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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-02-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02965

Full Text


College football: Conference titles on the line /B1


Early morning fog;
sunny to partly cloudy.
PAGE A4


CITRiR -S CO U N TY





HIRONICLE


DECEMBER 2, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


TOYOTATHON


at VILLAGE
TOYOTA SEEIT
ONPG. D6 TOYOTA


Inverness office
hours to change
The hours for the
Citrus County Chronicle's
Inverness office are
changing beginning
Monday, Dec. 3.
The office will be open
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday through Friday.


BUSINESS:






Comparisons
Check retailers prices
best deal./Page D
Comparisons
Check retailers prices
online to receive the
best deal./Page D1


Comin'


town


COMMENTARY:


Melting
Ice sheets in Greenland
dissipating three times
faster now than a
decade ago./Page C1
HOMEFRONT:



-- I i- -- I



Traveling?
Read these tips to keep
your home safe while
away/Page E10
NATIONAL NEWS:


Race card
What six words would
describe yours thoughts
about race?/Page A12


Tablet talk
Read about the new
tablet computers ready
for holidays./Page D4

Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ..............A18
Ed itorial............. ........ C 2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
M ovies ....................A 18
Obituaries ................A6
Together..................A20


6 I11 !7812111 Io


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Five-year-old Isaiah Varkett leads dozens of young and old, spirited Christmas-parade enthusiasts on the Mission
in Citrus parade float Saturday night in downtown Crystal River.

Community parades light up crowds with holiday spirits


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
Santa has officially
made his way into
Crystal River and
Beverly Hills.
Arriving Saturday
morning in Beverly
Hills, the jolly, generous soul ap-
peared in broad daylight for all to
see. As he squinted his eyes and
chuckled hello, he appeared in
the Christmas in the Hills Parade
themed "Magic of Christmas" in
Beverly Hills.
Beginning at 10 a.m., Christmas
enthusiasm ignited the streets as
the procession of more than 50 pa-
rade entries made their way down
Beverly Hills Boulevard to the
Civic Center.
While clapping, cheering and
dancing floats passed by, echoes of
Christmas caroling was heard as
residents sang along with music
coming from the daytime Parade
in the Hills.
From antique cars to decorated
floats, young and old alike joined
in the holiday spirit.
"Did you see the mermaid?"
asked 9-year-old Sarah Parker.
"Oh, Mommy, I see the horses
coming."
After Santa's mid-day nap, he
laced up his boots for a cheerful
appearance in Crystal River.
Santa Claus and parade grand
marshal Dale McClellan waved
hello as they both highlighted "A
Post Card Christmas" theme at the
annual Crystal River Christmas
Parade.
By popular demand, the night-
time illumination paraded south
from Citrus Avenue to Port Para-
dise Road in Crystal River.
Dozens of parade entries filled
the streets as the procession
brought smiles to children of all
ages.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Tower One from the Citrus County Sheriff's Fire Rescue Division delivers
Santa, a crowd favorite, down Beverly Hills Boulevard on Saturday morning
during the Parade in the Hills.


This year's parade was hosted by
the Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce and the city of Crystal River
Daylight or nighttime, children
happily cheered the parades'
floats and grand entrance of Santa


Clause who wished everyone a
"Merry Christmas!"
Chronicle reporterEryn Wor-
thington can be contacted at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


Forum to address funding for developmentally disabled


PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
Concerns about funding
for services for some of the
county's most vulnerable
residents are the focus of a
Monday forum featuring
several state leaders in
services for the develop-
mentally disabled.
Families of developmen-
tally disabled citizens want
to know if the state can ad-
equately serve their loves
ones, given the current
economic climate and
trends in state funding.
With annual and increas-
ing government budget
cuts, service-providers
who work with this seg-
ment of the population are


* WHAT: "Looking at
Florida's Future"
forum.
WHEN: 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monday.
WHERE: Chet Cole
Life Enrichment
Center at the Key
Training Center, 5521
W. Buster Whitton
Way, Lecanto.

concerned about their abil-
ity to continue operating
successful programs and
providing support services
such as transportation.
According to Neale PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
Brennan, director of the Clients of the Key Training Center depend on state funding
to help pay for a variety of programs and services. A forum
See Page A5 Monday at the center will address funding issues.


Progress


Energy


disputes


numbers

County tax

question has

been ongoing
PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
Property taxes play a big
role in any budget and
Progress Energy/Duke En-
ergy is no exception.
And Citrus County is not
the only place the recently
merged company has con-
tested property taxes and
assessments. The company
has publicized property
taxes playing a negative
role on its balance sheet
Last week's news that
Progress Energy Citrus
County's largest taxpayer-
paid about $19 million for
its 2012 taxes instead of the
anticipated $36 million sent
shockwaves through the
school system and all areas
of county government.
Progress paid approxi-
mately $34.3 million in local
See Page A4


Associated Press
Brandy Soublet is one of 45
female Marines assigned
this summer to 19 all-male
combat battalions.


Female


Marine


to see


combat

Lawsuits aim

to changepolicy
Associated Press
SAN DIEGO Marine
1st Lt. Brandy Soublet is
about as far from the war
front as possible at her desk
in the California desert, but
she's on the front lines of an
experiment that could one
day put women as close to
combat as their male peers.
The Penfield, N.Y.
woman is one of 45 female
Marines assigned this sum-
mer to 19 all-male combat
battalions. The Defense De-
partment in the past year
has opened thousands of
combat positions to women
to slowly integrate them
and gauge the impact such
a social change would have
See .Page A9


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
81
LOW
55


I-- S o U N I, D ',


J









Week in state gov't: Legislature gears up; Citizens under fire


BRANDON LARRABEE
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE- Like
holiday diners beginning to
awaken from tryptophan-
induced naps, lawmakers
came out of the Thanksgiv-
ing weekend and began lay-
ing the groundwork for the
2013 legislative session.
House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel, and Senate Presi-
dent Don Gaetz, R-
Niceville, began naming
leaders and committee
members early in the week
so lawmakers at least knew
which rooms to go to for
next week's kickoff meet-
ings. Senators began filing
their bills. And Gov Rick
Scott continued to roll out
the beginnings of what looks
like an agenda for the
session.
Meanwhile, a scandal in-
cluding allegations of sex-
ual impropriety continued
to rock one of the least-sexy
agencies in state
government.
LEGISLATIVE
RUMBLINGS
With the organizational
session out of the way and
lawmakers free to carry out
their duties, committee as-
signments and bills came
out of the proverbial start-
ing gate. It was a journey
that could extend until the
first days of May 2013. At
least that's the plan.
Weatherford had his com-
mittee assignments done by
Monday, with the Senate
moving at a more casual
pace no surprise to any-
one who drops by the re-
spective chambers on a
given day
Some of the highest-
profile picks included Rep.
Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala,
being tapped to head the Ju-
diciary Committee and Rep.
Marlene O'Toole, R-Lady
Lake, taking over the Edu-
cation Committee. Rep.
Richard Corcoran, R-
Trinity, will chair the Health
and Human Services
Committee.
Gaetz, who announced
some chairmanships Mon-
day, had all of his appoint-
ments wrapped up
Wednesday One of the more
closely watched committees
- the panel dealing with
gambling will be headed
by Sen. Garrett Richter, a
Naples Republican who will
also be president pro tem-
pore. Richter said he ex-
pected the Senate Gaming
Committee to move deliber-
ately to deal with a sensitive
issue.
"It would be very appro-
priate to try to take a com-
prehensive look at gaming
for the state of Florida," he
said.
Bills also started whizzing
around the Capitol, or at
least around the circuitry
that handles legislation.
Democrats started out by
trying to reignite one of the
hottest issues of the fall:
When and where Floridians
should be allowed to cast
ballots. Sen. Arthenia
Joyner, D-Tampa, and Sen.
Gwen Margolis, D-Miami,
filed a pair of bills (SB 80,
SB 82) to expand early vot-
ing times and the places
where it can occur.
The measures would also
eliminate a requirement
that people who have


moved into a community
from outside the county vote
a provisional ballot on Elec-
tion Day if they hadn't ear-
lier changed their legal
address.
Democrats have com-
plained Republicans, who
overwhelmingly control the
Legislature, have tried to
make it harder for people to
vote, particularly those who
are more transient, younger,
and minorities, all of whom
critics say are more likely to
vote Democratic. Republi-
cans have countered that
measures aimed at making
it more difficult to cast a
ballot are intended to stop
voter fraud.
Both bills filed this week
would require early voting
to begin 15 days before Elec-
tion Day, up from 10 days be-
fore under current law.
Early voting wouldn't end
until the Sunday night be-
fore the election under the
new measures. Current law
ended early voting on the
Saturday before Election
Day
Even with the Election
Day difficulties, which GOP
leaders are eager to ex-
plore, it's not clear that Re-
publicans will be ready to
do that abrupt an about-face
on the voting changes.
Other bills also got
started. Sen. Thad Altman,
R-Viera, filed a measure
that would require most
children younger than 7 to
use a booster seat or other
safety seat while riding in
cars. Sen. Maria Sachs, D-
Delray Beach, filed a meas-
ure barring Floridians from
using cell phones in cars un-
less they use hands-free
technology And Joyner filed
a bill aimed at preventing
employers from turning
away job applicants be-
cause they were unem-
ployed and a measure
calling for a study of pay dis-
parities between men and
women.
DIFFERENT KIND
OF $10,000 BET
Gov Rick Scott kicked off
the week by challenging
Florida state colleges to
offer four-year degrees for
$10,000 or less. Scott, who
has made the affordability
of college one of his hall-
mark issues, came out with
his challenge even as state
universities have been
pushing for higher tuition
rates.
"You should be able to
work and go to school and
not end up with debt," Scott


Weekly ROUNDUP

CF accepts challenge
Special to the Chronicle

OCALA The College of Central Florida accepted
the "Governor's $10,000 Degree Challenge," issued by
Gov Rick Scott during a news conference Monday at St.
Petersburg College.
The College of Central Florida is poised to accept the
challenge with its Bachelor of Applied Science in Busi-
ness and Organizational Management, which has been
offered at CF since January 2011.
CF administrators will develop a strategy in the com-
ing weeks to meet the challenge. CF's tuition for a
Florida resident in 2012-2013 is $105.10 per credit hour
for associate degree courses and $120.89 for baccalau-
reate level courses.
To learn more about CF, visit www.CFedu.


told WFLA TV on Monday
"If these degrees cost so
much money, tuition is so
high, that's not going to hap-
pen. I have put out this chal-
lenge to our state colleges -
we have 28 great state col-
leges and say, 'Can you
come up with degrees
where individuals can get
jobs that the total degree
costs $10,000?"'
By the end of the week,
the governor's office said
half of Florida's colleges
were at least considering
the idea, and a number had
already announced they
would accept the
challenge.
But not everyone was
pleased. Roberto Martinez,
vice chairman of the state
Board of Education, blasted
the change in a letter.
"The cost of a Bachelors
Degree at many of our col-
leges cost the students on
average approximately
$12,000," Martinez wrote.
"Reducing this further, to
create a cheap four-year de-
gree, will undermine the
quality and value of the ed-
ucation, hurting our stu-
dents chances to compete
successfully in our 21st Cen-
tury economy"
The other six members of
the board, which oversees
state colleges, issued a
statement Monday support-
ing the move.
Scott also called for the
Legislature to double, to $12
million, the funding for
"Quick Response Training
Grants," handed out by the
Department of Economic
Opportunity for training for
new or expanding
businesses.
And the governor told the
Florida Chamber of Com-
merce's insurance summit
that reforms were needed
for the state-managed Citi-


zens Property Insurance
Corp., though he didn't un-
veil a new policy proposal.
"To make the dream of
home ownership available
we must reduce the size of
Citizens," Scott said.
SPEAKING OF
CITIZENS ...
The board of Citizens,
meanwhile, arguably had
more interesting matters on
its mind.
Public pressure contin-
ued to grow on the company
over a series of embarrass-
ing revelations that were
being investigated by inter-
nal watchdogs before their
office was shuttered by the


company
But Citizens President
and CEO Barry Gilway hit
back during a meeting of the
company's governing board
Tuesday, acknowledging a
handful of Citizens supervi-
sors behaved inappropri-
ately in some instances, but
others faced allegations that
were either disproved or re-
main unsubstantiated.
A pair of Citizens employ-
ees reportedly took off their
bras and danced at the Coy-
ote Ugly bar in Tampa dur-
ing a company retreat in
2009, though they were dis-
ciplined. Another was ac-
cused of practicing law
without a license, though
Gilway said that hasn't been
substantiated.
In all, hundreds of pages
of documents released last
week alleged misappropria-
tions of funds, sexual ha-
rassment, lucrative
severance packages and
other inappropriate behav-
ior by a handful of Citizens
supervisors between 2004
and 2010. Gilway took over
the company in June.
But while Gilway said he
was "disgusted" at some ac-
tions, he pushed back
against the idea of Insur-
ance Executives Gone Wild.
"It is also critically impor-
tant that the actions of a
very, very few people over
the course of four years not


tarnish the reputation of
1,300 employees who come
in every single day and bust
their tails, even though they
are getting trashed in the
press on a daily basis,
Gilway said.
Making matters look
worse, the company's Office
of Corporate Integrity was
disbanded as it looked into
the issues. Scott last week
asked his inspector general
to inspect that action.
It wasn't all scandal for
Citizens, though; Gilway
told the insurance summit
he will brief the company's
board in December about
an effort requiring Citizens
to try to place policies with
private carriers before issu-
ing policies itself.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: Gov Rick Scott chal-
lenges state colleges to offer
four-year degrees for
$10,000 as part of an effort to
hold down the cost of higher
education.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "The last time I
looked around, we were still
in the United States of
America. We have not been
annexed to a communist
regime. We still have some
basic rights. Those rights in-
clude innocent until proven
guilty."- Citizens President
and CEO Barry Gilway, on
allegations against employ-
ees of the company


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A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Heritage festival exemplifies history


Demonstrations,

homes tour send

patrons into past

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
Visitors crowded the sidewalks,
demonstrators' fields and homes
of Floral City, enthusiastic to ex-
perience demonstrations of by-
gone days.
Floral City offered all that and
more at the 22nd annual Heritage
Days festival. From acoustic and
folk music to country food and
Blue Banner Tour of Historic
Homes, attendees enjoyed the
warm weather as they explored
Florida history at the annual
Florida Folk Life Day
Attendees meandered along Or-
ange Avenue with daily living ex-
hibits and demonstrations
mesmerizing their curiosity.
Broom-makers, basket weavers,
corn-pulverizing, sugar cane-
grinding and many more were
among the demonstrations. A


woman pulling fur from Ruby the
rabbit was also in attendance.
In addition, Blue Ribbon Tour
of Historic Homes had guests fill-
ing homes as they were lured into
the past.
Floral City Heritage Council
members Frank Peters and Henry
"H.D." Bassett welcomed curiosity
seekers into the historic Duval
House, which was open to the
public for the first time. Possibly
being the oldest surviving resi-
dential structure in Citrus County,
the Duval House Trust was cre-
ated to begin restoration of the
house. From the name of the town
founder on the wall, WH. Havron,
to original gutter brackets, Peters
said they are trying to keep the
original look of the house, which
was built in 1886 by John Paul
Formy-Duval. After he built the
house, he discovered it was not on
his property. Formy-Duval left his
home and built an almost identi-
cal one on Duval Island.
"As far as the historic value is
concerned, everything is irre-
placeable," Peters said.
To add to the historical educa-
tion, the Friends of the Floral City
Library hosted a Heritage Book


Sale. They also had a Holiday
Centerpiece Workshop for adults
and crafts from children.
Margaret Stonick, Dade City
resident, said she drives to Floral
City every year to enjoy Heritage
Days.
"I feel that everyone really
looses contact with how hard life
was before technology existed,"
Stonick said. "I am retired now


and enjoy bringing the grandchil-
dren here. It's more of an educa-
tional opportunity for them as
they are having fun."
As she was talking, her grand-
children were transfixed by a
group of clogger women, Klassic
Kountry Kloggers, who were per-
forming. Six ladies moved their feet
to music as their footwear created
audible percussive rhythms. They


seemed to be thoroughly enjoying
themselves as they twisted and
turned with smiles on their faces.
"Wow look at those women," 16-
year-old Joanee Liefer said. "They
are breaking it down."
Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington can be contacted at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington @chronicle
online.com.


New CR

councilors

to take

oath

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
City officials will swear in
two new city council mem-
bers at 7 p.m. Monday
Robert Holmes and Ken
Brown are expected to
take the oath during a
short ceremony The pair
will replace Ron Kitchen
and Maureen McNiff,
respectively
Holmes beat Keith
Shewbart in the Nov. 6
election for Seat No. 5,
which was occupied by
Kitchen, a longtime coun-
cil member and former
mayor This is Holmes'
third stint on the council.
Holmes, whose father
served on the council
from 1971-77, served from
1986 to 1999 and from 2002
to 2006. During his last
term, he helped usher in a
project along Cutler Spur
that helped divert
stormwater from flowing
directly into King's Bay
Holmes has said he'd
like to continue his work
in developing a stormwa-
ter management plan for
the city. He also favors of
the current sewer
expansion.
Holmes wants to see the
Riverwalk plan come to
fruition by working with
the community and busi-
ness members to make it
happen.
Brown ran unopposed
in his bid to replace Mc-
Niff in Seat 3. He has been
a regular at council meet-
ings and noted five issues
that kept coming up as he
consulted with residents.
They included:
Water quality issue,
keeping the waters in and
around the city clean.
Staying the course on
development in the city's
downtown core.
Considering new
ideas about U.S. 19 corri-
dor. His goal is to attract
more businesses, but not
entirely retail.
Developing a compre-
hensive plan, maybe 10
years into the future, re-
lating to the city's plan to
attract businesses and re-
taining those businesses.
Establishing better
relations with county
officials.
Kitchen ran unsuccess-
fully for a county commis-
sion seat this fall and
McNiff chose not to run.
The city's vice mayor,
Paula Wheeler, returned
for another four-year term
since she ran unopposed.
Chronicle reporterA.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe
@chronicleonline.com.


Treasures UNDFOR tree
TreasursUNDER


,


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
ABOVE: Rotarian Paul Houston assists his 9-year-old friend Aiden Topping in wrapping one of the gifts Aiden purchased Saturday morning as
part of an annual Rotary Christmas shopping program. BELOW: Karyn Sawyer, wife of Rotarian Neil Sawyer, wraps a gift with Matthew Gaines,
10, after the youngster, along with many others, returned from shopping for Christmas presents.

Rotarians take children for annual Christmaspresent shopping spree


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
Surrounded by tables of wrap-
ping paper and Christmas pres-
ents, children were excited
about their treasures Saturday.
"The little boy with me bought
a Nintendo DS for his family,"
County Judge Mark Yerman
said. "That's all he wanted was
one present for the whole family
to share."
Approximately 100 children
from Citrus County Schools cho-
sen by their school counselors
participated in the annual coun-
tywide Rotary Club Christmas
Shopping Spree at Kmart in
Crystal River. Rotarian mem-
bers donated money to the un-
derprivileged children, allowing
them to shop for their families
for Christmas.
"They can buy for them-
selves," Crystal River Rotary
Club member Frances Roberts
said. "However, it is mainly for
their family"
Children received $100 to-


ward their purchases. Then
Kmart offered an additional 10
percent off. Rotarians and stu-
dent Interact Club members ac-
companied the children on their
shopping trip.
"This is such a great opportu-
nity for them to buy gifts for
their parents," Christmas Shop-


ping Spree chairman and Ro-
tary Club member Fancy Taylor
said. "It even gives them a
chance to learn how to budget
their gifts. They also get to in-
teract with other students at
other schools. It is a wonderful
event and we love doing it. We
joined all the clubs and made it


a joint event."
After their shopping spree,
the children went to Crystal
River High School to wrap their
treasures. Santa greeted them
as they stepped off the school
buses and hurried toward their
awaiting presents.
Homosassa Springs Rotary
Club member Marybeth Nay-
field said her little boy used all
of his money to buy for members
of his family.
"Everything he bought was for
someone in his family," Nayfield
said. "He didn't buy anything for
himself, which this is the first
year that has happened to me.
He bought for his mom and dad,
uncle and grandparents who
live with him."
The little boy said he bought a
skateboard for his dad. How-
ever, he didn't think his mom
would like that.
Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington can be contacted at352-
563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online, com.






A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


PROGRESS
Continued from Page Al


property taxes for 2011.
Early estimates show the
school district could lose
about $8.1 million, the
county about $7.6 million
with about a $1 million loss
to other taxing entities.
Progress Energy Florida
spokeswoman Suzanne
Grant said the company's po-
sition is that the valuation of
its properties in Citrus
County is overstated, "so
we're following the process
put in place by the state to de-
termine a fair assessment."
Citrus County Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene
said the partial payment
from Progress/Duke is due
to a difference of opinion on
valuation and classification.
According to a statement
from Greene, following a
court ruling in 1998 and the
subsequent agreement, both
parties agreed to negotiate
annually
That court ruling upheld
the county appraiser's de-
nial of the company's pollu-
tion control classification in
1998.
Each year since, the
county has taken the posi-
tion that the assessment
should be fair and equitable
and have experts assist to
recommend a value. The
key issue is how pollution
control equipment is as-
sessed; in Citrus County, it
has not been assessed at
"salvage value," as the com-
pany believes it should be.
For the first time since
1998, negotiations came to a
standstill.
Greene explained a letter
was sent in June denying
Progress Energy's request
for classification of its re-
ported pollution control
equipment at "salvage"
value.


We have pollution control

equipment in 10 counties in

Florida, including Citrus, Pinellas

and Highlands and Orange. In all

the counties (except Citrus), that

equipment is assessed at no more

than its market value as salvage,

as provided by Florida law.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


and local government serv-
ices, and it dragged on al-
most two years.
"We settled in May in a
confidential settlement,"
said Sally Thelen, spokes-
woman for Duke Energy
Ohio. "We are pleased with
the settlement; we feel it is
a fair compromise reached
between Duke Energy Ohio
and the Ohio Department of
Taxation."
"It took a good while to
work through it," she said.
"We were of the opinion our
assets were overvalued."
"We were glad the af-
fected counties were able to
budget and plan according,"
she said, noting there is
some similarity to Citrus
County.
Differences over assessed
value also powered a 2010
Duke Energy property tax
dispute in Wyoming. That
settlement took about a year
with Duke paying $2.54 mil-
lion to cover the 2010 tax as-
sessments, instead of $2.77
million, based on the state's
original assessments.
Going forward in Citrus
County, at least the name
will be simplified. In April,
Progress Energy Florida
will adopt the Duke Energy
name.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


Suzanne Grant
spokeswoman for Progress Energy Florida.


According to the ap-
praiser's office, about 80
percent of all of Progress
Energy's pollution control
assets are in Citrus County.
"We have pollution con-
trol equipment in 10 coun-
ties in Florida, including
Citrus, Pinellas and High-
lands and Orange," Grant
said.
"In all the counties (ex-
cept Citrus), that equipment
is assessed at no more than
its market value as salvage,
as provided by Florida law."
Assessments were not
being challenged in any of
those other counties.
Grant said May 1,
Progress Energy Florida
filed its 2012 Citrus County
property tax return reflect-
ing a fair value of property
that would result in prop-
erty taxes due of approxi-
mately $19 million.
Subsequent to the filing
being received by the Citrus
County Property Ap-
praiser's Office in May 2012,
the property appraiser pro-
posed his view of a prelimi-
nary value for PEF's
property in Citrus County.
In September, Penney K.
Develle, Progress Energy
director of compliance,
wrote to Greene requesting
the numerous documents
regarding the tax assess-


ments and requesting a
meeting.
That meeting was Oct. 30,
and Greene reported he was
informed the company did
not want to pay more than
$19 million in taxes. On Fri-
day, Progress/Duke filed a
lawsuit on the issue.
According to Grant, the
differences in opinion on
the fair values are a result of
valuation methodologies,
the treatment of pollution
control equipment and the
valuations of the Crystal
River nuclear plant and the
two older coal-fired plants
(CR1 and 2).
"In addition, we have
been in discussions with the
property appraiser for more
than two years regarding
this issue," Grant said. "Our
1998 property tax settle-
ment with the county also
held open our ability to
challenge the issue going
forward."
"Duke Energy withhold-
ing $20 million in property
taxes," was a lead headline
back in July 2010 in south-
western Ohio.
According to Duke En-
ergy, at issue is the method
of assessing the company's
tangible personal property
tax value for tax year 2009.
Subsequent news stories
warned of cuts to schools


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 6:36 a.m. Thursday,
Nov. 29, in the 7000 block of S.
Lloyd Terrace, Floral City.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:44 p.m. Nov. 29 in
the 7000 block of N. Dawson
Drive, Hemando.
A residential burglary was
reported at 5:37 p.m. Nov. 29 in
the 3300 block of E. Wagon
Trail, Hemando.
Thefts
SA grand theft was reported
at 6:28 a.m. Wednesday, Nov.
28, in the 6400 block of W. Pine
Ridge Blvd., Beverly Hills.
SA felony retail theft was re-
ported at 10:02 a.m. Nov. 28 in
the 2600 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Invemess.
SA grand theft was reported
at 1:01 p.m. Nov. 28 in the 200
block of S. Tyler St., Beverly
Hills.
SA grand theft was reported
at 1:54 p.m. Nov. 28 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
SA larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 3:47 p.m. Nov. 28 in
the 10800 block of W. Wood-
land Place, Homosassa.
SA grand theft was reported
at 3:22 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29,
in the 5500 block of S. Will
Point, Homosassa.


ON THE NET
For information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.


M A petit theft was reported at
4 p.m. Nov. 29 in the 100 block
of N. Osceola Ave., Invemess.
SA larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 4:42 p.m. Nov. 29 in
the 2300 block of S. Waterman
Drive, Crystal River.
SA petit theft was reported at
5:46 p.m. Nov. 29 in the 400
block of W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 7:10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov.
28, in the 600 block of W. High-
land Blvd., Invemess.
A vandalism was reported
at 1:43 p.m. Nov. 28 in the 2700
block of W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.
A vandalism was reported
at4:07 p.m. Nov. 28 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A vandalism was reported
at 9:36 p.m. Nov. 28 in the 200
block of S. Otis Ave., Crystal
River.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Fictitious Name Notices.......................... D8

Bid Notices ........................... D8

Meeting Notices......................................... D6 D8

SLien Notices...................................................... D6

Self Storage Notices........................................ D6
Surplus Property.......................................... D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
sh
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc

pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Skies will be partly
cloudy today.


79 52 0.00 NA NA 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusteaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 81 Low: 55
Early AM fog; sunny to partly
S-- cloudy
i l MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 54
Early AM fog; sunny to partly cloudy

i TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 80 Low: 51
SEarly AM fog; partly cloudy to sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 80/52
Record 87/28
Normal 75/48
Mean temp. 66
Departure from mean +4
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 49.50 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.20 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 53
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 41%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
ragweed, grasses, composites
Today's count: 4.9/12
Monday's count: 5.8
Tuesday's count: 5.5
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/2 SUNDAY 8:03 1:51 8:26 2:15
12/3 MONDAY 8:55 2:43 9:17 3:06
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


DEC. 0 DEC.13 DEC.20


S
DEC. 28


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 5:32 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW..................7:08 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY........................... 9:11 PM.
MOONSET TODAY .......................10:03 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:46 a/3:01 a 8:26 p/3:40 p
Crystal River" 5:07 a/12:23 a 6:47 p/1:02 p
Withlacoochee* 2:54 a/10:50 a 4:34 p/10:52 p
Homosassa*** 5:56 a/2:00 a 7:36 p/2:39 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
7:26 a/3:42 a 9:03 p/4:17 p
5:47 a/1:04 a 7:24 p/1:39 p
3:34 a/11:27 a 5:11 p/11:38 p
6:36 a/2:41 a 8:13 p/3:16 p


Gulf water
temperature


70
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.44 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.38 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.47 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.88 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


Asio-
or / '" "
y Juneau .o'O ,UL,
; n "..s
1-, 8


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 31 20 .05 sh 50 40
Albuquerque 66 38 s 63 38
Asheville 63 28 pc 62 42
Atlanta 68 47 pc 69 53
Atlantic City 57 34 pc 60 48
Austin 84 66 pc 80 61
Baltimore 50 34 pc 59 48
Billings 61 40 w 57 36
Birmingham 71 46 pc 70 51
Boise 58 47 .02 sh 54 34
Boston 32 28 .03 c 56 43
Buffalo 49 26 sh 54 46
Burlington, VT 32 15 .02 sh 47 37
Charleston, SC 71 47 sh 72 53
Charleston, WV 64 31 sh 66 50
Charlotte 66 35 pc 67 46
Chicago 59 29 pc 61 50
Cincinnati 63 38 sh 62 53
Cleveland 57 33 sh 59 49
Columbia, SC 70 44 pc 72 47
Columbus, OH 61 39 sh 61 52
Concord, N.H. 27 22 .07 c 51 39
Dallas 83 64 pc 79 64
Denver 65 34 s 66 36
Des Moines 59 38 s 63 49
Detroit 52 37 sh 58 47
El Paso 75 39 pc 73 44
Evansville, IN 65 42 sh 68 56
Harrisburg 42 34 c 57 45
Hartford 33 29 c 54 40
Houston 83 63 pc 81 65
Indianapolis 64 38 sh 61 55
Jackson 73 37 pc 75 56
Las Vegas 67 54 pc 70 51
Little Rock 76 53 pc 74 57
Los Angeles 65 60 .01 c 63 58
Louisville 66 50 sh 66 57
Memphis 73 53 pc 71 60
Milwaukee 56 40 pc 57 42
Minneapolis 48 34 pc 49 42
Mobile 75 50 pc 74 55
Montgomery 76 44 pc 74 47
Nashville 69 39 pc 68 52
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


70s I ABana -.
pI ~- -'
iroplex.
Ni 64



FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 76 48 .04 pc 75 58
New York City 41 36 c 58 49
Norfolk 60 35 pc 65 48
Oklahoma City 77 58 pc 78 58
Omaha 57 31 .01 s 64 45
Palm Springs 78 54 pc 79 61
Philadelphia 51 39 pc 59 46
Phoenix 76 54 pc 77 56
Pittsburgh 58 33 sh 60 49
Portland, ME 25 22 .01 sh 51 43
Portland, Ore 54 46 .64 sh 50 44
Providence, R.I. 34 28 .02 c 57 44
Raleigh 65 34 pc 69 47
Rapid City 62 34 pc 66 37
Reno 60 48 r 55 34
Rochester, NY 46 27 sh 56 45
Sacramento 64 56 .68 r 61 46
St. Louis 70 48 pc 69 59
St. Ste. Marie 36 20 c 43 34
Salt Lake City 57 51 .01 sh 61 33
San Antonio 80 68 pc 79 64
San Diego 68 61 .10 c 66 59
San Francisco 64 57 .32 r 62 49
Savannah 74 46 sh 73 52
Seattle 56 47 1.23 sh 48 43
Spokane 48 43 .18 sh 47 36
Syracuse 38 25 sh 55 45
Topeka 69 45 s 70 55
Washington 51 37 pc 60 49
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 88 Alice, Texas LOW-2 Berlin, N.H.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/74/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 46/35/sh Mexico City
Athens 68/55/sh Montreal
Beijing 39/18/pc Moscow
Berlin 32/26/pc Paris
Bermuda 70/66/sh Rio
Cairo 81/66/pc Rome
Calgary 35/20/sn Sydney
Havana 81/67/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 67/56/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 72/58/pc Warsaw


54/41/s
39/31/s
51/36/s
70/45/s
40/38/sh
33/24/c
41/32/pc
89/73/ts
60/41/sh
73/64/sh
47/46/sh
50/39/sh
33/31/pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY -


For the RECORD


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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Courthouse office
Tompkins St. g square
0 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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I-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Two dead after bus crash at Miami airport


Associated Press
MIAMI A charter bus
carrying 32 members of a
church group hit a concrete
overpass at Miami Interna-
tional Airport after the
driver got lost Saturday,
killing two elderly people
on board and leaving three
others critically injured, of-
ficials said.
The large, white bus was
too tall for the 8-foot-6-inch
entrance to the arrivals
area, said airport spokes-
man Greg Chin. Buses are
supposed to go through the
departures area, which has
a higher ceiling, he said.
Chin said passengers told
him they were part of a
group of Jehovah's Wit-
nesses headed to West Palm
Beach. Police said in a news
release the group had char-
tered the bus to take them


FORUM
Continued from Page Al

Key Center Foundation, the
forum is being hosted by the
Key Center Family Connec-
tion and the Family Care
Council for Area 13.
She said it will include
local government and social
service leaders and families
of individuals with develop-
mental disabilities. A panel
discussion format will allow
an exchange of ideas with
the objective of stimulating
solutions and proactive
strategies.
Some of the issues to be
addressed include: seeking
to stem annual state budget
cuts, adequate funding for
clients on the Medicaid
waiver and serving young
developmentally disabled
adults transitioning from
Florida's high schools.
The public is invited to at-
tend. The forum, titled
"Looking at Florida's Fu-
ture," will be Monday at the
Chet Cole Life Enrichment
Center on the Lecanto cam-
pus of the Key Training Cen-
ter, 5521 W Buster Whitton
Way, Lecanto.


Associated Press
Airport workers look at a bus that crashed into a concrete
overpass at Miami International Airport on Saturday. The ve-
hicle was too tall for the 8-foot-6-inch entrance to the ar-
rivals area, and buses are supposed to go through the
departures area, which has a higher ceiling, according to an
airport spokesman.


to a church convention
there.
The group was made up of

The morning session is
from 10 a.m. to noon and will
focus on a panel of elected
officials and representatives
from state agencies.
Visiting speakers will in-
clude Deborah Linton, ex-
ecutive director of The ARC
of Florida; Barbara Palmer,
director of the Agency for
Persons with Disabilities;
Suzanne Sewell, president
and CEO of the Florida As-
sociation of Rehabilitation
Facilities; and Margaret
Hooper, public policy coor-
dinator for the Florida De-
velopmental Disabilities
Council.
Local speakers will in-
clude Stephanie Hopper,
member of the Key Center
Family Connection; Amy
Meek, CEO of United Way;
Cabot McBride, Inverness
City Council; and Nancy
Hayes.
Lunch will be served from
noon to 1 p.m. The after-
noon session will run from 1
to 3 p.m. with a panel of
local experts and officials
discussing the issues and
answering questions.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


congregation members of
Sweetwater's Kingdom Hall
of Jehovah's Witnesses, said


Sweetwater Mayor Manny
Marofio.
"This is a tragic accident
that has affected many fam-
ilies, as well as, our Sweet-
water family," Marofio said
in a press release. "I am pur-
suing all avenues to get in
touch with the appropriate
persons to officially extend
our help to the congregation
and those who were hurt."
A phone number listed for
the center in Sweetwater
went unanswered.
At the airport, two large
signs warn drivers of large
vehicles not to pass beneath
the concrete overpass. One
attached to the top of the
concrete barrier reads:
"High Vehicle STOP Turn
Left." The other, placed to
the left of the driveway and
several feet in front of the
barrier, says all vehicles
higher than the 8-foot-6


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threshold must turn left.
Three people were at hos-
pitals in critical condition.
The other 27 surviving pas-
sengers were hurt, but their
injuries were less extensive,
authorities said.
One person died at the
scene; the second died later
at a hospital.
Eight of the 14 patients
taken to Ryder Trauma Cen-
ter at Jackson Memorial
Hospital were in stable con-
dition, while two others
were in critical, said hospi-
tal spokeswoman Lidia
Amoretti.


A majority of the injuries
were facial due to the
frontal impact, said Miami-
Dade Police spokesman
Det. Alvaro Zabaleta.
"People that are passen-
gers on a chartered bus, you
are putting total confidence
on the driver and they're
high back chairs," he said.
"It's just like you are sitting
on a plane. You really don't
see anything in front of you
until of course they felt the
impact the force takes
them forward and the ma-
jority of them were facial
injuries."


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A





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Nancy
Layton, 75
HOMOSASSA
Nancy Eileen Layton, 75,
of Homosassa, passed away
Nov. 28, 2012, at Hospice
Care Unit in Inverness.
A native
of Belmar,
N.J., she
was born
July 19,
1937, to /
Robert and ,
Alice
(Bergman)
Anderson, Nancy
one of two Layton
children.
Nancy's professional career
included service with the
U.S. government as an ana-
lyst, and Nancy was a U.S.
Air Force veteran between
the Korean and Vietnam
wars. She moved here 27
years ago from Point Pleas-
ant, N.J., and was past pres-
ident of both the Ladies
Auxiliary of Elks in Point
Pleasant and the First Aid
Squad in Howell, N.J. Mrs.
Layton was an avid bunco
player and a member of the
Bunco Club.
Mrs. Layton was of the
Catholic faith and is sur-
vived by her husband of 49
years, Donald H. Layton,
Homosassa; son, Donald J.
"Donnie" Layton and wife,
Nancy, Katy, Texas; sister,
Patricia Warshany, Georgia;
and grandchildren, Shan-
non, Jennifer, Brett and D.J.
In addition to her parents,
Nancy was preceded in
death by three children,
George, Kim and Pamela
Layton.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa. wwwwilder
funeral.com

Elaine
Podloski, 55
INVERNESS
Elaine Podloski, 55, of In-
verness, died Saturday, Dec.
1, 2012, under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County in
Inverness.
Arrangements by McGan
Cremation Service LLC,
Hernando.


William
Kalb, 73
HOMOSASSA
William F Kalb, 73, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., died Wednes-
day, Nov 14, 2012.
Born Dec. 12, 1938, he was
known to
his family
and friends
as "Billy,"
"Crab," and
"Captain."
Raised in
Atlanta, Ga.,
by his par-
e n t s William
Howard Kalb
and Kath-
leen Kalb, who predeceased
him, Billy attended Georgia
State College. He served in
the U.S. Army as a para-
medic during the Cuban
Missile Crisis. Billy spent
much of his early years op-
erating his own scuba diving
and spear fishing business,
and managing Camp Caruso
on the island of Tobago, in
the West Indies. Continuing
his love of the water, he be-
came a certified U.S. Mer-
chant Marine officer with
master licenses for both
motor and passenger carry-
ing vessels. Billy was cap-
tain of a sports fishing boat
for more than 25 years, and
owned a taxidermy business
for many years in Destin.
Billy moved to the Winter
Haven community in Ho-
mosassa, where he owned a
landscaping business until
his retirement in 2006. Con-
tinuing his love affair with
fishing, he became the
proud owner of the Joanna,
a fishing boat kept on the
Homosassa River Billy's
fishing knowledge was so
extensive that he func-


tioned as an official fishing
guide and made fishing ex-
peditions to South Carolina
and other parts of the south-
east on a regular basis. Billy
was a member of the River-
haven Club for many years.
Billy is survived by his sis-
ter, Nora Kalb Bushfield
Esq., brother-in-law, John A.
Bushfield, and his niece,
Jolie Elise Bushfield, all of
Atlanta; and numerous
cousins and nieces in South
Carolina, Tennessee and
California. He will be sorely
missed by his family and
friends, loved and admired
by all.
In lieu of flowers the fam-
ily requests that donations
be made to the DeKalb
Service Center for the Men-
tally Disabled, 2660 Osborne
Road N.E., Atlanta, GA
30319. A celebration of life
in memory of Billy will be in
Atlanta, at the home of his
sister from 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 9,
2012, and at Riverhaven
Clubhouse from 2 to 4 p.m.
Jan. 19, 2013. Any inquires
about details of either cele-
brations and interest in ac-
companying Billy's ashes to
their final resting place
should be directed to
Nora@AtlantaLaw.net.
Standing by and God Bless.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. com.

Barbara
Potts, 72
HERNANDO
Barbara A. Potts, 72, of
Hernando, died Wednesday
Nov. 28, 2012, at her
residence.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


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Estra Pillau, 94
CRYSTAL RIVER
Estra Rosalie Pillau, 94, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Wednesday, Nov 21,
2012, at Suwannee Health
Care in Live Oak, Fla.
A memorial service will
be conducted at 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, Dec. 8, 2012, at the
Key Training Center Pavil-
ion at 1344 N. James Point,
Lecanto, FL 34461. The fam-
ily suggests memorial con-
tributions to the Key Center
in lieu of flowers. Strickland
Funeral Home Crystal
River, Fla., assisted the fam-
ily with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Linda Bond, 63
CROSS CITY
Linda Sorensen Bond, 63,
of Cross City, Fla., formerly
of Citrus County, Fla., died
Nov 29, 2012. She was for-
merly a nursing instructor
at Withlacoochee Technical
Institute in Inverness.
Survivors include her
husband, Ted Bond; son, Jay
Moore; daughter, Stephanie
Manning; stepdaughter, Jen-
nifer Bond; mother and
stepfather, Bettie and Jim
McDonough; sister, Kathy
Kinder; brother, Richard
Sorensen; and seven grand-
children.
Family and friends will be
received from 1 to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012,
with a Celebration of Life
service at 3 p.m. at the Gee
& Sorensen Funeral Home,
3180 30th Ave. N., St Peters-
burg, FL 33713, 727-323-
5111.


Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.




Gordon
Wells Jr., 80
INVERNESS
Gordon Trumble Wells Jr,
80, Inverness, died Nov 28,
2012, at his home under the
loving care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus County.
Mr Wells was born Aug.
31,1932, in Waukegan, Ill., to
the late Gordon and Carrie
(Panzer) Wells Sr and came
to his area from Illinois in
1992 where he retired from
the Antioch High School
(Antioch, Ill.) as the mainte-
nance supervisor for their
buildings and buses with 35
years of service. He proudly
served our country in the
U.S. Army and attended the
Hernando Church of The
Nazarene.
He is survived by his
three children, Michael
Wells and his wife, Cheryl,
of Antioch, Ill., Jerry Wells,
Inverness, and Wendy
Tyrrell and her husband,
Kevin, of Lindenhurst, Ill.;
his brother and sister, John
of Arkansas and Lucille
Elfering of Wisconsin; five
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren. He
was preceded in death by
his wife of 56 years, Uldine
Wells, on Sept 26, 2011, and
his brother, Everett, in June
2011.
Gordon's Service of Re-
membrance will be at 12:30
p.m. Friday, Dec 7, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral


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Home with Pastor Brian
Baggs officiating. Burial
with military honors will
follow in Florida National
Cemetery In lieu of flowers,
memorials are requested to:
Hospice of Citrus County or
American Cancer Society.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.




William
Ferrell, 70
HOMOSASSA
William Edward Ferrell,
70, of Homosassa, died Fri-
day, Nov 30,2012, in Lecanto.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Home & Crematory

Gertrude
Fulps, 92
CRYSTAL RIVER
Gertrude M. Fulps, 92, of
Crystal River, died Thurs-
day, Nov 29, 2012, at Crystal
Gem Manor Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.

* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A. S. Humana Gold Plus (HMO)
4e The ONLY Overall 4.5 STARS
From Medicare ,
"a-- rated plan in Citrus County



Medicare now rates all health and prescription drug plans each year, based on a plan's
quality and performance. The ratings help you know how good a job our plan is doing
based on how members rate Humana services and care.
Our doctors also make the 4.5 difference. The ratings show how well our doctors
detected illnesses to keep our members healthy and how we help them use prescription
medications.
The number of stars shows how well a plan performs.

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Humana is the largest Medicare Advantage organization in Florida, with over 400,000
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you've come to expect with Humana.
And now we can say our Humana Gold Plus (HMO) plan received a 4.5 Overall rating
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DON'T FORGET! The Medicare Advantage annual enrollment dates
are Oct. 15 Dec. 7**
*Source: CMS Medicare Advantage enrollment data by state Sept. 2012. **Some exceptions may apply.




Humana is a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Plan performance Star ratings are assessed each year and may change
from one year to the next. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. For more information contact the plan. A sales person will be
present with information and applications. For accommodation of people with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-877-713-6171 (TTY: 711),
8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week. Applicable to Humana Gold Plus plans H1036-025, 040, 052, 053A, 062C, 063A, 065C, 067, 068, 074, 081D, 119,
140,141,146, 196, and 199.
Y0040_FLHHEXDHHB CMSAccepted TPA 12/12


00D9Q3


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dec. 3 to 7MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, ce-
real variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
spaghetti with ripstick, turkey
super salad with roll, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken with ripstick, hot dog,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, baked beans, chilled
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Mozarella
maxstix, turkey wrap, PB dipper
plate, ham super salad with roll,
fresh baby carrots, sweet peas,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken nuggets, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, sweet
corn, chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Chicken sandwich,
cheese pizza, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage


pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, milk
and juice variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, milk
and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
breaded chicken sandwich, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled fruit,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, nacho rounds, ham super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, Mexi-
cali corn, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
barbecued chicken with ripstick,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese, turkey super salad with
ripstick, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk vari-
ety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, chilled fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast


Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, fresh
broccoli, potato triangles,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Nachos with Span-
ish rice, turkey and gravy on
noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
turkey salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, cold corn salad, Mexicali
corn, potato triangles, celery,


chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, ham salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
baked beans, chilled baked
beans, potato triangles, dried
fruit mix, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
turkey salad and roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, baby car-
rots, potato roasters, cucum-
bers, celery, chilled fruit, juice,
milk.
Friday: Pulled pork barbe-
cue, pizza, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, fajita chicken salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
potato triangles, peas, chilled
fruit, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced turkey with
turkey gravy, potatoes O'Brien,
carrot coins, sugar cookie, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Beef and mush-
room penne pasta, mixed veg-
etables, garlic spinach,
pineapple, slice wheat bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.


N


'Ward

Eye Center
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa

(352)489-3579 (352) 628-0123
Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


i'A


Wednesday: Baked chicken
thigh with chicken gravy,
mashed potatoes, green beans,
graham crackers, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger patty
with bun and ketchup and mus-
tard, baked beans, yellow corn
with diced tomato, mixed fruit,
low-fat milk.


Friday: Chicken salad, beet
and onion salad, three-bean
salad, citrus fruit, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical professionals share their
expertise with columns in Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicle's
Education section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the recipes in the Food
section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories
in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do in the
Religion section./Saturdays
* Read about area businesses and the activities of the
chamber of commerce in the Business section.
/Sundays
* Pick up tips for home improvement, saving money and
cashing in on antiques in HomeFront./Sundays



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A8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MARINE
Continued from Page Al

on the military's ability to
fight wars.
No branch is likely to feel
that change more than the
Marine Corps.
The small, tight-knit force
is the most male of the
armed services and prides
itself on having the toughest
and most aggressive war-
riors. The Corps historically
has higher casualty rates be-
cause it is considered to be
the "tip of the spear," or the
first to respond to conflicts.
It also was among the last
military branches to open
its doors to women, forming
the first female Corps in
1943, according to the
Women's Memorial in Wash-
ington D.C.
But changing times are
challenging the traditions of
the force, long likened to a
brotherhood.
Modern warfare has put
women in combat like never
before during the past
decade, even though a 1994
policy bars them from being


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 A9


assigned to ground combat
units below the brigade
level, which were consid-
ered too dangerous since
they are often smaller and
closer to combat for longer
periods.
Already under pressure
to provide the same oppor-
tunities for women, the De-
fense Department was hit
Tuesday with a second law-
suit by female service mem-
bers including two
Marines charging the
gender barriers unfairly
block them from promotions
open to men in combat.
The lawsuits are intended
to accelerate the military's
slow march toward lifting
the ban plaintiffs allege has
barred women from 238,000
positions.
Defense officials say they
recently opened 14,500 jobs
to women, and they need to
move cautiously to ensure
the change will not disrupt
wartime operations. Sou-
blet and the other 44 women
are part of the quiet, slow
transformation. Women
make up about 7 percent of
the Marine Corps compared
to about 14 percent overall


among the military's 1.4 mil-
lion active military
personnel.
She said some Marines
initially eyed her pioneer-
ing presence in the all-male
battalion with skepticism.
"The way that I would de-
scribe it to friends and fam-
ily was it was kind of like I
showed up to work in a cos-
tume," the 25-year-old logis-
tics officer said in a phone
interview from Twenty-Nine
Palms, a remote desert base
east of San Diego. "They
stared a little bit, but after a
while it wasn't like that
anymore."
That experience may play
out on bases and boats
worldwide as the Pentagon
levels the battlefield.
The Corps earlier this
year opened its grueling in-
fantry officer training
school to female Marines
and surveyed 53,000 of its
troops with an anonymous
online questionnaire about
the impact of erasing gen-
der barriers.
Survey results are ex-
pected to be released soon
after review by the defense
secretary


EI Days


of Christmas


November 26th!

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Come see Citrus County's finest new jewelry showroom offering expert jewelry
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Buying
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Flatware Tea Sets
Trays Trophies
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Antique Items
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Boxed Sets
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Oil Paintings
Watercolors
Listed Artists
Old Movie Posters
Old Prints or Etchings
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Necklaces Victorian
Bracelets Art Deco
Brooches Art Nouveau
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A10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


"s,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Humane Society
OF CITRUS CO.


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 All


Some years, we just want to stay home


Lucky


Special to the Chronicle
One might wonder why a
little dog who has found
himself homeless and re-
siding at a rescue facility
could possibly be called
Lucky. This little fellow is
looking toward the future
and knows that he will
soon be finding a loving,
forever home and at that
point he will indeed be
lucky. He is a Chihuahua
weighing about 10 pounds,
is about 18 months old and
has a sweet personality.
He likes everyone and gets
along great with the other
dogs. Lucky is neutered,
up to date on medical and
crate trained. An approved
adoption application and
adoption fee are required
to adopt. To access an ap-
plication or to view addi-
tional pets available for
adoption, visit the website
at www.roomforonemore.net.
Call 352-560-0051.


AImost everyone we
know has packed up
nd gone south for
the winter. The ones who
haven't left yet will be gone
soon. Our friends who live
south of us are leaving to go
even farther south. I have
never been to Belize or
Costa Rica or the Cayman
Islands, but I constantly
hear people say they are
going back for the fourth or
fifth time because they liked
it so much. They also have
much more
money and time.
Where did I go
wrong? Once
again, I will
probably have to
spend the whole
winter in my own
house in my own
town. How is it
that Sue and I
never spend the JII
winter in Baja MUL
California or
Montserrat?
This year I am deter-
mined to get out of town, if
not for the whole winter, at
least for a few weeks.
"How about Mexico?" I
asked Sue.
"Fine," she said, "if our
beheading is free. I don't
want to pay extra for that.
Make sure it's part of our
all-inclusive vacation pack-
age. I forget: How do you
say, 'Please, don't kill me,' in


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Spanish? I only took one
year of it in high school. Do
you use the polite form of
'you' or the familiar?"
"If you don't want to go,
you could just say 'no' like a
normal person," I said. "I'm
sure there are plenty of
places in Mexico that are
just as safe as it is here. Can-
cun, Cabo, San Miguel de
Allende..."
"No doubt. Let's do it I've
been meaning to lose some
weight, and I hear amoebic
dysentery is just
the thing for that
The pounds just
fall away."
"The Johnsons
go to Oaxaca, and
they always have
a wonderful
time."
"Yes, they do.
She told me they
M never drink the
LEN water"
"What do they
drink?"
"Tequila. It's why they
have such a wonderful time.
They're stewed 24 hours a
day"
"OK, fine," I said. "We
won't go to Mexico. What
about Greece? The islands
are nice and warm, full of


history"
"Good idea! Are you sure
you can find us a hotel close
to a violent anti-government
demonstration? I hear
they're very relaxing, like
being at a spa where they
club you with a thick stick.
You book it while I learn the
words for 'tear gas' and
'Molotov cocktail."'
"How about a cruise? You
can drink the water, be-
headings are pretty rare
and the food is great.
There's dancing, live shows,
rock climbing..."
"... seasickness, retching,
puking, dry heaves," she fin-
ished.
"We could go to one of
those towns that hate chil-
dren."
Sue perked up. "Don't toy
with me. Is there really such
a place?"
"Sure, hundreds of them."
"What country do we have
to go to?"
"This one. They're all
over the U.S."
"And people say we don't
do anything right in this
country," she said. "Are you
telling me there are towns
right here in the USA with
signs out front that say, 'You
have to be this tall to live


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here'?"
"No, because some of the
residents are actually
shrinking. They're for peo-
ple like us. No one under
age 55 can live there."
"Is that legal?"
"Sure. As long as they
keep out all children of all
races, religions and sexual
orientations."
"How's the beheading sit-
uation?"
"Very rare. Most drug
kingpins don't live to be 55."
"It does sound like a little
bit of heaven on Earth.
What's the hitch?"
"You have to like living
with a bunch of old people."
"I do that already What


else you got?"
I was running out of ideas.
"We could go to a movie."
"Didn't we go to one last
year?"
"I think it was two years
ago."
"What's playing?"
"'The Beheading' at 2, 4
and 6 o'clock."
"Nah, let's stay home.
We'll do something next
year"

Jim Mullen's newest book
is called "Kill Me, Elmo:
The Holiday Depression
Fbn Book." You can
reach him online at
JimMullenBooks. com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.




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Race Card Project creates new type of conversation


JESSE WASHINGTON
AP National Writer

She asked for just six
words.
Michele Norris, the Na-
tional Public Radio host,
was starting a book tour for
her memoir, which explored
racial secrets. Sensing a
change in the atmosphere
after the election of the first
black president and search-
ing for a new way to engage
and listen, Norris printed
200 postcards asking people
to express their thoughts on
race in six words.
The first cards that trick-
led into her mailbox were
from Norris' friends and ac-
quaintances. Then they
started coming from
strangers, from people who
had not heard Norris speak,
from other continents. The
tour stopped; the cards did
not:
"You know my race. NOT
ME!"
"Chinese or American?
Does it matter"
"Oh, she's just another
white girl."
"Waiting for race not to
matter"
A project's birth
Such declarations
brought the Race Card Proj-
ect to life.
"I thought I knew a lot
about race," said Norris, 51,
an award-winning black
journalist. "I realized how
little I know through this
project."
Two years later, the cards
have become almost a par-
allel career for Norris, best
known for her work on
NPR's "All Things Consid-
ered." She and an assistant
have catalogued more than
12,000 submissions on www.
theracecardproject.com.
People now send them via
Facebook and Twitter or
type them directly into the
website, leading to vibrant
online discussions.
Many cannot resist ac-
companying their Race
Cards with explanations,
stories and personal experi-
ences. Norris, in turn, feels
compelled to contact them,
listen to their stories and
archive this new conversa-
tion about race.
Discussions
The discussion is insepa-
rable from this moment,
when the page of America's
racial history is in mid-turn.
Part of Norris' inspiration
came from a series of NPR
interviews about race dur-
ing Barack Obama's ascent.
His re-election has re-
energized Norris' multira-
cial community of six-word
poets:
"Black babies cost less to
adopt."
"Never a Nazi, just a
German."
"Money on counter, not in
hand."
"You are dirt, so I
scrubbed."
Eric Liu, an author and
educator, heard about the
Race Card Project from a
friend. He called it "bril-
liantly powerful" due to the
strict brevity: "It forces this
profundity that you wouldn't
get if you let people go on
for two hours."
"It uses this format on the
front end to unlock all of
this expression and imagi-
nation," Liu said, "and on
the back end, once it's out in
the world, it forces people to
see each other with new
eyes."


Associated Press
Submissions to National Public Radio host and journalist Michelle Norris for her Race Card Project are seen Thursday in
Washington. Norris was on a book tour two years ago and started passing out postcards a dozen or so at a time, asking
people to share six words that express their thoughts about race. Now she has received more than 12,000 cards.


Powerful words
That's what happened
one Sunday when Celeste
Brown, a graduate student
from Florida, noticed the
Race Card Project on Twit-
ter and typed "We aren't all
'Strong Black Women"' into
her computer
A fire was lit. Women and
men of all ethnicities gath-
ered at keyboards from Los
Angeles to Ireland. Com-
ments flew: Isn't Strong
Black Woman a compli-
ment? No, it's strong like
oxen less than human. It
doesn't matter how we treat
them because they will sur-
vive. Time to stop putting up
walls and be vulnerable. I
feel like I'm forced to be
strong. It makes a woman
sound like a weed, not a
flower.
In an interview, Brown
said her statement uncon-
sciously distilled ideas and
experiences she had previ-
ously shared only with close
friends, like the tension be-
tween being independent
and needing a man, or the
question of how black
women can build careers
without being stereotyped
as too aggressive.
"I wrote the first thing
that came to mind," Brown
said.
For Norris, such ex-
changes fulfill her goal of
making it easier for people
to talk about race. As a pro-
fessional interviewer, she
often sees racial questions
lead people into "the pret-
zel twist" arms folded,
legs crossed, shoulders
hunched. But with the Race
Card Project, people ex-
press things unlikely to be
spoken into an NPR
microphone:
"Marry white to dilute the
black."
"I married a black man
anyway."
"When did your family
come here?"
"Disagree with blacks?
Automatic racist.
Pathetic!!!"
Norris knows about reti-
cence from her own family
In her memoir, "The Grace
of Silence," Norris de-
scribed a secret her doting
father never told her: He
was shot in 1946 by a white


police officer in his native
Birmingham, Ala.
Her mother hid some-
thing, too: Norris' beloved
grandmother traveled from
town to town in the 1940s
and '50s dressed as Aunt
Jemima to sell pancake mix,
a custom that many now
consider a degrading
mammy stereotype.
By confronting her fam-
ily's secrets, Norris has in-
spired others to reveal their
own.
Revelations
Like the businessman in
Los Angeles' Koreatown
who told Norris he abhors
Asian gangs, but secretly
roots for them because they
present an image of Asian
manhood he doesn't see
anywhere else.
Or the elderly white
woman who, along with her
childhood friends, used to
throw rocks at black share-
cropper children walking by
her home in Louisiana. She
recalls the chill she got
when one black girl was hit
by a rock and turned to look
her dead in the eye, a look
that made her recognize her


transgression. The woman
asked her father what she
should do. He told her, using
the n-word, that she couldn't
hurt black people because
"they have thicker skin."
Racial surprise
Or the story of Arlene
Lee, who posted: "Birthday
present; you are black,
sorta?"
On the night before Lee's
50th birthday, she was going
through the papers of her
late mother, an immigrant
from Peru.
Lee found her mother's
real birth certificate, plus a
fake one she had used to
enter the United States in
1958. On the fake document,
Lee's mother had changed
her race from black to
white.
"My mother raised me to
be white and I am, at least
by self identification I
guess," Lee wrote on the
Race Card Project website.
"It breaks my heart that
we never had a chance to
talk about it, that she didn't
feel she could trust her only
child to understand and that
she didn't feel she could


ever come out of hiding,"
Lee wrote.
"And now, I have a new
prism through which to see
things."
So does Norris. "These
six words are just the begin-
ning of fascinating stories,"
she said. "It's the most in-
teresting and rewarding
work I've ever done as a
journalist."
Race Card submissions
increased after the recent
election. So did requests to
use the project in schools or
institutions, and more peo-
ple than ever are including
additional comments.
A book is begging to be
written. Norris is talking
with several institutions
that are interested in per-
manently housing and
maintaining the project.
She will need assistance
when she ends a leave from
NPR that began last year,
when her husband took a
role with the Obama
campaign.
So many threads lead to
Obama. It's clear, Norris
said, he opened the door for
this conversation. But few
people mention the presi-


National Public Radio host
and journalist Michelle Norris
holds one of the "Race
Cards" that was sent to her
by Maureen Folk, of Pots-
dam, N.Y., in her home Thurs-
day in Washington where she
is archiving her Race Card
Project.

dent by name in their six
words. He is mentioned far
more in additional com-
ments, and almost always in
Norris' follow-up interviews.
"It appears that his ascen-
dance has made people
think not just of his story
and his place in history, but
also their own," she said.
New description
And what about Norris'
own place? What are her six
words?
When the project began,
her words were personal,
born of her experience as a
black Minnesota girl with a
slight speech impediment
who was advised against
pursuing a four-year college
degree. "Fooled them all,
not done yet" used to fit well.
But now, after what the
nation has experienced
these past few years, and
the gratitude she feels to-
ward thousands of people
who shared their stories
with her, Norris is reminded
of a quote from the leg-
endary dancer Alvin Ailey:
"The dance comes from the
people and must always be
given back to the people."
So today, her six words
are:
"Still more work to be
done."
Jesse Washington covers
race and ethnicity for The
Associated Press. He is
reachable at www twitter
com/jessewashington or
jwashington@ap.org


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A12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Club NOTES Memory screenings
Wisconsin Club Key Foundation speaker Memory screenings


plans luncheon
The Wisconsin Club will
meet at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday,
Dec. 12, at The Boathouse
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Meal choices are fried fish,
roast beef, lasagna and grilled
chicken. Reservations and
meal choices are required. All
former Wisconsinites and
snowbirds are welcome.
To reserve a spot, and for
more information, call Joyce at
352-860-1292.
Have fun
with snowbirds
The American Canadian
Snowbirds Club will be active
again this season with a weekly
golf scramble, euchre, bridge
and shuffleboard, as well as
dinners for Christmas and
Valentine's Day, a picnic and
annual meeting.
Whether you are new to the
area, a snowbird or have lived
here for years, all are welcome
for a good time. For more de-
tailed information regarding
your area of interestss, email
citrussnowbirds@gmail.com, or
call Tony at 352-341-4407.
German American
Club to meet
The German American Club
of West Central Florida will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec.
10, at the Knights of Columbus
Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486),
Lecanto.
After the brief business meet-
ing will be a social hour with re-
freshments and musical
entertainment. In the spirit of
the season, there will be Christ-
mas stollen, cookies and cof-
fee. Holiday music will be
presented by deejays Gerhard
Lorenz and Steve Szabo.
Members are encouraged to
attend; guests are always wel-
come.
For information, call 352-637-
2042 or 352-746-7058.
New Yorkers
to gather Dec. 20
The New York Club of Citrus
County will meet at noon Thurs-
day, Dec. 20, at Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Fred Camp-


A_ ,"


Special to the Chronicl
The New York Club celebrated Thanksgiving at the Inverness
Golf & Country Club and heard speaker Neale Brennan, di
rector of the Key Center Foundation. The club will have it
December meeting and Christmas party, with a gift ex
change and music by Fred Campball, on Dec. 20. For mor
information, call Dorothy or Ed at 352-527-2332.


bell will provide a program of
music.
An optional gift exchange will
take place, with a $7 limit per
gift. Men should bring a gift for
a man, and women should
bring one for a woman.
On the menu are prime rib or
grilled tilapia, baked potato,
mixed vegetables, dinner rolls
and eclairs for dessert. Tea,
soda and coffee provided. Cost
is $12, which includes tax and
tip. Lunch reservations must be
made by Wednesday, Dec. 12.
Mail your check to: New York
Club, P.O. Box 641261, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Write your
menu choice on your check.
Meetings are normally con-
ducted at noon the second
Thursday monthly. Visitors are
welcome, but must join after
two visits. Annual dues are $6.
The club supports the work of
CASA, helping victims of do-
mestic violence. Donations of
household supplies, toiletries,
baby supplies and money are
appreciated. Also needed are
twin-size sheets, bath towels,
paper towels and more.
For more information, call
Dorothy or Ed at 352-527-2332.
American-Italians
to have dance
Citrus American Italian Club
will have its annual Christmas


dinner dance on Saturday,
Dec. 8, at 4325 S. Little Al
Point, Inverness.
Doors open at 4 p.m., with
hors d'oeuvres at 5 p.m. and
dinner at 6 p.m. Santa will ar-
rive about 8 p.m. On the menu
are prime rib, baked potato,
vegetable, salad and dessert.
Music will be by Solid Gold.
Cost is $16. Call Dolores at
352-746-5019 for reservations.
Jersey club
plans activities
Activities for December for
the New Jersey and Friends
Club include the Christmas
Show at the Show Palace in
Hudson at 11:30 a.m. Dec. 15.
Christmas dinner at Stump-
knockers in Inverness will be at
3 p.m. Dec. 25.
With winter approaching,
members are asked to remem-
ber donations of food items and
clothing for the Family Re-
source Center. The club meets
the first Monday of each month
unless there is a holiday, at
which time it is the second
Monday.
The club bowls Thursdays at
10 a.m. at Sportsman's Bowl on
U.S. 41 in Inverness. All are
welcome; being from New Jer-
sey is not a requirement to join.
For more information, call 352-
527-3568.


Special to the Chronicle
HPH Hospice will host free 20-minute
memory screenings for adults age 50 and
older who are concerned about memory
impairment. Participants will meet pri-
vately with Jerry Fisher, MSW, program
specialist for the Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter.
The screenings will take place from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10, at the HPH
Hospice Team office, 3545 N. Lecanto


Special to the Chronicle in care, the children's fam-


The Department of Chil-
dren and Families/Chil-
dren's Legal Services will
join with the DCF Family
Team Coaching and The
Centers Inc. for its second
annual Holiday Bash for all
Citrus County children in
care and their families.
The bash will be from 1
to 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, at
The Centers, 2315 U.S. 41
North, Inverness. The
event is free to the children


ilies and caregivers. Santa
will be on hand to visit, and
the children can enjoy ac-
tivities and crafts, as well
as refreshments.
"This year, we have about
300 children in care,"
Michele Ingoglia, paralegal
specialist for Children's
Legal Services, said. "We
are in great need of dona-
tions to provide gifts for the
children, who range in age
from 1 month through 18
years old. No donation will


Highway, Beverly Hills, in the Winn-Dixie
shopping plaza.
While the screening is not considered a
diagnostic tool and is not intended for
those who have dementia or Alzheimer's,
it is extremely helpful when it comes to
determining if there is a serious memory
problem, according to the Alzheimer's As-
sociation.
Appointments are required.
Call HPH Hospice at 352-527-4600 for an
appointment.


be deemed too small or
too large, for that matter -
as every bit helps and is
greatly appreciated."
Ingoglia said unwrapped
toys and gift cards are
greatly appreciated and
can be dropped off at The
Centers. Especially needed
are children's books and
stocking stuffers to be
handed out by Santa.
For more information,
call Melissa Boling-Knazur
at 352-344-2933, ext. 6032,
or 352-586-6648.


News NOTES


Model railroaders to meet
The Citrus Model Railroad Club will meet at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at the Robinson
Horticulture building of the Citrus County
Fairgrounds.
The program for the evening will be a pres-
entation on designing and building business
communities appropriate for a home railroad
layout. This will demonstrate business' interac-
tion with running railroads, community support
and suggestions on railroad operations.
All are welcome. For more information, call
Bob Penrod at 352-797-6315.
Quilters to gather Dec. 6
Citrus Friendship Quilters will meet from 1 to
4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6, at the Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Meetings are the first and third Thursdays of
the month, and involve a business meeting,
along with a workshop or two. The workshops


are given by members of the club concerning
new instructions in quilting and easier methods
of quilting. A show-and-tell session follows.
All interested quilters are welcome. For more
information, call Nancy Cagle at 352-422-5967,
or Nancy Osborn at 352-726-7805.

'A Grinchmas Holiday' on tap
The fourth annual Holiday Show, "A Grinch-
mas Holiday," with entertainment by the New
Dawn Singers, will be presented at 7 p.m. Fri-
day, Dec. 7, at the Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
The New Dawn Singers is a traveling group
of college-age performers who bring a high-en-
ergy song and dance show to all ages across
the country.
Cost is $7 per person. For information and
tickets, call Citrus County Parks & Recreation
at 352-465-7007 or 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.


Month Smiles


Six Month Smiles is an alternative to comprehensive orthodontic treatment. The goal is to
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Cmplimentar This process is completely safe and does not harm your teeth. It is
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with your teeth and less expensive than traditional orthodontics. As an added
cleaning! bonus to you, we will also make you bleaching trays for free! This
way you will have straight and white teeth in as little as six months.


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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 A13


t





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Signal problems
preceded derailment
PAULSBORO, N.J. -Asig-
nal may have been malfunc-
tioning on a southern New
Jersey bridge where a train de-
railed, causing a hazardous
chemical to spew into the air
and leading to health problems,
evacuations, tricky cleanup de-
cisions and broader questions
about the condition of railway
infrastructure.
The train's crew told investi-
gators when they approached
the bridge before 7 a.m. Friday,
the signal light was red, telling
them not to cross, National
Transportation Safety Board
chairman Deborah Hersman
said Saturday. The crew found
it unusual to get a red light at
that hour of the day, she said.
They used a radio signal to
try to change the signal to
green, but it did not work, Hers-
man said. She said the conduc-
tor got off the train and
inspected the aging bridge.
When it appeared to be OK,
she said, the engineer called
for and received permis-
sion from a dispatcher to go
through the red light and cross
the bridge.
Only the two loco-
motives and the first
five cars on the south-
bound train got across
the bridge before
seven cars derailed.
Hersman said the en-
gine was moving 8
mph before the acci-
dent- under the 10 Ch
mph speed limit. Wa
Hersman said in- Caspei
vestigators were trying police
to determine whether
other train crews had, had the
same signal issue lately and
whether the signal problems
had anything to do with the ac-
cident.
Man killed father
with bow and arrow
CASPER, Wyo. Police re-
leased more details Saturday of
a grisly murder-suicide at a
Wyoming community college,
saying a man shot his father in
the head with a bow and arrow in
front of a computer science class
not long after fatally stabbing his


Associated Press
A containment boom floats Saturday in Mantua Creek near freight train tank cars that
derailed Friday in Paulsboro, N.J. Residents in an area of 12 blocks near the derailment
remained out of their homes as officials continued their efforts to clear a hazardous gas that
spewed from a ruptured freight train car.


father's live-in girlfriend at their
home a couple of miles away.
Computer science instructor
James Krumm, 56, may have
saved some of his students'
lives Friday by giving them time
to flee while trying to fend off
his son, Christopher
Krumm, 25, of Vernon,
Conn., Casper Police
Chief Chris Walsh said.
S "I can tell you the
courage that was
L" demonstrated by Mr.
Krumm was absolutely
without equal," he said,
ris adding his actions could
lsh offer some measure of
r, Wyo. comfort to those af-
S fected by the killings.
He said police still were try-
ing to figure out what motivated
Christopher Krumm to attack


his father and girlfriend, 42-
year-old Heidi Arnold, a math
instructor at the college. Arnold
was found stabbed to death in
front of the home she shared
with James Krumm.
After shooting his father with
the arrow, Christopher Krumm
stabbed himself, then fatally
stabbed his father in the chest
in a struggle in the classroom,
Walsh said.
West Point hosts
same-sex wedding
WEST POINT, N.Y. Cadet
Chapel, the landmark gothic
church that is a center for spiri-
tual life at the U.S. Military
Academy at West Point, was
hosting its first same-sex wed-
ding Saturday.
Penelope Gnesin and Brenda


Sue Fulton, a West Point gradu-
ate, were exchanging vows in
the regal church in an afternoon


ceremony attended by 250
guests and conducted by a sen-
ior Army chaplain.
The two have been together
for 17 years. They had a civil
commitment ceremony that
didn't carry any legal force in
1999, but had long hoped to
formally tie the knot. The way
was cleared last year, when
New York legalized same-sex
marriage and President Barack
Obama lifted the "Don't ask,
don't tell," policy prohibiting
openly gay people from serving
in the military.
Giant sequoia tree
tops a neighbor
FRESNO, Calif. Scientists
measuring California's giant se-
quoias to assess their role in
fighting climate change have
discovered the tree thought to
be the world's second largest is
actually third.
A team led by Humboldt
State's Stephen Sillett has dis-
covered The President is the
second-largest tree, supplant-
ing the nearby General Grant.
Researchers are studying


I4A A
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T 406 NE 1st, Cr
BEST info@(citrusp
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ystal Rive
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how the sequoias and coastal
redwoods will be affected by cli-
mate change and whether the
state's iconic trees can help
combat it.
Sillett said The President is
still growing and contains
54,000 cubic feet of wood.
The General Sherman is still
believed to be the world's
largest tree.
George H.W. Bush in
stable condition
HOUSTON Former U.S.
President George H.W. Bush
remains in stable condition at a
Houston hospital, but a linger-
ing cough related to bronchitis
likely will keep him there
through the weekend.
Methodist Hospital
spokesman George Kovacik
said Saturday there is no
change in the status of the 88-
year-old Bush from earlier in the
week. But Jim McGrath, a
spokesman for the 41st presi-
dent, said "he still has the cough
and we're now not expecting him
to be discharged this weekend."
From wire reports


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Rats gnawing pose a serious threat to electrical
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A14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tribes raise $9M for land


Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -
After months of high-profile
fundraising that drew
celebrities' attention and
dollars, a group of Native
American tribes has raised
$9 million to buy a piece of
land in South Dakota's
Black Hills that they con-
sider sacred, an official with
an Indian land foundation
said Friday
The Indian Land Tenure
Foundation president Cris
Stainbrook told The Associ-
ated Press the tribes raised


enough money to purchase
the land from its current
owners. The foundation was
one of several groups and or-
ganizations leading the effort
to buy the land.
The deal was finalized
Friday, which was the dead-
line for the tribes to raise
the money
The land, known as Pe' Sla,
went up for sale after being
privately owned. Members of
the Great Sioux Nation have
been allowed to gather there
every year to perform rituals.
The site plays a key role in
the tribes' creation story, and


members fear new owners
would develop it
Tribal leaders from three
Sioux tribes Rosebud
Sioux President Cyril Scott,
Shakopee Mdewakanton
Sioux Chairman Charlie Vig
and Crow Creek Chairman
Brandon Sazue -released a
joint statement Friday, saying
they are happy to reclaim
one of their sacred sites.
Those three tribes were
the only ones to contribute
to the purchase, Scott said.
Tribal leaders would not say
how much each tribe con-
tributed to the purchase.


--. --



Associated Press file photo
Reynolds Prairie in the Black Hills of South Dakota is seen in 2007. Native American tribes
raised $9 million to buy a piece of the Black Hills, which they consider sacred land.


David R. Best

Attorney
at Law


Over 35 years
practicing in
Citrus County





Areas of
Practice:

Personal Injury

Medical Malpractice

Sex Abuse Cases

Disability Cases


7655 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Suite 13
Crystal River, FL 34429


pe~cV SCA\tCA c\JAU5


-- lrI~I1~ ___ -


Drop your letter by the Crystal River Mall
or the Citrus County Chronicle between
Friday, November 23 and V
Friday, December 14,2012 CRYSTAL RI
CHRNICLE All letters will be "'".. '; I all to read and enjoy MA L
Sw.hroniloineo..m online at www.chronicleonline.com/letterstosanta2012!


Crystal River Mall
352-795-2585


Monday
10am-9pm


Tuesday
9am-9pm


Wednesday
9am-9pm


Thursday
8am-9pm


Friday
10am-9pm


Saturday
10am-9pm


1801 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River I
Mobil 1 Lube Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-795-2333 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-3pm Closed
1050 SE Hwy 19, Crystal River

Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-489-5477
9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-4pm Closed
20319 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon

Badcock Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-726-6366
352-76-66 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm 10am-4pm
3690 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness

Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunda
352-795-5346 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm Close
150 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


Jim Green Jewelers
352-563-0633
1665 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River


Monday
10am-5pm


Tuesday
10am-6pm


Wednesday
10am-5pm


Thursday
10am-5pm


Friday
10am-5pm


Saturday
11lam-3pm


Sunday
12pm-5:30pm


Sunday
Closed


' '~lii"l?~P


I


NATION


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 A15


ai~:~
r
;~ ;-- -r
--:
;*r.











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WorldRIEFS Morsi sets date of constitutional vote


Referendum in two weeks; supporters rally in streets


Associated Press
North Korea's Unha-3 rocket,
stands at Sohae Satellite
Station in Tongchang-ri,
North Korea. North Korea
said Saturday it will launch
a long-range rocket between
Dec. 10 and 22. The launch
will heighten strained
tensions with South Korean
ahead of its presidential
election Dec. 19.


Curacao police have
leads in gold heist
WILLEMSTAD, Curacao-
Police in Curacao said Satur-
day they have several leads
following a brazen heist in
which gunmen pretending to
be police stole 70 gold bars
worth an estimated $11.5 mil-
lion from a fishing boat.
Authorities have the li-
cense plate number of one of
three cars used in Friday's
getaway, and they have been
asking for the public's help in
tracking the suspects, police
spokesman Reggie Huggins
told The Associated Press.
"There is information com-
ing in," he said. "We are get-
ting reactions from the public,
but we still have to sort it out."
Police have said at least six
men were involved, but no
one has been arrested in a
case that surprised authorities
in the Dutch Caribbean island.
Manufacturing
grows in China
BEIJING China's manu-
facturing grew in November in
the latest sign the world's sec-
ond-largest economy is recov-
ering from its deepest slump
since the 2008 global crisis, a
survey showed Saturday.
The state-sanctioned
China Federation of Logistics
& Purchasing's monthly pur-
chasing managers' index im-
proved to 50.6 on a 100-point
scale on which numbers
above 50 indicate activity is
expanding. That was up
0.4 points from October's
numbers.
The PMI index measures
overall manufacturing activity
by surveying numerous indi-
cators including orders, em-
ployment and actual
production.


Under oath


Associated Press
CAIRO Egypt's Presi-
dent Mohammed Morsi
called Saturday for a refer-
endum in two weeks on a
contentious draft constitu-
tion, setting a date for an-
other milestone in the
country's transition to
democracy Widespread dis-
putes over the charter and
Morsi's recent seizure ofnear
absolute power have marred
the process and thrown the
country into turmoil.
As has been the case in
nearly two years since Hosni
Mubarak was ousted, what
should have been a cause
for national celebration
turned into dueling protest
between opponents and
supporters of how the tran-


sition has been managed -
largely divided along Is-
lamist and secular lines.
More than 100,000 Morsi
supporters organized by the
Muslim Brotherhood and ul-
traconservative Salafi groups
took to the streets of Cairo
and other cities a day after a
massive opposition demon-
stration against his decrees
giving him immunity from ju-
dicial oversight and the char-
ter rushed through an
assembly packed with allies.
The presidency has been
locked in a tug of war with
the powerful judiciary and
secular and Christian ac-
tivists since Morsi granted
himself far-reaching powers
Nov 22 in a bid to pre-empt
an expected decision by the
Supreme Constitutional


Court on Sunday to dissolve
the constitutional panel, as
it had done the Islamist-led
parliament earlier this year
Morsi also decreed courts
cannot dissolve the Islamist-
dominated upper house of
parliament, known as the
Shura Council another
decision slated to be before
the Constitution Court on
Sunday In protest, most of
the nation's judges have
gone on strike.
It was not clear if Egypt's
highest court would go
ahead with Sunday's ses-
sion. Any move to do so
would be a direct challenge
to Morsi and could further
undermine the charter's le-
gitimacy. Judges also have
threatened to boycott ob-
serving the referendum,


Associated Press
A supporter wears a mask depicting Egyptian President
Mohammed Morsi at a rally Saturday in front of Cairo
University in Cairo, Egypt. Tens of thousands of people are
demonstrating across Egypt in support of Morsi.


and the secular opposition
promised a civil disobedi-
ence campaign.
"After receiving this draft
constitution, and out of
keenness to build the na-


Unsafe conditions


Associated Press
Eddie Saman cleans out his house, which was damaged by Superstorm Sandy, as it begins to snow Nov. 7 in
the New Dorp section of Staten Island, New York. Uncounted numbers of families have returned to coastal homes
that are contaminated with mold, which can aggravate allergies and leave people perpetually wheezing.


Coldg mold loom as

hazards in Sandy

disaster zones
Associated Press
NEW YORK A month after
Sandy's floodwaters swept up his
block, punched a hole in his foun-
dation and drowned his furnace,
John Frawley still has no electric-
ity or heat in his dilapidated home
on the Rockaway seashore.
The 57-year-old, who also lost his
car and all his winter clothes in the
flood, now spends his nights shiv-
ering in a pair of donated snow
pants, worrying whether the cold
might make his chronic heart con-
dition worse.
"I've been coughing like crazy,"
said Frawley, a former commercial
fisherman disabled by a spine in-
jury He said his family doesn't
have the money to pay for even
basic repairs. So far, he has
avoided going to a shelter, saying
he'd rather sleep in his own home.
"But I'm telling you, I can't stay


John Frawley sits Thursday on the
porch of his house, which was
damaged during superstorm Sandy,
on the Rockaway Peninsula in New
York.
here much longer," he said.
City officials estimate at least
12,000 New Yorkers are trying to


survive in unheated, flood-
damaged homes, despite warnings
that dropping temperatures could
pose a health risk.
The chill is only one of the poten-
tial environmental hazards experts
said might endanger people trying
to resume their lives in the New
York and New Jersey disaster zone.
Uncounted numbers of families
have returned to coastal homes
contaminated with mold, which
can aggravate allergies and leave
people perpetually wheezing. Oth-
ers have been sleeping in houses
filled with construction dust, as
workers have ripped out walls and
flooring. That dust can sometimes
trigger asthma.
But it is the approaching winter
that has some public health officials
worried most Nighttime tempera-
tures have been around freezing and
stand to drop in the coming weeks.
New York City's health depart-
ment said the number of people
visiting hospital emergency rooms
for cold-related problems has al-
ready doubled this November,
compared with previous years.
Those statistics are likely only the
proverbial tip of the iceberg.


Syrian Internet restored after blackout


tion's institutions without
delay or stalling, I will issue
today the call for a public
referendum on this draft
charter on Saturday, Dec.
15," Morsi said.



Progress


made in


AIDS


battle

South African

clinic treats

hundreds daily

Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG In
the early '90s when South
Africa's Themba Lethu clinic
could only treat HIV/AIDS
patients for opportunistic
diseases, many would come
in on wheelchairs and keep
coming to the health center
until they died.
Two decades later, the
clinic is the biggest anti-
retroviral, or ARY treat-
ment center in the country
and sees between 600 to 800
patients a day from all over
southern Africa. Those who
are brought in on wheel-
chairs, sometimes on the
brink of death, get the cru-
cial drugs and often become
healthy and are walking
within weeks.
"The ARVs are called the
'Lazarus drug' because peo-
ple rise up and walk," said
Sue Roberts who has been a
nurse at the clinic, run by
Right to Care in Johannes-
burg's Helen Joseph Hospi-
tal, since it opened its doors
in 1992. She said they re-
cently treated a woman who
was pushed in a wheelchair
for 1.8 miles to avoid a taxi
fare and who was so sick it
was touch and go. Two weeks
later, the woman walked to
the clinic, Roberts said.
Such stories of hope and
progress are readily avail-
able on World AIDS Day
2012 in sub-Saharan Africa
where deaths from AIDS-
related causes have de-
clined by 32 percent from
1.8 million in 2005 to 1.2 mil-
lion in 2011, according to the
latest UNAIDS report
As people around the
world celebrate a reduction
in the rate of HIV infections,
the growth of the clinic,
which was one of only a few
to open its doors 20 years
ago, reflects how changes in
treatment and attitude to-
ward HIV and AIDS have
moved South Africa forward.


Associated Press
BEIRUT Internet and telephone
service were restored across much of
Syria on Saturday following a two-
day, nationwide communications
blackout that came during some of
Associated Press the worst fighting to hit the capital
Enrique Pena Nieto takes the since July
oath of office Saturday as Experts say the shutdown was
Mexico's new president at likely caused by President Bashar
the National Congress in Assad's regime, raising fears that the
Mexico City. Pena Nieto was government is taking increasingly
sworn in amid protests bold measures to cut off the country
inside and outside the from the outside world as it tries to
congressional chamber crush a relentless rebellion.
where he swore to protect Renesys, a U.S.-based network
the constitution and laws of monitoring firm that studies Internet
the land. disruptions, said in a statement Sat-
-From wire reports urday service went back up around


4:32 p.m. local time in Syria, describ-
ing it as a "largely complete restora-
tion of the Syrian Internet."
Mobile telephone networks also ap-
peared to be mostly back up Saturday
A Britain-based activist group, the
Syrian Observatory for Human
Rights, said it was receiving dis-
patches from many parts of the coun-
try Many land lines had remained in
working order.
The SANA state news agency said
technical teams brought Internet and
telephone services back online Satur-
day in Damascus and its suburbs -
the flashpoints of recent fighting be-
tween government soldiers and rebels.
The communications blackout
began Thursday, raising fears of a
burst of fighting outside the public


eye. The government and rebels have
blamed each other for cutting the
lines.
Syrian rebels are fighting a 20-
month-old revolt against the Assad
regime. Activists said some 40,000
people have been killed in the crisis,
which began with pro-democracy
protests but has morphed into a civil
war
On Saturday, Syrian troops backed
by helicopter gunships clashed with
rebels as government forces pushed a
major offensive on villages and towns
near the capital's international air-
port, activists said.
SANA reported a car bomb ex-
ploded in the Damascus neighbor-
hood of Ish Alwarwar. There was no
immediate word on casualties.


Associated Press
Christinah Motsoahae has
blood taken for testing Nov. 15
at the U.S.-sponsored "Right
to Care," Themba Lethu,
HIV/AIDS Clinic at the
Helen Joseph hospital in
Johannesburg.


Launcnhng



1M- W


I


I











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes
can be found on
Page A19 of
today's
Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Land of lakes, volcanoes


' p


Central Plaza of the well-preserved colonial city of Granada, Nicaragua.


Story & photos by Bany Schwartz
Trip journal and slideshow are found at: http://bschwartz.net/nica/journal
and http://bschwartz.net/nica/slideshow.


Nicaragua: Enchants with monkeys, mot-mots, more

-,3-'i'- lIm~ m icaragua is only a colorful birds. The main road through from the crater Granada is a well-pre-
SNicaragua is part of the Pan American served colonial town that has morphed
S, .brief two-hour Highway It is in very good shape. The into a very attractive tourist destina-
flight from Miami side roads seem to go from bad to tion. Our hotel was in the town center,
worse, where it can take more than an with a balcony overlooking the plaza
and after a quick stop at hour just to travel a few miles. It was and cathedral with all the town's activ-
passport control, it wa not unusual to see horse-drawn car- ity spread out before us. We toured sev-
S"A passp, riages rather than cars on the roads. eral towns in the area with artisan


A white-faced monkey;
Volcano San Cristobal; hiking in the Ome-
tepe Rain Forest; Barry and Bette
Schwartz on top of the Leon Cathedral.


reassuring to see a sign
with our name on it to
help lead us through the
hordes of people that
seem to always be milling
around airports in a
developing country.
Gerald, our guide for the next 10 days,
efficiently escorted us through the
crowds to a waiting car For the next 10
days, Gerald and Harold, our driver,
helped us learn about and experience
Nicaragua. While Central American
countries like
Costa Rica and
Belize have been
U.S. tourist desti-
nations for many
years, Nicaragua
has suffered from
poverty and politi-
cal upheaval since
Columbus first
landed there in
Barry Schwartz 1502, and the
ROAD LESS British called it
TAKEN the Mosquito
Kingdom in 1625.
When people
today think about Nicaragua, what is
probably recalled is the Sandinista-
Contra war and the Iran-Contra affair
while Ronald Reagan was president
Nicaragua is a beautiful country
sandwiched between Honduras to the
north and Costa Rica on the south,
stretching from the Caribbean to the Pa-
cific. It still feels unexplored in many
ways. While it is the largest Central
American country in size, about the
same area as New York state, it has
fewer than 6 million people, making it
the least densely populated area in
Central America.
The three main cities are Managua,
Leon and Granada. The geography is
impressive with two huge lakes, active
volcanoes everywhere and many
wildlife sanctuaries in which to look for


studios and watched as artisans spun
pots right in front of us.

OMETEPE
Finally, we took the one-hour ferry
trip to the large island, Ometepe, in the
middle of Lake Nicaragua. Two volca-
noes that have risen out of the lake cre-
ated the island, and its tropical forest
is filled with howling monkeys. We
stayed at an eco-resort that is still oper-
ated as a plantain farm. As we were re-
turning to the mainland, I was reading
a book on my iPad and one of the pas-
sengers pointed out to me that the
ferry had a free WiFi connection!
The exchange rate is favorable and
with our Nicaraguan Cordobas ob-
tained from ATMs found in major
cities, the hotels and food were not ex-
pensive. While Nicaragua is listed as
one of the poorest countries in Latin
America, after Haiti, and most live on
less than $3,000 per year, people are
not living in shacks and most seem to
have cell phones. Even satellite TV an-
tennas were present on rural village
rooftops. Basic education and health
care are available and free.
As we traveled throughout the coun-
try, we found few other tourists and the
people were very friendly toward us
and proud of their country The San-
dinista-Contra war is "ancient" history
and they understand the road to pros-
perity, in part, depends on tourism.
Investments from China, Venezuela
and other places are starting to slowly
transform the country with glitzy beach
resorts beginning to rise along the Pa-
cific coast. These will encourage cruise
ships to make stops in Nicaragua. It
will not be long before the tourist expe-
rience changes.
U
Barry Schwartz and his wife, Bette,
live at the end of Ozello Trail with their
mountain-climbing dog, Rowdy During
the past 30-plus years, they have visited
at least 50 countries. Email
him atschwartzbb@gmail.com.


LEON
We first traveled to Leon, a university
city north of Managua. Our hotel was
originally a convent from the 1850s, but
is now rebuilt as a beautiful hotel. It is
built in the Spanish colonial style, con-
sisting of a rectangle with a central
courtyard filled with gardens. The city
is also very typically laid out with a cen-
tral plaza, dominated by the town's
major cathedral.
Leon has the feel of an old Spanish
colonial town filled with working peo-
ple and students from the university. We
toured several active volcanoes in the
region, the town market and went to the
Pacific coast for a day of kayaking
around the mangroves. The beach has
areas with crashing waves and a bud-
ding surfing industry

TICUANTEPE
Next, we moved south of Managua to
the small rural village of Ticuantepe
and stayed at an old coffee plantation
owned by the Montibelli family The
plantation is now operated as an eco-
resort Our picturesque cabin looked
out on the dry tropical forest. While
our bed had mosquito netting, that did
not stop other critters from invading
the room during the night.
Alex, our local guide, accompanied
us on beautiful hikes around the area.
He knew the name of every bird by its
song, even before we saw it. A highlight
was hiking into Chocoyero Canyon and
seeing and hearing the thousands of
parakeets nesting in the box canyon. It
was interesting to see technology in-
vading even remote areas like this. Our
guide had a smart phone with a bird
sound app. He used the phone to en-
tice birds to come closer so we could
see them. It worked!

GRANADA
On our way further south to Granada,
we drove to the rim of the active vol-
cano Masaya and watched smoke rise


Visit to Greece
Al and Gloria Schroedel of Hernando recently visited the Acropolis in Athens,
Greece. The main structure in the background is the Parthenon constructed during
the period 447 to 432 B.C. The Parthenon was the main temple dedicated to
Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom and protector of the city of Athens. The
Parthenon symbolizes ancient Greece and continues to inspire architects across
the world. Restoration efforts are targeted for completion in about 10 years.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Worldwide event


honors children


SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 2, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
O WESH NBC 19 19 News News Football Night in America'14' NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Dallas Cowboys. (N) News
D S 3 3 14 6 Masterpiece Classic (In To Be Announced Lidia Celebrates Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey" Matthew To Be Announced
0 WEDUPBS 3 3 14 6 Stereo) 'PG' America'G' and others go off to war. 14'
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Motown-Hits Downton Abbey Revisited 'G' Downton Abbey Revisited 'G' Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbe" 14'
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Dallas Cowboys. From Cowboys News
S NB News Stereo Live14' Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (N) (In Stereo Live) a
S AC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revene "Revelations" 666 ParkAvenue News Sports
W ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' PG' (N) 'P' "Hypnos" (N)14' Night
S 10 10 10 10 1 NFL Football Pittsburgh Steelers at 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife (N) (In The Mentalist "Fugue in 10 News,
I WSCBS 10 10 10 10 10 Baltimore Ravens. (N) c Stereo) a (In Stereo) M Stereo)'14 Red"'14' 11pm (N)
NFL Football: Bobs Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Burn
0 WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 Buccaneers at Broncos Burgers Show Simpsons Burgers 14 Dad'14 (In Stereo) a Notice'PG'
E WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon aTime Revenge (N)'PG' 666 Park Avenue'14 News Inside Ed.
WC IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
WC IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Wommack Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
WFTS ABC 1 1 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge "Revelations" 666 Park Avenue News Castle'PG'
SWFT ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' PG' (N) 'PG' "Hypnos" (N) 14'
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Pro Se" Law & Order How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
W IND 12 12 16 '14' 14' Theory Theory 14' "Homesick' PG '14' '14'
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STo Be Stoerage- Storage Storage Storae Storage Storage Storage- Be the Boss "Complete Be the Boss Complete
54 48 54 25 27 Announced Texas Wars PG' Wars PG Wars PG' Wars'PG Wars PG' Texas Nutrition"'PG' Nutrition"'PG'
The Walking Dead "Say The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Comic
i 55 64 55 the Word"14' "Hounded" 14' '14' "Made to Suffer"'14' "Made to Suffer"'14' Dead14' Book Men
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52 35 52 19 21 Bigfoof'PG' (N) (In Stereo)'PG' Evidence'PG SierraSpy (N)'PG' Evidence PG
** "Not Easily Broken"(2009) Morris Chestnut. The after- "He's Mine Not Yours"(2011) Caryn Ward. A woman hires Lens on Don't
BET 96 19 96 math of a car accident tests a couple's marriage, a temptress to test her lover's fidelity.'NR' Talent Sleep!
VOl 254 51 254 Shahs of Sunset'14 |Shahs of Sunset'14' Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset Happens Atlanta
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C 27 61 27 33 Romance-Comedy) Steve arell. 'R' Paul Rudd. Premiere.'PG-13' '14' Peele'14'
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IMCN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) ewsro oewsroom (N) Spotlight Pre-Show CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute (N) (Live) CNN Heroes
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(ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17 The Fab Five SportsCenter (N) BCS College Football Bowl Selection Special (N) SportsCenter (N)
ESPNI) 34 28 34 43 49 2012 World Series of Poker Final Table. From Las Vegas. a World/Poker World/Poker World/Poker
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9 52 29 20 28*** "Elf" (2003) Will ** "Dr. Seuss'How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (2000, **"Dr. Seuss'How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (2000,
FM 29 52 29 20 28 Ferrell. PG Fantasy) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor. PG Fantasy) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor. 'PG'
*** "Primary Colors" (1998) John Travolta. ** "Beaches" (1988, Drama) Bette Midler, *** "Down and Out in Beverly Hills" (1986)
) 118 170 Premiere. (In Stereo)'R' John Heard. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c Nick Nolte. (In Stereo)'R'm
FNCI 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
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S 30 60 30 51 of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie.PG' schools an American boy in the martial arts. PG (2010)'PG'
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HALL 59 68 59 45 54 Swanson, Tess Harper a Polo, Paul Essiembre. Premiere. a Asner, John Newton, Alice Evans. 'NR' N
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302 201 302 2 2 'G-13' Wahlberg, Ben Foster. (In Stereo' R' 'MA' 'MA' 'MA'
"Liar Liar" ** "Johnson Family Vacation" **t "Safe House" (2012, Action) Denzel ** "Final Destination 5"(2011) 24/7
S 303 202 303 (2004) 'PG-13' c Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' Nicholas D'Agosto. 'R' Pacquiao
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i 51 2 1 Invention Invention Pawn Stars Pawn Stars wn Stars Pawn n Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Outback Hunters (N)
HIST 51 25 51 32 42 USA'PG' USA'PG' PG 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' PG '14'm
iI 2 3 "Holiday Spin" (2012, "Undercover Christmas"(2003, Romance- "Finding Mrs.Claus" (2012, Comedy) Mira "Undercover
24 38 24 31 Drama) c Comedy) Jami Gertz, Shawn Christian. a Sorvino,Will Sasso. Premiere.'NR' Christmas"(2003) B
S"The Devil's Teardrop" (2010, Crime Drama) *** "Nora Roberts'Carolina Moon" (2007, "Lost in the Dark" (2007, Suspense) Mae
N) 50 119 Natasha Henstridge. N Drama) Claire Forlani.'NR' Whitman, Matthew Smalley 'NR'
S 3 "Red Riding Hood" (2011) t* "Pulp Fiction" (1994) John Travolta. Criminals cross ** "Project X"(2012) Thomas Co-Ed
A 320 221 320 3 3 AmandaSeyfried.'PG-13' paths in three interlocked tales of mayhem. Mann. (In Stereo) 'R' _
(MSNBC 42 41 42 -Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Maximum Drama (N) Slaves, Suburbs |Lockup: Raw
n 10965 1 Aftermath: Population Omens of the 2012: Countdown to Evacuate Earth How humanswould evacuate 2012: Countdown to
09 5 09 44 53 ero PGApocalypse: The End Armageddon Earth.(N)'14' Armageddon
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IT 370 271 370 an" hunter battles creatures in ransylvania. 'PG-13' Jayma Mays. (In Stereo)'PG' c Caribbean: The Curse"
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I 31 5 3 "Outlander" "Land of the Lost"(2009, Comedy) Will **** "Raiders of the Lost Ark"(1981, Adventure) "Land of the Lost"
S31 59 31 26 29 'R Ferrell, Anna Friel. PG-13' Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, Paul Freeman. PG (2009)'PG-13'
TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 I* "TheHoliday"(2006) 'PG-13' ** "Four Christmases" (2008) 'PG-13' "Four Christmases" (2008) 'PG-13'
S** "Hang 'Em High" (1968, Western) Clint ** "Little Women" (1949, Drama) June ** "All Mine to Give" (1957, Drama) Glynis
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E 117 69 117 attitude.'14 Gabrielle"14' Kym"'14' Porsha" 14' Gabrielle" '14'
IWGN8A 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! Mother Mother |Mother Mother IMother News IReplay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: When a
child dies in your
family, the world
changes, and you will never
again be the same person.
Life goes on, but priorities
change, and re-
membering the
child who has died
is an important
way of traveling
through your grief
journey to the
other side. The
holiday season is
especially diffi-
cult, as old tradi-
tions often give -
way to new, more
meaningful tradi- ANI
tions that help to
remember the
child, sibling or
grandchild who has died.
That is why The Compas-
sionate Friends created the
Worldwide Candle Lighting.
The Compassionate Friends
is a national self-help be-
reavement organization for
families going through the
natural grieving process
after the death of a child.
The Worldwide Candle
Lighting is held at 7 p.m.
local time on the second
Sunday in December. This
Dec. 9 marks the 16th world-
wide event
By lighting at 7 p.m. local
time, candles first shine an
hour west of the Interna-
tional Date Line and an
hour later in the next time
zone, creating a virtual 24-
hour wave of light in re-
membrance of all children
who have died, no matter
their age or country of ori-
gin.
Hundreds of services
open to the public will be
held throughout the day,
with services in every state,


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG)
4:40 p.m. No passes.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In
3D. 1:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No
passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part
2" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" 3D (PG) 4:30
p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Killing Them Softly" (R) 2 p.m.,
5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Red Dawn" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m.,


4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG)
4:10 p.m. No passes.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In
3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1:05 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn,
Part 2" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:05
p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 4:30 p.m.
"The Collection" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Ides of-
6 Expire
11 Like a potato chip
16 Loud sound
21 Run off
with a lover
22 Happen
23 Fleming or
Zellweger
24 "M*A*S*H"
character
25 Opponent
26 Spacecraft part (hyph.)
28 Fiber plant
29 Rime
30 Papa
32 Jacob's twin
33 Kind of engine
35 whiz!
36 Time in office
38 Tiresome talker
41 Puntadel -
43 Time periods (abbr.)
44 Scotsman, e.g.
45 Big building
48 Steed
50 Linden or Holbrook
52 Edible seed
55 Sated
57 Insect egg
58 Sloping roadways
62 A state (abbr.)
63 Victory goddess
65 Barrel
67 Midnight-
69 In regular
succession
70 Knight's title
71 Summer in Paris
72 Silent
74 Hit a baseball
76 "- Karenina"
77 Legal wrong
79 Evergreen tree
81 Treat with respect
83 Implement
85 "- a boy!"
86 Bend
88 Compare
90 Big-
92 Rich stew
94 News
96 Burton or Allen
97 Hard liquor
99 Cafe au -
100 Hot-dog condiment
103 Latter- Saints
105 Saying


107 Ordinary
110 Furthermore
111 Postal material
113 True-blue
115 Wager
117 Ship in Greek myth
118 Graven image
120 Tidy
122 Glove size (abbr.)
123 Cry of discovery
125 Tax org.
126 City in New Jersey
128 Brewed beverage
130 Sticker
132 Indigo
133 the light
134 One
of the Muppets
135 Provide
with weapons
137 Gangster's girl
139 Horse's gait
141 Recipe meas.
143 Beg
145 Football
147 Serving item
150 Fuss
152 Flavoring for
97-Across
154 Sticky fastener
155 Float gently
159 Lacerate
160 Yiddish turnover
162 Related
164 Part of NATO (abbr.)
166 Sad
167 Ski resort
169 Seesaw
173 River in France
175 Stringed instrument
176 Revolves
177 Kukla, Fran and -
178 Comedy
179 Lovers'meeting
180 Speechify
181 Garden problem
182 Hauled

DOWN
1 Earn
2 Wonderland girl
3 Name for a pooch
4 Books pro (abbr.)
5 Clutched
6 "- the Rings"
7 High card
8 For each hundred (abbr.)
9 Of course!
10 Notched, as a leaf


Toasted bread cube
Chronicle (abbr.)
Writing fluids
Boil
- Pan
Stuff
Fall behind
Familiar saying
Kind of orange
Welcome
Hasty
Talent
Cigar residue
Encountered
Abundant
Old French coin
Discord personified
"Bewitched" aunt
Eat
Antlered animal
Ticket remnant
Exist
Endures
George or T.S.
Gets more
specific (2 wds.)
Dud of a car
Certain painter
Trousers
Reduce
On an even -
Pistol
Enthusiast
Chair at a bar
Unruly crowd
Holiday drink
Whistle sound
Cleverness
Of blood
Kingly
Island feast
Baby buggy
Child
Veto
Mona -
Guzzled
Pen point
Where Bangor is
Beneath
Expire
- Kippur
Gentlewoman
Intend
See eye-to-eye
Also-ran
Dead lang.
So far
Dense growth
of bushes


The non-clergy
Bluish green
Jai -
Legal matter
War god
Political acronym
Seaweed
"The Falcon"
Set afire
Dir. letters
Skillet


Affected one
Portal
Card suit
Religious pamphlet
Stair part
Put on
Same as above
Ajoint
Watchful
Compel
Woolen fabric


160 Tangle
161 Olympian queen
163 Distribute
(with "out")
165 Raise
168 Building
extensions
170 An explosive
171 Cakes and-
172 Disencumber
174 Paulo


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


@ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal I


as well as Washington, D.C.,
Puerto Rico and Guam. We
will be joined by allied and
sister organizations both at
home and abroad, with serv-
ices also held by local be-
reavement
groups ,
churches, fu-
neral homes,
hospitals, hos-
pices, children's
gardens,
schools, ceme-
teries and com-
S munity centers.
Anyone who is
unable to attend
a service is in-
lIE'S vited to light a
candle in re-
LBOX membrance at 7
p.m. for one
hour wherever they may be.
For more information on
this touching tribute, please
ask your readers to visit The
Compassionate Friends at
www. compassionate-
friends.org or call 877-969-
0010 toll-free. We also invite
your readers to visit our
website on Dec. 9 and post a
memorial message in our
online Remembrance Book.
We do this "that their light
may always shine!"-Patri-
cia Loder, Executive Direc-
tor, The Compassionate
Friends/USA
Dear Patricia Loder:
Thank you for giving us the
chance to mention the
Worldwide Candle Lighting.
This is a wonderful oppor-
tunity for the bereaved to
honor the memory of a child
who has died and to be part
of a community of others
who are paying tribute to
their loved ones. We hope
readers will look at your
website and participate in
this worthwhile event


A18 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


I





CIRCUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

POST NEWS
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 20, at Ocala Regional Air-
port Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for information.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
The post will have its second
anniversary celebration from
6 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15.
Please bring a covered dish or
finger foods.
Tickets are available for the
New Year's Eve steak dinner
on Dec. 31. Cost is $12.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Lounge
open at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon on
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the American
Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke entertain-
ers for the upcoming year. If in-
terested in being considered as
an entertainer or musician at
the post, call Elfi Baker or Patti
Foster at 352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. For Mon-
day golf league, call Leo Walsh
or John Kunzer, 746-0440. The
VFW Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer or Santos Colon at
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war


veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
All are welcome at a ham
dinner on Friday, Dec. 7, from
5 to 6:30 p.m. cost is $8 and all
are welcome. Children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke
by Mike.
All are welcome at a Tribute
to Patsy Kline on Sunday, Dec.
16. Buffet dinner will be from
5 to 6:30 p.m. followed by the
tribute. On the menu are fried
chicken, corn on the cob, relish


tray, coleslaw, pasta salad, bis-
cuits and dessert. Tickets are
$15 and can be purchased at
the post canteen.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veter-
ans or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334. One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw
4337.org for information about
all weekly post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Dec.
15. The public is welcome. All-
you-can-eat breakfast is served
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Cost
is $5.
Families in Need of Dunnel-
Ion Inc. will offer free Christmas
dinner to all from noon to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 25. Donations
will be accepted, but are not
necessary.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-


cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information


Matthew Rentschlar
Air Force Airman Matthew M.
Rentschlar graduated from
basic military training at Lack-
land Air Force Base, San Anto-
nio, Texas.
The airman
completed an
intensive,
eight-week
program that
included
training in mil-
Matthew itary disci-
Rentschlar line and
U.S. Air Force studies, Air
Force core
values, physi-
cal fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Rentschlar is the son ofAdri-


about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW


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enne Rentschlar of Crystal
River, and Mark Rentschlar of
Riverview. He is a 2010 gradu-
ate of Crystal River High
School.
Kevin Ray
Kevin Ray, serving in the
U.S. Navy, was recently pro-
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Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com. Call or visit the post
for regular and special events,
as well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.


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American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The post will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 26,
with proceeds going to support
American Cancer Society Mof-
fitt Cancer Center Ovarian Can-
cer Research and patients and
families served by Hospice of
Citrus County. A $10 entry fee
per rider will include a poker
hand and a meal at the end of
the run. Registration begins at
10 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. All ve-
hicles are welcome to partici-
pate. Music will be provided
and donated by George Mar-
shall. There will be door prizes,
a 50/50 drawing and fun. For
more information, call 352-
746-5018 or John Roby at
352-341-5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson
at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-


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lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 orAuxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/
Homosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its

See VETERANS/Page A20


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Junior and Vicki Clifton of
Dunnellon will celebrate
their 25th wedding anniver-
sary Dec. 5, 2012.
The couple were married
Dec. 5, 1987, in Citrus
Springs, and have lived in
Citrus County for 27 years.
Vicki is a retired human re-
sources coordinator and
Junior is retired from Citrus
County after 28 years.
They have three children:
Rodney (Donna) Clifton of
Grimsley, Tenn.; Bobby


Breen; and Heather (Will)
Roberson of Citrus Springs.
The couple have nine
grandchildren.


Quilters to gather Dec. 6


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus Friendship Quil-
ters will meet from 1 to 4
p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6, at the
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Meetings are the first and
third Thursdays of the
month, and involve a busi-
ness meeting, along with a
workshop or two. The work-



VETERANS
Continued from Page A19

meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-


shops are given by members
of the club concerning new
instructions in quilting and
easier methods of quilting.
A show-and-tell session
follows.
All interested quilters are
welcome.
For more information,
call Nancy Cagle at 352-422-
5967, or Nancy Osborn at
352-726-7805.


tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at 860-
1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will meet at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.

SERVICES &
GROUPS
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and


Frank and Inge
Buonomo of Citrus Hills
recently celebrated their
67th wedding anniversary
They were married Nov
24, 1945, in Alexandria, Va.
The couple are both World
War II veterans and were
married while still in the
service.
They met when Frank
returned from overseas in
1944 and was stationed in
Washington, D.C., where
Inge was a dental hygienist
while serving in the


Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty
and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also


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Women's Army Corps
(WACS).
The couple have two
sons, Gary of Hudson, N.H.,
and Ron and his wife,
Terry, who live in Sugar
Land, Texas. They also
have two granddaughters,
both of whom live in New
Hampshire.
Inge is a homemaker and
Frank is a retired engineer
They moved from Massa-
chusetts in 1984 to Citrus
Hills, where they still
reside.


available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All pro-
ceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort). Reservations should


Jennifer Madison of
Bethesda, Md., and
Stephen Snook of Arling-
ton, Va., have announced
their engagement and
forthcoming nuptials.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Robert and
Susan Madison of Raleigh,
N.C. She is a graduate of
Wake Forest University
and is a nanny in Washing-
ton, D.C.
Her fiance is the son of
Fred W and Merle Snook
of Homosassa, and the
grandson of Fred E. and
Sara Snook of Homosassa.
He is a graduate of the
University of South
Florida, and earned his
master's degree in busi-


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burn, Va.
Wedding vows will be ex-
changed at 7 p.m. May 25,
2013, at North Ridge Coun-
try Club, Raleigh, N.C.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


be made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-5131,
or email dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-
3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352422-8092.
* Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at


vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with
the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets. Free
classes to combat veterans are
offered by her at several loca-
tions and times. Call her at 352-
382-7397.


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TOGETHER











SPORTS


Florida State
takes shot at BCS
bowl berth in ACC
championship
against Georgia
Tech./B4
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* College football/B2
0 NFL/B3
1 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 College basketball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


After missing on Martin, Broncos try to stop him


Bucs meet Denver

for crucial game
Associated Press
DENVER Starting with the
Peyton Manning signing, almost
every big decision the Broncos
front office has made since John
Elway took over has worked out
One exception: the time they
tried to draft the "Dougie."
While zeroing in on Doug Mar-
tin in this year's draft, the Bron-
Tampa Bay rookie running back
Doug Martin, a first-round draft
pick out of Boise State, is fourth in
the NFL with 1,050 rushing yards.
Associated Press


cos traded away a late-first-
round pick, thinking the running
back from Boise State would still
be there when they picked a few
spots later Their trading
partner: Tampa Bay, Tai
which used the Broncos' Bay
pick to take Martin 31st (6-
in the draft. Del
The teams meet Sunday Bro
with the Broncos (8-3)
needing a win to wrap up (8
the AFC West title and the Tim
Buccaneers (6-5), with 4 p.
their prize rookie, Martin, tod
trying to stay in the thick of
the NFC wild-card chase. 0 TV:
"He was very high on
our board," Broncos coach John
Fox says. "He's a guy that I know
our personnel people liked, our
coaching staff liked. His success


mi
B
5)
ni
n4

ie
.m
ay
F(


doesn't surprise me whatsoever"
Propelled by Martin, fourth in
the NFL with 1,050 yards rushing,
a strong comeback season from
quarterback Josh Free-
pa man and the tough-love
ucS approach from first-year
at coach Greg Schiano, the
ver Buccaneers are among the
C league's biggest surprises.
S They have won four of
3) their last five and are tied
with Minnesota and Seat-
S tle for the NFC's last
wild-card spot.
It was at the end of Oc-
OX. tober that Martin's poten-
tial went on full display.
He had 214 combined yards in a
36-17 win over Minnesota on
See Page B4


Chiefs' Belcher


kills girlfriend, self


LB commits

suicide in front

of coach, GM

Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. It
began like any other Satur-
day for the Kansas City
Chiefs during the NFL sea-
son, their general manager
and coach at work early to
put final touches on this
weekend's gameplan. Then
they got a call to hurry to
the parking lot.
The two men rushed
through the glass doors of
Chiefs headquarters and


came face-to-face with line-
backer Jovan Belcher, hold-
ing a handgun to his head.
Belcher had already
killed his girlfriend and
sped the short distance to
Arrowhead Stadium, right
past a security checkpoint
guarding the entrance.
Upon finding his bosses,
Belcher thanked general
manager Scott Pioli and
head coach Romeo Crennel
for giving him a chance in
the NFL. Then he turned
away and pulled the trigger
The murder-suicide
shocked a franchise that
has been dealing with con-
troversies now made trivial
by comparison: eight
See .Page B4


Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher fatally shot his
girlfriend early Saturday in Kansas City, Mo., then drove to
Arrowhead Stadium and committed suicide in front of his
coach and general manager.



Panthers survive

South Sumter
uperg s third-quarter run that gave
upler gie his Panthers a boost during
k i an eventual 64-60 victory
Lecanto spark over South Sumter on Sat-
st urday night
"I noticed we were low on
in triumph intensity," Dupler said. "So
SI just tried to step it up and
JUSTIN PLANTE pump us up a bit."
Correspondent Thanks to Dupler's effort
LECNTO- Gd in the third, and senior
LECANTO Good
LGMikey Markos' game-
things come to those high 17 points, the
who wait. It's a say- Panthers held on to
ing that instills the their lead to send
idea of being patient the Red Raiders
and waiting for the home with a narrow
opportunity. defeat.
For Lecanto guard Con- The beginning of the
nor Dupler, great things
came in the form of a rapid See Page B4


'Bama BCS bound


I "' '-'" "' ". .. -
Associated Press
Alabama running back Eddie Lacy reacts with offensive linesman D.J. Fluker after scoring a touchdown against
Georgia during the second half of the SEC championship game Saturday in Atlanta.

Crimson Tide willplay for BCS title after nipping Georgia


Associated Press
ATLANTA Alabama is head-
ing back to the national champi-
onship game by a mere 5 yards.
AJ McCarron threw a 45-yard
touchdown pass to Amari Cooper
with 3:15 remaining, and the No. 2
Crimson Tide barely held off No. 3
Georgia 32-28 in a Southeastern


Conference title game for the ages
Saturday
After an apparent game-clinch-
ing interception by Alabama was
overturned on a video review,
Georgia's Aaron Murray com-
pleted a 15-yard pass to Arthur
Lynch, a 23-yarder to Tavarres
King and a 26-yarder to Lynch,
who was hauled down at the Ala-


bama 8 as the clock continued to
run.
The Bulldogs were out of time-
outs.
Instead of spiking the ball and
gathering themselves, the Bulldog
snapped the ball with 9 seconds to
go. Murray attempted a pass into
See Page B2


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COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Championship runs


Wisconsin,

Stanford will meet

for Rose Bowl after

conference titles

Associated Press

STANFORD, Calif. Kevin
Hogan threw for 155 yards and a
touchdown and ran for 47 yards
and another score to help eighth-
ranked Stanford beat No. 17 UCLA
27-24 in the Pac-12 championship
game Friday night.
The Cardinal (11-2) will play Wis-
consin, who led Nebraska 70-24
late in the Big Ten championship
game, in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1.
As a defender barreled into him,
Hogan hurled a 26-yard tying touch-
down to Drew Terrell on third-and-
15 early in the fourth quarter.
Jordan Williamson kicked his sec-
ond field goal from 36 yards with
6:49 remaining for the go-ahead
score to seal Stanford's first confer-
ence title since the 1999 season.
UCLA quarterback Brent Hund-
ley almost brought the Bruins (9-4)
back, but Ka'imi Fairbairn missed
a 52-yard field goal wide left in
closing moments for a disappoint-
ing loss.
No. 12 Oklahoma 24,
Texas Christian 17
FORT WORTH, Texas Landry
Jones threw for 244 yards and two
touchdowns, Damien Williams ran un-
touched 66 yards for a score and 12th-
ranked Oklahoma held on to win 24-17
at TCU and clinch at least a share of
the Big 12 title.
TCU's fourth-down pass to the goal-
line in the final minute was well-de-
fended and fell incomplete.
The Sooners (10-2, 8-1 Big 12) won
their eighth consecutive Big 12 game
since a late-September loss to
Kansas State, which played it regular-
season finale at home Saturday night
against No. 23 Texas. Oklahoma
would have the outright title and guar-
anteed BCS spot if the seventh-
ranked Wildcats lose.
Oklahoma, whose only other loss
was to No. 1 Notre Dame, is in good
shape for the final at-large BCS berth
even if K-State wins.
TCU (7-5, 4-5) lost all four of its Big
12 games at home despite winning four
on the road.
MA 4i nrA fa e.ijA "77


Associated Press
Wisconsin running back Melvin Gordon, right, celebrates with James White after Gordon ran 56 yards for a touch-
down during the first half of the Big Ten championship Saturday against Nebraska in Indianapolis. The Badgers led
the Huskers 70-24 late in the fourth quarter and, with the win, will meet Stanford in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1.


Baylor a 41-27 lead with 5:11 left in the
game.
The sophomore burst through the
middle and slowed down about 25
yards shy of the end zone. Seastrunk
stumbled into the end zone and was
down on the turf before limping off with
an apparent right leg injury.
J.W. Walsh rushed for two touch-
downs for Oklahoma State (7-5, 5-4).


Series bowl berth.
Kelce caught five balls for 69 yards
and the two scores. Kay completed 19
of his 29 passes for 245 yards and the
two scores.
Chandler Whitmer threw for 264
yards and a touchdown for UConn (5-7,
2-5), before leaving the game with a
head injury in the third quarter.
West Virginia 59,
Kansas 10
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Geno
Smith threw for 407 yards and three
touchdowns in his final home game to
lead West Virginia to a 59-10 win over
Kansas.
Smith completed 23 of 24 passes and
became the first West Virginia quarter-
back to throw for 40 touchdowns in a
season. His 95.8 completion percentage
matched the single-game Bowl Subdivi-
sion record set by Tennessee's Tee Mar-
tin against South Carolina in 1998.
West Virginia (7-5, 4-5 Big 12) scored
touchdowns on five of its six first-half
possessions. Stedman Bailey had 159
receiving yards and two touchdowns to
boost his FBS-leading total to 23.
Kansas (1-11, 0-9) lost for the 11th
straight time, the longest streak at the
school since the Jayhawks lost 17
straight from 1953-55.
Pittsburgh 27,
South Florida 3
TAMPA- Ray Graham rushed for a
pair of touchdowns and went over
1,000 yards Saturday night to help
Pittsburgh become bowl eligible with a
27-3 rout of struggling South Florida.
Tino Sunseri threw for 211 yards and
one TD for the Panthers (6-6, 3-4 Big
East) to join Graham in giving Pitt a
3,000-yard passer and 1,000-yard
rusher in the same season for the first
time in school history.
USF (3-9, 1-6) finished its second
straight losing season by losing nine of
10 following a 2-0 start, a slide that could
cost coach Skip Holtz his job. A year ago,
the Bulls dropped seven of eight follow-


ing a 4-0 start that vaulted them into the
Top 25 before a 44-17 loss to Pitt.
Graham scored on a pair of 1-yard
runs, Sunseri tossed a 2-yard TD pass
to J.P. Holtz, and a Pitt defense that's
allowed just nine points the past two
weeks held USF 117 yards and forced
four turnovers, including three intercep-
tions of Matt Floyd in the redshirt fresh-
man's second career start.
Pitt bounced back from losing its first
two games to Youngstown State and
Cincinnati to qualify for a postseason
berth for the fifth straight season. Along
the way, the Panthers gave top-ranked
Notre Dame its toughest test before losing
in triple overtime. They also rebounded
from a disappointing loss to Connecticut
to upset Rutgers 21-6 and put themselves
in a position to extend their first season
under coach Paul Chryst.
Despite forcing turnovers on the
Bulls' first three possessions of the
game, Pitt only led 13-0 at the half.
Jason Hendricks' interception and 10-
yard return to the USF 21 set up Gra-
ham's TD and a sack-fumble led to
Kevin Harper's 25-yard field goal early
in the second quarter.
USF failed to take advantage of Mar-
cus Shaw's long kickoff return to the Pitt
48 when Floyd was intercepted for the
second time after moving his team to
third-and-goal at the Panthers 5. Line-
backer Todd Thomas broke on a throw in-
tended for Demetris Murray and returned
the pick 33 yards up the left sideline.
Sunseri extended his streak of con-
secutive passing attempts without an in-
terception to 270. However, Pitt failed to
establish much of a rhythm on offense
before getting in the end zone twice
within a five-minute stretch of the third
quarter. Graham's second TD put the
Panthers up by 20, and Sunseri's 19th
TD pass of the season made it 27-0.
USF fell to 16-21 under Holtz, who
led the Bulls to an 8-5 record and their
sixth consecutive bowl trip two years
ago. He inherited a program built from
scratch with expectations of contending
for Big East titles, but has gone 5-16 in
the conference.


CORVALLIS, Ore. Storm Woods
ran for two touchdowns in the first quar-
ter and No. 16 Oregon State put up its
highest point total ever, routing Nicholls
State 77-3 in a game postponed by
Hurricane Isaac.
The Beavers surpassed their 76-0
win over Willamette in 1931.
Oregon State (9-3) started playing its
substitutes against the lower-division
Colonels in taking a 35-0 halftime lead.
Markus Wheaton caught 12 passes for
123 yards and a touchdown and sat out
the second half.
Officials from both schools decided
to put off the Sept. 1 opener when the
storm bore down on the Colonels' cam-
pus in Thibodeaux, La.
The Beavers had a complete turn-
around from their 3-9 finish last year.
Oregon State is possibly headed to the
Holiday Bowl in San Diego on Dec. 27,
and representatives from that bowl and
the Alamo Bowl were in attendance.
The team will learn its destination on
Sunday.
Baylor 41,
No. 24 Oklahoma St. 34
WACO, Texas Lache Seastrunk
rushed for 178 yards, including a 76-
yard touchdown in the fourth quarter,
and Nick Florence passed for 296
yards as Baylor beat No. 24 Oklahoma
State 41-34.
Baylor (7-5, 4-5 Big 12) has won at
least seven games in three straight
seasons the first time the Bears
have done that since 1949-51.
Seastrunk's long scoring run gave


RENO, Nev. Joe Southwick threw
two touchdown passes to lead No. 25
Boise State to a 27-21 victory over Ne-
vada, earning the Broncos a share of
the Mountain West Conference title and
ensuring their nation's best seventh
consecutive 10-win season.
D.J. Harper ran for 130 yards for
Boise State (10-2, 7-1) and the Bron-
cos' defense put the clamps on a Ne-
vada offense that was averaging 38
points per game.
Stefphon Jefferson ran for 139 yards
and a touchdown and Cody Fajardo
passed for 203 yards and ran for 81 for
the Wolf Pack (7-5, 4-4), who lost four
of their last five games after starting the
season 6-1.
Matt Miller caught seven passes for
127 yards, including a 52-yard touch-
down from Southwick that put Boise
ahead late 24-7.
Cincinnati 34,
Connecticut 17
EAST HARTFORD, Conn. Bren-
don Kay threw two touchdown passes
to Travis Kelce, and caught one from
the big tight end on a trick play as
Cincinnati beat Connecticut 34-17.
The win gives the Bearcats (9-3) a
share of the Big East championship,
along with Louisville, Rutgers and Syra-
cuse, all of which ended the season
with 5-2 conference records. Cincin-
nati's two conference losses came to
the Cardinals and Scarlet Knights and
the Bearcats were not in the running for
the conference's Bowl Championship


B2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


Tulsa edges UCF 33-27 on Singleton's overtime TD


Associated Press

TULSA, Okla. -Alex Sin-
gleton ran for 100 yards and
plunged over the top for a 1-
yard score in overtime to lift
Tulsa to a 33-27 victory over
UCF on Saturday in the
Conference USA champi-
onship game.
Tulsa won the C-USA
championship for the first
time since 2005 and is off to
the Liberty Bowl.
Singleton came up with
just the second 100-yard
game of his career, breaking
the school record for touch-
downs in the process. He
also had a 7-yard score in
the second quarter to break


Tarrion Adams' mark with
his 40th overall touchdown
and 39 on the ground.
After Cory Dorris blocked
Shawn Moffitt's 38-yard field
goal on Central Florida's
possession to start overtime,
Tulsa (10-3) kept the ball on
the ground on five straight
plays. Singleton was initially
given a touchdown on sec-
ond-and-goal, but officials
ruled on replay that he was
down inside the 1.
That was no problem for
the burly back whose spe-
cialty is short yardage.
UCF quarterback Blake
Bortles accounted for three
touchdowns for UCF (9-4).
The Golden Hurricane


tied it at 27 with 5:06 re-
maining when Trey Watts
picked up a punt that had
been batted forward by
UCF's Kemal Ishmael and
raced 54 yards up the Tulsa
sideline for a touchdown.
A.J. Bouye blocked Daniel
Schwarz's extra-point at-
tempt to preserve the tie.
Tulsa limited Latavius
Murray to short gains and
then forced an incomplete
pass by Bortles in overtime,
leading to Moffitt's field
goal try
The Golden Hurricane
dumped a cooler on coach
Bill Blankenship after what
looked like the game-win-
ning touchdown, but got to


celebrate again after Single-
ton's "second" score. Offen-
sive lineman Jared Grigg
zoomed around the field to
hold up a Conference USA
champions sign to the crowd,
and the team mobbed near
midfield to accept a bid to
the Liberty Bowl.
UCF will play in the Beef
'O' Brady's Bowl.
It was the third time the
teams have met in the Con-
ference USA championship
game since 2005, and the
last chance for it to happen
before UCF departs for the
Big East next season.
Tulsa won it in '05, with
the Golden Knights taking
the crown in '07.


I E- U J U A AL
Associated Press
Tulsa's Daeshon Bufford sacks Central Florida quarterback
Blake Bortles on Saturday during the second half of the Con-
ference USA championship at Chapman Stadium in Tulsa, Okla.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BAMA
Continued from Page B1

the corner but it was de-
flected at the line, winding
up in the arms of Chris Con-
ley out in the right flats.
Surprised to get the ball,
he slipped down at the 5.
Georgia couldn't get off
another play. Alabama cele-
brated as confetti fell from
the Georgia Dome roof. The
Bulldogs collapsed on the
field, stunned they had
come so close to knocking
off the team that has won
two of the last three na-
tional titles.
The Tide will get a chance
to make it three out of four
when they face top-ranked
Notre Dame for the BCS
crown on Jan. 7 in Miami.
"I'm ready to have heart
attack here," Alabama
coach Nick Saban said.
For the Bulldogs (11-2),
the consolation prize will
likely be a spot in the Capi-
tal One Bowl, though they
certainly looked like a team
deserving of a BCS bid.
Georgia coach Mark Richt
said his team had the play it
wanted at the end, but Ala-
bama ruined it by getting a
hand on the ball. And if it
had fallen incomplete in-
stead of going to Conley, who
instinctively caught it, the
Bulldogs could have tried
another play
"I told the guys I was dis-
appointed, but I'm not dis-
appointed in them," Richt
said. "They're warriors. We
had a chance at the end."
In a back-and-forth sec-
ond half that looked nothing
like a game in the defensive-
minded SEC, the Crimson
Tide trailed 21-10 after Alec
Ogletree returned a blocked
field goal for a touchdown
in the third quarter.
Alabama rallied behind a
punishing run game, finish-
ing with 350 yards on the
ground, an SEC champi-
onship game record. Eddie
Lacy the game's MVP -
rumbled for 181 yards on 20
carries, including two TDs.
Freshman TJ. Yeldon added
153 yards on 25 carries, also
scoring a TD.
But the Tide won it
through the air.
With Georgia stacking the
line, McCarron fooled the
Bulldogs with play action
and delivered a perfectly
thrown pass to Cooper, who
beat Damian Swann in single
coverage down the left side.
Georgia played like a
champion, too.
Using up their timeouts
and forcing a punt, the Bull-
dogs got the ball back at
their 15 with 1:16 remain-
ing. Alabama broke into a
celebration when a pass
down the middle for Conley
was deflected and Dee
Milliner appeared to make
a diving interception. But
the replay showed the ball
hit the ground, so Murray
and the Georgia offense
trotted back on the field for
their last gasp.
And what a gasp it was.
Just not quite enough.
Todd Gurley led Georgia
with 122 yards rushing, in-
cluding a couple of TDs.
Murray was 18 of 33 for 265
yards with one touchdown
and one interception.
McCarron was 12 of 21 for
162 yards with an intercep-
tion, just his third of the year
After a defensive slugfest
in the first half, the final two
quarters were nothing but
run-and-gun.
Alabama running. Geor-
gia gunning.
Trailing 10-7, Georgia
took the kickoff to start the
second half and marched
down the field for a go-
ahead touchdown. Gurley
ran it seven times, capped
by leg-churning, 3-yard
drive up the middle to make
it 14-10.


I ,U varegun i aie ff No. 25 Boise State 27,
Nicholls State3 N 2
Nevada 21





NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


NFL playoff picture



starts taking shape


Associated Press
The New England Patriots' Julian Edelman returned a fumble for a touchdown against the
New York Jets on Nov. 22. The takeway was one of 32 the Patriots have in 11 games.


Associated Press
The playoff picture could
get crystal clear this weekend.
Yeah, it's early, yet half the di-
vision races could be over by
Sunday night, with Baltimore,
New England, Denver and
Atlanta owning titles.
The simplest route can be
traversed by the Broncos
and Patriots. Win and
they're in: Denver at home
to Tampa Bay, and New
England at Miami.
If the Broncos fall to the
Buccaneers, they still win
the AFC West if San Diego
loses at home to Cincinnati.
Baltimore can eliminate
visiting Pittsburgh from
winning the AFC North by
beating its archrival, and
then can grab the division
crown if Cincinnati loses at
Oakland.
Houston, which shares the
best record in the league with
Atlanta at 10-1, can't clinch
the AFC South this week, but
it can earn at least a wild-
card spot with a victory or
losses by two of the following
three: Miami, Cincinnati and
Pittsburgh. The Texans are at
Tennessee.
New England (8-3)
at Miami (5-6)
An unstoppable offense (407
points, 80 more than the next
team), incredible turnover mar-
gin (plus-24, AFC-high 32 take-
aways and conference-low eight
giveaways) and a five-game win-
ning streak have lifted the Patri-
ots back to their accustomed
role as a Super Bowl favorite.
The Dolphins rarely chal-
lenge the Patriots, who have
won 12 in a row overall in De-
cember. In their last four wins at
Miami, the Pats have averaged
44 points a game.
"Plus 24 is what I see," Dol-
phins coach Joe Philbin says of
the Patriots' mastery in the divi-
sion. They take the ball away...
and then they lead the league
with only eight giveaways."
Pittsburgh (6-5)
at Baltimore (9-2)
The Ravens won in Pitts-
burgh two weeks ago and the
Steelers are reeling with no
passing offense as Ben Roeth-
lisberger recovers from shoul-
der and rib injuries. This is one
of the NFL's most intense rival-
ries, and the last thing the
Steelers want is to put Balti-
more in position to grab the
AFC North championship.
Ray Rice gained 30 yards on
fourth-and-29 with the game on
the line in last week's Ravens
win at San Diego. No matter
what the Ravens do Sunday -
or for the rest of the season for
that matter that figures to go
down as the play of the year.
Cincinnati (6-5)
at San Diego (4-7)
If the Bengals don't stumble
against weak competition, they
will go into the final two weeks
of the schedule with a great
shot at a wild card. They've
done well so far during this hia-
tus from tough competition,
beating Kansas City and Oak-
land, and they finish their stint in
the AFC West against the spi-
raling Chargers, who have lost
three straight and six of seven.
Dallas and Philadelphia fol-
low for the Bengals before they
close with division rivals Pitts-
burgh and Baltimore.
San Diego seems to invent
new ways to flop. If the Charg-
ers get Cincinnati in a fourth-
and-29, they are doomed.
Houston (10-1)
at Tennessee (4-7)
When the Texans won 10


times last year, making the
playoffs for the first time, it was
a franchise record. They are on
pace to shatter that and are the
league's only unbeaten team
on the road at 5-0.
The Titans need not worry
about such lofty things. After
losing at Jacksonville, their play-
off chances are just about gone.
Seattle (6-5)
at Chicago (8-3)
The Seahawks are the most
schizophrenic team in the
league, going 5-0 at home and
1-5 away. Their loss at Miami
last Sunday, in which they faded
down the stretch, means a vic-
tory at Soldier Field is even more
important for them to stay in con-
trol of the final wild-card spot.
Seattle has won three of the last
four regular-season matchups.
Chicago won't be at full
strength after a slew of injuries
hit in last weekend's win over
Minnesota. But if the revamped
offensive line can give Jay Cut-
ler enough time to throw, and
the defense does its usual job
of applying pressure to the
quarterback in this case,
rookie Russell Wilson the
Bears should be in good shape.
Minnesota (6-5)
at Green Bay (74)
Green Bay leads the NFC
wild-card chase and is one
game in back of Chicago in the
NFC North, but it could be a
rough go the last month for the
Packers if they don't get healthy.
They barely showed up at the
Giants last week, and with Clay
Matthews, Greg Jennings and
Charles Woodson hobbled, their
depth is being tested.
The Vikings figure to hand off
to Adrian Peterson as much as
possible, and if the Packers
can't slow him down, then not
having a fully healthy Percy
Harvin at wideout won't be criti-
cal for Minnesota.
Minnesota DE Jared Allen
has had some of his best sacks
performances against the Pack.
San Fran. (8-2-1)
at St. Louis (4-6-1)
Niners coach Jim Harbaugh
seemed amused when asked if
this seemed like a continuation
of the 24-24 tie of Nov. 11 -
the first NFL draw since 2008.
He definitely was not
amused by the lengthy line of
questioning he's gotten about
going with second-year QB
Colin Kaepernick over incum-
bent Alex Smith, who sustained
a concussion against the Rams
but now is healthy.
"The rationale is you've got
two quarterbacks that we feel
great about as the starting
quarterback," said Harbaugh, a
former QB himself. "Both have
earned it. Both deserve it."
N.Y. Giants (7-4)
at Washington (5-6)
These teams staged one of
the season's best games at the
Meadowlands, a 27-23 Giants
win on Oct. 21. Robert Griffin III
has helped the Redskins climb
back into wild-card contention,
and a victory here would put
them one game behind the de-
fending Super Bowl champions
in the NFC East.
New York played extremely
well last Sunday night in romp-
ing past Green Bay, breaking a
two-game slide.
Indianapolis (7-4)
at Detroit (4-7)
The Colts can reach eight
wins one season after going 2-
14 and earning the top selec-
tion in the draft. Quarterback
Andrew Luck has been superb
at home, but is 2-3 on the road.
Luck certainly has the play-


I


makers to match up with De-
troit's second-ranked offense in
veteran Reggie Wayne and
emerging youngsters T.Y. Hilton
and Dwayne Allen. And the
Colts have been far more disci-
plined than the Lions, who are
fortunate that DT Ndamukong
Suh was only fined and not
suspended for kicking Houston
quarterback Matt Schaub in the
groin on Thanksgiving Day.
Philadelphia (3-8)
at Dallas (5-6)
Dallas remains on the fringe of
playoff contention, which is a lot
more than anyone can say about
Philly. As the Andy Reid era
winds down, the Eagles have
lost seven in a row, including to
the Cowboys three weeks ago.
For the Cowboys to actually
have a shot at making the post-
season, they must do better in
the turnover department. They
are minus-11, which is awful,
yet better than Philadelphia's
minus-17. This is an opportu-
nity for them to take advantage
of the Eagles' charitable ways,
but Dallas has lost its last eight
Sunday night games.
Carolina (3-8) at
Kansas City (1-10)
Cam Newton feasted on the
Eagles' inept defense on Mon-
day night. Kansas City is much
more of a challenge because at
least the Chiefs seem to be try-
ing, despite losing eight straight.
KC can run the ball with Ja-
maal Charles, which is critical
considering how poorly Chiefs
QBs have performed. Panthers
rookie LB Luke Kuechly already
has 128 tackles and figures to
get a bunch more at Arrowhead
Stadium.
Arizona (4-7)
at N.Y. Jets (4-7)
What does it say about Ari-
zona's offer hense when the best
quarterback on the field at the
Meadowlands will be Mark
Sanchez?
The Cardinals, despite hav-
ing star receiver Larry Fitzger-
ald and the return of running
back Beanie Wells from injury,
are impotent. They rank 31st
overall with the ball and have
scored a measly 180 points,
better then only Kansas City.
Sanchez will try not to run
into any of his offensive linemen
this week as the Jets attempt to
avoid the turnovers that have
helped derail their season.
Jacksonville (2-9)
at Buffalo (4-7)
Chad Henne has provided
some spark to a previously dor-
mant offense, and that's gotten
top draft pick Justin Blackmon
more involved. Second-year re-
ceiver Cecil Shorts III also has
emerged.
But the Jaguars still are a
weak team, and the Bills can be
productive with the ball at
home, where they begin a
three-game stand albeit the
Dec. 16 match with Seattle is in
Toronto. Buffalo has averaged
29 points a game at Orchard
Park, where the potentially icy
conditions wouldn't help Jack-
sonville a bit.
Cleveland (3-8) at
Oakland (3-8)
Not much to pump up here,
although the Browns could win
a second straight game for the
first time since Sept. 25 of
last year. Trent Richardson is
closing in on the rookie rushing
mark for the Browns, held by
Jim Brown (942 yards in 1957).
He could have a romp
through the most porous de-
fense in the league: Oakland
has yielded 169 points in drop-
ping its last four games.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NFL standings


New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland

Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


N.Y Giants
Washington
Dallas
Philadelphia

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona


AFC
East
W L T
6 3 0
5 6 0
4 7 0
4 7 0
South
W L T
10 1 0
7 4 0
4 7 0
2 9 0
North
W L T
9 2 0
6 5 0
6 5 0
3 8 0
West
W L T
8 3 0
4 7 0
3 8 0
1 10 0
NFC
East
W L T
7 4 0
5 6 0
5 6 0
3 8 0
South
W L T
11 1 0
6 5 0
5 7 0
3 8 0
North
W L T
8 3 0
7 4 0
6 5 0
4 7 0
West
W L T
8 2 1
6 5 0
4 6 1
4 7 0
470


Pct PF
.727 407
.455 211
.364 221
.364 243
Pct PF
.909 327
.636 230
.364 238
.182 188
Pct PF
.818 283
.545 231
.545 282
.273 209
Pct PF
.727 318
.364 245
.273 218
.091 161

Pct PF
.636 305
.455 295
.455 242
.273 184
Pct PF
.917 317
.545 310
.417 321
.273 214
Pct PF
.727 277
.636 273
.545 248
.364 267
Pct PF
.773 276
.545 219
.409 205
.364 180


Thursday's Game
Atlanta 23, New Orleans 13
Today's Games
Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Kansas City 1 p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 6
Denver at Oakland, 8:20 p.m.


Glantz-Culver Line
For Dec. 2
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
at Chicago 4 3V2 (37V2) Seattle
at Green Bay 9 8/2 (46) Minnesota
San Francisco 7 7V2 (402) at St. Louis
at N.Y. Jets 3/2 5 (37) Arizona
Carolina 1 3 (40Y2) at Kan. City
at Detroit 412 6 (5112) Indianapolis
at Buffalo 6 6 (44/2) Jacksonville
New England 7 7/2 (5112) at Miami
Houston 4/2 6/2 (47) at Tennessee
at Denver 6/2 712 (50/2) Tampa Bay
at Baltimore 8 8 (35) Pittsburgh
Cleveland Pk 2 (38'2) at Oakland
Cincinnati +1 2 (46) at San Diego
at Dallas 9 10/2 (43) Philadelphia
Tomorrow
N.Y Giants Pk 2/2 (51) atWashington



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 11 4 .733 -
Brooklyn 11 5 .688 V2
Philadelphia 10 7 .588 2
Boston 9 8 .529 3
Toronto 4 13 .235 8
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 12 3 .800 -
Atlanta 9 5 .643 2/2
Charlotte 7 8 .467 5
Orlando 5 10 .333 7
Washington 1 13 .071 10'/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 8 7 .533 -
Chicago 8 7 .533 -
Indiana 8 8 .500 /2
Detroit 5 12 .294 4
Cleveland 4 13 .235 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 12 2 .857 -
San Antonio 13 4 .765 V2
Houston 8 8 .500 5
Dallas 7 9 .438 6
New Orleans 4 11 .267 8/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 14 4 .778 -
Utah 9 9 .500 5
Denver 8 9 .471 5/2
Minnesota 7 8 .467 5/2
Portland 7 10 .412 6/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Golden State 9 6 .600 -
L.A. Clippers 9 6 .600
L.A. Lakers 8 8 .500 1'/2
Phoenix 7 10 .412 3
Sacramento 4 11 .267 5
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 104, Charlotte 98
Toronto 101, Phoenix 97
Brooklyn 98, Orlando 86
Boston 96, Portland 78
Cleveland 113, Atlanta 111
New York 108, Washington 87
Minnesota 95, Milwaukee 85
Memphis 90, Detroit 78
Oklahoma City 106, Utah 94
Indiana 97, Sacramento 92
L.A. Lakers 122, Denver 103
Saturday's Games
Portland 118, Cleveland 117,20T
Miami 102, Brooklyn 89
Chicago 93, Philadelphia 88
Houston 124, Utah 116
Oklahoma City 100, New Orleans 79
Milwaukee 91, Boston 88
Memphis at San Antonio, late
Detroit at Dallas, late
Indiana at Golden State, late
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Phoenix at NewYork, 12 p.m.
Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Portland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Orlando at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


FOr lthei record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
5-3-3
CASH 3 (late)
7-0-9

S PLAY 4 (early)
3-0-1-9
PLAY 4 (late)
9-2-4-4

FANTASY 5
S Ltty 13- 22 -26 -27 -34

POWERBALL LOTTERY
3-10-19-36-46 2-5-33-45-48-50
POWER BALL XTRA
3 3


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASKETBALL
12:15 p.m. (FSNFL) BB&T Classic George Washington
vs. Manhattan
2:45 p.m. (FSNFL) BB&T Classic George Mason vs.
Maryland
NBA
9:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Los Angeles Lakers
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) New England Patriots at Miami Dolphins
4 p.m. (CBS) Pittsburgh Steelers at Baltimore Ravens
4 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Denver Broncos
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Eagles at Dallas Cowboys
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. (SUN) ACC Championship Florida State vs.
Georgia Tech (Taped)
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Bowl Selection Special
GOLF
7:30 a.m. (GOLF) Nedbank Golf Challenge Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) Golf World Challenge Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC, GOLF) Golf World Challenge Final Round
8:30 p.m. (GOLF) World Challenge Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
RUGBY
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series (Taped)
TENNIS
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Champions Series: Surprise. Courier vs.
McEnroe (Taped)
SKIING
1 p.m. (NBC) USSA Birds of Prey (Taped)
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) USSA Birds of Prey: Slalom Run 1 (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


GolfBRIEF


McDowell holds
World Challenge lead
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. -
Graeme McDowell rolled in two
long putts early in the round
Saturday and ran his streak to
29 holes without a bogey on his
way to a 4-under 68 and a two-
shot lead over Keegan Bradley
going into the final round of the
World Challenge.
McDowell hasn't won any-
where in the world since he ral-
lied from four shots behind and
beat Tiger Woods in a playoff at
this event two years ago, cap-
ping off a dream season in
which he won the U.S. Open
and the decisive match for Eu-
rope in the Ryder Cup.



SURVIVE
Continued from Page B1

game didn't start out in
Lecanto's favor. The
Raiders found a boost from
their returning football
players, and their athleti-
cism caught Lecanto off
guard. Lecanto found itself
being dominated on the
boards early, as South
Sumter nabbed 10 rebounds
to the Panthers' 4 in the first
quarter.
Lecanto senior Richie
Rizzolo found his mark from
long range, scoring 6 of the
Panthers' 12 points from be-
hind the arc. But the re-
mainder of Lecanto's
offense was negated by the
lack of second-chance shots.
But come the second
quarter, Makros would start
to heat up.
He scored eight straight
points for the Panthers in
the second, as the team be-
came more physical in the
post. They would outre-
bound the Raiders 13-8 in
the second quarter, the
brunt of the work being put
in by Lecanto's Geoffrey
Ruiz, who ended with a
game-high 11 rebounds.
But despite the offensive
surge, South Sumter would
keep their six-point lead
going into the half.
"South Sumter's speed
and athleticism threw us off
a little bit," Lecanto head
coach Frank Vilardi said.
"This was the most athletic
team we've seen, and it took
us a bit to get used to it and
adjust to the speed."
By the time the third


This time, he'll be the one
protecting a lead.
Bradley said he had to cope
with more fallout on the proposed
ban of the belly putting stroke
when one man in the gallery
called him a "cheater." It doesn't
take much to motivate the former
PGA champion, and it didn't
keep him from a 67 that put him
in the final pairing with McDowell.
Woods, the tournament host
and five-time champion at Sher-
wood Country Club, kept himself
in the game. Even though
Woods failed to birdie any of the
five par 5s, he picked up a pair
of birdies on the final two par 3s
and added a third to salvage a
69 that left him five shots behind.
From wire reports


quarter came, Lecanto
looked like a different team.
Rizzolo would start the
party out with five points, on
his way to 16 for the game.
But Lecanto made its stride
when Dupler went on his
seven-point tear late.
After coming out of half-
time down six, the Panthers
would enter the final frame
up by two.
But it wouldn't be long
until South Sumter found it-
self on top again. And that's
exactly when senior Makros
would take over
A rapid-fire pace laid way
to seven quick points and
gave Lecanto a lead it would
never relinquish.
Makros credits his team-
mates for his run, mainly
because they kept telling
him to shoot.
"I wasn't making any shots
during the game," Makros
said. "But the team just told
me to keep shooting. They
didn't give up on me, and
they kept my confidence up.
But honestly, I think the
game goes to Connor. With-
out his run, we wouldn't
have won this game."
Lecanto remains unde-
feated with the win, but it
definitely wasn't an easy
one.
"We just battled tonight,"
Vilardi said. "We played last
night, so we didn't have great
legs tonight, but our second
group stepped up and gave
our starters just enough time
to rest, and finish.
South Sumter came in
and played great but we just
had to grind it out," Vilardi
continued. "Overall, it was
an outstanding effort by our
kids."


Citrus grapplers take 2nd


Hurricanes wrestling runner-up

ofAvon Park Duals meet


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus wrestling team
completed a 4-1 record at the
Avon Park Duals on Saturday
for a second-place finish out
of 12 teams.
Citrus went 3-0 to reach
the four-team championship
round after downing Winter
Haven (40-31), Frostproof (48-
33) and Braden River (39-36).
The Hurricanes suffered a
loss to eventual champion
Tampa Freedom (57-19) be-


fore rebounding to down
Bayshore (42-39) for the run-
ner-up spot
The match against
Bayshore was particularly
notable because the Hurri-
canes trailed 39-6 before
winning six straight matches
via pin to score 36 unan-
swered points for the three-
point victory
Missing a wrestler at 113
pounds and 120 pounds, the
Hurricanes gave up 12 points
each match due to forfeit


Standout wrestlers for Cit-
rus included:
145 pounds: Jacob Nolen
5-0 (4 pins and a major deci-
sion).
152/160 pounds: Perry Re-
neer 3-2 (3 pins).
152/160 pounds: Tarique
Cabanas 3-2 (3 pins).
170 pounds: Casey Bear-
den 5-0 (3 pins and 2 deci-
sions).
195/220 pounds: Nick Fer-
nandez 3-1.
195/220 pounds: Brandon
Taylor 2-0.
220 pounds: Miciaha Ivey
1-0.
285 pounds: Jonathan Log-
gins 3-2 (3 pins).


Associated Press


CHARLOTTE, N.C. James Wilder Jr
ran two touchdowns as No. 13 Florida State
held off Georgia Tech 21-15 Saturday night
to capture its first Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence championship since 2005 and earn a
trip to the Orange Bowl.
It was Florida State's 13th ACC title.
The heavily favored Seminoles (11-2)
built a 21-6 lead at the half and held on to
win, helping to erase some of the sting from
last week's 37-26 loss to their bitter rival,
No. 4 Florida.
Despite its record, Georgia Tech (6-7) is
bowl eligible after receiving a waiver from
the NCAA on Thursday
It looked like Georgia Tech, a two-touch-
down underdog, might get blown out, but
the game wasn't decided until Karlos
Williams intercepted Tevin Washington


with less than a minute remaining.
The Yellow Jackets slowed down the
Seminoles in the second half and forced
two turnovers by quarterback EJ Manuel to
get back in the game.
Defensive end Emmanuel Dieke jarred
the ball from Manuel's grasp and recovered
the loose the fumble in the third quarter.
Washington, who hadn't completed a pass
all game, suddenly came alive, hitting Chris
Milton for a gain of 18 yards and B.J. Bostic
for 32 yards to reach the Florida State 3.
Robert Godhigh picked up a critical first
down on fourth-and-1 and Washington
scored his 19th touchdown of the season on
the following play to cut Florida State's
lead to 21-15 with 6:27 left in the game.
Georgia Tech coach Paul Johnson curi-
ously went for 2 and failed, meaning the
Seminoles only had to add a field goal to
make it a two-possession game.


Majerus passes away at 64


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Rick
Majerus, the jovial basket-
ball-obsessed coach who led
Utah to the 1998 NCAA final
and had only one losing sea-
son in 25 years with four
schools, died Saturday He
was 64.
Utah industrialist Jon



BELCHER
Continued from Page B1

consecutive losses, injuries
too numerous to count, dis-
content among fans and the
prospect that Pioli and Cren-
nel could be fired at season's
end.
Authorities did not release
a possible motive while piec-
ing together the case, other
than to note that Belcher and
his girlfriend, 22-year-old
Kasandra M. Perkins, had


MARTIN
Continued from Page B1

Oct 25, then ran for 251 yards
- highest total in the league
this year in a 42-32 win
over Oakland on Nov 4.
Schiano says his rookie
running back reminds him of
Baltimore's Ray Rice, the 5-
foot-8, 215-pound two-time
Pro Bowler who Schiano
coached at Rutgers. Martin is
5-9,210.
"They both have some
unique abilities: vision, pa-
tience, balance, strength,
those kinds of things that
allow them to be really good
running backs," Schiano says.


Huntsman, the coach's long-
time friend, confirmed in a
statement released through
The Salt Lake Tribune that
Majerus died of heart fail-
ure in a Los Angeles hospi-
tal. The coach had been
hospitalized there for sev-
eral months.
Players remembered Ma-
jerus, who got his start as an

been arguing frequently
The two of them left be-
hind a 3-month-old girl. She
was being cared for by
family
The Chiefs issued a state-
ment that said their game
Sunday afternoon against the
Carolina Panthers would go
on as scheduled, even as the
franchise tried to come to
grips with the awfulness of
Belcher's death.
"The entire Chiefs family is
deeply saddened by today's
events, and our collective
hearts are heavy with sympa-

"Some of those things you
can develop and some of
them are God given, and
that's what makes those two
special."
For his part, Martin says he
knew the Buccaneers were
among the teams most inter-
ested in him as the draft ap-
proached, while he hadn't
heard much from the Bron-
cos.
"I had a good feeling, be-
cause earlier on, I got a call
from Tampa Bay, and they
were just seeing if I was basi-
cally still alive and still mov-
ing," Martin says.
Though the Broncos failed
to land Martin, they still
made some productive picks
in the draft


assistant under Al McGuire
at Marquette, as a coach
who was exacting and per-
haps a bit unorthodox at
times, but always fair. Ma-
jerus was known for assem-
bling rosters with an
international flair, and his
final team at Saint Louis
had players from Australia
and New Zealand.


thy, thoughts and prayers for
the families and friends af-
fected by this unthinkable
tragedy," Chiefs chairman
Clark Hunt said in brief a
statement
A spokesman for the team
told The Associated Press
that Crennel plans to coach
on Sunday
"I can tell you that you
have absolutely no idea what
it's like to see someone kill
themselves," said Kansas
City Mayor Sly James, who
spoke to Pioli shortly after
the shootings.

The second-round choice
they received from Tampa
Bay turned into defensive
tackle Derek Wolfe, who has
started every game and
picked up three sacks.
The Broncos filled their
running back needs in the
third round by choosing Ron-
nie Hillman out of San Diego
State; Hillman has given the
Broncos depth and provided
a change of pace. He has 52
carries for 197 yards.
Meanwhile, Knowshon
Moreno, a former first-round
draft pick, filled in for the in-
jured Willis McGahee last
week He rushed for 85 yards
in a 17-9 win over Kansas City
and is expected to start again
Sunday


'Noles bowling


Associated Press
Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel throws a pass against Georgia Tech during the first half
of the ACC Championship on Saturday in Charlotte, N.C. The No. 13 Seminoles will get a
BCS bowl bid after holding on for a 21-15 victory against the Yellow Jackets.


FSU fend offGTto win ACC championship


B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 2 Duke hammers Delaware 88-50


Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Ryan
Kelly scored 15 of his 18
points in the decisive first
half and No. 2 Duke routed
Delaware 88-50 on Saturday
Mason Plumlee added 18
points and 11 rebounds for
the Blue Devils (8-0). They
never trailed, shot 52 percent,
led by 46 and enjoyed a rare
breather after a challenging
run of games against nation-
ally ranked opponents.
Seth Curry, the other
scholarship senior on the
roster, missed the first game
of his career at Duke with
an injured ankle. Against
the struggling Blue Hens (2-
6), the Blue Devils certainly
didn't need him.
Devon Saddler had 23
points for Delaware.
No. 1 Indiana 87,
Coppin State 51
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -Vic-
tor Oladipo and Will Sheehey
both scored 14 points to lead
No. 1 Indiana to an 87-51 win
over Coppin State.
The top-ranked Hoosiers (8-
0) overcame poor shooting at
the start of the game and pulled
away from the Eagles (1-6). In-
diana missed its first nine shots
and didn't take the lead until
Christian Watford's 3-pointer
with 9:25 left in the first half.
That gave Indiana a 14-11
lead, and the Hoosiers never
trailed again. Watford and
RemyAbell both added 10
points to the winning effort.
No. 3 Michigan 74,
Bradley 66
PEORIA, Ill. Freshman Nik
Stauskas scored 22 points in
his first start and Michigan sur-
vived a late run to get the win.
Stauskas started for Matt Vo-
grich and had eight first-half
points to help the Wolverines
(7-0) to a narrow 34-30 lead at
the break.
Walt Lemon Jr. led Bradley
(5-2) on a late run to close to
70-65 in the final minute. But the
Braves were forced to foul and
the Wolverines held on to win.
No. 4 Ohio State 70,
N. Kentucky 43
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
LaQuinton Ross scored a ca-
reer-high 22 points to lead cold-
shooting Ohio State past
Northern Kentucky.


Ohio State (5-1) rebounded
from a 73-68 loss to No. 2 Duke
on Wednesday night in which
the Buckeyes led most of the
way but faded at the finish. They
had another bad shooting game
against the Norse (0-5), making
only 38 percent of their shots.
Deshaun Thomas added 14
points, and Sam Thompson
scored 10 for the Buckeyes,
who opened an eight-game
homestand.
No. 5 Louisville 69,
Illinois State 66
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Russ
Smith scored 24 points and
Peyton Siva added 20, includ-
ing four 3-pointers, to lead
Louisville to the win.
Down three, Illinois State's
Tyler Brown airballed a 3-
pointer with 8 seconds left that
was saved by BryantAllen to
Jackie Carmichael. Carmichael
found Brown for another chance
at overtime, drawing consider-
able contact from Louisville's
Chane Behanan as the buzzer
sounded. But no foul was called
and the shot was off, giving
Louisville (6-1) the win.
Baylor 64,
No. 8 Kentucky 55
LEXINGTON, Ky. Ken-
tucky's 54-game winning streak
at Rupp Arena is over.
Pierre Jackson scored 17
points and Isaiah Austin and
A.J. Walton each added 11 for
the Bears (5-2). Brady Heslip
and Cory Jefferson each added
10 points and Baylor beat the
Wildcats for the first time in
eight tries.
Baylor shot 41 percent but
held Kentucky (4-3) to 30 per-
cent from the floor.
Archie Goodwin scored 17
points for Kentucky before foul-
ing out with 1:44 remaining in
the game.
No. 9 Arizona 85,
Texas Tech 57
LUBBOCK, Texas Nick
Johnson scored 18 points to
lead No. 9 Arizona to a 85-57
win over Texas Tech, keeping
the Wildcats unbeaten.
Solomon Hill and Mark
Lyons each added 14 points for
Arizona. Kaleb Tarczewski
pulled down 13 rebounds for
the Wildcats (5-0).
Texas Tech kept it close early
but Arizona steadily pulled
away for the easy win. The


Wildcats, averaging 10 3-point-
ers a game coming into the
contest, hit eight from beyond
the arc on 22 attempts
No. 11 Creighton 80,
Saint Joseph's 51
OMAHA, Neb. Doug Mc-
Dermott scored 18 of his 23
points in the first half, helping
Creighton to the easy win.
Gregory Echenique added
16 points and six rebounds for
the Bluejays (7-1), who
bounced back after being upset
by Boise State on Wednesday.
Langston Galloway scored
10 points for the Hawks (4-2),
who played their first true road
game. Carl Jones, who had 29
points in a win over Creighton
last season, was held to nine.
No. 12 Gonzaga 85,
Pacific 67
SPOKANE, Wash. Sam
Dower scored 18 points and
No. 12 Gonzaga beat Pacific
85-67, tying the team record for
most wins to open a season.
Elias Harris added 17 points
for Gonzaga (8-0), which tied
the 1994-95 squad for most
wins to start the season. Gon-
zaga's next game is Wednes-
day at Washington State.
Travis Fulton led Pacific (3-4)
with 15 points. Lorenzo Mc-
Cloud had 14.
No. 13 Mich. St. 84,
Nicholls State 39
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Keith Appling scored 13 points
and Michigan State used a big
run in the first half to grab con-
trol in the victory.
Michigan State (6-2) led 10-
9 eight minutes into the game
before outscoring the Colonels
27-4 during the rest of the
opening half.
No. 14 UNC 102,
UAB 84
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Leslie McDonald scored a ca-
reer-high 24 points in his first
career start, powering North
Carolina to the win.
James Michael McAdoo
added 15 points and 12 re-
bounds as part of a balanced
offensive showing for the Tar
Heels (6-2).
North Carolina was coming
off an ugly loss at No. 1 Indiana,
but the Tar Heels regrouped de-
spite playing without starting
freshman point guard Marcus


Associated Press
Duke's Mason Plumlee blocks a shot by Delaware's Jamelle Hagins during the second half
Saturday in Durham, N.C.


Paige due to a shoulder injury.
Va. Tech 81,
No. 15 Okla. St. 71
BLACKSBURG, Va. Erick
Green scored 28 points and hit
eight critical free throws in the
final 76 seconds to help Virginia
Tech remain unbeaten.
Robert Brown added 18
points and Jarell Eddie had 15
points and 12 rebounds for the
Hokies (7-0) and first-year
coach James Johnson.
Le'Bryan Nash and Marcus
Smart scored 18 each to lead
the Cowboys (5-1).
No. 16 Missouri 72,
Appalachian St. 56
COLUMBIA, Mo. Lau-
rence Bowers matched his ca-


reer high with 23 points despite
taking just one shot in the sec-
ond half, leading Missouri to
the victory in its first game
since embattled guard Michael
Dixon announced he would
transfer.
Earnest Ross added 13 point
and eight rebounds for the Tigers
(6-1), who have won 69 in a row
at home against non-conference
opponents dating to 2005.
Jay Canty had a career-high
29 points for Appalachian State
(1-6).
No. 17 Cincinnati 58,
Alabama 56
CINCINNATI Cashmere
Wright's fadeaway jumper at
the buzzer gave Cincinnati the
victory in a matchup of stingy


unbeaten teams.
In the final seconds, Cincin-
nati (7-0) was a bit better on
defense.
Trevor Releford had a chance
to give Alabama (6-1) the lead,
but Justin Jackson swatted away
his driving jump shot. Cincinnati
got the rebound and called time-
out with 6 seconds left.
No. 21 Minnesota 87,
N. Florida 59
MINNEAPOLIS Rodney
Williams had 15 points and
eight rebounds to power Min-
nesota to the win.
Austin Hollins added 12
points for the Gophers (8-1),
winners of four straight. Trevor
Mbakwe and Joe Coleman had
11 points each.


Heat singe Nets


Wade drops

34 in 102-89

Miami win

Associated Press

MIAMI Dwyane Wade
scored a season-high 34
points, LeBron James
added 21 points and the
Miami Heat rallied from a
14-point deficit to beat the
Brooklyn Nets 102-89 on
Saturday night
Ray Allen scored 13 and
Norris Cole finished with
12 for the Heat, who won
their sixth straight and re-
mained atop the Eastern
Conference. Miami held the
Nets to 30 points in the sec-
ond half.
Andray Blatche scored 20
points for Brooklyn, which
had won five in a row. Ger-
ald Wallace had 13 points,
Joe Johnson added 12 and
Deron Williams finished
with 10 points and 12 assists.
The Nets were 10 for 31
from the field in the second
half and lost to Miami for
the 12th straight time.
Thunder 100,
Hornets 79
NEW ORLEANS Kevin
Durant scored 20 points, Rus-
sell Westbrook added 18
points and 10 assists, and the
Oklahoma City Thunder won
their fifth straight game, 100-79
over the struggling New Or-
leans Hornets.
The two Thunder stars did
all their work in first three quar-
ters, resting for the final period
after helping their club build a
27-point lead.
Kevin Martin added 19 points
and Nick Collison 12 in reserve
roles for Oklahoma City, which
has won nine of 10, including its
last four by double digits.
Ryan Anderson had 21


.A. ..and Al Jefferson and Randy


Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade goes up for a s
Brooklyn Nets forward Jerry Stackhouse during
Saturday in Miami.


points and 10 rebounds for
New Orleans, but was only 3 of
11 on 3-point attempts, nor-
mally his strength. Robin Lopez
added 12 points and Roger
Mason Jr. 11 for the Hornets,
who have lost nine of 10.
Bulls 93, 76ers 88
CHICAGO Luol Deng
scored a game-high 25 points
and the Chicago Bulls beat the
Philadelphia 76ers 93-88.
Deng also had a season-
high seven assists and has led
the team in scoring in consecu-
tive games. He scored 22 in a
101-78 win over the Dallas
Mavericks.
Richard Hamilton added 15
points for the Bulls.
Joakim Noah had 12 points,
13 rebounds and seven assists
and Carlos Boozer had 12


points and 12 rebo


Foye each scored 20 for Utah.
The Jazz lost despite shooting
51 percent (48 of 94) overall
and going 11 for 20 from 3-
point range.
Trail Blazers 118,
Cavaliers 117, 20T
CLEVELAND Nicolas
Batum's 3-pointer with 0.2 sec-
S onds left in the second over-
time gave the Portland Trail
Blazers a 118-117 victory over
the Cleveland Cavaliers.
.Trailing 117-115 with 2.5 sec-
onds remaining, Portland called
timeout and inbounded near
midcourt. Damian Lillard passed
i to Batum, who hit a fadeaway
jumper from the right corner in
Front of Cleveland's bench. With
time only for a tip-in attempt, the
Cavaliers couldn't get a shot off
before time expired.
Lillard led Portland with 24
points while Batum added 22.
Alonzo Gee paced the Cava-
liers with 22 points, but missed
Associated Press a free throw that would have
shot against given them a three-point lead
the first half before Batum's shot.
Anderson Varejao had 19
pounds. points and 17 rebounds for his


Boozer has double-doubles in
six of his past eight games.
Jrue Holiday led the 76ers
with 23 points. Thaddeus
Young added 22 points and
seven rebounds.
Rockets 124,
Jazz 116
HOUSTON Patrick Pat-
terson scored 20 points, Chan-
dler Parsons and Jeremy Lin
had 19 apiece and the Hous-
ton Rockets beat the Utah
Jazz 124-116.
James Harden finished with
18 points for the Rockets, who
shot 55 percent (46 of 83) and
hit half of their 3-point shots at
11 of 22. Greg Smith and Car-
los Delfino each scored 13.
Gordon Hayward had 13 of
his 21 points in the second half


eighth straight double-double.
Bucks 91,
Celtics 88
MILWAUKEE Larry
Sanders had 18 points, 16 re-
bounds and five blocked shots,
and the Milwaukee Bucks ral-
lied for a 91-88 victory after the
Boston Celtics scored the first
17 points of the game.
Monta Ellis had 17 points
and seven assists for the
Bucks, while Ersan Ilyasova
added 15 points and five re-
bounds. Brandon Jennings had
a big 3-pointer in the fourth
quarter.
Paul Pierce paced the
Celtics with 19 points, and
Kevin Garnett added 17 points
and seven boards.


Boston surprises


St. John's 66-49


Rest of ranked

women s teams

earn victories

Associated Press

BOSTON Chantell Al-
ford scored 22 points and
Rashidat Agboola had a
double-double to lead
Boston University to a 66-49
upset win over No. 17 St.
John's on Saturday
Alford knocked down six
3-pointers, shooting 7 of 12
from the floor for the Terri-
ers (5-3). Agboola finished
with 12 points and 12 re-
bounds six offensive -
and Danielle Callahan
added 14 points.
Boston snapped the four-
game winning streak of the
Red Storm (4-2), who strug-
gled to keep pace. The Ter-
riers took a 32-13 lead when
Alford made a 3-pointer
with 3:54 left in the first half.
No. 15 Ohio St. 78,
Evansville 33
COLUMBUS, Ohio Tayler
Hill scored 20 points to lead
Ohio State to its 27th consecu-
tive home victory, over Evans-
ville in a nonconference game.
AshleyAdams added 14
points and all 13 players scored
for the Buckeyes (5-2), who led
40-23 at halftime and began the
second half with a 25-0 run to
take complete command.
Ohio State, coming off a 57-
54 loss to No. 22 North Car-
olina, shot 63 percent (17 of 27)
in the first half and 63.6 percent
(14 of 22) in the second. The
Purple Aces (2-5) struggled to a
23.1 percent overall mark (12 of
52), including just 15.6 percent
(5 of 32) in the second half
while facing a ranked opponent
for the first time this season.


No. 18 Okla. St. 91,
Texas Southern 49
STILLWATER, Okla. Liz
Donohoe and Lindsey Keller
scored 18 points apiece and
Oklahoma State routed Texas
Southern.
Toni Young added 16 points
for the Cowgirls (6-0), who
have won 12 in a row dating to
last season's WNIT title. It's the
nation's longest winning streak.
Morgan Toben scored 12 and
Brittney Martin added 11 points.
OSU's Tiffany Bias had 10 as-
sists, more than the Tigers who
finished with nine. Keller and
Kendra Suttles had eight re-
bounds for the Cowgirls who had
a 44-23 edge on the boards.
No. 21 Nebraska 60,
Idaho State 51
LINCOLN, Neb. Jordan
Hooper scored a season-high
29 points to lead Nebraska to a
win over Idaho State.
Hooper needed just eight
points to become the 16th
player in school history to reach
1,200 career points. Hooper's
double-double performance in-
cluded 10 rebounds. She was
12 of 23 from the field.
Lindsey Moore had 13 points
and five assists for the Corn-
huskers (6-2).
No. 23 Dayton 82,
UNLV 58
TEMPE, Ariz. Sam
MacKay scored 18 points to
lead Dayton to a victory over
UNLV in the first round of the
ASU Classic.
Kelli Thompson scored 27
points for UNLV (2-5).
MacKay had a career-high
eight rebounds for the Flyers
(8-0). Andrea Hoover scored 14
points and Cassie Sant 12. Ally
Mallot came off the bench and
scored 13 points. Olivia Apple-
white led with nine rebounds.


BASKETBALL


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Campbell ponders
more shows in '13
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Glen Campbell may be
wrapping up a goodbye
tour, but that doesn't
mean he's done with the
stage.
Camp-
bell is
consider-
ing sched-
uling
more
shows
next year
Glen after
Campbell playing
more
than 120 dates in 2012.
The 76-year-old singer
has Alzheimer's disease
and has begun to lose his
memory He put out his
final studio album,
"Ghost on the Canvas," in
2011 and embarked on
the tour with family
members and close
friends serving in his
band and staffing the
tour
Campbell will break
for the holidays and if he
still feels strong he'll
begin scheduling more
shows.

Stevie Wonder
cancels concert
WASHINGTON Ste-
vie Wonder is calling off a
concert for a group that
raises money for the
Israeli military
Wonder had been
scheduled to perform
Dec. 6 for Friends of the
Israel Defense Forces,
which raises money for

soldiers
and their
families.
Wonder
said the
United
Nations
recom-
Stevie mended
Wonder canceling
his per-
formance because he is
an official "Messenger of
Peace" for the organiza-
tion. The United Nations
overwhelmingly voted to
recognize a Palestinian
state Thursday over ve-
hement U.S. and Israeli
objections as hopes for
Mideast peace talks
stalled.
Wonder said in a state-
ment he was canceling
with a heavy heart, but "I
am and have always been
against war, any war,
anywhere."

Lopez tones down
concert
JAKARTA, Indonesia -
Jennifer Lopez wowed
thousands of fans in In-
donesia, but they didn't
see as much of her as con-
certgoers in other coun-
tries the American pop
star toned down both her
sexy outfits and her
dance moves during her
show in the world's most
populous Muslim country,
promoters said Saturday
Lopez's "Dance Again
World Tour" was per-
formed in the country's
capital, Jakarta, on Fri-
day in line with promises
Lopez made to make her
show more appropriate
for the audience, said
Chair Ibrahim from
Dyandra Entertainment,
the concert promoter.
'"JLo was very coopera-
tive ... she respected our
culture," Ibrahim said.
-From wire reports


From the stands


Associated Press
Bradley Cooper portrays Pat Solatano in the film, "Silver Linings Playbook." The film was recently nominated for
five Spirit Awards and is widely expected to be a best picture Oscar contender.


Fans get a close-up

JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK In David O. Rus-
sell's "Silver Linings Playbook,"
Bradley Cooper plays an unstable
former teacher trying to improve
himself after exiting a mental insti-
tution. When his character, Pat Soli-
tano, consults his otherwise
level-headed psychiatrist Dr Cliff
Patel (Anupam Kher) on whether a
Philadelphia Eagles' jersey is appro-
priate attire for a dinner party, Patel
questions which jersey On hearing
it's star wide-receiver DeSean Jack-
son, he responds unequivocally:
"DeSean Jackson is the man."
This is Philadelphia, where undy-
ing loyalty to the local NFL team -
"the Birds" is everywhere, even
in the sensitive relations between
therapist and patient.
As large a role as football plays in
American life, Hollywood has typi-
cally focused its cameras on the
field of play, where the dramatics of
gridiron battle are self-evident. But
"Silver Linings Playbook," which
was recently nominated for five
Spirit Awards and is widely ex-
pected to be a best picture Oscar
contender, is more interested in the
face-painters in the stands.
The annals of pigskin pictures
have ranged from the hijinks of
Groucho Marx ("Horse Feathers") to
the inspiration of a newcomer to the
sport ("The Blind Side"). Football in
movies has been a regular source of
hard-knock action ("Any Given Sun-
day"), manly tragedy ("Brian's
Song," "Remember the Titans") and
underdog triumph ("Rudy").
But along with "Silver Linings
Playbook," a handful of films have
sought to capture the fanatical pas-
sion both the communal spirit
and the toxic obsession that grips
millions of households and acres of
parking-lot asphalt every Sunday
this time of year
In Vincent Gallo's "Buffalo '66"
(1998), Gallo drew from his own
childhood in the upstate New York
city, playing a man named after the
hometown team (Billy), with life-
less parents glued to the TV screen
for Buffalo Bills games. A lost bet
on a crucial game cost Billy $10,000
and put him in jail. On his exit, he's
bent on avenging the guilty place
kicker, a fictionalized version of a
real-life Bills scapegoat, kicker
Scott Norwood.
"Big Fan" (2009), written and di-
rected by Robert D. Siegel (who also
wrote "The Wrestler"), depicted a
die-hard New York Giants fan (Pat-
ton Oswalt) whose devotion is tested


Birthday The year ahead will mark a period of many
new beginnings. You're likely to become much more daring
and adventurous, as well as start to explore numerous new
subjects that you never dared tackle previously.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Although another's intent
might be sincere, the possibilities of his or her coming
through for you might be somewhat overcome by reality.
Don't count on any outside help.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -An important endeavor in
which you're involved isn't likely to live up to your expecta-
tions if you leave any part to chance. You must be able to
control every step.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)- Don't become so enamored
with a new friend that you fail to keep in touch with any of your
longtime pals. Share your time as equally as possible with both.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Setting some lofty goals is
admirable, but don't fall into the trap of thinking they are al-


when he's brutally assaulted by his
favorite player
The 2004 film "Friday Night
Lights," and the subsequent TV se-
ries, sought to portray a football-
mad Texas town, where the sport
reverberated in nearly all that was
good and all that was bad in
Dillon, Texas.
These movies all share in the spirit
of Frederick Exley's classic 1968 fic-
tional memoir, "A Fan's Notes." The
Giants-loving author wrote: "Cheer-
ing is a paltry description. The Gi-
ants were my delight, my folly, my
anodyne, my intellectual stimula-
tion. ... I gave myself up to the Giants
utterly The recompense I gained
was the feeling of being alive."
It was that kind of intensity which
interested Russell, whose last film,
"The Fighter," captured the boxing
community of Lowell, Mass.
"What makes characters fascinat-
ing in a funny and an emotional way
to me is when they have life and
death stakes about their particular
currency," the director said. "So
(Robert) De Niro's currency was
everything about the Eagles."
As with many things in sports, the
Eagles devotion in "Silver Linings
Playbook" flows through the father,
played by De Niro. He not only
makes much of his living from the
Eagles as a bookie, but he watches
each game at home with obsessive-
compulsive ardor The fortunes of
the Solitanos become inextricably
linked with that of the Eagles.
The film is based on the novel of
the same name by Matthew Quick,
a Philadelphia native who, reached
by phone at his home in Massachu-
setts, makes no bones about his al-
legiance: "I bleed green," he said.


Today's HOROSCOPE
ready completed just because you thought of them. It takes
elbow grease to get things done.
Aries (March 21-April 19) You might be in for a surprise
when you discover that you have a total lack of knowledge
about something you thought you understood. Take imme-
diate measures to rectify it.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) When entering a joint agree-
ment, make sure your counterpart can contribute the nec-
essary knowledge that he or she claims to have. If the
partnership is out of balance, it could fizzle.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because you're in a some-
what lucky cycle, you should receive your fair share of
breaks. However, it you get involved with a negative per-
son, he or she could dilute things for you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Be careful you don't commit
yourself to something that is based more on hope than re-
ality. If you can't distinguish between the two, you're in for a


"My earliest memories of my fa-
ther are of going down to the Vet,"
Quick said, referring to Veterans
Stadium, the former home of the
Eagles. "In the neighborhood I grew
up in, the men didn't tell you that
they loved you or give you hugs,
they took you to Eagles games. If the
Eagles scored a touchdown, you got
a hug."
"It's such a metaphor for striv-
ing," Quick continued. "No matter
what happens, there's always that
next game. There's always that next
season."
The plot of "Big Fan" might sug-
gest a more cynical view of football,
but Siegel, too, is a lifelong sports
fan. Growing up on Long Island, he
became a devoted listener to the
New York-area sports radio station
WFAN. In the film, Oswalt's charac-
ter is a regular caller, dialing in like
a performer with a nightly show.
"The callers seemed like these
incredibly vivid, almost movie char-
acters," Siegel said. "You've got
these ordinary working Joes taking
on the machismo and testosterone
of their heroes and doing it anony-
mously through the radio where it's
very safe. It's kind of a form of fan-
tasy play acting."
As he treated a sport usually not
taken seriously (professional
wrestling) in "The Wrestler," Siegel
feels the often-disrespected sports
fan is fertile, relatively unexplored
territory
"What (fans) are passionate about
might seem silly to the outside ob-
server," Siegel said. "Certainly, you
could make the case that, that's very
sad and pathetic, but I don't. I ad-
mire their passion and I identify
with it."


huge letdown.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Recognize the difference be-
tween getting involved with a group you'll enjoy and one that
won't truly accept you, no matter how hard you try. Trying to
win the latter over will be a lost cause and a waste of time.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you decide to make a major,
expensive change in your home or residence, be ab-
solutely certain it'll be something that you can live with for a
long time. If it isn't, you'll end up being miserable.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't make the mistake of
lacking faith in your own abilities and relying solely on the
advice from persons who may not be as astute as you are.
Trust your instincts.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be extra careful about both
the management of your resources and of someone else's.
Chances are, handling money may not be your strong suit
at this time.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30
Mega Money: 3 -14 -17 29
Mega Ball: 4
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 10 $720.52
3-of-4 MB 70 $225.50
3-of-4 1,240 $38
2-of-4 MB 1,539 $21
1-of-4 MB 12,430 $2.50
2-of-4 32,616 $2
Fantasy 5:8 18 25 28 34
5-of-5 3 winners $77,217.28
4-of-5 314 $118.50
3-of-5 9,471 $11
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29
Fantasy 5:1 13 17 25 36
5-of-5 4 winners $49,090.51
4-of-5 239 $132.00
3-of-5 8,122 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY-

Today is Sunday, Dec. 2,
the 337th day of 2012. There
are 29 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 2, 1942, an artifi-
cially created, self-sustaining
nuclear chain reaction was
demonstrated for the first time
at the University of Chicago.
On this date:
In 1804, Napoleon crowned
himself Emperor of the French.
In 1859, militant abolitionist
John Brown was hanged for
his raid on Harpers Ferry the
previous October.
In 1927, Ford Motor Co.
unveiled its Model A automo-
bile that replaced its Model T.
In 1939, New York Munici-
pal Airport-LaGuardia Field
(later LaGuardia Airport) went
into operation as an airliner
from Chicago landed at one
minute past midnight.
In 1954, the Senate voted
to condemn Sen. Joseph R.
McCarthy, R-Wis., for con-
duct that "tends to bring the
Senate into disrepute."
In 1961, Cuban leader
Fidel Castro declared himself
a Marxist-Leninist who would
eventually lead Cuba to
Communism.
In 1970, the newly created
Environmental Protection
Agency opened its doors.
In 1982, in the first opera-
tion of its kind, doctors at the
University of Utah Medical
Center implanted a perma-
nent artificial heart in the
chest of retired dentist Dr.
Barney Clark, who lived 112
days with the device.
In 2001, in one of the
largest corporate bankrupt-
cies in U.S. history, Enron
filed for Chapter 11 protection.
Ten years ago: The
Supreme Court agreed to de-
cide whether minorities could
be given a boost to get into
universities. (Adivided Court
later allowed the nation's col-
leges and universities to se-
lect students based in part on
race, but emphasized that
race could not be the overrid-
ing factor.)
Five years ago:
Venezuela President Hugo
Chavez suffered defeat as
voters rejected sweeping
constitutional reforms by 51
to 49 percent.
One year ago: The Labor
Department announced the
unemployment rate had fallen
to 8.6 percent in Nov. 2011,
the lowest since March 2009.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer Attorney General Edwin
Meese III is 81. Senate Ma-
jority Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev., is 73. Broadcast
journalist Stone Phillips is 58.
Actress Lucy Liu is 44.


Thought for Today:
"Great minds have purposes;
little minds have wishes. Little
minds are subdued by mis-
fortunes; great minds rise
above them." Washington
Irving, American author
(1783-1859).


in 'Silver Linings' and other sports films


From left, Derek Luke, Billy Bob Thornton, Lee Thompson Lucas Black are
shown in a scene from the film, "Friday Night Lights."












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Dissipating inch by inch


-C--


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


.C
- -. -. --.- -

.-.


Associated Press
Surface melt water rushes this year along the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet through a supra-glacial stream channel, southwest of
Ilulissat, Greenland. Polar ice sheets are melting three times faster than in the 1990s, but so far that's added just less than half an inch to
already rising global sea levels, a new giant scientific study said. While the amount of sea level rise isn't as bad as some earlier worst-case
predictions, the acceleration of the melting, especially in Greenland, has ice scientists worried.


Ice sheets melting at north and south poles faster than


SETH BORENSTEIN
APScience Writer

WASHINGTON Fueled by
global warming, polar ice sheets
in Greenland and Antarctica are
now melting three times faster
than they did in the 1990s, a new
scientific study says.
So far, that's only added about
half an inch to rising sea levels,
not as bad as some earlier worst-
case scenarios. But the melting's
quicker pace, especially in
Greenland, has ice scientists
worried.
One of the biggest wild cards in
climate change has been figuring
out how much the melting of the
massive sheets of ice at the two
poles would add to the seas.
Until now, researchers haven't
agreed on how fast the mile-thick
sheets are thawing and if
Antarctica was even losing ice.
The new research concludes
Antarctica is melting, but points
to the smaller ice sheet in
Greenland, which covers most of
the island, as the bigger and
more pressing issue. Its melt
rate has grown from about 55 bil-
lion tons a year in the 1990s to al-
most 290 billion tons a year
recently, according to the study
"Greenland is really taking
off," said National Snow and Ice
Data Center scientist Ted Scam-
bos, a co-author of the paper re-
leased Thursday by the journal
Science.
Study lead author Andrew
Shepherd of the University of
Leeds in England, said their re-
sults provide a message for ne-
gotiators in Doha, Qatar, who are
working on an international
agreement to fight global warm-
ing: "It's very clear now that
Greenland is a problem."
Scientists blame man-made
global warming for the melting.
Burning fossil fuels, such as coal
and oil, emits carbon dioxide


Ice melt contributes to sea level
Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are melting at ar
accelerating pace causing seas globally to rise.
Ice sheet contribution to global sea levels
0 .3 5 in c h e s .................................................................................
Green
0.30 ..................................................... .............



0.25 .................... ......... ............
0.20.

0.15




0.00 .. .... .............................. ( No data for 2i

'92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06.................... .................... .................... .....
'92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 1


SOURCES: University of Leeds/UCL/ESAINASA


and other greenhouse gases that
trap heat, warming the atmos-
phere and oceans. Bit by bit, that
erodes the ice sheets from above
and below. Snowfall replenishes
the ice sheets, but hasn't kept
pace with the rate of melting.
Because the world's oceans
are so big, it takes a lot of ice
melting about 10 trillion tons
- to raise sea levels 1 inch.
Since 1992, ice sheets at the
poles have lost nearly 5 trillion
tons of ice, the study said, raising
sea levels by about half an inch.
That seemingly tiny extra bit
probably worsened the flooding
from an already devastating su-
perstorm Sandy last month, said
NASA ice scientist Erik Ivins,
another co-author of the study
He said the extra weight gives
each wave a little more energy.
"The more energy there is in a
wave, the further the water can
get inland," Ivins said.


Globally, the world
rose about half a foot
in the 20th century B
sheets accounts for o
sea level rise. Warmer
pands, contributing t
along with water fro
glaciers outside the po
Just how much ice
at the two poles has
cult for scientists to
2007, the Intergov
Panel on Climate Chai
include ice sheet mel
culations of future sea
because numbers
uncertain.
It's an important
cause if all the polar
somehow melted -
that would take cei
global sea levels would
more than 200 feet, s
sylvania State Univers
entist Richard Alley,
part of the research.


rise
n



l-l .


a decade ago


ONLINE
Science: www.sciencemag.
org
Ice sheets: http://nsidc.org
/cryosphere/quickfacts/ice
sheets.html


iind Some past studies showed
melting on the polar ice sheets,
............ while others said the Antarctic
ice sheet was growing and off-
setting melting in Greenland.
The new work by 47 scientists
around the world combines
three methods and measure-
ments from 10 satellites to come
to a scientific consensus on
tica what's happening to the polar
011) .......... ice sheets.
In the 1990s, the two ice sheets
.............. combined on average lost 110
'08 '10 billion tons of ice each year to
melting, the researchers re-
AP ported. That increased and by
2005 to 2010, they were losing
three times as much 379 bil-
d's oceans lion tons yearly. The numbers
on average don't include the summer of 2012
V/elting ice when Greenland experienced a
ine-fifth of melt that hadn't been seen in
r water ex- more than a century, re-
:o the rise searchers said.
m melting The consensus said as a
lar regions. whole, the Antarctic ice sheet is
is melting melting. Part of the issue is the
been diffi- southern continent is not react-
answer. In ing to climate change uniformly,
ernmental with some areas growing and
nge did not others shrinking. The entire
t in its cal- Antarctic ice sheet is about the
a level rise size of the U.S. and Mexico com-
were so bined.
NASA chief scientist Waleed
factor be- Abdalati, one of the few top ice
ice sheets researchers who wasn't part of
something the study, praised the work.
nturies "Understanding how and why
Id jump by the ice sheets are changing
said Penn- today better equips us for un-
sity ice sci- derstanding and predicting how
who wasn't much and in what ways they will
change in the future," he said.


Duke Energy new bully on county block


I don't like bul-
lies. In fact,
except for the
mothers of bullies
and New York
Yankees fans, I
can't think of any-
one else who
likes bullies.
Growing up
freckle-faced, and Mike
with the same PEE
name as a famous
Green Acres farm PA
animal, earned
me my fair share of teasing
and bullying. That changed
during the sixth grade when
my body suddenly took on
the size and form of a mid-
dle linebacker. I was no


longer the butt of
others' jokes, at
least not to my
face.
Last week, Cit-
rus County met
/ its own bully-
Duke Energy.
S Unfortunately,
there are no
Arnold magic bullets,
I TO such as sixth-
PR grade growth
spurts, that will
vanquish this
bully. Our county govern-
ment needs to stand its
ground and take its lumps,
because that is how you
handle bullies.
Progress Energy Florida,


as it's known as now, and be-
fore that, Florida Power, has
had a great relationship
with Citrus County and its
residents throughout the
years. There have been hic-
cups. The needs of large
corporate business often
run counter to the needs of
an eco-friendly citizenry
and government. But the
employees of Progress En-
ergy have mitigated to a de-
gree those hard feelings by
being great neighbors, com-
munity-minded citizens and
volunteers.
Through the years,
Florida Power/Progress En-
ergy has donated money for
a host of events and needs,


including volunteer recog-
nition, fire equipment and
sponsorship of events
geared toward promoting
education and the well-
being of the citizens of
Citrus County.
Their employees volun-
teer, too joining in annu-
ally Make A Difference Day
events or helping at the Key
Training Center. I have
known many of them per-
sonally Guys such as Willie
Easmon, who continued to
volunteer at the Little
League park coaching,
cleaning, mowing, repairing
fences and installing batting
cages, well after his own
children had moved on. I


can name scores more just
like him.
Progress Energy Florida
employees will continue to
volunteer and make a dif-
ference in our community,
because they are one of us
and understand working to-
gether to make the commu-
nity a better place.
Unfortunately, in the four
short months Duke Energy
has become Progress En-
ergy's parent company, it
has erased 40 years of good
will built up by hard work
and dedication of hundreds
of Progress employees. In
July, they chased out

See Page C3


I


Economic


stool is a


pogo stick
If you own property in
Citrus County, your
taxes are going to go
up dramatically That
means a lot
The personal impact of
the Duke/Progress Energy
battle is the power com-
pany will pay less in prop-
erty tax and local property
owners will pay more.
Every person in Citrus
County will experience an
impact.
The top story in the na-
tional news these days is
this "fiscal cliff" we are
going to fall off if Congress
and the president don't
reach a tax deal. To Citrus
County residents, the fall
off the cliff has started
without the rest of the
country
For decades, Progress
Energy has been paying
the largest tax bill in the
county. As a percent of the
total, the utility has paid
up to 26 percent of the
total local property taxes.
That has been a huge sub-
sidy our community has
enjoyed.
But the company has
been complaining for
years the Citrus County
formula for calculating
the taxes owed has been
flawed. Company officials
believed Property Ap-
praiser Geoff Greene
agreed with them and
some reduction in the
power company's 2011 tax
bill of $34,294,407 was
going to be realized. In-
stead, the property ap-
praiser sent a tax bill for
this year of $35,725,781.
Duke, the new owner of
Progress Energy, was out-
raged and decided to fight
the county The North Car-
olina-based power com-
pany dropped off a check
at the county courthouse
in Inverness for $19 mil-
lion this week and said
they dispute the remain-
ing $16 million.
A lot of arguing and fin-
ger-pointing will happen
during the next few weeks,
but the bottom line is, the
weakness of our local econ-
omy has been dramatically
shoved down our throats.
The Citrus County econ-
omy has been standing on
four legs for the past 50
years: Tourism, home con-
struction, medical services
and the utility company
During the past five years,
the home construction
business has all but disap-
peared because of the na-
tional economy Citrus
County's economy was left
standing on three legs.
Three years ago, the nu-
clear power plant in Crys-
tal River was shut down
for repairs and has sat
dormant since the repair
job failed. Insiders said
there is only a 50 percent
chance the plant will re-
turn to service. If Duke
shuts down the plant,
more than 500 of the high-
est-paying jobs in the
county will be lost.
It would be an eco-
nomic disaster for our
county. We already know
two of the four coal plants
at the Crystal River en-
ergy site will be retired
during the next five years.
Now Progress comes
along and tells the county
they are going to fight
their tax bill. If they are
successful, hundreds of
county and school work-
ers will lose their jobs.
The second leg of our eco-
nomic stool would effec-
tively be chopped off.
See Page C3


I


:7i':
"^







Page C2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2,2012



PINION


"Ifinally know what distinguishes man
from the other beasts:financial worries."
Jules Renard "Journal," 1887-1910


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ................... ..................... publisher
SMike Arnold .................................... editor
Charlie Brennan ................................ editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. ..................citizen member
Mac Harris ........... ................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ........... ......... copy chief
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus




Closing of the



American mind


-WASHINGTON
In 2007, Keith John
Sampson, a middle-
aged student work-
ing his way through $3'
Indiana University-
Purdue University Indi- /
anapolis as a janitor, r
was declared guilty of
racial harassment.
Without granting Samp- Georg
son a hearing, the uni- T
versity administration T
- acting as prosecutor, VOI
judge and jury con-
victed him of "openly reading (a)
book related to a historically and
racially abhorrent subject."
"Openly" "Related to." Good
grief.
The book, "Notre Dame vs. the
Klan," celebrated the 1924 defeat
of the Ku Klux Klan in a fight with
Notre Dame students. But some of
Sampson's co-workers disliked the
book's cover, which featured a
black-and-white photograph of a
Klan rally Someone was offended,
therefore someone else "must be"
guilty of harassment.
This non sequitur reflects the
right never to be annoyed, a new
campus entitlement. Legions of
administrators, who now outnum-
ber full-time faculty, are kept busy
making students mind their man-
ners, with good manners under-
stood as conformity to liberal
politics.
Liberals are most concentrated
and untrammeled on campuses, so
look there for evidence of what,
given the opportunity, they would
do to America. Ample evidence is
in "Unlearning Liberty: Campus
Censorship and the End ofAmeri-
can Debate" by Greg Lukianoff.
The 38-year-old graduate of Stan-
ford Law School describes himself
as a liberal, pro-choice, pro-gay
rights and lifelong Democrat who
belongs to "the notoriously politi-
cally correct Park Slope Food Co-
Op in Brooklyn" and has never
voted for a Republican "nor do I
plan to." But as president of the
Foundation for Individual Rights
in Education (FIRE) he knows the
most common justifications for lib-
eral censorship are "sensitivity"
about "diversity" and "multicul-
turalism," as academic liberals
understand those things.
In recent years, a University of
Oklahoma vice president has de-
clared no university resources, in-
cluding email, could be used for
"the forwarding of political
humor/commentary" The College
at Brockport in New York banned
using the Internet to "annoy or
otherwise inconvenience" anyone.
Rhode Island College prohibited,
among many other things, certain
"attitudes." Texas Southern Uni-
versity's comprehensive proscrip-
tions included "verbal harm" from
damaging "assumptions" or "im-
plications." Texas A&M promised
"freedom from indignity of any
type." Davidson banned "patroniz-
ing remarks." Drexel University
forbade "inappropriately directed
laughter." Western Michigan Uni-
versity banned "sexism," includ-
ing "the perception" of a person
"not as an individual, but as a
member of a category based on
sex." Banning "perceptions" must


ge
H
y


provide full employ-
ment for the burgeoning
ranks of academic ad-
ministrators.
Many campuses con-
gratulate themselves on
their broad-minded-
ness when they estab-
lish small "free speech
zones" where political
e Will advocacy can be sched-
S uled. At one point,
S Texas Tech's 28,000 stu-
DES dents had a 20-foot-
wide "free speech
gazebo." And you thought the First
Amendment made America a free
speech zone.
At Tufts, a conservative newspa-
per committed "harassment" by
printing accurate quotations from
the Quran and a verified fact
about the status of women in
Saudi Arabia. Lukianoff said Tufts
may have been the first American
institution "to find someone guilty
of harassment for stating verifi-
able facts directed at no one in
particular"
He documents how "orienta-
tion" programs for freshmen be-
come propaganda to, in the words
of one orthodoxy enforcer, "leave
a mental footprint on their con-
sciousness." Faculty, too, can face
mandatory consciousness-raising.
In 2007, Donald Hindley, a poli-
tics professor at Brandeis, was
found guilty of harassment be-
cause when teaching Latin Amer-
ican politics, he explained the
origin of the word wetbackss,"
which refers to immigrants cross-
ing the Rio Grande. Without a
hearing, the university provost
sent Hindley a letter stating the
university "will not tolerate inap-
propriate, racial and discrimina-
tory conduct." The assistant
provost was assigned to monitor
Hindley's classes "to ensure that
you do not engage in further viola-
tions of the nondiscrimination and
harassment policy" Hindley was
required to attend "anti-discrimi-
nation training."
Such coercion is a natural aug-
mentation of censorship. Next
comes mob rule. Last year, at the
University of Wisconsin-Madison,
the vice provost for diversity and
climate really, you can't make
this stuff up encouraged stu-
dents to disrupt a news confer-
ence by a speaker opposed to
racial preferences. They did,
which the vice provost called
"awesome." This is the climate on
an especially liberal campus that
celebrates "diversity" in every-
thing but thought.
"What happens on campus,"
Lukianoff said, "doesn't stay on
campus" because censorship has
"downstream effects." He quotes a
sociologist whose data he said
demonstrate "those with the high-
est levels of education have the
'lowest' exposure to people with
conflicting points of view." This
encourages "the human tendency
to live within our own echo cham-
bers." Parents' tuition dollars and
student indebtedness are paying
for this. Good grief.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


Amendments' fate
The amendments how did they come out? Nobody seems to want


to publish whether they failed or whether they
passed.
Editor's note: Three amendments to the Florida Con-
stitution received the 60 percent-plus approval needed
to pass. They are: Amendment 2 Veterans disabled
due to combat injury; homestead property tax discount,
63.2 percent in favor; Amendment 9 Homestead
property tax exemption for surviving spouse of military
veteran or first responder, 61.6 percent in favor; and
Amendment 11 Additional homestead exemption;
low-income seniors who maintain long-term residency
on property; equal to assessed value, 61.3 percent in
favor.


563-0579


Resolution needed


for coun


Duke Energy, the owner
of the five Progress En-
ergy Florida power
plants in Crystal River, is play-
ing hardball with Citrus
County.
As has been extensively re-
ported in the Chronicle and
other media since Thursday,
Progress Energy dropped off a
check for $19.7 million dollars
at the courthouse in Inverness
to pay for their property taxes.
The problem is the utility's tax
bill was $35 million and the
county and school board had
built their current operating
budgets on receiving that
amount of money If the tax
shortfall stands, draconian
budget cuts will be needed in
county government, parks, law
enforcement, fire services,
ambulance services, libraries
and schools.
The most significant short-
term problem is Progress En-
ergy did not follow the official
process to challenge their tax
bill. Every property owner has
the right to challenge his or
her property taxes before the
county's value adjustment
board. Once the board hears
all of the challenges and rules
on them, the property ap-
praiser officially certifies the
tax rolls and the local govern-
ment builds its budgets based
on the money available.
Progress Energy did not file
a challenge. And the local gov-
ernment is already two
months into a fiscal year based
on the utility's expected $35
million payment.
It wasn't until last week that
Property Appraiser Geoff
Greene realized Progress was
not going to pay the full tax bill
for the current fiscal year.
Under the new ownership of
Duke Power, Progress Energy
took the extreme step of short-
changing the county and tak-
ing its tax assessment to court.
The official lawsuit is ex-
pected to be filed by the end of
business Monday
It was disingenuous for
Progress Energy to not follow
the proper process and go be-
fore the value adjustment
board. We urge the power
company to come back to the
bargaining table and reach a
workable compromise for its
2012-13 tax payment.


THE ISSUE:
Progress Energy tax I

OUR OPINION:
Pay the bill, re-examin
next year.

At the same time, G
needs to enter into serio
gotiations on how the va
Progress Energy's ho
will be taxed in the futu
Progress Energy has
the largest taxpayer i
county since the early
when it began produce:
ergy at its Gulf Coast fi
Determining what the a
tax bill should look like i
ways been a complicat
fair. Once before, it result
a lawsuit with then-pro
appraiser Ron Schultz.
Since the Schultz la
the property appraise
Progress Energy have
each year and negotiate
assessed value both
agreed to. Those negoti
failed to succeed this
The power company ar
county should shoulder
of the responsibility fo
failure.
The Progress sale to
was completed earlier
year and the utility's le
ship changed in a high
troversial way. We can a
there was some corpora
moil at what is now the 1
power company in Ame:
On the local level, the
erty appraiser never f
was negotiating with the
level of the company, i
did not push hard enou
resolution. Instead, the n
gotiated taxes were off
certified and Progress E
was sent a tax bill show
increase as opposed to t
pected decrease.
At the heart of the loi
sessed value questic
$1.4 billion in pollution c
equipment installed a
coal plants. Progress E
does not feel pollution c
equipment should be val
the same level as a
plant producing reven
fact, Citrus County is th
place in Florida where
ity has been forced to pay


s crisis

on pollution control. None of
the other 66 counties tax pol-
lution control at the full rate,
bill. but Citrus officials claim the
Ron Schultz lawsuit gives
them the authority.
The complexities of the tax
e for bill are real and deserve a full
vetting by independent
sources that can make sure
rreene Citrus County and Progress
)us ne- Energy are being treated
value of fairly. But what is unfair is
ldings Duke/Progress Energy did not
re. participate in the official
been process to challenge its tax
.n the bill. Instead, it waited until the
1960s county was two months into
ng en- the fiscal year before an-
icility. nouncing it would not pay
annual Citrus County is being held
has al- hostage and is in an extremely
;ed af- vulnerable position.
Ited in It is true conversations and
operty correspondence happened be-
tween the power company and
wsuit, the property appraiser in May
r and and June. In hindsight, the
e met local officials involved in the
ted an conversations should have
sides treated the Progress Energy
nations complaint more seriously.
year. Only lawyers enjoy these
nd the types of disputes, because they
some will earn millions of dollars in
or the legal fees to find resolutions.
Progress Energy needs to
Duke come forward and pay its tax
in the bill for the current year At the
eader- same time, the property ap-
y con- praiser and taxing authorities
ssume have to realize the parent
te tur- company, Duke, is going to se-
argest riously fight what it feels is an
rica. unjustified tax burden.
prop- The company and the
elt he county will have to work to-
e right gether to determine what an
but he equitable solution looks like.
.gh for Our disappointment is pro-
on-ne- found. Citrus County and
icially Progress Energy have always
Energy been partners working toward
ing an a better community. With
he ex- Duke taking over, there was a
level of confidence the new
cal as- power company would forge
on is an even stronger relationship
controll with Citrus County to help it
it two grow jobs and improve its eco-
Anergy nomic future. Instead, we have
controll a breakdown, placing local
ued at government in a financial cri-
power sis and the economy on life
ue. In support.
e only We need some strong lead-
a util- ership to pull us out of this
taxes mess.


still provide a "study," while our schools, police depart-
ment, etc., will suffer. Unbelievable.
We dropped the ball
Editor, reference power company taxes: I think
the power company handled it very badly. Now, let
me play devil's advocate for a moment. Having
worked with contractors in doing various jobs for
that company for nearly 50 years, from the lowest
grunts to the meetings with executives at their cor-
porate headquarters in St. Pete, I did get a sense
of their thinking. For instance, in the '70s they ad-
vised us we should gear up our equipment, as they
were on the verge of a major expansion. We were
doing that. Within weeks, the oil embargo hit. They
started selling off their new equipment in an effort
to keep them out of bankruptcy. What does that
prove? That proves they're a for-profit company.
However, they do have the same fears and prob-
lems as anyone. They do great unseen things for
our county. They provide the best security on our
coast and the vast expanse of woodlands on our
west side. Now the taxes; if I understand it, the
question's over scrubbers. In short, scrubbers are
equipment mandated by the EPA to reduce the
amount of carbon released into the atmosphere.
Scrubbers have nothing to do with generating
power. It's a dead expense to them. In business, if
you had a similar piece of equipment, I suspect
your tax consultant would want you to write that
off. We had a chance for a two-point conversion and
I'm afraid we dropped the ball.
People pay taxes
Three cheers for Duke Energy. It's about time in-
dustry objects to being taken advantage of by
these questionable property taxes. Duke's point is
the more they are taxed, the more costs are passed
on to us, the consumers. When are people going to
learn? Businesses don't pay taxes; people do.


They're ridiculous
The power companies have been gouging the
people of this county for years with their so-called
fuel adjustment. Now they decided to dump on the
county government, too. It's about time somebody
clocks down on these people. They're ridiculous.
Protecting CEO
Progress Energy or Duke Energy doesn't want to
pay what they owe in Citrus County taxes? They said
they're protecting their customers and their share-
holders, but I guess they're mainly protecting their
CEO. How do we find out how much money the CEO
makes? I mean they always want to take it out of
the customers (who) pay for rate hikes and all that,
but let's take the money away from the big guy. He
doesn't need all of that money and he could use
some of his money to help pay the tax bill.
Stop spending like drunken sailor
I am so happy Progress Energy is going to refuse
to pay the same amount of taxes they have in the
past due to the fact the nuclear plant is no longer
open. This is great news. For once Citrus County, just
like other municipalities, is going to have to live
within its means and within its own budget and stop
spending money like it's a drunken sailor. And it's so
great we have the Save Our Homes tax cap and the
county won't be able to get back any of the money
by raising property taxes as well. So, Citrus County,
you're going to have to live within your means.
Will port stay?
Amazing -the commissioners and the EDC are still
pushing forward on the port. Why does that happen
when the populace wants to keep the Nature Coast the
way it is? Where else on the Florida coastline do you
have our pristine shores? Now with Progress Energy
withholding tax payments, I suppose the $100,000 will


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday season. The Chronicle is asking read-
ers to join in and support the countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or what-
ever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit agencies in the community and is leading
the effort to impact important community concerns. Send your contribution to Gerry Mulligan at the
Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Gerry Mulligan, publisher


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: DUKE ENERGY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grizzard could speak to any occasion


Nov. 24, 2012: Uni-
versity of Florida 37,
Florida State
University 26
"Frankly I don't
want to talk about it"

I borrowed those
eight words from
the incomparable
author, humorist, jour- Fred B
nalist and newspaper A SI
columnist, Lewis Griz- OF I
zard (1946-1994).
I can't imagine any-
one being unfamiliar with Griz-
zard or his work, but just in case:
Lewis Grizzard was he really
was the Mark Twain of our gen-
eration.
As a young man, after graduat-


3r
&I
L
L


ing from his beloved
University of Georgia,
Grizzard went to work
for the Atlanta Jour-
nal. He was lured away
for a while by the
Chicago Sun-Times,
only to return a few
years later to his Geor-
gia roots and the Jour-
rannen nal.
.ICE Grizzard's column
IFE would be syndicated,
eventually appearing
in more than 450 news-
papers and leading to books on
the best-sellers lists.
He's quoted as saying, "I am the
only person from Moreland, Ga., to
ever make the New York Times
Best Seller List... I'm the only per-


son from Moreland, Ga., who ever
heard of the New York Times Best
Seller List!"
Before his untimely death at the
age of 47 in 1994, I was a fan and
enjoyed many of the Grizzardisms,
most of which I won't quote here
because this remains a family
newspaper and I remain a family
writer. Even so, one which does, in
fact, come to mind after Saturday,
Nov 24, seems not only accept-
able, but, unfortunately, appropri-
ate because of the way I'm feeling
right now about the FSU loss to
Florida.
It seems the University of Geor-
gia had lost to its in-state rival
Georgia Tech and Grizzard's col-
umn for the next day was limited
to eight words and a lot of blank


space. All he had to say was
"Frankly, I don't want to talk about
it."
Amen, Lewis, Amen.
Of course, he could get by with
that because he was the world fa-
mous Lewis Grizzard. I'm the not-
so-famous Fred Brannen and I
can't.
I lose track of time, but my rec-
ollection is for the past two or
three years before his lifelong bat-
tle with heart disease was lost,
Grizzard's masterpieces and my
ramblings sat next to one another
each week on a page in the Sun-
day edition of the Citrus County
Chronicle. I wasn't shy and wrote
him a fan letter with a clipping of
his work and mine sitting next to
each other not drawing com-


LETTERS to the Editor


Too big to pay a fair
share of taxes
Duke/Progress Energy decides,
without a court decision, in ad-
vance, to cut its $35 million 2013
Citrus County property tax by $16
million. "Take us to court" say
they Susan Grant, spokeswoman
for Progress Energy said "reduc-
ing the tax liability is part of en-
suring that customers are not
overcharged." This from the
biggest utility in the USA (which)
is charging its customers for the
$24 billion nuke plant that may
never be built... in advance ...
with no refund required if it is
not built.
This monopoly has the cus-
tomer revenue, paid in advance,
blessed by the Florida PSC, to
tell Citrus County how much its
tax should be. They can afford to
pay for the battery of attorneys to
defend their position. Citrus
County taxpayers cannot afford
to defend.
Thank you PSC and thank you
Florida Legislature for allowing
this corporate insurrection to
legally happen to Citrus County
Let's hope our state legislative
representative, Jimmie T Smith,
can bring all his vast legislative
experience forward to lead his
fellow state legislators in passing
two laws to right this wrong.
Rescind the nuke plant "pre-
payment plan" and return 100
percent of the funds already col-
lected to the rate payers.
Pass legislation before Dec. 31,
2012, making it illegal for corpo-
rations to withhold payment of
state, county and local taxes in
advance of a court decision sup-
porting claims against the tax
levied. The law will become ef-
fective Dec. 31, 2012.


This battle is going
taxpayers of Citrus Cc
tune to fight if these 1l
passed in time, if at al
Here are two suggest
fight the battle:
Take the $100,000 al
the Port of Citrus fant
an experienced lobby
knows the Florida leg
process, the Florida F
sight and ruling proce
the power and method
the Duke/Progress En
nopoly
Problem is, where d
such an experienced i
Offer former state s
Florida PSC commiss
Nancy Argenziano the
lobby for the county S
than anyone in Citrus
derstands what the co
ing in the battle with
Duke/Progress Energ
state legislature to get
passed.


No surprise
Duke Ene
The actions taken b
ergy over their tax bill
new. If I remember co
Progress tried that wi
Shultz. Many of us old
think of public utilities
lic service as they wer
past. Today, they are p
ing corporations and
by the same greed tha
control of most corpor
In one of their rate
quests, (the utility) arg
needed it to guarantee
holders a 14-percent a
profit. The courts will
the issue and I am sur


to cost the
)unty a for-
aws are not
1.
stions to

allocated to
asy to hire
ist, who
islative
'SC over-
*sses and
dologies of


more taxes but less than we cur-
rently expect and it will have
won.
The arrogance of public utili-
ties is the direct result of our
state legislature and governor
selling out to them. Former state
leaders created the Public Serv-
ice Commission to protect the
consumers. Unfortunately, the
public utilities have bought state
government and do as they
please.


ergy mo- I was surprised to see Sheriff
(Jeff) Dawsy as the new
lo they find spokesperson for the county.
person? Foolish me, I thought we had a
enator and commission chairperson (who)
ioner spoke for the county government
e job to It was also disappointing to see
3he, more the sheriff's attitude toward re-
County, un- during public safety services to
)unty is fac- Duke. The power company has
provided substantial funds to
y and the county agencies separate from
t these laws taxes and safety at the power
plant is safety to the community I
realize the loss or revenue may
Tom Paslay cause the sheriff to start acting
Homosassa like a professional manager in-
stead of a grand spender, but that
about is what should be expected. Mak-
rgy ing threats, holding grand press
conferences and rattling sabers is
y Duke En- juvenile. What is needed is for
1 is nothing the county and the high sheriff to
'rrectly show their management skills
th Ron and prepare for the loss while
er folks still working with the courts and
*s as a pub- Duke to come up with a
re in the settlement
>rofit-mak- If the sheriff does not feel he
are affected can keep the community safe
t has taken without these funds, I am sure
rations. there are many retired police ad-
increase re- ministrators living in Citrus
gued it County (who) would be willing to
e its stock- show him how it is done.


annual
deal with
re it will pay


Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills


OPINIONS INVITED
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cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a letter
to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
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at 352-564-2930.
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Letters must be no longer than
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to letters
@chronicleonline.com.


Treat Duke
like Joe Citizen
Maybe I'm not so smart, but
this situation with Duke appears
pretty simple to me.
If Harry Cooper or Scott Adams
or Joe Citizen doesn't pay his
taxes, the county seizes his home.
Is the power plant so different?
If it doesn't pay its taxes seize
its property The real estate, the
power plant, the vehicles any-
thing of value, seize it.
OK, like I said. Maybe I'm not
smart, but that seems like a way
to go.
Harry Cooper
Hernando


Hot Corner: PROGRESS ENERGY


Bound to happen
What did you think would hap-
pen? All you people (who) have
been bashing utility companies
and you're angry at corporations,
what did you think would happen?
Florida Power has always been the
highest taxpayer in the county. We
moved here 35 years ago to work
for them and we've been paying a
lot of taxes, but I think we're leav-
ing because the place is not the
same. What did you think would
happen if you bash them all the
time? And it's not the same com-
pany it was. You're not going to


get as much taxes. And what if
they shut the place down, which is
what a lot of you want? You're so
angry all the time in your Sound
Offs. All those people will leave.
Not just the utility company, but
the people (who) live here and
work and make good livings.
They'll go somewhere else and
pay taxes.
Stuck again, as usual
Well, the Progress Energy. Too
bad they didn't put it in the paper
before the elections came on.
Then the people would really know
(who) not to vote for in this


county. But anyway, we're stuck
again as usual. Have a nice day.
Pay your taxes. It's going way up
now.
Can't run with business
I read in this morning's paper
(Nov. 29) about Progress Energy
and the company's decision
places local authorities in a tough
spot. Well, the state's decision to
let Progress Energy charge me
for a power plant they haven't
even built yet has put a lot of
people in a tough spot. I didn't
see that in the paper. So
Progress Energy's taking us down


one at a time. I wouldn't be let-
ting them be getting my money
ahead of time. And you only get
what you deserve. You can't run
with big business and be their
friend.
Shut them off
This is in regards to Progress
Energy not wanting to pay their
tax bill. They own land from (U.S.)
19 all the way to the Gulf of Mex-
ico. They have prime land there,
water land. Pay your bill. Or like
they say to us, pay your bill or
we'll shut you off. Come on, Citrus
County. Shut them off.


prisons of our columns, but
pointing out similarities in our
lives. We were the same age and
were both small town Southern
boys. He was kind and responded
by cracking a joke about how if
folks kept reading our columns,
we'd get to keep writing 'em.
There, I feel better after writing
about something other than 37 to
26.
And, now, though it's tough, I
will offer congratulations to you
folks who were decked out in or-
ange and blue I'm sure on Sat-
urday, Nov 24, it was great to be a
Florida Gator!
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness res-
ident and a Chronicle columnist.



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

I am not aware of any stools
that can remain standing with
two legs.
Citrus County has always
taken the concept of economic
development with a big yawn.
We just figured we'd keep build-
ing new homes and Florida
Power/Progress Energy/Duke
would always be here as our
main employer and taxpayer.
While our current model of eco-
nomic development is better
than any one we have ever had,
it is still totally underfunded
and ignored.
Earlier this year, the county
refused to spend $30,000 for a
federal grant that would spon-
sor the agency helping small
businesses grow. Even the much
smaller Sumter County to the
east spends more money on
economic development than
Citrus County So does Her-
nando County So does Marion
County.
We need legs put back on our
economic stool and we are not
going to get that done by doing
nothing. We've got our heads in
the sand on this one.
If the average homeowner
suddenly sees a big jump in
property taxes our attractive-
ness as a retirement community
will be greatly diminished. If we
start losing retirees because the
cost of living goes up guess
which one of the two remaining
legs of our economic stool could
be kicked out? That would be
the medical segment, which is
highly dependent on business
from the retiree population.
A one-legged stool is known
as a Pogo Stick. And I'm not
sure how long we'd be able to
jump up and down on one leg
and keep smiling.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.



ARNOLD
Continued from Page C1

Progress CEO Bill Johnson, who
was supposed to have taken
over after the merger between
Duke and Progress Energy That
should have been the first clue
this Duke/Progress group was
not going to have the same val-
ues as the one we've dealt with
for decades.
On Wednesday, more than a
month and half after the prop-
erty appraiser certified the tax
roll, Duke withholds a $16 mil-
lion portion of its tax bill. Duke
has pulled similar stunts in
Ohio and Wyoming.
The timing of this one was
calculated and cold; a bullying
tactic designed to bend diminu-
tive Citrus County to the power-
ful Duke Energy will. Duke
Energy knew it would be too
late for the county to raise its
millage rate to collect more
taxes for the shortfall. They
knew county officials might be
tempted to settle on a reduced
value on taxable property
rather than face the grave cir-
cumstances of making up $16
million in tax revenue.
Sounds a lot like the "give me
your lunch or I am going to
punch you" tactic. Hmmm. "I
am hungry, but my arm hurts
where you punched me yester-
day; go ahead, take my lunch
and I will go hungry"
County government has no al-


ternative to fight back, and they
have unanimously agreed to do
so. Sure those punches in the
arm are going to sting, but we
can't go without lunch every day
and survive.


Mike Arnold, editor of the
Chronicle, and can be reached
at 352-564-2930 or marnold
@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 C3





C4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


COMMENTARY


Russia uses eastern Europe after WWII


MICHAEL FRANCIS
Guest Columnist
The author tells the story of
how the Russians occupied
Eastern Europe at the end of
World War II and imposed Marxism
on states, which had no taste for
communism or for the imposed
Russian leaders who knew little
about the countries they domi-
nated. Most of the book focuses on
Hungary, Poland and Czechoslova-
kia, although there is a good deal
about events in Romania and Bul-
garia. The author has a grasp of the
basic contours of the struggle and
an excellent eye for the interesting
anecdote illustrating the point.
One overarching question on the
discussion table for years is why
Washington and London allowed
the Russians to carry out their bru-
tal restructuring of the societies
and governments of those countries
which pulled them into the Com-
munist camp?
The standard answer is the west-
ern allies were drained by the war
and had no taste for a military con-
frontation with Moscow. Also, the
Russians had lost far more lives in
World War II than the other allied
countries put together. There was a
feeling the Russians were justified
in taking control of this area as the
"spoils of war."
Maybe the world would have
been a better place if Roosevelt,
Truman and Churchill had pushed
Moscow harder to leave Europe.
But at the time, it seemed a costly
and dangerous confrontation for
the U.S., Great Britain, France and
others to initiate. Those war-weary


BOOK REVIEW
SAnne Applebaum, Iron Curtain: "The Crushing of Eastern Europe
1944-1956." (New York, Doubleday, 2012) 566 pages, $35.


governments were focused on the
reconstruction of their own
economies in the post war period.
This volume gives us a vivid ac-
count of the suffering that resulted
from the Soviet occupation. Clue-
less Kremlin economic policy "ex-
perts" tried to remake every
country's economy Political sys-
tems built around communism
were set up to give Moscow control
over all aspects of life. This became
increasingly difficult to justify when
there was a failure to stimulate eco-
nomic growth in the area. This situ-
ation meant the military and police
power were needed keep Eastern
Europe in the communist bloc.
On top of all this, Stalin insisted
on war reparations from these
countries. He forced the eastern
Europeans to disassemble much of
their machinery and transport it to
Russia where, at least in theory, it
would be re-assembled to help re-
store the destroyed Russian indus-
trial system inefficient as it was
and remained. In fact, much of the
machinery was impossible to re-as-
semble and hence wasted.
Another major source of friction
was the behavior of the Russian
troops in Eastern Europe. In partic-
ular, the massive numbers of rapes of
women, producing hostility toward
Moscow that lingered for decades.
Many of the non-communist polit-
ical and social leaders in Eastern
Europe were sent to prisons in Rus-


sia to "purify" the new programs
being imposed. It reached all cor-
ners of society: newspapers, farm-
ers, labor unions, education, radio,
law enforcement and cultural activ-
ities. Of particular concern were the
churches protestant and Catholic.
The religious leaders had long-
standing links to groups abroad
which Moscow tried to sever Artists,
writers and those in the cinema
were severely restricted.
Another major target was educa-
tion. A curriculum needed to be de-
veloped that presented Marxism
and the Communist party in a fa-
vorable light. Even comedians were
watched carefully for political jokes
that could be interpreted as mock-
ing the Russians.
There were some outlets of es-
cape. Large numbers of people
from the eastern countries defied
Russian troops and fled to West
Germany Powerful radio stations
that broadcast the western point of
view and achievements were heard
across the area. Washington pro-
vided much of this through its spon-
sorship of the "Voice of America."
This poured a flood of criticism of
Moscow's policies to those who
dared to listen. Words rather than
soldiers were used against the
Russian occupation.
The beginning of the end came in
February 1966 when Russia's
leader, Nikita Khrushchev, made a
secret speech in front of the 20th


Party Congress. He denounced
Stalin (who died in 1953) for a long
string of abuses of power and failed
economic schemes, which he char-
acterized as being ineffective and
cruel. The CIA obtained a copy of
the speech and publicized the ad-
missions of Khrushchev This was
the beginning of the undermining of
Russian claims of economic devel-
opment and political legitimacy
In retrospect, the speech marked
the end of the Soviet system in East-
ern Europe although each coun-
try went through its own cathartic
convulsion as it broke free of
Moscow's influence.
This volume overflows with im-
portant moments and events that
happened out of the public eye dur-
ing those years. It chronicles a vic-
tory of the human spirit and rights
of individuals.
The Iron Curtain was a catastro-
phe and its scars will live on in the
region. But there is a positive end to
this chapter of history The brave
men and women in Eastern Europe
resisted being dictated to by Moscow
and their gallant story deserves to be
documented in books such as this.
Given the success of her first book
("Gulag: A History") and this fine
book, it would seem logical for Ap-
plebaum to produce a companion
volume describing how the Iron
Curtain crumbled.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill
Woods resident who taught inter-
national politics and US. foreign
policy at the University ofNotre
Dame for 39 years prior to retiring.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to
THE EDITOR

Generous donors
Thanks to the generosity
of our patrons at Stone
Crab Jam Festival, Ho-
mosassa Seafood Festival,
Yankeetown Seafood Festi-
val and Our Lady of Grace
flea market, Cookin' Good
raised $186 for Hurricane
Sandy storm victims.
Since our last letter, we
have heard many stories
on the news and on the
Weather Channel. Upon
investigation of the vari-
ous organizations assist-
ing those in need after
the storm, we came
across a group called the
Graybeards. They have
been around since 9/11,
helping those in need.
Many of the Graybeards
live in the Rockaway area
of New York, which was
one of the hardest hit
areas. A lot of these guys
lost their homes, and are
now on the other side of
the equation. We have de-
cided to give this money
to them for direct support
to the victims in this part
of New York.
Check out their website
at wwwgraybeards.com.
Again, we want to thank
everyone who donated.
Betsy and Steven
Schwartz
owners of Cookin' Good
Beverly Hills


I ;.w:qhqI1 t *'*I V


8th Annual
Crystal River Community
1 ** Holiday Boat Parade T.










S Saturday, December 22nd
Participants meet at Kings Bay at 4:45 pm
4Jyarade starts promptly at 6:1 Spm

Decorate your boat in the theme of
6 "A Magical Christmas"
S Watch the boat parade from any location on S
Kings Bay to see Santa before he takes off on ~ ~
his trip from the North Pole!
Prizes will be awarded for best themed boat and most lights. .
S Call Capt.Suzie Martin at 352-586-8068
y to pre-register and for more information.


.www.chronic.eonlne com --


T'ree o, Remembrance
Place an ornament on a Tree of Remembrance
to honor or memorialize someone. I
+al +at ui atn t32568


Bluegrass at the Blue Lodge

~ .j,/Eq *


FEATURING
Lonesome Pine Band

Saturday December 15, 2012
ALL AFTERNOON (1-5PM)
Rib-Eye Steak wall the trimmings

5060 S Memorial Dr, Homosassa, FL

$10 Donation for Lodge Charities
Contact 352-228-7666 & 352-746-6936 for info


OOODFDI


-' -= --., .. ; II
The Friends of Fort Cooper State Park Present ,







Fort Cooper State Park
S December 7th 9th
6 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
Admission: Donation of nonperishable food, cash,
new toys for Citrus United Basket or donation of
pet food for Citrus County Animal Services.
Friday, Dec. 7 & Saturday, Dec. 8
I l. Decorations, lights, luminaries, entertainment, (
s'mores & refreshments while supplies last
Special guests: Santa
Sunday, Dec. 9
Sii "Decorations and Lights
1 Fort Cooper State Park
S 3100 S. Old Floral City Road, Inverness, FL
(352) 726-0315




000D2Ue
4 -42,I

~;b?'jk MOMSi


December 1st
Christmas in the Hills Parade/Arts & Crafts & Car Show
Christmas Parade Crystal River
The Nutcracker
Television Auction
Strings for a Season
K-9 Karnival
Encore Win Lose or Die
Holiday Craft Show
December 2nd
Golden Dragon Acrobats
Christmas in Killarney
Encore Win Lose or Die
Holiday Craft Show

December 3rd
Crystal River Christmas Parade
Strings for a Season Production

December 7th
Father Christmas Ball
The New Dawn Singers
Ft. Cooper Night of Lights

December 8th
Inverness Christmas Parade
Holiday Prelude
Ft. Cooper Night of Lights

December 9th
Holiday Prelude
Ft. Cooper Night of Lights
Silver Bells

December 12th
Hanukkah Celebration

December 14th
Adopt a Tree

December 15th
Homosassa Boat Parade
Toy Run
A Day at the Races

December 16th
The Joy of Christmas A Singing Celebration of Carols
Citrus Springs Christmas Parade
December 19th 24th & 26th
Celebration of Lights




343

SPON ISOR




citted t n g e I *,r .*Cunt thebes


plc to liv adwrk


'~"""~'ii~iiE
""'""'""'"" .,,,,












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


COMPARING COSTS


Shoppers can save

as retailers go

head-to-head


Associated Press- *

season, **^ -. -
st h e 7son. -. --V.--- ....,

hottest trend y s c








to Toys R Us, are prom- '
among retail-tch thr c -
ers isn't OrTTLErEpstm ', -
found on a Padvertise- cDI ,, ,
store shelf.p ri t to p e te
It's taking CD~Y SINOEQT,', r"

cash register can c a
Major retail- f te p o
ers, from Best Buy. I., T .
to Toys R Us, are prom- p e
rising to match their competir -
tors' prices. Generally customers
need to bring in an advertise- such PIE
ment or printout to prove the.
same item is available else-
where at a lower price. In some
cases, shoppers can come back etit
with a receipt and get a refund t e ete n t e
for the difference if the price ofto pe Te e s
an item they bought fell. o e.o .o
Best Buy Co. Inc., TargetS s.c T t.c ,
Inc., Wal-Mart Stores Inc.ms te
and Sears Inc. offer price D
matching to customers year-
round. But what's different now
is Best Buy and Target are
matching online retailers such PRICE Mb
as Amazon.com for the first time.
That's a big deal, since online
prices tend to be lower than The basics: The electronics
those at stories local competitor all year lrou r
Shoppers will be able to save register and must be within
extra money, but they're going to period. The electronics reta
have to read a lot of fine print to holidays to apply to several
















stores. Walmart also matches
do so. Online retailers: Best Buy wi
"Price matching sounds good, and electronic hardware prod
but there are so many exclu- MP3 players. The retailer wil
sions, it sometimes isn't as good They are: Amazon.com, Apl
as it sounds," said Edgar Buycom, CircuitCity.com, C
Dworsky, the founder of Dell.com, Hhgregg.com, HF
ConsumerWorld.org, which Newegg.com, OfficeDepot.c
tracks deals for shoppers. Staples.com, Target.com, T
For instance, Target limits the
numberof onlineiretailers it will Deadline: Customers can s
price match against to five. Best wihn th e return toars eca
Buy has selected 20, but only when that is). Customers c
matched online prices from Novline 24, on prots offto
1to Nov. 17 and will start again Full policy: www.bestbuy.co
from Nov. 27 to Dec. 24.
Toys R Us is offering price
matching for the first time and 0 The basics: The discount r
will match prices customers find competitors year round, bu
in only other brick-and-mortar holidays to apply to online
stores. Walmart also matches time.
against in-store prices. Online retailers: Target wil
Toys R Us, Best Buy, Sears and They are Amazon.com, Wal
Target say they will match prices ToysRUs.com and BabiesR
found on their own websites. It's Deadline: ustmes ec.






wan t instead of one that's incon- chase to seek a refund.
not uncommon for retailers to













Here are five ways to get the
offer steeper discounts online Dec. 24. Taret's offer to m
than in their actual stores. (But
Toys R Us said it won't match 0 Full policy: https://corpora
prices on its own website if the experience/our-low-price-pr
item is marked as an "online- TI
on p te epeee The basics: The toy seller i
Even the most experienced this holiday season.
bargain hunters can get tripped
up by all the rules. But shoppers 0 Online price matches: Toys
can save some money if they're with the exception of its ow
diligent. RUs.com as long as the
"It really is a way to save "online-only price."
money and shop at the store you Deadline: Ends Dec. 24. Cu
want instead of one that's incon- chase to seek a refund.
venient," Dworsky said.
Here are five ways to get the
most out of price matching offers:




Workforce Connection poised

to put people back to work


he economy is moving along
in somewhat the same man-
ner as traffic did during my
return trip to Florida from San An-
tonio the Sunday after
Thanksgiving. Interstate
10 was bumper-to-
bumper and remained
so all the way to Hous-
ton and beyond. It was a
continuous ribbon of red
taillights crawling east-
ward against the glare of
white headlights ap-
proaching in the west-
bound lanes. Laura
As impossible as it WORK
seemed and despite the CONNI
obvious tangle of con-
gestion and occasional
roadblocks, traffic was chugging
along often at an impressive clip
- which, as I've suggested, might
be said of our economic recovery
Consider what's happening in
the neighboring Ocala/Marion
County metropolitan statistical
area (MSA). For the second con-
secutive month, Ocala led all of


B
E
(F
E4


Florida's metro areas with the
largest over-the-year unemploy-
ment rate drop. From October
2011 to October 2012, unemploy-
ment fell 2.8 percent,
from 11.9 percent to 9.1
percent, which the U.S.
Department of Labor
reported last week. It
gave Ocala the third
best year in the country
in terms of putting peo-
ple back to work.
Citrus County is not
considered an MSA. But
3yrnes if it were, it could tout
-ORCE similar economic gains
CTION with an unemployment
rate that has fallen 2.4
percent over the year
from 11.6 percent to 9.2 percent.
Florida's rate fell from 10.2 percent
to 8.2 percent during the past year
Whether you consider the eco-
nomic recovery to be pedal-to-the-
metal or slow-and-steady, one
consequence of improvement is it

See Page D3


1. Know the policy
It ion mant to take i(lantx'ie
ot a price-i lltth fttei: rea(l the

ti 'd thie .llldell ne -on tie l t:ire'-
e\el))ite
Print lut lthe i )ol:lY and brin.,
it \ith .011i Hji inLg' li1 rd :o)
\'ill be helpfill if \:ii need to
* jl' .1iie oiiri'se
-c, "Kn m, their IP)Il:. t
ISS' l k\val'(rd or ,oii Ij\
I)b Iliitted into tii nkiin.-
eiiietliiL d(oenI't iiial-

i 2. Bring proof
Alj s ril' thie
Slthe priinted \elt
pi a e tf:r tlie iteiii


99,' doesn 't rIe-
-- 1 ': I i re 1


.99 t 11e
,$th e

-.87


ATCH GUIDE
EST BUY
; retailer will match the price of any
ig. The match can be sought at the
the normal return and exchange
iler is expanding its rules during the
online sellers for the first time.
vill match lower prices on appliances
ducts only, such as TVs, tablets and
I only match the prices of 20 websites.
ple.com, BHphotovideo.com,
CompUSA.com, Crutchfield.com,
Pcom, HomeDepot.com, Lowes.com,
:om, OfficeMax.com, Sears.com,
*igerDirect.com, and Walmart.com.
price match against local competitors
nge period (check your receipt for
an match against online prices until
it before Dec. 24.
om/pricematch
TARGET
retailer matches the prices of local
t it's expanding its policy for the
retailers and target.com for the first

I match against five online sellers.
mart.com, BestBuy.com,
Js.com.
eek price matches for local brick-
* items bought between Nov. 1 and
atch online prices ends Dec. 16.
ite.target.com/about/shopping-
romise
DYS R US
s matching prices for the first time

s R Us will not match online prices,
n sites, ToysRUs.com and Babies
purchase doesn't state that it is an

customers have seven days after a pur-

See Page D3


, .1*.l


JI
'- .. -. .

"' sad. be-
CaUdIe it said
cashiers have access to all
local advertisements. But
Dworsky recommends bringing
ads in anyway If there's any con-
fusion, you'll be better prepared
to make your case no matter
where you shop.
The cashiers and customer
representatives are always look-
ing for a reason not to approve
the transaction, Dworsky said.
3. Save receipts
Some retailers will give you
money back if you see a lower
price after you buy an item.
Keep a hold of your receipts and,
particularly for big-ticket items,
continue to look for lower prices.
Best Buy will issue refunds
until the end of January Toys R
Us lets you seek a refund up to
seven days after buying an item.
Sears customers can get a re-
fund after 14 days. Target is let-
ting customer's price match
against brick-and-mortar retail-
ers until Dec. 24 for any item
bought after Nov 1. You can only
ask Target to match the price of
an online retailer until Dec. 16.
4. Go straight to the
customer service desk
Many retailers have hired
cashiers specifically for the hol-
iday rush, so the new employees
may not be up-to-speed on the
store's price matching policy
Heather Wheeler, who runs sav-
ings website TheKrazyCoupon
Ladycom, recommends han-
dling the transaction at the cus-
tomer service desk instead of the
cashier.
"(Those staffers are) trained a
little more and are more knowl-
edgeable," Wheeler said.


See Page D3




Community involvement

benefits small business


E experts agree word-of-
mouth is the best kind of
advertising. When people
in a community talk in positive
terms about a business,
it communicates credi-
bility. Affirmative ver-
bal endorsement
enhances the reputa-
tion of any small busi-
ness. The result usually
motivates others to buy
service or product from I.
the business.
Community involve-
ment opens the doors to Dr. Fr
networking opportuni- Hei
ties, raises the profile of EXPER
the small business and AT
creates a buzz about M
your company. Being
involved in community volunteer
activities stands out in the public
eye.
Stand out in community
In the world of big corporations,
acts of social responsibility tend to
have a positive effect on public


I


I


recognition. People think well
company when it contributes
important causes. In the worlc
small business, it works the sa
way, but on the lo
level. Volunteering
support a worthy cc
munity cause can tra
beyond just feeling go
about your involvement
It opens the door
many unexpected be
fits and opportunities:
Get involved


ederick
rzog
IENCE
TERS


There is a well-
fined path to commune
involvement for
small business owi
Here are a few open
proven to work.


Join your Chamber of Cc
merce. It sponsors all kinds
events and offers opportunities
in-kind service donations. Noth
beats the networking opportu
ties of chamber participation.
U Civic groups and charita


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Risk


plays


role in


buyout


Dear Bruce: I saw
your column in the
Lexington Herald-
Leader and have a ques-
tion for you.
I recently received a no-
tification in the mail from
a previous employer who
is offering to buy out my
retirement plan with a
one-time lump sum. I can
roll it over into an IRA or
401(k) or cash it out. I was
with the company for 19
years. If I were eligible
(old enough), the retire-
ment would pay me $1,500
a month. I will be 49 in
January, so I have a few
years before I would be el-
igible to receive the bene-
fits. Can you provide some
insight? Reader in Lex-
ington, Iy.
Dear reader: You have
an interesting and some-
what complex decision to
make. Unfortunately, you
left out one very impor-
tant piece of information:
What is the lump sum pay-
ment that has been of-
fered to you?
You mentioned you will
be 49, which probably
means you will have to
wait 10 to 12 years before
you could collect from this
retirement plan. If you
took the cash, whatever
that amount might be, you
would have the use of it
for that extra 10 to 12
years. The variable here is
how much the lump sum
is and how you would in-
vest it in terms of risk.
The key ingredient in
this transaction is how
much income this money
would generate for you. If
you are one of those folks
who want absolutely no
risk, then the income
would be next to nothing
in today's environment.
The recent presidential
election seems to indicate
the administration will
continue the pressure for
very low interest rates.
That isn't to say there
aren't investments where
you can get a good return,
but risk is a variable.
You most certainly
should talk to a financial
adviser about specific av-
enues open to you. It's a
nice situation to be in.
Dear Bruce: In the
S business section of the
Richmond Times-
Dispatch, you recently re-
sponded to a question
Sh about probate on a will.
My mother-in-law passed
S away recently, and as I
f a watch my husband strug-
Sto gle to go through probate,
of I'm wondering what I will
me be up against when my 88-
cal year-old father passes
to away
m- My stepmother died
vel three years ago, making
ood him a widower. They set
ent. up a trust for their ac-
t count, leaving me as the
ne- executor of the estate
s. when he dies. I've heard
trusts don't require pro-
de- bate if all titled assets and
nity the will itself specify how
the things should be divided
ner. among heirs. To back up
ers that hearsay, your article
mentioned trusts operate
om- outside the will and out-
of side the purview of pro-
for bate court.
ing My question is: What
ni- steps need to be taken to
settle an estate trust? -
ble Reader in Richmond, Va


Page D3


Page D3


\ %I'b.9q


: :I :. l r l-. 1 1 : 1-..II -I 1









D2

SUNDAY
DECEMBER 2, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan REl.
this:
B Ir,%- 'W


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Inverness parade honors Patti Smith as grand marshal


his Saturday, Dec. 8,
the Citrus County
Chamber of Com-
merce and City of Inverness
are honored to have Patti
Smith serve as grand mar-
shal of the Inverness Christ-
mas parade. Like many of
us, she came to Citrus
County for a visit one that
has lasted 32 years and


doesn't show signs of end-
ing. Patti retired this past
July after devoting 30 years
to Parks and Recreation.
Asked about her initial re-
action when asked to be the
Grand Marshal, she
laughed.
"I said, 'They are going to
wonder who that grandma
is!' I am honored. When you


work hard, it is nice to know
that people recognize that
time and commitment."
Speaking of her time with
Parks and Recreation, Patti
said, "We worked hard with
a great team of long-term
employees; we got into
grants and acquired prop-
erty, the renovation of In-
verness began and then the


events just took off."
She enjoys her grandchil-
dren and did some recent
traveling to Ireland and
back to New York, but she
can't seem to sit still and
misses the ties to the com-
munity And don't worry -
if you are missing Patti in
the community, she will
soon be right back among us


as she begins a new career
that follows her passion of
giving. She begins her next
chapter in Citrus County
shortly, working with HPH
Hospice.
The 2013 Inverness
Christmas Parade is pre-
sented by B&W Rexall
Drugs, the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce and


the City of Inverness. The
parade, always held the
second Saturday of Decem-
ber, will feature nearly 100
entries, Ronald McDonald
and Santa and Mrs. Claus.
The parade kicks off at
noon from Pizza Hut and
proceeds east on U.S. 41/
State Road 44 to Highland
Boulevard.


Business After Hours

at local orange store


Pictured, from left: Dudley Calfee, general manager of Ferris Farms; Josh Wooten, Chamber
president/CEO; Cira Schnettler, administrative manager for the Chamber; and Matthew
McGuffin, administrative assistant for the Chamber.
M embers of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce enjoyed
an evening of music and networking, courtesy of Ferris Farms
in beautiful, historic Floral City. The retail store for Ferris Groves
opens its doors every November to Chamber members. This year,
attendees were treated to finger food, samples from the store and
a selection of sauces, as well as mimosas made with fresh-
squeezed OJ! Double Trouble provided live entertainment.


HAVE YOU...
... reserved your company's Marketplace booth for Manatee Festival?
Spots are almost all assigned, so call or email Jeff Inglehart at 795-3149 or
jeff@citruscountychamber.com today!
... sent in your suggestion to rename the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
bi-monthly newsletter?
Tomorrow is the last day we will accept recommendations. The chosen winner will
receive a $50 Visa gift card! Email your suggestion to cindi@citruscountychamber.com.


Citrus County Cruisin'
Dec. 4 -A Swingin' Christmas: Come out
and enjoy a nine-piece orchestra and three
crooners performing the best of Frank
Sinatra, Michael Buble and Bobby Darin -
plus Christmas favorites. Activity Center,
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, 240 W
Fenway Drive, Hernando. Guest tickets are
$26 plus tax. For more information, call 352-
746-7633.
Dec. 7, 8 and 9 Stroll through Fort
Cooper State Park and enjoy thousands of
lights and luminaries as you take in the
sights and sounds of Christmas. On the 7th
and 8th, children may visit with Santa and
live entertainment begins at 7 p.m. Admis-
sion is a nonperishable food item, new toy
or cash for Citrus United Basket or dona-
tion of pet food for Citrus County Animal
Services. Hours: 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Fort
Cooper Park is at 3100 S. Old Floral City
Road, Inverness. For more information
please call 352-726-0315.
Dec. 7 Fourth annual Holiday Grinch-
mas Show. The New Dawn Singers is a trav-
eling group of college-age performers who
bring a high-energy song and dance show to
all ages across the country They are full of
life, enthusiasm and spirit. The show takes
place at the Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 West Citrus Springs Blvd., Cit-
rus Springs, FL 34434. Tickets are $7 per
person. Call 352-465-7007.
Dec. 7 Come celebrate Girls Nite Out
with Hospice of Citrus County of the Na-
ture Coast at the Homosassa TOO Thrift
and Gift Shoppe. From 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
there will be chair massages, handbags,
hair salon, candles, jewelry, goodie bags,
wine and cheese and lots of surprises! Do-
nation is $10. Call Caroline at 352-621-1550.
Dec. 8 Santa and Mrs. Claus visit Cit-
rus County once again for the annual In-
verness Christmas parade, presented this
year by B&W Rexall Drugs, the Citrus


County Chamber of Commerce and the City
of Inverness. The parade kicks off at noon
from Pizza Hut and proceeds east on U.S. 41/
State Road 44 to Highland Boulevard. On
the second Saturday of December, this year's
parade theme is "A Postcard Christmas."
Dec. 8 Open House at Three Sisters
Springs. Join U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the
refuge staff at Three Sisters Springs and
tour the boardwalk, see manatees in a nat-
ural spring habitat, learn more about your
local national wildlife refuges and visit the
Friends of Crystal River NWR gift shop.
Park for free and take the free shuttle from
the King's Bay Plaza on U.S. 19 and King's
Bay Drive (by Sonic and Save-A-Lot).
Hours: 8 a.m. to noon. For more informa-
tion, call 352-563-2088.
Dec. 19 to Dec. 24 The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park, along with the Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park, will host its annual
Christmas Celebration of Lights, a seven-
evening event, from Wednesday, Dec. 19
through Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, and again
on Wednesday, Dec. 26. The park will open
at 5:30 p.m. on these evenings and remain
open until 9 p.m. A donation of $3 for adults
and $1 for children ages 6 through 12 is sug-
gested. Children age 5 and under are ad-
mitted free. The park is at 4150 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa. For more information,
call the park office at (352) 628-5343, ext.
1002, Monday through Friday


Shop local first -



it helps everyone

The Citrus County Chamber of Com- After Hours from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at B&W
merce and the Citrus County Economic Rexall Drugs, 214 U.S. 41 South in Inver-
Development Council encourage you to ness. Come out to mix and mingle with
"Shop Local First" all year, and especially your business networking group and check
during this traditional gift-giving time. an item or two off of your shopping list.
When we shop stores within our county, Next week, the community is invited to
it keeps a larger percentage of the dollar join the Chamber of Commerce at the
here in Citrus County; Crystal River Mall
it encourages employ- Please consider making north of town on U.S.
ment, sustains families 1 19, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
and has the potential to Shop Local First" your on Thursday, Dec. 13.
create additional busi- New Year's resolution. We will be announcing
nesses to supply mate- the award winners
rials for finished products. Shopping from the Crystal River and Inverness pa-
within Citrus County also keeps tax dol- rades. This event, sponsored by the Crystal
lars in Citrus, which provides all the serv- River Mall and Capital City Bank, will fea-
ices we enjoy: police, fire, libraries and ture live music and visits with Santa in ad-
schools. edition to the awards presentations. Bring
Please consider making "Shop Local the kids out to see Santa and then do a lit-
First" your New Year's resolution. And tle shopping. For a complete list of stores
why not start early? This coming Thursday, and events at the mall, please visit
Dec. 6, is the annual Christmas Business www.thecrystalrivermall.com.


Upcoming EVENTS




CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce
Dec. 5 BWA December Luncheon: 11
a.m. at PLANTATION ON CRYSTAL
RIVER. Open to men. Sponsored by Na-
ture Coast Bank; guest speaker Katie
Humphrey, health and empowerment
coach, speaks on "7 Core Steps to Revo-
lutionize Your Life."
Dec. 5 Ribbon-cutting: 4:30 p.m. at
LAWSON BBQ
Dec. 6 Business After Hours: 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at B&W REXALL DRUGS.
Dec. 7 Ribbon-cutting: 8:30 a.m. at
FLOWERS BY BARB.
Dec. 8 "A Postcard Christmas" Inver-
ness parade at noon, presented by B&W
Rexall Drugs.
Dec. 12 Ribbon-cutting: 4:30 p.m. at
KINGSWAY.
Dec. 12 Ribbon-cutting: 4:30 p.m. at
NATURE COAST FINANCIALADVISORS,
INC.
Stay updated on all [ r
our business and com-
munity events at our
website www.citrus
countychamber.com or
click the QR code here: il *.*p"


Remember...
Do you have news of your chamber
member company that you would
like to share? Send your stories,
photos and press releases to cindi@
citruscountychamber.com to get your
company in the paper! Also, remem-
ber to enter your company events on
the website at www.citruscounty
chamber.com.

-- .hb us on
facebook






What's better than pulling up to your holiday party in sleigh
this holiday season? How about arrving in a 2013 Chevy
Corvette Coupe? Joanna Castle Executive Drector of the Citus
County YMCA co-hosts Chamber Chat this week and tells us
how YOU can wm thi fabulous new car donated by Crystal
Chevrolet Homosassa. After you win a new Corvette be sure to
op on over to the 26th Annual Manatee Festival in downtown
Crystal River on January 19th and 2th. Fin arts, craft fair,
activities for the kids. beer garden and lots of great
entertainment s what this event i all about! W=&a set
glamorous t his holiday season? Jennifer Riager from M Hair
Studio is back to show us some snmpl holiday hair tips. You are
sure to ook fabulous at your next holiday party And if you
need to bring something d Clious to bring that party. Kim
McPherson from the Rustic Ranch has a recipe that is sure to
umpress-- Stuifed Apples. Is your mouth watering already? I
know mme is You do not want to miss this im packed edition


FoLoOoRoloDoA
-1
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-"- -

FESTIrVAL


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Irven attends
anti-aging event
Dr. Nancy Irven recently at-
tended an American Academy
of Anti-Aging
Medicine,
(A4M) confer-
ence. Pre-
sentations
S were on The
Gut, Brain
and Autoim-
Dr.Nancy mune Disor-
Irven ders, and the
dangers of
cholesterol-lowering drugs.
Dr. Irven earned her diplomat
in anti-aging through the A4M in
2000. The A4M is a group of
more than 12,000 MD's, DO's,
Ph.D.'s and DC's worldwide,
who practice functional
medicine.
Presenters included: William
Davis, MD, author of Wheat
Belly, which has been No. 1 on
the New York Times best-seller
list; Dr. David Perlmutter, neu-
rologist and medical director of
the Dr. Oz Show; and Dr.
Fasano, director of Celiac Re-
search, University of Maryland
School Of Medicine. The pre-
senters emphasized they are
not trying to practice outside the
box, they are trying to enlarge
the box.
Because of the results of Dr.
Fasano's research, we now
know 1 in 133 people has celiac
disease instead of 1 in 10,000.
Dr. Irven practices at Irven
Chiropractic Health Center,
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Suite
2, Crystal River. She can be
contacted at 352-795-9111 or
www. IrvenChiro.com.
Middlebrooks
becomes a CFP
Dayna L. Middlebrooks has
been authorized by the Certi-
fied Financial Planner Board of
Standards (CFP Board) to use
the certification marks CFP,
Certified Financial Planner and
CFP in accordance with CFP
Board certification and renewal
requirements.
Middlebrooks is a CFP,
M.S.B.A., financial adviser and
registered investment adviser
representative at Raymond
James Financial Services Inc.,
member FINRA/SIPC at 2657
N. Forest Ridge Blvd., in Her-
nando. Middlebrooks joined


COST
Continued from Page D1


5. Look beyond retailers
You can also price match depend-
ing on how you pay EBay Inc.'s pay-
ment processor, PayPal, promises to
match a lower price if you've already
made a purchase using the service.
That includes airline tickets. PayPal
will match the prices of retailers that
don't let customers use PayPal, how-
ever. Just fill out a form and upload a
receipt when you find a lower price.
PayPal will give you back up to $1,000
for all purchases made until Dec. 31.
You should also ask your credit
card company to see if it offers price
matching. It's rare, but there are a few
cards that do.
Citi just launched a program for its
credit card holders. Called the Citi
Price Rewind program, it promises to
do the work for you. Register your
purchases made on the Citi credit


Headhunters open house


Special to the Chronicle
Headhunters Barber Styling will have an open house from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 8, at 2012 State Road 44 W., in Inverness, across from the Dodge Dealership, between
RaceTrac and Aaron's. Door prizes and free mini massages will be available. The barber
shop is offering patrons who buy one haircut will get one free. Another offer is $5 off a hair-
cut for a friend or spouse. Free energizing shampoos with every haircut or free facials for
women.


Raymond James in 2002 and
has more than 10 years experi-
ence in the financial services in-
dustry. She provides financial
planning services by consider-
ing all aspects of an individual's


financial situation, helping the
investor develop a strategy for
meeting his or her goals and
providing guidance through the
personal financial planning
process.


GUIDE
Continued from Page D1

Full policy: www.toysrus.com/
pricematch
WALMART
The basics: The discount retailer
is keeping its year-round price
matching policy unchanged. The
company doesn't require cus-
tomers to bring in the advertise-
ment, but experts recommend
bringing it anyway, just in case.
Online retailers: Not available.
Deadline: Available year-round,
but will only do so at the register.

card online and it will send you a
check for the difference if it finds a
lower price from an online retailer.
The program is aimed at pricier
purchases: It will only issue a dis-
count if the price difference is $25 or
more. Citi will give you the amount up


These marks identify individ-
uals who have met the rigorous
experience and ethical require-
ments of the CFP Board, have
successfully completed finan-
cial planning coursework and


* Full policy: http://corporate.
walmart.com/ad-match-guarantee
SEARS
* The basics: The department store
is keeping its year-round price
matching policy unchanged over
the holidays.
* Online retailers: Sears will only
matches local competitor's prices
found online. Does not match on-
line-only retailers.
* Deadline: The program runs all
year long. Customers can price
match up to 14 days after the pur-
chase.
* Full policy: www.sears.com/price
match


to $250 for each item, and up to $1,000
a year. Of course, you're going to need
to pay your credit card bill in full and
not incur interest charges to truly
make this a deal.
Joseph Pisani can be reached at
http://twitter com/josephpisani


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will be considered for publica-
tion. Images taken with most cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
* Submissions about specific prices of products or
sales events are considered advertising and are not
eligible for Business Digest.


I .I'
_ lE ,I _' : ,.'. .


have passed the CFP certifi-
cation examination covering the
following areas: the financial
planning process, risk manage-
ment, investments, tax planning
and management, retirement
and employee benefits and es-
tate planning. CFP certificants
also agree to meet ongoing
continuing education require-
ments and uphold CFP Board's
Code of Ethics and Profes-
sional Responsibility, Rules of
Conduct and Financial Plan-
ning Practice Standards.
CFP Board is a nonprofit cer-
tification organization with a
mission to benefit the public by
granting the CFP certification
and upholding it as the recog-
nized standard of excellence for
personal financial planning.
CFP Board currently authorizes
more than 61,000 individuals to
use these marks in the United
States. For more about CFP
Board, visit www.CFP.net.
Labels celebrates
one year anniversary
Labels will celebrate its one
year anniversary Dec. 17, after
a year of financial success and
some positive surprises.
Labels purchases and sells
gently-used name-brand cloth-
ing such as American Eagle
and Aeropostale as well as
handbags and accessories.
Modeled after the successful
nationwide chain, Plato's closet,
Labels provides the same
amenities as Plato's, only
closer to home, keeping dollars
in Citrus County.
"This unique store model has
been extremely successful, not
only for the Key Training Center
and adults with developmental
disabilities, but for Citrus County
residents," said Melissa Walker,
assistant executive director of



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

Dear Reader: As I indi-
cated in the column you
refer to, trusts pass outside
of the probate court and are
private, as contrasted with a
will, which is a public docu-
ment. That said, there are
no easy answers.
You mentioned a trust has
been formed and there is a
will of which you are the ex-
ecutor The first thing you
must do is find out the terms
of the trust what kind of
trust it is and what it is set
up to accomplish. Most folks
of modest means set up
trusts simply to avoid pro-
bate.
You also must find out the
identity of the trustee the
person who makes the deci-
sions for the trust and


BYRNES
Continued from Page D1

has triggered the end of the
federal Emergency Unem-
ployment Compensation
(EUC) program. Initiated dur-
ing numerous previous reces-
sions, EUC provides
additional unemployment
benefits to displaced workers
experiencing long-term job-
lessness in states with high
unemployment rates. Since
2008, it has been extended 10
times and was originally set to
end last year
The last effective date for
an EUC claim is Dec. 23, the
last payable week for all
claimants is the week ending
Dec. 29. The program ends
Jan. 2, 2013, for all EUC
claimants, including 2,370 of
those jobless in our region or
12 percent of our unem-
ployed.
Travelers on the road of life
know that no matter how
swiftly traffic may move, we
can find ourselves unexpect-
edly broken down along the
way Of course, instead of sit-
ting by the side of the road
hoping our overheated en-
gines or flat tires repair them-
selves, most motorists do
whatever they can to get up
and running. We have auto in-
surance, AAA and other road-


side assistance plans to help
us.
Similarly, for those who
have lost jobs through no
fault of their own, the unem-
ployment compensation sys-
tem provides temporary and
partial wage replacement to
help displaced workers get
back on the road to
employment.
This is probably a good time
to point out neither Workforce
Connection nor any of
Florida's 23 other regional
workforce boards administer
or control the unemployment
compensation system, now re-
ferred to as "re-employment
assistance." Unemployment
Compensation benefits are
handled by the Florida De-
partment of Economic Oppor-
tunity (DEO).
With that said, we under-
stand for the long-term unem-
ployed, it may be difficult to
gauge any economic progress
or cheer conditions that mean
the end of emergency bene-
fits. If you have been collect-
ing EUC, Workforce
Connection wants you to
know you may lose your un-
employment benefits, but we
are here to help get you back
on the road to employment.
As that old chestnut goes,
when one door closes, an-
other opens. Our doors at
Workforce Connection are
open to job seekers, at no


charge, throughout Citrus,
Levy and Marion counties.
When you walk through the
door at our Inverness office,
you'll find professional staff
ready to serve you as well as
ample resources to help you
search and apply for jobs, pre-
pare for interviews and assist
with training and other sup-
port services. You can find
our office at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., south of town off U.S.
41. Or call us at 352-637-2223
or 800-434-JOBS.
Here's a sample of the fee-
free employment services:
Online job postings, re-
ferrals and job fairs
R6sum6, computer and
interview skill workshops
Skills/interest/aptitude
assessments
One-on-one consultation
with trained Employment
Specialists
Financial assistance for
education and training
Job-search resources
such as Internet access,
phone, copier and fax
This is just the start. The
bottom line is, the more you
avail yourself to the resources
and the more you work with
our trained placement spe-
cialists again, at no charge
- the better your chances of
replacing unemployment
checks with a paycheck and
paid benefits.
Need convincing? Last


month, 552 employers posted
1,574 open positions with
Workforce Connection, in-
cluding 153 employers in Cit-
rus County with 304 jobs. For
our region, that's more than
twice as many open positions
and a 52 percent increase in
the number of employers
posting jobs.
Citrus County saw a 103
percent increase over the
year in job openings, from 150
to 304. And the number of em-
ployers posting positions rose
80 percent from 85 to 153.
During October, Workforce
Connection found jobs for
1,131 people, netting a job
placement rate of 20.52 per-
cent, topping the state rate of
18.65 percent. Since January,
Workforce Connection has
helped 7,850 job seekers find
employment.
So the takeaway is, while
federal emergency unemploy-
ment benefits will soon end,
Workforce Connection is
ready, willing and able to help
shift your job search into high
gear.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a certi-
fied workforce professional
and communications man-
ager at Workforce Connec-
tion. Contactherat
352-291-9559 or 800-434-5627,
ext. 1234 orlbyrnes@
clm workforce. com.


HERZOG
Continued from Page D1

organizations are great sources of community in-
volvement. Sponsor a sports team, a food drive or
offer supplies to an event with your name on them.
Involve your employees in the volunteer ac-
tivity Working together for a common cause
builds strong bonds. Pride in making a contribu-
tion runs deep.
Look to schools, Junior Achievement and
other prospects to support youth groups. When
young people see the volunteer efforts of small
business people, it reinforces the importance in
American small business people.
A one-man band
So what if your business consists of one or two
people. Volunteering for a worthy cause puts your
business in the spotlight of community aware-
ness. Being on stage is socially responsible.
SCORE of Citrus County
SCORE of Citrus County offers the best coach-
ing for the existing business, not just a start-up
situation. We have counselors in many business
disciplines with great ideas to help your business
grow
Citrus SCORE earned the, "Top Gun" national
award, because of the quality support our volun-
teers provided small business owners in our county
Call for counseling services 352-249-1236. There
is no charge for our services. We have a huge library
of free books and a large national website for limit-
less education and resources for business owners.
Help us help you "for the life of your business."

Dr Frederick J Herzogis immediate past chair-
man of Citrus County SCORE. He can be
reached via email at fherzog@tampabayrrcom


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 D3


the Key Training Center.
"Because we were initially
targeting the younger genera-
tion, we hadn't anticipated the
number of shoppers we'd have
in the older demographic," said
Walker, who added she was
pleased Labels grew faster
than projected.
Also setting Labels apart from
the traditional clothing store is the
demographic of its employees.
"Most of our employees are
high school students," Walker
said. "We felt the need to pro-
vide this age group an opportu-
nity to learn more about the job
market and receive on-the-job
training."
At the same time, Labels
provides jobs for developmen-
tally disabled adults, making it
another win-win situation for the
Key Training Center.
Located in the Conner's
Plaza in Inverness, Label's
business hours are 10 a.m. to 7
p.m. Tuesday through Saturday
and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
For information, visit www.
facebook.com/labelscitrus
county or call 352-419-7591.
New boutique in
Crystal River Mall
Erica's Boutique is Crystal
River Mall's newest tenant.
Erica Meier has been in busi-
ness in Citrus County for more
than a year and decided it was
time to grow. Erica's Boutique
specializes in consignment and
carries clothing for men,
women and babies, as well as
jewelry and hair accessories.
Erica's boutique is between
Regal Cinema and JCPenney.
For more information on
leasing opportunities or Crystal
River Mall, contact the mall of-
fice at 352-795-2585 or like us
on Facebook.


what assets are involved.
Talk these things over with
your dad, assuming he is
willing to confide in you.
There are decisions to be
made concerning taxes and
other variables.
I know this is not the firm
answer you would like, but
unfortunately, these issues
are never one-size-fits-all.
Get all the facts together
and then sit down with your
dad and a tax attorney, or
possibly a CPA who special-
izes in tax and estate mat-
ters.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. cor
or to Smart Money PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.












Review: Gift guide to small tablets


Associated Press

NEW YORK The tablet com-
puter is without a doubt the gift of
the season just like it was last
year. But if you resisted the urge
in 2011, now is the time to give in.
This season's tablets are better all
around. Intense competition has
kept prices very low, making
tablets incredible values com-
pared to smartphones and PCs.
The first step in the buying
process is to decide on the size of
the tablet. They fall into two rough
categories: the full-sized tablet, pi-
oneered by the iPad, and the half-
size tablet, epitomized by the
Kindle Fire.
Full-sized tablets, which gener-
ally have screens measuring about
10 inches on the diagonal, are bet-
ter for surfing websites designed
for PCs, and far better when it
comes to displaying magazines
and documents. Overall, they go
further toward replacing a laptop.
They cost $400 and up.
Half-sized tablets, which have
screens measuring roughly 7
inches on the diagonal, are
cheaper and lighter, but just as
good as full-sized tablets for e-
book reading. It's an excellent first
computing device for a kid, or a
gentle nudge into the digital world
for an older adult with little com-
puting experience. This year's
crop costs $199 and up, but last
year's models are available for
less.
If you've settled on a small
tablet, here are some top choices.
*Apple iPad Mini (starts at $329
for 16 gigabytes of storage)


The most expensive of the
small tablets is also the pret-
tiest. Its exquisitely machined
metal rim sets it well apart
from competing tablets
clothed in plastic and rubber
It's also thin and light, despite
having a screen that's 40 per-
cent bigger than other "small"
tablets. But the quality of the
screen doesn't quite measure
up to the competition. It has
fewer pixels than other small
tablets, and they're spread
over a larger area, making for
a relatively coarse, pixelated
look. On the other hand, the
Mini has two cameras, front
and back, which is a rarity.
Where the Mini really wins
is in third-party apps: it's the
only small tablet that has ac-
cess to Apple's App Store,
with a superlative selection of
high-quality apps. It's an ex-
cellent addition to the house-
hold that's already hooked on
iPhones and full-size iPads.
For those not wedded to the Goc
"Apple system," the other new
tablets merit a close look. con
Amazon Kindle Fire HD
(starts at $199 for 16 gigabytes of
storage)
A year ago, the Kindle Fire was
the plucky, cut-rate tablet, the
Dodge Neon to the iPad's BMW
This year, the gap in quality and
features has narrowed consider-
ably. The Kindle Fire HD has a
better screen than the iPad Mini,
and now sports a front-facing cam-
era. The original Kindle Fire had
none.
In another nice touch, it has


Associate
ogle's Cheryl Pon shows off apps o0
SGoogle Nexus 7 tablet at the GoogI
ference June 27 in San Francisco.

speakers on either side of the
screen when it's held horizontally,
making for much better stereo
sound when you're playing a
movie.
The selection of content is nar-
rower than for the iPad, since it's
heavily slanted toward Amazon's
services. Likewise, the selection
of third-party apps is smaller than
on the iPad or Google's Nexus 7.
But there are enough games to
thrill a kid for hours, and like


Barnes & Noble's Nook, the
S Kindle can be configured
with a special "kid mode"
That shields them from racier
content and from messing
up your settings.
The Kindle Fire is espe-
cially useful for members of
Amazon's Prime shipping
service, since they get access
to free streaming movies. On
the other hand, anyone could
be annoyed by the ads that
appear on the lock screen.
.J1 Getting rid of them costs $15.
There's no option for cellu-
lar broadband, so you're lim-
ited to Wi-Fi connections.
U Barnes & Noble Nook
HD (starts at $199 for 8 giga-
bytes of storage)
Barnes & Noble has paid a
lot of attention to the screens
on its Nooks. This year, it's
clearly outdone the competi-
tion, with a screen that packs
the pixels tighter than any
d Press other small tablet. It's very
n the sharp and colorful, ap-
e I/O preaching the look of the
Retina screen that graces
the full-size iPad.
The other strength of the Nook
HD is that it has a slot for a mem-
ory card, meaning that you can ex-
pand the storage space for movies
and music by 32 gigabytes for $25.
It's the only tablet in our roundup
with this feature.
The downside is, the Nook HD
is less of a general-purpose tablet
and more of a consumption device
for books and movies. It doesn't
have a camera, so it's no good for
videoconferencing. The selection


of apps is the smallest. You'll find
big names like "Angry Birds" here,
but there is no depth to the cata-
log. There's also no option for cel-
lular broadband.
Still, the Nook is an excellent
choice for avid readers, kids and
others who won't be frustrated by
the small selection of things like 3-
D shoot-em-up games.
Google Nexus 7 (starts at $199
for 16 gigabytes of storage)
Frustrated that Amazon and
Barnes & Noble were taking
Google's Android software, gutting
it and using it to power tablets that
don't yield the search giant a red
cent in advertising revenue or e-
book sales, Google this year
launched the first tablet under its
own brand. The Nexus 7 has a
power-house processor and a
screen similar to that of the Kin-
dle Fire HD. Since it runs stock
Android, it has access to hundreds
of thousands of applications writ-
ten for Android smartphones, and
it has more sophisticated multi-
tasking abilities than the competi-
tors, so it's easy to switch from
program to program. Like the
iPad Mini, it has a GPS chip for
navigation. It has a front-facing
camera for videoconferencing.
There's a $299, 32-gigabyte ver-
sion that can connect to AT&T's
wireless network.
The Nexus 7 is a great tablet for
the technophile who would chafe
at the restrictions imposed by
competing manufacturers. But
anyone will be able to appreciate
it. In terms of kid-friendliness, it's
beaten by Amazon and Barnes &
Noble.


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds


In Print





Online


All


The Tintme


Fa: 32)56-66 TllFee (8). 5-240 1Em i:.lasfidsca oile*ln .m I ebi-:ww hrnclonie0o


Lonely widow active,
attractive, looking for
gentleman for
companionship, 75?.
Blind Box 1814M co
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429



2 JACUZZI TUBS
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Trans-Siberian Orchestra
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$174 (352) 746-7212



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
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$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




Your world firm


Need a job
or a
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This area's
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for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



2 KITTENS
1 FEMALE 1 MALE
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352-503-2830
FREE Horse Manure
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long haired white fluffy
cat, micro-chipped,
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for Hot tub
You Remove
28 Cement Pavers
2x4x 16"
Cit. Sprg (352) 489-4438



FRESH CITRUS
BELLAMY GROVE
Navals, Gift Shipping,
Collard, Mustard greens
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378
Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb


BlacK Labrador Ketnever,
about 1& 1/2 yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy",lost in
vicinity of W. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662


Cat named Eva:
Med-lg size 8+lbs
long hair, white coat with
hints of charcoal gray and
lite tan.
Blue eyes. Has claws.
DO NOT DECLAW!
spayed, micro chipped &
vaccinated
Missing since 11/19/12
around Broyhill and
Carnigie area off of Eden
Dr.
Owners grieving missing
her terribly.
PLEASE REPORT.
352-422-7425 OR
352-201-0559
Lost Men's Wallet
Brown Leather
Sentimental Value,
Homosassa Area
(352) 400-2094


wearing red color
Mini Farms area
(352) 795-8986
MAN'S RING
Sentimental
Lost in Inverness or
Dunnellon area. Please
call 352-746-1915



Found Kindle
Citrus Hills Area
Call to Identify
(352) 613-3027
Small Male Brown &
Beige Chihuahua
Found in Pine Ridge
11/27
(352) 746-9583



AIRPORT
TAXI
(352) 746-2929




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taylorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119



Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077



TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
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(352) 344-9444









Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"r AA ^ ^-


Avante
AtInverness
Nursing Home and
Rehab currently has
an opening for
full time
Physical Therapist
Please apply online@
Avante Centers.com
or fax resume to
352-637-0333
Experienced
Manager/Biller
For a DME Company.
Preferably orthothic fitting
experience. Fax or email
resume: 352-527-3401 or
Ikettenacke r(amail.com
IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's
Hospital Experience
ICU, ER, CCU, Med.
Surge, Tele, Labor
& Delivery, Daily Pay,
Apply onine at www.
nurse-temos.com
352-344-9828

*SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRlvers
Realonal.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanle Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace
MEDICAL ASST.
Phlebotomy Exp.
EMR training helpful
For Busy Primary
Care Office.
Mail resumes to:
PO Box 700
Lecanto Fl. 34460
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885
P/T, DIETARY AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE


.lt-""""i'11"

Ytl i \\oId fIIst.

iE ) b ,,


THERAPIST/
PSYCH NURSE
for a busy psychiatric
practice, will work pit
initially pls rsvp fax
352-726-7582







CHikoNICLE
Have you ever
wanted to write
for a newspaper?
Do you enjoy
watching sports?
Have you been
looking for a second
income source with
flexible hours?
The Chronicle might
have a job for you.
The Chronicle's
Sports department
is recruiting sports
correspondents to
write about live high
school sporting
events in
Citrus County.
The ideal candidate
should have some
knowledge of sports
and the ability to
write clean copy on
deadline. Preferred
candidates should
own a smart phone.
lap top with wi-fi and
have dependable
transportation. Sports
correspondents work
as independent
contractors.
Correspondents
should be available
to work nights and
weekends.
Send email with
qualifications and
contact information
to marnold@
chronicleonline.com.

CHRONICLE


The Citrus Chronicle
is searching for a
freelance
photographers) to
cover evening
sporting events and
feature assignments,
including weekends.
The position will be
on a contract basis.
The successful
candidate will own his
or her own digital
camera equipment
and be able to
accurately collect
basic information
necessary for photo
captions. Previous
shooting experience
is required as is basic
knowledge of digital
camera equipment
and editing programs
such as Adobe
Photoshop CS2.
Send contact
information and a
brief history of
experience to
Matthew Beck, chief
photographer, at
mbeck@chronicle
online.com







BARTENDER
WANTED
Avail, Days, Nights &
Weekends. Tips certified.
Call mornings ONLY
352-726-2112

EXECUTIVE
CHEF
Country Club
Restaurant exp.
helpful not req. Send
resume to: Blind Box
1818P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITIONS













BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
APL IN*PERSON


NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460






(352)493-4297 for Russ
Hall for in person resumeAnter-
vew appointment.


Lu .i I lrst.


Ci apN ifCLE


FLOOR COVERING
INSTALLER
Experience Necessary
Own Truck & Tools
352-564-2772,302-6123

HELP WANTED
for Two Positions:
(1) Transport &
Truck Driver and
(2) Heavy Equipment
Mechanic
Needs to be organ-
ized, motivated and
must have a clean
Class A driver's lic.
APPLY AT
Pospiech
Contracting, Inc
201 S. Apopka Ave.
Inverness. FL 34452
or send resume to
info@pospiech
contracting.com


Key Training
Center

has positions
available in group
home setting.
Assist adults with
disabilities in daily
living. HS Diploma/
GED required.
Applyv in person
at 5399 W. Gulf to
Lake Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

MASON &
MANSON TENDERS
Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and from
work in Citrus & sur-
rounding counties
(352) 302-2395


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


WANTED

Are You
Interested In:

SBein your own
bossV
SIncreasin, potential
earnings.
Growing your
exclusive area?
-_.* Working
-- ,' independently?
'" ,." Workinq with a
i .:. successful company?

C IT R U S C O U N T Y

CHRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily

Requirements: Do you have what it takes?
SAbility to work overnight Attention to detail
SCovered Truck, Van or SUV 365 Days/Year
Clean Driving Record Deadline and Customer
SCredit & Background Check Service oriented
Access to your own help
SLifting andphysical ability Flexible under essure
STeam Player Positive Thinker
SMust have a back-up plan Hard and smart worker
SComputer & Internet Access Keen sense of urgency

Deliver to stores and coin racks.
SExperience preferred but not required.


D4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOOKING FOR
PERSON

Girl Friday responsi-
bility from House-
keeping to Fin. Assist.
Must like animals
Avail. if necessary
7 days week.
Live in
(352) 522-1109
11am-6pm Only


Male Care givers
12 HR SHIFTS

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Earn Extra Christmas
money. More Exp.
the more you. make
.Apply In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr





STOCKBROKER
TRAINEE

or Series 7 or 6 w/clean
U-4. Home Office Opt.
Great Opportunity.
Send resume to:
joecalabro@
embarqmail.com










SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com






LOCAL BRIDAL/
FORMAL WEAR
Business for Sale
All Equipment and
Inventory Included
CALL (352) 563-0722


COLLECTOR METAL
SIGN Lithographed
yellow steel 15" wide X
12" high $25
603493-2193
HOWARD MILLER
Grandfather Curio Clock
cost $2000 will sell $1000
showroom cond.
352-382-5804

A


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





DISHWASHER
White,
$40 352-628-2150
GAS DRYER Like new
Maytag gas dryer lots of
misc. settings. $100
Phone 352-513-4519 call
back if no answer.
GE Refrigerator
White $400.
GE Stove Self Cleaning
White $225. Both less
than 2vrs old!
(352) 726-8021
GE STOVE
FLAT TOP -White
2yrs old. Features Steam
clean oven. $350
352419-7077
Haier HNSE032
3.2-Cubic Foot
Refrigerator/Freezer,
White bought in April
for $148. Asking $75 or
best offer 352-419-7017
KENMORE 25'CU
STAINESS STEEL side
by side, w/water & ice,
4yrs old exc. cond. $800
352-897-4196
KENMORE DRYER
good condition asking
$75 352-5134519
If no answer call back.
MAYTAG PLUS
26.8cu Stainless steel
side by side w/water &
ice. Exc. cond. $700
352-794-7488
REFRIGERATOR
2DR Whirlpool, 10CF,
White, Almost New $150
(352) 794-6545
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179


$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352-263-7398



Computer Desk
Hutch
$45.
(352) 628-5428







HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS

FRI. 11/30@ 6pm
*Antique Auction*
Sat 12/1 @ 6p gen.
merch. Sun 12/2 @ l 1 p
Tailgate/ box lots
-WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



AIR COMPRESSOR
10HP/3phase. $200
Must Sell *
20 x 30 Ruemellin Utility
Sandblaster. $200
352-586-0084
COMPRESSOR Crafts-
man 150psi, 1.5 HP,
15gal with hose & hose
reel. $150 obo
352-400-0141
FREEZER GE UPRIGHT
small upright approx 15
cubic feet $100
352-341-4586
GENERAL
GENERATOR Heavy
Duty, 5550W, 8550S,
never used. $375
352-400-0141
JET PEN LATHE lathe
with 5 pen kits other sup-
plies also available
good condition. $100
352-341-4586
PARTS CLEANER $125.

Ulility Pickup Racks $75.

CALL 352-586-0084



FREE 52" Mitsubishi
Flat screen. Good cond.
352-637-4145
RCA 26" FLAT SCREEN
WITH DVD, 1YR OLD
$129
(352)637-5909
TECHNICS CD
CHANGER Component 5
disc rotary Model SLPD-
787 Digital Servo System
$25. Dunnellon 465-8495
TV STAND WITH
DOORS AND SHELVES
53 1/2" long X 19 1/2"
deep X 20" high $25call
603493-2193



OAK for hobbistlx2x30
inch $1 ea
352-341-4586


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




4 FT Box Blade $400;
John Deere 1 bottom
Plow $400; All fit on a
small utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812
CULTIVATOR
1 row cultivator $100;
Pig Pole $100.
Both fit on small
utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812
Spike Tooth Harrows
2 Section Spike $100;
3 Point Hitch $300.
Both fit on small
utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812




"HIDE- A -BED-
Blue Denim, Good
Condition $150
352-746-4232
2 BAR STOOLS, high
back, swivel, oak, like
new $75 ea. Both for
$100 352-794-3591
3 Bar stools,
New
w/ arm & foot rest,
$200.
352-795-2975
3 PC LIVING RM SUITE
Sofa Loveseat &
Wing backchair.
Floral pattern w/burgandy
strips. Exc cond.
Never used. $550
352-527-8165
4 DINETTE CHAIRS
Wood w/beige uphlostery
on wheels $140.
STUDENT DESK (white)
$25 352-527-9332
ASHLEY
Loveseat w/lIg ottoman
Beige. Like new $275.
Can email pics.
352-566-6589
BAR STOOLS
3 44" tall swivel dark bwn
w/ tan seats almost new
$65; 3 34" tall swivel
white exc cond. $50.
352-341-1576
BASSETT DINING RM
Table w/4 highback
chairs, med. cherry color.
Top 42 x60 rectangular
w/leaf. Exc cond. $1000
352-522-1048
DBL RECLINER
DARK BRWN EXC.
COND VERY CLEAN
$90 352-560-3544
FULL SIZE BOX SPRING
Good condition, 3 years
old, wrapped in plastic
bag call or text
$40.352-746-0401
LOVESEAT
GOOD COND. $50
352-560-3544
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500


CLASSIFIED



Uurnaiurs


6'x8", beveled edges,
8 panels, perfect for
enhancing size of room
$90 (352) 746-1486
PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RATTAN TABLE AND
CHAIRS Natural rattan
glass top table and 4 high
back arm chairs 1 year
old used twice. Have orig-
inal receipt.
Sold our house and down
sized, purchase for $999
will sell for $499 call any-
time 740-705-9004
Sugarmill Woods
RECLINER CHAIR
Beige, med size, as new
$200 Dunnellon
(352) 465-9026
SOFA BED
IN VERY COND.
NEUTRAL COLORS
$100
920-723-2214
SOFA BED
W/OTTOMAN Red
micro-fiber, like new, full
size, $125. 352-795-6290
Sofa, Love Seat & Chair
Matching, beige
microfiber $500.
Glass ends tables &
coffee tables, match-
ing $175, 352-382-3497
Sofa, Love Seat, Chair w/
Ottoman. Choc Brown
$300; Round Coffee
table, 2 end tables, wood
wl glass & bottom shelf
$150. All great Cond
(352) 382-0608
TWIN BED
hi-lo frame manual
w/box spring & mattress
$125
(352) 220-3883
Twin Bedroom Set
5 piece, w/mattress
and boxsprings $200
Queen Sz. Mattress Set
$50, All in good shape
(352)419-7113
WICKER BEDROOM
SET includes dbl dresser
two (2) drawer night-
stands, dresser mirror
queen headboard.
$450 352-746-2329
Wood Frame Mirror
63" tall on tilt stand $25
352-341-1576



Craftsman
Riding Mower
1 HP Motor
42" Deck $400
(352) 746-7357
TORO
Riding lawn mower.
$400.
Echo styx Edger
$80
352-212-8855



LECANTO
Sat& Sun HUGE, Xmas &
household. All must go!
1540 N OTTAWA AVE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 D5


I


Sunday 9a ??
Clothing, household &
Xmas items, etc.
4953 W Southern St
LECANTO
Sunday 9a ??
Clothing, household &
Xmas items, etc.
4953 W Southern St




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 HOUSES Estate Sale
Sat, Dec. 1 thru Sat,
Dec. 8, 10 to5 daily
6201 Pine Circle



!!!!! 265/65 R17 !!!!!
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for three pair!
(352) 857-9232
(4) OPERA CD SETS
-cost $50+ ea.-sell
$20ea. or all $75. more
info call 352-527-9982
-**285/45 R22***
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
~~~~~275\55 R20-~~~~~
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
2 PENN SLAMMER
DEEP SEA FISHING
RODS- SLC 2702 AX 7',
1-6oz. Lure, 20-501b line,
Ex+, $30 ea., 628-0033
4 WHEEL WALKER-,
seat, hand brakes/wheel
locks, basket, folds for
storage, Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
40 PIECE SOCKET SET
in a case $20
352-382-1191
70 YEAR OLD ANTIQUE
IRON electric works great
$25 firm 352-382-1191
86' EZ GO GOLF CART
$650 OBO
(352) 341-0560
ALADDIN GENIE OIL
LAMP $30 VINTAGE
MOHL POTTERY
EXCELLENT COND.
352-419-5981
ANIMAL LIVE TRAP-
large metal trap, 10"
wide, 32" long, 12" tall,
like new, $25.
352-628-0033
Cargo Carrier fits
2" receiver, pd $300
never used, sell for
$100 352-447-2967
CHRISTMAS TREE
Beautiful 12FT, looks real
w/stand pd $800, asking
$299 OBO 352-726-6567
CHRISTMAS TREE
Martha Stewart 6 ft.
pre-lit. $35.00. 3 piece
reindeer set for yard.
$25.00 352-344-5311
COMPUTER PRINTER
needs wire connector inc.
red and black ink $10
352-382-1191
CONSOLE
52" console for flat
screen TV; brand new
$150; Electric lawn trim-
mer -used once $100
(352) 527-7223


DISNEY'S 75 YEARS
music & memories 3
disc.cd.limited edition
pd.$50. sell $20.
352-527-9982
ELECTRIC PAPER
SHREDDER new...$20
352-382-1191
FISHING REEL 4/0
PENN Special Senator,
7' HEALY ROD
$75 for both
(352) 726-2350
FRAMED DISNEY PRINT
"FLATTERY" cert.#838 of
2000-18"by 24"-
$100.00 more info call
352-527-9982
FREE
TIRES 2 Firestone tires
P215/55R17.
989-255-1513
Fresh Florida 15ct.
*JUMBO SHRIMP"
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
Fl Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077
FULL SIZE BOX SPRING
3 years old great shape,
wrapped in plastic bag
call or text $40.00
352-746-0401
Garage Beer
Refrigerator $125. firm
54 Piece Set Can-
nonsburg Lejean 22K
Floral Scalloped China
$170. (352) 270-4087
Green House
10 ft x 16 ft, with extras
Paid $2,300.
Asking $1,200 obo
(352) 513-5168
JEEP BATTERY
OPERATED WITH
CHARGER PEG
PEREGO GOOD CONDI-
TION $100 352-613-0529
Kerby Ultimate Vacuum
w/ Carpet Shampoo
system. Complete w/ all
accessories. Like New
Orig price $1500, asking
$350 (352) 860-1021
KING SIZE BED
complete, good cond.
$100, Oak Gun Case
exc. shape, $100
352-341-2019
WESTERN GUITAR
$50
SEAM FAST Sea mop
$70
352-527-1493
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
NEW 103 PC. SOCKET
AND WRENCH SET all
sizes wrenhes and
sockets $75 or best offer
352-382-1191
NEW ELECTRIC DRILL
SET must see $65 Or
Best Offer 352-382-1191
NEW TELEPHONE large
lettered numbers $20
352-382-1191
PEBBLE BEACH WHITE
COTTON CARDIGAN
$25 NATIONAL PRO-AM
WOMEN'S XL NEVER
WORN 352-419-5981


PERFUME VINTAGE
L'EFFLEUR BY COTY
$25 SATCHET AND .75
EAU DE PARFUM
SPRAY 352-419-5981
PIN FISH TRAPS- 2
Traps, bait compartment,
Ex.condition, $15 ea.
352-528-0033
POOL ACCESSORIES
new net and brush $15.
for both 352 -382-1191
POOL HEATER
AQUA CAL T115
6 yrs old. Works Great
$450.
6% X 812ft. Utility Trailer
$400 (352) 637-0397
POOL SALT SYSTEM 40
# bag salt $5
352-382-1191
PORTABLE 78
RECORD PLAYER $50
VINTAGE CEDAR
CHEST $30
352-527-1493
QUANTUM 6000
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
ex. cond., bart. charger,
cushion $2,500.00 obo
(352) 527-2085
REMINGTON 10FT.
POLE ELECTRIC CHAIN
SAW- 14" cut, use saw
by hand or with exten-
sion, Ex., $50. 628-0033
ROCKWELL SCOUTING
"1979" -50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps $100
352-527-9982
SKUTT KILN model 181
max temp 2250 degrees
352-341 -4586 $100
good cond.
SUBWOOFERS sound
dynamics rts series
1000-100 watts rms/400
watts peak like new
$50.00 352-527-9982
SUBWOOFERS sound
dynamics rts series
1000-100 watts rms/400
watts peak-like new $50
352-527-9982
SWIMMING POOL
ACCESSORIES 10 ft.
pole with brush on the
end. $10 352-382-1191
SWIMMING POOL
ACCESSORIES 20 # de
earth $10 352-382-1191
SWIMMING POOL
ACCESSORIES 30 in.
brush on end of a 10 ft.
pole $10. 352-382-1191
UGLY STICK FISHING
RODS- 1 & 2 pc. rods,
Ex. Condition, $10-15
each. 352-628-0033
VINTAGE CHRISTMAS
SANTAAND ANGEL $25
NAPCO JAPAN CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO
352419-5981



AFPIRE QUICKIE
Power chair EXC. COND
NEW BATTERIES
$700.(352) 726-3263
GO GO ELITE
SCOOTER motorized
scooter breaks down in
four pieces for easy
transport; used for 6
months, 1600$ new, sell
for 800$ OBO; you pick
up citrus co
mary031149@gmail.com


TAflSlDfrnkrI


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179
Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent CIng.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109



Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia In-
continency No Prob .
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

ltwin-er


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXP- Slabs,
Driveway,Patios,Found
-ation Repair #CBC057
405, (352) 427-5775



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-36838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090
Lic# CC2544





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
-* Small Carpentry
'. Fencing
Screening
S* Ocean Dryer
Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
S cell: 400-1722
.. . ;ured Lic.#37761


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est.
352-257-9508 *


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!.!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Esimates
352-465-6079 .t iite


4 3anr e amnIvan
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est.
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est.
*k 352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
Repair. Remodel.
Additions,
Free est.
(352) 949-2292
STEVEN GIBSON
Handyman & Maint.
Services, 20+ yrs., Exp.
(352) 308-2379



Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lie. (352) 364-2120

WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373**




GOOD MORNING LAWN
CARE
Leaves to Lawns *
Call 352-502-6588
GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588
LAWNCARE N MORE
Fall Clean-up, leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




MOBILE THERAPY
Holiday Special 20%off
call Jenna,Lic.MA58428
*(352) 897-5238*


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT



DISAPPEAR FOR LESS

IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! a
352-220-9190






ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.,

352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Handyman Dave
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
WINTER SPECIAL
$35 for Driveways
up to 60ft!
Ann's 352-601-3174









LEGAL / Professional
SAVE divorce, custody
wills, deeds, etc. Guaran-
teed docs 352-341-2173


GENERAL "
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
EROO15377

352-61-124


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


#1 Employment source is


www.chronicle0nline.Com


WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838




TREE SURGEON
Lie. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955



\LIII\\0 11 dIII-St.

LE, I) D)



( .... .


CARPET &"
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

urniture
S ingin: n leaned for
Carpet Stretching FREE- Ask
Carpet Repair How
* 352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty 9


Add an arisic touch to your exisfing yard
', or pool or plan
i somethg
S : ipletely newl
"Often imitate e
B Tj ... never duplicated"


YOUR INTERIOCKINGBRICKPAVIERSPECIALIST

COPES
i POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 352-400-3188
& Insured 352400.338


DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Fire wd.
352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373*


*Tree trimming/removal
Stump grinding

* Dry oak firewood for sale


Licensed & Insured






AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakhustes"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000DDBP
6r---


GI. NIE.ll

We Clean Windws and a Whole Lot More
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Low Rider power chair
needs some work.
$500.(352) 726-3263
JET 7 POWER CHAIR
WITH AUTO LIFT Good
condition. $400 OBO
(352) 513-4127
Pride Scooter,
Celebrity Wide seat,
Blue, $300. obo
(352) 527-1097
WHEEL CHAIR LIFT Fits
vehicle hitch for loading
manual folding wheel-
chair not scooter.$100.
Dunnellon 465-8495



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying
sterling silver flatware
and US silver coins
(352) 601-7074



"FAT" STRAT STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS AND SOUNDS
PERFECT "NEW" $70
352-601-6625
"LEFTY" LES PAUL
STYLE GUITAR "NEW"
W/AMP,GIGBAG,
STRAP & MORE $75
352-601-6625
"NEW" MITCHELL
MO100S ACOUSTIC
GUITAR. Solid top.
Vintage burst finish. $100
352-601-6625
"NEWRACOUSTIC
GUITAR Pkg DEAL
W/ GIGBAG STRAP
STRINGS & MORE! $75
352-601-6625
5 STRING RESONATOR
BANJO PERFECT FOR
NEWBIESS" OR
PARKING LOT JAMS
$95. 352-601-6625
KIMBALL ORGAN
Performer-Entertainer
Two tier. exc. cond.
w/bench books & light.
$150 352-634-0570



4 SECTION BREAD
BAKING PAN $10
FLUTED QUICHE $10 2
AIR BAKE COOKIE
SHEETS $10 CALL
419-5981

YOU'LL THIS!
KING SIZE MATTRESS
sealy posturpedic
with box spring and
frame, used 3 years,
very, very clean
like new, asking only
$300 Homosassa, SMW
860-883-3431
KITCHEN CANNISTER
SET $10 PORCELAIN
JAM JAR WITH LID
FROM FRANCE $10
352-419-5981
WALL MIRROR with
bevel edges 68" wide X
42" high $20 call
603-493-2193






D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


Ftnes s


BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $900 OBO
A Great Holiday Gift
352-697-2771
CARDIO TWISTER $90
Includes DVD, manual,
menus. (352)613-3727
Elliptical Exercise
Machine
Good Condition
$57.25 obo
(352) 489-8530
POWERHOUSE
WM 1501
24 different workouts!
$300. 352-628-5085
PR FORM 365S
Treadmill $100
352-212-1598 or
352-566-6345


-I
1 Set Top Flight
Men, right hand
Golf Clubs$75
I set Comp 400W Golf
Clubs, Men, right hand
$75. (352) 860-0229
2 Rubbermaid Boxes
Full of Paint Ball Guns
and Accessories
Dye, Smart Parts,
Tipman, Fill Station $250
(352) 563-0328
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Dec.. 8th 9-5p
Sun. Aug. 9th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
RUGAR LC9 Compact
9mm pistol NIB $375.
GLOCK 36.45 ACP pis-
tol 6+ 1 single stack mag-
azine for concealed carry.
NIB $550 352-422-0359
Thule Kayak Roof car-
rier & accessories
$125, bike carrier "3"
for 2" hitch, $60
352-447-2967



Covered CARGO Trailer
4'wide 8'long and 6' high.
New spare tire included.
Price $1050
352-341-1132



DIAMOND RING
% carat tw, 14 ct white
gold. SIZE 9, Original
price $525, Asking $150
(352) 341-1955
TURQUOISE AND
ABALONE NECKLACE
$30 3 BEADED BRACE-
LETS $10 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTOS 352-419-5981

^^^^^-I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47 for
years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917 .Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucs13@aol.com
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369

WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacement
China Most Patterns
Crystal Waterford Lenox
Sterling Flatware Lladro
Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Elec-
tronics Stereo Turntables
Billiard Cues Coins &
Jewelry and Scraps Best
Prices Paid Chris @
352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
sss$ssss


Arsenic
Arsenio is a beautiful
young terrier/pit bull
mix who was brought
to the shelter as a
stray. He is about
1-y.o. and is very af-
fectionate and play-
ful. He loves to be
with his human, and
gets along with other
dogs also. He is a
beautiful golden
beige in color with a
white chest and
white front paws. He
is not yet neutered
but would be at the
time of his adoption.
He is a strong young
dog and a fenced
yard to run in is rec-
ommended for him.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288. "


4 WIRED HAIR
Daschund PUPPIES
Ready to go Now,
will hold till Christmas
(352) 464-2382

14 Tiny Yorkies $600.
$700. ea. Small, Tiny &
Very Tiny Only 5
females, Raised in
loving home. CKC Reg.
health certs., & puppy
pacs. Parents on site
come watch them play
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258

CHIHUAHUA PUPS
For Sale
Ready to go Dec 28th.
2 Females & 2 Males
$100ea 352-503-9257

DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com





(352) 634-5039 *








DOUGIE
Dougie is a laid-back
friendly guy, alert and
attentive. He loves his
human friends and
sits, shakes and
speaks on command.
His foster mom says
he is housebroken
and has great house
manners. He is 5
years old, neutered
and Heartworm
-negative. Weighs 45
pounds and gets
along with most other
dogs. He so deserves
a great life and will
surely be your great
companion. He will
love you forever. Call
his foster mom Donna
@ 352-249-7801.

ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
2 Males & 4 Females,
Available after Nov 5th
AKC and all Shots
$1,500 to $1,750 call for
info (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732

FREE MALE CAT
Neutered 2yrs old, gray
w/black strip, rabbie
shots. 352-400-5480

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure Breed Pups, light
colors, 4 fem 2 males,
shots & H/C. Parents on
Premises $450 ea
352-628-6050

Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net

I MI


WAGS
Wags is a ly.o.
terrier/pit bull mix, black
and white in color, neu-
tered and
Heartworm-negative,
up to date with shots.
Weighs 45 pounds. He
has lots of personality
and is an entertainer,
will keep you amused.
He is a great family
dog, loves all people,
young and old. Gets
along great with other
dogs, gives lots of cud-
dles and kisses. That
tail never stops wagg-
ing. Call Karen @
218-780-1808.




CHICKENS Adult Laying
Chickens for Sale, RI
Reds, NH Reds & Aus-
tralorps. $12/each
352-344-0905

0 AszM -a


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"Mee# ting4


EGG LAYING
CHICKENS
CALL JIM 352-246-2585



2006 9.9 Honda,
4 stroke outboard, long
shaft, power tilt, power
trim electric Start $1,500
Cell 954-294-8979
Citrus Co. Area.
BOAT SEAT
flip flop cooler seat
new, $150
352-447-2967
Four, 14 inch, trailer,
Good Year, Marathon
Tires $200.
Manual Jack Plate
$100
352-795-2975
TROLLING MOTOR
MINN-KOTA RIPTIDE
24VOLT REMOTE C/P
QUICK RELEASE,
W/ BATTERIES $400
352-795-2975





MUST SELL

BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
DOCK SPACE AVAIL.
In Crystal River
Deep Water Canal
(352) 212-4839
FLATS BOAT
1995 18ft Islander cc
2004 90hp Mercury 2ST.
very low hrs. Jack plate,
polling platform, fish
finder, heavy duty Alum.
trailer w/spare tire. $7200.
906-203-2221
(Homosassa)
JON BOAT
18 ft., flat bottom,all
new decking, 25H
mercury, GPS & Trailer
$3,500 (352) 563-0328
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



97' CHALLENGER
by Damon 31k, new tires,
exc. cond. Runs Great!
$12,500. 352-726-3263



HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$7500 obo 352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



GMCTRUCK TOPPER
for 1/2 Ton Pick-Up
White, good cond.
$75 352-628-2150
Set of 4 Cooper
Discover LSX,
265/75R16
with chevy rims.
less than 1,500 miles
$450 (352) 563-0328
TOW DOLLY
Stehl, Great cond.
new tires, $625 OBO
352-621-3646



$CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *,
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYERS
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,


WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ



$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK '08
Lucerne,Spec. Addition.
42k Exc. cond. $14,900
(352) 794-3907
BUICK ACROSS
08, White, 4dr, 40kmiles
Cloth int. $13,000.
352-726-1864
BUICK LESABRE
01 Custom, senior
owned,garage kept, Ik
new, new tires,68kmi.
$5800 352-634-3806
CHEVROLET
'03 Monte Carlo,
2 DR, V6, runs great,
100k mi. $4,300
(352) 270-8759
CHEVROLET
1985 Monte Carlo 2DR
repainted, rebuilt en-
gine. Runs great, just
needs transmission
hose. Asking $2800
352-270-4098
CHEVY
2004 Mallbu, LTZ,
$3,495.
352-341-0018



CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Ed., Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Cond
$7500 352 522-0505
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2000 Mustang. If you like
Mustang Cobra convert.
*Must see this car*
$4975(352) 382-7001
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763



918-1130 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, Novem-
ber 27, until December
17,2012.
Pub: November 27 thru
December 17,2012.



755-1202 WCRN
Personal Mini Storage
12-12-12 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
- DUNNELLON
UNIT
#0163 MARINDA GARRI-
SON
#0009 JESSICA KLEMM
#0157 ROCHELLE MARK
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VE-
HICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- December
12th @ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY 41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
November 28 & Decem-
ber 2, 2012.



371-1202 SUCRN
12/13 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
ED'S AUTO & TOWING, INC
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Uen and intent to
sell these vehicles on
Thursday, December 13,
2012 at 9:00 AM at4610 S
FLORIDA AVE INVERNESS,
FL 34450 pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Flor-
ida Statutes. ED'S AUTO &
TOWING INC reserves the
right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1989 LINCOLN
VIN#1LNBM93EOKY735649
December 2,2012.


373-1202 SUCRN
12-12 CC Tourist Development Council Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, December 12, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
December 2, 2012.

374-1202 SUCRN
12/11 meeting- Affordable Housing Adv. Comm,
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Availability of Citrus County Triennial State Housing Initiatives Partnership
(SHIP) Program Report regarding recommendations on and the status of Affordable
Housing Incentives already adopted.
Housing Incentives per Florida Statute 420.9076(4) were reviewed and considered by
the Citrus County Affordable Housing Advisory Committee. Recommendations and


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 LIN
JUST SIGN
AND DRIVE
$ 0 DOWN
PAYMENT


ICOLN


MKZ


FIRST MONTH'S
PAYMENT I


CASH DUE AT
SIGNING'


$389


a month for 36 months
LINCOLN AFS
Red Carpet Lease'


Security deposit waived.
Tax, title and license fees extra.


2013 LINCOLN
JUST SIGN
AND DRIVE M
$s DOWN Is0 FIRST MONTH'S is0 CASH DUE
PAYMENT PAYMENT AT SIGNING2


$499


a month for 36 months
LINCOLN AFS
Red Carpet Lease'


I Security deposit waived.
Tax, title and license fees extra.


LINCOLN


2011 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
$29,950


2009 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
$24,900


Nick Nicholas Lincoln


Crystal River 795-7371
Visit us at www.nicknicholaslincoln.com


-- _--~~-
Nicholas
Ford S.R. 44
Lincoln u
r U.S.98
I omry I~as~r


d AFS RED CARPET LEAS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 D7






D8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
KIA
2005, Sedona LX
$7,795
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
1999, Firebird,
V6, 79.6k miles,
$6,500. OBO
352-476-3755
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. $9200 OBO
(352) 382-0428
TOYOTA
2004 Celica, GTS
$6,995
352-341-0018



80' Kelmark Kit Car
$1500 FIRM
CALL 352-586-0084
AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. DEC. 2. 2012
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET
'83, El Camino. Re-
stored V6. white, w/
custom cover. SS tires,
wheels, low m.,l $6,000
obo 352 464-0167





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment



CHEVROLET
2002 SUBURBAN
4 WD $4,500.
352-341-0018
GMC
2003 Yukon SLT
Exc cond New tires. Well
maintained.108,000mi
Load w/Onstar
$9,450 OBO
(207)-730-2636
KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285
MITSUBISHI
2005 Outlander
$4,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
1999 4 Runner, 2WD,
Mich tires, Some cos-
metic damage, Runs
Great $5200 OBO
(352) 344-0072



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2001 4cyl "TJ" Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
Low miles $10,500
352-220-4634



POLARIS
2003 Trail Blaze 250 au-
tomatic, runs great, gar-
age kept, very good
cond, needs 1 front tire,
$1400 obo 352-795-9878



2010 HONDA GOLD
WING
Comfort pkg, heated
seats & grips, navigation,
prem. auto, xm radio,
ABS & extras! 8k
$18,000. 352-341-0952
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 04'
Ultra classic. Runs great!
New tires, brakes &
battery. EXTRAS!!
$8500 or OBO
352-601-4722
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $3,500.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688


KAWASAKI
2006 VULCAN VF900
Custom. Only 7000
miles, garage kept
$3500 (352) 464-1495


KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 550 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 FIRM. Phone
352-726-8124
TOYOTA
'07,Camary Hybrid
Great cond. Dream to
Drive 40+mpg $11,300
(352) 860-2143


evaluation of affordable housing incentives already adopted were provided. The re-
sults have been compiled in a report to the Florida Housing Finance Corporation.
The final report will be approved by the Citrus County Board of County Commission-
ers at its regular meeting at 1:00 PM on December 11, 2012. A copy of the report
can be obtained at Citrus County Housing Services, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Ct.,
Lecanto, FL 34461. Any comments should be submitted in writing to Heidi Blanchette,
Operations Manager, Citrus County Housing Services at the same address by 5:00
PM on December 10, 2012.
December 2,2012.

377-1202 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
Finance Committee meetings of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on
Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 12:00pm and on Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at
12:00pm and on Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 12:00pm in the in the Board Room,
located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration
Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida to discuss:
Approval of Minutes.
Finance Report.
Other.
Regular meetings of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Wednesday,
January 30, 2013 at 12:30pm and on Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at 12:30pm and
on Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 12:30pm in the in the Board Room, located on
the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502
Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida to discuss:
Approval of Minutes.
COO Report.
Citrus County Hospital Board Committees Report.
Foundation Governance Issues.
Other.
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at
352-341-2245. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness,
Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2245.
December 2, 2012.

372-1202 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAY December 12, 2012 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto, Florida 34461
...............................................................**............*


DAVID HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN
ROBERT CABLE


JAMES WHITE
GERRY GAUDETTE


WILLIAM L. WINKEL


(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES
(5) SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD:
a) Alan Wing To meet the Board for approval for an active certificate
of competency for irrigation.
(6) CITATIONS:
a) Christopher Lee Smith Citation #0076 Engage in the business or act
in the capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certi
fied in Citrus County.
b) Steven Taylor Citation #0063 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
c) Shaun Stehlik Citation #0058 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
d) Gary Dion Citation #0082 Engage in the business or act in the ca
pacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
e) Benjamin Hill Citation #0083 Commence or perform work for which
a building permit is required, without such permit being in effect.
t) Stephen Roberts Citation #0037 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TION LICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSID-
ERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTI-
MONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION
286.0101. FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING
BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
(352) 341-6560 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR
LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
December 2,2012.

751-1209WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Hospital Board invites interested parties to submit a Request for
Proposal for the valuation of Citrus Memorial Hospital and other listed assets. The RFP
shall be submitted to the Citrus County Hospital Board on or before December 27,
2012 at 2pm, pursuant to the RFP.
Scope of Work for RFP
The Citrus County Hospital Board seeks a prospective bidder to address the following
requirements, pursuant to FS 155.40(5) (c&d):
Be a certified public accounting firm or other firm that has substantial expertise
in the valuation of hospitals to render an independent valuation of the Citrus
Memorial Hospital's fair market value for sale and or leasing of hospital facilities
owned by the board to a not-for-profit or for-profit entity.
Be a certified public accounting firm or other firm "to consider an objective op
rating comparison between a hospital or health care system operated by the
Citrus County Hospital Board and other similarly situated hospitals, both
not-for-profit and for-profit, which have similar service mix, in order to determine
whether there is a difference in the cost of operation using publicly available
data provided by the Agency for Health Care Administration and the quality
metrics identified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core
Measures. The comparison must determine whether it is more beneficial to tax
payers and the affected community for the hospital to be operated by a gov
ernmental entity, or whether the hospital can be operated by a not-for-profit or
for-profit entity with similar or better cost-efficiencies or measurable outcomes
identified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core Measures.
The comparison must also determine whether there is a net benefit to the commu
nity to operate the hospital as a not-for-profit or for-profit entity and use the pro
ceeds of the sale or lease for the purposes described (herein)." Florida Statute
155.40(5)(d).
To acquire the RFP please go to website of the Citrus County Hospital Board at
www.citruscountyhospitalboard.com.
November 28, December 2, 5 & 9, 2012.


367-1202 SUCRN
Inv. to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to DISTRICT SERVICES CENTER HVAC REPLACEMENT PROJECT will
be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time 10 Janu-
ary 2013 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200,
1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids
received will be opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at District Services Center, Building 100, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698.
B. Conference will occur 11 December 2012, 10:00 A.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from
VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC., 1111 NE 25TH AVE, SUITE 401, OCALA, FL 34470
PHONE NO: (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus
County School Board in the amount of $ 50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will
be made upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
November 18, 25 & December 2, 2012.


376-1202 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Ricitious Name
Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of SUS-
TAINABLE GREEN SOLU-
TIONS, located at P.O.
Box 2374, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34451, in the County
of Citrus, intends to regis-
ter said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
DATED at


hverness
this 29th day of Novem-
ber, 2012.
/s/ Emily Casey
A-Plus Global Enterprises,
Inc.
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. December 2, 2012.
375-1202 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Rctitious Name
Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
indersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of
WINNER'S CIRCLE, located
at 299 East Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto, Florida
34461, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
DATED at
Lecantothis
28th day of November,
2012.
/s/ James W. Carman
Owner/Managing Mem-
ber
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. December 2, 2012.


m


S12 CHEVY MALIBU I


12 DODGE RAM










[$13, 999 1 $219 PR MO


12 NISSAN ALTIMA










$16,999 R$266 RM


12 CHEVY EXPRESS








:6* *:

18 999 $297PERMO


12 CHEVY EQUINOX










$18999OR $297-ER M


12 CADILAC CTS




24.999' ,---391 N.




$24,099OR $91RMO
$'1!3M~


$13 9 OR $ PER MO
i3.999aS219,Ia"o


12 CHEVY IMPALA










$14,999OR235PR MO


12 FIAT 500


$15,9990$250 RMo


12 CHRYSLER 200




.---





$16,999 $266 R Mo


12 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY










18,999OR 297PER M


I 12 DODGE CHALLENGER


12 NISSAN TITAN










$24,999-$391 M"o


CRYSTAL



AUTOMOTIVE


w


352-564-1971 4

www.CRYSTALAUTOS.coM
*


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL
937 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL


Sls oca-rca :00am-:00m*S atuda 9:4. -7:*gSuda-Clse
Senr'e:M, 7am-5:30prnm Tml : w0aim-7:00pm Sturday 8:00am-4:00 SndayiT~ i-Close


*PRICE AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE
$599.50. PAYMENTS ARE FOR72 MONTHS AT 3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES
|DF1 ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
DF1H


Metn


Meng
I Noice


THE LOWEST PRICE





OF THE YEAR




ON ALL 2012 MODELS!


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


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I


I I







Section E SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012




SOME O RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


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E2 SUNDA~~ DECEMBER 2, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


I9^'l 637f.2






CUSTOM BUILT BEAUTY!!
* Great Room w/Pecan Fls. Gourmet Kitchen
* Large Lanai/Wet Bar *3/3/2 Car Gar + Off.
* Heated Pool/Hot Tub r Exquisite Master
* Very Quiet Serene Area Over an Acre!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Flol idaLislinglilo.com I









LIVE LIKE ROYALTY!
* Fantastic Kitchen Large Great Room
* Porcelain Tile Screened Pool/Lanai
* Master Bath is Gorgeous 3/2/2 Split Plan!!
* Lg. Propane Generator Oversized Lot
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Floridalistinglnfo.com


WATERFRONT BLOCK HOME!
* Large Kitchen/Lots of Cab. Fireplace in GR
* Boat/RV Parking Glass Room Overlooking Lake
* Very Quiet Area Outbuildings for Storage
* Great Yard/Lots of Trees Has Seawall!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloridaListingInto.com


5849 N. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CG Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


OVER

$105 MILLION

THIS YEAR
Call RE/MAX
To Sell Your Home!











REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

+


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


HERNANDO
SGorgeous 4BR/3BA2CG Home Lg. Kitchen w/Lotsof Cabinets
SQuartz Countertops Beautiful Master Suite
SLg. Ceramic Ti in Man Areas Extra Lg.Screened Lanai Area
* Fenced Backyard Beautiful Landscaped 1.24 Acres
SMove-In Ready w/Lots of Upgrades
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.neti



SO .. .





COVETED CRYSTAL RIVER AREA
65 Ft Seawall Corner Lot
* Sailboat Deep Water Possible Owner Financing!
SNo Bridges!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.con
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


HORSES
2/2 on 731 acres with 10 paddocks with water
and shelter 2-stall barn with tack room and
1/2 bath This home has been remodeled and has
1,056 sq ft of living gas, gas fireplace, large
screened room and a country feeling with open
floor plan and beamed ceiling Come see this
beautiful property
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


OPEN LAKEFRONT POOL HOME
This brand new listing includes a family room with
fireplace, split bedrooms Granite counters, stainless
steel appliances, self-cleaning, caged pool, laminate
flooring and more Huge lot on open lakefront with a
dock Has everything Needs nothing
THE REAL ESTATE DOCTOR AT (352) 212-6002
JOHN HOLLOWAY, SR.
CRS GRI. ABR. e-PRO
Email: johnHolloway@tampabay.rr.com
www.TheHollowayTeam.com


Country casual living on 1 acre! Over
3,000 sq. ft., huge garage, fireplace,
and bonus room! Celebrate the New
Year at home.
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


WATERFRONT CONDO
WITH BOAT...
This 2BR, 2BA waterfront condo overlooks
the Indian River and has a private dock with
16 ft. pontoon boat included. Enjoy the
enclosed patio, the community pool, and the
convenient location. Terrific waterfront buy
Pelican Cove.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email Wayne@WayneHemmericd.com L


3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage home,
located on the 1 2th tee with great view,
fenced backyard, formal dining room and
living room, large enclosed Florida room.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


2421 N. Hy e y l -w E c
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


C 24/ 7 r FO E
(637.28282


PINE RIDGE
*3BD/2BAi2CG Under Construction
* Dream Custom Home Builder Feature 2,464 SF Living
Call Listing Agent for Details
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


E2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rrm




- II:







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Removing mothball odor from furniture


D ear Sara:
Do you
have a
remedy for get-
ting mothball
odor out of a
cedar chest?
Nothing I have
tried works. -
Alice M., email
Dear Alice: Sara
Don't try to wash FRU
it out. That usu- LIV
ally causes the
odor to go deeper into the
wood. I would keep the
chest open and outside as
much as possible. A covered
porch would be a good
place. It will take a lot of
time, fresh air, heat and sun-
light before it goes away I
suppose you could try to re-
finish it, but that's a lot of
work, and there's no guar-
antee, because most cedar
chest interiors are not fin-
ished, so the smell is really
absorbed by the wood. You
can try a product called
Smelleze Mothball Deodor-
izer Pouch by Imtek
(noodorcom) or all of the


Maridm,
McClory
hit new
highs
Congratu-
lations to
Steve Mc-
Glory and Al-
ison
Markham of
EXIT Realty
Leaders


typical ab-
sorbers, such as
baking soda, kitty
litter, coffee
S grounds, newspa-
per and charcoal.
Dear Sara: My
aunt (an avid
reader of your
column) asked
Noel me to email you
GAL for suggestions
ING on how to elimi-
nate the center
creases from magazine
pages. One of her hobbies is
framing pictures of birds
from magazines, and many
times they are two-page
spreads with the middle
crease. How can she elimi-
nate the crease without al-
tering the picture? -Myrna
Z, email
Dear Myrna: She could
try ironing the page on a low
setting, but she'll need to
use another piece of paper
on top so she's not ironing
directly on the poster. She
can try laminating it, too.
Dear Sara: I read your
column faithfully and have


Steve Alison
McClory Markham
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.


in Crystal
River, who
have sold
$2.4 million in
closed sales
so far in
2012!
Steve and
Alison are a
powerhouse
duo! Contact
them at 352-
794-0888.


s. Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor,. A HOUSE Realtor
S302.3179 SOLDONO-.- 287-9022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 7466700 DD

244 W. ROMNEY LP, BEVERLY HILLS

Is,,,,, ..


used your shortcuts. Do you
have a suggestion for
straightening out a tangled
herringbone necklace? I re-
ceived one many years ago
from a dear friend and wore
it constantly until about two
months ago, when it became
twisted. Your help will be
greatly appreciated. -Bar-
bara L., email


Dear Barbara: I would
take it to a jeweler. A chain
necklace can be untangled
with baby oil and a straight
pin, but herringbone kinks
aren't something you can
simply get rid of, because of
their flat design. I suggest
taking it to a jeweler to see if
they can do anything to save
it. They might be able to roll


out the kinks or cut them
out.
Dear Sara: I watched a
disaster prep video on the
Internet that featured a big
plastic baggie called a wa-
terBOB that you fill with
water in your bathtub. I
think I want one; we always
fill the downstairs tub when
a big storm is predicted.


(We'd like to fill our upstairs
tub, but the drain has a slow
leak.) Have you ever actu-
ally used a waterBOB? If
you use it once, is it possible
to drain it and use it again
someday? It seems like it's a
one-shot deal, because it
would get icky inside from

See FRUGAL/Page E5


Lrk ChITU RIIIb REA l


karnda & irk Johns Tom Balfour l Aenus & H Steiner Art Paty
BoKtoE/ASM s.ALc REACTOR tALTOR--ROKR REACTOR


746-9000,


S-I ---- -- .
3946 N. PONY 4002 W. PINTO 4935 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 2968 W. BEAMWOOD 6121 N. SILVER PALM
4/3.5/3 359171 $749,900 4/2/2 358356 $249,900 3/2/2 357718 $138,900 3/2/2 358435 $198,500 3/2.5/2 358309 $148,500


Ise
2372 W. EGRET PL.
4/2/2 356193 $189,900


m Im

9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. MATHESON 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 7768 N. SARAZEN
3/2/1 356581 $69,900 2 357083 94,9 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2/2 354564 $139,900




400 S. WASHINGTON 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR. 842 W COCKATIEL LP. 510 W. PLAYER PATH
2/2/2 356626 $60,500 2/2/2 354530 $128,000 3/2/2 357166 $99,900 2/2/1 358921 $96,500
'L~iL,1 -1 0 V I' IT


II


6260 S. CANNA LILY
... ro::...3/2 359137 $69,900
8597N. DORA WAY 895 W. BEAKRUSH 15 S. FILLMORE 29 N. WASHINGTON
3/2/2 358108 $137,500 2/2/2358739 $84,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 2/1 356448 $39,900



S Muni
9-
16 S ADAMS 27 S. FILLMORE 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 45 S. MELBOURNE 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR.
2/1 356532 $42,900 3/1/1 356531 $53,900 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 354341 $84,900 | 2/1.5 359138 $81,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 E3


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* The Chronicle has forms avail-
able for wedding and engage-
ment announcements,
anniversaries, birth announce-
ments and first birthdays.


i n 'm it


Stromanthes a tempting tropical evergreen


No part of Florida is within
tropical latitudes be-
tween the Tropics of Can-
cer and Capricorn, each 23.5
degrees of latitude from the
Equator. Southeast Florida, in
cold zone 10, and the Keys, Zll,
are subtropical and warmed by
the sea and warm Gulf Stream
current. Tropical plants can be
grown in the garden in frost-free
South Florida. Citrus and south-
ern Marion County are deemed
to be in the north part of Central
Florida and Z9A to 8B. They will
average 10 to 15 frosty mornings
and can have prolonged hours of
freezing temperatures during the
winter months. Tropical plants
need to be brought indoors to
avoid chilling below 45 degrees
or freezing on frosty mornings.
There are about 13 species of
lush evergreens in the Stroman-


the genus. Not gingers,
they are sometimes
confused with gingers
and are often grown
together in tropical
cultivated shade gar-
dens. Stromanthes,
rhizomatous perennial
evergreens, evolved in
the tropical rain-
forests from Central
America south to
Brazil, Z10 to Z12. Ac-
customed to dense
shade or indirect and


--
Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


filtered light, Stromanthes are
understory plants, so make fine
houseplants and patio-potted
specimens. Leaves will scorch in
hot direct sunlight. They prefer a
mild, humid climate with no chill
hours below 45 degrees. Leaves
die when frozen.
Some sellers claim it can sur-


vive down to 27 de-
grees. My experience
is roots killed by freez-
ing cannot revive next
spring; they are dead.
The most popular
and readily available
Stromanthe is a culti-
var of Stromanthe san-
guinea called
'Triostar.' A strong
grower, 'Triostar'
spreads by fat, succu-
lent, underground rhi-
zomes. In a pot, it


needs well-drained soil rich in
decayed humus or organic veg-
etable matter. If kept too wet, the
roots could rot. Kept in a 10-inch
diameter pot, this plant should
thrive inside a screened pool
cage where humidity is high and
the screen yields at least 30 per-
cent shade. In winter, the pool


will act as a heat sink, then radi-
ate warmth at night.
When the 10-inch pot is full of
rhizomes, each with five to 10
leaves, the plant makes a spec-
tacular specimen.Their lush, ob-
long leaves reach 18 inches long
and 3 to 4 inches wide. Diameter
of the clump of leaves may reach
40 inches and conceal the pot en-
tirely in time. Leaves are dark
green above and burgundy-pur-
plish beneath.
'Triostar' has leaves variegated
with cream stripes, margins
and/or splotches. They are closed
in a petiole or stem sheath at
first, then unfurl when taller Old
plants can develop a short trunk
from an accumulation of the
trunk-like stems.
Usually considered a tropical

See JANE/Page E5


3/213 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
OOODEPF Call Joe at 302-0910


Sei n in Tr V a Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
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Sr-t.-i,,- r r 1 T- ii ,..- r .i t l .- ... t -f Prr.-rt --1 A a cul-de-sac with a circular driveway Some of the many features include a .... ,I i i .. I .... 1 I1
1 ..95,000 ii 224,900 i 111 399,000 0 I I1i i, I 199,000





SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 5 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
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You must see tr. "rn;hr,"rA- A-;i lr ---m. h-th h-; ; ,in. th, gated Brentwood I I exposure
Community of I... 11.11 ii i .... I ,I..i p.. ..., 1 1 Include ceramic with a 12x24 pool, buit in fireplace, bui in entertainment center, upgraded
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iipl, i-, f h,,Int -fr r tr- str r- 1 tom painting, tray Wellmaintained 2 bedroom 2 ba i Pristine villa with beautiful landscaping features 2 BR, 2 BA, plus den, 2-car
.... ..I ,, I ... . / ooring enhance the extensive oak molding around garage, upgraded cabinets in kitchen, tiled counter tops, butler's pantry, whole
tiled grill & storage area Enjoy the maintenance free lifestyle & all the ii i i I house stereo system, in wall pest control system, spectacular sunsets, and view
amenities this home has to offer MLS 357052 $140,000 MLS 357110 $469,000 i ii i $232,000 of driving range MLS 357521 $249,000

Iem .6 -h.







BRENTWOOD 2 BED 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD TOWNHOMES DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
Nice unfurnished 2 bed 25 bath townhome in the prestigious community of DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR. HILLSIDE VILLAS This home comes with all the luxuries you'l r-t fr- th,- -t.-l .-D.,,,,t DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLA
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#1202 $950 ..S, .... 1i,,, I ,,i ,$1.500 waterfountain and it backs up to the park #3288 $1,600 community of Terra Vsta Social Membership Included #1223 $1,300
'I IH


E4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

the residual water unless
you can store it in the
freezer when it's not in use.
If you can reuse it, it's a
good idea, I think, just to
save on bottled water alone;
but if you can't, $20 is an
awful lot for a throwaway
baggie. -Zhoen, forums
Dear Zhoen: I would fix
the drain in your other tub.
The parts and kits are not
expensive, and there are
plenty of repair video tuto-
rials online. I'm assuming
this is not for drinking,
though. Another option is to
simply use a clean bucket or
two, or use 2-liter plastic
pop bottles, food-grade
water storage containers/
barrels (which you can find
where camping supplies are
sold), or commercially bot-
tled drinking water. The wa-
terBOB is for one-time use.
EN.
Cookie cutters make
sugar cookies in lovely
shapes. Some cutters are
much easier to use than oth-
ers. Rather than fuss with
cutters during the busy hol-
iday season, you can im-
print your cookies with
items around your home,
such as a meat tenderizer,
potato masher or spatula.
Regular rubber craft stamps
can work, too (they'd have to
be clean stamps, of course).



JANE
Continued from Page E4

foliage plant, Stromanthe
does have flowers in sum-
mer. It sets seeds if polli-
nated. The tiny flowers are
white, pink or purplish, sur-
rounded by leafy bracts that
may be brightly colored,
usually red. Clusters of flow-
ers rise on stems above the
leaves; the species name
sanguinea refers to the
prominent blood-red bracts.
'Triostar' can be planted
outdoors in a shade garden
amid gingers, hydrangeas,
azaleas and camellias after
March. Be sure to repot and
perhaps divide larger clumps


The first reader tip shares
what she uses to stamp
cookies:
Cookie cut-outs: At Christ-
mas, I don't use cookie cut-
ters. I use a small glass to
cut circles in the dough. If I
want them to be a little
fancy, I use the bottom of the
glass as a cookie "stamp" to
press a design into the
cookie dough. It creates less
fuss for me than cookie cut-
ters. -Lillian, New York
Magnetic ornaments: I at-
tach magnets to ornaments,
silk flowers and Happy
Meal toys and hang them on
the fridge to decorate for
the holidays. Mindy,
Florida
Christmas shopping at
Goodwill: We have budgeted
$100 per child this year. I
want to make that amount
go as far as possible, so I will
be looking for some second-
hand presents. Our son is 6
years old, and he loves to
play board games with us.
Today at Goodwill, I found a
Jenga set for $2, a set of
dominoes for $1 and a set of
five wooden peg board
games (similar to the ones
on the tables at Cracker
Barrel restaurants) for $2.
The boxes were beat-up, so
I also chose some cute,
sturdy Christmas-themed
tins to package the games in.
I also picked out a few books
that I think both kiddos will
like.- M.J, Maine
Get more from dominoes:
FYI, there are tons of dif-


to bring indoors before night
temperature falls below 45
degrees in November
This plant makes a strik-
ing house plant and conver-
sation piece during social
gatherings. Offsets and
plant divisions in decorative
pots can be a welcome gift
for many gardeners during
the festive season.


Jane Weberis a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion Countygarden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


ferent domino games. You
can find various instruc-
tions and rules for different
games for free online, so
your kids would be getting
multiple games from one set
of dominoes. S.D.,
Minnesota
Evaluate which traditions
to keep: I always hated the
Christmas parade; I found it
to be cold, boring and too
late at night. The traffic
back home was a mess. It al-
ways felt like such a chore,
but it was a family tradition,
so I kept forcing myself to
take my family to it. Then
one day, I asked the family
individually what they loved
doing at Christmas. With
glowing eyes and the biggest
smile, the very first thing


out of my daughter's mouth
was the Christmas parade. I
was totally shocked. Now
that I know that it is special
to her, I don't hate the pa-
rade. Seeing it through her
eyes, the parade is a joy; the
cold is fun, and the traffic ...
well, that is just a little bit
easier to put up with. J
Moffitt, Pennsylvania
Keep cold air out I have
two big double-windows
downstairs. I hung cheap
transparent shower cur-
tains over each, under the
curtains. They fit both win-
dows perfectly, and they
keep out the cold air sur-
prisingly well. Rudy,
Missouri
Dishwasher heat dry: A
note if you open your dish-


washer to let dishes dry ver-
sus using the heat-dry fea-
ture: I used to do this, and
over the years it has de-
stroyed the particle
board/laminate countertop
over the dishwasher. It's
probably best to only open
the dishwasher and let the
dishes air-dry if the counter
is solid and indestructible.
- Carol, Maryland
Control water spots on
glass shower doors: I hang a
plastic shower curtain
(mostly colored ones for


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 E5

decor) and the shower cur-
tain keeps the glass clean
and spotless. Just wash the
curtain periodically, since it
collects soap/hard water
spots. -MaryJo, email
Christmas decorating: My
tinsel garland had seen bet-
ter days. I wanted to toss it
out because it didn't suit my
taste, and I'd been wanting
to buy a pre-lit pine/spruce
garland to replace it. But I
decided to hang on to my old

See FRUGAL/Page E9


-S JI -- ALL OF0CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
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Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


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(352) 746-0744


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Mark Casper352-476-8136


SMLS#355794 $349
Custom 4/3/3 pool home.
Numerous upgrades. 3+ acres.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


NEW LISTING





7)i a 597 W Doerr Path
MLS#359119 $199,000
Lantana model, many upgrades
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Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


2'j? e 3422N Buckhorn Dr
MLS#355561 $299,000
Beautifully designed 3/3/2 on 2.75
acres. Bring your horses!
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


S 5538 N Bravado Terr
MLS#359083 $167,000
3/2/2 pool home on a 1 acre
w/beautiful trees.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


. .L..?. 3690 W Treyburn Path
liamou MLS#358373 $139,900
Lovely 3/2/2 home in Breath-taking
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3/2/2 home on an acre, all you need
+ new roof!
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Spacious 3/2/3 home, corner lot,
friendly neighborhood.
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(P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
: Prudential logo and the Rocksymbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


C()Citu unty Bumce R Bojnk, Realtor
0R= ._ty KELLERW1LUAkU
Thinking about selling your home, buying or investing?
We've got a free CMA for you.
We've got great deals for you.
S We've got a great experience for you.
352) 637-2777 ww. CIltrusSold.com
(352) 637-2777 www.ccdt.kwraltyom







E6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
....... ..................... ..............advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information......................... .................. 352-563-5660
...... ......................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Green for the holidays


Clever choices you can make to help the planet


What's not to love
this festive holiday
season? The
smells of holiday baking,
the cheerful colored lights
and decorations which fre-
quently reawaken warm
memories of childhood. All
these wonderful memories
can be clouded by the real-
ity of the burden we place
on the environment.
You may have not given it
much thought, but between
Thanksgiving and New
Year's, the United States
produces 25 percent more
waste than at any other
time of year. One million
pounds of cans, bottles,
bows, greeting cards, boxes,
junk mail, catalogs and gift
wrap are just some of the
things that contribute to the
increase in waste this holi-
day season. This year, try a
few green gift and decorat-
ing ideas to make this holi-
day season truly the most
wonderful time of the year!


Giving Green: Most
likely you will feel com-
pelled to buy your family
something really special
this year. Many
people go out to
the malls this
time of year
aimlessly
searching for
that perfect gift,
but not having
anything partic-
ular in mind.
Frequently, Joan Br
these shoppers FLOF
leave the store F
empty-handed, FR
frustrated that LIVI
they couldn't
find anything thoughtful
enough or within a certain
price range. In this econ-
omy, giving green is defi-
nitely an underrated way of
showing you care.
Consider giving the gift of
a membership. Purchase a
membership to a gym, sport
center, or perhaps tickets to


a football game, or guitar or
kayaking lessons. A mem-
bership to an art museum,
tickets to the ballet or the-
ater for your artsy
pal, or perhaps
pilates or dance
lessons for the ex-
ercise enthusiast
Other great
ideas to consider
are a spa day,
massage and or
facials, coupons
adshaw for babysitting or
IDA- a free car wash.
All of these re-
DLY quire virtually
NG no wrapping,
and therefore,
less waste and little to no
driving. Many can be pur-
chased online, all the while
eliminating emissions from
driving around and the
stress of parking and large
crowds. Keep it simple,
easy, and thoughtful.

See GREEN/Page E7


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inside...


Greenhouse envy
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Study lamps for maker's mark; bell has Swiss background


Dear John: Thank you
for your assistance in
appraising the value of
furniture in the
home we just
bought. We can
relax now as its
value is moderate
and made to live
with, not place in a
museum.
We thought you
might find these
two pieces interest- John S
ing. The two dragon
lamps, one hanging SIKOI
from the ceiling ATI
and the other, were
found in a closet. What can
you tell us about their origin
and value? L. & D.M.,
Internet
Dear L. & D.M.: I think both
lamps were made in America
during the last quarter of the
19th century The lamps ap-
pear to be made of brass.
There is a good chance there


is a manufacturer's mark on
them. Look them over closely
at edges, fittings, or wick ad-
justment parts.
Should you find a
maker's mark, let
us know; it could
Enhance dollar
S. value considerably
Potential dollar
- value, if there are
no maker's marks,
is $100 to $200 each.
korski Dear John: This
bell was given to me
SK'S by my brother about
IC 55 years ago. It was
Found in an old
abandoned house. No one
ever claimed the house and
about thirty years later it was
finally demolished by the
elements.
The date on the bell is 1878.
Underneath the date is the
word Saignelegier On the op-
posite side is Chiantel and un-
derneath is Fondeur. This is


not for sale, as my family
wants it to remain in the fam-
ily However, we would like to
know what it is worth. S.R.,
Internet
Dear S.R: You have a Swiss
cowbell made of either brass
or bronze by the Chiantel
Foundry The potential dollar
value is $50 to $150.
DearJohn: I have a problem
that I would like to talk to you
about. I was told that I could
have my grandmother's secre-
tary but I need to travel to Al-
bany, New York to obtain it. I
have not seen it in about 10
years but I do know that I can
remember it at least for 70
See ATTIC/Page E7
These dragon-shaped lamps
were likely made in the last
quarter of the 19th century. If
the manufacturer could be de-
termined, it could potentially
enhance their value.
Special to the Chronicle


i


^i-
;,- .-
,.__ '.'*l
!" 'i.o







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GREEN
Continued from Page E6

If you do feel the need to face the
holiday crowds, or just love the thrill
of shopping, then consider shopping
locally Buying local helps sustain and
grow your community and reduce
emissions. You might also think about
giving green to promote green living.
Some gift ideas could be a stylish
reusable water bottle, or making a gift
basket of your favorite consumable
local jams or jellies or perhaps natu-
ral soaps and lotions or teas and
coffee.
Wrapping and Cards: As much as
half of the 85 million tons of paper
products Americans consume every
year go toward packaging, wrapping
and decorating goods. Also, wrapping
paper and shopping bags alone ac-
count for about 4 million tons of trash
annually in the U.S.
Now is the perfect time to save
those cookie tin containers or any
other decorative box. Other materials
you may have around the house might
include some old sheet music, maga-
zine ads, brown paper bags, comics,
old scarfs, or newspaper clippings.
You can use actual popcorn instead of
packing peanuts! It's a great way to get
the family together to do something
fun and that's great for the environ-
ment. You will also find it's financially
friendly as well. Consider an E-card
for a Christmas card or a good old-
fashioned phone call! It's free,
thoughtful, and personal.
Ecological Decorating: As you


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

years, being first in my grandmother's
home and now in my aunt's.
It is oak, about 6 feet tall and maybe
40 inches wide. There are drawers in
the bottom, a slant style "desk" that
drops down, and two glass doors on
top with a shelf or two. I cannot re-
member what is inside of the desk
part, as kids in those days did not open
things unless they were told they
could. I have been told it does not
come apart
My question to you and I realize it
is a great stretch, since I do not know
the origin would you have any idea
of its value?
It is a long trip up there to get it,
and even though it is sentimental, we
have to rent a trailer and all that to
obtain it, besides the long trip. Thank
you so very much for your time. My


drive by your block at night, you might
be in awe at how some of your neigh-
bors have truly gone all-out this year
with hundreds of string lights and me-
chanical snowmen, wreaths, etc. Con-
sider some cost-effective and
eco-friendly holiday lighting LED
string lighting. These lights are eco-
friendly, and while they may cost a lit-
tle more, LEDs tend to stay lit for the
lifetime of the product, which means
fewer to no replacements. Plus, there's
no heat transfer, so they're safer to use
on any living or faux foliage.
This holiday season, try some sim-
ple methods to conserve resources
and cut down on waste going to the
landfills. Be the change you want to
see in the world during the most mag-
ical time of the year!
Call Citrus County Extension at 352-
527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons without dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or
affiliations, genetic information and
veteran status as protected under the
Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment
Assistance Act.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is director of
Citrus County Extension.

husband and I read your article every
week and enjoy it very much. D.T,
Internet
Dear D.T: The general type of desk
you describe has been produced since
the late 1700s and on into the 20th cen-
tury The size of your desk indicates it
was manufactured in the 20th century
Also, if the drop down lid is supported
by metal arms to the inside or if the lid
supports are lopers, which come out
automatically, just under the lid, it was
made in the 20th century
Assuming it was made in the 20th
century, potential dollar value is $250
to $500.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol.com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For winter weather,


dream about adding



a greenhouse


Structures range from modest to luxurious


Associated Press
This image shows a greenhouse on the property of a home. Home or "hobby" greenhouses run the
gamut from lavish, Victorian-style conservatories to primitive structures cobbled together from dis-
carded window frames.


LEE REICH
Associated Press

Now is not the time of year for sow-
ing, unless it's sowing an idea: As the
weather turns colder and the land-
scape becomes washed in grays and
browns, imagine a retreat, an oasis of
lush greenery and brightly colored
flowers suffused in warm, moist air
A greenhouse.
Home or "hobby" greenhouses run
the gamut from lavish, Victorian-style
conservatories to primitive structures
cobbled together from discarded win-
dow frames. Each creates its own
oasis. Even my coldframe nothing
more than a large wooden box with a
clear plastic cover-hints of the trop-
ics each time its cover is opened.
For most of us, the greenhouse of
our dreams would be a spacious con-
servatory, cozy for its abundance of
lush, tropical greenery, with enough
space among the 6-foot-long banana
leaves and fragrant citrus blossoms to
accommodate a small dining table and
chairs.
But let's float back down to reality.
That greenhouse is beyond many a
gardener's budget, and it's hard in
these environmentally aware times to
justify heating a space enough to keep
tropical plants happy in winter. Fuel
needs rise dramatically with each de-
gree you ratchet up greenhouse tem-
perature.
Then again, newer greenhouse cov-
erings, coupled with innovative meth-
ods of storing excess heat generated


on sunny days, can go a long way to
dampening heat losses.
Before letting your imagination run
away with you though, consider
whether you'd prefer your greenhouse
to be freestanding or attached to your
home.
A freestanding structure offers the
most flexibility in design and siting,
and is bathed in light from all four
sides. Also, there's no need to inte-
grate it with house design, or for it to
look anything prettier than just
functional.
An attached greenhouse requires
more attention to style but it does have
some advantages. Cozied up against
your home, an attached greenhouse
loses less heat It can tap the heat-stor-
ing capacity of the home's wall where
it is attached, especially if that wall is
masonry, and can even tap into the
home's heating system.
On sunny winter days, excess heat
generated in the greenhouse can be
vented into your home. That moist
heat is a lot more comfortable than the
dry heat of home heating systems, al-
though some caution is needed
against venting too much moisture
into your home.
And getting back to that table and
chairs that might be squeezed into
your greenhouse: How likely are you
to trudge across the snow with brunch
to your freestanding greenhouse? If
you have a wall facing in a direction
that gets enough light for the plants
you want to grow, the attached green-
house is the one most likely to provide
living space as well as functional
space.
Deciding on the greenhouse's size
and what plants it will house also can
help determine heating needs. No
need to get into other details just yet.
Let your imagination roam.


E8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mississippi man keeps up



sorghum syrup tradition


Northeast Mississippi Daily
Journal

ETTA, Miss. "Slow as mo-
lasses" has a multitude of
meanings, and sorghum syrup
maker Terry Norwood knows
them all.
There's the long summer of
growth between planting tiny
sorghum seeds and harvesting
the tall, grass-family plants.
There's the three- to five-day
wait after cutting and bundling
to let nature work on the sugars
in the stalks before running it
through an antique roller appa-
ratus to squeeze the juice out.
And even when the sorghum
has been squeezed, the fire is
hot and the steam is rising, it
seems an eternity before the
first clear juice cooks down into
the thick amber syrup that
some folks say is the best friend
a biscuit ever had.
Sorghum is in Norwood's
blood.
"My uncle, great-uncle,
granddaddy and great-grand-
daddy were all sorghum mak-
ers," he said.
It was away from home that
Norwood first made his own
sorghum.
"Actually I had a fellow that
was helping me when I was
farming in Tennessee," he said.
"His brother made syrup, so he
and I would grow eight or 10
rows, enough for us to have a
little bit. They had all the
equipment, and I learned a lit-
tle bit."
When Norwood started
teaching vocational agriculture
at Ingomar, he and his students
raised sorghum for the school
festival.
"We cooked down at the
school a couple of years, but as
a rule the kids weren't as en-
thused about it as I was," he
said. "I loaded up equipment
one day, and I landed right
there under this tree. That's
where my great-granddaddy
and my granddaddy cooked."
For 30 years since, Norwood
has spent much of every fall
making sorghum molasses in a
rustic but efficient building of


Sweet sorghum
has to be replanted
each year, but it's
an easy process.
The juicy grass
will reliably grow
even in parts of the
Midwest, although
it has long been
identified with the
rural South.

his own construction. When any
of several plantings reaches a
certain maturity, he uses one
ancient machine to decapitate
the seed heads, then another to
cut the stalks and tie them in
bundles.
"We want to leave it in the
field for three to five days to let
the leaves dry up, let the cane
mellow," he said. "Once that
cane is cut off the ground, the
natural enzymes take over and
change that form of sugar so it
can be cooked down." He
grinds the stalks in the field
until he fills a 300-gallon con-
verted milk tank that keeps the
juice at 34 degrees for a day or
two, until he cooks it down to 30
gallons of syrup the next day
Norwood, a board member of
the National Association of
Sweet Sorghum Producers and
Processors, said sorghum takes
over his life in the fall.
"When I started, I was farm-
ing in a pretty big way, but even-
tually this got to be the tail that
wagged the dog," he said. Even
when he went to work with
Farm Bureau full time, his
sorghum making only
increased.
Though the principle is the
same sugary juice concentrated
into thick syrup sorghum and
sugar cane are different plants.
Sugar cane yields several years'
harvest from one laborious
planting in its favored climes
but won't reliably survive win-


ters in Northeast Mississippi.
Sweet sorghum has to be re-
planted each year, but it's an
easy process. The juicy grass
will reliably grow even in parts
of the Midwest, although it has
long been identified with the
rural South.
"It's very cheap to grow an
acre of sorghum," he said. "I've
got a pound-and-a-half of seed
and no fertilizer. I may plow it,
but until it's ready to harvest,
we really haven't got anything
in it.
"When we say it's ready to
harvest, the fun's over and the
work starts."
The juice trickles down a
tube to one end of the slightly
tapered, 12-foot-long copper
cooking pan, under which a fire
made from dry pine sawmill
slabs heats the juice, boiling off
most of the liquid and concen-
trating the sugars in a 90-
minute trip around several
baffles. At the syrup end of the
pan, Norwood lifts the scalding
liquid over the last barrier,
which prevents partially
cooked juice from mixing with
the finished molasses.
Norwood's wife, Debbie,
likes to bring their grandson,
Lem Tate, to the syrup shed
while she pours syrup into
quart- and pint-sized plastic
jugs and caps them.
"He's taking it all in," she
said of the 1-year-old. "He's
learning how to make syrup."
While the Norwoods sell
some of their crop at festivals
and pumpkin patches and some
through mail order to out-of-
state and out-of-country cus-
tomers, most of it leaves with
folks who come down their
driveway
"When Ole Miss is playing at
home, we'll put a sign out on
Highway 30, and there'll be a
string of cars out here," Terry
Norwood said.
Even though much of the
work is within the capacity of
one man, syrup making often
remains a social event, with
both new customers and old


Page E12


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

garland and get creative. I added
bows, silk flowers and berries to it
and hung the garland on my stair rail-
ing, then added family photos by at-
taching them with clothespins. I like
it enough that I can wait for a good
sale on the more natural-looking gar-
land. -Lori, Wisconsin
Easy hot sandwiches: I put cup-
cake liners in a muffin tin and fill
them with cooked barbecue pulled
pork or Sloppy Joe mixture. Then I
freeze them, remove them from the
tin, put them in a freezer bag and
label them. The kids pull one out and
microwave it for one minute, then put
it on a bun. This has really cut down
on our fast food stops! L Lynch,
Georgia
MEN
Dear Sara: Can you mix Dawn and
bleach? Tina, Ohio
Dear Tina: Don't mix dish soap


000BOSH


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of Citrus County, Inc.
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with bleach. The bottle of Dawn even
states not to mix it with bleach.
Dear Sara: I'm looking for a home-
made cleaner for the grout in our
bathroom ceramic tile. Tisha,
Canada
Dear Tisha: You can use an oxygen-
bleach-and-water mixture to clean
your grout.
Use a scrub brush or allow the so-
lution to set on the tile for a few min-
utes before cleaning it. Vinegar and
baking soda, hydrogen peroxide or
bleach and water might do the trick,
or look for commercial grout cleaner
products at your local home im-
provement store.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (wwwfrugalvillage.com), a web-
site that offers practical,
money-saving stra tegies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


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REALTOR
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gbarth@myflorida-house .corn


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 E9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


While you're away for the holidays ...


A checklit for

closing up your

home for vacation

Associated Press

The flights have been booked,
the suitcases retrieved from the
attic and your vacation itinerary
has been set. But while your mind
may be ready to wander to a far-
away land don't forget about home
sweet home just yet.
Securing your home and mak-
ing it look occupied while you're
away on a winter vacation will
help deter thieves. And some sim-
ple preparations can save you the
anguish and expense of returning
home to find damage if something
like a dishwasher hose decides to
fail in your absence.
"If you look at how long it takes
compared to repairing the poten-
tial damage, it seems much easier
to take the precautions than it
does to make the repairs," said
Richard Stone, a University of
Minnesota Extension educator in
housing technology
Here's a checklist for closing up
the house properly before you go:
Daily Check: Arrange for a
friend or neighbor to check on the
house at least once a day (and feed
the fish or water the plants). Give
that person a copy of your itiner-
ary and contact numbers. Ask that
they call the police if they see or
hear anything out of the ordinary
Mail/Newspapers: Have the
mail held, or ask a neighbor to
take it in. The U.S. Postal Service
will hold mail from three to 30
days. Sign up for this free service
at usps.com, or pick up a form at
the post office that can be given to
your letter carrier, left in your
mailbox or returned to your post
office. Cancel newspaper deliver-
ies, and ask your neighbor to take
in any unexpected holiday pack-
ages, notices of delivery attempts
that may be left on your door, or
free publications tossed on the
driveway "That's a sure sign that
you're not there, when all that
stuff starts accumulating at your
house," said Ernie Long, the
crime prevention coordinator for
the Aventura Police Department


ARMED 1

READY -0



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Associated Press
A homeowner adjusts his home security system. Make sure all windows and doors are locked and set your alarm if you have one when closing up
the house for vacation. The police also might be able to check on your house daily. If your department has one, register with its "vacation watch"
or "dark house" list of homes that officers will check when you are away.


in Florida and an instructor for
the National Crime Prevention
Council.
Snow removal: If you don't
have a contract for regular snow
removal, arrange for somebody to
clear your driveway and sidewalk
if there is a storm. The house will
look occupied if the driveway is
cleared, plus that allows any
emergency crews closer access to
your home. Students may want the
job, but find out if they have their
own equipment or need access to
yours.
Security: Lock all windows
and doors and set your alarm if
you have one. The police also
might be able to check on your
house daily If your department
has one, register with its "vacation


watch" or "dark house" list. "We
will periodically go by and check
your house to make sure every-
thing is on the up and up," Long
said. "Just about every police de-
partment offers some kind of va-
cation watch."
Lights: To make your house
look lived in, put lights on timers
to mimic your typical routine.
Long said he'll set his living room
timer to go on in the evening for a
bit, and then he'll set a bedroom
light to go on for an hour before
his usual bedtime. Exterior mo-
tion lights are highly effective in
deterring crime because, as Long
said, "you can't sneak up on
them."
Noise: A radio can also be set
on a timer to make it seem like


you're there. Burglars, looking for
an empty house, will first knock on
a front door, and will flee if they
hear a radio, thinking you just did-
n't hear the knock. If nobody an-
swers, they typically go around to
a back door, where they are less
visible, Long said.
Locks and Doors: The back
door should have a high-security
lock and a strong door frame. Long
recommends replacing short
screws with 312-inch wood screws
to reinforce the strike plate on the
door, making it harder for a crim-
inal to kick it in. "You need to have
good-quality locks but the door
frame is just as important, espe-
cially on the back door," he said.
"Studies have shown that if you
delay him two minutes, he'll go


somewhere else."
Valuables: The first place rob-
bers go in a home is the master
bedroom, Long said, where they
are after money, jewelry and guns.
If you have a big stash of cash or
an expensive jewelry collection,
he recommends storing it at a
bank safety deposit box and stor-
ing any weapons in a gun safe. If
you hide valuables in your home,
be creative, Long said; place them
in a coffee can, painted black and
attached to the floor joists over-
head in the basement, for in-
stance. "If the guy is there for a
while, he'll knock over everything
in your house, empty every
drawer, turn every mattress over


Page Ell


E10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida's




vanishing




springs


CRAIG PITTMAN
The Tampa Bay Times

ST. PETERSBURG -
North of Gainesville, a
church camp once at-
tracted thousands of visi-
tors because it was built
around the gushing waters
of Hornsby Springs. Then
the spring stopped flowing
and the camp had to spend
more than $1 million to
build a water park to re-
place it The old spring site
is now so stagnant that it's
frequently declared unfit
for humans to swim in. In
Silver Springs, where the
water was once so clear it
was as if the fish swam
through air, there are now
goopy mats of algae so
thick that alligators can


perch atop them. And in
the Ocala National Forest,
the gurgle of fresh water
pouring out of popular Sil-
ver Glen Spring is slowly
growing saltier. Deep be-
neath the ground we stand
on, below the strip malls
and the condos and the
lush green of the golf
courses, runs a river of
water that makes life in
Florida possible. The un-
derground aquifer rushes
through Swiss cheese cav-
erns, its hidden flow bub-
bling up to the surface in
Florida's roughly 1,000
springs the greatest con-
centration of springs on
Earth.
A century ago, Florida's

See SPRINGS/Page E12


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VACATION
Continued from Page E10

and look everywhere in
your house for good stuff,"
Long said. "They're not neat
when they do it"
Blinds: Leave the
blinds as you normally do. If
you raise and lower them
daily, Long recommends
keeping blinds closed in the
rear of the house, in case a
would-be robber is watching
for movement, and keep
them open in the front.
Thermostat: If you're
leaving a cold weather
clime, you can turn the heat
down in your home, but
don't turn it off altogether
since that could cause dam-
age from frozen water pipes.
Stone recommends going no
lower than 60 degrees. Even
at that temperature, the ex-
terior walls, which may
house pipes and plumbing
fixtures, will be colder, es-
pecially in older homes that
may have less, or no, insula-
tion in those outer walls.
"Turning that core tempera-


ture down is going to make
a significant difference in
the temperature around the
perimeter," Stone said.
Another concern is mold
if you have humidity
sources like plants or fish
tanks. Colder surfaces can
condense moisture and lead
to mold growth.
Set your thermostat fan
from "auto" to "run" or "on"
to keep the flow of warm air
even and continuous.
"I would rather pay a lit-
tle extra in electricity for
that short number of days
than to come home and find
that some rooms are colder
than others and there was
damage," Stone says.
Another way to increase
air flow is to open cabinets
surrounding pipes, likely in
the kitchen and bathroom,
and keep interior doors open.
Water: Turn off the
main valve (usually located
near the water meter) or, if
you have well water, turn off
the pump. Then, turn on an
upstairs faucet for about 15
seconds to relieve any pres-
sure that may have built up
in the system and that could


force water into the house if
there were a leak. Unless
you have frost-free spigots,
make sure outside spigots
have been turned off by
shutting off the inside valve
and draining them outside.
Appliances/Fixtures: If
you leave the main water
valve open, turn off non-es-
sential, water-dependent
fixtures like toilets, ice mak-
ers, washing machines and
dishwashers to help prevent
a leak if a hose or fitting
fails. Leave the refrigerator
on, freeze what you can, and
throw out or give away per-
ishable food that won't last.
A gas water heater can be
turned to the "vacation" or
"pilot" setting, usually lo-
cated at the bottom of the
unit, so you are not heating
water you don't need. An
electric water heater can be
turned off at the main elec-
trical panel. Because it can


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Ell

take a few hours to get the
water warm after you turn
the heater back on, consider
asking your caretaker to do
so on the day you are
returning.
Electronics: Unplug or
power down non-essential
electronics like televisions,
gaming systems, computer
monitors, coffee pots and
toasters to save money on
electricity. Make a list of
what you have turned off so
you can remember what
needs turning on when you
get home.
Garbage: Take it out
ahead of time, or arrange
for your caretaker to take it
out on the assigned day
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E12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012


SORGHUM
Continued from Page E9

friends hanging around, trying
(or pretending) to be useful. It
evokes memories ofnow-gone
relatives and friends who
used to do the same.
"My daddy was my fire-
man, and Woodrow Gray
and Daddy would get out
here on Saturday evening,
lying and telling stories,"
Norwood said. "I told them
a time or two, 'If y'all are
going to help me, y'all are
going to have to help me
right or I'm going to fire
you.'And they'd say 'Well, as
soon as you start paying us,
you can fire us.'
"We had a lot of fun. I'd
give anything to have them
back."
Sorghum making is still a
family affair for the Nor-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


woods, but to keep it that way
Terry Norwood had to mech-
anize, cobbling together a
cutter-binder from corn pick-
ers last made in the 1940s.
"I used to take my per-
sonal days when I was
teaching at Independence
to take a machete and cut
sorghum by hand," Debbie
Norwood said. "Eventually I
told him, 'I'm too old for
this.' It had to go to a one-
man operation; Terry has
got it down to a fine art."
Terry Norwood remem-
bers the moment of truth.
"One time I got told I
could probably run around
with the best-looking
woman in Union County
and talk my way out of it but
that if I planted any more
sorghum I was probably
going to get a divorce," he
joked. "It's been in the fam-
ily, and it kind of got to be an
obsession."


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SPRING
Continued from Page Ell

gin-clear springs drew presidents and
millionaires and tourists galore who
sought to cure their ailments by
bathing in the healing cascades. Now
the springs tell the story of a hidden
sickness, one that lies deep within the
earth:
The water in many springs no
longer boils up like a fountain, the
way they have for centuries. The flow
has slowed. In some places it has
even stopped or begun flowing
backward.
The water that does come out is
polluted by nitrates.
The pollution fuels the growth of
toxic algae blooms, which are taking
over springs and the rivers they feed
and putting human health at risk.
Finally, the fresh water coming
out of many springs is showing signs
of a growing saltiness, according to a
study by the Florida Geological
Survey
All of it- particularly the saltiness
- is a dark omen for the future of the
state's water supply
"It's the very same water we drink
that's coming out of the springs," said
Doug Stamm, author of the book
Florida's Springs. "When they start to
deteriorate, that's the water we drink
deteriorating too."
Yet a state-sponsored effort to save
the springs, launched by then-Gov
Jeb Bush 12 years ago, ended last year
under Gov Rick Scott. Groups draft-
ing plans to restore some of the most
important springs were disbanded
because they lost their funding.
Faced with a backlash this year
from Florida residents who cherish
their springs, the state's top environ-
mental regulator is now touting a re-


newed effort, even amid agency lay-
offs. But Bob Knight of the Florida
Springs Institute in Gainesville says
most of it appears to be "more in the
category of pork barrel projects ...
with questionable benefits to
springs."
Springs once burbled up all across
the state. But in South Florida they
were wiped out decades ago by the
ditching and draining of the land-
scape, as well as overpumping of the
aquifer The ones that remain are in
the less populated region north of In-
terstate 4. One former state official
called them "the Everglades of North
Florida."
As with the Everglades, the springs'
problems begin with human alter-
ations to their flow
The water coming out of Florida's
springs "is a blend of different ages,"
explained Brian Katz of the U.S. Geo-
logical Survey "Some went in days or
weeks ago," while some of it has been
underground for decades.
That means that when the rain
pours down, dribbling into fissures in
the earth that connect to the aquifer,
the springs appear to have a normal
flow. It's water that just went into the
ground and is now coming back out.
During the dry season, though, the
older underground rivers that should
keep the springs flowing year-round
no longer spurt upward to become
what Marjory Stoneman Douglas
once called "bowls of liquid light."
Jason Polk, a geoscience professor
at Western Kentucky University, has
been diving in Florida's springs and
sinkholes since 2004, doing research
in underground caverns in Pasco,
Hernando, Citrus and Marion coun-
ties. He has seen stark changes over
the years.
"You go in a cave where there's no
longer any water at all," he said.
"Places you used to swim through,


now you have to walk through. It's a
permanent decline. It's just gone."
Where did it go? The evidence
points to too much pumping of fresh
water millions of gallons a day
sprayed on suburban lawns and farm-
ers' fields, run through showers and
flushed down toilets, turned into
steam to crank turbines for electric-
ity, or siphoned into plastic bottles for
sale around the country
Floridians use 158 gallons of water
a day per person, about 50 more than
the national average. Meanwhile agri-
culture draws more water out of the
ground for irrigation than any state
east of the Mississippi. As a result, be-
tween 1970 and 1995, withdrawals
from the aquifer increased more than
50 percent and by 2005 hit 4.2 billion
gallons a day
As pumping grew, the flow from
many springs fell. In 2006, one of the
state's most powerful ones, Spring
Creek Springs near Tallahassee,
abruptly reversed its flow It has
never completely recovered, say local
residents.
A troubling glimpse of the future
comes from Hornsby Spring, north-
west of Gainesville. In 1953, the Sev-
enth Day Adventist Church bought it
and built Camp Kulaqua on the 600
acres around it. The camp attracted
50,000 people a year, many of them
eager to plunge into the spring's gush-
ing depths.
Twenty years ago, "you used to
could swim straight down 80 feet," re-
called Theresa Sroka, a former
camper who's now Kulaqua's market-
ing director. "There was a floating
dock in the middle and the lifeguard
would sit on it, because it was so
deep."
But then the flow began slowing,
and in 2003 it stopped.

See SPRINGS/Page E13


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPRINGS
Continued from Page E12

"It became a stagnant
pond," said camp director
Phil Younts. The water qual-
ity fell below what the
health department required
for swimming, so "we had to
bus kids to other places to
swim."
Ultimately the camp paid
$1.6 million to build a water
park to replace the spring.
Sometimes campers can
still jump into the spring
bowl, now less than 50 feet
deep. Most days, though, the
spring that was the center-
piece of the camp is off 1
imits.
That hasn't happened to
the biggest springs yet.
But Jeff Peterson, a cave
diver who has explored
many of the springs, has
seen worrisome changes in
Weeki Wachee Springs.
When he began exploring
it in 1994, the flow was so
powerful no diver could go
very far. But around 2007
the pressure dropped to
where exploration was so
easy his team could go a
mile down one tunnel.
When he hands his find-
ings over to state water offi-
cials, he said, "They say
thank you" but that's all.
"They're trying to deter-
mine how much we can tol-
erate dragging that thing
down before the ecosystem
falls down."
While the Bush springs
initiative was still alive, the
Florida Geological Survey
began pulling together its
first comprehensive report
on the subject in 30 years.
The report, which came
out in 2009, surveyed data
from 1991 to 2003. It docu-


mented the rise of pollution
and the fall of flows. But the
geologists didn't anticipate
the most startling finding.
"The most unexpected
conclusion," said Jonathan
Arthur, the state's chief ge-
ologist, "was the saline indi-
cators increasing in the
springs."
This saltiness, similar to
the saltwater intrusion that
cost Pinellas County its orig-
inal water supply wells in
the 1980s, isn't just creeping
in along the coast, such as in
Chassahowitzka Springs
and Homosassa Springs. It's
also showing up far inland
including at Silver Glen
Springs in Ocala National
Forest.
"Saltwater encroachment
is a hugely significant
issue," the report noted,
putting the words "hugely
significant" in italics. It
pointed out changing fresh
water into salt water "can
adversely affect the long-
term term sustainability of
Florida's water resources."
How does this happen?
Florida's freshwater aquifer
is not the only liquid roaring
through the ground. It floats
atop the remnants of an an-
cient sea that's trying to
push its way upward. Until
recently, that salty sea was
held in check by the massive
lens of fresh water above it,
Arthur said.
"We're seeing the early
stages of a shrinking of the
freshwater lens of water in
the aquifer," he said.
If Florida's freshwater
bubble continues to shrink,
"we'd have saltwater intru-
sion under the whole state.
That's a nightmare sce-
nario," said Knight of the
Florida Springs Institute.
"The evidence is there that
we're changing our aquifer."


The geologists made a
number of recommenda-
tions. They called for every-
thing from increased
monitoring statewide to fig-
uring out how to change
land use practices to cut
back on the pollution. They
sent their report to a host of
state agencies.
However, Arthur said, "I
am not aware of any formal
action on the recommenda-
tions." The report "did raise
eyebrows of some water
managers in terms of impor-
tance," he said, but "there
was a great desire to see
what does the rest of this
decade look like."
So his staff began work on
a sequel, looking at data
from 2003 to now. So far, he
said, "the preliminary re-
sults indicate that the pat-
terns are continuing."
However, as the springs'
woes worsen, work on the
second report is moving
slowly
"It is unfunded pretty
much at this point," Arthur
explained.
Before Disney and the
beaches became major
draws, springs were the
state's biggest tourist attrac-
tion. They still lure plenty of
visitors thanks to
taxpayers.
Beginning in 1949, the
state has acquired 17
springs for its state park sys-
tem. A 2003 study by Florida
State found that four of the
largest ones Wakulla,
Ichetucknee, Homosassa
and Volusia Blue each
brought in $70 million annu-
ally, and each created 259
jobs. The impact "was simi-
lar to what spring training
does, but all year long," said
study co-author Mark Bonn.
So if those springs dry up,
it's not just an environmen-


tal crisis it's an economic
catastrophe. Look what hap-
pened to the town of White
Springs, north of Lake City
In the early 1900s, so
many wealthy tourists
flooded White Springs seek-
ing a medical cure from its
waters that 13 hotels and a
railroad line catered to
them. Among the visitors:
presidents Teddy Roosevelt
and William Howard Taft.
The owner of the mineral
spring built a four-story
"spring house" around it to
give patients access for their
treatments for rheumatism,
indigestion, dandruff and
insomnia. The spring house
still stands, but visitors are
rare. The last hotel closed
this year and the spring it-
self is a glorified mudhole.
"It started flowing less
and would quit," said Den-
nis Price, a freelance geolo-
gist who lives in White
Springs. "Then it would flow
for a while and quit. People
got so used to it that it be-
came the norm. So when it
quit for good, it wasn't the
tragedy it should've been.
We assumed it was part of
the natural order, but it
wasn't natural."
Pumping from a nearby
phosphate mine drained so
much water from the
aquifer that the spring
stopped its regular flow in
the 1970s. Since then, when-
ever enough rain cascaded
down into sinkholes and
other fissures, the spring
perked back up again -
during flooding in 1998, it
rose 35 feet and topped the
railing around the top floor
of the spring house only
to die back down afterward.
There has been little flow
since 1999.
But residents of White
Springs are convinced their


spring can be reborn. The
phosphate mine has cut its
water use. Mayor Helen
Mills is trying to convince
the state to clamp down on
the other people slurping
water from the aquifer, par-
ticularly businesses in Jack-
sonville she contends could
get their water from the
ocean or the St Johns River.
"It's taken eons for the
Florida aquifer to be
formed," Mills said. "What
they're doing is causing ir-
reparable damage. ... We're
a harbinger for what's going
to happen to the rest of Cen-
tral Florida."
Where water still emerges
from springs, in many
places it's now murky,
plagued with nitrate
pollution.
The nitrates, studies have
shown for the past 20 years,
come mostly from excess
fertilizer, cattle feces and
leaky septic tanks. It washes
into the springs every time
it rains. In Fanning Springs,
in a state park in Levy
County, the nitrate level is
100 times what it's supposed
to be.
"Springs occur in areas
where the aquifer is close to
the surface, which means
it's susceptible to contami-
nation," explained Mark
Stewart, a geology professor
at the University of South
Florida.
Polk of Western Kentucky
University said he tested for
nitrate pollution in every
spring and sinkhole he in-
vestigated and "pretty much
all of them had high levels."


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 E13

The nitrates spur algae
growth. The blooms started
with a few wisps here and
there 20 years ago, and now
it's so thick it covers the
sandy bottom at Silver
Springs and coats the bright
green eel grass in Rainbow
Springs with a thick, brown
fuzz. In Fanning Springs
there's so much algae that
virtually no other vegetation
survives.
This is not just a cosmetic
problem. The algae, a
species called Lyngbya
wollei, can be toxic to hu-
mans. In 2002 state officials
began keeping a running
tally of all the swimmers,
kayakers, anglers and tu-
bers who brushed up
against it in state parks and
then complained of suffer-
ing from rashes, hives, nau-
sea, itching and asthma
attacks. That overall tally
has passed 140 reported
incidents.
Florida officials began
worrying about the dismay-
ing trends in the early
1990s. Jim Stevenson, a
state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection biolo-
gist, as well as a cave diver,
wondered why clear-as-
glass Wakulla Springs near
Tallahassee famous for
its glass-bottom boat tours
- sometimes filled with
murky water.
At one time, he said, "it
was one of the best places in
Florida to see birds and
wildlife." But now, "they
rarely ever have a day when
they could give a glass-
bottom boat tour anymore."


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E14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012







Real Estate


Classifieds

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966



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1 35 563- 5M.^ I Toll Fee:- 88) 82-234 1 -- l l C ^e^^ I -I ^^ite:^^ Iw r Il on e


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8158 W. Miss Maggie Dr. (H)......$675
2/1/1 Cottge on Water, Fenced Backyard
6944W. GrantSt. (H)...Redued $685
2/2/1 Cute, CentrllyLocated
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
994 E.Winneka St. (HER)..........$625
2/1.5 Country [ing On 1 ACRE Wi 1 C port
9432 E. Gable (. (INV)..............$ 00
2/2/1 Roomy with Screened Porch

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!


3/2/2 .........$825
2/2/2..........$675
4/2 .............$750
2/1...............$550


2/1/1 ..........$600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scrug9s,
Realtor-Associate
| 352-726-9010


Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; dock
$695/mo (352) 287-5020
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Completely
Furn. on Hunter s Sprgs,
sun deck W/D rm. All
until. incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all until. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec., 352-634-5499


FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$300/$200 dp. Trails
End Camp, A Friendly
Place to Live
352-726-3699
INVERNESS
2 B/R's Available
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12& 1-5
307 Washington Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
211, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
INVERNESS
Near Hospital. Modern
Tiled 2BR W/ Washer
Dryer Hookup. $500
352-212-6002


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
1 Bedroom $396;
2 Bedrooms $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."










OFFICE, RETAIL SPACE
FLORAL CITY,
Orange Av. 550 sq ft.
MUST SEE! $300 mo.
352-341-3000


Perfect Location
Office/Retail. High
Visibility. Beautiful
Historic Inv. Down-
town Courthouse Sq.
700 sq.ft. 628-1067





INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$700. mo 317-442-1063




HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
Pets? No smoking. 1st
&sec. 352-212-4981





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


LECANTO
1b/1ba, furn. Handyman
cottage porch, 5 acr.
pking, quiet, water&trash
pk up, incl. pets ok, ref's
$450mo. Blind Box1812P
CC Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429




CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Uke New
352-302-1370




INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
1 OR 2 BR, C/H/A QUIET
AREA $575
FIRST MONTH FREE
(352) 422-7794


AUCTION: FL Properties!
2 Operating Car Washes,
Residential, Commercial
& Waterfront Land


Properties in Six Counties
Many Will Sell Regardless of Price!
Waterfront, Commercial &
Residential Land Throughout FL
2 Operating Car Washes
Dunnellon & Crystal River, FL
Single Family Residence in Inglis, FL
Marion, Levy, Citrus, Lake,
Suwannee & Hamilton Counties
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Driggers, III,
Lic. Real Estate Broker, FL
Lic# AU707 & AB3145 I 10% BP
TRANoN. 877-374-4437








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 & FL RM
35 S. Lucille St. $575.
352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA, Fncd
$525. mo 352-795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA Near
Shopping $550. mo.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
Huge House 3/3/2
$800, 352-464-2514
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1 1/2 w/family rm Newly
remodeled inside & out.
W/D hook up. Fenced
$750. 352-586-4037
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2. (6 mo. term)
$550. Mo., credit check
(352) 804-5008
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2 Enclosed Porch,
Laundry room. Nice
backyard. Fenced.
$750. (352)-489-0117
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
CarPrt, C/H/A $475 mo
352-220-2447 212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm cottage. Good
rental history a must.
1st/last/sec $400 + elec.
352-628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 good neighborhood
Close to schools
$675. mo. 352-409-1900
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lake Estates
3/2/2, 2600 SQ FT Newly
remodeled $775 + dep.
850-527-5085 (Agent)
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office fenced yard, on
over '/AC, on Hwy 200
$875.+Sec., 344-3084
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, $475
3/2/2 House,
Meadows, $675
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 house, $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
6683 W Robin Lane
2 /11, CHA, W/D, 2 Car
Crprt, appl's $550/mo
+ dep (352) 628-6615
INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1/1 Lg. fam rm, shed.
$695.F/L/S Avail 12/1
352-560-7857
INVERNESS
Country Uving on Large
/2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212


INVERNESS
Like new, 2/2 villa near
pk, $625 (352) 212-4873




CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; Furnished
$695/mo (352) 287-5020

FLORAL CITY
3/1, 1,200 sf, Boat Dock,
Lrg. Lanai, oak trees,
priv. fnced, $700. mo.
incl cable. 352-419-7063

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611




SUGARMILL WDS
furn, 2/2/1 $1000 mnth
River Links Realty
352-628-1616





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th-Wheel with
slides. Screened gazebo
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


-U
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, Iba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872


Marie-Elena Carter
Broker Associate
Realtor
Accredited Buyer's
Representive
&
Certified Distress
Property Expert
Only Way Realty
352-422-4006
www.cartermaria.com

Motivated seller
wants this gone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond.
pvd rd. Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


-3
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com







ONLINE

AUCTION


BANK-OWNED

HOMES

8535 E GOSPEL
ISLAND RD
Inverness
3 BR, 2 BA
1,707 SF HOME
AENT'
Tomlka Splres-Hanssen
Landmark Realty
352-726-5263



SNo BackTaxes or Liens
InsurableTitle
SGoONLINE To
Bil Ngw!





HUDSON &
MARSHALL
866-539-4174
H&M CQ1035357. AB110; B. G.
Hudson. Jr., BK3006464. AU230




OPEN HOUSE
12/2/12 11a-2pm
1185 N Country Club
D..CRYSTAL RIVER
Patty Sargent Realtor
Trotter Realty
352-613-6500




OZELLO
"approx. 2.5 acres**
commercial .w/boatramp.
and gulf access, 3, 18',
roll-ups, $149k
call 352-634-3862


REMODELED 2/2/1
103 S Desoto. 1208 sf
New: appliances, paint,
flooring, light fixtures,
fans. Updated kit/baths.
$47,900. 527-1239





YOU'LL v THIS!
CLEARVIEW ESTATES
3+BR/ 2.5 BA, 2+Garage
on 1 acre. Clear views up
and down the trails. Too
many extras, must see.
Mid $200's 352-860-0444




FAIRVIEW ESTATES
Expansive custom built
home on one acre. 3/2 w/
den, 4 car garage w/
workshop. Great
entertainment spaces
inside and out.
Call Myriam at Weston
Properties LLC


Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418




2 Bedroom, 1 Bath,
1 car garage, New Roof,
laminate, flooring,
1000 sq. ft, $57,000,
352-419-6719


must sell!
$164,900, 3030 S Jean
Ave. Inverness, FL, Bank
Owned. Only $164,900
for this large 3/3/2 home
w/ workshop & beautiful
screened pool. Jessica
Wood 352-427-8863,
www.irwproperties.com

Inverness
2 br. 2 ba 1car garage,
Close to downtown.
New carpet, bath fixtures,
fans lights, & stove.
Asking $55000.00
call 352-344-8194

Inverness Highlands,
4 BR, 3 BA, Pool, Corner
of Carol and Tennyson.
2.8 acres, fenced, CHA,
deep well, UPDATES
in 2011. Offered As Is.
$174,900. 352-419-7017.

Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Sale. Nego.
(908) 322-6529


H
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558
WALDEN WOODS
Adult Community
2/2, DW+Carport. Furn.
Close to Community
Center Pool, $25,000
Call 352-428-6919






MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


IoodS


n:


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448




MINI FARM
5 Acres(2 lots) adj
Pine Ridge/C.Springs
3/2/2, block home
w/lots of extras! $185K
(352) 564-8307


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

I've SOLD
20 Properties
this year!
I NEED LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com

PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bring your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
back yard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164


AAA BLUE WATERS
Exclustive beauty
privately gated 4200 sq ft
splendor (Huge L-R,
D-R,, 3 suites) 799k
(352) 503-2288


Hme


L. I :-.-* -f I.- I

SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
BestNaTuIreCoast
Propertes.com
To view
great waterfront
properties"




Relocating family need-
ing atleast a 3/2/2 home
in Hernando Elementary
school district. Pre ap-
proved/ fast transactions.
No Real Estate Agents
Kenny (419) 544-9355





For Sale oSl
8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this beautiful GOLF
COURSE lot (100X125)
located in Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Have
fun boating, fishing and
jet skiing on the nearby
Tsala Apopka Chain of
Lakes. Enjoy nature, wild-
life and the natural beauty
of Fort Cooper State
Park. Call Kelly at
860-459-2411


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 E15


Hme


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857
DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 % ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116
KINGS BAY AREA
A Special home on deep
water. $460,000
804 SE 1st Court, Cyr Riv
(352) 795-3264
YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


Waterfront
Homes I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* I .1 ,. p,,,,j ,..l
I I: ll .il l l l ;.ill lvl I n .ii H
* 1 .1 .[ l l,]......s 1. .I 1,l i31 s sysil 1 .l,9 H
, cl ~lr.jlll. l & ;ll . i di o. i l.l. i I)P : N vi..1 ,
Mi = ',5:. I'- $175,000
Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 2123410
wI'1'1I'. ciliuscounirsold. conm


I -, I.Fc .11.. .. I ,i I. ll .l.. ..l i Il


ML 5 = 1')11:1 $48,900
loitaine 0 Regan 586 0075
I


UUUU IATbIL UUUU BUT

l I ni llllli ; 1 l 11 h ) .l .l..) I nq i 1..I FI
Mi : 35:- .'l1 $119,900
Pal Davis i3521212 /7280
Viewt listing.: irtr'r'. c21paldavis. conm


1:1 ill) I d' l F'l F 3: I .,I: l. i hIil / m ilF l6 ,:., 1
,,l, I.,1..1u.i.,l ASKING 199K.
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


* h_ l dllll .-I lo ll .lll di' v1

MNI = .:: "W-lI $125,000
1I'1i'I'. cilIusconIIIIsold. com
Jeanne b Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


OPEN HOUSE TODAY: NOON UNTIL 3 P.M.






GREAT CORNER LOCATION
TERRA VISTA SKYVIEW CITRUS HILLS I.), ,p.,, i,,'i..: No ,, ,, i,,, i
1116 W. Lake Valley Ct. 15 W. Ipswich Lane ,I. ,Il ,. ,.,,. ,. .b: I. .,, ,
S l ,, . . ... I , I I, ,-,h , 1 , -. 1 1 ,1,,- 1 1, ,, I ,1 ..h ,. " .
., 'l, I ,,i,,, rli = .1 $364,900 .... ,,, $299,900 $279,000 Ml = .i,
Katen Morton cell 3522/2 7595 Call Jim Motion lot a tout at 422 2173.


I_ 1.1Fl 1 1 : ih I lil l..~ i l I06"II
I ..F h I..is I.. ;h.l. p.l... -
Mi i ='-".il1 ONLY $55,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


l i" I l Jlsll' 5:2I III. cI. I l .111:1 I- I .III ,,0ill.
MI5 = ,/. 1cII $28,000
Nlanc Jenks 352 400 8072


M- --""^ i
BIG PRICE REDUCTION ON INVERNESS HOME!

* 1 A..- lI. h ..- ih

HA L IIA IlAii.i..ii... ii.-i.Ilp
OFFERED AT ONLY $67,900
Call Elias G. Kiallah at 352 400 2635
lot showing inmlomation


* F.AFi. FIV FFFIjNT l11ff
* I A. W ii .i.. :i i. 1 Fli. i


SMi=_ =3.57 Y $395,000
t';:'nt'. ciltiscounti sold. corn
Jeanne 8 Willaid Pickiel 212 3410



START A

REWARDING

REAL ESTATE

CAREER

Call Isaac Baylon
For Info 352-697-2493


Ih, ,,,,, ,h ., II. ,I l ,,, ,,,, hI- I ,- I ,,,,I, lh 1 I,,,

III,,,I, h 1 X 1 1 11 I I I
MI = i '.'i ASKING $228,900
Pa. D.nis :3522/12 1280
I'ell ls, ing n III c21ii.ild.i s com


Ijl lh ...l .\\ I.. .llllllllin .. l....hil .l' : l.r..l.

lh :. I ii l l..i i ii ild I III. .,illllil llI
dl I Ill l 1 11 1li i 11. 11 hl. I II IIII.:II l

Ml = .' $89,000
Ask lot Tim Donovan 220 0328


COMMERCIAL BUILDING

H.. 11 .. i I1 1 TI..l I I 1..i ,1


M li = .56 .'. A.i ...i $165,000
Call Jim Miot on at 422 2173 lot a tou.


LOADS OF GOODIES HERE!!

,V .'.11 ,:l.ll. lIIe 8 .~F III, I.I h11 -lln ih .lll
Mi ; =i ).''. ASKING $75,900
Pat Davis 352 212 7280
Viewt listingg: ws. c2l1aidavis. com


WHAT A SWEET SNOWBIRDS NEST, OR SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACI
A FULL TIME NEST FOR THAT MATTER f. CA .1. .. i i,,.1.i.i

I _" ,:i ,Il (,:lli. ._ I ..h h 11 e...Ih ,: I ,: I ,: ,i ,:
Mi = :':.1I ONLY $54,900 Mi = .i:' 1 $264,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699 Call Chailes Kellr 352 422 2387


ELEGANT AND LOVELY
GOLF COURSE HOME $154,500
a llI I I n V in.i l. 3.i i ..I4 1Fi ,l pl.1 pill.F
....u F, h .. ,,,,, .. F I,: l,:m.. l,, ........
I) F-. ; I IoI I Ii 1 h ..l,
Call DoIIs Mine, 352-344 1515 loI apple.


BUILDING FOR SALE
I i I l i1:, I I.. ,,ll. ...i Aii.i ...1 al


Call Martha Snyder 476 8727
and ask lot File =352415


CANAL FRONT CORNER LOT
A .: H i ,ii.,Id..: b,.i F, l .iI:l if, .l
.: bwl,), I,)I l11:l lliF hIl: llF I $. -j )Ij
I ail.i Ap...I. I 1lil
Mi1 = i'. -.'h $14,500
Call dilda 352 270 0202


E16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012