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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-23-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02979

Full Text


Boys hoops: SRCS loses close one at home /B1


Mostly sunny, lighter
winds.
PAGE A4


DECEMBER 23, 2012


I --tS UI NI D :


CITRU- S C 0 U N T Y





oHRO NICLe
www.chronicleonline.com
Florida's Best Community k-Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


Eyes on school security


Officials say safety top priority


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Once
upon a time, someone could
walk up to Pleasant Grove


Elementary School and
waltz right in.
There was always a "visi-
tors must check into the of-
fice" sign, but really no way
to monitor that other than a


school employee spotting a
stranger in the hallway
Lynn Brooks is happy
those days are gone.
Brooks is the school's re-
ceptionist and has worked
at Pleasant Grove for 19
years. She has seen the in-
stallation of door buzzers,


video cameras and driver's
license scanners all de-
signed to make the school
safe for its students and
staff.
"The parents like what
we're doing," she said.
"They like the security"
John Colasanti, who over-


sees maintenance for the
school district, agreed secu-
rity stops potential prob-
lems before they start.
But, referring to the Dec.
14 Sandy Hook Elementary
School tragedy, where a


Page A8


Discount deal
Several stores planning
last-minute shopping
deals, but not like last
year/Page D1

COMMENTARY:


Targeted
Several GOP governors
are in the crosshairs of
unions./Page Cl
HOMEFRONT:

I


Party favors
Small but smart tokens
of appreciation make
good gifts./HomeFront

LOCAL NEWS:
Good dogs
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers distribute
plush bloodhound toys
for emergency respon-
ders to give to children
in need./Page A2
EXCURSIONS:


Traffic cop
A Rhode Island traffic
cop does disco and
salsa moves in the
middle of rush-hour
traffic./Page A13
OCCASIONAL SERIES:

Aging
tM =
y America


Elder helpers
The aging of the baby
boomers impacts
communities across
the country./Page A7


HTo zTsT03


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Danny Hochadel has cerebral palsy, but that doesn't stop him from one of his favorite activities horse riding.
Above, Hochadel prepares to mount a horse named Skyjacker's Design in the Bushnell stable Derby Oaks.

Riding therapy helps disabled man find balance in life


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
BUSHNELL
Y hen Danny
Hochadel is on a
horse, he feels
'W normal.
Born with cerebral palsy and
borderline mental retardation,
life can be a challenge for the
34-year-old.
"It helps my legs," he said as
he put on his riding helmet at
Darby Oaks Stables in Bushnell.


Hochadel has been riding
since he was 8 after a physical
therapist at Lakeview School
(now CREST) told his mother,
Kathy Beville, that riding
horses would be the best
therapy
Hochadel's cerebral palsy af-
fects his balance, muscle
strength and gait, and you only
need to see his smile as he
rides to know the therapist's ad-
vice was good medicine.
"It stretches my legs,"
Hochadel said.


MEN
On a recent warm, slightly
breezy day, Hochadel and his
mother took a trip to the stable
where they've been riding for
the past nine years.
After putting on his helmet,
Hochadel stepped onto a step
stool next to "Skyjacker's De-
sign" (nicknamed AJ) a gentle
gray horse that stood perfectly
still as the young man slowly
climbed into the saddle and
See Page A5


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Crassi iod......A.. Homosassa blight site set to vanish
Classifieds ...........D5
Crossword ..............A14
Editorial....................C2 CHRIS VAN ORMER erative and giving us a closed developed as the new Dollar Gen-
Entertainment ..........B6 Staff Writer deadline," code compliance direc- eral store north of the RaceTrac
Horoscope ................B6 tor Kimberly Corbin said Thurs- gas station on the east side of U.S.
Lottery Numbers ......B4 Homosassa should soon make a day "When we have a cooperative 19 in Homosassa.
Lottery Payouts ........B6 better impression on U.S. 19 property, it makes things so much The park residents were evicted
Movies ....................A14 travelers, easier. It saves the county money last summer. The owner took out a
Obituaries ..............A6 The remnant of an abandoned because we don't have to proceed demolition permit, but did not pro-
Together..................A16 mobile home park that has become forward, and it saves everybody ceed, leaving the wasteland of
|11 1I/ / I an eyesore through vandalism and heartburn." shattered trailers in the midst of a
salvaging is scheduled to be The mobile home park is what commercial area.
cleared out by Jan. 11. was left after half the original park
6 578 2007 "We have an owner who is coop- that dated back for decades was See Page A5


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
65
LOW
39


BUSINESS:


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 138


Higher



taxes



loom


Don't be fooled by

January paychecks

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Workers prob-
ably won't feel the full brunt of next
year's tax increases in their Janu-
ary paychecks, but don't be fooled
by the temporary reprieve.
No matter what Congress does to
address the year-
end fiscal cliff, it's MORE
already too late INSIDE
for employers to
accurately with- 0 Read more
hold income taxes about the
from January pay- fiscal cliff.
checks, unless all /Page All
the current tax
rates remain unchanged, which is
an unlikely scenario.
Social Security payroll taxes are
set to increase Jan. 1, so workers
should immediately feel the squeeze
of a 2 percent cut in their take-home
pay But as talks drag on over how to
address other year-end tax in-
creases, the Internal Revenue Serv-
ice has delayed releasing income
tax withholding tables for 2013.
As a result, employers are plan-
ning to withhold income taxes at
the 2012 rates, at least for the first
one or two paychecks of the year,
said Michael O'Toole of the Ameri-
can Payroll Association.
If employers don't withhold
enough taxes in January, they will
have to withhold even more taxes
later in the year to make up the dif-
ference. Otherwise, taxpayers
could get hit with big tax bills, and
possibly penalties, when they file
their 2013 returns.
The tax increases could be steep.
If Congress fails to act, workers at
every income level face significant
tax increases next year as part of
the year-end "fiscal cliff."
A taxpayer making between
$50,000 and $75,000 would get an av-
erage tax increase of $2,400, ac-
cording to the Tax Policy Center, a
Washington research group. If the
worker is paid every two weeks,
that's about $92 a paycheck, on
average.
Someone making between
$75,000 and $100,000 would get a tax
increase averaging nearly $3,700. If
the worker is paid every two weeks,
that's about $142 a paycheck.
O'Toole said it would take most
employers two weeks to four weeks
to update their payroll systems,
once new tax withholding tables
are released. For some small busi-
nesses, it could take longer.
"Employers can't really just come
up with withholding tables on their
own, depending on what the rates
are," O'Toole said. "The smaller com-
panies that do not use a payroll pro-
cessing service probably would have
more problems than anyone else."
On Friday, the IRS said it plans to
issue guidance by the end of the
year, though it won't be early enough
to affect paychecks in early January
"We are aware that employers
have questions with respect to 2013
withholding," the agency said in a
written statement. "Since Congress
is still considering changes to the
tax law, we continue to closely mon-
itor the situation. We intend to issue
guidance by the end of the year on
appropriate withholding for 2013."
About three-quarters of taxpay-
ers got tax refunds this year, aver-
aging $2,707, according to the IRS.
See Page A2











Creatures of comfort


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
Beauregard the Bloodhound LifeSouth Community Blood Center's mascot was on hand Thursday in observance of miniature versions of him being
distributed to those with a true need of a stuffed animal that can be helpful in difficult times. From left, Pamela Egnot and Doris Edwards with LifeSouth,
Katie Lucas of Nature Coast EMS, Beauregard, Katie Mehl of Citrus Memorial Health System; Tom Davis of LifeSouth; and Gail Tierney with the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.


LifeSouth Community Blood


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

deputies and Cit-
rus Memorial
Health System are
again assured of having
Beauregard the stuffed
bloodhound in their com-
plement of equipment.
This is the fourth year
the plush 8-inch hound will
help out in situations
where children are ex-
posed to the stress and
trauma of crime, medical
or other emergencies.
Beauregard is actually
the LifeSouth Community



TAXES
Continued from Page Al

That gives most taxpayers
some leeway to manage their
income tax withholding.
However, many people rely
on tax refunds to pay bills or
make major purchases.
"The reality is, the vast
majority of Americans do
live paycheck to paycheck,
and that tax refund is their
most significant payday of
the year," said Bob Meighan,
vice president of TurboTax,
an online tax preparation
service.
Most of the expiring tax
breaks were first enacted
under President George W
Bush and extended under
President Barack Obama.
Obama campaigned for re-
election on extending the
tax cuts on incomes below
$200,000 for individuals and
$250,000 for married cou-
ples. Obama would let the
tax cuts expire on incomes
above those amounts.
In negotiations with
House Speaker John
Boehner, Obama offered to
raise the income threshold,
limiting tax increases to
those making more than
$400,000. Boehner, who has
argued for years the tax cuts
should be made permanent
for everyone, responded by
trying to push a bill through
the House that would have
let many of the tax cuts ex-
pire on incomes above
$1 million.
Many Republicans re-
volted and Boehner, R-Ohio,
shelved the bill, sending
lawmakers home for the
Christmas holiday and leav-
ing the outcome of talks in
doubt as the new year
approaches.
If Congress and the White
House cannot reach a deal,
income tax rates would go
up, estate taxes and invest-
ment taxes would increase
and the alternative mini-
mum tax would hit millions
of middle-income people. A
temporary payroll tax cut
that has benefited nearly
every wage earner in 2011
and 2012 expires, costing
the average family an addi-
tional $1,000 a year by itself.


Blood Centers mascot In
addition to the giveaway
version, LifeSouth has a
bigger-than-life-size char-
acter version who appears
at parades and special
events.
Thursday afternoon, the
various entities collected
their dogs, also known as
"happy hounds," in time
for the holiday season. And
while LifeSouth distributes
about 300 plush dogs, it is
not part of the agency's
blood donor program, but a
separate to effort to help
children, donor recruiter
Pamela Egnot explained.
"Our hearts are in it, we


Center's bloodhounds support children in need


enjoy doing it," she said, re-
calling some of the feed-
back she has received
when the dogs were used in
various situations.
"Kids love them," Tom
Davis, LifeSouth commu-
nity coordinator, said. "It's
just a wonderful thing."
He said dogs are also dis-
tributed in Marion County.
"We keep them on each
unit," Katie Lucas, Nature
Coast EMS public informa-
tion director, said. "We enjoy
the relationship it helps us
build with children."
Katie Mehl, with Citrus
Memorial Health System,
said the dogs are used for


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children in pediatric care
and those who have to
come into the emergency
room.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office spokeswoman Gail
Tierney said deputies will


We Welcome You To


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Crystal River
352-794-6139


hand out the dogs when
they encounter children in
various situations.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 orpfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates


Resolve to

donate blood

Chronicle
Along with losing
weight and exercising
more, LifeSouth Commu-
nity Blood Centers is ask-
ing Citrus County
residents to add donating
blood to their list of New
Year's resolutions.
To help residents get a
jump-start on that good
deed, LifeSouth will host
its annual New Year's
Resolution Blood Drive
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 31, at the
Walmart Supercenter,
2461 W Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
"Over the years, it's be-
come a tradition for many
donors to take part in this
drive. It grows every
year," said LifeSouth's
Pam Egnot.
To encourage residents
to take that step, there will
be a drawing for a 40-inch
LCD TV courtesy of Wal-
mart, and all donors will
be entered into a drawing
for an iPad Mini and will
receive a gift from
LifeSouth.
Donors must be 17 or
older, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a min-
imum of 110 pounds and
be in good health. A photo
ID is also required.
To learn more about
donating blood, call toll-
free 888-795-2707; or, on
the Web at www.life
south.org. Find lists of
local blood drives in Mon-
day's Chronicle.


Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD


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A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3- SUNDAY, DECEMBER23,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Bikes bring Christmas to kids of all ages


High Octane Saloon helps Santa hand out holiday gifts


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
Holding tightly onto his handle
bars, 3-year-old Bradley German
talked with Mr and Mrs. Claus as
he sat on his new bike. His sister,
7-year-old Ellen German, joined
him as cameras snapped photos
when she sat timidly on Mrs.
Claus' lap.
Those who surrounded the two
children tried to hold back tears
and concentrate on the children's
moment of happiness. Last Mon-
day, their father took his own life.
Brandon German, 27, had suffered
from depression off and on for
years.
Hearing of the news, High Oc-
tane Saloon in Homosassa


reached out to the family and set
up donation jars. Owner Doug
Doty pledged to do whatever it
took to see Bradley and Ellen re-
ceived Christmas presents and
food to eat.
"They are very excited about
having the bikes," said Cheryl
German, Brandon's mother "We
are very thankful and grateful for
everything. The children are
going to appreciate their new
bikes. We hope everyone has a
Merry Christmas."
The German family was among
many other families who congre-
gated Saturday at High Octane Sa-
loon in hopes of receiving a
bicycle for their children. Doty
began raising funds to buy bicy-
cles for Citrus United Basket


(CUB) after reaching his goal with
Shop with a Cop. Citrus United
Basket is a nonprofit organization
that provides food and financial
and material assistance during
emergencies to Citrus County
residents.
High Octane Saloon collected
donations to buy nearly 500 toys
and more than 100 bikes for chil-
dren served by CUB. Doty said it
was possible because of the gen-
erosity of customers. Toys, bikes
and Winn-Dixie gift cards were
also distributed to families.
"We have just had an over abun-
dance of calls coming in," Doty
said. "We have a family over here
that has four children and don't
have anything for them. I'm going
to see what is left and then go back


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Bradley German enjoyed his new bicycle at High Octane Saloon as he
had a conversation with Mr. and Mr. Claus.
and get some more this evening. "The reward for me is just see-
Last night, we bought 15 bikes and ing the smile on their faces. That
11 more this morning. is our Christmas gift."


Christms light
LOCATIONS

Check out homes
decorated for holidays
Homeowners who have
gone all-out to decorate the
exterior of their homes for the
holidays and aren't opposed
to motorists taking a spin by
their homes to see their
handiwork include:
A winter wonderland is
on North DeLeon Avenue in
Beverly Hills five blocks
west of Forest Ridge Boule-
vard (Beverly Hills Library is
the landmark) and Roosevelt
Avenue. Multiple houses in a
row are decorated and look
like one big house.
SA single residence deco-
rated beautifully is at 7776 E.
Fort Cooper Road. Take Old
Floral City Road to Fort
Cooper to the end on the right.
A house and yard deco-
rated with Christmas lights
and figures is at 8154 W. Pine
Bluff St., Crystal River, in the
Citronelle area. Pine Bluff
Street is off Citrus Avenue
(C.R. 495), about 6 miles
north of U.S. 19; or a half-mile
south of Dunklin Street. The
street is on the west side of
Citrus Avenue and it is the
first house on the left.
SA family's Christmas light
display has a computer-
controlled tree with thou-
sands of lights blinking to
music; all kinds of lighted, an-
imated reindeer on a teeter
totter; a slide; a merry-go-
round; a Santa train with
spinning wheels and moving
grid of lights on the ground; a
full nativity scene; and an in-
flated Santa, Frosty the
Snowman, and penguins.
The address is 8483 W.
Highland St., Homosassa.
The house is off U.S. 19
south of the airport and
Home Depot. It is the road
next to the Nissan dealership
on U.S. 19 across the street
from the Key Training Thrift
Store. It is the fifth house on
the left before the hill. The
Christmas light display
comes on every evening from
7 to 11 p.m.
A house dressed up for
Christmas is at 8039 N.
Golfview Drive, Citrus Springs.
Golfview is the road that turns
off the main road (Elkcam),
which is the road the golf and
country dub is on.
SA home in Connell
Heights subdivision at 904 N.
Lyle Ave., Crystal River, is
decorated. Coming from
Crystal River, go past Rock
Crusher Canyon Road. Turn
right before Key Training
Center on State Road 44.
Coming from Inverness, turn
left past Key Training Center
on S.R. 44.
SA home in Hunter's
Ridge in Crystal Oaks is
adorned for Christmas. Ac-
cess to the gated community
is off Crystal Oaks Drive. Visi-
tors need to enter "#44" on
the access pad. The home-
owner's phone rings, who
can open the gate. Enter, turn
left and left again into the cul-
de-sac at the bottom of the
hill. The light show lasts
about 10 minutes and can be
heard on the car radio at the
FM station shown in front of
the home.
-From staff reports


Bonds of bigs, little


Nicole Corda opens her gifts at the holiday-match event while Big Sister Katie Neely watches.


Detention facility throws Christmas party for Big Brothers


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer

Sitting in the rear of the court-
room, she fumbled with a small
craft she had received to keep
her busy while minutes ticked
away on the clock. Uncertain of
what was going to happen, she
looked down at the snowflake
craft in her hand as her red hair
covered the feelings on her face.
However, Nicole Corda did not
sit alone in the courtroom, as her
Big Sister Katie Neely joined her
Neely knew their evening in the
courtroom would turn out great
They talked about all of the mem-
orable moments they shared to-
gether Only the two of them would
understand their unbreakable
relationship.
As Citrus County Detention Fa-
cility Warden Russell Washburn
approached the stand, he wel-
comed the crowd to the Big
Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) hol-
iday celebration at the Citrus
County Detention Facility on
Wednesday night.
BBBS of Citrus County is an or-
ganization that provides children
who face adversity with one-on-
one support from a matched re-
lationship with a big brother or
big sister ("bigs") to change a
child's life.
"On most of our children, we


track promotional rates to the
next level," said Susan Rolston,
chief executive officer of BBBS
serving Pinellas, Hernando and
Citrus counties. "If it's academic
advancement and avoidance of
risky behaviors, we are really im-
pacting a child by having a big in
their life. In our county, we are
advancing children in a very pos-
itive and effective way"
Sheri Chancey, chairwoman of
the leadership councils for Citrus
and Hernando counties, board
member and big sister, added to
Rolston's comment.
"We are here and we are doing
what we said we would do," she
said. "The great thing is that Cit-
rus County really does set the bar
for the length and strength of
matches."
Historically, the Citrus County
Detention Facility staff pur-
chased the gifts for children,
then gave them to BBBS. How-
ever, staffers wanted to see the
kids open their presents. There-
fore, Washburn's staff proposed
the idea of a holiday celebration
at the detention facility
"I thought this would be a great
opportunity for us to connect
with the children and to see how
it brightens their faces," Wash-
burn said.
Rolston saw a hidden message
and connection with hosting the


event at the detention facility
"Many of the children do have a
parent (who) is incarcerated,"
Rolston said. "Although, it may
seem like an unusual place to
have a holiday party, their gen-
erosity was encouraging, but there
was also a subliminal message.
We are really pleased. This is a
wonderful opportunity for us."
After leaving the courtroom,
Corda and Neely and others
feasted on a donated Kentucky
Fried Chicken buffet-style meal
with all of the fixings. While the
dinner commenced, match sup-
port specialists Kelly Wagner and
Nehemiah Warner observed the
relationships between the chil-
dren and their bigs.
"It's really fantastic to see our
Citrus matches," Wagner said.
"It's nice to be able to interact
with the children in person."
Following dessert, an assort-
ment of games and activities took
place in the decorated adminis-
trative area for littlees" Children
laughed at the reindeer toss
Velcro'ed around their heads.
Corda and Neely watched and
laughed together; however, they
were enjoying their sisterly bond.
"I grew up in a big family,"
Neely said. "My siblings don't all
live close to me. It is something
that I can do to stay involved with
young people. I always had peo-


ple older than me that checked on
me and helped me stay on track."
Before the night was over,
Santa arrived and handed out the
gifts. Each present was prese-
lected by the staff of the detention
facility and assigned to a particu-
lar child. Every child left with his
or her hands full.
"For me personally, I really have
a passion for children in need and
helping the youth," Washburn
said. "We are hoping this event
will bring something positive to a
child (who) may not have poten-
tially had that opportunity to ex-
perience it. It is a rewarding
opportunity to see kids excited
about something that is positive.
"There is a stigmatism with
jails. When you think of jails, you
generally think of the negative.
This just happens to be the forum
that we are using. But I want the
kids to walk away with the un-
derstanding that good things re-
ally could happen for the right
reasons."
Sponsoring the holiday-match
event were Corrections Corpora-
tion of America, Bright House
Networks, KFC and Harley
Davidson of Crystal River
Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington can be contacted at 352-
563-5660, ext 1334, or
eworthington @chronicle
online com.


Christmas BUSINESS HOURS


The Chronicle's circulation
department will be open from
7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Dec.
24, and 7 to 10 a.m. Christmas
day, Tuesday, Dec. 25.
All county government of-
fices will be closed Monday,


Dec. 24, and Tuesday, Dec. 25,
for Christmas Eve and Christ-
mas. County offices will be
closed Tuesday, Jan. 1,2013,
for New Year's Day.
For information, visit www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.


The Citrus County Central
Landfill will close at 2:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 24, and will be
closed all day Tuesday, Dec.
25. The administration office
will be closed both days and
will reopen for regular business


Wednesday, Dec. 26. The land-
fill will be closed for Tuesday,
Jan. 1, and will reopen
Wednesday, Jan. 2.
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices will be closed Monday and
Tuesday, Dec. 24 and 25, and


closed Tuesday, Jan. 1.
Staff will be onsite each day
to clean and feed the animals.
For information, call 352-746-
8400 or visit www.citruscritters.
com.
-From staff reports


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle



Big Sisters






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Local/State BRIEFS


Restaurants open
Christmas Day
Area restaurants to be open
on Christmas include:
Samantha's Cafe (352-
344-0027) on State Road 200
north of Hernando will be open
from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m. Christ-
mas day. It's at the former site
of Brooklyn South Deli.
Huddle House restaurants
at 321 S. U.S. 41, Inverness
(352-637-4255), and 1208 N.E.
Fifth St., Crystal River (352-
564-0900), are open 24 hours
on Christmas Day.
Ike's Old Florida Kitchen at
Izaak Walton Lodge (352-447-
4899), 6301 Riverside Drive,
Yankeetown, will be open from
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Christmas
Day.
Mulligan's (352-560-
0012), 1305 Norvell Bryant
Highway (C.R. 486), will be
open from 1 to 5 p.m. Christ-
mas Day. Call for reservations.

Ex-Marine gets
5 years for scheme
MIAMI -An ex-Marine from
South Florida has been sen-
tenced to nearly five years in
prison for stealing the identities
of more than 100 fellow
Marines in a tax return fraud
scheme.
Jobsen Cenor of North Miami
pleaded guilty Oct. 3 to charges
of wire fraud and aggravated
identity theft. He was sen-
tenced Friday to 57 months in
prison followed by three years
of supervised release.
The U.S. Attorney's Office in
Miami said Cenor and a co-
conspirator agreed in 2011 to
file fraudulent tax returns using
stolen identities.
According to court docu-
ments, Cenor provided the
names, birthdays and Social
Security numbers of more than


a hundred Marines. Prosecu-
tors said many of the Marines
served in Cenor's unit in
Afghanistan.
The co-conspirator was sen-
tenced in July to nearly six
years in prison.

Inmate dies at
Polk County jail
FROSTPROOF -Authori-
ties are investigating the death
of an inmate in a central Florida
jail.
Polk County Sheriff's Office
spokeswoman Carrie Eleazer
said other inmates yelled out to
deputies Friday evening that
Stephen Harry Grimm was not
breathing.
Eleazer said deputies and
then paramedics attempted to
revive Grimm. The 53-year-old
Eaton Park man was pro-
nounced dead at the
Frostproof jail.
An autopsy will be con-
ducted. Eleazer said no foul
play is suspected and there
was no trauma to Grimm's
body.
Grimm had been sentenced
in October to 180 days in jail for
violating probation. He had
been arrested on DUI charges
in July 2011 and in April 2012.
Eleazer said when Grimm
was booked into the jail, he
said he suffered from a heart
condition and previously had a
heart attack.

Stepmother charged
in girl's death
SARASOTA A southwest
Florida woman has been
charged with aggravated child
abuse in the death of her 11-
year-old stepdaughter.
Authorities previously
charged only Melissa Stod-
dard's father in her death. The
Sarasota County Sheriff's Of-
fice said the girl was repeatedly


Nonstop flights to Key West


Associated Press
Peter Anderson, right, blows a conch shell Saturday as passengers exit a US Airways plane
in Key West, marking the arrival of the first nonstop flight from Washington's Reagan
National Airport to Key West International Airport. Saturday also marked the initiation of
limited nonstop service from New York's La Guardia Airport to Key West via Delta Airlines.


strapped down to a board or
tied up for hours.
The sheriff's office told the
Sarasota Herald-Tribune that
Kenneth and Misty Stoddard
told investigators they tied up
the girl for "behavioral issues."
The medical examiner deter-
mined Melissa died from a lack
of oxygen to the brain.
Melissa died after being
found unresponsive at home
Dec. 12.
Kenneth Stoddard was held
without bond Saturday on a
charge of aggravated child
abuse. His wife Misty was held
on $50,000 bond. Jail records
did not show whether either
had an attorney.
Cruise ship returns
after child falls
ORLANDO -A cruise ship


headed to the Bahamas had to
return to port in central Florida
after a young child was injured
in a fall aboard ship.
Royal Caribbean officials told
WFTV in Orlando a 14-month-
old from India fell Friday aboard
the Monarch of the Seas. The


ship left Port Canaveral on Fri-
day for a Bahamas cruise.
Cruise line officials said the
child was initially treated in the
ship's medical facility, but
needed to be hospitalized. The
ship turned around and re-
turned to Florida, where the


child was taken to a hospital.
No additional information
about the child's injuries was
released.
Cops can't pull cars
over for paint job
TALLAHASSEE -A Florida
appellate court said police can-
not pull over a motorist just be-
cause the car has been
repainted a different color.
A three-judge panel of the 1st
District Court of Appeal in Talla-
hassee on Friday reversed a
motorist's crack cocaine and
marijuana convictions and six-
year prison term.
An Escambia County sher-
iff's deputy stopped Kerick Van
Teamer's Chevy because it was
green, not blue as shown on
registration records. The deputy
then smelled marijuana. That
led to a search and discovery of
the drugs.
The appellate judges con-
cluded mismatching colors is
insufficient reason by itself to
suspect a crime. They also
noted there's no way to change
a car's color on registration
records.
The panel, though, certified
the issue to the Florida
Supreme Court because of a
conflicting appellate decision.
-From staff and wire reports


,egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





k Meeting


N.otices..............D8
.. =" 'a .; ... E "" "
0 "


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
5







5


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
62 s
40 s
48 s
59 pc
54 s
45 pc
54 s
51 s
59 s


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will be
mostly smooth. Mostly sunny today.


62 38 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclus daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
SHigh: 65 Low: 39
miin Mostly sunny, lighter winds

M _, MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 72 Low: 48
Partly cloudy

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 52
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 62/35
Record 84/26
Normal 71/44
Mean temp. 49
Departure from mean -8
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.80 in.
Total for the year 60.81 in.
Normal for the year 51.05 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.24 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 25
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 25%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
juniper, composites
Today's count: 5.1/12
Monday's count: 7.0
Tuesday's count: 7.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/23 SUNDAY 1:20 7:32 1:43 7:54
12/24 MONDAY 2:01 8:13 2:24 8:36
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


JAN.4 JAN.11 JAN.
JAN.4 JAN.11 JAN.18


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 5:39 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ...................7:21 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ..................... 2:20 PM.
MOONSET TODAY ............................3:12 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:01 a/10:16 a 3:02 p/9:40 p
Crystal River** 1:23 p7:38 a -- :02 p
Withlacoochee* 11:10 a/5:26 a 10:01 p/4:50 p
Homosassa*** 12:11 a/9:15 a 2:12 p/8:39 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
1:53 a/11:11 a 4:00 p/10:39 p
12:14 a/8:33 a 2:21 p/8:01 p
12:08 p/6:21 a 10:50 p/5:49 p
1:03 a/10:10 a 3:10 p/9:38 p


Gulf water
temperature


61
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.15 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.29 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.31 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.69 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


(' Belou I
L~coapJuneau


S,-r.---- 70lS "Mio;pI,
Houolon..

80 "
' t Y ' B3

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 38 28 pc 37 23
Albuquerque 47 21 pc 50 28
Asheville 45 27 pc 50 34
Atlanta 52 31 pc 55 45
Atlantic City 43 36 s 46 35
Austin 69 28 pc 76 49
Baltimore 42 36 s 46 30
Billings 33 14 sn 29 11
Birmingham 54 26 pc 57 53
Boise 49 39 rs 41 28
Boston 38 30 pc 41 28
Buffalo 33 28 .03 sf 35 23
Burlington, VT 37 24 .03 sf 26 11
Charleston, SC 59 35 s 60 42
Charleston, WV 34 26 .01 s 46 35
Charlotte 56 27 s 56 38
Chicago 32 17 pc 35 30
Cincinnati 36 26 pc 44 31
Cleveland 32 30 pc 37 28
Columbia, SC 59 32 s 59 38
Columbus, OH 33 26 s 39 27
Concord, N.H. 37 26 pc 33 16
Dallas 68 32 s 73 38
Denver 51 25 pc 48 25
Des Moines 40 10 pc 24 15
Detroit 35 29 pc 35 27
El Paso 58 36 s 65 38
Evansville, IN 42 19 pc 51 38
Harrisburg 40 35 s 42 26
Hartford 39 32 pc 40 24
Houston 69 33 pc 75 60
Indianapolis 30 13 pc 42 30
Jackson 63 26 sh 63 53
Las Vegas 52 34 pc 55 38
Little Rock 63 28 pc 62 47
Los Angeles 60 45 pc 62 51
Louisville 40 21 pc 50 42
Memphis 60 28 sh 60 50
Milwaukee 29 15 pc 31 22
Minneapolis 29 9 pc 23 14
Mobile 62 27 pc 67 59
Montgomery 59 28 pc 60 52
Nashville 49 22 sh 51 45
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 63 37 pc 68 61
New York City 38 36 s 43 33
Norfolk 49 36 s 53 36
Oklahoma City 59 33 s 52 27
Omaha 39 15 pc 21 10
Palm Springs 65 37 pc 67 49
Philadelphia 42 37 s 44 32
Phoenix 71 52 pc 65 48
Pittsburgh 31 28 s 38 27
Portland, ME 41 30 pc 33 21
Portland, Ore 49 42 .11 sh 44 35
Providence, R.I. 40 32 pc 42 27
Raleigh 50 34 s 54 36
Rapid City 39 17 pc 28 9
Reno 43 32 .33 rs 43 29
Rochester, NY 32 27 .07 sf 37 23
Sacramento 55 47 1.07 r 50 42
St. Louis 47 20 pc 49 31
St. Ste. Marie 27 21 pc 21 12
Salt Lake City 49 22 c 41 32
San Antonio 66 35 pc 75 51
San Diego 61 45 pc 64 56
San Francisco 59 50 .57 r 58 45
Savannah 57 30 s 61 41
Seattle 47 39 .16 sh 43 35
Spokane 41 32 .09 sn 37 25
Syracuse 34 27 .26 sn 33 21
Topeka 50 18 s 31 15
Washington 45 37 s 48 36
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 77 Port Isabel, Texas
LOW -27 Kremmling, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/73/s Madrid
Amsterdam 51/47/sh Mexico City
Athens 52/41/c Montreal
Beijing 19/6/s Moscow
Berlin 35/35/rs Paris
Bermuda 66/61/pc Rio
Cairo 66/51/s Rome
Calgary 3/-9/sf Sydney
Havana 75/56/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 68/55/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 62/47/s Warsaw


59/55/pc
54/45/sh
64/46/pc
75/45/s
25/17/pc
4/-4/pc
55/46/sh
85/73/ts
57/44/pc
83/69/pc
47/37/sh
34/21/sf
12/10/pc


C I T R S


C 0 U N TY


(HRKONICLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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N 11

SInverness
Courthouse office
TompkinsSt. square
S106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
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Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I-


A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Danny Hochadel has been riding since the age of 8. He says the activity stretches his legs.
Several days a week, Hochadel works in the records department at the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office shredding papers. He also rides as a volunteer with the Sheriff's Crime Watch.


HORSE
Continued from Page Al

tentatively scooted himself
forward.
"Danny knows what he's
doing when he gets on the
horse," said Wayne Conkle,
Darby Oaks Stables trainer.
"He wanders around, and
sometimes he rides with
somebody, but a lot of times
he rides by himself."
His mother said he's in
his own world when he's
riding and he feels nor-
mal. He can keep up with
everyone else.
"The horse is his legs,"
she said. "The horse does
the work for him he's not
disabled when he's on his
favorite horse."
Beville said she wasn't
told of her son's cerebral
palsy until he was 2. He was
her firstborn, and it was a
difficult birth. However,
being her first child, she
didn't know what to expect
or what was normal, al-
though she knew something
wasn't right. He wasn't walk-
ing, and she knew that
wasn't normal.
"When the doctor finally
told me it was cerebral
palsy, it was earth-
shattering," she said. "I


didn't know what he would
be able to do."
They lived in Inverness,
and Hochadel started at In-
verness Primary School.
However, he didn't stay
there long.
"The principal said he
might not learn anything at
that school, and I sat there
and went, 'That can't be
true.' I let some things go in
one ear and out the other
and decided to raise Danny
the way I wanted to do it and
expose him to as many
things as I could and not tell
him he couldn't do things,"
she said.
She enrolled him in Lake-
view School, where he
stayed until he graduated
and then moved into his
own Key Training Center
apartment in Inverness.
His mother lives in Bush-
nell near the stables and
works in Citrus County.
Several days a week,
Hochadel works in the
records department at the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice shredding papers. He
also rides as a volunteer
with the Sheriff's Crime
Watch.
"He loves working for the
sheriff's office," Beville
said. "What he'd really love
to do is be in the Sheriff's
Posse, but the horse has to


get to the point where it's
not 'spooky' at anything."
Hochadel also volunteers
with the Florida Walking
and Racking Horse Associa-
tion and the Southern Obsta-
cle Challenge Association,
two organizations that have
raised $2,000 each to benefit
the Key Training Center
MEN
As Hochadel rode AJ
around the stable's grassy
area, his mother stood
nearby watching him. Every
so often stable trainer
Wayne Conkle called out
suggestions "Give it more
rein, Danny," and, "You're
doing good."
"When Danny was little,
we bought an old quarter
horse and he rode her as
much as he could," Beville
said. "The first time we put
him on a horse, he loved it
He didn't want to quit. Even
now, he asks all the time,
'Can we go ride today?'
"Sometimes he can be
hard to read," she said, "but
look at him. He'd like to get
his driver's license, but has-
n't been able to pass the test
But when he's on a horse, he
goes wherever he wants to
go."'
Chronicle reporterNancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2927.


BLIGHT
Continued from Page Al

"This place is not only a health hazard, it
is a disgusting mess," Kristen King, owner
of The Downtown Diner, told the Chronicle
earlier this month. "There is exposed insu-
lation, sharp metal and
garbage all over the grounds.
I own one of the businesses Th
next to this mess and it is af- going to
fecting our businesses."
Corbin told the Chronicle Out the jI
a representative of the Fifth
Third Bank of Cincinnati, debris. T
the new owner of the park,
flew in to get the site going to
cleaned up, although the the sept
code violations weren't
caused by the bank through
"We find that happens a lot
when the banks get the prop- trailer pa
erty back," Corbin said. "It
has taken a while to get it to expect I
this point because of the the entire
foreclosure. When the banks
don't own it, they don't want Cleaned
to jump right in. When you
have somebody walking Jan. 11
away from it, they don't want
to do anything else to it It's Kimberl
in a limbo state. It makes it code comply
difficult to get cooperation."
Corbin said the Fifth
Third Bank had been cooperative in the
past and was keeping in good contact with
the county. The representative came to
Florida last week to deal with code viola-
tions for a number of properties through-
out the state. In Citrus County, the bank
staffer arranged for a contractor to demol-
ish the park.


e
)
u
U
Ir



0

tc






i
lia


"All Around Tractor Service is going to be
doing the work," Corbin said. "They will ob-
tain the permits. They got a verbal approval
from Fifth Third Bank on Tuesday Once
they get a faxed contract, they were going to
come in and obtain that demolition permit"
The contractor is expected to be
thorough.
"They are going to clean out the junk and
debris," Corbin said. "They are
going to crush the septic tanks
Dy are throughout the trailer park We
clean expect to have the entire place
cleaned up by Jan. 11."
ink and Corbin said in this case the
county allowed a little more
hey are time for completion because it
is Christmas week.
crush "Even if he gets the demoli-
c tanks tion permit today, I would be
surprised to see them out there
Mut the before Christmas," Corbin said.
The case is scheduled for a
rk. We hearing Jan. 20 before the spe-
cial master, who could give a
o have little more time, if needed. But
e place Corbin does not expect that to
happen.
up by "We've worked in the past
with All Around Tractor Serv-
ice," Corbin said. "They've
done very well. They take care
y Corbin of it."
dance director. Once the job is done, the site
should be level dirt, ready for
commercial development
"I don't think we're going to have any
problem with this situation," Corbin said.
"The restaurant will be very pleased. This
will help pick up business and they won't
see that eyesore."
Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer can
be reached at cvanormer@chronicleon-
line.com or 352-564-2916.


CITRUS COUNTY WATERING FINES
The county is issuing citations that carry with them a fine of $100 for first offenders
of local watering rules. Second violations cost $250, third or more cost $500.





HOMO5RESR N
( Dec. 19 through Dec. 24 & Dec. 26, 2012 5:30- 9:00 pm
at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
WIBL-IFEB P Sponsored by the Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park, Inc.
WILDLIFE PRRK a
Featuring 8asfaanX W r "nSdO r1and9 .*
a Spectacular Synchronized Light and Sound display in the
Garden of the Springs by Sebastian Hawes
Hosted by Joe Dube Refreshments available at the Miss-L-Toe-Cafe
7: Sun., Dec. 23: Visit Santa and Mrs. Claus,
with performances by Richard Michael Reyes,
sponsored by Citrus Kia.
Suggested donations: $3.00 for adults; $1.00 for children ages 6 12;
( children 5 and under are free.
S o ...7M Transportation by tram provided from US 19 Visitor Center


David R. Best

Attorney
at Law


Over 35 years
practicing in
Citrus County





Areas of
Practice:

Personal Injury

Medical Malpractice

Sex Abuse Cases

Disability Cases



7655 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Suite 13
Crystal River, FL 34429


4f~O


AI


www.HooperFuneralHome.com





FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY

(352) 726-2271
1-888-7HOOPER (746-6737)
SHomosassa Inverness Beverly Hills


SRI NG p gTRUS (O NT


(i-~


I


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Joanne
Aldunate, 76
HERNANDO
Joanne Aldunate/Kohl-
meier of Hernando, Fla.,
and Brant
Lake N.Y,
and for-
merly of
Rockville
Centre, "
Clifton
Park, N.Y,
passed
away Dec. 9,
2012, in her Joanne
76th year Aldunate
Loving
wife of Robert G., mother of
Gary Di Benedetto (de-
ceased), Christopher Di
Benedetto and Cristina
Clark. Proud grandmother
of Katrina, Joseph and Mari.
Loving sister of Caroline
Wells (Bill) and Betty Fink
(Paul-deceased).Devoted
aunt to Richard Wells
(Kelly), Jonathan Wells
(April), Paul Fink and Caro-
line Goodjohn (Kristofer).
Brother and sister-in-law
Carlos and Merri Aldunate.
Joanne fought a brave but
short battle with AML. In
lieu of flowers, donations to
the Leukemia and Lym-
phoma Society, PO. Box
4072, Pittsfield, MA 01202.
Joanne will be remembered
for her kindness and gen-
erosity. She will be cre-
mated and laid to rest at St.
Charles Cemetery. A cele-
bration of her life will be at
a later date.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Reginald
'Chappy'
Chapman, 95
OCALA
Reginald H. "Chappy"
Chapman, 95, Ocala, for-
merly of Inverness, died Fri-
day, Dec. 21, 2012.
Graveside services will be
at 1 p.m. Monday, Dec. 24, at
Oak Ridge Cemetery Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
With Crematory, Inverness.

Dale Mullis, 81
Mr. Dale Mullis, age 81,
passed away Monday, De-
cember 17, 2012. Born in
Brown County, Indiana, he
worked in accounting and
banking.
He is survived by wife,
Betty, step-daughter, Shelley
(Jimmy) Chalmers, 2 step-
granddaughters, Katy (Russ)
Creech, Joy Chalmers, and
numerous nieces and
nephews.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www.HooperFuneralHome
.com. No services have been
planned. Arrangements by
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


Patricia 'Trish'
Bowen, 63
BEVERLY HILLS
Patricia Ann "Trish"
Bowen, 63, of Beverly Hills,
Fla., passed
away Mon-
day, Dec. 17,
2012, at her
residence in r
Beverly
Hills.
She was
born March
7, 1949, in Patricia
Landstown, Bowen
Pa., and was
a Realtor. Patricia arrived
in this area in 1994, coming
from Miami, Fla., and was a
member of Jesus Is Min-
istries in Inglis, Fla. She en-
joyed camping, motorcycle
riding, the outdoors, and
was an artistic painter
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of nine years,
Marc Bowen. Other sur-
vivors include two sons, Art
Griffith Jr and Stephen
Griffith, both of Crystal
River, Fla.; two brothers,
Van and Daniel Vickery;
mother, Elaine McGuin; and
six grandchildren, Austin,
Ashley, Stephen, Samantha,
Michael and Danielle; one
niece, Melissa Elaine Vick-
ery; and one nephew,
Daniel Dean Vickery
A visitation is scheduled
from 10 to 11 a.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 26, 2012, with fu-
neral services at 11 a.m. at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home, Inverness, Fla. Bur-
ial will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
Fla. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests donations to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Sonya
Jacobs, 72
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sonya M. Jacobs, 72, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Dec. 20,2012,
at Hospice House of Citrus
County in Lecanto, Fla.
She was born May 29,
1940, in Oil City, Pa., to
George Edward and Flo-
rence (Elder) Montgomery
She came here 27 years ago
from Ocala, Fla. She was co-
owner and operated the
Ocala Blueprint Service in
Ocala. She enjoyed horse-
back riding and boating.
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of 46 years,
Thomas Jacobs of Crystal
River, Fla.; her son, Steven
Jacobs (Shauna) of Port
Richey, Fla.; her father,
George E. Montgomery of
Phoenix, Ariz.; a brother,
Robert Montgomery (Patty)
of Orange Grove, Fla.; a sis-
ter, Ann Nutaro (Joe) of
Phoenix, Ariz.; and a grand-
daughter, Reagan Jacobs of
Port Richey, Fla.
A memorial service will
be conducted at 11 a.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 23, 2012, at Strick-
land Funeral Home Chapel
in Crystal River with Hos-
pice of Citrus County Chap-
lain Boris Posso officiating.
In lieu of flowers, the family
suggests a memorial contri-
bution to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464.


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

BrownC


U


Sign the guest book at Betty Knox, 83
wwwchronicleonline. com. CRYSTAL RIVER


Yourth 'Uri'
Burke, 90
INVERNESS
Yourth L. "Uri" Burke, 90,
of Inverness, passed away
Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012.
She was born Nov. 21,
1922, in Highlands, Ill. She
graduated
f r o m
Charleston
H ig h
School,
where she
was a drum- -
mer in the
school .
band. She Yourth
worked for Burke
the General
Electric Company for 34
years in Illinois and
Florida. She was active in
the VFW Post 4337 Auxil-
iary and the Eagles Aerie
3992 of Inverness. She was
an avid patriot and aided
the Disabled Veterans Asso-
ciation. She was active out-
doors with hunting, fishing
and camping.
She was predeceased by
her husband, Jim Burke;
and companion of 20 years,
Skip Hoyer She is survived
by son, Dr. Richard
McKibben and his wife,
Diane; two granddaughters,
Honorable Kelly McKibben
(Scott) and Tracie Pring
(Mike); and two great-grand-
daughters, Kelly Ann Pring
and Courtney Pring.
A tribute to Uri's life will
be at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Dec.
26, 2012, at Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home, Inverness.
The family will receive
friends in visitation from
1 p.m. until the hour of
service.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
Chronicle staff can help
to edit text.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.



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Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


Betty Jean Knox, 83, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Dec. 20 at Citrus
Memorial hospital in
Inverness, Fla.
Born May 1, 1929, in Chill-
icothe, Ohio, to Steven and
Effie (Nelt) Miller, Betty
moved to Citrus County in
1983 from Columbus, Ohio.
She was a retired conven-
ience store manager. She
loved bowling and was a
member of the Rock
Crusher Church of God.
In addition to her parents,
Betty was preceded in death
by her husband, Woodrow
W Knox in 1999.
She is survived by her
daughter, Kimberly K.
Mullis (Spencer) of Crystal
River, Fla.; three sons, Kirk
D. Knox (Velinda) of High-
lands Ranch, Colo., Kevin D.
Knox (Wilma) of Houston,
Texas, and Woodrow K.
(Maureen) of North Car-
olina; seven grandchildren,
Justin Mullis, Cody Mullis,
Kai Knox, Kameron Knox,
Kolin Knox, Katelin Knox
and Keri Verzinskie; and
two great-grandchildren.
Family will receive
friends from 2 to 4 p.m. and
6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 27,
at Brown Funeral Home.
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Friday, Dec. 28, at
Brown Funeral Home, with
Pastor Dan Oakes
officiating.
Burial will follow at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell, Fla.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, www
brownfuneralhome.com.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
U.S. flags denote mili-
tary service on local
obituaries.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to the
contrary is made.


Cincinnati professor

nominated for Nobel dies


Associated Press

CINCINNATI Elwood
Jensen, an award-winning
University of Cincinnati
professor nomi-
nated for the
Nobel Prize for
medicine for work
that opened the
door to advances
in fighting cancer,
has died of pneu-
monia. He was 92.
Jensen died
Sunday, the uni- Elw'
versity announced Jen.
Thursday. He was profes
nominated multi- Univer
ple times for the Cinci
Nobel Prize for his
discovery of hormone re-
ceptors while at the Uni-
versity of Chicago in the
1950s and 1960s.
Back then, Jensen fo-
cused on the impact breast
tissue had on estrogen,
whereas most other re-
searchers were looking at
how the hormone influ-
enced tissue.
At the time, the standard
treatment for breast cancer
was to take out the ovaries
or adrenal glands, but after
creating a way to radioac-
tively tag estrogen, Jensen
found only a third of
breast tumors carry estro-
gen receptors.
The discovery allows
doctors today to identify
which patients will re-
spond to anti-estrogen
therapy and which need
chemotherapy or radia-
tion. The ground-breaking
finding has helped doctors
treat breast, thyroid and
prostate cancer.
Jensen was repeatedly
nominated for the Nobel
Prize and won dozens of
awards for his work, in-
cluding a Lasker Award
for Basic Medical Re-
search, a prize that is con-
sidered America's Nobel.
Dr Sohaib Khan, a pro-
fessor of cancer biology at
Cincinnati and a friend of
Jensen's, said Jensen's
greatest disappointment
in life was not winning the
Nobel he even brought
it up during their last con-


s
n


versation about a week be-
fore his death.
"He was talking about
how fortunate he was to
live a life like he has,"
Khan said. "But one
qualm he had was
that he did not get
the Nobel Prize. He
felt pretty strongly
that he really de-
-served it, and most
S people in the field
think exactly the
same way"
ood Nobel Prizes are
sen not awarded
sor at posthumously
sity of Khan called
nati. Jensen's work
"monumental" and
described the man as
down-to-earth, humble,
funny and always ready to
tell an old story from his
boxing days in college or
when he climbed the
14,690-foot Matterhorn in
the Alps in 1947.
He is survived by his
wife and two grown chil-
dren, a daughter living in
New Hampshire and a son
living in Ecuador
A memorial service is
tentatively set for Jan. 10 at
the university's Vontz Cen-
ter for Molecular Studies.


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A6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


ODJA





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Help at hand when elderly relative's health fails


JIM FITZGERALD
Associated Press
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y -
Marnie Schwartz was in Cal-
ifornia, a lawyer raising two
toddlers. She was in no po-
sition to move across the
country to care for her
mother, who was living
alone in New York and
whose health was beginning
to decline.
Schwartz's dilemma was
similar to that faced by
more and more Americans
as the population spreads
out, people live longer and
giving up a job is out of the
question.
"I needed eyes and ears
closer to my mother," said
Schwartz, an only child liv-
ing in Malibu. "I needed
someone to handle the med-
ical, the insurance, the fi-
nancial, stay on top of the
daily caregiving, so the emo-
tional strain wouldn't be
overwhelming."
Those needs have fos-
tered a niche that a variety
of enterprises have been
filling in recent years. Com-
panies and individuals call-
ing themselves advocates,
care managers and advisers
are willing to stand in for
the family and deal with the
maze of responsibilities that
comes with the care of an
elderly loved one.
With the aging of the baby
boom generation, the 78 mil-
lion Americans born be-
tween 1946 and 1964, calls
for such businesses are ex-
pected to increase during
the next 20 years.
Their service doesn't
come cheap and it's gener-
ally not covered by insur-
ance. But some customers


hAAging
America


have found it's worth the
peace of mind.
Schwartz found her "eyes
and ears" when a childhood
friend told her about A Dig-
nified Life, a small company
in White Plains, N.Y, that
specializes in elder care.
"I don't know what I
would have done without
them," Schwartz said. "They
knew where to go with all
these questions I had that
would have taken me 500
phone calls. They deci-
phered what the doctors
were saying. They got a
ramp built at the house.
They dealt with the plumber
They remembered every-
thing, and they did it in a re-
ally human, caring way
"In about a year and a
half, as my mother's situa-
tion got worse, they became
part of our daily life,"
Schwartz said. And in Octo-
ber, as her mother's health
failed, "they told me it was
time to get on a plane."
She was at her mother's
deathbed, she said, because
A Dignified Life knew when
to call.
Barbara Newman Man-
nix, who runs the company,
said "experience and empa-
thy" are required to do the
job well. She vets, hires and
monitors in-home care-
givers, attorneys, nursing
homes and more, guides a
family through the financial
tangles and makes sure an
elderly person's wishes are


Associated Press
Barbara Newman Mannix, founder of A Dignified Life, poses
for a photo Dec. 4 outside her office in White Plains, N.Y. The
company stands in for family members who can't be as close
as they'd like when an elderly relative begins to decline.


respected. She can help
arrange the sale of a house
and pre-plan a funeral.
For an initial, $625 four-
hour consultation, her com-
pany will evaluate a family's
needs and come up with an
"action plan." The family
can then hire the company
to implement the plan on an
hourly or retainer basis.
Mannix started the com-
pany after navigating the
maze during her husband's
fatal illness.
"You're suddenly in crisis
and the normal reaction is,
'What do I do, where do I go,
who do I call first?"' she
said. "People are lost. But
we tell them there is a way
to cope, there is crisis man-
agement, there are people
that will help you who do
what they do all day every
day"
She said many people just


don't have the personality
for dealing with doctors and
caregivers and insurance
companies.
"It's time, it's energy, it's
stress, it's consternation
among members of the fam-
ily," she said. "There's emo-
tional baggage, and if you
have children yourself
you're being pulled in both
directions."
Judy Rappaport, who
runs Preferred Lifestyle
Services in Jupiter, Fla.,
said most elderly people re-
sist moving to a son or
daughter's home.
"Everybody wants to stay
home," Rappaport said.
"Now we do what we can to
make it possible for people
to stay in their homes."
Most of her company's
staffers are nurses.
"When we're hired, we go
in and count the pills, check


the food in the refrigerator,
we talk to the doctors," she
said. "We get a complete
picture and we write up a
report in lay language. The
family knows what we'll do
and what it will cost right up
front."
The services can get very
specific.
"We had one lady who
wanted to play bingo and we
said, 'No problem, we can
get you to bingo.' But she
was a German lady and she
wanted to play bingo in Ger-
man," Rappaport said. "We
found a place."
Jullie Gray, incoming
president of the National
Association of Geriatric
Care Managers, said mem-
bership is now near 2,000,
up from fewer than 1,600 a
decade ago.
Rappaport said the aver-
age fee for her clients is be-
tween $1,500 and $2,500 a
month, not including the in-
home caretakers' pay
David Cutner, an elder
law attorney in Manhattan,
said he worries about eld-
erly people exhausting their
assets, but added, "People
who have a substantial net
worth and are not thinking
about government benefit


ON THE NET
www.adignifiedlife.com
www.preferredlifestyle
services.cor
www.carefamily.com
www.caremanager.org

programs might well want to
hire this type of service."
A much less comprehen-
sive and less costly alterna-
tive is offered by CareFamily,
which prescreens in-home
caregivers and matches
them to customers over the
Internet. On Monday, the
company announced a vari-
ety of online tools through
which a family can remotely
monitor a caregiver's atten-
dance, provide reminders
about medications and ap-
pointments and exchange
care plans and notes via
email, texting or phone.
The service would be in-
cluded in the average $15 an
hour fee paid for the care-
giver, said CareFamily CEO
Tom Knox. He said it can
"cut costs while ensuring
that the elderly can be well
taken care of without the
need to uproot seniors and
disrupt families."


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 A7


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A8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


SECURITY
Continued from Page Al

gunman killed 26 people including
20 children, Colasanti added:
"If somebody wants to get in
here, they'll get in here."
MEN
Columbine changed the way the
public views access to schools.
Schools underwent drastic se-
curity changes after the April 1999
killings at Columbine High School
in Littleton, Colo., caused by two
high school seniors who entered
through an unlocked door. They
killed 12 students and a teacher.
Parents' concern about child
safety at school skyrocketed. Hor-
rified educators realized how vul-
nerable they had been.
In public debate that followed,
school officials struggled with the
balance of keeping children safe
with offering a school environ-
ment not resembling an armed
fortress.
Citrus County officials say they
have acted in numerous ways in
recent years to strike that balance,
including:
SA partnership with the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office to provide
school resource officers, or SROs,
in every high school and middle
school, with deputies assigned to
elementary schools certain days a
week. Educators say the presence
of uniformed deputies in the
schools has a calming effect on
students and teachers.
School doors are now locked
from the outside once school
starts. Employees use their iden-
tification badges to gain access.
Only a handful of district officials
have keys, and they use those only
when a power outage disables the
electronic entry mechanism.
Schools are now designed to
ensure everyone who enters
checks in at an office or front desk.
At Pleasant Grove, Hernando, Flo-
ral City and Citrus Springs ele-
mentary schools, visitors press a
buzzer and the door is unlocked by
someone in the front office who
can see the visitor from a monitor.
At other schools, the front doors
either lead directly to the front
desk or visitors are physically di-
rected to the office by ropes or
barriers.
All visitors must now have
their driver's license scanned and
wear identification stickers while
in school. This came about from
the Jessica Lunsford Act, named
for the 9-year-old Homosassa girl


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Pleasant Grove Elementary School receptionist Lynn Brooks checks a monitor before allowing a parent to
enter the school Friday morning. Pleasant Grove is one of four elementary schools that require visitors to
press a buzzer before they can enter the school.


who was kidnapped, raped and
murdered in March 2005 by a man
who authorities discovered had
worked at a construction site at
Homosassa Elementary School.
As part of the act, all con-
struction workers and vendors
must undergo criminal back-
ground checks before they can
come in or near a school.
Classroom doors installed in
new or renovated schools can be
locked from the inside and the
outside. Classroom doors at other
schools may be locked only from
the hallway


Lynn Brooks, the receptionist at
Pleasant Grove, said the security
measures have helped her keep
an eye on who's in the school.
When visitors come to the front
entrance, a sign taped to the door
lets them know they should ring
the security buzzer and state their
name and reason for visiting. It
also asks visitors to look toward
the left, where a camera can cap-
ture their face.
And it adds: "Please do not
allow other visitors to enter the
building. We need to grant access
to each individual."


Brooks, at her desk in the main
office, can see the visitor on the
monitor.
"I always speak to the person
out there. Most of them I recog-
nize," she said.
Once buzzed in, cameras in the
hallway keep track of visitors so
Brooks knows they come right to
the front office before heading to
their destination in the school.
"They've got to come here first,"
Brooks said.
Sometimes visitors are not al-
lowed in. Often, those are cases of
divorced parents where one par-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ent who does not have custody
wants to see his child. Brooks said
she seeks assistance from Princi-
pal Lynne Kirby or assistant prin-
cipal Rob Hermann.
The driver's license scanner,
called the Raptor system, alerts
school authorities to anyone who
is a registered sexual offender or
predator. Those cases are then
handled by the principal, assistant
principal or SRO.
MEN
Once again, though, schools are
on high alert after the Dec. 14
shootings at Sandy Hook Elemen-
tary School in Newtown, Conn.,
where a gunman forced his way
into the school, killing 20 first-
graders and six educators, includ-
ing the school principal.
Citrus County officials say they
plan a school-by-school audit in
January to make sure safety fea-
tures are in proper order and em-
ployees are aware of safety
processes. They said the district
already has a safety committee
that meets regularly to discuss po-
tential security upgrades.
School board member Pat
Deutschman said she thinks the
Citrus school district does what it
can to protect students and staff
from danger
"We've invested a lot of money
in additional safety measures the
last 10 years," she said. "Our
teachers are very well trained, as
were the teachers at Sandy Hook.
Our SROs constantly undergo
training. The sheriff's office is
highly integrated in the school
district."
Kirby, the Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary principal, agreed.
"We're doing everything that's
humanly possible," she said.
She said some parents have of-
fered suggestions, from installing
bullet-proof glass in the schools to
principals packing firearms in
their offices.
One lawmaker has introduced a
bill allowing for armed principals
in schools. Another lawmaker is
calling on Gov Rick Scott to install
full-time SROs in elementary
schools.
Deutschman said she hopes the
Sandy Hook tragedy doesn't lead
to knee-jerk legislation that is
costly and ineffective.
"You have to bring some rea-
sonable common sense," she said.
"When you have a situation like
this, people want to run out mak-
ing rules and laws that could
cause a lot of unintended conse-
quences. Let's be careful to not
over-mandate certain things with-
out really thinking it through."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


On vacation


National nuclear
agency head leaves
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-
The man who has led the na-
tion's nuclear security agency
since 2007 is stepping down
next month after presiding over
a 20 percent increase in the
agency's budget but also some
management missteps that
have raised questions about
the agency's ability to carry out
its mission.
Tom D'Agostino announced
Friday he is leaving the Na-
tional Nuclear Security Adminis-
tration, which funds and
oversees work at the Sandia
and Los Alamos national labs in
New Mexico. The research cen-
ters employ about 20,000 peo-
ple in the state. He was
appointed to the post by Presi-
dent George W. Bush.
D'Agostino issued a state-
ment saying he wants to spend
more time with family and said
periodic leadership changes
make organizations healthier,
the Albuquerque Journal
reported.


Hepatitis C tests Crowd-funding aids Bay of Pigs vets
continue Sandy relief remember release


CONCORD, N.H. Hospi-
tals across the country recom-
mended hepatitis C testing for
some 7,900 patients last sum-
mer after a traveling medical
worker was accused of infect-
ing patients with tainted sy-
ringes in New Hampshire. But
five months later, nearly half of
those who may have been ex-
posed to the liver-destroying
disease in other states have yet
to be tested.
David Kwiatkowski, who has
pleaded not guilty to drug
charges, is accused of stealing
painkillers from New Hamp-
shire's Exeter Hospital and re-
placing them with syringes
tainted with his blood. Thirty-
two people in New Hampshire
have been diagnosed with the
same strain of hepatitis C he
carries, along with six in
Kansas, five in Maryland and
one in Pennsylvania.
Officials told The Associated
Press at least 3,700 patients
haven't been tested.


WASHINGTON Some
who lost their homes or busi-
nesses in Superstorm Sandy
have turned to crowd-funding
websites to elicit a faster re-
sponse than they might get
from the government or tradi-
tional charities.
While Congress considers a
$60 billion disaster aid package
for the storm victims, hundreds
of them have gotten quicker re-
sults by creating personalized
fundraising campaigns on sites
including GoFundMe, Indie
GoGo and HelpersUnite.
These individual fundraising
efforts have totaled a few mil-
lion dollars, enough to show the
funding model can work. Go
FundMe leads the way with
$1.3 million raised by about 320
individual campaigns from
more than 14,000 donors.
Some charity watchdogs
warn, though, that such sites
could be ripe for abuse by peo-
ple taking advantage of a
tragedy.


MIAMI Veterans from the
failed Bay of Pigs invasion are ,
celebrating 50 years since their V
release from Cuba.
The first planeload of prison-
ers arrived at Homestead Air
Force Base on Dec. 23, 1962.
Some survivors from those
flights planned a reunion Satur-
day at the Bay of Pigs Museum
in Miami's Little Havana. I
More than a 1,100 Bay of .
Pigs fighters were held for 20
months following the disastrous
April 1961 invasion to overthrow ".
Fidel Castro's government.
They were eventually re-
leased under an agreement in
which Cuba would receive more
than $50 million worth of food
and medical supplies.
Veteran Jose Andreu told The
Miami Herald he remembered
"a lot of hugging and crying"
when his sister, father and fi- Associated Press
anc6e welcomed him back to President Barack Obama arrives Saturday with first lady
Miami. Michelle Obama, top, and daughters Malia, top left, and
Sasha, bottom right, at Honolulu Joint Base Pearl Harbor-
-From wire reports Hickam in Honolulu, for the start of their holiday vacation.


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A10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


NCB in Workplace Campaign


Special to the Chronicle
The employees of Nature Coast Bank recently kicked off their annual United Way Work-
place Campaign. For the seventh year in a row, Nature Coast Bank employees have pro-
vided 100 percent participation in the campaign. The employees are dedicated to the
United Way movement. Pictured are: Bob Bonomo, Nature Coast Bank first vice president
and branch manager; Amy Meek, United Way CEO; Jennifer Barber, United Way director
of finance and operations; and Paul Mellini, Nature Coast Bank president and CEO.


Dec. 26 to 28 MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Christmas Eve: All sites closed.
Tuesday: Christmas Day: All sites closed.
Wednesday: Chef's salad (ham, cheese,
whole boiled egg, tomato) with French
dressing, carrot-raisin salad, fresh orange, slice
whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken parmesan, California
vegetables, Italian flat beans, peaches, slice


whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Meatballs with brown gravy, rice pilaf,
mixed vegetables, pears, slice white bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East
Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support Services at
352-527-5975.


No more gadgets


The last thing most of
us need is more stuff
we already have
plenty. I have an attic, a
garage, a basement and a
tool shed full of so much
stuff they have their own
gravity; they are starting to
attract things from other
places.
We have more kitchen
gadgets, many of them never
used, than Martha Stewart
and Bobby Flay
combined. I still
have yet to touch
that chocolate
fondue contrap-
tion that some-
one gave us 12
years ago. If it
was from you,
don't be of-
fended. You
probably never JA
took the Make M L
Your Own Jerky
at Home ma-
chine we gave you out of its
box, either.
Our pantry looks like an
outlet store for Things That
Will Never Be Used. Re-
member all that ice cream
we were going to churn at
home? All that beer we
would brew ourselves? All
that cheese we were going
to smoke? All those dried
fruit snacks we never
made?
Some things we did use -
once. The deep-fat fryer
worked fine, but so does a
frying pan, and it's much
easier to clean. The banana
slicer also worked, but so
does a knife. That thingy
that lets you make perfectly
round fried eggs? It really


does make perfectly round
fried eggs that taste remark-
ably, if not exactly, the same
as not-so-round fried eggs,
yet gives you one more thing
to wash.
The electric mixed-drink
whisk? We already had one
of those. It's called a spoon.
Someone got us an electric
wine cooler. Turns out we
already had one of those,
too. It's called a refrigerator.
Years have gone
by, and we still
haven't felt the
urge to use the
sausage maker
someone so
thoughtfully gave
us. Nor have we
made our own
pasta, sliced our
own deli meat or
N used the snow
LFN cone machine.
The waffle maker,
the machine that
makes only cupcakes, the
juicer, the sushi kit, the rice
cooker, the kimchi fer-
menter, the raclette grill, the
cotton candy machine, the
nacho cheese dispenser and
the electric yogurt maker
take up an enormous
amount of space on the
shelves.
While we love juice and
rice and sushi and cupcakes
and yogurt and waffles and
nachos and kimchi, and
while we love the people
who gave us these presents,
we don't have the time or
energy to use them.
Others must have this
same problem. Doesn't the
sports fan in your house al-
ready have enough memo-


rabilia to open a store? His
favorite jersey, the phone in
the shape of a football, the
baseball cap with the team
logo?
I've been in houses where
you can tell what the owners
enjoy before you step on the
porch. The doorbell is in the
shape of a golf bag. The boot
scraper is in the shape of a
corgi. The only surprise
would be to find out the wife
is the golfer and the hus-
band is the dog breeder.
The temptation is to give
them what they like, but
trust me, if they have a boot
scraper in the shape of their
hobby, you're not going to
find anything they don't
have.
Besides, studies show we
don't remember things as
much as we remember ex-
periences. We shouldn't be
giving our friends and fami-
lies things, but things to do.
An Alaskan cruise, tickets to
a hot concert or a game, a
gift pass to the movie the-
ater Those won't be sitting
on a shelf 10 years from now,
waiting to become obsolete.
So throw out the catalogs
and start thinking about
things to do, places to go. A
trip to the amusement park,
a photography course at the
local college, a lesson from
a professional chef.
Happy thing-free holiday!


Jim Mullen's newest book
is called "Kill Me, Elmo:
The Holiday Depression
Fbn Book." You can
reach him at
JimMullenBooks. com.


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1


COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I,
.I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No agreement in sight


Obama seeks

scaled-down

ficsal cliff deal
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama has
scaled back his ambitions for
a sweeping budget bargain
with Republicans. Instead,
he's calling for a limited
measure sufficient to pre-
vent the government from
careening off the "fiscal
cliff" in January by extend-
ing tax cuts for most taxpay-
ers and forestalling a painful
set of agency budget cuts.
In a White House appear-
ance Friday, Obama also
called on Congress to ex-
tend jobless benefits for the
long-term unemployed who
would otherwise be cut off
for 2 million people at the
end of the year
Obama's announcement
was a recognition chances for
a larger agreement before
year's end have probably col-
lapsed. It also suggested any
chance for a smaller deal
may rest in the Senate, par-
ticularly after the collapse of
a plan by House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, to
permit tax rates to rise on
million-dollar-plus incomes.
"In the next few days, I've
asked leaders of Congress to
work toward a package that
prevents a tax hike on mid-
dle-class Americans, protects
unemployment insurance for
2 million Americans and lays
the groundwork for further
work on both growth and
deficit reduction," Obama
said. "That's an achievable
goal. That can get done in 10
days."
Maybe, maybe not. The
latest plan faces uncertainty
at best in the sharply di-
vided Senate. GOP leader
Mitch McConnell of Ken-
tucky, who wields great
power even in the minority,
called Friday for Senate ac-
tion on a House bill from the
summer extending the full
menu of Bush-era tax cuts.
He promised it will take
GOP votes for anything to
clear the Senate, where 60
votes are required to ad-


Associated Press
President Barack Obama,
left, and John Boehner, R-Ohio,
above, speak to reporters
about the fiscal cliff negotia-
tions Friday in Washington.


vance most legislation. De-
mocrats control 53 votes.
Boehner, giving the GOP
weekly radio address, said,
"Of course, hope springs
eternal, and I know we have
it in us to come together and
do the right thing."
Earlier, Boehner said
Obama needs to give more
ground to reach an agree-
ment and he and Obama had
indicated in a Monday phone
call their latest offers repre-
sented their bottom lines.
"How we get there," he
added, "God only knows."
Congress shut down for
Christmas and Obama flew
to Hawaii with his family for
the holidays. But both men
indicated they'd be back in
Washington, working to beat
the fast-approaching Jan. 1
deadline with an agreement
between Christmas and
New Year's.
Obama announced his
plans after talking by phone
with Boehner and meeting
with Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev, who had
previously pinned his hopes
on an Obama-Boehner
agreement and is wary of
dealing with McConnell.
At the White House,
Obama projected optimism
despite of weeks of failed
negotiations.
"Call me a hopeless opti-
mist, but I actually still think
we can get it done," he said.
Boehner spoke in the
morning, describing the in-
creasingly tangled attempts
to beat the Jan. 1 deadline
and head off the perilous
combination of across-the-
board tax hikes and deep
spending cuts.
"Because of the political


OVER THE FISCAL CLIFF:
SOFT LANDING OR DIZZY DIVE?
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Efforts to save the nation from going over
a year-end "fiscal cliff" were in disarray as lawmakers fled the
Capitol for their Christmas break. "God only knows" how a deal
can be reached now, House Speaker John Boehner declared.
President Barack Obama, on his way out of town himself,
insisted a bargain could still be struck before Dec. 31.
"Call me a hopeless optimist," he said.
A look at why it's so hard for Republicans and Democrats to
compromise on urgent matters of taxes and spending, and
what happens if they fail to meet their deadline:
New Year's headache
Partly by fate, partly by design, some scary fiscal forces
come together at the start of 2013 unless Congress and
Obama act to stop them. They include:
Some $536 billion in tax increases, touching nearly all
Americans, because various federal tax cuts and breaks expire
at year's end.
About $110 billion in spending cuts divided equally
between the military and most other federal departments.
That's about 8 percent of their annual budgets, 9 percent for
the Pentagon.
What if they miss the deadline?
If New Year's Day arrives without a deal, the nation shouldn't
plunge onto the shoals of recession immediately. There still
might be time to engineer a soft landing.
So long as lawmakers and the president appear to be
working toward agreement, the tax hikes and spending cuts
could mostly be held at bay for a few weeks. Then they could
be retroactively repealed once a deal was reached.
The big wild card is the stock market and the nation's
financial confidence: Would traders start to panic if Washington
appeared unable to reach accord? Would worried consumers
and businesses sharply reduce their spending? In what could
be a preview, stock prices around the world dropped Friday
after House Republican leaders' plan for addressing the fiscal
cliff collapsed.

divide in the country, be- itwere easy, Iguarantee you
cause of the divide here in this would have been done
Washington, trying to bridge decades before."
these differences has been
difficult," Boehner said. "If


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Boeing engineers

using potatoes to

improve in-air Wi-Fi


Associated Press
CHICAGO If the wire-
less Internet connection
during your holiday flight
seems more reliable than it
used to, you could have the
humble potato to thank.
While major airlines
offer in-flight Wi-Fi on
many flights, the signal
strength can be spotty. Air-
lines and aircraft makers
have been striving to im-
prove this with the growing
use of wireless devices and
the number of people who
don't want to be discon-
nected, even 35,000 feet up.
Engineers at Chicago-
based Boeing Co. used
sacks of potatoes as stand-
ins for passengers as they
worked to eliminate weak
spots in in-flight wireless
signals. They needed full
planes to get accurate re-
sults during signal testing,
but they couldn't ask people
to sit motionless for days
while data was gathered.
"That's where potatoes
come into the picture,"
Boeing spokesman Adam
Tischler said.
It turns out potatoes -be-
cause of their water content
and chemistry- absorb and


reflect radio wave signals
much the same way as the
human body does, making
them suitable substitutes for
airline passengers.
"It's a testament to the
ingenuity of these engi-
neers. They didn't go in
with potatoes as the plan,"
Tischler said.
Recapping the serendip-
itous path that led to better
onboard wireless, Tischler
said a member of the re-
search team stumbled
across an article in the
Journal of Food Science de-
scribing research in which
15 vegetables and fruits
were evaluated for their di-
electric properties, or the
way they transmit electric
force without conduction.
Its conclusions led the
Boeing researchers to won-
der if potatoes might serve
just as well as humans dur-
ing their own signal testing.
Despite some skepticism,
they ended up buying
20,000 pounds of them.
Video and photos of the
work, which started in
2006, show a decommis-
sioned airplane loaded
with row upon row of po-
tato sacks that look like
large, lumpy passengers.


Associated Press
This 2006 photo provided by Boeing Co. shows early
dielectric substitution testing using potatoes in a Boeing
Test & Evaluation laboratory in Arizona.


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


urgerBRIEFSk Egyptians vote on constitution

Burger is back


Muslim Brotherhood-backed document likely to pass


Associated Press
Customers eat a meal at a
Burger King restaurant
Saturday in Marseille-
Provence airport in
Marignane, France. Fifteen
years after leaving France,
the U.S. hamburger chain
Burger King returned with
the opening of a restaurant
in Marseille-Provence airport.


Pope pardons his
former butler
VATICAN CITY Pope
Benedict XVI granted his for-
mer butler a
Christmas
pardon Sat-
S urday, for-
giving him
in person
during a
jailhouse
meeting for
Pope stealing
Benedict XVI and leaking
his private
papers in
one of the
gravest
Vatican
security
breaches in
recent
Paolo times.
Gabriele After the
15-minute
meeting, Paolo Gabriele was
freed and returned to his Vati-
can City apartment where he
lives with his wife and three
children. Gabriele, 46, was
arrested May 23 after Vatican
police found what they called
an "enormous" stash of papal
documents in his Vatican City
apartment. He was convicted
of aggravated theft by a Vati-
can tribunal Oct. 6 and has
been serving his 18-month
sentence in the Vatican police
barracks.
Italy awaits
Monti's decision
ROME Italy's president
dissolved parliament Satur-
day, setting the stage for gen-
eral
elections in
February
and leaving
Z-r only one
/ \ 1 lingering
question
from Pre-
Mario mier Mario
VMonti Monti's 13-
month term
trying to fix Italy's troubled fi-
nances: whether he will run.
Monti will announce his de-
cision Sunday, ending weeks
of speculation and jockeying
that have dominated Italy's po-
litical discourse and preoccu-
pied much of Europe, which is
eager to see Monti's financial
reforms continue in the conti-
nent's third-largest economy.


Associated Press
CAIRO Egyptians voted
on Saturday in the second
and final phase of a referen-
dum on an Islamist-backed
constitution that has polar-
ized the nation, with little in-
dication the expected
passage of the charter will
end the political crisis in
which the country is mired.
Islamist President Mo-
hammed Morsi is likely to
emerge from a bruising
month-long battle with a nar-
row victory for the constitu-
tion he and his Islamist
allies sought. But it has been
at the cost of alienating
many who had backed him,


leaving an adminis-
tration he has long
tried to depict as
broad-based even
more reliant on the
Muslim Brotherhood
and other Islamists.
The liberal and
secular opposition, in Mahn
turn, has ridden a Me
wave of anger among
a significant part of the pop-
ulation against Morsi and the
Brotherhood, who many feel
are establishing a lock on
power But it has been un-
able to block a charter critics
fear will bring greater imple-
mentation of Islamic law and
it now faces the question of
how to confront Morsi now.


n
eli


Morsi faced more
bleeding from his
administration.
Hours before polls
closed, Morsi's vice
president, Mah-
moud Mekki, an-
nounced his
noud resignation.
kki Shortly afterward,
state TV reported
the resignation of Central
Bank Governor Farouq el-
Oqdah. But then it carried a
denial by the Cabinet he had
stepped down. No explana-
tion was given for the con-
flicting reports, which come
after several days of media
report the administration
was trying to convince el-


Associated Press
Amnah Sayyed Moussa, 85, casts her vote Saturday for the
second round of a referendum on a disputed constitution
drafted by Islamist supporters of President Mohammed
Morsi in Giza, Egypt.
Oqdah not to quit his post, at crucial deal for a much
a time when Egypt's pound needed IMF loan of $4.8 bil-
has been losing value and a lion has been postponed.


Outpouring of support


10-

"u: m"ew.. ,. .. a. ".
""".. L: ......' i n ..:
,,, ... .. a. rl .


Associated Press
Volunteer Anthony Vessicchio of East Haven, Conn., helps to sort tables full of donated toys Friday at the town hall in Newtown, Conn. While
the town is grateful for all the support, Isabel Almeida with the local United Way said, it has no more room for gifts. Instead, she encouraged
people to donate to others in memory of the Sandy Hook victims.

Conn. town mourning loss ofstudents, teachers inundated with gifts, money


Associated Press
NEWTOWN, Conn. New-
town's children were showered
with gifts Saturday tens of
thousands of teddy bears, Barbie
dolls, soccer balls and board
games and those are only some
of the tokens of support from
around the world for the town in
mourning.
A little over a week ago, 20 chil-
dren and six school employees
were gunned down at Sandy
Hook Elementary School.
Twenty-year-old Adam Lanza
killed his mother, attacked the
school, then killed himself. Po-
lice don't know what set off the
massacre.
Days before Christmas, funer-
als were still being held Saturday,
the last of those whose schedules
were made public, according to


the Connecticut Funeral Direc-
tors Association. A service was in
Utah for 6-year-old Emilie Parker
Others were in Connecticut for
Josephine Gay, 7, and Ana
Marquez-Greene, 6.
All of Newtown's children were
invited to Edmond Town Hall,
where they could choose a toy
Bobbi Veach, who was fielding
donations at the building, re-
flected on the outpouring of gifts
from toy stores, organizations and
individuals around the world.
"It's their way of grieving,"
Veach said. "They say, 'I feel so
bad, I just want to do something
to reach out.' That's why we ac-
commodate everybody we can."
The United Way of Western
Connecticut said the official fund
for donations had $2.8 million in
it Saturday Others sent en-
velopes stuffed with cash to pay


for coffee at the general store,
and a shipment of cupcakes ar-
rived from a gourmet bakery in
Beverly Hills, Calif.
The Postal Service reported a
six-fold increase in mail in the
town and set up a unique post
office box to handle it. The
parcels come decorated with
rainbows and hearts drawn by
schoolchildren.
Some letters arrived in packs
of 26 identical envelopes one
for each family of the children
and staff killed or addressed to
the "First Responders" or just
"The People of Newtown." One
card arrived from Georgia ad-
dressed to "The families of 6
amazing women and 20 beloved
angels." Many contained checks.
"This is just the proof of the
love that's in this country," Post-
master Cathy Zieff said.


Photos showing those killed in the
Sandy Hook Elementary School
shooting are imprinted on fake
roses at a memorial Saturday in
the Sandy Hook village of
Newtown, Conn.


Bombing at rally
kills 9 in Pakistan .1
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -
A suicide bomber in Pakistan
killed nine people including a
provincial government official
at a political rally Saturday by .
a party that has opposed the
Taliban, officials said.
The rally in Peshawar, the
capital of northwestern Khy-
ber Pakhtunkhwa province,
was held by the Awami Na- i.
tional Party, whose members
have been repeatedly tar-
geted by the Taliban.
Among the dead was
Bashir Bilour, the second
most senior member of the Associated Press
provincial Cabinet, said Ghu- This Nov. 28 photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard shows
lam Ahmed Bilour, the politi- a World War II minesweeper in the Mississippi River near
cian's brother and federal St. Louis. The minesweeper, once moored along the
Mississippi River as a museum at St. Louis before it was torn
railways minister, away by floodwaters two decades ago, has become visible
-From wire reports rusted but intact.


Relics visible in low-level rivers


Associated Press
ST. LOUIS From
sunken steamboats to a
millennium-old map en-
graved in rock, the drought-
drained rivers of the
nation's midsection are of-
fering a rare and fleeting
glimpse into years gone by
Lack of rain has left many
rivers at low levels unseen
for decades, creating prob-
lems for river commerce
and recreation and raising
concerns about water sup-
plies and hydropower if the
drought persists into next
year, as many fear
But for the curious, the
receding water is offering a
treasure trove of history


An old steamboat is now
visible on the Missouri
River near St. Charles, Mo.,
and other old boats nestled
on river bottoms are show-
ing up elsewhere. A World
War II minesweeper, once
moored along the Missis-
sippi River as a museum at
St. Louis before it was torn
away by floodwaters two
decades ago, has become
visible rusted but intact.
Perhaps most interesting,
a rock containing what is be-
lieved to be an ancient map
has emerged in the Missis-
sippi River in southeast
Missouri.
The rock contains etch-
ings believed to be up to
1,200 years old. It was not in


the river a millennium ago,
but the changing course of
the waterway now normally
puts it under water ex-
posed only in periods of ex-
treme drought. Experts are
wary of giving a specific lo-
cation out of fear looters will
take a chunk of the rock or
scribble graffiti on it.
"It appears to be a map of
prehistoric Indian villages,"
said Steve Dasovich, an an-
thropology professor at Lin-
denwood University in St
Charles. "What's really fasci-
nating is that it shows village
sites we don't yet know about"
Old boats are turning up
in several locations, includ-
ing sunken steamboats dat-
ing to the 19th century











EXCURSIONS


Veterans
Notes can be
found on Page
A15 of today's
Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dancing cop holiday tradition


in Providence, Rhode Island


Associated Press
Former Providence Police Department officer Tony Lepore directs traffic Dec. 13 at
an intersection on Dorrance Street in Providence, R.I. Lepore is known as the danc-
ing cop because of his energetic and rhythmic style of moving vehicles and pedes-
trians through an intersection.


RODRIQUE NGOWI
Associated Press
-PROVIDENCE, R.I.
A h, Christmas in
Rhode Island.
Exquisitely
decorated mansions in
Newport. A red nose on
the giant termite that sits
atop a Providence
exterminator's building.
And a traffic cop, doing
disco and salsa moves in
the middle of rush-hour
traffic.

Officer Tony Lepore is as much a hol-
iday tradition as anything else in the
state that issued the first jail sentence
for speeding 108 years ago. Since 1984,
he has entertained drivers, pedestrians
and gawkers with dance moves in
downtown Providence all while di-
recting traffic.
"He is a Rhode Island landmark,
more or less. He's an icon, he's like a
little mini celebrity," says Michelle Pe-
terson, of Warwick. She's an emergency
medical technician and the mother of
three boys who was introduced to the
"dancing cop" years ago by her partner
in their ambulance.
This year, she took her boys to see
Lepore, 65, perform and got him to
pose for pictures with them.
"It feels good to see him out here; it
definitely brings the holiday spirit. I
think people come out here just to see
him and I think it brings some people
to shop so they can see him."
The routine, Lepore says, was born in
the month of May of the boredom and
aggravation that officers typically expe-
rience while directing rushing drivers
and jaywalking pedestrians. He was in-
spired by classic "Candid Camera" tele-
vision footage he saw a day earlier that
showed police officers elsewhere di-
recting traffic with flair


"I didn't know if my bosses were
going to like it, so a lot of times if I saw
a boss come down, I'd be doing my
fancy stuff, then I'd go back and do it
the old-fashioned way so I don't get
caught," Lepore says.
His secret didn't last long. City resi-
dents began calling the police station
and raving about Lepore's moves. A few
days later, The Providence Journal, the
state's largest newspaper, came out
with a story on the sensation.
The positive publicity encouraged of-
ficials to endorse the dancing cop, who
continued to perform until he left the
job in 1988, when he went into business
with his brother with a food and vend-
ing service.
In 1992, Lepore says, he got a call
from city officials asking him to rejoin
the force to dance and direct traffic
around Christmastime as they pushed
to redefine the city's image and bring
visitors downtown.
He signed a $1,200, 10-day contract as
a reserve police officer and says he has
frozen the value of the contract at the
1992 rate to encourage city officials to
recall his services every year
Standing in traffic, he adjusts his cap,
shakes his hip, raises and twists one leg
and spins. In one of the more unusual
moves, he bends his knees, leans far
back and quickly alternates support for
his body by keeping one hand on the
ground while motioning to the traffic
with the free hand.
In one move, he goes down on his
knees in homage to John Travolta's
character in "Saturday Night Fever"
He says his body takes a pounding
and that he has had knee surgery,
pulled some muscles and even suffered
stress fractures.
Lepore says his dance moves are
planned to send specific directions to
drivers to avoid causing confusion at
the intersection.
"I do it in such a way that even the
people in the cars know what I mean,
'cause every dance move means some-
thing to the driver, and I make sure that
he knows or she knows what I want
them to do," Lepore says.
The dancing is not a distraction and
has never caused incredulous drivers
to crash, he says.


Air Canada's new discount carrier will fly in July


Associated Press
TORONTO -Air Canada is entering
the low-cost leisure travel market with the
launch of its new Rouge airline in the
hopes of reclaiming the market share it
has lost to domestic and international
competitors, Canada's largest airline said
Tuesday
The new airline will begin flying on July
1 from Toronto to Venice, Italy, and Edin-
burgh, Scotland, two destinations that cur-
rently aren't served by Air Canada. It will
also serve Athens from Toronto and Mon-
treal.
Air Canada's existing flights to Cuba,
the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and
Costa Rica will be flown by the discount
carrier from Toronto.
The destinations are areas where de-
mand for travel has been growing, said
Ben Smith, Air Canada's chief commercial
officer


"With the introduction today of Air
Canada Rouge, Air Canada enters today's
growing leisure travel market on a truly
competitive basis," he said.
"Air Canada Rouge \i III le\ er- .
age the strengths of Ai-r -
Canada's extensive net-
work, operational e\-
pertise and frequent
flyer reward pro-
gram in order to
offer Canadians
great value for
their vacation
travel."
The airline said
flights to Venice,
Edinburgh and
Athens will start at
special introduc-
tory fares of $963
round-trip, including
all taxes, fees, charges


and surcharges.
Flights to the Dominican Republic and
Jamaica will start at $272, one-way, while
Cuba is offered starting at $545 round-trip.
All the introductory fares,
whili re available until
De,:. 25, are based on
T,:,ri:nto departures.
The discount
carrier will begin
operations with
two Boeing 767-
300ER and two
Airbus A319
aircraft that
will be re-
leased from
Air Canada's
mainline fleet.
Additional
planes will be
added as Air
C.~inda starts to take


delivery of new Boeing 787 Dreamliner
aircraft in 2014, ramping up to 50 planes.
It plans to hire 200 flight attendants and
pilots for the new low-cost carrier The pi-
lots will be existing Air Canada pilots who
will transfer to the new fleet that will
cater to the leisure market.
Air Canada pilots complained during
labor negotiations earlier this year that
the airline's launch of a low-cost carrier
could threaten their job security and
working conditions. In the end, a federal
arbitrator chose Air Canada's final offer
that included provisions allowing the air-
line to create a budget carrier
Air Canada is the 15th largest airline in
the world, serving more than 33 million
passengers last year
Canadian competitor WestJet is also
launching a discount regional carrier in
the second half of next year WestJet En-
core will cater to smaller markets with
Bombardier Q400 propeller aircraft.


In the islands
On a recent holiday in Aruba, Tom Hampton of Inverness and Rene Wacha of
Mclntosh enjoyed the pristine beaches at the Radisson Resort. Aruba is
approximately six miles wide and about 20 miles long. It is the largest of the
ABC islands: Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao. The population is about 101,000 and
the local language spoken is Papiamento, a mixture of Dutch, Spanish, English,
Portuguese and West African.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS
r0ata Coanest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


P






A14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


Senior needs



balance in life


SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 23, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: OakForest H Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
SWESH NBC 19 19 News News Football Night in America'14' NFL Football San Francisco 49ers at Seattle Seahawks. (N) News
D S 3 3 14 6 Masterpiece Classic (In To Be Announced Christmas at Luther: Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey" Spanish To Be Announced
B EDU PBS 3 3 14 6 Stereo) 'PG' Tidings of Comfort flu disrupts Downton Abbey PG
O WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin 'PG' 15th Annual Holiday Luther:Tidings Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo) PG' Doc Martin PG
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football San Francisco 49ers at Seattle Seahawks. From News
8 8 News Stereo Live)'14' CenturyLink Field in Seattle. (N) (In Stereo Live) c
WF ABC 20 20 20 News World *** "The Sound of Music" (1965, Musical) Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer. A governess News Sports
FT ABNews weds an Austrian widower with seven children. (In Stereo) G' N Night
S CBS 10 10 10 1 1 To Be Announced 60 Minutes (N) (In NCIS: Los Angeles The Good Wife "I TheMentalist (In 10 News, Paid
S WTSCBS10 10 10 10 10Stereo) N "Greed"'14' Fought the Law"'14 Stereo)'14'0 11pm (N) Program
NFL Football Regional Coverage. TheOT (N) The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Burn
0 WTV FOX 13 13 13 13 (N) (In Stereo Live) N 'PG' Simpsons Burgers 14 Dad 14 (In Stereo) B Notice'14'
E WCJBI ABC 11 11 4 News ABC *** "The Sound of Music" (1965, Musical) Julie Andrews. (In Stereo) G' News Inside Ed.
D WCL IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
SIND 2 2 2 22Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles WommackKolinda Duplantis the ap Awaken
N C 11 News World **** "The Sound of Music" (1965, Musical) Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer. A governess News Castle 'PG'
S MWFTSI ABC 11 11 11 News weds an Austrian widower with seven children. (In Stereo) G'
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Survivor" Law & Order How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
SIND 12 12 16 '14' 'PG' Theory Theory PG' "Corruption"PG 'PG' 'PG'
SWTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "12Wishes of Christmas" (2011) G' Sinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Tampa Whacked Born-Ride Honor
Of WACX TBN 21 21 Dr C.Stanle Reoice in the Lord Paid Paid Journe World Connec JimRaley Dayna Brody
o CW 4 4 4 1 1 King of Two and Twoand Engagement CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami A severed Cold Case'WASP" (In The Invisible"
SCW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men '14'm leg.'14' Stereo)'PG' (2007)'PG-13'
Casita Big Rotary Sunflower Inverness Your Citrus County Court I Spy'Y' The Cisco Black
S Mi E FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Spotlight Kid'G' Beauty
(D CGX) FOX 13 7 7 NFL Football: Giants at Ravens TheOT Simpsons |Burgers Fam. Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N)'PG' N
m WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Coned. Noticiero Ahora Virginia Una NocheconYuri FelizNavidad SalyPimienta'14 Comed. Noticiero
m WXPX IO N 17 "Gold Christmas" *** "Golden Christmas 3" 2012 'NR' "Anythin but Christmas" (2012 'NR' "Christmas Twister"
4 Storage- Storage- Storage Storage- orage Storage Storae Storage Storae Storae Be the Boss "Molly
54 48 54 25 27 Texas Texas Wars'PG Texas Wars WarsPG WarsPG' Wars Wars'PG' WarsPG' Maid" (N) 'PG'
**** "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947, *** "Miracle on 34th Street" (1994, Fantasy) Richard ** "Miracle on 34th Street"
C 55 64 55 Fantasy) Maureen O'Hara.'NR B Attenborough, Elizabeth Perkins.'PG' (1994) Richard Attenborough.
1Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot (In Rattlesnake Republic Gator Boys: Xtra Bites Finding Bifoot (N) (In Lost Treasure Hunters
(A I 52 35 52 19 21 (In Stereo) 'PG Stereo) P (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' (N) 'PG Stereo)P (N) 'PG'
96 19 96 Roots'PG' Roots George saves Tom's life. (Part 6 of 6)'14' The Soul The Soul The Soul The Soul "Django Vindicated
(SEE1 96 19 96 Man'PG' Man'PG' Man'PG' Man'PG' Unchnd"
IBRAl 254 51 254 Shahsof Sunset'14 Shahsof Sunset'14' Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset'14' Housewives/Atl.
"Harold & Kumar Jeff Dunham Christmas Jeff Dunham: Arguing Jeff Dunham Christmas Jeff Dunham: Arguing ** "National
I 27 61 27 33 Escape Guantanamo" Special With Myself Special With Myself Lampoon's Van Wilder"
T 9 4 9 2 37 "Unlikely Angel" ** "Fireproof"(2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple Angels Among Us (In Angels Among Us (In Angels
) 98 45 98 28 37 (1996, Drama) turn to God to save their marriage. 'PG' Stereo) 'PG Stereo) 'PG' Among
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid Paid Princess WallSt. (Dis)Service Mob Money: American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
IMNN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) NN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG'
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46 40 46 6 5 Ally G' Up!'G' BlogG' Charlie Escape Clause" (2006) 'G' Charlie Up! G' AllyG' Farm'G' 'G'
(ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17 30 for 30 SportsCenter (N SEC Storied (N) 30for 30 SportsCenter (N)
ESPN2J 34 28 34 43 49 Poker |World/Poker World/Poker World/Poker World/Poker |World/Poker |Basket
EWTN 95 70 95 48 Mother Angelica Live World Over Live |Collin Raye Christ Rosary G.K. Chesterton Puppets perform a play 'G'
*** "The Polar ** "Dr. Seuss'How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (2000, ** "Dr. Seuss'How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (2000,
(UF) 29 52 29 20 28 Express"(2004) 'G' Fantasy) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor. 'PG' Fantasy) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor. 'PG'
S**** "Cinema Paradiso" (1988) Salvatore *** "Primary Colors" (1998) John Travolta. A smooth-talk- *** "DeadAgain"(1991) Kenneth
118 170 Cascio. (Subtitled-English)'PG'B ing Southern governor runs for president. Branagh.'R'm
FNCI 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunda FOX Reort (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners Diners The Next Iron Chef Sugar Dome (N) The Next Iron Chef All-Star Family Cook- Iron Chef America
FSNFL) 35 39 35 NBA Basketball Utah Jazz at Orlando Magic.(Live) Magic In Magic In Magic UFC |Football World PokerTour
X 30 60 3 5 "Deck the Halls" (2006) Danny DeVito. ** "Christmas With the Kranks" (2004 ** "Christmas With the Kranks" (2004
LLXj 30 60 30 51 Neighbors clash over decoration glare. Comedy) Tim Alien, Jamie Lee Curtis.'PG' Comedy) Tim Alien, Jamie Lee Curtis. PG'
GOLF 72767 727 Golf |PGA Tour Golf The Players Championship, Final Round. |Golf PGATour Golf
*** "Debbie Macomber's Trading *** "The Most Wonderful Time of the Year" *** "The Night Before the Night Before
iHAI 59 68 59 45 54 Christmas" (2011) Tom Cavanagh. B (2008, Drama) Henry Winkler. c Christmas" (2010) Jennifer Beals. B
** "Joyful Noise" (2012) Queen Latifah, ** "Cowboys & Aliens" (2011) Daniel Craig, Girls'MA' Girls'MA' Enlightened Enlightened
i 302 201 302 2 2Dolly Parton. (In Stereo) PG-13' Olivia Wilde. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' B
** "Sanctum"(2011, Action) Richard ** "Journey 2: The Mysterious This Is 40: ** "Love & Other Drugs"(2010, Drama)
303 202 303 Roxburgh. (In Stereo) 'R' B Island" (2012)'PG' N 1st Jake Gyllenhaal. (In Stereo) R' B
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Million Dollar Rooms Extreme Homes'G' PropertyBrothers'G' House Hunters Reno Hunters IHunt Intl
Bamazon "Heart of American Pickers Ax Men "We're Not Ax Men "Sabotage" (N) Bamazon "One Way Outback Hunters (N)
HT 51 25 51 32 42 Darkness"'PG' 'PG' Alone"'PG' '14'0 Out"(N) 14' '14'
"Christmas on *** "Crazy for Christmas" (2005, Drama) *** "The Christmas Blessing" (2005, Drama) *** "Crazy for
LE 24 38 24 31 Chestnut Street" Andrea Roth.'NR' Neil Patrick Harris. N Christmas (2005)
"Holiday Baggage" (2008 Drama) Barry "All She Wants for Christmas" (2006, Drama) *** "A Christmas Wedding" (2006, Comedy)
50 119 BostwicK, CherylLadd. PG' N Monica Keena, Tobias Mehler. BN Sarah Paulson. 'NR' B
"Dream ** "Garden State" (2004) Zach ** "The Thing" (2011, Horror) Mary Elizabeth ** "Wanderlust" (2012) Paul Zane's Sex
320 221 320 3 3 House" Braff. (InStereo) R' Winstead. (In Stereo) 'R' Rudd. (In Stereo)'R'
CMSNBC 42 41 42 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Chained to My Ex To Catch a Predator |Lockup: Colorado
9 65 19 44 53 Cocaine Wars "Airport CocaineWars "Drug Inside Underground i ,n. i. ombie Alaska State Troopers I ,., i..."Zombie
S10965 109 44 53 Sting"14'Speedboats" 14' Poker'14, L,V' i.] ,III, I' (N)'14' i iii.l i
WiCI 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. See Dad "A FairlyOdd Christmas"(2012) Nanny |Nanny Friends Friends
(DOWN) 103 62 103 1 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next Oprahs Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next
OXYI ) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' B Snapped 'PG' B Snapped 'PG' B Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' I Law Order: Cl
S i 30 21 30 Untold History of the Dexe xteDextr must Homeland The Choice" *** "Traffic"(2000) Michael Douglas. The war on drugs Sexy
1 340 241 340 4 United States'14' protect himself. 'MA' 'MA' cc brings many casualties and few victories. 'R' Baby
Hot Rod Hot Rod Auto Racing Goodwood Festival of Goodwood Revival My Classic Car Crazy British Touring Car
[SPEED] 732 1132732 TV'G' TV'G' SpeedCar 'G Championships (N)
I 37 43 37 27 3 nk Master"Holy Ink' Ink Master"Buck Off" Ink Master"Blowing nk Master "BetterThan Ink Master "The Bigger Ink Master "Ink Master
SPIKE 37 43 37 27 36 '14' '14' cChunks"'14' Words?"'14' They Are"'l14' Live"'14'B
"Ultraviolet" (2006) ** "Colombiana"(2011, Action) Zoe Saldana, ** "Van Helsing" (2004, Fantasy) Hugh "Pirates of the
S 370 271 370 Milla Jovovich. Jordi Molla. (In Stereo)PG-13 Jackman. (In Stereo) PG-13' Caribbean"
Ship Florida Fishingthe Sport Sportsman Halls of Dolphins The Game 2011 XTERRA USA Saltwater Intothe
36 31 36 Shape TV Sports. Flats Fishing Fame All 365 Championship'PG Exp. Blue G'
SYFEY* 31 59 31 26 29 "StarTrek" Trek: First Contact" (1996) Patrick Stewart. "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country" (1991, "Star
S31 59 31 26 29 Half-robot Borg tries to sabotage a rocket flight. Science Fiction) William Shatner. 'PG' c Trek"
TBS 49 23 49 16 19 *** "Fun With Dickand Jane" (1977) ** "Evan Almighty" (2007) Steve Carell. ** "Evan Almighty" (2007) Steve Carell.
*** "Fitzwilly"(1967, Comedy) Dick Van *** "The Bishop's Wife"(1947, Fantasy) "It Happened on 5th Avenue" (1947,
(CM) 169 53 169 30 35 Dyke, Barbara Feldon, Edith Evans. NR' CaryGrant, David Niven.'NR' Musical Comedy) Don DeFore. NR'
i( 53 Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia "Fire From Amish Mafia "Devil -Ray: Yellowstone (N) Zombie Apocalypse Amish Mafia "Devil
(M) 53 34 53 24 26 '14c' the Lord"'14' ComesCalling"'14' PG'B c'14, L,V' c Comes Calling"'14'
(=IT 50 46 50 29 30 Toddlers &Tiaras Sin City Rules'14' Sister Sister Sister Wives (N)'14 Sin City Rules'14 SisterWives'14'
"Love's ** "Murder in Mind"(1997) ** "Die Another Day" (2002, Action) Pierce *** "Ransom"(1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson,
(I 350 261 350 Kitchen" Jimmy Smits.'R c Brosnan. Premiere.'PG-13' Rene Russo. (In Stereo)'R'
48 33 48 31 34 "Lord of the Rings" *** "The Lord of theRings: The Return of the King" (2003, Fantasy) ElijahWood, lan "Lord of the Rings"
TNT 48 33 48 31 34 McKellen. Humans and creatures unite to battle Sauron and his army 'PG-13' c
I N 38 58 38 33 ** "Garfield's Fun Fest"(2008) 'NR' Looney |Dragons Oblongs King/Hill King/Hill |Cleveland Fam. Guy IFam.Gu
TRAV 9 54 9 44 No Reservation Anthony Bourdain David Blaine Magic Magic David Blaine Hunt for Misfit Toys
TJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout'PG' c Wipeout'PG' WWipeout'PG' Jokers Jokers World's Dumbest...
tTVL) 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne |RoRosean Roseanne |RoRoseannRoseanne Roseanne aymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: SpecOrde aw & Order: Special Law & Order:Special Law & Order: Special
IUSA 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' VictimsVicti's14 VictimsVicti '14U Vic tims Unit14 Victims Unit14 Victims Unit'14
Bridezillas "Gabrielle & Bridezillas "Kym & Bridezillas "Porsha & Bridezillas Gloria's Bridezillas "Tricia & Bridezillas "Porsha &
wE) 117 69 117 Kym"'14' Porsha"'14' Gloria"'14 panic attack. '14' Danyelle"'14' Gloria"'14'
IWGNWAl 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! Mother Mother Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay 30Rock 30 Rock


D earAnnie: How can I
deal with the de-
mands of being a
high school senior? I am
overwhelmed.
Between homework, my
job, a social life, sports and
family time, there are not
enough hours in
the day All of
these things are
important to me,
but I don't know
how to balance
them. Please
don't suggest I
give up any of
them, because
they are all dear
to my heart. -
Distressed in
Duanesburg
Dear Dis- ANN
tressed: No one MAIL
expects you to
enter high
school knowing how to per-
fectly balance your life. This
is when you are supposed to
learn ways to do it, and
there may be a great deal of
trial and error in the
process because you are
juggling more responsibility.
That's OK. You don't have to
give these things up, but you
may have to scale back. Per-
haps one sport instead of
two, fewer hours at your job
or telling your friends you
can't go out on Saturday be-
cause you have to finish a
paper.
This is a good time to rec-
ognize that you can't do
everything, so you need to
prioritize. Schoolwork
comes first Talk to your par-
ents or the school counselor
about the rest. We are confi-


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D.
1:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 11 a.m.,
4:15 p.m. 9:45 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) In 3D.
11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 3:05 p.m.,
3:25 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) 3:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) 11:30 a.m.,
3:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part
2" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. 11 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13)
11:10 p.m., 2:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:35 p.m. No passes.


"This is 40" (R) ID required.
11:25 a.m., 2:55 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:15 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D.
11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:35 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13)
11:20 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 10:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) In 3D.
11:30 a.m., 3 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) 11 a.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Playing for Keeps" (PG-13)
11:40 a.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
3:20 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m.,
2:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Jewish spiritual leader
6 Entreaty
10 High up
15 -de deux
18 Edgar- Poe
19 Heavy hammer
21 Passover meal
22 Effrontery
23 Remains
24 Tree also called bass-
wood
25 Army chaplain
26 Spumante
27 Criticize
28 Girl in Neverland
29 Array
31 Treated badly
33 Faction
35 Big successes
36 Time period
37 Stand for
bric-a-brac
38 Whinny
40 Ice crystals
41 Climbing plant
42 Disconnect
44 Place of refuge
45 Prejudice
47 Stops up
51 Take great
pleasure
52 Barkin or Burstyn
53 Hot coal
55 Intelligence
56 tower
57 Line of rotation
58 Plod
60 "Once--time..."
62 Hookah
63 Bondmen
65 City in Russia
66 Kitchen gadget
67 Opposite of WNW
68 Agreeable
69 Transport
71 Far too heavy
73 Old name
for Tokyo
75 Maria
76 Clues
77 Paul or Perlman
78 Mil. rank
81 Horse on a track
83 Poker stake
84 Sediment


85 Destiny
87 Bumped
90 Boxing match
92 Western Indian
94 Soliloquy start
(2 wds.)
95 Efface
96 Choir leader
98 ex machine
99 Dresses
100 Perfectly all right (hyph.)
101 Figurine
103 Range
in South America
105 Caravan animals
106 Ragout
108 of March
109 Saccharine
110 Grow wider
111 "Woe -!"
113 Concrete
reinforcement
114 Kingly
115 Cover
118 French painter
119 Letter after alpha
120 For one
124 Edible seed
125 Boyle
or Sarandon
126 Skinflint
127 A state (abbr.)
128 Sea eagle
129 Turn inside out
131 Foreign
133 Lab compound
135 Film-
136 Wait on
137 Most terrible
138 Javelin
139 Change
the color
140 Direct
141 Waistcoat
142 Fencing move

DOWN
1 Speaks hoarsely
2 Range in
east-central Asia
3 Insipid
4 Cove
5 and outs
6 Column base
7 Furnishes
8 Circular current


Mature
Facet
Line for a pooch
Bettor's concern
- -de-lance
Written study
Outmoded
Modify
Playground
attraction
Pung
Terminus (2 wds.)
Made an estimate
Every way
Betsy or Diana
Outlaw
Whole
Gaelic
Get away from
- does it!
Faithless
Invent
Ran off to marry
Martini garnish
Dwell
Disgraceful
Like a missing soldier
(abbr.)
Excavation
Top performer
Fully developed
Make worse
Ringlets
Regrets
- and kicking
Sent in a certain direc-
tion
Look
A bit to eat
Japanese religion
Five (prefix)
Tiny colonist
Fasteners
Musical work
Terre -, Ind.
Small blossom
Make
(with "together")
Cards
Trapshooting
Hardy character
Seven -
Horse's gait
Dissolute one
Burden
Legless creature


Mexican food
Military trainee
Like a scrag
Festive
celebration
Eternal
Tidy
Humidor item
"The Lion in -"
Antitoxins


Discover
Glide over snow
List of personnel
Defy
Mix
"Bad, Bad
Brown"
Girl in the comics
Bend
Mouthfuls


121 In the manner of
122 Transparent
123 Potter
or Belafonte
125 Withered
126 Encore!
130 Animal doc
132 VII +VII
133 Psychic's ability (abbr.)
134 Health club


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


12-23


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


dent that you'll figure it out.
Dear Annie: Although my
husband and I have been
married for 13 years, we
only recently bought our
first home. We previously
lived in a small apartment
We are planning to have
our first house-
warming party
once we have
fully unpacked
and the house is
ready for com-
pany Would it be
OK to register for
things we'd like to
have and include
the information in
our invitations?
Or is it best to
keep a "private"
IE'S registration and
BOX inform only those
who ask what we
need? Can't
Wait To Share New Home
Dear Can't Wait: Except
for showers, it is never a
good idea to put information
about gift registries into an
invitation. It says "buy me
things" and that the gift is
the point of the party, in-
stead of focusing on the
friendship. You may give
suggestions to people who
specifically ask you what
you want, and if you have
one or two close friends or
family members, you can let
them pass the word, as well.


Email anniesmaibox@
comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I
.I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well as
events to which the public is in-
vited. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

POST NEWS
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
Tickets are available for the
New Year's Eve steak dinner
on Dec. 31. Cost is $12.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Lounge
open at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon on
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the American
Legion, American Legion Rid-
ers and 40/8 families have din-
ners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post will have its New
Year's Eve party Monday, Dec.
31, with cocktail hour beginning
at 5 p.m. with party snacks of
shrimp, pepperoni, cheese and
chips. Dinner will be prime rib,
baked potato, salad and
dessert. Live entertainment all
night; champagne toast with
party favors. Cost is $25; see
bartender in lounge for tickets.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke entertain-
ers for the upcoming year. If in-
terested in being considered as
an entertainer or musician at
the post, call Elfi Baker or Patti
Foster at 352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
SH.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and


call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m. Check
with Jack Gresham for tee
times.
The VFW Mixed Golf League
plays Thursdays alternating be-
tween Twisted Oaks Golf Club
and Citrus Springs Country
Club. Tee time is 8 a.m. New
players, both men and women,
are welcome. You do not have
to be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
The post will be closed Mon-
day, Dec. 24, and Tuesday,
Dec. 25, Christmas Day.
Pork chops are on the dinner
menu from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day, Dec. 28. Cost is $8; chil-
dren younger than 6 eat for $4.
All are welcome.
The New Year's Eve party
will be Monday, Dec. 31. Happy
hour from 5 to 7 p.m. Buffet din-
ner from 7 to 8:30 p.m., with
music from 8 p.m. to midnight.
Tickets (available at the post)
are $15; $25 per couple.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call 352-
465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about


chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Families in Need of Dunnel-
Ion Inc. will offer free Christmas
dinner to all from noon to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 25. Donations
will be accepted, but are not
necessary.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be


happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email
him at ultraray1997
@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com. Call or visit the post
for regular and special events,
as well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $5.
The post welcomes everyone
to "Speed Bingo" at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 9. Refresh-
ments will be available. Pro-
ceeds will benefit cancer aid
and research. Call 352-726-
5206 for information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast


and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The post will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 26,
with proceeds going to support
American Cancer Society Mof-
fitt Cancer Center Ovarian Can-
cer Research, and patients and
families served by Hospice of
Citrus County. A $10 entry fee
per rider will include a poker
hand and a meal at the end of
the run. Registration begins at
10 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Last
bike in will be 4:30 p.m., when
food will be served. All vehicles
are welcome to participate.
Music will be provided and do-
nated by George Marshall.
There will be door prizes, a
50/50 drawing and fun. For
more information, call 352-
746-5018 or John Roby at 352-
341-5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the former Inverness
Highlands S & W Civic Associa-
tion building at 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street.. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The auxiliary will host a New
Year's Eve Party on Dec. 31.
Nashville Artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
will provide music for dancing
and listening pleasure from 8
p.m. to midnight. Food will be
served all evening and a light
breakfast after midnight. Tickets
are $20 in advance and $25 at


the door. Table reservations for
six or more people can be
made with advance ticket sales.
The event will be in the new
home of Post 77, the former In-
verness Highlands S & W Civic
Association building. For ad-
vance tickets or to reserve tick-
ets, call Alice at 352-860-2981;
if no answer, leave a message
for a return call.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/
Homosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit www.Postl55.org.

See VETERANS/Page A16


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 A15


ill i l


I


I





A16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at 2 p.m. the third
Tuesday of January, March,
May, July, September and
November. All combat-
wounded veterans, lineal de-
scendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Pur-
ple Heart recipients are in-
vited. To learn more about
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
Chapter 776's College of
Central Florida (CF) En-
dowed Scholarship and the
Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) Scholarship
for Academic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF En-
dowed Scholarship for Aca-
demic Year 2013/14 awards
$500 to an applicant ac-
cepted or enrolled at CF as a
full-time student (12 or more
semester credit hours).
Chapter 776 scholarship in-
formation and an application
can be obtained at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org, or by call-
ing 352-382-3847. Chapter
776 must receive scholarship
applications no later than 5
p.m. Feb. 28.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14
awards $3,000 to a member
of the MOPH; a spouse,
widow, direct lineal descen-
dant (child, stepchild,
adopted child, grandchild) of
a MOPH member or of a vet-
eran killed in action, or who
died of wounds before having
the opportunity to become a
MOPH member. Great-
grandchildren are not eligible.
Applicant must be a U.S. citi-
zen, a graduate or pending
graduate of an accredited
high school; be accepted or
enrolled as a full-time student
(12 semester credit hours or
18 quarter hours) at a U.S.
college or trade school and
have at least a 2.75 cumula-
tive GPA based on an un-
weighted 4.0 grading system.
Scholarship applications
must be received at MOPH
Headquarters in Springfield,
Va., no later than 5 p.m. Feb.
13, 2013. MOPH scholarship
information and an applica-
tion can be obtained by visit-
ing the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detach-
ment 1139 meets at 7 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly
at DAV Post 70 in Inverness
at the intersection of Inde-
pendence Highway and U.S.
41 North. All Marines are wel-
come. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or Wayne Howard
at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819


meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard
at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness.
Call Bob Huscher, secretary,
at 352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at
the post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at
Denny's in Crystal River at
2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.



SERVICES &
GROUPS
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition provides food
to veterans in need. Food do-
nations and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north.
Hours of operation are 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inver-
ness. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and
widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members
are welcome. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation; dona-
tions are tax deductible.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537, or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY

Tree of Life


J-OAN %- _.I .l
Special to the Chronicle
Citrus HPH Hospice's Tree of Life shines with its own spe-
cial life this year. HPH's annual Tree for Life is the not-for-
profit's largest fundraiser, supporting patient care and
family and community support programs. Shown is David
Hill, who made a donation for a porcelain angel. For more
information about HPH Hospice, "Healing people's
hearts," and the Tree of Life effort, call HPH at 352-527-
4600, or go online at HPH-Hospice.org.


In SERVICE


David A. Hurst
Air Force Airman David A.
Hurst graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive,
eight-week
program that
included
training in
military dis-
cipline and
studies, Air
David A. Force core
Hurst values,
U.S. Air Force physical fit-
ness, and
basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the
Air Force.
Hurst earned distinction as
an honor graduate.
He is the son of Joette and
John Hurst of Homosassa.


The airman is a 2010 gradu-
ate of Crystal River High
School.

Brandon S. Avery
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class
Brandon S. Avery has gradu-
ated from the U.S. Navy's Nu-
clear Power School at Naval
Nuclear Power Training Com-
mand in Goose Creek, S.C.
Nuclear Power School is a
rigorous six-month course that
trains officers and enlisted stu-
dents in the science and engi-
neering fundamental to the
design, operation, and mainte-
nance of naval nuclear propul-
sion plants.
Graduates next undergo ad-
ditional instruction at a proto-
type training unit before
serving as a Surface Warfare
Officer aboard a nuclear-pow-
ered surface ship or as an
Electronics Technician aboard
a nuclear-powered submarine.
Avery is the son of Eric and
Alice Avery of Hernando. He is
a 2010 graduate of Lecanto
High School.


Humane Society OF CITRUS co.


Asa
Asa is a friendly 8-pound Chi-
huahua looking for a loving
forever home. He would be
happy just keeping you com-
pany at home watching tele-
vision, or keeping your lap
warm while you read a book.
He would also be more than
happy to be your new travel
companion. Asa is just 3
years old, is up to date on
medical, microchipped and
crate trained. An approved
adoption application and
adoption donation are re-
quired. To access an appli-
cation or view other
adoptable pets, visit
www.roomforonemore.net,
and for more information, call
Karron at 352-560-0051.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


90th BIRTHDAY

IleaneAnstis


Ileane Anstis, formerly of
Yankeetown, will celebrate
her 90th birthday on Dec. 25.
After living in Yankee-
town, she moved to be with
daughter, Joan, and son-in-


law, James.
Birthday cards may be
sent to her at 303 E. Church
Ave., Wewahitchka, FL
32465, and they would be
welcome.


For the RECORD


Divorces 12/9/12
to 12/16/12
Kim J Altland, York, Pa.
vs. Lynnette Dee Altland,
Beverly Hills
Jonathan Delicate, Ocala vs.
Dondi Delicate, Citrus Springs
Theresa Desrosires,
Homosassa v. Serge
Desrosires, Homosassa
Edward W. Johnson III,
Beverly Hills vs. Judith B.
Colbaugh, Homosassa
Anne Marie Lalonde,
Homosassa vs. Thomas
Anthony Lalonde, Stuart
David Sparenberg, Kevil, Ky.
vs. Rosalinda Sparenberg,
Crystal River

Marriages 12/9/12
to 12/16/12
Miller Van Allen Jr., Crystal
River/Linda Lee Mason,
Crystal River
Anthony Creig Ballard,
Inglis/Renee April Bevington,
Inglis
Clifford Thomas Butzer,
Floral City/Lesley Deanna
Winton, Floral City
Thomas Leo Dorwarth,
Crystal River/Donna Marie
Garcia, Crystal River
Cuthbert Lawrence
Eastman, Crystal River/
Sandra Mary Miner, Crystal
River
Ray Joseph Ekker, Floral
City/Gina Anne Giordano,
Floral City
George Michael Fruh,
Inverness/Kelly Dawn
Chambers, Inverness
Allan Wayne Guthrie,
Dunnellon/Deborah Mary


Scannapieco, Dunnellon
Peter Paul Magierski,
Homosassa/Sharon Kay
Ireland, Homosassa
Michael Todd McCracken,
Hernando/Annette Marie
Moseley, Hernando
Shawn Michael Osborne,
Hernando/Tiffany Danielle
Williams, Hernando
William Henry Piscione,
Crystal River/Ming Zhu Huang,
Crystal River
Paul Gregory Reese,
Gladwin, Mich./Mary Ann
Roberts, Homosassa
Aaron Mark Robinson,
Tampa/Denise Marie
Simmens, Tampa
Mark Donald Rodriguez,
Crystal River/Sheila Ann
Schmid, Crystal River
Steve Tuzzolino, Beverly
Hills/Constance Ann Trappe,
Beverly Hills
Albert Thomas Viccione,
Inverness/Connie Ann
Dawson, Inverness
Bryan Thomas Washington,
Homosassa/Kimberly French
Lawson, Homosassa
Werner Frans Josephine
Willems/Karen Maria Hendrick
Raymond Louis Wright,
Beverly Hills/Devin Andrea
Mazzeo, Beverly Hills
Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a
matter of public record, avail-
able from each county's Clerk
of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit www.clerk.cit-
rus.fl.us. For proceedings filed
in another county, contact the
clerk in that area.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


RABB I PLEA ALOFT PAS
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TAY S L I N DEN PA D R E A ST I
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RE L EI IH LEN C I DER I T
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P P E AVS EL Ti LMP EIE L E R
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ERN E EER T E ZXOT I C_ ESTER
N1O I R SE R1V SD REST SPE iA R
D YE S T E ER M V E 21 UpS T RiR Y
12-23 @ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Crystal River Mall
352-795-2585


Monday
10am-9pm


Tuesday
10am-9pm


Wednesday
10am-9pm


Thursday
10am-9pm


Friday
10am-9pm


Saturday
10am-9pm


1801 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River I

Mobil 1 Lube Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-795-2333 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-3pm Closed
1050 SE Hwy 19, Crystal River

Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-489-5477
9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-4pm Closed
20319 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon

Badcock Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-726-6366
352-76-66 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm 10am-4pm
3690 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness

Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-795-5346 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm Close
150 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


Jim Green Jewelers
352-563-0633
1665 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River


Monday
10am-5pm


Tuesday
10am-6pm


Wednesday
10am-5pm


Thursday
10am-5pm


Friday
10am-5pm


Saturday
11am-3pm


Sunday
12pm-5:30pm


Sunday
Closed











SPORTS


Boise State
needed more
late-game magic
to win another
bowl game./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE-


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Dr. Ron Joseph column/B2
0 College football/B3
0 High school wrestling/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Basketball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Bucs looking for improvement down stretch


Team hosts Rams

at RamondJames

Stadium today
Associated Press
TAMPA St Louis is clinging
to slim playoff hopes, while
Tampa Bay is already assured of
missing the NFL postseason for
the fifth straight year
Nevertheless, the struggling
Buccaneers (6-8) join the im-
proved Rams (6-7-1) in agreeing
that both teams have plenty to
play for in what's left of seasons
under new coaches.
Jeff Fisher has instilled confi-


dence in a team that
hasn't earned a
postseason berth
since 2004 in St.
Louis. Greg Schiano
had the Bucs in the
hunt for a spot until
last week's 41-0 loss


Black
* The Bucs'
against the
not be telev
Citrus Cou


to New Orleans ended any
chance of extending their season
for the first time since 2007.
"Coach Fisher's impact has
been huge. ... I think one of the
biggest things is the overall
change in attitude of this team,
and of this locker room," Rams
quarterback Sam Bradford said
of the former Tennessee Titans
coach who inherited a team that
stumbled to a 2-14 finish last year
"It's hard to explain.... But he's


such a confident
out guy and a confident
game coach. Just watch-
SRams will ing him, the way he
vised in carries himself in
nty today, meetings, during
practice, during the
game. Never loses
his cool. He's always calm, he's
always collected," Bradford
added. "It seems like he always
knows what his next move is, and
See Page B4
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers will
be looking to slow down St. Louis
Rams running back Steven
Jackson, who had 146 total yards
from scrimmage last Sunday
against the Minnesota Vikings.
Associated Press


hil


Kansas State

upsets No. 8 UF

Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Will
Spradling had 16 points and five
assists, including one that set up
Shane Southwell's 3-pointer in
the closing minutes, and Kansas
State beat No. 8 Florida 67-61 on
Saturday night.
Rodney McGruder added 13
points and Jordan Henriquez
had nine points and five blocks
for the Wildcats (9-2), who
watched a 10-point halftime lead
evaporate before clamping down
against one of the nation's top de-
fensive teams and then pulling
away in the final minutes.
Patric Young had 19 points for
the Gators (8-2), including two
with just over 2 minutes left that
got them within 58-55. But that's
when Southwell knocked down
his 3 from the corner, and Mc-
Gruder made two free throws
with 1:05 left to create some
breathing room.
Kansas State held on from the
foul line for its first regular-sea-
son, non-conference win over a
top 10 team since defeating No. 8
Minnesota on Dec. 21, 1981.
Kenny Boynton and Scott
Wilbekin scored 11 each for the
Gators, whose only other loss
came at then-No. 8 Arizona. Lead-
ing scorer Mike Rosario was held
to five points on 1-of-9 shooting.
The Wildcats have been strug-
gling in new coach Bruce
Weber's motion offense, and it
showed in sloppy, lackluster
losses to No. 2 Michigan and No.
14 Gonzaga. But they finally
managed to get it clicking just
enough against one of the na-
tion's premier defenses.
Still, it was defense that ruled
this one from the start.
Kansas State built an early
lead by turning over Florida
twice in the opening minutes,
and the Gators responded with a
9-2 surge in which they twice
scored off turnovers in transition.
Kansas State eventually set-
tled down on offense, and that
proved to be the difference in
the first half.


Associated Press
Florida guard Kenny Boynton is pressured by Kansas State guard Angel Rodriguez during the first half
Saturday at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.


---------------------------


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Eagles

swoop in

on Warriors

Three-pointplay

in OTshocks

Seven Rivers boys
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff Writer
LECANTO The last seven
seconds of Saturday afternoon's
boys basketball game between
Seven Rivers Christian and In-
dian Rocks Christian were the
pure definition of a double
whammy for the Warriors.
Spencer Adkinson got an offen-
sive rebound and put-back for the
visitors and forced Seven Rivers
standout Adam Gage to pick up
his fifth foul with 7.2 seconds left
in overtime.
Adkinson drained the
free throw to put
the Eagles up
two points
and effec-
tively end
the game
then during
an eventual
67-65 victory
Gage was the third
Warrior to foul out, simultane-
ously taking away Seven Rivers'
best option for a final shot and
forcing the school to play with
only four players.
The Warriors (4-5 overall) had
just seven players suited up Sat-
urday, and Gage joined John
Iwaniec and Liam Cash, who had
each fouled out in the fourth
quarter, on the bench.
"It goes down to what we've
dealt with all week, with the flu
going through our school," Seven
Rivers coach Jim Ervin said. "We
had six varsity players and a JV
player, but I don't want to make
excuses.
"Even with Adam Gage on the
bench at the end of the game, I
still had the confidence in my
team to make something happen."
Seven Rivers turned the ball
over with about two seconds left
at midcourt, allowing Indian
Rocks to erase a 12-point deficit
after one quarter and escape cen-
tral Florida with a victory
The visiting Eagles (7-6 overall)
suffered a one-point loss at Ocala
Trinity Catholic on Friday night
and were glad to be on the right
side of a close contest Seven
See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS


GTPag B2 SUN, ECE

iET


IN


THE


AME


P.L.A.Y. after X-mas


Special to the Chronicle
Registration will re-open
Dec. 26 for the next session
of PL.A.Y.
Citrus County Parks and
Recreations PL.A.Y. pro-
grams are designed for chil-
dren ages 3 to 5, each child
will receive a team T-shirt
and age-appropriate sports
equipment. Each program
runs for six weeks, one
night a week for one hour.
Soccer and T-ball are the
next sports offered. Soccer
will be at Central Ridge
District Park on Monday
evenings, or Wednesday
evenings at Homosassa
Area Recreational Park.
T-ball will be Tuesday
evenings at Central Ridge
District Park or at Bicen-
tennial Park on Thursday
evenings. Choose the time
that works best for your
schedule: either 5 to 6 p.m.
or 6 to 7 p.m.
Cost is $45 per child; save
$10 if you sign your child up
for more than one sport in
the same session.
For more information,
contact recreation program
specialist for youth pro-
grams Crysta Henry at 352-
527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.
com.
Registration for CR
L.L. coming up
The 2013 Crystal River Little
League Baseball registration
will take place at the baseball
side concession at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River according
to the following schedule:
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 12;
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Jan. 7 through
11.
Registration fee is $55 per
child for all ages and divisions,
including T-ball, baseball and
softball. All parents/guardians
must bring a birth certificate
and three documents proving
residency.
Clubs to open
Holiday Camp
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County Holiday Camp
will be open from 7 a.m. until 6
p.m. Dec. 26 through Jan. 4 at
the three club sites in Beverly
Hills, Inverness and halfway
between Crystal River and
Homosassa.
The cost is $10 per day and
programs are open to all chil-
dren between the ages of 5 and
18 years. Children will learn and
have fun at the same time par-
ticipating in games, arts and
crafts, sports and recreation,
technology, cooking and nutri-
tion programs. Children should
bring a sack lunch each day.
Pre-registration is important
so that clubs can maintain ade-
quate staffing ratios. To pre-
register, call the Robert


Special to the Chronicle
This youngster swings for the fences during Citrus County Parks and Recreation's P.L.A.Y.
program.
Halleen Club in Homosassa at art programs, introduction to sessment will be given on
352-795-8624, the Evelyn Wa- watercolor and introduction to Monday, Jan. 28, to determine
ters Club in Inverness at 352- drawing. team placement. The league
341-2507, or the Central Ridge The Citrus County YMCA cost is $85 for ages 6 to 12,
Club in Beverly Hills at 352- has received a grant for the Af- and $65 for 3 to 5. Scholar-
270-8841. Drop-ins are also terschool Programs from Sun- ships are available through the
accepted, as long as children coast Federal Schools Credit YMCA's Financial Assistance
are pre-registered. Union. This grant has enabled program. To apply, call the
Donations for camp scholar- the Y to provide many full schol- office at 352-637-0132.
ships ($60 for the entire camp) arships this year to children To register for the league,
may be mailed to the Boys & across the county to participate visit www.ymcasuncoast.org
Girls Clubs of Citrus County at in the Enrichment Clubs. To and download the form on the
P.O. Box 907, Lecanto, FL apply for the grant scholarship Citrus County page. Visit the
34460, or arranged by calling and financial assistance for office at 3909 N. Lecanto High-
352-621-9225. other YMCA programs, call the way or call 352-637-0132 for
Afterschool clubs Y office at 352-637-0132. more details.
resume Jan. 14 Youth Basketball YMCA offers


The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
will resume their normal sched-
ule for the second half of the
school year by offering a third
session beginning Jan. 14.
The Afterschool Clubs will be
offered at: Central Ridge Ele-
mentary, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary, Crystal River Primary,
Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock
Crusher Elementary. The clubs
are open to all children in
kindergarten through fifth grade.
The upcoming session will
offer kids the opportunity to
participate in soccer, basket-
ball cheerleading and two new


registration open
Citrus County YMCA is now
taking registrations for its 2013
Winter Youth Basketball
League, which begins
Monday, Jan. 28.
The league will run for 10
weeks (two weeks of practice
and eight weeks of games) and
is open to children ages 3
through 12. The Junior League
will have ages 3 through 5, and
the Youth League will consist of
6- through 12-year-olds with
several age brackets. Practice
will be once a week on a week-
day evening, with games being
played on Saturday. All practices
and games will be at the Key
Training Center Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center gymnasium.
Open tryouts and a skill as-


school programs
The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
are offered at Central Ridge El-
ementary, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary, Crystal River Primary,
Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock
Crusher Elementary.
Ages for the Y Afterschool
Program range from kinder-
garten through fifth grade. After-
school programs are a great way
to end the school day, and the
first fall session will offer kids the
opportunity to participate in flag
football, cheerleading and art.
For more information, call
the Citrus Y at 352-637-0132.


'Twas the night


before Christmas


G getting ready
for my
daughter's
birthday party re-
cently, my wife
had me go through
the mass collec-
tion of stuff one
collects in life. I
came across this
poem written by
my son, Billy,
when he was in


sixth grade.
No Ideas
Wheels turning in my head,
Thinking, thinking about a
dread.
Writing poems, it's hard to
think.
Finding ideas that will link.
Looking up to the sky.
No ideas will supply.
Thinking and dreaming, it
does not work.
The whole process makes
me berserk.
I think about things but
they're never right.
This all seems like an end-
less fight.
At last an idea pops in my
head.
The second before I go to
bed.
I ran to a paper so I can write
it out, but I forgot what the thing
was about.
I sit here thinking with all my
might.
Thinking and thinking about
what to write.
So in trying to think about
something to write on this
pre-Christmas weekend and
not just leave you with Billy's
poem, I elected to reflect on
Santa's conditioning and
ability to do his remarkable
Christmas Eve task Monday
It is remarkable how
Santa is never injured. He
works 365 days a year and
then drives his sleigh further
than the Iditarod sled dog
race, noted to be the tough-
est race on earth and which
approximately 1,161 miles
lasting from nine to 15 days.
Santa and the reindeers
endure the most arduous
race around the Earth from
sundown Christmas Eve to
sunrise Christmas day.
Santa does this in less than
12 hours, in a shorter period
of time than the Iditarod
race, providing presents
and good cheer to the world.
In spite of being over-
weight, never working out,
apparently drinking alcohol
heavily and having high
blood pressure, Santa ap-
pears to have had no over-
use injuries, chronic illness
of any kind and takes no
medication.
The tenant of conditioning
and training seems to be stu-
diously avoided by Santa. No
one ever sees him training.
If Christmas season food
is an indicator, Santa's diet


is atrocious. Few
endurance ath-
letes of Santa's
stature maintains
sustenance with
striped candy
canes, ginger
bread houses and
confectioners
sugar as sources of
energy and muscle
repair. Needless to
say, this goes


against a success-
ful athlete's competition
diet.
Santa's stature, with a
base metabolic index (BMI)
far exceeding the norm,
being on the short, very
round side, tells us he is not
a good surgical risk, is not
using steroids, testosterone,
growth hormone or stimu-
lants to race around the
world. In addition, the extra
girth around his jovial belly
that shakes like jelly may re-
sult in an elevated inci-
dence of heart disease,
stroke and other cardiovas-
cular maladies he seems to
have avoided.
Most notably, alcohol be-
fore competing or during
training has been conclu-
sively shown to deteriorate
performance and technical
skills. Santa, with his rosy
cheeks and large bulbous
nose of WC. Fields fame, is
frequently caused by ex-
cessive drinking as is his
rosy glow.
My personal non-medical
opinion is that a 'hot toddy'
keeps Santa loose, thus
avoiding jarring muscu-
loskeletal injuries while
bumping around in the
sleigh.
Santa and the yearly race
around the globe also do not
seem to draw the indigna-
tion of PETA and related or-
ganizations. Thankfully,
Santa's reindeer have ap-
parently not joined the
ranks of animals being
protested, so Santa may con-
tinue his mad 12-hour dash
around the world bringing
joy to all those fortunate
boys and girls who have
been nice and good and
didn't pout.
Santa follows one of the
most underrated but docu-
mented medical phenome-
non: He laughs, smiles and
seems to have a sense of
humor in spite of the elves.
It is easy to say and often
hard to do laughter is the
best medicine.
Tomorrow is Christmas
Eve, I'm going to listen for
Santa laughing ... I hope
you do as well.
Merry Christmas!
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
surgeon at SeaSpine Ortho-
pedic Institute, may be
reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


Recreation BRIEFS


Throw shoes in
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club meets
at 8:30 a.m. each Wednesday. Men,
women and juniors age 10 and older
can join.
There are all levels of play; handi-
capped method. Call Ron Fair 352-746-
3924, or email rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
YMCA is
SilverSneakers location
Citrus County YMCA is an official
SilverSneakers location for their group
exercise program in Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the nation's leading
exercise program designed exclusively
for older adults and is available at little
or no additional cost through Medicare
health plans, Medicare Supplement car-
riers and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes meet at the
First United Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays. Classes include cardio
interval, Pilates, and stability and
strength. To find out if you are eligible
for SilverSneakers, call your health
plan provider. For more information,
call the YMCA office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto, is host
site for a community Divine Yoga class
at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge and is


open to all ages and physical abilities.
Some of the benefits of yoga are im-
proved balance, coordination, strength
and flexibility. Yoga is also helpful in
counteracting stress and anxiety.
For more information, call Sheila
Abrahams at 352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
YMCA offers group
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA offers
group exercise in Citrus Springs at the
Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church,
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
The location offers classes in Pi-
lates and cardio circuit on a regular
basis beginning.
The Y currently has three other
areas in the county where group exer-
cise classes are offered, including Ho-
mosassa, Inverness and Crystal River.
Financial assistance is available to all
those who qualify. For more informa-
tion, call the YMCA office in Beverly
Hills at 352-637-0132, or visit online at
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Whispering Pines Park
offers tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers tennis
lessons with Lindsay Rodriquez. Pre-
registration and pre-payment are re-
quired at the park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for four
hours, or $30 per hour. Times are
arranged with the instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for registration
and information. Whispering Pines


also offers racquetball lessons. Call for
information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers a low-impact stretching class.
This ongoing class will be from 10 to
11 a.m. at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy, fun
with good benefits. Stretching helps to
make you more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and bal-
ance. This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative condi-
tions, such as osteoarthritis. Stretching
increases physical and mental relax-
ation and reduces the risk of joint
sprain, muscle strain or back prob-
lems. Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints. Re-
search suggests that moderate-inten-
sity, low-impact activity is just as
effective as high-impact activity in low-
ering the risk of heart disease.
For more information, visit www.
citruscountyparks.com and click on
instructional classes, or call 352-465-
7007.
Zumba at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers Zumba classes with instructor
Lynn DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fitness pro-
gram designed with exciting Latin and
international dance rhythms. No mem-


bership or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit www.
citruscountyparks.com or call
352-465-7007.
Zumba offered
at Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired dance-fit-
ness class, is offered at 4:30 p.m.
Monday and Thursday afternoons at
Dunnellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Woman's Club
offers Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's Club is
offering Zumba classes in air-condi-
tioned comfort from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays.
Everyone is welcome. For informa-
tion, call 352-447-2057.
Floral City Shuffleboard
Club invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club plays
at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and Fridays
and at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Floral
Park in Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to meet peo-
ple in the community, and get some
light exercise. We welcome all new-
comers. Yearly dues are $3 per per-
son, and there is no need to purchase
any equipment.


Call the vice president of the Floral
City Shuffleboard Club, Dana Bause,
at 352-726-0670.
Rainbow Springs
field trip slated
Citrus County Audubon Society has
scheduled a birding field trip at Rain-
bow Springs State Park in Dunnellon
for Thursday, Dec. 27. The public is
welcome to attend. Preregistration is
not necessary and participants with all
levels of birding skills are welcome.
This field trip is led by CCAS mem-
bers Fred Hileman and Tom Gulley.
The group will meet at 8 a.m. in the
parking lot. There is a fee of $2 to be
paid at the entrance to the park. Wear
comfortable walking shoes, as it will
involve some moderate walking, and
will last about three hours.
Visit CitrusCountyAudubon.com for
details.
Fort Cooper to
have bird walk
Come join in exploring the trails in
search of birds that call Fort Cooper
State Park home. An approximate 2 to
2 1/2-hour bird walk will take place be-
ginning at 8 a.m. Jan. 12.
The walk will be led by members of
the local Audubon society and is open
to all experience levels of birders.
Bring your binoculars, field guides,
bug repellant and anything that would
enhance the experience on the outing
to Fort Cooper State Park, 3100 S.
Old Floral City Road, Inverness.


Dr. Ron Joseph
DOCTOR'S
ORDERS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kicking Broncos


Associated Press
Boise State running back D. J. Harper hangs onto the ball Saturday after making a sideline
reception with Washington's John Glenn defending during the first half of the MAACO Bowl
in Las Vegas.

Late field goal give Boise State victory over Wash.


Associated Press
LAS VEGAS The last
two times Boise State played
in the Las Vegas Bowl, there
were other places the Bron-
cos wanted to be. Not so on
Saturday, when the smallest
player on the team came up
big in a 28-26 victory over
Washington.
After two straight
blowouts in the Las Vegas
Bowl, the Broncos had to
work hard for a win sealed
by a 27-yard field goal by 5-
foot-5 Michael Frisina with
1:16 left. It left them feeling
good about a game and a
season when, unlike the last
two years, there was hardly
any talk about Boise State
being in a BCS game.
"The most satisfying
thing about this season was
each week you'd see us get
just a little bit better," Boise
State coach Chris Petersen
said. "These guys, they
don't go through the mo-
tions. They have a chip on
their shoulder."
The win capped another
strong year for the No. 20
Broncos (11-2), who had to
overcome a 205-yard rush-


ing game by Bishop Sankey
against their normally
stingy defense. Sankey also
had 74 yards receiving, giv-
ing him 279 of Washington's
447 yards from scrimmage.
But it was Frisina who
came up with the biggest
game of his career in his
final game. He kicked three
field goals, including the
first game winner he could
ever recall booting.
"It's every kicker's dream
to win a big game with a field
goal," Frisina said. "For this
one to come on the last game
of my career, you couldn't
ask for anything more."
Washington (7-6) had
taken the lead for the first
time on a 38-yard field goal
by Travis Coons with 4:09
left when No. 20 Boise State
got a big kickoff return by
freshman Shane Williams-
Rhodes to the Washington
42. Joe Southwick guided
the team to the 12 before
Frisina hit the winning kick.
"I was just focused on
what I had to do," Frisina
said. "I'm there as the insur-
ance guy, I guess you'd say"
Boise State sealed the win
when Jeremy loane inter-


cepted Keith Price's pass as
the Huskies neared midfield.
"To their credit they found
a way to win the game in the
end," said Washington coach
Steve Sarkisian. "Our inabil-
ity to finish is pretty blaring."
Sankey, who was third on
the depth list when fall
practice began, rushed 30
times and caught six passes
in the biggest game of his ca-
reer. He scored one touch-
down and was the MVP of
the game, despite being on
the losing side.
"There's a lot of mixed
emotions going on," Sankey
said. "The MVP doesn't
mean so much when you
come out a loser."
Frisina was only 12 for 17
on field goals coming into
the game, but kicked three
of them, including a 34-
yarder to open the scoring
that was his first field goal
over 30 yards for the year.
Southwick, meanwhile,
had another efficient game,
completing 26 of 38 passes
for 264 yards and two touch-
downs for a Boise State
team that struggled offen-
sively through much of the
season.


ECU falls in N.O. Bowl


La. -Lafayette

wins New

Orleans Bowl

Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS -
Whether Terrance Broad-
way was throwing, running,
or throwing on the run, he
gave East Carolina fits and
justified Louisiana-
Lafayette coach Mark Hud-
speth's decision to let his
sophomore quarterback fin-
ish the season as his starter.
Broadway passed for 316
yards and ran for 108, help-
ing Louisiana-Lafayette re-
peat as winners of the New
Orleans Bowl with a 43-34
victory against East Car-
olina on Saturday -
The performance capped
a 2012 campaign which
opened with Broadway
backing up senior Blaine
Gautier, who broke a bone
in his throwing hand in late Louisia
September. for a re
"Terrance comes in and during
just has a phenomenal sea- touch
son," Hudspeth said, de- movin
scribing the difficult good o
decision not to give Gautier, scoring
the New Orleans Bowl MVP son lat
a year ago, his job back "Nol
when he was healthy again said B1
late in the season. "We re- for a 1
ally had hit our stride and bodyol
the best thing about Blaine advers
is he understood." came t
Broadway had to sit out game c
last season after transferring upbeat
from Houston, and saw this going t
year's New Orleans Bowl as And
his first real chance to add Baer a
some kind of championship third
to his name after coming up fourth
short as a high school stand- victory
out in Baton Rouge, La. Shai
"My main goal was to get 278 ya
our team a big win in this downs
bowl game and just to get but wa
that monkey off my back juns te
that I didn't have a ring from Moten
high school and last year," as ECI
Broadway said. "I was very tying o
focused on that." "The
Alonzo Harris rushed for change
120 yards, including touch- age th
downs of 6 and 68 yards for Carde:
the Ragin' Cajuns (9-4), who think (
briefly squandered a three- cute a


Associated Press
ana-Lafayette quarterback Terrance Broadway looks
receiver in the first half Saturday against East Carolina
the New Orleans Bowl in New Orleans.


down lead before
g back in front for
n Broadway's 14-yard
g pass to Javone Law-
:e in the third quarter
thing fazes our team,"
roadway, who also ran
.2-yard score. "Every-
n our team responds to
ity well. So when they
)ack on us and made a
out of it, our team is still
t and saying we're
o win this game."
they did, with Brett
adding his second and
field goals in the
quarter to seal the
y.
ne Carden passed for
yards and two touch-
for East Carolina (8-5)
as intercepted in Ca-
erritory by Jemarlous
in the fourth quarter
J drove for a potential
r go-ahead score.
ey did a good job of
ing, I guess, the cover-
roughout the game,"
n said of ULL. "But I
our offense could exe-
lot better It was noth-


ing really they were doing. It
was a lot of us just not exe-
cuting routine plays."
The Pirates' Reggie Bul-
lock rushed for 104 yards
and two touchdowns.
"The game plan was fine.
We just needed the execu-
tion of the calls. We've al-
ways played hard. That was
not a problem," East Car-
olina coach Ruffin McNeill
said. "We had a chance
there late in the game. ... I
was proud of our guys."
Carden's touchdowns
went to Justin Hardy for 19
yards and Danny Webster
for 16 yards. Hardy finished
with five catches for 59
yards. East Carolina's An-
drew Bodenheimer had five
catches for a team-high 65
yards, but could not secure
a crucial fourth-down pass
in the final minutes as de-
fensive back TJ. Worthy
ripped the ball away in ECU
territory That allowed the
Cajuns to run the clock
down to 15 seconds before
setting up Baer's final field
goal from 40-yards out.


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SPORTS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 B3


k






B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012



Glantz-Culver line
For Dec. 22
NCAA Football
Monday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Fresno St. 11Y2 12Y2 (59/2) SMU
Wednesday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
W. Kentucky 6 5/2 (58) Cent. Michigan
Thursday
Military Bowl
At Washington
San Jose St. 7Y2 7 (45) Bowling Green
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati 11 7Y2 (60) Duke
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
UCLA +1 1 (80/2) Baylor
Friday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
La.-Monroe 6 7Y2 (60) Ohio
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech 1 212 (41) Rutgers
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas Tech 13 13 (57) Minnesota
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG


at Green Bay
at Carolina
at Miami
at Pittsburgh
New England
Indianapolis
at Dallas
Washington
at Tampa Bay
N.Y Giants
at Houston
at Denver
Chicago
at Seattle
at N.Y. Jets


10/2 12/2
8 9
5 4/2
5 3/2
14 14'2
6 7
3 21/2
4 6/2
3 3
+1 2/2
7 8
12 13
5'2 5'2
2/2 Pk
3 2


(46) Tennessee
(46) Oakland
(41/2) Buffalo
(42) Cincinnati
(50) at Jacksonville
(42) at Kansas City
(51 2) New Orleans
(45) at Philadelphia
(44) St. Louis
(47/2) at Baltimore
(44/2) Minnesota
(44/2) Cleveland
(36'2) at Arizona
(39) San Francisco
(38'2) San Diego


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
NewYork 19 7 .731
Brooklyn 13 12 .520
Boston 13 13 .500
Philadelphia 13 14 .481
Toronto 9 19 .321
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 18 6 .750
Atlanta 16 9 .640
Orlando 12 14 .462
Charlotte 7 20 .259
Washington 3 22 .120
Central Division
W L Pct
Chicago 15 11 .577
Indiana 16 12 .571
Milwaukee 14 12 .538
Detroit 9 21 .300
Cleveland 6 23 .207
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
Memphis 18 7 .720
San Antonio 20 8 .714
Houston 14 12 .538
Dallas 12 15 .444
New Orleans 5 22 .185
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 21 5 .808
Minnesota 13 11 .542
Denver 15 13 .536
Portland 12 12 .500
Utah 14 14 .500
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 20 6 .769
Golden State 18 9 .667
L.A. Lakers 12 14 .462
Phoenix 11 15 .423
Sacramento 8 18 .308
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 99, Atlanta 80
Toronto 93, Orlando 90
Milwaukee 99, Boston 94, OT
Chicago 110, NewYork 106
Indiana 99, Cleveland 89
Detroit 100, Washington 68
Memphis 92, Dallas 82
San Antonio 99, New Orleans 94
Golden State 115, Charlotte 100
L.A. Clippers 97, Sacramento 85
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 92, Chicago 75
Detroit 96, Washington 87
Miami 105, Utah 89
Houston 121, Memphis 96
Indiana 81, New Orleans 75
Cleveland 94, Milwaukee 82
Denver 110, Charlotte 88
Phoenix at Portland, late
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at NewYork, 5 p.m.
Utah at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 9 p.m.


NFL standings


y-New England
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo


y-Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville


x-Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


AFC
East
W L T
10 4 0
6 8 0
6 8 0
5 9 0
South
W L T
12 2 0
9 5 0
5 9 0
2 12 0
North
W L T
9 5 0
8 6 0
7 7 0
5 9 0
590


Pct PF
.714 506
.429 255
.429 264
.357 306

Pct PF
.857 394
.643 309
.357 285
.143 219

Pct PF
.643 348
.571 355
.500 302
.357 280


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr lthe record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S CASH 3 (early)
7-1-8
CASH 3 (late)
999-9-5

PLAY 4 (early)
7 -9-8-0
PLAY 4 (late)
1-7-9-1

FANTASY 5
d LOtty 4-7-8-18-27

POWERBALL LOTTERY
1-18-35-39-44 18-20-35-36-37-39
POWER BALL XTRA
11 2


On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
NBA
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Utah Jazz at Orlando Magic
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head
Classic, Second Semifinal: Teams TBA
BILLIARDS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) International Tournament of Champions
(Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling World Series: Viper Champi-
onship (Taped)
FOOTBALL
4 p.m. (CBS) Cleveland Browns at Denver Broncos
4 p.m. (FOX) New York Giants at Baltimore Ravens or
Chicago Bears at Arizona Cardinals
8:20 p.m. (NBC) San Francisco 49ers at Seattle Seahawks
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) 2012 Open Championship Final Round
(Taped)
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) 2012 Re/Max World Long Drive
Championship (Taped)
TENNIS
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Champions Series: Rafter vs. McEnroe
(Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
2 p.m. (NBC) Skiing Audi Birds of Prey, Giant Slalom
(Taped)
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Snowboarding Sprint U.S. Grand Prix
Halfpipe (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


Washington
Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia

y-Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


y-Green Bay
Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit

x-San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona


West
W L T
11 3 0
5 9 0
4 10 0
2 12 0
NFC
East
W L T
8 6 0
8 6 0
8 6 0
4 10 0
South
W L T
12 2 0
6 8 0
6 8 0
5 9 0
North
W L T
10 4 0
8 6 0
8 6 0
4 10 0
West
W L T
10 3 1
9 5 0
6 7 1
5 9 0
590


Pct PF
.786 409
.357 299
.286 263
.143 195

Pct PF
.571 381
.571 327
.571 373
.286 253

Pct PF
.857 371
.429 389
.429 354
.357 296

Pct PF
.714 344
.571 319
.571 321
.286 330

Pct PF
.750 357
.643 350
.464 258
.357 224


x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
Saturday, Dec. 22
Atlanta at Detroit, late
Today, Dec. 23
Tennessee at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Kansas City 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
New England at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
San Diego at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 30
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Miami at New England, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Assigned RHP Pedro


Beato outright to Pawtucket (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS-Assigned 3B Brandon
Laird and OF Che-Hsuan Lin outright to Okla-
homa City (PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Agreed to
terms with OF Cody Ross on a three-year con-
tract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS-Recalled G Scott
Machado from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL).
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES-Recalled G Josh
Selby from Reno (NBADL).
SACRAMENTO KINGS-Suspended C De-
Marcus Cousins indefinitely for unprofessional
behavior and conduct detrimental to the team.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
HOUSTON TEXANS-Signed S Eddie
Pleasant from the practice squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS-Placed S
Dwight Lowery on injured reserve. Activated LB
Daryl Smith from injured reserve.
MIAMI DOLPHINS-Placed PK Dan Car-
penter on injured reserve. Signed PK Nate
Kaeding.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS-Waived TE Allen
Reisner and G Mark Asper. Activated CB Chris
Cook from injured reserve. Signed DE George
Johnson from the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS-Signed WR
Kamar Aiken from the practice squad.
ST. LOUIS RAMS-Signed CB Quinton
Pointer from the practice squad.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS-Signed LB Cam
Johnson from the practice squad to a two-year
contract.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
WORCESTER SHARKS-Returned D
Denny Urban to Reading (ECHL).
ECHL
ECHL-Suspended Lake Erie C Mitchell
Heard two games.



Baseball Calendar
2013
Jan. 9 Hall of Fame voting announced.
Jan. 9-10 Owners meeting, Paradise Val-
ley, Ariz.
Jan. 15 Salary arbitration filing.
Jan. 18 Salary arbitration figures ex-
changed.
Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings,
Phoenix.
Feb. 12 Mandatory reporting date for play-
ers participating in the World Baseball Classic in
Asia. Mandatory reporting date for all other
pitchers and catchers participating in the WBC.
Voluntary reporting date for pitchers and catch-
ers not participating in the WBC.
Feb. 15 Mandatory reporting date forWBC
players not participating in Asia. Voluntary re-
porting date for position players not participating
in the WBC.
Feb. 20 Mandatory reporting date for play-
ers not participating in the WBC.


WR Johnson breaks record


Associated Press

DETROIT Detroit
Lions receiver Calvin John-
son has had a record-break-
ing night during the Lions'
31-18 loss to Atlanta.
Johnson surpassed Jerry
Rice's single-season yards
receiving record of 1,848
with his 10th catch in the
fourth quarter Saturday
night That put Johnson over
the 200-yard mark in the


game against the Atlanta
Falcons. He needed 182 to
surpass the mark Rice set in
1995 with the San Francisco
49ers.
Johnson had more than
100 yards receiving for an
eighth straight game, break-
ing an NFL record set by
Charley Hennigan in 1961
and matched by Michael
Irvin in 1995. Johnson broke
another league mark with
10 receptions in a fourth


game in a row.
It was Johnson's 11th
game with 100 yards receiv-
ing this season, tying Irvin's
NFL mark.
In the first quarter, John-
son surpassed Herman
Moore's single-season fran-
chise record of 1,686 yards.
Befitting a season that
has gone badly, Johnson
fumbled in the first half to
help Atlanta add to its big
lead.


Hurricanes return



home with hardware


Citrus finishes

12th behind

four players at

Bulldog Brawl

TONY CASTRO
Correspondent

ST CLOUD Citrus High
School couldn't duplicate its
third-place finish from a year
ago at the conclusion of Sat-
urday's two-day, 23-team sec-
ond annual Bulldog Brawl in
Osceola County
Defending 2A state cham-
pion Springstead, which
began the day in third, 17
points behind leader Craw-
fordville-Wakulla and 6 1/2
points behind Bunnell-Fla-
gler Palm Coast, rallied to
edge both teams at the finish
line.
Springstead, which fin-
ished second in 2011 at St
Cloud to 18-time state cham-
pion Parkersburg South, WV
won this year's event edging
Wakulla by 9 1/2 points,
228.5-219.0.
Both Springstead and
Wakulla each had nine grap-
plers, who placed sixth or
better
Wakulla finished with
three champs in four finals
while the Spring Hill mat
men claimed five titles in six
finals matches.
Citrus settled on 12th place
with 97.0 points.
First-year head coach Jeff
Wood's Hurricanes captured
21-of-44 bouts (48 percent)
while notching 11 pins.
"I was hoping to see six to
eight guys place here," said
Wood, a Hurricane alum.
"But getting four players is
OK There's always room for



BUCS
Continued from Page B1

he's always very confident in
that next move. I think that
really carries over to our
team and our locker room."
The Rams won three
straight, including an over-
time victory over NFC West
rival San Francisco, to surge
into contention after a 3-6-1
start Last week's 36-22 loss to
Minnesota damaged their
playoff prospects, however,
they can still step a signifi-
cant step forward by closing
strong against Tampa Bay
and Seattle.
"Obviously our playoff
chances are slim right now,
but we can still have a win-
ning season if we win these
next two. And, if we beat Seat-
tle ... we can go undefeated in
our division," Bradford said.
"So there's still a lot left for us
to play for We're still coming
with the same attitude we've
had all year This is the most
important game of our season
right now."
Like St Louis, Tampa Bay



SWOOP
Continued from Page B2

Rivers was coming off its own
disappointing loss, a four-point
setback Fiday athome against
District 2A4 foe St John
Lutheran.
"They're just one of the
best-coached teams we're
going to face this season," In-
dian Rocks coach Joe Frost
said of Seven Rivers.
Gage poured in 30 points to
lead all scorers, 21 of which
came in the second half. A 6-
foot-4 shooting guard, the
Seven Rivers junior showed
on consecutive possessions
why the Indian Rocks bench
repeatedly yelled out
"Shooter!" whenever Gage
crossed half-court
Down 54-51 with less than
five minutes remaining in the
contest, Gage squared up and
nailed a three-pointer from
the left win to knot the score
at 54-all. After a miss by the
Eagles, the Warriors came
back down the court and
found Gage again on the left
side for another long-dis-


tance shot to stake Seven
Rivers to a 57-54 lead.
"I definitely had to start at-
tacking more," Gage said. "At-
tacking the hoop and pulling
up for shots, trying to create
opportunities."
Up until that point, Gage
had taken just 10 shots from


improvement with such a
young team."
"This was the most consis-
tent tournament we've had
all season," Wood continued.
"It's not always about the
here and now. With all our
young kids, we're building to-
ward the future."
On what his team's per-
formance meant, Wood said,
"Once we get our lineup in-
tact, you'll see us start hitting
our stride. For all the tough
matches that we lost, I
thought we did real well."
Four 'Canes registered
above .500 records at St.
Cloud over the weekend and
coincidentally all four
placed.
CHS' four players featured
junior Casey Bearden at 170
pounds (second), senior
Jacob Nolen at 145 (third),
junior Brandon Taylor at 182
(fifth) and senior Chris
Mosher at 113 (sixth).
Nolen and Mosher each
finished with a team-best
four wins.
Nolen opened the meet
with a pin over St. Cloud's
Forrest Stakelum (3:02) be-
fore posting an 8-0 major de-
cision over Flagler's Jackson
Trivett
In Saturday's semifinal,
second-seeded Casey Malloy
of Palm Bay-Heritage twisted
Nolen, 15-7.
From the loser's bracket,
Nolen pinned Okeechobee's
Ryan Hagen (2:34) before
edging Palmetto Ridge's Ma-
tias Wajner in the consolation
finals for third, 1-0.
"I'm so glad I won that last
match, I really thought I was
going to lose," admitted the
17-year-old Nolen, who
missed last year's Bulldog
Brawl due to family gradua-
tion event "I wasn't feeling
good all weekend; I've been
sick"


put together a winning streak
to rebound from a slow start
to get back in the playoffrace.
The Bucs won four straight to
climb to 6-4, but have not
played well during a four-
game skid that's left them
hoping to win the final two
games to avoid a losing
record.
Josh Freeman threw four
interceptions and lost a fum-
ble at New Orleans in one of
the worst performances of his
career But the fourth-year
pro remains confident the
Bucs can pull out of the tail-
spin and finish on a positive
note against the Rams and
NFC South rival Atlanta.
Schiano's message to play-
ers following last Sunday's
blowout loss to the Saints was
that they remain united and
committed to improving, to
weather the adversity
Freeman said he embraces
the challenge of leading the
team through hard times.
"Everybody has their own
style of leadership, but to the
best of my ability I try to con-
vey the message of do your
job, sacrifice for your broth-
ers," said Freeman, who's


the field despite clearly being
able to get his shot whenever
he wanted. It was a credit to
Indian Rocks' awareness of
the Warrior all day but the
Eagles were forced to send
Gage to the free throw line 18
times, where he hit 13 of
those attempts.
"If you could (microphone)
our bench during the game,
we're yelling at Adam to
shoot it," Ervin said. "But that
speaks to Adam as a young
man... He's just so unselfish."
Gage also hit 3 of his 7
three-point attempts and shot
a total of 7 of 12 from the field.
He added nine rebounds and
two assists.
"The biggest thing is you
have to know where No. 14
is," Frost said. "You have to
know where Gage is, he's
such a nice player"
Warriors freshman Zach
Saxer had 14 points and eight
rebounds as the Warriors'
only other player in double
figures. Jared Bogart, (eight
points), Iwaniec (seven
points) and Cash (six points)
were the only other Seven
Rivers players to score.
Indian Rocks got a team-


high 22 points from Ryan
Ferguson, 21 by Adkinson
and Eddie Moralobo's 16
points.
Seven Rivers shot well in
the first quarter, making their
first five shots of the game to
take a 19-7 advantage after
the opening eight minutes.


In the key to his semifinal
setback, "I tried to pick up
the pace, but the other guy
just countered everything I
did," Nolen said.
On placing third, "I came
into the tournament seeded
sixth and I beat the second-
and third-seeded guys," said
Nolen, who went 4-1 to im-
prove to 25-5 on the season.
"I'm OK with third, but I
could have done much better
if I wasn't sick"
Bearden entered as the
third seed and sailed through
his half of the bracket open-
ing with back-to-back pin
falls against Bishop Moore's
PJ. Mahoney (3:15) and Edge-
water's Trenton Erisman
(4:58).
In Saturday's semifinals he
toppled second-seeded
Ashani Brown-Knight of Pal-
metto Ridge, 6-1, to face last
year's 2A state runner-up and
top-seeded sophomore Conor
Ross of Springstead.
After a scoreless first pe-
riod, Ross notched a two-
point takedown in the second
period and secured a one-
point escape in the third pe-
riod for a 3-0 shutout
"Overall, I thought I did
well this tournament," said
the 16-year-old Bearden,
wrestling with a left shoulder
harness for protection. "Next
time, I can beat Ross. I played
it safe, I was a little nervous."
On grading his silver
medal, "No, I'm not satis-
fied," explained the 16-year-
old Bearden. "I've worked
too hard to get here."
Bearden went 3-1 to reach
the finals to improve to 20-4
on the season.
Next weekend, CHS will
take part in the one-day, 16-
team IBT event at Lakeland
High.


thrown for 25 touchdowns
against 12 interceptions.
"In this league nothing's
promised, nothing's guaran-
teed. You have to go out and
every week give it all you've
got ... At the end of the year
when you look back and re-
flect, there's going to be a lot
of stuff that you look at and
say: 'Man, we were that
close,"' Freeman added. "At
the same time, this is a new
team. There are a lot of new
pieces. ... You just have to
continue to get better That's
the one thing you've got to
focus on."
Schiano said he hasn't de-
tected any signs of quit in a
young team that's been tested
by injuries and suspensions
of key players.
"There's a lot of belief in
those guys, a lot of together-
ness, a lot of 'we're going to
do our best' And that's all you
can do is do your best You do
your best and see where that
stacks up against your oppo-
nent What gets you is when
you don't do your best That's
where you get aggravated
and frustrated," Schiano
said.


With attention elsewhere,
Saxer and Bogart each
scored five points in the
opening period.
"I guess they were keying
on me," Gage said, "but that's
when you have to find your
teammates and have faith
they'll make shots."
After outscoring Seven
Rivers 22-12 in the second
quarter, Indian Rocks trailed
by two heading into halftime.
The Eagles would actually
seize control of the game be-
hind point guard Moralobo's
decisive drives straight to the
hoop in the third quarter,
which led to seven straight
points by him at one point
and opening things up inside
for Ferguson and Adkinson.
"We told them after the
first, just keep chipping away,
possession by possession,"
Frost said.
Gage hit some big free
throws down the stretch, hit-
ting four in a row to twice re-
gain the lead for Seven Rivers,
the last time at 64-63 with 11
seconds left in the game.
But a loose ball foul on
Gage after a missed Indian
Rocks shot, put Ferguson on


the line with a chance for the
win with 1.7 seconds left.
After missing the first free
throw, the Eagles forward
canned the second to send it
to overtime.
Seven Rivers plays 4:30
p.m. Thursday,Jan. 3 atBran-
ford.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Temple upsets No. 3 Syracuse


Associated Press

NEW YORK Khalif
Wyatt scored 33 points and
Anthony Lee had 21 both
career highs and Temple,
despite not making a field
goal over the final 51/2 min-
utes, upset No. 3 Syracuse
83-79 on Saturday in the
Chevrolet Gotham Classic at
Madison Square Garden.
The Owls (9-2), coming off
a 10-point home loss to Can-
isius, used the combination
of Wyatt from the outside
and Lee inside to keep Syra-
cuse at bay The Orange led
by two at halftime but never
took a lead in the second
half even though there were
four ties, the last at 59 with
10:23 to play
C.J. Fair had a career-high
25 points for Syracuse (10-1),
which had its 52-game regu-
lar-season nonconference
winning streak snapped. Jim
Boeheim remained at 900
wins, two behind Bob Knight
for second place all-time
among Division I men's
coaches. Duke's Mike
Krzyzewski has 938 wins.
No. 9 Kansas 74,
No. 7 Ohio State 66
COLUMBUS, Ohio Red-
shirt freshman Ben McLemore
scored 22 points and Kansas
proved it was more than just a
bully at home by beating Ohio
State.
It was the third victory for the
Jayhawks (10-1) in little more
than a year over the Buckeyes
(9-2). Kansas won a 64-62 thriller
in last year's NCAA semifinals.
The Jayhawks, who had yet
to play a true road game, held
Ohio State without a field goal
for more than 10 minutes of the
second half. The Buckeyes, who
were led by Deshaun Thomas'
16 points, shot 9 of 36 from the
field in the final 20 minutes.
Jeff Withey added 14 points
and 10 rebounds for the Jay-
hawks. Elijah Johnson scored
13 and Travis Releford 11.


Bowers had 23 points and 10
rebounds to lead Missouri over
Illinois in the annual Braggin'
Rights game.
Alex Oriakhi added 13 points
and 14 rebounds as Missouri
(10-1) won its fourth straight in
the 32-year-old series. Jabari
Brown had 18 points and Phil
Pressey handed out 11 assists.
Brandon Paul led Illinois (12-
1) with 23 points. Tyler Griffey
scored 14 and Joseph Bertrand
had 13.
No. 11 Cincy 68,
Wright State 58
CINCINNATI JaQuon
Parker scored 16 of his 21
points in the second half and
Cincinnati remained unbeaten
by overcoming another poor
start to beat Wright State.
The Bearcats improved to
12-0 for the eighth time in
school history and the second
time in three seasons. Cincin-
nati won its first 15 games in
2010-11.
For the second game in a
row, the Bearcats struggled in
half-court offense and scored
only 22 points in the first half.
Parker scored Cincinnati's first
eight in the second half, spark-
ing a 23-6 run that put the
Bearcats in control for the first
time. The 21 points matched
his season high.
Titus Rubles added 11 points
and nine rebounds. Justin Jack-
son had nine points, seven re-
bounds and two of Cincinnati's
10 blocked shots.
No. 13 Minnesota 75,
Lafayette 50
MINNEAPOLIS Starting
guard Joe Coleman scored 12
points and Minnesota got 42
points from its reserves in a
rout of Lafayette.
Otto Osenieks added 10
points for the Gophers (12-1),
who have won eight straight.
Dan Trist scored 14 points for
the Leopards (5-9), who are 0-7
on the road.


No. 12 Missouri 82, No. 15 G'town 65,
No. 10 Illinois 73 American 48


ST. LOUIS Laurence


WASHINGTON Otto


Associated Press
Temple's Khalif Wyatt looks to shoot after driving past Syracuse's Brandon Triche during
the first half Saturday in the Gotham Classic tournament at Madison Square Garden in New
York. Temple defeated Syracuse 83-79.


Porter had 16 points and 13 re-
bounds, and Georgetown pulled
away late in the first half to beat
D.C. neighbor American.
Greg Whittington added 13
points for the Hoyas (10-1),
who took advantage of the siz-
able talent gap between the Big
East school and the Eagles
from the Patriot League.
Georgetown has a nine-game
winning streak over American,
its last loss coming 30 years
ago when Patrick Ewing and
Co. lost by one point in what
still stands as the biggest intra-
city upset in the nation's capital.
No. 18 S.D. St. 80,
San Fran. 58
HONOLULU Chase Tap-
ley made six 3-pointers on his
way to a career-high 33 points
and San Diego State beat San
Francisco in the first round of
the Diamond Head Classic for
its 10th straight win.
Tapley gave the Aztecs (10-1)
their first cushion in the opening
half with three jumpers during a
2-minute stretch, and he was
just getting warmed up. The
senior was 13 of 19 from the
field, with nine of those from out-


side, and back-to-back 3s with 9
minutes left in the game sent
San Diego State on its way.
The Aztecs have beaten
seven California schools this
season, including USC and
UCLA. They next play Sunday
against Indiana State, which
beat Ole Miss in overtime ear-
lier Saturday.
No. 19 Butler 75,
Evansville 67
INDIANAPOLIS Rotnei
Clarke and Andrew Smith each
scored 20 points to lead Butler
past pesky Evansville.
The Bulldogs (9-2) won their
sixth straight and completed a
sweep of the five Indiana
schools they played this season
in non-conference action in-
cluding last weekend's stunning
overtime victory against the
top-ranked Hoosiers.
Evansville (7-5) was led by
Colt Ryan with 25 points.
No. 20 Mich. St. 67,
Texas 56
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Derrick Nix had 25 points and
11 rebounds to help Michigan
State surge past Texas.


Nix was 7 for 10 from the
field and 11 for 13 at the line, a
major improvement for a 64.9
percent foul shooter.
Keith Appling had 14 points
and Adreian Payne added 13
for the Spartans (11-2), who
stayed perfect in six December
games.
Julien Lewis scored 16 points
for the Longhorns (7-5).
No. 23 UNC 97,
McNeese State 63
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. P.J.
Hairston scored a career-high
20 points in North Carolina's
victory over McNeese State.
Reggie Bullock added 17
points for the Tar Heels (9-3),
who shot 13 of 28 on 3-pointers
and never trailed. James
Michael McAdoo had 12 points,
Leslie McDonald added 11 and
Brice Johnson scored 10.
The Tar Heels broke open
the game early with a 22-4 run
to take a 27-8 lead midway
through the first half.
Jeremie Mitchell had 13
points to lead the Cowboys
(6-4), who had won five
straight.


No. 24 Okla. St. 78,
Tennessee Tech 42
STILLWATER, Okla. Fresh-
man guard Phil Forte scored 22
points to lead Oklahoma State
over Tennessee Tech.
Forte shot 6 of 11 from 3-
point range and the Cowboys
(10-1) hit a season-high 11 3-
pointers. Kamari Murphy
scored 12 points, Markel Brown
and Marcus Smart each had
11, and Kirby Gardner added
10 points and seven assists.
Judd Dillard led Tennessee
Tech (6-6) with 18 points.
Oklahoma State led 38-19 at
halftime, the second straight
game an opponent failed to
reach 20 points in the opening
20 minutes.
No. 25 N.C. St. 92,
St. Bonaventure 73
RALEIGH, N.C. C.J.
Leslie scored a career-high 33
points to lead North Carolina
State past St. Bonaventure.
Scott Wood added a season-
best 23 points on 8-of-10 shoot-
ing and Lorenzo Brown had a
season-high 11 assists for the
Wolfpack (9-2).
The nation's most accurate
shooting team shot 57 percent,
never trailed and now heads
into its weeklong holiday break
on a five-game winning streak.
Eric Mosley had 18 points for
the Bonnies (7-4).
Florida State 79,
Charlotte 76
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Michael Snaer scored 30 points
in his first game back from a
one-game absence, and Aaron
Thomas scored 17 as Florida
State beat Charlotte 79-76.
Snaer, a senior guard who
sat out a win over Louisiana-
Monroe on Monday for discipli-
nary reasons, had 17 points at
halftime and hit two free throws
with 11.8 seconds remaining to
help seal the win.
Thomas, a freshman guard,
came off the bench and scored
15 of his points in the second
half and hit one of two free
throws with 3.4 seconds left to
give the Seminoles (7-4) their
final margin.


Heat silence Jazz


Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James
scored 30 points, Dwyane
Wade added 21 points and
seven assists, and the
Miami Heat rode the
strength of a big third-quar-
ter run to beat the Utah
Jazz 105-89.
James added nine re-
bounds and seven assists for
the Eastern Conference-
leading Heat, who won their
fourth straight game and
next play on Christmas
against Oklahoma City in a
rematch of last season's NBA
Finals. Shane Battier scored
15 and Ray Allen added 13
for Miami, which opened the
second half on a 22-6 run to
build a 69-49 lead.
Marvin Williams scored
16 for Utah, which got 15
from Gordon Hayward and
11 from Paul Millsap.
The Jazz played the sec-
ond half without Mo
Williams, who appeared to
hurt his right thumb. Miami
was without Chris Bosh,
home with what the team
said was a cold.
Hawks 92, Bulls 75
ATLANTA-Al Horford had
20 points and 10 rebounds,
and every Atlanta starter
scored in double figures as the
Hawks routed the Chicago
Bulls 92-75 to snap a two-
game losing streak.
Lou Williams added 16
points in his first start, and the
Atlanta native led the way as
the Hawks outscored the Bulls
61-33 in the second and third
quarters combined. Both
teams played on Friday, but
the Bulls were the only one
that looked tired a night later.
Luol Deng paced Chicago
with 11 points, but the Bulls
(15-11) couldn't build on its
110-106 victory over the
Knicks in New York on Friday.
The Hawks (16-9), however,
bounced back from a poor
fourth-quarter performance in a
99-80 loss at Philadelphia.
Atlanta starters outscored
Chicago's starters 72-39 in
Hawks coach Larry Drew's


Associated Press
Miami Heat forward LeBron James shoots over Utah Jazz's
Paul Millsap and Al Jefferson during the first half Saturday
in Miami.


100th victory (100-73).
Rockets 121,
Grizzlies 96
HOUSTON James
Harden scored 31 points with
eight assists, and the Houston
Rockets earned their third
straight win, 121-96 over the
Memphis Grizzlies.
The Grizzlies entered the
game allowing an NBA-low
89.2 points a game. But they
had no answer for Harden. He
did all his scoring in the first
three quarters and reached at
least 20 points for an eighth
straight game.
Houston used a big run mid-
way through the second quar-
ter to take the lead, and didn't
trail after that to break a four-
game winning streak by the
Grizzlies.
Mike Conley had 16 points
for the Grizzlies on a night


when leading scorer Rudy Gay
finished with a season-low six
points.
Memphis hadn't allowed 100
points since the Clippers
scored 101 in the season-
opener an NBA-best streak
of 23 games.
Pistons 96,
Wizards 87
WASHINGTON Charlie
Villanueva scored 19 points,
Rodney Stuckey added 18 and
the Detroit Pistons got their
second win in as many nights
over the Washington Wizards,
96-87.
It was only the second time
this season that Detroit had
won consecutive games.
The Wizards, who trailed
throughout the game, have lost
seven straight and dropped to
an NBA-worst 3-22.
For the second straight


night, Detroit had 58 rebounds,
a season high.
The Wizards closed to 88-81
with 6:15 to play, but didn't
score for nearly four minutes
as Detroit built a 94-81 lead
with 2:55 to play.
Jordan Crawford, who
scored his only point of the first
half with 1:05 to play, scored 20
in the second half to lead
Washington with 21. Emeka
Okafor had 14 points and tied a
season high with 14 rebounds.
Cavaliers 92,
Bucks 80
MILWAUKEE Dion Wait-
ers scored 18 points and the
Cleveland Cavaliers snapped
a six-game losing streak with a
94-82 victory over the Milwau-
kee Bucks.
CJ Miles added 16 points
and Kyrie Irving had 15 for the
Cavaliers, playing without start-
ing center Anderson Varejao
for the third straight game be-
cause of a bruised right knee.
Monta Ellis had a season-
high 37 points for Milwaukee.
The Bucks won the previous
nine games against the Cava-
liers.
Pacers 81,
Hornets 75
NEW ORLEANS David
West scored 20 of his 25
points in the second half and
the Indiana Pacers overcame
a 22-point deficit to beat New
Orleans 81-75, handing the
Hornets their 11th straight loss.
Paul George steadied Indi-
ana in the first half with 11
points, and finished with 17 to
help the Pacers win for the
seventh time in eight games.
Robin Lopez had 24 points
and 11 rebounds for the Hor-
nets, stuck in their worst
stretch since December 2004.
Greivis Vasquez added 14
points, and Anthony Davis had
10 for the Hornets.
After the Hornets took a 46-
24, the Pacers outscored them
57-29 including 24-7 in the
third quarter.
West scored his 10,000th
career point midway through
the third quarter.


No. 1 Stanford rolls


over No. 10 UT


Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
Chiney Ogwumike had 21
points and a career-high 19
rebounds and top-ranked
Stanford remained unbeaten
with a victory over No. 10
Tennessee on Saturday.
Ogwumike, who entered
the game averaging 21.9
points and 12.2 rebounds,
also had a career-high five
assists for the Cardinal (11-0).
Amber Orrange scored 14
points, Toni Kokenis and
Bonnie Samuelson each
added 11 points and Joslyn
Tinkle had 10 points for the
Cardinal, who host No. 2
Connecticut in their next
game Dec. 29.
Bashaara Graves had 15
points and 12 rebounds for
Tennessee (7-3). Meighan
Simmons added 12 points,
while Ariel Massengale and
Cierra Burdick had 11
points each.
No. 2 UConn 102,
Hartford 45
WEST HARTFORD, Conn.
- Breanna Stewart scored a
season-high 27 points and four
teammates also scored in dou-
ble figures and the Huskies de-
feated the Hawks.
A pregame ceremony hon-
ored the victims of the Sandy
Hook Elementary School
shooting, with youth players
from Newtown joining the
teams on court.
It was the fifth time that
Stewart, a freshman, had led
the Huskies (10-0) in scoring
this season. Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis had 21
points, Kelly Faris 18, Bria Hart-
ley 15, and Stefanie Dolson 10
for UConn (10-0).
Stewart also had a team-high
seven rebounds. Daphne Elliott
led Hartford (8-3) with 10 points.
Before the game members
of the Newtown Girls Youth
Basketball Association lined up
with both teams on the court
holding green signs that said
"WE ARE SANDY HOOK. WE
CHOOSE LOVE" and clutching
teddy bears.
There was moment of re-


membrance that included the
ringing of a chime 26 times in
memory of the 20 students and
six adults who were killed in
the shooting.
Coaches and their staffs, and
courtside personnel wore green
ribbons, the school color at
Sandy Hook Elementary
School. Additionally, two large
paintings of green ribbons with
the white letters "SH" were on
the court.
No. 4 Duke 75,
USC 60
LOS ANGELES Chelsea
Gray led five players in double
figures with 18 points and the
Blue Devils remained unde-
feated with a victory over
Southern California in the
Women of Troy Classic.
Tricia Liston added 14 points,
Elizabeth Williams had 13 and
Haley Peters 12 for the Blue
Devils (10-0), who went 2-0 on
their West Coast visit. They beat
Cal State Bakersfield 97-63 Fri-
day night for coach Joanne P.
McCallie's 150th victory at the
school in their opening game of
the four-team event.
Gray had 10 rebounds, al-
though Duke got beat on the
boards, 44-36. Listen had four
of the team's eight 3-pointers.
Cassie Harberts scored 17
points and Kate Oliver had 15
points and 10 rebounds for
USC (3-7), which has lost five
in a row.
No. 23 FSU 93,
UNC Greensboro 63
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Chasity Clayton scored 21
points to lead the Seminoles
past the Spartans.
Clayton scored 10 points
during a 23-0 run by Florida
State after the Spartans had
taken an early 9-7 lead.
Lucy Mason scored 17 of her
21 points for the Spartans (3-7)
in the second half, making 5 of
7 3-pointers.
Alex Deluzio had 12 points
for Florida State (10-1),
Natasha Howard and Leonor
Rodriguez scored 11 each and
Chelsea Davis added 10.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Same old blood, gore


Associated Press
Actor Ashton Kutcher filed
divorce papers from his
wife Demi Moore, citing ir-
reconcilable differences.


Kutcher files
for divorce
LOS ANGELES -Ash-
ton Kutcher filed court
papers Friday to end his
seven-year marriage to
actress Demi Moore.
The actor's divorce pe-
tition cites irreconcilable
differences and does not
list a date the couple sep-
arated. Moore announced
last year she was ending
her marriage to the actor
15 years her junior, but
she never filed a petition.
Kutcher's filing does
not indicate the couple
has a prenuptial agree-
ment. The filing states
Kutcher signed the docu-
ment Friday, hours be-
fore it was filed in Los
Angeles Superior Court.
Kutcher and Moore
married in September
2005. Kutcher stars on
CBS' "Two and a Half
Men."
Messages sent to
Kutcher's and Moore's
publicists were not imme-
diately returned Friday

Miss Universe not
returning to BU
BOSTON -The 20-
year-old Rhode Island

who
brought
the Miss
Universe
crown
back to
the U.S.
for the
Olivia first time
Culpo in 15
years will
not return to Boston
University
Olivia Culpo's sister, So-
phie, tells The Associated
Press that Olivia, a BU
sophomore, wants to finish
her education, but does not
believe Boston University
could advance her ambi-
tion to become an actress.
The self-described
"cellist-nerd" made the
decision after assuming
her new role as Miss Uni-
verse 2012 following her
victory over 88 beauty
queens from around the
world Wednesday night.


Rolling
guitarist t
LONDON-
newspapers sa
Stones guitarist
Wood has mar
ancee Sally Hu
a ceremony at
Dorchester Ho
The Sun anc
Mirror carried
graphs of the 6
rocker with a i
niere and a da
and his 34-yea
in a tradition
gown and a clu
matching whit


Associated Press
Christoph Waltz, left, portrays Schultz and Jamie Foxx plays Django in "Django Unchained," which is directed by
Quentin Tarantino. The film centers on a slave trying to rescue his wife from a Mississippi plantation.


Review: Tarantino uses same violentplot in 'Django'


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

For his latest blood fest, "Django
Unchained," Quentin Tarantino
largely replays all of his other blood
fests, specifically his last flick, "In-
glourious Basterds."
In that 2009 tale of wickedly sav-
age retribution, Allied Jewish sol-
diers get to rewrite World War II
history by going on a killing spree of
Nazis. In Tarantino's new tale of
wickedly savage retribution, a black
man (Jamie Foxx) gets to rewrite
Deep South history by going on a
killing spree of white slave owners
and overseers just before the Civil
War
Granted, there's something glee-
fully satisfying in watching evil peo-
ple get what they have coming. But
"Django Unchained" is Tarantino at
his most puerile and least inven-
tive, the premise offering little
more than cold, nasty revenge and
barrels of squishing, squirting
blood.
The usual Tarantino genre mish-
mash- a dab ofblaxploitation here,
a dollop of Spaghetti Western there
- is so familiar now it's tiresome,
more so because the filmmaker con-
tinues to linger with chortling de-
light over every scene, letting
conversations run on interminably
and gunfights carry on to grotesque
excess. Bodies bursting blood like
exploding water balloons? Per-
versely fun the first five or six times,


pretty dreary the 20th or 30th.
Tarantino always gets good actors
who deliver, though, and it's the
performances by Foxx, Leonardo
DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz and
Samuel L. Jackson that make
"Django Unchained" intermittently
entertaining amid moments when
the characters are either talking
one another to death or just plain
killing each other
Foxx's Django starts literally in
chains, part of a line of slaves on
their way to the auction block. Gen-
teel bounty hunter King Schultz
(Waltz, an Academy Award winner
for "Inglourious Basterds") turns up
searching for Django because the
slave can identify three elusive
overseers with a price on their
heads. Next thing you know,
Django's apprenticing as a bounty
hunter, forming a partnership with
King that takes them deeper south
in hopes of freeing Django's wife,
Broomhilda (Kerry Washington).
The trail leads them to a planta-
tion owned by Calvin Candie (Di-
Caprio), a dandy who trains slaves
for barbarous Mandingo fighting.
There are morbidly funny mo-
ments as Django and King infiltrate
the plantation posing as buyers, the
two sharing twisted exchanges with
the flamboyantly creepy Candie and
his chief house slave and Uncle Tom
gone psycho, Stephen (Jackson,
Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction" co-star).
Tarantino mostly lets them prat-
tle on to such lengths that whatever


tension was building is defused. A
scene in which a posse of Klan fore-
runners (led by Don Johnson) de-
bates the difficulties of seeing out of
their white hoods is hilarious for a
few moments. But then they talk the
gag into the ground, and keep on
talking.
The humor co-exists uneasily and
often clumsily alongside a story so
charged with racial enmity Taran-
tino's solution to everything is to
put guns and dynamite into peo-
ple's hands, and while that might be
good escapism in a gangster story, it
feels flimsy and childish here.
In the wake of the school shoot-
ings at Sandy Hook in Connecticut,
Foxx talked about the need for Hol-
lywood to accept the fact that movie
violence can influence audiences.
Tarantino countered that blame
should fall to those who actually
carry out a crime.
They're both right, and it's absurd
to think the cartoon bloodshed of
"Django Unchained" might put
viewers over the top and send them
out on a shooting rampage.
Yet it is reasonable to ask why we
find a Tarantino-style body count so
entertaining that he can keep doing
the same thing over and over, and
we keep paying to see it.
"Django Unchained," a Weinstein
Co. release, is rated R for strong
graphic violence throughout, a vi-
cious fight, language and some nu-
dity Running time: 165 minutes.
Two stars out of four


Eichner returns game show to streets


Associated Press


NEW YORK Imagine
walking to work on the
streets of New York and


finding yourself in front of
Stones a camera being asked pop
ties knot culture questions by a ki-
netically insane game show
Two British host.
y Rolling It could happen if you
t Ronnie run into Billy Eichner
tried hisfi- On his weekly show,
imphreys at "Funny or Die's Billy on the
London's Street," the comedian
)tel. quizzes pedestrians by ask-
d the Daily ing irreverent questions -
Sphoto- "Does Lady Gaga look like
i5-year-old an ostrich?" or by rat-
)ale bouton- tling off a list of celebrity
rk blue suit, names and having players
r-old bride confirm if they're "Dead or
1 white Boring." Prizes range from
itch of a dollar bill to a ream of
e flowers. paper
-From wire reports There's just one caveat:


Birthday Make it a point to elevate your goals and ob-
jectives in the year ahead. Although you may need to be
patient success is likely to require considerable time and
effort you can achieve what you want.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -The best prescription for
having a fun day is to stay away from the dullards and as-
sociate only with friends and family who feel and act young.
Their exuberance will prove to be infectious.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You're not likely to have
any peace of mind if you fail to complete what you start.
Conversely, completing things will enhance your feelings of
self-worth and give you much gratification.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) One of your greatest assets
is your sincere concern for others. Those you're with will
sense that you care about them, which will end up proving
to be a settling influence on everybody.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Treat your affairs in a practi-


some of the answers are
subjective, and must con-
form to the host's opinions.
Eichner began the man-on-
the-street-style game show
on YouTube, but last year
Fuse picked it up as a
weekly television series. It
airs every Friday night.
Recently, the Queens-
born comedian sat down
with the Associated Press
to talk about the show and
his fascination with Meryl
Streep.
AP: Running up to New
Yorkers on the street isn't
always a safe thing to do.
Have you ever felt
threatened?
Eichner: Nine times out
of 10 people are game. You
know, pardon the pun. But
they are. They might not
want to participate, they
might just walk past me, but


Today's HOROSCOPE
cal, logical fashion, especially those that pertain to your
shopping and spending. Reason needs to preside over de-
sire and extravagance.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Others in the household or
workplace might not feel your sense of urgency pertaining
to things you deem important. Do what you can on your
own and ignore their priorities for the time being.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You'll fare much better if you
deal with each development when it occurs instead of let-
ting things pile up. Be reactive as well as assertive.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Socializing with old friends
whom you can be relaxed with will turn out to be quite
pleasurable. Conversely, you might not be too comfortable
around new or unfamiliar people.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Although you might not be the
first one out of the starting block in a competitive situation,
you will have enough tenacity and persistency to be one of


they're not angry Once in a
while I've had a handful of
occurrences where people
get angry An old lady
slapped me across the face
really hard. You know, peo-
ple sort of, like, shake the
camera you know they do
the Sean Penn thing where
they're like, 'Get out of my
face.' ... It's never gotten
crazy, but verbally it gets
heated and that's what's
fun about the show.
AP: Last season was
pretty funny, how do you
plan to step up your game
this time?
Eichner: This season's a
nice mix of real people on
the street and celebrity
guests. Will Ferrell, Maya
Rudolph and Rashida
Jones, Debra Messing, Zach
Quinto. Andy Cohen.
Rachel Dratch.


AP: This season papa
comes home, your Funny Or
Die founder Will Ferrell.
What do you have planned?
Eichner: Will plays a
game with me called,
'Would Drew Barrymore
like this?' and I run down a
list of things and he has to
tell me whether or not he
thinks Drew Barrymore
would like that and I tell
him based on my objective
opinion whether I think
he's right or wrong based
on my vision of what Drew
Barrymore would or would
not like. And then we play a
game with him called
'Scream for an American
Girl doll' and it's him ver-
sus these 7-, 8-year-old girls
on the street and they have
like a scream off to see who
can win this American Girl
doll and it's pretty funny.


the winners.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Even though you might not be
able to focus on or comprehend all the fine details, you will
have the wherewithal to see the entire picture rather than
each minute brushstroke.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't let others see you chaf-
ing at the bit over a proposal you find to be extremely in-
triguing. Displaying an indifferent attitude is likely to get you
a far better deal.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be willing to play second fid-
dle to your mate or special someone in a situation he or
she really wants to play the leading role. Harmony will
strengthen your relationship.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Do yourself and your
waistline a favor and don't overindulge in foods, sweets or
drinks that you really enjoy. Self-discipline in these areas
might take a lot of effort.


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Famer Paul Hornung is 77.
Actress Susan Lucci is 66.
Thought for Today: "Life
began for me when I ceased
to admire and began to re-
member." Willa Cather,
American author (1873-
1947).


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22
Mega Money: 3 6 7 44
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $1,061.50
3-of-4 MB 60 $232.50
3-of-4 1,050 $39.50
2-of-4 MB 1,532 $18.50
1-of-4 MB 11,089 $2.50
2-of-4 29,891 $2
Fantasy 5: 4 -11 -14 23 25
5-of-5 4 winners $51,961.73
4-of-5 395 $84.50
3-of-5 10,352 $9
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20
Fantasy 5: 7 12 22 27 29
5-of-5 3 winners $72,186.91
4-of-5 369 $94.50
3-of-5 10,877 $8.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 23,
the 358th day of 2012. There
are eight days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 23,1972, in what
became known as football's
"Immaculate Reception,"
Franco Harris of the Pitts-
burgh Steelers caught a pass
thrown by Terry Bradshaw
and scored a touchdown after
the ball had been deflected
during a collision between
Jack Tatum of the Oakland
Raiders and the Steelers'
John Fuqua; the Steelers won
the game (and an AFC divi-
sional playoff) 13-7, despite
controversy over the exact cir-
cumstances of the play.
On this date:
In 1783, George Washing-
ton resigned as commander
in chief of the Continental
Army and retired to his home
at Mount Vernon, Va.
In 1788, Maryland passed
an act to cede an area "not
exceeding 10 miles square"
for the seat of the national
government; about 2/3 of the
area became the District of
Columbia.
In 1823, the poem "Ac-
count of a Visit from St.
Nicholas" was published
anonymously in the Troy
(N.Y.) Sentinel; the verse,
more popularly known as
"'Twas the Night Before
Christmas," was later attrib-
uted to Clement C. Moore.
In 1962, Cuba began re-
leasing prisoners from the
failed Bay of Pigs invasion
under an agreement in which
Cuba would receive more
than $50 million worth of food
and medical supplies.
In 1986, the experimental
airplane Voyager, piloted by
Dick Rutan and Jeana Yeager,
completed the first non-stop,
non-refueled round-the-world
flight as it returned safely to
Edwards Air Force Base in
California.
Ten years ago: Senate
Republicans unanimously
elected Bill Frist to succeed
Trent Lott as their leader in
the next Congress.
Five years ago: The New
England Patriots set an NFL
record with their 15th win, the
best start in league history,
as they beat the Miami Dol-
phins 28-7.
One year ago: After days
of stalemate and rancor, the
U.S. Congress approved a
two-month renewal of payroll
tax cuts for 160 million work-
ers and unemployment bene-
fits for millions.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Ronnie Schell is 81. Emperor
Akihito of Japan is 79. Pro
and College Football Hall of











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Associated Press
Hallis Mailen, of Madison, Wis., participates in a rally calling for the recall of Gov. Scott Walker at the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison.
Organized labor, blindsided by a new law weakening union rights in Michigan, point to Walker, who raised more than $30 million to beat his
Democratic opponent in the June recall, as a prime target in the 2014 elections.




Governors targeted


Unionsplan new

offensive after loss

in Michigan

SAM HANANEL
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Blindsided
by a new law weakening union
rights in Michigan, organized
labor is preparing to target Re-
publican governors in politically
important states up for re-elec-
tion in 2014 part of a renewed
offensive against perceived anti-
union policies.
While unions fared reason-
ably well nationally last month
at the ballot box, their struggle to
survive has forced them to
spend staggering sums just try-
ing to hold ground. It is money
not spent on recruiting new
workers to stem a membership
decline that has made unions
more vulnerable than ever.
"It's unfortunate that that's the
case," said Michael Podhorzer,
political director for the AFL-
CIO. "But the reality of having
elected officials who are so anti-
organizing is that this is the first
step to getting to the point where
we can organize workers."
In Michigan, Gov Rick Snyder
signed legislation last week pro-
hibiting unions from requiring
workers to pay dues or repre-
sentation fees, even if they are
covered by union contracts.
It was another jarring blow for
unions in Michigan, a cradle of
the modern American labor
movement. Unions already had
spent $22 million this year in the
state on a failed effort to
enshrine collective bargaining
rights in the Michigan
Constitution.
Unions are gearing up for an-
other expensive fight in the
state. They hope to collect
enough signatures for a "statu-
tory initiative" that would let the
state's voters cast a ballot for or


'upL,
From left are Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett,
Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Ohio Gov. John Kasich. Labor leaders, as part of a renewed offensive against
perceived anti-union policies, point to Snyder and Walker as their prime targets in the 2014 elections, and
plan to target Corbett, Scott and Kasich.


But the reality of having elected
officials who are so anti-organizing
is that this is the first step to getting
to the point where we can organize
workers.


against "right-to-work," a meas-
ure essentially overriding the
substance of the new law.
But the symbolism of the law's
enactment in pro-labor Michi-
gan has given conservatives high
hopes they can succeed else-
where. Mark Mix, president of
the National Right to Work Com-
mittee, said his group is eyeing
Alaska, Missouri, Montana and
Pennsylvania.
"We think there's a chance just
about everywhere now," Mix
said.
Democratic governors in Mis-
souri and Montana would likely
block such measures. In Penn-
sylvania, Republican Gov. Tom


Michael Podhorzer
political director for the AFL-CIO.

Corbett recently said his state
lacks the political will to change
the labor laws, despite Corbett's
support and GOP control of the
Legislature.
So far, the costly battle has
produced mixed results for or-
ganized labor
Unions spent $24 million to
overturn an anti-union measure
in Ohio in November 2011, only
to lose their effort to recall Wis-
consin Gov Scott Walker the fol-
lowing June. Unions spent more
than $20 million in Wisconsin to
defeat the Republican in a spe-
cial election after he signed leg-
islation the year before stripping
most public employees of much


of their collective bargaining
power
This year, an effort to defeat a
California ballot measure that
would curb dues-collection for
political spending cost unions
more than they spent in
Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin
combined.
"Clearly, this is a strategy by
the ultraconservatives to make
us spend our resources, but we
have no choice," said Lee Saun-
ders, president of the American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees, the na-
tion's largest public employees
union.
The mixed bag belies labor's
successful fall campaign this
year.
Across the country, unions
helped elect Democratic gover-
nors, build labor-friendly ma-
jorities in state legislatures and
defeat ballot initiatives. They
also played a key role in helping
President Barack Obama win
swing states including Ohio, Ne-
vada and Wisconsin, according
to exit polls.


Page C3


Hearts and souls of American teachers


A after the horrific
events in New-
town, Conn., par-
ents across America are
thanking God their 6-
year-olds will be safely
asleep in their beds
tonight.
The rest of us are reel-
ing from the reality that
small innocent school Pat Deu
children are not immune GU
from senseless violence CO
which has no reason or
forgiveness.
It is the schoolteachers who are
emerging as the heroes of the day
The principal and school psychol-
ogist lunged at the shooter and


it
E
_


were killed, as were four
teachers who shielded
their students from harm
with their own bodies.
Teachers. Everyday he-
roes. People who dedi-
cate their lives to the
well-being of your chil-
dren, their children, any
children. These are the
schman people who go to work
-ST every day and spend eight
M hours with 5- and 6-year-
olds, pre-teens, a troubled
teenager, aspiring doctors
and writers, car mechanics and re-
searchers, singers and artists, math-
ematicians and soldiers, future
teachers and the next generation of


parents themselves.
OK, so what can we possible say
to people who run toward a man
carrying a semiautomatic assault
rifle who is threatening their
school? Thank you? It is hardly suf-
ficient, but it is also not unex-
pected of them putting the safety of
children above their own.
In a smaller measure, it is the
same thanks we say to those who
day after day go to battle with liter-
acy, numeracy, FCAT'ism, end-of-
course exams, performance pay,
anti-teacher unions campaigns,
anti-teacher-effectiveness meas-
ures and perpetually increasing
expectations some beyond their
ability to impact


Regardless of the socioeconomic
status of any child in their care, re-
gardless of the difficulties any stu-
dent brings with them impeding
their learning, regardless of their
lack of English language skills,
their innate intelligence, their
homelessness or wealth, or the
amount of involvement parents
offer, teachers still put the same ef-
fort into their teaching for every
student. They are the true heroes;
because regardless of the chal-
lenges they face, they come to work
everyday determined to overcome
them only for the benefit of their
students' futures.


Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Citrus


County's


letter to


Santa
Santa called the other
evening and asked if
I could assist in put-
ting together a Christmas
gift bag for Citrus County.
I admitted to Santa I
was not the best source
and some people in the
county would prefer I be
stuffed in a Christmas gift
bag with my hands and
feet tied and then
dropped off the Gospel Is-
land Bridge in Inverness.
Not wanting to be on
Santa's bad side, I gave
him some suggestions for
community gifts. Here's
the list:
1) An agreement be-
tween Progress Energy
and Citrus County for the
utility company to pay its
very large tax bill, or at
least a significant portion
of it. Negotiations broke
down this year and a law-
suit between the county's
largest employer and tax-
payer was filed. Santa,
please help the adults
find a solution; we are
tired of paying attorneys
to resolve problems.
2) Santa, while you are
at Progress Energy, we'd
really appreciate it if you
could bring us a fully-
operational nuclear plant
and plop it down at the
Crystal River energy site.
Lots of our fine citizens
work at the plant and we
really don't want it to go
away
3) A Riverwalk is
planned for Crystal River
and it is really close to
happening. Santa, if you
could have everyone look
at the big picture, we'd re-
ally like this to get built in
2013, because it will help
bring tourism and jobs to
our community. (Are you
seeing a theme here,
Santa? Our economy is re-
ally in need of some help
from the North Pole).
4) Santa, Whispering
Pines Park in Inverness is
the very best public park
in this part of Florida and
it needs some attention.
More specifically, it needs
some money to keep oper-
ating. These folks we elect
to run our governments
have dropped the ball on
this one and some big cut-
backs are in the works. A
gift box with $360,000
would get us through the
year
5) Speaking of contribu-
tions, the United Way of
Citrus County raises
money for a lot of the less
fortunate people in the
community and it has
been a tough year. If you
could sprinkle a little
more generosity dust
around the county, we can
reach the goal.
6) Santa, while I have
asked for lots of gifts so
far, let me ask you to take
one thing with you. A por-
tion of our population has
an unusual dependence
on drugs, and it is crush-
ing our small-town spirit.
So many people who end
up in the newspaper's po-
lice report are spiraling
out of control because of
drug dependence. Crime,
spouse abuse, child neg-
lect, job loss and violence
are all tied back to de-
pendence on drugs. Every
one of those drug-
addicted citizens starts
using drugs with the belief
he or she will be the person


Page C3


I







Page C2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012



PINION


"No theory is good exception on
condition one use it to go beyond."
Andre Gide, "Journals" 1918


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. ................... publisher
M ike A rnold .................................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ ................. citizen member
Mac Harris ..................... .......... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ..... ....... ...... copy chief
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


GIANT STEP






Riverwalk





can alter





cityscape


he seemingly hard part
to making the Riverwalk
along King's Bay a real-
ity has been accomplished, but
more heavy lifting is required.
The last remaining property
owners who have yet to sign on
to the plan have
agreed in princi- THE I
ple, but more de-
tails need to be Riverwa
worked out by another
Crystal River City form
Manager Andy
Houston, whom OUR 01
council members Mae
recently author- Maketh
ized to negotiate
with those property owners.
The Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce's area council in
Crystal River deserves credit
for helping convince five prop-
erty owners to buy into the
Riverwalk concept.
Some issues, such as park-
ing, stormwater runoff and the
impact the boardwalk would
have on future development,
still need resolving. It is only
natural that property owners
would want assurances from
the city, especially since they
are giving up easement along
the water on property that, in
some cases, is worth millions.
We urge council members to
be reasonable and look at this
from the property owners' per-
spective with an eye toward
what is best for the entire com-
munity. Residents identified


Raising rates
I would like to know when the
vote was cast to raise the
rates on the Citrus County
disadvantaged transport. It .
was raised from $1 to $3
each way-300 percent. I
can see doubling it, but
tripling it? Some of us on
disability cannot afford to
go to doctors' appoint-
ments now and this cuts
into our food monies for CA
the month. Please look at 563-
this again. These buses are
state and federally funded.
They just built a million-dollar com-
plex. Are we expected to pay for it?
Other power options
The time has come for our county
to be proactive and look at other
options for power. Perhaps there are
grants available for solar power.
Maybe Withlacoochee Electric could
expand and service our entire
county. Citizens should not be ex-
pected to pay repairs and construc-
tion costs for privately owned utility
companies. Let the Duke stockhold-
ers foot the bill. Forget Port Citrus.


S
l
e


P
s


I


I

-0


this as a vital component to the
city some years back, but the
idea has gained traction only re-
cently Earlier this year, the
Community Redevelopment
Agency earmarked a $1 million
to fund the second and final legs
of the project- a
;SUE: 902-foot boardwalk
stretching from
k takes Cracker's Bar and
r step Grill to a parking
ard. lot on Northwest
First Street.
INION: Shortly after-
ward, negotiations
happen. with property
owners began in
earnest. Now that the property
owners are at the table talking,
it is time for the city council to
remove all barriers from mak-
ing this dream a reality.
Businesses along King's Bay
and across U.S. 19 stand to ben-
efit from this project. Initially,
the bayside shops and restau-
rants will see growth. And as
the area prospers and word
gets out, the rest of the busi-
nesses will see the advantages
from the project.
Residents have said it is
their No. 1 priority, the money
is available, and the property
owners are negotiating. City
council members should do
everything they can to ensure
the project comes to fruition -
even if it translates to stepping
aside and not interfering with
the momentum.


That's a huge waste of money. Con-
centrate on eliminating the need for
Duke in our county. Let's go solar;
other counties have. Duke
JND can hit the road.
FF Sitting idle
"Patrol cars" article -
thumbs up to the person
who wrote it. Very true
story. You need to remind
the sheriff's (office). All
you see is two cop cars
parked in bushes in op-
)579 posite directions talking
to one another, not doing
their jobs, like the story
said. Thumbs up to the person
who wrote it.
Need parking spots
I'm calling about this Citrus Av-
enue (U.S.) 19 property. The best
use of the property would be a
parking lot. There is no parking
downtown near Heritage Village.
We have to park on the street. We
have to park in empty businesses.
Preferably, a two- or three-story
parking lot. That might take care
of all the future things coming up.
Just a thought.


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


The filibuster stalker


-WASHINGTON
deas are not re-
sponsible for the
people who believe
them, but when evalu-
ating Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid's
ideas for making the
Senate more like the
House of Representa-
tives, consider the
source. Reid is a leg-
islative mechanic try-
ing to make Congress'
machinery efficiently


George Will
OTHER
VOICES


responsive to his party's progres-
sivism. And proper progressives
think the Constitution, under-
stood as a charter of limited gov-
ernment, is unconstitutional.
They think the "living" Consti-
tution gives government powers
sufficient for whatever its ambi-
tions are, enabling it to respond
quickly to clamorous majorities.
Hence the progressive campaign
to substantially weaken the abil-
ity of senators to use filibusters to
delay action.
Until 1917, it was generally im-
possible to stop extended Senate
debates. Then during the ad-
ministration of Woodrow Wilson,
the Democrats' first progressive
president the Senate adopted
the cloture rule whereby debate
could be ended by a two-thirds
majority vote. In 1975, the re-
quirement was lowered to three-
fifths. If there is now another
weakening of minority rights,
particularly by a change brought
about by breaking Senate rules,
the Senate will resemble the
House. There the majority con-
trols the process and the disre-
garded minority can only hope to
one day become the majority and
repay the disregard in kind.
Wilson was the first president
to criticize the American found-
ing, which he did because the
Constitution bristles with delay-
ing and blocking mechanisms, es-
pecially the separation of powers.
The point of progressivism, say
its adherents, is to progress up
from the Founders' fetish with


limiting government
and restraining ma-
jorities. Hence pro-
gressives' animus
against the filibuster,
which protects minor-
ity rights by allowing
for the measurement
of intensity as well as
mere numbers.
Since there have
been 50 states, Repub-
licans have never had
60 senators. Democ-
rats have had that


many after 11 elections. Both par-
ties are situational ethicists re-
garding the filibuster in 2005, a
Republican Senate majority
threatened to forbid filibusters of
judicial nominees during George
W Bush's administration. It is,
however, when filibusters im-
pede the liberal agenda that ex-
cited editorials are written and
solemn seminars are convened to
deplore the "constitutional
crisis" of a "dysfunctional
Congress."
Recourse to filibusters has in-
creased in tandem with, and
partly because of, the 70 times
Reid has used a parliamentary
device ("filling the tree") to limit
and even deny the minority's
right to offer amendments to leg-
islation. Furthermore, 69 times
Reid has bypassed committees,
bringing bills written in private
directly to the Senate floor with-
out any Republican participa-
tion. The filibuster is a means
whereby the minority can give an
overbearing majority an incen-
tive to compromise. Yet progres-
sives simultaneously complain
about the filibuster and the ab-
sence of compromise.
Under Senate rules, it takes 67
votes to change the rules. Reid,
however, may decide in January,
on the first day of the new ses-
sion, the supposedly "new" Sen-
ate can adopt new rules by a
simple majority. This ignores the
fact the Senate, unlike the House,
is a continuing body because,
with staggered elections, no more


than one-third of its members can
be new and not nearly that
many ever are new at any time.
The Senate can adopt new
rules by a simple majority only by
ignoring its long-standing rules.
In the 2005 argument about fili-
bustering judicial nominees, Sen.
Joe Biden believed, or was told
he believed, this "arrogance of
power" ignored the fact that "the
Senate is not meant to be a place
of pure majoritarianism."
Four House Democrats have
asked a federal court to declare
Senate filibusters unconstitu-
tional. They said the superma-
jorities needed to end a filibuster
infringes the principle of major-
ity rule and dilutes the votes of
members of the House. The court
has many reasons, each suffi-
cient, for refusing to so rule, in-
cluding these two:
The Constitution said each
house of Congress "may deter-
mine the rules of its proceed-
ings." Also, the Constitution
requires of Congress six super-
majorities (for ratifying treaties,
proposing constitutional amend-
ments for ratification, impeach-
ment convictions, overriding
vetoes, expelling members and
removing an incapacitated presi-
dent who objects to removal). It is
a perverse non sequitur to say if
the Constitution does not man-
date a particular supermajority,
it is impermissible.
Conservatives believe 98 per-
cent of good governance consists
of stopping bad meaning most
- ideas. So conservatives can tol-
erate liberal filibusters more eas-
ily than liberals, who relish
hyperkinetic government, can
tolerate conservative filibusters.
Come January, 21 of Reid's 55
Democrats will have come to the
Senate in 2009 or later They have
never been in the minority. They
must remember this: Some day
they may be.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Depending on
the government
I don't need to tell most of you
our government has left us and
our Constitution, and is leading
us into government dependency
for our needs. This is an unsatis-
fiable appetite; it's going to take
heavy increases in income tax to
sustain. That's the way of the
beast.
This system will lead to slav-
ery of the entire country There
won't be enough tax money to
feed the beast. There's not
enough workers to feed the
beast, nor are there enough
wealthy people. If it weren't for
the wealthy, there would be no
jobs. The way it is, they're being
ran out of business. All of this
because a group of people I call
"the shadow government," wants
absolute control; it's all part of
"The New World Order" When
they finally get the citizens' guns,
then everything will be about
final.
The people are the govern-
ment, and this two-party system
is not working for us. One side
has created fear and hate of the
other side, so they can stay in


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

power, which is rapidly destroy-
ing America. But as long as the
people are fooled by these tac-
tics, it's only going to get worse.


But I have no fear, this is all a
sign the Lord's return is very,
very near, and I'm ready
Clarence Lovelady
Crystal River

ATV comments
outrageous
It always amazes me the outra-
geous comments people make to
further their own cause. Jan
Laarman of Crystal River said,
and I quote, "people here for na-
ture typically introduce higher
levels of income and education
than those interested in ATVs."
Wow. Where is the study that
supported this theory? Most peo-
ple I know who use ATVs are
very much into nature and love
riding into the back country to
find their little piece of heaven.
It also allows many who are
physically challenged to go
places and enjoy nature as much
as you or anyone else.
Quit putting down others just
because you don't agree with
what they like to do. It is a free
country
Claude Overholt
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Joy to the world, the Lord is coming


( A nd there were in great joy which shall be to
L the same country all people. For unto you is
s hep born this day in
herds abiding in the city of David
the field, keep- '.. a Saviour which
ing watch over is Christ the
their flock by I Lord."
night. And, lo, Luke 2: 8
the angel of the through 11, KJV
Lord came upon
them, and the Tuesday is
glory of the Lord Christmas Day
shone round Fred Brannen 2012. Cheryl and
about them; and A SLICE I have been cele-
they were sore rating since
afraid. And the OF LIFE Thanksgiving. As
angel said unto good grandpar-
them, Fear not: for behold, ents are supposed to do, a
I bring you good tidings of few weeks ago, we attended


the "Nutcracker" with many
of you at Curtis Peterson Au-
ditorium. We have also been
to a concert at Inverness
Middle School and programs
at two different churches.
During the performances
this year, as always, I remem-
bered being a little boy wear-
ing a bathrobe with my head
tied up in a scarf, carrying a
crooked stick while playing
the part of a shepherd.
I recalled I understood
our plays were make-
believe. Nonetheless, it was
still always a thrill when the
time finally came and a lit-
tle girl dressed as an angel


announced the birth of the
Christ child. Then, at that
moment, we'd all break into
song:

'Joy to the world, the Lord
is come, let earth receive
her King! Let every heart,
prepare him room and
Heaven and nature sing, let
Heaven and nature sing, let
Heaven, and Heaven, and
nature sing!"
Joy to the World, v.1,
Isaac Watts, 1719.

But, was it only make-
believe? Really?
I wasn't a shepherd, the


little girl wasn't an angel
and the doll used to repre-
sent the Christ child wasn't
really God incarnate.
But, was it all nothing
more than pretend? No.
I believe it was and it re-
mains something more. The
birth of our Lord and Savior
Jesus Christ was very real
and our celebration of this
event is a commemoration of
His coming. Regardless of cir-
cumstances, it isn't make-
believe, it is an immutable fact

"He rules the world, with
truth and grace and makes
the nations prove ... the glo-


ries of His righteousness
and wonders of His love,
and wonders of His love,
and wonders, and wonders
ofHis love!"
Joy to the World, v.3,
Isaac Watts, 1719.

My wish, my heartfelt
hope, is this joy will be real
for each and every one of
you not only as we cele-
brate Christmas, but each
and every day


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Floridians talk secession
Florida is one of the states where
petitions for seceding from the
union have circulated after
the election. Many have 0
sworn to leave the country
if Obama was re-elected
and Obamacare continued
along with other aspects of
big government. Most have
said they would go to a
country such as Canada or
Australia where socialized
medicine actually exists. If CA
one wants to get away 563-
from government, the
place to go is Somalia,
where there's no government at all.
Waiting on X-rays
I'm calling the Chronicle in refer-


TARGETED
Continued from Page C1

But amid the costly battles on
dozens of measures across the
country, overall union member-
ship has shrunk to 11.8 percent
of the workforce. It could hit an-
other historic low this year after
public sector unions lost thou-
sands of members in Wisconsin
and in other states that have
turned to layoffs due to budget
shortfalls.
Labor leaders point to Snyder
and Walker as their prime tar-
gets in the 2014 elections. How-
ever, Walker is seen as having
the upper hand in light of his
win last summer in the highly
publicized recall election.
Walker raised more than
$30 million to beat Democrat
Tom Barrett in the June recall
by almost 7 percentage points, a
wider margin than their first
face-off in the November 2010
election.
"Gov Walker is a national fig-
ure now and has already faced
down a direct challenge from
labor, a benefit he did not have
in 2010," Walker adviser Dan
Blum said.


TEACHERS
Continued from Page Cl

Yet it is those same people who
would put their lives on the line
for our children whom politicians
have targeted. Pure political rhet-
oric would have you believe many
of our teachers are ineffective and
dragging down the educational
system in America. The truth is
less than 3 percent of teachers
need improvement, and our stu-
dents are as competitive on tests
as any students in the world given
the same socioeconomic status
and opportunity. Most recently,
U.S. fourth-graders rose to the top
of international test scores. And
who exactly cares about test
scores right now? Not me, for one.


ence to the Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal emergency room. First of all,
their staff was very professional,
very courtesy. (I) went
SND there last night, let me
tell you. Time to see the
Doctor, one hour price-
less. Time to wait for X-
ray guy to come, 2 1/2 to
3 hours ridiculous.
Why? Because they don't
hire enough people. They
had one X-ray person
working the whole hospi-
0579 tal. That is ridiculous.
v I They want to move up
quality care? Hire more
people, plain and simple. Other-
wise, thanks to the ER. They did a
wonderful job with the exception of
the three-hour wait for the X-ray


The AFL-CIO's Podhorzer
said unions plan to target Ohio
Gov John Kasich, who was seen
as weakened when his enact-
ment of a measure limiting pub-
lic employee bargaining rights
was overturned by referendum.
Kasich's approval in surveys of
Ohioans has improved some-
what, although it remains below
50 percent.
Hungry for a win, unions also
are circling Corbett in Pennsyl-
vania and Florida Gov. Rick
Scott Though the states are ex-
pensive for advertising, the Re-
publican governors are seen as
vulnerable, with approval rat-
ings below 40 percent in
November
While defeating Corbett, Ka-
sich, Snyder or Walker would
strike a blow for more tradition-
ally pro-labor manufacturing
states, the chance to defeat
Scott is seen as a potential
bright spot for labor's future.
"Florida is different. It's one
place where unions are trying
to expand," Florida Democratic
strategist Steve Schale said.
Florida is a weak labor state,
but one where the heavy pres-
ence of service-sector jobs gives
large and newer unions such as
Service Employees Interna-


Instead, I care about the safety
and well-being of our children. I
also care every one of our teach-
ers is well-trained and well-
prepared to teach more rigorous
curriculum, and every one of our
schools is ramping up to meet the
next generation of higher stan-
dards. I care that our school board
and district administrators are
committed to being held account-
able for student performance -
because we will be.
What I don't care about is
teacher evaluations based on
some flawed FCAT score, or test-
ing data culled from someone
else's class for students assigned
to another teacher That is neither
valid nor honest. I care instead
about the efforts and outcomes for
every classroom as measured by
the individual and responsible


guy, but it's not his fault.
Dogs disturb my peace
I perhaps could be the person
with the big, rude, insulting mouth
(who) someone called in to the
Chronicle (and) that's why they love
their animals more than people.
Well, I think it's insulting when I go
out my side door on the side of my
yard to put water in my birdbath be-
cause I love the birds, and seed for
the squirrels, and the neighbor
opens their back door and all of a
sudden five rat dogs ... are barking
their heads off right next to me on
my property. I can't even think.
That's insulting. I can't even enjoy
my own side yard, backyard, any-
more because of these people with
their dirty animals.


tional Union an opportunity to
grow.
Former Gov Charlie Crist,
who left the Republican party
and changed his affiliation to
Democrat, is eyeing a run for
governor in 2014. Crist was seen
as a defender of public-sector
unions.
Conservative groups deny
claims the push for right-to-
work laws and other anti-union
measures is part of a concerted
GOP effort to weaken unions be-
cause they are a pillar of Demo-
cratic candidates and causes.
"It means that Michigan is
going to be more prosperous
and workers there are going to
have more freedom and choice
when it comes to a union," said
Tim Phillips, president of
Americans for Prosperity, which
has funded anti-union meas-
ures in Michigan and around
the country
But Phillips said the decrease
in union membership "does im-
pair their ability to just bully
people politically, which they've
done for a long time."


Follow Sam Hananel on
Iwvitter: http://twittercom/
SamHananelA4P


- teacher evaluation of progress.
Teachers don't lie to protect their
students. Teachers care deeply
about each student's progress and
ability to move forward. They treat
each student as they would their
own child, even willing to lay
down their life before allowing
their students to be harmed.
If you don't believe me, I suggest
you revisit the events at Sandy
Hook Elementary School before
making judgment The extraordi-
nary thing about that staff is they
represent all teachers I know -
brave, caring and dutiful. They
loved their students regardless of
their test scores. This is the heart
of a teacher
Shame on "education reform-
ers" who believe less of our class-
room teachers. Accusing them of
somehow not teaching to their full


Supporting the
ATV idea
This is in reference to the
prejudicial letter regarding
Commissioner (Scott) Adams'
proposal for the promotion of
ATVs. I would like to see the
statistics supporting the
writer's statement "people
here for nature typically intro-
duce higher levels of income
and education than those in-
terested in ATVs."
The median household in-
come for a Citrus County fam-
ily in 2007 (U.S. Census
bureau) was $35,810. The me-
dian household income for
ATV owners in 2007 (Specialty
Vehicle Institute of America)
was $52,800. While most ATV
owners consider themselves
"blue collar," 23 percent of
ATV owners have professional
or managerial occupations.
Seventy-five percent of ATV
owners ride as a family recre-
ational activity The price of a
new ATV runs between $4,000
and $11,000. So to ride as a
family is not an insubstantial
investment.
Our public recreational
lands should support the
recreational interests of as
many citizens as possible, in-
cluding hunters, boaters, fish-
erman, hikers, horseback
riders, bird watchers and ATV
riders. Riding on public land
in Florida requires vehicles be
titled and permits acquired,
which encourages people to
ride legally and safely and in-
creases the opportunity for
ATV safety education. ATVs
also provide access to lands
people with mobility difficul-
ties might not otherwise be
able to enjoy
Having specified areas for a
variety of activities ensures
those activities are enjoyed


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

who can control his or her addic-
tion. They never are. Drugs always
win. Santa, as your sleigh flies away
from our community, suck all of the
drugs with you.
7) Santa, we'd also like you to
drop off a few additional public of-
ficials without the extra dose of ego.
We seem to get ones who have very
large egos and have trouble playing
in the same sandbox. They take
each others' toys and want credit
for everything. More leadership
and smaller egos would be a really
good thing.
8) Santa, it would be really neat if
you would goose up the generosity
thing we mentioned so Citrus
County can raise money to build a
YMCA. While we have talked about
it for decades, no YMCA is in our
county Hernando County has a
YMCA. Pasco County has a YMCA.
Marion County has a YMCA.
(Sumter County has a truck stop -
oh never mind that one.) But Citrus
County does not have a YMCA.
Help us raise the funds to change
that in 2013.
9) Another good gift for Citrus
County would be more volunteers


capacity, holding them account-
able for the shortcomings of soci-
ety ranging from poverty and
immigration to learning disabili-
ties from birth.
Basing teacher pay and employ-
ment security to the scrutiny of bi-
ased tests purposely created to fail
40 percent and 50 percent of every
test-taker; tests that fail a signifi-
cantly larger percentage of disad-
vantaged students than those of
wealth; failing more minority stu-
dents than passing them; failing
more immigrant students than who
get by Testing causes the majority
of students with a learning disabil-
ity to be stopped in their tracks de-
spite their best efforts because of
even one standardized test
Teachers. Both heroes and vil-
lains of today? You need to decide
which because our politicians


without disruption to others.
While no single approach is
likely to solve all of the county's
woes, taking steps to broaden
the area's recreational appeal
is a logical course of action.
For more information on ATV
riding on public lands in
Florida, go to http://floridaohv.
org/ohv_locations.html#public.
Regina Fillinger
Hernando

Power poles form
Christian cross
Re: The ACLU's (and other
so called protection from reli-
gion groups) drive to remove
all religious symbols from pub-
lic property.
As I was driving north from
Crystal River on U.S. 19 the
other day, I noticed a large
number of power/telephone
poles that have one crossbar
near the top forming a perfect
Christian cross. This appears
to be a blatant attempt by the
power companies to promote a
religion and since these poles
are located on public property,
it seems to me the ACLU
should be suing the power
companies to either remove
these offending poles or at
least have the configuration of
the pole changed to position
the crossbar at an angle other
than at a right angle to the
pole. Where is the ACLU,
and/or other like-minded
groups, when you need them?
Len Martin
Pine Ridge

SUBMISSIONS
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


for Art Jones and his Rotary project
to clean up King's Bay People are
finally realizing we create pollution
and can fight it The "One Rake at a
Time" program has been conta-
gious and needs to expand to
Homosassa and other pollution-
damaged resources in our
community
10) Finally Santa, if you could re-
mind folks we have to work together
in the next year to overcome our
problems. No one from Washington
or Tallahassee is going to come
down here with solutions to our
problems. Those solutions have to
come from right here.
So maybe you could remind folks
not to measure their accomplish-
ments by what they are against.
Leadership and community spirit
are about doing things and making
good things happen. Maybe, Santa,
you could require folks to make a
list of the two things they support
and are willing to work for Maybe if
everyone was trying to accomplish
good things, we could work through
the tough times together
Thanks, Santa, and keep your seat
belt on while flying. And no texting.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


cannot. They demoralize teachers
and at the same time rely on
teachers to create a brighter fu-
ture, a safer environment and a
better-educated student who will
ensure the economic well-being of
our country
With whom do you entrust the
care and welfare of our children
and the future of our country?
Let's renew our faith and belief in
all teachers and stop making them
the scapegoats for all of society's
failures. Thank a teacher for your
child's education. To those who
have also saved a child's life, we
are all eternally grateful. This is
what America is all about. We are
all in this together
--In--
Pat Deutschman is a member of
the Citrus County School Board.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 C3


m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound oFF


Shouldn't be driving
There's been many com-
ments made about driving
habits around this part of
the county, especially
around the Forest Ridge
area over at Publix market
off of (County Road) 486.
Yesterday, I had an elderly
person coming out of the
side road and he decided he
was going to come into my
lane and he started for me.
Had I not blown on the
horn, he'd have sideswiped
me big time. Then he takes
off down the road as fast as
he could drive. I don't un-
derstand these people.
There's been a lot of com-
ments made about youths
being lousy drivers, but I'm
telling you, if you look at
the records of all the
wrecks that have happened
around Publix or anywhere
along Forest Ridge, see how
many of them are older
people by age and then tell
me the youth are the prob-
lem. I've had more run-ins
and more close calls with
elderly people who probably
shouldn't be driving a car
right now and yet they still
get their licenses, which I
don't understand.
Serve one master
You cannot serve God and
money too. It just can't be
done.
Parade problem
This message is for the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce: Each year, you
put out a theme for the pa-
rade. This year, it was "Post-
card Christmas." I watched
the parade. I only saw one
float in the whole parade
that had anything to do with


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a postcard. So it's not fair
to the people when you put
out a theme and no one fol-
lows it. You need to think
about it. It happens every
year. There was nothing in
the parade except one float
that had anything to do with
a postcard.
Beware this scam
Medicare seniors beware.
An agent for an insurance
company called me to tell
me she was delivering up-
date pages to my Medicare
book and needed an ap-
pointment for me to sign for
them. This was a falsehood.
I called Medicare and they


said they would never call
you on the phone. Updates
would only be done through
the mail.
Regulate firearms
In response to Harry
Cooper's letter in today's
Citrus County Chronicle,
"Costas wrong": I would like
to support Mr. Costas be-
cause Mr. Costas has raised
the question many of us
should raise. If the Second
Amendment is designed to
assist in keeping a well-reg-
ulated militia, as it says it
is, then what militia does
the NFL football player be-
long to and why was he not


regulated in his use of est here in Citrus County
firearms? He had a firearm and merry Christmas.
under the Second Amend- Children need meals
ment, which starts, "A well-


regulated militia."
Honest citizens
It is so nice to know we
still have honest people here
in Citrus County. I sent a
card to my paper carrier
with a Walmart gift card in it
for a thank you. It was sent
to the wrong address. The
gentleman opened it by mis-
take, but was so kind to call
me and return the card to
me. Wasn't that a wonderful
gift for Christmas? Thank
you so much for being hon-


This is in response to the
"Stop fancy meals," and the
board of education for chil-
dren. I went to school from
1958 to 1960 and we al-
ways had good meals for
lunch. We had a meat, we
had a vegetable and we had
potatoes or rice or some-
thing. We had bread and we
always had a dessert. I
don't know where this per-
son had one item for lunch.
And as for children not hav-
ing breakfast, that gives
them their health to keep


them healthy so they can
study. I don't know who and
what kind of type of school
they went to, but it must
have been a reform school,
because it sure wasn't a
good educational school for
children. You know, children
need good lunches.
Code enforcement
Code enforcement in Cit-
rus County is nothing but a
joke. I've complained al-
most 30 times to code en-
forcement in Citrus Springs
about a gentleman (who)
works an auto body shop
out of his garage. Every day,
there are cars and cars. And
on Saturday, sometimes
there's five, six cars being
worked on. I can't stand the
noise. I can't stand the
fumes. It's ridiculous to
have code enforcement.
They do nothing about it.
Thanks for help
My name is Lenora
Roland and I want to thank
Officer Brand and Officer
Vincent for helping me with
my husband (who) has
Alzheimer's.
Radioactive
I'm calling regarding a
Sound Off about the inactive
nuclear plant. The caller
claimed there is nothing nu-
clear going on there. On the
contrary. Spent nuclear fuel
is extremely hot, still ra-
dioactive and requires cool-
ing for years. That steam
coming out of the cooling
towers aren't from the em-
ployees making a pot of tea,
you know. About the sugges-
tion that the plant's security
team be laid off: Did I men-
tion all the radioactive mate-
rials sitting in the plant?


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BUSINESS


- CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SUPER




SALES


discounts abound as stores try

to salvage shopping season


OFF 0,
MARKED PRICE





70% -


OFF
fMtARKII D pIC F


NEW YORK ShopperTrak, which analyzes customer tra
cutting its holiday sales forecast as shopping has limped alor
giving weekend buying frenzy.
ShopperTrak, based in Chicago, said Wednesday that it n<
sales to be up 2.5 percent, down from a 3.3 percent projection
ber.
It cited Superstorm Sandy and "heavily discounted mercha
forecast, which compares with a 3.7 percent increase a year
ShopperTrak still believes that foot traffic will be up 2.8 per
the first increase in visits for the holiday season since 2008.
"We were hoping that this past Saturday would be the kick
come," said Bill Martin, co-founder of ShopperTrak. "But it fee
out of the holiday since Black Friday."
Martin also believes that the Newton, Conn., school shooti
tempering shoppers' moods over the weekend. "Christmas rr
with the family than putting gifts under the tree."
For the week ended Saturday, foot traffic was up 15.1 perc
rose 16.4 percent over the previous week. But compared witl
foot traffic was down 4.4 percent and sales declined 4.3 perc


P M Associated Press
-NEW YORK
h T T en it comes to
fat holiday dis-
counts, better
late than never
This holiday shopping
~e"L ion.11 many stores
haven't been offering the
same blockbuster deals as
they did last year Instead,
they've dangled offers of
free shipping and no-fee
jlayaways to lure shoppers.
5 But during the final
weekend before Christ-
mas, shoppers should ex-
pect to see more "70
percent off" and "buy
one, get one free" signs
as stores try to salvage a
season that so far has
been disappointing.
Teen retailer Aero-
postale Inc. has slashed
prices on everything in
its stores by 60 percent.
Rival teen chain Ameri-
can Eagle Outfitters is of-
fering 40 percent off all
purchases. Saks Fifth Av-
enue is cutting prices on
some designer clothing
up to 60 percent. And
Children's Place, a chil-
dren's clothing chain, is
offering up to 75 percent
Soff on its website.
The sales are aimed at
affic at U.S. stores, is luring shoppers like Jen-
ng since the Thanks- nifer Romanello,who
lives in Rockville Centre,
N.Y Romanello, a pub-
ow expects holiday licity consultant, is plan-
In issued in Septem- ning to spend $400 less
on holiday gifts this sea-
andise" for the reduced son as she spent a year
ago. ago. She said she'll be
cent from a year ago, looking for deep dis-
counts when she heads
off to good things to to stores this weekend.
els like the steam is "I just want to be cau-
tious," said Romanello, 47,
ng had an effect in who has two children,
lay be about being ages 12 and 15. "If it's a
great deal, I will consider"
;ent and retail sales The price slashing may
h the year-ago period, be good news for shop-
ent. pers, but it hurts stores.
Their profits likely will


suffer in their last-ditch
effort to boost sales dur-
ing the two-month holi-
day shopping period, a
time when they can
make up to 40 percent of
their annual revenue.
To be sure, stores have
been offering discounts
throughout the season,
but they resisted the
blockbuster deals that
ate away at profits last
year In fact, promotions
and discounting were
down 5 percent through
Dec. 10 compared with
last year, according to
BMO Capital Markets,
which tracks promotions
at about two-thirds of
mall stores. But sales
have been slow, and as of
Dec. 17, the level of dis-
counting is now even
with a year ago.
Now, stores will have
to rely even more on the
final days before Christ-
mas to make up the sales
shortfall. ShopperTrak,
which counts foot traffic
and its own proprietary
sales numbers from
40,000 retail outlets
across the country, said
Wednesday the number
of shoppers in stores for
the week that ended Dec.
15 fell 4.4 percent from
the year-ago period,
while sales declined 4.3
percent. As a result, the
company said it would
slash its sales forecast to
a 2.5 percent increase to
$257.7 billion, down from
the 3.3 percent growth it
had initially predicted.
And online sales,
which have been seen as
a beacon during the sea-
son, have been below ex-
pectations, too. Online
sales are up 13 percent
to $35 billion from Nov. 1
through Dec. 16, accord-
ing to comScore, an on-
line research. That pace
See Page D2


Facebook users hit like,' stores jump into action


Associated Press
NEW YORK Facebook isn't
just for goofy pictures and silly
chatter Whether shoppers know
it or not, their actions online
help dictate what's in stores dur-
ing this holiday season.
After polling customers on the
social media site, Macy's de-
cided to carry denim jeans in
bright neon hues rather than
pastels. Wal-Mart for the first
time decided to let customers
vote on which toys they want dis-
counted. And to better plan or-
ders for the decorative flags she
sells, a small business owner in
Mississippi is running a contest
that encourages customers to
chime in about how they're dec-
orating their homes this winter
The impact of social media on a
company's bottom line is tough to
quantify, with no hard data on how
millions of Facebook fans and
Twitter followers translate into
sales for stores. But during the hol-
iday shopping season, a roughly


Tashalee Rodriguez, of Boston, uses her smartphone wh
Nov. 23 at Macy's in downtown Boston.


two-month period when retailers
can make up to 40 percent of their
annual revenue, stores are uncov-
ering a valuable use for all the
seemingly useless online mutter-
ing: market research.


The result is tha
folks press the "like
give their seal of ap
particular company
make a comment or
they like the leathe:


just bought, they're helping
everyone from independently-
owned small shops to the na-
tion's biggest retailers make
decisions about what products to
stock up on, what to play up on
the sales floor and what promo-
tions to offer online.
For the first time this year, one
of Macy's Inc.'s apparel buyers
suggested the company solicit
feedback on Facebook on which
colors it should stock for "Else"
brand jeans in the fall ahead of
the holiday shopping season.
Several weeks later, with about
2,500 "likes" and 750 comments,
"Very Vivid" colors in bright
blue, orange and red were de-
Associated Press cleared the victor over softer
lie shopping shades such as baby pink and
baby blue.
The company, which has more
t whenever than 9 million "likes" on Face-
e" button to book, followed up with another
proval for a poll in July on whether it should
y's page or carry a "Kensie" brand dress in


1 how much
r boots they


.Page D2


Looking back on business before striving forward


To borrow a Christmas
carol phrase, at this
time of year it is cus-
tomary to look back on the
past 12 months and then,
with renewed vigor and clear
vision, set our sights on the
promise of the new year
Workforce Connection is
fortunate to be guided in this
effort by a dedicated board of
directors. Most members are
private businessmen and
women, and all work tire-


lessly to improve our com-
munities. We have equal rep-
resentation on our board
rather than proportionate. So
while Citrus County is
smaller in population than
Marion County, and Levy
County is smaller still, no
county in our region has an
advantage because of its size.
You may not be aware of
who is working on your be-
half, so I'd like to take a mo-
ment to introduce them:


Paula Anspach, a con-
sultant from Beverly Hills
who has served on the board
since 2005 and serves as
chair of the performance
committee;
Kevin Cunningham of
Re/Max in Lecanto who
joined the board in 2011 and
is vice chairman;
Theresa Flick of the Key
Training Center in Lecanto,
has been on the board since
1996;


Theressa Foster of Supe-
rior Residences of Lecanto
and Sunflower Springs, new
to the board this year;
Patricia Keelean of Mid
Florida Community Services,
also new this year;
Ted Knight of Hernando,
representing the U.S. Marine
Corps League;
Mike Melfi of Champs
Software of Crystal River, a
See Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Lack

of will


creates

obstacle
D ear Bruce: My
stepmother died
unexpectedly last
month. She had two step-
daughters, a stepson and a
brother as her sole sur-
vivors.
After going through her
belongings, we could not
find a will. Two weeks
prior, she set up an annu-
ity naming her brother, my
sister and me as the bene-
ficiaries. My aunt, who
lived near my stepmother,
told me my stepmother
had a friend living with
her up to her death and
she had just purchased a
lockbox. The box could
not be found, and we sus-
pect her friend took it,
along with some of her
other belongings. Is there
any way we can find out if
she did create a will?
Also, my aunt told me to
take my stepmother's two
vehicles, since there was
no need to leave them on
the property, which was
rented. How can I get
these vehicles titled over
to me? I have the titles,
but they are made out to
my father, who died six
years earlier, and my step-
mother, plus I live in
Kansas and she lived in
Missouri.
Her brother did not file
for probate, so I'm not
sure what to do. This or-
deal has really made me
aware of how important it
is to not only have a will,
but to also let someone
you trust be aware of
where it is and what your
wishes are. -A.E, Spring
Hill, Kan.
Dear A.P: Sorting out
the situation may take a
bit of doing.
If there is no will, your
stepmother died intestate.
If I read your letter cor-
rectly, her brother would
be her closest living rela-
tive, and he would be the
appropriate person to
apply to the surrogate's
court to be made adminis-
trator of her estate.
Once the court appoints
her brother as administra-
tor, he can sort out the es-
tate, perhaps with the
help of you and the other
stepchildren. That as-
sumes the brother is able
and the others do not kick
up a fuss.
If, however, he is ab-
solutely unwilling to be
the administrator, you
could apply to the probate
court, given you are a
stepdaughter The court
likely would contact the
other people you men-
tioned, and if there were
no objections, you could
be appointed. If you're
willing to step in and try to
sort this out, I congratu-
late you.
There is a lot of hearsay,
such as whether your
stepmother had a lockbox
with a will in it. Who
knows what her friend did
or did not do or was in-
structed to do by your
stepmother.
I don't see how the cars
can be transferred to any-
one until an administrator
is appointed. The fact that
you and your stepmother
live in different states is of
no great consequence.
As I have said many
times in my column and as
you point out, it is impor-
tant to have a will and
have your wishes clearly


Page D2


Laura Byrnes
WORKFORCE
CONNECTION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FACEBOOK *mAcys
Continued from Page D1
FOTEOI [ R1:1:. 4ID&RtJ~llATH WOLMiN


a bird or floral print. About
4,000 people issued their
verdicts within 48 hours,
and the department store
plans to carry the floral
print this February
Rather than simply using
social media to tout promo-
tions and new products,
companies are just now re-
alizing the value of making
customers feel as though
they're part of the decision
making process, said Jen-
nifer Kasper, who heads dig-
ital media at Macy's. In
addition to making cus-
tomers feel like insiders,
she said it helps businesses
better tailor their offers as
well.
Matt Cronin, a founding
partner of Web Liquid
Group, a digital marketing
agency, agreed that compa-
nies are still in the early
stages of figuring out how to
put their social media pro-
files to use. Until now, he
noted that social media
strategies have primarily
been about capturing as
many followers or fans as
possible without really
knowing where to go from
there.
One hurdle for major re-
tailers is that it's difficult to
take the information they
learn online and put it to
use while the trends are still
relevant, said Nicolas
Franchet, head of retail e-
commerce at Facebook.
That's one of the trickier
aspects of Walmart Store
Inc.'s new "Toyland Tues-
day" contest, which lets fans
vote on which of two toys
will be discounted on the
following Tuesday Once a
winner is declared on
Thursday, the retailer acts
quickly to inform its 4,000
stores of how to adjust pric-
ing and displays, says



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

spelled out. If they change
in some way, you can have a
codicil added to your will.
And unless someone knows
where the original will has
been kept, you are usually
out of luck.
Dear Bruce: My father is
interested in buying Treas-
ury bills, but he doesn't
know how to begin to buy
them. Where should he go to
get these? Reader, via
email
Dear Reader. You can buy
Treasury bills, notes and
bonds through a broker, if
you have one. If not, go di-
rectly through your bank.
You also can purchase
Treasury instruments di-
rectly from the government,
but I suggest you do it
through a professional. If a
problem develops, a profes-
sional is in a far better posi-
tion to straighten it out.
If you deal directly with
the Federal Reserve, you
will not pay a commission;
with a broker, you will.
Treasury bills mature in
one year or less; Treasury
bonds have the longest
term, at 20 to 30 years.
Dear Bruce: All the arti-
cles about investing I see
are about "Investing for Col-
lege" or "Investing for Re-
tirement," aimed at people
who are still employed. But
I have never seen an article
on what a retiree should in-
vest in. I would like to know


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Associated Press
This undated screenshot of Macy's online shopping website made available to the
Associated Press shows how social media is integrated into their online store. Whether
shoppers know it or not, their actions online help dictate what's in stores.


Wanda Young, senior direc-
tor of social media for Wal-
Mart, which has more than
25 million likes on Face-
book.
Although it's the first time
Walmart is letting shoppers
have a direct say in what
merchandise gets dis-
counted, the retailer is
learning to use social media
in more discreet ways as
well. Last year, Walmart,
based in Bentonville, Ark.,
acquired an analytics com-
pany called Kosmix that
monitors online chatter to
try and predict what prod-
ucts might suddenly become
popular.
The unit, now called
@Walmartlabs, suggested
that the retailer give juicers
prominent display for the
holidays last year, after a
movie about an obese man


where I should put my
money now that I'm retired.
I will list my financial for
you. I am 78 years old, single
and in good health, and I
have no outstanding debts.
My home is worth about
$200,000, with no mortgage.
My yearly income is close to
$24,000, which includes a
pension, Social Security
and a part-time job. On top
of that, I get $365 a month
from an IRA that runs for
another eight years. I have
$35,000 in a savings account
that earns less than 1 per-
cent I use this as a source of
cash as needed. I have
$85,000 with a financial firm
that has it invested evenly
between bonds and equity
funds. These funds are basi-
cally stagnant. I also have
about $100,000 in an annuity
that I will be able to start
collecting on at age 80. This
will be up to a maximum of
$11,000 per year for 10
years. I also have $4,000 in a
401(k), and $6,000 in a Roth
IRA.
Where should I invest? I
would guess long-term
would be 10 to 20 years. I'd
like some guidance from an
impartial judge, as would
many people in my situa-
tion. R.C., Richmond, Va.
DEAR R.C.: You're not
reading the same material I
read, because ample infor-
mation is published regu-
larly on appropriate
suggestions for retirees. If
you start reading the finan-
cial section of your local
newspaper and listening to
financial programs on the


who lost weight on a juice
diet started trending online.
Walmart declined to give ex-
amples of how it used on-
line chatter this holiday
season but said it's slowly
playing a bigger role in
product decisions.
That's critical because
companies are realizing
shopping behavior is often
more influenced by what's
happening in pop culture,
rather than their own past
shopping patterns, said Sh-
ernaz Daver, a spokes-
woman for @Walmartlabs.
"Social media has en-
abled us to understand in-
tent," she said.
Melinda Vitale Shaw,
owner of the two-store
MeLinda's Fine Gifts in
Picayune, Miss., is using the
same concepts as the
world's biggest retailer.


radio, you will have many
good leads on the subject.
But while generalities are
fine, one size does not fit all.
There are any number of fi-
nancial advisers who spe-
cialize in helping retired
folks stretch their assets so
they are comfortable for the
rest of their lives. To do that,
the advisers have to know a
great deal about you and
what you want to accomplish.
I am absolutely confident
you should be able to find
someone locally through the
newspaper, radio, TV shows
or ads who will gladly ad-
vise you and take over the
handling of your assets.
As an aside, keeping
$35,000 in a savings account
that earns less than 1 per-
cent is foolish. There are
places where you can earn 4
percent and 5 percent and
still have your money avail-
able to you as needed (with
small but real risk).
Dear Bruce: I have a 17-
month-old granddaughter
and would like to give her
$100 for each birthday and
$100 at Christmastime. At
first I thought of a Coverdell
account for her, but with no
more money than that per
year, it seems rather fruit-
less, and I know fees are in-
volved. I don't think I can
count on her parents or any-
one else to contribute.
Should I just open some
sort of savings account or an
educational savings ac-
count? Two hundred dollars
per year doesn't add up to
much, but I'd like to put it
somewhere other than


Since setting up a Facebook
page in 2010, she's used it as
a sounding board for what to
stock in her stores.
In the south, for example,
it's common for people to
change the decorative flags
outside their homes de-
pending on the season or the
holiday To get a better sense
of what type of decorative
flags might sell well next
year, Vitale Shaw recently
asked fans to post about the
designs they were currently
flying, or what they wished
they were flying.
She was surprised to see
several comments about
snowman flags, since it
doesn't snow much in the
south. Even though Face-
book sometimes proves her
business instincts wrong,
she called the site "a true
retailer's friend."


under the mattress. L.S.,
via email
Dear L.S.: I could suggest
lots of things to you, includ-
ing U.S. savings bonds, sav-
ings accounts, small stock
accounts, etc.
Without denigrating your
generosity, the gifts you de-
scribe will not amount to
much, even when your
granddaughter reaches
adulthood. You say you can't
count on the parents to con-


Associated Press
A person passes a retail store with sale sign displayed in
the window in Philadelphia.


SALES
Continued from Page Dl

is below the forecast of 17
percent for the season.
"It feels like the steam is
out of the holiday since
Black Friday," said Bill
Martin, ShopperTrak's co-
founder.
Indeed, many shoppers
have been weighed down
by concerns about their fi-
nancial future. Some worry
about the weak U.S. job
market, while others fear
the possibility of a stale-
mate between Congress
and the White House over
the U.S. budget could trig-
ger tax increases and
spending cuts known as the
"fiscal cliff" next year. That
would mean less money in
shoppers' pockets.
Walmart CEO Mike Duke
said during a speech in
New York City last week a
recent poll of shoppers of
the world's largest retailer
found an overwhelming
majority are aware of the
threat of higher taxes,
which is leading some to
cut back on holiday buying.
And consumer confidence
fell sharply this month, ac-
cording to a survey by the
University of Michigan,
partly because of concerns
taxes will rise next year if
no deal is reached.
In addition to economic


tribute to a fund, which tells
me there are things that
might make this child's life
more pleasant.
Instead of worrying about
saving for the future (this
doesn't sound like me!), why
not think about some little
things you could buy with
$200 a year that would make
her life more comfortable
and fun perhaps a toy
that her parents can't afford.
I wouldn't lose a lot of sleep


worries, a quirk in the cal-
endar- the holiday season
is four days longer than a
Year ago and includes a full
weekend right before
Christmas may be tempt-
ing shoppers to wait longer
to buy gifts. According to a
survey of 1,000 consumers
conducted by the Interna-
tional Council of Shopping
Centers and Goldman
Sachs, 64.9 percent of shop-
pers surveyed had finished
their holiday buying as of
last Sunday That's lower
than the 70.3 percent during
the same time a year ago.
"It's coming down to the
wire," said David Bassuk,
managing director and co-
head of the retail practice
at AlixPartners. "It's going
to require retailers to be
more aggressive with their
promotions than they were
hoping heading into the
weekend."
Still, time is on stores'
side. Six of the top 10
spending days for the holi-
day season are still ahead,
including the Saturday be-
fore Christmas, which is
expected to be the second
biggest shopping day of the
year. And last year, the final
10 days before Christmas
generated nearly 24 per-
cent of the holiday sales,
according to MasterCard
Advisors' SpendingPulse,
which tracks spending
across all payments includ-
ing cash.


over the future, but I would
try to make her life now as
pleasant as possible.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. cor
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneralinter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


& RUSH



For more information about advertising


D2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


BUSINESS


ab


i


[a w-7.,










D3

SUNDAY


DECEMBER


23, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Scan REi.
this:
IrL'


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Looking to eat out
on the holidays?
Havana House Grill
6875 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River, 352-563-0080
Open Christmas Eve, New
Year's Eve and New Year's Day
Holiday catering available

Joe's Family Restaurant
911 W. Main St., Inverness,
352-726-1688
Open Christmas Day and New
Year's Day from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River, 352-795-4211
Open Christmas Eve from 6 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Open Christmas Day: Breakfast
6 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Christmas Day buffet from
11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Open New Year's Eve from 6 a.m.
to 9 p.m. with dinner specials
New Year's Eve: Citrus 95.3
presents New Year's Eve at the
Plantation on Crystal River, 8
p.m. to 2 a.m., $39 per person
Open New Year's Day from 6
a.m. to 9 p.m. Come watch your
favorite bowl game in the West
82 & The 19th Hole Bars

Taverna Manos
5705 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River, FL 34429, 352-
564-0078
Open Christmas Eve and New
Year's Eve

New Year's Eve
events
New Year's Eve: Citrus 95.3
presents New Year's Eve in the
Palm Room at the Plantation
on Crystal River from 8 p.m.
to 2 a.m., $39 per person. DJ
Stump spinning, Champagne
toast at midnight, hors d'oeuvres
passed 10 p.m. to midnights;
cash bar with special pricing.
Discounted room packages for
two people overnight and tick-
ets to the Palm Room event,
$199. Call 352-795-4211.
Bowl in the New Year at Mana-
tee Lanes. $100 per lane for
up to six people includes four
hours of bowling, a live deejay,
party favors, chips, veggies,
pretzels, nuts and dip all night,
pizza and our famous (mild)
hot wing buffet at 11 p.m., free
champagne toast at midnight,
free coffee after midnight, one
drink ticket per person (alco-
hol for guests 21 and over).
Reservations with prepay only!
Call 352-795-4546.
Enjoy dinner and dancing at a
New Year's Eve Ball at the Citrus
Springs Community Center.
Tickets are $35 per person for
formal dinner, catered by
Gruff's Elite Banquet & Cater-
ing, cash bar and dancing
melodies for your entertain-
ment. Call 352-527-7540.

News you can use
ATTEND: Sebastian's Winter
Wonderland at the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park and sponsored
by the Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park, Inc.
Dec. 24 and Dec. 26 from
5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. For more
information, call 352- 628-
5343.
Wednesday, Jan. 9, the com-
munity is invited to join HPH
Hospice from 8:30 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. for a little magic
as they break ground for their
new facility. Snow is the fore-
cast, along with complimentary
cocoa, specialty coffees, de-
lectable Danish and more.
2939 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.,
Lecanto (next to Lecanto Sur-
gery Center); call 352-527-
4600.
REGISTER: Want to make 100
contacts in two hours? Regis-
ter today for Speed Network-
ing, an evening of business
matchmaking Thursday, Jan.
10, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the
Crystal River Mall. Preregistra-
tion $10 or $15 at the door.
Call 795-2585 to register or
for more information.
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem will host a free smoking
cessation class on Monday,
Jan. 14, 2013, from 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. in the auditorium on
the main hospital campus.
"Tools to Quit" is an intense
two-hour seminar with a
trained Tobacco Cessation
Specialist who guides partici-
pants as they identify triggers
and withdrawal symptoms,
and brainstorms ways to cope


with them. Reservations are
required, as seating is limited.
Register online at www.
citrusmh.com/events or call
352-560-6266.


Welcome new Chamber members


Nature Coast Financial Kingsway


Ambassadors for the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce celebr
cial staff. Back row, from left: Jarrod McAlister, consultant; Jennif
nandez, The Villages of Citrus Hills. Front row, from left: Bill Hudson
Care Center of Citrus County; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Bi
Frances O'Sullivan, executive assistant; Janet Mayo, Plantation on C


All they want for


Christmas ... is continued


community support


t's been a longtime dream in
Citrus County: A dental and
medical facility for the elderly,
vets, homeless and low-income
families. As we prepare to begin
the new year, Nature Coast Min-
istries Samaritans announces that
their dream is almost a reality.
The new clinic will be able to
see about 25 people a week, and
if additional support is received
that number will increase. This
local clinic is accessible six times
a day with the new county bus
service. Imagine, needy individu-
als given the respect and assis-
tance they need to be healthy
That translates to being more
likely to be hired, which lowers
unemployment in our county,
which boosts business and the
county economy It's a no-brainer,
really
Catholic Charities has donated
its Outreach Center at 9020 W
Atlas Drive in Homosassa for per-
manent use for a dental and med-
ical clinic. Dr Ronk has donated
his dental office equipment from
his Sarasota office. The state of
Florida Health Department has
granted sovereign immunity to
the medical team through the


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE

Rhonda Smith
Joe's Family
Restaurant, Inverness. /


Florida Volunteer Health Serv-
ices Department. More than 20
dentists and medical personnel
are committed to volunteer their
time.
A few items are all that stand in
the way of the clinic operating.
The needed items are two dental
chairs, a vacuum system, digital
imaging X-ray equipment and the
cost of professional installation
and most of all, supplies. Nature
Coast Ministries Samaritans is re-
lying on initial and continued
moral and financial commitment
from individuals and organiza-
tions. A clinic visit costs about $25
in supplies, and of course, without
supplies there can be no visits.
Remember, no dentist or doctor
receives payment; they are volun-
teering their time and talents.
Your help with money, ideas or
fundraisers is greatly needed and
appreciated. If you or your organ-
ization is looking at making a one-
time donation or a recurring
donation, consider contacting Na-
ture Coast Ministries Samaritans
at the office at 352-563-1860 or at
352-220-3823. They have speakers
available to come and discuss the
project.


... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


llmll "like" us on
Jk__ r----


now part of Chamber of Commerce family

nature Coast Finan-
cial specializes in
working with re-
tirees, or those very near re-
tirement. They know there
G are more challenges than
ever in maintaining a secure
retirement and take great
pride in their customers and
servicing their insurance
and financial needs. Their
outstanding team of retire-
ment advisers throughout
the state of Florida consists
of retirement planners, CPAs,
elder-law attorneys as well
as IRA specialists, position-
ing the firm to meet clients'
various needs. The firm is lo-
cated at 938 NE U.S. 19, Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. More
information is available atwww.
naturecoastfinancial.com or
by calling 352-794-6044.
Kingsway Beverly Hills
apartments are located at
6150 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto FL. The units are
leased to low-income seniors
ate the ribbon-cutting with Nature Coast Finan- and there are still apart-
er Frisch; Gary Marriage, CEO; and Nicholle Fer- ments available. Call 352-
I, Land Title of Citrus County; Tom Corcoran, Life 456-6006 for more
rentwood; Jennifer Martin, firm administration; information or visit www.
Crystal River; and Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing. kingswaybeverlyhills.com.


Upcoming Chamber events


J--

CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce





CITRUS COUNTY
Economic Development
Council, Inc.


Jan. 10 Business After Hours: 5 p.m. to 7
p.m. at CEDAR CREEK LIVING FACILITY
Jan. 11 January Chamber members
lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
Jan. 19 and 20 Florida Manatee Festival
in Crystal River, http://www.floridamanateefes-
tival.com.
Jan. 24 Business After Hours from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at GRUMPY GATORS
Feb. 7 Business After Hours from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. NATURE COAST MINISTRIES
Feb. 8 February Chamber members
lunch from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Plantation on
Crystal River


LEGISLATIVE DAYS yes, plural in 2013! Save the dates: March 20 and
21, 2013. More details to come.
Remember, coupons and discounts also appear on the mobile and
regular website!
Check out our complete calendar for community, entertainment and
fundraising events.



Register now for EMT training
It is time to register for the next Emergency Medical Technician
class. The 16-week course begins Monday, Jan. 28, and the program is
held at Nature Coast EMS administration building at 3876 W Country
Hill Drive in Lecanto. For more information and admission require-
ments, call Floyd Mead, lead instructor, at 352-586-8611, or Lori
Thompson, Student Services & clinical coordinator at 352-601-7330 or
visit our website at www.naturecoastems.org.
Nature Coast EMS announces the next Citizens Academy will begin
Jan. 29, 2013. The Citizen's Academy is a hands-on opportunity for
community members to see and learn what Nature Coast EMS Para-
medics and EMT's do every day The Nature Coast EMS Citizens Acad-
emy is free and meets every Tuesday for eight weeks from 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. If you would like to have fun while learning life-saving skills, call
352-249-4700 or visit www.naturecoastems.org. Just click on "community"


FoLoOo0Ro I oDoA




F mIVAII,


IIE. Tacebook







You do not want to miss our Holiday Extravaganza
episode! The always delightful Neale Brennen co-
hosts Chamber Chat this week and takes time to
thank the many angels who have given to the Key
Training Center wish list. Cindi Fein and Keith
Taylor join us to talk about the Manatee Fest
coming up in January-- a family friendly event you
are sure to enjoy. Then Josh Wooten, Cindi Fein,
and Neale Brennan battle it out in our fun,
holiday trivia game. It's the Chamber Chat
Challenge! Who will win the golden antlers? Be
sure to stay with us during the final segment as
Neale and I trade in our Santa caps for Chef Hats
and decorate some holiday themed cupcakes.
These cupcakes are sweet, simple and sure to
please your friends and family!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat--
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every
week!
If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!


m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Traditional conference


12 days of Christmas delivery


Special to the Chronicle
Mary Parsons of Century 21 JW Morton, left, and Sophia
Diaz-Fonseca of Drywell Group, LLC, right, attended the "Tra-
ditional Building Conference" in Chicago.


Inverness women
attends conference
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca of Dry-
well Group, LLC (owner of the
Pine Avenue and Masonic
Business Centers) and Mary
Parsons of Century 21 JW Mor-
ton Real Estate recently at-
tended the two-day "Traditional
Building Conference" spon-
sored by Restore Media, LLC in
Chicago, Illinois.
Besides the sessions on the
rehabilitation of structures, both
women participated in courses
dealing with Dutchman repairs
in masonry, problems with heat-
ing/cooling and moisture in his-
toric buildings, classical versus
modern architecture and
demonstrations in metal repro-
duction casting.
Both were also given an in-
sider's tour of the architectural
collection of the Chicago His-
tory Museum as part of the con-
ference. The archives of the
architectural collection include
Sanborn maps (early insurance
maps) hand-drawn plans,
sketches, hand-drawn and col-
ored renderings, photos, origi-
nal reports and writings of
some of America's finest archi-
tects of the 19th and 20th cen-



BYRNES
Continued from Page D1

member since 2004 and
chairman of the Marketing
and Outreach Committee;
John Siefert, executive
director of the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council in Inverness,
board member since 2011;
and
Denise Willis, director of
the Withlacoochee Technical
Institute in Inverness, new
board member and chair of
the Youth Committee.
Citrus County is indeed
well represented; more to
the point, Citrus County is
represented well by these
fine leaders. We'd like to
share some of their reflec-
tions on the year that was
and thoughts on prospects
for 2013.
Theresa Flick: "For our
community I think it's more
crucial than ever for the
workforce board, school sys-
tem and economic develop-
ment council to continue to
develop our partnership
going forward, especially
due to the events that are
taking place with Duke En-
ergy. It's important for our
community to be more di-
versified and provide em-
ployment opportunities.
With the recent skills gap
survey, we know what our
weaknesses are and we


tries. Some of these famous
architects include Daniel Burn-
ham (designed the earliest sky-
scraper and Union Station in
Washington, D.C.), William Ho-
labird (launched the architec-
tural Chicago School style),
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (set
the standards for Modernist de-
sign), Louis Henri Sullivan
(America's first truly modern ar-
chitect) and Frank Lloyd Wright
(originator of the Prairie Style
and America's most famous ar-
chitect).
Sophia and Mary received
certificates and continuing edu-
cation credits from the Tradi-
tional Building Conference for
their participation in workshops
and classes during the two-day
conference.
Workforce warns
about scams
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties cautions job-
seekers to be alert for scam-
mers usurping the names of
legitimate businesses and or-
ganizations to take advantage
of those looking for work.
Workforce Connection CEO
Rusty Skinner said the regional
workforce board decided to


should all come together for
the good of the community
and our fiscal well-being."
Denise Willis: "In terms of
2012, even though we had a
sluggish economy our dedi-
cated and motivated stu-
dents found employment In
the new year, we'll be happy
to continue having Work-
force Connection represen-
tatives working with
students on WTI's campus,
and at the College of Central
Florida's Citrus campus in
Lecanto, to identify job op-
portunities and reinforce
employability skills.
"In the coming year, WTI
stands ready to offer cus-
tomized training to close the
Skills Gap and we will con-
tinue the successful part-
nership with Workforce."
John Siefert: "Working to-
gether as a region allows for
the sum to be equal to more
than the individual county
can possibility be alone. We
are pleased that Workforce
Connection is one of the Cit-
rus Business Alliance part-
ners that works together to
assist our local businesses
in staying strong and
healthy, growing where pos-
sible in a period that has
been very difficult for every
business in the area due to
the recession.
"During 2012, Workforce
has moved forward in creat-
ing an environment that al-
lows new and existing
businesses to add jobs. The


Special to the Chronicle
Pharmacist Ken Heimann and his wife, Tina Heimann owners of B&W Rexall Drugs and
"Home of the 88 Breakfast" and Stephen DiGiovanni of Elegant Catering, donated 12
pairs of shoes to students at Inverness Middle School to celebrate the "Twelve Days of
Christmas." Mary-Ann Virgilio, of Virgilio Insurance Services, coordinated the project and
helped select the latest shoe fashions with the assistance of Savannah Joy Heimann,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Heimann. With help from Inverness Middle School, Virgilio
garnered 12 names for the donation, and she and Savannah delivered the shoes Dec. 12 to
Inverness Middle School for the children to have for Christmas.


issue the warning after hearing
about the problem from other
workforce boards. In Panama
City, he said, the Gulf Coast
Workforce Board recently re-
ported scammers posted jobs
on the Employ Florida Market-
place luring jobseekers who,
when they responded, were in-
structed to send money in ad-
vance for "required" job training.
"Scammers are unscrupu-
lous, clever and are often very
good at what they do," Skinner
said. "It is unconscionable that
these imposters are taking
money from people who are


new programs that have
been introduced allow for
employees and employers
to pursue new approaches
to training, to learning skills
where there is a demand of
that skill in the workforce.
"I firmly believe that 2013
will improve and expand on
those and other programs


diligently seeking employment."
The Employ Florida Market-
place, or EFM, is the state's
premier online job bank and
used by all 24 regional work-
force boards. Even though
EFM posts scamming warnings
on nearly every page, Skinner
said when someone is search-
ing for work and finds what ap-
pears to be a promising job, "it's
easy to get excited and let your
guard down."
Skinner noted there have
been no reports of similar em-
ployment scams in Citrus, Levy
and Marion counties, and he


that will make the tri-county
(Citrus, Levy and Marion
counties) area stand out
among the 67 counties in
Florida. We will make the
unemployed numbers con-
tinue their downward trend
and one day in the future,
all persons desiring employ-
ment will have a job."


hopes to keep it that way by
alerting jobseekers to warning
signs, such as claims of guar-
anteed employment and re-
quests for payment of up-front
fees.
In order to protect them-
selves, jobseekers are asked to
keep the following tips in mind:
Research the company to
make sure it is the real deal (to
ensure a business is authentic,
contact the Better Business Bu-
reau at www.bbb.org).
Keep your email address
private and do not provide your
Social Security number or any


We opened this column by
cribbing from Charles Dick-
ens' "A Christmas Carol."
We'll close this final column
of 2012 by asking John
Siefert to have the last
word:
"We do live in a terrific
county and region and state.
Enjoy the coming year"


sensitive information to an em-
ployer unless you are confident
they are legitimate.
Be wary of any employer
offering a job without an inter-
view.
Be alert for any employer
charging fees to either employ,
find placement or provide training.
Investigate thoroughly any
employer requesting you trans-
fer funds or receive packages
for reshipment, especially if
they are located overseas.
Avoid vague offers, exag-
gerated claims of possible
earnings or product effective-
ness, or any job posting claim-
ing "no experience necessary."
Likewise, jobseekers should
exercise caution when replying
to unsolicited emails for work-
at-home employment as well as
for employers who conduct
their interviews in a home set-
ting or in motel rooms.
Anyone who suspects they
have been victimized in an em-
ployment scam should contact
the Attorney General's Fraud
Hotline at 866-966-7226.
Chamber members
attend free event
Chamber members Mark
and Kathy Garlock of Garlock
Enterprises attended the 2012
Free Enterprise Celebration in
Grand Rapids, Mich. The week-
end was a celebration of the
free enterprise system.
The Van Andel Arena was
filled with independent business
owners from around the globe
recognizing new leaders. The
ICommerce industry, of which
Garlock Enterprises is one cog,
has had 33 consecutive months
of growth. The Garlocks
learned much from EDGE
leader Dexter Yager and
Amway President and CEO
Doug DeVos.
To learn more about Entre-
prenurial Development Group,
Garlock Enterprises or free en-
terprise, email garlock
enterprises.com or call
352-563-1513.
From staff reports

-
Laura Byrnes, APR is a
Certified Workforce Profes-
sional and communications
manager at Workforce Con-
nection. Contact her at 352-
291-9559 or 800-434-5627,
ext 1234 or lbyrnes@
elm workforce, com.


We need your




information

As our community grows, it becomes even more important
that we know how to keep in touch with each other. The
Chronicle's annual publication of Our Home Citrus is the best
and most complete resource for all those important
organizations, clubs, hobby groups and other ways we make
friends, share pastimes and help each other out.


If you would like your group to be listed in this publication
following form and mail or deliver by Jan. 4, 2013 to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Attention: Our Home Citrus
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


NAME OF ORGANIZATION: (Must be non-profit)
ORGANIZATION WEB PAGE:
MEETING PLACE: Specific building designation
(Elks Lodge, Resource Center, Town Restaurant, etc.)


i, please fill out the


STREET ADDRESS:


CITY:
MEETING TIME:
MEETING DATE: Day of week (Every Monday,
third Monday of the month, etc.)
CONTACT:
NAME:
PHONE NUMBER:
EMAIL ADDRESS:


Please check the category which best describes your organization only one
category, please:


1 Animals
O Arts and Crafts
O Civic
I Computers


O Education and Youth
L Food Programs
O Fraternal
O Gardening


O Cultural and Heritage L Hobbies


O Political
O Recreation Groups
1 Seniors
L Service Clubs
] Special Interest


Support Groups
Vehicles
Weight Control
Women's Clubs


I


D4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


BUSINESS


MOMS"-






2012
ur Home



A guide to living in Citrus County

ChOoSWff








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 D5


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Someone is missing this
Christmas. Lovely Lady,
degree, distinguished,
pretty, slender. Caring for
elderly parents. Would
like to meet man of char-
acter, intelligent, ethical,
successful in his endeav-
ors. Age 55 to early 70's.
Rely: Blind Box 1820
Citrus Cnty Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, FI
34429



15 ft ALUM. BOAT WIDE
DEEP V, 25HP ELEC.
START, TRAILER.
OLDER BUT CHEAPER!
$995 (352) 341-4949
$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47
for years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917 .Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucsl3@aol.com2

FINANCE
DIRECTOR
THE CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER
is seeking applicants
for the position of
Finance Director. Po-
sition reports directly
to the City Manager
and is responsible for
financial reporting,
budget development,
utility billing, collec-
tions, human
resources, risk man-
agement, and
payroll/benefits ad-
ministration. Required
qualifications
include a degree in
accounting/business
administration and
prior experience in
governmental ac-
counting. Salary
range is $50,688 to
$71,806. Letters of
application, with a full
resume, should be
mailed to:
City Manager,
123 NW Highway 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428 and be post-
marked no later than
January 9, 2013. En-
velopes should be
marked as "Finance
Director Applicant".
Equal Opportunity
Employer
HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
I acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856
HERNANDO/486 1+acre,
2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man
Cave/Work Shop w/AC
28x40, $47,500 J. Desha
Cndland Real Estate
(352)634-6340
MR2 SPYDER
2002 TRD model, 1
owner. Mint condition.
Garage kept, no acci-
dents, smoking, or pets.
New soft top & leather
seats. C352-464-7501.
$13.5K.
OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000. 4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



4 Month Old Kittens
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
Free 2 Guinea Pigs
Females,
To good loving home.
Must go together.
(330) 706-3148 cell
Homosassa
FREE 5 YR FEMALE
AUSTRALIAN BLUE
HEELER DOG.
FREE 3 mo. MUSCOVY
DUCKS (352) 637-7453
FREE FemaleTabby cat
2yrs needs good home.
Great w/ all animals.
FREE 2 males black &
white 3yrs. Great w/ all
animals. (352) 586-7662




YourWorld


Conetin II Sils Hl
^ ^ *. M ^ ^lc -..Ti.Sr .e ^ ^ ^^aa *..n ,*.



r^11-^^ -^^^ --^^ -^^^ -E^^ -^^ ^^B^^^B^


Free Firewood
(352) 746-3997
FREE KITTENS
14 wks old
Different Colors
litter trained
(352) 212-4061
HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to go.
Bring Shovel, Truck load
avail., Help Yourself.
352-697-5252
Pitt bull mix female 1 yr.
2 black & white kittens.
6mo. to good homes
only! (352) 216-6668
RED/WHITE SPANIEL
Female, Little over 1 yr.
old, beautiful, needs
fenced yard. family
dog (352) 344-8212
White Hotpoint
Refrigerator. You fix
or for parts.
(352) 302-4057


Black Labrador Retriever,
about 1% yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy", lost in
vicinity of W. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Lost brindle male
German shepherd mix
year old and answers
to Tank.
Lecanto Area
(352) 270-0651
Lost Cat
Black/Gray Tabby
short hair, male
Turner Camp Rd. Area
(352) 637-0970
LOST MALE FLAME
POINT SIAMESE
W/BLUES EYES,
ORANGE COLLAR, IN
HEATHERWOOD SUB
(352) 476-3084



Adult Male Cat
Orange & White
6-8 Ibs, found Paradise
Pt area on 12/21
(352) 536-5336
Young Male Cat
super friendly
found behind Fire Sta-
tion on Rock Crusher
Call to identify
(352) 634-2557
YOUNG MALE DOG
BRINDLE COLOR
Found on Holiday Dr,
Crystal River (352)
795-9687 or 220-9909




PRAYER TO
ST JUDE
May the Sacred Heart Of
Jesus be adored, glori-
fied, loved and praised
throughout the world now
and forever, Sacred
Heart of Jesus, pray for
us, St. Jude, worker of
miracles, pray for us St.
Jude, helper of the hope-
less, pray for us. Say this
prayer 9 times a day for 7
days and your prayer will
be answered. It has
never been known to fail.
Publication must be
promised. Thank you St.
Jude for your help.




TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444




FIT OFFICE ASST

Crystal River, $8/hr,
General Office and MS
Office skills required. Full
time Benefits Fast
paced. Familiarity with
Citrus County a must!
Send Resumeto: cccc
reception(,qmail.com










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindapracticemar
itampabav.rr.com


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429


* SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Reaional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug/Tobacco
Free Workplace


MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
needed for Family
Practice Physician
in Crystal River.
Experience req'd, good
phone and people
skills, knowledge of
electronic medical rec-
ords. Send Resume
w/contact info. to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box #1819P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Florida 34429


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto

RN I LPN
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-licensed
nurses. Long-term
care experience pre-
ferred. We offer great
pay and benefits to
full-time associates,
including medical
coverage, 401(k) and
paid vacation, sick
days and holidays.
Please apply at facil-
ity or mail resume to
Hannah Mand.
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D -37185




CLiuf


OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER

RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
CST- Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY !
Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827

P/T Chiropractic
ASSISTANT

Busy office, 30-35hrs
week, Must be outgo-
ing able to multi task.
Have computer skills.
Able to work Sat.
Morning s Fax
resume to :
352-726-3885

P/T, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE





FINANCE
DIRECTOR
THE CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER
is seeking applicants
for the position of
Finance Director. Po-
sition reports directly
to the City Manager
and is responsible for
financial reporting,
budget development,
utility billing, collec-
tions, human
resources, risk man-
agement, and
payroll/benefits ad-
ministration. Required
qualifications
include a degree in
accounting/business
administration and
prior experience in
governmental ac-
counting. Salary
range is $50,688 to
$71,806. Letters of
application, with a full
resume, should be
mailed to:
City Manager,
123 NW Highway 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428 and be post-
marked no later than
January 9, 2013. En-
velopes should be
marked as "Finance
Director Applicant".
Equal Opportunity
Employer

Sales / Project
Coordinator
Needed ASAP
Manufactured
Homes Exp. Req.
Serious inquires only!
Call Henry
(352) 795-1272


Accounts
Payable Clerk
position available.
Experience required.
Proficient in PO
processing, GL
coding, prepare and
check invoices for
payment, prepare
monthly reports and
basic accounting
skills. Proficient in
Microsoft Office Suite
and accounting
software knowledge.
Experience with
Computer Ease a
plus but not required.
EOE/DFWP company
Resume Submission
resumes@
dabcon.com


AUTO TECHS & Experi-
enced Detailer Needed.
Competitive Pay & Bene-
fits. ASE & or Ford Certi-
fied line techs. Call
(352)493-4297 for Russ
Hall for appointment.
Please bring resume to
interview.



PIANIST Needed
First Christian Church
of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual who can play the
piano for Sunday
Morning worship. We
have a blenede serve
ice. Using both praise
music and contem-
porary Hyms. Salary
Depending on Skill
or Email
pastorray@tampabay.r
r.com or Call
352-344-1908



TECHNICIAN

DUE TO THE
INCREASE IN
BUSINESS PHILLIPS
CHRYSLER JEEP
DODGE IS LOOKING
FOR EXP. LINE
TECHNICIAN
SEND RESUME TO:
3440 S PINEAVE.
OCALA 34471
OR FAX TO:
352-732-3024







Apartment
Maintenance
Position Available
Co. seeking P/T Mainte-
nance. Requires own
tools, experience & reli-
able transportation. Po-
sition requires plumb-
ing, HVAC, electrical,
and painting skills.
Please apply during the
hours of 9am-1pm,
Monday-Friday at Wild-
wood Townhomes, 301
E. Gulf Atlantic Hwy,
and Wildwood or
email csaunders@
hallmarkco.com


*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the CUSTOMER
RELATIONS DEPT
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. Call
Michelle 352-436-4460



Property Manager
for Apartment
Community
An established
property management
company is seeking a
F/T seasoned
professional Property
Manager for an RD
complex in Floral City.
Must be highly skilled at
communication and
working in an organized
manner. We offer a
competitive salary and
an excellent benefit
package including
401(k). On site apart-
ment a possibility.
Please send
resume or apply at:
Floral Oaks Apts.
8092 S. Floral Oaks
Cir, Floral City, FL or
email csaunders@
hallmarkco.com.












SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




'08 KENMORE STOVE
Self Cleaning Oven
Hidden element, like new!
$200 (352)503-6512 OR
352-601-1321
DRYER$1 00 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
HOT WATER HEATER
50 gallon whirlpool works
great, electric. $75.
352-302-7451
Kenmore (Sears) 700
series clothes washer
and GE dryer,
$350 for both.
Good condition.
352-419-7017
LG FRONT LOAD
WASHER lyr old. Perfect
cond. White, New $849
Selling for $650
(352) 527-3204









S 4 Employment
S1 source Is...






www chronclleonlhne con


MAY AU MIUChoWAV-
for use over range,
White, Never used! Only
$89. Call (352)464-1591
OLD KENMORE
WASHER $65 with 30
day warranty large
capacity only 24" wide.
Call/text 352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
Almond, double door, Ice
maker, Immaculate
Condition $400
(352) 419-6880
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
SOLD
APPLIANCES
White Smooth top range,
white dishwasher and
white microwave $400
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Can Deliver
352-263-7398
WASHER$1 00 Works
perfect with 90 day
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504



2 DRAWER CABINET
oak look, good condition.
$10. 352-302-7451





sALE
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
Fr 12/28. Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p, Antiques
Sat 12/29 Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p Gen.Merch.
Sun 12/30 Auction@ 1p
Tailgate Box Lot Auction
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



BAKER SCAFFOLD 2
complete sets on wheels.
Good cond. $100.
352-302-7451
HYDRAULIC JACK
sidecar, adjustable pull
out arms. Heavy duty.
$50. 352-302-7451
SCHUMACHER arc
welder, 110V, welds to
3/16. 7/16- 3/32 rod.
New in box. $75.
828-627-6718


27" MAGNAVOX TV
good working cond.
$40 (352) 344-1066
51" SONY WEGA
$125.00 plays and
sounds perfect.Free 27"
sharp with sale.We
went to flat screen.mint
condition,
352-364-2588
HITACHI 32' TV WITH
REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
VIZIO 42 INCH 3D TV
Vizio E3D420VX 3D TV
LCD 1080p 120hz with
box and remote. Great
condition. 6 pairs of 3D
glasses included. $400
Gerome 352-322-6779



2G 7" TABLET TOUCH-
SCREEN MID ANDROID
2.2 OS PC WI Fl
(YELLOW) 60.00 OBO
352-212-7788
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
LEXMARK
PRINTER/FAX excellent
cond. $25 352-860-2475
PLAYSTATION 1 SONY
works/good condition
adapter & 1 controller
$20.
352-628-4210



2 RECLINER CHAIRS
1 TAUPE LEATHER
1 MAROON CLOTH
$90 EACH
(352) 382-5814
2 VERY NICE CHAIRS
Light blue chr/rocker;
recliner reclines to a
sleeper. Thin stripes
$60/both (352) 795-3763
BAR STOOLS
2 white swivel stools,
Brocade $100/ea
(352) 419-6880
BEAUTIFUL QUEEN
BEDROOM SUITE LIKE
NEW. Brushed ash in
color. Double dresser,
chest of drawers, night
table, headboard w/ rails.
Faux marble counter
tops. $495. Inverness.
Phone 353-344-5854
or e-mail
lwyatt97@gmail.com.


SINGLE COPY



CONTRACTOR



WANTED


Are You

Interested In:

Bein your own



SIncreasing potential

earnings.

Growing your

._. exclusive area?

"1 eWorking
independently?

,-,,- .- Working with a

^.' successful company?


SC I T R US C 0 U N T Y




Swww.chronicleonline.com



Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201

Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily



Requirements: Do you have what it takes?

Ability to work overnight Attention to detail

Covered Truck, Van or SUV 365 Days/Year

Clean Driving Record Deadline and Customer

Credit & Background Check Service oriented

Access to your own help

Lifting and physical ability Flexible under pressure

Team Player Positive Thinker

Must have a back-up plan Hard and smart worker

Computer & Internet Access Keen sense of urgency


0 Deliver to stores and coin racks.

Q Experience preferred but not required.


CLASSIFIED









DG SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 DECLASSIFIED CITRUS Couivr~ (FL) CHROMCLE


BEDROOM SET
Beautiful 3 Piece set,
Solid Oak, Must Sell
Sacrifice at $200 OBO
(352) 564-0254
CURIO CABINET
Lighted. Glass shelves.
69"Hx16"W. Just in time
for Xmas. $60.
352-382-1000
DINING SET
Glass Top Table
w/4 chairs (fabric covered
w/palm trees)$200 for set
call 352-257-1480
DINING TABLE SET
LOVELY LIGHT WOOD
SEATS 6 W/ CHAIRS & 2
LEAVES, SIZE 67 X 431
$250 (352) 860-1519
ERGOMOTION
Bed w/vibration, Dormia
Memory Foam Mattress
BRAND NEW pd $2200
will sell for $1400 obo
352-209-1316
FURNITURE Like New!
Brown Suede cloth
Futon $200.
Tan Leather
Loveseat $200.
352-503-7623
Lazy Boy Cordovan
Leather Dual Recliner
Loveseat 3 yrs. brand
new cond. org. $2,100
Asking $500.
Sculptured
Wall hanging
Tasmanian Artist
Carolyn Audet, 9 Little
brass fish on driftwood,
$100.
(352) 341-3651
LEATHER SOFA, FAB-
RIC LOVE SEAT 3 cush-
ion longhorn leather sofa,
hunter green excellent
condition $400.00 2
cuslhlon love seat, beige
print like new $150.00
352-249-6463
LIGHT-COLORED
Wooden Table for
Breakfast Nook or
Kitchen Island, New
Condition 34"H 36"L
24"W Two Stools
ALL for $75.00
(352)527-9930 BH
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK GUN CABINET
Etched glass front.Very
Nice.$265
Locks w/drawer
352-875-5134 Dunnellon
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
Daybed w/ trundle & Mat.
Homosassa 628-2306
POWER LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR.
Like new condition-used
6 mo.- tan/ corduroy
material- power remote
$450.00 Call
352-382-2718
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
PRIDE 2 Pos. lift chair.
Seldom used. $325
Call for email photo
352-382-1039
Solid Oak Enter-
tertainment, Center
leaded glass trim,
3 lighted sect. lighted,
fits up to 42" TV, 9ft 6"
W, 20"D 6'2/2H, Holds
220 CD's/DVD's $500
obo Antique Roll Top
Desk, beautiful carve
front, 5'W. 30" D, $400.
obo (352) 746-7318


Furnitum


SET, Complete, head-
board, mattress, dresser
w/mirror & nightstand,
$250 for set
call 352-257-1480
Solid oak Not Veneer
Coffee Table with swivel
top to increase available
surface area.
Solid Oak 6 sided end
table w/ glass top $70 for
Both (352) 341-3651



CRAFTSMAN ROTARY
LAWN MOWER Briggs
and Stratton engine; 20 "
cut. New, Never used.
$75. 352-344-8468

MOVIE IG
SALE
MOWERS
Novia West Moving
Sale
Grasshopper 227
w/61" deck;
Grasshopper 430D
w/ 72" deck;
Grasshopper 620
w/ 48" deck.
Please call for pricing
(352) 622-1200
Weed Eater hedge
tnmmer $10
352-860-0183



BLACK & GOLD 2 PC.
SHELL & CARDIGAN set
Sz. Med $25 513-4614
BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING SIZE 5 & 6 SHIRTS,
PANTS & JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
EVENING BAG
shell-shaped gold bugle
beads $20 513-4614
MEANS BLACK
MOTORCYCLE JACKET
& VEST. EXC COND
$150 (352) 897-4549



8 MAN ZODIAK 8 man
inflatable zodiak boat
$100 (352) 270-3641
16" Pedestal Fan
$15
352-860-0183
ADDING MACHINE
Unisonic Desk Top 12
Digit Memory Elec. Print-
ing Calculator. $25.00
352-746-4160
BRASS FIREPLACE
GATE Folds up $30
352-860-2475
CANOPY SHED 10'x20'
steel frame canopy shel-
ter with sides-new-still in
boxes-$150.00
Call 352-382-2718
CLUB CAR 2 Sweater,
weather cover, lights,
mirrors, Trojan batteries
excel. cond. $1,400.
352-212-6182
GAME CALL OF DUTY
WORLD AT WAR
for nintendo ds
$10. 352-628-4210
Giant 72" TV DLP,
Samsung, Large
Screen, excel. cond.
$1,150 obo
Dining Room Table,
oak & tile top, 4 oak
upholstered chairs,
Paid $900 asking $350.,
352-419-2924,
352-560-7107


How Do


roumfW









Your Day





























Chronicle


Classifieds /


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& Online


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b : .-1' ,


.'! ~


--
I J


S C T I U CI COUNT Y


CHRONICLE Ci CiNI a







(352) 563m5966 d -


/ 3n~~


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179

Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent Clng.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352)419-6549




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER& SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352-726-2907



*BOB BROWN'S*
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 "*


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
VIFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018



*-i **-h *
The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



LARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
***352-302-3523***
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



GOOD MORNING LAWN
CARE
Leaves to Lawns
Call 352-502-6588
GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


HAULING-
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273
JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300



All hases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp llc2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


AAA ROOFING
Call te eak6usters"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 OOODDBP






IN

GENIE.
We dean Windows ad oWhole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
* Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/sprlnghill


Add an artisic louh yr exising yard
S-. or pool or plan
Ssomelhing
B ^-_ compleley new!
1 "Often nitated,
. i g never dupfate"

YOURINTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVERSPECIALIST
l COPES
SPOOL AND PAVER LLC
Insured 352-400-3188




Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry
-* Fencing
Screening
S Clean Dryer
W Vents
SAffordable & Dependable
t Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell 400-1722
Lured Lic.#37761


CARPET & L(
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING
Gift
peia certificates
Carpet Stretching Available
Carpet Repair
a 352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty WE


"epi'clin
,_Specuiali.Nt"
lnlri or .& E i.-rior
['., lll.., ,a,,,,, .4
FREE ESTIMATES -
352-465-6631


WI,

World Class
Window Tinting
Reduce -Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO* HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estmates
352-465-6079 -i_





a


GENERAL I
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377
352-621-124


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Olne!"
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala i
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM INC.

352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextaluml3@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238
302-8090
Lic#0CC2544




NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT



DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190


-r


D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I


, t
f,.


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GUITAR TREE STAND-
holds 3 Guitars, folds for
storage, black, Ex., $30.
352-628-0033
HAND Sweeper
$20, Miter Saw $20
Hand Spreader $5
352-860-0183
HITCH, factory made
2k gross weight, de-
signed for sml vehicle
incl. 2 ball mounts, pin &
clip$100 obo, call any-
time 352-586-7658
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
PEAK 12 VOLT
INFLATOR Used once.
$20. 352-628-3455
PENN DEEP SEA ROD
& REEL- Penn 330 GTI
Graphite Reel, 7ft. Penn
Power Stick,
Ex., $90. 352-628-0033
PICNIC TABLE 5 FOOT
LONG GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
PORTABLE A/C UNIT
GE 8,000 BTU, 115v,
APE08AKMI with all
accessories-only used
one time, $250.00
Call 352-382-2718
QUANTUM 6000
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
ex. cond., batt. charger,
cushion $2,500.00 obo
(352) 527-2085
Rainbow River Club
membership through
2015 Asking $150
954-755-7039
RV TIRE 255.70R.22.5
TRUCK NEW NEVER
MOUNTED RV or Truck
new 335.00 sell 100.00
352270 1775
SEWING MACHINE
Portable Brother sewing
machine with all accesso-
ries and carrying case
$125.00
Call 352-382-2718
SOLD
GENERATOR
like new, 5550 Troybuilt
never been used,
great condition
SUNBEAM WATER
COOLER / Cold, Hot,
REFIG Cold Hot Water,
& 5 Gal Water. Moving.
$65. 352-465-1319
TIRE 295.80R 22.5 RV
TRUCK Michelin XZA 2
85% tread ready for road
or spare. 100.00 U pick
up 352 270 1775
Trademark 3-in-1
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey,
and Foosball), 42.5 x 33
x 33-Inch, space saving
design, $350. 419-7017
TRIPOD- Silk U212
Universal Deluxe, heavy
duty. For photo or video
camera. $35.
352-382-4037
TV PANASONIC 27" TV,
w/remote WORKS
GREAT U pick up Pine
Ridge $40.00
352270 1775


Webber Grill
$20, Black & Decker
Workmate Table $20
352-860-0183
WET/DRY VAC Sears,6
1/2 HP, Exc. running,
extra filter & manual.
$35.00 352-746-4160



2 POWER LIFT CHAIRS
RECLINERS BY PRIDE
$325 EA. BOTH EXC.
COND.(352) 270-8475
GO GO SCOOTER
Elite, used only a few
times, like new $375 firm
u-pick-up, 352-560-3874
LARGE POWER LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR
$200(352) 564-0722



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



9 Piece Drum Set,
Excellent
Condition
$550. obo
(352) 637-4639
BALDWIN UPRIGHT
**PIANO**
good condition $425
352-344-0547
Cassio Keyboard
WK1800, like new,
Stand and bench in-
cluded $200 cash,
Citrus Hills
352-637-6762
CHICKERING
UPRIGHT PIANO
EXC. COND. $900
(352) 795-0381
HO HO HO STRING
BANJO WIRESONATER
PLAYS GREAT $70
MAHOGANY FINISH
352-601-6625
HO HO HO MITCHELL
MO100SACOUSTIC
GUITAR VINTAGE
SUNBURST "NEW"$80
352-601-6625
HO HO HO NEW
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PACK WIGIGBAG,
STRAP,PICKS & MORE!
$65 352-601-6625
HO HO HO NEW
STRAT-STYLE EL
GUITAR,H-S-S, NICE
METALLIC FINISH, $65
352-601-6625



CHAMPION JUICER
Fresh juice for your
health! Almond color, in
excellent condition $160
(828) 483-4550
Crystal River
Health Meter Scale
$25
352-860-0183



BICYCLE 28" Diamond-
back Edgewood hybrid
24sp exc condition.$145.
352-419-7200


REDUCED
BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $499. OBO
A Great Holiday Gift
352-697-2771
TREADMILL Pro-form
490-C like new. Do not
use. Need space. Paid
$350, will sell for $100
352-746-4160



AUTHENTIC NFL MIAMI
DOLPHIN JACKET LIKE
NEW, WORN TWICE
$70. (352) 795-3763
BROWNING Auto 22
Rifle W/ Browning scope
$425; WINCHESTER
30-30 Caliber, Model 94,
W/ Peep Scope $375
(352) 746-0070
CANOE
16 FT Mohaw,
fiberglass, GREAT
SHAPE $200 OBO
(352) 564-0254
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Ladies 26" Lamborghini
Road Bike
21 speed like new
$129.
(352) 249-4460
MELEX GOLF
36 volt excellent
Condition, $1100.
352-527-3125
Pool Table
4 x 8 ft, 1 slate,
leather pockets,
oak frame $700
(352) 586-9598
RUGER M 77 270cal.
Scope, sling case, like
new. Great Xmas Gift
$425. 352-601-1250
SAVAGE MODEL 340
222 Rem. cal. scope 4
clips exc. Cond $375 May
take partial trade on gun.
(352) 564-0036
Call 8am till 9pm
STETSON HAT 10X
New in the Box size 7
Cream color $125
(352) 746-0070
Tanning Bed
Professional, 24 Lamp
$600.
Hot Tub, color marble
gray, 220V, seats 4-6
600. (352) 586-9598
Two Club Car Golf
Cart's -2007
Excellent Condition!
48 volt, FAST,
exc. batteries $1850 ea.
352-527-3125



NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678



WHITE WOODEN
ROUND CANOPY
BASSINET Brand new,
never used Must see!!
$100. 352-422-2719


A.






For more information on how to reach
S S Citrus County Readers call
352-563-5592.


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47
for years 1938.
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948. 1949 19501954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917. Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucsl3@aol.com

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369




5 Tiny Yorkies
$550 and up, Small,
Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2
females,1 Male Maltese,
Raised in loving home.
CKC Reg. health certs, &
puppy pacs. Parents on
site come watch them
play (352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258

BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219


CHRISTMAS
DACHSHUNDS





Smooth Minis, family
raised, ready to go
Only 2 Left! $200ea.
Will Hold for Christ-
mas! call Debbie at
352-564-0855 eves


CITRUS OUNTY 0
CHRONICLE


www.hronicleonline.com
scarfaogh MW


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 D7


All Remaining


Will Be


THIS


EEK


To Make Room For




The Incoming


Citrus County's


Volume Sales Leader




We Deliver The Best


Showroom


Buying Experience


i Cars


Service




Come See Why We Are


Rated The Best!







SiuLLAGE TOYOTA




OF CRYSTAL RIVER




www.v.llageto.. ta.co 352-503-4121


CLASSIFIED


I Sel or








D8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


Dachshunds Mini
Long hair Xmas pups,
females, black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
Ready when you are!
$300 (352) 795-6870
or (352) 220-4792
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com





S(352) 634-5039
F6 BENGAL CAT CUBS
*Spotted & Marbles*
*Snows & Browns*
*$275, FL Health*
*Cert. & Shots*
*352-601-5362*
LABRADOODLE
PUPPIES 2 left! 1 black
male, 1 cream female.
Born 9/21/12. Shots,
dewormed, health certs.,
flea protection,
heartworm prevention.
Please call for prices.
352-410-0080


RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352-419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com

Livestock


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945



15 ft ALUM. BOAT WIDE
DEEP V, 25HP ELEC.
START, TRAILER.
OLDER BUT CHEAPER!
$995 (352) 341-4949
1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945


AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7000 352-637-1391
BASS BOAT
17 f, 75H Evinrude.
canopy, very clean.
trolling mtr. $3,200
(352) 220-1342


MST SELL

BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, Ttop, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506



DUTCHMAN 40FT
2012-2 slides, 2 ac's
new $51,900 ask. $32k
obo, call for more info
(850) 449-1811 Homoss.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333



1997 DODGE
STRATUS- ES
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 97,000 mi
$2800 (352) 341-3991
2003 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LXI
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 71,500 miles
$4300 (352) 341-3991
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CHEVROLET
2000 IMPALA
$4995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2003 AVALANCHE
$6850
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004 TRAILBLAZER
4X4 $6999
352-341-0018

Metn


2001 TOWN &
COUNTRY $4550
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
SEBRING 2001
convertible, $3500
352-621-5153 after 5pm
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC. PRICED TO SEL.
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR. IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
MR2 SPYDER
2002 TRD model, 1
owner. Mint condition.
Garage kept, no acci-
dents, smoking, or pets.
New soft top & leather
seats. C352-464-7501.
$13.5K.
NISSAN
2004 350Z, silver 2dr.
convertible, exc cond.
53k mles, $14,800 obo
352-382-4239
NISSAN
2005ALTIMA SE V6
$7495
352-341-0018
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8500 obo 382-0428
TOYOTA
'05 Camry LE, Silver.
leather interior, very good
condition, 86k miles.
$8900 (352) 637-2838
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



1929 FORD RUMBLE
SEAT ROADSTERS
For more info call -
(352) 637-6053
1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$24,900, 352-513-4257





1 *** *
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
Quad cab 360 body, tires
& interior good, needs
engine & transmission
work $1800 or best offer
352-464-4764
FORD
'03, Ranger XLT 31,200
miles, 5 spd., w/ topper
excel, cond. $6,000.
Call (352) 795-1332

Metn


2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS. V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
NEW POLARIS
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002 SPORTSMAN ATV.
4X4. SERVICED AND
READY FOR HUNTING
SEASON. $2995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE. STAGE ONE.
LOADED WITH OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR TOUR
DELUXE. READY FOR A
ROAD TRIP ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678







I I
1980 HONDA GOLD
WING 1100 $900 CALL
FOR INFO
(352) 564-0036
'08 Suzuki Burgman 400
Candy apple red, exc.
cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi
per gallon, luggage back,
& garage kept. $4500
(352) 897-4549



HONDA
1986, V4, Magna,
750CC, needs Carbs
cleaned, otherwise
road ready, clean Fl.
Title many extras $600.
Greg 352-419-7382



KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 550 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 FIRM. Phone
352-726-8124


388-1223 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 131598
Description of property: AK: 1512034 and legally described as E1/2 OF NE1/4 OF
NE1/4 LYING S OF CHICKEN FARM RD (GROVER CLEVELAND BLVD) & W OF FPC R/W
IN 29-19-18 TITLE IN OR BK 2330 PG 1065 OR BK 2345 PG 2417
TOMMY T & JESSICA D HUGHES
4118 W GROVER CLEVELAND BLVD
HOMOSASSA, FL
On October 12,2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 4118 W. Grover Cleve-
land Blvd.; Homosassa, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the
Code Compliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
December 23, 2012.

389-1223 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Port Authority will meet on Tues-
day, January 8, 2013 at 9:30 AM at the Citrus County Courthouse, Room 100 Board
Chambers, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, to discuss the business of
the Port Authority.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Port Authority with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


BY:

December 23, 2012.


Dennis Damato
Chairman


390-1223 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
1/2/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
December 23, 2012.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









HOMEFRONT


CITRITS COITrNTY CHRONIC F RFAT ESTATF C.ITFlD
~ .~bh~9~kI~~


B Sikorski's
SAtticPAGE E4
PAGE E4


I-


HOME AND GARDEN:

HAmRDY PAis, E3


REAL ESTATE:

SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS


~-"'---m-ow.
-- I i .... I -'"


This undated product image provided by
Beau-coup.com shows a snowflake vo-
tive, an attractive, useful gift to give as
a party favor for a holiday celebration.
Associated Press









E2~ SUDI DEEBR2,21 iu CuwY(L HOIL


5849 N. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
*4BD/3BA/3CG Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


PINE RIDGE
*3BD/2BAI2CG Under Construction
* Dream Custom Home Builder Feature 2,464 SF Living
Call Listing Agent for Details
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


LOCATION... LOCATION...
LOCATION...
3BR/2BA home with a total of 2,098 under
a new roof. Garage, FL room, and a privacy
fenced backyard. Move-in condition.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 ]
Email: barbarjmills@earthlink.net











REALTY ONE


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1 Buyer calls exclusive
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S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
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E 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


STUNNING pool home! Lovely 3/2/3+
den boasts a solar heated pool & spa, gas
fireplace, RV pad with 50 amp, large open
kitchen. Upgrades include flooring, custom
window treatments and baths. Enjoy your
morning coffee in the breakfast nook
overlooking your pool.

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


46 BEECH STREET
HOMOSASSA
*3BR/2BA/2CG Golf Course Home *Great Room
* Lg. Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook Gas Fireplace
*Screened Lanai& Pool Beautiful Landscaped 1 Acre
*Well-Maintained

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenlplmer@remax.net


WAItHIIK'UNI
S3/2/2 Inverness Home
S3,323 Sq. Ft. Living
* 1.06 Acres Oaks & Fruit Trees
SBuilt 1992 -Updated 2010
* Beautiful Unique Design
* Newer Appliances
* Top-of-the-Line Water System
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


- IH.!. V O---F!


PHIVAlk, StCLUUtCU
POOL HOME!
Country casual living on 1 acre! Over
3,000 sq. ft., huge garage, fireplace,
and bonus room! Celebrate the New
Year at home.
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


aiN I MA n, KNUUULU i IlE NiUL on mis DeaunTiul
3/2/2 pool home viewing state lands in Riverhaven
Renovated with top-of-the-line appliances in gourmet
kitchen, wood cabinets, granite, bamboo floors, brick
pavers from the street to far side of pool decking, open
floor plan, and plantation shutters Move-in ready Start the
New Year off right
IODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Emoil: team@citrusreolty.com


2421 N. B l I 01 NF


CRYSTAL RIVER
* Nice 2BR/2BAi2CG Home Lg. Great Room
* Eat-In Kitchen Enclosed Lanai
* Well-Maintained Nicely Landscaped Deep Lot


DASHING THRU THE GOLF COURSE!!
* Set Back Off the Road Wide Concrete Drive
* 3/3/2 + 2-Car Det. Gar Lge. Kit. w/Gas Range
* Cozy Gas Fireplace Lots of Tile/Hardwood in DR
S1.91 Acres! Short Drive to Gulf/Rivers
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www. FlolidaLislinglnlo.com


E2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











Hardy palms come in many shapes, sizes


In the Palmae family, there are six
distinct subfamilies. Palms are
monocots, having one growth bud.
If the bud is damaged in transporta-
tion or by freezing, the
plant will die.
Some "solitary palms"
reach tree-size at maturity
like Florida's state tree, the
sabal palm, Sabalpalmetto,
Zones 8-11. Taking the bud
to cook as cabbage kills the
tree.
Other palms are shrub-
sized, like the dwarf native
palms scrub palmetto, S. Jane
etonia, Z 9-11 and blue-stem JAN
palmetto, S. minor, Z7-10, GAR
both Sabal species with un-
derground stems, so no
trunk.
"Cluster palms" sprout secondary
shoots and plantlets from the base.
The most cold-hardy cluster palm is
the native needle palm, Rhapidophy-
lumhystrix (Z 8-10), which grows from
the south part of Central Florida north
to South Carolina and west to
Mississippi.
Hardy green and silver saw palmet-
tos, Serenoarepens, Z 8-11, are also
clustering palms. Caution: the popular
silver saw variety grows much more
rapidly than the green. It will reach 15
feet diameter in 15 years. Give it lots
of space to grow to maturity not in a
small flower bed. Cluster palms can be
divided with surgical precision and
expertise, provided the offsets have
developed their own roots.
Palm seeds sprout after about a
year. They can survive the heat in a
decomposing compost pile. The pan-
tropical coconut, Cocosnucifera, is the


I PIERD EH MI


PINE RIDGE
41313 POOL HOME
Best Priced Home on Market.
Hurry! Beautiful lot, large lanai.
Convenient location, 2630 sq. ft
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$205,000
Call Joe 302-0910
OOODLHK


I
v
I I
a


largest seed in the world. Palm seeds
have a single leaf, so are angiosperms.
Many frost-tender exotic palms are
sold locally They are often a handful
of seedlings grown in a
communal pot and best en-
joyed as indoor or patio
plants.
The date palm of the Mid-
dle East and North Africa
commonly depicted on holi-
day cards is the tree-size
"Sylvestris" date palm, P
dactylifera, Z 10-12. It is
frost-tender, so fronds can
Veber break in any breeze when
E'S frozen. Fronds are tinged
N greyish-green. The similar,
more frost-hardy Canary Is-
land date palm, P canarien-
sis, Z 9-11 has dark green fronds.
The two other Phoenix palms sold
locally need a protected microclimate
to survive winter here. Senegal date
palm, Preclinata, Z 10-11, has a cluster
of trunks curving out from the center
It can reach 20 feet tall with a diame-
ter of 10 to 20 feet in a microclimate
such as on the banks of the Rainbow
River. Frond stems are armed with vi-
cious, thorny spikes.
Dwarf date palm, P roebelini, Z10-
12, grows 10 feet tall and as wide. All
Phoenixes have armed petioles.
Queen palm, Syagrusromanzoffi-
ana, (formerly called Arecastrum),
Z10-12, is one of 32 palms in the genus.


\\oppy

tHolidays
from


Queens are available locally in spring
after danger of frost. Provided the next
few winters are mild, queens may establish
and survive locally.
A hard freeze will kill them dead.


It has a smooth, fibrous crown shaft
atop a single smooth but ridged trunk.
Pinnate fronds form a feathery duster
Grown tall down south, then harvested
with very little of its extensive root sys-
tem, queens are available locally in
spring after danger of frost. Provided
the next few winters are mild, queens
may establish and survive locally. A
hard freeze will kill them dead. If the
bud dies, the tree cannot sprout new
fronds next year. Planting queens in
warmed microclimates may be suc-
cessful. Elsewhere, it is an expensive
and ultimately futile gamble.
Two Washingtonia palms with fan-
shaped leaves evolved in the warm,
dry southwestern states and northern
Mexico. Half-hardy California fan
palm, W filifera, Z 9-11, grows to 60
feet tall in its natural habitat but is
shorter in cultivation. Dead fronds
hang down to form an attractive petti-
coat that should be left in place.
More frost-tender Mexican fan
palm, W.robusta, Z 10-11 grows 80 feet
tall with a compact 10-foot-diameter
PmwTWm". I R-9.9


crown. It has a thick, more
tapered trunk than the Cali-
fornian. Fronds are a shiny
green while Californians'
are greyish-green in a 15-
foot-wide crown.


E


SOLAR
* 3 Be
* Gra
* Jette


Next week, look for my
handy palm list and clip it
out before shopping for
cold-hardy palms.
-
Jane Weberisa
professional gardener and
consultant. Semi-retired,
she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden. For
an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or email
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


-- ) ( "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" 1.?

NANCY Direct: 352-634.4225
PONTICOS ,caerS
Multi-Million $$$ Producer K .
015S SuncoastBlvd Homosassa,FL 382-1700 Nancy Nancyknows.com






HEATED POOL & SPA! LARGER LOT! INCREDIBLE CUL-DE-SAC HOME!
d + Office / 2 Bath / 2 Car Garage Open Kitchen to Family Room (Gas Fireplace)
nite Island Kitchen to Family Room 2006 Roof Shingles Private Well for Lawn
d Tub + Large Shower in Master Split 3 Bedroom Plan Double Pane Windows
$207,000 MLS#356505 $124,500 MLS#356458


AkemyvirWal W Tyn SS.c


r Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaifney Lou Milele,
SRealor. n L W Ie Realtor
302.3179 soLD.' 287.9022 J ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU"
The Golden Girl WEEKS RE, 5 K Cell: (352) 697-1685

Merry Christmas
from our family to yours.
The Gaffney's
fro o.u. fammily

Mark Stone/Scott Bender
Your "HOME" town Agents!
-- 352-476-7996
sellingcitrus@gmail.com
o eown w.sellingcitruscom
iRealty r" La |S

WISHING '~- "
YOU AJOYOUSi
CHRISTMAS
AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR!


SAMERICAN
ERA REALTY INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Leato Hw
Bevedy His, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 E3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







E4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information......352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.................................... .......352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


4-H'ers prepare to present poultry

A animal science or livestock projects due to the limited space available in the
are the most popular type of proj- poultry barn.
ects for 4-H members. Throughout There will be two different contests
the fall, exhibitors have already weighed- March 28 at the county fair: exhibition and
in their large animal projects, steer and judging of the birds and the youth show-
swine, for the 2013 Citrus manship of the birds.
County Fair For a bird to place in its class
The rabbit exhibitors at- at a show, it must be in the best
tended an educational meeting possible show condition and be
that was mandatory for partici- a a good representative of a pure
pation in their show. Next, a --' breed standard. Poultry show-
youth exhibitors will present manship is a class where the
their poultry for registration* youths show the judge their ex-
and receive education about hibits. The youth will handle
raising and showing their birds the bird and explain to the
at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5. judge the good and bad points
Exhibitors must be members of the animal. It is unnecessary
of either 4-H or FFA to partici- to have an exceptional bird for
pate in the County Fair "Youth" Amy Duncan showmanship, because it is the
Livestock shows. The poultry YOUNG exhibitor who is being judged,
show exhibits many breeds of IDEAS and not the bird.
chickens, of course, but will For the Youth Poultry show, a
also probably feature other system of classes, breeds and
birds such as ducks, geese, turkey and varieties has been established to identify
sometimes game birds such as guineas or and classify chickens. A class is a group of
quail. Only purebred birds are accepted breeds that originated in the same coun-
into the show, with the exception of the try or region of the world. The name indi-
Production class, which allows hybrid or cates the region where the breed began,
crossbreeds. such as English, Mediterranean or
Because of the popularity of raising and American.
exhibiting chickens and other poultry, the Most chickens grown by today's com-
fair is limiting youths to a maximum of mercial poultry industry are from the
four entries per person this year. The American, English or Mediterranean
show superintendent has to limit entries See DUNCAN/Page E5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...

vT`ran~ y~I


Party favors

Jane Weber

Real Estate


PAGE E6

PAGE E3
Digest
PAGE Ell


For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Oil painting of more interest in city of origin


Dear John: I have
attached photos
of a Gil Klocker
oil painting. It has to be
close to 50 years old.
After taking it off the
wall, I noticed a very
delicate tag on the
back. If you enlarge the
tag, it sold for $200 back
then.
It measures 36 inches
wide by 28 inches deep.
It was hand-signed by
the artist upside down.


John Sikorski
SIKORSKI'S
ATTIC


Also, the painting is signed on the
bottom left side. You have a great
show and I really enjoy your col-
umn. FB., Weeki Wachee
Dear EB.: I was not able to find
any biographical information
about the artist nor any track
record of sales. The old label
states the city location. I suggest
contacting the local library or city
records for information about the
artist. You might contact the


gallery that handled
the artist's works, if
they are still in busi-
ness.
Secondary market
interest for an artist's
works generally starts
in the area they are rec-
ognized to have
worked. This leaves po-
tential dollar value in
the catch-as-catch-can
category
Dear John: I have at-
tached photos of a


porcelain bud vase with raised
gold gilding that was given to my
great grandmother prior to her
marriage in 1897 in Pennsylvania.
As you can see, there are no mark-
ings anywhere on the vase. Any
idea about origin or value? B.S.,
Internet
Dear B.S.: I think your very
pretty hand-painted foliate deco-
rated bud vase with a butterfly in
flight is made of porcelain. The


Special to the Chronicle
This Gil Klocker oil painting might be more valuable in the area they are
recognized to have worked.

country of origin is likely Japan and time of production late 19th to


Special to the Chronicle
This bud vase was likely made in
Japan during the late 19th to early
20th century.
early 20th century Potential dol-
lar value is below $100.
Dear John: I am sending you a
photograph of a placemat I found.
See ATTIC/Page E5







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DUNCAN
Continued from Page E4

classes. Breeds in the Ameri-
can class have yellow skin and
unfeathered shanks (legs).
They adapt easily to different
conditions and are used to
produce both meat and eggs.
Popular breeds in the
American class include the
Plymouth Rock, Dominique,
Rhode Island Red, New
Hampshire, Wyandotte, Jer-
sey Giant and others.
Breeds in the English class
excel in producing meat Pop-
ular English breeds include
the Cornish, Australorp, Orp-
ington and Dorking.
The Mediterranean class in-
cludes breeds that produce
eggs, not meat. They are small
and lay white eggs. Popular
breeds include the Leghorn,
Minorca, Blue Andalusian
and Ancona.


Any of the purebred breeds
can be grown to exhibit Many
of our exhibitors are raising
bantams. Bantams are the
miniatures of the poultry
world.
Most large fowl have a
miniature likeness called a
bantam. They have the same
requirements for shape, color
and physical features as do
large fowl.
Bantams are raised for their
beauty, as pets or for compan-
ion animals. Often, they can
be kept in areas too small for
large fowl.
They are excellent birds to
grow for exhibition.
4-H Animal Science live-
stock exhibitors learn more
than just how to raise and
show their poultry in the fair.
They have the opportunity to
learn the life skills of respon-
sibility, sportsmanship, coop-
eration and ethical behavior
through the poultry livestock
project.


These are the goals of all
4-H "learn by doing" projects;
helping youths become pro-
ductive members of the com-
munity.


For information about
how to start or join a club in
your area, contact your
Citrus County Extension's
4-H Office by calling 352-527-
5712 or email Amy Duncan
the 4-H agent: amyduncan@
bocc.citrus.fl.us. Citrus
County Extension connects
the public with the
University ofFlorida/IFAS's
knowledge, research and
resources to
address youth, family,
community and agricultural
needs. Programs and
activities offered by the
Extension Service are
available to all persons
without regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion or
national origin.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

It could be a pencil sketch. In the left
corner it says "Old Red Bank." In the
right-hand corner it is signed Lionel
Barrymore. It is 18 inches by 16. I love
your column. It is very interesting. -
A Y, Crystal River
DearA.Y: I suspect there are a lot of
our readers who recall the famous
actor Lionel Barrymore. He was also a
fairly accomplished artist, but there is
very little interest in the art world for
his original works. You have a repro-
duction.
Dear John: I hope you will be able to
help me place the year and maybe
value of an old vintage Grundig Short-
wave Radio record player I have. I used
to have the original manual, but have
misplaced it. I was almost positive it
said 1945. But someone told me
Grundig did not manufacture these in
the '40s?
It is a beautiful piece of furniture, no
nicks or breaks anywhere and the orig-


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 E5
inal back is solid and perfect The radio
did play until the last move I made. I
think some of the tubes may have come
loose.
I am attaching pictures, which I hope
will help. If you can help or if you know
who I could contact I would appreciate
it-B.L., Internet
Dear B.L: Grundig radios are recog-
nized worldwide for their high-quality
products. The collecting marketplace is
mainly interested in small tabletop
Grundig radios. Large console sets like
the one you own are of no interest to
most radio collectors. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
For information about time of pro-
duction, contact Dennis Williams at
Radio Relics www.clge.com. Good luck.


John Sikorski has been a professional
in the antiques business for 30 years.
He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box 2513, Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


i n V Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
___ a_ r4& rnwodReae (352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

REALTY G RO UP P.rsF ltropc BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133* VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777


BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR
ii ... ... .. .... i.. . i.. .., i i. .. .i.. ... i. DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
I .. i, ,i, I ,,I .11... . I1, ,I I ,I 1111 ,I . Come and see this really nice custom W indward on the 5th hole of Skyview
.. ... ,. ,,. ,,129.900 kitchen tl. .. tl... .... . fi.,ll .tl. T225. 000. d
,11 1 ... I I I ,, i,, II ,I ... . I I. I,, I .II la n a l h a : , .., .I .. .I I I . . . .. I I . ......... r
S .. ,,. 4. 11 ,129.900 kitchen S.. ... ..... .. I II I. II 225,000


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS
I 1i .. ...... ,1, .I .i ,I Ills 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car home One of Terra
' .. I I..' I 'i n ,1.. Enter the foyer and be instantly captivated by
the charm and tasteful decor of i., i .. i, i i .I i -i 1 *i i,, .
from the tiled Lanai to see tl n ,i1.
waterfall MLS 358547 $249,000


DETACHEDVILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
La i lew Golf
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH I vlla has
Elegant, immaculate with a fabulous panoramic view Don't miss this 3/3/2 SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH a therapeutic step in the latest in secure bathing The
home on the Skyview Golf Course of Terra Vista gas and solar heated pool & Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 1, .,. *i .1 i ~ floor Butler's pantry was for easy internet access while
.; 11 . ... t 1 ,I .,11. .,t, .I ,J f.,,i .l... If .t .1 plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades Situateil '. I 1, 1 ourse cooking The covered lanai faces south for cool evening breezes The best of all
.... .. I. iI hI , 1 ... ....i . .11. 1 1.1. I 1 .1 .. I, . ed lanal w ith lush landscape Located in the
,,. .. 1 376.500 ,... . ........ I i... i MS 357971 $339.000 I 5224.900


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
THIS LOVELY 2 BED + DEN HOME features an extended lanal with an DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS his home comes with allthe luxuries you'd -irt fr-m th, .t;. .--.,,,,t TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD
Inground spa Open floor plan with tile and carpet Located on a cul-de sac in Immaculate unfurnished home in the Community of Brentwood Open floor plan 2 bedroom plus a den, 2 bath and 2 car *i, ... .. i ... i i..i. i .. ... Nice furnished end unit townhome in Brentwood Open floor plan, eat in
the desirable community of TerraVista Social Membership Included I, i i i i i.... . i...i , i ..i i.b with hot tub, plantation shutters, triple ii .. ... i ... i I ,i i... .. kitchen, bath downstairs, complete with washer & dryer Social Club
#1273 1.300 ...i.. i,. .. .i i I 1.100 water fnintaanl It harl In tn the narlk 1 .~On Memhershln Included #12777 1.100


! ..


! ..







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


-U -


This undated product image pro-
vided by Tops Malibu shows Poof
Balls. A modern take on a tradi-
tional pea shooter, they are a fun
party favor or activity at a holiday
gathering.

Find party favors

with flair

KIM COOK
For The Associated Press


of the easier parties to
throw. Everyone's al-
eady in the merry-
making mood, so it's a simple
matter of setting the stage.
You can do that with decor,
food, beverages and music, but
it's also nice to offer a party favor
that guests can take home as a
token of a special evening.
For a clever collection of party
favors that can be customized,
look to creative gift maven Judy
Walker of Seattle, at the website


Associated Press
This undated image provided by Beau-coup.com shows mini cinnamon-scented pine cone candles, a thoughtful party favor for a holiday party.


TopsMalibu.com.
A sparkler in the shape of num-
bers and letters makes a fun way
to toast that doesn't involve
drinks; simply touch your
sparkler to the one next to you. If
you'd like to get silly, buy some
Poof Balls packets of tubes and
colorful paper balls like old fash-
ioned peashooters.
Walker's "Surprize Balls" re-
call a hot item in the 1950s cre-


ated by New Orleans native
Charles Gregor with the tag line,
"The Toy You Destroy to Enjoy"
Walker's handmade version con-
sists of crepe paper-wrapped
balls that you unravel to reveal a
variety of little trinkets and treas-
ures. They were a hit with retail-
ers at this fall's New York
International Gift Fair
For New Year's, she fills the
balls with vintage-style toys,


keepsakes, charms, gems, candy,
bubbles, confetti poppers, for-
tunes and quotes. She'll make
custom ones with individualized
notes or prizes. Buy them already
decorated, or plain to embellish
yourself.
Shiny red poppers filled with
confetti would be a fun midnight
favor for guests, and Walker has
little wish capsule necklaces too
for recording resolutions.


(Deluxe Surprize Balls, $16.50;
set of six undecorated balls, $59;
four sparklers, $16.50; six Poof
Balls, $15; wish capsules, $9.50,
www.topsmalibu.com)
Brit Moran of San Francisco,
who runs her own monthly sub-
scription-based craft store, is of-
fering a festive LED balloon kit
that includes mini LED lights,

See Page E7


POOF
| BALLS |
2 fancy "pa-shoolcrs
& handmade paper balls





II







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TIMELY
Continued from Page E6

glitter, air pump, balloons and ribbon
to make decorations or favors that
glow and sparkle. ($24.99, www.britco)
Small yet thoughtful favors can be
found at the online wedding and party
supplier www.beau-coup.com. Chic
silver snowflake wine stoppers, jew-
eled snowflake votive holders and
miniature, cinnamon-scented
pinecone candles would all make
pretty takeaways. (Wine stoppers,


$2.30 and up; votive holders, $2.42 and
up; pine cones, $7.24 and up)
A homemade take-home favor is al-
ways appreciated. HGTVcom has in-
structions for putting together
interesting ones like custom-mixed
loose tea, colorful candies packed in
cork-topped vials, and mini bottles of
custom-flavored liquors such as ginger
anise vodka and vanilla cinnamon
bourbon. Music lovers could create
USB thumb-drive mixes, perhaps with
the evening's party playlist.
(wwwhgtv.com/entertaining)
Monica Pedersen, an HGTV host and
author of "Make it Beautiful: Designs


and Ideas for Entertaining at Home"
(Agate Midway, 2012), has a favorite fra-
granced candle she likes to give.
"Pretty, scented votives wrapped
like a firecracker are always easy fa-
vors. Kai brand's my favorite, and def-
initely soothing for New Year's Day,"
she says. Kai's Twilight candles are a
heady blend of exotic white florals.
(box of four, $48, www.lifetherapycom)
Finally, as revelers head out the
door, Pedersen suggests setting out an
attractive cooler filled with iced bot-
tles of coconut water.
"Encourage your guests to take one
for the road," she says.


Associated Press
A snowflake-shaped wine bottle topper is a useful yet
inexpensive gift.


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Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
" 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
NNE (352) 634-2371 Cell
SERA bob@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS:bidavis.cor


Lk1J -A 1 LLJ UA I WL1 k L- I 11 -J Lu J ii 1
SSIMPLY PERFECT
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
3-Cargarage
Living room
Family room
Convection oven
Heated pool
Summer kitchen
.- '.::"* One acre
M $209,900 MLS 356376


""OH, WHAT A VIEW!
4 Bedrooms


Formal dining room
Huge family room
Pool, deck with pavers
On landlocked Lake Tahoe
$179,000 MLS 359292
SO CLEAN AND NEAT
THAT IT SPARKLES.
S3 Bed, 2 bath, a
- 2-car screened gar
Neutral colors throughout
Corian counters
Interior laundry
SWorkshop w/power & air
SOn 1.23 acre
&1&nnnn K AIQOFO'))F


--- - -L - -




Ananda & Mirk Jolnson Tom Ballour UL Awveus & Hi Strner Art Paty
BROKtE/AM, -ELOC K REACTOR tALTOR-BROKER REACTOR
4 10





3946 N. PONY 4002 W. PINTO 4935 N. PEPPER
4/35/3 359171 $749,900 4/2/2 358356 $249,900 3/2/2 357718 $




2372 W. EGRET PL. 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 6277 N. MA
4/2/2 356193 $189,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900 3/2/2 357083 1


746-9000,

0 st u ca


1-- IAC1 =4 I-11101VF SI 'F I


4710 W. MUSTANG 8597 N. DORA WAY 16 S. ADAMS 15 S. FILLMORE 29 N. WASHINGTON
3//3 359604 $249,900 32 35808 137 500 2/1 356532 $42,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 2/1 356448
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


)III~)
L L L


CRYSTAL RIVER

d


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 E7


I


1;6i,


~ao


--~- T\
J11.










Clean hard water stains on glasses with common household products


D ear Sara: How can I
get rid of hard water
etching on my glass-
ware? I've tried vinegar,
baking-soda paste and some
commercial products, but
nothing seems to work.
You're my last hope before
I throw these glasses out! -
Howard N, email
Dear Howard: Applying Sara
white toothpaste with a FRL
toothbrush might work. Or LIV
try a denture tablet such as
Efferdent with water, and
let the glasses soak. You could also try
a vinegar and lemon juice or Lemi
Shine soak, then scrub and wash as
usual. Hopefully, one of the above
methods will work. It's possible the
glasses are permanently etched.
Dear Sara: I have a coffee maker
with stains on the cover of the pot. I
tried every way to clean with no result
Can you help? -Allen B., Arizona


I
"I


Dear Allen: I'd soak it in
a water and bleach mixture
and then use a Mr. Clean
magic eraser to clean it
Dear Sara: I need ideas
for a vegetable to make for
the holidays. Usually I have
corn, but I'd like to try
something different for
once. Brenda, forums
Noel Dear Brenda: To keep
GAL things simple, I lean toward
ING a green vegetable such as
green beans, broccoli or
asparagus.
Dear Sara: Can you remove the
lights that come on a pre-lit tree? I've
searched almost everywhere and it
seems the days of decorating a tree
yourself are over. I want to put my own
lights on my tree, thank you very
much! Cat, email
Dear Cat Some are easily removed,
but most are a pain to cut out (I don't
advise trying it if you don't have a ton


of patience) and your tree could that are attached to your tree.
end up looking pretty sparse. Plain trees are still available. I
You could add your own lights bought one two years ago on
and simply not plug in the lights sale right before Christmas for


LANDMARK


less than $65.
Dear Sara: This summer, we

See Page Ell


311 W.Main St., Inverness
352-726-5263
1 A kI.:


E EST
,. , I


^F ^www.dan mar nverness.co


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY
.raIL-*. ~~~~~W s~l~~ r*Iinb' Ww'.-l J *


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN .A BOATER'S DREAM
ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN TRUE WANTED: INVESTORS WITH VISION 1.1 I
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240 Lakefront. 44 rental units, boat mooring & ramp, Laundromat
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre storage, workshop & boat rentals. So much potential.
In the equestrian section of Pine comer lot with mature oak trees and lots feet of seawall; stationary & float- $1,225,000 #359161 ean Cassese 352-201-7034
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a of privacy! Very well maintained,new ing dock; spacious modem 3/25
360 interactive virtual tour at roof 05/09.Just bring your suitcase and home sits high and dry (never
360 interactive virtual tour at move right in! Community features golf, flooded) on 2 lots. This meticu
www.mypineridgehome.com. tennis,clubhouse, lously maintained property is a
MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000 must see! $499,000


SANTA'S SECRET WATERFRONT PARADISE. Over
900 feet of waterfront, covered dock & a view to envy. A
fish camp in its previous life. $495,000.7926 Shannon Cf.
#357333 Call 352-726-5263
AN ECLECTIC PIECE OF
NATURE'S ART THAT HAPPENS TO
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET BE REAL ESTATE!
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River This amazing property sits right
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community on the water at Lake Tsala
ii .... ,.... .. T akethe on the Withlacoochee River Apopka! $899,000
$218,000 For more information please visit
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! www.eclectic-house.com
SKIP THE SUGAR COOKIES and buy a Sugar Shack
Inverness 2/2/2 w/1790 living for $51,500! #359599
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.



CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New: roof
the right setting for living the Florida 10/12, A/C & e panel 01/12, windows
defines this distinctive 54 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the 01/11, W/I 2009! Florida room, fenced r
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, backyard, 2 sheds, corner lot, quiet JEWEL WITH A POOL! Fantastic 3/2/2 Citrus Spring
true masterpli .... .... 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of 1--ti-n ith 1-t- -f -r-- n--- t- t- n pool home w/new int paint & flooring, privacy fencing, in
Lake Tsala , ....... room to dock all the water toys ... .... . ... .. laundry, covered patio, MOVE IN READY FOR $98,900
family to move right in! imaginable! ..... 1 .. #359044. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.
OODKV3 MLS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 1 $68,900


ONLY $62,500. BB^f ^. '-W" W W
#359474 OWNER WILL FINANCE this 2/1 canal-front cottage on
Kathy Chapman 1/3 acre w/oaks, fenced yard & large lanai. Needs TLC. 5503
352-476-4988 S. Marlin PI., Floral lty. $68,500. #356493.


,-
Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983.






MYLANTA....STOP HERE SANTA! It's the perfect Doll House to give your family for Christmas! Bank-owned 3/2/2
ing living & family rooms, screened porches, fenced yard, NEW APPLIANCES, AC, PAINT, FLOORING! MLS# 357336.
omika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.


- 000EBOSH

Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


r--r


-


E8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2003 WATERFRONT HOME: CLOSE TO GULF START YOUR NEW YEAR RIGHT!
* One guest suite on lower level 3+office/2/2 pool home built in 2008
S3/2 stilt home on quiet street Home has NEVER BEEN OCCUPIED
SWraparound covered porch Corian kitchen raised panel cabinetry
* Hardwood flooring both upper and lower Separate office and family room
S1-car opening but space for 2 cars Garden tub, shower & 2 sinks in Master
* Hardy board exterior Outdoor shower on lanai
#352898 $237,500 #358734 $229,950



See Virual Tors @ vvnm^rea^ehoms^uco


-- a !1
BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
BANK OWNED-LECANTO, FL Commercial location several blocks from Old
2br/2ba mobile on 1 acre. 25 x 30 detached bldg. Courthouse. Former flower shop.
$30,000 MLS#359561 $105,000 MLS#'356806





TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia. Spacious 2BR/BA pool home. Fireplace in LR.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water. 1 acre with detached garage.
$37,000 MLS#359133 $79,998 MLS#356908

CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (352302-6714


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 E9



BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST I


To place an ad, call 563"5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* I BEDROOM
start@$325 inc. H20
* 2 BEDROOMS
start@$450 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HERNANDO
2/1 $450 mo+dep
1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
352-201-2428

HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, 2/1/
older mobile needs TLC
$1,000 Down, $275. mo.
(352) 726-9369


HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last &Sec
(352) 382-5661

HOMOSASSA
2/1.5, LG Fenced Yard,
References, $425
352-220-6303

MINI FARMS
C.R., 2/1, 2.5Acres
$525.mo (352) 564-1242




2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 150 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room, furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740) 255-0125

HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272


3bdr/2 full baths/2 car
carDort on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On '/ Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
% Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352401-2979,
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used
Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832


REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498
HERNANDO/486 1+acre,
2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man
Cave/Work Shop w/AC
28x40, $47,500 J. Desha
Cridland Real Estate
(352)634-6340

HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660


2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
3/2, 2001, $19,900
2/2 waterfront. $31,000
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420
INVERNESS 2/2
completely remodeled
carport,scnrm,w/attached
storage shed, plywood
floors, drywall, $10,500
352-419-4606
INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828


INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352-419-6476


Inverness, FL 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Com-
pletely updated DW
home on Lake Hender-
son 55+Park. Ph
309-453-3072 or
RJ9a.1QrfAQi t11 fiAnn


LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804
Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch, 2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958


MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$8,000. (708) 308-3138
Singing Forest MHP
2 single-wides $12k &
$14k, Willard Pickrel
JW Morton RE
352-726-6668





COMING
SOON!
RV RENTALS
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 By Airport, CR I
For Info 461-4518





HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
*Ready to Move In *
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272


- -
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.(ilrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
LECANTO
2334 W. Silverhill Ln..........$525
2/1 Ground floor opt.
1013 N. Commerce Terr.......$525
2/1 Apt., screened lonai
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N. (rede ...................$450
2/1 SW mobile, furnished
9454W. Wisconsin t..........$175
3/2 Quiet dead-end street
HOMOSASSA
9540 S. Lotus P.................$625
2/1.5 DW mobile, huge lot
8019 W.GroveSt...............$575
2/2 SW Mobile on 1.25 acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5525 S. Kline Terr...............$875
2/2/1 Unfurnished, incl. lwncare
6315 N. Shorewood Dr........$00
2/1 Cute home, nice yard


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!


2/2/2 .........$675
3/2/2..........$825
4/2 OnACanal. $750
2/1/1 ..........$600

2/2 Townhouse...$700

2/2.5 Townhouse $650
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010













CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2,House w/Gar., $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857


Sugarmill Woods

Pine Ridge

Citrus Hills

Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!





6EST
iBSTr Of Citrus
SInc. I ~son
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 Facbook
Hwy. 19, 4/2miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


~E~E~









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA$400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
LECANTO
Nice, Clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse




SEUA HOUSING
Rd OPPORTUNITY





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




HERNANDO
APROX. 1100SQ FT
OFFICE ON OVER 1/2
ACRE ON HWY 200
$725 mo.352-344-3084
Homosassa Spgs
SmlRestaurant/Pizza
Shop for Rent, $800
269-369-2509
INVERNESS
Retail/Office, 1,200 SF, +
Storage (352) 637-1904




INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$700. mo 317-442-1063


HOMOSASSA
2/1 eat in kitchen, tile
floors, laundry rm, $450 +
sec. (727) 244-3949

HOMOSASSA
2/1 eat in kitchen, tile
floors, laundry rm, $450 +
sec. (727) 244-3949




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
3/2 Pool home $1150.00
Bob @ Coldwell Banker
352-634-4286

CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA Near
Shopping $550. mo.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384

BEVERLY HILLS
Huge House 31312
$800, 352-464-2514

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135

FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenced yard, on
over %zAC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875+Sec. 352-344-3084

HOMOSASSA
3/2 Block home w/wood
floors & washer dryer incl.
$750 mo. 352-476-1080
or 352-476-0174

INV. S. HIGHLANDS
2/2/2, Ist & Sec. $850.
mo. 352-419-5442

Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water Excel.
Loc. $675. 352-860-2554

INVERNESS
2/1 near hospital
fam. room, scn porch.
$600 352-422-2393

INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 312/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529


For Salea10

CHASSA-

HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800





BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611

INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-586-9932






AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFE/M C
REALTY ONE


-uadL L-I lull lya v -n-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872


Motivated seller
wants this aone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644





HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856


-3
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


(
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418




FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RWMK
REALTY ONE

CRYSTAL RIVER
312 on 10 Acres,
WI inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000.4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC &Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558






MUSl SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

HOMOSASSA SPRINGS






2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 % acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511


412/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023











Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


Citrus Couty -I
Land


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


I've SOLD
20 Properties
this year!
I NEED LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!..
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com

"MERRY CHRISTMAS!"
....and,
Happy New Year!


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515
PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bring your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
back yard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164









#I Employment
i source is...





www chronicleonline cor


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857

DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 % ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116

KINGS BAY AREA
A Special home on deep
water. $460,000
804 SE 1st Court, Cyr Riv
(352) 795-3264

Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den & fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock,
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925


WATERFRONT HOMES
I have them. Cottage 2/2
renovated 59,500, 3/2/2
5 yrs old, Furn, $149,000
(352)419-6880
Tropic Shores Realty
YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
BestNCTuretoast
ProDertles.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




Relocating family need-
ing atleast a 3/2/2 home
in Hernando Elementary
school district. Pre ap-
proved/ fast transactions.
No Real Estate Agents
Kenny (419) 544-9355



"Heatherwood 581W
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435





For Sale % t
8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this beautiful GOLF
COURSE lot (100X125)
located in Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Have
fun boating, fishing and
jet skiing on the nearby
Tsala Apopka Chain of
Lakes. Enjoy nature, wild-
life and the natural beauty
of Fort Cooper State
Park. Call Kelly at
860-459-2411
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot, wet lands
on Lee Woods Drive
112x 114ft. river ac-
cess, but not on River
$7,000. 352-621-1664


E10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012


Hme


Los o Sl







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E8

moved into a really old
(1940s) house in town. We
love the house, but the prob-
lem is the electric has not
been updated except for the
kitchen. We rent, so can't up-
grade it. All of the outlets are
two-prong, and there aren't
many of them. Anyway, I had
visions of decorating the
house with tons of lights, but
it's not looking to be that
easy There are no outlets
outside at all. We live right
on the edge of the town park
that gets decorated to the
gills, and I really don't want
our house to be dark and
gloomy I have six to eight
battery-operated balls that
will work for the trees, and I
was thinking maybe those
big red indoor/outdoor bows.
Do you have any suggestions


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Ell


for decorating without elec-
tricity, and without spending
a fortune? Stacey Nevada
Dear Stacey: You could
use paper bag or glass Mason
jar luminaries, or battery- or
solar-powered lights (a sin-
gle candle in each window
would look nice). There are
plug converters you can use
for your indoor outlets. You
could swap out outdoor
bulbs to be green- and red-
colored bulbs and simply
hang a Christmas wreath on
your front door, too.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village, a website
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living.
To send tips or comments,
write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut SL, Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


DIGEST GUIDE
* News notes submitted without
photos will not be reprinted if
the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg)
photos to newsdesk@chronicle
online.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for
future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right
to edit news notes.
* Publication on a specific date or
in color cannot be guaranteed.
" Submissions about the
achievements of other
businesses may be found in the
Business Digest in Sunday's
Business section.


Real Estate DIGEST

Agent sets production
milestone


Coleen Fatone-
Anderson has achieved
more than $1 million
dollar in closed sales
volume in 2012 for ERA
American Realty & In-
vestments.
Fatone-Anderson can
be reached at the Inver-
ness office of ERA
American Realty by call-
ing 352-726-5855.


Coleen
Fatone-
Anderson
ERAAmerican
Realty.


RE/MAX agents pass
$4 million mark
Two more agents have passed the $4
million mark in sales volume this year at


Len
Palmer
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Kelly
Goddard
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX Realty One: Len Palmer and
Kelly Goddard, agents in the Central
Ridge office on County Road 491 in
Lecanto.
Visit Palmer at www.citruscountyhomes
forsale.com or call 352-212-2611. Visit
Goddard at www.floridalistinginfo.com or
call 352-476-8536.


SE 1 RVINO. AL, OF C CUN"


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Fo a Virt l To*Lur or Mu Sli le Photos

Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiesc


HERNANDO finished 2 bedroom, I bath CRYSTAL RIVER H- andyman/woman
home w/fenced yard on 3 sides and a canal special; estate sale; 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car gar;
on the other, which is dry at present, but 1/3 acre, needs about $10,000 worth of work
when wet has access to Lake Hernando & to make this home worth $79,000; newer
Tsala Apopka chain. I screened porch dishwasher & range, wood burning fireplace
andpatio. #357952 1'"'..... #358966 $55,900


,. 3267 W Blossom Dr.
g MLS#359551 $219,000
4/3 pool home, park-like setting on the
golf course.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


P 3298 W Daffodil Dr.
MLS#358091 $221,000
GOLF COURSE HOME-
8th Green Little Pine course.
Teresa Boozer352-634-0213


.ill 375 E Liberty St.
S MLS#359601 $184,900
THIS 3/2/2 HOME WAS BUILT
FOR ENTERTAINING.
Matt Robinson 937-219-6949






-hills 165 E Ireland Ct.
MLS#354308 $199,000
Updated 3/2/2 Oaks Golf
Course Home
Mike McHale 352-302-3203
PENDING


. 460 W Doerr Path
MLS#356086 $325,000
Very nice 3/2.5/2 villa on Skyview Golf
Course
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


v-
1421 W Laurel Glen Path
a MLS#351452 $274,700
Beautiful 2/2/2 pool home w/den & lush
landscaping.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


,-ip 144 E Hartford St 3924 W Featheredge Ct
MLS#354754 $154,900 MLS#356230 $155,000
Lovely 3/2/2 pool home on the Immaculate 3/2/2+ home w/huge lanai
"Oaks" Golf Course & enclosed Florida room
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
PENDING PENDING


6152 N Silver Palm Way .nv "' 1730 E Pacific Ln. l"c"11te 'C" 2219 N Brentwood Cir. pg/f' F,
MLS#358583 $121,000 pIee0S MLS#356869 $129,900 MLS#354592 $124,900 7825 E Brooks Ln.
MUST SEE, charming, well maintained Great house at the top of the hill 3/2/2 Open Floor Plan with a nice view MLS#353915 $79,900
3/2/2 pool home. in Cambridge Green. from lanai. Country feel 3/2 mobile on 2 acres
Tami Mayer352-476-1507 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Sandra Olear352-212-4058
S2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudentialthe
S Prudential logo and the Rocksymbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


AGENT 1 1ll > Il 1 II OTNUT EVSA1W








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


_-., 6III il .mI l...ii1 I& l.,.:mf llc. i&..
..i ll .4,il Ih li ..I .I:. 11h 1 I lh. il h.:i;

.[hlly? I I Ij. l .1 lU..[l I,:.j ll, 1 III l I,: I1:

,, i,,:..., i.,. i i.1 .I M OTIVATED!!!!
$159,900
Ruth Frederick 1352 5636866


WATERFRONT MOBILE


hi s '1 1 '1 i.iIi I II "" l'"" '
MI = I':i3I PRICEDAT $44,000
Call Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


i i I. h... .I. h id r...ll ...-..:l i.r:h. il i.
i-ill. IiI i i i..iij).- ,, ..i t I



Ml = e-i. ASKING $168,900
P.A DA is ,3521212 7280
'ie lstl sing i c21ip.id.atis com


TWO CHIEFLAND COMMERCIAL
BUILDING FOR A GREAT PRICE
OFFERED AT $260,000
_,i..,,, iii iii F 1 : ,II ,) I- P _.. I iii f
I I. ..... ....... ... ... ....,,
C.ill Eh.s G kiti.l.h lho mone inlim.ion
.it 352 400 2635


~~T rztm


. .. 6I ... ..6 .6-, . . 6. -I,,h.6.lllll, h ll. r 1,,,, ,
.I ,,, I,, I I , ,, , I I .I.. 6, I .1 1 I1 1 6,r ,
. ,,, rI .i I..I.I. I, I. I, ,',1, I h Il '. I '1.



I hell hirht!7 1111 I I ,itl,-tlw l ,ii .. .ffi



.^ T --^^aa


* V i l .:. .:h. J 1..l IIl .h
* II. i, i l i.i .,,

MI. = .': i/I $375,000
Jeanne b Wilaid Pickiel2123410
I'tIr. CiitusCounti'Sold. comn


THE
NORTHEAST
CORNER OF
HWY. 44 AND
491 AWAITS
YOUR
DEVELOPMENT

j I, i, ,,, i,,, ,,, i
i.l hi h.. jh . f.hl I..h i. h I..
Ml = i '1i. ASKING $2,000,000
C.ll Jim lmoiluii. 422 2113
io gei sir ied on I our p.th Io success


H:..z I: pl..ip, I ,q p l.. noI p..:& 16.I. nI I.
l_..:..: h.'il l ll. ll l l ..l h ih:. .
Mi. =' .hi:. $154,900
Ask lot Isaac Baylon loti oui
personal tout 352 697 2493


5 BEAUTIFUL LOTS
LOCATED IN RIVER BUFFS

WA r.I i( n in .i l mi l. pi
A V .illi,i:] i: iiiiiiiiilii jlll-t, il iillll 'l~l-l i


EACH LOT PRICED AT $20,000
Call loiiaine 0 Regan 5860075


REDUCED!

7.; ,l . 1.l 1 . .l .111 1111 j. i ..

ONLY $84,900
Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


I i ,i q. l .' l .
nI. I I h d .. ,i l .. l d I' I.-J i.. l ,i I .. I l '

$127.500
Call Ruth fiederick / 352 563 6866


MAINTENANCE FREE!

i'l. 1)1:. i i.. I h ... _l ..1 . 1 1 ..



C.i Dorns Iliner .it 352 726 6668


IF YOU'RE HANDY -
THIS IS A DANDY!

Ci,: ll Jilll 11 I. H, iii' lli: i.: .l ili. ,
_ I. 11.1 Wlll l. |I Al lII lA i .. 11 ..Icl
Mi = .Q//h. ASKING $55,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352 4008072


E12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012