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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-25-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02981

Full Text


MERRY CHRISTMAS!


TODAY
& next
morning


HIGH
76 Partly sunny.
LOW PAGE A4
64


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


I TLm U E S Dw k~


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 140


SO YOU KNOW
* Early holiday
deadlines for
today mean lot-
tery numbers will
not be published
in today's Chroni-
cle. Look for the
payouts printed
in Wednesday's
edition.
Early deadlines
also mean stocks
will not be in
today's paper.
The stock market
will also be
closed Christmas
Day.


LOCAL NEWS:


CMHS to keep Sugarmill walk-in clinic

no difference. There will be made plans to do that.
Facility had been slated for closure no break in service." Residents in Homosassa
CMHS opened the Sug- and Sugarmill complained
armill Woods center in 2009. about the decision.
MIKE WRIGHT CMHS Chief Executive Officer Along with a walk-in clinic, "The community let us
Staff writer Ryan Beaty said a local family- the complex includes diag- know in no uncertain terms
practice physician, Dr. Wright Her- nostic imaging and physical they really appreciated the
CRYSTAL RIVER Citrus Me- nandez, will oversee the clinic and therapy, walk-in clinic," Beaty said.
morial Health System has a Christ- operate a private practice onsite at While the other services Ryan BeatyWe spent several months
mas gift for the residents of the same time. thrived, the walk-in portion trying to figure out a way we
southwest Citrus County The clinic will be open 8 a.m. to never received the amount of pa- can keep the walk-in clinic, or some
The walk-in clinic at Sugarmill 5 p.m. Monday through Friday to ac- tient traffic that CMHS anticipated. semblance of it."
Woods, slated to close Jan. 1 in a cept walk-in patients, Beaty said. Hospital officials said in September Hernandez, who lives in
budget-cutting move, will remain "It'll be very seamless," Beaty they could save $500,000 by closing
open after all. said. "The average person will see the walk-in clinic after Dec. 31 and See Page A4





All smiles for Christmas


Still open
A storefront gets
smashed by a car over
the weekend./Page A3
WORLD NEWS:
U.S. death
An Afghan policewoman
kills an American
contractor./Page AO1
NATIONAL NEWS:








Gun control
Lawmakers, NRA debate
ban on assault
weapons./Page AO1
HEALTH & LIFE:


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Ronnie Badolato is all smiles this Christmas. The Beverly Hills resident is raising her six grandchildren and has recently received a vast array of
community support.

Woman raising six grandchildren blessed with generosity from community


Alert biz
A small town in Iowa
does international
business./Page Cl


ASK THE EXI












Health
Doctors Beni
Gandhi, Grill
Kumar share
expertise./Pa


PERTS:



I


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
BEVERLY HILLS
With tears in her eyes and
a smile beaming across
her face, Ronnie
Badolato couldn't stop saying
thank you.
Thank you to the people of Cit-
rus County. Thank you to God.
Thank you to members of her


mous women's lunch bunch.
Thank you to Progress Energy.
Her heartfelt thanks is in re-
sponse to a Sept. 9 Chronicle
story profiling the unemployed
single grandmother raising her
six grandchildren with fierce de-
votion, tenacity and self-reliance.
She never asked for anything
more than prayers for her family
In fact, she balks at accepting
charity.


hearts. That's what people re-
sponded to.
"I started getting phone calls at
the house a lady from Inver-
ness called and said, 'I'm not a
rich lady,' and told me the story
about her sons, about how she
and her husband were doing
everything they could for their
grandchildren and told me not to
give up hope," Mrs. Badolato
said.


church, to friends and strangers, "We're OK. We'll be OK. We Teachers frc
I to the YMCA, the Knights of don't need anything," she told the called to see w
Columbus, the American Legion Chronicle in September needed. The w
women's auxiliary, to an anony- That's what touched people's of the local An




& Life Port study beset by delays


nett,
o and
their
age Cl


Comics . . . . .C7
Community ...... .C5
Crossword ....... .C6
Editorial ........ A10
Entertainment . . .B4
Horoscope ....... .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B4
M ovies .......... .C7
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ....... .C8
TV Listings ....... C6


6 84178 2002! U 51


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Port Citrus, the Chroni-
cle's No. 1 story of 2011,
stumbled over obstacles
during 2012 on its way to a
feasibility study
"Why would anyone be
afraid of finding out whether
this port is valid or not?"
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe, who also is the port
director, asked more than
once during the year as the
project and study were met
with legal challenges.
Citrus County Port Au-
thority board members' first
move of 2012 was to don


2012 Year in REVIEW


their Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners'
(BOCC) personae to conduct
a public hearing to adopt a
port element within the
county's comprehensive
plan. This they did on
Jan. 10.
The port element adop-
tion was a condition of pro-
ceeding with the application
for a grant through the
Florida Seaport Transporta-
tion and Economic Develop-
ment Council to perform a
feasibility study regarding
the establishment of a port


in Citrus C(
located $50
on conditic
matching it
came from t
Economic
Council,
Connection
Last wee
Board Mei
who also is
emphasize(
paid only $
$100,000 fe;
"It has be


county FSTED al-
,000 for the study
on of the county
t. Matching funds
the Citrus County


om the kids' schools
what the family
women's auxiliary
nerican Legion


called around Thanksgiving to
say they wanted to treat
grandma, since so many others
focused on the grandkids.
"I bought myself some clothes
and a pocketbook, and I didn't
feel guilty," Mrs. Badolato said.
"It was a nice feeling."
The choir director at Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church in Bev-
erly Hills contacted the Knights
of Columbus, which offered to
help with anything she needed
for the kids anything. The
See Page A9


Shoppers swarm

stores, spend less

Sales down from lastyear


Associated Press


Development ATLANTA Christmas
CLM Workforce shoppers thronged malls
i and the BOCC. and pounced on discounts
k, Port Authority but apparently spent less
mber Joe Meek, this year, their spirits
BOCC chairman, dampened by concerns
d that the county about the economy and the
;8,000 toward the aftermath of shootings and
asibility study storms.
*en a very limited Talk about more than
just the usual job worries
See Page A4 to cloud the mood: Confi-


dence among U.S. con-
sumers dipped to its low-
est point in December
since July amid rising eco-
nomic worries, according
to a monthly index re-
leased Friday
Marshal Cohen, chief re-
search analyst at NPD Inc.,
a market research firm
with a network of analysts
at shopping centers


PageA2


CITR U-S C 0 U N T Y adl.ac





HlONICLr, .T.o
__www.chronicleonline.com-


-r





A2 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012

SHOPPING
Continued from Page Al

nationwide, estimates cus-
tomer traffic over the week-
end was in line with the
same time a year ago, but
that shoppers seem to be
spending less.
"There was this absence
of joy for the holiday,"
Cohen said. "There was no
Christmas spirit. There
have been just too many dis-
tractions."
Shoppers are increas-
ingly worried about the "fis-
cal cliff" deadline the
possibility that a stalemate
between Congress and the
White House over the U.S.
budget could trigger a series
of tax increases and spend-
ing cuts starting Jan. 1
The recent Newtown,
Conn., school shooting also
dampened shoppers' spirits
atop the fall's retail woes
after Superstorm Sandy's
passage up the East Coast.
The Northeast and Mid-
Atlantic, which account for
24 percent of retail sales na-
tionwide, were tripped up
by Sandy when the enor-
mous storm clobbered the
region in late October, dis-
rupting businesses and
households for weeks.
All that spelled glum
news for retailers, which
can make up to 40 percent of
annual sales during Novem-
ber and December.
The Saturday before
Christmas was expected to
be the second biggest sales
day behind the Friday after
Thanksgiving.
After a strong Black Fri-
day weekend, the four-day
weekend that starts on
Thanksgiving, when sales
rose 2.7 percent, the lull that
usually follows has been
even more pronounced.
Sales fell 4.3 percent for the
week ended Dec. 15, accord-
ing to the latest figures from
ShopperTrak, which counts
foot traffic and its own pro-


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


prietary sales numbers from
40,000 retail outlets across
the country On Wednesday,
ShopperTrak cut its forecast
for holiday spending down to
2.5 percent growth to $257.7
billion, from prior expecta-
tions of a 3.3 percent rise.
Online, sales rose just 8.4
percent to $48 billion from
Oct 28 through Saturday, ac-
cording to a measure by Mas-
terCard Advisors' Spending
Pulse. That is below the on-
line sales growth of between
15 to 17 percent seen in the
prior 18-month period, ac-
cording to the data service,
which tracks all spending
across all forms of payment,
including cash.
At the malls, overall pro-
motions were up 2 to 3 per-
cent from last year heading
into the pre-Christmas
weekend, after being down 5
percent earlier in the sea-
son, according to BMO Capi-
tal Markets sales rack index,
which tracks the depth and
breadth of discounts.
Attempting to drum up
enthusiasm, retailers have
expanded hours and
stepped up discounts.
At The Garden State
Plaza, teen retailer Aero-
postale discounted all cloth-
ing and accessories by 60
percent Charles David, Ca-
chet and AnnTaylor had cut
prices by 50 percent of all
merchandise. At AnnTaylor,
racks of discounted clothes
had been marked down by
an additional 25 percent.
One dress, originally priced
at $118, was marked down to
$49 but with the additional
25 percent, it cost $21.30.
But the deals at the mall
failed to impress Wendy Mc-
Closkey, 35, of Lebanon,
Ind., who started her holi-
day shopping Sunday at the
Castleton Square Mall in In-
dianapolis. A snow storm
that blustered through the
Midwest this week delayed
her shopping plans
"I was so surprised. I fig-
ured they'd have better
deals," she said.


This is a
WINGED ANT


F,4 g


Homosassa 621-7700
Crystal River 795-8600 FREE INSPECTIONS
Inverness 860-1037


This is a
WINGED TERMITE
$n* t"*


I -


Associated Press
FedEx courier Andrew Standeven makes last minute deliveries to businesses Monday at the CambridgeSide Galleria mall
in Cambridge, Mass. Although fresh data on the holiday shopping season is expected in coming days, early figures point
to a ho-hum season for retailers despite last-ditch efforts to lure shoppers over the final weekend before Christmas.


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STATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Officelo Annual writeoff for state
holiday today


The Citrus County
Chronicle's circulation depart-
ment will be open from 7 to
10 a.m. Christmas day, Tues-
day, Dec. 25.
The Chronicle's Inver-
ness office will be closed
Tuesday, reopening Wednes-
day, Dec. 26.
All county government
offices will be closed Tuesday,
Dec. 25, in observance of the
Christmas holiday. County of-
fices will also be closed Tues-
day, Jan. 1, in observance of
New Year's Day.
For information, visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
The Citrus County Cen-
tral Landfill will be closed all
day Tuesday, Dec. 25. The
administration office will be
closed Tuesday, and will re-
open for regular business
Wednesday, Dec. 26. The
landfill will also be closed for
regular business Tuesday,
Jan. 1, and will reopen
Wednesday, Jan. 2.
Citrus County Animal
Services will be closed Tues-
day, Dec. 25, and closed
Tuesday, Jan. 1.
Kennel staff will be on-site
each day to clean and feed
the animals in their care.
For information, call 352-
746-8400 or visit the website
at www.citruscritters.com.
Restaurants open
Christmas Day
Area restaurants to be
open Christmas Day include:
Sabina's Diner (352-
586-4168) on U.S. 41 in
Hernando will be open from
6 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Samantha's Cafe (352-
344-0027) on State Road
200 north of Hernando will be
open from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m.
It's at the former site of
Brooklyn South Deli.
Huddle House restau-
rants at 321 S. U.S. 41, In-
verness (352-637-4255), and
1208 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal
River (352-564-0900), are
open 24 hours.
Ike's Old Florida Kitchen
at Izaak Walton Lodge (352-
447-4899), 6301 Riverside
Drive, Yankeetown, will be
open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Mulligan's (352-560-
0012), 1305 Norvell Bryant
Highway (C.R. 486), will be
open from 1 to 5 p.m. Call for
reservations.
Author to speak to
Republican group
Mauguerite Cavenaugh,
will speak about her award-
winning book, "Buzz Your
Business & Be The Best," at
1 p.m. at the Jan. 5 meeting
of the Ronald Reagan Re-
publican Assembly, 938 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19),
Crystal River, in the South
Square Plaza. Visit
MaugueriteCavenaugh.com
- books will be available for
purchase and refreshments
provided. For information
about the meeting, call 352-
257-5381. CASA donations
accepted.
Tows available for
holiday revelers
Ed's Towing and Scally's
Lube and Go are again par-
ticipating in the Tow to Go
program through Jan. 2. Driv-
ers who have consumed al-
cohol and run the risk of
being arrested for drunken
driving can receive a free tow
directly home by calling Ed's
Towing at 352-726-5223 or
Scally's at 352-860-0550.
Those requesting the serv-
ice are advised that they can
only be towed directly home
and not to other locations.
Prescription
cards available
The Citrus County govern-
ment offers a discount pre-
scription card.
The card is free to resi-
dents through a partnership
with the National Association
of Counties (NACo) and
gives a varying discount of up
to about 22 percent to resi-
dents who don't have insur-
ance or whose insurance
doesn't cover certain drugs.


Call 352-527-5900.
-From staff reports


Florida forgave

$124.2 million in

taxes and fnes

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE For the third
year in a row, Florida is giving up
on collecting more than $100 mil-
lion in taxes, fees and fines owed
the state.
But the amount of money the
state is walking away from contin-
ues to grow. Data released this past
month shows that the state forgave
$124.2 million in the fiscal year that
ended June 30.
Florida in 2011 wrote off $110.5
million as uncollectable, while the
number was more than $109 million
the year before.
The overall amount of money that
Florida is losing is small compared
with the size of the state's annual
$70 billion budget But the failure to


collect the money comes amid year
after year of state budget cuts.
State Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart
and the new Senate budget chief,
said even though the amount is
small he still wants the Legislature
to re-examine whether the state is
doing enough to collect money it is
owed.
"We want to be circumspect and
prudent with every dollar we have
available to us in the state budget,"
Negron said. "We'll take a fresh look
at that number and see if there is
any possibility of reducing that
amount."
A large portion nearly $37 mil-
lion that was written off by state
officials was unpaid taxes, includ-
ing sales taxes, corporate income
taxes and unemployment taxes.
A breakdown provided by the De-
partment of Revenue shows that
$15.4 million that was forgiven was
sales taxes owed by businesses.
Stores and other businesses are re-
quired to collect and then hand
over the state's 6 percent sales tax.
The agency also forgave $13.4 mil-


lion in unpaid income taxes from
corporations.
This year the state also closed the
books on trying to collect back
nearly $30.7 million that was over-
paid to people receiving unemploy-
ment compensation checks. These
overpayments were made when the
state's jobless rate was rising be-
tween the years of 2006 and 2009.
James Miller, a spokesman with
the Department of Economic Op-
portunity, pointed out that the
amount of money written off repre-
sents just 1.3 percent of the unem-
ployment compensation benefits
the state was paying annually
The names of businesses and res-
idents that owed money to the De-
partment of Revenue and had their
tax bills waived are kept confiden-
tial under state law. The names of
people who received too much in
jobless benefits are also exempt
from the state's public records law.
The Agency for Health Care Ad-
ministration reported that it waived
collection of nearly $14 million that
the state paid too much to more


Double damage


Crime, car

wreck make

for busy time

at one shop
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HERNANDO On
Monday, Gus Breitweg,
owner of Gus's Gold &
Gems in the Shoppes at
Citrus Hills Plaza in Her-
nando, was still reeling
from the events of last
week.
First, on Tuesday, his
shop was burglarized in
the early morning hours
- someone smashed his
glass front door, entered
the store, smashed a glass
case and stole some
merchandise.
"We get the door and
the case replaced, every-
thing cleaned up, every-
thing's good, we'll get
through this," he said,
"then on Friday, around
5:30, I was in the back
doing paperwork and
heard a loud boom."
He went on to describe
what happened: An eld-
erly man in a vehicle was
in the parking lot, facing
his store, and drove
through a row of hedges,
jumped the curb, ran
through his front window,
then through the wall ad-
joining Citrus Hills Nail
Salon.
"It was a mess," Bre-
itweg said. "I was
shocked. We just got
everything cleaned up
from the burglary, and
then this. But we're hang-
ing in there."
Next door at the nail
salon, the damage was
more extensive, including
injuries to the owner, Thi
Lee 0, and several cus-
tomers, according to an
employee, who said the


G60LD &


rl



.1.-
__-_ --. --





--
3"ir


__ ^I


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Shoppers make their way past a storefront Monday morning that was smashed by
a car over the weekend at the Shoppes of Citrus Hills Plaza. Damage to Citrus Hills
Nails and Gus's Gold and Gems has forced the businesses to utilize plywood to se-
cure the front of the stores.


car traveled between two
concrete pillars out in
front of the stores and then
between two pillars inside
the nail salon, hit the re-
ception desk and pushed
it and three other desks
into a raised island in the


center of the store, where
the car finally stopped.
The driver and his pas-
senger, an elderly woman,
were trapped inside the
car until rescue workers
could get them out.
Due to holiday staffing


at the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, an official re-
port was not available
Monday
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


Ted Williams postage stamp debuts in Keys

Florida Keys legendary
fishing guides including
from left, Stu Apte, Ga
Ellis and Skip Bradeen
i as well as pastor Tony
Hammon show repro
ductions of a U.S. Post
Service stamp honoring
the late baseball great
Ted Williams on Dec. 1
in Islamorada, Fla. The
quartet shared memori
of their experiences wi
N Williams who fished
and had a home in Isla
orada during a stam
presentation ceremony
the Matecumbe Histor
Trust. Williams, who w
,. a resident of Citrus
County and was drawn
,- here, in part, because
the fishing, died July 5
2002.
U-6.ANDY NEWMAN/Florida Keys Ne
Bureau


-


of numbers.
The numbers drawn Sunday
night were 01-02-03-13-17.


3ws


-From wire reports


than 100 health care providers
treating patients in the state's Med-
icaid program.
Shelisha Coleman, a spokes-
woman for the agency, however,
said that even though the debt has
been forgiven "the agency will con-
tinue to try to recoup taxpayer
dollars."
Coleman said if the provider files
for reimbursement of a new claim
then the agency can place a lien on
that claim in order to recover the
overpayment
Coleman, however, said in most
cases collections are unsuccessful
because either someone is dead or
in jail, or the company is dissolved
or has filed for bankruptcy
This year's total amount that is
being waived also includes nearly
$800,000 in fines owed to the
Florida Commission on Ethics by
public officials and others.
Republican legislative leaders
have already said they may enact
new measures in the coming year
that make it harder for elected offi-
cials to refuse to pay the fines.



Around

THE STATE

Fort Lauderdale

Wading bird nesting
dips again this year
South Florida officials say
wading bird nesting suffered in
2012 when too much water re-
turned to the region too fast.
The South Florida Water
Management District said a
rainy year following two years
of drought caught herons, wood
storks, ibises and egrets off
guard. Officials said the number
of wading bird nests declined
for the third straight year.
Wading birds can't nest or
abandon nests when water lev-
els are too high and small prey
fish aren't available. Officials
told the Sun Sentinel 26,395
wading bird nests were found
this year. In 2009, 77,505 nests
were found.
Officials said nesting totals in
the Florida Everglades also are
far below the targets set in state
and federal restoration plans.
Wading birds typically nest
during Florida's winter-to-spring
dry season.

Miami

Ex-Marine hospitalized
after Mexico release
A Marine veteran who spent
months in a Mexican prison
after trying to carry an heirloom
shotgun across the border had
to be hospitalized on his way
home to Florida.
Jon Hammar of Palmetto
Bay was released Friday from a
prison in Matamoros, Mexico.
Relatives said he was hospital-
ized over the weekend in
Louisiana as he drove to South
Florida with his father.
Hammar's mother said the
27-year-old had a bad chest
cold and a stomach ailment be-
fore his release from the prison.
He's expected home in time for
Christmas.
Hammar was headed to
Costa Rica in August when he
drove across the Mexican bor-
der. U.S. authorities told him he
could declare the unloaded
shotgun at the border. Mexican
officials, however, said it was il-
legal and sent Hammar to
prison.

Tallahassee

ry One player wins
- $199,900.09 top prize
One winner of the "Fantasy
tal 5" game will collect
g $199,900.09, the Florida Lot-
tery said Monday.
L6, The winning
ticket was bought
ies in Miami, lottery
ith officials said.
The 496 tickets oridalotWery
m- matching four
ap numbers won $65 each. An-
to other 11,392 tickets matching
cal three numbers won $7.50 each,
and 95,084 tickets won a Quick
Pick ticket for picking two






A4 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012



PORT
Continued from Page Al

investment," Meek said.
"And it will be a very limited
investment."
Thorpe said port develop-
ment would come from the
private sector
Nine firms responded
early in the year to a request
for qualifications (RFQ) to
conduct the feasibility study
They were: BEA Architects
Inc., Hanson Engineering,
Martin Associates, GEC Inc.,
Vickerman Associates,
Atkins Global, CDM Smith,
TranSystems and Civil En-
gineering Group Inc. Their
applications were opened
in public on Jan. 20 at the
Lecanto Government Cen-
ter
The firms had been asked
to provide documented evi-
dence of a strong maritime
background; experience in
maritime shipping and port
operation; demonstrated fa-
miliarity with port develop-
ment, with expertise in
economic analysis and fi-
nancial feasibility, port-
related development and
operational costs; and pre-
vious success with identify-
ing and obtaining return on
investment.
Following an exercise by
a team of county employees
to shortlist the applicants to
conduct the feasibility study,
the port authority board se-
lected six firms on March 27
in a public meeting.
At that time, the board ex-



CMHS
Continued from Page Al

Sugarmill and is semi-retired
and affiliated with Citrus Me-
morial hospital, offered to
open a practice at the Sug-
armill clinic and also maintain


pected the study to be com-
pleted by the end of 2013.
The study would address
such questions as where the
port would be sited, how it
would be funded and how
much revenue it could
raise.
Presentations from each
of the six firms were heard
in public sessions on April
17 at the Citrus County
Courthouse in Inverness.
Martin Associates, with an
average score from the
board of 9.2, was chosen as
the best-qualified applicant
Other scores were Vicker-
man & Associates Inc. 9.0;
TranSystems- 8.0; Gulf En-
gineers & Consultants -7.6;
Hanson Professional Serv-
ices 7.0; and BEA Archi-
tects Inc. 6.2.
A 2011 lawsuit filed Inver-
ness resident Robert
Schweickert Jr alleging a
Sunshine Law violation by
the BOCC was dismissed on
May 17. Board members had
each met separately with a
Tampa attorney regarding
creating a port. Schweickert
argued the meetings then
became a de facto meeting
and therefore a violation.
Circuit Court Judge Richard
"Ric" Howard dismissed
the original complaint, cit-
ing absence of facts to make
a case for a Sunshine Law
violation.
At that time, Schweickert
still had an outstanding con-
stitutional challenge about
the process of adding Port
Citrus to the state's list of
ports.
By late August, Martin As-

the walk-in service, Beaty said.
"There will be a lot of ac-
tivity there," Beaty said.
He added: "It should be a
budget-neutral event. Be-
cause it's a hybrid ... our
projections show it won't
lose money."
Beaty said he's happy to
accommodate patients in


sociates had not started the
feasibility study Completion
was not anticipated until
early in 2013.
When asked if the recent
primary election pulled
away the focus on the study,
Commissioner Dennis Dam-
ato, port authority chairman,
told the Chronicle, "The big-
ger reason that the port was
put on the back burner was
getting the (county) budget
squared away."
Thorpe added that an-
other delay was the avail-
ability of Martin Associates,
which had not had time to
schedule a scope-of-work
meeting until Sept. 17.
Also late in August, Schwe-
ickert filed another legal
complaint alleging the Sun-
shine Law was violated in
the way Martin Associates
was selected to conduct the
feasibility study Schweickert
argued the team of county
employees that ranked ap-
plicants to recommend to the
port authority should have
met in public for the process.
Furthermore, when port au-
thority board members
marked ballots to choose a
firm, the lawsuit alleges an-
other Sunshine Law viola-
tion took place because the
votes were not disclosed dur-
ing the meeting.
Having been served a
summons the Friday before
the Sept. 17 meeting, repre-
sentatives from Martin As-
sociates did not attend to
discuss the scope of work
for the feasibility study
According to an email to
Port Counsel Richard Wesch,

southwest Citrus with a de-
cision that makes financial
sense as well.
"I think it's very good
news," he said. "We listened
to the community."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.


John C. Martin, head of Mar-
tin Associates, stated: "It is
my thinking we should not
begin the negotiating process
until the issue is resolved."
The meeting was ad-
journed after four minutes.
Rather that face the ex-
pense of defending a law-
suit and more delay in
starting the feasibility study,
the board chose to conduct
a "cure" session to get the
lawsuit withdrawn.
Wesch said he did not be-
lieve any Sunshine violation
took place, but recom-
mended the port authority
set a meeting on Oct. 23 to
conduct another public
hearing of the review of the
responses from firms offer-
ing to carry out the feasibil-
ity study as a cure session.
After the board repeated
the process with new scores
for all the firms, a new con-
sultant, TranSystems, had
the highest rating, and was
invited to present a scope-
of-work.
On Nov 20, Rick Ferrin,
vice president at TranSys-
tems Corp., presented an
outlined approach to the
study as a three-phased proj-
ect to determine economic
viability, identify funding
sources and identify oppor-
tunities and customers.
Since that time: "We've
been refining the scope of
work to present to the port


authority on Jan. 8," Thorpe
said.
Staff members also have
worked with the Florida De-
partment of Transportation
for grant approval.
"The scope-of-work is
done. It's going to be at-
tached to a contract. Hope-
fully, it's going to be
approved on Jan. 8 by the
port authority," Thorpe said.
"This feasibility study is
about more than whether
the port is feasible. It's been
used as a port. The Progress
Energy canal is being used
as a barge port. The barge
canal port has been used by
Cemex as a port. The pur-
pose of this study from
TranSystems is to identify
potential markets, types of
markets that can use it, po-
tential partners, potential
uses of facilities that are
currently there, what limita-
tions there may be, what
would be required to ex-
pand its capacity."
TranSystems is expected
to release its completed fea-
sibility study by the end of
2013. Port authority repre-
sentatives then would use
the study to market the port
to developers from the pri-
vate sector They also intend
to conduct town hall meet-
ings to explain the findings
to county residents and take
comments.
"There are people who


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

are already interested in uti-
lizing the port," Thorpe said.
"The difference is whether
it is a public port or a private
port. Right now, it is a pri-
vate port. The county does
not have any ownership or
leased property on the port.
The biggest leased property
that's currently active is the
Cemex mine. There are po-
tential customers who could
use that property and work
with Cemex.
"What I would envision in
the future is that there are
many benefits to becoming a
public port," Thorpe contin-
ued. "Even with businesses
established now, that would
convert to a public port to
get additional dollars to im-
prove the infrastructure -
the bulkhead, the roadway
- you could see a port de-
veloper wanting to be a pub-
lic port to get half the money
funded for all the improve-
ments. It would be a big ad-
vantage for them."
The port authority will
meet at 9:30 a.m. on Tues-
day, Jan. 8, in Citrus County
Courthouse, Room 100, at
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness. Among the topics to be
discussed is the Port Citrus
feasibility agreement with
TranSystems.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online, com or 352-564-2916.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




[ "A,:.. Meeting Notices..........................C12


Notice to

SCreditors/Administration.......C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
pc
pc
pc

pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Partly cloudy today.


NA NA NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusteaily
"' rZ ~TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
A High: 76 Low: 64
Partly sunny.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 51
Partly sunny with a chance of showers and
thunderstorms.
THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 67 Low: 49
Mostly sunny.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 68/44
Record 83/26
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 56
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.80 in.
Total for the year 60.81 in.
Normal for the year 51.22 in.
*As of 2 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 2 p.m. 30.05 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 2 p.m. 5
HUMIDITY
Monday at 2 p.m. 53
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, composites
Today's count: 5.9/12
Wednesday's count: 7.7
Thursday's count: 7.5
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/25 TUESDAY 2:43 8:55 3:07 9:19
12/26 WEDNESDAY 3:27 9:39 3:51 10:03
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


JAN.4 JAN.11 JAN.
JAN.4 JAN.11 JAN.18


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 5:40 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:22 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY........... 3:44 PM.
MOONSET TODAY ........................4:56 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 2:42 a/11:57 a 4:46 p/11:30 p
Crystal River** 1:03 a/9:19 a 3:07 p/8:52 p
Withlacoochee* 12:54 p7:07 a 11:35 p/6:40 p
Homosassa*** 1:52 a/10:56 a 3:56 p/10:29 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
3:27 a/12:37 p 5:25 p/-
1:48 a/9:59 a 3:46 p/9:36 p
1:33 p7:47 a /7:24 p
2:37 a/11:36 a 4:35 p/11:13 p


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc


Gulf water
temperature


59
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness n/a n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


AST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


37 30
44 28
49 36
57 46
42 22
61 38
38 25
13 8
66 51
41 31
40 31
30 28
29 17
63 44
39 28
49 45
34 30
40 26
34 26
54 40
36 28
35 27
47 33
33 21
20 17
35 24
55 33
48 44
40 23
38 26
71 59
36 30
68 60
54 41
58 51
57 53
50 44
58 53
30 23
18 14
72 59
71 53
58 48


sn
pc
.31 sh
.75 sh
pc
ts
pc
c
.55 ts
c
sn
pc
c
sh
.16 pc
.17 sh
sn
.02 pc
pc
sh
.07 pc
c
c
sn
.01 c
pc
s
c
pc
sn
ts
pc
ts
pc
r
1.42 pc
.08 pc
.01 r
c
.01 c
.35 ts
.40 ts
.20 sh


New Orleans 77 62 ts 74 44
New York City 39 33 pc 43 31
Norfolk 52 39 pc 54 41
Oklahoma City 35 24 sn 27 10
Omaha 18 11 c 13 -1
Palm Springs 63 45 pc 66 44
Philadelphia 41 29 pc 45 31
Phoenix 59 47 s 61 46
Pittsburgh 37 21 pc 38 30
Portland, ME 35 28 pc 35 19
Portland, Ore 43 39 .03 r 45 40
Providence, R.I. 41 26 i 39 25
Raleigh 53 44 pc 58 43
Rapid City 12 6 sn 14 0
Reno 39 33 rs 42 27
Rochester, NY 32 29 sn 30 21
Sacramento 49 37 sh 53 43
St. Louis 35 30 c 37 27
St. Ste. Marie 28 23 .01 sn 23 16
Salt Lake City 45 33 .13 c 32 23
San Antonio 66 45 pc 71 29
San Diego 55 52 .10 pc 64 51
San Francisco 53 47 sh 54 47
Savannah 63 41 sh 69 58
Seattle 41 37 r 41 35
Spokane 31 25 .13 c 30 26
Syracuse 36 29 sn 34 17
Topeka 25 16 c 21 9
Washington 41 31 pc 47 36
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 83 Corpus Christi, Texas
LOW -18 Bismarck, N.D.
WORLD CITIES
TUESDAY Lisbon 58/48/pc
CITY H/L/SKY London 49/44/sh
Acapulco 85/71/pc Madrid 53/36/sh
Amsterdam 49/45/sh Mexico City 74/45/pc
Athens 57/47/s Montreal 19/5/pc
Beijing 23/8/pc Moscow 18/17/sn
Berlin 50/44/sh Paris 50/44/sh
Bermuda 68/62/pc Rio 91/75/s
Cairo 68/52/pc Rome 61/46/pc
Calgary 0/-8/s Sydney 92/66/sh
Havana 81/64/s Tokyo 47/32/s
Hong Kong 66/54/pc Toronto 28/16/c
Jerusalem 59/45/s Warsaw 40/35/pc


C I T R U S


C U N TY


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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
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02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


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I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Islam, Christmas mix in Senegal


Associated Press
DAKAR, Senegal After
prayers at the mosque,
Ibrahim Lo is off to do some
last-minute Christmas shop-
ping. Soon he is eyeing the
rows of dolls wrapped in
plastic bags on a wooden
table as he searches for gifts
for his four children.
A bouquet of inflatable
Santa toys tied to a nearby
tree bobs in the air at this
outdoor market in the sea-
side capital as he makes his
picks.
It looks a lot like Christ-
mas in Senegal, where 95
percent of the 12.8 million
residents are Muslim. Even
the Grande Mosquee, a
mosque that dominates the
city's skyline, is aglow in
holiday lights.
"When they go to school,
the children learn about
Santa," says Lo, wearing a
flowing olive green robe
known as a boubou. "We are
born into the Senegalese
tradition of cohabitation be-
tween Muslims and Chris-
tians. What is essential is the
respect between people."
Senegal, a moderate
country along Africa's west-
ern coast, has long been a
place where Christians and
Muslims have coexisted
peacefully Most Christians
here are Catholic and live in
the south of country and in
the capital.
Hadim Thiam, 30, nor-
mally sells shoes but during
December he's expanded to
an elaborate spread of tin-
sel, cans of spray snow and
fireworks.
"It's not linked to God. It's
for the children," says Jean
Mouss, 55, a Christian out
shopping for holiday decora-
tions at Thiam's stand. "We
wish Muslims a Merry Christ-
mas and invite them into our
homes for the holiday"
Signs of Christmas are
prevalent in this tropical
seaside capital.
Green and flocked plastic
trees of every size are sold
on street corners alongside
Nescafe carts and vendors
splitting open coconuts. "My


First Christmas" baby sleep-
ers are folded neatly on the
top of the piles of second-
hand clothing for sale on the
streets. There are French
"buches de Noel" and
chocolate snowmen for sale
in the upscale patisseries.
At lunchtime, a chorus of
schoolchildren singing
"Silent Night" echoes across
a courtyard. The main cathe-
dral is now a spectacle of
lights each night no easy
feat for a city often subjected
to power cuts.
Still, not everyone in
Senegal thinks embracing
Christmas is all in good
cheer. Mouhamed Seck, a
Quranic teacher and imam
for a mosque in a Dakar
suburb, says taking part in
the holiday is supporting a
non-Muslim's religion.
"Islam forbids Muslims
from taking part in these
festivities," he says.
Parents who celebrate
Christmas, though, say it's a
secular time to celebrate
with their families on a na-
tional holiday
"To make my two children
happy, I buy gifts for them
and ask their mother to pre-
pare a very hearty meal but
we don't go to Mass," says
Oumar Fall, 46, who has a 10-
year-old and a 13-year-old.
Santa Claus, known in this
former French colony as
Pere Noel, also makes the
rounds at upscale shopping
centers and grocery stores in
the weeks before Christmas.
Mamadou Sy, 40, had been
working at a hotel in Mo-
rocco until his visa recently
expired. Now back in Sene-
gal, he's making extra


Associated Press
Christmas lights reading "Welcome to Dakar" light up a highway alongside a mosque Dec. 12 in Dakar, Senegal. As Christ-
mas approaches in mostly Muslim Senegal, vendors ply the streets selling tinsel, artificial trees, and inflatable Santas,
and the main boulevards are all aglow in holiday lights. Senegal, a moderate country along Africa's western coast, has
long been a place where Christians and Muslims coexist peacefully and share in each other's holidays.


money this December as a
Santa at the seaside Magi-
cland amusement park.
Like children every-
where, some are frightened
by him, but most just want
pictures and presents.
"Senegal is a unique case
where 5 percent of the coun-
try is Christian," he says,
seeking shade while wear-
ing his red fur costume and
hat. "Christians celebrate
Muslim holidays and Mus-
lims celebrate Christian
holidays."


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A6 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012

Obituaries

Betty Jones, 77
INVERNESS
Betty Marie Jones, age 77,
Inverness, died Dec. 23.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private arrange-
ments.

Wayne
Swanson, 60
HOMOSASSA
Wayne E. Swanson, 60, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Wednesday, Dec. 19,
2012, at home.
Wayne
was born
Sept. 10,
1952, in
SCannon
Falls,
Minn., to
Everett and
Phyllis
Wayne (Gill) Swan-
Swanson son. Wayne
moved to Rosemount,
Minn., where he graduated
from Rosemount Sr. High in
1971 and married his wife in
1977. He moved to Ho-
mosassa, Fla., in 2005 after
he retired from Seagate
Technology out of Bloom-
ington, Minn. Wayne en-
joyed softball, motorcycling,
boating, working on a
friend's race car and getting
together with family and
friends.
He was preceded in death
by father and mother
Everett and Phyllis Swan-
son; sister and brother-in-
law Julia and Richard
Sorenson; and father and
mother-in-law Clemence
and Darleen Reis.
Wayne is survived by his
loving wife of 35 years, Rox-
anne Swanson; his daughter
Tammy (Todd) Fickle; his
son Joshua (Dana) Swanson;
sister Eileen (Frank) Mar-
tin; brother and sister in-
law Bernard and Brenda
Reis; grandchildren Mor-
gan, Brody and Jordyn
Fickle, Lily, Lola and Lucky
Swanson; and many nieces
and nephews.
Special thanks to Frank
and Barbara Derouin for
helping Wayne in his hour of
need.
Wayne was a loving hus-
band, father, grandpa and
uncle.
He will be missed.
Private services will be
given in Homosassa, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Chronicle policy permits
free and paid obituaries.
Email obits@chronicle
online, com or call 352-
563-5660 for details.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
publication in the next
day's edition.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In Ethiopia, tablets are teachers


Associated Press
WENCHI, Ethiopia -
The kids in this volcano-
rim village wear filthy,
ragged clothes. They sleep
beside cows and sheep in
huts made of sticks and
mud. They don't go to
school. Yet they all can
chant the English alphabet,
and some can spell words.
The key to their success:
20 tablet computers
dropped off in their
Ethiopian village in Febru-
ary by a group called One
Laptop Per Child.
The goal is to find out
whether children using
today's new technology can
teach themselves to read in
places where no schools or
teachers exist The Massa-
chusetts Institute of Tech-
nology researchers
analyzing the project data
say they're already startled.
"What I think has al-
ready happened is that the
kids have already learned
more than they would have
in one year of kinder-
garten," said Matt Keller,
who runs the Ethiopia
program.
The fastest learner is 8-
year-old Kelbesa Negusse,
the first to turn on one of
the Motorola Xoom tablets
last February Its camera
was disabled to save mem-
ory, yet within weeks
Kelbesa had figured out
the tablet's workings and
made the camera work.
He proclaimed himself a
lion, a marker of accom-
plishment in Ethiopia.


On a recent sunny week-
day, nine months into the
project, the kids sat in a dark
hut with a hay floor At 11,000
feet above sea level, the air at
night here is chilly, and the
youngsters coughed and
wiped runny noses. Many
were barefoot. But they all
eagerly tapped and swiped
away on their tablets.
The apps encouraged them
to click on colors green,
red, yellow. "Awesome," one
app said aloud. Kelbesa re-
arranged the letters HSROE
into one of the many English
animal names he knows.
Then he spelled words on his
own, tracing the English let-
ters into his tablet in a thick
red line.
"He just spelled the word
'bird!"' exclaimed Keller
"Seven months ago he didn't
know any English. That's un-
believable. That's a quantum
leap forward."
"If we prove that kids can
teach themselves how to read,
and then read to learn, then
the world is going to look at
technology as a way to change
the world's poorest and most
remote kids," he said.
"We will have proven you
can actually reach these kids
and change the way that they
think and look at the world.
And this is the promise that
this technology holds."
Maryanne Wolf, a Tufts
University professor, studies
the origins of reading and
language learning and is a
consultant to the One Laptop
project. She was an early
critic of the experiment in
Ethiopia but was amazed by


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the disabled-camera
incident
"It's crazy I can't do that I
couldn't hack into anything,"
she said. "But they learned.
And the learning that's gone
on, that's very impressive to
me, the critic, because I did
not assume they would gravi-
tate toward the more liter-
acy-oriented apps that they
have."
Wenchi's 60 families grow
potatoes and produce honey
None of the adults can read.
They broadly support the lap-
top project and express
amazement their children
were lucky enough to be
chosen.
"I think if you gave them
food and water they would
never leave the computer
room," said Teka Kumula,
who charges the tablets from
a solar station built by One
Laptop. "They would spend
day and night here."
Kumula Misgana, 70,
walked into the hut that One
Laptop built to watch the
kids. Three of them had
started a hay fight "I'm fasci-
nated by the technology,"
Misgana said. "There are pic-
tures of animals I didn't even
know existed."
He added: "We are a bit
jealous. Everyone would love
this opportunity, but we are
happy for the kids."
Kelbesa, the boy lion, said:


"I prefer the computer over
my friends because I learn
things with the computer"
Asked what English words he
knows, he rattled off a barn-
yard: "Dog, donkey, horse,
sheep, cow, pig, cat"
Kelbesa, one of four chil-
dren, is being raised by his
widowed mother, Abelbech
Wagari, who dreams the
tablet is his gateway to higher
education.
While the adults appeared
grateful for the One Laptop
opportunity, they wished the
village had a teacher
Keller said that Nicholas
Negroponte, the MIT pioneer
in computer science who
founded One Laptop, is de-
signing a program for the 100
million children worldwide
who don't get to attend
school. Wolf said Negroponte
wants to tap into children's

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A huge collection of odd TV stuff needs a home


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES -James
Comisar is the first to ac-
knowledge that more than
a few have questioned his
sanity for spending the
better part of 25 years col-
lecting everything from
the costume George
Reeves wore in the 1950s
TV show "Superman" to
the entire set of "The
Tonight Show Starring
Johnny Carson."
Then there's the pointy
Spock ears Leonard Nimoy
wore on "Star Trek" and
the guns Tony Soprano
used to rub out a mob rival
in an episode of "The
Sopranos."
"Along the way people
thought I was nuts in gen-
eral for wanting to con-
serve Keith Partridge's
flared pants from 'The Par-
tridge Family,"' the good-
natured former TV writer
said of the 1970s sitcom as
he ambles through rows of
costumes, props and what
have you from the begin-
nings of television to the
present day.
"But they really thought I


needed a psychological
workup," Comisar, 48,
added with a smile, "when
they learned I was having
museum curators take care
of these pieces."
A museum is exactly
where he wants to put all
10,000 of his TV memora-
bilia items, everything
from the hairpiece Carl
Reiner wore on the 1950s
TV variety program "Your
Show of Shows" to the gun
and badge Kiefer Suther-
land flashed on "24" a cou-
ple TV seasons ago.
Finding one that could
accommodate his
collection, which fills two
sprawling, temperature-
controlled warehouses,
however, has sometimes
been as hard as acquiring
the boots Larry Hagman
used to stomp around in
when he was J.R. on "Dal-
las." (The show's produc-
tion company finally
coughed up a pair after
plenty of pleading and
cajoling.)
Comisar is one of many
people who, after a lifetime
of collecting, begin to real-
ize that if they can't find a


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These days almost every-
thing has a price, although
Comisar's reputation as a
serious collector has led
some people to give him
their stuff.
If he simply sold it all, he
could probably retire as a
millionaire several times
over. Just last month some-
one paid $480,000 for a
faded dress Judy Garland


wore in the 1939 film "The
Wizard of Oz." What might
Annette Funicello's origi-
nal Mickey Mouse Club
jacket fetch?
He won't even think
about that.
"I've spent 25 years now
reuniting these pieces, and
I would be so sick if some
day they were just broken
up and sold to the highest
bidder," he said.


permanent home for their
artifacts those objects
could easily end up on the
trash heap of history. Or,
just as bad as far as he's
concerned, in the hands of
private collectors.
"Some of the biggest bid-
ders for Hollywood memo-
rabilia right now reside in
mainland China and
Dubai, and our history
could leave this country
forever," said Comisar,
who these days works as a
broker and purchasing ex-
pert for memorabilia
collectors.
What began as a TV-
obsessed kid's lark mor-
phed into a full-fledged
hobby when, as a young
man writing jokes for
Howie Mandel and Joan
Rivers, and punching up
scripts for such producers
as Norman Lear and Fred
Silverman, Comisar began
scouring studio back lots,
looking for discarded stuff
from the favorite shows of
his childhood. From there
it developed into a full-on
obsession, dedicated to
preserving the entire phys-
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history.
"After a couple years of
collecting, it became clear
to me," he says, "that it did-
n't much matter what TV
shows James watched in
the early 1970s but which
shows were the most
iconic. In that way, I had
sort of a curator's perspec-
tive almost from the
beginning."
In the early days, collect-
ing such stuff was easy for
anyone with access to a stu-
dio back lot. Many items
were simply thrown out or
given away when shows
ceased production. When
studios did keep things
they often rented them out
for small fees, and if you
lost or broke them you paid
a small replacement fee. So
Comisar began renting
stuff right and left and
promptly losing it, acquir-
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Page A8 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012



PINION


"Christmas waves a magic wand over
this world, and behold, everything is
softer and more beautiful."
Norman Vincent Peale, 1898-1993


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................ ........... .......... publisher
M ike Arnold ..................................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. ..................citizen member
i Mac Harris ........... ................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...............................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ........... ......... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CHRISTMAS DAY




Editorial board


wishes all a



Merry Christmas


Each member of the Edi-
torial Board would like
to extend his or her per-
sonal message on this Christ-
mas Day.
MEm
I hope the Christmas spirit
continues to live all year round
in Citrus County. As the head-
lines in our news-
paper tell the
story each day, THE I
Citrus County res- Chris
idents continue to
respond. Be it fire OUR 01
damage at a home
or war injuries to Have a rr
a veteran or
hunger to a child, our local
community comes together and
lends assistance 365 days a
year. It is one thing that makes
us different.
Gerry Mulligan
MEN
The holidays bring joy, but
for some they carry added
stress. Add some extra joy to
your life by lending a helping
hand to those who need relief
from their stress.
Mike Arnold

With Christmas comes hope.
With senseless massacres;
with illness of all sorts; with
philosophical polarization, the
message of hope is easily lost.
But hope is alive. Christmas
and all it represents is proof!
Here's hoping you have a
merry Christmas.
Charlie Brennan
MEu
The Christmas holiday pe-
riod is a celebratory season of
hope and joy. Hope resides in
the Christ child's message of
universal love that exhorts us
to put aside our differences to
make our community, country
and world a better place for all.
Joy is found in His message of
selfless charity that inspires us


Wary of Medicare scam
Anyone getting a Medicare card
should be careful of a re-
cent scam. I got a phone 0
call from an Asian-speaking
person who said that
Medicare is going to be
sending out new
Medicare cards. He asked
me, he did confirm my
address, and then he
asked me for what bank I
dealt with. And when I CA
told him that I was not 563
going to give him that in-
formation, the call was
discontinued. So be careful. Don't
give out any information over the
phone.
Clean up effort great
Many thanks to the guys that
are out cleaning up (U.S.) 41 from
Dunnellon almost all the way to
Inverness. They did a great job. It
truly looks more like Citrus
County instead of the county


S
t

P
pi


I

(


to give rather than to receive,
so generosity may reign over
avarice. Therefore, it is my
Christmas wish that each of us
embraces this season of hope
and joy so the Christ child's
message of love and charity ra-
diates in our daily lives and
throughout the world. A Merry
and Blessed
SU : Christmas to all!
CSUE: Curt Ebitz
mas. M E
In this holiday
'INION: season, I wish all
travelers a safe
jerry one! trip, all families
separated by the
miles a sense of togetherness in
spirit, and for everyone a feel-
ing of peace that transcends the
hustle and rush of the season.
During this time, we are often
reminded that there is still
much good in the world, and
there are many people who
dedicate themselves to making
our community a better place. I
hope each of us will feel the
peace of the season that tran-
scends the hustle, and that we
will each carry into the new
year a commitment to be a bet-
ter person, to be more thought-
ful of others, and to be more
thankful for our many blessings.
Mac Harris
MEu
Sometimes those sentimen-
tal pass-around emails contain
some simple truths. Here's one
I'd like to share: I wish you a
day of ordinary miracles, little
things to rejoice in. I wish you
a day of happiness and little
bite-size pieces of perfection
that give you the feeling the
Lord is smiling on you, holding
you so gently because you are
someone special and rare.
I hope everyone is able to
make wonderful memories this
Christmas.
Rebecca Martin


dump. Hopefully they will continue
the good work around the county.
And also, I hope that some
D of the yahoos around
JN here don't go running
nw over the black bags that
lrr lthe guys put trash in.
Thank you.
Duke and Adams
You could have pre-
Ssented the Duke/Progress
F scenario to fourth-
)579 graders and they could
have figured it out. Mr.
Adams appears to be the
only one that compre-
hends this situation. In the public
meetings, their comments make
them look even more incompetent
to hold a paid position.
Confused by CMH mess
I am really confused about this
Citrus Memorial hospital. Why
wasn't the hospital put up for sale
instead of wasting millions of tax-
payers dollars on lawyers?


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


Anxiety about Obamacare


T his March will
mark three
years since Oba-
macare became law,
and it still has not had t
any serious effect on
most Americans' lives.
That's the way Presi-
dent Obama and the
law's Democratic au-
thors planned it; they Byror
conveniently pushed OTI
the dislocations and V
unhappy conse-
quences of national
health care well past their re-
election campaigns.
But Obamacare will be here
soon, with an Oct 1, 2013, start of
enrollment in insurance ex-
changes and a Jan. 1, 2014, dead-
line for full implementation. The
political results could be deeply
painful for Democrats.
During the campaign for Oba-
macare, President Obama
pledged repeatedly that his
health care scheme would not
touch the vast majority of Ameri-
cans who are satisfied with their
coverage.
"No matter how we reform
health care, we will keep this
promise to the American peo-
ple," Obama said in June 2009. "If
you like your doctor, you will be
able to keep your doctor, period.
If you like your health care plan,
you'll be able to keep your health
care plan, period. No one will
take it away, no matter what."
If anyone believed that then,
they probably don't believe it
now. In practice, Obamacare will
mean the loss of employer-based
health insurance for many peo-
ple; big increases in premiums
for others; changes on the job for
still others; and a bureaucratic
nightmare for many more. Add to
that the involvement of the Inter-
nal Revenue Service, which will
act as Obamacare's enforcer -
all Americans will have to prove
to the IRS that they have "quali-
fied" coverage and it's likely


Obamacare will have a
rocky and unpopular
start.
Over the past
months there has been
scattered press cover-
age of coming prob-
lems. That is likely to
i increase in 2013.
There will be more sto-
York ries with headlines
IER like this, from
CES Bloomberg News re-
cently: "Aetna CEO
Sees Obama Health
Law Doubling Some Premiums."
And this, from the Associated
Press: "Surprise: New Insurance
Fee in Health Overhaul Law."
And this, from the Wall Street
Journal: "Health-Care Law Spurs
a Shift to Part-Time Workers."
Real-world experience might
even spark some rethinking of
Obamacare's premises. For ex-
ample, the president and his
Democratic allies promised Oba-
macare will cut the deficit. That's
almost certainly not true, al-
though many in the press re-
peated it faithfully Now, with
Obamacare near, there are hints
of a reassessment.
For example, in a recent edito-
rial about fiscal cliff negotiations,
The Washington Post noted that
the nation's "underlying fiscal
problem is that federal expendi-
tures are slated to rise faster than
economic growth," and that "the
long-term drivers" of those fed-
eral expenditures are "Medicare,
Medicaid, Social Security and
subsidies for the health-care ex-
changes established by the Af-
fordable Care Act." Obamacare
will take its place as a contribu-
tor to future deficits.
Obamacare has never been
popular Indeed, it has been un-
derwater in terms of public ap-
proval from the moment it began
to take legislative shape in 2009.
In last month's exit polls, 49 per-
cent said all or part of Oba-
macare should be repealed,


while 44 percent said it should be
left as is or expanded.
"There hasn't been any trend,"
says pollster Scott Rasmussen.
"From the beginning, well before
the law was passed, public opin-
ion has been remarkably stable
and modestly negative. ... All of
that has been based upon theory
and politics. Most Americans
have not yet felt any impact from
the law."
If Obamacare were popular,
there's no doubt more governors
would choose to have their states
set up insurance exchanges, as
the law envisioned. Instead,
nearly two dozen Republican
governors have refused, which
will force the federal government
to build the exchanges itself.
The governors are saying no to
state-run exchanges for three rea-
sons. One, they believe it will cost
their states too much money Two,
they believe the federal govern-
ment will exercise ultimate con-
trol over everything, despite
federal reassurances that states
will play a significant role. And
three, many believe Obamacare
implementation will be a disaster
Some who watch Obamacare
closely see something similar
"The administration is well be-
hind schedule," says James
Capretta of the conservative
Ethics and Public Policy Center
"It's going to be a train wreck in a
lot of places."
Capretta sees the administra-
tion trying to paper over some of
the problems by rushing billions
of dollars in subsidies out the
door That way they will argue
Obamacare is doing much good,
whatever its flaws.
But it's possible no amount of
money will be enough to hide those
flaws once Obamacare becomes
a reality in Americans' lives.
--*--A
Byron York is chief
political correspondent for
The Washington Examiner


G TAIEIR.
(C(oOmlcC OfH '2012


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I am writing this letter to the
thief (who) stole jewelry and
coins on Veterans Day weekend
in Citrus Springs.
You might have thought you
only stole jewelry and coins, but
in reality you stole 50 years of
memories from my wife.
You took a ring given to her by
her son, who now lies in the vet-
erans cemetery in Fero Memo-
rial Gardens. You stole another
ring left to her by her now-de-
ceased aunt (who) raised her You
stole other jewelry left to her by
her mother and my mother who
are no longer with us. You also
stole other jewelry that had senti-
mental value that marked our 20
years together, and the new wed-
ding set I purchased marking our
50th wedding anniversary (and)
the gold wedding bands that we
were married with more than 50
years ago. These things cannot be
replaced.
I moved my wife and family all
over the world while I served my
country for 33 years in the U.S.
Navy and left them behind when
I served aboard ship and was de-
ployed for months at a time.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

When I retired, she wanted to re-
turn to Florida, where she was
born and felt safe. The day you
robbed us, she was at the heart
doctor getting a stress test run on
her heart due to a heart problem.
She is also blind in one eye and
slowly losing sight in the other
Well, you took the security away
from her also. She no longer
feels secure in her own home.
I don't know who you are, but I
bet your mom is real proud of
you. I only hope no one will ever
do your mom like that when she


is in her 80s, while you serve
time in jail, which eventually
you will.
Anyone having information re-
garding this robbery, I would ap-
preciate you contacting the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, so
maybe I can recover some of my
wife's things, especially the ones
that have sentimental value.
DeWayne Kidwell
Citrus Springs

Training unnecessary
Our Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners, the ones
who have been pleading poor-
mouth for weeks, are sending
Administrator Brad Thorpe to
New Orleans for training on sea-
ports at a cost to taxpayers of
$4,267.52. (Citrus County Chroni-
cle, Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012.)
Given Thorpe's salary, and
given the fact that Citrus County
does not yet (if ever) have a port,
I suggest the commissioners in-
stead give Thorpe a one-way
ticket to Afghanistan, which also
does not have a port.
James M. Mclntosh
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


3


1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Ronnie Badolato is surrounded by her six grandchildren. They are, back, from left, Samatha
Royle and her brother Richard Royle; front, from left, Will Badolato, Star Royle, Alan
Badolato and brother Thomas Badolato.


SMILES
Continued from Page Al

YMCA gave all six kids
scholarships to their pro-
grams for an entire year.
A woman offered a freezer
full of food and the pharma-
cist at Walgreens offered to
supply Christmas presents
for the kids, which Mrs.
Badolato graciously refused.
"I told them 'No, I love
you for offering, but we're
OK,"' she said.
Then a representative
from Progress Energy
called to say they wanted to
do a home energy makeover
"They came out and did
an energy inspection and
made recommendations to
help me save money on my
bills," Mrs. Badolato said.
That was enough to make
Mrs. Badolato jump for joy,
but it didn't stop there.
"A woman went up in the
attic and said the duct work
looked poor, so a man came
out and redid the entire duct
work. They said I can expect
a $75 reduction in my bill
each month! Do you know


what I can do with $75? I can
pay my water bill!" she said.
As if that wasn't enough, a
Progress Energy crew of 11
people came to the house
and cleaned up the yard,
trimming hedges and trees.
They replaced all her light
bulbs with energy-saving
bulbs, put draft stoppers be-
hind outlet and switch
plates, and installed water-
saver shower heads.
They brought in a Christ-
mas tree with decorations
and presents for the kids and
then gave the oldest grand-
child, Richard Royle, an
$800 scholarship for college.
Richard is in ninth grade at
Lecanto High School.
"That was the best thing
they could've done, because
it changed his whole atti-
tude about school," she said.
After they left, someone
called to say they forgot
something they wanted to
replace the old toaster oven
and microwave oven.
"They were a very, very
lovely family and we're so
happy we were able to support
them with an energy
makeoverwith a holiday spin,"
said Suzanne Grant, Progress


Energy spokeswoman.
Grant said the local United
Way chose the Badolato fam-
ily and Progress Energy em-
ployees volunteered their
time and labor
"This is just a small part
of what we do through our
charitable arm of the com-
pany," Grant said.
"The generosity of people
is overwhelming," Mrs.
Badolato said. "The hardest
thing is to accept it, but I've
had people who tell me,
'You think you're the only
one who's allowed to give?
You have to let others have
the pleasure of giving, too.'
"I'm learning," she said.
One final gift: A job.
"Just as my unemploy-
ment's about to run out, I get
a phone call from the school
board do I want to work in
the kitchen? So, I just filled
out paperwork for a job as a
sub. God is watching out for
us," she said. "The commu-
nity is watching us. This last
gift, it's a wonderful ending
for a wonderful year."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2927.


Stocks down on fiscal cliff fears


Associated Press
Stocks fell in light trading
Monday during a shortened
holiday trading session
with lawmakers running
out of time to reach a
budget deal that would pre-
vent the U.S. from going
over the so-called fiscal
cliff.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average fell 51 points
to 13,140. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index gave up 4
points to 1,426. The Nasdaq
composite slipped 9 points
to 3,012.
In more than a dozen in-
terviews with The Associ-
ated Press, conservative
activists said they would
rather see the country fall
off the cliff than agree to
any tax increases for any
Americans, no matter how
wealthy


With many in Washington
away for the holidays, that
scenario appears increas-
ingly likely
"There is starting to be-
come a little bit of an ac-
ceptance that we fall off the
fiscal cliff," said JJ Kina-
han, chief derivatives
strategist for TD Ameri-
trade. "People are starting
to think about how they
may plan their portfolio if
that does happen."
Stocks fell sharply Friday,
with the Dow logging its
biggest drop in more than a
month, after House Repub-
licans called off a vote on
tax rates. That left federal
budget talks in disarray just
days before sweeping tax
increases and government
spending cuts are sched-
uled to take effect
Sen. Joe Lieberman said
Sunday that it "It's the first


time that I feel it's more
likely we'll go over the cliff
than not," following the col-
lapse late Thursday of
House Speaker John
Boehner's plan to allow tax
rates to rise on million-dol-
lar-plus incomes. Wyoming
Sen. Jon Barrasso, a mem-
ber of the Republican lead-
ership, predicted the new
year would come without
an agreement.
Failure to agree on a
budget plan before year-
end would lead to simulta-
neous spending cuts and
tax hikes that many fear
may push the economy
back into recession.
President Barack Obama
and Congress are on a short
holiday break. Congress is
expected to be back at work
Thursday and Obama will
be back in the White House
after a few days in Hawaii.


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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BIEF US adviser killed in Kabul OBRIEFS


kli. di I Bethlehem


Firefighters die
in ambush in NY
WEBSTER, N.Y. -Agun-
man ambushed four volun-
teer firefighters responding to
an intense pre-dawn house
fire Monday morning outside
Rochester, N.Y., killing two
and ending up dead himself,
authorities said. Police used
an armored vehicle to evacu-
ate more than 30 nearby
residents.
The gunman fired at the
firefighters when they arrived
shortly after 5:30 a.m. at the
blaze near the Lake Ontario
shore in Webster, town Police
Chief Gerald Pickering said.
The first Webster police offi-
cer who arrived chased the
suspect and exchanged gun-
fire with him, authorities said.
Authorities didn't say how
the gunman died or whether
anyone might have died in
the fire itself.
The dead men were identi-
fied as Police Lt. Michael Chi-
apperini, 43, the Webster
Police Department's public in-
formation officer; and Tomasz
Kaczowka, also a 911 dis-
patcher, whose age was not
released.
Police officer
shot in Houston
HOUSTON -A police offi-
cer has died in Houston after
a driver who refused to com-
ply with a traffic stop crashed
his vehicle then opened fire
Monday.
A bystander was also fa-
tally shot, according to Hous-
ton police spokesman John
Cannon.
The officer, with a police
department from the Houston
enclave of Bellaire, died at a
hospital, Cannon said. He did
not release the names of the
officer or the bystander.
Cannon said the incident
began just before 9 a.m. when
the officer tried to pull over the
suspect's vehicle. The driver
instead sped away and the of-
ficer chased after him.
"During the pursuit appar-
ently the suspect's vehicle
struck a white pickup truck,"
Cannon said.
After the crash, the officer
approached the vehicle and
the suspect opened fire. The
officer fired back. The second
man who was killed worked in
a body shop near where the
shooting took place, Cannon
said.
Other police officers mean-
while captured the suspect,
who also was shot, Cannon
said. He was taken to a hos-
pital where he was in critical
condition.
Army teams
going to Africa
WASHINGTON -A U.S.
Army brigade will begin send-
ing small teams into as many
as 35 African nations early
next year, part of an intensify-
ing Pentagon effort to train
countries to battle extremists
and give the U.S. a ready and
trained force to dispatch to
Africa if crises requiring the
U.S. military emerge.
The teams will be limited to
training and equipping efforts,
and will not be permitted to
conduct military operations
without specific, additional
approvals from the secretary
of defense.
This first-of-its-kind brigade
assignment involving
teams from the 2nd Brigade,
1st Infantry Division will tar-
get countries such as Libya,
Sudan, Algeria and Niger,
where al-Qaida-linked groups
have been active.
It also will assist nations
like Kenya and Uganda that
have been battling al-Shabab
militants on the front lines in
Somalia.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
An Afghan policewoman
walked into a high-security
compound in Kabul Monday
and killed an American con-
tractor with a single bullet
to the chest, the first such
shooting by a woman in a
spate of insider attacks by
Afghans against their for-
eign allies.
Afghan officials who pro-
vided details identified the
attacker as police Sgt Nar-
gas, a mother of four with a
clean record. The shooting
was outside the police head-
quarters in a walled com-
pound which houses the
governor's office, courts and
a prison in the heart of the
capital.


Kabul
AFGHANISTAN




o loo100mi
PAK.
o 1iii, 1 71
SOURCE. ESRI AP

A police official said she
was able to enter the com-
pound armed because she
was licensed to carry a
weapon as a police officer
The American, whose
identity was not released,
was a civilian adviser who


worked with the NATO com-
mand. He was shot as he
came out of a small shop,
Kabul Governor Abdul
Jabar Taqwa told The Asso-
ciated Press. The woman re-
fused to explain her motive
for her attack, he said.
The fact that a woman
was behind the assault
shocked some Afghans.
"I was very shaken when I
heard the news," said Nas-
rullah Sadeqizada, an inde-
pendent member of
Parliament.
"This is the first female to
carry out such an attack. It
is very surprising and sad,"
he added, calling for more
careful screening of all can-
didates, male and female,
for the police force.
According to NATO, some


1,400 women were serving
in the Afghan police force
mid-year with 350 in the
army still a very small
proportion of the 350,000 in
both services.
Such professions are still
generally frowned upon in
this conservative society but
women have made signifi-
cant gains in recent years,
with most jobs and educa-
tion opportunities open to
them, at least by law if not
always in practice.
This is in stark contrast to
the repression they suffered
under the former Taliban
regime, which forced
women to be virtual prison-
ers in their homes, and se-
verely punished them for
even small infractions of the
draconian codes.


'One more law?'
'Onm Or 1W .


Associated Press
National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre speaks Dec. 21 in Washington during a news
conference in response to the Connecticut school shooting. The nation's largest gun-rights lobby is calling for
armed police officers to be posted in every American school to stop the next killer "waiting in the wings."


US lawmakers look to restrict gun magazine capacity


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Lawmakers
from both parties voiced their will-
ingness Sunday to pursue some
changes to the nation's gun laws,
but adamant opposition from the
National Rifle Association has
made clear than any such effort will
face significant obstacles.
NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre dis-
missed efforts to revive a ban on as-
sault weapons as a "phony piece of
legislation" that's built on lies.
Democratic lawmakers in Con-
gress have become more adamant
about the need for stricter gun laws
since the shooting of 20 children
and six teachers at Sandy Hook El-
ementary School in Newtown,
Conn.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein of Califor-
nia is promising to push for a re-
newal of expired legislation that
banned certain weapons and lim-
ited the number of bullets a gun


magazine could hold to 10.
"I think we ought to be looking at
where the real danger is, like those
large clips," said Sen. Kay Bailey
Hutchison, R-Texas.
"I think we need a comprehen-
sive approach," said Sen. Mark
Warner, D-Va., a longtime gun rights
supporter "I'll look at all the pro-
posals ... I think it looks at mental
health, I think it looks at protecting
our schools but I also think it looks
at these high-volume magazines,
you know, that can fire off so many
rounds."
Both lawmakers appeared on
CBS' "Face the Nation," where
NRA President David Keene said
lawmakers were asking the wrong
question when discussing how
many rounds a gun magazine
should have.
The right question, he said: "Can
we keep guns out of the hands of
people who are potential killers?"
LaPierre made clear it was


highly unlikely that the NRA could
support any new gun regulations.
"You want one more law on top of
20,000 laws, when most of the fed-
eral gun laws we don't even en-
force?" he said.
Instead, LaPierre reiterated the
group's support for putting police
officers in every school.
"If it's crazy to call for putting po-
lice and armed security in our
schools to protect our children,
then call me crazy," LaPierre said
on NBC's "Meet the Press."
"I think the American people
think it's crazy not to do it," he said.
"It's the one thing that would keep
people safe."
Sen. Joe Lieberman, a Connecti-
cut independent, said he found the
NRA's statements in recent days to
be "really disheartening."
Still, he said he agrees with some
of the points the group has made
about the causes behind violence in
America.


DUI charge: Jan. 4 court date for Idaho Sen. Crapo


Associated Press


ALEXANDRIA, Va. A
conservative U.S. senator
from Idaho who has said he
doesn't drink because of his
Mormon faith has been
charged with drunken
driving.
Sen. Michael Crapo, a
three-term Republican with
a reputation as a social and
fiscal conservative, regis-
tered a blood alcohol con-
tent of .11 percent after
police pulled his car over in
this suburb south of Wash-
ington, D.C., authorities said.
The 61-year-old lawmaker,
who faces a court date Jan.
4, apologized in a statement
issued hours after his arrest
early Sunday
"I am deeply sorry for the
actions that resulted in this


circumstance," Crapo said
in the statement Sunday
night "I made a mistake for
which I apologize to my fam-
ily, my Idaho constituents
and any others who have
put their trust in me. I ac-
cept total responsibility and
will deal with whatever
penalty comes my way in
this matter"
He also said he would
take measures to ensure
"this circumstance is never
repeated."
Crapo, who was elected in
1998 and is in his third Sen-
ate term, is expected to take
over the top Republican spot
next year on the Senate
Banking Committee. He also
serves on the Senate's
budget and finance panels
and has been active on envi-
ronmental and health issues.


Crapo was a member of the
so-called "Gang of Six" sen-
ators that worked in 2011 to-
ward a deficit-reduction
deal that was never adopted
by Congress. He also served
for six years in the U.S.
House of Representatives.
Police in the suburb of
Alexandria said Crapo was
stopped early Sunday after
his vehicle ran a red light.
Police spokesman Jody
Donaldson said Crapo
failed field sobriety tests
and was arrested at about
12:45 a.m. Sunday He was
taken to the Alexandria jail
and released on an unse-
cured $1,000 bond at about 5
a.m. Sunday
"There was no refusal (to
take blood alcohol tests), no
accident, no injuries," Don-
aldson said.


Associated Press
This Sunday, Dec. 23, book-
ing photo provided by the
Alexandria, Va. Police
Department shows Idaho
Sen. Michael Crapo. Crapo
was arrested early Sunday
morning and charged with
driving under the influence in
a Washington, D.C., suburb,
authorities said.


Associated Press
Latin Patriarch of
Jerusalem Fouad Twal
waves to the crowds
Monday before Christmas
celebrations in the West
Bank town of Bethlehem.

Cleric celebrates
Palestinian state
BETHLEHEM, West Bank
- The top Roman Catholic
cleric in the Holy Land cele-
brated the United Nations' re-
cent recognition of a
Palestinian state in his annual
pre-Christmas homily on
Monday, saying that while the
road to actual freedom from
Israeli occupation remains
long, the Palestinian home-
land has been born.
Latin Patriarch Fouad Twal
told followers at the patriar-
chate's headquarters in
Jerusalem's Old City that this
year's festivities were doubly
joyful, celebrating "the birth of
Christ our Lord and the birth
of the state of Palestine."
"The path (to statehood) re-
mains long, and will require a
united effort," added Twal, a
Palestinian citizen of Jordan.
Israel grants
university status
JERUSALEM Israel has
granted a West Bank college
in Ariel coveted university
status, in a move that could
trigger international condem-
nation and enrage the
Palestinians.
Defense Minister Ehud
Barak said Monday that fol-
lowing a legal review, he has
instructed the military to up-
grade the college's status,
the final approval for the
designation.
The announcement marks
a victory for nationalist set-
tlers who hope university
recognition will give them fur-
ther legitimacy and a stronger
sense of permanence in the
West Bank.
Vatican


Associated Press
Pope Benedict XVI lights a
candle Monday at his
studio window overlooking
St. Peter's Square at the
Vatican, after the unveiling
of the Nativity scene.
Pope lights
Christmas candle
VATICAN CITY Pope
Benedict XVI has lit a Christ-
mas peace candle set on the
windowsill of his private studio.
Pilgrims, tourists and Ro-
mans gathered below in St.
Peter's Square for the inau-
guration Monday evening of a
Nativity scene and cheered
when the flame was lit.
Later, he appeared in St.
Peter's Basilica to lead Christ-
mas Eve Mass. The cere-
mony began at 10 p.m. (2100
GMT) instead of the midnight
start time, which was changed
at the Vatican years ago to let
the pontiff rest.
-From wire reports


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











SPORTS


* Football/B2
* Scoreboard/B3
* TV schedule/B3
* Entertainment/B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Citrus soccer alumni play for good cause

Inaugural Citrus High School event raises .. .

money for Sandy Hook Elementary and CASA -


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
INVERNESS When the idea of the
alumni game first occurred to Ian Feldt, it
started as merely a nice thought in his
head and nothing more.
Maybe just a fun way to get together
with old friends and play a game of soccer
like they used to back in high school.
"To be quite honest," Feldt said with a
laugh, "it started off as a totally selfish
idea in that I was just looking for a way to
get my friends together that I've been play-
ing with or coaching with and have a
game.


"That materialized into an idea that this ..
could be an opportunity to do some good,"
Feldt continued.
An alumnus himself and current first- '..
year coach of the Citrus High School girls
soccer team, Feldt teamed up with Citrus -
activities director Laura Aguilera to put -. k
together an event that would satisfy
Feldt's "selfish" wish to play some soccer
like old times while simultaneously rais- : -- m.' "
ing some money for charity .-.' '
"It ended up being a win-win situation . .. .* : . -
for everybody involved," Feldt said. ..... .... '",.
Feldt managed to get approximately 45
past graduates and former Citrus soccer Special to the Chronicle
Katherine Rinaldi performs the coin flip before the women's Black and White alumni
See Page B3 charity soccer game at Citrus High School on Friday night.


Girls Golfer of the Year finalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM




Ladies of the links


Maycee Mullarkey, Victoria Pfeiffer,
Crystal River junior Citrus senior

Mullarkey, Pfeiffer, Liu are finalists for Chronicle"


Frankly, girls golf was very up-and-
down in 2012, with some golfers
shooting great rounds one day and
losing their feel the next
Winning one big event is impressive, but
the three girls above were more often than
not their team's aces on the course.
Crystal River junior
Maycee Mullarkey,
Lecanto junior Chynna
Liu and Citrus senior
Victoria Pfeiffer each
did well often enough
to be considered the
best the county had to
offer, which is the basis
for the trio's selection
Jon-Michael as finalists for Chroni-
cle Girls Golfer of the
Soracchi Year
ON POINT Mullarkey and Pfeif-
fer were co-winners of
the Citrus County Championship, while
Liu submitted the lowest rounds of the
season for Lecanto and, as a bonus, even
made a hole-in-one.
The finalists have standing invitations to
the Chronicle sports banquet at the conclu-
sion of the 2012-13 school year, where the
winner of the award will be announced.


All-Chronicle
girls golf team
Victoria Pfeiffer,
Citrus senior
Co-won the Citrus County Championship
with an 18-hole round of 99 and paced the
Hurricanes during the entire regular season
as the team's No. 1 golfer. Fired a 100 at the
District 2A-5 tournament.
Camrin Kersh,
Citrus freshman
Shot an 89 at the District 2A-5 tournament
to qualify individually for the regional tourna-
ment. Her 18-hole round was the best by a
female golfer in the county in 2012.
Maycee Mullarkey,
Crystal River junior
Shot 98 at the District 1A-8 tournament to
help lead the Pirates to their first regional
berth in recent memory. Also shot 99 to co-
win the Citrus County Championship. Also
one of county's only female golfers to


Chynna Liu,
Lecanto junior

's Girls Golfer of the Year

consistently break 50 strokes for nine holes.
Chynna Liu,
Lecanto junior
For much of the year, the Panthers upper-
classman was the golfer in the county to beat
and was the only female to break 40 in a
match played in Citrus County this season.
During her round of 39 at Citrus Hills, Liu
carded a hole-in-one.
Jessica Hafner,
Lecanto junior
Paced the Panthers at the District 2A-5
tournament with a 95, while also coming in
fourth at the county meet. Hafner occasionally
led Lecanto during nine-hole regular-season
matches, as well.
Maddison Polazzo,
Lecanto freshman
One of a few females to actually shoot
under 50 in a nine-hole round, Polazzo fired a
43 earlier in the year, which was the second-
lowest score shot by a female golfer over nine
holes in the county.


1 Lack of use bothers Tebow


Jets backup was 3 or 4'

since playing so little

Associated Press
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. It has been
a while since Tim Tebow only watched this
much from the sideline.
The popular backup quarterback didn't
play a snap for the New York Jets for the
fourth time in five games, a mere spectator
despite being active Sunday for the 27-17 loss
to the San Diego Chargers.
New York will either trade or release
Tebow after the season, a disappointing one-
year stint with the Jets that just seems to get
worse for Tebow. He was asked after the
game if he could remember the last time he
had played so little on the football field.
New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow said
Sunday that he hasn't played this little since
he was 3 or 4 years old.
Associated Press


"Three or 4 years old, probably," Tebow
said. "Since I started."
The former Heisman Trophy winner and
two-time national champion at the University
of Florida spent his first two seasons with the
Denver Broncos, who used Tebow in occa-
sional situations until he became the starter
last season and led the team to the playoffs.
"My rookie year, I got opportunities doing
stuff," Tebow said. "You know, goal-line,
third down, fourth down and stuff like that."
Tebow was leapfrogged by Greg McElroy
on the team's depth chart when Rex Ryan
chose to have the third-stringer make his
first NFL start in place of the benched Mark
Sanchez. All three quarterbacks were active,
but only McElroy played and Tebow never
got into the game in the team's wildcat pack-
age. Tebow said "it just happened" that he
didn't play in the package usually reserved
for him, but ESPN New York reported that
he actually asked out of running the wildcat
earlier in the week.
The Jets used wide receiver Jeremy Ker-
ley in the wildcat as Tebow remained on the
See Page B3


Eric van den
Hoogen
ON TENNIS


CR Open

coming

soon
Before we get into the
details about the
longest running tour-
nament in Citrus County, I
would like to take this op-
portunity to wish all of you a
Merry Christmas and a
happy, healthy New Year.
The ninth annual Crystal
River Open Tennis Tourna-
ment will donate all pro-
ceeds to two local charity
programs: The Youth Group
at the First United
Methodist Church in Inver-
ness and The Family Re-
course Center in Hernando,
to help the less fortunate
among us.
The tournament will take
place at Crystal River High
School, as usual.
Entry fee: Donation of
cash, toiletries, non-perish-
able foods, and/or gently
used clothing (suggested $20
per person and $10 for sec-
ond event).
Divisions offered will be:
Women's, Men's and Junior
Doubles and Mixed Dou-
bles, divided in A, B and C.
Two matches guaranteed
(consolation round).
Deadline for entries is
Jan. 16.
Check in at least 15 min-
utes prior to your match.
Please call Friday, Jan. 18,
for your starting times if you
have not been notified be-
fore.
The tournament directors
are Cindy Reynolds, AJ
Glenn at 697-3089 or aj-
glenn03@gmail.com; Sally
deMontfort at 795-9693 or
deMont@embarqmail.com;
Eric van den Hoogen at
(352) 382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.
If you are not able or in-
terested to play but still
would like to help the cause,
volunteers will be available
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sat-
urday as well as Sunday to
accept your donation at the
tennis courts.
The organizers would like
to stress the point that they
will adjust the schedule
anyway possible to allow
you to participate if you
have other commitments
tennis or otherwise.
Tuesday Team
Tennis
There were no results re-
ported for Dec. 18.
The women-only league is
geared towards players
rated 3.0 to 3.5. If interested
in playing or want to captain
a team, contact chairwoman
Candace Charles at 352-563-
5859 or Candacecharles@
tampabayrr.com.


See Page B2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Walking wounded


7 *,* -. r *C

* *

-? --- ..ait t
-P ,.1-,


Associated Press
Chicago Bears running back Matt Forte gains yards as Arizona Cardinals inside linebacker Paris Lenon pursues
during the first half Sunday in Glendale, Ariz.

Foster, Forte injuries could hurt Bears, Texans in 2012playoff

Associated Press I W~ .


Starting running backs Arian Fos-
ter of Houston, Matt Forte of Chicago
and Trent Richardson of Cleveland
were sidelined for part of their
games Sunday
With one week remaining in the
regular season, the Texans will be
monitoring Foster's heart after he
was removed from a loss to Min-
nesota with an irregular heartbeat
"I'll be OK," Foster said. "It's a
very minor situation, so I'll be OK"
Foster, the team's leading rusher,
left the game after gaining 15 yards
on 10 carries. He also had two
catches for 14 yards. His last play
came with about nine minutes left in
the third quarter.
Coach Gary Kubiak said Foster
had experienced the problem once
before in practice.
"He calms down and he's fine,"
Kubiak said.
The medical staff told Kubiak that
Foster was OK late in Sunday's game
and could return. But Kubiak
thought it best to give him the rest of
the game off.
"I know they're on top of it and
he's feeling fine," Kubiak said.
Forte gained 88 yards in 12 carries,
including a 4-yard TD run in a win at
Arizona before leaving with a right
ankle injury early in the second half.
Chicago safety Chris Conti left the
game in the first half with a ham-
string injury
Late in the fourth quarter of a loss at
Denver, Richardson was carted off the
field with a left ankle injury; the
Browns offered no report on the injury
Earlier, fellow rookie Brandon
Weeden hurt his right shoulder
when Von Miller crashed into the
quarterback.
Weeden slammed his helmet to
the ground on the sideline and
walked slowly to the locker room.
Earlier in the game, cornerback
Sheldon Brown left with a head in-
jury after colliding with Broncos re-
ceiver Brandon Stokley Brown was
trying to cover Demaryius Thomas
over the middle of the field when he
bumped into Stokley
Broncos cornerback Tracy Porter
left with a concussion in the first
quarter.
Oakland quarterback Carson
Palmer hurt his back in a loss at
Carolina.
Palmer was flushed from the
pocket late in the first quarter, rolled
right and stopped to set up. That's
when defensive end Greg Hardy
came in from behind and hit Palmer
in his lower back with the crown of
his helmet. Officials flagged Hardy
for unnecessary roughness because
he led with his helmet, resulting in a
15-yard penalty and an automatic
first down.


Associated Press
Oakland Raiders quarterback Carson Palmer walks off the field after suffering
a back injury during the first half Sunday against the Carolina Panthers in
Charlotte, N.C.


X-rays on Palmer were negative.
Also, Raiders DB Phillip Adams
(groin) and safety Tyvon Branch
(foot) were sidelined.
San Francisco tight end Vernon
Davis sustained a concussion against
Seattle after getting hit along the
sideline by Seahawks safety Kam
Chancellor.
Davis was attempting to haul in a
pass deep in Seattle's end late in the
first quarter. Davis caught the pass
but was immediately knocked off his
feet by Chancellor, jarring the ball
loose. Davis was slow to get up, was
examined by doctors on the sideline
and eventually taken to the locker
room for further evaluation.
Pittsburgh TE Heath Miller left in
the fourth quarter of a loss to Cincin-


nati with a right knee injury
Chiefs WR Terrance Copper (left
knee) and DT Tyson Jackson (left
foot) left a loss to Indianapolis.
Jaguars WR Cecil Shorts III and
guard Uche Nwaneri left the loss to
New England with concussions.
Chargers rookie safety Brandon
Taylor was carted off the field in the
third quarter against the Jets after
injuring his right knee. Jets DB Ellis
Lankster left in the second half with
a concussion.
The Bucs lost CB E.J. Biggers to a
groin injury in a loss to St. Louis.
Giants DL Marvin Austin and
Chris Canty both left a loss at Balti-
more with knee injuries. Ravens WR
Anquan Boldin hurt his shoulder in
the third quarter and did not return.


I.-


Colts' story just


got a little nicer


The Colts were a nice
little story six weeks
ago.
That's when a team that
started 1-2 and had "rebuild-
ing" written all over it re-
sponded to the loss of rookie
coach Chuck Pagano with one
of those how-did-they-do-it
winning streaks -
and that was sup-
posed to be that
Considering the
Colts finished 2-14
a year ago, then
said goodbye to
Peyton Manning
and turned the rest
of the roster up-
side-down, the sea-
son was already a Jim I
success.
Fans in Indi- A
anapolis knew COLUF
can't-miss rookie
quarterback Andrew Luck
was bound to improve, but ex-
plaining the 4-1 run after
Pagano left the team to deal
with leukemia was tough
enough, especially because
there was precious little room
elsewhere for improvement.
The Colts still can't run the
ball, and they still start rookies
at nearly every one of the skill
positions. The defense? Don't
ask
Yet the story just got better
Indianapolis was outgained
by more than 200 yards Sun-
day in Kansas City The Colts
lost the time-of-possession
battle but still won 20-13 and
locked up an improbable play-
off spot
"Mission accomplished,"
Colts interim coach Bruce Ar-
ians said, as though he ex-
pected as much. "That's all I
can say It's a fantastic feeling."
And the story is about to get
better still.
Pagano has been cleared to
return, perhaps as early as
Monday He might have been
the only guy in the entire or-
ganization who was expecting
great things when he took
over, but an entire squad and
staff have come over to his
side in his absence.
Arians, who stepped in for
his close pal and consulted
Pagano throughout his or-
deal, is a candidate for coach
of the year. And Luck, who
threw for a modest 205 yards
and a touchdown, still made
up a lot of ground in his race
against similarly impressive
first-year quarterback
starters Robert Griffin III of
Washington and Russell Wil-
son of Seattle because of
something he didn't do -
throw a costly interception.
Even the much-maligned
defense got into the act, with
Darius Butler picking off
Brady Quinn's pass and re-
turning it for a touchdown five
plays into the game, and whole
unit rising up to stuff Quinn on
a quarterback sneak late in
the game, turning the ball
back over to Luck in time for a
rookie-record seventh
winning drive.
"Whenever teams go for it
on fourth down, the defense
takes it personal," Indianapo-
lis end Dwight Freeney said.
If the defensive stand was a


L
21


surprise, what Luck did with
the opportunity wasn't The
Colts' running game is still lit-
tle more than a chance for
Luck to catch his breath, and
despite the emergence of re-
ceivers TY Hilton and
Dwayne Allen, just about
everybody in Arrowhead Sta-
dium was looking
at veteran wideout
Reggie Wayne. So
was Luck, who saw
him cut through a
seam in the middle
of the defense, then
fired a high, hard
pass that Wayne
latched onto in the
end zone for a 7-
,itke yard score.
Luck owns the
rookie records for
INIST most yards, most
300-yard games,
most winning drives, and the
strike to Wayne put him closer
to the rookie record of 26
touchdown passes set by none
other than Manning. And just
like Manning, to whom Luck
was often compared before
the season, the rookie knew
exactly what to say about all of
them.
"I think it definitely means
something. After the season
I'll have a chance to reflect
back on it Obviously, it is nicer
to be in the playoffs and know
that," Luck said, "but it is nice
to have a couple records that
I'm sure will be broken in the
next year"
What he said next, though,
came as something of a
surprise.
"I think we were confident
in the locker room from day
one. I remember going in, try-
ing to gauge the feel of what it
was going to be like. Guys
were confident on this team,
like Reggie Wayne who had
never missed a playoff until
that year Dwight Freeney,
Robert Mathis, those guys are
winners, they know how to
win, so I think they imparted
some of that magic, if you will,
on some of the younger guys,
the newer guys.
"It was a confident bunch,
we never prepared to lose a
game, we always prepared to
win, and I guess that worked
out"
It's still a mystery exactly
how, but Luck wasn't going to
spend much more time
dwelling on that than he did
on accumulating records.
"I guess it will be an extra
special Christmas," he said,
referring to Pagano's return.
"There will be a lot of emo-
tions when he comes through
the door It's funny, there are
probably 10 guys who have
never met Chuck on the
team, but I think they will be
emotional too because I'm
sure they feel like they know
him, too, because his pres-
ence is felt so much in the
building out here, and wher-
ever we go."
Jim Litke is a national
sports columnist for TheAsso-
ciated Press. Write to him at
jlitke@ap. org and follow him
at http://twittercom/
JimLitke


Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck
rookie record for passing yardage Sunday.


TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

Citrus Area Senior
Ladies 3.0/3.5
Tuesday League
The results for Dec. 18 are:
Riverhaven def. Citrus Hills, 3-2;
Pine Ridge Mustangs def. Sug-
armill Woods, 4-0; Crystal River
def. Meadowcrest, 4-1.
To play in this league, a player
must be at least 50 years of age or
older, with a 3.0/3.5 rating. The
league is always looking for play-
ers to sub for teams.
For information, email chair-
woman Lucy Murphy at
wjlrmurphy@embarqmail.com or
352-527-4239.


Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
The results for Dec. 20 are: Bi-
centennial Bratz def. Sugarmill
Woods Oakies, 5-4.
The standings are as follows:
Pine Ridge Fillies, 58; Sugarmill
Woods Oakies, 50; Bicentennial
Babes, 48; Skyview Advantage, 47;
Skyview, 46; Pine Ridge Maver-
icks, 44; Bicentennial Bratz, 43;
Skyview Aces, 35.
For information, contact chair-
woman Diane Halloran at
352-527-7763 or tdhfla@
tampabayrrcom
Ladies on the Court
No scores reported for Dec. 20.
Ladies on The Court play at 8:30
a.m. Thursday at Le Grone Park
courts in Crystal River. Bring a
new can of balls and 50 cents. Two-


out-of-three tiebreak sets are
played.
For information, contact Bar-
bara Shook at dshook@
tampabayrr.com or 352-795-0872.
The Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0 3.5 League
No scores reported for Dec. 21.
All players must be at least 50
years of age or older with a 3.0 3.5
rating. Players cannot be both a
member of a team and a sub.
For information, email chair-
woman Sue Doherty at
suedoherty@prodigy.net
USTA Leagues
The next season will be as fol-
lows:
55 and up Senior (three dou-
bles): Mostly Saturdays starting
Jan. 12.
65 and up Senior (three dou-


bles): Tuesdays and Fridays start-
ing Jan. 15.
18 and up Adult (three doubles,
two singles): Fridays, Saturdays,
Sunday starting Jan. 11.
Team commitments are due by
Dec. 25.
Schedule for the rest of 2013:
18 and up Mixed (three dou-
bles): March-May
40 and up Adult (three doubles,
two singles): May-July
40 and up Mixed (three dou-
bles): August-October.
Combo Senior and Adult (three
doubles): October-December.
If you have any questions for in-
formation in our District 4 (south),
call or e-mail Leigh Chak at 352-
572-7157 or vacocala@gmail.com
or ustaflorida.com.
Tournaments
Jan. 12 and 13: JCT Tournament


at Southern Hills C.C.
Deadline to register is 9 p.m.
January 9.
Enter by mailing
jjeanette3saj@aol.com. The entry
fee is $20.
For information call 352-232-
0322.
Rick Scholl, SMW/Oak Village
Tennis Center Courts, 1 Village
Center Circle, Homosassa, FL
34446, 352-232-4888.
Lou Giglio, Southern Hills C.C.,
19858 Southern Hills Blvd.,
Brooksville, FL 34601, 727-207-
4760.
Judy Jeanette, GlenLakes C.C.,
9000 GlenLakes Blvd., Weeki
Wachee, FL 34613, 352-232-0322.
Jan.19-20 (tentative): Crystal
River Open.
Feb. 9 and 10: JCT Tournament
of Champions at SMW


B2 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
y-New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo
South

y-Houston
x-Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville
North

y-Baltimore
x-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
West


Pct PF
.733 529
.467 288
.400 272
.333 316

Pct PF
.800 400
.667 329
.333 292
.133 235

Pct PF
.667 381
.600 368
.467 312
.333 292


W L I Pct PF
y-Denver 12 3 0 .800 443
San Diego 6 9 0 .400 326
Oakland 4 11 0 .267 269
Kansas City 2 13 0 .133 208
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


East
Washington
Dallas
N.Y Giants
Philadelphia
South


Pct PF
.600 408
.533 358
.533 387
.267 273


W L T Pct PF PA
y-Atlanta 13 2 0 .867 402 277
New Orleans 7 8 0 .467 423 410
Tampa Bay 6 9 0 .400 367 377
Carolina 6 9 0 .400 313 325
North
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 11 4 0 .733 399 299
Minnesota 9 6 0 .600 342 314
Chicago 9 6 0 .600 349 253
Detroit 4 11 0 .267 348 411
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-San Francisco 10 4 1 .700 370 260
x-Seattle 10 5 0 .667 392 232
St. Louis 7 7 1 .500 286 328
Arizona 5 10 0 .333 237 330
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Saturday's Game
Atlanta 31, Detroit 18
Sunday's Games
Green Bay 55, Tennessee 7
Indianapolis 20, Kansas City 13
New Orleans 34, Dallas 31, OT
Minnesota 23, Houston 6
Carolina 17, Oakland 6
Miami 24, Buffalo 10
Cincinnati 13, Pittsburgh 10
New England 23, Jacksonville 16
Washington 27, Philadelphia 20
St. Louis 28, Tampa Bay 13
San Diego 27, N.Y. Jets 17
Denver 34, Cleveland 12
Chicago 28, Arizona 13
Baltimore 33, N.Y Giants 14
Seattle 42, San Francisco 13
Sunday, Dec. 30
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
Miami at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m.

FBS bowl glance
Subject to Change
All Times EST
Saturday, Dec. 15
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Arizona 49, Nevada 48
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State 41, Toledo 15
Thursday, Dec. 20
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
BYU 23, San Diego State 6
Friday, Dec.21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
UCF 38, Ball State 17
Saturday, Dec. 22
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 43, East Carolina 34
MAACO Bowl
LasVegas
Boise State 28, Washington 26
Monday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), late
Wednesday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Central Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky
(7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Washington
Bowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-
2), 3 p.m. (ESPN)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m.
(ESPN)


Baylor
(ESPN)


Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
(7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4),

Friday, Dec. 28
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.


9:45 p.m.


Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m.
(ESPN)
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Minnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Dec. 29
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Rice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m.
(ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Arizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (8-4), 4 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Syracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Texas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m.
(ESPN)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
AtTempe, Ariz.
Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Dec. 31
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Georgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2
p.m. (CBS)


On the AIRWAVES TEBOW


Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
LSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Tuesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon
(ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Mississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-
3), Noon (ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m.
(ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1
p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m.
(ESPN)
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Northern Illinois (12-1)vs. Florida State (11-
2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8
p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 5
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 19
RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic
At Montgomery, Ala.
Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN)
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Jan. 26
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, TBA (NFLN)



NBA standings


New Yorl
Brooklyn
Boston
Philadelp
Toronto


Miami
Atlanta
Orlando
Charlotte
Washing


Chicago
Indiana
Milwauke
Detroit
Clevelan


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
S 20 7 .741
14 12 .538
13 13 .500
)hia 13 15 .464
9 19 .321
Southeast Division
W L Pct
18 6 .750
16 9 .640
12 15 .444
7 20 .259
ton 3 22 .120
Central Division
W L Pct
15 11 .577
16 12 .571
ee 14 12 .538
9 21 .300
d 6 23 .207


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 21 8 .724
Memphis 18 7 .720
Houston 14 12 .538
Dallas 12 16 .429
New Orleans 5 22 .185
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 21 5 .808
Denver 15 13 .536
Minnesota 13 12 .520
Utah 15 14 .517
Portland 13 13 .500
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 21 6 .778
Golden State 18 10 .643
L.A. Lakers 13 14 .481
Phoenix 11 17 .393
Sacramento 9 18 .333
Sunday's Games
Brooklyn 95, Philadelphia 92
New York 94, Minnesota 91
Utah 97, Orlando 93
San Antonio 129, Dallas 91
L.A. Clippers 103, Phoenix 77
Sacramento 108, Portland 96
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Boston at Brooklyn, 12 p.m.
New York at L.A. Lakers, 3 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Miami, 5:30 p.m.


Houston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Miami at Charlotte, 7p.m.
Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Washington, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Toronto at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.
New York at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m.



Free agents
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BALTIMORE (1)-- Re-signed Nate McLouth,
of, to a $2 million, one-year contract.
BOSTON (6)- Re-signed David Ortiz, dh,
to a $26 million, two-year contract; signed David
Ross, c, Atlanta, to a $6.2 million, two-year con-
tract; signed Jonny Gomes, of, Oakland, to a
$10 million, two-year contract; signed Shane
Victorino, of, Los Angeles Dodgers, to a $39
million, three-year contract; signed Koji Uehara,
rhp, to a $4.25 million, one-year contract; signed
Ryan Dempster, rhp, Texas, to a $26.5 million,
two-year contract.
CHICAGO (1) Signed Jeff Keppinger, 3b,
Tampa Bay to a $12 million, three-year contract.
DETROIT (2) Signed Torii Hunter, of, Los
Angeles Angels, to a $26 million, two-year con-
tract; re-signed Anibal Sanchez, rhp, to an $80
million, five-year contract.
HOUSTON (1) Signed Carlos Pena, lb, to
a $2.9 million, one-year contract.
KANSAS CITY (3) Re-signed Jeremy
Guthrie, rhp, to a $25 million, three-year con-
tract; signed George Sherrill, Ihp, Seattle, to a
minor league contract; signed Xavier Nady, of,
San Francisco, to a minor league contract.
LOS ANGELES (4) Signed Ryan Madson,
rhp, Cincinnati, to a $3.5 million, one-year con-
tract; signed Joe Blanton, rhp, Los Angeles
Dodgers, to a $15 million, two-year contract;
signed Sean Burnett, Ihp, Washington, to an $8
million, two-year contract; signed Josh Hamil-
ton, of, Texas, to a $123 million, five-year con-
tract.
MINNESOTA (1) Signed Kevin Correia,
rhp, Pittsburgh, to a $10 million, two-year con-
tract.
NEW YORK (5) Re-signed Hiroki Kuroda,
rhp, to a $15 million, one-year contract; re-
signed Andy Pettitte, Ihp, to a $12 million, one-
year contract; re-signed Mariano Rivera, rhp, to
a $10 million,on e-year contract; signed Kevin
Youkilis, 3b, Chicago White Sox, to a $12 mil-
lion, one-year contract; re-signed Ichiro Suzuki,
of, to a $13 million, two-year contract.
OAKLAND (1) Re-signed Bartolo Colon,
rhp, to a $3 million, one-year contract.
SEATTLE (1) Re-signed Oliver Perez, Ihp,
to a $1.5 million, one-year contract.
TAMPA BAY (3) Re-signed Joel Peralta,
rhp, to a $6 million, two-year contract; signed
James Loney, 1b, Boston, to a $2 million, one-
year contract; signed Roberto Hernandez, rhp,
Cleveland, to a $3.25 million, one-year contract.
TEXAS (2) Re-signed Colby Lewis, rhp, to
a $2 million, one-year contract; signed Joakim
Soria, rhp, Texas, to an $8 million, two-year con-
tract.
TORONTO (2) Signed Maicer Izturis, inf,
Los Angeles Angels, to a $10 million, three-year
contract; signed Melky Cabrera, of, San Fran-
cisco, to a $16 million, two-year contract.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
ARIZONA (4) Signed Eric Hinske, 1b, At-
lanta, to a $1.35 million, one-year contract;
signed Eric Chavez, 3b, NewYorkYankees, to a
$3 million, one-year contract; signed Brandon
McCarthy, rhp, Oakland, to a $15.5 million, two-
year contract; signed Cody Ross, of, Boston, to
a $26 million, three-year contract.
ATLANTA (3) Signed Gerald Laird, c, De-
troit, to a $3 million, two-year contract; signed
B.J. Upton, of, Tampa Bay, to a $75.25 million,
five-year contract; re-signed Reed Johnson, of,
to a $1.75 million, one-year contract.
CHICAGO (4) Signed Scott Baker, rhp,
Minnesota, to a $5.5 million, one-year contract;
signed Dioner Navarro, c, Cincinnati, to a $1.75
million, one-year contract; re-signed Shawn
Camp, rhp, to a $1.35 million, one-year contract;
signed Scott Feldman, rhp, Texas, to a $6 mil-
lion, one-year contract.
CINCINNATI (2) Re-signed Jonathan
Broxton, rhp, to a $21 million, three-year con-
tract; re-signed Ryan Ludwick, of, to a $15 mil-
lion, two-year contract.
COLORADO (1) Re-signed Jeff Francis,
Ihp, to a $1.5 million, one-year contract.
LOS ANGELES (2) Re-signed Brandon
League, rhp, to a $22.5 million, three-year con-
tract; signed Zack Greinke, rhp, Los Angeles
Angels, to a $147 million, three-year contract.
MIAMI (2) -Signed Juan Pierre, of, Philadel-
phia, to a $1.6 million, one-year contract; signed
Placido Polanco, 3b, Philadelphia, to a $2.75
million, one-year contract.
NEW YORK (1) Re-signed Tim Byrdak,
Ihp, to a minor league contract ($1 million).
PHILADELPHIA (1) Signed Mike Adams,
rhp, Texas, to a $12 million, two-year contract.
PITTSBURGH (2) Signed Russell Martin,
c, NewYorkYankees, to a $17 million, two-year
contract; re-signed Jason Grilli, rhp, to a $6.75
million, two-year contract.
ST LOUIS (2) Signed Randy Choate, Ihp,
Los Angeles Dodgers, to a $7.5 million, three-
year contract; signed TyWigginton, inf, Philadel-
phia, to a $5 million, two-year contract.
SAN DIEGO (1) Re-signed Jason Mar-
quis, rhp, to a $3 million, one-year contract.
SAN FRANCISCO (3) Re-signed Jeremy
Affeldt, Ihp, to an $18 million, three-year contract;
re-signed Angel Pagan, of, to a $40 million, four-
year contract; re-signed Marco Scutaro, inf, to a
$20 million, three-year contract.
WASHINGTON (2)- Re-signed Zach Duke,
Ihp, to a $700,000, one-year contract; signed
Dan Haren, rhp, Los Angeles Angels, to a $13
million, one-year contract.


TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Third-Place Game: Teams TBA
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Final: Teams TBA
NBA
12 p.m. (ESPN) Boston Celtics at Brooklyn Nets
3 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Los Angeles Lakers
5:30 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat
8 p.m. (ESPN) Houston Rockets at Chicago Bulls
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Clippers
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Boston Celtics at Brooklyn Nets (Same-day
Tape)
3 a.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat
(Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) New York Knicks at Los Angeles Lakers
(Same-day Tape)
BOAT RACING
5 p.m. (FSNFL) H1 Unlimited Series (Taped)
FOOTBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN2) 2013 Outback Bowl Preview Show
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) 2012 Pop Warner Championship
(Taped)
GOLF
11 p.m. (GOLF) American Century Championship Sec-
ond Round (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Continued from Page B1


sideline. Kerley completed
a 42-yard pass to Clyde
Gates out of the wildcat,
and had a few other snaps
out of the scheme.
"Well, it's been disap-
pointing," Tebow said of the
season. "Obviously, it didn't
go as we thought, as I had
hoped, but sometimes in
life you have that. Some-
times you have setbacks
and you just have to look at
them as another opportu-
nity for you to step back up
and keep working and fig-
ure out what to do."
Tebow was acquired from
Denver in a trade last
March and expected to be a
major contributor to the of-
fense. He has been only a
role player whenever he
actually plays. He took
three snaps at St. Louis on
Nov 18, a week after break-
ing two ribs, but has played
in just one game since -
getting a full offensive se-
ries for the first time all
season last Monday night in
Tennessee.
Otherwise, it has been a
lot of standing around for
Tebow There were several
moments throughout the
game Sunday when the de-
fense was on the field and
McElroy and Sanchez went
over the game plan with of-
fensive coordinator Tony



ALUMNI
Continued from Page B1


stars to come out for a game
Friday night at Hurricane
Stadium, with all proceeds
going to charities. One for-
mer player even flew in
from Maryland to partici-
pate.
The night was comprised
of two games a women's
game at 5:30 p.m. and a
men's game at 7:30 p.m. The
male and female partici-
pants were divided into two
teams of each gender, desig-
nated as Black and White
teams, where they faced
each other in their respec-
tive games.
Many parents of past stars
got a chance at the event to
watch their children play
soccer again after so many
years, making the event a
very spirited way to spend
some time with family this
holiday season.
"So many parents were
out there that I haven't seen
in some 15 years," Feldt
said. "They're watching
their son who might be 35 or
40 (years old) playing soccer
again. It was a great trip
down memory lane."
The charities that benefit-
ted from the event are the
Citrus Abuse Shelter Asso-
ciation (CASA) in Citrus
County along with a collec-
tion of money going to help
the victims of the Dec. 14
tragedy at Sandy Hook Ele-
mentary School in New-
town, Conn.
"We wanted to keep it
local initially," Feldt said.
"And we threw around some
(ideas for) charities in the
area. CASA came up from a
few different people and
they're doing a great thing
for the community, so we
thought we'd go ahead with
them.
"Then Sandy Hook hap-
pened," Feldt continued,
"and we felt we should do
something for them as well."
Aguilera was an integral
part of the soccer event's or-
ganization and was on hand
during the game, assisting
in all the many charitable
functions.
"Ultimately this game
could not have happened
without the support of the
administration at Citrus


Sparano, while Tebow was
off to the side talking with
other teammates.
"I think first and fore-
most, you try to do what's
right and you try to do your
best and you try to treat
others the way you want to
be treated," Tebow said.
"Those were three things
that my high school football
coach taught me and it's
still just as true to this day"
Tebow was then asked if
he feels he has been
treated right by the Jets,
and he then laughed twice.
"I have a lot of great rela-
tionships with people in the
Jets organization and this
team," he said. "It's been a
privilege to be a part of


High," Feldt said. "I would
like to thank specifically
Laura Aguilera. Without her
assistance, it never would
have been possible for us to
organize this event."
Aguilera commented on
how the event was helping
Sandy Hook and its many
surviving students and
teachers.
"We are collecting
snowflakes," Aguilera said.
"The national PTSA is doing
(a paper) snowflake drive to
decorate the hallways (of
Sandy Hook) for when the
students return. So we have
opportunities for people at-
tending (the game) to make
snowflakes."
Spectators were also en-
couraged to bring in canned
goods as an alternative to
the $2 entry fee, making it
three good causes the event
was collecting for
The concession stand and
entry gate were run by the
Citrus girls soccer team
players and worked as a
fundraiser for their pro-
gram, as well.
A few honorary alumni
were utilized during the
coin toss for the start of both
the women's and men's
games.
The first-ever Citrus girls
soccer player (10 years be-
fore there even was a girls
soccer team to play on) and
mother to a current team
member, Katherine Rinaldi,
performed the coin toss in
the women's game, while
the very first coach of the
Citrus soccer program back
in 1986, Ken Berger, held
the honors in the men's
game.
David Ziegler, a former
team captain back in the
late 80s, flew in from Mary-
land to make the event. For-
mer teammate Mike
Rosignal, who is now a sher-
iff's deputy in Lake County
and from the same era as
Ziegler, played in the men's
game on the Black team,
which lost to the White team
2-1.
Another standout player
on the Black team was Alex
Posta, who still holds the
men's school record for
most career goals at Citrus.
Amber Presnick, who
graduated from Citrus in
2003 and went on to play
soccer at the University of
Florida, was out on the field


this team."
He also avoided a ques-
tion about whether he
thinks he has been given a
fair chance in New York,
saying he wants to focus on
the future.
That future could include
his hometown Jacksonville
Jaguars, who will pursue
Tebow in the offseason, ac-
cording to an ESPN report.
He laughed off the rumors
that he could be heading
back to his hometown and
the only other team besides
the Jets that tried to ac-
quire him last offseason.
"We've just got to find a
way to beat the Buffalo
Bills next Sunday," Tebow
said.


again. Presnick is very
much the poster child for
Citrus girls' soccer in her
era she came out and
played on the Black team
which triumphed over the
White team 3-0 in their re-
spective game.
"It's a lot of fun and good
to see all the girls. Good to
see how out of shape we all
are," Presnick said with a
chuckle. "I hope to do it
every year. It's a great idea."
Erin and Shelby Wells,
2011 and 2010 Citrus High
graduates, played in the
game for the White team.
Erin is currently attending
Northwood University
while her sister Shelby goes
to Palm Beach Atlantic.
Both girls play soccer for
their respective colleges
and often face each other on
opposing sides of the field
these days.
Former Citrus girls head
coach Brady Bogart (a cur-
rent teacher at Inverness
Middle School and the Cit-
rus head baseball coach)
helped the women's Black
team from the side line at
the event Bogart started his
career at Citrus back in the
mid-90s and manned a girls'
squad as far as the "sweet
16" in the early part of the
last decade.
It was really a coup for
Feldt to get so many impor-
tant members affiliated
with the long, decorated his-
tory of Citrus soccer to come
out and be a part of what he
hopes to be an annual event.
"I was really trying to get
coaches (involved) who had
their feet in the soccer com-
munity," Feldt said. "I was
(hoping) all these guys
(would) come out and volun-
teer And they did. And from
what I understand, they re-
ally had a great time."
Aguilera was pleased
with how the successful
event turned out and sup-
portive of its many charita-
ble ambitions.
"Our community is just al-
ways supportive of all of our
programs here at Citrus
High School," Aguilera said.
"So every chance we get we
like to try and find ways to
give back. So this gives our
alumni a chance to (return)
and be together on the holi-
days and play but it also
gives us a chance as a school
to (collectively) give back."


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the Citrus High School alumni men's Black and White teams pose for a photo
following their game Friday night.


Associated Press
New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow looks on from the
bench during the second half Sunday against the San Diego
Chargers in East Rutherford, N.J.


SCOREBOARD


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 B3












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Christmas in July


Robert Frost's

Christmas cards

collected in NH

Associated Press
HANOVER, N.H.
Take heart, holiday pro-
crastinators: Famed poet
Robert Frost once waited
until July to get his Christmas
cards in the mail.
Unlike the flimsy, forgettable
cards of today, however, Frost's
cards arguably were worth the
wait. For the past 28 years of his
life, he teamed up with a bou-
tique printer to send beauti-
fully illustrated booklets
featuring a different poem for
each year
Dartmouth College, which
Frost briefly attended as a stu-
dent and later returned as a
lecturer, has collected more
than 500 of the cards, including
the first installment, which was
sent without Frost's knowledge.
In 1929, Joseph Blumenthal
of the New York-based Spiral
Press, who was setting type for
one of Frost's poetry collec-
tions, decided the poem
"Christmas Trees" would make
an attractive greeting card.
With permission from Frost's
publisher, he printed 275
copies, one of which eventually
made its way to Frost. The poet
liked it so much, he decided to
collaborate with Blumenthal on
cards starting in 1934. The re-
sulting series lasted until 1962,
the year before his death.
"It was one of the more fun
things about him," said Frost bi-
ographer Jay Parini, a profes-
sor at Vermont's Middlebury
College. He called the cards a
"remarkable tradition" that's
carried out by other poets
today
Many of Frost's cards feature
woodcut illustrations evoking
the New England landscape
with which he was so deeply as-
sociated. Printed on heavy
cardstock, some run to 10 or 15
pages. The 1942 card included a
hand-colored illustration of a
country village and the poem
"The Gift Outright," which
Frost, who won four Pulitzer
Prizes for poetry, later recited
from memory at the inaugura-
tion of President John F
Kennedy
Many in the Dartmouth col-
lection were sent to Frost's
close friend and editor Edward
Lathem, whose nearly six
decades of work at the Ivy
League school included a long
stint as head librarian.
In 1959, the card featured a


Associated Press
One of Robert Frost's Christmas cards is pictured in this photo provided by Dartmouth College. The famed
poet once waited until July to send his Christmas cards.


previously unpublished poem
called "A-Wishing Well," and on
Lathem's copy, Frost inserted
two hand-written lines in the
poem.
Parini said that was not un-
usual for Frost, who often in-
scribed first editions of his
books with little notes for his
friends, or sometimes even
complete, unpublished poems.
"He liked to personalize
things," he said.
In 1951, Frost accompanied a
card featuring the poem "A
Cabin in the Clearing" with this
note to Dartmouth bookstore
employee Ruby Dagget: "in
hopes that you will carry it like


a lesson to your schoolhouse in
the wilds ofVershire," a nearby
Vermont town.
In one of his 1953 cards, he
explained why the poem "Does
No One at All But Me Ever Feel
This Way in the Least?" was
postmarked July instead of De-
cember
"This Christmas poem,
though not isolationist, is so
dangerously isolationist, it was
thought better to send it out for
Independence Day instead of
Christmas," he wrote.
Sending such a tardy greeting
also was in keeping with Frost's
personality, Parini said. "He
never lost an opportunity to


make a splash," he said.
From an initial print run of
775 cards in 1934, the number
of cards produced grew to more
than 17,000 in 1962. Some have
been snatched up by collectors
for $4,000 to $5,000, said Steve
Smith, who researched the
cards for Dartmouth's alumni
office.
Among his personal favorites
is the 1934 card Frost sent from
Key West, Fla., to a Dartmouth
professor.
"The time stamp was Dec. 24
at 5 p.m., so I like imagining
Frost at the post office in Key
West on Christmas Eve," he
said.


Humorous videos spread health messages


Associated Press

ANN ARBOR, Mich. The Uni-
versity of Michigan's School of Pub-
lic Health has released a series of
humorous videos that attempt to an-
swer such questions as: Will wear-
ing a hat keep you warm if you
venture outside in the cold wearing
nothing else?
Andrew Maynard developed the
RiskBites series, available on YouTube.
He is director of the university's
Risk Science Center and a professor
of environmental health sciences.
Maynard said he wants the series
to give people credible and timely
information on understanding
human health risks.
"Increasingly sophisticated edu-
cational material on YouTube and
elsewhere is being consumed by
ever-greater numbers of people,"


Other "more provocative" topics of his include
"Ten Ways Water Can Kill," "Could Eating
Chocolate Get You a Nobel Prize?" and "Poop
and Cell Phones," university spokeswomen
Terri Mellow and Laurel Thomas Gnagey said.


he said in a statement. "The most
successful content generators are
people with a passion for knowl-
edge and an ability to connect with
their audience. And in this new
medium they are leaving profes-
sional educators in the dust."
In the "Does Wearing a Hat Keep
You Warm While Dancing Naked?"
video and others, Maynard uses a
white dry erase board and a black
marker to draw lessons. Other
"more provocative" topics of his in-


Birthday Getting what you want in the year ahead isn't
likely to be one of your problems, but how you handle what
you receive could become quite an issue. Know the difference
between being careful and being greedy.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) This might not be a good day
to rely on anybody to toe the line in a get-together. Everybody
is relaxing, and a few people could let their hair down in ways
you may not like.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Although you'll have plenty of
justification for feeling lucky, remember that good fortune does
have its limitations. Don't press yours too far, especially in iffy
situations.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you're planning a get-to-
gether, double-check your guest list to make sure you haven't
forgotten anybody. You'll feel terrible if you leave out a certain
someone.


elude "Ten Ways Water Can Kill,"
"Could Eating Chocolate Get You a
Nobel Prize?" and "Poop and Cell
Phones," university spokeswomen
Terri Mellow and Laurel Thomas
Gnagey said in a statement.
Maynard's face is never seen in
the videos. Only his hand is visible
as he draws objects, stick figures
and words and narrates.
"I'm amused when people tell me
I draw well, because I really don't,"
Maynard said. "But I think that this


Today's HOROSCOPE

Aries (March 21-April 19) Heed your own conscience and
don't let someone who is rather emotional dissuade you from
doing what your common sense dictates.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It's a day of giving and receiving,
and you'll have your share of both. Fortunately, each will come
straight from the heart, so everything should turn out happily
for you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Although you might let those in
your charge get away with doing things you normally wouldn't
let them do, it won't be a problem. They know that, and so
should you. Relax and have fun.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Your intuition is pretty good
presently, but that doesn't mean you should let your imagina-
tion run rampant. Keep your firm sense of realism operational.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't be embarrassed about finding
other ways to keep pace with your high-rolling friends. Your


is perhaps part of the charm of the
videos."
The series officially launched in
November, and the reaction to them
has been positive so far among pro-
fessionals who teach about risk, he
said. Some already are using the
videos in their courses.
Still, Maynard said he has yet to
fully connect with his target audi-
ence of young people.
He challenges critics who say it's
impossible to explain complex sci-
ence in a 60-to-90-second video.
"If we are going to communicate
effectively, we need to be where
people are, not where we think peo-
ple should be," Maynard said. "With
social media we need to think of ed-
ucation as a conversation. Risk
Bites does this by creating a com-
plex tapestry of understanding, one
thread at a time."


pleasant and friendly manner always keeps you in their good
graces.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Objectives that are of importance
to you are equally woven into the interests of others, so don't
sweat it. There will be plenty of harmony of purpose in effect.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -You'll be relying on logic and ex-
perience quite a bit, so although fanciful thinking could make
you feel joyful, you won't let it get out of hand.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be extra careful if you are
forced to share some time with someone who has a question-
able reputation. There could be plenty of good reasons for the
bad odor.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't forsake an old pal
who gets out of line. This might be one of the times to turn the
other cheek. Sometimes, maintaining a friendship is more im-
portant than momentary lapses.


Florida
LOTTERIES

* Last night's winning
numbers were
unavailable due to
early deadlines.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23
Fantasy 5:1 2 3 13 17
5-of-5 1 winner $199,099.09
4-of-5 496 $65
3-of-5 11,392 $7.50
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22
Powerball: 1 18 35 39 44
Powerball: 11
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 5 winners $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 18 20 35 36 37 39
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 40 $4,725
4-of-6 1,564 $89
3-of-6 33,520 $5.50
Fantasy 5:4 7 8 18 27
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 497 $555
3-of-5 14,562 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, Dec. 25,
the 360th day of 2012. There
are six days left in the year.
This is Christmas Day.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 25, A.D. 336, the
first recorded celebration of
Christmas on Dec. 25 took
place in Rome.
On this date:
In 1066, William the Con-
queror was crowned king of
England.
In 1776, Gen. George
Washington and his troops
crossed the Delaware River
for a surprise attack against
Hessian forces at Trenton, N.J.
In 1868, President Andrew
Johnson granted an uncondi-
tional pardon to all persons
involved in the Southern re-
bellion that resulted in the
Civil War.
In 1926, Hirohito became
emperor of Japan, succeeding
his father, Emperor Yoshihito.
In 1941, during World War
II, Japan announced the sur-
render of the British-Cana-
dian garrison at Hong Kong.
In 1989, ousted Romanian
President Nicolae Ceaus-
escu and his wife, Elena,
were executed following a
popular uprising.
In 1991, Soviet President
Mikhail S. Gorbachev went
on television to announce his
resignation as the eighth and
final leader of a communist
superpower that had already
gone out of existence.
In 2009, passengers
aboard Northwest Airlines
Flight 253 foiled an attempt
to blow up the plane as it was
landing in Detroit by seizing a
man who tried to set off ex-
plosives in his underwear.
Ten years ago: A major
storm made for a white
Christmas in parts of the
U.S.; the severe weather ulti-
mately was blamed for some
two dozen deaths.
Five years ago: Atiger at
the San Francisco Zoo es-
caped her enclosure and
killed a park visitor; two
brothers also were mauled,
but survived. (The tiger was
killed by police.)
One year ago: A 56-year-
old man dressed as Santa
Claus shot and killed his es-
tranged wife, their two
teenage children and three
other relatives at an apart-
ment in Grapevine, Texas,
before taking his own life.
Today's birthdays: Actor
Dick Miller is 84. Singer
Jimmy Buffett is 66. Pro and
College Football Hall-of-
Famer Larry Csonka is 66.
Actress Sissy Spacek is 63.
Baseball Hall of Famer
Rickey Henderson is 54.
Thought for Today: "My


idea of Christmas, whether
old-fashioned or modern, is
very simple: loving others.
Come to think of it, why do
we have to wait for Christmas
to do that?" Bob Hope,
American comedian (1903-
2003).


Hand Colored from an original by J. O'Hara Cosgrave II

~3
2o L (? i

(t "-;





I I N S ^I D E


Section C TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012



H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'p


* Dr. David
B. Raynor
/Page C2
U Dr. Ed
Dodge
/Page C2


iche marketing


Jenny Bennett, owner of
Oneida Nameplate Company
Inc., poses in Oneida, Iowa.
Bennett, an Internet-savvy
grandmother, has helped fuel
worldwide name recognition
for this unincorporated town-
ship set among the farm
fields of northeast Iowa.

East Iowa

business is tiny

town's main

employer
CINDY HADISH
The Gazette
-ONEIDA, Iowa
grandmother has
helped fuel world-
wide name recog-
nition for this
unincorporated township
set among the farm fields
of northeast Iowa.
On any given day, 77-
year-old Genny Bennett
might talk to a customer in
Germany, Australia or
other countries around the
globe, as they place orders
to Oneida Nameplate Co.
"I should have retired
long ago, but it's never been
more interesting," Bennett
said, citing an increased de-
mand for the medical alert
bracelets the company
makes. "People call in and I
love to chat with them.
Sometimes we have to look
it up on a map and see
where they're calling from."
A growing number of
customers with food aller-


CLIFF JETTE/The Gazette
Amy Murphy solders medical emblems onto medical alert bracelets Dec. 6 at Oneida Nameplate Company Inc. in Iowa.


gies, diabetes, and condi-
tions such as Alzheimer's
disease, use the bracelets
and medallions to notify
emergency medical per-
sonnel of their condition
in case the patient cannot
communicate.
A breast cancer survivor,
Bennett can relate to their
difficulties.
"I like to encourage
them," she said. "It gives
them hope."
Christmas has become a
busy time as the company
segued into beaded brace-
lets and Black Hills gold
jewelry that combine
beauty and practicality as
gifts.
Even with those factors,
however, this year has
been slow.
Bennett pointed to
Google search engine algo-
rithms as the issue. When
that method changed,


Oneida Nameplate's web-
site was no longer near the
top of online searches.
"We're just a small
niche," Bennett said. "At
one time, we were one of
three companies. Now
there are 300 or more."
Most of those companies
have online experts to run
their websites, she said.
Genny and her husband,
Don, 85, have had to learn
as they go, as they have for
nearly 50 years.
The couple founded their
business in 1963. Then in
Chicago, the newlyweds
eventually made their way
back to Iowa. Attracted by a
vacant schoolhouse they
purchased to serve as home
and business headquarters,
the Bennetts moved to
Oneida in 1971.
"We raised our kids
there," Genny said of their
son and daughter "We like


Holidays and alcohol


any of us through the
Christmas and New Year's
season will raise an occa-
sional glass and drink a
toast. Some of us may do
it too often.
We all know some of
the benefits of moderate .
alcohol consumption,
and overdoing it can
lead to problems. About
one third of Americans
do not consume alcohol,
for various reasons: reli-
gious, previous addic- Dr. Den
tion, or it just generally EAR,
does not suit them.
With the uptick of par- & TH
ties throughout the holi-
day season, alcohol consumption
goes up significantly
There is good evidence that mod-
erate drinking has some health
benefits, such as lowering the risk


I

II


of heart disease, but that should
not be a green light for people to
overconsume.
About 70,000 to 80,000
deaths per year are di-
rectly attributed to ex-
cessive drinking, which
puts it on the top five list
of most preventable
deaths, following smok-
ing and poor diet and
lack of exercise.
Excessive drinking can
be daily excessive
is Grillo amounts of alcohol, or it
NOSE can be binge drinking,
ROAT which is very common in
FROAT younger adults and a
major problem on college
campuses. When you combine the
excessive drinking and the hazard it
poses with driving, you multiply


. age C4


it this way It's rural and I
grew up on a farm."
At its peak, about 300
people lived in Oneida,
which boasted a bank, bar-
bershop, hotel and other
businesses. Three rail
lines that converged in
Oneida long ago ceased
passing through town.
Oneida's population of
60 or so in the 1970s has
dropped by half since
then.
Residents decided
Oneida should disincorpo-
rate in 1994.
Oneida Nameplate has
been the only business in
town for some time, now
situated in a former farm-
ers Grange building and
employing a good tenth of
the population.
Stepping inside the tidy
building is akin to seeing
Santa's workshop in action.
Employees deep-


engrave the charms and
medallions and hand-
polish each piece. Genny
Bennett noted that the
modern laser engraving
used by other companies
becomes illegible after a
short time.
"Our products last for-
ever," she said, citing cus-
tomers who wear bracelets
they purchased decades
ago.
Don Bennett punches
out each piece in a sepa-
rate workshop and han-
dles orders for trophies,
another arm of the
business.
Neither plans to retire
anytime soon. The cou-
ple's three grandchildren
might someday decide to
run the company, but that
task more likely will fall to
current employees.
Genny said she would
miss talking to customers.


Sacral nerve stimulation

therapy for the bladder

P patients with over- used as an alternative to
active bladder or complement prescrip-
symptoms are tion drugs for overactive
often treated with drug bladder symptoms. Al-
therapy, which is usually ternatively, bladder ac-
the first option. How- tivity can be altered or
ever, many such patients modulated using an en-
may not respond ade- tirely different approach
quately to the medical by stimulating the
therapy nerves to the bladder
There is also a high Dr. Udaya Kumar Neuromodulation
rate of discontinuation UROLOGY (modulating the nerve
of treatment, especially TODAY supply) of the bladder
among the younger pop- using InterStim therapy
ulation, due to the costs has gained acceptance
or side effects such as dry mouth or as an effective means to treat pa-
constipation. There are several op- tients who have failed medical
tions available to such patients. management
Pelvic floor muscle biofeedback InterStim is FDA-approved for
is a behavioral therapy that may be See Page C4


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
NAVIGATING
CANCER


Diet and

breast

cancer
n many of my previous
columns, I have dis-
cussed the need and
the importance of moving
back to a plant-based diet.
Our country is so obese,
and this move can help
with this disturbing trend.
Now, there is even more of
a reason for women to eat
their fruits and veggies.
A new study suggests
that women with higher
levels of carotenoids -
nutrients found in fruits
and vegetables have a
lower risk of breast cancer,
especially cancers that are
harder to treat and have a
poorer prognosis.
When researchers from
Harvard Medical School
pooled the results of stud-
ies that measured
carotenoid levels in
women's blood, they found
that those with the highest
See Page C3


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Defining

chemobrain
C hemobrain is a con-
dition where pa-
tients have cognitive
impairments after cancer
therapy Some of the com-
mon reported symptoms of
chemobrain are as follows:
Forgetting things that
they usually have no trou-
ble recalling (memory
lapses).
Trouble concentrating.
Trouble remembering
details like names, dates,
and sometimes larger
events.
Trouble multi-task-
ing, like answering the
phone while cooking,
without losing track of one
task.
Taking longer to fin-
ish things.
Trouble remembering
common words.
In most of the patients,
the symptoms are tempo-
rary and resolve after the
See Page C4


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Take time to check out lesions that persist


L esions that per-
sist or won't heal
should be biop-
sied. Corns, calluses
and warts are common
skin issues podiatrists
see. These issues often 'i
cause people discom-
fort that leads them to \
seek relief.
Patients with sympto- Dr. Davi(
matic corns and cal- BEST
luses can usually be FORV
offered relief fairly eas-
ily Debridement, of-
floading padding or sleeves,
inserts and shoe changes or mod-
ifications generally are all that is
needed to provide relief for a pa-
tient's complaints.
Warts are a much more difficult
proposition in my experience.
Warts almost always need forms of


d
I


topical medication, in-
jection, and surgical
measures in addition to
the treatments for
(I ] corns and calluses to
provide relief.
Ulceration is another
common lesion a podi-
atrist sees. Causes of ul-
ceration include, but
I Raynor are not limited to, in-
FOOT sect bite, chemical or
ARD- thermal burn, venous
_ARD insufficiency, edema,
peripheral artery dis-
ease, diabetic complications, in-
fection, immunosuppression and
neuropathy, to name a few.
Podiatrists, nurses, wound care
specialists, surgeons and derma-
tologists have training and experi-
ence that allows them to more
precisely diagnose lesions and


wounds, their cause, and the most
appropriate treatment by obtain-
ing a history of the problem, the
patient's current health issues
and examining the wound and any
testing that was performed.
I can very easily differentiate a
wart from a callus or corn, as I
have 18 years of experience in
dealing with these issues. I can
very easily determine venous sta-
sis ulceration just by the appear-
ance of the wound.
There are times, however, it is
not that simple.
There are times when I tell a
patient, "I don't know. I've never
seen that before." This can apply
to the visual or palpable appear-
ance of an issue or lesion, or the
way a problem resists therapy that
should provide benefit.
Wounds that do not heal in a


reasonable fashion that should
with the prescribed treatment, or
those that appear different or act
differently than one would expect
should be biopsied.
A biopsy of tissue usually can be
performed in the office setting
and only require a small amount
of local anesthesia. A small 3-mm
to 4-mm punch is used to obtain a
full-thickness sample of the lesion
or wound for the pathologist to
study The wound is often just cau-
terized and infrequently requires
a suture.
This is the definitive method of
diagnosis. The diagnosis is con-
firmed by the biopsy and the pa-
tient and physician will know the
cause and best method of treat-
ment.
Squamous cell carcinoma oc-
curs on the foot and leg and can be


fatal if untreated and metastasis
occurs. Squamous cell can mas-
querade as a wart or scab that
"won't seem to heal."
Malignant melanoma can mas-
querade as an ingrown toenail.
Biopsy can lead to a definitive di-
agnosis for the cause of lesions
and wounds. Proper diagnosis
will speed treatment and lead to a
better chance of successful, satis-
factory outcomes.
Proper diagnosis can help mini-
mize morbidity, expense and com-
plications. Consider a simple
biopsy if a wound or lesion persists
or is not responding to treatment
as you or your physician expects.
0]
David B. Raynor, DPM, is a
podiatrist in Inverness and can
be reached at 352-726-3668.


Authors' experiences serve as proof of Heaven


p ( roof of Heaven" is a re-
cent book by Dr. Eben
Alexander, a top neuro-
surgeon who trained
and taught at Harvard
for 15 years before join-
ing in 2006 a special-
ized practice in
Lynchburg, Va.
In his book, Alexan-
der tells the story of the
devastating E. coli
meningitis that struck
him out of the blue in
November 2008. E. coli Dr. Ed
is found normally in the JOYI
colon. Its invasion of HEAL
the cerebrospinal fluid
to cause meningitis is LIV
extremely rare, and
how this happened to Alexander
remains a mystery to this day He
had absolutely no risk factors.
Yet, his spinal fluid tests re-
vealed a virulent E. coli infection
that surrounded his brain with tis-
sue-destroying pus. He went into a
deep coma that lasted over six
days, being kept alive only by life-
support machinery and the care of
very dedicated doctors and
nurses. By then, hope for his re-
covery was virtually zero. Then a
miracle happened. On the seventh
day, he opened his eyes! Over the


S


next several months he went on to
eventually make a full recovery
Alexander's story of his experi-
ences during the week
that he was comatose is
astounding. Even
though his brain was
under mortal attack, his
spirit was alive, giving
him vibrant experi-
ences that changed his
life forever. One of the
astonishing aspects of
his "Journey into the Af-
Dodge terlife" (the book's sub-
5 OF title) is the fact that
fTHY these vivid experiences
stayed with him after
NG he came out of his pro-
found coma. They are
the reason he wrote his book.
I'm very glad Alexander shared
his unique experience. Skeptics
may doubt his account, as they
doubt the validity of any experi-
ences of this kind. In fact, the title,
"Proof of Heaven," may be a bit
overstated. One person's experi-
ence hardly constitutes proof.
Still, Alexander's account has a
ring of authenticity. It was clearly
real to him, and it has changed his
life perspective in a profound way
I recommend his book highly It is
worth reading.


"Dying to Be Me" is another fas-
cinating book. Anita Moorjani, a
young Indian woman who grew up
in Hong Kong, was educated in
British schools and was successful
in the corporate world. In 2002 she
was diagnosed with Hodgkin's
lymphoma.
Despite treatment, her condi-
tion deteriorated. By February
2006 she was only skin and bones.
She went into a coma and was
taken to the hospital in terminal
condition. With her organs shut-
ting down, her doctors held out no
hope for recovery They only
began a desperate course of treat-
ment at the insistence of her
husband.
While in the coma, she had vivid
"other-worldly" experiences that
had a profound impact on her She
learned that she was a magnifi-
cent being who was totally and un-
conditionally loved, and she knew
this was where she belonged. She
was given the choice of staying in
this beautiful new world of uncon-
ditional love, or of returning to her
cancer-ravaged body
She wanted to stay, but she de-
cided to go back, knowing her hus-
band needed her
When she came out of the coma,
something remarkable had hap-


opened. The organs in her emaci-
ated body began working again,
and her cancer had disappeared.
Her doctors did every sophisti-
cated test possible, but could not
find any trace of cancer cells in a
body that was previously satu-
rated with cancer. She had expe-
rienced spontaneous healing.
Unwilling to trust their tests, the
cancer specialists completed her
course of chemotherapy anyway
It took months for Anita's weak-
ened body to gain strength again,
but today she's a vibrant woman
who enjoys life and conveys a
powerful message of love. Her
unique experience let her know
that this material world, with all
its glitter, as well as its pain and
suffering, is illusory Beyond it is a
sphere of magnificent beauty and
unconditional love.
Eben Alexander and Anita
Moorjani both came back from
their "other-worldly journeys"
with the deep conviction that they
were accepted and surrounded
with unconditional love. Neither
was spiritually inclined before
their experiences, but both re-
turned knowing that love is the
foundational principle of the
universe.
The skeptic position is that it's


impossible to verify these kinds of
subjective experiences scientifi-
cally That is true with our current
state of scientific knowledge. Ad-
vances in science in probing mat-
ters such as love and meditation
are astonishing, but we're not yet
able to establish the validity of
paranormal experiences.
Even so, I'm impressed with the
clear medical evidence that Eben
Alexander and Anita Moorjani
were both terminally ill. This evi-
dence was solidly documented
and confirmed by careful review.
There is no explaining these re-
coveries that were beyond the lim-
its of any current scientific
knowledge. In that sense, they
were miraculous.
These books carry a timely mes-
sage. The human spirit is a gift of
greater value than anything else
we have. This message has come
down through the ages for all of
us. We may hear it if we pause in
the hustle-bustle of our lives and
tune into the universal message of
love.

Ed Dodge, M.D., MPH, is a
retired physician now living in
Texas. Visit his website, www
thejoysothealthyliving. com.


Health NOTES


Nature Coast EMS Citi-
zens Academy will begin Jan.
29, a hands-on opportunity for
community members to see
and learn what Nature Coast
EMS paramedics and EMTs do
every day.
Graduates learn skills they
can use in actual emergencies,
because the academy is fo-
cused on hands-on training,
showing and teaching the skills
that an EMS crew may use. Par-
ticipants will get to practice start-
ing IVs, intubations (placing a
breathing tube), defibrillations,
reading heart rhythms and doing
a full "code" on a SIMMAN man-
nequin. In the final session, par-
ticipants will take care of a
simulated patient in a mock pa-
tient care scenario and have the
opportunity to ride along with
paramedics and EMTs and go
on actual emergencies.
The Nature Coast EMS Citi-
zens Academy is free and
meets from 6 to 9 p.m. every
Tuesday for eight weeks. Call
352-249-4700 to register.
Citrus Memorial Health
System will host a free smok-
ing cessation class from 5 to
7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, in the
auditorium on the main hospital
campus.
"Tools to Quit" is an intense
two-hour seminar in which par-
ticipants receive information on
how to select and prepare for
their own quit date. A trained to-
bacco cessation specialist
guides participants as they
identify triggers and withdrawal
symptoms, and brainstorms
ways to cope with them. Free
nicotine replacement therapy
including patches, gum and
lozenges will also be provided.
Refreshments and educa-
tional materials will be available
during the seminar. Seating is
limited; register online at
www.citrusmh.com/events or
call 352-560-6266 to reserve a
seat.
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers: New Year's
Resolution blood drive Dec. 31
will have all donors entered to
win an LCD TV courtesy of
Walmart. Help save a life in the
new year.
To find a donor center or a
blood drive near you, call 352-
527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in good
health to be eligible to donate.


Nature Coast EMS


Special to the Chronicle
Nature Coast EMS sponsored and decorated two trees in
the Citrus County Parks & Recreation Christmas Tree Dis-
play in Beverly Hills. The event was sponsored in conjunction
with Lowes Home Improvement and the Citrus County Chron-
icle. More than 50 trees were sponsored and decorated by
various organizations and families. After a few days on dis-
play, the trees were donated to needy families for the holi-
days. Pictured with Santa and Mrs. Claus from Nature Coast
EMS is Todd Hockert, quality improvement director, and
Katie Lucas, public information officer.


A photo ID is required.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway


(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30


a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
days, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays,
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday
and closed Sundays.
Visit www.lifesouth.org.
0 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 26, Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park,
South Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa.
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 27, Citrus Memorial
Health System, Highlands
Boulevard, Inverness.
0 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 28, Citrus Memorial
Health System, Highlands
Boulevard, Inverness.
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 29, Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, South Sun-
coast Boulevard, Homosassa.
0 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 30, Howard's
Flea Market, South Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
0 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
Dec. 31, Walmart Supercenter,
West Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 31, Walmart Supercenter,


South Suncoast Boulevard, Ho-
mosassa.
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center continues the "Know
Your Stats" prostate cancer
awareness campaign this
month with daily health tips
available at facebook.com/


srrmc, and is scheduling ap-
pointments for a free prostate
cancer screening Jan. 30,
2013.
The prostate cancer screen-
ing is available to men older
than 40 who have not received

See Page C3


Accepting New Patients H


(


"Caring is my Profession




Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-Ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

B.K. Patel, M.D. H. Khan, M.D.
Internal Medicine Board Certified Family Pactice
Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Termn Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals




Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
308 S. Line Ave.
Inverness
(352) 344-5511


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


C2 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inhaler treats chronic obstructive pulmonary disease


q I heard about There is also scarring
a new inhaled and swelling of the air-
medication for ways along with smooth
trea ing chronic bron- muscle contraction or
chitis and emphysema. C bronchospasm.
What can you tell me Emphysema is an en-
about it? largement of the tiny
A: Chronic bronchitis air sacs in the lungs and
and emphysema are the destruction of their
also known as chronic walls. Both of these
obstructive pulmonary Richard Hoffmann conditions produce ob-
disease or COPD. Peo- ASK THE struction to airflow and
ple with chronic bron- PHARMACIST difficulty breathing.
chitis have a persistent Symptoms of COPD in-
cough that produces clude cough, sputum
sputum and is caused by inflam- production and shortness of
mation in the airways. breath. These symptoms may


worsen if the person develops a
respiratory tract infection.
An estimated 24 million Ameri-
cans suffer from COPD, with over
50 percent under the age of 65.
However, more than 95 percent of
all deaths from COPD occur in
people older than 55.
It is the fourth leading cause of
death in the United States, and is
projected to become the third
leading fatal illness by 2020.
Smoking is a major cause of
COPD, and about 10 percent to 15
percent of smokers develop this
condition.
The newly approved treatment


for patient with COPD is called
TudorzaPressair and contains the
drug aclidinium.
Aclidinium is known as an an-
timuscarinic or anticholinergic
medication. When inhaled into
the airways, it helps to relax the
airways' smooth muscle and ex-
pand them making it easier to
breathe.
The most common side effects
reported by patients using Tu-
dorzaPressair during clinical
studies were headache, inflam-
mation of the nasal passage, and
cough.
However, it may also cause


some serious side effects, includ-
ing bronchospasm, increased
pressure in the eye (glaucoma) or
urinary retention.
TurdorzaPressair should only
be used for the maintenance treat-
ment of COPD and not as a rescue
medication. It comes as a dry pow-
der that is used as an oral inhaler
twice a day

Richard P Hoffmann, Pharm.D.,
has been a pharmacist for more
than 40years. Send questions to
him at 2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando, FL 34442.


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

levels had a lower risk of
breast cancer compared to
those with the lowest levels.
The association appeared
to be stronger for smokers
than for non-smokers, and
for women who were lean
compared to those who
were overweight. All of
these factors influence the
life expectancy of women in
this country
Carotenoids are the mi-
cronutrients in fruits and



NOTES
Continued from Page C2

a PSA test since January 2012.
Call 352-795-123.
Flu shot clinics are of-
fered by B&W Rexall Drugs in
Inverness. Call Donna Steven-
son at 352-726-1555.
Nature Coast EMS offer
flu shots for $28; however, the
flu shot is free with valid
Medicare Part B, and many
other insurance providers are
also accepted.
Flu shots are available 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day, (except holidays), at the
Nature Coast EMS administra-
tion office on Homosassa Trail
at Country Hill Drive in Lecanto.
If your organization, busi-
ness, ALF or other group would
like to schedule a flu clinic at
your location, call Jane Bedford
at 352-249-4751 or email
JaneB@naturecoastems.org.
Support GROUPS

NOTE: The holidays may
cause some groups to cancel
meetings. Call ahead if unsure.
SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilita-
tor, at 352-688-7744.
Caregivers' Support and
Information meeting, 1 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday monthly at
St. Timothy Lutheran Church,
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River. Call Charlotte Downing
at 352-422-7044 for direc-
tions/information. Refreshments
served.
OCALA- Ocala Health
Stroke Support Group meets
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the fourth
Tuesday monthly at the Senior
Wellness Community Center
(9850 S.W. 84th Court, Suite
500, Ocala). The next meeting
will be June 26.
The group is for stroke sur-
vivors and their families and
provides a forum for support,
encouragement, and accept-
ance of a new and changing
life. Interested persons are en-
couraged to contact 800-530-
1188 for more information and
to register.
The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society Suncoast
Chapter, Cancer Support
Group (including Multiple
Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner
Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no
charge and light refreshments
are provided. Contact Lourdes
Arvelo, LCSW, patient services
manager, at 813-963-6461 ext.


vegetables that give them
their vibrant orange, yellow,
and red colors. Foods that
are good sources of
carotenoids include carrots,
sweet potatoes, spinach,
kale, red peppers and win-
ter squash.
As I have said before, our
plates need to be colorful
with fruits and veggies, not
brown and white with meat
and potatoes.
Having higher circulating
blood-carotenoid levels may
be particularly protective
against breast cancers that
do not need estrogen to
grow. The finding suggests


11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or
visit The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society website at
www.lls.org.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group by Alzheimer's
Family Organization, 2 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
Sugarmill Manor, 8985 S Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
Call Bevin Brayton at 352-
302-9066.
SPRING HILL Stroke
Support Group, noon the
fourth Thursday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Pam McDonald at
352-346-6359.
NEW PORT RICHEY -
Community Chatterboxes
support group to assist individu-
als suffering from communica-
tion deficits (i.e., aphasia,
apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a
result of a cerebral vascular ac-
cident or other neurological dis-
orders, 3 to 4 p.m. every other
Thursday at Community Hospi-
tal, 5637 Marine Parkway, New
Port Richey, FL 34652. Care-
givers and spouses are encour-
aged to attend. Call
727-845-0757.
PINELLAS PARK-
"Connections" fireside discus-
sion-style support group for
cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly, WellSpring
Oncology, 6600 66th St. N.,
Pinellas Park, 727-343-0600;
www.wellspringoncology.org.
Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 352-527-2443.
SPRING HILL--Am-
putee support group, 7 p.m.
the last Monday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Eva Baker at 352-
592-7232.
Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter sup-
port group: are attended by
caregivers of loved ones with
dementia or Alzheimer's Dis-
ease. All support groups are
free of charge to caregivers.Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inver-
ness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday
monthly. Call Anne Black at
352-527-4600.

Weekly meetings
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group, 6:45
p.m. Wednesday at Dunnellon
Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St., Room 204 in of-
fice building, use right-side en-
trance across from the
Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is
for family and friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group in your area: call 888-
947-8885 or go to www.NAR
ANONFL.org.


that eating a healthy, plant-
based diet may be one of the
first modifiable risk factors
for these less common,
poorer-prognosis cancers.
The study combined data
from eight trials that in-
cluded more than 3,000
women with breast cancer
and close to 4,000 women
without the disease. It is not
clear if carotenoids directly
lowered cancer risk. The
message to women does not
change.
If we want to reduce the
risk of cancer, not just
breast cancer, eating a
plant-based diet low in fat


Recovery from Food Ad-
diction, 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Thursday at St. Anne's
Church, 9870 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, in the parish
hall library. Call Peg at 410-
903-7740.
Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous (FA) is a free
12-step recovery program for
anyone suffering from food ob-
session, overeating, undereat-
ing or bulimia. For details or a
list of meetings, call 352-270-
8534 or visit
www.foodaddicts.org.
0 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday at
Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Depression and anxiety
peer support group meets at
10 a.m. Thursday at Central
Ridge Library.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in the
back hall, St. Thomas Church,
off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal
Street. Group is composed of
men and women who are expe-
riencing grief and are con-
vinced "Life can be good
again." Open to all. Come or
call Anne at 352-212-0632.
AI-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S.
U.S. 41.
Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
0 Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Serenity:
10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 352-
621-0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
M AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.


and animal protein may
help. This study, like others,
suggests this is the case. The
study was recently pub-
lished in the Journal of the
National Cancer Institute.
The suggestion that eating
plenty of fruits and vegeta-
bles may be particularly ben-
eficial for women at risk for
non-estrogen-dependent tu-
mors is especially intriguing.
Many breast cancers in
women with a family history
of the disease and specific
genetic mutations that dra-
matically increase their
breast cancer risk fall into
this category Making


SA 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living Wa-
ters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne
St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at
352-527-2443. Free and open
to the public.
DUNNELLON Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist Church
of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell
Road. Call the church at 352-
489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
C.R. 491 and S.R. 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 352-382-0851.
Overeaters Anonymous:
5 p.m. Wednesday at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church. Call
Rita at 352-382-8503.
Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the Sen-
ior Center (V.A. building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Dolores at 352-746-5019.
The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our


healthy lifestyle choices is
important for women with a
genetically increased risk
for cancer.
Maintaining a healthy
lifestyle is no guarantee that
a high-risk woman will not
get cancer, and it's no sub-
stitute for aggressive
screening. But, it's exciting
news that fruits and vegeta-
bles may help prevent
breast cancer.
At the same time, we don't
want to give high-risk
women a false sense that if
they eat right they don't have
to be vigilant about screen-
ing. Yearly mammograms


Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call
Carolyn at 352-341-0777.
The New Beginning, 7
p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
352-341-0777.
The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar disorder and
more. Weekly meeting. Call
352-637-3196.
Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station).
Call Charmaine at 352-
422-3234.
Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
10:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days. Child care available. Call
CASA at 352-344-8111.
Celebrate Recovery:
0 7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday at the Christian Recov-
ery Fellowship Church, 2242
W. State Road 44. Call 352-
726-2800.
7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church's Student Ministries
Building. Dinner available be-
fore the meeting from 6 to 7
p.m. for $4 donation and a cof-
fee house after. Call 352-
746-6200.
Gulf to Lake Church Min-
istry Complex, West Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal River.
Dinner at 6 p.m. Friday, fol-


save lives, so make sure you
get yours on a regular basis.

Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist and a member of
the Citrus County Unit of
the American Cancer
Society Watch "Navigating
Cancer" on WYKE TVat
7:30 p.m. Tuesday and at
10 a.m. Thursday. Ifyou
have any suggestions for
topics, or have any
questions, contact him at
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461, or
email cjbennett@rboi.com.


lowed by large- and small-
group time and a Coffee Cafe
at 9. Call 352-586-4709.
Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless and
hurting of Citrus County. We
offer referrals to Celebrate Re-
covery, call 352-563-1860.
Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits, 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 352-628-2874.
Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and codepen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road,
Dunnellon.
Call Char at 352-465-1644
or Nancy at 352-794-0017.
SPRING HILL-- Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at 352-346-8864.

See GROUPS/Page C4


MASTERPIECE
DE NTAL STU DIO
The art of optimum-quality dentistry.

Always

ew Patients

FRANK J. \AAm IN. IlMIN.
4805 S Suncoast B,
Homosassa FL 344-
352-628-0012 v-,


RUSH



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HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 C3









Dental clinic becoming reality through generosity


B y the time you
read this, it will
be Christmas
Day
As we all know,
Christmas is the time of
giving. Ever since my
kids were small, we al- ..
ways chose some way of [.., H
giving in the commu- I
nity We somehow al- Dr. Frank
ways gravitated to Vascimini
something that was SOUND BITES
meaningful for us at the
time.
I remember buying soccer balls together


GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

treatment is completed. This
condition is relatively new and
information is somewhat evolv-
ing. The exact cause-and-effect
relationship with chemotherapy
is not established.
There was a large breast can-
cer conference in San Antonio,
Texas, recently This is an annual
event where the latest research
in breast cancer is presented.
This year many interesting stud-
ies from around the world were
presented.
In one study, researchers tried
to elucidate the cause of chemo-
brain. New brain imaging re-
search suggests chemo brain is
an inappropriate label for the
neurocognitive deficits often re-
ported by cancer patients. That's
because reduced brain function
caused by fatigue and worry is
often present even before
chemotherapy begins.
The research involved func-
tional magnetic resonance imag-
ing (fMRI) in breast cancer
patients performed 24 to 34 days


when the kids were in-
volved in soccer and
basketballs when that
was the focus. We al-
ways dropped them off
at the fire station,
knowing they would get
to a needy family
Though I am not at
liberty to give any spe-
cific names yet, there
have been many people
who were generous to
the dental clinic for the
needy I am helping put
through Nature Coast


after surgery and before
chemotherapy in 29 patients, or
radiotherapy in 37 patients. The
control group consisted of 32 age-
matched healthy subjects.
Women diagnosed with breast
cancer, but who were slated just
for radiation therapy, did better
on memory tests performed dur-
ing fMRI (functional MRI) scan-
ning while women without
cancer did even better. The
chemotherapy group reported
significantly greater severity of
fatigue and performed less well
on the verbal memory task at the
first test This test was done after
surgery but before chemother-
apy was started.
In other words, symptoms of
so-called chemobrain existed be-
fore chemotherapy was even
started. So, those symptoms are
not due to chemotherapy but
they can be due to cancer, stress,
fatigue, etc.
Yes, chemotherapy or other
treatment may worsen the
symptoms.
Some suggestions to improve
these symptoms are as follows:
Use a detailed daily planner.
Keeping everything in one place
makes it easier to find the re-


Ministries.
I want to personally thank the
18 dentists who have already
signed up to volunteer their time
to this cause throughout the year
Without you we would not have
been able to move forward with
the project.
Our donors for this project
would only make a commitment if
they knew we had dental profes-
sionals on board to make it hap-
pen. I was so proud to be able to
tell them that we did, in fact, have
the involvement of the dentists in
our community


minders you may need.
Exercise your brain. Take a
class, do word puzzles, or learn a
new language.
Get enough rest and sleep.
Exercise your body Regular
physical activity is not only good
for your body, but also improves
your mood, makes you feel more
alert, and decreases tiredness
(fatigue).
Eat yourveggies. Studies have
shown that eating more vegetables
improves your brainpower
Set up and follow routines.
Don't try to multitask. Focus
on one thing at a time.
Ask for help when you need
it
Try not to focus on how
much these symptoms bother
you. Accepting the problem will
help you deal with it
-0
Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and oncologist He
is volunteer medical adviser of
the Citrus Unit ofAmerican
Cancer Society Write to 521 N
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, e-mail sgandhi@
tampabayrr-com or call
352-746-0707.


My sincere thanks goes out to
you, my fellow dentists, for your
gift of time to this very worthy
cause.
For those of you who are read-
ing this and feel that urge to give
of your time, talent or treasure,
please feel to contact me via
email. My address can be found at
the end of this column.
I am so excited that this is actu-
ally happening. When you become
involved in ventures like this you
always seem to wonder if it is re-
ally ever going to come to fruition.
With the help of many people and


GROUPS
Continued from Page C3

Organizations
Alzheimer's Association-Florida
Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support
groups are for family members, care-
givers and others interested in learning
more about Alzheimer's disease.
Meetings are open to everyone and
free of charge.
To arrange free respite care so you
can attend a group, call the Hernando
office at 352-688-4537 or 800-
772-8672.
Website: www.alzsupport.com -
Live chat every Wednesday at noon.
Message boards open at all times to
post questions and leave replies. Join
the Alzheimer's Association online com-
munity at www.alz.org/living_with_
alzheimers message_boards_lwa.asp.
Brooksville: Lykes Memorial
County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30
p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry
Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Sen-
ior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30
p.m. first Thursday monthly.
Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537.


many organizations I am so happy
to say, "It is really going to
happen."
I want to wish all of my faithful
readers a merry Christmas, happy
New Year and joyous holidays to
all faiths. May all of God's blessing
be with you and your loved ones.

Dr Frank Vascimini is a dentist
practicing in Homosassa. Send
your questions to 4805 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL
34446 or email info@
MasterpieceDentalStudio. com.


Spring Hill: The Residence at Tim-
ber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m.
third Monday monthly. Call Diane
Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Resi-
dence at 352-683-9009. Free respite
care provided, call to reserve.
First United Methodist Church of
Homosassa has several support
groups that run on a monthly basis. All
groups are open to the public and free
of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room
203 in the Administration Building:
First Monday: diabetic support
group.
Second Monday: Alzheimer's/de-
mentia caregivers support group.
Fourth Monday: stroke survivors
support group.
Memory Lane Respite offered
weekly for people with Alzheimer's/de-
mentia. Anyone bringing a loved one
for the first time is encouraged to come
early to fill out information forms. Call
352-628-4083 for meeting dates.
Citrus Memorial Health System
is a 198-bed, not-for-profit community
hospital that provides health care serv-
ices to residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. Support
group meetings are in the CMHS

See GROUPS/Page C8


GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

the factor of problems that it
can cause.
Let's look at a few num-
bers to try to help guide us to
properly consume alcohol
through the holiday season,
and for that matter, the rest
of the year. A drink is consid-



KUMAR
Continued from Page C1

overactive bladder that is re-
fractory to drug treatment,
urinary retention that is not
due to obstruction and bowel
incontinence. Many patients
who have significant bowel
conditions such as fecal in-
continence, bowel urgency
or even constipation along
with urinary symptoms may
see an improvement in both
conditions.
Before permanent Inter-
Stim placement, test evalua-
tion is done to see if the
patient would benefit from
InterStim neuromodulation.
During the test phase, a
temporary lead is placed in
the small of the lower back
area near the sacral nerves
that are located close to the
tail bone. The lead is con-
nected to a small external
neurostimulator that the pa-
tient wears on the waistband
like a pager This neurostim-
ulator generates mild elec-
trical pulses that can be
adjusted.
During the test evaluation
that usually last for two to
three days, the patient tracks
his or her symptoms with a
voiding diary, which helps
determine the response to
the treatment. During the
evaluation period, the pa-
tient may carry on with his
or her usual activities.
The temporary leads are
removed at the end of the
trial period, and the patient
and the physician together
decide whether to
proceed with long-term
neurostimulation.
Placement of the long-
term or permanent Inter-
Stim neurostimulator is very
similar to the test lead place-
ment, except that the neu-
rostimulator is surgically
placed under the skin of the
buttock. With the long-term
device, the patient may con-
trol the neurostimulator
with a hand-held program-
mer that works like a remote
control to adjust the stimula-
tion up or down.
The success rate with In-
terStim neuromodulation
has been reported at 70 per-
cent to 80 percent in several
studies. Success is defined
as at least a 50 percent re-
duction in the symptoms.
Studies also report a signifi-


ered a 12-ounce beer, 5
ounces of wine, and 1.5
ounces of liquor. Moderate
drinking is one drink a day
for a woman, and two drinks
a day for a man, and that is
somewhat based on weight,
height, and body mass index.
Excessive drinking causes
chronic conditions including
liver disease, as well as the
acute injuries from, classi-
cally, a motor vehicle acci-


cant improvement in quality
of life, decrease in use of
pads and cost of alternative
treatments and long-term
benefits. The benefits ap-
pear to be greater than those
reported by patients treated
with medications.
Finally, botulinum toxin
or Botox may be injected
into the bladder to treat pa-
tients who do not respond to
other forms of therapy
While the treatment can be
very effective, the benefits
are short-lived and repeat
injections are required. In
addition, the injections are
not FDA approved and
hence not covered by most
insurance carriers.
Overactive bladder is a
common condition that
presents as urinary urgency


dent In 72 percent of the
time, excessive drinking is
done by males. Other in-
juries include falls, accidents
such as falling asleep with a
cigarette, and accidents
around the water including
drowning. Suicide and homi-
cide rates are also higher in
people who consume heavy
amounts of alcohol.
As mentioned earlier, al-
cohol in moderation can


and involuntary loss of
urine or urge incontinence.
Behavioral therapy and
drugs are often used as first
choice but in patients who
respond inadequately or
have side effects, sacral
nerve stimulation with In-
terStim can offer lasting
benefits.

Udaya Kumar M.D., FRCS
Urol, Dip. Urol (London), is
certified by the American
Board of Urology and the
Board of Urology of U.K
and Ireland. He is a former
professor of urology with
University ofArkansas for
Medical Sciences. Contact
him at 3475 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, FL
34448 or 352-628-7671.


help heart disease, but there
is some evidence to suggest
that breast cancer and colon
cancer can actually be worse
with alcohol consumption.
It seems that there is al-
ways a balance that needs to
be considered when taking
in alcohol. The one big dif-
ference is, in the younger
population, they are not at
high risk for heart disease,
breast cancer or colon can-


cer, so for most young peo-
ple consuming excessive
amounts of alcohol poses
only a risk factor, no benefit.
Good or bad, it seems that
drinking habits start young,
and people are influenced
by their peers, and in some
cases by their family on how
they interact with and con-
sume alcohol.
Please be careful this hol-
iday season, and remember


that good habits are not sea-
sonal. Try to live year round
with the idea that mild to
moderate drinking is okay,
and excessive is not.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at 352-795-0011 or
visit CrystalCommunity
ENTcom.


David R. Best

Attorney
at Law



Over 35 years

practicing in

Citrus County






Areas of

Practice:

Personal Injury

Medical Malpractice

Sex Abuse Cases


Disability Cases


7655 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Suite 13
Crystal River, FL 34429


The #1 Provider of News and
Advertising Information in
Citrus County


Call to see how you can receive

2 Weeks Free

352-563-5655

C .i -- _i o. o. ....

-wc.chronicleonline.c orrn
769452


I


C4 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Seven Days A We

Rain or S^^hin












COMMUNITY C
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIc I I A


News NOTES

Parks Friends
to host cruise
The Friends of Crystal
River State Parks will host a
sunset cruise aboard the
cruise ship "Monroe" at 5
p.m. Friday, Dec. 28. Free
refreshments and treats will
be served.
Proceeds will benefit the
nonprofit Friends group in
support of the Crystal River
State Parks.
To get to the park visitor
center, take U.S. 19 one mile
north of the Crystal River
Mall, to Nick Nicholas Ford,
then turn west on State Park
Road and follow it all the way
to the end.
Call 352-563-0450 for in-
formation. Tickets are $20
and are sold at the park.
Seating is limited.
Rainbow Springs
field trip slated
Citrus County Audubon
Society has scheduled a bird-
ing field trip at Rainbow
Springs State Park in Dun-
nellon for Thursday, Dec. 27.
The public is welcome to at-
tend. Preregistration is not
necessary and participants
with all levels of birding skills
are welcome.
This field trip is led by
CCAS members Fred Hile-
man and Tom Gulley. The
group will meet at 8 a.m. in
the parking lot. There is a fee
of $2 to be paid at the en-
trance to the park. Wear
comfortable walking shoes,
as it will involve some moder-
ate walking, and will last
about three hours.
Bring binoculars if you
have them; if not, several
pairs will be available. Explor-
ing Rainbow Springs will take
participants into the butterfly
garden and to the nature trail
leading to the meadow and
pine forest areas.
Visit CitrusCounty
Audubon.com for details.
Chorus seeks
male singers
The Citrus County Chapter
"Chorus of the Highlands" of
the Barbershop Harmony So-
ciety seeks men to join the
group, which has been in the
area for more than 27 years.
The chorus meets at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday in Inverness.
Call 352-382-0336 for
more information.

Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE

Smokey


Help orphaned ani


Supplies such as food,

Special to the Chronicle

Two local pet rescue groups will
have the third annual Pet Angels pet
needs drive through Saturday, Jan. 3,
to collect needed items and donations
to help orphaned pets in their care.
Home at Last Pet Adoptions
(halpetadoptions@yahoo.com) and
Precious Paws Rescue (precious-
pawsflorida.com) are the beneficiar-
ies of the pet supplies collection. Both
organizations are all-volunteer regis-
tered charities.
Foster pets are cared for in the
homes of volunteers who provide all
the needed daily care. All pets receive


als News NOTES
Car drawing
to be Dec. 29


cleansers, paper towels and more are needed


the necessary veterinary care.
Items needed to help with their care
include cat litter, pet food both canned
and dry, disinfectant cleaners, laundry
detergent, paper towels, donations
and gift cards.
Donations may be left at any dona-
tion site or checks made out to and
mailed to: Home at Last, PO. Box 4533,
Homosassa, FL 34447.
All donations are tax deductible.
For more information or to have do-
nation picked up, call Home at Last at
352-476-6832, or Precious Paws at 352-
726-4700.
Gifts can be dropped off at:
Precious Paws Adoption Center,


Crystal River Mall, from noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday (Closed
from Dec. 27 through Jan. 2 for the
holidays.)
Plantation Animal Clinic, 9030 W
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Pawfection Ranch 6420 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Goin' Postal 7789 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa
Cypress Village Property Owners
Association, 108 W Cypress Blvd.,
Homosassa (A Frame) at the entrance
to Sugarmill Woods
Oak Village Association at Servos
Square, 5478 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.


Learn about oysters with FWGP


Special to the Chronicle

Dr Jennifer Seavey will be
guest speaker at the meeting
of the Friends of the Withla-
coochee Gulf Preserve at 10
a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, at 1001
Old Rock Road, Yankeetown.
Seavey, assistant director


of Seahorse Key Marine
Laboratory, will talk about
"Restoring Resiliency in a
Changing World: Oysters in
Florida's Big Bend." All are
welcome.
Seavey has a bachelor's
degree in biology, a master's
degree in wildlife science,


and a Ph.D. in landscape
ecology She has conducted
research on birds and
coastal issues throughout
the United States and inter-
nationally She is interested
in addressing conservation
and management issues for
threatened species and


ecosystems.
Her current research fo-
cuses on climate change
ecology, especially along
low-lying coastal systems in
Florida such as oyster reefs.
For more information,
visit www.withlacoochee
gulfpreserve.com.


Garden Club Pride


Special to the nronicle
The Pride Award was presented recently by Keep Citrus County Beautiful to the Crystal River Garden Club. Accepting the
award on behalf of the Garden Club, from left, were: Jenny Wensel, first vice president; Mary Ulyat, past president; Libby
Wentzell, president; and Judy Porelle, past president. KCCB members on hand for the presentation included Susie
Metcalfe, president, and members Courtney Pollard, Paula Wheeler and Erin Ray. More than 30 club members participate
throughout the year to do a monthly cleanup of the Crystal River Cemetery at Third Avenue and Third Street Northeast.
For more information about the Garden Club, call Jenny Wensel at 352-795-0844. Keep Citrus County Beautiful recognizes
an individual, group or business each month that exemplifies taking pride in the community by cleaning up litter or ille-
gally dumped items, promoting recycling and proper waste disposal, fixing and sprucing up buildings in need of attention,
or landscape maintenance and planting. To nominate someone for a future Pride Award, visit the KCCB website at www.
kccbinc.org, or leave a phone message at 352-746-9393.


There are only a few days
left to purchase tickets for the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County car drawing to be at 1
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 29, at
Love Chevrolet in Inverness.
For $25, the winner has a
choice of a 2013 Chevy Mal-
ibu or a 2013 Equinox SUV or
the cash value of the car as
determined by the dealer. The
car is being supplied by Bob
and Chad Halleen of Love
Honda/Chevrolet.
Funds earned from the car
drawing will benefit the chil-
dren at the three Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County sites.
To learn more about the Boys
& Girls Clubs and for locations
of where to buy tickets, call
352-621-9225.
New Yorkers to
gather Jan. 10
The New York Club of Cit-
rus County will meet at noon
Thursday, Jan. 10, at Inver-
ness Golf and Country Club.
Speaker for January will be
Diana Finegan, executive di-
rector of CASA.
On the menu are roast pork
loin and gravy or corned beef
and cabbage, corn, dinner
rolls, rainbow sherbet and
cookies for dessert. Tea, soda
and coffee provided. Cost is
$12, which includes tax and
tip. Lunch reservations must
be made by Wednesday, Jan.
2. Mail your check to: New
York Club, P.O. Box 641261,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Write
menu choice on your check.
Meetings are normally con-
ducted at noon the second
Thursday monthly. Visitors are
welcome, but must join after
two visits.
Annual dues are $6. The
club supports the work of
CASA, helping victims of do-
mestic violence. For more in-
formation, call Dorothy or Ed
at 352-527-2332.
Novel group to
elect new officers
The Florida Chapter of the
Historical Novel Society will
have a members-only meet-
ing at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 5,
in the Community Room of
the Central Ridge Library, 425
W. Roosevelt Blvd., in Beverly
Hills.
Election of officers for 2013
will take place during the busi-
ness meeting. The rest of the
meeting will be devoted to in-
house critique sessions.
For more information, visit
www.fchns.org, or call Marian
Fox, 352-726-0162.


Community band celebrates holidays in concert


Special to the Chronicle
Smokey is a young adult fe-
line waiting for that special
home. She likes to be part
of the family's activities
but enjoys a nap in a sunny
window. PPR has several
teenage and young adult
felines available for adop-
tion. All are sweet, some
more playful than others,
but all ready to move into
your heart and home. Stop
by the CR mall adoption
center and you may find
just the perfect pet waiting
for that special home for
the holidays. Kittens and
cats are available for adop-
tion at the PetSupermarket
on State Road 44 in Inver-
ness during regular store
hours. The Crystal River
Mall adoption center is
open Thursday through
Sunday from noon to 4
p.m. The adoption center
will be closed Dec. 27
through Dec. 30. View pets
at www.preciouspaws
florida.com or call 352-
726-4700.


It was standing room only at the
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa for the Nature
Coast Community Band's "Holiday
Prelude" concert.
Conductor Cindy Hazzard and the
all-volunteer band present a con-
cert series of outstanding classical
and contemporary music each year,
free to the public.
The Friends of NCCB supports
their efforts. To become a
Friend, send your mem-
bership donation to Na-
ture Coast Community
Band, 2756 N. Stampede
Drive, Beverly Hills, FL
34465.
Featured in the con-
cert were trumpet
soloists Randy Hickman,
Saralynne Miller, Martha Ruth
Brown, Ron Redding, uth
Tom Mohan and Patricia AROUI
DiGioia, and soprano COMM
soloists Karen Medrano
and Dreama Leonard.
Opening with the triumphant
"Holiday Rhapsody," we rhap-
sodized over the melodious strains
of family Christmas favorites in-
cluding "Deck the Halls" and "Jin-
gle Bells," a Christmas standard in
which the percussion section
shone. The whimsical "Twelve Days
of Christmas" followed.
"0 Most Holy Mystery," a Thomas
L. De Victoria/Edwards master-
piece, composed as a chorale in the
1500s, profoundly serene, sheds


L
I
I

1


light on the miracle of God's
message.
My personal favorite was the "Bu-
gler's Holiday" with the trumpet
soloists aforementioned. This Leroy
Anderson holiday piece garnered a
standing ovation from the audience.
Popularized by the Boston Pops Or-
chestra's Arthur Fiedler, conductor
of multi-lingual talents, this piece
joined Anderson's famed "Synco-
pated Clock" and Blue
Tango string of hits pop-
ular with music lovers
worldwide.
"Mary's Boy Child," a
Philip Sparke piece
made popular by Harry
Belafonte, was presented
in Calypso style and thor-
evins roughly enjoyed by the
audience.
Levins Tchaikovsky's "Nut-
ID THE cracker Suite," a peren-
IUNITY nial crowd pleaser, was
written in 1893 and is
considered the most popular ballet
of all time. It is the story about a
family's Christmas party told year
after year in concert halls through-
out the world, including New York's
Carnegie Hall.
The three selections presented
were the "Chinese Tea Dance," the
"Russian Dance" and the all-time
favorite, "Dance of the Sugarplum
Fairy"
A most delightful "Night Before
Christmas" selection, narrated by
international broadcaster Lewis Al-


paugh, was brought to life by nu-
merous instrumental solos bringing
us a vivid picture of an age-old tale,
a most beloved family piece we
never tire of hearing.
After intermission, the band's
"Winter on Emerald Bay," an Alan
Lee Silva piece written as a simple
joyous Irish dance, was performed
with its typical raucous rhythm con-
trasted with mystical beauty.
Mel Torme and Robert Wells'
"The Christmas Song" featured
Dreama Leonard, soloist.
The "Three Klezmer Miniatures,"
another Philip Sparke piece, was
based on traditional Jewish
Klezmer melodies. Included as a
tribute to the celebration of
Hanukkah, it originated in the ghet-
tos of eastern Europe where itiner-
ant Jewish musicians often played
for celebrations, particularly
weddings.
Three movements were featured:
1. Sham Horay (There are the
Mountains of Golan) and Niguh
Shay Yosi (A Circle of Dance). 2.
Toombalyka (A Russian Love Song).
3. Hava Nagila, the most famous of
all Jewish folk dances, that means
"Let us rejoice," featured in nu-
merous stage and film presenta-
tions depicting the Jewish heritage.
"Hymn to the Saints," a
Tchaikovsky lesser-known work, yet
powerfully written as a sacred
piece, reminds us that we need to
be thankful for and respectful to the
military members all over the world


who are responsible for the free-
doms we enjoyed in this concert
hall that day The piece was grate-
fully dedicated to all who are keep-
ing us safe.
"Angels in the Bleak Winter," a
Gary Holst piece, pulled out all of
his creative "stops" and created a
festive arrangement with two
melodies with first "In the Bleak
Midwinter," and the popular carol,
"Angels We Have Heard on High" as
the second melody as written by
Larry Clark, one of the most popu-
lar and most performed composers
of our times.
Leroy Anderson's "A Christmas
Festival" concluded the afternoon's
"Holiday Prelude" as narrator
Doreen Morgan expressed it best:
"We hope our musical festivities
send you out singing in your hearts
or even out loud."
Thanks, Citrus Nature Coast
Community Band, for a most lovely
afternoon Christmas concert Merry
Christmas!
The spring concert dates are
March 2 at Citrus Springs Commu-
nity Center and March 3 at the Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church in
Inverness.

Ruth Levins participates in a
variety of projects around the
community Letherknowabout
your group's upcoming activities
by writing to PO. Box 803, Crystal
River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. U Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TU ES DAY EVENING DEC EMBER 25, 201 2 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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[X) 30 60 30 51 of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie.'PG' Voices of Mike Myers.'PG' of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie.'PG'
tLlEJ 727 67 727 Golf PGA Tour Golf Deutsche Bank Championship, Final Round. Golf |Golf
"Matchmaker Santa" (2012, "A Bride for Christmas" (2012, "Hitched for the Holidays" (2012) "Naughty or Nice" (2012, Fantasy)
59 68 59 45 54 Romance) Lacey Chabert. cc Romance) Arielle Kebbel. cc Joey Lawrence. c Hilarie Burton. cc
"Anchorman: Legend *** "Rio"(2011, Comedy) Voices of Anne **a "Joyful Noise" (2012) Queen Latifah, Boxing's Best of 2012
302 201 302 2 2 of Ron" Hathaway (In Stereo) 'G' s Dolly Parton. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c (N) 'PG' c
i 303 202 303 *** "The Terminal" (2004, Comedy-Drama) *** "Crazy Stupid, Love." (2011) Steve *** "The Terminal" (2004, Comedy-Drama)
303 202 303 Tom Hanks. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' E Carell. (In Stereo 'PG-13' cc Tom Hanks. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' E
WHiGiJ 23 57 23 42 52 Hunt Intl |Hunters |Hunters |Hunt Intl Love It or List It'G' |Property |Property Hunters |Hunt Intl |Million Dollar Rooms
Hatfields & McCoys A Hatfield murders a Hatfields & McCoys The McCoys murder Anse's Hatfields & McCoys A shattering New Year's
HIST 51 25 51 32 42 McCoy (Part 1 of 3)'14, D,L,S,V'E cbrother.'14, D,L, V'a Day battle.'14, D,L,S,V'x c
"The Christmas Consultant" (2012, Comedy) "The Merry In-Laws" (2012, Romance- "Holiday Spin"(2012, Drama) Ralph Macchio,
LIFE 24 38 24 31 David Hasselhoff, Caroline Rhea. x Comedy) Shelley Long.'NR'x Garrett Clayton, Allie Bertram. cx
5 1 ** "Her Final Fury: Betty Broderick, the Last ** "Next Stop Murder" (2010, Suspense) **Y "Borderline" (2002, Suspense) Michael
LMN 50 119 Chapter"(1992) Meredith Baxter. cx Brigid Brannagh, Allison Lange. NR'x Biehn, Gina Gershon.'R'x
Wk 320 221 320 3 3 **3 "The Adjustment Bureau" ***, "Superman" (1978) Christopher Reeve. Superman **' "A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Zane'sSex
320221 320 3 3 (2011) Matt Damon., learns of a plot to destroy the West Coast.'PG' Christmas (2011)'R'
MSNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball Matthews The Ed Show (N) Rachel Maddow The Last Word |The Ed Show
Brain Games "Pay Brain Games Brain Games "Watch Brain Games "Pay Brain Games Brain Games "Watch
)if) 109 65 109 44 53 Attention!"'G' "Remember This!"'G' This!"'G' Attention!"'G' "Remember This!"'G' This!"'G'
tiD 28 36 28 35 25 "A Fairly Odd Christmas"(2012) |Sponge. Full H'se |Full Hse. Full Hse. |See Dad Nanny |Nanny Friends Friends
[WIW 103 62 103 Breaking Down Unfaithful: Stories Unfaithful: Stories Unfaithful: Stories In the Bedroom Unfaithful: Stories
fXYJ 44 123 The Bad Girls Club The Bad Girls Club Bad Girls IThe Bad Girls Club |The Bad Girls Club |Bad Girls The Bad Girls Club
** "Beastly"(2011) *Y "The Three Musketeers" (2011, Action) ***Y "War Horse"(2011) Emily Watson. A horse sees joy **Y "Red"
340 241 340 4 Alex Pettyfer. Matthew MacFadyen. 'PG-13' c and sorrow during World War I.'PG-13' Ea
Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest
tSPEEUJ 732 112 732 Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff
iEi 3o7 43 37 27 36 *** "A Bronx Tale"(1993, Drama) Robert De Niro, Chazz **** "GoodFellas" (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An
37 43 37 27 36 Palminteri, Lillo Brancato. (In Stereo) 'R' Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s NewYork Mafia. (In Stereo)'R
S**Y2 "John Carter" (2012) Taylor *** "The Pirates! Band of **Y "The Vow" (2012, Romance) Rachel */, "Ghost Rider:
370 271 370 Kitsch.'PG-13'E a Misfits" (2012)'PG'E McAdams. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'E Spirit of Vengeance"
36 31 36 College Football LSU at Florida. College Football South Carolina at Florida.
WY 31 59 31 26 29 K-9 K-9 K-9 K-9 K-9 K-9"Mind K-9 K-9 K-9 K-9 Warehouse 13 "The
31 59 31 26 29 Snap"_Greatest Gift"'PG'
(ITB) 49 23 49 16 19 **** "A Christmas Story" (1983) 'PG' Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang BiBang Bi Bang Conan '14'c
i 169 53 169 30 35 "King of Kings"i(1961, Historical Drama) **1 "Love Finds Andy Hardy" **' "Andy Hardy Gets Spring *** "Judge Hardy
169 53 169 30 35 Jeffrey Hunter.'PG-13' ax '(1938) Lewis Stone.'NR' Fever"(1939)'NR'E andSon'"NR'
53 34 53 24 26 To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
(aiC) 50 46 50 29 30 Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss
S**Y+ "Turner& Hooch"(1989, Comedy-Drama) *Y "Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. *Y "Spy Kids: All the Time in the ** "Against the
350 261 350 Tom Hanks. (In Stereo) 'PG' Evil"(2011) 'PG' World' (2011) 'PG' Ropes '(2004)
mm) 48 33 48 31 34 *Rizzoli & Isles'14'E Rizzoli & Isles "Virtual Rizzoli & Isles "Over/ Rizzoli & Isles (Season Leverage "The Long Rizzoli & Isles'14'Ea
48 33 48 31 34 Love"'14'Ec Under"'14' Finale) (N) '14' Good-bye Job"'14'
TOON 38 58 38 33 Regular Gumball Gumball Looney Level Up |Adven King/Hill King/Hill American American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
TRFl 9 54 9 44 Food Food Food Food Hunt for Misfit Toys Toy Hntr Toy Hntr NFL Food Bggg Bggg
truTY 25 55 25 98 55 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Killer Karaoke World's Dumbest...
(OVL) 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Nanny Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Raymond |Raymond King |King
S**'* "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the */, "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra" (2009, **** "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981,
LUSAJ 47 32 47 17 18 Crystal Skull" (2008) Harrison Ford. Action) Channing Tatum. 'PG-13'E Adventure) Harrison Ford.'PG'I
S7 17 "Hope Floats" (1998, Romance) Sandra *** "Mrs. Doubtfire"(1993, Comedy) Robin Williams. An estranged **Y "Shall We
117 69 117 Bullock, Harry Connick Jr.'PG-13' dad poses as a nanny to be with his children.'PG' Dance?" (2004)
1Wii 18 18 18 18 20 Chris |Chris |Funny Home Videos Mother |Mother |Mother |Mother |News |WGN Funny Home Videos


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SAFTEC /_

@2012 Tribun Media Services, Inc
All Righls Reserved
I \in r-r- I


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek



-t,
think I grabbed
every holiday
decoration we ch"-
hav -


I- :.... .- --


REVDIT --

L -- I- WHAT VPOE95 PECEMER
HAVE THAT NO OTHER
TEBNIT MONTH HAS?
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer THE "
here: E L 1 L
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: WAFER SMELL DENOTE PELLET
I Answer: Santa's helper was suffering from -
LOW "ELF" ESTEEM


46 Get through to Answer to Previous Puzzle
48 King's digs
50 Lubricate ABBA IDA P
51 Leg part BBA 1 D A I
52 Prepare a TROT CON F E VA
Christmas MISTLETOE RON 0
present
57 Chimney dust CHA I N ARBORS
58 "-- was ISIS ROSY
saying"
59 Mystique CH INA K LEEa
60 Flip a coin I M B E T R E E|S
61 Pistachio OPPOS ITE ARE
62 Gross!
ROTC EGRETS
DOWN RICO HOBO
1 Used to own ARAT S L A PPS
2 Make a wrong S HOL L H L
move
3 Twist the truth P N E L B A E G A D
4 Kenyan tribe LYE ESS ROBS
5 More than
simmer 10 Perfume 21 Horn sound
6 Son of Prince bottles 22 Vexes
Valiant 11 Courtroom fig. 23 Actress
7 MHz part 16 Fizzy Powers
8 Special galas beverage 27 Breather
9 Battery 20 German name 28 Cattle mover
terminal part 29 "Bus Stop"
'ant more puzzles? author
ust Right Crossword Puzzles" books 31 Six-legged
QuillDriverBooks.com soldiers
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 (2 wds.)
34 "Fancy"
13 14 singer
35 Designer
17 Jacobs
36 Calcutta
19 20 nanny
41 Summer
24 -- Games org.
42 Subpoena
I7 244 Google
competitor
32 33 34 35 36 45 Stews
47 Longtime
38 39 Denver QB
48 Classroom
42 43 sound
4 449 1950s actor
Richard -
50 Not the
49 50 half -
52 53 54 55 56 53 Ames inst.
54 Bemoan
5 59 55 Rainbow
shape
- 56 Balderdash!


Holiday wishes from Annie's Mailbox


D ear Readers: Merry
Christmas. We hope those
who are celebrating this
holiday are fortunate
enough to enjoy it with
family and friends. A
few years ago, we
printed a prayer that a
reader sent in, author
unknown. Since then,
we've received several
requests to reprint it,
so here it is once
again:
A Christmas Prayer
Let us pray.. That
strength and courage AN N
abundant be given to MAIL
all who work for a
world of reason and
understanding. That the good
that lies in each of our hearts
may day by day be magnified.
That we will come to see more
clearly not that which divides us,
but that which unites us. That
each hour may bring us closer to
a final victory, not of nation over
nation, but of ourselves over our
own evils and weaknesses. That
the true spirit of this Christmas
Season, its joy, its beauty, its
hope, and above all, its abiding
faith, may be among us. That the
blessings of peace be ours, the
peace to build and grow, to live in
harmony and sympathy with oth-
ers, and to plan for the future
with confidence.
Dear Readers: Last year, we
printed the PNC Christmas Price
Index figures for the cost of pur-
chasing all the items listed in the
song "The Twelve Days of


Christmas."
According to the PNC, this
year, True Loves must pay more
than $107,300.24 for all
S 364 gifts, an increase
of 6.1 percent. And
while the price of the
partridge, two turtle
doves, four calling
birds, eight maids-a-
milking, nine ladies
dancing and 10 lords-
a-leaping remained
the same, those pesky
swans jumped 11.1
percent to $7,000. The
IE'S pear tree is 11.8 per-
BOX cent higher at $189.99.
Also costing more this
year are 11 pipers pip-
ing, 12 drummers drumming,
three French hens and five gold
rings, which rose 16.3 percent
due to the dramatic rise in gold
prices.
Dear Annie: It seems people
are always complaining about not
having gifts acknowledged. In our
house, when you received a gift,
you could play with it the day you
received it Then it was put away
until you had written your thank-
you note. If the child didn't want
to write one, that was OK, and the
toy was donated. The same ap-
plied to monetary gifts. You
couldn't spend it before writing a
thank-you note, and if you didn't
write one, the money was given to
charity
This works even with a 2-year-
old. You explain why saying
"thank you" is important. Then
ask them to tell you what they


would like to say so you can write
it for them. I always let the child
write something, as well, even if
it's only a scribble. One of the
children once drew a happy face,
which was so sweet.
Every Christmas, I would in-
clude note cards and stamps in
their Christmas stockings. After a
while, they would simply come to
me saying they needed to write
their thank-you notes and would
ask for my assistance. It is such a
simple policy to implement. -
Proud Grandma
Dear Grandma: We highly ap-
prove of your methods and wish
more parents would implement
them.
On that note, here's Annie's
Snippet for Christmas Day (credit
Oren Arnold): Christmas gift sug-
gestions: To your enemy, forgive-
ness. To an opponent, tolerance.
To a friend, your heart. To a cus-
tomer, service. To all, charity To
every child, a good example. To
yourself, respect
--in--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 Third
St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.
To find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


Bridge

North 12-25-12
10 3
V 74 2
+ AK5 4 3
S6 5 2
West East
A K74 4 A 9 8 2
V K6 5 V 3
*98 QJ106
K Q 9 4 3 J 10 8 7
South
4 QJ 6 5
V A Q J 10 9 8
+ 7 2
7 A

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
4 V Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: 4 K


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

First of all, I wish all of my readers a very happy
holiday season. And here is this year's Christmas
Competition. Ignore the given East-West hands;
they will change when the answers to questions
one and two are given in the column of Jan. 25,
2013. (The other answers will be on Jan. 26, and the
winners announced on March 23.)
1. How should South play in four hearts after
West leads the club king?
2. If South is the dealer and East-West pass
throughout, how would the bidding go?
Look at only the West hand.
3a. If South opens one diamond, what should
West do?
3b. If West opens one club and East responds
one heart, what should West rebid?
3c. South opens one no-trump (15 to 17 points)
and North raises to three no-trump. What should
West lead?
Look at only the South hand.
4. South opens one heart and North responds
one spade. What should South rebid?
Look at only the East hand.
5a. If West opens one spade, what should East
respond?
5b. If South opens one club, West doubles, and
North passes, what should East bid?
Mail your entry to Phillip Alder, c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106 to
arrive by Jan. 23. Or email it from my website,
www.phillipalderbridge.com. Click on the Contact
button and type out your answers.
Please take as read all of the usual disclaimers,
and remember that this is primarily for fun.


ACROSS
1 Rudder
5 Emeril's
exclamation
8 Coffee
12 Diva's tune
13 Mother lode
14 Single entity
15 Turkey go-with
17 Gravy dish
18 Email
provider
19 Greedily
21 Indecisive
24 Corrida shouts
25 Mouths
26 Type of skiing
30 Tulsa's st.
32 Vase
33 Columnist
Bombeck
37 Romanov title
38 Cut timber
39 Bed of coal
40 Humidity
problem
43 Bikini half
44 Toy on a


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C6 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


y





CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


EARL, I MAPE L 690-6
SGUt6lSY CRR;17TAS
PAJAMASTo WEAR
-7 FOR CHiRISTMA )
/EVEfo \M&4T,





Sally Forth
Sally Forth


WE CAN P1"TTEM OW
Vl41LEG WE SIT 69VE
FIREPLACE SIPPING ROT
CHOCOLATE AN9 LIG-
fTEW~MG TO CHRISTMAS
CAROLS, WOM'TIf IATA
BiE FOINI*? y


Dilbert


FfK OUTMPN'EXE.La I1 THINK 1&FCMFsl UPI
YEAM,HyOU KE-u GOT -~I6-E NEIGhBOKHCOD
SOME ET flsTUFF-/ STANDRKDS.
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Beetle Bailey

CCi (WE BRING YOU JOY N
ALL YEAR LONG -- E

O Et L N^ L 3---'-- '-
SANTA? L. ,. ..---

SAW--


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Blondie


SLET'5JU5fT S'Sk5 WO'T6!
us'k R R mCRw- T CLtE
| POWh3.UNTILA T LEAKT
| H,(LLOWEZN! -^ n


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


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B ,TU R 'W"' '7 Y-OU A.:-Y.


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Big Nate
COOL! A SWISS
ArlMY KNIFE s
YUP'. THAT'S T+E
GENUINE ARTICLE,






Arlo and Janis -


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


'REN\ENPBER,PAP 'OU CAtWT TAKE A NAP
AFTTER PINNER., WE'VE GOT SOME TOYS
TO PUT TOeETHiER."
Betty

WR Y-OURFAVORnE PR6SIENT?



^HEAvPHoNE,! ^_

^^^^..^^^f/^YN
1 JT- -7-A'?* '^'**^ j *^ S *'


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11 a.m., 1:40 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 11:15 a.m.,
3:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 3:50 p.m.
"The Hobbit" (PG-13) In 3D. noon, 8 p.m. No
passes.
"The Hobbit" (PG-13) 4 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.


"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. noon,
3:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 3:20 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"This is 40" (R) ID required. 11:50 a.m., 2:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:10 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3 p.m.,
5:25 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit" (PG-13) In 3D. 11:50 a.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit" (PG-13) 3:35 p.m. No passes.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:40 p.m.


limes subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 slenbe 3

"RKPXNYJWN, JF RKXOC, XN OTAL XH


WRYXTH. LALPF YXJL ML OTAL, LALPF


YXJL ML VXAL, XY'N RKPXNYJWN."


CWOL LAWHN PTVLPN


Previous Solution: "My whole artistic life has always been about change, change,
change ... it's the only thing I find interesting." Paul Simon
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-25


Peanuts


Pickles


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 C7






C8 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012


GROUPS
Continued from Page C4

Administration Building unless
indicated.
S ACS Man to Man Prostate
Support and Education Pro-
gram, 11:30 a.m. the second
Wednesday monthly. Meetings
are in the conference room at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute at 522 N. Lecanto
Highway in the Allen Ridge Med-
ical Mall. Call 352-527-0106.
AHEC Quit Smoking
Group: 3 p.m. Tuesday at
Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, Allen Ridge Medical
Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000,
ext. 213.
Breast Cancer Support
Group: 11:30 a.m. the second
Friday, Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Call Judy
Bonard at 352-527-4389.
Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. Call
Carol at 352-726-1551, ext.
6596 or ext. 3329.
Cancer Support: at Cancer
Treatment Center. Call Jean-
nette at 352-746-1100 for date
and time.
Diabetes Support Group:
Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at
352-341-6110 for details.
Head and Neck Cancer
Support: Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Contact
Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106.
Heart-Healthy Eating
Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. sec-
ond Wednesday every other
month, CMHS Medical Office
Building. Call 352-560-6266 or
352-344-6538 to register.
Look Good Feel Better
Group: monthly at Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
sponsored by the American
Cancer Society, the Cosmetol-
ogy Association and the Per-
sonal Care Products Council. A
licensed cosmetologist is pres-
ent to advise women about
many issues. For dates, times,
more information or to register,
call the American Cancer Soci-
ety at 800-395-5665.
Mended Hearts Support
Group: 10 a.m. second Friday,
Gulf Room at CMHS Historic
Building. Call Cardiovascular
Services at 352-344-6416.
Ostomy Support: 2 p.m.
third Sunday, Cypress Room at
CMHS Historic Building. Call
Steve Spielman at 352-229-
4202, Sue Penner at 352-560-


7918, Sharon Brummer at 352-
382-4446 or Betty or Mel Ship-
ley at 352-341-0005.
Stroke Support Group of
Citrus County: 3 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly, CMHS
Annex Building conference
room, State Road 44 across
from Walgreens. Call 352-344-
6596 or 352-344-1646.
Hospice of Citrus
County support groups and
workshops. Call 866-642-0962
or 352-527-2348 for details.
Grief workshops:
1 p.m. Thursday Hos-
pice of Citrus County Clinical
Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inver-
ness.
2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday
- Newly Bereaved Grief Work-
shop, Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
Grief support groups:
11 a.m. Tuesday Our
Lady of Grace Catholic Church
Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
9 a.m. Wednesday-
Grief's Journey ... A Walking
Group, Whispering Pines Park
(Parking Area E).
10a.m. Thursday-
Wings Education Center, 8471
W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
0 2 p.m. second Thursday
- Hospice of the Nature Coast
Levy Office, 24-B County Road
40 E., Inglis.
10:30 a.m. Saturday-
First United Methodist Church,
831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Evening support groups (for
working people):
6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
newly bereaved Hospice of
Citrus County Clinical Office,
326 Line Ave., Inverness.
Social support:
10 a.m. Tuesday -
Frank's Family Restaurant,
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando.
1 p.m. first Thursday -
Mulligan's Grill (formerly Mango
Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant High-
way (C.R. 486), Hernando.
11:30 a.m. third Tuesday
- LIFT luncheon (widows/wid-
owers), Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club; call 352-621-
1500, ext. 1728 for a seat.
Wings education series:
"4th Tuesdays @ 2" -
Wings Education Center, 8471
W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
Teen Encounter and Camp
Good Hope Camps for griev-
ing children/teens offered in
April and October.
Suicide Survivors Support
Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Monday


at the Hospice of Citrus County
Hospice House, 3350 W.
Audubon Park Path, Lecanto.
The group is free and open to
the public. Participants need
not be hospice families. For in-
formation, call Lynn Miller at
352-527-2020.
Hospice of Citrus
County/Hospice of the Nature
Coast, licensed 1985, is a not-
for-profit charitable organization
providing comprehensively re-
sponsive and compassionate
end-of-life services to the termi-
nally ill and their families in 12
counties of north Central
Florida. It also provides grief
support services for children
and adults in the community.
HPH Hospice, in partner-
ship with the Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, offers Caregivers Sup-
port Groups for caregivers of
dementia or Alzheimer's pa-
tients to provide information,
education and emotional sup-
port in a safe, comforting and
confidential environment.
There is no charge, and
everyone is welcome to join.
Call Sue Piatek at 352-527-
4600 with questions.
First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our
Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41,
Inverness.
Second Monday, 1 p.m.,
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. Free
respite care provided, call to
reserve.
0 Fourth Tuesday, 5 p.m.,
Emeritus at Barrington Place,
2341 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486 east of
C.R. 491), Lecanto. Free
respite care provided, call to re-
serve.
Weekly ongoing Bereave-
ment Group from HPH Hos-
pice and St. Timothy's
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
available to anyone who has
experienced the loss of a loved
one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thurs-
days at St. Timothy's Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church, 1071 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crys-
tal River. There is no cost to at-
tend. Call Paul Winstead at
352-527-4600.
HPH Hospice, a nonprofit
agency initially licensed in
1984, provides, care, comfort
and support to individuals af-
fected by a life-limiting illness in
Citrus County. In addition to its
office in Beverly Hills, it has a
Hospice House on Norvell
Bryant Highway in Lecanto for
patients with limited caregiving
assistance and a Hospice Care
Center in Citrus Health & Reha-


bilitation Center in Inverness for
patients with complicated pain
and symptoms.
SPRING HILL Oak Hill
Hospital H2U Partner's Club
support groups meet on the
campus of Oak Hill Hospital,
11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill.
Alzheimer's Caregivers
Support Group 2 p.m. first
Thursday monthly, Jerry Fis-
cher, facilitator.
Diabetes Support Group
- 10 am. second Monday
monthly, Kim Palmer, facilitator.
Multiple Myeloma Support
Group 5:30 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly, Diane
Terry, facilitator.
Kidney Education Support
Group 2:30 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly, Mary
Jane Talty, facilitator.
Epilepsy Support Group -
3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly,
Lillian Rojas, facilitator.
Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society Support Group 6:30
p.m. fourth Wednesday
monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilita-
tor.
Crohn's Disease Support
Group 6 p.m. the last Thurs-
day monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar,
facilitator.
H2U Partner's Club events
and activities are open to mem-
bers only. Membership is open
to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus
County residents for $20 a
year.
Oak Hill Hospital has been
serving the Nature Coast since
1984. It is the largest medical
facility in Hernando and Citrus
County (234 acute-care beds),
is one of the area's largest pri-
vate employers, and offers Her-
nando County's only
comprehensive cardiovascular
program, including open heart
surgery.
Approximately 300 physi-
cians, 950 associates and more
than 350 volunteers comprise
Oak Hill Hospital's health care
delivery team.
Visit OakHillHospital.com.
Monthly groups
BROOKSVILLE -
Women's breast cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7:30 p.m. the
first Tuesday monthly at Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope
Center at 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra
Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-
8128.
SPRING HILL Care-
giver Support Group, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday
monthly, at the Florida Cancer
Institute-New Hope's Spring Hill
Center, 10441 Quality Drive,


Suite 203 in the Medical Arts
Building next to Spring Hill Hos-
pital. Call Pamela McGee, facil-
itator, at 352-688-7744.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group by Alzheimer's
Family Organization, 2:30 p.m.
the first Thursday monthly at
Superior Residences of
Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway. RSVP if you require
respite. Call Debbie Selsavage
at 352-746-5483.
Families Against Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group, 11
a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at Sandy Oaks RV Resort,
6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills, for families, friends
and anyone affected by MS.
Call 352-422-5868.
BROOKSVILLE "Man
to Man" prostate cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope's
Brooksville Center, 7154 Med-
ical Center Drive. Call Mary
Capo at 352-596-1926.
Grandparents Raising
Grandchildren Support
Group, 10 a.m. to noon the first
Monday monthly at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804
W Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids
Central Inc. will facilitate the
meeting. Call Pam at 352-
387-3540.
OCALA-- The
Alzheimer's and Memory Dis-
orders support group of Ocala,
3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday
monthly at the Medical Office
Building at West Marion Com-
munity Hospital, 4600 S.W.
46th Court, second-floor Com-
munity Room. Call 352-401-
1453.
Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, hosts a
volunteer meeting at 10:30 a.m.
the second Tuesday monthly,
September to May. Call 352-
344-8111.
HIV support group, 3to 4
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at Citrus County Health
Department, 3700 Sovereign
Path, Lecanto. Open to all af-
fected by HIV. Persons attend-
ing remain confidential, testing
will be anonymous. Reserva-
tion not required. Call 352-527-
0068, ext. 281, if you have any
questions.
Bereaved Parents of the
USA (BP/USA) grief support
group for parents and grand-
parents who have experienced
the death of a child, 7 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the First Presbyterian Church,
1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal


HEALTH & LIFE


11 Chron Ic[h1


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


-.0p-
Fa: 35)56-56 1TolFre:(88 82230 mal:casifes a roice*lnec. -ste wwchonceolie 0o


Sudoku **** 4puz.com

134 978

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8 1 6

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29 7 5 18

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8 6

S752_684

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.
.AI of our "
Wl~l,4tam'# m, structures
-. 120mph
Installations by Brian CBCI253853 winds
44352-628-7519


'FREE ,iES
Permit And
I Engineering Fees I
( Up to $200 value -

*Siding *Soffit *Fascia -Skirting* Roofovers *Carports Screen Rooms* Decks Windows* Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Someone is missing this
Christmas. Lovely Lady,
degree, distinguished,
pretty, slender. Caring for
elderly parents. Would
like to meet man of char-
acter, intelligent, ethical,
successful in his endeav-
ors. Age 55 to early 70's.
Rely: Blind Box 1820
Citrus Cnty Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, FI
34429


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191


FREE 5 YR FEMALE
AUSTRALIAN BLUE
HEELER DOG.
FREE 3 mo. MUSCOVY
DUCKS (352) 637-7453
FREE FemaleTabby cat
2yrs needs good home.
Great w/all animals.
FREE 2 males black &
white 3yrs. Great w/ all
animals. (352) 586-7662



Your \\oIi LI first.



CH ( ,iLE
( I ,


HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to go.
Bring Shovel, Truck load
avail., Help Yourself.
352-697-5252
White Hotpoint
Refrigerator. You fix
or for parts.
(352) 302-4057



FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Lost 10 yr old Male Rat
Terrier Dog black & white.
Went missing on
Fri Dec. 21st around
1pm in Lecanto / Cardinal
st area No collar.
Answers to the name of
Killer. Please call.
(352) 621-9810
PLEASE HELP!LOST
ALL WHITE AKITA WITH
ONE FLOPPED EAR.NO
COLLAR.LOST
AROUND S. CAN PT
AND OST WEST IN
HOMOSASSA.HER
NAME IS NALLA.SHE
HAS SEIZURES AND
LOST HER WAY WHEN
SHE WAS OUT TO
PLAY, NALLA IS VERY
MUCH LOVED AND
MISSED. PLEASE HELP
US ANSWER OUR
CHRISTMAS PRAYERS
AND BRING HER
HOME.(352)503-7973
OR (352)6132647. MARK
OR DONNA. CONTACT
US ATANY TIME IF
FOUND.**REWARD**


Black/Gray Tabby
short hair, male
Turner Camp Rd. Area
(352) 637-0970
LOST MALE FLAME
POINT SIAMESE
W/BLUES EYES,
ORANGE COLLAR, IN
HEATHERWOOD SUB
(352) 476-3084


Adult Male Cat
Orange & White
6-8 Ibs, found Paradise
Pt area on 12/21
(352) 563-5336
Young Male Cat
super friendly
found behind Fire Sta-
tion on Rock Crusher
Call to identify
(352) 634-2557
YOUNG MALE DOG
BRINDLE COLOR
Found on Holiday Dr,
Crystal River (352)
795-9687 or 220-9909



TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444



FIT OFFICE ASST
Crystal River, $8/hr,
General Office and MS
Office skills required. Full
time Benefits Fast
paced. Familiarity with
Citrus County a must!
Send Resumeto: cccc
reception(5)qmail.com


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindapracticemar
dtampabav.rr.com


613459782
529685743 19

-7 G IS 34 5 2 J91
761834529
35892 1674
294765318
936148257
842573196
175 296- 843


F/T RN
IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

River. Call Bernadette Pas-
salacqua at 352-746-4664 or
visit www.bereavedparents
usa.org.
Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call
Joann Brown at 352-341-7741
or the American Cancer Society
at 800-395-5665 to register.
SPRING HILL Spinal
Cord Injury support group, 5
p.m. second Thursday monthly
in the gym at HealthSouth Re-
habilitation Hospital. Call Dee
Hardee at 352-592-7237.
Friends of the Blind, 9
a.m. to noon the second Friday
monthly. Call Butch Shultz at
352-344-2693 for location.
Women's Breast Cancer
Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the
second Friday monthly, Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute
in the Allen Ridge Medical Cen-
ter, County Road 491, Lecanto.
Light lunch served. Call Judy
Bonard at 352-527-4389.
Epilepsy support group
at the Lakes Region Library, In-
verness. Call Lili Jane at 352-
344-8765.
Mended Hearts of Citrus
County, for individuals who
have or had cardiovascular dis-
ease, as well as caregivers and
family members, 10 a.m. the
second Friday monthly in the
Gulf Room in the Historic Citrus
High School; parking and trans-
portation available from CMHS
parking lot "A2."
Open to the public. Call Millie
King, at 352-637-5525; or
CMHS Cardiovascular Services
at 352-344-6416.
The Area 13 Family Care
Council, 10 a.m. to noon the
second Monday monthly at the
Wildwood Agency for Persons
with Disabilities office, 1601 W.
Gulf Atlantic Highway (State
Road 44). All persons inter-
ested in issues of those with
Developmental Disabilities are
encouraged to attend. Call
Karen Huscher at 352-726-
1445 or isabelfccl3@yahoo.
com. Area 13 covers Citrus,
Hernando, Lake, Marion and
Sumter counties. There are 15
Family Care Councils with gov-
ernor-appointed volunteer
members. Seeking new mem-
bers. Contact Huscher at 352-
726-1445 or cbettykay@aol.
com; facebook.com/groups/
331632140186772/.


NEEDEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

#1 Employment source is
www.chronicleonline.com






TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 C9


OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER
RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
CST- Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY !
Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827
P/T, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE



Sales / Project
Coordinator
Needed ASAP
Manufactured
Homes Exp. Req.
Serious inquires only!
Call Henry
(352) 795-1272



Accounts
Payable Clerk
position available.
Experience required.
Proficient in PO
processing, GL
coding, prepare and
check invoices for
payment, prepare
monthly reports and
basic accounting
skills. Proficient in
Microsoft Office Suite
and accounting
software knowledge.
Experience with
Computer Ease a
plus but not required.
EOE/DFWP company
Resume Submission
resumes@
dabcon.com
PIANIST Needed
First Christian Church
of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual who can play the
piano for Sunday
Morning worship. We
have a blenede serve
ice. Using both praise
music and contem-
porary Hyms. Salary
Depending on Skill
or Email
pastorray@tampabay.r
r.com or Call
352-344-1908







SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


m -I


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



DRYER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
HOT WATER HEATER
50 gallon whirlpool works
great. electric. $75.
352-302-7451
Kenmore (Sears) 700
series clothes washer
and GE dryer,
$350 for both.
Good condition.
352-419-7017
LG FRONT LOAD
WASHER lyr old. Perfect
cond. White, New $849
Selling for $650
(352) 527-3204
OLD KENMORE
WASHER $65 with 30
day warranty large
capacity only 24" wide.
Call/text 352-364-6504
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Can Deliver
352-263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
perfect with 90 day
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
WASHING MACHINE
$100 Kenmore Three
Speed Automatic Washer
Contact Rich @
352-897-4842


2 DRAWER CABINET
oak look, good condition.
$10. 352-302-7451


DUDLEY'S

"ESTATE AUCTION**




Thurs 12/27
Special Hours
Preview: 3pm
Auction: 5pm
Professional Woodwork
Shop tools,
quality furniture,
Appliances, boat, scuba
& survey equip & tons
of surprises.
www.dudleysauction.
com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


sALt
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
Fri 12/28 Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p, Antiques
Sat 12/29 Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p Gen.Merch.
Sun 12/30 Auctio n 1p
Tailgate Box Lot Auction
"WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



BAKER SCAFFOLD 2
complete sets on wheels.
Good cond. $100.
352-302-7451
HYDRAULIC JACK
sidecar, adjustable pull
out arms. Heavy duty.
$50. 352-302-7451



HITACHI 32' TV WITH
REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
VIZIO 42 INCH 3D TV
Vizio E3D42OVX 3D TV
LCD 1080p 120hz with
box and remote. Great
condition. 6 pairs of 3D
glasses included. $400
Gerome 352-322-6779



2G 7" TABLET TOUCH-
SCREEN MID ANDROID
2.20S PC WI FI
(YELLOW) 60.00 OBO
352-212-7788
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
LEXMARK
PRINTER/FAX excellent
cond. $25 352-860-2475



2 RECLINER CHAIRS
1 TAUPE LEATHER
1 MAROON CLOTH
$90 EACH
(352) 382-5814
2 VERY NICE CHAIRS
Light blue chr/rocker;
recliner reclines to a
sleeper. Thin stripes
$60/both (352) 795-3763
CURIO CABINET
Lighted. Glass shelves.
69"Hx16"W. Just in time
forXmas. $60.
352-382-1000
DINING SET
Glass Top Table
w/4 chairs (fabric covered
w/palm trees)$200 for set
call 352-257-1480
DINING TABLE SET
LOVELY LIGHT WOOD
SEATS 6 W/CHAIRS & 2
LEAVES, SIZE 67 X 43%
$250 (352) 860-1519
Lazy Boy Cordovan
Leather Dual Recliner
Loveseat 3 yrs. brand
new cond. org. $2,100
Asking $500.
Sculptured
Wall hanging
Tasmanian Artist
Carolyn Audet, 9 Little
brass fish on driftwood,
$100.
(352) 341-3651
LIGHT-COLORED
Wooden Table for
Breakfast Nook or
Kitchen Island, New
Condition 34"H 36"L
24"W Two Stools
ALL for $75.00
(352) 527-9930 BH


Requirements:
* Ability to work overnight
Covered Truck, Van or SUV
* Clean Driving Record
Credit & Background Check
Access to your own help
Lifting and physical ability
Team Player
Must have a back-up plan
* Computer & Internet Access


MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK GUN CABINET
Etched glass front.Very
Nice.$265
Locks w/drawer
352-875-5134 Dunnellon
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
Daybed w/ trundle & Mat.
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
PRIDE 2 Pos. lift chair.
Seldom used. $325
Call for email photo
352-382-1039
QUEEN BEDROOM
SET, Complete, head-
board, mattress, dresser
w/mirror & nightstand,
$250 for set
call 352-257-1480
Solid Oak Enter-
tertainment, Center
leaded glass trim,
3 lighted sect. lighted,
fits up to 42" TV, 9ft 6"
W, 20"D 6'2/2H, Holds
220 CD's/DVD's $500
obo Antique Roll Top
Desk, beautiful carve
front, 5'W, 30" D, $400.
obo (352) 746-7318
Solid oak Not Veneer
Coffee Table with swivel
top to increase available
surface area.
Solid Oak 6 sided end
table w/ glass top $70 for
Both (352) 341-3651



CRAFTSMAN ROTARY
LAWN MOWER Briggs
and Stratton engine; 20"
cut. New, Never used.
$75. 352-344-8468

MOVIIIG

MOWERS
Novia West Moving
Sale
Grasshopper 227
w/61" deck;
Grasshopper 430D
w/72" deck;
Grasshopper 620
w/48" deck.
Please call for pricing
(352) 622-1200
Weed Eater hedge
trimmer $10
352-860-0183



DUDLEY'S

"**ESTATE AUCTION"




Thurs 12/27
Special Hours
Preview: 3pm
Auction: 5pm
Professional Woodwork
Shop tools,
quality furniture,
Appliances, boat, scuba
& survey equip & tons
of surprises.
www.dudleysauction.
com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384



BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING SIZE 5 & 6 SHIRTS,
PANTS & JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
MENS BLACK
MOTORCYCLE JACKET
& VEST EXC COND
$150 (352) 897-4549



8 MAN ZODIAK 8 man
inflatable zodiak boat
$100 (352) 270-3641
16" Pedestal Fan
$15
352-860-0183
ADDING MACHINE
Unisonic Desk Top 12
Digit Memory Elec. Print-
ing Calculator. $25.00
352-746-4160
BRASS FIREPLACE
GATE Folds up $30
352-860-2475


CORNING WARE
$2 each-no covers
Blue Cornflower
Spice of Life
352-527-8287
HAND Sweeper
$20, Miter Saw $20
Hand Spreader $5
352-860-0183
HITCH, factory made
2k gross weight, de-
signed for sml vehicle
incl. 2 ball mounts, pin &
clip$100 obo, call any-
time 352-586-7658
LENOX CRYSTAL VASE
4" Odler
Exc Cond
$7 352-527-8287
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
PICNIC TABLE 5 FOOT
LONG GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
QUANTUM 6000
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
ex. cond., batt. charger,
cushion $2,500.00 obo
(352) 527-2085
Rainbow River Club
membership through
2015 Asking $150
954-755-7039
RV TIRE 255.70R.22.5
TRUCK NEW NEVER
MOUNTED RV or Truck
new 335.00 sell 100.00
352 270 1775
SOLD
CLUB CAR 2 Seater,
weather cover, lights,
mirrors, Trojan batteries
excel. cond. $1,400.
SUNBEAM WATER
COOLER / Cold, Hot,
REFIG Cold / Hot Water,
& 5 Gal Water. Moving.
$65. 352465-1319
TIRE 295.80R 22.5 RV
TRUCK Michelin XZA 2
85% tread ready for road
or spare. 100.00 U pick
up 352 270 1775
Trademark 3-in-I
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey,
and Foosball), 42.5 x 33
x 33-Inch, space saving
design, $350. 419-7017
TV PANASONIC 27" TV,
w/remote WORKS
GREAT U pick up Pine
Ridge $40.00
352 270 1775
Webber Grill
$20, Black & Decker
Workmate Table $20
352-860-0183
WET/DRY VAC Sears,6
1/2 HP, Exc. running,
extra filter & manual.
$35.00 352-7464160



GO GO SCOOTER
Elite, used only a few
times, like new $375 firm
u-pick-up, 352-560-3874



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


Cassio Keyboard
WK1800, like new,
Stand and bench in-
cluded $200 cash,
Citrus Hills
352-637-6762


CHAMPION JUICER
Fresh juice for your
health! Almond color, in
excellent condition $160
(828) 4834550
Crystal River
Health Meter Scale
$25
352-860-0183



BICYCLE 28" Diamond-
back Edgewood hybrid
24sp exc condition.$145.
352419-7200
REDUCED
BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $499. OBO
A Great Holiday Gift
352-697-2771


Do you have what it takes?
* Attention to detail
* 365 Days/Year
* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented
* Flexible under pressure
* Positive Thinker
* Hard and smart worker
* Keen sense of urgency


Deliver to stores and coin racks.
1 Experience preferred but not required.


All Remaining


Will Be


THIS WEEK




To Make Room For




The Incoming


Citrus County's



Volume Sales Leader




We Deliver The Best



Showroom


Buying Experience



Cars


m Service




Come See Why We Are


Rated The Best!



TOYOTA


VILLAGE TOYOTA




OF CRYSTAL RIVER *,




www.villagetovota.com 352 50 3-4121


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


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Interested In:
1 ein0c your own


* Increasing potential
earnings.
* Growing your
exclusive area?
* Working
independently?
* Working with a
successful company?


C C I T R U Sr,- U N T v

HRONI-CLE
V www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I




C10 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012


1 9,483/285mo.


2009 BUICK
ENCLAVE CXL


$15,988/2236mo.


2012 TOYOTA
CAMRY XLE


N
200BIK208HME


$27 ,988/405Mo.


$25,98 8/37 7m ,


$21,988P320mo. $ 22,998335mo.


2010 BUICK 2009 CHEVY 2008 HUMMER
CROSSE CXL CORVETTE H2



,988/320mo. 35,488? 510Mo. $39,9888574Mo.


m mi....


2010 FORD
MUSTANG


2005 CADILLAC
DEVILLE


27 ,48 8/398Mo. S11,998/P180o..


40,988/588Mo.
2006 CADILLAC
DTS LUXURY


11,998 P 80mo.


$13,988/P208mo.


7 ,988P1 23M.. 6,D988M1 09,o.


$1 6,588P244mo.


$8,9881 3 7 mo.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$11,488/173mo.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SOLD
TREADMILL Pro-form
490-C like new. Do not
use. Need space. Paid
$350, will sell for $100



AUTHENTIC NFL MIAMI
DOLPHIN JACKET LIKE
NEW, WORN TWICE
$70. (352) 795-3763
BROWNING Auto 22
Rifle W/ Browning scope
$425; WINCHESTER
30-30 Caliber, Model 94,
W/ Peep Scope $375
(352) 746-0070
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Ladies 26" Lamborghini
Road Bike
21 speed like new
$129.
(352) 249-4460
MELEX GOLF
CAWRT
36 volt-Excellent
Condition, $1100.
352-527-3125
Pool Table
4 x 8 ft, 1 slate,
leather pockets,
oak frame $700
(352) 586-9598
SAVAGE MODEL 340
222 Rem. cal. scope 4
clips exc. Cond $375 May
take partial trade on gun.
(352) 564-0036
Call 8am till 9pm
STETSON HAT 10X
New in the Box size 7
Cream color $125
(352) 746-0070
Tanning Bed
Professional, 24 Lamp
$600.
Hot Tub, color marble
gray, 220V, seats 4-6
$600. (352) 586-9598
Two Club Car Golf
Cart's -2007
Excellent Condition!
48 volt, FAST,
exc. batteries $1850 ea.
352-527-3125



NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678

Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,# ,- ,# ,0 ,# ,0 ,


$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47
for years 1938,
1942,1943,1945 1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917 .Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucs13@aol.com
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.


-obile B
Fo entH


$550 and up, Small,
Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2
females,1 Male Maltese,
Raised in loving home.
CKC Reg. health certs, &
puppy pacs. Parents on
site come watch them
play (352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
Dachshunds Mini
Long hair Xmas pups,
females, black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
Ready when you are!
$300 (352) 795-6870
or (352) 220-4792
F6 BENGAL CAT CUBS
*Spotted & Marbles*
*Snows & Browns*
*$275, FL Health*
*Cert. & Shots*
*352-601-5362*
LABRADOODLE
PUPPIES 2 left! 1 black
male, 1 cream female.
Born 9/21/12. Shots,
dewormed, health certs.,
flea protection,
heartworm prevention.
Please call for prices.
352410-0080






RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352-419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966








# rEmployment
source is...


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* I BEDROOM
start@$325 inc. H20
* 2 BEDROOMS
start@$450 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!
HERNANDO
2/1 $450 mo+dep
1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
352-201-2428
HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, 2/1/
older mobile needs TLC
$1,000 Down, $275. mo.
(352) 726-9369
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1 bath. NICE
SWMH ON BIG YARD,
FENCED BACKYARD,
SCREENED BACK
PORCH, IN NICE AREA
ON PAVED STREET.
PETS ALLOWED
$495./MT, 1ST, LAST,
$300 DEPOSIT.
CALL 352 634-3862 OR
794-3760
HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last &Sec
(352) 382-5661
MINI FARMS
C.R., 2/1, 2.5 Acres
$525.mo (352) 564-1242



2BR. 1/ BA.on your
own 75x 150 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740) 255-0125
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353
BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On /2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183



t irt ll 'jl lld lSt

EL) D /)



I


CLASSIFIED



HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA& Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
% Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352401-2979,
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used
Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
+Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498
HERNANDO/486 1+acre,
2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man
Cave/Work Shop w/ AC
28x40, $47,500 J. Desha
Cridland Real Estate
(352)634-6340
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603)860-6660




2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987
FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420
INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352) 212-8873
INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352-419-6476
Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch, 2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958


LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804
MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$8,000. (708) 308-3138




COMING
SOON!
RV RENTALS
I CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 By Airport, CR
For Info 461-4518




HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
*Ready to Move In *
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272



CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2,House w/Car., $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135



Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
LECANTO
Nice, Clean I BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000



Homosassa Spgs
SmlRestaurant/Pizza
Shop for Rent, $800
269-369-2509
INVERNESS
Retail/Office, 1,200 SF, +
Storage (352) 637-1904


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 CIL


12-25


SLaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIck or UFS 2012


"Mom, is this my babysitter?"


Thank eou For 15 Years,

I '- / B AUTIFtLRESu 5L


W W ILL8 I
P CONSTRUCTION CORP
QflNA1ft Est 1988


INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$700. mo 317-442-1063




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Block home w/wood
floors & washer dryer incl.
$750 mo. 352-476-1080
or 352-476-0174
INVERNESS
2/1 near hospital
fam. room, scn porch.
$600 352-422-2393


INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529





For Sale 4,4

CHASSA-
HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800


i


of Vtes!P


INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-586-9932
-eE


ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


Your World

49 : Na e Ia:e




CIpNMCLE


~ea Diw eftory


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179
Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent Cing.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109



Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549



Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549


Your World






CHI()N ICLE


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lie. (352) 746-3444




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
VeAFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST* 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *


r Ta 100anvman
s FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
v FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est.
352-257-9508 *A



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820




The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



LARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
*352-302-3523***
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




GOOD MORNING LAWN
CARE
Leaves to Lawns *
Call 352-502-6588
GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!

i f I II(" ill\ l

t .ll \ 1 >l I llrSt.
Ebiy D-y


Q O I ,


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090
Lic# CC2544


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OneT
Tub to Shower Conversions TooT -
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM






CARPET &
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Specia izing in: Certifict
Carpet Stretching Available
Carpet Repair P
S 352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


World Class
Window Tinting
Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estimates
352.465.6079 icimr


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
IlL^ ^ ~or pool or plan
something
: -: .. ... com plete lynewl

JE iinever dupicitei"|


YOURINTERIOCKINOBRICKPAVERSPECIAUST

l COPES
| POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 352-400-3188
& Insured 352-4003.318


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT



DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! o
352-220-9190





AAA ROOFING
Cll ike Aak6usen"
Free Written Estimate

*100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000DDBP


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.

352-621-0881

6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextaluml3@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
\ Small Carpentry
.*Fencing
Screening
CLean Dryer
W Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
S cell: 400-1722
wed Lic.#37761


GENERAL :
Stand Alone
Generator C

Thomas ElectrIc LC
Residential/Com mercial Service
General Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377








GENIE
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lt More!
*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
* Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill







C12 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012




WORD GURDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE *kMiI4V
1. Christmas evergreen jubilance (1) Every answer is a rhyming 4/2/3 HEATED POOL
pair of words (like FAT CAT lots of extras!
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
2. Christmas present frugality (1) they will fit in the letter 352-688-6500 or
squares. The number after the 352-212-5023
definition tells you how many
3. Red-berried greenery foolishness (2) syllables in each word.


EN


2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comr
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


4. Poetically under a Xmas ring (1)


5. Christmas bulbs' elevations (1)


6. Feels the lack of mistletoe smooches (2)


7. Tilting a hung, filled Xmas decoration (2)


DNIDOIS DNIDI3O3 'L SHSSIN SSSIN '9 SIHItH S1lHIT '*s
HIVHM IV3N't ATIOA ATIOHS IMl d ll"~dl sI T H'I 1
12-25-12 SHLASrV


Lj: 5 J d :1


INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Motivated seller
wants this gone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
corn 352 726 6644


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





HERANADO
3 Bay industrial bldg.
acre lot fenced $1200
mo + elec(352) 637-1411


HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856




Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
"OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135




OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000.4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 % acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511


CLASSIFIED


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515
PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bring your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
back yard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

*Buy or Sell*

I'll Represent
YOU


ERA
American Realty




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857
DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 % ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116
KINGS BAY AREA
A Special home on deep
water. $460,000
804 SE 1st Court, Cyr Riv
(352) 795-3264
Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv.. 3/2/1. den & fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock,
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925
WATERFRONT HOMES
I have them. Cottage 2/2
renovated 59,500, 3/2/2
5 yrs old, Furn, $149,000
(352) 419-6880
Tropic Shores Realty

YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty








SCAN OR GO TO
www.
BestNaTuireCoast
Prooerties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




Relocating family need-
ing atleast a 3/2/2 home
in Hernando Elementary
school district. Pre ap-
proved/ fast transactions.
No Real Estate Agents
Kenny (419) 544-9355




**Heatherwood 581"
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435





For Sale
8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this beautiful GOLF
COURSE lot (100X125)
located in Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Have
fun boating, fishing and
jet skiing on the nearby
Tsala Apopka Chain of
Lakes. Enjoy nature, wild-
life and the natural beauty
of Fort Cooper State
Park. Call Kelly at
860-459-2411


Chronicle


Classifieds /


In Print 1" -


& Online ....







CHKONICLE Cm3=M9





(352) 563-5966


Wooded Lot, wet lands
on Lee Woods Drive
112 x 114 ft. river ac-
cess, but not on River
$7,000. 352-621-1664



BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945



15 ft ALUM. BOAT WIDE
DEEP V, 25HP ELEC.
START, TRAILER.
OLDER BUT CHEAPER!
$995 (352) 341-4949
1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945


AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7000 352-637-1391



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506



DUTCHMAN 40FT
2012-2 slides, 2 ac's
new $51,900 ask. $32k
obo, call for more info
(850) 449-1811 Homoss.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333



1997 DODGE
STRATUS ES
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 97,000 mi
$2800 (352) 341-3991
2003 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LXI
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 71,500 miles
$4300 (352) 341-3991
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CHEVROLET
2000 IMPALA
$4995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2003 AVALANCHE
$6850
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004 TRAILBLAZER
4 X4 $6999
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2001 TOWN &
COUNTRY $4550
352-341-0018
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
Ilkenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, Ilkenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
MR2 SPYDER
2002 TRD model, 1
owner. Mint condition.
Garage kept, no acci-
dents, smoking, or pets.
New soft top & leather
seats. C352464-7501.
$13.5K.
NISSAN
2005ALTIMA SE V6
$7495
352-341-0018
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8500 obo 382-0428
TOYOTA
'05 Camry LE, Silver.
leather interior, very good
condition, 86k miles.
$8900 (352) 637-2838
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yarls, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



1929 FORD RUMBLE
SEAT ROADSTERS
For more info call -
(352) 637-6053
1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$24,900, 352-513-4257







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
Quad cab 360 body, tires
& interior good, needs
engine & transmission
work $1800 or best offer
352464-4764


FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
352-270-7420 $5,000
FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
352-270-7420 $5,000
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K ml, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285




CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
NEW POLARIS
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN ATV.
4X4, SERVICED AND
READY FOR HUNTING
SEASON. $2995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR TOUR
DELUXE, READY FOR A
ROAD TRIP ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678




'08 Suzuki Burgman 400
Candy apple red, exc.
cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi
per gallon, luggage back,
& garage kept. $4500
(352) 8974549



HONDA
1986, V4, Magna,
750CC, needs Carbs
cleaned, otherwise
road ready, clean Fl.
Title many extras $600.
Greg 352-419-7382



KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 550 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 FIRM. Phone
352-726-8124


510-1225 TU FCRN
Barbara Jean Lawson File No: 2012CP614 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.:2012CP614
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BARBARA JEAN LAWSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of BARBARA JEAN LAWSON,, deceased, whose
date of death was August 22, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness, FL 34447. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
AI other crecdtas of the decedent and other persons having ddms or de-
mands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONIHSAFTER THEDATE OFTHE RST PUBLICATION OFTHB NOTICE. A L L
CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is December 18, 2012.
Attorney for Estate: Personal
Representative:
/s/ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN, ESQ. /s/WILLIAM LAWSON
Attorney for the estate 4681 W. Woodlawn Street
Florida Bar Number: 0075272 Dunnellon, FL 34433
PO Box 415, Homosassa Springs, Florida 34447, Telephone: (352) 382-7934, Fax: (352)
382-7936, E-Mail: christensenlaw earthlink.net, Secondary E-Mail:
christensenlaw@earthlink.net
December 18 & 25 2012.


511-1225 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organiza-
tion (TPO) Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and Citizens Advisory
Committee (CAC) will hold a joint meeting by teleconference on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 9, 2013 at 2:00 pm to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organi-
zation. The general public who would like to participate in the teleconference meet-
ing should call 1-800-998-7433 for further information.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organi-
zation (TPO) Board will meet on Thursday, January 10, 2012 at 5:15 pm in Council
Chambers at the Inverness Government Center, 212 W. Main Street, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization.
Any person requinng reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Transportation Planning
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
12/20/12
BY:/s/Sheila Martin
Planning and Administration, TBARTA
December 25, 2012.


Meetng^O^
I Ntics :


Meeting^f
I Notices


MeeBtin
I Notices




TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 C13


THE PERFECT LAST MINUTE
GIFT IS AT CRYSTAL!


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-9054


2010 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER


II 1 1
E~ii.66 6iyiiji-i


2010 HYUNDAI SONATA


FRE2:R EODD ESG W1 .M PCALICN


2010 NISSAN ALTIMA


2010 CHEVY EQUINOX


$9999 $12,999 $12,999 $15,999
OR$156 o.R$203 J OR$203 OR250 .


2010 CHRYSLER 300


2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE


2009 CHRYSLER SEBRING
..'000"^_


2009 SCION XD


1430-8" 5 ::E : :0. I:-M-8"7 E 6.180


I-M-58"755 Eld.42376 1 1400%SM. j. j.52230


$15,999 $16,999 I $9999 $9999
ORi$250. OR$266. (OR$156+ OR.$156


2009 HYUNDAI ELANTRA


2009 DODGE JOURNEY


dipi~ n rx
FEH.MMBWHFIDM


2009 HYUNDAI SANTE FE


2009 CHEVY EQUINOX


$S9999 $11,999 $12,999 $12,999
oR$156 oR188 ., oRS203k o,,S 203 o


1-80-8" 5 Ext.306 1 1300584-755: d.30 I


2009 CADILAC CTS


2008 NISSAN ROGUE


2008 DODGE CHARGER


2008 CHEVY SILVERADO
q^W


1i-800-:5.8. 755t. 680:I : 1 :1-800-584-*875 Et.30


:o ^i : ..om


$23999* $11,999 $11,999 $13,999
OR375'[ OR$188M? JOR$188 OR219


2008 NISSAN TITAN


2008 TOYOTA TACOMA


2008 TOYOTA SEQUOIA


IE2CDEEAITHMI
1-80-58"75 Ed. 811


$14,999 $15,999 $22,999
OR$2350 OR.$250M. OR$360M .


2008 FORD F350


I. I.p~

$ 999
f407 PER
OR$407MO._


A
I, '- *~


ii
0
~liiNC


I\


CRYSTAL
A I I T M T I VF


'V Mw m mwm vIm I V L

352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL


L *PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE I
WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 72 MONTHS AT 3.99%APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


Pxil k: 1 1 B Y! I n 6I I.mf~ :0mdm i C:. i.^ Wl = Kin 1


RE iiiE 2 RRECIW ESAGE ITH INFOADSEILWING
1-80058"75 ExA255


IE24H E MIZI i -iMBM jITH INF M M il
1-80-58755 dA861


1%


1%


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0


m


-,)r


* r


I




C14 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012


SEASON
TO SAVE


!
r
!
^
k
^


WITH APPROVED CREDIT


INTEREST
0% FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS


PAYMENT!
UNTIL MARCH 2013


2013 NISSAN ALTIMA


$119,999+

109 SIAPR
Modol# 13013, Vin# 136690 1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE, S3,999 DUE AT SIGNING.
\__________________


2013 NISSAN SENTRA


,999


FRE 24 OURRECRDEMESAG W ITHIFO&PRCN
800=584=8755 EXiiju~rT.T 6109


$1


$179O 2.49/
1792 APR
Model# 12113, Vin# 612959 1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE, S3,999 DUE AT SIGNING.
<^ .,


2012 NISSAN
VERSA


$12,999
$119o 0O
Model# 11462, Vin# 287990
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE. 53.999 DUE AT SIGNING.


2012 NISSAN
FRONTIER
Ii^ k.


$15,999
$149o 0R
Model# 31112. Vin# 461839
I OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE S3 999 DUE AI SIGNING


2012 NISSAN
ROGUE


$17,999
$139 0 APR
Model# 22112, Vin# 613231
I OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE S3999 DUE AI SIGNING


2012 NISSAN
MURANO


$24,999
$219 o 0
Model# 23112, Vin# 120649
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT [HIS PRICE S3999 DUE AT SIGNING.


\


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-9054


CRYSTAL
NISSAN


7 352-564-1971
41XiNk 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
yY2 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


I


Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
+PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WAC. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000
MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. **0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED
CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


L


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LNIMSSAIM


- Aw