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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-06-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02968

Full Text



College basketball: No. 6 UF takes on FSU/B1


I T UR DA


Partly sunny with
isolated light rain and
patchy fog.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO UNTY





)RONICLe
www.chronicleonline.com
;Best Community k-Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


TOYOTATHON

E11 IT
at VILLAGE -
TOYOTA OCEE1 To

VOLUME 118 ISSUE 121


Longtime teacher 'Doc' Hudson dies


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER The man
dubbed a "true teacher of life,"
and known to many Citrus County
residents as "Doc" Hudson died
Wednesday He was 90.
"He is irreplaceable. A big part
of Crystal River and Citrus County
history died today," said John
Grannan, whose mother, Dorothy
King, graduated with Hudson from


Crystal River High School in 1940.
Hudson would go on to become
a teacher, coach and principal at
his alma mater.
Grannan said he's known Hud-
son all his life and would call him
on occasion in his latter years for
some persimmons Hudson's
favorite fruit
"I will have to take some and
place them on his grave," Grannan
said. "He will be missed."
James Franklin "Doc" Hudson


Sr. was born Dec. 23, 1921, in
Crystal River to Dr. Porter Hud-
son and his wife, Beulah.
After a short time away to col-
lege in Atlanta, Hudson returned
home and began his teaching ca-
reer at Lecanto as principal of a
two-room schoolhouse.
He later moved to his alma
mater, Crystal River High School,
where he taught biology, coached
baseball and six-man football and
became principal. His team won


a state championship in
six-man football in the
late 1940s.
He and his wife, Ailene,
later moved to Lake
Worth, where he taught at
Conniston Junior High
School for 25 years. The
Hudsons returned to Cit- Jai
rus County in 1983 and Huds
opened an antique store
on Citrus Avenue.
Jack Dumas, the Crystal
River fire chief, recalls as a
child his parents talking about
Hudson.


Ti
;0I


"They spoke of him,
something akin to a movie
star," Dumas said.
He later came to know
the man behind the leg-
end and also found him to
be a wonderful person
"who will be missed."
es Dumas' mother, Roger
n Sr. Carol Dumas, was strug-
gling with absorbing the
news of Hudson's death Wednes-
day afternoon.
"His father delivered both me


Page A2


Leaving his mark


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Andy Nott visits with his daughter Marli Pollard on Tuesday morning in her first-grade classroom at Central Ridge Elementary School. Nott,
a school psychologist in the Citrus County School District, will retire Dec. 21, after 34 years with the district.

Retiringpsychologist was instrumental information ofRenaissance Center


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CITRUS SPRINGS Sometimes Dr.
Andy Nott enters a classroom, sits off to the
side and observes.
He's there to watch a child who is strug-
gling in school. Nott is looking for signs, for
answers.
Nott takes a look around the room to see


Treats
Find recipes and cookie
ideas in a special
holiday section./Inside


Comics ..........C6
Community .......C4
Crossword ....... .C5
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ... B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C6
Obituaries ........ A5
Classifieds ........ C7
TV Listings .......C5


6 1845781 2011U02! II


how other children interact with their
teacher. He wants to know how the child he
is watching acts differently
Is the child paying attention? Do her eyes
wander? Does she understand the teacher's
instructions? Does her mind appear
elsewhere?
Students usually look up when Nott en-
ters the classroom. His presence normally
causes no more than a casual curiosity.


"I try to be obscure," he said.
He usually spends about 45 minutes to an
hour at a time. He then meets with teachers
and the student and begins formulating a
plan Nott hopes will transform a struggling
student into a successful one.
Nott is a school psychologist. He retires
Dec. 21 after 34 years with the Citrus
See Page A9


Citrus teachers score

high in evaluations


Criteria will

determine

meritpay
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
It shouldn't come as a
surprise Citrus County's
high-performing school
district employs high-
performing teachers.
The state Department of
Education on Wednesday
released its first teacher
evaluation ratings report
using criteria that eventu-
ally will be used to help de-
termine teacher merit pay
For now, the report is
only informational. Indi-
vidual teacher reports are
not available to the public
for one year.
The report shows 97
percent of Citrus County


Number of Citrus
County teachers
per category:
Highly effective: 463.
Effective: 691.
Needs
improvement: 16.
Developing (3 years
or less): 19.
Unsatisfactory: None.

public school teachers
scored in the "highly effec-
tive" or "effective" cate-
gories. The remaining
teachers were in either a
"needs improvement" or
"developing" category, the
latter being for teachers
with three years or less on
the job.
District officials said the
results reflect the dis-
trict's seven straight years
See Page A9


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Dealing with Duke En-
ergy's failure to pay its en-
tire tax bill, finding budget
stability and partnering
with the two cities are
peaks of the six-point
chairman's plan presented
Tuesday to the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC).
"Obviously, with the
issue that we are facing
right now with Duke En-
ergy, the focus is on that,"
said Joe Meek, chairman
of the BOCC in his intro-
duction. "The Duke En-
ergy issue highlights some
of the things that are on
this chairman's plan."
Meek was making refer-
ence to the surprise move
last week when Progress


Energy, a subsidiary of
Duke Energy, owner of the
Crystal River Power Sta-
tion, delivered only a par-
tial payment of $19 million
of its ad valorem taxes. The
sum is about $17 million
less than its bill the county
has budgeted for the cur-
rent fiscal year that began
two months ago.
One by one, Meek de-
tailed the points of his op-
eration plan for the year
ahead. Many of his points
are directly affected by
Duke's action, especially
the first one: "Address and
confront budget issues."
"Some of the issue with
Duke and us highlights the
fact that we are so relying
on one particular industry,
one particular taxpayer,"
See Page A9


Progress


impact


on park


pondered


Whispering

Pines a concern

for Inverness
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS The sky
is falling, but not on the city
of Inverness.
That was the message In-
verness City Manager Frank
DiGiovanni gave to mem-
bers of the city council
Tuesday concerning the
Duke Energy tax shortfall
and its impact of the city.
"We don't participate
greatly in the $35.6 million
tax bill, so it doesn't impact
us greatly,"
DiGiovanni
said. "The
things that
mi are taxed
S within the
I'* city are the
a properties
owned by
Frank Progress
DiGiovanni Energy -
Inverness city the poles,
manager, transmis-
sion lines, the property at
Independence and 44 West
... the amount that will im-
pact the city of Inverness
on our receivables is about
$19,000.
"That's not a lot, but we
don't want to lose it, ei-
ther," he said. "As a city, we
are fiscally stable. The ma-
jority of the impact goes
around this municipal
government."
The one area that could
impact the city in a major
way is the yearly $300,000
the county contributes to-
ward the operating costs of
Whispering Pines Park.
In fiscal year 2010-11, the
county paid the city
$300,000, which was $70,000
less than they had previ-
ously contributed.
The county paid $300,000
for fiscal year 2011-12,
said Tom Dick, Inverness
assistant city manager.
The total annual operat-
ing budget for Whispering
Pines Park is $690,222.
"The city pays the lion's
share to operate the park,"
DiGiovanni said, "even
though 90 percent of the
park's users come from out-
side the city."
Citrus County Commis-
sioner Scott Adams
brought up the topic of
Whispering Pines Park at
the commission meeting
Tuesday after a proposal
to fund a linear park in
Crystal River.
Adams told a reporter
Wednesday his concern is
the county treats the city of
Inverness and the city of
Crystal River equally when
it comes to funding the
parks.
"My concern why
See Page A2


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
77
LOW
56


DECEMBER 6, 2012


Educator coached six-man football in the 1940s


INSIDE:


Meek's plan

punched by Duke


Crisis shapes county's future


IINSIDE1 I





A2 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


LOCAL


Inverness road repairs


near completion date


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Just a
few weeks longer is the pre-
diction for the completion of
road repairs on Hendrix Av-
enue and Emery Street in
Inverness.
The area has been closed
to through traffic from U.S.
41 since Oct. 21 when Lik-
wid Communications Inc.
hit a Florida Public Utilities
gas line.
"The gas line was several
feet from the locate marks,
and every indication is that
it was improperly located
during the Sunshine One-
call utility locate process,"
said Katie Cottrell, city of
Inverness director of public
works. "The gas erupted
from the intersection, caus-
ing approximately a 3-foot
void, and traveled under the
asphalt, buckling another
point in the intersection,
which is also assumed to
contain a void."
Cottrell said this did not


break up the surface to the
same extent, adding that
cracks "radiated from the
buckled areas of pavement
and traversed to multiple
points in the intersection."
At the time of the rupture,
the gas caught fire. FPU has
repaired the line and has
assured the city there's no
further danger of fire, Cot-
trell said.
The intersection remains
closed until repairs can be
made to the road base and
asphalt.
At the Inverness City
Council meeting Tuesday,
City Manager Frank DiGio-
vanni informed the council
the city will need to pay be-
tween $12,000 and $15,000
up front to cover repair
costs, but they will be reim-
bursed by the gas company
Also at Tuesday's city
council meeting, DiGiovanni
updated council members
on two upcoming road im-
provement projects High-
land Boulevard and Zephyr
Street between Ella Avenue


and North Apopka Avenue.
Funding for the design of
both road projects have
been designated in the city's
2013 Capital Improvement
Program (CIP). The city's
share of the design cost is
$37,500 for each project.
Florida Department of
Transportation has commit-
ted to fund 50 percent of the
estimated $75,000 design
cost for each project.
"We've done this previ-
ously for Tompkins Street
and it has worked very
well," DiGiovanni said.
Improvements for High-
land Boulevard include
road widening and adding
an 8-foot bike path. Zephyr
Street improvements in-
clude widening the road,
better defining the travel
lanes and improving traffic
flow at key intersections.
Construction is estimated
to begin near the end of 2013.
Chronicle reporterNancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2927.


TAX
Continued from Page Al

would we cut funds to the
city of Inverness when
we've made the proposal to
spend money on a park in
Crystal River? I want to
see both cities helped
evenly"
As for cutting funding to
Whispering Pines, that has
yet to be decided.


"There are plenty of
areas where we can tighten
our belt to get to where
we've got to get without hav-
ing to scare everybody half
to death," Adams said. "I
think us being 50-50 with
both cities in treating them
the same and working with
them is what we need to
do."
DiGiovanni said no mat-
ter what the outcome is, the
city will deal with it.
"If they do not pay -


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

this city has always looked
to the future and we will
look at ways to make
things happen ...We'll fig-
ure something out. It may
not be as comfortable as it
is now, but the bottom line
is, I don't see the park
going away or the city
recoiling."
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927


HUDSON [.-'
Continued from Page Al-


and my husband (Brown
Dumas)," she said.
Mrs. Dumas said Hudson
became an incredible men-
tor to them, helping her hus-
band land his job in banking
after high school and help-
ing with a job as his secre-
tary while he was principal.
"He saw good in people
and he made you feel you
are good," Mrs. Dumas said.
"Everyone should have
someone like 'Doc' in their
lives," she said.
Lloyd Bertine, pastor of
Gulf to Lake Church in Crys-
tal River, said he also knew
of the Hudson family all his
life. He remembers hearing
about Hudson as a teacher
and coach at Crystal River.
Bertine got to know him
personally later in life and
the two became pretty close.


MATTHEW BECK/Chroniclefile
Doc Hudson was a fixture in Crystal River for decades. In
this 2004 file photograph, he sits with a fish display he made
and had on exhibit at a local bank. Hudson died Wednesday.


"He was a good man,"
Bertine said.
Ginger Bryant, who is
chairwoman of the Citrus
County School Board, said
her mother was a student of
Hudson's. She said Hudson
served the people of Citrus
County well as an educator


and as an individual.
"He was just an awesome
man. A very nice, nice per-
son," she said.
Hudson is survived by his
wife of 68 years, Ailene; his
son, James Franklin Hud-
son; and his sister, Margaret
Braun of Savannah, Ga.


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Page A3 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




County expecting more cash from FEMA


Money to cover costs from T.S. Debby


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

The federal government is re-
imbursing some costs of Tropical
Storm Debby's damages.
The fourth tropical cyclone of the
2012 hurricane season neared
Florida on June 24 dropping tor-
rential rainfall throughout the
state, resulting in significant flood-


ing in Citrus County on June 26,
after Debby made landfall near
Cedar Key and turned south. As the
storm's eye crossed the county con-
tinuing east, it drenched the com-
munity with as much as 15 inches
of rain, swamping roads, parking
lots, homes and businesses.
The Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners (BOCC)
declared a local emergency


On July 3, the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency de-
clared a number of Florida
counties eligible for FEMA's Pub-
lic Assistance Program, including
Citrus County. A National Emer-
gency Grant in the amount of
$256,953 was awarded to Florida
on July 23.
On Monday, the U.S. Depart-
ment of Labor announced another
award of a $2,699,712 National
Emergency Grant supplement to
the Florida Department of Eco-


nomic Opportunity following the
damages caused by Debby The
supplement will continue funding
temporary jobs for eligible dislo-
cated workers who are assisting
with cleanup and recovery efforts
Of the $2,699,712 supplement,
$1,238,570 will be released ini-
tially, bringing the total funding
awarded to date to $1,495,523. Ad-
ditional funding up to the amount
approved will be made available
as the state demonstrates a con-
tinued need for assistance.


Lindsay Ubinas, county public
information officer, said "Citrus
County should receive approxi-
mately $343,000 FEMA funds from
Tropical Storm Debby These
funds will be reimbursing road
maintenance, solid waste man-
agement and utilities out-of-
pocket expenditures that
occurred as a result of the storm."
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com
or 352-564-2916.


Bringing Christmas cheer


Center wants

to give every

child a happy

holiday

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Only Santa's workshop
at the North Pole is busier
than the Family Resource
Center this time of year.
By Dec. 22, the
Hernando-based agency
will have received,
wrapped, sorted and dis-
tributed Christmas gifts for
about 2,000 Citrus County
children and they can't
do it without the generos-
ity of the community.
Currently, about 130
children still need
sponsors.
"This is my philosophy
about this project," said
Ginger West, Family Re-
source Center director.
"We meet two needs: We
meet the needs of these
children who don't have
underwear and are sleep-
ing on bare mattresses
and have cold houses
without enough blankets.
But we also meet the
needs of the people in this
community who want to
have the feeling of the
real Christmas, and that is
an important need, too."
West added most people
choose to sponsor a spe-
cific child and get a list of
the child's needs and
wants no one is re-
quired to provide every-
thing on the list. Others
supply general items -
sweaters, sweatshirts,
books, toys, pajamas, etc.
Another option is the
"Charlie Brown" tree of
single items. As West ex-
plained, whenever a
child's list comes back
without a "greatest need"
item being provided
(sneakers or pajamas or
something like that), the
item gets its own tag with
the child's ID number and
is placed on the scraggly
little Christmas tree near
the front of the busy Re-
source Center. That way,
those who can only pro-
vide one or two items can
do so.
West, who has been
doing this for more than
30 years, said they also
shop for items year-round,
beginning on Dec. 26. Just
this past July, the Inver-
ness Walmart had 1,500
girls size 7/8 hooded
sweatshirts for $1 each.
West estimated how many
they might need for
Christmas 2012 and pur-
chased 50 of them.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Ingrid Ellis folds one of the many pieces of clothing that will be given as a Christmas present this year through the
Family Resource Center. Thousands of toys, clothing and personal items are collected, wrapped and donated each
year through the center.


Every year, West says the
same thing: Just when it
gets close to Christmas and
it looks like they're not
going to have enough gifts
to accommodate all the
needs, the good people of
Citrus County come
through. She has never ever


seen a child whose name
comes across her desk go
without Christmas gifts.
To sponsor a child with
gifts, call the Family Re-
source Center at 352- 344-
1001 or stop by the center
at 2435 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando, at the intersec-


tion of U.S. 41 and County
Road 486.
If you know of a child or
family who needs Christ-
mas help, the Family Re-
source Center does not
take direct requests for
Christmas gifts, only re-
ferrals from local agen-


cies such as the Salvation
Army 352-513-4960 or Cit-
rus United Basket (CUB)
at 352-344-2242.
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy
@chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Legion to donate
to wounded Marine
Blanton Thompson Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 will
have an early bird dinner and
Pearl Harbor ceremony at
5 p.m. Friday at 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway.
The event, which is open
to the public, will feature a
Skype chat with Marine Josh
Langston White, during which
three checks totaling $8,500
will be presented.
A native of Citrus County,
White, 22, was critically injured
in August while he was on pa-
trol in the Kajaki District in the
Helmand Province of
Afghanistan, losing both legs
and suffering serious abdomi-
nal injuries from the blast of an
improvised explosive device.
The meal of meatloaf,
mashed potatoes, vegetables
and dessert is $7.
Call Commander Mike
Klyap at 352-302-6096 or call
the post at 352-795-6526.
Car wash to benefit
MLK committee
A car wash set for Saturday
will benefit the Martin Luther
King Jr. Commemoration Pa-
rade Committee and the
George Washington Carver
Center. The car wash will be
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
NAPAauto parts store on
State Road 44 in Crystal River.

Old Town
Two on horseback
killed in crash
Officials said an 86-year-old
woman, a 10-year-old old girl
and a horse were killed when
they were struck by a vehicle
on a dark road in Dixie County.
The Florida Highway Patrol
said the girl was riding on the
horse as Minnie Melba De-
laney led it across the road
Tuesday night. A minivan
driven by 39-year-old John
Henry Mash hit them.
From staff and wire reports

Correction
Due to incorrect informa-
tion provided to the
Chronicle, a story on Page
Al of Wednesday's edition,
"Progress: Our plant is safe,"
contained an error. Progress
Energy pays the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office about
$400,000 annually for training
and upkeep of the emer-
gency sirens, among other
things.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


North Carolina gives OK to Duke, Progress merger


PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
The North Carolina Utilities
Commission has approved a set-
tlement with Duke Energy resolv-
ing all issues under review
regarding Duke's ouster of Bill
Johnson as president and CEO fol-
lowing the close of its merger with
Progress Energy Inc.


Sam Watson, spokesman for the
agency, said the commission ap-
proved the settlement Monday, ef-
fectively ending its investigation
of the July 2 merger.
The commission ordered the in-
vestigation after the merger. Ac-
cording to agenda documents, it
had not been informed by Duke or
Progress, anytime prior to July 3,
that Jim Rogers would replace


Johnson as president and CEO of
the combined company
The investigation eventually led
to Progress/Duke being forced to
file 5,964 pages of merger-related
documents with the commission,
most of which were eventually
made public. Some of the docu-
ments cite Johnson's handling of
the Crystal River nuclear plant sit-
uation as grounds for his dismissal.
Under the agreement, Duke will
make changes in top management
Rogers will retire Dec. 13, 2013.


Duke will name a new general
counsel and executive vice presi-
dent for regulated utilities. Duke
will create a CEO and board mem-
ber search committee with a bal-
anced number of former Duke and
former Progress board members.
The N.C. Waste Awareness and
Reduction Network, a nonprofit
utility watchdog group, opposed
the settlement It has been an in-
tervener in the case and main-
tains information was withheld
about expenditures that would


impact customers, including the
extreme costs of the Crystal River
nuclear plant repairs.
Also on Monday, Duke Energy
announced a settlement with the
North Carolina attorney general
resolving all issues under review
by the attorney general regarding
Duke's change in president and
chief executive officer following
the close of the merger.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfa-
herty@chronicleonline. com.


CEO firing had stalled approval






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Man arrested on


charges of unlawful


sexual activity

ERYN WORTHINGTON team at Jessie's Place,
Staff writer a child adcovacy facility,
which initiated an
CRYSTAL RIVER A investigation.
Crystal River man was ar- When the girl was asked
rested Tuesday on a what happened she
charge of unlawful reportedly told of in-
sexual activity in- appropriate sexual
volving a 3-year-old acts by Veltman.
girl, according to the When investiga-
Citrus County Sher- tors confronted Velt-
iff's Office. -- man, he admitted to
Daryl Lee Velt- inappropriate sex-
man, 18, West Daryl ual activity, accord-
GreenwoodLane, Veltman ing to an arrest
faces a felony faces felony report. He also ad-
charge of sexual sexcharges. vised of a second
battery There is no victim in another
bond. jurisdiction.
According to the arrest re- He was arrested and
port, the child was inter- transported to the Citrus
viewed by a child protection County Detention Facility.




Juvenile charged with


felony sexual battery


Chronicle

A 14-year-old boy is fac-
ing several felony sex
charges, according to the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office.
The boy, who is from Ho-
mosassa, is accused of sex-
ual battery or injuring the
sexual organs of someone
under 12 years old; lewd
and lascivious molestation
and lewd and lascivious
battery. No bond was
allowed.
The alleged victim is 12
years old.


The boy allegedly en-
gaged in inappropriate sex-
ual activity with the girl
during at least a two-year
period.
The boy reportedly con-
fessed to investigators and
admitted to all the charges
alleged by the victim. He
was arrested and trans-
ported to the Citrus County
Detention Center. However,
due to the boy's age, Depart-
ment of Juvenile Justice
was contacted and it was ad-
vised he be transported to
the Juvenile Center in
Ocala.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrests
Anthony Pacifico Jr., 31,
of Homosassa, at 9:37 p.m.
Sunday on misdemeanor
charges of domestic battery and
battery. No bond.
Robert Swearingen, 68, of
Homosassa, at 9:54 p.m. Tues-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery. No bond.
William Wheeler Jr., 58, of
Hemando, at 10:38 p.m. Tues-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery. No bond.
Other arrests
Casey Breaker, 19, of
Hoover Street, Beverly Hills, at
6:05 p.m. Sunday on a misde-
meanor charge of trespassing in
an unoccupied structure or con-
veyance. Bond $500.
Mark Segretto, 22, of
North Jefferson Street, Beverly
Hills, at 6:05 p.m. Sunday on a
misdemeanor charge of tres-
passing in an unoccupied struc-
ture or conveyance. Bond $500.
Terry Blanford, 43, of
Spring Drive Place, Ocala, at
2:17 p.m. Monday on a warrant
for conspiracy to commit traffick-


ing in a controlled substance.
Sheriff's deputies, with the help
of the U.S. Marshal's Service,
contacted Blanford after he was
seen walking down North Tulsa
Terrace in Citrus Springs on
Monday aftemoon, according to
his arrest affidavit. Bond
$100,000.
Ashley Bean, 23, of West
Woodland Place, Hudson, at
9:37 p.m. Monday on a felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance (methamphet-
amine) and misdemeanor
charge of possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond $2,500.
Robert Cotten, 24, of
North Remington Terrace, Her-
nando, at 9:27 a.m. Tuesday on
felony charges of trafficking or
endeavoring to traffic in stolen
property and burglary of an un-
occupied residence. According
to his arrest affidavit, he is ac-
cused of taking an air condi-
tioner from a home on East
Wagon Trail. Bond $10,000.
Joseph Damron, 34, of
Shoal Line Boulevard, Spring
Hill, at 10 a.m. Tuesday on a Cit-
rus County warrant for violation
of probation on an original felony
charge of possession of
methamphetamine. No bond.


Christopher Martinez, 20,
of North Elmwood Point, Crystal
River, at 5:55 p.m. Tuesday on
a misdemeanor charge of retail
petit theft. Bond $250.
John McGahen, 22, of
West Oaklawn Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 6:08 p.m. Tuesday
on a warrant for violation of pro-
bation on an original felony
charge. No bond.
Deanna Thompson, 40, of
West Tennessee Lane, Crystal
River, at 6:18 p.m. Tuesday on a
felony charge of scheming to de-
fraud less than $20,000. Accord-
ing to her arrest affidavit, she is
accused of fraudulently refunding
merchandise at the Belk depart-
ment store in Crystal River,
where she worked. Bond $2,000.
Melissa Thomton, 34, of
Homosassa, at 12:30 a.m.
Wednesday on misdemeanor
charges of disorderly intoxica-
tion and resisting an officer with-
out violence. Bond $650.
Burglaries
SA commercial burglary was
reported at 12:28 a.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 4, in the 2700 block of N.
Florida Ave., Hemando.
SA commercial burglary was
reported at 7:49 a.m. Dec. 4 in


the 3100 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:21 a.m. Dec. 4 in the
1400 block of White Lake Drive,
Invemess.
Thefts
An auto theft was reported
at 9:28 a.m. Monday, Dec. 3, in
the 1100 block of E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hernando.
SA larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 12:11 p.m. Dec. 3 in
the 10000 block of E. Bluegill
Court, Invemess.
SA grand theft was reported
at 12:31 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4,
in the 70 block of S. Washington
St., Beverly Hills.
SA grand theft was reported at
1:31 p.m. Dec. 4 in the 12500
block of Tiger Tail Island,
Homosassa.
An auto theft was reported
at 3:53 p.m. Dec. 4 in the 5200
block of S. Cherokee Way,
Homosassa.
SA grand theft was reported at
4:58 p.m. Dec. 4 in the 6000 block
of E. Loring Lane, Inverness.
SA petit theft was reported at
5:11 p.m. Dec. 4 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Meeting Notices ........................C12


Lien Notices............................................C 12

Miscellaneous Notices..........................C12


Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices..........C10


Notice to Creditors/Administration......C10


Surplus Property....................................C10


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Partly to mostly
cloudy with a chance of showers and
thunderstorms today.


8 52 NA 79 54 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusteaily

).rj ~TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
A High: 77 Low: 56
Partly sunny with isolated light rain
S-- showers and patchy fog.
- -I7 FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 58
Partly sunny with isolated showers.

H .. SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
.- High: 78 Low: 58
Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Wednesday 79/50
Record 86/26
Normal 75/47
Mean temp. 65
Departure from mean +4
PRECIPITATION*
Wednesday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 49.77 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 5
HUMIDITY
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 46
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, Grasses, Composites
Today's count: 4.5/12
Friday's count: 5.2
Saturday's count: 5.3
AIR QUALITY
Wednesday was good with pollut-
ants mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MA
(MORNING) (AFTERNO(
12/6 THURSDAY 11:21 5:09 11:44
12/7 FRIDAY 5:55 12:07


C.0 C.13
DEC. 0 DEC. 13


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW
C MOONRISE TODAY
DEC. 20 DEC. 28 MOONSET TODAY.........


MAJOR
ON)
5:32
6:19


.5:33 PM.
..7:11 A.M.
......NONE
12:29 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Thursday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 10:22 a/6:24 a 11:18 p/6:36 p
Crystal River** 8:43 a/3:46 a 9:39 p/3:58 p
Withlacoochee* 6:30 a/1:34 a 7:26 p/1:46 p
Homosassa*** 9:32 a/5:23 a 10:28 p/5:35 p


High/L
11:50 a'
10:11 a/
7:58 a/2
11:00 a/


***At Mason's
Friday


SCreek


.ow High/Low
7:35 a /7:37 p
4:57 a 10:32 p/4:59 p
:45 a 8:19 p/2:47 p
6:34 a 11:21 p/6:36 p


Gulf water
temperature



66
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Tues. Wed. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.27 29.22 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.34 38.33 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.42 39.40 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.83 40.81 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


(# n o ra I mneau .10 .u. - a
sos

ss FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
THURSDAY


Wednesday Thursday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


.11 s
s
c
c
s
s
s
c
c
.26 sh
s
s
.34 s
c
.10 pc
.03 c
c
pc
pc
c
pc
.06 s
s
c
sh
pc
s
c
.01 s
s
s
pc
.01 c
pc
pc
pc
c
c
c
c
.02 c
c
.02 c


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Wednesday Thursday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 69 64 .56 c 74 59
New York City 58 39 s 42 36
Norfolk 64 44 .03 s 48 35
Oklahoma City 63 38 pc 70 44
Omaha 58 31 sh 52 33
Palm Springs 82 54 pc 81 54
Philadelphia 59 43 .01 s 44 33
Phoenix 82 54 pc 78 53
Pittsburgh 43 33 s 42 34
Portland, ME 55 36 .02 s 38 27
Portland, Ore 51 39 .03 sh 46 40
Providence, R.I. 59 40 .03 s 41 30
Raleigh 65 56 pc 51 36
Rapid City 62 28 c 37 21
Reno 53 45 .24 pc 55 30
Rochester, NY 46 31 s 43 32
Sacramento 57 54 .39 pc 63 42
St. Louis 54 37 c 57 47
St. Ste. Marie 29 20 .01 rs 37 32
Salt Lake City 48 40 .09 sh 49 35
San Antonio 76 46 s 74 55
San Diego 64 59 pc 66 56
San Francisco 62 59 .50 pc 59 49
Savannah 78 47 ts 65 50
Seattle 48 40 .13 sh 45 39
Spokane 44 35 .24 sn 35 29
Syracuse 48 32 .16 s 39 29
Topeka 62 28 c 61 38
Washington 63 47 s 45 33
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 83 Yuma, Ariz.
LOW 1 Grand Maras, Minn.
WORLD CITIES


THURSDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/72/s Madrid
Amsterdam 41/32/sh Mexico City
Athens 60/48/sh Montreal
Beijing 28/18/c Moscow
Berlin 30/24/sf Paris
Bermuda 70/62/sh Rio
Cairo 69/54/s Rome
Calgary 27/12/c Sydney
Havana 80/64/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 66/56/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 63/50/sh Warsaw


57/56/sh
39/37/pc
50/35/pc
74/43/s
32/28/s
25/19/c
41/33/pc
88/75/pc
51/36/pc
71/57/pc
57/38/s
37/34/pc
26/18/pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY N


For the RECORD


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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,0 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
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I-


....................


.......... ................................


A4 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


LOCAL


- -





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


James 'Doc'
Hudson Sr., 90
CRYSTAL RIVER
James Franklin "Doc"
Hudson Sr, 90, of Crystal
River, Fla., passed away at
his home Wednesday, Dec. 5,
2012. James was born Dec.
23, 1921, in Crystal River to
Dr Porter James Hudson
and wife Beulah Hudson.
James was smitten with a
cute young
a s lady from
Red Level,

already en-
gaged. So
Doc took
the situa-
tion in
James hand and
Hudson Sr. wrote and
sent the "dear John" letter
He married the love of his
life, Ailene Turner, in June
1945.
James started his teach-
ing career as the principal
in Lecanto in a two-room
schoolhouse. He was a
coach and teacher at Crystal
River schools where they
won the state championship
in six-man football and later
became principal of that
school. They later moved to
Lake Worth, where he
taught at Conniston Junior
High School for 25 years. In
1983 he and Ailene returned
to Crystal River where they
have lived at the family
home overlooking Sleepy
Lagoon off King's Bay Doc
was always a fisher of men
and fish. He never met a
stranger and was loved and
admired by all his many stu-
dents through the years. He
loved the Lord and life to its
fullest.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 68 years, Ailene
O. Hudson; son James
Franklin Hudson and wife
Sandy of Calvert, Texas; sis-
ter Margaret Braun of
Savannah, Ga. He was most
proud of his son, Frank
(Frankie) Hudson.
James will be laid to rest
and reunited with his right
arm, which he lost in an
automobile accident at the
age of two, at the Crystal
River Cemetery alongside
his father, mother and sister,
Ruth Smiley Visitation will
be 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7,
2012, at Strickland Funeral
Home in Crystal River and
graveside services 11 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, at the Old
Crystal River City Cemetery
The family suggests that
those who wish, in lieu of
flowers may make a memo-
rial contribution to the
Crystal River Anthology
Guild, 9686 West Cedar St.
Crystal River, FL 34428.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline for publication
in the next day's edition
is 3 p.m.






I 3"I


0 0i 0, I












Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland &r Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678


Helen 'Nanny'
Kuschnereit, 98
CITRUS SPRINGS
Helen "Nanny" Gaverella
Kuschnereit, 98, of Citrus
Springs, Fla., passed away
peacefully Nov 30, 2012,
under the loving care of her
family at
Diamond


------R i d g e
Ridge
Health and
Rehabilita-
tion Center
in Lecanto.
Born Sept.
Helen 16, 1914, in
Kuschnereit N e w
Rochelle,
N.Y, to John and Jennie
(Fox) Riley Helen moved to
Citrus County forty years
ago from Islip, NY. She was
a retired machinist, a mem-
ber of the Catholic faith and
as a young woman she en-
joyed writing poetry She
was an avid collector of
dolls and tea pots.
Helen was preceded in
death by her husband,
August Kuschnereit, and
her sisters, Frances and
Rhoda. Survived by her de-
voted and loving son, John
Ludlow Sr and his wife
Doris of Citrus Springs; her
step daughter, Margie
Swaine; five adoring grand-
sons, John Ludlow Jr of
Stuart, Kevin Ludlow of Stu-
art, Brian Ludlow and his
wife Pam of Dunnellon,
Darren and his wife Debbie
of Homosassa, and Chris
Ludlow and his fiancee
Jessica Fernandez of
Hernando; four affectionate
great-grandchildren,
Timothy Ludlow, Lindsay
Basquez and her husband
Jeremy, Janey Ludlow, and
Tyler Ludlow; one great-
great-grandson, Jayden
Basquez and dedicated,
extended family members
Karen Fenton and her
husband Craig of Stuart.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto. Family and friends
may visit from 10 to 11 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8,2012, at the
Brown Funeral Home in
Lecanto. A memorial serv-
ice will begin at 11 a.m.
Saturday with Father Tom
Spillett officiating.
In Lieu of flowers dona-
tions can be made to St Jude
Children's hospital. Brown
Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto,
www.brownfuneralhome.
com.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


(CaA.4. .ba47U
Funeral Home With Crematory
GORDON WELLS
Service: Friday, 12:30 PM
JEANNIE HARRIS
Mass: Tuesday, 10:00 AM
St. Benedict's, Crystal River
ARTHUR SMITH
Arrangements Pending
726-8323 DGKD






OF HOMOSASSA, Inc.
www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com


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Lorrie Verticals
1, ,,
BEST/ 2" Faux Wood
r^ Woven Woods
SCellular & Roman Shades
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5454 S.Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)

F C A L L N O W -7


ISServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

Funeal Hme &Cremtor


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhomecom


Wilbur
Coultas Jr., 74
BEVERLY HILLS
Wilbur Horace Coultas
Jr, 74, of Beverly Hills, Fla.,
passed away Dec. 4, 2012, at
his home under the loving
care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus County
Born on April 2, 1938, in
Normal, Ill., to Wilbur
Horace Sr and Katherine
(Marlowe) Coultas. Wilbur
moved to Citrus County 15
years ago from Hamburg,
Mich. He was an automotive
engineer for General
Motors and retired after 39
years. Wilbur was a
Corvette enthusiast, he
built and flew model air-
planes and he loved any
and all noisy
engines.
Preceded in death by his
wife, Susie R. Coultas, sis-
ter, Ruth Gauger and his
daughter, Kimberly Jane.
Survived by his daughter,
Kristi (Mark) Clark of
Muskegon, Mich.; son,
Kevin Coultas of Kalama-
zoo, Mich.; sisters, Kather-
ine Gross of Chicago, Ill.,
Jane Foster of Burr Ridge,
Ill., and Ann (Bob) Kondal-
ski of Auburn, Wash.; two
grandchildren, Natalie and
Nathan Clark; and
special friend, Barbara
Berg.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Florida. In lieu of
Flowers, memorial dona-
tions can be made to
Hospice of Citrus County
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto,
www.brownfuneralhome.
com.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Carmella
Beebe, 96
NEW PORT
RICHEY
Carmella M. Beebe, 96, of
New Port Richey, formerly
of Largo, Fla., died Dec. 4,
2012. Visitation will be 1 to
3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8,
service to follow at 3 p.m.,
at New Testament Baptist
Church, 2050 Belcher
Road, Largo. Graveside
service 1:30 p.m. Monday,
Dec. 10, at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. Moss Feaster Funeral
Homes and
Cremation Services,
Dunedin, wwwmossfeaster
dunedin.com, provided
information.


Arthur
Smith, 86
CRYSTAL RIVER
Arthur L. Smith, 86,
Crystal River, died Dec. 4,
2012, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center
Arthur was born Dec. 16,
1925, in New York City to the
late Clinton A. and Helen
Lazard Smith. He served
our country in the United
States Army Air Corp during
World War II. Arthur en-
joyed golfing and was a
member of the Elks, Opti-
mist and American Legion
Post No. 155 of Crystal
River He was a very socia-
ble person who enjoyed
being around others.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife of 25 years,
Ruth Smith; his son, Troy
(Jennifer) Smith, St. Peters-
burg Beach; stepson Larry
(Maria) Folsom, Tallahas-
see; stepdaughters Theresa
Folsom, Tallahassee, and
Cinnamon (Paul) Walker,
Murphy, N.C.; grandchil-
dren Sienna and Max
Smith; and step-
grandchildren Becky and
Wesley Folsom and Zara
and Villa Walker
A tribute to Arthur's life
will be 10 a.m. Friday, Dec.
7,2012, at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home. Burial will
follow with military honors
at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Lasherm
Stephan, 54
INVERNESS
Lasherm E Stephan, 54, of
Inverness, Fla., passed away
Dec. 3, 2012, at the Citrus
Hospice in Inverness. Born
June 25, 1958 in Chicago, Ill.,
to Lawrence Frederick and
Vivian Elaine (Thomson).
Lasherm moved to Citrus
County 13 years ago from
Green Bay, Wis. He was a
correctional officer and a
U.S. Army Veteran.
He is survived by his fi-
anc6e, Patricia Sue Tongate
of Inverness; one daughter,
Samantha Stephan; one son,
Tucker Stephan; two broth-
ers, Casey and Dennis
Flynn.
Private cremation under
the direction of Brown
Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


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Workforce Connection

3 RNetWORKER



JOBS Apply @ www.EmployFlorida.com
Chaplain Master's degree in ministry, clinical pastoral
focus preferred. Two (2) years experience. Salary DOE.
Job Order No. 9728995.
Physical Therapist Assistant Associate's degree,
Florida license, and First Aid credentials. No experience
required. $18-$23/hour. Job Order No. 9729433.
Livestock Pavilion Manager Bachelor's degree, Fla.
Driver License, First Aid/Safety certification.
engineering. One year experience in facility
management and marketing. $21-$33.50/hour.
Job Order No. 9728764.


PEOPLE Call 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1220
Carol S. Call Center Customer Service Representative.
10+ years call center CSR experience, strong written
and verbal communication, Microsoft proficient. BA
from University of Michigan.
Paula H. Communications and Print Media Specialist.
Classically trained design professional with experience
handling all aspects of media relations for clients;
proficient with all major design software.
Carla S. Computer Programmer Analyst. Skills include
SAP (UNIX), PI, ECC, Seeburger Workbench, AS/400 and
IBM 3090 Mainframe systems. EDI software proficiency
includes SAP/PI, Sterling Gentran Integration Suite,
Gentran Mainframe, Premenos and Fastran/400. BA in
Business Administration/Computer Systems from the
University of Toledo.


WORKFORE www.clmworkforce.omi
ffll7ll in 1103 E. Inverness Blvd.
CITRUS LEVY MARIOI Inverness, FL 34452 I 637-2223
Equal Opportunity Program/Employer. Auxiliary Aids and Services are available upon
request to individuals with disabilities via Florida Relay at 711. For accommodations,
email accommodations@cimworkforce.com or call 800-434-5627, ext. 7878.
000DFJO


Kevin
Cooney, 58
CRYSTAL RIVER
Kevin Cooney, 58, of
Crystal River, Fla., died Aug.
2, 2012. The family will wel-
come friends at Fero Funeral
Home 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 9, 2012. Funeral Mass of
Remembrance 9 a.m. Mon-
day, Dec. 10, 2012, at Our Lady
of Grace. Arrangements en-
trusted to Fero Funeral Home.

Brenda
Keating, 54
HERNANDO
Brenda Kay Keating, 54,
of Hernando, Fla., passed
away Dec. 3, 2012, at her
home. Private cremation
will take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto.

Patricia
Cooney, 80
BEVERLY HILLS
Patricia Cooney, 80, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012.
Visitation 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 9, 2012, at Fero Funeral
Home. Funeral Mass, 9 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, at
Our Lady of Grace with en-
tombment to follow at Fero
Memorial Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted to
Fero Funeral Home.


Death
ELSEWHERE
Dave
Brubeck, 91
JAZZ COMPOSER
HARTFORD, Conn. -Jazz
composer and pianist Dave
Brubeck, 91, whose pioneer-
ing style in pieces such as
"Take Five" caught listeners'
ears with exotic, challenging
rhythms, has died.
Brubeck, who lived in
Wilton, died Wednesday
morning at Norwalk Hospital
of heart failure after being
stricken while on his way to a
cardiology appointment with
his son Darius, said his man-
ager Russell Gloyd. Brubeck
would have turned 92 today
Brubeck had a career that
spanned almost all Ameri-
can jazz since World War II.
He formed The Dave Brubeck
Quartet in 1951 and was the
first modern jazz musician
to be pictured on the cover
of Time magazine on Nov
8,1954 and helped define
the swinging, smoky rhythms
of 1950s and '60s club jazz.
George Wein, a jazz pi-
anist and founder of the
Newport Jazz Festival, had
known Brubeck since he
first worked in Wein's club
in Boston in 1952.
"No one else played like
Dave Brubeck," he said.
-From wire reports


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 A5


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THE T D ,KCTYINR)VCHROIC


IHowTo"s ,RA HEMR TI N EI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 4229057 10.46 +.56 CheniereEn 61233 16.77 +.30 SiriusXM 858576 2.77 +.01 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
NokiaCp 1446053 3.88 +.44 Vringo 48798 3.15 -.22 Microsoft 564353 26.67 +.30 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
S&P500ETF1365097141.50 +.25 NwGoldg 27334 10.64 -.10 Facebookn 558340 27.71 +.25 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
FMCG 1055640 32.16 -6.12 Rentech 22563 2.87 +.05 PwShs QQQ504554 64.90 -.73 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
Citigroup 810097 36.46 +2.17 NAPallg 19794 1.40 +.03 Intel 445722 19.85 -.12 Chg: Loss orgain fortheday. No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempton by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
McMoRn 15.82 +7.36 +87.0 IncOpR 3.50 +.43 +13.9 RenewErs 3.99 +2.01 +101.8 ng qualification n- Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
PlainsEx 44.50 +8.45 +23.4 EnviroStar 2.18 +.18 +9.0 MitekSys 3.22 +.82 +34.2 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock Issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
CobaltlEn 28.21 +4.43 +18.6 MeetMe 3.31 +.24 +7.8 NetlUEPS 4.05 +.83 +25.8 Holder owes Installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Supvalu 2.90 +.35 +13.7 AlmadnMg 3.07 +.21 +7.3 Novogenrs 7.46 +1.26 +20.3 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the lastyear.wi -Trades will be settled when the
ChinZenix 2.91 +.34 +13.2 Bcp NJ 11.30 +.51 +4.7 CstlCon grs 6.00 +1.00 +20.0 stock is issued. wd When distributed, wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVs2xlnPal29.14-15.88 -35.3 PacBkrMg 5.95 -.64 -9.7 MattressF 23.67 -6.65 -21.9
Pandora 7.80 -1.65 -17.5 LongweiPI 2.50 -.25 -9.1 AnikaTh 9.42 2.53 -212
FMCG 32.16 -6.12 -16.0 Medgenwt 3.18 -.32 -9.1 TibcoSft 20.00 -4.72 -19.1
CSVlnvNG 15.88 -2.19 -12.1 Medgenics 9.03 -.87 -8.8 ClearSignn 4.36 -.71 -14.0 52-Week Net % YT[
BiP GCrb 7.99 -.96 -10.7 Crexendo 2.50 -.20 -7.4 CombiMrs 2.41 -.38 -13.6 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


1,575 Advanced
1,439 Declined
131 Unchanged
3,145 Total issues
74 New Highs
26 New Lows
4,024,852,857 Volume


DIARY


221 Advanced
225 Declined
27 Unchanged
473 Total issues
5 New Highs
10 New Lows
73,970,075 Volume


1,050
1,374
151
2,575
58
42
1,764,580,316


13,661.72 11,735.19Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 4,750.12Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 435.57Dow Jones Utilities
8,515.60 7,129.84NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,164.87Amex Index
3,196.93 2,518.01Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,202.37S&P500
15,432.54 12,618.11Wilshire 5000
868.50 705.78Russell 2000


13,034.49
5,120.31
454.69
8,264.80
2,397.32
2,973.70
1,409.28
14,773.20
820.60


I NYSE


) % 52-wk
ig % Chg


+82.71 +.64 +6.69 +6.87
+45.97 +.91 +2.00 +2.69
+6.39 +1.43 -2.15 +1.65
+40.93 +.50+10.54 +9.33
-14.86 -.62 +5.22 +4.24
-22.99 -.77 +14.15+12.25
+2.23 +.16+12.06+11.76
+15.61 +.11 +12.00+11.53
-1.52 -.18+10.75 +9.98


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkMontg 60.10 +.10
BkNYMel 23.74 -.02
Barday 15.93 +.21
BariPVixrs 30.16 -.51
ABBLtd 19.87 +.21 BarrikG 33.40 .79
ACE Ld 80.31 +.94 Baxter 64.47 -.30
AESCorp 10.86 +.14 BeamInc 57.74 +.98
AFLAC 53.58 +1.01 BeazerHrs 14.23 -.51
AGLRes 39.70 +.89 BectDck 77.39 +.42
AKSteel 4.07 +.14 BerkHaA131444.00 +554.00
AOL 31.73 +.49 BerkH B 87.62 +.35
ASAGold 21.69 -.08 BestBuy 12.08 -.07
AT&Tlnc 33.91 -.01 BigLots 30.06 -1.21
AUOptron 4.45 -.03 BioMedR 19.17 -.09
AbtLab 64.54 +.15 BIkHillsCp 35.90 +.47
AberFitc 45.23 -.22 BlkDebtStr 4.31 +.03
Accenture 69.60 +.99 BlkEnhC&l 12.64 -.01
AdamsEx 10.48 BIkGlbOp 12.76 -.02
AMD 2.29 +.03 Blackstone 14.77 +.08
Aeropost 13.73 -.48 BlockHR 17.57 -.28
Aetna 43.55 +.19 Boeing 73.87 -.18
Agilent 38.66 +.53 BostBeer 112.89 -.11
Agniog 52.40 -1.65 BostProp 102.56 +.03
AlcatelLuc 1.18 +.02 BostonSci 5.57 +.02
Alma 8.57 +.15 BoydGm 5.48
AllegTch 26.70 +.37 Brinker 30.20 +.95
Allergan 92.37 +.56 BrMySq 32.79 +.09
Allete 40.13 +.33 BrkfldOfPr 16.34 +.04
AlliBGIbHi 15.53 -.10 Brunswick 26.15 -.30
AlliBlnco 8.58 +.02 Buckeye 48.12 -.61
AlliBern 17.25 -.51 Buenavent 32.19 -.19
Allstate 41.30 +.72 BungeLt 71.40 -.13
AlphaNRs 8.07 +.82 BurgerKn 17.02 +.16
AIpAerMLP 16.01 -.06 CBLAsc 22.50 -.09
Altria 33.30 -.19 CBREGrp 18.75 +.18
AmBev 41.79 +.62 CBSB 35.47 -.37
Ameren 29.96 +.51 CHEngy 65.18 -.02
AMovilL 22.88 -.42 CMSEng 24.63 +.25
AEagleOut 21.26 -.19 CNOFind 9.34 +.13
AEP 43.20 +.85 CSSInds 20.40 -.06
AmExp 56.40 +.56 CSX 20.16 +.52
AmlntGrp 33.78 +.46 CVSCare 46.18 +.24
AmSIP3 7.63 +.04 CYS Invest 12.77 -.04
AmTower 74.61 -.22 CblvsnNY 13.80 -.14
Amerigas 39.49 +.02 CabotOGs 47.64 +.07
AmeriBrgn 42.26 -.49 CallGolf 6.58 -.10
Anadarko 74.74 +1.23 Calpine 17.44 +.10
AnglogldA 29.98 -.59 Camecog 18.60 +.21
ABInBev 87.60 -.68 Cameron 54.76 +.27
Ann nc 32.30 -.46 CampSp 36.68 +.13
Annaly 14.40 -.02 CdnNRsgs 28.02 +.40
Aon plc 56.65 -.06 CP Rwyg 97.50 +3.88
Apache 77.73 +1.47 CapOne 57.05 +.03
AquaAm 25.01 -.24 CapitlSrce 7.90 -.04
ArcelorMit 15.99 +.37 CapMplB 14.76 +.13
ArchCoal 7.22 +.50 CardnlHlth 40.39 -.01
ArchDan 26.72 +.01 CarMax 35.39 -.50
ArosDor 12.38 +.15 Carnival 37.21 -.07
ArmourRsd 6.97 -.06 Caterpillar 86.05 +1.89
Ashland 74.80 +1.90 Celanese 42.00 +1.01
AsdEstat 15.09 -.32 Cemex 8.92 -.01
AsfaZen 48.23 +.36 Cemigpfs 11.34 -.26
AlasPpln 30.75 -.25 CenterPnt 19.92 +.29
ATMOS 35.70 +.21 CenEIBras 3.32 -.10
AuRicog 7.28 -.33 Cnbtyink 38.88 -.40
AutoNat 39.37 +.01 Checkpnt 9.21 +.16
AvalonBay 132.72 -1.51 ChesEng 16.97 +.10
Avon 13.82 +.02 ChesUtI 48.07 +1.17
BB&TCp 27.86 +.17 Chevron 105.17 +1.21
BHPBiIILt 72.52 +.77 ChicB&l 40.85 -.16
BP PLC 41.31 +.31 Chimos 17.81 -.23
BRFBrasil 18.68 +.14 Chimera 2.73 +.03
BRT 6.30 -.07 ChinaMble 57.88 +.73
BakrHu 42.00 -.25 Chubb 78.18 +1.98
BallCorp 43.61 -.09 Cigna 51.92 +.26
BmoBradpf 17.12 +.45 CindBell 5.23 -.09
BmoSantSA 7.67 -.05 Citlgroup 36.46 +2.17
BmoSBrasil 6.80 +.13 CleanHarb 57.02 +.27
BkofAm 10.46 +.56 CliffsNRs 29.53 +.13


Clorox 75.62 +.11
Coach 57.35 +.13
CobaltlEn 28.21 +4.43
CCFemsa 142.26 +.28
CocaColas 37.31 +.16
CocaCE 31.71 +.33
Coeur 22.20 -.91
CohStlnfra 18.03 -.05
ColgPal 107.21 -.37
ColonyFnd 19.48 -.56
Comerica 28.91 +.09
CmwREIT 15.25 -.14
CompSci 38.60 +.11
Con-Way 27.54 -.06
ConAgra 29.69 +.14
ConchoRes 81.63 +3.83
ConocPhils 57.18 +.34
ConsolEngy 32.98 +1.53
ConEd 56.08 +.72
ConstellA 35.63 -.23
ContlRes 75.04 +2.71
Cnvrgys 15.92 +.19
Corning 12.38 +.16
CottCp 8.31 +.04
CovenbyH 43.70 +.18
Covidien 57.62 -.31
Crane 42.50 +.59
CSVS2xVxS .90 -.04
CSVellVSt 18.80 +.32
CredSuiss 24.68 +.55
CrwnCsle 66.75 -.44
Cummins 101.31 +4.00

DCTIndl 6.21 -.09
DDReCrp 15.41 -.05
DNP Selct 9.27 +.11
DR Hortn 18.59 -.35
DSW Inc 67.57 -2.95
DTE 61.57 +1.08
DanaHldg 14.28 -.13
Danaher 53.35 +.10
Darden 47.20 -.20
DaVitaHlth 106.32 +.19
DeanFds 17.10 -.06
Deere 84.24 +.74
DelphiAuto 33.87 -.03
DeltaAir 9.71 -.02
DenburyR 15.57 +.35
DeutschBk 46.07 +1.06
DevonE 52.62 +.74
DigitalRIt 65.59 -.24
DrxFnBull 108.76 +3.38
DirSCBear 15.22 +.06
DirFnBear 16.91 -.53
DirSPBear 17.76 -.09
DirDGIdBII 10.12 -.90
DrxEnBear 8.19 -.18
DirEMBear 10.62 -.35
DirxSCBull 57.61 -.25
Discver 40.87 -.13
Disney 49.59 +.29
DollarGen 46.60 -1.34
DomRescs 51.73 +1.33
DEmmett 23.08 +.12
DowChm 29.49 +.20
DuPont 42.62 +.14
DukeEn rs 64.46 +.86
DukeRlty 13.32 -.10
EMCCp 25.15 +.23
ENI 47.15 -.68
EOGRes 118.72 +1.54
EQTCorp 58.76 +.97
EastChem 60.27 +.61
Eaton 51.18 -.10
EatnVan 31.94 +.18
EVEnEq 10.69 -.02
Ecolab 71.16 -.71
Edisonlnt 44.98 +.53


EwLfSci 90.60
Ban 9.86
BdorGldg 13.35
EmersonEl 50.65
EmpDist 19.91
EnbrdgEPt 28.00
EnCanag 21.74
EndvSilvg 8.04
EngyTsfr 43.30
EnPro 40.21
ENSCO 58.96
Entergy 63.74


EntPrPt 49.94
EqtyRsd 54.43
EsteeLdrs 59.33
ExoRes 7.88
Exelon 29.56
Express 14.29
ExxonMbl 87.73
FamilyDIr 69.80
FedExCp 89.43
FedSignl 6.21
Ferrellgs 17.64
Ferro 2.88
RbriaCelu 11.50
RdlNRn 23.63
RdNatlnfo 36.70
FstARnn 24.49
FstHorizon 9.40
FstRepBk 33.45
FTActDiv 7.49
FtTrEnEq 11.75
FirstEngy 42.02
Rx3yrTips 25.53
Ruor 53.50
FootLockr 34.98
FordM 11.31
ForestLab 36.12
ForestOil 6.47
FBHmSec 29.14
FMCG 32.16
Fusion-io 22.43


GATX 42.65 +.56
GabelliET 5.62
GabHlthW 9.30 -.02
GabUtI 6.81 -.04
GatsaSA 4.23 +.09
GameStop 25.97 +.09
Gannett 17.99 +.55
Gap 31.81 +.87
GenDynam 66.88 +.44
GenElec 21.23 +.37


GenGrPrp 19.56 +.14
GenMills 40.95 +.32
GenMotors 25.00 -.41
GenOn En 2.60 +.04
Genworth 6.08 +.09
GeoGrp 29.14 -.01
Gerdau 8.52 +.19
GlaxoSKln 43.52 -.08
GoldFLd 11.37 -.34
Goldarpg 36.97 -1.17
GoldmanS 117.13 +.55
GoodrPet 8.41 +.05
Goodyear 12.80 +.04
GraphPkg 6.18 -.19
GtPlainEn 20.45 +.26
Griffon 10.60 +.04
GpFSnMxn 15.05 +.03
GpTelevisa 24.18 +.90
GuangRy 16.78 +.31
HCA HIdg 32.40 +.39
HCP Inc 44.82 -.18
HSBC 51.87 +.65
HSBCCap 25.94 +.00
HalconRrs 6.55 +.45
Hallibrtn 33.50 +.44
HanJS 16.03 +.07
HanPrmDv 13.54 +.01
Hanesbrds 35.79 -.11
Hanoverlns 37.89 +1.46
HarleyD 46.28 -.23
HarmonyG 7.50 -.17
HartfdFn 21.54 +.61


HawaiiEl 25.32
HItCrREIT 59.04
HItMgmt 7.43
HIthcrRlty 24.04
Heckmann 3.78
HeclaM 5.59
Heinz 58.50
HelmPayne 54.98
Herbalife 46.56
Hersha 4.81
Hertz 15.87
Hess 49.47


iShBTips 123.05 +.22
iShChina25 38.12 +1.11
iSCorSP500142.06 +.26
iShEMkts 42.34 +.45
iShiBxB 122.25 +.25
iSSPVal 65.49 +.47
iShB20T 125.32 -.06
iS Eafe 55.36 +.09
iShiBxHYB 93.18 +.15
iSR1KV 71.83 +.47
iSR1KG 65.30 -.13
iSR2KG 92.93 -.36


HewlettP 13.82 +.29 iShR2K 81.99 -.10
HighwdPrp 32.07 -.10 iShUSPfd 39.62 -.02
HollyFront 43.27 -1.86 iShREst 63.56 -.17
HomeDp 64.02 -.22 iShDJHm 19.88 -.62
HomexDev 12.30 -1.45 iStar 7.61 -.09
HonwIllnf 61.57 +1.05 Idacorp 43.08 +.60
Hospira 31.02 +.08 ITW 61.71 +.55
HospPT 22.86 +.03 Imaton 4.33 -.06
HostHofs 14.63 ... IngerRd 48.44 +.59
HovnanE 4.88 -.21 IntegrysE 53.51 +.96
Humana 65.06 -.08 IntcnlEx 130.18 -.67
Huntsmn 16.05 +.17 IBM 188.65 -.71
IAMGIdg 10.74 -.80 InlGame 14.68 +.40
ICICI Bk 42.90 +1.35 IntPap 36.03 -.22
ING 9.34 +.15 Interpublic 10.90 +.19
iShGold 16.49 -.03 Invesco 24.46 -.14
iSAsfia 25.07 +.03 InvMtgCap 21.10 -.01
iShBraz 52.34 +.88 IronMtn 31.46 -.01

iShGer 23.77 +.01
iShHK 19.18 +.29
iShltaly 12.89 -.12 JPMorgCh 41.20 +.63
iShJapn 9.30 +.01 JPMAlerian 38.53 -.30
iShKor 59.95 +.35 Jabil 18.80 +.02
iSMalas 14.66 +.05 JanusCap 7.88 +.16
iShMex 67.77 +.05 Jefferies 17.87 +.12
iShSing 13.52 +.06 JohnJn 69.97 +.11
iSPacxJpn 46.65 +.22 JohnsnCt 27.41 -.01
iSTaiwn 13.63 +.08 JoyGlbl 56.63 +1.06
iShSilver 31.82 -.08 JnprNtwk 18.37 +35
iShS&P10064.61 +.04 KBHome 14.04 -.47
iShDJDv 57.56 +.34 KBW Inc 17.24 +.03


KKR 13.58 -.20 Merck 44.39 -.01
KTCorp 17.36 -.28 MetLife 33.32
KCSouthn 77.32 +.59 MetroPCS 10.10 +.14
Kaydons 23.40 +.15 MetroHlth 11.23
KAEngTR 24.91 +.10 MKorsn 50.40 -2.06
Kellogg 55.65 +.42 MidAApt 62.75 -.05
KeyEngy 7.01 +.19 MillMdan 12.44 -.79
Keycorp 7.92 +.03 MobileTele 17.52 -.31
KimbClk 84.84 -.23 MolsCoorB 42.40 +.65
Kimco 19.54 +.06 Molyorp 8.80 +.20
KindME 78.58 -.84 MoneyGrm 12.16 +.38
KindMorg 33.83 -.09 Monsanto 89.60 +.40
Kinrossg 9.51 -.38 MonstrWw 5.56 -.07
KnghtCap 3.36 +.03 Moodys 49.74 +.77
KodiakOg 8.57 +.41 MorgStan 16.98 +.37
Kohls 44.15 +.42 MSEmMkt 15.09 +.05
KrispKrm 8.95 -.22 Mosaic 53.08 +.10
Kroger 26.71 -.16 MotrlaSolu 55.18 +.96
LSICorp 6.87 +.14 MurphO 56.16 +.56
LTCPrp 32.68 -.20 NCRCorp 24.03 -.02
LaZBoy 14.47 -.77 NRG Egy 21.73 +.51
Ladede 40.77 +.40 NVEnergy 18.58 +.20
LVSands 45.31 -.15 NYSEEur 23.35 +.27
LeapFrog 8.66 -.26 Nabors 14.67 +.11
LeggPlat 27.17 -.68 NBGreece 1.77 +.04
LennarA 36.42 -1.36 NatFuGas 52.45 +.46
LeucNatl 23.19 +.19 NatGrid 56.77 +.28
Lexmark 24.27 -.09 NOilVarco 68.61 -.05
LbtyASG 3.98 -.04 Navistar 21.38 +.47
LillyEli 49.58 +.36 NewAmHi 10.60 +.04
Limited 51.23 -.07 NJRscs 41.31 +.56
LincNat 25.58 +.32 NewOriEd 16.41 -1.67
Lindsay 77.02 -1.02 NYCmtyB 13.09 +.14
Linkedln 107.81 +1.64 Newcastle 8.16 -.04
LloydBkg 2.95 ... NewellRub 21.71 +.05
LodhdM 91.53 +.05 NewfdExp 25.17 +.91
Loews 41.06 +.11 NewmtM 43.96 -1.13
LaPac 16.98 -.38 NewpkRes 7.70 -.05
Lowes 35.20 -.42 Nexeng 24.51 +.16
Luxotlca 40.60 -1.12 NextEraEn 69.18 +1.27
+09 NiSource 24.57 +.38
i kiB E NikeB 97.68 +.01
NobleCorp 35.76 +.17
M&TBk 96.32 +.17 NobleEn 96.04 +.09
MBIA 8.63 -.07 NokiaCp 3.88 +.44
MDU Res 20.72 +.25 Nordsrm 52.70 -.53
MEMC 2.98 -.03 NorfkSo 61.59 +1.38
MFAFnd 8.31 -.10 NoestUt 39.29 +.83
MCR 10.13 +.01 NorthropG 66.76 +.11
MGIC 1.93 +.03 Novarts 62.40 -.29
MGM Rsts 9.97 +.05 Nucor 40.81 +.07
Macquarie 43.71 +.14 NustarEn 45.00 -.09
Macys 38.87 +.60 NuvMuOpp 15.83 +.03
MagelMPts 43.00 -.03 NvPfdlnco 9.85 +.13
Magnalntg 46.07 +.21 NuvQPf2 9.28 +.02
MagHRes 3.87 +.10 OGEErgy 56.92 +.42
Manibtowoc 14.92 -.16 OasisPet 30.92 +.47
Manulifeg 12.95 +.12 OcciPet 74.49 +.80
MarathnO 30.47 +.43 OcwenFn 34.41 -.87
MarathPet 58.11 -1.05 OfficeDpt 3.28 -.01
MktVGold 45.35 -1.30 OiSAs 3.80 -.10
MVOilSvs 38.99 +.18 OldRepub 10.70 +.08
MktVRus 28.38 +.44 Olin 21.22 +.28
MktVJrGd 20.76 -.46 OmegaHIt 22.96 -.11
MarlntA 35.27 -.26 Omnicom 49.77 +.10
MarshM 35.20 +.29 OnAssign 19.57 -.23
MStewrt 2.53 -.05 ONEOKs 44.41 -.14
Masmo 16.21 -.37 OneokPtrs 55.60 -.74
McDrmlnt 10.58 +.06 OrientEH 11.97 -.25
McDnlds 86.97 -.23 OshkoshCp 28.39 -.57
McGrwH 53.51 +.30 OwensCorn 33.66 -.75
McKesson 94.32 -.16 Owenslll 19.24 -.02
McMoRn 15.82 +7.36
McEwenM 3.60 -.23
MeadJohn 67.57 -.04 PG&ECp 40.69 +.34
Mechel 6.36 +.22 PHH Corp 21.73 -.17
Medids 43.94 +.74 PNC 55.89 +.81
Medrnic 42.03 +17 PNMRes 21.17 +.18
MensW 31.35 -1.02 PPG 119.46 -.85


PPLCorp 29.35 +.39 RadioShk 1.96 +.04
PVHCorp 111.14 -2.59 Ralorp 89.38 -.07
PVRPtrs 23.64 +.10 RangeRs 64.61 +1.40
PallCorp 60.26 +.65 RJamesFn 37.31
Pandora 7.80 -1.65 Rayonier 50.05 +.04
ParkerHan 82.90 +1.72 Raytheon 57.25 +.49
Parkwy 13.36 +.14 Rltylnco 40.17 -.16
PeabdyE 26.06 +1.12 RedHat 48.37 -.64
Pengrthg 5.08 -.01 RegalEnt 15.74 +.21
PennWstg 11.15 +.32 RegionsFn 6.57 +.12
Penney 17.53 -.25 Renren 3.13 -.02
Pentair 48.21 -.13 RepubSvc 29.13 +.54
PepBoy 9.48 -.09 Revlon 14.88 -.02
PepoHold 19.78 +.15 ReynAmer 43.46 -.60
PepsiCo 69.71 +.39 RioTint 51.88 +1.59
Prmian 13.16 +.02 RiteAid .99 -.00
PetrbrsA 18.08 +.36 RobbMyer 59.25 -.12
Petrobras 18.37 +.34 RockwAut 80.39 +1.44
Pfizer 25.64 +.48 RockColl 56.01 +.11
PhilipMor 88.53 -.42 Rowan 32.46 +.58
Phillips66n 50.69 -.87 RyCarb 34.37 -.47
PiedNG 31.56 +.45 RoyDShllA 66.97
Pier1 19.88 +.09 Royce 12.95 -.01
PimoStrat 11.37 -.10 RmanHP 3483 +.67
PinWst 51.71 +.33
PioNtrl 104.85 +2.46
PitnyBw 10.88 -.15 SAIC 11.67 +.16
PlainsEx 44.50 +8.45 SAPAG 78.91 -1.22
PlumCrk 42.29 -.10 SCANA 46.33 +.62
Polaris 80.74 -1.21 SKTIcm 15.61
PostPrp 48.63 ... SpdrDJIA 130.24 +.85
Potash 39.59 +.58 SpdrGold 164.12 -.30
PSUSDBull 21.83 +.05 SPMid 182.30 +.39
PSSPLwV 27.93 +.17 S&P500ETF141.50 +.25
PwShPd 14.72 -.01 SpdrHome 25.65 -.64
Praxair 105.93 +.77 SpdrS&PBk 23.19 +.21
PrecDrill 7.57 +.13 SpdrLehHY 40.52 +.03
PrinFnd 27.88 +.21 SpdrS&P RB 27.49 +.12
ProLogis 34.30 +.04 SpdrRetl 62.55 -.24
ProShtS&P 34.53 -.08 SpdrOGEx 53.98 +1.61
PrUltQQQs 54.10 -1.16 SpdrMetM 42.40 +.31
PrUShQQQ 30.34 +.60 STMicro 6.50 +.22
ProUItSP 58.85 +.25 Safeway 17.46 +.45
PrUltSP500 84.76 +.45 SJoe 21.80 +.01
PrUVxSTrs 20.41 -.66 SUude 34.51 +.30
PrUltCrude 27.42 -.37 Saks 10.56
PrUShCrde 43.60 +.56 Saesforce 156.87 -.07
ProUltSilv 52.07 -.28 SJuanB 13.81 +.16
ProctGam 69.41 +.10 SandRdge 6.45 +.34
ProgsvCp 21.53 +.40 Sanofi 45.80 +.39
PrUShSPrs 55.94 -.18 Schlmbrg 71.32 +.10
PrUShL20rs 59.80 +.04 Schwab 12.93 +.05
ProUSR2K 27.41 +.13 SeadrillLd 36.85 -.18
PUSSP500rs39.78 -.19 SealAir 16.44 -.01
Prudent 52.61 +.55 SempraEn 70.30 +2.06
PSEG 30.01 +.65 SenHous 22.63 -.04
PubStrg 141.55 -.95 Sensient 35.87 +.18
PulteGrp 16.20 -.89 ServNown 29.41 -.78
PPrlT 5.43 -.02 ShawGrp 45.02 -.03
QEPRes 29.56 +1.06 SiderurNac 5.04 +.17
Qihoo360 24.30 -1.72 SilvWhtng 35.11 -1.07
QuanexBld 21.11 -.29 SimonProp 152.27 -.28
QuantaSvc 25.93 -.18 SixFlags 63.36 +1.26
Questar 19.61 +.10 Skechers 19.29 -.36
QksilvRes 3.19 +.07 SmithAO 63.35 -.06
RPM 28.50 -.21 SmithfF 22.90 +.37
Rackspace 66.81 +.22 Smudcker 88.29 -.63
RadianGrp 4.62 +.01 SonyCp 9.70 +.07




The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


IA EIA N SOC5 CANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.92 +.12
AbdnEMTel 20.63 +.16
AdmRsc 33.71 -.58
AlexoRg 3.65 -.12
AlldNevG 30.87 -1.03
AlmadnMg 3.07 +.21
AmApparel 1.02 +.03
Argan 19.02 -.25
Aurizong 3.62 -.03
AvalnRare 1.31 -.01
Bacterin 1.14
Banrog 3.11 -.13


BarcUBS36 42.57
BarcGSOil 21.00
BlkMunvst 11.78
BrigusGg 1.00
BritATob 105.34
CAMACEn .62
CelSd .29
CFCdag 22.39
CheniereEn 16.77
CheniereE 20.41
ChiArmMt .39
ChinaShen .37
ClaudeRg .57
ClghGlbOp 10.96
ComndSec 1.60


+.30 ComskMn 2.22 +.02
-.13 Contango 40.54 -.34
+.05 CornstProg 5.34 +.06
-.02 CrSuislno 4.00 +.03
-1.61 CrSuiHiY 3.21 -.04
-.01

0 DeourEg .0 +.01
+.30 DenisnMg 1.10 +.03
-.05 EVLtdDur 16.83 -.06
-.03 EVMuniBd 14.93 +.06
-.01 EVMuni2 14.18 +.06
-.01 ElephTalk 1.23 +.03
+.07 EllswthFd 7.10 -.02
EurasnMg 2.00 -.08


ExeterRgs 1.21 -.03


GamGldNR 13.03 -.05
GascoEngy .11 -.00
Gastargrs .91 -.05
GenMoly 3.58 -.05
GeoGloblR .07 -.00
Geoldnelcs .29 +.01
GeoPeto .07 +.01
GoldRsvg 2.86 +.01
GoldResrc 16.42 +.17
GoldStdVg 1.38 +.05
GoldenMin 4.11 -.17
GoldStrg 1.74 -.02


GranTrrag 5.68 +.07
GtPanSilvg 1.65 +.01
Hemisphrx .81 -.00
HstnAEn .55 -.01
mmunoCII 2.12 -.05
ImpOilgs 43.25 +.67
InovioPhm .53 -.01
IntellgSys 1.47 -.03
nvAdvMu2 13.54 +.05
i 0R 56 02

KeeganRg 4.01 +.09
LkShrGldg .68 +.03
Libbey 19.20 -.56
LongweiPI 2.50 -.25


LucasE 142 +02 NovaBayP 1.39 -.06
NovaCppn 1.90 -.01
Meete 3.31 +.24 NovaGldg 4.38 -.04 SamsO&G .80 -.07
Sandstgrs 11.59 17
Metalieo 1.57 +.02 SprottRL g 1.47 +.04
MdwGold g 1.39 -.09
NaideaBio 262 04 ParaG&S 2.25 -.07 SynergyRs 4.32 +.15

TimberlnR .30 +.01
Neuralstem 1.23 +.03 RareEleg 3.25 .13 Tim ns g 2.0 .0
Nevsung 3.98 +.06 ReavesUtl 23.86 04 Timmnsg 2.90 -.07
NewEnSys .48 +.02 Rentech 2.87 +.05 TravelCts 4.30 -.06
NwGoldg 10.64 -.10 RexahnPh .31 -.01 TriangPet 6.04 +.06
NA Pall g 1.40 +.03
NDynMng 3.41 -.12 Richmntg 2.91 +.01 Uranerz 1.32 -.04
NthnO&G 16.16 +.30 Rubicong 2.90 -.03 UraniumEn 2.54 +.02


VangTotW 48.55 +.14
VantageDrl 1.75 -.11
VirnetX 33.90 +.27
VistaGold 2.98 +.07
Vringo 3.15 -.22
Walterlnv 42.44 -.86
WFAdvlnco 10.26 +.02
WFAdMSec 16.07 -.03
WTDrfChn 25.85 +.04
YMBiog 1.61 -.05
ZBBEngy .23 +.01


I NiA N A TIONALMARKET 11


Name Last Chg


ASMLHId 62.19 +.77
Aastom 1.32 +.02
Abiomed 12.88 -.18
Abraxas 2.09 +.08
AcadaTc 24.04 +.41
AcadiaHIt 22.02 -.13
AcadiaPh 4.67 -.33
Accuray 6.20 -.03
AcelRx 3.65 -.29
Achillion 7.48 -.16
AcmePkt 19.38 -.05
AordaTh 25.24 +.45
ActvsBliz 11.23 -.05
AdobeSy 35.40 +.10
Adtan 18.92 -.89
AdvisBds 46.99 +1.08
Aegerion 21.00 -.03
AeroViron 22.94 +2.68
AEterngrs 2.17 -.05
Affymax 23.11 -1.37
Affymetix 3.25 -.06
AirTrnsp 3.69 +.08
AkamaiT 35.50 -.50
Akorn 13.23 -.13
Alexion 94.11 -1.05
Alexzars 4.88 -.64
AlignTech 26.14 -.39
Alkermes 18.86 -.73
AllotComm 20.53 -1.19
AllscriptH 11.03 +.15
AlteraCplf 31.01 -1.17
Allsrcen 97.93 -2.72
Amarin 12.04 -.56
Amazon 253.96 +1.47
Amedisys 10.39 -.50
AFTxE 6.84 -.01
ACapAgy 30.99 -.48
AmCapLi 11.69 -.17
ACapMtg 25.09 -.51
ARItyCTn 11.73 +.02
AmSupr 2.66 -.01
Amgen 89.01 +.68
AmicusTh 5.54 -.05
AmkorTch 4.36 +.04
Anadigc 1.90
AnalogDev 40.57 +.22
Anlogic 72.80 -.70
Analystlnt 2.96 -.17
Ancesry 31.79 -.01
AnikaTh 9.42 -2.53
Ansys 66.02 +.04
AntaresP 3.96 -.11
AntheraPh .67 -.03
ApolloGrp 20.42 -.11
Apollolnv 8.10 -.01
Apple Inc 538.79 -37.05
ApldMal 10.80 -.08
AMCC 7.03 -.01
Approach 22.98 +.32
ApricusBio 1.90 -.18
ArQule 2.60 -.02
ArchCap 44.76 +.34
ArenaPhm 8.68 +.06
AresCap 17.52 +.07
AriadP 21.75 -.01
ArkBest 8.46
ArmHId 36.33 -.49
ArrayBio 3.69 -.04
Arris 14.08 -.18
ArubaNet 19.90 -.61
AscenaRts 19.79 +.18
AsiaEntRs 2.82 -.18
AsialnfoL 10.92 -.40
AspenTech 26.42 +.17
AsscdBanc 12.72 +.02
AstexPhm 2.75 +.12
athenahlth 65.71 +.71
Athersys 1.04 -.01
Atmel 5.35 -.08
AuoNavi 11.66 +.03
Autodesk 33.60 +.52
AutoData 57.24 +.57
Auxilium 18.08 -.11
AvagoTch 34.53 -.39


AvanirPhm 2.56 -.06 CogoGrp 2.39 -.09
AvisBudg 19.14 ... Coinstar 50.14 +2.77
Aware 6.62 -.03 Comcast 36.88 -.32
Axcelis 1.21 +.13 Comcspd 35.78 -.26
BBCNBcp 11.54 -.01 CmcBMO 35.30 +.01
B/EAero 47.03 -.29 CommSys 10.46 -.02
BGCPtrs 3.46 +.06 CommVlt 66.62 -.91
BJsRest 32.20 -.17 CmplGnom 3.13
BMCSft 40.20 -.22 CmpTask 18.25 -.49
Baidu 88.12 -2.13 Compuwre 9.50 -.08
Bazaarvcn 9.23 -.23 Comverse 3.49 -.09
BeacnRfg 30.58 -.97 ConcurTch 62.94 -1.12
BeasleyB 5.01 +.13 Conmed 27.63 -.36
BebeStrs 3.68 -.02 Conns 27.20 -.96
BedBath 57.60 -.52 ConsuPtf 5.75 +.32
BioRetlab 27.31 +.56 Corcept 1.65 +.14
Bioryst 1.37 -.06 CorinthC 2.26 -.03
Biogenldc 150.55 -1.31 Costo 105.95 +1.55
BioMarin 47.89 -.20 CowenGp 2.24 -.02
BioSanters 1.44 +.02 Creelnc 31.72 -.32
BioScrip 10.63 -.08 Crocs 13.30 +.02
BloominBn 15.40 -.05 CrssCbyHI 4.22 +.09
Bluora 14.31 -.29 CrosstxLP 14.24 +.24
BobEvans 38.77 +1.58 Ctrip.om 18.02 +.09
BtbnlnT 25.12 +.09 CubistPh 41.35 +.12
BreitBurn 18.23 -.09 Cyclaceirs 7.59 +1.22
Bridgeline 1.80 -.45 Cymer 87.17 +.72
Brightcvn 9.57 -.32 Cynosure 23.39 -1.05
Broadcom 32.34 -.11 C Semi 9.99 +.07
BroadSoft 31.69 -.68
BrcdeCm 5.45 -.05
BrooksAuto 7.68 +.01 Daktronics 10.02 -.34
BrukerCp 14.23 -.04 DeckrsOut 41.32 +.39
BuffabWW 74.11 +1.81 Delcath 1.46 +.01
CAInc 21.97 -.33 DellInc 10.37 +.06
CBOE 29.85 +.02 Dndreon 4.69 +.29
CH Robins 61.91 +.89 Dennys 4.84 -.00
CMEGrps 54.72 +.07 Dentsply 39.28 +.13
CNinsure 7.93 ... DexCom 13.86 -.29
CTCMedia 8.38 +.02 DiamndFhlf 15.15 +.22
Cadence 12.80 +.06 DianaCont 5.66 -.12
Caesarsn 6.30 -.31 DigitalGen 10.84 +.08
CalaGDyln 8.35 -.02 DirecTV 49.57 +.26
CalaStrTR 9.98 +.16 DiscCmAh 61.74 +1.23
CalAmp 8.19 -.21 DiscCmCh 57.04 +.94
CapCtyBk 10.99 -.06 DiscovLab 2.20 -.15
CapFedFn 11.86 +.01 DishNetwk 36.13 -1.07
CpstnTrbh .97 +.00 DollarTrs 40.55 -.81
Cardiomgh .27 +.01 DonlleyRR 9.30 +.04
Cardtronic 23.30 +.26 DrmWksA 16.77 +.25
CareerEd 3.07 -.03 DryShips 1.74 -.02
Carrizo 20.83 +.42 Dunkin 31.06 -.12
CarverBcp 5.13 +.08 DyaxCp 3.10 -.14
CasellaW 4.00 -.07 Dynavax 2.70 -.08
Caseys 50.85 +.25 E-Trade 8.54 +.17
CatalystPh .45 -.02 eBay 52.02 +.03
Catamarns 48.10 -.08 EaglRkEn 8.85 -.06
Cavium 34.20 +.10 ErthLink 6.56 +.02
Celgene 79.40 -.04 EstWstBcp 21.06 +.04
CellTherrs 1.36 +.01 Ebixlnc 16.11 -.34
CelldexTh 5.81 -.22 ECOtaltyh .52 +.08
Celsion 7.41 -.39 EducDevel 4.00 +.04
CentEurop 1.74 -.02 8x8 nc 6.67 -.17
CentAI 8.09 +.17 ElectSd 11.28 +.07
Cepheid 31.74 -.56 ElectArts 14.63 +.19
Cereplasth .09 +.01 EFII 18.77 -.02
Cerner 78.54 +1.67 EncoreCap 26.65 -.04
Chartlnds 59.76 +.16 EndoPhrm 28.07 -.21
CharterCm 69.74 -.71 EngyXXI 33.37 +2.03
ChkPoint 44.71 -.45 Entegris 9.13 +.13
Cheesecake 32.92 +.12 EntropCom 5.01 -.03
ChelseaTh 1.14 -.65 EnzonPhar 6.93 -.07
ChildPlace 48.02 -.22 Equinix 180.97 -2.01
ChiAutLrs 4.59 +.18 Ericsson 9.53 +.01
ChiCeram 1.93 -.02 Euronet 22.70 +.49
ChinGerui 1.46 +.18 ExactScih 9.69
ChrchllD 63.64 -.73 Exelids 4.36 -.18
CienaCorp 14.99 -.34 Eqxedias 60.09 +.17
CinnFin 40.50 +.08 Expdlnt 37.64 +.58
Cintas 41.97 +.12 ExpScripts 54.31 +.36
Cirrus 28.72 -1.05 ExtmNet 3.57 -.09
Ciso 19.21 +.04 Ezcorp 19.10 +.19
CitrixSys 59.90 -1.12 F5Netwks 92.96 -.02
CleanEngy 12.90 +.13 FLIRSys 19.87 +.01
Cleantchrs 4.44 -.20 Facebookn 27.71 +.25
Clearwire 2.37 -.10 Fastenal 41.52 -.19
CoffeeH 7.49 +.33 FifthStFin 10.43 -.02
CognizTech 69.75 +2.61 FifthThird 14.36 +.22


FindEngin 26.03 +.25 InnerWkgs 12.77 -.22
Fndlnst 18.40 -.17 IntgDv 6.41 +.06
Finisar 13.35 -.24 Intel 19.85 -.12
FinLine 20.05 -.49 Inteliquent 2.36 -.03
FBusnFn 23.12 -.28 InteractB 15.09 -.01
FstCashFn 48.75 +.78 InterDig 43.94 +.73
FFnclOH 14.24 -.25 InterMune 8.96 +.10
FstNiagara 7.62 +.11 InBcsh 18.19 +.20
FstSolar 29.94 +.33 IntSpdw 26.44 -.17
FstMerit 14.02 -.07 Intersil 7.45 +.04
Fiserv 79.71 +2.03 Intuit 59.91 +.19
FiveBelwn 34.40 -.65 IntSurg 516.77 -10.40
Flextrn 5.91 +.11 InvRIEst 8.54 -.10
Fluidigm 13.66 -.44 IridiumCm 6.16 -.27
FocusMda 24.34 +.35 IronwdPh 10.46 -.03
FormFac 4.26 -.13 Isis 9.04 +.03
Fortnet 18.82 -1.11 IvanhoeEh .42 -.01
Fossillnc 86.72 +.55 bIa 15.40 +.02
FosterWhl 23.23 +.15
Francesca 27.00 +.19
FreshMkt 50.70 +.46 JASolarh .69 -.03
FronterCm 4.73 +.04 JDASoft 44.72 -.02
FuCelllh .85 -.01 JDSUniph 12.37 +.03
FultonFncl 9.69 +.03 JackHenry 38.90 +.04
FushiCo 929 +02 JadcklnBox 27.43 +.17
-e -- Jamba 2.08 -.02
JamesRiv 3.30 +.08
GSVCap 8.34 +.10 JazzPhrm 51.30 -.35
GTAdvTc 3.04 -.07 JetBlue 5.22 +.05
G-lll 36.17 -.79 JiveSoftn 13.17 -.35
GalenaBio 2.17 -.07 JosABank 43.00 -.29
Garmin 39.71 -.19 KCAPFin 8.24 -.36
Gentex 17.81 -.26 KITDigit .74 +.02
GeronCp 1.14 ... KLATnc 46.40 -.79
Gevo 1.49 -.05 KeryxBio 2.81 -.16
GileadSd 74.54 +.38 KiOR 6.09 +.01
GblEagle 9.96 -.01 KraftFGpn 45.78 +.08
GluMobile 2.48 -.05 KratosDef 4.43 +.01
GolLNGLd 37.30 +.24 Kulicke 11.41 -.02
Google 687.82 -3.21 LKQ Cps 21.80 +.23
GrCanyEd 23.39 -.73 LPL Find 28.06 +.12
GrLkDrge 8.58 -.27 LSllndlf 6.90 -.07
GreenMtC 41.17 +.39 LamResrch 35.26 -.25
Grifolsrs 24.70 +.05 LamarAdv 38.59 -.10
Groupon 3.86 +.10 Landstar 49.36 +.11
GrpoRn 5.90 +.03 Lattce 3.87 -.06
GulfportE 38.00 +.95 LeapWirlss 6.70 +.25
HMN Fn 3.15 ... LegacyRes 24.20 -.14
HMS Hdgs 23.73 +.37 LedPhrm 1.70 -.02
HainCel 59.66 -.98 LibGlobA 58.76 +1.57
Halozyme 5.88 -.13 LibGlobC 55.39 +1.25
HancHId 31.62 +.31 LibCapA 106.40 +.84
Harmonic 4.72 -.06 LibtylntA 19.25 -.01
Hasbro 37.00 -.32 LifePtrs 3.05 +.42
HawHold 6.18 -.05 LifeTech 48.97 +.07
HlthCSvc 23.46 -.07 LifePtH 36.01 +.38
HrtlndEx 12.83 +.16 LimelghtN 2.07 +.04
HSchein 80.04 -.57 LincElec 47.38 +.26
HercOffsh 5.26 +.03 LinearTch 33.17 +.16
HiTchPhm 31.05 +.14 LinnEngy 38.66 -.58
HimaxTch 2.38 +.06 LinnCon 38.15 -.18
Hollysys 10.36 -.18 Liquidity 40.25 +.68
Hologic 19.24 +.37 LivePrsn 12.08 -.07
Homelnns 25.50 -.27 LodgeNeth .15 -.02
HmLnSvcn 18.91 -.15 LookSmth .82 -.05
HomeAway 20.55 -.81 LorlSpacs 53.69 +.03
HorizPhm 2.38 -.07 Lulkin 56.90 +1.31
HotTopic 9.79 -.09 lululem s 68.59 -2.05
HudsCity 7.98 +.07
HuntJB 58.76 +.63
HuntBncsh 6.10 +.09 MBFncl 19.28 -.02
IAC Inter 43.85 +.35 MCGCap 4.41 -.09
IPGPhoton 59.85 -.73 MEIPhrm 1.75 -.01
iShAsiaexJ 58.75 +.73 MGE 50.65 +.08
iShACWX 40.87 +.18 MIPSTech 7.50
iShACWI 47.36 +.23 MKSInst 24.52 -.01
IconPLC 27.44 -.22 MTS 48.98 +.43
IconixBr 20.35 +.01 MSG 43.00 +.10
IdenixPh 5.06 -.06 MagicJcks 16.67 +.41
Illumina 51.69 -.07 MaidenH 8.99 +.09
ImunoGn 12.00 -.02 MAKOSrg 13.52 -.08
Imunmd 3.01 -.16 MannKd 2.15 -.04
ImpaxLabs 20.45 -.11 MktAxess 32.80 +2.18
Incyte 17.85 +.05 MarvellT 8.73 +.07
Infinera 5.79 -.10 MatrixSv 10.94 -.07
InfinityPh 23.98 -.65 Mattel 36.71 -.08
Informant 24.90 -1.43 MattressF 23.67 -6.65
Infosys 43.49 -.54 Madmlntg 29.20 +.25


MaxwlT 7.14 -.01 Pacerlnt 3.67 +.01
MedAssets 16.13 -.25 PacBbsd 1.58 -.11
MedicAcbn 2.69 +.04 PacEthanh .31 +.00
MediCo 21.99 -.74 PacSunwr 1.58 -.08
Medidata 39.34 +1.68 PaciraPhm 16.57 -.38
Medivatns 53.77 +.89 PanASlv 18.07 -.58
MeloCrwn 14.39 +.21 PaneraBrd 156.64 -1.15
Mellanox 67.65 -.23 ParamTch 20.33 +.11
MentorGr 15.49 ... Parexel 32.17 +.16
MercadoL 75.45 +2.35 Patterson 33.25 -.10
MergeHIth 2.82 -.29 PattUTI 17.95 +.15
Merrimkn 6.99 -.11 Paychex 32.97 +.18
Metabolix 1.49 +.35 Pendrell 1.17 +.02
Methanx 31.44 +.08 PnnNGm 49.20 -1.64
Microchp 29.93 +.11 PennantPk 10.71 +.09
MicronT 6.18 +.14 PeopUdF 12.19 +.10
MicrosSys 41.61 -.53 Peregrinh 1.28 -.01
MicroSemi 20.01 +.29 PerfectWd 10.50 -.21
Microsoft 26.67 +.30 Perrigo 104.81 -.19
Mindspeed 3.89 -.05 PetSmart 70.38 -.13
Misonix 6.20 ... Pharmacyc 53.59 -.96
Mitcham 12.44 -1.63 Photrln 5.45 +.55
MitekSys 3.22 +.82 PluristemT 3.53 +.08
Molex 26.45 +.04 Polyom 10.06 -.12
Momenta 10.86 -.02 Popular rs 19.80 +.21
Mondelez 25.49 -.26 Pwrlnteg 32.54
MonstrBvs 51.63 -.03 Power-One 4.06 -.08
Motricityh .82 -.04 PwShsQQQ 64.90 -.73
MultmGm 13.82 -.02 PriceTR 64.34 +.64
Mylan 27.27 -.12 priceline 664.23 +.42
MyriadG 27.61 -.36 Primoris 14.32 -.13
NIl HIdg 5.05 +.03 PrivateB 15.39 -.21
NPSPhm 9.89 -.23 PrUPQQQs 50.58 -1.61
NXPSemi 24.49 +.36 PrognicsPh 2.21
Nanosphere 2.60 -.13 ProgrsSoft 20.16 -.13
NasdOMX 23.67 -.49 PUShQQQrs42.16 +1.24
NatlBevrg 14.89 -.27 ProspctCap 10.34 -.04
NatPenn 9.46 -.03 PureCycle 2.41 -.01
NektarTh 6.51 +.04 QIAGEN 18.11 -.33
NetlUEPS 4.05 +.83 QlikTechh 19.07 -.52
NetApp 32.81 +.76 Qlogic 9.00 +.16
NetEase 41.05 -.38 Qualom 63.63 +.42
Netliix 83.37 -3.28 QltyDistr 6.90 -.01
NetSpend 11.49 -.22 QualitySys 18.00 +.15
Neurcrine 7.39 ... Questcor 25.61 -.70
NYMtgTr 6.65 -.05 RFMicD 4.39 +.09
NewsCpA 24.25 -.26 RPXCorp 9.20 +.09
NewsCpB 24.94 -.18 Rambus 4.82 -.05
NexstarB 9.44 +.06 Randgold 102.75 -1.61
Nordson 62.59 +.91 RaptorPhm 5.29 +.07
NorTrst 47.44 +.17 RealPage 19.85 +.33
NwstBcsh 11.95 -.01 RecoveryE 1.74 -.21
Novadaqg 8.83 -.04 Regenrn 185.20 +4.50
NovtlWrls 1.25 -.04 RenewErs 3.99 +2.01
Novavax 1.82 -.05 RschMotn 11.94 +.39
NuVasive 14.30 -.12 ResConn 11.60 -.02
NuanceCm 21.99 +.39 RetailOpp 12.78 -.08
NuPathe 3.16 -.14 RexEnergy 12.65 +.32
NutriSyst 7.67 +.08 RigelPh 8.22 -.10
Nvidia 11.96 -.14 RiverbedT 17.61 -.16
NxStageMd 11.35 +.01 RosettaR 45.35 +.85
OCZTech 2.20 +.25 RossStrss 55.35 -.06
OReillyAu 91.38 -1.52 RoviCorp 15.55 -.28
Oclaro 1.83 -.02 RoyGId 79.68 -2.06
OdysMar 2.73 -.09 Ranair 35.39 +.06
OldDomFs 32.92 +.21
Omnicell 15.74 +.40
OmniVisn 15.21 +.04 SBACom 67.89 -.63
OnSmcnd 6.70 -.01 SEIInv 22.00 -.03
Onothyr 4.30 -.14 SLMCp 16.84 +.45
OnyxPh 77.05 +2.55 STEC 4.83 -.04
OpenTxt 55.41 -.71 SVBFnGp 54.91 +.23
OpenTable 42.87 -.30 SabraHltc 22.42 +.36
OpntTch 41.35 -.09 SalixPhm 42.90 +.26
OptmerPh 10.48 -.03 SanderFm 48.05 -.07
Oracle 32.00 -.38 SanDisk 39.80 -.50
Orexigen 4.66 -.09 Sanmina 10.11 +.42
Orthfx 37.27 -.28 Santarus 9.85 -.07
OtterTail 24.51 +.21 Sapient 10.44 +.31
Overstk 14.43 -.09 Sareptars 27.58 -1.59
SavientPh 1.14 -.01
SchoolSp 1.20 -.08
PDCEngy 35.06 +.46 SdClone 4.29 -.11
PDLBio 7.64 +.05 SdGames 8.21 -.04
PMCSra 5.12 -.11 SeaChange 10.00 +.92
PRGXGlbl 6.39 +.09 SeaoastBk 1.61
PSSWrld 28.45 -.02 SeagateT 27.60 +1.14
Paccar 44.04 +.62 SearsHldgs 41.21 -1.67


SeattGen 25.56 -.36
SecNtIf 8.41 +.33
SelCmfrt 25.00 -2.67
Selectvlns 19.20 +.40
Semtech 27.97
Sequenom 4.69 -.27
SvcSource 5.36 +.18
ShandaG s 2.87 -.05
Shire 90.40 +1.14
Shutterfly 27.25 +.75
SigmaAld 72.54 -.15
Silicnlmg 4.71 +.04
SilvStdg 13.44 +.13
Sina 41.49 -.60
Sindair 10.82 -.18
SiriusXM 2.77 +.01
Skullcandy 8.34 +.03
SkyWest 11.57 +.08
SkywksSol 23.51 +.34
SmartBa 12.50 -.12
SmithWes 10.58 -.08
SodaStrm 40.46 -1.52
Sohu.cm 38.10 -.13
Solazyme 7.54 +.12
SonicCorp 9.93 +.22
Sonus 1.68 -.04
SouMoBc 23.25 -.11
Sourcefire 46.18 -2.54
SpectPh 11.11 -.16
SpiritAir 16.82 +.10
Splunkn 28.74 +.61
Spreadtrm 16.85 -.78
Staples 11.29 -.05
StarSdent 2.98 -.12
Starbucks 50.79 -.33
SIDynam 12.97 +.31
StemCells 1.82 -.01
Stericyde 93.96 +.54
SMadden 43.82 -.81
Stratasys 68.23 -.77
StratDiag 1.04 -.07
Stayer 57.83 +3.86
Summerlnf 2.02 +.06
SunesisPh 4.60 -.23
SunOpta 6.23 +.01
SunPwrh 4.60
SupcndTch .31 -.03
SusqBnc 10.19 -.05
SycamNets 2.69 +.01
Symantec 18.87 +.21
Symetricm 5.88 -.03
Synaorn 5.77 +.14
Synaptcs 26.34 +.17
SynrgyPh 5.39 -.11
Synopsys 33.33 +.10
SyntaPhm 7.53 -.14
Syntel 56.44 -1.57
Syntrolmh .42 -.01
THQrs 1.25 -.14
TICCCap 9.87 -.07
TPCGrp 44.89 +.10
twteleom 25.59 +.26
TakeTwo 12.10 -.20
Targacept 4.58 +.08
TASER 8.15 -.15
TechData 44.70 +.46
Tellabs 3.37
TescoCp 10.74 +.09
TeslaMot 33.71 -.19
TxCapBsh 44.78 +.03
Texlnst 29.86 +.26
TexRdhse 15.81 -.07
Theravnce 22.34 +.72
Thoratec 37.35
ThrshdPhm 4.23 -.02
TibcoSft 20.00 -4.72
TitanMach 23.14 +.16
TiVoInc 11.56 -.26
TowerGrp 17.48 +.06
TractSupp 84.31 +.92
TranSwtch .77 +.10
Tranzyme .71 -.01
TrimbleN 56.07 +1.15
TrinityBio 15.23 +.30
TripAdvn 38.37 +.84
TriQuint 4.99 +.06
TrueRelig 23.82 +.05
TrstNY 5.23 -.04


Trusimk 22.33 +.06
21Vianet 9.12 -.21
USATechh 1.87 +.03
UTiWrldwd 14.03 -.05
UltaSalon 100.19 -.19
UlmSoft 91.12 -4.10
Umpqua 11.81 +.12
UtdNtrIF 52.80 +.56
UtdOnln 5.63 -.07
USEnr 1.76 +.11
UdStatn 30.79 -.04
UtdTherap 52.36 -.21
UnivDisp 22.96 -.43
UnivFor 36.78 -.38
UranmRsh .34 -.00
UrbanOut 36.35 -.19


VCAAnt 20.59 +.07
VOXX Inl 6.53 -.08
ValueClick 19.12 +.34
VanSTCpB 80.47 +.07
VanlntCpB 88.70 +.16
Veeolnst 28.57
Vell 3.49 +.08
VBradley 26.21 -1.11
VerintSys 27.13 -.60
Verisign 35.47 -.13
Verisk 49.00 +.40
VertxPh 39.18 -.31
ViaSat 37.93 -.41
ViacomB 51.39 +.10
Vical 3.02 +.01
VirgnMdah 35.40 +.19
ViroPhrm 24.31 -.47
VisChinah .23 +.01
VistaPrt 31.66 +.02
Vivus 11.01 -.38
Vodafone 25.67 -.07
Volcano 25.24 +.18
Volterra 16.88 -.18
WarnerCh 11.36 -.17
WarrenRs 2.78 +.03
WashFed 16.14 +.06
Web.com 14.46 -.12
Websense 14.23 -.05
WendysCo 4.75 +.06
WernerEnt 21.67 +.17
WDigital 36.03 +2.44
Wesitmr 9.58 +.11
Wsptlnng 26.98 +.29
WetSeal 2.83 -.06
WhiteHFnn 13.90
WholeFd 92.86 +.79
WilshBcp 5.63 -.01
Windstrm 8.54 +.04
WisdomTr 6.10 +.01
WdAccep 73.50 +.23
WrightM 20.61 -.15
Wynn 109.94 -.18
XOMA 2.95 -.03
XenoPort 8.08 +.10
Xilinx 34.40 +.06
YRCWwde 6.86 +.12
YYIncn 13.16 -1.02
Yahoo 18.89 -.04
Yandex 20.94 +.32
ZaZaEngy 2.10 +.06
Zagg 7.07 -.22
Zalicus .65 +.01
Zhongpin 12.36
Zllow 26.39 -.81
ZonBcp 19.57 -.04
Zopharm 4.07 -.12
ZxCorp 2.71 -.09
Zogenix 2.40 -.13
Zoltek 7.31 -.07
Zumiez 20.57 +.50
Zyngan 2.32 +.07


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.8520 4.8450
Australia .9555 .9547
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 2.0898 2.1100
Britain 1.6099 1.6106
Canada .9913 .9928
Chile 478.90 481.55
China 6.2265 6.2303
Colombia 1812.30 1814.50
Czech Rep 19.28 19.27
Denmark 5.7029 5.6951
Dominican Rep 39.77 40.10
Egypt 6.1180 6.1155
Euro .7646 .7633
Hong Kong 7.7501 7.7501
Hungary 216.51 216.12
India 54.556 54.685
Indnsia 9646.00 9613.00
Israel 3.8013 3.8089
Japan 82.35 81.84
Jordan .7110 .7100
Lebanon 1504.00 1504.50
Malaysia 3.0413 3.0430
Mexico 12.9090 12.9476
N. Zealand 1.2098 1.2134
Norway 5.6229 5.6184
Peru 2.581 2.580
Poland 3.15 3.16
Russia 30.7535 30.8132
Singapore 1.2184 1.2175
So. Africa 8.7639 8.7932
So. Korea 1081.50 1084.98
Sweden 6.5932 6.5937
Switzerlnd .9262 .9260
Taiwan 29.09 29.11
Thailand 30.68 30.68
Turkey 1.7864 1.7848
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6730
Uruguay 19.4599 19.3499
Venzuel 4.2956 4.2956


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.10 0.10
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 0.61 0.62
10-year 1.59 1.63
30-year 2.78 2.80



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jan 13 87.88 -.62
Corn CBOT Mar13 7573/4 +534
Wheat CBOT Mar 13 860 +31/2
Soybeans CBOT Jan 13 147914 +23/4
Cattle CME Feb 13 130.52 +.37
Sugar (world) ICE Mar13 19.57 +.13
Orange Juice ICE Jan13 124.45 +.85



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1692.40 $1716.50
Silver (troy oz., spot) $32.833 $33.681
Copper (pound) $3.66/0 $3.b220
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1584.20 $1611./o

NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AKSteel ........ 4.07 +.14-50.7 McDnlds 3.08 3.5 16 86.97 -.23-13.3
AT&Tlnc 1.80 5.3 44 33.91 -.01 +12.1 Microsoft .92 3.4 14 26.67 +.30 +2.7
Ameteks .24 .6 21 37.71 +.48+34.4 MotrlaSolu 1.04 1.9 23 55.18 +.96 +19.2
ABlnBev 1.57 1.8 ... 87.60 -.68 +43.6 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 14 69.18 +1.27 +13.6
BkofAm .04 .4 28 10.46 +.56+88.1 Penney ...... 17.53 -.25-50.1
CapCtyBk .........10.99 -.06 +15.1 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 15 17.66 +.05 +3.6
CntryLink 2.90 7.5 35 38.88 -.40 +4.5 RegionsFn .04 .6 12 6.57 +.12 +52.8
Citigroup .04 .1 11 36.46 +2.17 +38.6 SearsHldgs .33 ... ...41.21 -1.67 +29.7
CmwREIT 1.00 6.6 27 15.25 -.14 -8.4 Smucker 2.08 2.4 20 88.29 -.63 +12.9
Disney .75 1.5 16 49.59 +.29 +32.2 SprintNex ... ... ... 5.72 +.04+144.4
DukeEnrs 3.06 4.7 18 64.46 +.86 ... Texlnst .84 2.8 19 29.86 +.26 +2.6
EPRProp 3.00 6.5 20 45.87 -.14 +4.9 TimeWarn 1.04 2.3 17 46.05 -.65+27.4
ExxonMbl 2.28 2.6 11 87.73 +.54 +3.5 UniFirst .15 .2 15 72.75 +.35 +28.2
FordM .20 1.8 9 11.31 ... +5.1 VerizonCm 2.06 4.7 41 44.10 +.43 +9.9
GenElec .68 3.2 16 21.23 +.37+18.5 Vodafone 1.54 6.0 ... 25.67 -.07 -8.4
HomeDp 1.16 1.8 23 64.02 -.22+52.3 WalMart 1.59 2.2 15 71.65 -.07 +19.9
Intel .90 4.5 9 19.85 -.12 -18.1 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 15 35.57 +1.30 +7.6
IBM 3.40 1.8 13188.65 -.71 +2.6 YRCWwde ......... 6.86 +.12 -31.2
Lowes .64 1.8 21 35.20 -.42 +38.7


A6 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 A7


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: InBosA 5.97 +.01
Balancp 17.02 +.03 LgCpVal 19.31 +.10
Retlnc 9.01 ... NatlMunlnc 10.54 -.01
Alger Funds B: SpEqtA 15.89 +.02
SmCapGr 6.89 -.02 TradGvA 7.37
AllianceBern A: Eaton Vance B:
GblRiskp 17.77 +.05 HIthSBt 10.54 +.04
GIbThGrAp63.33 -.10 NatlMulnc 10.54
HighlncoAp 9.47 +.02 Eaton Vance C:
SmCpGrA 38.00 -.22 GovtC p 7.36
AllianceBern Adv: NatMunlnc 10.54
LgCpGrAd 30.18 -.18 Eaton Vance I:
AllianceBern B: FltgRt 9.11 +.01
GIbThGrBt 54.19 -.09 GblMacAbR 9.81 +.02
GrowthBt 27.17 -.21 LgCapVal 19.36 +.09
SCpGrBt 30.22 -.18 ParStEMkt 14.58 +.11
AllianceBern C: FMI Funds:
SCpGrCt 30.40 -.18 LgCappn 17.01 +.06
Allianz Fds Insti: FPA Funds:
NFJDvVI 12.62 ... Newlnco 10.63
SmCpVi 31.70 +.01 FPACres 28.87 +.13
Allianz Funds C: Fairholme 30.37 +.30
AGICGrthC 26.54 -.06 Federated A:
Amer Beacon Insti: MidGrStA 35.28 +.04
LgCaplnst 21.65 +.22 MuSecA 11.01
Amer Beacon Inv: Federated Instl:
LgCaplnv 20.49 +.20 KaufmnRe 4.86 -.41
Amer Century Adv: TotRetBd 11.66
EqGroAp 24.35 +.03 StrValDvlS e 5.05 +.01
EqIncAp 7.89 +.04 Fidelity Adv Foc T:
Amer Century Inv: EnergyT 35.42 +.34
AIICapGr 30.58 -.17 HItCarT 23.23 +.07
Balanced 17.51 +.01 Fidelity Advisor A:
DivBnd 11.30 ... Nwlnsghp 22.55 -.08
Eqlnc 7.90 +.04 StrlnA 12.85 +.02
Growthl 27.66 -.10 Fidelity Advisor C:
Heritagel 22.43 -.01 Nwlnsghtn21.23 -.08
IncGro 27.17 +.05 Fidelity Advisor I:
InfAdjBd 13.62 +.01 EqGrln 65.02 -.49
IntDisc 10.10 +.03 Eqlnin 26.37 +.14
InfiGrol 11.34 ... FItRatel n 9.94 +.01
NewOpp 8.16 -.05 IntBdln 11.78 +.01
OneChAg 13.25 +.02 Nwlnsgtln 22.87 -.09
OneChMd 12.69 +.01 StrIlnin 13.00 +.01
RealEstl 22.85 -.12 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 25.83 -.16 BalancT 16.58 +.01
Valuelnv 6.31 +.03 DivGrTp 13.17 -.01
American Funds A: EqGrTp 60.61 -.45
AmcpAp 21.38 +.03 EqInT 25.94 +.13
AMufAp 28.28 +.13 GrOppT 40.98 -.30
BalAp 20.29 +.08 HilnAdTp 10.37 +.03
BondAp 13.00 +.01 IntBdT 11.75
CaplBAp 53.25 +.06 MulncTp 14.00
CapWGAp 36.82 +.07 OvrseaT 17.72 +.02
CapWAp 21.66 -.01 STFiT 9.36
EupacAp 40.95 +.08 Fidelity Freedom:
FdlnvAp 40.39 +.18 FF2010n 14.34 +.02
GIblBalA 26.73 +.02 FF2010K 13.14 +.02
GovtAp 14.61 ... FF2015n 11.99 +.01
GwthAp 34.05 +.09 FF2015K 13.21 +.02
HITrAp 11.31 +.03 FF2020n 14.51 +.02
IncoAp 18.12 +.04 FF2020K 13.63 +.02
IntBdAp 13.80 +.01 FF2025n 12.09 +.02
InfiGrlncAp31.08 +.05 FF2025K 13.78 +.02
ICAAp 30.53 +.07 FF2030n 14.39 +.02
LtTEBAp 16.51 ... FF2030K 13.92 +.02
NEcoAp 28.68 +.05 FF2035n 11.91 +.02
NPerAp 30.98 +.05 FF2035K 14.00 +.03
NwWrldA 53.58 +.26 FF2040 n 8.31 +.02
STBFAp 10.08 ... FF2040K 14.04 +.03
SmCpAp 39.29 +.04 FF2045K 14.19 +.03
TxExAp 13.38 +01 Fidelity Invest:
WshAp 31.12 +.13 AIISectEq 12.96 +.03
Ariel Investments: AMgr50n 16.38 +.01
Apprec 40.35 +.22 AMgr70rn 17.38 +.01
Ariel 50.45 +.08 AMgr20rn 13.40 +.01
Artisan Funds: Balancn 20.14 +.02
Infl 24.25 +.07 BalancedK 20.14 +.02
Infilnstf 24.42 +.07 BlueChGrn 49.38 -.23
InfiVal r 30.16 +.08 BluChpGrK 49.44 -.23
MidCap 38.31 +.04 CAMunn 13.15
MidCapVal 21.53 +.08 Canadan 53.44 +.11
BBH Funds: CapAp n 29.54 -.06
CorSeIN 17.65 +.07 CapDevOn 11.80 -.04
Baron Funds: Cplncrn 9.46 +.02
Asset 47.79 +.13 ChinaRgr 30.02 +.42
Growth 53.29 +.04 CngS 465.09
SmallCap 25.40 -.10 CTMunrn 12.26
Bernstein Fds: Contra n 77.38 -.30
IntDur 14.29 +.01 ContraK 77.41 -.30
DivMu 15.01 ... CnvScn 25.11 +.05
TxMgdlni 13.85 +.04 DisEqn 24.18 +.04
Berwyn Funds: DiscEqF 24.14 +.05
Fund 32.55 -.21 Divlntln 29.83 +.01
BlackRock A: DivrslntKr 29.82
EqtyDiv 19.84 +.12 DivStkOn 17.32 +.04
GIAIAr 19.54 +.03 DivGthn 29.83 -.01
HiYInvA 8.04 +.02 EmergAs r n29.46 +.26
InfiOpAp 32.41 +.10 EmrMkn 22.68 +.18
BlackRock B&C: Eqlncn 46.94 +.24
GIAICt 18.15 +.03 EQIIn 19.49 +.07
BlackRock InstI: ECapAp 18.84 -.01
EquityDv 19.89 +.12 Europe 31.14 -.01
GlbAllocr 19.65 +.03 Exch 323.88
HiYldBd 8.04 +.02 Exportn 22.56 +04
BruceFund406.09 +1.23 Fideln 35.55 +.01
Buffalo Funds: Fiftyrn 19.90 -.03
SmCapn 28.51 -.20 FItRateHi r n 9.94
CGM Funds: FrlnOnen 29.35 +.03
Focus n 27.55 GNMAn 11.81 -.01
Mutl n 27.57 +.01 Govtnc 10.67 +.01
Realty n 28.33 -.20 GroCo n 94.55 -.64
Calamos Funds: Grolncn 20.97 +.05
GrwthAp 50.42 .32 GrowCoF 94.60 -.64
Calvert Invest: GSt.2 -064
Incop 16.65 +.01 GhStratrn 920.42 +
InfiEqAp 13.89 +.03 Hihncr n 9.33 +03
SocialAp 30.61 +07 Indepnn 25.19 -.08
SocialAp 30.61 +.07 InProBdn 13.72 +.03
SocBdp 16.64 +.02 IntBdn 1119 +01
SocEqAp 38.15 +.08 ntGon 10.92 +.01
TxFLgp 16.87 -.01 IntGMu n 10.78 .1
Cohen &Steers: InfDiscn 32.82 +01
RltyShrs 66.98 -.24 InfiCprn 20.07 +.03
Columbia Class A: InvGrBd n 11.73
Acornt 29.97 -.05 InvGBn 8.04
DivOpptyA 8.71 +.05 Japanr 953 -.04
LgCapGrAt26.61 -.01 JpnSmn 9.04 -.02
LgCorQAp 6.50
MdCpGrOp 9.93 .02 LgCapVal 11.31 +.09
MdCpGrOp 9.93 -.02 LatAm 48.57 +43
MidCVIOpp 8.26 +.05 LevCoStkn 31.15 +.16
PBModAp 11.35 +.02 LowPrn 39.35 +.05
TxEAp 14.55 LowPriKr 39.34 +.06
FrontierA 10.75 -.07 Magelln n 73.04 +.01
GlobTech 20.55 -.05 MDMurn 11.79 -.01
Columbia Cl 1,T&G: MAMunn 12.99 -.01
EmMktOp I n 8.70 +.09 MegaCpStknll.78 +.04
Columbia Class Z: MIMunn 12.69 -.01
AcornZ 31.11 -.05 MidCapn 29.30 -.05
AcornlntZ 40.59 +.03 MNMunn 12.15 -.01
DivlncoZ 14.80 +.05 MtgSecn 11.39
IntTEBd 11.16 ... Munilncn 13.78
SelLgCapG 13.60 ... NJ Munrn 12.51 .01
Credit SuisseComm: NwMktrn 18.02 +.02
ComRett 8.26 +.06 NwMilln 32.70 +.05
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.95 +.01
InfiCorEqn 10.34 +.03 OTCn 59.50 -.64
USCorEql n12.20 +.02 OhSMunn 12.61
USCorEq2nl2.09 +.04 o100ndex 10.12
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 32.30 -.03
CommAp 19.14 -.01 PcBasn 25.12 +.01
DWS Invest1S: PAMunr n 11.67 +.01
CoreEqtyS 18.10 +.03 Puritnn 19.45 +.01
CorPlsInc 11.31 ... PuritanK 19.44
EmMkGrr 16.11 +.20 RealElncr 11.53 -.01
EnhEmMk 11.32 +.01 RealEn 31.23 -.12
EnhGlbBdr 10.51 +.02 SAIISecEqF12.98 +.02
GIbSmCGr 39.19 +.02 SCmdtyStrtn9.07 +.07
GIblThem 22.69 +.19 SCmdtyStrFn9.10 +.07
Gold&Prc 13.67 -.25 SrEmrgMkt 16.46 +.19
HiYdTx 13.38 +.01 SEmgMktF 16.52 +.19
IntTxAMT 12.39 SrslntGrw 11.81 -.01
IntlFdS 42.91 +.13 SerlnfGrF 11.85 -.01
LgCpFoGr 32.90 -.19 SrslntVal 9.44
LatAmrEq 40.54 +.58 SerlnfiValF 9.48 +.01
MgdMuniS 9.76 SrlnvGrdF 11.73
MATFS 15.61 -.01 StlntMun 10.91-.01
SP500S 18.85 +.03 STBFn 8.60
WorldDiv 23.82 +.05 SmCapDiscn23.48 -.02
Davis Funds A: SmIlCpS r n 17.76 -.02
NYVenA 35.76 +.17 SCpValur 15.64 -.01
Davis Funds B: SllSelLCVrnll.70 +.07
NYVenB 33.93 +.15 SCSlcACapn27.97
Davis Funds C: SB0 SelSmCp 19.66 -.03
NYVenC 34.28 +.16 Sratlncn 11.50 +.01
Davis FundsY: S1rReRtr 9.78 +.02
NYVenY 36.21 +.17 TaxFrBrn 11.90
Delaware Invest A: TotalBd n 11.07
Diver Inc p 9.46 +.01 Trend n 78.43 -.39
SMIDCapG 23.92 +.15 USBI n 11.97 +.01
TxUSAp 12.53 ... Utility 18.71 +.18
Delaware Invest B: ValStratn 30.89 +13
SelGrBt 34.41 -.03 Valuen 75.11 +34
Dimensional Fds: Wrldwn 20.17 -.02
EmMCrEqn19.56 +.20 Fidelity Selects:
EmMktV 28.99 +.31 Aim 39.44 +.22
IntSmVan 15.53 +.03 Bankingn 19.03 +.11
LargeCo 11.17 +.02 Biotchn 111.16
TAUSCorE2n9.84 +.03 Brokrn 49.03 +.36
USLgVan 22.45 +.17 Chemn 116.40 +.74
USMicron 14.94 -.05 ComEquipn22.75 +.07
USTgdVal 17.54 -.01 Compn 59.82 -.55
US Small n 23.34 -.03 ConDisn 27.69 -.16
USSmVa 27.05 -.03 ConsuFnn 14.51 +.08
IntlSmCon 15.52 +.03 ConStapn 83.33 -.11
EmMktSCn21.01 +.17 CstHon 47.89 -.57
EmgMktn 26.74 +.30 DfAer n 85.58 +.30
Fixdn 10.35 ... Elecfrn 44.18 -.10
IntGFxlnn 13.23 +.01 Enrgyn 50.65 +.48
IntVan 16.06 +.05 EngSvn 65.88 +.35
InfProSec 13.13 +.02 EnvAltEnrnl6.51 +.11
Glb5Fxlnc nill.33 +.02 FinSv n 60.69 +.50
2YGIFxdn 10.14 Goldrn 36.48 -.87
DFARIEn 25.80 -.10 Healiln 145.47 +.43
Dodge&Cox: Insur n 53.01 +.60
Balanced 77.02 +.29 Leisrn 102.52 -.22
GblStock 8.99 +.05 Material n 69.67 -.46


Income 13.96 MedDIn 59.82 +.09
InlStk 33.90 +.13 MdEqSysn 28.33 -.08
Stock 119.47 +.55 Mulnmdn 55.97 -.11
DoubleUne Funds: NtGasn 30.63 +.33
TRBd I 11.37 Pharmn 15.49 +.05
TRBdNp 11.37 ... Retailn 64.72-.35
Dreyfus: Softwr n 84.39 -.33
Aprec 43.87 -.16 Techn 98.42 -1.55
CTA 12.65 -01 Telcmn 50.83 +.04
CorVA Transn 52.02 +.32
Dreyf 9.73 +.01 UtilGrn 56.94 +.74
DryMidr 29.71 +.06 Wirelessn 8.28 +.02
GNMA 16.12 Fidelity Spartan:
GrChinaAr 33.60 +.60 5001dxlnvn 50.14 +.09
HiYldAp 6.63 +.02 5001dxl 50.15 +.09
StratValA 30.49 +.19 Intlnxlnvn 34.17 +.03
TechGroA 33.37 -.14 TotMktlnvn41.21 +.06
DreihsAclnc 10.58 ... USBondl 11.96
Driehaus Funds: Fidelity Spart Adv:
EMktGr 29.51 +.33 ExMktAdrn40.24 +.02
EVPTxMEmI47.55 +.34 5001dxAdvn50.15 +.10
Eaton Vance A: IntAdrn 34.20 +.04
ChinaAp 17.98 +.26 TotMktAdrn41.22 +.07
AMTFMulnc 10.82 USBondI 11.96
MultiCGrA 8.37 -.04


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.59 +.09
OverseasA 22.53 +.06
First Investors A
BIChpAp
Eqtylncop 7.61 +.02
GloblAp 6.84 +.01
GovtAp 11.43
GrolnAp 16.54 +.01
IncoAp 2.62 +.01
MATFAp 12.79
MITFAp 13.12 -.01
NJTFAp 13.99
NYTFAp 15.55
OppA p 30.05 +.04
PATFAp 14.10
SpSitAp 24.34 +.07
TxExlncop 10.48 +.01
TotRtAp 16.81 +.01
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.15 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.87
ALTFAp 12.10
AZTFAp 11.69 +.01
CallnsAp 13.22 -.01
CAIntAp 12.37
CalTFAp 7.65
COTFAp 12.67
CTTFAp 11.64
CvtScAp 15.07 +.06
DblTFA 12.40
DynTchA 32.60 -.18
EqlncAp 17.96 +.05
Fedlntp 12.77
FedTFAp 12.97
FLTFAp 12.17
FoundAlp 11.13 +.07
GATFA p 13.04
GoldPrMA 29.98 -.52
GrwthAp 49.74 -.08
HYTFAp 11.17 +.01
HilncA 2.07 +.01
IncomAp 2.20 +.01
InsTFAp 12.82
NYITFp 12.14
LATFAp 12.26
LMGvScA 10.28
MDTFAp 12.19 -.01
MATFAp 12.45
MITFAp 12.49 -.01
MNInsA 13.18 -.01
MOTFAp 12.97
NJTFAp 12.85
NYTFAp 12.34
NCTFAp 13.15
OhiolAp 13.36
ORTFAp 12.82
PATFAp 11.15
ReEScAp 16.42 -.07
RisDvAp 37.43 +.11
SMCpGrA 36.51 +.05
Sbratlncp 10.72 +.02
TtlRtnAp 10.56 +.01
USGovAp 6.82 -.01
UllsAp 13.63 +.17
VATFAp 12.48 -.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GlbBdAdvn 13.58 +.03
IncmeAd 2.19 +.02
TGIbTRAdv 13.82 +.04
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.22 +.01
USGvCt 6.78 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.25 +.09
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 23.09 +.26
ForgnAp 6.72 +.03
GIBdAp 13.62 +.03
GrwthAp 19.27 +.12
WorldAp 15.95 +.12
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.40 +.25
ForgnC p 6.55 +.03
GIBdCp 13.65 +.04
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.58 +.07
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 12.11
US Eqty 44.44 +.03
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust III:
Quality 23.35 -.01
GMOTrust IV:
InflntrVI 20.66 +.05
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.41 +.13
InfCorEq 28.14 +.05
Quality 23.36 -.01
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 54.07 +.11
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVApx 38.01 -.23
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppte 24.07 -1.65
HiYield 7.41 +.03
HYMunin 9.58 +.01
MidCapVx 38.25 -.39
ShtDrTFn 10.69
Harbor Funds:
Bond 13.11 +.01
CapAplnst 41.89 -.18
Inllnvt 60.87 -.03
Intfr 61.61 -.04
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.40 +.07
DivGthAp 20.50 +.13
IntOpAp 14.85 +.04
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 33.48 +.07
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.70 +.15
Div&Gr 21.71 +.15
Balanced 21.25 +.03
MidCap 27.98 +.14
TotRetBd 11.97 +.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 11.05 +.02
ICON Fds:
Energy S 18.75 -.03
HIlhcareS 17.63 +.06
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.98 +.01
IVA Funds:
WldwideIr 16.29 +.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.56 +.07
Invesco Funds:
Energy 36.98 +.37
UTliFes 17.31 +.23
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 13.06 +.04
Chart p 17.99 +.07
CmstkA 17.45 +.17
Constp 23.60 -.05
DivrsDivp 13.57 +.07
EqlncA 9.16 +.04
GrlncAp 20.78 +.15
HilncMu p
HiYldp 4.40 +.01
HYMuA 10.29
InfiGrow 28.62 +.05
MunilnA 14.19
PATFA 17.35 -.01
USMortgA 13.02
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 14.17 +.01
USMortg 12.96
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 13.16 +.05
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.69 +.04
AssetStAp 25.58 +.04
AssetSbl r 25.85 +.04
HilncAp 8.59 +.01
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.15
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.21 +.01
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 28.24 +.08
JPMorgan R CI:
CoreBondnl 2.16 +.01
ShtDurBd 11.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.32
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.14
HighYldn 8.16 +.02
IntnTFBd n 11.50
LgCpGr 23.84 -.09
ShtDurBdn 11.01
USLCCrPlsn22.91 -.06
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.89 -.02
ContrarnT 14.55 +.12
EnterprT 66.04 +.24
FIxBndT 11.07 +.01
GllUfeSciTr 30.84 +.02
GIbSelT 9.62 +.05
GITechTr 18.18 -.11
Grw&lncT 33.60 -.07
JanusT 31.55 -.16
OvrseasTr 32.78 +.45
PrkMCValT21.80 +.06
ResearchT 32.07 -.07
ShTmBdT 3.11
TwentyT 61.35 -.46
VentureT 59.04 +.02
WrldWTr 45.51 +.24
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.47 +.01


IncomeAp 6.73 +.01
RgBkA 14.48 +.09
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.73 +.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.78 +.03
LSBalanc 13.56 +.02
LSConsrv 13.57 +.02
LSGrwth 13.49 +.03
LSModer 13.41 +.02
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.44 +.20


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.85 +.20
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 127.94 +.33
CBApprp 15.84 +.04
CBLCGrp 24.16 +.02
GCIAIICOp 8.97 +.04
WAHilncAt 6.23 +.01
WAMgMup 17.57
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.91 +.02
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.71 +.07
CMValTrp 41.90 +.22
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 26.28 +.10
SmCap 28.19 +.04
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.13
StblncC 15.49 +.04
LSBondR 15.07
SblncA 15.40 +.04
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.83 +.02
InvGrBdY 12.84 +.02
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.81 +.08
BdDebAp 8.09 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.65
MidCpAp 17.64 +.11
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.68
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.65 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.75 +.03
MIGA 17.63
EmGA 47.87 -.12
HilnA 3.58 +.01
MFLA
TotRA 15.13 +.05
UtilA 18.39 +.15
ValueA 25.35 +.12
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.76
GvScBn 10.52
HilnBn 3.58 +.01
MulnBn 9.20
TotRBn 15.14 +.05
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.48 +.13
MFS Funds Instl:
InlfEqn 18.80 +.03
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.07 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBtx 14.32 -.71
GovtBt 8.96
HYIdBBt 6.04 +.01
IncmBldrx 17.58 -.06
InlfEqB 10.92 +.02
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.78 +.28
Mairs & Power:
Growth 84.19 +.09
Managers Funds:
Yackananpnl9.11 +.04
YacktFocn 20.54 +.04
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.67 +.03
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.36 +.03
AsianGllnv 18.41 +.08
Indialnvr 17.86 +.05
PacTgrlnv 24.09 +.13
MergerFdn 15.97 +.05
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 11.12
TotRtBdl 11.12 +.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.56 -.07
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.53 +.03
MontagGrI 25.87 -.01
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 14.81
MorganStanley Inst:
InfEql 14.40 -.01
MCapGrl 34.73 +.11
Muhlenkn 56.32 +.31
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.19 -.15
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 32.21 +.12
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.29 +.05
GblDiscA 29.86 +.17
GlbDiscZ 30.31 +.17
QuestZ 17.77 +.07
SharesZ 22.48 +.09
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.33
Geneslnst 50.59 +.05
Inl r 17.30 +.02
LgCapVlnv 27.37 +.19
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 52.39 +.06
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.95 +.03
Nicholasn 49.58 +.05
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.10
HiYFxlnc 7.49
IntTxEx 11.15
SmCpldx 9.15
Stkldx 17.53
Technly 15.48
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 17.44 +.01
LtMBAp 11.32
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.50
HYMunBd 17.44 +.01
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.27 -.08
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.08 +.21
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.27 +.07
Globall 22.72 +.02
Infllr 20.31 +.01
Oakmark 49.36 +.19
Select 33.05 +.27
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.63 +.01
GlbSMdCap 15.09 +.05
LgCapStrat 9.88 +.02
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.48 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.64 +.01
CAMuniAp 9.01
CapApAp 48.03 -.15
CaplncAp 9.25
DvMktAp 34.22 +.11
Discpe 57.58 -4.90
EquityA 9.52 +.02
EqlncApx 24.90 -.49
GlobAp 63.53 +.13
GIbOppA 28.71 +.11
GblStrlncA 4.35 +.01
Goldp 31.26 -.96
IntBdAp 6.60 +.01
LtdTmMu 15.33 +.01
MnStFdA 36.61
PAMuniAp 11.71
SenFltRtA 8.28
USGv p 9.84
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.44 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.65 +.02
CplncBt 9.05
EquityB 8.72 +.02
GblStrlncB 4.36
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.44
RoMuAp 17.43 +.01
RcNtMuA 7.78
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.92 +.11
InfiBdY 6.60 +.01
IntGrowY 30.50
Osterweis Funds:
Stlncon 11.76 +.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.91
TotRtAd 11.65 +.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 11.42 +.03
AIIAsset 12.87 +.03
ComodRR 6.96 +.06
Divlnc 12.34 +.02
EmgMkCur 10.54 +.02
EmMkBd 12.50 +.01
Fltlncr 8.92 +.01
ForBdUnr 11.51 -.05
FrgnBd 11.42
HiYld 9.64 +.03
InvGrCp 11.42 +.01
LowDu 10.67 +.01
ModDur 11.20
RealRtnl 12.78 +.02
ShortT 9.91
TotRt 11.65 +.01
TRII 11.17 +.01
TRIII 10.24
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 11.35 +.04
LwDurA 10.67 +.01
RealRtAp 12.78 +.02
TotRtA 11.65 +.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 11.22 +.03
RealRtCp 12.78 +.02
TotRtCt 11.65 +.01
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.78 +.02


TRtnp 11.65 +.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 11.41 +.03
TotRtnP 11.65 +.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.37 +.15
Perm Port Funds:
Permanntx 48.37 -.59
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.98
InfiValA 18.86 +.06
PionFdAp 32.24 +.13
ValueAp 11.88 +.06


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.36
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.46
Pioneer FdsY:
StatlncYp 11.30 +.01
Price Funds:
Balancen 20.95 +.02
BIChipn 45.10 -.24
CABondn 11.76 -.01
CapApp n 23.37 +.03
DivGron 26.21 +.09
EmMktBn 14.29 -.01
EmEurop 18.56 +.17
EmMktSn 32.93 +.30
Eqlncn 26.13 +.16
Eqlndexn 38.13 +.07
Europe n 15.94 -.03
GNMAn 10.04
Growthn 37.19 -.23
Gr&lnn 22.46 +.05
HIthScin 42.68 -.03
HiYield n 6.93 +.01
InsfCpG 18.50 -.13
InstHiYld n 9.76 +.01
MCEqGrn 30.03 +.01
IntlBondn 10.16 -.02
IntDisn 45.85 +.12
Inl G&l 12.90 +.04
InflStkn 14.18 +.03
Japan n 7.80 -.02
LatAm n 40.48 +.45
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 11.28
MidCapn 58.65 +.02
MCapVal n 25.06 +.08
NAmern 35.53 -.13
NAsian 16.72 +.10
New Era n 42.67 +.23
NHorizn 35.17 -.05
NIncn 9.98 +.01
NYBondn 12.17 -.01
OverSSFn 8.43 +.01
PSIncn 17.25 +.01
RealAssetrnlO.99 +.01
RealEstn 20.49 -.07
R2010n 16.70 +.02
R2015n 12.99 +.01
R2020n 18.01 +.03
R2025n 13.19 +.02
R2030n 18.94 +.02
R2035n 13.39 +.02
R2040n 19.06 +.03
R2045n 12.69 +.02
SciTecn 26.23 -.20
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStkn 35.73 -.05
SmCapVal n39.02 -.10
SpecGrn 19.45 +.02
Speclnn 13.03 +.02
TFlncn 10.78 -.01
TxFrHn 12.13
TxFrSIn 5.73
USTIntn 6.33
USTLgn 14.17
VABondn 12.54 -.01
Value n 26.37 +.23
Principal Inv:
Divlnfllnst 10.12 +.03
LgCGlln 10.15 -.04
LT20201n 12.72 +.01
LT20301n 12.56 +.02
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.08 -.06
HiYldAp 5.69 +.02
MidCpGrA 31.47 +.01
MuHilncA 10.55 +.01
STCrpBdA 11.59 +.01
UtlityA 11.87 +.09
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 17.95 -.08
HiYldBt 5.68 +.02
Prudential Fds Z&I:
MadCapGrZ32.71 +.01
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.21
AZTE 9.68 +.01
ConvSec 20.24
DvrlnAp 7.69
EqlnAp 17.25 +.08
EuEq 20.20 +.07
GeoBalA 13.21 +.06
GlbEqtyp 9.45 +.01
GrlnAp 14.55 +.10
GIblHItA 47.30 +.06
HiYdAp 7.91 +.02
HiYldIn 6.15 +.02
IncmAp 7.28
IntGrlnp 9.61 +.02
InvAp 14.51 +.02
NJTxAp 10.03
MuliCpGr 55.00 -.12
PATE 9.69
TxExA p 9.22
TFInAp 15.99
TFHYA 12.95 +.01
USGvAp 13.59 -.01
GlblUtilA 10.35 +.08
VoyAp 21.64 -.06
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 16.01
DvrlnBt 7.62
Eqlnct 17.09 +.08
EuEq 19.28 +.06
GeoBalB 13.08 +.06
GlbEqt 8.49
GINtRst 17.38 +.11
GrlnBt 14.28 +.10
GIblHthB 37.60 +.05
HiYldBt 7.90 +.02
HYAdBt 6.02 +.01
IncmBt 7.21
IntGrln t 9.49 +.02
InfiGrth t 14.29 +.01
InvBt 13.00 +.02
NJTxBt 10.02
MulCpGr 46.89 -.10
TxExBt 9.23 +.01
TFHYBt 12.97 +.01
USGvBt 13.51 -.01
GlblUtilB 10.31 +.08
VoyBt 18.13 -.05
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.54 -.02
LgCAIphaA 44.14 +.32
Value 25.90 +.16
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.52 -.05
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.01 -.08
PennMulr 11.89 -.01
Premierl r 20.24
TotRetlr 14.09 -.03
ValSvct 11.70
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.55 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.16
SEI Portfolios:
S&P500En 38.94 +.08
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.97 +.23
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 21.03 +.02
10001nvr 40.36 +.09
S&P Sel 22.38 +.04
SmCpSI 21.34 -.04
TSMSelr 25.88 +.04
Scout Funds:
Inf 32.84 +.06
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.70 +.21
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.76 +.09
Sequoia 165.29 +.04
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.35 -.16
SoSunSClnv tn22.94+.09
St FarmAssoc:
Gwhq 55.75 +.25
Stratton Funds:
MulD-Cap 36.92 -.11
RealEstate 30.51 -.10
SmCap 55.67 +.15
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.22
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.41
TotRetBdl 10.29
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.06 +.01
Eqldxlnst 10.88 +.02
InfEqllnst 16.21 +.03
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 19.53 +.07
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 16.40 +.05
REVallnstr 26.86 +.04
Valuelnst 49.40 +.34
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.90 +.05
IncBuildAt 18.70 +.08
IncBuildCp 18.70 +.08
IntValue I 27.52 +.05
LtTMul 14.78
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.05 +.02
Income 9.38 +.01
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp9.67 +.04
Flexlncp 9.40 +.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 35.02 -.17
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 25.60 +.05
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.12 -.06


ChinaReg 7.45 +.12
GIbRs 9.80 -.03
Gld&Mtls 11.64 -.22
WIdPrcMn 11.42 -.21
USAA Group:
AgvGt 35.90 -.15
CABd 11.29
CrnstStr 23.30 +.03
GovSec 10.35
GrTxStr 14.74 +.02
Grwth 16.76 +.01
Gr&lnc 16.06 +.06
IncStk 13.53 +.05


Name NAV Chg
Inco 13.60 +.02
Inf 25.45 +.04
NYBd 12.77 -.01
PrecMM 26.62 -.75
SciTech 14.56 -.02
ShtTBnd 9.29
SmCpStk 14.87 +.01
TxElt 13.92
TxELT 14.17
TxESh 10.86
VABd 11.81
WldGr 21.37 +.04
VALIC :
MdCpldx 21.47 +.05
Skldx 26.62 +.06
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.59 +.01
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.72 +.03
CAITAdmn 11.92 -.01
CALTAdmn12.24
CpOpAdln 79.08 +.17
EMAdmr r n 35.55 +.42
Energyn 112.18 +1.05
EqlnAdm nn50.70 +.28
EuroAdml n 59.53 +.11
ExplAdmln 74.25 -.13
ExtdAdm n 45.25 +.02
500Adml n 130.53 +.25
GNMA Ad n 11.03
GrwAdmn 36.45 -.13
HlthCrn 62.59 +.26
HiYldCp n 6.08 +.01
InfProAdn 29.66 +.04
ITBdAdml n 12.26 +.02
ITsryAdml n 11.85 +.01
IntGrAdm n 60.36 +.13
ITAdmln 14.59
ITGrAdmrn 10.51
LtdTrAdn 11.20
LTGrAdml n11.11
LTAdmln 12.02
MCpAdmnln00.77 +.31
MorgAdmn 61.56 -.16
MuHYAdm nl1.48
NYLTAdn 12.03
PrmCap rn 72.96 +.31
PALTAdm n11.93
ReitAdm r n 91.20 -.34
STsyAdml n 10.80 +.01
STBdAdml nlO.67
ShtTrAdn 15.94
STFdAdn 10.90 +.01
STIGrAdn 10.88
SmCAdmn 38.23 -.03
TxMCaprn 71.48 +.13
TfBAdml n 11.20
TStkAdmn 35.34 +.06
ValAdmln 22.72 +.17
WellslAdm n59.69 +.14
WellnAdm n59.30 +.25
Windsor n 50.28 +.33
WdsrllAdn 52.04 +.39
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 12.24
CapOppn 34.22 +.07
Convrtn 12.96 +.01
DivApplnn 23.84 +.10
DivdGron 16.72 +.08
Energy n 59.73 +.56
Eqlncn 24.18 +.13
Explrn 79.70 -.14
FLLTn 12.46
GNMAn 11.03
GlobEqn 18.56 +.06
Grolncn 30.27 +.05
GrthEqn 12.22 -.04
HYCorpn 6.08 +.01
HlthCren 148.29 +.62
InfaPron 15.10 +.02
InfExplrn 14.71 +.07
IntlGrn 18.96 +.04
InfiValn 30.87 +.19
ITIGraden 10.51
ITTsryn 11.85 +.01
LifeConn 17.32 +.03
LifeGron 23.56 +.05
Lifelncn 14.81 +.02
LifeModn 21.00 +.04
LTIGraden 11.11
LTTsryn 13.62 -.01
Morgn 19.84 -.05
MuHYn 11.48
Mulntn 14.59
MuLtdn 11.20
MuLongn 12.02
MuShrtn 15.94
NJLTn 12.57
NYLTn 12.03
OHLTTEn 12.96
PALTn 11.93
PrecMtlsrn 15.77 -.06
PrmcpCorn 15.24 +.06
Prmcp r n 70.27 +.29
SelValu rn 21.23 +.08
STARn 20.86 +.04
STIGraden 10.88
STFedn 10.90 +.01
STTsryn 10.80 +.01
StratEqn 21.23
TgtRetlncn 12.29 +.01
TgRe2010n24.56 +.04
TgtRe2015nl3.57 +.02
TgRe2020n24.08 +.05
TgtRe2025 nl3.71 +.03
TgRe2030n23.52 +.05
TgtRe2035nl4.15 +.03
TgtRe2040n23.25 +.05
TgtRe2050 n23.15 +.06
TgtRe2045nl4.60 +.03
USGron 21.10 -.07
USValuen 11.89 +.07
Wellsly n 24.63 +.05
Welltnn 34.33 +.14
Wndsrn 14.90 +.10
Wndsll n 29.31 +.21
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r nlOl.18 +.15
ExtMktln 111.69 +.05
MidCplstPlnl09.81 +.34
TotlntAdm r r4.54 +.09
Totlntllnstr n98.16 +.38
TotlntllPrn 98.18 +.38
TotlntSig r n 29.44 +.12
500n 130.51 +.25
Balancedn 23.71 +.02
EMktn 27.05 +.33
Europe n 25.54 +.04
Extendn 45.18 +.02
Growthin 36.44 -.14
LgCaplxn 26.12 +.05
LTBndn 14.75
MidCapn 22.18 +.07
Pacific n 9.86 +.01
REITrn 21.37 -.08
SmCapn 38.17 -.02
SmlCpGth n24.47 -.05
STBndn 10.67
TotBndn 11.20
TotllntlIn 14.67 +.06
TotStkn 35.32 +.06
Value n 22.72 +.17
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.72 +.03
DevMklnstn 9.71 +.01
EmMklnstn 27.05 +.33
Extlnn 45.25 +.02
FTAIIWIdl r n87.40 +.38
Grwthlstn 36.45 -.13
InfProlnstn 12.08 +.01
Instldxn 129.67 +.25
InsPIn 129.68 +.25
InstTStldxn31.98 +.05
InsTStPlus n31.99 +.05
MidCplstn 22.26 +.07
REITlnstrn 14.12 -.05
STBondldxnlO.67
STIGrlnstn 10.88
SClnstn 38.24 -.02
TBlstn 11.20
TSlnstn 35.34 +.06
Valuelstn 22.72 +.17
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 107.82 +.20
GroSign 33.75 -.12
ITBdSign 12.26 +.02
MidCplcbdxn 31.80 +.10
STBdlcdxn 10.67
SmCpSig n 34.45 -.02
TotBdSgl n 11.20
TotStkSgln 34.10 +.05
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.95 +.01
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 10.19 +.03
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.68 +.01
CorelnvA 6.62 -.03
DivOppAp 15.30 -.02
DivOppCt 15.11 -.02
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.12 -.15
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.40
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSklnv 21.70 +.09
Opptylnv 39.89 +.13
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.83
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.08 -.13
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.83
Western Asset:
CrPlsBdFl p 11.69 ...
CorePlusl 11.70 +.01
William Blair N:


GrowthN 12.22 -.09


Stocks rise on latest





'fiscal cliff' reports


Market watch
Dec. 5, 2012

Dow Jones +82.71
industrials
13,034.49

Nasdaq -22.99
composite 2,973.70


Standard & +2.23
Poor's 500 1,409.28
1,409.28


Russell
2000


-1.52

820.60


Associated Press


NEW YORK Stocks
closed higher Wednesday,
their first gain of the week,
as bank shares rose and
comments by President
Barack Obama made in-
vestors optimistic a quick
deal could be made to avoid
the "fiscal cliff."
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 82.71 points to
end at 13,034.49. It had been
up as much as 137. The
Standard and Poor's 500
closed up 2.23 points to
1,409.28. The Nasdaq com-
posite was down 22.99
points to 2,973.70, held back
by a slump in Apple.
Citigroup jumped $2.17,
or 6.3 percent, to $36.46
after the bank said it plans
to eliminate more than
11,000 jobs, or about 4 per-
cent of its workforce, to cut
expenses and improve effi-
ciency. Travelers surged
$3.47, or 4.9 percent, to $74
after it announced plans to
resume stock buybacks.
Travelers temporarily sus-
pended repurchases follow-
ing superstorm Sandy while
it assessed its exposure to
damage claims.
"We can probably solve
this in about a week, it's not
that tough," Obama said in
lunchtime remarks to the
Business Roundtable in
Washington. The comments,
made just before noon,


budget deficit. Economists
said the measures, if imple-
mented, could push the U.S.
back into recession.
Apple was among the de-
cliners, falling $37.05, or 6.4
percent, to $538.79. Stifel Fi-
nancial analyst Aaron Rak-
ers said the drop was in part
due to comments from
AT&T Mobility chief execu-
tive officer Ralph de La
Vega, which suggested
smartphone activations this
quarter were lagging the
same period a year ago. The
stock has now dropped 23
percent since closing at a
record $702.10 in
September
Stocks are still up on the
year, after the Federal Re-
serve extended its bond-
buying program in
September, offsetting con-
cern the European debt cri-
sis was set to spread. The
Dow has gained 7 percent
and S&P 500 has advanced
12 percent.
"The market will hold on
to its gains for the year
Given the uncertainty I
don't see any compelling
reasons for an increase,"
said Brian Gendreau, a
market strategist with
Cetera Financial Group, a
Los Angeles-based broker
"But that could change in a
blink. If there's better-than-
expected news from these
negotiations, the market
could pop."


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I N WY RK STO KE C ANG


Name Last Chg
Sothebys 30.88 +.69
SoJerlnd 50.72 +.61
SoulhnCo 43.46 +.56
ShnCopper 37.26 +1.16
SwstAirl 9.79 +.16
SwstnEngy 34.50 +.52
SpectaEn 27.44 +.04
SprintNex 5.72 +.04
SP Mals 35.66 -.43
SPHIthC 40.37 +.14
SPCnSt 35.89 +.07
SPConsum 46.94 -.14
SP Engy 70.90 +.49
SPDRFncl 15.85 +.19
SP Inds 37.26 +.39
SPTech 28.75 -.29
SP UIl 35.45 +.53
StdPac 6.48 -.36
Standex 48.33 -1.27
StanBlkDk 70.68 +1.16
StarwdHi 52.96 -.28
StateSt 44.63 +.23
Steris 33.80 -.27
SlIlwtM 11.16 -.15
StatHotels 6.20 -.03
Sbtyker 54.36 +.01
SturmRug 52.52 -1.91
SubPpne 38.59 -.27
SunCmts 39.24 -.34
Suncorgs 32.97 +.52
Suntech .86 -.01
SunTrst 26.60 +.34


SupEnrgy 20.64
Supvalu 2.90
SwiftTrans 8.51
Synovus 2.37
Sysoo 31.67
TCFFncl 11.80
TDAmerit 16.25
TEConnect 35.54
TECO 16.88
TJXs 43.33
TahwSemi 16.96
TalismEg 11.22
Target 62.04
TataMotors 25.36
Teavana 15.41
TeckResg 34.46
TelelBrasil 21.78
TelefEsp 13.04
TempurP 27.40
Tenaris 39.82
TenetHltrs 28.97
Teradata 57.94
Teradyn 15.73
Terex 24.48
TerraNitro 215.10
Tesoro 38.93
TetraTech 7.02
TevaPhrm 41.48
Textron 23.17
Theragen 1.48
ThermoFis 63.96
ThomCrkg 3.22
3MCo 90.76


Tiffany
TWCable
TimeWarn
Timken
TitanMet
TollBros
TorchEngy
Torchmark
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travelers
Tredgar
TriConfi
TrinaSolar
TurqHillRs
TwoHrblnv
Tycolnf s
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold
UNS Engy
USAirwy
USG
UltraPtg
UniFirst
UnilevNV
UnionPac
UtContf
UtdMicro
UPSB


UtdRentals 42.57 +.36 Walgrn 35.57
USBancrp 31.76 +.33 WalterEn 31.66
USNGsrs 21.00 +.78 WsteMInc 33.52
USOilFd 32.22 -.19 Weathflntl 1073
USSteel 22.06 +.40 WeinRit 7 10
UtdTech 80.23 +.09 WenRt 27.10
UtdhlthGp 53.84 .30 WellPoint 56.10
UnumGr 20.68 25 WellsFargo 32.98
WestarEn 28.51
WAstEMkt 15.55


ValeSA 17.77
ValeSApf 17.47
ValeantPh 57.71
ValeroE 31.34
VangTSM 72.60
VangREIT 64.37
VangAIIW 44.50
VangEmg 42.62
VangEur 47.73
VangEAFE 34.33
VarianMed 69.81
Vecten 29.53
Ventas 64.12
VeoliaEnv 11.23
VeriFone 32.54
VerizonCm 44.10
Visa 148.06
VMware 90.34
Vornado 75.93
VulcanM 51.12
WGL Hold 38.73
WPXEnn 15.73
Wabash 8.58
WalMart 71.65


WstAMgdHi 6.39
WAstlnfOpp 13.22
WstnRefin 27.91
WstnUnbn 12.88
Weyerhsr 26.58
Whrlpl 98.62
WhibngPet 44.36
WmsCos 32.28
WmsPtrs 48.41
Winnbgo 13.79
WiscEngy 37.81
WT India 19.03
Worthgn 23.33
Wyndham 49.68
XL Grp 25.04
XcelEngy 27.24
Xerox 6.97
Yamanag 17.72
YoukuTud 15.30
YumBrnds 65.90
Zimmer 65.63


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,575

Declined: 1,439

Unchanged: 131

Volume: 4.0 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,050

Declined: 1,374

Unchanged: 151

Volume: 1.8 b
AP

helped push the market
higher, said Quincy Crosby,
a market strategist at Pru-
dential Financial.
Stocks have largely
traded sideways for two
weeks as investors wait for
developments from Wash-
ington on crucial budget
talks to avoid the "fiscal
cliff," a series of sharp gov-
ernment spending cuts and
tax increases scheduled to
start Jan. 1 unless an agree-
ment is reached to cut the


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. . .--.. ejp .7-1







Page A8 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012



PINION


"Self-reflection is the school of wisdom."
Baltasar Gracian, 1647


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ....................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ................................................ editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
S Mac Harris .................................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin .......... ........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ....... ....... ...... copy chief
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CLEANING UP





Bay project's




prospects



look good


King's Bay's spring-fed
environment is prime
habitat for manatees
and a must-see destination
for man. Beneath the
iridescent surface, a silent
confluence of pol-
lutants has been
slowly poisoning THE I!
the health of the
crown jewel of the King'
Nature Coast. restore
Stormwater
runoff dumps high OUR 01
doses of nutrients Momt
in the form of fer- on ou
tilizers and septic
tank effluent into
the bay, stoking the growth of
harmful filamentous algae,
which kills the beneficial
plants, with the entire mass of
dead and decaying vegetation
forming a thick mat of rotting
detritus over the once-white
sandy bottom.
For more than a year, a grass-
roots effort to rid King's Bay of
harmful algae one rake at a
time has caught the public's at-
tention and, more importantly,
the notice of government and
its hefty resources.
Sen. Charlie Dean, a leading
proponent of the restoration of
the springs, while recognizing
the hard work of Art Jones and
his Kings Bay Rotary Club
project, knows he needs more
stakeholders at the table. To
that end, Dean recently joined
Herschel T. Vinyard, secretary
of Florida's Department of En-
vironmental Protection, for a
tour of King's Bay. During that
trip, Dean noted: "We have had
a group of good folks out there
working hard and raking up
that lyngbya, but we now need
to incorporate that with some
businesspeople and the Legis-
lature and get it done. Public-
private partnership, getting
everybody involved, is how we
are going to have to do this."
We agree completely and
wholeheartedly back the lead-
ership the senator is demon-
strating on the issue.


S
"S
ra

P

r
r


For years, King's Bay has
been under assault. The causes
are many: minimal stormwater
planning and infrastructure;
improperly maintained septic
tanks; political impotence on
the fertilizer
issue; and over-
;SUE: pumping of the
aquifer.
Bay To a man, the
nation. delegation that
visited King's Bay
INION: late last month
ntum said the time for
side. studies is over,
which leads us to
believe the time
for action is now.
Recently, the county kicked
in $225,000 toward the pur-
chase and operating expenses
of a harvester. Prior to that, the
city of Crystal River con-
tributed $38,000 to the project.
Swiftmud has also mentioned
funds might be available for
the project.
The catalyst for this aggressive
new interest in saving King's
Bay is Jones and his hard work-
ing volunteers. They have made
the restoration of King's Bay a
popular topic and kept it in the
spotlight. Sen. Dean and Vin-
yard's involvement grows the
stakeholder cachet immensely
Citrus County and Crystal
River's leaders have also joined
the effort with their sewer proj-
ect along King's Bay
Some of the challenges re-
maining include obtaining ad-
ditional grant funding for
stormwater management proj-
ects, legislation or local laws
prohibiting the use of fertilizer,
new rules and regulations pro-
hibiting unchecked water con-
sumption and stemming the
tide of naysayers who shame-
lessly and selfishly cling to mis-
guided assumptions about
septic tank pollution.
Momentum is on the side of
King's Bay It is up to the team
of stakeholders to drive
the restoration project to
completion.


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


=Hot Corner: PROGRESS ENERGY=


Ethically wrong
I read where one of our county
commissioners considers
Progress Energy's tax payment
issue as nothing more than Busi-
ness 101. He must have missed
taking Ethics 101. Too bad.
Pay what you want
Wouldn't it be wonderful if, like
Progress Energy Florida, all property
owners could just pay the amount of
taxes they decided they wanted to
pay? The biggest corporations ap-
pear to be the most corrupt and
greedy. Let's just sock it to the public
and give our top CEOs millions in


bonuses. And why are these top peo-
ple so honored and revered? Oh, be-
cause they have come up with the
best schemes to fleece the public, so
they need to be handsomely
rewarded.
What do you think now?
For about the last six years now,
I've been calling Sound Off to ex-
press my disapproval of Progress
Energy's surcharge on our monthly
electric bill. In your editorials, you al-
ways seem to defend them because
of the jobs they provide and the
taxes they pay. I'm wondering now if
you Chronicle owners think Progress
Energy is such a great outfit now.


Cultivating our bewitchment


ASHINGTON Even
Jonathan Swift, who said
promises and pie crusts
are made to be broken, might
have marveled at the limited
shelf life of Barack Obama's
promise of a "balanced" deficit-
reduction plan sub-
stantial spending cuts
to accompany revenue
increases. Obama
made short shrift of
that promise when he
demanded $1.6 trillion
in immediate tax in-
creases and mostly un- --
specified domestic
cuts. He also promised
to cut $800 billion from Georg
10 years of war spend- OTI
ing that will end, which VOI
is like "cutting" $800
billion by deciding not
to build a ski resort on Mars.
Year after year, the Demo-
cratic-controlled Senate, ignoring
the law, refuses to pass budgets.
Year after year, Washington
makes big government cheap by
charging Americans only $6 for
every $10 of government services,
borrowing the difference. And
the biggest purchaser of U.S. gov-
ernment debt is not China but ...
the U.S. government, largely
through the Federal Reserve. Yet
what supposedly is horrifying is a
sequester that would cut less
than 3 percent of federal spend-
ing over the next decade?
Or horrible Grover Norquist.
Although a surfeit of numbers are
being bandied, a pertinent one is
missing the number of legisla-
tors who have pledged to
Norquist not to raise taxes. The
number is: Zero. All pledges have
been to voters. Progressives
lament the public's distrust of the
political class, while urging many
members of it to treat their prom-
ises as pie crusts.
Given progressives' "princi-
pled" refusal to countenance en-
titlement reforms, the principal
drivers of the fiscal imbalance
will not be untouched even by
raising, from 65, the age of


Medicare eligibility. In 1965, the
year this program was created,
the average life expectancies of
men and women at age 65 were
another 13.5 and 18 years respec-
tively Today they are 19 and 21,
and rising. Given modern med-
ical especially phar-
macological
marvels, longevity
often involves living
with several chronic
ailments that might
have been fatal a gen-
eration ago. For liber-
als, however, no
demographic or scien-
tific changes need be
e Will accommodated.
|ER Democrats insist the
CES manufactured un-
pleasantness due Jan.
1 is a crisis of insuffi-
cient revenues. But Jeffrey Dorf-
man, a University of Georgia
economics professor, thinks
arithmetic says otherwise. Writ-
ing for RealClearMarkets, he says
possible tax increases and spend-
ing cuts would reduce the current
deficit by less than a third, leav-
ing a deficit larger than any run
by any president not named
Obama.
At the end of the Clinton ad-
ministration, when the budget
was balanced (largely by rev-
enues generated by commercial-
ization of the Internet), annual
federal spending was $1.94 tril-
lion and revenue was $2.10 tril-
lion. "Adjusting for inflation and
population growth since the start
of 2001," Dorfman writes, "today's
equivalents would be $2.77 tril-
lion and $3.00 trillion," and a $230
billion surplus.
What is to blame for today's
huge imbalance? The Bush tax
cuts? The recession? Obama's
spending? Dorfman answers yes,
yes and yes but that "spending
is the main culprit" because:
Today federal revenue is $2.67
trillion (slightly less than "the
Clinton equivalent") and spending
is $3.76 trillion, so we are spend-
ing $987 billion more than we


would be if we had just increased
Bill Clinton's last budget for infla-
tion and population growth.
"Philosophy," said the philoso-
pher Ludwig Wittgenstein, "is a
battle against the bewitchment of
our intelligence by means of lan-
guage." In unphilosophic Wash-
ington, bewitchment is cultivated.
Notice how quickly and thor-
oughly a phrase used intermit-
tently for more than 50 years -
"fiscal cliff" was made ubiqui-
tous by one of Washington's least
flamboyant speakers (Ben
Bernanke). This melodramatic
language encourages the supposi-
tion that plunging off the
(metaphorical) cliff is unthink-
able. But as this column has hith-
erto noted, the cliff's
consequences huge tax in-
creases and defense cuts "are"
progressivism's agenda. And
Obama needs to restock the
pantry where he stores his ex-
cuses for his economic policy fail-
ures. The tax increases would
augment his policy of enlarging
government's control of the na-
tion's economic output, and he
could henceforth blame continu-
ing economic anemia on Republi-
cans who supposedly should have
averted what progressives desire.
The shrillness of "cliff" talk be-
witches minds that should be
skeptical about the supposed
point of all this deficit reduc-
tion. Conservatives, many of
whom are such because they un-
derstand government's metabolic
urge to metastasize, believe that
spending cuts will be chimeras.
Given Obama's "principled"
stance against "obdurate" Re-
publicans, the cliff can be dodged
only by imposing tax policies that
further darken the nation's fu-
ture, and government spending
would continue to rise even
under the sequester-imposed
"austerity." More bewitchment of
intelligence by language.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


Gov. Scott should go
Voters are up in arms over Gov
Rick Scott and his underhanded
actions. What a mistake we made
when we elected this man. A
man so rich, so arrogant, so in-
considerate and thoughtless, that
he approved a law that denies
due process to the citizens of
Florida. That will not stay!
Once Rick Scott was elected,
with his fraudulent promises, he
then brought in a lobbyist for the
Florida Medical Association, and
got passed a law that the citizens
of Florida cannot file a medical
malpractice action against doc-
tors at public and nonprofit hospi-
tals or those that have teaching
relationships with state universi-
ties. Again, denying the citizens of
this great state due process, as
embodied in the Fifth Amend-
ment If a citizen goes in for sur-
gery and has the wrong
appendage removed, or an oph-
thalmologist operates on the
wrong eye, leaving the citizen
blind in one eye, the patient
learns that he or she cannot file
an action for medical malpractice.
Gov Rick Scott is the worst
governor we have had during my
59 years as a citizen of Florida. I
and my friends worked 12 to 16
hours every day to get this man


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

elected! We plan to work 16 to 20
hours every day to put him out of
office.
This governor refused to ap-
prove the pipeline that would
have given many people jobs,
people who are actually living
on food stamps and what little
help they can find. The pipeline
would have given many people a
start to rebuild their lives, feed
their families, and keep their


children in school. Well gover-
nor, be assured that you will be a
one-term governor, the good peo-
ple of Florida have no need for
such fly-by-night politicians in
our state, so pack your bags, and
get ready to leave what was one
of the greatest states in the coun-
try, until we put you in office.
Now our state has become a
Third World state with your
help. Many of our people are
starving due to your actions.
Anna Clark
Inverness

Appalled at tax tactic
I am appalled at Progress En-
ergy and Duke's refusal to pay
their tax bill. I would like to know
why they feel that their scrubbers
should not be part of their tax
valuation. If you have an issue
with your tax bill, you pay it, go
through the proper channels to
dispute it, but not pay what you
think you should pay This is no
way to enhance their reputation
with the PSC, the county, and its
residents. This is the kind ofun-
derhandedness and handling of
matters with the county that infu-
riate the public.
Al Loftis
Citrus Springs


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


POGSBLE ADMINISTATION RfLACUMET CAKNIGPAIS


LETTERS > to the Editor


(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RETIRE
Continued from Page Al

County School District. When he
was first employed, Roger Weaver
was superintendent of schools.
Nott, who played a significant
part in the formation of the Renais-
sance Center program, is one of
nine district psychologists. His
home schools are Central Ridge El-
ementary, Inverness Middle and
Citrus High.
His wife, Michele, recently re-
tired as a math teacher at Inver-
ness Middle. And his daughter,
Marli Pollard, is a first-grade
teacher at Central Ridge.


LOCAL


"It's all I've ever known," Pol-
lard said, referring to growing up
with educators as parents.
Central Ridge Principal Nancy
Simon said teachers appreciate
Nott's assistance.
"He brings a deep knowledge of
children what makes them
tick," Simon said. "He's very prag-
matic. He relates so well to
children."
Nott didn't plan on a career in
the schools. At 24 years old and
with a bachelor's degree in psy-
chology, he answered an ad for an
educational diagnostician in the
Citrus County School District. Ba-
sically, the job was to test students
in achievement and learning.
"I thought I'd try it for a year,"


Nott said. "I really liked it."
That was 1978 and Nott hasn't
left. He continued his education
with a master's degree in educa-
tional sciences and became the
school district psychologist
Along the way, educators started
to focus on the way individual
schools handled students with be-
havioral issues. Most schools pro-
vided one "alternative education"
classroom with one teacher, but
there was no cohesiveness in the
school district for educating dis-
ruptive students.
Educators led by Jimmy
Hughes, a former superintendent
of schools, led the effort to create
a centralized alternative school.
The Renaissance Center was born


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 A9


in a group of portable classrooms
near Citrus High School.
Students with behavioral is-
sues began receiving special-
ized curriculum, along with a
strict level system that re-
warded progress.
Many students were eventually
returned to their home schools
where they thrived, Nott said.
"Kids who made it through the
program and graduated, the ma-
jority have done very well," he
said. "A lot of kids have done very
well."
Nott said he has enjoyed his run
in the school district and will miss
the students.
"It's been really gratifying," he
said, "knowing I had impact in


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Andy Nott will walk the halls in the
school district for a little more than
two weeks before retiring.
their lives."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wright@chronicleonline. com.


RATINGS
Continued from Page Al

as being an "A" district,
brought on by consistently
high standardized test
scores.
"It does mirror our stu-
dents' success," said Patrick
Simon, director of research
and accountability.



DUKE
Continued from Page Al

Meek said. "It really shines
a light on things we need to
do here."
The board will take up
revenue analysis, a topic
brought forward by Com-
missioner Rebecca Bays at
the end of the last budget
cycle. On Nov 6, the BOCC
heard a report from
Heather Encinosa, an attor-
ney with the firm of Nabors,
Giblin & Nickerson, about
the possibilities of raising
revenue through creating
Municipal Services Taxing
Units to levy millage on ex-
isting services and Munici-
pal Service Benefits Units
to fund capital facilities.
Other sources would in-
clude a local-option sales
tax, surtaxes and a utility
availability fee.
"We are going to do a com-
plete review of revenue and
expense analysis," Meek
said.
Budget discussions would
be brought forward at the
beginning of 2013 for the
next budget cycle.
The second point was to
develop partnerships with
the cities of Crystal River
and Inverness to improve
relationships.
With Inverness, "Whisper-
ing Pines has been a sticking
point for many years," Meek
said. "That needs to come to
resolution this year"
With Crystal River, Com-
missioner Dennis Damato
presented an update on cur-
rent King's Bay projects. He
also presented a printed


Teachers are scored on
two basic criteria:
One, principals observe
teachers, watching for effec-
tive teaching practices.
Two, a multitude of test
scores. Simon said the sec-
ond criteria combines
scores from numerous test-
ing areas.
For teachers whose stu-
dents do not take standard-
ized tests in their


plan called "Partnership for
a New Beginning" that he
will deliver Monday to Crys-
tal River City Council.
The third point was to de-
velop a comprehensive and
detailed long-range plan.
"I would encourage board
members to look at Pasco
County and what they've
gone through over the past
three years," Meek said.
"Pasco County is not known
for growth management and
planning. They are often
used as the poster child for
what happens when you
don't have policies in place.
They had a drastic change
in heart about three and a
half years ago where they
underwent a major process
within their community."
Meek said he would invite
representatives of Pasco
County to give the board a
presentation about its com-
prehensive strategic plan.
The fourth point was to
focus on a specific environ-
mental project within
King's Bay
"I'd like us to pick a spe-
cific project and get the
state, the county and the city
all on the same page toward
a specific project and a
common goal," Meek said.
With several groups hav-
ing started with a cleanup of
the bay, Meek said he hoped
it would become a master
plan addressing the issue of
water runoff into the bay
The fifth point was as-
signing specific areas and
issues to individual com-
missioners.
"I would like to have each
of us as board members
identify areas of interest
and concentration to focus


classrooms, such as physical
education or music, the
school's average of test
scores are used in the
teacher scoring.
In the so-called value-
added model, it is difficult
to pinpoint problem areas,
Simon said.
By 2015, the scores will
have an impact on teacher
pay All new teachers will be
enrolled in the program by


our time and talents on,"
Meek said.
Originally, Meek raised
the subject during his swear-
ing-in ceremony Nov 20,
mentioning his knowledge
about each commissioner's
possible area of expertise.
"It's not to limit any com-
missioner's ability or in-
volvement, but we're going to
get an understanding among
the five of us," Meek said.
The last point was en-
hancing economic develop-
ment initiatives.
"This is illustrated with
the Duke Energy issue,"
Meek said. "One of the
major issues we have to con-
front is market diversifica-
tion. We can no longer rely
on single industries. We re-
lied on construction, and
now basically the only other
aspect was the utility We
are now seeing the result of
having all of our eggs in one
basket. Both of those areas
are either gone or being
threatened right now. We
have to focus on such things
as infrastructure invest-
ment, tourism those types
of things need to be a focus
of this commission."
The task would be to cre-
ate an environment to en-
courage things to happen.
Meek made board liaison
appointments, which kept
members in their current
positions.
In other business:
U The board directed staff
to prepare a Legislative Pol-
icy Statement for the Citrus
County Legislative Delega-
tion meeting Wednesday
The board included a policy
to promote all-terrain fam-
ily recreational trails in the


then, and current teachers
have the option of joining
the program. The advantage
is the chance for bonuses by
scoring in the top two cate-
gories. The risk is teachers
give up tenure and work on
an annual contract
Simon and assistant su-
perintendent of schools
Mike Mullen said even
though the scores released
Wednesday have no bear-


Withlacoochee Forest pro-
posed by Commissioner
Scott Adams and a policy re-
garding the Duke Energy
issue. The policy list was
passed unanimously
Meek said from Jan. 1,
the agenda item for public
input always would be at
1:30 p.m. during regular
commission meetings.
The BOCC approved a
proclamation declaring
Dec. 7 as Pearl Harbor Re-
membrance Day
The board conducted a
public hearing and adopted
a resolution regarding the
method for levy of assess-
ment of properties in the
Harbor Isle area of the 2010
Citrus County/City of Crystal
River Wastewater Special
Assessment district
The board agreed to
tree-cutting for clearance of
the north-south grass run-
way at the Crystal River
Airport.
The board accepted Cit-
rus County Transit fare
increases.
During public input
time, John Grannan, presi-
dent of the Citrus County
Historical Society, asked
that society representatives
would be part of any discus-
sion about closing the Old


ing on their pay, teachers
pay close attention
anyway.
"We have teachers who
have high expectations of
themselves," Simon said.
As of late Wednesday af-
ternoon, the Department of
Education had not yet
posted the report.
Six Citrus County schools
had more than 50 percent of
their teachers score in the


Courthouse in Inverness in
any budget-cutting effort.
Grannan also asked the
board maintain the position
of the historic resources
officer
U The board agreed on
new annual fees for Chassa-
howitzka River Campground.
From Jan. 1, an annual park-


"highly effective" category.
They are: Renaissance Cen-
ter (83 percent), Citrus High
(64.5 percent), Inverness
Middle (57 percent), Citrus
Springs Middle (56 percent),
Lecanto High (56 percent)
and Crystal River Middle
(53 percent).
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


ing pass covering seven days
a week but no overnight
parking will cost $350. The
fee for Monday through
Thursday with no overnight
parking will be $150.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online com or 352-564-2916.



ETIT


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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hati at Obama issues stern warning


President tells GOP he won'tplay 'game' on debt ceiling dispute


WorldBRIEFS

Message


Associated Press
Illinois Rep. Joseph Lyons,
D-Chicago, tells lawmakers
Wednesday they are ad-
journing for the year and
wishes all a safe and happy
holiday season while on the
House floor during a ses-
sion at the Illinois State
Capitol in Springfield, III.


Parents charged
with taking baby
Police have filed charges
against the parents of a seri-
ously ill baby accused of tak-
ing her from a Pennsylvania
hospital without permission.
Lehigh County prosecutors
said April Saul and Daniel
Rivera took their daughter out
of Lehigh Valley Hospital in
Allentown against doctor's or-
ders. Authorities said they
also used obscene language
when confronted by medical
staff.
The baby was born prema-
turely last July. She remained
at the hospital until Oct. 23,
when Saul and Rivera re-
moved the child and said they
planned to take her to
Philadelphia for treatment.
Prosecutors said the child
was too ill to leave.
Student shoots self
while in custody
HOUSTON -A school
district spokesman said a
high school student who shot
himself while handcuffed in
the back of a patrol car after
being taking into custody at
his Houston-area campus
had told a friend he might
hurt himself.
Police said they're investi-
gating how the gun the stu-
dent shot himself with wasn't
found before he was put in
the vehicle Wednesday.
Galena Park school district
spokesman Jonathan Frey
said deputies picked up the
17-year-old Wednesday
morning after he'd texted a
friend that he wanted to hurt
himself.
Bodies believed to
be Iowa cousins
IOWA CITY, Iowa -
Hunters discovered two bod-
ies Wednesday believed to
be the young Iowa cousins
who vanished five months
ago while riding their bikes,
authorities said.
The families of 9-year-old
Elizabeth Collins and 11-
year-old Lyric Cook have
been notified of the discovery
and are asking for privacy,
Black Hawk County sheriff's
Capt. RickAbben said. He
wouldn't say where the bod-
ies were found or if there
were suspects in the girls'
disappearance.
The cousins were last seen
July 13 near a popular recre-
ational lake in Evansdale, a
city about 110 miles northeast
of Des Moines. Investigators
found their bikes and a pink
purse near the lake hours
later, but no sign of the girls.
"It's definitely not the out-
come that we wanted, obvi-
ously," Abben said, appearing
to fight back tears during a
news conference in Evans-
dale. "This is a difficult thing
for us to go through. It's a dif-
ficult thing for the community."
He said the bodies were
being sent to the state med-
ical examiner's office to con-
firm their identities.
Hundreds of volunteers
helped investigators search
for girls after they went miss-
ing, traipsing through corn-
fields and wooded areas in
and around Evansdale, a city
of 8,000 residents.
From wire reports


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Hew-
ing to a hard line, President
Barack Obama warned con-
gressional Republicans on
Wednesday not to inject the
threat of a government de-
fault into complex fiscal cliff
negotiations aimed at avoid-
ing year-end tax increases
and spending cuts that could
harm the economy
"It's not a game I will
play," declared Obama as
Republicans struggled to
find their footing in talks
with a recently re-elected
president and unified con-
gressional Democrats.
Among the Republicans,
Sen. Tom Coburn of Okla-
homa became the latest to
break ranks and say he


Associated Press

WASHINGTON In an
effort to ease the burden of
being stricken with a debili-
tating condition, the Social
Security Administration is
expanding a program that
fast-tracks disability claims
by people who get serious
illnesses such as cancer,
early-onset Alzheimer's and
Lou Gehrig's disease -
claims that could take
months or years to approve
in the past.
While providing faster


could support Obama's de-
mand for an increase in tax
rates at upper incomes as
part of a comprehensive
plan to cut federal deficits.
Across the Capitol, House
Majority Leader Eric Can-
tor said Republicans want
to "sit down with the presi-
dent. We want to talk
specifics." He noted the
GOP had made a compro-
mise offer earlier in the
week and the White House
had rejected it.
Since then, neither
Obama nor congressional
Democrats have signaled in-
terest in negotiations both
sides said are essential to a
compromise. Presidential
aides have even encouraged
speculation Obama is will-
ing to let the economy go


benefits, the program also is
designed to ease the work-
load of an agency that has
been swamped by disability
claims since the economic
recession a few years ago.
Disability claims are up by
more than 20 percent from
2008. The Compassionate Al-
lowances program approves
many claims for a select
group of conditions within a
few days, Social Security
Commissioner Michael As-
true said. The program is
being expanded today to in-
clude a total of 200 diseases


over the "fiscal cliff" if nec-
essary and gamble the pub-
lic will blame Republicans
for any fallout.
Eventually, Democrats ac-
knowledge, there will be
compromise talks, possibly
quite soon, toward an agree-
ment that raises revenues,
reins in Medicare and other
government benefit pro-
grams, and perhaps raises
the government's $16.4 tril-
lion borrowing limit.
For now, the demonstra-
tion of presidential inflexi-
bility appears designed to
show, unlike two years ago,
Obama will refuse to sign
legislation extending top-
rate tax cuts and allow pub-
lic and private pressure to
build on the Republican
leadership.


and conditions.
Many of the conditions
are rare; all of them are so
serious people who suffer
from them easily meet the
government's definition of
being disabled, Astrue said.
With proper documentation,
these are relatively easy
cases for the agency to de-
cide, too easy to put through
the usual time-consuming
process other applicants
face, he said.
"Why for someone who is
going to die within 15
months do we need 15 years


So far, the GOP has offered
to support non-specified in-
creases to raise tax revenues
by $800 billion over a decade
but has rejected Obama's de-
mand to let the top income
tax rate rise from 35 percent
to 39.6 percent
To buttress their case,
Republican officials in
Congress pointed to numer-
ous proposals Obama has
previously advanced that
could generate the same
amount of revenue he is
seeking without raising
rates. The list includes lim-
iting the tax deductions
taken by upper-income tax-
payers, raising taxes on the
oil and gas industry and
curbing or eliminating the
deductibility of tax-exempt
bonds.


NASA lost in space


Associated Press
The International Space Station is shown July 19, 2011, during a fly around as the shuttle Atlantis departed the
station on the last space shuttle mission.

Panel: Agency lacks purpose, nation needs to re-evaluate goals


Associated Press

WASHINGTON NASA, the
agency that epitomized the "Right
Stuff," looks lost in space and
doesn't have a clear sense of where
it is going, an independent panel of
science and engineering experts
said in a stinging report Wednesday
The report by a panel of the dis-
tinguished National Academy of
Sciences doesn't blame the space
agency; it faults the president, Con-
gress and the nation for not giving
NASA better direction. At the same
time, it said NASA is doing little to
further the White House's goal of
sending astronauts to an asteroid.
In one withering passage, the
panel said NASAs mission and vi-
sion statements are so vague and
"generic" they "could apply to al-
most any government research
and development agency, omitting
even the words 'aeronautics' or
'space."'
The space shuttles were retired
in 2011 and are now museum
pieces. Few people are paying at-
tention to the International Space


Station, and American astronauts
have to rely on Russian spaceships
to get there and back. Meanwhile,
rocket-building is being outsourced
to private companies, and a com-
mercial venture plans to send peo-
ple to the moon by the end of the
decade.
Academy panel member Bob
Crippen, a retired NASA manager
and astronaut who piloted the first
space shuttle mission, said he has
never seen the space agency so
adrift. He said that includes the
decade between the end of the
Apollo moon landings in the early
1970s and the beginning of the shut-
tle program.
"I think people (at NASA) want to
be focused a little more and know
where they are going," Crippen told
The Associated Press.
NASA spokesman David Weaver
defended the agency, saying in an
emailed statement it has clear and
challenging goals. He listed sev-
eral projects, including continued
use of the International Space Sta-
tion and efforts to develop a
heavy-duty rocket and crew cap-


sule capable of taking astronauts
into deep space.
John Logsdon, a space policy ex-
pert who advised the Obama cam-
paign in 2008, said the panel's
report, which is more strongly
worded than usual for the academy,
"rather fairly points its fingers at
the White House."
"There's a general sense of dis-
appointment the administration
has not been more bold and vision-
ary in setting out a path for the pro-
gram," said Logsdon, who was not
on the panel.
President Barack Obama told the
space agency in 2010 to plan to send
astronauts to an asteroid by 2025 as
a training ground for an eventual
Mars landing. But the 80-page panel
report and its authors said there is
little support for that idea within
NASA and the international space
community.
The agency hasn't done much to
determine an asteroid target, and
its strategic plan avoids mention of
an asteroid mission, the report said.
Also, panel members said NASA
hasn't allocated much money for it


of medical records?" Astrue
said in an interview. "If
somebody's got a confirmed
diagnosis of ALS, you know
in essence, it's not only a
disability, it's a death sen-
tence, and there is no use in
burdening them with
paperwork."
High demand during the
sour economy has made it
difficult for Social Security
to reduce disability claims
backlogs and wait times for
decisions. About 3.2 million
people have applied for dis-
ability benefits this year


Associated Press
An Egyptian protester
wears an eye patch
Wednesday during an anti-
Muslim Brotherhood
demonstration outside the
presidential palace in
Cairo, Egypt. The Arabic on
the eye patch reads, "tear
gas damaged my eye."

Egypt descends
into turmoil
CAIRO Supporters and
opponents of Egyptian leader
Mohammed Morsi fought with
rocks, firebombs and sticks
outside the presidential
palace in Cairo on Wednes-
day in large-scale clashes
that marked the worst vio-
lence of a deepening crisis
over the disputed constitution.
Egypt's Health Ministry
said 126 people were
wounded in the clashes that
were still raging hours after
nightfall.
Three of Morsi's aides re-
signed in protest of his han-
dling of the crisis. With two
aides who had quit earlier,
now five of his panel of 17 ad-
visers have left their jobs
since the problems began.
Norway to close
Venezuela embassy
CARACAS, Venezuela -
Norway will close its embassy
in Venezuela because of ram-
pant crime in the South Amer-
ican country and move the
diplomatic mission to neigh-
boring Colombia, its ambas-
sador said Wednesday.
Norwegian ambassador
Lars Vaagen said the deci-
sion to move the embassy to
Bogota next year was made
after analyzing the problem of
widespread violent crime in
Venezuela.
Norway's embassy in Cara-
cas has been operating for al-
most 45 years.
Ship sinks off Dutch
coast, four dead
THE HAGUE, Netherlands
- Four crew members died
and seven were missing in
the icy waters off the North
Sea, after a cargo ship col-
lided with another vessel and
sank off the Dutch coast
Wednesday night, rescuers
said.
"We can confirm that four
bodies have been found,
along with 13 people rescued
alive," said Coast Guard
spokesman Marcel
Oldenburger.
The 485-foot Baltic Ace col-
lided with the 440-foot con-
tainer ship Corvus J in
darkness near busy shipping
lanes some 40 miles off the
coast of the southern Nether-
lands. The Baltic Ace had a
crew of 24 which was forced
to abandon ship as it sank
quickly.
UK Treasury chief
juggles budget
LONDON Britain's
Treasury chief George Os-
borne said Wednesday the
recovery of the U.K. economy
is taking longer than he had
hoped and warned more
spending cuts will be needed
to get public finances under
control.
With official growth fore-
casts cut, Osborne had little
room for maneuver but said
he was trimming departmen-
tal spending to generate more
investment in infrastructure.
"It has taken time, but the
British economy is healing," Os-
borne told the House of Com-
mons, though the latest
estimate from the independent
Office for Budget Responsibility
forecasts a 0.2 percent contrac-
tion in the economy this year.
In his scheduled update to
budget policies, Osborne es-
sentially stuck to his plan of
cutting government deficits to
promote recovery.
From wire reports


Gov't tries to ease disability process


Social Security Administration to fast-track rare disease claims











SPORTS


Texas A&M
freshman QB
Johnny Manziel
is one of three
finalists for the
Heisman
Trophy./B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


w

F*

'i
( ___ ...


Lecanto boys dismiss Belleview


STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
LECANTO -A sluggish start and lackluster
shooting had the Lecanto Panthers basketball
team trailing early to winless Belleview, but
their token full-court press defense and an
early fourth quarter run led to a 63-50 win
Wednesday night in a non-district matchup.
Brandon Burich led the way for Lecanto
with 14 points and five rebounds, while
Robert Vega (12 points, five rebounds) and
Mikey Makros (11 points, five rebounds) con-
tributed as well.
Up by 45-35 entering the final quarter, the
Panthers (8-0) finished off a 12-4 run to pull
away, as Makros came up with a steal, leading
to a feed down low from Vega to Burich for a
score. After Belleview's Christian Ishak hit a
jumper, Vega scored twice inside, on a drive
then an offensive putback.


Daniel Vazquez scored following his own
free throw miss to pull the Rattlers to within
51-39 with over five minutes left, but Burich
scored inside again before Belleview
(0-6) missed a pair of free throws and com-
mitted a turnover, one of 19 on the night,
largely at the hands of the Panther press.
"Brandon played really great, and stepped
up tonight, Robert (Vega) really played well.
He came off the bench and really was effec-
tive in the post area," said Grasso.
Two from the line by Richie Rizzolo re-
claimed Lecanto's largest lead of sixteen, 55-
39 with four minutes remaining, putting it out
of reach for the Rattlers.
"I thought in the first half, our press was a
little lazy, but in the second half we came out
ready to apply pressure and we got a lot out of
that," said assistant coach Marc Grasso, fill-
ing in for head coach Frank Vilardi.
Lecanto struggled from the field, shooting


37 percent, and Belleview capitalized, taking
a 15-14 lead after the opening quarter.
The Panthers scored to start the second
quarter, on a deep Makros three-pointer from
the wing, giving Lecanto a lead they would
not relinquish. A three from Rizzolo and an-
other from Makros helped pad the lead to 27-
18 midway through the period, and the
Panthers were able to get comfortable from
there, while the Rattlers began to struggle
against the press.
"I thought we played hard. I think that our
shot selection wasn't as good as it could've
been," said Grasso. "I think that our boxing
out and rebounding was not as good in the
first half, but in the second, I think we really
came out ready to play"
Lecanto outrebounded the Rattlers 39-33,
while committing just 14 turnovers.
The Panthers will visit Citrus Friday for a
7:30 p.m. start.


Instate beatdown


Associated Press
Florida guard Mike Rosario shoots a layup off of a steal as Florida State's Michael Snaer watches in the first half Wednesday in
Tallahassee. No. 6-ranked Florida took a 72-47 victory at Florida State.


No. 6Florida has

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida's
guards made the difference -
a big difference in an easy
win over archrival Florida
State on Wednesday night.
Kenny Boynton and Mike
Rosario both scored 14 points
as the sixth-ranked Gators
romped to a 72-47 victory over
the defending Atlantic Coast
Conference champions.
Freshman Michael Frazier
added 12 points while Scottie


little trouble in dispatching Florida State in Tallahassee


Wilbekin chipped in five assists
and five steals.
The Gators big man, 6-foot-9
Patric Young, finished with 10
points and eight rebounds.
"Hopefully our guys are able
to see that our sum our total
- is maybe bigger than one or
two individuals," Florida coach
Billy Donovan said. "That's a
good sign of a team."
No one was more impressed
with Florida's performance
than Florida State coach
Leonard Hamilton.


"We ran into one of the better
teams that we've played since
I've been at Florida State," said
Hamilton, who is in his 11th
season at Florida State.
"They've found the magic
level," Hamilton said. "They
understand who they are and
what their strengths and weak-
nesses are and they're just exe-
cuting until they find the
mistake that you're going to
make and they make you pay."
Time and again it turned out.
It took the Gators just 5 min-


utes to take a 12-2 lead and the
rout was on.
"We took care of business in
the first 4 minutes and that's
what really determined the
game," said Boynton, whose
layup with 8:57 left gave
Florida its largest lead, 62-25.
"We didn't want to slow the
game down," Boynton said.
"We could have beat them by
more."
Florida (7-0) has held five


Page B4


0 College football/B2, B3
0 Outdoors/B2
0 NFL picks/B2
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Basketball, baseball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Soccer


Soccer
NOTEBOOKS


Boys


teams


gaining


strength
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
One month into the high
school boys soccer season, all
three teams are seeing a sim-
ilar trait: character Coaches
are pleased with what they're
seeing so far
Rewarded with play
Crystal River's turnaround
year continues to go strong, as
the Pirates are just a handful
of wins from their 7-win total
last season, with more than a
dozen games remaining. The
team is nearly at full strength,
with senior midfielder Omam
Valdivia who's missed the
last three weeks with a frac-
tured ankle close to return-
ing to the team.
Freshman AJ Bass was
brought up from junior varsity
during that time to help fill
the roster spot and Pirates
head coach Bobby Verlato was
so pleased with his play that
Bass was promoted to varsity
the rest of the season. Bass
said the team has helped him
learn what he's supposed to,
and thinks his conditioning
will be better from running
cross country for the school.
See Page B4


Girls


teams


recovering

JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Coming into this week's
local soccer matches, two
inter-county squads have faced
a recent plague of injuries and
red cards that've forced
coaches and teammates to fill
large gaps in their rosters.
By rearranging players or
coming up with entirely new
game plans, local teams aim
for continued success on the
field as the last key games of
the regular season, before dis-
trict play, quickly appear on
the horizon.
Miller, Martin
red-carded
Citrus senior Deycasha
Miller and Lecanto junior
Breanna Martin both earned
red cards last week and will
be sidelined for six weeks
each. Miller saw herself
ejected from a Nov. 28 game
against Belleview while Mar-
tin was playing in a heated
Nov. 20 game against District
4A-4 rival Springstead.
Miller, Citrus' top goal
scorer and county leader in
goals up to the point of her
suspension, forces Citrus
See Page B3


Rays acquire Escobar from Marlins


Tampa Bay solidifies SSposition,

picks up player's $5 million salary


Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Yunel Escobar's stay with
the Miami Marlins lasted all
of two weeks.
The payroll-slashing Mar-
lins dealt the shortstop and
his $5 million salary across
Florida to the Tampa Bay
The payroll-slashing Miami
Marlins dealt shortstop Yunel
Escobar and his $5 million
salary across Florida to the
Tampa Bay Rays early
Wednesday morning for minor
league infielder Derek Dietrich.
Associated Press


Rays on Tuesday night for
minor league infielder
Derek Dietrich.
Escobar's departure drops
the Marlins' projected open-
ing-day payroll to a major
league-low $38 million,
which includes $4.5 million
owed Toronto next year, $1.5
million due to Arizona in
2013 as part of the Heath
Bell trade and $1 million to
account for a prorated share
of Bell's signing bonus.
Combined with the
Toronto trade, the Marlins
have pared $151.5 million in
payroll from their books in
recent weeks, just two


months after finishing their
first season in a new ballpark
built with taxpayer money
Right-hander Ricky No-
lasco, the team's highest-
paid remaining player with
a salary of $11.5 million next
year, would prefer to be
traded, too, agent Matt Sos-
nick said Monday
"We'll take a little timeout
on the trade front," said Mar-
lins president of baseball op-
erations Larry Beinfest, who
promised the payroll savings
will be reinvested.
Acquired in the 12-player
trade that sent Jose Reyes,
Mark Buehrle and Josh
Johnson to Toronto on Nov.
19, the 30-year-old Escobar
batted .253 last season with
nine homers and 51 RBIs.
He is a .282 career hitter
in six major league seasons


with 53 homers and 298
RBIs for Atlanta (2007-10)
and Toronto (2010-12). Esco-
bar was suspended for three
games in September for
wearing eye black display-
ing an anti-gay slur written
in Spanish during a game
against Boston.
"I think he definitely
learned a lesson from the
eye-black incident," Rays
executive vice president for
baseball operations Andrew
Friedman said. "I think it
had a real impact on him
and that he feels remorse
about it. And the digging that
we did we believe that it
was an isolated incident and
that nothing of that nature
will be a concern going for-
ward, or we wouldn't have
acquired him."










Gap widens between Broncos, Raiders


Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. Just a year
ago, Denver and Oakland went to
the end of the season in the race for
the AFC West title, with the Broncos
edging the Raiders for first place on
the final day by winning a three-
team tiebreaker with San Diego.
Now the teams couldn't be further
apart.
The Broncos (9-3) are riding a
seven-game winning streak into
Thursday night's game in
Oakland having already
wrapped up the division Denver
title. They are spending (93) at
the last month worried Raider
about playoff positioning
and staying healthy for 0 Time: 8:
the postseason. today.
The Raiders (3-9) have 0 TV: NFL
lost five straight and have
been eliminated from
playoff contention for a 10th straight
season as the franchise has regressed
in the first year of the new regime led
by general manager Reggie McKenzie
and coach Dennis Allen.
"It's definitely disappointing," de-
fensive back Michael Huff said.
"Coming into the season, we had a
new GM, had a new coaching staff
and it felt like the sky was the limit,
but for some reason obviously, we
had a lot of injuries but for some
reason, we haven't been on the same
page the whole season. The defense
has had their struggles, the offense
has their struggles at times, special


I
(
*I


teams had their struggles at time.
It's like we haven't just put that com-
plete game together yet. We're just
trying to figure it out and find that
perfect game."
The Broncos figured it out quickly
after going 8-8 last year in their first
season under front office boss John
Elway and coach John Fox. The
biggest change came when they ac-
quired quarterback Peyton Man-
ning to replace pedestrian passer
Tim Tebow
But nearly 20 other
players acquired since
Broncos Elway took over the foot-
Oakland ball operations have
s (3-9) started games this sea-
son, including standout
20 p.m. defensive star Von Miller,
who has 26 1/2 sacks in
Network less than two seasons.
"It's been a lot of
hard work by a lot of
people whether it's personnel de-
partment, the coaching staff, the
players in the locker room," Fox
said. "As far as the offseason I know,
a lot was made of Peyton Manning,
but we had a lot of other guys that
have been big contributors to this
football team as well. But, you know,
anything worth a darn takes time to
build and so we just in year two of
that process."
The acquisition accelerated it He
has come back from a neck injury
that sidelined him all last season to
set a Denver record with 29 touch-
down passes.


NFL Week 14: Peyton will pick apart Raiders
The Denver Broncos already own the AFC West title, but are not likely to pull back any
against the team Denver fans (and some players) always have loved to hate. The Oakland
Raiders are losers of five straight games.


MATCHUP STORYLINE
(Thu.) DEN at OAK Broncos certainly rate as a threat anytime they have the ball

PHI at TB r 3 Eagles playing for next year, Bucs playing for a playoff berth

CHI at MIN )- Bears so banged-up and Adrian Peterson is running wild

BAL at WAS j A Ravens overcome headaches thinking about RG3

MIA at SF N Jim Harbaugh's QB decision needs to pay dividends here

NO at NYGJ If this game was in Superdome, choice would be reversed

DET at GB I Lions are consistently mediocre and undisciplined

ARI at SEA V Seahawks are 5-0 in Seattle


PICK
DEN 38-13

TB 30-13

MIN 16-14

BAL 24-23

SF 23-14

NYG 30-27

GB 33-19

SEA 27-10


TEN at IND I I Another step toward the postseason for Andrew Luck and Colts IND 28-17

NYJ at JAC B And the Jets are favored why, exactly? JAC 10-9

ATL at CAR Falcons desperately want to stay home for entire playoffs ATL 33-23

DAL at CIN *A P This one is easy: Bengals are the better team CIN 23-16

STL at BUF j After handling Niners, Rams should flatten Bills, right? Nope BUF 21-20

KC at CLE *. r Browns starting to show enough to maybe save Shurmur's job CLE 20-10

SD at PIT : Could be a rout if Ben Roethlisberger plays for Steelers PIT 20-13

(Mon.) HOU at NE Texans would prove a lot with a win here. Won't happen NE 28-22
Barry Wilner AP


Aggies'


Johnny Football


Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel could become the first
win the Heisman Trophy when the award is presented Saturday


[ Manziel could ma

Associated Press

COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
Johnny Manziel certainly has
the statistics worthy of a Heis-
man Trophy winner He plays in
the powerful Southeastern Con-
ference. He has a signature win
S" all things Heisman voters typ-
ically look for
The only question is whether
the voters will give the award to
a freshman for the first time.
Adrian Peterson, star running
back for the Vikings and the only
freshman to finish second in vot-
ing, is hoping the jinx ends Sat-
urday night.
"Hopefully they don't rob him
S like they did me," Peterson, who
lost by 328 votes to junior Matt
Leinart in 2004, said in an inter-
view with The Associated Press.
"I hope he wins."
Manziel may be a favorite this
year, but who knows? Kansas
State quarterback Collin Klein
and Notre Dame linebacker
Manti Te'o are the other finalists
and both can make strong cases,
too. But neither caught the at-
tention of the fans quite like
Johnny Football, who led the Ag-
gies to an upset of No. 1 Ala-
bama in Tuscaloosa.
Manziel accumulated 4,600
yards of total offense in 12 games
Associated Press to break the Southeastern Con-
freshman to ference record for total yards in
night, a season. The record was previ-


ke history by winning Heisman trophy


ously held by 2010 Heisman win-
ner Cam Newton, who needed
14 games to pile up 4,327 yards.
The Aggies, who went 10-2 in
their first season in the SEC
after moving from the Big 12,
certainly hope Manziel is the
one to finally break the fresh-
man curse (Manziel is a redshirt
freshman, not a true freshman).
On a website the school cre-
ated to promote Manziel for the
award, they point out he's dif-
ferent than many freshman.
Manziel enrolled in college in
January 2010 and will be a jun-
ior academically this spring. He
turns 20 on Thursday, making
him older than Mark Ingram
was when he took home the
Heisman as a sophomore in
2009.
He would also be just the sec-
ond Aggie to win the award and
the first since John David Crow
in 1957. Crow got a push from his
famous coach before the voting
was done that season.
"If John David Crow doesn't
win the Heisman Trophy," then-
A&M coach Paul "Bear" Bryant
said, "they ought to stop giving
it."
Crow got a good laugh this
week when asked if he believed
the same was true of Manziel.
"I don't have near the audi-
ence that coach Bryant had," he
said, still chuckling. "I'm not
sure how big that would go over"


Then the 77-year-old former
halfback got serious.
"He is very, very deserving,"
Crow said. "I don't care what age
he is, whether he is right-
handed or left-handed, wears a
17 shoe or nine shoe, he is very,
very deserving of being named
the outstanding player in college
this year"
Manziel's whirlwind season
had a modest beginning with
him having to beat out two other
quarterbacks to win the starting
position in mid-August.
As his numbers grew, so did
the legend of Johnny Football, a
nickname Aggies bestowed him
with as he settled in at College
Station. When the Aggies beat
the defending champion Crim-
son Tide on national television
behind an outstanding perform-
ance by Manziel, the phrase
seemed to be everywhere.
It's a name that still amuses
him.
"I don't know if I really see it
as a legend," he said. "It's more
of a folk tale, I guess."
His numbers alone seem like
the stuff of some exaggerated
Texas football folk tale. He has
thrown for 3,419 yards and 24
touchdowns and run for 1,181
yards and 19 more scores to be-
come the first freshman, first
SEC player and fifth player
overall to throw for 3,000 yards
and run for 1,000 in a season.


Let FWC know how you feel at webinar


As reported here last
week, the Florida
Fish and Wildlife
Commission had meetings
Wednesday, today and Fri-
day in Apalachicola, which
I assume were
held as sched-
uled since this
was written be-
fore those dates.
One of the
items on the
agenda was a
proposal to cre-
ate two new cate-
gories: "Game
Fish" and "Sport R.G. S
Fish." If these TIG
categories were LIN
established,
species will be
added as seen fit in future
meetings. No species will be
added until at least the next
meeting, which will be in
Orlando in mid-February
(the commission meets five
times each year, moving the
site around the state).
To summarize briefly, the
Game Fish category param-
eters would be: no commer-
cial harvest, possession or
sale; hook and line only;
and captain and crew of for-
hire vessels such as charter
boats would have a bag limit
of zero.
The Sport Fish category
will be basically the same,
but no harvest, commercial
or recreational would be


I
I


permitted. Put another way
- both categories would be
catch-and-release except for
recreational anglers, who
would be permitted to har-
vest species in the Game
Fish category,
subject to bag
and size limits.
To gain input
from anglers,
FWC is holding
two "webinars,"
from 6 to 8 p.m.
Dec. 10 and 12. To
learn more about
the webinars,
chmidt visit MyFWC.
iHT com/Fishing,
IES then click "Salt-
water Fishing,"
"Rulemaking"
and "Workshops."
For those not familiar
with the process, visit the
website wwwfwc.adobe
connect.com/mfm/ log in as
a guest, "enter the room,"
then follow the instruc-
tions. You can do this be-
fore the starting time, but I
don't know how far ahead
one can log on. Participants
are limited to 100 at any
one time.
The webinars are identi-
cal, so there's no need to "at-
tend" both. If you have no
access to a computer at
those times and wish to
have voice access only, or
want more information
about the process, contact


Carly Canion at 850-617-9627
or Carly.Canion@MyFWC.
com.
There are currently no
saltwater game fish species,
contrary to commonly-held
opinion. The closest we
come are species which
cannot be sold and can be
harvested using hook and
line only
My guesses for inclusion
in the Game Fish category
are red drum, snook and
spotted seatrout, although
not all at once, nor in that
order If my hunch is cor-
rect, snook will be first,
since the season will be
open on the Atlantic side by
the February meeting, and
the classification will affect
snook least, followed by red
drum, then spotted
seatrout.
There would be no point
to include other trouts, un-
like snook, where all sub-
species will probably be
included.
My guess for the Sport
Fish category would be bill-
fish (probably all, but the
FWC might ease into that),
bonefish, permit and tar-
pon. Bonefish and tarpon
are, in my opinion, a given
and may be included at the
same meeting, followed by
billfish and permit Person-
ally, I think the new cate-
gories are a good idea, but
I'd like to know how you feel


about it, and so would the
commission.
mmm
The inshore bite has
picked up with the warming
weather, and the bag has
been quite mixed, including
reds, sea bass, sheepshead
and trout. A good part of the


Chassahowitzka* Crysta
High/Low High
THURS 10:22a.m. 6:24a.m. 8:43a.m.
i/6 11:18 p.m. 6:36 p.m. 9:39 p.m.
FRI 11:50 a.m. 7:35a.m. 10:11 a.m.
12/7 ------------ 7:37 p.m. 10:32 p.m.

SAT 12:11 a.m. 8:49a.m. 11:41 a.m.
12/8 1:20 p.m. 8:44 p.m. 11:25 p.m.


SUN 1:04 a.m.
12/9 2:40 p.m.

MON 1:56 a.m.
12o10 3:49 p.m.

TUES 2:47 a.m.
12/11 4:49 p.m.
WED 3:36 a.m.
12/12 5:42 p.m.


9:58 a.m. 1:01 p.m.
9:51 p.m. ----
10:59 a.m. 12:17 a.m.
10:51 p.m. 2:10 p.m.
11:55a.m. 1:08a.m.
11:46 p.m. 3:10 p.m.
12:46 p.m. 1:57 a.m.
-----4:03 p.m.

*From mouths of rivers.


action has moved into the
back country, especially in
the deeper holes and
sloughs, but keep an eye on
the tides. You don't want to
be stranded back there
waiting for the water to
come back, trust me. A num-
ber of anglers have been


touting the new cupped
popping cork from D.O.A.
Tight Lines to you.


Chronicle outdoors colum-
nist RG Schmidt can be
reached at rgschmidt@
embarqmail. com.


al River** Homosassa*** Withlacoochee*


I/Low


High/Low


3:46 a.m. 9:32 a.m.
3:58 p.m. 10:28 p.m.
4:57 a.m. 11:00a.m.
4:59 p.m. 11:21 p.m.
6:11 a.m. 12:30p.m.
6:06 p.m.
7:20 a.m. 12:14 a.m.
7:13 p.m. 1:50 p.m.
8:21 a.m. 1:06a.m.
8:13 p.m. 2:59 p.m.
9:17 a.m. 1:57 a.m.
9:08 p.m. 3:59 p.m.
10:08 a.m. 2:46 a.m.
9:59 p.m. 4:52 p.m.


5:23 a.m. 6:30 a.m.
5:35 p.m. 7:26 p.m.
6:34 a.m. 7:58 a.m.
6:36 p.m. 8:19 p.m.
7:48 a.m. 9:28 a.m.
7:43 p.m. 9:12 p.m.
8:57 a.m. 10:48 a.m.
8:50 p.m. 10:04 p.m.
9:58 a.m. 11:57 a.m.
9:50 p.m. 10:55 p.m.
10:54 a.m. 12:57 p.m.
10:45 p.m. 11:44 p.m.
11:45 a.m. 1:50 p.m.
11:36 p.m. ----


**At Kings Bay. ***At Mason's Creek.


CHFipNIcLE


Tide charts


High/Low


1:34 a.m.
1:46 p.m.
2:45 a.m.
2:47 p.m.
3:59 a.m.
3:54 p.m.
5:08 a.m.
5:01 p.m.
6:09 a.m.
6:01 p.m.
7:05 a.m.
6:56 p.m.
7:56 a.m.
7:47 p.m.


B2 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Northern Illinois head coach Rod Carey, left, and Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher pose for photos after a news
conference Wednesday promoting the Jan. 1 Orange Bowl in Hollywood, Fla. Carey, who served as offensive coordina-
tor the past 12 games and has been the line coach for two years, will make his head coaching debut. He replaces Dave
Doeren, who took the North Carolina State job.



Whole new game


Northern Illinois

coach Carey gets a

bit ofsleep -finally

Associated Press
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. Northern
Illinois coach Rod Carey got some
sleep on Wednesday, his third full day
on the job of leading the Huskies.
On a plane. For an hour
"Felt awesome, by the way," Carey
said. "Awesome."
Right now, awesome would seem a
most appropriate word to describe
what Carey and Northern Illinois are
going through. BCS mania has struck
the small city of DeKalb, Ill., and it'll
likely keep ramping up over the next
four weeks until the Huskies (12-1)
meet Florida State (11-2) in the Or-
ange Bowl in Miami on Jan. 1.
Carey- unsure when his next good
night's sleep will come and unboth-
ered by that will make his debut as
the Huskies' coach in that game, the
first Bowl Championship Series ap-
pearance for the newly crowned
champions of the Mid-American Con-
ference. He spent Wednesday in
South Florida, seated on the opposite
end of a poolside dais from Florida
State coach Jimbo Fisher at a hotel
resort, a huge glass bowl of oranges
propped between them.
"I think the right word is blessed,"
Carey said. "That's the best way I can
say to put it right now. It's been a
crazy four days for me personally and


our team, and really this is about our
team, not about me. Our team has
earned this by going out and doing
what they have to do on the field and
we're super-excited to be part of this
Discover Orange Bowl and have a
great opponent like Florida State.
"What a thrill for us."
Ever since the Huskies were an-
nounced Sunday as being BCS-
bound, the debate has been ongoing
over whether Northern Illinois was
worthy of being in one of football's
premier bowl games.
Clearly, the Huskies would think
they earned their trip to Miami.
And if they're not convincing
enough, Fisher was more than happy
to make the case for them.
"That team had an unbelievable
football year," Fisher said. "You look
at the numbers and the people
they've beaten and the things they've
done. They're a great opponent.
They've had a tremendous year And
to me, it's disrespectful to Northern
Illinois (to question its BCS validity).
We definitely don't think that way We
know what kind of opponent they're
going to be."
Carey and Fisher did all the buzz-
creating things on Wednesday, like
posing with Obie, the game's over-
stuffed orange mascot, and shaking
hands while standing on either side of
the trophy that'll be presented to the
winning coach on New Year's Night.
Fisher even good-naturedly warned
Carey about the pratfalls of bringing a
football team for a week to Miami -
where nightlife can be tempting.
"Know where they're at," Fisher
said.


"Thanks," Carey groaned.
"Hey I'm going to have to the same
problem," Fisher said. "My problem
is, they know where to go."
Neither team has started bowl
practices yet Northern Illinois re-
turns to the practice field on Satur-
day, and Fisher is still finalizing the
Seminoles' practice plans going for-
ward. So both coaches were at ease
Wednesday, sitting in a cool breeze as
waterfalls sprayed behind them and
a few people lounged on nearby ham-
mocks nestled between palm trees.
Carey probably needed the bit of
rest and relaxation. Dave Doeren,
who was Northern Illinois' coach for
its march to the MAC title, left Satur-
day for North Carolina State. Carey -
a former offensive assistant got
promoted Sunday, when the Huskies
learned they were BCS-bound. He
didn't even get a chance to speak at
any length about the move to his wife
until about 2 a.m. that night.
He knows he's ready to coach, and
knows some nerves will come with
that as well.
"I think that would be normal,"
Carey said. "I think it's like walking
down the aisle when I was marrying
my wife. You have those last-second
thoughts but those thoughts don't
stop you from doing it. It's 10 years
later and I'm married."
So now, he's turning much of his at-
tention to other commitments the
ones of the four-year variety, from re-
cruits. And he's already noticing one
distinct advantage of calling recruits
from "BCS-bound Northern Illinois"
as opposed to just "Northern Illinois."


Stewart won't


race Indy 500


Stewartpasses

on owner

Penske s offer

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Tony
Stewart passed up a chance
to race for Roger Penske in
the Indianapolis 500.
The three-time NASCAR
champion said Wednesday
at the International Motor-
sports Industry Show that
he wouldn't attempt to race
in both the Indy 500 and
NASCAR's Coca-Cola 600 on
the same day
"As much as I would like
to do it, we just don't have
the time to do it proper,"
Stewart said. "The IRL is so
competitive now, you're not
going to just show up like
drivers used to do in the past
and be competitive. These
guys don't leave anything on
the table there. You're not
going to stroll into the Indy
500 with these guys who race
every week and be as
competitive as they are."
Penske extended the invi-
tation last week in Las Vegas
while accepting the Sprint
Cup trophy Later, when
given the chance to shrug it


offas a lighthearted moment
with Stewart, Penske in-
sisted he was very serious
about fielding a car for the
NASCAR owner-driver
"It was a very humbling
comment and offer that he
made, for sure," said Stew-
art, booed by fans when he
made the announcement.
"I'm very humbled by the
fact that he offered it to us.
It's a great opportunity, but
it's very hard when you're
running three Cup teams
right now and the obliga-
tions that we have making
sure that we're doing the
right things, we have a lot of
people that depend on us....
It's kind of like being at
Thanksgiving dinner My
plate is finally full. I don't
know if I can add anymore to
what I have right now."
He left open the possibil-
ity of racing for Penske at
some point.
"I'm not going to do it this
year, but there's nothing say-
ing that down the road that I
may not take him up on that
same offer," Stewart said.
There was a push to get
Stewart to race in Indi-
anapolis since Penske made
the offer, with Indianapolis
Motor Speedway starting an
online petition for fans to
encourage the driver to ac-
cept the ride.


Associated Press
Tony Stewart arrives for NASCAR's Sprint Cup awards
ceremony Friday in Las Vegas.


GIRLS
Continued from Page B1

head coach Ian Feldt to com-
pletely rearrange his team
and refocus his girls to fill an
offensive gap that was pri-
marily built around Miller
Martin occupied a key
midfield position for
Lecanto and, with her two
assists so far in the season,
was immensely valuable at
making and creating plays
for her team.
Both players hope to re-
turn to their respective
teams by the postseason.
Lecanto rights ship
after losing streak
The Panthers started out
this season on the fast track
to success. Dropping only
one game early, their season
opener to Nature Coast,
Lecanto went on a six-game
winning streak before drop-
ping its second loss of the
season to district rival


Springstead.
Lecanto traveled to Trin-
ity Catholic only to take its
third defeat and second in a
row as the Celtics shut the
Panthers out 8-0.
"We've suffered many in-
juries and absenteeism,"
Lecanto head coach Roselle
Lattin said. "It wasn't until
the fifth game of the season
we had our full roster be-
cause we had girls in cross
country
"Once everyone returned,
we started battling injuries
and the flu (and) it's been
one thing after the other but
that happens," Lattin contin-
ued. "We've had everyone
healthy for only (a few)
games so it's been very diffi-
cult to create consistent
starting lineups. However,
all of the girls have done a
great job of stepping up to fill
the void of missing players."
Lecanto has recently
staged a comeback and is
currently on a three game,
clean-sheet winning streak,
having defeated both county


rivals (Crystal River 2-0, Cit-
rus 4-0) in shutout victories
and downed district rival
Gainesville on Tuesday 3-0.
Lattin's Lady Panthers
hope to extend their streak
as they meet district rival
Vanguard at 7:30 p.m. tonight
in Ocala for the second time
this season after defeating
them 3-0 on Nov 8.
Citrus keeper out
for up to two weeks
Hurricanes goalkeeper
Paige Gramer suffered a leg
injury during Monday's
game against Lecanto and


will be out of Citrus' net for
at least two weeks to recover
Citrus junior varsity
keeper Lauren Heise
stepped up to fill Gramer's
shoes on Tuesday against
Central and stepped up to
make a successful diving
save in the game.
Fellow JV call-ups Lydia
DeJesus and Holly Ruppert
have helped fill key gaps for
Citrus, which aided Tuesday
evening's win over the Bears.
Hamilton, Lyons
returns to teams
Despite all the injuries


local teams are accruing,
some players are managing
to recover from their woes
and rejoining their respec-
tive teams' line-up.
Lecanto sophomore
Laura Hamilton returned to
play against Citrus on Mon-
day after a few weeks nurs-
ing a sprained ankle.
Hamilton (seven goals, two


assists) is currently tied for
top scorer on her team with
Jessica Allen (seven goals,
five assists) and was a key
component of Lecanto's win
over Gainesville on Tues-
day, scoring two goals.
Crystal River midfielder
Cheyenna Lyons returned to
the field as well after injuring
her arm early in the season.


Citrs Srins Civic Assciai
Citrus Springs Civic Association


Annual -
Christmas t
Parade -


Maximum strength
analgesic creme for
temporary relief from:
Joint and Muscle
soreness
Arthritis
Back aches
F1O


- n --h e Richcreamy
Sunshine otnut Patties dipped in
real milk chocolate
Say "Happy Holidays from Florida" with the healthy
gift of sweet, seedless Navel Oranges. Tree-ripened and
picked at the peak of perfection. Arrives fresh and ready
to enjoy. Quality guaranteed. *Plus standard shipping
ORANGE BLOSSOM
SIndian River Citrus
Gifts of Florida's Finest Fruit
www.orange-blossom.com/6503 1-800624-8835


7 "i Sunday,
S' December 16th

Santa Claus Is Coming to Town! -
This free event to the community begins at the
fountain at Citrus Springs Blvd and S.R. 41 -4
Accepting floats and marchers of all kinds: -,.
baby, family and businesses

Participants in parade: line up at 1pm *
Parade starts at 2pm

Please Mail registration form to:
Citrus Springs Civic Assn C/O Ann Ottavio "
10821 N. Dragonis Dr. Citrus Springs Fl 34433 -.
For Info Call: 352 465 1191 or
email: lottavio@bellsouth.net

Registration forms must
be received by: December 9

(Ci.
14.. i..tA A k 4t.4..A 4 A A. .


Donate A Boat

or Car Today!
Boa 'rAn el

"2-Night Free Vacation!"

I14tOCAtANIE L
www.boatangel.com
ar\ nWnebybdOiauelmin lu IMB OM AIiTUILEni


AM AIRLINES ARE
HIRING

Train for hands on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance
866-314-3769
OOODE6F


MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE
Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management.
Job placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized.
Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com


Centura
-- COLLEGE


SPORTS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 B3


^F


c~c~".
;Li
*rU~






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NFL standings


y-New England
N.Y Jets
Buffalo
Miami


x-Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City



N.Y Giants
Washington
Dallas
Philadelphia


y-Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina


Green Bay
Chicago
Minnesota
Detroit


San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona


AFC
East
W L T
9 3 0
5 7 0
5 7 0
5 7 0
South
W L T
11 1 0
8 4 0
4 8 0
2 10 0
North
W L T
9 3 0
7 5 0
7 5 0
4 8 0
West
W L T
9 3 0
4 8 0
3 9 0
2 10 0
NFC
East
W L T
7 5 0
6 6 0
6 6 0
3 9 0
South
W L T
11 1 0
6 6 0
5 7 0
3 9 0
North
W L T
8 4 0
8 4 0
6 6 0
4 80
West
W L T
8 3 1
7 5 0
5 6 1
4 8 0
480


Pct PF
.750 430
.417 228
.417 277
.417 227

Pct PF
.917 351
.667 265
.333 248
.167 206

Pct PF
.750 303
.583 254
.583 302
.333 229

Pct PF
.750 349
.333 258
.250 235
.167 188


Pct PF
.583 321
.500 312
.500 280
.250 217

Pct PF
.917 317
.500 333
.417 321
.250 235

Pct PF
.667 296
.667 294
.500 262
.333 300

Pct PF
.708 289
.583 242
.458 221
.333 186


x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
Thursday, Dec. 6
Denver at Oakland, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 9
Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at N.Y Giants, 4:25 p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 10
Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m.
NFL playoff
scenarios
AFC
Clinched: Denver, AFC West; Houston, play-
off spot; New England, AFC East.
HOUSTON
Clinches AFC South division with:
--Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie, or
-Tie AND Indianapolis loss
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie AND Bal-
timore loss or tie, or
Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie AND
Denver loss or tie
Clinches home-field advantage throughout
AFC playoffs with:
-Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie AND Bal-
timore loss AND Denver loss
BALTIMORE
Clinches AFC North division with:
Baltimore win AND Pittsburgh loss AND
Cincinnati loss
Clinches playoff spot with:
Win AND Pittsburgh loss or tie, or
-Win AND Cincinnati loss ortie, or
-Tie AND Pittsburgh loss AND Cincinnati
loss
NFC
Clinched: Atlanta, NFC South.
ATLANTA
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win AND Chicago loss or tie AND Green
Bay loss or tie, or
-Win AND San Francisco loss, or
-Tie AND Chicago loss AND Green Bay
loss
Clinches home-field advantage throughout
NFC playoffs with:
-Win AND Chicago loss or tie AND Green
Bay loss ortie AND San Francisco loss
SAN FRANCISCO
Clinches playoff spot with:
-Win AND Dallas loss AND Minnesota loss
AND Tampa Bay loss AND Washington loss
AND St. Louis loss or tie, or
-Win AND Dallas loss AND Minnesota loss
AND Tampa Bay loss AND Washington loss
AND Seattle loss ortie



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 13 4 .765 -
Brooklyn 11 6 .647 2
Philadelphia 10 8 .556 3/2
Boston 10 8 .556 3Y2
Toronto 4 14 .222 9/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 12 4 .750
Atlanta 10 5 .667 1VY2
Charlotte 7 10 .412 5/2
Orlando 7 10 .412 5/2
Washington 2 13 .133 9/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 9 8 .529 -
Indiana 10 9 .526 -
Milwaukee 8 9 .471 1
Detroit 6 14 .300 4/2
Cleveland 4 15 .211 6
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 13 3 .813 Y2
San Antonio 15 4 .789
Houston 9 8 .529 5
Dallas 8 9 .471 6
New Orleans 5 12 .294 9
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 15 4 .789 -
Denver 9 10 .474 6
Utah 9 10 .474 6
Minnesota 8 9 .471 6
Portland 8 11 .421 7
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 11 6 .647
Golden State 11 7 .611 Y2
L.A. Lakers 9 10 .474 3
Phoenix 7 12 .368 5
Sacramento 4 12 .250 61/2
Tuesday's Games
Minnesota 105, Philadelphia 88


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Wednesday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
7-4-8
CASH 3 (late)
8-1-7

PLAY 4 (early)
8-4-2-7
PLAY 4 (late)
8-6-5-8

FANTASY 5
Fl id 3-6-18-19-21

POWERBALL LOTTERY
13-17-19-27-38 6-20-25-36-44-52
POWER BALL XTRA
12 3


On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Long Beach State at Syracuse
NBA
8 p.m. (TNT) New York Knicks at Miami Heat
10:30 p.m. (TNT) Dallas Mavericks at Phoenix Suns
BOXING
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Raymundo Beltran vs. Ji-Hoon Kim
NFL
8:20 p.m. (NFL) Denver Broncos at Oakland Raiders
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) College Football Awards
GOLF
6:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Nelson Mandela
Championship First Round
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) Omega Dubai Ladies Masters Second
Round (Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (GOLF) Emirates Australian Open Second Round
1 a.m. (GOLF) Thailand Golf Championship Second
Round

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Ocala Christian at Crystal River
GIRLS BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m. Ocala Christian at Crystal River
7 p.m. Seven Rivers at Wildwood
7:30 p.m. Citrus at Lecanto
BOYS SOCCER
7 p.m. Lecanto at Forest
GIRLS SOCCER
7 p.m. Lecanto at Vanguard
GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING
4 p.m. Crystal River at Citrus


Washington 105, Miami 101
Oklahoma City 117, Brooklyn 111
Indiana 80, Chicago 76
Houston 107, L.A. Lakers 105
Memphis 108, Phoenix 98, OT
Wednesday's Games
New York 100, Charlotte 98
Indiana 99, Portland 92
Boston 104, Minnesota 94
Golden State 104, Detroit 97
L.A. Lakers 103, New Orleans 87
Atlanta 108, Denver 104
Chicago 95, Cleveland 85
San Antonio 110, Milwaukee 99
Orlando at Utah, late
Toronto at Sacramento, late
Dallas at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
New York at Miami, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Denver at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.
Orlando at Sacramento, 10 p.m.



Glantz-Culver Line
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
Denver 10 10Y2 (48Y2) at Oakland
Sunday
at Washington Pk 2 (47) Baltimore
at Cleveland 5 5/2 (37/2) Kansas City
at Pittsburgh OFF OFF (OFF) San Diego
at Indianapolis 5'2 5'2 (48) Tennessee
N.Y Jets 3 2Y2 (38'2) at Jax.
Chicago 3 3 (39Y2) at Minnesota
Atlanta 3'2 3'2 (47'2) at Carolina
atTampa Bay 8'2 7 (47) Philadelphia
at Buffalo 3 3 (42) St. Louis
at Cincinnati 3 3 (45Y2) Dallas
at SanFran. 10'/210 (39) Miami
at N.Y Giants 6 5 (53) New Orleans
at Seattle 10 10/2 (34Y2) Arizona
at Green Bay 6Y2 7 (52) Detroit
Monday
at N. England 4Y2 3/2 (51Y2) Houston
Off Key
Pittsburgh QB questionable


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Agreed to terms
with OF Lew Ford, OF Conor Jackson, OF
Jason Pridie, RHP Daniel McCutchen, RHP
Adam Russell, C Allan De San Miguel, C Jose
Gil, C Chris Robinson and LHP Jan Novak on
minor league contracts.
DETROITTIGERS-Traded LHPAndy Oliver
to Pittsburgh for C Ramon Cabrera.
TEXAS RANGERS-Agreed to terms with OF
Chih-Hsien Chiang on a minor league contract.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES-Exercised the 2014 op-
tion on manager Fredi Gonzalez. Named Dave
Holliday and Brad Sloan special assistants to
the general manager/major league scouts. Pro-
moted Don Chiti to special assistant to the gen-
eral manager/pitching development and special
assignment. Agreed to terms with C Jose Yepez
and C Matt Pagnozzi on minor league contracts.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA-Fined Brooklyn F Gerald Wallace


$5,000 for flopping.
ATLANTA HAWKS-Recalled G John Jenk-
ins from Bakersfield (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Suspended Seattle CB Brandon
Browner four games for violating the policy on
performance enhancing substances.
BUFFALO BILLS-Placed DE Chris Kelsay
on injured reserve. Signed CBTJ. Heath and G
Keith Williams from the practice squad.
DETROIT RED WINGS-Reassigned D
Gleason Fournier from Grand Rapids (AHL) to
Toledo (ECHL).
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Placed RBJohnny
White on injured reserve. Signed RB Ryan
Grant. Signed OL Shea Allard and S Chaz Pow-
ell to the practice squad.
HOUSTON TEXANS-Signed CB Stanford
Routt. Placed CB Brice McCain on injured re-
serve with a designation for return.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-Signed LBJamaal
Westerman. Signed RB Alvester Alexander to
the practice squad. Released TE Martell Webb
and CB Isaiah Green from the practice squad.
MIAMI DOLPHINS-Placed T Jake Long on
injured reserve. Released DB Anderson Russell.
Signed T Patrick Brown and DB Tyrone Culver.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS-Placed WR Percy
Harvin on injured reserve.
NEW YORK JETS-Signed DT Tevita Finau
to the practice squad.
OAKLAND RAIDERS-Signed RB Jamize
Olawale from the practice squad.
ST LOUIS RAMS-Released WR Saalim
Hakim from the practice squad. Signed CB
Quinton Pointer to the practice squad.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS-Placed LB
Antwan Barnes on injured reserve. Re-signed
OL Reggie Wells.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS-Released DB
Eddie Whitley from the practice squad. Signed
LB Alex Hoffman-Ellis to the practice squad.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS-Signed CB De-
Shawn Shead from the practice squad, CB Ron
Parker from Carolina's practice squad and RB
Derrick Coleman to the practice squad.
TENNESSEE TITANS-Signed OL Kyle
DeVan and T Daniel Baldridge. Signed G Chris
Scott to the practice squad. Placed T David
Stewart, S Robert Johnson and G Steve
Hutchinson on injured reserve. Claimed G Mitch
Petrus off waivers from New England.
OLYMPICS
IOC-Stripped the 2004 Olympic medals
from Ukrainian shot putter Yuriy Bilonog, Be-
larussian hammerthrower Ivan Tskikhan, Russ-
ian shot putter Svetlana Krivelyova and
Belarussian discus thrower Irina Yatchenko for
doping.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
SPORTING KANSAS CITY-Acquired D/M
Josh Gardner from Montreal for a 2013 second-
round draft pick, and exercised Gardner's con-
tract option.
COLLEGE
WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE-An-
nounced it is adding Chicago State as a mem-
ber in July
CALIFORNIA-Named Sonny Dykes football
coach. Announced WR Keenan Allen will enter
the NFL draft.
EASTERN MICHIGAN-Announced offen-
sive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Ken
Karcher has left the football program.
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL-Fired football
coach Mario Cristobal.
MARIST-Signed women's basketball coach
Brian Giorgis to a contract extension through
the 2020-21 season.
PURDUE-Named Darrell Hazell football
coach.


Associated Press
NHL commissioner Gary Bettman speaks to reporters after an NHL Board of Governors meet-
ing, Wednesday in New York. The league and the players' association have cleared their
schedules with progress being made in collective bargaining talks.




Late into the night


NHL owners,

players meet for

long time

Associated Press

NEW YORK It isn't
known what progress if
any has been made in the
second day of marathon
talks in the NHL labor dis-
pute, but owners and play-
ers surely sense that time is
working against them.
Negotiations resumed
Wednesday and stretched
deep into the night again, this
time in fits and starts, as the
league and the players' asso-
ciation searched for a deal to
save the hockey season.
It wasn't until midnight
Tuesday that talks wrapped
up, and all signs indicated
Wednesday's discussions
could go as late or later
Very little information
leaked out of the meeting
room, but it is believed that
each side submitted propos-
als to the other and spent
lots of time apart discussing
what was offered.
Owners often retreated to
their own room one floor
above the location of the bar-
gaining session and then
took the elevator back down
to get talks going again. Some


of the together sessions
lasted as short as 15 minutes.
Cautious optimism
emerged Tuesday in the
first round of talks that kept
NHL Commissioner Gary
Bettman on the outside
along with union executive
director Donald Fehr, while
six owners and about 18
players talked inside. The
good feeling carried over
into Wednesday morning
when various team execu-
tives said they heard good
reports during an NHL
board of governors meeting.
Bettman spoke briefly
after that, just before nego-
tiations started again, and
the sides remained silent
the rest of the talks while
talks were ongoing. The
reemergence of a podium
with a lectern featuring the
NHL shield in a media
workroom, sparked some
hope that some sort of an-
nouncement would soon be
coming. It remained unoc-
cupied for quite some time,
however it gained instant
popularity on Twitter
Bettman declined to take
any questions earlier
Wednesday when he stood
at that podium in a Manhat-
tan hotel. A ray of hope that
a season-saving deal could
be made emerged late Tues-
day night after about eight
hours of bargaining.


"We are pleased with the
process that is ongoing, and
out of respect for that
process I don't have anything
else to say," Bettman said.
Executives scurried on
New York streets and
hopped into cars after the
two-hour board of governors
meeting, some offering an
opinion on the proceedings.
"We feel good about the in-
formation we got," new
Columbus Blue Jackets Pres-
ident John Davidson said.
Larry Tanenbaum of the
Toronto Maple Leafs, one of
the six owners participating
in these negotiations, also
painted an optimistic pic-
ture as he walked the few
blocks back to the hotel
hosting the meetings.
"We're going to continue
to talk up until we get a
deal," said Tanenbaum, who
added there is more clarity
on both sides where each
group stands. "All I can say
is as long as we're talking
we're hopeful."
If a breakthrough can be
made soon, the delayed and
shortened hockey season
could get going quickly
"I've always been hopeful
there would be a season,"
said Lou Lamoriello, the
New Jersey Devils presi-
dent and general manager
"Right now we just have to
leave it in the hands of the
people that are talking."


Te'o wins Lombardi award


Associated Press

HOUSTON Notre
Dame linebacker Manti
Te'o won the Lombardi
Award on Wednesday as
college football's best line-
man or linebacker
Te'o, also a Heisman Tro-
phy finalist, had 103 tackles
and seven interceptions this
year to help the undefeated
Fighting Irish reach the
BCS championship game
against Alabama.
"It's the big dance," Te'o



BEATDOWN
Continued from Page B1


opponents to less than 50
points this season while
taking its fourth straight
win over the Seminoles (4-
4) who have lost three
straight home games after
their most lopsided defeat
to Florida since a 96-61 loss
in 1999.
"They were struggling
switching pick and rolls
with their bigger guys,"
Young said.
Michael Snaer led
Florida State with 10 points,
all in the second half. It was
the second straight game




BOYS
Continued from Page B1

"I want to get better at
midfield. I think it could re-
ally help the team," Bass
said.
Showing poise
They lost on their home
pitch in a game where they
were given seven yellow
cards and the Citrus Hurri-
canes could have folded
after the frustrating 2-1 loss
to tough district foe
Vanguard.
Instead, the 'Canes won
their next game on the road
3-2 against Nature Coast,
with head coach Phillip
Journey saying, "They
played the best soccer game


said about the title game. "It
is something that you dream
about when you are little
and for me to be in that
game and playing against a
real good Alabama team, it
will be a perfect end to this
chapter in my life."
Te'o edged Alabama of-
fensive lineman Barrett
Jones, Georgia linebacker
Jarvis Jones and South Car-
olina defensive end Jade-
veon Clowney for the award
presented by the Rotary
Club of Houston.


that Snaer started slowly,
failing to even take a shot in
the first half of Sunday's 61-
56 loss to Mercer
"When your system is not
in synch it's difficult for any
of the guys to execute,"
Hamilton said. "I think he'll
be fine."
Snaer's first field goal
came with his team down by
37 points and some of the
10,593 fans already headed
home.
Florida, which came into
the game ranked second
nationally in scoring de-
fense, had the Seminoles
baffled from the outset,
forcing 13 turnovers in the
first half and outrebound-
ing them 21-11.


I have ever seen them play"
The next night came their
most dominating win of the
season, a lopsided 9-1 con-
test against Hernando.
The team will continue
working on its conditioning,
passing, crossing the ball
and shooting, and Journey
hopes to see the same re-
sults, adding, "If they play
like they did (that night),
they'll be hard to reckon
with every night"
Citrus also took a 3-2 win
Tuesday night at Central.
Opportunity
knocking
The Lecanto Panthers
have shown character of
their own early on. Bounc-
ing back from a demoraliz-
ing draw to county rival
Crystal River in which


"You look at my highlights
and you look at their high-
lights, I'm a big fan of their
highlights," Te'o said.
"When you look at the
company I am with -
Jarvis, JC, Barrett all
guys that have proven
themselves many, many
times. For me to walk away
with it, I am just very, very
grateful. All of those guys
are deserving of the trophy
as well, so it is just a great
experience and great
opportunity for me."


Florida State shot 25 per-
cent in the opening half and
managed three points over
the final 8:54.
Florida came into the
game with five wins at home
and another on a neutral
site in Tampa. The Gators
didn't appear the least bit
bothered opening their road
schedule on their archri-
val's court.
Florida shot 49.1 percent
in the game and forced 22
turnovers while Florida
State shot 34.8 percent.
Former Florida State
player Mitch Wiggins and
his son Andrew, one of the
most highly recruited prep
players in the nation,
attended the game.


they gave up two goals in
the last eight minutes -
the team bounced back
with a 2-0 shutout over
Gainesville High School
last week.
Head coach Doug Warren
is concerned with his team's
low goal output this season,
saying the opportunities are
there; the Panthers just
aren't converting on the
shots. However, he is happy
with how his team is playing
together and that will be key
to a playoff push.
"Everyone's working well,
coming together as a team,
"he said. "We have a good
chemistry going..'.'
The Panthers got a huge
boost in the form of a 3-1
home victory Tuesday night
against District 4A-4 rival
Springstead.


B4 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MLB's winter meetings bring more signing


Keppinger,

Chavez, Blanton,

Bay on the move

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -Jeff Kep-
pinger, Joe Blanton, Jason Bay and a
diamond full of players wound up in
different places Wednesday at the
winter meetings while top con-
tenders waited for a pair of free-
agent prizes to make their decisions.
Eric Chavez, Randy Choate and
Sean Burnett also joined new
teams. The lone trade was minor,
with Detroit sending left-hander
Andy Oliver to Pittsburgh for a
young catcher
Former MVP Josh Hamilton
and former Cy Young Award win-
ner Zack Greinke remained in
play They're the driving forces in
this market and depending on
where they go, more moves are
likely to follow.
Texas would like to re-sign
Hamilton, at the right price. The
slugger was in Nashville this week
but has left, and his agent met


with Rangers general manager
Jon Daniels on Tuesday night.
New York Mets pitcher R.A.
Dickey keeps drawing attention.
He lives near the Opryland Hotel
and dropped in for a visit, though
there's no change in his situation.
Signed for next season, he wants a
new contract while several clubs,
including Boston, want to trade for
the reigning NL Cy Young winner
In the meantime, some deals
stayed on deck. No telling if any of
them will get done before the
meetings end Thursday with the
Rule 5 draft for players left off 40-
man rosters.
Also in the mix: Cleveland
shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera, amid
speculation Arizona is trying to
get him in a multi-team swap.
All-Star third baseman David
Wright of the New York Mets be-
came the first player to step up to
the brightly lit podium in the press
room. Standing at the spot where
trades and signing are usually
announced, his appearance was
expected.
Wright was in town to talk about
his $138 million, eight-year con-
tract, the largest in team history
The lifetime .301 hitter is a six-
time All-Star and turns 30 in two


Associated Press
The Los Angeles Angels added Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Joe
Blanton, who agreed to a $15 million, two-year contract Wednesday.


weeks. A Mets fan growing up,
Wright said he wanted to spend
his entire career with the club.
Away from the dais where
Wright spoke, inside the suites at
the sprawling 2,881-room hotel,
several players changed jerseys.
Keppinger agreed with the
Chicago White Sox on a $12 mil-
lion, three-year contract, a person
familiar with the deal told The As-


sociated Press on condition of
anonymity because there was no
announcement.
The versatile infielder hit .325
with a career-high nine home runs
and 40 RBIs for Tampa Bay last
season. At 32, the well-traveled
Keppinger is known for making
contact and has more walks than
strikeouts during his eight-year
career with the Rays, San Fran-


cisco, Houston, Cincinnati, Kansas
City and the Mets.
Keppinger is likely to play third
base for the White Sox. Kevin
Youkilis finished the season at that
spot for Chicago last season, then
became a free agent. The New
York Yankees and Arizona also
had been interested in Keppinger
Arizona wound up with Chavez,
giving the corner infielder a $3 mil-
lion, one-year contract, a person
with knowledge of the deal said.
The 34-year-old Chavez hit .281
with 16 homers in 278 at-bats for
the Yankees, seeing time at first
base, third base and designated
hitter The six-time Gold Glove
winner lives in the Phoenix area.
Bay and the Seattle Mariners
agreed on a one-year deal, a per-
son familiar with the negotiation
said. The 34-year-old outfielder is
hoping to resurrect his career
with the Mariners after three dis-
appointing and injury-plagued
seasons with the Mets.
The Los Angeles Angels added
Blanton and Burnett to their re-
tooled pitching staff, and St. Louis
signed Choate for its bullpen.
Baltimore kept outfielder Nate
McLouth and Colorado re-signed
pitcher Jeff Francis.


30,000-point man o.Baylorcoast
past No. 5 ND


Kobe becomes

youngestplayer

to reach mark

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Kobe
Bryant scored 29 points, mak-
ing him the fifth player in
NBA history to score 30,000,
and the Los Angeles Lakers
snapped a two-game skid
with a 103-87 victory over the
New Orleans Hornets.
Bryant entered the game
needing only 13 points to
eclipse the scoring mile-
stone andd did so with a short
jumper late in the first half
that was perhaps the least
spectacular of his baskets,
which included the usual
array of soaring dunks, de-
moralizing transition 3-
pointers and turnaround,
off-balance jumpers.
Dwight Howard added 18
points for the Lakers, who
trailed by a point at half-
time but seized control with
a 13-0 run to open the third
quarter, and the lead grew
as large as 20.
Hawks 108,
Nuggets 104
ATLANTA- Josh Smith's
steal, jam and free throw with
31 seconds remaining ex-
tended Atlanta's lead and the
Hawks held on to beat the Den-
ver Nuggets 108-104.
Smith had 16 points and 13
rebounds on his 27th birthday.
Al Horford led the Hawks with
25 points and 12 rebounds.
Ty Lawson paced Denver
with a season-high 32 points.
Corey Brewer had 19.
Two free throws by Danilo
Gallinari with 2:34 remaining
gave Denver its first lead of the
final period at 98-97. Lawson's
3-pointer gave the Nuggets a
101-99 advantage before Hor-
ford hit a tying jumper.
Knicks 100,
Bobcats 98
CHARLOTTE, N.C. J.R.
Smith hit a fallaway jumper
from the left wing as time ex-
pired to give the New York
Knicks a 100-98 victory over
the Charlotte Bobcats.
The Bobcats appeared in po-
sition to win late in the game
after a miss by Raymond Fel-
ton with 14 seconds left, but
rookie Michael Kidd-Gilchrist
made an ill-advised pass and
Smith intercepted it.
After a timeout, Smith drove
to the left side and hit an 18-
footer over Kidd-Gilchrist.
Carmelo Anthony scored 20
of his 23 points in the first half,
but wasn't on the floor for the
final 2:10 after injuring his left
hand diving into the team's
bench for a loose ball.
Pacers 99,
Trail Blazers 92
INDIANAPOLIS Paul
George scored 22 points to help
the Indiana Pacers beat the
Portland Trail Blazers 99-92.
George Hill added 18 points
and David West had 16 points
and 10 rebounds for the Pacers
(10-9), who have won four of
five and moved above .500 for
the first time since a 2-1 start.


Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Brittney Griner had 24
points and 14 rebounds,
three other Baylor players
scored in double figures
and the third-ranked Lady
Bears beat No. 5 Notre
Dame 73-61 Wednesday
night in a repeat of last sea-
son's national champi-
onship game.
The Fighting Irish could
do little to slow Griner,
who was 10 of 16 from the
floor The Lady Bears (7-1),
with all five starters back
from the team that went
40-0 last season, used a 10-
0 run late in the second
half to pull away
The Irish (5-1), with just
two starters back, were
simply no match, especially
with All-America senior
Skylar Diggins struggling
on 4-of-19 shooting with
rapper Lil Wayne sitting
courtside to cheer her on in
the second half.
Odsyssey Sims returned
after missing four games
with a hamstring injury
and added 16 points for
Baylor Brooklyn Pope had
14 points and Jordan
Madden 12.
Freshman Jewell Loyd
led Notre Dame with a sea-
son-high 24 points, Kayla
McBride had 16 and Na-
talie Achonwa 11.
No. 21 UNC 64,
Radford 44
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Waltiea Rolle scored 24
points and Xylina McDaniel


Associated Press
Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Kobe Bryant drives past New Orleans Hornets shooting
guard Roger Mason Jr. in the first half Wednesday in New Orleans. During the half, Bryant
became the youngest player in NBA history to surpass 30,000 points.


Indiana, the league leader in
scoring defense, held the Blaz-
ers to 43 percent shooting.
Damian Lillard led Portland
(8-11) with 23 points. Wesley
Matthews scored 19, LaMarcus
Aldridge had 18 points and 10
rebounds, and J.J. Hickson had
14 points and 12 rebounds for
the Trail Blazers.
Bulls 95,
Cavaliers 85
CLEVELAND Marco Be-
linelli scored a season-high 23
points, Luol Deng added 22
and the Chicago Bulls took con-
trol early on to beat the Cleve-
land Cavaliers 95-85.
Belinelli, starting his second
straight game in place of injured
shooting guard Richard Hamil-
ton, helped the Bulls bounce
back from a four-point home
loss to Indiana on Tuesday.
Chicago went ahead for
good less than two minutes in
and shot 66.7 percent in the
first quarter.
The Cavaliers have lost 13 of
15 and are 2-7 since point
guard Kyrie Irving broke his left
index finger last month. Ander-
son Varejao recorded his 10th
straight double-double with 11
points and 15 rebounds his
10th straight game with at least
15 boards.
Donald Sloan scored a sea-
son-high 14 points to lead


Cleveland.
Warriors 104,
Pistons 97
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Klay Thompson scored 19 of
his 27 points in the third quar-
ter, and the Golden State War-
riors pulled away to beat the
Detroit Pistons 104-97.
The Warriors, starting a
seven-game road trip against
the Eastern Conference,
snapped Detroit's five-game
winning streak at home.
Golden State has won two
straight games in Detroit after
losing 25 of 29.
Stephen Curry finished with
22 points and 10 assists, his
fourth straight 20-10 game, while
David Lee added 20 points and
11 rebounds for the Warriors.
Tayshaun Prince was the only
Pistons starter to reach double
figures, but four reserves scored
at least 10, including 17 from
Rodney Stuckey and 15 points
and 12 rebounds from Andre
Drummond.
Celtics 104,
Timberwolves 94
BOSTON Kevin Garnett
scored 18 points, grabbed 10
rebounds and remained un-
beaten against his former team
as the Boston Celtics beat the
Minnesota Timberwolves 104-


94 in Rajon Rondo's return
from a two-game suspension.
The Celtics improved to 10-0
since they acquired Garnett
from the Timberwolves during
the summer of 2007. They also
won for the 11th straight time
against Minnesota.
Boston went 1-1 without
Rondo, suspended for his role
in a scuffle during a game
against the Brooklyn Nets last
Wednesday.
Rondo had 17 points and 11
assists. Paul Pierce scored 18,
Jason Terry 17 and Brandon
Bass 12.
Spurs 110,
Bucks 99
SAN ANTONIO Tony
Parker and Gary Neal each
scored 22 points, and the San
Antonio Spurs had a season-
high 53 rebounds in a 110-99
victory over the Milwaukee
Bucks.
Tim Duncan added 17 points
and 10 rebounds for San Anto-
nio (15-4). Tiago Splitter had 15
points, Manu Ginobili scored 11
and Matt Bonner had a season-
high 12 rebounds.
Monta Ellis had 21 points
and 11 assists for Milwaukee
(8-9). Brandon Jennings added
14 points and Ersan Ilyasova
scored all of his 17 points in the
first half.


had 16 points and eight re-
bounds to lead North Car-
olina over Radford.
Krista Gross, who ranks
second in the ACC in re-
bounding, pulled down a ca-
reer-high 17 for the Tar Heels,
who bounced back from a
102-57 loss to No. 14 Ten-
nessee on Sunday.
UNC (8-1) opened on an 11-
2 run, and after Jordynn Gay-
mon's jumper cut the deficit to
13-4, the Tar Heels scored the
next eight points to lead 21-4
with 4:19 left in the first half.
They led 33-10 at the break
and went up 46-23 in the sec-
ond half.
Diani Mason led Radford
(3-4) with 10 points.
Creighton 66,
No. 25 Nebraska 57
OMAHA, Neb. Reserve
Marissa Janning scored 19
points on 7-of-10 shooting, in-
cluding four 3-pointers, to lead
Creighton over Nebraska.
McKenzie Fujan added 13
points for the Bluejays (4-2),
who shot 56.3 percent
(27 of 48).
The Bluejays, who earned
their first victory over a ranked
opponent since a 75-71 win
over Illinois State in Feb.
2008, led 36-27 at the break
and held off Nebraska in the
second half after Lindsey
Moore knocked down a 3-
pointer with 12:49 left to cut
Creighton's lead to 43-40.
Creighton went on a 17-6
run over the next 8:36.
Hailie Sample scored 20
points for Nebraska (6-3).


USF Bulls can't


catch Cowboys


Associated Press

STILLWATER, Okla. -
Marcus Smart scored 15
points, Markel Brown
added 13 and No. 23 Okla-
homa State bounced back
from its first loss of the sea-
son to beat South Florida
61-49 on Wednesday night.
Smart, the Cowboys'
playmaking freshman,
nailed a 3-pointer from the
left wing to launch a 16-5
run that put Oklahoma
State (6-1) in control in the
second half. He finished it
off by hitting another 3,
then making a quick steal
in the backcourt before set-
ting up Brown's layup for a
48-34 lead with 7:29
remaining.
The Bulls (5-3) couldn't
get closer than nine points
after that.
Victor Rudd had 14
points for South Florida,
and Anthony Collins
scored 12. The Bulls were
held to a season-worst 34
percent shooting and had
their lowest scoring game
of the season.
No. 19 Mich. St 76,
Ark.-Pine Bluff 44
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
No. 19 Michigan State held
Arkansas-Pine Bluff scoreless


for almost 10 minutes and
went on to win 76-44 on
Wednesday night.
Garry Harris scored 13
points, Travis Trice had 12 and
Branden Dawson added 10 for
the Spartans (7-2).
Michigan State started the
game with a 14-0 run, led 38-
12 at halftime and kept a com-
fortable lead in the second half.
The Golden Lions (1-7)
missed their first 13 shots
and didn't score until 9:48
into the game.
Arkansas-Pine Bluff's
DaVon Haynes, who is from
Detroit, scored a season-high
20 points all after halftime.
The Golden Lions had
seven points over the last 2:20
of the first half to finish with 12,
the fifth-lowest total at halftime
by a Division I team this sea-
son, according to STATS LLC.
The Southwestern Athletic
Conference team was compet-
itive for at least a half in
its last two losses to Oregon
and Arizona State. It trailed the
Ducks 37-30 at halftime and
lost by 21 and was behind the
Sun Devils by two points in the
first half before losing by 13.
Arkansas-Pine Bluff's road-
weary players might simply be
tired of traveling all over the
country.


SPORTS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 B5


JL












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Witherspoon
honored
LOS ANGELES -New
mom Reese Witherspoon
is being honored by
March of Dimes for being
a model celebrity parent.
The 36-
year-old
Oscar
S winner
and
mother of
S* three will
receive
the
Reese organiza-
Witherspoon tion's
Grace Kelly Award at its
Celebration of Babies
luncheon Friday at the
Beverly Hills Hotel.
Witherspoon gave birth
in September to a son,
Tennessee, with her hus-
band, talent agent Jim
Toth. She's also mom to
Ava, 13, and Deacon, 8,
from her previous mar-
riage to actor Ryan
Phillippe.
Witherspoon says she
was "very lucky to have a
healthy delivery and
leave the hospital with a
healthy full term infant,
but so many families in
this country do not get
that experience."
She hopes her involve-
ment with March of
Dimes calls attention to
its efforts to prevent birth
defects and premature
birth.

Hugh Hefner gets
marriage license
LOS ANGELES -
Hugh Heftier and Crystal
Harris are again taking
steps toward the altar,
more than a year after
the centerfold canceled
their previous engage-
ment and was branded a
"runaway bride" in Play-
boy.
The couple obtained a
marriage license Tues-
day at a courthouse in
Beverly Hills.
Harris called off the
couple's previous engage-
ment in June 2011,
prompting Playboyto affix
"runaway bride" stickers
to an issue introducing
her as Mrs. Hefner
Celebrity website TMZ
first reported the couple's
license. It says they re-
united earlier this year
and plan to wed on New
Year's Eve.
The Playboy founder
has been married twice
before.

Muniz had 'mini
stroke'
LOS ANGELES -
Actor Frankie Muniz says
he was hospitalized last
week after suffering a
"mini

The
former
Star of
"Malcolm
in the
Middle"
wrote on
Frankie Twitter
Muniz Tuesday
he was treated Friday for
a "mini stroke," which he
describes as "notfun at all."
He says he has to "start
taking care of my body.
Getting old!" but pro-
vided no other details.
Muniz turns 27
Wednesday.
A representative for
Muniz did not immedi-
ately respond to a
request for comment.
-From wire reports


Love letters


Sotheby's to auction

evidence of'Peanuts'

creator's secret tryst

Associated Press

NEW YORK The late
"Peanuts" creator Charles Schulz
was once so infatuated with a young
woman 23 years his junior he sent
her dozens of romantic letters and
drawings of his beloved cartoon
characters. Many of the themes of
that correspondence made it into
his daily comic strips at the time.
Now those love notes from 1970-
1971 are being offered for sale at
Sotheby's in New York by the fam-
ily ofTracey Claudius, who the auc-
tion house says is ill at her home
near Philadelphia. It's estimated
the notes will fetch $250,000 to
$350,000 at the Dec. 14 auction.
Claudius met the cartoonist on
March 16, 1970, while accompany-
ing a friend on an interview assign-
ment. She ostensibly came along as
a photographer, but afterward ad-
mitted in a letter to Schulz that it
was a chance for her to meet her
idol and thank him "for all the en-
joyment Charlie Brown and that
'stupid beagle' provide me."
She was 25. The married Schulz
was 48. His comic strip ran for
nearly half a century
Schulz died in 2000 at age 77.
There are 44 letters totaling 56
pages, including 22 original draw-
ings of some of the characters, pri-
marily Charlie Brown, Snoopy and
Lucy Many are signed "Sparky,"
Schulz's nickname.
Sotheby's says it the most signifi-
cant collection of correspondence
and drawings by Schulz to come to
auction.
"He was quite a private and re-
served person," said Selby Kiffer,
Sotheby's head of fine books and
manuscripts. "I don't think he car-
ried on long correspondence with
friends and acquaintances. There's
no record in the commercial world
and auction records of that."
Schulz often lovingly writes
Claudius' name in triplicate:
"Tracey Tracey Tracey" One letter
comments on Claudius' "good
points," including being "beep-
able," "huggable" and "buggable" -
language he applied to Lucy and
Snoopy in later comic strips, like
"Lucy playfully beeped Snoopy's
nose" and Snoopy calling himself
"buggable and huggable."
In two letters from 1970 Schulz


These photos, provided by Sotheby's
in New York, shows some of the
romantic letters and drawings the
late Peanuts creator Charles Schulz
sent to a young woman 23 years his
junior, who infatuated him. The love
notes from 1970 to 1971 are being
offered for sale Dec. 14 at Sotheby's
in New York.
writes that he must cease calling
Claudius because his long-distance
phone calls to her had been discov-
ered by his wife. Soon after, he cre-
ated a strip in which Charlie Brown
berated Snoopy for his obnoxious
behavior when he's not allowed to
go out "to see that girl beagle." In
subsequent panels, Charlie warns
Snoopy "you'd better start behaving
yourself" and when Snoopy picks
up the telephone, Charlie Brown
yells "And stop making those
long-distance phone calls."
He also sent her a dictionary dust
jacket filled with comments includ-
ing "I'm going to return my new dic-
tionary ... there are no words to tell
you how much I love you."
In his 2007 book, "Schulz and
Peanuts: A Biography," David
Michaelis said Schulz was almost


between two marriages when he
embarked on the romance with
Claudius. The first marriage ended
in 1972; he remarried in 1973.
Michaelis said Schulz twice pro-
posed to Claudius but she turned
him down for fear of ruining his
reputation as one ofAmerica's most
loved icons.


George Takei beams into Archie's Riverdale


Associated Press


PHILADELPHIA Mr.
Sulu in Riverdale? Oh my!
Actor and equal rights ad-
vocate George Takei, whose
portrayal of the Star Trek
character in television and
film has made him a science
fiction legend, is crossing a
new frontier this week by ap-
pearing as himself in issue
No. 6 of Archie Comics'
"Kevin Keller," a series about
Riverdale's only gay
teenager.
Takei, who is also gay, said
his appearance in the issue
that is released Wednesday
dovetails nicely with his real-
life advocacy for equal rights
because it helps bring home
his message that anyone can
aspire to be what they want
to be no matter who they are.
Jon Goldwater, Archie
Comics' co-chief executive
officer, said writer and artist
Dan Parent "met George at a
convention and asked him if


Birthday Many interesting changes could be in the mak-
ing for you in the year ahead. This new cycle you'll be en-
tering will be filled with all kinds of exciting possibilities, with
both social and material benefits.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Unless your efforts are
organized and efficient, things aren't likely to work out too
well. If you're impulsive, problems could arise just when
you're about to fulfill an objective.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Keep an open mind, and
you'll find that situations will automatically adjust them-
selves to your satisfaction. Any feelings of unfairness that
linger will be of your own creation.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be extremely mindful of
your behavior if you are involved in an arrangement with a
friend that requires an investment from both. Either one of
you could feel put upon.
Pisces (Feb. 2-March 20) Endeavors you manage


he'd be interested in appear-
ing in the Kevin Keller
comic, and being a huge Star
Trek fan I flipped when he
agreed.
Sulu was always my fa-
vorite character, so I said do
whatever it takes to get him
in the comic."
Takei, who signinged
copies of the comic
Wednesday at Midtown
Comics in New York, was
quick to say yes.
"I remember as a preteen
and a teenager, I used to read
Archie Comics," said Takei,
75, who grew up in
California. "I was so
flattered."
In the story Takei is the
subject of an essay by Keller
who cites him as an inspira-
tional hero not just for his
acting but his advocating
on behalf ofAsian-Americans
and gays and lesbians, too.
"I've always been an
advocate. I grew up in two
U.S. internment camps. I was


Archie Comics shows an animated depiction of George Takei
as Mr. Sulu from "Star Trek," center, with Archie characters
for issue No. 6 of Archie Comics' "Kevin Keller," a series
about Riverdale's only gay teenager.


too young to understand that
at the time," he said. "As a
teenager I couldn't reconcile
what I was reading in my
civics books with my
boyhood."
That led him to realize that
he would have to speak out
and up for equality,
something he's been doing


Today's HOROSCOPE
solely will have excellent chances for success. Problems
could quickly develop, however, if you have to share your
authority with another.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Be sure to treat serious mat-
ters with the respect they deserve. Left unattended and un-
resolved, they are likely to rear their ugly heads and
demand you tend to them.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Heed the warning signs that
impel you to wrap up all important projects and to not take
a gamble when it comes to choosing a delegate for a vital
task.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Although you're an excellent
conceptualizer, you aren't likely to be equally as competent
where execution is concerned. Make a good game plan
and follow it to the letter.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Even though you are quite
adroit at managing your material affairs, you may not be too


publicly since coming out in
2005. It's also gotten him
nearly 3.1 million fans on
Facebook where he blends
humor, nerdiness and
earnestness in his postings.
"Humor plays and kittens
play," he said of his page.
"And I slip in a little advocacy
in between because it's me."


impressive at handling personal relationships. Stick to what
you do best whenever you can.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It is far better to go without than
to make a bad deal with strings attached. In order to get
what you want or think you need, it would be far better to
wait until the timing is right.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Unless you set a shining ex-
ample, don't expect your friends and associates to behave
perfectly. On the contrary, they will emulate you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Those with whom you are in-
volved aren't likely to tolerate any heavy-handed tactics.
Use measures or procedures that are fair but firm, and be
considerate of other people's feelings.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) When and where your ex-
pectations are within feasible perimeters, things should
work out reasonably well for you. You're not apt to get
something for nothing, though, so don't waste time wishing.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4
Mega Money: 3- 5 21 30
Mega Ball: 7
4-of-4 MB No winner $550,000
4-of-4 4 winners $1,833
3-of-4 MB 60 $267.50
3-of-4 1,227 $39
2-of-4 MB 1,812 $18
1-of-4 MB 13,531 $2.50
2-of-4 33,059 $2
Fantasy 5:14 23 26 28 30
5-of-5 3 winners $73,656.93
4-of-5 298 $119.50
3-of-5 9,492 $10.50
MONDAY, DECEMBER 3
Fantasy 5:6 10 24 25 29
5-of-5 No winner Rolldown
4-of-5 284 $555
3-of-5 9,448 $20

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Thursday, Dec. 6,
the 341st day of 2012. There
are 25 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 6,1922, the
Anglo-Irish Treaty, which es-
tablished the Irish Free State,
came into force one year to
the day after it was signed in
London.
On this date:
In 1790, Congress moved
to Philadelphia from New
York.
In 1884, Army engineers
completed construction of the
Washington Monument by
setting an aluminum cap-
stone atop the obelisk.
In 1889, Jefferson Davis,
the first and only president of
the Confederate States of
America, died in New
Orleans.
In 1907, the worst mining
disaster in U.S. history oc-
curred as 362 men and boys
died in a coal mine explosion
in Monongah, W.Va.
In 1917, some 2,000 peo-
ple died when an explosives-
laden French cargo ship
collided with a Norwegian
vessel at the harbor in
Halifax, Nova Scotia, setting
off a blast that devastated
the city.
In 1942, comedian Fred
Allen premiered "Allen's
Alley," a recurring sketch on
his CBS radio show spoofing
small town America.
In 1947, Everglades
National Park in Florida was
dedicated by President Harry
S. Truman.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush pushed
Treasury Secretary Paul
O'Neill and economic adviser
Larry Lindsey from their jobs
in a Cabinet shakeup.
Five years ago: CIA
Director Michael Hayden
revealed the agency had
videotaped its interrogations
of two terror suspects in
2002 and destroyed the
tapes three years later out
of fear they would leak to
the public and compromise
the identities of U.S.
questioners.
One year ago: Declaring
the American middle class in
jeopardy, President Barack
Obama, speaking in
Osawatomie, Kan., outlined a
populist economic vision that
would drive his re-election
bid, insisting the United
States must reclaim its stand-
ing as a country in which
everyone can prosper if pro-
vided "a fair shot and a fair
share."
Today's Birthdays:
Comedy performer David Os-
sman is 76. Actor Patrick
Bauchau is 74.


Country singer Helen Cor-
nelius is 71.
Thought for Today: "Do
not wait to strike till the iron is
hot; but make it hot by strik-
ing." William Butler Yeats,
Irish Nobel Prize-winning
poet (1865-1939).







F I 6,-



FLAIR FOR FOOD
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Farm fresh food


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Darlene Clevinger removes some fresh vegetables from a trailer last week in preparation for the vegetables to be packaged at The
Farmers Market in Hernando. Farm manager Shaun Seedeen loads the baskets full of freshly picked vegetables for his customers.


The Path offers homelessplace to rehabilitate while working on produce farm


JULIANNE MUNN
Chronicle food writer
Soul food might be a perfect
way to describe how The
Path of Citrus County feeds
its clients, spiritually and
literally
DuWayne Sipper is the
founder of The Path, a Beverly
Hills-based program providing
the homeless with shelter, reha-
bilitation and a chance to work
with its burgeoning farm co-op-
erative in Hernando.
Sipper started The Path 11
years ago "because God told me
to." He runs the organization
with his wife, Kathryn. They met
through a Christian Internet dat-
ing site shortly after Sept. 11,
2001, and married six years ago.
Sipper recalled his years as an
"Army brat" who survived a
rough teen-to-adult transition in
Miami. He was a limousine
driver for the famous Breakers
Hotel in South Florida when
poor health changed his life.
"I thought I was coming to Cit-
rus County to die," he said.
Instead, he found friendship
and peace at Hernando Church
of the Nazarene, along with the
inspiration to start his Christian
help program with the church's
assistance.
Though the original intent of
The Path which now owns five
shelter homes for people beset
by a wide variety of problems -
was housing, Sipper said he
awoke one morning visualizing
plans to add farming to the mix.
The vision led to The Path's 15-
acre farm behind the Church of
the Nazarene on U.S. 41 in Her-
nando, now lush with sprouts
and ripe seasonal produce su-
pervised by Shaun Seedeen, a
fellow Nazarene church mem-
ber and former Path volunteer.
Because of the requests,
Kathryn Sipper began posting
recipes she gathered for her blog
on the farm/co-op website
www.thepathcommunity. org.
Some of those recipes are
shared today with Flair for Food
readers. They include baked
crispy kale chips, smothered col-


included local organizations in-
volved with feeding people,
churches and WTI.
On a recent Friday, the baskets
were filled with fall greens such
as broccoli, cabbages, kale and
more. It was typical autumn pro-
duce, freshly picked by Seedeen
and volunteers across the road
from the Hernando Farmer's
Market.
"Our winter crop is mostly
greens (lettuces, collards, kale,
mustard greens), broccoli, cauli-
flower, cabbage, bok choy,
kohlrabi. In spring and summer
are varieties of peppers, squash,
zucchini, cherry tomatoes, vari-
eties of eggplant, okra and a few
other veggies," Kathryn Sipper
said.
Chrissy Burns is owner of the
Hernando Farmer's Market and
helps support The Path in many
ways.
"She's our business partner
and has her own business, but
has been a huge help with al-
lowing us to use her location and
refrigerator storage, and a great
help with the basket distribution
and customer service to our co-
op members. When we have sur-
plus vegetables, she also sells
those exclusively for The Path,"
Sipper said.
The Path's program also in-
cludes basic nutrition classes
weekly, and the produce is used
for hands-on demonstrations to
incorporate in recipes. Two
cook-off competitions between
the houses were also held.
The Sippers are quick to ac-
knowledge they are not farmers.
They said they were grateful
when Seedeen became part of
The Path farming program.
Seedeen said he learned farm-
ing near his home in Mastic,
Long Island.
Additional farming expertise
came through research, talking
to farmers, using local resources
such as IFAS and the Agricul-
ture Alliance, and trial and
error. Sprouting machines a
seedling grower was gradually
acquired, along with other
equipment.
See Page C2


lard greens and cabbage, and
roasted garlic mashed cauli-
flower
The Sippers believe providing
clients who amount to six res-
idents in each of the five homes
- with the opportunity to work
on a farm is good therapy
"The farm project began in the
backyard of one of the Path
houses in 2002," said Kathryn
Sipper, a New Jersey native. "In
2005, Hernando Church of the
Nazarene loaned DuWayne 10
acres to farm. In 2011, they
loaned us five more acres."
This is how the farm-to-
citizen co-op works:
After purchasing a $300 mem-


bership for six months, the mem-
ber is entitled to a huge harvest
basket filled with seasonal pro-
duce ready and waiting for pick-
up every Friday morning at
Hernando Farmer's Market on
U.S. 41 across from the
Nazarene Church.
"The farm co-op was started in
the fall of 2010 to help with sus-
tainability with 26 members that
fall," Kathryn Sipper said. "In
2011, there were 40 members; in
the fall and winter of this year, 58
members; in the spring, 65 mem-
bers, and currently, 40 members."
Memberships range from
April to September and October
to March. Other recipients have


Use fresh vegetables in array of recipes


Julianne Munn
OVER EASY


It was such a
pleasure to tour
the farm in Her-
nando last week op-
erated to benefit
The Path of Citrus
County (see featured
story this page). The
array of fresh pro-
duce begged for a
recipe using a vari-
ety of Florida's best
veggies.


PAN-ROASTED FLORIDA VEGETABLES '
WITH GARLIC AND FRESH HERBS 4
1 large eggplant, large diced (remove skin if desired)
2 zucchini, large diced
2 large squash, large diced
2 bell peppers, seeded and diced large
6 cloves fresh garlic, minced
12 mushrooms, rinsed and quartered www.florida-agriculture.com
Try pan-roasting vegetables with freshly
See Page C3 picked produce.


.~4
..
Sr..


do a lot more things since
surgery. She still needs
therapy once a week, plus
she does daily therapy at
home. They want to work
on getting up stairs to
See Page C3


I B rnIINS 1 IDE II


PAGE C2


"A' "
a^ b w^s


Lovina Eicher
THE AMISH
COOK



Toast of


holiday


season
he Thanksgiving
holiday is over and
everyone is prepar-
ing for Christmas. As I
prepare for Christmas, let
us remember Jesus is the
reason for the season. So
often people forget what
Christmas is really about.
We spent Thanksgiving
Day at Sister Emma and
Jacob's house. Emma pre-
pared two turkeys. They
had the table set for 19
people. Daughter Eliza-
beth's friend Timothy and
Susan's friend Mose
joined us for the day It is
hard to believe Emma's
and my family total 19
when we are together
Besides turkey, Emma
had mashed potatoes,
turkey gravy, California-
blend vegetables, cheese
sauce, taco salad, cheese,
vegetables, dip and dirt
pudding. I took home-
made bread, deviled eggs,
cherry and pumpkin pies,
pumpkin rolls and Long
John Rolls to add to her
menu.
There was way too
much food and plenty of
leftovers.
Our 40 new chickens
are laying eggs for a few
weeks now. If one chicken
lays one egg, we get 40 a
day I am so glad to have
my own eggs again.
The deviled eggs I took
to Jacob's were our eggs.
Since we have plenty, we
have a breakfast meal for
supper some nights.
Sometimes, it's fried eggs
and potatoes or breakfast
burritos. We like the bur-
ritos with our homemade
salsa. The children want
me to make egg salad, so
they can make sand-
wiches with it.
Another thing I would
like to do since I have
plenty of eggs is to make
noodles. It seems hard to
find time to do all the
things I'd like to do.
I would like to do some
sewing soon. I am teach-
ing Susan how to do more
sewing. She is not too fond
of it, but she wants to
learn how.
Daughter Elizabeth cut
out six pairs pants for her
friend Timothy during her
time off from work. Timo-
thy lives alone and needs
new pants for work. Eliza-
beth offered to sew some
for him. I am surprised
how quickly she has
caught on to cutting out
and sewing dresses, shirts
and pants. I am sure
Susan will, too, once she
gets the hang of it. Timo-
thy gave Elizabeth a
sewing machine last year
for a gift. I think she en-
joys sewing even better
since she has her own
sewing machine.
We haven't had any
snow stay yet. We had flur-
ries last week, but they
disappeared almost as
fast as they came. Lovina
and Kevin had their snow
pants and boots and are
ready to play in the snow.
They were a little disap-
pointed it didn't accumu-
late. I am sure they will
have plenty to play in
once it starts coming.
Last week, Loretta's
therapist checked her five
weeks after her surgery.
The therapist is really
pleased with the progress
Loretta has made. She can





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Waiting for wine to mati


O ne of the wine
world's most
overblown myths
concerns the business
of aging or cellaring of -
wine.
Good folks from my
generation may recall
the sonorous voice of
Orson Welles broad-
casting (for Paul Mas- Ron Dri
son) "We will drink no WIl
wine before its time."
The implication is S
winemakers at Paul
Masson, a giant bulk manufacturer,
mature their newly fermented
baby wines in costly French oak
barrels. It is followed by further
aging for years, perhaps in the bot-
tle. All of this is done before re-
leasing it to the public for sale.
Nothing, of course, is further
from the truth. Paul Masson, along
with more than 95 percent of the
world's table wine producers, do
not age their products at all, be-
yond spending some time perhaps
in wooden barrels to "take the



FARM
Continued from Page C1

Sipper emphasized The Path
relies on environmentally friendly
resources, such as river muck, and
worm castings no pesticides or
growth hormones. Some tilapia
was introduced to experiment
with aquaponics, but so far the
fish have been mostly a great
source of fertilizer.
Obviously passionate about
their chosen work, DuWayne Sip-
per pointed out "no one knows
how many people are displaced
every day," by varying circum-
stances including a poor economy,
drug addiction and other prob-
lems that causes loss of shelter
"The fact is, there are 135
churches in the area and just one
shelter (like the Path)," he said.
For more information about
how to sign up for membership in
the farm co-op weekly plan, call
The Path at 352-527-6500, ext. 5.
Following are vegetable recipes
shared by Kathryn Sipper:
BAKED CRISPY KALE
CHIPS
(Recipe from Jaden Hair, a pro-
fessional recipe developer, food
columnist, and food photographer
specializing in fast, fresh, and easy
recipes for the home cook. Her
website: www.steamykitchen.com)


n
N
I


blush off" recently fer-
mented grapes.
"When is a bottle of
wine ready to drink?" is
a frequently asked
question. So some folks
are concerned the bot-
S tle purchased may be
too young or immature
and won't have realized
ikhouse its true flavor potential.
IES The fact is, of all wines
bottled in the world in
UCH any year, only a tiny
percentage is actually
meant to "lay down." That is an-
other way of saying they must be
"aged" before they can be truly
appreciated.
So what's so special about this
select group?
Certain wines should be ma-
tured, or they will taste terrible.
What do I mean by "terrible?"
As fine wine develops in the bot-
tle, it undergoes a complex series
of chemical changes. Among this
group are certain French red Bor-
deaux and burgundies from the

The biggest secret to getting
the kale super-crisp is to dry
them in a salad spinner. If there
is moisture on the leaves, the
kale will steam, not crisp. Also,
do not salt the kale until after
they have come out of the oven. If
you salt beforehand, the salt will
just cause the kale to release
moisture... thus steaming instead
of crisping. The convection set-
ting on an oven works well too,
set at 325 degrees and baked for
about 10-15 minutes. Suggestions
include sometimes mixing the
salt with Cajun or Creole
seasoning.
4 giant handfuls of kale, torn
into bite-sized pieces and
tough stems removed (about
1/3 pound)
1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
Sea salt or kosher salt
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Line a baking sheet with parch-
ment paper
Place the kale leaves into a
salad spinner and spin all of the
water out of the kale. Dump the
water and repeat one or two times
more just to make sure that the
kale is extra dry Use a towel to
blot any extra water on the leaves.
Place the kale on the baking sheet
Drizzle olive oil over the kale
leaves and use your hands to toss
and coat the leaves. Bake in the
oven for 12 to 20 minutes until
leaves are crisp. Take a peek at


so-called "good vintage" years,
which need time to realize their
potential. The same is true with a
number of Italian Tuscans and
piedmonts, several California
cabernets and merlots, as well as a
minute group of white dessert
wines from France and Hungary
Opened too early, they will taste
bitter, astringent and rough. Or
sadly, they may not have any dis-
tinctive taste at all.
I mean, here we are in a ritzy
restaurant, having paid $50-plus
for a supposedly superb bottle of
Chateaux Gizmo, and we are hard
pressed to recognize any flavor
whatsoever, no matter how much
we slurp and swish the stuff
around in our mouths.
How long, then, should fine
wines be allowed to age before
they are opened? No easy answer
Assuming storage conditions
are just right with a correct tem-
perature and humidity, a broad
generalization would be: The bet-
ter and more noble the wine, the
longer it takes to peak, and the

the 12 minute mark the timing
all depends on how much olive oil
you use. Just use a spatula or tongs
to touch the leaves; if they are
paper-thin crackly, the kale is
done. If the leaves are still a bit
soft, leave them in for another 2
minutes. Do not let the leaves turn
brown (they'll be burnt and bitter).
Remove from oven, sprinkle with
salt and serve.

SMOTHERED
COLLARD GREENS
AND CABBAGE
1/2 pound bacon, chopped
1/2 large onion, chopped
5 leaves collard greens -
rinsed, trimmed and chopped
salt and ground black pepper
to taste
1 teaspoon greens
seasoning, divided
1 head cabbage, chopped
1 pinch white sugar
Fry the bacon with the onion in
a large skillet over medium heat
until the bacon is crisp, about 10
minutes. Stir in the chopped col-
lard greens, sprinkle with salt,
black pepper, and 1/2 teaspoon of
the greens seasoning; cook and
stir for 5 minutes.
Add in the darker chopped cab-
bage leaves, and cook and stir
until almost tender, about 5 min-
utes. Stir in the remaining cab-
bage; season with salt, black


*


ire is pure
longer it will stay at this plateau wine left
before it starts downhill. Someti
Make no mistake: Time will hold som
take its toll on the best of wines, one migh
just as it does with the fairest of that are
us. In reality, less than 1 percent of big disco
the world's wines are meant to be out and 1
aged more than 10 years. The good cost a lot
news is the wonderful old beau- In gene
ties don't suddenly die like a not prep,
snuffed candle. Rather, they taper Avoid wl
off in much the same way that and reds
human beauty fades, gracefully-- are some
we can hope. line, and
Who drinks the perfectly ma- wine mer
tured ripe and balanced wines? Two su
The answer is interested hobbyists mas holic
with pockets deep enough to build U Fran
really nice home storage facilities Californi
-we don't call them "wine cellars" me of a
anymore, especially in Florida Chablis,
who can pursue their hobby of ac- mineralil
cumulating some of the serious col- 0 The
lectable vintages of the world. net sauvi
Fortunately for the rest of us, fruit bom
winemakers today are bottling old world
their product to drink on release fruits las
from the winery The major warn- $28. This
ing I can pass on is: beware of well, 8 to


pepper, sugar, and the remaining
greens seasoning. Stir well; cover
and cook until tender, stirring oc-
casionally so that the greens do
not scorch, about 10 minutes. It
makes about 8 servings.

ROASTED GARLIC
MASHED
CAULIFLOWER
Garlic ingredients:
2 large garlic bulbs
2 teaspoons butter, divided
2 pinches sea salt
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Cut each garlic bulb in half hori-
zontally. Smear 1 teaspoon butter
on the bottom of each half and re-
place the top. Tightly wrap each
reassembled bulb in aluminum
foil that has been lined with
parchment paper. Place wrapped
bulbs onto an ungreased baking
sheet and bake for 1 hour. Remove
and cool for 10 minutes. Remove
bulbs from the foil and cool for an
additional 10 minutes, until cool
enough to handle.
Cauliflower ingredients:
2 extra large or 3 small or
medium cauliflower heads
2 cups chicken stock
2 teaspoon sea salt, divided
1/2 cup butter
1/4 teaspoon fresh cracked
black pepper


Dash cayenne pepper
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
chives
Remove the stem from the cau-
liflower and cut into florets (about
15 cups). In a large pot, combine
cauliflower, chicken stock and 1
teaspoon sea salt. Bring to a boil,
reduce to a simmer and simmer
for 20 to 25 minutes, until fork ten-
der. In a large colander, drain
well.
Return the drained cauliflower
to the hot pot over low heat. Add
butter, remaining 1 teaspoon sea
salt, black pepper and cayenne.
Cover until butter has melted. Re-
move cover and mash with a po-
tato masher until well combined.
Leave cauliflower covered over
low heat until roasted garlic is
cool. When roasted garlic is ready,
remove the lid to the cauliflower
and squeeze roasted garlic bulbs
over the pot, allowing the individ-
ual cloves to squeeze out and land
in the pot. Once garlic is emptied
of roasted cloves, discard the
empty shells. Use the potato
masher to combine the roasted
garlic into the cauliflower. Right
before service, stir in 2 table-
spoons chives. Serve warm. Makes
about 7 cups.

Julianne Munn is the food writer
for the Citrus County Chronicle.
Email her atjmunn2@
tampabayrrcom.


at the Thursday,

MU EU Dec. 6
The second floor historic courtroom at the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum
Featuring
Sotern ExposaIre
with Vocals By Kim EVlHIS
Doors open at 6pm. Music starts at 7pm
Sponsored by
Call for tickets SC p dibU.....
341-6427 and 341-6488 C iiNi e
$25/Concert $80/Season (4) Edward
Jones
Proceeds to benefit the Old .. Financial
Courthouse Heritage Museum and CHARITIES Services
The Citrus County Historical Society. Heinz Funeral Home
Citrus Dental of Inverness, Comfort Keepers, James A Neale, PA, Deco Cafe, Accent Travel,
Whalen Jewelers, Tally-HoVacations, Regions Bank, Frank Di Giovanni, Chefs of Napoli II


.. ,

16 II. Friends of Fort Cooper State Park Present







Fort Cooper State Park
December 7th 9th
^ 6 p.m. 8:30 pm. n
Admission: Donation ofnonperishable food, cash,
new toys for Citrus United Basket or donation of
pet food for Citrus County Animal Services.
Friday, Dec. 7 & Saturday, Dec. 8
Decorations, lights, luminaries, entertainment,
s'mores & refreshments while supplies last
i Special guests: Santa
iSunday, Dec. 9
Decorations and Lights I
Fort Cooper State Park
3100 S. Old Floral City Road, Inverness, FL i
(352) 726-0315

.. . ..O I


00D2U6


w/, (y// G ,Jt oa/ ..

Homosassa Annual







December 15 6:00 PM
For Information:

Call Ricky-352-302-5779 or

The Freezer -352-628-2452


December 15, 2012

Starts @ 6:00 PM
Begins at Marker 75 by Bird Island
Ends at the Magic Manatee
Captains meeting at The Freezer on December 12, 2012 @ 6 PM
Register at The Freezer or Call Ricky


/O00DBR2a /A n19 CH iCLE


Bluegrass at the Blue Lodge


The Nature Coast

Community Band -,
Cindy Hazzard, Conductor ,

Presents





..







iA Saturday, December 8, 2012 2:30 PM
S Cornerstone Baptist Church
1100 West Highland Ave, Inverness
Sunday, December 9, 2012 2:30 PM -"
First United Methodist Church
8831 W Bradshaw St, Homosassa



ALL NCCB CONCERTS ARE FREE OF ADMISSION


FEATURING
Lonesome Pine Band

Saturday December 15, 2012
ALL AFTERNOON (1-5PM)
Rib-Eye Steak wall the trimmings

5060 S Memorial Dr, Homosassa, FL

$10 Donation for Lodge Charities
Contact 352-228-7666 & 352-746-6936 for info

I0DFDI www chroniceonlne com


C2 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


FLAIR FOR FOOD


myth

too long on the shelves.
mes a package store will
e sort of super sale where
t see whites, for example,
5 or 6 years old offered at
unts. You might as well go
buy bottled water. It will
less and taste better.
eral, most wine shops are
ared for long-term aging.
whites older than 3 years,
older than 6 years. There
exceptions to this guide-
you will have to trust your
chant to explain them.
suggestions for the Christ-
days:
iciscan Chardonnay is a
a product, yet reminds
white burgundy from
with interesting hints of
ty It costs about $18.
recent release of caber-
gnon is not a Napa Valley
ib, much more subtle and
d, layers of black stone
;t and last. It costs about
s one will certainly age
10 years.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Create cocktails with versatile liquor AMISH
Continued from Page C1


MICHELLE LOCKE
Associated Press

What you want: A festive
bar that will add panache to
your next holiday party.
What you don't want: Having
to spend oodles of cash on a
confusing array of bottles
you're not sure how to use.
The solution? Pick booze
that like the best kind of
guest is flexible, able to
take on different roles as
party dynamics dictate.
So we asked two bar-
tenders to come up with one
liquor and three ways to
serve it The suggestions are:
Versatile vodka
At Bistro Boudin in San
Francisco's historic Fisher-
man's Wharf, bartender
Nicholas Reynders goes for
the classic clear spirit, vodka.
He'd first serve it as a blue-
berry-tini, mixing a shot of
vodka with 1/2 ounce of sim-
ple syrup (equal parts sugar
and water heated until the
sugar is melted, then cooled)
and 12 fresh blueberries.
Combine all with ice in a
shaker, then shake, strain
and serve in a martini glass.
For a second treatment he
starts by muddling a bit of
cantaloupe in a shaker.
(Muddling is a bartenders'
term for mushing fruit, veg-
gies or herbs in the bottom
of a glass or shaker. You can
do this with a special tool



EASY
Continued from Page C1

1 large yellow onion,
diced
1/4 cup fresh parsley,
hand torn
2 teaspoons fresh
oregano (or 1 teaspoon
dried oregano)
Canola or olive oil for
cooking
Sea salt to taste
Fresh ground pepper
to taste
Preheat a large-sized
saut6 pan over medium-
high heat. Add 1 tablespoon
of oil to the hot pan. Add
half of the onion to the pan
and cook for 2 minutes. Add
half of the garlic and all the
bell peppers to the onion
mixture in the pan. Con-
tinue to cook the vegetables
in the pan and add all of the
yellow squash and zucchini
to the pan. Lightly season
the cooking vegetables with
salt and pepper. Let the veg-
etables cook until the
squash is crisp-tender
(about 2 minutes).
Remove the vegetables
from the pan into a large
serving bowl. Place the
saut6 pan back over the heat
and use a spatula to remove
any debris. Once the pan is


Associated Press
Cocktails from left are a Blueberry 'Tini, a Cantaloupe Rush
and a Basil Martini at the Bistro Boudin in San Francisco. All
were made with vodka.


called, logically, a muddler,
or just use a wooden spoon.)
Add 1 1/2 ounces vodka plus
an equal amount of simple
syrup, shake with ice, strain
and serve over ice with a
splash of soda water.
For the simplest treat-
ment, he recommends a
shot of vodka, an equal
amount simple syrup, and a
squeeze of lime and lemon
juice all shaken over ice and
strained into a martini glass.
A cocktail party doesn't
have to be elaborate, Reyn-
ders said. Shaker, jigger,
mixing glass and you're
halfway there. "A little extra
shake doesn't hurt for the
perfect chilled martini."


hot again, add 1 tablespoon
oil and the other half of the
diced onion. Let the onions
cook for 2 minutes and then
add the garlic, mushrooms
and eggplant. Lightly season
the cooking vegetables with
salt and pepper. Let the veg-
etables cook until the egg-
plant is tender (about 2
minutes).
Remove the vegetables
from the pan and place
them into the bowl with the
other vegetables. Add fresh
herbs to the bowl of vegeta-
bles and stir to combine.
Serve warm.
It makes 6 to 8 servings.
-Recipe and photo cour-
tesy of Florida Department
of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services
MEN
I imagine most everyone
has pet peeves when dining
out, whether it's fast food or
haute cuisine. Personal fa-
vorite gripes include:
Thin and watery soup
- think of a bowl of bland
broth with miniscule cubes
of canned carrots and pota-
toes and a few peas passed
off as vegetable soup.
So-called homemade
potato salad with potato
chunks way too al dente.
Bisque or chowder that
tastes of an abundant flour
filler for thickening the broth.
Barely fried bacon.


Mezcal mixology
Sombra Mezcal founder
Richard Betts recom-
mended this smoky spirit
for holiday get-togethers be-
cause "it mixes well in
drinks from margaritas to
Manhattans. It can be great
neat and, if it's that kind of
party, it's a great shot, too."
Plus it fits into his party
philosophy
"Have a point of view. You
cannot be everything to
everyone, so pick something
and geek out on it Mezcal is
a great example because
you're exploring the real
agave spirit of Mexico, and
this is cool."
A quick primer on mezcal,


Meat and poultry gravy
with that telltale mass-
produced artificial taste.
Thin, watery spaghetti
sauce.
Scrambled eggs and
omelets with crusty, brown
edges.
Servers who know noth-
ing about menu items, in-
cluding their origin,
ingredients and preparation.
Glass in windows and
doors long overdue for a
good cleaning.
House salads with
wilted, brown-tinged lettuce
and anemic slices of tomato.
Salads served in minis-
cule bowls that result in
spilled and flying greens.
That's just for starters.
Share your dining annoy-
ances if you wish.
MEN
A big plate of delicious
homemade cookies is a
must for holiday entertain-
ing. Here is an easy recipe
to make with no stress at all.

PECAN FINGERS
1 cup Bisquick
1/4 cup butter or
margarine, softened
1/4 cup chopped
pecans
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla or
almond extract


a distilled spirit made from
the maguey plant, a type of
agave: When the spirit is
made from the blue agave
and comes from certain des-
ignated areas, it's tequila. So
while all tequila is mezcal,
not all mezcal is tequila. In
the past, mezcal outside
Mexico has often been of
poor quality and contained a
worm in the bottle, a market-
ing gimmick dreamed up in
the 1940s. These days, there's
quality mezcal to be found.
For his triple-play ap-
proach, Betts suggested
making a batch of a modi-
fied version of the saint's
eye cocktail on the Sombra
website devised by Jim
Meehan, author of "The
PDT Cocktail Book: The
Complete Bartender's
Guide from the Celebrated
Speakeasy" 2 ounces
mezcal, 3/4 ounce lime
juice, 3/4 ounce pineapple
juice, 1 bar spoon of agave
nectar and a sprig of tar-
ragon to garnish.
As a counterpunch to that
citrusy concoction he'd mix
up a mezcal Manhattan with
2 1/2 ounces mezcal, 3/4
ounce sweet vermouth, a
dash of Angostura bitters, 1
maraschino cherry and an
orange peel garnish.
And, finally, he'd serve
mezcal neat. "It is the best
way for people to really ap-
preciate how special it is."


3 tablespoons boiling
water
Heat oven to 375 degrees.
In mixing bowl, blend
Bisquick, butter, nuts, sugar
and flavoring. Add boiling
water; stir vigorously with
fork until dough forms a ball
and cleans the bowl. Shape
dough in 24 fingers, 2 1/2
inches long. Place on un-
greased baking sheet. Bake
10 to 12 minutes.
While warm, roll each fin-
ger in granulated or pow-
ered sugar.

Julianne Munn is the food
writer for the Citrus County
Chronicle. Email her at
jmunn2@tampabay.rrcom.


strengthen those muscles.
We are thankful we did the
surgery Only God knows
how long this will help her,
but we must put our full
trust in Him and let Him
lead the way
I want to again thank
readers who have been an
encouragement to us in any
way
Daughter Susan baked a
batch of outrageous choco-
late chip cookies this week.
With the mixed flavor of
chocolate and peanut but-
ter, our family really likes
them.

OUTRAGEOUS
CHOCOLATE
CHIP COOKIES
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups brown
sugar
2 cups margarine
2 cups peanut butter
2 teaspoons vanilla
4 eggs


FLAIR FOR FOOD


Make siuFtihe

community kno,

about your spe


Sck\Ata C, a Ck5


Drop your letter by the Crystal River Mall
or the Citrus County Chronicle between


Friday, November 23 and IV
Friday, December 14,2012 C
C RO IC E All letters will be ..t... ...all to read and enjoy
V w..hrone.o.ineo.. online at www.chronicleonline .com/letterstosanta2012!


CRYSTAL

MA


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 C3

S4 cups flour
0 2 cups oatmeal
0 4 teaspoons baking
soda
0 1 teaspoon salt
0 12 ounces of
chocolate chips
Preheat oven to 350 de-
grees. Melt margarine and
mix with sugars, peanut but-
ter and eggs. Then add in the
dry ingredients. Mix until
thoroughly blended. Then
add chocolate chips. Roll
into balls and bake at 350
degress for 10 to 15 minutes.
Cookies will spread out and
be golden brown around the
edges when done.

Lovina Eicher and her
husband, Joe, are raising
eight children on their
rural Michigan
homestead. Lovina
inherited the Amish Cook
column from her mother
Elizabeth Coblentz. For
information about the
Amish Cook, or to ask a
question, write TheAmish
Cook, PO. BOX 157, Mid-
dletown, OH 45042 or visit
amishcookonline. com.

....


r


Reme mbe


Reas



TheSe







Page C4 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

LHS to present
murder mystery
Lecanto High School The-
atre will present "Trapped," a
one-act English murder mys-
tery farce at 7 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 7, and Saturday, Dec. 8,
at Curtis Peterson Auditorium
in Lecanto.
The public is welcome; ad-
mission is $5 at the door.
Wisconsin Club
plans luncheon
The Wisconsin Club will
meet at 11:30 a.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 12, at The Boat-
house Restaurant in Crystal
River.
Meal choices are fried fish,
roast beef, lasagna and
grilled chicken. Reservations
and meal choices are re-
quired. All former Wiscon-
sinites and snowbirds are
welcome.
To reserve a spot, call
Joyce at 352-860-1292.
Post making
Christmas merrier
Blanton Thompson Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 at 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River, will sponsor its
first Children and Legion
Members Shopping event
(CALMS) Saturday Dec. 8.
The event begins at 10
a.m. at the post. Legion
members and veterans will
take area children, in addition
to their own children or
grandchildren, shopping at K-
mart in Crystal River Mall.
The shopping trip will begin
after the children have had a
small snack and have their
faces painted by Ms. Annie.
The event will be to give chil-
dren who may not be able to
have a Christmas holiday the
chance to shop and enjoy the
holiday spirit with military vet-
erans and their families.
There will also be a Christ-
mas party at 10 a.m. Satur-
day, Dec. 15, where the
children will receive their
gifts. To register or for more
information, call the post at
352-795-6526, or Cmdr. Mike
Klyap at 352-302-6096.
Market Day set
in Floral City
Floral City Market Day will
be from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, at
7050 S. Florida Ave., adja-
cent to Ivy Lane Consign-
ment.
Vendors offer seasonal
produce, homemade crafts,
baked goods and more. As a
special treat, Santa will make
an early appearance.
For more information or to
be a vendor, email Jamie at
jmewarren@yahoo.com, or
call 352-637-1112.


Animal Shelter
ADOPTABLES


Bo


Angels for animals


Items needed by rescue groups to help care for orphanedpets


Special to the Chronicle

Two local pet rescue groups will
have the third annual Pet Angels pet
needs drive from Monday, Dec. 3,
through Saturday, Jan. 3, to collect
needed items and donations to help
orphaned pets in their care.
Home at Last Pet Adoptions
(halpetadoptions@yahoo.com) and
Precious Paws Rescue (precious-
pawsflorida.com) are the beneficiar-
ies of the pet supplies collection. Both
organizations are all-volunteer regis-
tered charities. Foster pets are cared
for in the homes of volunteers who
provide all the needed daily care. All
pets receive necessary veterinary care.
Items needed to help with their care
include cat litter, pet food both


GIFTS CAN BE DROPPED OFF AT:
* Precious Paws Adoption Center, Crystal River Mall, from noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday. (Closed from Dec. 27 through Jan. 2 for the holidays.)
* Plantation Animal Clinic, 9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
* Pawfection Ranch 6420 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
* Goin' Postal 7789 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
* Cypress Village Property Owners Association, 108 W. Cypress Blvd.,
Homosassa (A Frame) at the entrance to Sugarmill Woods
* Oak Village Association at Servos Square, 5478 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa


canned and dry, disinfectant cleaners,
laundry detergent, paper towels, do-
nations and gift cards.
Donations may be left at any dona-
tion site or checks made out to and
mailed to: Home at Last, PO. Box 4533,


Homosassa, FL 34447. All donations
are tax deductible.
For more information or to have do-
nation picked up, call Home at Last at
352-476-6832, or Precious Paws at 352-
726-4700.


Special to the Chronicle
The fourth annual Rubber Duck Race sponsored by the Friends of the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve, Yankeetown, took place
recently on the Withlacoochee River. More than 470 rubber ducks took to the water for a chance to make their sponsor
a winner or loser. Three hundred and fifty ducks had previous years' experience. The additional one hundred and twenty
got their chance to get their feet wet for the first time due to the generous support of the community. The Friends thank
all who participated in making this a successful fundraiser for the WGP. The winning duck, No. 245, was sponsored by
Shirley Kubistek of Yankeetown, who won $200. The losing duck, No. 310 was sponsored by Helen Ciallella of
Yankeetown, who won $50.



Fill empty spaces by helping others


AMI Citrus says a
warm welcome to
snowbirds! Contem-
plating the "busy-
ness" of the
season, NAMI
Citrus will not
have a general
meeting this
month. We look
forward to next
month when our
speaker will be
Dr. Susan C.
Reeder, local psy- Marilyi
chotherapist. NA
To mark your CITI
calendar, plan to
join us Monday,
Jan. 14, at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, County
Road 486, Citrus Hills, with
doors opening at 6 p.m. and
the speaker at 6:45.


I
I



I

I

F
F;


The NAMI board will con-
tinue to meet during this
holiday, as we continue to
work toward our
goal of being
S more proactive
and of more ben-
efit to those who
S need our assis-
tance. Last
month, the
Chronicle
blessed us with a
lengthy article on
iBooth mental health
MI needs in our
RUS area, and the par-
ticular needs of
NAMI Citrus.
Thus, we were delighted to
find ourselves with four
community members volun-
teering to be board mem-
bers, plus some kind folks


who sent us financial assis-
tance.
We'd like to say a special
welcome to Steven Burch,
Patricia Kittleman, Gerri
Schwenkler and the brave
Scott Harbison, who has
agreed to lead us as presi-
dent, and who has already
set up a Facebook page for
us. Check it out to see what
we are up to!
We always have room for
hardworking folks. Just call
our Warm Line at 352-341-
2273 for more information,
and for assistance during
this holiday season, which
can be so stressful.
There are not enough
healing words for hurting
folks at this time of year.
Possibly the best thing one
can do to fill empty places in


someone's heart and life is
to do something for some-
one else. To give is to re-
ceive a hard but worthy
lesson to learn.
To our readers: Thank
you for reading about NAMI
Citrus. Thank you for finan-
cial remembrances and for
wanting to help. This sup-
port cheers us and fuels us
with resolve to keep on
keeping on. Please plan to
be with us Jan. 14 and learn
more about NAMI and pos-
sibly, as we listen to Dr
Reeder, about yourself.

Marilyn Booth is a member
of the Board ofDirectors of
NAMI Citrus, of the
National Alliance on
Mental Illness.


Celebrated, sensitive watercolor artist to visit


Special to the Chronicle
Bo is a very sweet Lab mix
with one brown and one
blue eye. He's good with
kids, other dogs, is house-
broken, knows his basic
commands, walks well on
a leash and is a perfect
gentleman. He is about 10
years old, 67 pounds, loves
attention and is not a real
barker. He would be the
perfect dog for a retired or
working couple. Come visit
Bo at Citrus County Animal
Shelter, 4030 S. Airport
Road, Inverness, behind
the fairgrounds. View all
our adoptables at www.
citruscritters.com or call
352-746-8400.


widely celebrated watercolorist
will be guest demonstrator for
the Citrus Watercolor Club
(CWC) annual holiday luncheon at
noon Friday, Dec. 14, at the Citrus
Hills Country Club.
The CWC extends a warm
welcome to Janet Rogers, an
artist who is well known for
her sensitive portraits of
women and children, as well
as her expressive floral
paintings. Originally from
Philadelphia, Pa., Rogers re-
sides in Ormond Beach with
her watercolorist husband,
Steve Rogers. She is a signa-
ture member of the Florida
Watercolor Society, Ameri- Nor
can Watercolor Society, Na- CIT
tional Watercolor Society WATEF
and a Member with Excel- ci
lence of the South Carolina
Watercolor Society.
Rogers has won numerous awards
from exhibiting her work, including
Disney's Festival of the Master,
"Under the Oaks." Her work can be


1

I

*I

L


found in the book, "The One-Hour Wa-
tercolorist" by Patrick Seslar, pub-
lished by North Light, as well as her
three new CDs and her website,
www.watercolorsbyrogers.com.
"I love the fluid nature of water-
color," Rogers said. "To
me, the interaction of the
artist with the medium is
S- like a dance full of mo-
tion, feeling and expres-
sion. Discovering new
color and composition as
the painting develops is
my joy"
Rogers has gained much
popularity as an instructor
for many workshops in the
Freyer United States and Europe.
RUS As a teacher, her goal is to
COLOR enable students to find
.UB their connection with wa-
tercolor in new and ex-
pressive ways.
Local artists will be able to benefit
from her teaching abilities during a
two-day workshop on Dec. 15 and 16 at
the Whispering Pines Park Recreation


Center in Inverness. At press time,
availability for a place in the work-
shop had neared capacity. For work-
shop information, call Carole Byron at
352-489-8575.
Members of Citrus Watercolor Club
enjoy a "Painting of the Month" com-
petition in October, November, Janu-
ary, February, March and April. They
have opportunities to show and sell
their work, take workshops and par-
ticipate in monthly sketch/paint-outs,
etc.
For more information about the
meeting or to become a member, call
Bonnie Wallace at 352-274-0790 or
Ellen Hines at 352-527-0901, or visit
the CWC website at www.citruswater
colorclub.com.
The Citrus Watercolor Club meets at
noon the second Friday of each month,
except July, at the First United
Methodist Church, Pleasant Grove
Road (County Road 581), Inverness.


Norm Freyer handles publicity
for the Citrus Watercolor Club.


News NOTES

B.H. chorus to
present concert
The Chorus of Beverly
Hills will celebrate with the
Christmas Concert "An Old-
Fashioned Christmas" at 3
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9, in the
sanctuary of the Beverly Hills
Community Church, 82 Civic
Circle.
The songs will bring back
memories of Christmases
past with a beautiful mixture
of sacred and modern
tributes.
Some of the titles include:
a medley of Irving Berlin's
songs, "I Saw Mommy Kiss-
ing Santa Claus," "Home for
Christmas," "A Bell Carol"
with the church's Chime
Choir, "Blue Christmas" and
an amusing take-off on J.S.
Bach's Fugue in G minor
called the "Cold and Fugue
Season."
Tickets for the afternoon
performance are $5 and are
available from all chorus
members and through the
church office.
Director Renate Williams
and accompanist Ruth Car-
ruthers will lead the group.
For more information, call
the church office at 352-746-
3620 or Volena Van Gunst at
352-746-5680.
Hospice volunteer
training slated
Hospice of Citrus County
will provide orientation and
patient support training from
9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 7, at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Wings Education
Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
The class provides an
overview of hospice philoso-
phy and history.
Participants will become
acquainted with services pro-
vided by Hospice of Citrus
County for patients and fami-
lies. They will also become
familiar with the concept of
palliative care and learn the
importance of confidentiality.
Teens and high school stu-
dents are welcome. Volun-
teering for Hospice of Citrus
County will provide commu-
nity service hours for the
Bright Futures Scholarship
and other academic needs.
To register, call Director of
Volunteer Services Cathi
Thompson at 352-527-2020,
or email cthompson@
hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
Card party set
for Dec. 11
The Beverly Hills Card
Club invites all to its Military
Card Party slated for Dec. 11
at Central Ridge Community
Center at Beverly Hills, 77
Civic Circle.
Reservations are required
by Dec. 7. Doors open at 11
a.m.; lunch will be served at
noon. Games will begin at 1
p.m. Donation is $12.
Tickets are available at the
office at Central Ridge Com-
munity Center from 7:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
Come enjoy the fun, prizes
and raffle.
For more information, call
the center at 352-746-4882,
or call 352-746-3636.
Thinkers to host
former Navy officer
The New Age Thinkers will
meet at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 8, at the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
(Florida Conference Room).
The final presentation for
2012 will be by Suzanne
Giesmann, who will discuss
"Meaning and Messages
from the Other Side."
Giesemann is a Hay
House author and inspira-
tional speaker who focuses
on love-centered living.
She is a former Navy com-
mander who is now a practic-
ing intuitive with nine books
to her credit.
Space is limited. For more
information, call Donna at


352-628-3253, or email miss-
donna@tampabay.rr.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Annual race is fowl play!






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


THURSDAY EVENING DECEMBER 6, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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West
4K QJ 10 4
V Q 10 9
* J 10 4
*6 5
South
4 2
VA 7 6


12-06-12


East
SA 7 5 3
V 5 3
K Q 9 7 6
A7


4 A32
K K J 10 4 3 2

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East


14
Pass


2Pa
Pass


44
Pass


IOpening lead: 4 K

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

It is pleasant to report that more is being written
for near-beginners. "A First Book of Bridge Prob-
lems" by Patrick O'Connor (Master Point Press)
contains 50 elementary declarer-play and defense
questions, with the answers overleaf. There is also
a description of the bidding system used (very
basic), an explanation of the responses to Stay-
man, a glossary of terms used in the book, the
themes of the problems and the key points to re-
member.
This deal is the last in the book, presumably
meant to be the hardest. Take the East hand. You
are defending against five clubs. Partner leads the
spade king. How would you signal?
North had an unenviable choice over one spade:
pass, a negative double and two clubs. Pass was
undesirable with six points. A negative double was
outside the range of this book (and not without
risk). Two clubs, though imperfect, was reasonable.
You naturally jumped to game, although four
spades would have been defeated after a club
lead. But South bid five clubs as an each-way bet
In the book, O'Connor, who is Australian, asks
the reader: How do you plan the defense? My
phraseology was an attempt to make the problem
a tad tougher
You must not signal. You know South has at most
one spade. And you can see a likely three defen-
sive tricks in one spade, one diamond and one
club. However, if you signal with the spade three at
trick one, partner might think that is showing an
odd number of spades and try to cash a second
trick in the suit. Overtake with your spade ace and
shift to the diamond king.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ADDEZ 'E

@2012 Trbune Media Services, Inc -
All Rights Resered
ROYIV



ORPCEP



MUSOFA
y ^ 7- ^^ ^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

.- --'y
S* d

4 )

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Ij



HIS 1551RE TO OWN THE
BIGGEST PLUMBING COMPANY
IN TOWN WAS --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer A r T
here: U T L i
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: EAGLE CRAMP STEREO POISON
I Answer: The rock climber saw these when he went to buy
new climbing equipment STEEP PRICES


ACROSS
1 Oval nut
6 Fern leaf
11 Acid in
proteins
12 Edmonton
puckster
13 Lectern
15 uno
16 Loud sleeper
18 Alley from
Moo
19 Start of a bray
21 Prune off
22 Be bold
enough
23 Twosome
25 Skipper's OK
28 Give the slip
30 Day- paint
31 Plant sci.
32 Peace offering
33 Quiet sound
35 Crack filler
37 Devotee
38 Brown bag
40 Ferber or Best
41 Chaucer
pilgrim


42 Gam
43 chi
46 The reason
why
48 Genghis'
grandson
50 Jeweled
coronets
54 Winter
constellation
55 Moving about
56 Full of back
talk
57 Lascivious
looks

DOWN
1 Food for
infants
2 Comic
Philips
3 England's FBI
4 Liqueur
flavoring
5 Verb preceder
6 Bridge
quorum
7 Crater edge


Answer to Previous Puzzle


SIDED UN IQU E
SCUBAS SATURN
TIDBIT AVAILS
ES GGELE
AID TOE I K E
JUT PIN BA LS

MAHAL OAT NIA
PI ERS U ESP
RDS JRS BYEE
E PA
LONG E HRIVE
ARTIE SIGNED
BRACE LEDTO


8 Diet spread
9 Orchid-loving
Wolfe
10 Send by
parachute
14 Downy fungi


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


15 Sherpa's
home
17 First draft of a
movie
(2 wds.)
19 Saintly rings
20 Release
violently
22 Arnaz
24 Terrier or
poodle
25 Residence
26 Kittens
27 "Butch
Cassidy" role
29 Double curve
34 Vietnam's
capital
36 Let go
39 Woven
43 Bout enders
44 Mystique
45 Egret cousin
46 Indefinite
number
47 Glass
container
49 Alamos,
N.M.
51 AAA
suggestion
52 Mammal's
need
53 12th-graders


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Dear Annie: My incredible
husband of two years has
a 4-year-old daughter
with his ex-wife. I
have actively helped
raise "Christie" since
she was barely a year.
We haven't commu-
nicated with the
mother since the time
we took her to court
for refusing visitation,
but my husband and I
have always provided
for Christie in every
way possible, above
and beyond the ANN
court-ordered child MAI
support.
This little girl loves
me. I have never tried to re-
place her mother, encouraged
or expected her to call me
"Mom," or even so much as
talked badly about her mother
in front of her.
But lately, Christie has been
questioning my relationship
with her father, saying the rea-
son her mommy and daddy are
not together is because of me.
When I ask her to do something
she doesn't want to do, she says
her mommy says she doesn't
have to listen to me because I
am not her mother. Even worse,
she's been told when my hus-
band and I have a baby of our
own, Daddy won't love her as
much as the new baby.
Christie is obviously too
young to draw these conclusions
on her own, so Mom is giving
her these impressions or telling
her these things outright. I don't
know why any mother would
want to hurt her child this way,
but I worry it is going to cause


Christie to resent me. How can
we handle this? Stepmom in
the Middle
Dear Stepmom:
Many courts now rec-
ognize parental alien-
ation. Suggest your
husband speak to his
lawyer about this pos-
sibility. In the mean-
time, when Christie is
with you, do your best
to counter the nega-
S tive brainwashing.
Let her know how
much you love her
IE'S and always will; that
BOX a new baby means
she will be more im-
portant than ever,
and the new baby will need a
big sister; that everyone in the
household has chores to do, and
you want her to learn to be a big
girl. As she gets older, she will
recognize her mother's bitter-
ness, so please don't play into
that drama.
Dear Annie: I am a recent
widow in my mid-70s. I decided
after the death of my husband a
couple of years ago that I would
live out my life alone.
I don't have much of a social
life, but I do attend church serv-
ices regularly. I find myself sit-
ting next to a man who once
spoke to me after the service.
After several weeks, I could tell
he seemed interested in me.
After a few conversations, I re-
alized I am 10 years older than
he is.
He seems like a kind and po-
lite man, and his wife has been
dead for many years. I am flat-
tered by his attention and
shocked at this chain of events.


I would appreciate your input
on the age difference. I am basi-
cally a happy, healthy woman,
but this is a situation I could
take or leave. So if you tell me
to come to my senses, I will say
"Goodbye, Columbus."
- California
Dear California: The age dif-
ference is irrelevant as long as
you don't mislead him about it.
If you enjoy his company, we say
go for it. There is nothing wrong
with a companionable friend-
ship, and if either of you is look-
ing for something more, just be
sure you are both comfortable
with it.
Dear Annie: You printed sev-
eral responses to "Looking for a
Relationship, Too" and in-
cluded one from "El Paso,
Texas," who suggested women
take up shooting because "guys
like a gal with good aim."
I laughed, thinking of a song
from the Broadway musical
"Annie Get Your Gun," which
was titled, "You Can't Get a Man
with a Gun." Thanks for a good
chuckle. Musical Lover


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Cre-
ators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To
find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writ-
ers and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
a t www crea tors. com.


14
54


North
4 986
SKJ 8 4 2
S85
SQ 9 8


12-6


ENTERTAINMENT


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 CS


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


M..I THEN MY WET HERE YOU WHAT' THE NOBEL PRIZE
SCHOOL HAIR DRIPPED ON ARE, SIR.. THiS? FOR FICTION..
N.. MY HOMEWORK, CONGRATULATIONS
AND RUINED IT..


9/


Pickles


Sally Forth

LOOK OVER THERE! THAT'S THE AND THERE'S ADVENTURELAND,
WALT WHITMAN MALL WHERE MY WHERE I FOUND OUT I'M
FRIENDS AND I HUNG OUT' EVEN AFRAID OF KIDtIE
RROLLER COASTERS! AND THERE'S
MY SCHOOL, HALF HOLLOW HILLS
I-'- 1 HIGH SCHOOL WEST! /


Dilbert


The Born Loser


For Better or For Worse

STErE HFRS EN~ERYRING Yu DONY HRVE RN
ELLYI CRNttHINK OFAf' EXyEKCCLE.c-GET HIIM
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The Grizzwells


Blondie


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TRO 5CE CRE.APER,
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Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Sorry to keep you folks waiting ... The
flight was delayed."


Doonesbury


Big Nate

..AND THE CINEMA-
TOGRAPHY Is...
SIR? THIS
IS A NON-
SMOKINi
BUILDING.



00

Arlo and Janis


CHUCKLE'! 'AND IT
OBVIOUSLY WORKED,
SINCE YOU MISTOOK
ME FOR AN ACTUAL
_WIZARD!.

-7


KID, TELL HIM I'M
NOT A WIZARD.

YEAH.
NOT
EVEN
CLOSE.


HONEY, WOULD YOU MIND STANDING I WANT TO SEE WHAT OUR TREE HMMM...I'M STILL HOTc \ i OL
IN THAT CORNER AND HOLDING VOUR WOULD LOOK LIKE OVER THERE SUI...LET ME ,1T I ,
: HUR r OKAVY, BUT P L ,-'. :
? I FEEL KINDA
-4 SILLY /r







Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"WE PON7T NEEP A GPS. -N A\ON\~TeLS
MY PAP WHICH WAN TO GO."
Betty


www tam lycircus con
"I sure hope today was a day
Santa wasn't watching' me."


~ WIA N, I PON EVEN '- -- I
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SMY SC ReeNS6AV R! NOW IT -
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Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) 4:40 p.m.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 2" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" 3D (PG) 4:30 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Killing Them Softly" (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Red Dawn" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) 4:10 p.m.


"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In 3D. 1:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1:05 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. No
passes.
"Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 4:30 p.m.
"The Collection" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: s slenba 3


RW KFWT WXRI GRJFECG: PKUPAN GXA


GR ST P KFGGKT BFJLTX GCPJ FN


JTMTNNPXA?" 0.1. SPXXFT

Previous Solution: "I became a cartoonist largely because I failed in my goal of
becoming a successful executive." Scott Adams
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-6


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


C6 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


COMICS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


News NOTES


PFLAG to offer
'Tips for Holidays'
PFLAG Lecanto (Parents,
Family and Friends of Lesbians
and Gays) will meet from 7 to
9 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11, at the
Unity Church of Citrus County,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto.
In addition to the usual time
for conversation, this month's
discussion will be on "Tips for
the Holidays," suggestions from
PFLAG National about how
LGBT persons, their families
and friends, might productively
deal with holiday family
gatherings.
PFLAG's mission is to pro-
mote the health and well-being
of LGBT persons, their families
and friends. Meetings are open
to everyone and provide an op-
portunity for dialog, discussion
and support, as well as educa-
tion about LGBT issues and
concerns.
For more information, call
Linda at 352-419-2738, or
email pflag.lecanto
@gmail.com.
Sunshine Gardens
collecting for needy
Sunshine Gardens of Crystal
River will host its first food and
toy drive for the holiday season.
Bins are set up to accept do-
nations at the assisted living fa-
cility behind Walgreens off U.S.
19. Nonperishable food items
will be donated to Daystar and
toys will be donated to Toys For
Tots. Everyone is welcome to
drop by and make a donation.
For information, call 352-422-
2719 or 352-563-0235.

Vendors sought
for B.H. markets
The Beverly Hills Arts, Crafts
and Farmers Market kicked off
in May 2012 and continues to
take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
the first and third Fridays of
each month at Lake Beverly
Park, 77 Civic Circle.
Christmas is in the air and
new vendors offering unique
gift selections will be present at
the two December markets
Dec. 7 and 21. This market is a
convenience for area residents
and the Beverly Hills Civic As-
sociation and the Central Ridge


Community Center ask for
residents' support of the local
businesses.
Vendors at $10 per space
may register in advance by call-
ing civic office manager Bonnie
Larsen at 352-746- 2657 from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday
through Friday.

'Girls' Nite Out'
in Homosassa
Hospice of Citrus County's
Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift
Shoppe will present Girls' Nite
Out from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Fri-
day, Dec. 7, at the Thrift & Gift
Shoppe, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane. A donation of $10 will
benefit patients and families
served by Hospice of Citrus
County.
Fashion styles come and go,
and beauty trends fade in and
out. At Girls Nite Out, attendees
can keep up with the latest in
what to wear (and how to pull it
off). The event will offer food,
fun and fashion, and feature
wine and cheese, handbags,
door prizes, goodie bags, chair
massages, a makeup artist and
hair designer.
For a reservation or informa-
tion, call Caroline at 352-621-
1550. Visit Hospice of Citrus
County on Facebook or at
www.hospiceofcitrus.org.

Play secret Santa
for seniors
The Networking Breakfast
Club is collecting donations in
gift form to present to seniors
who have no family.
Some new items being
sought include (but are not lim-
ited to): slipper socks, handker-
chiefs, sweaters and so forth.
Items will be collected through
Dec. 7. Bring unwrapped gifts
to any of four locations:
Arbor Trail Rehab & Skilled
Nursing Center, 611 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness; 352-
637-1130.
New Horizon Senior Citi-
zen Home, 1745 Forest Drive,
Inverness; 352-726-5466.
Health Center at Brent-
wood, 2333 N. Brentwood Cir-
cle, Lecanto; 352-746-6611.
Citrus Health & Rehab,
701 Medical Court East, Inver-
ness; 352-860-0200.


Women's club
plans gifts show
The Women's Club of Dun-
nellon will sponsor a different
and creative event to welcome
in the holiday season. The
Unique Treasures and Gifts
Show will be from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Friday, Dec.7, and Satur-
day, Dec. 8, at the Women's
Club building at 11758 Cedar
St., Dunnellon.
The show will feature varied
treasures and gifts available
from many vendors. Many
types of food will also be of-
fered including: Amish jams and
jellies, produce, barbecue
sauces and designer cakes.
Mini-facials and chair mas-
sages will ease the stress of
holiday preparing. Biscuits,
sausage gravy and jellies will
be available for breakfast, as
well as hot dogs, chips and
drinks for lunch.
For more information, call
Pat at 352-489-6708.

Holiday grief
workshop is free
Many community members
anticipating a difficult holiday
season due to the death of a
loved one or friend are wel-
come to participate in a free
holiday grief workshop.
HPH Hospice, "Healing Peo-
ple's Hearts in Citrus County,"
is providing the workshop at
2:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13, at
St. Timothy's Evangelical
Church, 1071 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19) in Crystal River.
Led by an HPH bereavement
counselor, participants will learn
valuable tips for coping during
the holidays.
For more information, call the
team office at 352-527-4600.
Visit at HPH-Hospice.org.

Inverness Lions
slate yard sale
Inverness Lions Club will
have its final yard sale of the
year from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fri-
day, Dec. 14, and Saturday,
Dec. 15.
Items for resale are being ac-
cepted at 3399 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
For more information, call
352-422-2224.


Sale for St. Jude


RUTH LEVINS/Special to the Chronicle
The Crystal River Alpha Gamma Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Alpha sorority had a garage sale
recently to benefit St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Shown at the sale are Rosemary
Branham, Trudie Myers, ESA President Betty Gross and Treasurer Sherry Cavaratta.


Isaiah Foundation Speaker


RUTH LEVINS/Special to the Chronicle
Barbara Washburn, right, director of the Isaiah Foundation, was the guest speaker at a
recent luncheon meeting of the Crystal River United Methodist Women. The Isaiah
Foundation is a support group for developmentally, physically challenged and autistic
children. Washburn is pictured with Carol McConnaughey, past president of the UMW.





To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


F ( 2 6 6T l e ( 8 0 E : a a I ww r c n e


-d -a Td


IvyUUI% %I' December22atthe Y W
Homosassa Butterfly Farm
I FREEADMISSION and other tickets discounted to $6.00!
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT- PICTURES WITH SANTA. '-- llvAWA A .. Ili )R PRiLS |
RSVP FOR AFTER HOURS PARTY! CALL FOR DETAILS 628-7519
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com advancedaluminfo@yahoo.com


2000 Chevy Corvette
Metallic Bowling Green
Std shift, one owner,
& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874
2006 HUSQVARNA
Garden Tractor 25hp
Kohler Hydrostatic
transmission, 48" mower
& 48" landscape box
$1200 (352) 601-2480
BEVERLY HILLS
Fri, 8 to ? Sat, 8 to noon
BIGGEST YARD SALE
OF THE YEAR! tools to
power chair, everything
from table saw to
walkers
197 W. Sugarberry Ln.

I. '

BEVERLY HILLS
Fri, Sat 8 to 2
marine items, guitar,
hshld,sm ladies clothes
216 & 218 S. Lee St






BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-until
HUGE SALE
Furn., Home Decor.
Many misc. items
891 W. Gleason Place

For Sale %0W
CHASSA-
HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin.. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800
CITRUS SPRINGS
FIRST TIME SALE
Fri, Sat, 8 to 3
hshld, tools, fabrics,
collectibles, lots of misc.
7336 N. Veronica Drive


CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri & Sat 7:00 5:00
House sale! Everything
must go! Furniture,
tools, appliances, ETC
5720 Stockholm Ln
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
DISHWASHER Maytag
Performa, BRAND NEW
cond. Never used. White.
275.00 Call
(352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
Drum Set, amplifier
w/earphones $65
3 wheel woman's bike
w/basket $100
352-527-0409
DUNNELLON
Thurs Fri & Sat 9a- until
Lots of xmas stuff, Horse
carriages & tack, 2 wheel
weed whacker, pole
auger, & lots more.
5971 W Last Chance Ln
EAGLE SKIMMER
'99 Flats Boat. tunnel,
50 John, new troll mtr..
FF. GPS. excel. $6,000
obo (352) 527-4910

,' ,

EL DORADO
ESTATES/LecantoFr
i, Sat, Dec 7 & 8th
8 to 2, records,
shot glasses, thou-
sand watt generator
Lots of goodies!
6115 S. Coronado Ter
ELECTRIC RANGE W/
OVER RANGE
MICROWAVE Both
maytags, white, Brand
New! Never been used.
Range is $360 and OTR
Microwave $210.
Call (352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
ELECTRIC STOVE
2003 GE Black Glass
Top. Exc Condition $100;
2003 GE Black
Microwave $50
(352) 897-4739


FLORAL CITY
Fri. & Sat.
dolls, watches, guns,
tools, misc.
7408 E. April Ct.

HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat 8am to 2pm
quilts, wicker, B&D 36v
cordless mower, ladies
24" cruiser bike, prints,
books, xmas, more,
7185 W Hadenotter Ln
off Memorial
HOMOSASSA
Thurs. Fri. & Sat. 8am.
HUGE SALE
Green Acres St
INVERNESS
Fri. 7, & Sat. 8, 8a-2p
404 Iris Lane
INVERNESS
Fri. 7, & Sat. 8, 8a-3p
Holiday, Tools, Hshold.
6432 E. Willow Street
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
asking $13,500
352-419-6476
INVERNESS
Thurs Fri Sat & Sun 9-3
1175 S Telephone Pt Rd
JUSTIN BIEBER
BELIEVE TOUR 6
tickets section 226 row
14 Amway Arena,
Orlando Jan 25, 2013
$200.ea 352-637-5537
LARGE SECTIONAL
SOFA Very nice
L-sectional couch with
dual recliners on each
end. $300 352-503-2610

.. ,, ..-,




LECANTO
Fri, Sat, 12/7 & 12/8
9am to 6pm, tools,
shopsmith, workbench,
little giant ladder, bedrm
set, lots of misc.
2451 N Brentwood Circle


LAWN MOWER Dixon,
zero turn, 30 inch. With
attachable Craftsman
lawn sweep, $750.
352-637-0663
LG FRONT LOAD
WASHER lyr old. Perfect
cond. White $650
(352) 527-3204
PACIFIC CS SERIES
5PC DRUM SET
w/Sabian cymbals, dbl
peddle kit, stool,$450
352-201-1916
PINE RIDGE
Fri, Sat, Dec 7 & 8
8:30am to 2pm
Hshld, yard items & more
4095 W Ranger St
REFRIGERATOR
White AMANA, 20CF,
$100; White MAYTAG
DISHWASHER $100
Both in very good cond
(352) 897-4739
SECTIONAL SOFA
camel, 2 yrs old,
exc. cond. $600
352-628-6974
Video Palm Corder
Panasonic, Zoom X14,
color & sound, soft shell
case, tapes & papers
Excel cond. 5175.
352-228-3040, 489-0122
WASHER & DRYER
white, good condition
$250 for pair
352-212-9371
Wheel chair Ramps
Will load into any SUV
or van, hold any power
chair, or handicapped
cart. $150.
352-228-3040, 489-0122



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087


2964583 17
5 3 162 7 9 48
7 8 4931256




6235148 7 9

1 7 5 38 946 24
849762135


-7S3S -G2-


FREE FIREWOOD
CUT TO FIREPLACE
LENGTH (352) 341-1143
FREE KITTEN
female black & orange
5 months old. To good
home only!
(863) 843-2495
Have 3 Cats, one has to
go! male,blue eyed, sia-
mese racoon, beautiful
pls call 352-726-2890
Heater & Accessories
for Hot tub
You Remove
Cit. Sprg (352) 489-4438
Mission in Citrus has a
FREE garage sale to
those in need.
No resale agents! Lots of
baby items, household
items and kids toys.
A little bit of everything.
If you are in need or
know someone who is,
please tell them.
2488 N. Pennsylvania
Crystal River
(near Manatee Lanes)
Fri & Sat all day



FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378
Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077


lost- black and white cat
name COTAanderson st
and charles ave on
11/29/2012 please call
352-476-7574
reward offered

Lost Mane Coon Cat
Pine Ridge 12/4
male,tiger, long hair,
declawed on front, no
collar but microchip-
ped W. Angus Dr.
(352) 697-2220




BLACK PIT BULL
MIX, at E.44 at
Boyscout Rd,
looks like still a puppy
352-637-2162

FEMALE DOG
MIXEDFOUND
BEVERLY HILLS AREA
Filmore St.
(352) 362-1606

Found: Handsome, Pure
White Minature American
Eskimo male dog. Found:
Owner.does not want
dog! I can not keep as I
already have three
dogs!Free to GREAT
home!! Friendly, gets
along great with other
dogs. Do not know about
children. 31/2 yrs.
old.Loves to go Bye Bye!
Please call 352-563-1519
or 727-504-4488.


1. Cronclme 1


COMMUNITY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 C7









CS8 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


D LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 201


NEED A NEW
CAREER?
CAREER PREPARATION
COURSES
Starting Jan./Feb. '13
FIVE-WEEK PROGRAM
MEDICAL ASST. $1,420
TWO-WEEK PROGRAM
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT, $475.
PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119





Fresh Florida 15ct.
"JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077


"Sure, I can do the operation for $800
...bigger stitches."




Thank You For 15 Years, ofAtes.


TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A** ***


Experienced
Manager/Biller
For a DME Company.
Preferably orthothic fitting
experience. Fax or email
resume: 352-527-3401 or
Ikettenacker(ga mail.com

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online training
gets you Job ready
ASAP. HS Diploma/GED
& PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Medical Careers
begin here
Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if
qualified. SCHEV certi-
fied. Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com


N494d a a:B
#1 Employment source is

wwvw.chronicleonline.com


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885





AIRLINE CAREERS

Become an Aviation
Maintenance Tech. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. Job
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
(866)314-3769

Nursing Careers
BEGIN HERE GET
TRAINED IN MONTHS,
NOT YEARS. FINAN-
CIAL AID IF QUALI-
FIED. HOUSING
AVAILABLE. JOB
PLACEMENT
ASSISTANCE. CALL
CENTURY INSTITUTE
(877) 206-6559


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Ann


CLASSIFIED



AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769




EXECUTIVE
CHEF
Country Club
Restaurant exp.
helpful not req. Send
resume to: Blind Box
1818P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429




DRIVERS
Class A Flatbed.
HOME EVERY WEEK-
END! Pay 37/mi, Both
ways, FULL BENEFITS,
Requires 1 year OTR
Flatbed experience,
(800)572-5489 x227,
SunBelt Transport,
Jacksonville, Fl
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624



Manufacturer of
A/C Grilles, Registers
and Diffusers
is currently accept-
ing applications for
an experienced
Sheet Metal Fabrica-
tor. Must have a
strong math and me-
chanical aptitude,
ability to read and
interpret Engineering
Drawings, ability to
plan, fabricate, as-
semble, install, layout
and perform all types
of fabrication, have
knowledge in sheet
metal layout, includ-
ing bending deduc-
tion. Must have expe-
rience in using hand
operated benders,
press brakes, sheet
metal punches
(manual and hydrau-
lic) and be able to
operate fabricating
machines, such as
shears, brakes,
presses to cut, punch,
and bend materials.
Job will also consist of
trimming, filing, grind-
ing, deburring and
buffing using hand
tools and power
tools. Must be able
to inspect assemblies
for conformance to
specifications, using
measuring instru-
ments such as cali-
pers, scales, gauges,
etc. Excellent bene-
fits package, 401k.
Appoolv In person to
METAL INDUSTRIES
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, Fl 33513.
DFW EOE.


HELP WANTED
for Two Positions:
Transport /
Truck Driver and
Heavy Equipment
Mechanic
Needs to be organ-
ized, motivated and
must have a clean
Class A driver's lic.
APPLY AT
Pospiech
Contracting, Inc
201 S. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34452
or send resume to
info@pospiech
contracting.comrn

MASON &
MASON TENDERS
Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and from
work in Citrus & sur-
rounding counties
(352) 302-2395




TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Earn Extra Christmas
money. More Exp.
the more you. make
.Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr




CUSTOMER SVC
P/T 30 hrs, send resume:
citrusventures@
hotmail.com
Seasonal Cleaner
Contractor Wanted
P/T. Timely, accurate &
exp. 352-302-6418

TEMPORARY
P/T RETAIL
SERVICE CLERK
Customer serv. exp.,
Flexible wl schedule,
some weekends.,
Able to lift. Computer
knowledge, copier & of-
fice equip. exp.
Email Resume To:
Lordcopsp@
centurylink.net
or 746-1700




Apply Now, 12 Drivers
Needed. Top 5% Pay &
Late Model Equipment.
Guaranteed Home for
Xmas. Need CDL Class
A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782
www.ad-drivers.com




"Can Your Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School.
3wk Training Program.
Backhoes, Bulldozers,
Excavators. Local Job
Placement Asst. VA
Benefits Approved. 2
National Certifications.
(866)362-6497


ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical
*Business
*Cnminal Justice
*Hospitality
Job placement
assistance.Computer
available. Financial Aid
if qualified. SCHEV
authorized. Call
www.Centura
Online.com
888-203-3179


CDM ARMS,
CONCEALED
WEAPONS COURSE
DEC 8TH. CALL TO
SIGN UP!
Buy, Sell, Trade, Guns.
Dunnellon 352-304-8491







SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25,2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com






LOCAL BRIDAL/
FORMAL WEAR
Business for Sale
All Equipment and
Inventory Included
CALL (352) 563-0722




Colectble


Comic Books & Baseball
Cards LG Assortment
pls call 352-634-3143
HOWARD MILLER
Grandfather Curio Clock
cost $2000 will sell $1000
showroom cond.
352-382-5804
Musical Snow Globe
w/moving train Hallmark
Coca Cola Santa Unique
Gift $18 New in box Can
email pic 352-382-3650




DIGITAL SUPERWAVE
OVEN The Sharper Im-
age, Oven with extended
ring, NEW cost $145,
ASK $95 419-7017
DISHWASHER Maytag
Performa, BRAND NEW
cond. Never used. White.
275.00 Call
(352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
DRYER $100 with 90 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504
ELECTRIC RANGE W/
OVER RANGE
MICROWAVE Both
maytags, white, Brand
New! Never been used.
Range is $360 and OTR
Microwave $210.
Call (352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
Electric Soup-A-Chef
Soup Maker
NEW, Rapid heating
cooks boils simmers 30
mins,$50 419-7017
ELECTRIC STOVE
2003 GE Black Glass
Top. Exc Condition $100;
2003 GE Black
Microwave $50
(352) 897-4739
FREEZER GE upright
20x24x60 inches 3yrs old
up and running
352-341-4586
$100
GE REFRIGERATOR
21 cubic ft w/ice maker
white, $300
352-382-0608
GE REFRIGERATOR
side by side
icemaker/water runs
great white $300
352-637-1510
GE Refrigerator
White $400.
GE Stove Self Cleaning
White $225. Both less
than 2vrs old!
(352) 726-8021
KENMORE WASHING
MACHINE Kenmore
washing machine good
condition..$75.00
352-527-3177
LG FRONT LOAD
WASHER lyr old. Perfect
cond. White $650
(352) 527-3204
MAYTAG PLUS
26.8cu Stainless steel
side by side w/water &
ice. Exc. cond. $700
352-794-7488
Refrigerator Whirlpool,
white, 25/2 cu ft. side
by side icemaker, eve-
rything works $150
Washer, Whirlpool,
white, super capacity
$150 (352) 637-4731


ieesQ12.1-0
0o ,4


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179
Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent CIng.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352)419-6549




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549




Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia In-
continency No Prob.
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/ 410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXP- Slabs,
Driveway,Patios,Found
-ation Repair #CBC057
405, (352) 427-5775



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *


m
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 *k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
*k 352-257-9508 k
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
Reoair. Remodel.
Additions
Free est.crc1330081
(352 ) 949-2292
STEVEN GIBSON
Handyman & Maint.
Services, 20+ yrs., Exp.
(352) 308-2379


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373"*


GOOD MORNING LAWN
CARE
Leaves to Lawns *
Call 352-502-6588

GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588

LAWNCARE N MORE
Fall Clean-up, leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
WINTER SPECIAL
$35 for Driveways
*** up to 60ft! ***
Ann's 352-601-3174










LEGAL / Professional
SAVE divorce, custody
wills, deeds, etc. Guaran-
teed docs 352-341-2173


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


UNITYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling &Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Fire wd.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373"*


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
*All Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry

Screening
Cl. ean Dryer

Affoduawe & Dependable
,S Experience lifelong
352.344-0905
c cell' 400-1722
;ured -Lic #37761





VINDON

We dean Windows ad oa Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
SGutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


Add an arlisic touch to your existing yard
1 or pool or plan
Hr0meths"
r coqmpletynew!
.) "Often ihnitated,
r never dupcate


OUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPA VER SPECIALIST


i POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 352-400.3188


Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
FREE ESTIMATES -

1 352-465-6641


GENERAC
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
General Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized TechniciansW
ER0015377







AAA ROOFING
Call the "4ak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate

$1OO OFF
, Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
ic./Ins. CCCO57537 DDBP


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




05SAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190





ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.

352-621-0881

6 Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextaluml3@yahoo.com


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!"
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Esdmates
352465,6079


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090
Lic# CC2544


REFRIGERATOR
2DR Whirlpool, 1OCF,
White, Almost New $150
(352) 794-6545
REFRIGERATOR
White AMANA, 20CF,
$100; White MAYTAG
DISHWASHER $100
Both in very good cond
(352) 897-4739
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
TRASH COMPACTOR
Kenmore trash
compactor. Black. $30.
352-503-9354
WASHER
Good condition, 30 day
warranty. $100
352-476-9019
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 90 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504




AUCTION
Every Friday Night
@ 6pm
Estate Liquidations
and Auctions LLC
628 SE HWY 19
Crystal River
352-228-4920
estateliauidations
andauctions.com
AU 4381 AB 3202

DUDLEY'S

THREE AUCTIONS

12/6 ESTATE
ADVENTURE
4000 S Fl Ave,
Inverness, 3pm
2007 PT Cruiser Con-
vertible w/8kmiles, Like
new Furniture inc. Cot-
tage House, Lg Col Pwr
& hnd tools, Christmas
items, Vending Ma-
chine, GREAT PLACE
TO PURCHASE unique
gifts.
12/7 REAL ESTATE &
CONTENTS
4560 N Allamandra Dr
(Pine Ridge) 8am RE
10am SELLING TO
SETTLE ESTATE 3/3
POOL home 4343 Un-
der roof 3 car garage
$$$ Landscaping, tons
of extras Inc. Thermidor
Commercial Stove,
MUST SEE. Hitchcock,
Ethan Allen, Broyhill all
high end furniture &
accessories. HUGE
Auction. Bring Chair.
ALSO SELLING Adj.
1 acre at corner of
Canarywood
12/7 REAL ESTATE
Black Diamond GOLF
COURSE lot ABSO-
LUTE preview 12:30
Auction 1pm Lot on the
#1 Fairway of Ranch .
Must register prior
www.dudleysauction.
com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** * *


12-6









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


sALE
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
FRI. 12/7 review (04
auction 6om
Bring in this ad receive
5% disc. this wk only
**WE BUY ESTATES*
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389




AIR COMPRESSOR
10HP/3phase. $200
Must Sell *
20 x 30 Ruemellin Utility
Sandblaster. $200
352-586-0084
COMPRESSOR Crafts-
man 150psi, 1.5 HP,
15gal with hose
& hose reel. $100
352-400-0141
CRAFTSMAN LT1000-
LAWN TRACTOR For
sale. 17.5 Horse power,
42 inch mower. Electric
start, 6 speed transaxle.
Will include dual bag
grass catcher. $500.00.
Cash only, please.
352-726-6168
GENERAL
GENERATOR Heavy
Duty, 5550W, 8550S,
never used. $375
352-400-0141
PARTS CLEANER $125.

Ulility Pickup Racks $75.

CALL 352-586-0084
PRESSURE WASHER:
Karcher pressure
washer,2400 PSI, $20
352-503-9354




32" TV, not HD, w/
washed oak finished
cabinet $65. obo
(352) 344-9288
MAGNAVOX HOME
STEREO 5-disc changer
radio, 3 speakers
mint condition $35
860-2475
RCA 26" FLAT SCREEN
WITH DVD, 1YR OLD
$129
(352)637-5909
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $30
352-613-0529
TCLL40FHDF11TA
40-INCH TCL
L40FHDF11TA 1080p 60
Hz LCD HDTV, 1 yr old
used little cost $400 ask
$200 firm 419-7017
TELEVISION 25" with
remote $30.00
352-527-3177
TOSHIBA PORTABLE
DVD PLAYER SD-P1400
New In Box 7" TFT LCD
All Accessones Included
$60 727-463-4411




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




PRESSURE WASHER
Campbell Hausfeld
PW1825 1800 PSI, cost
$128 on sale,used 2x,
ask $80 352-419-7017




**HIDE- A -BED**
Blue Denim Sofa w/
queen size sleeper,
Good Condition $125
352-746-4232
3 Bar stools,
New
w/ arm & foot rest,
$200.
352-795-2975
3 PC LIVING RM SUITE
Sofa Loveseat &
Wing backchair
Floral pattern w/burgandy
strips. Exc cond.
Never used. $550
352-527-8165
4 DINETTE CHAIRS
Wood w/beige uphlostery
on wheels $140.
STUDENT DESK (white)
$25 352-527-9332
ANTIQUE DRY SINK
Dark Antiqued Pine -
$75.00 352-382-4911


Loveseat w/lg ottoman
Beige. Like new $275.
Can email pics.
352-566-6589
BAR STOOLS
2 Multi color fabric
barstools $15.00 each.
352-527-3177
BAR STOOLS
3 44" tall swivel dark bwn
w/ tan seats almost new
$65; 3 34" tall swivel
white exc cond. $50.
352-341-1576
BASSETT DINING RM
Table w/4 highback
chairs, med. cherry color.
Top 42 x60 rectangular
w/leaf. Exc cond. $1000
352-522-1048
Complete Bedroom Set
Broyhill, Twin Headbd
Dresser w/mirror, desk
w/hutch, chest of draw-
ers. Good cond. $250
(352) 563-5206
Couch, Love Seat
Blue Floral
& 3 Tables
excellent condition
$450.
(352) 746-3649
FULL SIZE BOX SPRING
In bag ready to go $25
call or text 352-746-0401
LARGE SECTIONAL
SOFA Very nice
L-sectional couch with
dual recliners on each
end. $300 352-503-2610
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET.
In original plastic, never
used. Ong price $3000,
Sacrifice $975. Can deliver.
Call Bill (813)298-0221
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Mirror Wall Panels
6'x8", beveled edges,
8 panels, perfect for
enhancing size of room
$90 (352) 746-1486
PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN BEDROOM
SET. 5 piece queen bed-
room set, quality built,
used 6 months, like new.
Frame, mattress, springs.
Can deliver. $400. For in-
formation 352-897-0711
RATTAN TABLE AND
CHAIRS Natural rattan
glass top table and 4 high
back arm chairs 1 year
old used twice. Have orig-
inal receipt.
Sold our house and down
sized. purchase for $999
will sell for $499 call any-
time 740-705-9004
Sugarmill Woods
RECLINER CHAIR
Beige, med size, as new
$200 Dunnellon
(352) 465-9026
SECTIONAL SOFA
camel, 2 yrs old,
exc. cond. $600
352-628-6974
SOFA BED
IN VERY COND.
NEUTRAL COLORS
$100
920-723-2214
SOFA BED
W/OTTOMAN Red
micro-fiber, like new, full
size, $125. 352-795-6290
Sofa, Love Seat & Chair
Matching, beige
microfiber $500.
Glass ends tables &
coffee tables, match-
ing $175, 352-382-3497
STAGE COACH STYLE
BENCH very nice west-
ern style bench. $40.00
352-527-3177
TV ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER Black & Glass
like new $75 Can text pic
call or text 352-746-0401
TWIN BED
hi-lo frame manual
w/box spring & mattress
$125
(352) 220-3883
Twin Bedroom Set
5 piece, w/ mattress
and boxsprings $200
Queen Sz. Mattress Set
$50, All in good shape
(352) 419-7113
UPHOLSTERED CHAIR
Exc condition.Lt gold w/
tiny flocking.Can send
pix.$35 Text your email to
(904) 687 3866
WALNUT TABLES
2 Small 36 inch high
square tables somewhat
like used in coffee shop.
$25.00 ea 352-527-3177


UIDIER MEDR M
SET includes dbl dresser
two (2) drawer night-
stands, dresser mirror
queen headboard.
$450 352-746-2329




2006 HUSQVARNA
Garden Tractor 25hp
Kohler Hydrostatic
transmission, 48" mower
& 48" landscape box
$1200 (352) 601-2480
Craftsman
Riding Mower
Briggs & Stratton
Eng., 15.5 HP Motor
42" Deck $400
(352) 746-7357
JOHN DEER LAWN
TRACTOR LX 188
hydro static, 48" cut
$500 352-564-8726
LAWN MOWER Dixon,
zero turn, 30 inch. With
attachable Craftsman
lawn sweep, $750.
352-637-0663
TORO
Riding lawn mower.
$400.
Echo styx Edger
$80
352-212-8855




BEVERLY HILLS
Frl, 8 to ? Sat, 8 to noon
BIGGEST YARD SALE
OF THE YEAR! tools to
power chair, everything
from table saw to
walkers
197 W. Sugarberry Ln.

1


BEVERLY HILLS
Fri, Sat 8 to 2
marine items, guitar,
hshld,sm ladies clothes
216 & 218 S. Lee St

CITRUS SPRINGS
FIRST TIME SALE
Fn, Sat, 8 to 3
hshld, tools, fabrics,
collectibles, lots of misc.
7336 N. Veronica Drive
CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri & Sat 7:00 5:00
House sale! Everything
must go! Furniture,
tools, appliances, ETC
5720 Stockholm Ln
CRYSTAL RIVER
Huge Holiday Sale *
Thurs. 6 & Fri. 7,9A.- 4P.
334 N. Pompeo Ave.
DUNNELLON
Thurs Frl & Sat 9a- until
Lots of xmas stuff, Horse
carriages & tack, 2 wheel
weed whacker, pole
auger, & lots more.
5971 W Last Chance Ln





EL DORADO

ESTATES/LecantoFr
i, Sat, Dec 7 & 8th
8 to 2, records,
shot glasses, thou-
sand watt generator
Lots of goodies!
6115 S. Coronado Ter

FLORAL CITY
Fri. & Sat.
dolls, watches, guns,
tools, misc.
7408 E. April Ct.
FLORAL CITY
Thur,Fri, Sat, 8-4
xmas decor, curtains &
rods, jewelry, hshld items,
overhead projector
and screen, vcrs,
7200 E Hampton Ct.
HERNANDO
Moving Sale
Thurs. Frl & Sat 8a -3p
rain or shine inside & out!
Furn., guy stuff, bar,
Kegerator, Bud mug
collection, Star Trek, doll
house. Lots of stuff.
2313 N. Lakefront Dr.
(off Parson Pt Rd.)
HERNANDO
Moving Sale
Thurs. Fri & Sat 8a -3p
rain or shine inside & out!
Furn., guy stuff, bar,
Kegerator, Bud mug
collection, Star Trek, doll
house. Lots of stuff.
2313 N. Lakefront Dr.
(off Parsons Pt Rd.)
HOMOSASSA
3 FAMILY SALE
Wed. Thurs Fn. 8a-5p
clean, new clothes
Too Much List!
6753 W. COUNTRY
CLUB


HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat 8am to 2pm
quilts, wicker, B&D 36v
cordless mower, ladies
24" cruiser bike, prints,
books, xmas, more
7185 W Hadenotter Ln
off Memorial

HOMOSASSA
Thur. Fri. & Sat. 8a-5p,
Something for every-
one, mostly all new.
beautiful china cab..
Ig. dresser. Mens Stuff
4825 W. Oaklawn St.
HOMOSASSA
Thurs. Fri. & Sat. 8am.
HUGE SALE
Green Acres St
INVERNESS
Fri. 7, & Sat. 8, 8a-2p
404 Iris Lane
INVERNESS
Fri. 7, & Sat. 8, 8a-3p
Holiday, Tools, Hshold.
6432 E. Willow Street
INVERNESS
Thurs & Fn 8am-2pm
Christmas Decorations,
rockers, household items
134 Poe St
INVERNESS
Thurs & Fn 8am-2pm
Christmas Decorations,
rockers, household items
134 Poe St
INVERNESS
Thurs Fri Sat & Sun 9-3
1175 S Telephone Pt Rd
INVERNESS
Thurs. & Fri 9am-5pm
Oak dining rm table &
chairs, misc household
items, & tools.
5740 S. Bristol Terrace.

INVERNESS
Thurs. & Friday 8a-4p
Nice 4 seater golf
cart, canoe, utility
trailers. $150. & up
generator, roto tiller.
rear eng. mower
MISC. Fishing, plumb-
ing electrical. & tools
Turn at Applebees
restaurant, 4 miles, S.
on 581 look for signs

t-.--,.-



! t' u,


LECANTO
Frl, Sat, 12/7 & 12/8
9am to 6pm, tools,
shopsmith, workbench,
little giant ladder, bedrm
set, lots of misc.
2451 N Brentwood Circle
PINE RIDGE
Fri, Sat, Dec 7 & 8
8:30am to 2pm
Hshld, yard items & more
4095 W Ranger St

Rainbow Lake Est
MOVING SALE *
Everything Must Go!
Come anytime from
now until Dec. 24
Tools, Lawn mower.
lawn ornaments, all
furn., appliances,
MUCH more 21184
SW Honeysuckle St.




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 HOUSES Estate Sale
Sat, Dec. 1 thru Sat,
Dec. 8, 10 to5 daily
6201 Pine Circle




BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING SIZE 5 & 6 PANTS,
SHIRTS & JACKETS
$35 352-613-0529




32 INCH GARAGE/BACK
DOOR Very good condl-
tion, heavy, has window
$50 860-2475
8FT SPRUCE XMAS
TREE, ORNAMENTS,
LIGHTS, $50
(352) 341-5182
Baby Stroller deluxe
model with canopy $30
Inverness
864-283-5797
BATTERY OPERATED
JEEP WITH CHARGER
PEG PEREGO $90
352-613-0529
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $400 OBO
(352) 746-3327
CANON PIXMA MX350
Wireless Office All-in-One
Printer (4205B002) Ask-
ing $50 419-7017
Cargo Carrier fits
2" receiver, pd $300
never used, sell for
$100 352-447-2967
CHRISTMAS TREE
Beautiful 12FT, looks real
w/stand pd $800, asking
$299 OBO 352-726-6567
CHRISTMAS TREE
Martha Stewart 6 ft.
pre-lit. $35.00. 3 piece
reindeer set for yard.
$25.00 352-344-5311
COMFORTER SET
FULL HANNAH MON-
TANA WITH SHEETS &
PILLOW CASES $35
352-613-0529
Drum Set, amplifier
w/earphones $65
3l heel woman's bike
w/basket $100
352-527-0409
ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
Elliptical exercise
machine $75.00
352-527-3177
FIBERGLASS PET CAR-
RIERS MEDIUM SIZE &
1 NICE CAT CARRIER
20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP"*
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077
Garage Beer
Refrigerator $125. firm
54 Piece Set Can-
nonsburg Lejean 22K
Floral Scal loped China
$170. (352) 270-4087
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
Green House


10 ft x 16 ft, with extras
Paid $2,300.
Asking $1,200 obo
(352) 513-5168
Kerby Ultimate Vacuum
w/ Carpet Shampoo
system. Complete wall
accessories. Like New
Ong price $1500, asking
$350 (352) 860-1021
KING SIZE BED
complete, good cond.
$100, Oak Gun Case
exc. shape $100
352-341-2019
LIFE-LIKE TRAINS SET
Heavy Hauler train set
with extra cars and
tracks. Used twice. $70.
Call 1-352-382-1154


CLASSIFIED




GUITAR
$50
STEAM FAST STEAM
MOP $70
352-527-1493
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825

OPTIMUS PORTABLE
RECORD PLAYER
SPD 33. $50
VINTAGE CEDAR
CHEST $30
352-527-1493
PERFUMEAND
SATCHET VINTAGE
LEFFLEUR BY COTY
$25.75 EAU DE
PARFUM 419-5981
PICNIC TABLE 5 FOOT
LONG GOOD CONDI-
TION $85 352-613-0529
POOL HEATER
AQUA CAL T115
6 yrs old. Works Great
$450.
61% X 812ft. Utility Trailer
$400 (352) 637-0397
QUANTUM 6000
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
ex. cond., batt. charger,
cushion $2,500.00 obo
(352) 527-2085
SAMSONITE HANGING
TRAVEL BAG $10 LUG-
GAGE
CARRIER/PERSONAL
DOLLY $10
352-419-5981
SKYLIGHT 27"/27" BUB-
BLE TYPE ONLY 45.00
352-464-0316

SOLD
86' EZ GO GOLF CART
TOY HESS TRUCKS
mint cond. w/bag & box,
great Chnstmas gift!
5 dif. trucks $30 ea
352-341-4754
Video Palm Corder
Panasonic, Zoom X14,
color & sound, soft shell
case, tapes & papers
Excelcond. $175.
352-228-3040, 489-0122
VINTAGE HURON
CHIEF SNOW SHOES-
wood frame with gut,
leather shoe straps, Ex+,
$60, 352-628-0033
WOOD DISPLAY RACK
2 wood cylindrical display
racks $30 each.
352-527-3177




4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT $75.00
352-464-0316
AFPIRE QUICKIE
Power chair EXC. COND
NEW BATTERIES
$700.(352) 726-3263
BEDSIDE COMMODE
ANDALUMINUM
WALKER ADJUSTABLE
LEGS ONLY 20.00
EACH 352 464 0316
GO GO ELITE
SCOOTER motorized
scooter breaks down in
four pieces for easy
transport; used for 6
months, 1600$ new, sell
for 800$ OBO; you pick
up citrus co
mary031149@gmail.com
JAZZY 1170
Low Rider power chair
needs some work.
$500.(352) 726-3263
JET 7 POWER CHAIR
WITH AUTO LIFT Good
condition. $400 OBO
(352) 513-4127
Pride Scooter,
Celebrity Wide seat.
Blue. $300. obo
(352) 527-1097
TOILET SEAT RISER 4"
WITH HANDLES FOR
SUPPORT ONLY 25.00
352 464 0316
Wheel chair Ramps
Will load into any SUV
or van, hold any power
chair, or handicapped
cart. $150.
352-228-3040, 489-0122




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying
sterling silver flatware
and US silver coins
(352) 601-7074




"FAT STRAT"STYLE
GUITAR HSS PICKUPS,
METALLIC FINISH
"NEW IN BOX" $75
352-601-6625
"GOT BANJO?" ALMOST
NEW 5 STRING BANJO
W/RESONATER PLAYS
NICE, LOOKS GREAT!
$90 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PACKAGE"NEW"
W/GIGBAG,STRAP,
CHART,STRINGS,ETC
$75 352-601-6625
BALDWIN PIANO
Hamilton Studio upright
Bench Seat, Oak wood
mnt cond. $1,000.
352-746-1654
CASIO KEYBOARD
CTK 2000, heavy duty
stand, playbooks,
$100 352-527-3874
ELECTRIC GUITAR
STARTER KIT
W/AMP,GIGBATGTUNER-
STRAP, ETC$45
352-601-6625
HORNER F5 MODEL
MANDOLIN
and hard case, $395.
Jimmie at 621-0617
KIMBALL ORGAN
Performer-Entertainer
Two tier. exc. cond.
w/bench books & light.
$150 352-634-0570
LEFTY BLACK STRAT
STYLE GUITAR, "NEW"
PLAYS, SOUNDS,


LOOKS PERFECT! $45
352-601-6625
LEFTY STRAT STYLE
GUITAR W/AMP,
TUNER,STRAP,STRING,
ETC "NEW IN BOX" $75
352-601-6625
MITCHELL 000
BODYSOLID TOP
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG $100
352-601-6625
PACIFIC CS SERIES
5PC DRUM SET
w/Sabian cymbals, dbl
peddle kit, stool,$450
352-201-1916
PIANO
Yamaha portable "Grand"
DGX-505 w/stand, bench
& foot switch. Digital
music, notebook &
software. New cond.
$500 (352) 489-1593


2 AIR BAKE COOKIE
SHEETS $5 GREEN
MIXING BOWL 13 INCH
LIKE NEW $10
Inverness 352-419-5981
2 LIGHT GREEN
BRAIDED RUGS One
oval, one round. $25 for
both. Text email address
for pix & details. 904 687
3866
11X18 W/W CARPET
pale beige, clean $100
352-513-4614
9X18 W/W CARPET Pale
beige, clean $85
352-513-4614
AERO BED Rarely used
blow up Queen Bed. $35.
352.249.9164
Almost new,
wicker rocker,
high back, smoke free
home $75.
(352) 586-1566
BAMBOO COFFEE
TABLE with glass top
approx 3 ft wide $25
860-2475
FLUTED QUICHE DISH
IRIDESCENT WHITE
$10 PORCELAIN JAM
JAR WITH LID FRANCE
$8 352-419-5981
HOOVER STEAMVAC
Quick-N-Lite Carpet
Cleaner FH50005
NEVER USED asking
$80 419-7017
KITCHEN CANNISTER
SET $10 13 INCH DEC-
ORATIVE CLEAR
GLASS CHRISTMAS
PLATE $10 419-5981
SILK FICUS TREES 4
are 5-6' tall; 1 is 8-9' tall &
fuller. $7-25. Can send
pix & details. Text email
addr to 904 687 3866






BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $900 OBO
A Great Holiday Gift
352-697-2771
Elliptical Exercise
Machine
Good Condition
$45.00 obo
(352) 489-8530
EXERCISE BIKE UP-
RIGHT FAN TYPE (DP)
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO 85.00 352 464 0316
POWERHOUSE
WM 1501
24 different workouts!
$300. 352-628-5085
PR FORM 365S
Treadmill $100
352-212-1598 or
352-566-6345
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE SAVE YOUR
BACK WORKS GREAT
ONLY 100.00 352 464
0316
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
60.00 352 464 0316




1 Set Top Flight
Men, right hand
Golf Clubs$75
1 set Comp 400W Golf
Clubs, Men, right hand
$75. (352) 860-0229
2 Rubbermaid Boxes
Full of Paint Ball Guns
and Accessories
Dye, Smart Parts,
Tipman, Fill Station $250
(352) 563-0328
'04 EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric, sharp, exc
cond. incl. charger.
$1,995 (352) 503-2847
Club Car Golf Cart
2007,exc. condition
backseats, lights,
exc. batteries $1850.
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Dec.. 8th 9-5p
Sun. Aug. 9th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
KAYAK
Wilderness Systems Tar-
pon 120, yellow, used ap-
prox 7 x's, garaged, inc.
paddle, transport cart &
XL life preserver, over
$1k in equip. $675
Ed, 352-726-5677
NEW FN 5-7 LEATHER
HOLSTER Paddle or
beltloop mount $60
5134614
SHOTGUN shells 12
ga.-10 boxes.#4
shot.$100 352-503-2792
Thule Kayak Roof car-
rier & accessories
$125, bike carrier "3"
for 2" hitch, $60
352-447-2967




Covered CARGO Trailer
4'wide 8'long and 6' high.
New spare tire included.
Pnce $1050
352-341-1132




TURQUOISE/ABALONE
NECKLACE $25
VINTAGE BLACK JET
NECKLACE $10
352-419-5981




JUSTIN BIEBER
BELIEVE TOUR 6
tickets section 226 row
14 Amway Arena,
Orlando Jan 25, 2013
$200.ea 352-637-5537


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
S, , , ,


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 C9

WORDY GURDY 0 J.....DCQX


WORDY GCURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE

pair of words (like FAT CAT
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. A Kardashian's lap pool workouts (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
|definition tells you how many
3. Challenge "Homeland" star Danes (1) syllables in each word.

S@2012 UFS, Dist by Univ Ucck for UFS
4. Tossed greens love song (2)


5. Western grassland milk farm (2)


6. Soldier groups' two-door cars (1)


7. Business get-together salutation (2)
----------l -----------


12-6-12


9NISIID 9NIaaM .L SBdnlO3 SdOOHL' 9 AIHIV aTIIV l d s
VTIVH aV'IVS'P 3HIWVD IHV(I SWIAS SNII 'Z NIflMH NMflI '
SH:1 SNV


II.' -orsA


$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47
for years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917. Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucsl3@aol.com

Gas Engines or Parts,
1903 & Up Toy or full
size Cash on Spot,
Cell (315) 466-2268

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369





4 WIRED HAIR
Daschund PUPPIES
Ready to go Now,
will hold till Christmas
(352) 464-2382

14 Tiny Yorkies $600.
- $700. ea. Small, Tiny &
Very Tiny Only 5
females, Raised in
loving home. CKC Reg.
health certs., & puppy
pacs. Parents on site
come watch them play
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258










Arsenio
Arsenio is a beautiful
young terrier/pit bull
mix who was brought
to the shelter as a
stray. He is about
1-y.o. and is very af-
fectionate and play-
ful. He loves to be
with his human, and
gets along with other
dogs also. He is a
beautiful golden
beige in color with a
white chest and
white front paws. He
is not yet neutered
but would be at the
time of his adoption.
He is a strong young
dog and a fenced
yard to run in is rec-
ommended for him.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288.











DOUGIE
Dougie is a laid-back
friendly guy, alert and
attentive. He loves his
human friends and
sits, shakes and
speaks on command.
His foster mom says
he is housebroken
and has great house
manners. He is 5
years old, neutered
and Heartworm
-negative. Weighs 45
pounds and gets
along with most other
dogs. He so deserves
a great life and will
surely be your great
companion. He will
love you forever Call
his foster mom Donna
@ 352-249-7801.


for Chnstmas! exc. pets
exotic tri-color, $10 ea.
352-503-6952
CHIHUAHUA PUPS
For Sale
Ready to go Dec 28th.
2 Females & 2 Males
$100ea 352-503-9257
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
1 Males & 3 Females,
Available AKC and all
Shots $1,500 to $1,750
Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
FREE Kittens looking for
a good home. 5 adorable
8 weeks old kittens. 2
black & white tuxedo 2
black males, 1 gray
female. (510) 867-5727








SETH
Seth is a 1 y-o red
nosed pit bull puppy
with green eyes.
He is neutered.
hearfworm-negative.
microchipped and
housebroken, learn-
ing basic commands.
Loves treats and
chewing on his bone!
Friendly, energetic.
and loves his human
and dog friends. A
favorite activity is on
the couch for a nap.
He would be a great
companion. For more
information contact
his foster family,
Crystal and Gerome
@ 352-533-4332. "

Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofouos.net











WAGS
Wags is a ly.o.
terrier/pit bull mix, black
and white in color, neu-
tered and
Heartworm-negative,
up to date with shots.
Weighs 45 pounds. He
has lots of personality
and is an entertainer,
will keep you amused.
He is a great family
dog, loves all people,
young and old. Gets
along great with other
dogs, gives lots of cud-
dles and kisses. That
tail never stops wagg-
ing. Call Karen @
218-780-1808.


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
i es grass cutting
1 your water
S1 bedrooms

325 inc. H20
s 2 bedrooms
start
@ $450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


HERNANDO
2/1 $450 mo+dep
1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
352-201-2428

HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last &Sec
(352) 382-5661

HOMOSASSA
3/2 W/ Porch & Deck
$650/mo. first & sec
603-860-7455






BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 312
1500 sq. ft. On/2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183


DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, Large Lot,
Quiet Area $28,000
(727) 480-5512


HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
S Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807


Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95% re-
modeled inside, 1.25 ac-
res half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see! 74K
(352) 621-0192

Palm Harbor Homes
Mobile Condo w/ porch
2BR/2BA $299/Month
800-622-2832


REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181






**CRYSTALRIVER**
3b/2ba den,newer c/h/a
carpet & vinyl, very clean
RV Hkup. $39.900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340

FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498

HERNANDO 1 ACRE
Workshop 24x40w/ac
Kit-log cabin look+den/fpl
$$$ under $50k $$$
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352)634-6340

HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 476-7077

HOMOSASSA
DBL MH, pool, 4 rentals,
2 + acres, 2 workshops,
Owner Fin. 20% DOWN
$160K 352-628-0304





2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348

2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987

FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420

INVERNESS 2/2
completely remodeled
carport,scnrm,w/attached
storage shed, plywood
floors, drywall, $10,500
352-419-4606

INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
asking $13,500
352-419-6476


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


WANTED

Are You

Interested In:

Beii
\ e yOour own
boss?

Increasing potential
earnings.

SGrowing your
exclusive area?

S. -. Working 1
"' -s independently?

," Working with a
i. i*,0 -' successful company?





u www.chronicleonline.com


Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Requirements: Do you have what it takes?

Ability to work overnight Attention to detail
Covered Truck, Van or SUV 365 Days/Year
Clean Driving Record Deadline and Customer
SCredit & Background Check Service oriented
Access to your own help
Lifting and physical ability Flexible under pressure
Team Player Positive Thinker
Must have a back-up plan Hard and smart worker
Computer & Internet Access Keen sense of urgency


g Deliver to stores and coin racks.
i Experience preferred but not required.









C10 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012


Inverness, FL2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Com-
pletely updated DW
home on Lake Hender-
son 55+Park. Ph
309-453-3072 or
35-4llo..f-loA t $3. fnn


INVERNESS/DNTWN
***MELODY PARK***
2/2/carport $11,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352) 634-6340
Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch, 2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958
MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$8,000. (708) 308-3138
STONEBROOK MHP
2BR, 2BA, 1200 sq. ft.,
Fully Furnished
Lakeview Homosassa
$40,000., MUST SEE!
(352) 628-9660




CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2,House w/ Gar., $600
3/2, Seasonal DW, $1,000
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all util. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec., 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$300/$200 dp. Trails
End Camp, A Friendly
Place to Live
352-726-3699
--- ---y q
INVERNESS
S2 B/R's Available
I CANDLEWOOD
COURT
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
IRental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF,8-12& 1-5
307 Washington Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.



OPPORTUNITY I
L------ J
INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
LECANTO
Nice, Clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000




INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$700. mo 317-442-1063




BEVERLY HILLS
55+ 2/2/1, fully furn.
$1,300 mo. 746-2303
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
Pets? No smoking. 1st
& sec. 352-212-4981





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370




BEVERLY HILLS
1 OR 2 BR, C/H/A QUIET
AREA $575
FIRST MONTH FREE
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA, Fncd
$525. mo 352-795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA Near
Shopping $550. mo.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
Huge House 3/3/2
$800, 352-464-2514
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2 Enclosed Porch,
Laundry room. Nice
back yard. Fenced.
$750. (352)-489-0117

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, $475
3/2/2 House,
Meadows, $675
CITRUS SPRINGS


3/2/2 house, $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616


RYTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm cottage. Good
rental history a must.
1st/last/sec $400 + elec.
352-628-1062
INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1/1 Lg. fam rm, shed.
$695.F/L/S Avail 12/1
352-560-7857
INVERNESS
Like new, 2/2 villa near
pk, $625 (352) 212-4873




FLORAL CITY
3/1, 1,200 sf, Boat Dock,
Lrg. Lanai, oak trees,
priv. fnced, $700. mo.
incl cable. 352-419-7063

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225





CRYSTAL RIVER
apt.to share,reasonable
352-563-0515





For Salenor

CHASSA-

HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin.. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN orGA.
call 352-382-1800




SUGARMILL WDS
furn, 2/2/1 $1000 mnth
River Links Realty
352-628-1616




20 ACRES FREE! Own 60
acres for 40 acre
price/payment. $0 Down,
$168/mo. Money Back
Guarantee, NO CREDIT
CHECKS. Beautiful Views,
Wpet Tp ra i(nns)4-7537


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


Marle-Elena Carter
Broker Associate
Realtor
Accredited Buyer's
Representive
&
Certified Distress
Property Expert

Only Way Realty
352422-4006
www.cartermarla.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it Ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national ongin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tlon or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people secunng
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


CLASSIFIED


INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872

Motivated seller
wants this aone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
cor 352 726 6644


Auctons


DUDLEY'S


THREE AUCTIONS

12/6 ESTATE
ADVENTURE
4000 S FI Ave,
Inverness, 3pm
2007 PT Cruiser Con-
vertible w/8kmiles, Like
new Furniture inc. Cot-
tage House, Lg Col Pwr
& hnd tools, Christmas
items, Vending Ma-
chine, GREAT PLACE
TO PURCHASE unique
gifts.

12/7 REAL ESTATE &
CONTENTS
4560 N Allamandra Dr
(Pine Ridge) 8am RE
10am SELLING TO
SETTLE ESTATE 3/3
POOL home 4343 Un-
der roof 3 car garage
$$$ Landscaping, tons
of extras Inc. Thermidor
Commercial Stove,
MUST SEE. Hitchcock,
Ethan Allen, Broyhill all
high end furniture &
accessories. HUGE
Auction. Bring Chair.
ALSO SELLING Adj.
1 acre at corner of
Canarywood

12/7 REAL ESTATE
Black Diamond GOLF
COURSE lot ABSO-
LUTE preview 12:30
Auction 1pm Lot on the
#1 Fairway of Ranch .
Must register prior
www.dudleysauction.
corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384




Sun Dec 9th 1PM-4PM
4153 N Little Dove Ter.
Custom built pool home.
2956 SQ FT of luxury
living. From HWY 486,
N on Annapolis, L on
Eisenhower,

road name

changes to

White Cloud,

to Litte Dove.

Hse on R


vv"StV,' *rVpete LL;
352-613-2644




OZELLO
**approx. 2.5 acres**
commercial .w/boatramp.
and gulf access, 3, 18',
roll-ups, $149k
call 352-634-3862




REMODELED 2/2/1
103 S Desoto. 1208 sf
New: appliances, paint,
floonng, light fixtures,
fans. Updated kit/baths.
$47,900. 527-1239





YOU'LL v THIS!
CLEARVIEW ESTATES
3+BR/ 2.5 BA, 2+Garage
on 1 acre. Clear views up
and down the trails. Too
many extras, must see.
Mid $200's 352-860-0444




FAIRVIEW ESTATES
Expansive custom built
home on one acre. 3/2 w/
den, 4 car garage w/
workshop. Great
entertainment spaces
inside and out.
Call Myriam at Weston
Properties LLC
32o-R 1i-2g4


Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418




2 Bedroom, 1 Bath,
1 car garage, New Roof,
laminate, flooring,
1000 sq. ft, $57,000,
352-419-6719
Inverness
2 br. 2 ba 1car garage,
Close to downtown.
New carpet, bath fixtures,
fans lights, & stove.
Asking $55000.00
call 352-344-8194
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Sale. Nego.
(908) 322-6529




The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


WALDEN WOODS
Adult Community
2/2, DW+Carport, Furn.
Close to Community
Center. Pool. $25,000
Call 352-428-6919







MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell





For Sale 1
39 Greentree Street,
Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 1/2 OFF
SUGARMILL HOME. RE-
DUCED: $129900
GRANITE/SS HIGH
CEILINGS/DOUBLE
TREY/ PLANT
SHELVES/ 3/2 WITH OF-
FICE/ 2050sq ft. MOVE
IN CONDITION/2005
Contact Ryan
352-346-7179 or
ryan49445@yahoo.com


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

MINI FARM
5 Acres(2 lots) adj
Pine Ridge/C.Springs
3/2/2, block home
w/lots of extras! $185K
(352) 564-8307
PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bnng your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

AAA BLUE WATERS
Exclustive beauty
privately gated 4200 sq ft
splendor (Huge L-R,
D-R,, 3 suites) 799k
(352) 503-2288
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay$429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857
DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Pnced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116
KINGS BAY AREA
A Special home on deep
water. $460,000
804 SE 1st Court, Cyr Riv
(352) 795-3264
Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3.300 sf under roof 2.000
liv.. 3/2/1. den &fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock.
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925

YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
BestNaTureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"





Relocating family need-
ing atleast a 3/2/2 home
in Hernando Elementary
school district. Pre ap-
proved/ fast transactions.
No Real Estate Agents
Kenny (419) 544-9355





DUDLEY'S


THREE AUCTIONS

12/6 ESTATE
ADVENTURE
4000 S FI Ave,
Inverness, 3pm
2007 PT Cruiser Con-
vertible w/8kmiles, Like
new Furniture inc. Cot-
tage House, Lg Col Pwr
& hnd tools, Christmas
items, Vending Ma-
chine, GREAT PLACE
TO PURCHASE unique
gifts.

12/7 REAL ESTATE &
CONTENTS
4560 N Allamandra Dr
(Pine Ridge) 8am RE
10am SELLING TO
SETTLE ESTATE 3/3
POOL home 4343 Un-
der roof 3 car garage
$$$ Landscaping, tons
of extras Inc. Thermidor
Commercial Stove,
MUST SEE. Hitchcock,
Ethan Allen, Broyhill all
high end furniture &
accessories. HUGE
Auction. Bring Chair.
ALSO SELLING Adj.
1 acre at corner of
Canarywood

12/7 REAL ESTATE
Black Diamond GOLF
COURSE lot ABSO-
LUTE preview 12:30
Auction 1pm Lot on the
#1 Fairway of Ranch.
Must register prior
www.dudleysauction.
com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


Waterfro
Home


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

MONTANA
2004 30 FT. 5th Wheel,
2 slide-outs, includes
slider hitch. $17,000.
(352)493-1195,538-6446

TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835

WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For SaFleo SY

8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this beautiful GOLF
COURSE lot (100X125)
located in Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Have
fun boating, fishing and
jet skiing on the nearby
Tsala Apopka Chain of
Lakes. Enjoy nature, wild-
life and the natural beauty
of Fort Cooper State
Park. Call Kelly at
860-459-2411





2006 9.9 Honda,
4 stroke outboard, long
shaft, power tilt, power
trim electric Start $1,500
Cell 954-294-8979
Citrus Co. Area.

BOAT SEAT
flip flop cooler seat
new, $150
352-447-2967

Four, 14 inch, trailer,
Good Year, Marathon
Tires $200.
Manual Jack Plate
$100
352-795-2975

TROLLING MOTOR
MINN-KOTA RIPTIDE
24VOLT REMOTE CIP
QUICK RELEASE,
W/ BATTERIES $400
352-795-2975





2005 G3 EAGLE 185
fish ready, w/90 4-stroke
Yamaha and trailer, fresh
water use, $7500
352-513-4261

'07 14FTAIRBOAT
Alum., Like new, seats 4
w/ dnve-on alum trailer.
Incl $30,000 850hp world
racing engine. Orginal
cost $55,000. Selling
$25,000. (352)793-3511
or cell (352)303-9612




AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7500 352-637-1391




MOST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES

DOCK SPACE AVAIL.
In Crystal River
Deep Water Canal
(352) 212-4839

EAGLE SKIMMER
'99, Flats Boat, tunnel,
50 John, new troll mtr.
FF, GPS, excel. $6,000
obo (352) 527-4910

FLATS BOAT
1995 18ft Islander cc
2004 90hp Mercury 2ST.
very low hrs. Jack plate,
polling platform, fish
finder, heavy duty Alum.
trailer w/spare tire. $7200.
906-203-2221
(Homosassa)

G-3
Model 1236 Alum. Jon
boat, swivel seats, troll.
motor, depth/fish finder,
Galvan. trailer, &
9.8 merc. $1650.
352-341-1709

JON BOAT
18 ft., flat bottom,all
new decking. 25H
mercury, GPS & Trailer
$3,500 (352) 563-0328

STARCRAFT
'92 20FT PONTOON
50hp Yamaha, like new,
enclosed toilet, trailer dbl
axel w/ new tires.
$4400.(352) 220-1342

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com





NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506





HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$7500 obo 352-422-8092


Set of 4 Cooper
Discover LSX,
265/75R16
with chevy rims.
less than 1,500 miles
$450 (352) 563-0328

TOW DOLLY
Stehl, Great cond.
new tires, $625 OBO
352-621-3646





$CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BUYING JUNK CARS
SRunning or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ




918-1130 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners


$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

2000 Chevy Corvette
Metallic Bowling Green
Std shift, one owner,
& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874

'02 CLK430
MERCEDES CONVERT.
RED, MINT $11, 200
OBO(352) 302-8265

BUICK '08
Lucerne,Spec. Addition.
42k Exc. cond. $14,900
(352) 794-3907

BUICK ACROSS
08, White, 4dr, 40kmiles
Cloth int. $13,000.
352-726-1864

CHEVROLET
'03 Monte Carlo,
2 DR, V6, runs great,
100k mi. $4,300
(352) 270-8759

CHEVY
2004 Malibu, LTZ,
$3,495.
352-341-0018




CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Tounng Ed., Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Cond
$7500 352 522-0505




will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, Novem-
ber 27, until December


1755-1213 THCRN
Thomas M. Dolan File No: 2011-CP-554 Notice of Adminitsration
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS M. DOLAN
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of Thomas M. Dolan, deceased, File Number
11-CP-554, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450-4299. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
Al persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge
the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or ju-
risdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three
months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is December 6, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/MARSHALL L. COHEN /s/Debra Dolan
Florida Bar No. FL154330 4506 N. Tumbleweed Trail
P.O. Box 60292 Hernando, Florida 34442
Fort Myers, Florida 33906, Telephone: (239) 275 4600 December 6 & 13,
2012.


1717-1206 THCRN
Vs, Tim C. Master case No: 2012-CA-7197 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CA-1197
BRANNEN BANK, a Florida State Banking
Corporation f/k/a THE BANK OF INVERNESS,
Plaintiff,
v.
TIM C. MATSER,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE is given that pursuant to a Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated Novem-
ber 15, 2012 in Case No. 2012-CA-1197, of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Citrus County, Florida in which BRANNEN BANK, a Florida State Bank-
ing Corporation f/k/a THE BANK OF INVERNESS is the Plaintiff and TIM C. MATSER is
the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale
beginning at 10:00 a.m. on the 20th day of December, 2012 at
www.citrus.realforeclose.com the following described property set forth in the Sum-
mary Judgment:
Lot 112, of CONNELL LAKE ESTATES, PHASE II, according to the plat thereof, as re-
corded in Plat Book 14, Pages 113 through 116, inclusive, of the Public Records of Cit-
rus County, Florida.
THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS
WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL
JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS
REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO
ANY REMAINING FUNDS.
DATED the 16th day of November, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
November 29 & December 6, 2012.

1718-1206 THCRN
Vs, Howard H. Carter Case No: 2012-CA-969 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2012-CA-969
BRANNEN BANK, a Florida State Banking
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
HOWARD H. CARTER a/k/a
HOWARD HARVEY CARTER,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE is given that pursuant to a Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated No-
vember 15, 2012 in Case No. 2012-CA-969, of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial
Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida in which BRANNEN BANK, a Florida State
Banking Corporation is the Plaintiff and HOWARD H. CARTER a/k/a HOWARD HARVEY
CARTER is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by elec-
tronic sale beginning at 10:00 a.m. on the 20th day of December, 2012 at
www.citrus.realforeclose.com the following described property set forth in the Sum-
mary Judgment:
Lot 30, of FOREST LAKE NORTH, according to map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 8, Pages 101 through 105, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
TOGETHER WITH one 1995 MERI double-wide mobile home, I.D. No.
FLHMLCP53712966A and FLHMLCP53712966B located thereon.
THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS
WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL
JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS
REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO
ANY REMAINING FUNDS.
DATED the 16th day of November, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
November 29 & December 6, 2012.

1720-1206 THCRN
Vs. Halsey, Eric W. Case No: 2010CA3917 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010CA3917
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP,
FOR THE MASTR ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGES TRUST 2006-OA2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERIC W. HALSEY, et al.

Defendants
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 24,
2012, and entered in Case No. 2010CA3917, of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial
Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida. U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE MASTR ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGES TRUST
2006-OA2, is Plaintiff and ERIC W. HALSEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIC W. HALSEY; CY-
PRESS VILLAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are defendants. The Clerk of
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash via the Internet at
www.citrus.realforeclose.com, at 10:00 a.m., on the 20th day of December, 2012,
the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 9, IN BLOCK B-38, OF CYPRESS VILLAGE, SUGARMILL WOODS, ACCORDING TO
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 86 THROUGH 150, PLAT
BOOK 10 PAGE 1-150, AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AS AMENDED IN PLAT BOOK 9 PAGE 87A, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days
of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at:
Citrus County John Sullivan (352) 341-6700
Hernando County Peggy Welch (352) 754-4402
Lake County Laurie Crews (352) 253-0900 x100 Marion
Tameka Gordan (352) 401-6701
Sumter County Lorna Barker (352) 569-6088
Dated this 12th day of November, 2012
VAN NESS LAW FIRM, PA.
1239 E. Newport Center Drive, Suite 110, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442
Ph: (954) 571-2031 Fax: (954) 571-2033, PRIMARY EMAIL: Pleadinas@vanlawfl.com
/s/Lauren E. Barbati, Esq., Florida Bar 68180
Lbarbati@vanlaswfl.com
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the


DUDLEY'S
AUCTrR5W

THREE AUCTIONS

12/6 ESTATE
ADVENTURE
4000 S FI Ave,
Inverness, 3pm
2007 PT Cruiser Con-
vertible w/8kmiles, Like
new Furniture inc. Cot-
tage House, Lg Col Pwr
& hnd tools, Christmas
items, Vending Ma-
chine, GREAT PLACE
TO PURCHASE unique
gifts.

12/7 REAL ESTATE &
CONTENTS
4560 N Allamandra Dr
(Pine Ridge) 8am RE
10am SELLING TO
SETTLE ESTATE 3/3
POOL home 4343 Un-
der roof 3 car garage
$$$ Landscaping, tons
of extras Inc. Thermidor
Commercial Stove,
MUST SEE. Hitchcock,
Ethan Allen, Broyhill all
high end furniture &
accessories. HUGE
Auction. Bring Chair.
ALSO SELLING Adj.
1 acre at corner of
Canarywood

12/7 REAL ESTATE
Black Diamond GOLF
COURSE lot ABSO-
LUTE preview 12:30
Auction 1pm Lot on the
#1 Fairway of Ranch.
Must register prior
www.dudleysauction.
corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384




17,2012.
Pub: November 27 thru
December 17,2012.


FoecosreSae


FoecosreSae


FoecosreSae










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
November 29 & December 6, 2012.


1719-1206 THCRN
V. Joel & Brenda Smith Case No: 2012-CA-1130 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO.
2012-CA-1130
DARRELL RENNER and KAREN RENNER, his wife,
Plaintiffs,
v.
JOEL SMITH and BRENDA SMITH, husband and wife, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
and SECURITY CREDIT SERVICES, LLC, as assignee of DIRECT MERCHANTS CREDIT
CARD BANK,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE is given that pursuant to a Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated Octo-
ber 18, 2012 and Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated November 15, 2012 in
Case No. 2012-CA-1130, of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Cit-
rus County, Florida in which DARRELL RENNER and KAREN RENNER, his wife are the
Plaintiffs and JOEL SMITH and BRENDA SMITH, husband and wife, THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, and SECURITY CREDIT SERVICES, LLC, as assignee of DIRECT MER-
CHANTS CREDIT CARD BANK are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash by electronic sale beginning at 10:00 a.m. on the 20th day of De-
cember, 2012 at www.citrus.realforeclose.com to the highest and best bidder for
cash the following described property set forth in the Summary Judgment:
Lot 10 and the North 17 feet of Lot 9, Block 5, SKYWAY HIGHLANDS, according to the
plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 49, Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida.
THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS
WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL
JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS
REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO
ANY REMAINING FUNDS. NOTWITHSTANDING THE FOREGOING, THE UNITED STATES
SHALL NOT BE BOUND BY THE SIXTY DAY TIME PERIOD IMPOSED BY 45.032, FLA. STAT.
UPON MOTIONS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SURPLUS PROCEEDS.
DATED the 15th day of November, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ Amy Holmes, As Deputy Clerk
November 29 & December 6, 2012.


1734-1213 THCRN
Vs Richard R Newsom Case No; 09-2008-CA-002633 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure
Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2008-CA-002633
DIVISION
BANK OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff,
vs
RICHARD R NEWSOM et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
November 21, 2012 and entered in Case NO 09-2008-CA-002633 of the Circuit Court of the
FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, is
the Plaintiff and RICHARD R NEWSOM; JESSICA A NEWSOM; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at By electronic sale beginning at
10'00 AM on the prescribed date at www citrus realforeclose com at 10'00AM, on the 20th
day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment'
PARCEL B: LOT 15, LESS AND EXCEPT THE SOUTH 347.60 FEET OF HOMOSASSA
HIGHLANDS ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,
PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE
AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: 1999 FLEETWOOD, VIN# GAFLX54A84249ET21 &
GAFLX54B84249ET21
A/K/A 7314W ROSEDALE DRIVE, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 21, 2012
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By /s/Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
F08035950
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D. Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Street, Inverness, FL
34450-4231, Phone: 352-341-6700, Fax: 352-341-7008
December 6 & 13, 2012


1727-1206 THCRN
vs, Diamond Consruction Case No: 2012 CA 990 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012 CA 990
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DIAMOND CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, INC.,
BRIAN BLANKENSHIP, and BRANDI BLANKENSHIP,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Citrus County, Florida, I will
sell the properties situated in Citrus and Hernando Counties, Florida, described as:
Lot 8, Unrecorded Crooked Oaks Subdivision, being further described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 9, Township 17 South, Range 17 East,
Citrus County, Florida, thence North 89o44'03" East, 1320.09 feet to the Southeast cor-
ner of the Southwest /4 of the Southwest /4 of said Section 9; thence North 0o13'18"
East 1,213.36 feet to a point on the Southeasterly boundary of Lot 13, Riverwood
Shores as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 21, Public Records of Citrus County, also the
P.C. of a curve concaved Northwesterly having a central angle of 50o13'24" and a
radius of 347.61 feet, thence along the arc of said curve a distance of 65.03 feet
(chord bearing and distance between said points being South 57o 11'18" West 64.94
feet) to P.T. of said curve, thence South 62o32'53" West 180.62 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING and the P.C. of a curve concaved Southeasterly having a central angle of
14o25'18" and a radius of 154.19 feet, thence along the arc of said curve 38.81 feet
(chord bearing and distance between said points being South 55o20'18" West 38.17
feet to the P.C. of said curve, thence South 48o07'35" West 236.44 feet, thence South
41o52'25" East 300.00 feet to the P.C. of a curve concaved Southerly having a central
angle of 127o18'02" and a radius of 50.00 feet, thence along the arc of said curve
111.09 feet (chord bearing and distance between said points being North 21o46'36"
East 89.61 feet), thence North 04o34'23" West 321.03 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Lot 9, Block 209, Pine Ridge, Unit 2, according to the map or plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 8, pages 37-50, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
Lot 11, Block 118, Royal Highlands, Unit 9, according to the plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 12, page 16, Public Records of Hernando County, Florida.
at public sale on December 20, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at www.citrus.realforeclose.com,.
any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the property
owner, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Circuit Court
By:/s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
November 29 & December 6, 2012.


1731-1206 THCRN
Vs William J Crawford Case No 09-2010-CA-000940 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure
Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2010-CA-000940
DIVISION
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC, ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-11,
Plaintiff,
vs
WILLIAM J CRAWFORD et al,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
November 19, 2012 and entered in Case NO 09-2010-CA-000940 of the Circuit Court of the
FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW
YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFI-
CATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006- 11 is the
Plaintiff and WILLIAM J CRAWFORD; TENANT #1 N/KIA RUSSELL JONES; TENANT
#2 N/KIA DIANNA RUSSELL are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at By electronic sale beginning at 10'00 AM on the prescribed
date at www citrus realforeclose com at 10'00AM, on the 13th day of December, 2012, the
following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment'
LOT 18, BLOCK 143, OF BEVERLY HILLS, UNIT NUMBER 6, SECTION TWO, ACCORD-
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 132
TO 134, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/KIA 402 S Adams Street, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 20, 2012
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By/s/Penny Peterson, Deputy Clerk
F09106273
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact:Mr. John D. Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Street
Inverness, FL 34450-4231, Phone: 352-341-6700, Fax: 352-341-7008
November 29 & December 6, 2012


1732-1213 THCRN
Vs. Lacey K. Klingler Case No: 2010 CA 002610 Re-Notice of Foreclosure
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2010 CA 002610
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
LACEY K. KLINGLER; DANIEL J. PRICE; JOHN DOE AND; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION;
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
November 28, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2010 CA 002610, of the Circuit Court of
the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE


HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP s Plaintiff and LACEY K. KLINGLER; DANIEL J. PRICE; JOHN
DOE AND; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION; are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash www.citrus.realforeclose.com, at 10:00
a.m., on the 27th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 8, BLOCK 60 OF CRYSTAL MANOR UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 112 134, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the
sale.
Dated this 28th day of November, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of said Court
(SEAL) By:/s/Sonia Prylepa, As Deputy Clerk
This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the
Court Administrator at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FI 34450-4299, Phone No.
(352)637-9853 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you
are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call
1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services).
Submitted by:Kahane & Associates, P.A., 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000
Plantation, FL 33324, Telephone: (954) 382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com,
File No.: 10-23323 BOA
December 6 & 13, 2012.


CLASSIFIED


1726-1206 THCRN
Vs Aleta Volkman Case No 09-2010-CA-004721 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2010-CA-004721
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs ALETA VOLKMAN A/K/A VOLKMAN ALETA, et al,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
November 20, 2012 and entered in Case NO 09-2010-CA-004721 of the Circuit Court of the
FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff and ALETA VOLKMAN A/K/A VOLKMAN ALETA; GREENBRIAR OF CIT-
RUS HILLS OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at By electronic sale beginning at 10'00 AM on
the prescribed date at www citrus realforeclose com at 10'00AM, on the 20th day of De-
cembr, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment'
CONDOMINIUM UNIT 6A, BUILDING 13, GREENBRIAR OF CITRUS HILLS CONSOLI-
DATED CONDOMINIUM, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON
ELEMENTS, ACCORDING TO THE AMENDED AND RESTATED DECLARATION OF
CONDOMINIUM THEREOF RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 1358, PAGES 296
THROUGH 331; AMENDMENT IN BOOK 1684, PAGE 325; AND AMENDMENT IN BOOK
1687, PAGE 2352, AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 156 E GLASSBORO COURT UNIT# 6A- 13, HERNANDO, FL 34442
Any person aiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 20, 2012
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By/s/Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
F10069576-WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC-R-UNASSIGNED-Team 1
**See Americans with Disabilities Act**
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D. Sullivan 110 N. Apopka Street
Inverness, FL 34450-4231, Phone: 352-341-6700, Fax: 352-341-7008
November 29 & December 6, 2012


1736-1213 THCRN
vs Ramon Montanez Case No'09-2011-CA-004327 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.09-2011-CA-004327
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC
Plaintiff,
v
RAMON MONTANEZ; FRANCISCO URDAZ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAMON MON-
TANEZ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCISCO URDAZ; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTSS, WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; SUGARMILL WOODS CIVIC ASSOCIATION, INC
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sep-
tember 20, 2012,in this cause, I will sell the property situated in CITRUS County, Florida,
described as'
LOT 32, BLOCK B-240, OF OAK VILLAGE, SUGARMILL WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 86 THROUGH 150, INCLU-
SIVE, AND CONTINUED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGES 1 THROUGH 150, AND PLAT BOOK
11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, AS AMENDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87-A, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CIT-
RUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
alkla 14 SCHEFFLERA CT., HOMOSASSA, FL 34446-6103
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, on December 27, 2012, at ten o'clock
am EST by electronic sale at www citrus realforeclose com, in accordance with Section
45 031, Florida Statutes
Any person aiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale
Dated at Inverness, Florida, this 25th day of September, 2012
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(Seal) By/s/Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
ADA COORDINATOR (352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450
WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.
December 6 & 13, 2012


1737-1213 THCRN
Vs Ana & Gonzalo Guitian Case No: 2009-CA-003265 Amended Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY FLORIDA
Case # 2009-CA-003265
Wells Fargo Bank, N A as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series
2005-PR1 Trust Case # 2009-CA-003265
Plaintiff,
-vs -
Ana M Guitian and Gonzalo J Guitian, Wife and Husband Defendant(s)
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated Au-
gust 22, 2012, entered in Civil Case No 2009-CA-003265 of the Circuit Court of the 5th Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein Wells Fargo Bank, N A as Trustee
for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-PR1 Trust, Plaintiff and Ana M
Guitian and Gonzalo J Guitian, Wife and Husband are defendantss, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash BY ELECTRONIC SALE BEGINNING AT 10'00A M ON THE
PRESCRIBED DATE AT htto'//www citrus realforeclose com on December 27, 2012, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit'
LOT 12 AND 13, BLOCK L, OF LAKE TSALA GARDENS ADDITION, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 142, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Street, Inverness,
Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,
or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled ap-
pearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated at Inverness, Florida this 22nd day of August, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Citrus County, Florida
By /s/Amy Holmes, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700, (561) 998-6707
09-142041 FC01 W50
December 6 & 13, 2012


1738-1213 THCRN
Vs Wendel & Sherri Perry Case No' 2012-CA-000837 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 2012-CA-000837
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST
MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES ARSI 2006-M3,
Plaintiff,
vs
WENDEL PERRYAND SHERRI PERRY, et al
Defendant
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Septem-
ber 27, 2012, and entered in 2012-CA-000837 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC,
ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES ARSI 2006-M3, is the Plaintiff
and WENDEL PERRY; SHERRI PERRY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 are the Defendants)
Betty Strifler as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
www citrus realforeclose com, at 10'00 AM on December 27, 2012, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit'
THE SOUTH 1/2 (ONE-HALF) OF LOT 12, BLOCK422-A, OF REPLAT OF A PORTION
OF INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST, FIRST ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 116 TO 122, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale
Dated this 28th day of September, 2012
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Courts
By/s/Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to partici-
pate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; to appear in Court at, Cit-
rus County, John Sullivan: (352) 341-6700
December 6 &13, 2012


1739-1213 THCRN
Vs. Bonita Brooks Fagin Case No: 2012-CA-000282 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.2012-CA-000282
SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Whose address is: P.O. Box 11904, Tampa, FL 33680
Plaintiff,
v.
BONITA BROOKS FAGIN A/K/A BONITA B. FAGIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONITA
BROOKS FAGIN A/K/A BONITA B. FAGIN, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS; TENANT #1; TENANT 2,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of CITRUS County, Florida, the clerk shall sell
the property situated in CITRUS County, Florida described as:
EAST V2 OF LOT 375 AND WEST V2 OF LOT 376, ALL IN CRYSTAL PARK ADDITION TO THE
TOWN OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 50, PAGE 415.
and commonly known as: 317 Northeast 13th Terrace, Crystal River, Florida 34428, at
public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on December 27, 2012, by elec-
tronic sale at www.citrus.realforeclose.com beginning at 10:00 A.M., on the pre-
scribed date.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, the ADA Coordinator at the Office of
the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7 days before your


scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time
before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-
paired, call 711.
Dated this 8th day of September, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ Penny Peterson, Deputy Clerk
December 6 & 13, 2012.


1740-1213 THCRN
Vs David H Walsh Case No 2012-CA-347 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No 2012-CA-347
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED
HOLDERS OF NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-2 NOVASTAR
HOME EQUITY LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2
Plaintiff,


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 ClL


vs
David H Walsh,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
September 27th, 2012, and entered in Case No 2012-CA-347 of the Circuit Court of the 5th
Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF NOVASTAR
MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-2 NOVASTAR HOME EQUITY LOAN
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2 is Plaintiff and David H Walsh, are De-
fendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash via online auction at
www citrus realforeclose com at 10'00 A M on the 27th day of December, 2012, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit
All that Certain Land Situate in Citrus County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 28 of Holiday Acres
Unit No. 2 according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page (s) 40 and 41,
of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida; less the following described property:
Begin at the southeast corner of said Tract 28, run thence North 330 feet, thence West
210 feet, thence South to intersect the Southerly line of said Tract 28, thence South-
easterly to point of beginning.
Street Address: 4412 North Elm Drive, Crystal River, FL 34428
and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as se-
curity in Plaintiff's mortgage
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the
sale
Dated at Inverness, Citrus County Florida, this 28th day of September, 2012
Betty Striffler, Clerk of said Circuit Court
By /s/Amy Holmes, As Deputy Clerk
CLARFIELD, OKON, SALOMONE & PINCUS, P L, 500 S Australian Avenue, Suite 730
West Palm Beach, FL 33401, (561) 713-1400 pleadings@cosplaw com
December 6 & 13, 2012



1741-1213 THCRN
Vs. Michael & Donna Chirizio Case No: 2011CA002639 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No:2011CA002639
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL CHIARIZIO; DONNA CHIARIZIO, et al. Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Septem-
ber 27, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2011CA002639, of the Circuit Court of the Fifth
Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP, is Plaintiff and MICHAEL CHIARIZIO; DONNA CHIARIZIO, are de-
fendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash via the
Internet at www.citrus.realforeclose.com, at 10:00 a.m., on the 27th day of Decem-
ber, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 13, BLOCK G, OF PINERIDGE FARMS SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT
THEREOF FILED AT PLAT BOOK 16, PAGES 37-44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days
of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at:
Citrus County John Sullivan (352) 341-6700
Hernando County Peggy Welch (352) 754-4402 Lake
County Nicole Berg (352) 253-1604 Marion
TamekaGordan (352)401-6710 Sumter County
Lona Barker (352)5696952 You can also use the orlne Frioda State CoutsSystem Tile I ADA
Accommodalon
Request Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA Coordinator in
your county.
Dated this 17th day of September, 2012
VAN NESS LAW FIRM, P.A., 1239 E. Newport Center Drive, Suite 110, Deerfield Beach,
Florida 33442, Ph: (954) 571-2031 Fax: (954) 571-2033
PRIMARY EMAIL: Pleadings@vanlawfl.com, Morgan L. Weinstein, Esq.,
Florida Bar #: 87796, Email: MWeinstein@vanlawfl.com
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
December 6 & 13, 2012.


1743-1213 THCRN
Vs. Samuel Diguglielmo Case No: 2012 CA 000933A Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chap-
ter 45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.2012 CA 000933A
U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SPECIALTY
UNDERWRITING AND RESIDENTIAL FINANCE TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AB3
Plaintiff(s),
vs.
SAMUEL DIGUGLIELMO, et. al.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 14th, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2012 CA 000933 A of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida, wherein U.S.
BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SPECIALTY UN-
DERWRITING AND RESIDENTIAL FINANCE TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AB3 is the Plaintiff and SAMUEL J. DIGUGLIELMO; and AL-
ICE JEAN DIGUGLIELMO; and BANK OF AMERICA NA; and REGIONS BANK are the
Defendants, the clerk shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic
sale at www.citrus.realforeclose.com, at 10:00 a.m. on the 20th day of DE-
CEMBER ,2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Fi-
nal Judgment, to wit: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST SIDE OF CITRUS
AVENUE AND THE SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE SHORE DRIVE FORMERLY LAKE STREET, RUN
THENCE EASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH OF LAKE SHORE DRIVE 145 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE EAST LINE OF CITRUS AVENUE 100 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO
THE NORTH LINE OF ZEPHYR STREET FORMERLY RAILROAD STREET THENCE WEST ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF ZEPHYR STREET 145 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE EAST SIDE OF CITRUS
AVENUE, THENCE NORTH ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF CITRUS AVENUE 100 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, IN SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH RANGE 20 EAST ACCORD-
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 36, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE,
YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING
FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS.
DATED this 30th day of November, 2012.
By:/s/ Kalei McEkroy Blair, Esq.
"In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to
any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court,
CITRUS County, 110 NORTH APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL 34450- County Phone:
352-341-6430 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service".
December 6 & 13, 2012.


1745-1213 THCRN
Vs Erin Mitchell Hunt Case No 2010CA006084 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION

Case No.2010CA006084
GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, Case No 2010CA006084
Plaintiff, Division'
v
ERIN MICHELLE HUNT; JOHN B CLAYPOOL; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
REVENUE; UNKNOWN TENANT # 1; UNKNOWN TENANT # 2
Defendants,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated November
27, 2012, entered in Civil Case No 2010CA006084, DIVISION of the Circuit Court of the
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein is Plaintiff, and ERIN
MICHELLE HUNT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIN MICHELLE HUNT; JOHN B CLAY-
POOL; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2 are Defendants
BETTY STRIFLER, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 10'00
a m, online at www.citrus.realforeclose.com on the 27th day of December, 2012 the fol-
lowing described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit
ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATE IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, VIZ: LOT 8, IN
BLOCK J, OF CHASSAHOWITZKA VILLAGE, UNIT 3, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SE
CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53'10"
WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 26, A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01'40" EAST PARALLEL TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID
SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 288.74 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES
36'40" WEST, 493.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;THENCE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 36'40" EAST, 80.08 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01'40" WEST, 94.17
FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS OF A CANAL; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES
56'52" WEST, ALONG SAID WATERS A DISTANCE OF 81.84 FEET TO A POINT THAT
BEARS SOUTH 1 DEGREE 06'10" WEST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
NORTH 1 DEGREE 06'10" EAST, 93.72 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING
This property is located at the Street address of: 8446 WEST MILO COURT,
HOMOSASSA, FL 34448.
If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a
claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale If you fail to file a claim you will not
be entitled to any remaining funds After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of
the lis pendens may claim the surplus
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on November 28, 2012
(SEAL) BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE COURT
By/si Penny Paterson, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff' Elizabeth R Wellborn, PA, 350 Jim Moran Blvd Suite 100,
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442, Telephone' (954) 354-3544, Facsimile' (954) 354-3545
Primary Email' KWalsh@erwlaw com
IN ACORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN'S WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a per-
son with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator, John Sullivan, at (352) 341-6700 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8771.
0719TB-28338
December 6 & 13, 2012


1756-1213 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
vs. Andrew Jurewicz Case No: 09-2007-CA-004952 Notice of Foreclosure
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUSCOUNTY, FLORIDA.GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2007-CA-004952
DEUSTCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS F/K/A BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ANDREW JUREWICZ A/K/A ANDREW JOREWICZ A/K/A ANDREW J. JUREWICZ A/K/A
ANDREW J. JORWICZ, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated No-
vember 10, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09-2007-CA-004952 in the Circuit Court of
the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida wherein DEUSTCHE BANK
TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS F/K/A BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE was the


Plaintiff and ANDREW JUREWICZ A/K/A ANDREW JOREWICZ A/K/A ANDREW J.
JUREWICZ A/K/A ANDREW J. JORWICZ, ET AL. the Defendant(s). I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash, by electronic sale beginning at 10:00 a.m. Eastern
Standard Time at www.citrus.realforeclose.com on the 20th day of December, 2012,
the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 54, IN BLOCK 4, OF CIMMAMON RIDGE, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 12, PAGE 65, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Clerk, Circuit Court
By:/s/ Penny Peterson, Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Ad-
ministrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450,
(352) 641-6700, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled ap-
pearance is less than seven days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
December 6 & 13, 2012.


Foreclosure Sale/
Action Notic


Foreclosure S
Action Notic2e,


Foreclosure


Forcl sue el


[FrelsueSae








C12 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

!Ira l


2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2000 Mustang. If you like
Mustang Cobra convert.
*Must see this car*
$4975(352) 382-7001
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
KIA
2005, Sedona LX
$7,795
352-341-0018
LINCOLN
1993 Town Car, Good
Cond. New brakes, good
rubber, leather intenor,
$2000 (352) 220-6303
Mercury
"97 Grand Marquis w/
trailer hitch, 4 good
hancock tires, high
mileage $1100 OBO
(352) 249-7541
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. $9200 OBO
(352) 382-0428
TOYOTA
2004 Celica, GTS
$6,995
352-341-0018



'80 Kelmark Kit Car
$1500 FIRM
CALL 352-586-0084
CHEVROLET
'83, El Camino. Re-
stored V6. white, w/
custom cover, SS tires,
wheels, low m.l. $6,000
obo 352 464-0167





** ** * k*
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150
TOYOTA
1992 Pick-up, 10 Ft box
truck, 135K e-z miles,
well maintained, ready to
go, $3800 OBO
(352) 344-8882 or
wscec(chotmail.com



CHEVROLET
2002 SUBURBAN
4 WD $4,500.
352-341-0018
KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285
MITSUBISHI
2005 Outlander
$4,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
1999 4 Runner, 2WD,
Mich tires, Some cos-
metic damage, Runs
Great $5200 OBO
(352) 344-0072



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600



POLARIS
2003 Trail Blaze 250 au-
tomatic, runs great, gar-
age kept, very good
cond, needs 1 front tire,
$1400 obo 352-795-9878



'04 HONDA
750 Shadow Aero. Runs
& looks great! $3500
(352) 344-0084
HARLEY-DAVIDSON '04
Ultra classic. Runs great!
New tires, brakes &
battery. EXTRAS!!
$8500 or OBO
352-601-4722
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $3,500.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688



KAWASAKI
2006 VULCAN VF900
Custom. Only 7000


miles, garage kept
$3500 (352) 464-1495


KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 550 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 FIRM. Phone
352-726-8124
TOYOTA
'07,Camary Hybrid
Great cond. Dream to
Drive 40+mpg $11,300
(352) 860-2143


1757-1213 THCRN
vs. Crouse, John Case No. 09-2010-CA-003484
Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-003484
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., ALSO KNOWN AS WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., FORMERLY KNOWN AS WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, FOR-
MERLY KNOWN AS WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JOHN O. CROUSE II, JOHN O. CROUSE, III, STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF REVENUE,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 27, 2012, and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-003484 of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit, in and for CITRUS County, Florida, wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, N.A., ALSO KNOWN AS WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF WELLS
FARGO BANK, N.A., FORMERLY KNOWN AS WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, FORMERLY
KNOWN AS WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, is the Plaintiff and UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JOHN
O. CROUSE II, JOHN O. CROUSE, III, STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, are
the Defendants, the Clerk of the Court shall offer for sale to the highest bidder for
cash on DECEMBER 27, 2012, beginning at 10:00 A.M., at 10:00 a.m. at
www.citrus.realforeclose.com. the following described property as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment lying and being situate in CITRUS County, Florida, to wit:
Lot 11, Block 423 B, of a Re-plat of a portion of INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST FIRST AD-
DITION, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page(s) 116 through
122, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
Property Address: 5686 S. Luray Terrace Iverness, Florida 34452
NOTICE: If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in
order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision
of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator John Sullivan, whose tele-
phone number is (352) 341-6700 for the Courts within 2 working days of your receipt
of your notice to appear in Court.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP
TO $70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE
THAT SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE
TIME OF THE SALE. NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS
PROVIDED HEREIN.
DATED this 28th day of November, 2012.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
STRAUS & EISLER, P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff, 10081 Pines Blvd, Suite C
Pembroke Pines, FL 33024,954-431-2000, Service.pines@strauseisler.com
December 6 & 13, 2012.

1758-1213 THCRN
Vs. Howard James Lamp"l Case No: 2012-CC-000155 Notice of Sale Chapter 45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDIC-
TION DIVISION
CASE NO. 2012-CC-000155
HILLSIDE VILLAS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corpo-
ration,
Plaintiff,
v.
HOWARD JAMES LAMP'L, ET. AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Octo-
ber 2, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2012-CC-000155 of the COUNTY COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein HILLSIDE VILLAS
PROPERTY OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC. is Plaintiff, and HOWARD JAMES LAMP'L and
LORI ANN LAMP'L are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at
10:00 a.m. electronically at www.citrus.realforeclosure.com
on the 27th day of Dec, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment, to wit:
Lot 22, Block C, of Hillside Villas First Addition, according to the Plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 16, Pages 65 through 66, of the Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida. Address of which is: 355 W. Doerr Path, Hernando, FL 34442.
A/K/A 355 W. Doerr Path, Lot 22, Bldg. C, Hernando, FL 34442
A PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED this 27th day of November, 2012.
Betty Strilfer, Clerk Circuit Court
By:/s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
December 6 & 13, 2012.

1759-1213 THCRN
vs Amber N Myles Case No 09-2011-CA-000763 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.09-2011-CA-000763
US BANK, N A
Plaintiff,
v
AMBER N MYLES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AMBER N MYLES A/K/A AMBER MYLES;
UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTSS, WHO
(IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUS-
TEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS, DIVISION OF HOUSING SERVICES; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE
CORPORATION
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered on June 28, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on Novem-
ber 19, 2012, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Citrus County, Florida, the clerk shall sell
the property situated in Citrus County, Florida, described as
LOT 7, BLOCK 4, OF FLYING DUTCHMAN ESTATES PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 12, PAGE 118, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
alkla 2141 W. DEER TRAIL LN., LECANTO, FL 34461-9465
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Online at
www citrus realforeclose com Citrus County, Florida, on December 20, 2012 at 10'00 AM
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale
Dated at St Petersburg, Florida, this 4th day of December ,2012
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
DOUGLAS C ZAHM, PA
/S/ Tara M McDonald, Tara M McDonald, Esquire, Florida Bar No 43941
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St Petersburg, FL 33716, Telephone No (727)
536-4911, Fax No (727) 539-1094, Attorney for Plaintiff
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
ADA COORDINATOR (352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450
WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771
December 6 & 13, 2012


329-0930 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the Southwest Florida Water Management District has re-
ceived an application for a water use permit to withdraw water from wells and/or
surface waters from Hampton Hills, LLC and Terra Vista Property Owners Association,
Inc., 2476 N. Essex Avenue, Hernando, FL 34442. Application number: 20007805.011.
Application received: September 24, 2012. Predominant use type(s):
recreation/aesthetic. Total requested withdrawal average daily gallons per day:
471,700 Gallons. Peak month average gallons per day: 1,172,300 Gallons. Maximum
daily gallons per day: 1,172,300 Gallons. From eight (8) wells. Location: Sections 26
Township 18 South, Range 18 East; Section 25 Township 18 South, Range 18 East; Sec-
tion 23 Township 18 South, Range 18 East all in Citrus County, Florida. The application
is available for public inspection Monday through Friday at Southwest Florida Man-
agement Department, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604. Interested persons
may inspect a copy of the application and submit written comments concerning
the application. Comments must include the permit application number and be re-
ceived within 14 days from the date of this notice. If you wish to be notified of
agency action or an opportunity to request an administrative hearing regarding the
application, you must send a written request referencing the permit application
number to the Southwest Florida Water Management District, Regulation Perfor-
mance Management Department, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 or
submit your request through the District's website at www.watermatters.org. The Dis-
trict does not discriminate based on disability. Anyone requiring accommodation un-
der the ADA should contact the Regulation Performance Management Department
at (352)796-7211 or 1(800)423-1476: TDD only 1(800)231-6103.
December 6, 2012.


1742-1206 THCRN
12/17 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
TONY'S COLLISION CEN-
TER
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Uen and intent to
sell these vehicles on
12/17/12, 10:00 AM at
3251 South Florida Ave
Inverness FL 34450, pursu-
ant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes.
TONY'S COLLISION CENTER
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and/or
all bids.
2000 GMC Jimmy


VIN 1GKCS13W3Y2171794
December 6, 2012
1744-1206 THCRN
12/17 Sale
Knightly Auto Service
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is here-
by given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicle
described below under
Florida Statutes 713.78.
The undersigned will sell
at public sale by compet-
itive bidding on Monday,
December 17,2012 on
the premises where said
vehicle has been stored


and which are located at
Knightly Auto Service
61 NE Hwy. 19#A Crystal
River, Citrus County, Flor-
ida, the following: 02 KIA
VIN# KNAFB121025191213
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale
in cash only. Vehicles
sold as is and must
be removed at the time
of sale. Sale subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated
party. Published one (1)
time in Citrus County
Chronicle,
December 6, 2012


1733-1206 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Mosquito Control District would like to announce to the Citizens of
Citrus County that the Regular Board Meeting will be held on Thursday, December
13, 2012.
The meeting will be held at 8:00 a.m. at the District's Headquarter's Office,
located at 968 N. Lecanto Hwy. Lecanto, Fl. 34461.
Robert Milan
Chairman of the Board
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Mosquito
Control District, 968 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, Fl. 34461
(352) 527-7478 at least two days before the meeting.
Any person who wishes to appeal any decision made by the Board, Agency or
Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing,
will need a record of the proceedings, and that for such purpose, may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
December 6, 2012.

1762-1206 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice of Worshop
HOMOSASSA SPECIAL WATER DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that the Board of Commissioners of the Homosassa Special
Water District will hold a workshop on December 12, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. at the District
Office, 7922 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, Florida for new Commissioner
Orientation.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Homosassa Special Water District
Office, 7922 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448 or P.O. Box 195,
Homosassa, FL 34487, (352) 628-3740, at least two (2) days before the meeting. If you
are hearing or speech impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, December 6, 2012.


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iii






CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Contents Cookies and Holiday Treats


Cover story
The choices of chocolate have never been more delicious
Page 3

Cook now, eat later
Making food ahead of time can ease the stress levels
Page 4

Perfect pies
Some simple suggestions for perfect pumpkins desserts

Page 6

Holiday cookies
Readers share their favorite recipes for holiday cookies
Page 8


Tiny treats
Serve multiple desserts and keep the portions small
Page 10

Fancy schmancy
Making gourmet doughnuts is the next big thing
Page 12

Talking turkey
This year avoid the oven and try grilling and smoking

Page 14

Holiday music
Create a holiday mood with the sounds of the season
-Page 16


Gerry Mulligan -
Publisher


Serving Citrus County for over 18 Years.
352-746-4769
2637 Forest Ridge Blvd., Hernando, FL


Ken Melton -
Community Affairs Editor

Cindy Connolly -
Community Affairs
Graphic Artist


Sarah Gatling -
Community Editor

Trista Stokes -
Advertising
Sales Manager
Citrus Publishing
1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


Vonda Parson's Butter Toffee With Walnuts took first
place in the Citrus County Chronicle's Christmas Cookie
Contest. She won a $50 Publix gift card. Second place
went to Rose Brecka with her Gram's Christmas
Cookies, and Barbara Finster's Bon Bon Cookies took
third place. Second place was awarded a $40 Publix gift
card and a $25 Publix gift card went to third place. The
recipes are on Page 8.


Never the
ordinary,
always the
extraordinary!
ODBXE


G2 Thursday, December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-,4







CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


*3
<
' i- 'a --'"


The Sweetest gift


Hope for chocolate springs eternal especially this time of year.

Never have the choices been more artful or delicious.


By Jessica Royer Ocken
CTW Features

Visions of many candies
dance in our heads come hol-
iday time: candy canes on the
tree, peppermints fashioned
into wreaths, allsorts stuffed
in stockings. But one reigns
supreme. The holiday season
is practically drenched in
chocolate.
Chocolates, gift-boxed or
pick your own, ranked as the
No. 2 holiday gift last year
surpassed only by books, ac-
cording to Unity Marketing,
a Stevens, Penn. marketing
consultancy that surveyed
2,000 buyers.
"Chocolate earns its top
rating as a gift because it fits
the bill. It is something
everyone likes, yet it also


feels like a treat," says Pam
Danziger Unity Marketing
president. "Even though it is
readily available and accessi-
ble, chocolate still makes the
recipient feel special."
Happily for holiday shop-
pers, there's a gob-smacking
array of creative, delicious
new offerings from which to
choose.
If you're lucky, there's a
handcrafted chocolate maker
on Main Street in your town
who'll offer a sample before
you buy.

Happiness in a box
Abox of chocolates is a
virtually goof-proof holiday
gift. Easy to find, not too
costly, impressively pack-
aged and wrapped, a choco-
late assortment offers


something for everyone. (Not
wild about nougat? Here, try
the maple fudge!) It's a gift
that's passed the test of time.
The humble Whitman's Sam-
pler celebrates its 100th an-
niversary this year. Top
seller: the 12-ounce sampler
($8.99, drug and grocery
stores).
"We're just part of people's
traditions," says Mark Sesler,
chief marketing officer for
Russell Stover Candies,
owner of Whitman's.
"We're part of the holiday
feeling no matter how mod-
em or advanced society has
become."
While U.S. consumers
have long preferred milk
chocolate, our appreciation
for dark chocolate is on the
rise. "Consumers' palates are


changing and adapting as
they learn about and try new,
finer varieties," says Joan
Vieweger, president of the
Fine Chocolate Industry
Assoc. and co-founder of
Choclatique, a Los Angeles
artisan chocolate maker.
New this year, the Feed 8
Origins Collection from Go-
diva ($25 for 8 pieces, Go-
diva boutiques) caters to this
worldly perspective with a
globetrotting box of choco-
lates from around the world:
Ecuador Dark, Costa Rica
Milk, Uganda Dark and
Venezuela Milk.
Godiva provides eight
school meals for children in
these countries for every box
sold.


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boned chocolates is a gener-
ous gift, and the presentation
can be thrilling, especially
for children.
Choclatique offers a Tower
of Delight with more than


110 pieces of chocolate in 12
colorful boxes stacked nearly
two feet tall ($195, online).
The brightly wrapped and
beribboned three-box holiday
tower from Portland-based
Moonstruck Chocolate com-
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dark chocolate and milk
chocolate ($60, specialty
retailers and fine grocers).


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Thursday December 6, 2012 G3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Cook Now, Eat Later,





Skip the stress



Can make-ahead foods still taste fresh come mealtime? Absolutely. Here's a

guide to what to make ahead, when to make it, how to store it, and how to reheat it.


By Dawn Klingensmit
CTW Features

Getting Thanksgiving dinner or
any holiday feast on the table can
seem like a math word problem gone
awry:
Question: If it takes four hours to
cook a 15-pound turkey, and three of
the side dishes need something done
to them "just before serving," how
many times will the cook wish there
were an easier way without resorting
to boxed or "instant" imposters of tra-
ditional favorites?
Answer: Probably countless times,
and each of them unnecessary because
many side dishes can be prepared or
partially prepared a day or more in ad-
vance. And certain freezer-friendly
recipes can be made weeks or months
in advance and still taste fresh come
mealtime.
"When it comes to a traditional
Thanksgiving meal, everything but a
green salad and the turkey can be
made ahead, frozen and reheated on
the holiday," says Michele Borboa, a
personal chef from Bozeman, Mont.,
and author of "Make-ahead Meals
Made Healthy" (Fair Winds Press,
2011). "Bread-based stuffings are es-
pecially easy to fix and freeze, but you
can also freeze mashed potatoes, cran-
berry sauce and rice dishes, so all you
have to do is thaw or reheat and
serve."
It's simply math: An earlier start
plus Borboa's step-by-step instruc-
tions equals more time for friends and
family over the holidays.

2 months in advance
Bread-based and rice stuffings can
be fully assembled, baked cooled and
frozen. Thaw overnight in the refriger-
ator and reheat in the oven.
Or, start two days ahead to save


time without freez-
ing. Cube and bake
bread until lightly
toasted, cool, and
store at room tem-
perature in an air-
tight container. For (
rice stuffings,
steam the rice, let it
cool completely,
and store in the re-
frigerator.
Chop onions,
celery, carrots and
other vegetables
your recipe calls
for. Store them in
the refrigerator to
saut6 on the holi-
day, or saut6 them
in advance, cool
and refrigerate
until you assemble
the stuffing. If your
recipe calls for
nuts, toast and
store them in an
airtight container.
"On Thanksgiv-
ing Day, all you
have to do is assemble the prepped in-
gredients along with broth and any
other ingredients" such as herbs and
spices, and then follow instructions
for cooking, Borboa says.
Cranberry sauce can be made up to
two months in advance, cooled com-
pletely and frozen.

1 month in advance
"Raw potatoes don't freeze well,"
Borboa warns, "but mashed potatoes
can be made up to one month in ad-
vance. Make your favorite mashed po-
tatoes, spread them in a greased
casserole dish and cool completely.
Place a sheet of plastic wrap directly
over the potatoes, and wrap the casse-


role dish tightly with heavy-duty foil."
To reheat, thaw overnight in the re-
frigerator and place in the oven for 30
minutes at 350 degrees F. "You may
have to adjust the butter, milk and sea-
sonings but the hard work is done well
in advance," Borboa says.
Also an advocate of doing as much
as possible ahead of time, Chicago
event planner Debi Lilly believes
quality suffers for certain dishes.
"Mashed potatoes absolutely cannot
be made in advance. To me, the best
texture is when they're fresh off the
stovetop," says Lilly, president of A
Perfect Event. "They come out warm
and creamy, and they just don't carry
that same consistency when reheated.
They get a little lumpier and dry out,


and the texture changes."
The gravy that goes on top of them
also requires same-day preparation,
according to Lilly: "It's very fatty and
tends to separate," she says.
If you'd rather not freeze mashed
potatoes, you can save time with this
fix-ahead tip: Wash and scrub pota-
toes, cut them into chunks, and place
in a large pot. Fill with enough cold
water to cover the potatoes and add a
generous pinch of salt and the juice of
one lemon to keep potatoes from
browning. Potatoes can stay covered
in water, refrigerated, for up to two
days, Borboa says. When ready to

see Stress Page 5


G4 Thursday, December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Stress
from Page 4

cook, drain the water and boil in fresh
water.

2 weeks in advance
"I prefer fresh-baked breads and rolls
since freezing them can take away from
their taste and texture, but if frozen
properly, they can be made two to three
weeks in advance and reheated on
Thanksgiving Day," Borboa says.
Allow fresh-baked rolls to cool com-
pletely, and then place them on a baking
sheet. Place in the freezer until
just solid. Place rolls in heavy-duty
freezer bags, squeeze the air out, seal
and freeze. You can simply let them
thaw at room temperature overnight and
serve them or warm them in the oven.

2 days in advance
"You can't cook an entire turkey and
reheat it without ruining quality and in-
creasing your chances of food poison-
ing," Borboa warns, "but you can prep a
few ingredients to save time."
A day or two ahead, cut oranges,
onions, celery, carrots, herbs and other
ingredients you plan to use to flavor the
turkey. "I don't like soggy stuffing so I
bake stuffing in the oven and fill the
cavity of the turkey with aromatics and
shove herbs, spices, citrus, onions and
garlic beneath the skin of the turkey,"
Borboa says. "I prep the ingredients
ahead of time so all I have to do is put
them in place in the turkey before put-
ting it in the oven."

1 day in advance
"When it comes to salads, I say fresh
is best, but you can certainly chop veg-
etables and other salad ingredients a day
in advance and then assemble them on
Thanksgiving Day and allow them to
chill before serving," Borboa says. "Al-
ways put the dressing on right before
serving since vinegar and other acidic
ingredients will wilt salad greens."

On the holiday
"It's best to prep fruit salads the day
you serve them because the fruit tends
to turn brown," Borboa says. "Even
when you have citrus juice mixed with
them, they don't have the vibrancy of
being just sliced or diced. I'd wait until
right before serving to add bananas
since they tend to get soggy when mixed
with juicy fruit."
CTW Features


Make-ahead

appetizer:

Mouthwatering

Mini Crab Cakes

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 pound lump crab, picked over, finely
chopped
2/3 cup light mayonnaise made with olive
oil
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives
1 tablespoon Old Bay Seasoning
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
5 cups whole wheat bread crumbs, divided
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
4 eggs, beaten

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
Add onion and carrot and cook, stirring often,
for 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, for
1 minute. Transfer to a large bowl. Add crab,
mayonnaise, herbs, Old Bay, mustard and 1
cup bread crumbs, stirring well to combine.
Form mixture into 32 crab cakes. Place flour,
eggs and remaining bread crumbs in three
separate shallow bowls.
Dip crab cakes in flour, shaking off excess.
Dip in eggs, allowing excess to drip off. Dip in
bread crumbs to coat. Set crab cakes on a
greased baking sheet and refrigerate for 1
hour. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F Spray
crab cakes with olive oil. Bake for 20 to 25
minutes or until lightly browned. Let cool com-
pletely on a wire rack. To freeze, place crab
cakes in a single layer on a baking sheet until
firm. Transfer crab cakes to a large freezer
bag or freezer container. To reheat, place
frozen crab cakes on a greased baking sheet
in a 375-degree oven and bake for 15 to 20
minutes or until heated through.
Serve warm.

Make up to one month ahead and freeze
until ready to reheat.
Yield: 32 crab cakes
Source: Make-Ahead Meals Made Healthy by
Michele Borboa


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Thursday December 6, 2012 G5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Pumpkin perfected



Bake from scratch without stress with a few simple suggestions.


Raise a glass to friends and
family with this sweet cock-
tail sure to keep spirits -
and glasses full of joy

Toasted
Marshmallow

Ingredients
3/4 ounce Godiva Chocolate
Vodka
3/4 ounce Smirnoff Fluffed Vodka
1/4 ounce Baileys Original
Irish Cream

Preparation
1. Shake and strain into a shot
glass.
2. Finish with dollop of marsh-
mallow fluff.
3. Rest small chocolate bar
square and small graham cracker
on top.
CTW Features


I


By Dana Carman
CTW Features

Baking pie from scratch
may not seem like the best
way to lighten the holiday
to-do list. According to chef
Millicent Souris, however,
that's the best way to your
best pumpkin pie and, re-
ally, she assures, it's not as
laborious as it sounds.
Souris, author of "How to
Build a Better Pie: Sweet
and Savory Recipes for
Flaky Crusts, Toppers, and
the Things in Between"
(Quarry Books, 2012), has
offered some of her expert
advice for the would-be
baker along with a recipe
that puts a new spin on the
old classic.

What makes a
"perfect" pumpkin pie?
Pie is an intersection of
crust and filling and baking,
so it's about all three being
harmonious.

Where do most people
go wrong with their pies?
People overwork their
crust so it ends up being
chewy, rather than flaky and
tender. They don't use
enough salt, in general, to
flavor the filling or the crust
(salt informs flavor). Pies
are generally under-baked
and people use criminal
amounts of cinnamon and
nutmeg.

What are your secrets
for making your own
crust?
The best crust, hands-
down, is half unsalted butter
and half leaf lard. The but-
ter adds that lovely richness
that only butter owns (sorry,


vegans)
and leaf
lard, the
holy grail
of pastry
fat offers a
clean fla-
vor and
tender
flake.
Shorten-
ing was
invented
to mimic
leaf lard,
but Crisco
is evil.
Cer-
tainly all
lard or all
butter
work, or
any varia-
tion of.
Handle the '
crust the
least.
Don't
overwork
it. Make it with your hands
for the most control. Be
quick every motion
should have a purpose.
Do you prefer real
pumpkin or canned?
I think canned pumpkin is
where pumpkin pie gets
gross. Using pumpkins is
not a big deal. Buy one.
Turn your oven on to 400
degrees. Cut the pumpkin
into big pieces and take the
seeds out. Toss with some
olive oil, sprinkle with salt,
add some aromatics like
cinnamon stick, star anise,
nutmeg, a vanilla bean husk
- these lightly inform the
flavor. Roasting food brings
out lots of flavor. Roast the
pumpkin until it is done
(when a butter knife slides


through easily). Scrape the
pumpkin from the skin.
Mash or put through a
colander.
We think all this stuff is
hard, but it's not. You can
prep the pumpkin days be-
fore you need it.

Do you have any
suggestions for those
looking to "spice up" their
pumpkin pies?
That's where the praline
comes in (see recipe in side-
bar). I also think nuanced
seasoning, such as using
whole spices, changes the
game. Nutmeg, cinnamon,
mace, allspice everything
should be balanced. I like to
add fresh ginger to brighten
it, along with lemon zest
and juice. A shot of whisky


never hurt anybody or
anything.


How far in advance would
you recommend baking
your pumpkin pies before
the holiday?
Ideally the same day, but
Christmas is a tough one.
Everything can be prepped,
the filling can be made
ahead of time and the crust
can be pre-baked the night
before. If you must, bake it
the night before, and just let
it cool down and stay out at
room temperature
overnight. Room tempera-
ture is the best way to serve
food; you get the entire fla-
vor. If you refrigerated it,
warm it a bit to take the
chill off.
CTWFeatures


G6 Thursday, December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Variation On a Theme:

Sweet Potato Pie

with Sesame Praline
Editor's note: Pumpkin may be substituted for
sweet potatoes and pumpkin seeds for sesame
seeds but in all cases, the author recommends
using fresh ingredients over canned.
Crust
Single Pie Crust, chilled
Filling
2 pounds sweet potatoes or 3 cups roasted
and put through a sieve
2 large eggs, room temperature
3/4 cup heavy cream, room temperature
3/4 cup packed light brown sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon ground mace
1/8 teaspoon fresh nutmeg (about 15 grates)
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh ginger, zested across a
grater
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
Shot of bourbon
Praline
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
6 tablespoons packed brown sugar
6 tablespoons heavy cream
2 teaspoons kosher salt


3/4 cup sesame seeds, toasted
Wash
1 egg white
Prebake tools
Aluminum foil
Baking beans
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Bottom Crust
Roll out your chilled pie crust to 1/8-inch (3 mm)
thick and about 15 inches in diameter. Place in
your pie pan and trim the edges so there is no
more than 1/4 inch of overhang. Lift and crimp the
overhang along the rim of the pie pan. Chill your
crust in the freezer for at least 15 minutes or chill in
the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes. It is impor-
tant for the crust to be very cold and the fat to re-
form and firm up. Pull your pie plate out of the
refrigerator and place your foil in it. It should sit
flush with the plate, come up along the rim, and
fold down to cover the edges. This foil protects the
crust from overbrowning, but do not press the foil
to the edges. Place your baking beans in the bot-
tom and level them out. Put the crust in the oven.
Bake the crust for 20 minutes at 425 degrees.
Then pull out the crust, lower your oven to 375 de-
grees, and carefully lift the aluminum foil by the
edges off your crust with the beans in it. Put your
crust back in the oven for 15 minutes. Check at 7
minutes and turn it 180 degrees. Check your crust.
The edges may be a little darker than the rest, but
it should be set and very light in color. The bottom


is more than likely a little bit bubbly and looks
shiny. Let it cook a bit more, 5 minutes at the most,
if the bottom is more shiny than matte. Then take
the crust out and let it rest for 10 minutes. Lower
the oven to 350 degrees.
Filling
Roast your sweet potatoes (as much as 3 days
in advance). When the potatoes are still warm, slip
them out of their sleeves and push through a
medium-size colander. If you have a high-power
blender or food processor, use that, but in lieu of
said equipment, push the sweet potatoes through
a colander with a wide wooden spoon. This is an
essential step, because the texture informs the
loveliness of this pie. If you have a blender or a
hand mixer, pull it out. If not, wield your strongest
whisk and your dominant hand. Don't use the
blender or hand mixer on the first step of ricing the
potatoes; they don't have enough horsepower, and
you'll just end up with a gluey mess. Mix together
your eggs and cream until homogenized. Add the
3 cups of sieved potatoes and mix until it's all to-
gether. Add the sugar, salt, spices and bourbon.
Mix until smooth.
Bake
Pour your sweet potato mixture into your cooled,
partially baked piecrust. Put it in the oven. At 30
minutes turn it 180 degrees. Check the pie at 45 or
50 minutes. This takes about an hour to cook. The
best way to check it is to put a butter knife in the


middle or give it a shake. If the knife comes out
pretty clean, it is good. For the same measure, if
it's only the very middle of the pie that is jiggly, the
pie is done. Pull it and let set for at least an hour.
See steps 6 and 7 below to add cooled praline.
Praline
To make the praline, melt your unsalted butter in
a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the
brown sugar when the butter begins to bubble and
whisk them together. Watch your heat, you don't
want this to burn, but you want the brown sugar to
dissolve into the butter, to cook together. Add the
heavy cream in a steady stream, whisking the
whole time. Stop whisking and let this bubble a bit
to come together. It's done when it ceases to taste
just like butter, sugar and heavy cream, it's still raw.
It will taste like a creamy caramel, about 5 or 7
minutes. Add the salt to finish and whisk. Finish
with the sesame seeds. Mix the sesame seeds in
so everything is well dispersed. It is very important
to let this praline sit and cool a bit. If you pour on
the pie hot it will spill over the sides. Pour the
cooled praline over a cooled pie. Let it firm up a bit,
about 30 minutes. It should coat the entire top.
Recipe reprinted with permission from "How to
Build a Better Pie: Sweet and Savory Recipes for
Flaky Crusts, Toppers, and the Things in Between"
by Millicent Souris (Quarry Books, 2012).
CTW Features


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Thursday December 6, 2012 G7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Christmas cookie


recipe contest entries


Bonbon

Cookies
By Barbara Finster

1/2 cup butter or margarine
3/4 cup sifted confectioners'
sugar
1 tablespoons vanilla
Food coloring, if desired
1 1/2 cups flour
1/8 teaspoon salt

Fillings:
Candied or maraschino
cherries, pitted dates, nuts,
raisins, chocolate pieces

Bonbon Icing:
1 cup sifted confectioners'


sugar
2 tablespoons cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
Red, green or yellow food
coloring, if desired

Mix butter, sugar, vanilla and
food coloring. Blend flour and salt
in thoroughly with hand. If dough
is dry, add 1-2 tsp. cream. For
each cookie, wrap 1 level table-
spoon dough around a filling of
your choice.
Place 1 inch apart on ungreased
baking sheet and bake 12-15 min-
utes at 350 degrees. Cool, dip
tops of cookies in icing. Decorate
each cookie with your choice
of topping.
Makes 20-25 cookies


Decadent

Triple

Chocolate

Chewies
By Pat Morgan

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
2/3 cup baking cocoa
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup butter or margarine at
room temperature
3/4 cup granulated sugar
2/3 cup packed brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla


2 eggs
12 ounce bag semi-sweet
chocolate chips
1/2 cup canned chocolate
frosting

Preheat the oven to 350 de-
grees. Combine flour, cocoa, bak-
ing soda and salt in small bowl.
Beat in separate bowl with mixer
until creamy: butter, both sugars
and vanilla. Add eggs and beat
again. Mix in the flour. Fold in the
chocolate chips. Drop by
spoonfuls onto ungreased or
parchment-covered sheets.
Bake 8-10 minutes then cool on
baking racks.
In microwave, heat up chocolate
frosting until just starting to melt.
Drizzle over tops of cooled
cookies.
Makes 3 to 4 dozen
depending on size

Special instructions
Can be decorated after frosting
is drizzled with any type of non-
pareils. You can also switch the
semi-sweet chips with another
flavor for variety.

Memories
Just before the holidays years
ago, I would ask my children what
kind of cookies they wanted me to
bake and they always asked for
these. They are soft and chewy
and very chocolate. The ingredi-
ents can be varied for different fla-
vors but the straight chocolate is
the favorite at most gatherings.


Cranberry

Oatmeal

Raisin Cookie
By Jenny Snead

2 sticks butter
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt


1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 cups quick-cooking oats
1 cup raisins
1 cup chopped fresh
cranberries
1 tablespoon grated orange peel
1 package (12 ounces) white
chocolate chips

In a mixing bowl, cream butter
and sugar. Add eggs one at a
time. Beat in vanilla. Sift together
flour, baking powder, salt and bak-
ing soda. Add to creamed mixture.
Stir in oats, raisins, cranberries
and orange peel. Stir in white
chocolate chips. Drop by rounded
teaspoonful 2 inches apart onto
greased baking sheet.
Bake at 375 degrees for 10-12
minutes or until the edges are
lightly browned. Cool on wire rack.
Makes 6 dozen

Memories
I love the smell this puts in the
house.




Honey Butter

Cookies
By Marcia Smith

2 cups butter, softened at room
temperature
1 cup honey (local is the best)
2 eggs, separated (use the egg
whites for topping)
1 grated lemon rind (use the
whole lemon)
8 cups all purpose flour
2 tablespoons of lemon juice
Raw sugar for topping

Cream butter and gradually add
honey. Beat in egg yolks. Add
lemon rind, flour and lemon juice.
Mix well. Chill dough. Roll into
balls and place on greased cookie
sheet. Press flat with a glass and
brush with lightly beaten egg white
and sprinkle with raw sugar.
Bake 10 to 15 minutes at 350
degrees.
Makes 8 dozen


G8 Thursday, December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special instructions
Prepare to be comforted.

Memories
Butter cookies are such a com-
fort cookie for holidays and this
recipe does not require much
effort to look pretty.



Triple-

Chocolate

Truffles
By Suzanne Farrell

1/2 cup cold milk
1 package (3.9 ounces)
chocolate instant pudding
36 Oreo cookies, finely crushed
(about 3 cups)
1 1/2 packages Baker's
semi-sweet chocolate
(12 squares) melted
1 square Baker's white
chocolate, melted (or white
chocolate chips 1 cup)

Stir milk and pudding mix in
medium bowl with large spoon just
until mix is moistened. Immedi-
ately add cookie crumbs, mix well.
Shape into 42 (1-inch) balls.
Freeze for 10 minutes. Dip in
semi-sweet chocolate and place in
single layer in shallow waxed
paper-lined pan.
Refrigerate 20 minutes or until
firm. Drizzle with white chocolate
and refrigerate 10 minutes or until
firm.
Makes 42 cookies



Vonda's

Almond

Butter Toffee
By Vonda Parsons

12 saltine crackers
1 stick butter
2 cups brown sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 packages chocolate chips
1/2 cup-crushed almonds

Place saltines flat on a greased
cookie sheet with all crackers
touching.

In saucepan melt 1 stick of but-


CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


ter. Add 2 cups brown sugar. Bring
to boil. When sugar is melted add
1 teaspoon of baking soda. Stir
quickly and pour over crackers.
Place in oven and bake 8 min-
utes at 425 degrees. Take out of
oven and pour chocolate chips on
top and spread the chocolate as it
melts. Sprinkle crushed almonds
over the top and refrigerate. Once
it cools, break into toffee pieces.
Makes about 20 pieces of toffee
(depending on size of pieces)

Special instructions
Keep refrigerated

Memories
Baking cookies with my granny
Christmas Eve for Santa



Gram's

Christmas

Cookies
By Rose Brechka

8 ounces cream cheese
1 pound butter
4 cups sifted flour
Preserves for filling

Mix first three ingredients to-
gether until well blended. Place in
refrigerator for at least an hour or
overnight. Roll dough out on a
floured board sprinkled with granu-
lated sugar until thin. Cut circles
with a 2-inch round cookie cutter.
In the center of each cookie, put a
small amount of preserves. (I use
Solo filling). Fold over and pinch
together.
Bake in a 375 degree oven for
about 15 minutes. Allow to cool
and sprinkle with powdered sugar.
Makes about 4 to 5 dozen
(depending on the thickness)

Memories
When my grandmother came to
this country from Hungary in 1907
she brought many of her "Old
Country" customs with her. She
also brought recipes that had been
in her family for generations.
These cookies were part of
every Christmas. Until you try one,
it's hard to believe that only four
ingredients can be so delicious.
It has been left to me to carry on
the tradition and would not be
Christmas without them.


Lemon

Blossoms
By Ann Guarnier
For cookie batter
1 yellow cake mix
1 box Jello instant lemon
pudding and pie filling
4 large eggs
3/4 cup vegetable oil

For the glaze
1 box confectioner's sugar
1/3 cup lemon juice
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 tablespoons water
Grated rind of one lemon

Mix batter thoroughly with elec-
tric mixer. Line cookie pans with
parchment paper and spray with
Pam. Spoon teaspoons of batter
evenly onto cookie pan (about 12
per pan).
Bake at 350 degrees for 12 to
15 minutes.
Makes about 48 cookies

Special instructions
Cool cookies in pan for a couple
of minutes, then remove onto cool-
ing rack to cool completely. While
cookies are baking, prepare glaze
mixture.
When cookies are completely
cooled, drizzle the cookies with
the glaze. The glaze will set, but
be careful not to stack the cookies,
as the glaze will stick to a cookie
placed on top.

Memories
I come from a large family of
five sisters and three brothers. We
and our children often enjoyed
cookie baking at Christmas time.
We would each bring ingredients
of a different cookie. After lots of
mess, merry making, laughs and
baking we all shared a variety of
homemade cookies and lots of
wonderful memories.


Bananas

Foster Bars
By Dea Kershaw

1 stick butter
1 cup dark brown sugar
1 egg
1 tablespoon dark rum
1 cup flour
1/8 teaspoon baking soda


1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup bananas diced
1/2 cup pecans or walnuts finely
chopped

Frosting:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter at
room temperature
4 ounces softened cream
cheese
4 tablespoons light brown sugar
1 teaspoon rum or vanilla
extract
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 to 2 cups confectioners'
sugar, sifted

In large bowl beat butter and
sugar until creamy. Add egg and
rum to combine. In small bowl,
whisk flour, baking soda, baking
powder, cinnamon and salt, gradu-
ally add to butter mixture. Stir in
bananas and nuts. Pour into lightly
greased/floured 9 inch square
pan. Spread evenly.
Bake at 350 degrees for 25 min-
utes or until toothpick inserted in
center comes out clean. Cool
completely.

Frosting
Beat butter, cream cheese,
sugar and extract with electric
mixer until light and fluffy. Add cin-
namon and 1 cup confectioners'
sugar, blend until smooth. Add ad-
ditional confectioners' sugar to
create desired consistency.
Spread over cooled bars.
Makes 16 2-inch bars

Special instructions
Cover and store in refrigerator
up to 3 days.



Pecan

Snowballs
By Samantha Eddinger

1 cup butter
1/2 cup powdered sugar
2 cups flour
3/4 cup pecan
meal
Additional pow-
dered sugar
Cream
butter and
sugar to- .
gether until
fluffy. Add flour, one cup at a


Thursday December 6, 2012 G9


time. Add pecans. Form into balls.
Bake at 350 degrees for 20 min-
utes or until lightly browned on
bottom. Cool, then roll in additional
powdered sugar.


Cream

Cheese

Drop Cookies
By Badcock Home Furnishings

1 cup butter
2 package cream cheese
(3 ounces each)
1 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 tablespoons milk
2 cups all purpose flour
Pecan halves or halved candied
cherries

Cream together the butter,
cream cheese, sugar, salt and
vanilla. Add egg and milk, beat
well. Stir in flour. Drop cookie bat-
ter from teaspoons onto an un-
greased baking sheet then press
pecan or cherry into the top of
each.
Bake at 325 degrees for 18 to
20 minutes. Place on rack to cool.
Makes about 5 dozen
cream cheese cookies








V-







CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Make it Small and Sweet


Serving just one dessert is so 2011.This year, make the most of everyone's

favorite course by offering guests an array of tiny treats.


By Jessica Royer Ocken
CTW Features

Turkey or ham is the cen-
terpiece of many a holiday
meal, but the true main at-
traction comes at the end of
the feast: dessert. Whether
it's pumpkin pie, Bfiche de
Noel, or Grandma's famous
gingersnaps, the final course
is what everyone secretly (or
not so secretly) saves space
for.
And this year, you can be
sure to deliver. Having just
one dessert to indulge in is a
thing of the past. Sweet little
cupcakes? Mini macarons?
Tiny pies? No one is immune
to this cuteness. "Mini


desserts are just adorable,"
confesses Dani Cone, the
baker behind Seattle's High
5 Pies and author of"Cutie
Pies: 40 Sweet, Savory and
Adorable Recipes" (Andrews
McMeel, 2011). "A mini pie
bite bursting with colorful
fruit, rustic crust and a
crumb top? What could be
better?"
Then there's the flavor.
Tiny treats like macarons, a
delicious filled French pas-
try, "pack a lot of flavor in
their small size," says Ann E.
McBride, co-author with
Kathryn Gordon of"Les Pe-
tits Macarons: Colorful
French Confections to Make
at Home" (Running Press,


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2011). "So while you can
easily eat a couple and enjoy
variety, you'll also be satis-
fied with just one."
Still another bonus? "Bite-
sized desserts are naturally
portion-controlled," notes
Carole Bloom, author of 10
dessert cookbooks, including
"Bite-Size Desserts" (Wiley,
2009). "And they're easy to
handle. There's no need to
cut or slice or decide what
size piece you want."
These features combine to
make small sweets perfect
for holiday gatherings. "I
love small things at parties,
because I hate eating stand-
ing up," says Deb Perelman,
the accomplished cook and
blogger behindsmitten
kitchen.com and "The
Smitten Kitchen Cookbook"
(Random House, 2012). "If it
takes more than one bite, it's
on your chin."
Shrink the size of your
holiday desserts and offer a
variety so everyone can man-
age a taste or manage to


taste them all.


Make it delicious
When serving an assort-
ment, you can keep to the
classics and experiment, too.
Our experts recommend sea-
sonal flavors such as pump-
kin and maple, perhaps with
caramel or butterscotch, for
Thanksgiving. For Christ-
mas, offer spicy selections
with cinnamon, ginger or
mint in addition to chocolate.
Perhaps a chocolate pepper-
mint or gingerbread cake ball
(a luscious truffle made of
crumbled cake and frosting),
suggest Robin Ankeny and
Charlotte Lyon of The Cake
Ball Co., based in Dallas,
and authors of "Cake Balls"
(Running Press, 2012), or a
rich bourbon-pumpkin but-
tercream macaron.
Fruits of the season also
are great choices. "If you
have a basic vanilla cake
recipe or one with fruit, you
can switch it up," Perelman
says. "If you use peaches in


the summer, use apples or
pears in the fall. I'm also a
big fan of cranberries in
baked goods. They have a
nice flavor when you add
sugar, and they go well with
orange and citrus, too."
It's also an option to
choose simpler flavors, such
as basic birthday cake or
brownie, and add festive
decorations to dress up your
treats for the holiday occa-
sion, note Ankeny and Lyon.
In addition to varying fla-
vors, consider your selec-
tions to be sure you'll offer a
range of colors, textures, and
styles. "Plan to have an as-
sortment of bite-size desserts
on your menu, such as
tartlets, cakes, cookies, and
candies," Bloom says.

Make it beautiful
Almost as fun as cooking
and baking mini desserts is
finding fabulous ways to dis-
play them. A cake ball or two
can nestle in a serving spoon
or become cake pops with


the help of lollipop sticks.
Cone loves to make piepops,
too. Anything on a stick will
look great nestled into a bou-
quet in a vase or glass, and
Bloom suggests creative
plating with dishes of differ-
ent shapes, sizes, and colors,
and even using pieces of
slate and granite or baskets.
Setting small items in mini-
cupcake papers will make
them pretty and easy to pick
up, adds Perelman.
Macarons, with their var-
ied colors and neat, round
shape, can be displayed
countless ways. "I love dis-
playing pastel macarons on
antique tiered cake or cookie
platters," McBride says. Line
them up in multicolored
rows like gems or stack them
in a pyramid, she suggests.
Or, make a delicious edible
centerpiece for your sweets
table by pinning macarons to
a foam shape (or attaching
them with a bit of frosting),
see Sweet Page 11


G10 Thursday December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C, %-
A h-411Z ~i







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Sweet
from Page 10
such as a tree or large ball.
Desserts this delightful may
not wait until the end of the
meal to make their debut. A
mini pie could greet each
guest at their assigned seat,
perhaps even wrapped to take
home as a party favor, says
Cone, adding: "Have fun with
this! There are so many ways
to display these treats, and
they look great piled high a
true pie bounty!"

Make it manageable
Now, in all honesty, is mak-
ing a batch of petit-four-sized
pies more labor intensive than
a standard nine-incher or two?
Probably. But creating tiny
treats doesn't have to mean
chaining yourself to the stove
for days at a time. "It just re-
quires planning, and maybe a
good piping bag," Perelman
says.
Consider these tips:
Don't abandon your favorite
recipes. "In many cases home
cooks can make their full-size


CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


recipes into bite-size desserts,"
Bloom says. Just practice a
few times so you can figure
out the yield and the adjusted
cooking time.
Cookies are a particularly
easy item to make smaller,
Perelman says.
Bar cookies are easiest of
all. Something like her cran-
berry crumb bars can be cut in
one-inch squares for one-bite
delight. (Cool the pan to al-
most-frozen for cutting ease.)
Bite-sized cheesecakes can
be tricky, Bloom says. Choose
a silicone mini-muffin pan to
help them come out easily.

Bake in advance
Make a few flavors of mini
cupcakes over a period of
weeks, Perelman suggests.
Wrap them airtight and store
in the freezer until the holiday
arrives.
Then just thaw, add frosting,
and you're ready to go.
Your guests will be amazed
at the bounty of decadence,
and you'll be a hero, because
after all, everyone loves a
choice!


You will need:
Your favorite crust recipe
Your favorite filling recipe (see
Dani's below)
Rolling pin
Flour
Nonstick spray
Muffin tin

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the
chilled dough (right from the fridge!) to
about 1/4-inch thickness.
Cut dough into 4-5-inch circles
Spray muffin tin lightly with nonstick
spray
Gently press each circle into a muffin
cup, making sure sides and bottom are
pressed in, leaving about 1/2-inch over-
hang above the muffin cup.
Fold and tuck: gently fold over the over-
hang and tuck it back into the muffin tin,
just as you crimp a full-sized pie
Crimp the edges, again just as you
would a full-sized pie. Start with your
thumb and forefinger of left hand and


place on edge.
With forefinger of right hand, push
edge gently between thumb and forefin-
ger of left hand, and continue around the
Cutie Pie, making about 5 crimps.
Fill with your favorite pie filling, top with
either mini lattice, a mini flat top or crumb
top. If topping with lattice or flat top, brush
lightly with egg wash and sprinkle with
sugar before baking.
Bake at 400 degrees for about 50 min-
utes, until crust is deep golden brown and
filling is bubbly.
Check the bottoms by using a butter
knife to gently lift up the Cutie Pie and
see that it is golden brown on the bottom,
too.

High 5 Apple Pie Filling
6-8 medium Granny Smith apples
4 ounces light brown sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1-1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg


Thursday, December 6, 2012 Gil


pinch of ground cloves
1 egg, lightly beaten
1/8 cup raw sugar

Directions:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
Wash, core, and slice apples into
1/2-inch slices.
Toss apple slices and all ingredients to-
gether in a glass or metal baking pan, at
least 1 inch deep. Make sure apples are
well coated.
Bake apples for 5 minutes, remove
from oven and stir.
Fill pie crust(s) with apple mixture and
top with lattice or flat top. Crimp edges.
Lightly brush top with egg wash of one
lightly beaten egg and sprinkle with raw
sugar.
Bake as directed.


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Dani Cone's Cutie Pies






CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


It's time to



make the fancy



schmancy



doughnuts!


Gourmet doughnuts are next big thing.


By Bev Bennett
CTW Features
Move over cupcakes. It's time for
doughnuts to take their star turn. So,
bring on the sprinkles, the chocolate, the
bacon. Yes, even the bacon.
"People were doing interesting flavors
with cupcakes. It was a matter of time
before the same thing happened to
doughnuts," says Lara Ferroni, cook-


4 (21/2-inch diameter) plain or
sugar-coated cake doughnuts
1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons orange
liqueur
1/4 cup finely chopped dried,
sweetened cranberries
2 (3-ounce) bars semisweet
chocolate, broken into small
pieces
3 tablespoons finely chopped
walnuts or pecans, optional


book author and food photographer,
Portland, Ore.
However, if you still envision racks of
plain, glazed doughnuts in your favorite
coffee shop, stretch your imagination.
You can make luscious, indulgent and
extravagant doughnuts for holiday par-
ties in no more time than it takes to bake
a batch of cookies.
Once you've mastered the basic tech-
nique, "you can put your own spin on


1. Crumble doughnuts into small bits to
measure 2 packed cups. Place crumbs in
large bowl. Add enough liqueur to just
dampen crumbs. Stir in cranberries. Measure
mixture by level tablespoons. Form into un-
even, truffle-shaped balls, about 1-inch diam-
eter. Don't overwork. Place truffles on baking
sheet lined with parchment paper.
2. Refrigerate at least 1 hour, or until firm and
cold.
3. Place chocolate in top of double boiler over
simmering water. Melt, stirring occasionally.
Chocolate should be lukewarm, not hot. Im-


the doughnut; make it your own," says
Mark Klebeck, a co-founder of Top Pot
Doughnuts in Seattle.
Create your own designer doughnuts
using your favorite seasonal flavors,
such as nutmeg, peppermint, cranberry
or pumpkin. Coat finished doughnuts
with orange, coconut or chocolate glaze.
Then, since there's no such thing as
too much, finish off your masterpiece
with chopped nuts, chocolate shavings


mediately remove from heat. Remove cold
truffles from refrigerator. Using two spoons,
dip truffles, one at a time, into melted choco-
late, turning to coat truffles on all side. Place
on parchment-covered baking sheet. If de-
sired lightly sprinkle about 1/2 teaspoon nuts
over each truffle. Set aside at cool room tem-
perature. Chocolate will firm up in less than
an hour. Refrigerate if preparing in advance.
Makes 16 truffles; 8 servings.
Note: If desired, insert a bamboo skewer into
each truffle and serve as pops.
SCTW Features


or savory bacon.
Doughnuts topped with chopped wal-
nuts and crumbled bacon is one of the
tantalizing recipes in the new cookbook
by Mark and Michael Klebeck, "Top Pot
Hand-Forged Doughnuts" (Chronicle
Books, 2011).
The choices are yours. Here are some
"do and dough-not" suggestions to get
started.
If you're a doughnut novice, try the
cake style recipes, which are easier and
faster than yeast doughnuts, say the ex-
perts.
Don't make doughnuts a day in ad-
vance. For best quality, make doughnuts
on party day. Cake doughnuts only take
about 30 minutes to prepare and you can
make them a few hours ahead of time to
avoid last-minute preparation, according
to Ferroni, author of"Doughnuts: Sim-
ple and Delicious Recipes to Make at
Home" (Sasquatch Books, 2010).
Resist super-sizing so your guests can
sample more. "You can grab one or two
and don't feel like you have to cut up a
doughnut and share it," Klebeck says.
Do take steps to make cleanup easier.
Unfortunately, frying doughnuts can be
messy. Cover your stovetop with alu-
minum foil. Toss the spattered foil when
see Doughnuts Page 13


Chocolate-Covered Orange and Cranberry

Doughnut Truffles Inspired by Lara Ferroni


G12 Thursday December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Doughnuts
from Page 12
you're done, Klebeck says.
Don't stack glazed doughnuts. Although
a doughnut tower would be an eye-catching
display on the dessert table, glazed dough-
nuts are best arranged in a single layer so
they don't stick together. A large platter or
party tray will hold a dozen doughnuts.
Invite your guests to share in the fun of
doughnut preparation with a DIY decorat-
ing station, Ferroni says. Set out a platter of
plain doughnuts. Make a glaze and bring it
warm to the table. Add a few bowls of top-
pings. Let guests create their own designer
doughnuts.
Don't discard your leftovers. Turn the
stale crumbs into truffles as Ferroni does.
If you're ready to make doughnuts from
scratch, try the Klebeck sensation: a choco-
late cake doughnut with peppermint icing
and candy cane bits.
"Mint and chocolate is an incredible
combination," he says.
If you've been practicing and have left-
over, stale doughnuts, prepare the follow-
ing recipe for doughnut truffles. As an
alternative you can make doughnut truffles
with store-bought doughnuts.
"Mint and chocolate is an incredible
combination.," he said.


Peppermint snowdrift cake doughnuts


Chocolate peppermint doughnuts:
Adapted from the cookbook "Hand-Forged
Doughnuts."
2 cups cake flour plus more for rolling and
cutting
1/2 cup unsweetened Dutch process cocoa
powder
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon iodized salt
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons shortening
2 large egg yolks
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon peppermint extract
2/3 cup milk
Canola oil for frying
Peppermint icing:
4-1/2 cups confectioners sugar, sifted
1-1/2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/4 teaspoon iodized salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon peppermint extract
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon hot water


Crushed peppermint candies for decoration
1. First make the doughnut dough. Sift the flour,
cocoa powder, baking powder, salt and nutmeg
together into a mixing bowl and set aside.
2. In a stand mixer, fitted with the paddle attach-
ment, mix the sugar and shortening for 1 minute
on low speed, until sandy. Add the egg yolks,
one at a time. Then mix for 1 more minute on
medium speed, scraping the sides of the bowl
with a rubber spatula if necessary, until the mix-
ture is light colored and thick. Mix in the vanilla
and peppermint extracts.
3. Add the flour mixture to the mixing bowl in
three additions, alternating with the milk, mixing
until just combined, on low speed each time. The
dough will be sticky.
4. Transfer the dough to a clean bowl, cover with
plastic wrap and refrigerate for 45 minutes or up
to 24 hours.
5. Using a candy thermometer to measure the
temperature, heat at least 2 inches of oil in a
deep fryer or large pot to 370 degrees F
6. Roll out chilled dough to 1/2-inch thickness on
a lighted floured surface; lightly flour top of


dough and rolling pin to prevent sticking. Cut into
as many doughnuts and doughnut holes as pos-
sible, dipping cutter into flour before each cut.
Fold and gently rework dough; cut more holes.
7. Shake any excess flour off doughnuts. Care-
fully lower doughnuts into hot oil, a few at a time.
Don't crowd. When doughnuts float to the oil's
surface, fry about 1 minute per side. The texture
will change as the doughnuts are done.
8. Remove doughnuts with slotted spoon; drain
on paper towels and cool completely.
9. While doughnuts are cooling make the icing.
Place the confectioners sugar, corn syrup, salt,
vanilla and peppermint extracts in the work bowl
of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attach-
ment. With the machine on medium speed, add
the hot water in a slow, steady stream and blend
until all the sugar has been incorporated, scrap-
ing the bowl a few times if necessary Set aside.
10. Dip one side of each doughnut into warm
icing. Sprinkle on crushed peppermint candies.
Place doughnuts, icing side up, on wire rack to
cool completely.
Makes 1 dozen doughnuts and holes.


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Thursday, December 6, 2012 G13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Where there's smoke...



Oven? Not this year. Follow 2 of the most popular turkey trends

to the great outdoors: grilling and smoking Mr. Gobbles


By Matthew M. F. Miller
CTW Features

Breaking with tradition is always a test of the home
cook's mettle, especially around the holidays. Loved ones
have expectations and when they aren't met, disappoint-
ment causes upset even Tums can't relieve.
For those looking to make the leap from the oven to the
outdoors this year, there are a few general guidelines to
make sure that the holiday turkey turns out well done and
not charred or dry.
The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service recom-


mends the following pointers for successfully smoking a
turkey:
Whole turkeys that weigh 12 pounds or less are the rec-
ommended size for safe grilling or smoking. A larger turkey
remains in the "Danger Zone" between 40 degrees F and
140 degrees F too long.
If a larger turkey has been mistakenly purchased, detach
the dark meat sections (leg and thigh portions) from the
breast and smoke/grill the turkey parts separately.
This procedure should result in the best possible results.
When purchasing a whole turkey or turkey breast, the
structure is as important as the weight. Generally, a turkey


that is broad and flat will fit better under the covered
smoker or grill than one that protrudes too high in the breast
area. Remember there should be at least one inch of space
between the turkey and the lid.
Do not stuff the smoked turkey.
Because smoking is at a low temperature, it can take too
long for the temperature of the stuffing to reach the required
temperature of 165 degrees F. Also, smoked stuffing has an
undesirable flavor.
Following, a recipe for a grilled turkey and one for a
smoked turkey, courtesy the National Turkey Federation.
CTWFeatures


Savory Grilled Turkey:

The Ultimate Grilled Turkey


Delight holiday guests' taste buds with a
new take on the holiday bird.
The savory and rich flavor profile the grill
adds to the turkey will keep your recipe in
the books for seasons to come.
1 (12-pound) whole turkey
1 cup unsalted butter, cubed
1/2 cup cider vinegar


1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon A.1. steak sauce
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
1 teaspoon Louisiana-style hot sauce


1. Remove giblets from turkey (discard or save for another use).
2. Using long-handled tongs, moisten a paper towel with cooking oil and lightly coat the
grill rack. Prepare grill for indirect heat, using a drip pan in the center. Skewer turkey
openings closed.
3. When the grill temperature has reached about 3500 F, place turkey on the grill rack,
directly over the drip pan. Grill, covered, over indirect medium heat for 1 hour.
4. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil.
Reduce heat; simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally Remove from the heat. Set
aside and cover 2/3 cup for serving.
5. Continue to grill turkey 1 hour-2 hours longer or until a meat thermometer reads 1750
F in the thigh, basting frequently with remaining sauce.
6. Cover turkey and let stand for 15 minutes before carving. Serve with reserved sauce.


G14 Thursday December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Smoked Turkey ..
1. When using a charcoal smoker, fill the liquid pan with water, wine, apple juice or the
liquid you desire. *
2. Fill the charcoal pan with a good-quality charcoal. Light the charcoal and place the
cover on the smoker. When the smoker has reached an internal temperature of 250 de-
grees F to 300 degrees F, quickly place the turkey on the smoker rack and replace the
cover. (Some smokers have built in temperature indicators. If not, place an appliance
thermometer on the smoker rack before starting the heat.)
3. Add charcoal every hour, as necessary, to maintain 250 degrees F to 300 degrees F
Replenish the liquid as necessary. Heat and liquid are critical to maintaining the hot
smoke that cooks the turkey.
4. When cooking with a smoker, start with clean equipment. Place the smoker in an area
shielded from winds to maintain a consistent cooking temperature. To enhance the fla-
vors, add chunks or chips of water-soaked hardwood or fruitwood. DO NOT use soft-
wood (pine, fir, cedar or spruce) as it gives the food a turpentine flavor and coats it with a
black pitch or resin.
5. Smoking time depends on many factors: the size and shape of the turkey, the distance
from the heat, temperature of the coals and the outside air temperature. Estimate 20 to
30 minutes per pound if using a smoker. Always use a food thermometer. The whole
turkey is done when the food thermometer, placed in the inner thigh, reaches 180 de- A .
grees F The breast is done when the internal temperature reaches 170 degrees F




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Thursday, December 6, 2012 G15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CHRISTMAS COOKIES AND HOLIDAY TREATS


Play it safe


Christmas music is everywhere, all the time. Here's how to create

a festive mood without putting the overplayed on repeat


By Lindsey Romain
CTW Features

No holiday party is complete
without festive music, but come
turkey time, guests might be
burned out. Grandma plays them
in the kitchen, department stores
blare them from window displays
and no car ride is safe from a hol-
iday-themed radio station.
But how can you have a holi-
day party without them? Easy.
Seek out something off-the-
beaten track.
Ronald Clancy, author and
product developer of the "Millen-
nia Collection: Glorious Christ-


mas Music, Songs and Carols" -
a Christmas music package that
chronicles the history of holiday
music from the early centuries of
Christianity to today suggests
classical pieces that may be unfa-
miliar to the modern ear, and that
don't make it to the radio air-
waves too often.
On his suggested classical
playlist: "Gloria" from "Le
Messe" by Camille Saint-Saens,
"Hort Zu Ihr Lieben Leute" by
Michael Praetorius, "Anima Nos-
tra" by Michael Haydn, "Mes-
siah" by George Frideric Handel,
"Down in Yon Forest" an
anonymously written 15th cen-


tury English folk song and
"Panis Angelicus" by Cesar
Franck (recently popularized by
Josh Groban).
The songs aren't glaringly
Christmas-sounding but have
roots in the meaning of the holi-
day and lend a similar ambiance.
Clancy also suggests covers of
uncommon holiday songs, like
John Jacob Niles unique take on
"I Wonder as I Wander" or
"Morning Has Broken" by Cat
Stevens, which was originally the
Gaelic Christmas hymn "Leanabh
An Aigh." Some entirely non-
Christmas songs that he says can
still evoke a Christmas-esque


mood: "What a Wonderful
World," "Wind Beneath My
Wings," "Yesterday When I Was
Young," "My Favorite Things,"
"The Sounds of Silence," "Bridge
Over Troubled Water" and "As
Time Goes By."
Jim Blum, who hosted "Ora-
ments & Icing," a nationally dis-
tributed Christmas show for
NPR, suggests "reinvented"
Christmas music.
"The cliches are ousted and the
religion is underplayed," he says
of his favorites, like Mindy
Smith's "My Holiday," Martin
Sexton's "Camp Holiday," Bela
Fleck & The Fleckstones' "Jingle


All the Way" and Mary Chapin
Carpenter's "Come Darkness,
Come Light."
And while they may be more
outright familiar than his other
suggestions, Blum also recom-
mends Christmas albums played
on unique instruments to give
them an edge albums like
Gregg Miner's "A Christmas Col-
lection Vol. 1 and 2" ("Gregg has
a museum of unusual instruments
in California," Blum says) and
carpenter Woody Phillips's "A
Toolbox Christmas," with holiday
melodies played on or with tools
like power drills and hammers.
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G16 Thursday December 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE