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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-26-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02982

Full Text


Volleyball: Player of Year finalists announced /B1


I ED ES A


Windy with a line of
showers and storms
moving through.
PAGE A4


CITRUS COUNTY






Swww.chronicleonline.com
SBest Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 141


Insured with Citizens? Maybe not for long


Gov. Rick Scott aims to reduce size

of Citizens Property Insurance Corp.
PAT FAHERTY $499 million. It is by far Florida's
Staff writer largest insurance company, cov-
ering about 1.34 million proper-
Gov. Rick Scott is pushing for ties statewide. The number of
changes to reduce the size of Cit- policyholders has increased as
izens Property Insurance Corp., other insurance companies left
the nonprofit government enter- the state or became more costly
prise that provides insurance for and restrictive in the types of cov-
Florida property owners unable erage offered.
to obtain coverage elsewhere. Citizens is funded by sur-
He also wants to make the cor- charges imposed on property in-
poration more accountable. surance policies written in the
Citizens insures 4,527 proper- state, with provisions for addi-
ties in Citrus County valued at tional assessments if necessary.


Rate increases are capped at 10
percent a year, except for sink-
hole coverage.
In 2012, a concerted effort to
"depopulate" the number of Citi-
zens policyholders was enacted
by returning policyholders to the
private sector. The depopulation
program works with private-
sector companies wanting to in-
sure Citizens policyholders.
Last week, the Florida Office of
Insurance Regulation announced
the approval of up to 100,000 poli-
cies to be removed from Citizens
Property Insurance by two
Florida domestic insurance com-
panies starting Dec. 4. American
Integrity Insurance Company of


BY THE NUMBERS
* Up to 100,000 The number of policies to be moved from
Citizens Property Insurance to two domestic insurance
companies beginning Dec. 4.
* 50,000 in November and 40,000 in December The number of
policies approved to be taken over by American Integrity
Insurance Company.
* 60,000 policies The number of policies approved to be taken
over by Heritage Property & Casualty Insurance Company.
* 30 The number of days Citizens policyholders have to accept
or decline the offer.


Florida was approved to take out
50,000 policies in November and
is approved for an additional
40,000 in December


Heritage Property & Casualty
Insurance Company was licensed


Page A2


Housing


on the


rebound


locally

NORM WAGY
Special to the Chronicle
It's been a long, hard
slog since the housing
bubble burst in 2007. But
maybe, just maybe, there
are signs the local mar-
ket is improving.
Sweetwater Homes of
Citrus Chief Executive
Officer Steve Ponticos is
encouraged interest in
construction seems to
have picked up in recent
weeks.
"The day after the
election, our phones
started to ring," he said.
"We've contracted two
new homes and are hear-
ing from people who
have had projects on
hold who appear ready to
take them off the shelf. I
don't know why It seems
people have decided to
get on with their lives."
If so, it would be wel-
come news.
Sweetwater, which
was averaging about 80
homes a year since its in-
ception, with more than
100 a year during the
boom, dropped to 11 new
jobs in 2008. Ponticos ex-
pects the number to
reach 18 for 2012.
Steve's wife, Nancy
Ponticos, a broker with
ERA Key 1 Realty, re-
ported the inventory of
resale homes in Sug-
armill Woods is down
significantly About 160
homes were for sale at
the beginning of Decem-
ber, compared to 300
Sugarmill homes 18
months ago when the
market was crowded.
"We are seeing more
cash buyers in the past
few weeks, as well as
stronger buyers with
more down payments
than we have seen in a
number of years," she
said. "Sellers that need
and want to sell are able
to as long as they are re-
alistic with the buyer's
market. Buyers want to
take advantage of low
prices and low interest
rates. This is creating
the activity we need to


move forward."
See


Com ics .......
Community ....
Crossword .....
Editorial .......
Entertainment .
Horoscope . . .
Lottery Numbers
Lottery Payouts .
M ovies ........
Classifieds . . .
TV Listings . . .


I III5IiIUI20C0


2012 Year in REVIEW


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Josh Langston White and his girlfriend Brittni Brown shop inside of a Bethesda, Md., Target store the week before Thanksgiving. White, a U.S.
Marine, lost his legs in August in an improvised explosive device blast.


Mrin HOLIDAYS

Marine Lance Cpl. Joshua Langston
White, who was injured in the line of duty


in August 2012,


became


a well-known


name in Citrus County in the fall of 2012.




Mideast, China focus of speech


Pontiff delivers his annual Christmas message


Associated Press


VATICAN CITY- In his
Christmas message to the
world Tuesday, Pope Bene-


dict XVI called for an end
to the slaughter in Syria
Page A2 and for more meaningful
negotiations between Is-
raelis and Palestinians,
.... C6 while encouraging more
.... C4 religious freedom under
.... C5 China's new leaders.
... .A8 Delivering the tradi-
.... B4 tional speech from the cen-
.... B4 tral balcony of St. Peter's
.... B3 Basilica, Benedict also en-
.... B4 courage Arab spring na-
.... C6 tions, especially Egypt, to
.... C7 build respectful societies.
.... C5 The pope prayed China's
*il I I new leadership may "es-
teem the contribution of the
religions, in respect for each
1 2 5 other" to help build a "fra-


eternal society for the bene-
fit of that noble people."
It was a clear reference to
the Chinese government's
often harsh treatment of
Catholics loyal to the pontiff
instead of to the state-sanc-
tioned church. Earlier this
month, the Vatican refused
to accept the decision by
Chinese authorities to re-
voke the title of a Shanghai
bishop, who had been ap-
pointed in a rare show of
consensus between the
Holy See and China.
As the 85-year-old pon-
tiff, bundled up in an
ermine-trimmed red cape,
gingerly stepped foot on
the balcony, the pilgrims,
tourists and Romans below
backing St Peter's Square
erupted in cheers.
Less than 12 hours ear-


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
On Aug. 10, the Crystal River native and
2009 Crystal River High School gradu-
ate was on foot patrol in the Kajaki
District in the Helmand province of
Afghanistan when an improvised explosive
device (IED) severely injured him. White ap-
parently stepped on a pressure-plate land
mine while on a mission.
The 22-year-old lost both legs and suffered
injuries to his arms, lungs and abdominal area.
On Aug. 22, Commandant of the Marine
Corps Gen. James Amos presented White
with the Purple Heart award. Then it became
White's mission to return home and become
a member of the Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple Heart
See Page A2


lier, Benedict had led a
two-hour long Christmas -
Eve ceremony in the basil-
ica. He sounded hoarse
and looked weary as he
read his Christmas mes-
sage and then holiday
greetings in 65 languages.
In his "Urbi et Orbi"
speech, which traditionally
reviews world events and
global challenges, Benedict
prayed "peace spring up for
the people of Syria, deeply
wounded and divided by a
conflict that does not spare .
even the defenseless and
reaps innocent victims."
He called for easier ac-
cess to help refugees and
for "dialogue in the pursuit
of a political solution to the Associated Press
conflict." Pope Benedict XVI delivers his "Urbi et Orbi" (to the City and
to the World) speech Tuesday from the central loggia of
See Page A7 St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican.


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
70
LOW
40


DECEMBER 26, 2012





A2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


HOME
Continued from Page Al

Before he could do that,
White had to recuperate. He
spent the next month and a
half in a hospital before
being transported to an out-
patient facility at the
Wounded Warrior barracks.
He received extensive reha-
bilitation at Walter Reed
National Military Medical
Center in Maryland.
Meanwhile in Citrus
County, local residents
began reaching out to help
White after learning of his
ordeal. Citizens hosted mul-
tiple fundraisers to estab-
lish a recovery fund for
White and provide travel
funds for his family to visit
him while he underwent
surgeries and treatment.
On Aug. 23, CRHS hosted
a barbecue fundraiser at
which countless volunteers
manned vending stations
with pulled pork and cake
pops. T-shirts and wrist-
bands were sold in honor of
White serving our country
The fundraiser coincided
with the Pirates' preseason
football game, christened
"The Josh White Night."
White played football at
CRHS for four years.
All funds from the barbe-



HOUSING
Continued from Page Al

Nancy Ponticos is opti-
mistic prices are becoming
more stable. She added buy-
ers are realizing the value
and quality of resale homes
in Sugarmill Woods remains
high.
Kevin Cunningham, the
broker-owner of Re/Max Re-
alty One in Lecanto, also re-
ported an increase in
activity since the election.
He analyzes the attitude
of people as, "The election
is behind us now. Time to
move on."
Home sales in Sugarmill
Woods in October were 16,
with an average price of
$150,925. In November, 24
homes were sold at an aver-
age of $136,942.
Cunningham reported
through October, 2,217 units
were sold in Citrus County
this year compared to 2,031
in 2011. The average price
in the county increased
from $96,900 in 2011 to
$101,471 this year. Sixty-one
percent of the transactions
were cash sales, primarily
from retirees who sold their
northern homes.
Foreclosures accounted
for 510 sales this year with
170 distressed short sales
recorded. The sales include
single-family homes, condos
and mobile homes.
Randy Clark, the incom-
ing president of the Citrus
County Builders Associa-
tion, reported the building
trades have experienced
"dismal numbers" for the
past seven years.
In 2005, at the height of
the real estate boom, 3,500
homes were built in Citrus
County many on specula-


People I had never even met
supported me.

Josh White
a Citrus County native and U.S. Marine corporal injured in
Afghanistan in the line of duty in August 2012.


cue and game were donated
to the Josh White fund.
On Oct. 28, a 21-gun salute
commenced a bass tourna-
ment at Lake Rousseau and
about 50 anglers gathered to
fish, with the funds benefit-
ing White.
Before the fishing started,
tournament director Matt
Beck announced donations
of $6,400 from businesses
and individuals were
raised. In addition, the fund
received 20 percent of the
anglers' $90 entry fees.
Money was also raised from
food sales and the drawings
for donated prizes. By the
end of the tournament,
more than $8,200 was do-
nated to White's fund.
"I want to thank the com-
munity for everything they
have done," White said.
"People I had never even
met supported me. I am so
grateful."
On Dec. 19, the hometown
hero received his wish of re-
turning to Citrus County.
With sirens blaring and
motorcycles thundering,

tion. This year's construc-
tion is expected to reach
140, purchased by home-
owners, not speculators.
Clark expects to see some
improvement in the next
few months as the snow-
birds return to the area.
"We are approaching our
best time of the year," but,
he added, construction in
Citrus County depends
largely on retirees moving
here. "Until they sell their
homes up north, they can't
build their retirement
homes down here."
Clark, who owns Clark
Construction in Crystal
River, is encouraged local
government officials are
aware of the importance of
construction to the county
and are working to make the
county more inviting to
home buyers.
Steve Ponticos added new
code restrictions have en-
hanced construction in the
county. Houses are struc-
turally more sound and far
more energy efficient.
"The houses we are build-
ing now are much different
than the ones we were
building only a few years
ago," he said. "That is a big
plus for today's buyers."
Reports of improved real
estate sales around the state
and the country are a sign
conditions will improve in
Citrus County.
"We are usually the last
ones to feel the effects of a
downturn and we are al-
ways the last to recover,"
Ponticos said.
He believes "pent-up de-
mand" is about to intensify
as the baby boomer genera-
tion begins reaching retire-
ment age. He expects slow
growth in local construction
in 2013 with the likelihood of
a "return to normal" by 2014.


White's motorcade made its
way through Crystal River to
the Crystal River National
Guard Armory Hundreds
gave White a rousing wel-
come at an event designated
for him, sponsored by the
Blanton-Thompson Ameri-
can Legion Post No. 155.
Military, civic and vet-
eran organizations thanked
him for his sacrifice and
patriotism.
County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek, accom-
panied by commissioners
Rebecca Bays, John "JJ"
Kenney and Scott Adams,
read a proclamation declar-
ing Aug. 28, 2012, as "Josh
Langston White Day" in Cit-
rus County.
Crystal River Mayor Jim
Farley presented White
with keys to the city and
proclaimed the week of


q


Dec. 24 '"Josh White Week."
White is spending his hol-
iday with his family and en-
joying his time home.
"I have two younger
brothers who look up to me
and I have really missed,"
White said. "I'm just enjoy-
ing quality time with them."
White is learning to walk
again with his prosthetic
legs called shortiess." Part
of his rehabilitation re-
quires his legs to take steps
in learning how to walk with
his prosthetic legs. Shorties
are the first step. White de-
scribed them as "stilt-like,
with no bend in the knees."
"My goal is to learn to run
with my prosthetic legs," he
said. "Right now, I am in a
wheelchair all of the time,
and that's not the way I am
going to spend the rest of my
life. I want to run marathons."
White will return to Mary-
land to continue his rehabil-
itation. However, he is
concentrating on time with
his family and community.
"I appreciate so much
(what) the community has
done for me," White said.
"Thank you."


Exclusive


I -I


POLICIES
Continued from Page Al

in August 2012 and with a
home office in St. Peters-
burg has been approved to
remove 60,000 policies.
By law, Citizens policy-
holders will be notified of
the take-out request (policy
assumption) and will have
30 days to accept or decline
the offer. If policyholders
do not respond, they will be
"assumed" by the Florida
domestic company
Starting Jan. 8, up to
65,990 more policies are to
be removed from Citizens
by four Florida domestic
insurance companies.
Gov Rick Scott main-
tains Citizens inhibits new
insurance companies from
coming to Florida, result-
ing in less competition. He
said the corporation is un-
derfunded for potential
losses, putting all Florida
homeowners at risk to pay
for losses through taxes.
"Shrinking Citizens will
also protect Florida fami-


f-ti


lies from hurricane taxes,"
Scott said in a speech to the
Annual Insurance Summit.
"And, shrinking Citizens
will attract new capital to
Florida and help to perma-
nently reduce the cost of
property insurance."
In response to an Octo-
ber report from the Citi-
zens Audit Committee and
allegations Citizens has
mishandled corporate
funds, Scott called for
stronger financial over-
sight and is expected to ap-
point an independent
inspector general to inves-
tigate Citizens finances.
Florida's Chief Finan-
cial Officer Jeff Atwater
supports the measure, with
a 12-month report period to
restore public confidence
in the corporation.
Concerns about Citizens
Property Insurance have
not been a strong local
issue. The offices of state
Rep. Jimmie T Smith, R-In-
verness, and state Sen.
Charlie Dean, R-Inverness,
report they have not re-
ceived many calls about Cit-
izens Property Insurance.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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I 12 ,


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L-"







Page A3 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



State adopting nationwide education standards


FCA Tset to be replaced by 2014-15


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida's
schools are adopting uniform aca-
demic standards shared with most
other states, but the move is not cre-
ating the kind of uproar that's sur-
rounded some other major changes
in public education.
Common Core State Standards,
which are designed to help Ameri-
can children compete with their
peers around the world, are getting
mostly high marks from Florida's
teachers, administrators and politi-
cians alike. Forty-five states, the
District of Columbia and three ter-
ritories are adopting the standards,
which cover kindergarten through
high school.
Supporters say the standards
are designed to align with college
and work expectations in a global
economy
To be sure, there is some angst,
but it's mostly over how to meet the
state's goal of getting them fully


phased in over the next 20 months.
"It's the implementation, it's the
structure, it's the timing," Pinellas
County School Superintendent
Mike Grego recently told the State
Board of Education. "There's no
resistance."
Florida and its new education
commissioner, Indiana's outgoing
state schools chief Tony Bennett,
have been leaders in the initiative.
While serving as a measuring
stick, they'll give schools and
teachers wider latitude for devel-
oping curriculum to help students
learn what's required than cur-
rently allowed by the Sunshine
State standards.
"My first thought was, 'Gee,
that's the way I was taught to teach
back in the '70s,"' said Andy Ford,
president of the Florida Educa-
tion Association.
The statewide teachers union has
been at odds with Republican gov-
ernors and the GOP-controlled Leg-
islature over such issues as private


school vouchers, class size limits
and the use of student test scores to
determine everything from school
grades to teacher evaluations, but
the FEA is supportive of the com-
mon core approach.
"It tells you what you need to
teach but not how to teach it, so it
gives me back the power to say 'OK,
this is where I want my kids to go,"'
said Margaret Goodwin, third-grade
teacher at Westgate Elementary
School in St Petersburg.
Melissa Stokes, a fourth-grade
teacher at Yulee Elementary
School in northeast Florida, also is
looking forward to the new
standards.
"It's better for not just the teacher,
but it's even more crucial for the
students," she said.
The standards will be particu-
larly helpful in military communi-
ties such as Yulee that have a rapid
turnover of students. Stokes said
children transferring from out of
state often haven't learned the skills
required in Florida.
That's just a bonus, said state
Public Schools Chancellor Pam


Stewart, who's also serving as in-
terim commissioner until Bennett
arrives in mid-January
The new standards in math and
language arts aren't as broad as the
Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards they are replacing, but
are deeper Students will study
fewer ideas and facts, but they'll be
expected to know more about
those they do study That's in-
tended to make them think and
solve problems rather than be
"spoon-fed what they are learn-
ing," Stewart said.
For example, Florida's current
ninth-grade language arts standard
simply calls for students to compare
and contrast elements in multiple
reading texts. A comparable com-
mon core standard says students
should be able to "compare and
contrast a fictional portrayal of a
time, place or character and a his-
torical event of the same period as a
means of understanding how au-
thors of fiction use or alter history."
Common standards will make
state-to-state test score compar-
isons "more apples to apples" than


ever before, Stewart said, but most
important, they will require stu-
dents to learn skills, knowledge and
abilities they'll need after they
leave high school.
The new standards, though, will
require new tests. That will mean
an end to the much-criticized
Florida Comprehensive Assess-
ment Test, but not to the debate
over high-stakes testing.
"Some people are falling into the
'anything's better than the FCAT,'
but I'm not there," said union pres-
ident Ford. "I'm a little leery of try-
ing to replace one bad program
with another"
Ford also is among those who
have questioned the fast pace at
which the new standards are being
implemented and the lack of a pilot
program to try them out first
The standards went into effect for
kindergarten and first-grade classes
this school year Next year, they'll be
fully implemented in kindergarten
through second grade and partially
in effect for third through 12th
grade. In 2014-15, they'll be in force
for all grades.


Around
THE STATE

Tallahassee
Thousands of foster
kids visit families
Thousands of children in
foster care will go home for
the holidays this month.
The Department of Chil-
dren and Families helped
speed up paperwork to re-
unite foster kids with their
families, finalized adoptions
and lengthened visits so chil-
dren may spend time with
family on that special day.
Child welfare officials said
about 1,200 children will visit
relatives in Florida and out of
state this month. Another
1,200 kids will be placed in
their permanent home.
The agency collaborates
with judges, guardians, foster
families and case managers
to expedite rigorous back-
ground screenings, court or-
ders and travel arrangements.

Gainesville
Groundwater levels
studied in 9 counties
North Florida's two water
management districts are
studying ways to restore and
maintain groundwater levels,
with the use of reclaimed
water or surface water from
rivers as possibilities.
The Gainesville Sun re-
ported the North Florida
Aquifer Replenishment Initia-
tive is studying the northeast-
ern area of the Suwannee
district and the northern area
of the St. Johns district and
includes all or part of
Alachua, Union, Bradford,
Hamilton, Columbia, Putnam,
Duval, Clay and Nassau
counties.
Much of the area lies in a
water resource caution area,
meaning supplies are not pro-
jected to meet future needs.
Studies to gather more
data on the causes of de-
pleted aquifer levels and
springs flow are ongoing at
the same time that districts
are investigating ways to re-
plenish the aquifer.

Fort Walton Beach


IL


,S


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Sharon Harris works on part of a huge mural in the children's section of the Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills.

Central Ridge Library renovating youth area with murals, teen upgrades


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
BEVERLY HILLS
_ things are getting a little wild at the
library
The Friends of the Central Ridge
SLibrary in Beverly Hills have begun
work on their longtime goal of updating the
youth area.
The theme: Wild Things.
"What they're trying to do is create an en-
vironment that's fun and creative for kids to
come and read and spark their imagina-
tion," said Eric Head, director of library
services for the Citrus County Library
System.
Head added that very little has been done
to the youth area since the library opened
in 1995.


Funds for the project come from the
Friends of the Citrus County Library System
semi-annual book sale.
April McLaughlin, Central Ridge Friends
president, explained the proceeds from the
book sales are divided among the Central
Ridge, Coastal Region and Lakes Region li-
braries' Friends groups to use as they wish.
The Central Ridge group has been saving
its money for 10 years.
"All along we wanted to do something for
the youth area," she said.
"There's always a need in Citrus County
and in Beverly Hills for the youth to have
something to do."
When finished, including a future teen-
centered upgrade, the total cost of the proj-
ect will be about $20,000.
Right now, it's still a work in progress.
Local artist Sharon Harris is painting mu-
rals on the walls and huge wooden cutouts


of trees, along with native Florida wildlife,
thus the theme "wild things."
McLaughlin said besides using a local
artist, they've used local interior designer
Smart Interiors and local construction com-
pany Daly & Zilch.
Some of the upgrades include a reading
area with kid-friendly furniture and two
early literacy stations touch screen com-
puters with preschool-finger-friendly key-
boards and features.
"This lifts the morale of everyone li-
brary employees and patrons," McLaughlin
said. "It's been a long time coming and
many people have dedicated their time and
money There are many more things we'd
like to do, and as people continue to donate
and come to the book sales, we will."
Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can
be reached at nkennedy@chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


Officials rep
numbers o
Panhandle off
record numbers
visited northwest
past year.
Walton Count
$16.5 million in I
from October 20
September 2012
the record $13.9
elected in the pre
year.
Okaloosa Coi
in $13.2 million i
compared with $
the previous yea
Rosa County als
its bed tax collect
$1.03 million to
Santa Rosa C
moting its eco-to
tions such as zip
and reef diving.


)ort record
f tourists
officials say
of tourists
;t Florida this


Sheriff's office warns about fraud


Special to the Chronicle


As 2012 quickly comes to a close,
y collected the Citrus County Sheriff's Office
bed taxes reminds you to remain vigilant in
)11 through protecting your identity, personal
2. That broke credit and bank accounts.
million col- Despite numerous warnings
vious fiscal throughout the year about scam-
mers who prey on unsuspecting
unty brought consumers through bogus emails
n bed taxes, and phone calls, the sheriff's office
$11.6 million continues to receive complaints
ar. Santa from trustworthy and innocent vic-
tims who have been swindled out of
so improved hundreds of thousands of dollars.
actions from Highlighted below are scams
$1.19 million. most commonly reported to the
countyy is pro- sheriff's office fraud line this year:
urism op- U Sweepstakes/lottery scam: This
p-lining, biking particular scam generally targets
seniors who live alone and are vul-
-From wire reports nerable to the lies told to them by


the scammer. Often too ashamed to
tell anyone, many older adults are
robbed of their life savings before
law enforcement or family mem-
bers are notified.
It's important to remember no le-
gitimate sweepstakes or lottery will
ask you to pay money up front to
collect your winnings.
Internet scams targeting resi-
dents searching for home or vaca-
tion rentals, looking for work or
buying/selling an item online ran
rampant in Southwest Florida dur-
ing 2012. To avoid becoming a vic-
tim of these clever scams, always do
your due diligence when conduct-
ing business of any kind with some-
one online.
Beware of scammers who offer to
pay more than what you are asking,
or send a check and ask you to
"wire excess money" to a shipper or


other unknown person. Never fill
out an online application sent to
you by a "potential" employer ask-
ing for personal information unless
you are certain it is legitimate.
And keep in mind the old saying,
"If it looks to good to be true, it
probably isn't true."
Phishing text messages or
voice-mails: Scammers will text
messages or leave a voice mail
telling you that your bank or credit
card account has been compro-
mised. If you are instructed to enter
your card or bank account number
into your phone, do not doing so
will give the bad guy your account
information. Instead, always call
your card holder or financial insti-
tution to confirm.
Microsoft security team: This
scam kept the fraud line ringing
from residents who reported re-


ceiving a phone call from someone
claiming to be from the Microsoft
security team alerting the Internet
user to a "supposed" virus on their
computer
Smooth talking from the scammer
convinces the user to allow them re-
mote access to their computer This
is quite dangerous and can end up
costing the consumer hundreds of
dollars in computer repair costs
after the scammer destroys the
hard drive, as well as steals the vic-
tim's identity
If you have a problem or need as-
sistance, call 352-249-9139; or visit
4093 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, next to Main Street Restau-
rant and Grill.
Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday Appointments aren't
necessary











Little Free Library copied worldwide


Boxes allows all to 'take a book, return a book'


Associated Press

HUDSON, Wis. It
started as a simple tribute to
his mother, a teacher and
bibliophile. Todd Bol put up
a miniature version of a one-
room schoolhouse on a post
outside his home in this
western Wisconsin city, filled
it with books and invited his
neighbors to borrow them.
They loved it, and began
dropping by so often his
lawn became a gathering
spot. Then a friend in Madi-
son put out some similar
boxes and got the same re-
action. More home-crafted
libraries began popping up
around Wisconsin's capital.
Three years later, the
whimsical boxes are a global
sensation. They number in
the thousands and have
spread to at least 36 coun-
tries, in a testimonial to the
power of a good idea, the
simple allure of a book and
the wildfire of the Internet
"It's weird to be an inter-
national phenomenon," said
Bol, a former international
business consultant who
finds himself at the head of
what has become the Little
Free Libraries organization.
The book-sharing boxes are
being adopted by a growing
number of groups as a way
of promoting literacy in
inner cities and underde-
veloped countries.
Working project
Bol, his Madison friend
Rick Brooks, and helpers run
the project from a funky
workshop with a weathered
wood facade in an otherwise
nondescript concrete indus-


trial building outside Hud-
son, a riverside community of
12,000 about 20 miles east of
downtown St. Paul, Minn.
They build wooden book
boxes in a variety of styles,
ranging from basic to a minia-
ture British-style phone
booth, and offer them for sale
on the group's website, which
also offers plans for building
your own. Sizes vary The es-
sential traits are they are eye-
catching and protect the
books from the weather
Each little library invites
passersby to "take a book,
return a book."
Educational tool
Educators in particular
have seized on the potential
of something so simple and
self-sustaining.
In Minneapolis, school of-
ficials are aiming to put up
about 100 in neighborhoods
where many kids don't have
books at home. A box at dis-
trict headquarters goes
through 40 books a day, serv-
ing children whose parents
come to register them and
adults who come to prepare
for high school equivalency
tests.
"I absolutely love them,"
said Melanie Sanco, the dis-
trict's point person on the
effort. "It sparks the imagi-
nation. You see them
around and you want one....
They're cute and adorable."
Kids who have books stay in
school longer, she said.
Bol and Brooks, who runs
outreach programs at the
University of Wisconsin, see
the potential for a lot more
growth. At one point, they
set a goal of 2,510 boxes -


surpassing the number of
public libraries built by phi-
lanthropist Andrew
Carnegie. They passed that
mark this summer.
Plan flourishes
The Rotary Club plans to
use the book boxes in its liter-
acy efforts in the west African
nation of Ghana. Books for
Africa, a Minnesota-based
group that has sent more than
27 million books to 48 coun-
tries since 1988, decided to
ship books and little libraries
to Ghana, too.
Groups are working with
Antoinette Ashong, a pro-lit-
eracy activist and head-
mistress of a girls' school in
the capital of Accra.
"I want to spread reading
in Africa, which is a prob-
lem because in Africa it is
very, very difficult to get
books to read," Ashong said
in a Skype interview. She
has already put up 45 boxes
in poor neighborhoods.


Associated Press
Todd Bol, co-founder and executive director of Little Free Libraries, shows off one of the
lending boxes. The nonprofit Little Free Libraries movement is branching out in new
directions, including inner-city neighborhoods where kids might not have many books and
into developing countries were people are hungry for reading material, and by Christmas
expects its followers will have erected more than 5,000 book boxes across the U.S. alone.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Meeting NotiCeS..........................1C O



Notice to



:. Creditors/Administration.........C9



STax Deed Notices..........................C9


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
T.illiIij. :
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
NA NA NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
[ TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
_- High: 70 Low: 40 *y
Windy with line of showers/storms
moving -lr, i gli
.... .....................THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING

High: 60 Low: 33
Sunny, but cool

FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
-- High: 68 Low: 53
... Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 74/50
Record 85/16
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 62
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.80 in.
Total for the year 60.81 in.
Normal for the year 51.31 in.
*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in.


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 58
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


59

38%


Juniper and composites
Today's count: 4.1/12
Thursday's count: 6.9
Friday's count: 6.7
AIR QUALITY
Tuesday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/26 WEDNESDAY 3:27 9:39 3:51 10:03
12/27 THURSDAY 4:13 10:25 4:37 10:49
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
0 ( O SUNSET TONIGHT.......... 5:41 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:22 AM
0 4^ 0_ C MOONRISE TODAY........................... 4:31 P.M.
DEC. 28 JAN.4 JfM. 11 JAN. 18 MOONSET TODAY....................... 5:46 AM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. S.:.ni- n,-,r. !p1 -irii.: r,i, qu .1 ir, i,:, r il:.n l
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:27 a/12:37 p 5:25 p/--
Crystal River* 1:48 a/9:59 a 3:46 p/9:36 p
Withlacoochee* 1:33 p/7:47 a -- /7:24 p
Homosassa*" 2:37 a/11:36 a 4:35 p/11:13 p


***At Mason's Creek
Thursday
High/Low High/Low
4:08 a/12:14 a 5:59 p/1:13 p
2:29 a/10:35 a 4:20 p/10:17 p
12:16 a/8:23 a 2:07 p/8:05 p
3:18 a/12:12 p 5:09 p/11:54 p


Southwest winds from 20 to 25 knots.
Seas 4 to 6 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be rough. Chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms today.


Gulf water
temperature


630
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Mon. Tues. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


20s


S 0S
,.s o0 os
sos


Below
10
.-Anchoragje :r.lu

-206 s 80s
30s


Below -
o M., nlPas.. 30s
10S ChDc,":.'e ",
los


50s
CF'N 303 Alnr.na 60
I M.i,, p, -- 4 os : 31 I
40 40- 70

-Hou, ," ,
40S v 4kq
^ OuI f Uilk.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Tuesday Wednesday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
31 25 .04 c 34 28
41 28 pc 45 26
50 35 sh 51 29
54 48 .13 sh 52 31
45 32 r 50 45
69 36 s 46 21
48 30 rs 43 38
8 -2 03 c 22 7
56 43 61 pc 43 30
37 24 sn 36 25
35 30 .01 pc 37 35
34 28 .02 sn 30 26
22 15 .01 pc 29 24
61 48 .01 ts 69 39
47 35 r 47 31
57 46 sh 56 34
29 25 .01 sn 34 30
36 32 rs 38 26
36 32 sn 36 27
54 51 .04 ts 65 34
36 33 sn 35 26
34 20 .02 pc 34 28
48 28 1.33 pc 34 22
17 0 .07 pc 31 13
13 2 pc 19 5
33 22 sn 31 27
53 43 pc 53 35
37 30 sn 32 22
43 33 sn 36 33
38 30 05 sn 38 30
77 41 04 s 48 33
33 30 sn 31 21
61 49 3.44 pc 44 28
48 38 pc 52 36
43 31 1.23 pc 35 19
62 49 sh 60 45
38 34 rs 35 28
44 34 .38 pc 37 25
26 21 sn 32 22
13 0 pc 19 9
73 63 15 pc 55 31
61 44 1.01 pc 50 31
41 34 r 41 27


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


City
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Palm Springs
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, Ore
Providence, R.I.
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Rochester, NY
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Ste. Marie
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Savannah
Seattle
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Washinoton


Tuesday Wednesday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


51 34 r 45 38


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 88 Brownsville, Texas
LOW -25 Havre, Mont.
WORLD CITIES


WEDNESDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/71/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 46/41/sh Mexico City
Athens 59/47/s Montreal
Beijing 26/10/s Moscow
Berlin 44/36/pc Paris
Bermuda 70/63/pc Rio
Cairo 69/52/pc Rome
Calgary 10/-5/c Sydney
Havana 82/65/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 68/56/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 62/48/s Warsaw


59/43/pc
46/41/sh
53/34/s
71/41/pc
24/15/pc
31/29/sn
48/44/sh
95/77/pc
59/48/sh
72/62/pc
42/31/s
26/23/c
39/34/c


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
I- IMeadowcrest
44s office
,a .-ll Brani Hvi, 1624 N.
Dunkerield B H Meadowcrest
Dunker ed -Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A ve Crystal River,
A 1 \ ,"Madowresi FL 34429
N 1:1 il

I IInverness
Courthouse office
TompkinsSt. g square
S106 W. Main
S 41 44' Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ....................................................................... P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ....................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes .......................... .................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ....................... Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I-


A4 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 A5


-~


A I
a


a
U-


The Community Food Bank of Citrus County is

fighting to end hunger in our community.


rA 0s11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


trbl











Tip of the 2013 iceberg


Health care tax

hikes for 2013

may be just a start

Associated Press

WASHINGTON New taxes
are coming Jan. 1 to help finance
President Barack Obama's health
care overhaul. Most people may
not notice. But they will pay atten-
tion if Congress decides to start
taxing employer-sponsored health
insurance, one option in play if
lawmakers can ever agree on a
budget deal to reduce federal
deficits.
The tax hikes already on the
books, taking effect in 2013, fall
mainly on people who make lots of
money and on the health care in-
dustry But about half of Ameri-
cans benefit from the tax-free
status of employer health insur-
ance. Workers pay no income or
payroll taxes on what their em-
ployer contributes for health in-
surance, and in most cases on
their own share of premiums, as
well.
It's the single biggest tax break
the government allows, outstrip-
ping the mortgage interest deduc-
tion, the deduction for charitable
giving and other better-known
benefits. If the value of job-based
health insurance were taxed like
regular income, it would raise
nearly $150 billion in 2013, ac-
cording to congressional esti-
mates. By comparison, wiping
away the mortgage interest de-
duction would bring in only about
$90 billion.
"If you are looking to raise rev-
enue to pay for tax reform, that is
the biggest pot of money of all,"
said Martin Sullivan, chief econo-
mist with Tax Analysts, a nonpar-
tisan publisher of tax information.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama speaks June 28 in the East Room of the White House in Washington after the
Supreme Court ruled on his health care legislation. New taxes are coming Jan. 1, 2013 to help finance
Obama's health care overhaul. Most people may not notice. But they will pay attention if Congress decides
to start taxing employer-sponsored health insurance, one of the options in play if lawmakers can ever agree
on a budget deal to reduce federal deficits.


It's hard to see how lawmakers
can avoid touching health insur-
ance if they want to eliminate
loopholes and curtail deductions
so as to raise revenue and lower
tax rates. Congress probably
wouldn't do away with the health
care tax break, but limit it in some
form. Such limits could be keyed
to the cost of a particular health
insurance plan, the income level
of taxpayers or a combination.
Many economists think some
kind of limit would be a good thing
because it would force consumers
to watch costs, and that could help
keep health care spending in
check. Obama's health law took a
tentative step toward limits by im-


posing a tax on high-value health
insurance plans. But that doesn't
start until 2018.
Next spring will be three years
since Congress passed the health
care overhaul but, because of a
long phase-in, many of the taxes to
finance the plan are only now com-
ing into effect. Medicare spending
cuts that help pay for covering the
uninsured have started to take ef-
fect, but they also are staggered.
The law's main benefit, coverage
for 30 million uninsured people,
will take a little longer It doesn't
start until Jan. 1, 2014.
The biggest tax hike from the
health care law has a bit of mys-
tery to it. The legislation calls it a


"Medicare contribution," but none
of the revenue will go to the
Medicare trust fund. Instead, it's
funneled into the government's
general fund, which does pay the
lion's share of Medicare outpa-
tient and prescription costs, but
also covers most other things the
government does.
The new tax is a 3.8 percent levy
on investment income that applies
to individuals making more than
$200,000 or married couples above
$250,000. Projected to raise $123
billion from 2013-2019, it comes on
top of other taxes on investment
income. While it does apply to
profits from home sales, the vast
majority of sellers will not have to


worry since another law allows in-
dividuals to shield up to $250,000
in gains on their home from taxa-
tion. (Married couples can exclude
up to $500,000 in home sale gains.)
Investors have already been
taking steps to avoid the tax, sell-
ing assets this year before it takes
effect. The impact of the invest-
ment tax will be compounded if
Obama and Republicans can't
stave off the automatic tax in-
creases coming next year if there's
no budget agreement.
High earners will face another
new tax under the health care law
Jan. 1. It's an additional Medicare
payroll tax of 0.9 percent on wage
income above $200,000 for an in-
dividual or $250,000 for couples.
This one does go to the Medicare
trust fund.
Donald Marron, director of the
nonpartisan Tax Policy Center,
said the health care law's tax in-
creases are medium-sized by his-
torical standards. The center, a
joint project of the Brookings In-
stitution and the Urban Institute,
provides in-depth analyses on tax
issues.
They also foreshadow the cur-
rent debate about raising taxes on
people with high incomes. "These
were an example of the president
winning, and raising taxes on
upper-income people," said Mar-
ron. "They are going to happen."
Other health care law tax in-
creases taking effect Jan. 1:
A 2.3 percent sales tax on
medical devices used by hospitals
and doctors. Industry is trying to
delay or repeal the tax, saying it
will lead to a loss of jobs. Several
economists say manufacturers
should be able to pass on most of
the cost.
A limit on the amount em-
ployees can contribute to tax-free
flexible spending accounts for
medical expenses. It's set at $2,500
for 2013, and indexed thereafter
for inflation.


Some urge Boehner: Let Dems pass fiscal cliff bill


Associated Press

WASHINGTON In case
the public weren't frus-
trated enough over Con-
gress' failure to resolve the
"fiscal cliff," consider this:
lawmakers probably could
enact a compromise quickly
and easily if Republican
leaders let Democrats pro-
vide most of the votes.
That would give Democ-
rats a bigger voice in the
bargain, of course, which
the Republican-led House
is loath to do. That's why
about 10 percent of the
House's members -
staunch anti-tax conserva-
tives were able to thwart
Speaker John Boehner's bid
to pass a narrowly crafted
bill that might have
strengthened his bargaining
hand.
By trying to pass his plan
with GOP votes alone,
Boehner could afford to lose
only two dozen of the 241
House Republicans. His pri-
vate headcount found
nearly twice that many de-
fectors, party insiders say,
forcing Boehner to give up
without seeking a formal
vote. The miscalculation left
negotiations in disarray as
the Dec. 31 deadline nears.
The House's 192 Democ-
rats essentially sat on the
sidelines, bit players in last
week's House drama.
House speakers tradition-
ally advance major legisla-
tion only if most of their
party's members support it.
It's called the "majority of
the majority" rule of thumb.
But past speakers, including
Democrat Nancy Pelosi and
Republican Dennis Hastert,
have ignored the rule at
times.
Some Democrats are now
calling on Boehner to do the
same to avert the "fiscal
cliff" of big tax hikes and
spending cuts scheduled to
take effect in the new year
Veterans in both parties
say many House Democrats
would likely join a sufficient
number of Republicans -
though not necessarily a



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Associated Press
Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, joined by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor,
R-Va., left, speaks to reporters Dec. 21 about the fiscal cliff negotiations at the Capitol in
Washington. Lawmakers probably could enact a compromise quickly and easily if Republi-
can leaders let Democrats provide most of the votes. By trying to pass his plan with GOP
votes alone, Boehner could afford to lose only two dozen of the 241 House Republicans. His
private head-count found nearly twice that many defectors, party insiders say, forcing
Boehner to give up without seeking a formal vote.


majority to pass a com-
promise along the lines that
Boehner and President
Barack Obama seemed to be
nearing last week before
Boehner struck out on his
own. Such a compromise
plan might preserve Bush-
era tax cuts for all couples
making less than $400,000 or
so a year It also could in-
clude an outline for future
spending cuts and changes
to keep the Alternative Min-
imum Tax from hitting mil-
lions of new taxpayers.
While Obama did not ex-
plicitly embrace such a
plan, he and Boehner ap-
peared to be edging toward
some variation of it. But
Boehner abruptly launched
his separate proposal he
dubbed it "Plan B" -which
the conservatives' revolt

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Boehner's plan would
have spared anyone making
less than $1 million a year
from a tax rate hike in 2013.
At least 40 House Republi-
cans refused to back any tax
rate increase at all, lawmak-
ers said, dooming the plan.
However, perhaps as
many as 200 House Repub-
licans apparently were will-
ing to let tax cuts expire for
a fraction of the wealthiest
households.
That's a significant break
from the party's no-tax-
hikes-ever orthodoxy




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GOP leaders note that vir-
tually everyone's taxes will
rise Jan. 1 without congres-
sional action. They say spar-
ing 98 or 99 percent of
Americans is the best politi-
cal alternative, given
Obama's negotiating
strength.
It's not known how many
House Republicans would
vote to avert the "fiscal cliff"
by supporting a tax-and-
spending plan closer to
Obama's liking. In his re-
election campaign, the pres-
ident called for letting the
Bush-era tax cuts expire on






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incomes above $250,000 for
couples and $200,000 for in-
dividuals. In later negotia-
tions with Boehner, Obama
said he could accept a
$400,000 threshold if Repub-
licans agreed to other tax
and spending provisions.
An Obama-backed deal
presumably would draw the
overwhelming support of
House and Senate Democ-
rats. But even if every
House Democrat backed it,
it would need another 25
votes in that chamber Some
Democrats say Boehner
should let a few dozen will-
ing Republicans provide
those votes by putting an
Obama-blessed bill on the
floor
"If Speaker Boehner is
willing to bring to the floor
of the House a bill, and just
let this House work its will,
Democrats and Republi-
cans voting as their con-
science determines, then I
believe we can get some-
thing done," Rep. Chris Van
Hollen, D-Md., told
Bloomberg TV
He noted that Pelosi, as
House speaker in 2006, vio-
lated the "majority of the
majority" rule by letting Re-
publicans provide most of
the votes for an Iraq war
funding measure she
disliked.
Hastert, the Republican
speaker from 1999 to 2007,
overrode the rule at least


twice. In one case, he let
Democratic votes carry the
load on a stem cell research
bill everyone knew Presi-
dent George W Bush would
veto. Hastert also yielded to
pressure to let the McCain-
Feingold campaign finance
bill pass even though most
House Republicans op-
posed it.
Aides to Boehner say he
believes in, and abides by,
the "majority of the major-
ity" rule without declaring it
an iron-clad requirement.
They did not respond to
messages asking if Boehner
might consider ignoring the
rule to avert the "fiscal
cliff."


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A6 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 A7


Lonzo Love, left, gives a haircut to Ron Kelly, both of Atlanta,
during the Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless event
Tuesday at the Georgia World Congress Center Christmas
Day. During the event, thousands of people in need are
served a meal, get clothing and toys, hair care and medical
services, or have a chance to get a shower.




SPREADING

THE CHRISTMAS





SPIRIT


Photos by Associated Press


ABOVE: Volunteers Victoria
and Olivia Ko, twin sisters
from Fairfax, Va., and local
Joy Pordye watch a pigeon fly
inside a food distribution tent
as they warm themselves
beside a heating duct hidden
behind a Christmas tree in
the Belle Harbor neighborhood
of the Queens borough of
New York on Christmas Day.
The trio were taking a break
from serving food to residents
of the neighborhood hit by
superstorm Sandy. LEFT: Ron
Janssen, left, and Marilyn
Widdifield, dance to music
Tuesday at the 2012 Senior
Holiday Dinner at the Hilton
Hotel in Eugene, Ore. Seniors
enjoyed the music of Dean
Martin and Frank Sinatra
before eating a meal at the
hotel.


PHOTOS FROM ABOVE LEFT: Al Home receives a meal from volunteers at The Extended Aftercare Alumni holiday event in downtown Houston on Christmas morning. EAI Alumni started
the tradition to give people new to recovery from drug and alcohol addiction an opportunity to be of service. Extended Aftercare Alumni volunteers, from left, Traci Laduke, and Bill Gray
share a moment while serving holiday meals to the homeless and the less fortunate on Christmas morning in downtown Houston. Imani Windham hugs her 11-month-old son Jermiah
during a Christmas dinner at Antioch Baptist Church in Durham, N.C. The church started serving a Christmas meal to homeless people in the neighborhood about 10 years ago, said
the Rev. Michael Page, pastor of Antioch, and expanded it to anyone from the community.


SPEECH
Continued from Page Al

Benedict prayed God
"grant Israelis and Palestini-
ans courage to end long years
of conflict and division, and
to embark resolutely on the
path to negotiation."
Israel, backed by the
United States, opposed the
Palestinian statehood bid,
saying it was a ploy to by-
pass negotiations, some-
thing the Palestinians deny
Talks stalled four years ago.
Senior Palestinian official
Saeb Erekat said in a meet-
ing with the pope last week,
Palestinian President Mah-
moud Abbas "emphasized
our total readiness to re-
sume negotiations."
The Palestinians have not
dropped their demand Is-
rael first stop settlement ac-
tivities before returning to
the negotiating table.
Hours earlier, in the an-
cient Bethlehem church
built over the site where tra-
dition holds Jesus was born,
candles illuminated the sa-
cred site and the joyous
sound of prayer filled its
overflowing halls.
Overcast skies and a cold
wind in the Holy Land did
not dampen the spirits of
worshippers in the biblical
West Bank town. Bells pealed
and long lines formed inside
the fourth-century Church of
the Nativity complex as
Christian faithful waited to
see the grotto that is Jesus'
traditional birthplace.
Duncan Hardock, 24, a
writer from MacLean, Va.,


traveled to Bethlehem from
the republic of Georgia,
where he had been teaching
English. After passing
through the separation bar-
rier Israel built to ward off
West Bank attackers, he
walked to Bethlehem's
Manger Square where the
church stands.
"I feel we got to see both
sides of Bethlehem in a re-
ally short period of time,"
Hardock said. "On our walk
from the wall, we got to see
the lonesome, closed side of
Bethlehem ... But the mo-
ment we got into town, we're
suddenly in the middle of
the party."
Bethlehem lies 6 miles
south of Jerusalem. Entry to
the city is controlled by Is-
rael, which occupied the
West Bank in 1967.
For those who couldn't fit
into the cavernous Bethle-
hem church, a loudspeaker
outside broadcast the Christ-
mas day service to hundreds
of faithful in the square.
Their Palestinian hosts,
who welcome this holiday as
the high point of their city's
year, were especially joyous
this season, proud of the


United Nations' recognition
of an independent state of
Palestine just last month.
"From this holy place, I
invite politicians and men
of good will to work with de-
termination for peace and
reconciliation that encom-
passes Palestine and Israel
in the midst of all the suffer-
ing in the Middle East," said
the top Roman Catholic
cleric in the Holy Land,
Latin Patriarch Fouad Twal
in his annual address.
Back at the Vatican, Bene-
dict offered encouragement
to countries after the Arab
spring of democracy protests.
He had a special word for
Egypt, "blessed by the child-
hood ofJesus."
Without citing the tumul-
tuous politics and clashes in
the region, he urged the
North African region to
build societies "founded on
justice and respect for the
dignity of every person."
Benedict prayed for the
return of peace in Mali and
harmony in Nigeria, where,
he recalled "savage acts of
terrorism continue to reap
victims, particularly among
Christians."


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The Vatican for decades
has been worried about the
well-being of its flock in
China, who are loyal to the
pope in defiance of the com-
munist's government support
of an officially sponsored
church, and relations be-
tween Beijing and the Holy
See are often tense.
Speaking about China's
newly installed regime,
Benedict expressed hope
"they will esteem the contri-
bution of the religions, in re-
spect for each other, in such
a way that they can help to
build a fraternal society for
the benefit of that noble peo-
ple and of the whole world."
Acknowledging Latin
America's predominant
Christian population, he
urged government leaders
to carry out commitments to
development and to fighting
organized crime.
At Canterbury cathedral,
Anglican leader Rowan


Williams delivered his final
Christmas day sermon as
archbishop of Canterbury.
He acknowledged how the
church's General Synod's
vote against allowing
women to become bishops
had cost credibility and said
the faithful felt a "real sense
of loss" over the decision.
In the U.S., the Rev Jesse
Jackson brought his mes-
sage of anti-violence and
gun control to a Chicago jail,


using his traditional Christ-
mas Day sermon at the facil-
ity to challenge inmates to
help get guns off the streets.
"We've all been grieving
about the violence in New-
town, Connecticut, the last
few days," he told reporters
after addressing inmates, re-
ferring to the school shooting
that killed 26 children and
adults. "Most of those here
today ... have either shot
somebody or been shot"


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N te-,N


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION/WORLD







Page A8 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012



PINION


"The task of the modern educator is not to
cut down jungles, but to irrigate deserts."
C.S. Lewis, 1898-1963


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz............... .............. citizen member
JiS Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..... ................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............. .................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP




TDC wants



new executive



director


he county's Tourism De-
velopment Council re-
cently voted to search for
a new executive director,
someone who will "think about
how to put us on the map," as
one council member said. This
new high-powered person
would join the Citrus County
Visitors and Con-
vention Bureau as THE I
the supervisor of T
current director Bring in a
Marla Chancey. director fo
While the Visi- offi
tors and Conven-
tion Bureau is a OUR 01
county office, the
proposed new Plan fi
$80,000 position sec
would be paid
through the tourism develop-
ment fund bed taxes, not
property taxes.
Is this addition a good idea?
Well, maybe.
Solidifying and growing our
tourism sector makes good
sense. But we challenge county
leaders to pause for some seri-
ous thought and plan the best
way to accomplish it.
Though someone said that
"it's more than manatees"
drawing visitors to Citrus
County, the research shows a
different picture. We draw vis-
itors heavily from other areas
in the state who want to enjoy
what we advertise as "The
Water-lover's Florida." This is,
after all, the only place people
are allowed to swim with the
manatees. Plus, visitors to busy
urban centers to our east and
south often detour here to
enjoy the relaxing, water-based
pursuits the Nature Coast
offers.


Scam alert
The Medicare card scam is hap-
pening again. They want
your bank name and ac- 0
count number and
threaten to take away
your Medicare insurance
if you do not give them
this information. Do not
answer questions, but do
try to write down the
Caller ID telephone num-
ber and report this to CAL
your Medicare regional 563-
office. Let's hope they
can do something about
this scam.
Stop grandstanding
First off, I am not connected to
Duke Energy in any way, shape or
form. I would like to state that the
school board should stay out of
this.
Our money is for the children
and schools and teaching them.
And I, for one, and many of my
neighbors (think) if you come up
for an increase in taxes for the
school board and you fight this
fight, you will be beaten. Quit try-
ing to grandstand.
Choose wisely
TDC article: "Sports marketing"
is a broad subject, as defined by
Wikipedia. The TDC should com-
mission a study to discover what
part of sports marketing will be
pursued before they hire. Other-
wise, this could be a boondoggle
to spend the surplus funds on hir-
ing the wrong person.


S


ic

P
r
o


I


Certainly we need to explore
ways to diversify and expand
our tourism economy. But
we're limited to a relatively
modest budget based on the
bed taxes. While those rev-
enues are up over the past
year, they won't accommodate
unlimited promotional activi-
ties. We simply
SUE: can't compete
with areas that
high-level dedicate big dol-
r tourism lars toward adver-
ce? tising, travel
incentives, sports
INION: venue develop-
ment and similar
st, act initiatives.
nd. Let's slow down
a bit, study the
data and think carefully about
our next steps.
Heed the external research
on where our visitors originate,
but don't forget our own resi-
dents' priorities. Consider this:
In its establishment year of
1995, community-based Citrus
20/20 found that what is treas-
ured most in Citrus County is
the unique and irreplaceable
wealth of the county's natural
resources. This hasn't
changed: Ecotourism has been
a top consideration in Vision
Check community gatherings
since the beginning. Then in
2011, the Citrus 20/20 Board
added youth initiatives to its
focus areas and, of course,
where kids go, parents go.
County leaders should do
some long-term planning. Ar-
ticulate a vision for the
county's future and make sure
the community is on board be-
fore leaping to an expensive,
quick-fix solution.


Adams makes sense
I read the article on Dec. 12 in
your paper, "Mixed vote
JND for new revenue options."
Just like career politi-
W cians; they spend all their
time looking for new rev-
enue rather than ways to
cut spending. Scott
Adams is the only one
who has any sense on
that board and we need
to elect at least two more
)579 like him.
Likes Adams
Hooray, hooray for Scott
Adams. What a privilege that I
voted for him.
He is right on, hitting the nail
on the head. The commissioners
- irresponsible before, irresponsi-
ble now and they have always
been irresponsible. Hooray for
Scott Adams. We need more like
him.
Questions training funds
Where is the money? Seems like
most of Citrus County offices are
making cuts in their budgets be-
cause Progress Energy won't pay
their taxes, but the county wants
to spend $4,300 training for
something they don't even have. I
worked for the Tampa Port Au-
thority for over 30 years and re-
tired as terminal manager. I didn't
have to pay for training. If the
Port of Citrus County is ever built,
it will not have that many perma-
nent employees maybe 10,
plus or minus.


Time to change the debate


ARIANNA HUFFINGTON
Guest columnist

Hey, have you heard about
this thing called "the fis-
cal cliff?" Actually, the
better question is: Have you
heard about anything except the
fiscal cliff? Nine months ago, the
term had not even entered the
media lexicon. And now it's sud-
denly everywhere.
It was Fed Chairman and Neol-
ogist-in-Chief Ben Bernanke
who, while testifying in front of
Congress back in February, first
used the term to describe the
combined effect of the expiration
of the Bush tax cuts, the payroll
tax cuts and unemployment ben-
efits, along with the beginning of
across-the-board spending cuts
(the so-called "sequestration")
that were part of the debt ceiling
deal (technically the Budget Con-
trol Act) of 2011.
Whether or not we go over the
fiscal cliff, around the fiscal curve,
or down the fiscal slope remains
to be seen and no doubt heard
about nonstop every day through
the end of the year but one
thing is already certain: Our polit-
ical debate has already gone over
the cliff. In fact, it was sequestered
long ago, when the acceptable pa-
rameters of this so-called debate
were initially set.
Just look at the current state of
the negotiations. President
Obama's proposal delivered to
John Boehner and Eric Cantor by
Obama's lead negotiator Tim Gei-
thner calls for $1.6 trillion in
tax revenue over the next 10
years, the majority of which
comes from letting the Bush tax
cuts expire for those making
more than $250,000, along with
$600 billion in savings from enti-
tlement and farm subsidy pro-
grams, and $800 billion from
reduced combat spending. There
would also be $200 billion in new
spending for unemployment ben-
efits, homeowner mortgage relief
and infrastructure.
Republicans immediately took
to their fainting couches.
"Right now I would say we're
nowhere, period," Boehner told


Other VOICES


Chris Wallace.
But, in fact, these were the
same terms the supposedly
shocked shocked! Republi-
can leaders had already heard
from the president himself ear-
lier in the year.
President Obama has mounted
a campaign-style effort to go over
the heads of congressional leaders
and get the American people in-
volved. Recently, he appeared at a
toy manufacturing company in
Pennsylvania, proclaiming the Re-
publicans refusing to budge and
thus raising taxes for everybody-
would amount to "the lump of
coal" for a "Scrooge Christmas."
The president ended his
speech by saying, "So I want you
to call, I want you to send an
email, post on their Facebook
wall. If you tweet, then use a
hashtag we're calling 'My2K.' Not
Y2K, 'My2K,' all right? Because
it's about your '2K' in your
pocket."
It's really great the president is
appealing directly to the people.
But why assume the people will
only respond to a direct appeal to
their pocketbooks? Why not also
appeal to the need to grow the
economy, create jobs, rebuild our
infrastructure and, yes, even take
care of America's unemployed?
Where is the moral imperative -
that can help connect us all to
rebuild the country?
The debate the country should
be locked in right now isn't about
the fiscal cliff and the deficit, but
about the growth cliff and the 20
million unemployed or underem-
ployed Americans. Economic
growth for the fourth quarter is
expected to be under 2 percent-
well below what it needs to be if
we're going to substantially re-
duce unemployment.
Of course, if we actually did
worry about growth and did some-
thing about it, that would go much
further toward reducing the deficit
than cuts to social programs.
"The boom, not the slump, is
the right time for austerity," John
Maynard Keynes said, and it is as
true now as when he said it in the


1930s.
But instead of trusting the
country to understand that, the
president has instead largely ac-
quiesced to the Republican
mantra that when American fam-
ilies have to tighten their belts, so
does the government, and has
chosen as his distinction-drawing
principle the disagreement over
tax cuts for the wealthy
The president has the wind in
his sails. He's just won an elec-
tion convincingly And he's fac-
ing an opposition whose
exhausted vision for the country
has curdled into, simply, tax cuts
for the wealthy and forever-
unspecified loophole closing.
The moment is ripe, and people
are ready, for something more
than an appeal to use the hashtag
"My2K."
Republicans have termed
Obama's proposal "fantasyland,"
but it's a measure of how far
we've gone into fantasyland that
this is the debate we're having at
a time of near-recession, and of
dismal prospects for 20 million
unemployed or underemployed
Americans. It's important to re-
member this debate didn't go off
the cliff by itself. This was no act
of God it was entirely
manmade.
It would be great if we could
channel some of the ingenuity we
clearly possess for producing
manufactured crises (debt ceil-
ing, fiscal cliff, etc.) and giving
them catchy names into solving
our real problems. One start
would be for the president to use
his new, hard-fought political
capital not just to beat the Re-
publicans at this particular game,
but to expand the playing field of
the next one. The only way we're
going to grow the economy is if
we grow the debate about the
economy.

Arianna Huffington is president
and editor-in-chief ofHuffington
Post Media Group. Her email
address is arianna@
h uffingtonpost com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Don't sell weapons
An open letter to any U.S. re-
tailer that sells assault weapons:
America is fed up. Polls show
62 percent of us favor a ban on
assault-style weapons like the
Bushmaster AR-15 used to kill
20 innocent children and six
adults at an elementary school
in Newtown, Conn. President
Obama has called for tighter
controls on sales of these
weapons, but we can't count on
Congress to even approve a
working budget or much of any-
thing else.
So I'm asking you retailers to
follow the lead of Dick's Sporting
Goods and immediately ban the
sale of all assault weapons. I'm
also asking you to take it a step
further and ban the sale of high-
capacity magazines and armor-
piercing bullets. These moves
may hurt your sales for a while,
but it is the right thing to do.
I pledge that my business will
go to Dick's Sporting Goods and
other retailers who adopt such a
ban.
The Second Amendment, rati-
fied in 1791, states "the right of


the people to keep and bear
arms shall not be infringed." But
in 1791, Native Americans were
scalping and killing other Ameri-
cans who were killing the first
group indiscriminately so as to
steal their land. Surely, times
and circumstances have
changed. Or have they?
The Declaration of Independ-
ence states, in part, Americans
are "created with certain un-
alienable rights, that among
these are Life, Liberty and the
pursuit of Happiness." Implied
in those rights is the expectation
that any American should be
able to attend school, go to a
movie or a shopping mall or
stand in a line to meet their Con-
gressman with a reasonable ex-
pectation of survival.
But the proliferation of gun vi-
olence in this country has given
us all pause that these simple
activities are not as safe as they
were a few short years ago.
We've all heard the old argu-
ment "guns don't kill people,
people kill people." It's an ab-
surd argument in an age where
military-style weapons are avail-
able at your retailers, online, at


gun shows and even on eBay
Millions of these weapons are on
the street and in our homes, gun
sales are soaring, and we all be-
come more unsafe with every
passing day
We know it is generally men-
tally ill people who commit these
horrific acts. We also know as a
society, we have to do a better job
of watching each other and ensur-
ing those people with mental ill-
ness get the help they need. But
that's not as easily solved as ban-
ning assault weapons, the high-
capacity magazines that ensure
multiple victims, and armor-
piercing bullets whose only func-
tion is to penetrate the vests of
our police officers. A ban on these
items will not affect hunters, tar-
get shooters or the average gun
owner in the least
Please demonstrate you are a
patriotic American retailer and
do the right thing by banning
these weapons. Don't wait for
Congress to act, and don't wait
until you sell your existing stock.
Do it today
Kevin R Mulligan
Crystal River


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 A9


LETTERS to the Editor


Tough choices
The Fed said our econ-
omy is in danger of going
over a financial cliff, which
will cause our economy -
which is in a feeble recov-
ery to slip back into re-
cession by causing large
tax increases and spending
cuts simultaneously This is
because tax increases will
inhibit business and con-
sumer spending, and gov-
ernment spending cuts will
also remove capital from
the economy The president
and House Republicans
are involved in a rancorous
argument over taxes and
spending cuts supposedly
to avoid this cliff.
I believe they have it all
wrong. When something is
weakly recovering, you
don't mess with it.
I would extend all tax
cuts one more year and
stop sequestration. This
would, of course, increase
the debt problem, but the
most immediate need is to
increase jobs and keep
money in the faltering
economy If you increase
jobs, you increase tax rev-
enue and decrease social
spending. To increase jobs,
we need to relieve onerous
regulation, increase do-
mestic oil, gas and coal
production, approve the
Keystone (pipeline) and en-
courage new manufactur-
ing, especially car
production. Most so-called
American companies are
exporting jobs, while for-
eign carmakers are moving
to the U.S. in the right-to-
work states. It's encourag-
ing Michigan just passed
right-to-work legislation.
We need to free our Ameri-
can car companies from
the grasp of the UAW.
Of course, we have other
problems. Our debt service
is 40 percent of our budget
and growing. Most of us
know the results of over-
spending on credit person-
ally and we can see the
results of overspending in
Europe. We are also headed
down that path. As soon as
we get the economy
cranked up, we need to
make some serious spend-
ing cuts, along with maybe
some tax increases. Our
major entitlement pro-
grams Social Security,
Medicare, and Medicaid -
are in need of serious re-
structuring; however, the
election seems to show we
are not yet ready to do more
than minor changes yet.
We, collectively as a na-


tion, need to spend less. If
fewer people were willing
to overspend on mortgages,
credit cards and student
debt, we would not be in
such a mess. The economy
needs to stop relying on in-
creasing consumer spend-
ing. We need to save more
and build things which re-
place foreign products and
provide export opportuni-
ties. That is one reason
manufacturing and energy
production is important. To
encourage saving, we need
to institute more conserva-
tive fiscal policies which
preserve the value of our
dollar, allow decent inter-
est rates and reduce
inflation.
More people should have
a stake in our taxation sys-
tem. Investors like Mitt
Romney do not pay FICA
on their dividend income.
That should be changed so
they pay FICA the same as
regular income up to the
legal limit and up to retire-
ment age. Also, we should
institute a lower-tier tax
rate so more low-income
people pay a small amount
of taxes. Everyone as near
as possible should have a


stake in our tax is
way, we stop thes(
comments about t
cent, or the 47 pe:
We're all America
together


Fair share n
A recent letter
Chronicle request
for President Oba
he asks the wealth
a bit more in taxe
wealthy's response
balance the defic
falsely assumed.
I have been he;
"fair share" story
years now and ha
be told what is fai
the liberal zealots
heard the CBO sa
tire income of the
est would only pa
debt interest for
weeks, at best? A
are these rich fol]
they not the peop
give us jobs, creal
support our econ
spending that dis
income and pay r
federal taxes alre
Don't get me wi
wealthy should pJ
and they do in do
Does everyone
"fair share" is mo
Does a not-wealtt
tax-paying teacher


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issues. This fair share adding to the in-
e nasty tellect of our nation? Do
the 1 per- not our front-line troops
recent. pay their fair share by de-
ans in this fending us?
Make no mistake, most of
Don Clark middle class pays a form of
Floral City fair share. And ironically,
Mr. Obama's supporters
t will suffer most, with more
mystery and higher taxes despite
to the his campaign promises.
ts support Every working person
ima while (overwhelmingly middle
hy to pay class) will, on Jan. 1, 2013,
*s, but the see their payroll taxes rise
sibility to by 2 percent. There are
it is more than 100 "other"
taxes to consider, some still
aring the hidden in Obamacare
for four legalese. Rich and poor
ve yet to alike pay sales tax, gas tax,
ir. Have utility tax, etc., with a total
s not close to 50 percent.
ay the en- Mr Obama did not prom-
wealthi- ise any restriction on new
y for our taxes. They are coming, too.
a few Under consideration is a 17
nd who percent VAT tax, a real es-
ks? Are tate buyer's tax, bank trans-
le who action tax, an 18 percent
te and gasoline tax and many
omy by others.
posable Increasing federal taxes
nost of the on the rich will not cut it.
*ady? Obama will get a lot more
wrong, the money from the middle
ay more, class. He has to it's
llars. where the money is.
assume The House of Represen-
iney? tatives wants the president
4y, non- to outline spending cuts to
r pay a reduce the need for econ-


omy-damaging tax
Here's the logjam
cratic legislators
spending without
their base support
thereby losing the
election and losin
opulent lifestyle.
There's more. B
the Fed has been
money for the pas
years, inflation is
evitably arriving s
with a vengeance.
wealthy will be ab
dle it they have
income. We in the
class will suffer a
rise in all prices \
any rise in income
Unfortunately, t
rent administration
four years doing n
head off the multi
pending crises. B]
the current Congr
misses the mark.
last two years of tU
(administration) a
first two years of t
Obama (administi
when both Democ
houses of Congres
most of their time
an unpopular Oba
while kicking the
down the road. Th
Democratic Senal
passed a budget ii
three-plus years.'
would they disavow
Constitution that
clue entitlemei
votes.
The swing Obar
porters voted for 1
lunch. It's a selfish
we live in. Remer
there is smart-self
is dumb-selfish, b
no unselfish. Wha
take to save our R
Te


What's ah
I have been wat


x hikes. fleeting back on my life's
: Demo- experiences. When I was in
cannot cut school, from kindergarten
losing through high school, I had
ters, no reason to be concerned
Mir next for my safety, whether at
ig their school or at leisure.
However, by the time my
because younger sister, who was
printing only three years younger
st four than I am, got to high
in- school, she had to contend
soon and with racial tension in her
The school, which was the same
)le to han- high school that I attended.
strong I grew up in a community
middle that was in close proximity
crippling to a military base an Air
without Force base to be precise. I
e. did have social interactions
;he cur- with some of the people as-
on wasted sociated with the military
nothing to base, both civilian employ-
ple im- ees and members of the
laming military At that time one
*ess had to be a federal govern-
It was the ment employee to buy
he Bush Geico insurance. I could
nd the not purchase this insur-
;he ance because I was not a
ration) federal government em-
cratic ployee; however, I did not
ss spent feel deprived. Now every-
enacting one in America appears to
imacare have access to this
debt can insurance.
ie current I also grew up in a pre-
te has not Walmart environment.
n what, Based on my experience,
Why Walmart reminds me very
w our much of the base exchange
way? A on the military base. They
nts and had one store that sold
everything from clothes to
ma sup- food for the benefit of
their free everyone associated with
h world the military who had ac-
nber, cess to the base, and of-
fish, there fered a discount from most
ut there's civilian stores. In the pres-
at will it ence of Walmart and the
publici? availability of Geico insur-
ance, most of America
*d LaPorte today must be nothing
Hernando more than one large fed-
eral government I want to
ead? apologize for my ignorance,
ching the but what type of society is


media coverage of the most
recent attack on civilians,
the shootings at the ele-
mentary school in New-
town, Conn.
I was not born yesterday,
and have been around for a
while, and have been re-


^'cy


one large federal govern-
ment? Personally, I do not
wish to take part in that
type of social movement. I
was around in the 1970s,
and I don't believe this is
what American people
were looking for. Perhaps I
am wrong, but it won't be
the first time.
Based on my experience,
I would not want to bring
up children in the social
environment that I have
been subjected to since
1980, partially because I
have not chosen to have a
large number of offspring
in the hope that one of
them might be successful
in life. It appears to me
that not all of them are
going to be successful at
their life's endeavors,
whatever they choose them
to be.
Unfortunately, based on
our current laws, someone
must commit criminal ac-
tivities before they are con-
sidered to be a criminal. So
why did there appear to be
less criminal activity in the
past, at least on such a
scale as is seen today, with
mass attacks on schools,
government institutions,
and private business?
Could this have had any
effect on the attack on the
World Trade Center on
9/11?
The terrorists definitely
did their homework after
the failed attack in 1993.
This is enough time to get a
master's degree.
What could have caused
such a radical change in
our social environment in
so short of a time? And, if
things keep progressing at
their present rate, what is
this nation going to be like
in the future?
Gregory N. Harsin
Homosassa


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


tonBRIES Syrian rebels make gains "BRIEFS

Vigil Passed


Associated Press
Snow-covered stuffed ani-
mals with photos attached
sit at a memorial Tuesday
in Newtown, Conn.

Newtown, Conn.,
marks Christmas
NEWTOWN, Conn. -
Newtown celebrated Christ-
mas amid piles of snow-
covered teddy bears, long
lines of stockings and heaps
of flowers as volunteers
manned a 24-hour candlelight
vigil in memory of the 20 chil-
dren and six educators
gunned down at an elemen-
tary school just 11 days be-
fore the holiday.
Well-wishers from around
the country showed up
Christmas morning to hang
ornaments on a series of me-
morial Christmas trees while
police officers from around
the state took extra shifts to
direct traffic, patrol the town
and give police here a break.
Ex-President Bush
still in hospital
HOUSTON Former
President George H.W. Bush
spent Christmas in a Houston
hospital
with his
wife, Bar-
bara, and
other rela-
tives who
planned to
treat him to
a special George
holiday H.W. Bush
meal. former
Bush's president.
son, Neil,
and his wife also visited
Tuesday, and one of Bush's
grandsons was planning to
stop by as well, said Jim Mc-
Grath, Bush's spokesman in
Houston.
The 88-year-old has been
in the hospital since Nov. 23
with a lingering, bronchitis-
like cough. A hospital
spokesman had said Bush
was likely to be released to
spend Christmas at home,
but then McGrath said the
former president developed a
fever.
DC hotels prep
for inauguration
WASHINGTON Visitors
coming to the nation's capital
for President Barack
Obama's second inaugura-
tion can't stay in the one
place President Ronald Rea-
gan's family once called an
eight-star hotel. That spot is
the White House, and it's
booked for the next four
years. Still, inauguration-
goers have a range of lodging
options from crashing on a
friend's couch to rooms that
cost thousands of dollars a
night.
With second inaugurations
tending to draw fewer specta-
tors, finding a place to stay in
Washington won't be nearly
as difficult as in 2009.
City officials are expecting
600,000 to 800,000 visitors
for the Jan. 21 inauguration,
far less than the 1.8 million
people who flooded the Na-
tional Mall four years ago to
witness the inauguration of
America's first black presi-
dent. Back then, some hotels
sold out months in advance
and city residents rented out
their homes for hundreds of
dollars a night. This time, ho-
tels say they're filling up more
slowly, with rooms still avail-
able and prices at or slightly
below where they were four


years ago.


-From wire reports


Associated Press

BEIRUT Syrian rebels
fully captured a northern
town near the Turkish bor-
der Tuesday after weeks of
heavy fighting and attacked
a regime air base in a neigh-
boring province, activists
said.
The air base is in Aleppo
province, where opposition
fighters have already cap-
tured three other large mil-
itary bases in recent
months. Rebels have also
laid siege to the interna-
tional airport in the city of


Aleppo, Syria's commercial
capital, and launched an of-
fensive on the police acad-
emy near the city
With steady rebel gains
across the north, President
Bashar Assad's regime is
having increasing difficulty
sending supplies by land to
Aleppo province, especially
after rebels cut a major
thoroughfare from Damas-
cus. It is just another sign
the opposition is consolidat-
ing its grip across large
swaths of territory in north-
ern Syria near the Turkish
border


In his traditional Christ-
mas address, Pope Benedict
XVI decried the slaughter of
the "defenseless" in Syria,
where anti-regime activists
estimate more than 40,000
have died in fighting since
the uprising against Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's rule
began in March 2011.
In another blow to the
regime, activists said Mo-
hammed Adnan Arabo, a
member of Syria's parlia-
ment, has left the country
and joined the opposition.
Ahmad Ramadan, an execu-
tive council member of the


opposition Syrian National
Council group, and other ac-
tivists said Arabo arrived in
Turkey on Tuesday
He said the regime's hold
on power is deteriorating
and rebels are besieging
military bases for weeks
until they either take over
or negotiate with local army
commanders to surrender.
He added some regime
forces are being diverted to
the capital to fight there.
"The regime cannot pro-
tect its bases and also can-
not send forces to support
troops under siege," he said.


Gunman identified in NY


' *


Associated Press
Firefighters gather around a burning house Monday after they were let back into the area to battle the blaze in
Webster, N.Y. A gunman ambushed four volunteer firefighters responding to an intense pre-dawn house fire Mon-
day morning outside Rochester, N.Y., killing two and ending up dead himself, authorities said. Police used an ar-
mored vehicle to evacuate more than 30 nearby residents.

Man who killed two firefighters left note with killing plan


Associated Press

WEBSTER, N.Y. -The ex-con
who lured two firefighters to their
deaths in a blaze of gunfire left a
rambling typewritten note saying
he wanted to burn down the neigh-
borhood and "do what I like doing
best, killing people," police said
Tuesday as they recovered burned
human remains believed to be the
gunman's missing sister
Police Chief Gerald Pickering
said 62-year-old William Spengler,
who served 17 years in prison for
the 1980 hammer slaying of his
grandmother, armed himself with a
revolver, a shotgun and a military-
style rifle before he set his house
afire to lure first responders into a
death trap before dawn on Christ-
mas Eve.
"He was equipped to go to war,
kill innocent people," Pickering
said.
The rifle he had was a military-
style .223-caliber semiautomatic
Bushmaster rifle with flash sup-
pression, the same make and cal-
iber weapon used in the
elementary school massacre in
Newtown, Conn., Pickering said.
The chief said police believe the


firefighters were hit with
shots from the rifle, given
the distance, but the inves-
tigation was incomplete.
Pickering declined to di-
vulge the full content of the I
two- to three-page note left
by Spengler or say where it
was found, but read one line Will
from it: "I still have to get Spei
ready to see how much of Killed
the neighborhood I can Mor
burn down, and do what I
like doing best, killing people."
The human remains were found
in the charred house that Spengler
shared with his 67-year-old sister,
Cheryl. A medical examiner will
need to determine the identity and
cause of death because the body is
badly burned.
Spengler killed himself as seven
houses burned around him Monday
on a narrow spit of land along Lake
Ontario in this suburb of Rochester
A friend said Spengler hated his
sister, but the chief said the note
left by him did not give a motive.
No other bodies were found, and
police late Tuesday said the on-
scene investigation had been
completed.
Two firefighters were shot dead


li
n
h
in


in the ambush and two oth-
ers are hospitalized in sta-
ble condition.
Spengler fired at the four
firefighters when they ar-
* t rived shortly after 5:30 a.m.
Monday to put out the fire,
Pickering said. The first po-
!am lice officer who arrived
agler chased the gunman and ex-
imself changed shots.
day. Authorities said Spengler
hadn't done anything to
bring himself to their attention
since his parole. As a convicted
felon, he wasn't allowed to possess
weapons. Monroe County District
Attorney Sandra Doorley said
Spengler led a very quiet life after
he got out of prison.
A friend, Roger Vercruysse, lived
next door to Spengler and recalled
a man who doted on his mother,
whose obituary suggested contribu-
tions to the West Webster Fire
Department.
"He loved his mama to death,"
said Vercruysse, who last saw his
friend about six months ago.
Vercruysse also said Spengler
"couldn't stand his sister" and
"stayed on one side of the house
and she stayed on the other"


Nasty storms make holiday travel tough


Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS -
Christmas Day along the
Gulf Coast was filled with
severe thunderstorms that
brought drenching rains,
high winds and damaging
tornadoes while the nation's
midsection dealt with freez-
ing rain, sleet and snow that
made for a sloppy and some-
times dangerous trek for
holiday travelers.
Winds toppled a tree onto
a pickup truck in the Hous-
ton area, killing the driver
Icy roads already were
blamed for a 21-vehicle
pileup in Oklahoma, where
authorities warned would-
be travelers to stay home.
The National Weather Serv-
ice tweeted that a tornado
was headed toward down-
town Mobile, Ala., and
WALA posted on its website


a photo from its tower cam
of what looked like a funnel
cloud moving toward the
city
Near McNeill, Miss., in
the southwestern part of the
state, winds from a storm,
possibly a tornado, dam-
aged a dozen homes and in-
jured several people, none
seriously, said Pearl River
County emergency manage-
ment agency director Danny
Manley
Trees fell on a few houses
in central Louisiana's Rapi-
des Parish but there were
no injuries reported and
crews were cutting trees out
of roadways to get to people
in their homes, said sher-
iff's Lt. Tommy Carnline.
Fog blanketed highways,
including arteries in the At-
lanta area where motorists
slowed as a precaution. In
New Mexico, drivers across


the eastern plains had to
fight through snow, ice and
low visibility
At least three tornadoes
were reported in Texas,
though only one building
was damaged, according to
the National Weather Serv-
ice. Tornado watches were
in effect across southern
Louisiana and Mississippi.
Nearly 350 flights nation-
wide were canceled by the
evening, according to the
flight tracker FlightAware.
com.
More than half were can-
celed into and out of Dal-
las/Fort Worth International
Airport that got a few inches
of snow.
Christmas lights also
were knocked out, with
more than 70,000 people
without power in east
Texas, Arkansas, Missis-
sippi and Louisiana.


And in Louisiana, quar-
ter-sized hail was reported
early Tuesday in the west-
ern part of the state and a
WDSU viewer sent a photo
to the TV station of what ap-
peared to be a waterspout
around the Lake Pontchar-
train Causeway in New Or-
leans. There were no
reports of crashes or dam-
age.
Meanwhile, blizzard con-
ditions were possible for
parts of Illinois, Indiana and
western Kentucky, with pre-
dictions of 4 to 7 inches of
snow. Much of Oklahoma
and Arkansas braced under
a winter storm warning of
an early mix of rain and
sleet forecast to eventually
turn to snow. About a dozen
counties in Missouri were
under a blizzard warning
from Tuesday night to noon
Wednesday


Associated Press
An Egyptian election worker
shows his colleagues an in-
valid ballot Dec. 22 while
counting ballots at the end
of the second round of a ref-
erendum on a disputed con-
stitution. Egypt's election
commission announced
Tuesday the draft Constitu-
tion passed with a 63.8 per-
cent "yes" vote.


Ukraine police
helicopter crashes
KIEV, Ukraine -A police
helicopter belonging to
Ukraine's Interior Ministry
crashed shortly after takeoff
Tuesday in the central part of
the country, killing five people
on board, officials said.
The Mi-8 helicopter
slammed into the ground at
about 1400 GMT just after
taking off from an airport in
the city of Alexandria in the
Kirovograd region, about 200
miles southeast of the capital,
Kiev, ministry spokesman
Serhiy Burlakov said.
Investigators were working
to determine what caused the
helicopter to hit the ground as
it was gaining speed Tuesday
afternoon, Burlakov said.
Three of the dead were crew
members, and two were
ground staff on board the
helicopter.
The Mi-8 is a workhorse
helicopter used widely in civil-
ian and military aviation in for-
mer Soviet states. Mi-8
crashes are often blamed on
poor maintenance, aging
equipment, a disregard for
safety regulations and a cost-
cutting mentality.
Israel to build
942 more homes
JERUSALEM Israel has
advanced the process of
building 942 more settler
homes in east Jerusalem
under a new fast-track plan to
tighten its grip on the territory,
which the Palestinians claim
as the capital of a future
state.
A government planning
committee Monday moved
the project to the advanced
stage of asking contractors to
submit bids to build them, the
Interior Ministry said Tuesday.
Once a bid is awarded, con-
struction can begin on the
project in the Gilo area,
though it can take months, if
not longer, to reach that point.
An additional 300 units can
be built after further planning,
said attorney Daniel Seide-
mann, an expert on
Jerusalem construction who
sees the building as an obsta-
cle to peacemaking.
About 40,000 Israelis live in
Gilo.
VP says Chavez
up, walking
CARACAS, Venezuela -
Vice President Nicolas
Maduro surprised Venezue-
lans with a Christmas Eve an-
nouncement that President
Hugo Chavez is up and walk-
ing two weeks after cancer
surgery in Cuba, but the news
did little to ease uncertainty
surrounding the leader's
condition.
Sounding giddy, Maduro
told state television Vene-
zolana de Television he had
spoken by phone with
Chavez for 20 minutes Mon-
day night. It was the first time
a top Venezuelan govern-
ment official had confirmed
talking personally with
Chavez since the Dec. 11 op-
eration, his fourth cancer sur-
gery since 2011.
"He was in a good mood,"
Maduro said. "He was walk-
ing, he was exercising."
-From wire reports






Golf page Thursday


SPORTS


The local golf page will
appear in Thursday's paper
because of the Christmas
holiday.

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Sports briefs/B2
* Basketball, football/B2
* Scoreboard/B4
* TV, lottery/B3
* Entertainment/B4


Finals rematch goes to Miami over OKC


James has big

night in 103-97

home triumph

Associated Press
MIAMI LeBron James
finished with 29 points, nine
assists and eight rebounds,
Dwyane Wade scored 21, and
Miami Heat forward LeBron
James dunks as Oklahoma City
Thunder point guard Russell
Westbrook looks on during the
first half Tuesday in Miami.
Associated Press


the Miami Heat survived a
frantic finish to beat the
Oklahoma City Thunder 103-
97 in an NBA Finals rematch
on Tuesday
Mario Chalmers scored a
season-high 20 for the Heat,
who matched the franchise's
best 25-game start at 19-6.
Chris Bosh added 16 for
Miami, which has beaten the
Thunder five straight times
going back to last June's title
series.
Kevin Durant scored 33
points and Russell Westbrook
added 21 for Oklahoma City,
but both Thunder stars
missed potentially game-tying
3-point attempts in the final
seconds. Serge Ibaka and


Volleyball Player of the Yearfinalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM





Spike in productivity


Buckley, St. Martin,


V volleyball is definitely a sport where
you have to be attacking in order to
Score points.
In 2012, defense ruled Citrus County's
volleyball teams which actually placed
more of a premium on stellar attackers.
A trio of outside hitters Lecanto's
Marie Buckley, Crystal
River's Casidy New-
comer and Seven
Rivers Christian's
Daniette St. Martin-
highlight the list of fi-
nalists for the Chroni-
cle's Volleyball Player
of the Year
oWhile Buckley
Jon-Michael stands 5-foot-11 and
Soracchi looks most like the pro-
totypical outside hitter,
ON POINT St. Martin and
Newcomer were each
5-foot-6 dynamos relying on the same traits
Buckley does: great athleticism, supreme
eye-hand coordination and hard hitting to
pound the ball into the ground on the
opponent's side of the net.
The finalists have standing invitations to
the Chronicle sports banquet at the conclu-
sion of the 2012-13 school year, where the
winner of the award will be announced.


Casidy Newcomer,
Crystal River senior


Newcomer finalists for Volleyball Player of the Year


All-Chronicle
volleyball team
Lindsay Connors,
Citrus senior libero
Connors was one of the few bright spots
on a rebuilding team and bolstered the
Hurricanes' defense in 2012.
Emily Laga,
Crystal River senior libero
Laga registered 803 digs 8.1 per set -
as one of the best back row defenders in the
county. The Pirate also added 34 aces and
had a 95 percent serving success.
Casidy Newcomer,
CR senior outside hitter
The Pirate had 422 kills at a 37 percent
hitting clip, while adding 368 digs and a
team-high 79 aces all for a playoff team.
Marie Buckley,
Lecanto senior outside hitter
One of the best attackers in the county,
Buckley led the Panthers in kills and was also


the Panthers' most dangerous offensive
player in the postseason, including a 19-kill
effort in the District 6A-6 title game.
Courtney Rymer,
Lecanto senior setter
While listed as a setter, Rymer was all a
Swiss Army knife for the Panthers. The upper-
classman was among the team leader in kills,
digs and assists and her 12-kill, 24-dig perform-
ance against West Port in the District 6A-6 title
game was a fitting snapshot of her talents.
Daniette St. Martin,
SRCS senior outside hitter
Had 129 kills and 209 digs as the Warriors'
best all-around player despite standing
5-foot-6. Also earned FACA's District 1A-8
Player of the Year honors.
Alexis Zachar,
SRCS junior middle blocker
Standing an imposing 6-foot-4, Zachar
formed a front line with sister Andrea to
stymie opponents' attacks. Zachar racked up
69 blocks, added 178 kills and forced other
teams to game plan around her.


Christmas day
NBA hoops
For all of Tuesday's
actions, see Page B2.

Kevin Martin each added 15
for the Thunder, who have
dropped two straight for the
first time this season.
The Heat went 19 for 19
from the foul line, the second-
best effort in franchise his-
tory. They were 30 for 30 at
Boston on March 24, 1993.
And it was a wild finals re-
match one that lived up to
expectations.
See Page B3



SMU wins

Hawaii

Bowl

Mustangs crush

Fresno St. 43-10

Associated Press
HONOLULU Margus
Hunt knew he had eight hours
to fill on the flight over the Pa-
cific Ocean, so he asked the
SMU staff to put together film
of Fresno State for him to
study He hit the Bulldogs like
a tidal wave Monday night in
the Hawaii Bowl.
The 6-foot-8 defensive end
raced around right tackle to
blindside Derek Carr and force
a fumble. Hunt smashed into
running back Robbie Rouse on
a delayed handoff and forced
another fumble. On a three-
man rush, he sacked Carr in
the end zone for a safety
It was an inspiring perform-
ance by the senior from Esto-
nia, and it set the tone for the
Mustangs' 43-10 win.
"That was a lot of fun," Hunt
said. "We knew from the get-go
it was going to be a Monday
night football game, the only
game in the nation. We wanted
to show our skills and make
some plays. To me personally
... this is where it all started.
It's good to end on this note."
The Mustangs (7-6) also re-
turned two interceptions for
touchdowns, giving them eight
for the season to tie the NCAA
record set last year by South-
ern Miss. Hayden Greenbauer
picked off Carr and returned
it 83 yards with 1:14 left, the
final blow to a miserable night
for the Bulldogs (9-4).
SMU had seven sacks, more
than double the most Fresno
State had given up in a game
all year
Garrett Gilbert was effec-
tive with his arm and his legs,
running for a 17-yard touch-
down for the first score of the
game and throwing a perfect
strike to Darius Johnson for a
21-yard score to answer the
Bulldogs' only touchdown. He
rushed for 98 yards on 18 car-
ries and threw for 212 yards.
But this game was decided
by the Mustangs' defense, with
See Page B3


In NFL, 2012 season year of the comeback


Pagano, Manning

Peterson make

campaign inspiring

Associated Press
DENVER From Peyton Man-
ning overcoming four neck surgeries
to Adrian Peterson's rebound from a
shredded knee to Chuck Pagano's
fight with leukemia, this has been the
Year of the Comeback in the NFL.
A season besmirched by
tragedies, replacement officials and
a bounty scandal also will go down


as one in which some of the game's
greats not only regained their old
form but somehow surpassed it.
There are always feel-good stories
about those who overcome long odds
and broken bodies to regain at least
a sliver of their past glory This sea-
son provided an abundance of them.
When the season started, who
could have expected Manning to re-
capture his MVP play so quickly
with a new team? Or for Peterson to
come back less than nine months
after shredding his left knee. Or for
Jamaal Charles to return better than
ever after suffering a similar injury
Then there's Pagano beating the
biggest opponent of his life.
See Page B3


Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, left photo, and Denver
Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning each came back from serious injuries
to be among the best players in the NFL at their respective positions.
Associated Press


Marie Buckley, Daniette St. Martin,
Lecanto senior Seven Rivers senior





B2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012



SPRT


W. Kentucky, C. Michigan in Pizza Bowl


A. Jones arrested
for battery
DULUTH, Ga. For-
mer Atlanta Braves star
center fielder Andruw
Jones was free on bond
after being arrested in
suburban Atlanta early
Tuesday on a battery
charge, according to jail
records.
Around 1:30 a.m. Tues-
day, police responded to a
call for a domestic dispute
between Jones and his
wife in Duluth.
Gwinnett County Deten-
tion Center records say
Jones was booked into the
county jail around 3:45
a.m. and had been re-
leased on $2,400 bond by
11 a.m.
Once one of the premier
players in the big leagues,
Jones broke into the ma-
jors with the Atlanta
Braves in 1996 and won
10 consecutive Gold
Gloves from 1998-07 as
their center fielder. He has
434 career home runs over
the span of 17 seasons in
the majors.
Jones earlier this month
signed a $3.5 millionon, one-
year contract with the To-
hoku Rakuten Golden
Eagles of Japan's Pacific
League.
Jaguars place
WR Shorts on IR
JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
placed receiver Cecil
Shorts III on injured re-
serve following his second
concussion of the month.
Shorts sustained a con-
cussion in Sunday's loss to
New England. He also sat
out the Dec. 9 game
against the New York Jets
with a concussion. He had
55 receptions for a team-
leading 979 yards and
seven touchdowns.
The Jaguars (2-13) al-
ready have receiver Lau-
rent Robinson on IR. They
traded Mike Thomas and
waived Kevin Elliott, leav-
ing rookie Justin Blackmon
as the only remaining re-
ceiver from the opener.
Jacksonville also placed
running back Rashad Jen-
nings (shoulder) and line-
backer Greg Jones (leg)
on IR.
The team activated re-
ceiver Jerrell Jackson
from the practice squad
and was awarded offen-
sive lineman Mark Asper
and tight end Allen Reis-
ner off waivers from
Minnesota.
Former Rangers
owner dies at 75
HOUSTON Brad Cor-
bett, who owned the Texas
Rangers from 1974 to
1980 and wasn't afraid to
regularly switch out man-
agers, died on Christmas
Eve. He was 75.
Corbett's daughter,
Pamela Corbett Murrin,
told The Associated Press
that her father died peace-
fully in his sleep on Mon-
day. She said he had not
been sick recently.
At Corbett's helm, the
team had six managers in
six years four in the
1977 season alone. An
article on the Rangers'
website also said the
team had its first four win-
ning seasons under Cor-
bett and finished second
in the AL West three
times. The 94 victories in
1977 remained the most
in team history until 1999,


it said.
Indiana S
Miami
HONOLULI
Odum banked
footer with eig
second left in
rally Indiana S
55 win over M
day in the third
game of the D
Head Classic.
Manny Arop
Mahurin score
apiece for the
(7-4), who trai
many as nine
who shot just
from the field.
Kadji led thE
(8-3) with 13 p


St. beats
in OT
U Jake
in a 15-
ht-tenths of a
overtime to
3tate to a 57-
liami Tues-
d-place
)iamond

) and R.J.
3d 13 points
Sycamores
led by as
points and
27 percent

e Hurricanes
points .
- From wire reports


Associated Press

DETROIT Before the Bobby
Petrino era begins at Western Ken-
tucky, there's a bowl game to play-
the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
against Central Michigan.
The game at Ford Field today is
in Detroit, not far from the campus
of the Chippewas (6-6). The Hilltop-
pers (7-5) will be run by interim
coach Lance Guidry
Petrino's hiring has almost over-
shadowed the play of the Hilltop-
pers. They are in their first bowl
since becoming a top-tier college
football school in 2009.
Petrino is returning to coaching
less than a year after he was dis-
missed at Arkansas. He had hired


his former mistress to work in the
Razorbacks' football department.
Guidry, who was the team's de-
fensive coordinator, says his play-
ers are ready
"These kids are really hungry,"
Guidry said. "Really been having
some great practices, although
they've been going through a lot of
different things with the head
coaches."
Guidry was appointed interim
coach Dec. 8, a day after Willie Tag-
gart left to coach South Florida.
Two days later, Western Kentucky
hired Petrino to be Taggart's full-
time replacement in a stunning
move that didn't seem to shake up
the players much because familiar
faces were still around.


"Even though Coach Taggert is
gone, the coaches are still here with
us," Western Kentucky junior run-
ning back Antonio Andrews said.
"They've been here since Day One."
Dan Enos has been leading the
Chippewas since 2010. Enos was
hired soon after Central Michigan
played in and won its last postsea-
son game, beating Troy in the GMAC
Bowl with a team put together by
former coach Butch Jones, who is
now coaching at Tennessee.
Central Michigan won its last
three games this year to be eligible
for a bowl. After going 3-9 in each of
Enos' first two seasons, his players
are excited to still be playing.
"That's why I coach," Enos said.
"That's why our coaches coach, to


The Lake shove


Associated
Los Angeles Lakers center Dwight Howard pulls down a rebound against New York Knicks center Tyson Chan
during the second half Tuesday in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 100-94.


Los Angeles wins back-and-forth game with New


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES Kobe Bryant en-
gineered a second-half comeback,
helping the Los Angeles beat the New
York Knicks 100-94 on Tuesday and
extend the Lakers' winning streak to
five games while lifting them to .500.
Bryant scored 34 points in his NBA-
record 15th Christmas Day game and
Metta World Peace added 20 points
and seven rebounds while defending
Carmelo Anthony, whose 34 points
led the Knicks. Bryant, the league's
leading scorer, has topped 30 or more
points in nine straight games.
The Lakers improved to 14-14 9-
9 under new coach Mike D'Antoni -
and upped their holiday record to 21-
18, including 13-9 at home.
The Knicks controlled most of the
game behind Anthony and J.R.
Smith, who had 24 points. But they
struggled offensively in the fourth,
when Anthony was limited to seven
points and Smith had five.
Smith's 3-pointer pulled New York
to 96-94. After Pau Gasol made one of
two free throws, Smith missed an-
other 3 that would have tied the
game at 97 with 32 seconds left.
Gasol dunked with 12 seconds to
go, punctuating a win that sent Lak-
ers fans, frustrated by the team's
struggles and coaching change, home
happy The Lakers avenged a 116-107
loss in New York on Dec. 13.
Steve Nash had 16 points, 11 assists
and six rebounds in his second game
in nearly two months. He missed 24


straight games while recovering from
a small fracture in his lower left leg.
Dwight Howard had 14 points and 12
rebounds, and Gasol had 13 points
and eight rebounds.
Bryant had eight of the Lakers' first
10 points to open the fourth during a
run that provided their first lead
since the opening quarter in a game
matching the two teams that have
played the most on Christmas Day
Celtics 93, Nets 76
NEW YORK Rajon Rondo scored
19 points in his first full game against
Brooklyn this season, and the Boston
Celtics beat the Nets 93-76 on Tuesday
in another game with some heated mo-
ments between the division rivals.
Rondo, sidelined in the first meeting
and thrown out of the second after shov-
ing Nets forward Kris Humphries into the
courtside seats, outplayed counterpart
Deron Williams and helped the Celtics
take control early.
Rookie Jared Sullinger tied a career
high with 16 points and Jeff Green had
15 for the Celtics (14-13), who avoided
falling under .500 with just their second
victory in six games.
Gerald Wallace and Brook Lopez each
scored 15 for the Nets, who have lost four
of five.
The Celtics took control with a 23-5 run
in the second quarter. They had 11 as-
sists on 13 baskets and outscored the
Nets 34-18 in the period.
A month after the teams scuffled in
Boston, there was another skirmish in the


York Knic


fourth quarter that resulted in four tech
fouls, but that was the most fight the NE
put up in a disappointing performance.
the national stage of the Christmas
opener. They were never in the game
the first 20 minutes, and their fans heai
to the exits with under 2 minutes left as
"Let's go Celtics!" chant broke out.
Williams had only 10 points on 3-of
shooting and Joe Johnson, his partner
a high-priced backcourt, shot 4 of 14 f
his 12 points.
Boston's Kevin Garnett had eight
points and 10 rebounds on the day he
tied Charles Oakley for 15th place on
NBA's career list with his 1,282nd gan
Rockets 120, Bulls 97
CHICAGO James Harden score
26 points and Jeremy Lin added 20
points and 11 assists to lead the Hous
Rockets to a 120-97 win over the
Chicago Bulls.
Omer Asik returned to the United C
ter and had a double-double with 20
points and 18 rebounds in his first trip
back to Chicago since signing with the
Rockets in the offseason.
The Rockets starters all scored in d
ble figures. Chandler Parsons added
points and Marcus Morris had 10.
Houston has won six of seven.
The Rockets had been just 3-7 on t
road entering Tuesday, but a strong sE
ond quarter turned the holiday match
into a blowout. The Rockets outscored
the Bulls 31-19 in the period to break
game open.


have an impact on those young
people."
The running backs may have
much to say in deciding how this
game plays out.
Andrews has run for 1,609 yards
and 11 touchdowns this year He's
also a receiving threat and returns
kickoffs and punts. He has 2,977 all-
purpose yards on the season, just
273 behind the record set by Barry
Sanders.
Central Michigan's Zurlon Tipton
has 1,391 yards rushing and 19 TDs,
258 yards receiving and another
score.
"I like that whole battle-of-the-
backs thing," Tipton said. "It's going
to be a good battle, and I'm looking
forward to it."



SOptimism


f at Penn


| State

Important

offieasonfor

Nittany Lions

Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Star linebacker Michael
Mauti's college football ca-
reer had just come to an end
in November when he spot-
ted the next generation of
Penn State football players.
So, he decided to do what
Mauti had done time and
again during his Nittany
Lions career: He helped
others, and imparted some
inspirational words along
the way
Adam Breneman, one of
the top tight end prospects
in the country, is one of
them, and he listened in-
tently Mauti indeed passed
the torch of leadership to
Breneman and some other
high school seniors on re-
cruiting trips to Happy Val-
ley that day, setting the tone
for a critical offseason at
Penn State.
Indeed, there is no bowl
game to rally around this
season. No sunny destination
dancing around in the Nit-
tany Lions' heads. No fun-
filled reward for all of their
hard work in this season of
recovery at Penn State.
But there is hope. There
is optimism. And there is
Year 2 of the Coach Bill
O'Brien era to sculpt.
No better time than the
present.
Under O'Brien, Penn
State finished an over-
achieving 8-4 with a second-
place finish in the Big Ten
Leaders Division. The Nit-
tany Lions went 6-2 in con-
ference, and likely would
have been a lock for a New
Year's Day bowl game. As it
is, Penn State is not in a
bowl for the first time in
eight seasons.
But there is much to build
on. An emotional 24-21 over-
Press time win, for instance, over
dler Wisconsin in the finale sent
the program into the offsea-
son on a high note.
*ks And O'Brien will need
that in his first full offseason
to secure a recruiting class
nical amid scholarship cuts. The
ts sanctions levied in July
on for the Jerry Sandusky child
molestation scandal- limit
after Penn State's recruiting
ded classes to no more than 15 a
a year for the next four years,
starting with the 2013 class
-7 to be signed in early Febru-
r in ary Most teams can sign 25.
or There is also a four-year
postseason ban to digest.
O'Brien will also need to
find new leaders. Mauti was
the one of a group of seniors
ie. who helped keep most of the
team together in the fren-
zied weeks after the NCAA
d announced the punishment.
Breneman, a highly
ton touted senior from Cedar
Cliff High in Camp Hill, Pa.,
has a chance to be in that
en- leadership mix someday He
has been part of a contin-
gent of recruits who have


been vocal about keeping
their commitments despite
the penalties.
ou- "Now, it's our turn to
23 come in, and, in a couple
years, lead the program,"
Breneman said recently, re-
he counting Mauti's postgame
ec- words to him. "That was def-
Jp initely very motivating to
d talk to him.
the "It's a huge thing. Big
shoes to follow up."


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Glantz-Culver Line
For Dec. 26
NCAA Football
Tonight
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
W. Kentucky 6 5Y2 (57) Cent. Michigan
Thursday
Military Bowl
At Washington
San Jose St. 7Y2 7 (43Y2) Bowling Green
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati 11 7 (60) Duke
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
UCLA +1 1 (80Y2) Baylor
Friday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
La.-Monroe 6 7 (61) Ohio
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech 1 212 (41) Rutgers
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas Tech 13 13 (57) Minnesota
Saturday
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Air Force +1 2 (61) Rice
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Arizona St. 13 14Y2 (56) Navy
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
West Virginia 3Y2 3Y2 (73Y2) Syracuse
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon St. 1 2Y2 (57Y2) Texas
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
TCU 1 212 (40Y2) Michigan St.
Monday
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt 5 7 (51 2) NC State
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Southern Cal 10 10 (64) Georgia Tech
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Iowa St. +3 1 (51)CTulsa
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
LSU 3 4Y2 (59) Clemson
Tuesday
Heart of Dallas Bowl
Oklahoma St. 18 16Y2 (70) Purdue
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Miss. St. 2 2 (52) N'western
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina 4 6 (48) Michigan
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia 8 10 (60Y2) Nebraska
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 6 6Y2 (47Y2) Wisconsin
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Florida St. 15 13 (58Y2) N. Illinois
Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida 131Y214 (45Y2) Louisville
Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Oregon 9Y2 9 (75Y2) Kansas St.
Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M 3 4Y2 (72Y2) Oklahoma
Jan. 5
Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Mississippi 1Y2 312 (5212) Pittsburgh
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas St. +1 4 (61Y2) Kent St.
Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Alabama 7Y2 9Y2 (41Y2) Notre Dame
NFL
Sunday
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
at Buffalo 3 3Y2 (40) N.Y. Jets
at N. England11 10 (48) Miami
at Cincinnati 3 3 (41) Baltimore
at Pittsburgh OFF OFF (OFF) Cleveland
Houston 5Y2 6Y2 (4612) at Indianapolis
at Tennessee 5Y2 4 (42) Jacksonville
at N.Y. Giants 9Y2 7Y2 (47) Philadelphia
at Washington 3Y2 3 (50) Dallas
Chicago 3 3 (44Y2) at Detroit
Green Bay 3 3 (46Y2) at Minnesota
at Atlanta OFF OFF (OFF) Tampa Bay
at N. Orleans 4 5 (54) Carolina
at Denver 16 16 (42) Kansas City
at San Diego OFF OFF (OFF) Oakland
atSanFran. 15 1612 (39) Arizona
at Seattle 10 10Y2 (41) St. Louis
Off Key
Cleveland and Pittsburgh QBs questionable
Atlanta may rest players for the playoffs
Oakland QB questionable



NFL standings


y-New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

y-Houston
x-Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

y-Baltimore
x-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


Washington
Dallas
N.Y Giants
Philadelphia

y-Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

y-Green Bay
Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit


x-San Fran.
x-Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona


AFC
East
W L T
11 4 0
7 8 0
6 9 0
5 10 0
South
W L T
12 3 0
10 5 0
5 10 0
2 13 0
North
W L T
10 5 0
9 6 0
7 8 0
5 10 0
West
W L T
12 3 0
6 9 0
4 11 0
2 13 0
NFC
East
W L T
9 6 0
8 7 0
8 7 0
4 11 0
South
W L T
13 2 0
7 8 0
6 9 0
6 9 0
North
W L T
11 4 0
9 6 0
9 6 0
4 11 0
West
W L T
10 4 1
10 5 0
7 7 1
5 10 0


Pct PF
.733 529
.467 288
.400 272
.333 316

Pct PF
.800 400
.667 329
.333 292
.133 235
Pct PF
.667 381
.600 368
.467 312
.333 292

Pct PF
.800 443
.400 326
.267 269
.133 208


Pct PF
.600 408
.533 358
.533 387
.267 273

Pct PF
.867 402
.467 423
.400 367
.400 313

Pct PF
.733 399
.600 342
.600 349
.267 348

Pct PF
.700 370
.667 392
.500 286
.333 237


x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
Saturday's Game
Atlanta 31, Detroit 18
Sunday's Games
Green Bay 55, Tennessee 7
Indianapolis 20, Kansas City 13
New Orleans 34, Dallas 31, OT
Minnesota 23, Houston 6
Carolina 17, Oakland 6


SCOREBOARD


FOr thIe re cord


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
S:: 6-4-2
.*:... CASH 3 (late)
s5-2-0
.. *,^ PLAY 4 (early)
0-6-7-0
PLAY 4 (late)

FANTASY 5
1-30-32-33-36
MEGA MONEY
26 38 42 43
Fora Lofttey MEGA BALL
7


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) New Orleans Hornets at Orlando Magic
7 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Charlotte Bobcats
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Clippers
(Taped)
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Houston Rockets at Chicago Bulls (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Little Caesars Bowl Central Michigan
vs. Western Kentucky
SOCCER
9:55 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Manchester
United vs. Newcastle United

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Correction


In Tuesday's Girls Golfer of the Year finalists article, Lecanto
junior Jennifer Hafner was misidentified. The Chronicle regrets
the error.


Miami 24, Buffalo 10
Cincinnati 13, Pittsburgh 10
New England 23, Jacksonville 16
Washington 27, Philadelphia 20
St. Louis 28, Tampa Bay 13
San Diego 27, N.Y. Jets 17
Denver 34, Cleveland 12
Chicago 28, Arizona 13
Baltimore 33, N.Y. Giants 14
Seattle 42, San Francisco 13
Sunday, Dec. 30
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
Miami at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 16
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds TD
Manning, DEN 554 377 4355 34
Brady, NWE 601 379 4543 32
Roethlis., PIT 426 269 3131 23
Schaub, HOU 508 326 3733 22
Flacco, BAL 523 3133783 22
Dalton, CIN 513 3193591 26
P Rivers, SND 510 325 3455 24
C. Palmer, OAK 565 3454018 22
Fitzpatrick, BUF 479 294 3175 23
Hassel., TEN 221 138 1367 7
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG
Charles, KAN 271 1456 5.37 91t
A. Foster, HOU 335 1328 3.96 46
Ridley, NWE 270 1189 4.40 41
Johnson, TEN 255 1187 4.65 94t
Spiller, BUF 183 1185 6.48 62
R. Rice, BAL 254 1138 4.48 46
Green-Ellis, CIN 278 1094 3.94 48
Greene, NYJ 257 989 3.85 36
Re. Bush, MIA 219 960 4.38 65t
Richardson, CLE 267 950 3.56 32t
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG
Welker, NWE 110 1260 11.5 59
Wayne, ND 102 1315 12.9 33
Johnson, HOU 100 1457 14.6 60t
A.. Green, CIN 95 1324 13.9 73t
Thomas, DEN 87 1312 15.1 71t
Decker, DEN 78 988 12.7 55
B. Myers, OAK 75 753 10.0 29
Johnson, BUF 73 935 12.8 63
B. Lloyd, NWE 73 902 12.4 53
H. Miller, PIT 71 816 11.5 43
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret
A. Foster, HOU 16 14 2 0
Richardson, CLE 12 11 1 0
Decker, DEN 11 0 11 0
A.. Green, CIN 11 0 11 0
Gronkowski, NWE 10 0 10 0
R. Rice, BAL 10 9 1 0
Ridley, NWE 10 10 0 0
De.Thomas, DEN 9 0 9 0
H. Miller, PIT 8 0 8 0
Re. Bush, MIA 8 6 2 0
Kicking
PAT FG LG
Gostkowski, NWE 62-62 29-35 53
S.Graham, HOU 44-44 28-34 51
Tucker, BAL 40-40 29-31 56
M. Prater, DEN 50-50 25-31 53
Janikowski, OAK 22-22 31-34 57
P Dawson, CLE 28-28 28-29 53
Suisham, PIT 31-31 27-30 52
Vinatieri, IND 33-33 26-33 53
Bironas, TEN 30-30 24-30 53
Lindell, BUF 35-35 21-22 50
NFC leaders
Week 16
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD
Rodgers, GBY 512 343 3930 35
Griffin Ill, WAS 375 249 3100 20
Ale. Smith, SNF 217 152 1731 13
M. Ryan, ATL 571 394 4481 31
R. Wilson, SEA 374 237 2868 25
Brees, NOR 627 393 4781 39
Romo, DAL 611 405 4685 26
Newton, CAR 452 264 3621 19
Manning, NYG 515 308 3740 21
Bradford, STL 509 303 3450 20
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG
Peterson, MIN 314 1898 6.04 82t
M. Lynch, SEA 2971490 5.02 77t
Morris, WAS 302 1413 4.68 39t
Martin, TAM 291 1312 4.51 70t
Gore, SNF 238 1146 4.82 37
Forte, CHI 224 991 4.42 46
Jackson, STL 246 990 4.02 46


Bradshaw, NYG 205 908 4.43 37
L. McCoy, PHL 190 795 4.18 34
M. Turner, ATL 216 782 3.62 43
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG
Johnson, DET 117 1892 16.2 53
B. Marshall, CHI 113 1466 13.0 56
Witten, DAL 103 983 9.5 36
D. Bryant, DAL 88 1311 14.9 85t
Gonzalez, ATL 88 889 10.1 25
R.White, ATL 871309 15.0 59
Cruz, NYG 82 1040 12.7 80t
Cobb, GBY 80 954 11.9 39t
Colston, NOR 78 1102 14.1 60
Crabtree, SNF 77 933 12.1 38t
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret
Jones, GBY 13 0 13 0
D. Bryant, DAL 12 0 12 0
M. Lynch, SEA 12 11 1 0
A. Peterson, MIN 11 11 0 0
B. Marshall, CHI 11 0 11 0
Do. Martin, TAM 11 10 1 0
Ju.Jones, ATL 10 0 10 0
Morris, WAS 10 10 0 0
M.Turner, ATL 10 9 1 0
Rudolph, MIN 9 0 9 0
Kicking
PAT FG LG
Tynes, NYG 40-40 33-39 50
M. Bryant, ATL 42-42 32-37 55
Hanson, DET 35-35 31-35 53
Walsh, MIN 32-32 32-35 56
Akers, SNF 41-41 27-38 63
D. Bailey, DAL 36-36 28-30 51
Barth, TAM 38-38 25-30 57
Hauschka, SEA 44-46 22-25 52
Henery, PHL 24-25 27-30 49
Crosby, GBY 46-46 19-31 54



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
New York 20 8 .714
Brooklyn 14 13 .519
Boston 14 13 .519
Philadelphia 13 15 .464


Toronto


Miami
Atlanta
Orlando
Charlotte
Washington


Indiana
Chicago
Milwaukee
Detroit
Cleveland


9 19 .321
Southeast Division
W L Pct
19 6 .760
16 9 .640
12 15 .444
7 20 .259
3 22 .120
Central Division
W L Pct
16 12 .571
15 12 .556
14 12 .538
9 21 .300
6 23 .207


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 21 8 .724
Memphis 18 7 .720
Houston 15 12 .556
Dallas 12 16 .429
New Orleans 5 22 .185
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 21 6 .778


Denver
Minnesota
Utah
Portland


L.A. Clippers
Golden State
L.A. Lakers
Phoenix
Sacramento


15 13 .536
13 12 .520
15 14 .517
13 13 .500
Pacific Division
W L Pct
21 6 .778
18 10 .643
14 14 .500
11 17 .393
9 18 .333


Tuesday's Games
Boston 93, Brooklyn 76
L.A. Lakers 100, New York 94
Miami 103, Oklahoma City 97
Houston 120, Chicago 97
Denver at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Washington, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Toronto at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.
New York at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Dallas at Oklahoma City 8 p.m.
Boston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


HEAT
Continued from Page B1

There was a fast start by
the reigning champions, a
one-handed dunk by James
on an offensive rebound that
will be added to his copious
highlight reel, a scrum after a
hard foul that led to double-
technicals on Wade and
Ibaka early in the fourth, an
easy rally by the Thunder
from an early double-digit
deficit, and even a jawing
match between Durant and
James in the final minutes.
Such was the intensity that
James slumped over the
scorer's table with 1:08 left,
exhausted.
Oh, and there was a wild
finish, as well.
Wade lost the ball on an ill-
advised, behind-the-back
dribble, and the turnover set
up Durant for a two-handed
dunk that got the Thunder
within 96-95 with 44.1 sec-
onds remaining.
Needing a stop on the next
trip, the Thunder forgot to




SMU
Continued from Page B1

Hunt leading the way He
was voted the game's MVP
"We tried some slide pro-
tections to 92 (Hunt). You
know, they beat us," Fresno
State coach Tim DeRuyter
said. "We tried going empty
to spread things out and get
it out quick, we tried to max
protect Everything we tried
didn't work."
Fresno State, the Moun-
tain West Conference cham-
pion, has lost its last four
bowl games.
SMU, which went 25 years
without a bowl after its
NCAA death penalty, now




NFL
Continued from Page B1

A year ago, Manning was
in the midst of four neck op-
erations to fix a nerve injury
that had caused his right
arm to atrophy and had
sidelined him for an entire
season. Soon, he would say
a tearful farewell to Indi-
anapolis, a city he'd put
back on the NFL map, and
hook up with John Elway in
Denver
Peterson's left knee was
still swollen after he'd
shredded it on Christmas
Eve, an injury similar to the
one Charles suffered earlier
last season. Yet both would
defy medicine and conven-
tional wisdom alike to re-
bound as better runners
than they were before get-
ting hurt.
Pagano's fight started
three months ago when it
was disclosed he had can-
cer, forcing the first-year
Colts coach to take time off
for chemotherapy treat-
ments. He returned to work
this week, taking the reins
from assistant Bruce Arians,
who guided the team to a
surprising playoff berth in
his absence.
"When I asked for Bruce
to take over, I asked for him
to kick some you-know-what
and to do great. Damn
Bruce, you had to go and
win nine games?" Pagano
said. "Tough act to follow."
If all goes well at practice
this week, Pagano will be on
the sideline for the regular-
season finale against Hous-
ton. That's a final tuneup for
the AFC wild-card playoffs
that nobody saw coming for
the Colts so soon after cut-
ting ties with Manning, who
switched teams, coaches,
cities and colors and didn't
miss a beat in 2012.
Despite a new supporting


play defense instead.
Kendrick Perkins and Ibaka
both were confused on the
ensuing Miami possession,
and Bosh was left alone to
take a pass from James and
throw down a dunk that re-
stored Miami's three-point
edge.
Oklahoma City got within
one when Durant made a
jumper over James, but no
closer Ray Allen's two free
throws with 15.6 seconds left
made it 100-97, and Miami's
last three points came from
the line after a Thunder foul
and Westbrook getting hit
with a technical for punching
a table after arguing that he
was fouled on his 3-point try
in the final moments.
While the stars were stars,
the Heat got help from one
unexpected source.
Chalmers was making every-
thing, even unintended plays.
Allen lost possession on
what looked to be a pass to no
one, but Chalmers picked up
the bouncing ball on the right
wing, whirled and made a 3-
pointer putting Miami up
86-79 with 8:14 left


has played in a school-
record four straight bowls,
winning three of them. Hunt
was a mystery when that run
started in 2009, a gold medal-
ist in the shot put and discus
in Beijing at the 2006 Junior
World Championships who
came to SMU for track and
field and turned to football
when it was his only hope of
scholarship money
SMU coach June Jones has
a knack for taking a chance
on athletes from other sports,
and he liked what he saw,
from the 82-inch wing span to
the 4.7 speed in the 40.
"It's not hard for me to see
a world-class athlete who
can run like that, has
strength like that, has an arm
length like that," Jones said.


cast and a 36-year-old body
he insists continues to con-
found him, the quintessen-
tial quarterback has had
one of the best seasons in
his storied career Manning
set franchise or NFL
records just about every
week while completing 68
percent of his passes for
4,355 yards with 34 TDs and
just 11 interceptions.
And yet, he insists he's not
anything close to what he
used to be, that all he can do
is maximize what's left in a
body that's been slowed by
so many surgeons' scalpels,
and trips around the sun.
"I know you don't believe
me when I say this; I'm still
learning about myself phys-
ically and what I can do, it's
still the truth," Manning
said after guiding Denver to
its 10th straight win. "I still
have things that are harder
than they used to be, so
(there's) things I have to
work on from a rehab stand-
point and a strength stand-
point. That's just the way it
is and maybe that's the way
it's going to be from here on
out, I don't know."
Maybe Manning's being
modest, maybe he's sucker-
ing opponents into blitzing
him more often so he can
burn them again. Either
way, it's a remarkable re-
bound for a man whose
right arm was so weakened
after one of his neck surger-
ies that he could hardly
throw the football 15 yards.
Long before Manning
ever dreamed he'd be wear-
ing the orange-mane mus-
tang on his helmet instead
of the blue and white horse-
shoe, Manning met up with
college buddy Todd Helton
of the Colorado Rockies for
a workout during last year's
NFL lockout. They re-
treated to an indoor batting
cage at Coors Field with a
trainer in tow, and Man-
ning's first pass nose-dived


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 B3


In the end, that cushion
was necessary
The Heat came out flying,
opening a quick 13-2 lead
after making six of their first
seven shots. About all that
didn't go right for the Heat
early on was James commit-
ting a foul, the first time he
was called for a personal
since Dec. 8.
It happened 4:03 into the
game 254 minutes and 7
seconds of on-court time
since his last one when
James fouled Ibaka on a
dunk attempt
Chalmers had 12 points,
matching his season high, in
the opening quarter alone,
and that was also Miami's
lead after his layup for a 15-3
edge. When Durant headed
to the bench after being
called for his second per-
sonal, plus a technical, with
2:08 left in the first, the Heat
led 27-16.
But even with Durant out,
Oklahoma City scored the
last eight points of the quar-
ter, six of those coming from
the line in what became a
theme.


"The first scrimmage we had
... the only thing I didn't know
was if he was going to be
tough enough. The first play
we ran a trap and hit him
real hard, and he wanted to
fight I said, 'OK, we may
have a player here.'
"His best football is ahead
of him," Jones said. "I was
really excited, on a national
stage, for him to have that
kind of a game."
The Bulldogs turned in a
dud.
Fresno State, which had
averaged just over 47 points
in its last five games, was shut
out in the first half for the
first time in two years. Carr
was too busy running for his
life to get the Bulldogs into
any kind of offensive rhythm.


so badly that Helton told
him to quit goofing around.
Manning wasn't messing
with him. He was dead seri-
ous. His arm was shot, his
future in football in doubt A
few days later, he under-
went spinal fusion surgery
and would miss the entire
2011 season.
If doctors had told him
that was it, Manning said he
would have called it a ca-
reer without regret. But
they gave him a bit of hope
and that's all he needed to
embark on his comeback in
Colorado.
Coach John Fox, never
one to lobby for awards, sug-
gested this week that Man-
ning deserves a fifth MVP
honor for the numbers he's
put up, the obstacles he's
overcome, the shift of cul-
ture he's engineered.
Manning isn't interested
in talking about MVPs or
comeback awards. He just
wants enough wins to get a
shot at hoisting another
Lombardi Trophy in New
Orleans in six weeks.
Peterson, on the other
hand, is unabashedly clear
in his desire for some recog-
nition after overcoming torn
anterior cruciate and me-
dial collateral ligaments in
his left knee, requiring the
kind of reconstructive sur-
gery that usually turns dom-
inant players into ordinary
ones.
There's a long, long list of
players who had shortened
careers because of such in-
juries. But Peterson re-
turned to the Vikings lineup
less than nine months after
his operation, and with a
league-high 1,898 yards, he's
207 yards shy of Eric Dick-
erson's single-season
record. He can topple it
with another big game Sun-
day when Minnesota faces
Green Bay with a playoff
berth on the line for the
Vikings.


Associated Press
Kansas City Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles ran for 165 yards in the third quarter alone
against the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Queen delivers
message in 3D
LONDON-Queen
Elizabeth II has hailed
the holidays in a new di-
mension, delivering her
Christmas message for
the first time in 3D.
In the annual, prere-
corded broadcast, the
monarch paid tribute to
the armed forces, "whose
sense of duty takes them
away from family and
friends" over the holi-
days, and expressed grat-
itude for the outpouring
of enthusiasm for her Di-
amond Jubilee
celebrations.
The queen said she
was struck by the
"strength of fellowship
and friendship" shown by
well-wishers to mark her
60 years on the throne.
"It was humbling that
so many chose to mark
the anniversary of a duty
which passed to me 60
years ago," she said as
footage showed crowds
lining the Thames River
in the rain earlier this
year for a boat pageant.
"People of all ages took
the trouble to take part in
various ways and in many
nations."
The queen also re-
flected on Britain's host-
ing of the Olympic games
in 2012, praising the
"skill, dedication, train-
ing and teamwork of our
athletes" and singling out
the volunteers who de-
voted themselves "to
keeping others safe, sup-
ported and comforted."
Elizabeth's message
aired shortly after she at-
tended a traditional
church service at St.
Mary Magdelene Church
on her sprawling San-
dringham estate in
Norfolk.
Wearing a turquoise
coat and matching hat,
the monarch rode to
church in a Bentley, ac-
companied by grand-
daughters Beatrice and
Eugenie. Her husband,
Prince Philip, walked
from the house to the
church with other mem-
bers of the royal family
Three familiar faces
were missing from the
family outing. Prince
William is spending the
holiday with his pregnant
wife Kate and his in-laws
in the southern England
village of Bucklebury
Prince Harry is serving
with British troops in
Afghanistan.
After the church serv-
ice, the royals usually
gather to watch the
queen's prerecorded tele-
vision broadcast, a tradi-
tion that began with a
radio address by King
George V in 1932.
The queen has made a
prerecorded Christmas
broadcast on radio since
1952 and on television
since 1957. She writes the
speeches herself and the
broadcasts mark the rare
occasion on which the
queen voices her own
opinion without govern-
ment consultation.
Her switch to 3D was
not the only technologi-
cal leap for prominent
British figures this
Christmas.
The Archbishops of
Canterbury and York
chose to tweet their ser-
mons for the first time, in
order to bring Christmas
to a new digital
audience.
From wire reports


Mediocre 'Guidance'


Hi0 01


Associated Press
Billy Crystal, left, Kyle Harrison Breitkopf, center, Joshua Rush in a scene from the film "Parental Guidance."

New Billy Crystal-Bette Midler comedy tolerable, uninspired


MICHAEL RECHTSHAFFEN
The Hollywood Reporter

he schmaltz is piled on thick,
and if the comedy were any
broader it would require an
Imax screen, but still there's some-
thing touching about how hard
Billy Crystal and Bette Midler hus-
tle to peddle the threadbare mate-
rial that makes "Parental
Guidance" a perfectly tolerable, if
uninspired, moviegoing
experience.
As "the other grandparents" who
are given a golden opportunity to
bond with their seldom-seen
grandchildren, Billy and Bette
work double-time, well aware that
it's not just the juvenile characters
they have to entertain, but also the
paying audiences who could count
on both of them for a good laugh
back in the day
That they manage to pull their
weight even when the achingly for-
mulaic plotting threatens to drag
them under is a testament to their
"let's-put-on-a-show" spirit. The
end result should appeal to audi-
ences, including bonding grand-
parents and grandkids, looking for


a little undemanding holiday
cheer
Crystal is Artie Decker, who has
just lost his longtime gig as "De
Voice of the Fresno Grizzlies"
when the minor-league baseball
team decided to upgrade the outfit
with the sort of talent that knows
its way around a Facebook page or
a Twitter account
Already despondent, he's not ex-
actly jumping up and down over
the news that he and his wife
Diane (Midler) have been re-
cruited to babysit their daughter
Alice's (Marisa Tomei) three kids
when she and her tech-geek hus-
band Phil (Tom Everett Scott) get a
last-minute opportunity to have
some out-of-town alone time.
As expected, uptight Alice's no-
sugar-allowed helicopter parent-
ing clashes mightily with Artie
and Diane's old-school approach
to child-rearing, not to mention
the fact that Phil has programmed
his smart home to be intuitive
within an inch of its inhabitants'
lives.
Also as expected are the result-
ing gags built around technologi-
cally challenged Artie. Fortunately,


old pro Crystal comes armed with
an arsenal of rim-shot-ready re-
joinders that hit the mark more
than they miss.
While his character has been
given more of an emotional arc
than Midler's (unsurprising, since
the genesis of "Parental Guidance"
came from a newly minted grand-
parenting experience in producer
Crystal's life), it's still nice to see
Midler strutting her stuff in her
first onscreen comedy role in
years.
And Tomei is always a welcome
presence, even when she's saddled
with what's essentially a one-note
character for most of the film.
It would have been nice if direc-
tor Andy Fickman ("Race to Witch
Mountain") and husband-and-wife
screenwriters Lisa Addario and
Joe Syracuse ("Surf's Up") could
have mined some fresher stuff
from this frequently played ball-
game, but at least when you've got
Crystal calling the shots, you can
still count on the occasional
change-up.
"Parental Guidance," a 20th
Century Fox release, is rated PG
for some rude humor 104 minutes.


Klugman, Durning fondly remembered


FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer


NEW YORK What a
couple of mugs, sporting
less-than-perfect physiques
in the bargain.
But was there anything
lovelier than Jack Klugman
or Charles Durning doing
what they did for an
audience?
Rumpled Klugman ex-
ploding at his prissy flat-
mate Tony Randall in the
long-running sitcom "The
Odd Couple." Portly Durn-
ing hoofing, fleet of foot, and
singing how "Ewwwww, I
love to do a little sidestep"
in the film "The Best Little
Whorehouse in Texas."
Each was a luminous dis-
play of the extraordinary
possibilities of the ordinary
Klugman and Durning
(both of whom died Monday,
Klugman at 90 in Los Ange-
les, Durning at 89 in New
York) spent storied careers
building catalogues of roles
that classed them indis-
putably as "character
actors."
Even with a certain "al-
ways-a-bridesmaid-never-a-
bride" taint attached to it,


Birthday Friends are likely to play small but important
roles in both your personal and work-related affairs in the
year ahead. Your chums might allow you to realize a num-
ber of things that couldn't be achieved otherwise.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't take anything for
granted where your work or career is concerned. Chances
are, what you believe to be a sure thing might not turn out
like you anticipate.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you're down in the dumps
for some reason, you could easily allow negative thinking to
dominate your thoughts. Don't predict gloomy results with-
out justification.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Make it a point not to mix
business with pleasure, especially when it comes to your
friends. Even a project with someone whom you totally
trust, things could still go wrong.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It'll be up to you to take


the term
"character
actor" com-
mands re-
spect and
affection
among au-
diences,
even audi- Jack
ence mem- Klugman
bers who
may not quite realize their
level of investment in such
artistry
Traditional stardom -
"leading man" status is
conferred on the actors who
embody a fantasy, an ideal.
They are famously out of
reach of a ticket holder or a
couch potato, other than
through sitting back and
watching from afar Dreams
are a powerful engine of
Hollywood, and these actors
- whether Clark Gable or
Will Smith are thrilling
dream agents.
But there's another breed
of actor the group in
which Klugman and Durn-
ing reign supreme who
sustains us in more comfort-
able ways. If a star like Brad
Pitt stirs the frisson of eter-
nal longing in the audience
(oh, to be with him, or be


Today's HOROSCOPE
measures to renegotiate a matter that isn't all that you were
told it would be. Unless you act, you'll have to live with the
dismal original terms.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Unless you are well organ-
ized and systematic, you're likely to do a bum job on what-
ever it is you're trying to accomplish. You'll need to fix what
isn't right.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Rewards can be had if you're
prepared to work for them. Conversely, if you gamble on
things getting done without your help, you'll be disap-
pointed.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't ignore your mate's
suggestions if you know they come from a knowledgeable
place. It'll be you who will be held accountable for the re-
sults.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't give what you would like to
do priority over any tasks given to you by your superiors.


...l him!), a
character
actor serves
another
need: cine-
maticc
kinship.
Klugman
Charles sol v i n g
During crimes as a
lab geek on
his series "Quincy, M.E.," or
During as a stressed-out
cop ("Dog Day Afternoon")
or a romantic who's smitten
with Dustin Hoffman in
drag ("Tootsie")- these are
actors we identify with, in-
stantly and eagerly Nothing
seems to stand between us
and what they do. They, with
their just-coping-with-life
heroics, show us who we
are, or could be if we try a
little harder (or warn us of
the jam that might befall us
if we don't). They are our
proxies.
They never go out of style.
They never lose their ap-
peal. They are never put
away because their looks
have faded or their waist-
line thickened. We stick
with them, just as they stick
with us. (Durning was work-
ing into his late 80s in a re-


curring role as the irascible
father of Denis Leary's fire-
fighter protagonist on the
drama "Rescue Me"). In this
way, too, they resemble
everybody we truly love: We
love them in every phase of
their lives.
Like most of us, the char-
acter actor seldom if ever
gets the girl or saves the
world. They aren't flashy.
But with their own special
magnetism, they remind us,
in role after role, that
everyday people are spe-
cial, too.
Sure, we love being daz-
zled by Hollywood glamour
We love stars who make us
weak in the knees.
But an actor like Klug-
man or Durning bears a
message that applies far be-
yond the realm of Tinsel-
town, a message worth
remembering with every
performance: Beauty is, as
beauty does.
Now, with their passing,
we don't feel the pain of loss
as much as gratitude for all
the happy hours shared
with Durning and Klugman.
We are so glad for knowing
them. Never mind we never
met


You'll need to take your responsibilities seriously.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you are lax and wasteful in
the management of your resources over the next few days,
you could end up in a serious financial bind. Try to be more
careful.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -You can bank on others being
peeved if you give them reason to believe that your per-
sonal interests are far more important than anything in
which they're involved.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) It's important that you don't
believe everything you hear, because there's likely to be
someone who wants to set you up to be a purveyor of mis-
information.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Investigate thoroughly
any undertaking that requires you to provide cash before
getting involved. Not only does this include a social event,
but any commercial affair as well.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B3.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24
Fantasy 5: 5 14 22 23 28
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 354 $555
3-of-5 10,612 $18
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23
Fantasy 5:1 2 3 13 17
5-of-5 1 winner $199,099.09
4-of-5 496 $65
3-of-5 11,392 $7.50
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22
Powerball: 1 18 35 39 44
Powerball: 11
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 5 winners $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 18 20 35 36 37 39
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 40 $4,725
4-of-6 1,564 $89
3-of-6 33,520 $5.50
Fantasy 5:4 7 8 18 27
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 497 $555
3-of-5 14,562 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Dec.
26, the 361st day of 2012.
There are five days left in the
year. The seven-day African-
American holiday Kwanzaa
begins today. This is Boxing
Day.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 26, 1972, the
33rd president of the United
States, Harry S. Truman,
died in Kansas City, Mo., at
age 88.
On this date:
In 1776, the British suf-
fered a major defeat in the
Battle of Trenton during the
Revolutionary War.
In 1799, former President
George Washington was eu-
logized by Col. Henry Lee as
"first in war, first in peace and
first in the hearts of his
countrymen."
In 1908, Jack Johnson be-
came the first African-Ameri-
can boxer to win the world
heavyweight championship
as he defeated Canadian
Tommy Burns in Sydney,
Australia.
In 1996, 6-year-old beauty
queen JonBenet Ramsey
was found beaten and stran-
gled in the basement of her
family's home in Boulder,
Colo. (To date, the slaying re-
mains unsolved.)
In 2004, some 230,000
people, mostly in southern
Asia, were killed by a
tsunami triggered by the
world's most powerful earth-
quake in 40 years beneath
the Indian Ocean.
Ten years ago: It was an-
nounced that West Virginia
resident Jack Whittaker Jr.
had won the $314.9 million
Powerball lottery jackpot, at
that time a record prize.
Five years ago: Joe
Dolan, one of Ireland's first
pop music stars, died in sub-
urban Dublin at age 68.
One year ago: Dr. Luis
Bonilla, a heart surgeon from
a Mayo Clinic in Florida flying
across the northern corner of
the state to retrieve a heart
for transplant, was killed with
two other people when their
helicopter crashed.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Caroll Spinney (Big Bird on
TV's "Sesame Street") is 79.
Rock musician Lars Ulrich
(Metallica) is 49.
Thought for Today: "The
people can never understand
why the President does not
use his supposedly great
power to make 'em behave.


Well all the President is, is a
glorified public relations man
who spends his time flatter-
ing, kissing and kicking peo-
ple to get them to do what
they are supposed to do any-
way." President Harry S.
Truman (1884-1972).


j











DU CACITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Orange in memorial: Students remember lost teacher

Robert Littman passed away in January from leukemia


LANE VICK
Special to the Chronicle
At 2 p.m. Wednesday at Crystal
River Middle School, students
dressed in orange came together
shaking their bracelet-clad wrists
high in the air as chimes and lit-
tle silver bells rang out in mem-
ory of Robert Littman, a beloved
teacher who died early in Janu-
ary 2012.
The "Orange you Glad it's Al-
most Christmas?" event was
planned and implemented by the
School Activities Planning Club
not only to commemorate
Littman, but also to raise aware-
ness about leukemia, the disease
he so nobly fought.
Littman, as school technology
teacher, was known as "the tech


guy" to students
and is fondly re-
membered. Stu-
dents remember
him for his
humor and for
making learning
fun. His wife,
Robert Ellen Littman,
Littman and children
were on hand for the bell-ringing
memorial.
The School Activities Club
plans to be a part of the Relay for
Life and has raised $1,685 to date
for its contribution. Members
created bracelets of orange and
white beads or cords with tiny
bells that sold for a small price
and raised $130 to be added to
the Relay for Life fund.
The club has also sponsored


the sale of pink ribbons for breast
cancer and liquid whiteout sales
for lung cancer, not only earning
money for the cause but also rais-
ing awareness about the differ-
ent forms of the disease.
Sixteen club members (all
girls) sponsor a monthly raffle,
held an auction of pies and
cakes, sold candygrams and ben-
efited from yard sales.
They are planning a Jan. 29......
fashion show and, later, a spring
carnival. The fashion show is
open to all who want to model,
and the theme "Decades of
Hope" (the same theme as the MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Relay for Life) will feature stu- Crystal River Middle School students, each wearing a bright orange bracelet
dents wearing clothing from the with small bells attached, wave their arms to ring the bells last week for
'50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s and "Orange You Glad It's Almost Christmas," an event that honored former
Crystal River Middle School teacher Robert Uittman. Uittman died from leukemia
See Page C2 in January. The event was held to raise awareness about the disease.


The sounds of Christmas


Photographs by Matthew Beck

The Homosassa Elemen-
tary School chorus,
under the direction of
Ben Barlow and Donna
Olsen, entertained students
with the musical" 'Twas One
Crazy Night Before Christmas!"
The program featured a com-
pilation of song and dance
with lighthearted themes,
such as dreaming of Martha
Stewart sleeping on the floor
while extended family is in
town. Aaron Cheek served
as narrator, taking a time-
honored story and giving
it a twist.


At Lecanto High School, we're seeing silver


Silver is a common
color during the holi-
day season, and silver
also seems to be the current
"color" of Lecanto High
School for two reasons.
First, US News and World
Report awarded Lecanto
High School with a Silver
Medal this year, which
makes Lecanto one of the
best high schools in the na-
tion. Three criteria must be


met to make the list. First, a
high school needs to be per-
forming better than the aver-
age high school in its
respective state. Second, a
school's least advantaged
students need to be perform-
ing better than other "like"
students in that state.
If a school meets the first
two criteria, they are eligible
for the third criteria col-
lege readiness, which is


based on AP and IB success.
US News ranks Lecanto as
the 1,614th best school in the
nation. A cynical person
might scoff at that ranking,
but for a high school in a
small rural county like Cit-
rus, that is a great place to
start
Even better, though, is
Lecanto's ranking on the
Washington Post's High
School Challenge: Lecanto


High School is number 989 of
the best schools in America.
In this list, schools are
ranked by a simple method:
how many college level tests
(AP and IB) are taken di-
vided by the number of grad-
uates. Lecanto's average was
1.98 tests taken for every
graduating senior.
Silver is also an appropri-
ate color of distinction for
the Lecanto High School


Yearbook. For three consec-
utive years (2008-2010), the
yearbook at Lecanto High
School earned the Silver
Award from Columbia
Scholastic Press. In 2011, it
earned Most Outstanding
High School Yearbook, and
in 2012 it became a National
Sample Book for Balfour
Publishers.
See Page C2





C2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


Hoping to mend rent hearts, crafters send


mittens with a message to Newtown


Associated Press
"Chester Raccoon stood at
the edge of the forest and
cried. 'I don't want to go to
school,' he told his mother 'I
want to stay home with you. I
want to play with my friends.
And play with my toys. And
read my books. And swing on
my swing. Please may I stay
home with you?"'- "The
Kissing Hand," by Audrey
Penn.
NEW YORK- Imagining the
horror for Sandy Hook Elemen-
tary students when they walk
into their new school for the
first time, a Connecticut mom is
relying on Chester of the chil-
dren's classic "The Kissing Hand"
and the busy fingers of her fel-
low knitters to ease their way
Kim Piscatelli of East Hamp-
ton, Conn., hit on the idea of
sending a copy of the book for
each of the kids and a pair of
handmade mittens adorned
with a heart in one palm, signi-
fying the reassuring kiss left
there by the mother of scared,
sad Chester in the story written
by Audrey Penn.
Piscatelli, a 40-minute drive
from Newtown, sent out a call to
her friends, who called on their
friends. The project she thought
up just Sunday spread quickly
on Facebook and websites for
knitters and crafters, with the
first shipment of books and mit-
tens scheduled to land in New-
town the first week of January
"I thought, how are those
families ever going to get back
in a routine of sending their
children to school? If there
ever was a town that needed to
know about that book, it was
Newtown," said an over-
whelmed Piscatelli, who now
has a warehouse stacked with
1,600 copies of the book and
plenty of volunteers to sort,
pack and ship.



ORANGE
Continued from Page C1

today's fashions. There will
be a red carpet with cameras
flashing for arriving "celebri-
ties," a pre-event mixer, and
a post-show party with re-
freshments. Admission will
be on a donation basis. The
fashion show is 5 to 7 p.m. in
the school auditorium.


This undated publicity photo provided by Tanglewood Press shows
the cover of author Audrey Penn's book, "The Kissing Hand."


Others are hurriedly making
mittens, from California and
Canada to Florida and the U.S.
Virgin Islands, in time for the
start of classes in a once-shuttered
school in nearby Monroe. A
knitters' group in Georgia
pulled an all-night "knitathon"f
for the cause, Piscatelli said.
The book's publisher, Tangle-
wood Press, has donated the
books, along with enough
copies of a sequel dealing with
Chester's loss of a playmate for
teachers to read aloud.
In "The Kissing Hand," the
tearful boy is heading off to
school for the first time, but he
begs his mother to stay home.
She spreads his tiny fingers and

Abigail Hart, who teaches
sixth-grade world history,
eighth-grade American his-
tory, is ESE department head
and Relay for Life chair-
woman, leads the School Ac-
tivities Planning Club. She
has put together a 14-mem-
ber Relay for Life Crystal
River Middle School team.
Hart is assisted by Kelly Fil-
ipic, a mathematics teacher.
Ashten Williamson, a seventh-
grade student and club mem-


kisses him square in the palm
and tells him "whenever you
feel lonely and need a little lov-
ing from home, just press your
hand to your cheek and think,
'Mommy loves you."'
The story was first published
in 1993 by the Child Welfare
League of America, a Washing-
ton, D.C.-based coalition of
agencies and organizations
helping children at risk. Penn
had tried and failed for years to
get her story of Chester pub-
lished.
"At first, no bookstore, no
wholesaler would carry it," said
Peggy Tierney, who worked at
the league and took Penn with
her after starting Tanglewood.

ber, is excited about raising
money for Relay for Life. Club
members thought the bell-
ringing memorial a positive
idea and a good way to com-
memorate Mr. Littman, re-
calling how much he meant
to the school. Members like
Grace Little enjoy planning
events and creating an
awareness of people's needs.
Eighth-grader Khiara Har-
vey explained that she "liked
to be helpful" and to feel that


"Then kindergarten teachers
discovered it, word spread,
people started going into stores
trying to find copies, then
everyone started carrying it,
and by 1999 it was on the New
York Times best-seller list."
One of Piscatelli's first stops
in getting her mitten project off
the ground was to contact Penn,
who lives in Durham, N.C. She
recalled reading the story to
her own three kids when they
were younger
Penn, who lost a brother to
drowning when she was 13,
signed off on the combined
book-mitten project as soon as
Piscatelli contacted her
Piscatelli and dozens of knit-
ters who have contacted her
through the project's Facebook
page are pressing on to get the
books and mittens in the stu-
dents' hands. About 600 kids at-
tended Sandy Hook when
Lanza opened fire, but Pis-
catelli plans to share mittens
and books with all the school-
children of Newtown.
"The original request was for
hand-knit mittens with a heart
knit in, embroidered on or
sewn on," she said. "The reality
is we have people sewing polar
fleece mittens, mittens made from
recycled sweaters, store-bought
mittens. Every pair of handmade
or store-bought mittens will
have a heart sewn on if it isn't
there when we receive them."
When a company called
Oceanhouse Media learned of
Piscatelli's idea they released a
digital version of "The Kissing
Hand" early and free of cost in
the iTunes app store. Piscatelli
has also heard from the loved
ones of grown-up volunteers on
the ground in Newtown.
"I got a call from a woman
who said 'My father is with the
Red Cross,"' Piscatelli said. "'He's
a psychologist and is there now
and I really think he needs a
pair of Kissing Hand mittens."

she could make a difference.
Assistant principal Inge
Frederick is especially proud
of the students in the School
Activities Planning Club.
"In a time when young
people are often thought to
be self-centered, the activi-
ties these kids do show how
much they care about their
community," she said. "They
aren't thinking of them-
selves. They are thinking of
others."


= Students fTHE MONTH=
Gwendolyn Lim and Jeremiah Lee have
been named Students of the Month for De-
cember, it was announced by Lecanto High
School and West Citrus Elks Lodge No. 2693.
Gwendolyn, 17, is the daughter of Troy
and Genevieve Lim of Beverly Hills, Fla.
Gwendolyn is a three-
year member of the Na-
tional Honor Society and a
two-year member of the
WSpanish Club, Future
Florida Educators of
-America, and Ugandan
Pearls, currently serving
as secretary She is also a
Gwendolyn member of Colors for
Lrn CASA. Gwendolyn is a
member of the International Baccalaure-
ate program and was recently recognized
as an AP scholar with honors.
Academically, she maintains a 4.77
weighted GPA, has been on the Principal's
Honor Roll throughout high school, re-
ceived the principal's award in kinesiology
and placed second in the Literary Fair
short story category
Athletically, Gwendolyn is a three-year
member of the LHS girls tennis team.
Her community service includes more
than 200 hours of volunteering at Central
Ridge Library, peer tutoring and piano ac-
companiment for her church choir
Gwendolyn plans to attend the Univer-
sity of South Florida to major in biomed-
ical sciences.
Jeremiah, 17, is the son of Scott and Ann
Lee of Hernando, Fla.
Jeremiah is a three-year
member of National
Honor Society and Inter-
act Club, currently serving
as vice president He is the
-"- creator/organizer of the
S/-- j two-year-old LHS Intra-
mural Sports Club. Jere-
17 miah has also participated
Jeremiah in the amateur Chess Club,
Lee Spanish Club, Key Club,
Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and the
Robotics Club. Last summer, Jeremiah rep-
resented Lecanto High School at Boys State.
Jeremiah maintains a 4.44 weighted
GPA, has been on the Principal's Honor
Roll throughout high school, and won first
place at Math Field Day his freshman year
He is a member of the International Bac-
calaureate program, serves as student rep-
resentative for the IB Parent Organization,
and is the webmaster for the official LHS
IB website, providing study guides and
other pertinent information for all grade
levels.
Athletically, Jeremiah is a three-year
member of the LHS swim and dive team,
serving as co-captain his junior year
Jeremiah's community service includes
volunteering as a peer tutor, bell-ringing
for the Salvation Army, delivering Meals on
Wheels to senior citizens, and working with
children at SALSA Summer Art Camp.
Jeremiah has been accepted to Baylor
University, Wheaton College and Sanford
University. He is currently undecided on
his college and his major
The Student of the Month program is
sponsored by the West Citrus Elks Lodge in
order to bring recognition to outstanding
youth in the area.


SILVER
Continued from Page C1

What is the secret to their
success? "Our success is be-
cause of our picture quality,
layouts, stories, and
themes," says Abigail Field-
ing, a junior who is the Club
Section Editor '"Also, Dr
Sylvester runs a strict
schedule which helps us
stay organized. Yearbook is
a great class, and I love to
see the excitement when
students get their copy."
Tyler Philolius, one of
three senior editors and a
talented Thespian, adds,
"We really have a hardwork-
ing staff that is a well-oiled
team. Going to the Yearbook
Seminar at the Florida
Aquarium last year kept us
informed of trending topics
and things we could add."
Upon graduating this May,
Tyler will definitely miss
being part of such a great
team. However, he looks for-
ward to his next step in life,
attending AMDA: College
and Conservatory of the
Performing Arts in Los An-
geles.
Silver is a good color and
a valuable metal. Lecanto
High School will continue to
work hard to improve.
Hopefully, in the not too dis-
tant future, Lecanto High
School will earn Gold-
given to the top 500 schools
in the nation!
Darrick Buettner is coor-
dinator of the IB program at
Lecanto High School.

SUBMISSION
DEADLINES
Follow these guidelines
to help ensure timely
publication of submit-
ted material.
Community notes: At
least one week in ad-
vance of the event.
Chalk Talk: 4 p.m.
Monday for publica-
tion Wednesday.


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*
..<





WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 C3


from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick


Adventure in Books


Snuggle Up and Read!


Are you looking forward to your long
school holiday? The Mini Page offers
exciting suggestions for reading during
your wintry days off from school.
A groundbreaking book
Fifty years ago, "The
Snowy Day" becam-
the first mainstream
book to feature an
African-American ch, Ii
as the hero. Hundr-, s
of kids and teachers
said the book helped Ezra Jack Keats
give black kids pride in themselves. It
won the Caldecott Medal.
Ezra Jack Keats was Jewish.
He grew up in a very poor area of
New York City and experienced
discrimination first-hand.
Before "The Snowy Day," he had
illustrated many books, but this was
the first book he also wrote. He saw
no books featuring kids who weren't
white, so he decided to write one
himself.
In "The Snowy
Day," a young boy
wakes up to find
his city covered
with exciting,
wonderful snow. W'


Jon Blake is the author of more
than 50 books for kids. He also teaches
creative writing in England.
In "The Last Free Cat,"
Jade adopts a stray
cat, even though it
is against the law for
anybody but the rich to
keep one. A cat flu has
supposedly spread to
people. Jade goes on
the run to save her cat.

Sean Callery is a journalist, teacher
and writer in England.


-t
in H I
In I he skii


"I Wonder Why There's
a Hole in the Sky and
Other Questions About
the Environment" is full
of fun facts about our
changing world.


Tim Green is a former NFL player
who has written several books about
sports.
In "Unstoppable,"
Harrison finally finds
a good foster home
and becomes a star
on his new junior high
football team. But
then cancer strikes,
and he has to fight
the odds again in
order to keep playing.


Nancy Shaw has written eight other
books for kids, including "Sheep in a
Jeep."
In "Elena's Story," a
girl in Guatemala tries
to do well in school,
but she has to take
care of her little sister
and brother. She
struggles to find time
to study.

Jim Murphy has written more
than 35 books for kids, including the
Newbery Honor Book "The Great Fire."
"Truce" is the true story
of a Christmas Eve during
World War I. Against
orders, thousands of
German and Allied
soldiers stopped fighting
and celebrated together.
The Germans sang "Silent
Qjt, bys'.. Night" in German. The
S--w,n.."'.by Allies joined in, in English.

Ally Condie taught high school
English before becoming a writer.
"Reached" is the final .....
book in the "Matched" A
trilogy. Three teens live
in a world where the I
government controls
everything, from who
people marry, to their
jobs, to what they eat.
But rebellion grows.


SThe Mini aee
Betty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large


* pencil letter B sea horse


* letter C


Meet Suraj Sharma
Suraj Sharma stars as Pi in the
movie "Life of Pi." In the story, Pi is
lost at sea with a tiger in the boat.
Suraj, 19, had not acted until this
movie. Before getting the role, he was
a college student studying philosophy
in India. He grew up in New Delhi,
India. His brother is an actor. His
parents are mathematicians.
For the movie, he had to learn how to swim, handle a
raft and prepare raw fish for eating.
When he was younger he studied Hindustani music, a
type of music from India. He also practiced karate.
frm The Mini Page 2012 Un sa Uchck
from The Mini Page -2012 Universal Ucick
S Gus Goodsport's Rot
Supersport: Kenjon Barner
SHeight: 5-11 Birthdate: 4-28-89
Weight: 192 Hometown: Riverside, Calif.
If you enjoy football fireworks, watch Kenjon Barner and
the University of Oregon's explosive offense.
This season, the Ducks averaged about 50 points per
game, and Barner was one of the big contributors. He's a
Duck who runs like a deer.
In the first 11 games, Kenjon gained 1,426 yards, including a school-
record 321 against Southern Cal. He also scored 19 touchdowns and is on
track for major postseason honors.
Barner, the youngest in a family of seven children, can score running,
receiving, and on punt and kickoff returns. Like all backs, he has taken
numerous hard hits. But he keeps on running into the end zone.
Barner could have gone to the NFL after last season but chose to stay in
school and Oregon opponents wish he had left!


froMore Th Min Pagereat Books 2012 Unversal Uclck


More Great Books


Kathryn Lasky has written more
than 30 books for kids and adults,
including the Newbery Honor Book
"Sugaring Time."
In "The Diary
of Minnie Swift:
Christmas After All,"
a girl, her family and
an orphaned cousin .
struggle in the Great
Depression in 1932.
When Minnie's father
disappears, the
holidays seem lost.

David Almond has worked as an
editor and a teacher. This is his
second novel for kids.
In "Kit's Wilderness,"
Kit moves to a
mining town. He
is challenged to a
scary game deep
underground. There,
he and a boy from
the town try to find
;the ghosts of their
ancestors.


Ann Malaspina has written several
books for young people, including
"Finding Lincoln" and "Phillis Sings
Out Freedom."
"Touch the Sky"
is the true story of U w
Alice Coachman, .' .
who got a chance
to compete in the
Olympics high jump
in 1948. At that
time, no African-
American woman
had won an Olympic
gold medal.
Editor J. Patrick Lewis was an
economics professor before he began
writing poems for kids.
"National
Geographic
Book of Animal
Poetry" is full
of clever and
touching poems
by many poets,
each illustrated
by action-
packed photos.


Jacqueline Woodson has written
many books for kids, including three
Newbery Honor Books.
In "Each
Kindness," Chloe
joins the crowd
that is being mean
to a new girl -
until one day, the
girl is gone. Chloe
has missed her
chance to be kind.

Andrew Zimmern hosts and
produces several food shows on the
Travel Channel. Molly Mogren is a
journalist who worked as a cook to
earn money to travel.
"Andrew
Zimmern's
Field Guide to
Exceptionally
Weird, Wild,
& Wonderful
Foods" is about
foods ranging
from brains to
wildebeest to
bird's nest soup.


from Th Min Page 212 Uni -al Ucick


Further Reading Adventures


Rosanne Parry wrote her first
novel while sitting in a tree house in
her backyard.
In "Heart of a
Shepherd," Brother
SHL'PH. mustt help keep the
ranch going when his
father is sent to Iraq
with his reserve unit.
But Brother does not
fit in with the ranch
life and faces many
hardships.


Richard Peck has written more
than 20 books for kids, including
the Newbery Medal winner "A Year
Down Yonder."
In "A Season of Gifts,"
a 12-year-old boy and
his family run into
trouble as the new
folks in town. But -
their new neighbor,
Grandma Dowdel,
finds clever ways to
help them.

Graham L. Banes is a zoologist
who has studied orangutans in
Indonesia.
"The Kingfisher
t j( r -6' .4 Encyclopedia of
EncYcLOPEDIPA Life" groups life
L forms by how long
i they live.
a S ^ ;
-^*""Ai


The Mini Page thanks Mary Phelan, children's
librarian, Washington, D.C., public library, for
help with this issue.


James Buckley Jr. has written
more than 50 books for kids about
sports. He coaches youth baseball and
soccer.
"Jeremy Lin: Rising
Star" is the true story
of the pro basketball
player who wouldn't
give up until, all of
a sudden, he became
a star.



Joan Bauer has written 10 books
for kids, including the Newbery
Honor Book "Hope Was Here."


In "Almost Home,"
Sugar Mae is
struggling to keep up
her spirits after she
and her mother end
up homeless. When
she and her dog are
put into foster care,
she heals herself by
writing poems.


I
. sa .-


Lee R. Berger, a professor in
human origins, helped discover this
fossil. Marc Aronson is a historian
who has also written several books.

Rock" is the true
story about how
a 9-year-old boy,
his scientist dad,
a dog and Google
Earth discovered a
skeleton fossil that
was almost 2 million
years old.


Next week, The Mini Page offers suggestions
for more winter holiday fun.


Patricia MacLachlan has written
many books for kids, including the
Newbery Medal Book "Sarah, Plain
and Tall."
"The Boxcar Children
Beginning" is the
iiit -: story of how four
siblings become
orphans and learn to
fend for themselves.



Laurence Yep has written more
than 60 books for kids, including the
Newbery Honor Books "Dragonwings"
and "Dragon's Gate."
"Dragons of Silk" is
the final book in the
Golden Mountain
Chronicles. The series
tells of four girls
whose lives are bound
with the mythological
Weaving Maid who
lives in the skies.

Tony Preciado is a special effects
artist and 3-D computer animator.
Rhode Montijo is a sculptor who has
written and illustrated books for kids.
"Super Grammar"
is a fun, imaginative
p way of learning about
-- grammar with
.- superheroes.


Look through your newspaper for stories
and pictures that would make good books.


The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley Artist


_________


The Mini Page'

Book of States


The Mini Page's popular series of issues about each state is collected
here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease
of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state,
along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs
and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of
States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.


Kentucky From A to Z


S --


-r h..-Mm P 12age 20r12Un IersalU chcIk
S>aTMF MIGHTY ?/ a<(
FUNNY'S LVllllhfl &JWk(
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category?
Sam: What says "ho, ho, ho" and would '-
S make a great sandwich with peanut ::-k .' --
butter?
Solomon: Jelly Ole St. Nick! '' L'
l Sarah: What is Santa's favorite movie?
Sylvester: "Clause Encounters"!

Stephanie: Who sold Santa his favorite
gardening tool?
Stewart: Frosty the hoeman!

TM J> OT from The Mini Page 2012 Un.-..... Ucllck
5 TBasset TRY'N
M I s SWinter Reading FIND
Words that remind us of places to read by, in, on or under are hidden in the block
below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find: BED,
BEDROOM, BLANKETS, BUS, CAR, CAT, CHAIR, CLASSROOM, COVERS,
CUSHIONS, DEN, DOG, FIREPLACE, GRANDPARENTS, HOUSE, LIBRARY,
OFFICE, SCHOOL, SOFA, TABLE, TREE, WINDOWS.
S CS T E K N A L B E C I F O
WITH OO S H H T DG O D Y R A R B I L
BOOK CO A O R E V S N O I H S U C
O B F I U E N C K L OO H C S
V C E A R S E AM O O R D E B
A4 i\ E A N D L M E R S W O D N I W
R T V S T N E R A P D N A R G
S B U S L K MOO R S S A L C
K E L B AT E C A L P E R I F



Ready Resources
The Mini Page provides ideas for -
websites, books or other resources that will help
you learn more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
ezra-jack-keats.org
kathrynlasky.com/KK/Home.html
supergrammar.com
readingrockets.org/books/interviews
At the library:
"The Art of Reading: Forty Illustrators Celebrate
RIF's 40th Anniversary" by Reading Is Fundamental


To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make
check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini
Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call toll-
free 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com.
Please send copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total
cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.)
Name:
Address:
City: State: Zip:


Rookie Cookie's Recipe
Peanut Butter Ice Cream Pie
You'll need:
* 1 (1.5-quart) container reduced-fat vanilla ice cream f
* 15 miniature chocolate peanut butter candies
* 1 prepared chocolate pie crust S _
* chocolate or caramel sauce as desired
What to do: ;e
1. Spoon ice cream into a large glass bowl; microwave for 25 seconds to
soften.
2. Cut miniature peanut butter chocolate candies into fourths (60 pieces).
3. Stir candies into softened ice cream and 1I,. 11,.iii.. .. ..i.I,
4. Spoon ice cream mixture into prepared pie crust. Freeze until well set.
5. Let soften at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes before serving.
Drizzle chocolate sauce or caramel sauce on pie before cutting. Serves
6 to 8.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe. fro....MnP.g...M12un.m.u.. .


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EDUCATION


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ..I


Mini Spy... TM
Mini Spy loves to read holiday stories. See if you can
find: question mark bowl of oatmeal eyeglasses
* letter A bell bat frog snake
* carrot kite seal number 8 word MINI
* feather daisy candy cane basket


r







Page C4 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Community choir
to start rehearsals
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir will begin re-
hearsals for the spring
(March 24 and April 7) con-
certs at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.
8, in the Fellowship Hall of
Faith Lutheran Church, 935
S. Crystal Glen Drive,
Lecanto.
The music will include Vi-
valdi's "Gloria," "Ave Verum
Corpus" by Mozart and the
"Halleujah" chorus from
Beethoven's "Christ on the
Mount of Olives."
New voices are welcome
through the Jan. 28 re-
hearsal. Auditions will be at
6:30 p.m. each Tuesday
evening, prior to the begin-
ning of rehearsal.
More information is avail-
able on the choir's website at
www.citruschoir.com, or by
calling 352-212-1746 or 352-
628 6452.
Decorative Artists
will gather Jan. 5
Nature Coast Decorative
Artists Chapter of the Society
of Decorative Arists will meet
at 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, at
the Weeki Wachee Senior
Center.
There will be a short meet-
ing, show and tell, and a
birthday raffle. There will be
no project this meeting; it's
the date for the White Ele-
phant Sale and Soup/Salad
and More lunch. Members
can bring items in to sell.
For more information, visit
naturecoastdecorativeartists.
com, or call Andi at 352-666-
9091, Jeanette at 727-857-
1045, or Pat at
352-249-7221.
Parks Friends
to host cruise
The Friends of Crystal
River State Parks will host a
sunset cruise aboard the
cruise ship "Monroe" at 5
p.m. Friday, Dec. 28. Free
refreshments and treats will
be served.
Proceeds will benefit the
nonprofit Friends group in
support of the Crystal River
State Parks.
To get to the park visitor
center, take U.S. 19 one mile
north of the Crystal River
Mall, to Nick Nicholas Ford,
then turn west on State Park
Road and follow it all the way
to the end.
Call 352-563-0450 for in-
formation. Tickets are $20
and are sold at the park.
Seating is limited.
Celebrate new
year at center
Everyone is invited to a
New Year's Eve Ball from 8
p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Monday,
Dec. 31, at the Citrus Springs
Community Center, 1570 W.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.
The ball will feature the
Dancing Melodies for enter-
tainment and dancing, and a
formal dinner catered by
Gruff's Elite Banquet & Cater-
ing. There will be a cash bar.
Cost is $35 per person.
For tickets, call 352-465-
7007 or 352-527-7540.
Spanish-Americans
plan Dec. 31 dance
The Spanish American
Club of Citrus County will
have a New Year's Eve
Dance from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 31, at the
Knights of Columbus Hall,
2389 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way, Lecanto.
Music will be by deejay
Leo Roche. There will be a
midnight champagne toast,
noise makers, party favors
and door prizes, hors d'oeu-
vres, sodas, water, coffee
and dessert; BYOB. Semi-
formal attire is required.
Tickets are $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for guests. For
tickets call Ben at 352-746-
3599, Maria at 352-341-
0979, Jeanette at


352-598-7816, or Iris 352-
201-7901.


Healthy resol


Extension program focuses o


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Extension office
is offering a Weight Management
Program based on the Dietary Guide-
lines of 2010.
The Dietary Guidelines emphasize
slow, long-term weight loss based on
healthy eating and regular physical
activity. In addition, risk for chronic
diseases like diabetes and heart dis-
ease are reduced when people are
physically active most days of the
week. Even those who already have
chronic diseases like high blood
pressure and diabetes may control
them better by eating healthy foods
and becoming active.
The Citrus County Extension's
Weight Management Program will
begin Wednesday, Jan. 9, from 10 to
11:30 a.m. at the Citrus County Exten-
sion office in Lecanto (3650 W Sover-
eign Path, Suite 1). Classes will meet


weekly for
eight weeks
through
Wednes-
day, Feb.
27.
A por-
tion of
each ses-
sion will
focus on .
partici-
pants exer-
cising. There
will also be
presentations
on such topics as cut-
ting extra calories, re-
ducing fat intake,
proper portion sizes,
understanding nu-
trition labels and
maintaining weight
loss. Participants will


Special to the Chronicle
On Nov 30, VFW Post 4252 in Her-
nando hosted another Operation Wel-
come Home (OWH) dinner and
ceremony to greet a returning soldier
from Operation Enduring Freedom in
Afghanistan.
OWH Master of Ceremonies, Air
Force Chief Master Sgt. (retired) John
Stewart, led a the evening attended by
members of numerous Citrus County
veterans organizations and private cit-
izens, who assembled to honor Army
Sgt. Amanda Ryder.
Sgt Ryder was presented with gift
cards and other items from those in at-
tendance as appreciation for her serv-
ice as an armament repair specialist
while stationed less than 75 miles
from the Iranian border with the
602nd Maintenance Company at Shin-
dand Air Base, Afghanistan.
That base is a critical strategic loca-
tion providing equipment mainte-
nance support to deployed forces and
the ongoing reduction of U.S. military


operations.
"After 10 years of sustaining and
equipping our war-fighters, we are
faced with the challenging mission of
removing nonessential equipment off
the battle field," said Lt. Col. Paul
Martinez, a senior officer at the air
base.
"You can only imagine the logistical
nightmare of equipment that must be
in terrible condition from the ele-
ments of Afghanistan and duration of
the war."
"We are so proud to honor these re-
turning heroes," Stewart said. "I at-
tempted to explain to the audience
why it is important to not only wel-
come them home, but to provide what-
ever assistance is necessary for
transition from the hell of war, to the
peace of America."
"I am committed because I love my
country, I love my kids and I love
everyone that has given me the free-
dom to live my life as I choose," said
Barbara Mills, president of OWH.
"The hours we commit to honoring


our troops pale in comparison to the
long hours they must face while de-
fending world freedom.
"I have learned that fact firsthand
during weekly calls to my deployed
son. At the same time it is the most dif-
ficult job parents and spouses must
experience in their lifetime when hav-
ing to constantly worry about loved
ones fighting terrorism."
Mills said OWH not only tries to
help returning troops and relieve fam-
ily anxiety, the group attempts to get
local veterans' organizations and pri-
vate citizens to participate in remem-
bering and honoring Citrus County's
military veterans upon their return.
OWH always needs gift cards and
monetary donations to allow the or-
ganization to continue the program.
Businesses, veterans' organizations
and private citizens that wish to get in-
volved can learn more by calling Mills
at 352-422-6236, mailing Stewart at
cornhusker69@yahoo.com, or by visit-
ing on the Web at www.operation
welcomehomeveterans.org.


Lounge to host poker run for Hospice


Special to the Chronicle
On Saturday, Jan. 12,
Heads & Tails Lounge, 9211
S. Florida Ave. in Floral
City, will host a poker run
fundraiser to benefit pa-
tients and families served
by Hospice of Citrus County.


Registration for the run
will begin at 10 a.m. at
Heads & Tails Lounge.
A registration fee of $10
per rider will cover an arm
band (poker hand) and a
barbecue dinner at the end
of the run.
Stops include Sleepy Hol-


low, Z Rox's Place, The
Thunder Inn, IRRU Social
Club and Heads & Tails
Lounge.
"Kick stands up" will be
at 11 a.m. The benefit will
begin at Heads & Tails at
noon.
There will be raffle draw-


ings, a silent auction, and a
50/50 drawing.
Dinner will be offered for
a $5 donation. All vehicles
are welcome.
For more information,
call Chrissy at 352-642-3429,
or call Heads & Tails
Lounge at 352-419-6598.


Learn


where


to help


Forum links

volunteers,

opportunities

Special to the Chronicle
Learn where you can
make a difference and
discover your niche in
community service.
The Nature Coast Vol-
unteer Center and Re-
tired and Senior
Volunteer Program host a
forum for people to link
up with volunteer
opportunities.
This is an opportunity
to meet with NCVC/RSVP
staff and volunteer man-
agers throughout the
county and learn about
their programs and oppor-
tunities for service.
Opportunity Links will
be at 3 p.m. Thursday, Jan.
10, at the Central Ridge
Community Center, 77
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
NCVC/RSVP works on a
community-wide basis to
develop high-impact vol-
unteer programming.
Through building rela-
tionships with nonprofit,
school, faith-based and
other groups, NCVC/
RSVP plays a critical role
in leveraging volunteer
power to the fullest effect
For more information,
call 352-249-1275, or e-mail
patty. lascuola@bocc.
citrus.fl.us.
Visit on the Web at
www. naturecoast
volunteercenter.org. Per-
sons with disabilities re-
quiring reasonable
accommodations may call
ahead.


News NOTES

Learn about
oysters with FWGP
Dr. Jennifer Seavey will be
guest speaker at the meeting
of the Friends of the Withla-
coochee Gulf Preserve at
10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, at
1001 Old Rock Road,
Yankeetown.
Seavey, assistant director
of Seahorse Key Marine Lab-
oratory, will talk about
"Restoring Resiliency in a
Changing World: Oysters in
Florida's Big Bend." All are
welcome.
Seavey has a Bachelor of
Science degree in biology, a
master's degree in wildlife
science, and a Ph.D. in land-
scape ecology.
She has conducted re-
search on birds and coastal
issues throughout the United
States and internationally.
She is particularly interested
in addressing conservation
a ma nagement issues for
threaten species and
ecosystems.
Her current research fo-
cuses on climate change
ecology, especially along low-
lying coastal systems in
Florida such as oyster reefs.
For more information, visit
www.withlacoocheegulf
preserve.com.
Pilot Club to host
card party Jan. 19
The Gulf to Lakes Pilot
Club of Citrus County will
host a Military Card Party
Wednesday, Jan. 16, at the
Crystal River Woman's Club.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and
play begins at 7 p.m.
There will be refreshments,
"share the pot," and door
prizes. Tickets are $12.
For more information or to
purchase tickets, call Judy at


352-746-0636; RSVP re-
quired by Jan. 9.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Citrus vet welcomed home


SANDY MASS/Special to the Chronicle


Sgt. Amanda Ryder is welcomed home by one member from each organization in attendance.


Sgt. Amanda Ryder feted by organizations at VFWPost 4252






WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 CS


Bridge


North


WEDNES DAY EVENING DECEMBER 26, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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2952 29 2028 (2007) Vince Vaughn. Allen, Elizabeth Mitchell.'G' Caan, Bob Newhart.'PG' Stereo) 'PG' cc
*** "The Black Hole" (1979) Maximilian ** "Highlander: The Final "Hellraiser: Hellworld" (2005, Horror) Doug "Tupac:
1F 118 170 Schell, Yvette Mimieux. (In Stereo)'PG'E Dimension" (1994) 'PG-13' cc Bradley, Henry Cavill. (In Stereo)'R' c Resurr."
(iT ) 44 37 44 32 Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
[F 26 56 26 Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Wedding: Impossible Restaurant: Im.
[FEifL) 35 39 35 ACC Magic NBA Basketball: Hornets at Magic |Magic In Magic Football World Poker Tour
S 30 60 30 51Two and Two and Twoand Two and *** "The Other Guys"(2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark *** "The Other Guys" (2010,
S 30 60 30 51 Half Men Half Men Half Men Half Men Wahlberg, Eva Mendes.'PG-13' Comedy) Will Ferrell. PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf PGA Tour Golf BMW Championship, Final Round. Golf |Golf
59 68 59 45 54 ** "November Christmas" (2010, Drama) *** "Debbie Macomber's Mrs. Miracle" "Debbie Macomber's Call Me Mrs. Miracle"
59 68 59 45 54 Sam Elliott, John Corbett.'NR cE (2009, Drama) James Van Der Beek. ca (2010, Drama) Doris Roberts. cc
"New Year's Eve" (2011) Halle Berry, Game of Thrones (In Game of Thrones (In Game of Thrones (In Boxing's Best of 2012
302 201 302 2 2 Jessica Biel. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c Stereo) 'MA' a Stereo) 'MA' a Stereo) 'MA' a (N)'PG'E
2 303 202 30***3 / "Moonstruck" (1987, Romance-Comedy) ***, "GasLand"(2010) Narrated This Is 40: *** "GrossePointeBlank"(1997) John
303 202 303 Cher. (In Stereo) 'PG' c by Josh Fox.'NR'xc 1st Cusack, Minnie Driver. (In Stereo) 'R'E
(ji.t 23 57 23 42 52 Love It or List It'G' House Hunters Reno Property Brothers'G' Buying and Selling Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers'G'
Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun
51 25 51 32 42 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
I **Y "Must Love Dogs"(2005) Diane Lane, *** "Pretty Woman" (1990) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. A corporate Biography Actress Julia
24 38 24 31 John Cusack. Premiere. 'PG-13' cc raider hires a hooker to act as a business escort. 'R' Roberts. PG'
*** "Nora Roberts' Carnal Innocence" "The Hunt for the 1-5 Killer"(2011, "The Bad Son" (2007, Suspense) Catherine
LMNli 50 119 (2011, Mystery) Gabrielle Anwar. NR'c Docudrama) John Corbett. NR' Dent, Tom McBeath, Ben Cotton. NR '
ri i 320 221 320 3 3 *** "The Contender" *Y "This Means War"(2012) ** "Project X" (2012) Thomas **Y "The Revenant" (2009, Comedy) David
320 221320 3 3 (2000) 'R' Reese Witherspoon.'PG-13' Mann. (In Stereo)'R'N Anders. (In Stereo) 'R'
MSNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball Matthews IThe Ed Show (N) Rachel Maddow The Last Word IThe Ed Show
Hell on the Highway Border Wars"War on Border Wars'14' Border Wars"24-Hour Hell on the Highway Border Wars"24-Hour
S 109 65 10944 53 "Do or Die"'14' the Streets"'14' Watch" (N) '14' '14' Watch"'14'
NICK 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Drake |Drake Full H'se |Full H'se Full H'se |Full H'se Nanny |Nanny Friends |Friends
OWN 103 62 103 Prison Wives'PG' Prison Wives'PG' 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
fWXl 44 123 Law Order: ClI Law Order: ClI Law Order: ClI Law Order: ClI Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
340241 340 4 A Game of **, "Fightville"(2011, Untold History of the Inside the NFL (N) Jim Rome on Showtime Inside the NFL (In
340241 340 4 Honor Documentary) (In Stereo) 'NR'[c United States'14' 'PG, L cc (N)'PG, L Stereo) 'PG, L cc
NASCAR Pinks Pass Time Pass Time Pinks All Out From Drag Race Drag Race Barrett-Jackson Special Pinks All Out From
732 112 732 Race Hub '14, L Concord, N.C.'PG' Edition 'PG, L Concord, N.C.'PG'
Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction
liE 37 43 37 27 36 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
S**Y2 "Gnomeo and Juliet" (2011) *Y "The Benchwarmers" (2006) *** "Friends With Benefits" (2011) Justin **/ "Jumping the
370 271 370 Voices of James McAvoy. David Spade.'PG-13' Timberlake. (In Stereo)'R' c Broom"(201 1)
UF Bowl Heat Live! NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Charlotte Bobcats. From Time Heat Live! Inside the Inside the Inside the 3Wide Life
(SU]i 36 31 36 Preview (N) (Live) Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte, N.C. (N) (Live) (N) (Live) Heat HEAT (N) Heat 'PG'
S*** "Starship Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters "Well of Ghost Hunters "Roasts Ghost Hunters "Stage Ghost Hunters
31 59 31 26 29 Troopers"(1997)'R' "Harvesting Murder" Horror" c and Ghosts" Fright" c "Murdered Matron" c
(TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 King |King Seinfeld |Fam.Guy Fam.Guy |Fam.Guy Fam.Guy Fam.Guy BigBang |BigBang Conan c
T ** "Butterfield 8" (1960, Drama) Elizabeth **Y "Forty Guns"(1957) Barbara **Y "The Maverick Queen" (1955) **Y "The Violent
169 53 169 30 35 Taylor, Eddie Fisher.'NR' c (DVS) Stanwyck. NR' Barbara Stanwyck.'NR' Men"(1955)
Fast N' Loud (In Fast N' Loud (In Moonshiners (In Amish Mafia (In Moonshiners (In Amish Mafia (In
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14'x Stereo)'14'x Stereo) 14' c Stereo) c Stereo)'14'x Stereo) x
fTL) 50 46 50 29 30 Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Best Funeral Ever Toddlers & Tiaras Cheer Perfection (N) Toddlers & Tiaras
"Bloodknot" **** "Five Fingers" (2006) ** "The Uninvited" (2009) "Freddy's Dead: The Final *** "Ginger Snaps"
S 350 261350 'R' Laurence Fishburne. 'R a Elizabeth Banks.'PG- 13'a Nightmare" (1991) 'R' c (2000)
Castle "Love Me Dead" Castle "One Man's Castle Beckett's ex- Castle "Punked" (In Castle "Anatomy of a CSI: NY "Boo" (In
PG4833 48 31 34 'PG' Treasure"'PG' c partner arrives.'PG' Stereo)'PG' c Murder"'PG' c Stereo)'14'x
[iiT 38 58 38 33 Regular |Gumball Adven |NinjaGo Dragons Ben 10 King/Hill King/Hill American |American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
RIiV) 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Bizarre Foods Bggg Bggg Bggg Bggg Fast Food-Glbl Drive Thru Paradise
itiJ 25 55 25 98 55 Cops'PG' Cops'PG' World's Dumbest... Full Throttle Saloon Full Throttle Saloon Black Gold (N) '14' epo Repo
(T)D 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H |Cosby Cosby |Cosby Raymond |Raymond Cleveland IDivorced King Kng
NCIS A blind photogra- NCIS "Angel of Death" NCIS "Bury Your Dead" NCIS "Family" (In NCIS A distraught NCIS "Chimera" (In
47 32 47 17 18 pher.'PG' a '14' E '14'X Stereo)'14' E naval officer.'14'x Stereo)'14' E
Charmed "Reckless Charmed "Awakened" High School Confidential High School High School High School Confidential
117 69 117 Abandon"'PG' 'PG'X c(Part 2 of 2) Confidential (N) Confidential (N) (Part 2 of 2)
1WGNFA 18 18 18 18 20 Chris |Chris Funny Home Videos Rules |Rules Rules |Rules WGN News at Nine Funny Home Videos


South
14

3,
6+


12-26-12


VA J 9 8 4 3
* Q J 10 9
- 8 3 2
East
6 A 10 5 3 2
V K Q 10
+ 7
10 9 6 4
South
4 J864


+ AK8 5
AK QJ 5

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West


West North
Pass 1 V
Pass 2 V
Pass 4*
Pass Pass


East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: t K


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Charles Mingus, a renowned jazz double bassist,
composer and band leader who died in 1979, said,
"Creativity is more than just being different. Any-
body can plan weird; that's easy What's hard is to
be as simple as Bach. Making the simple awe-
somely simple, that's creativity."
At the bridge table, some players are too cre-
ative, making easy deals unnecessarily difficult. At
other times, weird distribution demands creativ-
ity.
This deal occurred during a duplicate at a coun-
try club, where the standard was intermediate.
How should South plan the play in either six dia-
monds or six clubs after West leads the spade
king?
The given auction seems reasonable. With 18
points, the South hand is strong enough for a sec-
ond-round jump, but the heart void is a big minus.
Similarly, North is only worth a two-heart rebid
given his partner's black-suit bidding. But when
South continues with three diamonds, the North
hand improves. And when North raises diamonds,
it is reasonable for South to bid a slam. Yes, they
might have two fast spade losers, but South cannot
find out what he wants to know.
Look at the North-South hands only A grand
slam could be there, but the weird 4-1 breaks are
too hard to handle.
South starts with 10 top tricks: one heart, four
diamonds and five clubs. So, in diamonds, he ruffs
the opening lead on the board, cashes the diamond
queen and heart ace (discarding a spade), plays a
club to his ace, ruffs another spade, draws trumps,
and claims.
In clubs, the play is effectively the same.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
Sa by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, .
to form four ordinary words.
RIKEH doi .,*7

2012 Tribune Media Se ces Ino -
All Rights R...eserved t "'
DOORE I ..ii.k.p -t



OVDECI '
SI T

THE SKUNK

ALODDE I HOOPL.UMM---


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:"
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: FACET EXCEL DIVERT BITTEN
I Answer: What does December have that no other
month has? THE LETTER "D"


ACROSS
1 Party tray
cheese
5 Subject matter
10 Hockey
venues
12 Relax after a
hard day
13 Phoned
(2 wds.)
14 Horses
15 fixe
16 Promissory
note
18 Help with the
dishes
19 Like skim milk
22 Army doc
25 Plane trip
29 box
30 Turf grabber
32 Las Vegas
show
33 Cause-and-
effect law
34 Curl up cozily
37 Mount gems


38 Takes care of
(2 wds.)
40 Dog days mo.
43 Just scrape
by
44 Irritate
48 Shooting star
50 "Will it play
in -?"
52 General drifts
53 Hooky player
54 Bottle- -
dolphin
55 Sec'y

DOWN
1 Carpet nail
2 Descartes'
name
3 Very clever
4 de cologne
5 Explosive
letters
6 Felt grateful
7 Landing place
8 500


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HELM BAM JAVA
ARIA ORE UNIT
DRESSING BOAT
AOL AVIDLY
TIMID HOLES
ALPINE
OK LA U N EERMA
TSAR LOG SEAM
MILDE-W BRA
YOYO REACH
PALACE OILM
SHIN GIFTWRAP
SOOT ASIAURA
TOSS N T YECH


9 Bank
offerings
10 Onassis
nickname
11 Washer cycle
12 Ordinary


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Slightly gamy
20 Choral
ensembles
21 Box office
purchase
22 Cosmonaut's
lab
23 Blissful abode
24 Cheap bar
26 Like furs and
diamonds
27 Dagwood's
neighbor
28 Domesticated
31 Small fry
35 Lascivious
looks
36 Cartoon
shriek
39 Equinox mo.
40 Space lead-in
41 Sporty trucks
42 It may be
spliced
45 Glass and
Gershwin
46 Dust bunny
47 Have supper
48 Atlas abbr.
49 Peculiar
51 Pitcher's stat


Dear Annie: I have been
dating "Stan" for five
years. We are both in our
60s. When we started dating, I
was absolutely certain
that I did not want to
get married. But Stan
and I have been
through so much
these past few years
with various illnesses
and the like. We have
always stood by each
other, and I have
come to realize that I
would like to be mar-
ried to this man and
have said so to him. ANN
Stan still has re- MAIL
sponsibilities to a sur-
viving parent. Both Stan and his
mom seem so dependent on each
other that I feel like the prover-
bial third wheel. When I discuss
this with Stan, there is a slight
change, but only for a brief pe-
riod of time, and then things go
right back to the way they were,
with me essentially on my own. I
don't want to walk away from
Stan, but I need more than I am
getting and want to know how to
get my point across. I would hate
for Stan to lose out on having a
wonderful life with me at this
stage of our lives. So Confused
Dear Confused: You cannot
force Stan to see the benefits of
marriage through your eyes. His
relationship with his surviving
parent takes precedence over his
relationship with you, and right
now, Stan interprets marriage as
an abandonment of Mom.
In addition, you have changed
the rules midstream by wanting
marriage when you initially pre-
cluded it. You would do better to


absorb Mom into your life, mak-
ing a commitment toward her
care part of your relationship.
And although that doesn't prom-
ise marriage, it will
make Stan more fa-
vorably disposed.
Only you can decide
whether the relation-
ship with Stan the
Man is worth keeping
without the legal
papers.
Dear Annie: My
husband, "Bob,"
rarely washes his
hands after using the
IE'S bathroom. My son and
BOX I are really disgusted
with this behavior and
worry about the lingering germs
that his hands pass on to every-
thing else he touches. Bob claims
we are germophobes, and that a
little bacteria is good for you. He
thinks we overdo the hand wash-
ing, getting rid of the "good"
germs. I have asked him to pose
this question to his doctor, but he
refuses. Please help settle this ar-
gument. Irritated in Indiana
Dear Indiana: It's true that
over-sanitizing can be a problem,
but some degree of hygiene is
necessary because not all bacte-
ria are harmless. And we transfer
these less helpful germs prima-
rily through our hands, not only
via contact with multiple sur-
faces that others have touched
(or will), but also by rubbing our
eyes, scratching our noses and
covering our mouths with these
same bacteria-laden hands. This
is how easily diseases such as
meningitis, flu and hepatitis can
get passed around. If your hus-
band wants to swim in a swamp


to see whether it boosts his im-
mune system, that's up to him.
But he shouldn't subject the rest
of his family to his quirks.
Dear Annie: This is in re-
sponse to "No State," whose 23-
year-old cousin is now a police
officer and brags that he can give
out tickets to those who annoy
him. A police officer who abuses
his authority not only makes him-
self look bad, but also damages
the reputation of his department
and all the other hardworking
and dedicated officers who put
their life on the line day in and
day out.
Most police officers try to do
their very best in difficult cir-
cumstances. It is often a thank-
less job, but one we willingly
accept. Trust me, other police of-
ficers do not like to see these
abuses of power. "No State"
should talk to this officer's supe-
riors. Retired Kentucky
Trooper
Dear Trooper: We suspect this
cousin is all talk, but it might not
take much for him to cross a line.
We appreciate your counsel.
Happy Kwanzaa to all our
readers.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


West
4 K Q 9 7
V 7 6 5 2
* 6 4 3 2
4 73


12-26


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


L.






C6 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


TEt) AND I TOOK CARE WHERE DID YOU GET THE GUITAR?
OF EVERYTHING. NOW I
COME SING CHRISTMAS FROM MY DAD'S OLD ROOM...
CAROLS WITH US. I ALONG WITH SOME ORIGINAL
I BUT WE E "- SONGS THAT WERE BEST
DON'T HAVE LEF THERE
ANY MUSIC.It -


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


YOU'RE A MISERABLE
HUMAN BEING AND
I HOPE YOU DIE IN A
LONG, PAINFUL WAY!
\\\


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


Big Nate
MERCY! LOOKS LIkE
SOMEBODY GOT
EVERYTHING ON
HIS WISH LIST!
YEAH ..
ALMOST.





Arlo and Janis -


IT'S HARP NOT TO BE .. r', t -; E-
TR.gtCKY TH HOCK- '
I 6 ABSENCE COF SOe- f f .
THIN AS AMRICAN AS 9INE .
APPLE PIE A NAT VI- CRECHE CHURCHES --

TY-SCN I


Blondie
ELMO SURE DID A GREAT JOB WELL, I RESERVE SOME WWHY? DD NO, BUT I LET HIM
--ON THI SNOWMAN --E ECir YOU HELP BORROW MY SCCAR!
Dennis, t_ _.H. IM -D-E.A.. ;r
'i"^ ^r^ i r ,.' "A I O,







Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"I'M ALREADY TARTIN'TO GET THE
CHRIGTMAS SPIRIT FOR NEYVT YEAR,
Betty


www tamrlycircus corn
"I just thought of some things
Santa forgot. How many days
till my birthday?"


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7
p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 12 p.m., 3:40
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:25 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"This is 40" (R) ID required. 11:50 a.m., 2:50, 7:45,10:45.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:10 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In
3D. 11 a.m., 6:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13)


3 p.m. No passes.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6:30, 9:50.
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7
p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:15
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 11:15 a.m.,
3:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 3:50 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In
3D. 12 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) 4
p.m. No passes.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 1 slenba n


"NLFM FMLW ILWVOWV (UW) LF LW WC


VOWP FC FMJCN LH FMV FCNVA, OHI


FMOF LW FMV NCJWF FMLHX NV ROH IC."


FVJL XOJJ

Previous Solution: "Christmas, my child, is love in action. Every time we love, every
time we give, it's Christmas." Dale Evans Rogers
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-26


Sally Forth


Dilbert


ASOK, I NEED TO
TEACH YOU TO BE
MORE ASSERTIVE IN
MEETINGS.


DIAL IT
BACK A
LITTLE.


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

FUNDRAISERS
The Rotary Club of Sugarmill
Woods and the Rotary Interact
Club of Lecanto High School have
joined together to support the Box
Tops for Education fundraiser for
Lecanto Primary School. Box Tops
for Education labels can be found
on more than 300 products that
families purchase and use on a
daily basis.
There are two drop boxes -
one in the lobby of the Sugarmill
Woods Country Club and the other
in the Military Outlet Store on West
Citrus Avenue in Crystal River.
For a complete listing of prod-
ucts, go to www.RotarySMW.com.
The labels can also be mailed to
the Sugarmill Woods Rotary Club.
P.O. Box 8, Homosassa Springs,
FL 34447.

SCHOLARSHIPS
AND CONTESTS
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
is offering two scholarships for
college-bound students Chapter
776's College of Central Florida
(CF) Endowed Scholarship and the
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for the aca-
demic year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship awards $500 to an ap-
plicant accepted or enrolled at CF
as a full-time student (12 or more
semester credit hours). Chapter
776 scholarship information and an
application can be obtained at
www.citruspurpleheart.org, or by
calling 352-382-3847. Chapter 776
must receive scholarship applications
no later than 5 p.m. Feb. 28.
The MOPH Scholarship awards
$3,000 to a member of the MOPH;
a spouse, widow, direct lineal de-
scendant (child, stepchild, adopted
child, grandchild) of a MOPH
member or of a veteran killed in
action, or who died of wounds be-
fore having the opportunity to be-
come a MOPH member.
Great-grandchildren are not eligi-
ble. Applicant must be a U.S. citi-
zen, a graduate or pending
graduate of an accredited high
school; be accepted or enrolled as
a full-time student (12 semester
credit hours or 18 quarter hours) at
a U.S. college or trade school and
have at least a 2.75 cumulative
GPA based on an unweighted 4.0
grading system. Scholarship appli-
cations must be received at MOPH
headquarters in Springfield, Va., no
later than 5 p.m. Feb. 13. MOPH
scholarship information and an ap-
plication can be obtained by visit-
ing the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.


EDUCATION


The Spot Family Center has
received funding from Kids Central
Inc. and the Department of Chil-
dren and Families to offer scholar-
ships to local students for the
2012-13 After School Enrichment
Program. The program is from 2:45
to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday
and serves students in kinder-
garten through seventh grade. The
Spot has 20 scholarships remaining.
The scholarships are available
to local families who qualify. Appli-
cations can be picked up at 405
S.E. Seventh Ave., Crystal River.
Scholarships will be given to stu-
dents on a first-come, first-served
basis. Any family receiving free or
reduced-price lunches automati-
cally qualifies.
The scholarships will offer stu-
dents free academic tutoring, nutri-
tional education and homework
assistance, outdoor recreational
activities, arts and crafts, computer
tech labs, reading teams, mentor-
ship and leadership skills.
The program runs the entire
school year. On scheduled early
dismissal days, the hours will be
12:30 to 6 p.m. Bus transportation
from Crystal River Primary and
Middle schools is available to The
Spot.
Registration is required. Call
352-794-3870 to apply. Space is
limited.
The deadline for the Citrus
Macintosh Users Group 2012 to
2013 school year scholarship ap-
plications is Tuesday, Jan. 15.
This year, CMUG will award schol-
arships a minimum of
$500 each to one graduating
senior from Citrus, Lecanto
and Crystal River high schools.
Academy of Environmental Sci-
ence seniors, including home-
schooled students attending the
academy, will compete with appli-
cants from their home district. Stu-
dents interested in applying should
get applications from their school
guidance department.
For information, call Buzz
Fredrickson at 352-341-4392.
The Citrus Community Con-
cert Choir, Inc. is now accepting
applications for its 2013 scholar-
ship award of $1,500. Application
is open to graduating high school
seniors or enrolled college stu-
dents and residents of Citrus
County or children of Citrus County
residents. Past and present choir


IlkI


members and relatives of choir
members are also eligible. Appli-
cants may obtain scholarship quali-
fications and application forms
from their school guidance coun-
selors or online at www.
citruschoir.com. Completed appli-
cations must be received no later
than April 30.
The College of Central Florida
is awarding dozens of scholar-
ships to qualifying students inter-
ested in taking honors classes at
the Citrus campus this fall semes-
ter. A major component of CF's
Honors Institute, the Community of
Scholars Honors Program offers
incoming high school graduates
two-year tuition scholarships, cur-
rently valued at $3,000 per aca-
demic year, while offering partial
scholarships to those who are cur-
rently attending CF.
Students in the honors program
are free to pursue the degree op-
tion of their choosing at CF, with
the scholarship requirement being
successful participation in a limited
number of honors-level classes
that also serve to fulfill degree re-
quirements. Students may also
take classes at any of the CF loca-
tions each term, and are not bound
to enrolling only in classes offered
at the Citrus campus. Besides fi-
nancial benefits, the Community of
Scholars offers members priority
registration each term.
Typically, a cumulative high
school GPA of 3.75 is needed to
qualify for the Community of Schol-
ars, although applications for those
with a slightly lower GPA may be
considered in some cases. Stu-
dents wishing to be considered for
scholarships should call Dr. June
Hall at 352-746-6721.

CLASSES AND COURSES
For information about outdoors
and recreational classes in Citrus
County, see the Sunday Sports
section of the Chronicle.
The Withlacoochee Technical
Institute is accepting applications
for various programs and
classes. Classes start Jan. 8, un-
less otherwise noted.
Air Conditioning, refrigeration
and heating technology. Classes
meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. week-
days. The class is three sessions.
The cost per session is about
$1,440; books, supplies and lab


fees are additional. NCCER certifi-
cation is available.
*Automotive collision repair
and refinishing. Classes meet7:45
a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays. The
class is three sessions. The cost is
about $1,560 per session; books,
supplies and lab fees are additional.
Program is NATEF/ASE certified.
Automotive service technol-
ogy I and II. Classes meet 7:45
a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays. The
class is four sessions. The cost per
session is about $1,560; books,
supplies and lab fees are additional.
Program is NATEF/ASE certified.
Commercial foods and culi-
nary arts. Classes meet 7:45 a.m.
to 2:45 p.m. weekdays. The course
is three sessions. The cost per
session is about $1,560; books,
supplies and lab fees are addi-
tional. Food preparation and serv-
ing activities are an integral part of
the course. ServSafe certification
is available.
Cosmetology. Classes meet
8:15 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays.
The course is approximately 11
months and prepares students for
the licensing exam. The cost per
session is about $1,600; books,
supplies and lab fees are addi-
tional. Students must attend an ori-
entation session before the start of
the program.
Early childhood education.
Classes meet 7:45 a.m. to 2:45
p.m. weekdays. The program
length is 600 hours. Students re-
ceive part I and part II state-man-
dated child care training in order to
prepare for the state competency
examinations. Tuition is about
$1,600; books, supplies and lab
fees are additional.
Electricity. Classes meet 7:45
a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays. The
course is two sessions. The cost
per session is about $1,560;
books, supplies and lab fees are
additional. The program is
NCCER-certified.
Firefighter I. Classes meet
two days per week from 5:00 pm
until 10:00 pm and every other Sat-
urday for 225 hours approximately
16 weeks. The cost is approxi-
mately $772.00 and does not in-
clude books, lab fees, uniforms or
bunker gear. Visit our website
www.ccpstc.comfor information on
Fire Fighter II.
Industrial machinery mainte-
nance and repair. Classes meet


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 C7

7:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays.
The course is three sessions. The
cost per session is about $1,560;
books, supplies and lab fees are
additional. The program is
NCCER-certified.
Massage therapy. Classes
meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. week-
days. The program length is 750
hours. Tuition is about $1,995;
books, supplies and lab fees are
additional. This program is de-
signed to prepare students for em-
ployment as Licensed Massage
Therapists. Upon completion of the
program graduates must take the
Board approved examination to
practice as Massage Therapists.
Medical administrative spe-
cialist. Classes meet 8:15 a.m. to
2:45 p.m. weekdays. The course is
two sessions. The cost per session
is about $1,400; books, supplies
and lab fees are additional. Certi-
fied Medical Administrative Assis-
tant (CMAA) certification is
available.
Network systems administra-
tion. Classes meet 8:15 a.m. to
2:45 p.m. weekdays. The course is
two sessions. The cost per session
is about $1,400; books, supplies
and lab fees are additional. This is
a viable career path with multiple
opportunities for advancement.
Workers generally start out in sup-
port positions and then advance as
they become more knowledgeable
about the computer systems.
There are several industry certifi-
cations offered through Microsoft,
Cisco, Red Hat and CompTIA Net-
work+.
Nursing assistant. Classes
meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. week-
days, and are four weeks long and
will begin Aug. 8. The cost is about
$320; books, supplies and lab fees
are additional. CPR certification is
included. Licensing exam is avail-
able upon successful completion of
the program.
Patient Care Assistant.
Classes meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45
p.m. weekdays, for 11 weeks. This
course includes Nursing Assistant.
The cost is about $772; books,
supplies and lab fees are addi-
tional. Licensing exam is available
upon successful completion of the
program.
Applied welding technology.
Classes meet 7:45 a.m. to 2:45
p.m. weekdays. The course is two
sessions. The cost per session is
about $1,560; books, supplies and
lab fees are additional. AWS certifi-
cation is available.
Financial assistance is available
for qualified students. Most pro-
grams are approved for veteran's
training. For information, call Student
Services at 352-726-2430, ext.
4326; or visit www.wtionline.cc.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


I Classifieds


In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


0 0 00 0= = An I .%N- ., I. I*Ia *s.a.--'ft


S udoku *** 4puz.com

4 1

649 _287

1 5

583 647




297 153

8 4

195 423



Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

J All of our .
dcl aaed. ",lIi structures
withstand
120m h
Installations by Brian cBc 1253853 wins
-4 & 4 352-628-7519


F It R E ,EsTjBE Ti_
Permit And rI ll
I Engineering Fees
. Up to $200 value ll
-c ..:... ,. ^, _
*Siding* Soffit *Fascia -Skirting* Roofovers *Carports* Screen Rooms *Decks* Windows *Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Someone is missing this
Christmas. Lovely Lady,
degree, distinguished,
pretty, slender. Caring for
elderly parents. Would
like to meet man of char-
acter, intelligent, ethical,
successful in his endeav-
ors. Age 55 to early 70's.
Rely: Blind Box 1820
Citrus Cnty Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, FI
34429


2000 Chevy Corvette
Metallic Bowling Green
Std shift, one owner,
& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $425/mo.+ util. No
Pets, 1574 S. Iroquois
Ave (352) 503-7562


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



FREE 5 YR FEMALE
AUSTRALIAN BLUE
HEELER DOG.
FREE 3 mo. MUSCOVY
DUCKS (352) 637-7453
HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to go.
Bring Shovel, Truck load
avail., Help Yourself.
352-697-5252
White Hotpoint
Refrigerator. You fix
or for parts.
(352) 302-4057


-I


LOST L.QT
Black/Gray Tabby
short hair, male
Turner Camp Rd. Area
(352) 637-0970
PLEASE HELP!LOST
ALL WHITE AKITA WITH
ONE FLOPPED EAR.NO
COLLAR.LOST
AROUND S. CAN PT
AND OST WEST IN
HOMOSASSA.HER
NAME IS NALLA.SHE
HAS SEIZURES AND
LOST HER WAY WHEN
SHE WAS OUT TO
PLAY, NALLA IS VERY
MUCH LOVEDAND
MISSED. PLEASE HELP
US ANSWER OUR
CHRISTMAS PRAYERS
AND BRING HER
HOME.(352)503-7973
OR (352)6132647. MARK
OR DONNA. CONTACT
US ATANY TIME IF
FOUND.**REWARD**



Adult Male Cat
Orange & White
6-8 Ibs, found Paradise
Pt area on 12/21
(352) 563-5336
Young Male Cat
super friendly
found behind Fire Sta-
tion on Rock Crusher
Call to identify
(352) 634-2557




TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444


FIT OFFICE ASST
Crystal River, $8/hr,
General Office and MS
Office skills required. Full
time Benefits Fast
paced. Familiarity with
Citrus County a must!
Send Resumeto: cccc
reception(u@mail.com




HOUSEKEEPING
PERSON
Opening on house-
keeping staff at Citrus
Hills. Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including laundry,
as well as offices and
models needed.
Flexible part-time
schedule to include
weekends.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


958471326

172683495
5832 19647
641735982
297846153
826397514
719564238
435128769


ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindapracticemar
@tampabav.rr.com



F/T RN
IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429



NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER
RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
CST- Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY I
Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827


PIT, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE









C8 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


Sales / Project
Coordinator
Needed ASAP
Manufactured
Homes Exp. Req.
Serious inquires only!
Call Henry
(352) 795-1272






Accounts
Payable Clerk
position available.
Experience required.
Proficient in PO
processing, GL
coding, prepare and
check invoices for
payment, prepare
monthly reports and
basic accounting
skills. Proficient in
Microsoft Office Suite
and accounting
software knowledge.
Experience with
Computer Ease a
plus but not required.
EOE/DFWP company
Resume Submission
resumes@
dabcon com











SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




Kenmore (Sears) 700
series clothes washer
and GE dryer,
$350 for both.
Good condition.
352-419-7017
LG FRONT LOAD
WASHER lyr old. Perfect
cond. White, New $849
Selling for $650
(352) 527-3204
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHING MACHINE
$100 Kenmore Three
Speed Automatic Washer
Contact Rich @
352-897-4842


I aletb


DUDLEY'S

*ESTATE AUCTION**





Thurs 12/27
Special Hours
Preview: 3pm
Auction: 5pm
Professional Woodwork
Shop tools,
quality furniture,
Appliances, boat, scuba
& survey equip & tons
of surprises.
www.dudleysauction.
com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384



sALja
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
Fri 12/28, Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p, Antiques
Sat 12/29 Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p Gen.Merch.
Sun 12/30 Auction@ 1p
Tailgate Box Lot Auction
*WE BUY ESTATES"
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389




HITACHI 32' TV WITH
REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529

SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529

VIZIO 42 INCH 3D TV
Vizio E3D420VX 3D TV
LCD 1080p 120hz with
box and remote. Great
condition. 6 pairs of 3D
glasses included. $400
Gerome 352-322-6779




2G 7" TABLET TOUCH-
SCREEN MID ANDROID
2.2 OS PC WI Fl
(YELLOW) 60.00 OBO
352-212-7788


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


WANTED

l Are You
m Interested In:

Bemn your own


C Increasin, potential
earn ngs.

"- Growing your
. exclusive area?

-_ Working
'l -- independently?
-- Workinq with a
A-. successful company?

S ..- -. C O U N T Y - -v
0UIM

CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Deliver to stores and coin racks.
_ Experience preferred but not required.


Illr


k .


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




2 RECLINER CHAIRS
1 TAUPE LEATHER
1 MAROON CLOTH
$90 EACH
(352) 382-5814
2 VERY NICE CHAIRS
Light blue chr/rocker;
recliner reclines to a
sleeper. Thin stripes
$60/both (352) 795-3763
DINING TABLE SET
LOVELY LIGHT WOOD
SEATS 6 W/ CHAIRS & 2
LEAVES, SIZE 67 X 43/2
$250 (352) 860-1519
Lazy Boy Cordovan
Leather Dual Recliner
Loveseat 3 yrs. brand
new cond. org. $2,100
Asking $500.
Sculptured
Wall hanging
Tasmanian Artist
Carolyn Audet, 9 Little
brass fish on driftwood,
$100.
(352) 341-3651
LIGHT-COLORED
Wooden Table for
Breakfast Nook or
Kitchen Island, New
Condition 34"H 36"L
24"W Two Stools
ALL for $75.00
(352) 527-9930 BH
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK GUN CABINET
Etched glass front.Very
Nice.$265
Locks w/drawer
352-875-5134 Dunnellon
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
Daybed w/trundle & Mat.
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Solid Oak Enter-
tertainment, Center
leaded glass trim,
3 lighted sect. lighted,
fits up to 42" TV, 9ft 6"
W, 20"D 6'2/2H, Holds
220 CD's/DVD's $500
obo Antique Roll Top
Desk, beautiful carve
front, 5'W 30" D $400.
obo (352) 746-7318


Seldom used. $325
Call for email photo
352-382-1039
Solid oak Not Veneer
Coffee Table with swivel
top to increase available
surface area.
Solid Oak 6 sided end
table w/ glass top $70 for
Both (352) 341-3651



CRAFTSMAN ROTARY
LAWN MOWER Briggs
and Stratton engine; 20 "
cut. New, Never used.
$75. 352-344-8468



SALE
MOWERS
Novia West Moving
Sale
Grasshopper 227
w/ 61" deck;
Grasshopper 430D
w/ 72" deck;
Grasshopper 620
w/48" deck.
Please call for pricing
(352) 622-1200
Weed Eater hedge
trimmer $10
352-860-0183




DUDLEY'S

**ESTATE AUCTION**





Thurs 12/27
Special Hours
Preview: 3pm
Auction: 5pm
Professional Woodwork
Shop tools,
quality furniture,
Appliances, boat, scuba
& survey equip & tons
of surprises.
www.dudleysauction.
com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384




BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING SIZE 5 & 6 SHIRTS,
PANTS & JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
MENS BLACK
MOTORCYCLE JACKET
& VEST. EXC COND
$150 (352)897-4549


P 111A TBLE5FOT
LONG GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
Trademark 3-in-1
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey,
and Foosball), 42.5 x 33
x 33-Inch, space saving
design, $350. 419-7017
TV PANASONIC 27" TV,
w/remote WORKS
GREAT U pick up Pine
Ridge $40.00
352 270 1775
Webber Grill
$20, Black & Decker
Workmate Table $20
352-860-0183
WET/DRY VAC Sears,6
1/2 HP, Exc. running,
extra filter & manual.
$35.00 352-746-4160



GO GO SCOOTER
Elite, used only a few
times, like new $375 firm
u-pick-up, 352-560-3874



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



Cassio Keyboard
WK1800, like new,
Stand and bench in-
cluded $200 cash,
Citrus Hills
352-637-6762



CHAMPION JUICER
Fresh juice for your
health! Almond color, in
excellent condition $160
(828) 4834550
Crystal River
Health Meter Scale
$25
352-860-0183



BICYCLE 28" Diamond-
back Edgewood hybrid
24sp exc condition.$145.
352-419-7200
REDUCED
BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $499. OBO
A Great Holiday Gift
352-697-2771
SOLD
TREADMILL Pro-form
490-C like new. Do not
use. Need space. Paid
$350, will sell for $100

o'jw 7 ;,


"W"-




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
CH1u am rneeflaA


PEACHES
Peaches is a 10+
year-old black lab
retriever female who
came to the shelter
as a stray. She is
housebroken,
Heartworm-negative,
and spayed. She is a
very calm, gentle,
affectionate older
girl. However, she has
just been diagnosed
with mammary can-
cer. Her prognosis is
unknown at this time,


F6 BENGAL CAT CUBS
*Spotted & Marbles*
*Snows & Browns*
*$275, FL Health*
*Cert. & Shots*
*352-601-5362*
LABRADOODLE
PUPPIES 2 left! 1 black
male, 1 cream female.
Born 9/21/12. Shots,
dewormed, health certs.,
flea protection,
heartworm prevention.
Please call for prices.
352-410-0080


Livestock


8 MAN ZODIAK 8 man NFL Dept for details although she does e
inflatable zodiak boat AUTHENTIC NFL MIAMI 352-563-5966 not appear to be in
$100 (352) 270-3641 DOLPHIN JACKET LIKE any pain and is fairly .
16" Pedestal Fan NEW, WORN TWICE active for her age.
$15 $70. (352) 795-3763 With good care she
352-860-0183 BROWNING Auto 22 could still have a rela-
ADDING MACHINE Rifle W/ Browning scope tively good life. We
Unisonic Desk Top 12 $425; WINCHESTER volunteers at the
Digit Memory Elec. Print- 30-30 Caliber, Model 94, shelter are hoping *** *t***
ing Calculator $25.00 W/ Peep Scope $375 with all our hearts to Tell that special
352-746-4160 (352) 746-0070 $100 each for find a compassion-
CORNING WARE Concealed Weapons FLORIDA LICENSE ate, caring individual person
CORNING WARE ConcealedWeapons PLATES FROM CITRUS orfamily who would Happy Birthday"
$2 each-no covers Permit Course w with a classified ad
Blue Cornflower DAN'S GUN ROOM COUNTY THAT BEGIN be willing to share with a classified a
Spice of Lfe (352) 726-5238 WITH THE NUMBER 47 their home with under Happy
Spice of Life (352) 726-5238 for years 1938 Peaches, which Notes.
352-527-8287 Ladies 26" Lamborghini 1942,1943,1945,1947 would most likely be Only $28.50
HAND Sweeper Road Bike 1948, 1949, 1950, 1954. her last home. When includes a photo
$20, Miter Saw $20 21 speed like new Up to $1000 for any her time comes she
Hand Spreader $5 $129. Florida porcelain li- would be euthanized Call our Classified
352-860-0183 (352) 249-4460 cense plate dated at the shelter free of Dept for details
HITCH, factory made MELEX GOLF 1911-1917. Any charge. She is a very 352-563-5966
2k gross weight, de- CART condition accepted, gentle girl who
signed for sml vehicle 36 volf Excellent so long as they are causes no trouble
incl. 2 ball mounts, pin & Condition, $1100. readable. Jeff Francis whatsoever. She gets
clip$100 obo, call any- 352-527-3125 727 424 1576 email along with other
time 352-586-7658 Pool Table gobucs13@aol.com dogs and with chil-
dren, and is com-
LENOX CRYSTAL VASE 4 x 8 ft, 1 slate, pletely not interested BRING YOUR
4"Odler leather pockets, WANT TO BUY HOUSE in cats. She would fit FISHINGPOLE
Exc Cond oak frame $700 or MOBILE Any Area into just about any FISHING POLE!
$7 352-527-8287 (352) 586-9598 Condition or Situation. home situation and M-
missionincitrus.com SAVAGE MODEL 340 Call Fred, 352-726-9369 be very happy there.
Citrus County's Only 222 Rem. cal. scope 4 __We truly don't want -
Emergency Homeless clips exc. Cond $375 May the shelter to be the
& Veteran's Shelters take partial trade on gun. last home she knows.
Now 80-100 a night (352) 564- 0036 Is there any who
includes 18 children Call 8am till 9pm would be able to
EMERGENCY FUNDS STETSON HAT 10OX open their heart and
& Other needsgare New in the Box size 7 5 Tiny Yorkies their home for this INVERNESS, FL
needed at this time. Cream color $125 $550 and up, Small, sweet older dog? 55+ park on lake w/5
352-794-3825 (352) 746-0070 Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2 Please call Joanne piers, clubhouse and
S--Tanning Bed- females,1 Male Maltese, at 352-795-1288. much more! Rent
QUANTUM 6000 professional 24 Lam Raised in loving home. includes grass cutting
POWER WHEEL CHAIR Professiona024 Lamp CKC Reg. health certs, & and your water
ex. cond., batt. charger, Hot Tub, color marble puppy pacs. Parents on 1 BEDROOM
cushion $2,500.00 obo gay22Voseas46 site come watch them start@$325 inc. H20
(352) 527-2085 600. (352) 586-9598 play (352) 212-4504 ----- 2 BEDROOMS
RV TIRE 255.70R.22.5 Two Club Car Golf or (352) 212-1258 start@$450 inc. H20
TRUCK NEW NEVER Two Club Car Golf-Pets considered and
MOUNTED RV or Truck Cart's -2007 BEAGLEPUPPIES section 8 accepted.
new 335.00 sell 100.00 Excellent Condition! BEAGLE Call352-476-4964
352 270 1775 48 volt, FAST, $125 Ca r 3 detail!
exc. batteries $1850 ea. Crystal River Area For Details!
SOLD 352-527-3125 386-344-4218 RED MINIATURE HERNANDO
CLUB CAR 2 Seater, 386-344-4219 POODLE PUPS 2/1 $450 mo+dep
weather cover, lights, f tilityM 7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND 1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
mirrors, Trojan batteries 4Tra r Dachshunds Mini 1 FEMALE; $850. 352-201-2428
excel. cond. $1,400. Long hair Xmas pups, REGISTRATION AND
TIRE 295.80R 22.5 RV NEW females, black & cream. HEALTH CERTIFI- HERNANDO
TRUCK Michelin XZA 2 HAULMARK 6X12 Champion blood lines. CATES; AVAILABLE RENT TO OWN, 2/1/
85% tread ready for road ENCLOSED TRAILERS Ready when you are! 12-22-12. CALL older mobile needs TLC
or spare. 100.00 U pick ONLY $1999. $300 (352) 795-6870 352-419-8233 OR $1,000 Down, $275. mo
up 352 270 1775 (352) 621-3678 or (352) 220-4792 janiceannross@msn.com (352) 726-9369


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179

Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent CIng.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109





Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549





Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549





JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S*
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *r




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696


SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *


All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est.
* 352-257-9508 A*



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820




The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




LARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
***352-302-3523***
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



GOOD MORNING LAWN
CARE
Leaves to Lawns *
Call 352-502-6588
GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.







Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Requirements:

* Ability to work overnight
* Covered Truck, Van or SUV
* Clean Driving Record
* Credit & Background Check
* Access to your own help
* Lifting and physical ability
* Team Player
* Must have a back-up plan
Computer & Internet Access


I


Do you have what it takes?

* Attention to detail
* 365 Days/Year
* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented
* Flexible under pressure
* Positive Thinker
* Hard and smart worker
* Keen sense of urgency


12 26 @ Laughingstock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIIck lor UIS, 2012

"I gotta be at the airport in three
minutes. I'm driving."





Thank You For 15 Years, of tes!l


SI / / ^ BEAUIIFLRESUULTSI


. WILLA.
mS CONSTRUCTION CORP


nsura3 insi


Slll or Swap II


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I et









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1 bath. NICE
SWMH ON BIG YARD,
FENCED BACKYARD,
SCREENED BACK
PORCH, IN NICE AREA
ON PAVED STREET.
PETS ALLOWED
$495./MT, IST, LAST,
$300 DEPOSIT.
CALL 352 634-3862 OR
794-3760
HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last &Sec
(352) 382-5661
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $425/mo.+ util. No
Pets, 1574 S. Iroquois
Ave (352) 503-7562
MINI FARMS
C.R., 2/1, 2.5 Acres
$525.mo (352) 564-1242




2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 150 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740) 255-0125
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
caroort on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On 1/ Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807
Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used
Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail. -
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498
HERNANDO/486 1+acre,
2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man
Cave/Work Shop w/AC
28x40, $47,500 J. Desha
Cndland Real Estate
(352)634-6340
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660




2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987
FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420
INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352) 212-8873


INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352-419-6476
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804
Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch, 2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958
MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$8,000. (708) 308-3138





COMING
SOON!
RV RENTALS
CONSIGNMENT USA I
I US 19 ByAirport CR
For Info 461-4518




HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
*Ready to Move In 4
Owner Financina Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272




CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2,House w/Gar., $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/I BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
LECANTO
Nice, Clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000




Homosassa Spgs
SmlRestaurant/Pizza
Shop for Rent, $800
269-369-2509
INVERNESS
Retail/Office, 1,200 SF, +
Storage (352) 637-1904




INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$700. mo 317-442-1063


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
INVERNESS
2/1 near hospital
fam. room, scn porch.
$600 352-422-2393
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225





For Sale 1,,

CHASSA-

HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800




INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-586-9932


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY


Motivated seller
wants this aone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"

www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




HERANADO
3 Bay industrial bldg.
acre lot fenced $1200
mo+ elec(352) 637-1411




HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856




Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE-
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135




OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000.4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558




HOMOSASSA SPRINGS






2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511


CLASSIFIED






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023



I Nf^ Ed


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


I've SOLD
20 Properties
this year!
I NEED LISTINGS!









DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real EstateL..
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn

"MERRY CHRISTMAS!"
....and,
Happy New Year!


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bring your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
back yard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164













Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

*Buy or Sell*

I'll Represent
YOU

ERA
American Realty


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 C9


LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857

DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116

KINGS BAY AREA
A Special home on deep
water. $460,000
804 SE 1st Court, Cyr Riv
(352) 795-3264

Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den & fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock,
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925

WATERFRONT HOMES
I have them. Cottage 2/2
renovated 59,500, 3/2/2
5 yrs old, Furn, $149,000
(352) 419-6880
Tropic Shores Realty

YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


L!J EMfL&i

SCAN OR GO TO
www.
BestNaiureiCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"





Relocating family need-
ing atleast a 3/2/2 home
in Hernando Elementary
school district. Pre ap-
proved/ fast transactions.
No Real Estate Agents
Kenny (419) 544-9355





**Heatherwood 581"*
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435






For Sale ,,,,l

8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this beautiful GOLF
COURSE lot (100X125)
located in Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Have
fun boating, fishing and
jet skiing on the nearby
Tsala Apopka Chain of
Lakes. Enjoy nature, wild-
life and the natural beauty
of Fort Cooper State
Park. Call Kelly at
860-459-2411

HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot, wet lands
on Lee Woods Drive
112x 114 ft. river ac-
cess, but not on River
$7,000. 352-621-1664





BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945




15 ft ALUM. BOAT WIDE
DEEP V, 25HP ELEC.
START, TRAILER.
OLDER BUT CHEAPER!
$995 (352) 341-4949



MUST SE


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855


WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Cairo river distance (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CA

and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Move the locale of a snowbank (1) they will fit in the letter


3. Confiscate lock openers (1)


4. Ship's wharf space merriment (1)


5. "Guilt Trip" star Seth's work boots (2)


)g
AT
), and


squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word.

02012UFS,Dist byUnv UclickforUFS


6. Highly uncommonly exactly (2)


7. Final-choice-making exactitude (3)


NOISIJlhd NOISIEGI L AIItflvaIS AiT I 9 SNVDOOHH SN[OO1 's
HaINI HAI3H 't SAHI 3ZI3S '* 13(IL dMIHS g HIW 3HIN 'i
12-26-12 SH MSNV



U : I 1 1 N n


1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945



AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7000 352-637-1391
TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warrantymany extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506




DUTCHMAN 40FT
2012-2 slides, 2 ac's
new $51,900 ask. $32k
obo, call for more info
(850) 449-1811 Homoss.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




2366-1226 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-299
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
DAVID DIBARTOLOMEO
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 09-5193
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 27 PB 9
PG 54 LOT 9 BLK 1483
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: MARIA COLON
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on January 9, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated November 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
DecemberS, 12, 19 & 26,
2012
2367-1226 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-307
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
JOSEPH G CAPPUCCILLI
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 09-1464
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
LOT 7: COM AT SW COR
OF SEI/4 OF NEI/4 OF
NEI/4, TH S 89 DEG 55M


A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333




1997 DODGE
STRATUS- ES
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 97,000 mi
$2800 (352) 341-3991

2000 Chevy Corvette
Metallic Bowling Green
Std shift, one owner,
& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874

2003 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LXI
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 71,500 miles
$4300 (352) 341-3991

A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113

CHEVROLET
2000 IMPALA
$4995
352-341-0018




7S E ALS LN OF SEI/4 OF
NEI/4 OF NEI/4 353.18 FT
TO POB TH S 89 DEG 55M
7S E AL S LN 153.5 FT, TH N
0 DEG 20M 43S E 300 FT,
TH N 89 DEG 55M 7S W
153.5 FT, TH S 0 DEG 20M
43S W 300 FT TO POB DESC
IN OR BK 1335 PG 1203
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: LAWRENCE M
KURUC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on January 9, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated November 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 5, 12, 19 & 26,
2012
2368-1226 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-294
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
US BANK CUSTODIAN FOR
TRC-SPE LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO:
10-10390 YEAR OF ISSU-
ANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
FERRIS GROVE SPRING IS-
LAND PARK UNIT 1 PB 11
PG 23 LOT 40 DESC IN OR
BK 734 PG 1522 & OR BK
744 PG 7
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: KAREN SEELY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such


$6850
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004 TRAILBLAZER
4 X4 $6999
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2001 TOWN &
COUNTRY $4550
352-341-0018
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
MR2 SPYDER
2002 TRD model, 1
owner. Mint condition.
Garage kept, no acci-
dents, smoking, or pets.
New soft top & leather
seats. C352-464-7501.
$13.5K.
NISSAN
2005 ALTIMA SE V6
$7495
352-341-0018




certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on January 9, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated November 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 5, 12, 19 & 26,
2012
2369-0109 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-238
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010-1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-8291
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
GREENBRIAR TWO CONDO
DECL IN OR BK 687 PG
1199 PHASE XIII UNIT 4B
BLDG 34 DESC IN OR BK
668 PG 52
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: GREENBRIAR TWO
CONDOMINIUM ASSOC
INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on January 23, 2013 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated December 3, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 19, 2012
December 26, 2012
January 2, 2013
January 9, 2013


761-1226 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 2012-CP-000703
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
BARBARA L. PATRICK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Barbara L. Patrick, deceased, whose date of
death was October 1, 2012 is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, File Number 2012-CP-000703; the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands


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C 10 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8500 obo 382-0428
TOYOTA
'05 Camry LE, Silver.
leather interior, very good
condition, 86k miles.
$8900 (352) 637-2838
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$24,900, 352-513-4257






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
Quad cab 360 body, tires
& interior good, needs
engine & transmission
work $1800 or best offer
352-464-4764
FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
352-270-7420 $5,000
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
NEW POLARIS
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.

POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN ATV.
4X4, SERVICED AND
READY FOR HUNTING
SEASON. $2995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR TOUR
DELUXE, READY FOR A
ROAD TRIP ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678



'08 Suzuki Burgman 400
Candy apple red, exc.
cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi
per gallon, luggage back,
& garage kept. $4500
(352) 897-4549



HONDA


1986, V4, Magna,
750CC, needs Carbs
cleaned, otherwise
road ready, clean Fl.
Title many extras $600.
Greg 352-419-7382



KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 550 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 FIRM. Phone
352-726-8124


against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is December 19, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq. Don W. Patrick
Florida Bar No. 0857750 3805 East Garnett
Court
VanNess & VanNess, P.A. Hernando, FL 34442
1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa.com
December 19 & 26, 2012.

762-1226 WCRN
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CrIRUS COUNIYFLORIDA
File No 2012CP577 PROBATE DIVISION
PUBLIC NOTICE
Matthew Bruce Cook File No 2012CP577 Notice to Creditors
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MATTHEW BRUCE COOK
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MATTHEW BRUCE COOK, deceased, whose
date of death was March 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the
personal representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is December 19th, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representatives: Personal Representatives:
/s/LETICIA VEGA, ESQ. /s/CYNTHIA WATSON
Attorney for Personal Representatives 9710 S. Appaloosa Ave.
Florida Bar Number: 658626 Floral City, Florida 34436
FOWLER WHITE BURNETT, P.A.
Espirito Santo Plaza
1395 Brickell Avenue, 14th Floor /s/BUFFY SMITH
Miami, FL 33131 9585 S. Appaloosa Ave.
Telephone: (305) 789-9227 Floral City, Florida 34436
Fax: (305) 728-7577, E-Mail: Ivega@fowler-white.com
Secondary E-Mail: klynch@fowler-white.com
December 19th and 26th


763-1226 WCRN
Cathleen Louise Sandy File No: 2072CP686 Notice to
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF File No.: 2012CP686
CATHLEEN LOUISE SANDY


Cred,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No:2012CP686


Deceased.




NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CATHLEEN LOUISE SANDY, deceased, whose
date of death was March 1, 2012; File Number 2012CP686 is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative s attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: December 19, 2012.
Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire FBN: 114278 THOMAS R. DAVIS, JR.
dba@gendersalvarez.com Personal Representative
Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire FBN: 146528 246 Cherrywood Drive
afd@gendersalvarez.com Lake Wales, FL 33898
GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE, P.A., 2307 West Cleveland Street
Tampa, Florida 33609, Phone: (813) 254-4744 Fax: (813) 254-5222
December 19 & 26, 2012.

768-0102 WCRN
Joslyn B. Dixon File No: 2012-CP-636 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2012-CP-636
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSLYN B. DIXON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOSLYN B. DIXON deceased, whose date of
death was October 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is dECEMBER 26, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/Megan T. Fitzpatrick /s/ Brock A. Davis
FITZPATRICK & FITZPATRICK, P.A. 4935 Apricot Court
213 North Apopka Avenue Castro Valley, California 94546
Inverness, Florida 34450-4239, 352-726-1821, Florida Bar No. 84987
December 26 & January 2, 2013.

769-0102 WCRN
Bettie Jo Cornett Case No: 2012CP713 Notice to Cred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012CP713
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
BETTIE JO CORNETT, Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the Estate of Bettie Jo Cornett, deceased, File Number 2012CP713, by the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, FL, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450; that the total cash value of the estate is
$39,832.50, and that the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned
by such order is:John W. Cornett, 3499 S. Enright Terr., Homosassa, FL 34448.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this Notice is served within three
months after the date of the first publication of this Notice must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is December 26, 2012.
Attorney for Person(s) Giving Notice: Person(s) Giving Notice:
/s/BRUCE CARNEY, ESQUIRE /s/JOHN W. CORNETT
Florida Bar No. 0045705 3499 s. Enright Terr.
Carney & Associates, P.A. Homosassa FL 34448
7655 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Ste. 2, Crystal River, FL 34429, 352/795-8888
December 26 & January 2, 2012.


767-1226 WCRN
01-07 meeting Citrus County Water & Wastewater Authority
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY WATER & WASTEWATER AUTHOR-
ITY will meet on Monday, January 7, 2013, at 1:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as possi-
ble, in the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room #166,
Lecanto, Florida to discuss such matters as may properly come before the Authority.
This meeting is open to the public.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Utility Regulation, 3675
E. Orange Drive, Hernando, Florida 34442-4353, at least one week before the meet-
ing. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone (352) 527-5312.
The Citrus County Water & Wastewater Authority will render its decisions based on
the evidence brought forward under the powers vested in it in F.S. 367.171 and Citrus
County Code, Chapter 102, Article IV. ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DE-
CISION OF THIS AUTHORITY WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS PERTAINING
THERETO AND THEREFORE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
BY:
HARRY M. KILGORE, CHAIRMAN
CITRUS COUNTY WATER & WASTEWATER AUTHORITY
December 26, 2012.

770-1226 WCRN
01 7-02 Advisory Council Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus Springs Advisory Council will meet on
Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 9:00 o'clock A.M., at the Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Building "B", Citrus Springs, Florida, to con-
duct business of the Citrus Springs Municipal Service Benefit Unit.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Advisory Council with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


Joan Dias, Chairwoman
December 26, 2012.


B y:


CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU


All Remaining


Will Be


THIS WEEK




To Make Room For




The Incoming


Citrus County's



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Metn


Metn


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 Cll


$19,483A/285mo.


$15,988/2236mo.


$21,988/320mo. s22,998/335mo.


40,988/588mo.


2009 BUICK
ENCLAVE CXL


2012 TOYOTA
CAMRY XLEI


2005 DODGE 2006 CADILLAC
RAM 1500 DTS LUXURY


$27,988/405Mo.


$25,988/377mo


2012 CADILLAC 2
CTS LUXURY LA


$29,788/430mo.


$21,988/320mo.


$27,488/O398M,. $11,998/180mo.
2009 CHEVY 2008 HUMMER
CORVETTE H2



$35,488/510Mo. $39,988/574m,.


2005 CADILLAC
DEVILLE


$11,998p180Mo.
2010 CHEVY
SILVERADO


1 3,988/P208mo.


2005 JEEP LIBERTY
LIMITED 4X4


$7,9 881 23Mo. 6,988/109mo. $16,58O8244Mo.


$8,988P1 3 7 o.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IL


$11,488/173mo.




C12 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012


THE PERFECT LAST MINUTE
GIFT IS AT STALL!


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-9054


2010 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER


2010 HYUNDAI SONATA


FRE2 H E6RE : H D PC PCN


2010 NISSAN ALTIMA


2010 CHEVY EQUINOX


$9999 $12,999 $12,999 $15,999
OR$1 56M OR$203 OR$.203 RM. o.250 ,


2010 CHRYSLER 300


2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE


2009 CHRYSLER SEBRING


2009 SCION XD


13058,87 ExtMe:1EI U-SW-.5. :755 :ld.18


S :6. *. 'sM~ i: u g^ iJ3. '.:rlI *~ e::.Bs 5=* ^.


$15,999 $16,999 $S9999 $9999
ORi$250M o,$266S OR$ $156i .OR.$156M.


2009 HYUNDAI ELANTRA


2009 DODGE JOURNEY


RIE 2 H .,M MMEWIH NFOMDSWMPCIN
1430%V 755Ed3 2586m


2009 HYUNDAI SANTE FE


2009 CHEVY EQUINOX


1 66!,24H M A IN.Aj ..6S IW
1-800-584,875: 1 Ex.36 1y 1-800-584-8755 Eld=n 3097


$9999 $11,999 $12,999 $12,999
R$1 56 M, OR$188 M, OR$203k M OR.203Eo.


2009 CADILAC CTS


2008 NISSAN ROGUE


2008 DODGE CHARGER


2008 CHEVY SILVERADO


1-800-58"755 6 t.fl 180-584-875 .63


:66 : ii : '1 i"' .66 :


$23999 $11,999 $11,999 $13,999
RS*375i oR$188O O OR$188M OS219


2008 NISSAN TITAN


U i I
:*i~ii i 3lMH11fI 1~


2008 TOYOTA TACOMA


2008 TOYOTA SEQUOIA


FIVE24HRRECORDD AWITH EI
1-800-58"755 Ed.1 8111i


$14,999 $15,999 $22,999
OR$235. 3 OR$250 a OR$360'3o


2008 FORD F350


FREE 2:4 HR RECORDEDMBAWITHI :11D'SPECAL P:
1-80-8"55 dA37


$25999
OR$407 M


A
r ,' ,~~


ii
0


I\


CRYSTAL
A I I T ('H M H'n T I V \


352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL

*PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE
WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 72 MONTHS AT 3.99%APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


REEl4HRRCIM MSSAE'r WITH NOADSEAL PtCING1
1-80058"75 ExA255


1%


1%


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-*r


* Fr


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