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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-28-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02961

Full Text



Step back in time with Floral City Heritage Days
I. I ..


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 118 ISSUE 113


PSC OKs Progress Energy rate reduction


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE State regula-
tors cut the monthly bill for a typical
Progress Energy Florida customer
by $7.13 on Tuesday, but rejected a
proposal from commercial users for
a further reduction linked to a crip-
pled nuclear power plant
Most of the overall rate reduc-
tion for 2013 is due to the declin-
ing price of natural gas that's
burned in conventional power
plants.


A smaller part is represented by
$327.6 million that the St Peters-
burg-based utility expects to re-
ceive from an insurer for power it
will have to buy from other
sources to replace the output of
the damaged reactor at Crystal
River. It has been out of service
for the past three years, since a
containment wall cracked during
an attempt to replace the plant's
steam generators.
Progress previously received
$162 million from its $490 million


replacement power insurance
policy The commercial cus-
tomers, though, contend Progress
should expect a second $490 mil-
lion because different parts of the
reactor's containment building
sustained two separate cracks in
two different years.
That would have reduced the
replacement power costs passed
on to customers by an equal
amount.
The commission, without dis-
cussion of the issue, approved a


staff recommendation to reject
that argument, which was made by
the Florida Industrial Power
Users Group, PSC Phosphate-
White Springs and federal agen-
cies served by Progress.
The staff recommendation
notes that Nuclear Electric Insur-
ance Ltd. has so far acknowledged
only the first event and not made a
determination on the second.
It adds that if the insurer deter-
mines the second crack is a sepa-
rate event and entitled to an


additional $490 million in cover-
age, that amount then could be
used to reduce customers' rates.
The annual adjustments will re-
duce the overall monthly bill for a
residential customer using 1,000
kilowatt hours, which is about av-
erage, from $123.19 to $116.06.
That's a $7.13 reduction even with
the commission's approval on
Monday of a $1.93 increase in a
charge for preliminary and con-
struction costs associated with fu-
ture nuclear projects.


EGYPTIAN UPRISING:


In Cairo, a
familiar sight
Hundreds of thousands
of Egyptians return in
protest to Tahrir Square,
this time railing against
new president Mohammed
Morsi./Page A12

WHISTLEBLOWER:
New rules
for tipsters
President Obama signs
a bill giving broader
protections to govern-
ment employees at-
tempting to root out
corruption and waste.
/Page A7
HOT SPOT:


Syrupy goodness on tap


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Brothers Jerry and Frank Allen help feed sugar cane through the grinder at Harry Maynard's farm. To the right, Jeff Law mans the spigot that will
send the juice to vats in a nearby building.


New Zealand's
precious
"The Lord of the Rings,"
"Avatar," "The Avengers"
and now "The Hobbit"
are proving to be a boon
for the Antipodes.
/Page B6
FISCAL CLIFF:
Obama takes
to bully pulpit
As negotiations on the
fiscal cliff remain at a
standstill, the president
plans to appeal directly
to the American people.
/Page A12
PROCESSION:
Heartbreaking
homecoming
Sgt. Logan Harbison,
killed Nov. 17 in an
accidental shooting,
returns home as the
county pays its respects.
/Page A3


Com ics .......... C6
Community .......C4
Crossword ....... .C5
Editorial ..... .. .A10
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope .... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C6
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ....... .C7
TV Listings ....... C5


6 1l1 1 II 184578 200211


Locals keep up tradition of

brewing sugar cane syrup


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
t is an episodic and de-
liberate tradition
deeply rooted in the
American South.
Rows of cane fields
along with citrus groves
once dominated Florida's
fertile peat, loam and clay
soils.
Today, sugar cane and
cane syrup production
has ground to a trickle,
but a Citrus County family
is keeping the tradition
alive.
Once a year mostly


sometime in November, at All
the family homestead on .
Maylen Avenue in
Lecanto -Harry May-
nard, 79, will call his
cousins Jerry and Frank
Allen, and fire up the old
mill and two companion
vats. His daughter Wanda
Law and her husband,
Jeff, also will drive down
from Jennings to help.
Maynard begins the
process six weeks earlier,
stripping the cane plants
of greenery and buds.
Then, he harvests his acre Harry Maynard skims the juice as it cooks. The juice eventually reduces down to be-
come cane syrup. Maynard has kept this Southern tradition alive by cultivating sugar
See /Page A2 cane on a small portion of his home property on Maylen Avenue.


CMHS eyes patient discharges

Officials want to ease emergency room wait times


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Citrus
Memorial hospital officials
are continuing to seek ways
to attack one of the public's
chief complaints: long
waits for care in the emer-
gency room.
One potential answer is
asking doctors to discharge
patients by 11 a.m., freeing
up bed space for new pa-
tients.
Director of Nursing
Linda McCarthy outlined
that step and others taken
since the hospital created a
task force last spring to re-
duce the wait time for


emergency room patients.
The problem is not iso-
lated to the ER, McCarthy
said. Rather, the lack of bed
space on other floors of the
hospital means patients
who should be admitted to
the hospital end up in the
waiting room or in an ob-
servation area.
"You have to look at this
as a set of dominoes," she
told members of the Citrus
Memorial Health Founda-
tion during their meeting
Monday night
The ER wait the time
for a patient to see a doctor,
be admitted or be dis-
charged is on average
288 minutes, or nearly five


hours. The national hospi-
tal average is between 156
and 247 minutes, McCarthy
said.
The national average of
ER patients being admitted
to the hospital is 13 per-
cent; at CMHS, it's 25 per-
cent, McCarthy said. She
said many patients are eld-
erly and need extended
hospital care, or doctors in
some cases will admit pa-
tients because it's safer
than sending them home.
McCarthy said one issue
is the shortage of emer-
gency room nurses, but she
said that situation is getting
See Page A5


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
For 12 years, whooping
cranes have hailed the holi-
day season, with many
county residents getting out
to witness an early morning
flyover of the leggy, red-
crowned birds.
This year, however, like a
lot of Florida visitors, the
cranes are not flying this far
south. Five of the endan-
gered birds arrived Friday
at St. Marks National


For more information,
visit www.bringback
thecranes.org.

Wildlife Refuge in Wakulla
County, which will be their
wintering grounds. The
cranes have landed and are
expected to stay for the
season.
A spokesperson for
Whooping Crane Eastern
Partnership stated: "One
See Page A5


Cranes stopping


short of county


Whoopers in panhandle this year





A2 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


Continued from Page Al

field and piles the chopped-
off stems in a huge bundle
on a trailer. Maynard then
moves the trailer next to the
chicken coop and a top-
vented building around
back.
On the day after Thanks-
giving, Maynard and his
family had the old mill
whirring while the Allen
cousins fed the cane stems
through the grinder. The
juice is captured in a con-
tainer with piping to 100-
gallon and 60-gallon vats,
where the juice is cooked.
"It is cooked for about
three and a half hours and
the 60-gallon vat produces
between 6 and 8 gallons of
syrup. The 100-gallon one
produces about 12 or 13 gal-
lons," Maynard said.
Maynard stirs the boiling
vats and skims a green-
frothy sludge into a bucket.
Word has it, back in the day,
that sludge, if left to fer-
ment, can be quite a brew.
"I just get rid of it now,"
Maynard said.
After the juice is reduced
during the cooking, it is then
filtered into a narrow cy-
press dugout with a spigot.
After the filtering process,
bottles are filled with amber
syrup.
Maynard sells a bottle for
$6.

MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to
submit information
about regular meet-
ings for publication
on the Community
page each weekday.
Include the name of
the organization, the
time, day and place
of the meeting,
whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom
to call for details.
Send in information
attn: Community
Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to
(352) 563-3280,
attention: Club meet-
ings.
Email to
community@
chronicleonline.com.


I love doing it and will
continue with it until I can't.

Harry Maynard
on making cane syrup from scratch.


The retired mosquito con-
trol worker began cultivat-
ing sugar cane and
producing cane syrup about
20 years ago, but has been
doing it "for at least 50
years."
Maynard said his family
has been involved in the tra-
dition for generations.
"I love doing it and will
continue with it until I
can't," Maynard said.
And it looks like he will
have a chance to pass it on
to the next generation.
His daughter, Wanda Law,
said she always resisted


growing up on a farm in Cit-
rus County and went off to
college, never intending to
return to this way of life.
"But now that I've got
children of my own, the way
of life has become more ap-
pealing," Law said.
She and husband, Jeff,
live on a farm in Jennings
and now have chickens and
other farm animals. They
also own a sugar cane mill
with a 300-gallon vat that
Maynard gave to his son-in-
law.
"It's really an interesting
tradition and I know we will


continue to do it," Law said.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


Wanda Law shows Paul Grannan where the syrup is filtered
in a dug-out cypress.


... and no chmiae' This is a n onde itl sen ice.


Real People Saiy It Best: On . .ff. i ,-I .... I...,.. I I
true. Florida ri ..I,.,I \I i, .I 1 Ih .,r.. 1. 1- I. I l l. 1.. I.
receive a free ,n IllI,. ,I i | ..n. r11. ni ,r 1 ' d 2 r2i i|. l, i al.-i. N
state ide. Sin-,i 1'' I .I.Ii i.l., I .I, .nriiiii in. R-1.1, Irn- -
has helped thIf i. In, l. I I .... I i n-1 I ill .> -i,., l. i ..-,
conversations i4...in .11111 hi .1 .ii.. Iii..

Citrus Hearing Impaired Program Services
109 NE Crystal Street, Suite B
Crystal River, Florida 34428 Mg l /
352-795-5000 Look for the train car f/

www.ftri.org/crystal /
Curen.... clen s:.......o e.sn. .rkngprpe ly.ryo r.loid


Qr Vendor Food


K-9's only, all dogs mys be leashed. Dogs will be available for adoption.
Sponsored by Greater Inverness Olde Towne Association of Businesses
For more information call 344-6568 or visit www.invernessoldetowne.com


-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle



Heartbreaking homecoming


Citrus County Sheriff's Office deputies lead the hearse containing the body of Army Sgt. Logan
Harbison on Tuesday afternoon east on State Road 44 near Inverness. Sgt. Harbison, 25, a Citrus
High School graduate, died Nov 17 in an accidental shooting. He served two tours in Iraq and was stationed
in Lakewood, Wash., undergoing medical treatment. Services are 10:30 a.m. Thursday at Cornerstone
Baptist Church in Inverness. Burial with full military honors follows at Florida National Cemetery in
Bushnell. Visitation is 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home on U.S. 41 in Inverness.


Around the
COUNTY


County's Christmas spirit on parade


Sheriff's 10-43 talks
Shop with a Cop
The next edition of the
Sheriff's 10-43 Show is at
7:30 p.m. today, on channel
16 for Bright House customers.
Special guests Deputy Joe
Faherty and his wife, Dawn
Faherty, will explain the an-
nual Shop with a Cop pro-
gram and how it benefits kids
in need in Citrus County.
The Sheriffs 10-43 Show can
also be seen on Wednesdays
at 7:30 p.m. and Fridays at
11 a.m. Previous shows can
be viewed by visiting
www.sheriffcitrus.org. Click
on the Public Information tab,
then Sheriff's 10-43 Show.
Christmas tree event
set in Inverness
The Christmas Trees
Around Courthouse Square
event is 5:30 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 30, on the second floor
of the Historic Inverness
Courthouse. Santa Claus, the
Citrus High School Chamber
Choir and the trio of Tom and
Drema Leonard along with
Sally Smith-Adams on piano
will appear.
The event is free and open
to the public.
K-9 Karnival set
for Saturday
The Greater Inverness Olde
Towne Association of Busi-
ness Members (GIOTAB), in
partnership with Bark Central
Dog Park and Pet Supermar-
ket, invites you to its Fourth
Annual "K-9 Karnival" from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
1, at Liberty Park in down-
town Inverness.
Dogs can participate in a
Doggie Beauty Pageant and
training exercises while dog
owners may choose to com-
pete in the hot dog-eating
competition or browse spon-
sor booths.
All dogs must be secured
on a leash while at the park.
For information, call Jennifer
Springer at 352-344-6568, or
go to www.invernessolde
towne.org.
Nugent to appear
at WPN meeting
The Women's Political Net-
work will host its annual
Christmas luncheon at noon
Sunday, Dec. 2, at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club in the
Garden Room.
Speakers include Citrus
Commissioner Scott Adams
and Citrus United Way CEO
Amy Meek. U.S. Rep Rich
Nugent appears as a special
guest. Christmas carols will
be led by State Rep. Dennis
Baxley.
Cost is $22; reservations
only. Contact Jeanne McIntosh
at Jeannemc@tampabay.
rr.com or 352-484-9975.
-From staff reports


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
Santa Claus and the
Christmas spirit will be
front and center as annual
Christmas parades begin
Saturday.
Starting the procession of
parades is the Christmas in
the Hills Parade in Beverly
Hills, with the theme "Magic
of Christmas."
Beginning at 10 a.m., pa-
rade participants will dis-
pense candy as they make
their way from Beverly Hills
Boulevard near County
Road 491 to the Civic Center
Sponsored by the Beverly
Hills Lions Foundation, Cit-
rus County Chamber, Citrus


County Parks and Recre-
ation and the Chronicle, pa-
rade entries will compete for
five trophies and the award
for best float, worth $500.
Escorting the holiday
spirit with Santa will be
more than 50 parade en-
tries, including marching
bands.
In conjunction with the
parade, the public is invited
to attend the Holiday Arts
and Crafts/Car Show featur-
ing 75 cars, 42 indoor and
outdoor arts-and-crafts ven-
dors and a kids' area. Fes-
tivities run from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m.
Don't put your lawn
chairs and blankets away
just yet.


At 6 p.m., "A Postcard
Christmas" will ignite holiday
cheer on both sides of U.S. 19
as it promenades south from
Citrus Avenue to Port Para-
dise Road in Crystal River
Crystal River's 49th an-
nual Christmas parade will
bring nighttime illumination
while children are handed
candy by local partakers.
Sponsored by the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
and the city of Crystal River,
nearly 100 entries will rep-
resent local businesses, or-
ganizations and schools,
including marching bands.
Santa Claus and Grand
Marshal Dale McClellan
will also wave hello to
attendees.


Owner of M&B Dairy in
Lecanto, McClellan is the
2012 overall winner of the
Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt
Expo Southeastern Farmer
of the Year award.
Not able to make the pa-
rades this Saturday?
The following Saturday,
Dec. 8, Mr and Mrs. Claus
and Ronald McDonald visit
Citrus County for the annual
Inverness Christmas
Parade.
Kicking off at noon, "A
Postcard Christmas" begins
at Pizza Hut in Inverness
and heads east on State
Road 44 to Highland
Boulevard.
Sponsored by B&W Rex-
all Drugs, the Citrus County


Lighten your holiday electric bills


PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
With Black Friday gone,
it's time to dig out the
Christmas decorations.
Unpacking and hanging
those holiday lights comes
with a financial cost and
possible safety issues.
But there are alternatives
that can dull the hit to a
household power bill and
provide some peace of mind.
"They will want to use
LED lights both inside
and outside," said Barry
Bowman, Sumter Electric
Cooperative Inc. director
of corporate communica-
tions. "They are cooler,
don't heat up as much and
are more energy efficient
so customers can save on
their electric bills."
LED stands for light-
emitting diode. In the
words of Energy Star, a


joint program of the U.S.
Department of Energy
and the Environmental
Protection Agency, LEDs
are "small light sources
that are illuminated by
the movement of electrons
through a semiconductor
material. LEDs are excep-
tionally energy efficient
when producing individ-
ual colors, many using up
to 90 percent less energy
than an incandescent bulb
to produce the same
amount of light They can
also last up to 10 times
longer than traditional in-
candescent strands."
Bowman also offered
some holiday lighting
safety tips. He recom-
mends for tree lighting,
position the lights near an
existing outlet to use the
cord they came with
rather than having to use
an extension cord. "If you


must use an extension
cord," he said, "do not use
it in a high-traffic area or
under a rug."
He warned revelers to
inspect the condition of
lights before stringing
them and to be wary when
buying new lights. He said
with a lot of cheap lights
coming from overseas, it is
best to make sure lights
are certified by Under-
writers Laboratories.
Lights should also be la-
beled for indoor or out-
door use.
"LEDs are readily avail-
able and much better than
they used to be," he said.
"They're brighter and they
come in all shapes. It's
better alternative all the
way around."
According to the U.S
Department of Energy,
LED Christmas lights are
made with an epoxy lens,


not glass, and are much
more resistant to damage.
Bowman said people
who really want to save on
holiday lighting bills
should shut their lights off
when they go to bed and
turn them back on the
next day instead of leaving
them on overnight.
Of course, there are
other ways to spruce up
for the holidays. Progress
Energy suggests that in-
stead of weighing down a


tree with lg.
decorate with
naments. Pro
suggests plug
and electric
into a power s
tect against su
make it convene
them off.
Contact Ch
porter Pat Fal
564-2924 or
chronicleonlii


State BRIEFS


Family files suit against
Marion sheriff's office
OCALA The family of a man who
was shocked with a stun gun while
handcuffed has filed a wrongful death
lawsuit against the Marion County Sher-
iff's Office and two deputies involved.
A grand jury report found Deputy
Norm Brown shocked Joshua Salvato
for several minutes as Salvato lay face
down and handcuffed after being shot
by another deputy.
Salvato had fought Brown and Deputy
Lauren Miley in a park last July after Miley
tried to question him about reports he had
been acting oddly and shouting at traffic.
The Ocala Star-Banner reported that
after Miley shot Salvato, Brown began
shocking him. He told investigators he
didn't realize Salvato had been shot.
Salvato died at the scene. The shooting
was ruled justified.
Infamous Ma Barker
house for sale
OCKLAWAHA- The central Florida
house known as the Ma Barker hideout,


site of the longest shootout in FBI his-
tory, is up for sale. It's listed at $889,000.
The house was made famous in 1935
when fugitive gangster Fred Barker and
his mother, Kate "Ma" Barker, were killed
in a shootout with the FBI. Ma Barker had
been labeled Public Enemy No. 1 by the
federal government for a spree of murders,
kidnapping and robberies throughout
the Midwest. The Orlando Sentinel re-
ported the sale will include FBI docu-
ments, maps from the shootout, and
photographs showing the bodies.
Shopper claims she was
wrongly arrested
PENSACOLA-A Panhandle woman
said she was unnecessarily arrested
while shopping at a Walmart after
Thanksgiving dinner.
An Escambia County sheriff's deputy
said Antonia Angelena Bennett was fight-
ing over a cellphone and told her to leave.
When she refused, he wrestled her to
the ground and arrested her.
But 27-year-old Bennett says she did-
n't raise her voice until a deputy took the
phone, threatened to use a stun gun on


her if she didn't let go of the
her arm, threw her to the gi
her in the back and handcu
The Pensacola News Jo
ported Bennett said her bal
alone as she was escorted
Man arrested after
golf course
TARPON SPRINGS -A
Florida man is facing sever
after authorities said he ran
around a golf course and si
deputy's car during a police
Authorities said the unideni
running naked around a Ta
golf course early Tuesday r
Pasco Sheriff's Office de
up with the suspect after he
went into a convenience st(
saulted an employee. Author
he then jumped into his var
deputies chased him. He al
swiped a patrol car during t
Deputies eventually stop
It's not clear why he was
clothes.


Chamber of Commerce and
the city of Inverness, more
than 100 entries will be fol-
lowing the holiday proces-
sion of Grand Marshal Pati
Smith.
Smith retired this year
after devoting 30 years to
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation.
For Crystal River and In-
verness parades, a joint
mixer will be held Dec. 13 at
the Crystal River Mall, 1801
U.S. 19 in Crystal River
Sponsored by the Crystal
River Mall and Capital City
Bank, the public is invited
to join in the awards cere-
mony, music and greetings
from Santa from 5 p.m. to
7p.m.


Here's


the pitch:


Horseshoes,


and you're


invited


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer


his, people BEVERLY HILLS Pitch,
tinsel or or- toss, throw -whatever you call it,
egress also the goal is to hit the pole and beat
goingg lights the other guy (or gal).
decorations That's the nuts and bolts of
strip to pro- playing horseshoes.
irges and to On Saturday, Dec 8, the Beverly
nient to turn Hills Horseshoe Club invites the
public to its inaugural Proud Vet-
ronicle re- erans tournament to benefit the
herty at 352- Wounded Warrior Project.
pfaherty@ "Our normal tournaments, the
ne.com. second Saturday of the month,
are for NHPA 'pro' pitchers," said
club president Ron Fair "They
baby cart, hit pitch from September through May
round, kneed and it's for NHPA members only"
found, kneed NHPA is the National Horse-
ffed her. shoe Pitchers Association.
urnal re- Fair said players from all over
by was left the state come to the monthly
away. tournaments in Beverly Hills, the
er naked home of the largest NHPA club in
Florida with close to 100 mem-
run bers. Monthly tournaments draw
southwest between 50 to 100 spectators.
al charges "We wanted to do something so
naked anyone with any skill level can
ideswiped a play and have a better chance at
chase, winning," Fair said. "Some of our
tified man was pitchers pitch 80 to 95 percent
rpon Springs ringers, so you can't expect some-
morning. one from off the street to be able
puties caught to compete."
allegedly Entry fee for players is $15,
ore and as- which includes a hot dog or ham-
orities said burger lunch and a soda. Food
and fled as saidwill be available for purchase.
n and fled as Games begin at 9 a.m.
legedly side- All proceeds benefit the
he chase. Wounded Warrior Project. Visit
ped the van. online at wwwwoundedwarriororg.
n't wearing Fair said to ensure a spot to
pitch, call him at 352-746-3924 by
-From wire reports Nov. 30.






A4 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


Teen arrested;



allegedly tried



to stab dog


Reportedly

struggled with

deputies

AMANDA MIMS
Correspondent

A 19-year-old Dunnellon
man faces multiple charges
in connection with a domes-
tic dispute that began Fri-
day evening when he
reportedly tried to stab a
woman's dog.
A 32-year-old witness told
authorities the suspect,
Davin Slone, attempted to
stab the dog, a pit bull mix,
which had been barking at
him and had been aggres-
sive toward him in the past,
according to Slone's arrest
affidavit.
The 32-year-old, one of
two alleged victims in the
case, told a sheriff's deputy
he confronted the teen after
seeing him trying to stab the
dog.
An argument between the
two men ensued, and Slone
threw the fixed-blade knife
at the 32-year-old. The knife
struck the man's shin but
did not cut him. The 32-
year-old then picked up a
shovel and hit the teen in
the back with it.
A second man, a 34-year-
old, intervened and Slone
allegedly charged him. The
teen and that man ex-
changed punches.


The 34-
year-old
said the
f figh tingg
ceased
when they
heard the
sirens of a
Davin Slone sheriff's
deputy's pa-
trol vehicle. The woman
who owns the dog said she
did not see any of the fight-
ing, but she heard it from in-
side her home. She also said
Slone has been aggressive
toward her animals in the
past.
The teen reportedly said
that as soon as the sheriff's
deputy left, he would begin
fighting with the two men
"and there would be blood."
Slone attempted to run
away and repeatedly struck
the hood of the patrol vehi-
cle with his forehead as
deputies tried to restrain
him, the report stated.
Using the back of his head,
Slone allegedly hit one of
deputies in the lip.
Slone faces charges of do-
mestic battery, aggravated
assault with a deadly
weapon without intent to
kill, aggravated assault/bat-
tery of a law enforcement
officer and criminal mis-
chief. He was taken to the
Citrus County Detention Fa-
cility, where he was held
without bond.
A deputy requested that
animal control respond to
the scene regarding the ag-
gressive dog.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Jorge Dossantos Jr., 23,
of West Jackson Court, Lecanto,
at 5:52 a.m. Sunday on misde-
meanor charges of driving under
the influence, criminal mischief
and refusal to submit to a test of
breath, blood or urine. According
to his arrest affidavit, he was
pulled over after a law enforce-
ment officer saw his vehicle
swerving and traveling at a high
rate of speed on U.S. 19. He
stopped his vehicle at Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park. During the stop, the officer
noticed Dossantos' speech was
slurred and he had difficulty per-
forming sobriety tasks. He re-
fused to submit to a test of his
breath or urine. Bond $1,250.
Domestic battery
arrest
Patricia Falcone, 77, of
Hemando, at 10:15 p.m. Satur-
day on a misdemeanor charge


of domestic battery. No bond.
Other arrests
Warren Bunts Jr., 27, of
West Village Drive, Homosassa,
at 6:40 p.m. Sunday on a Citrus
County warrant for violation of
probation for an original felony
charge of aggravated battery.
No bond.
David Collett Jr., 34, of
Constitution Boulevard, Inver-
ness, at 6:14 p.m. Sunday on a
misdemeanor charge of retail
petit theft. Bond $250.
Donald Holman, 53, of
North Bass Road, Dunnellon, at
7:52 p.m. Sunday on a Citrus
County warrant for felony
charges of possession of co-
caine and possession of co-
caine with intent to sell. Bond
$20,000.
Joseph Rooney, 73, of
Dunnellon, at 7:01 p.m. Sunday
on a felony charge of battery on
a person 65 or older. No bond.
Dawn Plew, 33, of North
Sunshine Path, Crystal River, at


11:37 p.m. Sunday on a misde-
meanor charge of resisting an of-
ficerwithout violence. Bond $500.
Angela Matthews, 42, of
West Gulf to Lake Highway,
Crystal River, at 12:06 a.m.
Monday on misdemeanor
charges of driving while license
suspended or revoked and re-
sisting an officer without vio-
lence. Bond $1,000.
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 10:39 a.m. Monday,
Nov. 26, in the 6400 block of S.
Premier Ave., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 5:03 p.m. Nov. 26 in
the 700 block of S. Doug Point,
Inverness.
A residential burglary was
reported at 7:38 p.m. Nov. 26 in
the 8300 block of S. Florida
Ave., Floral City.
A residential burglary was
reported at 12:05 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 27, in the 20 block of S.
Adams St., Beverly Hills.


Thefts
M A petit theft was reported at
9:50 a.m. Monday, Nov. 26, in
the 1500 block of N. Fanning
Point, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported at
3:41 p.m. Nov. 26 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
M A petit theft was reported at
4:43 p.m. Nov. 26 at S. Barbour
St., Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported at
5:35 p.m. Nov.26 in the 3800 block
of W. Educational Path, Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported at
8:38 p.m. Nov. 26 in the 3600
block of N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported at
5:36 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, in
the 1600 block of W. Main St.,
Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 7:49 a.m. Monday, Nov. 26, in
the 3700 block of E. Cart Lane,
Inverness.


,egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle














Notice to Creditors/Administration.........................C10

Self Storage Notices.................................................C 10

Tax Deed Notices.......................................................C10

SSurplus Property........................................................C10


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
s
pc
pc

pc


s
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc

s
s

s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light to moderate
chop. Sunny today.


79 51 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 74 Low: 52 *
Party cloudy, breezy and dry

THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 77 Low: 55
Mostly sunny, breezy and warm

7 FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 57
Mostly sunny, breezy and warm

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 79/50
Record 87/28
Normal 76/49
Mean temp. 65
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 49.23 in.
*As of 7 p mrn at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.12 in.


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 5
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 490
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Composites, Grasses, Palm
Today's count: 4.4/12
Thursday's count: 5.1
Friday's count: 5.3
AIR QUALITY
Tuesday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/28 WEDNESDAY 4:38 10:50 5:03 11:15
11/29 THURSDAY 5:27 11:40 5:52 -
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


DEC. DEC. 13 DEC. 20
DEC. 6 DEC.13 DEC.20


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:05 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY 5:47 P.M.
MOONSET TODAY............................ 7:01 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:28 a/12:36 a 6:08 p/1:26 p
Crystal River** 2:49 a/10:48 a 4:29 p/10:33 p
Withlacoochee* 12:36 a/8:36 a 2:16 p/8:21 p
Homosassa*** 3:38 a/12:25 p 5:18 p/--


***At Mason's Creek
Thursday
High/Low High/Low
5:01 a/1:11 a 6:43 p/2:00 p
3:22 a/11:22 a 5:04 p/11:09 p
1:09 a/9:10 a 2:51 p/8:57 p
4:11 a/12:10 a 5:53 p/12:59 p


Gulf water
temperature


67
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Mon. Tues. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.84 29.84 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.58 39.59 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.02 41.02 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY


Tuesday Wednesday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 67 54 .73 s 64 48
New York City 42 34 .53 pc 43 32
Norfolk 62 43 .05 s 49 34
Oklahoma City 50 27 s 63 45
Omaha 44 15 s 48 29
Palm Springs 81 55 pc 78 58
Philadelphia 42 37 .50 pc 42 29
Phoenix 84 55 s 77 52
Pittsburgh 37 33 .01 pc 39 25
Portland, ME 37 21 c 39 26
Portland, Ore 47 35 sh 48 45
Providence, R.I. 38 31 .24 pc 42 27
Raleigh 58 43 .09 s 52 27
Rapid City 37 13 s 48 28
Reno 52 25 sh 52 37
Rochester, NY 38 29 sn 38 26
Sacramento 62 40 r 59 52
St. Louis 41 22 s 50 34
St. Ste. Marie 31 17 .07 sn 26 17
Salt Lake City 53 28 pc 58 42
San Antonio 64 48 .14 s 68 49
San Diego 66 52 pc 63 56
San Francisco 61 49 r 63 53
Savannah 63 42 .02 s 65 42
Seattle 50 35 sh 50 47
Spokane 39 27 pc 41 33
Syracuse 40 30 sn 38 26
Topeka 43 15 s 55 33
Washington 45 39 .06 s 46 33
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 84 Phoenix, Ariz.
LOW -7 Wakefield, Mich.
WORLD CITIES


WEDNESDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/74/s Madrid
Amsterdam 47/42/c Mexico City
Athens 66/64/sh Montreal
Beijing 31/19/s Moscow
Berlin 45/40/sh Paris
Bermuda 73/66/sh Rio
Cairo 73/58/s Rome
Calgary 17/15/pc Sydney
Havana 81/66/sh Tokyo
Hong Kong 72/66/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 64/48/s Warsaw


54/46/sh
46/37/sh
53/34/pc
73/43/s
29/20/sn
29/25/c
45/43/c
83/72/ts
61/50/r
76/65/ts
55/43/sh
35/22/c
45/40/pc


26 .01
27
43
50 .02
29 .27
50
37 .21
24
45 .34
26
34 .14
29
24
39 .28
37 .41
45 .03
17
30 .03
29
39 .07
32
17
42
15
12
23
36
29
33 .36
26 .14
52
26
46 .57
45
37
53
35 .02
36
16
16
54 1.14
53 .14
39 .07


C I T R U S.


C U N TY -


For the RECORD


Tuesday Wednesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


CHRONICLE
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34450


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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 A5


S. Korea: US socialite to


lose honorary consul title


Kelley allegedly used status forpersonalgain


Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea -
South Korea will revoke an
honorary title given to an
American socialite tied to a
scandal involving former
CIA director David Petraeus,
officials said Tuesday.
Jill Kelley, the Tampa,
Florida, socialite, misused
her title as South Korean
honorary consul by raising
it in unspecified personal
business dealings, a For-
eign Ministry official in
Seoul said. The official,
who declined to be named
because the matter is still
being discussed, wouldn't
elaborate and said it's not
clear when the title will be
revoked.
Deputy Foreign Minister
Kim Kyou-hyun told South
Korean reporters during a
visit to Washington that Kel-
ley inappropriately used
her title for personal gain.
"It's not suitable to the
status of honorary consul
that (she) sought to be in-
volved in commercial proj-
ects and peddle influence,"
Kim said, according to Yon-
hap news agency
Kelley, 37, unraveled the
scandal involving Petraeus
that emerged in early No-
vember
Kelley who lives in a
waterfront mansion along
one of Tampa's toniest
streets had complained


CMHS
Continued from PageAl

better She said there were
13 open ER nursing posi-
tions in June and only six in
November.
A larger problem is a
delay in physicians dis-
charging their patients
from the hospital's upper
floors. Hospital Chief Exec-
utive Officer Ryan Beaty
said 72 percent of patients
are discharged after noon,
with the biggest discharge
time between 2 and 3 p.m.
Because the hospital has
no recommended discharge
time, the time that doctors
discharge patients varies.
"There's no target," Mc-
Carthy said.
Foundation board mem-
ber Dr. Carlton Fairbanks
called the number of after-
noon discharges "stagger-
ingly bad."
Physicians do not work
for the hospital. While some
physicians are known for
their early calls, others are
not.
Hospital chief medical
officer Dr. Charles Nintin-
sky said that presents a lack
of formality.
"They come in whenever
they come in," Nintinsky said.


to an FBI agent that she
had received threatening
emails telling her to stay
away from Petraeus, who
once commanded Central
Command at MacDill Air
Force Base in Tampa. Pe-
traeus got to know Kelley
through parties and events
around Tampa.
Agents tracked the
emails to Petraeus biogra-
pher Paula Broadwell, who
was having an affair with
the former general.
During the investigation,
officials also discovered
that Kelley had exchanged
numerous emails with Gen.
John Allen when he was in
charge of Central Com-
mand. The Pentagon is in-
vestigating potentially
"inappropriate" correspon-
dence between Kelley and
the four-star general who is
the top U.S. and NATO
commander of the war in
Afghanistan.
As the scandal unfolded,
so did details about Kel-
ley's life. Accounts of lavish
parties at her mansion with
politicians and military
generals were replaced by
reports of her family's fi-
nancial woes.
Her position as an hon-
orary consul to South
Korea was also revealed, as
were her efforts to broker
business deals on behalf of
the country
A New York businessman

At McCarthy's recommen-
dation, foundation board
members voted to ask the
hospital's physicians' com-
mittee if it would consider


said Kelley was introduced
to him at the Republican
National Convention in
Tampa in August as some-
one whose friendship with
Petraeus would help facili-
tate a no-bid deal with
South Korea on a coal-gasi-
fication project. She would
supposedly be in a position
to help broker the billion-
dollar deal directly with
the Korean president, and
expected a 2 percent com-
mission, said Adam Victor,
president and chief execu-
tive officer of TransGas De-
velopment Systems.
She also tried to estab-
lish a relationship between
South Korea and the Uni-
versity of South Florida's
medical school.
A senior South Korean
Foreign Ministry official
who handles consulate af-
fairs in the United States
said honorary consuls don't
have diplomatic immunity,
and that the ministry ap-
plies much less strict rules
in appointing them than it
does for potential govern-
ment officials.
In the past, a U.S. citizen
who adopted a South Ko-
rean child and a business-
man with strong links to
South Korea had been
named honorary consuls,
he said. The ministry pays
$2,500 a year to each of the
15 current honorary con-
suls in the United States.

an 11 a.m. discharge target
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


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CRANES
Continued from Page Al

advantage we see is it will
shorten our migration by a
couple of hundred miles
and an unknown number of
days. The downside is we
will not be able to do a fly-
over at Dunnellon-Marion
County Airport as we have
in the past and we will
miss seeing all our friends
in Crystal River."
Crane fans or craniacs
- in Citrus County won't get
a glimpse of this year's flock
unless they travel north to
the Florida Panhandle
refuge. Operation Migration
usually divided its flock be-
tween St. Marks and Chas-
sahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge near Crystal
River to reduce the chance
of a mass loss through bad
weather or predation. But
this year, the flock was too
small to split, so all cranes
will stay at St Marks.
"This is the earliest the
birds have arrived at St.
Marks, and we are thrilled
to have them here so soon,"
said Terry Peacock, refuge
manager at St. Marks. "I was
in the blind at the pen site to
watch the birds arrive. I just
have to say that it never gets
old watching the birds come
to the refuge. It was as
touching this time as it was
the first time."
These cranes are the 12th
group to be guided by ultra-
light aircraft from central
Wisconsin to the Gulf Coast
of Florida. Operation Migra-
tion announced it would
maintain its Chassahow-
itzka facilities in prepara-
tion for next year
The Whooping Crane
Eastern Partnership, an in-
ternational coalition of pub-



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lic and private organiza-
tions, is conducting the rein-
troduction project in an
effort to restore this endan-
gered species to part of its
historic range in eastern
North America. There are
now 115 whooping cranes in
the wild in eastern North
America thanks to its efforts.
In addition to the five
birds led south by WCEP
partner Operation Migra-
tion's ultralights, six cranes
are making their first south-
ward migration as part of
WCEP's Direct Autumn Re-
lease program. The DAR
cranes were hatched and
raised by biologists with
project partner Interna-
tional Crane Foundation.
The six birds were released
in the company of older
cranes from whom the
young birds learn the migra-
tion route south. Five of the
DAR cranes have completed
their migration and are lo-
cated in Hendry County, Fla.
The sixth bird is currently
located at Jasper-Pulaski
Fish and Wildlife Area in
Pulaski County, Ind. The ul-
tralight-led and DAR cranes
this year are joining two
wild-hatched chicks in the
2012 cohort.
Whooping cranes were on
the verge of extinction in
the 1940s. Today, there are
only about 600 birds in exis-
tence, about 445 of them in


the wild. Aside from the
WCEP birds, the only other
migratory population of
whooping cranes nests at
Wood Buffalo National Park
in northern Alberta,
Canada, and winters at
Aransas National Wildlife
Refuge on the Texas Gulf
Coast. A non-migratory flock
of about 20 birds lives year-
round in the central Florida
Kissimmee region, and an
additional 14 non-migratory
cranes live in southern
Louisiana.
WCEP asks anyone who
encounters a whooping
crane in the wild to give
them the respect and dis-
tance they need. Do not ap-
proach birds on foot within
200 yards; remain in your
vehicle; do not approach in
a vehicle any closer than
100 yards. Also, please re-
main concealed and do not
speak loudly enough that
the birds can hear you. Fi-
nally, do not trespass on pri-
vate property in an attempt
to view or photograph
whooping cranes.
To report whooping crane
sightings, visit the WCEP
whooping crane observation
webpage at www.fws.gov/
midwest/whoopingcrane/
sightings/sightingform.cfm.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916.


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I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





A6 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


Jeanne
Harris, 86
SUGARMILL
WOODS
Jeanne (Gauthier) Harris,
86, of Sugarmill Woods, died
peacefully Sunday, Nov. 25,
2012, at her home sur-
rounded by family and
under the care of HPH Hos-
pice. She was born June 15,

Franklin,
N.H., to
Earnest and
Beatrice
Gauthier.
She grew
up in
Franklin,
Jeanne N.H., and
Harris attended
local schools. She graduated
from Franklin High School
in 1944. She graduated from
The Wilson School of Med-
ical Technology in Boston,
Mass., as an X-ray techni-
cian and served in the U.S.
Navy WAVES. She moved to
Washington, D.C., and was
employed at the National
Academy of Sciences. Dur-
ing that time, she received
her bachelor's degree from
the University of Maryland.
It was while living in Wash-
ington that Jeanne met and
married her second hus-
band, Tom Harris. Follow-
ing her retirement from the
National Academy, she
began a successful and en-
joyable second career in the
theater, becoming an ac-
complished actress on stage
and television in the Wash-
ington area. She attended
acting classes at the Round
House Theatre School,
Montgomery College and
the Kennedy Center
Theatre Lab. Jeanne
brought her love for the
theater to Homosassa,
where she and her husband
retired to in 1993. She was a
founding member of "Stage-
crafters," the community
theater of Sugarmill Woods.
She thoroughly enjoyed
working in many theater
productions in the area
both as an actress and di-
rector. She was a communi-
cant of St. Benedict
Catholic Church in Crystal
River and served as a lector
for many years. She was a
member of the Council of
Catholic Women and was
also a long-time member of
the Women of Sugarmill
Woods, serving on the
Board as director of Com-
munity Services.


OBITUARIES


Jeanne leaves her loving
husband of 40 years, Tom
Harris of Sugarmill Woods;
sisters Mary Gauthier
(Larry) Woods of Northfield,
N.H., and Marjorie Gauthier
of Boynton Beach; and close
relatives Celeste Richard
(Gregg) Couture of Franklin,
N.H., and Linda Gauthier
(Johneric) Wickstrom of
Tilton, N.H. She will be
especially missed by her
grandchildren Krystal,
Samantha, Jason and
Shawn and three great-
grandchildren. She is also
survived by stepdaughters
Martha Harris of Boca
Raton and Linda Fletcher
Simon of Steubenville, Ohio;
brothers-in-law Jay Harris,
Humble, Texas, and David
(Norma) Harris, Port Orange;
nephews, nieces, cousins
and many friends.
A funeral Mass will be
celebrated at St. Benedict
Catholic Church with Fr.
Ryszard Stradomski offici-
ating, 10 a.m. Tuesday, Dec.
11, 2012. Interment will be
in the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell. In
accordance with Jeanne's
request, there will be no vis-
itation. There will be a
celebration of Jeanne's life
following the scheduled
Mass in Hilgert Hall at St.
Benedict's, where the family
will greet friends. Memorial
donations my be made to
HPH Hospice, 3545 N
Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills,
FL 34465, or St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429. The family
would like to thank HPH
Hospice and Home Health
Care, especially Sandy, Betsy
and Catherine and Jeanne's
special friend and nurse,
Vickie, for the support and
care provided throughout
Jeanne's illness. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness, is in
charge of arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.



"Your Trusted Family- Owned
|Funeral Home for 50 Years"


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


John
Flinn, 71
HERNANDO
John E. Flinn, 71, of
Hernando, Fla., died
Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012, at
Citrus Memorial Hospital,
Inverness. Jack was born
Jan. 22, 1941, in Pittsburgh,
Pa. He
joined the
Army in
1958 as a
Spara -
S trooper. He
i then joined
the Special
Forces and
John currently
Flinn belongs to
Chapter 21 Special Forces
Association and the 82nd
All-Airborne Chapter. After
serving in the military for 23
years, Jack joined the postal
service as a letter carrier for
24 years. He retired to play
golf, bowl and work in his
garden. He volunteered with
the sheriff's department to
ride the trail and do commu-
nity patrol for Citrus County
He is survived by his wife
of 26 years, Mary Ann, along
with his children, Tracey Kuka,
Spring Hill, Robert Flinn,
Georgia, Michele French,
Indianapolis, Christopher
Bradley, Indianapolis; seven
grandchildren; one great-
grandson; and his best friend
Tom Morgan of Inverness.
Graveside military honors
will be conducted at 11 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 3, 2012, at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. In lieu of
flowers, memorials are re-
quested to be sent to
Wounded Warrior project,
(www.woundedwarrior
project.org). Arrangements
are being handled by Strick-
land Funeral Home, Crystal
River.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn.


Leona
Sgroi, 91
HOMOSASSA
Leona Sgroi, 91, of Ho-
mosassa, passed away Nov.
21, 2012, at home. Funeral
and interment services will
be held in Castleton, N.Y.
Wilder Funeral Home
provided information.

Burnell
Vick, 78
DUNNELLON
Burnell Ray Vick, 78, of
Dunnellon, passed away
Nov 24, 2012, at HPH,
Spring Hill, Fla.
Survivors include his
wife, Donna J. Vick, Dunnel-
lon; sons Jeffrey Vick,
Kabul, Mo.; Shannon R.
(Clara) Vick, Dunnellon;
stepson Kurtis Daniels, Dora,
Ala.; and stepdaughter
Pamela Grande, Hawthorne.
Private cremation serv-
ices are entrusted to New
Serenity Memorial Funeral
Home & Cremation Svcs.,
Inc., 352-563-1394.

Robert
Gregg, 83
BELLEVIEW
Robert W Gregg, 83, of
Belleview, Fla., died
Sunday, Nov 25, 2012, at his
residence. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.


The We Care Food Pantry


December 1 Noon 5pm on ch. 16



Online & Televised



Auction


Item # 12:00-1:00 Value
507 Gift Card to Helen's Nursery & Rock Yard $100
513 Golf for 4 at Brentwood GC $160
525 14K & Diamond Heart Pendant from Neal's $150
527 World Woods Golf + 1 night accom. For 4 $500
535 Wedding or Vow renewal pkge-A Perfect Day $395
536 50 sq.ft Pergo installed, Quality Flooring $250
556 Spa Services+deluxe basket from Fifth St Spa $475
573 26" Hot Pink Ladies Mountain Bike $80
581 Puppy set with bed from Comfort Keepers $90
597 Dryer Vent Cleaning by Will Construction $90
610 2 tkts to gala C.:.ir .,er, t., iJ,-rm,ll Rotary $170
617 3 vintage Parisian Vargas prints-Elaine Burr $200
636 Dom Perignon & 20 wings at Lollygaggers $150
639 Golf for 4 at Citrus Hills-Oaks or Meadows $160
640 1/2 Hr. Air Tour for 3 by Crystal Aero Group $106
651 Paul Mitchell products from Kut 'N" Krew $140
704 Gift Certificate for 2 Tires-Citrus KIA $250
717 "West Side" Dining Certificates-various $225
734 Day's Pontoon Rental-Riverhaven Marina $165






Item # 1:00-2:00 Valu
506 "Tropical Nights" painting Kay Wyckstrom $125
516 Carrier Test/Tune/Clean by Bay Area A/C $99
524 Golf for 4 at The Preserve $160
532 3 month membership to Sugarmill Woods CC. $489
538 New Concepts products & gift certificates $130
549 Golf for 4 at Royal Oaks Golf Course $120
565 Turquoise clip earrings & pin-Florida Jewelers $50
587 Foot Spa Package $70
600 Prog. Thermostat, installed-Daniels Heat & Air $165
604 Large package of dog goodies-Walmart, Hom $83
606 Barnes & Noble Nook-Homosassa Walmart $199
645 Golf for 4 at Seven Rivers $120
654 Barrel Style BBQ grill-Lowes, Inverness $119
668 Divers Watch from the Military Outlet $100
685 Nascar/McDonalds Racing Jkt-Roger Garrison $200
700 "Gator" package of goodies-Elaine Burr $130
705 Full auto detail form Eagle Buick $150
723 "Dining Around County" dining certificates $240
738 Pro Dive Set w/mask& fins-American Pro Dive $205


Go to:
www.NatlAuctions.com
now for more than 300
fabulous items!
Item # 2:00-2:30 Value
514 Joseph Ribkoff Jacket (size 8)
Val's Boutique $198
520 2 night Cabin stay
Nature's Resort $262
529 Golf for 4 at Sugarmill or
Southern Woods $200
553 Warrior L/H 52 pitching wedge
Ken Steidel $130
578 Golf for 4 at Inverness Golf &
Country Club $160
593 Jake McGee baseball & photo
Tampa Bay Rays $55
612 Gent's Pulsar Kinetic Watch
Jim Green Jewelers $225
644 Golf for 4 at The Dunes $160
655 Sunset Cruise-Eddie Levin $250
Call final bids in to
telethon Saturday, bec 1
Noon to 5 pm on

352 527 2341

ue WYKE TV ch.16
Item # 2:30-3:00 Value
656 Cigar's & Accessories Basket
9 Tobacco Depot $149
0 662 Tea Cup planter w/accessories
FDS Disposal $75
697 Antique Rocking Chair
Old Inverness Antiques $300
707 Mower Tune up (at home)
5 At Your Home Repair Svcs $180
719 "Crystal River Casual" Dining
certificates $218
730 26" Boys Green bike w/helmet
Regions Bank $150
741 "Homosassa Dining" assorted
restaurant certificates $190
802 Waring Pro Juice Extractor
Shirley O'Steen $150
0 805 Holistic Pet Exam at
The Healing Place $85
810 3 month membership to prestigious
Black Diamond Ranch CC $3000


Item # 3:00-4:00 Value
511 International Color Package-Yai Yai Salon $125
530 Golf for 4 at Sugarmill or Southern Woods $200
550 3 signed Wayne Timm prints of Florida cities $60
558 2 Nights stay for 2 at Riverside Resort $200
582 Re-upholster 4 dining chairs-Counsils Upholstery $120
599 Exquisite hand crafted quilt-Karol Kusmaul $350
608 SonyBlu-Ray Disc/DVD player-Walmart, Inverness $129
611 Silver Hershey Kiss necklace-Gus's Gold & Gems $150
616 Orig. Earnhart racing jacket-Nature Coast Ministries $200
621 Power Glide table top miter saw-Kane's Ace $60
627 Midway Animal Hospital Gift certificate $130
631 Diamond necklace in 14K-Jewels & Diamonds $600
646 3 day stay with golf for 2 at Plantation Crystal River $350
693 Vert. blinds for sliding door-72 HR Blind Factory $150
695 Day's Kayak Rentals for 2-Belle Harbour Marina $120
708 1 month membership to Sporting Health Club $60
720 "Taste of Inverness" various dining certificates $226
780 Hooked on Phonics Math, 2nd-3rd grade $180
807 River Safaris-River Adventure Basket w/certs $265

We Care Food Pantry, a non-profit 501(c)(3),
helping solve the heart-breaking problem of hunger
affecting thousands of families, children, seniors
and the homeless in Citrus County.


Item # 4:00-5:00
512 Manatee snorkel tour for 2-Birds Underwater
519 Carrier Test/Tune/Clean by Bay Area A/C
522 Hour Massage & Haircut at Abitaire Paris
533 3 month membership to Southern Woods GC.
575 15 rounds Trap or Skeet-Robinson Ranch
583 2 nights Lecanto Holiday Inn + 2/Wildlife Park
595 Tumbled Stone Floor Madallion-Pro Line Tile
619 Vera Bradley Tea Garden bag-Connor's Gifts
620 Shaw Accent Rug-Michaels Floor Covering
624 Fused Glass Accent Table-Bealls Outlet, Inv.
630 Antique Singer Sewing Machine-The Path
637 Deluxe Walker with seat-Quality Mobility
658 Baby Monitor baby package-Doti Stango
674 Golf for 4 at Plantation on Crystal River
696 Hooter's pack of gift card, hat, t-shirt, coozie
702 Household pest treatment-Florida Pest
721 "Dining Around County" dining certificates
735 1/2 day Pontoon rental-Manatee RV Parks
784 Daytona w/end getaway-Travel Authority, NC


Value


C I T R U 0 U N T Y



www.chronicleonline.com


George
Ingram, 79
HOMOSASSA
George E. Ingram, 79, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Monday, Nov. 26, 2012,
at Cypress Cove Care Center
in Crystal River. Graveside
military honors will be con-
ducted at 11:30 a.m. Friday,
Nov 30, 2012, at the Florida
National Cemetery in
Bushnell.

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


The Friends of Fort Cooper State Park Present








Fort Cooper State Park
December 7th 9th
6 p.m.- 8:30 p.n.
Admission: Donation of nonperishable food, cash,
new toys for Citrus United Basket or donation of
pet food for Citrus County Animal Services.
Friday, Dec. 7 & Saturday, Dec. 8
Decorations, lights, luminaries, entertainment,
II s'mores & refreshments while supplies last
Special guests: Santa
Sunday, Dec. 9
O *Decorations and Lights
Fort Cooper State Park
jI 3100 S. Old Floral City Road, Inverness, FL
S(352) 726-0315
Iq | I 0 v


4 CHRONICLE
^-^ .- -


Acoustic music, fish fry, demonstrations,
historical exhibits and Country Store.


) I
I0,
))I







OOOD2U6


CHkNICLE


aL4. E. Z1aCs
Funeral Home With Crematory
SGT LOGAN HARBISON
View: Wed 5:00-7:00 PM
Service: Thurs 10:30 AM
Cornerstone Baptist Church
LEO STACK
View: Friday 10:00 AM
Service: Friday 11:00 AM
ROBERT GREGG
Private Arrangements
PATRICIA BINNEY
Service: Friday 4:00 PM
JEANNIE HARRIS
Service: Pending
726-8323 ......


III Memory Of


Dennis Rutsch

who passed away 2 years

ago today. You are loved

r mi ned.


Friday, Nov. 30 5:30 to 9 p.m.
Fish Fry begins at 5 p.m.
Candles 'N' Carols at 5:30 p.m.

An educationl/hisMtoricleventprese b
Floality Heitg Conil o mor iT* STMIgT i nT]jiliiforma ion
call 352860-0101orvisitf~loralityh or


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Ida Kirby, 84
OCALA
Ida Mae Kirby, 84, Ocala,
passed away Nov 16 at Crystal
River Health & Rehab. Private
cremation services entrusted
to New Serenity Memorial
Funeral Home & Cremation
Svcs., Inc., 352-563-1394.
See DEATHS/Page A7






www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com

l More

Than Just
Lorrie Verticals

,Bs *2" Faux Wood
'"' Woven Woods
Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
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5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)

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MDCAN





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6





Eugene
Schubert, 87
HERNANDO
Mr. Walter Eugene
Schubert, age 87 of
Hernando, Fla., died Friday,
November 23, 2012 in Her-
nando, Fla. He was born
Dec. 12,
1924 in
Bronx,
N.Y, son of
the late Eu-
S gene and

i (Deitrick)
Schubert.
Walter He was an
Schubert Air Force
veteran and moved to Her-
nando from New York. He
owned his own garage and
was a stock car driver
Mr Schubert was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents and daughter Janet Lee
Harbourne. Survivors in-
clude his wife, Virginia
"Ginny" Schubert of
Hernando; son Chuck (Judy)
Harbourne; adopted daugh-
ter Mary (Billy) O'Farrell;
adopted son Chris Lang; two
nieces, Cynthia and Vivian;
grandson Marc Harbourne;
granddaughter Ashley
Harbourne; great-grand-
daughter Emily Rose
Harbourne; and close
friends Bobby Hart,
Richard and Rosetta
Meade, Bruce and Lou
Pashley, Georgia and Ray
Stewart and Charles and
Vi Davey
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Patricia
Missall, 80
BEVERLY HILLS
Patricia Missall, 80, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., passed
away Nov 25, 2012, under
the care of Citrus County
Hospice at the Hospice
House in Lecanto. Patricia
was born in Buffalo, N.Y, to
Marion and Thomas Quinn.
She attended St. Francis
Xavier as a young child and
continued her Christian ed-
ucation at Mount St. Joseph
Academy As a young
woman, she worked as a
clerk at Riverside Men's
Shop. She then worked as a
CAN at Brothers of Mercy,
and then a clerical position
in a prominent doctor's of-
fice. Patricia was a loving
and devoted mother to five
children.
She was preceded in
death by her loving husband
Norbert Missall and her son
Robert Dunn. She is sur-
vived by four of her five chil-
dren, Michael Dunn (and
his wife Evonne) from Den-
ver, Colo., Susan Beaver
(and her husband Michael)
from Beverly Hills, William
Dunn from Palm Desert,
Calif., and Laurie Cordova
from Lake City, Tenn.; five
grandchildren, Michael
Dunn from El Paso, Texas,
Katie Dunn from Los
Angeles, Calif., Ryan Beaver
(and his wife Kristin) from
Homosassa, Chad Beaver
from Homosassa, and Cody
Beaver from Beverly Hills;
and three great-grand-
children, Chance Beaver,
Aaliyah Beaver and Sebast-
ian Beaver
Patricia was a parish
member of St. Benedict
Catholic Church in Crystal
River and had been active
in the Altar & Rosary
Society at the Church. She
was also an active member
of the Crystal River
Women's Club.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto. Mass of the


Resurrection will be offered
at 10 a.m. Thursday, Nov 29,
2012, at St. Benedicts
Catholic Church in Crystal
River Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto, www
brownfuneralhome.com.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Chronicle policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660
for details and pricing
options.


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 A7


Leo
Stack Jr., 80
INVERNESS
Leo Eugene Stack Jr, 80,
of Inverness, died Nov. 25,
2012, at Arbor Trail Health
& Rehab Center. Leo was
born in East Gary, Ind., Sept
18, 1932, to the late Leo
Eugene
Stack Sr
a n d
Geraldine
Roark
Stack and
came to this
area in
1972 from
Leo Porter, Ind.
Stack Jr. He was a
water testing and certifica-
tion technician for the City
of Inverness and served our
country in the U.S. Navy. He
was the last surviving char-
ter member who created the
Inverness Moose Lodge No.
2112 and also was a member
of the Eagles Lodge. He cre-
ated the curriculum for the
wastewater management
certificate program at the
Withlacoochee Vocational
School. He was an all-
around intelligent person
who loved worldly travels
and was an avid participant
in conserving our natural
resources. Most of all, he
was a loving husband to his
wife Ruth, whom he mar-
ried on Aug. 14, 1984, until
her passing on Nov 11,2009.
He also was a loving father,
son, brother and grand-
father He will be missed in
our hearts and lives and al-
ways will be an inspira-
tional and loving person in
our lives. God bless his gen-
tle and loving soul. We have
loving and happy memories
of our father
He is survived by three
children, Leo Eugene Stack
III of Fort Myers, Kathy Jo
Stack Ganga, Ironwood,
Mich., and Lisa Ann Stack
Corey, Porter, Ind.; four
stepchildren, Charles
Mergl, Kingston, N.Y,
Joseph Mergl, Waldwick,
N.J., and William and
Robert Mergl, both of Inver-
ness; his brother and sister,
Ronald J. (Doris) Stack, Ti-
tusville and Nona (Bill) Ong,
Chesterton, Ind.; 13 grand-
children, eight great-grand-
children; 13
step-grandchildren and
nine step-great-
grandchildren. He was pre-
ceded in death by his wife
Ruth on Nov. 11, 2009, and
two daughters, Jo Ann
Haney and Andrea Louise
Stack Clayton. Also surviv-
ing are a very special
daughter-in-law, Alice Wells,
and Walter Wilson, a good
friend for 40 years.
Funeral services will be
11 a.m. Friday, Nov 30,2012,
from the Chas E Davis
Funeral Home with Fr.
Erwin Belgica of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church
officiating. Burial will fol-
low in Florida National
Cemetery Friends may call
at the funeral home Friday
from 10 a.m., until the hour
of service.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)


As Great Lakes dry up,

communities dependent

on tourism face extinction


Associated Press

ONEKAMA, Mich. For
more than a century, easy
access to Lake Michigan
has made Onekama a pop-
ular place for summer visi-
tors and a refuge for
boaters fleeing dangerous
storms. Now the commu-
nity itself needs a rescue,
from slumping lake levels
that threaten its precious
link to open water
The Great Lakes, the
world's biggest freshwater
system, are shrinking be-
cause of drought and rising
temperatures, a trend that
accelerated with this year's
almost snowless winter
and scorching summer
Water levels have fallen to
near-record lows on Lakes
Michigan and Huron, while
Erie, Ontario and Superior
are below their historical
averages. The decline is
causing heavy economic
losses, with cargo
freighters forced to lighten
their loads, marinas too
shallow for pleasure boats
and weeds sprouting on ex-
posed bottomlands, chas-
ing away swimmers and
sunbathers.
Some of the greatest suf-
fering is in small tourist
towns that lack the eco-
nomic diversity of bigger
port cities. Yet they are last
in line for federal money to


deepen channels and re-
pair infrastructure to sup-
port the boating traffic that
keeps them afloat.
The Army Corps of Engi-
neers has estimated that
about 30 small Great Lakes
harbors will need attention
in the next couple of years.
Lake Michigan's level at
the end of October was
more than 2 feet below its
long-term average. The
Corps of Engineers says
without heavy snowfall this
winter, the lake may de-
cline to its lowest point
since record-keeping
began in 1918.
The channel that connects
Portage Lake and Lake
Michigan is now about 7
feet deep at best When the
water is choppy, some ves-
sels can hit bottom. If things
get much worse, Onekama
may be effectively cut off
from the big lake.
"Businesses would close.
People would be laid off. It
would be devastating," said
Jim Mrozinski, owner of
Onekama Marine Inc.,
which services and stores
pleasure craft and draws
customers from across the
Upper Midwest. He owns
three marinas, one now un-
usable because of shallow
water If he's lucky, the oth-
ers will have enough depth
to rent perhaps 10 of the 55
slips next spring.


Under bill, government

whistleblowers afforded

greater protections


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Pres-
ident Barack Obama
signed legislation Tues-
day that affords greater
protection to federal em-
ployees who expose fraud,
waste and abuse in gov-
ernment operations.
Capping a 13-year effort
by supporters of whistle-
blower rights, the new law
closes loopholes created
by court rulings, which re-
moved protections for
federal whistleblowers.
One loophole specified
that whistleblowers were
only protected when they
were the first to report
misconduct.
The law makes it easier
to punish supervisors who
try to retaliate against the
government workers.
The new legislation,
however, would go beyond
restoring protections, to
expand whistle-blower
rights and clarify certain
protections.
Specific protections
would be given to certain
employees, including gov-
ernment scientists who
challenge censorship.
Workers at the Trans-
portation Security Admin-
istration would be
covered under the law for
the first time.
The bill also would clar-
ify that whistleblowers
have the right to commu-
nicate with Congress.
To stop illegal retalia-
tion, the bill would make
it easier to discipline
those responsible, by


modifying the burden of
proof required when taking
action against those trying
to punish whistleblowers.
The new legislation will
also suspend the Federal
Circuit Court of Appeals'
sole jurisdiction to review
decisions in whistleblower
cases.


T --E t -"-2012
NUTCI-A C KE-
DECEMBER I, 1.2012
6:00 PM Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Lecanto
Box Office (352) 637-4663
Reserved Seats $15.00
*VIP Package Available


THANK YOU
TO OUR
SPONSORS!


. .. ..IHEH ARGRO P
Ciii^iAJ


Ede LawmGlup
A ErfifGM


d.D7DA SkPdf: WSt. C- ommaa t T-Shk. PoWgam &. EMWryo t P Sew *Sg eam Paty &f mWL


Sck5\Atca CAcku5


- lrI~I1~


Drop your letter by the Crystal River Mall
or the Citrus County Chronicle between


Friday, November 23 and IV
Friday, December 14,2012 C
C HONICiE All letters will be ....... all to read and enjoy
Vww..hronlo..i.ne.o.. online at www.chronicleonline .com/letterstosanta2012!


---
RYSTAL R


S i*&


Enccre Ensemble Thelter, Inc.
Ircudly Presents...









Written by een MAusnev
Directed by Mike Shier, Sr.

Nov. 0O TDe. 2, 2012
Nov. 30 & Dec. 1: Doors open at 6:00 pm.
,ra-d mso-nt Dec. 2: Doors open at 3:00pm.
Citrus Cunitvy An entertaining/interactive/murder/ T-TIe p
Chariltles mystery/comedy/music dinner theater. j CL
BE\rER LY HILLS LIONS CLUB
72 Civic Circle
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465

Catered Dinner and Performance for
$25 per Person

ByV rSEMVATION CNLV!
Please Calld
(352) 212-5417

000DOUL Produced through special arrangement with Mysteries by Moushey Inc


An intimate evening with this master of moods for
an instrumental feast spilling over with laughter as
he spins strings and stories from the world of folk,
pop, classical, blues and more.



The Art Center Theatre
2644 N. Annapolis Ave. and Highway 486 i
Hernando, Florida (Citrus County)
$18 Adults / $12 Student (under 12 years)
Box Office: 3521746-7606
For more information
call 746-7606 or 746-0648
DOQM CONICLE


I P L TI UM "O r


w.











AS~TH WENSAMNOEBR2,R02SOKSEiusCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IHowTKs *I 'IEA H T I i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1439452 9.66 -.18 CheniereEn 67592 15.62 +.34 RschMotn 832599 10.72 -1.26 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1151682140.33 -.72 Vringo 35032 3.52 -.23 Facebook n 811792 26.15 +.21 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
NokiaCp 707198 3.17 -.19 Rentech 28587 2.82 +.07 SiriusXM 568539 2.70 -.06 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDR Fncl 483593 15.64 -.14 NwGoldg 21513 10.22 -.12 Cisco 524211 18.96 +.05 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
Corning 403294 12.13 +.78 NAPallg 20648 1.51 +.07 Intel 442859 19.93 +.05 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
GCSaba 4.20 +1.05 +33.3 Arrhythm 2.40 +.45 +23.1 AcadiaPh 5.43 +3.13 +136.1 ing qualification. n-Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
Ralcorp 88.80 +18.57 +26.4 PacBkrM g 5.44 +.91 +20.1 Kingtne rs 2.32 +.67 +40.7 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
CitiR2K9-1411.60 +1.31 +12.7 Ever-Glory 2.20 +.25 +12.8 Immersion 6.32 +1.63 +34.8 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified pnce. s-
Edenor 2.03 +.22 +12.2 SL Ind 18.77 +1.45 +8.4 GeoMet pf 8.59 +1.93 +29.0 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
ZuoanFash 3.26 +.29 +9.8 IncOpR 3.35 +.25 +8.1 FstFnB wt 5.47 +.73 +15.4 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
McMoRn 8.18 -1.47 -15.2 MexcoEn 5.31 -.40 -7.0 NeptuneTg 2.50 -.81 -24.5
ChinaDigs 2.07 -.28 -11.9 Vringo 3.52 -.23 -6.1 Astealntl h 2.96 -.44 -12.9
Thorl Inds 38.60 -5.00 -11.5 RareEleg 3.36 -.20 -5.6 Synutra 4.23 -.54 -11.3
NBGreece 2.08 -.21 -9.2 GoldRsvg 3.13 -.17 -5.2 Bridgeline 2.08 -.25 -10.7 52-Week Net % YT[
IRSA 7.04 -.59 -7.7 Augustag 2.60 -.14 -5.1 RschMotn 10.72 -1.26 -10.5 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ct


DIARY


1,346 Advanced
1,697 Declined
116 Unchanged
3,159 Total issues
105 New Highs
12 New Lows
3,225,007,068 Volume


DIARY


203 Advanced
226 Declined
35 Unchanged
464 Total issues
10 New Highs
7 New Lows
68,468,656 Volume


1,106
1,333
120
2,559
57
27
1,679,833,877


13,661.72 11,232.16Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 4,533.98Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 426.30Dow Jones Utilities
8,515.60 6,898.18NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,150.17Amex Index
3,196.93 2,507.72Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,158.67S&P 500
15,432.54 12,158.94Wilshire 5000
868.50 677.82Russell 2000


12,878.13
5,077.07
446.18
8,150.77
2,385.46
2,967.79
1,398.94
14,649.39
807.74


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


-89.24 -.69 +5.41 +11.44
-7.42 -.15 +1.14 +7.56
+.30 +.07 -3.98 +2.08
-46.80 -.57 +9.01 +14.00
-2.10 -.09 +4.70 +8.84
-8.99 -.30 +13.92 +17.98
-7.35 -.52+11.24+17.05
-62.57 -.43+11.06+16.72
-1.28 -.16 +9.02+16.04


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BakrHu 41.62
BallCorp 44.63
BoBradpf 16.31
BeSantSA 7.40
ABB Ltd 18.86 -.01 BoSBrasil 6.74
ADTCpn 43.57 +.47 BkofAm 9.66
AES Corp 10.17 -.03 BkMontg 59.42
AFLAC 51.51 -.34 BkNYMel 24.06
AGL Res 38.41 +.02 Barday 15.50
AK Steel 3.79 -.03 BariPVixrs 30.36
AOL 36.58 -.27 BarnesNob 15.92
ASA Gold 21.84 -.34 BarrickG 34.54
AT&T Inc 33.62 -.35 Baxter 65.81
AUOptron 3.96 -.09 Beam Inc 53.16
AbtLab 64.06 -.30 BeazerH rs 14.50
AberFitc 44.62 +.01 BectDck 77.15
Accenture 67.35 -.32 BerkHaA132004.00
AdamsEx 10.39 -.08 BerkH B 88.08
AdvAuto 76.61 -1.55 BestBuy 12.89
AMD 1.88 +.01 BioMedR 19.09
Aeropostf 13.31 -.46 BIkHillsCp 34.66
Aetna 42.66 -.12 BlkDebtStr 4.28
Agilent 37.34 -.13 BlkEnhC&l 12.64
Agnieog 55.34 -1.99 BIkGlbOp 12.70
AirProd 82.87 -.47 Blackstone 14.54
Airgas 87.99 -2.48 BlockHR 18.12
AlcatelLuc 1.14 +.02 Boeing 74.49
Alcoa 8.28 -.03 BostBeer 112.95
AllegTch 25.86 -.34 BostProp 101.64
Allergan 91.49 -.18 BostonSci 5.63
Allete 38.18 +.01 BoydGm 5.27
AlliBGIbHi 15.78 +.09 Brandyw 11.78
AlliBlnco 8.60 -.02 Brinker 29.74
AlliBern 18.08 -.06 BrMySq 32.61
Allstate 40.42 -.03 Brookdale 24.90
AlphaNRs 7.02 -.16 BrkfidOfPr 16.17
AIpAlerMLP 16.21 +.05 Brunswick 25.24
Altria 33.15 -.06 Buckeye 49.29
AmBev 40.90 -.18 Buenavent 32.81
Ameren 28.75 -.10 BungeLt 72.43
AMovilL 23.57 -.23 BurgerKn 16.46
AmCampus 44.16 -.24 CBLAsc 21.76
AEagleOut 19.39 -.09 CBREGrp 17.91
AEP 41.45 -.03 CBS B 34.77
AmExp 54.44 -1.25 CHEngy 65.00
AmlnDtGrp 32.49 -.48 CIT Grp 36.74
AmSIP3 7.61 +.04 CMS Eng 23.95
AmTower 74.20 -.15 CNO Find 8.69
Amerigas 40.85 +.06 CSS Inds 20.27
Ameriprise 60.15 -.35 CSX 20.01
AmeriBrgn 41.22 -.23 CVS Care 45.25
Anadarko 73.35 -.91 CYS Invest 12.60
AnglogldA 30.24 -1.19 CblvsnNY 13.71
ABInBev 86.12 -.59 CabotOGs 47.80
Ann Inc 32.43 -.33 CallGolf 6.41
Annaly 14.70 -.06 Calpine 17.04
Aon plc 56.45 -.75 CamdenPT 65.21
Apache 77.23 +.75 Camecoog 17.61
Aptlnv 25.19 +.35 CampSp 36.60
AquaAmn 25.20 -.23 CdnNRsgs 28.05
ArcelorMit 14.71 -.35 CapOne 57.61
ArchCoal 6.37 -.04 CapifiSrce 8.02
ArchDan 26.43 -.28 CapM pB 14.75
ArmourRsd 6.88 +.02 CardnlHIth 39.54
Ashland 69.86 +.71 CareFusion 27.77
AsdEstat 15.00 +.29 CarMax 35.27
Assurant 33.83 -.39 Carnival 38.12
AssuredG 13.90 -.28 Caterpillar 84.01
ATMOS 34.78 +.12 Celanese 39.42
AuRicog 7.90 -.25 Cemex 8.94
AutoNatn 39.48 -.35 Cemigpfs 11.45
AvalonBay 132.35 +3.40 CenterPnt 19.62
Avon 14.08 -.22 CenEIBras 3.29
BB&TCp 28.14 -.56 Cntyink 38.52
BHP BilILt 70.73 -.57 Checkpnt 8.55
BP PLC 41.35 -.25 Chemtura 19.96
BRE 47.99 +.26 ChesEng 17.41
BRFBrasil 18.81 -.26 ChesUfi 43.60
BRT 6.50 +.21 Chevron 103.38


ChicB&l 39.64 +.27
Chieos 18.42 +.18
Chimera 2.60 -.02
ChinaMble 55.95 -.59
Cigna 52.42 +.18
CindBell 5.20 +.03
Cifgroup 35.04 -.53
CleanHarb 56.99 -.20
CliffsNRs 30.01 -.69
Clorox 74.63 +.14
Coach 57.63 -.24
CobaltlEn 22.34 +.50
CCFemsa 134.57 -.43
CocaColas 37.42 +.06
CocaCE 30.52 -.01
Coeur 22.81 -.86
CohStlnfra 17.87 -.01
ColgPal 107.64 -.22
Comerica 29.59 -.20
CmwREIT 15.05 +.18
CompSci 37.59 -.20
Con-Way 28.50 +.13
ConAgra 29.63 +1.34
ConocPhils 56.18 -.62
ConsolEngy 31.44 -.35
ConEd 54.84 -.04
ConstellA 34.82 +.42
ContlRes 67.88 -1.78
Cnvrgys 15.06 -.16
Cooper Ind 78.66 -.15
Corning 12.13 +.78
CosanLtd 16.13 -.25
CottCp 8.59 +.08
Covidien 57.39 -.08
Crane 42.08 -.19
CSVS2xVxS .93 +.03
CSVellIVSt 18.78 -.42
CreXus 12.38 -.01
Cummins 99.72 +.11

DCT Indl 6.30 -.05
DDRCorp 15.38 -.15
DNP Selct 9.53 +.04
DR Horton 19.58 +.08
DSW Inc 67.68 -.58
DTE 59.26 -.01
DanaHIdg 13.82 -.02
Danaher 52.21 -.48
Darden 52.95 -.29
DaVitaHIth 109.29 -.71
DeanFds 16.69 -.16
Deere 84.40 -.06
DelphiAuto 33.43 +.07
DeltaAir 9.82 +.02
DenburyR 15.05 -.29
DeutschBk 43.43 +.13
DevonE 53.12 +.25
DigitalRIt 64.26 +.13
DrxFnBull 104.54 -2.57
DirSCBear 16.05 +.08
DirFnBear 17.62 +.42
DirSPBear 18.18 +.30
DirDGIdBII 11.69 -.94
DrxEnBear 8.43 +.21
DirxSCBull 54.79 -.33
Discover 40.59 -.75
Disney 48.60 -.43
DollarGen 49.51 +.20
DomRescs 50.54 -.11
DEmmett 22.85 +.07
Dover 62.69 -.99
DowChm 29.71 +.13
DuPont 43.44 +.10
DukeEnrs 61.59 +.28
DukeRlty 13.42 -.15
E-CDarng 4.43 -.03
EMCCp 24.57 -.10
EOG Res 115.08 -1.57


EQT Corp 60.47
EagleMat 54.20
EastChem 59.03
Eaton 51.05
EatnVan 31.56
EVEnEq 10.66
Ecolab 70.04
Edisonlnt 44.49
EdwLfSci 84.06
Ban 10.16
BdorGldg 14.97
EmersonEl 49.20


EmpDist 19.95
EnbrdgEPt 28.51
EnCanag 21.09
EngyTsfr 43.18
EnPro 38.50
ENSCO 57.22
Entergy 62.23
EntPrPt 51.52
EqtyRsd 55.25
EsteeLdr s 58.69
ExeoRes 7.74
Exelon 29.76
Express 12.99
ExxonMbl 87.35
FairchldS 12.92
FedExCp 88.70
FedSignl 5.63
Ferrellgs 18.68
Ferro 2.83
FidlNFin 23.87
FidNatlnfo 35.69
FstHorizon 9.58
FTActDiv 7.67
FtTrEnEq 11.84
FirstEngy 41.97
Ruor 53.07
FootLockr 34.46
FordM 11.10
FordMwt 2.18
ForestLab 33.52
ForestOil 6.59
FBHmSec 28.48


FranceTel 10.41 -.24
FMCG 38.49 -.35
Fusion-io 23.65 -1.33

GATX 41.26 -.17
GabelliET 5.57 -.01
GabHIthW 9.18 +.05
GabUlI 6.89 +.07
GafisaSA 3.66 -.02
GameSbtp 26.68 -.14
Gannett 17.57 -.09
Gap 35.15 -.47


Generac 33.95 +1.94
GenDynam 64.96 -.10
GenElec 20.87 -.19
GenGrPrp 18.80 -.36
GenMills 40.62 +.17
GenMotors 25.01 -.22
GenOn En 2.47 +.06
Genworth 5.62 +.04
GaGulf 45.97 +.32
Gerdau 8.78 -.17

GlaxoSKIn 42.73
GoldFLtd 11.81 -.37
Goldcrpg 39.14 -1.88
GoldmanS 118.41 -2.53
Goodyear 11.67 -.16
GtPlainEn 19.80 +.01
Griffon 9.81 +.03
GpFSnMxn 14.33 +.19
GuangRy 16.66 -.05
Guess 23.96 -.59
HCA Hldg 30.75 -.21
HCP Inc 45.10 -.69
HDFCBk 40.79 -.44
HSBC 49.77 -.09
HSBC Cap 25.86 +.08
HalconRrs 5.96 -.23
Hallibrtn 32.04 +.01
HanJS 16.03 -.19
HanPrmDv 13.45 +.04
Hanesbrds 35.11 +.17
Hanoverlns 35.57 -.14


HarleyD 46.99 -1.00
HarmonyG 7.91 -.32
HartfdFn 20.89 -.31
HawaiiEl 24.49 +.07
HItCrREIT 59.29 -.64
HItMgmt 7.85 -.03
HlthcrRlty 23.55 -.35
HealthNet 23.33 -.98
Heckmann 3.84 +.01
HeclaM 5.78 -.07
Heinz 57.83 +.29
Herbalife 46.52 -1.16


Hertz 14.88
Hess 49.38
HewlettP 12.36
HighwdPrp 32.10
Hillshiren 27.42
HollyFront 44.90
HomeDp 64.16
HonwIllntI 60.62
Hospira 29.20
HospPT 22.44
HostHofis 14.49
HovnanE 5.49
Humana 64.39
Huntsmn 16.29
Hyperdyn .64
IAMGId g 11.84
ICICIBk 38.52
ING 8.78
iShGold 16.95
iSAsfia 24.54
iShBraz 51.43
iSCan 27.88
iShGer 23.08
iSh HK 19.01
iShJapn 9.24
iSh Kor 58.85
iSMalas 14.48
iShMex 66.25
iShSing 13.14
iSPacxJpn 45.79
iSTaiwn 13.22
iShSilver 32.93


iShChina25 36.86
iSCorSP500140.93
iShEMkts 41.28
iShiBxB 122.07
iShUSTrs 25.35
iShEMBd 121.84
iShNMuBd 113.40
iShB20T 125.29
iS Eafe 54.14
iShiBxHYB 92.48
iShBFxBd 108.34
iSR1KV 70.90


iSR1KG 65.09 -.23
iSR2KV 71.80 -.10
iSR2KG 92.01 -.17
iShR2K 80.63 -.10
iShUSPfd 39.82 +.07
iShREst 63.08 -.34
iShDJHm 20.57 +.02
iStar 7.75 +.06
Idacorp 41.43 +.03
ITW 60.54
Imafon 4.13 +.05
IngerRd 47.76 -.15
IngrmM 16.24 +.21
IntegrysE 53.35 +.06
IntcnfiEx 129.97 -.84
IBM 191.23 -1.65
InfiGame 13.36 +.38
IntPap 36.25 +.15
Interpublic 10.27 +.04
Invesco 24.74 -.03
InvMtgCap 20.60 +.11
IronMtn 31.91 -.10
ItauUnibH 14.84 -.31

JPMorgCh 40.75 -.13
Jabil 18.73 -.20
JanusCap 8.40 -.06
Jefferies 15.95 -.03
JohnJn 68.81 -.28
JohnsnCI 26.97 -.11
JoyGIbl 55.68 -1.33


JnprNtwk 17.09 +.28 McEwenrt .14
KBHome 14.61 +.16 MeadJohn 67.21
KBRInc 27.69 -.31 MeadWvco 30.11
KKR 13.94 -.07 Mechel 6.24
KC Southn 79.31 -.29 Medids 43.03
Kaydon s 22.35 +.06 Medtrnic 42.41
KAEngTR 25.09 +.17 Merck 43.88
Kellogg 55.45 +.06 MetLife 32.62
KeyEngy 6.16 -.01 MetroPCS 10.54
Keycorp 8.23 -.25 MetroHIth 11.19
KimbClk 85.58 -.80 MKorsn 51.40
Kimco 18.89 -.28 MidAApt 62.83
KindME 81.85 +.84 MobileTele 16.72
KindMorg 33.76 +.08 Molyeorp 8.47
Kinrossg 10.25 -.15 MoneyGrm 12.35
KnghtCap 2.97 +.15 Monsanto 90.81
KodiakOg 8.63 -.07 MonstrWw 5.47
Kohls 51.16 -.75 Moodys 46.81
KrispKrm 9.02 -.31 MorgStan 16.63
Kroger 24.86 +.25 MSEmMkt 14.66
KronosWw 15.64 +.31 Mosaic 53.20
LG Display 16.40 -.19 MotrlaSolu 54.03
LSI Corp 6.71 +.02 MuellerWat 5.22
LTC Prp 32.57 -.07 MurphO 57.05
LaZBoy 16.39 +.08 NCRCorp 23.96
Ladede 39.89 -.08 NRG Egy 20.67
LVSands 46.36 +2.33 NVEnergy 18.31
LeapFrog 8.77 +.27 NYSE Eur 22.67
LeggMason 25.58 -.34 Nabors 13.80
LennarA 38.72 +.18 NamTai 14.73
LeucNafi 20.91 +.03 NBGreece 2.08
LexRItyTr 9.30 -.15 NatFuGas 51.71
Lexmark 24.50 -.35 NatGrid 56.81
LbtyASG 4.00 +.04 NOilVarco 70.02
LibtProp 34.62 -.32 Navistar 20.24
LillyEli 47.68 -.25 NewAmHi 10.60
Limited 49.11 -.32 NJiRscs 40.33
LincNat 24.32 -.30 NewOriEd 18.78
Lindsay 78.18 +1.61 NYCmtyB 12.69
Linkedln 107.59 -1.23 Newcastle 8.25
LockhdM 93.10 -.19 NewellRub 21.36
LonePineg .97 NewfidExp 24.11
LaPac 17.03 -.58 NewmtM 47.00
Lowes 35.34 -.01 NewpkRes 7.56
L A 5 Nexenog 24.20
NextEraEn 67.82
NiSource 23.66
M&TBk 98.65 -.26 NielsenH 28.06
MBIA 8.56 -.28 NikeB 97.01
MDU Res 20.51 +.07 NobleCorp 34.41
MEMC 2.80 +.17 NokiaCp 3.17
MFA Fnd 8.22 -.03 Nordstm 54.16
MCR 10.13 +.15 NorfikSo 58.94
MGIC 1.70 +.01 NoestUt 38.39
MGM Rsts 9.86 +.04 NthnTEn n 22.02
Macquarie 41.49 +.02 NorthropG 65.33
Macys 39.63 -.23 Novarfs 60.55
MagelMPts 43.82 +.51 Nucor 40.47
Magnalntg 45.36 -.19 NustarEn 43.61
MagHRes 3.92 -.15 NuvMuOpp 15.73
Manitowoc 14.67 -.11 NvPfdlnco 9.80
Manulifeg 12.55 -.01 NuvQPf2 9.24
MarathnO 31.04 +.04 OGEEngy 56.72
MarathPet 58.59 -.47 OasisPet 30.11
MktVGold 47.46 -1.29 OcciPet 75.48
MVOilSvs 37.89 -.30 Oceaneerg 53.01
MVSemi n 31.59 +.09 OcwenFn 33.91
MktVRus 27.37 -.50 OfficeDpt 3.25
MktVJrGId 21.87 -.45 OfficeMax 10.03
MarlntA 34.64 -.07 OiSAs 3.71
MarshM 35.25 -.28 OldRepub 10.54
MStewrt 2.44 +.04 Olin 20.80
Maseo 16.97 +.11 OmegaHIt 22.90
McDrmlnt 10.51 -.08 Omnicom 47.80
McDnlds 85.92 -.32 OnAssign 19.37
McGrwH 51.77 -.12 ONEOKs 45.58
McKesson 92.75 -.81 OneokPtrs 58.70
McMoRn 8.18 -1.47 OshkoshCp 30.97
McEwenM 3.58 -.20 OwensCorn 33.62


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.92 +.01
AbdnEMTel 20.25 +.02
AdmRsc 32.83 -.78
Adventrx .62 -.01
AlldNevG 32.75 -.65
AlmadnMg 2.75 +.03
AmApparel .99 +.06
Argan 18.12 +.09
Aurizong 3.75 -.08
AvalnRare 1.45 -.07
Bacterin 1.25
Banrog 3.27 -.01


BarcUBS36 42.77
BarcGSOil 20.86
BioTime 3.52
BlkMunvst 11.76
BrigusGg 1.03
BritATob 104.83
CAMAC En .62
CelSd .34
CFCdag 23.26
CheniereEn 15.62
CheniereE 20.50
ChiBotanP .49
ChinaPhH .30
ChinaShen .41
ClaudeRg .60


+.19 ClghGlbOp 11.02 -.07
-.14 Contango 40.81 -2.16
CornstProg 5.14 +.02
+.05 CornerstStr 6.41 +.10
CrSuiHiY 3.18 -.02
+.53
-.06 DeourEg .21 -.00
+.01 DenisnMg 1.13
+.01 DocuSec 2.65 -.04
+.34 EVLtdDur 17.03 +.14
-.25 EVMuniBd 14.74 +.09
EVMuni2 14.07 +.07
-.01 ElephTalk 1.06 -.05
+.05 Ellomay 5.41 +.09
-.03 EllswthFd 7.02 +.01


ExeterRgs 1.27 -.05


GamGldNR 13.32 -.15
Gastargrs .88 +.10
GenMoly 3.77 -.12
GeoGloblR .09 -.00
Geodnefcs .36 -.06
GigOpDcs 1.96 +.01
GIblScape 1.45 -.15
GoldResrc 15.36 -.57
GoldStdVg 1.33 -.05
GoldenMin 3.98 -.02
GoldStrg 1.79 -.04
GranTrrag 5.50 -.09


GtPanSilvg 1.74 -.04
Hemisphrx .78 +.01
HooperH .38 +.02
HstnAEn .54 -.05
ImmunoCII 2.00 -.03
ImpacMtg 13.81 -.40
ImpOilgs 42.72 -.67
InovioPhm .50 +.04
IntellgSys 1.50 +.03
IntTowerg 2.08 -.09
Inuvo 1.17 -.19
aso R 049 .04

KeeganRg 3.90 -.11
LkShrGldg .76 -.01


Libbey 19.70 +45 NovaGldg 4.57 -.08
Lo PI 226 NCaAMTFr 15.98 +.15
SamsO&G .71 +.06
Sandstgrs 12.34 +.11
MeetMe 3.17 -.04 ParaG&S 2.31 -.11 SilverBull .48 +.01
MdwGoldg 1.47 -.02 PhrmAth 1.17 -.01 SprottRL g 1.45 +.01
NaideaBio 2.58 +.04 ProlorBio 4.43 +.02 SynergyRs 3.69 -.11
NeoStem .67 -.01 PyramidOil 3.91 +.02 TanzRyg 4.67 -.06
NBRlstem 1.2055 +.11 RadiantLog 1.25 +.03 Taseko 2.83 -.01
Nevsung 4.23 -13 RareEleg 3.36 -.20 Timminsg 3.20 -.12
NwGoldg 10.22 -.12 ReavesUtl 24.00 +.08 TrnsafiPet .79 -.00
NA Pallg 1.51 +.07 Rentechd 2.82 +07 TriangPet 5.72 -.09
NDynMng 3.70 +.01 RexahnPh .43 +.01 Tuonwsg 1.41
NthnO&G 14.79 -.22 Ridimntg 3.79 -.14 USGeoth .40 +.01
NovaBayP 1.61 -.07 Rubieong 2.93 -.11 Uranerz 1.37


UraniumEn 2.22 +.02


VangTotW 47.76 -.29
VantageDrl 1.75 -.02
VirnetX 32.18 -.58
VistaGold 2.97 -.02
Vringo 3.52 -.23
Walterlnv 39.11 -.45
WFAdvlnco 10.29 +.14
YMBiog 1.64 +.02
ZBB Engy .23 +.00


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AFC Ent 26.63 +.88
AMC Net 50.83 -.29
ASML HId 58.65 +.78
Aastrom 1.30 +.09
Abiomed 14.65 +.34
Abraxas 2.03 +.10
AcadaTc 21.89 +.51
AcadiaPh 5.43 +3.13
AcelRx 4.67 -.30
Achillion 7.60 -.08
AcmePkt 19.97 +.91
AcfvsBliz 11.33 -.01
Acxiom 17.46 +.01
AdobeSy 33.18 -.12
Adtran 19.14 +.64
Aegion 19.18 +.05
AEterngrs 2.18 +.02
Affymax 23.81 +.26
Affymetrix 3.30 -.05
AkamaiT 34.57 -1.16
Akorn 12.99 -.01
AlaskCom 2.09 +.02
Alexion 93.91 -.16
Alexzars 5.02 +.05
AlignTech 26.90 -.09
Alkermes 19.66 -.31
AllotComm 21.84 +.57
AllscriptH 12.37 +.01
AlteraCplf 31.54 -.37
AlterraCap 22.87 +.18
Alfsrcen 104.68 +2.75
AltraHldgs 18.03 -.04
Amarin 12.13 +.64
Amazon 243.40 -.22
ACapAgy 31.34 -.11
AmCapLd 11.86 -.02
ACapMtg 25.04 -.12
ARItyCTn 11.43 -.01
AmSupr 2.77 +.15
Amgen 86.98 -.31
AmicusTh 5.51 +.60
AmkorTch 4.09 -.03
AnaeorPh 5.54 +.14
Anadigc 1.50 -.06
AnalogDev 40.11 -.27
Anlogic 73.07 -.14
Analystlnt 3.07 +.02
Ancestry 31.52 -.06
AngiesList 11.01 +.23
Ansys 65.82 -1.07
AntaresP 3.98 +.01
AntheraPh .64 +.02
ApogeeE 22.92 +2.17
ApolloGrp 19.18 +.27
Apollolnv 8.15 +.08
Apple Inc 584.78 -4.75
ApldMati 10.36 -.11
AMCC 6.80 +.07
Approach 23.41 -.23
ArQule 2.69 -.04
ArchCap 44.22 -.19
ArenaPhm 9.31 -.12
AresCap 17.49 -.16
AriadP 21.55 -.36
ArkBest 8.49 +.44
ArmHId 36.39 +.48
ArrayBio 3.52 +.14
Arris 13.80 -.02
ArubaNet 18.88 +.10
AscenaRts 19.87 -.04
AscentSolr .74 +.02
AspenTech 25.49 -.98
AssodBanc 13.01 -.09
AstexPhm 2.67 +.06
Athersys 1.00 +.01
AfiasAir 41.92 -1.57
Atmel 5.15 +.12
Audience n 8.79 +.62
Autodesk 31.92 -.32
AutoData 55.38 -.29
Auxilium 18.50 -.25
AvagoTch 34.12 +.08
AvanirPhm 2.66 +.11
AVEO Ph 7.11 +.01


AvisBudg 17.75
Aware 6.43
BBCN Bcp 11.38
B/EAero 45.36
BGMed 1.41
BGC Pts 3.47
BJsRest 33.92
BMC Sft 40.62
Baidu 94.52
Banner Cp 29.95
Bazaarvc n 9.46
BeacnRfg 30.87
BeasleyB 4.89
BebeStrs 3.80
BedBath 59.06
BioRetLab 25.26
Biocryst 1.42
Biogenldc 147.88
BioMarin 48.24
BioMimefc 7.27
BioSanters 1.31
BioScrip 9.95
BIkRKelso 9.83
BobEvans 36.68
BreitBurn 18.35
Brightcvn 10.01
Broadcom 32.09
BroadSoft 32.53
BrcdeCm 5.74
BrklneB 8.31
BrooksAuto 7.39
BrukerCp 14.56
CA Inc 22.01
CBOE 29.53
CH Robins 60.83
CME Grps 54.29
CTC Media 8.60
CVB Fnd 9.99
Cadence 12.79
Caesars n 5.82
CalaGDyln 8.31
CalaStrTR 9.86
CapCtyBk 10.90
CapFedFn 11.82
CpstnTrb h .94
CardFnc 15.07
Cardtronic 23.09
CareerEd 2.89
Carrizo 20.18
CarverBcp 3.02
CasellaW 4.63
Caseys 47.60
CatalystPh .50
Catamarns 47.15
CathayGen 17.68
Cavium 34.20
Celgene 78.14
CellTherrs 1.36
CelldexTh 5.94
Celsion 7.58
CentEurop 1.90
CEurMed 4.66
CentAI 7.31
Cepheid 32.12
Ceradyne 34.92
Cereplast h .09
Ceres n 3.79
Cerner 76.83
Chartlnds 57.57
CharterCm 70.29
ChkPoint 45.51
Cheesecake 34.75
ChelseaTh 1.69
ChildPlace 48.39
ChinBAKrs 2.38
ChiCeram 2.20
ChinGerui 1.25
ChinaTcF 1.41
ChrchllD 60.78
CienaCorp 14.51
CinnFin 40.04
Cintas 40.57
Cirrus 30.38
Cisco 18.96
CitrixSys 60.28
CleanDsl 2.44
CleanEngy 13.53
Cleantch rs 3.70


+.12 Clearwire 2.22 +.03
-.02 CoStar 85.38 -1.72
-.09 CognizTech 65.54 -.45
Cogo Grp 2.44 -.04
-.13 Coinstar 46.39 -.16
+.01 Comcast 36.29 -.34
+.49 Comcspd 35.31 -.28
+.36 CmcBMO 38.61 -.45
-.93 CommSys 10.65 +.20
-.53 CommVIt 66.41 -.55
-.98 CmplGnom 3.13 -.01
-.43 Compuwre 8.77
+.04 Comverse 3.43 +.11
+.05 Concepts 20.80 +.05
+.15 ConcurTch 63.75 -.04
+.26 Conmed 27.01 -.17
-.06 Conns 27.49 -.29
-1.23 ConstantC 12.90 -.06
-.35 Coparts 29.77 -.09
+.18 Corcept 1.39 -.01
+.03 CorinthC 2.26 +.06
-.02 CorOnDem 27.50 -.01
-.18 Cosi Inch .57 -.02
+.23 Costeo 96.51 +.25
+.35 CrackerB 64.38 -.17
+.24 CrayInc 14.20 +.62
-.08 Cree nc 33.01 +1.09
+2.40 Crocs 13.49 +1.14
+.05 CrosstxLP 14.96 +.16
+.29 Ctrip.eom 19.47 +.16
-.09 CubistPh 39.60 -.14
+.02 Cymer 84.68 +.74
-.12 CypSemi 9.87 -.04
+.04 2oneth 66 -l
-.65
-.98
-.08 DUSA 7.97 -.02
-.24 DeckrlsOut 36.27 +1.02
-.16 Delcath 1.34 -.03
-.02 Dell Inc 9.77 -.18
+.04 Dndreon 4.34 -.12
-.08 Dentsply 38.87 -.35
-.07 DexCom 12.33 -.05
-.03 DiamndFhlf 14.21 +.38
-.01 DianaCont 6.48 +.15
-.03 DigitalGen 10.20 +.10
-.18 DigRiver 14.13 -.18
-.01 DirecTV 49.19 +.19
-.43 DiscCmAh 57.70 -.18
+.01 DiscovLab 2.14 +.06
+.04 DishNetwk 34.39 -.91
+.21 DollarTrs 41.13 -1.05
+.01 DonlleyRR 9.70 +.15
-.25 DrmWksA 17.23 +.12
-.17 DryShips 1.84 +.09
+.10 Dunkin 31.46 +.47
-.65 DurectCp 1.02 +.07
-.07 Dynavax 2.82 -.07
+.24 E-Trade 8.38 -.05
-.22 eBay 51.15 -.25
+.03 eHealth 25.84 +.58
-.12 EaglRkEn 9.03 +.03
+.08 ErthLink 6.42 -.02
+.19 EstWstBcp 21.32 -.48
+.08 Ebixlnc 16.18 -.60
-.01 EchoThera 1.31 -.05
-.25 EducDevel 3.92
-.19 8x8 Inc 6.38 -.07
-1.50 ElectSd 10.44 +.07
+.01 ElectArts 14.73 +.14
-.62 EFII 18.13 -.04
+.04 EndoPhrm 28.23 -.02
+.05 Endobgix 13.55 +.03
+.63 EnerNOC 11.76 -.42
-.27 EngyXXI 30.68 -.86
-.04 Entegris 8.81 +.07
-.04 EntropCom 4.71 -.13
-.02 Equinix 182.69 -2.79
-.28 Ericsson 8.89 -.19
-.09 ExactScih 9.32 -.17
-.08 Exelids 5.32 +.12
-.18 EddeTc 2.68 +.06
-.38 Expedias 60.83 -.11
+.05 Expdlni 36.98 -.26
-1.89 ExpqScripts 52.08 +.79
+.28 ExtrmNet 3.58 -.01
+.04 EZchip 38.33 +.41
... Ezcorp 18.76 +.05


F5 Netwks 91.83 -.78 lionPLC 27.79 +.20
FLIRSys 20.04 +.17 loonixBr 19.60 +.25
FXEner 4.05 -.19 IdenixPh 4.52 -.09
Facebookn 26.15 +.21 Illumina 51.19 +.02
Fastenal 40.85 -.34 Immersion 6.32 +1.63
FifthStRn 10.69 -.15 ImunoGn 12.00 +.07
FifthThird 14.55 -.18 ImpaxLabs 20.48 -.05
FindEngin 25.83 +.09 inContact 5.57 +.10
Fndlnst 18.31 -.02 Incyte 18.06 +.09
Finisar 12.98 +.07 Infinera 5.27 -.12
FinLine 20.26 -.39 InfinityPh 25.19 -.50
FstCalifFn 7.83 +.01 Informat 27.26 +.05
FstCashFn 48.12 +.12 Infosys 43.60 -.26
FFnclOH 14.72 -.29 InnerWkgs 12.70 +.05
FMidBc 12.67 -.07 Insulet 21.47 -.46
FstNiagara 7.39 +.01 IntegLfSci 38.37 -.48
FstSolar 26.28 +.97 IntgDv 6.03 -.03
FstMerit 14.00 -.03 Intel 19.93 +.05
Fiserv 75.13 -.25 Inteliquent 2.32 -.02
Flextrn 5.66 -.13 InteractB 15.08 -.08
FocusMda 23.77 -.19 InterDig 41.03 -.26
ForbEnSv 1.98 -.01 InterMune 8.99 -.09
Forfnet 19.18 -.05 InfiSpdw 26.25 +.12
Fossil Inc 84.83 -.68 Intersil 6.93 +.05
FosterWhl 22.28 -.47 Intuit 58.20 -.23
Francesca 25.46 -1.06 IntSurg 525.00 -9.25
FreshMkt 60.24 -1.14 InvRIEst 8.54 -.03
FronterCm 4.59 +.06 IridiumCm 6.05 -.03
FuelCell h .85 -.03 Isis 9.01 +.01
FullCrde 7.86 -.26 Itron 42.24 +.50
FultonFncl 9.61 -.10 IvanhoeEh .49 -.00

GSI Group 7.74 +.31 JA Solar h .65 +.03
GTAdvTc 3.29 -.04 JDASoft 44.64 +.06
GalenaBio 1.58 -.11 JDS Uniph 11.43 -.09
Garmin 37.89 -.50 JackHenry 38.63 +.06
Genomic 28.26 +.20 JacklnBox 27.26 -.23
Gentex 17.24 -.23 Jamba 1.98 -.01
GeronCp 1.38 -.05 JamesRiv 2.88 +.14
Gevo 1.58 +.08 JazzPhrm 51.91 +.06
GileadSd 74.65 -.82 JetBlue 5.06 -.02
Gleacherh .72 +.05 JiveSoftn 13.68 -.38
GIbSpcMet 14.00 +.01 JosABank 47.28 -.22
GluMobile 2.54 -.16 KITDigit .61 -.01
GolLNGLtd 39.03 -.37 KLATnc 44.74 -.38
Google 670.71 +9.56 KeryxBio 2.93 +.04
GrCanyEd 23.25 +.96 KiOR 6.00 -.48
GrLkDrge 8.72 +.26 KraftFGp n 45.33 +1.02
GreenMtC 28.95 +.34 KratosDef 4.47 -.16
Greenlight 23.18 -.49 Kulicke 10.94 +.24
Grifolsrs 24.19 +.27 LKQCps 21.50 -.13
Groupon 3.96 +.16 LPL Find 27.17 +.26
GulfportE 31.73 -.11 LSI Indlf 6.44 +.23
H&EEqs 15.07 +.01 LamResrch 34.91 -.34
HMN Fn 3.14 +.19 LamarAdv 39.62 -.33
HMS Hldgs 22.64 -.23 Landstar 50.32 -.23
HainCel 60.82 +.62 Lattice 3.96 -.11
Halozyme 5.56 -.17 LeapWirlss 6.06 -.14
Harmonic 4.36 +.02 LegacyRes 24.15 -.01
Hasbro 38.30 -.02 LedxPhrm 1.79 +.02
HawHold 6.06 +.02 LibGlobA 57.09 -.18
HIthCSvc 22.89 -.20 LibCapA 108.00 -1.00
HrfindEx 13.91 +.07 LibtylntA 19.23 +.01
HeartWare 76.43 -5.28 LifeTech 48.95 -.63
HSchein 80.04 -.54 LifePtH 35.19 -1.37
HercOffsh 4.45 -.08 Lifevantge 2.57 +.05
HimaxTch 2.21 +.05 LimelghtN 1.81 +.14
Hologic 18.82 -.62 LincElec 46.19 +.12
Home Inns 26.23 +.67 LinearTch 32.32 -.10
HmLnSvcn 19.10 -.04 LinnEngy 39.25 +.37
HomeAway 20.96 +.25 LinnCo n 38.37 +.35
HorizPhm 2.63 -.01 Lionbrdg 4.09 +.19
HorsehdH 9.03 -.13 Liquidity 42.47 +.81
HotTopic 9.66 -.03 LocalCorp 2.56 +.03
HubGroup 32.54 +.58 LodgeNeth .20 +.03
HudsCity 8.06 -.01 Logitech 6.96 -.09
HuntJB 60.01 +.15 LookSmth .76 -.03
HuntBncsh 6.17 -.14 Lulkin 53.55 +.32
IAC Inter 43.30 +.40 lululemn 71.95 +1.26
IdexxLabs 92.30 -1.63
II-VI 16.85 +.56
IPG Photon 60.24 +.41 MAP Phm 16.05 +.53
iRobot 18.65 +.33 MCGCap 4.37 +.04
iShEMAsia 54.68 -.04 MEI Phrm 1.46 +.06
iShACWI 46.58 -.26 MERTele 3.26 -.27
iShNifty50 23.57 +.03 MGE 49.78 +.03
iShNsdqBio 137.02 -.51 MIPSTech 7.59 +.08


MTS 47.52 -.13
MagicJcks 17.22 +.54
MAKO Srg 13.65 -.41
MannKd 1.97 -.02
MarinMid 30.94 -.33
MarvelIT 8.30 -.06
Masimo 20.51 -.12
Mattel 36.44 -.28
MattressF 27.15 -.75
Maximlntg 28.30
MaxwlT 7.16 +.18
MedAssets 16.52 +.01
MedicAcIn 2.72 +.02
MediCo 21.40 +.03
Medivatns 48.80 +.01
MeleoCrwn 15.28 +.11
Mellanox 84.30 -.96
MEMSIC 3.06 -.05
MentorGr 14.47 -.08
MercadoL 73.59 -.66
MergeHIth 3.31 +.03
MeritMed 13.79 +.56
Microchp 29.74 +.04
MicronT 5.68 -.01
MicrosSys 43.67 -.08
MicroSemi 18.31 -.07
Microsoft 27.08 -.31
Micrvisrs 2.43 -.18
Misonix 5.44 +.08
MissnW 9.00 +.05
ModusLnkh 3.25 -.01
Molex 26.29 -.15
Moment 10.32 -.23
Mondelez 25.27 -.24
MonroMuf 33.15 +1.14
MonstrBvs 51.97 +6.09
Motricityh .75 +.01
Move Inc 7.59 -.29
Mylan 27.20 +.21
MyriadG 30.41 -.24
NIC Inc 15.22 +.03
NIl HIdg 5.00 -.05
NPS Phm 9.89 +.17
NXPSemi 23.88 -.10
NasdOMX 23.61 +.07
Natlnstrm 24.43 -.13
NatPenn 9.49 +.01
NektarTh 6.15 -.08
NeptuneTg 2.50 -.81
NetApp 31.31 -.05
NetEase 44.16 +.11
Netfiix 83.08 +1.02
NetSpend 11.27 -.06
NYMigTr 6.53 +.07
NewsCpA 23.93 -.20
NewsCpB 24.51 -.20
NexstarB 10.21 -.95
NorTrst 47.89 -.32
NwstBcsh 11.82 -.01
NovfWrls 1.30 +.09
Novavax 1.88 +.02
NuVasive 14.05 -.32
NuanceCm 21.75 +.18
NuPathe 3.06 +.14
Nvidia 12.16 +.05
NxStageMd 11.56 -.17
OCZTech 1.33 +.19
OReillyAu 92.00 -.46
Oclaro 1.87 -.22
OdysMar 2.73 +.05
OIdDomFs 33.54 +.05
OmniVisn 15.36 +.29
OnSmcnd 6.44 +.22
Oneothyr 4.66 -.05
OnyxPh 75.21 -.79
OpenTxt 56.66 +1.81
OpenTable 45.05 +.27
OpntTch 41.49 +.02
OpbmerPh 10.04 -.18
Oracle 31.22 +.26
OraSure 7.75 -.01
Orexigen 4.73 -.17
OriginAg 1.54 +.10
Orthfx 37.37 +.05
OtterTail 23.90
Overstk 14.97 +.22


PDC Engy 32.42 +.93
PDL Bio 7.64 -.02
PLXTch 4.31 +.06
PMCSra 5.03 +.04
PSS Wrld 28.44 -.08
Paccar 43.17 -.10
PacBbsd 1.59 +.09
PacEthan h .32 +.01
PaciraPhm 16.64 +.40
PanASIv 19.02 -.31
PaneraBrd 160.57 -1.34
ParamTch 19.81 -.05
Parexel 31.82 +.09
Patterson 33.64 +.01
PattUTI 17.00 -.24
Paychex 32.08 -.16
Pendrell 1.05 -.02
PnnNGm 47.71 +1.04
PennantPk 10.42 -.15
PeopUtdF 12.11 +.08
Peregrin h 1.14 +.24
PerfectWd 10.82 -.01
Perrigo 102.20 -.38
PetSmart 69.36 +.35
Pharmacyc 53.48 +.27
PluristemT 3.30 -.20
Polyeom 10.47 +.03
Popularrs 19.14 -.61
Power-One 3.95 -.19
PwShs QQQ 64.96 -.22
PriceTR 64.42 -.53
priceline 636.75 -3.24
PrivateB 16.43 +.07
PrUPQQQs 50.72 -.58
PrognicsPh 2.18 -.09
ProgrsSoft 19.82 -.18
PUShQQQrs42.14 +.43
ProspctCap 10.57 -.18
PureBio rsh .90 +.08
PureCycle 2.58 +.15
QIAGEN 18.40
QlikTechh 18.91 -.25
Qlogic 9.28 +.04
Qualeom 62.26 -.23
QltyDistr 6.17 +.37
QualitySys 18.12 -.08
QuantFu h .82 +.02
Questeor 27.66 -.18
RFMicD 4.23 +.05
RadiSys 2.19
Rambus 4.71 -.09
Randgold 103.93 -1.98
RaptorPhm 4.92 -.08
RealPage 19.54 -.13
Regenrn 174.70 +.31
RentACt 34.45 +.15
Replgn 6.38 +.19
ReprosTh 14.30 -.51
RschMotn 10.72 -1.26
ResponGen 1.25 +.16
Responsys 6.52 +.19
RexEnergy 12.52 -.07
RiverbedT 18.13 +.21
RosttaG rs 4.78 -.36
RosettaR 46.06 -.19
RossStrss 57.05 +.21
Rovi Corp 15.17 +.35
RoyGId 82.85 -.56
rue21 28.52 -.65

SBACom 67.44 +.19
SEI Inv 22.28 -.04
SHFL Ent 13.71 -.28
SLM Cp 16.74 +.01
STEC 4.80 -.15
SVB FnGp 56.43 +.06
SalixPhm 40.55 -.81
SanderFm 48.70 -.47
SanDisk 40.14 -.53
SangBio 5.63 +.16
Sanmina 9.21 -.05
Sanofi rt 1.72 +.02
Santarus 9.91 +.06
Sapient 10.40 -.11
Sareptars 28.75 -2.26


SaientPh 1.15 -.01 TripAdvn 37.77 -.14
Schnitzer 27.15 -.93 TriQuint 4.60 -.01
SciClone 4.30 +.03 TriusTher 5.22 +.31
SciGames 7.75 +.04 TrstNY 5.22 -.06
SeagateT 25.95 -1.40 Trustmk 22.15 -.30
SearsHIdgs 46.05 -.86 USATechh 1.70 +.11
SeattGen 25.27 -.29 UWrdwd 14.11 +.07
SelCmfrt 26.69 +.13 U]iWrld 14.11 +.07
Selectvlns 18.47 -.08 UltaSalon 93.24 +31
Semtech 24.93 +.16 Ultratech 33.01 +.98
Sequenom 4.47 -.04 Umpqua 11.76 -.14
SvcSource 4.81 +.27 Unilife 2.27 -.13
ShandaG s 3.10 -.10 UBWV 24.32 -.57
ShoeCarns 22.10 +.79 UtdNtrIF 52.59 +.89
Shutterfly 28.31 +.93 UtdOnln 5.51 +.12
SifyTech 1.95 +.17 US Enr 1.57 -.05
SigmaAld 72.01 -.21 UtdStat 30.44 +.58
Silicnlmg 4.65 -.17 UtdTherap 52.62 -1.33
SilicnMotn 13.31 -.28 D -.33
Slcnware 5.14 -.11 UnivDisp 23.02 -.09
SilvStdg 13.71 -.42 UnivFor 37.96 +.21
Sina 47.31 +.12 UnwiredP 1.26 -.05
Sindair 11.56 -.04 UranmRsh .35 -.01
SiriusXM 2.70 -.06 UrbanOut 37.65 -.69
SironaDent 62.17 +.17
Skullcandy 7.95 -.31
SkyWest 11.29 +.16 VCAAnt 20.21 -.17
SkywksSol 21.65 +.02 VOXXOInD 6.17 +.03
SmartBal 12.48 +.87 ValueClick 18.47 -.04
SmithWes 10.40 +.53 VanSTCpB 80.35 -.07
SodaStrm 36.38 +1.01 VanlntCpB 88.50 +.28
Sohu.cm 39.54 +1.06 Veeolnst 27.36 +.04
Solazyme 6.72 +.23 VelD 3.67 .03
SonicCorp 10.10 +.25
Sonus 1.48 +.06 VBradley 27.30 -1.12
SouMoBc 24.40 +.30 Verisign 39.87 +.18
Sourcefire 47.56 -.19 Verisk 48.35 -.17
SpectPh 11.27 -.01 VertxPh 39.98 -.52
SpiritAir 16.32 -.21 ViaSat 36.19 +.51
Splunkn 29.06 +.26 ViacomB 50.38 +.25
Spreadtrm 17.83 -.05 Vical 2.99 +.08
Staples 11.79 +.01 VirgnMdah 34.02 -.26
StarSdent 2.91 +.21 ViroPhrm 24.21 +.46
Starbucks 50.21 -.68 MstaPrt 30.35 +.71
SfiDynam 12.53 -.38 ivus 11.41 +.25
StemCells 1.90 -.03 Vodaf
Stericyde 93.41 +.96 Vodafone 25.04 -.22
SMadden 44.40 +.31 Volcano 26.81 -.10
Stratasys 75.65 -.32 Volterra 17.31 +.21
SunesisPh 4.82 -.18 WarnerCh 11.73 -.18
SunPwrh 4.39 +.25 WarrenRs 2.77 +.07
SupcndTch .26 -.02 WashFed 16.22 -.08
SusqBnc 10.15 -.25 Web.com 14.78 +.21
SwisherH If 1.38 -.01 WendysCo 4.65 -.04
SycamNets 2.69 -.01 WernerEnt 21.91 +.37
Symantec 18.02 -.29 WDigital 34.69 -1.12
Symetricm 5.89 -.01 Westrld 9.15
Synaeorn 5.50 +.42 Wstnn g 26.29 -.4
Synapfcs 26.30 +.31 Wsnng 26.29 -41
SynrgyP rs 5.07 +.45 WetSeal 2.88 +.01
Synopsys 32.71 -.13 WholeFd 91.37 -.78
SyntaPhm 7.99 Windstrm 8.31 +.04
Syntrolmh .45 -.02 WisdomTr 6.10 -.02
TICC Cap 9.77 -.14 Woodward 36.22 +.57
TTMTCh 8.50 -.24 WrightM 21.17 -.29
twteleeom 25.42 -.09 Wynn 108.26 +.69
TakeTwo 12.40 +.01 XOMA 2.86 -.12
Tangoe 12.61 -.46 Xlinx 34.09 -.19
TASER 8.72 +.18 Xyratex 9.18 -.41
TechData 44.54 +.67 YRCrs 7.01 .0741
Tellabs 2.86 -.01 YRC rs 7.01 -07
TeslaMot 32.15 -.12 YYIncn 12.20 +.90
TesseraTch 15.77 +.77 Yahoo 18.93 +.18
TetraTc 24.87 -.16 Yandex 22.10 +.09
Texlnst 29.46 -.17 Yongye 5.35 -.05
TexRdhse 16.75 +.17 ZaZaEngy 1.72 -.09
Theravnce 21.64 +.36 Zagg 7.10 -.12
Thoratec 37.89 +.11 Zalicus .71 +.12
ThrshdPhm 4.59 +.13 Zhongpin 12.54 +.04
TibcoSft 25.59 +.01 illow 25.33 -.90
TitanMach 22.50 +.14 ZonBp 19.96 -.75
TiVoInc 10.21 +.06
TowerGrp 16.81 -.47 Zopharm 4.58 +.08
Towerstm 3.16 +.19 Zpcar 7.58 -.31
TractSupp 89.44 -.33 Zogenix 2.68 -.05
TransceptP 5.31 +.62 Zoltek 7.17 -.06
Travelzoo 18.14 +.44 Zumiez 19.83 +.10
TrimbleN 54.47 -.25 Zyngan 2.35 -.05


PAND6RA`
.. ,, ....:. 7 i I :. T


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


RPM 27.72 -.26
RadianGrp 4.23 -.01
PG&ECp 40.54 -.21 RadioShk 2.10 +.14
PHHCorp 21.36 -.14 Ralcorp 88.80 +18.57
PNC 55.03 -.52 RJamesFn 37.40 -.32
PNM Res 20.82 +.14 Rayonier 48.35 -.89
PPG 122.39 -.62 Raytheon 56.11 -.14
PPL Corp 28.81 +.37 Rltylnco 39.45 -.06
PVH Corp 109.29 -1.45 RedHat 48.51 -1.20
PVRPtrs 23.50 +.03 RegalEnt 15.49 +.06
PallCorp 59.45 -1.55 RegionsFn 6.59 -.06
Panasonic 4.83 -.05 Renren 3.39 -.05
Pandora 8.44 -.14 RepubSvc 28.07 -.03
PeabdyE 24.29 -.32 ResMed 41.14 +.63
Pengrthg 5.05 -.11 RetailPrpn 12.33 -.19
PennWstg 10.69 -.05 Revlon 14.91 -.08
Penney 17.52 +.29 ReynAmer 42.92 -.01
Pentair 47.60 -.20 RioTinto 47.20 -.93
PepBoy 10.70 +.13 RiteAid 1.00 -.01
PepeoHold 19.37 +.02 RobtHalf 27.72 -.24
PepsiCo 70.11 +.11 RockwAut 78.49 -.24
Prmian 13.89 +.03 RockColl 56.08 -.41
PetrbrsA 17.67 -.43 RockwdH 43.48 -.01
Petrobras 18.13 -.51 Rowan 30.97 -1.17
Pfizer 24.25 -.24 RylCarb 34.83 -.17
PhilipMor 89.13 -.74 RoyDShllA 66.32 -.45
Phillips66n 50.06 +.50 Royce 12.90 -.02
PiedNG 30.34 +.06 Ryland 33.72 -.05
Pier 1 19.60 -.13
PilgrimsP 6.91 -.13
PimoStrat 11.29 +.19 SAIC 11.52 +.04
PinWst 49.90 +.12 SCANA 45.57 +.12
PioNtrl 104.83 -1.52 SKTIcm 15.28 -.17
PitnyBw 11.00 -.11 SpdrDJIA 128.68 -.84
PlainsEx 33.99 -.04 SpdrGold 168.71 -.72
PlumCrk 41.74 -.29 SPMid 180.01 -.40
Polaris 85.01 +1.55 S&P500ETF140.33 -.72
PostPrp 47.98 +.58 SpdrHome 26.22 -.01
Potash 38.42 +.02 SpdrLehHY 40.26 +.12
PwshDB 27.98 -.04 SpdrS&P RB 27.48 -.27
Praxair 106.31 -.40 SpdrRetl 62.74 +.15
PrinFnd 27.32 -.27 SpdrOGEx 52.30 -.41
ProLogis 33.95 -.35 SpdrMetM 41.73 -.50
ProShtQQQ 25.84 +.08 STMicro 6.00 +.05
ProShtS&P 34.84 +.21 Safeway 16.54 +.13
PrUItQQQs 54.23 -.43 StJoe 22.09 +.09
PrUShQQQ 30.33 +.21 StJude 32.20 +.34
ProUltSP 58.00 -.56 Saks 10.44 +.21
PrUltSP500 82.98 -1.18 Salesforce 156.37 -3.85
PrUVxSTrs 20.56 +.78 SallyBty 24.74 +.09
PrUltCrude 27.04 -.40 SJuanB 13.11 -.33
ProctGam 68.99 -.49 SandRdge 5.57 -.16
ProgsvCp 21.39 -.28 Sanofi 44.39 -.27
PrUShSP rs 56.80 +55 Schlmbrg 69.87 -.56
PrUShL20 rs 60.15 -.42 Schwab 13.03 -.12
ProUSR2K 28.35 +.09 SeadrillLtd 38.46 -.75
PUSSP500rs40.70 +.64 SealAir 16.91 -.27
PrudentI 50.83 -.95 SenHous 22.37 -.22
PSEG 29.78 +.07 Sensient 35.71 +.04
PubSrg 142.72 -2.58 SericeCp 13.88 -.08
PulteGrp 17.11 +.03 SiderurNac 4.78 -.13
PPrlT 5.49 +.03 SigneUwlrs 53.87 +1.71
QEP Res 28.30 -.29 SilvWhtnhg 36.63 -.42
Qihoo360 23.02 -.17 SimonProp 151.021.02 -1.13
QuanexBId 21.28 +.18 Skedichers 19.70 +.64
QuantaSvc 25.11 -.54 SmithAO 61.84 +.10
Questar 19.51 +.08 SmithfF 21.99 -.40
QksilvRes 3.19 -.01 Smucker 86.13 +.10




The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.






Yesterday Pvs Day

Argent 4.8060 4.8210
Australia .9571 .9562
Bahrain .3770 .3769
Brazil 2.0786 2.0817
Britain 1.6018 1.6018
Canada .9943 .9937
Chile 480.58 481.25
China 6.2274 6.2310
Colombia 1819.90 1826.50
Czech Rep 19.58 19.51
Denmark 5.7664 5.7534
Dominican Rep 40.10 39.85
Egypt 6.1079 6.1021
Euro .7732 .7714
Hong Kong 7.7501 7.7501
Hungary 216.88 217.35
India 55.465 55.595
Indnsia 9614.00 9600.00
Israel 3.8589 3.8528
Japan 82.17 82.18
Jordan .7078 .7085
Lebanon 1503.50 1504.50
Malaysia 3.0460 3.0552
Mexico 13.0156 13.0124
N. Zealand 1.2187 1.2167
Norway 5.6940 5.6526
Peru 2.598 2.590
Poland 3.17 3.17
Russia 31.0585 31.0185
Singapore 1.2232 1.2216
So. Africa 8.8377 8.8709
So. Korea 1087.95 1085.82
Sweden 6.6930 6.6135
Switzerlnd .9309 .9287
Taiwan 29.12 29.09
Thailand 30.69 30.68
Turkey 1.7917 1.7958
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6733
Uruguay 19.6199 19.6099
Venzuel 4.2955 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.08
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-Vyear 0.65 0.67
10-year 1.64 1.67
30-year 2.78 2.82



*FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jan 13 87.18 -.56
Corn CBOT Mar 13 764 +12/4
Wheat CBOT Mar 13 8881/2 +2434
Soybeans CBOT Jan 13 14491/4 +24/2
Cattle CME Feb 13 132.32 -.08
Sugar (world) ICE Mar13 19.23 +.08
Orange Juice ICE Jan 13 126.05 -1.40



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1742.20 $1723.20
Silver (troy oz., spot) $33.982 ?32.923
Copper(pound) $3.b36b $3.b1bO
Platinum (troy oz., spot)16bi8.bO $1b/3.OO

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


WkFree Gift with Purchase
255 E. Highland Blvd. For the Month of December
Inverness, FL 34452
352.726.4709 PANDORA holiday ornament.*
Mon-Fri: 9:30-5:30 Sat: 9:30-5 *See our store for details
US Pat No 7,007,07-0 202 Pandora I elry, LLC All r.ghl rs ed PANDORA.NET


OD9a3N


. ..........


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... ... ... 3.79 -.03 -54.1 McDnlds 3.08 3.6 16 85.92 -.32 -14.4
AT&T Inc 1.80 5.4 44 33.62 -.35 +11.2 Microsoft .92 3.4 15 27.08 -.31 +4.3
Ameteks .24 .7 20 36.65 -.60 +30.6 MotrlaSolu 1.04 1.9 23 54.03 -.57 +16.7
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 ... 86.12 -.59 +41.2 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 13 67.82 -.14 +11.4
BkofAm .04 .4 25 9.66 -.18 +73.7 Penney ... ... 17.52 +.29 -50.2
CapCtyBk ... ...... 10.90 -.07 +14.1 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 15 17.69 -.03 +3.8
CntryLink 2.90 7.5 35 38.52 +.12 +3.5 RegionsFn .04 .6 12 6.59 -.06 +53.3
Citigroup .04 .1 11 35.04 -.53 +33.2 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 46.05 -.86 +44.9
CmwREIT 1.00 6.6 27 15.05 +.18 -9.6 Smucker 2.08 2.4 20 86.13 +.10 +10.2
Disney .60 1.2 16 48.60 -.43 +29.6 SprintNex ... ....... 5.63 +.01+140.6
DukeEn rs 3.06 5.0 17 61.59 +.28 ... Texlnst .84 2.9 19 29.46 -.17 +1.2
EPR Prop 3.00 6.8 20 44.25 -.48 +1.2 TimeWarn 1.04 2.2 17 46.60 +.08 +28.9
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.6 11 87.35 -1.27 +3.1 UniFirst .15 .2 15 70.46 -.39 +24.2
FordM .20 1.8 9 11.10 -.01 +3.2 VerizonCm 2.06 4.8 40 42.98 -.32 +7.1
GenElec .68 3.3 16 20.87 -.19 +16.5 Vodafone 1.54 6.2 ... 25.04 -.22 -10.7
HomeDp 1.16 1.8 23 64.16 -.22 +52.6 WalMart 1.59 2.3 14 69.50 -.41 +16.3
Intel .90 4.5 9 19.93 +.05 -17.8 Walgrn 1.10 3.3 14 33.03 -.04 -.1
IBM 3.40 1.8 13191.23 -1.65 +4.0 YRC rs ... ... ... 7.01 -.07 -29.7
Lowes .64 1.8 21 35.34 -.01 +39.2


bi


A8 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 A9


I MUTUALFUNDS II


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: MultCGrA 8.41 -.04
Balancp 16.90 -.04 InBosA 5.92 +.01
RetInc 8.99 +.01 LgCpVal 19.11 -.13
Alger Funds B: NatlMunlnc 10.51 +.01
SmCapGr 6.82 -.02 SpEqtA 15.83 -.03
AllianceBern A: TradGvA 7.37 +.02
GblRiskp 17.55 -.01 EatonVance B:
GIbThGrAp63.51 -.12 HIthSBt 10.36 -.03
HighlncoAp 9.39 +.02 NatlMulnc 10.51 +.01
SmCpGrA 37.69 -.23 EatonVance C:
AllianceBern Adv: GovtC p 7.35 +.01
LgCpGrAd 30.10 -.21 NatMunlnc 10.51 +.01
AllianceBern B: Eaton Vance I:
GIbThGrBt 54.36 -.10 FltgRt 9.09
GrowthBt 27.16 -.16 GblMacAbR 9.76 +.01
SCpGrBt 29.99 -.18 LgCapVal 19.17 -.12
AllianceBern C: FMI Funds:
SCpGrCt 30.16 -.18 LgCappn 16.82 -.06
Allianz Fds Insti: FPA Funds:
NFJDvVI 12.52 -.07 Newlnco 10.62
SmCpVI 31.36 -.01 FPACres 28.50 -.07
Allianz Funds C: Fairholme 29.72 -.35
AGICGrthC 26.47 -.08 Federated A:
Amer Beacon Insti: MidGrStA 34.95 -.15
LgCaplnst 21.25 -.12 MuSecA 10.97 +.01
Amer Beacon Inv: Federated Instl:
LgCaplnv 20.12 -.11 KaufmnR 5.19 -.01
Amer Century Adv: TotRetBd 11.63 +.02
EqGroAp 24.01 -.15 StrValDvS 4.99 -.01
EqlncAp 7.82 -.03 Fidelity Adv FocT:
Amer Centuryl nv: EnergyT 35.05 -.29
AIICapGr 30.53 -.12 HItCarT 22.86 -.08
Balanced 17.35 -.05 Fidelity Advisor A:
DivBnd 11.28 +.02 Nwlnsghp 22.48 -.08
Eqlnc 7.82 -.03 StrlnA 12.75 +.02
Growth 27.56 -.08 Fidelity Advisor C:
Heritagel 22.31 -.11 Nwlnsghtn21.17 -.08
IncGro 26.93 -.15 Fidelity Advisor I:
InfAdjBd 13.50 +.03 EqGrln 64.99 -.25
IntDisc 9.94 ... Eqlni n 26.00 -.12
InfiGrol 11.13 +.02 FItRatel n 9.92 +.01
New Opp 8.09 -.02 IntBdl n 11.75 +.01
OneChAg 13.11 -.02 NwlnsgtlIn 22.80 -.09
OneChMd 12.57 -.02 StrIlnin 12.90 +.02
RealEsti 22.75 -.13 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 25.77 -.11 BalancT 16.48 -.05
Valuelnv 6.24 -.03 DivGrTp 13.06 -.04
American Funds A: EqGrTp 60.58 -.25
AmcpAp 21.12 -.07 EqInT 25.59 -.12
AMuiAp 27.98 -.09 GrOppT 41.05 -.14
BalAp 20.11 -.06 HilnAdTp 10.26 +.02
BondAp 12.97 +.02 IntBdT 11.73 +.01
CaplBAp 52.65 -.11 MulncTp 13.98 +.02
CapWGAp 36.27 -.08 OvrseaT 17.35 +.01
CapWAp 21.52 -.01 STFiT 9.35
EupacAp 40.24 +.03 Fidelity Freedom:
FdInvAp 39.91 -.14 FF2010n 14.25 -.01
GIblBalA 26.44 -.04 FF2010K 13.06
GovtAp 14.59 +01 FF2015n 11.91 -.01
GwthAp 33.66 -.10 FF2015K 13.12 -.01
HITrAp 11.23 +.02 FF2020n 14.41 -.01
IncoAp 17.95 -.03 FF2020K 13.54 -.01
IntBdAp 13.78 +.01 FF2025n 11.99 -.02
InfiGrlncAp 30.48 -.04 FF2025K 13.67 -.02
ICAAp 30.24 -.12 FF2030n 14.28 -.01
LtTEBAp 16.49 +.01 FF2030K 13.81 -.02
NEcoAp 28.49 -.05 FF2035n 11.80 -.02
NPerAp 30.54 -.05 FF2035K 13.88 -.02
NwWrldA 52.75 +.01 FF2040n 8.24 -.01
STBFAp 10.08 ... FF2040K 13.91 -.03
SmCpAp 38.86 -.06 FF2045K 14.06 -.03
TxExAp 13.34 +01 Fidelity Invest:
WshAp 30.81 -.15 AIISectEq 12.85 -.05
Ariel Investments: AMgr50n 16.27 -.01
Apprec 39.47 -.11 AMgr70rn 17.23 -.03
Ariel 49.61 -.09 AMgr20rn 13.34
Artisan Funds: Balanc n 20.01 -.06
Inf 23.98 +.03 BalancedK 20.01 -.05
Infilnstf 24.15 +.03 BlueChGrn 49.04 -.13
InfiVal r 29.60 +.06 BluChpGrK 49.10 -.13
MidCap 38.04 -.16 CAMunn 13.13 +.01
MidCapVal 21.28 -.06 Canadan 53.07 -.44
BBH Funds: CapApn 29.45 -.12
CorSeIN 17.49 -.08 CapDevOn 11.78 -.04
Baron Funds: Cplnc rn 9.37 +.02
Asset 51.15 -.26 ChinaRgr 29.40
Growth 58.31 -.05 CngS 465.09
SmallCap 26.02 -.03 CTMunrn 12.25 +.01
Bernstein Fds: Contran 77.15 -.31
IntDur 14.26 +.01 ContraK 77.18 -.31
DivMu 15.00 +.01 CnvScn 24.88 -.04
TxMgdlni 13.52 -.06 DisEqn 24.33 -.09
Berwyn Funds: DiscEqF 24.34 -.08
Fund 32.03 -.04 Divlntl n 29.39
BlackRockA: DivrslntKr 29.38 -.01
EqtyDiv 19.59 -.08 DivSkOn 17.12 -.07
GIAIAr 19.40 -.06 DivGthn 29.57 -.10
HiYInvA 7.97 +.01 EmergAsrn28.85 +.09
InfiOpAp 31.73 -.10 EmrMkn 22.28 +.04
BlackRock B&C: EqIncn 46.29 -.21
GIAICt 18.02 -.06 EQIIn 19.27 -.10
BlackRock InstI: ECapAp 18.42 -.01
EquityDv 19.64 -.08 Europe 30.45 -.05
GIbAllocr 19.51 -.06 Exch 323.88
HiYdBd 7.97 +.01 Exportn 22.38 -.14
BruceFund400.18 -.08 Fideln 35.38 -.18
Buffalo Funds: Fiftyrn 19.79 -.11
SmCap n 28.46 -.04 FItRateHi r n 9.93 +.01
CGM Funds: FrlnOnen 29.02 -.09
Focusn 27.72 .14 GNMAn 11.78 .
Mutsn 27.75 -.14 Govtlnc 10.64 +.01
Realty n 28.23 -.20 GroCo n 94.66 .41
Calamos Funds: Grolncn 20.79 -.10
GrwthAp 50.30 -.27 GrowCoF 94.71 -.41
Grow-2 CoK 94.69 -.41
Calvert Invest: Gzr9rat r n 202 .0
Inco p 16.64 +.02 HighnStratn 20.25 +.0
InfiEqAp 13.65 Hgnc r n 925 +
SocialAp 30.39-.05 Indepnn 25.07 -.10
Ap InProBdn 1358 +.01
SocBdp 16.63 +.02 IntBdn 11.16 +.01
SocEqAp 37.74 -.19 IntGovn 10.0 +.01
TxF Lgp 16.88 +.02 InInMuVn 10.77 +.01
Cohen & Steers: InMuDs n 32 +.013
RltyShrs 66.47 -.32 InfiSCprn 19.77
ColumbiaClass A: InvGrBds n 1170 +01
Acornt 29.78 -.05 InvGrBdn .02 +01
DivOpptyA 8.59 -.03 Japan r 9.46 .05
LgCapGrA t 26.47 -.10 JpnSm n 8.86 -.02
LgCorQAp 6.45 -.04 LgCapVal 11.12 -.05
MdCpGrOp 9.85 -.06 LatAm 47.87 -.43
MidCVIOpp 8.19 LevStkn 3058 -12
PBModAp 11.25 -.02 LowPrn 38.79 -.09
TxEAp 14.52 +.02 LowPriKr 38.77 -.09
FrontierA 10.69 -.04 Magelln n7259 -.36
GlobTech 20.30 -.11 MDMurn 11.80 +.01
Columbia ClI,T&G: MAMunn 12.99 +.02
EmMktOpl n 8.47 -.01 MegaCpStk nl.68 -.06
Columbia Class Z: MIMunn 12.69 +.01
AcornZ 30.91 -.05 MidCapn 29.12 -.12
AcornlntZ 40.10 +.03 MNMunn 12.16 +.01
DivlncoZ 14.68 -.08 MtgSecn 11.36 +.01
IntTEBd 11.15 +.01 Munilncn 13.77 +.02
SelLgCapG 13.50 -.03 NJMunrn 12.49 +.02
ValRestr 48.88 -.21 NwMktrn 17.88 +.08
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMilln 32.39 -.15
ComRett 8.31 +.05 NYMunn 13.93 +.02
DFA Funds: OTC n 59.01 -.02
InfiCorEqn 10.10 -.05 OhMunn 12.60 +.01
USCorEql n12.07 -.04 100ndex 10.06 -.06
USCorEq2 nl.93 -.05 Ovrsealn 31.68 -.01
DWS Invest A: PcBas n 24.87 +.04
CommAp 18.85 -.12 PAMunrn 11.66 +.01
DWS InvestS: Puritn n 19.34 -.04
CoreEqtyS 17.91 -.14 PuritanK 19.33 -.05
CorPlIsnc 11.27 +01 RealEIncr 11.48 -.01
EmMkGrr 15.85 -.01 RealEn 31.03 -.20
EnhEmMk 11.25 +.06 SAIISecEqF 12.87 -.06
EnhGIbBdr 10.44 +.02 SCmdtyStrtn9.12 +.04
GIbSmCGr 38.40 -.06 SCmdtyStrFn9.15 +.04
GIblThem 22.15 -.10 SrEmrgMkt 16.15 -.04
Gold&Prc 14.28 -.30 SEmgMktF 16.21 -.04
HiYldTx 13.34 +.03 SrslntGrw 11.64
IntTxAMT 12.37 +.01 SerlnfiGrF 11.68
Intl FdS 41.89 -.22 SrslntVal 9.24 -.02
LgCpFoGr 32.74 -.18 SerInfiVaIF 9.27 -.02
LatAmrEq 39.47 -.31 SrlnvGrdF 11.71 +.02
MgdMuniS 9.75 +.02 StlntMun 10.91
MATFS 15.59 +.03 STBFn 8.60 +01
SP500S 18.70 -.10 SmCapDiscn23.16 +.01
WorldDiv 23.56 -.05 SmllCpSrn 17.57 -.04
Davis Funds A: SCpValur 15.45 +.01
NYVenA 35.36 -.14 SlSelLCVrnll.53 -.05
Davis Funds B: S-0 SlcACapn27.74 -.10
NYVenB 33.56 -.14 SSelSmCp 19.53 -.02
Davis Funds C: Skatlncn 11.41 +.01
NYVenC 33.90 -.14 SCrReRtr 9.74 +.01
Davis FundsV: TaxFrBrn 11.89 +.02
NYVenY 35.80 -.14 TotalBdn 11.04 +.01
Delaware Invest A: Trendn 78.19 -.24
Diverlncp 9.44 +.01 USBIn 11.94 +.01
SMIDCapG 23.85 -.04 Utilityn 18.27 .04
TxUSAp 12.50 +.03 ValStratn 30.52 -.10
Delaware Invest B: Valuen 73.94 -.18
SelGrBt 34.35 -.05 Wridwn 19.92 -.06
Dimensional Fds: Fidelity Selects:
EmMCrEqn19.02 -.07 Aimn 38.99 -.11
EmMktV 28.08 -.11 Banking n 19.02 -.17
IntSmVan 15.19 .06 Biotchn 110.34 -.33
LargeCo 11.08 -.05 Brokrn 48.52 -.16
TAUSCorE2 n9.71 -.04 Chem n 114.97 -.11
USLgVan 22.04 -.14 ComEquipn22.17 -.10
USMicron 14.71 ... Compn 60.22 -.41
USTgdVal 17.24 -.01 ConDisn 27.75 -.06
US Small n 22.98 -.02 ConsuFnn 14.38 -.11
USSmVa 26.48 -.02 ConStapn 82.36 +.03
InfiSmCon 15.22 -.05 CstHon 47.98 -.08
EmMktSCn20.40 -.04 DfAern 84.65 +.03
EmgMktn 26.05 -.09 Elecfrn 43.18
Fixdn 10.35 ... Enrgyn 50.12 -.42
IntGFxlnn 13.19 +.01 EngSvn 64.01 -.45
IntVan 15.66 -.11 EnvAltEnrnl6.22 +.02
InfProSec 13.00 +.02 FinSvn 59.73 -.28
GIb5Fxlnc nill.30 ... Gold r n 38.34 -.81
2YGIFxdn 10.14 Healiln 143.07 -.55
DFARIEn 25.60 -.13 Insurn 52.00 -.28
Dodge&Cox: Leisrn 102.22 +.30
Balanced 75.81 -.35 Materialn 70.10 -.34


GblStock 8.80 -06 MedDIn 58.98 -.22
Income 13.94 +.01 MdEqSysn 28.27 -.17
IntStk 33.07 -.17 Multmdn 55.11 -.30
Stock 117.02 -.79 NtGasn 30.23 -.19
DoubleUne Funds: Pharmn 15.14 -.06
TRBdI 11.40 Retail 64.18 -.19
TRBd Np 11.39 Softwrn 83.74 -.20
Dreyfus: Tech n 99.24 -.26
Aprec 43.78 -.22 Telcm n 49.96 -.24
CTA 12.63 +.02 Transn 51.43
CorVA UtilGr n 55.42 +.05
Dreyf 9.64 -.05 Wireless n 8.10 -.06
DryMidr 29.30 -.06 Fidelity Spartan:
GNMA 16.12 5001dxlnvn 49.74 -.25
GrChinaAr 33.51 -.15 5001dxl 49.74 -.26
HiYldAp 6.57 +.01 Intllnxnvn 33.43 -.08
StratValA 30.04 -.14 TotMktlnv n 40.83 -.18
TechGroA 33.01 -.23 USBondl 11.94 +.01
DreihsAclnc 10.58 +.02 Fidelity Spart Adv:
Driehaus Funds: ExMktAdr n39.66 -.07
EMktGr 28.91 -.01 5001dxAdvn49.74 -.26
EVPTxMEml46.48 -.16 IntAdrn 33.45 -.09
Eaton Vance A: TotMktAd r n40.84 -.18
ChinaAp 17.71 -.06 USBondl 11.94 +.01
AMTFMuInc 10.78 +.02


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.16 -.04
OverseasA 22.35 +.02
First Investors A
BIChpAp ...
Eqtylnco p 7.53 -.03
GloblAp 6.75 -.02
GovtAp 11.40
GrolnAp 16.39 -.06
IncoAp 2.60 +.01
MATFAp 12.77 +.03
MITFAp 13.11 +.01
NJTFAp 13.96 +.02
NYTFAp 15.53 +.01
OppAp 29.76 -.03
PATFAp 14.04 +.02
SpSitAp 23.84 -.02
TxExlncop 10.46 +.02
TotRtAp 16.70 -.03
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.19
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.88
ALTFAp 12.10
AZTFAp 11.68 +.01
CallnsAp 13.21 +.01
CAIntAp 12.36 +.01
CalTFAp 7.66 +.01
COTFAp 12.66 +.01
CTTFAp 11.63 +.01
CvtScAp 14.92 -.03
DblTFA 12.40 +.02
DynTchA 32.45 -.15
EqlncAp 17.81 -.07
Fedlntp 12.76 +.02
FedTFAp 12.99 +.02
FLTFAp 12.17 +.02
FoundAlp 10.93 -.02
GATFAp 13.02 +.01
GoldPrMA 31.65 -.67
GrwthA p 49.58 -.11
HYTFAp 11.15 +.02
HilncA 2.06 +.01
IncomAp 2.18 -.01
InsTFAp 12.82 +.02
NYITF p 12.13 +.01
LATFAp 12.25 +.02
LMGvScA 10.28
MDTFAp 12.20 +.02
MATFAp 12.44 +.02
MITFAp 12.50 +.01
MNInsA 13.18 +.01
MOTFAp 12.97 +.02
NJTFAp 12.84 +.02
NYTFAp 12.35 +.01
NCTFAp 13.16 +.02
OhiolAp 13.36 +.02
ORTFAp 12.81 +.02
PATFAp 11.14 +.01
ReEScAp 16.31 -.09
RisDvAp 37.60 -.19
SMCpGrA 36.26 -.15
Stratlncp 10.72 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.53 +.01
USGovA p 6.83
UilsAp 13.50 +.03
VATFAp 12.48 +.02
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 13.52
IncmeAd 2.17
TGIbTRAdv 13.70 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.20 -.01
USGvCt 6.79
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.96 -.05
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 22.70 -.08
ForgnAp 6.53 -.01
GIBdAp 13.56
GrwthAp 18.76 -.06
WorldAp 15.58 -.05
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.03 -.08
ForgnC p 6.36 -.01
GIBdCp 13.59
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.39 -.02
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S lnc 12.09 +.01
USEqty 44.10 -.21
GMOTrust:
USTreas x 25.00
GMOTrust III:
CHIE 22.85 -.06
Quality 23.08 -.07
GMOTrust IV:
InfilntrVi 20.16 -.13
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.11 -.07
InfiCorEq 27.49 -.15
Quality 23.10 -.07
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.28 -.08
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 37.91 -.11
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.44 -.13
HiYield 7.33 +.01
HYMuni n 9.54 +.01
MidCapV 38.30 -.11
ShtDrTF n 10.69
Harbor Funds:
Bond 13.06 +.02
CapAplnst 41.81 -.17
Infilnv t 59.56 -.32
Infl r 60.29 -.31
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.87 -.05
DivGthAp 20.25 -.09
IntOpAp 14.57 -.06
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 32.95 -.05
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.01 -.14
Div&Gr 21.43 -.10
Balanced 21.15 -.07
MidCap 27.81 -.09
TotRetBd 11.93 +.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 11.08 +.01
ICON Fds:
Energy S 18.59 -.15
HIthcareS 17.27 -.09
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.96
IVA Funds:
WldwideIr 16.24 -.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.43 -.04
Invesco Funds:
Energy 36.239 -.31
Ulifies 16.91 +.05
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.94 -.01
Chart p 17.75 -.08
CmstkA 17.17 -.08
Constp 23.43 -.13
DivrsDivp 13.44 -.04
EqIncA 9.09 -.03
GrIncAp 20.58 -.10
HilncMu p
HiYld p 4.36 +.01
HYMuA 10.27 +.02
InfiGrow 28.12 -.07
MunilnA 14.16 +.02
PATFA 17.33 +.02
US MortgA 13.02
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 14.13 +.01
USMortg 12.96 +.01
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 13.04
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 24.69 +.03
AssetStA p 25.58 +.03
AssetSrl r 25.85 +.04
HilncA p 8.54 +.01
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.15 +.01
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.20 +.01
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 28.14 -.08
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondn 12.15 +.01
ShtDurBd 11.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.24 -.06
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.14 +.01
HighYldn 8.12 +.01
lntnTFBdn 11.51 +.01
LgCpGr 23.79 -.09
ShtDurBdn 11.01
USLCCrPIsn22.82 -.12
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.76 -.04
ContrarnT 14.29 -.03
EnterprT 64.91 -.14
FIxBndT 11.03
GlUfeSciTr 30.31 -.16
GIbSel T 9.45 -.01
GITechTr 18.13 -.03
Grw&lncT 33.42 -.13
Janus T 31.39 -.10
OvrseasTr 31.76
PrkMCVal T21.61 -.09
ResearchT 31.74 -.10
ShTmBdT 3.10
TwentyT 61.15 -.23
VentureT 58.44 -.04
WrldWTr 44.71 -.08
John Hancock A:


BondAp 16.42 +.02
IncomeA p 6.69
RgBkA 14.37 -.11
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.69
John Hancock Cl1:
LSAggr 12.62 -.05
LSBalanc 13.43 -.03
LSConsrv 13.48
LSGrwth 13.34 -.04
LSModer 13.30 -.02
Lazard InstI:
EmgMktl 19.11 -.04


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.51 -.05
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 125.57 -1.07
CBApprp 15.72 -.08
CBLCGrp 23.85 -.10
GCIAIICOp 8.77 +.01
WAHilncAt 6.19 +.01
WAMgMup 17.55 +.03
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.63 -.09
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.39 -.10
CMValTrp 41.40 -.19
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 25.90 -.15
SmCap 27.93 -.01
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.01 -.01
StrlncC 15.35 +.02
LSBondR 14.95
StrlncA 15.26 +.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.79 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.80 +.02
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.67 -.07
FundlEq 12.80 -.06
BdDebAp 8.04 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.64
MidCpAp 17.39 -.05
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.67
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.64
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.55 -.10
MIGA 17.44 -.02
EmGA 47.63 -.15
HilnA 3.55 +.01
MFLA
TotRA 15.04 -.04
UtilA 18.09 -.05
ValueA 25.07 -.12
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.59 -.03
GvScBn 10.51 +.01
HilnBn 3.55
MulnBn 9.19 +.02
TotRBn 15.05 -.04
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.19 -.12
MFS Funds InstI:
InfiEqn 18.41 -.03
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.09 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.91 -.03
GovtBt 9.00
HYIdBBt 6.06 +.01
IncmBldr 17.47 -.01
InfiEqB 10.72 +.06
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.35 -.23
Mairs & Power:
Growthn 83.38 -.18
Managers Funds:
Yacktman p n18.94 -.08
YacktFocn 20.37 -.08
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.50 -.03
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.20 -.07
AsianGllnv 18.11 +.03
Indialnvr 17.12 +.18
PacTgrlnv 23.55 -.10
MergerFdn 15.89 -.02
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 11.10 +.01
TotRtBdl 11.09 +.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.70 -.07
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.60 -.06
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 14.81
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 14.15 +.03
MCapGrl 34.67 -.11
Muhlenkn 55.57 -.16
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.26 -.11
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 31.71 -.11
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.10 -.03
GblDiscA 29.42 -.09
GIbDiscZ 29.86 -.09
QuestZ 17.57 -.03
SharesZ 22.18 -.06
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.13 -.06
Geneslnst 50.27 -.09
Infir 16.97 +.01
LgCapV lnv 27.17 -.23
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 52.06 -.10
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.84 +.02
Nicholasn 49.12 -.13
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.09 +.01
HiYFxlnc 7.45 +.01
IntTxEx 11.13 +.01
SmCpldx 8.99 -.01
Stkldx 17.42 -.09
Technly 15.34 -.07
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 17.36 +.04
LtMBAp 11.31
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.48
HYMunBd 17.36 +.04
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.14 -.12
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 42.33 -.15
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 28.99 -.08
Globall 22.29 -.05
IntlIr 19.87 +.03
Oakmark 48.86 -.25
Select 32.32 -.22
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.58
GIbSMdCap 14.85 -.04
LgCapStrat 9.75 -.02
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMux 7.44 +.01
AMTFrNYx 12.57 +.02
CAMuniApx 8.99 +.02
CapApAp 47.96 -.16
CaplncAp 9.21 -.01
DvMktAp 33.88 -.06
Discp 62.12 -.18
EquityA 9.42 -.05
EqlncAp 25.20 -.09
GlobAp 62.11 -.20
GIbOppA 28.20 -.01
GblStrlncA 4.32
Gold p 33.03 -.66
IntBdA p 6.55 +.01
LtdTmMux 15.29 +.01
MnStFdA 36.77 -.16
PAMuniA px 11.69 +.02
SenFltRtA 8.27
USGv p 9.83
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMux 7.40 +.01
AMTFrNYx 12.58 +.03
CplncB t 9.01 -.01
EquityB 8.63 -.04
GblStrlncB 4.34 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYApx 3.43
RoMuApx 17.28 +.03
RcNtMuAx 7.73 +.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.58 -.06
InfiBdY 6.55 +.01
IntGrowY 29.93 +.06
Osterweis Funds:
Stklncon 11.71 +.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.90 ...
TotRtAd 11.60 +.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 11.29 +.02
AIIAsset 12.74 +.01
ComodRR 6.94 +.04
Divlnc 12.26 +.03
EmgMkCur 10.48
EmMkBd 12.41 +.05
Fltlnc r 8.87 +.01
ForBdUnr 11.42 -.02
FrgnBd 11.37 +.01
HiYld 9.55 +.01
InvGrCp 11.36 +.02
LowDu 10.64 +.01
ModDur 11.17 +.01
RealRtnIl 12.65 +.02
ShortT 9.90
TotRt 11.60 +.02
TRII 11.15 +.02
TRIll 10.21 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIlAstAutt 11.22 +.02
LwDurA 10.64 +.01
RealRtAp 12.65 +02
TotRtA 11.60 +.02
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 11.10 +.02
RealRtCp 12.65 +.02
TotRtCt 11.60 +.02
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.65 +.02


TRtnp 11.60 +.02
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP11.28 +.02
TotRtnP 11.60 +.02
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.06 -.08
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.15 -.13
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.96 +.01
InfiValA 18.33 -.10
PionFdApe 31.92 -9.49
ValueAp 11.76 -.09


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.29
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.39
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.26
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.77 -.05
BIChipn 45.02 -.16
CABondn 11.74 +.02
CapAppn 23.22 -.04
DivGron 25.97 -.14
EmMktBn 14.20 +.07
EmEurop 18.00 -.16
EmMktS n 32.27 -.06
Eqlncn 25.84 -.12
Eqlndexn 37.82 -.19
Europe n 15.56 -.07
GNMAn 10.02
Growth n 37.16 -.12
Gr&lnn 22.30 -.10
HIthSci n 42.09 -.18
HiYield n 6.87 +.01
InsiCpG 18.46 -.05
InstHiYld n 9.68 +.02
MCEqGrn 29.86 -.18
IntlBondn 10.07 -.02
IntDisn 45.13 -.01
Intl G&I 12.61 -.05
InfiStkn 13.96 -.01
Japan n 7.73 -.02
LatAm n 39.60 -.42
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 11.26 +.01
MidCapn 58.33 -.34
MCapVal n 24.74 -.07
NAmern 35.36 -.14
N Asian 16.45 +.01
NewEran 42.17 -.32
N Horizn 34.90 -.13
N Incn 9.96 +.01
NYBondn 12.14 +.01
OverS SFn 8.27 -.03
PSIncn 17.12 -.02
RealAssetr nlO.89 -.08
RealEstn 20.31 -.08
R2010n 16.57 -.03
R2015n 12.88 -.03
R2020n 17.83 -.05
R2025 n 13.05 -.04
R2030on 18.74 -.06
R2035n 13.25 -.04
R2040M n 18.84 -.06
R2045P n 12.55 -.04
SciTecn 26.10 -.02
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStk n 35.32 -.11
SmCapVal n38.54 -.10
SpecGrn 19.24 -.06
Speclnn 12.95
TFIncn 10.77 +.02
TxFrH n 12.09 +.02
TxFrSI n 5.73 +.01
USTIntn 6.31 +.01
USTLgn 14.13 +.05
VABondn 12.52 +.01
Value n 25.91 -.11
Principal Inv:
Divlnfillnst 9.90 -.04
LgCGIlIn 10.09 -.04
LT20201n 12.60 -.03
LT20301n 12.42 -.04
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.98 -.10
HiYldAp 5.63
MuHilncA 10.51 +.02
UtilityA 11.63
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 17.93 -.07
HiYIdBt 5.63 +.01
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 32.63 -.19
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.20 +.01
AZ TE 9.67 +.01
ConvSec 20.09 -.02
DvrlnAp 7.62
EqlnAp 16.99 -.08
EuEq 19.61 -.07
GeoBalA 13.15 -.04
GIbEqtyp 9.33 -.04
GrInAp 14.33 -.08
GIblHIthA 46.50 -.17
HiYdAp 7.83 +.01
HiYId In 6.09 +.01
IncmAp 7.26 +.01
IntGrln p 9.38 -.06
InvAp 14.37 -.08
NJTxAp 10.02 +.02
MuliCpGr 54.55 -.18
PATE 9.68 +.01
TxExAp 9.21 +.01
TFInA p 15.97 +.02
TFHYA 12.92 +.02
USGvAp 13.57 +.01
GIblUtilA 10.12 -.02
VoyAp 21.48 -.09
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.98 +.02
DvrlnBt 7.55 -.01
Eqlnct 16.83 -.08
EuEq 18.72 -.07
GeoBalB 13.00 -.04
GIbEqt 8.39 -.03
GINtRst 17.16 -.14
GrInBt 14.06 -.08
GIblHIthB 36.97 -.14
HiYldBt 7.82 +.01
HYAdBt 5.96 +.01
IncmBt 7.19 +.01
IntGrIn t 9.27 -.05
InfiGrtht 13.96 -.07
InvBt 12.87 -.08
NJTxBd t 10.01 +.02
MuldtCpGr 46.51 -.15
TxExBt 9.21 +.01
TFHYBt 12.95 +.03
USGvBt 13.50 +.01
GlblUtilB 10.08 -.02
VoyBt 18.00 -.07
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.22 -.08
LgCAIphaA 43.67 -.31
Value 25.64 -.17
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAu p 11.50 -.02
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 14.85
PennMulr 11.75 -.03
Premierl r 20.09 -.11
TotRetl r 13.95 -.04
ValSvcet 11.56 -.09
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.54 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.00 -.06
SEI Portfolios:
S&P500En 38.62 -.20
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.40 +.01
Schwab Funds:
HIlthCare 20.69 -.08
0lOOOnvr 40.00 -.19
S&P Sel 22.20 -.11
SmCpSI 21.00 -.03
TSMSelr 25.64 -.12
Scout Funds:
Infl 32.15 -.01
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.12 -.19
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.45 -.17
Sequoia 163.54 -.92
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.13 -.17
SoSunSClnv t n22.34-.09
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 54.86 -.35
Stratton Funds:
Mulfi-Cap 36.76 -.10
RealEstate 30.19 -.15
SmCap 54.85 +.12
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.21
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.37 +.03
TotRetBdl 10.31
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.04 +.01
Eqldxlnst 10.78 -.04
InDiEqllnst 15.82 -.08
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 19.09 -.01
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 16.07 +.04
REVallnstr 26.57 -.03
Valuelnst 48.56 -.07
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.53
IncBuildAt 18.47 -.06
IncBuildCp 18.47 -.06
IntValuel 27.14 +.01
LtTMul 14.76
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.00 +.01
Income 9.35 +.01
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 66.84 -1.23
Transamerica A:
AegonHYB px 9.56 -.03
Flexlncpx 9.35 -.03
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 34.67 -.10
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 25.17 +.04
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.04 -.03


ChinaReg 7.37
GlbRs 9.80 -.08
Gld&Mtls 12.19 -.20
WdPrcMn 11.96 -.23
USAA Group:
AgvGt 35.77 -.14
CABd 11.27 +.02
CrnstStr 23.12 -.05
GovSec 10.34
GrTxStr 14.67 -.02
Growth 16.57 -.05
Gr&lnc 15.87 -.08
IncStk 13.42 -.07


Name NAV Chg
Inco 13.59 +.01
Inf 24.97 +.03
NYBd 12.72 +.02
PrecMM 28.20 -.61
SciTech 14.41 -.02
ShtTBnd 9.29 +.01
SmCpStk 14.62 -.03
TxElt 13.89 +.02
TxELT 14.13 +.02
TxESh 10.86
VABd 11.79 +.01
WIdGr 20.99
VALIC :
MdCpldx 21.17 -.04
Stkldx 26.40 -.14
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.46 -.05
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.56 -.06
CAITAdmn 11.90 +.01
CALTAdmnl12.21 +.02
CpOpAdl n 77.98 -.26
EMAdmr rn 34.58 -.17
Energyn 110.64 -1.06
EqlnAdm n n50.14 -.24
EuroAdml n 57.77 -.33
ExplAdml n 73.47 -.11
ExtdAdm n 44.60 -.08
500Adml n 129.46 -.67
GNMA Ad n 11.00
GrwAdmrn 36.33 -.14
HlthCrn 61.30 -.24
HiYldCp n 6.03
InfProAdn 29.38 +.06
ITBdAdml n 12.21 +.02
ITsryAdml n 11.82 +.02
IntGrAdm n 59.13 -.25
ITAdmlIn 14.56 +.01
ITGrAdrnmn 10.49 +.02
LtdTrAdn 11.20
LTGrAdmln11.09 +.04
LTAdmln 11.99 +.02
MCpAdml n 99.60 -.35
MorgAdrn 61.20 -.27
MuHYAdm n11.45 +.02
NYLTAdn 12.01 +.02
PrmCaprn 71.61 -.31
PALTAdrnm nll.90 +.01
ReitAdm r rn 90.49 -.48
STsyAdml n 10.79
STBdAdmlnlO.66
ShtTrAdn 15.94
STFdAdn 10.89 +.01
STIGrAdn 10.87
SmCAdm n 37.70 -.07
TxMCap r n 70.85 -.34
TfBAdmln 11.18 +.01
TStkAdm n 35.01 -.16
ValAdml n 22.40 -.13
WellslAdrnm n59.30 -.05
WelltAdnm n58.72 -.17
Windsor n 49.59 -.23
WdsrllAdn 51.33 -.26
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 12.21 +.02
CapOppn 33.75 -.11
Convrtn 12.85 -.01
DivApplnn 23.60 -.10
DivdGron 16.50 -.07
Energy n 58.91 -.56
Eqlnc n 23.92 -.11
Explrn 78.86 -.12
FLLTn 12.42 +.01
GNMAn 11.00
GlobEqn 18.20 -.07
Grolncn 30.00 -.18
GrthEqn 12.22 -.06
HYCorpn 6.03
HlthCren 145.24 -.57
InflaPron 14.96 +.03
InfiExplrn 14.43 -.03
IntlGr n 18.57 -.08
InfilVaIln 30.05 -.19
ITIGraden 10.49 +.02
ITTsryn 11.82 +.02
LifeConn 17.20 -.03
LifeGro n 23.30 -.08
Lifelncn 14.74
LifeModn 20.81 -.05
LTIGraden 11.09 +.04
LTTsryn 13.59 +.04
Morg n 19.72 -.09
MuHYn 11.45 +.02
Mulntn 14.56 +.01
MuLtdn 11.20
MuLongn 11.99 +.02
MuShrtn 15.94
NJLTn 12.54 +.01
NYLTn 12.01 +.02
OHLTTEn 12.92 +.02
PALTn 11.90 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 16.00 -.12
PrmcpCorn 15.00 -.06
Prmcp r n 68.97 -.30
SelValu r n 20.99 -.06
STARn 20.64 -.05
STIGraden 10.87
STFedn 10.89 +.01
STTsryn 10.79
StratEqn 20.96 -.06
TgtRetlncn 12.21 -.01
TgRe20l10n24.36 -.03
TgtRe2015 nl3.45 -.03
TgRe2020 n23.85 -.06
TgtRe2025 nl3.57 -.04
TgRe203 n23.26 -.08
TgtRe2035 nl3.98 -.06
TgtRe2040On22.96 -.10
TgtRe2050n22.86 -.10
TgtRe2045 nl4.42 -.06
USGron 20.95 -.07
USValuen 11.71 -.07
Wellsly n 24.48 -.01
Welltn n 34.00 -.09
Wndsr n 14.70 -.06
Wndslln 28.91 -.15
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n98.76 -.51
ExtMktIn 110.09 -.20
MidCplstPl n108.54 -.38
TotlntAdm r r23.98 -.12
Totlntllnstr n95.93 -.47
TotlntllP r n 95.95 -.47
TotlntSig rn 28.77 -.14
500 n 129.44 -.67
Balancedn 23.56 -.05
EMktn 26.31 -.13
Europe n 24.79 -.14
Extend n 44.54 -.08
Growth n 36.33 -.14
LgCaplxn 25.89 -.13
LTBndn 14.72 +.04
MidCapo n 21.92 -.08
Pacific n 9.73 -.04
REITrn 21.20 -.12
SmCap n 37.64 -.07
SmlCpGthn24.19 -.05
STBnd n 10.66
TotBndn 11.18 +.01
Totllntl n 14.34 -.07
TotStkn 34.99 -.16
Value n 22.39 -.14
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.56 -.06
DevMklnstn 9.48 -.05
ErnMklnstn 26.31 -.12
Extln n 44.60 -.08
FTAIIWIdl r n85.34 -.44
Grwthlstn 36.33 -.14
InfProlnstn 11.97 +.03
Instldxn 128.61 -.66
InsPIn 128.62 -.66
InstTStldxn 31.69 -.14
InsTStPlusn3l.69 -.14
MidCplstn 22.00 -.08
REITInstrn 14.00 -.08
STBondldxn10.66
STIGrlnstn 10.87
SCInstn 37.70 -.07
TBIstn 11.18 +.01
TSInstn 35.01 -.16
Valuelstn 22.40 -.13
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 106.94 -.55
GroSign 33.64 -.13
ITBdSign 12.21 +.02
MidCpldxn 31.43 -.11
STBdldxn 10.66
SmCpSig n 33.97 -.06
TotBdSgln 11.18 +.01
TotStkSgln 33.79 -.15
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.93 +01
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 10.03 +.06
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.69 +.02
CorelnvA 6.60 -.04
DivOppAp 15.29 -.07
DivOppCt 15.10 -.07
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.02 +.03
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.31
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStlnv 21.25 -.05
Opptylnv 39.43 -.14
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.83
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.03 -.14
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.83
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.67 +.01
CorePlusl 11 .68 +.01
William BlairN:


GrowthN 12.12 -.05


Stocks down on latest




'fiscal cliff' rumblings


Associated Press


NEW YORK Stocks
slumped on Wall Street
Tuesday after Senate Ma-
jority Leader Harry Reid
said he was frustrated by
the lack of progress in talks
over the U.S. budget im-
passe in Washington.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average closed down
89.24 points to 12,878.13.
The Dow and other indexes
had been moving between
small gains and losses for
most of the day, then
turned lower after Reid's
comments in the early
afternoon.
"We have to get away from
the happy talk and start
talking about specific
things," Reid told reporters
in televised comments.
The Standard & Poor's
500 lost 7.35 points to
1,398.94 and the Nasdaq
composite index lost 8.99
points to 2,967.79.
Worries about the budget
talks have been hanging
over the stock market for
weeks. Stocks slumped im-
mediately after the Nov 6
election over concerns that
politicians would be unable
to reach a deal to trim the
deficit before a Jan. 1 dead-
line.
If that deadline isn't met,
under current law a series
of sharp tax increases and


A DAY ON WALL STREET

N ov 2 7 20 12 .................................................................. 14 ,50 0
Dow Jones
industrials ..........................13,500

... .. . .............. . 12 ,50 0
-89.24 -,

12,8 78.13 ......................... ....... ......... i................. 11,500
M J J A S 0 N
Pct. change from previous: -0.69% High 12,980.19 Low 12,868.26

N ov 2 7 20 12 .................................................................. 3,500
N a s d a q .................................................................. 3 ,250
com posite ... .3,000


-8.99 2,750

2,967.79 .............. .......r ...... .............. .........r........ 2,500
M J J A S 0 N
Pct. change from previous: -0.30% High 2,985.32 Low 2,965.14

N ov 2 7 2 0 12 .................................................................. 1 ,6 0 0

S ta n d a rd & .................................................................. 1,500
Poors 500 .........1. ........... t. 1,400

-7.35
1 ,3 9 8 .9 4i .. ..... .. ........ ......... ..........1. ........ ......... ........ 1 ,2 0 0
1,398.94 M J J A S 0 N
Pct. change from previous: -0.52% High 1,409.01 Low 1,398.03


spending cuts will come into
effect. Economists have
warned that the measures
could push the economy
back into a recession. That
deadline has come to be
known as the "fiscal cliff."
Last week, stocks pared
some of the losses that fol-
lowed the election. Presi-
dent Barack Obama plans to
make a public case this
week for his strategy for
dealing with the issue as he


pressures Republicans to
allow tax increases on the
wealthy while extending tax
cuts for families earning
$250,000 or less.
The S&P declined as
much as 5 percent in the
weeks after voters returned
a divided government to
power, with President
Barack Obama returning to
the White House and Re-
publicans retaining control
of the House.


US declines to label China




a currency manipulator


Associated Press expensive in China.
Republican presidential
WASHINGTON The nominee Mitt Romney had
Obama administration de- vowed during the campaign
lined Tuesday to label to brand China a currency
China a currency manipula- manipulator if he won the
tor, noting that it has let the White House. Such a desig-
yuan rise nearly 10 percent nation would risk retaliation
in value against the dollar that would hurt American
since June 2010. exporters, the Obama ad-
The decision came in a ministration has argued.
twice-a-year Treasury re- The Treasury is required
port on whether any other to report its findings on cur-
nations are manipulating rency manipulation to Con-
their currencies to gain gress semiannually The last
trade advantages. Despite time the United States
its decision, the administra- named any country a cur-
tion said the yuan remains rency manipulator was in
"significantly undervalued," 1994, when the Clinton ad-
and it urged China to make ministration made that ac-
further progress. cusation against China.
U.S. manufacturers con- Since then, both Demo-
tend that China is manipu- cratic and Republican admin-
lating its currency to gain a istrations have determined
trade advantage. A weaker that they could make more
yuan makes Chinese goods progress in narrowing Amer-
cheaper for American con- ica's trade gap with China
sumers and U.S. goods more through negotiations rather


than confrontation.
But during this year's
presidential campaign,
Romney argued that this ap-
proach had failed. He said
he would label China a cur-
rency manipulator on his
first day in office. Such a
designation could eventu-
ally lead to higher tariffs on
Chinese goods entering the
United States. But such tar-
iffs could also trigger a trade
war with a country that is
the fastest-growing market
for U.S. exports.
The deadlines for the cur-
rency report to be issued
are April 15 and Oct. 15 each
year But the Obama admin-
istration announced in Oc-
tober that it would delay the
fall report until after meet-
ings of finance ministers in
early November. That deci-
sion also delayed the report
until after the November
election.


We Have a Train Load


SnfTnnNn Mtp.h


10-


wOI Il& iulSmI



New&Used



Furniture


/




OFF


STOREWIDE




IFURITURLE DEPOT


S352-726-4835

its 565 Hwy. 41 South, Inverness

MON.-FRI.-9-5 SAT. 10-4 ...DA


Name Last Chg
SonyCp 9.74 -.16
SoJerInd 48.96 +.0'
SouthnCo 42.79 +.16
SthnCopper 35.96 -.4
SwstAirl 9.29 -.1
SwstnEngy 35.82 -.1
SpectraEn 27.70 -.08
SpiritAero 15.02 +.04
SprintNex 5.63 +.0
SprottSilv 13.43 -.0.
SP Mafs 36.27 -.1
SP HIhC 39.60 -.2
SP CnSt 35.38 -.0.
SPConsum 46.75 -.1!
SP Engy 70.32 -.5!
SPDRFncl 15.64 -.14
SP Inds 36.69 -.08
SPTeih 28.85 -.13
SP UkI 34.61 +.0!
StdPac 6.90 +.05
Standex 47.32 +.5!
StarwdHfi 52.86 +.0!
StateStr 44.54 -.3'
Steris 33.62 -.08
SillwtrM 11.35 -.0'
Shyker 54.22 -.3
SturmRug 56.99 +1.98
SubPpne 38.92 -.0
SunCmts 38.12 -.3'
Suncorgs 33.08 -.4'
Suntedich .86 +.03


SunTrst 26.80
SupEnrgy 18.96
Supvalu 2.70
SwiftTrans 8.72
Synovus 2.35
Sysco 31.27
TCF FncI 11.77
TDAmeritr 15.83
TECO 16.52
TJXs 43.09
TaiwSemi 16.83
TalismEg 11.54
Target 62.57
Teavana 14.88
TeckRes g 32.46
TelelBrasil 22.21
TelefEsp 12.93
TenetHltrs 27.69
Teradata 61.55
Teradyn 15.56
Terex 23.87
TerraNitro 215.00
Tesoro 41.50
TetraTech 6.75
TevaPhrm 40.52
Textron 23.70
Theragen 1.46
ThermoFis 62.19
Thor Inds 38.60
3DSys 45.24
3MCO 90.31
Tiffany 62.63
TWCable 93.28


TImeWarn 46.60
Timken 41.41
TitanMet 16.57
TollBros 32.11
TorchEngy .80
Torchmark 51.58
TorDBkg 81.87
Total SA 49.07
TotalSys 21.72
Transocn 45.52
Travelers 70.83
Tredgar 18.65
TriConfi 15.82
TrinaSolar 2.33
Tronoxs 15.19
TwoHrblnv 11.21
Tycolntis 27.54
Tyson 19.11
UBSAG 15.45
UDR 23.12
UIL Hold 34.80
UNS Engy 41.30
USAirwy 12.72
USG 26.86
UltraPtg 21.06
UndArmrs 54.10
UniFirst 70.46
UnilevNV 37.31
UnionPac 122.25
UtdCont 20.14
UtdMicro 1.95
UPSB 72.16
UtdRentals 39.86


US Bancrp 32.10 -.29 Weathflnfi 9.78
US NGsrs 22.14 -.04 WeinRIt 26.88
US OilFd 31.98 -.21 WdlPoint 54.97
USStee 21.26 -.35 WelsFargo 32.63
UtdTedich 78.83 +.15 Westargn 3804
UtdhlthGp 52.59 -.94 WestarEn 204
UnumGr 20.16 -.17 WAstEMkt 15.55
WstAMgdHi 6.35
WAstlnfOpp 13.28
ValeSA 17.30 -.36 WstnRefin 28.13
ValeSApf 16.94 -.33 WstnUnion 1259
ValeroE 31.15 .44
VangTSM 71.91 -.38 Weyerhsr 26.56
VangREIT 63.81 -.36 Whrlpl 100.19
VangEmg 41.59 -.35 WhifngPet 42.37
VangEAFE 33.51 -.20 WmsCos 32.69
VarianMed 68.88 -.58 WmsPtrs 50.16
Vectren 28.78 +.28 WmsSon 44.41
Ventas 64.06 -1.10 Winnbgo 13.90
VeoliaEnv 10.15 -.22
VeriFone 30.97 -.19 WiscEngy 36.68
VerizonCm 42.98 -.32 WTIndia 17.93
VimpelCm 10.11 -.39 Worthgtn 22.48
Visa 146.78 -.47 XLGrp 23.90
VMware 89.56 -.74 XcelEngy 26.45
Vornado 74.98 -.45 Xerox 6.53
WGLHold 37.81 -.18 Yamanag 19.32
WPXEnn 15.94 -.08 Yelpn 20.24
Wabash 7.84 -.24 YoukuTud .21
WalMart 69.50 -.41 YoukuTud 17.21
Warn 33.03 -.04 YumBrnds 73.80
WalterEn 28.63 -.13 ZaleCp 5.02
WsteMInc 31.91 -.13 Zimmer 66.02


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS







Page A10 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012



PINION


"More cranks take up unfashionable
errors than unfashionable truths."
Bertrand Russell, 1950


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ ............. citizen member
ZJS Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin .......... ....... guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............. .................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CASH FLOW




Funding key



piece of bay



water quality


If the One Rake at a Time
project in King's Bay hasn't
been enough to improve its
water quality, the fresh flow of
government dollars should cer-
tainly help its prospects.
Last week, Florida's Depart-
ment of Environ-
mental Protection THE IS
(DEP) earmarked
$1.1 million for the $1.1 r
reclaimed water earmarked
reuse project for reuse |
the city of Crystal
River. The jointly OUR 01
funded project by
the city and South- Forward
west Florida
Water Management District
sends 750,000 gallons of re-
claimed water daily to the
Progress Energy Citrus County
Power Complex.
The project not only reduces
wastewater nutrient loading by
16 percent in King's Bay, but
significantly decreases the
amount of groundwater
Progress Energy will need to
pump.
King's Bay is important to
the economic health of Citrus
County. It is home to hundreds
of wintering manatees who mi-
grate here for the protection its
72-degree temperatures offer


S
pr
d
P

P
t


against cold-weather shock.
Those manatees draw thou-
sands of tourists each year to
our area, comprising our
largest single source of outside
revenue especially during
winter months.
Additionally,
;SUE: water recreation
SUE: activities such as
million skiing, fishing,
for water kayaking and boat-
roject. ing, make King's
Bay a major sum-
INION: mer destination
spot for tourists
thinking. and residents.
The project is a
key piece of the King's Bay
clean-up puzzle that includes
the Kings Bay Rotary's One
Rake at a Time project, the
stormwater diversion and
treatment project, the Hunters
Spring water quality improve-
ment project and the King's
Bay Park Lagoon restoration.
Each of these projects cannot
restore King's Bay to its once
pristine condition; but taken as
a whole, they can return it to its
heyday
We congratulate the DEP on
having the wisdom to recognize
the importance of funding this
worthwhile project.


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


EDITOR'S NOTE: The Chronicle
is modifying its Sound Off criteria in
an effort to print a larger majority of
the Sound Off submissions. We will
now only accept Sound Offs dealing
with local or state issues. Sound Offs
asking for clarification or information
will still be accepted regardless of
subject matter.
Overpopulated area
I'm calling about the article that
was in Sound Off about needing
help with the pigs. I know your
friend is up North and that's their
second home, but my
guess is that used to be 0
0
the pigs' home, that land
there. So I would just
think that to leave it alone
would be the best thing
and let the pigs come oc- W
casionally to the property
they used to roam. That's A
the problem from around
here. It used to be the CAL
deers' land, the pigs' land .6 .
and they've overpopulated
the area.
Thanks, Citrus Memorial
Well, sounds like this needs to
be in the newspaper. Today is
Wednesday, day before Thanksgiv-
ing. I had to go to the Citrus Me-
morial hospital emergency room
and I was only there for three and
a half hours. That is complete
triage, CAT scan, blood work and
release three and a half hours.
That's awesome. I was in a room
that I've never seen before, so it's
new. And there was a doctor I'd
never seen before. So hopefully
that's going to be standard over


!

(


there. Good job, Citrus Memorial.
Thank you.
Great letter, Ms. Weiser
I just wanted to make a com-
ment on a letter written to the
editor on Nov. 21 by Maria
Weiser. I just wanted to say it is a
fantastic letter. I'm so glad she
wrote it and I couldn't have said
it better myself.
Careful with pets
The one advantage of feeding
feral cats is that they congregate
and when one gets dis-
JND temper, they all do. Hu-
mans can be infected
fF with distemper virus
with no effects but can
Hj infect their pets. So
think about it next time
you decide to kiss your
pet's nose or (let them)
eat from your dish. Dis-
temper is a terrible way
RT70 for an animal to die.


Young at heart
Yesterday evening I had an au-
tomated voice telephone call from
the Young Republicans of Citrus
County urging me to join. They
went on to extol the virtues of the
Ronald Reagan era and the hor-
rors of the upcoming second
term of President Obama. What I
found quite amusing was, they
kept repeating the phrase "Young
Republicans." And as I am a sen-
ior in my 70s, that was rather
amusing. But perhaps someone
put us on the call list because
they thought we were young at
heart.


Morsi behaving like a pharaoh


The diplomatic hosannas for
Egyptian President Mo-
hamed Morsi following his
brokering of the recent
ceasefire between
Hamas and Israel were
still being heard even
as the former head of
the Muslim Brother-
hood started behaving F
like a pharaoh. Morsi
"temporarily" seized
new powers that,
among other things,
forbid judicial review Cal T
of his policies. OTI
What ought to amaze VOI
us is how many times
Western and especially
U.S. diplomats have gone to the
Arab-Muslim well, believing they
will find something different at
the bottom. Egypt, Hamas and
even Iran string us along like a
cad with a bevy of women in his
orbit because we refuse to ac-
knowledge their true intent
In a recent radio interview I
tried to explain to the host that the
Muslim Brotherhood and other
enemies of Israel mean what they
say "Those are just words," he
said. How do you break through
such willful ignorance?
We are engaged in a clash of
civilizations between Western
democracies and Islamic funda-
mentalism. Whether we admit it
or not, this is an indisputable fact
History proves it. As with most
dictatorships, Egypt had an elec-
tion and it could be its last "free"
one. Morsi's government is now
about the business of suppressing
dissent, a familiar practice
among dictators. Protests over
Morsi's power grab have again
enlivened Cairo's Tahrir Square
and produced a rebellion by
Egyptian judges who have been
denied judicial review by their


h
H
I1


new "pharaoh."
New generations of Muslim
children are taught to hate all
things Western, includ-
ing Jews, Christians
and other "infidels."
Israel is pressured to
S sign off on a ceasefire
agreement with
S, J Hamas, so that the
West can get back to
holiday shopping.
% Hamas and their ter-
rorist brothers use
iomas ceasefires to rearm.
IER According to The Sun-
CES day Times, citing Is-
raeli officials, "Israeli
intelligence satellites
have spied the loading of rockets
and other materiel believed to be
destined for the Gaza Strip."
It's not only the West with
which Arab-Muslin nations and
terrorist groups break agree-
ments. As former Israeli diplomat
Yoram Ettinger writes in "The Is-
rael-Hamas Clash of Civiliza-
tions," "the culture of compliance
is foreign in the Middle East,
which has not experienced intra-
Muslim compliance with most
intra-Muslim agreements for the
last 1,400 years. It is a culture that
reveres the 7th century (and)
Muhammad's treaty of Huday-
biyya, stipulating that treaties are
not in perpetuity. Treaties may be
violated in order to achieve the
overriding goal of bringing ene-
mies to submission upon
amassing sufficient power to
overcome the enemy" This is
likely why there is talk about
Egypt vacating its 1979 peace
treaty with Israel.
The only hope of maintaining a
sense of stability in the region is
for Israel to remain strong and to
have unequivocal support from
the West. President Obama's en-


dorsement of Israel's right to de-
fend itself against missiles
launched from Gaza was helpful.
It would be even more helpful if
the United States would stop be-
lieving the fiction that the goal of
the Palestinians is their own
state after which they will live to-
gether peacefully with the rest of
the world. It won't happen. It
can't happen, given the beliefs
and practices ofArab-Muslim na-
tions.
Israel's enemies understand
strength and resolve. They are
encouraged by weakness and vac-
illation. That is why they feel em-
boldened, not only to move
missiles that were likely pro-
vided by Iran into Gaza, but also
why other terrorists attacked the
U.S. mission in Benghazi, killing
four Americans. They pay little or
no price for doing so while we
argue over whether words were
taken out of intelligence docu-
ments before U.N. Ambassador
Susan Rice appeared on five
Sunday talk shows.
No nation has done a better job
fighting terrorism than Israel. It
remains America's strongest ally
in the region and a necessary
counterforce to attempts by
Hamas and PLO sympathizers
Russia, China and North Korea to
penetrate deeper into the Middle
East.
If more people would take the
time to read the pronouncements
and goals of Morsi when he
headed the Muslim Brotherhood
and also his latest speeches, they
would understand what the
endgame is and why disbelief by
the West is also part of their strat-
egy for world domination.
--*--a
Readers may email Cal Thomas
at tmseditors@tribune.com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Electoral College
There still remains one final
step before Obama can become
president As you know the popu-
lar vote, doesn't elect either a
president or vice president of the
United States; only electoral votes
are tasked to accomplish this!
On the first Monday after the
second Wednesday in December,
members of the Electoral College
will meet to make this determina-
tion. A majority of two-thirds of
the states must be present to con-
stitute a quorum, as mandated by
the second and 12th Amend-
ments to the Constitution.
If for some untoward reason, a
total of 17 states refuse to attend
this meeting, a quorum can not
be met, hence no voting can take
place. If this extraordinary event
occurs, it falls to the House of
Representatives to choose a
president, and the Senate to
pick a vice president.
Republicans control the
House of Representatives, while
Democrats the Senate. In this
particular scenario, Romney will
be elected president and Biden
vice president! Now that would
be remarkable!
Peter Monteleone
Pine Ridge


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


Support entertainers
I was saddened by the low
turnout for the Nov 24 24K Gold
Music Show at the Curtis Peter-
son Auditorium. These beautiful
talented young people put in
hundreds of hours rehearsing to
provide us music lovers with a
great show (you will be hard
pressed to find a show of this
quality in Branson) and we stay


home to watch TV sad.
Please music lovers, they will
return to Lecanto Jan. 20. Please
let's support this wonderful
group.
H. T. (Tom) Morgan
Homosassa

Universal problem
On Nov 21, your editorial on
military officers was to the point
Our military leaders must be held
to a high standard of service. I
held my morals and standards
high in my 39 years of military
service. My records stand to
prove that I know many officers
who hold outstanding records.
As a sequel to this editorial, you
should print one regarding Con-
gress and the executive branch.
You named several military offi-
cers with improper character
Now, could you point out some of
our political leaders who have be-
haved badly, some disciplined
and some not This is a fair way to
acknowledge that improper con-
duct does not happen only in the
military leadership, but also has
happened in the group that ap-
points the military leaders.
Herman (Hank) Butler Jr.
Lt. Col. Army, retired
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 All


Letters to THE EDITOR


Libya mishandled
Good morning! After the
2012 election, I told myself
that I was not going to write
anymore letters. Boy, was I
wrong. Now I can under-
stand somewhat why people
get hooked on drugs, as for
me I am hooked on politics
only because I am hopefully
determined to see justice,
especially on the Libya
bloodshed issue for the
senseless deaths of four
Americans, while Obama
was busy with campaigning.
Now as for Obama at the
Nov. 15 conference and on
the subject of Susan Rice
and his getting his feathers
ruffled over her Let's face
it, Ms. Rice, if you are not
sure of what actually hap-
pened in Libya, go do your
homework. As for your
Democratic coworkers
coming to your "rescue,"
my opinion is that if you
can't get this one issue cor-
rect, you certainly cannot
become secretary of state.
Judy A. Cressey
Crystal River

Gov't struggles
First there was social se-
curity. I wasn't there when
it started, but throughout
my working life I was told
we had a deal that our
elected representatives
had come up with using
their collective wisdom.
They knew that we were
basically irresponsible and
needed the government to
see to it that we had money
for our retirement ensuring
we would be independent
in our old age. They would
calculate the amounts to
pay into this account and
anyone who would dare to
not pay as prescribed could
do a little jail time until
they repent.
Now "they" tell us the
system they created doesn't
work and we must all forget
about the promise of a se-
cure future. Social Security
will die a natural death
simply by denying infla-
tionary increases as the
value of the dollar de-
creases. This process has
been in effect for three
years now.
Then came Medicare.
Our elected officials de-
cided they knew better how
to take care of our health
needs than we did, so as
was now accepted norm,
they prescribed how much
money we would hand over
to them to manage and they
would see to it that we all
got proper health care in
our old age. Again, the
penalty for not paying what
they demanded as your
"fair share" was severe.
Now they tell us that the
Medicare System doesn't
work and we must all forget
about the promise of health
care in our retirement.
"Not to worry" they tell us,
We are going to fix these sys-
tems. You will have to take
over paying for it (again) but
they still insist they know
better than we how to take
care of ourselves.
So now, those two govern-
ment programs are so won-
derful, our representatives
are taking over all health
care.
Why do we keep electing
these self proclaimed "ex-
perts" to represent us in
governing the country?
Why do we sit back and
let them promise they will
do what they have proven
over and over again that
they are incapable of
doing?
I have asked Richard
Nugent, our representa-
tive, about this, and he tells
me he has signed on to the
Paul Ryan plan for
Medicare that essentially
involves issuing vouchers
(in some amount) to future
retirees. With your little
voucher, further price in-
creases will be your prob-
lem in lieu of the promise
made to collect your money
and provide health care.
The fact that insurance


companies are spending
millions to get you to buy
their so-called 'Advantage"
plans should tell you where
the voucher system is
headed. They are not trying
to get you to buy a product
that doesn't promise to
make them truck loads of
profit. Altruism ends where
profit begins.
I see what is going on as
another proof that giant
corporations run the coun-


try for their own profit by
way of their bought-and
paid-for representatives,
and with little concern
about what it ends up cost-
ing us all. How else do you
explain these huge compa-
nies falling over each other
to get the money that the
government is telling us
can no longer pay for what
they promised us?
More proof? Rep. Nugent
is also quite proud of hav-
ing helped pass legislation
to confiscate and destroy
imported prescription
drugs that infringe on
American drug company
profits even though they
cost substantially less and
literally, save lives.
"Too big to fail" ab-
solutely proved the theory,
but that's another story
Stephen C. Brown
Inverness

Women's health
This letter is in response
to Mr. Lawrence, of Ho-
mosassa, who felt that vot-
ers should possess a
knowledge of the branches
and function of government
prior to casting their ballot
While I agree with you on
many of your points, one
statement in particular got
under my skin. It was per-
taining to the importance
of women's issues, in which
you stated "the world is
about to come to an end as
we know it and all these id-
iots have on their mind is
free birth control pills and
abortions."
Allow me to correct your
assumption, sir If you be-
lieve that women's health
issues and clinics that pro-
vide care to women only in-
volve birth control and
abortion, you are sadly mis-
informed. Either you are


not married and have no
daughters, or you have
been blessed to be able to
provide them with afford-
able health insurance. If it
is the latter, then good for
you. But you are consid-
ered the exception these
days, rather than the rule.
There are those of us who
are single parents due to
divorce and not "birthing
out of wedlock," who can-
not afford to support our-
selves and remain insured
because we don't make
enough money
Women's health issues
also entail regular pap
smears and mammograms
that we would not other-
wise have access to. For
women like us, these pro-
grams are invaluable. They
also provide the HPV vac-
cine for our daughters to
protect them from con-
tracting the virus. So while
you are schooling the gen-
eral population on the im-
portance of educating
ourselves about govern-
ment, please take the time
to educate yourself about
the health issues facing
women today That will re-
flect a less narrow-minded
viewpoint for your future
posts.
Heather Smith
Citrus Springs

Failing voters
The House and Senate
pass thousands of bills to
block and throw roadblocks
in front of business, big and
small. Not one bill to help
small business. Left side,
right side, they both stink
and let us down. But oh the
talk, talk, talk. Its the one
thing they are good at.
Gerald Ruble
Inverness


CAjRPET ITiLE_-WDIo)arDjINY-L;AMINaT


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 8-5
Sat. 9-1 on
f
,, ,T l -, I


COLORCENTER


527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES
44 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Lecanto (next to landfill) CCC#2837



"Wild on Water"
DYNABODY'S WATER AEROBICS CLASSES
presents
A HOLIDAY VARIETY SHOW
Featuring Local & Professional Talent


L and The Saints ('rival A. Wiilson & Family
Citrus High School's Category 5
Ron Smith, Professional Pianist
Judah Burton, Mime
Louie & Zumba Group
Bill Alston, Body Builder
Debbie Sosnicki
Josh Ulloa top 50 of American Idol
Take Stock in Children Student Scholars
And Many More!
Saturday, December 1, 2012
3pm to 5pm
At the Cornerstone Baptist Church, Inverness
Admission: $10.00 Adults, $2.50 Children (Over 12)
1 Can or Dried Food Product Children under 12
Contact: Ruby Burton at 476-3185 for more information
Benefiting Take Stock in C I ) Si t fE
Children of Citrus County j I 11- whI
isco alwChu chp roud cly eo stseco


Shepherd of the Hills Ef
\\ Citru

Ch Ft


jChr


Tickets are $45 each (donati
2540 W. Norvel
Monday-Friday,
For more information please call, 527


episcopal Church proudly hosts
is County

either

istmas

SBall

Friday December 7, 2012
All proceeds for "Serving Our
Savior" (SOS) Food Pantry
Cocktails/appetizers hour 6pm-7pm
Dinner 7pm-8pm.
Dance & Special Events 8p.m.-IIp.m.
Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center
5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461-8531

" Semi-Formal Attire


ion). Purchase at the church office,
11 Bryant Hwy CR 486
from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.
-0052, 419-5489,563-5932 or 270-3391


Shopping has gone too far
Thanksgiving is over. Next year I believe
stores will be open all day. It's sad, but
custom, tradition, family get-togethers
have given way to spending and making
money. The good news is, Publix was
closed. Thank you, Publix, for caring and
putting people before business.


Appears people want port
The people who are against Port Cit-
rus had a chance to vote against it, but
they didn't. Jimmie T Smith is in favor
of the port and he ran on that. Nancy
Argenziano was against it. As you know,
Smith won. So I guess the people want
the port.


Sound OFF


LI!Days

of Christmas

Starting Monday, *
November 26th! w R e


Sc D aysan Code
2 Ds of for Instant access.



PRIZES W

On the first day of Christmas
the Chronicle gave to me...

Like us on Facebook and watch for
the Code Word on our wall to win! C... .....

www.facebook.com/citruscountychronicle Vwll ....hi onoli..


pm p
9r


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPINION












NATION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Y CHRONICLE


NationBRIEFS Obama to take bully
Hopeful watcher


Associated Press
Cory Redwine, 21-year-old
brother of 13-year-old Dylan
Redwine, watches members
of the New Mexico State
Police Dive team conduct
sonar scanning of the bot-
tom of Vallecito Reservoir
on Monday during the
search for Dylan in Vallecito,
Colo. So far there is no sign
of the boy, who has been
missing for a week.

Rice concedes, but
can't sway senators
WASHINGTON U.N.
Ambassador Susan Rice told
lawmakers Tuesday her initial
explanation of the deadly
Sept. 11 raid in Libya was
wrong, but her concession failed
to mollify three Republican sen-
ators who signaled they would
oppose her possible nomina-
tion to be secretary of state.
In a closed-door meeting that
Rice requested, the ambas-
sador answered questions from
Sens. John McCain, Lindsey
Graham and Kelly Ayotte
about her explanations about
the cause of the attack on the
U.S. diplomatic mission in
Benghazi, Libya, that killed
Ambassador Chris Stevens
and three other Americans.
She was joined by acting CIA
Director Michael Morell.
Rice's unusual visit to
Capitol Hill typically only
nominees meet privately with
lawmakers reflects the
Obama administration's cam-
paign for the current front-
runner to replace Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton.
War contractor: Feds
should pay out in suit
PORTLAND, Ore.--An
Iraq war contractor that lost an
$85 million verdict to a group
of sickened Oregon soldiers
has filed a lawsuit seeking to
force the federal government
to pay the soldiers' damages.
In early November, 12 Ore-
gon National Guard soldiers
won the verdict against Kel-
logg Brown and Root, an en-
gineering and construction
firm that helped lead the re-
construction work in post-war
Iraq. The soldiers were ex-
posed to a toxin while guard-
ing an Iraqi water plant.
In the new lawsuit, KBR
also demands that the gov-
ernment pay more than $15
million in its attorneys' fees.
At the heart of the suit is a
so-called indemnification clause
KBR alleges it agreed to with
the U.S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers in March 2003. The
clause was designed to protect
KBR against "unusually haz-
ardous risks" in its work in Iraq.
The soldiers said they suf-
fer from respiratory ailments
after their exposure to sodium
dichromate, and they fear a
carcinogen the toxin contains,
hexavalent chromium, could
cause cancer later in life.
Fourth person dies of
mushroom poisoning
LOOMIS, Calif. -A fourth
person has died from eating a
soup made with poisonous
mushrooms earlier this month
at a senior care facility in
Northern California, authori-
ties said Tuesday.
The Placer County Sheriff's
Department said it had been
notified by a mortuary of the
death. Three others at the six-
bed Gold Age Villa care facility
in Loomis died from eating the
mushrooms in what sheriff's
investigators have previously
characterized as an accident.
All of the victims were sick-
ened on Nov. 8, including the
caretaker who made it.
From wire reports


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama plans to
make a public case this
week for his strategy for
dealing with the looming fis-
cal cliff, traveling to the
Philadelphia suburbs Fri-
day as he pressures Repub-
licans to allow tax increases
on the wealthy while ex-
tending tax cuts for families
earning $250,000 or less.
The White House said
Tuesday that the president
intends to hold a series of
events aimed at building
support for his approach to
avoid across-the-board tax
increases and steep spend-
ing cuts in defense and do-
mestic programs. Obama
will meet with small busi-


ness owners at the White
House on Tuesday and with
middle-class families on
Wednesday
Obama's strategy is two-
fold: Negotiate behind
closed doors with Republi-
cans while taking his
agenda outside the Beltway
only weeks after winning re-
election. The president's
visit to a small business in
Hatfield, Pa., that makes
parts for a construction toy
company will cap a week of
public outreach as the
White House and congres-
sional leaders seek a way to
avoid the tax increases and
spending cuts scheduled to
take effect Jan. 1.
Obama's tactics were
quickly panned by Senate
Republican leader Mitch


pulpit on
McConnell, who said Tues-
day that "rather than sitting
down with lawmakers of
both parties and working
out an agreement, he's back
out on the campaign trail,
presumably with the same
old talking points we're all
familiar with."
Both sides warn the so-
called fiscal cliff could harm
the nation's economic re-
covery, but an agreement
still appears far from as-
sured. The White House
and congressional Republi-
cans have differed on
whether to raise revenue
through higher tax rates or
by closing tax loopholes and
deductions.
House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, has
pushed for raising addi-


fiscal cliff WrBRIEFS
Cavalry ride out


tional revenue through the
reducing of tax loopholes
instead of raising tax rates
on wealthy Americans and
Republicans have said De-
mocrats need to come up
with cuts in entitlement pro-
grams like Social Security
and Medicare.
The White House has
countered that the presi-
dent will not sign legisla-
tion that extends current
tax rates for the top 2 per-
cent of income earners, or
those households with in-
comes over $250,000. White
House officials have ex-
pressed a willingness to
discuss changes to
Medicare and Medicaid but
oppose addressing Social
Security as part of the fiscal
cliff discussions.


Associated Press
Egyptians chant slogans Tuesday during a demonstration in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt. More than 200,000 people
flocked to Cairo's central Tahrir Square, chanting against Egypt's Islamist president in a powerful show of strength
by the opposition demanding Mohammed Morsi revoke edicts granting himself near autocratic powers.


Egyptians return to Tahrir Square en masse to protest Morsi


Associated Press
CAIRO
More than 200,000 people
thronged Cairo's central
Tahrir Square, protesting
against Egypt's Islamist president
Tuesday in an opposition show of
strength, as the standoff over Mo-
hammed Morsi's assertion of near-
absolute powers escalated into the
biggest challenge yet to his and
the Muslim Brotherhood's rule.
The massive, flag-waving, chant-
ing crowd in the iconic plaza ri-
valed the size of some of the large
protests of last year's uprising
that drove autocrat Hosni
Mubarak from office. The same
chants used against Mubarak
were now turned against Egypt's
first freely elected leader
"The people want to bring down
the regime," and "erhal, erhal" -
Arabic for "leave, leave," rang
across the square.
Protests in Tahrir and several
other cities Tuesday were sparked
by edicts issued by Morsi last week
that effectively neutralized the ju-
diciary, the last branch of govern-
ment he does not control. But it
turned into a broader outpouring
of anger against Morsi and the
Muslim Brotherhood, which oppo-
nents say have used election vic-
tories to monopolize power,
squeeze out rivals, and dictate a
new, Islamist constitution, while
doing little to solve Egypt's mount-
ing economic and security woes.
Clashes broke out in several cities
as Morsi opponents tried to attack
offices of the Brotherhood, setting
fire to at least one. At least 100 people
were injured when protesters and
Brotherhood members protecting
their office pelted each other with
stones and firebombs in the Nile
Delta city of Mahalla el-Kobra.


Protesters attend an opposition rally Tuesday in Tahrir Square in Cairo.


"Power has exposed the Broth-
erhood. We discovered their true
face," said Laila Salah, a housewife
in the Tahrir protest who said she
voted for Morsi in this summer's
presidential election After Mubarak,
she said, Egyptians would no
longer consent to an autocrat.
Gehad el-Haddad, a senior ad-
viser to the Brotherhood and its
political party, said Morsi would
not back down on his edicts. "We
are not rescinding the declaration,"
he told The Associated Press.
That sets the stage for a drawn-
out battle between the two sides
that could throw the nation into
greater turmoil. Protest organiz-
ers on a stage in the square called
for another mass rally on Friday
If the Brotherhood responds with
mass rallies of its own, as some of
its leaders have hinted, it would
raise the prospect of greater vio-
lence after a series of clashes be-
tween the two camps in recent
days.


A tweet by the Brotherhood
warned that if the opposition was
able to bring out 200,000-300,000
"they should brace for millions in
support" or Morsi.
Another flashpoint could come
Sunday, when the constitutional
court is due to rule on whether
to dissolve the assembly writing
the new constitution, which is
dominated by the Brotherhood
and Islamist allies. Morsi's
edicts explicitly banned the
courts from disbanding the
panel. If the court defies him
and rules anyway, it would be a
direct challenge that could spill
over into the streets.
"Then we are in the face of the
challenge between the supreme
court and the presidency," said
Nasser Amin, head of the Arab
Center for the Independence of
the Judiciary and the Legal Pro-
fession. "We are about to enter a
serious conflict" on both the legal
and street level, he said.


Associated Press
Members of the cavalry
march out of the central
courtyard Tuesday after
being presented to Kuwaiti
emir Sheikh Sabah Al
Ahmed Al Sabah during his
state visit to Britain at
Windsor Castle, Windsor,
west of London.

Palestinians awaiting
statehood vote
PARIS France an-
nounced Tuesday that it plans
to vote in favor of recognizing
a Palestinian state at the U.N.
General Assembly this week.
With the announcement,
France becomes the first
major European country to
come out in favor, dealing a
setback to Israel. The timing
of the announcement appears
aimed at swaying other Euro-
pean nations.
The Palestinians say the
assembly is likely to vote
Thursday on a resolution rais-
ing their status at the U.N.
from an observer to a non-
member observer state.
Unlike the Security Council,
there are no vetoes in the
General Assembly and the
resolution is virtually certain
of approval.
Syrian warplanes hit
olive oil factory
BEIRUT Syrian war-
planes bombed an olive oil
factory packed with farmers
Tuesday, killing at least 20
people in the latest regime
strike to rip through a crowd
of civilians, activists said.
Human Rights Watch said
it found "compelling evidence"
the regime used cluster bombs
in an airstrike that killed at least
11 children earlier this week.
It was not immediately
clear whether the olive press
was the intended target, or if
the plane misfired.
China's party paper
falls for Onion joke
BEIJING The online ver-
sion of China's Communist
Party newspaper has hailed a
report by The Onion naming
North Korean dictator Kim
Jong Un as the "Sexiest Man
Alive" not realizing it is
satire.
The People's Daily on
Tuesday ran a 55-page photo
spread on its website in a trib-
ute to the round-faced leader,
under the headline "North
Korea's top leader named
The Onion's Sexiest Man
Alive for 2012."
Quoting The Onion's spoof
report, the Chinese newspaper
wrote, "With his devastatingly
handsome, round face, his
boyish charm, and his strong,
sturdy frame, this Pyongyang-
bred heartthrob is every
woman's dream come true."
Arafat exhumed for
poisoning probe
RAMALLAH, West Bank -
Eight years after Yasser Arafat's
mysterious death, his political
heirs opened his grave Tues-
day and let forensics experts
take samples from his re-
mains, defying strong cultural
taboos in search of evidence
that the icon of Palestinian
nationalism was poisoned.
Palestinians have claimed
for years that Israel poisoned
Arafat, who died in a French
hospital. Israel has denied the
charges.
The exhumation marked the
end of months of procedural
wrangling but only the begin-
ning of the testing. Palestinian
officials said it would take at
least three months to get re-
sults, and even then, they
might not be conclusive.
-From wire reports











SPORTS


* Big East
makes big
moves with
additions of
Tulane and
East Carolina.
/B5


0 Local golf/B2
0 NBA, College hoops/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 Football/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hurricanes hustle past Pirates for victory


Citrus boys earn first win against

Crystal River on hard court


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS The Cit-
rus and Crystal River boys'
basketball teams rivalry
lived up to its reputation as
a gritty and closely fought
affair.
The two combined for 44


free throws in the first half
on the back of 30 total fouls.
The teams exchanged leads
several times throughout
the first half before the Hur-
ricanes took a four-point
lead into the break after
being behind by as much as
eight points early in the sec-
ond period.


The 'Canes (1-2) widened
their lead after the half be-
hind junior point guard
Devin Pryor's 13-point third
quarter, and Citrus out-
lasted a Pirate squad that
refused to go away in its sea-
son-opener for a 64-58 home
victory Tuesday
"I told my guys that when
you play in a county-rivalry
game, you're going to get
everything they've got," a re-
lieved Citrus head coach
Tom Densmore said. "We
had to get out of our man-to-


man because of foul trouble,
and it helped us get some
more steals out of it and
keep Crystal River off the
line. It was really the kind of
5amn cTI Vw t ao c.pt.Pi I' Fm


just glad
top."
Pryor
with 26 p(
his team
with four
ond half
Ellis (14


Crystal River's Lady Pirates defeat
Dunnellon's Lady Tigers 52-49
Chronicle


we. c e o.ut. o.m Crystal River High School girl's basketball team showed
we came out on up at Dunnellon High School and beat them 52-49 on
paced all shooters Tuesday after the original Monday night game was moved.
points and bolstered Leading the Lady Pirates from the field was Jasmyne
's defensive effort Eason with 15 points and 20 rebounds. Close behind her
r steals in the sec- was Megan Wells with 14 points and six assists and Kate-
. Junior Mitchell lyn Hannigan with 13 points.
points), senior Leading scorer for Dunnellon (1-2) was Tanika Jackson
with 14 points and 11 rebounds.
See Page B4 Crystal River (3-1) will host Eustis at 7 p.m. Friday.


Associated Press
Florida State defensive coor-
dinator Mark Stoops will be
the Kentucky Wildcats' new
football head coach next year.


Kentucky


hires


FSU's


Stoops


Noles defensive

coordinator to

be head coach
Associated Press
LEXINGTON, Ky. Ken-
tucky has hired Florida
State defensive coordinator
Mark Stoops as the Wild-
cats' football coach.
Stoops replaces Joker
Phillips, who was fired on
Nov. 4. Phillips went 13-24 in
three seasons at Kentucky
and the Wildcats were 0-8 in
the Southeastern Confer-
ence this year.
Kentucky made the an-
nouncement on Tuesday
and the 45-year-old Stoops
will be introduced here at a
news conference on Sunday
No. 13 Florida State (10-2)
plays Georgia Tech Satur-
day in the Atlantic Coast
Conference championship
game.
Terms of Stoops' contract
with Kentucky were not re-
leased. His salary with the
Seminoles was $550,000 a
year. He should definitely
receive a raise in his new
position; Phillips' annual
salary was $1.7 million.
Stoops' hiring concludes a
quicker-than-expected
coaching search by the uni-
versity. After Saturday's sea-
son-ending loss at
Tennessee, Kentucky ath-
letic director Mitch Barn-
hart said he had no
timetable to find a replace-
ment for Phillips.
But it didn't take long for
Barnhart and the Wildcats
to make a move. The deci-
sion makes Stoops a head
coach for the first time in
his career
"I want to thank (Ken-
tucky) President Eli Capi-
louto and Mitch Barnhart
for this opportunity," Stoops
said in a statement. "I prom-
ise the faithful of the Big
Blue Nation I will be fo-
cused and driven to create a
positive, winning atmos-
phere for the program and
an environment that all of
Kentucky can be proud of."
Florida State coach
Jimbo Fisher said after the
Seminoles' practice Tues-
day that Stoops will coach
Saturday's game but that he
hadn't talked with him
about coaching through a
bowl appearance. Stoops
did not talk to reporters
after the workout.
Stoops becomes the third
brother in college football's
See Page 13B4


Associated Press
Minnesota forward Rodney Williams Jr. dunks against Florida State in the first half of Tuesday's
basketball game in Tallahassee.




Slam dunked


Florida State falls

to Minnesota
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida
State coach Leonard Hamilton
could only envy Minnesota's
Tubby Smith on Tuesday night
Hamilton expected his team
would be fresh and ready to go
after a six-day rest over the
Thanksgiving holiday while
the 21st-ranked Gophers were
rolling into town for their
fourth road game in six days.
As it turned out, the Semi-
noles never had a chance when
Minnesota didn't look any
worse for the wear.
Minnesota (7-1) had a 7-0
lead, increased it to double
digits early, building a 21-point
lead halfway through the sec-
ond half on its way to a 77-68
victory in the ACC-Big Ten
Challenge.
"Minnesota played with a lot
more fire," Hamilton said.
"They were a lot more aggres-
sive. I thought that we would
have been the team that would
be extremely aggressive. We've
been inconsistent with it."
Minnesota's more experi-
enced team took advantage of
their familiarity with each
other while Hamilton is search-


Associated Press
Florida State guard Montay Brandon, left, guard Rafeal Portuondo,
rear, and forward Okaro White leave the court after a Tuesday game
against Minnesota in Tallahassee. Minnesota won 77-68.


ing for the right chemistry
Joe Coleman scored 16
points and Rodney Williams
added 14 to lead the way in
Minnesota's win over the de-
fending Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence champions.
Terrance Shannon led the
Seminoles with 14 points and
11 rebounds and Michael
Snaer added 12 points on 3-of-
9 shooting. Terry Whisnant and
Okaro White both had 10
points for the Seminoles.
Minnesota built its biggest
lead in the half at 35-20 on


Austin Hollins' 3-pointer with
2:56 left in the half. Andre
Hollins' 3 made it 30-19 with
6:22 remaining and the Go-
phers held a double-digit lead
for most of the game.
"We were just hotter tonight
than they were," Smith said.
"We want to attack and be ag-
gressive in full-court offense.
That's our style and that's what
we want to do."
And they did it this time at
Florida State's expense.
See Page B3


Pirates


push past


Buffalo


on pitch


Crystal River boys

beat The Villages

3-1 on soccer field

DAVE PIEKLIK
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Travis
Swanson's left foot continues to be
sweeter than cranberry relish, and
the Crystal River High School
boys' soccer team was thankful
after the holiday break to have a
familiar face back in goal Tuesday
in a 3-1 win over The Villages.
Swanson netted two goals and
added an assist in the district
match against the Buffalo (0-2-2
overall; 0-2-1 district) as the Pi-
rates improved to 4-2-1 on the year,
including 2-1 in district play Goal
keeper Kyle Kidd returned after
sitting out a game and a half with a
hip injury, narrowly missing a
clean sheet with eight saves.
"We needed this win," said
Swanson, who has 11 goals this
season.
The start of a tough two-week
schedule, Crystal River head
coach Bobby Verlato told his team
before the game the match was a
must win. He described it as a
"character game" that would show
just what type of team they were.
The Pirates lost their last two
games coming into Tuesday and
lost to the Buffalo last season.
"I found we have some charac-
ter and we don't quit," Verlato said
of the win.
The two teams played evenly in
the first half, with both teams com-
bining for 12 shots on goal. Swan-
son narrowly missed a goal late in
added time, kicking a shot a foot
wide of the right goal post
At the 37:40 mark in the second
half, Swanson took a throw from
midfielder John McAteer, on the
right touch line, cut to the middle
of the field and fired a shot past
goalie Zach Davis.
Just shy of 10 minutes into the
half, Crystal River midfielder Eric
See Page B4



Lady Sharks

sweep past

Hurricanes
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS Citrus High
School head girls' soccer coach
Ian Feldt shook his head and put
his hands up in the air often Tues-
day night.
His Hurricanes were having
problems with Brooksville's Na-
ture Coast High School, ultimately
losing 3-0 at the Citrus Bowl.
"We weren't making first good
hits," Feldt said. "We weren't ag-
gressive enough on 50-50s. I think
we were playing a quality team."
Nature Coast (6-1 overall, 5-0 in
Class 3A-District 6) outshot the
Canes 22-11 on Tuesday night.
Despite the score, it was not a
blowout as the 'Canes (5-3, 3-2) bat-
tled for each possession. But Cit-
rus could not score.
See Ra. Pge B4







CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO GOLF


I


Not European-bound


Woods declines

to add more

tournaments

DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer

THOUSAND OAKS,
Calif. Tiger Woods is
more driven to catch Jack
Nicklaus than to try to em-
ulate Luke Donald and
Rory McIlroy
Woods made it clear
Tuesday he had no interest
in taking up membership
on the European Tour. He
had floated the possibility
last month in Turkey he
would look into dual mem-
bership with Europe count-
ing the Ryder Cup or
Presidents Cup toward the
minimum requirement of
13 events.
"I'll make it real simple
- I'm not going to play the
European Tour next year,"
Woods said.
Woods is starting next
season at the Abu Dhabi
Golf Championship. Throw
in the four majors and four
World Golf Championships,
and he would need only
three more events to be-
come a European Tour
member.
"It's a bit much for me
still," Woods said, adding
his focus is squarely on the
record 18 majors won by
Nicklaus.
Donald last year became
the first player to win the
money title on the PGA
Tour and European Tour in
the same season. McIlroy
matched that feat this year,
even though three of his
five wins were regular PGA
Tour events.
On the strength of majors
and WGC events, which are
every bit part of the Euro-
pean Tour schedule as the
PGA Tour schedule, Woods
could have won both money
titles at least four times in
the past decade if he had
been a European Tour
member and added a cou-
ple of events. Europe used
to require only 11 events to
be a member.
"Certainly, I've had op-
portunities over the years,
especially when it was at 11
events," Woods said. "I was
very close a couple times


Associated Press
Tiger Woods, right, and Rory Mcllroy walk on the stairway of the eighth hole during their
18-hole medal-match Oct. 29 at the Lake Jinsha Golf Club in Zhengzhou, in central China's
Henan province. Mcllroy beat Tiger Woods by one stroke in the head-to-head exhibition
match between the world's two top-ranked golfers.


and could have taken mem-
bership up and played it.
But still ... I enjoy playing
around the world, and I still
always will. But I am going
to play this tour."
When asked why he
never bothered becoming a
dual member, Woods said,
"It wasn't important to me."
"I think I could have won
it a few times," he said of
the money titles. "I don't
know what that number


was. But it just wasn't im-
portant to me. My main con-
cern was winning major
championships, and I've
won 14 of them, and I'm
very proud of that."
Asked whether adding a
few European events would
have detracted from his
preparation for the majors,
Woods nodded.
He remains stuck on 14
majors, winning his last one
in 2008 in the U.S. Open at


Torrey Pines. Woods has
failed to win the past 14 ma-
jors he has played, the
longest drought of his ca-
reer Next year's rotation of
majors include Merion for
the U.S. Open, a course he
has never seen, and Oak
Hill for the PGA Champi-
onship, the only time
Woods has played all four
rounds at a PGA without
breaking par.
Woods said winning a


I enjoy

playing around

the world, and I

still always will.

But I am going

to play this

tour.

Tiger Woods
on competing on the PGA
and European Tours.

major makes it a great year,
which in his mind means
four players had a great
year Bubba Watson (Mas-
ters), Webb Simpson (U.S.
Open), Ernie Els (British
Open) and McIlroy (PGA
Championship).
"That's something I
haven't done since '08, so
it's something I can do next
year," he said. "I've won
golf tournaments; I've had
some really nice years,
some really good years in
there. But as I said, winning
a major championship just
takes it to a whole new
level."
That doesn't make his
year a total loss.
Woods played his most
complete season since
2009, and the World Chal-
lenge that starts Thursday
at Sherwood Country Club
will be his 24th week of
competition, which in-
cludes the Ryder Cup and
an exhibition in Turkey
The only stumble was at
Doral, where he withdrew
in the middle of the final
round when his Achilles
tendon flared up on him.
He won in his next start, at
Bay Hill, and then added
wins at the Memorial and
AT&T National.
"I'm very excited because
last year at this point in
time I was still not quite
where I wanted to be phys-
ically," he said. "I ended up
having a little bit of a prob-
lem at Doral at the begin-
ning of the year, but did the
prudent thing in not play-
ing at the end. This year has
been fantastic in that re-
gard. I've felt good. I've
played a full schedule for
the first time in a very long
time, and just very pleased
with what I've done overall
with my game."


Golf tournament
benefits Blessings
Inverness Golf & Country
Club's 50th anniversary Club
Championships will begin
Friday, Nov. 30 and end Sun-
day, Dec 1.
Visitors are welcome to at-
tend and watch some of Cit-
rus County's finest golfers
compete. The tournament is
being sponsored this year by
Whalen Jewelers and has
chosen Citrus County Bless-
ings in a Backpack as its
charity for this event. Dona-
tions will be accepted at the
"19th hole."
For more information, call
352-726-2583.
Citrus Hills plan
golf scramble
The Citrus Hills Women's
Club will host a nine-hole
Fabulous '50s Golf Scramble
on Nov. 30 at the Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club's
Meadows course.
Cost is $37.50 and in-
cludes cart rentals and lunch
in the country club's Garden
Room, all with a Fabulous
'50s theme. This event is
open to all women golfers.
The day begins at 8:30
a.m. with a continental
breakfast of home-baked
treats, and sales of putts and
Mulligans. Prizes will be
awarded at the luncheon.
Proceeds will go the
CHWC's Scholarship Pro-
gram, which awards scholar-
ships to deserving Citrus and
Lecanto high schools seniors.
Call Carol at 352-746-
0697 or Maryellen at 352-
527-3843 for information and
to sign up.
Youth golf lessons
at Pine Ridge
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation in partnership
with Pine Ridge Golf Course
will offer youth golf lessons
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Thursday
evenings for five weeks,
beginning Sept. 5.
Children ages 6 to 16 are
eligible and the cost is $50
per child. Instruction will be
given by golf pro Randy Rob-
bins and several of his volun-
teers. During the lessons,
participants will learn putting,
driving, chipping, on-course
play and on-course etiquette.
Visit www.citruscounty
parks.com, or call 352-
527-7540.
From staff reports


Local LEADERS


HOLE-IN-ONE
* Maria Valdes used a 9 iron to hit a hole-in-
one Saturday Nov. 24, on the 88-yard No. 11
hole at Twisted Oaks Golf Club. Barbra and
Walter Mosic were witnesses.
BRENTWOOD
Nov. 21,Wednesday afternoon point quota
group results.
First +12
Vicki Howard and Herm Gardner
Second +10
Deb Langdon and Tom Cox
Most over quota +7
Sam Williams
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Louis DeGennaro
No. 4 Sam Williams
50/50 winner Kenny McCabe
Nov. 24, Saturday morning (HDCP)
scramble results.
First
Gene Moff, Neil Swanton,
Pete lacobelli and Gene Kutina
Second
Dick Hunt, Butch Hunt
and Jennie Diaz
Third
Mike Settle, Alex Mishos,
Nick Mishos and Jim Pearson
Closest to the pin:
No. 2 Alex Mishos
Closest to the Pin:
No.4 Chuck Bengal
Nov. 25, Sunday morning scramble results.
First 6 under
(MOC) Birdie on No. 5
Bob Staker, Paul Roy
and George Batson
Second 6 under
Joe Goyette, Diane Wagner
and Jan Lassiter
Third 5 under
Bruce Liston, Don Gittings
and Rolf Kettenburg
Closest to the Pin:


No. 2
No. 4
50/50 winner
Honorable mention:
Jennie Diaz, Jerry Walker,


Jack Meday
Chuck Curtis
Lee Levering


Diane Levering and Lee Levering
Nov. 26, Monday morning men's group
results.
First Bob Staker +
Second Rob Goyette +
Most over quota +2


Charlie Kuntz
Closest to the F
No. 2
No. 4

Nov. 20, Brenti
standings.
Team:
First
Penny Magliani
Second
Dianne Joyner
Third
Esther Ormsby
Individuals:
First
Second
points
Third
Low Gross
Low Net
Chip-ins:
No.6


Hal Snider 29
'in: Rick Mazzacua 31
Rob Goyette Jesse Lewis 31
Jim Kieffer OTG winners:Frank Delucia, Dick Emberley,
WOMEN Seamus Graham, Frank Hughes, Jesse Lewis
wood Tuesday Ladies League OTG/B, Walt Novak and Hal Snider.
Nov. 20, Brentwood Farms Golf Course
Men's Nine Hole Golf League results.
105 points Hal Snider 31
o and Jane Vandenbergh Frank DeLucia 34
97.0 Seamus Graham 34
and Kay Fitzsimmons OTG winners:
73.0 Frank Delucia, Dick Emberley, Seamus Gra-
and Barbara Ouellette ham, Frank Hughes, Jesse Lewis and Jim Mc-
Donough
Penny Magliano 52.5 "Snowbirds, those new to the area and golfers
Kay Fitzsimmons 46.0 of any age or ability are welcome to join a
friendly round of nine holes of competitive golf.
Nancy Poisson 44.0 We play early every Tuesday morning at
Dianne Joyner 46 Brentwood Farms golf course. Tee is time at
Jeri Meday 30 7:45 a.m. For information, call Frank Hughes
at 352-746-4800 or email new216@tam-
Pat Grace pabayrr.com.


Birdies:
No.4 Sandi Luther
No. 9 Mary Ann Barch
Game of the Day Best Score on Par 5's:
Jane Vandenbergh 22
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Joan Minnelli
Nov. 27, Brentwood Tuesday Ladies League
standings.
Team:
First 117.0 points
Penny Magliano and Jane Vandenbergh
Second 105.0
Dianne Joyner and Kay Fitzsimmons
Third 84.5
Nancy Poisson and Claire Lindley
Individuals:
First Penny Magliano 57.5
Second Kay Fitzsimmons 49.5
(Tie) Nancy Poisson 49.5
Low Gross Nancy Poisson 42
Low Net Dorothy Gratien 30
(Tie) Jeri Meday 30
Chip-ins
No. 2 Nancy Poisson
No. 6 Joan Minnelli
No. 6 Mary Ann Barch


Game of the Day Most 3
Rosemary Karaffa
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2


Putts:


Glenora Hilton


BRENTWOOD FARMS
Nov. 27, Brentwood Farms G.C. Men's Nine
Hole Golf League results.


CITRUS HILLS
Nov. 21, The Citrus Hills Men's Golf Associ-
ation played 1-2-3 on the Oaks golf course.
First -22
Bob Sarno, Dick Morelli,
John Balais and Dave O'Brien
Second -20
Dick Stillwagen, Jerry McClernon,
Keith Bainbridge and Tim Quinn
Third -18 (MOC)
John Nagel, Jerry Krause,
John Keller and Lou Pulgrano
Fourth -18 (MOC)
Don Morrison, Bruce Cahoon,
Clive Affleck and Don Gatz
WOMEN
Nov. 11,The Citrus Hills Ladies Golf Asso-
ciation played nix four. This required cir-
cling four holes before start of play that
would be deleted from the final net score.
The holes required to be circled were two
holes on front nine and two holes on back
nine. Of these four holes, one must be a
par 5, two a par 4 and one a par 3.
Flight One
First Judy Stone 49
Flight Two
First Lily Kim 48
Second Barbara Hirnyk 49
(Tie) Sung Ja Kim 49
(Tie) Dorothy Ammerman 49
(Tie) Young Ja Chi 49
Flight Three
First Barbara Musick 45


Second Gloria Phill
Flight FoL
First Jeannette N
Birdies:
No.1
No. 15

CITRUS SF
MEN
Nov. 27, The Citrus Spring
tion played 2 BB on front
First
Hancock, Robertson,
Gonczi and Malloy
Second
Clutter, Hunt,
Balas and Norton (blind)
Closest to Pins:
No. 4
No. 8
No. 11
No. 14
No. 16
Nov. 24, The Citrus Spring
tion played 1 best ball on
5's and 3 on par 3's.
First
Lycke, Sirmons,
Colletti and Hancock
Second
Feher, Mannix,
Malloy and Hancock (blind)
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4
No. 8
No. 11
No. 14
No. 16
Nov. 22, The Citrus Spring
Association played points
First Walt Nortoi
Second Bob Malloy
Third Leon Smith
Nov. 20, The Citrus Spring
tion played 2 best ball.
First
Manecky, Lycke,
Woodworth and Robertson
Second
Feher, Norton,
Smith and Lycke (blind)
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4
No. 8
No. 11
No. 14
No. 16


ips 46 MIXED
ur Nov. 25, Citrus Springs Golf & Country Club
Mazzone played Tom's and Hen's. Tom's and Hen's is
an 18-hole game with partners playing their
Sue Burgun own ball with the score that counted deter-
Barbara Musick mined by a random draw of "Tom's or
Hen's" cards that were on the following tee.
RINGS Scoring was on a net basis per hole.
First 68*
is Men's Associa- Linda and Ed Turschmann
and 3 on back. Second 68*
142 Sherri and Karl Hammond
Third 69
Sheron and Mel Wilkins
155 Fourth 72
Marjorie and Len Sibley
Fifth 73*
Pat Shoemaker (Blind) and Bill Mannix
Manecky Sixth 73*
Clutter Linda and Keith Miller
Curry *Matching of cards to determine
Jenkins Closest to the Pin:
Manecky No 4 gold tees Len Sibley
s Men's Associa- No. 8 white tees Henry McAloan

par 4s, 2 on par No.16 all tees Sheron Wilkins
Nov.18, Citrus Springs Golf & Country
Club played 9-hole par-3 mixed scramble.
Foursomes Divison
First 24
96 Barbie McAloan, Janet Lillvik
Johnny Menth and Ed Turschmann
Second 26
Linda Miller, Kathy Sirmons
Feher Sandy Mearns and Dave Shoemaker
Hancock Threesomes Division
Feher First 25
Sirmons Sharon Kundel, John Kundel
Curry and Walt Norton
is Men's Second 27*
s. Linda Turschmann, Keith Miller
n 43 and Don Voss
38 *Matching of cards to determine
37 Closest to the Pin:
is Men's Associa- No. 6 women only Linda Turschmann
No. 4 men only John Kundel
128 No. 5 all players Barbie McAloan


(blind)
118



Hancock
Hancock
Gonczi
Hancock
Curry


INVERNESS
Nov. 27, the Inverness Golf & Country Club
Women's Golf Association played Low
Gross/Low Net.


First Flight
Low Gross Mollie Chamberlain
Second Flight
Low Gross Bev Black
First Low Net Nancy Purcell
Second Low Net Fran Hayes


92

85
61
63


Third Low Net Tere Wood 68
Birdies:
No. 10 Nancy Purcell
No. 15 Mollie Chamberlain
Chip-ins:
No. 10 Jean Carley
Nov. 20, the Inverness Golf & Country Club
Women's Golf Association played criss
cross.
First Flight
Miriam Jacobs 26
Nancy Bennett 28
Second Flight
Joyce Taylor 25
Lavera Sasser 25
Chip Ins:
No. 1 Joyce Taylor
No. 5 Joyce Taylor
No. 15 Tere Wood
Birdies:
No. 15 Tere Wood

SUGARMILL WOODS
Nov. 20, Sandblasters men's group played
team point quota.
First +22
Joe Gannon, Tony Valente,
Chuck Reeb and Barry Turska
Second +16
Rich Perry Jim Turner,
Bob Strausser and John Moore
(Tie) Jim Rettick, FrankVanzin
and Dale Vaughn
Notable Rounds:
Mike Schwabek 78
Chuck Reeb 79
Ernie Pettine 84

TWISTED OAKS
Nov. 20, Twisted Oaks Ladies Association
played low net.
First Flight
First Chris Hultzen 33.5
Second Mary Fama 34
Third Barb Mosio 35
(Tie) Joan Ruggere 35
Second Flight
First Helen Kennerly 32.5
Second Jan Himmelspach 33
Third Suzanne Matthews 36
Third Flight
First Pat Doing 32
Second Nancy Vallimont 35
Third Bev McGonnigal 36
Fourth Flight
First Linda Vehrs 32
Second Ro Spencer 33
Third Claire Moran 35


ET


I






WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 B3


No. 3 Michigan holds off rallying N.C. State


Wolverines'Burke controls game

with career-high nine assists


Associated Press

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -
Trey Burke had 18 points
and 11 assists, and No. 3
Michigan held off a late
rally by No. 18 North Car-
olina State in a 79-72 victory
Tuesday night.
Freshman Nik Stauskas
led the Wolverines (6-0) with
20 points and Tim Hardaway
Jr added 16, but it was Burke
who controlled the game,
equaling his previous career
high of nine assists in the
first half and going the whole


game without a turnover.
N.C. State (4-2) trailed 73-
58 before going on a 10-0 run
capped by T.J. Warren's
layup with 2:11 remaining.
Hardaway answered with a
driving bank shot.
It was 75-70 when the
Wolfpack forced a turnover
and called a timeout with
54.4 seconds to play, but C.J.
Leslie was called for an of-
fensive foul.
Leslie appeared to swing
his left arm a bit while back-
ing down against Michigan's
Mitch McGary N.C. State


coach Mark Gottfried was
incensed by the call on the
sideline.
Warren led the Wolfpack
with 18 points.
Michigan committed only
six turnovers four in the
first half. N.C. State shot 57
percent from the field but
lost its fifth straight game in
the ACC-Big Ten challenge.
Michigan led 45-40 after
Leslie's twisting dunk early
in the second half. The
Wolverines answered with
an alley-oop pass to Glenn
Robinson III, whose dunk
popped out of the basket
momentarily before drop-
ping back in.
Michigan methodically
built its lead into double
digits and led 62-48 after


Stauskas made a 3-pointer
from the right wing.
It was 73-58 before N.C.
State made a game of it
down the stretch. Warren
scored on a 3-on-1 break to
make it 73-68. He was fouled
on the play but missed the
free throw that would have
cut the deficit to four.
Michigan has committed
10 or fewer turnovers in five
of its six games this season.
Before the game, Michi-
gan raised a banner com-
memorating its 2012 Big Ten
regular-season title the
program's first since 1986.
The Wolverines look even
more dangerous so far this
season, especially when
they're moving the ball well
and making outside shots.


Associated Press
Michigan forward Mitch McGary reacts to a North Carolina
State turnover in the second half of Tuesday's basketball game
at Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich. Michigan won 79-72.


Baylor's



women



routs



Rice


No. 24 Iowa St.

defeats Drake

Associated Press

HOUSTON Brittney
Griner scored a season-high
35 points and third-ranked
Baylor cruised to an 89-49
victory over Rice on Tues-
day night.
Playing a college basket-
ball game in her hometown
of Houston for the first time,
Griner received a standing
ovation from the predomi-
nantly Baylor-backing
crowd when she was an-
nounced before the game.
The 6-foot-8 senior added
nine rebounds and four
blocks as Baylor (6-1) raced
to a 46-17 halftime lead and
never looked back.
When Griner was benched
with more than 12 minutes
remaining in the game, she
had seven more points than
Rice's entire team.
Jessica Kuster scored 18
points for Rice (2-4) in the
loss. The Owls missed 15 of
their first 16 shots from the
field and shot under 25 per-
cent against Baylor's stellar
defense.
Baylor All-American
point guard Odyssey Sims
missed her fourth straight
game since sustaining a
strained hamstring in the
Lady Bears' loss to Stanford.
Iowa State 87,
Drake 45
AMES, Iowa Hallie
Christofferson had 20 points
and 10 rebounds and Nicole
Blaskowsky and Anna Prins
added 17 points each as No.
24 Iowa State defeated Drake
87-45 on Tuesday night.
Nikki Moody had 15 points
and 10 assists for the Cyclones
(5-0).
Cara Lutes scored 19 points
for the Bulldogs (1-4), who shot
16.1 percent (5 of 31) in the first
half and went 11:40 without a
field goal as Iowa State built a
51-13 halftime lead.
It was Iowa State's eighth
win in the last nine games be-
tween the schools and tied the
all-time series at 26 victories
each. The winning margin of 42
points was bettered only by the
95-29 win (66 points) by the
Cyclones in 1975.
Iowa State played its second
game without star forward
Chelsea Poppens, who suf-
fered a concussion against Loy-
ola Marymount on Nov. 23. She
has plenty of time to rest before
the team's next game against
Iowa on Dec. 6.


Losing streak ends


Associated Press
The Philadelphia 76ers' Jrue Holiday, left, dives for a loose ball from the Dallas Mavericks' Dominique Jones in the first
half of Tuesday's game in Philadelphia.


Turner and Young lead 76ers past Mavericks 100-98


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Evan Turner
scored 22 points and Thaddeus
Young had 20 to lead the Philadel-
phia 76ers to a 100-98 win over the
Dallas Mavericks on Tuesday night.
Jrue Holiday had 18 points and
seven assists for the Sixers, who
snapped a six-game losing streak to
Dallas. Philadelphia shot 6 of 14 on
3-pointers and won its second
straight game.
Chris Kaman scored 20 points, and
Elton Brand and Shawn Marion had
17 apiece for the Mavericks. Vince
Carter added 15 and was clutch in
the fourth quarter in trying to bring
Dallas back from a 10-point hole.
The 76ers finally created some
space in a back-and-forth game when
they snapped a tie with a 10-0 run
midway through the fourth.
Carter hit his third 3-pointer and
then a left-handed layup to bring the
Mavericks to 100-98 with 37 seconds
left. O.J. Mayo missed two free



DUNKED
Continued from Page B1


Minnesota shot 47.3 percent in the
first half while Florida State finished
with a chilly 37.9 percent, after hit-
ting just 32.1 percent in the first half.
"We allowed those early misses to
affect our energy and our focus,"
Hamilton said. "You can't wallow in
self-pity too long because you've got
another team right around the cor-
ner," said Hamilton, whose team
faces Mercer on Sunday


throws with 2.7 seconds to go and Jae
Crowder's last-gasp jumper was off
the mark, leaving Dallas with a 2-5
record on the road.
Suns 91, Cavaliers 78
CLEVELAND Goran Dragic scored
19 points, Michael Beasley added 15 and
Phoenix took control late in the third quar-
ter to beat Cleveland.
The Suns scored the final 14 points of
the third to take a 71-59 lead they did not
relinquish, sending Cleveland to its 10th
loss in 11 games.
Cavaliers center Anderson Varejao had
20 points and 18 rebounds for his sixth
straight double-double. He came in leading
the NBA in rebounding with a 14.7 average.
Cleveland was playing its fourth game
in five nights. The Cavaliers shot 36 per-
cent from the field against a Suns team
that was giving up an NBA-worst 103.3
points per game.
Cleveland played its fifth straight game
without star point guard Kyrie Irving, out
until mid-December with a broken left


Florida State, which won its first
ACC title last season, has lost five
straight games in the annual ACC-Big
Ten challenge dating to a 75-61 vic-
tory over the Gophers in Smith's first
season at Minnesota in 2007.
No. 1 Indiana 83,
No. 14 North Carolins 59
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.- Cody Zeller
had 20 points and eight rebounds, lead-
ing No. 1 Indiana to a stunning 83-59 rout
of No. 14 North Carolina in the ACC-Big
Ten Challenge.
Victor Oladipo and Will Sheehey both
added 19 points for the Hoosiers (7-0),


index finger. Backup shooting guard
Daniel Gibson missed the game with a
sore right elbow.
Rockets 117, Raptors 101
HOUSTON James Harden scored
24 points and matched a career high with
12 assists to lead Houston over Toronto.
Patrick Patterson added 22 points for
the Rockets, who have won four in a row.
OmerAsik had 13 points and 18 re-
bounds.
Andrea Bargnani scored 21 points and
Terrence Ross added a career-high 19 for
the Raptors, who have lost five straight.
The Rockets planned to fly to Min-
neapolis immediately after the game to
attend Wednesday's funeral for Sasha
McHale, the 23-year-old daughter of
coach Kevin McHale. Sasha McHale died
on Saturday from complications of lupus.
The team will then fly from Minneapolis to
Oklahoma City to face the Thunder on
Wednesday night Harden's first game
there since he was traded to Houston on
Oct. 27.


who have won 34 consecutive November
games at home.
The Tar Heels (5-2) were led by Dexter
Strickland with 14 points and Marcus
Paige with 11 not nearly enough when
North Carolina managed three points and
one field goal a tip-in that Indiana may
have gotten a hand on in the first 81/2
minutes of the second half.
For 16 minutes, the college power-
houses battled to a 31-31 draw.
But Zeller scored six points in a 15-6
run to close the first half and played a
key role in the Hoosiers' 13-0 spurt to
open the second half that turned the
game.


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct G
Brooklyn 9 4 .692 -
NewYork 9 4 .692
Philadelphia 9 6 .600
Boston 8 6 .571 1!
Toronto 3 12 .200
Southeast Division
W L Pct GI
Miami 10 3 .769 -
Atlanta 8 4 .667 1!
Charlotte 7 6 .538
Orlando 5 8 .385
Washington 0 12 .000 9!
Central Division
W L Pct GI
Milwaukee 7 5 .583 -
Chicago 6 7 .462 1!
Indiana 6 8 .429
Detroit 4 11 .267 4!
Cleveland 3 12 .200 5!
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GI
Memphis 10 2 .833 !
San Antonio 12 3 .800 -
Houston 7 7 .500 4!
Dallas 7 8 .467
New Orleans 4 9 .308
Northwest Division
W L Pct G
Oklahoma City 11 4 .733 -
Denver 8 7 .533
Utah 8 7 .533
Portland 6 8 .429 4!
Minnesota 5 7 .417 4!
Pacific Division
W L Pct G
Golden State 8 6 .571 -
L.A. Clippers 8 6 .571 -
L.A. Lakers 7 7 .500
Phoenix 7 8 .467 1!
Sacramento 4 9 .308 3!
Monday's Games
San Antonio 118, Washington 92
Brooklyn 96, New York 89, OT
Detroit 108, Portland 101
Milwaukee 93, Chicago 92
Memphis 84, Cleveland 78
Oklahoma City 114, Charlotte 69
Utah 105, Denver 103
New Orleans 105, L.A. Clippers 98
Tuesday's Games
Phoenix 91, Cleveland 78
Philadelphia 100, Dallas 98
Houston 117, Toronto 101
Minnesota at Sacramento, late
Indiana at L.A. Lakers, late
Wednesday's Games
San Antonio at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Portland at Washington, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Utah at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City 8 p.m.
NewYork at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
San Antonio at Miami, 8 p.m.
Denver at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


SEC fines Miss.
$5,000
OXFORD, Miss. Mis-
sissippi has been fined
$5,000 by the Southeastern
Conference after fans
rushed the field following the
football team's 41-24 victory
over No. 25 Mississippi State
in the Egg Bowl on Saturday.
The win snapped the
school's three-game losing
streak in the Egg Bowl and
made the Rebels bowl eligi-
ble for the first time since
2009.
The conference said in a
statement Tuesday this was
the university's first violation
of the policy banning fans
from entering the competi-
tion area since it went into
effect in 2004. The policy
covers football and men's
and women's basketball.
A second violation would
cost the school $25,000
while a third and any subse-
quent violations would be a
$50,000 penalty.
-Associated Press


College Basketball SCORES


Men's College
Basketball Scores
EAST
Baruch 91, Hunter 62
Bucknell 62, Dartmouth 49
Cortland St. 84, Ithaca 67
Hampden-Sydney 83, Wesley College 75
John Jay 81, CCNY 61
Lehigh 77, Quinnipiac 66
NJIT 98, Lyndon St. 42
Penn St.-Harrisburg 72, Susquehanna 67
Pittsburgh 70, Howard 46
Providence 61, Holy Cross 42
St. Joseph's (NY) 68, Mount St. Vincent 66
Vermont 85, Harvard 78
Westfield St. 72, Regis 60
SOUTH
Alabama 75, Lamar 47


Barton 94, Lees-McRae 63
Elizabeth City St. 82, Washington Adventist
54
King (Tenn.) 73, Mount Olive 66
Limestone 89, Pfeiffer 65
McNeese St. 93, Centenary 62
Minnesota 77, Florida St. 68
Mississippi St. 60, Alcorn St. 42
NC Central 70, Utah Valley 52
Nebraska 79, Wake Forest 63
North Florida 71, Bethune-Cookman 65
Presbyterian 97, Toccoa Falls 38
Sewanee 87, Emory & Henry 59
Southern Miss. 61, Denver 50
Tulane 69, Loyola NO 57
UAB 75, Troy 55
Virginia Tech 95, Iowa 79
Xavier (NO) 69, Mobile 66
MIDWEST
Aurora 80, Wis. Lutheran 54


Bowling Green 70, Detroit 65
Butler 97, Hanover 73
Concordia (Wis.) 59, Marian (Wis.) 58
DePaul 85, Fairfield 78
Dubuque 80, North Central (Minn.) 65
Ill.-Chicago 58, N. Illinois 46
Lakeland 79, Edgewood 65
Michigan 79, NC State 72
Minn. St.-Moorhead 79, Valley City St. 66
Rockford 72, Dominican (III.) 70
St. Francis (III.) 56, Spring Arbor 44
Wayne (Neb.) 86, York (Neb.) 71
Wis.-La Crosse 67, Bethany Lutheran 55
Wis.-Whitewater 71, Illinois Wesleyan 65
SOUTHWEST
Texas 65, Sam Houston St. 37
Wayland Baptist 66, Southwestern (Texas) 55
FAR WEST
No scores reported from the FAR WEST


Women's Basketball
Scores
EAST
American U. 85, UMBC 57
Baruch 66, Hunter 44
Boston U. 54, Rhode Island 29
Canisius 61, Binghamton 48
Castleton St. 62, Middlebury 60
Fairfield 51, Vermont 47
Ithaca 53, Cortland St. 33
John Jay 66, CCNY 51
Northeastern 80, Dartmouth 45
RPI 77, Utica 67
Rider 68, Lafayette 64
William Smith 79, Roberts Wesleyan 74
SOUTH
Apprentice 65, NC Wesleyan 56
Barton 71, Lees-McRae 52


Bellarmine 74, Berea 33
Berry 67, Covenant 50
Bethel (Tenn.) 89, Brescia 62
Cumberlands 76, Columbia (Mo.) 63
Hanover 74, Centre 72
IUPUI 61, Belmont 53
Johnson C. Smith 46, Chowan 41
Lee 71, Trevecca Nazarene 65
Liberty 76, UNC-Greensboro 56
Limestone 87, Pfeiffer 50
McNeese St. 90, Centenary 33
Mississippi 62, MVSU 60
Mount Olive 60, King (Tenn.) 56
N. Kentucky 66, Youngstown St. 64
Ohio Mid-Western 92, Kentucky Christian 82,
OT
Pikeville 71, Alice Lloyd 64
SC State 94, Southern Wesleyan 46
SC-Upstate 51, W. Carolina 48
Samford 62, Auburn-Montgomery 24


Tennessee Tech 74, Alcorn St. 57
Transylvania 77, Spalding 70
UAB 58, High Point 53
Washington (Md.) 53, Johns Hopkins 51
Xavier (NO) 58, Mobile 53
MIDWEST
Iowa St. 87, Drake 45
Mary 69, Valley City St. 42
St. Cloud St. 89, Grand View 49
W. Illinois 69, Valparaiso 55
Wichita St. 62, Grambling St. 44
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 89, Rice 49
Houston 55, UTSA 42
Texas-Arlington 77, Houston Baptist 71
FAR WEST
Idaho 68, E. Washington 66
New Mexico 67, Weber St. 44
Utah 92, Utah St. 64
Wayland Baptist 85, U. of the Southwest 37


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BASKETBALL






B4 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


NCAA Football
Nov.29
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
at Rutgers 2Y2 3 (43Y2) Louisville
Friday
Mid-American Conference at Detroit
Championship
N. Illinois 5 6 (58) Kent St.
Pacific-12 Conference
Championship
at Stanford 10Y2 8Y2 (46) UCLA
Saturday
Cincinnati 512 5 (4012) at UConn
Pittsburgh 5Y2 6 (46Y2) at S. Florida
Oklahoma 7 6Y2 (60Y2) atTCU
at Kansas St. 10Y2 11 Y2 (63/2) Texas
Oklahoma St. 4Y2 4Y2 (86) at Baylor
Boise St. 8Y2 9Y2 (59Y2) at Nevada
at West Virginia 20 20 (70Y2) Kansas
atTexas St. 122 13 (57) New Mexico St.
at Arkansas St.10Y2 10 (62Y2) Middle Tenn.
La.-Lafayette 9Y2 9Y2 (60) at FAU
at Hawaii 3Y2 6 (53Y2) S. Alabama
Conference USA Championship
at Tulsa 1 1 (55) UCF
Southeastern Conference at Atlanta
Championship
Alabama 7Y2 7 (49Y2) Georgia
Atlantic Coast Conference at Charlotte, N.C.
Championship
Florida St. 13 14 (63Y2) Georgia Tech
Big Ten Conference at Indianapolis
Championship
Nebraska 3 3 (49) Wisconsin
NFL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
at Atlanta 3Y2 4 (56) New Orleans


at Chicago
at Green Bay
San Francisco
at N.Y. Jets
Carolina
at Detroit
at Buffalo
New England
Houston
at Denver
at Baltimore (
at Oakland (
Cincinnati
at Dallas


Sund
4 4
9 9
7 7
312 4Y2
1 3
4Y2 4Y2
6 6
7 712
412 52
612 7
)FF OF
)FF OF
+1 1Y2
9 9


ay
(37Y2) Seattle
(46Y2) Minnesota
(40) at St. Louis
S (3612) Arizona
(40Y2) at Kansas City
2 (51) Indianapolis
(45) Jacksonville
S (51) at Miami
(47) atTennessee
(50Y2) Tampa Bay
F (OFF) Pittsburgh
F (OFF) Cleveland
2 (46) at San Diego
(43) Philadelphia


Monday
N.Y Giants Pk 2Y2 (51) atWashington
NCAA Basketball
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
at Ohio 10 St. Bonaventure
at Wisconsin 101Y2 Virginia
at Youngstown St. 4Y2 Kent St.
Cleveland St. 1 at Ball St.
at Richmond 12Y2 William & Mary
at James Madison Pk GeorgeWashington
Temple 8 at Buffalo
Bradley 2Y2 at Cent. Michigan
at Clemson 6 Purdue
Michigan St. 2 at Miami
George Mason 4Y2 at Rhode Island
at North Texas 8 Texas-Arlington
at Wichita St. 15 Tulsa
at S. Illinois 3 Fresno St.
at SMU 8 Utah
at Creighton 14 Boise St.
at UTEP 2/2 New Mexico St.
at Illinois 9 Georgia Tech
at Penn St. 2Y2 Boston College
at Duke 6 Ohio St.
at UC Santa Barbara Pk Wyoming
at Washington St. 6Y2 Idaho
at Nevada 13Y2 UC Davis
atUNLV 15 UCIrvine
at Stanford 19 Seattle
at Santa Clara 8V2 Utah St.
at Washington 4Y2 Saint Louis
at UCLA 1612 CS Northridge
at Marshall 11 Y2 Morehead St.
Duquesne 4 at Appalachian St.
at Dayton 14 WeberSt.
at Georgia Southern 2Y2 Elon
at Furman Pk W. Carolina
at lona 6 Niagara
UMass 8Y2 at Siena
at S. Dakota St. 15 North Dakota
at Loyola of Chicago 5 Tennessee Tech
BYU-x 4Y2 Montana
at Arizona 23Y2 N. Arizona
x-at Salt Lake City
NBA
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
Portland 4 atWashington
San Antonio 7Y2 at Orlando
at Boston 3Y2 Brooklyn
at Atlanta 9 Charlotte
at Detroit 1 Phoenix
at Chicago 5 Dallas
New York 1Y2 at Milwaukee
at Memphis 912 Toronto
Utah 3Y2 at New Orleans
at Oklahoma City 9Y2 Houston
at L.A. Clippers 8V2 Minnesota


REGULAR SEASON
STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo
South
Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville
North
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland
West
Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


Pct PF
.727 407
.455 211
.364 221
.364 243
Pct PF
.909 327
.636 230
.364 238
.182 188
Pct PF
.818 283
.545 231
.545 282
.273 209
Pct PF
.727 318
.364 245
.273 218
.091 161


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East W L T Pct PF
N.Y Giants 7 4 0 .636 305
Washington 5 6 0 .455 295
Dallas 5 6 0 .455 242
Philadelphia 3 8 0 .273 184
South W L T Pct PF
Atlanta 10 1 0 .909 294
Tampa Bay 6 5 0 .545 310
New Orleans 5 6 0 .455 308
Carolina 3 8 0 .273 214
North W L T Pct PF
Chicago 8 3 0 .727 277
Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 273
Minnesota 6 5 0 .545 248
Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267
West W L T Pct PF
San Francisco 8 2 1 .773 276
Seattle 6 5 0 .545 219
St. Louis 4 6 1 .409 205
Arizona 4 7 0 .364 180
Sunday's games
Denver 17, Kansas City 9
Chicago 28, Minnesota 10
Cincinnati 34, Oakland 10
Cleveland 20, Pittsburgh 14
Indianapolis 20, Buffalo 13
Jacksonville 24, Tennessee 19
Atlanta 24, Tampa Bay 23
Miami 24, Seattle 21
Baltimore 16, San Diego 13, OT
St. Louis 31, Arizona 17
San Francisco 31, New Orleans 21
N.Y Giants 38, Green Bay 10
Monday's game
Carolina 30, Philadelphia 22
Thursday, Nov. 29, game
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 2, games
Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Kansas City 1 p.m.


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
4-9-1
CASH 3 (late)
1^ 9' 1-9-0
i PLAY 4 (early)
S 8-3-0-8
PLAY 4 (late)
1-0-2-4
FANTASY 5
2-4-7-10-17
MEGA MONEY
6-11-16-42
odaM Lottey MEGA BALL
2



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Virginia at Wisconsin
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) George Washington at James Madison
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Michigan State at Miami
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgia Tech at Illinois
9:30 p.m. (ESPN) Ohio State at Duke
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6:30 p.m. (SUN) Alabama-Birmingham at Central Florida
(Taped)
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) San Antonio Spurs at Orlando Magic
NFL
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Pro Football Hall of Fame Special
SOCCER
2:55 p.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League:
Manchester United FC vs. West Ham United FC

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. Lecanto at Academy at the Lakes
BOYS SOCCER
7 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River
GIRLS SOCCER
7:30 p.m. Belleview at Citrus
WRESTLING
6:30 p.m. Crystal River at Weeki Wachee


Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 3. game
N.Y Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
Panthers 30,
Eagles 22
Carolina 14 0 7 9- 30
Philadelphia 3 12 7 0 22
First Quarter
Phi-FG Henery 36, 11:12.
Car-Barnidge 24 pass from Newton (Gano
kick), 6:12.
Car-LaFell 43 pass from Newton (Gano kick),
3:36.
Second Quarter
Phi-FG Henery 41, 14:15.
Phi-Brown 65 run (pass failed), 10:56.
Phi-FG Henery 45, 3:20.
Third Quarter
Car-Newton 1 run (Gano kick), 9:13.
Phi-Brown 5 run (Henery kick), 3:30.
Fourth Quarter
Car-FG Gano 23, 12:40.
Car-Newton 2 run (kick failed), 4:40.
A-69,144.
Car Phi
First downs 24 18
Total Net Yards 398 311
Rushes-yards 35-109 26-204
Passing 289 107
Punt Returns 0-0 2-32
Kickoff Returns 5-114 4-110
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 18-28-0 16-21-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-17 1-12
Punts 5-37.6 2-41.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 4-3
Penalties-Yards 6-101 5-30
Time of Possession 35:12 24:48
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Carolina, Newton 14-52, Stewart
8-27, D.Williams 11-21, LaFell 1-6, Tolbert 1-3.
Philadelphia, Brown 19-178, Lewis 5-24, Jack-
son 1-2, Foles 1-0.
PASSING-Carolina, Newton 18-28-0-306.
Philadelphia, Foles 16-21-0-119.
RECEIVING-Carolina, Smith 4-60, Olsen 4-
50, LaFell 3-74, Murphy 2-65, Tolbert 2-24,
Stewart 2-9, Barnidge 1-24. Philadelphia,
Maclin 5-55, Brown 4-11, Celek 2-19, D.John-
son 2-13, Jackson 1-9, Cooper 1-7, Havili 1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
AP Pro32
power rankings
The Associated Press Pro32 NFL Power
Rankings, as voted by a 12-member panel,
with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Nov.27, total points based
on 32 points for a first-place vote through
one point for a 32nd-place vote, and previ-
ous ranking:
W L T Pts Pvs
1. Houston Texans (7) 10 1 0 370 1
2. San Francisco 49ers (3)8 2 1 365 2
3. Atlanta Falcons 10 1 0 354 3
4. New England Pats (2) 8 3 0 352 7
5. Denver Broncos 8 3 0 337 4
6. Baltimore Ravens 9 2 0 333 6
7. NewYork Giants 7 4 0 316 9
8. Chicago Bears 8 3 0 305 8
9. Green Bay Packers 7 4 0 286 5
10. Indianapolis Colts 7 4 0 260 15
11. Cincinnati Bengals 6 5 0 252 17
12.Tampa Bay Bucs 6 5 0 248 12
13. Seattle Seahawks 6 5 0 237 10
14. Pittsburgh Steelers 6 5 0 233 11
15. New Orleans Saints 5 6 0 232 12
16. Washington Redskins 5 6 0 214 18
17. Minnesota Vikings 6 5 0 187 14
18. Dallas Cowboys 5 6 0 181 16
19. Miami Dolphins 5 6 0 159 24
20. Detroit Lions 4 7 0 157 19
21. San Diego Chargers 4 7 0 140 20
22. St. Louis Rams 4 6 1 129 26
23. Buffalo Bills 4 7 0 117 22
24. NewYorkJets 4 7 0 102 21
25. Cleveland Browns 3 8 0 91 29
26. Carolina Panthers 3 8 0 88 28


27. Tennessee Titans 4 7 0 87 23
28. Arizona Cardinals 4 7 0 76 25
29. Philadelphia Eagles 3 8 0 45 27
30. Jacksonville Jaguars 2 9 0 43 31
31. Oakland Raiders 3 8 0 27 30
32. Kansas City Chiefs 1 10 0 13 32
VOTING PANEL
Chris Berman, ESPN
Clifton Brown, Sporting News
Cris Collinsworth, NBC Sports
Rich Gannon, CBS Sports/SiriusXM NFL
Radio
Bob Glauber, Newsday
Rick Gosselin, Dallas Morning News
Clark Judge, CBSSports.com
Ira Kaufman, Tampa Tribune
Pat Kirwan, SiriusXM NFL Radio/CBSS-
ports.com
John Lynch, Fox Sports
Alex Marvez, Foxsports.com
Dan Pompei, Chicago Tribune

BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE-Suspended
Philadelphia C Carlos Ruiz 25 games for a vio-
lation of the Major League Baseball's Joint Drug
Prevention and Treatment Program.
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Assigned 2B Ivan De
Jesus outright to Pawtucket (IL).
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Named Daryl
Boston first base coach, Bobby Thigpen bullpen
coach and Harold Baines assistant hitting
coach.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Assigned RHP
Fabio Martinez outright to Columbus (IL). An-
nounced 2B Brent Lillibridge refused outright
assignment and elected free agency.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Agreed to terms with
RHP Scott Feldman on a one-year contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Agreed to terms with
OF Trevor Crowe, LHP Sergio Escalona, RHP
Edgar Gonzalez and RHP Jose Valdez on
minor league contracts. Announced the resig-
nation of vice president of marketing and strat-
egy Kathleen Clark.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS-Placed DB Anthony
Levine on injured reserve.
CAROLINA PANTHERS-Placed DT Ron
Edwards on injured reserve. Signed DT Frank
Kearse from the practice squad.
CHICAGO BEARS-Signed OL Andre
Gurode. Waived DT Amobi Okoye. Released
WR Raymond Radway and G Chris Riley from
the practice squad. Signed OL Derek Dennis
and WR Dale Moss to the practice squad.
CINCINNATI BENGALS-Released C Scott
Wedige and LB Ben Jacobs from the practice
squad. Signed OT Dan Knapp and TE Bryce
Davis to the practice squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS-Signed DE
Ryan Davis to the practice squad.
HOUSTON TEXANS-Released RB Davin
Meggett. Signed LB Cameron Collins.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS-Signed RB Jordan
Todman from the practice squad and RB Joe
Banyard to the practice squad.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS-Placed OT Bryce
Harris on injured reserve. Signed TE Michael
Higgins from the practice squad.
NEW YORK GIANTS-Signed RB Ryan
Torain and RB Kregg Lumpkin. Released OL
Selvish Capers. Terminated the practice squad
contract of RB Joe Martinek.
NEW YORK JETS-Waived G Hayworth
Hicks.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES-Released DE
Jason Babin.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS-Placed S Atari
Bigby on injured reserve. Signed LB Bront Bird.
Signed S Sean Cattouse to the practice squad.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS-Agreed to terms
with LB NaVorro Bowman on a five-year con-
tract extension.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS-Released QB Josh
Portis from the practice squad. Signed WR Phil
Bates to the practice squad.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Placed S
Cody Grimm and T Jeremy Trueblood on injured
reserve. Claimed WR/KR David Gilreath off
waivers from Pittsburgh. Released G Chris
Scott from the practice squad. Signed S Sean
Baker to the practice squad.
TENNESSEE TITANS-Re-signed OL Kyle
DeVan. Placed RB Darren Evans on injured re-
serve.


Lady 'Canes cruise to win


CHS lifts more

than Central

MICHAEL MAKSYMICZ
Correspondent

INVERNESS The Cit-
rus High School Lady Hur-
ricanes made easy work of
the Central Lady Bears of
Spring Hill during their sec-
ond meet in the 5A district
competition Tuesday.
The Citrus High School
weightlifters showed confi-
dence and poise as they pro-
ceeded to rack up all first
and second places, except
for one, to defeat Central
70-5.
The advantage, however,
was in the 'Canes favor from
start since the Bears only
had four girls competing.
The rest of the weightlifting
team had scheduling con-
flicts as many girls are still
playing basketball.
The Bears' number
deficit didn't seem to take
away from the hard work of
the Lady 'Canes lifters.
"I have made large im-
provements over last season
due to summer workouts,
and assistant coach 'Chops'
Alexander provides extra
help with our workouts,"
Junior Hannah Evans said.
Evans, who competes in
the 154-pound weight class,
attributes hard work and


support of her peers and
family to her increased lift-
ing capabilities.
"I plan to compete in this
weight class for the rest of
this season," she adsaidded.
In the 110-pound weight
class, CHS senior Monica
Coates captured first with a
total lift of 200 pounds,
while Sarah Parsley took
second with 190 pounds.
"This year I have moved
up to the 110-pound weight
class," Coates said. "The last
three years, I competed in
the 101-pound class.
Coates eyes are on a big-
ger prize than just a higher
weight class.
"I went to state last season
and finished third, and I
feel that I will have a good
chance to go to state this
season, as I have increased
my training and I feel very
good in this weight class,"
she said.
In the 119-pound weight
class, Ashley Nichols cap-
tured first with a total of 205
pounds, while Abbey Mat-
tingly took second with a
total of 195 pounds. In the
129-pound weight class,
Aaron McIntyre grabbed
first with 245 pounds, while
Hunter Paspiech settled for
third place with 175.
In the 139-pound weight
class, Makenzi Hotaling
lifted a total of 235 pounds
for first place, and Kendra
Kirby totaled 225 pounds for


second. In the 154-pound
weight class, Hannah Evans
walked away with a total lift
of 280 pounds, while Melissa
Michaud lifted 205 pounds.
There was no competition
in the 169-pound weight
class, leaving Martina Mer-
cado to capture first with
175 pounds and Jesse San-
tana lifting 165 pounds for
second.
In the 183-pound weight
class, Anna Venero easily
captured first with a total
lift of 280 pounds, and
Marissa Crilley grabbing
second with a total of 115
pounds.
Samantha Kanawall in
the 199-pound weight class
lifted a total of 235 pounds,
while Kara Hooks settled
for second with 195 pounds.
In the unlimited class,
Christy Cooper placed first
with a total lift of 235
pounds. Kaitlynn Ramsay
took second with a total lift
of 220 pounds.
"Last year, we had a few
girls who were not as strong,
but this season they have
stepped up and increased
their totals and are looking
much better," coach Alexan-
der said. "We are looking
forward to a good season
and I see some of our girls
going to state.:
The Lady Hurricanes will
host the Crystal River Lady
Pirates at 4 p.m. Dec. 6 in a
District 5A meet.


Sports BRIEFS


C.R. vaults over The Villages Seven Rivers routs St. Francis


The Lady Pirates speared the Buffalo with a 5-
0 victory Tuesday night in The Villages.
Leading the scoring for Crystal River (3-4
overall, 2-1 district) was Christina Bresson with
two goals. Scoring one goal apiece were Brooke
Levins, Delaney Owens and Melissa Cang
Cuesta, who also had one assist.
Hannah Hutchinson notched two assists while
teammate Cheyenna Lyons had one.
The Lady Pirates will host county rival Lecanto
at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.


TD "He's ear
SSTOOPS Stoops said
"He's done
Continued from Page B1 everywhere
know he's re
famed coaching family to for the job."
lead his own program. Older Bob said
brother Bob Stoops is the Mark is to tru
head coach at Oklahoma "When yo
and Mike Stoops is the those position
Sooners' defensive coordi- wants to tell y
nator. Before joining the the OU coac]
Oklahoma staff this year, how it was f(
Mike was the head coach at let anyone hu
Arizona. it at my own


S A E60-58 with 1:4
ANEO However,
struggled for
Continued from Page B1 the waning sE
watched Pry(
Randy Lynn (11 points, 13 pair of free
rebounds) and sophomore Lynn got
Desmond Franklin (10 bucket undei
points) each added double- all but seal i
digit scoring to Pryor's onds remain
game-high for the 'Canes. Pirates d(
"I wasn't playing too well point guard
in the first half, with my drained a cou
thumb bothering me a little ers in the fo
bit," Pryor said. "I felt like points on th
my teammates needed me adding team-1
to step up as a leader." rebounds and
Crystal River (0-1) was Senior gua
down by 10 on three differ- made three 3:
ent occasions in the second points for his
half, but climbed back to Outside of
narrow Citrus' advantage to for-15 foul sh




SHARKS Citrus b
Continued from Page B Nature
The Citrus I

The Sharks scored first in ture Coast 3-2
the game's 15th minute. corngfor
Hailey LaLande took a pass Scoring for
from Emily Myers and fired were Killian M
it into the net from 20 yards Marsden and
out, giving the Sharks a 1-0 land. Assisting
lead at halftime. were Marsder
Nature Coast became Wilcoxin and
more aggressive in the sec- Goal keep
ond half. At 43 minutes, had six saves
Meyers broke away and Citrus will h
rocketed a shot in from 18 at 7:30 p.m. F
yards, netting her 14th goal
of the season. Makenzie
Cummings assisted. stis, Citrus N
Myers also assisted on her toughest dist
team's final goal. With the Nature Coast
game 54 minutes old, she Masserio sai
passed to Silvana Paonessa, half, the tean
who booted it from six yards. out the situatii
"We felt that other than Eu- more in the se


the deciding
yellow card a
defender Je
Continued from Page B1 who took S'
from behind
Hartwell volleyed a shot tempt Taking
into the top left of The Vil- kick from 1
lages' goal off a Swanson Swanson wra
corner kick to increase the left of the Bus
lead 2-0. tioned in fr
What ultimately became making the s(


Seven Rivers Christian School (2-0) handily
defeated St. Francis Catholic High School 49-29
on Tuesday night in Gainesville.
Andrea Zachar lead the Lady Warriors with 20
points, nine rebounds, four assists and two
steals. Alexis Zachar followed her sister with 14
points, four rebounds, seven blocked shots and
five steals.
Seven Rivers hosts Liberty Christian at 6:30
p.m. Thursday.
From staff reports


ned it," Bob
of his brother.
really well
he's been. I
*ally prepared

his advice to
st his instincts.
u get one of
ns, everybody
*ou what to do,"
I said. "That's
or me. I didn't
irry me. I took
pace, trusted


46 to go.
the Pirates
good shots in
seconds as they
or convert on a
throws. Then
a wide-open
r the basket to
it with 50 sec-
ng.
o-it-all junior
Ty Reynolds
iple of 3-point-
urth to net 25
e night while
high totals of 10
I three steals.
rd Matt Taylor
s en route to 13
Pirates.
Reynolds' 11-
ooting, Crystal


)o
C

Hi
ee


2c
M

I, )
R
er
o
hoE
ri(



rii
he
.c(


01


my guy and my instincts on
what I wanted to do, and for-
tunately it worked out."
Mark Stoops has been the
Seminoles' defensive coordi-
nator the past three seasons.
Florida State's defense was
ranked 108th when he took
over and he has turned the
Seminoles into one of the na-
tion's top defensive teams.
The Seminoles have the
nation's second-ranked de-
fense, giving up 249.4 yards
per game.


River made seven of its 19
free throws.
"It felt like it was way too
much Devin (Pryor) against
Ty (Reyolds) at one point, and
I think it didn't bode well for
either team as we got out of
our offenses," Pirates head
coach Steve Feldman said.
"Between the fact that we hit
a fatigue wall and broke
down defensively and didn't
cash in on our free throws,
that's enough to beat you on
any given night against a
quality opponent like Citrus."
Citrus stays at home
Thursday for a matchup
with Wildwood, and Crystal
River travels to Eustis for a
district contest Friday Both
games tip off at 7 p.m.


"I felt the defense did an
)ys beat excellent job," she contin-
Oast 3-2 ued. "Our three goal scorers
igh School did well. We played well."
am beatNa- Nature Coast earned
on Tuesday.Na- Feldt's respect.
Sue "They are a very good
e Hurricanes program," the Citrus coach
ean, Joshua said. "They are very deep at
ichael Het- all positions. They have a
with the goals number of really excep-
Austin tional individuals."
yan Dolan. Despite the shutout, the
Alan Verone Canes had some impressive
n eight shots. efforts.
st Hernando "For us, Megan Flaherty
day. at sweeper had a very solid
From staff reports effort," Feldt said. "Despite
the three goals, goalkeeper
would be our Paige Gramer played really
ct opponent," well. She made some amaz-
ead coach Lisa ing saves (nine saves for the
"In the first game).
were feeling "DK (Decaysha Miller) is
n. We attacked our workhorse. She always
ond half. does well."


goal followed a
against Buffalo
b Kincannon,
wanson down
in a tackle at-
, the direct free
15 yards out,
ipped the shot
ffalo wall posi-
'ont of Davis,
core 3-0.


Buffalo striker Bryce Lan-
gley took a pass from team-
mate Magnus Morkon,
beating Kidd left side to
make the game 3-1.
Next up for the Pirates is
a county rivalry match today
against Lecanto, followed by
several district games.
"This is the gauntlet time of
our schedule," Verlato said.


SCOREBOARD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 B5


Racquets poised to start swinging next year


he 6.5 Senior
Combo team
from Skyview
sealed the USTA Cham-
pionship with a 2-1 vic-
tory over Fort King.
The team was cap-
tained by Margie
McLellan and included
the following players:
Jacqueline Bennett,
Linda Wallace, Martha
McBride, Marti Little,
Ruth Branson, Terrie
LeAnn Marshall.


Er
van den
ON CC


Michelle Jones, Maribel Mena,
Carrie Ingersoll and Susan
Cremins Conaty.
Hopefully, after reading about
our champions time after time,
you will get the itch to try to play
in a league yourself. It is a lot of
fun. You can either sign up as a
player or, if you really are com-
mitted, as captain of your own
team. In the next month or so, you
have to decide if you want to give
it a shot at least for the leagues
that start in January
There will be four age divisions:
18-plus, 40-plus, 55-plus and 65-
plus. The 55-plus and 65-plus divi-
sions will kick off the year in
January, both with three doubles
teams.


In February, it will be
the 18-plus, with three
mixed doubles teams.
At the end of March, it is
the turn of the 18-plus
adults, with two singles
and three doubles. Last
but not least is the 40-
plus division, with two
singles and three dou-
ic bles, which will start in
Hoogen summer 2013.
DURT The 55-plus division
will play Saturday and/or
Sunday, and the 65-plus
during the week If a lot of players in
your 65-plus team are working, you
may play on the weekends.
Remember if you turn 18,40,55,
65 anytime in 2013, even on Dec.
31, you can play in the age division
starting Jan. 1, 2013.
Deadlines for all these leagues
will be available in the next cou-
ple of weeks. And, as usual, you
will find them in this column -
only in your local paper.
There were no local league
scores this week because of
Thanksgiving.
Citrus County Women's
Tuesday Team Tennis
This women-only league is geared
toward players rated 3.0 to 3.5. If inter-


ested in playing, or if you want to cap-
tain a team, contact chairwoman
Candace Charles at 352-563-5859 or
Candacecharles@tampabay.rr.com.
Citrus Area Senior
Ladies 3.0/3.5 Tuesday
League
To play in this league, a player must
be at least 50 years of age with a
3.0/3.5 rating. The league is always
looking for players to sub for teams.
For information, email chairwoman
Lucy Murphy at wjlrmurphy@embarq
mail.com or 527-4239.
Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0 3.5 League
All players must be at least 50 years
of age or older with a 3.0 to 3.5 rating.
Players cannot be a member of a
team and a sub.
For information, email chairwoman
Sue Doherty at suedoherty@
prodigy.net.
Ladies on the Court
Ladies on The Court play at 8:30
a.m. Thursday at Le Grone Park
courts in Crystal River. Bring a new
can of balls and 50 cents. Two-out-of-
three tiebreak sets are played.
For information, contact Barbara


Shook at dshook@tampabay.rr.com or
352-795-0872.
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
For information, contact chair-
woman Diane Halloran at 352-527-
7763 or tdhfla@tampabay.rr.com
USTA Leagues
Senior Combo Women 6.5:
Skyview def. Fort King, 2-1. Record 4-2.
Ruth Branson/Terrie LeAnn Mar-
shall won, 7-5, 6-4;
Michelle Jones/Maribel Mena
lost, 6-2, 3-6, 1-0;
Carrie Ingersoll/Susan Cremins
Conaty won, 4-6, 6-2, 1-0.
Senior Combo Women 7.5:
Skyview def. Fort King, 3-0. Record 7-1.
Pam Payne/Jacqueline Bennett,
6-3, 6-7, 1-0;
Nelva Polich/Susan Barry, 2-6,
6-1, 1-0;
April Manley/Irma Buttermore,
7-6,6-2.
This team missed the championship
by only one set. They tied with Fort
King. Both had a 7-1 record, but the
tiebreaker for the championship was in
Fort King's favor.
Senior Combo Women 8.5:
Skyview lost from Fort King, 3-0.


Record 0-4.
For information in our District 4
(south) call or email Leigh Chak at
352-572-7157 or vacocala@
gmail.com or ustaflorida.com.
Tournaments
Dec. 1 and 2: JCT Tournament at
Sugarmill Woods.
Juniors interested in competing in
the upcoming tournaments should
"friend" the JCT on Facebook -
search for Junior Circuit Tennis. All
JCT information is posted on the site,
including the season's schedule, start-
ing times and specific tournament an-
nouncements.
To enter the tournament, email Judy
Jeanette at jjeanette3saj@aol.com.
The entry fee is $20 and is paid at the
tournament. For information from a
live person, call Judy at 352-232-
0322.
Jan. 12 and 13: JCT Tournament
at Southern Hills Country Club.
Jan.19 and 20 (tentative): Crystal
River Open.
Feb. 9 and 10: JCT Tournament
of Champions at Sugarmill Woods.
----
Eric van den Hoogen, Chronicle
tennis columnist, can be reached
at hoera@juno.com.


Associated Press
Baseball union leader Marvin Miller speaks to reporters
July 16, 1981, after rejecting a proposal to end a baseball
strike in New York. Miller died Tuesday in New York. He
was 95.



Former baseball


union head dies


Marvin Miller

won free agency

forplayers

Associated Press

NEW YORK Marvin
Miller was a labor econo-
mist who never played a
day of organized baseball.
He preferred tennis. Yet he
transformed the national
pastime as surely as Babe
Ruth, Jackie Robinson, tel-
evision and night games.
Miller, the union boss
who won free agency for
baseball players in 1975,
ushering in an era of multi-
million-dollar contracts and
athletes who switch teams
at the drop of a batting hel-
met, died Tuesday at 95. He
had been diagnosed with
liver cancer in August
"I think he's the most im-
portant baseball figure of
the last 50 years," former
baseball Commissioner Fay
Vincent said. "He changed
not just the sport but the
business of the sport per-
manently, and he truly
emancipated the baseball
player- and in the process
all professional athletes.
Prior to his time, they had
few rights. At the moment,
they control the games."
In his 16 1/2 years as ex-
ecutive director of the
Major League Players As-
sociation, starting in 1966,
Miller fought owners on
many fronts, not only
achieving free agency but
making the word "strike"
stand for something other
than a pitched ball.


Over the years, his influ-
ence on the game was widely
acknowledged if not always
honored. Baseball fans argue
over whether he made the
game fairer or more nakedly
mercenary, and the Hall of
Fame repeatedly rejected
him in what was attributed to
lingering resentment among
team owners.
Players attending the
union's annual executive
board meeting in New York
said their professional
lives are Miller's legacy
"Anyone who's ever
played modern profes-
sional sports owes a debt of
gratitude to Marvin Miller,"
Los Angeles Dodgers
pitcher Chris Capuano
said. "He empowered us as
players. He gave us owner-
ship of the game we play
Anyone who steps on a
field in any sport, they have
a voice because of him."
Major League Baseball's
revenue has grown from
$50 million in 1967 to $7.5
billion this year. At his last
public speaking engage-
ment, a discussion at New
York University School of
Law in April marking the
40th anniversary of the
first baseball strike, Miller
said free agency and re-
sulting fan interest con-
tributed to the increase.
And both management and
labor benefited, he said.
"I never before saw such a
win-win situation in my life,
where everybody involved
in Major League Baseball,
both sides of the equation,
still continue to set records
in terms of revenue and
profits and salaries and ben-
efits," Miller said. He called
it "an amazing story."


Big East expands


Associated Press
From left, Tulane head football coach Curtis Johnson, men's basketball coach Ed Conroy, President Scott Cowen and
baseball coach Rick Jones talk after a news conference Tuesday in New Orleans. The Big East moved quickly to replace
Rutgers and braced for more possible departures, getting Tulane and East Carolina to agree to join the re-invented
conference in 2014.

Tulane, East Carolina to join Big East conference '14, leave C-USA


Associated Press

The Big East moved quickly to re-
place Rutgers and braced for more
possible departures, getting Tulane
and East Carolina to agree to join the
re-invented conference in 2014.
"I would go as far to say as this is a
historic day for Tulane University ...
the Big East is coming to the Big Easy,"
school President Scott Cowen said
Tuesday
Tulane, in New Orleans, and East
Carolina, in Greenville, N.C., will
make it six Conference USA schools to
join the Big East in the past two years.
Rutgers announced a week ago it
would leave the Big East for the Big
Ten. Cowen and athletic director Rick
Dickson said serious talks with the Big
East began about a week ago.
"This is an unprecedented opportu-
nity to join a national conference,"
Dickson said.
ECU athletic director Terry Holland
said an offer to join the Big East came
Sunday
"It was a quick turnaround," he
said.
Rutgers would like to join the Big Ten
by 2014, along with Maryland, but the
Scarlet Knights have left their depar-
ture date from the Big East ambiguous.
Conference bylaws require members to


give the league notification of two years
and three months before departing, but
the Big East has negotiated early exits
for Syracuse, Pittsburgh and West Vir-
ginia in the past year
West Virginia joined the Big 12 this
year. Syracuse and Pitt will begin play
in the Atlantic Coast Conference in
September
With Maryland leaving the ACC,
there has been strong speculation that
Connecticut or Louisville will be the
next to leave the Big East as the Terps'
replacement.
If either does, the conference is still
on target to have 12 football members
in 2014, just not the same ones it will
have in 2013 when the new Big East
debuts.
"We're not finished," Big East Com-
missioner Mike Aresco said. "We obvi-
ously have some other plans for
expansion."
The Big East is also on the open
market, trying to negotiate a pivotal
new television contract. Aresco said
that had to be put on hold for a few
days as the conference regrouped
after the latest defection.
Boise State and San Diego State,
currently in the Mountain West, are
set to join for football only starting in
2013, anchoring the Big East's new
West Division. Also on schedule to join


next season are current C-USA mem-
bers SMU, Houston, Memphis and
Central Florida.
Navy has committed to join the Big
East for football in 2015. The confer-
ence had planned to find a 14th mem-
ber to balance out its divisions even
before Rutgers left. BYU and Air
Force were top targets for that spot.
Aresco said the Big East could even
expand to 16 members, depending on
what schools are available.
"We have to let that play out," he
said.
Officials from San Diego State and
Boise State have said they are still
committed to joining the Big East but
have expressed a desire for the con-
ference to add more western schools.
"They absolutely are extremely
committed to the Big East," Aresco
said. "We absolutely will be looking at
some western schools."
The Big East's membership in-
cludes seven schools, including
Georgetown and St. John's, that either
do not have football teams or don't
compete at the FBS level, but have
helped it become a premier basketball
conference.
Tulane seems an odd choice based
on the school's recent performance in
football and men's basketball, the two
most prominent sports.


Sports BRIEFS


Associated Press
Boxing champ Hector "Macho" Ca-
macho acknowledges fans July 7,
2001, at KeySpan Park in New
York's Coney Island. Camacho
wake started Tuesday.


Puerto Rico says adios
to 'Macho' Camacho
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico Family,
fans and fellow boxers said goodbye
Tuesday to Hector "Macho" Camacho at
a memorial and wake for the slain for-
mer world champion fighter known for
his flamboyance in and out of the ring.
Hundreds of people filed past Ca-
macho's open casket, displayed inside
a gymnasium decked out for the occa-
sion with black carpet and curtains.
The boxer wore white, along with a
large gold crucifix and a necklace
spelling out his nickname, "Macho," in
capital letters.
Camacho was shot Nov. 20 while sit-


ting in a parked car with a friend outside
a bar in Bayamon, his hometown. The
friend died at the scene and the boxer
three days later after doctors removed
him from life support. Police have said
they have suspects but have not yet ar-
rested anyone for the shooting.
The memorial and wake was sched-
uled to last two days. Family members
have not yet announced the location
and date of the funeral. His lawyer,
Linda George, told Radio Isla 1320 it
would be in New York.
Ruiz suspended 25
games after positive test
NEW YORK Philadelphia Phillies
catcher Carlos Ruiz has been sus-


pended for the first
25 games of next
season following a
positive test for an
amphetamine.
Ruiz's suspension
was announced
Tuesday by Major
League Baseball.
The 33-year-old,
an All-Star for the


Carlos
Ruiz


first time this year, will be eligible to
play in spring training games.
Texans, 49ers, Falcons
1-2-3 in Pro32 rankings
NEW YORK The Houston Tex-
ans are No. 1 for the third straight


week in the AP Pro32 NFL power
rankings, with the New England Patri-
ots making a big move after another
dominating win.
The Texans received seven of the
12 first-place votes and 370 points
Tuesday from The Associated Press'
panel of media members who regu-
larly cover the league. San Francisco
and Atlanta remained second and
third, and the Patriots jumped three
spots to fourth following their rout of
the New York Jets.
The 49ers had three first-place
votes and 365 points, the Falcons re-
ceived 354 points and the Patriots had
two first-place votes and 352 points.
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Pop icon Elton John performs
Nov. 25 during his concert
in Beijing.
Concert dedicated
to dissident
BEIJING -Pop icon
Elton John publicly dedi-
cated his only concert in
Beijing to Chinese artist
and political critic Ai
Weiwei, sending a mur-
mur of shock through an
audience accustomed to
tight censorship of
entertainment.
Minutes into a more
than two-hour show
Sunday night, John told
the audience that the
performance was dedi-
cated "to the spirit and
talent of Ai Weiwei," ac-
cording to several audi-
ence members. They said
the crowd rumbled in
recognition that Ai re-
mains a touchy subject
for the Chinese
government.
An internationally ac-
claimed sculptor and in-
stallation artist, Ai has
used his art and his
renown to draw attention
to social injustice. He
was detained for nearly
three months last year,
and he remains barred
from leaving China.

Merry Christmas
for Michael Buble
NEW YORK, NY -
Early signals indicate
that prospects are excel-
lent for a second year of
strong sales for the
Michael Buble CHRIST-
MAS CD, which is al-
ready top 10 on iTunes in
several
countries.
Buble's
label
Reprise
r Records
has
teamed
up this
Michael year with
Buble Walmart,
Beringer
Wine, Target and
Starbucks for several
major marketing cam-
paigns in conjunction
with the CHRISTMAS
album's re-release this
year.
December also brings
several high profile
Buble appearances
including his upcoming
2nd Annual NBC Holiday
Special "Home for the
Holidays" filmed in his
native Vancouver, which
will be airing Dec. 10 at
10 p.m., and preceded by
a performance on NBC's
hit show "The Voice"
where Buble mentored
Blake Shelton's team on a
series of shows that ran
last month. The 2nd an-
nual special includes
guest performances by
Blake Shelton, Rod Stew-
art, Elmo and Carly Rae
Jepsen and
follows up his hugely
successful Christmas
Special that aired last
year on NBC.
The Canadian super-
star is also scheduled to
appear on the Today
show and Jimmy Fallon
both on Dec. 3.
-From wire reports


Destination down under


Associated Press
A giant sculpture of Gollum, a character from "The Hobbit," is displayed in the Wellington Airport to celebrate the
upcoming premiere of the first movie in the trilogy, in Wellington, New Zealand. The sculpture was created at
Weta Workshop, part of Peter Jackson's movie empire in the Wellington suburb of Miramar. The world premiere
of "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" is Nov. 28 at Wellington's Embassy Theatre.

Hobbits, superheroes put magic in New Zealand film industry


Associated Press

WELLINGTON, New Zealand
rate full of sushi arrives.
Workers wearing wetsuit
shirts or in bare feet bustle
past with slim laptops. With days to
go, a buzzing intensity fills the once-
dilapidated warehouses where
Peter Jackson's visual-effects studio
is rushing to finish the opening film
in "The Hobbit" trilogy.
The fevered pace at the Weta Dig-
ital studio near Wellington will last
nearly until the actors walk the red
carpet Nov. 28 for the world pre-
miere. But after "The Hobbit: An
Unexpected Journey" hits theaters,
there's more work to be done.
Weta Digital is the centerpiece of
a filmmaking empire that Jackson
and close collaborators have built
in his New Zealand hometown, re-
alizing his dream of bringing a slice
of Hollywood to Wellington. It's a
one-stop shop for making major
movies not only his own, but
other blockbusters like "Avatar"
and "The Avengers" and hoped-for
blockbusters like next year's "Man
of Steel."
Along the way, Jackson has be-
come revered here, even receiving
a knighthood. His humble de-
meanor and crumpled appearance
appeal to distinctly New Zealand
values, yet his modesty belies his in-
fluence. He's also attracted criti-
cism along the way
The special-effects workforce of
150 on "The Lord of the Rings" tril-
ogy a decade ago now numbers
1,100. Only five of Weta Digital's
workers are actual employees, how-
ever, while the rest are contractors.
Many accept the situation because
movie work often comes irregularly
but pays well. Union leaders,
though, say the workers lack labor
protections existing in almost any
other industry
Like many colleagues, Weta Digi-
tal's director, Joe Letteri, came to
New Zealand in 2001 to work on the
"Rings" trilogy for two years. The
work kept coming, so he bought a
house in Wellington and stayed.
Jackson, who declined to be in-
terviewed for this story, launched
Weta in 1993 with fellow filmmakers
Jamie Selkirk and Richard Taylor.
Named after an oversized New
Zealand insect, the company later
was split into its digital arm and
Weta Workshop, which makes props
and costumes.
Loving homages to the craft are
present in Weta Digital's seven
buildings around the green-hilled
suburb of Miramar. There are old-


Birthday Certain changes over which you'll have little or
no control could usher in some promising material condi-
tions in the year ahead. It will behoove you to flow with
events whenever these shifts begin to occur.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) To achieve the best re-
sults when negotiating with someone who is using intimidat-
ing methods, assume that the other party is merely bluffing.
Even if they're not, the extra confidence will give you the
edge.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It's important to follow a
carefully conceived game plan regarding an important mat-
ter. Try your best not to deviate from such a blueprint, be-
cause your on-the-spot decision-making might not be
optimal.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Unfortunately, this might not
be one of your more productive days, but not for a lack of in-
dustriousness on your part. It is likely to be due to others
unloading excess work on you.


time movie posters, prop skulls of
dinosaurs and apes, and a wall of
latex face impressions of actors
from Chris O'Donnell to Tom
Cruise.
Its huge data center, with the
computing power of 30,000 laptops,
resembles a milk-processing plant
because only the dairy industry in
New Zealand knew how to build
cooling systems on such a grand
scale.
Little of Weta's current work was
visible. Visitors must sign confiden-
tiality agreements, and the working
areas of the facilities are off-limits.
The company is secretive about any
unannounced projects, beyond say-
ing Weta will be working solidly for
the next two years, when the two
later "Hobbit" films are scheduled
to be released.
The workforce has changed from
majority American to about 60 per-
cent New Zealanders. The only skill
that's needed, Letteri says, is the
ability to use a computer as a tool.
Beyond having creativity as a
filmmaker, Jackson has proved a
savvy businessman, Letteri says.
The government calculates that
feature films contribute $560 mil-
lion each year to New Zealand's
economy Like many countries, New
Zealand offers incentives and re-
bates to film companies and will
contribute about $100 million to-
ward the $500 million production
costs of "The Hobbit" trilogy. Almost
every big budget film goes through
Jackson's companies.
"New Zealand has a good reputa-
tion for delivering films on time and
under budget, and Jackson has been
superb at that," says John Yeabsley,
a senior fellow at New Zealand's In-
stitute of Economic Research. "No-
body has the same record or the
magic ability to bring home the
bacon as Sir Peter."
"You cannot overestimate the fact
that Peter is a brand," says Graeme
Mason, chief executive of the New
Zealand Film Commission. "He's
built this incredible reputational
position, which has a snowball ef-
fect."
Back in 2010, however, a labor
dispute erupted before filming
began on "The Hobbit." Unions said
they would boycott the movie if the
actors didn't get to collectively ne-
gotiate. Jackson and others warned
that New Zealand could lose the
films to Europe. Warner Bros. exec-
utives flew to New Zealand and
held a high-stakes meeting with
Prime Minister John Key, whose
government changed labor laws
overnight to clarify that movie


Today's HOROSCOPE
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You could end up being
greatly disappointed if you fail to keep your hopes and ex-
pectations within reasonable bounds. Your optimism simply
won't match your opportunities.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't expect to learn too
much if you are intimidated by the subject matter. Get back
in character and trust your smarts to figure out what it's all
about.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Experiencing some opposition
and/or frustration could prevent you from conducting busi-
ness in your usual manner. Do your best to keep things
moving forward.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) On issues where you and
your mate hold divergent opinions, it might be difficult for ei-
ther of you to alter the other's point of view. Applying
pressure will only make matters worse.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) You're apt to be totally un-
yielding with anyone who takes you for granted, yet when


workers were exempt from being
treated as regular employees.
Helen Kelly, president of the New
Zealand Council of Trade Unions,
says a compromise could easily
have been reached. She says the
law changes amounted to unneces-
sary union-busting and a "gross
breach" of employment laws.
Weta Digital's general manager
Tom Greally compared it to the
construction industry, where mul-
tiple contractors and mobile work-
ers do specific projects and then
move on.
Animal rights activists said last
week they plan to picket the pre-
miere of "The Hobbit" after wran-
glers alleged that three horses and
up to two dozen other animals died
in unsafe conditions at a farm
where animals were boarded for
the movies. Jackson's spokesman
Matt Dravitzki acknowledged two
horses died preventable deaths at
the farm but said the production
company worked quickly to im-
prove animal housing and safety. He
rejected claims any animals were
mistreated or abused.
Jackson's team pointed out that
55 percent of animal images in
"The Hobbit" were computer gen-
erated at Weta. The People for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals
(PETA) have asked Jackson in the
future to create all his animals in
the studio.
Controversies aside, the rise of
Weta and the expat American com-
munity in and around Miramar is
visible in everything from a Mexi-
can restaurant to yoga classes. On
Halloween, which in the past was
not much celebrated in New
Zealand, hundreds of costumed
children roamed about collecting
candy Americans gave the tradition
a boost here, but the locals have
embraced it.
The National Business Review
newspaper estimates Jackson's per-
sonal fortune to be about $400 mil-
lion, which could rise considerably
if "The Hobbit" franchise succeeds.
Public records show Jackson has
partial ownership stakes in 21 pri-
vate companies, most connected
with his film empire. He's spent
some of his money on philanthropy,
helping save a historic church and
a performance theater.
For all his influence, Jackson
maintains a hobbit-like existence
himself, preferring a quiet home
life outside of work. In the end,
many say, he seems to be driven by
what has interested him from the
start: telling great stories on the big
screen.


someone truly needs your help, you'll be the first to lend a
hand.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If what you want turns out to be
the opposite of what everybody else desires, it might be
quite difficult for you to go along with them. Nonetheless,
you need to take this one for the team.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -An important personal objec-
tive might not be in accord with the wishes and/or plans of
your colleagues. Instead of being supportive, they could
make things harder for you. Try to be diplomatic, but also
be firm.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Many little annoyances, which
you would normally overlook, could become overwhelming if
you don't try to get a handle on them. Sweat the small stuff.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Someone who is trying to use
intimidating methods to get you to comply with his or her
wishes might act like he or she has the upper hand, but it's
just a bluff. Don't be taken in.


Florida
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call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Nov.
28, the 333rd day of 2012.
There are 33 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 28, 1942, nearly
500 people died in a fire that
destroyed the Cocoanut
Grove nightclub in Boston.
On this date:
In 1520, Portuguese navi-
gator Ferdinand Magellan
reached the Pacific Ocean
after passing through the
South American strait that
now bears his name.
In 1861, the Confederate
Congress admitted Missouri
as the 12th state of the
Confederacy after Missouri's
disputed secession from
the Union.
In 1885, at the end of the
Third Anglo-Burmese War,
British troops occupied
Mandalay.
In 1905, Sinn Fein was
founded in Dublin.
In 1912, Albania pro-
claimed its independence
from the Ottoman Empire.
In 1922, Captain Cyril
Turner of the Royal Air Force
gave the first public skywrit-
ing exhibition, spelling out,
"Hello USA. Call Vanderbilt
7200" over New York's Times
Square; about 47,000 calls in
less than three hours
resulted.
In 1958, Chad, Gabon and
Middle Congo became au-
tonomous republics within
the French community.
Ten years ago: In twin at-
tacks in Kenya, three suicide
bombers killed 14 people at
an Israeli-owned hotel, while
at least two missiles were
fired at but missed an
Israeli jetliner taking off from
Mombasa airport.
Five years ago: Aday
after an international Mideast
peace conference in
Annapolis, Md., President
George W. Bush told Israeli
and Palestinian leaders he
was personally committed to
their mission of peace.
One year ago: Egyptians,
despite a recent wave of un-
rest, waited peacefully in long
lines to vote in the first parlia-
mentary elections since the
ouster of Hosni Mubarak;
Islamist parties were the big
winners. Occupy Wall Street
protesters defied a deadline
to remove their weeks-old
encampment on the Los
Angeles City Hall lawn.
Today's Birthdays:
Recording executive Berry
Gordy Jr. is 83. Former Sen.
Gary Hart, D-Colo., is 76.
Singer-songwriter Bruce
Channel is 72. Singer Randy
Newman is 69. CBS News
correspondent Susan
Spencer is 66. Movie director
Joe Dante is 65. "Late Show"
orchestra leader Paul Shaffer
is 63. Actor Ed Harris is 62.
Former NASA teacher in
space Barbara Morgan is 61.


Thought for Today: "We
are not all born at once, but
by bits. The body first, and
the spirit later." Mary
Hunter Austin, American
novelist and playwright
(1868-1934).











EDUCATION Buai5
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Homosassa school finds the patriotic spark


Students learn history in


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA-American his-
tory is more than a hobby for Ho-
mosassa Elementary School
second-grade teacher Danita
Consol. It's in her blood.
Consol is a member of the

Homosassa Elementary School
first-grader Roman Sultesz cuts
out a star for an American flag
during the school's "We the
People" celebration Nov. 15.
MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle


a fun way


Daughters of the American Rev-
olution. Her ancestry includes
Nicholas Ickes, who fought in the
Revolutionary War, and at Valley
Forge saw Gen. George Washing-
ton on his knees in prayer.
So with Consol's leadership,
the school had a "We the People"
celebration Nov. 15 featuring
members of the Sons of the
American Revolution in period
dress, games for children and
posters on display
"It ties up the lessons we've
been working on in the classroom
the last few weeks," Consol said.


Assistant Principal Jill Young
said the school has worked to-
ward the event since Constitu-
tion Day on Sept. 17. The event
coincided with the conclusion of
the Nov 6 election.
"We wanted to tie it all in to-
gether," she said.
The evening featured a "Decla-
ration of Independence" poster
contest sponsored by the Sons of
the American Revolution. This is
the fourth year the organization
has teamed with the school for
the poster contest. The winners
face winners from other schools
in Citrus and Hernando counties.
Third-, fourth- and fifth-graders
entered 150 posters and there


were two winners: Ashlynn Name,
fourth grade; and Amara Pil-
iouris, third grade. Both girls said
they were proud of their efforts.
Ashlynn, whose poster de-
picted a replica of the Declara-
tion of Independence, said the
American lessons are important.
"You've got to learn about the
history of this country," she said.
Principal Chris Bosse said the
"We the People" event was the
perfect way to bring the lesson
focus out of the classroom.
"They learned about history,"
he said, "in a fun way tonight"
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


Special to the Chronicle
Maijah Franklin, left, Paige Eckart, Madeline Jeffes and Katie Dreyer play fairies during a production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream."


Shakespeare sells out Seven Rivers


Special to the Chronicle

he Seven Rivers Players recently per-
formed William Shakespeare's "A Mid-
summer Night's Dream" to two sold-out
shows. The set was an elaborate recreation of
the forest, fairy haven and palace in the story.
The costume design was inspired by steam-
punk fashion. Although the story was written
more than 400 years ago, audiences enjoyed
many aspects of the story, such as the humor,
wit, lovers' quarrels and parents' demands of
their children.


Reilly Cash, left, as Helena, Kim Strong as Puck, Andrea Golliher as
Hermia, Cooper Hassen as Demetrius, and Liam Cash as Lysander.


Nicholas Latorraca plays Francis Flute, and Joshua Jackson plays Nick
Bottom.


Kim Strong, top, as Puck, Blair Salter as Titania, and Mark Smith as
Obero perform in the Seven Rivers production.


Competition has engineers pushing frontiers of robotics


Teaching robots to

drive a challenge
TOM AVRIL
The Philadelphia Inquirer
PHILADELPHIA Ordinarily,
it is no big deal for Cheongki Jeong
to climb into a car and drive. But
what if he needed to get to the
scene of a nuclear emergency?
That is why Jeong and a team of
Drexel University engineers are
starting to prepare driving lessons


for a motorist who is unfazed by ra-
diation: a robot
Clad in a black bodysuit covered
with dots of reflective tape, Jeong
climbed in and out of a golf cart
seat the other day, again and again,
a suite of cameras tracking his
moves so they could be translated
for a robot.
Drexel is leading a team of 10
schools in an international compe-
tition sponsored by the research
arm of the Pentagon prompted
in part by the 2011 meltdown in
Fukushima, Japan, where much of
the devastation might have been


contained had robots gotten to the
scene quickly
Competitors must program a
robot to accomplish eight tasks -
among them driving to the scene,
climbing over a pile of rubble,
using a tool to break through a
wall, and shutting off a valve. Spe-
cialized robots have previously ac-
complished tasks similar to some
on the list, but for one robot to
tackle all eight would be a daunt-
ing challenge, said Drexel's Paul
Oh.
"It's pushing the frontiers of ro-
botics beyond anything that we


know in any center, be it academic,
industry, or government agency,"
said Oh, an engineering professor
and the team leader
The Drexel-led team, which also
includes Swarthmore College and
the University of Delaware, has an
early leg up on some of the compe-
tition. The group learned this fall
that its proposal was one of seven
to win $3 million each in project
funding from the Defense Ad-
vanced Research Projects Agency
Another team, led by Lockheed


Page C2


Denise Willis
GUEST
COLUMN


WTI


students


prepared


for work
Throughout the polit-
ical campaigns, I
heard on what
seemed to be a daily basis
about the economy and
how jobs are moving over-
seas because of the lack of
a skilled workforce. When
I heard the ads I could
not help wonder where
they were getting the
information.
I know Citrus County is a
microcosm in the scheme
of things, but I also know
the students at WTI are
better prepared than ever
before to enter the work-
force. They have acquired
the skills and knowledge
needed to be successful in
the workplace.
When I walk around
campus to visit the pro-
grams and talk to stu-
dents, I see first-hand
how our students' com-
munication skills have
improved. I see the stu-
dents solving high-level
math problems and apply-
ing that math to a project
they are working on. I see
the students working with
computers to find an an-
swer to a question or find
a much-needed part. I see
students using lasers to
align motors. I see stu-
dents using the latest in
technology to diagnosis
engines. I see students
who are very serious
about their attendance. I
see students role-playing
job interviews. I see them
working on resume and
studying for their indus-
try certification exams or
their occupational licens-
ing exams.
During the 2011-12
school year, WTI post sec-
ondary students earned
421 industry certifica-
tions. Among the certifica-
tions earned are
CompTIA A+, American
Welding Society, Automo-
tive Service Excellence
(ASE), NCCER, CNA, LPN
and Serv-Safe. It is at this
time of year I feel the ex-
citement in the air as stu-
dents do all they can to be
ready for employment
when they complete their
program.
We work closely with
the Workforce Connec-
tion to identify employ-
ment opportunities for
our students. Workforce
Connection is a good
partner and a good re-
source for our students,
as well as for the employ-
ers in the county.
As the holiday season is
upon us, we all have
See Page C2





C2 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


HONORS
Alex Bradshaw and Abra-
ham Juste have been named
Rotary Club of Inverness sen-
iors of the month for November.
Alex Bradshaw is the daugh-
ter of Wes and Leigh Ann Brad-
shaw of Inverness. She has
been involved in sports and
clubs at Cit-
rus High
School. They
include: jun-
ior-varsity
cheerleading,
varsity cheer-
A leading, var-
Alex sity soccer,
Bradshaw track, LINK,
FBLA, Na-
tional Honor Society and Key
Club. She is the captain of the
varsity cheerleading squad.
Bradshaw will have com-
pleted coursework in three ad-
vanced placement courses
prior to graduation. Following
graduation, she plans to attend
Auburn University, majoring in
English. Her career plan is to
be an attorney.
Abraham Juste is the son of
Reynold Juste of Citrus
Springs.

tively been in-
volved in
athletics and
clubs during
his high
school ca-
I t reer. They in-
Abrahament c ude:
JusContinued frNational
Honor Society, varsity basket-
ball, AVID and LINK.
Just will have completed
coursework in four advanced
placement courses before he


ROBOTICS
Continued from Page Al

Martin's Advanced Technol-
ogy Laboratories, based in
Cherry Hill, won an initial
$375,000 from DARPA to de-
velop software for its robot,
in partnership with the
University of Pennsylvania
and Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute.
Bchines the early funding,
Drexel has another edge. Un
like some teams, it already
has seven working "Hubo"
robots, which were built by
partners at the Korea Ad-
vanced Institute of Science
and Technologyu The ma-
chines, roughly the size of a
10-year-old boy, are among
the most advanced humanoid
robots yet developed.
Still, getting ready for the
multiphase competition,
which includes events to-
ward the end of next year
and in 2014, will require fast
action.
A lab on the ground
floor of Drexel's Bossone
building already is swarm-
ing with activity, with en-
gineers scurrying amid
several Hubos in various
stages of assembly.
Daniel Lofaro, a doctoral
candidate in electrical engi-
neering, has started pro-
gramming one of the Hubos
so its hands can turn a valve
handle or steering wheel -
right hand up, left hand
down, or vice versa.
Robert Ellenberg, a doc-
toral candidate in mechani-



robot climb a laddeup while





facing backward.



WILLIS
Continued from Page Al

things for which we are
thankful. I am thankful I
have the opportunity to play
a part in the growth of our
students' professional lives
and that WTI is a good
source for employers to find


quality workers.
I wish everyone safe and
happy holidays.

Denise Willis is
the director of
Withlacoochee
Technical Institute.


ilk 1

graduates. He plans to attend
Florida Atlantic University to
pursue a degree in nursing,
with a career plan to become a
nurse practitioner.
FUNDRAISERS
The Rotary Club of Sug-
armill Woods and the Rotary In-
teract Club of Lecanto High
School have joined together to
support the Box Tops for Edu-
cation fundraiser for Lecanto
Primary School. Box Tops for
Education labels can be found
on more than 300 products that
families purchase and use on a
daily basis.
There are two drop boxes -
one in the lobby of the Sug-
armill Woods Country Club and
the other in the Military Outlet
Store on West Citrus Avenue in
Crystal River.
For a complete listing of the
products, go to www.Rotary
SMW.com.
The labels can also be
mailed to the Sugarmill Woods
Rotary Club. P.O. Box 8, Ho-
mosassa Springs, FL 34447.
SCHOLARSHIPS
AND CONTESTS
The Spot Family Center
has received funding from Kids
Central Inc. and the Depart-
ment of Children and Families
to offer scholarships to local
students for the 2012-13 After
School Enrichment Program.
The program is from 2:45 to
6 p.m. Monday through Friday
and serves students in kinder-
garten through seventh grade.
The Spot has 20 scholarships
remaining.
The scholarships are avail-
able to local families who qual-

Other members are work-
ing with a laser-based sen-
sor that they plan to mount
on the robot's head, allow-
ing it to measure the dis-
tance to obstacles.
Then there is Jeong,
climbing in and out of the
golf-cart seat in his black
bodysuit. Eighteen cameras
follow the bits of reflective
tape attached to his clothing,
recording his movements so
they can be translated into
instructions for Hubo.
The robot's joints do not
twist and turn in as many di-
rections as a human's. So
Jeong climbs into the seat
with a precise, almost stiff
series of motions, being
careful not to exceed the ca-
pabilities of his metallic
alter ego.
"I try to imagine as if I am
a robot," said Jeong, who is
pursuing an undergraduate


ify. Applications can be picked
up at 405 S.E. Seventh Ave.,
Crystal River. Scholarships will
be given to students on a first-
come, first-served basis. Any
family receiving free or re-
duced-price lunches automati-
cally qualifies.
The scholarships will offer
students free academic tutor-
ing, nutritional education and
homework assistance, outdoor
recreational activities, arts and
crafts, computer tech labs,
reading teams, mentorship and
leadership skills.
The program runs the entire
school year. On scheduled
early dismissal days, the hours
will be 12:30 to 6 p.m. Bus
transportation from Crystal
River Primary and Middle
schools is available to The
Spot.
Registration is required. Call
352-794-3870 to apply. Space
is limited.
The Harry F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 of Beverly Hills is
sponsoring two national VFW
scholarship programs.
The Patriot's Pen Essay
Contest is open to sixth-, sev-
enth- and eighth-grade stu-
dents, and gives them the
prospect of winning cash
awards at the local, regional
and state levels, with the oppor-
tunity for a first-place scholar-
ship at the national level and an
all-expenses-paid trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., for the winner and
a parent/guardian. This year's
essay theme is "What I Would
Tell our Fo)unding Fathers." A
300- to 400-word typed essay
is required.
The Voice of Democracy
See Rage C7

degree in mechanical
engineering.
After the tsunami that
struck Japan, radiation lev-
els at Fukushima were ini-
tially too high for humans to
safely enter the site. A robot
would have been ideal.
"The tragic thing was, if
they were able to get some-
thing there just to shut off a
valve within hours of the
breach," said Drexel's Oh,
"it could have prevented so
much more damage."
For the competition, the
teams do not yet know ex-
actly what kind of vehicle
their robots will be required
to drive. So, like a human
getting used to a rental car,
the robots must be prepared
to adapt, said team member
Christopher Rasmussen, an
associate professor of com-
puter and information sci-
ences at Delaware.


Special to the Chronicle
Front row, from left: Nathalie Ray, Elizabeth Brannock, Kathleen Justice, Emily
McDermott. Middle row, from left, are: Luz Dary Acevedo Romero, Macey Mehlenbacher,
Avi DiPietra, Maria Valdivia, Allison Ryan, Von'Jieona Smith, Amanda Linkous, Madisen
Holton, Emily Merbeth. Back row, from left, are: Mike Richardson, Gauge Banks, Sean
Hogerheide, Jimmy Brannock, Josh Holton, Wade McDonald, Robert Linkous, Ashley
Moore, Erik Braem. Participants not pictured include: Elizabeth Seeko, Cortnie Seymour,
Veronica Williams.


Students receive leadership awards
Twenty-five area high school and college students received leadership awards for
completing the sixth annual Student Leadership Development Series, sponsored by
the CF Institute for Community Advancement, Citrus County Schools, and the CF Cit-
rus Campus Student Activities Board. Participants completed five or more leadership
workshops conducted at the CF Citrus Campus.
The six-week series consisted of workshops on teambuilding, leadership styles, body
language, personality profiling, smart credit and leading a focused life.
For more information on the Student Leadership Development Series, contact the
CF Citrus Campus at 352-746-6721.


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Citrus County
C Education Foundation
Funding Success in the Classroom

A TRIBUTE TO TEACHERS & STAFF
Honoring Administrators and Teachers and staff
of the Citrus County School District

Provides alumni, families and friends the opportunity to
honor a special educator, administrator and/or staff member
(past or present) from Citrus County School District.

By making a tax-deductible gift to the Citrus County
Education Foundation through A Tribute to Teachers & Staff
program, you will help students in the district while showing
your appreciation for the teachers) and staff who impacted
your life, or the life of your childrenn.

Tributes will be distributed during
American Education Week in November.



A A
Citrus County
^Education Foundation
Funding Success in the Classroom
For more information visit: wwwcitrusfoundation.org
Email us at: eduk8r@tampabay.rr.com

CRNNI (LE
L ... L' A


EDUCATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 C3


,The Mini pade
Betty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large


from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclck
Beloved Pets


Our Favorite Animals


Are there
animals living
in your home? ,-"
In almost
six out of 10
American
homes, at -
least one pet-
is a part of the
family.
This week, The Mini Page takes
a closer look at some of our favorite
animals the dogs, cats, "pocket pets"
and others that live right alongside us.
From the beginning
Wolves,
jackals,
foxes.
coycr es
and I1i,.2 .,
are .a11l
cani nes
(KAY-
nines). They are all related to a
prehistoric fox-like animal. Most canines
live and hunt in groups called packs.
Early human beings liked having
canines around because they helped
clean up leftover food. Eventually
the dogs began to think of human
settlements as their territory, and they
would protect it against invaders.


Dogs and cats are the
No. 1 and No. 2 most
common pets in homes
in the United States.
People have always
loved having animals
around them.
Other favorite pets
include horses, birds,
and reptiles and
amphibians.


Who chose whom?
Humans may have welcomed dogs
into their communities, but cats "chose
us," said pet expert Gina Spadafori.
"No one
caught one.
They chose to
be around us.
Cats are very
close to still
wild," she said. ..................,
For centuries, cats have helped people
control mice and rats in cities and on
farms. In some societies, cats were
associated with gods. For example,
the Egyptian goddess Bastet was
sometimes pictured as a cat. Cats can
also be symbols of good or bad luck.


Pocket pets
Would your pet
fit in your pocket?
If so, you probably
have a guinea pig,
hamster, rabbit or
similar pet.
More than 4 1b,
million homes in
the U.S. include _
pocket pets. These
types of animals are easier to take
care of than some other pets because
they are usually in cages. They are fun
to snuggle with and may have distinct
personalities. In fact, you can teach
tricks to these types of pets, such as
turning in a circle.


with her dog. See if you


* lips
* dolphin
* frog


* heart
* word MINI
* funny face


Meet "Too Cute!" Animals
The Animal Planet series "Too Cute!"
began this fall with a display of cute
videos of kittens and puppies, as it did
in earlier episodes. But this season, it
,is also showing clips of baby mini pigs,
hedgehogs, dwarf rabbits and goats.


In December, Animal Planet begins
This Bengal kitten is a new show, "Too Cute!1, i 1 ,..
featured in the Animal This series follows a year in the life
Pneatureine "Too C of baby sloths in a sanctuary in Costa
Planet series 'Too Cute!" Rica. The babies have to attend sloth
school, where they take climbing class and learn other survival skills.
People can talk live with veterinarians and cat behavior specialists at
animalplanet.com. -m-eMniP.g.eQ212U-.....,uUhJ
from The Mini Page 20.12 Unveal Uchck

< Gus GoowpurtS Report
Supersport: Arian Foster
Height: 6-1 Birthdate: 8-24-86
Weight: 228 Birthplace: Albuquerque, N.M.
For a player who wasn't even chosen in the 2009 NFL
draft, running back Arian Foster has come a long way in a
short time.
Signed as a free agent three years ago by the Houston
Texans, Foster has made All-Pro twice and led the league
in rushing in 2010 with 1,616 yards. That's some switch for the former
Tennessee Volunteers back, whose subpar performance in his senior
season failed to impress pro scouts.
Away from the noisy arenas, Foster devotes time to his family and to
several charities. He also enjoys writing poetry in his quieter times.
But on the football field, the Texans' standout is poetry in motion, and
one of pro football's best backs.


from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Ucick


Fun With Pets


Holiday treats
The holidays are coming up. Will
your pets be included in gift-giving
traditions at your house?
"The most important thing you
can give your pets is time," said
Spadafori. "Walk the dog, or teach
your hamster a trick."
Other ideas:
Wrap one of your pet's regular
treats in a piece of newspaper and
give it to the animal to tear open.
Cats love to chase and bat at
corks from wine bottles and pingpong
balls.
New Year's pet resolutions
If you'd like to do something nice
for lots of animals, think about
helping your local animal shelter.
Save pennies from your family's
change and deliver the money to the
shelter later in the year.
Collect unwanted towels from
neighbors and friends. Shelters use a
lot of towels and always need more.


Pets in books
Do you have a favorite book about
pets? Here are a few classics to read:
"The Girl Who Loved Wild
Horses" by Paul Goble
"Because of
Winn-Dixie" by Kate
DiCamillo
"Shiloh" by Ph% 11;
Reynolds Naylor
Pets in movies
Some of our favorite movies also
feature pets.
"Homeward Bound: The
Incredible Journey" tells a story of
two dogs and a cat trying to find
their owners.
"The Aristocats" is an animated
movie about some rich cats in Paris.


"Eight
Below" tells the
story of a team
of dogs facing
an Arctic storm
with their owner.


_ . .... .........



p.ypA-
photo a Dimney Enterpnise Inc


Pet fact-a-roonies
Cats purr,
but lions
cannot. Big
cats can't purr
constantly and
effortlessly
as small cats
can. Tigers can Lions may not be
rumble a tiger- able to purr, but
sized purr-like they can roar!
sound, but on the exhale only.
All dogs have
pink tongues,
except the chow
chow and the
Chinese shar-pei.
These breeds'
tongues can be
purple, black or
blue-black. Black Chinese shar-pei
spots on tongues are common in
many dogs, but they don't always
mean that the dog is part chow chow
or shar-pei.


J. &


from The Min Page 2012 Unwe.r.al Uclck


Pets for People


Feeling better
We hear a lot about how people
can help pets adopting shelter
animals, spaying and neutering,
making sure our pets are healthy.
In recent years, people have started
to realize how much pets help people.
For instance, owning and caring
for pets can help people lower their
blood pressure and get more exercise.
Spending time with animals can
help people feel less depressed, and
it opens them up to be more involved
with other people.
In fact, pets f ,-
are used to help
those who have a
medical condition
or who have been
in an accident.
Doctors call this
animal-assisted therapy. Handlers
take dogs to hospitals or nursing
homes to spend time with children
and adults.


This pet owner is
spending some
healthy time
outdoors with her
springer spaniel.
Experts say owning
a pet can also help
kids improve their
grades. Kids who
read out loud to
pets develop better
reading skills.


Other benefits
Scientists have discovered that
kids who grow up in homes with
pets have fewer allergies and skin
conditions such as eczema (ECK-
zeh-ma). Having a dog may help kids
stay healthier, with fewer colds and
stomach problems.
Kids who
have pets in the
home also learn
responsibility.
Chores such as
feeding, walking
and cleaning up
after a pet help children understand
taking care of someone besides
themselves.
Families with dogs may be more
active and spend more time outdoors.

The Mini Page thanks Gina Spadafori, pet
care expert and author, for help with this
issue.
Next week, The Mini Page is about what's
new up in space.


Care for them and yourself
While we love our pets, it's
important that we also take good
care of them and ourselves. Follow
these safety tips to keep you and
your animals healthy and happy.
1. Wash your / \ / \
hands after each o /
time you feed or pet
your animals. Even
if you have "indoor" b
pets, their coats or 6
food can carry disease. Keeping your
hands clean will protect you both.
2. As cold winter weather
approaches, remember to keep your
pets warm. Pets who stay outside
need an insulated dog house or other
shelter from cold and wind. Make
sure drinking water hasn't frozen.
3. Make sure
your pets see a
veterinarian
regularly. A vet
can help with _
controlling
ticks and fleas, which ......
is also healthy for the humans in
your home. These insects can carry
diseases that harm your pet and you.
4. Research the types of plants
you have in your home. Some of them
attract animals, and a few can be
harmful to pets, such as aloe and ivy.
5. Approach a pet you don't
know carefully. Always ask the
owner first if it's OK to pet the
animal. Let a dog or cat come up to
you first and explore you by sniffing.


The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley Artist


Sfrom The Mini Page 2012 U.n.e.ral Ucld
F^ kTM MIGHTY ciiNAir T
(, ) FUNNY'S MAinnIII Q)W&(o s
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category? _

Dennis: What should you give a dog with a fever?
Danny: Mustard it's the best thing for a hot dog!

S^ ^Darlene: What's the best thing to say when
.. .. choosing a hot dog? \ a
Debbie: "Weenie, meenie, miney moe"! i

Dylan: What's the most popular name for a hot dog?
Darryl: Frank!


Basse s"f. TRY 'N
Sound's Pets FIND
Words that remind us of favorite pets are hidden in the block below. Some
words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See
if you can find: AMPHIBIANS, ANIMAL, CANINE, CATS, DOGS, EXERCISE,
HEALTH, HORSE, NEUTER, PETS, POCKET, PURR, REPTILES,
RESPONSIBILITY, SAFETY, SHELTER, SPAY, THERAPY, TIME, TREAT.
WHATPET G P S N A I B I H P MA W F V
IS IN YOUR R E J H Y N E SM H T L A E H
HOME? T T Y Y E L I X E B T Q A S P
E S P Y AL T ME L ZA T V N
N E A U T P T E A R I A E O E
4 I M R WR E S E K L C T H R U
N I E D X R F J R C M I P K T
A T H O R S E A S G O D S E E
C Y T I L I B I S N O P S E R



Ready Resources Q
The Mini Page provides ideas for -
websites, books or other resources that will help
you learn more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
aspca.org/aspcakids
humanesociety.org/news/magazines/kind_news
healthypet.com/kidsklub/KidArticles.aspx
At the library:
"Adopting Pets: How to Choose Your New Best
Friend" by Bill Gutman
"Cats Vs. Dogs" by Elizabeth Carney


The Mini Page

Shook of States
The Mini Page's popular series of issues about each state is collected
here in a 1 56-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease
of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state,
along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs
and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of
States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.


9mht A-i p~ef
SMontana From Ato Z




.- --- -
- g -


---I
To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make
check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini
Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call toll-
free 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com.
Please send copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total
cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.)
Name: I
Address: I
City: State: Zip:
- _ _ -_ _- -_ _- _-- _- -_ -_ _ -_ -_ _- __ _


from, Th Min Pge 2012 Unve.l Ui


!TM Rookie Cookie's Recipe
SAvocado Dressing
You'll need:
1 ripe avocado, peeled and pitted
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons low-fat sour cream
S1/4 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 clove garlic
What to do:
1. Place all ingredients in a blender and process until smooth.
2. Chill for 2 hours.
3. Serve as a salad dressing or use as a dip for vegetables.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe.
from The Mini Page 2012 Unlveral UcllCl


I


-r


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EDUCATION


Mini Spy
Mini Spy is playing fetch
can find:
* monkey dragon
* carrot bell
* number 3 stork
* shark pig's face







Page C4 -WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES I

Thinkers to host I
former Navy officer
The New Age Thinkers will
meet at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 8, at the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
(Florida Conference Room).
The final presentation for
2012 will be by Suzanne C]
Giesmann, who will discuss Si
"Meaning and Messages ow
from the Other Side." Giese- ti(
mann is a Hay House author ch
and inspirational speaker gi.
who focuses on love- gi
centered living. w:
She is a former Navy com- bi
mander who is now a practic- ei
ing intuitive with nine books ei
to her credit. in
Space is limited. For more te
information, call Donna at th
352-628-3253, or email miss- R
donna@tampabay.rr.com. p.
Card party set Cl
for Dec. 11 is
The Beverly Hills Card Pa
Club invites all to its Military
Card Party slated for Dec. 11
at Central Ridge Community
Center at Beverly Hills, 77
Civic Circle.
Reservations are required
by Dec. 7. Doors open at 11
a.m.; lunch will be served at
noon. Games will begin at
1 p.m. Donation is $12.
Tickets are available at the
office at Central Ridge Com-
munity Center from 7:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
For more information, call
the center at 352-746-4882,
or call 352-746-3636.
NARFE to have
Christmas lunch
Chapter 776 of the Na-
tional Active and Retired Fed-
eral Employees Association
(NARFE) welcomes all ac-
tive, retired employees, sur-
viving annuitants and guests
to attend its annual Christ-
mas luncheon Monday, Dec.
10, at the Inverness Golf and
Country Club, 3150 S. Coun-
try Club Drive.
There will be a social start-
ing at 11:30 a.m., followed by
a luncheon at noon. Cost is
$18 per person. Ci
Make checks payable to al
NARFE Chapter 776 and ch
mail to NARFE Chapter 776, m
P.O. Box 614, Lecanto, FL ca
34460. Make sure checks ar- tu
rive no later than Nov. 30. De
All who attend are asked to
bring a new, unwrapped toy
for Toys For Tots.
For more information, call
Joel at 352-522-1923.


AdoptA
RESCUED PET

Alf

Ci
a
N

ad(
pe


Special to the Chronicle
Alf is a Dachshund whose
family could not keep him
and really want him to go
to a good home. His foster
mom says he is an ex-
tremely sweet and lovable
boy and agile for his 11
years. He also has a fa-
vorite ball he likes to play
with. We need to find a lov-
ing home for this senior
guy. Adopt A Rescued Pet
Inc. does home visits prior
to adoptions, so can only
adopt to the Citrus County
area. Call 352-795-9550
and leave your name, num-
ber and pet's name for a re-
turn call. Visit www.
adoptarescuedpet.com for
other pets and the adop-
tion calendar with loca-
tions, dates and times.


Making a difference


Toys needed for Spot Family Center's annual Christmas Jam


Special to the Chronicle


You can help make a difference this
hristmas season: Partner with The
pot Family Center and local business
owners for its annual toy drive. Dona-
ons will help ensure that every local
hild (ages 2 to 17) in need receives a
ft. In 2011, The Spot distributed 4,000
fts to local families and children
ith the help of more than 100 local
businesses and community members.
The Spot Family Center will host its
ghth annual Christmas Jam on Dec.
and Dec. 24. The free two-day event
eludes food, fun, gifts and live en-
rtainment. Each day has a different
reme and an encouraging message.
registration begins both days at 5:30
m. and closes promptly at 7 p.m. On
hristmas Eve, wrapped gifts will be
stributed. All children must be reg-
tered and present to receive a gift.
parents or guardians must attend to


TOY DROP-OFF LOCATIONS
Crystal River: The Spot Family Center, Advanced Family Hearing, Blackshears
Aluminum, Citrus Equipment, Nature Coast Bank, Advanced Health Dr. Horn, Crystal
River Church of God, ERA Suncoast Realty, Nails by Angela, Sandy's Barber Shop,
Natalia's Pizza & Pasta, Orange Bank, GTE Financial Bank, Signature Dental Care
and TLC Rehab.
Hernando: Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters, Neapolitan Ice Cream, Nature Coast
Bank and TLC Rehab.
Inverness: Dynabody Fitness Club, TLC Rehab and Love Chevrolet.
Other locations include: Backyard Pool and Spa, Pinch a Penny Pool and
Insurance Resources & Risk Management in Beverly Hills; TLC Rehab and Twisters
Design Studio in Homosass; Michael Paul Hair & Nail Studio in Citrus Springs;
and TLC Rehab locations in Citrus and Marion counties.


register their child and children must
be present. A full dinner will be
served to everyone on both nights.
Several local business partners are
listed as toy collection locations. To
designate your business as a drop-off
location, volunteer to help or for more


information, call Evelyn Vissicchio,
program director, at 352-794-3870, or
email evthespot@yahoo.com.
To make a monetary donation for
the event, send a check payable to The
Spot Family Center to PO. Box 2046,
Lecanto, FL 34460.


Keeping families safer


Special to the Chronicle
trus Sheriff Fire Rescue recently received a donation of 102 smoke alarms from The Home Depot in Crystal River. The
arms are intended for Citrus County families who currently don't have any in their home or the financial means to pur-
hase them. Fire Rescue personnel will install the smoke alarms at no cost for any qualifying family. Those who qualify
ay call the battalion chief's office at 352-341-2169. If you get a recording, leave a message with your name, numeri-
il address and telephone number. Fire Rescue staff will return the call and schedule an appointment for installation. Pic-
red, from left, are: Home Depot manager Chris Lawson, Fire Chief Larry Morabito, Battalion Chief Ken Clamer, Home
epot assistant manager Julie Shutt, Fire Rescue Lt. Gary Bonick and driver/engineer Reed Elwell.




Help kids, maybe win vehicle


Fundraiser benefits Bd&GC


Special to t he Chronicle

The Boys & Girls Clubs of
itrus County will give away
new vehicle on Dec. 29.
ot only would the car
ake a terrific Christmas/
ew Year's present, but to
Id to the excitement, the
person who owns the win-


ning ticket will have his or
her choice of vehicles ei-
ther a 2013 Chevy Malibu or
a 2013 Equinox SUV
Tickets sell for $25 and
may be purchased from any
Boys & Girls Club of Citrus
County board member, at
the BGCCC website (www.
citrusbgc.com), or at Love


Chevrolet, Tally-Ho Vaca-
tions, Ink-4-Less Plus in In-
verness, the Frugal Frog in
Floral City, Love Honda and
the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County office be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa, Investors Choice
Financial in Crystal River
(Meadowcrest area) and
WYKE in Lecanto.
The ticket drawing will be
at the Love Chevrolet deal-


ership in Inverness at 1 p.m.
Dec. 29.
Funds earned from the
car drawing will benefit the
children at the three Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
sites in Beverly Hills, Inver-
ness and between Crystal
River and Homosassa.
To learn more about the
Boys & Girls Clubs or the
car giveaway, call 352-
621-9225.


'K-9 Karnival' to be in Liberty Park


Special to the Chronicle

The Greater Inverness Olde
Towne Association of Business
Members (GIOTAB), in partnership
with Bark Central Dog Park and
Pet Supermarket, invites ever. one
to its fourth annual "K-9 Karni I. I
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, .
Dec. 1, at Liberty Park in down-
town Inverness.
The day will feature a variety \ fA
events for both dogs and their
owners. Dogs can participate
in a doggie beauty pageant
and training exercises,
while dog owners may choose to
compete in the hot dog eating ,:,o:-
petition at noon or browse amon.L
the many sponsor booths avail ble
A food court, children's games
and other entertainment will a II
lend additional surprises.


Admission is free for owners and
$2 per pet. Nonperishable dog/cat
food for the county's Pet Meals
Program will be
collected, as
well. Dogs
In Heed
AoM j


II.'


good home will be available for
adoption throughout the day from
various rescue organizations.
Also on hand will be
representatives from Courtroom
Dogs for Kids, which provides
ther.ipy dogs that serve as calming
companions to children who have
been traumatized and who now
mi ist testify in court The group
works closely with child
advocacy centers, such as
Jessie's Place and the
Guardian ad Litem
Program.
The event is limited to
people and dogs only, and
t all canines must be secured
on a leash while at the
park. For more information,
i: all Jennifer Springer at
352-3 44-6568, or go to
\v\" invernessoldetowne.org.


News NOTES

Holiday grief
workshop is free
Many community members
anticipating a difficult holiday
season due to the death of a
loved one or friend are wel-
come to participate in a free
holiday grief workshop. HPH
Hospice, "Healing People's
Hearts in Citrus County," is
providing the workshop at
2:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13,
at St. Timothy's Evangelical
Church, 1071 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19) in Crystal
River.
Led by an HPH bereave-
ment counselor, participants
will learn valuable tips for
coping during the holidays.
For more information, call
the team office at 352-
527-4600. Visit online at
HPH-Hospice.org.
'Mr. Photoshop'
at local club
The Citrus County Art Cen-
ter Camera Club meeting on
Dec. 10 will have Larry
Becker, "Mr. Photoshop," as a
guest speaker.
The club, at 2644 N.
Annapolis Ave., is hosting
Becker for
two hours
starting at
y 7 pm.
Becker is
a trainer,
author and
photogra-
pher who,
Larry for the past
Becker six years,
to do talk on has been
Photoshop. the execu-
tive director
of NAPP, the largest Photo-
shop and digital imaging as-
sociation in the world.
Becker travels the country
visiting camera clubs to ex-
plain to them what NAPP is
all about. Much of his profes-
sional career has revolved
around Photoshop, and he
taught Photoshop at USF in
Tampa.
He will be covering both
how to save money on gear
and gadgets, as well as vari-
ous strategies for making
money with photography.
All are welcome. For more
information, call 352-
400-4466.
Clubs to open
Holiday Camp
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County Holiday Camp
will be open from 7 a.m. until
6 p.m. Dec. 26 through Jan. 4
at the three club sites in Bev-
erly Hills, Inverness and
halfway between Crystal
River and Homosassa.
The cost is $10 per day;
programs are open to all chil-
dren between the ages of 5
and 18 years. Children will
learn and have fun participat-
ing in games, arts and crafts,
sports and recreation, tech-
nology, cooking and nutrition
programs. Children should
bring a sack lunch.
Pre-registration is impor-
tant so that clubs can main-
tain adequate staffing ratios.
To pre-register, call the
Robert Halleen Club in Ho-
mosassa at 352-795-8624,
the Evelyn Waters Club in
Inverness at 352-341-2507,
or the Central Ridge Club in
Beverly Hills at 352-
270-8841. Drop-ins are also
accepted, as long as children
are pre-registered.
Donations for camp schol-
arships ($60 for the entire
camp) may be mailed to the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County at P.O. Box 907,
Lecanto, FL 34460, or call
352-621-9225.
Holiday program
set for Nov. 30
The city of Crystal River
will host a Christmas tree
lighting and holiday program
at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, at
the Crystal River Gazebo.
Luminaries will be avail-
able for $2 each to honor
loved ones. The event is


sponsored by the Pilot Club
of Crystal River.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.






WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 CS


WEDNES DAY EVENING NOVEMBER 28, 201 2 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/l: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
0 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Ent Access Rockefeller Ctr. Saturday Night Live "SNL Christmas"'14' News Jay Leno
World Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In Andre Rieu: Radio City Music Hall: Live in New II Volo Takes Flight Italian teen vocal Super
8 PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) xa York Musician and guests. 'G' sa group. 'G' sa Brain
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Journal Business PBS NewsHour (N) Nature 'G' s (DVS) |Rick Steves' European Christmas 'G' c T Smiley
W NBC 8 8 8 News Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Christmas in Rockefeller Saturday Night Live "SNL Christmas" Popular News Jay Leno
S (W NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News 8 Ton. Center (N)'G' holiday sketches. (N) '14' x
News World Jeopardy! Wheel of A Charlie Brown Modern Suburgatory Nashville Teddy tells Eyewit. Nightline
W ABC 20 20 20 News (N) G' Fortune Christmas 'G'E Family (N) 'PG' Rayna the truth 'PG' News (N)Ec
10 News, Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! Survivor: Philippines Criminal Minds (N)'14' CSI: Crime Scene 10 News Letterman
S(W9 SP)]CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Fortune (N) G' (N) (In Stereo) a a (DVS) Investigation (N)'14' 11pm (N)
FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) The Insider The X Factor The remaining finalists perform. FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Access
0 FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) a 'PG' (N) (N) (In Stereo Live) '14' xc (In Stereo)a c Hollyw'd
D WCJB)ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. Charlie Brown Mod Fam Suburg. Nashville (N)'PG' News Nightline
Christian Today Jack Van Great Awakening Joseph Place for A. CTN Life Today Clear Great
SWCL IND 2 2 2 22 22 Fitness Impe Prince'G' Miracles Wommack Special Vision Awaken
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ABC 11 11 11 News (N)'PG' America Christmas 'G'E Family (N) 'PG' Rayna the truth 'PG' (N; I
WMR ND 12 12 16 .Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Criminal How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
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E WACX TBN 21 21 Paid The 700 Club (N)'G' Victor M. Child |Moore Paid |TV55 Studio Direct Healing Paid
King of King of Two and Engagement Arrow Oliver meets a Supernatural "Hunteri Two and Engagement Friends Friends
IMWTOG CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men mysterious woman. Heroici" (N) '14' Half Men '14' s 'PG'
Nature Citrus County Sheriff's To Be Straight Funny Business'PG' World Match Racing Ladies European Golf
C(WYi FAM 16 16 16 15 Coast Today Court 10-43 Announced Talk Med Tour'G' Tour
SD(WOGX FOX 13 7 7 Simpsons Simpsons Big Bang Big Bang The X Factor (N) (In Stereo Live) '14' sc FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ'PG' Access
rB WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticias Notic. Un Refugio Por Ella Soy Eva'14' Amores Verdaderos Amor Bravlo (N)'14' Noticias Noticiero
S(WXPX ION 17 ***Y2 "The Fugitive"(1993) 'PG-13' WWE Main Event (N) **Y, "The Guardian" (2006) Kevin Costner. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
Storage Storage Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck
54 48 54 25 27 Wars Wars PG' Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty (N) Dynasty N Dynasty Dynasty
CSI: Miami "Shock" (In CSI: Miami "Blood in ** "Poseidon" (2006) Josh Lucas. A luxury ** "Poseidon"(2006) Josh Lucas. A luxury
55 64 55 Stereo) '14' a the Water"'14' s liner capsizes in the North Atlantic., a liner capsizes in the North Atlantic., a
Swamp Wars"Snake Finding Bigfoot: Further Finding Bigfoot: Further River Monsters: Gator Boys (In Stereo) Finding Biqfoot: Further
(ll) 52 35 52 19 21 Farm Shootout"'PG' Evidence'PG' Evidence'PG' Unhooked 'PG' 'PG'X Evidence'PG'
106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live "Top 10 *Y "Next Day Air" (2009, Comedy-Drama) The Soul Family Don't Sleep! Hosted by
96 19 96 Countdown" Wild Out Wednesday. (N)'PG' Donald Faison. Premiere. 'R' sa Man 'PG' First TJ. Holmes'PG'
!ifAVii 254 51 254 Top Chef: Seattle Life After Top Chef Real Housewives Life After Top Chef Top Chef: Seattle (N) LOLwork Happens
Always Tosh.0 Colbert Daily Show Chappelle Key & South Park South Park South Park Key & Daily Show Colbert
27 61 27 33 Sunny '14'X Report Show Peele'14' 'MA' MA' 'MA' Peele 14' Report
8 4 8 8 7Reba'PG' RebaPG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Redneck Island (In Redneck Island (In Redneck Island (In
CMTaP 98 45 98 28 37 c c X Xa a Stereo)'PG' Stereo)'PG' Stereo)'PG'
ICiNiC 43 42 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report The Facebook Amer. Greed American Greed Mad Money
fil 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Anderson Cooper Erin Burnett OutFront
Phineas Good- Shake It A.N.T Dog With a Good- A.N.T Farm (In Stereo) Austin & Phineas Austin & Jessie
DiSN 46 40 46 6 5 and Ferb Charlie Up!'G' Farm G' Blog'G' Charlie 'G'Ea Ally'G' and Ferb Ally'G' 'G' c
[ESPii 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter(N) Audibles College Basketball Michigan State at Miami. |College Basketball Ohio State at Duke. (N) SportCtr
[ESPJ 34 28 34 43 49 Nation Football College Basketball Virginia at Wisconsin. College Basketball Georgia Tech at Illinois. SportCtr Audibles
EWIN) 95 70 95 48 Savoring Christ Daily Mass |EWTN Live 'G' If We Listened ISaints |Faith Catholic Women
"Home Alone: The ***'"U "U(2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed ***Y "Aladdin" (1992 Fantasy) Voices of The 700 Club (In
29 52 29 20 28 Holiday Heist" (2012) Asner, Christopher Plummer. 'PG' Scott Weinger, Robin Williams.'G' Stereo) 'PG' c
** "Asunder" (1998, Suspense) Blair ** "House of D" (2004) Anton ** "The Final Cut" (2004) Robin *** "eXistenZ"
FU 118 170 Underwood, Debbi Morgan. (In Stereo) 'R'x Yelchin. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' x Williams. 'PG-13' s (1999) 'R'E
(iT ) 44 37 44 32 Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
[F 26 56 26 Diners Diners Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Stakeout Restaurant: Im.
[Fi L) 35 39 35 ACC Magic NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Orlando Magic. |Magic In Magic |Football World Poker Tour
Two and Two and ** "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" (2009) Shia LaBeouf. Sam American Horror Story: American Horror Story:
[A) 30 60 30 51 Half Men Half Men Witwicky holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. Asylum (N) Asylum
fiLF) 727 67 727 Central Euro Tour Weekly |Top 10 Golf Central (N) (Live) Big Break Greenbrier Top 10 ICentral
*** "The Town Christmas Forgot" (2010, "It's Christmas, Carol!" (2012, Fantasy) Carrie "Matchmaker Santa" (2012, Romance) Lacey
59 68 59 45 54 Drama) Lauren Holly xa Fisher, EmmanuelleVaugier. a Chabert, Florence Henderson. s
S"X2: X-Men United"(2003) Patrick Stewart. A right- **Y "Final Destination 5" (2011) Boardwalk Empire Treme "Tipitina" (In
302 201 302 2 2 wing militarist pursues the mutants.'PG-13'Sm Nicholas D'Agosto.'R' 'MA' c Stereo) 'MA' c
**Y, "Jackie Chan's Who Am I?" (1998) Jackie Witness (Subtitled- 24/7 ** "The Thing"(2011) Mary **Y "The Eagle"
WiB ) 303 202 303 Chan. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c English) 'MA' a Pacquiao Elizabeth Winstead. R' a (2011) 'PG-1i
(HiT 23 57 23 42 52 House Hunters Reno House Hunters Reno Property Brothers'G' Buying and Selling Hunters Hunt IntlI Property Brothers'G'
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Cajun Cajun Invention Invention Restoration Restoration
HiT 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Pawn Pawn USA'PG' USA'PG'
My Life Is a Lifetime My Life Is a Lifetime The The The The My Life Is a Lifetime My Life Is a Lifetime
24 38 24 31 Movie'14'[c Movie'14' s Houstons Houstons Houstons Houstons Movie (N) '14' s Movie'14' s
ii 50 119 ** "To Love, Honor and Deceive"(1996, "The Perfect Student" (2011, Suspense) *** "Seventeen and Missing" (2007, Drama)
_50_ 119 Suspense) Vanessa Marcil. s Natasha Henstridge, Josie Davis. R' ax Deedee Pfeiffer. 'NR' s
Hunted "Kismet" (In Hunted Sam awakes in Hunted "Polyhedrus" **l "A Very Harold & Kumar 3D ,* "This Means War"(2012)
320 221 320 3 3 Stereo)'MA' c the hospital.'MA' 'MA' a Christmas" (2011)'R' Reese Witherspoon.'PG-13'
MSNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball Matthews The Ed Show (N) Rachel Maddow IThe Last Word IThe Ed Show
Hell on the Highway Border Wars "River Border Wars "War Border Wars "War on Hell on the Highway Border Wars "War on
o 109 65 109 44 53 "Do or Die"'14' Under Siege"'PG' Games"'14' the Streets"'14' (N)'14' the Streets"'14'
iID 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Drake |Drake Full Hse. |Full Hse. Full Hse. |Full H'se Nanny |Nanny Friends |Friends
[IWD 103 62 103 Breaking Down Breaking Down Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss
fWXl 44 123 Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Law Order: CI
** "Against the Ropes"(2004, Drama) Meg Homeland "Two Hats" Inside the NFL (N) Jim Rome on Showtime Inside the NFL (In
340 241 340_ 4 Ryan, Omar Epps. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' 'MA' a 'PG, L sx (N) 'PG, L Stereo) 'PG, L c
f 732 112 732 RaceNASCAR Pinks '14' Pass Time Pass Time Pinks All Out From Drag Race Drag Race Barrett-Jackson Special Pinks All Out From
SPEE 732 112 732 Race Hub 'PG' 'PG' Sonoma, Calif.'PG, L Edition Sonoma, Calif.'PG, L
f**Y, "Swordfish" **Y2 "S.W.A.T" (2003, Action) Samuel L. Jackson. A Los **Y "S.WA.T."(2003, Action) Samuel L. Jackson. A Los
37 43 37 27 36 (2001)'R' Angeles SWAT team must protect a criminal. Angeles SWAT team must protect a criminal.
S**Y' "The I Inside" ** "You Again"(2010, Romance-Comedy) **Y "Van Helsing" (2004, Fantasy) Hugh ** "Bad Teacher"
370 271 370 (2004) 'R' c Kristen Bel. (In Stereo) 'PG' s Jackman. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' s (2011) Cameron Diaz.
Halls of College Football (Taped)'PG' SEC Gridiron LIVE (N) Israeli 3 Wide Life
36 31 36 Fame (Live) Bask. 'PG'
Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters (In Ghost Hunters "Due Deal-Dark Deal-Dark Ghost Hunters "Due
31 59 31 26 29 "Hindenburg Crash Site" "Frighternity" xa Stereo) 'PG' s Date With Death" (N) Side Side Date With Death"
TBS] 49 23 49 16 19 King |King Seinfeld |Seinfeld Fam. Guy Fam.Guy Fam.Guy |Fam. Guy BigBang BigBang Conan (N)'14' c
** "Chandler" (1971, Crime Drama) Warren ***Y "The Time Machine" (1960, Science **F "The Andromeda Strain" (1971, Science
(iiM 169 53 169 30 35 Oates, Leslie Caron. 'GP' Fiction) Rod Taylor. 'G' (DVS) Fiction) Arthur Hill. 'G' 7
Moonshiners (In Moonshiners "Rise 'n Moonshiners"Moonshine Moonshiners (N) (In Moonshiners (N) (In Moonshiners (In
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14' s Shine!"'14' s Goldmine"'14' Stereo) '14' s Stereo) '14' s Stereo) '14' s
[ILC] 50 46 50 29 30 Medium |Medium Little People Big Cake Boss: Next Great Baker |Cake Extreme Cougar Cake Boss:Next
*** "Down and Out in Beverly Hills" (1986) **Y "The Lucky Ones" (2008, Drama) Rachel "Assassin in Love" (2007, "Redmption'
1 350 261 350 Nick Nolte. (In Stereo)'R' c McAdams. (In Stereo) 'R' Comedy) Damian Lewis. 'PG-13' x
The Mentalist "Red The Mentalist (In Castle "Suicide Castle (In Stereo) Castle "Tick, Tick, Tick Perception A student
48 33 48 31 34 Letter"'14'x Stereo)'14'x Squeeze" 'PG' '14'X .."'PG'a tips off Pierce.'14'
[TOONi 38 58 38 33 Regular |Gumball Adven NinjaGo Dragons Ben 10 King/Hill King/Hill American |American Fam. Guy Fam.Guy
TRA 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Food Food Bggg Bggg Toy Hntr Toy Hntr Sandwich Paradise 2 Bbq Paradise 2: An
tiiT) 25 55 25 98 55 Cops'14' Cops'14' World's Dumbest... Tow Tow Tow Repo Conspiracy Conspiracy
(1TL) 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H |Cosby Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Cleveland |Divorced Cleveland |Divorced
NCIS "Sharif Returns" NCIS "Friends and NCIS A Navy lieutenant NCIS Director's contact NCIS A murder victim NCIS "Angel of Death"
47 32 47 17 18 'PG'X Lovers"'PG' c is poisoned. PG' is killed.'PG' in a taxi. 'PG' a '14'
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W 117 69 117 Hex"'14' E Identity"'PG' s Christine"'14' s Davina"'14' a her mind.'14' Tutera: Unveiled
1WiliAJ 18 18 18 18 20 Chris |Chris Funny Home Videos Rules |Rules Rules |Rules WGN News at Nine Funny Home Videos


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
BAH IT/ E
I R I
@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
STURMS /




SII


SIMOWD


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek






F--
f ,n






THE 5PIPEKR5
11
NEW Eu51NE55
HAP A ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer Y I
here: L s
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: HUNCH STOMP BIGGER WINNER
I Answer: Everyone at the party thought the pihata
was a BIG HIT


ACROSS
1 Level to the
ground
5 June honoree
10 Flowering tree
12 Narrow and
elongated
13 Nth
14 Wayne genre
15 Liverpool
poky
16 Waiter's
check
18 When Paris
sizzles
19 Acted like a
pig
22 Broken-off
glaciers
25 Noted sci-fi
writer
29 Spam, maybe
30 Prospectors'
finds
32 Clinic staffer
33 Acid in
proteins
34 Lobby
furnishing


Looks after
Soft to the
touch
Bridal notice
word
Do batik
Rather
you me
Sombrero
go-with
Moon, in
poetry
Public
speaker
Globetrotted
Desperado's
fear
Exam for jrs

DOWN
Meter maid of
song


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PRAM V T P L E D
AU DI ERE S E R E
WEATHERS ARNE
ZAP SOLOED
MEDIC AMYS
ATA KABUKI
YAR D I L K SLED
ASTI DUE TIDE
SPARSE DIN

SEDATE PAM
WARS PLUMBAGO
ALOT EAR ELSE
TYPE EWE REAR
7 Bug repellent 12 Brain halves


Animal pro 8 Have the
Double curve nerve
Widthof a cir 9 Birthday no.
Gambling 10 Make funny
stake faces
11 Envelope abbr.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


APB datum
Archipelago
dots
Open wider
London's
Big -
Ostrich
relatives
Like a blue
moon
Earthshaking
Norse god
Hawk
Titanic
message
Quilt filler
Famous
cathedral
town
Hung on to
Despot who
fiddled
Historical
periods
Chows down
Zeus' spouse
Help a thief
- Jarrett of
NASCAR
Sponge up
"The Gold
Bug" author
Short
distance


ear Annie: I am a woman
who follows a strict diet It
has nothing to do with
weight or any medical
condition. I don't care
about calories. It's
about eating organic,
and there are a lot of
things I do not tolerate,
such as corn syrup,
food coloring, table
sugar, unfiltered water,
etc.
If I do not approve of
a treat someone has
made, is it appropriate
to politely decline to ANNI
accept it? On occa- MAIL
sions where I'm given
something I don't have
to eat in front of them, I gra-
ciously accept it and then give it
away later. What if I'm on a date
and the guy wants to take me
where I wouldn't ordinarily eat?
Should I insist on sticking to my
diet?
I can handle a few splurges
here and there, but how do I
avoid constantly eating junk
without being rude or weird? I
live in a rural area, so there are
not many restaurant choices. -
Upstate Dieter
Dear Dieter: If someone of-
fers you food that you prefer
not to eat, don't feel obligated
to stick it in your mouth. Say
"thank you" and put it aside, or
if you are feeling expansive, ex-
plain that you have difficulty
tolerating certain foods. When
out on a date, you will need to
be flexible if your choices are
limited. Most restaurants have
options that, while not ideal,
are tolerable on occasion -
plain baked chicken or fish, for


example. On subsequent dates,
when you know each other bet-
ter, let the guy know that you
only eat organic.
Then offer to cook
him dinner.
Dear Annie: My
mom is in her 60s and
has been both di-
vorced and widowed.
She would love to find
someone to spend
time with, and we
want her to be happy
The problem is,
Mom has devoted
IE'S herself to this "man
BOX search" to the point
that nothing else is
important. When she
meets a man, she becomes to-
tally absorbed in him. When we
ask her to do things with her
grandchildren, she replies, "I
don't know. I might get a better
offer." When we invite her to the
kids' events, she says, "I'm not
sure. I am hoping someone will
ask me out."
Now we don't call as much
because it hurts to know we're
second best to any guy she just
met. Mom is often lonely be-
cause she waits by the phone
for "him" instead of doing
things with other people. We
wish she would also remember
to make time for the family who
loves her and the friends who
want to spend time with her. In-
stead, she neglects us for any
man who pops into her life.
What can we do? Never the
Better Offer
Dear Never: There's not much
you can do if your mother insists
on behaving like an adolescent
girl. Try to accept this behavior


as best you can. It isn't intended
to hurt you. Mom's self-worth is
tied to having a man in her life,
and without one, she doesn't feel
she has value.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Just Wondering," whose
daughter-in-law has an overly
close relationship with her 20-
year-old son.
My son was 4 years old when
his father and I divorced. A few
years later, his dad left his life for
good. My son has struggled
throughout his years with social
anxiety and many other mental
issues, and we have been to coun-
seling. He is also abnormally
close to me and doesn't like to
leave my side.
Now that he is a teenager, peo-
ple comment that it is not normal
and he should be out with his
friends. It is very easy for people
to judge without knowing what
it's like to have a child who strug-
gles with life. I do agree with your
answer, though, that the family
needs ongoing counseling. -
SFIP


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please email
your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


Bridge


North 11-28-12
A AQ
VAQ 9 4
8 7 3 2


West East
S109854 4 7632
V10 875 VJ 3 2
K Q 9 -
4 K Q 9 6 5 4 2
South
A KJ
V K6
A J 10 6 5 4
6 A 10 7

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 Pass 1 V Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass


Opening lead: 4 10


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Ken Allan published a bridge whodunit, "Deadly
Endplay," in 2011. Now he has produced a part-
fact-mostly-fiction book about cheating at bridge,
"Shades of Grey" (Master Point Press).
Can you prove cheating from hand records? Why
do players cheat when there are no monetary
awards? The answers are not clear-cut, having
shades of grey (The author is Canadian.)
There are several bridge deals. Here is one with
a card-play point What happens in three no-trump
after West leads the spade 10?
There is no bidding in the book. With its good
six-card suit, the South hand is strong enough for
a one-diamond opening and two-no-trump rebid.
Three no-trump looks like a walk in the over-
trick park, but after winning with dummy's spade
queen and calling for a diamond, East's club dis-
card is a nasty blow.
Now there isn't time to establish the diamonds.
The defenders will take three spades and two di-
amonds. Declarer needs luck in hearts and clubs.
In the book, South "won the diamond, went back
to dummy, and played the club jack."
I wonder how she got to dummy A spade to the
ace, opening that suit up? Or with a heart, which
blocks the suit? Surely she cashed the heart king
before playing her second heart.
Then East made a very bad error, covering the
club jack with his queen. Declarer put on her ace
and down came the king. South arranged to fi-
nesse her club seven and took two spades, three
hearts, one diamond and three clubs.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


I






C6 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth

OKAY, HERE'S THE DECORATING THEN WE FILL THE SPACES
PLAN. FIRST, WE START WITH IN BETWEEN WITH THE
A FOUNDATION OF THE MAJOR SECOND-TIER ORNAMENTS,
ORNAMENTS AROUND THE TREE... AND FINALLY COVER ANY
LITTLE GAPS WITH THE
THIRD-TIERS.


Dilbert


The Born Loser

TOAY-(,WE .A FE-URIU6 K' I UT (OU RAVEN'T E7A Ft W1RO CPA5S, AS LONRG IT'5
FF.E-RpANORGcGRICK.E-N TESC\p\ON OF OW WEP-E FR.E.!
h~ --------J PK'EPM U TA f l-T,'--T, I

PN'T WE-' L TR


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


WELL, I'VE HAO IT MORE THAN
YOU'VEHAD IT1, BOSS.
-" ARE.YOU

I'VE HAD IT
S -" MUCH MORE
THAN YOUL
HAVE.
SrBUMSTEAI.,
-^l.; -_<=--


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Least desirable assignment in the entire
environmentalist movement.


www fam lycircus com
"Can you check and make sure
Daddy did my homework right?"


Doonesbury Flashback


Big Nate
NATE, WHAT H01-... '
FOR YOU FRANCIS
ARE LOOK AND
SO SAD' TEDDY
ARE GOING
STO A
MOVIE.





Arlo and Janis -


IT'15BEEHt XHAT
(T' bO~ WHAT'S
SO LOW H7
SINC I'VE usfTHE
BEENAA COURS
CLA5S ROOM. 01?

4;:- IL


IV65TI6LATO6 ARE POR50t6
ALL LAD5 TO COUK)TER
THIS 6EW THREAT/


UM.. MATH, RAY, HO-5
t15TORY, TH& COAC-fA-
5OMuTHIN6 TRATIOM
LIKE THAT.






11.


PROMISE YOOU(
WAIT FOR MAE.




F3 OR


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) 4:40 p.m. No passes.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 2" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Wreck-it Ralph" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG) 4:30 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
4:40 p.m. No passes.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In 3D. 1:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.


"Red Dawn" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 2" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7p.m.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG) 2 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Wreck-it Ralph" (PG) 4:50 p.m.
"Cloud Atlas" (R) 1:20 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 7:15 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Betty


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S Bslnbe r


"TAROHSV HO XTP K BMTAZRY HX SNR


XKWV. SNRV'WR FMRKSRI K XRP MKXG:


MRKZZV AHJ MRKM KIYHMKZ."


IKWHI ZRSSRMYKX

Previous Solution: "I feel cheated never being able to know what it's like to get preg-
nant, carry a child and breast-feed." Dustin Hoffman
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-28


I'VE HAO NO, I'VE HAO IT,
IT, OSS!! SUMSTEAO!!



/[ -. r
~y^~~~


HOWI 01 IT GO AT WORK
STOPAY, SWEETHEART?
^_^_^ THE E305S
l AND I HAO
i- 'J -\ *~' '> IT* OUT, <:
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IF I GO, OPENING
I'LL JUST A DOUBLE
BE IN / ATE!
THE... --7/-


Frank & Ernest


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AND HOW ARE WE DEFINING
"THIRD-TIER"
ORNAMENTS? ANYTHING THAT
TAKES MORE THAN
20 MINUTES TO
S CORRECTLY
IDENTIFY WHAT
IT'S SUPPOSED
^-_ ^ -: To BE.

i --_., :._'/ *^.r ^ /'f
.. i^ s.;-. s : =_'. /






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



CHALK
Continued from Page C2

Competition is for students in
grades nine through 12. The
program allows students to
compete for more than $2.3
million in scholarships and in-
centives. First-place state win-
ners will receive an
all-expenses-paid trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., from March 2
through 6 to be honored and
compete for $152,000 in schol-
arships. First place receives a
$30,000 scholarship. A typed
essay and a three- to five-
minute standard cassette tape
or audio CD of the essay is re-
quired. The theme is "Is our
Constitution Still Relevant."
Students must be enrolled in
public, private or parochial
schools within the United
States; home-school students
are also eligible.
The deadline for submittal is
Nov. 1 for judging at the local
level, with winners advancing to
regional, state and national lev-
els. Application forms are avail-
able at VFW Post 10087, 2170
Vet Lane, behind Cadence
Bank in Beverly Hills on County
Road 491.
For information, call the post
at 352-746-0440.
The deadline for the Citrus
Macintosh Users Group 2012
to 2013 school year scholar-
ship applications is Tuesday,
Jan. 15, 2013. This year,
CMUG will award scholarships
- a minimum of $500 each -
to one graduating senior from
Citrus, Lecanto and Crystal


EDUCATION


River high schools. Academy of
Environmental Science
seniors, including home-
schooled students attending the
academy, will compete with ap-
plicants from their home district.
Students interested in applying
should get applications from
their school guidance
department.
For information, call Buzz
Fredrickson at 352-341-4392.
The Citrus Community Con-
cert Choir, Inc. is now accepting
applications for its 2013 schol-
arship award of $1,500. Appli-
cation is open to graduating high
school seniors or enrolled col-
lege students and residents of
Citrus County or children of Cit-
rus County residents. Past and
present choir members and rela-
tives of choir members are also
eligible. Applicants may
obtain scholarship qualifications
and application forms from their
school guidance counselors or
online at www.citruschoir.com.
Completed applications must be
received no later than April 30,
2013.
The College of Central
Florida is awarding dozens of
scholarships to qualifying stu-
dents interested in taking hon-
ors classes at the Citrus
campus this fall semester. A
major component of CF's Hon-
ors Institute, the Community of
Scholars Honors Program of-
fers incoming high school grad-
uates two-year tuition
scholarships, currently valued
at $3,000 per academic year,
while offering partial scholar-
ships to those who are currently
attending CF.
Students in the honors pro-


gram are free to pursue the de-
gree option of their choosing at
CF, with the scholarship re-
quirement being successful
participation in a limited number
of honors-level classes that
also serve to fulfill degree re-
quirements. Students may also
take classes at any of the CF
locations each term, and are
not bound to enrolling only in
classes offered at the Citrus
campus. Besides financial ben-
efits, the Community of Schol-
ars offers members priority
registration each term.
Typically, a cumulative high
school GPA of 3.75 is needed
to qualify for the Community of
Scholars, although applications
for those with a slightly lower
GPA may be considered in
some cases. Students wishing
to be considered for scholar-
ships should call Dr. June Hall
at 352-746-6721.

CLASSES AND COURSES
For information about out-
doors and recreational classes
in Citrus County, see the Sun-
day Sports section of the
Chronicle.
Citrus Macintosh Users
Group (CMUG) meets the
fourth Friday monthly. The club
meets from 7 to 9 p.m. with an
informal question-and-answer
session at 6:30 p.m. Guests are
welcome. The next meeting will
be Friday, Nov. 30.
Because of the Christmas
holiday, CMUG will not have
classes or a general meeting in
December; however, the club
will host the lab and workshops
to assist members with equip-
ment and software. Please see


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 C7


the News and Events section of
cmugonline.com for dates. Re-
member to register with the ap-
propriate person so the unpaid
volunteers can schedule the
work flow to avoid being
swamped.
Classes for November will be
Apple Contacts and Mail with
Gus Kahwati and iPad iTunes
with Laurie Martin.
The schedule for the month is:
Thursday, Nov. 29, 1 to 5
p.m. Lab/tune-up. Registration
required and indicate topic to
be covered. Email John Eng-
berg at mrbyte@earthlink.net.
All events are in room 103,
building C4, at the College of
Central Florida Citrus Campus.
Class fees are $10 for single,
$15 for a family and $20 for
nonmembers. Labs and work-
shops are for members only
and are free.
For more information about
CMUG, go to cmugonline.com
and click on the About Us
button.
If you've always wanted
to get started in scrapbook-
ing or if you just want to get
together with others who enjoy
scrapbooking, Julie Baker will
offer a class at 1 p.m. Thurs-
day, Dec. 6, at the Citrus
Springs Library.
The class is free, but partici-
pants need to bring two pages
of coordinating scrapbook
paper (holiday), stickers, rib-
bon, scissors, glue stick and
two photos (optional) to create
a two-page pop-up layout.
For more information or to
register, call 352-489-2313.
The Citrus Springs Library
will host a jewelry class with


Edna Mikel at 1 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 29.
In this class, the student will
have the choice of making a
necklace, bracelet or earrings.
The class is free, but the stu-
dent will need to either bring
their own beads or they can
purchase beads at the class.
Call the library at 352489-
2313 for more information or to
register for the class.
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute is offering GED prep
classes. Classes are $30 per
term and are offered during the
day and evening in many loca-
tions in Citrus County.
In addition to GED prepara-
tion classes, adult education
students are also offered free
career counseling, and financial
aid and post-secondary appli-
cation assistance, as well as
free child care for eligible adult
education parents. ESOL
classes are available for those
wanting to learn to speak, read
and write English.
Tuition scholarships are
available to qualified candi-
dates. For information, contact
Student Services at 352-726-
2430 ext. 4326 or ext. 4363, or
online at www.wtionline.cc/
programs.htm#adult.
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute would like input from
community members regarding
what classes they would like to
see offered at the school. To
offer suggestions, log on to
www.wtionline.cc, then click on
"Community Education" and fill
out a suggestion form.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation is offering baton
classes at the Citrus Springs


Community Center.
Classes are open to all girls
and boys ages 4 to college age.
No experience is necessary.
For information, call Diane
Sorvillo at 352-527-6540. All
classes are taught by Sorvillo, a
former Majorette Queen of
America and two-time national
champion.
Classes and times are:
4:45 to 5:30 p.m. New
Beginners (ages 4 to 7).
0 5:30 to 6:15 Competi-
tive team class.
6:15 to 7 p.m. Solo
competitive class.
7 to 7:45 p.m. New Be-
ginners (ages 8 and older).
Class fees are $32 per
month, or two different classes
for $45.
Free tutoring is available
from state-approved providers
to students who scored a Level
1 or Level 2 on the Reading or
Math FCAT last spring at all Cit-
rus County Elementary Schools
and the Renaissance Center
(Title I schools).
Enrollment forms will be
mailed to all qualifying families.
Tutoring is available after
school, at day care sites or
community centers, in home or
online. Spaces are limited, so if
requests for free tutoring ex-
ceed the amount of funding
available, the school district will
prioritize services.
Neither the Florida Depart-
ment of Education nor the
school district promotes or en-
dorses any particular Supple-
mental Educational Services
provider. For information, call
Maribeth Smith at 352-726-
1931, ext. 2321.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Lonely widow active,
attractive, looking for
gentleman for
companionship, 75?.
Blind Box 1814M c/o
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429



BEVERLY HILLS
Estate Sale
Saturday Dec 1
26 N Monroe St



3 Bar stools,
New
w/ arm & foot rest,
$200.
(815) 674-6178



Y ui1 \\ ,II list.
LEi) DI)


COpM E
( ,


~813946275+
.x(3 2 56 -1T oES.*w.chom
Chon- To ay'-To-y'-Tody's Goo1Thngs Domsti1Meica


$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47 for
years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917 .Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucs13@aol.com

BASSETT DINING RM
Table w/4 highback
chairs, med. cherry color.
Top 42 x60 rectangular
w/leaf. Exc cond. $1000
352-522-1048

BEVERLY HILLS
1 OR 2 BR, C/H/A QUIET
AREA $575
FIRST MONTH FREE
(352) 422-7794

CASHIER PURE
GAS STATION
30 Hrs. Thurs.- Sun.
Apply in Person
1017 SE Hwy 19


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, 2/1& Block Storage
Bid. All Rent w/ Opt
Handy person $550. ++
for all (612) 226-0091
Four, 14 inch, trailer,
Good Year, Marathon
Tires $200.
Manual Jack Plate
$100
352-795-2975
HOME GYM
HEALTH MAX PRO 30X3
for strength & resistance
training. $120
352-566-6345

INVERNESS
Sat. Dec 1, 7am-Until
FINAL YARD SALE *
Appliance Clearance
WELCH APPLIANCES
1120 W. MAIN STREET

JEEP
2001 4cyl "TJ" Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
Low miles $10,500
352-220-4634

Mirror Wall Panels
6'x8", beveled edges,
8 panels, perfect for
enhancing size of room
$90 (352) 746-1486


PORTABLE 78
RECORD PLAYER $50
VINTAGE CEDAR
CHEST $30
352-527-1493
PR FORM 365S
Treadmill $100
LIFE GEAR
RECUMBENT BIKE
$100 352-566-6345
RECLINER CHAIR
Beige, med size, as new
$200 Dunnellon
(352) 465-9026
Sofa, Love Seat, Chair w/
Ottoman. Choc Brown
$300; Round Coffee
table, 2 end tables, wood
wl glass & bottom shelf
$150. All great Cond
(352) 382-0608
TOYOTA
19994 Runner, 2WD,
Mich tires, Some cos-
metic damage, Runs
Great $5200 OBO
(352) 344-0072
WESTERN GUITAR
$50
SEAM FAST Sea mop
$70
352-527-1493



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy access
Pine Ridge
352-746-3545
FREE HP OFFICEJET
#1600 COPIER,
FAX, PRINTER, PHOTO
MAKER. PAPER FEEDING
TRAY JAMS. 726-1076
FREE KITTENS
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
Free to good home
Tri-color Cat about a year
old she is simply
beautiful. Please call
231-597-6577 for more
info.
Free to Good
Home-Netherlands Dwarf
Rabbit-Friendly, good
with children.
Call 352-257-5173
FREE White,
micro-chipped,
spayed, kitty very
loving....Allergies in my
home! 352-527-1399




FRESH CITRUS@
BELLAMY GROVE
Navals, Gift Shipping,
Collard, Mustard greens
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378


Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077



Black Labrador Retriever,
about 1& 1/2 yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy",lost in
vicinity of W. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Female large blue eyed
cat; long hair; white with
mixed grey & tan.
Microchiped. Inverness
Broyhill and Carnegie.
352-201-0559;
352-422-7425



Found Kindle
Citrus Hills Area
Call to Identify
(352) 613-3027
Lg Male Neutered
Boxer found in Thrasher
St/ Oaklawn area of
Homosassa. Please Call
(352) 503-9421
Small Male Brown &
Beige Chihuahua
Found in Pine Ridge
11/27
(352) 746-9583




NEED A NEW
CAREER?
CAREER PREPARATION
COURSES
Starting Jan./Feb. '13
FIVE-WEEK PROGRAM
MEDICAL ASST. $1,420
TWO-WEEK PROGRAM
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT, $475.
PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119




Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
Fl Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


HELP NEEDED
AROUND MY HOUSE
With cooking, cleaning
gardening & errands etc.
Flexible Hrs., drug free,
clean background.
Near 486 & 491
(509) 701-1279



FIT Medical
Insurance Biller

Experience required,
Benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1795M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

FIT RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

F/T-P/T
Phelbotomist

For physicians office
with benefits and
competitive salary
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1786M.
CitrusCo. Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429

IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's
Hospital Experience
ICU, ER, CCU, Med.
Surge, Tele, Labor
& Delivery, Daily Pay,
Apply nine at www.
nurse-temes.com
352-344-9828
MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES
**Pharmacist
**EMT
**Radiology
**Receptionist/Biller
**Physical Therapy
Receptionist/ Biller
**Lab Tech
Fax Resume to:
Human Resources
352-52-527-3401 or e-mail
lindak@citrusdiabetes
treatment.com
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T, DIETARY AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
ADIvy in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE


PTA
We are currently seek-
ing a PTA to work in a
great outpatient setting.
This is a F/T position
with benefits. Interested
Candidates must be FL
licensed and have the
ability to work with
patients of all ages
Salary Negotiable
Call 352-795-4114
for more info or Fax
Resume 352-563-2438








Have you ever
wanted to write
for a newspaper?
Do you enjoy
watching sports?
Have you been
looking for a second
income source with
flexible hours?
The Chronicle might
have a job for you.
The Chronicle's
Sports department
is recruiting sports
correspondents to
write about live high
school sporting
events in
Citrus County.
The ideal candidate
should have some
knowledge of sports
and the ability to
write clean copy on
deadline. Preferred
candidates should
own a smart phone,
lap top with wi-fi and
have dependable
transportation. Sports
correspondents work
as independent
contractors.
Correspondents
should be available
to work nights and
weekends.
Send e-mail with
qualifications and
contact information
to marnold@
chronicleonline.com.








License Real Estate
Associate FT or PT
Good Commissions
Inverness Horizon
Realty 352-212-5222





PLUMBERS
WANTED
Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at: 4079 S. Ohio
Ave, Homosassa


7 26385499 1
9 5 4 1 2 7638
261573984
589614723
437892156
395261847
1487593625
672-438519


TELEMARKETERS
WANTED
Earn Extra Chrlstmas
money. More Exp.
the more you. make
.Apply In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr




CASHIER PURE
GAS STATION
30 Hrs. Thurs.- Sun.
Apply in Person
1017 SE Hwy 19




STOCKBROKER
TRAINEE
or Series 7 or 6 w/clean
U-4. Home Office Opt.
Great Opportunity.
Send resume to:
joecalabro@
embarqmail.com




LOCAL BRIDAL/
FORMAL WEAR
Business for Sale
All Equipment and
Inventory Included
CALL (352) 563-0722


^^^^-I


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
r ## '#r


BELLAVITA
Spa riness
Center
Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs
Front Desk Receotion
Housekeeping/Locker
Room Attendant
Fitness Desk Staff
Aerobic Instructors
Massage Therapists
Skincare Specialists
Nail Techs
Spa Coordinator
APPLY IN PERSON
2125W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.


HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto



NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pmn
Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle

IC m IE
L_-___J1


O00CY4V
Sudoku *** 4puz.com

8 6


72 854-_

9 _127_


261


5 9 7 3


__156

261 7



875_ 62

14 _19

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


FREE'BEST
Permit And ,
I Engineering Fees
^ Up to $200 value I 4 -

*Siding *Soffit *Fascia Skirting* Roofovers *Carports* Screen Rooms* Decks *Windows Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com







C8 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


2000 HESS FIRE
TRUCK -LIKE NEW- $15
(352) 527-8287
HOWARD MILLER
Grandfather Curio Clock
cost $2000 will sell $1000
showroom cond.
352-382-5804
LIONEL TRAIN LAYOUT
4'4" X 7', Complete
Village. Many bldgs,
bridges, ice skating pond
& trees. HO gauge. Like
New $550. 352-212-8500
NO.62809 BUXX
LIGHTYEAR ULTIMATE
TALKING ACTION
FIGURE -$25.00-
(352)527-8287



4 Person Hot Tub,
w/ all accessories
+ chemicals
$200 obo
Cell (518) 420-5373
Citrus Springs



DRYER 90 DAY
WARRANTY $100
Call/text 352-364-6504
FRIGIDAIRE CHEST
FREEZER 8.8cf Like
new,$329 new, sale$150
352-400-0141
GE STOVE
FLAT TOP -White
2yrs old. Features Steam
clean oven. $350
352-419-7077
KENMORE 25'CU
STAINESS STEEL side
by side, w/water & ice,
4yrs old exc. cond. $800
352-897-4196
MAYTAG PLUS
26.8cu Stainless steel
side by side w/water &
ice. Exc. cond. $700
352-794-7488
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER
90 WARRANTY $100
352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352-263-7398
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
& DRYER.
8 YRS,HEAVY
DUTYLARGE
CAPACITY,EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
$200 FIRM. SOLD AS
SET ONLY.
352-503-7279




DUDLEY'S
"A-CTW

Sun December 2
Preview: 10am
Auction: 1pm
antique & collectible
auction*
'78 El Camino, an-
tique toys, Waterford,
high end Star Trek,
period oak & mahog-
any & other beautiful
antique furniture,
lighting, clocks, fine
jewelry, Art-Ho Ho Ho!
(Remember 12/7 4k
sqft home & contents
in Pine Ridge!)
www.dudlevsauctlon.
corn (us41)
4000 S. Florida Ave, In-
verness, FL 637-9588
12%BP w/2% ca/chk
Au2267 AB1667



Thursday
November 29,
Preview: 12pm,
Auction:
3pm-inside/outside
ADVENTURE *
AUCTION
Double ring-quality
tools, clean Furniture,
household &
collectiblesthink
Christmas shopping!
www.dudleysauction.
com (us 41)
4000 S. Florida Ave,
Inverness, FL 637-9588
12%BP w/2%ca/chk
Au2267 ABI1667


SALEk
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
FRI. 11/30 @ 6pm
*Antique Auction*
Sat 12/1 @ 6p gen.
merch. Sun 12/2 @ 1p
Tailgate/ box lots
"WE BUY ESTATES"
6055 N. Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389


AIR COMPRESSOR
CRAFTSMAN 5 HP 25
GAL 110/220 W/HOSE
$150. SCROLL SAW 16"
VAR.SPEED $40
352-527-4319
COMPRESSOR Crafts-
man 150psi, 1.5 HP,
15gal with hose & hose
reel. $150 obo
352400-0141
GENERAL
GENERATOR Heavy
Duty, 5550W, 8550S,
never used. $375
352-400-0141



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



4 FT Box Blade $400;
John Deere 1 bottom
Plow $400; All fit on a
small utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812
CULTIVATOR
1 row cultivator $100;
Pig Pole $100.
Both fit on small
utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812
Spike Tooth Harrows
2/ Section Spike $100;
3 Point Hitch $300.
Both fit on small
utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812



2 New Power Recliners,
Flexsteel Sage custom
fabric, $750 ea; China
Cabinet, Transitional
style, with glass, $150
(352) 795-9230
3 Bar stools,
New
w/ arm & foot rest,
$200.
(815) 674-6178


/ '

o r\o d first






( ', ,I,, ,


2 BAR STOOLS, high
back, swivel, oak, like
new $75 ea. Both for
$100 352-794-3591
3 PC LIVING RM SET
Elegant burgandy couch,
loveseat & wing chair.
Exec. Cond. $900
352-232-1246
ASHLEY
Loveseat w/lIg ottoman
Beige. Like new $275.
Can email pics.
352-566-6589
BASSETT DINING RM
Table w/4 highback
chairs, med. cherry color.
Top 42 x60 rectangular
w/leaf. Exc cond. $1000
352-522-1048
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
DAYBED
Wood wicker & wrought
iron. Dark wood two
mattresses. Very good
shape. Asking $475
call 352-503-6018
Entertainment Center
Oak L54" H49" D19" $75
OBO 352-726-6274
KINCAID Master Bedrm
set Qn Sz Bed, 2 night






MO 11V 4 G-


KING BR SET, DINING
RM, LIVING RM, MISC
TABLES, CHAIRS &
TV'S ALL EXC. COND.
352-586-0566
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
TwiCall (352)270-3772 or9.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Mirror Wall Panels
8 panels, perfect for
enhancing size of room
$90 (352) 7464-1486
OVERSTUFFED CHAIR
Excellent condition. Blue.
$50 Call 352-628-3418
RATTAN TABLE AND
CHAIRS Natural rattan
glass top table and 4 high
back arm chairs 1 year
old used twice. Have orig-
inal receipt.
Sold our house and down
sized. purchase for $999
will sell for $499 call anyels
time 740 705-9004
Sugarmill Woods
Sugarmill Woods


PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
oavulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER CHAIR
Beige, med size, as new
$200 Dunnellon
(352) 465-9026
RECLINER CHAIR. TAN
In very good condition.
$60 352-628-3418.
SLEEPER SOFA
Blue Denim, Good
Condition $150
352-746-4232
SLEIGH BED Queen Sz,
solid wood, walnut color,
pristine condition,barely
used. $250.00 Call
(352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
SOFA BED
W/OTTOMAN Red
micro-fiber, like new, full
size, $125. 352-795-6290
Sofa Sleeper Dark
Plaid, on casters
queen size, $250.
Large bureau with mir-
ror & armoire, blonde
$150. 352-232-1246
Sofa, Love Seat & Chair
Matching, beige
microfiber $500.
Glass ends tables &
coffee tables, match-
ing $175,3582-382-3497
Sofa, Love Seat, Chair w/
Ottoman. Choc Brown
$300; Round Coffee
table, 2 end tables, wood
wl glass & bottom shelf
$150. All great Cond
(352) 382-0608
Twin Bedroom Set
5 piece, w/ mattress
and boxsprings $200
Queen Sz. Mattress Set
$50, All in good shape
(352)419-7113
VINTAGE DRESSER W
MIRROR Medium oak, 2
full sz drawers, 2 half
drawers. $200 Call
(352) 270-3772 or
(352) 464-1591



CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER Auto 46",
Kohler 16.5HP, yard cart,
dethatcher attachment,
15gal elect.
sprayer. $650 obo
352-400-0141
MANTIS TILLER
$125.00
352-527-4319


Requirements:

* Ability to work overnight
* Covered Truck, Van or SUV
* Clean Driving Record
Credit & Background Check
Access to your own help
SLifting and physical ability
* Team Player
* Must have a back-up plan
* Computer & Internet Access


Do you have what it takes?

* Attention to detail
* 365 Days/Year
* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented
* Flexible under pressure
* Positive Thinker
* Hard and smart worker
* Keen sense of urgency


! Deliver to stores and coin racks.
Experience preferred but not required.


CLASSIFIED



Troy Bilt pony 17.5 HP,
42in cut 7 speed, Briggs
& Stratton engine. The
cart is a 10 cu. ft. utility
dump cart. Excel.
cond, barely 6 months.
$750.obo, 352-419-7017



BEVERLY HILLS
Estate Sale
Saturday Dec 1
26 N Monroe St



ALPACA LL BEAN
BROWN CAR COAT
coyote trim on hood, size
large cost $450,sell $100
like new. 352-527-0732
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZE 5
PANTS, SHIRTS &
JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
JEWELED beautiful
beaded jacket, great for
cruises or dinner parties.
Size s/m, never worn.
cost $35. 352-344-3485



"GRAB IT" AS SEEN ON
TV $7 obo
(352) 527-2085
(4) OPERA CD SETS
cost $50.00+ ea.-sell
$20.00 ea. or all $75
more info call
352-527-9982
-**285/45 R22***
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
~~~~~275\55 R20-~~~~~
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
09" CLUB CAR
ELECTRIC *
$2000. 352-637-4864
or 352-220-3277
ANNIVERSARY CLOCK,
GOLD / CLOISONNE,
DOME circa 1970's $80
obo (352)527-2085
BIRD CAGE FOR
MEDIUM SIZE BIRD
White.20x30x34H. On
stand with coasters. $50
352-726-5753
BOAT
12FT Aluminum $275
DOG KENNEL 12 X 7
CHAIN LINK W/DOOR
$225
352-232-1246


(352) 563-5966


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


wran ew ar rol,
BBQ Grill II Go Ice
Portible w/ soft side
coolers, set up and
take down $180.
(239) 728-1062 Cell
CAREX 4 PRONGED
CANE $35 obo
(352) 527-2085
CHRISTMAS TREE
Beautiful 12FT, looks real
w/stand pd $800, asking
$299 OBO 352-726-6567
CHRISTMAS TREE
Beautiful 12FT, looks real
w/stand pd $800, asking
$299 OBO 352-726-6567
COMFORTER SET
FULL HANNAH MON-
TANA WITH SHEETS &
PILLOW CASES $35
352-613-0529
CONSOLE
52" console for flat
screen TV; brand new
$150; Electric lawn trim-
mer -used once $100
(352) 527-7223
Digital Samsung Camera
s 1050. Brand new 10.1
megapixel 5x optical
zoom 3.0tft Icd $100.
352-344-3485
DISNEY PRINT
"FLATTERY" -cert.#838
of 2000 size18"by
24"-$100. For more info
call 352-527-9982
DOG SNUGGLES, PINK
OR BLUE, S/M $5.00
each (352)527-2085
DURO MED
INDUSTRIES 2
WHEELED WALKER
alum. $15 obo
(352) 527-2085
ELECTRIC FIREPLACE
Cherry wood in color.
with fireplace tools &
electric log. $99.00
352-621-0248
EUREKA, "THE BOSS"
MIGHTY MITE VACUUM.
all attachments. $50 obo
(352)527-2085
EVEREST & JENNINGS
WHEEL CHAIR ft.
rests,ex. cond. $100 obo
(352) 527-2085
EXCALLBUR
4-WHEELED WALKER,
BLUE brakes, basket,
exc. cond. $80 obo
(352) 527-2085
EXTRA LARGE BIRD
CAGE 78"x27x24 It is on
wheels Price $100
352-344-3472 or
352-201-4430
FREE
TIRES 2 Firestone tires
P215/55R17.
989-255-1513


Vow~o




Sou l




Your Da





















Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print /

& Online


iThank Toou For 15 Years, of %estl


Fresh Florida 15ct.
*JUMBO SHRIMP-
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077

GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529

GRAB BAR FOR
SHOWER. EASY
INSTALL BUTTON $8
obo (352) 527-2085


Green House
10 ft x 16 ft, with extras
Paid $2,300.
Asking $1,200 obo
(352) 513-5168
HOSPITAL BED WITH
REMOTE, SIDE RAILS
$100 obo (352) 527-2085
KING SIZE BED
complete, good cond.
$100, Oak Gun Case
exc. shape, $100
352-341-2019


LADIES S/M DEPENDS
SILHOUETTE
Never used 78 in Pkg.
$25 obo (352)527-2085

Lawn Edger
3HP Edger needs carb
kit. $100 352-382-7074

LIFE-LIKE TRAINS SET.
Heavy Hauler train set
with extra cars and
tracks. Used twice. $70.
Call 1-352-382-1154.


yeS ... .
I,
^ I. ,


-- -


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p.
/


":^. :.. '* ;. /., ;'
-* 7 Ir/ *
.1 /9 .''*-.'


'I;^
(I^J


I


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia In-
continency No Prob .
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383


FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXP- Slabs,
DrivewayPatios,Found
-ation Repair #CBC057
405, (352) 427-5775



All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *k



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
Repair. Remodel.
Additions,
Free est.
(3521 949-2292
STEVEN GIBSON
Handyman & Maint.
Services, 20+ yrs., Exp.
(352) 308-2379




NATURE COAST
CLEANING
Res/Comm, No Time
Wasted 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557


SBat



The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373-*




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
352-563-9824, 228-7320


GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




MOBILE THERAPY
Holiday Special 20%off
call Jenna,Lic.MA58428
**(352) 897-5238*




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
QUALITY PAINTING
Affordable Reliable
Insured References
Call Doug 352-270-6142




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
WINTER SPECIAL
$35 for Driveways
up to 60ft! -
Ann's 352-601-3174




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.
COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *


A TREE SURGEON
Lie. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Fire wd.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352-227-7373*


#1 Employment source is


www.chronicleonline.cor


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


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Interested In:

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C ITRUS C OUN T YJ



Swww.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


.-- (7-s j


a* -4
CHRONICLEc /; Ci oMCNiTl

'^ ^- ^. ".


I
Is













WORDAY GURD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Trucker's truck's branch branches (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Two and two took an oath (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many

3. Blouse grime (1) syllables in each word.
I 102012UFS Dist by Univ Uclickfor UFS
4. Nonclergy merriment (3)


5. "Vegas" star Dennis' swaps (1)


6. Surly person's ice cream wavy lines (1)


7. Immaculate Vatican chapel (2)


missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
PICNIC TABLE 5 FOOT
LONG GOOD CONDI-
TION $85 352-613-0529
PORTABLE 78
RECORD PLAYER $50
VINTAGE CEDAR
CHEST $30
352-527-1493
PROBASICS 3 IN 1
COMMODE excellent
cond. $75 obo
(352) 527-2085
QUICK SHADE
ROLLER BAG Fits
10'xl0'popup canopy
Never used $40.00 Call
Ray@ 352464-0573
ROCKWELL SCOUTING
"1979" 50 first day
covers- matching gov.
stamps $100
352-527-9982
ROSCOE MEDICAL
HOSPITAL BED TABLE
locking legs, exc. cond.
$80 obo (352) 527-2085
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK ex. cond. $50 obo
(352) 527-2085
SLIDING SHOWER
CHAIR FOR BATHTUB
ex. cond. $80 obo
(352) 527-2085
SUBWOOFERS sound
dynamics rts
series1000-100 watts
rms/400 peak-like new
$50 352-527-9982
THOMAS KINKADE
6ft pull up tree fully
decorated $75.00
352-527-1399
WESTERN GUITAR
$50
SEAM FAST Sea mop
$70
352-527-1493




AFPIRE QUICKIE
Power chair EXC. COND
NEW BATTERIES
$700.(352) 726-3263
JAZZY 1170
Low Rider power chair
needs some work.
$500.(352) 726-3263
JET 7 POWER CHAIR
WITH AUTO LIFT Good
condition. $400 OBO
(352) 5134127
Pride Scooter,
Celebrity Wide seat
Blue, $300. obo
(352) 527-1097




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying
sterling silver flatware
and US silver coins
(352) 601-7074




"NEW"STRAT STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
HSS(slight blem)PLAYS
PERFECT! $60
352-601-6625
BUYING
Guitars, Banjos &
Mandolins,Fender,
Gibson & Martin
any condition
(443) 463-3421
DOBRO BLUES GUITAR
W/ case and extra's.
Beautiful condition $350
(352) 746-9470
KIMBALL ORGAN
Performer-Entertainer
Two tier. exc. cond.
w/bench books & light.
$150 352-634-0570
PIANO
STORY & CLARK
LOVELY MAPLE
UPRIGHT & STOOL.
GOOD COND. $1200
352-232-1246




2 JACUZZI TUBS
FREE *
YOU HAUL AWAY
352-628-7542

YOU'LL v THIS!
KING SIZE MATTRESS
sealy posturpedic
with box spring and
frame, used 3 years,
very, very clean
like new, asking only
$300 Homosassa, SMW
860-883-3431



BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $900
352-697-2771


HEALTH MAX PRO 30X3
for strength & resistance
training. $120
352-566-6345
POWERHOUSE
WM 1501
24 different workouts!
$300. 352-628-5085
POWERHOUSE
WM 1501
24 different workouts!
$300. 352-628-5085
PR FORM 365S
Treadmill $100
LIFE GEAR
RECUMBENT BIKE
$100 352-566-6345




1 Set Top Flight
Men, right hand
Golf Clubs$75
1 set Comp 400W Golf
Clubs, Men, right hand
$75. (352) 860-0229
Club Car Golf Cart
reconditioned by manu-
facturer 2010, new
batteries, side curtain,
ext. top, seats 4, exc.
cond. must sell $1750.
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CUSTOM KYDEX
HOLSTERS $40 call for
details 352-637-3894
GARMIN GPSMAP
.76CX Garmin 76Cx
handheld mapping GPS.
Color screen. Great for
marine, outdoor or
geocashing. Absolutely
like new! $175.
352-527-0433
GOLF CART
Electric, EZ Go
excellent cond.
$2,500 (352) 503-2847
PUSHPOLE 18' 2-piece
Moonlighter fiberglass.
Never used, w/ hardware.
A great Christmas gift!
$250. 352-628-0447.
Leave message.
Remington field
master 572, $300.
Lacrosse venom snake
boots, size 91/2 New
$75
(352) 441-0645




Covered CARGO Trailer
4'wide 8'long and 6' high.
New spare tire included.
Price $1050
352-341-1132



ROCKING HORSE
Today's kids brand, good
condition doesn't make
sounds, $35
(352)465-1616




DIAMOND RING
% carat tw, 14 ct white
gold. SIZE 9, Original
price $525, Asking $150
(352) 341-1955


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

WHITE NINTENDO Wll
in flawless condition and
comes with games, con-
trollers, etc. Asking $100
itsmeejenn@yahoo.com




$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47 for
years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917 .Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727 424 1576 email
gobucs13@aol.com


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369




WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacement
China Most Patterns
Crystal Waterford Lenox
Sterling Flatware Lladro
Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Elec-
tronics Stereo Turntables
Billiard Cues Coins &
Jewelry and Scraps Best
Prices Paid Chris @
352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
$$$$$$$$


4 WIRED HAIR
Daschund PUPPIES
Ready to go Now,
will hold till Christmas
(352) 464-2382


14 Tiny Yorkies $600.
- $700. ea. Small, Tiny &
Very Tiny Only 5
females, Raised in
loving home. CKC Reg.
health certs., & puppy
pacs. Parents on site
come watch them play
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258











Arsenio
Arsenic is a beautiful
young terrier/pit bull
mix who was brought
to the shelter as a
stray. He is about
1-y.o. and is very af-
fectionate and play-
ful. He loves to be
with his human, and
gets along with other
dogs also. He is a
beautiful golden
beige in color with a
white chest and
white front paws. He
is not yet neutered
but would be at the
time of his adoption.
He is a strong young
dog and a fenced
yard to run in is rec-
ommended for him.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288. "


BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
2 Males & 4 Females,
Available after Nov 5th
AKC and all Shots
$1,500 to $1,750 call for
info (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
FREE MALE B&W CAT
Decl & Neut approx 5 yrs
old. Dominate lap cat.
Needs home. Call
352400-4676 for Info.
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure Breed Pups, light
colors, 4 fem 2 males,
shots & H/C. Parents on
Premises $450 ea
352-628-6050
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net

WAGS
Wags is a ly.o.
terrier/pit bull mix, black
and white in color, neu-
tered and
Heartworm-negative,
up to date with shots.
Weighs 45 pounds. He
has lots of personality
and is an entertainer,
will keep you amused.
He is a great family
dog, loves all people,
young and old. Gets
along great with other
dogs, givelos of cud-
dles and kisses. That
tail never stops wagg-
ing. Call Karen @
218-780-1808.




CHICKENS Adult Laying
Chickens for Sale, RI
Reds, NH Reds & Aus-
tralorps. $12/each
352-344-0905
FREE *
EGG LAYING
CHICKENS
CALL JIM 352-246-2585
0 -


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


i19If 1 fil


INVINIESS, I-L
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cuffing
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, 2/1& Block Storage
Bid. All Rent w/ Opt
Handy person $550. ++
for all (612) 226-0091
HERNANDO
2/1 $450 mo+dep
1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
352-201-2428
HERNANDO
2/1 $450 mo+dep
1/1 MH $350 mo+dep
352-201-2428
HERNANDO
Lrg. 2/1 V2, Remodeled
Next to Citrus Hills, 1 yr.
Lease. No Pets, $495.
mo.+ Sec. 352-344-3084
HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last &Sec
(352) 382-5661
HOMOSASSA
3/2 W/ Porch & Deck
$650/mo. first & sec
603-860-7455
INGLIS
2/2, Close to Plant
on 1 acre Clean, Quiet
$550. (352) 447-6016




BAD CREDIT RENT-TOCWN.
1 3 t h
Street homes of Aachua, FL.
N o w
has land/home pkgt. Ready to
m o v e
in NOW! Call 386-418-0424
DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, Large Lot,
Quiet Area $28,000
(727) 480-5512

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95% re-
modeled inside, 1.25 ac-
res half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see! 74K
(352) 621-0192
INVERNESS
2/2 Stoneridge Landing
55+ Gated Community
Pool & Club House 28x40
End Glass Lanai & Furni.
$22,900 352-341-0473
INVERNESS
3 months free lot rent
w/ purchase! 1 & 2 Bd
Homes starting @ $6900
Located in a 55+ park
on Lake. Lot rent $276.
month, Water Included.
352-476-4964
Palm Harbor Stilt
Homes, Waterfront,
Beach, 34 Years
Experience
www.plantcitv.palm
harbor.com
John Lyons
800-622-2832 x 210


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS/DNTWN
-MELODY PARK*
2/2/carport $11,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352) 634-6340
LECANTO 55+ PARK
1997 West 14x66 3b/2ba
w/c. non-smoker-move
in condition, newer heat
pump, split floor plan, ca-
thedral ceilings thruout.
Glass & Screened FL
room & open deck w/craft
room, outside storage
shed. $245 rent incl.
water, sewage & gar-
bage, ALL appliances
incl. Asking $23000obo
mobilhome.shutterfly.
com/ 352-400-8231
STONEBROOK MHP
2BR, 2BA, 1200 sq. ft.,
Fully Furnished
Lakeview Homosassa
$40,000., MUST SEE!
(352) 628-9660




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Completely
Furn. on Hunter's Sprgs,
sun deck, W/D rm. All
util. incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb., maint.
Incl., peaceful No pets,
$600. plus mo. 628-6700

INVERNESS
2 B/R's Available
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


EQUAL HOUSING
L

OPPORTUNITY

INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo 1st. & Last
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
INVERNESS
Near Hospital. Modern
Tiled 2BR W/ Washer
Dryer Hookup. $500
352-212-6002




HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
Pets? No smoking. 1st
& sec. 352-212-4981




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 C9


CLASSIFIED




USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




"CRYSTALRIVER-
3b/2ba den,newer c/h/a
carpet & vinyl, very clean
RV Hkup. $39.900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
HERNANDO 1 ACRE
Worksho. 24x40w/ac
Kit-log cabin look+den/fpl
$$$ under $50k $$$
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352)634-6340
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 476-7077
HOMOSASSA
DBL MH, pool, 4 rentals,
2 + acres, 2 workshops,
Owner Fin. 20% DOWN
$160K 352-628-0304




2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348
2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987
INVERNESS 2/2
completely remodeled
carport,scnrm,w/attached
storage shed, plywood
floors, drywall, $10,500
352-419-4606


Inverness, FL 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Com-
pletely updated DW
home on Lake Hender-
son 55+Park. Ph
309-453-3072 or
352-419-6495 $15.999.


ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th-Wheel with
slides. Screened gazebo
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


Marie-Elena Carter
Broker Associate
Realtor
Accredited Buyer's
Representive
&
Certified Distress
Property Expert

Only Way Realty
352-422-4006
www.cartermaria.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSE NG
OPPORTUNITY


CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800




INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
1 OR 2 BR, C/H/A QUIET
AREA $575
FIRST MONTH FREE
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA Near
Shopping $550. mo.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, ( 6 mo. term)
$550. Mo., credit check
(352) 804-5008
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 2 bath.$600.
Garage, new flooring,
ceramic tile baths,
modern kitchen. Call
352-697-0195
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
CarPrt, C/H/A $475 mo
352-220-2447 212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1%/, Good neighbrhd.
Close to schools $675.
mo. 352-409-1900
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lake Estates
3/2/2, 2600 SQ FT Newly
remodeled $775 + dep.
850-527-5085 (Agent)
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office fenced yard, on
over 1/AC, on Hwy 200
$875.+Sec., 344-3084
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
Country Living on Large
'2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225


Motivated seller
wants this gone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




OZELLO
-approx. 2.5 acres**
commercial .w/boatramp.
and gulf access, 3,18',
roll-ups, $149k
call 352-634-3862




REMODELED 2/2/1
103 S Desoto. 1208 sf
New: appliances, paint,
flooring, light fixtures,
fans. Updated kit/baths.
$45,900. 527-1239





YOU'LL v THIS!
CLEARVIEW ESTATES
3+BR/ 2.5 BA, 2+Garage
on 1 acre. Clear views up
and down the trails. Too
many extras, must see.
Mid $200's 352-860-0444
Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, Private lot
352-746-0002




Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




2 Bedroom, 1 Bath,
1 car garage, New Roof,
laminate, flooring,
1000 sq. ft, $57,000,
352-419-6719

must sell!
$164,900, 3030 S Jean
Ave. Inverness, FL, Bank
Owned. Only $164,900
for this large 3/3/2 home
w/ workshop & beautiful
screened pool. Jessica
Wood 352-427-8863,
www.irwproperties.com
Inverness Highlands,
4 BR, 3 BA, Pool, Corner
of Carol and Tennyson.
2.8 acres, fenced, CHA,
deep well, UPDATES
in 2011. Offered As Is.
$174,900. 352-419-7017.
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Sale. Nego.
(908) 322-6529




The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558
WALDEN WOODS
Adult Community
2/2, DW+Carport, Furn.
Close to Community
Center, Pool, $25,000
Call 352-428-6919






MOST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282 Cell















Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


MINI FARM
5 Acres(2 lots) adj
Pine Ridge/C.Springs
3/2/2, block home
w/lots of extras! $185K
(352) 564-8307


Sellers I have
SOLD 23 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com








C-






Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

H Buy or Sell H

I'll Represent
YOU

ERA
American Realty



WaeEBHEnt
Homes^^^


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty









SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
BestNaTu-reCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


SEA CHASER
2008 1800 RG (18') V
hull. 90 Yamaha 4 stroke,
only 82 hours. Warranty
until
11-30-2014.Aluminum
trailer
Great flats or bay boat.
Excellent condition, al-
ways stored in-
side.$14,900. Call
352-601-6656
TRI PONTOON BOAT
A & M, 27 ft, fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $19,500
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




97' CHALLENGER
by Damon 31 k, new tires,
exc. cond. Runs Great!
$12,500. 352-726-3263




5X8 -$850.00
Cargo Transport
side-door. Wheels
packed new jack stand.
getdahl@yahoo.com
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$7500 obo 352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




$CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ


Cl&us C u
Hom:s


Cl&us COEI
Homes I


AAA BLUE WATERS
Exclustive beauty
privately gated 4200 sq ft
splendor (Huge L-R,
D-R,, 3 suites) 799k
(352) 503-2288
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857
Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den & fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925




KINGS BAY AREA
A Special home on deep
water. $460,000
804 SE 1st Court, Cyr Riv
(352) 795-3264



ForsaFrSl


8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this beautiful GOLF
COURSE lot (100X125)
located in Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Have
fun boating, fishing and
jet skiing on the nearby
Tsala Apopka Chain of
Lakes. Enjoy nature, wild-
life and the natural beauty
of Fort Cooper State
Park. Call Kelly at
860459-2411




Four, 14 inch, trailer,
Good Year, Marathon
Tires $200.
Manual Jack Plate
$100
352-795-2975




18ft PONTOON
30 Johnson,no trailer
good shape. $1200
321-303-6453

BASS BOAT
1985,16ft Bayliner
Needs work 85HP force
eng., galvinized trailer.
$600. (352) 507-1490



MUST SEL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES







C10 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012


For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
05' LINCOLN TOWN
CAR GARAGE KEPT,
Two-Tone, LOADED 65K
$10,500. 352-860-0164
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call (352) 978-3571
BUICK LESABRE
01 Custom, senior
owned,garage kept, Ik
new, new tires,68kmi.
$5800 352-634-3806
CADILLAC
2009, STS V6,
44k miles, Luxury
$18,850.
Call (352) 422-0360
CHEVROLET
1985 Monte Carlo 2DR
repainted, rebuilt en-
gine. Runs great, just
needs transmission
hose. Asking $2800
352-270-4098
CHEVROLET
2001 IMPALA,
$4,995
352-341-0018



CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Ed., Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Cond
$8000 352 522-0505
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
DUDLEY'S


Sun December 2
Preview: 10am
Auction: 1pm
antique & collectible
auction*
'78 El Camino, an-
tique toys, Waterford,
high end Star Trek,
period oak & mahog-
any & other beautiful
antique furniture,
lighting, clocks, fine
jewelry, Art-Ho Ho Ho!
(Remember 12/7 4k
sqft home & contents
in Pine Ridge!)
www.dudlevsauctlon.
corn (us 41)
4000 S. Florida Ave, In-
verness, FL 637-9588
12%BP w/2% ca/chk
Au2267 AB1667

FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
$4,500
352-341-0018
FORD
2000 Mustang. If you like
Mustang Cobra convert.
*Must see this car*
$4975(352) 382-7001
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call 352-302-3704
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
(352) 978-3571
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
Ilkenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
$19,950
Call 352-232-1481
KIA
2008 Sedona LX, 76k
miles, Super Nice!!!,
$9,800. obo
Call 352-302-3704
PONTIAC
1999, Firebird,
V6, 79.6k miles,
$6,500. OBO
352-476-3755
PONTIAC
2004 SUNFIRE,
$2,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2004, Camry LE
V6, 64K miles Super
Clean $9,800. obo
Call (352) 978-3571
TOYOTA
2007, Yarls, 59K miles, 2
DR, H/B $8,800.
Call 352-422-0360




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. DEC. 2. 2012
1-800-438-8559








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo


Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment


GMC
2003 Box Truck
$6,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K ml, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call 352-978-3571
TOYOTA TACOMA
07, pre-runner, sr5
4dr, v6, auto, $16k
727-776-4645




CHEVROLET
2002 SUBURBAN
$5,995.
352-341-0018
GMC
2003 Yukon SLT
Exc cond New tires. Well
maintained.108,000mi
Load w/Onstar
$9,450 OBO
(207)-730-2636
TOYOTA
1999 4 Runner, 2WD,
Mich tires, Some cos-
metic damage, Runs
Great $5200 OBO
(352) 344-0072




CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2001 4cyl "TJ" Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
Low miles $10,500
352-220-4634
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles, Hard
Top $13,800.
Call 352-422-03601




KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k
mi. $8,300 obo 726-9285




2010 HONDA GOLD
WING
Comfort pkg, heated
seats & grips, navigation,
prem. auto, xm radio,
ABS & extras! 8k
$18,000. 352-341-0952
2010 HONDA GOLD
WING
Comfort pkg, heated
seats & grips, navigation,
prem. auto, xm radio,
ABS & extras! 8k
$18,000. 352-341-0952
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 04'
Ultra classic. Runs great!
New tires, brakes &
battery. EXTRAS!!
$8500 or OBO
352-601-4722
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $3,500.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688




KAWASAKI
2006 VULCAN VF900
Custom. Only 7000
miles, garage kept
$3500 (352) 464-1495
YAMAHA
2004 Silverado w/ wind-
shield, sidebar, & foot
rest, Exc Cond,17,800 mi
$3500 (352) 270-8225




918-1130 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, Novem-
ber 27, until December
17, 2012.
Pub: November 27 thru
December 17,2012.




2355-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-306
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7987
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
RIVER LAKES MANOR UNIT
1 PB3 PG 96 LOT 11 BLK 10
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: VELDORA AR-
THUR, KARIS FLOYD
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,


Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012
2356-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-305
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7988
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
RIVER LAKES MANOR UNIT
1 PB 3 PG 96 LOT 12 BLK 10


NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: VELDORA AR-
THUR, KARIS FLOYD
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012

2357-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-304
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 09-0293
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
RAINBOW ESTS UNIT 2 PB 3
PG 84 LOT 11 BLK 19
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: FAZIA ALAM
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012

2358-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-303
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0249
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
RAINBOW ESTS UNIT 2 PB 3
PG 84 LOT 16 BLK 4
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: FRANK R
VONHECHT
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012

2359-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-302
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0551
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
DE ROSA INC UNIT 5 RE-
VISED PB 11 PG 29 LT 14
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: ANNE CLENISE
ALOUIDOR, JOEL DELVA
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETIY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012

2360-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-301
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0326
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-


ERTY:
SUNNY ACRES PB 11 PG 38
LT 32
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: FORTUNE 7 EN-
TERPRISES INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012


2361-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-300
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 09-0297
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
RAINBOW ESTS UNIT 2 PB 3
PG 84 LOT 10 BLK 22
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: BEVERLY HOLDER,
CHRISTINE F HOLDER, ED-
WARD A HOLDER
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012

2362-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-298
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2248
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
N 160 FT OF W 185 FT OF
S1/2 OF NEI/4 OF SW1/4
OF SW/4 LESS WC25 FT
FOR RD R/W DESC IN OR
BK 329 PG 541, DC IN OR
BK 830 PG 2121 & OR BK
830 PG 2120
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: ESTATE OF GE-
NEVA L ARCHER, ESTATE
OF WILLIAM R ARCHER
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012


CLASSIFIED




2363-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-297
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-1083
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
KNIGHTS ADD TO CRYSTAL
RIVER PB 1 PG 28 LOT 249
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: ANDRE
DEVAUGHN, ANDRE G
DEVAUGHN, JIMMY
DEVAUGHN
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012




2364-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-296
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 09-1857
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
HOMOSASSA SPGS HTS
UNREC SUB MAP 229B LOT
3 BLK C FURTHER DESC IN
OR BK 901 PG 1039
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: FLEET FINANCE &
MORTGAGE INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2365-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-308
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-4880
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 15
PB 6 PG 123 LOTS 4, 5 & 6
BLK 1143 DESC IN OR BK
552 PG 1238 & BK 797 PGS
1070 & 1071
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: JOHN KIDWELL,
RICHARD LEINBACH, ROB-
ERT SHIRLEY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on December 19, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated October 30, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
November 14, 2012
November 21, 2012
November 28, 2012
December 5, 2012





755-1202 WCRN
Personal Mini Storage
12-12-12 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
- DUNNELLON
UNIT
#0163 MARINDA GARRI-
SON
#0009 JESSICA KLEMM
#0157 ROCHELLE MARK
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VE-
HICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.

LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- December
12th @ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.

PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY 41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
November 28 & Decem-
ber 2, 2012.


744-1128 WCRN
Richard F. Creighton File No: 2012CP662 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.:2012CP662 Division Probate

IN RE: ESTATE OF
RICHARD F. CREIGHTON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of RICHARD F. CREIGHTON, (the Decedent),
whose date of death was October 16, 2012, and the last four digits of whose social
security number are 0181, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILEDWITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 21 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/THOMAS E. SLAYMAKER /s/Thomas E. Slaymaker
Attorney for Thomas E. Slaymaker 2218 Highway 44 West
Florida Bar Number: 398535 Inverness, Florida 34453
Slaymaker and Nelson, P. A., 2218 Highway 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726 6129, Fax: (352) 726 0223, E-Mail: tom@slaymakerlaw.com
Secondary E-Mail: kathe@slaymakerlaw.com
November 21 & 28, 2012.


743-1128 WCRN
Richard Albert Hall File No: 2012-CP-613 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2012-CP-613

IN RE: ESTATE OF
RICHARD ALBERT HALL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of RICHARD ALBERT HALL, deceased, whose
date of death was August 9, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34447. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al othercrecitas ofthe decedent and other perns having ddms or de-
mands against decedent 's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONIHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHE TRSTPUBUCATIONOFTHBNOTICE. A L L
CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWIlHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 21, 2012.
Attorney for Estate: Personal
Representative:
/s/ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN, ESQ. /s/ MICHAEL HALL
Attorney for the estate 942 Pritchard Island
Rd.
Florida Bar Number: 0075272 Inverness, Florida
34450
PO Box 415, Homosassa Springs, Florida 34447, Telephone: (352) 382-7934
Fax: (352) 382-7936, E-Mail: christensenlaw@earthlink.net
Secondary E-Mail: christensenlaw@earthlink.net
November 21 and 28, 2012.


756-1204 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
In accordance with State Statute 328.17, public notice is hereby given as follows:

On July 17, 2012, the City of Crystal Rver removed a boat from Kngs Bay in ac
cordance with a Court Order issued by Circuit Judge Richard Howard.
The subject boat is described as follows: 1973 Nautalin 43' houseboat. Floida
Registration #FL 1133 JG, HIN# FLZD290090470
As of this date, the City has incurred the following costs related to the removal
and storage of this boat:
$1,650.00 removal of Boat from water
$ 600.00 towing of boat
$ 195.71 storage of boat for period from 7/17/2012 through
11/27/2012
$2A45.71 TOTAL
Additional costs will continue to be charged to this boat while stored.
The City has demanded payment for all charges related to the boat no later
than November 23, 2012.
The boat will be disposed of on December 10, 2012, starting at 8 AM if payment
in full is not made on all applicable charges related to the boat.
Contact Person for the City:
City Manager A. R. Houston
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
(352) 795-4216, ext. 302
November 28 & December 4, 2012.


753-1205 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PETITION TO VACATE PLAT
The Petitioner, R. Bruce McLaughlin, on behalf of George H. Decker, hereby gives
notice of his intention to petition the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
to vacate a portion of that certain unrecorded plat of Sunny Isles Estates, Unit One,
as described in Exhibit A, attached hereto and made a part hereof.
/s/ R. Bruce
McLaughlin
Petitioner
Exhibit A
A LEGAL DESCRIPTION FOR GEORGE DECKER OF PARCEL A
BEING A PORTION OF PIRATE COVE, SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 18
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

PARCEL A
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID TOWNSHIP A DISTANCE OF 10560.00 FEET; THENCE
NORTH A DISTANCE OF 1786.05 FEET; THENCE N5116'51"W A DISTANCE
OF 14.98 FEET; THENCE N30 21'30"E A DISTANCE OF 139.30 FEET;
THENCE S59 38'30"E A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE
N30 21'30"E A DISTANCE OF 150.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE N59 38'30"W A DISTANCE OF 25.00; THENCE N30 40'43"E A
DISTANCE OF 81.15 FEET; THENCE N78 22'02"E A DISTANCE OF 115.73 FEET;
THENCE Sl 37'58"E A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET; THENCE S78 22'02"W A
DISTANCE OF 93.63 FEET; THENCE S30 40'43"W A DISTANCE OF 58.78 FEET;
THENCE N59 38'30"W A DISTANCE OF 25.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
November 28 & December 5, 2012.


754-1128 WCRN
Dec. Auctions
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicles will
be sold at PUBLIC AUC-
TION on the property of
SCALLY'S LUBE & GO TOW-
ING AND RECOVERY, 1185
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL
34453; 352-860-0550; in
accordance with Florida
Statute 713.78. Auction
Date as Follows: All Sales
will begin at 8:00 AM. Ve-
hicle may be viewed 30
minutes before sale. For
details call 352-860-0550.

1) 1994 PONTIAC
BONNEVILLE


COLOR: WHITE
VIN#1G2HX52LOR4273775
Auction Date: 12/09/12

2) 2006 PONTIAC GR PRIX
COLOR: BLUE VIN#
2G2WP552261146088
Auction Date: 12/09/2012

3) LEXS ES 330
COLOR: SILVER VIN#
JTHBA30G445053375
Auction Date: 12/09/2012
Scally's Lube and Go re-
serves the right to bid on
all vehicles in Auction. All
sales are final at 9:00 AM
November 28,2012.

752-1128 WCRN
12/18 Auction


Meeting^f
Notice


PUBLIC NOTICE
AUCTION
The following vehicles)
will be sold at public auc-
tion, per FL Stat. 713.78,
commencing at 9:00 AM
on December 18th, 2012,
at Carter's Auto Recycl-
ing, 8795 South Florida
Ave., Floral City, Florida:
Phone: 352-637-1141
1990 FORD TRUCK
VIN#1 FDKE37MXLHA88576
HAULMARK ENCLOSED
TRAILER
VIN#4XSCB12163G051696
Interested parties should
contact Carter's Auto
Recycling at 352-637-1141
/s/ Marge Carter, Owner
November 28,2012.


Meeting^f
Notices


750-1128 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
meet in Regular Session on December 4, 2012, at 1:00 P.M., in the Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of con-
ducting the regular business of Citrus County.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.

Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceed-
ings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes).
November 28,2012.


751-1209WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County Hospital Board invites interested parties to submit a Request for
Proposal for the valuation of Citrus Memorial Hospital and other listed assets. The RFP
shall be submitted to the Citrus County Hospital Board on or before December 27,
2012 at 2pm, pursuant to the RFP.
Scope of Work for RFP
The Citrus County Hospital Board seeks a prospective bidder to address the following
requirements, pursuant to FS 155.40(5) (c&d):
Be a certified public accounting firm or other firm that has substantial expertise
in the valuation of hospitals to render an independent valuation of the Citrus
Memorial Hospital's fair market value for sale and or leasing of hospital facilities
owned by the board to a not-for-profit or for-profit entity.
Be a certified public accounting firm or other firm "to consider an objective op
rating comparison between a hospital or health care system operated by the
Citrus County Hospital Board and other similarly situated hospitals, both
not-for-profit and for-profit, which have similar service mix, in order to determine
whether there is a difference in the cost of operation using publicly available
data provided by the Agency for Health Care Administration and the quality
metrics identified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core
Measures. The comparison must determine whether it is more beneficial to tax
payers and the affected community for the hospital to be operated by a gov
ernmental entity, or whether the hospital can be operated by a not-for-profit or
for-profit entity with similar or better cost-efficiencies or measurable outcomes
identified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core Measures.
The comparison must also determine whether there is a net benefit to the commu
nity to operate the hospital as a not-for-profit or for-profit entity and use the pro
ceeds of the sale or lease for the purposes described (herein)." Florida Statute
155.40(5)(d).

To acquire the RFP please go to website of the Citrus County Hospital Board at
www.citruscountyhospitalboard.com.
November 28, December 2, 5 & 9, 2012.


738-1128 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA SITTING AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE 2010 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT FOR
WASTEWATER UTILITY SERVICES HARBOR ISLE OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM
METHOD FOR THE LEVY, COLLECTION AND ENFORCEMENT OF NON-AD VALOREM AS-
SESSMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF WASTEWATER SERVICES IN THE 2010 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT HAR-
BOR ISLE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2010 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Harbor Isle,
more particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof,
that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the gov-
erning body of the 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal
Service Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Harbor Isle is considering the
adoption of a non-ad valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services
commencing in fiscal year 2013/2014 within said area and intends to use the uniform
method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assessments as
set forth in Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the govern-
ing body of the 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Serv-
ice Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Harbor Isle will conduct a public
hearing on Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 2:00 p.m. in the Board of County Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida to consider the adoption of a resolution authorizing their use of the uni-
form method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assess-
ments. If this method of collection is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
Interested persons may appear at the hearing to be heard regarding the use of
the uniform method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem as-
sessments. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the County Com-
mission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, they will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be made.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least seven (7)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please use the TTY
Telephone (352) 341-6580.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
EXHIBIT A
2010 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT-HARBOR ISLE
The 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District -
Harbor Isle consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads in which
a sewage disposal system and sewer improvements are constructed or recon-
structed and all lots and parcels which are served or to be served by a sewage dis-
posal system and sewer improvements, located in Citrus County, Florida, further de-
scribed as follows:
HARBOR ISLE DESCRIPTION: A PORTION OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 28,TOWNSHIP 18
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE S8951 '30"W, ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4, A DIS-
TANCE OF 342.77 FEET; THENCE S03 40'05"E ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY AND THE
NORTHERLY EXTENSION THEREOF, OF PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3 AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 43, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA, A
DISTANCE OF 866.86 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 44 (FORT ISLAND TRAIL) AND ALSO THE BOUNDARY OF
SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID
CURVE BEING CONCAVE SOUTHEASTERLY, HAVING A RADIUS OF 1318.57 FEET, A
CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF S48 57'45"W, 274.83 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE
ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 275.33 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE
S42 58'50"W ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AND SAID BOUNDARY OF PARADISE
COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3, A DISTANCE OF 219.00 FEET THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF
A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET, A CHORD BEARING
AND DISTANCE OF N02 01 '10"W, 35.36 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE
A DISTANCE OF 39.27 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N47 01'10"W A DIS-
TANCE OF 354.36 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK C OF SAID PARA-
DISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3; THENCE S51 20'00"W, ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF
SAID BLOCK C, A DISTANCE OF 290.14 FEET; THENCE CONTINUING ALONG THE
BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK C, S75 59'30"W A DISTANCE OF 154.81 FEET; THENCE
N73 57'00"W A DISTANCE OF 260.94 FEET; THENCE N08 36'50"W A DISTANCE OF 44.39
FEET TO A POINT ON A TRAVERSE LINE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY, EASTERLY AND NORTH-
ERLY SHORES OF CRYSTAL RUN AND PRETTY LAKE, THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG
SAID TRAVERSE LINE N56 43'00"E A DISTANCE OF 562.21 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE
N17 56'30"E A DISTANCE OF 278.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE N6051 '00"E A DIS-
TANCE OF 73.20 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE S7614'20"E A DISTANCE OF 95.45 FEET,
MORE OR LESS; THENCE LEAVING SAID TRAVERSE LINE AND CONTINUING ALONG THE
BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK C, S7614'20"E A DISTANCE OF 46.13 FEET; THENCE
S53 50 10"E A DISTANCE OF 80.38 FEET; THENCE S1327'40"E A DISTANCE OF 45.71 FEET;
THENCE S26 55'00"W A DISTANCE OF 378.35 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHEASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF NORTH ISLAMIRADA WAY; THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE S47 01 10"E A DISTANCE OF 83.25 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF LOT
11, BLOCK B OF SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3; THENCE N26 55'00"E,
ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 10 AND 11, OF SAID BLOCK B, A DISTANCE
OF 190.00 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 10; THENCE ALONG THE
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 10, S63 05'00"E A DISTANCE OF 163.05 FEET TO A
POINT ON A CURVE ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF S.E. PINWHEEL DRIVE,
SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE NORTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 683.67 FEET, A
CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N27 50'56"E 22.25 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC
OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 22.25 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE CON-
TINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE N26 55'00"E A DISTANCE OF 120.00
FEET; THENCE S63 05'00"E A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER
OF LOT 10, BLOCK A OF SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3; THENCE ALONG
THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 10 S57 03'26"E A DISTANCE OF 223.89 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING LESS AND EXCEPT ANY ISLANDS, STATE AND FEDERALLY
OWNED CONSERVATION LANDS, GOVERNMENTALLY OWNED LANDS, LESS AND EX-
CEPT ANY PROPERTY ALREADY SERVED BY A FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMEN-
TAL PROTECTION PERMITTED SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEM AND LESS AND EXCEPT ANY
PROPERTY WITHIN THE CORPORATE BOUNDARY OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLOR-
IDA.
November 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2012.


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Foreclosure Sm
Action Notices
I .:,Se/I


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40 %pr4






FlrlCt0ertg o ni Citru 0o nt Hitria Soit0lrlCt Nov 30 an0e.,21 0ol 13


P 7" 4
Special to the Chronicle
The Duval House will be a new part
of the Blue Banner Tour of Historic
Homes.


Historic


home new


to tour

By Paulette Lash Ritchie
Floral City Heritage Council
Built in 1866 by John Paul
Formy-Duval when he left Ocala
after the Civil War, the Duval
House is the oldest remaining
residence in Citrus County. Be-
fore the upstairs was completed,
he discovered that it was not on
his property so he moved a mile
west to Duval Island where he
built a similar house. After the


Duval family moved out, it had a
succession of occupants until the
mid-193 Os, when it was acquired
by the Metz family.
The placement of the house
on the property is unlike sur-
rounding homes. The front of this
house with its porch-over-porch
faces the east and the "back" of
the house faces Old Floral City
Road. Extensive additions have
occurred over the years to the
west and south sides of the


building.
The upstairs of the Duval
House was never finished -
remaining very much as it was in
the 1860s and the second story
can only be reached from an en-
closed stairway opening onto the
front porch. There is no access to
the upstairs from the interior of
the lower floor.
Typical of several historic
homes in Floral City, the front
yard contains a large cistern used


to store rainwater which was col-
lected by roof gutters.
The house remained in the
possession of the Metz family
until acquired in early 2012 by
the Duval Preservation Trust,
which has initiated the restora-
tion project for this important
historic building.
The house will be a new part
of the Blue Banner Tour of His-
toric Homes. Information about
the tour begins on Page 6.


Heritage


festival


kicks off


Friday
The Floral City Heritage Coun-
cil presents Floral City Heritage
Days Nov. 30 and Dec. 1.
Activities begin Friday night
with Candles 'N" Carols which
features an all-you can-eat fish fry
with night rides in a horse drawn
wagon down the mile-long Or-
ange Avenue lined with luminar-
ies. Attendees enjoy singing carols
from the open front porches of
historic homes under the venera-
ble century-old oak trees.
The fish fry begins at 4 p.m.
Floral City Heritage Hall Museum
and Country Store will be open at
5 p.m.
By 5:30 p.m. Orange Avenue
from Old Floral City Road to
Annie Terrace is closed to all ve-
hicular traffic and luminaries are
placed along either side of the
roadway under the century-old
oak trees.
The horse and wagon ride re-
quires a $5 ticket for all, except
infants younger than 2, who are
held during the ride.
Parking for this event is sug-
gested on Marvin Street, one
block north, or behind the Floral
City Library. It is recommended
see Festival Page 3





G2 Wednesday November 28, 2012


Our New Classics


q LINCOLN


NICK NICHOLAS JH
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River
TOLL FREE 1-877-795-7371 795I I 7371
Sales: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7 PM; Sat 8:30 AM to 5 PM Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM


SAfter You Enjoy
The Heritage Festival Stop
By And Take Advantage
Of Our Year End
Celebration Sale.


GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEOPLE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.

*'-


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
www.nicknicholasford.com
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5


726-1231


FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Wednesday November 28, 2012 G3


Floral

City

Heritage

Days

sponsors
Citrus County
Chronicle

Ferris Farms Inc.

Lions Club

Ace Hardware
Inverness

Ace Hardware
Hernando

Brannen Bank

Gelin
(FC med clinic)

Daniel's
Heating &A/C

Edward Jones
(W. Robinson)

Too Far



Festival
from Page 1
for safety to use a flashlight
to and from parking areas.
From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Dec. 1, visitors can stroll
through Florida Folk Life
Day with early Florida daily
living exhibits, demonstra-
tions, and the Blue Banner
Tour of Historic Homes.
The day of festivities and
education will include the
Friends of Library Heritage
Book Sale, folk music and
country food.


Friday night of Heritage
Days is traditionally the "Can-
dles 'N' Carols" event and
Old Fashioned Fish Fry. Held
in the old limerock Commu-
nity Building, leased and re-
habilitated by the Floral City
Lions Foundation Inc., the
"all-you-can-eat" affair begins
at 4 p.m.
A favorite stop for visitors
is the Heritage Council's
County Store next door to the
Community Building in
Heritage Hall.
Find numerous reproduced
historic postcards, Florida
maps, folk art, and other
prints. History books, tour
guides to the town's historic
architecture, "Avenue of
Oaks" T-shirts and children's
wooden toys and classic sto-
rybooks are a few more of the
items offered for sale.
New this year is the oppor-
tunity for Victorian photos
taken by Rebecca Pujals-
Jones. She will be located in
Heritage Hall.
By 5:30 p.m. Orange Av-


enue from Old Floral City
Road to Annie Terrace is
closed to all vehicular traffic
and luminaries are placed
along either side of the road-
way under the century-old oak
trees. A horse and wagon
will carry visitors along the
avenue.
There is a $5 ticket for all,
except infants younger than 2,
who are held during the ride.
Caroling groups and musi-
cians can be heard on the near
mile-long ride.
Decorated homes and giant
Christmas cards provided by
businesses and organizations
can be seen as visitors ride or
walk down the closed avenue.
At 9 p.m. the luminaries
will have been removed and
the avenue opened again to
vehicular traffic.
Parking for this event is
suggested on Marvin Street,
one block north, or behind the
Floral City Library. It is rec-
ommended for safety to use a
flashlight to and from parking
areas.


* Small Dog Grooming Healthy Pet Treats and Food
Group Dog Training Doggie Day Care
Dental Care Program
Miscellaneous Toys & Pet Supplies


GRTA' TOUCH
7360 S. FLORIDA AVE., FLORAL CITY
JUDY HAMILTON DBA
352-341-0099


Floral City Hardware

$$ BUY YOUR LOTTO HERE! $$
Hwy. 48 on the Avenue 7 f 70 @
of Oaks in Floral City 726-3079


Garages 90
Kitchens Baths
SInsurance Inspections
WILL X 352-628-2291
CONSTRUCTION CORP. 3-682
osEst. 1988o) Virginia Will
www.BeautifulResultsNow.com %.. i... ~ .... i.. I..RI ., III


Candles 'N' Carols

and a fish fry Friday


Gerry Mulligan -
E Publisher
0
C Ken Melton -
*- Community Affairs
~ Editor

5 IL (0O Cindy Connolly-
0 L M Community Affairs
SGraphic Artist

Z L.o Sarah Gatling -
Z Community Editor

C -4 Trista Stokes -
g Advertising
Sales Manager


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS







G4 Wednesday November 28, 2012


Saturday



activities


At the Ferris Groves
lot on U.S. 41
* Home tour tickets and
information tent by Floral
City Heritage Council
* Mount Carmel Methodist
Church's popular barbecue
ribs and chicken; sweet
potato pies
* Parking assistance: Ferris
Farms Inc. will provide free
hay wagon rides from the
parking area around the main
block of activities in town.
Town Center
* Withlacoochee State Trail:
the Citrus Model A's Club
display
* Friends of the Floral City
Library will hold a Heritage
Book Sale.
* Floral City Library will


FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS


* -


host a Holiday Centerpiece
Workshop for adults and
crafts for children from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
* Citrus County Historical
Society Inc. will offer mem-
berships and items from the
Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum Store.
* Heritage Hall museum
exhibit

Demonstrators' Field
* Michael Hamden, certified
arborist, presents the Historic
Oak Trees information, sur-
vey, tree preservation plan and
general arboreal information.
* Demonstrations of early
Florida arts, trades and daily
living skills
* Children's activities


Entertainment

FRIDAY
* There will be carolers along Orange
Avenue on Friday evening as strollers
wander through the luminaries.
* At the Duval House Friday evening
and Saturday: Double Trouble (Jim
Davis and Moriah Dixon on cello
and violin)

SATURDAY

Fire Pit Stage Cafe
(Demonstrators' Field)
Sound provided by Tom Ellis
Acoustic & Folk Music
* Magic Bus: 10 a.m. to noon
* Too Many Smiths: noon to 1 p.m.
S2 PM: 1 to 2 p.m.
* Too Many Smiths: 2 to 3 p.m.
* 2 PM: 3 to 4 p.m.

Town Square
* Klassic Kountry Kloggers


26>~~~ .jW~6i'.j7~24 (4


Inverness Surgical Association
................ .............=....
^^, |||||^l'''lrus Memorial Health System T1 .......
UfS ~WELCOMES

William R. Brown, D.P.M
Dr. Brown joins the CMHS family as a
member of the Citrus Memorial Hospital
Medical Staff providing podiatric medical and
surgical care to the diabetic and high risk B'
populations of our community. He is
committed to his patients and applies a practical,
comprehensive and proactive approach to at-risk
patients with the ultimate goal of restoration
and preservation of foot and ankle function.


* American Board of Podiatric Surgery -
Board Certified in Foot Surgery and
Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle Surgery
American Board of Podiatric Medicine -
Board Certified
Council for Medical Education and Testing
Physician Certified in Wound Care
Unique team approach with specialty focus
on limb preservation and amputation
prevention
Visit: cmhinvernessSurgical.com for more
information about Dr. Brown and the other skilled
surgeons at ISA Drs. Michael Brown, Carmain,
Fernandez, Golkar, Hegarty, Pham.


Most Insurance plans accepted

CITRUS MEMORIAL
&>-fl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Directions,

parking,

restrooms
FRIDAY NIGHT
5:30 to 9 p.m.

TRANSPORTATION
Horse and wagon rides
will be available down
closed Orange Avenue/
County Road 48, through the
luminaries to hear the carol-
ers and musicians.
Tickets are $5 per person
(infants younger than 2, who
will be held, are free).
"Under Florida Law, an
equine activity sponsor or
equine professional is not li-
able for an injury to or the
death of a participant in
equine activities resulting
from the inherent risks of an
equine activity."
see Directions Page 11






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS Wednesday November 28 2012 G5


BEST OF THE BEST
2012 Jacobsen 3 BR/2 BA This home was built with 2" x 6" construction.
Comes with China Labs sinks, ceiling fan preps in all rooms, 1 pc fiberglass tub
and shower. It is built by the legendary Jacobsen Homes with their 53 year
tradition. This is a limited opportunity. Must see this home to appreciate its value!






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Delivery & Set-up OR p
$43,900 ONLY wac.
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and Beautiful Kitchen with Upgraded Whirlpool Appliances/Fireplace and many *
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SALE PRICE
Delivery & Set-up OR
$95,900 ONLY cmo.
with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. NO MONEY DOWN
OR $3898 per sq. ft. Use Land Equity.
Principle & Interest F.H.A. Loan We have over 40 models on display
TAYLOR MADE ^ New, Used and Repossessed.

HOMES 352-621-9181
7165 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL
www.taylormade-homes.com 1 mile south of Howard's Flea Market


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p =1


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Wednesday November 28, 2012 G5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS


IT
1T


T
Iim.
**i-S: ^







G6 Wednesday November 28, 2012


Blue Banr of Historic Hons


Historic house markers em-
bellish the Floral City homes
open this year for the 21st Blue
Banner Tour of Historic Homes.
Tickets are $10 for all private
homes. Tickets may be pur-
chased at any one of the homes
with a blue banner in front or at
the information tent next to the
Ferris Grove Sales Store on
U.S. 41. The tour is self-guided
and entry may begin at any one
of the sites.
Some historic buildings do
not requite a ticket. Most sites
are within walking distance.

THE W. H.
DUNN HOUSE
8050 S. Bedford Road
Owned by Harvey
and Astrid Dunn
This home is located 3/4 mile
west of U.S. 41 from the traffic
light. Driving to this site is rec-
ommended.
The phosphate boom of the
1890s to early 1900s is show-
cased at Floral City Heritage
Days.
During this
time, one of two
major mining
companies in Cit-
rus County, the iu
Florida Mutual
Mine Company,
built this house in
1907, not as a
home, but for a
field office. It has
been described as a place for
the owners and stockholders to
go when they needed to conduct
business in the area.
There was a "housekeeper"
or caretaker who lived there and
maintained the house.
The company owned several
mines in the area and the field
superintendent for these Floral
City mines was William Harvey
Dunn, grandfather of the cur-
rent owner, the Rev. Harvey
Dunn.
W. H. Dunn came to the re-
gion from Alabama and married
Nannie L. Hemrick, a Georgia


I


schoolteacher.
Some of their children were
born at other local mines: the
Rev. Dunn's father was born at
the Ten Cent Mine and three of
his aunts were born at the Three
Penny Mine. However, the Rev.
Dunn's twin aunt, Hazel, and
uncle, Hampton, were born in
this Mutual Mine house.
Hampton Dunn is known to
Citrus County history buffs as
the author of "Back Home, a
History of Citrus County,
Florida," one of two dozen
books compiled or authored by
Hampton during his colorful
life.
He has been described as a
reporter, author, editor, soldier,
historian, preservationist, cru-
sader for traffic safety and that
rare individual who is recog-
nized as a hometown hero. He
served in World War II as a re-
porter and was managing editor
of Tampa Bay Daily Times and
chairman of the board of AAA
Auto Club South.
In 1916 the house, which had
been the
Field Of-
-fice, be-
came the
property of
W. H. Dunn
and the
downstairs
bedroom
now called
"The Ba-
bies Room" is where Hampton
and his twin sister, Hazel, were
born that year. That room in-
cludes one of the eight original
fireplaces (the house has nine
working fireplaces). These are
served by only two chimneys
because the fireplaces are back-
to-back and above each other
downstairs and upstairs.
"Grandfather Dunn wired the
house in 1916.
You will notice some of the
old wiring upstairs where you
will see the knob and tube-style
wiring," the Rev. Dunn said.
The original house was sided


with board 'n' batten; later nov-
elty siding was added. After the
Rev. Dunn obtained the house
in 1973, insulation and vinyl
siding were added.
"In 1928 the roof was
changed from a
gable-style to a
hip-style roof
and that is
when the bat-
ten was re-
moved and the .
novelty siding
added. John
Ogden, a local
carpenter, did
the work," the Rev. Dunn said.
The house has remained in
the Dunn family since 1916, al-
though it was vacant for about
20 years before the current
owners moved in.
Another interesting feature of
the house is the fact that the
front of the house faces an old
abandoned mine road which ex-
isted long before Bedford road.
Therefore, one drives into the
property from the back and side
of the house, not the front.

FLORAL CITY
COMMUNITY
BUILDING
8370 E. Orange Ave.
Owned by Citrus County
Leased by Floral City Lions
Foundation Inc.
The Floral City Woman's
Club received a gift of land in
1929 from 10 prominent local
businessmen. Around 1933, the
club turned over the land deed
to the county in exchange for
the building of a clubhouse with
federal funds under the Works
Progress Administration
(WPA).
Construction was supervised
by local builder John Ogden.
Due to the numerous aban-
doned phosphate mines in the
area, lime rock became the
choice of construction material.
The building is one of the 26
contributing buildings within
the National Historic District


and served as a service club for
soldiers during World War II.
Until 1996 the building was
maintained and operated by a
board composed of local
organizations.
In 1996 the
.Floral City
Lions Founda-
tion Inc. en-
Stered into a
30-year lease
for the build-
ing with the
Board of
County Com-
missioners and
utilizes their "building fund" to
rehabilitate the structure.

THE ENCHANTED
GARDEN AT
THE HISTORIC GRINER
HOUSE
8481 E. Orange Ave.
Master Gardener
Amanda Mullen
(Only the garden and not the
house is open at this site.)
Perfected with individual vi-
gnettes at every turn, "The En-
chanted Garden" best describes
the garden at the Historic Griner
House. Beyond the limerock
driveway and wayside seating
area, there lies a fairyland
world. Large wooden gates
open to many garden rooms
connected by narrow painted-
stone paths,
each leading
to the next.
Ancient
brick encir- C
cles a half-
submersed
swimming
pool; an old
picnic table
dabbled with shades of purple
paint sits nearby and off to one
side is another seating area, se-
cluded by a mature fringe tree
full with seed pods. A short tun-
nel of vines ends at a hidden
painted door leading to yet an-
other garden path.
Turn another direction to en-


counter Cherokee roses climb-
ing the lattice arbor with
painted lavender roses on
pavers and an inviting bench.
Return toward the house and
there is a large outdoor room
covered entirely with passion
vine, bougainvillea and other
vines.
The stately old camellia
bushes form the foundation of
this garden. Those and some of
the other plants were laid out
more than 55 years ago by the
gardener's mother, Eva Rae
Griner, whose roots ran deep in
Floral City's early days.

HISTORIC TOOKE-
SPIVEY HOUSE
8532 E. Orange Ave.
Owned by Tom Dyer
The Tooke family members
were early settlers to the Floral
City area. Generally, they were
farmers and merchants during
the phosphate boom period of
the area's history. A number of
historic houses along Orange
Avenue bear the Tooke name.
Irwin Tooke and his wife,
Billie, were the builders of this
home in about 1908. They also
built the home across the street,
which has been significantly
altered.
Several variations of this
wood-framed, bungalow-style
dwelling can be found in the
area. This home
displays the bat-
tered columns
typical of the
bungalow style.
Brick posts sup-
port these bat-
tered columns.
Typical of early
homes, the
house was built without built-in
closets; however, the house re-
tains its original windows,
doors and woodwork.
As a contributing historic
building, the home is within
The Floral City Historic Dis-

see Homes Page 7


FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Wednesday November 28, 2012 G7


Homes
from Page 6
trict, which was listed in 1993
on the National Register of His-
toric Places. The current owner
purchased the home in 2000
and has accomplished exten-
sive restoration to the interior
and landscape.

HISTORIC D. A.
TOOKE HOUSE
8560 E. Orange Ave.
Owned by William
and Janet Weber
In 1900 or a year or two be-
fore, this house was built for H.
D. Bassett, who was a phos-
phate mine superintendent. He
first served the Black Diamond
Mine at New Hope and later
served as superintendent for the
Bradley Mine south side of
Floral City.
A photo from 1934 reveals


that the house originally had a
wrap-around porch from front
to back. But with the popularity
of the automo-
bile, the side
porch was re- ",
moved in favor
of a porte coche, *
allowing the auto -
close proximity
to the house.
During that exte-
rior renovation,
battered columns
were added across the front of
the house to complement the
columns on the porte coche.

HISTORIC J.T.
LOVE HOUSE
8580 E. Orange Ave.
Owned by Gregory
and Sandra Cross
James Thaddeus Love built
his house around 1915. He was
the grandson of J.P. Formy-


Duval, early landowner of what
was the original area of town.
Current owners have been
restoring
and rehabil-
itating the
ma house over
the years.
Inside,
the living
room walls
reveal the
original
beaded
board and all floors are
original.
Complementary rehabilita-
tion of the kitchen and bath-
room has been accomplished
and the house exhibits a fresh
coat of paint on its exterior.
A challenge to the owners
has been the large "patio" addi-
tion on the rear of the house
made by a previous owner, but
the challenge shall be met.


When the roofing on the front
porch had to be replaced, the
owners had roll-roofing hand
cut to match the main roof.
This is only one example of
the care taken by many of own-
ers of these historic homes in
Floral City.

FLORAL CITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
8599 E. Marvin St.
This church structure was
built in 1945 after being
founded as early as 1910 at
Cove Bend east of the town
and near the river. L. M. Black
and Carey Dillinger (who was a
cousin of the notorious John
Dillinger, a most-wanted crimi-
nal in the 1920s and '30s)
headed up the building com-
mittee. E. Arnold Zellner do-
nated materials from his ranch
east of town on Trails End
Road.


When members of the
Whitelaw family came to the
Cove Bend area from Ten-
nessee, they were joined by a
few members of the Church of
Christ who were meeting in the
school building there. Those
early settlers included the John-
son, Lewis, Peterson and
Rooks families.
After the Cove Bend school
structure was sold, members
met in the Floral City Commu-
nity Building during World War
II, while materials were col-
lected for the present construc-
tion. Carey Dillinger made
wooden pews and the design
was so well accepted that other
churches in the county re-
quested him to make pews for
them.
It is one of several buildings
in Floral City that was con-
see Homes Page 9


Committed



To Serving Our



Community



Since 1946.



Enjoy the Festival!



--O O m / 1997 2004

INVERNESS 501 W. Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450 1998 2005
BEVERLY HILLS 5054 N. Lecanto Hwy.,Beverly Hills, FL 34465 1999 2006
2000 2007
FUNERA HOMES HOMOSASSA 8495W. Grover Cleveland, Homosassa, FL 34446 2001 2009
& CREMATORY (352) 726-2271 1-888-7HOOPER(746-6737) www.HooperFuneralHome.com ___ 2003 2011


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS





G8 Wednesday November 28, 2012


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FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS


Homes
from Page 7
structed with a basement. The
church owns the large lot across
the street with a pavilion and
this is the area that the church
so generously uses to support
Floral City Heritage Days
annually.

FLORAL CITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
8480 E. Marvin St.
In 1884 the Methodist com-
munity, led by master builder
George Higgins and
assisted by George
Robinson, built this
gothic vernacular
structure. Re-
strained touches of
gothic are seen in
the shape and trac-
ery of the church .a
windows.
Some original
amethyst glass re-
mains.
The color was de-
veloped as sun hit
the glass, which
contains manganese. Man-
ganese was obtained from Ger-
many, therefore when World


War I broke out, the American
source was cut off and antique
glass found today may be dated
to that period.
This splendid church is con-
sidered the focal point for the
National Floral City Historic
District and is eligible on its
own for the National Register
of Historic Places.
Restoration of the interior
and exterior of the building was
accomplished in 1992.
It was restored to its found-
ing date and contains no elec-
tricity.
The removal of an addition at

lovely bay window
behind the pulpit.
Two original pews
have been retained
at the back of the
church.
From the book,
- "A Time to Remem-
*" ber, the History of
S the Floral City
S' Methodist Church"
by Ann Luff, a per-
spective of the phos-
phate boom period is
given when, in 1891,
it was "suggested that Sunday
was no more than any other


day. The mines did not operate,
but stores were open all day and
delivery wagons ran as usual."
That was a shocking scene
for many of the day.

OLD COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
8375 E. Orange Ave.
Owned by
Ron and Carlotta Yancey
Once known as the finest
home in Floral City, this struc-
ture with folk Victorian-style
overtones may
have been
built as early
as 1879, since -
tradition states
that the stained -
glass windows
were a wed-
ding present
from James M.
Baker to his bride, Celeste Eu-
lade "Nettie" Duval when they
married in 1879.
James Baker was a prominent
merchant, a farmer and a local
phosphate mine manager.
In 1898, the home was sold
to Mrs. Hugh (Marian M.) Bor-
land and moved from its origi-
nal site on the northwest corner
of Orange Avenue and Church


Street to its present location.
The structure has undergone
numerous changes and owners
since its prime days. Current
owners have made much
restoration progress to include
exposing the second-story al-
cove porch which was once
closed in.
Originally the house had a re-
cessed porch that was later en-
closed most likely to create a
foyer when the house was
moved and converted into a
hotel.
A portion of
n R the wrap-
around porch
Swas removed
when the con-
crete block ad-
dition was
added to the
southwest cor-
ner of the house in the mid-20th
century. Removing the structure
to fully restore the building has
proven financially challenging
since all the electric service
comes into the house on that
building.
Although zoned commercial,
the house is used as a private
residence but the block addition
serves as an antique shop.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wednesday November 28, 2012 G9


Special

assistance
Friday Night Luminaries:
Camp E-Nini-Hassee and
Shamrock Inn.
Parking Assistance and
Locations: Fred Daniels,
American Legion Post No.
225; Floral City United
Methodist Church; Ferris
Farms Inc.; First Baptist
Church of Floral City.
Demonstrators Field/
Food Pavilion: Floral City
Church of Christ.
Safety: Floral City Volunteer
Fire Rescue; Sheriff's Office;
Community Patrol Unit 5; Na-
ture Coast EMS at Floral City.
Costumed Hosts and Host-
esses for Historic Home
Tour: Floral City Heritage
Council; Floral City Garden
Club; Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum Docents; Citrus Garden
Club; Crystal River Woman's
Club; other local and county
residents; Home Stuff
Interiors.
Heritage Hall Museum:
Frank Peters, chairman and
designer; 1907-1911 Floral
City diorama by Tom Ritchie.
Also, thanks to volunteers
who turned out for various
other projects.







G10 Wednesday, November 28, 2012


Special food



offerings


Friday, Nov. 30
4 p.m.
* Floral City Lions
Foundation Inc.:
Old Fashioned Fish Fry

Saturday, Dec. 1
10 a.m. 4 p.m.
* Ferris Groves Sales Store
* Mount Carmel
Methodist Church: chicken,
ribs, baked beans, coleslaw,
bread, sweet potato pies,
cold drinks and water


* Floral City Team Green
4-H: hot dogs, hamburgers,
chips, pickles on a stick,
baked goods, drinks
* Reuben Cardonick,
Calypso Concessions:
Kettle Kom, funnel cakes,
ribbon fried potatoes,
lemonade, sweet tea
* Michael Torres: fire-
roasted corn on the cob,
drinks
* Too Far: pork lunches


Country Store supports council



and offers hard-to-find items


The Floral City Heritage
Council Country Store will
be open for business dur-
ing Heritage Days.
The purpose of any mu-
seum store is not only to
raise funds for the mu-
seum exhibits but also to
reflect and be compatible
with the current exhibits.
The Museum Country
Store offers items seldom
found in modem chain
stores, such as feather
dusters, corn brooms, blue
granite dinnerware, glass
wasp catchers, antique tin


signs and wooden and tin
toys, train whistles and
hand fans.
In addition to repro-
duced historic Florida
maps, some historic Floral
City postcards and stereo-
scopic view cards have
been reproduced and Flo-
ral City history books are
available, including the
new "Images of America
Floral City" book.
The store has children's
classic storybooks, jigsaw
puzzles and cast-iron
banks.


Also available are T-
shirts, wall clocks and
large black and white post-
cards, suitable for framing,
as well as photographs of
the "Avenue of Oaks" by
Rebecca Pujals-Jones. To
reflect the long history and
pre-history of Floral City,
a reference booklet titled
"A Time Line of Floral
City, Florida," charting
from 10,000 B.C. to the
present, will be available.
The Museum Country
Store is normally open Fri-


10 a.m. to 2 p.m. During
Heritage Days it will be
open during Candles 'N'
Carols from 5 to 6 p.m. on
Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
There are also antiques
on display in the store.
The center set of shelv-
ing, antique cook-stove,
pot-bellied stove and walls
are covered with antiques,
which are on display only.
Stop in and shop.
There are treasures in
the Country Store that


days and Saturdays from would be hard to find.


Area restaurants and food stores


(From traffic light)

North
* Pudgee's Hot Dog Stand
* Ferris Groves Sales Store
* Aunt Martha's Market
* Floral City Bagels


South
* Floral City Deli Food
and Gas
* Express Lane Food Store
East
* Shamrock Inn
* Floral City Foods


Children's activities


* The Floral City Library
will have children's crafts
and adult centerpiece
workshops from 10:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
* Floral City Team Green
4-H will have its Petting
Park with farm animals on


the northeast comer of the
demonstrators' field.
* "What Is It?" antique tools
and instruments will be
shown on the demonstrators'
field.
* Children can dig for coins
in the "Treasure Mountain."


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Fishing Docks
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FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Wednesday, November 28, 2012 Gil


Arts, trades, living



skills demonstrated


DEMONSTRATORS' FIELD
Demonstrators of early
Florida arts, trades and daily
living skills include:
* Rod Miner provides an
old Florida Cracker cow
camp with homestead tools
and equipment, antique sad-
dles, a barbwire collection,
branding irons and old bridle
bits. He also shows a Swamp
Trapper's Camp with animal
hides harvested by early trap-
pers, tools weapons and
equipment, including 30 dif-
ferent animal traps used by
early trappers.
* Kathy Barnes weaves
chair seats of cane and will
take orders.
* Tom Seager is a cooper
and shows the art of wooden
bucket making. Buckets may
be purchased.
* Lou Seager brings her An-
gora rabbit, plucks its fur and
spins yard under a canvas

Directions
from Page 4

Orange Avenue/County
Road 48 will be closed to
ALL vehicular traffic during
this period. Traffic will be
routed to Marvin Street via
Annie Terrace and Old Floral
City Road.

PARKING
At the Methodist Church on
Marvin Street, one block
north of Orange Avenue/
CountyRoad 48, may be en-
tered via Old Floral City
Road. Bring a flashlight for
safety to and from parking.
On the paved parking lot at
the Baptist Church on
Magnolia. Behind the Floral
City Library.

RESTROOMS
Community Building
Church Street, north near
Marvin Street
Floral City Library in town


tent. Yam may be purchased.
* Fred Wilder from St. Pe-
tersburg for many years has
joined the event to demon-
strate the use of the string
pole wood lathe.
* Richard and Betty Smith
show a wide array of antique
hand- or foot-operated
sewing machines.
* Gene Fourakure returns
this year, grinding cornmeal
and grits. He has these items
for sale.
* Doris Graves demon-
strates her skills of chair seat
caning and will take orders.
* Dot Lehman also uses
pine needles in her weaving
and has items for sale.
* Steven Estenson,
blacksmith
* Dina Estensen, broom
maker
* Fort Cooper State Park
exhibit
* Tom Ritchie, sugar cane

center. All sites include handi-
cap facilities.

SATURDAY
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

TRANSPORTATION
A tractor-pulled haywagon
sponsored by Ferris Farms
Inc. will be offered at no
charge to visitors. The rides
will begin at the field next to
the Ferris Sales Store on U.S.
41, travel cross the State Trail,
go south to Marvin Street and
around the block and back
across the State Trail. Most of
the demonstrations, activities
and historic homes will be on
the route.
Rides will begin at 10 a.m.
and finish at 4 p.m.
Traffic will be routed via
Daniels Drive from east on
County Road 48, west and
north on Great Oaks Drive
and back to Orange Avenue/
County Road 48. Sheriff's
deputies will be stationed at
the detours.


grinding
* Bill Weber, woodworking
* Michael Hamden, oak
tree exhibit
* Paul Anderson, Seminole
artifacts
* Nina Matteo, antique
printing
* Nancy Turner, tatting
* Doug Welin's "What is
it?" (antique tools and
instruments)
* Trina Welin's wash day
* Jerry Cowling,
storytelling
* Steve Kingery, boat
building
* Linda Wade, treadle
sewing and quilting
* Tom Bjorkman, telegra-
pher (in Heritage Museum)
* Needle art
* Cracker Florida history
* Basket weaving
* Paper making
* Corn husking
* Petting park

PARKING
Park in the field at the north
side of Ferris Groves Sales
Store and Packing House and
walk a block to downtown or
catch the free hay wagon
shuttle ride to the block of the
main activities and historic
homes.
East and west sides of the
Floral City United Methodist
Church on Marvin Street and
across the road from Floral
City School.
Side street parking
permitted if vehicle wheels
are off the pavement.
Parking is not permitted
along Orange Avenue.


RESTROOMS
Community Building will
be open for use.
Portable restrooms on
Church Street not far from the
Food Pavilion on Marvin
Street.
Floral City Library in town
center.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS





FLORAL CITY HERITAGE DAYS


G12 Wednesday, November 28, 2012



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