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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-09-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02971

Full Text


Johnny Recordsetter: Manziel awarded Heisman /B1


,bh


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
80
LOW
60


A.M. fog;
partly cloudy.
PAGE A4


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 124


we'vee been


Duked'


County officials say nation's largest utility strategically saddled Citrus with tax cris


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS They
never saw it coming.
Not the property ap-
praiser who decides the
taxable value.
Not the county commis-
sioner who heads the
county's economic devel-
opment effort
Not the administrator


who sets the budget based
on tax revenue.
None of them knew what
Progress Energy Florida
and its parent company,
Duke Energy, had in store
with its 2012 tax payment
until it was too late.
With budgets already ap-
proved and fiscal years
begun, Progress delivered
a $19.3 million tax check
Nov 28. The payment is a


far cry from the $36 million
expected.
It leaves the county com-
mission and school board
having to immediately fill a
multimillion-dollar hole.
And, following Progress's
filing of a lawsuit Friday,
Nov 30, against Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene,
the local governments are
preparing to fund a legal
fight as well.


Top county officials said
they received not a single
hint from Progress that
anything of this magnitude
was amiss.
"We could have a new
word," County Attorney
Richard Wesch said.
"We've been Duked."
The Chronicle sent an
email with several specific
questions to Progress
spokeswoman Suzanne


Grant. While Grant cited
the lawsuit as reason why
she couldn't comment on
details or provide docu-
ments, she said the tax
issue should not have been
a surprise.
"The county and prop-
erty appraiser have known
for more than two years
that the company believes
See Page A2


* WHAT:
Joint school board-
county commission
meeting.
* WHEN:
10 a.m. Monday.
* WHERE:
College of Central
Florida, Lecanto.
* ON THE AGENDA:
Discuss and decide
on the next step in
the Progress Energy
tax/legal issue.


Mirth and merrymaking


Thousands gather in

Inverness to watch

parade float by

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

he commotion on
the busy road wind-
ing through the
heart of Inverness came to
a halt Saturday morning.
Spectators filled both sides
of Main Street as they hunted "
for the perfect spot to watch
the annual Inverness Christ-
mas parade, billed this year
as '"A Postcard Christmas."
Some claimed curbs to get as
close to the action as possible. Oth-
ers lazed in lawn chairs, while -
many merely stood and waited.
"We know to get here early every
year," Lecanto resident John Jones
said. "The children just love the
floats."
Downtown Inverness erupted in
holiday enthusiasm around noon, MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
when parade entrants began prom- Shelly Mayes' female bloodhound Scout howls along with the festive Christmas music Saturday afternoon during the
ending east on State Road 44 from Inverness Christmas Parade. The float was sponsored by No. 832 Deputy Dogs, a nonprofit organization that breeds, raises and
Pizza Hut to Highland Boulevard. trains bloodhounds that are given to law enforcement agencies. The dogs are used to search for missing children, Mayes said.
Sponsored by B & W Rexall Thousands of people line Main Street throughout downtown Inverness. The parade lasted more than 90 minutes.
Drug, the Citrus County Chamber A festively decorated John Deere tractor driven by Dick Yant makes its way along the parade route Saturday.
of Commerce and the City of Inver- The tractor, and the float it pulls, promote the Citrus County Fairgrounds' upcoming tractor and truck pull slated for Jan. 25 and 26.
ness, dozens of floats and perform-
ers followed the lead of Grand -
Marshal Pati Smith. Smith retired
this year after 30 years as Parks ..
and Recreation director in
Inverness. .
While festively bedecked pa-
raders passed by and exchanged r
friendly waves with the crowd, _
echoes of Christmas wishes and "
caroling could be heard. tofl
From antique cars to marching __l
bands to Sonny the Cooter, young
and old alike joined in the holiday
spirit Ronald McDonald and
Frosty the Snowman made appear-
ances, much to the delight of many
children.
Even Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Traffic Patrol Officer Terry
Corbin joined in the fun atop a
motorcycle.
"I just wanted to have fun with -
See Page A4


STATE GOVERNMENT:
Another run?
Now a Democrat, former
Gov. Crist is eyeing his old
job and the GOP says
"bring it on."/Page A3

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Classifieds ................D5
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Ed itorial............. ........ C 2
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Horoscope ................B6
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Obituaries ..........A5, A6
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.I 1114|171112111 007 Io


For county's jobless, cliff looms even larger


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
About 750 hard-luck county
residents are already on the edge.
The looming national eco-
nomic emergency known as the
"fiscal cliff" is a combination of
scheduled increases in taxes and
reductions in federal spending.
That's as defined by the Con-
gressional Budget Office, which
states most of the related poli-
cies designed to reduce the
deficit are due to take effect
at the beginning of 2013.
There could be many more
residents adversely affected,
depending on which scenario
emerges. The situation is one


* Guest columnists John
Read and Robert Hagaman
offer their thoughts on the
causes of and solutions to
the cliff crisis. Page C1.

with no upside, according to
one leading Florida economist.
The budget office also pre-
dicts weaker-than-expected
economic growth in 2013.
The result has been an im-
passe in Washington, D.C., over
raising taxes or cutting spending.
One federal program sched-
uled to end is Emergency Un-
employment Benefits (EUC).
The program has been in place


since 2008, and is 100 percent
federally funded. It provides a
temporary extension of unem-
ployment benefits to individu-
als who have exhausted their
state unemployment benefits.
"As of (the) week ending Dec.
1, 2012, there were 118,976
claimants statewide on EUC.
The total for all EUC claimants
in Citrus County is 746," said
James Miller, deputy chief com-
munications officer with the
Department of Economic Op-
portunity (DEO). "Effective Jan.
1, 2013 (barring an extension),
any new claims filed after that
date will be eligible to receive


Dems demand benefits

extension in cliff deal
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Hovering in the back-
ground of the "fiscal cliff" debate is the
prospect of 2 million people losing unem-
ployment benefits four days after Christmas.
"This is the real cliff," said Sen. Jack
Reed, D-R.I. He's been leading the effort to
include another extension of benefits for
the long-term unemployed in any deal to
avert looming tax increases and massive
spending cuts in January
See Page A5


See .Page A5


I S U N D


CITRU-S COU NTY F Y





HRcNICLEo n
__www.chronicleonline.com





A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


DUKE
Continue from Page Al

the valuation on its property
at the Crystal River Energy
Complex is overstated," she
wrote.
MEN
Comprising about 26 per-
cent of the tax roll, Progress
Energy is by far Citrus
County's largest taxpayer.
Last year, it paid $34 million
in Citrus County property
taxes.
Progress has five power
plants at its Crystal River
Energy Complex one nu-
clear and four coal-burning.
The nuclear plant has been
offline since 2009 and the
company has said it will de-
cide in June whether to re-
pair it. Two of the coal
plants are scheduled to go
offline in 2014.
Because of its signifi-
cance, Property Appraiser
Geoff Greene hires an Or-
lando accountant to negoti-
ate just values with the
company
Greene pays Bill Keith, a
former tax official with
Progress, about $1,500 to
oversee the Progress tax re-
turn for his office.
Generally, the process is
fairly routine. Progress files
its return in early May, a
company representative
and Keith exchange emails
seeking information and
clarity, and outstanding is-
sues are resolved in a meet-
ing with representatives
from both sides.
That's how it happened in
2009, 2010 and 2011, accord-
ing to records in Greene's
office.
And that's how it started
in 2012. Progress filed its tax
return in early May, seeking
an exemption classification
for its $1.3 billion pollution-
control equipment installed
in 2009 at the coal plants.
Keith and Penney Dev-
elle, director of tax compli-
ance for Progress,
exchanged emails that
sought clarification and
data. The central issue of
placing a taxable value on
pollution control, however,
was never resolved.
Greene sent a June 27 let-
ter to Develle saying he was
denying the pollution-
control exemption based on
a 1998 Citrus County circuit
court case involving former
Property Appraiser Ron
Schultz. The judge ruled
that because pollution-
control equipment is not
listed in the state constitu-
tion as an exemption, the
law that allowed it is
unconstitutional.
Greene's letter added that
Progress had 30 days to file
an appeal with the Value
Adjustment Board.
The company didn't do
that. In fact, according to
Greene and his chief deputy
appraiser, Les Cook, the
company barely acknowl-
edged Greene's letter.
Greene and Cook said
Keith attempted to reach
the company on numerous
occasions, only to be told
each time that they were too
busy with the Duke merger
to discuss the Citrus County
property assessment case.
Grant, the Progress
spokeswoman, disputed
that. She said the company
"on multiple occasions
through meetings and let-
ters" communicated to the
county what it believed the
taxable value of the com-
pany's property should be.
Greene set the tentative
tax roll on July 1, which al-
lowed local tax authorities
such as the county commis-
sion and school board to
prepare budgets for the up-
coming fiscal year.
The fact that Progress had
not settled their taxable
value by July 1 did not
bother Greene. Both he and
Cook figured company rep-
resentatives were busy with
the Duke merger and would
take care of the assessment
issue in due time.
County Administrator


Brad Thorpe said Greene
assured officials there was
no problem.
"He said, 'I think we're
OK. Things are OK,"'
Thorpe said. "He said things
are looking good."
On Sept. 25, just days be-
fore Greene would stop cal-
culating the final tax roll
that came out Oct. 2, Develle
sent Greene a letter asking
for copies of documents and
an "informal conference" to
discuss the company's
objections.
That term, Cook said, is
significant and normally fol-
lows a pattern: TRIM notice
to taxpayer, informal con-
ference to discuss the as-


LOCAL


sessment, appeal to Value
Adjustment Board and fi-
nally, a lawsuit in the ab-
sence of resolution.
Cook said Progress, for
whatever reason, deliber-
ately skipped the Value Ad-
justment Board appeal and
went directly to a lawsuit -
after the tax roll was al-
ready certified.
Grant said the company
utilized its right to take the
matter to court
"The VAB process is not
well suited to address com-
plex legal and time-
intensive property tax as-
sessment disputes," she
said.
mmE
Duke's decision to pay a
partial tax bill is forcing
both the school board and
county government to make
immediate budget cuts. The
school board must trim
about $8.1 million; the
county, about $7.5 million.
County officials are con-
vinced Duke's decision to
challenge the assessment in
November is a calculated
move to leverage its 2012
taxes. They believe the com-
pany knows it has crippled
local governments, which
may not now be able to af-
ford a lengthy court battle.
"They made a calculated
business decision in the
course of their conduct,"
Wesch said.
Commission Chairman
Joe Meek, who also heads
the economic development
council, placed the blame
squarely on Duke.
"What is so disappointing
is the manner and fashion
in which this action was
taken," he said. "They know
the impact this situation is
putting our community
into."
Progress officials contend
they alerted Citrus County
three years ago that they
disputed the assessment at
the power plant. They also
said the county was told in
May about the disparity be-
tween Greene's assessment
and what the company be-
lieved it should be assessed.
Both parties point to a
May 16 meeting in St. Pe-
tersburg. Vinny Dolan, then-
president of Progress
Energy Florida, invited
county officials to a meeting
to discuss the potential fu-
ture tax fallout of the nu-
clear power plant.
Four officials Wesch,
Thorpe, Greene and Cook--


attended the meeting. When
they arrived, the four were
told Dolan would not be
meeting with them. Instead,
they met with Amy Mangan
and Chris Flack, two com-
munity liaisons for
Progress.
Grant said Dolan neither
set up the meeting nor
planned to attend. She said
Mangan set it up.
Wesch and Thorpe said
there was some discussion
about the nuclear plant.
They noted the plant is re-
moved from the company's
rate base in 2013, which will
significantly drop its taxable
value. If Duke decides to re-
pair the plant, it would sig-
nificantly increase the
value.
Wesch said the purpose of
the discussion was to find
ways to keep the tax rates
steady
"They didn't want to see
spikes in their values. We
didn't want to see it, either,"
he said.
Wesch and Thorpe said
the issue of the 2012 tax roll
never came up. If it did, they
said, it wasn't mentioned in
a way that either of them
recall.
"I was there. I would have
been alarmed if they men-
tioned 'this year,"' Thorpe
said.
Greene and Cook recall
the meeting differently
They said Flack mentioned
the figures "14-34" or "19-
34," but didn't elaborate.
"For the first 30 minutes,
we didn't know what they
were talking about," Cook
said.
Later, Greene deduced
Flack was referring to the
difference in what Progress
wanted to pay in taxes ver-
sus its 2011 tax bill: $19
million and $34 million.
The next meeting was the
"informal conference" on
Oct. 30 in Crystal River in-
volving Greene, Cook and
three Progress officials, in-
cluding Keith Butler, vice
president of tax for Duke
Energy.
Greene said Butler had a
few questions about his
method of developing the
property assessment, and
then jumped to property
taxes. He said Butler made
it clear he wanted a "signif-
icant reduction and not a
token reduction" in the
company's tax bill.
Cook said they told Butler
the property appraiser


deals with assessments, not
taxes.
"He would not talk about
values," Cook said.
The next day Greene
called Butler to ask him
what he meant by a "signifi-
cant reduction." He said
Butler said the company
would pay $27 million this
year, $24 million in 2013 and
eventually wind down to $19
million. Greene reiterated
what he and Cook said the
day before: The property
appraiser doesn't negotiate
tax payments.
Greene called Thorpe
and Superintendent of
Schools Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel to let them know
Progress had taken a sud-
den, hard stand.
The company took an-
other stab a week later.
Flack and Gene McGee, a
county resident who lobbies
for Progress Energy, met
with Thorpe, Wesch, Meek
and Himmel. This time the
company offered to pay $30
million in 2012 property
taxes.
Wesch and Thorpe said
they told the Progress rep-
resentatives the issue was
Greene's assessment of the
Progress property, and that
was not their area. Wesch
said he asked Flack if he
had the authority to negoti-
ate on the company's behalf
at all. Flack ended the meet-
ing a few minutes after it
began.
Grant said that while the


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company believed its tax
payment should be $19 mil-
lion, it offered to reduce the
amount gradually from last
year's $34 million payment
to avoid harmful impacts to
the county.
"Unfortunately, those of-
fers were rejected, which
forced us to pursue litiga-
tion in the circuit court,"
Grant said.

The school board and
county commission will con-
vene with Greene at a spe-
cial joint meeting 10 a.m.
Monday at the College of
Central Florida. During that
meeting, the boards are ex-
pected to join the Progress
lawsuit as defendants and
decide how the legal bill
will be split.
Officials, however, also
have a plan they hope will
avoid future uncertainties
with the Duke Energy tax
bill.
Greene's office plans a
full-scale assessment next


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

year of the company's en-
ergy complex to create a
baseline value on which
both the company and
county agree.
Officials have no idea
whether that will place the
value higher or lower than
what Progress is now as-
sessed. They say it's the
fairest way to determine the
company's taxable value
without having the potential
for a court fight every year.
"Our intent is to get it
right," Greene said. "We're
not trying to go up or down."
Thorpe acknowledged the
renewed interest in deter-
mining the full value of
Duke's energy complex is a
direct result of Duke's deci-
sion to pay only a portion of
its tax bill.
"If you're going to take
everything off the table," he
said, "all bets are off."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. corn.


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TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Time for negotiations in Crystal River


County, city to talk

ofjoining forces for

development plan


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER County of-
ficials have a plan they hope will
forge better ties with city leaders
and turn Crystal River into a more
beautiful city.
Meanwhile, at the Community
Redevelopment Agency (CRA)
meeting Monday, and about what
could arguably be the city's mar-


* WHAT: Crystal River City
Council meeting.
WHEN: 7 p.m. Monday, Dec.
10; 6 p.m. CRA meeting.
WHERE: City Hall on U.S. 19.
CONTACT: www.crystalriverfl.
org

quee feature the Riverwalk -
officials will discuss a break-
through development.
Citrus County Commissioner
Dennis Damato and County Ad-
ministrator Brad Thorpe will be
on hand Monday during the city
council's regular meeting to pres-
ent a comprehensive citywide de-
velopment plan and the
opportunities for the two govern-


ment entities to join forces. The
plan includes a provision for the
purchase and development of the
vacant lot at the corner of Citrus
Avenue and U.S. 19 as a public
space.
At the CRA meeting, officials
will discuss plans to move ahead
with construction of the bayfront
boardwalk after it appears all the
affected property owners have
signed on to the project.
The council also is expected to:
Hear a presentation by Art
Jones about the King's Bay lyng-
bya cleanup project.
Consider approval of the exe-
cution of a Memorandum of Un-
derstanding with Citrus County
related to supporting the "One
Rake at a Time" program to re-


move lyngbya from King's Bay and
Crystal River
Vote on amending provisions
related to the height of accessory
structures.
Consider a request from Cit-
rus County Board of County Com-
missioners to waive the 125
percent surcharge for sewer ex-
pansion fees in Area 114 of the
Disadvantaged Small Communi-
ties Grant Project.
Discuss the status of Yeomans
Park.
The 6.52-acre property was do-
nated by Calvin Yeomans in 1991,
with the caveat that the property
be utilized as a nature park with
boardwalks, nature trails, and a
visitation center
In 1994, the city was awarded


$90,000 in Florida Recreation De-
velopment Assistance Program
(FRDAP) funds to make certain
improvements to the property.
There was a provision in the
FRDAP grant that the improve-
ments would be available to the
public for a minimum of 25 years
or the city would return the
$90,000. The city temporarily
closed the park in 2010 and has
since been trying to figure what to
do with the property
The city has until the end of
2012 to reopen the park or pay
back the grant money It also can
pay the money and sell the
property
Chronicle reporter AB. Sidibe
can be reached at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


One good throw


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Mike Dickinson of Ocala pitches a horseshoe Saturday morning at the Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club's Wounded War-
rior Project benefit horseshoe tournament. Two classes, members of the National Horseshoe Pitcher Association and
those in the novice class, competed for honors. In all, about 70 pitchers were on hand. The benefit is expected to
raise between $1,500 and $2,000. All proceeds will benefit the Wounded Warrior Project.




Volumes of residents line library a


Locals celebrate

fifth birthday of

Homosassa facility

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Parking spots were limited and
volumes of people inside gave in-
sight to why
The entrance of the Homosassa
Public Library was lined with
people and organizations cele-
brating the library's fifth birthday
in conjunction with the Citrus
County Library System's 25th an-
niversary Friday and Saturday
On Dec. 7, 2007, Homosassa
opened the 15,000-square-foot li-
brary at 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.
With high ceilings and tall stone
columns, local residents are
proud of the abundance of traffic
which cycles daily throughout the
Homosassa Public Library
"Wow, I remember when this li-


brary was built," Homosassa resi-
dent Maggie Field said. "Look at it
now. It's gorgeous and thriving."
Festivities including story-
telling, songs, rhymes, birthday
cards, decorated cookies and
Christmas music by flautist Chris-
tine Beilharz. The children's area,
known as the Kid's Cove, also had
various activities. Clowns created
take-home balloon animals and
interacted with children as they
made their own special crafts.
"We had a wonderful time with
our birthday celebration," Ho-
mosassa Public Library field li-
brarian Veronica Davis said. "With
economic times being hard, we
hope that everyone can see how
important libraries are to society.
Today has been a great time."
Friends of the Homosassa Li-
brary donated supplies for adults
to join Mary Rightmeyer from
Stampin' Up to make their own
greeting cards.
Performing during the library
birthday was Dessie's Pioneer
Friends. Candace Boothe, Gus
Valderrama and Margaret Harris


presented a costumed re-enact-
ment of conversations between
Florida pioneer woman Dessie
Smith-Prescott, portrayed by
Boothe, author Ernest Heming-
way portrayed, by Valderrama,
and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings,
portrayed by Margaret Harris.
Boothe took the crowd on a
"journey back into time" as she
explained how Smith-Prescott
was a pioneer of Citrus County
"She built her own home by her-
self. When Dessie was in a crowd
of people, she would talk to the
men more than the women,"
Boothe said. "She wasn't flirting
with the men. She just had more
to talk about with them, because
she was into guns and fishing."
Hemingway met Smith-Prescott
in the Bahamas and was attracted
to her hunting and fishing abili-
ties. A bit of moonshine would
help top off their hunting and fish-
ing trips. Smith-Prescott also be-
came friends of Pulitzer
Prize-winning author Rawlings.
Later, they accompanied each
other in the Florida Women's Hall


Crist may run


for governor


as Democrat

Former Republican governor

switches parties once again

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Now that former Republican
Gov Charlie Crist is a Democrat, pretty much every-
one in Florida's political world expects him to seek
his old job.
"I will consider it, and I will think about it," Crist
told The Associated Press by phone
while boating off of Miami and be-
fore a planned dinner Saturday .
evening with former Democratic
governor and Sen. Bob Graham.
The former Republican governor
revealed his long-anticipated con-
version Friday, after more than two
years as an independent. He made
the announcement on Twitter and Charlie
included a photo of his new voter Crist
registration form, which he filled said he will
out at the White House. think about
Earlier Saturday, Florida Repub- running for
licans gathered for a meeting and governor again.
said they will be extra motivated to re-elect Gov.
Rick Scott if his opponent is Crist, who left the GOP
during his 2010 run for Senate.
"Bring it on," Peter Feaman, the party's national
committeeman, told a room of Republican activists.
"That man sat at my house, in my kitchen, at my
breakfast table and told me he was a Ronald Rea-
gan Republican. OK, I'm putting my boots on, be-
cause guess what? You lied to me."
Should the 56-year-old Crist run, he could become
the first person to run for Florida governor as a Re-
publican and as a Democrat Crist only served one term
before choosing to run for Senate instead of re-election.
Republicans, anticipating the switch, have been
attacking him for months. As Crist campaigned with
President Barack Obama and other Democrats dur-
ing the fall, Republicans ran a television ad and is-
sued scores of press releases pointing out his
previous conservative positions.
"I really feel at home. A lot of it was inspired by what
Democrats have stood for, and honestly, friends have
told me most of my political life, 'Charlie, you're re-
ally a Democrat and you just don't know it"' Crist said.
Crist was a moderate governor and met often with
Democratic leaders. At dinners in the governor's
mansion, he included Republicans and Democrats
at his head table. He endeared himself to the teach-
ers union by vetoing a Republican priority bill that
would have stripped teachers of tenure and based
merit raises on test scores. He also won over many
black leaders by championing civil rights issues,
prompting one black lawmaker to describe him as
the first black governor


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Margaret Harris, left, portrays Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings while Gus
Valderrama plays Ernest Hemingway and Candace Boothe portrays
Dessie Smith Prescott during a re-enactment this weekend at the fifth
birthday of the Homosassa Public Library and 25th anniversary of the
Citrus County Library System.


of Fame.
Boothe, who was Smith-
Prescott's caretaker for 18 years,
shared personal anecdotes about
the pioneer woman and marveled
at how headstrong and special she
was. Boothe is now aiming to pre-
serve Smith-Prescott's legacy and
the 24-acre Wahoo Ranch on Lake


Rousseau off North Citrus Avenue
in Crystal River She hopes Wahoo
Ranch can be registered as a his-
toric site or turned into a museum.
Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington can be reached at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online, com.


*






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Progress workers brighten Christmases


PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer

It has become a long-
standing holiday tradition
for employees from the
Crystal River Energy Com-
plex to collect and deliver
toys for the Citrus County
Family Resource Center.
On Friday, workers from
the energy complex, which
is owned by Duke Energy
subsidiary Progress Energy
Florida, delivered a pickup
truck and trailer full of toys
to fulfill the wish lists of 304
underprivileged children.
Other Progress Energy
employees were inside the
center helping wrap gifts
that had already arrived.
The gift drive is part of
Progress Energy Florida's
annual Holiday Hope pro-
gram and Give Where You
Live campaign. The Give
Where You Live campaign,
under way for more than a
decade, provides hands-on
support to community or-
ganizations at a time when
many nonprofits are
stretched for resources.


And the toy drive for the
Family Resource Center's
annual holiday effort goes
back more than 20 years. It
started when the International
Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers got involved with
the center's Christmas effort
Progress employee Na-
talie Harness who coor-
dinated this year's drive -
said it started in October.
Groups or individuals get a
particular child to shop for
"We try and get them every-
thing on their wish list," she
said.
She said the children
don't just ask for toys, some
have very specific requests
- for warm clothes and
other necessities.
Family Resource Center
director Ginger West said
the charity will fill the
Christmas lists of about
2,000 underprivileged chil-
dren who have been referred
to the program by agencies
throughout the county.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924
or pfaherty@chronicle
online.com.


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
Gordon Caldwell of Progress Energy Florida carries in donated
toys and other Christmas gifts Friday at the Citrus County Family
Resource Center for distribution to underprivileged children.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus High School Marching Band member Daleny Mitchell,
15, plays her tuba alongside other band members Saturday.
The band recently returned from Chicago, where it marched
in the city's nationally televised Thanksgiving Day parade.


PARADE
Continued from Page Al

the crowd," Corbin said.
"The crowd having fun is
what it is all about."
Mr. and Mrs. Claus
watched the parade from a
double-decker bus and
waved to all of the parade
entrants before making a
grand entrance.
"Ho ho ho! Merry Christ-


mas!" shouted Santa.
Following the Crystal
River Christmas parade, a
mixer will be held Dec. 13
to celebrate the two towns'
efforts and give awards for
exceptional entries. The
public is invited to join the
awards ceremony from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Crys-
tal River Mall, 1801 U.S. 19
in Crystal River. The event
is sponsored by the Crystal
River Mall and Capital
City Bank.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Erik Von Brunn, 35, of Ho-
mosassa, at 4:20 p.m. Thursday
on a felony charge of battery on
a person 65 years of age or
older. No bond.
Kelly Barr, 42, of North
Range Way, Beverly Hills, at 1:14
a.m. Friday on misdemeanor
charges of criminal mischief and
trespassing after warning. Bond
$750.
Peter Johnson, 45, of
North Hourglass Terrace, Crystal
River, at 11:14 a.m. Friday on a
felony charge of grand theft. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, he


* For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public Infor-
mation on the CCSO
website, click on Crime
Mapping for a map
showing where each
type of crime occurs in
Citrus County.

is accused of stealing 14 spools
of copper wire from Home Depot
in Crystal River. Bond $2,000.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

4,::::
B id N otices...........................................D8

y 4 Meeting Notices ....................................D8

S*'Lien Notices..............................D8



I Miscellaneous Notices.........................D8


....... Surplus Property..................................D8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR N NHl L O 1 PR HI L
NA NA NA NA L A !74 60


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
G ni-i I ilel
Homestead
J ,: i oni illp
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR I HI LO PR.
76 63 NA 78 63 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK ,o 'oaseb
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 80 Low: 60
AM 'f,:,' Parill cloudy


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 64
.A,.1 h lg Pd ili, cloudy ..ih a '0' chance of a

"- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 62
I -- lo.ii. cloudy; 40% chance of scattered
Showers
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday na/na
Record 86/28
Normal 74/46
Mean temp,
Departure from mean 0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday in.
Total for the month in-
Total for the year in,
Normal for the year 49.97 in.
'As Qf 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate.
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in,


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 pm. 6
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Chenopods, nettle, pair
Today's count: 3.7/12
Monday's count: 5.0
Tuesday's count: 4.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutar
mainly ozone.


nts


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
,OPirlG, (AFTERNOON)
1:14 7:28 1:41 7:55
2:03 8:17 2:32 8:46


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O SUNSET TONIGHT,
SUNRISE TOMORROW
) 0 ()0 MOONRISE TODAY.
EPl. 13 IEC. 2 11B.28 J1.4 MOONSET TODAY


.5:33 EM
.713AM
2:58 A M


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information cal Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more
information on drought conditions please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http'/lame.fl-dof.corntfire weatrirkbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
O D C iilj,-Jr,. _- .1:, ,.*. stl:-,i u, ,'r .- i '-, tJ ;, .. i..,r -..ilrdj-,
H ..]I .;, -i rili. .*.ilh t..ul-off nozzle or -i. ri rrn. ,r,.., :1 non-grass areas, such as
S.,- .ir.' i 1-- 4i,,- flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
". i un ri il.., :. n..i:_.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313. unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669


"From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowt.1ka'
Crystal River"V
Withlacoochee
Homosassa"*


High/Low
1 04 a9:58 a
1o01 p 720 a
10-48 a&5:08 a
12:14 a.8.57 a


TIDES
"At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
2:40 p;9:51 p
- 7 13 p
10.04 pi5 01 p
150 p8 50 p


""At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
1.56 a/t0.59 a 3:49 p10 51 p
12.17 a/8:21 a 210 p/813 p
11 57 a7609 a 1055 p!6001 p
1.06 a'958 a 2:59 p/950 p


Suilrhe:;':I winds around 10 knots.
Seas 1 foot or less. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Skies
..ll be :-artl,' cloudy today.


F'cast




PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


Gulf water
temperature


73
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.11 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.31 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.39 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral Cit, 40.80 n/a 42.40
Levels repoted t oeet above sea level Flood staAge tr lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, te mean-
arnuai tlood whist hs a 43-precent alnc ot beiig equaledd or exceeded n any oit yeai This data is
sbtained firom the Soushwsst Fondia Water Managemiien Di;stnct and is ssibiect to revision ini ino event
iii tie DislTict or the Unted Stales Geoiog cai Survey be liable for any damages ansing out of the use of
this data It yi hiave a oy (nieqstis yoj solbd inu: tc tlie Hnydloogis:al al a SDectl on ;lS (352) 7% -72

THE NATION
S.


d/. "* \',


-1 20s

aw t. C ...



_for e J ea _oo l o 4i.. ?^
r s -- AD'a 3 K-'U*- -




209
64 t30 .-." ... ... f? 3 0s .




B0r- ", S as ~ a
2W,0
VM/ 0


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
A~any 43 36 10 pc 44 36
Albuquerque 59 30 rs 46 18
Ashviile 67 44 c 64 47
Atanta 70 54 06 pc 71 57
Atlanc City 55 48 1 47 sh 54 50
Austn 83 56 c 78 36
Batimcre 54 46 sh 49 45
Billngs 36 16 pc 26 17
Birmngham 65 60 pc 71 60
Bose 43 31 .07 pc 36 25
Boston 45 43 34 pc 49 40
Butfaio 45 38 18 sh 43 43
Burington VT 45 35 01 pc 37 31
Charleston SC 70 48 pc 74 59
Chareston. WV 63 55 29 sh 64 52
Charotte 69 47 pc 71 56
Chicago 42 36 15 sh 43 27
Cm cina 57 49 04 sh 58 45
Cleveland 48 39 06 sh 51 43
Cowumia SC 72 49 pc 74 57
Cotumbus, OH 54 48 05 sh 55 47
Conco~r. NH 38 32 24 pc 45 30
Dalas 70 50 c 72 32
Denver 52 22 sn 24 10
DesMones 40 27 c 36 13
Detrot 43 36 20 sh 42 37
EIPaso 67 49 pc 65 32
Eva le, IN 57 49 Is 64 37
Hamsburg 47 39 02 sh 46 41
Hairtord 45 42 25 pc 46 35
Houston 83 62 s 82 46
ndianapois 49 43 03 Is 56 36
acksn 71 56 c 78 55
asVegas 6 44 s 58 36
LiIie Rock 69 55 Is 73 40
Los Angeles 6 53 s 66 52
Lousve 60 52 75 sh 65 44
ehis 63 60 08 Is 72 40
Milwaukee 38 33 13 sh 40 25
Mnneapois 33 25 01 sn 32 4
Mobile 7861 02 pc 74 63
Montgomery 7255 01 pc 76 60
Nashve 64 59 21 sh 70 50


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs rainisnow mix, sunny: sh=showers;
snz snow. tIs hunderstorms, w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 77 55 pc 76 64
New YorkCiy 50 44 32 sl 51 47
Norfoik 63 52 01 pc 64 54
Oklahoma Ciy 54 44 c 46 22
Omaha 40 29 c 30 8
Palm Spnngs 77 48 s 74 47
Phiadelphia 52 45 19 sh 51 49
Phoenx 73 51 s 68 45
Pittsbugh 54 48 12 sh 52 49
Portland. ME 39 34 21 pc 47 30
Portland. Ore 47 38 02 sh 48 42
Providence. Ri 49 44 38 pc 49 38
Raleigh 66 50 01 pc 70 57
Rapd Cty 40 19 pc 20 10
Reno 52 27 s 47 25
Rochester NY 46 39 08 sih 42 41
Sacramento 57 42 s 63 39
St LOus 49 44 24 sh 56 29
SSt e Mane 30 25 sn 30 21
Sa ake City 43 28 02 pc 31 22
San Antono 78 62 01 c 81 41
San Diego 64 57 s 67 47
San Francsco 59 46 s 64 50
Savannah 74 46 pc 75 60
Seattle 44 38 sh 45 41
Spokane 35 21 trace c 31 25
Syracuse 49 34 09 pc 43 39
Topeka 48 27 c 40 14
Washngton 54 48 sh 51 48
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87 Alice. Texas LOW -4 Orr. Minn.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon 50 45/pC
CITY HL/SKY London 48/35 sh
Acapulco 86/71/pc Madrid 51 32/s
Amsterdam 46/41/sh Mexico CiRy 7246 /p
Athens 60/44/sh MonlreaI 29 261s
22/19/pc Moscow 28i141c
Berlin 29 27/sn Pans 43/38 sh
Bermuda 72/66/sh Rio 78 71/ts
Cairo 72/54/c Rome 46/31/s
Calgary 25 22/pc Sydney 82/60 sh
Havana 84/70 pc Tokyo 47/34 pc
I Kong 68/65/pc Toronto 33 31 sf
Jerusalem 65/52/c Warsaw 26/20 pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY TN


For the RECORD


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


DATE DAY

12/9 SUNDAY
12/10 MONDAY


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A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


LOCAL


Aos


L if





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLIFF what the
CLIFFsaid Lau
nication:
Continued from Page Al gional
facilitate
up to a maximum of 19 nection,
weeks of re-employment as- training
distance benefits." services
Miller explained that any and Levy
claims filed from now until waiting
Jan. 1 are eligible for up to a going, as
maximum of 23 weeks. be cut or
"The decrease in the Workir
number of benefits weeks is see redu
dictated by the U.S. Depart- due to an
ment of Labor based on the taxes an
requirements of the Middle the temp
Class Tax Relief and Job duction
Creation Act of 2012," he withhold
said. "If Congress is able to The W
reach a deal on extending states if(
them, then DEO will imme- before tl
diately reach out to all every U.
claimants affected and no- go up by
tify them of the extension." But in
And if not? Republic
"We really have no idea Richard


DEAL
Continued from Page Al

"Many of these people are strug-
gling to pay mortgages, to provide ed-
ucation for their children," Reed said
this past week as President Barack
Obama and House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, rejected each other's
opening offers for a deficit deal.
Emergency jobless benefits for
about 2.1 million people out of work
more than six months will cease Dec.
29, and 1 million more will lose them
over the next three months if Congress
doesn't extend the assistance again.
Since the collapse of the economy in
2008, the government has poured $520
billion an amount equal to about
half its annual deficit in recent years -
into unemployment benefit extensions.
White House officials have assured
Democrats that Obama is committed
to extending them another year, at a
cost of about $30 billion, as part of an
agreement for sidestepping the fiscal
cliff and reducing the size of annual
increases in the federal debt.
"The White House has made it clear
that it wants an extension," said
Michigan Rep. Sander Levin, the top
Democrat on the House Ways and
Means Committee.
Republicans have been relatively
quiet on the issue lately. They de-
manded and won savings elsewhere to
offset the cost of this year's extension,
requiring the government to sell some
of its broadcasting airwaves and mak-
ing newly hired federal workers con-
tribute more toward their pensions.


impact would be,"
ra Byrnes, commu-
s manager for re-
employment
)r Workforce Con-
which provides job
and placement
for Citrus, Marion
y counties. "We are
to see where it is
to how much would
Wheree"
ng residents could
ced take-home pay
I increase in payroll
d the expiration of
porary 2 percent re-
in Social Security
ding.
hite House website
Congress fails to act
he end of the year,
S. family's taxes will
$2,000.
his weekly update,
can U.S. Rep.
Nugent, whose dis-


trict includes Citrus County,
said "talks between the
White House and the Con-
gress have gone nowhere
but backwards." He said
President Barack Obama's
plan, which calls for $1.6
trillion in new tax revenue
- largely from tax increases
aimed at the nation's
wealthiest citizens as
well as approximately $50
billion in new stimulus
spending, is totally unwork-
able and unsustainable.
Dr. Sean M. Snaith is di-
rector of the Institute for
Economic Competitiveness
at the University of Central
Florida, which publishes
economic forecasts for
Florida and the nation.
"I think the national econ-
omy is vulnerable if, in fact,
all tax cuts expire and auto-
matic spending cuts kick in.
That would knock the econ-


The Congressional
Budget Office said in a
study last month that
extending the current
level of long-term
unemployment benefits
another year would add
300,000 jobs to the
economy.
Boehner did not include jobless
benefits in his counteroffer response
this past week to Obama's call for $1.6
trillion in new taxes over the next decade,
including raising the top marginal
rates for the highest-paid 2 percent.
Long-term unemployment remains
a persistent problem. About 5 million
people have been out of work for six
months or more, according to the Bu-
reau of labor Statistics. That's about 40
percent of all unemployed workers.
The Labor Department said Friday
that the unemployment rate fell to 7.7
percent from 7.9 percent, the lowest in
nearly four years. But much of the de-
cline was due to people so discour-
aged about finding a job that they quit
looking for one.
Democrats have tried to keep a
flame burning under the issue. Ending
the extended benefits would "deal a
devastating blow to our economy," 42
Democratic senators wrote Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev,
this past week.
The Congressional Budget Office


omy back to recession," he
said. "We (Florida) are very
vulnerable to the brunt of
the fiscal cliff, the impact of
uncertainly has already
started. Consumer confi-
dence has had a pretty sig-
nificant decline eight
points from November to
December."
"We are in a difficult situ-
ation. There is really no so-
lution without some pain,
and the proposed taxes on
the upper income brackets
is really not a solution."
He compared the national
deficit situation to gaining
weight.
"It's easy to gain weight,
but when it's time to go to
the gym and exercise, it's
never fun."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


said in a study last month that extend-
ing the current level of long-term un-
employmentbenefits another year would
add 300,000 jobs to the economy The
average benefit of about $300 a week
tends to get spent quickly for food, rent
and other basic necessities, the report
said, stimulating the economy
The liberal-leaning Economic Pol-
icy Institute found that extended un-
employment benefits lifted 2.3 million
Americans out of poverty last year, in-
cluding 600,000 children.
States provide the first 20 weeks to
26 weeks of unemployment benefits
for eligible workers who are seeking
jobs. When those are exhausted, fed-
eral benefits kick in for up to 47 more
weeks, depending on the state's un-
employment rate.
The higher a state's unemployment
rate, the longer state residents can
qualify for additional weeks of federal
unemployment benefits. Only seven
states with jobless rates of 9 percent or
more now qualify for all 47 weeks.
Congress already cut back federal
jobless benefits this year. Taken to-
gether with what states offer, the ben-
efits could last up to 99 weeks. Cutting
the maximum to 73 weeks has already
cut off benefits to about 500,000 people.
Opponents of benefit extensions
argue that they can be a disincentive
for taking a job.
"Prolonged benefits lead some un-
employed workers to spend too much
time looking for jobs that they would
prefer to find, rather than focusing on
jobs that they are more likely to find,"
said James Sherk, a labor policy ana-
lyst at the conservative Heritage
Foundation.


Juanita
Brooks, 71
INVERNESS
Juanita J. Brooks, 71, of
Inverness, died Thursday,
Dec. 6, 2012, at Citrus Me-
morial hospital. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory in Inverness is
handling the arrangements.

GemFmill
Holton, 61
HOMOSASSA
GemmillA. Holtom, 61, of
Homosassa, died Friday,
Dec. 7, 2012, under the care


of Hospice of Citrus County
in Homosassa. Arrange-
ments are by McGan Cre-
mation Service LLC,
Hernando.
Emma
Owen, 89
BEVERLY HILLS
Emma M. Owen, 89, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., passed
away Nov 27, 2012, at
Woodland Terrace Nursing
Home. Graveside services
will be 11 a.m. Thursday,
Dec., 13, 2012, at Fero Me-
morial Gardens.
See DEATHS/Page A6


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Obituaries


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


)hiftuivriP


DEATHS
Continued from PageA5

Susan Anker, 72
CHRISTIANSBURG,
VA.
Susan T Anker, 72, of
Christiansburg, Va., loving
wife and
mother,
peacefully
passed
away at her
home with
her chil-
dren by her
side Dec. 5,
Susan 2012.
Anker She was
preceded in
death by her husband of 47
years, Bernard Anker; her
parents, Alex and Pearl
Yarnot; and brother, David
Yarnot. She is survived by
her son, Joel Anker and
wife, Georgiann; her daugh-
ter, Rachel Anker-Johnson
and husband, Chris; her
grandchildren, Selena
Anker, Kellen Anker, Cole-
man Anker and Adam
Anker; beloved cat, Tommy
Henry; her sister, Christine
Brooks of Friendswood,
Texas; her sister-in-law,
Shirl Skarda of Sussex, Wis.;
and her nieces and
nephews, Juliann Brooks,
Aaron Brooks, Mary Brooks,
Becky Steele and Christo-
pher Yarnot.
Susan took pride and joy
in decorating her home,
knitting and needlework,
cooking for her family and
friends, and she enjoyed
reading, especially poetry,
and listening to classical
music.
Visitation will be from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday, Dec.
8, 2012, at Horne Funeral
Home, Christiansburg. The
funeral services will follow
at noon in the funeral home
chapel, with the Rev Angie
Hoff officiating. A graveside
service will be Monday, Dec.
10, 2012, at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Online condolences may
be made to the family at
hornefuneralservice.com.
Arrangements are with
Hore Funeral Home &
Crematory, Christiansburg,
Va., 540-382-2612.





Lincoln 'Linc'
Cavalieri, 94
Lincoln E. "Linc" Cava-
lieri, 94,
joined our
Lord in
Heaven on
.Wednesday,
Dec. 5, 2012,
peacefully
in his home
f a in the pres-
L o ence of his
Lincoln loving fam-
Cavaleri ily. Mere
words can-
not describe his life. To sim-
ply say he was kind,
generous and loving does
not do him justice. Linc was
a man who had an extraor-
dinary ability to positively
impact anyone who had the
pleasure of knowing him.
Lincoln was born Feb. 28,
1918, in Hamden, Conn. He
is the beloved son ofAlberto
and Romilda Cavalieri, and
is survived by his beloved
wife of 69 years, Margaret;
his sons, Robert L., Richard
E. (Jody) and Lincoln J.
(Geria); and his daughter,
Carol A. Powrie (Gregory).
Line was a kind and loving
grandfather who revered
his 12 grandchildren and
four great-grandchildren.
A veteran of World War II
(U.S. Army), Linc spent most
of his celebrated sports and
entertainment career as the
executive vice president of
Detroit's Olympia Stadium
and Joe Louis and Cobo
Arenas. He promoted major

To Place Your
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Saralynne


Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com
Ciloin i i d
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entertainers too numerous
to list, including Elvis Pres-
ley and the Beatles, created
one of the nation's premier
college hockey tourna-
ments, the Great Lakes Invi-
tational, helped launch the
career of boxer Tommy
Hearns, and conceived of
and built the first-ever pri-
vate suites in an arena at
Olympia Stadium. Simulta-
neously, Line served as vice
president of the National
Hockey League's Detroit
Red Wings.
Line will be deeply
missed by all who had the
pleasure of his company In
lieu of flowers, it is sug-
gested memorial donations
be made to the American
Cancer Society. A memorial
service beginning at 11 a.m.
will be Saturday, Jan. 26,
2012, at Faith Lutheran
Church, 935 Crystal Glen
Drive, Lecanto, FL 34461.
wwwfaithlecanto. com.





John Grant, 81
CRYSTAL RIVER
John Walter Grant, 81, of
Crystal River, went to be
with the Lord on Wednes-
day, Nov 28,
2012, at
Hospice
House,
Lecanto. A
native of
Miami, Fla.,
he was born
July 6, 1931,
John one of eight
Grant children to
Walter and
Daisy (Jones) Grant. He
moved here in 1974 from
Ojus, Fla., and was a life-
long truck driver, most re-
cently with D.A.B.
Construction in Citrus
County. He was a member of
Bible Baptist Church in
Crystal River and was a U.S.
Army and National Guard
veteran. Mr. Grant loved the
outdoors and especially
loved to do his yard work,
both for himself as well as
his neighbors. John was well
loved by everyone.
He leaves behind his wife
of 17 1/2 years, Helen Grant
of Crystal River; his chil-
dren, John K. Grant (Janet),
Jim W Grant and Bonnie
McEwen (Tom); his stepchil-
dren, Linda Kealey, David,
Steve and Mark Burrows;
his brother, Clarence Grant;
his sister, Lillian Whitby; 13
grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren. Mr.
Grant was preceded in
death by his first wife,
Bessie Grant; siblings, Dolly,
Hannah, Annie, Joe, Jennie;
and granddaughter, Beckie
Outler.
A memorial service will
be 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15,
2012, from Bible Baptist
Church, with pastors Tom
Reaves and Ronnie Reid of-
ficiating, 5740 W Norvell
Bryant Highway (C.R. 486),
Crystal River, FL 34429. Call
352-795-4389. Interment will
be private. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family request me-
morial contributions be
made to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464. Wilder



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Sign the guest book at
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Delores
Knopp, 80
INVERNESS
Delores Elfleda Knopp,
80, of Inverness, died Thurs-
day, Dec. 6, 2012, at her
home. Born in Waco, Texas,
on Oct. 3, 1932, to the late
Henry and Fern (Pinegar)
Lucas, she came here 23
years ago from Tampa. Mrs.
Knopp was a customer serv-
ice representative with Sun-
Trust Bank with 20 years of
service. She was a member
of the Fort Cooper Baptist
Church in Inverness.
Delores is survived by her
sons, Cecil "Jim" (Patricia)
Haney of Lutz, Fla., Harold
"Pete" (Sandra) Hancock of
Clearwater, Fla., and Chris
Brewer of Crystal River; her
sister, Betty Ratsch, New
Port Richey, Fla.; four
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren. De-
lores was preceded in death
by her husband of 22 years,
Leonard, on June 25, 2001.
Following cremation, De-
lores' urn will be interred
with her husband at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.




Forrest Leer, 85
HOMOSASSA
Fbrrest Weldon Leer, 85, of
Homosassa, passed away
Thursday, Dec. 6,2012, at Hos-
pice House in Lecanto. A na-
tive of Canton County, S.D., he
moved here in 1987 from
Dunedin. Mr Leer was a long-
time pack-
age carrier
for Bill Sum-
merford
S' Package De-
livery in
Tampa and
was a U.S.
Navy vet-
Forrest eran from
Leer 1945 to 1954.
Forrest
loved to fish, go to garage
sales and flea markets, and
occupied a merchant's space
at Howard's Flea Market
He is survived by his wife
of nearly 37 years, Maggie P
Leer, of Homosassa; his
children, Michael, Mark and
Missy Leer, all of Orlando;
his daughter, Mary Shaw
(Gary), of Orlando; his sons,
Ivan Murphree (Kathy),
and Rodney Murphree
(Frances), both of Alabama;
his son, Richard Murphree,
of Homosassa; his daughter,
Debbie Harmon (Bob), of
Hartwell, Ga.; his daughter,
Sheila Leis (Jimmy), of Ho-
mosassa; his sister, Shirley
Peters, of California; 15
grandchildren; and many
great-grandchildren.
Graveside services will be
12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11,
2012, at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell.
Friends will be received
from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-


mosassa. Wilder Funeral
Home, Homosassa, pro-
vided information.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.




Johnny
Palmer, 70
HOMOSASSA
Johnny Hall Palmer, 70, of
Homosassa, passed away
Friday, Nov. 30, 2012 at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center. A native of
Centre, Ala.,
he was born
Aug. 7, 1942,
to Hall and
Maude
(McCloude),
one of four
children.
Johnny was
Johnny a retired
Palmer construc-
tion super-
intendent, most recently
with Donald Austin Con-
struction, in Germantown,
Tenn., and moved here in
1979 from Largo, Fla.
Mr. Palmer was a U.S.
Army veteran from 1959 to
1962 and was preceded in
death by his first wife, Carol
Palmer, on April 27, 1997,
and son John Palmer, on
Sept 11, 1993. He is survived
by his wife of 12 years,
Martha Palmer of Ho-
mosassa; his daughters,
Sherri Palmer, Suzanne
Arnold (Mark) and Angela
Stone (Greg Angust), all of
Homosassa; his son, Christo-
pher Stone (Danielle), New
Hampshire; his brothers,
Alan Palmer of South Car-
olina, and Layne "Steve"
Palmer of Homosassa; his
sister, Ann Hill of Alabama;
11 grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Wilder Funeral Home in
Homosassa is handling the
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's policy permits both
free and paid obituaries.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.






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Edward
Reisig, 78
BEVERLY HILLS
Edward W Reisig, 78,
Beverly Hills, died Friday,
Nov 30, 2012, at his resi-
dence. A native of Philadel-
phia, Pa., he was born
March 4, 1934, to the late
Ralph and Marie (Whalen)
Reisig and came to this area
in 2002 from Palm City, Fla.
He owned and operated a
cabinet manufacturing busi-
ness and was a member of
St. Anne's Episcopal Church
in Crystal River.
Ed is survived by his wife,
Edwina (Newton) Reisig;
his seven children, Richard
Reisig, Anne Marie Krim,
Donald Reisig, Glenn
Reisig, Lynne Conroy, Jane
Jaeger and Alyce Rathburn;
one brother, Dave Reisig;
and many grandchildren
and great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by a daughter, Mary Reisig
and a brother, Ralph Reisig.
A memorial Mass will be
celebrated at St. Anne's
Episcopal Church in Crystal
River on Saturday, Dec. 15,
2012, at 2 p.m. with Father
Kevin Holsapple officiating.
Cremation arrangements
are being handled by the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory In
lieu of flowers, memorials
are being accepted by St.
Anne's Episcopal Church
memorial fund.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.





Stephen
Smith, 67
CRYSTAL RIVER
Stephen Charles Smith,
67, of Crystal River, died
Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012, in
Gainesville. A lifelong


Floridian,
Steve was
born Feb. 8,
1945, in St.
Petersburg
to the late
James and
Billie
Stephen Smith. After
Smith serving our
country
proudly in the U.S. Army, he
became a deputy for the
Pinellas County Sheriff's
Office. He graduated with a
Bachelor of Arts degree
from the University of South
Florida. Steve owned his
own business and was an
agent through Nationwide
Insurance. After being diag-
nosed with terminal cancer
in 1999, doctors offered a
bleak prognosis. However,
never wavering from his
strong Christian faith and
trust in the Lord, he defied
the odds and became a med-
ical miracle. He cherished
every day and spent his life
investing in others through
teaching, counseling and
spending time with family
and friends.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Brad and Elisa
Smith; their children, Addi-
son and Nathan Smith; his
brother, Gary "G.Z." Smith;
as well as his dear friend
and caregiver, Linda
Medley
A tribute to Steve's life
will be Monday, Dec. 17,
2012, at 1 p.m. at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home in In-
verness, preceded by visita-
tion with the family from
noon until the hour of serv-
ice. Burial will follow at 2:30
p.m. at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell with
full military honors. In lieu
of flowers, make a donation
to the charity or organiza-
tion of your choice in
Stephen's name if you feel
so inclined.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


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L~ji





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Partners needed for annual 'Jam'


The Spot Famil
its children'spart

Special to the Chronicle
You can help make a difference
this Christmas season: Partner
with The Spot Family Center and
local business owners, churches
and others for its eighth annual
toy drive. Donations will help en-
sure every local child (ages 2 to 17)
in need receives a gift. In 2011,
The Spot distributed 4,000 gifts to
local families and children with
the help of more than 100 local
businesses and community
members.


y Center to stage
y Dec. 23 and 24

The Spot Family Center will
host its eighth annual Christmas
Jam on Dec. 23 and Dec. 24. The
free two-day event includes food,
fun, gifts and live entertainment.
Each day has a different theme
and an encouraging message. Reg-
istration begins both days at 5:30
p.m. and closes promptly at 7 p.m.
On Christmas Eve, wrapped gifts
will be distributed. All children
must be registered and present to
receive a gift. Parents or
guardians must attend to register
their child and children must be


TOY DROP-OFF LOCATIONS
* Crystal River: The Spot Family Center, Advanced Family Hearing, Blackshears Aluminum, Citrus
Equipment, Nature Coast Bank, Advanced Health Dr. Horn, Crystal River Church of God, ERA
Suncoast Realty, Nails by Angela, Sandy's Barber Shop, Natalia's Pizza & Pasta, Orange Bank,
GTE Financial Bank and TLC Rehab.
* Hernando: Nature Coast Bank and TLC Rehab.
* Inverness: Dynabody Fitness Club, TLC Rehab and Love Chevrolet.
* Other locations include: Seven Rivers Christian School, Diamond Ridge & Rehab Center in Lecanto,
Backyard Pool and Spa, Pinch a Penny Pool and Insurance Resources & Risk Management in Beverly
Hills; TLC Rehab and Twisters Design Studio in Homosassa; Michael Paul Hair & Nail Studio in Citrus
Springs; and 12 TLC Rehab locations in Citrus and Marion counties.


present. A full dinner will be
served to everyone on both nights.
Several local business partners
are listed as toy collection loca-
tions. To designate your business


as a drop-off location, volunteer to
help or for more information, call
Evelyn Vissicchio, program direc-
tor, at 352-794-3870, or email
evthespot@yahoo.com.


To make a monetary donation
for the event, send a check
payable to The Spot Family
Center to PO. Box 2046, Lecanto,
FL 34460.


It's a wrap: All invited to help Spot get ready for party


Special to the Chronicle
Volunteers are needed to
help wrap gifts for the eighth
annual Spot Family Center Toy
Drive, which is in full swing.
Three gift-wrapping parties


with Christmas music and re-
freshments will be held to wrap
more than 3,000 toys for fami-
lies in Citrus County.
Make it a family event: All are
invited to participate. Volun-
teers may bring wrapping


paper, tape and scissors, but
that is not mandatory A favorite
Christmas dessert to share is al-
ways welcome.
When and where to wrap:
U From 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 11, at Crystal River Church


of God, 2180 N.W 12th Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 352-795-3079.
U From 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 13, at Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-3148.


From 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 18, at The Spot Family
Center, 405 S.E. Seventh Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 352-794-3870.
For more information, call
the Spot at 352-794-3870 or visit
www.TheSpotFamilyCenter org.


Celebrate Hanukkah Dec. 12 in Inverness


All welcome to come
Special to the Chronicle
All are welcome to a Hanukkah
candle-lighting and celebration at 6
p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12, on the


grounds of the Old Historic Court-
house in Inverness.
In addition to the celebration and
music, latkes (potato pancakes) and
doughnut holes will be served with
coffee and tea.
This will be the only public
Hanukkah celebration in Citrus


County. Sponsors are Joe's Family
Restaurant, Seventh Heaven Salon &
Spa, the Citrus County Chronicle, Cit-
rus County Historical Society and
Congregation Beth Sholom of Citrus
County, with thanks to Citrus County
Parks & Recreation, Benny Cruz and
Citrus County Sheriff Fire Rescue.


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 A7


m


A










2012: Year of hope, help, change


he year 2012 kept the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
(CCVC) busy as we part-
nered local veteran-owned busi-
nesses with veterans in need to
build handicap access ramps, re-
pair rooftops, solve plumbing and
electrical issues and
perform automotive
repairs.
We referred veterans
to service officer
Chuck Fettes at the Cit-
rus County Veterans
Service Office, where
limited funding is
available to assist with
utility bills, and have
recommended the Sen- Barbara
ior Services Office in VETEI
Lecanto for informa- VIE
tion and assistance in
caregiver issues.
The CCVC has hosted monthly
yard sales, provided food to quali-
fied veterans via our food bank
and welcomed new members and
their families. We've also offered
guidance in the search for missing
military records and information


C

'I


on an array of subjects in this col-
umn that appears exclusively on a
monthly basis in the Chronicle.
We have guided veterans and
their families seeking information
about (and obtaining) their bene-
fits to the Chapter 70 Disabled
American Veterans' Joe
McClister, who, as the
DAV's service resource
officer has been suc-
S cessful at paving the
way and cutting through
red tape.
A wide variety of top-
ics have been discussed
during our guest spot on
WYKE's "Every Day is a
,orcoran Gift," hosted by Anne
ANS' Black of HPH Hospice.
NS We've had CCVC repre-
sentatives attend serv-
ices at the Florida
National Cemetery in Bushnell
and the Traveling Veterans Me-
morial Wall as it was displayed in
Citrus County. Our members have
aided in the rewarding of aca-
demic achievements with public
recognition and scholarships.


We participated in the 10th an-
nual Thanksgiving Feeding Al-
liance hosted by the New Church
Without Walls, where Citrus
County individuals and families in
need were presented with turkeys
from Publix, food provided by the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints, whose assistance
made this event possible, dinners
packaged by the Salvation Army,
plus additional food, information
and supplies provided by a collec-
tion of local groups. Walmart pro-
vided parking lot space, canned
goods and shopping carts for this
event that assisted more than
3,000 Citrus County residents.
By mid-year, we were successful
in revamping our website into an
interactive space where back is-
sues of our newsletter, "The Coali-
tion Crusader," are available to
download in pdf format. This site,
www.ccvcfl.org, is constantly being
updated with fresh news and cur-
rent events, and through our site
we features links to important in-
formation and forms for veterans.
We have a presence on Facebook,


Twitter and Google Plus. We're
viewable on You Tube and are ac-
tively adding to that channel.
In 2013, the CCVC will continue
to match veterans with donated
medical equipment, keep our food
bank doors open, and welcome
more veterans and their families
to our organization. We hope we
can count on the participation of
even more local businesses in our
efforts to make life better for our
veterans in need.
We will build a more active co-
ordination between ourselves and
other military veteran organiza-
tions so more veterans seeking as-
sistance will be served. Joining
hands with the American Legion,
Disabled American Veterans, Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars, Korean
War Veterans and more is a sure-
fire way to reach out to a larger
number of our deserving service
men and women.
All of us here at the CCVC would
like to thank all the businesses
and individuals who have so gen-
erously donated their time, en-
ergy, food, cash and services this


year, and we look forward to a con-
tinuing relationship with you. We
wish you and yours a safe and
happy new year.


Barbara L. Corcoran is the public
information officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition Inc.
She maybe contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this group may
be found at wwwccvcfl.org.


For more news about local
veterans' organizations, see
pages 21 and 22 of today's
Chronicle.
To report veterans news
items, as well as other
community events, call
Sarah Gatling, community
editor, at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1197. To email
news, send it to
community@chronicle
online.com.


Veterans NOTES


Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All pro-
ceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger


and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-
3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. Call the
Citrus office at 352-527-4600.


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Compass Bank. Member FDIC.


A8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


VETERANS NEWS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dec. 10 to 4 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, ce-
real variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozarella maxstix,
spaghetti with ripstick, turkey
super salad with roll, fresh baby
carrots, broccoli, chilled fruit,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds, un-
crusted PBJ, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, baked
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger
sliders, pulled barbecue pork
on bun, PB dippers, ham super
salad, fresh baby carrots,


baked French fries, dried mixed
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, macaroni and
cheese, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, hot ham and cheese on
bun, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, sweet peas, chilled
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, milk
and juice variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, milk
and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk variety.


Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken and
rice burrito, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
macaroni and cheese, ham
super salad with rip stick, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden salad,
whole kernel corn, dried fruit
mix, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Pulled barbe-
cue pork on bun, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles,
dried fruit mix, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, hot dog,
turkey super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, potato
roasters, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, cheese pizza, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal


and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, fresh
broccoli, potato roasters, broc-
coli, chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken
with maxstix, turkey and gravy
over noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham


super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, potato triangles,
peas, celery, chilled fruit, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued
roasted chicken with roll,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, chilled baked beans,
potato roasters, chilled fruit,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
ham super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans, po-
tato triangles, applesauce, cu-
cumbers, celery, chilled fruit,
juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, chicken alfredo,
pizza, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, fajita chicken salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
potato roasters, corn, chilled
fruit, juice, milk.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Cream of tomato
soup, apple juice, meatloaf
sandwich on whole-grain bun
with ketchup, raisins, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter on bun
with mustard, baked beans with
tomato, carrot coins, coleslaw,
graham crackers, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday cele-
bration: Beef and macaroni with
cheese, green beans, corn with
red pepper, slice yellow cake,
slice Italian bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce, herb
mashed potatoes, spinach,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Barbecued pork ri-
blet, green beans, mashed po-
tatoes, chunky cinnamon
apples, slice whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
Call 352-527-5975.


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Youth Team Consultants

- a h^L .hI ...


Special to the Chronicle
Tommy Tucker Youth Team Consultants for 2012 met Nov. 13 at Graphic Elite Printing to
give input on the new Tommy Tucker comic book, issue No. 4, to be introduced to Citrus
County elementary students in the spring. From left are: Stephanie Bandstra, Lecanto High
School; Tom Rogers, Tommy Tucker creator and illustrator; Katherine Alexander, Lecanto
High School; and, Paige Applegate, Citrus Springs Middle School. Tommy Tucker is a su-
perhero used to educate local elementary students about the dangers of underage sub-
stance abuse. The comic book was created in partnership with Partners for a
Substance-Free Citrus, Graphic Elite Printing and Blue Heron Tees, Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, Citrus County Schools, Tobacco-Free Citrus, TD Bank and the Chronicle.


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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


=Hot Corner: BAD LANGUAGE=
Ann Landers was right
I'm reading today's paper, Monday, Dec. 3, the Hot Cor-
ner about profanity. It brings to mind what Ann Landers
once said; that people (who) use profanity have a lack of
vocabulary. This is very true.
Core values start at home
I'm calling the Chronicle regarding "Display certain val-
ues," where the person says that the kids need core val-
ues. Core values and morals are taught by parents, not by
the Department of Education. This person should hang
around a high school and listen to the language that the
students are using themselves among each other. You
want core values, morals? They need to start at home with
the parents. Department of Education is for education. Go
back to the parents. In reference to "A lot to learn," where
the person said about the fellow that said they better get
educated. Let me tell you something. Profanity has been
around for years and will continue to be around for years.
Even law enforcement I'm ex-law enforcement uses
profanity. It is common today. So for you to say high
school students don't hear it, go to a high school and just
listen to them talk.
No need for profanity
I started working driving semis when I was still in my
teens. I'm now a retired senior citizen and I'm reading the
Chronicle about all this stuff in Sound Off about the coach
being fired because of profanity, and folks defending the
profanity. Rough times back then and all, but to me, to not
be able to speak our own language without the filth and all
that comes out of some people's mouths, shows to me a
gross stupidity and lack of intelligence to be able to speak
our own language without a foul mouth. And to those that
are still trying to get across to have to use profanity, they
need to learn how to talk and explain themselves without it.

Sound OFF
It is all distracted driving
I'm calling Sound Off in reference to your article "Keep
dogs in their place," where the person complains about
the dogs being on the lap of the driver and one little
slipup and they can crash. There are more people using
cellphones and texting that causes crashes than a little
dog sitting on someone's lap. So I think that really needs
to be addressed more than a dog sitting on a lap. Stop the
texting. Stop talking on the phone.
Pets are like family
There was an item in the Sound Off about people com-
plaining that people should leave dogs home or some-
thing, that they're not allowed to go anywhere. Obviously
these people do not own a dog. But in most cases, a lot of
these people treat dogs as if they're replacements for
their grandchildren or children. You ought to realize as
people get older, they use these sorts of pets as kind of a
filler because they've either lost their child or their grand-
children don't live close to them. So this is their excuse
and so they treat them like a child, and I guess you can't
hold that against them. But in most cases, it's not a prob-
lem. But I do agree there's some people that are going to
go overboard in the way they treat them. They dress them
up, they take them in these large shopping bags and they
carry them around the store and I think that's a little too
much.


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A10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Stop bashing and
offer solutions
Here we go again an-
other deranged and non-
factual conservative rant in
the Chronicle on a pleasant
Saturday morning. I have
to say, when I read some
letters I imagine the person
stomping his/her feet up
and down, throwing a tem-
per tantrum like a 2-year-
old, and it makes me
chuckle! It would be so re-
freshing to actually read a
conservative letter filled
with solutions and ideas
that could be discussed and
calmly debated ... not per-
sonal feelings and mean
comments about others
who disagree.
Enough bashing our
president, too; try to
muster up some good, old-


fashioned Amer:
spect for our cho
and stop "crying
becoming and di
to our country S
bashing, put fort
and keep on car:
what democracy
about.



Gutless
of vanda
Well, it happen
four weeks after
Obama bumper :
my vehicle, it ha
dalized for the se
The first gutless
throw paint on tl
now my tires we
What is it that
about such conte
the lack of educa
racism, believing
News, or listenii
baugh? I suspect
bination of all of
To think the tire
was done on a Si
ing the Christma
You should be pi


Support y
by worn
I feel I must cl
payroll taxes are
from our payche
for Medicare, So


Christ Medical Center offers
Transportation to
doctor's appointments as a
courtesy service.

Urgent Care is essential-
no appointment necessary and
we are open seven days a week.

A picture is worth a thousand
words and can mean all the
difference diagnosing your
medical condition. We staff a full
Diagnostic Imaging
Department.


One Stop
Medical Facility
Appropriate, comprehensive
and timely treatment for our
patients all in one place is the
sole purpose of Christ Medical
Center. This multi-specialty
group offers trusted medical
care where multiple physicians
and practitioners work together
to speed recovery and keep
costs down for the patient.


SChrist Medical Center is the new
, home of Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center and
Physicians Medical
Weight Loss. See how we
have helped people confidently
handle a diabetes diagnosis and
successfully shown others the
secret to weight loss safely and
helped them keep it off.


0


Maintain better health and
relieve pain from your condition
with Physical Therapy
Treatment.

Our in-house, full-time
Pharmacist ensures
patients get their medications
within minutes as they check out.

Afull-service Medical
and Beauty Spa located
in the facility helps complete
your healthy living experience.


aanfTooF"cd


ican re- rity and unemployment.
osen leader Yes, payroll taxes are
." It's un- forced savings for retire-
isrespectful ment and health care and
top the those who earn the most
;h solutions do, in fact, pay the most
ing! That's Food stamps and many
is all other programs are paid
for by the high earners for
E. G. Yerian the low earners and unem-
a. played, in which the pro-
Homosassa ductive workers do not
participate in.
SactIt is important to note the
alism low-wage earners are eligi-
ned again; ble for an earned income
Shutting an tax credit. Not only do they
sticker on pay zero income tax, they
s been van- actually get money back
second time and pay for no law enforce-
act was to ment, no counter-cyclical
he vehicle; help against recession or
re slashed. bloated mortgage debt, no
brings aid to education, and noth-
mpt? I in t ing for other federal pro-
empt? Is itgrams.
action, grams.
g Fox How can they contribute
ig to Lim- nothing ... and have any
ng to Lim- stake in the future of Amer-
t it's a com-
Sthe above. ica? They are only paying
-slashing toward programs from
sunday dur- which they personally ex-
is season pect to receive more than
roud! they have paid in and re-
ceive extra money from the
Mike Lazar programs the regular work-
Hernando ing man pays for. When you
have no skin in the game,
ourself you should not be eligible
to vote until you go from a
king liability on the economy
arify that and become an asset as a
deducted positive contributor to our
*cks to pay society
)cial Secu- Remember, John E


Kennedy said, "ask not
what your country can do
for you, but what you can
do for your country"
In other words, get to
work and support yourself
and family
Claude Strass
Homosassa

Federal holiday
pay wasteful
I recently discovered
during the holidays, in par-
ticular this past Thanksgiv-
ing, Rep. Richard Nugent
paid his staff "holiday pay"
for Wednesday, Nov. 21,
and Friday, Nov 23, giving
them three paid days off.
I asked if they had to use
vacation time and was put
on hold while the staffer
asked his supervisor. He
then told me they were
being paid as "holiday
pay" and not vacation or
sick time.
How many of us as pri-
vate sector or union work-
ers receive this treatment?
If we want the extra day(s)
off, we have to use vaca-
tion time or are not al-
lowed the days off at all. In
some cases, if an employee
calls in sick the day before
or after a holiday, they are
not paid for the holiday.
I find this practice of
Rep. Nugent to be hypo-
critical, especially as one
who touts "cut government


waste," "haul in reckless
union benefits," and "cut
entitlements such as Social
Security and Medicare."
These same staffers also
receive extra holiday pay
on Christmas Eve, New
Year's Eve, Good Friday
and any other time they
can make an extended
weekend out of a holiday,
i.e., if another holiday falls
on a Tuesday or Thursday,
they get holiday pay for
that Monday or Friday as
well. I also called Sens.
Rubio and Nelson's (re:
S.1789) offices on Wednes-
day, Nov 21 (all around 9
a.m.), and their staffers
were working. In fairness,
I do not know if they
worked Friday, Nov 23,
and, if not, how they were
paid. All of this while we


are on the brink o
cal cliff."
Why is Rep. Nu1
generous with our
lars for those close(
self, but then favo
such as H.R. 2309
stoppage of Satur
delivery), which p
to eliminate 25,00(
well as cut or elim
tirement and heal
fits?
Did you know al
ment offices do no
postage? It is calle
"franked" mail, w!
free to them. So w
complain about lo
they are partially
ble.
All elected office
fice payrolls shou
dited by a taxpayer
watchdog commit
made public so we
payers, know which
cians actually "wa
walk" and not just
the talk."
Sus


Know tl
neighbc
When Progress
was acquired by I
ergy last year, I re
1976 documentary
won an Academy.
was called "Harla
County, U.S.A." an
icled the thuggish
ior Duke Energy u
neutralize Kentuc
miners concerns
dining wages and
issues.
Duke's more rec


fthe "fis- tory includes a dismal en-
vironmental record. It has
gent so been sued by the EPA,
Stax dol- which was settled in the
e to him- EPAs favor by the
r bills Supreme Court eight years
(the later. It has been in legal
day mail battles with various envi-
roposes ronmental watchdog
D jobs as groups in North Carolina
linate re- and even legally entangled
th bene- with the Cherokee Indians
with its attempts to put an
l govern- electrical substation on sa-
t pay for cred burial grounds.
ed When Duke purchased
which is Progress last year, every-
hile they one (including regulators)
sses, was surprised by the sud-
responsi- den ouster of Bill Johnson
and his replacement with
ials' of- Duke's own Jim Rogers.
ld be au- One cannot feel too sorry
*r for Bill Johnson; however,
tee and because it paid him more
e, the tax- than $44 million to leave
ch politi- and keep his mouth shut
ilk the $44 million. That kind
S"talk of money sort of dwarfs
the $17 million it is with-
holding from the county.
an Taylor Now, I am in no position
Inverness to render opinion as to
whether Duke owes the
hy $17 million it has decided
)r not to pay the county.
When I read the Chronicle
Energy online and see some of the
uke En- extremely well-thought
called a comments posted about
y that this problem, I am encour-
Award. It aged we have the talent
n and intelligence to resolve
d chron- this situation. But we are
behav- not dealing with nice
ised to neighbors here just an-
'ky coal other greedy and careless
about de- corporation.
I a+.


Ssaiety

cent his-


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Crystal River


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Healing Has


a New Home!

Ocala Health is pleased to announce
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Dawsy budget too high
I see Sheriff Dawsy on the 6 o'clock
news today complaining about Progress
Energy or Duke Energy not paying their fair
share of taxes. He's got what I call chutz-
pah. With the budget he has and the toys
he has, the county would have a lot more
money if it looked into his budget. (It
should ask) why his deputies take their
cars home and use it for personal busi-
ness, the gas they put in their cars and so
forth, with his helicopters and his high-
speed boats and all that. If the city council
or commissioners would look into him be-
fore they gave him a blank check, Citrus
County would have a lot more money. Let's
put a stop to Dawsy.
Is county liable for 'no aid'?
The photograph of Sheriff Dawsy at the
news conference in front of his office yes-
terday, as reported in the Chronicle today
(Nov. 30), shows many of the sheriff's of-
fice employees. My question is, if they have
the time to be there listening to the news
release, are these essential or nonessential
personnel? My thought is, they're not to-


Welcome back Marguerita Grill
I'm just calling to respond to the article
that the Marguerita Grill has broken ground
to start building. I'm just wanting to say to
Tommy: "Welcome back and hurry up and
get the restaurant done so we can come
and enjoy what we've enjoyed in the past


tally essential. So with more than 20 per-
sonnel there, it looks like they could at
least eliminate some of them and that
would give them their million-dollar
savings.
In the Nov. 30 Chronicle, in the article,
"Dawsy: Duke's fault if county's not safe,"
paragraph 3 said, and I quote, "Dawsy also
said he informed Duke Energy, the parent
company of Progress Energy Florida, that
he canceled a mutual-response agreement
with Progress for sheriff's office response
for emergencies at the energy complex
north of Crystal River."
My question is: If something happens at
the power plant, could Citrus County be
held civilly responsible or liable for offering
no aid? I certainly hope not.
Get rid of tank
Sheriff Dawsy, stop threatening the citi-
zens of this county by saying he's going to
cut deputies and crime is going to go up.
First of all, there's no crime in this county.
I've never once ever felt unsafe walking
down the street. So if he has to cut
deputies to save money, so be it. And also,
get rid of his tank.


years and to enjoy it for many years to
come. Way to go, Tommy. Welcome back.
Hurry up. God bless."
Pets better than people
The reason I love my animals more than
people is (because) they don't have such
big, rude, insulting mouths.


Hot Corner: DAWSY


Sound OFF


~p~


A12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


OPINION


AMMOIN
nm.1,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Spending exceeds
revenue
Recently a couple of die-
hard Democrats have chal-
lenged statements I have
made in my letters. While
reading their postings, it is
obvious I have missed the
mark and gone completely
over their heads. One lady
claims great offense over a
letter I wrote about a column
by Miami Herald columnist
Leonard Pitts. Of course, she
didn't bother to do her re-
search and go back and read
the column by Mr Pitts.
In the column in question,
Mr Pitts was crowing about
changing demographics and
Obama's re-election. He
used the terms "coalition of
blacks, women, gays, Mus-
lims and Hispanics" and
"old, white, evangelical
males."
Since my letter was about
his column and the same
subject, I used the same ter-
minology For that, I have
been labeled bigoted, sexist
and racist
Let's not let any facts get
in the way of a good name-
calling session. In my first
letter, I correctly attributed
the above terminology to
Mr Pitts.
My offended fan refers to
my thoughts as unmitigated,
undocumented nonsense.
Let's review them. They are:
We have a national debt of
$16.2 trillion. It increased $6
trillion under Barack
Obama, 50 percent more in
four years than it did under
George Bush in eight It is
projected to reach $22 tril-
lion by the time he finishes
his second term. We need to
get this under control and
begin to reduce it The only
solution I have heard offered
by Obama is we are going to
increase taxes on the rich.
That would get us relief of
$80 billion a year and we
need relief of $1.5 trillion.
We basically operate on a
$3.5 trillion yearly budget
We raise $2 trillion through
taxes and we borrow $1.5
trillion. We spend $3.5 tril-
lion year broken down into
two main categories. We


spend $2 trillion on social
programs such as Medicare,
Medicaid and Social Secu-
rity, and we spend $1.5 tril-
lion to operate the
government and fund the
military.
That is the problem. We
could shut down the govern-
ment and the military and
almost balance the budget
We are spending as much on
social programs as we raise
in taxes. Our social programs
were designed for a much
different demographic with
a lot more workers per re-
tired person. They need
major changes and that will
require reduced benefits, or
major tax increases, or both.
When Obama declares the
rich are not paying their fair
share that is class warfare.
The facts are the wealthiest
1 percent pay 40 percent of
all federal income tax col-
lected. The wealthiest 10
percent pay 70 percent of all
federal income taxes col-
lected. Those facts are easily
verifiable.
On Jan. 1, we will have the
highest personal income tax
and corporate tax rates in
the world. The Wall Street
Journal has published
dozens of articles linking
company migration to our
tax rates, and the migration
may be spreading to individ-
uals. In 2011, we saw an 800-


percent increase in the num-
ber of emigrates from our
shores. Nothing kills job cre-
ation and economic growth
like high taxes. Those are my
thoughts, which ones do you
dispute?
The plans of the socialists
of America are to destroy us
from within by a debt-in-
duced financial collapse
leading to chaos and riots in
the streets. From the ashes,
they see a new socialist soci-
ety arising. The present ad-
ministration will devote the
next four years to disarming
the citizens, much like the
health care takeover of the
prior four years. It's their


No. 1 priority
Harle


Lt. Col. L
got it r
Lt. Col. Hank
right in the lette
Chronicle today
regarding discre
military people
cians. If the sam
of press was give
political world \
hold our heads i
On a personal
appalled the press
to identify any pe
former Marine w
mitted a bad act


it figured out (I think). Amer-
ica expects their Marines to
always win and be the best
Sometimes we do not win
and sometimes we are not
the best. We are just people
like you and sometimes we,
in the military make mis-
takes. (God forgive me, I
made my share.) Let us not
crucify some of the best
military leaders.
I wish you well. Good
holiday and Semper Fi.
Neville Anderson
sergeant USMC (Ret.)
Inverness


Seeking


transparency
*y Lawrence I never considered myself
Homosassa part of any party but rather
voting for the best man.
butler Obama ran on a cam-
ight paign that he would have
an open and transparent
Butler got it government That has not
r in the happened yet!
(Nov 29), Now, we're in the midst
'tions by of congressional investiga-
vs. politi- tions as to who changed the
e amount "Benghazi" talking points
en to the for Ms. Rice to go on every
ve might available Sunday talk show
n shame. and tell the nation this was
note, I am not a terrorist attack by al
ss continues Qaida, but rather a protest
arson as a over a movie! I have yet to
ho has com- see any protesters carrying
I think I got RPG's as are shown in on-


site video during the at-
tack. I guess they just
wanted to be sure they got
their point across!
To deliberately mislead
the American public before
the election was a totally
dishonest and corrupt ac-
tion by our transparent gov-
ernment. You can be a
Democrat or you can be a
Republican, but being lied
to by a government official
is still corruption.
Our last great liar was
Richard Nixon. I don't care
about political parties;
however, lying to me as a
citizen is corruption of the
highest level. Now, every-
one is backpedaling as to
who changed the talking
points, yet no one seems to
actually know just who did
the changes. Seems we
have heard that garbage
before, too.
The president is now de-
fending Ms. Rice by playing
the race card, which is
something he seems to do
pretty often. I really doubt
anyone is picking on Ms.
Rice because of her skin
color, but rather the fact
that she went on national
talk shows and misled the
nation right before the elec-
tion. One must ask whether


the election outcome was
the driving force or does the
administration just adjust
things to meet their needs?
I for one would want a new
secretary of state and the
new director of the CIA to
be honest and of the moral
fiber to tell the truth regard-
less of the outcome. They,
for sure, have the safety and
welfare of this nation in
their hands, and to think
they would lie based upon
direction from a higher
level leaves me no faith
whatsoever in a transpar-
ent, or honest government!
I will not take this to the
political level, but rather to
the honesty level and ask
everyone consider the pos-
sible outcomes if we are lied
to on a regular basis, be-
cause something is politi-
cally beneficial. We all must
make our own judgments.
But this is not just about
talking points, this is corrup-
tion at possibly the highest
levels. Men died, and it is
being swept aside as if noth-
ing went wrong! That goes
beyond the lies of Nixon by
a large measure! At least no
one died in Watergate!
John Cassell
Homosassa


* ect 32 9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
BA a GRILL Crystal River
352-795-4211
at Plantation on Crystal River www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


Dedin St. Martin, MD, FAAP Ulia lSmmas, MD


Dr. St. Martin Is a former Chief Resident at Bridgeport Hospital, Yale University Health System
Dr. Shammas was trained at Shands at the University of Florida In Pediatrics


-


OPINION


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 A13


p~~U





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learn about bees


Public invited to program bypreservefriends


Special to the Chronicle
Gary Van Cleef, master
beekeeper and apiary in-
spection supervisor Region
I, Division of Plant Indus-
try, Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services, will present a
program to the Friends of
the Withlacoochee Gulf
Preserve at 1 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 15, 1001 Old Rock
Road, Yankeetown. All are
welcome.


Van Cleef will discuss
"Bees, Pollination and the
Future of Beekeeping in
Florida." He has been in-
volved with beekeeping
since his Boy Scout days
dating back to the late 1960s.
Upon retiring from the
Marine Corps, Van Cleef
has taken his love of bees to
a professional level.
He teaches at bee col-
leges and seminars in
Florida and throughout the
Caribbean. His current po-


sition is key to maintaining
a healthy, robust and active
beekeeping industry by
helping the beekeepers
identify and eliminate dis-
eases harmful to honey
bees. Pollination is criti-
cally important to food
crops, flowering plants and
honey Bees have been
threatened recently with
diseases that have reduced
the population.
Visit www.withlacoochee
gulfpreserve.com.


Help with weight management


Focus on exercise, creating lifestyle changes


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Exten-
sion office is offering a
Weight Management Pro-
gram based on the Dietary
Guidelines of 2010.
The Dietary Guidelines
emphasize slow, long-term
weight loss based on
healthy eating and regular
physical activity. In addi-
tion, risk for chronic dis-
eases like diabetes and
heart disease are reduced
when people are physically
active most days of the
week.
Even those who already
have chronic diseases such
as high blood pressure and
diabetes may control them


better by eating healthy
foods and becoming active.
The Citrus County Exten-
sion's Weight Management
Program will begin
Wednesday, Jan. 9, from 10
to 11:30 a.m. at the Citrus
County Extension office in
Lecanto (3650 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 1). Classes will
meet weekly for eight
weeks through Wednesday,
Feb. 27.
A portion of each session
will focus on participants
exercising. There will also
be presentations on topics
such as cutting extra calo-
ries, reducing fat intake,
proper portion sizes, un-
derstanding nutrition la-
bels and maintaining


weight loss. Participants
will also be encouraged to
meet informally between
weekly sessions and walk
together.
The cost of the class is
$15 (check or money order,
no cash) per participant
and is limited to 40 people.
Pre-paid registration is
required and no refunds or
transfers to other classes
will be given.
Medical releases and lia-
bility forms plus payments
must be turned in by Dec.
28.
To register, call Monica
Payne at 352-527-5713.
Registration for the class
is going on now, but it will
end at 5 p.m. Dec. 28.


Extension, institute partnerfor another class


Special to the Chronicle
The UF/IFAS Citrus County Extension
office is partnering with Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute to offer a free
Weight Management Class, based on the
Dietary Guidelines of 2010.
The Citrus County Extension's Weight
Management Program will begin Thurs-
day, Jan. 10, from 2 to 3 p.m. at Dr. C.
Joseph Bennett Jr.'s office at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Classes will be


taught by Monica Payne, family and con-
sumer sciences Extension agent. The
classes will meet each Thursday through
Feb. 28.
The class will include health and
lifestyle presentation, and participants will
be encouraged to set goals related to
healthier eating and increased physical ac-
tivity The class is free, but pre-registration
is required. The class is limited to 12
participants. Call 352-527-5713. Registra-
tion ends at 5 p.m. Jan. 4.


Went to fiscal cliff; all I


got was a stupid T-shirt


It seems we are about to
fall off the "fiscal cliff."
Didn't we already do
that? What happened in
2007 and 2008 when the
value of our homes got cut
in half? What was that? A
fiscal speed bump? A fiscal
slap on the back of the
head? Whatever euphe-
mism you want to use,
falling off the fiscal cliff is a
pretty short drop
for most of us
after that.
What was it
when we had to
bail out the banks
and the auto man-
ufacturers? A fis-
cal parachute
that failed to
open? Falling
into a fiscal wood Jl
chipper? Buying MUL
the fiscal farm?
Eating the fiscal
puffer fish? Failing the fis-
cal physical?
Boy, if we fall off the fiscal
cliff, horrible things will
happen. That college I al-
ready can't afford to send
my kids to will raise its
prices. That used car I al-
ready can't afford to buy will
be even more expensive.
If we jump on the fiscal
hand grenade, if we stick
our finger in the fiscal elec-
trical socket, if we touch the
fiscal third rail, people who
are out of work now will still
be out of work. How will
they even know we hit the
fiscal bridge abutment at
100 mph? Unless someone


tells them, they won't notice
much of a difference.
If the fiscal dam breaks, if
the fiscal China syndrome
occurs, if the fiscal cherry
bomb explodes, if the fiscal
pandemic spreads, if the fis-
cal Waterloo arrives, how
will the people whose
homes are already under
the fiscal water be able to
fiscally tell? They still won't
be able to pay
their fiscal bills.
It's almost as if
you can make
anything sound
bad by putting
the word "fiscal"
in front of it.
Don't eat the fis-
cal breakfast
burrito; the fiscal
M "Three Amigos"
LEN wasn't as funny
as they told me;
don't bring home
a fiscal report card. But peo-
ple who lost money when
Lehman Brothers, AIG and
Citigroup tanked won't
know if they're getting fis-
cally waterboarded. Things
will be pretty much the
same for them.
A columnist in a major
newsmagazine said, "It's a
bad time to be rich." Yes, as
you can well imagine, it
must be horrible to have a
lot of money.
You may have noticed the
rich are always complaining
about it. It's a wonder they
don't give away all that
money, so they can be wildly
happy like the rest of us. No


doubt they're wishing they
were poor now, like all the
lucky people who get to
wonder where their next
paycheck is coming from.
The wealthy are missing all
the fun of deciding which
bill to pay first the one for
rent, the car loan, heating
oil, medical or food and
which not to pay at all. Boy, I
wouldn't want to be rich
right now; it really must
stink.
If only there were some
way to avoid this fiscal
Bataan Death March, this
fiscal Mount St. Helens, this
fiscal superstorm Sandy,
this fiscal Hurricane Kat-
rina, this fiscal San Fran-
cisco earthquake, this fiscal
Pompeii, this fiscal Titanic,
this fiscal Krakatoa. What
could we possibly do? What
can anyone do? Cut the De-
fense Department's budget
by a third, solving the prob-
lem overnight and still leav-
ing us with the biggest
military in the world by far?
Stop, that's crazy talk.
If you and I fall off a real
cliff, we die. If our economy
goes over a fiscal cliff, not
one political career will die.
The difference is when you
and I die, someone, some-
where, might care.

Jim Mullen's newest book
is called "Kill Me, Elmo:
The Holiday Depression
Fun Book" You can reach
him on the Web at
JimMullenBooks. com.


HumaneSocietyOF CITRUS COUNTY


Skippy
Skippy was brought to the
rescue because when he
was purchased as a puppy
the breeder said he would
only be 4 pounds as an adult.
Skippy weighs 12 pounds.
Because he wasn't what
they expected him to be, his
people discarded him. He


was shy and insecure when
he arrived, but is a different
fellow now. Skippy is 3 years
old, neutered, up to date on
medical, microchipped and
crate trained. An approved
adoption application and
adoption fee are required to
adopt. Visit www.roomforone
more.net, or call Karron at
352-560-0051.


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A14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


COMMUNITY


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Y .:.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fast-growing fish may never end up on your plate


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Salmon
that's been genetically mod-
ified to grow twice as fast as
normal could soon show up
on your dinner plate. That is,
if the company that makes
the fish can stay afloat
After weathering concerns
about everything from the
safety of humans eating the
salmon to their impact on the
environment, Aquabounty
was poised to become the
world's first company to sell
fish whose DNA has been al-
tered to speed up growth.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration in 2010 con-
cluded that Aquabounty's
salmon was as safe to eat as
the traditional variety The
agency also said that there's
little chance that the salmon
could escape and breed
with wild fish, which could
disrupt the fragile relation-
ships between plants and
animals in nature. But more
than two years later the
FDA has not approved the
fish, and Aquabounty is run-
ning out of money
"It's threatening our very
survival," says CEO Ron Sto-
tish, chief executive of the
Maynard, Mass.-based com-
pany "We only have enough
money to survive until Janu-
ary 2013, so we have to raise
more. But the unexplained
delay has made raising
money very difficult"
The FDA said it's still
working on the final piece of
its review, a report on the
potential environmental im-
pact of the salmon that must
be published for comment
before an approval can be
issued. That means a final
decision could be months,
even years away While the
delay could mean that the
faster-growing salmon will
never wind up on American
dinner tables, there's more
at stake than seafood.
Aquabounty is the only
U.S. company publicly seek-
ing approval for a genetically
modified animal that's raised
to be eaten by humans. And
scientists worry that its expe-
rience with the FDAs lengthy
review process could dis-
courage other U.S. compa-


Associated Press
Salmon that's genetically modified, rear, to grow twice as fast as a normal fish, foreground, could soon show up on your
dinner plate if the company that makes the fish can stay afloat.


nies from investing in animal
biotechnology, or the science
of manipulating animal DNA
to produce a desirable trait
That would put the U.S. at a
disadvantage at a time when
China, India and other for-
eign governments are pour-
ing millions of dollars each
year into the potentially lu-
crative field that could help
reduce food costs and im-
prove food safety
Already, biotech scientists
are changing their plans to
avoid getting stuck in FDA-
related regulatory limbo. Re-
searchers at the University of
California, Davis have trans-
ferred an experimental herd
of genetically engineered
goats that produce protein-
enriched milk to Brazil, due
to concerns about delays at
the FDA. And after investors
raised concerns about the
slow pace of the FDA's
Aquabounty review, Cana-
dian researchers in April
pulled their FDA application
for a biotech pig that would
produce environmentally
friendly waste.
AGAINST
THE CURRENT
The science behind ge-
netic modification is not
new. Biotech scientists said


that genetic manipulation is
a proven way to reduce dis-
ease and enrich plants and
animals, raising productiv-
ity and increasing the global
food supply Genetically
modified corn, cotton and
soybeans account for more
than four-fifths of those
crops grown in the U.S., ac-
cording to the National
Academies of Sciences.
But there have always
been critics who are wary of
tinkering with the genes of
living animals. They say the
risk is too great that modi-
fied organisms can escape
into the wild and breed with
native species. Not that we
don't already eat genetically
altered animals. Re-
searchers say the centuries-
old practice of selective
breeding is its own form of
genetic engineering, produc-
ing the plumper cows, pigs
and poultry we eat today


"You drive a hybrid car be-
cause you want the most effi-
cient vehicle you can have.
So why wouldn't you want
the most efficient agriculture
you can have?" asks Alison
Van Eenennaam, a professor
of animal science at Univer-
sity of California, Davis.
Aquabounty executives
say their aim is to make the
U.S. fish farming industry,
or aquaculture, more effi-
cient, environmentally
friendly and profitable.
After all, the U.S. imports
about 86 percent of its
seafood, in part, because it
has a relatively small aqua-
culture industry Aquacul-
ture has faced pushback in
the U.S. because of con-
cerns about pollution from
large fish pens in the ocean,
which generate fish waste
and leftover food.
Aquabounty executives
figure that the U.S. aquacul-


ture industry can be trans-
formed by speeding up the
growth of seafood. The com-
pany picked Atlantic
salmon because they are the
most widely consumed
salmon in the U.S. and are
farmed throughout the
world: In 2010, the U.S. im-
ported more than 200,000
tons of Atlantic salmon,
worth over $1.5 billion, from
countries like Norway,
Canada and Chile.
Using gene-manipulating
technology, Aquabounty adds


a growth hormone to the At-
lantic salmon from another
type of salmon called the
Chinook. The process, com-
pany executives say, causes
its salmon to reach maturity
in about two years, com-
pared with three to four
years for a conventional
salmon.
TOUGH SALE
But getting the fish to
market hasn't been easy
The company began dis-
cussions with the FDA in
1993. But the agency did not
yet have a formal system for
reviewing genetically modi-
fied food animals.
So Aquabounty spent the
next decade conducting
more than two dozen stud-
ies on everything from the
molecular structure of the
salmon's DNA to the poten-
tial allergic reactions in hu-
mans who would eat it. By
the time the FDA completed
its roadmap for reviewing
genetically modified ani-
mals in 2009, Aquabounty
was the first company to
submit its data.
After reviewing the com-
pany's data, the FDA said in
a public hearing in Septem-
ber of 2010 that
Aquabounty's salmon is "as
safe as food from conven-
tional Atlantic salmon." The
FDA also said the fish "are
not expected to have a sig-
nificant impact" on the
environment


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NATION


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 A15




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Teen wants Easy-Bake



Oven to appeal to boys


Girlgathers


30,000 signatures

on petition

Associated Press
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Four-
year-old Gavyn Boscio loves to
cook and asked for an Easy-Bake
Oven for Christmas. But when his
big sister went to buy one, she dis-
covered to her disappointment that
it comes only in girly pink and pur-
ple, with girls and only girls -
on the box and in the commercials.
So the eighth-grader from
Garfield, N.J., started an online pe-
tition asking Pawtucket, R.I.-based
Hasbro to make the toy ovens in
gender-neutral colors and feature
boys on the package.
By Friday, 13-year-old McKenna
Pope's petition had garnered more
than 30,000 signatures in a little
more than a week.
And celebrity chef Bobby Flay,
who owned an Easy-Bake Oven as a
boy, is among those weighing in on
her side.
In a video McKenna made to ac-
company her petition on
Change.org, Gavyn whips up a
batch of cookies and tells his sister
he wants a dinosaur and an Easy-
Bake Oven for Christmas. When she
asks him why there are no boys in
the commercial for Easy-Bake
Ovens, he explains: "Because only
girls play with it."
"Obviously, the way they're mar-
keting this product is influencing
what he thinks and the way that he
acts," McKenna said in an inter-
view. She said her little brother
would probably be OK playing with
a purple-and-pink oven by himself
but would be too embarrassed to
use it in front of his friends.
A spokesman for Hasbro did not
return calls for comment.
In a letter McKenna received on
Monday, a Hasbro representative
told her the company has featured
boys on the packaging over the
years and said a brother and sister
were finalists for the Easy-Bake
"Baker of the Year" award in 2009.
Hasbro also pointed to Flay as an
example of a chef who traced his


Associated Press
When McKenna Pope, 13, wanted to buy an Easy-Bake Oven for her brother
Gavyn Boscio, 4, she realized the toy was only geared toward girls. Pope
started a petition demanding the toy company Hasbro make its Easy-Bake
Oven more boy friendly.


career to an early experience with
the Easy-Bake.
McKenna found the response dis-
appointing.
"All they really told me is that
boys play with their products. I al-
ready know boys do play with your
products, so why are you only mar-
keting them to girls?" she said. "I
don't want them to make a boys'
Easy-Bake Oven and girls' Easy-
Bake Oven. I want them to make an
Easy-Bake Oven for kids."
The debate over whether toy
companies are reinforcing gender
stereotypes pinks and princesses
for girls, guns and gross things for
boys seems to flare every year,
particularly at Christmas, and has
involved such things as Legos, toy
microscopes and Barbie dolls. Now,
it has extended to another one of
the most beloved baby boomer toys,
introduced in the 1960s.
Flay, 47, said he asked for an Easy-
Bake for Christmas when he was
about 5. He remembers it as a "pu-
trid green" and recalls baking cakes
with his mother from mixes. (The
Easy-Bake Oven back then used a
light bulb as a heating element; now
it operates more like a real oven.)At
the time, he said, the stereotype was
that only women cooked, but a lot


has changed since then.
"I cannot tell you how many
young boys are my fans. And they
want to grow up, and they want to
cook," the Food Network star said.
Jim Silver, a toy expert and edi-
tor-in-chief of Timetoplaymag.com,
played with an Easy-Bake himself
when a kid and said boys still play
with it, just as girls play with Hot
Wheels cars. He said Hasbro is sim-
ply marketing to the audience most
likely to buy the oven and there's
nothing wrong with that.
About seven years ago, Hasbro
had a cooking product aimed at boys,
the Queasy Bake Cookerator, which
included recipes for gross-sounding
treats such as Dip n' Drool Dog
Bones and Mud n' Crud Cake. "Sales
failed miserably," Silver said.
Flay said he is not surprised it
failed because Hasbro was trying to
appeal to boys in a stereotypical
way Instead, he urged the toy-
maker to think about widening the
market for the Easy-Bake.
"Why not actually create some-
thing that everybody knows the
name, but also it comes in different
colors so that boys, girls, doesn't
matter, they can pick what color
they want and it will make them a
little more comfortable to buy it?"


Puerto Ricans fight back

against caiman onslaught


Associated Press

VEGA BAJA, Puerto Rico -
When heavy rains begin to pelt a
flood-prone neighborhood along
Puerto Rico's north coast, peo-
ple start sharpening their knives
and preparing their lassoes.
The floods herald the arrival
of caimans, a close relative of
the alligator, whose population
has exploded in and around
the lagoon next to Los Naran-
jos neighborhood in the coastal
city of Vega Baja.
The scaly reptiles have
been spotted prowling
around schools and crawling
into flooded yards after rains,
causing both widespread
panic and curiosity in the
community.
Calls to government officials
to help catch the reptiles and
take measures to prevent fur-
ther flooding have been futile.
So now, the residents of Los
Naranjos have been forced to
face their fears and become
caiman catchers themselves in
this community of scarce re-
sources where some still ride
horses bareback as transporta-
tion. Among the rudimentary
equipment at their disposal:
Wire, duct tape and metal
poles.
People taught themselves the
trick to hunting caimans, some-
times learning from others how
to rope them in and tape their
mouths shut They've also mas-
tered the art of flashing lights
into the brackish waters of the
nearby lagoon until they spot
pairs of squinty green eyes
gleaming just above the sur-
face.
Ask anyone in this coastal
neighborhood if they know
someone who traps and kills
caimans, and the reply is likely
a peal of laughter. The question
is akin to asking who hunts for
crabs, neighbors say Everyone
does it.
Caimans are found across
Puerto Rico, especially its
north coast, but the island's
biggest population is in Vega
Baja, site of the Tortuguero La-
goon, a natural reserve, said
Angel Atienza, wildlife director
of the island's Department of
Natural Resources.


Associated Press
Caimans are native to Central
and South America, but were in-
troduced to Puerto Rico by
stores such as Woolworth's that
sold baby caimans the size of
lizards as pets during the 1960s
and '70s. When the caimans
began to grow, people released
them into the wild, where fe-
males rapidly reproduced, laying
up to 40 eggs at a time.
"They have always lived
there, they have always repro-
duced there," he said. "There
are thousands there."
After seeing a caiman cross a
road near the elementary
school where she's the director,
Johanna Rosado ordered chap-
erones to accompany children
when they go to the bathroom
following heavy rains, just as a
precaution. She said the school
is surrounded by a chain-link
fence but is trying to raise
money to build a concrete wall.
"It's one thing to hear about
it and it's another to see it with
your own eyes," Rosado said. "I
lived it. Now I believe it
happens."
The creatures are native to
Central and South America, but
were introduced to Puerto Rico
by stores such as Woolworth's
that sold baby caimans the size
of lizards as pets during the
1960s and 70s, Atienza said.
When the caimans began to
grow, people released them
into the wild, where females
rapidly reproduced, laying up
to 40 eggs at a time. The island's
government authorizes hunting
caimans since they're consid-
ered non-native species.
"They have no natural ene-
mies," Atienza said. "They go
into people's homes. In Vega
Baja, they recently went into
someone's yard."


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NATION/WORLD


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 A17











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WorldRS Egyptian panel recommends vote

No talking


Associated Press
Local and international
activists protest inside a
conference center to
demand urgent action to
address climate change at
the U.N. climate talks
Saturday in Doha, Qatar.
After all-night wrangling,
the latest draft agreements
lacked the strong commit-
ments on climate action
and financing by rich coun-
tries that poor countries
had hoped for. But they did
include a text on "loss and
damage," a relatively new
concept which relates to
damages from climate-
related disasters.


Italy's PM says he
intends to quit
ROME Premier Mario
Monti told the Italian president

he plans to
resign fol-
S lowing the
sudden loss
of support
from Silvio
Berlusconi's
party,
Mario paving the
Monti way for
early elections a year after the
economist helped pull the
country back from the brink of
financial disaster.
Only hours earlier, Berlus-
coni announced he would run
again for premier, aiming for
a comeback just a year after
he quit in disgrace under the
pressure of financial markets
as Italy teetered toward the
brink of financial disaster.
The office of President
Giorgio Napolitano, who met
for nearly two hours with Monti
at the presidential palace, said
the premier told the head of
state that without the support
he could no longer effectively
govern Italy, which is mired in
recession and trying to
emerge from the eurozone
sovereign debt crisis.
Monti, an economist who
heads a non-elected Cabinet
of technocrats which replaced
Berlusconi's a year ago, will
quickly consult with political
leaders to see if they can pull
together to pass a budget
and financial stability law
deemed critical to healing
Italy's finances.

NationBRIEFS

Born wild! Mom
gives birth at zoo
SYRACUSE, N.Y -An
upstate New York zoo got a
surprise visit from the stork.
A woman gave birth on a
wildlife path at the Rosamond
Gifford Zoo in Syracuse on
Friday, delivering her baby girl
with the help of zookeepers
not far from the bear exhibit.
Zoo educator Liz Schmidt
told The Post-Standard she
rushed over from the reindeer
pen to find the 21-year-old
woman pushing out the baby.
Other zoo workers arrived
with blankets to keep mom
and baby warm.
Rotting whale
likely left to nature


MALIBU, Cali
ernment agency
tion to remove tl
carcass of a whe
fornia beach, me
pear the job will
Mother Nature.
The corpse of
whale created a
Friday as people
down the narrow
beach to look at
- white bones,
ber and the tail f
along the water'


Morsi agrees to give up

near-absolute power

Associated Press
CAIRO -A national dialogue committee
said a referendum on a disputed draft con-
stitution will be held on schedule, but Pres-
ident Mohammed Morsi has agreed to
rescind the near-absolute power he had
granted himself.
The statement came after a meeting that
was boycotted by the main opposition lead-
ers, who are calling for the Dec. 15 vote to
be canceled.
Morsi had called for the dialogue to try to
defuse a spiraling crisis, but the decision
appeared unlikely to appease the opposi-
tion since it recommends the referendum
go ahead as scheduled. Morsi's initial dec-
laration was to be rendered ineffective any-


way after the referendum.
Gamal Eid, a human rights lawyer, said
the recommendations to rescind some pow-
ers were a "play on words" since Morsi had
already achieved the desired aim of final-
izing the draft constitution and protecting
it from a judicial challenge.
The charter, which would enshrine Is-
lamic law and was drafted despite a boycott
by secular and Christian members of the
assembly, is at the heart of a political crisis
that began Nov. 22 when Morsi granted
himself authority without judicial
oversight.
Opposition activists are camping outside
the presidential palace and are calling for
more protests Sunday
Several rallies on both sides have drawn
tens of thousands of people into the streets
and sparked fierce bouts of street battles
that have left at least six people dead. Sev-
eral offices of the president's Muslim
Brotherhood also have been torched in the
unrest.


Associated Press
Egyptian security forces stand guard as protesters opposed
to Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi gather outside the
palace Saturday in Cairo, Egypt.


Hanukkah is here


AMW
Associated Press
People gather to watch the lightning of the first candle, celebrating the beginning of Hanukkah on Grzybowski
square Saturday in Warsaw Hanukkah is the Jewish festival of lights.

Across the globe, festivities begin with candle-lighting events


Associated Press
JERUSALEM -Jews around the
world ushered in the eight-day
Hanukkah festival Saturday
evening, lighting the first candles of
ceremonial lamps that symbolize
triumph over oppression.
In Israel, families gathered after
sundown for the lighting, eating tra-
ditional snacks of potato pancakes
and doughnuts and exchanging
gifts.
Local officials lit candles set up
in public places, while families dis-
played the nine-candle lamps,
called menorahs, in their windows
or in special windproof glass boxes
outside.
Hanukkah, also known as the fes-
tival of lights, commemorates the
Jewish uprising in the second cen-
tury B.C. against the Greek-Syrian
kingdom, which had tried to impose
its culture on Jews and adorn the
Jewish Temple in Jerusalem with
statues of Greek gods.
The holiday lasts eight days be-
cause according to tradition, when
the Jews rededicated the Temple in
Jerusalem, a single vial of oil,


enough for one day, burned miracu-
lously for eight.
For many Jewish people, the hol-
iday symbolizes the triumph of good
over evil.
Observant Jews light a candle
each night to mark the holiday
Oily foods are eaten to commem-
orate the oil miracle, hence the
ubiquitous fried doughnuts and po-
tato pancakes, known as latkes.
In Israel, children play with four-
sided spinning tops, or dreidels,
decorated with the letters that form
the acronym "A great miracle hap-
pened here." Outside of Israel, the
saying is "A great miracle happened
there." Israeli students get time off
from school for the holiday, when
families gather each night to light
the candles, eat and exchange gifts.
Hanukkah which means dedi-
cation- is one of the most popular
holidays in Israel, and has a high
rate of observance.
In Ohio, the first public candle
lighting on Saturday will be by
Holocaust survivor Abe Weinrib,
who turns 100 next week. Weinrib,
who will light the first candle on a
13-foot public menorah at Easton


Town Center in Columbus, said his
biggest triumph was surviving the
Holocaust, the Nazi campaign to
eliminate Jews in Europe.
Weinrib told The Columbus Dis-
patch newspaper that he was ar-
rested while working in Polish
factories owned by his uncle when
he was in his 20s. He spent six years
imprisoned in camps, including the
notorious Auschwitz.
In New York City, Jews are cele-
brating the holiday's start with the
ceremonial lighting of a 32-foot-tall
menorah at the edge of Central
Park.
Dignitaries, rabbis and a big
crowd are expected Saturday
evening for the ceremony The steel
menorah weighs 4,000 pounds and
stands tall enough that organizers
will need an electric utility crane to
reach the top. It has real oil lamps,
protected from the wind by glass
chimneys.
A large menorah is also ready to be
lit on the lawn in front of Independ-
ence Hall in Philadelphia. The
menorah is being put up by the
Philadelphia Lubavitch Center, a
group dedicated to Jewish education.


USDA chief: Rural America becoming less relevant


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Agri-
culture Secretary Tom Vil-
sack has some harsh words
for rural America: It's "be-
coming less and less rele-
vant," he said.
A month after an election


f. No gov- Democrats won even as
Sis taking ac- rural parts of the country
he decaying voted overwhelmingly Re-
ale on a Cali- publican, the former Demo-
aking it ap- cratic governor of Iowa told
be left to farm belt leaders this past
week he's frustrated with
te their internecine squabbles
the huge fin and said they need to be
spectacle more strategic in picking
wandered their political fights.
SMalibu "It's time for us to have an
the remains adult conversation with
rolls of blub- folks in rural America," Vil-
flukes trailing sack said in a speech at a
sedge, forum sponsored by the
Farm Journal. "It's time for
-From wire reports a different thought process


here, in my view."
He said rural
America's biggest
assets the food
supply, recre-
ational areas and -
energy, for example
- can be over-
looked by people To
elsewhere as the Vilse
U.S. population US. agr
shifts more to secret
cities, their sub-
urbs and exurbs.
"Why is it that we don't
have a farm bill?" said Vil-
sack. "It isn't just the differ-
ences of policy It's the fact
that rural America, with a
shrinking population, is be-
coming less and less rele-
vant to the politics of this
country, and we had better
recognize that and we better
begin to reverse it."
For the first time in re-
cent memory, farm-state


ii
!T


n
ic
ta


lawmakers were not
able to push a farm
bill through Congress
in an election year,
evidence of lost clout
in farm states.
The Agriculture
Department said 50
n percent of rural
ck counties have lost
culture population in the
ary. past four years and
poverty rates are
higher there than in metro-
politan areas, despite the
booming agricultural
economy
Exit polls conducted for
The Associated Press and
television networks found
that rural voters accounted
for just 14 percent of the
turnout in last month's elec-
tion, with 61 percent of them
supporting Republican Mitt
Romney and 37 percent
backing President Barack


Obama. Two-thirds of those
rural voters said the govern-
ment is doing too many
things better left to busi-
nesses and individuals.
Vilsack criticized farmers
who have embraced wedge
issues such as regulation,
citing the uproar over the
idea that the Environmental
Protection Agency was going
to start regulating farm dust
after the Obama administra-
tion said repeatedly it had
no so such intention.
In his Washington speech,
he also cited criticism of a
proposed Labor Depart-
ment regulation, later
dropped, intended to keep
younger children away from
the most dangerous farm
jobs, and criticism of egg
producers for dealing with
the Humane Society on in-
creasing the space hens
have in their coops.


Rebels


finally


unite in


Syria

New leaders

to be named
Associated Press
BEIRUT Rebel com-
manders from across Syria
have joined forces under a
united command they hope
will increase coordination
between diverse fighting
groups and streamline the
pathway for arms essential
to their struggle against
President Bashar Assad.
While many of the
brigades involved in the
fighting are decidedly Is-
lamist in outlook and some
have boasted about exe-
cuting captured soldiers,
two of the most extreme
groups fighting in Syria
were not invited to the
rebel meeting in Turkey or
included in the new coun-
cil- a move that could en-
courage Western support
Disorganization has be-
deviled Syria's rebel
movement since its birth
late last year, when some
protesters gave up on
peaceful means to bring
down Assad's regime and
took up arms, forming the
base of what became the
Free Syrian Army
But the movement has
never actually been an
army Scores of rebel
groups battle Assad's
forces across the country,
many coordinating with
no one outside of their
own area. While some say
they want a civil, demo-
cratic government, others
advocate an Islamic state.
The new body, expected
to be announced officially
Sunday, hopes to form the
basis of a united rebel front
Some 500 delegates
elected the 30-person
Supreme Military Council
and a Chief of Staff on Fri-
day and planned to meet
soon with representatives
from the opposition's newly
reorganized political lead-
ership, participants said.
"The aim of this meeting
was to unify the armed op-
position to bring down the
regime," said a rebel com-
mander from near Damas-
cus who attended the
meeting. "It also aims to get
the situation under control
once the regime falls."
The move toward
greater unity on the armed
front comes as the U.S. and
others try to strengthen
the opposition's leader-
ship while sidelining ex-
tremist factions that have
become a vital part of the
rebels' ground forces.
The opposition's politi-
cal leadership reorgan-
ized last month, under
Western pressure, into a
new National Alliance
that its backers hope will
have broader representa-
tion and stronger links to
rebel fighters.











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes can
be found on -"
PageA21 .**-"
of today's (...-
Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


New life for special tree, courtesy Biltmore


Couple's beloved symbol moved to estate


JEFFREY COLLINS
Associated Press
ASHEVILLE, N.C. -The Christmas
tree Joseph Gray bought his wife back
in 1972 grew at the end of their drive-
way for 40 years, reminding them of the
joy of the first holiday season they spent
together in their home on Roan Moun-
tain in Tennessee.
But trees, like people, get old. Gray
lost his wife in 2010 and the tree that
represented so many good memories
was now 55 feet tall and struggling to
stay alive. Gray, 81, wasn't ready to have
the tree cut down, but he didn't know
what to do with it.
In stepped the Biltmore House in
Asheville with an elegant and fitting so-
lution.
Every year, the popular holiday at-
traction needs a tall Norway spruce for
its front lawn display and tries to select
a tree that, for one reason or another,
will likely have to be removed. The tree
farm Biltmore House uses for the
Christmas trees inside the home knew
about Gray's tree and suggested that it
be considered to grace the attraction's
front lawn, said LeeAnn Donnelly, a
spokeswoman for the attraction.


After sending a team to look at it, the
Biltmore House bought the tree from
Gray, trucked it down the mountain and
decorated it with 45,000 lights.
"It couldn't have turned out better, I
don't think," said Gray, who drove down
the mountain with a daughter and two
grandchildren for his first trip to the
Biltmore House and one last look at
that special tree.
Joseph and Evelyn Gray were to-
gether almost 65 years, if you count the
three years he courted her They had
four children. They spent the summers
at Roan Mountain State Park. Joseph
Gray worked there at the foot of 6,285-
foot tall Roan Mountain about 30 miles
southwest of Johnson City, Tenn. Once
visitors stopped coming in the late fall,
they headed to the house they had built
just down the road.
Evelyn Gray loved Christmas. She
would pull out her special decorations
and lights as soon as her husband found
the live tree he liked.
"She would work on it for a week, just
to get it the way she wanted it," her hus-
band said. "It was pretty when she got
through with it She had lights, every-
thing on it."
Then Joseph Gray put the angel on


Associated Press
Joseph Gray of Roan Mountain, Tenn., contributed the Christmas tree on the front lawn
of The Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C., this season. Gray and his wife, who died in
2010, had planted the tree 40 years ago in their yard. Gray drove down to The Biltmore
Estate with his daughter and two grandchildren Saturday, Nov. 17, to take one last look
at that special tree.


top that would watch over everything up
until the huge family gathering on
Christmas Day The tradition went on
for decades, until Evelyn Gray just
didn't feel well enough to decorate.
"She got to where she was sick and
she could hardly fool with it. We bought
one, all you had to do was bring it out,"


Joseph Gray said.
When Gray got to the Biltmore House
and saw his old Christmas tree once
again decorated for the holidays, it
brought forth a smile.
"I still like the live trees the best," he
said. "It seems more like Christmas
with the live tree."


Seasons




of the


Historic estate


beautiful place


to visit in fall

NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle

any Floridians, as well as
those from other states,
flock like migrating birds
to North Carolina to see the leaves
of deciduous trees decked out in
their fall colors.
The timing of this event is un-
certain because of the changes
in weather from year to year, and
no matter how well planned, vis-
itors and colors do not always co-
incide. Oh, the whims of nature.
Every October we plan a week
in North Carolina with my
daughter and her husband ex-
ploring seasonal opportunities.
Neil Sawyer Last year, our theme was seeking
SPONTANEOUS out wineries that seem to blan-
TRAVELER ket the state, along with the ac-
companying vineyards which
add to the beauty of the season.
Our plans were easy this past
October We booked some time at the Biltmore
Estate in Asheville, one of our favorite areas in
North Carolina.
In 1877, Cornelius Vanderbilt, shipping and railroad
tycoon, died and passed along huge fortunes to his
heirs, but mostly to his eldest son, William, age 56 at
that time. The amount of inheritance is reported to
have been about $90,000,000, making him one of the


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Migrating Canada geese take a scenic rest stop at the Biltmore during their migration south.


richest men in America. He followed in his father's
footsteps and became responsible for the numerous
maritime and railroad business entities of the
Vanderbilts' empire.
William had 11 children, and at his death left his
youngest living son, George, $5,000,000. This inheri-
tance, along with a couple million dollars previously
received by gift or inheritance, gave George a war
chest to pursue his desires, which were a bit esoteric
compared to the entrepreneurial spirit of his other
family members.
He had become enamored with the idea of a coun-
try home in North Carolina, sparsely settled at the
time, so there was much opportunity and room to live
out one's fantasy And that he did!


George, at about age 27, purchased 125,000 acres of
beautiful countryside, sometimes for just pennies or a
few dollars per acre, involving more than 400 separate
land transactions. During this time he met Edith, age
25, in India on a photo shoot, and they were married a
short time later
George set about to build the largest home in
America The Biltmore House.
The house includes 250 rooms, 75 bathrooms and
covers 178,000 square feet Hundreds of workers were
employed during the five years of the building
process. The home now hosts an estimated 1,000,000
visitors per year


See Page A21


The Biltmore House formal garden in fall colors.
The Inn on Biltmore Estate.
Touring the North Carolina estate via Segway.


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are If it's selected as a winner, it will be published
sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the in the Sunday Chronicle.
newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the photograph will win a prize.
trip.


Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office
in Inverness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


DREAM
VACATIONS
oto Con(te4s






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Lazy' cousin may


have Asperger


SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 9, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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(N 50 119 receives mysterious letters and e-mails.'NR' Liam Neeson. R' Suspense) Megan Ward, Kristin Minter. R'
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Dear Annie: My niece,
"Susan," is 23 years
old and in college.
After four years, she still
hasn't picked a major. She is
quite intelligent, but lazy
and immature. She is so-
cially awkward and has lost
friends because
of her negative
attitude.
My problem is,
Susan wants to
"hang out" with
my 15-year-old
daughter. She in-
vites herself over
whenever she
likes. My daugh-
ter is a terrific,
normal girl who
excels in sports
and school and ANN
has many friends. MAIL
She doesn't want
to hang out with a
23-year-old cousin, and we
don't want her to, either.
We try to make excuses,
hoping Susan will eventu-
ally get the hint, to no avail.
Her mother doesn't get
hints, either. It sometimes
puts us in an awkward posi-
tion because she is so per-
sistent. I am tired of being
expected to accommodate
Susan because she is family
That shouldn't be a free
pass for forcing my child to
be around someone who is
neither age appropriate nor
a good influence. I don't
want my daughter's "half-
full" optimism to be drained
by someone who always
thinks the glass is half-
empty Suggestions? An-
noyed Mom
Dear Mom: What you call
"lazy and immature" is
much more complicated.
When we hear that a young
person is intelligent but so-


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG)
4:40 p.m.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In
3D. 1:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D.
12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part
2" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Wreck-it Ralph" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG)
4:30 p.m. No passes.
"End of Watch" (R) ID required.
1:15 p.m.,4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Playing for Keeps" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.


"The Collection" (R) ID required.
4:50 p.m.
"Killing Them Softly" (R) ID
required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Red Dawn" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG)
4:10 p.m.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG)
In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1:05 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part
2" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG)
1:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Vertical passage
6 Extent
11 Wooden shoe
16 Evergreen tree
21 Aquarium fish
22 Tapestry
23 Ridge among mountains
24 Think
25 Sitting - of the world
26 Rough calculation
28 Stove
29 Santa -, Calif.
30 Ripens
31 Work unit
32 Evil spirit
34 Antiquity
35 Bakery item
37 Brooks or Gibson
38 Charged particle
40 Tyrannosaurus -
41 Rogers or Orbison
42 Jacket part
44 Tropical fruit
46 Expensive
49 Singing group
52 Mare's hair
53 Deer
55 One of the
B vitamins
59 Mr. Simpson
60 Reveal
61 African fly
64 Moumful song
65 Sea eagle
66 Auctioneer's cry
67 Coral islands
68 Cushion
70 Remove
71 "Do--say..."
72 Ore deposit
73 Northeastern state (abbr.)
74 Mentions
76 Turf
77 Bear witness
79 Small dog,
for short
80 Eye
82 Snapshots
84 Dramatis personae
85 Gin flavoring
86 Goad
87 Do nothing
88 Minor weakness
90 Related
91 Feeling blue


92 Money for riding
95 Exist
96 Composition
98 Egyptian goddess
100 Go after game
101 -Angeles
102 Peel
104 Wooden container
105 Insects
106 Kind of insurance
107 Sate
108 B. DeMille
110 Make happy
112 Moolah
113 Mediterranean island
114 Football team
116 Go wrong
117 Close tightly
118 -or later
119 Coup d'-
121 Made fit
124 Reveal
125 Lanka
128 One--
customer
130 Austere
131 By way of
132 Appellation
136 Weight unit
137 Goes bad
139 Links item
140 Gale
141 Club member
142 Die down
144 Joint action
147 Favored group (hyph.)
149 Made of flax
150 With full force
151 Kind of sugar
152 Scandinavian
153 Work dough
154 Unadorned
155 Smudge
156 Bovine animal


DOWN
1 Brown ermine
2 Hair dye
3 Rose oil
4 To and -
5 Spigot
6 Drooped
7 Heartless
8 Valuable minerals
9 de deux


Perfume
City in Vietnam
Garment part
Droplet
Aquatic mammal
Abounded
Source of oil
Clean-air org.
Greasy spoon
- -Saxon
Tall and thin
Musical group
Old Testament book
Farm animals
Crowd count
Top-notch (hyph.)
Painter's subjects
- Town"
Funny guy
Child
Assistance
Police action
Swindle
Animal in a race
Infinite knowledge
Masculine
Saw
Dejected
Domed dwelling
Requires
Corpse
Light brown
Summary
Have a bite
Gentlest
Some dramatic works
Get off at O'Hare
Cotton thread
Chilly
Earthy lump
Brief
Bar bill
Maneuver
Mardi -
Lummox
Place for steeds
Broad comedy
Bay window
Off the -
Itinerary
Lab compound
Have a late meal
Visit
Mound
Disreputable place
Poets


Heavy metal
Fully developed
Allow
Baseball stat.
Hammerhead part
Bill and -
Alliance acronym
Rivers
Food fish
Colorful bird


Be present
Equal
Repentant one
Stem
Superhero's
sidekick
Pointless
Smell
Stringed instrument
In flames


En -
Stage direction
Transmit
Steep
Dry
Light meal
- in the sky
Scot's cap
Reply (abbr.)
Odd or parking


Puzzle answer is on Page A22.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


cially awkward, it could be
Asperger syndrome. The
fact that Susan likes to hang
around with your 15-year-
old daughter indicates that
she is uncomfortable with
her peers. If her mother is
the same way, it is likely to
be an inherited
trait and environ-
mentally rein-
Sforced behavior
Please stop
hinting to people
who don't get it.
Talk to both
Susan and her
mother. Say that
you think Susan
is smart and you
love her, but that
she would benefit
IE'S from finding
.BOX more appropri-
ate friends. Sug-
gest they talk to
Susan's physician about an
evaluation.
Dear Readers: Tonight is
The Compassionate
Friends' Worldwide Candle
Lighting for children who
have died. Please light a
candle this evening at 7
p.m., local time, and re-
member them with love.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254. To find
out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features
by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers, visit at
www creators. com.


A20 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


1
Ll





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle


The main flower garden of the Biltmore House.


BILTMORE
Continued from Page A19

Having visited the Bilt-
more House on previous oc-
casions, this time we did an
extensive "exploration" of
the grounds and gardens of
this fabulous estate. Some of
the attractions included the
estate's winery situated at
Antler Hill Village, down
the hill and across the vine-
yard, from our fifth-floor
room at the Inn on Biltmore
Estate, the "residence" of
visitors staying on the prop-
erty. Of course, the expan-
sive wine-tasting room,
accessed through a tunnel
where the wines are aged,
was an enjoyable event.
Adjacent to the winery is
the old carriage house,
which houses a couple of ca-
sual eateries for those who
just want to hang out or rest
a while. The area was deco-
rated in an autumn theme at
the time of our visit
In the immediate vicinity
is Cedric's Tavern, a delight-
ful restaurant serving great
Reuben sandwiches and
burgers for lunch, and a full
menu of flavorful American
and global treats at dinner-
time. A creamery is conve-
niently located next door
Legacy of the Land is an
optional tour of much of the
estate, on miles of back
roads and trails, not accessi-
ble by car An entertaining
guide drives, walks and talks
his guests through many


"behind-the-scenes" high-
lights of the challenges of
George and his workers in
the development of the in-
credible estate.
Ninety acres of beautiful
gardens and flowers adorn
the estate in their full fall
mode of God-given beauty.
The highlight of our visit
to this phenomenal piece of
North Carolina paradise
had little in common with
the Biltmore House or the
surrounding beauty, except
the opportunity to view it up
close from the platform of a
Segway After a briefing on
the operation of the battery-
powered vehicle we were on
our way, silently, over hill
and dale, exhilarated by the
cool mountain air, as we
glided over both paved and
graveled trails.
The Biltmore Estate is a
beautiful and impressive
getaway, still the largest pri-
vately owned home in Amer-
ica, where one can
experience the opulence
and grandeur of days gone
by, and there is not a better
time than when the seasons
are changing.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer
have been residents of
Crystal River for27years.
They travel frequently,
havingbeen to 48 states,
64 countries and seven
continents. Neil welcomes
comments and questions
about travel. Contact
him via email to
gobuddy@tampabayrrcom.


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Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well as
events to which the public is in-
vited. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

PoS NEWS
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch
and coffee at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd.
(State Road 50, east of U.S.
41). All Coastie veterans are
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 20, at Ocala
Regional Airport Administration
Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave.,
Ocala. All are welcome. Call
Mike Emig at 352-854-8328 for
more information.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
The post will have its second
anniversary celebration from 6
to 10 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15.
Please bring a covered dish or
finger foods.
Tickets are available for the
New Year's Eve steak dinner
on Dec. 31. Cost is $12.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Lounge
open at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon on
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the American


Legion, American Legion Rid-
ers and 40/8 families have din-
ners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke entertain-
ers for the upcoming year. If in-
terested in being considered as
an entertainer or musician at
the post, call Elfi Baker or Patti
Foster at 352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m. Check
with Jack Gresham for tee
times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays alter-
nating between Twisted Oaks
Golf Club and Citrus Springs
Country Club. Tee time is 8


a.m. New players, both men
and women, are welcome. You
do not have to be a member of
the VFW to join. Lunch follows.
Call John Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
There will be no dinner Fri-
day, Dec. 14.
All are welcome at a Tribute
to Patsy Kline on Sunday, Dec.
16. Buffet dinner will be from 5
to 6:30 p.m., followed by the
tribute. On the menu are fried
chicken, corn on the cob, relish
tray, coleslaw, pasta salad, bis-
cuits and dessert. Tickets are
$15 and can be purchased at
the post canteen.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post, or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41.
The chapter hall is on the cor-
ner of Independence Highway
and Paul Drive. We thank vet-
erans for their service and wel-
come any disabled veteran to
join us from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
any Tuesday or Thursday at
the chapter hall. This is also
the time that we accept do-
nated nonperishable foods for
our continuing food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able.
Anyone who knows a disabled
veteran or their family who re-
quires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any


veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by appoint-
ment. Call 352-344-3464 and
leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.One
of the DAVA's projects is mak-
ing lap robes and ditty, wheel-
chair and monitor bags for
needy veterans in nursing
homes. All who wish to help in
our projects are welcome. We
need to make the items certain
sizes, so please call for infor-
mation. We also collect toiletry
items for the veterans. Good,
clean material and yarn are
needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and

See VETERANS/Page A22


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 A21





A22 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A21

Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dun-
nellon. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at 4
p.m.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Dec.
15. The public is welcome. All-
you-can-eat breakfast is served
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Cost is
$5.
Families in Need of Dunnel-
Ion Inc. will offer free Christmas
dinner to all from noon to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 25. Donations
will be accepted, but are not
necessary.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email
him at ultrarayl 997@yahoo.
com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampabay.
rr.com. Call or visit the post for
regular and special events, as
well as meetings. Google us at
VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The post will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 26,
with proceeds going to support
American Cancer Society Mof-
fitt Cancer Center Ovarian Can-
cer Research and patients and
families served by Hospice of
Citrus County. A $10 entry fee
per rider will include a poker
hand and a meal at the end of
the run. Registration begins at
10 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Last
bike in will be 4:30 p.m., when
food will be served. All vehicles
are welcome to participate.
Music will be provided and do-
nated by George Marshall.
There will be door prizes, a
50/50 drawing and fun. For
more information, call 352-746-
5018 or John Roby at 352-341-
5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-


3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-726-
5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-3444702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,


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Puzzle is on Page A20.


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spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-
5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at 860-
1629 for information.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
SERVICES AND GROUPS
Citrus County Fallen He-
roes Monument Inc. at Bicen-
tennial Park, Crystal River, will
have its annual reading of the
names of fallen heroes and
benefactors thank-you cere-
mony at 5 p.m. Wednesday,
Dec. 12. All are welcome.


50th ANNIVERSARY=

The Thomses


Arthur 'Art" EW Thoms
and Enid M. (Marshall)
Thoms commemorated
their 50th wedding an-
niversary on Dec. 1, 2012.
They were married in
Kennebunk, Maine, in 1962
and met while they were in
the military. After their
years in the military, Art
was a sole proprietor and
retired from the insurance
and securities business,
and Enid was a
teacher and retired from
architectural design and
construction.
They moved to Citrus
County in 1989 and cared
for Enid's mother until her
passing. The Thomses at-
tended St. Timothy
Lutheran Church in Crys-
tal River, where Art was
the choir director and Enid
was a choir member.
The couple were active
in many other support ac-
tivities for the church and
acquired a large church
family at St. Timothy They
began a tradition of hosting


Epiphany in their home to
spend time with their choir
friends and the pastor of
St Timothy They moved to
the East Coast of Florida in
2004; in 2010 they moved to
Ocala and spend summers
in their 1800s historic
home in Kennebunk,
Maine.
The Thomses celebrated
their anniversary here
with close friends Bob and
Mary Schlumberger of
Crystal River


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Leus


Fred and Cyrylla Leu of Homosassa celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary Dec. 8, 2012.
They were married in Illinois and are the parents of
three sons, John, Jim and Joe, and one daughter, Jean.
They have eight grandchildren and two great-grand-
children.


FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit
the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For
proceedings filed in another county, contact the
clerk in that area.


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CIIIK


TOGETHER & VETERANS











SPORTS


Army tried to snap
a 10-game losing
streak to Navy on
Saturday./B4



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


- Recreational sports/B2
- NFL/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Basketball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CRHS football job gets 47 responses


Pirates program in holdingpattern,

though, because ofcurrent hiringfreeze


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff Writer
Less than a month since the dis-
missal of head football coach Greg
Fowler, Crystal River High School
is at an impasse in the hiring
process.
First, the good news: The appli-
cation process is closed and 47







Fun


CRsAyala claim.

2nd at vernable

wrestling meet
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE Tw
streaks continued for Citru
County grapplers following the
two-day, 25-team Kiwanis Invita
tional Wrestling Tournament oi
Saturday night at Hernando
High School.
Crystal River, which had placed
in the tourney's top 10 eight time
over the past decade, finishes
13th overall with 79.5 points.
In the 31st Kiwanis event, two
time defending Class 2A stat
champion Springstead pocketed
its 17th championship trophy -
and seventh in a row -by topping
2012's 2A state runner-up, Lake
land-Lake-Gibson, 215.5-166.0.
Springstead returned to Spring
Hill with a tourney-high nine
players while the Polk County
based Braves notched six.
The Pirates' 13-member ma
squad captured 20 of 45 bouts
featuring 14 pins.
Crystal River did not return
empty-handed as junior Dylai
Ayala finished 4-1 losing in the
152-pound finals to the state'
No. 1 ranked Alex Destra of Lake
Gibson, 13-10.
The Pirates haven't won a gol
medal at Kiwanis since then
sophomore Seth Metz turned the
trick in 2003.
Ayala arrived at the Michael A
Imhoff Gymnasium as the No.
seed unbeaten at 9-0.
Ayala, a 2012 Class 1A qualified
in Lakeland, roared through hi


candidates submitted resumes.
Of those, 10 were considered
"local" applicants by Crystal River
activities director Tony Stukes,
meaning they reside in Citrus,
Hernando, Sumter or Marion
counties.
Stukes' opinion is that whoever
comes in will be walking into a
very manageable situation.







SatI


"We haven't fallen off the map," Pirate coach's name adorning the
Stukes said. "This is a great pro- stadium. His 237-91 record, seven
gram. Our program is established district titles and positioning of
enough where someone doesn't Crystal River as a perennial local
have to come in and .. powerhouse in the 1980s and
rebuild." r; 1990s are all aspects most
To that point, the Pi- fans and alumni are famil-
rates haven't endured a iar with and to a degree
losing season since 2006 have come to expect.
and went 6-4 each of the '" Now, the bad news: The
past two seasons. Crystal next step -while clear-cut-
River, however, hasn't been to the may be delayed by forces outside
FHSAA playoffs since 2008. the school's control.
Also, the legend of Earl Bramlett
still looms large, with the former See P age B4







Kiwanis


JOE DICRISTOFALO/Special to the Chronicle
Crystal River's Dylan Ayala couldn't contain Lake Gibson High School's Alex Destra in the 152 pound final
of the Kiwanis Invitational at Hernando High School in Brooksville.


first four bouts notching four pin
falls over Pasco's TJ. Maple
(4:09), Central's Adam Keister (53
seconds), Lennard's Miguel
Nunez (1:47) and Springstead's
Robert Holdway (1:30).
Ayala led 5-3 after two minutes
against Destra who was elimi-
nated in the Class 2A-II, aka the
Region of Doom's final wrestle-
back round last spring, to three-
time state champion Cody Ross
of Springstead.
From the second period on,
Destra would simply pile up two-
point takedowns against Ayala in
exchange for one-point escapes.
See Page B4


Five Citrus wrestlers place at Graves Invitational


The Citrus High School
wrestling team had five grapplers
place Saturday at the Graves Invi-
tational at Brandon High School.
Hurricanes senior Nick Fernan-
dez (195 pounds) and junior
Casey Bearden (170 pounds) each
went 6-2 to take third place.
Junior Brandon Taylor (185
pounds) took fourth with a 6-3
record, senior Jacob Nolen (145)
was 5-3 to claim fifth and senior
Chris Mosher (113 pounds)
finished sixth.
"This is our best placing as far


as individuals go so far," said Cit-
rus head coach Jeff Wood.
Taylor and Fernandez exceeded
pre-event expectations.
"Neither Taylor or Fernandez
were seeded to place," Wood said.
"All the guys wrestled great.
"Mosher had to wrestle two (de-
fending) state champs in one day,"
Wood continued. "It really gives an
idea where he's at."
Citrus gets back on the mat at
10 a.m. Saturday at the Celebra-
tion Duals.
From staff reports


Manziel named Heisman winner


QBfirst freshman
to win the award

Associated Press
NEW YORK-Johnny Football
just got himself a way cooler nick-
name: Johnny Heisman.
Texas A&M quarterback Johnny
Manziel became the first
freshman to win the Heisman
Trophy Saturday in New York.
Associated Press


Texas A&M quarterback Johnny
Manziel became the first fresh-
man to win the Heisman Trophy,
taking college football's top indi-
vidual prize Saturday night after a
record-breaking debut.
Notre Dame linebacker Manti
Te'o finished a distant second and
Kansas State quarterback Collin
Klein was third in the voting. In a
Heisman race with two nontradi-
tional candidates, Manziel broke
through the class barrier and kept
Te'o from becoming the first purely
defensive player to win the award.
Manziel drew 474 first-place
votes and 2,029 points from the


panel of media members and
former winners.
"I have been dreaming about
this since I was a kid, running
around the backyard pretending I
was Doug Flutie, throwing Hail
Marys to my dad," he said after
hugging his parents and kid sister.
Manziel seemed incredibly
calm after his name was an-
nounced, hardly resembling the
guy who dashes around the foot-
ball field on Saturday He simply
bowed his head, and later gave
the trophy a quick kiss.


Page B4


Harris

smokes

Jingle Bell

5K field
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS Talk
about Christmas rush.
Brandon Harris was in a
hurry of his own creating
Saturday during the Jingle
Bell 5K run at Wallace
Brooks Park.
Harris, a Crystal River
High School junior, sped
through the 3.1 mile
course and won the race
in a blazing time of 16:48.8.
That was better than the
17:03 time he ran at the
state meet as a Pirates
cross country runner last
month in Tallahassee.
He found he could han-
dle the hills and liked hav-
ing the Inverness
Christmas Parade crowd
cheering on his efforts.
"I knew I could do it
(break 17 minutes) on this
course," he said. "I ran in
front of a lot of people and
it helped. I have more fun
on this course. I'll be back."
The second-place fin-
isher was David Caron, 16,
of Chaplin, Connecticut.
He ran an 18:03.
"I'm just visiting family,"
Caron said. "It was great.
This is my first time here."
The female winner,
Cindy Carver, took third
with a time of 18:45. She
beat all kinds of high
school boys and girls cross
country runners. Her
S_. Page B4


USF tabs

Taggart

as next

coach

Taggart leaves

W Kentucky

to join Bulls

Associated Press
TAMPA Willie Tag-
gart entered the room to
applause, shook hands
with his father, hugged his
mother and
waved to
family and
friends who
turned his
introduc-
tory news
conference
into a mini-
pep rally Willie
South Taggart
Florida's new USF
new football football coach.
coach made
a name for himself as
player and coach at West-
ern Kentucky, but an op-
portunity to return home to
the Tampa Bay area to try
to rescue another strug-
gling program simply was
See Page B4


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Team wins beach volleyball championship


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County's Parks and
Recreation adult beach volleyball
season came to an end Tuesday
The top six teams advanced into
the playoffs though the unde-
feated team, led by Jonathan
Pullen, came out victorious as
champion.
Although this was only the first
season, Parks and Rec was very
happy with the turnout it had, but
would like to see the number of
teams double from five to 10 next
season.
The next season most likely
begin in March, so if you're inter-
ested in a very fun and competi-
tive league, call Jess Sandino at
527-7547.
Volunteers needed for
Youth Basketball League
Citrus County YMCA is currently
seeking to connect volunteers through
its Y Community Champions program.
Volunteers are needed for the Winter
Youth Basketball League to begin
Jan. 28 in Crystal River at the Key
Training Center.
The Youth Basketball League will


run for 10 weeks (two weeks of prac-
tice and eight weeks of games) and
is a friendly noncompetitive league
centered on teamwork and good
sportsmanship. Volunteer coaches
would be needed one weekday
evening for practice, and on Satur-
day for games. Referees and score-
keepers are also needed for Saturday
games. Basketball experience and/or
a youth sports background is pre-
ferred. All volunteers must
undergo a background screening.
The benefits of volunteering in-
clude personal development, health
and wellness, building relationships,
and having a community connection.
Volunteers are also needed in the
areas of special events and office
administration.
For more information or to volun-
teer, call 352-637-0132, or stop by the
office at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County Parks &
Recreation and Tennis Pro Mehdi
Tahiri for youth tennis lessons.
Instruction will include condition-


ing, drills, footwork, match play, dou-
bles and single strategy. The five-
week sessions will be at the Lecanto
Community Park Tennis Courts on
Sunday. Each session will run from
3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is open to boys
and girls ages 8 to 14 and costs $60
per child.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Whispering Pines Park
offers tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers tennis
lessons with Lindsay Rodriquez. Pre-
registration and pre-payment are re-
quired at the park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for four
hours, or $30 per hour. Times are
arranged with the instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for registration
and information. Whispering Pines
also offers racquetball lessons. Call
for information.
Jonathan Pullen (kneeling) helped
lead his team to a Parks and Rec
adult beach volleyball title on
Tuesday night.
Special to the Chronicle


~4j ~


.. V


Benefit

Special to the Chronicle


The Crystal River High
School baseball team is
holding a golf tournament on
Jan. 12 at Skyview Golf &
Country Club as a fundraiser
for the 2013 season.
The event is a four-person
scramble with a 1 p.m. shot-
gun start and the cost per
golfer is $75.
There will be a slient auc-
tion, closest to the pin con-
test, longest drive and prizes
for the first, second and
third-place teams.
There is also the ability to
sponsor a single hole for
$100 or have a four-person
team and a hole sponsor-
ship for $350 (a $50 savings).
For more information,
contact Don Kidd at 352-212-
1395 or
donkiddl@yahoo.com
CR L.L. registration
coming up
The 2013 Crystal River Little
League Baseball registration
will take place at the baseball
side concession at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River according
to the following schedule:
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
days, Dec. 15 and Jan. 12;
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 19;
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Jan. 7 through
11.
Registration fee is $55 per
child for all ages and divisions,
including T-ball, baseball and
softball. All parents/guardians
must bring a birth certificate
and three documents proving
residency.
Clubs to open
holiday camp
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County Holiday Camp
will be open from 7 a.m. until 6
p.m. Dec. 26 through Jan. 4 at
the three club sites in Beverly
Hills, Inverness and halfway be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa.
The cost is $10 per day and
programs are open to all chil-
dren between the ages of 5 and
18 years. Children will learn
and have fun at the same time
participating in games, arts and
crafts, sports and recreation,
technology, cooking and nutri-
tion programs. Children should
bring a sack lunch each day.
Pre-registration is important
so that clubs can maintain ade-
quate staffing ratios. To preregis-
ter, call the Robert Halleen Club
in Homosassa at 352-795-8624,
the Evelyn Waters Club in Inver-
ness at 352-341-2507, or the
Central Ridge Club in Beverly
Hills at 352-270-8841. Drop-ins
are also accepted, as long as
children are preregistered.
Donations for camp scholar-
ships ($60 for the entire camp)
may be mailed to the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County at
P.O. Box 907, Lecanto, FL
34460, or arranged by calling
352-621-9225.
After-school clubs
resume Jan. 14
The Citrus County YMCA's
After-school Enrichment Clubs


golf tou

will resume their normal sched-
ule for the second half of the
school year by offering a third
session beginning Jan. 14.
The after-school clubs will be
offered at Central Ridge Ele-
mentary, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary, Crystal River Primary,
Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock
Crusher Elementary. The clubs
are open to all children in
kindergarten through fifth
grade.
The upcoming session will
offer kids the opportunity to
participate in soccer, basketball
cheerleading and two new art
programs, introduction to wa-
tercolor and introduction to
drawing.
The Citrus County YMCA
has received a grant for the
after-school programs from
Suncoast Federal Schools
Credit Union. This grant has
enabled the Y to provide many
full scholarships this year to
children across the county to
participate. To apply for the
grant scholarship and financial
assistance for other YMCA pro-
grams, call the Y office at 352-
637-0132.
Youth basketball
registration open
Citrus County YMCA is now
taking registrations for its 2013
Winter Youth Basketball
League, which begins Monday,
Jan. 28.
The league will run for 10
weeks (two weeks of practice
and eight weeks of games) and
is open to children ages 3
through 12. The Junior League
will have ages 3 through 5, and
the Youth League will consist of
6- through 12-year-olds with
several age brackets. Practice
will be once a week on a week-
day evening, with games being
played on Saturday. All practices
and games will be at the Key
Training Center Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center gymnasium.
Open tryouts and a skill as-
sessment will be given on Mon-
day, Jan. 28, to determine team
placement. The league cost is
$85 for ages 6 to 12, and $65
for 3 to 5. Scholarships are
available through the YMCA's
Financial Assistance program.
To apply, call the office at
352-637-0132.
To register for the league,
visit www.ymcasuncoast.org
and download the form on the
Citrus County page. Visit the of-
fice at 3909 N. Lecanto High-
way or call 352-637-0132 for
more details.
After-school
programs offered
The Citrus County YMCA's
After-school Enrichment Clubs
are offered at Central Ridge El-
ementary, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary, Crystal River Primary,
Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock
Crusher Elementary.
Ages for the Y after-school
program range from kinder-


rney up

garten through fifth grade. After-
school programs are a great
way to end the school day, and
the first fall session will offer
kids the opportunity to partici-
pate in flag football, cheerlead-
ing and art.
For more information, call the
Citrus Y at 352-637-0132.
Fort Cooper to
have bird walk
Come join in exploring the
trails in search of birds that call
Fort Cooper State Park home.
An approximate 2 to 2 1/2-hour
bird walk will take place begin-
ning at 8 a.m. Jan. 12.
The walk will be led by mem-
bers of the local Audubon soci-
ety and is open to all
experience levels of birders.
Bring your binoculars, field
guides, bug repellant and any-
thing that would enhance the
experience on the outing to Fort
Cooper State Park, 3100 S. Old
Floral City Road, Inverness.
Normal park entrance fee of
$3 per vehicle (up to eight peo-
ple per vehicle) is required. For
more information, call the park
at 352-726-0315.
Throw shoes in
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club
meets at 8:30 a.m. each
Wednesday. Men, women and
juniors age 10 and older can join.
There are all levels of play;
handicapped method. Call Ron
Fair 352-746-3924, or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
SilverSneakers
location at YMCA
Citrus County YMCA is an of-
ficial SilverSneakers location for
their group exercise program in
Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise program
designed exclusively for older
adults and is available at little or
no additional cost through
Medicare health plans,
Medicare Supplement carriers
and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes meet
at the First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa on Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fri-
days. Classes include cardio
interval, Pilates, and stability
and strength. To find out if you
are eligible for SilverSneakers,
call your health plan provider.
For more information, call the
YMCA office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site for a
community Divine Yoga class at
10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge
and is open to all ages and
physical abilities. Some of the
benefits of yoga are improved
balance, coordination, strength
and flexibility.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at
352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
YMCA offers group
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA of-


coming


fers group exercise in Citrus
Springs at the Hope Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church, 9425 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd.
The location offers classes in
Pilates and cardio circuit on a
regular basis beginning.
The Y currently has three
other areas in the county where
group exercise classes are of-
fered, including Homosassa, In-
verness and Crystal River.
Financial assistance is avail-
able to all those who qualify.
For more information, call the
YMCA office in Beverly Hills at
352-637-0132, or visit online at
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This ongoing
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is
easy, fun with good benefits.
Stretching helps to make you
more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and
balance. This helps to slow
down the onset of common de-
generative conditions, such as
osteoarthritis. Stretching in-
creases physical and mental
relaxation and reduces the risk
of joint sprain, muscle strain or
back problems. Low-impact ex-
ercises can improve health and
fitness without harming weight-
bearing joints. Research sug-
gests that moderate-intensity,
low-impact activity is just as ef-
fective as high-impact activity
in lowering the risk of heart
disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-465-7007.
Zumba offered at
Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired
dance-fitness class, is offered
at 4:30 p.m. Monday and
Thursday afternoons at Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Club offers
Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's
Club is offering Zumba classes
in air-conditioned comfort from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday.
Everyone is welcome. For in-
formation, call 352-447-2057.


The stress of the


Christmas season


he amazing value of
living in a small town
in America is friends
and the value of friendship
on your health.
Last week while walking
back from the Christmas
parade after having din-
ner with several friends,
all our kids and
my in-laws in
downtown Crys-
tal River, my
neighbor and
close friend :
were sitting on
the bridge wait- -
ing to have a '
Christmas toast
with me.
Of course, Dr. Ron
with a good DOCT
tequila.
The walk led ORD
me to ask the
question about the value
of friends on your health.
The walk after dinner was
a no-brainer regarding the
value of exercise after a
meal. A walk at night with
family and friends can't be
safely done in Chicago,
Miami, Detroit or the cen-
ter of the universe in
Washington, D.C.
Looking into this issue,
the consensus in today's
society and scientific com-
munity (not always being
correct) is that friendship
has a major impact on
health and well-being.
That is to say, having
friends especially as
some of us age helps
minimize depression, im-
proves self-worth, pro-
vides the need to
ambulate, go out and get
off our rear ends to do
something, anything.
In Australia over a pe-
riod of 10 years (which
their tax dollars paid for),
a study of 1,500 older indi-
viduals showed 22 percent
of those with a network of
friends lived longer.
It is the same for youth
- having friends involved
with sports was noted to
have significant impact on
healthy lifestyle and
health habits.
Why is it women live
longer than men on aver-
age? Through history,
women have banded to-
gether for protection, mu-
tual support and in
current culture have
more close nurturing
friends than men. The
power of having girl-
friends may be yielding its
secrets to science regard-
ing women's longevity.
For good or bad, having
friends often provides a
different opinion of eat-
ing, lifestyle and health
habits. Another study
found having few or no
close friends increased
the risk of having a first-
time heart attack by about
50 percent.
Similar interests in
friendships are of signifi-
cant importance. The
healthy commonalities


r
T,
X


can be swimming, kayak-
ing, running or a myriad of
sports and sporting en-
deavors. Thus the quality
of a friendship is more im-
portant than the specific
number of friends.
There are some friends
who lift your spirit and
soul and ease
your troubles.
Then there are
the others who
seem to suck
the life out of
you, like those
weird things in
the Harry Pot-
ter books. Not
all friendships
Joseph are good for
OR'S your health.
A 2008 study
ERS found friends
that talk and
focus on problems called
"co-ruminating," like
cows chewing their cud,
can actually increase
stress levels. Some friend-
ships have negative
health benefits. A promi-
nent study following
12,000 people for 32 years
found that a person's risk
of becoming overweight
increased 57 percent if a
close friend became over-
weight.
Stories and anecdotes of
friendships that encour-
age healthy lifestyle
choices and having signif-
icant health impacts are
ubiquitous.
Among many unknown
factors, one factor of the
benefit of friends deals
with stress reduction and
the associated inflamma-
tory changes that result
from it. Friends can en-
courage healthy reactions.
A strong social support
can help have a dramati-
cally positive reaction to
scary or worrisome situa-
tions. Friends and associ-
ated activities can
minimize heart rates and
blood pressure.
Meeting new people
can be a healthy way in
its own right. Take your
dog for a walk, work out
at a gym, go for a run on
one of our great trails, or
join a bowling, baseball
or tennis league. Go down
to the shooting range. My
wife and I, her dad and
one of our military sons
went shooting last week
at the range in Withla-
coochee. It's amazing the
people we met and
befriended.
The Christmas holiday
is fast approaching -
keep working out to keep
your stress level down.
Take a friend with you, a
little exercise will help
you both. Don't forget to
talk.

Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
surgeon at SeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute,
may be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net.





NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Redskins, Ravens


meet in Beltway Bowl


Bucs hostEagles,

will tryto stay

inplayofhunt

Associated Press
Ask the Baltimore Ravens
and Washington Redskins
about their biggest rivals
and they don't mention each
other.
For the Ravens, it's usu-
ally playing the Pittsburgh
Steelers, who beat them last
weekend. For the Redskins,
it's often the New York Gi-
ants, an opponent they
edged last Monday night.
Baltimore (9-3) leads the
AFC North and wins it by
beating Washington and
seeing both the Steelers and
Bengals lose. The Ravens
grab a playoff berth with a
win and one of those divi-
sion rivals losing.
Washington (6-6) has won
three in a row to move
within one game of the Gi-
ants atop the NFC East.
Rookie sensation Robert
Griffin III runs a hybrid of-
fense that has been effective
on the ground and in the air.
When needed, RG3 has
been a superb improviser
Philadelphia (3-9)
at Tampa Bay (6-6)
While the Eagles can't get
the season over quick enough,
Tampa Bay still has big plans.
Losses to the Falcons and
Broncos the last two weeks
were damaging, but the Bucs
remain in the wild-card chase
and can't afford a stumble here.
Their productive offense
could tear through a weakened
and sometimes disinterested
Eagles defense; look for re-
ceiver Vincent Jackson to excel
in his matchup with whichever
defensive backs cover him.
Jackson averages 20.3 yards
per reception, easily tops in the
league. Philly allows 233 yards
per game through the air. Jack-
son might get that many.
Houston (11-1) at
New England (9-3)
The best Monday nighter of
the season, with the winner
emerging as an AFC favorite.
New England's offense has
been unstoppable, with the Patri-
ots outscoring opponents by 170
points. The 430 they have put up
are 79 more than the Texans,
who rank second in scoring.
So a light-up-the-scoreboard
affair could be in order, even
though Houston ranks sixth in
defense.
Miami (5-7) at
San Fran. (8-3-1)
San Francisco has gotten
very sloppy the last two weeks,
endangering what was a huge
lead in the NFC West. The Nin-
ers had 21 penalties in those
games out of 88 total for the
season, and eight times were
called for offensive holding.
Those issues certainly need
to be cleaned up before the
49ers visit New England and
Seattle the next two weeks.
Miami must find a way to
keep linebacker Aldon Smith in
check in passing situations.
Smith has matched the fran-
chise single-season sacks
mark with 17 1/2, and Miami's
starting left tackle, Jake Long,
is gone for the season.
New Orleans (5-7)
at N.Y. Giants (7-5)
The Saints have a three-
game winning streak against
Giants, including two blowouts.
But New Orleans is a different
team on the road and, for that
matter, a lesser version of pre-
vious Saints squads with Drew
Brees at quarterback. Brees
never has lost to the Giants in
four games, has 11 touch-
downs, no interceptions and a
122.1 passer rating.
But he comes off a five-inter-
ception debacle against Atlanta,
and faces a Giants team that
still must have nightmares over
chasing RG3. With trips to At-
lanta and Baltimore ahead and
just a one-game edge in the


NFC East, New York is in dire
need of a win here.
Chicago (84) at
Minnesota (6-6)
Last year, one injury after an-
other, most notably to QB Jay
Cutler, victimized the Bears.
The injury curse has struck


Associated Press
Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III leads his
team into an important clash against the Baltimore Ravens.


again, with the latest star un-
able to suit up being Brian
Urlacher. That doesn't bode
well for a team that has lost
three of four and must play
Green Bay next week.
"When you start getting de-
pleted and trying to make that
run for the division, trying to po-
sition yourself for the playoffs
or whatever it is, and you don't
have your main guys out there,
it could be difficult," said Min-
nesota defensive end Jared
Allen, whose club lost out-
standing receiver Percy Harvin
for the season this week, but
has the equally outstanding
Adrian Peterson.
Detroit (4-8) at
Green Bay (8-4)
Detroit's slide has reached
four, all against solid oppo-
nents, including the Packers'
24-20 decision three weeks
ago. The Lions have been
undisciplined and it has really
cost them late in games.
They also don't get after the
passer as well as would be ex-
pected with the likes of
Ndamukong Suh, Kyle Vanden
Bosch and CliffAvril on de-
fense. Even worse with Aaron
Rodgers on the other side, De-
troit struggles in pass coverage.
So even with Jordy Nelson
likely sidelined and Donald
Driver nursing a broken
thumb, the Packers could tear
up the tundra and fill up the
scoreboard.
Atlanta (11-1)
at Carolina (3-9)
The Falcons barely escaped
against the Panthers in Week
4. Atlanta has clinched the NFC
South, but desperately wants to
clinch home-field advantage
throughout the NFC playoffs,
and actually could do so this
weekend with a victory and
losses by Chicago, Green Bay
and San Francisco.
With few blowouts this sea-
son, the Falcons haven't over-
whelmed anyone despite their
gaudy record. It will take some
playoff victories to make a
major impression, not wins over
the likes of the Panthers, who
fell at lowly Kansas City al-
beit in an emotion-filled setting
- last Sunday.
Dallas (6-6) at
Cincinnati (7-5)
Two teams in the midst of the
playoffs races even though
each has had a slew of stum-
bles this season.
Cincinnati has overcome a
four-game slide with four con-
secutive wins, three against
AFC West weaklings and one
over the Giants, who aren't look-
ing so good recently, either. The
Bengals do seem a legit con-
tender, though, as their defense
has stepped up, allowing a mere
42 points in the winning string.
Dallas confounds everyone,
and if it could hold onto leads
late in games, it might very well
be leading the NFC East. The
Cowboys trail the Giants by one
game, but their last four victories
are against Carolina, Cleveland
and two against Philadelphia, all
last-place teams.
Tennessee (4-8) at
Indianapolis (84)
Here's how stunningly well
this season is going for the
Colts: win here and next week at
Houston a tall order, that one
- and Indy could own a playoff
spot. That's how effective the
new regime and its collection of
new players, including, of
course, top overall draft pick An-
drew Luck, has been.
Winners of six of the last
seven outings, the Colts come
off one of the most exhilarating
comebacks in the league this
year, capped by a final-play
touchdown at Detroit.
Tennessee has nothing so


noteworthy in its 2012 resume,
although it did force Indy to
overtime on Oct. 28 before
losing 19-13.
Arizona (4-8) at
Seattle (7-5)
The first of three home
games with NFC West rivals for
the Seahawks, a huge edge in
the schedule that could help
them make the playoffs. Seattle
is 5-0 at home and comes off its
most impressive late-game per-
formance; forget that replace-
ment officials-aided last-second
win over Green Bay in Week 3.
No team has collapsed
deeper than the Cardinals,
who won their first four, but
haven't tasted victory in two
months. Their quarterback situ-
ation is a total mess, and they
can't stop the run.
San Diego (4-8) at
Pittsburgh (7-5)
For those who believe the
Steelers saved their season
with that impressive victory at
Baltimore, hold on. They re-
main vulnerable until Ben
Roethlisberger is healthy
enough to function like the win-
ning quarterback he has been.
But the defense has come
on and might be good enough
to lift the Steelers to the play-
offs while Roethlisberger fully
recovers.
San Diego has lost four
straight and seven of eight as it
plays out the string in perhaps
the final season for coach Norv
Turner and general manager
A.J. Smith.
St. Louis (5-6-1)
at Buffalo (5-7)
St. Louis is the only team in
the league that wishes it could
face San Francisco more often
after a tie and a win against the
49ers. This week, though, it's
Buffalo, which runs the ball
nearly as well as the Niners,
but has trouble stopping it.
Could be a productive day for
the Rams' Steven Jackson and
the Bills' C.J. Spiller on the
ground.
The Rams could play a role in
who gets an NFC wild-card slot
because they face Minnesota,
Tampa Bay and Seattle after
this. The Bills have not beaten a
team that currently has a win-
ning mark. Of course, St. Louis
doesn't have one, either.
Kansas City (2-10)
at Cleveland (4-8)
The Browns are showing
some life since new owner
Jimmy Haslam took over, and
perhaps they can save coach
Pat Shurmur's job with contin-
ued strong performances.
Cleveland is plus-7 in turnover
differential, which could be a
huge edge against Kansas City,
which ranks at the bottom of
the NFL with a minus-21 and
32 giveaways.
KC comes off an uplifting vic-
tory against Carolina one day
after linebacker Jovan Belcher
shot to death his girlfriend and
then committed suicide.
Coach Romeo Crennel once
had the same job in Cleveland,
where he went 24-40 before
being fired.
New York Jets (5-7)
at Jacksonville (2-10)
Mark Sanchez remains be-
hind center, and not necessarily
on a short leash given the
backup situation with the Jets.
New York has gotten sloppy in
virtually every offensive area,
with the spotlight, naturally, on
Sanchez's failings. But the run-
ning game isn't much, the re-
ceivers have been pedestrian
and the offensive line has con-
tinued its 2011 slump.
Yet the Jets' remaining oppo-
nents, beginning with the AFC-
worst Jaguars, have a 15-33
record.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 B3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NFL standings


y-New England
N.Y Jets
Buffalo
Miami

x-Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


N.Y Giants
Washington
Dallas
Philadelphia

y-Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina


Green Bay
Chicago
Minnesota
Detroit

San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona


AFC
East
W L 1
9 3 (
5 7 (
5 7 (
5 7 (
South
W L 1
11 1 (
8 4 (
4 8 (
2 10 I
North
W L
9 3 (
7 5 (
7 5 (
4 8
West
W L 1
10 3 (
4 8 (
3 10 (
2 10
NFC
East
W L 1
7 5 (
6 6 (
6 6 (
3 9 (
South
W L 1
11 1 I
6 6
5 7 (
3 9 (
North
W L 1
8 4 (
8 4 (
6 6 (
4 8 (
West
W L 1
8 3
7 5 (
5 6
4 8 (


Pct PF
.750 430
.417 228
.417 277
.417 227

Pct PF
.917 351
.667 265
.333 248
.167 206

Pct PF
.750 303
.583 254
.583 302
.333 229

Pct PF
.769 375
.333 258
.231 248
.167 188


Pct PF
.583 321
.500 312
.500 280
.250 217

Pct PF
.917 317
.500 333
.417 321
.250 235

Pct PF
.667 296
.667 294
.500 262
.333 300

Pct PF
.708 289
.583 242
.458 221
.333 186


x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
Thursday's Game
Denver 26, Oakland 13
Today's Games
Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at N.Y Giants, 4:25 p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 13
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 16
Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Miami, 1 p.m.
Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 17
N.Y Jets atTennessee, 8:30 p.m.
Heisman
Finalist Voting
Finalist voting for the 2012 Heisman Trophy,
with first-, second- and third-place votes and
total points (voting on 3-2-1 basis):
Player 1st 2nd 3rd Total
J. Manziel, Tex.A&M 474 252 1032,029
M.Te'o, Notre Dame 321 309 125 1,706
C. Klein, Kansas St. 60 197 320 894



Glantz-Culver Line
For Dec. 8
NCAA Football
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Navy-x 8Y2 7 (56) Army
x-at Philadelphia
NFL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG


at Washington Pk 2/2
at Cleveland 5 6/2
at Pittsburgh 7 7/2
at Indianapolis 5Y2 5/2
N.Y Jets 3 2/2
Chicago 3 3
Atlanta 3/2 3/2
atTampa Bay 8/2 7/2
at Buffalo 3 3
at Cincinnati 3 3
atSanFran. 10'/210
at N.Y Giants 6 5


(47/2) Baltimore
(38) Kansas City
(41/2) San Diego
(48) Tennessee
(38/2) at Jax.
(39) at Minnesota
(47/2) at Carolina
(47/2) Philadelphia
(42) St. Louis
(45/2) Dallas
(39) Miami
(53) New Orleans


JOB
Continued from Page B1

The high school also
wants someone who will
also be hirable as a teacher,
and Stukes said there is a
hiring freeze within the Cit-
rus County School District
"due to the current eco-
nomic problems we're
having."
While he didn't cite the sit-



TAGGART
Continued from Page B1

too good to ignore.
"I always said I wouldn't
leave WKU unless I had a
chance to go and win a na-
tional championship, and I
truly believe that can be
done here," Taggart said Sat-
urday after signing a five-
year, $5.75 million contract to
replace Skip Holtz, who was
fired after the worst season
in USF's 16-year history
"It wasn't long ago USF
was No. 2 in the country It's


FOr the record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
1-0-7
.CASH 3 (late)
fS- 99-6-2

PLAY 4 (early)
9-0-4-5
PLAY 4 (late)
9-8-6-4

FANTASY 5
lodLtt 9-22-29-30-33

POWERBALL LOTTERY
7-23-26-40-53 3-7-8-28-29-53
POWER BALL XTRA
21 3


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Middle Tennessee State at Kentucky
3 p.m. (SUN) Furman at South Carolina
NBA
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Phoenix Suns
BILLIARDS
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Billiards International Challenge of
Champions (Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBAWTBA Bayer Advanced Aspirin World
Tour Finals (Taped)
FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (FOX) Philadelphia Eagles at Tampa Bay Buccaneers
4 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at San Francisco 49ers
4 p.m. (FOX) New Orleans Saints at New York Giants
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Detroit Lions at Green Bay Packers
GOLF
5:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Nelson Mandela
Championship Final Round
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Nelson Mandela
Championship Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) Franklin Templeton Shootout Final Round
8:30 p.m. (GOLF) Franklin Templeton Shootout Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
RUGBY
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Seven World Series South Africa
(Taped)
FIGURE SKATING
1 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix Final (Taped)
TENNIS
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Champions Series: Philadelphia: Rafter vs.
McEnroe (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
3 p.m. (CBS) Skiing Deer Valley Celebrity Skifest (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


at Seattle 10 10 (35'2) Arizona
at Green Bay 6/2 6/2 (50) Detroit
Monday
at New England4'2 3Y2 (51) Houston



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
New York 14 5 .737
Brooklyn 11 7 .611
Philadelphia 11 9 .550
Boston 11 9 .550
Toronto 4 16 .200
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 13 5 .722
Atlanta 12 5 .706
Charlotte 7 12 .368
Orlando 7 12 .368
Washington 2 15 .118
Central Division
W L Pct
Chicago 11 8 .579
Milwaukee 9 9 .500
Indiana 10 10 .500
Detroit 7 15 .318
Cleveland 4 17 .190


GB
2'/2
3/2
3'/2
101/2

GB
/2
6/2
6/2
101/2

GB
1'/2
1'/2
5/2
8


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 17 4 .810 -
Memphis 14 4 .778 1'/2
Dallas 10 10 .500 6/2
Houston 9 10 .474 7
New Orleans 5 14 .263 11
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 16 4 .800 -
Utah 11 10 .524 5/2
Denver 10 10 .500 6
Minnesota 9 9 .500 6

uation by name, the school
district is facing a budget
shortfall due to a partial tax
payment by Progress Energy
Florida.
If the school has its way, it
will not wait until the crucial
spring period to bring in a
new coach.
"I don't foresee waiting
until the spring," Stukes
said. "We're hoping to put
someone in by January
"We're trying to determine
if and when we can put our


been proven that we can get
there," Taggart added.
"What we have to do now is
put everybody on the bus,
put 'em in the right seat and
let coach T drive this bus!"
Taggart, 36, led Western
Kentucky to a 7-5 record this
season. The Hilltoppers,
who appointed defensive
coordinator Lance Guidry
interim coach on Saturday,
will make their first post-
season appearance since
joining the Football Bowl
Subdivision when they face
Central Michigan in the Lit-
tle Caesars Bowl.
A former assistant at


Portland 8 11 .421 7/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 13 6 .684 -
Golden State 13 7 .650 /2
L.A. Lakers 9 11 .450 4/2
Sacramento 6 12 .333 6/2
Phoenix 7 14 .333 7
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 95, Boston 94, OT
Denver 92, Indiana 89
Atlanta 104, Washington 95
Golden State 109, Brooklyn 102
Chicago 108, Detroit 104
Minnesota 91, Cleveland 73
Memphis 96, New Orleans 89
San Antonio 114, Houston 92
Milwaukee 108, Charlotte 93
Utah 131, Toronto 99
Oklahoma City 114, L.A. Lakers 108
Sacramento 91, Orlando 82
Saturday's Games
L.A. Clippers 117, Phoenix 99
San Antonio 132, Charlotte 102
Golden State 101, Washington 97
Boston 92, Philadelphia 79
Detroit 104, Cleveland 97
Miami 106, New Orleans 90
Chicago 93, New York 85
Dallas 116, Houston 109
Atlanta 93, Memphis 83
Sacramento at Portland, late
Today's Games
Toronto at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Oklahoma City, 7p.m.
Denver at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Golden State at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Portland, 10 p.m.

coach on staff and what we
will do is continue to look
through the applicants."
Whoever decides to accept
the position will also have to
understand and adapt to the
community
"The community of Citrus
County is a different place
than the rest of Florida,"
Stukes said. "We're looking
for someone who wants to be
a part of this community,
someone who wants to plant
roots here."


Stanford to Jim Harbaugh,
Taggart takes over a pro-
gram that went 16-21 under
Holtz, who dropped nine of
10 games following a 2-0
start this season.
"We've got a winner in
Willie Taggart. He's young,
dynamic, driven, innovative
and successful," said ath-
letic director Doug Woolard,
who led the six-day search
for a successor with assis-
tance from former NFL
coach and Tampa resident
Tony Dungy, who sat in on
interviews with the finalists
- another selling-point
with Taggart


Navy football claims 11th



straight win over Army


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA
Navy's decade of domi-
nance over Army was 14
yards away from sinking.
Then the Black Knights
botched a handoff with an
overdue victory in sight
and the Midshipmen
pounced on the fumbled
ball.
Tight games or blowouts,
Navy has made a habit of
beating Army


Keenan Reynolds helped
Navy top Army for the 1lth
straight time, scoring the
winning touchdown late in
the fourth quarter in a 17-13
victory in the 113th rivalry
game Saturday
The Midshipmen can
hook an anchor to the Com-
mander-in-Chief's Trophy
and bring it to Annapolis.
"It means everything,"
Navy coach Ken Niumat-
alolo said. "That's our No. 1
goal, to get the Commander-


in-Chief's Trophy. I'm just
so happy for these guys."
Navy (8-4) and won the
CIC trophy awarded to the
team with the best record
in games among the three
service academies. Army
and Navy each beat Air
Force, putting the presti-
gious trophy up for grabs in
the regular-season finale
for the first time since 2005.
Army (2-10) hasn't
hoisted the CIC trophy
since 1996.


Sports BRIEFS


Cowboy charged gameday.
after player dies in Perry, O'Hair up
auto accident at Shootout


IRVING, Texas Police
charged Dallas Cowboys de-
fensive lineman Josh Brent with
intoxication manslaughter Sat-
urday after he flipped his car in
a pre-dawn accident that killed
teammate Jerry Brown.
Irving police spokesman
John Argumaniz said the acci-
dent happened about 2:20 a.m.
Saturday in the Dallas suburb,
hours before Brent was to be
on a team flight to Cincinnati for
the Cowboys' game Sunday
against the Bengals.
Argumaniz said the 25-year-
old Brown a practice-squad
linebacker who also was
Brent's teammate for three sea-
sons at the University of Illinois
- was found unresponsive at
the scene and pronounced
dead at a hospital.
It marked the second straight
week the NFL found itself deal-
ing with a tragedy right before



JINGLE
Continued from Page B1

father and coach Marion
Carver, was there watching
her Her dad was a pretty fair
runner years ago.
She was asked how she can
run this fast at age 44.
"Genetics," she said. "The
hills are a little tough. I love
the people (cheering the run-
ners on)."
Citrus High cross country
runner Alyssa Weber was the
second female to finish the
race. She was eighth with a
time of 19:44.
"I love every 5K I run," she


HEISMAN
Continued from Page B1

"I wish my whole team
could be up here with me,"
he said with a wide smile.
Te'o had 321 first-place
votes and 1,706 points and
Klein received 60 firsts and
894 points.
Just a few days after turn-
ing 20, Manziel proved
times have truly changed in
college football, and that ex-
perience can be really over-
rated.
For years, seniors domi-
nated the award named
after John Heisman, the pi-
oneering Georgia Tech
coach from the early 1900s.
In the 1980s, juniors started
becoming common winners.
Tim Tebow became the first



KIWANIS
Continued from Page B1

"It was close for a while,"
shrugged the 17-year-old
Ayala. "The difference is
he's a point wrestler. He'll
take you down all night -
that's how he beats people.
He's also got tremendous
cardio."
On whether Ayala was OK
with finishing runner-up in
the Pirates' initial IBT (indi-
vidually bracketed tourna-
ment) of the season, he said
"Tonight was a lesson
learned. Now I know what I
need to work on."
Though Ayala was the lone
Pirate to place fourth or bet-
ter, Jose Aday finished above.
500 at 138 pounds behind a 3-
2 mark, while Michael Allan
at 120, Kris Caraballo at 126,
Robert Brooker at 160, An-
drew Bilby at 182 and Chris-
tian Barber at 285 each
finished 2-2.
"We had a couple tough
days," assessed CRHS Head
Coach Craig Frederick
"We've got to get tougher Our
job as coaches is to toughen
our kids up. This was a good
tournament to show our kids
we're not as good as we think


NAPLES, Fla. Kenny
Perry and Sean O'Hair took a
two-stroke lead in the Franklin
Templeton Shootout op Satur-
day, birdieing the final six holes
in better-ball play for an 11-
under 61.
Perry and O'Hair were 19
under overall, two strokes
ahead of first-round leaders
Davis Love III and Brandt
Snedeker at Tiburon Golf Club.
Love and Snedeker had a 65.
Jason Dufner and Vijay
Singh, Stewart Cink and Carl
Pettersson, and Charles Howell
III and Rory Sabbatini were tied
for third at 15 under in the round
delayed by heavy rain and wind
for 1 hour, 50 minutes.
Defending champions Kee-
gan Bradley and Brendan Steele
shot a 64 to get to 13 under.
The 12 two-man teams will
play a scramble Sunday. The
winners will split $750,000.

said. "It has some hills."
Crystal River High School
teacher Laura Wingate con-
tinues to enjoy both 5K road
races and triathlons.
"I'm all right now," she said.
"Thehills arehard. Itfeltgood."
Former Crystal River High
cross country runner Karen
Stukes won the women's mas-
ters title with a time of 22:15.
The accountant won her sec-
ond straight title and her son,
Jason was there running right
with Mom.
"Wonderful," Stukes said.
"We have a friendly rivalry I
beat Karen Tyler (22:32). She
usually beats me."
Crystal River High School
ace cross country runner,

sophomore to win it in 2007,
and two more won it in the
next two seasons.
Adrian Peterson had
come closest as a freshman,
finishing second to South-
ern California quarterback
Matt Leinart in 2004. But it
took 78 years for a newbie to
take home the big bronze
statue. Johnny Football re-
ally can do it all.
Peterson was a true fresh-
man for Oklahoma. As a
redshirt freshmen, Manziel
attended school and prac-
ticed with the team last
year, but did not play in any
games.
He's the second player
from Texas A&M to win the
Heisman, joining John
David Crow from 1957, and
did so without the slightest
hint of preseason hype.
Manziel didn't even win the

we are."
On Ayala's outstanding ef-
forts, "The last kid (Destra),
we just haven't seen anything
like that before," praised
Coach Frederick of the ath-
letic-looking Destra. "Kudos
to Dylan, he's got to be our
MVP he was the only guy to
play"
"Overall, we've got some
good kids, they just didn't
place," added Coach Freder-
ick "From here on out, we've
got to close the gap before
the state series. This was a
good test for our team; we
lost a lot of close matches."
Like the Pirates, the
Lecanto Panthers returned
home with one placer
Lecanto finished 17th
overall with 48.0 points and
have not had a gold medalist
in Brooksville since Mike
Musto in 2004.
The Panthers carved out
11 wins in 37 bouts among its
13-member mat squad.
Jonah Nightengale paced
the Panthers with a 3-2 won-
lost slate featuring three pins
at 195.
Nightengale, who entered
as the No. 4 seed, collected
pins over Hernando's Jesus
Herebia (25 seconds), Spring-
stead's Jesse Curl (49 sec-
onds) and Gulf's Josh


Dubai Ladies
Masters
DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates China's Shanshan
Feng won the Dubai Ladies
Masters by five strokes, closing
with a 3-under 69 for her sec-
ond Ladies European Tour title.
The sixth-ranked Feng fin-
ished at 21-under 267 at Emi-
rates Golf Club. She won the
LPGA Championship in June
for her first major title.
The Netherlands' Dewi Claire
Schreefel was second after a 69.
Michelle Wie shot a 69 to tie
for 19th at 6 under.
Australian Open
SYDNEY -Australian John
Senden took a three-stroke lead
in the Australian Open, making
an eagle and two birdies in a
four-hole stretch on the back
nine en route to a 2-under 70.
Senden, the 2006 champion,
had a three-round total of 7-
under 209 in tough, windy con-
ditions at The Lakes.

Clarissa Consol, finished 1lth
with a 19:54. She was the top
female in the Beat the Sheriff
Race.
She will run cross country
next year at Stetson Univer-
sity
"I like this course a lot," she
said.
The race was held on an
overcast day with tempera-
tures in the 70s. There were
350 runners registered in-
cluding a number of chil-
dren.
"Fantastic day," said race
director Chris Moling. "We
have about 100 kids. Great
turnout for elementary and
middle school runners. Great
day"

starting job until two weeks
before the season.
Who needs hype when
you can fill-up a highlight
reel the way Manziel can?
With daring runs and elu-
sive improvisation, Manziel
broke 2010 Heisman winner
Cam Netwon's Southeast-
ern Conference record with
4,600 total yards, led the Ag-
gies to a 10-2 in their first
season in the SEC and or-
chestrated an upset at then-
No. 1 Alabama in
November that stamped
him as legit.
He has thrown for 3,419
yards and 24 touchdowns
and run for 1,181 yards and
19 more scores to become
the first freshman, first SEC
player and fifth player over-
all to throw for 3,000 yards
and run for 1,000 in a
season.

Rodriguez (44 seconds).
In the semifinals, he fell to
Robinson's Alex Reay, 16-11.
In the consolation finals
for third place, Land O'
Lakes' Gary Garcia pre-
vailed, 6-3.
"I'm not really OK with
fourth," described the 17-
year-old Nightengale. "I felt
like I should have done bet-
ter Last year, I beat that
Robinson kid, today I lost by
decision. The biggest thing is
I'm out of shape."
On what his short-term
goal is, "I've got to work on
improving my conditioning,"
noted Nightengale, who had
not competed this season
prior to Kiwanis. "And start
finishing my moves."
"I wish we would had com-
peted Wednesday (vs. CRHS
- but no ref showed), we
didn't get the tune-up I was
hoping for," lamented LHS'
fourth-year skipper Scot
Roberts. "Actually, we lost a
critical day of training."
On Nightengale's efforts,
"Considering he's had two
surgeries on his wrist since
last year and he hadn't wres-
tled before this weekend, he
really did tremendous," said
Roberts. "I thought he did as
well as anyone could have
expected."


B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 1 Indiana suffocates C. Connecticut St.


Associated Press

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -
No. 1 Indiana had another
strong offensive game on
Saturday, and it looks as if
the Hoosiers can play de-
fense, too.
While Christian Watford
scored 21 points and Cody
Zeller had 19 points and a
career-high 19 rebounds, it
was the Hoosiers' suffocat-
ing defense that had the
starring role in a 100-69 vic-
tory over Central Connecti-
cut State.
Indiana is off to its second
straight 9-0 start under Tom
Crean. It has won 13 straight
at Assembly Hall and 27
consecutive non-conference
home games.
Matt Hunter poured in 40
points, matching an Assem-
bly Hall record for a visiting
player, but the Blue Devils
(4-4) never had a chance
against Indiana's compre-
hensive performance.

No. 2 Duke 90,
Temple 67
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- Seth Curry scored 23 points,
big men Mason Plumlee and
Ryan Kelly had double-doubles
and Duke got the win at the
Izod Center.
Curry was 5 for 9 from 3-
point range, leading Duke's 12-
for-20 effort from behind the arc.
Plumlee finished with 16
points the first time he was
below 19 this season and 14
rebounds. Kelly had 14 points
and 10 rebounds for Duke (9-0).
Quenton DeCosey had 13
points for the Owls (6-1), who
were looking for their best start
since going 14-0 in 1987-88.
No. 3 Michigan 80,
Arkansas 67
ANN ARBOR, Mich.- Jordan
Morgan scored a season-high 12
points and matched a season
high with 10 rebounds to help
Michigan remain undefeated.
The Wolverines (9-0) are off
to their best start since they
won the first 11 games of the
1988-89 season, when they
went on to win the program's
only national title.
Michigan led by 13 in the first
half, but the game got close
after halftime.


The Razorbacks opened the
second half with an 11-2 run to
pull within two points and trailed
56-55 with 8:58 left. The
Wolverines went on a 10-2 run
and coasted to the win, John
Beilein's 100th in six seasons at
the school.
Marshawn Powell had 18
points for the Razorbacks (4-4).
No. 4 Syracuse 108,
Monmouth (N.J.) 56
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -
Michael-Carter Williams had 15
points and a career-high 16 as-
sists, C.J. Fair finished with 14
points and 10 rebounds and
Syracuse pounded Monmouth
of New Jersey.
Syracuse (8-0) has won 28
straight home games, the
longest streak in the nation.
Monmouth (5-5), which had
won four of five, is 0-42 against
teams from the Big East.
Carter-Williams, who also
had five steals and four blocks,
has reached double digits in as-
sists five times and his 83 as-
sists are 29 more than he had
his entire freshman season.
His total for the game was the
third-highest in school history,
behind only Sherman Douglas
(22) and Pearl Washington (18).
No. 5 Louisville 99,
Missouri-KC 47
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Russ
Smith scored a career-high 31
points, powering Louisville to
the easy victory.
Smith was 12 of 18 from the
field and 3 of 5 from 3-point
range in surpassing his previ-
ous high of 30. He led Louisville
(8-1) in scoring for the sixth
time in nine games.
Luke Hancock added 15
points and Montrezl Harrell had
a career-high 14 points for the
Cardinals, who shot 56 percent
in winning their third in a row.
Louisville's defense stifled
Missouri-Kansas City (4-5). Be-
sides forcing 24 turnovers lead-
ing to 35 points, the Cardinals
held the Kangaroos to 27 per-
cent shooting.
No. 7 Ohio State 89,
Long Beach St. 55
COLUMBUS, Ohio De-
shaun Thomas had 18 points,
including a 3-pointer in an 11-
point run in the first half, and
Ohio State cruised past Long


Beach State.
LaQuinton Ross had 16
points in a reserve role,
Lenzelle Smith Jr. added 14,
and Sam Thompson scored 13
for the Buckeyes (6-1), who
built a 42-point lead before ex-
perimenting with different lineup
combinations.
Dan Jennings scored 16
points and James Ennis had 12
for the 49ers (3-6), who have
dropped three straight. They
lost at No. 4 Syracuse 84-53 on
Thursday before taking on an-
other top-10 team just over 40
hours later.
No. 9 Kansas 90,
Colorado 54
LAWRENCE, Kan. Ben
McLemore scored 24 points,
Kevin Young added 16 points
and eight rebounds and
Kansas routed former Big 12
member Colorado.
Elijah Johnson hit three 3-
pointers and finished with 11
points, and Travis Releford
added 10 points and six assists
for the Jayhawks (7-1), who
have won seven straight since
losing to Michigan State early in
the year.
Kansas used an 18-3 run in
the opening minutes to silence
a small but vocal section of Col-
orado fans. The Jayhawks led
43-22 at halftime.
No. 11 Cincy 92,
Md.-East. Shore 60
CINCINNATI Cashmere
Wright set a career high with six
3-pointers, and Sean Kilpatrick
scored 19 of his 23 points in the
first half, keeping Cincinnati un-
beaten.
The Bearcats (9-0) have
opened the season with nine
wins for only the 10th time in
school history. They also did it
in during the 2010-11 season,
winning their first 15 games.
Wright finished with 20 points
and nine assists.
Kyree Jones led the Hawks
(0-9) with 25 points. The Hawks
shot 29.9 percent from the field.
No. 12 Missouri 68,
Tennessee State 38
COLUMBIA, Mo. Stefan
Jankovic scored all 14 of his
points in the second half, help-
ing Missouri overcome a sloppy
start.
Laurence Bowers had 18


Associated Press
Indiana's Will Sheehey protects the ball from Central Connecticut State's Matt Hunter
during the second half Saturday in Bloomington, Ind. Indiana won 100-69.


points and 10 rebounds and
Alex Oriakhi added 15 points
and 10 boards for Missouri (8-
1), which defeated its second
consecutive Ohio Valley Con-
ference team following an 81-
65 win Tuesday over Southeast
Missouri State.
Robert Covington scored 12
points and Jordan Cyphers
added 11 for Tennessee State
(4-6).
Missouri outrebounded Ten-
nessee State 52-27 and made
15 of 19 free throws. Ten-
nessee State only attempted
five, all in the second half, and
made two.
No. 15 G'town 46,
Towson 40
WASHINGTON George-
town held Towson scoreless
over the final 4% minutes, and
the Hoyas won their second
home clankfest in a row, recov-
ering from a 17-point first half.
Greg Whittington scored 11
points, and Mikael Hopkins and
Otto Porter had 10 apiece for
the Hoyas (7-1), who shot 17
percent in the first half and 29
percent for the game. George-
town won with defense, forcing
22 turnovers and pulling away


- if it could be called that -
with a 4-0 game-ending run.
Georgetown transfer Jerrelle
Benimon had 11 points and 16
rebounds to lead the Tigers (4-
5), who are rebuilding with only
three scholarship players from
last season's 1-31 team.
Georgetown set the school
record for scoring futility in the
shot clock era with a 37-36 over
Tennessee on Nov. 30.
No. 19 Mich. St. 73,
Loyola of Chicago 61
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Gary Harris scored 20 points
and the Spartans pulled away
in the second half.
Adreian Payne added 14
points and 10 rebounds for
Michigan State (8-2).
Down 32-30 at the break, the
Spartans went on a 22-9 run to
take control. Harris hit three 3-
pointers during the burst.
Ben Averkamp had 25 points
and eight rebounds for the
Ramblers (6-3).
No. 23 Okla. St. 62,
Missouri St. 42
STILLWATER, Okla. -
Markel Brown scored 15 points,
Michael Cobbins and Le'Bryan


Nash added 10 apiece and the
Cowboys beat the Bears.
The Cowboys (7-1) scored
14 of the game's first 16 points.
After a dreadful first half, Mis-
souri State (2-7) came out of
the break hot and used a 10-0
run to claw back within 34-23
after Nathan Scheer's 3-pointer
from the wing.
The Bears hit their first four
shots and eight of their first 11
in the second half, but couldn't
keep up the sharp shooting.
A turnover and three straight
misses gave an opening for an
11-0 burst, and Cobbins'jumper
with 8:09 left pushed the lead
back to 53-31.
No. 25 N.C. State 80,
Cleveland St. 63
RALEIGH, N.C. Richard
Howell had 17 points and 10 re-
bounds to help the Wolfpack
beat the Vikings in their annual
return to Reynolds Coliseum.
C.J. Leslie scored 19 for the
Wolfpack (6-2), who shot 55 per-
cent and led by double figures
most of the afternoon. Freshman
T.J. Warren added 16 points.
Reynolds was the Wolfpack's
home for 50 years before the
program moved off campus.


Heat stifle Hornets


Associated Press

MIAMI Dwyane Wade
scored 26 points, LeBron
James finished with 24
points and seven assists,
and the Miami Heat
snapped a two-game slide
by topping the New Orleans
Hornets 106-90.
Chris Bosh scored 13, and
Ray Alien and Shane Battier
each added 11 for Miami,
which took control by
outscoring the Hornets 33-10
over the final 11 minutes of
the first half. New Orleans
started the game 10 for 12
from the floor, then shot 9 for
31 over the rest of the half.
Ryan Anderson scored 24
for New Orleans, which got
20 from Robin Lopez and 12
from Jason Smith.
Bulls 93, Knicks 85
CHICAGO Marco Belinelli
and Luol Deng scored 22
points apiece as the Chicago
Bulls beat the Knicks 93-85,
snapping New York's five-game
winning streak.
Raymond Felton led the
Knicks with 27 points, matching
his season high set on Thurs-
day in a victory at Miami. How-
ever, Felton was just 9 for 30
from the field, exceeding his ca-
reer high for field-goal attempts
by six shots.
Mavericks 116,
Rockets 109
HOUSTON O.J. Mayo
scored 40 points, including 10
in the last three minutes, to lift
the Dallas Mavericks to a 116-
109 victory over the Rockets in
coach Kevin McHale's return to
the Houston bench.
James Harden had 30 points
at halftime, but the Mavericks
slowed him down in the second
half. He scored just nine points
in the second half.
Hawks 93,
Grizzlies 83
MEMPHIS, Tenn.- Josh
Smith had 24 points, Lou
Williams scored 18 of his 21 in
the second half, and the Atlanta
Hawks beat the Memphis Griz-
zlies 93-83.


'Noles women


suffer first loss


I Associated Press


Miami Heat guard Dwyane W
during the first half Saturday
Al Horford had 19 points and
grabbed 14 rebounds for At-
lanta, which won for the ninth
time in its last 10 games. Jeff
Teague finished with 13 points
and six assists.
Zach Randolph and Marc
Gasol scored 18 points apiece,
Randolph grabbing 13 re-
bounds as Memphis lost at
home for only the second time
this season. Rudy Gay scored
17 points, but was 7 of 25 from
the field. Mike Conley finished
with 12 points.
Clippers 117,
Suns 99
LOS ANGELES Jamal
Crawford led a fourth-quarter
rally with 13 of his 21 points,
and the Los Angeles Clippers
beat Phoenix 117-99, winning
their fifth in a row while sending
the Suns to their season-worst
sixth straight loss.
Blake Griffin added 24
points, and Chris Paul had 16
points and 11 assists. Crawford
made all four of his free throws
to extend his streak to 55 in a
row since Nov. 3.


Associated Press
lade drives past New Orleans Hornets forward Ryan Anderson
in Miami. Wade scored 26 as the Heat won 106-90.

Warriors 101, Pistons 104,
Wizards 97 Cavaliers 97


WASHINGTON David Lee
had 24 points and 17 rebounds,
Klay Thompson added 23
points and the Golden State
Warriors beat the Washington
Wizards 101-97 for their third
straight road win.
Stephen Curry scored 22
points for the Warriors, who
won the first three games of a
road trip for the first time since
February, 2003.
Celtics 92, 76ers 79
BOSTON Kevin Garnett
scored 19 points, Jeff Green
added 16, and the Boston
Celtics won the back end of a
home-and-home with Philadel-
phia, beating the 76ers 92-79.
Paul Pierce finished with 13
points and Rajon Rondo dished
out 11 assists and collected nine
rebounds, one night after his
first triple-double of the season.
Rondo had just seven points.
Thaddeus Young led
Philadelphia with 22 points and
Evan Turner scored 13.


CLEVELAND Brandon
Knight scored a career-high 30
points and the Detroit Pistons
defeated the Cleveland Cava-
liers for the second time in six
days with a 104-97 win.
The Pistons, who won for
just the second time in 12 road
games this season, took control
with a run that began late in the
third quarter and carried into
the fourth period.
Spurs 132,
Bobcats 102
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Danny Green scored 23 points
and the San Antonio Spurs set
a franchise record with 19 3-
pointers to hand the Charlotte
Bobcats their seventh straight
defeat, 132-102.
Green was 7 of 9 from 3-
point range and the Spurs shot
56 percent from behind the arc.
Tony Parker had 22 points and
nine assists as the Spurs won for
the ninth time in 10 games to
push their record to 17-4.


LINCOLN, Neb. Jor-
dan Hooper had a career-
best 36 points and 12
rebounds to help No. 25 Ne-
braska hand No. 24 Florida
State its first loss 78-77.
Hooper was 6 of 11 from
3-point range in her dou-
ble-double performance.
Emily Cady had 15 points.
Lindsey Moore had 14
points and eight assists.
Nebraska (7-3) led 40-36
at halftime in a game with
17 lead changes.
Florida State (7-1) had
the ball with 22 seconds
left following a pair of free
throws by Nebraska point
guard Moore. However,
the Seminoles missed two
free throws and a chance
to go up.
Leonor Rodriguez
scored 24 points, including
4 of 4 from 3-point range
for Florida State. Deluzio
came off the bench and
scored 19 points, including
3 for 4 on 3s. Chastity Clay-
ton had 14 and. Natasha
Howard had seven
rebounds.
No. 5 N. Dame 109,
Utah State 70
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Na-
talie Achonwa had 23 points
with 12 rebounds as No. 5
Notre Dame cruised to a 109-
70 win over Utah State.
Notre Dame (6-1) domi-
nated Utah State (2-7) in the
paint, with Achonwa and other
Irish players hitting easy shots
in the low post off feeds from
fastbreak and half-court sets.
Utah State tried collapsing
on the low post, but was often
whistled for fouls. Aggies guard
Jenna Johnson fouled out just
three minutes into the second
half. Devyn Christiansen led
the Aggies with 21 points.
No. 17 UCLA 62,
No. 12 Texas 42
HOUSTON -Alyssia
Brewer had 12 points and 11


rebounds, and No. 17 UCLA
held No. 12 Texas to 24 per-
cent shooting.
Jasmine Dixon added 10
points for the Bruins (5-1),
who have played three ranked
teams already this season.
Nneka Enemkpali had 16
points and 12 rebounds for
Texas (5-1) her school-
record sixth straight double-
double. No other Longhorns
player had more than six
points as Texas hit just 15 of
63 field goals and committed
29 turnovers.
No. 19 Dayton 60,
Michigan St. 53
DAYTON, Ohio Cassie
Sant had 19 points, five re-
bounds and four assists as No.
19 Dayton handed Michigan
State its first loss this season.
Andrea Hoover had 12
points and 10 rebounds and
Ally Malott also scored 12
points for Dayton (10-0).
Becca Mills scored 17
points for the Spartans (8-1).
However, Michigan State shot
just 19 for 64 (30 percent).
No. 23 Miami 67,
Davidson 35
CORAL GABLES Mor-
gan Stroman had 17 points
and 13 rebounds to lead No.
23 Miami.
Stroman was 8 of 11 from
the floor and also led the Hurri-
canes (7-1) with six assists
and four steals. The senior tied
Kayona Hayes for the team
lead with four blocked shots,
helping Miami block 10 for the
game. Krystal Saunders added
13 points and Hayes 12.
Miami opened on a 10-0 run
over the game's first 5 minutes
and led 27-18 at halftime.
Davidson (3-5) allowed Miami
to go on another 10-0 run to
open the second half and was
outscored 40-17 in the half.
The Wildcats made just 25
percent (16 of 63) from the field
in the game against Miami's 47
percent (29 of 62) clip, and hit
just 2 of 19 on 3-pointers.


BASKETBALL


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 B5


I












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Hillary Scott
expects first baby
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Lady Antebellum's
Hillary Scott is expecting.
Scott announced her
pregnancy Friday on

calling
the baby
"our
Christmas
gift." A
spokes-
woman
con-
Hillary firmed
Scott the news
and said
no other details were
available.
It's the first child for
the 26-year-old "Need
You Now" singer and her
husband, Chris Tyrrell.
It's also the first child for
the trio, which includes
Charles Kelley and Dave
Haywood.

Toni Braxton in
L.A. hospital
LOS ANGELES -
Singer Toni Braxton has
been hospitalized in Los
Angeles.
The
R&B per-
former
said in a
Tweet on
Friday
she's
been hos-
Toni pitalized
Braxton because
of "minor
health issues" related to
lupus. A spokeswoman
confirmed the hospital-
ization but had no other
details.
"But no worries!" Brax-
ton wrote to fans. "I will
be out any day now."
The 45-year-old singer
of "Un-break My Heart"
revealed two years ago she
has lupus, a potentially
deadly autoimmune dis-
ease that killed Braxton's
uncle. She also suffers
from a narrowing of the
blood vessels in her heart.
Braxton said in a re-
cent "20/20" interview
doctors told her the lupus
diagnosis meant her per-
forming career would
likely be diminished and
the disease helped push
her into a recent bank-
ruptcy

Senator to MTV:
Cancel'Buck Wild'
CHARLESTON, WVa.
- U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin
is asking MTV to cancel
the West Virginia-based
reality show "Buck Wild"
that's set to air next year
Manchin's office said
Friday he sent a letter to
the president of the net-
work saying the show
profits off "poor deci-
sions of our youth."
The senator also said
the show set to begin air-
ing Jan. 3 plays to ugly, in-
accurate stereotypes
about the people of his
home state.
The network ordered
12 episodes of the show
last fall, and a trailer
shows the cast drinking
and swearing, four-
wheeling and fighting,
even filling a dump truck
with water and using it as
a swimming pool. It was
shot in Sissonville and
Charleston.
MTV declined com-
ment Friday through a
spokeswoman.

-From wire reports


Master of his class


Associated Press
Novelist Stephen King gestures as he speaks to creative writing students Friday at the University of
Massachusetts-Lowell in Lowell, Mass.

Stephen King offers writing tips to Massachusetts students


Associated Press

LOWELL, Mass. Stephen King
loves scaring people, but one stu-
dent at University of Massachusetts
Lowell tried to find out Friday what
scares him.
"Spiders, snakes ... my mother-in-
law," the writer said with a grin.
The author of international best-
selling books including "Carrie"
and "The Shining" came to the col-
lege to talk with writing students.
English Department professor
Andre Dubus III, another best-
selling author and an old friend of
King's, shared the stage for about
an hour as students asked questions
about their craft.
King told the crowd of 125 stu-
dents that his goal is to write stories
that sizzle with emotion.
"I'm a confrontational writer," he
said. "I want to be in your face. I
want to get into your space. I want to
get within kissing distance, hugging
distance, choking distance, punch-
ing distance. Call it whatever you
want But I want your attention."
He got that Friday, plus some
laughs.
Wearing jeans and a black T-shirt,
the 65-year-old writer from Maine
peppered his talk with profanity
and promised students he was just
a regular guy He said they shouldn't
be in awe like he was when he was
a University of Maine freshman and
heard a talk from "Catch-22" author
Joseph Heller.
"It's not like being U2, you know
what I'm saying?" King said.


The author told students he
knows where he gets his writing
ideas about half the time, and his
fascination for horror stories didn't
come from childhood trauma.
During his lecture and in an in-
terview later, King also talked about
two books he's finished that will be
published in 2013. The author's
crime novel "Joyland" will be out in
paperback in July, followed in Sep-
tember by the book "Doctor Sleep,"
a sequel to his thriller "The Shin-
ing." The story is set in a New
Hampshire hospice, where now all-
grown-up character Danny Tor-
rance works.
King said he had reservations
about writing a sequel, but people
always wanted to know more about
the little boy from "The Shining."
"People used to ask me, years
later after 'The Shining,' what ever
happened to that kid? ... I'd say 'I
don't know' But it started to kind of
kick around in my brain, you
know?"
Because Torrance can read
minds, King said he was intrigued
by the idea of having the character
work in a hospice as someone who
helps people cross over from life to
death.
The author encouraged students
to be people-watchers and pick up
on traits that would let them create
their own characters.
King also warned them against
becoming discouraged about pub-
lishers' rejection slips and said not
to use notebooks for story ideas. He
said the stuff that's worth writing


stays in your head.
"My method for starting anything
is I tell myself the story when I'm
laying in bed at night, waiting to go
to sleep," King said.
The no-notebook idea made an
impression on sophomore Joshua
Beverage, who said later he'd give
the method a try The 19-year-old
creative writing major said he's
been reading King's stories and
seeing movies based on them since
he was 8.
"I never thought I'd actually be in
his presence. That was really big for
me," he said.
Sophomore literature major
Chelsea Graham said she was im-
pressed King said it should be up to
readers to decide what books are
important to them.
"I liked how he said it's a good
book when it sort of takes over your
life," the 19-year-old said.
Dubus, who joined King on an-
other UMass Lowell stage later Fri-
day for a talk before an audience of
3,000, said the earlier lecture meant
a lot.
"He gives these students the
sense that the university is impor-
tant, where they are is important,
what they're doing is significant,
and that they count," he said.
But for as much writing advice as
King shared with students, the hor-
ror master also left them with some
mystery
"I've always wondered who I am
when I write," King said, "because
once I'm doing it, I'm not in the
room with myself."


Wall Street Journal BEST-SELLERS


FICTION
1. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Third
Wheel" by Jeff Kinney (Amulet Books)
2. "The Black Box" by Michael Connelly
(Little, Brown)
3. "Notorious Nineteen: A Stephanie
Plum Novel" by Janet Evanovich (Bantam)
4. "Cold Days" by Jim Butcher (Roc)
5. "The Forgotten" by David Baldacci
(Grand Central Publishing)
6. "The Racketeer" by John Grisham
(Doubleday)
7. "Agenda 21" by Glenn Beck and Har-
riet Parke (Threshold Editions)
8. "Merry Christmas, Alex Cross" by
James Patterson (Little, Brown)
9. "The Last Man: A Novel" by Vince
Flynn (Atria/Emily Bestler Books)
10. "Heroes of Olympus: The Mark of
Athena" by Rick Riordan (Disney-Hyperion)
NONFICTION
1. "The Elf on the Shelf" by Carol V. Ae-
bersold, Chanda A. Bell (CCA&B)
2. "Killing Kennedy" by Bill O'Reilly, Mar-


Birthday In coming months, a number of unusual cir-
cumstances that will give you plenty of opportunities to add
to your holdings and resources are likely to develop. More
than a few of them will manifest in an unusual manner.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't be reluctant to let
your special needs be known to persons who truly love
you. They are just as interested in promoting your cause as
you are.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) One of your greatest abili-
ties is to be able to effectively deal with others. Your needs
will be met without you having to ask.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Certain interests that are
important to you will be advanced not only through your
own efforts, but through those of others as well. People will
help because they'll want to.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you have to make an im-
portant decision, choose a protracted approach that will


tin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)
3. "Barefoot Contessa Foolproof:
Recipes You Can Trust" by Ina Garten
(Clarkson Potter)
4. "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power"
by Jon Meachum (Random House)
5. "Killing Lincoln" by Bill O'Reilly, Martin
Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)
6. "Guinness World Records 2013" by
Guiness Book Records (Guiness Book
Records)
7. "LEGO Ninjago: Character Encyclo-
pedia" by DK Publishing (DK Publishing)
8. "Jesus Calling: Enjoying Peace in His
Presence" by Sarah Young (Integrity Pub-
lishers)
9. "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen with
Kevin Maurer (Dutton Books)
10. "The Virgin Diet" by JJ Virgin (Harle-
quin)
FICTION E-BOOKS
1. "The Black Box" by Michael Connelly
(Little, Brown)
2. "Cold Days" by Jim Butcher (Penguin


Today's HOROSCOPE

have staying power, instead of the option that is merely a
quick fix.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't hesitate to help unravel
a delicate matter for a friend if you believe you're able to do
so. However, once done, don't expect anything in return ex-
cept gratitude.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You might be dubious about
making a sensitive decision, because it's one where you'll
need to let your heart rule your head. You'll discover you
couldn't have made a wiser choice.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Sometimes it's advisable to
take a calculated risk when conditions warrant it, as long as
you don't go totally overboard. It may be one of those
times.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If someone with whom you
share a close, personal bond needs special attention, don't
leave his or her side, even if you're asked to join a group of


Group)
3. "Notorious Nineteen: A S
Plum Novel" by Janet Evanov
House)
4. "The Forgotten" by David
(Grand Central Publishing)
5. "The Racketeer" by John
(Doubleday)
6. "The Edge of Never" by J
ski (J.A. Redmerski)
NONFICTION E-B
1. "Proof of Heaven" by EbE
(Simon & Schuster)
2. "Team of Rivals" by Doris
Goodwin (Simon & Schuster)
3. "Killing Kennedy" by Bill
tin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)
4. "My Mother Was Nuts" b;
shall (New Harvest)
5. "Lincoln's Little Girl" by C
land (Cecelia Holland)
6. "Damaged" by Cathy Gla
Collins)


friends for a last minute get-together.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Because of some I
favorable shifts in conditions, a matter you the
be difficult to handle can be accomplished wi
ease. Relax and go for it.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Let the person y
how much you care with some kind of tangible
your affection. It doesn't have to be anything
just heartfelt.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) This is one of tho
you could reap extra benefits for your warm a
ate dealings with others. You don't have to dc
special or expensive, you just have to be kind
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -You could lear
you made a much better impression than you
someone whom you thought failed to notice y
soon have friends in high places.


tephanie
ich (Random

IBaldacci

Grisham

J.A. Redmer-

OOKS
en Alexander

Kearns


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7
Mega Money: 19 32 33 44
Mega Ball: 3
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 3 $2,555
3-of-4 MB 40 $420
3-of-4 800 $62.50
2-of-4 MB 1,190 $29
1-of-4 MB 10,836 $3
2-of-4 26,175 $2
Fantasy 5:6 9 18 21 24
5-of-5 3 winners $78,494.79
4-of-5 469 $80.50
3-of-5 12,194 $8.50
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6
Fantasy 5:2 11 24 30 31
5-of-5 1 winner $215,334.06
4-of-5 258 $134.50
3-of-5 8,644 $11.00

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 9,
the 344rd day of 2012. There
are 22 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 9, 1942, the Aram
Khachaturian ballet "Gayane,"
featuring the surging "Sabre
Dance," was first performed
by Russia's Kirov Ballet.
On this date:
In 1854, Alfred, Lord Ten-
nyson's famous poem, "The
Charge of the Light Brigade,"
was published in England.
In 1912, longtime House
Speaker Thomas "Tip" O'Neill
was born in Cambridge,
Mass.
In 1940, British troops
opened their first major offen-
sive in North Africa during
World War II.
In 1962, the Petrified For-
est in Arizona was desig-
nated a national park.
In 1982, special Watergate
prosecutor Leon Jaworski
died at his Wimberley, Texas,
ranch at age 77.
In 1984, the five-day-old
hijacking of a Kuwaiti jetliner
that claimed the lives of two
Americans ended as Iranian
security men seized control
of the plane, which was
parked at Tehran airport.
In 1987, the first Palestin-
ian intefadeh, or uprising,
began as riots broke out in
Gaza and spread to the West
Bank, triggering a strong Is-
raeli response.
In 1992, Britain's Prince
Charles and Princess Diana
announced their separation.
(The couple's divorce be-
came final Aug. 28, 1996.)
Ten years ago: Senate
Republican leader Trent Lott
apologized for remarks he'd
made praising the 1948 pres-
idential run of then-segrega-
tionist Strom Thurmond,
saying, "A poor choice of
words conveyed to some the
impression that I embraced
the discarded policies of the
past."


3'Reilly, Mar- Five years ago: Republi-
can presidential candidates
y Penny Mar- sought to embrace Hispanics
in a Spanish-language de-
bate in Coral Gables, Fla.
,ecelia Hol-
One year ago: The Euro-
s pean Union said 26 of its 27
member countries were open
to joining a new treaty tying
From wire reports their finances together to
solve the euro crisis; Britain
remained opposed.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Kirk Douglas is 96. Actor Dick
unexpected, Van Patten is 84. Actress
ought would Dame Judi Dench is 78.
th relative Actor Beau Bridges is 71.
Football Hall-of-Famer Dick
rou love know Butkus is 70. Former Sen.
e evidence of Thomas Daschle, D-S.D., is
extravagant, 65. World Golf Hall of Famer
Tom Kite is 63. Singer Donny
)se days when Osmond is 55.
and consider-
o anything Thought for Today: "Give
d. me the liberty to know, to
1 firsthand that utter, and to argue freely ac-
Srealized on cording to conscience, above
iou. You will all liberties." John Milton,
English poet (1608-1674).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Point and counterpoint: FINANCES





Facing the fiscal cliff


Issue looms over

US taxpayers
he election is over and
we are approaching a
looming "fiscal cliff."
Given the election was
roughly a draw, we see
Democrats and Republicans
once again painted into oppos-
ing corners. In the broadest
sense, the latest fights are about
tax and
spending
S* .. policies.
Demo-
crats
i want to
I save the
current
top 35
percent
marginal
John Read tax rates
GUEST f o r
COLUMNIST house-
holds
making
less than $250,000, allow Bush-
era tax cuts to expire Dec. 31,
and restore Clinton-era rates of
39.6 percent on the top 2 percent
of earners. Republicans want to
reduce or make the existing 35
percent rates permanent and
are pushing for capping unspec-
ified income tax deductions and
imposing spending cuts on so-
cial programs such as Medicare,
Medicaid and Social Security In
their view, to allow the 39.6 per-
cent rates to resume would dis-
courage "job creators" from
creating jobs because their tax
burden will be too high.
The latest budget dustup can
be traced to 2011's divisive and
nasty fight over approving the
federal budget and debt ceil-
ing, a standard and ongoing
commitment to repay money
that has been spent and is
owed to those who invest in
this country including our-
selves. To quickly bring down
the national debt and under in-
tensely aggressive pressure
from newly elected tea party
members, John Boehner, the
Speaker of the House of Rep-
resentatives, demanded tril-
lions in social spending cuts
while wanting to retain ex-
pired Bush-era rates for the
wealthy In other words, he and
the Republicans wanted to cut
from the middle class to pay for
a decade of financial industry
greed and mismanagement. In
contrast, President Obama and
Democrats preferred to gradu-
ally reduce spending while
preserving middle class tax


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FISCAL CLIFF SUMMARY
* Fiscal cliff wars: Democrats are demanding to raise revenue by boosting tax rates or
nation's highest earners. Republicans insist on eliminating deductions and other tax
instead. Which is better for the economy?
* On the one hand: Economists generally agree a simpler tax code with lower rates an
ductions, exemptions and credits would help the economy. With fewer tax preference
would be more likely to seek the best investments for their money instead of the mos
tax breaks. And lower rates would leave them more money to spend.
* On the other hand: Whether the higher tax rates President Barack Obama wants wou
economy more than curbing deductions, as Republicans assert, is less clear. Many ec
say it would depend on which deductions lawmakers curb.
NOT REACHING A DEAL
* Over the cliff: The dealmakers who warn a year-end plunge off the "fiscal cliff" the
increases in taxes and cuts in government spending scheduled for next year would
trous don't seem to be rushing to stop it.
* The why: Some lawmakers argue briefly going over the cliff is the best way to force a
compromise.
* The risk: The Congressional Budget Office predicts the fiscal cliff policies, if left unc
long after the new year, would spark a recession later in 2013 and send the unemplo:
above 9 percent by fall.


rates and let rates be raised
only on the wealthiest 2 per-
cent. Of course, this would not
solve all of our budget issues,
but it would be a start and en-
gender a greater sense of fair-
ness to those among the middle
class who are taking the reces-
sion the hardest. As a result of
conflict between the needs of
the middle class and poor who
depend on social programs to
live from day-to-day and
wealthy corporations and indi-
viduals allied with the tea
party, a stalemate was baked
into all negotiations.
Instead of hammering out
reasonable solutions to ad-
dress spending and revenues,


Congress formed what was
called a "Super Committee,"
consisting of six Democrats
and six Republicans. The
Super Committee was assigned
the Herculean task of coming
up with workable compromises
and solutions. And it proved to
be impossible. As a result noth-
ing was accomplished and the
fiscal can was kicked down the
road to Jan. 1, 2013.
Instead of sensible and work-
able solutions based on a real-
life grasp of how the vast federal
budget and an economy the size
of the United States actually
works, a risky and cheap gim-
mick called the "Budget Control
Act of 2011" was passed which


called for sequele
funds starting Jan.
questration" basi
any amount exc
budget limit is held
treasury and not t
the agencies speci
ing appropriation:
rally, anything short
already been allo
play havoc with oni
ment functions.
like that sort of thin
However, if
continue refusing
rates to increase
ers, then Presiden
sists he will hold


Dealing with the

debt and deficit

imagine this: You have just
maxed out your third credit
card. Still you want to buy
a new car or a big screen TV
you think you ought to have.
What is the next step? You
have choices.
Try to think of other ways to
prolong the final judgment.
Should
you step
back, sur-
4E 6RINI vey the
situation
N carefully
ORE. TAX... or try to
fool
someone
into help-
ing you
get that RobertHagaman
car or GUEST
TV? You
Tcn ud- COLUMNIST
can de-
clare
bankruptcy and let all your
n the friends pay the bill, thinking
breaks you have stuck your creditors
with the bill, or you can start
d fewer de- thinking responsibly and solve
s, people your financial dilemma hon-
st lucrative estly.
Our federal government has
put itself in your position and
onomisd hurt the is considering options to solve
onomits the problem. Although none of
the options being tossed
around will solve any of the fi-
nancial dilemmas, they keep
e automatic talking as if they know what
be disas- they are doing.
In the meantime, our na-
tional debt clock keeps on tick-
ing. At the same time, many of
checked too our citizens think it is not a se-
becked too
yment rate rious problem. For that reason,
as well as others, our govern-
ment leaders continue to ig-
Associated Press nore the seriousness of the
situation.
estration" of A great many citizens only
1, 2013. "Se- think about the world of "me."
call means If "me" has what "me" wants,
feeding the why worry about anything our
d back by the leaders do or don't do? Those
transferred to "me" people refuse to ac-
fied in exist- knowledge everything has a
s bills. Natu- price and someone always
rtofwhathad pays. There will come a time
cated would when our government can no
going govern- longer feed the "me" people,
Republicans because all of the resources
ng. will be exhausted. No more
Republicans credit, no more rich to tax
to allow tax and the middle class -
on top earn- certain politicians claim to
nt Obama in- protect has become totally
Congress to impoverished.


See Page C3


Page CS


Not addressing issues


sometimes backfires


M y father, who was one of
nine children in a farm-
ing family during the
Great Depression, is a great sto-
ryteller. A favorite of mine is a
tale he recounts about one of the
many scars he wears on his .
hands.
He was tinkering with some
piece of equipment on his Illi-
nois farm when his hand was Mike
caught in the machine and sliced PE
to the bone. Back then, families A
didn't have a budget for doctors A
or health care. My father, wor-
ried he'd be in Dutch with my grandfather
because he couldn't do his chores, wrapped
his bloody hand in a rag and kept it in his
pocket for the next two weeks until it
healed. Not a single chore was missed.
I always admired his work ethic and am
thankful this apple didn't fall too far from
the tree.
But as I've come to learn, there are al-
ways two sides to every story What would
have happened if my father's hand had be-
come infected? The damage to him and the
family would have been much greater than
if he'd just told someone. I am sure each of
us can think of a time we ignored a small
problem that eventually grew into a
disaster.
Two weeks ago, county government
learned that lesson the hard way
Duke Energy, convinced it has been over-
paying its taxes through the years, paid
roughly $19 million in taxes, which is about
$16 million less than what Property Ap-
praiser Geoff Greene believes is owed


I
A


based on his office's assessment
Duke and the property appraiser
differ on several items, including
the process of assessment and
what should be assessed.
In my mind and the minds of
county leaders, Duke Energy
mishandled the situation, be-
cause it circumvented the value
adjustment appeal process and
Arnold purposely waited until the tax
I TO roll had been certified before
sending a partial payment of its
ER tax liability. This essentially
placed the county, the school dis-
trict, the cities, the libraries and the sheriff
in an emergency budget situation.
That said, county leaders deserve the
blame for keeping their economic prob-
lems tightly wrapped up and tucked away
while hoping they may never see the light
of day But it's unfair to lay all the blame on
the current county commission, or at the
feet of Greene. This problem's been fester-
ing for years.
Since then-Property Appraiser Ron
Schultz's 1998 legal victory over Florida
Power allowed him to tax pollution control
equipment, we've known of the potential
pitfalls of relying on extra revenue without
a firm agreement or larger test of the cir-
cuit court decision. Once Progress Energy
was forced to add another $1.4 billion in
pollution control devices in 2009, the red
flags should have been noticed. No busi-
ness is going to continue to indiscrimi-
nately submit to higher property values


Page C3


Plenty of positives in county

been dampened some- ues to go down and more people
what in Citrus County continue to go back to work.
after our local governments re- Walmart is about to open its sec-
ceived the troubling news ond store in a year. Sibex in
Progress Energy wasn't going to Crystal River has received new
pay its full tax bill. contracts and is expanding its
Progress is the largest tax- workforce. Nurses and assis-
payer in the county and the $16 tants are needed at both county
million difference in what they hospitals and at many of the
paid and what Property Ap- Gerry Mulligan rehab facilities in the county.
praiser Geoff Greene said they OUT THE Jobs are available. Many of
owed is a big deal. the employers are expecting
How big of a deal, you ask? WINDOW employees to come with train-
Well, the county school board ing and skills, but there are
immediately stopped paying for non-es- opportunities.
sential bus transportation, which resulted U Real estate is beginning to make a
in the Citrus High School Marching Band comeback. New homes are under con-
not being able to show up at last weekend's struction in Citrus Hills. Existing home
Christmas parade in Beverly Hills. sales have climbed in specific parts of Cit-
No bands in the Christmas parade? Re- rus County. Real estate agents report they
ally? are very busy
While the Progress Energy/Duke crisis An interesting change is more homes
is real, it is important not to lose sight of have become rentals, but the inventory is
the fact that many good things are hap- beginning to move again and that's a good
opening in our community. Personally, I be- sign for the economy
lieve the problem with our largest U New businesses are eyeing the county
employer/taxpayer will be worked out be- again. The intersection of County Road
fore we get involved in some huge lawsuit. 491 and County Road 486 where the new
But if you look at some other things Walmart is set to open in January is
going on in our community, you will see being primed for new development. Plans
lots of positives. are being developed along State Road 44
Citrus Memorial Hospital appears to west of Inverness for new opportunity.
be working through its governance prob- Publix is building a new store in Inver-
lems. The county's Inverness-based public ness. More retail means more opportunity
hospital has a new governing board and and additional jobs.
fewer meetings with attorneys. After U Plans continue for the construction of
spending millions of dollars on legal fees the first YMCA in Citrus County. The cap-
to fight a politically inspired battle, the ital campaign is beginning and the do-
governing board is using good old common nated site on C.R. 486 is ready to go.
sense to find a resolution. That's good for U Under the leadership of Kings Bay
everyone involved.
Jobs are available in Citrus County. See Page C3


I







Page C2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9,2012



PINION


"One must choose in life, between
making money and spending it.
There's no time to do both."
Edouard Bourdet, 1934


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ................... .................... publisher
M ike Arnold ................................................ editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz.................. ...................citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ............. ................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..............................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ .................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TOUGH TALK





Tax issue




response




appropriate

Progress Energy's refusal term funding for these services
to pay its full assessed that would not fluctuate with
taxes put the county in ad valorem tax rates.
an immediate cash flow bind. These are prudent actions,
With the fiscal given the tough
year under way THE ISSUE: stance regarding
and tax assess- property taxes
ments certified, County faces taken by Progress
there was no op- budget shortfall due Energy's new
portunity to adjust to tax issue. owner, Duke En-
millage rates to ergy, the certainty
provide funding OUR OPINION: of the two oldest
for the budget al- coal units at the
ready in effect. Commission is Crystal River site
The only realistic making responsible will be retired in
option for the decisions, the next few
county was to years, and the
amend the budget to adjust for continuing uncertainty of
the lower expected revenue, whether the nuclear unit will
In its Dec. 4 meeting, the be repaired or retired. All of
commission approved budget this can impact the level of fu-
revisions, including fund trans- ture county ad valorem taxes.
fers, spending reductions and While the county has been
curtailing some planned ex- prudent in its immediate ac-
penditures. Through these tions on the budget shortfall,
measures, it balanced the we believe the decision to cut
budget without taking harsher funding to Whispering Pines
measures of closing facilities Park in Inverness for this fiscal
or announcing layoffs. year was a mistake. By not pay-
However, some measures are ing the county share this year,
not sustainable over the long the county is asking the much
term, such as not making vehi- smaller city of Inverness to pick
cle purchases, making fund up all the funding for the park
transfers at a level that cannot that is available to and used by
be maintained over time and city and county residents.
restricting capital improve- Although we are encouraged
ments. For this reason, the Chairman Joe Meek has pub-
commission termed the Dec. 4 licly committed to working
decisions Phase 1, while com- with Crystal River and Inver-
mitting to Phase 2 planning for ness, and in particular to work-
how to deal with potential ing toward a long-term
shortfalls in future budgets. agreement on Whispering
In January, the commission Pines, abruptly cutting funding
will begin developing the from the county budget was not
budget for funding county busi- a positive step in this direction.
ness during the next fiscal year Despite our difference with
that begins in July. As part of the Whispering Pines decision,
this process, commissioners we believe, on balance, the
are planning to examine how county has acted responsibly in
they raise and spend money dealing with a difficult situation.
and take a serious look at cre- We also urge Duke to pay this
ating new Municipal Services year's taxes and for Duke and
Taxing Units (MSTUs) and Mu- the tax assessor to work to es-
nicipal Services Benefits Units tablish a valuation formula for
(MSBUs). These new struc- the plant that is agreeable and
tures would be aimed at as- fair to both parties, and do this
signing costs to the users of without the expense and time
services and stabilizing long- delay of protracted litigation.


True dog repellent
This message is for Cathy Reid,
the lady who's having the
dog problems. A while
ago, we had a situation 0
with dogs defecating on
our lawn. I know it's not
any comparison to what
you're facing. However,
we used cayenne pepper f
and we sprinkled it all
over the yard. And ever
since then, the dogs CA
never came back and C
avoid our yard entirely. So 563-
maybe if you put cayenne
pepper on the perimeter
of your farm that may help you.
Good luck and I'm so sorry to
hear about your poor animals.
Respect for flag
To the Sound Off (about) the
person (who) wrote in "Respect
the flag:" I've called in over the
past couple of years the same in-
formation, how many neighbors
here don't light their flags at
night, which is a requirement, it's
a courtesy. If you're going to leave


I
-C


your flag flying all night long, you
need to spotlight it. Otherwise
when the sun sets, you're sup-
posed to take it down. A
JND lot of them are tattered
and ripped here in the
Neighborhood and every-
body thinks they're a
great citizen because
they've got pieces of flag
hanging up. But every
time I've submitted this
to Sound Off, they've
never printed it. So I
)579 don't know if they're for
or against it or not, but I
would think they'd be all
positive in helping us get rid of
the tattered flags and showing the
respect to the flag if it's flying,
even at night.
Thanks for kindness
I want to thank all of my good
friends for their kindness, friend-
ship, Beth and Karen, Mr. Tom,
Joyce, Heinz Funeral Home.
Thanks from my sons and mom.
God bless all for their care. Thank
you.


Fiscal transparency in Florida


BARBARA PETERSEN
AND DAN KRASSNER
Guest Columnists
D during his tenure as
Florida Senate President,
Mike Haridopolos con-
tracted with Spider Data Services
to develop an unprecedented
budget-tracking system at a cost of
nearly $5 million. That system,
Transparency 2.0, is now fully de-
veloped and ready for use, but re-
cent news reports suggest Florida
lawmakers may well walk away,
shelving the program.
For reasons not entirely clear,
the state Senate handed manage-
ment of the program to the gover-
nor's office during the summer,
but Gov Rick Scott does not ap-
pear to be ready or willing to take
ownership of Transparency 2.0,
and has yet to sign an agreement
with the Senate transferring the
contractual obligations to the ex-
ecutive branch. The contract with
Spider Data Services runs
through the end of this year That
means if action is not taken be-
fore Dec. 31 to renew the con-
tract, it will expire without the
program ever being launched,
leaving Floridians in the dark
and $5 million poorer
With the support and encour-
agement of Gov Scott's staff and
Senate President Don Gaetz, we
met with Spider Data Services.
We were provided user names
and passwords and allowed un-
fettered access to the Trans-
parency 2.0 website. After a
thorough assessment of the sys-
tem's capabilities, we then com-
pared Transparency 2.0 to those
of the two transparency websites
up and running Transparency
Florida.gov, created two years
ago by the Florida Legislature,
and MyFloridaCFO.com/
Transparency and its sister web-
site https://facts.fldfs.com, both
created and maintained by Chief
Financial Officer Jeff Atwater


Based on our comparison of the
features and data sources of the
three websites, it is our conclu-
sion Florida would save millions
of dollars and receive an A grade
for public access to government
spending and financial informa-
tion on national report cards that
track budget transparency sites if
Transparency 2.0 is allowed to
launch.
According to Spider Data Sys-
tem's website, Transparency 2.0
is intended as "a single source of
information" that will serve both
"as a portal to raise awareness of
how government is organized,"
and a source for specific finan-
cial information on government
programs, functions and person-
nel "critical to successful gover-
nance and operations."
On a more practical level,
Floridians who want simple an-
swers to questions such as
"where did federal stimulus dol-
lars go in Florida?" or "how
much is invested in programs for
veterans?" would find answers
easily and quickly on the Trans-
parency 2.0 website. While the
cost of site maintenance has been
raised as an issue, many other
states have demonstrated signifi-
cant cost savings in the use of
sites with greater than the esti-
mated annual maintenance costs
of Transparency 2.0. Questions
have also been raised about the
procurement process for Spider
Data Services, which is ironic
since the Transparency 2.0 web-
site, which offers the most de-
tailed and comprehensive history
of every state vendor contract
available, would provide com-
plete transparency on any such
proposals.
The Transparency 2.0 website,
if made public, would put state
government contracts, spending,
government employee salaries
and agency budgets online for all
Floridians to read in plain lan-
guage and in one place. Budget


transparency reform through the
launch of Transparency 2.0
would place a significant spot-
light on how Florida government
awards state contracts to outside
businesses, making the procure-
ment process more transparent
- and accessible for Florida
citizens. Our government will be
able to live within its means and
balance the state budget, with a
clear view of the source of every
dollar in the budget and where
and why it is spent.
The only way for citizens to get
the biggest bang for their tax-
payer bucks is to give them the
tools to easily see and track
where their money goes, in and
out of state government, to un-
derstand how government spends
their money and why With Trans-
parency 2.0, our leaders and our
citizens will have access to vitally
important budget information at
their fingertips, information al-
lowing government to be more ef-
ficient and our citizens more
informed.
The First Amendment Founda-
tion and Integrity Florida strongly
recommend the governor and our
legislative leaders take steps nec-
essary to provide a globally com-
petitive level of budget
transparency and public access to
information through the public
launch of Transparency 2.0.
--In--
Barbara A Petersen is president
of the FirstAmendment Founda-
tion, an organization that acts as
an advocate for open govern-
ment, knowinggovernment open-
ness and transparency is critical
to citizen trust and involvement
in our democratic society
Dan Krassneris the executive
director of Integrity Florida, a
nonpartisan, nonprofit research
institute and government watch-
dog whose mission is to promote
integrity in government and ex-
pose public corruption.


eMY riPRiNKS Al i.iNIeP To AIldfR FATAWlY..


SLETTERS to the Editor


I'll agree, if you agree
The following letter was sent
to Senator Rubio & Rep. Nugent
on Nov 26. 2012
To my elected legislators,
Short and sweet.
I will agree to increase the in-
come tax rates for all the peo-
ple, across the board, who file
returns when everyone, includ-
ing the 47 percent, pays income
tax.
This is a very fair statement.
We are all in this together and
we should all share the burden
together Everyone (who) has an
income should pay an income
tax, regardless how small it may
be.
Remember the words ofJFK
in context.
'Ask not what your country
can do for you Ask what you
can do for your country"
Wiser words have never been
spoken.
Be open and responsible and
tell the people the truth about
the changes in the tax rates and
tables that are a part of Oba-
macare. Which deductions will
be changed and which taxes will
be added? Which thresholds will
change for the tax rates to be
calculated?
The discussion about taxing


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
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and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
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limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

the rich is nothing more than a
diversion to steer the people
away from the unpopular and
destructive tax increases they
are going to receive. Let's make
a big fuss about taxing the rich


while we slip in the tax in-
creases, the people will never
know what hit them until it is too
late.
I think I can see through the
ruse and I am extremely disap-
pointed in the Obama plan to
stick it to all of us.
At this time of trouble and
debt, no one should get or be
asking for a free ride. Congress
should be spending their time on
getting people back to work.
You should stop borrowing $60
billion every week and you
should get a balanced budget
and stick to it
Alfred E. Mason
Crystal River

Thanks for coverage
On behalf of the board of di-
rectors and members of the New
Jersey and Friends Club of Cit-
rus County, I would like to thank
the management and staff of the
Citrus County Chronicle and its
subsidiaries for the extraordi-
nary coverage for our activities
during the past year We really
appreciate your support. Thank
you very much.
Ernie Polk, publicity
NJ and Friends Club of
Citrus County


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hindsight is 20-20


It is the time of
the year when
a bowl of chili
can go down oh so
good the time *
when cool morn-
ings last until after
lunchtime.
I made a pot of
chili a few days
ago. Cheryl and I Fred B1
enjoyed it very A SL
much, but I must OF L
confess I took a
shortcut. Instead
of putting together the right
mixture of beef, beans,
chopped tomatoes, tomato
sauce, chili powder, other sea-
sonings and peppers of all
sorts, I simply bought a can of
a famous maker's canned con-
coction, put it into a crock pot
and added some beef and
some beans. Then, four hours
later, voila! Chili!
As most of you know, a half-
century ago, I found a job
working in a bank and man-
aged to milk it into a long-term
career. But before that, I was a
cook... the family cook.
Strange, but to me it never
seemed like a chore. Both of
our parents worked and by the
time he was 13, my older
brother William had an after-
school job. I was only 10 years
old, but it just sort of came nat-
urally for me to cook. After I
came in from school each day,
I'd prepare supper and have it



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Rotarian Art Jones, the com-
munity and local government
are finally getting on board
with the effort to clean up
King's Bay Jones' "One Rake
at a Time" effort brings volun-
teers in to clear away the
weeds choking off the oxygen
and creating barriers to the
natural plants needed in the
bay
Now, local and state govern-
ments have stepped up to pro-
vide cash and resources to
support Jones and his effort.
For the first time in decades,
progress is being made. Jones
has made it popular to protect
the environment.


READ
Continued from Page C1

all of the provisions of the
Budget Control Act and allow
Bush-era tax cuts to expire.
Because he ran his campaign
on this pledge and won the
election with it- he intends to
stick to it. Otherwise, he will
be seen as caving to Republi-
cans, which will greatly dam-
age his credibility during the
next four years.
Unfortunately, Republicans
have their own credibility
challenges, mostly with their
well-heeled supporters and
the more truculent and pro-
saic tea party As a result of
their positions, they cannot be
seen as giving in on cutting
spending or protecting the in-
terests of the wealthy They are
further hamstrung by having
signed a no-new-taxes-under-
any-circumstances document
called the "Taxpayer Protec-
tion Pledge" with Grover
Norquist and his "Americans
for Tax Reform" interest
group. The ostensible threat to
incumbents is, if they violate
their sacred pledge to Mr.
Norquist, they will be chal-
lenged in their next election
cycle by an even more extreme
tea party that will be more
than willing to insist on the no
increased tax dogma no
matter what harm they may in-


r
Ll
L


flict on our country
Finally, if no deal is struck
and sequestration is allowed
to go forward, what can we
look forward to?
First, financial markets may
tank and become very unsta-
ble as investors lose even more
confidence in our economy If
the job creators are nervous
about hiring new workers now,
just wait until they get a taste
of these crazy policies.
It is no secret to get the
economy back into shape, we
need millions of more jobs so
people can start spending
again, given 70 percent of the
economy is driven by con-
sumer spending. If millions
more are thrown out of work
as a result of this avoidable fi-
asco, then the economy may
not get on track for months or
years as credit dries up be-
cause banks will hold onto
their reserves even more
tightly than they are now.
Also, don't forget the income
and Social Security tax cuts
that have been in place since
2011 will expire, and the aver-
age four-person household can
anticipate paying an extra
$2,200 in taxes in 2013. Addi-
tionally, the "alternative mini-
mum tax" will return and will
raise taxes on more than half
of all married couples with
two or more children. Spend-
ing by those in the middle
class who are employed will
be curtailed due to the in-


on the table for the
other family mem-
S bers when they got
home.
My mother was a
good cook, a very
good cook, and I
learned from her;
also, I was never
shy about trying
annen changes to recipes
ICE until I got 'em the
IFE way I wanted them.
Sometimes it drove
my guinea pigs
nuts, but it worked for me.
My Cheryl remains the most
lovely person I've ever known,
but when we were first mar-
ried, she couldn't cook. Oh, she
could scramble an egg, heat up
canned soup, put together a
reasonably good meat loaf and
make some edible spaghetti,
but that was about it. I don't
know who coined the phrase
"you can't live on love alone,"
but it's true, you can't not in-
definitely. So, after a few
weeks of married life, I began
to teach my wife how to cook.
Nowadays, I like her cooking
better than anyone I know;
that is, except my own.
Back to chili.
As Cheryl and I were having
our recent lunch of chili, a
thought crossed my mind, a
memory popped up from 30 or
more years ago.
At that time, we were a fam-
ily of five and feeding us was an


Crystal River is moving
forward with improvement
plans, including the construc-
tion of the Riverwalk project
along King's Bay The effort
will bring more tourists to the
area and help improve the
local economy
The state's recent pur-
chase of the construction land-
fill on C.R. 486 near
Meadowcrest is a clear signal
the state of Florida is going to
proceed with plans to build
the Suncoast Parkway through
Citrus County The state is ne-
gotiating to purchase property
along the route of the parkway
The Three Sisters Springs
purchase is complete and the
feds are now fine-tuning plans
to establish a welcome center
and bring new tourists to the
region.


creased insecurity and higher
taxes. Perversely, emergency
unemployment benefits will
end for millions of the unem-
ployed just when they will
need it most as jobs start to dry
up again.
In all, a total of $984 billion
in defense and non-defense
cuts will go into effect during
the next several months, im-
pacting many necessary mili-
tary and non-military
expenditures.
If no realistic accommoda-
tion is achieved before the end
of the year, then things will take
their course and we will see
what the "law of unintended
consequences" has in store for
us. And all this because the 1
percent of the wealthiest insist
on keeping their windfall tax
cuts. The reality of our situa-
tion is we will soon need to
raise taxes and reduce spend-
ing to rein in our debt and
deficits there is no one an-
swer -we just need to be very
careful about what we do.
And there's the rub. No one
is willing to give in, even a lit-
tle. Remember, as Winston
Churchill once said "... gentle-
men, we have run out of
money. Now we have to start
thinking."


John Read is the assistant
public information officer for
the Citrus County Democratic
Executive Committee.


ongoing, formidable financial
challenge. Cheryl was working
outside the home those days
and much of the time, I pre-
pared the evening meal. This
meant most of the time I did the
grocery shopping, clipped
coupons and searched for any
savings I could find. Chili was
inexpensive to make and it
pleased the kids.
I thought back on Beth,
Becky and Fred 3 eating chili.
It was an experience just to
watch them. They all loved it,
but each of them loved it in a
different way Beth simply ate
the chili with an ample portion
of crackers. But Becky sat in
front of her bowl and ate
around the beans, eating noth-
ing but the meat and the sauce
and eventually leaving a bowl
of extraordinarily clean beans.
Fred 3 methodically addressed
his bowl by using a fork to pick
out and eat all of the beans,
then he'd use a spoon to sepa-
rate and eat the sauce, leaving
a bowl with nothing but amaz-
ingly clean meat
Too bad I didn't see it as
clearly while it was happening
as I did in my recent memory
- there was money to be
saved in this situation and I
missed my chance!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


The College of Central
Florida (once known as CFCC)
continues to expand in
Lecanto and is offering new
classes to help residents ex-
pand their skills and improve
job opportunities. We have a
real college campus in
Lecanto and Dr. Vernon
Lawter is doing a great job of
working with the community
to grow opportunities.
The Progress Energy issue
may be a major distraction
right now, but let's not over-
look the positive things hap-
pening in Citrus County



Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


Confused about gas tax
In Wednesday morning's paper
(Dec. 5) under "Shortfall burden
slightly lifted," it said there was a
shortfall for road resurfacing. I
thought that's why you were gouging
us with the extra gas tax for the road
resurfacing. Now, you're talking about
something else. What is it really?
Sheriff's budget inflated
Our county is in financial trouble be-
cause of Duke Energy. We can correct
this problem by reducing the budget
of Sheriff (Jeff) Dawsy. His budget's
inflated and needs to be reduced. We
need to close some fire stations any-
way. He's got too many open with too
many people on staff. Volunteers were
fine before, be fine now. (We) didn't
have a problem in the past. If prob-
lems arise, then we'll take care of it.
But as of now, Sheriff Dawsy's budget
is way inflated, way out of line.
Squandered millions
Citrus County officials seem to think
it's Progress Energy's responsibility to
support them. It's not its fault the
county has squandered millions and
millions from the windfall of having a
large utility in their county. Where did
all the millions go? Citrus County sure
didn't spend it on improvements such
as sewer, water and sidewalks.
Cut volunteer pay
With the county in crisis right now
with the plant not paying their taxes,
I'm reading they may have to cut fire
and police protection. I'm a former



PAPER
Continued from Page C1

based on a single circuit court decision
when no other county in the state is re-
ceiving those tax revenues.
County leaders know there is a real
possibility of CR 3 never getting back on-
line and CR 1 and 2 being taken offline
in the near future. These changes mean
we will continue to see shrinking tax
revenues from the power plant facility
To that point and the point the county
needs to seriously explore diversifying
its economic base, County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek this week unveiled
his six-point plan for the coming year.
No. 6 on his priority list is to continue
enhancing economic development ini-
tiatives for the county. Several other
points in Meek's plan address the econ-
omy While it is not government's job to
provide jobs, his plan lays the ground-
work for encouraging companies to
bring their business to our county



HAGAMAN
Continued from Page C1

What happens next? Believe it or
not, the "me" people will attack those
of us who may have a few pennies left.
Read the news about what's happen-
ing in Greece.
The dominant solution being pro-
moted at this time is to tax the rich.
Every analysis of this proposal has in-
dicated the proposed increase will
fund our bloated government for eight
days. Actually, if the government were
to take all of the wealth of the so-called
rich who do not pay their fair share, it
would only take care of the bills for a
few days. Even those politicians who
favor such action know this, but they
will feel better knowing their attack on
the wealthy will make some of our less
fortunate love them more. Those who
love the idea are oblivious to the fact
this is not a valid solution.
Those same people who get satisfac-
tion demeaning the wealthy most of
them are wealthy themselves have
shown no interest in tackling our real
problems. They cannot get the idea of a
new car or big screen TV out of their
head long enough to look at the debt
problem. Our president has even
started talking about the deficit, making
people think he is referring to the debt.
There is a big difference. Debt is what
is owed. Deficit is what is spent beyond
the ability to pay In one's personal life,
it becomes obvious soon when debt is ig-
nored while deficit continues. It does
not take long before the deficit ends and
the debt must be resolved somehow.


Hot Corner: BUDGET


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 C3


firefighter from Long Island, which re-
ceived no pay at all and was a volun-
teer firefighter. What you need to do is
cut the volunteer pay completely. If
they're true volunteers, they'll continue
volunteer firefighting until this prob-
lem is (resolved). The county will save
thousands of dollars if you cut the vol-
unteer pay right now.
Can't tax filters
If Progress Energy has to pay the
extra tax on their filter equipment,
where do you think the extra money will
come from? Why, of course, from the
electric customers. So that unfair tax
will only put an extra tax on the con-
sumer taxpayer. Equipment to clean
the smoke and acid rain is not some-
thing that earns money for Progress
Energy. So how can you tax it? Taxing a
filter system is a no-brainer.
Hope this kills port idea
We are very happy the tax revenue
coming into the county is being cut
drastically. Maybe this will be enough
to stop the Port Citrus project. The
only ones who want this project are a
few special interest groups and the
Citrus County commissioners. The tax-
payers of Citrus County are against
Port Citrus.
Stop spending and taxing
Here's a message for Joe Meek and
the rest of the commissioners: Cut
your budgets. You need to quit spend-
ing. That's my message to all the gov-
ernment. Spending is out of control.
Quit trying to just spend and tax,
spend and tax...


To the more immediate problem,
commissioners adopted Phase I of
their budget cuts, which include freez-
ing vehicle purchases, freezing hiring
of vacant positions, implementing a
one-time profit transfer from solid
waste/utilities, utilizing library serv-
ices reserves and delaying funding of
Whispering Pines Park.
In January, commissioners and
county administrative staff will begin
work on Phase II. A portion of Phase II
involves plans to generate additional
revenue through user fees, MSBUs
and MSTUs.
Regardless of what measures are
taken, expect some bumps, bruises
and scars along the way After all,
we've hidden our cut, bloodied hand in
our pocket for far too long and it's
starting to fester


Mike Arnold is the editor of the
Citrus County Chronicle. He can be
reached at mamold@chronicle
online.com.

Since our president has indicated
he and his fellow elected and ap-
pointed cohorts have no idea how to
solve the problem, he has asked the
general public to help. At the same
time, he is throwing out the suggestion
the wealthy are to be attacked to make
the rest of us feel better
It is really time for the conversation
to return to solving the problem of
spending more than our country can
afford. If an honest approach were to
be taken to solving the spending prob-
lem, then a surtax, strictly for the pur-
pose of lowering our debt, would be in
order. I see little chance of that ever
happening since our politicians are
more interested in getting re-elected.
Even our president, who under cur-
rent law cannot be re-elected, is still
on his favorite mission: campaigning.
Congress and our president have
had more than a year to solve the so-
called fiscal cliff without even looking
for a solution. What would make any-
one think an issue so serious can now
be solved in less than a month? Very
likely, come January, the debt ceiling
will again be raised and a new plan to
solve the problem will be presented to
take effect in 2015. Even though liberal
economists believe debt is no problem,
it really cannot continue to grow in-
definitely
An ever increasing national debt is
the problem and a resolve to reduce it
is mandatory


Robert E. Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman. He
resides in Homosassa.


Heanvhi, atthe6a oeR f F sDcaT CIR





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letter to THE EDITOR


Unions no longer
relevant
The editorial cartoon en-
titled "Twinkietoes" de-
picted a guy labeled
"Unions" had shot himself
in the foot, obvious refer-
ence to Hostess Bakery and
how union employees shot
themselves in the foot.
In the early years unions
were vital, but over the
decades, they've more than
outlived their usefulness. I
got out of the U.S. Air Force
in 1961 and worked in a
Ford warehouse awaiting
college. The union was
going to strike and the day
before the walkout was a
carnival atmosphere. They
were talking about axe han-
dles, smashing car win-
dows and busting knees.
1971- I bought my su-
perspeedway race car and
entered in a hotrod show.
We had a Hawaiian scene
around the car and plugged
in a small portable tape
player It was beautiful,
then the music stopped!
Some guy unplugged the
cord! I asked what he was
doing and he said this was-
n't safe, because it wasn't
plugged in a union electri-
cian. I asked if he was
union. He said he was. So I
told him to plug it back in
- safely He said I had to
get a work order and pay
$40! I told him to kiss my...
donkey and stuck batteries
in the player


1978 I was an execu-
tive making about $500 a
week and my brother-in-
law, a union electrician,
was making $25 an hour.
He made as much by
lunchtime Wednesday
stringing wire as I did all
week managing several de-
partments and dozens of
people. Naturally, he got
time and a half for over-


h---

- .
1 .1 *


DDN, OB,., I,,, ,,,
DIDN'T WINUIAWliUjC



j- ,/__ ,


time, double time for Satur-
day and triple time for Sun-
day, which meant he got
$75 an hour for stringing
wire in 1978 when gas was
a buck a gallon or less and
a suburban home cost
$30,000 to $40,000.
Early 1980's I was at a
barbecue at the home of an
air traffic controller. The
following day, his union


(PATCO) was going to strike
control towers across
America, despite a no-
strike clause in its contract.
I pointed out he had a re-
ally nice house in an up-
scale suburb and was
making more money than
anyone else in his high
school class; he had no col-
lege, but made more than
most college grads. I told


him Reagan was going to
fire them if they went on
strike. He laughed and said
Reagan wouldn't dare. He
didn't show up for work the
next day and along with
thousands, found himself
out of work. They never got
back to where they once
were.
Airline mechanics struck
Eastern Airlines in the late


-1*~y


"\


~Jli
-'I
-j.


" ( .


:.-0 -/4,.-_-, ,-A A 6 J 3-0 i
Citrus Springs Civic Association ..
: i Annual
Christmas
Parade


Santa Clau Is


Sunday,
-" December 16th-4

i Coming to Town! ,


This free event to the community begins at the
-= fountain at Citrus Springs Blvd and S.R. 41
- Accepting floats and marchers of all kinds:
baby, family and businesses

Participants in parade: line up at 1pm
Parade starts at 2pm "

Please Mail registration form to:
S Citrus Springs Civic Assn C/O Ann Ottavio -
10821 N. Dragonis Dr. Citrus Springs Fl 34433
For Info Call: 352 465 1191 or
email: lottavioadbellsouth.net
I i
SRegistration forms must
be received by: December 9

1 44.i




8th Annual
Crystal River Community
Holiday Boat Parade









Saturday, December 22nd
participants meet at Kings Bay at 4:45 pm
'arade starts promptly at 6:15pr

Decorate your boat in the theme of
"A Magical Christmas"
Watch the boat parade from any location on
Kings Bay to see Santa before he takes off on
his trip from the North Pole!
Prizes will be awarded for best themed boat and most lights
Call Capt. Suzie Martin at 352-586-8068
to pre-register and for more information.
C I.....U 7. UNE

www chroraclnline com


Homosassa Annual







December 15 6:00 PM
For Information:

Call Ricky-352-302-5779 or

The Freezer- 352-628-2452


December 15, 2012

Starts @ 6:00 PM
Begins at Marker 75 by Bird Island
Ends at the Magic Manatee
Captains meeting at The Freezer on December 12,2012 @ 6 PM
at The Freezer o Callc



OOODBR2


Tree of Reemmbrance
Place an ornament on a Tree of Remembrance
to honor or memorialize someone. f


December 9th
Holiday Prelude
Ft. Cooper Night of Lights
Silver Bells
December 12th
Hanukkah Celebration
December 14th
Adopt a Tree
December 15th
Homosassa Boat Parade
Toy Run
A Day at the Races
December 16th
The Joy of Christmas A Singing Celebration of Carols
Citrus Springs Christmas Parade
December 19th 24th & 26th
Celebration of Lights


POWELAWL


-----------


For more Letters
to the Editor, see
Pages A12 and A13

1980s. A TV reporter inter-
viewed a striking union
worker and asked what the
union was going to do since
Eastern had no more to
give and said they would go
under if the union didn't
come back to work. The
union worker said then
they win. The reporter re-
minded him if Eastern
went under, union workers
would be out of work. So
what, the union guy said,
they win. Winning by losing
your job, benefits, retire-
ment, the TV guy asked?
Yep, the union guy said,
then we win.
And now we have Host-
ess. The union was told
Hostess has nothing more
to give, but the union would
not listen. A great Ameri-
can icon is gone along with
some 18,000 jobs, benefits
and retirement packages,
but the union won. These
workers will get unemploy-
ment compensation for a
while, but these are differ-
ent times. Where will they
work now? Jobs are not
plentiful anymore, and my
guess is the Hostess work-
ers have certainly shot
themselves in the foot -
but they won.
Harry Cooper
Hernando


The Chronicle would like t

thank the community for1II;1: ~ l I

partneing wih us i makin


CitusCont abeutfu
place t live nd wor


C4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


COMMENTARY


A6

L1.











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
From left, a new Apple iPad is on display during an Apple event in San Francisco; a profile view of the new Microsoft Surface, a tablet
computer in Los Angeles; Barnes & Noble shows one of the two new Nook tablets the company is releasing in fall 2012.


Review: Three weather phone


apps for those on the go

ANICK JESDANUN
AP Technology Writer
CHARLESTON, WVa. For me, climate
change is a serious issue. No, I'm not refer-
ring to the debate over global warming. My
concerns are much simpler. I'm constantly
checking the weather for the hours and
days ahead because deciding to hike on a
rainy day or neglecting to dress warmly can i a mnon
put a damper on a vacation.
During recent travels, I tried several free [ ,
weather apps for the iPhone and Android
phones. (Versions for tablet computers are NWe"'"" e r
available, but I didn't testthose extensively) | Ir.,, '
I didn't try to determine which is more s',, ) g
accurate at predicting the weather They W
are all generally good, but not error-free. L.n:as.i
Rather, I evaluated each based on features a
and ease of use. Nlor ,,
The ones I tested operate similarly on
iPhones and Android phones, though there hi
are some differences in how information c"h., .
gets presented or accessed. Here's a look at
three apps I recommend:
The Weather Channel i
When you open this app, the home
screen presents you with current condi- ....
tions, including temperature, humidity,
wind, visibility, UV index (a gauge of the
strength of ultraviolet radiation) and dew
point (which I have yet to figure out a use Associated Press
for). You also get information on sunrise This screenshot shows WeatherBug's app
and sunset times. for mobile phone. The app shows a graphical
forecast for upcoming days, today plus five
See Page D4 days for Android and two for the iPhone.


Working to


close skills gap


after several months
of research, 10 pub-
lic forums, inter-
views with
business lead-
ers and a survey
of employers, it
probably comes
as no surprise
that, yes, there
are gaps some
would say /
chasms be-
tween the criti-
cal skills needed Laura
in some targeted WORK
industry sectors CONNE
and the qualifi-
cations of job
applicants and recent
graduates.
That understanding is
central to "Addressing the
Skills Gap," a report cap-
ping our multi-month, tri-
county skills gap initiative
and presented this week to
Workforce Connection's
board of directors.
But we knew that going
in. After all, when leaders
in workforce development,
economic development
and education have been
working together to trans-
form communities as long


and as collaboratively as
those in Citrus County and
elsewhere in our region
have, you tend to
get a feel for
these things.
And it didn't
feel very good.
Don't misun-
derstand. No one
is saying our
workforce is un-
skilled; just ap-
plicants' skills
Byrnes don't always
FORCE match up with
:CTION what's needed by
employers, right
here right now,
as well as what will be
needed by emerging indus-
tries down the road. There
are many reasons why this
may be the case. Whether
we chalk it up to advances
in technology or loss of en-
tire industries due to the re-
cession, whether by
progress or obsolescence,
the reality is, the needs of
businesses change. We've
got to keep up.
Across the country, an es-
timated 3 million jobs are

See Page D4


Two

pensions

not

allowed
Dear Bruce: I am re-
tired military and
contributed to So-
cial Security for more
than 22 years while on ac-
tive duty. After military re-
tirement, I was hired as
an employee of the state
of Illinois, which does not
contribute to the federal
Social Security system.
I have been told by the
state that by law, when I
retire I will lose part of my
federal Social Security,
because I am considered
a "double dipper" I do not
see why that is possible,
because these are two dif-
ferent pension retirement
systems. Can you explain
the origins of this situa-
tion and what, if anything,
I can do about it? WK,
via email
Dear WK: The origins
of your situation are rela-
tively simple to answer A
lot of people think one
pension from the govern-
ment should be enough.
That is why "double dip-
ping" has been looked
down upon and many
times eliminated.
Whether there is any type
of appeal available to you
is beyond my knowledge.
It seems to me if you
have paid into Social Se-
curity, as you have indi-
cated, you should be
eligible to receive benefits
without regard to what
else you are doing. It's
hard to rationalize why
you should not receive the
same benefits as your co-
workers, but if you're
looking for rationality and
fairness in law, you are
looking in the wrong
place.
I wish I could be of
more help, but all I can do
here is sympathize. Per-
haps my readers will have
something to share. I in-
vite them to comment.
Dear Bruce: Thank you
for a great column! I read
you every day in my email.
Just as an aside, my
brother and sister at-
tended your nursery
school!
I am writing because I
know you have a wide au-
dience and will be able to
reach a lot of people who
may find themselves in
the same situation as we
did. My husband retired
early in 2006. Since then,
he has done a good deal of
consulting work for his
former employer We have
maintained the health
coverage with the em-
ployer at our own ex-
pense.
He did not start collect-
ing Social Security until
this month. Starting last
year, we were inundated
with offers from every in-
surance company in
America, trying to get us
to sign up for their
Medicare supplements.
We contacted his em-
ployer and asked exactly
what needed to be done
regarding Medicare since
he would be turning 65 in
August. The woman we
talked to said since we
were already enrolled in
the health plan with the
company, we need do
nothing; it would all be
automatic. So we did
nothing.
In September, when his
doctor tried to get preap-
proval for a treatment, we
were told my husband was


Page D3


I


I
t










D2

SUNDAY


DECEMBER


9, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Scan .
this:
rSi r.*FB


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Parades mark beginning of holiday season


About 50 entrants partici-
pated in the Christmas in
the Hills parade on Satur-
day morning, Dec. 1, in Bev-
erly Hills. Trophies were
awarded for Best Float in
the following categories:
Youth: Cub Scout Pack
No. 975.
Business: Snow Produce.
Religious: Beverly Hills
Community Church and
Club-Central Ridge Rotary.
The winner of the $500
overall Best Float award was
the Beverly Hills Fishing
Club! Lecanto Middle School
entered its band and chorus
as well as the marching band
from Lecanto High School.
In addition to the parade,
more than 40 crafters pre-
sented their wares for the
start of the shopping season
and 75 cars participated in
the Classic Car Show. Thewinne
Dale McClellan presided Beverly
as grand marshal of the the almost
Crystal River Christmas pa- year wer
rade Saturday, Dec. 1 at 6 ald as w
p.m. down U.S. 19 south Mrs. Clau
from Citrus Avenue to Port Inverness
Paradise Road. Approxi- you by tl
mately 100 entries treated Chamber
the record crowds on the City of Ir
street to holiday music and sponsored
twinkling lights as they RexallDr
awaited Santa's arrival. The The
parade in Crystal River was awards f
brought to you by the Citrus both para
County Chamber of Com- day, Dec.
merce and the City of Crys- River M
tal River and was sponsored Bank and
this year by Sibex. Mall will
At noon on Saturday, Dec. nual awal
8, Patti Smith sat as grand Hours Mi
marshal of the Inverness 7 p.m. tha
Christmas parade. Joining is invited.


*r of the $500 overall best float prize in the Christmas in the Hills Parade was the
lls Fishing Club.


st 100 entries this
e Ronald McDon-
ell as Santa and
is. The parade in
; was brought to
he Citrus County
of Commerce, the
iverness and was
d this year by B&W
*ugs.
presentation of
or best floats in
des will be Thurs-
13, at the Crystal
all. Capital City
the Crystal River
co-sponsor the an-
rds Business After
xer from 5 p.m. to
t night The public


The judges for the Crystal River parade this year were (from
left) Commissioner Dennis Damato, Mrs. Damato and Leon
McClellan. The Chamber thanks them for their time.


Upcoming EVENTS
Dec. 13 Business After
Hours Parade Winners: 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at Crystal River Mall,
hosted by CRYSTAL RIVER MALL CITRUS C
and CAPITAL CITY BANK. Chamber of C
Jan. 10 Business After
Hours: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at CEDAR
CREEK LIVING FACILITY.
Jan. 11 January Chamber 4
members lunch: 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club. --l
Jan. 19 and 20 Florida CITRUS COUNT
Manatee Festival in Crystal Economic Developme
River. http://www.floridamanatee
festival.com.
Jan. 24 Business After mobile and regular
Hours: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at For a complete I
GRUMPY GATORS. and community a(
Remember, coupons and our website at ww
discounts also appear on the chambercom.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ... `h

Ed Wilsek
Specialty Gems, Crystal River.


COUNTY
Commerce


Y



ir website!
ist of Chamber
activities, visit
w.citruscounty


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


The men of Citrus
County who endured itchy
lips and donned hairy
faces during the past
month have brought
awareness to and funds for
men's health, specifically
prostate and testicular can-
cer initiatives. November
Citrus County is proud to
announce it has raised
more than $1,500 all
through the power of the
moustache.
November is the offi-
cial fundraising and
awareness campaign in
which male participants,
known as Mo Bros, start
the month of November
clean-shaven and grow a
moustache throughout
the month. This hairy rib-
bon is designed to spark
conversations about
men's health issues.
Women, or Mo Sistas, also
play an important role in
the movement, from regis-
tering a team of Mo-sup-
porters to raising
awareness and funds for
the cause.
The month began with
an official Shave-Off and
culminated with the very
successful Mo Show & Fi-
nale Party. Celebrity bar-
tenders at the party were
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher Gerry Mulli-
gan and Chamber Chat
Media Coordinator
Melissa Benefield. The
party also played host to
the Mo "Fashion" Show.
Mo Bro winners include:
John Mims (Best Mo),
Adnan Mohammadbhoy


aka Dr. Mo (Unique Mo),
Justin Nash (Lame Mo)
and Greg Wimer (Big
Mo).
Special thanks go to our
celebrity bartenders, all
the Mo Bros and Mo Sis-
tas who supported
November Citrus County,
Burkes of Ireland, those
who donated silent auc-
tion items (Burkes of Ire-
land, HPH Hospice,
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, Superior
Residences of Lecanto/
Sunflower Springs As-
sisted Living), Family
Headquarters Barber
Shop for doing the hot-
towel shaves, Carol Con-
diff at Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living for her
Mo clipping skills, Supe-
rior Residences of
Lecanto for our yummy
food and Flashpoint Neil
for great entertainment.
To learn more about
November Citrus County,
visit facebook.com/
MovemberCitrus. And if
you have an interest in get-
ting involved in Movember
Citrus County 2013, contact
Dorothy T Pernu, APR, at
352-634-1823 or
dorothypernu@hma.com.
The following organiza-
tions bring Movember in
Citrus County to our com-
munity: Agricultural Al-
liance of Citrus County,
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce and the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council.


APPLAUSE, APPLAUSE
for Chamber Golden

Fork award winners
congratulations to the winners in the Citrus
County Chronicle 2012 Golden ForkAwards.
Chamber members had an excellent showing
in almost every category. We applaud the
following Chamber members who received
acknowledgement in the categories listed:


Ale House/Port Hotel &
Marina: Honorable mention,
waterfront dining.
B & W Rexall Drugs: Winner,
breakfast, coffee shop,
diner, homestyle, omelet,
prime rib, salad, and sand-
wich; honorable mention,
ice cream and wings.
Beef 'O' Brady's Family
Sports Pub: Honorable men-
tion, sports bar and wings.
Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters:
Honorable mention, coffee
shop.
College of Central Florida:
Honorable mention, banquet
facility.
Charlie's Fish House: Win-
ner, fish; honorable mention,
seafood and waterfront dining.
Chefs of Napoli II: Honor-
able mention, Italian.
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club: Honorable mention,
banquet facility.
Cody's Original Road House:
Winner, bar and grill; honor-
able mention, prime rib, sal-
ads and steaks.
Crackers Bar & Grill: Winner,
seafood and waterfront dining.
Elegant Catering/B & W
Rexall: Winner, appetizer and


catering; honorable men-
tion, dessert and service.
El Ranchito: Winner, Mexican.
Fat Boy's Bar-B-Q: Honor-
able mention, barbecue.
Golden Corral: Winner,
buffet.
Havana House Cafe & Grill:
Winner, Cuban restaurant.
Ice Cream Dr.: Winner, ice
cream.
Joe's Deli: Winner, deli and
bagels; honorable mention,
sandwiches.
Joe's Family Restaurant:
Honorable mention, diner,
homestyle, omelet and Sun-
day brunch.
Lollygaggers Sports Pub &
Grill: Winner, sports bar;
honorable mention, cold
beer.
Plantation on Crystal River:
Winner, banquet facility and
Sunday brunch.
Publix: Winner, bakery; hon-
orable mention, bagels.
Rustic Ranch Restaurant &
Bakery: Honorable mention,
bakery, breakfast, home-
style, omelet, steaks and
catering.
Taverna Manos: Honorable
mention, Greek.


Stay on the cutting edge of fashion this holiday
season! Lillian "Yai Yai" Knipp of Yai Yai International
co-hosts Chamber Chat this week. Lillian shares
some winter fashion tips that are sure to keep you
sparkling at your next holiday party. Need a great
gift? Give the gift of wine! Lillian also shares some
of her favorite wines that are sure to impress. Alice
Cushman and Teri Davis from Howard's Flea Market
tell us how you can give a little and do a lot for the
Citrus County Resource Center through their Santa
Babies Program. Learn about Santaland and how
you can help a Citrus County family have a real
Christmas. Since we are in the spirit of giving
Pastor Donna Sallee tells us how we can turn our
gently used purses and pocketbooks into Handbags
for Hope to benefit Fresh Hope Ministries. Learn
more at Freshhopeministries.com.
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat--
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every
week! If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber Chat
on Facebook for clips of past segments and updates
on our weekly show!


F-*- -

4r


-'.. - --
S.FoLoOoRoIoDoA



..... .- ...


Citrus County fa(en Jferoes Monument, Inc.
BicentenniaCPark- CrystaCfiver, lorfida


:* h

-.^:
.- ',




.: ., .re c-d yl.. tedtoattendon
;'. ..,.. ..e nesday (December 12, 2012 5:00 p.m.
,Ai 49iftai4ngiu of FaftIfnamen of ourfFaffen Jferoes
., .... t. -.eneM. rm
*:idB,. 6-fr ,"a4' r"" .. 'n.


Mo Bros, Sistas raise

$1,500+ for men's health


Will your
business
be open on
Christmas?
We are compiling a list
to run during the next
two weeks showing what
restaurants and other
businesses will be open
on Christmas and New
Year's Day. Please for-
ward your holiday hours
to cindi@citruscounty
chamber.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

uninsured! We questioned
how that could be, because
we had been told it was au-
tomatic. They said only Part
A hospitalization is auto-
matic.
We immediately went to
the Social Security office
and signed him up for Parts
A and B, but because it was
now September, and five
days after his birthday on
Aug. 30, a penalty was im-
posed. Coverage for Part B
would not begin until No-
vember, and no claims
would be entertained for
the period between Aug. 1
and Oct. 31!
I think there are probably
a lot of people who are un-
aware of this punitive policy
by the Medicare folks. We
had assumed, wrongly, since
you can choose when to opt
into Social Security and
payments are adjusted ac-
cordingly, the same would
be true of Medicare. We get
a letter from Social Security
every year telling what the
benefits are and the options.
We are surprised they do
not do the same for
Medicare, especially since a
penalty is involved.


BUSINESS


I hope you will spread the
word so others don't get
caught like we did. D.T.,
Prescott, Ariz.
Dear D.T: It was so nice
hearing from you, and I'm
delighted to know your
brother and sister attended
our nursery school. I hope
they, too, are doing well.
The points you make here
are pertinent. You have to
make decisions in terms of
Medicare to be perfectly
covered. It has been well es-
tablished that you are re-
quired to pay for some extra
coverage. As you point out,
you should get nervous
when you're told something
is automatic and you need
do nothing.
You have now alerted a
great many people to the
problem, and hopefully they
will learn from you as I
have.
Dear Bruce: My husband
and I own a town house we
bought right before the real
estate bubble burst. As it
stands, we owe about
$30,000 more on the place
than the estimated market
value. To make matters
worse, the neighborhood
two blocks away from us has
experienced a significant
jump in property crimes and
violent crimes, with a lot of
drug dealing going on. The


neighborhood on the other
side of our house is full of
single-family homes and is
more established. We'd like
to move before things get
worse. I don't believe the
troubled neighborhood has
hit rock bottom yet
We do not have $30,000 in
savings or investments,
other than retirement in-
vestments, to pay off the
$30,000. If we go ahead and
list our house, what are our
options as far as finding a
new place to live? -Reader
in Madison, Wis.
Dear Reader: In every
market, there's always
someone who buys at the
lowest possible price and
someone who buys at the
highest. You, unfortunately,
are in the second category
You have a lot of company
The tone of your letter
tells me you are responsi-
ble citizens trying to do the
responsible thing. You
might consult with your
mortgage company to see if
there's a possibility of a
short sale, in which the
mortgage company essen-
tially agrees to accept less
than the amount it is owed
for the property and forgive
the rest of the loan. The
problem here is you proba-
bly are not behind on pay-
ments, and as far as the


mortgage company is con-
cerned, you're golden. It
has no incentive to negoti-
ate. Retirement savings are
more than likely insulated
from attachment, but I sus-
pect any negotiation would
include the amounts and
where and how they are in-
vested.
Some attorneys specialize
in this type of negotiation,
and it would certainly be to
your advantage to at least
discuss your situation with
one.
You did not mention your
ages or how much you have
in your retirement accounts.
But depending on those vari-
ables, this may be the time to
bite the bullet. You might


even find a buyer who would
pay a tad more to help re-
duce that $30,000 deficit.
Many people grew up
with the idea real estate
prices went in only one di-
rection. For many years, in-
cluding well before the
bubble, I've tried to point
out to my readers all invest-
ments, including real estate,
have ups and downs. In
many cases, it's impossible
to calculate precisely which


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 D3

way the market is moving
until after the bloodbath.

Send questions to
bruce@bruce
williams.com or to Smart
Money PO. Box 7150, Hud-
son, FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email to newsdesk@chronicle
online.com or fax to 352-563-3280, attn: Business
Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.


Remember


Rea


TheS


Make suL the

community knock

about your spec

Holiday worsh

services.

Advertise on t

special pa
Chronicle.


Publishes:
Sunday, D

Deadline:
Mon. Dec.



For more
informati
contact
Beverly B
at 564-2912


pe-C st CA


- Chih:


Drop your letter by the Crystal River Mall
or the Citrus County Chronicle between
Friday, November 23 and
Friday, December 14,2012 CRYSTAL RT
C 'IRO I All letters will be ::... ;. I'... all to read and enjoy MALM' L
.. online at www.chronicleonline .comletterstosanta2012!


Crystal River Mall
352-795-2585


Monday
10am-9pm


Tuesday
9am-9pm


Wednesday
9am-9pm


Thursday
8am-9pm


Friday
10am-9pm


Saturday
10am-9pm


1801 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River I
Mobil 1 Lube Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-795-2333 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-3pm Closed
1050 SE Hwy 19, Crystal River

Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-489-5477
9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-4pm Closed
20319 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon

Badcock Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-726-6366
352-726-69am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm 10am-4pm
3690 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness

Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunda
352-795-5346 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm Close
150 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


Jim Green Jewelers
352-563-0633
1665 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River


Monday
10am-5pm


Tuesday
10am-6pm


Wednesday
10am-5pm


Thursday
10am-5pm


Friday
10am-5pm


Saturday
11lam-3pm


i i I1 '


Sunday
12pm-5:30pm


Sunday
Closed





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GNC is October business
of the month at Crystal River Mall
David DePoutot, the manager of GNC, took the initiative of
approaching mall management with ways he wanted to in-
crease sales for GNC. His ideas included sampling products on
a weekend in the food court and having a window display in the
opposite side of the mall directing customers to his location.
Mall management wants to thank David and Wes for show-
casing an attractive store and actively participating with mall
management to help brand GNC in the Crystal River Mall.
GNC's well-trained staff pride themselves on listening and
asking the right questions to assist their customers in making
the appropriate selection of nutritional supplements and
vitamins.
Crystal River Mall is honoring a Business of the Month
every month. The criteria for the award includes outstanding
visual appearance of the store, creative displays, use of ad-
vertising, thinking outside the box and outstanding customer
service.
For more information on leasing opportunities at Crystal
River Mall, contact the mall office at 352-795-2585; visit www.
thecrystalrivermall.com or like us on Facebook at The Crystal
River Mall.
From staff reports


BYRNES
Continued from Page D1

unfilled or were at the
time we launched the initia-
tive last spring because
employers cannot find qual-
ified workers, according to
the National Skills Coali-
tion, formerly Workforce Al-
liance.
To gauge the extent of the
problem in our region, we
needed to move beyond the
anecdotal. We took a deep
dive into targeted industry
sectors to identify skills em-
ployers say are critical to the
success of their business and
determine where applicants
fell short.
Among the industries ex-
amined manufacturing;
health care; information
technology; business and fi-
nancial services; and trans-
portation, distribution and
logistics the analysis
found gaps in manufacturing
and health care industries,
as well as the need to move
new and emerging workers
into the talent pipeline for



WEATHER
Continued from Page D1


Navigating the tabs, you
get hourly forecasts for the
next 24 hours on the iPhone
and 15 on the Android. On
both, you get daily forecasts
for the next 10 days. The An-
droid version doesn't include
dates, so you're left to figure
out whether Saturday means
this Saturday or next week-
end. Click on "36 Hour" for
brief written summaries for
today, tonight and tomorrow.
The map shows you the
radar for your region, giving
you an idea of how far away
a storm might be. During my
travels, I've used this fea-
ture to gauge how quickly
heavy rain might pass. You
can switch that to show
cloud cover instead of radar,
or both. You can also add
details such as rain or snow
over the past 24 hours.
You can check weather
anywhere in the U.S. by en-
tering a city name or ZIP
code. Or click on a target
icon for the weather where
you are, as determined by
your phone. There's a loca-
tion icon at the bottom of the
Android version. On the
iPhone, you're left to figure
out you need to click on the
magnifying glass or the "i"
button for settings. Flick the
screen left or right to check
weather in other locations.
The app also offers video
of weather forecasts and
news, with those from your
city or region coming up
first There are tools for see-
ing what people are saying
about the weather on Twit-
ter and for sharing your
weather-related photos and
video. The app offers a
pollen report; the iPhone
version has hurricane and
maritime conditions, too.
The Weather Channel said
the information is coming to
Android next year, along
with longer hourly forecasts.
Conclusion: You get lots of
information on current con-
ditions and the most options
of the three for viewing
maps. Limiting hourly fore-
casts to 24 hours or less is
stingy. On The Weather
Channel's website, I get two
days of hourly forecasts.
AccuWeather
The home screen also of-
fers temperature, humidity,
wind, UV index and visibil-
ity conditions, plus sunrise
and sunset. The Android
version lists wind gusts, not
just wind speeds. The


manufacturing and informa-
tion technology The report
also identified key "aspira-
tional industries" and criti-
cal steps for those.
Now that we're armed
with more than a hunch, we
are able to attack the skills
gap issues head on. Within
the next few weeks, Work-
force Connection will create
a Skills Gap Task Force to
begin work early in the new
year. The small group will
prioritize the report's rec-
ommendations, among
which are:
Create a customized
business training program to
address manufacturing
workplace fundamentals
and basic skills,
Actively support the Col-
lege of Central Florida's new
bachelor's degree in nursing
program.
Address the "experi-
ence" challenge through ex-
panded use of internships
and apprenticeship pro-
grams, leveraging of business
incubators and promotion of
the value of credentials to
area employers.
Happily, a lot of the heavy


iPhone version has informa-
tion on dew point, while An-
droid does not.
AccuWeather goes beyond
The Weather Channel in of-
fering 15 days of forecasts,
not just 10, and offers dates
on the iPhone and Android.
Its extended forecasts are
more detailed than the
Weather Channel's. You can
click on a day to get those
details.
Comparable with The
Weather Channel, Ac-
cuWeather offers 24 hours of
hourly forecasts on its app.
By contrast, you get more
than three days on its web-
site, and even more with a
paid subscription. Ac-
cuWeather has more details
than The Weather Channel
for each hour, though you're
left to figure out where to
flick and touch to get those
details.
AccuWeather's map is ad-
equate, but doesn't offer as
many options as The
Weather Channel's.
As for location, the An-
droid version has a target
icon on the home screen (it's
buried in the other apps) to
quickly pull up information
on where you are. That but-
ton is not coming to the
iPhone for another few
months, so for now, the loca-
tion is harder to change.
Unlike the other apps I
tried, AccuWeather doesn't
offer suggestions as you
start typing in the name of a
city to switch locations. With
big fingers on a small touch
keyboard, I had to type
"Sault Ste. Marie" in its en-
tirety for the sister cities in
Michigan and Ontario.
Like The Weather Chan-
nel, AccuWeather offers
local, regional and national
video. AccuWeather has
special forecasts for certain
types of activities such as
golfing, bicycling and lawn
mowing as well as risks
for asthma, flu and mi-
graines. However, you're
just given a one-word as-
sessment, such as "poor" or
"excellent," with no clues as
to why it might be a horrible
day to run or ski.
Conclusion: The app
could be better with its
hourly forecasts. It also
should to be easier to
change locations. The activ-
ities forecasts show prom-
ise, though I long for more
details. AccuWeather prom-
ises some of these desired
features in a few months.
AccuWeather has typically
been my first stop for
weather information on a
regular computer, but the


NBOWI TO* i
40% SEVaER DAY"4*


Special to the Chronicle
David DePoutot, manager of GNC, receives recognition for his
store being the October Business of the Month at Crystal River


lifting is well under way. In
anticipation of the report's
findings, Workforce Connec-
tion's board of directors -
which includes nine repre-
sentatives from Citrus
County has already moved
to implement several recom-
mendations, including fund-
ing to train the existing
workforce, internships and
other work experience.
Workforce Connection has
also laid the ground work to
address issues within the
manufacturing sector by
working with the Marion Re-
gional Manufacturers Asso-
ciation (MRMA) to establish
a training coordinator and
set aside $300,000 for train-
ing specific to the manufac-
turing and distribution
industry sectors.
Of course, that's just the
start. Now it's time for all
stakeholders to roll up our
sleeves.
Workforce Connection
CEO Rusty Skinner put it
this way, "Now we have to
focus on the specific skills
and skill areas that are
needed ... doing so will take
active participation by those


app leaves me wanting for
now unless I'm looking
for extended forecasts.
WeatherBug
This app's home screen
crams a lot of useful infor-
mation without clutter The
screen doesn't give you as
much detail as the others on
current conditions. Humid-
ity, dew point and UV index
are missing from the An-
droid version, and neither
version has information on
visibility, sunset or sunrise.
What you get instead is a
graphical forecast for up-
coming days today plus
five days for Android and
two for the iPhone.
Touch on the forecast sec-
tion for additional days and
details though you get


sector businesses."
The reports points out
while the skills gap chal-
lenge affects the entire com-
munity, "partners who are
working to close the skills
gap should be encouraged
by the history of collabora-
tion and teamwork that ex-
ists within Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties ...partners
(can) leverage this founda-
tion of successful collabora-
tion to help prepare the
workforce with the skills
needed by regional busi-
nesses."
Both reports, "Addressing
the Skills Gap" and "Occu-
pations for Aspirational In-
dustries," are available at
Workforce Connection's
website, www.clmworkforce.
com.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a
certified workforce profes-
sional and communications
manager at Workforce
Connection. Contactherat
352-291-9559 or 800-434-
5627, ext. 1234 orlbyrnes@
clm workforce, com.


only seven in all, the fewest
of the three apps. Click on
any day for written sum-
maries of day and evening
forecasts. Then click on that
for hourly forecasts. Yes,
that means nearly seven
days of hourly forecasts, not
the stingy 24 hours (or less)
offered by the other two.
WeatherBug's radar map
is OK, but not as versatile as
The Weather Channel's.
WeatherBug doesn't have
a target icon on the Android
version to help you quickly
get weather for where you
are, but it's not really
needed. On the iPhone and
Android, weather automati-
cally updates to your cur-
rent location when you have
GPS enabled.
Switching locations or


Business DIGEST


adding one by city or ZIP
code is relatively easy, but
only the iPhone version of-
fers suggestions as you
type. Once you enter a city,
you can narrow your choice
to a specific school, airport
or other weather monitor-
ing station. WeatherBug
has placed more than
10,000 of these across the
country. The others offer
localized weather by ana-
lyzing available data from
government and private
sources. From my office in
New York, I can get current
conditions at a nearby
school rather than a Cen-
tral Park station 1.6 miles
farther away
Video is limited to na-
tional forecasts, but still im-
ages from several nearby


locations let you see for
yourself whether it's rain-
ing. A recent update to the
WeatherBug app adds such
specialty forecasts as golf-
ing, pollen and dry skin.
There aren't as many
choices as AccuWeather's
app, but you get more de-
tails for the ones that are
available.
Conclusion: I find Weath-
erBug to be the easiest to
use of the three, and I love
the extended hourly fore-
casts. It's a good choice as
long as you're not looking
for a lot of video and a fore-
cast beyond seven days.
Anick Jesdanun, deputy
technology editor for The
Associated Press, can be
reached at njesdanun@
ap.org.


Experience the joys of Christmas

Light Displays in Citrus County

Entry Deadline 8pm December 10th, submit up to 2 photos of your home.
Voting: December 11th December 20th

The house with the most votes WINS
A Ca $50 Gift Certificate to Ace Hardware!

Hardware

--


Get us your letter by

December 21st and

we will get it to Santa!


www.chronicleonline.com


TABLET
Continued from Page D1

only tablet in our
roundup that comes with
a "pen" that can be used
to write and draw on the
screen. In our test, this
worked well, though the
number of apps that take
advantage of the pen is
still small. (Other tablets,
like the iPad, only re-
spond to finger-like ob-
jects, so third-party
styluses for them are of
necessity thick and
clumsy)
The Note 10.1 runs
Google's Android soft-
ware, giving it access to a
wide array of apps origi-
nally written for smart-
phones. The selection is
not on par with the iPad's
but better than other al-
ternatives.
The Note's screen falls
into the low-resolution
category, sporting 1,280
by 800 pixels. That's a
third of what the iPad
musters.
Like the Nook, the
Note 10.1's storage mem-
ory can be expanded with
cards.
The Note's appeal is
somewhat of a niche, but
it could be just the thing
for the budding or estab-
lished artist.
Microsoft Surface
(starts at $499)
Microsoft's first tablet
seems at first like a
throwback to the first
iPad. It's thick, heavy and
rugged. But it really does-
n't have much in common
with the first iPad or any
Apple- or Google-pow-
ered tablet. It runs Win-
dows RT, a version of
Windows 8 adapted for
tablets. It comes with a
version of Microsoft's Of-
fice suite and the ability
to connect to wireless
printers and some other
peripherals, like USB
drives. The covers for it


have functional keyboard
printed on the inside.
The screen resolution
is 1,366 by 768 pixels,
placing it in the low-reso-
lution category.
The Surface screams
"work, work, work." It's
the tablet for those who
are wedded to Word and
want to take their writing
on the go.
One thing to note about
the Surface: the basic
model starts out with "32
gigabytes" of memory, but
of that, only 16 gigabytes
are available to the user.
It accepts memory cards
of up to 64 gigabytes,
however, so expanding
the memory is cheap.
Even though it runs
Windows, the Surface
doesn't run standard Win-
dows applications. It will
run only programs specif-
ically adapted for Win-
dows RT The selection is,
for now, quite limited.
Asus Vivo Tab RT
(starts at $599
with a dock)
Asus has a quality line
of Android tablets they
call "Transformer," be-
cause they dock into a
keyboard with an extra
battery The combination
folds up just like a small
laptop and has excellent
battery life. The Vivo Tab
RT essentially takes a
Transformer and stuffs it
with Windows RT instead
of Android.
The tablet part is
smaller and thinner than
the Surface. Together
with the keyboard, it
makes for a familiar little
setup: a tiny laptop run-
ning Windows. Like the
Surface, it has a memory
card slot and a USB port.
The screen resolution is
the same.
The Vivo Tab is a good
tool for those who want to
get some work done on
the commute or plane, or
those who can't decide if
they want a laptop or a
tablet.


D4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds


SIn Print


and


Online


All

The Time


Fax:(35)56-565 1 ollFree(88)82-240 1Emal:l,.T ..fi r.n n ..Iwwwchronileo


Christmas Tree
9 ft, pre lit, wesley pine
used once
$125.
(352) 527-2327

Generator for Sale
Troybilt, 5550 Watts
120/240V, Never used
$400.
(352) 419-6253





OPEMN
HOUSE

HOMOSASSA
Sun, Dec 9th
noon to 4pm
3/3, on 2 lots
3802 S Eastpark Way
just off 490-A





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087

MATRESS FULL SIZE
&
BOX SPRING FULL SIZE
FREE (352) 527-4484







FREE Biscuit & Gravy
half order Bring this ad to
Bob's Kitchen
5364 Suncoast
Homosassa, fl 34446
352-628-0334

FREE KITTEN
female black & orange
5 months old. To good
home only!
(863) 843-2495

FREE KITTENS
12 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654

FREE KITTENS
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230

Free Kittens
tuxedo/ 6wks old
friendly, healthy
727-580-1083

Free Lion Head
Dwarf Bunnies,
8 weeks old
(352) 302-3113

Have 3 Cats, one has to
go! male,blue eyed, sia-
mese racoon, beautiful
pls call 352-726-2890

Heater & Accessories
for Hot tub
You Remove
Cit. Sprg (352) 489-4438


Pond shuck
erfish, Snail. Free to
good home.
352-270-1524




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378
Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
Fl Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077



FEMALE DOG
MIXEDFOUND
BEVERLY HILLS AREA
Filmore St.
(352) 362-1606
Found Tool Box
on SR 44 near
Key center
Call to identify
(352) 795-7989



Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
Fl Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077



WANTED TO BUY
15FT WIDE SWIMMING
POOL COVER REEL
Call (352) 382-3681




TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444




CELESTIAL SPA
NOW HIRING:
Esthetician
Nail Tech &
Message Therapist
Apply in person @
9 Regina Blvd,
Beverly Hills
(352) 527-0077

CELESTIAL SPA
NOW HIRING:
Esthetician
Nail Tech &
Message Therapist
Apply in person @
9 Regina Blvd,
Beverly Hills
(352) 527-0077










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


, SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace


MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

* Billing Clerk
* Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


VETERINARY
TECHNICIAN
Min. 3 yrs. experience
Email or Fax Resume
Fax (352) 794-0084
plantationanimal@
yahoo.corn





Citrus County
Hospital Board CCHB
EXECUTIVE
ASSISTANT
Will assist the CCHB
in any daily activities
including clerical and
office duties and
financial documenta-
tion wth expectation
of profiency in Word,
Excel, Outlook and
Powerpoint.
Resumes will be
accepted before
DECEMBER. 21, 2012
May Sent to
cchbtrustees@
ciruscountvhosoital
board, corn
or Mail to CCHB
PO Box 1030
Inverness Fl. 34451
DFWP/EOE





EXECUTIVE
CHEF
Country Club
Restaurant exp.
helpful not req. Send
resume to: Blind Box
1818P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429


FT/PT SERVER
POS experience a
plus. Must be 18 yrs.
old. 352-637-1920


Account Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460 to
Schedule an Interview




AUTO TECHS & Experi-
enced Detailer Needed.
Competitive Pay & Bene-
fits. ASE & or Ford Certi-
fied line techs. Call
(352)493-4297 for Russ
Hall for in person
resume/interview appoint-
ment.



Manufacturer of
A/C Grilles, Registers
and Diffusers
is currently accept-
ing applications for
an experienced
Sheet Metal Fabrica-
tor. Must have a
strong math and me-
chanical aptitude,
ability to read and
interpret Engineering
Drawings, ability to
plan, fabricate, as-
semble, install, layout
and perform all types
of fabrication, have
knowledge in sheet
metal layout, includ-
ing bending deduc-
tion. Must have expe-
rience in using hand
operated benders,
press brakes, sheet
metal punches
(manual and hydrau-
lic) and be able to
operate fabricating
machines, such as
shears, brakes,
presses to cut, punch,
and bend materials.
Job will also consist of
trimming, filing, grind-
ing, deburring and
buffing using hand
tools and power
tools. Must be able
to inspect assemblies
for conformance to
specifications, using
measuring instru-
ments such as cali-
pers, scales, gauges,
etc. Excellent bene-
fits package, 401k.
Appooly In person to
METAL INDUSTRIES
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, FI 33513.
DFW, EOE.

MASON &
MASON TENDERS
Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and from
work in Citrus & sur-
rounding counties
(352) 302-2395

TELLER
Brannen Bank
is currently
interviewing for two
teller position's in the
Citrus County area.
Must have previous
cash handling
experience, be
detail oriented, PC
literate and have
excellent customer
service skills.
Inquiries please
call Carol Johnson at
352-726-9001.

Brannen Banks
of Florida, Inc.
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP


B
CASA IS HIRING

Two F/T Positions
Mon.- Fri. 3 P -11 P,
and 11PM to 7AM
shift; $8.00 Hr. plus
excel. benefits. Case
Mgmt. exp a plus.
Applications taken at
CASA Outreach
at 1100 Turner Camp
Road., Inverness,
Florida. 34453

Floor Technician
Announcement
#12-71
Full time skilled Floor
Technician position.
Must have at least
one year experience
in stripping, waxing,
buffing and cleaning
floors. Continuous
moving of office
furniture. Hours are
5:00pm-1:30am with
weekends required
occasionally.
Graduation from H.S
or GED certificate.
$8.45 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, December 14,
2012 EOE/ADA




Part Time work
that you can feel
good about
Fero Memorial Gardens
seeks a Part-Time
Administrative Clerk to
assist us in serving our
families.

Part-Time weekday
& weekend hours
-Answer Phones, filing
& file research, light
book-keeping, etc.
Apply today and dis-
cover how rewarding it
can be to work with us.
Apply by faxing your
resume to
(352)732-8785.
Or apply in person
at Fero Memorial
Gardens
5955 North Lecanto
Hwy, Beverly Hills, Fl.
Equal Opportunity
Employer, M/F/DIV




www.ferofuneral
home.com









SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14,2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




LOCAL BRIDAL/
FORMAL WEAR
Business for Sale
All Equipment and
Inventory Included
CALL (352) 563-0722




DEPT 56. Asst'd
Villages & Accessories
*Call for Selection*
352-489-0339












Tell that special
person
Happy Bi rthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,#,# # ,


Musical Snow Globe
w/moving train Hallmark
Coca Cola Santa Unique
Gift $18 New in box Can
email pic 352-382-3650



DISHWASHER Maytag
Performa, BRAND NEW
cond. Never used. White.
275.00 Call
(352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
DRYER $100 with 90 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504
DRYER $100 with full 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
ELECTRIC RANGE W/
OVER RANGE
MICROWAVE Both
maytags, white, Brand
New! Never been used.
Range is $360 and OTR
Microwave $210.
Call (352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
GE REFRIGERATOR
21 cubic ft w/ice maker
white, $300
352-382-0608
GE REFRIGERATOR
side by side
icemaker/water runs
great white $300
352-637-1510
GE Refrigerator
White $400.
GE Stove Self Cleaning
White $225. Both less
than 2vrs old!
(352) 726-8021
KENMORE 25.5
double door refrigerator
plus KitchenAid flat top
electric stove. All in exc.
cond. Color Bisque
$400 OBO
(352) 476-1113 or
(352)513-5135
KENMORE RANGE
Almond Kenmore electric
range with self cleaning
oven. Good condition.
$75. 352-860-0142
KENMORE WASHING
MACHINE Kenmore
washing machine good
condition..$75.00
352-527-3177
LG FRONT LOAD
WASHER lyr old. Perfect
cond. White $650
(352) 527-3204
Refrigerator Whirlpool,
white, 2572 cu ft. side
by side icemaker, eve-
rything works $150
Washer, Whirlpool,
white, super capacity
$150 (352) 637-4731


MITTY APPLIAN
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
TRASH COMPACTOR
Kenmore trash
compactor. Black. $30.
352-503-9354
WASHER $100 with full
90 day warranty call/text
352-354-6504
WASHER & DRYER
white, good condition
$250 for pair
352-212-9371
WASHER
Good condition, 30 day
warranty. $100
352-476-9019
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 90 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL STOVE
flat top blk, 5 yrs old.
good cond. $150
352-637-5032





SALE
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
FRI. 12/7 review a4
auction i6pom
Bring in this ad receive
5% disc. this wk only
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



AIR COMPRESSOR
10HP/3phase. $200
Must Sell *
20 x 30 Ruemellin Utility
Sandblaster. $200
352-586-0084
CRAFTSMAN LT1000-
LAWN TRACTOR For
sale. 17.5 Horse power,
42 inch mower. Electric
start, 6 speed transaxle.
Will include dual bag
grass catcher. $500.00.
Cash only, please.
352-726-6168
PARTS CLEANER $125.
Ulility Pickup Racks $75.
CALL 352-586-0084
PRESSURE WASHER:
Karcher pressure
washer,2400 PSI, $20
352-503-9354


19' FLAT SCREEN
TV/DVD 6 mos. old. Just
sold home. Have manual,
remote, box & packing.
$100. 352-341-3607
32" TV, not HD, w/
washed oak finished
cabinet $65. obo
(352) 344-9288
MAGNAVOX HOME
STEREO 5-disc changer
radio, 3 speakers
mint condition $35
860-2475
RCA 26" FLAT SCREEN
WITH DVD, 1YR OLD
$129
(352)637-5909
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $30
352-613-0529
TCL L40FHDF11TA
40-INCH TCL
L40FHDF11TA 1080p 60
Hz LCD HDTV, 1 yr old
used little cost $400 ask
$200 firm 419-7017
TELEVISION 25" with
remote $30.00
352-527-3177




CANON EOS REBEL
DIGITAL CAMERA Great
condition, $350 Call
(352)464-1591
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




PATIO SET
Heavy duty glass top
w/lazy susan, 5 matching
chairs & umbrella aqua
$300 Firm 352-228-9395




BHIDE- A -BED**
Blue Denim Sofa w/
queen size sleeper,
Good Condition $125
352-7464232
4 DINETTE CHAIRS
Wood w/beige uphlostery
on wheels $140.
STUDENT DESK (white)
$25 352-527-9332
8 pc King size bedroom
set $1000. 8 pc Dining
rm set $800. Credenza
w/glass doors $400.
All in exc. condition!
call (352) 586-0566


Antique bed and chest
set, 2 pc. China Hutch,
Small end table $500 for
all (352) 560-7132
BAR STOOLS
2 Multi color fabric
barstools $15.00 each.
352-527-3177
BAR STOOLS
3 44" tall swivel dark bwn
w/ tan seats almost new
$65; 3 34" tall swivel
white exc cond. $50.
352-341-1576
BEAUTIFUL BUTCHER
BLOCK TABLE FOR
BREAKFAST NOOK OR
KITCHEN ISLAND 34"H
36"L 24"W WITH 2
STOOLS $95
(352) 527-9930
COACH & LOVESEAT
Peach, Aqua & cream.
Nonsmoking home! $150
(352) 621-3330
Complete Bedroom Set
Broyhill, Twin Headbd
Dresser w/mirror, desk
w/hutch, chest of draw-
ers. Good cond. $250
(352) 563-5206
Couch, Love Seat
Blue Floral
& 3 Tables
excellent condition
$450.
(352) 746-3649
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4 chairs
on casters, $250
(352) 897-4739
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER, light wood,
holds 36" tv, $150
352-637-5032
King Size Bed
excel. cond.
$100.
(352) 795-0763
LARGE SECTIONAL
SOFA Very nice
L-sectional couch with
dual recliners on each
end. $300 352-503-2610
Like new dining room ta-
ble with 4 chairs, solid
wood. $75 OBO
mbrower4833@aol.com
call/text:(352)364-1453
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
2 nice electric lift chairs
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
SECTIONAL SOFA
camel, 2 yrs old,
exc. cond. $600
352-628-6974


SINGLE COPY



CONTRACTOR



WANTED


Are You

e Interested In:

S Bein your own

boss.

* Increasing potential

earnings.

Growing your

.-. exclusive area?

1 ^ Working
\ -s.. independently?

Working with a

successful company?


C I T R US .C U N T Y




www.chronicleonline.com


Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201

Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Requirements: Do you have what it takes?

Ability to work overnight Attention to detail

Covered Truck, Van or SUV 365 Days/Year

Clean Driving Record Deadline and Customer

Credit & Background Check Service oriented

Access to your own help

Lifting and physical ability Flexible under pressure

Team Player Positive Thinker

Must have a back-up plan Hard and smart worker

Computer & Internet Access Keen sense of urgency


0 Deliver to stores and coin racks.

Q Experience preferred but not required.


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 D5









D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


SOFA BED Full Sz,
matching patterned
pillows, easy clean
material, paprika color,
sat in spare bedroom,
barely used. $250
Call. (352)464-1591
SOFA BED
IN VERY COND.
NEUTRAL COLORS
$100
920-723-2214
STAGE COACH STYLE
BENCH very nice west-
ern style bench. $40.00
352-527-3177
TWIN BED frame, maple
color headboard and box
springs- no mattress
$25.00 352-794-3020 or
352-586-4987
TWO CURIO
CABINETS, walnut
great condition!
$100 ea. 352-637-1369
WALNUT TABLES
2 Small 36 inch high
square tables somewhat
like used in coffee shop.
$25.00 ea 352-527-3177



2006 HUSQVARNA
Garden Tractor 25hp
Kohler Hydrostatic
transmission, 48" mower
& 48" landscape box
$1200 (352) 601-2480
Craftsman
Riding Mower
Briggs & Stratton
Eng., 15.5 HP Motor
42" Deck $400
(352) 746-7357
LAWN MOWER Dixon,
zero turn, 30 inch. With
attachable Craftsman
lawn sweep, $750.
352-637-0663
LAWNMOWER 22"
Self-propelled,Toro Recy-
cler Lawn Mower
w/catcher. Like new.
$100 352-563-5386




CRYSTAL RIVER
(Shamrock Acres)
6638 W San Juan Ter
SAT/SUN 7:30a 4p
Kids Art Desk & Kitchen,
Bike, Toys, Hshld Items,
Lawn Mower, Sewing
Table, TV, Elliptical
CRYSTAL RIVER
ESTATE SALE *
Sat. Sun. 8am 3pm
Electronics, furn.
movies, jewelry, etc.
1236 NE 3rd St. Hwy 44
(Behind Huddle House)

YARD SALE
DUNNELLON
Sat & Sun 8am-5pm
Xmas, auto, china, crys-
tal stemware, tv's, house-
hold, multi family
6411 W Riverbend Road
HERNANDO
Fri. Sat & Sun 8am- 3pm
UPSCALE YARD SALE
Baldwin piano, key-
board spkrs, mic spans,
Andrea, Limoge,
antique books, & docs.
Tools, boat & motor,
elec. lift/recliner chair,
dinette set, stained
glass fire screen, '98 yr
dictionary & more.
1971 Cloverdale Terr.
352-341-1709


Dunnellon 27" TV remote does not
Moving Sale Dai work. $10 563-1073
Sat.& Sun.. 8a- 4p Drum Set, amplifier
Furn, Decorative items & w/earphones $65
tools. No early birds. 3 wheel woman's bike
5852 W Riverbend Rd w/basket $100
FLORAL CITY 352-527-0409
Sat & Sun 9am- Until ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
MULTI FAMILY Elliptical exercise
8642 E. Orange Ave machine $75.00
HOMOSASSA 352-527-3177
Fri, Sat 7am to 4pm Entertainment Center
xmas, 100'sofl Ip's, All wood,Light Oak
books, glassware, 32" Sanyo old style TV
plus-sz clothes, Pan- exc. cond. $275 for both
dora jewelry, 352-726-6845
scrubs, lots more! FEATHER TICK matress
5690 S Calder Point topper. Good cond.
$40.00 Also 3 pc. pre-lit
PINE RIDGE reindeer set for yard.
Sat, Sun 9am to 4pm $25.00 352-344-5311
Furniture Only! FIBERGLASS PET CAR-
cmpl. dining rm set, RIERS MEDIUM SIZE &
sleigh bed, roll top & 1 NICE CAT CARRIER
computer desk, wall unit, 20.00 EACH
misc. tables, antiques 352-464-0316
2471 W. Mustang Blvd FIESTA DISHES
FIESTA DISHES
Rainbow Lake Est SERVICES FOR 8.
MOVING SALE EXTRA SERVING
Everything Must Go! BOWLS $150 FIRM
Come anytime from SMW (352) 503-6734
now until Dec. 24 Fresh Florida 15ct.
Tools, Lawn mower **JUMBO SHRIMP**
lawn ornaments, all @$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
furn., appliances, FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
MUCH more 21184 delivered (352)795-0077
SW Honeysuckle St. Generator for Sale
C Troybilt, 5550 Watts
120/240V, Never used
$400.
(352) 419-6253
BOYS WINTER CLOTH- GERBIL CAGE GOOD
ING SIZE 5 & 6 PANTS, CONDITION $25
SHIRTS & JACKETS 352-613-0529
$35 352-613-0529 IONhRMOVER
IRON REMOVER
whole house system
w/ chemical feeder,
own. manual like new
4 WHEEL WALKER- Cost $850. Asking $350.
hand brakes & wheel (352) 726-4421
locks, seat, folds for stor- Kerby Ultimate Vacuum
age, Ex., $50. w/ Carpet Shampoo
352-628-0033 system. Complete wall
32 INCH GARAGE/BACK accessories. Like New
DOOR Very good condi- Ong price $1500, asking
tlon, heavy, has window $300 (352) 860-1021
$50 860-2475 Large Wood
19" TV Unfinished Doll House
with remote. $15 $225.
563-1073 (352) 628-5451
Baby Stroller -deluxe MARTIN WESTERN
model with canopy $30 GUITAR
Inverness $50
864-283-5797 STEAM FAST STEAM
MOP $70
BATTERY OPERATED 352-527-1493
JEEP WITH CHARGER 3--19
PEG PEREGO $90 missionincitrus.com
352-613-0529 Citrus County's Only
BAVARIAN CHINA Emergency Homeless
SERVICE FOR 12+ & Veteran's Shelters
DINNERWARE w/gold Now 80-100 a night
trim. $400 OBO includes 18 children
(352) 746-3327 EMERGENCY FUNDS
BOSS GENERATOR & Other needs are
like new, $400 needed at this time.
Futon, metal frame 352-794-3825
great cond. $250 MOTORIZED BICYCLE
352-637-1369 Brand New
Cargo Carrier fits 26" Huffy
2" receiver, pd $300 2 cycle 80cc
never used, sell for $350 850-898-7156
$100 352-447-2967
CHRISTMAS CAROLING OPTIMUS PORTABLE
CLOCK Plays a different RECORD PLAYER
tune every hour$10 VINTAGE C DAR
563-1073 VINTAGE CEDAR
5631073 CHEST $30
Christmas Tree 352-527-1493
9 ft, pre lit, wesley pine
used once PERFUME AND
$125. SATCHET VINTAGE
(352) 527-2327 LEFFLEUR BY COTY
COMFORTER SET $25 .75 EAU DE
FULL HANNAH MON- PARFUM 419-5981
TANA WITH SHEETS & PICNIC TABLE 5 FOOT
PILLOW CASES $35 LONG GOOD CONDI-
352-613-0529 TION $85 352-613-0529


Pool Cleaner,
Hydro Sweep, $150.
Tonic Pro Air Purifier
$100.
(352) 489-9305
POOL TABLE
Regulation 7 ft
Must Sell. $150 OBO
(352) 697-2195
QUANTUM 6000
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
ex. cond., batt. charger,
cushion $2,500.00 obo
(352) 527-2085
SAMSONITE HANGING
TRAVEL BAG $10 LUG-
GAGE
CARRIER/PERSONAL
DOLLY $10
352-419-5981
SKYLIGHT 27"/27" BUB-
BLE TYPE ONLY 45.00
352-464-0316
TOY HESS TRUCKS
mint cond. w/bag & box,
great Christmas gift!
5 dif. trucks $30 ea
352-341-4754
Video Palm Corder
Panasonic, Zoom X14,
color & sound, soft shell
case, tapes & papers
Excel cond. $175.
352-228-3040, 489-0122
WHIRPOOL DRYER
Heavy Duty $150
GLIDER WALKER
w/footstool, good cond.
$50, 352-795-7254
WOMAN'S BICYCLE 26"
Hard Rock GS
21 speed Mountain Bike.
$75 Call 352-621-7586
WOOD DISPLAY RACK
2 wood cylindrical display
racks $30 each.
352-527-3177
Yamaha Motor Scooter
"Razz" 1988, Street legal.
Less than 1000 miles,
exc. cond. $1000 CASH
FIRM (352) 445-9448



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT $75.00
352-464-0316
Aluminum Crutches
new cond $25
Aluminum 4 leg folding
walker, new cond $20
352-344-5283
BEDSIDE COMMODE
AND ALUMINUM
WALKER ADJUSTABLE
LEGS ONLY 20.00
EACH 352 464 0316
GO GO ELITE
SCOOTER motorized
scooter breaks down in
four pieces for easy
transport; used for 6
months, 1600$ new, sell
for 800$ OBO; you pick
up citrus co
mary031149@gmail.com
TOILET SEAT RISER 4"
WITH HANDLES FOR
SUPPORT ONLY 25.00
352 464 0316
Wheel chair Ramps
Will load into any SUV
or van, hold any power
chair, or handicapped
cart. $150.
352-228-3040, 489-0122



Collector buying
sterling silver flatware
and US silver coins
(352) 601-7074


CLASSIFIED



"FAT STRAT"STYLE
GUITAR HSS PICKUPS,
METALLIC FINISH
"NEW IN BOX" $75
352-601-6625
"GOT BANJO?" ALMOST
NEW 5 STRING BANJO
W/RESONATER PLAYS
NICE, LOOKS GREAT!
$90 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PACKAGE"NEW"
W/GIGBAG,STRAP,
CHART,STRINGS,ETC
$75 352-601-6625
BALDWIN PIANO
Hamilton Studio upright
Bench Seat, Oak wood
mint cond. $1,000.
352-746-1654
CASIO PIANO
CTK574 W/STAND
BATTERY & 9 Volt. $60
Gas Chain Saw $50
(352) 628-7688
ELECTRIC GUITAR
STARTER KIT
W/AMP,GIGBAQTUJNER-
STRAP ETC $45
352-601-6625
Fender Vintage
reissue "65" Princeton
reverb guitar combo
amp. $850.
(352) 522-0467
HORNER F5 MODEL
MANDOLIN
and hard case, $395.
Jimmie at 621-0617
LEFTY BLACK STRAT
STYLE GUITAR, "NEW"
PLAYS, SOUNDS,
LOOKS PERFECT! $45
352-601-6625
LEFTY STRAT STYLE
GUITAR W/AMP,
TUNER,STRAP,STRING,
ETC "NEW IN BOX" $75
352-601-6625
LEFTY! "NEW" LES
PAUL STYLE GUITAR
W/AMP,TUNER,STRAP
CORD,&MORE $75
352-601-6625
MITCHELL 000
BODYSOLID TOP
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG $100
352-601-6625
PACIFIC CS SERIES
5PC DRUM SET
w/Sabian cymbals, dbl
peddle kit, stool,$450
352-201-1916
PIANO
Yamaha portable "Grand"
DGX-505 w/ stand, bench
& foot switch. Digital
music, notebook &
software. New cond.
$500 (352) 489-1593
SOLD IN 1 DAY
CASIO KEYBOARD
CTK 2000, heavy duty
stand, playbooks,



2 AIR BAKE COOKIE
SHEETS $5 GREEN
MIXING BOWL 13 INCH
LIKE NEW $10
Inverness 352-419-5981
2 LIGHT GREEN
BRAIDED RUGS One
oval, one round. $25 for
both. Text e-mail address
for pix & details. 904 687
3866
11X18 W/W CARPET
pale beige, clean $100
352-513-4614
9X18 W/W CARPET Pale
beige, clean $85
352-513-4614


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AER BED
Rarely used blow up
Queen Bed. $35.
352.249.9164
Almost new,
wicker rocker,
high back, smoke free
home $75.
(352) 586-1566
BAMBOO COFFEE
TABLE with glass top
approx 3 ft wide $25
860-2475
FLUTED QUICHE DISH
IRIDESCENT WHITE
$10 PORCELAIN JAM
JAR WITH LID FRANCE
$8 352-419-5981
KITCHEN CANNISTER
SET $10 13 INCH DEC-
ORATIVE CLEAR
GLASS CHRISTMAS
PLATE $10 419-5981
SILK FICUS TREES 4
are 5-6' tall; 1 is 8-9' tall &
fuller. $7-25. Can send
pix & details. Text email
addr to 904 687 3866






BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $900 OBO
A Great Holiday Gift
352-697-2771
EXERCISE BIKE UP-
RIGHT FAN TYPE (DP)
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO 85.00 352 464 0316
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE SAVE YOUR
BACK WORKS GREAT
ONLY 100.00 352 464
0316
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
60.00 352 464 0316
SEARS EXERCISE
BIKE, Whirlwind,Dual
Action Digital,
good cond. $100
352-344-5283
TREADMILL
Pro Form Crosswalk 380,
like new, $375 OBO
(352) 382-7399



2 Rubbermaid Boxes
Full of Paint Ball Guns
and Accessories
Dye, Smart Parts,
Tipman, Fill Station $250
(352) 563-0328
'04 EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric, sharp, exc
cond. incl. charger.
$1,995 (352) 503-2847
Club Car Golf Cart
2008,exc. condition
backseats, lights,
exc. batteries 48 volt.
$1850. 352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Dec.. 8th 9-5p
Sun. Aug. 9th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605


Parker Bros. shotgun,
12ga. V. H.-$1150.
Trapdoor Springfield,
45-70 $500. Ithaca
20ga. double $425
Call (352) 270-6142
Remmington Model
700, 300 ultra mag
w/adj burns scope
gun$500 obo gun cabi-
net $50 352-537-4144

SOLD
IN ONE DAY
KAYAK
Wilderness Systems Tar-
pon 120, yellow, used ap-
prox 7 x's, garaged, inc.
paddle, transport cart &
XL life preserver, over
$1k in equip.
Thule Kayak Roof car-
rier & accessories
$125, bike carrier "3"
for 2" hitch, $60
352-447-2967


2005 Gladiator
5 x 10 Closed Trailer
white, clean, with new
tires & wheels
$1,395 obo
(352) 382-0422
Trailer tilt-bed, 4x8x2
sides, new tires, and
spare, excellent $350
(352) 503-6972






baby crib $75., musical
cradle $50., stroller $50.,
adjustable high chair
$30., Fisher Price cradle
swing $55. 352-637-5537
GRACO PACK 'N' PLAY
Used few times when
grandchild visited.Navy
print, gender-neutral. $20
352-341-3607




TURQUOISE/ABALONE
NECKLACE $25
VINTAGE BLACK JET
NECKLACE $10
352-419-5981


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** * *


Gas Engines or Parts,
1903 & Up Toy or full
size Cash on Spot,
Cell (315) 466-2268
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369



Dachshunds mini, long
hair, x-mas pups, fe-
males, blck & cream,
champion blood
lines-ready when you are
$300- (352) 795-6870
(352) 220-4792
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039 *k


DOUGIE
Dougie is a laid-back
friendly guy, alert and
attentive. He loves his
human friends and
sits, shakes and
speaks on command.
His foster mom says
he is housebroken
and has great house
manners. He is 5
years old, neutered
and Heartworm
-negative. Weighs 45
pounds and gets
along with most other
dogs. He so deserves
a great life and will
surely be your great
companion. He will
love you forever. Call
his foster mom Donna
@ 352-249-7801.
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
1 Males & 3 Females,
Available AKC and all
Shots $1,500 to $1,750
Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732


BUNNIES
for Christmas! exc. pets
exotic tn-color, $10 ea.
352-503-6952








EVE
Eve is a 2 y.o. old
medium sized
pit/terrier mix, black
in color, very, very
playful. Smart,
athletic, agile, high
energy, very loving.
Gets along with other
dogs and loves
humans, is a great
walking/jogging
companion. Was
found abandoned,
tied to a trailer, but is
still very trusting. She
loves belly rubs, chew
bones, and squeaky
toys. A fenced yard
for Eve would be
preferred, as she
loves to run.
Call Judy
@352-503-3363.


SETH
Seth is a 1 y-o red
nosed pit bull puppy
with green eyes.
He is neutered,
heartworm-negative,
microchipped and
housebroken, learn-
ing basic commands.
Loves treats and
chewing on his bone!
Friendly, energetic,
and loves his human
and dog friends. A
favorite activity is on
the couch for a nap.
He would be a great
companion. For more
information contact
his foster family,
Crystal and Gerome
@ 352-533-4332."


WAGS
Wags is a ly.o.
terrier/pit bull mix, black
and white in color, neu-
tered and
Heartworm-negative,
up to date with shots.
Weighs 45 pounds. He
has lots of personality
and is an entertainer,
will keep you amused.
He is a great family
dog, loves all people,
young and old. Gets
along great with other
dogs, gives lots of cud-
dles and kisses. That
tail never stops wagg-
ing. Call Karen @
218-780-1808.


0 ..j


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179
Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent CIng.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549




Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia In-
continency No Prob.
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXP- Slabs,
Driveway,Patios,Found
-ation Repair #CBC057
405, (352) 427-5775


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515


Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Paint/Remodel, Repair,
Woodwork,Flooring,
Plumbing, DrywallTile
work Lic.37658/lns.
Steve 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
*k 352-257-9508 k
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570


Reoair. Remodel.
Additions
Free est.crc1330081
(352) 949-2292
STEVEN GIBSON
Handyman & Maint.
Services, 20+ yrs., Exp.
(352) 308-2379




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373**




GOOD MORNING LAWN
CARE
Leaves to Lawns *
Call 352-502-6588
GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588
LAWNCARE N MORE
Fall Clean-up, leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300

WINTER SPECIAL
$35 for Driveways
**** up to 60ft! ****
Ann's 352-601-3174










LEGAL / Professional
SAVE divorce, custody
wills, deeds, etc. Guaran-
teed docs 352-341-2173


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373**


World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Esdmates
352Z465,6079 ai


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190


ALL EXTERIOR

ALU MINUM, INC.

352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextaluml3@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


GENERAAC
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

326114


CARPET & L
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

pe aF in: Furniture
Specializing in: Cleaned for
Carpet Stretching'FREE Ask
Carpet Repair
a 352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates E
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


Add an artisic touch to your existing yard
IN |or pool or plan
.. . something
completly new!
eZ. "Often imitated
never dupicatei'


OUR INTERLOCKINGBRICK PAVRSPECIALIST
COPIES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 352-400-3188


TILE '


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090
Lic # CC2544





BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


AAA ROOFING
CaGll te "eeak6uste
Free Written Estimate

:100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 OOODDBP


S "Repaint
Specialist"

Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing

S- FREE ESTIMATES -
S 352-465-6631


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry

Screening
ean Dryer
S AffodUe & Dependable
4 Exper ence lifelong
*H 352.344-0905
. cell' 400-1722










Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing

! Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/sprnghill


1 7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

^^^^^^B^^^^^^


For Sale
Ready to go Dec 28th.
2 Females & 2 Males
$100ea 352-503-9257
FREE Kittens looking for
a good home. 5 adorable
8 weeks old kittens. 2
black & white tuxedo. 2
black males, 1 gray
female. (510) 867-5727
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpous.net


DOG CRATE 48"length
x29' width $40
DOG IGLOO $10
(352) 527-0982

Livestock


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



BOAT SEAT
flip flop cooler seat
new, $150
352-447-2967


HONDA
2006 Aquatrax 2 wave
runners and trailer,1135
cc 4 stroke motor,100
hours each, completely
maintained,one has
turbo, both have reverse.
$8,000.00 352-267-0952


2005 G3 EAGLE 185
fish ready, w/90 4-stroke
Yamaha and trailer, fresh
water use, $7500
352-513-4621
'07 14FT AIRBOAT
Alum., Like new, seats 4
w/ drive-on alum trailer.
Incl $30,000 850hp world
racing engine. Original
cost $55,000. Selling
$25,000.(352)793-3511
or cell (352)303-9612

AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7500 352-637-1391


MUST SELL

BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner -$2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
EAGLE SKIMMER
'99, Flats Boat, tunnel,
50 John, new troll mtr.
FF, GPS, excel. $6,000
obo (352) 527-4910
FLATS BOAT
1995 18ft Islander cc
2004 90hp Mercury 2ST.
very low hrs. Jack plate,
polling platform, fish
finder, heavy duty Alum.
trailer w/spare tire. $7200.
906-203-2221
(Homosassa)
JON BOAT
18 ft., flat bottom,all
new decking, 25H
mercury, GPS & Trailer
$3,500 (352) 563-0328
SOLD
G-3
Model 1236Alum. Jon
boat, swivel seats, troll.
motor, depth/fish finder,
Galvan. trailer, &
9.8 merc.
STARCRAFT
'92 20FT PONTOON
50hp Yamaha, like new,
enclosed toilet, trailer dbl
axel w/ new tires.
$4400.(352) 220-1342
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506


HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$7500 obo 352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


He w o
How So


Your


'V


Chronicle

Classifieds
- 7^ * :.';.*


In Print

& Online


I
/,


CH I T R I S C U N T Y


CHRONICLE C]fl


(352) 563-5966


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.* ..



"- *. 7 "
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*us ,=o e u ,,v YXl ,


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A Bold Design. An Inviting Interior. Intelligent Excellence.


1111 Entune
i ~Makes life on the road more convenient,
entertaining and informative.


Available Blid Spot Monitor (BSM)
with Rear Cross-traffic Alert (RCTA)
Radar technology designed to detect and
identify vehicles that may not be visible


IL


S eBinTM
A non-slip surface for your cell phone
or MP3 device.


IntelliTouchTM
Touch to operate elegant, low-profile controls
for climate control and audio systems.


GE TOYOT


O ToyotaCare
lIlll"I'lll", 111111.ll,'~ry mll-lI .........


www.villagetovota.com C VRYSTA .L R BV ER 352-628-5100


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 D7


W;


rf, .








D8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


2004 30 FT. 5th Wheel,
2 slide-outs, includes
slider hitch. $17,000.
(352)493-1195,538-6446
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides. New ti-
res, excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



Set of 4 Cooper
Discover LSX,
265/75R16
with chevy rims.
less than 1,500 miles
$450 (352) 563-0328
TOW DOLLY
Stehl, Great cond.
new tires, $625 OBO
352-621-3646
Truck Bed Tool Box
diamond plate aluminum
locks both ends, 60" top
51" bottom, exc. cond.
$100, 352-726-6845



$CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ



$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
2000 Chevy Corvette
Metallic Bowling Green
Std shift, one owner,
& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874
'02 CLK430
MERCEDES CONVERT.
RED, MINT $11, 200
OBO(352) 302-8265
BUICK
1997, Skylark
$2,950
352-341-0018
BUICK ACROSS
08, White, 4dr, 40kmiles
Cloth int. $13,000.
352-726-1864
CHEVROLET
'03 Monte Carlo,
2 DR. V6. runs great,
100k mi. $4,300
(352) 270-8759
CHEVY
2004 Malibu, LTZ,
$3,995.
352-341-0018



CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Ed., Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Cond
$7500 352 522-0505
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
'00, Mustang LX.
auto, V6, red, runs
excellent, $4,700.
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
FORD
Escort, 4 Door.
73k miles, New tires
extra clean $3,650
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
FORD FUSION
2010 Fusion, White exte-
nor, black nterior,great
gas mileage, all the good-
ies: Navigation, Sync,
Power seat, a/c,
sun/moon roof, leather,
AM/FM, all maintenance
at dealer, no accidents.
Steve -508-816-3964 or
e-mail
attysweitz@gmail.com.
$19,500
GMC
2003, Yukon
$8,495
352-341-0018
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
LINCOLN
1993 Town Car, Good
Cond. New brakes, good
rubber, leather Intenor,
$2000 (352) 220-6303
Mercury
"97 Grand Marquis w/
trailer hitch, 4 good
hancock tires, high
mileage $1100 OBO
(352) 249-7541
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. $9200 OBO
(352) 382-0428


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
S* ** * *


CHEVROLET
1980 Corvette Sting Ray,
T-Top, 350 V8,Automatic,
A/C,All original matching
numbers,86,000 original
miles,98% restored,
$11,700.000
352-267-0952
CHEVROLET
'83, El Camino. Re-
stored V6, white, w/
custom cover. SS tires,
wheels, low m.,l $6,000
obo 352 464-0167



$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440



CHEVROLET
SILVERADO
08 CREW CAB, Blue
Silver, 67K miles,
show-room condition
FLAWLESS, Fully
accessorized
Guaranteed PERFECT
Well Below Book at
$13.750. Firm
352-634-2091

FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS. V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150



918-1130 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board


^^^^^^^I


GMC
'03, Sierra, extra cab.
new tires, Extra Clean
automatic V6, $6,950
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
TOYOTA
1992 Pick-up, 10 Ft box
truck, 135K e-z miles,
well maintained, ready to
go, $3800 OBO
(352) 344-8882 or
wscec(chotmail.com



CHEVROLET
1999 Tahoe
4 x 4 $3,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004 Trailblazer
4 x 4, $7,995
352-341-0018
KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285
TOYOTA
19994 Runner, 2WD,
Mich tires, Some cos-
metic damage, Runs
Great $5200 OBO
(352) 344-0072



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2001 4cyl "TJ Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
Low miles $10,500
352-220-4634



of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at


^^^^^^^I


MAZDA
'04. MPV, 7 Seater,
mnrf, every thing pwer,
shwrm cond. 60k mi.
$9,400 (352) 522-0467



POLARIS
2003 Trail Blaze 250 au-
tomatic, runs great, gar-
age kept, very good
cond, needs 1 front tire,
$1400 obo 352-795-9878



'04 HONDA
750 Shadow Aero. Runs
& looks great! $3500
(352) 344-0084
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688



KAWASAKI
2006 VULCAN VF900
Custom. Only 7000
miles, garage kept
$3500 (352) 464-1495



KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 550 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 FIRM. Phone
352-726-8124
NISSAN
2004 350Z, 2dr.
convertible, silver, 53k
mles, auto trans, $14,800
352-382-4239



govdeals.com, Novem-
ber 27, until December
17,2012.
Pub: November 27 thru
December 17,2012.

Misc. otice


378-1216 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
All interested parties within Citrus County are hereby advised that the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners, acting as Citrus County Transit, is applying to the
Florida Department of Transportation for a capital grant under Section 5310 and/or
5311 of the Federal Transit Act of 1991, as amended, for the purchase of 6 passenger
wheelchair and stretcher accessible buses and/or 16 passenger wheelchair accessi-
ble buses to be used for the provision of public transit services within Citrus County.
A Public Hearing has been scheduled on December 31. 2012 9:00AM at 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path Room 166. Lecanto Florida 34461 for the purpose of advising all inter-
ested parties of service being contemplated if grant funds are awarded, and to in-
sure that contemplated services would not represent a duplication of current pro-
posed services provided by existing transit or Para transit operators in the area.
This hearing will be conducted if, and only if, a written request for the hearing is re-
ceived by Thursday, December 27, 2012 by 5:00 p.m. (two business days prior to the
scheduled hearing).
Requests for a hearing must be addressed to Citrus County Transit, attention Lon Frye
at PO Box 1930, Lecanto Fl. 34460. A copy of the request should be sent to the Flor-
ida Department of Transportation, District Seven, Attn: Tracy Dean at 11201 N. McKin-
ley Drive, MS-7330, Tampa, FL 33612.
December 9 & 16, 2012.


M
380-1209
SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public


sale by competitive bid-
ding on the premises
where said vehicles)
have been stored and
which is located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
6403 W. Homosassa Trail,
HomosassaCitrus County,
Florida the following:
DOS:12-21-12@8AM
1971 Go-Go Camper
VIN#12RS26850


DOS:12-31-12@8AM
2007 Kia
VIN#KNAFE121075408564
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale in
cash only. Vehicle(s) sold
as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement, between
owner & obligated party.
December 9, 2012.


751-1209WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Hospital Board invites interested parties to submit a Request for
Proposal for the valuation of Citrus Memorial Hospital and other listed assets. The RFP
shall be submitted to the Citrus County Hospital Board on or before December 27,
2012 at 2pm, pursuant to the RFP.
Scope of Work for RFP
The Citrus County Hospital Board seeks a prospective bidder to address the following
requirements, pursuant to FS 155.40(5) (c&d):
Be a certified public accounting firm or other firm that has substantial expertise
in the valuation of hospitals to render an independent valuation of the Citrus
Memorial Hospital's fair market value for sale and or leasing of hospital facilities
owned by the board to a not-for-profit or for-profit entity.
Be a certified public accounting firm or other firm "to consider an objective op
rating comparison between a hospital or health care system operated by the
Citrus County Hospital Board and other similarly situated hospitals, both
not-for-profit and for-profit, which have similar service mix, in order to determine
whether there is a difference in the cost of operation using publicly available
data provided by the Agency for Health Care Administration and the quality
metrics identified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core
Measures. The comparison must determine whether it is more beneficial to tax
payers and the affected community for the hospital to be operated by a gov
ernmental entity, or whether the hospital can be operated by a not-for-profit or
for-profit entity with similar or better cost-efficiencies or measurable outcomes
identified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core Measures.
The comparison must also determine whether there is a net benefit to the commu
nity to operate the hospital as a not-for-profit or for-profit entity and use the pro
ceeds of the sale or lease for the purposes described (herein)." Florida Statute
155.40(5)(d).
To acquire the RFP please go to website of the Citrus County Hospital Board at
www.citruscountyhospitalboard.com.
November 28, December 2, 5 &9, 2012.


379-1209 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 004-13
Sugarmill Woods WTP No. 2, WTP No. 3 and WWTP SCADA Upgrade
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide the modification to the existing SCADA system associated with the Cit-
rus County Sugarmill Woods Water Treatment Plant (WTP) No. 2, Sugarmill Woods WTP
No. 3 and the Sugarmill Woods Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP). A detail
scope of work and project requirements are included within the project specifica-
tions. The general concept of the project is to modify the existing SCADA system at
the WWTP to also control and monitor the two WTPs and to monitor particular sys-
tems and equipment at the WWTP. Modifications to WTP No. 2 will include providing
new RTUs for Wells 5, 10, 11 and 12; providing fiber optic communication link from the
WTP to the wells using the existing underground conduits; modifying the existing PLC
control system at the WTP to control and monitor the wells; and provide a cellular
communication data link from the WTP to the WWTP. Modification to WTP No. 3 shall
include modifying the existing PLC control system at the WTP to include a cellular
data communication link from the WTP to the WWTP. Modification to the WWTP in-
cludes providing RTUs on particular systems and equipment at the WWTP and using
the same radio communication link associated with the lift stations to allow the
SCADA system to monitor these systems, provide a cellular data communication link
to allow the SCADA system to control and monitor the WTPs and upgrade the exist-
ing SCADA system with new computers, workstation and software.
Minimum Requirements for Submitting a Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Certified General Contractors License or
2. Register General Contractors Ucense or
3. Electrical Contractors License
4. Ability to meet all ICSC qualifications as outlined in the Engineers Specifications
for this project titled "Sugarmill Woods WTP No.2, WTP No. 3 and WWTP SCADA Up-
grade, Technical Specifications, 100% Submittal, dated November 2012, written by
AECOM.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before January 9, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path: Suite 266:
Lecanto.FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for January 9, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Joe Meek, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
December 9, 2012


THE LOWEST





PRICE I


OF THE YEAR


ON ALL 2012



MODELS!

12 NISSAN SENTRA










s12,999 0 $203 R MO


12 DODGE RAM











$13,99 219 PER MO


12 NISSAN ALTIMA













12 CHEVY CRUZE

















--'
1 .686

















$16,0999 R266 RMO


12 CHEVY EXPRESS














12 CHEVY EQUINOX


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12 CHEVY IMPALA










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12 FIAT 500







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: I : I52'4 1,


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CRYSTAL



AUTOMOTIVE






g 352-564-1971

l www.CRYSTALAUTOS.coM

1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL

937 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Bmoksville, FL






*PRICE AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE
$599.50. PAYMENTS ARE FOR72 MONTHS AT 3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES
ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
000DF1H


20,999 OR$328PER M


mmmr&


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I B


I B


I B






H Section E -SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012



OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


ESTATE GUIDE


B Sikorski's
SAttic PAGE E6
PAGE E6


ri-I
rL


o.f.
'L "
If,


.- -
L,


When designing living rooms for clients who
entertain heavily around the holidays, de-
signer Brian Patrick Flynn often pairs sofas
with swivel chairs, which allow for easy con-
versation in any direction, as well as coffee
tables which can double as benches, and
occasional tables which also work as
stools, as seen here.


FX


JE


?"-" ,-- t-_ -- '.i
" - j .-. r
i~-? jE- *
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J' I f/I,'[VIN 1I A"


I/ 1'!


rmlSTN


'I 1MH Il'l










E2 SUNDA'I~ DECEMBER 9, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


BEST OF THE BEST!
*Pool & Spa/Waterfall Cooks Kit. w/Nook
* Boat/RV Parking Great Room + Family Room
* Inviting Entryway Beautiful Master Suite
* Over 4,200 Sq. R. Upscale Gated Comm.
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Iwww.FloiidaLislinglnlo.coinl


* Ktchen has SS Appl. Home Never Lived In
* 2/3/1 + 24x24 Garage Boat/RV Parking
* Large Carport *400 Amp Bec. & 19-Seer A/C
* 4.75 Acres/Fenced Short Drive to Gulf/Rivers
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Flo idallislinigliilo.com


* 3BD/3BA2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
* Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
*2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


1035 S. BROOKFIELD DR.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG + POOL Remodeled Kitchen
* Granite Counters New Flooring
* Pool Has Pavers, Waterfall & Large Lanai
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


SPRUCE CREEK PRESERVE
*55+ Golf Course Community Bright and Cheerful
* Newer Air Conditioner Professionally Landscaped
*30-Year Roof New Fence
* Low HOA Fees
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 9
Email: sherylpolls@aol.comi
Website: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


Great buy on this 3/3/2 home on corner lot in great
community of Canterbury Lake Estates Nice open floor
plan, split bedrooms, huge master walk-in closet, ceramic
tile, double pane windows, secunty system, covered lanal,
screened patio, circular drive New A/C & water heater
2010 Community offers clubhouse, pool, & tennis courts
Enjoy the Florida lifestyle
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net
VIRTUAL TOURS ut www.martha.sather.remax.com





--as
REUIl\




REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


WATERFRONT









4 Bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace,
deep water. Lots of dock space.


LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com


DUNNELLON
*Beautiful 3BR/2BN2CG Home Great Room wVaulted Ceilings
* Kitchen w/Lots of Cabinets Nice Master Suie
SScreened Lanai & Pool L-Shaped Barn& 2-Stall Barn
*Tack& Feed Room/Hay Barn


LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenplilmer@remax.net lik


GREAT 3/2/1
Lovingly cared for on 2 fully-fenced lots in Crystal
River Amenities include RV/boat storage, 12x13
utility building with attached carport Enjoy your
SPOOL in your privacy fenced 1 5x24 deck Guys
check out the MANCAVE garage/work area
9' ceiling, A/C, plumbed, with cabinets GALORE
Near shopping, boating, hospital, schools, etc

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


UU NUI MISS UUI on this Pine
Ridge deal! Lovely 3/2/3+ den boasts a
solar heated pool & spa, gas fireplace, RV
ad with 50 amp, large open kitchen.
Upgrades include flooring, custom window
treatments and baths. Enjoy your morning
coffee in the breakfast nook overlooking
your pool.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email cnadal@remax.net


CHYA51AL HIVIH
* Beautiful 3BR/3BA/3CG Home Gourmet Kitchen
* Great Room wNaulted Ceilings Lg. Master Suite
SScreened Pool & Spa Lots of Beautiful Decking
* 900 Sq. R. Workshop 2 Covered Boat Slips
* Beautiful Natural FL Setting
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpllmer@remax.net


ILUHAL UI IY
S5 Acres of Waterfront
Over 1,200 Ft. on the Water
SDock on Open Lake
SPrivate Cove with Dock
S3/2 Mobile Home 1,248 Sq. Ft.
SLarge Screened Porch
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


SUPER NICE BRENTWOOD 3/3/2 ON A PRIVATE
CORNER LOT. All prettied up and move-in
ready. Split plan; great cooks kitchen w/
breakfast bar. Living and dining rooms
have sliders to large screened-in lanai;
inside laundry, large side-entry garage.
Priced right to sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net

















#1 in Citrus County


- N H I 01 N.FlorII
8375 S. Iucos Bld. Honssa6870 w.*ueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


16 ASTERS COURT, SUGARMILL WOODS
* 4BR/2BA2 Car Garage Built 2005 2,165 SF
* Large Family Room Wood Cabinets Throughout
* Formal LRIDR Master BR with 2 Walk-Ins
SKitchen with Breakfast Nook Stainless Steel Appliances
* Large Screened Porch Extra Brick Paver Patio

LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016
Email: lounalley@timpabay.rr.com l


PRE-APPROVED SHORT SALE!
Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath home includes 2-car
garage and screened porch In great condition and
loaded with appealing features this home is like
new Located close to Homosassa shopping and
local waterways Split bedroom plan, nice cabinets
and more

STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 E3


It's the time of the


year for poinsettias


December days are
shorter, nights
longer and tempera-
tures below freezing on
early mornings in Central
and North Florida. In cold
Zone 8B in Marion County,
expect to get about 20 frosty
mornings and several hard
freezes over winter
Citrus County is predom-
inantly Z9A, with protected
microclimates in Z9B influ-
enced by the Gulf of Mexico
and inland bodies of water.


Jane
JAN
GARI


9A gardens should experience 10 to 15
frosty mornings and a hard freeze or
two. Poinsettias can be grown in South
Florida gardens, where they can
reach 12 feet tall.
Tropical plants cannot survive out-
side in the garden without insulating
protection and the labor of love. My
many flower beds have a fresh blanket
of top mulch of natural pine needles
raked from a local farm pasture. Pines
shed older needles during October lo-
cally This free and sustainable mulch
is not eaten by termites and kills no
precious trees. Heavy, thick bundles of
spun polyester frost blanket material,
left over after retiring from the nurs-
ery trade, remain rolled up and stored
in the garage attic. I am too old or lazy
to go to the trouble of covering plants
or wheeling them into the house dur-
ing winter.
There are over 314 million people in
the United States in over 117 million
households. Everyone likes colorful


plants to brighten winter.
The poinsettia, Euphorbia
pulcherrima, or Mexican
Flame Tree, is tropical
from frost-free Zones 10 to
12. The species name pul-
cherrima means "very
beautiful." Hundreds of
millions of cuttings are
S grown commercially every
Veber year to adorn households,
primarily in the Northern
E'S Hemisphere. Growers arti-
DEN ficially darken the plants in
the fall to lengthen their
"night" hours. This forcing promotes
flowering and the changing color of
the attractive bracts surrounding the
tiny flowers.
Historically, the Aztecs called this
plant Cuetlaxochitl. The bracts are
used for dying and the sap medicinally
to control fevers. Spanish Franciscan
friars used the colorful plant during
their Christmas parades in Mexico.
Botanist Juan Blame first noted this
plant in his journal during the 17th
century In 1833, German botanist
Wilenow officially assigned the Latin
binomial to accurately identify the
plant now commonly called poinsettia.

See JANE/Page E10


Powell
hits new
high k;1
ERAAmeri-
can Realty & In-
vestments is
proud to an- Betty
nounce the latest Betye
Powell
production level ERAAmerican
achieved by one Realty.
of its Inverness
office agents for 2012.
Betty Powell has surpassed
the $1 million mark in closed sales
volume in 2012.
ERAAmerican Realty is proud
to recognize the achievement of
this fine real estate professional.
Betty Powell can be reached at the
Inverness office of ERAAmerican
Realty by calling 352-726-5855.
Real
Team
sets new
record
Congratula-
tions to the
Real Team of The Real
EXIT Realty Team
Leaders in EXIT Realty
Beverly Hills, Leaders.
who have
passed $2.1 million in closed sales


Real Estate DIGEST

so far in 2012.
The Real Team is a dynamic
team that specializes in short
sales. You can contact them at
352-527-1112.
Ivory earns kudos
from RE/MAX
Realtor David
Ivory is being
recognized for
passing the /, fl
multi-million dol-
lar mark in sales
volume this year. 'A
David joins an
elite group of David
local Realtors Ivory
who have quali- RE/MAX
fied for this pres- Realty One.
tigious club.
David is an agent with RE/MAX
Realty One and works out of their
Crystal River office. The associ-
ates and staff of RE/MAX congrat-
ulate David on his continued
success.
Andersons tops at
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker Investors
Realty of Citrus County would like
to announce that both Cliff Ander-
son and Erna Anderson have
crossed the $1 million mark in
sales volume for 2012.


Cliff
Anderson
Coldwell
Banker.


Erna
Anderson
Coldwell
Banker.


Cliff is a specialist in the villa
community of Royal Oaks and
Erna focuses primarily on the
planned community of Arbor
Lakes, but both are highly qualified
to list and sell throughout Citrus
County.
Cliff can be reached directly at
352422-0179 and Erna can be
reached directly at 352-464-4604,
or at the office at 352-726-9533.

* Submit information for
the Real Estate Digest by
4 p.m. Thursday for publi-
cation Sunday.
Submit material, attn:
HomeFront, at Chronicle
offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; fax to 563-
3280; or e-mail to news-
desk@ chronicle
online.com.


First Floor Fantasy! .
In a quiet corner of Inverness Village
is this newly priced 2/2 condo. New
kitchen, decorator touches through-
out, delightful rear family room/
screened lanai with lovely view.
MLS 356846 $39,900
Ask for Marilyn Booth TODAY!
637-4904 or 726-6668


PINE RIDGE
41313 POOL HOME
Best Priced Home on Market.
Hurry! Beautiful lot, large lanai.
Convenient location, 2630 sq. ft
cooled. MUST SEE!
$205,000
Call Joe 302-0910
000DHDD


OPEN ............


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Suggestions to



stock a beginner's



new spice rack


ear Sara: My daugh-
ter is moving into a
new home, and she
wants me to help her buy
spices to stock her pantry.
Which spices would you
start with? Linda, New
York
Dear Linda: I'd buy spice
blends that can cover S
meats, poultry and vegeta- ara
bles, as well as spices for FRU
sweet and savory dishes. I LIV
suggest buying staples such
as oregano, cinnamon, garlic and
onion powder, basil, thyme, rosemary,
chili powder, red pepper flakes, nut-
meg, paprika, cumin, ginger, cloves,
allspice, celery and parsley She can
add her own baking ingredients (salt,
pepper, baking soda, vanilla, etc.) and
expand her spices from there.
Dear Sara: What are your thoughts
on potty training early to save on dia-
pers? I've been reading about elimi-
nation communication and wondered
what you think about it. Diana D.,
Wisconsin
Dear Diana D.: After changing dia-
pers for 12 years straight, I feel quali-
fied to give this slippery slope of a
question a whirl. I think most parents
look for cues and signals to anticipate
their child's potty needs, even without
totally embracing the natural infant
hygiene method. Personally, I was not
in any rush to have my kids use the
potty; my kids were definitely wearing
diapers at older ages than many other
kids. I have to admit, there were a few
times when I saw very young children
without diapers and thought it was
pretty impressive, but it was important
to me that I wait until I felt that each of
my kids was ready
Each parent makes his or her own
decision on how to approach potty
training. If someone wants to use the
elimination communication method, I
say good for them. I can see the appeal
and benefits. I see it as a natural ap-
proach that is a good match for some
families. It would not have been a good
match for my family, as it simply would-
n't have been practical or convenient
for my busy schedule. (Of course, even


I


as I say that, I feel the com-
mon pang of guilt shared by
many parents, as if my busy
life meant I wasn't properly
focused on my children.
Ha!)
I often needed to use dia-
pers as a backup for situa-
tions, so it would have been
l a bit frustrating to try the
natural infant hygiene
GAL method. For example, I
ING could not rely on a care-
giver or expect them to fol-
low through on the elimination
communication method when I was
working or unavailable. (Did I just feel
another guilty pang for working? Ha!)
But I don't mean to imply that a work-
ing mom or dad couldn't still use the
method successfully
Before I dig a deeper hole, to an-
swer your question: The elimination
communication method's purpose is
not to save money on diapers; that just
happens to be a bonus. I would not go
into it with frugality as your motiva-
tion.
Dear Sara: We just returned from a
great vacation at a resort in Stowe, Vt.,
that had the best sheets I had ever
slept on. After our first night, our
group met for breakfast and everyone
was raving about the sheets! The label
on the sheets said Comphy, and I dis-
covered on the Internet that the com-
pany produces high-quality microfiber
bedding but does not sell to the pub-
lic. The Comphy website said the pub-
lic must buy their sheets through


See FRUGAL/Page E5


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Realtor Associate
Your CLEAR Choice in Real Estate Hometown
debbieclearyfl@yahoo.com Realty
www.debbiecleary.com 6050W Gulf to Lake Hwy
Crystal River, FL
352-601-6664 office 352-564-0333


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


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E4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

authorized dealers, which
are the hotels. Have you
ever used microfiber
sheets? What do you think
of them? Where did you buy
them? If I could find a set
that was like the hotel
sheets, I would go to bed
happy every night! -Diana,
Iowa
Dear Diana: I have used
microfiber sheets, pillow-
cases and comforters. They
are nice to sleep on. You can
find various brands of mi-
crofiber sheets anywhere
that sells linens, such as
Bed Bath and Beyond, Tar-
get, Walmart, Costco, QVC,
Sears, etc. As for the Com-
phy brand, you can buy their
sheets for your home. I
called their customer serv-


ice line and a representa-
tive recommended buying
from this online retailer:
stopdropandrelax. com.
mmm
Holiday clearance sales
are a great way to buy gift
items or add to your home
inventory Many of the items
in these sales are not in tra-
ditional holiday colors, and
clearance products cover
much more than just candy
and decorations now, too.
Look for kitchen tools,
paper goods, home scents,
health and beauty items,
clothing and accessories,
dishes and cookware, craft
supplies and appliances, to
name a few.
The first reader tip shares
another great clearance
product to stock up on:
Shop holiday clearance:
Look for baking items. I
went to my local Aldi store
and found pumpkin pan-


cake mix for 25 cents per
box. I bought all of it, which
was around 30 boxes; I'll
keep 10 boxes and donate
the rest. I also bought 40
boxes of Halloween brownie
mix (the kind you frost and
decorate) at 25 cents per
box; I'll keep 20 and donate
the rest. Frosting and cake
mixes were also available
for 25 cents per box. People
may be inclined to think
that because there's a holi-
day on the box it must taste
different, but it's actually


the same as the regular
product. -Nana, Illinois
Lunch organization: I
have a list posted inside one
of my cabinet doors noting
what each person likes for
lunch. I just go down the list
to make sure everything is
packed. I also have every-
thing organized in bins. All
the sandwich-making sup-
plies, for instance, are in a
single bin in the fridge. -
Cookie, Mississippi
Silicone baking cups: I
use those silicone cupcake


liners to freeze food in.
Once it's frozen, I pop the
food out and put it in a Zi-
ploc bag in the freezer. I
make big batches of steel-
cut oatmeal, which takes
forever to cook, then I
freeze it in single-portion
sizes. It works perfectly I
live alone, so I freeze a lot of
what I can't eat right away I
don't throw out food! This
method would be good for
soups, casseroles and stews,
too. -Peggy email
Christmas giftwrap: In-


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 E5

stead of using gift tags, I use
different colored wrapping
paper for each person. So
everything blue is for one
person, everything red is for
another person, etc. The
paper doesn't have to be
identical, just the same
color. I group them all by
color under the tree, too. -
Olivia, Ohio
Reuse jars: I save my
peanut butter containers.
It's a messy job, but it feels

See FRUGAL/Page E10


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E6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


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Edible ornaments


They're fun

It's the time of year
again when holiday
decorations are adorn-
ing lamp posts, mailboxes
and shrubbery throughout
our neighborhoods. Why
not keep wildlife in mind
when hanging your holiday
decorations this year?
Edible holiday decora-
tions are homemade, inex-
pensive and
nature-inspired. Children
love to help make them and
best of all it's a beautiful
way to feed the birds and
wildlife with attractive and
edible holiday decorations.
Edible holiday decora-
tions for wildlife require
more time than money and
are a great way to get the
family involved in doing
something environmentally
friendly for the birds.
Maybe you were fortunate
enough to share family ac-
tivities such as stringing
popcorn and cranberries


to make, and attract wildlife


when you were a child.
This holiday season might
be the perfect time to slow
things down and
make the same
edible holiday
decorations.
More impor-
tantly, you'll be
making memo-
ries with your
children.
Many of the
steps for these Joan B1
tasty holiday FLOE
decorations can
easily be done FREI
while the family LIV
is watching tele-
vision in the evening. The
next day, hang these pretty
and enticing holiday deco-
rations on an outdoor
Christmas tree. It's perfect
if you have an evergreen
tree near a window where
you can watch the birds
and wildlife enjoy the ap-
petizing holiday decora-


rI
R
I


tions and ornaments.
Peanut butter pine
cones: This delicious holi-
day decoration
S for birds is a tra-
ditional favorite.
Put crunchy or
creamy peanut
butter in the
crevices of pine
cones and then
roll them in bird
seed. Wrap the
adshaw cones with wire
IDA- or thick twine
and hang them
IDLY on a tree, wreath
NG or swag. These
are definitely
one of the easiest edible
holiday decorations.
Popcorn and cranberry
garland: Since young chil-
dren and needles don't mix,
you'll have to create the
popcorn and berry strings,
but they can help by

See EDIBLE/Page E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inside...


Holiday seating secrets
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Piano stool is undoubtedly an antique; beer stein collecting


Dear John: I read your
column every Sunday
Enclosed you will find
a picture of an old
piano stool. The
markings on the bot-
tom show it was made
by the New York
Piano Stool Co. I have
had it for about 50
years and it was old
when I got it. Could
you give me an idea of
when it was made and Johr
the value? TJ. W,
Homosassa SIK
Dear TJ.W.: I think
your piano stool was
made before World War I, so it
is around 100 years old. Al-
though they are not in any
specific category of collect-
ing, piano stools have been a
popular part of the antiques
furniture marketplace for a
long time. Those like the one
you own typically sell in the
$50 to $100 range short of


good luck. There are still a
few companies that make
new piano stools similar to
yours. The new
ones cost in the
$300 range. An-
,r. tique furniture
~ j can often, qual-
S ity for quality,
be purchased
for much less
than new.
Dear John: I
Sikorski recently pur-
chased a house
RSKI'S and the uphol-
TTIC stered chair
without arms in
the photo was left in the
house along with several
other pieces I may ask about
later. What can you tell me
about the age and value? -
L.L.S.M., Internet
Dear L.L.S.M.: The chair
was made in America not long
after the Civil War. The style
is Renaissance Revival. The


type of chair is called a demi-
arm chair, small arms. I think
it would sell in the $75 to $150
range.
Dear John: I have a paint-
ing won in 2003. The artist is
Sharon Crute and the paint-
ing is called "Through the In-
side." It is a limited edition
giclee print, 3 of 100. It is 30 by
50 inches with a certificate of
authenticity. It also says
Michael Bray artist represen-
tative Inc. I cannot find any-
thing or anyone to help me
out. As I listen to your show I
thought I would give you a
bother for any info you can
give me about the artist and
the present value. -B.M., In-
ternet
Dear B.M.: Fine art digital
prints first started to appear
in the marketplace in 1987.
They were made with large-
format iris inkjet printers that
used high quality inks and
paper. In 1991 a fellow in


France named the process
"giclee," which literally trans-
lates as "spurt of ink." The
name was immediately ac-
cepted by the general market-
place.
The artist Sharon Crute
continues her art career. Cur-
rently there is no secondary
market interest in her works.
Her website is www.sharon
crute.com.
Dear John: Enclosed are
snapshots, front and back, of
what I think is a Bavarian
wedding sequence stein,
which measures close to 3
feet tall. I do not know of what
material it is made of
See ATTIC/Page E7
This piano stool could be 100
years old or more. Although
piano stools are not a specific
collecting category, an an-
tique piece is an attractive al-
ternative to a new one.
Special to the Chronicle


Ii
[1
3:



IL .







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

although it seems to look like
clay It was given to me by a
German lady some 20 years
ago and I do not know how
long she had it before she gave
it to me.
I cannot find any markings
on this stein, so it seems it
might be categorized as a "col-
lectible" without any mone-
tary significance, although it
could be sold in the "catch-as-
you-can" realm. I think a stein
hobby enthusiast might be in-
terested in it for its eye appeal
and its photogenic uniqueness
or simply a conversational
umbrella stand or a private
liquor bar eye-catcher. I have
reached an age where such a
This large, colorful beer stein
shows a Bavarian wedding.
Beer steins are a popular col-
lecting category, but most col-
lectors prefer steins
manufactured in the 19th or
early 20th century. This stein
most likely dates from after
World War II.
Special to the Chronicle


trophy could be simply sold in
bulk with my other furnishings
should I pass away; it would
be a shame. Thank you for
whatever help you can offer
on value. S.JZ., Beverly
Hills
Dear SJ.Z.: Beer steins have
been a specific category of col-
lecting for decades. Most stein
collectors prefer steins made
in the 19th to early 20th cen-
tury Your large, decorative
stein depicting a wedding cel-
ebration was made after
World War II and is likely not
more than 50 years old. It
makes an interesting decora-
tive item, but is not of much in-
terest to a serious beer stein
collector. So you are correct,
potential dollar value is catch-
as-catch-can.

John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He
hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send questions
to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala 34478 or ask
sikorski@aol.com.


EDIBLE
Continued from Page E6

handing you the pieces of food. Older
children can handle this part, though,
and it's a big time saver It needs to be
a thick needle with an eye large
enough for a thick thread or thin
waxed dental floss.
The popcorn should be plain, un-
salted and stale. Fresh popcorn crum-
bles too easily The cranberries can be
fresh or dried. The fresh berries are
larger and showier on the tree. Put a
knot on one end of the thread and start
threading the popcorn and berries in
the pattern of your choice. Finish the
garland with another knot The garland
doesn't have to be long. Put shorter gar-
land pieces near another one to look
continuous on the tree.
U Citrus cup hanging feeders: An-
other enticing holiday decorations
option is using the skins of orange or
grapefruit halves as miniature cup
feeders. Scoop the pulp from the cit-
rus fruit and enjoy it yourself. Next,
poke three holes, evenly spaced,
around the rim of the orange/grape-
fruit cup and tie thick string or twine
through the holes to form a hanger (in
much the same way the wire is
formed in hanging flower baskets).


Fill these little cups with bird seed or
other bird treats. Hang these feeders
on an outdoor Christmas tree for the
birds and wildlife to enjoy
U Bagel wreaths: Contact local bread
distributors to obtain past-their-sell-
date bagels. To begin, slice the bagels
and spread them with peanut butter,
shortening or lard. Let the kids have the
fun of dipping the peanut butter/short-
ening-covered bagels face down on
paper plates full of colorful bird seed or
wildlife seed mixes. Wildlife mixes usu-
ally contain sunflower seeds, cracked
corn and other kinds of seeds. Lastly,
hang these tasty holiday decorations
with raffia and watch the hungry
wildlife and birds quickly devour them!
For more information on attracting
wildlife to your yard, contact Citrus
County Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, research, and re-
sources to address youth, family, com-
munity, and agricultural needs.
Programs and activities offered by
the Extension Service are available
to all persons without regard to race,
color, handicap, sex, religion, or na-
tional origin.

Dr Joan Bradshawis the director for
UF/IFAS Citrus County Extension.


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j:Mf il|1L [c1111 ---











Holiday seating solutions


Designers share tips

to maximize options

for entertaining
MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
T he joy of home entertaining at
the holidays often comes with a
challenge: How do you provide
enough seating for a roomful of holi-
day revelers with just a sofa and a
few chairs? Are there creative op-
tions besides resorting to folding
chairs?
Los Angeles-based interior de-
signer Betsy Burnham frequently
hears from clients who want help
solving this puzzle. "People are doing
more home entertaining than ever," '.
Burnham says, so they want to design
their living space to accommodate
guests easily. For those without huge '1
rooms, that can be challenging.
Here, Burnham and designers
Brian Patrick Flynn and Kyle
Schuneman offer advice on maximiz- _-
ing seating without sacrificing style.
Stealth seating
"I'm a big fan of vintage ottomans, .
stools and sturdy side tables like ..aP
stumps for this exact purpose," says
Schuneman, author of "The First
Apartment Book: Cool Design for
Small Spaces" (Clarkson Potter,
2012). These pieces can work as ta- "4.7
bles or storage surfaces, he says, then
occasionally serve "as extra seating
for game nights or casual gatherings
around the coffee table."
Benches can work the same way.
Schuneman suggests buying two
benches that coordinate nicely with
the decor of your living room, and
then placing them at the foot of beds
in your home. When extra seating is
needed, "you can easily pull them
out for the holidays and bigger din-
ners," he says. "And you have a cohe- --
sive looking space, as opposed to a
bunch of stuff you just pulled from .
around the garage."
Flynn, founder and editor of
decordemon.com, uses ottomans in a
similar way. "What I often do is use
an upholstered or hardy wood stor- Associated Press
age ottoman on casters instead of a Party seating is shown in a living room in a townhouse in Santa Monica, Calif. The cowhide ottoman functions normally as a coffee table but
for parties the tray is removed for extra seating. The two Eames stools work well for impromtu seating, and the garden stool next to the chair
See Page E9 can be used either as a seat or surface for drinks.


E8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SEATING
Continued from Page E8

coffee table in the sofa area," he says.
"Inside the storage ottoman, I keep
floor cushions. When it's time for
guests, the ottoman can be wheeled
just about anywhere as extra seating,
and the floor cushions allow guests to
lounge."
Burnham points out that using ot-
tomans or benches may be more ap-
propriate in a casual family room or
great room than in a more formal liv-
ing room. But even for formal spaces,
an elegant ottoman can work: "Done
well, it's a beautiful way to bring an-
other fabric into your space," she
says.
Chairs from elsewhere
Flynn often uses a mixture of dif-
ferent chairs and benches at a dining
room table year-round, rather than a
matching set The look is stylish, and
when chairs need to be brought into
a living room for a party, they don't
necessarily look like they're been
taken from the dining room set. The
mix can include "a three-seater
bench, squatty stools, armless chairs,
six chairs and a pair of wingbacks at
each end," he says.
Another option he suggests: "Bring
in your outdoor seating and deliber-
ately mix it in with the indoor pieces.
The juxtaposition can be nice, plus
you can coordinate them with similar
colored cushions or accessories."
Burnham does something similar
with seating from game tables: A
poker table with four chairs can be a
great way to fill one corner of a room,
she says, and those four chairs can be
placed elsewhere in the room during
a larger party.
The right sofa
Pay attention to size and depth
when choosing a sofa, Burnham says.
"A standard-size sofa is 7 feet. If you
have three seat cushions, people sit
in a pristine way in their cushion,"
she says, and you'll be limited to a
maximum of three guests on your
sofa. She prefers "sofas that have
bench seams, so that it's one big
seat," making it more likely that four
guests might use the space.
Longer sofas offer additional seat-
ing, but Flynn says they're best used
in what he calls a "floating space
plan," where two identical long sofas
are placed across from one another
in the center of a room, rather than
having one sofa against a wall. They
need to be "balanced with an extra-
long coffee table," he says.


Sofas with deep cushions are an-
other option, but Flynn points out
that "extra-deep sofas are very tricky.
They are insanely comfortable, but
can be a space planning disaster. I
only use them in super large or grand
living rooms. ... You've got to ensure
the tables and chairs which surround
it have the same visual weight."
Schuneman agrees: "I think you
definitely want to mix it up with dif-
ferent patterns and textures of throw
pillows, so it doesn't become a big
blob in the room."
If you have extra space after choos-
ing your sofa, Burnham suggests fo-
cusing on adding chairs to your living
room rather than a loveseat. Al-
though loveseats seem to offer more
seating than chairs, they are often oc-
cupied by just one person. "A
loveseat's a tough one," she says, "be-
cause I don't think people want to be
super physically close" at parties.
Folding and stacking
"Folding chairs are often eye-
sores," Flynn says, so he prefers
chairs that can be stacked when not
in use. "My favorite stacking chair is
the Emeco Navy chair. It's super
light, maybe 7 pounds or so, and it's
classic in design. When not in use,
stack them seven high in a closet and
you'll never know they're there."
Burnham and Schuneman have
each found a few types of stylish fold-
ing chairs, but they tend to come with
higher price tags. She favors black
bamboo folding chairs from Ballard
Designs (about $100) for rooms with a
more traditional style, and has used
clear Lucite folding chairs ("kind of
like the Philippe Starck ghost
chairs") in more modern living
rooms.
Schuneman likes the fabric-cov-
ered "terai" folding chairs from An-
thropologie (about $200), and
suggests they can serve as a "great in-
spiration point for a DIY project."
Try recovering the cushion of an old
upholstered folding chair "in some
beautiful fabric that works in your
room," he says.
Planning carefully, shopping well
and using a little DIY creativity are
the keys to solving any holiday seat-
ing dilemma, says Schuneman.
"I always tell people to buy pieces
that can move throughout your
home," he says, "so that chair in the
guest room can come into the living
room, and that bench in the bath-
room could double as an extra sur-
face for gifts or what not. If you
purchase pieces in your home that
work throughout, it really maximizes
your potential."


Associated Press
For extra seating, especially during the holidays, interior designer Brian Patrick Flynn often incorpo-
rates benches into spaces which can serve as decoration most of the time, but be pulled out to ac-
commodate guests when entertaining, as seen in this living room.
o0DH Oen 7 Das For Your Convenience P


SFOI Prudential PHILLIPS
m FLORIDA SHOWCASE PROPERTIES "-


A ': < .86 E. Ireland Ct., Hernando
.-" 2 New Homes to choose from
Granite countertops.
Tile throughout except bedrooms
.~ --: -- All hardwood cabinets
Deep 3 car garage
Designer bath tiles
High efficiency energy windows & sliders
Designer paint colors
1/2 Acre golf course lot
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd. to right
on Ireland to end of cul-de-sac on left.
ML itn rc 2730.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 E9







E10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

good to keep them out of the
landfill. They're large, trans-
parent containers that aren't
too pretty to write on or label,
and they don't break if they're
dropped. -M.H.H., email
Stretch the food budget:
Find foods whose prices have
remained stable and use them
more. We're eating a lot more
carrots they're healthy and
inexpensive, and their price
hasn't fluctuated much.
They've become a much more
frequent ingredient or veggie
side in our household than
they once were. Try out new
foods that you haven't tried
before, to replace some of
your more expensive usuals.
I've started experimenting
with different greens when
they're on sale. For example,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


we had eaten lots of spinach
and rapini (broccoli rabe), but
not kale.
Now kale shows up on the
table as I experiment with
new foods in an effort to get
the most bang for my buck
while still eating healthy
You can also find seasonal
items at decent prices. Since
it's in season, pumpkin has
been a good budget stretcher
for us. An extra-large pump-
kin goes a long way G.G.,
forums


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (wwwfrugalvil-
lage.com), a website that of-
fers practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday living.
To send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas City
MO, 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


JANE
Continued from Page E5

This beauty is named for Joel
Robert Poinsett, the first U.S. envoy
to Mexico in 1825. A plant collector,
he brought cuttings back to his
South Carolina greenhouse in 1828.
He later became a renowned Con-
gressman. William Prescott, a horti-
culturist and historian who wrote
"The Conquest of Mexico," decided
to dub the popular plant poinsettia
to honor the congressman.
In southern California, Paul Ecke
grew poinsettias at his Encicitas
ranch and cut the bracts as flowers
early in the 1900s. By 1920, the fam-
ily sold field-grown poinsettias from
a roadside stand. Between 1923 to
the 1960s, Paul Ecke Sr. traveled the
country promoting and marketing
poinsettias for the holiday time. Tel-
evision shows quickly adopted red
poinsettias as colorful props. Joined
by his son Paul Jr., a well-trained


This beauty is named
for Joel Robert
Poinsett, the first
U.S. envoy to Mexico
in 1825.

horticulturalist, the family switched
from field growing to greenhouse
operations, where light could be
controlled, to have millions of plants
ready for market by the end of No-
vember. Plant breeders developed
other color forms. Buying perhaps
two plants each, 117,000,000 house-
holds equals big business in the
United States alone.
Poinsettia growing has shifted to
less-expensive operations in
Guatemala. The Eckes and others
had bought up most smaller grow-
ers. With mass marketers like Wal-
mart, Costco, Lowes and Home
Depot demanding cheaper produc-
tion, Paul Ecke III sold the family


business in August 2012. California
operations will be phased out in
three years.
There are about 200 species in the
Euphorbia genus, including annu-
als, perennials, shrubs and many
succulent, cactus-like plants. While
most are tropical and subtropical,
there are a few temperate plants in
the genus. All have milky sap, which
can be corrosive to sensitive skin.
Sap in the eyes may cause tempo-
rary blindness.
Keep poinsettias out of reach of
toddlers and pets that may break or
chew plant parts. Artificial poinset-
tias are a frugal option for sensitive
people.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant. Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County
garden. For an appointment call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN -
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
In the equestrian section of Pine comer lot with mature oak trees and lots
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a of privacy! Very well maintained, new
360' interactive virtual tour at roof 0509. Just bring your suitcase and
move right in! Community features golf,
wwwnmypineridgehome.com. tennis, clubhouse.
MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded
and private setting perfect retreat!
,. i ' ... ... i I T ake the
LS #3 53046 $400,000
MLS #353046 $400,000


NATURE'S ART THAT HAPPENS TO
BEST KEPT SECRET BE REAL ESTATE!
3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River This amazing property sits right
Oaks East, a gated waterfront community on the water at Lake Tsala
on the Withlacoochee River Apopka! $899,000
$218,000 For more information please visit
will buy you this peace of heaven! www.eclectic-house .com


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New: roof
the right setting for living the Florida 10/12, A/C & e-panel 01/12, windows
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle. Open and airy with the 01/11, W/H 2009! Florida room, fenced
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, backyard, 2 sheds, comer lot, quiet
true masterpi .... ,,i i.i 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of 1 ... ;. 1 i i. .
Lake Tsala i I.I... ... room to dock all the water toys .... .... I I. .. .1 .
family to move right in! imaginable . I ... .. .
0OODHOX MLS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 n ,, $68,900


COLDI^eWL
BANKOR









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Chronicle


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Ell


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* I BEDROOM
start@$325 inc. H20
2 BEDROOMS
start@$450 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HERNANDO
2/1 $450 mo+dep
1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
352-201-2428

HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last &Sec
(352) 382-5661

HOMOSASSA
2/2, 2 Ig porches &
1 carport. $675
(908) 884-3790

HOMOSASSA
3/2 W/ Porch & Deck
$650/mo. first & sec
603-860-7455

INVERNESS
2/2, Kitchen equipped,
crprt, sunroom, $500
352-344-8313 or
352-697-0136





BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On '2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183


DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, Large Lot,
Quiet Area $28,000
(727) 480-5512

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
SAcre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95% re-
modeled inside, 1.25 ac-
res half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see! 74K
(352) 621-0192
Palm Harbor Homes
Stilt Homes
34 Years Experience
Go directly to the
factory & Save
800-622-2832

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181





FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 476-7077
HOMOSASSA
DBL MH, pool, 4 rentals,
2 + acres, 2 workshops,
Owner Fin. 20% DOWN
$160K 352-628-0304





2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348


2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987

FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420

INVERNESS 2/2
completely remodeled
carport,scnrm,w/attached
storage shed, plywood
floors, drywall, $10,500
352-4194606

INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
asking $13,500
352-419-6476



Inverness, FL 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Com-
pletely updated DW
home on Lake Hender-
son 55+Park. Ph


LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp & shower
$25,000.352-212-6804

Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch,2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958

MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$8,000. (708) 308-3138


STONEBROOK MHP
2BR, 2BA, 1200 sq. ft.,
Fully Furnished
Lakeview Homosassa
$40,000., MUST SEE!
(352) 628-9660






RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CilrusounlyHomeRenlols.com
LECANTOIBEVERL HILLS
1933 Shanelle Path (L)...RDUD SI,000
3/2/2 Inc. Full emb. Poo, Tenn, Gym
202S. Tyler St. (BH) ..................$650
2/2/2 ipaousl Houso, NrYcrd, FmlyRoom, Pd t Fiendly
CRYSTAL RIVER
11255W. Baysre Dr. ((R)...1,200
2/2 Wteiront ondo, Greotlw Unfurnished
9454W. Wionsin (. ((R)........$75
3/2 Recently Remodeled, On ulst lee
HOMOSASSA
5865W.Vikre Path (H)..............$685
3/2/1 (ozy Ho k. Yol (bse to Rock Ciushel Elmentor
6944W. GrantSt. (H)...Redued $685
2/2/1 Cute, Centrally Located
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
545 E. Alaska Dr. (H)................ $775
2/2/1 Flond Room lthA/C nd HndicapAcessible
9432 E. Gale t. (IN )..............$700
2/2/1 Roomy with Sreened Pch Fenced














CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2,House w/ Gar., $600
3/2, Seasonal DW, $1,000
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacanthome
and watch us work for you!


3/2/2 .........$825
2/2/2..........$675
3/2/2 .........$950
2/2 Townhouse. $700


2/1 .............$450

2/2 Waterfront. .$1500
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scrugas,
. Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA$400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985

FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$300/$200 dp. Trails
End Camp, A Friendly
Place to Live
352-726-3699

HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499

INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393

INVERNESS 2/1
no pets, $500 + dep.
919 Turner Camp Rd.
352-860-2026

INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847

LECANTO
Nice, Clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349

Now Accepting
Applications

Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
1 Bedroom $396;
2 Bedrooms $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771

"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."




J-l-JH ~itll





-i


OFFICE, RETAIL SPACE
FLORAL CITY,
Orange Av. 550 sq ft.
MUST SEE! $300 mo.
352-341-3000







HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
Pets? No smoking. 1st
& sec. 352-212-4981







HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


msim


LECANTO
Sb/1ba Charming
Furnished Cottage
porch, 5 acr pking,
quiet, water&trash pk
up, incl. pets ok, ref's
$450mo.
BlindBox 1812P
CC Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,FL34429




CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Uke New
352-302-1370




Citrus Springs
(off 488 btwn Citrus
Springs & Dunnellon)
1 BR Cottage $350 mo
newly remodeled, non
smoking.(352) 465-4234
SUGARMILL WDS
furn, 2/2/1 $675 month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616




BEVERLY HILLS
1 OR2 BR, C/H/A QUIET
AREA $575
FIRST MONTH FREE
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA Near
Shopping $550. mo.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
Huge House 3/3/2
$800, 352-464-2514
CITRUS HILLS
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
2450sqft. $1000 central
A/C ,well, quite area
352-464-0268

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1 1/2 w/family rm Newly
remodeled inside & out.
W/D hook up. Fenced
$750. 352-586-4037


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 W/D, auto gar-
age opener, newer
appl'S, snroom. Newer
home, good neighbrd.
$795. mo. 352-382-1373
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2 Enclosed Porch.
Laundry room. Nice
backyard. Fenced.
$750. (352)-489-0117
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
HOLDER
312/2 2000 sq. ft. home
Lg. fenced yard. dog ok
$800.mth 352-302-7303
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, $475
3/2/2 House,
Meadows, $675
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 house, $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
2/2/2, Ist & Sec. $850.
mo. 352-419-5442
INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
312 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225





For Saleor %

CHASSA-

HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611








AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE
REALTY ONE


ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441



INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"
wwW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


HOME
AUCTION
I




11609 EAST SALMON DR
Floral City
4 BR, 2 BA 1,776 SF
Agent: Tomika Spires
Landmark Realty
352-726-5263



U No BackTaxes
o# I No Liens
Als!s!- InsurableTitle
Get The Details AND
Big NQwl
.. A" .

OPEN HOUSE:
Sat & Sun, Dec 15 & 16,
1:00- 3:00pm




ea prope nt 5% premium on nch ile
Al sae n Secto oin mval
Open n Hu


HOMOSASSA
Sun, Dec 9th
noon to 4pm
3/3, on 2 lots
3802 S Eastpark Way
just off 490-A




Sun Dec 9th 1PM-4PM
4153 N Little Dove Ter.
Custom built pool home.
2956 SQ FT of luxury
living. From HWY 486,
N on Annapolis, L on
Eisenhower,
road name

changes to

White Cloud,
to Little Dove.

Hse on R


Weston Properties LLC
352-613-2644


OZELLO
"approx. 2.5 acres"
commercial .w/boatramp.
and gulf access, 3, 18',
roll-ups, $149k
call 352-634-3862



REMODELED 2/2/1
103 S Desoto. 1208 sf
New: appliances, paint,
flooring, light fixtures,
fans. Updated kit/baths.
$47,900. 527-1239




YOU'LL THIS!
CLEARVIEW ESTATES
3+BR/ 2.5 BA, 2+Garage
on 1 acre. Clear views up
and down the trails. Too
many extras, must see.
Mid $200's 352-860-0444



FAIRVIEW ESTATES
Expansive custom built
home on one acre. 3/2 w/
den, 4 car garage w/
workshop. Great
entertainment spaces
inside and out.
Call Myriam at Weston
Properties LLC
352-613-2644


Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418



2 Bedroom, 1 Bath,
1 car garage, New Roof,
laminate, flooring,
1000 sq. ft, $57,000,
352419-6719
Inverness
2 br. 2 ba 1car garage,
Close to downtown.
New carpet, bath fixtures,
fans lights, & stove.
Asking $55000.00
call 352-344-8194
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Sale. Nego.
(908) 322-6529




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RE/MAY
REALTY ONE


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
WI inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/,lRC
REALTY ONE
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC &Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558
WALDEN WOODS
Adult Community
2/2, DW+Carport. Furn.
Close to Community
Center. Pool $25,000
Call 352-428-6919






MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell





For Sale %Bu
39 Greentree Street,
Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 1/2 OFF
SUGARMILL HOME. RE-
DUCED: $129900
GRANITE/SS HIGH
CEILINGS/DOUBLE
TREY/ PLANT
SHELVES/ 3/2 WITH OF-
FICE/ 2050sq ft. MOVE
IN CONDITION/2005
Contact Ryan
352-346-7179 or
ryan49445@yahoo.com


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
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E12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


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Volunteers fight to bring back chestnut


Associated Press

WEAVERVILLE, N.C. Jim
Hurst has doted on his trees,
arranged in three "families" on a
bluff high above the rushing
French Broad River.
He installed a drip irrigation
system to help rejuvenate this for-
mer hayfield's powdery, depleted
soil. To protect against browsing
deer, he girded the delicate
sprouts in plastic sleeping and
wire mesh. In the four years since
planting the fuzzy, deep-brown
nuts, he nursed the seedlings -
through back-to-back droughts, a
killing frost, even an infestation of
17-year locust applying herbi-
cides and mowing between the
rows to knock down anything that
might compete.
Then, on a hot day this past
June, Hurst moved methodically
along the steep hillside, a petri
dish in his left hand, and infected
the young saplings with the fungus
that will almost certainly kill
them.
It wasn't malice, but science -
and hope that led him to take
such an action against these spe-
cial trees.
"My mother's family never
stopped grieving for the (Ameri-
can) chestnuts," the 51-year-old
software engineer and father of
two said as a stiff breeze rustled
through the 110 or so surviving
trees, many already bearing angry,
orange-black cankers around the
inoculation sites.
"Her generation viewed chest-
nuts as paradise lost."
Hurst hopes the trees on his


Associated Press
Maine Forest Service forester Merle Ring, left, and Michele Windsor, right, of the Oxford County Soil and
Water Conservation District, measure the diameter of what's believed to be the tallest American chestnut tree
in its native range, in Hebron, Maine. The American chestnut tree was once one of the most dominant trees
in the eastern United States. But a blight overtook the trees in the first half of the 1900s, wiping out most of
the population by the 1950s.


hillside farm part of a vast ex-
periment in forest plots where this
"linchpin" species thrived before
the onslaught of an imported par-
asite might hold the key to re-
gaining that Eden.
The American chestnut once
towered over everything else in


the forest. It was called the "red-
wood of the East." Dominating the
landscape from Georgia to Maine,
Castanea dentata provided the
raw materials that fueled the
young nation's westward expan-
sion, and inspired the words of
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and


Henry David Thoreau.
Then, the blight struck. By the
1950s, this mightiest of trees was
all but extinct "gone down like a
slaughtered army," in the words of
naturalist Donald Culross Peattie.
Now, after 30 years of breeding
and crossbreeding, The American


Chestnut Foundation believes it
has developed a potentially blight-
resistant tree, dubbed hopefully,
the "Restoration Chestnut 1.0."
At a national summit in
Asheville in mid-October, the
group's board adopted a master
plan for planting millions of trees
in the 19 states of the chestnut's
original range.
This year, volunteers in state
chapters established seed or-
chards that will soon begin pro-
ducing regionally adapted nuts for
transplanting into the wild. But as
those who attended the recent
summit heard, much hard work
remains and much uncertainty.
The restoration tree is being in-
troduced onto a physical and eco-
nomic landscape that has long
since learned to do without the
once-indispensable American
chestnut. Will it crowd out other
trees and plants that we have
come to value in the past century?
How do you convince landowners
and government agencies that it's
worth the money and effort?
And there are those who will
question the wisdom of trying to
bring back something that could
not survive on its own or, worse
yet, "engineering" a replacement
that can. But Hurst and the others
at the summit are confident there
is no obstacle they can't overcome
in the effort to restore the East's
"cathedral forests."
"I think that's something worth
fighting for," he said. "To fix some-
thing that's broken."


See CHESTNUT/Page E14


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a, (352) 746-9924


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 E13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







E14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012


CHESTNUT
Continued from Page E13

In the spring of 1540, Spanish
conquistador Hernando de Soto's
quest for silver and gold brought
him to the Blue Ridge Mountains,
in what is now western North Car-
olina. A survivor of the expedition
would later record: "Where there
be mountains, there be
chestnuts."
More than 500 years later, Peat-
tie conjured that virgin landscape
in full flower: "the great forest
below waving with creamy white
Chestnut blossoms in the crowns
of the ancient trees, so that it
looked like a sea with white
combers plowing across its sur-
face."
With trunks measuring 10, 12,
even 17 feet in diameter, the trees'
branches soared up to 120 feet
above the forest floor.
Along the continent's Ap-


palachian spine, chestnuts cov-
ered some 200 million acres -
comprising fully a quarter and, in
some places as much as two-
thirds, of the upland forest. It is
difficult to overstate the tree's im-
portance.
Settlers built cabins, rail fences
and barns out of its light, strong,
even-grained wood. They hunted
deer, turkeys and squirrels made
fat on its mast and themselves
feasted on the sweet, starchy nuts.
Thoreau wrote lovingly of going
"a-chestnutting" in the New Eng-
land woods. In an 1857 journal
entry contemplating the chest-
nut's spiny bur, he rhapsodized on
the wonderful care with which na-
ture "has secluded and defended
these nuts, as if they were her
most precious fruits, while dia-
monds are left to take care of
themselves."
Tannins from the tree's bark
cured the leather for belts that
powered machines that drove the
Industrial Revolution. The chest-


nut's naturally rot-resistant wood
supplied most of the railroad ties
and telegraph poles that knitted
together the rapidly expanding
United States.
"At last when the tree can no
longer serve us in any other way,"
forest economist PL. Buttrick ob-
served, "it forms the basic wood
onto which oak and other woods
are veneered to make our coffins."
But by the time he wrote those
words in 1915, a death knell had
already sounded for the American
chestnut.
It is unclear exactly when or
how the blight arrived here,
though most agree it came on
chestnut trees imported from
China or Japan. The fungus -
Cryphonectria parasitica was
first identified in 1904 by employ-
ees of the New York Zoological
Park and was soon detected in
chestnuts as far south as Virginia.
Entering through wounds in the
bark, the fungus threads its way
through the straw-like vessels that


carry water and nutrients from
the ground to the tree's crown. As
the tree responds to plug these
holes, the blight works its way
around the trunk "until it is com-
pletely girdled," William A. Mur-
rill, the botanical garden's
assistant curator, wrote in 1906.
"The tree essentially commits
suicide," said geoscientist Freder-
ick Paillet, an emeritus professor
at the University of Arkansas who
has studied chestnuts for nearly a
half century
Carried by insects and on the
wind, the blight cut through the
forests like an invisible scythe. By
the mid-20th century, it had
spread throughout the entire
range killing an estimated 4 bil-
lion trees in one of the worst eco-
logical calamities in U.S. history
But the American chestnut has
not disappeared altogether. Mil-
lions of seedlings still sprout each
year from old stumps or long-
buried nuts. Most reach just a few
feet in height before the blight -


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

which persists in the soil and on
the bark of surrounding trees -
ultimately finds and kills them.
Occasionally, someone will
stumble across a tree that has
managed to live long enough to
flower. Such specimens are re-
ferred to as LSAs "large surviv-
ing Americans."
Last year, Traylor Renfro was
clearing trails at his mountaintop
retreat in Grassy Creek, near the
Virginia border, when something
pricked his finger. At first, he
thought he'd been stung.
"And then when I looked at it, I
realized that it was a bur," he said.
He was aware of the blight, and
so his prime suspect was one of
the bushlike chinquapins scat-
tered about. His search for more
burs led him to a nearby tree, its
long, feather-like leaves edged
with teeth that resemble breaking
ocean waves.
It was an American chestnut -

See CHESTNUT/Page E15


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHESTNUT
Continued from Page E14

about 37 inches around and at
least 50 feet tall.
Nearby, Renfro found several
young chestnuts that had sprouted
from a desiccated, diseased
stump. Examining the larger tree
with a ladder, he could see no
signs of blight giving him hope
that his tree had somehow devel-
oped a defense against the fungus.
"I'm not in denial," he said,
cradling a brown bur in his palm
as he stared upward. "But show
me one that big."
All claims of a naturally resist-
ant American are "baloney," said
Paul Sisco, a retired American
Chestnut Foundation staff geneti-


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 E15


cist. This and other LSAs, he said,
have just somehow managed to
hang on a bit longer.
"These trees often die within a
year or two of 'discovery,"' said
Sisco, past president of the foun-
dation's Carolinas chapter.
But these survivors are playing
an important role in the restora-
tion effort.
MEN
Enter Charles Burnham.
A corn geneticist by training,
Burnham was retired from the
University of Minnesota when he
read about the government's
failed efforts. He began thinking
about ways in which his own suc-
cessful work with food crops
might be applied to the chestnut
conundrum.
In 1983, Burnham and several
other plant scientists formed The


American Chestnut Foundation -
built on his program of"backcross
breeding."
Burnham started out with a hy-
brid between an American and a
Chinese chestnut, then back-
crossed it with a "pure American."
The progeny of that pairing were
then backcrossed to American
chestnut a second time; the off-
spring from that coupling were
then crossed a third time back to
American stock.
(The American Chestnut Coop-
erators Foundation a smaller,
but no less dedicated sister organ-
ization is focused on grafting
and intercrossing large native sur-
vivors to achieve a blight-resis-
tant, all-American chestnut.)
Since an American chestnut
parent always passes some of the
blight-susceptible genes to its


progeny, the backcross or B3 -
trees are then intercrossed
among themselves so their prog-
eny have a chance of inheriting
resistant genes from both par-
ents, said Fred Hebard, chief sci-
entist at the organization's main
research farms near
Abingdon, Va.
The resulting B3F3 trees -
third backcross, third filial gener-
ation are, genetically, up to 94
percent American.
"The approach was a popula-
tion of near-American chestnuts
that would breed true for resist-
ance," said Steiner.
The product of all that crossing,
backcrossing and intercrossing is
being put to the test at Hurst's and
hundreds of other breeding or-


chards around the country
The chestnuts on Hurst's prop-
erty some of which have grown
to an impressive 20 feet in height
- contain genetic material from
three North Carolina "mother
trees." Scattered among the "fam-
ilies," as a scientific control, are
several offspring of a Chinese
chestnut.
The trees that show the most re-
sistance after inoculation will be
used at the seed orchards to pro-
duce the next generation. All the
rest about 99 percent will be
destroyed, said Steiner.
"The quality of that seed coming
out of that orchard will get better
and better and better as more and
more of the poor trees are re-
moved," he said.


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1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


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CITRUS HILLS
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Fo a Vru T o M P o os,
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MLS#357556 $257,300
New 2012 construction on Citrus Hill's
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S2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
SPrudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


mE KE Y Office 382-1700
ERA REALTY INC. _c|







14 Dogwood
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1542 E. BISMARK ST., HERNANDO









DELIGHTFULLY PLANNED 3/3/2
MAJESTIC FAMILY HOME
Fourteen ft. ceilings. All rooms generously sized. Separate
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Motivated seller has reduced price to
$240,000

pJi p1I)


I [, Sr-IO ALL O C C N









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THREE BEDROOM, ..i.. Li, ... ..-. -I CI U cou S
Bl ,ir .I" ,I l ',,i,,.'l,,,,) ;II ,,,..h, l.) i F F O R O i" E
i. ; $109,900
C.// /s..fe B.rla Ilo lot ou personjal tout
362 697 2493





L,-


ROOM TO S-P-R-EA-D OUT
5 ACRES HOMESITE


S l! ....I1 I I 6 11. H ll l.. I.....l ... II 1..i .I..
S.. ..... .. 1.. l ...l 1....1
NMl = ,i h. Asking $248,900
Pa. Da.is, 362 212 1280
ieln Lising 111111 c2/o.it.nis corn


l .-II h ....L.1 I .... 1 .... 1


MtLi = $850,000
Call Jim Motion at 352422 2173 cell


CLEAN. CLOSE. COMFORTABLE
:. ;l ll4 vI .l.ill l.j l ll : a ... ill l I Ili l1-i li .
l ll l .ill 1 I. 1II lll. i l l Il .,,. i l l. ll' i l.ll ll II I IIII


.il l.i llCi Kea'l e 10wp ie. .. l ,35 l l. lpm6
I [., .16 ,.. Il .1 II \ ii lII ;I. I II 6
1 6,.1 0t. = l,",:.,:]:1i $107,500

Cl/ Caiel Kejre toprellell _`3524166549


1 i:' '*S"'.' 337.500
h ,.1h hhh 6VF r
I , li />t li; i li li -/ /, |, r


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY


n ii i l us l.,i ii lilh .. ,il ji ] I i
l., .i d i ..., h h i .I ... .J .. mI~,l 1, :.
$95,000
Call Jim Moti on at 3524222/173 lot
I out personal lour ol Emetald Hills


i ..i", I I. i ...S flU f. ....I

,,,I ll ll, |, 1 1 1 i ,, ji I n I, l ll ll. i l
.,,,,l1:h :1i ... l .h .. .ii i h ri l .I D ... I I.. ....
, $240,000 Ml. = "'.h.
D.an id (uiIz Cell 964i 383 8786
011 362 726 6668












DISTINCTIVE HOME
ij. i.I i:. J l.,. i i l i...l .h ilJ bii l I ....)l v. i lh

iiu sali, mi ii l ll.l ssIIl eI ssi I. nici i I ul eril ..ll l
Mi 5 = .7'i7 $72,000
lonaine 0 Regan 586 0075









IF YOU'RE HANDY, THIS IS A DANDY!


.. v.I ]...lv il .l _I I l im ll .:.:.i .i .| i AI _
li ,i I.,i n;lil III. .IIVI111 H


Mi 5= -,". Asking $55,000
NVancy Jenks 352 400 8072


* Fo wood fl.ii I i '.I
* UBI J UIail. _.liI Il i..

Mlt = 3~.iII $115,000
Jeanne ot Willatd Pickiel 2123410
I'I'it ctuscouni$sold. conm


SUPER SUBDIVISION:
i, ,, i ,,',iii ..'i,, JUST LISTED!
I I I ,,h,' ,.,,, ,,,. . I ,,I .ll in,),l _iI,: il|,ll;l i. i hBi, HOB'in;: ,
.h. h. n ; l I l 1 I.. ll f .I .h. ; L.,, EnI. ] -


$25,000 Ml 5 = '. $219,000
skh lot Ruth Frederick 362 663 6866 Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


SPACIOUS ROOMS

.'l il'll ii I'I in- i :h. 'inui iF. rlil H .i llI \i il.ii l


i_ l 'llll i ,tl l ll il -l 'll dl 0;i l', I l l'| l ll III
Ml I;-.i. $119,900
Call Doiis Minei 352 344 1515
Io ice/ll 352 422 4627


.11i.1 II i l 111 l ... I....
* All ...... Ii i .ji .i i'l I I. ., l. ,.

*1 Mii H MII I H Mi-i "
Ml = 37i./lh $475,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


PRICED REDUCED!

T. i | I . p.hi|ly lyl h n:,i 1 ,jlli i .l
nIyI.I I invi'nl: I ni i l ii l'la li .gl.,Il



$274,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


* I a. ,,,, FI.In H i1
1,,,: ,,,,,,I

M I=,.7:::' $58,000
Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
It'l'Ir'. cilII scounlY'sold. corn


E16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012