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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-22-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02978

Full Text



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PAGE A4


DECEMBER 22, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


CITR R-S CO U N TY





HRONICLE


Newspaper Serving Florida's


www.chronicleonline.com


Best Community 50*


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 137


Revitalization project gets support, though some wary


Dennis
Damato
county
commissioner
drafted project
proposal.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Plans
go in motion following a single
start, and that's what backers
of a proposed county-Crystal
River project are hoping for
More than 100 people
showed up Thursday night at
the Plantation on Crystal


River resort to hear Commis-
sioner Dennis Damato's plan
to revitalize Crystal River,
using existing county and city
funds and state grants.
The Crystal River Area
Council, an arm of the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, hosted the town hall
meeting for community resi-
dents and leaders to show


either support for the plan or
to punch holes in it
Chronicle Publisher Gerry
Mulligan, who chairs the
Crystal River Area Council,
facilitated the meeting. He
encouraged potential oppo-
nents to focus on strengthen-
ing the plan.


Page A4


Graduation
rates hurt
local schools
in DOE rankings
Lecanto and Cit-
rus high schools
maintained "B"
grades while Crystal
River High School
dropped from a "B"
to a "C," according to
2012 school grades
released Friday by
the Department of
Education.
While elementary
and middle schools
are graded only on
test scores, high
school grades in-
clude data such as
graduation rates,
learning gains and
academic perform-
ance by struggling
students.
Lecanto High
School had enough
academic points to
earn an "A," but the
grade slipped to a
"B" because it didn't
reach the minimum
65 percent gradua-
tion rate for at-risk
students.
CRHS missed a
"B" by five points.
The Academy of
Environmental Sci-
ences earned an "A"
based on test data
alone. The charter
school does not
have graduation
rates because its
students graduate
with their home high
school.
-From staff reports


GUN LORRY RESPONDS-


NRA proposal:
Armed officers
in schools
The National Rifle
Association offers
suggestions on how to
curb gun violence at
schools, but its ideas
get a cold reception
from parents, adminis-
trators and police
across the nation.
/Page A9


Com ics .......... C8
Community .......C6
Crossword ........C7
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ... B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ........ A5
Classifieds ........ C9
TV Listings .......C7


6 8411578 2011U02 5II


Surprise

recusal


deepens


tax suit

% "intrigue


PriCidia Thomas

Swill not hear

S'"Progress case

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
S!-A new judge will handle
the lawsuit filed by
Progress Energy Florida
against Citrus County Prop-
erty Appraiser Geoff
Greene and Tax Collector
Janice Warren.
.... .The lawsuit filed in late
November is contesting ad
valorem tax assessments
made by Greene for the tax
year 2012 and requesting a
refund of ad valorem taxes
paid under protest to War-
ren in excess of amounts
lawfully due.
See Page A2

Photographs by Matthew Beck
oyll Old St. Nick, a.ka. Ken Torres, Choo s ee
a park service specialist at the Ellie
.Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, has an up-close encounter with spike in
one of the female whitetail deer he hand-
feeds Friday morning. Torres was carrying absences
on an annual Christmas tradition by dressing
as Santa and feeding many of the park
residents treats, such as the cracker this
deer eats. Park rangers offer enrichment alf- y
activities for many of the animals as a way
to keep the creatures from becoming bored.
At left, Silver, an adult fox squirrel, rumors to
cautiously approaches Santa Claus on th
Friday, wanting to make sure the coast ismesay
.., .clear. The animal's reluctance lasted quite
some time before Silver became comfortable MIKE WRIGHT
with his bearded friend. Staff writer
Below, the park's oldest and largest resident,
Lu, gets a treat of a quarter of a watermelon. INVERNESS Friday
The hippo has lived more than 40 years at was just another school day
the park and has several favorites, with in Citrus County as parents
watermelon being near the top of the list. and educators headed into
a two-week holiday break
they hope will end a lot
calmer than it began.
Absenteeism in elemen-
-'c tary and middle schools
Y ,i was higher than normal,
which officials blamed in
part on a myriad of rumors
sparked Thursday through
social media that warned of
violence.
Assistant superintendent
See Page A2



Lives upended by fire, family uplifted by outpouring


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA When a fire
destroyed their mobile home
Wednesday, Jona Hemion and
Rachael Karaffa first cried tears
of relief that everyone got out
safely
Then they cried because they
lost everything, including $600
worth of Christmas gifts for their
four children that they had just
picked up from layaway at Wal-
mart only two days earlier.
Finally, they cried at the out-
pouring of help and concern from
family and friends, neighbors and
strangers.


By Thursday afternoon, the
Crystal River Rotary Foundation
had found a rental home for them
to move into and Crystal River at-
torney Keith Taylor personally
donated $800 for the deposit, said
Alison Markham, longtime family
friend and member of Crystal
River Rotary
However, that home was too
small for the family, and as of Fri-
day afternoon they were still
looking for a place to live.
The Red Cross has covered the
cost for three nights at the Days
Inn in Crystal River, plus gave the
couple money on a card to get
utilities turned on. A woman do-
nated her $30 credit from The


Kids Trading Post and someone
else donated money to go toward
beds.
"It's overwhelming, all the help
people are offering," said
Rachael Karaffa, 26. "Our friends
and neighbors started asking
their friends and neighbors -
everyone wants to help. The
whole community is so great."
"You don't think this will ever
happen to you," said Jona
Hemion, 23. "We're just thankful
everyone got out."
According to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office Division of Fire
Rescue report, Engine 71 from
See Rage A2


HOW TO HELP
The Hemion-Karaffa family lost
everything in a home fire Wednesday.
* For information about what the family
needs, call Alison Markham of Crystal
River Rotary at 352-697-0761.
Immediate needs include clothing
for the three older children:
* Mason, age 6, who wears boys size 6
or 7 shirts, boys size 5 pants; Savan-
nah, age 4, wears girls size 4 or 5
shirts and girls 4 pants and Easton,
2, wears boys 3T pants and shirts.
* Walmart gift cards.
* Household goods and furnishings.
* A vehicle.


Damato: Millions in funding already 'in place'


This artist's
rendering
depicts a
park pro-
posed for
the site of
a vacant
lot at the
corner of
U.S. 19
and Citrus
Avenue.
Special to the
Chronicle









CCSO discovers grow house in Citrus Springs


Special to the Chronicle


CITRUS SPRINGS Citrus
County Sheriff's Office Tactical
Impact Unit (TIU) members re-
sponded Thursday to W. Higgins
Place in Citrus Springs in refer-
ence to a possible marijuana grow
house.


After securing a search war-
rant, deputies found the house to
be unoccupied. However, they
discovered a residence being
used solely for the cultivation of
marijuana.
There were no beds, no televi-
sions and no living quarters
within the residence. The elec-


tricity utilized to facilitate the
growth of the plants was being
stolen from Progress Energy.
Two bedrooms and a spare
bathroom on the south side of the
residence had been converted
into a hydroponic grow opera-
tion. The bathroom walls had
been removed so water could be


easily pumped into the adjoining
rooms, where it was constantly
circulating to the 24 plants,
which were approximately 8 feet
tall.
All of the plants were in the
final stage of growth, which is the
flowering stage.
"These plants were fully ma-


tured and ready for harvest," said
TIU Sgt. John Novy "Each plant
would produce approximately
three to four pounds of finished
product with a total approximate
street value of $384,000."
The investigation is still ongoing
and significant evidence was
seized from the scene.


SUIT
Continued from PageAl

The lawsuit also names
Marshall C. Stranburg, in-
terim executive director
of the Florida Depart-
ment of Revenue, as a de-
fendant. The Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners and the
school board have joined
the lawsuit as interveners.
In November, Progress
made a "good faith" pay-
ment of about $19 million
for its 2012 property taxes.
But county officials say
the actual tax bill is closer
to $36.5 million.
The case had been as-
signed to Fifth Judicial
Circuit Court Judge Patri-
cia V Thomas, who serves
as administrative judge
for Citrus County. How-
ever, on Dec. 17, Thomas
signed an order of "re-
cusal and re-assignment."
It requested "the under-
signed" (Thomas) "should
disqualify herself from
this case" and the court
found it necessary to re-
quest Daniel B. Merritt
Sr., as Chief Judge of the
Fifth Judicial District, re-
assign the case to another
judge.
Progress Energy Florida
is seeking to have a judge
declare the company's
pollution-control equip-
ment "salvage," which
would render its taxable
value practically nil. The
company is relying on a
state law that exempts
pollution-control equip-
ment from property taxes.
However, Judge Thomas
found that same law un-
constitutional in a 1998 case
involving then-Property
Appraiser Ron Schultz
and Florida Power Corp.,
Progress' predecessor
"Our 1998 property tax
settlement with the
county also held open our
ability to challenge the
issue going forward,"
Progress spokesperson
Suzanne Grant said. "In
addition, we have been in
discussions with the prop-
erty appraiser for more
than two years regarding
this issue.
Last week, attorneys
filed a response to the
lawsuit an affirmative
defense for Warren and
Stranburg. And on Thurs-
day, a response was filed
on behalf of Greene.
"I remain hopeful that
there may yet be resolu-
tion to this dispute,"
Greene said in a press re-
lease. "I expect after this
response, both sides will
have a better understand-
ing of positions to facili-
tate future discussions
between parties."
Greene said he could
not discuss the substance
of the case, but would
keep the public apprised
of any new developments.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A fire recently destroyed the manufactured home a family of six from Homosassa lived in. The family, including Easton
Hemion, 2, held by his father Jona, and Rachel Karaffa holding her daughter Savannah Golotto, 4, are temporarily living in
the Days Inn hotel in Crystal River.


FIRE
Continued from Page Al

the Connell Heights Fire
Station responded to a
structure fire call at 12:27
p.m. and arrived at 12:32
p.m. at 1911 S. Melanie
Drive in Homosassa, where
they found the 1,000-square-
foot manufactured home 75
percent involved with fire.
The Florida State Fire



SCHOOLS
Continued from Page Al

of schools Mike Mullen said
schools reported no unusual
activity for Friday's half-day
prior to the holiday break.
Absentee rates in the ele-
mentary schools ranged
from 29 percent at Rock
Crusher to 44 percent at
Pleasant Grove and Citrus
Springs. About 30 percent of
the district's middle school
students missed school
Friday
High school students, who
were taking final exams Fri-
day, tended to show up for
classes. Absenteeism in the
high schools was about 10
percent, Mullen said.
In an email to school
board members, Mullen
said he attributed some of


Marshal's office was notified
but did not respond because
the fire was not determined
to be suspicious in nature.
From their motel room at
the Days Inn, as 10-month-old
Emerson slept and 2-year-
old Easton played with his
4-year-old sister Savannah,
Hemion and Karaffa told the
Chronicle what happened:
Karaffa's mother, Dianne
Karaffa, was in the home
with Hemion's mother and
their grandson, Easton.

the absenteeism to the fact
that Friday was a half-day
prior to a long break. He
also believed rumors of vio-
lence led parents to keep
their young children home
from elementary school. He
also said educators treated
Friday like any other day
"Our principals and
school staffs did a great job
calming parents," Mullen
wrote.
School officials blamed
the rumors on two things:
the one week anniversary of
the shootings at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in New-
town, Conn., that killed 26
people, including 20 first-
graders. Also, the Mayan
calendar legend that indi-
cated the world would end
on Dec. 21, 2012.
Many of the rumors were
spread through Facebook.
Officials with the school dis-


Hemion was at work at
Crystal River Quarries and
Rachael Karaffa was at Rock
Crusher Elementary School
for her son Mason's holiday
program. She had Savannah
and baby Emerson with her
After the program, as she
was on her way home,
Karaffa's uncle called and
asked, "Is your house on fire?"
"I said, 'I don't think so,'
then I called Jona's mom, and
she was crying hysterically, so
I rushed home," Karaffa said.

trict and Citrus County
Sheriff's Office investigated
each rumor and found none
credible.
Friday capped an edgy
week in Citrus County and
across the country for par-
ents and school districts fol-
lowing the Connecticut
tragedy. The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office increased
its presence at schools dur-
ing the early part of the
week and again on Friday
School resumes Jan. 7.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


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Hemion, too, rushed home
to find their home com-
pletely destroyed by fire.
"The first thing I asked, 'Is
Easton alive? Did he get
out?' That's the one thing
that calmed me down my
kids were safe," Karaffa said.
"It hit us when we finally got
to go inside and we saw that
everything was gone.
"It was so hard," she said.
"We were struggling before,
but we were trying to get the
kids what they needed, and


the next thing you know,
everything's gone."
Dianne Karaffa said she
had been in the living room
with Easton, who was
asleep on the couch, and
Hemion's mother, Tammy
Hemion, was in the kitchen.
"I sat up and smelled
smoke," she said.
The two women went out-
side, and when they saw the
entire back of the trailer
consumed with flames, they
raced back, grabbed Easton,
let the cats out and called
for help.
In an instant, everything
was gone.
"When something like this
happens, you're not pre-
pared," Jona Hemion said.
"This is something we've got
to work on."
They did not have renters
insurance.
Now comes the job of put-
ting their lives back together,
even as the young family
counts their blessings.
As Dianne Karaffa wiped
away tears, she shook her
head and spoke about the
process of rebuilding. The
only thing she was able to
save was a favorite Christmas
ornament ofher late husband
who died three years ago.
"When you have your
family and your community
and everybody helping you
get your life back together,
when it's other people who
are doing it for you and
you're not doing it for your-
self, that's hard," she said.
"It's hard to receive help.
But we're so grateful."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached
at nkennedy@chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


ebrtin oSL g


Dec. 19 through Dec. 24 & Dec. 26, 2012 -5:30 9:00 pm no
at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
Sponsored by the Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park, Inc.
WILDLIFE PRRK ,
Featuring ~' % 8asflan 8 rvAftr r' on r1Rand"
a Spectacular Synchronized Light and Sound display in the
Garden of the Springs by Sebastian Hawes
Hosted by Joe Dube Refreshments available at the Miss-L-Toe-Cafe
Sat., Dec. 22: Hearts to Hands Deaf Choir
performs in the Garden of the Springs,
sponsored by Wal Mart of Homosassa Springs.
Suggested donations: $3.00 for adults; $1.00 for children ages 6 12;
children 5 and under are free.
S DM7L Transportation by tram provided from US 19 Visitor Center


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A2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FIltNDS,\\.-


I _dO il







Page A3 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Unemployment up slightly for November


Chronicle
The unemployment rate for No-
vember in the Citrus, Levy, Marion
County region was 9.2 percent, up
0.1 percent over the month and
down 2.4 percent from one
year ago, according to Workforce
Connection.
Out of a labor force of 206,777,
there were 18,993 jobless, a drop
of 135 during the month and
5,016 fewer than in November
2011.
The November 2012 unemploy-


ment rates, released Friday by the
Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity (DEO), were 9.2 per-
cent in Citrus County, unchanged
since October; 9.2 percent in Mar-
ion County, up 0.1 percent over the
month; and 8.8 percent in Levy
County, also unchanged over the
month. Florida's not-seasonally-
adjusted unemployment rate was
7.9 percent in November, down 0.3
percent, and the national unem-
ployment rate was 7.4 percent, a
drop of 0.1 percent.
Workforce Connection CEO


Rusty Skinner said the slight fluc-
tuation during the month is "puz-
zling"- since the influx of
seasonal hires was expected to
have a greater impact but not
alarming.
"To gauge how we're doing, you
have to look at where we were a
year ago," Skinner said. 'And we're
definitely seeing some positive
movement"
Skinner noted while the labor
force is about the same size as it
was in November 2011, 4,711 more
people have jobs and 5,016 fewer
are unemployed.
DEO's chief economist Re-
becca Rust said the Workforce


Connection region is not alone
as all 67 counties had declines
in unemployment rate through-
out the year, while 25 counties
experienced similar slight in-
creases, 33 counties dropped
during the month, and nine re-
mained flat.
Here is how employment num-
bers break down for each county:
Citrus County's labor force
dropped by 603 during the month to
56,261, the number of employed fell
by 564 to 51,076 and those without
jobs dropped by 39 to 5,185. Com-
pared to November of 2011, the
labor force expanded by 310, the
number of employed rose by 1,545


and the number of jobless dropped
1,235 from 6,420.
Levy County's labor force
fell by 267 since October to
16,866, employment dropped by
246 jobs to 15,381 and the num-
ber of unemployed declined by
21 to 1,485. Throughout the year,
the labor force has remained
virtually the same, the number
of employed increased by 233
and the number of unemployed
dropped by 348.
Among Florida's counties,
Citrus County's unemployment
rate ranked 11th, Marion County's
10th, and Levy County dropped to
18th.


Baby's lucky number 12


Couple's daughter

born Dec. 12, 2012
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS Cradled in her arms,
she held onto her newborn baby as she
gazed into her daughter's eyes with
glowing admiration.
Sitting excitedly next to her was her
husband, who also beamed with joy as
he absorbed the image of his wife hold-
ing their newborn.
Dressed in a red and white striped
onesie accented by a red tutu, Annastyn
Gleason had no worries in the world; she
knew she was safe next to her mother's
heart.
Even though she was already amazing
to her parents, some might consider An-
nastyn as lucky
On Dec. 12, Stefanie and Jonathan
Gleason welcomed Annastyn into the
world with a home birth at 3:09 a.m. She
weighed 7 pounds 12 ounces and was 19
1/2 inches long.
Did you see all of the 12s?
Her birthday is 12/12/12. Add the three
and nine from her time of birth together
to equal 12. She weighed 7 pounds and
12 ounces.
"We wanted to try to have her on the
12th of December," Stefanie said. "We
weren't for sure if we were going to make
it or not, because I went into false labor
on the eighth of December"
"We were joking one night about hav-
ing her at 12 o'clock and it didn't happen.
So the midwife said, 'Well, you can add
the 3 and 9 and it equals 12,"' Jonathan
said.
Stefanie and Jonathan have two chil-
dren each from previous relationships.
They feel Annastyn has helped connect
the blended family
"Annastyn has brought us closer as a
family," Stefanie said. "We have a
blended family and it comes with every-
day challenges. Annastyn puts a smile on
our faces and warmth in our hearts
daily"
In addition to her lucky number of 12,
Annastyn was born at home which her
parents said gave them privacy and
bonding time.
"We loved the amount of privacy and
bonding time we had by having her at
home," Stefanie said. "I was able to
labor at my own pace and walk around
freely I was not tied to a bed in an un-
comfortable position waiting on a doctor
to come in."
"When the baby came out, they didn't
take her away to weigh her," she said. "I
was able to hold her and he held her An
hour later they did the Apgar test We got
to hold her for a long time before they
took her away from us."


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Jonathan and Stefanie Gleason planned their daughter Annastyn's birth for Dec. 12.


On Dec. 11, Stefanie's midwife came
over to see how she was progressing.
After determining she was already 6
centimeters dilated, the midwife de-
cided to stay the night, as she knew Ste-
fanie was going to deliver soon.
"She was actually out here sleeping on
the couch when I was about to deliver,"
Stefanie said with a chuckle. "We had to
wake her up and by the time she got in
there to the bathroom, Annastyn was
ready to be born."
Annastyn entered the world in the
early hours of the day, and Stefanie and
Jonathan had an instant connection with
their daughter
"She was real calm when she was
born," Jonathan said as he grinned from
ear to ear "The water birth went really
well. I was overwhelmed and teary Then
it was neat to hold her She is my first
girl."
Sporting the same glowing grin, Ste-
fanie said, "I was looking at her dimples
and thinking how cute they were. That
was the first thing I noticed."


The Gleasons said they had a backup
plan if an emergency arose. In order to
have a midwife, they had to be within 30
minutes of a hospital. Citrus Memorial
is only five minutes from their resi-
dence and Stefanie is a home-health
nurse.
They recommend home births to any
couple who has an uncomplicated preg-
nancy. Stefanie said not only was it
peaceful and relaxing, it took the major-
ity of her pain away
"I was nervous about the water birth
at home," Jonathan said. "It was actually
really relaxing and calm. I would rec-
ommend it to other fathers. It was a neat
experience and I was more connected.
It was more about us and not all of the
hospital."
Giving birth at home was an experi-
ence they will never forget.
"My midwife was on standby for me
and let us make all of the decisions," Ste-
fanie said. "After my smooth, fast labor
and birth, we bonded immediately with
the baby and each other without inter-


ference of doctors and nurses."
About two hours after Annastyn's
birth, the midwife left and they were
able to enjoy their daughter alone. How-
ever, the midwife returned 24 hours and
48 hours later to check on Annastyn's
progress.
Annastyn will always be lucky in Ste-
fanie and Jonathan's hearts. However,
they utilized Annastyn's lucky number of
12.
"Because of all of the 12's, we thought
we should play the Powerball the
evening of the birth," Stefanie said.
"Twelve was our Powerball number
That was wishful thinking, because we
didn't win."
More importantly, Stefanie said she is
enjoying her time with her daughter
Stefanie smiled and said, "He keeps
telling me to quit spoiling her, but I
can't"
Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington
can be contacted at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington@chronicle
online.com.


Spot Family Center Christmas Jam helps local children


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Christmas gifts are wrapped
and food is being prepared. Now
it's time for families to congregate
and enjoy the company of others.
The Spot Family Center is host-
ing its eighth annual Christmas
Jam from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Dec. 23
and Dec. 24, at 405 S.E. Seventh
Ave. in Crystal River The Spot
Family Center is a nonprofit or-
ganization that offers ministry to
Citrus County families.
The two-day free event will offer
music, live dramas, bounce houses,
games, prizes, fear factor and a
message of hope. In addition, hot
meals will be served each night
along with a free clothing giveaway
While supplies last, groceries will
be distributed on the first night
On Christmas Eve, a Christmas
message and gifts will be pre-
sented to children.


* WHAT: The Spot Family
Christmas Jam.
WHEN: Sunday, Dec. 23, and
Monday, Dec. 24.
WHERE: Jim LeGrone Park,
405 S.E. Seventh Ave.,
Crystal River.
FOR INFO: 352-794-3870.

Last year, the ministry received
about 3,000 donated gifts from 100
different organizations. They were
given to more than 800 families,
said Evelyn Vissicchio, who, to-
gether with her husband, Joe, op-
erate the ministry
"We decorate the tent like a liv-
ing room," Vissicchio said. "We
put up a tree and put all of the
presents around and piles of pres-
ents are separated by age."
"Anyone who is in need is wel-
come," Vissicchio said. "We want
to make sure that anyone who


wouldn't be having Christmas will
have one through us. We are more
of an emergency Christmas."
The Spot Family Center contin-
ues to impact on the community
"We know that our time is well
spent here," said volunteer
Amelia Lembo. "The first time I
was on the food line, there were
kids that thanked me and said the
only time they eat bread is when
they come to the Spot. I was cry-
ing. We are able to see the first-
hand impact that we have on the
lives of these children."
They want to encourage anyone
needing Christmas resources to
join them during their two-day
event-regardless of situation.
"This is a place that God is
blessing abundantly," Lembo said.
"The kindness and compassion
they have for everyone regardless
of who they are or what their back-
ground is is amazing."
Children must attend to receive


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Amelia and Nicholas Lembo, volunteers at The Spot Family Center,
helped organize and wrap Christmas presents for the upcoming
Christmas Jam.


gifts. Everyone is required to reg-
ister by 7 p.m. to receive service.
Citrus County identification is
required.
Toys for ages 7 to 11 are still


needed.
To donate money, make checks
payable to The Spot Family Cen-
ter, 1315 U.S. 41 N., Inverness, FL
34450.


Rate down 2. percent for the year






A4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012



PROJECT
Continued from Page Al

"Open your minds and
consider what we can
achieve by working to-
gether," Mulligan said.
The plan, created by
Damato with assistance
from top county officials,
proposes three distinct de-
velopment districts in
Crystal River: downtown/
waterfront; town center;
and resort. Proposed proj-
ects include the city buy-
ing the 2.3-acre vacant
corner of Citrus Avenue
and U.S. 19 for a park, ex-
tending the Crosstown
Trail along Cutler Spur
Boulevard to the Planta-
tion and adding
streetscaping to Paradise
Point Road.
Damato, who owns
commercial property in
Crystal River and is a
former chairman of the
Community Redevelopment
Agency, said millions of
dollars from city, county
and state coffers are avail-
able for projects.
"These are pretty pic-
tures," he said, referring to
a PowerPoint presentation
of project designs. "It's all
doable. The funding is in
place."
The concept had plenty of
support.
Businessman Ted
Johnston, a resident since
1976, said the city needs
a boost
"You'd be kidding your-
self if you drive down U.S.
19 now and don't think
there's some blight," he
said. "This will help the city
greatly and I'm for it 100
percent."
Kennedy Smith, a 23-year
resident of the city, agreed.
"This is the first compre-
hensive plan I've ever
seen," he said. "This is a


great start in the right
direction."
There was criticism,
though, from Crystal River
City Council backers who
see the city being forced
into a county plan without
city input.
"This is kind of being
foisted on the city right
now," Gail Jannarone
said.
Councilwoman Paula
Wheeler added: "I read the
definition of'partnership' in
the dictionary, and this is
not it."
Councilman Robert
Holmes said he could see
how aspects of the plan,
such as allowing seven-story
buildings, could damage the
city.
"How do we maintain our
small-town mindset?" he
said. "Do we look like New
Port Richey? Do we put con-
dos in?"
Councilman Mike
Gudis, though, said he
welcomed the opportunity
to participate in a
partnership.
"I'm glad to see the
county is recognizing our
problems here and they
want to help," Gudis said.
The next step is a city
council workshop, likely in
January, to discuss the
plan. That would be fol-
lowed at some point by a
joint city council-county
commission meeting to take
the plan further.
Mulligan said he real-
ized relationships be-
tween the city and county
have not always been ami-
cable. He suggested a part-
nership will include
everyone.
"This is the starting
point," he said. "This isn't
the finishing point"

Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrest
Teddy King, 36, of Ho-
mosassa, at 12:01 a.m.
Wednesday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Other arrests
Adrian Jackson, 34, of
West Silver Hill Lane, Lecanto,
at 1:26 p.m. Monday on a war-
rant for violation of parole on
original felony charges of flee-
ing and eluding a law enforce-
ment officer, grand theft of a
motor vehicle and driving while
license suspended, revoked or
canceled. No bond.
Richard Wamser, 59, at
12:42 a.m. Tuesday on a mis-
demeanor charge of trespass-
ing after warning. Bond $500.
Patrick Kruis, 24, at 11:35
a.m. Tuesday on a felony
charge of burglary of an unoc-
cupied conveyance. According
to his arrest affidavit, he is ac-
cused of stealing a woman's
handbag. He reportedly told a
sheriff's deputy he has a drug
problem and was willing to co-
operate so he could receive the
help he needs. Bond $5,000.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcit rus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.

David Isle, 28, of Crystal
River, at 9:58 p.m. Tuesday on
felony charges of grand theft
and burglary (becomes armed)
and a misdemeanor charge of
criminal mischief. According to
his arrest affidavit, he is accused
of breaking into vehicles at
Manatee Lanes in Crystal River
and stealing several items, in-
cluding a handgun. Bond $27,250.
Robert Haner, 40, of West
Griffith Pond Court, Homosassa,
at 12:15 a.m. Wednesday on a
misdemeanor charge of battery.
According to his arrest affidavit,
he is accused of punching a man
at Jake's Bar in Homosassa.
Bond $500.
William Buchanan, 23, of
East Tangelo Lane, Inverness,
at 1:09 a.m. Wednesday on a
felony charge of habitual driving
while license suspended. Bond
$2,000.


For the RECORD


cation information and
scheming to defraud.
Bilby's bond is $6,000.
According to the arrest
affidavit, Bilby is a former
administrator of Crystal
Gem Manor Assisted Liv-
ing facility. However, she


Living has been coopera-
tive during the investiga-
tion. Officials there have
tried to reimburse multiple
victims for lost money
Bilby was arrested and
taken to the Citrus County
Detention Facility.


ON THE NET
For the Record reports are archived at www.chronicleonline.com.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle







Self Storage Notices................C14




JSelf Storage Notices..........C14


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
S


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
S


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Sunny and
breezy today.


59 46 0.10 59 47 0 30

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 60 Low: 26
A cold morning and a sunny, cool
day. Hard freeze Sunday morning.
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 65 Low: 36
Another cold morning, then some clouds and
'-a milder later in the day.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 50
S...,,, Partly sunny to oi'il, cloudy with a continued
,-- warming trend.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 58/43
Record 84/20
Normal 72/44
Mean temp. 51
Departure from mean -7
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.30 in.
Total for the month 1.80 in.
Total for the year 60.81 in.
Normal for the year 50.97 in.
*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.14 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 45
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Composites, juniper
Today's count: 5.9/12
Sunday's count: 5.0
Monday's count: 5.0
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


36

5%


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/22 SATURDAY 12:40 6:51 1:02 7:14
12/23 SUNDAY 1:20 7:32 1:43 7:54
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:38 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW. 7:21 A.M.
0 (4 0 4 _y MOONRISE TODAY ........................... 1:42 P.M.
DEC. 28 JANM.4 JANM.11 JAN. 18 MOONSET TODAY..................2:18AM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. So.:ie- n,-. p iiiir r. i, qu.iiir,' for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:08 a/9:10 a 1:44 p/8:34 p
Crystal River** 12:05 p/6:32 a 11:22 p/5:56 p
Withlacoochee* 9:52 a/4:20 a 9:09 p/3.44 p
Homosassa*** 12:54 p/8:09 a -- /7:33 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
1:01 a/10:16 a 3:02 p/9:40 p
1:23 p/7:38 a /7:02 p
11:10 a/5:26 a 10.01 p/4:50 p
12:11 a/9:15a 2:12 p/8:39 p


Gulf water
temperature


71
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a 29.15 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a 38.29 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a 39.31 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a 40.69 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


f .. "




Los
A ,tele

70s
Below
10
..Anchorage ,,,.:au
,4
,ads


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FridL
H L


pK s o.- ,
Ct. l, 0 -


_,c 40S .
3Osa m


DFW
50s Menopie- .
e. e-Paso! E_

f ,. -0e 1


Hor AIR
81--
80s ,



iy Saturday
Pcp. Fcst H L


37 .54 sn
15 s
32 s
33 s
39 58 pc
22 pc
37 .49 c
26 c
33 s
39 rs
38 .63 c
32 .20 sn
34 .19 rs
42 s
28 .06 sn
37 s
22 .02 s
28 s
28 30 sn
40 s
30 .13 pc
32 1,03 rs
25 pc
20 pc
11 s
30 .02 pc
32 pc
28 S
37 69 c
38 .77 c
32 pc
23 .03 s
35 s
31 pc
32 s
44 pc
30 s
33 s
22 s
9 pc
34 s
37 s
31 s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rainisnow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


50s
4t- rn


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 57 43 s 59 49
New York City 56 39 .71 c 43 32
Norfolk 63 41 .45 pc 50 31
Oklahoma City 63 24 pc 63 36
Omaha 27 7 s 30 6
Palm Springs 65 35 pc 64 48
Philadelphia 59 39 1.28 c 43 29
Phoenix 70 45 pc 70 42
Pittsburgh 40 30 .02 sn 34 22
Portland, ME 53 32 .99 sh 42 24
Portland, Ore 46 35 .02 sh 45 39
Providence, R.I. 55 37 .68 c 42 25
Raleigh 54 39 .01 s 52 27
Rapid City 54 15 s 40 17
Reno 54 37 sn 37 30
Rochester, NY 40 34 .39 sn 31 26
Sacramento 56 43 .07 r 50 43
St. Louis 37 24 s 44 30
St Ste. Maria 29 22 .21 pc 25 13
Salt Lake City 41 20 c 46 32
San Antonio 61 27 pc 66 54
San Diego 60 42 pc 61 54
San Francisco 58 52 .14 r 55 47
Savannah 53 42 s 57 29
Seattle 47 29 .01 sh 43 38
Spokane 38 32 .08 rs 41 27
Syracuse 39 33 .79 sn 35 25
Topeka 39 13 s 43 18
Washington 59 39 .29 pc 44 29
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 77 Key West, Fla. LOW -27 Alamosa,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/72/s Madrid
Amsterdam 44/41/r Mexico City
Athens 52/46/sh Montreal
Beijing 28/4/pc Moscow
Berlin 27/25/c Paris
Bermuda 66/61/sh Rio
Cairo 64/49/s Rome
Calgary 3/-1/c Sydney
Havana 75/60/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 72/55/c Toronto
Jerusalem 54/47/pc Warsaw


59/46/pc
56/53/r
60/44/c
70/42/s
33/22/sn
7/-4/pc
55/52/r
86/75/ts
54/41/s
77/64/c
56/45/r
30/24/sn
17/10/c


C I T R U S.


C O U N TY


Home health care


provider nabbed on


identity theft charges

Chronicle was terminated in May
after suspicious transac-
CRYSTAL RIVER A tions were uncovered.
Crystal River woman who Bilby was cashing pay-
was employed as a roll checks, using
home care profes- credit cards and
sional was arrested r applying for credit
Tuesday on iden- cards of former em-
tity theft charges. ployees and Gem
Rebecca Ann Manor residents -
Bilby, 30, N. Conant R who left the facility
Avenue, was ar- or passed away
rested on charges Reports state
of criminal use of Rebecca that Crystal Gem
personal identifi- Bilby Manor Assisted


CHRONICLE
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N 1:1 il

I IInverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. g square
S' 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
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Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
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I-


"" " f





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Margaret
Colburn, 96
HERNANDO
Margaret Colburn, 96, of
Hernando, died Thursday,
Dec. 20, 2012, at Citrus Me-
morial Health System in
Inverness.
Arrangements by McGan
Cremation Service,
Hernando.
Sonya
Jacobs, 72
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sonya M. Jacobs, 72, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Dec. 20,
2012, at Hospice House of
Citrus County in Lecanto,
Fla.
She was born May 29,
1940, in Oil City, Pa., to
George Edward and Flo-
rence (Elder) Montgomery
She came here 27 years ago
from Ocala, Fla. She was co-
owner and operated the
Ocala Blueprint Service in
Ocala. She enjoyed horse-
back riding and boating.
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of 46 years,
Thomas Jacobs of Crystal
River, Fla.; her son, Steven
Jacobs (Shauna) of Port
Richey, Fla.; her father,
George E. Montgomery of
Phoenix, Ariz.; a brother,
Robert Montgomery (Patty)
of Orange Grove, Fla.; a sis-
ter, Ann Nutaro (Joe) of
Phoenix, Ariz.; and a grand-
daughter, Reagan Jacobs of
Port Richey, Fla.
A memorial service will
be conducted at 11 a.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 23, 2012, with Hos-
pice of Citrus County
Chaplain Boris Posso offici-
ating. In lieu of flowers, the
family suggests a memorial
contribution to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARY
DEADLINE
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Call 352-563-5660.


Louis
Martin, 77
PINE RIDGE
Louis William Martin, 77,
of Pine Ridge, FL, formerly
a long-time resident of Co-
hasset, MA, passed away on
December 6th, 2012, with
his family at his side, after a
courageous battle with
prostate cancer.
The son of Hungarian im-
migrants, born May 18th,
1935 in New York, NY, Lou
graduated from Brooklyn
Technical High School and
continued his education at
City College of New York,
receiving Bachelor's and
Master's degrees in Me-
chanical Engineering. He
began his career at M.W
Kellogg Engineers in New
York, NY, then spent 21
years with Badger Engi-
neers in Cambridge, MA. He
finished his career working
for KTI Engineers in Hous-
ton for 10 years, and retired
an industry expert in the de-
sign and operation of steam
super heaters for petro-
chemical refineries. His
drawings, designs, and cal-
culations continue to be the
industry benchmark for su-
perior design of petrochem-
ical super heater systems.
He was respected for pro-
viding expert technical ad-
vice and guidance with
professionalism, open com-
munication, and rapport.
He and his wife Liz raised
their two sons and daughter
in Cohasset, on the South
Shore of Boston, providing
them with a wonderful
home and family life, as well
as a nurturing and loving
upbringing. Lou was a de-
voted husband to Liz, as
well as a wonderful father,
grandfather, and friend; he
is remembered for his sta-
bility, character, kindness,


warmth, and sense of
humor Nothing pleased
Lou more than to sit with
family members and friends
over a glass of wine and
have good conversation
over a broad range of topics
across history, society, poli-
tics, technology, and
business.
He will be dearly missed
and is survived by his loving
wife Liz of Pine Ridge, FL;
his son Colin Martin and his
wife Stacy of League City,
TX; his son Jim Martin and
his wife Shilpa of Arlington,
MA; and his daughter Lara
Armitage and her husband
Andy of Lauder, Scotland.
He is also survived by five
grandchildren: Nicole, Ava,
Elina, Lucius, and Sylvie.
A memorial service in cel-
ebration of his life will be
held in Boston at a later
date.
www.ferofuneralhome.com
Lois
Lawrence, 91
OCALA
The service of remem-
brance for Mrs. Lois Wanda
Lawrence, 91, of Ocala, will
be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
22,2012, at the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes.
Interment will follow at
Fero Memorial Gardens,
Beverly Hills.
Howard
Reed, 87
HOMOSASSA
Howard Raymond Reed,
87, of Homosassa, died
Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, in
Homosassa.
Private cremation
arrangements are under the
Care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory Crys-
tal River.


Author, 'Best Little Whorehouse'

playwright Larry L. King dies


Associated Press
NEW YORK Larry L.
King, a writer and play-
wright whose magazine ar-
ticle about a campaign to
close down a popular bor-
dello became a hit Tony
Award-nominated musical
"The Best Little Whore-
house in Texas" and a
movie starring Burt
Reynolds, died Thursday
He was 83.
His wife, Barbara Blaine,
said King died after bat-
tling emphysema at Chevy
Chase House, a retirement
home in Washington where
he had been living the past
six months.
"One of the things that I
will always remember
about Larry is that he re-
mained funny all the way
through this illness," she
said.
He wrote in a good ol' boy
vernacular style similar to
other Southern authors
such as Roy Blount and
Charles Portis. King wrote
two musicals, five plays, 14
books, a few screenplays
and hundreds of magazine
articles, for which he won
an 0. Henry Award in 2001.
His books include
"None But a Blockhead"
about the act of writing,
and a children's book
called "Because of Lozo
Brown," about the fears

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,'
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


children have of meeting
others. Collections of his
essays were also published,
including "The Old Man
and Lesser Mortals," which
began as an article about
his father.
"King's strengths are his
energy and wit and his in-
tegrity not to compromise
the fundamentals. He rings
an American bell," Norman
Mailer once said.
His "Confessions of a
White Racist" he called
it "a gratuitous admission
of guilt on behalf of all
white racists past and pres-
ent, malignant and benign"
- was a finalist for a Na-
tional Book Award.
He won an Emmy for his
1982 television documen-
tary for CBS, "The Best Lit-
tle Statehouse in Texas."
He taught at Princeton and
was a fellow at Duke.
"Writing looks much eas-
ier than trapeze work, I
know, until you sit before a
typewriter long enough to
realize it won't speak back
unless spoken to," King
wrote in "None But a
Blockhead."

6a. E. Zais
FuneralHome With Crematory
PATRICIA BOWEN
Service: Wednesday, 11:00 AM Chapel
Burial: Florida National Cemetery
JAMES HAWLEY
Private: Florida National Cemetery
JANET MOOSE
Private Arrangements
CAROLYN SMILLIE
Kingdom Hall Later Date
726-8323 GK


King came to Washington
in 1954 to work for a newly
elected Congressman from
El Paso.
A journalist from West
Texas, he had planned to
remain on Capitol Hill for
about three years and then
go to work for a newspaper.
He wound up staying in
politics as an aide in Wash-
ington for 10 years.
His experience pro-
duced a best seller in 1978,
"Wheeling and Dealing:
Confessions of a Capitol
Hill Operator."
King has three grown
children by his first wife.
His second wife died in
1972. He also had two
grown children with his
third wife, Blaine.
A private funeral was
planned and King would be
buried at the Texas State
Cemetery in Austin, Blaine
said.
"I'm of the belief that sad
endings, or bad endings,
make for better drama than
happy endings," King told
the AP in 1986. "And life re-
ally works more that way
anyhow for most people."




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While They Last.


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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 A5











ASSAURAY DCEBET2,H01 SMOCKSEiuCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IHowT"S *E 'THI MATIN EI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2169864 11.29 -.23 GoldStrg 76692 1.52 -.14 RschMotn 1387102 10.91 -3.21 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1957189142.79 -1.31 NwGoldg 75015 10.51 -.10 Microsoft 618531 27.45 -.23 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
FordM 796191 11.86 +.09 CheniereEn 46188 18.01 -.19 MicronT 566029 6.32 -.47 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
GenElec 760447 20.88 -.17 NovaGldg 37569 4.47 +.17 Intel 558116 20.77 -.26 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
NokiaCp 653320 3.99 -.19 Aurizon g 32568 3.31 -.08 SiriusXM 544690 2.95 -.05 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
PinnclEnt 16.20 +2.85 +21.3 Accelr8 3.90 +.58 +17.5 Halozyme 7.01 +1.49 +27.0 ing qualification. n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
Orient pfD 25.15 +3.20 +14.6 GSE Sy 2.20 +.26 +13.4 AmCasino 26.50 +4.43 +20.1 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferredstockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
HovnanE 7.00 +.87 +14.2 Crexendo 2.61 +.21 +8.8 FstCityF 9.70 +1.40 +16.9 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Cemig s 12.74 +1.54 +13.8 PernixTh 8.70 +.56 +6.9 Sinovac h 3.28 +.47 +16.7 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
PrUVxST rs 23.28 +2.71 +13.2 AmShrd 2.50 +.15 +6.4 Torm rs 3.76 +.51 +15.7 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Herbalife 27.27 -6.43 -19.1 DGSE 4.64 -.44 -8.7 DSHIthcre 2.91 -1.09 -27.3
NuSkin 34.51 -5.44 -13.6 Suprmlnd 3.25 -.30 -8.5 RschMotn 10.91 -3.21 -22.7
E-House 3.64 -.56 -13.3 GoldRsvg 2.89 -.26 -8.3 AtlCstFn h 2.02 -.53 -20.8
GreenbCos 16.14 -2.02 -11.1 GenMoly 3.87 -.27 -6.5 Misonix 6.51 -1.11 -14.6 52-Week Net % YT[
GardDenv 67.40 -8.14 -10.8 ParaG&S 2.08 -.14 -6.3 XploreTn 4.00 -.60 -13.0 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ct


DIARY


1,002 Advanced
2,031 Declined
121 Unchanged
3,154 Total issues
91 New Highs
16 New Lows
4,715,722,864 Volume


DIARY


191 Advanced
247 Declined
30 Unchanged
468 Total issues
8 New Highs
13 New Lows
127,517,871 Volume


817
1,663
112
2,592
46
29
2,414,586,794


13,661.72 11,735.19Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 4,781.35Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 435.57Dow Jones Utilities
8,519.14 7,129.84NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,164.87Amex Index
3,196.93 2,518.01Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,202.37S&P 500
15,432.54 12,618.11Wilshire 5000
868.50 707.83Russell 2000


13,190.84
5,340.80
457.63
8,443.15
2,352.13
3,021.01
1,430.15
15,026.61
847.92


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


-120.88 -.91 +7.97 +7.29
-17.01 -.32 +6.40 +5.69
-2.51 -.55 -1.52 -1.15
-73.28 -.86 +12.92 +12.30
-9.07 -.38 +3.24 +3.81
-29.38 -.96 +15.96 +15.37
-13.54 -.94 +13.72 +13.03
-134.69 -.89 +13.92 +13.20
-4.57 -.54 +14.44 +13.36


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BeoBradpf 17.69 -.03
BoSantSA 8.02 +.01
BoSBrasil 7.30 +.01
BkofAm 11.29 -.23
ABB Ltd 20.83 +.03 BkMontg 61.42 -.30
ACE Ltd 80.07 -1.57 BkNYMel 25.80 -.40
ADTCpn 44.73 -.64 Barday 17.07 -.40
AESCorp 10.90 -.12 BariPVixrs 32.54 +2.08
AFLAC 53.81 -.89 BarnesNob 15.12 -.03
AGL Res 40.36 -.27 BarrickG 33.38 -.26
AK Steel 4.43 -.12 Baxter 67.25 -.55
ASAGold 20.99 -.21 Beam Inc 61.28 -.25
AT&T Inc 33.67 -.50 BectDck 78.86 -.27
AbtLab 66.05 +.50 BerkHaA134800.00-1136.00
Abthabwi 30.93 -.37 BerkH B 89.83 -.86
AberFitc 47.37 -1.18 BerryPIsn 16.01 +.27
Accenture 67.42 -1.60 BestBuy 11.67 -.30
AccessMd 33.20 +.35 BioMedR 19.30 -.19
AdamsEx 10.55 -.09 BIkHillsCp 36.63 -.32
AMD 2.59 +.19 BlkDebtStr 4.30 +.07
Aeropostf 13.13 -.45 BlkEnhC&l 12.36 -.11
Aetna 46.63 -.36 BlkGlbOp 13.02 -.12
Agilent 41.05 -.31 Blackstone 15.32
Agnicog 51.01 +.17 BlockHR 18.64 -.31
AlcatelLuc 1.38 -.06 Boeing 76.17 -.03
Alcoa 8.57 -.13 BorgWarn 68.64 +.08
AllegTch 30.19 +.02 BostBeer 137.88 +.47
Allergan 91.95 -1.14 BostProp 105.70 -.97
Allete 41.27 -.11 BostonSci 5.82 +.01
AlliBGIbHi 16.00 +.07 BoydGm 6.99 +.03
AlliBlnco 8.57 +.03 BrMySq 32.56 -.01
AlliBern 16.73 -.25 Brookdale 25.22 -.18
Allstate 40.31 -.81 Brunswick 27.75 -.30
AlphaNRs 9.28 -.23 Buckeye 45.81 -1.19
AIpAlerMLP 16.04 -.09 BurgerKn 17.00 +.20
Altria 31.85 -.37 CBLAsc 21.13 -.08
AmBev 41.70 -.19 CBREGrp 19.64 -.36
Ameren 31.05 -.12 CBSB 37.28 -.24
Amerigrp 91.70 -.17 CHEngy 65.21 +.16
AMovilL 23.15 -.04 CMS Eng 24.54 -.08
AEagleOut 20.68 -.16 CNOFind 9.35 -.25
AEP 43.45 -.15 CSSInds 21.26 -.17
AmEnx 57.65 +.25 CSX 19.95 -.15
AmlntGrp 34.74 -.79 CVSCare 48.67 -.46
AmSIP3 7.50 +.08 CYS Invest 12.09 -.05
AmTower 76.77 -.49 CblvsnNY 14.74 -.12
AmWrWks 37.05 -.08 CabotOG s 50.83 -.24
Amerigas 39.25 -1.03 CalDive 1.79 +.02
Ameriprise 62.67 -.84 CallGolf 6.30 -.17
AmeriBrgn 43.64 -.16 Calpine 18.09 -.02
Anadarko 75.80 -.52 Cameoeg 19.99 -.84
AnglogldA 30.34 +.16 Cameron 56.28 -.26
ABInBev 87.50 -1.05 CampSp 35.50 -.39
Ann Inc 33.88 -.13 CdnNRsgs 29.18 +.36
Annaly 14.76 ... CapOne 58.89 -.26
Anworth 5.95 -.06 CapifiSrce 7.44 -.07
AonpIc 56.63 -.43 CapMplB 14.35 -.13
Apache 80.00 +.03 CardnlHIth 42.03 -.28
Aptlnv 26.73 +.04 CareFusion 28.76 -.29
AquaAm 24.85 -.05 CarMax 37.79 -.18
Arbitron 46.44 +.20 Carnival 37.02 +.03
ArcelorMit 17.00 -.52 Caterpillar 87.90 -1.60
Arichoal 7.31 -.23 Celanese 44.56 -.54
ArchDan 27.78 -.25 Cemex 9.76 -.21
ArmourRsd 6.67 ... Cemigpfs 12.87 +.54
Ashland 80.11 -.68 CenterPnt 19.46 -.21
AsdEstat 15.95 ... Cntyink 39.29 -.46
AstoriaF 9.40 -.32 Checkpnt 10.75 +.45
ATMOS 36.02 -.22 ChesEng 17.32 -.26
AuRicog 7.85 +.03 ChesUfi 46.37 -.50
AvalonBay 136.65 +1.08 Chevron 109.71 -.67
Avon 14.29 -.40 Chicos 18.66 -.33
BB&TCp 29.45 -.19 Chimera 2.64 -.01
BHP BilILt 76.97 -.80 ChinaMble 57.82 -.65
BP PLC 42.12 -.11 Chubb 75.41 -.64
BRFBrasil 20.31 -.19 Cigna 53.79 -.38
BRT 6.55 +.05 CindBell 5.42 -.02
BakrHu 40.66 -.54 Cinemark 25.52 -.73
Ballcorp 44.80 -.66 Ciftigroup 39.49 -.68


CleanHarb 52.33 +.14
CliffsNRs 35.40 -.38
Clorox 74.02 -1.32
Coach 57.57 -.85
CobaltlEn 25.05 -.38
CCFemsa 145.83 -3.60
CocaColas 36.89 -.16
CocaCE 31.67 -.30
Coeur 23.31 +.13
CohStlnfra 18.34 +.02
ColgPal 105.10 -.69
Comerica 30.18 -.23
CmwREIT 16.19 -.03
CompSci 39.05 -.86
Con-Way 28.60 -.17
ConAgra 29.80 -.36
ConchoRes 79.49 -1.77
ConocPhils 58.61 -.67
ConsolEngy 33.15 -.52
ConEd 56.05 -.39
ConstellA 35.20 -.69
Cnvrgys 16.35 -.25
Corning 12.60 -.19
CottCp 8.04 -.05
CoventryH 44.74 -.18
Covidien 57.40 -.58
Crane 46.25 +1.29
CSVellVSt 17.21 -1.21
CSVS2xVxrs10.16 +1.16
CrwnCsfie 71.26 -.27
CubeSmart 14.58 +.18
Cummins 108.07 +.30

DCTIndl 6.50 -.03
DDRCorp 15.60 -.09
DNP Selct 9.31 -.03
DR Horton 19.75 -.35
DSW Inc 64.87 -.55
DTE 61.13 -.05
DanaHldg 15.25 -.06
Danaher 56.06 -.44
Darden 45.13 -.34
Darling 15.99 -1.01
DeVry 23.73 -.57
DeanFds 16.56 -.22
Deere 86.19 -.56
DelphiAuto 36.14 +.10
DeltaAir 11.86 -.08
Deluxe 32.18 +.10
DenburyR 16.27 -.11
DeutschBk 43.68 -1.11
DevonE 53.46 -.73
DiamRk 9.18 -.02
DicksSptg 45.59 -.09
DrxFnBull 120.26 -3.83
DirSCBear 13.64 +.19
DirFnBear 15.12 +.43
DirSPBear 16.80 +.43
DirDGIdBII 9.94 +.06
DrxEnBear 7.62 +.22
DirxSCBull 63.74 -.77
Discover 38.50 +.09
Disney 50.00 -.93
DollarGen 43.63 -.34
DomRescs 51.94 -.26
Dover 64.54 -.16
DowChm 31.99 -.50
DuPont 44.93 -.40
DukeEn rs 64.51 -.54
DukeRlty 13.92 -.04
EMC Cp 25.62 -.29
EOG Res 123.57 -.80
EQT Corp 60.10 +.93
EastChem 66.00 -.65
Eaton 53.84 -.82
EVEnEq 10.66 -.07
Ecolab 71.20 -1.03
Edisonlnt 45.82 -.23


EducRlty 10.45
Ban 10.31
BdorGldg 12.72
EmersonEl 53.01
EmpDist 20.90
EnbrdgEPt 28.26
EnCanag 20.25
EngyTsfr 43.82
EnPro 40.59
ENSCO 59.68
Entergy 64.52
EntPrPt 50.18


Fusion-io 22.42 -.88

GATX 43.53 -.07
GabelliET 5.65 -.03
GabHIthW 8.78 +.07
GabUIl 6.17 -.10
GameSbtp 25.57 -.56
Gannett 18.55 -.42
Gap 31.37 -.38
GardDenv 67.40 -8.14
GenDynam 70.40 +.12
GenElec 20.88 -.17


Heckmann 4.03
HeclaM 5.66
Heinz 58.71
HelixEn 20.40
Herbalife 27.27
Hersha 5.08
Hertz 16.50
Hess 53.39
HewlettP 14.34
HighwdPrp 33.48
HollyFront 47.09
HomeDp 61.32


iSR2KV
iShR2K
iShUSPfd
iShREst
iShDJHm
iStar
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ITW
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Inergy
Infosys
IngerRd


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*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


EqtyRsd 56.61
EsteeLdrs 59.82
ExeoRes 7.42
Exelon 29.88
ExxonMbl 87.23
FMC Tech 41.71
FNBCpPA 10.82
FairchldS 14.39
FamilyDIr 63.04
FedExCp 92.74
FedSignl 7.40
Fedlnvst 20.23
Ferrellgs 18.24
Ferro 4.02
RdlNFin 23.70
FidNatlnfo 34.89
FstARn n 24.35
FstHorizon 10.02
FstlnRT 14.05
FMajSilvg 20.32
FstRepBk 33.12
FTActDiv 7.52
FtTrEnEq 11.86
FirstEngy 41.61
Huor 59.15
FootLockr 33.66
FbrdM 11.86
FbrdMwt 2.85
ForestLab 35.19
ForestOil 6.94
FBHmSec 29.92
FMCG 33.58


GenGrPrp 19.65
GenMills 41.10
GenMotors 27.32
Genworth 7.05
Gerdau 8.72
GlaxoSKIn 43.65
GlimchRt 11.09
GoldFLtd 11.88
Goldcrpg 35.20
GoldmanS 128.44
GoodrPet 9.27
GtPlainEn 20.31
GreenbCos 16.14
Griffon 11.00
GuangRy 19.10
HCAHIdg 31.14
HCP Inc 44.78
HSBC 52.66
HSBCCap 25.92
HalconRrs 6.91
Hallibrtn 34.71
HanJS 16.59
HanPrmDv 13.31
Hanesbrds 36.03
Hanoverlns 38.42
HarleyD 48.69
HarmonyG 8.29
HartfdFn 22.24
HawaiiEl 25.55
HItCrREIT 60.50
HItMgmt 9.14
HlthcrRlty 23.86


HonwIllIni 64.21 -.08
HospPT 22.98 -.23
HostHofis 15.80 -.06
HovnanE 7.00 +.87
Humana 68.39 +.16
Huntsmn 15.98 -.32
IAMGIdg 11.21 +.18
ING 9.29 -.25
iShGold 16.09 +.04
iSAsfia 24.75 -.20
iShBraz 54.97 -.57
iShEMU 33.20 -.20
iShGer 24.57 -.16
iShHK 19.13 -.14
iShJapn 9.74 -.06
iSh Kor 61.65 -.64
iSMalas 14.74 -.21
iShMex 69.59 -1.12
iSTaiwn 13.15 -.16
iShSilver 29.00 +.00
iShS&P100 64.93 -.63
iShDJDv 57.62 -.46
iShBTips 122.04 +.34
iShChina25 39.24 -.51
iSCorSP500143.51 -1.32
iShEMkts 43.27 -.51
iShiBxB 121.24 +.21
iShB20T 122.25 +1.32
iS Eafe 56.51 -.35
iShiBxHYB 93.63 -.27
iSR1KV 72.90 -.71
iSR1KG 65.60 -.49


IntegrysE 53.26 -.86
IntcnfEx 126.25 -3.85
IBM 193.42 -1.35
IniGame 14.17 -.08
IntPap 39.31 -.28
Interpublic 11.15 -.27
Invesco 26.23 -.11
InvMtgCap 20.02 -.26
IronMtn 31.43 +.46
ItauUnibH 16.41 +.02

JPMorgCh 44.00 -.53
JPMAlerian 38.81 -.33
Jabil 19.39 -.56
Jaguar g .58 -.14
JanusCap 8.43 -.16
Jefferies 18.73 -.12
JohnJn 70.27 -.48
JohnsnCfi 30.12 +.11
JoyGIbl 62.52 -.59
JnprNtwk 20.17 -.18
KBHome 15.16 -.44
KBRInc 29.57 -1.92
KCSouthn 83.82 +.06
Kaydons 23.63 -.22
KA EngTR 25.00 +.04
Kelbgg 56.18 -.41
KeyEngy 6.94 -.19
Keycorp 8.44 -.12
KimbClk 84.05 -.90
Kimco 19.45 -.21


KindME 79.26 -.69 MobileTele 18.47 -.01 Pengrthg 4.99
KindMorg 35.34 -.13 Mohawk 91.29 +4.25 PennVa 4.70
Kinrossg 9.38 -.02 Molyomrp 9.85 -.25 PennWstg 11.66
KnghtCap 3.53 +.05 MoneyGrm 12.73 -.17 Penney 19.59
KodiakOg 9.00 -.22 Monsanto 92.55 +.01 Pentair 48.23
Kohls 43.35 -.44 MonstrWw 5.86 -.05 PepBoy 10.01
KrispKrm 9.47 +.03 Moodys 50.25 -.98 PepomHold 19.76
Kroger 26.30 -.33 MorgStan 18.92 -.35 PepsiCo 69.63
LDKSolar 1.15 -.12 MSEmMkt 15.16 -.16 Prmian 12.47
LTCPrp 34.86 -.04 Mosaic 55.63 -.20 PetrbrsA 19.80
LaZBoy 14.04 -.25 MotrlaSolu 54.58 -.29 Petrobras 19.97
Ladede 38.50 -.04 MuellerWat 5.49 -.11 PtroqstE 4.80
LaredoPet 18.05 +.01 MurphO 60.39 -1.05 Pfizer 25.08
LVSands 46.28 -.84 NCR Corp 25.43 +.02 PhilipMor 84.95
LaSalleH 25.85 +.16 NRG Egy 22.87 -.32 Phillips66n 52.16
LeapFrog 7.79 -.12 NVEnergy 18.56 -.04 PiedNG 32.42
LeggMason 26.18 -.42 NYSEEur 32.25 PiedmOfc 18.02
LeggPlat 26.83 -.66 Nabors 14.60 -.39 PimoStrat 11.40
LennarA 38.46 -.83 NBGreece 1.84 +.04 PinndEnt 16.20
LeucNatf 23.84 -.36 NatFuGas 52.09 -1.07 PinWst 52.14
LexRltyTr 10.17 -.03 NatGrid 57.13 -.17 PitnyBw 10.78
Lexmark 23.52 -.36 NOilVarco 68.33 -1.21 PlainsAAs 45.46
LbtyASG 4.07 -.03 Navistar 20.35 +.23 PlainsEx 46.15
LillyEli 49.55 +.30 NewAmHi 10.73 +.07 PlumCrk 44.25
Limited 47.24 -1.43 NJRscs 39.97 -.27 Polaris 84.35
LincNat 25.90 -.55 NewOriEd 19.79 -.20 PolyOne 20.01
Lindsay 77.74 -.30 NYCmtyB 13.15 -.09 PostPrp 49.38
LloydBkg 3.13 -.12 Newcastle 8.63 -.16 Potash 39.94
LockhdM 93.13 +.63 NewellRub 21.82 +09 PwshDB 27.52
Loews 40.90 -.34 NewfidExp 26.97 -.19 PS USDBull 21.76
LaPac 18.90 +.23 NewmtM 44.58 +.48 Praxair 108.66
Lowes 35.04 -.34 NewpkRes 7.95 -.06 ProLogis 36.46
L BaA 55N14 42 exeng 26.72 -.05 ProShtS&P 33.92
EBZi NextEraEn 69.96 -.63 Pr QOs 55.18
M&TBk 9986 1.27 NiSource 24.97 -.05 PrUShQQQ 29.62
MBIA 7.84 -.15 NikeB 105.10 +6.10 ProUltSP 60.72
MDU Res 21.54 -.30 NobleCorp 35.87 -.51 ProShtR2K 24.35
MEMC 3.24 -.14 NokiaCp 3.99 -.19 PrUltSP500 89.04
MFAFnd 8.30 -.09 Nordsm 52.45 +34 PrUVxST rs 23.2814
MCR 10.22 +.07 NorflkSo 62.55 .42 roltSlv 43.1
MGIC 2.34 -.06 NoestUt 39.23 -.22 ProctGam 68.72
MGM Rsts 11.81 +.15 NorthropG 68.63 -.37 ProgsvCp 21.20
Ml Homes 25.66 +.01 NStarRlt 6.95 +.04 PrUShL2SPrs 62.6800
Macquarie 45.07 -.60 Novarfts 63.19 -.57 PUSSPhL20 rs637.64
Macys 37.51 -.40 NuSdn 34.51 -5.44 PUSSP500 rs37.64
MagelMPts 43.60 -.55 Nucor 43.52 -.45 PrudenG 53.43
Magnalntg 49.49 +.13 NustaEn 4495 -1.03 PubStg 145.23
MagHRes 4.10 +.03 NuvMuOpp 15.57 +.17 PultGrp 1819
Manitowoc 15.51 -.31 NvPfdlnco 9.78 +.03 PultGrp 18.1933
Manulifeg 13.59 -.22 NuvQPf2 9.09 -.01 QEP Res 30.32
MarathnO 31.05 -.41 OGEEngy 56.20 -.81 QuanexBld 20.32
MarathPet 62.14 -.12 OasisPet 31.26 +.32 QuantaSvc 27.21
MktVGold 45.18 +.11 OcciPet 78.14 -.88 QntmDSS 1.31
MVOilSvs 39.09 -.63 OcwenFn 34.39 -.23 Questar 19.73
MktVRus 29.55 -.42 OfficeDpt 3.47 +.09 QksilvRes 3.39
MktVJrGld 20.29 +.08 OfficeMax 9.73 -.19 Quiksilvr 4.05
MarlntA 37.40 -.28 OldNBcp 12.02 -.19 RLJLodgT 19.04
MarshM 35.03 -.23 OldRepub 10.46 -.29 RPM 29.30
MStewrt 2.53 -.07 Olin 21.12 -.14 RadianGrp 5.13
Masom 16.27 -.38 OmegaHIt 23.60 +.27 RadioShk 2.37
McDrmlnt 10.86 -.29 Omncre 35.99 -.60 Ralcorp 89.29
McDnlds 90.18 +.14 Omnicom 50.21 -.57 RangeRs 63.72
McGrwH 54.04 -.86 OnAssign 19.80 +.02 RJamesFn 39.26
McKesson 98.00 -1.08 ONEOKs 43.41 -.44 Rayonier 51.11
McMoRn 15.72 +.06 OneokPtrs 53.74 -.53 Raytheon 59.23
McEwenM 3.75 +.07 OshkoshCp 29.14 -.37 Realogyn 41.32
Mechel 6.62 -.29 Owenslll 20.92 -.45 Rltyln 40.71
MedProp 11.80 -.13 ]
Medtrnic 42.02 -.66
Merck 41.52 -.64 PG&ECp 41.49 -.43
Meredith 34.65 +.01 PNC 58.31 -.86 '
Meritor 4.75 -.07 PNM Res 21.02 -.02
MetLife 33.07 -.73 PPG 133.26 -1.13 The rer
MetroPCS 9.91 -.07 PPL Corp 28.92 -.19
MetroHIth 11.26 +.02 PVRPtrs 25.99 +.11 NYSE I
MKors 53.49 -1.62 PallCorp 60.68 -.17
MidAApt 64.51 -.08 Pandora 8.97 +.04 found o
MitsuUFJ 5.28 +.02 ParkerHan 85.15 -1.40
PeabdyE 26.35 -.39


-.12 RedHat 54.99 +2.38
RegionsFn 7.11 -.07
+.13 Renren 3.38 +.06
-.50 RepubSvc 29.79 -.13
-.55 ResMed 41.52 -.72
-.12 ResrceCap 5.81 -.08
-.06 Revlon 14.34 -.43
-.48 ReynAmer 41.74 -.36
+.22 RioTinb 56.78 -.38
-.62 RiteAid 1.23 +.02
-.61 RobtHalf 31.58 +.07
-.11 RockwAut 83.01 +.06
-.35 RockColl 58.60 +.20
-.55 RylCarb 34.16 -.41
-.26 RoyDShllA 69.29 -.45
+.25 Royce 13.32 -.11
-.10 and 36.34 -1.01
-.05
+2.85
-.09 SAIC 11.46 -.21
-.31 SCANA 46.22 -.21
-.60 SKTIcm 16.48 +.12
-.22 SpdrDJIA 131.79 -.99
-.57 SpdrGold 160.33 +.60
-.33 SPMid 186.49 -.74
-.22 S&P500ETF142.79 -1.31
+.03 Spdr Div 58.37 -.53
-.29 SpdrHome 26.45 -.33
-.05 SpdrS&PBk 23.93 -.26
+.11 SpdrLehHY 40.88 -.09
-.80 SpdrRefi 62.28 -.57
-.12 SpdrOGEx 55.07 -.41
+28 SpdrMetM 44.42 -.47
-1.11 SPXCp 65.79 +.70
+.58 STMicro 7.12 +.02
-1.14 STRHIdgs 2.66 +.03
+.11 Safeway 17.93 -.23
-2.39 StJoe 22.43 -.36
+2.71 Seude 36.24 -.31
+04 Saks 10.69 -.01
-1.10 Salesforce 168.95 -1.13
-.32 SaElyBty 24.19 -.05
+.95 SJuanB 12.50 -.08
-1.37 SandRdge 6.26 +.07
+.90 Sichlmbrg 69.69 -1.41
-1.05 Schwab 14.32 -.14
-.07 SeabGldg 17.73 +.32
-.91 SeadrillLtd 37.38 -.33
-.30 SealAir 17.35
-.02 SempraEn 71.96 +.01
-.19 SenHous 23.56 +.04
-1.87 Sensient 35.83 -.47
-.39 SericeCp 14.30 -.24
-.05 ShawGrp 46.55 +.23
+.05 SiderurNac 5.49 -.31
-.06 SilvWhtng 34.49 -.40
-.03 SilvrcpMpg 5.01 -.09
+.05 SimonProp 157.80 -.27
-.14 Skechers 18.69 +.01
-.19 SmithAO 62.29 -1.07
-.01 SmithfF 21.97 -.05
+.05 Smucker 86.61 -.32
+.34 SonyOp 10.93 -.20
-.23 SoJerInd 51.89 +52
-.05 SouthnCo 43.32 -.19
-.05 SthnCopper 37.61 -.62
+.91 SwstAirl 10.46 -.08
-.17 SwstnEngy 34.45 +.16




nainder of the

listings can be

n the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.87 +.03
AbdnEMTel 20.82 -.38
AdmRsc 34.00 -.01
Advenox .58 +.01
AlexeoRg 3.48 -.07
AlldNevG 29.13 +.08
AlmadnMg 3.03 +.04
Argan 17.74 -.25
AfiatsaRg .19 +.02
Aurizong 3.31 -.08
AvalnRare 1.35 -.07
Banrog 2.70 -.09


BarcUBS36 41.33
BarcGSOil 21.10
BioTime 3.45
BlkMunvst 11.28
BrigusGg .90
BritATob 101.22
CelSd .29
CFCdag 21.13
CheniereEn 18.01
CheniereE 21.61
ChinaPhH .20
ChinaShen .46
ClaudeRg .52
ClghGlbOp 11.46
Contango 44.52


+.15 CrSuislneo 4.04 +.01
-.27 CrSuiHiY 3.20 +.04
-.04
+.15
-.00 DourEg .21 -.01
.31 DenisnM g 1.22 -.06
.1 EVLtdDur 16.67 +.15
+.01 EVMuniBd 14.30 +.15
+.07 EVMuni2 13.96 +.08
-.19 EllswthFd 7.14 -.02
-.02 EmrldOrs 5.19 +.11
-.01 ExeterRgs 1.09 -.04
-.04123 -.
+.00
-.01
+1.21 GamGIdNR 12.83 -.01


GascoEngy .08
Gastargrs 1.19
GenMoly 3.87
GeoGloblR .07
GeoPeto .07
GoldRsvg 2.89
GoldResrc 15.35
GoldenMin 4.66
GoldStkg 1.52
GranTrrag 5.51
GtPanSilvg 1.45
GreenHntr 1.67
Hemisphrx .28
HstnAEn .21
iShlndiabt 25.63


ImmunoCII 2.04 +.11
ImpOilgs 43.30 -.31
InovioPhm .52 +.01
IntellgSys 1.43
IntTowerg 1.99 -.10
InvAdvMu2 13.28 +.09
IsoRay .81 +.04


KeeganRg 3.84 +.01
LadThalFn 1.41
LkShrGld g .75 +.00
LongweiPI 2.57 +.14
LucasEngy 1.26 +.16


NovaGldg 4.47 +.17
NuvDiv3 15.20 +.07
MeetMe 3.32 +.04 NMuHiOH 1400 +12
Metalio 2.03 +.01SamsO&G .69 -.01
Metal(oo 2.03 +.l01 Sandst grs 11.89 +.50
NadaBio 1.25 -.05 ParaG&S 2.08 -14 SynergyRs 5.24 +.06
Neteam 61 02 Polyetg 96 +.06 TanzRyg 4.21 -.18
NBRESeCo PyramidOil 4.04 +.04 Taseko 3.00
NB ec 4.55 -. Quaterrag .34 -.01 TimberlnR .23 +.03
Neuralstem 1.13 -.03 QuestRMg 1.01 -.07 TrnsafiPet .79 -.01
Nevsung 4.15 +.18 RareEleg 3.42 -.19 TriangPet 5.84 -.11
NwGoldg 10.51 -.10 Rentech 2.68 -.06 TwoHrbwt .60 -.04
NA Pall g 1.22 +.03 RevettMin 2.83 -.02 UQM Tech .72 -.01
NDynMng 3.41 -.07 RexahnPh .29 ... USAnimny 1.95
NthnO&G 17.18 +.10 Richmntg 3.04 -.03 Univlnsur 4.12 -.08
NovaCppn 1.86 -.10 Rubicong 2.45 -.05 Ur-Energy .85 +.01


Uranerz 1.36 -.05
UraniumEn 2.48 -.03


VangTotW 49.19 -.42
VantageDrl 1.74 -.03
VirnetX 31.02 -1.98
VistaGold 2.41 -.09
Vringo 3.07 -.06
Walterlnv 43.17 -1.31
WFAdvlnco 10.01 -.08
WstC&G gs .94 +.08
WidePoint .33 -.00
YMBiog 2.87
ZBB Engy .32 +.01


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 49.86 +.46
ASMLHId 63.44 -1.24
Abiomed 13.66 +.04
Abraxas 2.18 +.02
AcadiaHIt 22.79 -.13
AcadiaPh 4.51 -.24
Accuray 6.83 -.01
Achillion 8.80 +.05
AcmePkt 22.01 -.19
AeordaTh 25.18 +.41
AcfvsBliz 10.65 -.13
Acxiom 17.80 -.27
AdobeSy 37.71 -.16
Adtran 19.65 -.20
AdvEnld 13.70 +.11
AdventSoft 21.79 -.29
Aegerion 25.71 +1.09
Aegion 21.70 -.59
AeroViron 21.63 -.44
Affymax 19.24 -.13
Afymetrix 3.22 -.08
AirMethod 113.24 -.58
AirTrnsp 3.80 -.10
AkamaiT 41.76 -.10
Akorn 13.29 -.01
AlaskCom 2.13 +10
Alexion 93.88 -1.98
Alexzars 5.79 -.43
AlignTech 28.40 +.22
Alkermes 19.27 -.05
AllotComm 17.55 -.90
AllscriptH 9.12 -.02
AlnylamP 18.07 -.59
AlteraCp If 34.50 -.24
AlterraCap 28.00 -.04
Amarin 7.96 -.28
Amazon 256.92 -4.58
Ambrllan 9.76 -.24
Amedisys 11.47 -.87
ACapAgy 31.15 -.52
AmCapLd 12.34 -.06
ACapMtg 25.21 -.09
ARItyCTn 11.74 +.04
AmSupr 2.86 -.09
AmCasino 26.50 +4.43
Amgen 87.16 -1.25
AmicusTh 2.76 -.30
AmkorTch 4.28 -.09
Anadigc 2.39 +.13
AnalogDev 42.19 -.16
Anlogic 73.76 +.41
Analystlnt 3.17 +.02
Ancestry 32.00 -.02
AngiesList 11.97 +.02
Ansys 68.69 -.17
AntaresP 3.78 -.04
ApogeeE 23.26 -1.29
ApolloGrp 20.77 -.03
Apollolnv 8.45 -.02
Applelnc 519.33 -2.40
ApldMat 11.50 +.12
AMCC 8.21 -.03
Approach 25.24 +.08
ArQule 2.81 -.02
ArchCap 43.11 -.59
ArenaPhm 8.63 -.39
AresCap 17.50 -.01
AriadP 20.47 -.10
ArkBest 9.56 +.22
ArmHId 37.75 -.57
ArrayBio 3.58 -.03
Arris 15.33 +.27
ArubaNet 20.97 +.15
AscenaRts 18.90 -.03
AspenTech 26.99 +.38
AssodBanc 13.43 -.11
AstexPhm 2.72 -.09
athenahlth 76.14 -.87
Atmel 6.23 +.01
Autodesk 35.49 -.41
AutoData 57.58 -.79
Auxilium 18.62 -.06
AvagoTch 31.36 -.54
AvanirPhm 2.65 -.05


AVEO Ph 6.49
AviatNetw 3.23
AvisBudg 20.17
Aware s 5.26
Axcelis 1.35
BBCN Bcp 11.79
B/EAero 49.41
BG Medh 2.56
BGC Pts 3.29
BMC Sft 40.71
Baidu 98.70
BankMufi 4.24
Banner Cp 30.87
Bazaarvc n 9.45
BeacnRfg 32.77
BeasleyB 4.95
BebeStrs 3.97
BedBath 55.72
BioDIvrylf 4.05
Biocryst 1.57
Biogenldc 149.91
BioMarin 48.89
BioSanters 1.30
BioScrip 10.53
BIkRKelso 10.03
BloominBn 15.66
Blueora 15.44
BobEvans 41.20
BostPrv 9.08
Broadcom 33.18
BroadSoft 34.66
BrcdeCm 5.39
BrklneB 8.39
BrooksAuto 8.18
BrukerCp 15.27
BuffabWW 72.32
BldrFstSrc 5.61
CAInc 22.19
CBOE 30.14
CH Robins 63.60
CMEGrps 50.74
CVBFnd 10.53
CadencePh 4.85
Cadence 13.47
Caesars n 7.68
CalAmp 8.20
CdnSolar 3.21
CapBkFnn 17.19
CapCtyBk 11.43
CapFedFn 11.74
CpstnTrb h .91
Cardtronic 24.00
CareerEd 3.33
CaribouC 16.19
Carrizo 22.31
CarverBcp 4.40
CasellaW 4.60
Caseys 52.41
Catamarn s 48.49
CathayGen 19.82
Cavium 31.09
Cbeyond 9.14
Celgene 79.70
CellTherrs 1.29
CelldexTh 6.63
Celsion 7.50
CentEurop 2.20
CentAI 8.30
Cepheid 33.39
Cerner 78.28
CharterCm 73.43
ChkPoint 47.55
Cheesecake 32.86
ChelseaTh .80
Chembio rs 5.26
ChildPlace 45.31
ChrchllD 64.09
CienaCorp 15.88
CinnFin 39.61
Cintas 41.64
Cirrus 27.84
Cisco 19.96
CitzRepBc 19.13
CitrixSys 66.15
CleanEngy 13.31
Clearwire 2.88
CognizTech 73.73
Cogo Grp 2.32


-.20 Coinstar 52.00 -.20
-.01 ColBnkg 17.85 +.02
-.13 Comcast 37.23 -.86
+.06 Comcspd 35.87 -.77
+.04 CmcBMO 35.39 -.48
+.24 CommSys 10.44 +.26
+.09 CommVIt 71.55 -.87
CmplGnom 3.12
-.03 Compuwre 10.80 -.05
-1.23 ComScore 13.33 -.11
-1.14 Comversen 27.29 -.04
+.09 Comverse 3.83 +.12
ConcurTch 69.44
+.06 Conmed 27.81 -.14
-.49 Conns 30.29 -.23
-.05 ConsolCom 15.92 -.05
-.01 CopanoEn 30.95 -.49
-.64 Coparts 29.99 -.42
-.05 Corcept 1.54 -.04
-.02 CorinthC 2.53 -.01
-1.30 Costeo 99.49 +.29
-.13 CowenGp 2.42 -.09
+.03 Cree Inc 33.86 -.78
-.07 Crocs 13.75 +.06
-.11 CrosstexE 14.23 +.01
-.42 CrosstxLP 13.86 +.13
+.01 Ctrip.eom 22.62 -.04
-.23 CubistPh 43.05 -.11
-.02 CumMed 2.70 -.01
-.29 Curis 3.68 +.10
-.83 Cyclaceirs 5.71 -.57
-.09 CypSemi 11.25 -.11
-.07 Cori 2.64 +.06
+.16
-.27
-2.56 Dealertrk 28.80 +.36
+.18 DeckrsOut 34.49 -.42
-.45 Delcath 1.20 -.03
-.54 Dell Inc 10.43 -.07
-.16 Dndreon 5.22 -.07
-.66 Dennys 4.85 +.10
+.08 Dentsply 40.35 -.05
-.10 DexCom 13.33 -.20
-.03 DiamndFh 14.53 -.28
+.07 DiambkEn 18.98 -.04
-.38 DigitalGen 11.04 -.42
-.19 DigRiver 14.47 -.20
-.31 Diodes 16.85 -.50
-.26 DirecTV 50.27 -1.03
-.02 DiscComA 63.15 -.34
-.05 DiscComC 58.29 -.22
-.11 DishNetwk 35.55 -1.18
DollarTrs 40.03 +.04
-.08 DonlleyRR 9.10 -.32
+.05 DragonWg 3.40 +.20
-.09 DrmWksA 16.81 +.18
+.13 DryShips 1.73 -.03
-.44 Dunkin 32.83 -.21
-.65 DyaxCp 3.58 -.06
+.71 Dynavax 2.84
-.77 E-Trade 8.83 -.06
+.44 eBay 51.35 -.79
-.32 EaglRkEn 8.74 +.01
-.05 ErthLink 6.50 -.23
-.03 EstWstBcp 21.63 -.52
-.07 Ebixlnc 16.45 +.02
+.12 EchoThera .95 -.20
-.23 EducDevel 4.01 +.06
-.02 8x8 Inc 7.39 -.04
-1.90 ElectSd 9.71 -.26
+.22 ElectArts 13.89 -.05
-.48 EFII 18.40 -.10
-.49 Eloquan 23.55 -.11
-.00 EndoPhrm 25.87 -.30
+.66 Endobgix 13.49 +.20
-.58 EnrgyRec 3.27 -.03
+.01 ErngyXXI 32.00 -.75
-.03 Entegris 9.19 -.02
-.52 EntropCom 5.53 -.06
-1.15 EnzonPhs 4.59 +.09
+.04 Equinix 202.56 -1.43
-.28 Ericsson 10.06 -.01
+.17 Euronet 23.53 -.12
+.58 ExactScih 10.71 -.24
-.13 Exelids 4.59 -.10
-.03 E)deTc 3.28 -.02
+.01 Expedia 59.59 -1.32
-.08 Expdlnfi 39.73 -.17


ExpScripts 54.22 -.42 iShNsdqBio 137.95 -1.13
ExtrmNet 3.65 -.08 lonixBr 22.26 +.31
Ezeorp 19.89 +.06 IdenixPh 5.00 -.05
F5 Netwks 97.46 +.13 iGo Inch .25 -.06
FEICo 55.26 +.04 Illumina 56.39 +.17
FLIRSys 21.90 ... ImunoGn 12.69 -.33
FX Ener 4.29 -.21 ImpaxLabs 20.33 +.02
Facebookn 26.26 -1.10 Incyte 16.35 -.37
Fastenal 46.08 +1.06 Infinera 5.94 -.13
FifthStRn 10.44 -.08 InfinityPh 32.84 +.45
FifthThird 15.12 -.02 Informat 30.78 -.22
FindEngin 27.51 -.31 InnerWkgs 13.39 -.17
Fndlnst 18.60 +.15 InsightEnt 17.24 -.00
Finisar 15.80 +.02 IntgDv 7.14 -.08
FinLine 18.92 +.43 Intel 20.77 -.26
FstCashFn 48.86 +.07 Inteliquent 2.77 -.08
FstCityF 9.70 +1.40 InteractB 13.89 -.26
FFnclOH 14.28 -.03 InterDig 40.97 -1.63
FMidBc 12.73 -.19 Intrface 15.96 -.07
FstNiagara 7.88 -.08 InterMune 10.01 -.02
FstSolar 30.92 -1.33 InftSpdw 28.03 +.06
FstMerit 14.30 +.04 Intersil 8.30 +.05
Fiserv 79.70 -.52 Intuit 61.44 -.61
Flextrn 6.24 -.08 IntSurg 496.76 +8.45
Flowlnt 3.36 -.10 InvBncp 17.79 +.01
FocusMda 25.59 -.15 IridiumCm 5.72 -.21
Fortnet 21.16 -.14 IronwdPh 10.69 -.22
Fossil Inc 92.81 -1.17 Isis 10.27
FosterWhl 24.07 -.69 Itron 45.26 +.05
Francesca 25.61 -.75 IvanhoeEh .70 -.03
FredsInc 13.83 +.54 Ma 16.65 -.04
FronterCm 4.28 -.15
FuelCellh .98 -.03
FultonFncl 9.88 -.03 j2Global 31.15 +.24
FushiCo 928 16 JASolarrs 4.01 -.14
JDASoft 45.18 +.22
JDSUniph 13.20 -.10
GTAdvTc 3.00 JackHenry 39.57 -.19
GalenaBio 1.58 JacklnBox 28.75 -.15
Garmin 41.07 -.36 Jamba 2.20 -.04
GenComm 9.69 +.44 JamesRiv 3.47 -.15
Genomic 27.53 +.41 JazzPhrm 52.84 -.06
Gentex 18.78 +.11 JetBlue 5.80 -.14
Genfivah 10.11 -1.00 JiveSoftw 14.61 -.11
GeronCp 1.60 +.01 JosABank 42.63 -.44
GigaMedia .96 -.04 KLATnc 48.37 -.14
GileadSd 72.78 -.88 KeryxBio 2.68 -.09
GladerBc 14.91 -.09 KipsBMed .75 -.32
GlbSpcMet 13.79 -.59 KraftFGpn 45.53 -.90
GluMobile 2.44 -.07 KratosDef 4.91 -.09
GolLNGLtd 37.20 -.94 Kulicke 11.82 -.22
Goodyear 13.08 -.06 LJ Int 1.76 +.02
Google 715.63 -6.73 LKQCps 21.31 -.07
GrCanyEd 23.63 -.56 LSI Corp 7.00 -.03
GrLkDrge 8.92 -.02 LSI Ind If 6.99 +.20
GreenMtC 41.11 -1.48 LTX-Cred 6.21 -.13
Groupon 4.82 +.03 LamResrch 36.24 -.35
GulfportE 37.75 -.27 LamarAdv 39.38 -.58
HMN Fn 3.14 Landstar 51.62 +.30
HMS Hdgs 25.77 -.35 Lattce 3.88 -.01
HSN Inc 55.11 -.09 LeapWirlss 6.67 -.20
HainCel 54.66 -1.27 LegacyRes 23.68 -.07
Halozyme 7.01 +1.49 LexPhrm 1.99 +.04
HancHId 32.00 -.30 LibGlobA 62.49 -.71
HanwhaSol .88 -.10 LibGlobC 58.48 -.61
Harmonic 4.97 -.11 LibCapA 114.98 -1.45
Hasbro 36.04 -.56 LibtylntA 19.51 -.14
HawHold 6.59 -.07 LifeTech 50.56 -.77
HIthCSvc 23.15 -.25 LifePtH 38.19 -.74
Healthwys 10.43 -.16 Lifevantge 2.20 +.10
HrfindEx 13.00 +.01 LimelghtN 2.17 -.11
HSchein 80.94 -1.07 LincElec 48.78 -.10
HercOffsh 6.06 -.04 LinearTch 34.22 -.17
Hologic 20.59 +.17 LinnEngy 36.78 -.29
Home Inns 29.20 +.42 LinnCo n 36.90 -.02
HmLnSvcn 19.10 -.09 LivePrsn 13.05 -.23
HomeAway 21.85 -.79 LodgeNeth .09 -.00
HorizPhm 2.35 -.05 LookSmth .91 +.08
HorsehdH 10.16 +.17 Lulkin 55.88 -.41
HotTopic 9.81 -.18 lululemns 7571 -1.44
HudsCity 8.16 -.11 =
HuntJB 59.20 +.45
HuntBncsh 6.37 -.02 MAPPhm 15.27 -.17
IAC Inter 46.45 -.09 MCG Cap 4.55 -.05
IdexxLabs 95.24 -1.00 MGE 51.37 -.97
II-VI 18.28 +.32 MIPSTech 7.74 -.04
iRobot 18.20 -.82 MKS Inst 25.72 +.27
iShACWI 47.91 -.42 MTS 50.29 -.20


MaidenH 9.06 +.04 PacWstBc 25.06 -.04
MAKOSrg 13.03 -.53 Paccar 44.84 -.14
MannKd 2.18 +.01 Pacerlnfi 4.14 -.07
MarvelT 8.34 -.11 PacEthan h .34 -.00
Masimo 20.53 -.30 PacSunwr 1.54 -.02
Mattel 36.89 -.45 Pactera 7.03 -.27
Mattsonh .94 +.01 PanASlv 18.17 +.20
Maximlnig 29.42 -.13 PaneraBrd 158.17 -8.07
MaxwlT 8.17 -.23 ParamTch 23.00 -.10
MedAssets 17.19 -.13 Parexel 29.90 -.83
MedicAcIn 2.69 ... ParkerVsn 2.19 -.06
MediCo 24.17 +.46 Patterson 34.15 -.04
Medivatns 51.84 -2.58 PattUTI 18.52 -.42
MeleoCrwn 16.40 -.38 Paychex 31.40 -.99
Mellanox 61.35 +2.74 Pendrell 1.23 -.02
MentorGr 17.02 -.05 PnnNGm 48.80 -.44
MergeHIth 2.64 +.01 PennantPk 10.79 -.13
Micrel 9.49 -.07 PeopUtdF 12.14 -.20
Microchp 32.59 -.04 PeregrinP 1.25 -.02
MicronT 6.32 -.47 PerfectWld 10.66 -.02
MicrosSys 42.44 -.38 Perrigo 102.78 -.86
MicroSemi 20.88 -.05 PetSmart 69.60 -1.39
Microsoft 27.45 -.23 Pharmacyc 60.24 -.71
MillerHer 21.12 +.19 PhotrIn 5.66 +.22
Mindspeed 4.39 ... Polymom 10.51 -.10
Misonix 6.51 -1.11 PoolCorp 41.82 +.40
Molex 27.13 -.54 Popular rs 20.63 -.27
Momenta 11.62 -.01 Potlatch 38.75 -.32
Mondelez 25.76 -.31 Pwrlnteg 33.13 -.60
MonroMuf 33.94 -.26 Power-One 4.29 -.04
MonstrBvs 52.09 -.03 PwShsQQQ 65.20 -.69
Motricityh .66 +.03 PriceTR 65.89 -.61
Mylan 27.81 +.04 priceline 618.88 -11.95
MyriadG 27.13 -.38 PrivateB 15.45 +.07
NETgear 39.27 +.20 ProPhasLh 1.36 -.11
NICInc 16.56 +.16 PrUPQQQs 51.99 -1.67
NIl HIdg 7.42 -.07 ProceraN 18.29 +.04
NPS Phm 9.10 +.04 PrognicsPh 2.87 +.04
NXP Semi 25.35 -.71 ProgrsSoft 21.40 -.04
NasdOMX 25.49 -.62 PUShQQQrs40.63 +1.23
Natlnstrm 25.61 -.16 ProspctCap 10.97 -.03
NatPenn 9.36 -.11 PureCycle 2.89 +.01
NektarTh 7.10 +.14 QIAGEN 18.48 -.36
NetApp 33.82 -.25 QlikTech h 21.75 +.26
NetEase 42.02 +.24 Qlogic 9.78
Netfiix 91.34 -2.16 Qualeom 61.61 -1.25
NtScout 25.70 -.17 QltyDistr 6.04 -.07
NetSpend 11.35 -.23 QualitySys 17.61 -.90
Neurcrine 7.92 +.17 Qualysn 13.85 +.27
NYMtgTr 6.28 -.04 Questeor 30.06 +.22
NewsCpA 24.95 -.47 RFMicD 4.39 -.14
NewsCpB 25.60 -.47 Rambus 5.17 -.14
Nordson 62.71 -.31 Randgold 99.46 +.97
NorTrst 50.16 -.05 RaptorPhm 5.74 -.16
NwstBcsh 12.15 +.06 RealPage 21.57 -.04
Novavax 1.94 -.07 Regenrn 173.48 +.64
nTelos 13.31 -.10 Regulusn 5.20
NuVasive 15.48 +.09 RentACt 35.30 -.64
NuanceCm 22.13 -.27 ReprosTh 15.38 +.40
NutriSyst 8.06 ... RschMotn 10.91 -3.21
Nvidia 12.35 -.29 ResConn 11.34 -1.06
NxStageMd 10.66 -.31 Responsys 5.96 -.07
OCZTech 2.04 -.04 RetailOpp 12.79 -.11
OReillyAu 89.99 -1.81 RexEnergy 12.80 -.19
OSI Sys 65.52 +2.72 RigelPh 6.51 -.23
Oclaro 1.76 +.01 RiverbedT 19.74 -.13
OdysMar 2.85 +.04 RosettaR 44.73 -.38
OldDomFs 34.28 +.07 RossStrs 53.93 +.67
OmniVisn 13.83 -.43 RoviCorp 15.40 -.38
OnSmcnd 6.84 -.11 RoyGId 78.95 +.42
Oneothyr 2.00 -.04 RuthsHosp 7.55 -.14
OnyxPh 78.17 -.79
OpenTable 48.85 -.63
OpbmerPh 9.32 -.10 SBACom 70.90 +.82
Oracle 33.76 -.18 SEI Inv 23.16 -.32
OraSure 7.00 -.08 SHFL Ent 14.09 +.08
Orexigen 5.36 +.14 SLM Cp 16.82
Oritani 15.04 -.07 STEC 5.16 -.18
Orthfx 38.77 -.77 SVB FnGp 57.15 +.38
OtterTail 25.18 SabraHItc 21.74 -.28
Overstk 13.93 -.55 SalixPhm 42.05 -.04
SanderFm 49.91 -.16
SanDisk 44.32 +.09
PDC Engy 33.95 +.06 SangBio 5.89 -.27
PDLBio 7.44 -.03 Sanmina 10.75 -.28
PLXTch 3.54 -.11 Sanofi rt 1.76 +.03
PMC Sra 5.25 -.11 Santarus 11.20 -.08
PSSWrld 28.50 ... Sapient 10.72 -.16


Sareptars 24.81 +.10 TractSupp 88.03 -1.03
SavientPh 1.22 -.01 TrimbleN 59.37 -.38
Schnitzer 30.01 -.70 TripAdvis 41.97 -1.00
SciClone 4.46 -.01 TriQuint 4.76 -.04
SciGames 8.77 +.09 TrueReig 25.17 -.25
SeacoastBk 1.50 +.01
SeagateT 30.46 +.08 TrstNY 5.24 -.10
SearsHIdgs 40.83 -3.40 Trustmk 22.53 -.44
SeattGen 23.47 -.45 TuesMrn 5.75 -.48
SelCmfrt 25.79 +.08 21Vianet 9.23 -.04
Selectvlns 19.36 -.04 UTiWrldwd 13.28 +.02
Semtech 28.99 +.13 Ubiquif 12.15 -.17
Sequenom 4.64 -.25 UltaSalon 97.23 +.82
SvcSource 5.82 -.13 Umpqua 12.01 .21
ShandaGs 2.94 -.23 pui 109 -.
ShndTelcm 15.55 -.30 UniPixel 10.32 -.62
Shutterfly 29.49 -.01 UBWV 24.10 -1.40
SigaTechh 2.68 +.03 UtdNtrIF 55.78 +.12
SigmaAld 73.70 +.03 UtdOnln 5.84 +.05
SignatBk 72.05 -.54 US Enr 1.58 +.01
SilganHId 41.66 -.77 UtdStatn 31.16 +.01
SilicGrln 10.35 -.29 UtdTherap 52.51 +.06
Silicnlmg 4.91 -.06 UnivDisp 24.95 -.90
SilcnLab 41.74 -.66 UnivFor 38.38 -.82
SilvStdg 14.24 -.18 UnwiredP 1.23 .05
Sina 48.09 -.67 UnwiredP 1.23 .05
Sindair 12.64 +.10 UrbanOut 39.43 -.00
SiriusXM 2.95 -05
SironaDent 62.77 -.31
SkyWest 12.87 -.07 VCAAnt 20.85 +.01
SkywksSol 20.08 -.32 VOXX Intf 6.48 -.07
SmartBal 12.97 -.63 ValueClick 19.73 -.08
SmithWes 8.10 -.16 Veeeolnst 29.21 -.59
SodaStrm 42.20 -1.12 VelD 5.33 +.09
Sohu.cm 44.48 +.43 Venaxis rs 2.67 +07
Solazyme 8.52 -.12
SonicCorp 10.34 -.08 Verisign 38.04 +.15
Sonus 1.73 -.10 Verisk 50.96 -.17
SouMoBc 23.02 +.03 VertxPh 43.04 -.30
Sourcefire 46.38 -.27 ViaSat 39.18 -.17
SpectPh 11.72 +.42 ViacomB 53.09 -.40
SpiritAir 17.25 ... Vical 3.09 +.02
Splunkn 29.37 +.26 VirgnMdah 36.42 -.37
Spreadtrm 17.54 -.35 ViroPhrm 22.75 -.42
Staples 11.53 -.22 ivus 13.42 .28
StarSdent 2.95 -.19 us -.
Starbucks 53.60 -.61 Vodafone 25.13 -.32
SfiDynam 13.62 -.18 Volcano 24.22 +.59
StemCells 1.62 +.02 WarnerCh 11.68 -.05
Stericyde 91.66 -1.03 WarrenRs 2.81 +.01
StewEnt 7.59 -.13 WashFed 17.00 +.24
Stratasys 79.50 +.28 WebMD 15.09 -1.08
SunesisPh 4.15 -.20 WendysCo 4.76 -.04
SunPwrh 5.45 +.01 WernerEnt 21.74 +.31
SusqBnc 10.53 -.08
SwisherH If 1.86 -.02 WestellT 2.03 -.07
SycamNets 2.39 +.08 WDigital 42.09 -.07
Symantec 18.54 -.10 Westmrld 10.01 -.11
Symetricm 5.75 +.06 Wstptlnng 26.96 -.67
Synaeorn 5.52 -.04 Westway 6.69 +.61
Synapfcs 29.54 +.22 WetSeal 2.76 -.04
SynrgyPh 4.98 -.08 WholeFd 91.18 -.52
Synopsys 31.74 -.26 WIshBCp 5.59 -.20
SyntaPhm 8.94 -.21 Wndskm 8.73 -.18
Syntrolmh .36 -.01 Wdtr 6.2 -.
THQrs .35 -.05 WsdomTr 6.21 -.09
TICCCap 10.04 -.08 Woodward 37.30 -.14
TTMTCh 9.01 -.34 Wynn 113.51 -.77
tw teleom 25.60 ... XOMA 2.55 -.08
TakeTwo 11.35 -.34 X)linx 36.10 -.20
Tangoe 12.59 -.17 Xyratex 10.26 -.29
TASER 8.69 -.06 YRCWwde 6.76 +.13
TechData 45.62 -.62 Yahoo 19.35 -.34
Tellabs 3.49 +.05
TescoCp 11.11 +.16 Yandex 22.15 -.17
TeslaMot 34.00 -.43 ZaZaEngy 2.37 +.06
TesseraTch 16.47 -.04 Zagg 7.41 -.27
TetraTc 26.42 -.13 Zalicus .69 +.04
TxCapBsh 45.36 -.45 ZIlow 27.98 +1.08
Texlnst 30.93 -.35 ZonBcp 21.49 -.43
TexRdhse 16.79 -.19 Zopharm 4.05 +.04
Theravnce 21.88 -.30 Zpcar 8.50 -.15
Thoratec 37.92 -.09 xCo 2.79 -.09
ThrshdPhm 4.28 -.11 xCorp 2.79 -.09
TibcoSft 22.36 +1.62 Zogeix 1.37 -.04
TiVo Inc 12.38 -.01 Zoltek 7.54 -.01
TowerGrp 18.22 -.21 Zumiez 19.28 -.56
Towerstm 3.52 +.09 Zynga 2.33 -.05


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.9040 4.8970
Australia .9611 .9537
Bahrain .3771 .3771
Brazil 2.0787 2.0645
Britain 1.6160 1.6284
Canada .9941 .9874
Chile 476.95 475.40
China 6.2338 6.2347
Colombia 1777.50 1792.50
Czech Rep 19.09 19.02
Denmark 5.6630 5.6351
Dominican Rep 40.25 40.25
Egypt 6.1683 6.1675
Euro .7590 .7552
Hong Kong 7.7502 7.7501
Hungary 220.01 215.08
India 55.070 54.855
Indnsia 9659.00 9653.00
Israel 3.7480 3.7455
Japan 84.23 84.42
Jordan .7083 .7109
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0600 3.0555
Mexico 12.9465 12.7442
N. Zealand 1.2140 1.1992
Norway 5.5822 5.5600
Peru 2.565 2.563
Poland 3.10 3.06
Russia 30.8395 30.6776
Singapore 1.2207 1.2186
So. Africa 8.5607 8.4888
So. Korea 1075.63 1074.29
Sweden 6.5588 6.5143
Switzerlnd .9168 .9119
Taiwan 29.08 29.07
Thailand 30.61 30.64
Turkey 1.7975 1.7860
U.A.E. 3.6730 3.6731
Uruguay 19.2299 19.2399
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2956


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.06 0.04
6-month 0.12 0.09
5-year 0.76 0.69
10-year 1.76 1.71
30-year 2.93 2.87



S FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Feb 13 88.66 -1.47
Corn CBOT Mar 13 702 +51/2
Wheat CBOT Mar 13 792 +11/2
Soybeans CBOT Mar13 14291/4 +241/2
Cattle CME Feb 13 133.57 +.07
Sugar (world) ICE Mar13 19.25
Orange Juice ICE Mar 13 134.25 -3.80



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1659.10 $1695.80
Silver (troy oz., spot) $30.142 $32.223
Copper (pound) $3.5555 $3.66bb
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$l1b36.90 $1614.bO

NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... ... ... 4.43 -.12 -46.4 McDnlds 3.08 3.4 17 90.18 +.14 -10.1
AT&T Inc 1.80 5.3 44 33.67 -.50 +11.3 Microsoft .92 3.4 15 27.45 -.23 +5.7
Ameteks .24 .6 21 37.34 -.31 +33.0 MotrlaSolu 1.04 1.9 23 54.58 -.29 +17.9
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 ... 87.50 -1.05 +43.5 NextEraEn 2.40 3.4 14 69.96 -.63 +14.9
BkofAm .04 .4 30 11.29 -.23+103.1 Penney ...... 19.59 -.50 -44.3
CapCtyBk ...... 11.43 -.26 +19.7 PiedmOfc .80 4.4 16 18.02 -.10 +5.8
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 35 39.29 -.46 +5.6 RegionsFn .04 .6 13 7.11 -.07 +65.3
Citigroup .04 .1 12 39.49 -.68 +50.1 SearsHIdgs ........ 40.83 -3.40 +28.5
CmwREIT 1.00 6.2 29 16.19 -.03 -2.7 Smucker 2.08 2.4 20 86.61 -.32 +10.8
Disney .75 1.5 16 50.00 -.93 +33.3 SprintNex .......... 5.46 -.02+133.3
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.7 18 64.51 -.54 ... Texlnst .84 2.7 20 30.93 -.35 +6.3
EPR Prop 3.00 6.4 21 46.61 +.31 +6.6 TimeWarn 1.04 2.2 17 47.57 -.69 +31.6
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.6 11 87.23 -1.66 +2.9 UniFirst .15 .2 16 74.06 -.46 +30.5
FordM .20 1.7 10 11.86 +.09 +10.2 VerizonCm 2.06 4.7 40 43.57 -.24 +8.6
GenElec .76 3.6 16 20.88 -.17 +16.6 Vodafone 1.54 6.1 ... 25.13 -.32 -10.3
HomeDp 1.16 1.9 22 61.32 -.65 +45.9 WalMart 1.59 2.3 14 68.65 -.35 +14.9
Intel .90 4.3 9 20.77 -.26 -14.4 Walgrn 1.10 3.0 15 36.31 -1.24 +9.8
IBM 3.40 1.8 13193.42 -1.35 +5.2 YRCWwde ... ... ... 6.76 +.13 -32.2
Lowes .64 1.8 21 35.04 -.34 +38.1


A6 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 A7


I MUTUiijAL DS I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: MultCGrA 8.47 -.07
Balancp 17.12 -.08 InBosA 6.01 -.01
RetInc 8.96 +.01 LgCpVal 19.56 -.19
Alger Funds B: NatlMunlnc 10.27 -.01
SmCapGr 6.76 -.04 SpEqtA 16.29 -.12
AllianceBern A: TradGvA 7.32
GblRiskp 16.41 +.01 EatonVance B:
GIbThGrAp65.66 -.76 HIthSBt 9.21 -.07
HighlncoAp 9.50 -.01 NatlMuInc 10.26 -.02
SmCpGrA 37.54 -.15 EatonVanceC:
AllianceBern Adv: GovtCp 7.31 +.01
LgCpGrAd 30.54 -.21 NatMunlnc 10.27 -.01
AllianceBern B: Eaton Vance I:
GIbThGrBt 56.17 -.65 FltgRt 9.12
GrowthBt 27.48 -.17 GblMacAbR 9.81 -.01
SCpGrBt 29.59 -.12 LgCapVal 19.61 -.19
AllianceBern C: FMI Funds:
SCpGrCt 29.76 -.13 LgCappn 17.24 -.19
Allianz Fds Instl: FPA Funds:
NFJDvVI 12.74 -.13 Newlnco 10.63
SmCpVl 29.96 -.19 FPACres 29.39 -.18
Allianz Funds C: Fairholme 31.02 -.71
AGICGrthC 24.75 -.19 Federated A:
Amer Beacon Insti: MidGrStA 36.08 -.26
LgCaplnst 21.69 -.22 MuSecA 10.78 +.01
Amer Beacon Inv: Federated InstI:
LgCaplnv 20.59 -.21 KaufmnR 5.00 -.04
Amer Century Adv: TotRetBd 11.60 +.02
EqGroAp 24.68 -.23 StrValDvlS 5.05 -.04
EqIncAp 7.91 -.04 Fidelity Adv FocT:
Amer Century Inv: EnergyTx 36.17 -.49
AIICapGr 28.56 -.26 HItCarT e 22.57 -.83
Balanced 17.16 -.09 Fidelity Advisor A:
DivBnd 11.15 +.02 Nwlnsghp 22.75 -.18
Eqlnc 7.92 -.04 StrlnAe 12.69 -.19
Growthl 26.95 -.20 Fidelity Advisor C:
Heritagel 22.30 -.19 Nwlnsghtn21.50 -.17
IncGro 27.64 -.26 Fidelity Advisor I:
InfAdjBd 13.40 +.03 EqGrln 65.15 -.57
IntDisc 10.16 -.08 EqIlnn 26.51 -.25
InfiGrol 11.43 -.07 FItRatel n 9.91 -.01
New Opp 8.33 -.06 IntBdl n 11.72 +.01
OneChAg 13.43 -.08 NwlnsgtIn 23.02 -.18
OneChMd 12.83 -.06 Strlnlen 12.84 -.19
RealEstl 23.66 -.07 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 26.05 -.19 BalancT 16.63 -.11
Valuelnv 6.44 -.06 DivGrTp 13.34 -.13
American Funds A: EqGrTp 60.89 -.53
AmcpAp 21.74 -.19 EqInT 26.11 -.25
AMutAp 28.47 -.21 GrOppT 41.54 -.42
BalAp 20.44 -.12 HilnAdTp 10.36 -.02
BondAp 12.94 +.01 IntBdT 11.70 +.01
CaplBAp 52.73 -.33 MulncTp 13.77 +.01
CapWGAp 37.05 -.37 OvrseaT 17.83 -.17
CapWAp 21.24 -.02 STFiT 9.35
EupacAp 41.49 -.49 Fidelity Freedom:
FdlnvAp 40.77 -.36 FF2010n 14.42 -.05
GIblBalA 26.91 -.17 FF2010K 13.21 -.05
GovtAp 14.55 +01 FF2015n 12.06 -.04
GwthAp 34.33 -.32 FF2015K 13.28 -.05
HITrAp 11.37 -.01 FF2020n 14.61 -.06
HilnMuniA 15.42 +01 FF2020K 13.72 -.06
IncoAp 18.05 -.10 FF2025n 12.19 -.06
IntBdAp 13.75 +.01 FF2025K 13.89 -.08
IniGrlncApx31.40 -.51 FF2030n 14.52 -.08
ICAApx 30.20 -1.00 FF2030K 14.04 -.08
LtTEBAp 16.32 +.01 FF2035n 12.03 -.08
NEcoAp 29.29 -.31 FF2035K 14.15 -.09
NPerAp 31.45 -.31 FF2040n 8.40 -.05
NwWrldA 54.47 -.56 FF2040K 14.19 -.09
STBFAp 10.07 FF2045K 14.35 -.10
SmCpAp 40.03 -.27 Fidelity Invest:
TxExAp 13.16 +01 AIISectEqx 11.99 -1.25
WshApx 31.33 -.47 AMgr50n 16.42 -.06
Ariel Investments: AMgr70rn 17.29 -.11
Apprec 41.45 -.38 AMgr20rn 13.11 -.02
Ariel 51.90 -.37 Balancn 20.17 -.13
Artisan Funds: BalancedK 20.17 -.12
Intl 24.47 -.25 BlueChGr n 48.99 -.54
IntilnstI 24.60 -.25 BluChpGrK 49.03 -.53
IntfVal r 30.20 -.39 CA Mun n 12.95 +.01
MidCap 37.64 -.19 Canadan 53.43 -.28
MidCapVal 20.91 -.17 CapApn 29.34 -.29
BBH Funds: CapDevOn 11.77 -.09
CorSeIN 17.46 -.16 Cplncrn 9.50 -.01
Baron Funds: ChinaRgr 29.86 -.43
Asset 48.85 -.26 CngS 465.09
Growth 53.79 -.25 CTMun re n 11.98 -.05
SmallCap 26.08 -.11 Contra n 77.58 -.63
Bernstein Fds: ContraK 77.52 -.63
IntDur 14.08 +.02 CnvScn 25.73 -.11
DivMu 14.81 +01 DisEqxn 24.32 -.45
TxMgdlnt 13.87 -.16 DiscEqFx 24.26 -.46
Berwyn Funds: Divlnt n 29.77 -.27
Fund 34.07 -.30 DivrslntKr 29.72 -.26
BlackRockA: DivStkOn 17.37 -.19
EqtyDiv 19.95 -.18 DivGthn 29.81 -.28
GIAIAr 19.68 -.11 EmergAsrn29.24 -.36
HiYInvA 8.13 EmrMkn 22.78 -.24
IntDOpA p 32.56 -.34 Eq Inc n 47.23 -.45
BlackRock B&C: EQIIn 19.54 -.19
GIAICt 18.32 -.11 ECapAp 18.88 -.22
BlackRock InstI: Europe 31.09 -.33
EquityDv 19.99 -.18 Exch 323.88
GIbAllocr 19.76 -.12 Exportn 21.81 -.14
HiYdBd 8.12 Fideln 35.76 -.37
BruceFund 408.01 ... Fifty r n 20.17 -.18
Buffalo Funds: FItateHi r n 9.92
SmCapn 28.08 -.10 FrnOnen 29.86 -.22
CGM Funds: GNMAen 11.74 -.03
Focusn 28.86 -.68 Govtlnc 10.58 +02
Mutln 28.13 -.41 GroCon 93.41 -.93
Realtyn 29.33 .08 Grolncn 21.19 -.21
Calamos Funds: GrowCoF 93.28 -.93
Grw p 47.14 51 GrowthCoK 93.30 -.92
Calvert Invest: GrSratrn 2074 -19
Incop 16.65 +.04 Highlnc r n 9.34 -.01
InfEAp 14.20 .09 ndepn n 25.79 -.29
IntAp 14.20 -.09 InProBden 1342 -16
SocialAp 30.82 -.11 ntrBdn 1113 +01
ocBdp 1.4 +.4 IntBd n 11.13 +.01
SocBdp 16.34 +04 IntGoven 10.85 -.02
TxFLgp 16.56 +.01 IntDiscn 3280 -.30
Cohen & Steers: nfDiscn 320.807 -.3015
RltyShrs 64.30 -.25 InGrBden 20.59 -.06
Columbia Class A: InvGBn 8.00 +.01
Acornt 29.28 -.18 Japanr 979 .05
CaAlloMod px 11.31 -.20 JpnSm n 903 .0
DivOpptyA 8.72 -.06 LgCapValx 11.16 -.45
LgCapGrA t 26.92 -.26 LatAml 4580 -.28
LgCorQAp 6.49 .06 LevCoStkn 3213 -.34
MdCpGrOp 10.16 -.09 LowPrn 39.41 -.27
MidCVIOpp8.47 -.06 LowPriKr 3938 -.27
TxEAp 14.29 +.01 Magellnn 73.16 -.66
FrontierA 10.88 -.06 MDMurn 11.61 +.01
GlobTech 20.88 -.18 MAMunn 12.68 +.01
Columbia Cl ,T&G: MegaCpStknl1.92 -.12
EmMktOpln8.77 -.12 MIMunen 12.54 +.01
Columbia Class Z: MidCapn 29.40 -.15
AcornZ 30.36 -.19 MNMunen11.98 -.01
AcornlntZ 40.52 -.35 MtgSecn 11.35 +.01
DivlncoZ 14.83 -.12 MuniIncen 13.56 +.01
IntTEBd 10.99 +01 NJMunren 12.26 -.02
SelLgCapG 13.89 -.19 NwMktren 17.75 -.31
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMilln 30.29 -.27
ComRett 8.04 +.02 NYMunn 13.68 +.01
DFA Funds: OTC n 60.75 -.64
InftCorEqn 10.59 -.10 OhMunen 12.39 -.03
USCorEql n12.37 -.11 1001ndexx 9.45 -.90
USCorEq2nl2.18 -.12 Ovrsean 32.15 -.27
DWS Invest A: PcBasn 24.54 -.18
CommAp 18.87 -.18 PAMunren11.46 -.02
DWS InvestS: Puritn n 19.40 -.11
CoreEqtyS 18.29 -.26 PuritanK 19.39 -.11
CorPlsInc 11.27 +.02 RealEIncr 11.37 -.01
EmMkGrr 16.50 -.21 RealEn 32.00 -.12
EnhEmMk 11.33 SAIISecEqFx 11.98-1.28
EnhGlbBdr 10.33 -.01 SCmdtyStrtn8.82 +.03
GIbSmCGr 39.89 -.31 SCmdtyStrFn8.85 +.02
GIblThem 23.50 -.20 SrEmrgMkt 16.77 -.18
Gold&Prc 13.49 -.02 SEmgMktF 16.79 -.19
HiYIdTx 13.09 ... SrslntGrw 11.82 -.11
IntTxAMT 12.15 ... SerlnfiGrF 11.84 -.10
Intl FdS 44.00 -.51 SrslntVal 9.36 -.07
LgCpFoGr 32.76 -.25 SerlnfiValF 9.37 -.07
LatAmrEq 41.84 -.40 SrlnvGrdFe 11.59 -.06
MgdMuniS 9.55 +.01 StlntMuen 10.84 -.01
MATFS 15.24 ... STBFn 8.59
SP500S 18.98 -.18 SmCapDiscn24.11 -.13
WorldDiv 24.16 -.16 SmllCpSrn 18.13 -.10
Davis Funds A: SCpValur 16.17 -.10
NYVenA 34.86 -.32 S nSelLCVrnll.73 -.12
Davis Funds B: StkSlcACap n28.29 -.25
NYVenB 33.31 -.31 SlSelSmCp20.16 .10
Davis Funds C: Sfratlncn 11.37 -.01
NYVenC 33.61 -.31 StrReRtr 9.64
Davis FundsY: TaxFrBrn 11.71 +.01
NYVenY 35.23 -.32 TotalBdn 10.95 +.01
Delaware Invest A: Trend xn 73.59 -6.41
Diverl Incpe 9.34 -.08 USBlen 11.89 +.01
SMIDCapG 22.93 -.13 Utilityn 18.72 -.13
TxUSAp 12.28 +.01 ValStratn 31.53 .21
Delaware Invest B: Value n 76.38 -.70
SelGrBt 34.91 -.32 Wrldwn 20.24 -.19
Dimensional Fds: Fidelity Selects:
EmMCrEqnl9.99 -.21 Airxn 40.66 -.97
EmMktV 29.30 -.35 Bankingxn 19.40 .37
IntSmVan 15.85 -.17 Biotchn 110.76 -.97
LargeCo 11.25 -.11 Brokrxn 49.90 -1.48
TAUSCorE2n9.98 -.09 Chemxn 117.73 4.58
USLgVan 22.88 -.29 ComEquipn23.21 -.40
US Micron 14.53 .07 Compxn 61.34 .56
USTgdVal 16.99 -.13 ConDisxn 25.45 -2.66
USSmalln 22.62 -.13 ConsuFnxnl4.59 .37
USSmVa 26.13 -.18 ConStapxn80.39 -2.88
InttSmCon 15.79 -.14 CstHoxn 48.37 -1.15
EmMktSCn20.66 -.17 DfAerxn 87.46 1.40
EmgMktn 27.04 -.31 Electrn 45.27 -.67
Fixdn 10.32 ... Enrgyxn 51.15 -1.28
IntGFxlnn 13.01 +.03 EngSvn 66.54 -.85
IntVan 16.50 -.16 EnvAltEnrnl6.94 -.16
InfProSec 12.83 +.03 FinSvxn 61.37 -1.25
Glb5Fxlncnll.14 +.01 Goldrn 35.86 -.04
2YGIFxdn 10.04 ... Healthxn 134.84-11.79
DFARIEn 26.22 -.09 Insurxn 51.57-2.21
Dodge&Cox: Leisrxn 101.47 -6.74
Balanced 78.08 -.64 Materialxn 70.62 -2.46


GblStock 8.97 -.11 MedDI x n 57.83 -3.73
Income 13.84 +.01 MdEqSysxn28.03 -.84
IntStk 34.35 -.49 Multmdxn 57.02 -1.30
Stock 122.02 -1.40 NtGasxn 31.08 -.43
DoubleUne Funds: Pharmxn 15.14 -.46
TRBd In 11.38 Retail x n 62.18 -2.37
TRBdNpn 11.38 +.01 Softwr x n 82.63 -5.21
Dreyfus: Techn 100.84 -.82
Aprecx 44.05 -55 Telcmxn 50.88 -1.27
CTA 12.34 +01 Transxn 51.77 -2.40
CorVTA UtilGr n 57.07 -.37
Dreyfx 9.80 -.14 Wirelessn 8.26 -.10
DryMidr 30.41 -.23 Fidelity Spartan:
GNMA 15.64 +.01 5001dxlnvn 50.61 -.47
GrChinaAr 34.92 -.19 5001dxl 50.61 -.48
HiYldAp 6.67 -.01 Intllnxlnvn 34.11 -.28
StratValA 30.96 -.30 TotMldxF r 41.30 -.37
TechGroA 34.66 -.20 TotMktlnvn41.30 -.37
DreihsAclnc 10.64 -.01 USBondle 11.89 +.01
Driehaus Funds: Fidelity Spart Adv:
EMktGr 29.90 -.31 ExMktAdrn39.86 -.30
EVPTxMEmI 48.80 -.47 5001dxAdv n50.61 -.47
Eaton Vance A: IntAd rn 34.11 -.28
ChinaAp 18.11 -.19 TotMktAdrn41.30 -.37
AMTFMuInc 10.49 USBondle 11.89 +.01
AMTFMulnc 10.49 ..


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 48.52 -.34
OverseasA 21.89 -.14
First Investors A
BIChpAp
Eqtylnco p 7.72 -.07
GloblAp 6.95 -.06
GovtA p 11.39 +.01
GrolnAp 16.78 -.16
IncoAp 2.63 -.01
MATFAp 12.48 +.01
MITFAp 12.88 +.01
NJTFAp 13.68 +.01
NYTFAp 15.21 +.01
OppAp 30.65 -.28
PATFAp 13.80 +.01
SpSitAp 24.68 -.15
TxExIncop 10.27 +.01
TotRtAp 16.93 -.08
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.11 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.84
ALTFAp 11.88
AZTFAp 11.50 +.01
CallnsAp 13.02
CAIntAp 12.17 +.01
CalTFAp 7.54 +.01
COTFAp 12.44 +.01
CTTFAp 11.42 +.01
CvtScAp 15.20 -.05
Dbl TFA 11.99
DynTchA 33.31 -.24
EqlncAp 18.22 -.15
Fedlntp 12.55 +.01
FedTFAp 12.77 +.01
FLTFAp 11.97 +.01
FoundAlp 11.34 -.07
GATFAp 12.79 +.01
GoldPrMA 29.55 -.32
GrwthAp 50.68 -.30
HYTFAp 10.94 +.01
HilncA 2.09
IncomAp 2.24 -.01
InsTFAp 12.62 +.01
NYITF p 11.92 +.01
LATFAp 12.02 +.01
LMGvScA 10.25
MDTFAp 11.95 +.01
MATFAp 12.18 +.01
MITFAp 12.35
MNInsA 12.99 +.01
MOTFAp 12.73 +.01
NJTFAp 12.58 +.01
NYTFAp 12.13 +.01
NCTFAp 12.93 +.01
OhiolAp 13.13 +.01
ORTFAp 12.57
PATFAp 10.93 +.01
ReEScAp 16.86 -.06
RisDvAp 37.92 -.26
SMCpGrA 33.95 -.16
Stratlncp 10.76 -.01
TtlRtnAp 10.53 +.01
USGovAp 6.81
UbIsAp 13.74 -.06
VATFAp 12.25 +.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 13.23 -.05
IncmeAd 2.23
TGIbTRAdv 13.53 -.05
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.26 -.01
USGvC t 6.77 +.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.34 -.19
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 23.61 -.22
ForgnAp 6.83 -.07
GIBdAp 13.27 -.05
GrwthAp 19.36 -.21
WorldAp 15.67 -.18
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.90 -.22
ForgnC p 6.70 -.07
GIBdCp 13.30 -.05
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.42 -.08
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 12.08 +.02
US Eqty 45.33 -.46
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.01
GMOTrust III:
Quality 22.51 -.15
GMOTrust IV:
IntIlntrVI 20.86 -.17
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsrx 11.50 -.35
IntCorEq 28.35 -.22
Quality 22.51 -.16
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 55.16 -.45
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 39.05 -.29
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 24.67 -.19
HiYield 7.32 -.01
HYMuni n 9.43 +.01
MidCapV 39.31 -.29
ShtDrTFn 10.64 +.01
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.45 +.01
CapAplnst 42.55 -.33
Intfllnvt 61.16 -.56
Intir 61.73 -.56
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 34.31 -.32
DivGthAp 20.71 -.22
IntOpA p 14.97 -.14
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 34.29 -.32
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 43.93 -.43
Div&Gr 22.05 -.25
Balanced 21.53 -.14
MidCap 28.49 -.25
TotRetBd 11.98 +.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 10.89
ICON Fds:
Energy S 19.00 -.20
HIthcareS 17.48 -.14
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.94 -.01
IVA Funds:
Wdwide I r 15.92 -.08
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.50 -.13
Invesco Funds:
Energy 37.61 -.35
Ublibes 17.34 -.07
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.40 +.02
Chartp 17.99 -.12
CmstkA 17.81 -.19
Constp 23.87 -.24
DivrsDivp 13.51 -.12
EqlncA 9.21 -.06
GrIncAp 21.01 -.21
HilncMu p
HiYldcp 4.44
HYMuA 10.12 +.01
InfiGrow 28.69 -.24
MunilnA 13.93 +.01
PA TFA 17.07 +.01
US MortgA 13.01
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.90 +.01
US Mortg 12.95
Invesco Funds Y:


AssetStAp 25.58 -.17
AssetStbilr 25.76 -.18
HilncAp 8.54
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.09 +.01
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.15 +.02
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValIn 28.05 -.19
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondn 12.10 +.02
ShtDurBd 11.00
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.23 -.11
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.08 +01
HighYldn 8.18 -.01
lntmTFBd n 11.33 +.01
LgCpGr 23.94 -.23
ShtDurBd n 11.00
USLCCrPIsn22.16 -.23
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.24 -.07
ContrarnT 15.03 -.10
EnterprT 65.87 -.46
FIxBndT 11.03 +.02
GIUfeSciTr 30.14 -.22
GIbSelT 9.94 -.14
GITechTr 18.79 -.15
Grw&lncT 34.19 -.17
JanusT 31.84 -.23
OvrseasTr 33.43 -.60
PrkMCValT21.37 -.15
ResearchT 32.53 -.24
ShTmBdT 3.10
TwentyT 61.73 -.66
VentureT 53.72 -.26
WrldWTr 46.83 -.61
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.43 +.02


IncomeA p 6.74 -.01
RgBkA 14.26 -.10
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.74 -.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 13.05 -.11
LSBalanc 13.75 -.07
LSConsrv 13.64 -.01
LSGrwth 13.73 -.10
LSModer 13.53 -.04
Lazard InstI:
EmgMktl 20.20 -.18


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.62 -.19
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 127.03 -1.26
CBApprp 15.96 -.17
CBLCGrp 22.99 -.22
GCIAIICOp 9.18 -.08
WAHilncAt 6.28
WAMgMup 17.23 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.68 -.20
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 30.62 -.29
CMValTrp 42.66 -.40
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 26.89 -.29
SmCap 29.15 -.13
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.09 -.03
StrlncC 15.53 -.05
LSBondR 15.03 -.03
StrlncA 15.43 -.06
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdApx 12.60 -.26
InvGrBdYx 12.61 -.26
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 12.11 -.13
BdDebAp 8.14 -.01
ShDurlncAp 4.65
MidCpAp 18.00 -.16
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.68
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.65
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.53 -.20
MIGA 17.85 -.15
EmGA 48.73 -.40
HilnA 3.59
MFLA
TotRA 15.30 -.09
UtilA 18.76 -.11
ValueA 25.48 -.26
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 16.07 -.13
GvScBn 10.46 +.01
HilnBn 3.60
MulnBn 9.02
TotRBn 15.31 -.08
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.59 -.26
MFS Funds Instl:
IntiEqn 19.09 -.21
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.11
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.52 -.06
GovtBt 8.93
HYIdBBt 6.08
IncmBldr 17.73 -.07
IntiEqB 10.85 -.08
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 38.60 -.36
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 85.57 -.68
Managers Funds:
Yackhman p n19.35 -.22
YacktFocn 20.76 -.24
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.73 -.09
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.47 -.06
AsianGllnv 18.35 -.12
Indialnvr 17.20 -.24
PacTgrlnv 23.99 -.12
MergerFdn 16.12
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.90 +.02
TotRtBdl 10.90 +.02
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.53
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.81 -.16
MorganStanley Inst:
IntDEql 14.37 -.11
MCapGrl 34.78 -.22
Muhlenkn 57.54 -.60
Under Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.30 -.29
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 32.67 -.29
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.36 -.12
GblDiscA 28.31 -.24
GIbDiscZ 28.68 -.24
QuestZ 16.56 -.08
SharesZ 22.50 -.20
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.65 -.21
Geneslnst 48.70 -.33
Intl r 17.47 -.18
LgCapV Inv 28.03 -.29
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.66 -.34
Nicholas Group:
HilncIlxn 9.85 -.17
Nicholasn 50.29 -.47
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.96 +.02
HiYFxlnc 7.55 -.01
IntTxEx 10.73 +.01
SmCpldx 9.24 -.05
Stldx 17.72 -.17
Technly 16.34 -.07
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 17.14 +.01
LtMBAp 11.21
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.36 +.01
HYMunBd 17.14 +.01
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.27 -.07
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.93 -.45
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.56 -.17
Globall 23.34 -.26
Intl I r 20.66 -.22
Oakmark 48.69 -.47
Select 30.96 -.33
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.54 -.03
GIbSMdCap 14.60 -.13
LgCapStrat 9.96 -.08
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.30
AMTFrNY 12.33 +.01
CAMuniAp 8.84 -.01
CapApAp 48.37 -.35
CaplncA p 9.11 -.02
DvMktAp 34.83 -.23
Discp 58.93 -.32
EquityA 9.59 -.08
EqlncAp 25.45 -.25
GlobAp 64.53 -.65
GIbOppA 29.09 -.19
GblStrlncA 4.36
Goldp 30.49 -.12
IntBdA p 6.61 -.02
LtdTmMu 15.10 +.01
MnStFdA 37.11 -.29
PAMuniAp 11.52 +.01
SenFltRtA 8.30
USGv p 9.81 +.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.26
AMTFrNY 12.33
CplncB t 8.94 -.01
EquityB 8.86 -.08
GblStfrlncB 4.37
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.38
RoMuAp 17.02 +.01
RcNtMuA 7.63
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 34.42 -.23
IntlBdY 6.61 -.02
IntGrowY 30.48 -.33
Osterweis Funds:
Sklncon 11.63 -.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.87
TotRtAd 11.34 +.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 11.48 -.01
AIIAsset 12.98 -.03
ComodRR 6.67 +.02
Divlnc 12.34
EmgMkCur 10.56 -.05
EmMkBd 12.52
Fltlnc r 8.99 -.01
ForBdUnr 11.11 -.01
FrgnBd 10.97 +.01
HiYld 9.68 -.02
InvGrCp 11.18 +.01
LowDu 10.54 +.01
ModDur 10.93 +.01
RealRtnIl 12.40 +.03
ShortT 9.87
TotRt 11.34 +.01
TRII 10.67 +.02
TRIll 9.96 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIlAstAutt 11.40 -.01
LwDurA 10.54 +.01
RealRtAp 12.40 +.03
TotRtA 11.34 +.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIlAstAutt 11.27 -.01
RealRtCp 12.40 +.03
TotRtCt 11.34 +.01
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.40 +.03
TRtnp 11.34 +.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 11.47


TotRtnP 11.34 +.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.81 -.19
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.50 -.02
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.94 +.01
InfiValA 19.33 -.21
PionFdAp 32.54 -.27
ValueAp 12.02 -.13
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.47 -.03


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.57 -.03
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.30
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.64 -.11
BIChip n 45.68 -.39
CABondn 11.56 +.01
CapAppn 22.26 -.10
DivGro n 26.42 -.20
EmMktBn 14.18
EmEurop 19.07 -.17
EmMktS n 33.43 -.39
Eqlnc n 26.54 -.25
Eqlndexn 38.50 -.36
Europe n 15.97 -.17
GNMAn 10.01 +.01
Growth n 37.78 -.27
Gr&ln n 22.64 -.24
HIthSci n 41.54 -.34
HiYieldn 6.99
InsfCpG 18.92 -.13
InstHiYId n 9.76 -.01
MCEqGrn 30.65 -.22
IntlBondn 10.15 -.03
IntDis n 45.74 -.29
Intl G&l 12.95 -.10
IntlStkn 14.30 -.13
Japan n 8.00 -.05
LatAm n 37.59 -.30
MDShrtn 5.22
MDBondn 11.08
MidCap n 56.57 -.39
MCapValn 24.11 -.20
NAmer n 35.96 -.29
NAsian 16.56 -.16
NewEran 41.94 -.34
NHorizn 33.18 -.22
N Incdn 9.84 +.01
NYBondn 11.92
OverS SFn 8.48 -.07
PSIncn 17.23 -.06
RealAssetrnll1.02 -.08
RealEstn 20.95 -.08
R2010n 16.46 -.07
R2015n 12.87 -.06
R2020 n 17.86 -.11
R2025 n 13.10 -.09
R2030n 18.90 -.13
R2035n 13.36 -.10
R2040n 19.06 -.15
R2045n 12.69 -.10
SciTecn 27.21 -.21
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStkn 33.96 -.23
SmCapVal n38.95 -.15
SpecGrn 19.37 -.17
Speclnn 13.01 -.01
TFIncn 10.57 +.01
TxFrHn 11.93 +.01
TxFrSIn 5.69
USTIntn 6.22 +.01
USTLgn 13.56 +.12
VABondn 12.31 +.01
Value n 26.43 -.28
Principal Inv:
Divlnfllnst 10.37 -.10
LgCGI In 9.90 -.12
LT20201n 12.90 -.06
LT20301n 12.76 -.08
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.45 -.15
HiYldAp 5.72
MidCpGrA 31.27 -.25
MuHilncA 10.37 +.01
STCrpBdA 11.56-
7398.70
UtlityAx 11.92 -.20
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.29 -.15
HiYldBt 5.71 -.01
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 32.46 -.26
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.16 +.02
AZTE 9.52
ConvSec 20.59 -.08
DvrlnAp 7.74 -.01
EqlnAp 17.65 -.17
EuEq 20.37 -.23
GeoBalA 13.35 -.07
GIbEqtyp 9.75
GrInAp 14.85 -.15
GIblHIthAe 44.92 -3.26
HiYdApx 7.94 -.05
HiYldIn 6.16
IncmAp 7.25 +.02
IntGrln px 9.73 -.23
InvAp 14.57 -.15
NJTxA p 9.85 +.01
MuItCpGr 55.86 -.50
PATE 9.55 +.01
TxExA p 9.08
TFInAp 15.74 +.01
TFHYA 12.77
USGvAp 13.51 +.01
GIbIUtilA 10.47 -.05
VoyAp 21.99 -.27
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.75 +.01
DvrlnBt 7.68
EqInct 17.48 -.17
EuEq 19.58 -.22
GeoBalB 13.22 -.07
GIbEqt 8.76
GINtRs tx 17.76 -.19
GrlnBt 14.59 -.16
GIblHIthBe 35.09 -3.20
HiYldBtx 7.93 -.04
HYAdBt 6.03
IncmBt 7.18 +.01
IntGrlntx 9.68 -.15
IntfiGritht 14.55 -.17
InvBt 13.14 -.14
NJTxB t 9.84 +.01
MultCpGr 47.80 -.43
TxExBt 9.08
TFHYBt 12.80 +.01
USGvBt 13.44 +.01
GIblUtilB 10.42 -.05
VoyBt 18.52 -.23
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.89 -.19
LgCAIphaA 43.91 -.45
Value 25.89 -.20
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 8.59 -.07
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 14.66 -.09
PennMulr 11.47 -.10
Premier r 19.16 -.20
TotRetlr 13.62 -.11
ValSvct 11.31 -.13
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.54 +.02
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.14 -.17
SEI Portfolios:
S&P500En 39.56 -.37
SSgA Funds:
EmgMktx 20.37 -.20
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 18.57 -.13
10001nvr 38.54 -.36
S&P Sel 22.24 -.21
SmCpSl 21.06 -.11
TSM Selr 25.80 -.24
Scout Funds:
Int 33.06 -.36
Selected Funds:
AmShD 41.81 -.40
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.26 -.32
Sequoia 168.67 -.55
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 43.61 -.36
SoSunSClnvtn22.60-.21
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 55.70 -.52
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 37.43 -.27
RealEstate 29.80 .04
SmCap 55.36 -.35
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.03 +.03
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.54 +.01
TotRetBdl 10.34 +.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.99 +.02
Eqldxlnst 10.82 -.10
IntlEqllnst 16.16 -.14
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 20.07 -.16
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 16.78 -.30
REVallnstr 25.18 -.19
Valuelnst 49.45 -.37
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 27.32 -.26
IncBuildAt 18.85 -.09
IncBuildCp 18.85 -.08
IntValue I 27.95 -.26
LtTMul 14.65 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYId 5.07 -.01
Income 9.35 +.02
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBpx9.68 -.07
Flexlncpx 9.36 -.06
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGr e n33.59 -2.71
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 25.97 -.11
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.42 -.21
ChinaReg 7.45 -.07


Name NAV Chg
Int 25.81 -.24
NYBd 12.52 +.01
PrecMM 25.93 -.06
SciTech 14.77 -.15
ShtTBnd 9.28
SmCpStk 15.06 -.07
TxElt 13.74 +.01
TxELT 13.94
TxESh 10.83 +.01
VABd 11.64 +.01
WIdGr 21.85 -.21
VALIC :
MdCpldx 20.99 -.16
Stkldx 26.16 -.25
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.96 -.16
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.93 -.12
CAITAdmn 11.74 +.01
CALTAdmnl12.00 +.01
CpOpAdl n 77.91 -.87
EMAdmr r n 36.10 -.42
Energyn 114.52 -.83
EqlnAdm n n50.89 -.48
EuroAdml n 60.44 -.58
ExplAdml n 76.34 -.59
ExtdAdm n 45.79 -1.08
500Admln 131.69 -2.19
GNMA Ad n 11.00 +.01
GrwAdm n 36.67 -.53
HlthCr n 60.96 -.41
HiYldCpn 6.11 -.01
InfProAdn 28.62 +.07
ITBdAdmln 11.95 -.18
ITsryAdml n 11.76 +.01
IntGrAdm n 60.76 -.67
ITAdmlIn 14.37 +.01
ITGrAdmrn 10.46 +.01
LtdTrAdn 11.14
LTGrAdmlIn 10.97 +.08
LTAdmln 11.80 +.01
MCpAdmlnl02.01 -2.35
MorgAdrnm n 62.52 -.51
MuHYAdmn11 .29 +.01
NYLTAdn 11.79 +.01
PrmCap r n 72.56 -.68
PALTAdm nll.73 +.01
ReitAdm r rn 92.81 -1.39
STsyAdml n 10.79
STBdAdml nlO.62 -.03
ShtTrAdn 15.91 +.01
STFdAdn 10.88
STIGrAdn 10.87
SmCAdm n 38.70 -.96
SmCapGrth n31.19 -.53
SmCapVal n31.21 -1.00
TxMCap r n 72.69 -.67
TtBAdml n 11.08 -.04
TStkAdm n 35.71 -.32
ValAdml n 23.01 -.43
WellslAdrnm n58.49 -.13
WelltnAdm n59.85 -.37
Windsorn 51.58 -.54
WdsrllAdn 53.03 -.49
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 12.00 +.01
CapOppn 33.74 -.38
Convrtn 13.17 -.04
DivApplnn 23.94 -.17
DivdGron 16.96 -.12
Energy n 60.97 -.45
Eqlnc n 24.28 -.23
Explrn 81.93 -.64
FLLTn 12.23 +.01
GNMAn 11.00 +.01
GlobEqn 18.96 -.17
Grolnc n 30.73 -.29
GrthEqn 12.31 -.09
HYCorpn 6.11 -.01
HlthCren 144.51 -.97
InflaPron 14.57 +.03
IntlExplrn 15.02 -.15
IntlGrn 19.11 -.21
IntfiValn 31.85 -.33
ITIGraden 10.46 +.01
ITTsryn 11.76 +.01
LifeConn 17.42 -.04
LifeGron 23.93 -.17
Lifelncn 14.81 -.01
LifeModn 21.22 -.11
LTIGraden 10.97 +.08
LTTsryn 13.29 +.11
Morgn 20.14 -.17
MuHYn 11.29 +.01
Mulntn 14.37 +.01
MuLtdn 11.14
MuLongn 11.80 +.01
MuShrtn 15.91 +.01
NJLTn 12.34 +.01
NYLTn 11.79 +.01
OHLTTEn 12.73 +.01
PALTn 11.73 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 16.03 -.29
PrmcpCorn 15.00 -.13
Prmcp r n 69.96 -.65
SelValu r n 21.40 -.20
STARn 21.13 -.10
STIGraden 10.87
STFedn 10.88
STTsryn 10.79
StratEqn 21.79 -.17
TgtRetlncn 12.33 -.01
TgRe2010 n24.70 -.07
TgtRe20155nnl3.70 -.05
TgRe2020 n24.35 -.13
TgtRe20250 nl3.89 -.09
TgRe203 n23.88 -.16
TgtRe2035 nl 4.40 -.10
TgtRe2040On23.67 -.19
TgtRe2050n23.57 -.19
TgtRe2045 nl 4.86 -.12
USGron 21.38 -.21
USValuen 11.87 -.12
Wellslyn 24.14 -.06
Well n 34.65 -.21
Wndsrn 15.28 -.16
Wndsll n 29.87 -.27
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r nlOO.42 -.86
ExtMktln 112.98 -2.71
MidCplstPlnlll.13-2.59
TotlntAdm r r4.87 -.22
Totlntllnstr n99.43 -.91
TotlntllP r n 99.45 -.90
TotlntSig r n 29.83 -.27
500n 131.69 -2.15
Balancedn 23.93 -.11
EMktn 27.49 -.32
Europe n 25.96 -.24
Extend n 45.78 -1.02
Growth n 36.67 -.52
LgCaplxn 26.37 -.43
LTBnd n 14.30 -.10
MidCap n 22.49 -.48
Pacific n 10.08 -.07
REITr n 21.75 -.32
SmCap n 38.69 -.90
SmlCpGth n24.94 -.39
STBndn 10.62 -.03
TotBnd n 11.08 -.04
Totllnt n 14.87 -.13
TotStk n 35.70 -.33
Value n 23.02 -.41
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.94 -.11
DevMklnstn 9.64 -.08
EmrnMklnstn 27.45 -.32
Extln n 45.78 -1.09
FTAIIWIdl r n88.74 -.82
Grwthlstn 36.66 -.54
InfProlnstn 11.66 +.03
Instldxn 131.76 -1.24
InsPIn 131.77 -1.24
InstTStldxn 32.56 -.30
lnsTStPlus n32.57 -.29
MidCplstn 22.53 -.52
REITInstrn 14.36 -.22
STBondldxnlO.62 -.03
STIGrlnstn 10.87
SCInstn 38.70 -.96
TBIstn 11.08 -.04
TSInstn 35.72 .32
Valuelstn 23.01 -.43
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 108.78 -1.81
GroSig n 33.95 -.50
ITBdSign 11.95 -.18
MidCpldxn 32.19 -.74
STBdldxn 10.62 -.03
SmCpSig n 34.87 -.86
TotBdSgl n 11.08 -.04
TotStkSgl n 34.47 -.31
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.95 -.01
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 10.19 -.09
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.72 -.07
CorelnvA 6.29 -.05
DivOppAp 15.39 -.14
DivOppCt 15.24 -.15
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 44.02 -.40
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.65
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 20.91 -.15
Opptylnv 39.60 -.35
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.85 -.32
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.67 +.02
CorePlusl 11.67 +.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.03 -.11


GIbRs 9.74 -.05
Gld&Mtls 11.46
WdPrcMn 11.26 -.03
USAA Group:
AgvGt 32.77 -.29
CABd 11.15
CrnstStr 23.55 -.09
GovSec 10.31
GrTxStr 14.73 -.06
Grwth 16.96 -.17
Gr&lnc 16.26 -.17
IncStk 13.66 -.13
Inco 13.46 +.02


Markets show displeasure





with canceled budget vote


Associated Press


NEW YORK Investors
sent Washington a reminder
Friday that Wall Street is a
power player in talks to
avoid the "fiscal cliff."
Stocks fell sharply after
House Republicans called
off a vote on tax rates and
left federal budget talks in
disarray 10 days before
sweeping tax increases and
government spending cuts
are scheduled to take effect.
The Dow Jones industrial
average lost as much as 189
points before closing down
120.88 points, or 0.9 percent,
at 13,190.84. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index fell 13.54
points to 1,430.15. The Nas-
daq composite index de-
clined 29.38 to 3,021.01.
The House bill would
have raised taxes on Ameri-
cans making at least $1 mil-
lion per year and locked in
decade-old tax cuts for
Americans making less.
Taxes will rise for almost all
Americans on Jan. 1 unless
Congress acts.
House Speaker John
Boehner had presented what
he called "Plan B" while he
negotiated with the White
House on avoiding the
sweeping tax increases and
spending cuts, a combina-
tion known as the fiscal cliff.
But Boehner scrapped a
vote on the bill Thursday
night after it became clear
that it did not have enough
support in the Republican-
led House to secure pas-
sage. He called on the White
House and the Democratic-
led Senate to work some-
thing out.


Market watch
Dec. 21, 2012

Dow Jones -120.88
industrials 13,190.84

Nasdaq -29.38
composite 3,021.01


Standard &
Poor's 500


-13.54

1.430.15


Russell -4.57
2000 847.92

NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,002

Declined: 2,031

Unchanged: 121

Volume: 4.71 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 815

Declined: 1,666

Unchanged: 108

Volume: 2.41 b
AP

The market's decline
demonstrated that in-
vestors' nerves are raw as
they await a resolution.
"Where we are today, the
market would be satisfied
with the announcement of a
stopgap measure," said Quincy
Krosby, a market strategist
at Prudential Financial.
"The more the clock ticks,
the more the market is say-
ing, 'Just give us something."'
Sal Arnuk, a partner at
Themis Trading, suggested
the sharp drop in stocks early
in the day might have been
an overreaction. The Dow was
down as much as 189 points,
and before the market opened,
stock futures suggested a
decline of 200 points or more.


"It's not a surprise that
they weren't able to come to
an agreement," he said. I don't
think most of Wall Street an-
ticipated that they would
come to an agreement."
Other markets registered
their concern, but the reac-
tion was not extreme. The
yield on the benchmark 10-
year U.S. Treasury note fell
0.04 percentage point to 1.76
percent.
The price of gold, which
some investors buy when
fear overtakes the market,
climbed, but only by 0.9 per-
cent. Gold rose $14.20 to
$1,660.10 an ounce.
If the full fiscal cliff takes
effect, economists say it
could drag the United
States into recession next
year. The impact would be
gradual, though.
Most people would receive
only slightly less money in
each paycheck. And the tax
increases and spending cuts
could be retroactively
repealed.
If budget talks dragged
on, many businesses might
put off investment or hiring,
and consumer spending
could suffer.
"Believe you me," Krosby
said, "if you think that there
is a recession in the offing
you are going to see this
market sell off. It's sell off
first, ask questions later."
Stocks closed lower Fri-
day in Asia after House Re-
publicans canceled their
vote. The Nikkei index in
Japan fell almost 1 percent,
and Hong Kong's Hang Seng
Index dropped 0.7 percent.
Stocks were also lower in
Europe.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


It's all hands on deck

for final retail push

FREEPORT, Maine With the final retail
push underway, L.L. Bean CEO Chris Mc-
Cormick is playing Santa's helper against a
backdrop of conveyor belts and beeping front-
end loaders as he boxes up slippers and shirts.
But there's little time to reflect on the holiday
cheer those gifts will bring because he's busy
concentrating to make sure no shipments go
astray.
At L.L. Bean, top executives are abandoning
their desks to work in the shipping department
and to answer customers' phone calls as part of
an annual all-hands-on-deck approach to ensure
last-minute purchases arrive at their destinations
before Christmas.
This season the deadline for orders with guar-
anteed Christmas delivery was the latest ever,
with L.L. Bean offering free shipping as late as
noon Friday.

AP Impact: Big Pharma

cashes in on HGH abuse

A federal crackdown on illicit foreign supplies
of human growth hormone has failed to stop
rampant misuse, and instead has driven record
sales of the drug by some of the world's biggest
pharmaceutical companies, an Associated Press
investigation shows.
The crackdown, which began in 2006, re-
duced the illegal flow of unregulated supplies
from China, India and Mexico.
But since then, Big Pharma has been satisfy-
ing the needs of U.S. users and abusers, includ-
ing many who take the drug in the false hope of
delaying the effects of aging.
From 2005 to 2011, inflation-adjusted sales of
HGH were up 69 percent, according to an AP
analysis of pharmaceutical company data col-
lected by the research firm IMS Health. Sales of
the average prescription drug rose just 12 per-
cent in the same period.

GE to buy aviation unit of

Italy's Avio for $4.3 billion

FAIRFIELD, Conn. Industrial conglomerate
General Electric plans to buy the aviation busi-
ness of Italian manufacturer Avio for $4.3 billion
to grow its jet propulsion business and
strengthen its supply chain.
The Fairfield, Conn., company said Friday that
it wants to build its supply chain as it ramps up
engine production. The deal also gives GE a
chance to offer Avio products outside the avia-
tion industry, in power generation, oil and marine
products.
GE will buy Avio S.p.A.'s aviation business
from European private equity firm Cinven and
the Italian aerospace group Finmeccanica.


Walgreen's fiscal 1Q profit

sinks nearly 26 percent

Walgreen's fiscal first-quarter earnings sank
nearly 26 percent as costs tied to a couple of big
deals and Superstorm Sandy helped put a big-
ger-than-expected dent in the drugstore chain's
performance.
CEO Greg Wasson told analysts he saw the
quarter as a "turning point" for the Deerfield, Ill.,
company, which has been working to recapture
customers it lost during a contract dispute with
Express Scripts Holding Co. But investors didn't
buy that message, at least initially, as the stock
fell deeper than broader market declines in Fri-
day trading.
Walgreen Co. spent $4 billion in cash earlier
this year to buy a stake in Alliance Boots, a
Swiss company that runs the largest drugstore
chain in the United Kingdom. It also spent $438
million on a drugstore chain focused on the mid-
South under the USA Drug, Super D Drug and
Med-X names.

Planned News Corp spin-off

lost $2 billion in fiscal 2012

LOS ANGELES Rupert Murdoch's News
Corp. said Friday the news and publishing unit it
plans to spin off next year posted a $2 billion net
loss in the fiscal year through June, mainly due
to one-time charges and restructuring costs in its
newspaper division.
The details of the split were revealed Friday in a
filing to the Securities and Exchange Commission.
It confirmed investors' suspicions that the spun-
off company to be known as News Corp. -
will be smaller and less profitable than the TV
and movie business that will form Fox Group Inc.
The "new" News Corp. posted $8.7 billion in
revenue last fiscal year, about a quarter of the
company's total. Charges amounted to $2.8 bil-
lion, mainly due to declines in the value of news-
papers and a drop in advertising at its in-store
flyer business. The charges included restructur-
ing costs of $156 million, most of which came
from shutting down The News of the World, the
tabloid at the heart of a phone hacking scandal
in Britain.

Hostess expects to split up

snack cakes in sale

NEW YORK Twinkies, Wonder Bread and
Devil Dogs are likely to return to shelves in coming
months, but probably not under the same owners.
Hostess Brands Inc. said in bankruptcy court
Friday it's narrowing down the bids it received for
its brands and expects to sell off its snack cakes
and bread to separate buyers. The testimony
came from an investment banker for Hostess,
which is in the process of liquidating.
-From wire reports


I NE^^^ ~WYORKSTOCjECHNGE I


Name Last Chg
SpectraEn 27.54 -.27
SpiritAero 16.39 +.20
SpiritRCn 17.26 +.28
SprintNex 5.46 -.02
SP Marls 37.00 -.33
SP HIthC 40.21 -.34
SPCnSt 35.17 -.30
SP Consum 47.28 -.42
SP Engy 72.07 -.74
SPDR Fncl 16.40 -.20
SP Inds 37.93 -.24
SPTech 28.95 -.25
SP UI 35.31 -.13
StdPac 7.15 -.14
Standex 50.08 -.52
StarwdHfl 57.63 -.08
StarwdPT 23.34 -.13
StateStr 46.41 -.14
Steelcse 12.55 -.38
Steris 34.79 +.28
SbllwtrM 12.50 -.20
StoneErngy 20.58 +.31
Sbyker 55.87 -.70
SturmRug 43.59 -.19
SubPpne 39.20 -.33
SunCmts 40.00 +.20
Suncorgs 32.88 -.23
Suntech 1.13 -.08
SunTrst 28.27 -.70
SupEnrgy 20.88 -.46
Supvalu 2.84 +.20


Synovus 2.44
Sysco 31.96
TCF Fncl 12.27
TDAmeritr 16.87
TE Connect 37.43
TECO 17.03
TJXs 41.95
ThawSemi 16.95
TalismEg 11.21
Target 59.60
TeckRes g 36.09
TelefEsp 13.47
TempurP 30.70
Tenaris 41.68
TenetHltrs 32.43
Teradyn 16.75
Terex 26.78
TerraNitro 215.00
Tesoro 43.69
TetraTech 7.50
TevaPhrm 37.97
Textron 24.48
Theragen 1.61
ThermoFis 63.81
ThomCrkg 3.85
3DSys 51.92
3MCo 93.10
Tiffany 58.40
TWCable 95.53
TimeWarn 47.57
Timken 46.43
TitanMet 16.47


TollBros 31.74
TorchEngy .71
Torchmark 52.11
TorDBkg 84.30
Total SA 51.60
TotalSys 21.67
Transom 45.64
Travelers 72.82
Tredgar 19.14
TriContf 15.98
TrinaSolar 4.36
Tronox s 19.25
TurqHillRs 7.16
TwoHrblnv 11.59
Tycolntis 29.38
Tyson 19.47
UBSAG 15.96
UDR 23.82
UIL Hold 36.69
UNS Engy 43.16
USAirwy 13.44
USG 27.71
UltraPtg 19.33
UndArmrs 49.06
UniFirst 74.06
UnionPac 125.68
UtdContl 24.19
UtdMicro 1.99
UPS B 74.84
UtdRentals 44.80
US Bancrp 32.48
USNGsrs 19.57


US OilFd 32.36 -.37 Walgrn 36.31
USSteel 23.94 -.68 WalterEn 34.23
UtdTech 82.54 -.63 WsteMInc 33.85
UtdhlthGp 55.03 -.43 WatsnPh 90.85
UnumGr 20.87 -.28 Weathflnti 10.83
T f WelnRIt 26.91
WellPoint 61.31
ValeSA 20.10 -.36 WellsFargo 34.48
ValeSApf 19.39 -.42 WestarEn 29.12
ValeantPh 60.84 -.19 WAstEMkt 15.44
ValeroE 34.14 -.24 WstAMgdHi 6.15
VMyNBcp 9.46 -.05 WAstlnfOpp 13.13
VangTSM 73.43 -.63 WstnRefin 28.35
VangREIT 66.32 -.11 WstnUnion 13.59
VangDivAp 59.88 -.41 Weyerhsr 28.14
VangEmg 43.42 -.48 Whrlpl 101.38
VangEAFE 35.06 -.22 WmsCos 32.80
VarianMed 70.80 -.98 WmsPtrs 49.33
Vectren 29.74 -.45 WmsSon 43.45
Ventas 64.01 -.68 Winnbgo 16.43
VeoliaEnv 11.94 -.29 WiscEngy 37.49
VeriFone 28.45 -.97 WT India 18.92
VerizonCm 43.57 -.24 Worthgtn 25.55
VimpelCm 10.85 -.37 Wyndham 53.38
Visa 150.77 -1.69 XL Grp 24.56
Vishaylnt 10.31 -.09 XcelEngy 27.21
Vonage 2.32 -.04 Xerox 7.05
Vornado 79.76 -.39 Xylem 26.76
WGL Hold 39.79 -.18 Yamanag 16.91
WPX En n 15.23 -.20 YingliGrn 2.18
Wabash 9.16 -.13 YoukuTud 17.70
WalMart 68.65 -.35 YumBrnds 63.88







Page A8 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
H Mike Arnold .......................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ ............. citizen member
L fJ^ Mac Harris ....... .................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............. .................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TEACHABLE MOMENT




Test success




a reminder of




our potential


anada. Sweden. France.
Denmark. Germany.
Israel.
Not only can your fourth-
grader name them, they've
bested them.
This from the National Cen-
ter for Education Statistics,
which recently released a pair
of studies analyzing the read-
ing, math and science achieve-
ments of
students around THE I
the globe based
on responses to Florida's fou
tests produced among woi
by the Interna- internati
tional Associa- of reading
tion for the science ac
Evaluation of
Educational OUR 01
Achievement. Goodj,
One test the Good job,
Progress in good job,
International
Reading Liter-
acy Study, or HOW
PIRLS evalu- YOU
ated students' To see samr
abilities to read questions a
for literary ex- ticipating st
perience and either of the
acquire and use PIRLS sap
information http://tiny
they've ready, h p//t
while another pirls-samF
- the Trends in TIMSS sal
International http://tiny
Mathematics timss-samn
and Science


Study, or TIMSS -
their mathematical
tific abilities.
Among the finding
Florida's four
scored above the U.
on PIRLS and, alon
gapore, had more stu
forming at or a
advanced internatii
ing benchmark tha


Errant blai
Vandalism. This is nc
on by people on the pa
on the Fox News. This i
on by people who do n
the rights of others in
try and we have many
like that. So don't blar
body else; blame the p
do not respect the right
Stand at attenti(
I am a World War II v
eran and I was very up
at the Inverness Christ
mas Parade on Saturd.
Dec. 8. I was along the
parade route by Bank
America and when the
colors went through wi
the American flag on
them, hardly anybody
cept for myself stood a
attention when the Am
can flag passed by in t
I think Citrus County p
should be embarrassed
lack of education when
to the parade and the
flag.
God bless food
My husband and I ha
humbly go to the local
and we just wanted to
appreciation to those o
tions who donate and t
people who distribute t
God bless you all.


rest of the participating school
systems around the world.
In Florida and throughout
the world, girls outperformed
boys on PIRLS.
In Florida, boys outper-
formed girls on TIMSS.
On TIMSS, Florida had a
higher percentage of students
perform at or above interna-
tional benchmarks than the


SSUE:
urth-graders
rld's best in
onal study
, math and
hievement.

PINION:
kids, and
teachers.


WOULD
DO?
iples of the
sked of par-
tudents, visit
following:
mple:
yurl.com/
ple
mple:
yurl.com/
iple


international
median.
Another en-
couraging note:
Florida's data
came only from
public school
systems. Our
state's public
schools and
teachers have
been harshly
scrutinized by
our Legislature
and proponents
of private
schooling of
late; these
results show
public education
can and does
- work.
Our teachers'
work will never
be done, and
our schools
should always
strive to im-
prove. But in a


measured state whose public education
and scien- system has been marred by
deep funding cuts, FCAT flas-
,s: cos and perhaps a greater em-
th-graders phasis on metrics than results,
S. average these studies' findings present
igside Sin- us with a lesson worth memo-
idents per- rizing: Our teachers are capa-
bove the ble and our students willing,
onal read- and when challenged, can rise
n did the above the rest of the world.


me Volunteers all
ot brought I was calling to say we should
3per, people make the Sheriff Dawsy a volun-
s brought teer position, the Citrus County
ot respect commissioners voluntary posi-
this coun- tions and the school board a vol-
of them untary position and that should
ie some- take care of a lot of our tax prob-
eople (who) lems with the power plant. They
ts of others. should not have put all the eggs in
on i F one basket and rely on
et- O ND one source of income.
set IF Beware of fox
The person who lost
ay, the black and white cat
( named Coda at Anderson
of and Charles Avenue:
Please be aware there's a
th CAL beautiful fox that crossed
CA in front of our car right in
ex- 563-0579H that area. There's several
at foxes around that area.
eri- So anyone that has their
he parade. pets out, you better put them in
people because the foxes are hungry and
d at their they've already got one little cat.
n it comes One kitten has already been
American taken. So please be aware of this.
God bless you.
I banks Consider travel


ad to
food banks
express our
Drganiza-
:he kind
:he food.


Thirty-five thousand people in
Florida have signed a petition to
secede from the union. Since they
represent such a small percent-
age of the entire population of
Florida, may I suggest they go to
Mexico, Canada or even Cuba?


" 'Tis not love's going hurts my days,
But that it went in little ways."
Edna St. Vincent Millay,
"The Spring and the Fall," 1923


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Cops know urgency of gun control


When members of the
Newtown, Conn., police
force entered the school
auditorium where President
Obama was about to speak, the
crowd rose and applauded. The
officers' quick response to the
carnage at Sandy Hook Elemen-
tary School had prob-
ably saved many
young lives.
As the nation starts
debating the lessons of -
Newtown, we should -
listen to what law en-
forcement officers
have to say Their mes-
sage is clear and con-
sistent: Tighten gun Coki
control laws.
The National Rifle Steven
Association likes to OTI
depict gun control ad- VOI
vocates as liberal
loonies who don't respect or un-
derstand red-blooded, heat-
packing Americans. But that
characterization has always been
unfair The men and women who
patrol our streets every day are
the loudest advocates for greater
restrictions on gun ownership.
Listen to James Johnson, the
police chief of Baltimore County,
Md., and the new chairman of the
National Law Enforcement Part-
nership to Prevent Gun Violence:
'America, we are not doing enough
to keep guns out of the wrong
hands. We are long past the point
of saying 'enough is enough.' The
mantra has grown old. It's time to
take action to keep firearms from
dangerous people."
No law can protect every child
- or every cop from a crazy
person with a gun. But it's absurd
and even immoral to assert, as the
gun lobby does, that because laws
are imperfect, they are useless.
We don't cancel speed limits or
drunken driving laws, even
though they are violated con-
stantly We make them tighter and
enforce them better because we


ie

H
4


know they save lives. Not every
life, but enough to make the laws
worthwhile.
Police officers say the same
thing about gun laws, and they
should know. As the nation was
focusing on Newtown, Conn., two
police officers in Topeka, Kan.,
were shot and killed
outside a grocery
store. "It's clearly be-
yond words," lamented
Topeka's police chief,
Ronald Miller
"It's unspeakable ...
about why this is hap-
pening in America at
this stage in our history."
and The police focus on
several key issues,
Roberts starting with the easy
IER availability of military
CES assault weapons, the
-- kind used in Newtown
and other recent massacres. They
are especially alarmed by high-
capacity magazines that enable
shooters to spray 30 and even 100
bullets without reloading.
"It is ridiculous to argue that
hunters or civilians who own
weapons for self-defense need a
100-round drum magazine,"
Johnson said. "As we have seen,
people don't stand a chance
against this kind of firepower"
Police Chief Robert White of
Denver told the local website
Westword: "Gun policies are ab-
solutely critical. Assault weapons
serve no practical purpose. You
can't use them for hunting. We're
not soldiers in a war abroad. I
have a lot of questions about as-
sault weapons."
The second major area of con-
cern for the police is faulty back-
ground checks. Under current
law, those checks are required
only when a gun is bought
through a licensed dealer But 40
percent of all sales are made at
gun shows or through other pri-
vate transactions and are entirely
untraceable.


Chicago Police Superintendent
Garry McCarthy told the Chicago
Tribune this huge loophole must
be closed. He noted one of his of-
ficers was shot with a gun origi-
nally sold in 1972 that got totally
lost in the system. "Where has
that gun been since 1972?" he
asked. "And the problem is, they
don't have expiration dates. It's
not like milk. That gun from 1972
is just as deadly in 2012 as it was
in 1972. We've got to do something
about the flow of firearms here."
Police chiefs are political
creatures; they've been preach-
ing this sermon a long time, and
they know why the problem
persists.
"We talk about this constantly,
and absolutely nothing happens,"
said Philadelphia Police Com-
missioner Charles Ramsey, "be-
cause many of our legislators,
unfortunately, at the federal level
lack the courage to do anything."
He's right about that, but there
are small signs that Newtown
might have some positive effect.
A few lawmakers finally seem
motivated to defy the NRA, which
has followed the infuriating but
effective strategy of opposing all
restrictions on all guns at all
times. Reasonable compromises
are out there that won't violate
anybody's right to defend his
home or bag his buck: Ban as-
sault weapons, or at least high-
powered magazines; extend
background checks to all gun
sales; improve the sharing of in-
formation among government
agencies so that the mentally un-
stable or criminally inclined have
a tougher time buying guns.
These measures won't save
every life, but they'll save some,
and that's a deal worth making.
Just ask the cops.

Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email
at stevecokie@gmail. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Saying goodbye hurts
I had to say a final farewell to
an old and special friend today.
It's never easy letting go of
things we love, what we've be-
come used to, important parts of
our lives.
I tried being positive as I remi-
nisced about happy times that
filled my heart over the many
years of togetherness. There
were no bad times, no regrets,
no tears until now.
As the ground was covered,
only the mound of dirt, newly
planted flowers and a lovingly
placed headstone represented
yesterday It was a beautiful
day, the day I put my beloved
Mickie in his final resting
place.
The 20 years I was privileged
to care for and cherish my yel-
low tabby cat, rescued from a
Dumpster, were more meaning-
ful because of him. Perhaps just
a domestic cat to most, he was a
unique feline with green eyes,
long whiskers and a soft, orange-
striped coat. He loved me un-
conditionally Playing and
meowing, purring while sunning
himself on the windowsill,
"Mickie" had a good and safe in-
door life.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board should call 352-
564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including emailed letters.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Just as you love your neighbor,
love your pets. Neuter or spay
them, take them to the vet regu-
larly, and treat them as a family
member For, too soon, we have
to let go of the important parts of
our lives we've become used to.
And, it really hurts.
Joanie Welch
Inverness


Great plans
The presentation by Citrus
County officials and staff at the
Crystal River City Council meet-
ing Dec. 10 for a comprehensive
citywide development plan and
the opportunities for the city
and county to join forces for op-
portunities for the betterment of
business in the Crystal River
area was very good news!
As a businessperson of this area
since 1993, I must say we need all
the help we can get in what has
been a poor economy coupled with
the county offices moving out of
Crystal River to Meadowcrest.
Much thought and work went
into this presentation, including
goals for more tourism with
Three Sisters Springs being ac-
cessible to the public.
The council agreed to have
meetings in the future consider-
ing the BOCC plans. It would be
great for business if public park-
ing was made available, espe-
cially with Riverwalk. The
presentation was very good. I
hope that the city and county do
join forces. As the saying goes,
"There is strength in numbers."
Renee Christopher-McPheeters
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NRA: Put armed officers at schools Marine asked
to leave school


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Guns and po-
lice officers in all American schools
are what's needed to stop the next
killer "waiting in the wings," the
National Rifle Association de-
clared Friday, taking a no-retreat
stance in the face of growing calls
for gun control after the Connecti-
cut shootings that claimed the lives
of 26 children and school staff.
"The only thing that stops a bad
guy with a gun is a good guy with a
gun," said Wayne LaPierre, the
group's chief executive officer
Some members of Congress who
had long scoffed at gun-control pro-
posals have begun to suggest some
concessions could be made, and a
fierce debate over legislation seems
likely next month.
The nation's largest gun-rights
lobby broke its weeklong silence on
the shooting rampage at Sandy
Hook Elementary School with a de-
fiant presentation. The event was
billed as a news conference, but
NRA leaders took no questions.
Twice, they were interrupted by
banner-waving protesters, who
were removed by security
Some had predicted that after the
slaughter of a score of elementary-
school children by a man using a
semiautomatic rifle, the group might
soften its stance. Instead, LaPierre
delivered a 25-minute tirade against
the notion that another gun law
would stop killings in a culture
where children are exposed daily


Associated Press
The National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre
gestures Friday as he speaks about the violent video game "Kindergarten
Killers," left, during a news conference in Washington, D.C.


to violence in video games, movies
and music videos. He argued guns
are the solution, not the problem.
"Before Congress reconvenes,
before we engage in any lengthy de-
bate over legislation, regulation or
anything else; as soon as our kids
return to school after the holiday
break, we need to have every single
school in America immediately de-
ploy a protection program proven
to work," LaPierre said. "And by
that I mean armed security"
He said Congress should imme-
diately appropriate funds to post an
armed police officer in every school.
Meanwhile, he said the NRA would
develop a school emergency response
program that would include volun-


teers from the group's 4.3 million
members to help guard children.
His armed-officers idea was im-
mediately lambasted by gun con-
trol advocates, and not even the
NRA's point man on the effort
seemed willing to go so far Former
Republican Rep. Asa Hutchinson
ofArkansas, whom LaPierre named
national director of the program,
said in an interview that decisions
about armed guards in schools
should be made by local districts.
"I think everyone recognizes that
an armed presence in schools is
sometimes appropriate," Hutchin-
son said. "That is one option. I
would never want to have a manda-
tory requirement for every school


Parents, administrators skeptical


Associated Press


MIAMI The reactions of
parents, teachers and school
administrators ranged from
hesitation to anger on Fri-
day after a proposal by the
nation's largest gun-rights
lobby to put an armed po-
lice officer in every school.
Superintendent Hank Gr-
ishman of the Jericho, N.Y,
schools on Long Island said
he is outraged by the idea.
He said putting more guns
in schools won't make chil-
dren safer.
"Their solution to resolve
the issue around guns is to
put more guns in the equa-


tion?" said Girshman, an
educator for 44 years. "If
anything it would be less
safe for kids. You would be
putting them in the midst of
potentially more gunfire."
The National Rifle Asso-
ciation called for the armed
officers in every American
school at a press confer-
ence Friday
Parent and community ac-
tivist Helen Gym in Philadel-
phia believes the NRA's
proposal is "extraordinarily
opportunistic." Philadelphia
schools have debated and
rejected the use of armed
guards or police officers in
its city schools.


"This is not an Old West
shootout," she said. "We're
talking about an elementary
school."
There are an estimated
10,000 school resource offi-
cers, most of them armed
and employed by local po-
lice departments, currently
in the nation's schools, ac-
cording to Mo Canady, exec-
utive director of the
National Association of
School Resource Officers.
Canady said these offi-
cers help bridge the gap be-
tween the schools and
police, and often develop a
close enough relationship
with parents and children


that they feel comfoi
coming forward with
mation that could pre
threat. He said that
proposal is pursue
should include swor
enforcement of
trained to work in sch
"I don't believe tha
putting an armed gua
there is going to mal
school safer," he said.
New York City I
Michael Bloomberg sa
NRA is blaming eve
but itself for a nation
crisis and offering "a
noid, dystopian visio
more dangerous and v
America where every


district to have that."
He also noted that some states
would have to change their laws to
allow armed guards at schools.
LaPierre argued guards need to
be in place quickly because "the next
Adam Lanza," the suspected shooter
in Newtown, Conn., is already plan-
ning an attack on another school.
"How many more copycats are
waiting in the wings for their mo-
ment of fame from a national
media machine that rewards them
with wall-to-wall attention and a
sense of identity that they crave,
while provoking others to try to
make their mark?" LaPierre asked.
The NRA's proposal would be un-
workable given the huge numbers of
officers needed, said the president
of the International Association of
Chiefs of Police, Craig Steckler.
He pointed to budget cuts and
hiring freezes and noted that in his
hometown of Fremont, Calif., it
would take half the city's police
force to post one officer at each of
the city's 43 schools.
The Department of Education
has counted 98,817 public schools
in the United States and an addi-
tional 33,366 private schools.
Gun rights advocates on Capitol
Hill had no immediate comment.
They will have to walk a tough road
between pressure from the power-
ful NRA, backed by an army of pas-
sionate supporters, and outrage
over the Sandy Hook deaths that
has already swayed some in Con-
gress to adjust their public views.



of proposal
rtable armed and no place is safe."
infor- Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y,
vent a called the NRA's response
if the "both ludicrous and insulting"
ed, it and pointed out that armed
n law personnel at Columbine High
officers School and Fort Hood could
iools. not stop mass shootings. The
at just liberal group CREDO called
ard in LaPierre's speech "bizarre
ke the and quite frankly paranoid."
"This must be a wake-up
Vayor call even to the NRA's own
id the members that the NRA's
ryone Washington lobbyists need
al gun to stand down and let Con-
para- gress pass sensible gun con-
n of a trol laws now," CREDO
violent political director Becky
one is Bond said in a statement.


after questions

arise over past
Associated Press
HUGHSON, Calif. -Afor-
mer Marine applauded for
voluntarily guarding a central
California elementary school
apparently misrepresented
his service history, U.S. Marine
Corps officials said Thursday.
Craig Pusley showed up
for a second day of guard
duty Thursday at Hughson
Elementary School, this time
in civilian clothes after wear-
ing military fatigues the day
before. He was gone by mid-
morning, after Unified School
District Superintendent Brian
Beck discovered discrepancies
about Pusley's military serv-
ice and asked him to leave.
A day earlier, Pusley, 25, told
The Modesto Bee he was a
sergeant in the Marine Reserve
and had deployed to Iraq and
Afghanistan.
Capt. Gregory A. Wolf, a
Marines spokesman, told The
Associated Press Thursday
Pusley never served overseas
and was discharged in 2008
as a private after serving less
than a year at the Marine Corps
Recruit Depot in San Diego.
He also is not a reservist.
Laura Fong, the principal
at Hughson Elementary
School, wouldn't comment on
the controversy Thursday.
But she said it was a "very
heartwarming thing" when
the former Marine showed
up, and his presence made
her and the staff feel safer.
Before the controversy,
parents in the small commu-
nity 100 miles southeast of San
Francisco thanked Pusley for
guarding their children and
bought him cups of coffee.
"In the beginning, I thought
it was a good idea, because
as a parent I was concerned
about safety with everything
going on," Amber Navarro,
26, said while picking up her
first-grader at the school. "He
seemed like a really nice guy."


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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 A9












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NationBRIEFS Still time for fiscal cliff agreement
Light up President issues stern summons to Congressional leaders


WorldBRIEFS

Not the end


Associated Press
Holiday lights adorn a walk-
way Friday in Christopher
Columbus park on the
waterfront in Boston.


Three charged with
murder in explosion
INDIANAPOLIS Prose-
cutors have charged a home-
owner, her boyfriend and his
brother with murder after
causing a massive house ex-
plosion last month that killed
an Indianapolis couple and
decimated their neighborhood.
Marion County prosecutor
Terry Curry said Monserrate
Shirley and the others were
arrested Friday morning and
charged with felony murder.
Shirley's attorney has said
she and her boyfriend were
away at a southern Indiana
casino when the explosion
happened Nov. 10 in the
Richmond Hill subdivision on
the city's far south side.
Authorities said they believed
the explosion was intentional
and caused by natural gas.
The explosion killed Jen-
nifer and John Longworth,
who lived next door to
Shirley's home. Five houses
were destroyed and 90
houses in the subdivision
were damaged, costing an
estimated $4.4 million.
Snowstorm in
Midwest weakens
DETROIT The first
widespread snowstorm of the
season weakened as it
moved east Friday, but not
before it dumped more than
1 1/2 feet of snow in Michigan
and made travel difficult in the
Great Lakes region.
Inouye hailed as
pivotal role model
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama said the
late Democratic Sen. Daniel In-
ouye showed him "what might
be possible in my own life."
In a memorial service at the
National Cathedral, Obama re-
called a boyhood memory of
watching Inouye during the
Watergate hearings. He said
the experience left him with a
sense of what serving in gov-
ernment was all about. He
said he had watched a man
full of "grace and dignity."
The president said, quote,
"Danny Inouye was perhaps
my earliest political inspiration."
The Hawaii lawmaker was
the second-longest serving
senator in U.S. history. He
died Monday of respiratory
complications at age 88.
Escaped inmate
appears in court
CHICAGO One of two
convicted bank robbers who
made a daring escape from a
high-rise downtown Chicago
federal jail has appeared in
court.
A federal judge told Joseph
"Jose" Banks on Friday mom-
ing during a brief hearing he is
charged with escape. Banks re-
sponded he understood. Banks
was captured Thursday night in
Chicago.
The other man who es-
caped early Tuesday, Kenneth
Conley, remains at large.
Banks shuffled into court,
shackled at his arms and legs
and surrounded by marshals.
Escape carries a sentence
of up to five years in prison
and $250,000 fine. Banks al-
ready has been convicted in
federal court of four counts of
bank robbery, each of which
carries a maximum sentence
of 20 years in prison.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama issued a stern summons to
congressional leaders Friday to ap-
prove legislation before year's end to
prevent tax increases on millions of
middle class Americans and prevent
an expiration of long-term unemploy-
ment benefits for the jobless.
One day after House anti-tax rebels
torpedoed Republican legislation be-
cause it would raise rates on million-
dollar-earners, Obama said he still
wants a bill that requires the well-to-
do to pay more. "Everybody's got to
give a little bit in a sensible way" to
prevent the economy from pitching
over a recession-threatening fiscal


cliff, he said.
He spoke after talk-
ing by phone with
House Speaker John
Boehner architect
of the failed House
bill and meeting
with Senate Majority
Barack Leader Harry Reid.
Obama "I still think we can
wants a plan get it done," Obama
by year's end. said as he struggled to
pick up the pieces of
weeks of failed negotiations and polit-
ical maneuvering.
The president spoke at the end of a
day in which stocks tumbled and con-
gressional leaders squabbled as the
fiscal cliff drew implacably closer


"How we get there, God only
knows," said Boehner at a morning
news conference, referring to the in-
creasingly tangled attempts to beat the
Jan. 1 deadline and head off the per-
ilous combination of across-the-board
tax hikes and deep spending cuts that
threaten to send the economy into
recession.
There was no immediate response
from his office to the president's
remarks.
Obama spoke shortly before a
scheduled departure to join his family
in Hawaii for Christmas, but in an in-
dication of the importance of the
issue, he told reporters he would be
returning to the White House next
week.


Associated Press
Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry is President Obama's first Cabinet appointee following the November election.



Obama nominates Kerry



for secretary of state


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Pres-
ident Barack Obama on
Friday nominated Massa-
chusetts Sen. John Kerry,
one of Washington's most
respected voices on for-
eign policy, as his next
secretary of state.
The move is the first in
an expected overhaul of
Obama's national security
team heading into his sec-
ond term.
As the nation's top
diplomat, Kerry will not
only be tasked with exe-
cuting the president's for-
eign policy objectives, but
also will have a hand in
shaping them. The long-
time lawmaker has been
in lockstep with Obama on
issues such as nuclear
non-proliferation, but
ahead of the White House
in advocating aggressive
policies in Libya, Egypt


and elsewhere that the
president later embraced.
"He is not going to need
a lot of on-the-job train-
ing," Obama said, stand-
ing alongside Kerry in a
Roosevelt Room cere-
mony. "Few individuals
know as many presidents
and prime ministers or
grasp our foreign policies
as firmly as John Kerry"
He is expected to win
confirmation easily in the
Senate, where he has
served since 1985, the last
six years as chairman of
the Foreign Relations
Committee.
Kerry would take the
helm at the State Depart-
ment from Secretary
Hillary Rodham Clinton,
who has long planned to
leave the administration
early next year Clinton is
recovering from a concus-
sion sustained in a fall
and did not attend the


White House event.
In a statement, Clinton
said, "John Kerry has
been tested in war, in
government, and in diplo-
macy Time and again, he
has proven his mettle."
Obama settled on Kerry
for the job even though it
could cause a political
problem for Democrats in
Massachusetts. Kerry's
move to State would open
the Senate seat he has
held for five terms, giving
Republicans an opportu-
nity to take advantage. Re-
cently defeated GOP Sen.
Scott Brown would be his
party's clear favorite in a
special election.
Kerry would join a na-
tional security team in
flux, with Obama ex-
pected to choose a new
defense secretary and di-
rector of the Central Intel-
ligence Agency in the
coming weeks.


The 69-year-old Kerry
already has deep relation-
ships with many world
leaders, formed during his
Senate travels and as an
unofficial envoy for
Obama. The president has
called upon Kerry in par-
ticular to diffuse diplo-
matic disputes in
Afghanistan and Pakistan,
two countries that will be
at the forefront of Obama's
foreign policy agenda
early in his second term.
At times, Kerry has
been more forward-
leaning than Obama on
foreign policy issues. He
was an early advocate of
an international "no-fly
zone" over Libya in 2011
and among the first U.S.
lawmakers to call for
Egyptian strongman Hosni
Mubarak to leave power
as pro-democracy protests
grew. Obama later backed
both positions.


UN helicopter shot down in South Sudan


Four Russian crew

members killed

Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS The United
Nations said South Sudan's armed
forces shot down a U.N. helicopter
Friday killing all four Russian crew
members on board, an attack South
Sudan's military spokesman blamed
rebel fighters.
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
stood by the U.N.'s account in a state-
ment, strongly condemning the shoot-
ing down "of a clearly marked U.N.
helicopter by the Sudan People's Lib-
eration Army" and calling on South
Sudan's government to conduct an im-
mediate investigation and prosecute
those responsible.
Ban sent condolences to the fami-
lies of the four crew members, whose
names were not released, and to the
Russian government.


The U.N. Security Council
"strongly deplored" the shooting
down of the helicopter by the SPLA
which it said "jeopardized" the oper-
ations of the U.N. peacekeeping mis-
sion in South Sudan and was "a grave
violation" of the status of forces
agreement between the United Na-
tion and South Sudan. The council
called for a swift investigation by
South Sudan and the U.N. mission
and urged South Sudan "to hold those
responsible for the accident account-
able and take all necessary measures
to avoid such tragic accidents in the
future."
Earlier, U.N. deputy spokesman Ed-
uardo del Buey said the helicopter
from the U.N. peacekeeping mission
in South Sudan was on a reconnais-
sance mission when it was shot down.
The mission, known as UNMISS, said
the helicopter was not carrying any
passengers.
"In subsequent communications be-
tween the mission and the South Su-
danese Armed Forces, the SPLA told
the mission that it has shot down the


helicopter in the Likuangole area in
Jonglei state," del Buey said.
Pibor County in Jonglei State,
where the helicopter was shot
down, has been the scene of recent
clashes between rebel militia fight-
ers led by David Yauyau and South
Sudanese forces. A former member
of the South Sudanese Army,
Yauyau launched his rebellion after
failing to win a parliamentary seat
in the Sudanese general elections in
April 2010. South Sudan accuses
Sudan of arming Yauyau.
South Sudan military spokesman
Kella Kueth denied his military shot
down the U.N. helicopter and told AP:
"It was the forces of Yauyau. Yauyau's
forces are working with Khartoum for
the downfall of South Sudan."
Earlier, SPLA spokesman Philip
Aguer told AP "the helicopter crashed
somewhere between the SPLA base
and the Yauyau base in the Pibor
area."
He said he didn't know what caused
the crash.
"I think the government of South


Associated Press
Dancers perform as the
sun rises Friday at the
Teotihuacan archeological
site in Teotihuacan, Mex-
ico. Many believed Friday
was the conclusion of a
vast, 5,125-year cycle in
the Mayan calendar. Some
have interpreted the
prophetic moment as the
end of the world, while oth-
ers as believed it marked
the birth of a new and
better age.


NKorea said it
detained US citizen
SEOUL, South Korea -
North Korea said it has de-
tained an American citizen
who has confessed to un-
specified crimes.
North Korean state media
said Friday in a short dispatch
someone named Bae Jun Ho
entered the North on Nov. 3
as a tourist but was detained
because of crimes.
The North said the crimes
were "proven through evi-
dence" but didn't elaborate.
Pyongyang has detained
several Americans in recent
years. Some have been ac-
cused of religious proselytiz-
ing. Two journalists were also
detained after crossing into
the North from China while on
a reporting trip but were later
released.
Islamists,
opponents clash
ALEXANDRIA, Egypt-
Clashes have broken out in
northern Egypt between Is-
lamist supporters and oppo-
nents of the country's highly
contentious draft constitution.
The two sides hurled rocks
and stones at each other Fri-
day in the Mediterranean port
city of Alexandria, prompting
policore tear gas to sepa-
rate them.
The clashes add to the al-
ready tense political crisis in
Egypt on the eve of the sec-
ond leg of voting on the draft
charter.
The Islamists had called for
a massive rally outside the
main mosque in the heart of
Alexandria. It was not clear
who started the fight.
Netanyahu vows to
build in Jerusalem
JERUSALEM Israel's
prime minister has vowed to
build in Jerusalem despite
criticism from the United Na-
tions, dismissing the interna-
tional body in particularly
strong terms.
"The capital of the Jewish
people for the past 3,000
years is Jerusalem," Ben-
jamin Netanyahu told Israel's
Channel 2 television Friday.
"So I will say in the clearest
way possible, the Western
Wall is not occupied territory
and I don't care what the U.N.
will say," he added, referring
to the wall Jews consider their
holiest place for prayer.
Missionaries freed,
kidnappers caught
GUATEMALA CITY -
Guatemalan authorities said
two female Mormon mission-
aries were kidnapped for two
days before being freed by a
special police anti-kidnapping
unit helped by the FBI.
Interior Minister Mauricio
Lopez Bonilla said three kidnap-
pers were captured during the
rescue of the 22-year-old mis-
sionaries, one from the U.S.
and the other from Ecuador.
He said the two were taken
Wednesday and held in a
house in the town of Escuintia,
about 30 miles from the capital.
The kidnappers had de-
manded a $5 million ransom.
-From wire reports











SPORTS


UCF throttles Ball
State in the Beef
'0' Brady's Bowl in
St. Petersburg./B3



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


H AP athletes of the year/B2
0 NHL, MLB/B2
0 Basketball, football/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL previews/B5
0 Olympics, tennis/B5
S A Entertainment/B6


SRCS boys take hard loss to St. John


Hurricanes storm
past River Ridge
The Citrus boys basket-
ball team scored the last
eight points of the game to
take a 60-53 victory at
River Ridge in New Port
Richey on Friday night.
Devin Pryor led the Hur-
ricanes with 20 points,
Mitchell Ellis added 15
and coach Tom Densmore
said forward Javian Clark
did a nice job guarding 6-
foot-10 River Ridge center
John Childs.
Citrus (7-3 overall) plays
6 p.m. Thursday against
Fivay in the Nichols Christ-
mas Classic at Lecanto
High School.
US OK with
sports betting
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -
A new poll finds just over
half of Americans favor
making sports betting legal
everywhere, while almost
three-quarters are against
legalizing Internet gambling.
The Fairleigh Dickinson
University PublicMind poll
touches on two forms of
gambling that New Jersey
is avidly pursuing.
State lawmakers gave
final approval Thursday to
an Internet gambling bill and
sent it to Gov. Chris Christie,
who hasn't indicated
whether he'll sign it. And
New Jersey is embroiled in
a lawsuit over its plans to
offer sports betting next year
despite a federal ban on it in
all but four states.
The nationwide tele-
phone poll found 51 per-
cent in favor of sports
betting and 27 percent
backing Internet gambling.
NCAA suspends
Texas' Kabongo
INDIANAPOLIS The
NCAA has suspended
Texas basketball player
Myck Kabongo for 23
games for accepting imper-
missible benefits and pro-
viding false statements
during an investigation into
the infractions.
The Division I committee
on student-athlete rein-
statement announced the
suspension Friday.
Kabongo also must
repay $475 to a charity of
his choice. The suspension
includes the 10 games he
has already missed.
The NCAA said
Kabongo accepted airfare
and personal training in-
struction and then provided
false and misleading infor-
mation about the infrac-
tions during two interviews
with university officials.
Pierzynski nears
deal with Texas
A person familiar with
the situation says catcher
A.J. Pierzynski has passed
a physical, clearing the
way for a one-year deal
with the Texas Rangers.
That person spoke on
condition of anonymity Fri-
day because the Rangers
had not added Pierzynski
to their 40-man roster.
From staff and wire reports


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO Alumni of Seven
Rivers Christian School were
treated to entertaining hoops ac-
tion in Friday's District 2A-4
matchup between the Warriors and
St. John Lutheran of Ocala.
The game featured a sensational
dunk off a crossover dribble by
Seven Rivers junior Adam Gage as
well as a game-tying, buzzer-
beating 3-pointer from beyond
midcourt by Saints senior Glen
Owen to end the third period.
The game was a tight one, with


the teams remaining within a
three-point margin for all but
three seconds of the final period.
But a tired Warriors team could-
n't hang on down the stretch as St.
John's superior size and depth
generated multiple turnovers
while the Saints outscored the
Warriors 12-4 in the fourth to cap-
ture a 53-49 victory on Alumni
Night in the Seven Rivers gym.
Gage, who led the game with 30
points, scored 12 points in the
third to help his Warriors (4-4 over-
all, 0-1 district) build a seven-point
lead with five seconds to play in
See Page B4


Warriors learn lesson vs. stellar Saints


CARL MCDERMOTT
Correspondent
LECANTO While the Seven
Rivers Christian girls basketball
team looked to impress Ocala St.
John Lutheran in its first district
game of the season, the outcome
was not to the home team's lik-
ing. The Warriors lost 68-42 to the
visiting Saints on Friday night.
The Warriors' Alexis Zachar fin-
ished with 13 points and eight re-


'Canes roll through h


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus senior point guard Elizabeth Lynch goes in for a layup against Crystal River on Friday night at Crystal River
High School. The Hurricanes took a 62-42 victory over the Pirates to complete the series sweep in 2012.

Citrus girls basketball team dispatches Crystal River 62-42


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER The final
score of Friday's Citrus at Crystal
River girls basketball game indi-
cates a 20-point blowout favoring
the Hurricanes. But eliminate a
four-minute surge in the second
quarter, during which Citrus High
School transformed an eight-point
deficit into a nine-point lead, and
it's a different game.
That, however, is how the Hurri-
canes succeed, and it propelled
them all the way to a 6242 triumph.


"The game was really about mo-
mentum and who would sustain
it," Crystal River High School
coach Jason Rodgers said. "We just
couldn't sustain any of the runs we
had an opportunity to make."
Citrus improved to 11-4 overall,
which includes a pair of double-
digit victories over Crystal River
(9-3 overall). But it required the
second-quarter run to put this
game on track for the Hurricanes.
A pair of 3-pointers by Megan
Wells she would lead all scorers
with 21 points carried the Pi-
rates to a 14-9 lead after one quar-


ter. A Lamechia Richburgh basket
and a Katelyn Hannigan free
throw increased the lead to 17-9
with 6:30 left in the half. Ten sec-
onds later, Treleasha Simmons
banked in a shot for Citrus from in-
side the lane, trimming the deficit
to 17-11 and offering a premoni-
tion of ill tidings for Crystal River.
With Simmons and teammates
Micah Jenkins and Marissa
DuBois working down low,
Shenelle Toxen roaming the high
post area and point guard Liz

See Page B4


bounds before fouling out Seven
Rivers sophomore Alyssa Gage
had 11 points and six rebounds.
The game started at a slow
pace as both teams had a hard
time finding the basket and hold-
ing onto the ball. The first quar-
ter ended with St. John on top
9-6. The two teams combined for
12 turnovers and 14 missed shots.
In the second period, both teams
See Page B4


CR


downs


Central


Bresson's hat

trick spurs

Pirates to win
JON-MICHAEL
SORACCHI
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Pow-
ered by sophomore forward
Christina Bresson's first ca-
reer varsity hat trick, the
Crystal River High School
girls soccer team coasted to
a 4-1 home victory against
Brooksville Central on Fri-
day night.
Delaney Owens netted
the Pirates'
other goal, .
while ...
Natalie e f,
Ezzell .
added
two as-
sists to -
supplement
Crystal River's offensive
charge.
The contest, especially
during the first half, wasn't
as easy for the Pirates (9-6-1
overall) as the final score in-
dicated. Crystal River dom-
inated possession from
whistle to whistle, but the
team's attack wasn't very
proficient. In fact, the Pi-
rates peppered the Bears'
goal, but it was Central's
first attempt that gave the
away team a 1-0 lead.
After a Bears player was
fouled on the team's first
foray into Pirates' territory,
Central earned a direct free
kick 20 yards out on the left
side of Crystal River's goal.
Brooksville Central senior
attacker Karrissa Dimuccio
made the Pirates pay with a
perfectly placed blast into
the top right comer less than
10 minutes into the match.
"That's been our problem
all season," Crystal River
coach Bill Reyes said.
"(Central) had one opportu-
nity and they capitalized.
We had 40 and capitalized
on four
"I'd like to see us closer to
100 percent than 10 percent,
but a win is a win."


See Page B4










AP: NHL players close to dissolving union


Dissolution of union can allow players

to file antitrust lawsuits against league


Associated Press

NEW YORK NHL players
are a step closer to dissolving
their union.
In a vote this week, union mem-
bers overwhelmingly agreed to give
the players' association's executive
board the power to file a "dis-
claimer of interest" until Jan. 2.
A person familiar with the out-
come of the vote told The Associ-
ated Press on Friday the measure
was approved by a vote of 706-22
(97 percent), easily reaching the


two-thirds majority that was nec-
essary. However, the executive
board hasn't made plans yet to
meet to discuss whether to file the
disclaimer. If the Jan. 2 deadline
passes, another authorization vote
could be held to approve a later
filing.
The person spoke on condition
of anonymity because the results
of the vote hadn't been
announced.
If the executive board files the
disclaimer, the union would dis-
solve and become a trade associa-


tion. That would allow players to
file antitrust lawsuits against the
NHL.
Negotiations between the NHL
and the union have been at a
standstill since talks ended Dec. 6.
No bargaining is scheduled, and
time is running short to save the
season. All games through Jan. 14
have been canceled, more than
half the season. The New Year's
Day Winter Classic and All-Star
game already are victims of the
lockout.
A new labor agreement would
need to be in place by that time to
salvage a 48-game schedule, the
minimum in Commissioner Gary
Bettman's opinion for the season
to proceed.
The NHL is already the only


North American professional
sports league to cancel a season
because of a labor dispute, losing
the 2004-05 campaign to a lockout.
The NHLPA now appears set to
follow the lead set by NFL and
NBA players. Both dissolved their
unions during lockouts last year.
The legality of the lockout is al-
ready set to be tried in U.S. fed-
eral court after the NHL filed a
class-action lawsuit last week
against the NHLPA. The NHL also
submitted an unfair labor practice
charge with the National Labor
Relations Board.
The NBAs labor dispute ended
less than two weeks after the union
was disbanded. Jeffrey Kessler, the
lead negotiator for the National
Basketball Players Association in


that dispute, contends the NHLPA
would be wise to go ahead with the
"disclaimer of interest"
"I think this is much more likely
to lead to a settlement sooner,"
Kessler told The Canadian Press
last week. "The players have con-
cluded that they are on the verge
of possibly deciding that it is bet-
ter not to be a union and using the
antitrust laws to attack the lock-
out, which all fans should be
happy with because it'll work."
The league's Board of Gover-
nors discussed the possibility of a
"disclaimer of interest" Dec. 5,
and Bettman said the NHL didn't
see it as a significant threat.
"We don't view it in the same way
in terms of its impact as apparently
the union may," Bettman said.


Hitting the highest mark


Associated Press
Gabrielle Douglas, who became the first African-American
gymnast to claim gymnastics' biggest prize the all-around
Olympic title is The Associated Press' 2012 female
athlete of the year.

Douglas earns AP female

athlete of the year honors


Associated Press

When Gabby Douglas al-
lowed herself to dream of
being the Olympic cham-
pion, she imagined having a
nice little dinner with fam-
ily and friends to celebrate.
Maybe she'd make an ap-
pearance here and there.
"I didn't think it was going
to be crazy," Douglas said,
laughing. "I love it. But I re-
alized my perspective was
going to have to change."
Just a bit.
The teenager has become a
worldwide star since winning
the Olympic all-around title
in London, the first African-
American gymnast to claim
gymnastics' biggest prize.
And now she has earned an-
other honor Douglas was se-
lected The Associated Press'
female athlete of the year,
edging out swimmer Missy
Franklin in a vote by U.S. ed-
itors and news directors that
was announced Friday
"I didn't realize how much
of an impact I made," said
Douglas, who turns 17 on
Dec. 31. "My mom and every-
one said, 'You really won't
know the full impact until
you're 30 or 40 years old.' But
it's starting to sink in."
In a year filled with stand-
out performances by female
athletes, those of the pint-
sized gymnast shined bright-
est. Douglas received 48 of
157 votes, seven more than
Franklin, who won four gold
medals and a bronze in Lon-
don. Serena Williams, who
won Wimbledon and the
U.S. Open two years after
her career was nearly de-
railed by a series of health
problems, was third (24).
Britney Griner, who led
Baylor to a 40-0 record and
the NCAA title, and skier
Lindsey Vonn each got 18
votes. Sprinter Allyson Felix,
who won three gold medals
in London, and Carli Lloyd,
who scored both U.S. goals


in the Americans' 2-1 victory
over Japan in the gold-medal
game, also received votes.
"One of the few years the
women's (Athlete of the
Year) choices are more com-
pelling than the men's," said
Julie Jag, sports editor of
the Santa Cruz Sentinel.
Douglas is the fourth gym-
nast to win one of the AP's
annual awards, which
began in 1931, and first
since Mary Lou Retton in
1984. She also finished 15th
in voting for the AP sports
story of the year.
Douglas wasn't even in the
conversation for the Olympic
title at the beginning of the
year. That all changed in
March when she upstaged
reigning world champion
and teammate Jordyn
Wieber at the American Cup
in New York, showing off a
new vault, an ungraded un-
even bars routine and a daz-
zling personality that would
be a hit on Broadway and
Madison Avenue.
She finished a close sec-
ond to Wieber at the U.S.
championships, then beat
her two weeks later at the
Olympic trials. With each
competition, her confidence
grew. So did that smile.
By the time the Ameri-
cans got to London, Douglas
had emerged as the most
consistent gymnast on what
was arguably the best team
the U.S. has ever had.
She posted the team's
highest score on all but one
event in qualifying. She was
the only gymnast to compete
in all four events during
team finals, when the Amer-
icans beat the Russians in a
rout for their second
Olympic title, and first since
1996. Two nights later, Dou-
glas claimed the grandest
prize of all, joining Retton,
Carly Patterson and Nastia
Liukin as what Bela Karolyi
likes to call the "Queen of
Gymnastics."


Phelps voted

AP male

athlete ofyear

Associated Press

Now that he's away from
the pool, Michael Phelps
can reflect really reflect
- on what he accomplished.
Pretty amazing stuff.
"It's kind of nuts to think
about everything I've gone
through," Phelps said. "I've
finally had time to myself, to
sit back and say, '... that re-
ally happened?' It's kind of
shocking at times."
Not that his career
needed a capper, but Phelps
added one more honor to
his staggering list of accom-
plishments Thursday- The
Associated Press male ath-
lete of the year.
Phelps edged out LeBron
James to win the award for
the second time, not only a
fitting payoff for another
brilliant Olympics (four gold
medals and two silvers in
swimming at the London
Games) but recognition for
one of the greatest careers
in any sport.
Phelps finished with 40
votes in balloting by U.S. ed-
itors and broadcasters, while
James was next with 37.
Track star Usain Bolt, who
won three gold medals in
London, was third with 23.
Carl Lewis is the only
other Olympic-related star
to be named AP male ath-
lete of the year more than
once, taking the award for
his track and field exploits
in 1983 and '84. The only
men honored more than
twice are golf's Tiger Woods
and cyclist Lance Arm-
strong (four times each), and
basketball's Michael Jordan
(three times).
"Obviously, it's a big ac-
complishment," Phelps said.
"There's so many amazing
male athletes all over the
world and all over our coun-
try To be able to win this is
something that just sort of
tops off my career"
Phelps retired at age 27 as
soon as he finished his final
race in London, having won
more gold medals (18) and
overall medals (22) than any
other Olympian.
No one else is even close.
"That's what I wanted to
do," Phelps said. "Now that
it's over, it's something I can
look back on and say, 'That
was a pretty amazing ride."'
The current ride isn't so
bad either
Set for life financially, he
has turned his fierce com-
petitive drive to golf, work-
ing on his links game with
renowned coach Hank
Haney as part of a television
series on the Golf Channel.
In fact, after being informed
of winning the award,
Phelps called in from El Do-
rado Golf & Beach Club in
Los Cabos, Mexico, where
he was heading out with
Haney to play a few more
holes before nightfall.
"I can't really complain,"
Phelps quipped over the
phone.


Associated Press
ABOVE: Michael Phelps has
added another triumph to his
list of accomplishments: The
Associated Press male athlete
of the year. RIGHT: Phelps
touches the wall ahead of
Chad le Clos for the win in the
men's 100-meter butterfly
final at the Aquatics Centre in
the Olympic Park during the
2012 Summer Olympics in
London.

Certainly, he has no com-
plaints about his swimming
career, which helped turn a
sport most Americans only
paid attention to every four
years into more of a main-
stream pursuit.
More kids took up swim-
ming. More advertisers
jumped on board. More
viewers tuned in to watch.
While swimming is un-
likely to ever match the ap-
peal of football or baseball,
it has carved out a nice little
niche for itself amid all the
other athletic options in the
United States largely due
to Phelps' amazing accom-
plishments and aw-shucks
appeal.
Just the fact that he won
over James shows just how
much pull Phelps still has.
James had an amazing year
by any measure: The league
MVP won his first NBA title
with the Miami Heat, pick-
ing up finals MVP honors
along the way, and then
starred on the gold medal-
winning U.S. basketball
team in London.
Phelps already had won
the AP award in 2008 after
his eight gold medals in Bei-
jing, which broke Mark
Spitz's record. Phelps got it
again with a performance
that didn't quite match up to
the Great Haul of China, but
was amazing in its own right
After the embarrassment
of being photographed tak-
ing a hit from a marijuana
pipe and questioning
whether he still had the de-
sire to go on, Phelps re-


;~.* ,'~.





k
t2:~jj


turned with a vengeance as
the London Games ap-
proached. Never mind he
was already the winningest
Olympian ever. Never mind
he could've eclipsed the
record for overall medals by
swimming on the relays.
He wanted to be one of
those rare athletes who
went out on top.
"That's just who he is,"
said Bob Bowman, his long-
time coach. "He just could-
n't live with himself if knew
he didn't go out there and
give it good shot and really
know he's competitive. He
doesn't know anything else
but to give that kind of effort
and have those kind of ex-
pectations."
Phelps got off to a rocky
start in London, finishing
fourth in the 400-meter indi-
vidual medley, blown out of
the water by his friend and
rival, Ryan Lochte. It was
only the second time that
Phelps had not at least fin-
ished in the top three of an
Olympic race, the first com-
ing way back in 2000 when
he was fifth in his only event
of the Sydney Games as a 15-
year-old.
To everyone looking in,
Lochte seemed poised to
become the new Phelps -
while the real Phelps ap-
peared all washed up.
But he wasn't going out
like that.


No way
Phelps rebounded to be-
come the biggest star at the
pool, edging Lochte in the
200 IM, contributing to a
pair of relay victories, and
winning his final individual
race, the 100 butterfly.
There were two silvers, as
well, leaving Phelps with a
staggering resume that will
be awfully difficult for any-
one to eclipse.
His 18 golds are twice as
many as anyone else in
Olympic history. His 22
medals are four clear of
Larisa Latynina, a Soviet-
era gymnast, and seven
more than the next athlete
on the list. Heck, if Phelps
was a nation, he'd be 58th in
the medal standings, just
one behind India (popula-
tion: 1.2 billion).
"When I'm flying all over
the place, I write a lot in my
journal," Phelps said. "I
kind of relive all the memo-
ries, all the moments I had
throughout my career.
That's pretty special. I've
never done that before. It's
amazing when you see it all
on paper"
Four months into retire-
ment, Phelps has no desire
to get back in the pool. Oh,
he'll swim every now and
then for relaxation, using
the water to unwind rather
than putting in one of his fa-
mously grueling practices.


Brewers sign LHP Tom
Gorzelanny
MILWAUKEE The Milwaukee
Brewers signed left-handed reliever
Tom Gorzelanny to a two-year con-
tract Friday.
The 30-year-old Gorzelanny went 4-
2 with a 2.88 ERA and one save in 45
games with Washington last season, a


stint that included one start. He posted
a 1.33 ERA in 27 innings pitched out of
the bullpen following the All-Star break.
Gorzelanny worked at least two in-
nings in 19 of his 44 relief appear-
ances last season, his first as a
full-time reliever.
Overall, Gorzelanny is 44-45 with a
4.41 ERA and two saves in 193 games
(111 starts) during eight seasons with


Baseball BRIEFS


Pittsburgh, the Cubs and Washington.
Terms were not released.
Twins sign Rich Harden
to minor-league contract
MINNEAPOLIS The Minnesota
Twins have signed injury-hampered
right-hander Rich Harden to a minor-
league contract with an invitation to
compete for a spot on the staff in


spring training.
The move was made Friday. The
31-year-old Harden missed the entire
2012 season after surgery on Jan. 31
to repair the rotator cuff in his throwing
shoulder.
Harden has the third-best strike-
outs-per-nine-innings ratio in the ma-
jors since 2003, when he debuted with
Oakland. He pitched seven years for


the A's, last in 2011, and also spent
time with the Chicago Cubs and Texas
Rangers. Harden has surpassed 150
innings in only one season, in 2004.
The Twins also announced left-han-
der Scott Diamond had arthroscopic
surgery Tuesday to remove a bone
chip from his elbow. The team said
he'll be ready for spring training.
From staff reports


B2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UCF pummels Ball St.


Knights claim Beef

'O'Brady's Bowl

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Blake
Bortles threw for three touch-
downs and ran for another to lead
Central Florida to a 38-17 victory
over Ball State in the Beef '0'
Brady's Bowl on Friday night.
Bortles threw first-half TD
passes of 7 and 5 yards to Latavius
Murray, who also scored on a 2-
yard run to help the Knights (10-4)
build a 21-point halftime lead and
coast to victory in their final game
as a member of Conference USA.
Bortles had a 6-yard TD run and
threw for 272 yards to become
UCF's first 3,000-yard passer since
2002. He also led the Knights in
rushing with a career-best 80 yards
on nine carries.
Ball State (9-4) was hoping to fin-
ish with at least 10 wins for the
third time in school history, how-
ever its high-powered offense


sputtered while being held to a
season-low point total. Keith Wen-
ning threw a 7-yard TD pass to
Willie Snead early in the second
quarter, but the Cardinals didn't
get into end zone again until
Snead scored on a 16-yard recep-
tion with 5 minutes remaining.
Bortles completed 22 of 33
passes without an interception,
and his three TD passes were a ca-
reer-best and tied the Beef '0'
Brady's Bowl record. Wenning was
22 of 34 for 217 yards and two TDs
for Ball State, which had a six-
game winning streak snapped be-
fore an announced crowd of 21,759.
UCF, which will move into the Big
East next season, rebounded from
an overtime loss in the Conference
USA title game to finish with dou-
ble-digit victories for the third time
since stepping up to the Football
Bowl Subdivision. The Knights also
won 10 in 2007 and 2010, when they
were Conference USA champions.
The Knights' loss to Tulsa in the
Conference USA title game kept
them close to home for the postsea-
son. Instead of heading to the Lib-
erty Bowl for the second time in


three years, coach George O'Leary
and his players settled for a 100-
mile trek west from Orlando to
Tropicana Field, the home of major
league baseball's Tampa Bay Rays.
O'Leary also brought his team to
St. Petersburg in 2009, losing to
Rutgers by three touchdowns. Fri-
day night's victory improved the
66-year-old coach's record to 4-5 in
bowl games, including a 2-3 mark
with UCE
Ball State's first bowl appearance
since 2008 is the latest step in an im-
pressive turnaround under coach
Pete Lembo, whose team suffered
early losses to Clemson, Kent State
and Northern Illinois before win-
ning six straight down the stretch to
put themselves into a position to fill
the Big East's slot in the Beef '0'
Brady's game because the league
didn't have enough bowl-eligible
teams to meet its commitment
UCF running back Latavius
Murray runs against Ball State dur-
ing the first quarter of the Beef 'O'
Brady's Bowl on Friday in St.
Petersburg.
Associated Press


Lively Raptors Ue su ves

........__......._ triple overtime


i orontw aowns

Orlando 93-90

Associated Press

TORONTO DeMar
DeRozan scored 17 points,
Jose Calderon had 13 points
and nine assists and the
Toronto Raptors won their
fifth straight game Friday
night, beating the Orlando
Magic 93-90.
Rookie Terrence Ross
scored seven of his 13 points
in the fourth quarter while
Alan Anderson, Ed Davis
and Amir Johnson each had
10 for the Raptors.
Aaron Afflalo scored 26
points and Nikola Vucevic
had 16 points and 12 re-
bounds for the Magic, who
lost for the first time in five
games. Gustavo Ayon had 12
points and 13 rebounds
while E'Twaun Moore
added 12.
A soaring putback dunk
by Ross and a three-point
play by DeRozan put
Toronto up 78-68 with 9:35 to
go. Orlando used a 6-0 run to
cut it to 82-76 before Ross
struck again, hitting a long 3,
then stealing the ball from
Jameer Nelson at midcourt
and racing in for a windmill
jam that put the Raptors up
87-76 with 5:55 remaining.
76ers 99, Hawks 80
PHILADELPHIA- Thad-
deus Young had 18 points and
11 rebounds, and Evan Turner
scored 21 points to help the
Philadelphia 76ers beat the
Atlanta Hawks 99-80.
Jason Richardson scored 17
to help the Sixers snap a five-
game losing streak. Jrue Holi-
day had 11 points after missing
four games with a sprained left
foot. The 76ers held the Hawks
to 39 percent shooting and out-
rebounded them 45-37.
The Sixers learned before
the game that injured center
Andrew Bynum had been
cleared to start a six-step reha-
bilitation process. There is still
no timetable for when he can
return to play from bone bruises
in his knees.
Josh Smith led the Hawks
with 17 points and Lou Williams
scored 13.
Bulls 110,
Knicks 106
NEW YORK New York's
Carmelo Anthony and three
others were thrown out of a
foul-filled game, and the
Chicago Bulls beat the Knicks
for the second time this season,
110-106.
Knicks center Tyson Chan-
dler and Bulls counterpart
Joakim Noah were tossed after
a fourth-quarter altercation,
shortly after New York coach
Mike Woodson had been
ejected following his second
technical, drawing a loud ova-
tion from Knicks fans who an-
grily booed the officiating for
much of the second half.
Luol Deng had season highs
of 29 points and 13 rebounds
despite briefly leaving the game
with an injured left shoulder.
Marco Belinelli added 22 points
as Chicago won for the fourth
time in five games.
Anthony finished with 29
points on 10-of-25 shooting,


Associated Press
The Toronto Raptors' Terrence Ross slams back a rebound Friday over the Orlando Magic's
J.J. Redick in Toronto.


ending his streak of four
straight 30-point games. The
Knicks lost for the second time
in three home games after win-
ning their first 10.
Bucks 99,
Celtics 94, OT
BOSTON Monta Ellis
scored five of his 27 points in
overtime and the Milwaukee
Bucks beat the Boston Celtics
in the teams' final meeting this
season 99-94 despite blowing
a seven-point lead late in
regulation.
The Bucks won for the sixth
time in eight games, taking
three of four against the Celtics,
who had a five-game home
winning streak snapped despite
35 points by Paul Pierce.
Luc Mbah a Moute scored 20
points and Larry Sanders had 17
and 20 rebounds for Milwaukee.
Jeff Green scored 14 points,
Kevin Garnett 12 and Courtney
Lee 11 for the Celtics.
Pierce, who scored a sea-
son-high 40 points in Boston's
previous game, sent the game
to OT by hitting a 3 with 2.5
seconds left.
Grizzlies 92,
Mavericks 82
MEMPHIS, Tenn.- Rudy
Gay scored 26 points, and
Zach Randolph had 17 points
and 13 rebounds to help the


Memphis Grizzlies win their
fourth straight game, 92-82
over the Dallas Mavericks.
Marc Gasol added 11 points
and 11 rebounds for Memphis.
Tony Allen finished with 10
points, but his biggest contri-
bution was on the defensive
end, holding former Grizzly
O.J. Mayo, the Mavericks'
leading scorer, to 10 points on
3-of-11 shooting.
Shawn Marion and Vince
Carter led the Mavericks with
14 points apiece, and Marion
also had 11 rebounds. Do-
minique Jones had 13 points
and seven assists, and Bran-
dan Wright added 12 points.
Dallas never led, and Mem-
phis built a 17-point advantage
in the third quarter.
The Mavericks suffered
through 24 turnovers leading to
29 Memphis points, and the
Grizzlies' 17 offensive rebounds
contributed to a 22-9 advantage
in second-chance points.
Pistons 100,
Wizards 68
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Greg Monroe had 15 points
and nine rebounds and rookie
Andre Drummond added a dou-
ble-double and the Detroit Pis-
tons ended a six-game losing
streak with a 100-68 rout.
The Pistons, who never


trailed, got 15 points from
Brandon Knight and 11 points
and a career-high 14 rebounds
from Drummond. Detroit
hadn't beaten anyone other
than the Cavaliers since late
November.
The teams meet again Satur-
day night in the nation's capital,
but the Wizards will have to
play a much better game to
have a shot at splitting the
home-and-home series.
Washington only dressed
nine players, with John Wall,
Trevor Ariza, Bradley Beal and
Nene among the unavailable
players, and lost their sixth
straight.
Jordan Crawford led Wash-
ington with 20 points, but two
other players reached double
figures.
Pacers 99,
Cavaliers 89
CLEVELAND Roy Hibbert
scored 18 points and Lance
Stephenson added a season-
high 16 to lead the Indiana Pac-
ers to a 99-89 win over the
Cleveland Cavaliers, who lost
their sixth straight game.
Hibbert didn't have to deal
with injured Cavs center Ander-
son Varejao, the NBA's leading
rebounder. Varejao missed his
second game in a row with a
bruised right knee.


Associated Press

TAMPA Victor Rudd
scored 29 points, including
a game-tying 3-pointer with
3.8 seconds left in regula-
tion, and South Florida
beat Bowling Green 87-84
in triple overtime on Fri-
day night.
Rudd also had a go-
ahead three-point play
with 13.5 seconds left -
that made it 85-84 and
two late free throws in the
third overtime.
South Florida made a
late, regulation run, getting
within 60-58 on Anthony
Collins' layup with 14.6 sec-
onds remaining. After Aus-
ton Calhoun converted 1 of
2 free throws, Rudd tied it
at 61 on his 3-pointer
South Florida (7-3) also
got 18 points from Martino
Brock and 16 from Toarlyn
Fitzpatrick.
Crawford scored all of
his 27 points after halftime
for Bowling Green (5-6).
Calhoun added 22 points.
The game was delayed
22 minutes with 21.6 sec-
onds to go in the first over-
time when an electrical
problem knocked out most
of the arena's lights.
No. 6 Indiana 88,
FAU 52
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -
Cody Zeller had 24 points,
Christian Watford scored 17
and No. 6 Indiana over-
whelmed another under-
manned opponent Friday night,
routing Florida Atlantic 88-52.
Indiana has shot a com-
bined 60.4 percent from the
field in two games this week
en route to a 29th consecutive
nonconference win at home.
The Owls (5-7) were led by
Greg Gantt, who finished with
25 points. He needs four more
to break Earnest Crumbley's
school scoring record (1,559).


But Indiana never gave
coach Mike Jarvis' team a
chance in a game that turned
ugly fast.
Since losing Saturday to But-
ler, the Hoosiers (11-1) are 64
of 106 from the field and have
held two opponents to a com-
bined shooting rate of 32.8.
Playing twice in three
nights has only seemed to
help the Hoosiers, who led
55-25 at halftime. They came
into the game leading the na-
tion in scoring (89.2 points)
and were No. 3 in field goal
shooting (52.1).
No. 22 Notre Dame
89, Niagra 67
SOUTH BEND, Ind.-
Jack Cooley had 24 points
and 15 rebounds, both sea-
son highs, to lead Notre
Dame over Niagara.
The 6-foot-9 senior jumped
out to a quick start, tying his
season-high game total of 20
points by halftime. The Fight-
ing Irish led 42-34 at the break.
Niagara (5-7) committed 11
fouls in the first half and the
Irish (12-1) took advantage,
hitting 12 of 14 (86 percent)
free throws. Cooley made half
of those and was perfect from
the stripe.
The Irish got rolling as the
game wore on, shooting a
season-high 62 percent in their
10th consecutive victory. They
put the game away with a 23-7
run during a 7-minute span
midway through the second
half, extending their lead to 20.
Antoine Mason led the Pur-
ple Eagles with 17 points.
It was Cooley's eighth dou-
ble-double in his last 10
games. Freshman forward
Cameron Biedscheid had 15
points for Notre Dame, shoot-
ing 4 of 4 from 3-point range.
The winning streak is the
longest for the Irish since a
10-game run four years ago.


No. 7 UK shines


Purdue routs

IUPUI

Associated Press

SANTA BARBARA,
Calif. A'dia Mathies
scored 19 points and No. 7
Kentucky extended its win-
ning streak to nine games
Friday with a 66-38 victory
over UC Santa Barbara.
The Wildcats (10-1) went
2-0 on their Pacific Coast
road trip that began with
an 80-62 win over Pepper-
dine in Malibu on Tuesday
DeNesha Stallworth and
Samarie Walker each
scored 12 for the Wildcats.
Stallworth, a 6-foot-3 junior
from Richmond, Calif.,
stood tall in her home
state. She had 17 points
against Pepperdine.
Mathies, a senior guard
from Louisville, hit four 3-
pointers, three of them in
the second half, as Ken-
tucky broke it open after
leading 28-20 at halftime.
The Gauchos (4-7) com-


mitted 17 of their 28
turnovers in the first half
against Kentucky's pres-
sure defense.
No. 13 Purdue 78,
IUPUI 53
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -
Courtney Moses scored 18
points, Drey Mingo added 13
and Purdue used a big sec-
ond-half run to extend its best
start in a decade.
The Boilermakers (11-1) led
36-28 at halftime but pulled
away from IUPUI with a 14-2
spurt in the first 6:11 of the
second half.
DeAirra Goss had 24 points
for the Jaguars (6-7), who
shot 36.7 percent.
No. 14 L'ville 106,
Wagner 32
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Megan
Deines scored 19 points and
eight of Louisville's nine play-
ers reached double figures in
a rout of Wagner.
The Cardinals (11-2), who
led 47-12 at halftime, shot
60.9 percent from the floor (39
of 64). Deines was 8 for 10.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012



For Dec.22
NCAA Football
Today
New Orleans Bowl
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
La.-Lafayette 4Y2 5 (66) East Carolina
Las Vegas Bowl
Boise St. 7Y2 5Y2 (44) Washington
Monday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Fresno St. 11Y2 12Y2 (59Y2) SMU
Wednesday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
W. Kentucky 6 5Y2 (58) Cent. Michigan
Thursday
Military Bowl
At Washington
San Jose St. 7Y2 7 (45) Bowling Green
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati 11 7Y2 (60) Duke
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
UCLA +1 1 (80Y2) Baylor
Friday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
La.-Monroe 6 7Y2 (60) Ohio
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech 1 2Y2 (41) Rutgers
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas Tech 13 13 (57) Minnesota
Dec.29
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Air Force +1 1 (61) Rice
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Arizona St. 13 14Y2 (56) Navy
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
WestVirginia 3Y2 4 (74) Syracuse
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon St. 1 2 (57) Texas
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
TCU 1 2Y2 (40) Michigan St.
Dec.31
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt 5 7 (52) NC State
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Southern Cal 10 10 (64) Georgia Tech
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Iowa St. +3 1 (51) Tulsa
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
LSU 3 4Y2 (59) Clemson
Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
Oklahoma St. 18 17 (70) Purdue
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Mississippi St. 2 2 (52) Northwestern
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina 4 5Y2 (47Y2) Michigan
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia 8 10 (60Y2) Nebraska
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 6 6Y2 (47Y2) Wisconsin
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Florida St. 15 13 (58V2) N. Illinois
Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida 13Y2 14 (45Y2) Louisville
Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Oregon 9Y2 9 (75Y2) Kansas St.
Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M 3 4Y2 (72) Oklahoma
Jan. 5
Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Mississippi 1Y2 3Y2 (52Y2) Pittsburgh
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas St. +1 4 (61Y2) Kent St.
Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Alabama 7Y2 10 (41Y2) Notre Dame
NFL
Tonight
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
Atlanta 3 4 (51) at Detroit
Tomorrow
at Green Bay 10Y2 12Y2 (46) Tennessee
at Carolina 8 9 (46) Oakland
at Miami 5 412 (4112) Buffalo
at Pittsburgh 5 3Y2 (42) Cincinnati
New England 14 14Y2 (50) at Jacksonville
Indianapolis 6 7 (42) at Kansas City
at Dallas 3 212 (51 2) New Orleans
Washington 4 612 (45) at Philadelphia
at Tampa Bay 3 3 (44) St. Louis
N.Y Giants +1 2Y2 (47Y2) at Baltimore
at Houston 7 8 (4412) Minnesota
at Denver 12 13 (4412) Cleveland
Chicago 512 512 (3612) at Arizona
at Seattle 212 Pk (39) San Francisco
at N.Y. Jets 3 2 (3812) San Diego



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 19 7 .731
Brooklyn 13 12 .520 512
Boston 13 13 .500 6
Philadelphia 13 14 .481 6/2
Toronto 9 19 .321 11
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 17 6 .739 -
Atlanta 15 9 .625 212
Orlando 12 14 .462 612
Charlotte 7 18 .280 11
Washington 3 21 .125 1412
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 15 10 .600 -
Milwaukee 14 11 .560 1
Indiana 15 12 .556 1
Detroit 8 21 .276 9
Cleveland 5 23 .179 1112
WESTERN CONFERENCE


Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 18 6 .750 -
San Antonio 19 8 .704 Y2
Houston 13 12 .520 512
Dallas 12 15 .444 712
New Orleans 5 20 .200 1312
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 21 5 .808 -
Minnesota 13 11 .542 7
Denver 14 13 .519 712
Utah 14 13 .519 7Y2
Portland 12 12 .500 8
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 19 6 .760 -
Golden State 17 9 .654 2Y2
L.A. Lakers 12 14 .462 7Y2
Phoenix 11 15 .423 8Y2
Sacramento 8 17 .320 11
Thursday's Games
Minnesota 99, Oklahoma City 93
Miami 110, Dallas 95
Portland 101, Denver 93


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
S::: 1-9-2
CASH 3 (late)
. 2 3-2-6
PLAY 4 (early)
4-9-7-4
PLAY 4 (late)
4-2-7-2
FANTASY 5
4 11-14-23-25
MEGA MONEY
3-6- 7 -44
oida Lottery MEGA BALL
13


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Gotham Classic Syracuse vs. Temple
1:30 p.m. (SUN) USC at Georgia
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas at Michigan State
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Governor's Holiday Hoop Classic -
George Mason vs. Richmond
4 p.m. (CBS) Kansas at Ohio State
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Marshall at Kentucky
4 p.m. (FSNFL) The Citadel at Georgia Tech
4 p.m. (SUN) Southern at Texas A&M
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Governor's Holiday Hoops Classic -
Old Dominion vs. Virginia
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Illinois vs. Missouri
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida at Kansas State
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Davidson at Drexel
NBA
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Bulls atAtlanta Hawks
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Utah Jazz at Miami Heat
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN) R&L Carriers New Orleans Bowl East
Carolina vs. Louisiana-Lafayette
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Maaco Bowl Las Vegas Boise State
vs. Washington
NFL
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Atlanta Falcons at Detroit Lions
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) 2012 U.S. Open Golf Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Wigan Athletic
vs. Arsenal
WINTER SPORTS
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing USSA Freeski Pipe (Taped)
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Snowboarding FIS Team SBX (Taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) Snowboarding U.S. Snowboardcross Cup
(Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
1 p.m. Indian Rocks at Seven Rivers
WRESTLING
10 a.m. Citrus in St. Cloud IBT


Correction

In Wednesday's Chronicle sports section, Crystal River's
Tristan Corbett and Lecanto's Austin Hartman were
misidentified in a wrestling photo. The Chronicle regrets the
error.


Friday's Games
Philadelphia 99, Atlanta 80
Toronto 93, Orlando 90
Milwaukee 99, Boston 94, OT
Chicago 110, NewYork 106
Indiana 99, Cleveland 89
Detroit 100, Washington 68
Memphis 92, Dallas 82
New Orleans at San Antonio, late
Charlotte at Golden State, late
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, late
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Washington, 7 p.m.
Utah at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.
Indiana at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Denver, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 10p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.



Remaining free
agents
NEW YORK The 102 remaining free
agents (x-signing club, if different, would lose
draft pick):
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BALTIMORE (6)- Endy Chavez, of; Bill Hall,
of; Nick Johnson, dh; Joe Saunders, Ihp; Jim
Thornme, dh; Randy Wolf, Ihp.
BOSTON (5) Aaron Cook, rhp; Daisuke
Matsuzaka, rhp; Vicente Padilla, rhp; Scott
Podsednik, of; Cody Ross, of.
CHICAGO (7)- Brian Bruney, rhp; Orlando
Hudson, 2b; Francisco Liriano, Ihp; Jose Lopez,
c; Brett Myers, rhp; A.J. Pierzynski, c; Dewayne
Wise, of.
CLEVELAND (3) -Travis Hafner, dh; Casey
Kotchman, 1b; Grady Sizemore, of.
DETROIT (2)-JoseValverde, rhp; Delmon
Young, of-dh.
HOUSTON (1) Chris Snyder, c.
LOS ANGELES (2) LaTroy Hawkins, rhp;
Jason Isringhausen, rhp.
MINNESOTA (2) Matt Capps, rhp; Carl Pa-
vano, rhp.
NEW YORK (6) Pedro Feliciano, Ihp;
Freddy Garcia, rhp; Raul Ibanez, of; Derek
Lowe, rhp; x-Rafael Soriano, rhp; x-Nick
Swisher, of.
OAKLAND (2)- Stephen Drew, ss; Brandon
Inge, 3b.
SEATTLE (2) Kevin Millwood, rhp; Miguel
Olivo, c.
TAMPA BAY (3) Kyle Farnsworth, rhp; J.R
Howell, Ihp; Luke Scott, dh.
TEXAS (4) -x-Mark Lowe, rhp; Mike Napoli,
c; Roy Oswalt, rhp; Yoshinori Tateyama, rhp.
TORONTO (5) Jason Frasor, rhp; Kelly
Johnson, 2b; Brandon Lyon, rhp; Carlos Vil-
lanueva, rhp; Omar Vizquel, 2b.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
ARIZONA (3) Henry Blanco, c; Matt Lind-
strom, rhp;TakashiSaito, rhp.
ATLANTA (8) -Jeff Baker, of; Miguel Batista,
rhp; x-Michael Bourn, of; Matt Diaz, of; Chad


Durbin, rhp; Chipper Jones, 3b; Lyle Overbay,
1b; Ben Sheets, rhp.
CINCINNATI (2) Miguel Cairo, 1b; Scott
Rolen, 3b.
COLORADO (2) Jason Giambi, 1b;
Jonathan Sanchez, Ihp.
LOS ANGELES (6) Bobby Abreu, of; Todd
Coffey, rhp; Adam Kennedy, inf; Juan Rivera, of-
1b; MattTreanor, c; Jamey Wright, rhp.
MIAMI (5) Chad Gaudin, rhp; Austin
Kearns, of; Carlos Lee, 1b; Juan Oviedo, rhp;
Carlos Zambrano, rhp.
MILWAUKEE (3) -Alex Gonzalez, ss; Shaun
Marcum, rhp; Francisco Rodriguez, rhp.
NEW YORK (6) -Ronny Cedeno, inf; Scott
Hairston, of; Ramon Ramirez, rhp; Jon Rauch,
rhp; Kelly Shoppach, c; Chris Young, rhp.
PHILADELPHIA (2) -Jose Contreras, rhp;
Brian Schneider, c.
PITTSBURGH (2) Rod Barajas, c; Chad
Quails, rhp.
ST. LOUIS (3) Lance Berkman, 1b; Brian
Fuentes, Ihp; x-Kyle Lohse, rhp.
SAN FRANCISCO (5) -Aubrey Huff, 1b;
Guillermo Mota, rhp; Brad Penny, rhp; Freddy
Sanchez, 2b; RyanTheriot, 2b.
WASHINGTON (5)- Mark DeRosa, of; Mike
Gonzalez, Ihp; Edwin Jackson, rhp; x-Adam
LaRoche, 1b; Chien-Ming Wang, rhp.





FBS Bowl Glance
All Times EST
Saturday, Dec. 15
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Arizona 49, Nevada 48
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State 41, Toledo 15
Thursday, Dec. 20
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
BYU 23, San Diego State 6
Friday, Dec. 21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Ball State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Dec. 22
New Orleans Bowl
East Carolina (8-4) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette
(7-4), Noon (ESPN)
MAACO Bowl
LasVegas
Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Wednesday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Central Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky
(7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)


Broncos looking for third


Boise State

meets UWin

Las Vegas Bowl

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Once
again, Boise State is in this
gambling city for a bowl
game to end yet another suc-
cessful season. Unlike previ-
ous years, though, no one is
talking about where the
Broncos should really be.
There is no BCS contro-
versy for the No. 20 Broncos
coming into the Las Vegas
Bowl to play Washington.
No talk about Boise State
being in the chase for a na-
tional title, either.
But if this season is what
rebuilding is all about,
Boise State coach Chris Pe-
tersen will gladly take it
"Part of the problem with
sports today, particularly
college football, is that you
do well and that sets the bar
high," Petersen said. "In our
case it's set so high that any-
thing but a perfect season is
looked upon differently"
Petersen's team wasn't
perfect this year, though the
Broncos aren't complaining
about a 10-2 season and a
national ranking. Not after
losing six starters from last
year to the NFL draft and
having to find a quarterback
to replace Kellen Moore,



CR
Continued from Page B1

Bresson finally broke
through for Crystal River,
netting the first of her three
goals by racing between
Central goalkeeper Sarah
Kaspers and a Bears de-
fender and sliding a through
ball into the back of the net
to make it a tie game.
The Pirates' second goal,
which essentially decided



WARRIORS
Continued from Page B1

picked up the pace as each
forced the basketball inside
for lineups or trips to the
free-throw line.
The Lady Warriors (6-3
overall) were 7 of 8 from the
charity stripe and the Saints
shot 60 percent, sinking six
foul shots. Seven Rivers jun-
ior Alexis Zachar led scor-
ing in the first half with nine
points and her sister An-
drea Zachar pulled down



SRCS
Continued from Page B1

the period.
But Owen's (team-high 23
points) long-distance heave
set the stage for a better
fourth period for a Saints club
(8-4, 3-1) that includes three
players taller than 6-foot-4.
A 3 by St. John senior Jor-
dan Smith broke a 47-47 tie
with 3:20 remaining before
scoring slowed to a crawl
between both teams. A put-
back by freshman Zac Saxer
with 1:20 to go represented
the only remaining Warrior
basket as the Saints avoided
fouls for most of the second
half to keep Seven Rivers
off the line in the critical
late moments.


ROLL
Continued from Page B1

Lynch slicing through the
defense to dish passes off,
the 'Canes began finding
open shots close to the hoop.
They started cashing in
those chances, Simmons in
particular. She finished the
game with a team-high 16
points, 12 coming in the sec-
ond quarter and eight of
those in Citrus' 16-point run.
"It was just something we
worked hard on in prac-
tice," Simmons said. "There


was good movement of the
ball, and that was leaving
the middle wide open."
By halftime, the 'Canes
had pushed their lead to 35-
23. The Pirates were never
able to sustain any of the
momentum in the third
quarter, due to poor shoot-
ing (1-of-12 from the field, 4-
of-16 from the free-throw
line) and a bundle of
turnovers (seven).


who went 50-3 as a four-year
starter for Boise State.
Still, the year could have
been even better had the
Broncos not lost a 21-19 game
at home to San Diego State
that might have kept them
out of a bigger bowl game.
"Win one more game and
we're in the BCS," Petersen
said.
Instead Boise State is in
the Las Vegas Bowl for the
third straight year, hoping to
come up a winner in the city
once again. They're five-
point favorites against a
Washington (7-5) team that
had won four in a row be-
fore being upended in over-
time by Washington State in
the regular-season finale.
In a bit of a twist, it's the
first of two straight games
between the two schools.
Boise State travels to Wash-
ington next year to open the
season in the newly reno-
vated Husky Stadium.
"It sets the stage for an in-
triguing offseason for nine
months before the rematch
here at Husky Stadium,"
Washington coach Steve
Sarkisian said when the
matchup was announced. "I
think it's pretty cool."
Boise State has won two
straight Las Vegas Bowl
games, the first coming after
an overtime loss to Nevada
cost the then-undefeated
Broncos a certain spot in a
BCS game in 2010. Last year,
Boise State lost 36-35 at
home to TCU on its way to a


the game, was more of the
same. Ezzell threaded a pin-
point pass onto the feet of a
wide-open Owens, who only
had the keeper to beat for a
2-1 Crystal River advantage.
In the second half, Bres-
son scored her final two
goals. A shot off the post by
Ezzell could have furthered
the margin.
"Coach (Reyes) told us to
dribble less and shoot
more," Bresson said. "We
started trusting our shot
and they went in."


seven rebounds. The teams
ended the half with the
Saints up 24-20.
In the second half, the
Saints came out running as
their transition game
started clicking. The pres-
sure defense led to
turnovers and easy baskets.
St. John's also found the
range from behind the arc
as the Saints poured in five
3-pointers with senior Hal-
lie Linville hitting two from
downtown.
Linville led St John with
19 points, 14 in the second
half.


The Warriors mishandled
an inbounds pass with 22
seconds left and missed on
a long 2-point shot with five
seconds to play before
Smith (15 points) sealed the
win with a couple of con-
verted free throws with
three seconds on the clock.
Seven Rivers (20-for-49 on
field goals), without its sec-
ond-leading scorer Cory
Weiand due to illness, were
a little better shooting from
the field than the Saints (22-
for-57), and held its own on
the boards despite the size
disadvantage.
"Fatigue set in with us
missing a couple players
and that led to mental
breakdowns," Seven Rivers
head coach Jim Ervin said.
"It was a tough matchup for
us. I thought we did a pretty

"Our (pressure) defense
does yield some easy shots,
but it also creates a lot of
turnovers," Citrus coach
Brian Lattin said.
That was evident in the
pivotal second quarter as
well. The 'Canes forced 10
Pirate turnovers while sur-
rendering just one basket-
which means they gave up a
single field goal in each of
the middle two quarters.
"I was proud of the way
we responded when we
were down eight early in the
second quarter," Lattin said.
"We were resilient enough


not to worry about the
scoreboard and just play
our game.
"County games are always
tough and Crystal River is a
great program."
The outcome left Citrus
unbeaten in five games
against county rivals. While
the 'Canes clearly took ad-
vantage of their opportuni-
ties better than Crystal
River, those chances were
created in the team's trade-


12-1 season that ended with
a blowout win over Arizona
State in the bowl.
If playing in the relatively
minor Las Vegas Bowl was a
disappointment for Boise
State the last two years, it's a
reward this year after a sea-
son that would be good by
any standards other than
those set by Petersen's
teams in Boise.
"It's a good matchup," Pe-
tersen said. "And the play-
ers are always excited to
come to Las Vegas."
That goes for the players
on Washington, too. Aside
from a well-stocked gift
room for players to select
something for their dorms,
the city's hotels and casinos
are always a lure.
"A lot of people wanted to
go the Vegas Bowl," quarter-
back Keith Price said. "Ob-
viously it's a fun place to be,
but we've got to channel the
team kind of and set certain
limitations and make sure
we're focused and ready for
the game."
The Huskies looked like
they wouldn't have a post-
season during a three-game
slide that included blowout
losses to Oregon and Ari-
zona. But they rebounded
before a startling loss in the
Apple Cup.
Price will be trying to re-
bound from an interception
in overtime that led to the
loss to Washington State and
ended the regular season on
a down note.


Crystal River put 19 shots
on goal and took a total of
30 shots, while Central
could only muster four total
shots, two on frame.
Reyes credited Ezzell, a
defender by trade, and for-
ward Brooke Levins for
sliding into central mid-
field positions to cover the
absence of two starters
Friday
Crystal River is off until
Jan. 4, when the Pirates
host Nature Coast for a 7:30
p.m. start.


St. John outscored Seven
Rivers 31-11 in the third pe-
riod to take a 55-31 lead and
effectively put the game
away
Warriors coach Gary
Dreyer felt his team made
the mistake of playing St.
John's game to start the sec-
ond half.
"We couldn't run with St.
John and they took control
of the game," said Dreyer,
who had no problem with
his team's effort and be-
lieved the Seven Rivers
gave its best effort for four
quarters.


decent job on the boards,
tonight. It's just unfortunate
St. John had just two team
fouls the entire second half
until they committed inten-
tional fouls in the last 30
seconds, so we couldn't get
off shots. We got a good look
at the end but just couldn't
convert."
Gage led his team with 12
boards for a double-double
and made four steals. Saxer
and senior Jared Bogart
(seven points) each added
seven rebounds for the
Warriors.
With last week's Warrior
win over 2A-4 First Acad-
emy not counting toward the
district, the loss starts Seven
Rivers at 0-1 in league play
The Warriors play at
home today against Indian
Rocks at 1 p.m.

mark style.
With defense.
"I'm not faulting my girls
effort," Rodgers said. "They
didn't shoot well tonight, but
they never gave up. They
played hard and never quit.
Citrus was the better team
tonight. They were better
able to take advantage of
their chances."
Balanced scoring was a
major factor favoring Citrus.
Three others besides Sim-
mons reached double fig-
ures: Toxen netted 14,
Jenkins scored 12 (eight in
the third quarter) and Lind-


say Connors got 10. In con-
trast, Wells was Crystal
River's only double-digit
scorer Next best was Rich-
burgh with eight
Citrus is now idle until
the Nichols Christmas Clas-
sic, when it plays St. Peters-
burg Gibbs on Dec. 27.
Crystal River takes on Bri-
arcrest Christian (Tenn.) in
the Marlins Holiday Tour-
nament on Dec. 27 in
Panama City.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Surging and stumbling toward NFL

BARRY WILNER
AP Pro Football Writer .


Some teams surge toward the
playoffs. Look at Denver, Seattle,
Washington and Green Bay
Others struggle to stay in the
mix: try the Steelers, Bengals, Gi-
ants and Bears.
This penultimate weekend of
the schedule could propel a few of
them and eliminate others.
Chief among the clubs that
could go either way: the defending
champion New York Giants, who
have lost their last three road
games by a combined 82-29 to fall
to 8-6. Not even coach Tom Cough-
lin is sure what he has as they
head to Baltimore.
"It would be easy for me to say I
do, but the reality of it is we
haven't been able to play to sub-
stantiate what I would say is the
personality of this team," said
Coughlin, whose club gets a wild
card, for sure, by winning out. "So
I'm definitely counting on the vet-
erans to go ahead and prove this
and do it with consistency
"Last year we did it over a six-
game run and, exactly, we're in
that situation again."
Even though their opponent
Sunday, the Ravens, already have
sewn up a playoff spot, it's a criti-
cal game for Baltimore (9-5) to get
back on track after three straight
defeats two at home and one a
bit down the road in Washington.
"We dug this hole we're in,"
safety Bernard Pollard said. "We
can't blame anybody but our-
selves. We don't like losing three
straight games. Nobody does. It's
at the point right now where we
have to get back at it, man. We dug
the hole, now we've got to find a
way to get out of it"
The action begins Saturday
night with Atlanta at Detroit.
There are no more Monday night
games this season.
Also Sunday, it's Cincinnati at
Pittsburgh in an AFC wild-card
showdown; Chicago at Arizona;
San Francisco at Seattle; Wash-
ington at Philadelphia; New Or-
leans at Dallas; Minnesota at
Houston; Indianapolis at Kansas
City; Cleveland at Denver; Ten-
nessee at Green Bay; New Eng-
land at Jacksonville; St. Louis at
Tampa Bay; Buffalo at Miami; San
Diego at New York Jets; and Oak-
land at Carolina.
St. Louis (6-7-1)
at Tampa Bay (6-8)
Both teams should look forward to
bigger and better things in 2013.
These are generally young teams
being constructed in dissimilar ways.
Jeff Fisher is a defensive guy and
he's put together a solid unit led by
ends Chris Long and Robert Quinn,
LB James Laurinaitis and corner-
backs Cortland Finnegan and rookie
Janoris Jenkins. They rank ninth and
have 41 sacks, third in the league be-
hind contenders Denver, Houston
and Cincinnati.
The Bucs are doing most of their
good things with the ball. Vincent
Jackson is first in yards per catch
(19.8) and fourth in yards receiving,
while rookie Doug Martin has 1,250
yards rushing and 10 TDs.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers free safety Ronde Barber talks on a phone to coaches in the first half Sunday against
the New Orleans Saints at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans.


Cincinnati (8-6)
at Pittsburgh (7-7)
A Bengals win, perhaps a long shot
because second-year quarterback
Andy Dalton hasn't beaten either the
Steelers or Ravens yet, gives Cincin-
nati a second consecutive postseason
berth. That hasn't happened since
1982 and never has occurred without
involving a strike-shortened season.
The Bengals also can take the divi-
sion by sweeping the final two games
and having Baltimore lose twice.
Pittsburgh can win the division only
if there is a three-way tie, but definitely
gets a wild card with two victories.
Chicago (8-6)
at Arizona (5-9)
Reeling and injury-ravaged, the
Bears have dropped three straight and
five of six. There's some discord in the
locker room, coach Lovie Smith's job
security has become shakier, and they
no longer can win the NFC North.
Still, a wild-card spot is available if
they win out, and even though the
Cardinals routed Detroit last week, it
was Arizona's first win in 10 games.
San Francisco (10-3-1)
at Seattle (9-5)
The spotlight matchup, even though
it won't decide the NFC West. San
Francisco can take the division for the
second successive season by beating
Arizona in its finale even if it falls at
what will be a rocking CenturyLink
Field. The 49ers earned at least a wild
card with their, uh, wild 41-34 victory
at New England last weekend.
"Given my first four years, around
this time, we probably wouldn't be
playing for much, maybe a chance to
win a game and maybe get in or wait-
ing on three other teams to lose," star
linebacker Patrick Willis said. "It feels
good to know that you're playing for
something. We have a playoff berth,
but we want the division. And we also
want to have that first-week bye, and
we know we have to win this week


first."
The Seahawks are 6-0 at home,
have won five of their last six overall,
and scored 58 and 50 points the last
two weeks. They aren't likely to come
close to that against the NFL's stingi-
est defense; the Niners have allowed
218 points, one fewer than Seattle.
Washington (8-6) at
Philadelphia (4-10)
Credit Mike Shanahan and his
coaching staff for one of the best jobs
down the stretch. It helps when you
have not one but two effective rookie
quarterbacks: Robert Griffin III and
Kirk Cousins.
The Redskins might beat the weak
Eagles with Rex Grossman this week.
But even if RG3 is back as expected,
look for another key Washington
rookie, RB Alfred Morris, to add to his
1,322 yards and nine TDs on the
ground.
New Orleans (6-8)
at Dallas (8-6)
Dallas is in the same situation as
Washington. Win out and the Cow-
boys take the NFC East.
They've shown plenty of fortitude in
winning five of six, rallying to beat the
Bengals and Steelers in the last two
outings.
New Orleans will test the Dallas de-
fense and is adept at forcing
turnovers, something the Cowboys
often commit (minus-9 margin)
Minnesota (8-6)
at Houston (12-2)
Seems like most everyone believes
Adrian Peterson is a lock to break Eric
Dickerson's single-season rushing
mark of 2,105. But he still needs al-
most 300 yards in the last two games,
and to average that much would be a
pace for 2,400 yards in a season.
The Texans are formidable against
the run and badly want to assure
being at home throughout the AFC
playoffs. By damaging Minnesota's
push for an NFC wild card, Houston


would ensure it is at home in January.
"This year he's definitely the best,
linebacker Bradie James said of Pe-
terson, who has 1,812 yards. "I played
against Ricky Williams in his heyday
when he would just run over every-
body. I played against the Bus
(Jerome Bettis); the Bus was great in
short yardage. I played against Mike
Alstott. I played against all these guys,
and what Adrian Peterson is doing
right now, I hadn't seen it before.
"We don't want to be on the end of
his record setting. We've got to do our
job and really not get caught up in all
that."
Indianapolis (9-5)
at Kansas City (2-12)
Indy's sensational turnaround from
2-14 to wild-card team will be com-
plete with a victory at the Chiefs. The
Colts have managed it despite the
fewest takeaways in the NFL (10) and
a minus-17.
But the Chiefs, who were shut out
by lowly Oakland a week ago, are
even worse at minus-22.
Cleveland (5-9)
at Denver (11-3)
Consider how far the Broncos have
come from a 2-3 record and tons of
questions about whether Peyton Man-
ning could once again be, well, Peyton
Manning. He is every bit as good in
his first season in Denver, has gotten
in-tune with his receivers, particularly
Demaryius Thomas and Eric Decker,
and has a fierce defense to boot.
"I like young players that really want
to get better, and those guys have
done that," Manning said. "Our timing
has improved throughout the season.
It's not what it would be had we played
together for five years."
In Cleveland, they wonder if the
young cast will play another year with
coach Pat Shurmur.
Tennessee (5-9) at
Green Bay (10-4)
The Packers could move into the


SPORTS


Olympian's downward spiral


Seeking an outlet,

Hamilton turned

to prostitution

Associated Press
Her image could hardly have been
better: Athletic. A knockout. All-
American. So accomplished and so
wholesome that Disneyland hired
her for speaking engagements, the
Big Ten named an award after her
and the Wisconsin Potato and Veg-
etable Growers Association made her
their pitchwoman.
Yet something troubled Suzy Favor
Hamilton. The former track star out of
Wisconsin, whose speed and talent took
her to seven national championships
and three Olympics, ultimately dealt
with her demons by stealing away to
live a life as a highly paid prostitute.
An "escape," she called it, that was
really a way of masking an American
Dream coming unhinged a real-life
tragedy that undercut the myth that
success, wealth and fame is a surefire
path to happiness.
"I do not expect people to under-
stand," Favor Hamilton said in a fren-
zied burst of tweets after details about
her secret life became public Thurs-
day in a report on The Smoking Gun
website. "But the reasons for doing this
made sense to me at the time and were
very much related to depression."
Stanley Teitelbaum, a psychologist
who wrote the book "Athletes Who In-
dulge Their Dark Side," said it's not
so difficult to understand. After retir-
ing, and spending most of her life try-
ing to live up to a certain ideal and
getting her highs from the adrenaline
rush of elite, competitive sports, day-


Associated Press
Suzy Favor Hamilton poses for a portrait at her home in Shorewood Hills, a
suburb of Madison, Wis. The three-time Olympian has admitted leading a dou-
ble life as an escort. She apologized Thursday after a report by The Smoking Gun
website said she had been working as a prostitute in Las Vegas.


to-day life in the civilian world can
seem boring.
"You've got to think of an emotional
outlet, maybe in her case, a noncon-
ventional outlet, a way of getting high
by somehow being a bad girl in con-
trast to her image of an upstanding,
Olympic athlete," Teitelbaum said.
In an interview earlier this year
with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel,
Favor Hamilton said she dealt with
anxiety, an eating disorder and strug-
gled with postpartum depression
after the birth of her daughter, Kylie,
now 7. But, she told the newspaper, "I
feel better than I've ever felt."
At the time of the interview, it
turned out, she was doubling as "Kelly
Lundy," a $600-an-hour call girl for an
escort service based in Las Vegas.
Apparently, it wasn't for the money


In the Journal Sentinel profile, Favor
Hamilton said she gave upward of 60
motivational speeches each year and
ran a successful realty firm, in addi-
tion to doing appearances for Disney
and the Rock 'n' Roll Marathon se-
ries. The Smoking Gun reported that
a check through public records
showed she lived in a $600,000 house
in the Madison suburb of Shorewood
Hills and that neither she nor her
husband, Mark, had any outward
signs of financial difficulties.
Some homes in Shorewood Hills
back onto university property.
On Friday, there was no answer at
the front door of her house a size-
able, split-level home at the end of a
cul de sac where a hurdle emblazoned
with the word "Wisconsin" sits, snow
covered, alongside the driveway.


Player not sure


about top form


Nadal wary

about return

from injury

Associated Press

MADRID -After a seven-
month hiatus nursing a hurt
knee, Rafael Nadal is wary
about his upcoming return to
the tennis court and believes
it may be some time before
he is back in top form.
"I have my doubts. It's nor-
mal. We are talking about a
knee, so of course I am afraid
to see how it is going re-
spond," Nadal told Canal
Plus television Friday. "But I
can only trust my doctors and
believe in myself and that
everything will be all right."
The 26-year-old Spaniard
is set to play an exhibition
tournament in Abu Dhabi on
Dec. 27. It will be his first ac-
tion since he was sidelined
with tendinitis in his left
knee after a second-round
loss to 100th-ranked Lukas
Rosol at Wimbledon in June.


The injury prevented
Nadal from defending his
Olympic singles gold at the
London Games, where he
was supposed to be Spain's
flag bearer in the opening
ceremony He also had to
pull out of the U.S. Open
and Spain's Davis Cup final
against the Czech Republic,
which his teammates lost
without him.
The 11-time Grand Slam
winner and former No. 1
player said his knee had im-
proved over the last two
months after making frus-
tratingly little progress dur-
ing the summer.
Even so, he acknowl-
edged that he may have to
skip some more events to
get back to full speed.
"I'm prepared to accept
that at the start my knee
might not respond well and
I may have to take it easy,
mixing periods of play and
rest for the first three
months," he said.
Nadal said that he wanted
to play at Indian Wells and
Miami with the goal of being
completely fit by April to
play at Monte Carlo.


We are talking about a knee, so
of course I am afraid to see how
it is going to respond.

Rafael Nadal
tennis player on his recovery from a knee injury.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 B5



playoffs

No. 2 seed in the NFC with a victory
and a loss by San Francisco. That
should be enough motivation to
keep them humming; they've won
eight of nine, including three in a
row within the division to put away
the NFC North.
Tennessee was the beneficiary of
Mark Sanchez's generosity on Mon-
day night. Aaron Rodgers is no
Sanchez.
New England (10-4) at
Jacksonville (2-12)
An angry bunch of Patriots head
south to face one of the league's worst
teams. Barring a misstep by Denver,
New England is looking at playing in
the wild-card round, by which time it
had better have solved defensive
woes exposed by San Francisco last
Sunday night.
The Jaguars don't figure to provide
any challenge as they contend for the
top overall draft pick.
Buffalo (5-9)
at Miami (6-8)
Buffalo's high expectations after a
busy offseason adding talent fell apart
early. The Bills could see some front-
office housecleaning after they finish
off their 13th straight season out of the
playoffs.
Miami has taken some decent steps
in its rebuild, but this could be a game
of turnovers. Buffalo is minus-10 and
Miami is minus-12 in turnover margin.
San Diego (5-9)
at New York Jets (6-8)
To the chagrin of Fireman Ed and
other Jets fans, the Sanchez error, uh,
era might not be over. At least for 2012,
barring injuries, the regressing QB will
be on the sideline as Greg McElroy
tries to secure a job for the future.
The Chargers are playing out the
string, too. They found some enthusi-
asm when they beat Pittsburgh two
weeks ago, but then the Panthers
routed them in San Diego.
Oakland (4-10)
at Carolina (5-9)
The Panthers, particularly Cam
Newton, are playing well enough to
perhaps save coach Ron Rivera's job.
It seems logical that Raiders coach
Dennis Allen, in his first season of
what will be a lengthy rebuilding proj-
ect, also is safe.
Atlanta (12-2) at Detroit
(4-10), Saturday night
The Falcons drew the kind of posi-
tive reviews after their rout of the Gi-
ants that many had withheld. Awin at
faltering Detroit, which has gone from
competitive to dreadful during a six-
game slide, clinches NFC home-field
advantage.
"This is what you work so hard in
the offseason for," star tight end Tony
Gonzalez said. "This is what you work
so hard during the regular season,
and what we've done up to this point
is we've put ourselves in a great posi-
tion. As far as I'm concerned and what
I've been telling my teammates and
what coach has been telling us, let's
go out and finish the job."













ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE-

PSY reaches 1B
views on YouTube
NEW YORK- Viral
star PSY has reached a
new milestone on
YouTube.
The South Korean rap-
per's video for "Gangnam
Style" has reached 1 bil-
lion views, according to
YouTube's own counter.
It's the
first time
any clip
Shas sur-
passed
that mark

stream-
ing serv-
Park ice
Jae-sang owned by
Google Inc.
It shows the enduring
popularity of the self-
deprecating video that
features Park Jae-sang's
giddy up-style dance
moves. The video has
been available on
YouTube since July 15,
averaging more than 200
million views per month.
Justin Bieber's video
for "Baby" held the previ-
ous YouTube record at
more than 800 million
views.

Rebel Wilson to
host movie awards
LOS ANGELES -
"Pitch Perfect" star and
"Bridesmaids" scene-
stealer Rebel Wilson is
taking center stage.
MTV said it tapped the
Australian actress to host
its annual movie awards,
set for April 14 in Culver
City, Calif. The network
made the announcement
late
Thursday
during
the finale
of its
popular
'Jersey
SShore"
series.
Rebel Wilson
Wilson is an ac-
tress and writer who rose
to fame with her role as
Kristin Wig's nosy room-
mate in "Bridesmaids."
Wilson's other credits in-


clude "Bachel
"What to Expe
You're Expect
The MTV M
Awards have
ally been hel
but as the sui
movie season
into May, the
scheduled its
lier to give fil
peek at the se
blockbusters.
Movie Award
featured excl
previews.

Travis pl
guilty to
PLANO, Tex
try star Randy
pleaded not gi
ple assault an
March 11 in a
municipal cou
Travis on Fr
peared in a Pl
room with his
and asked for
Plano police
Travis followii
23 incident in
parking lot in
allegedly inter
an argument i
woman he kno
estranged hus
body was hurt
Travis, whei
day by WFAA-
ment about hi
legal troubles.
ple shouldn't 1
everything the
hear or read.


Asso
John Paul White and Joy Williams of The Civil Wars perform at the Austin City Limits Music Festival, ii
Texas. Williams said Thursday in a Twitter chat she's been listening to new music, a sign that the (
winning duo who ended their recent European tour due to 'irreconcilable differences' may release a new
2013.



Twitter post offers clu



to The Civil Wars' futui


Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. While
there still remain questions about
the future of The Civil Wars, there's
new music on the way
Joy Williams, one half of the
Grammy Award-winning duo with
John Paul White, said Thursday dur-
ing a Twitter chat she was in the stu-
dio listening to new Civil Wars songs.
It's a tantalizing clue to the fu-
ture of the group, which appeared
in doubt when a European tour un-
raveled last month due to "irrecon-
cilable differences."
At the time, the duo said it hoped
to release an album in 2013. It's not


clear if Williams was referring
Thursday to music for a new album
or for a documentary score they
have composed with T Bone Bur-
nett. They're also set to release an
"Unplugged" session on iTunes on
Jan. 15.
Nate Yetton, the group's man-
ager and Williams' husband, had
no comment though he has sup-
plied a few hints of his own by post-
ing pictures of recording sessions
on his Instagram account recently
The duo announced last summer it
would be working with Charlie
Peacock, who produced its gold-
selling debut "Barton Hollow." The
photos do not show Williams nor


White, but one includes
player Odessa Rose.
Rose said in an Instagra
"Playing on the new Civ
record ... Beautiful sounds
Even with its future in do
duo continues to gather ac
Williams and White are u
Golden Globe on Jan. 13,.
Grammy Awards on Feb.
their "The Hunger Games'
track collaboration "Safe &
with Taylor Swift.
Williams' comments cai
ing an installment of an a
terview series with Alison
A Fine Frenzy sponsored
Recording Academy


Movie REVIEW


Cruise oozes low-key charisma as 'Reac

CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic


orette" and The idea of watching a movie in
ect When which a sniper methodically crafts his
ing." own bullets, practices weekly at a gun
[ovie range, then waits quietly in an empty
tradition- parking garage before shooting five
d in June, people dead may not sound like the
mmer most appealing form of entertainment
has edged during these tragic days.
network Nevertheless, it's important to assess
show ear- 'Jack Reacher" on its own terms, for
Im fans a what it is and what it isn't Besides being
eason's caught in some unfortunate timing, it's
The MTV also clever, well-crafted and darkly hu-
s has often morous, and it features one of those ef-
usive film fortless bad-ass performances from Tom
Cruise that remind us he is indeed a
movie star, first and foremost
ds nt OK, so maybe Cruise doesn't exactly
ads not resemble the Reacher of British nov-
assault elist Lee Child's books: a 6-foot-5, 250-
xas Coun- pound, blond behemoth. If you haven't
rTravis has read them, you probably won't care.
uilty to sim- Even if you have read them, Christo-
d faces trial pher McQuarrie's film the first he's
Dallas-area directed and written since 2000's "The
[rt. Way of the Gun" moves so fluidly
iday ap- and with such confidence, it'll suck
ano court- you in from the start
attorneys McQuarrie, the Oscar-winning writer
a jury trial of "The Usual Suspects," exhibits some
e cited Hitchcockian aspirations in 'Jack
ng an Aug Reacher" with its sense of foreboding
a church from the very beginning, its twists and
which he double crosses and the quintessential
rvened in icy blonde at the center in British
involving a beauty Rosamund Pike. Hinting at a ro-
ows and her mance between the two main charac-
band. No- ters is among the film's few mistakes.
As Pee-wee Herman said in "Pee-
n asked Fri- wee's Big Adventure" to the woman
TV to com- who has a crush on him: "You don't
s recent want to get mixed up with a guy like
, said peo- me. I'm a loner, Dottie. A rebel." Taken
believe from the Child novel "One Shot," Jack
ey might Reacher is all that: a former military
investigator who's become a bit of a
-From wire reports mythic figure since he's gone off the


Birthday There's a possibility that in the year ahead you
will enter into an endeavor with a newfound enterprising
friend. This person will think on a much grander scale than
you, elevating your expectations as well.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)- If a loved one comes to
you for some advice, strive to be as frank and forthright as
possible.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The possibility for success
is pretty good, provided you see everything you take on
through to the desired conclusion. Don't get careless and
leave anything up to chance.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Even if you feel you need
to soothe the pride of an egotistical friend, don't attempt to
use flattery. Sincerity will produce far better results.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) The end results aren't likely


Tom Cruise stars in the film "Jack Reacher."


grid. No address, no credit card trail.
This is a guy who uses pay phones -
that's how stealthy he is.
When the deadly shooting occurs at
the film's start, along the Riverwalk
outside PNC Park where the Pitts-
burgh Pirates play, authorities believe
they've quickly found their man: a
sniper who's ex-Army himself named
Barr He reveals nothing during his in-
terrogation but manages to scribble the
words "Get Jack Reacher" on a
notepad before winding up in a coma.
Reacher is hard to reach, if you'll
pardon the pun, but he knows to show
up anyway when he hears about the
crime just 'cause he's one of those
stay-one-step-ahead kind of guys. He
agrees to team up with Barr's defense
attorney, Helen Rodin (Pike), hoping
to burying the guy But the deeper he
digs, the more he realizes the case
isn't as simple as he, the lead detective
(David Oyelowo) or the district attor-
ney (Richard Jenkins) had hoped.
Besides being a mind teaser, 'Jack
Reacher" offers the muscular thrills of


Today's HOROSCOPE
to be too desirable if you work only along the lines of least
resistance.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Tell it like it is if you hope to win the
respect of your contemporaries. If you gild the lily now, it will only
give your listeners cause to doubt your future statements.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Generally, and under most
conditions, you are a reasonably good manager of your re-
sources. This quality, however, is likely to be absent today
at present. Be as careful as you can.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Be satisfied with a small but
handy return from an investment that you're only tangen-
tially involved in. If you press for more, it'll give the powers
that be cause to wonder if you deserve anything.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) That which you ignore will
only require more attention later, so take your responsibili-


a '70s action flick, incl
scenes that mercifully
edited messes and a thi
longed car chase through t
downtown Pittsburgh, wit
ing and screeching provic
rhythmic soundtrack. C
down the megawatt charis
stead relies on a no-nons
weariness which has its om
Disappointingly, though
Herzog is a bit of a stereo
lain as a mastermind nam
he's never really fleshed
to seem truly frightening,
he sounds right for the
when delivering voiceove:
ject matter he's excited a
own films, like the d(
"Cave of Forgotten Dream
he's threatening us v
domination.
'Jack Reacher," a Para
tures release, is rated PC
lence, language and
material. Running time: 1
Three stars out of four


ties and duties seriously.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Ignoring certain pe
cial gathering will not only breed resentment,
servers to question if you're just being nice to
can do you some good.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You'll attract admire
by accentuating your more modest virtues, while
could prove to be counterproductive. Make a wis
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It would be wise
anything for granted, even in situations where
ally lucky.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -You might find
situations that simultaneously offer some gre.
ties. If it's difficult to handle both at the same
the best one first.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20
Fantasy 5:7 12 22 27 29
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posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY
cited Press
n Austin, Today is Saturday, Dec.
Grammy- 22, the 357th day of 2012.
album in There are nine days left in
the year.
Today's Highlight:

Bird Johnson, the wife of
Ie aPresident Lyndon B. John-
son, was born Claudia Alta
Taylor in Karnack, Texas.
On this date:
r e In 1808, Ludwig van
Beethoven's Symphony No.
s violin 5 in C minor, Op. 67, Sym-
phony No. 6 in F major, Op.
am post: 68, and Piano Concerto No.
vil Wars 4 in G major, Op. 58, had
their world premieres in Vi-
)ubt, the enna, Austria.
colades. In 1864, during the Civil
up for a War, Union Gen. William T.
and two Sherman said in a message
10, for to President Abraham Lin-
"sound- coin: "I beg to present you as
Sound" a Christmas-gift the city of
e Savannah."
me dur-
artist in- In 1910, a fire lasting more
Sudol of than 26 hours broke out at
by The the Chicago Union Stock
Yards; 21 firefighters were
killed in the collapse of a
burning building.
In 1937, the first, center
S tube of the Lincoln Tunnel
connecting New York City
r and New Jersey underneath
the Hudson River was
opened to traffic. (The north
tube opened in 1945, the
-: south tube in 1957.)
In 1944, during the World
War II Battle of the Bulge,
U.S. Brig. Gen. Anthony C.
McAuliffe rejected a German
demand for surrender, writing
"Nuts!" in his official reply.
In 1984, New York City
resident Bernhard Goetz shot
and wounded four youths on
a Manhattan subway, claim-
ing they were about to rob
him.
In 2001, Richard C. Reid, a
passenger on an American
Airlines flight from Paris to
Miami, tried to ignite explo-
Associated Press sives in his shoes, but was
subdued by flight attendants
and fellow passengers. (Reid
uding fight is serving a life sentence in
aren't over- federal prison.)
killing, pro- Ten years ago: A defiant
he streets of North Korea said it had
h the grind- begun removing U.N. seals
ling its own and surveillance cameras
ruise dials from nuclear facilities U.S. of-
sma and in-
ense world- ficials said could yield
wn appeal. weapons within months.
gh, Werner Five years ago: Ajury in
atypical vil- Riverhead, N.Y., convicted
ed The Zec; John White, a black man, of
out enough second-degree manslaughter
but at least in the shooting death of
part. Even Daniel Cicciaro, a white
r about sub- teenager, during a confronta-
about in his tion outside White's house.
documentary One year ago: A wave of
ns," it's as if 16 bombings ripped across
vith world Baghdad, killing at least 69
people in the worst violence
amount Pic- in Iraq in months days after
--13 for vio- the last American forces left
some drug the country, heightening fears
30 minutes, of a new round of Shiite-
Sunni sectarian bloodshed.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Hector Elizondo is 76. Base-
ball Hall-of-Famer Steve
ople at a so- Carlton is 68. ABC News an-
but cause ob- chor Diane Sawyer is 67.
Those who Rock singer-musician Rick


Nielsen (Cheap Trick) is 66.
rs more readily Rapper Luther Campbell is
flamboyance 52. Rhythm-and-blues singer
e choice.
not to take Jordin Sparks is 23.
you are usu- Thought for Today: "The
way you overcome shyness
yourself in two is to become so wrapped up
at opportuni- in something that you forget
time, focus on to be afraid." Lady Bird
Johnson (1912-2007).











RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Century of music


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


SONNY HEDGECOCK/High Point Enterprise
Wanna McAnally plays organ in the chapel at Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church, in High Point, N.C. McAnally, who recently
turned 100, has been playing for more than 80 years.

North Carolina church organist stillplaying songs at 100 years old


JIMMY TOMLIN
High Point Enterprise
-HIGH POINT, N.C.
Wanna McAnally takes her seat at
the chapel organ of Wesley Me-
morial United Methodist
Church an organ donated to
the church in her honor, by the way and
squints at an open hymnal before her.
"I didn't bring my glasses," she protested
mildly, as if that might somehow prevent
her from playing this distinguished instru-
ment she's been playing for more than 80
years.
Ten seconds later, the organ rumbled to
life, its majestic pipes resonating with a
medley of old hymns emanating from the
High Point woman's 100-year-old fingertips.
With no warmup, and even in the chilly
chapel air the room remains unheated
when no service is taking place McAnally
hit every note.
"They look terrible," she said as she in-
spected her wrinkled hands, "but they still
play."
Indeed, they do. And McAnally, with or
without her glasses, doesn't need a hymn-


Religion NOTES


CELEBRATE
CHRISTMAS
First Assembly of God,
4201 S. Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness, will host Larry Ford
for a Christmas/Patriotic Con-
cert at the 10:30 a.m. service
Sunday, Dec. 23. Ford is a
Grammy Award-winning tenor
who has been singing since the
age of 5. He is an ordained
minister and is often seen on
the Gaither Homecoming pro-
grams. His music has taken
him all throughout the United
States and to many foreign
countries.
Pastor Dairold Rushing in-
vites everyone to attend. There
is no charge, but a free-will of-
fering will be received. For in-
formation, call 352-726-1107.
Faith Lutheran Church is
off State Road 44 and County
Road 491, inside Crystal Glen
Subdivision. Regular services
are at 6 p.m. Saturday and
9:30 a.m. Sunday. Following
the Sunday service is a time of
fellowship and Bible study. No
Bible study on Christmas Eve
or New Year's Eve. Christmas
Eve Holy Communion candle-
light service is at 7 p.m. The
Christmas Day Festival Service
is at 10 a.m. No New Year's
Eve or New Year's Day serv-
ices. Everyone is welcome. For
information, call 352-527-3325
or visit faithlecanto.com.
Advent continues Sunday
at Joy Lutheran Church on
S.W. State Road 200 at 83rd
Place, Ocala. The Advent mes-
sage by Senior Pastor Edward
Holloway Jr. for tomorrow is
"Realign Life to God." Christ-


mas Eve Communion candle-
light services are 7 and 10
p.m., with Pastor Holloway's
message, "Rejoice Your Savior
Has Come."
Call 352-854-4509, ext. 221.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) on Fort Island
Trail West, will celebrate the
fourth Sunday of Advent with
services at 8 and 10:15 a.m. All
are invited to join St. Anne's at
6 p.m. Sunday for a Wassail
sing-along. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Gospel Band
will lead the caroling. There will
be hotdogs and hot cider.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, will hold
regular worship services at
8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday
school and Bible class at
9:15 a.m. will continue the
study and discussion about
"The End Times." The Christ-
mas Eve candlelight service is
at 6:30 p.m. The Christmas Eve
Service of Lessons and Carols
is at 10 p.m. Christmas Day
worship is at 10 a.m. The com-
munity is invited to all services.
Call 352-489-3027.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to the
Christmas worship service at 9
a.m. Sunday to celebrate the
hope and promise that comes
with the miracle of Christmas.
Following the service is a coffee
fellowship. No Wednesday
service Dec. 26. Wednesday
Bible study resumes the follow-
ing week. NorthRidge is a non-
denominational church where


Page C2


book she's got reams of sheet music in
her head.
"She's really quite remarkable," said the
Rev Al Ward, senior pastor at Wesley Me-
morial. "She may say, 'I missed a note,' but I
don't think anybody would ever find it."
McAnally, who recently turned 100, began
playing the organ in high school after tak-
ing up the piano at age 9 and she never
quit. She served as the church's official or-
ganist for 34 years from 1962 until her re-
tirement in 1996 but she was also the
assistant organist for 16 years before that
stint and has continued playing for weekly
communion services in the chapel since
retiring.
That's an impressive resume in itself, but
it doesn't even include the countless wed-
dings and funerals she's performed at
McAnally began playing at weddings when
she was a senior at Salem College circa
1932 and conservatively estimates she
has musically escorted more than 500
brides down the aisle at Wesley Memorial
and other local churches.
"I've played for two generations I
played for the couple's wedding and for
their children's weddings," she said. "And


it's amazing wherever I go, somebody will
come up to me and say, 'You played for my
wedding."'
McAnally recalls that when she was the
church's assistant organist, church officials
asked her three times to become the official
organist, but she kept turning them down. A
vote among her immediate family her
husband, Charles, and their two children -
came up three to one against her taking the
job, because her family knew what a huge
commitment the job would require.
"I can remember times we were going
somewhere, and there would be a funeral,"
recalls McAnally's daughter, Wanna Blanton
of High Point. "She never turned anybody
down, so she just had to change her plans.
She was always on call."
She ultimately took the job on an interim
basis the official organist had gone on
what was to be a one-year mission trip, but
never returned to the church and that in-
terim position lasted 34 years.
Through the years, Charles McAnally a
High Point attorney who is now deceased -
apparently grew tired of his wife's many


Page C5


: .5 -: - -- : .. ..:I
Special to the Chronicle
Clients from the Key Center's "Simon" and "Davis" cottages visited Homosassa Butter-
fly Attraction for their Christmas party.



A day of enjoyment


Special to the Chronicle
It was a different kind of Christmas
party for the clients from the Key Center's
"Simon" and "Davis" cottages this year!
They were invited by Bobby Vigliottito to
take a tour of his Homosassa Butterfly At-
traction, one of Citrus County's most pop-
ular attractions.
Together with their chaperones, the
clients enjoyed an educational movie
about the lifecycle of butterflies, followed
by "hands-on" demonstrations and then a
trip through the butterfly garden where
they were surrounded by a plethora of
butterflies in their natural habitat
To top off their Christmas party, volun-
teers Robert and Mary Ann DeSimone
hosted a scrumptious outdoor barbecue
with presents for all.
The Key Center has various "cottages"
where up to 10 clients reside on a year-


The Key Center has
various "cottages" where
up to 10 clients reside on
a year-round basis.

round basis. On occasion, volunteer com-
panions may organize an outing of some
kind for a single client or a group of
clients.
This gesture gives the clients a much-
needed diversity in their normal everyday
routine, and is enjoyed immensely by
everyone involved.
For information on how you may be-
come involved in giving a small amount of
your time and/or talents to help out the
less fortunate, call Neale Brennan at the
Key Center at 352-795-5541, ext. 313.


Singing


songs of


peace

ne of my favorite
parts of Christmas
is attending the
Christmas Eve service at
my church.
With the lights dimmed,
candles soften the sanctu-
ary, soften faces, quiet the
hearts of the people who
have come.
Some come harried and
hassled. Others come bur-
dened and broken. All
come seeking something,
seeking peace.
At my church, it's our
tradition on Christmas
Eve to sing of peace and
silence. As we hold can-
dles we sing, "Peace,
peace, peace on earth and
good will to all."
We sing, "Silent night,
holy night," and "Now let
us all sing together of
peace, peace, peace on
earth."
It's a holy, happy mo-
ment as we sing. It's a mo-
ment when all is calm and
quiet, still and right. And
then we walk outside
where all is not still,
where all is not calm, not
quiet, not right.
Sometimes people call
the newsroom telling
whoever answers the
See Page C5


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Jewish

influences

and

Christmas
t is a scene that is re-
peated all over the
world at this time of
year. A family gathers to-
gether, pops in a Christ-
mas CD, or perhaps views
a DVD, enjoys some sea-
sonal candies, and
watches the children as
they open their presents
and toys.
There may even be a
brief prayer or two in
honor of the birth ofJesus
and what most will not re-
alize is all these acts have
Jewish roots.
What is Christmas with-
out the seasonal peren-
nial, "White Christmas"?
This favorite with its nos-
talgic look at snow was
written by a Jew, Irving
Berlin. And oy! if that
were not enough, the
lovely carol, "Hark! The
Herald Angels Sing" was
written by Felix
Mendelssohn, who con-
verted to Christianity so
his music would gain
fame in a world that was
anti-Semitic in his day.
And let us not forget the
Jewish artists who record
seasonal albums, such as
Barry Manilow and Bar-
bra Streisand.
When it comes to
videos, most likely they
were produced by Jewish
producers such as the
See Page C5


MAI~I f





C2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

you will experience a friendly,
loving and casual atmosphere.
The church meets at the Inver-
ness Woman's Club, 1715 For-
est Ridge Drive, across from
the Whispering Pines Park en-
trance. For informaiton, call
Pastor Kennie Berger at 352-
302-5813.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River will
meet for worship at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. The sermon by the
Rev. Jack Alwood is "Angels
and Humans" and the chancel
choir will sing "Christmastide"
and guest soloist Susan
Stofcheck will sing "Mary, Did
You Know?" Christmas Eve
candles and communion begins
at 6 p.m. and is open to all. Visit
www.fpccrflorida.org or call
352-795-2259.
First Lutheran Church
will present "A Festival of Nine
Lessons and Carols" featuring
music and Scripture readings to
tell the story of the birth of
Christ. The readers of the Word
will tell the story, the choir will
describe the scene in the music
of glorious anthems, and the
congregation will join the choir
to all sing familiar carols to-
gether. Come early to hear the
beautiful pre-service music.
The service will be celebrated
at 10 a.m. Sunday in the First
Lutheran Church sanctuary at
1900 W. State Road 44, Inver-
ness. This service originated in
Kings College Chapel, Cam-
bridge, England, where for
more than 75 years it has been
broadcast live every Christmas
Eve to millions of listeners
around the world, who have
made it an integral part of their
Christmas celebration. Every-
one is invited. There is no ad-
mission charge. A freewill
offering will be collected. For in-
formation, call the church office
at 352-726-1637.
Hernando United


RELIGION


Nature Dulcimer Players


Special to the Chronicle
The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Citrus Springs will host the Nature Dulcimer Play-
ers at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 30. The Players will present a musical salute to winter,
demonstrate their instruments, and perform a number of carols and songs. Pictured (left to
right) are Karen Ott of Inverness, Maxine Connor of Homosassa, Nancy Turner of Citrus
Springs, Cheryl McElwain of Inverness and Betty Musick of Pine Ridge.


Methodist Church will have
special Christmas music at the
Sunday morning service at
10 tomorrow. There will also be
a small group of young people
playing the instrument they
have been studying under the
direction of Darryl Frenier, choir
director. Pastor Jerry Carris will
also hold a candlelight service
at 6 p.m. Christmas Eve with a
live Nativity scene and Com-
munion will be served. All are
invited to partake of the Lord's
supper. It is not necessary to be
a member of the church. The
church is at 2125 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County Road
486), Hernando.
The Christmas cantata,
"Then Jesus Came," will be pre-
sented at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at
Heritage Baptist Church,
2 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
There will be no evening serv-
ice. A candlelight Christmas Eve
service will take place at 6 p.m.
There will be no evening service
Sunday, Dec. 30. A New Year's
Eve service will take place at
7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31.


The children of First
Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs will share a
Christmas presentation during
the 10:30 a.m. worship service
Sunday followed by light re-
freshments. A Christmas can-
dlelight service will take place
at 6 p.m. Sunday. The church is
at 7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Dan Wagner is the minis-
ter. Call the church office at
352-628-5556.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church's chancel
choir will present the musical
cantata, "A Night For Rejoic-
ing," at 11 a.m. Sunday. Christ-
mas Eve candlelight worship
with Holy Communion is at
5 and 7:30 p.m. The church is
on County Road 486 opposite
Citrus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., welcomes everyone to at-
tend a combined worship serv-
ice at 11 a.m. Sunday. The
choir will present a Christmas
cantata. There will be no


8:30 a.m. blended worship
service or 6 p.m. evening serv-
ice. Sunday school classes will
begin at the regular time of
9:45 a.m. The church invites
everyone to share in a special
candlelight service at 7 p.m.
Christmas Eve. The Rev. John
Rothra will deliver a Christmas
message. Communion will be
served. There will be no supper
or services on Wednesday. Visit
www.fbcfloralcity.org or call
352-726-4296.
First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills will show its origi-
nal Christmas drama produc-
tion of "Simple Gifts" at 6 p.m.
Sunday. "Simple Gifts" prom-
ises to be heartwarming and
entertaining for the entire fam-
ily. There will be a special treat
for all children in attendance. In
addition to the drama, mem-
bers of the Crystal River High
School Band will perform a se-
lection of songs on the hand
bells. The church invites you
and your loved ones to be our
honored guests this Christmas
season. The church is at 4950


N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-746-2970.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to celebrate the Nativity of
Our Lord on Monday by attend-
ing Nativity Vespers Molieben
(healing service) at 4 p.m., Holy
Supper at 5 p.m. and the Nativ-
ity Vigil at 6:30 p.m. Join us at
9 a.m. Christmas morning for
Nativity Divine Liturgy. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, off U.S. 41 North,
across from Dollar General. Call
352-726-4777.
First United Methodist
Church of Ocala will offer three
Christmas Eve services: two
traditional services at 4 and 7 in
the sanctuary with harp, organ,
kids choir, chancel choir, and in-
strumental ensemble, and a
contemporary service at 5:30
with praise band and kids choir
in the Family Life Center. All
services include childcare in the
nursery and candlelight and
Communion. The youths will
present a live nativity in the
courtyard 15 minutes before the
7 p.m. service. Everyone is in-
vited. The church is at 1126 E.
Silver Springs Blvd. (State
Road 40) diagonally across the
boulevard from the old Ritz
Hotel. Call 352-622-3244 or
visit www.fumcocala.org.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church's Christmas Eve family
candlelight service with Com-
munion is at 4:30 p.m. and the
traditional candlelight service
with Communion is at 7 p.m. A
nursery is provided. The church
is at 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S..19), Crystal River. Call
352-795-5325 or visit www.st
timothylutherancrystalriver.com.
Inverness Church of God
will have a Christmas Eve serv-
ice at 5 p.m. The public is in-
vited. The church is at 416 U.S.
41 South, Inverness. Call the
church at 352-726-4524.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., off U.S. 41 in Hernando,
invites everyone to its Christ-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

mas Eve service at 7 p.m.
Come and worship the new-
born King.
Suncoast Baptist
Church, at 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs, will
have its Christmas Eve candle-
light service at 6 p.m. Everyone
is welcome. For information,
call 352-621-3008.
Peace Lutheran will have
its Christmas Eve service at 7
p.m. Christmas Day service is
at 10 a.m. The Dunnellon com-
munity is invited.
The church is collecting un-
wrapped toys for Toys-4-Tots.
Food is being collected for
Food-4-Kids. Visit www.
PeaceLutheranOnline.com.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate Christ-
mas Eve services with Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 with a children's
pageant at 7 p.m., then Christ-
mas carols at 10:30 p.m. fol-
lowed by the 11 p.m. Rite 2
Solemn High Eucharist. Mulled
cider and cookies will be served
between the two services.
Christmas Day Holy Eucharist
Rite 1 service is at 10 a.m.
WORSHIP
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to celebrate the Nativity
of Our Lord by attending Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and Di-
vine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday.
The church is at 1277 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness (off U.S. 41
North, across from Dollar Gen-
eral). The Holy Myrrhbearers
ask attendees to bring a box or
can of food for distribution at
Family Resource Center in Her-
nando. Call 352-726-4777.
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rock Acres Industrial Park, 6843
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday. Regular church serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
Call Pastor Brian Kinker at 352-
601-4868. The ministry website
is Covenant-Love.com.
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


DCry'stal River
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12thAve.) Nurse
Provided


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.

S 8-I 0-0i ,,.l sr
i i ii ii I -


S Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon
00OA93J

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 -4:30pmr
795-4479

THE
SALVATION
ARMY "CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
712 S. Sol Ave.


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (All Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org





"The
Church
in the

I..I .,11
-"" Y










Special
Event or
Weekly

Services

Please Call
Beverly at

564-2912
For

Advertising

Information


ST. ANNE'S Crystal River B--E Crystal
SCHURCHURCH OF River
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion CHRIST Foursquare
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple A Friendly Churchl C
To be one in Christ in r With A Bible Message. ospel Church
,I I1... VU .... .... ... I .. ... . . .. .


c ie/ vres ueas Hs ser vuats,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


Corner ot U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


:" ": T West Homosassa
U6JIyW Citrus First United
HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
SCKIN FAM I LY Church of Christ Methodist
IN CH KIS! 9592 W.Deep Woods Dr. church

CKYSTAL Crystal River, FL 34465 Everyone
RIv CK. 352-564-8565 Becoming
VJN IT D www.westcitruscoc.com A Disciple
i of Christ


A (THODi I TIl
CH U IC H
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:, A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


W. Deep Woods Dr.
-X




US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


uJ





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the fourth Sunday
of Advent with Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. A nurs-
ery is provided during the
10:30 a.m. service. Christian
Formation is at 9:15 a.m. Godly
Play Sunday school is at
10 a.m. The Christmas Eve Eu-
charist begins at 10 p.m. with
carols followed by Holy Eu-
charist at 10:30 p.m. The
Christmas Day Eucharist is at
9:30 a.m. No healing service or


RELIGION


Bible study Wednesday due to
the holiday. SOS is from 9 a.m.
to noon Thursday at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church.
Evening Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, offers the following Sun-
day activities: SONrise Sunday
school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at
9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages
4 through fourth grade during
the 9 a.m. service, Sunday
school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except the
7:45 a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered and AWANA begins


at 5:15. Midweek worship serv-
ice for adults is at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. For the youths,
there is "Ignite," and for chil-
dren, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252 or visit www.fbcinver-
ness.com.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate the fourth
Sunday of Advent with Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. Sunday
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. Adult Sunday school
is at 9:30 a.m. Lunch is at
12:15 p.m. followed by youth
Sunday school. The food pantry
is open from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday. The
Feed My Sheep Ministry will
serve a hot lunch at 11:30 a.m.


Wednesday followed by a heal-
ing and Holy Eucharist at
12:30 p.m. Morning prayer is at
9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City welcomes everyone
to share in the 8:30 a.m.
blended service and 11 a.m.
traditional service Sunday. Cof-
fee and doughnuts are served
in the fellowship hall from 9:15
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school
classes for all ages begin at
9:45 a.m. Sunday evening
service is at 6. Wednesday
evening suppers begin at 5.
Cost is $3 for adults, $2 for
youth, $1 for children 12 and
younger, with a maximum of
$10 per family. The Wednesday
evening services includes adult


Bible study and prayer meeting,
youth ministry (Ordinary Teens,
Extraordinary God) and
AWANA at 6:30 p.m. For infor-
maiton, visit www.fbcflorcity.org
or call 352-726-4296.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. The first
Sunday monthly is designated
for children to have a special
time together in the "Children's
Church" room during the
10:30 a.m. worship service.
The remaining Sundays, chil-
dren will remain in the audito-
rium for worship with their
parents. Sunday school begins
at 9:30 a.m. with classes for
everyone. Adult Bible class is at
7 p.m. Wednesday in rooms


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 C3

105 and 106. The youth group
meets at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
the Youth Ministries Building.
K.I.D. Zone (for children pre-k
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s
dinner from 6:30 to 7; and chil-
dren's Bible study classes from
7 to 8 p.m. The church is at 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Call 352-
726-4524.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. Call 352-382-2557.
See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! i

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL


CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com



Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912




For

Information

On Your

Religious

Advertising

_________|


SHomosassa Springs
. SEVENTH-DAYADVENTIST'fCHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


~ Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


U:."



5,'U
I 'I
Fis Bapis



Chrc


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
00A5H7 Floral City, FL.


LECANTO
CHURCH
OF CHRIST
797 S Rowe Terrace
Lecanto, FL 34460
Sunday AM
Bible Class.......10:00 a.m.
Worship............11:00 a.m.
Sunday PM
Worship..............5:00 p.m.
Wednesday PM
Bible Class.........7:00 p.m.
Committed to restoring
the "old paths" of New
Testament Christianity.
Visitors Come Worship With Us
A Warm Welcome Awaits You!
"Speak where the Bible Speaks;
be silent were itis silent."


Minister
John D. Arnold
352-746-4919 Office
386-208-4967 Cell


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
** _____--~-^^^^
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
L www.fbcfloralcity.org


Grace Bible
Church





Sunday
9:30 AM..................-Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM..................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
12 mi.east of US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


The New Church
Without Walls


Multi-Cultural
Rev. Stephen Lane Non-Denominational
SCongregation Ministering to
Fa ith I the Heart of Citrus County"
Lutheran Senior Pastors & Founders

Church (L.CM.S.) ,
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto "
Crystal Glen Subdivision rc
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325


COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

^fyffiort ,^ (~Met


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information



Community Church




Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.aenesiscommunitvchurch.ora
*Authentic Love Relevant Faith
SEmbracing Community


Good

Shepherd
Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

32 4 71


I I I





C4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church invites the public to wor-
ship at 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday.
A coffee hour follows both serv-
ices. The church is barrier free
and offers a free CD ministry,
large-print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery atten-
dant is available for preschool-
age children. The church is on
County Road 486 opposite Cit-
rus Hills Boulevard in Hernando.
Call 352-746-7161.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
meet at 9 a.m. Sunday and 10
a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Sunday morning worship serv-
ice is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at the
junction of U.S. 41 and State
Road 40. Call the church office
at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa, 10540 W. Yulee
Drive, weekly schedule: Sunday
school for all ages at 9 a.m., fol-
lowed by morning worship at
10:25. Youth Bible study is at
4:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall.
Sunday evening Bible study be-
gins at 6. Life Care Center is
open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday and
Thursday. Call 352-628-3858.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service is at
6. Midweek services are at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Young
Musicians/Puppeteers meet at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Youth
Bible study for ages 11 and
older is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the
second and fourth Fridays
monthly in the fellowship hall.
The church is on East Parsons
Point Road in Hernando.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church at 6918
S. Spartan Ave. in Homosassa
(one mile from U.S. 19, off Car-
dinal Street). Visit comeand-
seefbc.org. Services are
interpreted for the deaf. Sunday
school classes at 9:45 a.m. with
Sunday worship at 11 a.m. and
6 p.m. "King's Kids" and "Fly-
ers" for K-5 grades from 6 to
7:15 p.m. Sunday. Wednes-
day Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. with "War-
riors" for grades 6 through 12
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
First Presbyterian
Church will celebrate the fourth
Sunday of Advent with one
service of worship only at 10
a.m. The Rev. Craig S. Davies


RELIGION


will preach on "The Greatest
Good News of All," with read-
ings from Luke 2:1-14. The
Christmas Eve family service
with congregational participa-
tion is at 6 p.m. The Christmas
Eve candlelight Communion
service is at 8 p.m. The church
is at 206 Washington Ave.,
Inverness. Call the church at
352-637-0770.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services are at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study is at
6 p.m. Wednesday in the
chapel. Everyone is welcome.
Call 352-746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6.
Wednesday Bible study is at
7 p.m. Everyone is welcome.
The church is at the intersec-
tion of State Road 44 and U.S.
19. Call Evangelist George
Hickman at 352-794-3372 or
352-795-8883, or email
georgehickman@yahoo.com.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions: 855-426-4542.
Abundant Life of Crystal
River is a growing church
where you can find a church
home as well as a caring
church family. The Sunday
morning service is at 10:30 and
the midweek service is at
7 p.m. Wednesday. Both serv-
ices have uncompromised and
encouraging Bible-based teach-
ings that will build your faith.
Abundant Life is a full-Gospel,
nondenominational church that
believes in the power of Pente-
cost. Come and grow with us.
Come as you are and leave for-
ever changed by the presence
of the Lord. Abundant Life of
Crystal River is at 4515 N. Talla-
hassee Road, Crystal River.
Visit www.abundantlifecitrus.org
or call 352-795-LIFE
First Church of God of In-
verness, 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to Sun-
day morning worship services
at 10:30. Call 352-344-3700.
The public is invited to
worship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
Call 352-726-0100.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Cornerstone Christian
Supply, a ministry of Inverness
Church of God, is having a
Christmas sale from now until
Monday. There are great sales
on Bibles some at half price.
T-shirts are buy one, get one
free. Many other items are also
on sale. Sale prices are for in-
stock items only. Cornerstone
Christian Supply is at 416 U.S.


41 S., Inverness. For informa-
tion, call the bookstore at 352-
344-2470.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly Hills
will host its monthly outdoor
flea market from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. today on the church prop-
erty at 6 Roosevelt Boulevard
in Beverly Hills off North
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491). Shoppers are wel-
come. Up to 50 commercial
and private vendors are ex-


pected to display their wares.
Commercial vendors and pri-
vate individuals are welcome to
bring and sell goods. Spaces
are available for $10. A mobile
kitchen, "Cooking Good," will
serve breakfast and lunch
items. Flea markets take place
the fourth Saturday monthly ex-
cept in June, July and
August. Next month's flea mar-
ket is Jan. 26. For informaiton
or to reserve a space, call Rose
Mary at 352-527-6459 or email


wjeselso@tampabay.rr.com.
A motorcycle ride through
the community of Dunnellon will
kick off the Dunnellon Com-
munity Revival Celebration.
All bikers should assemble for
prayer and the blessing of vehi-
cles at 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
Jan. 5, at First United Methodist
Church, 21501 W. State Road
40. All riders may then join a
"Ride for the Son" with the
Florida Chapter of the Christian
Motorcyclists Association. The


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ride will end at Dunnellon Plaza
for a time of prayer for the Re-
vival at 6:30 p.m. January 6-9 at
First United Methodist Church.
For Informaiton, call the church
office at 352-4894026.
SA "Community Revival
Celebration" will take place
Jan. 6-9 at Dunnellon First
United Methodist Church,
21501 W. State Road 40.
Gospel music, praise and

See NOTES/Page C9


We need your



information

As our community grows, it becomes even more important
that we know how to keep in touch with each other. The
Chronicle's annual publication of Our Home Citrus is the best
and most complete resource for all those important
organizations, clubs, hobby groups and other ways we make
friends, share pastimes and help each other out.


If you would like your group to be listed in this publication,
following form and mail or deliver by Jan. 4, 2013 to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Attention: Our Home Citrus
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


please fill out the


NAME OF ORGANIZATION: (Must be non-profit)
ORGANIZATION WEB PAGE:
MEETING PLACE: Specific building designation
(Elks Lodge, Resource Center, Town Restaurant, etc.)

STREET ADDRESS:


CITY:
MEETING TIME:
MEETING DATE: Day of week (Every Monday,
third Monday of the month, etc.)
CONTACT:
NAME:
PHONE NUMBER:
E-MAIL ADDRESS:

Please check the category which best describes your organization only one


category, please:

O Animals
O Arts and Crafts
L Civic
I Computers


O Education and Youth
L Food Programs
O Fraternal
O Gardening


L Cultural and Heritage L Hobbies


O Political
O Recreation Groups
1 Seniors
L Service Clubs
] Special Interest


Support Groups
Vehicles
Weight Control
Women's Clubs


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260



Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School ...............9:00
W orship..................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30


Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


O\S


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


First United

Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship
IRl rL-


Hwy.44 E@ 0
SWashington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services *
Traditional 0
i 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
i Casual Service *
9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service *
* Tapes & CD's Available *
" Sunday School for all ages 0
9 9:30 AM d
" Nursery Provided *
Fellowship & Youth Group
* 5 to 7 PM
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org u
Podcast: FPC inv.com *
U U
* Church Office 637-0770 U
* Pastor Craig Davies
,i


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and Y


harmony to all.

Come n over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, IN\


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


*.I








VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M to 3:15 P.M Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
.catholicweb.com .


I


2012
Wur Home



A guide to living in Citrus County
UKOWff


ERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CENTURY
Continued from Page C1

organ engagements, but a Bible
verse he kept in his wallet kept
him from asking her to give up
music. According to McAnally, the
verse encouraged Christians to
use the gifts God had given them,
and Charles couldn't help but ac-


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

phone their stories of injus-
tices done to them or to
someone else. They tell us
stories of their pain phys-
ical, financial, mental, emo-
tional, spiritual.
They call us hoping we
will take away their pain.
They call us hoping we can
give them peace.
Some call regularly with
the same story, the same
chronic pain that worsens
as time goes by
We can tell their stories in
the paper, which may or
may not bring them relief,
although any relief is tem-
porary at best. But we are
powerless to take away their
pain. We are impotent to
give them peace.
At Christmastime we sing
of peace, because that's all



JOURNAL
Continued from Page C1

Weinstein Company The
credit list for most of the
Christmas-themed shows,
especially on the Hallmark
Channel, read like a syna-
gogue membership list.
As for those presents
around the tree, many of
them, no doubt, came from
stores owned or founded by
Jews. Those tools for dad,
from The Home Depot, the
teens' outfits from The Gap,
mom's robe from Macy's and
the kids' toys made by Mat-
tel all have Jewish
connections.
Jews have been mer-
chants for years dealing in
everything from pots and
pans to diamonds. Many of
this country's famous de-
partment stores started out
as peddler operations until
their owners were able to
purchase a building to start
a store.
As a matter of fact, a
friendly rivalry between two
famous New York depart-
ment stores led to the cre-
ation of the famous Macy's
Thanksgiving Day parade.
What would the holiday sea-
son be without this seasonal
kick-off?
Are you ready to sink your
teeth into some Christmas
candy? Those famous
Peeps, marshmallow treats
usually associated with
Easter, also come in the
shape of Christmas trees
and are made by a Jewish
candy company Ditto for
Ben and Jerry's ice cream
and Celestial Seasonings
Tea, though the original
Jewish owners have since
sold their companies to
other interests.
Growing up in Connecti-
cut, going into Hartford for
a visit to G. Fox & Co was a
special treat around the hol-
iday season. This Connecti-
cut institution had for its
motto, "The Center of Con-
necticut Living Since 1847."
The department store was
founded by a Jew, Gershom
Fox, and over the years it

WEEKLY LINEUP
Nearly a dozen medical
professionals share
their expertise with
columns in Health &
Life./Tuesdays
Read up on all things
school-related in the
Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
Plan menus for the
week from the recipes
in the Food section.
/Thursdays
Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene.
/Fridays
See what local houses
of worship plan to do in
the Religion section.
/Saturdays
Read about area
businesses in the
Business section.
/Sundays
Pick up tips for home
improvement, saving


money and cashing
in on antiques in
HomeFront./Sundays


RELIGION


knowledge music was her gift.
"He would pull that out and
read it sometimes," she recalls
with a chuckle. "I guess he got
tired of going to all those wed-
dings and funerals."
McAnally even missed a choir
trip to Carnegie Hall because she
had already committed to play at
a wedding.
"People would say, 'Don't you
get tired of playing at weddings?


anyone really wants.
Scottish theologian
William Barclay said the
word peace in the Bible
never simply means the ab-
sence of trouble. He wrote,
"The peace which the world
offers us is the peace of es-
cape, the peace which
comes from the avoidance
of trouble, the peace which
comes from refusing to face
things."
That's the peace we think
we want and the peace we
chase. We eat it, we drink it,
we snort it up our noses and
run up our credit cards try-
ing to buy it.
In contrast, Barclay said
the peace Jesus offers is the
"peace of conquest, the
peace which no experience
in life can ever take from us,
the peace which no sorrow,
no danger, no suffering can
make less the peace
which is independent of
outward circumstances."


morphed into a major iconic
mercantile operation carry-
ing everything from TVs to
lingerie. The store was over-
seen by the formidable ma-
triarch herself, Beatrice Fox
Auerbach, whose stringent
ways were never crossed. It
was a different time and
place, the 1980s, but the hol-
iday decorations at the store
never failed to thrill us all.
Before the store was sold
to the May Co., Fox's used to
use its street-level windows
for beautiful, animated
Christmas displays. There
were Santas and reindeer,


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 PM.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


SPRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Telefono: (352) 341-1711


S Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E.Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
........ P~Ii .-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
J Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!


Doesn't it get to be old hat?"'
McAnally said. "And I said, 'Every
time that bride walks down the
aisle, I get the biggest thrill. That's
always a happy time for me."'
Actually, any time she's playing
the organ is a happy time for
McAnally
"Practicing is never a chore for
me," she said. "Even when I'm


practicing, I'm
world."


A few years back some
historians determined that
since 3600 B.C., the world
has known less than 300
years of peace, and more
than 14,000 wars have killed
more than 3.64 billion
people.
We live in a world where
war, unrest and senseless vi-
olence is the norm and
peace is the oddity.
And yet, at Christmas we
sing of peace. We sing of it
because in a world of un-
peace it's what we long for
most. We sing of it because a
Prince of Peace left his
home in heaven and came
to earth, bringing peace
with him.
The angels who an-
nounced his coming pro-
claimed, "Glory to God in
the highest heaven, and on
earth peace to those on
whom his favor rests"
(Luke 2:14).
Peace, even when the


snow scenes and a toy work-
shop all with moving anima-
tronic movements; this
before 3-D TV and the other
electronic devices and ad-
vancements that we have
today
Still, people came from
all over Connecticut and
Massachusetts to view the
entertaining winter scenes.
There is but one other
Jewish influence on Christ-
mas I would like to point
out. Two thousand years
ago, a young Jewish mother
named Mary gave birth to a
child who would be known


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
.. i a, ,,..,.,,I .,,,i,,,rlil .,,,-dl,l ,, 1
meeting at the Inverness Womans( .
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813



tF fW
"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and inviteyou
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


just in another


To this day, she still practices a
couple of times a week in the
chapel, preparing for the Wednes-
day morning communion
services.
That says a lot, considering she
has to walk up a narrow stairwell
of about 15 steps just to get to the
chapel's balcony where the
organ is installed and she re-
fuses anyone who offers to assist
her


world is at war. Peace, even
when unpeace reigns. To
those on whom his favor
rests, God gives peace with
himself and the ability and
power to broker peace with
others and with ourselves.
For centuries, people
have sung about peace amid
unpeace. During the Ameri-
can Civil War, Henry
Wadsworth Longfellow
penned the words to the
carol, "I Heard the Bells on
Christmas Day"
In it he laments, "In de-
spair I bowed my head.
'There is no peace on earth,'
I said. 'For hate is strong
and mocks the song of peace
on earth, good will to men."'
But in the very next
stanza he wrote and we
still sing "Then pealed
the bells more loud and
deep: 'God is not dead, nor
doth he sleep; the wrong
shall fail, the right prevail
with peace on earth, good


as Jesus of Nazareth. This
man lived and died as a Jew
and it is his legacy and birth
that is the celebration of the
season.
May the beauty and good-
will that prevails during this
time of year, spill into the
next while we recognize our
common roots and heritage.

Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish
educator She lives in Ocala
with her husband, Phil.
She can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siid.i, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


will to men."
For those on whom God's
favor rests, peace is both
now and yet to come, a down
payment against the time
when Jesus brings a final,
once and for all, eternal
peace, restoring everything
we have destroyed.
Until then, it's Christmas.
Christ has come. Jesus him-
self is our peace. So, let us
sing.


*

*


*


*


*

*

*

*

*

*


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 CS

On McAnally's 100th birthday
Dec. 13, family and friends hon-
ored her with a birthday celebra-
tion at the church.
As for the future?
"I guess I'll keep playing a little
longer," McAnally said, "but I'll
quit by summer for sure."
Don't bet there won't be an en-
core, though. That's the same
thing McAnally told church offi-
cials last year


NancyKennedyis the
author of "Move Over,
Victoria -I Know the
Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing,"and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


8th Annual
Crystal River Community
Holiday Boat Parade




**- -^




Saturday, December 22nd
participants meet at Kings Bay at 4:45 pm
Parade starts promptly at 6:15pm

Decorate your boat in the theme of
"A Magical Christmas"
Watch the boat parade from any location on
Kings Bay to see Santa before he takes off on


his trip from the North Pole!
Prizes will be awarded for best themed boat and most lights.
Call Capt. Suzie Martin at 352-586-8068
to pre-register and for more information.


'^7 www chronicleonline corn


FIRST 4Years
Bringing Christ
FIRS to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
S& Bible Class
S 8:45 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor



^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing







OF aS SFho
63 a m.










OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and A


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! I

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. IarrTv Pner
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service ...................8:30 AM
Sunday School.....................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service.......................6:00 P
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes............7.....7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 P
Teens.............................. :15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"







Page C6 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NeWS NOTES News NOTES

N.W::TE Celebrating days of Hope ".W"NOTEw
Shuffleboard clubH Ceg ds f Celebrate new
to meet in B.H. year at center


The Beverly Hills Shuffle-
board Club board meeting
will be at 3 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 8, at the Central Ridge
Library; the members' meet-
ing will be at 3 p.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 10, at the
community center.
The club is still shuffling at
1 p.m. when weather permits,
and welcomes all. For infor-
mation, call Sharon Pineda at
352-527-8488.
Decorative Artists
to gather Jan. 5
Nature Coast Decorative
Artists Chapter of the Society
of Decorative Arists will meet
at 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, at
the Weeki Wachee Senior
Center (off U.S. 19 and Tou-
can Trail).
There will be a short meet-
ing, show and tell, and a
birthday raffle. There will be
no project this meeting; it's
the date for the White Ele-
phant Sale and Soup/Salad
and More lunch. Members
can bring items in to sell.
For more information, visit
naturecoastdecorative
artists.com, or call Andi at
352-666-9091, Jeanette at
727-857-1045, or Pat at 352-
249-7221.
Daystar closed
for holidays
Daystar Life Center of Cit-
rus County will be closed for
the holidays through Jan. 7.
The extended hours of clos-
ing will be for relocation into
the new office, to better sup-
port clients, and the installa-
tion of new food storage
racks.
Daystar is still participating
in the 2013 Birdies for Tampa
Bay Charities program. The
Bonus Pool for the 2013
Tampa Bay Championship
Birdies for Tampa Bay Chari-
ties program will guarantee a
10 percent Bonus Pool pay-
ment to Daystar for all do-
nated checks made out to
Tampa Bay Championship.
If you donate to Daystar
and make the check out to
Tampa Bay Championship,
the charity program will give
Daystar the amount of the
check, plus 10 percent. The
last day for payments to be
received and accepted for
the 2013 Birdies for Tampa
Bay Charities program will be
April 19. Daystar is asking
that all donation checks be
made out to Tampa Bay
Championship until April 19.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Olaf


Special to the Chronicle
Olaf is one of the sweetest
lap kitties you will ever
find. He loves to play and
also gets along very well
with humans and other
cats. This 1-year-old or-
ange tabby recently lost
his home through no
fault of his own and is
looking for another one.
Visitors are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humanitar-
ians' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Drop
by and enjoy our felines in
their cage-free, homestyle
environment. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fll86.html.


Eighth annual Spot Christmasjam slated for Sunday, Monday J


Special to the Chronicle

Celebrate at the Spot Family Cen-
ter's Christmas Jam from 5:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 23, and Mon-
day, Dec. 24. It's time for hope to be
put back into our lives and it's
through our loved ones we can see
the true reason for Christmas.
Even though economic times are
causing budgets to dwindle, where
the giving spirit of our community is
abundant, there is hope.
The Spot Family Center is hosting
its eighth annual Christmas Jam. The
two-day event is absolutely free and
will offer music, live drama, bounce
houses, games, prizes, fear factor and
a message of hope.


Hot dinners and beverages will be
served each night, along with a free
community clothing give-

Gr,:,:erles l\%III be
distriibuted ,-n the

A while


supplies last.
On Christmas Eve, a hot dinner
will be served. After a special Christ-
inas message ("The Reason for the
Season"), all children will receive
presents donated during the Spot Toy
Drive. Children must attend to re-
ceive gifts. All teens and adults will
also receive a special Christmas gift.
The Christmas Jam will take
place at The Spot Family Center at
Jim LeGrone Park, 405 S.E. Sev-
enth Ave. in Crystal River
Everyone must register to re-
) ceive service. Registration is from
5:30 to 7 p.m.; no pre-registration.
For more information, call
352-794-3870 or visit online at
www.TheSpotFamilyCenter.org.


Everyone is invited to a
New Year's Eve Ball from 8
p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Monday,
Dec. 31, at the Citrus Springs
Community Center, 1570 W.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.
The ball will feature the
Dancing Melodies for enter-
tainment and dancing, and a
formal dinner catered by
Gruff's Elite Banquet & Cater-
ing. There will be a cash bar.
Cost is $35 per person.
For information and tickets,
call 352-465-7007 or 352-
527-7540.

Spanish-Americans
invite all to dance
The Spanish American
Club of Citrus County will
have a New Year's Eve
Dance from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 31, at the
Knights of Columbus Hall,
2389 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way, Lecanto.
Music will be by deejay Leo
Roche.
There will be a midnight
champagne toast, noise mak-
ers, party favors and door
prizes, hors d'oeuvres, sodas,
water, coffee and dessert;
BYOB. Semi-formal attire is
required.
Tickets are $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for guests.
For tickets, call Ben at 352-
746-3599, Maria at 352-
341-0979, Jeanette at 352-
598-7816, or Iris at 352-
201-7901.
Auxiliary to host
New Year's party
Allen Rawls American Le-
gion Auxiliary Unit 77 will host
a New Year's Eve Party on
Dec. 31.
Nashville Artist John
Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band will provide music
for dancing and listening
pleasure from 8 p.m. to mid-
night. Food will be served all
evening and a light breakfast
after midnight. Tickets are
$20 in advance and $25 at
the door.
Table reservations for six or
more people can be made
with advance ticket sales.
The event will be in the
new home of Post 77, the for-
mer Inverness Highlands S &
W Civic Association building
at 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street.
For advance tickets or to
reserve tickets, call Alice at
352-860-2981; if no answer,
leave a message for a return
call.
Friends, fashion,
fun at show
For a glimpse of new
spring fashions, come to the
Ladies of the West Citrus
Elks annual fashion show,
slated for Friday, Jan. 25, with
the doors opening at 11 a.m.
at the West Citrus Elks
Lodge, 7890 Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. in Homosassa.
This year's fashions are
provided by Bealls depart-
ment store in Crystal River.
Along with the fashions,
there will be a luncheon pro-
vided by Chef Ken with gift
baskets and door prizes.
Tickets are $20. Call Anne
at 352-382-1848, or Pat 352-
382-3151 for information or to
purchase tickets.
Proceeds from the event
will benefit local charities
served by the Pilot Club.
Military Card Party
coming up Jan. 16
The Gulf to Lakes Pilot
Club of Citrus County will
host a Military Card Party
Wednesday, Jan. 16, at the
Crystal River Woman's Club.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and
play begins at 7 p.m.
There will be refresh-
ments, share the pot and
door prizes. Tickets are $12.
For more information or to
purchase tickets, call Judy at
52-746-0636; RSVP is
required by Jan. 9.


Event volunteers, donations are welcome


Special to the Chronicle

The Path of Citrus County will
have its annual Christmas party on
Dec. 25 at the Citrus County
Builder's Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
In past years, the event
was focused only on
clients of The Path Shel-
ter, but this year's event
planners are opening
doors to other homeless
persons and shelters in
the community.
The Path seeks to
partner with other or-
ganizations with simi-
lar missions in order
to benefit as many home-
less persons as possi-
ble this holiday
season, including the
homeless veterans liv-
ing in secluded areas of the county.
Special attention will also be fo-
cused on residents of the county


who do not want to be alone for
Christmas Day, by either volunteer-
ing or joining in the festivities.
Volunteers will be asked to help
throughout the duration of the
day with various tasks that
focus on giving back to those
in need and the local organiza-
tions that serve them.
The festivities begin at 11
Sa.m. and run through 5
0 p.m. that evening. They
S will include a variety
of games, entertain-
ment, a Christmas
dinner and
organizing the do-
nations col-
lected with
-- r -- wish lists
.** from other
local or-
ganizations.
Persons
interested in con-
tributing food or other items are
asked to bring their donations to


any one of the following locations
from now until Christmas Day:
The Path Bargain Store, 1729
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto;
Sheldon-Palmes Insurance of
Hernando, 1037 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando;
The Path's main office, 21
Melbourne St., Beverly Hills.
Donations may also be dropped
off at the Builder's Association
building on Christmas Day as early
as 7 a.m. and throughout the day
until 5 pm.
In addition to volunteers, some of
the items requested for the event in-
clude: food and desserts, gift items
and gift cards (Walmart, grocery
stores, gas cards, etc.), nonperish-
able food items, personal hygiene
items, birthday and "thinking of
you" cards and other items.
Business and other sponsorships
are welcome. Key Sponsor for the
event is David Ditchfield Tri-
County Audiology
Call the Christmas event coordi-
nators at 352-341-0173 for more in-
formation about sponsorships, food
and items needed, or to volunteer.


Master gardeners offer January clinics


First to be Jan. 2 in Floral City


Special to the Chronicle

Plants in the house are
good for you, according to re-
search, and potted plants out-
doors can add beauty and
drama to a landscape.
Come to one of the free
January Master Gardener


Plant Clinics to find out about
such "Container Gardening."
Learn how to pot and care for
containerized plants, which
plants to use and potential in-
sect problems. The schedule
for the free clinics is:
Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2 p.m.
at Floral City Library


Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1 p.m. at
Lakes Region Library
Inverness.
Wednesday, Jan. 9, 1:30
p.m. at Central Ridge Library,
Beverly Hills.
Friday, Jan. 11, 1:30 p.m.
at Coastal Region Library
Crystal River
Wednesday, Jan. 16,
1 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library.


H Tuesday, Jan. 22,2 p.m. at
Homosassa Library.
Master gardener volun-
teers will be available to re-
spond to any gardening
questions. Bring questions,
samples, etc., to any of the
clinics for free, University of
Florida-based information.
Call the Citrus County Co-
operative Extension Service
at 352-527-5700.


Support group offers help to caregivers


Special to the Chronicle

The public is welcome to an
Alzheimer's caregiver support group
at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 3, at Supe-
rior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, west of the


Greek Orthodox Church.
The group will allow people
touched by Alzheimer's disease and
other related disorders to come to-
gether in a nonjudgmental, safe envi-
ronment to vent frustrations, share
coping techniques, learn more about


the disease and discover what re-
sources are available.
Those who plan to attend and who
require respite care for their loved
one during the meeting should RSVP
by Monday, Dec. 24, by calling 352-
746-5483.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Secret Santa for Seniors


Special to the Chronicle
Secret Santa for Seniors, a project of the Networking Breakfast Committee, was for seniors without family members in
nursing homes, assistant living facilities and at home. The community donated more than 200 gifts to help the seniors
have a happier Christmas, by far the best year yet for the effort. Thank you to the community, Arbor Trail Rehab, Citrus
Health & Rehab and New Horizon for helping make Secret Santa for Seniors happen. From left are: Russell Cummings, Crys-
tal Ashe, Kari Rady, Yolanda Lusher, Dawn Moore, Charlene Reed, Monica Tanner and Kim Rigalo.



Enjoy Christmas Day with The Path





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


SATURDAY EVENING DECEMBER 22, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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( ) 51 25 51 32 42 Mankind tames the wilderness.'PG' The end of the Civil War.'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG PG
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___I_50 119 Docudrama) Poppy Montgomery. Davis, Marc Menard.'NR cc lovers face a violent blackmailer.'NR'
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North
4 Q 10 5 4
V 10 7 6 3
Q J9
d- Q 2


12-22-12


East
S 6
S A QJ 8 5 4
S 87
SK 9 8 3


South
4AKJ9832
VK2
*AK
J6

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
2V
4 4 Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: V 9

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Donald Rumsfeld said, "There are known
knowns. These are things we know that we know.
There are known unknowns. That is to say, there
are things that we know we don't know. But there
are also unknown unknowns. There are things we
don't know we don't know."
Now make a list of things you don't know you
don't know!
At the bridge table, we sometimes have to de-
cide what to do when we do not know who has
which key cards. At other times, though, we will
know who has what if an opponent is careless with
the card that he plays.
As a simple example, you lead from ace-10-
fourth against no-trump. Dummy has two low
cards. Your partner plays the jack and declarer
wins the trick with the queen. Who has the king?
It must be declarer. Now let declarer win the
first trick with the king. Who has the queen?
You do not know, because partner would have
played the jack with or without the queen.
With that hint, how should the play go in four
spades after West leads the heart nine?
East opened two hearts to show a decent six-
card suit and 5 to 10 high-card points.
If South plays the heart two under East's ace,
East will know West led a singleton. East will re-
turn the heart four, his lowest card being a suit-
preference signal for clubs. West will ruff, cash the
club ace, and continue with another club for down
one.
Now go back to trick one, when South must
smoothly drop his king under East's ace. East is
quite likely to shift to a diamond, after which de-
clarer takes seven spades and three diamonds.

by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, All right!
to form four ordinary words. thib" Ow3~t both
SHURC -

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
TTHIG



LEBHOB
AFTER SEEING THAT HER
PO5S HAP PUG UP THE
BACK VARP, SHE
IRAWMYL I WANTED THE---


IzI KzK~z


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer m mh e
here: t ,
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BRAWN HEDGE DISOWN RITUAL
I Answer: The fancy new pub really -
RAISED THE BAR


ACROSS
1 Chalky
mineral
5 Make flour
10 Dirigible filler
12 Bug's antenna
13 Mystery
man's girl
14 Electrical unit
15 River in
France
16 Neaten the
lawn
18 Sty matriarch
19 Fiction genre
23 Big Band -
26 Gangster's
gun
27 Refs
30 Happen to
32 Hive
collection
34 Freight
carriers
35 Small fairy
36 Silently sullen
37 Imitate
38 Aykroyd or
Rather


39 In the saddle
42 NASA
destination
45 Always, to
Poe
46 Horror film
servant
50 General
conception
53 Salad green
55 Mall booths
56 Attacks on a
castle
57 Shuts with a
bang
58 Kind of muffin

DOWN
1 Actress
Hatcher
2 Stein fillers
I cO n


Answer to Previous Puzzle


KINIEIAD QUIEIEIG
FERVI D URORA
CERISE MOANED
VCR ATL M

EMO O VAL BERN
COUNSEL VIRAL
TEPEE CHALICE
ABED MUON ALS
RAE 0OO|MPH LIES|
ATT PAC
Z ENIT H ELANDSS
ASIDES REMORA
POLAR NEWSY


4 Cow's 7 Spots in
"second la mer
course" 8 Fiddling
5 Topaz or despot
emerald 9 Made a s
6 Sales agent 10 Cinemax
alternative


11 Fur-bearers
12 Spotted
animal
17 Nutritious
grain
20 Gawkers
21 Held gently
22 Qatar ruler
23 Decline
gradually
24 Be a
bookworm
25 1960s hairdo
28 Reimbursed
29 Sp. miss
31 Water, in Baja
32 Has high
hopes
33 Craving
37 Exist
40 Wallet stuffers
41 Comforter
filling
42 Pen refills
43 Planting
medium
44 Portico
47 Prefix with
"byte"
48 Microwave
49 Legal matter
51 Belief
52 Signs off on
54 Robin's beak


ear Annie: I want to reply
to "Twice Bitten," who is
being bitten by tiny bugs. I
had the same problem.
After several visits to
the dermatologist and
tests with no diagnosis,
I tried lavender soap
and lotion. Bugs do not
like the smell of laven-
der You also can sprin-
kle lavender flowers
on your carpet and use
lavender sachets in
your hamper and in
and around your bed.
-Also Been Bitten AN N
Dear From: We MAIL
heard from hundreds
of readers on this sub-
ject When we initially did our re-
search, we found too many
possibilities to print So here are
a few more:
East Coast: As a pest control
technician, I get many complaints
like this. After a thorough inspec-
tion and finding no visible pests, I
suggest quite a few of the same
options you did. But I have no-
ticed that this often happens
when the weather turns colder
and our furnaces kick back on. It
tends to dry out the skin, with the
sensation of being bitten by bugs.
A humidifier may do the trick.
Louisville, Ky.: That poor
woman who is plagued by bites
has been bitten by "no-see-um"
bugs. They are so named because
they are too small to see with the
naked eye. I was bitten last sum-
mer and almost lost my mind
until a friend told me to buy white
vinegar and spray it on my sheets
and pillows in the morning and
leave them uncovered to dry.
After several nights of this, the


bites stopped.
Ontario, Calif.: I had a similar
problem, and it turned out to be
rat mites. We got rid of
the rats in our attic,
but their tiny mites
dropped down into the
house. Our extermina-
tor identified them
when I put one under
a microscope.
Washington State:
"Twice Bitten" should
S see a doctor and ask
about the Norwegian
scabies. Unlike regu-
IE'S lar scabies, they do not
-BOX leave the telltale
tracks and are harder
to identify.
Ventura, Calif.: One of the laun-
dry detergent makers added a
stain-release chemical that has
caused many of my friends to
have the same problem.
Louisiana: Years ago, my hus-
band returned from working in a
remote area. That night, I was bit-
ten by some type of bug. We
searched the bed for hours. Noth-
ing. This went on for weeks, but
with only a slight redness, there
was nothing to show a doctor. My
husband started to believe I was
imagining things. After a month of
ridiculously intensive house-
cleaning, preventive bug spray-
ing, bed checks and sleepless
nights, I felt a bite and instinc-
tively grabbed the culprit It was
dark brown and slightly larger
than a pinhead. I took "the re-
mains" to an entomologist. He
studied it, said he'd never seen
anything like it and asked if he
could keep it.
Greensboro: I, too, had bites
from an unknown source show up


around my face and neck. I went
to a dermatologist, who gave me a
strong antibiotic and a steroid
cream and told me it was yeast.
That didn't work After discussing
it with my sister, who works at a
hospital, she suggested that I see
an allergist. He discovered that I
am allergic to dust mites.
Lady Lake, Fla.: My son had a
similar problem. I checked his
bed, changed laundry detergent,
scrubbed, but nothing helped. Fi-
nally, I sat where he studied and
felt a bite. I noticed mites flitting
about a nearby houseplant. I
tossed out the plant, vacuumed
thoroughly and sprayed with
Lysol. Two days later, we were
free of bites.
New York: These people may
have Morgellons, which the med-
ical community doesn't always
recognize. The writer may have
picked this up from contaminated
clothing or furniture fabric, or
from exposure to a contaminated
pet.
The cleaning you recom-
mended is necessary, but so are
antibiotics, anti-fungal medica-
tions and other treatments simi-
lar to those used for scabies.
--In--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 Third
St, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.
To find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit
www creators. com.


West
S7
S9
S10 6 5 4 3 2
SA 10 7 5 4


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 C7


I






C8 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles

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YEAR.






Sally Forth

DON'T WORRY, LITTLE BRO. YOU'LL JUST A LITTLE STREET I TRIED TO I CAN'T BELIEVE
BE OKAY. HOCKEY MISHAP. IMPROVE THE I'M GOING TO SAY
WHAT HAPPENEHE GOT HIS GAME WITH THIS, BUT MAYBE
S STICK CAUGHT TRANSPORTATION. WE SHOULD ALL
IN THE SPOKES JUST RELAX AND
OF HIS BICYCLE. WATCH THE STAR
WARS HOLIDAY
I SPECIAL" INSTEAD.





Dilbert


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


THIS ISNYT oRK, oHt
-IT'S M31C I.
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The Born Loser

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BR.IG5 tYOU,POP7 POWE.tRDRILL-. AMI. R5UREF ANYTR\NRGTAT'5 USEFULOR
COULD USE A.EW P\R OF TREAT I NEEtD!

Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes





Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Kids these days. No motivation to hunt or
gather, but plenty of time to run around
trying to rescue every endangered
subspecies on the planet."


Doonesbury


HI, REAPERS! YOU CAN
ALL EXHALE NOW WE
MAPE IT!


I -






Big Nate

WELL, SPITSY, LOOKS
LIKE I WON'T BE
GETTING A DOG
FOR. CHFRISTMAS...
AGAIN.







Arlo and Janis -


ALTHOUGH WHO GOULP BLAME
YOU FOR WORRYING? THE ENP
OF B'AKTUN 13 PIP COIaNWCl
WITH PA SSA THROUGH A ALAO-
CNYNCHWROMZATIONBEAM..










BUT AT LEAST I CAN
STILL PLAY WITH YOU,
RIGHT'.. FETCH!
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Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 1:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 11 a.m., 4:15 p.m. 9:45 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In
3D. 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m.,3:05 p.m., 3:25 p.m.,
7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13)
3:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 2" (PG-13) 12:15
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:40 p.m. 11 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:10 p.m., 2:35 p.m., 7:35


p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes.
"This is 40" (R) ID required. 11:25 a.m., 2:55 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:15 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In
3D. 11:30 a.m., 3 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:40
p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13)
11 a.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Playing for Keeps" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:25 p.m.,
4:50 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) noon, 3:20 p.m., 6:45, 10:05 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Blondie
CAN YOU SPOT US WE WANT TO A FEW EXTRA BUCKS FOR THANKS, WHAT THE HECK! I DESERVE
SOME CHRISTMAS BJUY A -SCILL M / GIFT?! ASSOLUTELVY !!IADDV! SOMETHING NICE...I'VE BEEN
-, ,- I -.
c REA LLY GOOD THIS -E







Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"BY T4E WAY,T1-E SANTA POVMWNT-E STREET
HASA BETTER CANpY CANE SELECTION."
Betty


I-22 N
WWW tamllycIrcus corm
"Don't tell ANYBODY, PJ. It's
a surprise! We got Mommy
a new phone."


YOU'RE PUTTINGTOO '
MUCH PRESSURE ON
YOURSELF r KTOME
IT PERFECT r

-5' VV<


S21( -,, CWHAT CONCEN0 YOU MORE ABOUT
rn / PO-ITICIAK, UNAN W P
O T I QUESTIONS O 1

UNQUf6TIONDt |



S-ipHVt5 I2-22


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: d s lnba o


"M SYVNJY NW XGKMJMIK PZYW M


HMIVXRYBYH KZNK M PNIW'K UXMWU KX


PMW NWO JXBY UNJYI SO SYMWU


NWOKZMWU YCIY."


- YNBC PYNRYB


Previous Solution: "Winter is the time for comfort, for good food ... for a talk beside the
fire: It is the time for home." Edith Sitwell
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-22


YOU'RE RIGHT- AND GOO (S
PERFECT (S THE THE ENEMY o0
ENEMY OF GOOD GDOO ENOUGH
W ^'<'YS ^' '.


Frank & Ernest


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NOTES
Continued from Page C4

prayers for healing will be in-
cluded in the services. Interde-
nominational speakers are
Claude Ray, an evangelist
biker; the Rev. Nathaniel
Rawls, pastor of First Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church;
Dunnellon's own Ernie Mills,
who played football with the
Gators, the Pittsburg Steelers
and the Dallas Cowboys; and
David Vander Klay, a New York
detective. The community is in-
vited. Nursery available.
Call the church office at 352-
489-4026.
The annual Citrus County
Camp Meeting will take place
Sunday through Friday, Jan. 6
to 11, at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church on the corner of
Croft Road and Hayes Street in
Hernando. Guest speakers are
James Knox of Deland and
Eddie Goddard of Chat-
tanooga, Tenn. Special singing
nightly along with a nursery will
be provided. Forilnformaiton,
call Pastor Jerry Bloxton at
352-726-0100.
All widows in the commu-
nity are invited to join the Wid-
ows Ministry Group from 4 to
5:30 p.m. Wednesday begin-
ning Jan. 9, at Cornerstone
Baptist Church, 1100 W. High-
land Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't
finished with us yet!" For infor-
mation, call Darla at 352-270-
8115.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando, will host Tri-
umphant Quartet in concert at 7
p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 9. The
church's orchestra and choir,


RELIGION


Celebration Sounds, will open
the concert at 6:45 p.m. Doors
open at 6 p.m. The public is in-
vited. There is no charge. A
love offering will be collected.
For Informaiton, call 352-726-
6144 or visit www.hernando
nazarene.org.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday, Feb.
11. Lunch will be served at
12:15 p.m. followed by card
play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun, prizes
and a raffle. Cost is $12 per
player. Make up your table of
four or come as a single and
we will pair you. Call Dottie at
352-382-3656 or Marilyn at
352-746-6583 for reservations
by Feb. 7. The church is at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual
"Tricky Tray Fundraiser" on Sat-
urday, Jan. 19, in the Parish
Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Doors open at 10
a.m. and drawings begin at
11:30 a.m. The event features
baskets with contents valued at
$25 or more, raffles and money
trees. Items include a mah
jongg set, gift certificates for
golf, restaurants and supermar-
kets. Purchase a sheet of 25
numbered tickets for $5 for de-
posit in a bag adjacent to your
choice of baskets. The Life
South Blood Mobile will be on
site. Ticket tenders will be avail-
able for blood donors and for
those who cannot stay. Pro-
ceeds go to needed items for
the church and charitable con-
tributions. For information, call
Bernita Becker at 352-344-
0235. For membership informa-
tion, call Rosalie Madigan at
352-746-2987.


Christmas Eve services


Special to the Chronicle
The Floral City United Methodist 1884 white-framed church
offers two Christmas Eve services to those who especially
like to feel the security of Christmas memories past and the
blessings of the present. The acoustics in the sanctuary
bring extra joy in singing the Christmas hymns. Candlelight
services will be conducted by the Rev. Mary Gestrich at 7
p.m. and 9 p.m. Communion will take place after the later
service. Believed to be the oldest active church in the area,
it has recently been renovated and holds a regular Sunday 8
a.m. service. The church is at 8478 E. Marvin St. across
from the elementary school. The back entrance is accessi-
ble for the disabled. For information, call 352-344-1771.


Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church had to accept Leslie
Hammes' withdrawal from per-
forming Jan. 20 due to a recent
illness. However, the church's
own musician, Renee' Deuvall
has prepared a program for 3


p.m. that day. Renee' will sing,
and perform classical to con-
temporary arrangements,
Chopin to Gershwin, Rach-
maninoff to Scott Joplin. Her
vocals will include an operatic
aria, and she is planning to per-


form a local, first-time young
composer's arrangement. Deu-
vall has requested all proceeds
are to benefit the church's
building project.
The St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Parish Men's Association
is sponsoring its annual "A Day
at the Races" trip to Tampa
Bay Downs for an exciting day
of thoroughbred horse racing
on Wednesday, Jan. 23. Cost
of $45 per person includes
round-trip bus transportation
from the church parking lot,
entry fee and reserved seating
in the clubhouse, racing form
and a hot buffet luncheon.
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for
Bible study at 10 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly. Bible
study is followed by a luncheon.
Studies have included such
subjects as prayer, love and pa-
tience. All ladies are invited to
attend and enjoy Christian
fellowship.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Call 352-726-1707.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
Gulf to Lake Church is col-
lecting coats for schoolchildren
in grades K to eight (sizes 6
through juniors up to adult
small). Cayla's Coats Ministry
was started in memory of Cayla
Barnes, who passed in 2010.
Her mother, Jessica Barnes, is
a teacher in the county and
sees first-hand the need for
kids inadequately dressed for


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 C9

our occasional cold weather.
Coat donations are accepted at
the church, 1454 N. GulfAve.
(off State Road 44 across from
Meadowcrest).
For information, call the
church at 352-795-8077 or
Joan Cook at 352-422-2635.
Before- and after-school
care is available in Citrus
Springs for children through fifth
grade at North Oak Baptist
Church. Call 352- 489-3359.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. Call
352-860-0052 or 352-586-5174
or email trustingheartministry
@yahoocom.
A bereavement support
group in Homosassa meets
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday
in the back hall at St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19, just south
of Cardinal. Call Anne at 352-
212-0632.

CELEBRATE
RECOVERY

Celebrate Recovery, a
Christ-centered 12-step fellow-
ship, meets at 6 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto. Call 352-
453-5501.
Celebrate Recovery meets
at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Fri-
days at Christian Recovery
Fellowship Church, 2242 W.
State Road 44. Call 352-
726-2800.
Celebrate Recovery meets
at 6 p.m. Friday at the Gulf to
Lake Ministry Complex in
Meadowcrest, left of SunTrust
Bank. Call 352-586-4709 or
email celebrate.recovery
@gulftolake.com.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Fa: 32)53-65 Tl Fe: 88)82-34 E al:*asi *es 9 onceol*eco wbi0:ww *rnilonie0o


Someone is missing this
Christmas. Lovely Lady,
degree, distinguished,
pretty, slender. Caring for
elderly parents. Would
like to meet man of char-
acter, intelligent, ethical,
successful in his endeav-
ors. Age 55 to early 70's.
Rely: Blind Box 1820
Citrus Cnty Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, Fl
34429




2 RECLINER CHAIRS
1 TAUPE LEATHER
1 MAROON CLOTH
$90 EACH
(352) 382-5814

COMING I
SOON!
RV RENTALS
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 By Airport, CR
For Info* 461-4518
L-- -- J


BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945

FIT RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273

SOLD


AEROLITE
2007 fully loaded
camper w/ queen size
bed. Exc cond. 19 ft;
sleeps 4.


1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945
RV TIRE 255.70R.22.5
TRUCK NEW NEVER
MOUNTED RV or Truck
new 335.00 sell 100.00
352 270 1775
TIRE 295.80R 22.5 RV
TRUCK Michelin XZA 2
85% tread ready for road
or spare. 100.00 U pick
up 352 270 1775
Trademark 3-in-l
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards. Air Hockey.
and Foosball). 42.5 x 33
x 33-Inch, space saving
design, $350. 419-7017
TV PANASONIC 27" TV,
w/remote WORKS
GREAT U pick up Pine
Ridge $40.00
352 270 1775



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


000DCQZ

Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

3 9 1


7 _4


3 2


4 7 5


8 2 3

4 1 6


8 9 7


9 2


6 8 9
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


Iddcaed 4A&c44Unc


All of our
structures
withstand


Installations by Brian cBC12zs5383 1 0nm

n4&aI^ d4^anMqato^352-628-7519


F RE E 1O ZMSTD
Permit And l
I Engineering Fees I
SUp to $200 value

SSiding Soffit Fascia Skirting Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms* Decks *Windows Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



4 Month Old Kittens
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
Free 2 Guinea Pigs
Females.
To good loving home.
Must go together.
(330) 706-3148 cell
Homosassa
FREE 5 YR FEMALE
AUSTRALIAN BLUE
HEELER DOG.
FREE 3 mo. MUSCOVY
DUCKS (352) 637-7453
FREE FemaleTabby cat
2yrs needs good home.
Great w/ all animals.
FREE 2 males black &
white 3yrs. Great w/ all
animals. (352) 586-7662
Free Firewood
(352) 746-3997
FREE KITTENS
14 wks old
Different Colors
litter trained
(352) 212-4061
HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to go.
Bring Shovel, Truck load
avail., Help Yourself.
352-697-5252
Pitt bull mix female 1 yr.
2 black & white kittens.
6mo. to good homes
only! (352) 216-6668
RED/WHITE SPANIEL
Female, Little over 1 yr.
old, beautiful, needs
fenced yard. family
dog (352) 344-8212
White Hotpoint
Refrigerator. You fix
or for parts.
(352) 302-4057




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Black Labrador Retriever,
about 11 yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy", lost in
vicinity of W. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Lost brindle male
German shepherd mix
year old and answers
to Tank.
Lecanto Area
(352) 270-0651
Lost Cat
Black/Gray Tabby
short hair, male
Turner Camp Rd. Area
(352) 637-0970


LULs III lysLl Rivea I vely
large orange and white
neutered male, micro
chipped cat. Adopted
from Citrus County Ani-
mal Services shelter on
12/15; he was let outside
and is now missing. If
found, please return him
to the shelter; upon
confirmation that this is
him, $50 reward will be
paid. (352) 212-3278
LOST MALE FLAME
POINT SIAMESE
W/BLUES EYES,
ORANGE COLLAR, IN
HEATHERWOOD SUB
(352) 476-3084



Young Male Cat
super friendly
found behind Fire Sta-
tion on Rock Crusher
Call to identify
(352) 634-2557
YOUNG MALE DOG
BRINDLE COLOR
Found on Holiday Dr,
Crystal River (352)
795-9687 or 220-9909




TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444




FIT OFFICE ASST
Crystal River, $8/hr,
General Office and MS
Office skills required. Full
time Benefits Fast
paced. Familiarity with
Citrus County a must!
Send Resumeto: cccc
reception(~)mail.com









Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindapracticemar
@itamDabav.rr.com


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429


MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
needed for Family
Practice Physician
in Crystal River.
Experience req'd, good
phone and people
skills, knowledge of
electronic medical rec-
ords. Send Resume
w/contact info. to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box #1819P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Florida 34429


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
RN I LPN
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-licensed
nurses. Long-term
care experience pre-
ferred. We offer great
pay and benefits to
full-time associates,
including medical
coverage. 401 (k) and
paid vacation, sick
days and holidays.
Please apply at facil-
ity or mail resume to
Hannah Mand.
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D- 37185



C- .
'Citrnus o


OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER
RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
CST- Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY I
Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827


PIT Chiropractic
ASSISTANT

Busy office, 30-35hrs
week, Must be outgo-
ing able to multi task.
Have computer skills.
Able to work Sat.
Morning s Fax
resume to :
352-726-3885


PIT, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE






Sales / Project
Coordinator
Needed ASAP
Manufactured
Homes Exp. Req.
Serious inquires only!
Call Henry
(352) 795-1272






Accounts
Payable Clerk
position available.
Experience required.
Proficient in PO
processing. GL
coding, prepare and
check invoices for
payment, prepare
monthly reports and
basic accounting
skills. Proficient in
Microsoft Office Suite
and accounting
software knowledge.
Experience with
Computer Ease a
plus but not required.
EOE/DFWP company
Resume Submission
resumes@
dabcon.com


328794156
1 6 7 82 5-49 3
95 43 16872
293 14 8765
685273914
471569328
832957641
54963 1287
716482539


PIANIST Needed
First Christian Church
of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual who can play the
piano for Sunday
Morning worship. We
have a blenede serv-
ice. Using both praise
music and contem-
porary Hyms. Salary
Depending on Skill
or Email
pastorray@tampabay.r
r.com or Call
352-344-1908


TECHNICIAN

DUE TO THE
INCREASE IN
BUSINESS PHILLIPS
CHRYSLER JEEP
DODGE IS LOOKING
FOR EXP. LINE
TECHNICIAN
SEND RESUME TO:
3440 S PINE AVE.
OCALA 34471
OR FAX TO:
352-732-3024





Apartment
Maintenance
Position Available
Co. seeking P/T Mainte-
nance. Requires own
tools, experience & rell-
able transportation. Po-
sition requires plumb-
Ing, HVAC, electrical,
and painting skills.
Please apply during the
hours of 9am-1 pm,
Monday-Friday at Wild-
wood Townhomes, 301
E. Gulf Atlantic Hwy,
and Wildwood or
email csaunders@
hallmarkco.com


Property Manager
for Apartment
Community
An established
property management
company is seeking a
F/T seasoned
professional Property
Manager for an RD
complex in Floral City.
Must be highly skilled at
communication and
working in an organized
manner. We offer a
competitive salary and
an excellent benefit
package including
401(k). On site apart-
ment a possibility.
Please send
resume or apply at:
Floral Oaks Apts.
8092 S. Floral Oaks
Cir, Floral City, FL or
email csaunders@
hallmarkco.com.








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#1 Employment source is




www.chronicleonline.com







C10 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


13 COMIC BOOKS
Batman, Robin#0,
Deathstroke with Batman.
Some sets $40 341-0450

COMICS 3 TEEN
TITANS #30 April 1987,
#36 Nov 1983, #56 Aug
1985. Clean
$20. 352-341-0450

SOARING EAGLE
FIGURINE .NEW, in box.
Was $59.95 selling for
$35.Call for e-mail picture
linda 352-341-2271

STEINS BUDWEISER
"GRANT'S FARM
GATES" 1987 Holiday
stein pair. 6-1/2" A+
condition. $30 341-0450


,a


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






'08 KENMORE STOVE
Self Cleaning Oven
Hidden element, like new!
$200 (352)503-6512 OR
352-601-1321

DRYER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504

HOT WATER HEATER
50 gallon whirlpool works
great. electric. $75.
352-302-7451

Kenmore (Sears) 700
series clothes washer
and GE dryer,
$350 for both.
Good condition.
352-419-7017

KENMORE WASHER
heavy super cap
plus 6 cycle
$100. 352-563-8033

LG FRONT LOAD
WASHER lyr old. Perfect
cond. White, New $849
Selling for $650
(352) 527-3204
MAYTAG MICROWAVE
for use over range,
White, Never used! Only
$89. Call (352)464-1591
OLD KENMORE
WASHER $65 with 30
day warranty large
capacity only 24" wide.
Call/text 352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
Almond, double door, Ice
maker, Immaculate
Condition $400
(352) 419-6880
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
SOLD
APPLIANCES
White Smooth top range,
white dishwasher and
white microwave $400

WASHER Kenmore,
white. $100.
352476-9019

WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Can Deliver
352-263-7398

WASHER$100 Works
perfect with 90 day
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504

Whirlpool Accubake
glass top, self cleaning
Electric Stove $200
& Whirlpool Dishwasher
$100. both cream color
good condition
(352) 382-2497

WHIRLPOOL DRYER
7 cycle super cap $100.
352-563-8033
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
extra large cap $100.
352-563-8033


2 DRAWER CABINET
oak look, good condition.
$10. 352-302-7451







HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
Fri 12/28 Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p, Antiques
Sat 12/29 Prev@ 4p
Auction@ 6p Gen.Merch.
Sun 12/30 Auction@ lp
Tailgate Box Lot Auction
WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389




BAKER SCAFFOLD 2
complete sets on wheels.
Good cond. $100.
352-302-7451
BAND SAW- Wands
Power Kraft band saw
w/cabinet. Belt drive.
Extra bands.
$75.352-621-4711
HYDRAULIC JACK
sidecar, adjustable pull
out arms. Heavy duty.
$50. 352-302-7451
SCHUMACHER arc
welder, 110V, welds to
3/16. 7/16- 3/32 rod.
New in box. $75.
828-627-6718
TABLE SAW -7 1/4"
Craftsman saw, with
Black & Decker
portable saw table. $50.
352-621-4711
WELDER- Sears PNC
1000 welder. 115 volt.
50 amp. $60.
352-621-4711




27" MAGNAVOX TV
good working cond.
$40 (352) 344-1066
51" Hitachi Projection
TV, good condition
asking $350 obo
352-527-7890
51" SONY WEGA
$125.00 plays and
sounds perfect.Free 27"
sharp with sale.We
went to flat screen.mint
condition,
352-364-2588
HITACHI 32' TV WITH
REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529
OAK ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER with T.V. $85.
NICE 352-875-5134
Dunnellon
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
VIZIO 42 INCH 3D TV
Vizio E3D420VX 3D TV
LCD 1080p 120hz with
box and remote. Great
condition. 6 pairs of 3D
glasses included. $400
Gerome 352-322-6779




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
LEXMARK
PRINTER/FAX excellent
cond. $25 352-860-2475
PLAYSTATION 1 SONY
works/good condition
adapter & 1 controller
$20.
352-628-4210




WICKER FURNITURE
End Tables,TV Stand,3
other pieces,
Beautiful $100 all
352-875-5134 Dunnellon




2 RECLINER CHAIRS
1 TAUPE LEATHER
1 MAROON CLOTH
$90 EACH
(352) 382-5814
2 SITTING ROOM
CHAIRS Very pretty,
wood and soft seat.
AC furniture company.
$25 ea. 352-533-8440
2 VERY NICE CHAIRS
Light blue chr/rocker;
recliner reclines to a
sleeper. Thin stripes
$60/both (352) 795-3763
BAR STOOLS
2 white swivel stools,
Brocade $100/ea
(352) 419-6880


BEAUTIFUL QUEEN
BEDROOM SUITE LIKE
NEW. Brushed ash in
color. Double dresser,
chest of drawers, night
table, headboard w/ rails.
Faux marble counter
tops. $495. Inverness.
Phone 353-344-5854
or email
lwyatt97@gmail.com.
BEDROOM SET
Beautiful 3 Piece set,
Solid Oak, Must Sell
Sacrifice at $200 OBO
(352) 564-0254
CURIO CABINET
Lighted. Glass shelves.
69"Hx16"W. Just in time
forXmas. $60.
352-382-1000
DINING SET
Glass Top Table
w/4 chairs (fabric covered
w/palm trees)$200 for set
call 352-257-1480
DINING TABLE SET
LOVELY LIGHT WOOD
SEATS 6W/CHAIRS & 2
LEAVES, SIZE 67 X 43%
$250 (352) 860-1519
DINNING TABLE AND 4
CHAIRS brown wood
table, inlaid glass top,
very pretty, $100.
352-533-8440
Entertainment Center
lightwood, glass door
with shelves,
opening for tv 28x26 $75.
352-563-8033
ERGOMOTION
Bed w/vibration, Dormia
Memory Foam Mattress
BRAND NEW pd $2200
will sell for $1400 obo
352-209-1316
FURNITURE Like New!
Brown Suede cloth
Futon $200.
Tan Leather
Loveseat $200.
352-503-7623
Lazy Boy Cordovan
Leather Dual Recliner
Loveseat 3 yrs. brand
new cond. org. $2,100
Asking $500.
Sculptured
Wall hanging
Tasmanian Artist
Carolyn Audet, 9 Little
brass fish on driftwood,
$100.
(352) 341-3651
LEATHER SOFA, FAB-
RIC LOVE SEAT 3 cush-
ion longhorn leather sofa,
hunter green excellent
condition $400.00 2
cushion love seat, beige
print like new $150.00
352-249-6463
LIGHT-COLORED
Wooden Table for
Breakfast Nook or
Kitchen Island, New
Condition 34"H 36"L
24"W Two Stools
ALL for $75.00
(352) 527-9930 BH
LOVE SEAT Multi
colored.Excellent condi-
tion. $100. Call for a
e-mail picture linda
352-341-2271
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK GUN CABINET
Etched glass front.Very
Nice.$265
Locks w/drawer
352-875-5134 Dunnellon
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
2 nice electric lift chairs
Homosassa 628-2306
POWER LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR.
Like new condition-used
6 mo.- tan/ corduroy
material- power remote
$450.00 Call
352-382-2718
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
PRIDE 2 Pos. lift chair.
Seldom used. $325
Call for e-mail photo
352-382-1039
QUEEN BEDROOM
SET, Complete, head-
board, mattress, dresser
w/mirror & nightstand,
$250 for set
call 352-257-1480
Solid Oak Enter-
tertainment, Center
leaded glass trim,
3 lighted sect. lighted,
fits up to 42" TV, 9ft 6"
W, 20"D 6'2/2H, Holds
220 CD's/DVD's $500
obo Antique Roll Top
Desk, beautiful carve
front, 5'W, 30" D, $400.
obo (352) 746-7318
Solid oak Not Veneer
Coffee Table with swivel
top to increase available
surface area.
Solid Oak 6 sided end
table w/ glass top $70 for
Both (352) 341-3651


A- a


SLEIGH BED, Qn Sz,
Kincaid Dk Cherry
Finish,$99. Call
(352)464-1591




CRAFTSMAN ROTARY
LAWN MOWER Briggs
and Stratton engine; 20
cut. New, Never used.
$75. 352-344-8468

MOVING
SALE

MOWERS
Novia West Moving
Sale
Grasshopper 227
w/61" deck;
Grasshopper 430D
w/72" deck;
Grasshopper 620
w/48" deck.
Please call for pricing
(352) 622-1200
Weed Eater hedge
trimmer $10
352-860-0183




BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET T
SAT. DEC. 22nd
8AM to 2PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd.

HOMOSASSA
Fri & Sat 9a- 4pm
MOVING SALE *
Fiberglass truck lid F250
or F350 $200.
Over the cab camper
self contained,
loaded, & clean, $7000.
2042 S Sunwood Pt

INVERNESS
FLEA MARKET
1ST ANNUAL
HOLIDAY NIGHTTIME
Open 7:30a til 8:00p
Sat. Dec. 22nd
Look for 1/2 off special
3600 S. Florida Ave
At Fairgrounds
(352) 697-0193








INVERNESS
Fri Sat 8a -2p
HUGE SALE! Antiques,
collectibles, toys, linens
households and clothes
9928 E LakeTahoe Dr

LECANTO
Saturday Dec 22
Clothing for girls, boys,
men, women- All $5 ea
All brand new w/ tags!
627 E Savoy St.

PINE RIDGE J
Sat Dec 22 9am-2pm
5484 W. Corral Place




BLACK & GOLD 2 PC.
SHELL & CARDIGAN set
Sz. Med $25 5134614
BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING SIZE 5 & 6 SHIRTS,
PANTS & JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
EVENING BAG
shell-shaped gold bugle
beads $20 513-4614
MENS BLACK
MOTORCYCLE JACKET
& VEST. EXC COND
$150 (352) 897-4549




8 MAN ZODIAK 8 man
inflatable zodiak boat
$100 (352) 270-3641
1918 JENNY STAMP
good condition. $100 or
best offer Linda
352-341-2271
16" Pedestal Fan
$15
352-860-0183
Acoustic Guitar,
FIRSTACT MG381
(3/4 SIZE)- bag, strap,
learners book, new, $30.
352-628-0033
CANOPY SHED 10'x20'
steel frame canopy shel-
ter with sides-new-still in
boxes-$150.00
Call 352-382-2718
CLUB CAR 2 Seater,
weather cover, lights,
mirrors, Trojan batteries
excel. cond. $1,400.
352-212-6182
COMPUTER DESK
Corner style. File
drawer,printer shelf. Like
new. $99 352-563-1073


CLASSIFIED



BRASS FIREPLACE
GATE Folds up $30
352-860-2475
FIREWOOD Dried,
seasoned, split,
delivered! $100 a cord.
352476-9563
GAME CALL OF DUTY
WORLD AT WAR
for nintendo ds
$10. 352-628-4210
GENUINE BLACK
LEATHER PURSE BY
ROLF $25 LIKE NEW
NEVER USED E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
Giant 72" TV DLP,
Samsung, Large
Screen, excel. cond.
$1,150 obo
Dining Room Table,
oak & tile top, 4 oak
upholstered chairs,
Paid $900 asking $350.,
352-419-2924,
352-560-7107
GUITAR TREE STAND-
holds 3 Guitars, folds for
storage, black, Ex., $30.
352-628-0033
HAND Sweeper
$20, Miter Saw $20
Hand Spreader $5
352-860-0183
HITCH, factory made
2k gross weight, de-
signed for sml vehicle
incl. 2 ball mounts, pin &
clip$100 obo, call any-
time 352-586-7658
JOHN DEER TRAVEL-
ING SPRINKLER- heavy
cast metal, follows hose
around yard, $30
352-628-0033
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
PEAK 12 VOLT
INFLATOR Used once.
$20. 352-628-3455
PENN DEEP SEA ROD
& REEL- Penn 330 GTi
Graphite Reel, 7ft. Penn
Power Stick,
Ex., $90. 352-628-0033
PICNIC TABLE 5 FOOT
LONG GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
PORTABLE A/C UNIT
GE 8,000 BTU, 115v,
APE08AKMI with all
accessories-only used
one time, $250.00
Call 352-382-2718
PROFESSIONAL
SALON HAIR DRYER
$25 (352) 795-3763
QUANTUM 6000
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
ex. cond., batt. charger,
cushion $2,500.00 obo
(352) 527-2085
Rainbow River Club
membership through
2015 Asking $150
954-755-7039
RV TIRE 255.70R.22.5
TRUCK NEW NEVER
MOUNTED RV or Truck
new 335.00 sell 100.00
352 270 1775
SEWING MACHINE
Portable Brother sewing
machine with all accesso-
ries and carrying case
$125.00
Call 352-382-2718

SOLD
GENERATOR
like new, 5550 Troybuilt
never been used,
great condition
SUNBEAM WATER
COOLER / Cold, Hot,
REFIG Cold / Hot Water,
& 5 Gal Water. Moving.
$65. 352465-1319
TIRE 295.80R 22.5 RV
TRUCK Michelin XZA 2
85% tread ready for road
or spare. 100.00 U pick
up 352 270 1775
Trademark 3-in- I
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey,
and Foosball), 42.5 x 33
x 33-Inch, space saving
design, $350. 419-7017
TRIPOD -Slik U212
Universal Deluxe, heavy
duty. For photo or video
camera. $35.
352-382-4037
TV PANASONIC 27" TV,
w/remote WORKS
GREAT U pick up Pine
Ridge $40.00
352 270 1775
Webber Grill
$20, Black & Decker
Workmate Table $20
352-860-0183




2 POWER LIFT CHAIRS
RECLINERS BY PRIDE
$325 EA. BOTH EXC.
COND.(352) 270-8475


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GO GO SCOOTER
Elite, used only a few
times, like new $375 firm
u-pick-up, 352-560-3874
LARGE POWER LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR
$200(352) 564-0722




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




9 Piece Drum Set,
Excellent
Condition
$550. obo
(352) 637-4639
BALDWIN UPRIGHT
-PIANO**
good condition $425
352-344-0547
Cassio Keyboard
WK1800, like new,
Stand and bench in-
cluded $200 cash,
Citrus Hills
352-637-6762
CHICKERING
UPRIGHT PIANO
EXC. COND. $900
(352) 795-0381
ELECTRIC GUITAR
Aria Pro II Semihollow,
black with white trim in-
cludes Crate Amp.
$350.00 Firm. Call
352-621-7586
HO HO HO STRING
BANJO W/RESONATER
PLAYS GREAT $70
MAHOGANY FINISH
352-601-6625
HO HO HO MITCHELL
MO100S ACOUSTIC
GUITAR VINTAGE
SUNBURST "NEW"$80
352-601-6625
HO HO HO NEW
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PACK W/GIGBAG
STRAP,PICKS & MORE!
$65 352-601-6625
HO HO HO NEW
STRAT-STYLE EL
GUITAR,H-S-S, NICE
METALLIC FINISH, $65
352-601-6625
WURLITZER SPINET
PIANO FREE 88 keys
play but Needs refinish-
ing. Pro-mover only at
your cost. 341-0450




CHAMPION JUICER
Fresh juice for your
health! Almond color, in
excellent condition $160
(828) 483-4550
Crystal River
Health Meter Scale
$25
352-860-0183
LG BLACK LANTERN
NEW ,in box.Was 49.95,
selling for $25.Call for
picture e-mail.
Linda 352-341-2271


Equipmnt^


"I have to drive him home

after every party."

STou For



[lhank Fou for 1 liears oft~es!


B BEAUTIFUL RESULTS I


VWILUmh
CONSTRUCTION CORP
Ef \ Est 1988
Ag


i 352-6





-ING REEL -
ter reel, 50 LA,
enew. $25.
52-621-4711
IG ROD- 7.5 ft.
od spinning rod.
r Trout or Reds.
352-621-4711
G ROD Penn
D Level Wind,
rag reel w/ugly
ger rod. $80.00
2-621-4711
IG RODS- 6'6"
sador grouper
IKE NEW. $20.
2-621-4711
;6" Lamborghini
oad Bike
peed like new
$129.
2) 249-4460
LEX GOLF

ItEx7cellent
ition, $1100.
-527-3125
ool Table
8 ft, 1 slate,
her pockets,
frame $700
i) 586-9598
Penn Senator
ladelphia made.
ood condition.
352-621-4711
R M 77 270cal.
sling case, like
Great Xmas Gift
352-601-1250
SE MODEL 340
m. cal. scope 4
Cond $375 May
:ial trade on gun.
2) 564-0036
8am till 9pm
SON HAT 10X
the Box size 7
m color $125
2) 746-0070
inning Bed
ional, 24 Lamp
$600.
b, color marble
220V, seats 4-6
:352) 586-9598
lub Car Golf
trt'S -2007
ent Condition!
volt, FAST,
teries $1850 ea.
2-527-3125




NEW
LMARK 6X12
)SED TRAILERS
NLY $1999.
2) 621-3678




TE WOODEN
ND CANOPY
JET Brand new,
ised Must see!!
352-422-2719


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47
for years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917 .Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucs13@aol.com

USED HOYER LIFT
pls call Bob
352-628-3351

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


CHRISTMAS
DACHSHUNDS






Smooth Minis, family
raised, ready to go
Only 2 Left! $200ea.
Will Hold for Christ-
mas! call Debbie at
352-564-0855 eves


5 Tiny Yorkies
$550 and up, Small,
Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2
females,1 Male Maltese,
Raised in loving home.
CKC Reg. health certs, &
puppy pacs. Parents on
site come watch them
play (352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258


PEACHES
Peaches is a 10+
year-old black lab
retriever female who
came to the shelter
as a stray. She is
housebroken,
Heartworm-negative,
and spayed. She is a
very calm, gentle,
affectionate older
girl. However, she has
just been diagnosed
with mammary can-
cer. Her prognosis is
unknown at this time,
although she does
not appear to be in
any pain and is fairly
active for her age.
With good care she
could still have a rela-
tively good life. We
volunteers at the
shelter are hoping
with all our hearts to
find a compassion-
ate, caring individual
or family who would
be willing to share
their home with
Peaches, which
would most likely be
her last home. When
her time comes she
would be euthanized
at the shelter free of
charge. She is a very
gentle girl who
causes no trouble
whatsoever. She gets
along with other
dogs and with chil-
dren, and is com-
pletely not interested
in cats. She would fit
into just about any
home situation and
be very happy there.
We truly don't want
the shelter to be the
last home she knows.
Is there any who
would be able to
open their heart and
their home for this
sweet older dog?
Please call Joanne
at 352-795-1288.


El

FISH
Tidewal
like
35
FISHING
Super-ro
Great fo
$20.
FISHING
320 LI
Lever d
stick Til
35:
FISHING
Ambas
rod, LI
35:
Ladies 2
R
21 sp

(35:
MEL

36 vo
Condi
352
Pc
4x8
leat[
~k 1


BICYCLE 28" Diamond- o,
back Edgewood hybrid (352
24sp exc condition.$145. REEL -
352419-7200 6/0 Phi
BOW FLEX XTL work out Very Go
center, leg extender with $50.
work out chart & video RUGEF
$75. cell 352-563-8033 Scope,
new G
REDUCED $425.
BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II SAVAGE
home gym center 222 Re
with all upgrades and clips exc.
accessories $499. OBO take part
A Great Holiday Gift (35
352-697-2771 Call
TREADMILL, electric in- STET
cline, approx 9 yrs. old New in
good cond. $150 OBO Crea
BOWFLEX weight bench (352
150lbs. Ik new $300 OBO
(352) 637-0262 Ta
Hernando Professi
Weslo Treadmill Hot TubT
excellent condition! gray,2
used very little, $300 obo $600.
352-382-4088

Excell'
48
AUTHENTIC NFL MIAMI exc. bat
DOLPHIN JACKET LIKE 35:

$70. (352) 795-3763
BROWNING Auto 22
Rifle W/ Browning scope
$425; WINCHESTER HAUl
30-30 Caliber, Model 94, ENCLC
W/ Peep Scope $375 O
(352) 746-0070 (3"
CANOE
16 FT Mohaw,
fiberglass, GREAT
SHAPE $200 OBO
(352) 564-0254 WHIT
Concealed Weapons ROUI
Permit Course BASSIN
DAN'S GUN ROOM never u
(352) 726-5238 $100.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179
Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent CIng.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109



Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549





Yotul\vorld fi t


Need a jobiE

or a

qualified

employee?


This area's
#1

employment
source!


CS.OiCO.E
C ---


Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696

SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX! 25yrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est.
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est.
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%hGuar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
* 352-257-9508 *4
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V* RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584


- LARRY'S TRACTOR -
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
352-302-3523-
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373**




GOOD MORNING LAWN
CARE
Leaves to Lawns *
Call 352-502-6588
GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273
JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373**


#1 Employment source is


www.chronicleonline.com


VIYkiVTNVC Wry ~


) LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2012


12-22


I Sel or S






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


000DCQX

WORDY UBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Street crime group caroled (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
m and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. "This Is 40" director Apatow's pals (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Covered stadium roof metal alloy (1) syllables in each word.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclickfor UFS


4. Most awful craving for a drink (1)


5. Keepsake holder wall fixture (2)


6. Talkative McDaniel who played Mammy (2)


7. Cloudburst bright idea (2)


WHOISNIVUH OaflISNIVH 'L HILLVH ALLVHO '9 IIh3OS 13I301 *
isHli ISHOIM t 3NOHH o13 NOT S(ff Sfl S COri g ONVS ONVO 1I
12-2212 2 S AtSNV


J:1 d J l:1


BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219


Dachshunds Mini
Long hair Xmas pups,
females, black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
Ready when you are!
$300 (352) 795-6870
or (352) 220-4792

F6 BENGAL CAT CUBS
*Spotted & Marbles*
*Snows & Browns*
*$275, FL Health*
*Cert. & Shots*
*352-601-5362*


MING
Ming is an approxi-
mately 1 y.o. female
terrier mix who is
currently at the
shelter. She is very
intelligent and
understands down/
sit/stay. Has no food
aggression and gets
along with other
dogs. She is very
friendly and cooper-
ative and gets along
with adults and kids.
Would be best with a
young, active family.
She is a beautiful
dark brindle in color
with a regal stance
and learns very
quickly. Walks well
on a leash. Will be
spayed, microchip-
ped and up to date
with shots upon
adoption.
Call Cheryl @
352-419-5275.








RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352-419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com


L_ DrODUUUULEI
PUPPIES 2 left! 1 black
male, 1 cream female.
Born 9/21/12. Shots,
dewormed, health certs.,
flea protection,
heartworm prevention.
Please call for prices.
352-410-0080




DOG TRAINING
SHOCK COLLAR
gives warning first, $75
352-522-0467


Livestock


w




Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



Moil Hme


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 BEDROOM
start@$325 inc. H20
* 2 BEDROOMS
start@$450 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


CRYSTAL RIVER
412 DW, CHA$600.
mo., No Dogs
(352-) 795-9738
HERNANDO
2/1 $450 mo+dep
1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
352-201-2428
HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, 2/1/
older mobile needs TLC
$1,000 Down, $275. mo.
(352) 726-9369
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last &Sec
(352) 382-5661
HOMOSASSA
2/1.5, LG Fenced Yard,
References, $425
352-220-6303
MINI FARMS
C.R., 2/1, 2.5Acres
$525.mo (352) 564-1242



2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 150 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740) 255-0125
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353
BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On 1/ Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183



Your World

a%#M4------


I EII I II III I I


LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804
Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch, 2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958
MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$8,000. (708) 308-3138


HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA& Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272
HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352401-2979,
352-621-3807
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/Mo
Loaded. 3/2 From
$399/Mo Loaded.
Homes on your lot
$0 Down.
800-622-2832
REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181



CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
*Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
3/2, 2001, $19,900
2/2 waterfront. $31,000
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420
INVERNESS 2/2
completely remodeled
carport,scnrm,w/attached
storage shed, plywood
floors, drywall, $10,500
352419-4606
INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352-419-6476


Inverness, FL 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Com-
pletely updated DW
home on Lake Hender-
son 55+Park. Ph
309453-3072 or
352-_419-6g 495 $1.600


CLASSIFIED



Singing Forest MHP
2 single-wides $12k &
$14k, Willard Pickrel
JW Morton RE
352-726-6668






SOON!
RV RENTALS
I CONSIGNMENT USA I
SUS 19 By Airport, CR I
For Info 461-4518
-n II



HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
*Readyto Move In *
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272





-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.comn
LECANTO
2334 W. Silverhill Ln..........$525
2/1 Ground floor opt.
1013 N.Commerce Terr......$525
2/1 Apt., screened lana
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N. Crede ...................$450
2/1 SW mobile, furnished
9454W. Wisconsin Ct..........$77115
3/2 Quiet dead-end street
HOMOSASSA
9540 S. Lotus Pt.................$625
2/1.5 DW mobile, huge lot
8019 W. Grove St...............$575
2/2 SW Mobile on 1.25 acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5525 S.Kline Terr...............$875
2/2/1 Unfurnished, inc. lawncare
6315 N. Shorewood Dr........$700
2/1 Cute home, nice yard
CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2,House w/ Gar., $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135



Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


( ALV RAHOUSN
OPPORTUNITY


-IM
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
LECANTO
Nice, Clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000



CRYSTAL RIVER
SNICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. IncI Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037



HERNANDO
APROX. 1100SQ FT
OFFICE ON OVER 1/2
ACRE ON HWY 200
$725 mo.352-344-3084
Homosassa Spgs
SmlRestaurant/Pizza
Shop for Rent, $800
269-369-2509
INVERNESS
Retail/Office, 1,200 SF, +
Storage (352) 637-1904



INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$700. mo 317-442-1063



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Rental

BLACK DIAMOND
3/2 Pool home $1150.00
Bob @ Coldwell Banker
352-634-4286
CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370



BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA Near
Shopping $550. mo.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
Huge House 3/3/2
$800, 352464-2514
CITRUS SPRINGS
2 Bedroom. 1 Bath.
Beautifully renovated pool
home in nice section of
Citrus Springs, tile
throughout. Qualified
renters only pay first
month's rent. $700 per
month. (352)-270-1535
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenced yard, on
over IAAC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875+Sec. 352-344-3084
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Block home w/wood
floors & washer dryer incl.
$750 mo. 352476-1080
or 352-476-0174
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water Excel.
Loc. $675. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
2/1 near hospital
fam. room, scn porch.
$600 352-422-2393
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897


LiATi SALtL in iNature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872
Motivated seller
wants this aone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crossiandrealty.
corn 352 726 6644

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EUALHOUNG
OPPORTUNITY


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 C 11


aSale
Specializing in '/ M
Acreage
Farms/Ranches & 4/2/3 HEATED POOL
Commercial lots of extras!
mmercia SELLER MOTIVATED!


Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418



2 Bedroom, 1 Bath,
1 car garage, New Roof,
laminate, flooring,
1000 sq. ft, $57,000,
352-419-6719



FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135



OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000. 4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558





MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


z/z/z 2reat uoumntry
home on 2 1 acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529


g-I
For Sale%

CHASSA-
HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800



BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-586-9932

-elUstt


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


WANTED

Are You
S Interested In:
Bein your own
bossV

Increasin, potential
earnings.

Growing your
exclusive area?


independently?
.* Workin with a

1 successful company?




CHiONJCILE
www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Requirements:

* Ability to work overnight
Covered Truck, Van or SUV
Clean Driving Record
Credit & Background Check
Access to your own help
Lifting and physical ability
Team Player
Must have a back-up plan
SComputer & Internet Access


Do you have what it takes?

* Attention to detail
* 365 Days/Year
* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented
* Flexible under pressure
* Positive Thinker
* Hard and smart worker
* Keen sense of urgency


Chronicle


Classifieds

In Print

& Online


/


CHRONICLE CHLPNIClFo



-I


) 53 63596


Deliver to stores and coin racks.
1 Experience preferred but not required.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comr
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


.I


A




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chris Warax Ryan Brown


Frank Mira


Larry Scull


Paul Onorato Burt Stevens


Harry Ogden


Josh Davis


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Gordon DeBruyn


Larry Reed


Carlos DeMesquita


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Brent Stoneking


Chris Williams


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Troy Wicklund


Louise Tyler


Ed DiLego Rob Davis


Chuck Hunt


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Bert Weber


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Jim Donaldson


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Mark Mecionis







Cliff Greenup


Karl Blonkenfeld


Kevin Snider
Kevin Snider


Sharon Gullett Jason King


Roy Brown


Nick Nicholas


Shane Bryant


Dora Hunt Shanna Willbur Karen Rogers


Yvonne Baker Brandy Erlandson Sally McDavid


Larry Dasch


Brian Davenport


Michelle Evans


Michael Miller


Mike Paonessa


Rick Petro


Jim Preston


Deb Hanlon Donna Bandy Lisa Hayes Laura Carter


John Taylor


Richard Garrett Adrian Knight


Michelle Russo


Ray Rodriguez
Ray Rodriguez


Bob Kelly

JolI


Tom Othouse Ashley Oglesby


Bill Townshend


Jeremy Green


Jimmy Spencer


Scott Parker


Dave Clark
Dave Clark


Kim Williams


Glen Adams


Bob Hickinbotham
Bob Hickinbotham


Daniel Yourga


Larry Reynard


Mike Caron


Charissa Treacy


Dave Sekulski Mike Zuniga


Mike Baker
Mike Baker


Travis Wells


John Whiting Jack Hyde


Mark Anderson Nora Souhrada


Chase Faso


IAD s
Dennis Potulsky


Dusty Oglesby


Doug Miller


Roger Harper


Ron Jefferson


Eric Young


Greg Riggs
Greg Riggs


Nick


Nicholas ,


Crystal River 795-7371
Visit Is I t \A/\A/\A/ nnirnirhnln.c fnrrllinr'nln nmm


f-


INCOLN


Greg Karl


Ana Cruz


I


C12 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 C13


I Crys'a-lRliverMail i






C14 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.comrn
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bring your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
back yard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164











Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
*Buy or Sell*

I'll Represent
YOU

ERA
American Realty




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week


LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857
DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 2 ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116
KINGS BAY AREA
A Special home on deep
water. $460,000
804 SE 1st Court, Cyr Riv
(352) 795-3264
Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den & fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock,
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925
WATERFRONT HOMES
I have them. Cottage 2/2
renovated 59,500, 3/2/2
5 yrs old, Furn, $149,000
(352) 419-6880
Tropic Shores Realty

YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
BestN'Tu-reCoast
Properties.corn
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




Relocating family need-
ing atleast a 3/2/2 home
in Hernando Elementary
school district. Pre ap-
proved/ fast transactions.
No Real Estate Agents
Kenny (419) 544-9355


Cl&us C un
Hom:s


01-05 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Inverness Mini Storage
hereby gives notice that
the entire contents of the
following units will be
auctioned on January 15,
2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Helen Jean Allen
3460 Hendrick St.
Detroit, Mi 48204 Units
27-S, 28-S, 10-S & 13-E
Judy Bennett


"Heatherwood 581**
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435




For Sale t,,, A
8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this beautiful GOLF
COURSE lot (100X125)
located in Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Have
fun boating, fishing and
jet skiing on the nearby
Tsala Apopka Chain of
Lakes. Enjoy nature, wild-
life and the natural beauty
of Fort Cooper State
Park. Call Kelly at
860-459-2411
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot, wet lands
on Lee Woods Drive
112x 114ft. river ac-
cess, but not on River
$7,000. 352-621-1664



BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945



15 ft ALUM. BOAT WIDE
DEEP V, 25HP ELEC.
START, TRAILER.
OLDER BUT CHEAPER!
$995 (352) 341-4949
1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945


AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7000 352-637-1391
BASS BOAT
17 ft, 75H Evinrude,
canopy, very clean,
trolling mtr. $3,200
(352)220-1342


KuS SELL

BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner -$2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506



DUTCHMAN 40FT
2012-2 slides, 2 ac's
new $51,900 ask. $32k
obo, call for more info
(850) 449-1811 Homoss.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



1997 Lincoln Towncar
New power window
regulator front passenger
side $25 (352) 586-6309
FORD ENGINE
ON STAND $160.
3 Transmissions OBO
(352) 746-2226



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518& 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ



283-0105 SACRN


Inverness, FL 34451
Units 15-E, 17-E & 18-E
Troy Maniscaloo
6245 Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34452
Units 9-E & 12-S
Kathy Powers
9043 Aquavista Dr.
Inverness, FL 34450
Unit 8-W
Tamara Holton
5741 S. Calgery Terr.


Unit 9-W
Laura Ann Crougiola
3797 E. Johnson PI.
Inverness, FL 34453
Unit 2-N
This notice is iven pursu-
ant to section 83.806 Fl
Statutes to satisfy the self
service facility owners lien
on contents thereof.
December 22, 29 & Janu-
ary 5,2013.


282-1222 SACRN
9/07 sale Space 36/43, A4, 30, 26, C2, 31, 44, 35 and 17 Suncoast Storage & Rent-
als, LLC
PUBLIC NOTICE
Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC according to provisions of the "Florida
Self-Storage Facility Act," Chapter 83, Part IV, Section 83.806 of the Florida Statutes,
hereby gives NOTICE OF DISPOSITION. Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC, 9034 W.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448 will dispose of the contents of the storage
spaces) listed below via competitive bidding, on Jan. 5. 2013 at 11 AM or by dona-
tion to local charity. Successful bidder must pay in cash. All purchased items are sold
as is and must be removed at the time of the sale.
Space Number Occupant Contents
00 Coonse, Julie Household
46 Shinaberry, Eugene Tools, stereo eqip.
December 15 & 22, 2012.


CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy19... 352564-8333



1997 DODGE
STRATUS ES
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 97,000 mi
$2800 (352) 341-3991
2003 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LXI
Leather seats, well maint.
exc. cond. 71,500 miles
$4300 (352) 341-3991
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CHEVROLET
2000 IMPALA
$4995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2003 AVALANCHE
$6850
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004 TRAILBLAZER
4X4 $6999
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2001 TOWN &
COUNTRY $4550
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
SEBRING 2001
convertible, $3500
352-621-5153 after 5pm
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
Ilkenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, Ilkenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
NISSAN
2004 350Z, silver 2dr.
convertible, exc cond.
53k miles, $14,800 obo
352-382-4239
NISSAN
2005 ALTIMA SE V6
$7495
352-341-0018
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8500 obo 382-0428
TOYOTA
'05 Camry LE, Silver.
leather interior, very good
condition, 86k miles.
$8900 (352) 637-2838
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yarls, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



1929 FORD RUMBLE
SEAT ROADSTERS
For more info call -
(352) 637-6053
1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$24,900, 352-513-4257






Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518& 795-4440
DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
Quad cab 360 body, tires
& interior good, needs
engine & transmission
work $1800 or best offer
352-464-4764
FORD
03, Ranger XLT, 31,200
miles, 5 spd., w/ topper
excel, cond. $6,000.
Call (352) 795-1332



P O Box 367


FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K ml, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
NEW POLARIS
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN ATV.
4X4, SERVICED AND
READY FOR HUNTING
SEASON. $2995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR TOUR
DELUXE, READY FOR A
ROAD TRIP ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678



1980 HONDA GOLD
WING 1100 $900 CALL
FOR INFO
(352) 564-0036
'08 Suzuki Burgman 400
Candy apple red, exc.
cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi
per gallon, luggage back,
& garage kept. $4500
(352) 897-4549



HONDA
1986, V4, Magna,
750CC, needs Carbs
cleaned, otherwise
road ready, clean Fl.
Title many extras $600.
Greg 352-419-7382



KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 550 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 FIRM. Phone
352-726-8124



284-1229 SACRN
01/02 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicle
described below under
Florida Statutes 713.78.
The undersigned will sell
at public sale by com-
petitive bidding on
Wednesday, January 2,
2013 at 9:00 am on the
premises where said vehi-
cle has been stored and
which are located at,
Smitty's Auto, Inc., 4631
W. Cardinal St.,
Homosassa, Citrus
County, Florida the fol-
lowing:
1986 CHEVEROLET CI0
VIN#
1GCDC14H 1GF342644
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of pur-
chase in cash only. Vehi-
cle sold as is and must be
removed at the time of
sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated
party.
December 22,2012.




Inverness, FL 34452


THE BEST Ql



PREOWNED V

1i1 z . ,.


*Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See de Iler for deli.'-.,


QUALITY



VEHICLES



'07 CHEVROLET


COBALT

4 Dr. Sedan, LS
12120170


$7,995

or $139/mo.






















'12 CHRYSLER

TOWN &

COUNTRY
4 Dr. Wgn., Touring
12119008


S19.995

or $319/me.






















'11 HONDA


CRV

19K Miles, Like New
12110132


S19,995

or $319/mo.
























CHOOSE FROM!





TOYOTAl



RIVER^(j


'07 TOYOTA


COROLLA

LE, 4 Cyl, Power
12100428


10,995 -

or $199OO/mo.


'04 JEEP


WRANGLER X

57k Miles, Hard Top, 4x4
12100474


413,995 1

or s275/mo.


'05 FORD


FIVE HUNDREDS

Limited, 40K Miles
12119001 ,OF


s19,995 m

or 179/mo.






OVER 100 VEHICLES TO


VILLAGE


www.illageovoa.com C RYSTA L I
SToyotaCare


VILLAGE TOYOTA

CRYSTAL RIVER


M. *


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012 C15


BMW in Ocala


O


The Ultimate
bmwinocala.com Driving Machine

THE BMW
HAPPIER NEW YEAR
EVENT
Going on now, with a
holiday credit of up to $3500*
Get Savings Up To $12,000 Off
New 2012 BMWs!^
Plus through December 31st, Business Owners can receive
a tax credit on the purchase of a new BMW X5 or X6**
New 2013
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328i
Sedan
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BMW
528i
Sedan
New 2013
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640i Gran
Coupe
New 2013
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650i
Coupe


New 2013
BMW
750 Li
Sedan
New 2013
BMW
X1
sDrive28i
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X3
xDrive28i
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X5
xDrive35i


BMW Ultimate ServiceTM:
Pay Nothing 4 years or 50,000 Miles Total Maintenance Charges: $0
Take ATest Drive And Receive
$100 In Gift Certificates!"
AEx: New 2012 BMW 750Li, STK#MW84700, MSRP $92,695. Discount includes all BMW factory rebates and incentives. Discount excludes tax, tag,
title, registration and dealer fee. See dealer for details. *$3500 BMW holiday credit available on select new BMWs through BMW Financial Services. "To
qualify, the BMW X5 orX6 must be purchased (not leased) and must be used for at least 50% for business purposes. Must be purchased before 12/31/12.
See dealer for tax credit details. Financing available through BMW Financial Services. Photos used for display purposes only. All vehicles subject to
prior sale. ^^Promotional Gift cards are valued at $25 each with available shopping credit to be used at four (4) different eOutlet Store retailers. Gift
card value may be applied toward the purchase of products, services, and S&H fees exclusively from the specific websites noted on the gift cards. Only
one (1) gift card may be redeemed per transaction. Gift cards have no cash value, are not redeemable for cash and may not be combined with credits
from otherstore gift cards. Otherterms and conditions apply see eOutletStores.com for full details and restrictions. Offers expire end of day 12/31/12.


BMW
of Ocala


3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352-861-0234
BMWinOcala.com


I


All 2012 Volkswagens"
Priced At Dealer Invoice-
Plus Get 0% Financing For
Up To 72 Months! \


*0% is $13.89 per month per $1000 borrowed with approved credit. Dealer invoice pricing on select in-stock models only. Excludes tax, lo, title, registration and dealerfee.
Prior sales excluded. Offers cannot be combined. See dealer for details. ^ ^ Promotional Gift cards are valued at $25 each with available shopping credit to be used at
four (4) different eOutlet Store retailers. Gift card value may be applied toward the purchase of products, services, and S&H fees exclusively from the specific websites noted
on the gift cards. Only one (1) gift card may be redeemed per transaction. Gift cards have no cash value, are not redeemable for cash and may not be combined with credits
from other store gift cards. Other terms and conditions apply see eOutletStores.com for full details and restrictions. Offers expire end of day 12/31/12.


Volkswagen
of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd., Ocala On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352-861-0234 VWofOcala.com


Das Auto.


ight Now At Volkswagen Of Ocala
It's The...

VEnd of The Yea

Sales Everit


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




C16 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2012


0* L


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New 2012 Honda Civic LX
AUTOMATIC


Honda Days
SALES EVENT

I~en8c


New 2013 Honda Fit -'
MODEL GE8H3CEXW, EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED A
WITH AUTOMATIC, A/C AND CRUISE



New 2012 Honda Accord LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW, AUTOMATIC,POWER PKG,
CRUISE,TRACTION CONTROL AND SO MUCH MORE



New 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid
MODEL FB4F2CEW, AUTO CVTTRANSMISSION, RATED 44MPG* ALL AROUND, ECO
ASSIST SYSTEM, 100,000 MILES WITHOUT TUNE UP, BLUETOOTH HANDS FREE LINK



New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL RM3H3CEW, COME SEEWHYTHE CR-V ISTHE BEST
SELLING COMPACT SUV IN AMERICA! SAVE WHILETHEY LAST!



New 2012 Honda Ridgeline RT
MODELYK1F2CEW, 4WD WITHTHETRUNK INTHE BED. POWER PKG.
CRUISE CONTROL,V-6 POWER AND A RIDE LIKE NO OTHER.


New 2012 Honda Crosstour 2WD 2.4 LA EX
MODELTF3H3CJW. AUTOMATIC HATCHBACK WITH STYLE AND COMFORT,
ALLTHE LUXURY AMENITIES AND ROOMTO DOWHATYOU NEED.
&;A p


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