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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-25-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02958

Full Text


Stoked at Doak: Gators manhandle 'Noles /B1


Sunny, cool.
PAGE A4


I -- S o U NI D :


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 110


COMMENTARY:


Cyber center finds a slot in Inverness


Critics: Gambling doesn 'tfit city's image


Giving back
Tuesday is hailed as a
day to donate time to
charities./Page Cl
HOMEFRONT:
,,-


Giving gifts
Choose gifts that give
back for this holiday
season./HomeFront
BUSINESS:








Discount day
Small businesses try to
lure customers with
their own discounts on
Saturday./Page Dl
NATIONAL NEWS:


Male voters
Sorry, fellas, but
President Barack
Obama's re-election
makes it official: Women
can overrule men at the
ballot box./Page All
OPINION:
Take the
necessary
action to clean
up the
corporate
cesspit
Citizens has
apparently
become.


NATIONAL NEWS:


Penmanship
States work to keep
handwriting alive in age
of tech./Page A13

Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ............ D4
Crossword ...........A18
Editorial .................. ..C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ............ B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
M ovies .................. A 18
O bituaries ................A6


6 |1|1|1184578 2I007 o


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Tuesday was Jim
Carlisle's lucky morning.
Carlisle and his wife, Jenny, were


biding their time at the JoJo's Cyber
Center game machines in down-
town Inverness when the comput-
erized jackpot wheel mounted on
the wall went off.
The jackpot spinners always


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
It is the hidden shimmering bay,
tucked away in a sea of bays dotting
Florida's rugged Nature Coast.
But King's Bay's cachet as a mar-
vel of nature and home and play-
ground to man and seacows is
perhaps unparalleled in the state.
That position, in turn, has helped
make the once-pristine body of
water on the edge of the city of
Crystal River the confluence of
competing demands and interests.
In the past several months,
King's Bay has been roiled by
everything from sparring over
rules of conduct around how to
best protect and nurture manatees


to pollution blamed on low spring
flow, septic tanks and fertilizer
There are efforts under way to
clean up the bay, and Southwest
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict (SWFWMD) has begun work to
set the minimum flows and levels
(MFLs) for the bay and the Crystal
River, which empties into the Gulf
of Mexico.
The Springs
King's Bay/Crystal River is one of
33 recognized clusters of what are
called first-magnitude springs in
the state. The area's many springs
are said to average between 800
and 900 cubic feet of water per sec-
ond of output. First-magnitude is
defined as meaning they discharge


come up a winner. It then sends
those winnings randomly to anyone
in the center who is playing at the
time. Sometimes it's one player;
sometimes it's more than one.
Carlisle found himself $1,475
richer
The Inverness retirees, both 80,
said they are regulars of JoJo's,


at least 100 cubic feet of water per
second (cfs), or about 64.6 million
gallons per day (mgd).
Through the years, these springs
have helped flush the bay and river
and kept the waters pristine.
But in recent history, a cursory
look at the water in a lot of areas
reveals algal formations and mats
of filamentous algae called lyng-
bya, which smothers native sub-
merged plants.
Reasons for the pollution of the
popular body of water vary, but
many blame it on reduced flow
from the spring vents and the seep-
age of nitrates from septic tanks
and fertilizer into the water system.
See Page A5


Author's Old Florida home beckons


"Enchantment lies in dif-
ferent things for each of us.
For me, it is in this: to step
out of the bright sunlight
into the shade of orange
trees; to walk under the
arched canopy of their
jadelike leaves; to see the
long aisles of lichened
trunks stretch ahead in a
geometric rhythm; to feel
the mystery of a seclusion
that yet has shafts of light
striking through it. This is
the essence of an ancient
and secret magic." Mar-
jorie Kinnan Rawlings,
"Cross Creek"
AMANDA MIMS
Correspondent
It isn't the typewriter on
the porch of the Cross
Creek home where Mar-
jorie Kinnan Rawlings
wrote "The Yearling." It's
not the 1940 Oldsmobile
parked in her carport. It's
not even the abundance of
citrus trees she loved so
much, or the clucking
chickens going to roost, or
the old barn that has met
the setting sun head-on
each afternoon for
decades.
Indeed, the whole of
Rawlings' former home is
greater than the sum of its
parts, and it's the prop-
erty's embodiment of Old
Florida and the spirit of


AMANDA MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
Visitors walk through the historic home of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings in Cross Creek.


the author herself that at-
tract tens of thousands of
visitors each year
In the book "Cross
Creek," Rawlings wrote, "I
do not understand how any
one can live without some
small place of enchant-
ment to turn to."
This was hers.
Although Rawlings died
in 1953, 15 years after pub-
lishing her Pulitzer-prize
winning novel "The Year-


ling," visitors to the home
where she lived for 25
years now Marjorie Kin-
nan Rawlings Historic
State Park feel as though
they are glimpsing into her
life, just as she lived it
And for some, like Eliza-
beth Worley-Ryan, a fourth-
generation Floridian,
visiting the park is about
more than just getting
closer to Rawlings and see-
ing where her characters


were born, although that's
an undeniable part of the
experience. To Worley-
Ryan, who grew up in
Perry and Homestead,
walking through the house
at Cross Creek is like going
home.
"For me, it's like going
back into my childhood,"
she said. "I remember this
type of home and the stove
See Page A9


which moved in October from U.S.
41 to downtown Inverness on the
corner of Pine and Dampier streets.
"I enjoy playing," he said. "I play
poker because I get more control."
JoJo's has all the markings of a
gambling site. The machines are
games of chance, not skill. Winners
See Page A4


1931 2012


Associated Press
Actor Larry Hagman is seen
Oct. 9, 2008. Hagman, who
for more than a decade
played villainous patriarch JR
Ewing in the TV soap "Dal-
las," has died at the age of
81, his family said Saturday
Nov. 24,


'Dallas'


star


dies in


Texas


Larry Hagman

was 81
LYNN ELBER
AP Television Writer
J.R. Ewing was a business
cheat, faithless husband
and bottomless well of cor-
ruption. Yet with his
sparkling grin, Larry Hag-
man masterfully created
the charmingly loathsome
oil baron and coaxed
forth a Texas-size gusher of
ratings on television's
long-running and hugely
successful nighttime soap,
"Dallas."
Although he first gained
fame as nice guy Major
Tony Nelson on the fluffy
1965-70 NBC comedy "I
Dream of Jeannie," Hag-
man earned his greatest
stardom with J.R. The CBS
serial drama about the
Ewing family and those in
their orbit aired from April
1978 to May 1991, and broke
viewing records with its
"Who shot J.R.?" 1980
cliffhanger that left unclear
if Hagman's character was
dead.
The actor, who returned
as J.R. in a new edition of
"Dallas" this year, had a
long history of health prob-
lems and died Friday due to
complications from his bat-
tle with cancer, his family
said.
"Larry was back in his
beloved hometown of Dal-
las, re-enacting the iconic
role he loved the most.
Larry's family and closest
friends had joined him in
Dallas for the Thanksgiving
holiday," the family said in
a statement that was pro-
vided to The Associated
Press by Warner Bros., pro-
ducer of the show.
The 81-year-old actor was
surrounded by friends and
family before he passed
peacefully, "just as he'd
wished for," the statement
said.
Linda Gray, his on-screen
wife and later ex-wife in the
original series and the se-
quel, was among those with
Hagman in his final mo-
ments in a Dallas hospital,
said her publicist, Jeffrey
Lane.
See Page A7


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
69
LOW
36


King's Bay future


7- --


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
In the past several months, King's Bay has been roiled by everything from sparring over rules of conduct around
how to best protect and nurture manatees to pollution blamed on low spring flow, septic tanks and fertilizer.

Jewel of Crystal River sees cleanup, preservation, protection


CITRU-S CO R 0 U N T Y

TOYOTATHON


CUSEE IT
ONPHRNG,rD6 TOYOTA
www.chronicleonline.com ___










On stilts, barely above the water


Stiltsville shacks

evoke past in bay

near Miami

Associated Press
MIAMI Perched above the
shallow turquoise waters of Bis-
cayne Bay are shacks on stilts that
have hosted some of Florida's
wildest parties, from the days
when alcohol and gambling were
outlawed, to a bachelor party for a
member of the Kennedy clan.
Seven homes still stand in
Stiltsville, as the community is
called, about a mile out in the Bis-
cayne channel in Biscayne Na-
tional Park, just a short boat ride
or kayak trip from the Key Bis-
cayne coastline.
"When are you out there and
there's nobody there, it's one of
the most desolate settings imagi-
nable," said Paul George, a history
professor at Miami-Dade College.
"And yet in other ways it's one of
the most striking."
The first dozen homes were built
close to the surface of the water in
the late 1920s, but they were vul-
nerable to storm surges and hurri-
cane damage. By the 1930s and
'40s, the homes were built higher
off the ground on wooden stilts
held up by steel-reinforced con-
crete pilings driven through the
sand below. The houses had boat
docks, wraparound verandas and
plenty of windows to pick up the
breeze. Generators fueled electric-
ity, cisterns collected rain water
and sewage was sent to a disposal
facility.
Over two dozen homes existed
during Stiltsville's heyday in the
1960s. Seven are still standing, but
they are now part of Biscayne Na-
tional Park and are no longer pri-
vately owned.
HistoryMiami, a local cultural
institution and museum, runs oc-
casional three-hour boat tours led
by George to see Stiltsville, though
the boats do not dock at the
homes. Kayakers can also tie up at
the base of a home and at least
stand on the deck for stunning
sunset views. The homes, now
used for tours and other events,
are locked when no one is there.
George said the homes were a
last bastion for what he calls "old


IAA AA


Miami's good ol' boy network," a
place where acquaintances could
fish, drink, tell stories, carouse
and get away from city life.
"When you get out there, you've
left your cares behind," George
said.
Stiltsville even had its own
clubs, hosting members-only par-
ties known for bikini-clad women
and sometimes nude sunbathers.
During Prohibition, there was il-
legal gambling and alcohol. A
local, known as Crawfish Charlie,
was an almost mythological figure
in the community, schmoozing
boaters and selling them bait and
chowder.
In 1992, one of the homes col-
lapsed as more than 100 visitors
partied during a rainstorm.
Stiltsville was also known as the
site of a party for then-bachelor
Ted Kennedy, with a live band.
But many of the homes were
damaged or destroyed in hurri-
canes and fires, and they were not


infrequent targets of police raids.
Beginning in the 1950s, the com-
munity also faced opposition from
residents of nearby Key Biscayne,
who called the shacks eyesores
and its residents squatters, George
said.
"People over here started com-
plaining about the wild happen-
ings over there," George said as he


pointed at Stiltsville from Key Bis-
cayne, which is about 10 miles
from Miami.
Stiltsville homeowners tried to
portray the community as family
friendly
"We're a family-type colony, not
a scruffy bunch of squatters,"
Frank Knuck, a local judge, was
quoted as saying in several publi-


Historian Paul George narrates the
story of Stiltsville, a group of
homes in Biscayne National Park.
The narrated tour tells the colorful
story of these homes perched
above the shallow waters of
Biscayne Bay.
cations, including a report by the
Stiltsville Trust, a nonprofit cre-
ated to preserve the remaining
Stiltsville structures.
But the complaints pushed the
state to eventually order Stiltsvil-
lians (as the residents called
themselves) to abandon the homes
when their property leases ex-
pired in 1999.
George, an author and local
celebrity, gives several tours of
South Florida. Gretchen Weissner
of Hollywood, Fla., is a regular on
his tours.
"He's got some nice anecdotes.
This guy is really good," she said.
The Stiltsville, Cape Florida
Lighthouse and Key Biscayne Boat
Tour starts from Bayside Market-
place near the Port of Miami. Birds
fly alongside the slow-moving boat
as cool breezes pass through the
open cabin. The boat does not
make any stops, but George sup-
plies fact-packed lessons about the
Miami River's building boom, the
Key Biscayne bridge and the city's
ties to politicians like the late Sen.
Ted Kennedy, who, George said,
"loved the sea."
The tour also offers stunning
views of Bill Baggs Cape Florida
State Park and the Cape Florida
Lighthouse before it heads off to
the Biscayne Channel and the
heart of Stiltsville.


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A2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


,: l:.







Page A3- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Crystal River

Semmes to speak at
Reagan assembly
Mr. Jon Semmes, well-
known guide on the Rainbow
and Withlacoochee rivers,
owner of Singing River Tours,
and musician, will speak at
1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, at
the Ronald Reagan Republi-
can Assembly. Topics will in-
clude the ecosystem and
history of these rivers.
The assembly meets at
938 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.
19) in the South Square
Plaza in Crystal River. Re-
freshments will be provided.
For information, call 352-
257-5381.
Chronicle accepts
Citizen nominations
The Citrus County Chronicle
is seeking 2012 nominees for
Citizen of the Year. Winners in
the past have been honored
for everything from philan-
thropy to volunteerism, civil
rights work to service to coun-
try, and environmental efforts
to governmental initiatives.
While all nominations are
considered, preference is
given to community contribu-
tions above and beyond the
role one plays in his or her
day-to-day job.
Email nominations to
marnold@chronicleonline.
com; or, mail to Mike Arnold,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
34429 by Dec. 21.
Manatee Festival
extends invitations
The city of Crystal River
and the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce invites
artists to submit an applica-
tion for the 26th annual Man-
atee Festival from Jan. 19 to
20 in downtown Crystal River.
A few vendor spaces are still
available.
While artists from all across
the nation are invited and do
attend, festival organizers are
extending a special welcome
to local Florida artists wishing
to showcase their work.
To apply, go to www.florida
manateefestival.com and
download an application, or
call Jeff Inglehart at the Citrus
County Chamber
352-795-3149.


CUB ho
announce
Citrus United
(CUB) is prepari
nual Christmas f
event, which pro
tance to struggle
Citrus County w
registered at CU
store will be close
month of Decem
dents are asked
household and c
tions until after J
New toys, bik
tary donations c
appreciated to e
ued success of I
Christmas progr
hours will be froi
3 p.m. Monday t
day, starting Jan
352-344-2242 o
director@embar

Citrus Co

Legislative c
to meet in I
The Citrus Co
tive Delegation
annual meeting
Wednesday, De
Citrus County C
chambers in the
house, 110 N. A
Inverness.
The delegation
state Sen. Charl
Rep. Jimmie T.
Inverness Repul
To address th
contact Judy We
office at 352-86C
Church
group tc
Americans Un
ration of Church
(Nature Coast C
at 4 p.m. Tuesday
the Lakes Regio
1511 Druid Road
For information
lyn at 352-726-9


Santa Claus parades into Citrus County


Chamber of Commerce and the City
of Crystal River The parade begins
at 6 p.m. and travels south in the
southbound lanes of U.S. 19 from
Citrus Avenue to Port Paradise
Road.
The theme this year is "A Post
Card Christmas." The Grand Mar-
shal is Dale McClellan of M&B
Dairy and the 2012 overall winner
of the Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt
Expo Southeastern Farmer of the
Year award.
The following Saturday, Dec. 8,


Santa and Mrs. Claus visit Citrus
County once again at the annual In-
verness Christmas parade, pre-
sented this year by B & W Rexall
Drug, the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce and the city of
Inverness.
The parade kicks off at noon
from Pizza Hut and proceeds east
on State Road 44 to Highland
Boulevard. Pati Smith, a county fix-
ture at Inverness Parks and Recre-
ation for many years, is the Grand
Marshal.


Special to the Chronicle
Everyone loves a parade and Sat-
urday, Dec. 1, two are in Citrus
County.
Parade-goers can start in Beverly
Hills at the Christmas in the Hills
Parade, along with the Holiday Arts
& Crafts/Car Show. Festivities in-
clude the 10 a.m. parade that
travels down Beverly Hills Boule-


vard from County Road 491 to the
Civic Center a car show, a kids'
area and an outdoor selection of
arts and crafts.
For information, call 352-746-
4882. Event runs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Participants may finish their
evening by enjoying the lights and
sounds of Christmas at the annual
Crystal River Christmas parade,
presented by the Citrus County


Looking out on the bay


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The sheltered waters next to Charlie's Fish house in Crystal River could be the "one particular harbor" Jimmy Buffet sings about. These sailors
found a delightful spot in the sheltered water of King's Bay.


Searching for feathered friends


Bird watchers

hit local trail to

look at birds
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer


)liday As they woke up and
ement stretched their feathers, the
resident Swans noticed on-
Basket lookers gawking at them.
ing for its an- Even the Wood Ducks
food and toy quaked about all of the early
>vides assis- morning activity.
ng families in Cool Saturday morning
ho have pre- air accompanied 15 birders
JB. The thrift along Pepper Creek Trail
sed the entire for the fall season's second
eher Rensi bird walk. Citrus County
Sber. Resi- Audubon Society, in cooper-
to hold on to action with the Homosassa
Clothing dona- Springs Wildlife State Park,
an. 3. led the guided tour down
es and mone- the one-mile paved Tram
continue to be Trail, known as the Great
ensure contin- Florida Birding Trail.
this annual Birders utilized binocu-
am. Winter lars and field guides to stare
m 9 a.m. to into trees as experienced
through Fri- birders instructed them of
1. 3. Contact their findings.
r cubexec "This time of year we are
rqmail.com. going to see birds that are
here year-round," Conser-
)unty, vation Coordinator Nancy
Kost said. "Also, we are
delegation going to see birds that are
here just in the winter We
nverness call them snowbirds."
unty Legisla- From the parking lot on
will have its U.S. 19 to the entrance on
at 2 p.m. Fishbowl Drive, birders had
ac. 12, atthe the opportunity to see vari-
. 12, at the eties of birds such as war-
ny court blers, wood ducks, swans,
county court- phoebes, black vultures,
popka Ave., mallards, pileated wood-
peckers, blue jays and many
n consists of more.
ie Dean and "The Audubon Society is
Smith, both always doing something in
blicans. nature," said Tom Gulley, a
e delegation, board of directors of
ells in Dean's Audubon Society member
0-5175. "I've seen all of the birds
-State here today before. However,
it is always different seeing
) meet them because they are in
hited for Sepa- different environments."
and State Echoes of "Oh, I see a
chapter) meets bird" or "Look at the color
on that one" were heard
y, DecL. ibr18, at throughout the hardwood
n Library, forest as birders were awe-
, Inverness. stricken with excitement.
n, call Mara- "In about 90 percent of
)112. birds, the male bird is usu-
-From staff reports ally more colorful," said


Chronicle file photo
Participants of a bird walk
search the skies and trees
for the feathered animals at
Potts Preserve.

Fred Hileman, vice presi-
dent of Citrus County
Audubon Society, a local
volunteer-based organiza-
tion interested in birding,
wildlife and natural re-
sources in Citrus County.
"He has to attract a mate.
Also, the female birds need
to be a little bit less obvious,
because they sit on their
nests more. They are more
hidden. The male is more
obvious and will direct at-
tention away from the
female."
However, birders learned
this is not true for all birds.
Male hummingbirds do not
tend to the females once
they have mated.
"With hummingbirds, the
female does all of the work
after they mate," Kost said.
"She builds the nest and
raises the eggs and then
feeds, bathes and teaches
the babies everything they
need to know."
Educating the public is
exactly what the Citrus
County Audubon Society
did.
"Everyone needs a bird
bath in their yard," Kost said.
"If you don't have a bird
bath, take the top of your
garbage can and fill that with
water Birds love water and
sometimes there is not


State BRIEFS

Woman accused of
riding manatee
ST. PETERSBURG -A St.
Petersburg woman has been
charged with violating Florida
law by riding a manatee.
Ana Gloria Garcia Gutier-
rez was arrested on a misde-
meanor warrant Saturday.
Pinellas County sheriff's
deputies said she was pho-
tographed riding the manatee
at Fort De Soto Park last
September.
Sheriff Bob Gualtieri held a
press conference a few days
later asking for the public's
help in identifying the woman.
Gutierrez called deputies and
allegedly admitted touching
the endangered sea mam-
mal. She told them she was
new to the area and didn't
know it was illegal to touch a
manatee. The manatee was
not hurt.
The maximum penalty is a
$500 fine and six months in
jail. Gutierrez was released
on $1,500 bail.
Police: Meth dealer
flushed confession
LAKELAND -A man ac-
cused of being a metham-
phetamine trafficker allegedly
confessed and then
flushed the detective's
recorder down the toilet.
The Ledger reported Sat-
urday that Polk County
deputies said they found 30-
year-old Patrick Townsend
driving with 32.4 grams of
meth in his boxers during a
Wednesday traffic stop.
Deputies said Townsend
confessed, saying he usually
deals in kilograms. A detec-
tive allegedly recorded the
confession but left the
recorder on a desk.
Townsend allegedly grabbed
it, hid it in his armpit and
asked to use the bathroom,
where he flushed it.
When the detective looked
for recorder, Townsend al-
legedly mocked him by say-
ing, "Tighten up on your job,
homee"
Townsend was jailed with-
out bail Saturday, charged
with meth trafficking and de-
stroying evidence. No infor-
mation on an attorney was
immediately available.
-From wire reports


enough for all of them."
When asked about migra-
tion, experienced birders
offered their thoughts.
"The migration to me is
mysterious," Kost said.
"Some of these birds go
thousands of miles to mi-
grate. How they find their
way from Alaska to Mexico
every year is amazing."
Birds migrate to warmer
climates during the fall. As
the warm air returns, birds
will return to where they
originated. However, one
bird is not capable of
migration without initial
assistance.
"You have the whooping
crane that does not have
that ability," Citrus County
Audubon Society Vice Pres-


ident Fred Hileman said.
"Once the whooping cranes
are shown once by ultra
lights, they are able to do it
on their own the next year"
The guided tour con-
cluded with a boat ride back
to the visitor's center where
the swans reside. Birders
sat back and relaxed as they
used their binoculars to
focus in on the banks of the
river
For more information on
future bird walks, contact
Citrus County Audubon So-
ciety at www.citrus
countyaudubon.com
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be con-
tacted at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


Christmas activities to begin Dec. 1


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Conservation Coordinator Nancy Kost guided bird lovers
through the Pepper Creek Trail in Homosassa, describing the
birds they saw Saturday.






A4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012



CYBER
Continued from Page Al

do not win prizes; they win
points on phone cards,
which they can redeem for
cash up to $500 a day
Assistant State Attorney
Mark Simpson believes In-
ternet sweepstakes busi-
nesses are illegal gambling
houses. However, he twice
has taken similar busi-
nesses to court on anti-
gambling charges in Marion
County and lost both times.
"It looks like all the
strength, all the power is in
our corners, but we can't get
judges and juries to see it
our way," Simpson said.
"The general feeling is ju-
ries don't care."
Some Inverness political
leaders, who debated two
months ago whether to ex-
pand its alcohol ordinances,
are chagrined at the new
downtown business.
"I'm not excited about it,"
Mayor Bob Plaisted said.
"There's a lot of people who
are not really happy about
that."
Councilwoman Jacquie
Hepfer, however, who sup-
ported the unsuccessful at-
tempt to allow more bars
into the central business
district, sees JoJo's as a way
to support the downtown
economy
"It's going to bring people
to the downtown," Hepfer
said. "They're not going to be
a bunch of rowdy drunks. If
they're going to spend
money, they might as well
spend it in Inverness instead
of getting on a bus and going
to Biloxi or a gambling boat"
Manager: 'We're not
bothering anyone'
JoJo's Cyber Center had
been located on U.S. 41 just
south of Eden Drive since
2008 until owner Joan


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Inverness officials say an Internet sweepstakes business is not a good fit for the downtown area. JoJo's Cyber Cen-
ter opened in October in a rented storefront previously occupied by a produce market.


O'Gara sold the business in
October to Zhuo Lin and his
wife Qiao Qiu Cao. Workers
at JoJo's know the owner
only as "Lee."
The business was moved
to downtown Inverness in
mid-October after Skoor's
Market vacated its rented
storefront on Pine Street
JoJo's manager Maria Es-
pada said the facility has
about 50 computer ma-
chines. It is open seven days
a week 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sunday through Thursday; 9
a.m. to midnight Friday and
Saturday
JoJo's does not sell alco-


hol and customers must be
at least 21 to enter. The front
windows and doors and cov-
ered up so anyone on the
sidewalk or street cannot
see the gaming machines
inside.
Espada said many cus-
tomers are regulars who fol-
lowed JoJo's from its U.S. 41
location to downtown Inver-
ness. She said about 100
people play the games daily
Customers pay to charge
points onto phone cards a
penny a point. The cards are
then inserted into the ma-
chines. Various games cost a
certain number of points.


The cheapest game is 5
points 5 cents. Some go as
high as 500 points $5, Es-
pada said.
Games include slots and
poker. Payouts are in points,
which can be redeemed for
cash.
Or, she said, some cus-
tomers keep the phone
cards and redeem the points
for phone time.
Some, she said, donate
their winning phone cards
to American soldiers serv-
ing overseas.
Neither Plaisted nor
Councilman Cabot McBride
have stepped foot in JoJo's,


but they don't like what it
represents to downtown
Inverness.
"I don't think it sets the
correct image for our down-
town," McBride said. "It
does not seem to coincide


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

with our tradition of family
values."
Plaisted said the city
council should consider reg-
ulating Internet sweep-
stakes businesses.
"What we try to do is run a
city that captures the heart
of 'Andy of Mayberry,' he
said. "Gambling just doesn't
work for our community"
Espada said the criticism
is unfair.
"We're not bothering any-
one," she said. "It's a choice
whether to come in. Where
the location is doesn't matter
They're all over the place."
Hepfer said the city
should be careful before it
regulates entertainment
"It's nothing to lose sleep
over," she said. "It's another
business. It's a legal busi-
ness. I didn't think we were
legislating morality What's
the difference between
going there and going to a
church bingo?"
Jenny Carlisle, whose
husband Jim won a $1,475
sweepstakes Tuesday, said
she doesn't understand why
anyone would create a fuss
about JoJo's.
"This gives us a place to
go," she said.
Mrs. Carlisle said she and
her husband are not gam-
blers and have not visited
casinos.
"We don't play that big,"
she said. "We can't afford to
do it like that."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



k I Bid Notices.........................D8

Meeting Notices......................... D8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
5







S


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 1 foot or less. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Mostly
sunny today.


71 47 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ecalus aily

| TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 69 Low: 36
Sunny, cool

, MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 48
Some morning frost, mostly sunny

.. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 50
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 70/45
Record 86/27
Normal 77/50
Mean temp. 58
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 49.06 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 51
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 53%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
composites, grasses, palm
Today's count: 4.0/12
Monday's count: 3.9
Tuesday's count: 4.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was moderate with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/25 SUNDAY 2:28 8:39 2:50 9:01
11/26 MONDAY 3:08 9:20 3:32 9:43
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


DEC. 6 DEC. 13 DEC. 20


SUNSET TONIGHT 5:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:03 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY 3:41 P.M.
MOONSET TODAY............................ 4:23 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 2:41 a/11:33 a 4:10 p/11:19 p
Crystal River** 1:02 a/8:55 a 2:31 p/8:41 p
Withlacoochee* 12:18 p/6:43 a 11:27 p/6:29 p
Homosassa*** 1:51 a/10:32 a 3:20 p/10:18 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
3:19 a/12:14 p 4:53 p/11:59 p
1:40 a/9:36 a 3:14 p/9:21 p
1:01 p/7:24a -- /7:09 p
2:29 a/11:13 a 4:03 p/10:58 p


Gulf water
temperature



66
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness n/a n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


pc
s
s
s
pc
s

s
.02 pc
pc
sn
sf
s
pc
s
pc
pc
.01 sn
s
c
.01 pc
s
s
pc
sn
s
PC
pc
.02 pc
PC
c
s
s
s
s
PC
s
PC
PC
s
s
s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 61 50 s 65 53
New York City 50 38 pc 43 34
Norfolk 55 41 s 48 33
Oklahoma City 60 25 s 69 41
Omaha 44 18 c 45 29
Palm Springs 87 57 s 85 53
Philadelphia 49 39 pc 44 33
Phoenix 85 62 s 82 55
Pittsburgh 32 28 .03 sf 41 27
Portland, ME 47 34 pc 37 23
Portland, Ore 52 46 .80 pc 49 37
Providence, R.I. 49 37 pc 42 32
Raleigh 52 40 s 49 31
Rapid City 61 22 sn 34 20
Reno 64 27 pc 58 29
Rochester, NY 38 32 sn 38 31
Sacramento 66 39 pc 65 45
St. Louis 39 24 s 55 34
St. Ste. Marie 27 22 sn 33 24
Salt Lake City 53 27 pc 52 33
San Antonio 67 51 s 74 59
San Diego 71 51 s 66 54
San Francisco 67 51 pc 65 51
Savannah 63 44 s 61 38
Seattle 47 41 .04 pc 46 33
Spokane 43 37 .19 pc 40 26
Syracuse 38 32 .04 sn 37 29
Topeka 50 22 s 54 28
Washington 47 38 pc 46 32
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 89 Riverside, Calif.
LOW -7 Int'l Falls, Minn.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 85/73/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 51/40/sh Mexico City
Athens 62/50/pc Montreal
Beijing 45/17/pc Moscow
Berlin 52/40/c Paris
Bermuda 68/64/sh Rio
Cairo 72/56/pc Rome
Calgary 30/19/pc Sydney
Havana 79/60/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 81/74/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 60/49/sh Warsaw


63/49/sh
51/43/sh
60/47/c
69/46/pc
31/26/pc
30/27/pc
50/43/pc
80/71/ts
59/49/pc
87/65/pc
53/46/sh
33/28/sf
45/40/c


C I T R U S


C O U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CHRONICLE
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I


I-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BAY
Continued from Page Al

Dr. Bob Knight, head of
the Florida Springs Insti-
tute, said though his organi-
zation has no recent King's
Bay studies, spring flow in
most of north Florida has
declined between 20 per-
cent and 25 percent.
"Silver Springs is almost
dry. I believe 2 inches of
groundwater a year is lost in
Florida," Knight said.
He blames a lot of the
flow reduction on with-
drawals from the aquifers.
"As long as we keep
pumping water, it will get
worse," Knight added.
He suggests cutting back
to half what the current con-
sumptive water-use figures
are and control the alloca-
tion of permits.
Knight said currently, in-
dividual water use averages
150 gallons a day and that,
he said, is unsustainable.
He said it is shortsighted
policy to allow people to
water their green lawns
with underground water.
Knight thinks surface
water sources such as reser-
voirs like Lake Rousseau
should be the wave of the
future.
Restoring King's Bay
Michael Lusk, refuge
manager at the Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge Complex said the
bottom-line issue in trying
to restore King's Bay to its
pristine glory is for people
to understand "there is no
silver bullet"
"I am not advocating
more restrictions. We all
have the freedom or the
right to have green lawns,
but there are consequences
to our actions," Lusk said.
He said people should try
to convince our leaders to


stop "sucking water from
the ground."
He also said removal of
septic tanks and responsible
use of fertilizers should
help reduce the nitrogen in
the springs and allow
aquatic plant life to flourish
so the manatees can eat
properly
Lusk said manatee waste
is very low in nitrogen and
is therefore not the cause of
the pollution as some peo-
ple suggest
Officials at SWFWMD
whose charge it is to watch
over the area's water re-
sources and issue permits
said they are working on
setting state-required MFLs
for King's Bay and the Crys-
tal River
"We are in the data col-
lection (phase) right now,"
said SWFWMD's Veronica
Craw.
She said the target year
for the MFLs is 2014.
Craw, however, said the
district has been active in
various initiatives to restore
King's Bay
She pointed to the follow-
ing ongoing projects as
proof SWFWMD also is
committed to cleaning up
King's Bay:
City of Crystal River to
Progress Energy Reclaimed
Water Project which is co-
operatively funded between
the SWFWMD and the city
of Crystal River. The $5.1
million project is a re-
claimed water transmission
line from Crystal River
wastewater treatment plant
to Progress Energy's Citrus
County power complex to
provide 750,000 gallons per
day of reclaimed water to
offset groundwater pump-
ing. The project is expected
to reduce wastewater nutri-
ent loading to the spring-
shed by 16 percent;
Three Sisters Stormwa-
ter Treatment Wetland is


being fully funded by
SWFWMD. The Three Sis-
ters Springs stormwater
treatment wetland will in-
tercept and treat stormwa-
ter discharged directly into
the King's Bay canal sys-
tem. The project is expected
to remove nutrients, sus-
pended solids and other
contaminants from storm-
water from approximately
135 acres of commercial and
residential land within the
city of Crystal River;
Hunter Springs Water
Quality Improvement Proj-
ect is a SWFWMD and Cit-
rus County effort. The
project is to expand an ex-
isting water quality treat-
ment area (stormwater
pond) and remove accumu-
lated sediment adjacent to
the outfall. The expansion
equates to a 40 percent in-
crease in treatment volume;
King's Bay Park Lagoon
Restoration, is another
SWFWMD and Citrus
County project. The project
is proposed to remove detri-


tus from King's Bay Park, in-
stall a manatee exclusion
fence and re-vegetate the
newly restored area with
native submerged and
emergent plant species. The
exclusion will be main-
tained for two years to en-
sure survival and
colonization of the lagoon by
the restored vegetation.
Community cleanup
Beside the SWFWMD ef-
fort, Art Jones of Kings Bay
Rotary has spearheaded
lyngbya cleanup at the bay
since September 2011.
"More than 350 people
have volunteered since we
started," Jones said.
Improving water quality
and clarity has been the
goal of the project, he said.
'"And, every day, it is a lit-
tle cleaner and you can see
the clarity is improving in
the Hunter Springs area,"
Jones said.
He said more things are
in the offing including more
mechanical harvester use,
as harvesters are more ef-


\~- L.
~ Jy
\
\ \ -~
\


fective in removing large
chunks of lyngbya than the
use of rakes alone.
Harvester use comes with
issues because some believe
its widespread use can be
harmful to manatees and
some useful aquatic plants.
Joyce Kleen of U.S. Fish
and Wildlife said her
agency, Florida Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) and Jones came to an
understanding regarding
the use of the harvester
"It is like the agreement
we had with the county; Mr.
Jones agreed not to use the
harvester when manatees
are present and he said he
would add bubbler bar to
the harvester so the lyngbya
can float to the surface,"
Kleen said.
The bar helps separate
the lyngbya from the en-
twined plant life causing the
lyngbya to float to the sur-
face and then get removed.
New season
The new manatee season
just started (Nov 15) in
King's Bay and that means it
is first time visitors are sub-
ject to the new rules of con-
duct for the area.


INCLUDING CHILDREN'S
CLEANING, FILLINGS
AND SEALANTS

5445 Commercial Way, Spring Hill

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BREAST AUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 A5

In March, USFWS desig-
nated King's Bay, its tribu-
taries and adjoining water
bodies upstream of the con-
fluence of King's Bay and
the Crystal River as a mana-
tee refuge.
The King's Bay manatee
refuge now joins an existing
federal manatee protection
network of 11 sanctuaries
and 13 refuges throughout
Florida.
In addition, the area
north of Buzzard Island -
known as the sport zone -
will serve boaters traveling
up to 25 mph during day-
light hours between June 1
and Aug. 15. In the proposed
rules released last June, the
sport zone speed would
drop from the current 35
mph during the summer
months to slow or idle
speed. Slow or idle speed is
defined as speed that allows
steerage for a boater.
The controversial rules
drew a lot of opposition lo-
cally Opponents said they
felt left out of the decision-
making process while oth-
ers cried government
overreach for restricting
waterborne activities.


c, 0 ,( ': 1,. .... 7 I
."' .. tl

N IL
-/ 1 11 i
,, .. .- I,'i n
.-. ,,-.- .~-,-





S... Crystal River
** .. ,. i~iin~ii WAildifI K~ucie

0 .... .. ';"' ",",,"". "


41
'.,I ,


Homosassa 621-7700 F E I S E T O
Crystal River 795-8600 FREE INSPECTIONS
Inverness 860-1037
TERMITE SPECIALISTS INGED ANT WINGED TERMITE
SINCE 1967
.BUSM-
S PEST CONTROL
Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH
www.bushhomeservices.com. Acni E ,.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


== Nov. 26 to 30 MENUS =


Obituaries


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Hot dog, un-
crusted PB&J, turkey super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, baked
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Pulled barbe-
cue pork on a bun, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, baked French fries,
dried mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, macaroni
and cheese, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, green
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, hot ham and cheese on
bun, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, sweet peas, chilled
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken and
rice burrito, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
macaroni and cheese, ham
super salad with ripstick, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden
salad, sweet corn, dried fruit
mix, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Pulled barbe-
cue pork on bun, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, baked beans, potato tri-
angles, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, hot dog,
turkey super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, green beans,
potato roasters, chilled fruit,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo
with ripstick, cheese pizza, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, chilled fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-

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fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate break-
fast round, cereal and toast,
grits, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, pizza,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato
roasters, steamed broccoli,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken
plate, turkey and gravy over
noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
ham super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cold corn salad,
potato triangles, sweet peas,
celery, chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Barbecue
chicken with roll, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey
super salad with roll, pizza, yo-
gurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
chilled baked beans, potato
roasters, baked beans, chilled
fruit, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
ham super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
potato triangles, cucumber
coins, celery, chilled fruit, juice,
milk.
Friday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, spaghetti
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
potato roasters, sweet corn,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casse-
role, garlic spinach, Italian
vegetable medley, mixed fruit,
slice whole-wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Grape juice, Sal-
isbury steak, noodles with
brown gravy, garden peas,
dinner roll with margarine, low-
fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef salad
(ham, cheese, whole boiled
egg, tomato) with French
dressing, carrot-raisin salad,
fresh orange, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Chicken parme-
san, California vegetables,
Italian flat beans, peaches,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: meatballs with
brown gravy, rice pilaf, mixed
vegetables, pears, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For additional information,
call Support Services at 352-
527-5975.

To Place Your
("In Memory" ad,

Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


Elaine
Collins, 93
BUSHNELL
Elaine P Collins, 93, of
Bushnell, died Friday, Nov.
23, 2012, at HPH Hospice in
Lecanto. Funeral arrange-
ments are private.
Heinz. Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

Lois
Donohue, 88
HOMOSASSA
Lois M. Donohue, 88, of
Homosassa, died Wednes-
day, Nov 21, 2012, at home.
A Catholic funeral Mass
will be at 10 a.m. Monday,
Nov 26,2012, at St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
Interment will follow at
1 p.m. at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell. The
family will receive friends
at the funeral home Sunday
afternoon from 2 until 4 p.m.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa.

Estelle
Gagnon, 78
HERNANDO
Estelle L. Gagnon, 78,
Hernando, died Nov. 19,
2012, in Citrus Memorial
hospital.
Mrs. Gagon was born
April 7, 1934, in Lisbon,
Maine, and came to this
area in 1972 from Seminole,
Fla. She and her husband,
Luc Gagnon, owned and op-
erated the Countryside Inn
Restaurant for more than 20
years in Hernando.
She is survived by her
brother, Gerald Lebrun of
St. Petersburg. Her hus-
band, Luc, preceded her in
death on Feb. 22, 2004.
At her request, she will be
cremated and there will be
no services. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory in charge.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting text.)
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to the
contrary is made.




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Logan
Harbison, 25
LAKEWOOD, WASH.
Sgt. Logan Tyler Harbi-
son, U.S. Army, 25, died Sat-
urday, Nov. 17, 2012, at his
home in
Lakewood,
Wash.
Lo gan
was born
Feb. 7,1987,
in Tampa,
Fla. He was
proudly
serving our Sgt. Logan
country in Harbison
the U.S.
Army, having finished two
tours of active duty in Iraq
at the time of his death.
Logan was a very loving and
giving person, enjoyed fish-
ing and hunting and spend-
ing time with his dog
"Brentley" and his fiancee,
Christine.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his mother and step-
father, Danita and Shannon
Heathcock, Inverness; his
father and stepmother, Rus-
sell and Sherry Harbison,
New Port Richey; his fi-
ancee, Christine Fauten-
berry; his brother and
sister-in-law, Jordan and
Sara Harbison, St. Mary's,
Ga.; maternal grandparents
Bobby and Nadine
Humphries, Inverness; pa-
ternal grandfather Paul
Harbison Jr, Blairsville,
Ga.; and stepgrandparents
Gerald Heathcock, Adams,
Tenn., and Carolyn Heath-
cock, Cross Plains, Tenn.
A celebration of Logan's
life will be at 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Nov 29, at Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church
with Pastors Donnie Seagle
and Babb Adams officiating.
Burial with military honors
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery The family
will receive friends from 5
to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. The family requests
donations in Logan's mem-
ory to Wounded Warrior
Project, PO. Box 758517,
Topeka, KS 66685 or
woundedwarriorproj ect. org
in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.





Thomas
Honan, 88
HOMOSASSA
Thomas Joseph Honan,
88, Homosassa, died Thurs-
day, Nov 22,2012, HPH Hos-
pice House of Lecanto.
Funeral services will be
at 5 p.m. Monday, Nov 26,
2012, at Wilder Funeral
Home, Homosassa. The
family will receive friends
one hour prior.


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Arthur
Ronayne, 81
Arthur E Ronayne, 81,
died Nov 22, 2012, at Hos-
pice of Citrus County House
in Lecanto, Fla.
Arthur was born Aug. 4,
1931, in
Somerville,
Mass., the
son of Lam- ,
bert and
Harriet ,*
Ronayne.
He served
in the Mas-
sachusetts Arthur
Army Na- Ronayne
ti onal
Guard from 1949 to 1951 and
the U.S. Navy from 1951
to1955 during the Korean
War. Arthur retired as a re-
gional credit manager from
Zayre Corp. (now TJ.
Maxxcorp) in 1985 to care
for his terminally ill wife,
Edna M. Ronayne, who died
Feb. 25, 1986. In 1996, he re-
married: Barbara Ronayne
who died in January 2011.
Arthur was a parishioner of
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church and the Knights of
Columbus. He was also a
member of the Inverness
VFW Post 4337 and Ameri-
can Legion Post 77.
Survivors include daugh-
ter Maryellen Ronayne of
Tarpon Springs, Fla.; sons,
Stephen Ronayne, of Her-
nando, Fla., and James Ron-
ayne of Queen Creek, Ariz.;
sisters, Harriett Beauch-
esne of New Port Richey,
Fla., and Maryanne Bandini
of Holiday, Fla.; and grand-
children, Derek and David
Beaudry, Hannah, Anthony,
Trey and Joel Ronayne.
A funeral Mass will be
conducted for Mr. Ronayne
at 11:30 a.m. Nov 27,2012, at
Espirito Santo Catholic
Church in Safety Harbor,
Fla. Interment will take
place at Sylvan Abbey Me-
morial Park, Clearwater,
Fla. In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
Arthritis Foundation or
American Cancer Society.
Heinz Funeral Home and
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

DEADLINES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.







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Ray
Nusbaum, 87
INVERNESS
Ray Nusbaum, 87, loving
husband, father and grand-
father, passed away Nov. 23,
2012, in Inverness, Fla.
Born in
Kankakee,
Ill., son of
Elmer and
Eva Nus- ,,
baum, he is
survived by
his loving
wife, Janet,
of 38 years; Ray
his son, Nusbaum
Burton Ray
Nusbaum;
and daughters, Sandra Nus-
baum, Valerie (Leif) Morton,
Donna Leigh (Tim) O'Brien
and Rachel (Tim) Smith;
and grandchildren, David,
Timmy, Steven, Justin, Kyle
and Emily
Ray served our country in
the U.S. Navy during World
War II and had a long career
as vice president with Atlas
Metal Industries in Miami,
Fla. He lived his life with in-
tegrity, a strong work ethic
and faithfulness to his fam-
ily He was a wonderful ex-
ample of those called the
greatest generation. Ray
was greatly loved and re-
spected by family, friends
and co-workers and will be
deeply missed.
Visitation with the family
will be from 1 to 2 p.m. and
the memorial service at
2 p.m. Monday, Nov. 26, at
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home, 501
W Main St., Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

* U.S. flags denote
military service on local
obituaries.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ACTOR
Continued from Page Al

"He brought joy to every-
one he knew. He was cre-
ative, generous, funny,
loving and talented, and I
will miss him enormously
He was an original and
lived life to the fullest," the
actress said.
Years before "Dallas,"
Hagman had gained TV
fame on "I Dream of Jean-
nie," in which he played an
astronaut whose life is dis-
rupted when he finds a
comely genie, portrayed by
Barbara Eden, and takes
her home to live with him.
Eden recalled late Friday
shooting the series' pilot "in
the frigid cold" on a Malibu
beach.
"From that day, for five
more years, Larry was the
center of so many fun, wild
and sometimes crazy times.
And in retrospect, memo-
rable moments that will re-
main in my heart forever,"
Eden said.
Hagman also starred in
two short-lived sitcoms,
"The Good Life" (NBC, 1971-
72) and "Here We Go Again"
(ABC, 1973). His film work
included well-regarded per-
formances in "The Group,"
"Harry and Tonto" and "Pri-
mary Colors."
But it was Hagman's mas-
terful portrayal of J.R. that
brought him the most fame.
And the "Who shot J.R.?"
story twist fueled interna-
tional speculation and mil-
lions of dollars in
betting-parlor wagers. It
also helped give the series a
place in ratings history
When the answer was re-
vealed in a November 1980
episode, an average 41 mil-
lion U.S. viewers tuned in to
make "Dallas" one of the
most-watched entertain-
ment shows of all time, trail-
ing only the "M*A*S*H"
finale in 1983 with 50 mil-
lion viewers.
It was J.R.'s sister-in-law,
Kristin (Mary Crosby) who
plugged him he had made
her pregnant, then threat-
ened to frame her as a pros-
titute unless she left town -
but others had equal
motivation.
Hagman played Ewing as
a bottomless well of corrup-
tion with a charming grin, a
business cheat and a faith-
less husband who tried
to get his alcoholic wife,
Sue Ellen (Gray),
institutionalized.
"I know what I want on
J.R.'s tombstone," Hagman
said in 1988. "It should say:
'Here lies upright citizen
J.R. Ewing. This is the only
deal he ever lost"'
On Friday night, Victoria
Principal, who co-starred in
the original series, recalled
Hagman as "bigger than life,
on-screen and off. He is un-
forgettable and irreplace-
able to millions of fans
around the world, and in the
hearts of each of us who was
lucky enough to know and
love him."
Ten episodes of the new
edition of "Dallas" aired
this past summer and
proved a hit for TNT Film-
ing was in progress on the
sixth episode of season two,
which is set to begin airing
Jan. 28, the network said.
There was no immediate
comment from Warner or
TNT on how the series
would deal with Hagman's
loss.
In 2006, he did a guest
shot on FX's drama series
"Nip/Tuck," playing a


Associated Press
This 1983 file photo shows actor Larry Hagman, center left, with fellow cast members of the television series "Dallas."
Back row, from left, are: Howard Keel, Barbara Bel Geddes, Larry Hagman, Linda Grey, Susan Howard and Steve Kanaly.
Front row, from left, are: Priscilla Presley, Victoria Principal and Ken Kercheval.


This 1967 file photo shows Barbara Eden, left, and Larry
Hagman in a scene from the television show "I Dream of
Jeannie."


macho business mogul. He
also got new exposure in re-
cent years with the DVD re-
leases of "I Dream of
Jeannie" and "Dallas."
Dallas Mayor Mike Rawl-
ings said Saturday morning
in a statement that Hag-


man's role as J.R. helped the
city gain "worldwide
recognition."
"Larry is a North Texas
jewel that was larger than
life and he will be missed by
many in Dallas and around
the world," Rawlings said.


The Fort Worth, Texas,
native was the son of singer-
actress Mary Martin, who
starred in such classics as
"South Pacific" and "Peter
Pan."
Martin was still in her
teens when he was born in
1931 during her marriage to
attorney Ben Hagman.
As a youngster, Hagman
gained a reputation for mis-
chief-making as he was
bumped from one private
school to another. He made
a stab at New York theater
in the early 1950s, then
served in the Air Force from
1952-56 in England.
While there, he met and
married young Swedish de-
signer Maj Axelsson. The
couple had two children,
Preston and Heidi, and
were longtime residents of
the Malibu beach colony
that is home to many
celebrities.
Hagman returned to act-
ing and found work in the
theater and in such TV se-
ries as "The U.S. Steel
Hour," "The Defenders" and
"Sea Hunt." His first contin-
uing role was as lawyer Ed
Gibson on the daytime se-


rial "The Edge of Night"
(1961-63).
He called his 2001 mem-
oir "Hello Darlin': Tall (and
Absolutely True) Tales
about My Life."
"I didn't put anything in
that I thought was going to
hurt someone or compro-
mise them in any way," he
told The Associated Press at
the time.
Hagman was diagnosed in
1992 with cirrhosis of the
liver and acknowledged he
drank heavily for years.
In 1995, a malignant
tumor was discovered on his
liver and he underwent a
transplant.
After his transplant, he
became an advocate for
organ donation and volun-
teered at a hospital to help
frightened patients.
"I counsel, encourage,
meet them when they come
in for their operations, and
after," he said in 1996. "I try
to offer some solace, like
'Don't be afraid, it will be a
little uncomfortable for a
brief time, but you'll be OK."'
He also was an anti-smok-
ing activist who took part in
"Great American Smoke-


SCA\A 0 CtCLGAU5


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 A7

DID YOU KNOW?
Five things to know
about "Dallas" star
Larry Hagman:
1. HIS FAMOUS MOM -
Hagman was the son
of singer-actress Mary
Martin, who starred in
such classics as "South
Pacific" and "Peter
Pan." Martin was still
in her teens when he
was born in 1931
during her marriage to
attorney Ben Hagman.
2. HOW HE FIRST
GAINED FAME Years
before "Dallas,"
Hagman was on "I
Dream of Jeannie," in
which he played an as-
tronaut whose life is
disrupted when he
finds a comely genie,
portrayed by Barbara
Eden, and takes her
home to live with him.
3. HIS REAL LIFE
ADVOCACY Hagman
was diagnosed with
cirrhosis of the liver
and acknowledged
he drank heavily for
years. He had a
transplant after a
malignant tumor was
discovered in 1995,
and it turned him into
an advocate for organ
donation and a hospital
volunteer. He was also
an anti-smoking
activist who took part
in "Great American
Smoke-Out"
campaigns.
4. WHAT HE WANTED
ON J.R.'s TOMBSTONE
"It should say: 'Here
lies upright citizen J.R.
Ewing. This is the only
deal he ever lost,'"
Hagman said in 1988.
5. WHO SHOT J.R.? -
The answer to that
cliffhanger was one of
the most-watched
television events in
history. It was J.R.'s
sister-in-law, Kristin
(Mary Crosby) he
had made her
pregnant, then
threatened to frame
her as a prostitute
unless she left town.

Out" campaigns.
Funeral plans had not
been announced as of Sat-
urday morning.


y?


S and no charge' This is U o;iideIul set ce '

Real People Say It Best: or Ocff,-r th- w n.,t tc.r.-,-4. ... ,- .
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-- V


Drop your letter by the Crystal River Mall
or the Citrus County Chronicle between L
Friday, November 23 and V- -
Friday, December 14,2012 CRYSTAL
ONICLE All letters will be .4.. .. i ...all to read and enjoy MA
1wwwonend-ne.m online at www.chronicleonline.com/letterstosanta2012! Y'YNZ


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October 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013, 7 days a week, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.


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3. Member Overall Rating of Drua Coveraae**: 5 Stars


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Freedom Health is a Coordinated Care plan with a Medicare contract and a contract with the Florida Medicaid program. Freedom plans available are HMO- and HMO-SNP. The benefit information
provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/ co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year.
Premiums, co-pays, co-insurance, and deductibles may vary based on the level of Extra Help you receive. Please contact the plan for further details. This plan is available to anyone who has both
Medical Assistance from the State and Medicare. (1) You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. (2) Limitations, copays and restrictions may apply. (3) Amount varies by plan and county.
(*)Health Plan Customer Service domain groups similar measures and the domain is assigned a star rating. Each measure star rating within a domain may vary. This domain consists of the following 4
measures: C34-Plan makes timely decisions aboutAppeals; C35-Reviewing Appeals Decisions; C36-Call Center-Foreign Language Interpretation and TTY/TDD Availability; C37-Enrollment Timeliness.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AUTHOR
Continued from Page Al

and the fireplaces and every-
thing. It's very nostalgic to be
here."
Through guided tours, visi-
tors learn about Rawlings'
life and her farm, which has
been kept much the way it
was when she lived there,
with a few exceptions.
Today, there aren't nearly
as many citrus trees, which
Rawlings wrote about in
"Cross Creek."
'"At one time, it was mostly
orange groves," said Park
Manager Lee Townsend, who
grew up in the still-rural area
and gives tours of the home.
Townsend said visitors
come to see Old Florida, and
this is one of the few places
they can still do that
"People really enjoy get-
ting out and coming to see
how it was," Townsend said.
Amelia Island resident
Tom Raymond has had Cross
Creek on his mind for years
and recently explored the
property for the first time.
"About 20 years ago, we
watched a video tape of the
movie 'Cross Creek,' and I
had always been fascinated
by the location and story,
and I said, 'it's on our bucket
list. We have to go there
someday"'
"You can see how people
lived years and years ago,"
said his wife, Elizabeth Ray-
mond. "You get the idea of
how life was back then. It's
very easy to picture. (Rawl-
ings') words brought it to life.
She was that kind of a writer"
Through her books and
now through her home,
Rawlings continues to bring
readers back to a simpler
time, and visitors can still be
enchanted by Old Florida
and Cross Creek, just as she
was.

WATERING FINES
The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100
for first offenders of
local watering rules.
Second violations cost
$250, third or more
cost $500.
Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 A9


* WHAT: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park.
* WHEN: The park is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Access inside the home is by guided tour only. Guided
walks through the home are offered on Thursdays,
Friday, Saturdays and Sundays at 10 a.m., 11 a.m.,
1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. October through
July. Tours are not offered on Thanksgiving or
Christmas. Group tours require reservations.
* WHERE: The park is in Cross Creek, between
Gainesville and Ocala, off County Road 325.
* INFORMATION: To make tour reservations or for more
information, call 352-466-3672. Learn more at
www.floridastateparks.org/marjoriekinnanrawlings.


AMANDA MIMS/Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: Katy Thomas, left,
talks to her daughter, 11-
year-old Lauren, about the sig-
nificance of items on the front
porch of the Rawlings home.
LEFT: Between 30,000 and
40,000 visitors see the his-
toric Rawlings home each
year. Through guided tours,
visitors learn about Rawlings'
life and her farm, which has
been kept much the way it
was when she lived there.
T: Eggs and cooking
utensils are displayed in the
kitchen of the main house.


DID YOU KNOW?
* Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings came to rural Cross Creek in
1928 to find a home and a place to write.
* Her experiences here were woven into her stories.
* Rawlings' cracker farmhouse has original furnishings
and is interpreted by staff in 1930s clothing.
* Near the house are ornamental plants of the varieties
Rawlings cultivated and a seasonal kitchen garden
with herbs, flowers and vegetables.
Source: www. floridastateparks. org.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Men play crucial role in gender gap


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sorry,
fellas, but President Barack
Obama's re-election makes
it official: Women can over-
rule men at the ballot box.
For the first time in re-
search dating to 1952, a
presidential candidate
whom men chose decisively
- Republican Mitt Romney
- lost. More women voted
for the other guy
It's surprising it didn't
happen sooner because
women have been voting in
larger numbers than men
for almost three decades,
exit polls show.
But men, who make up
less than half the U.S. popu-
lation, always have exer-
cised power greater than
their numbers and they
aren't about to stop now.
When it comes to elec-
tions, males as a group are
more influential because
they show less party loyalty
than women, who skew
Democratic.
Despite all the focus on
candidates courting His-
panics or the working class,
men are the nation's ulti-
mate swing voters; they're
why Republican George W
Bush became president and
Republican John McCain
didn't.
Their move away from
Obama this year expanded
the voting "gender gap." It
wasn't enough to determine
the outcome, but came
close.
Beyond fads
So presidential hopefuls
staring into the gender gap
in 2016 might want to look
beyond the usual controver-
sies over "women's issues"
such as abortion or the
polling fads such as "Wal-
mart moms." Maybe it's time
to pause and consider the
fickle male. Maybe it's time
to ask, "What do men
want?"
In the voting booth, that is.
"I don't think we fully un-
derstand it yet," political
scientist Christina Wol-
brecht of the University of
Notre Dame said about why


Associated Press
An audience of mostly women listen Oct. 19 behind President Barack Obama as he speaks
about the choice facing women in the election during a campaign event at George Mason
University in Fairfax, Va. For the first time in research dating to 1952, the candidate whom
the most men chose Mitt Romney lost. More women voted for the other guy. It's sur-
prising it didn't happen sooner, since women have been voting in larger numbers than men
for almost three decades, exit polls show.


men and women vote differ-
ently But she said plenty of
research on elections going
back to the 1950s indicates
it's not because of issues
such as equal pay, birth con-
trol coverage in health
plans or Romney's awkward
reference to "binders full of
women."
What they want
Paul Kellstedt has some
ideas. A Texas A&M associ-
ate professor of political sci-
ence, Kellstedt studies what
American men and women
want from their government
and how that shifts over
time.
Like Wolbrecht, he noted
the sexes aren't that differ-
ent, at least when it comes
to the issues.
Studies have found the
opinions that separate lib-
erals and conservatives,
even on issues such as abor-
tion, don't divide the sexes
much. Men and women are
about as likely to fall on ei-
ther side of those debates,
and millions of each happily
line up with each political
party.
But there has been a con-
sistent thread of disagree-


ment for decades over what
role the government should
play It's not a big gap, but it
is statistically significant,
about 4 percentage points or
5 points in many studies,
Kellstedt said. As a group,
women tend to like bigger
government with more
health and welfare pro-
grams; men lean toward
smaller government that
spends less, except on the
military
Sort of the social safety
net versus rugged individu-
alism. Or Obama versus
Romney
Gender differences
There are lots of possible
reasons the genders see this
differently
Besides women's tradi-
tional role as family nurtur-
ers, they also live longer
than men and are more
likely to rely on Social Secu-
rity and Medicare. Women
are more likely to be poor.
They're more likely to be
single parents struggling to
pay for child care, educa-
tion and medical bills. Men
may feel many social pro-
grams are expensive and
won't benefit them.


"Women tend to believe
that government has a role
to play, that it should be a
partner in their life," said
Democratic pollster Celinda
Lake. "Men tend to think it's
been a good day when the
government hasn't done
anything bad to you."
When the nation as a
whole drifts to the left or
right on the big government-
small government debate,
the gap between men and
women fluctuates. Men and
women shift their views in
the same direction, Kellstedt
said, but men as a group tend
to change their minds faster
and move their views farther.
"The variation among
men's opinions is larger," he
said. "The flighty, moody
ones are the men, not the
women."
He said this difference of
opinion on the role of gov-
ernment isn't big enough to
entirely explain the larger
gender gap in voting, how-
ever "It's a little bit of a
puzzle."
Women as a group voted
Democratic in the past six
presidential races, from
1992 through 2012, accord-
ing to exit polls. The last


time they decisively sup-
ported a Republican was
Ronald Reagan's re-election
in 1984. The Reagan years
were when Americans first
began taking note of the
"gender gap," as women's
rights groups emphasized
female support for Reagan
in 1980 was narrow while
male voters overwhelmingly
endorsed him.
Men lean Republican but
play the field. In the past six
presidential races, men
voted Republican three
times, Democratic twice (in-
cluding barely supporting
Obama in 2008), and essen-
tially split their vote in the
1996 Bill Clinton-Bob Dole
race, exit polls show.
Party loyalty
This year, Obama cam-
paigned on giving a leg up to
those needing education,
health care or job training.
Romney talked about
shrinking government, ex-
cept for the military, and
said overgrown social pro-
grams were creating a cul-
ture of dependency Their
arguments fit the long-
running fissure of the gen-
der gap.
"Women stuck with
Obama," said Karen Kauf-
mann, a University of Mary-
land associate professor
who studies the gender gap.
"We didn't see a lot of move-
ment from women. The
movement was really men
going back to the Republi-
can Party."
Women's support for
Obama dropped just 1 per-
centage point from 2008;
they voted for him by 55 per-
cent to 44 percent this time.


Men's support for Obama
dropped 4 points, flipping
them to Romney's side, by a
52-45 margin. Women were
10 percentage points more
likely to vote for Obama
than men were, according to
the survey of voters at the
polls conducted for The As-
sociated Press and televi-
sion networks.
Polling history
Gallup polling has
tracked the gender gap
since 1952. Gallup says this
year's gender divide was 20
percentage points, the
largest ever using its
method of calculation.
The gender gap isn't just a
white thing. It exists even
among minorities that vote
overwhelmingly Demo-
cratic. Obama got 96 percent
of black women's votes, but
87 percent of black men's,
compared with 76 percent
of Hispanic women and 65
percent of Hispanic men,
according to the exit poll.
"We group together this
white male vote and sort of
put that in the Republican
ledger and we don't talk
enough about all the various
subgroups that fit within
men and the multiple issues
and currents that determine
how they're going to vote,"
said sociologist Donald
Levy, director of the Siena
College's research institute.
"The Democrats aren't
succeeding with some of
these folks," Levy said. The
Democratic Party needs to
figure out why, he said, the
same way "the Republicans
are doing some soul-
searching about how they
can appeal to women."


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NATION


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 All








Rare hardwood sparks gunfights, corruption in Asia


Associated Press
KOH KONG, Cambodia -
A Thai force dubbed the
"Rambo Army" couldn't stop
the gangs, armed with bat-
tlefield weaponry, as they
scoured the forests. Neither
could a brave activist,
gunned down when he came
to investigate. Nor, appar-
ently, can governments
across Southeast Asia.
The root of the conflicts
and bloodshed? Rosewood.
The richly hued, brown-
ish hardwood is being ille-
gally ripped from Southeast
Asian forests, then smug-
gled by sea and air to be
turned into Chinese furni-
ture that can sell for hun-
dreds of thousands of
dollars. Some of it also ends
up in the finest American
guitars, or as billiard cues.
The felling, almost all of it
illegal, has increased dra-
matically in recent years
and driven the region's rose-
wood to the brink of
extinction.
"This is not just an envi-
ronmental issue. It drives
corruption and criminal
networks. There is a lot of
violence and blood spilled
before the rosewood ends
up in someone's living
room," said Faith Doherty of
the Environmental Investi-
gation Agency, a nongovern-
mental group based in
London. "It's one of the most
expensive woods in the
world. That's why there is a
war for it."
In Koh Kong, a jungle re-
gion of southwest Cambodia
where most villagers earn
less than $2 a day, finding a
rosewood tree is better than
winning the lottery A cubic
meter (1.3 cubic yards) of
top-grade rosewood last
year could be sold for up to
$2,700 to middlemen who
hover around forests and
construction sites of dams
and roads in Thailand, Laos,
Myanmar and Vietnam.
Various species grow in
SoutheastAsia and countries
including India, Brazil and
Madagascar Nearly all
source nations have banned
felling and export of un-
processed rosewood, allow-


A delivery man loads Chinese-style furniture made from African rosewood outside
shop Oct. 23 in Beijing. Documents show China's appetite for rosewood is so
long been prized in China, and the dramatic growth of its wealthy class is cited
reason for the surge in exploitation.


ing harvesting only in special
cases such as clearing forests
for dam construction.
The volume of rosewood
consumed by China alone
suggests most was obtained
illegally China imported
$600 million worth in 2011,
according to official Chi-
nese documents made avail-
able by James Hewitt, an
expert on the illegal timber
trade at the London think
tank Chatham House. About
half came from Southeast
Asian countries.
The documents also show
China's appetite is soaring
- from just 66,000 cubic me-
ters in 2005 to 500,000 cubic
meters last year
Rosewood has long been
prized in China, and the
dramatic growth of its
wealthy class is cited as the
main reason for the surge in
exploitation.
Wood smugglers
The hunt for rosewood ig-
nites violence between offi-
cials and smugglers, and
sometimes among rival
gangs.
The EIA estimates nearly
50 Cambodian loggers and
smugglers have been killed
in Thailand and others ar-
rested in the past two years


in clashes, with Thais also
suffering casualties.
In Koh Kong, one of the
country's leading environ-
mental activists, Chut Wutty,
was shot dead in April while
investigating illegal rose-
wood logging by Timber-
green, a company with no
known address that is be-
lieved to be a hook-up of
gangs and officials.
In Thailand's northeast,
authorities last year formed
what they called a "Rambo
Army" of 11-man units of
armed forestry rangers to
target the traffickers who
cross the porous frontier
from Cambodia, often in
well-armed bands. The
Rambo Army was dis-
banded after a three-month
operation due to lack of
funds.
Despite the loss of law-
enforcement muscle and
widespread corruption,
thousands of illegally felled
trees have been seized in re-
cent years and many of
those accused of involve-
ment in the trade have been
arrested, including the son
of a Cambodian general and
12 Thai police officers. Last
month, Thai authorities
nabbed eight Cambodian


rosewood hunt
Thai border p
Sisaket.
It hasn't beer
protect rosewo
land. By some c
mates, the r
rosewood tre
dropped from


selling come from legally
felled wood," said Doherty
of EIA, which has been in-
vestigating the rosewood
trade for several years. "In
countries with widespread
corruption and fraud, you
need an independent moni-
tor on the ground and that is
not happening. When I look
at products in American
stores, I have my doubts."
Legal sources
-a1 China is making tentative
efforts to import rosewood
and other species from legal
sources, having established
several bodies to regulate
the trade. But one Chinese
official familiar with the
timber trade acknowledged
that while the Beijing gov-
ernment was in principle
Associated Press against illegally imported
de a furniture wood, "this has yet to be re-
)aring; it has inforced by laws." The offi-
I as the main cial spoke on condition of
anonymity because of the
sensitivity of the issue.
;ers in the Chinese customs docu-
)rovince of ments show Cambodia ex-
ported 36,000 cubic meters
n enough to of logs to China from Janu-
od in Thai- ary 2007 to August 2012. The
official esti- Cambodian government re-
number of cently issued a blanket de-
ees there nial, but there's a different
300,000 in story on the ground.


2005 to as low as 80,000 last
year.
Western markets
Some rosewood makes its
way to the U.S. and Europe.
A number of Chinese web-
sites offer rosewood prod-
ucts to Western customers.
U.S. authorities in 2009
and 2011 raided the Ten-
nessee plants of the Gibson
Guitar Corporation, seizing
$500,000 worth of imported
ebony and rosewood that
was to be used in finger-
boards. Gibson paid
$350,000 in penalties in Au-
gust to settle federal
charges of illegally import-
ing ebony, but rosewood was
not part of the charges.
Environmental groups
suspect many such rose-
wood sales violate U.S. and
European Union laws.
"I would be very inter-
ested to see how American
and European outlets prove
that the products they are


Running out
When the rosewood trade
surged in late 2009, trucks
were running night and day
piled with logs in Koh Kong.
Now, with the rapid deple-
tion, villagers are going for
roots, branches and old cut-
tings, selling rosewood by
the kilogram rather than
cubic meter, conservation-
ists say
EIA says to curb the trade,
Southeast Asian nations
must push for rosewood to
be included in CITES, the
international treaty protect-
ing trade in endangered
flora and fauna. Rosewood
species from Madagascar
and Brazil are already
listed.
Tougher regulations on
timber exports to the Euro-
pean Union will take effect
in March. In the U.S., the
Lacey Act of 2008 makes it
illegal to import wood har-
vested and exported ille-
gally under another
country's laws.
But all this may prove too
late for forests.
"The rosewood is almost
all gone from Koh Kong
after just a few years," said
LICADHO's In Kongchit. "It
has been a total rape."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Associated Press
Inspectors assess damage Saturday around the area of a
gas explosion that leveled a strip club in Springfield, Mass.,
on Friday evening. Investigators were trying to figure out
what caused the blast where the multistory brick building
housing Scores Gentleman's Club once stood.


Cause of gas blast
being probed
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. -
Dozens of building inspectors
began assessing homes and
businesses in one of New Eng-
land's biggest cities Saturday, a
day after a natural gas explo-
sion leveled a strip club next to
a day care and heavily dam-
aged a dozen other structures.
The blast injured 18 people,
many of them first responders.
Investigators were trying to
figure out what caused the Fri-
day night blast in Springfield that
could be heard for miles, left a
large hole in the ground where
the multistory brick building
housing Scores Gentleman's
Club once stood and scattered
debris over several blocks.
Officials had already evacu-
ated part of the entertainment
district after responding to a
gas leak and odor reported
about an hour before the explo-
sion while firefighters, police of-
ficers and gas company
workers were in the area filled
with commercial properties and
residences.
Singers continue
Wisconsin protest
MADISON, Wis. Every
weekday as the clock strikes
noon, dozens of demonstrators
pass out songbooks inside the
Wisconsin Capitol. Office work-


ers who know what's coming
scramble to close their doors,
and several police officers take
up watch from a distance.
Then the group begins to
sing. The first song might in-
clude the lyrics, "Hit the road,
Scott, and don't you come back
no more."
Most of the protesters who
hounded Gov. Scott Walker for
his collective-bargaining law got
on with their lives long ago. But
one group still gathers every day
to needle the state's leading Re-
publican a tactic they promise
to continue even as supporters
suggest there are more effective
ways to influence politics.
Circus camel takes
detour through city
GLENDALE, Calif. It was
not a typical jam up that slowed
traffic in Southern California's
Glendale it was a runaway
circus camel.
KCAL-TV reported a camel
escaped from Ramos Brothers
Circus on Friday and began
galloping down Glendale
Boulevard with handlers in hot
pursuit.
The circus said "Atula" was
about to be taken into the ring
for an exercise but for some
reason decided to break free.
Handlers eventually caught
up with the rambunctious animal
and led her back to the big top.
From wire reports


Preserving penmanship


Some states

keep cursive

in curriculum
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES The
pen may not be as mighty
as the keyboard these
days, but California and a
handful of states are not
giving up on handwriting
entirely
Bucking a growing
trend of eliminating cur-
sive from elementary
school curriculums or
making it optional, Cali-
fornia is among the states
keeping longhand as a
third-grade staple.
The state's posture on
penmanship is not likely
to undercut its place at
the leading edge of tech-
nology, but it has teachers
and students divided
over the value of learning
flowing script and loop-
ing signatures in an age
of touchpads and mobile
devices.
Some see it as a waste of
time, an anachronism in a
digitized society where
even signatures are elec-
tronic, but others see it as
necessary so kids can
hone fine motor skills, re-
inforce literacy and de-
velop their own unique
stamp of identity.


Associated Press
A student practices writing in cursive Oct. 18 at St. Mark's Lutheran School in Hacienda
Heights, Calif.


The debate comes as 45
states move toward adopt-
ing national curriculum
guidelines in 2014 for Eng-
lish and math that don't in-
clude cursive handwriting,
but require proficiency in
computer keyboarding by
the time pupils exit elemen-
tary school.
Several states, including
California, Georgia and
Massachusetts, have added
a cursive requirement to the
national standards, while
most others, such as Indi-
ana, Illinois and Hawaii


have left it as optional for
school districts. Some
states, such as Utah, are still
studying the issue.
Whether it's required or
not, cursive is fast becoming
a lost art as schools increas-
ingly replace pen and paper
with classroom computers
and instruction is increas-


ingly geared to academic
subjects tested on standard-
ized exams. Even the stan-
dardized tests are on track
to be administered via com-
puter within three years.
Experts say manuscript,
or printing, may be suffi-
cient when it comes to
handwriting in the future.


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Facing bias as disabled parent


Report: Legal

system fails to

protect parents,

their children

DAVID CRARY
AP National Writer
Millions of Americans
with disabilities have
gained innumerable rights
and opportunities since
Congress passed landmark
legislation on their behalf in
1990. And yet advocates say
barriers and bias still
abound when it comes to
one basic human right: To
be a parent.
A Kansas City, Mo., couple
had their daughter taken
into custody by the state two
days after her birth because
both parents were blind. A
Chicago mother, because she
is quadriplegic, endured an
18-month legal battle to keep
custody of her young son. A
California woman paid an
advance fee to an adoption
agency, then was told she
might be unfit to adopt be-
cause she has cerebral palsy
Such cases are found na-
tionwide, according to a new
report by the National Coun-
cil on Disability, an inde-
pendent federal agency The
445-page document is viewed
by the disability-rights com-
munity as by far the most
comprehensive ever on the
topic simultaneously an
encyclopedic accounting of
the status quo and an emo-
tional plea for change.
"Parents with disabilities
continue to be the only dis-
tinct community that has to
fight to retain and some-
times gain custody of
their own children," said
autism-rights activist Ari
Ne'eman, a member of the
council. "The need to cor-
rect this unfair bias could
not be more urgent or clear."
Legal failings
The U.S. legal system is
not adequately protecting


Associated Press
ABOVE: Carrie Ann Lucas, right, applies makeup for her
daughter Adrianne, 13, at their home in Windsor, Colo., to
prepare for a trip to an adoption hearing for her son, Anthony.
RIGHT: Twins Abigail and Noah Thomas, 8, ride on the
motorized wheelchair of their mother, Jenn Thomas, on their
way to a school book fair Nov. 19 in Arlington Heights, III.
Thomas, a 36-year-old mom who has cerebral palsy, said her
twins occasionally complain about having to do a few extra
chores around the house to help her.


the rights of parents with
disabilities, the report said,
citing child welfare laws in
most states allowing courts
to determine a parent is
unfit on the basis of a dis-
ability Terminating parental
rights on such grounds
"clearly violates" the intent
of the 1990 Americans with
Disabilities Act, the report
contends.
Child-welfare experts, re-
sponding to the report, said
they shared its goals of ex-
panding supports for dis-
abled parents and striving
to keep their families to-
gether But they said re-
movals of children from
their parents notably in
cases of significant intellec-
tual disabilities are some-
times necessary even if
wrenching.
"At the end of the day, the
child's interest in having
permanence and stability
has to be the priority over
the interests of their par-
ents," said Judith Schagrin,
a veteran child-welfare ad-
ministrator in Maryland.
In the bulk of difficult
cases, ensuring vital support
for disabled parents may be
all that's needed to elimi-
nate risks or lessen prob-
lems, many advocates said.


Parental barriers
The new report, titled
"Rocking the Cradle: Ensur-
ing the Rights of Parents
with Disabilities and Their
Children," estimates 6.1 mil-
lion U.S. children have dis-
abled parents. It said these
parents are more at risk
than other parents of losing
custody of their children, in-
cluding removal rates as
high as 80 percent for par-
ents with psychiatric or in-
tellectual disabilities.
Parents with all types of
disabilities physical or
mental are more likely to
lose custody of their chil-
dren after divorce, have
more difficulty accessing
assisted-reproductive treat-
ments to bear children, and
face significant barriers to
adopting children, the re-
port said.
Blind faith
One of the cases it details
involved Erika Johnson and
Blake Sinnett of Kansas
City, whose 2-day-old daugh-
ter, Mikaela, was taken into
custody by Missouri author-
ities because both parents
were blind. The action oc-
curred after a hospital
nurse reported Johnson


seemed to be having trouble
with her first attempts at
breast-feeding which
Johnson said happens with
many first-time mothers.
During a 57-day legal bat-
tle, before the couple re-
gained custody, they were
allowed to visit Mikaela
only two to three times a
week, for an hour at a time,
with a foster parent
monitoring.
Since then, the family has
been left in peace, said
Johnson, who tries to offer
support to other disabled
parents facing similar
challenges.
"Some parents just give
up or don't have the re-
sources," she said in a tele-
phone interview.
Adoptive rights
A Windsor, Colo., woman
with disabilities said the
prejudice she encountered
prompted her to go to law
school, to better defend her
own rights and those of
other disabled parents.
Carrie Ann Lucas uses a
power wheelchair and is re-
liant on a ventilator due to a
form of muscular dystrophy
She is a single mother of
four adopted children, ages


22, 17, 13 and 11, all of whom
also have disabilities, in-
cluding two who use wheel-
chairs and three with
intellectual disabilities.
Lucas said she's been the
subject of several investiga-
tions by child welfare offi-
cials she attributed to bias
linked to her disabilities.
"Each one of these refer-
rals that gets accepted for
investigation causes a great
deal of stress, not only for


me, but for my children,"
Lucas wrote in an email.
She said the investiga-
tions dated back to her first
efforts to adopt Heather, her
biological niece, in 1999,
after the girl was placed in
foster care. At one point in a
long procedural struggle, a
social worker told a judge
that "there was no way that
handicapped woman could
care for that handicapped
child."


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NATION


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
A North Carolina Department of Transportation worker jumps over running ocean water Nov. 19 as he moves traffic cones
on the damaged section of N.C. Highway 12, north of the Mirlo Beach area in Rodanthe on Hatteras Island, N.C.


US role in climate talks unclear


Some activists

cautiously

optimistic

Associated Press

DOHA, Qatar During a
year with a monster storm
and scorching heat waves,
Americans have experi-
enced the kind of freakish
weather that many scien-
tists said will occur more
often on a warming planet.
And as a re-elected presi-
dent talks about global
warming again, climate ac-
tivists are cautiously opti-
mistic the U.S. will be more
than a disinterested by-
stander when the U.N. cli-
mate talks resume Monday
with a two-week conference
in Qatar
"I think there will be ex-
pectations from countries to
hear a new voice from the
United States," said Jen-
nifer Morgan, director of the
climate and energy program
at the World Resources In-
stitute in Washington.
The climate officials and
environment ministers meet-
ing in the Qatari capital of
Doha will not come up with
an answer to the global tem-
perature rise that is melting
Arctic sea ice and permafrost,
raising and acidifying the
seas, and shifting rainfall pat-
terns, which has an impact on
floods and droughts.
They will focus on side is-
.......... .s.c.................................


Water reaches the street level of the flooded Battery Park
Underpass on Oct. 30 in New York. It is remnants from
superstorm Sandy.


sues, such as extending the
Kyoto protocol an expiring
emissions pact with a dwin-
dling number of members -
and ramping up climate fi-
nancing for poor nations.
They will also try to struc-
ture the talks for a new
global climate deal that is
supposed to be adopted in
2015, a process in which
American leadership is con-
sidered crucial.
Many were disappointed
Obama didn't put more em-
phasis on climate change
during his first term. He
took some steps to rein in
emissions of heat-trapping
gases, such as sharply in-
creasing fuel efficiency stan-
dards for cars and trucks.
But a climate bill that would
have capped U.S. emissions
stalled in the Senate.
"We need the U.S. to en-
gage even more," European
Union Climate Commis-


sioner Connie Hedegaard
told The Associated Press.
"Because that can change
the dynamic of the talks."
The world tried to move
forward without the U.S.
after the Bush Administra-
tion abandoned the Kyoto
Protocol, a 1997 pact limit-
ing greenhouse emissions
from industrialized nations.
As that agreement expires
this year, the climate curves
are still pointing in the
wrong direction.
The concentration of
heat-trapping gases such as
carbon dioxide has jumped
20 percent since 2000, pri-
marily from the burning of
fossil fuels like coal and oil,
according to a U.N. report
released this week. And
each year, the gap between
what researchers say must
be done to reverse this
trend, and what's actually
being done, gets wider.


Bridging that gap, through
clean technology and re-
newable energy, is not just
up to the U.S., but to coun-
tries such as India and
China, whose carbon emis-
sions are growing the fastest
as their economies expand.
But Obama raised hopes
of a more robust U.S. role in
the talks when he called for
a national "conversation" on
climate change after win-
ning re-election. The issue
had been virtually absent in
the presidential campaign-
ing until Hurricane Sandy
slammed into the East Coast
The president still faces
domestic political con-
straints, and there's little
hope of the U.S. increasing
its voluntary pledge in the
U.N. talks of cutting emis-
sions by 17 percent by 2020,
compared to 2005 levels.
Still, just a signal Wash-
ington has faith in the inter-
national process would go a
long way, analysts said.


Immigrants struggle


to cope after Sandy


Associated Press

NEW YORK Super-
storm Sandy plunged some
immigrants living illegally
in the U.S. into darkness
and even deeper into the
shadows.
Some of those who need
help to get temporary hous-
ing and food are afraid to
come forward because they
risk deportation. And many
have returned to damaged,
powerless, moldy homes
because they have no other
place to stay
"My son has asthma and
now he is worse. The house
has this smell of humidity
and sea water," Mexican
immigrant Miguel Alarcon
Morales said while holding
his 2-year-old son, Josias.
"It is not safe to live there. I
am starting to feel sick, too."
Advocates are stepping
up their efforts to get help
to immigrants in hard-hit
areas, in some cases going
to door to door.
"If you are here illegally
and you are at your home
and see the National Guard
and people in military uni-
form, going up and down,
sure, you are going to be
afraid," said Gonzalo Mer-
cado, executive director of
El Centro del Inmigrante, a
nonprofit that helps day la-
borers and their families in
Staten Island.
"To not be informed
means to be afraid. That is
why we are here, to inform
immigrants of resources
available to them," Mer-
cado added.
The New York City area
is home to more than 2.3
million Hispanics, accord-
ing to census numbers, and


some places hardest hit by
the storm are known as
landing spots for Mexican
immigrants. Nonprofits in
the area calculate at least
20,000 Mexicans in hard-hit
Staten Island.
Officials from the Mexi-
can government have vis-
ited shelters in New York
and New Jersey looking for
immigrants to help, in-
forming them on how to ob-
tain food stamps, financial
assistance from FEMA or
the Mexican government.
More than 735 people
have signed up to receive
economic help from the
government of President
Felipe Calderon, but there
is only $180,000 so far to dis-
tribute, said the Mexican
consul in New York, Carlos
Sada. As of this week, 66
checks had been written to
victims of the hurricane, to-
taling $110,000.
More than three weeks
after Sandy, the five mem-
bers of the Morales family
still live at their rental
home in Staten Island,
where floodwaters reached
the second floor Although
the home has power now,
there is no heat. The family
uses only an electric heater.
Because Morales' chil-
dren were born in the
United States, he can apply
for Federal Emergency
Management Agency help,
but he has been hesitant.
"When one has no legal
documents, that person will
always think that there can
be repercussions," said
Morales, who lost his job at
an ice cream store in New
Jersey that closed after the
storm. He now works part-
time at a bakery


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WorBRIEFSHamas No. 2 rejects Gaza arms halt

Mourning


Associated Press
Pakistani Shiite Muslim
girls mourn Saturday during
a Muharram procession
in Islamabad, Pakistan.
Muharram is a month of
mourning in remembrance
of the martyrdom of Imam
Hussein, the grandson of
Prophet Mohammed.
Shiites mark a
holy day at shrine
KARBALA, Iraq It is the
most impassioned day of the
year for Shiite Muslims -
Ashoura, when one of the
faith's most revered figures,
Imam Hussein, was martyred
in battle. Hundreds of thou-
sands of Shiites who flocked
to his resplendent, gold-
domed shrine to commemo-
rate him Saturday found the
site has radically changed.
The shrine of Imam Hus-
sein, the grandson of the
Prophet Muhammad, is seeing
its most extensive renovation
since the 17th century. The
construction is part of a push
by Iraq's Shiite rulers to rein-
vigorate sacred shrines long
neglected under former dicta-
tor Saddam Hussein, reflecting
the community's steadily grow-
ing pride and power since the
fall of their nemesis.
Lebanese army
arrests 5 Syrians
BEIRUT The Lebanese
army said it has arrested five
Syrians for possession of ex-
plosives, the latest incident
fanning fears Syria's civil war
is spilling across the border.
An army statement said
the five were arrested in the
southern market town of
Nabatiyeh on Saturday fol-
lowing a tip they were in-
volved in "suspicious security
activity."
Army personnel seized 450
grams of explosives, a detona-
tor, and ammunition for a 160
mm mortar with Hebrew writ-
ing on it, the statement said.
Pope elevates
6 cardinals
VATICAN CITY Pope
Benedict XVI responded to
criticism that the club of
churchmen who will choose
his successor is too Eurocen-
tric, elevating six new cardi-
nals from Colombia, India,
Lebanon, Nigeria, the Philip-
pines and the U.S. during a
formal ceremony Saturday.
Critics have complained
the "princes of the church" no
longer represents the
Catholic Church today, since
Catholicism is growing in Asia
and Africa but is in crisis in
much of Europe.


Hindu


An Indian man
Hindu god I
participates S
procession du
nual cattle fair
Rajasthan, Ind
on the banks
Lake, is a popu
grimage spot
quented by for
who come to
the annual ca
camel races.


Announcement

ahead ofplans to

broker new deal

Associated Press
CAIRO Gaza's ruling Hamas
will not stop arming itself, the No. 2
in the Palestinian group told The
Associated Press on Saturday, sig-
naling tough challenges ahead for
indirect negotiations between Is-
rael and the Islamist militants on a
new border deal for Gaza.


Associated Press
Thanksgiving shopping took a no-
ticeable bite out of Black Friday's
start to the holiday season, as the
latest survey found retail sales in
stores fell slightly from last year
Saturday's report from retail tech-
nology company ShopperTrak finds
consumers spent $11.2 billion at
stores across the U.S. That is down
1.8 percent from last year's total.
This year's Friday results appear
to have been tempered by hundreds
of thousands of shoppers hitting
sales Thursday evening while still
full of Thanksgiving dinner Retail-
ers including Sears, Target and Wal-
mart got their deals rolling as early
as 8 p.m. on Turkey Day
Online shopping also may have


The talks are being brokered by
Egypt, which also helped forge a
cease-fire deal that ended eight
days of Israel-Gaza fighting earlier
this week.
The truce went into effect late
Wednesday and has largely held.
Residents in Gaza said Israel has
begun easing some border restric-
tions, allowing fishermen to head
further out to sea and permitting
farmers inspect land in a former no-
go zone.
Moussa Abu Marzouk, deputy to
Hamas' top leader in exile Khaled
Mashaal, said talks on a further eas-
ing of restrictions are to be Monday
in Cairo. Hamas and Israel do not


cut into the take at brick-and-
mortar stores: IBM said online sales
rose 17.4 percent Thanksgiving day
and 20.7 percent Black Friday, com-
pared with 2011.
Yet ShopperTrak said retail foot
traffic increased 3.5 percent, to more
than 307.67 million store visits, indi-
cating at least some shoppers were
browsing but not spending freely
"Black Friday continues to be an
important day in retail," said Shop-
perTrak founder Bill Martin. "This
year, though, more retailers than
last year began their doorbuster
deals on Thursday, Thanksgiving it-
self. So while foot traffic did in-
crease on Friday, those Thursday
deals attracted some of the spend-
ing that's usually meant for Friday"
The company estimated shopper


meet directly and the indirect
talks are through Egyptian
intermediaries.
An Israeli security official has
said Israel would likely link a sig-
nificant easing of Gaza's border
blockade to Hamas' willingness to
stop arming itself. Israeli officials
were not immediately available for
comment Saturday
However, Abu Marzouk rejected
such demands.
"These weapons protected us and
there is no way to stop obtaining
and manufacturing them," he said
in an interview at his office on the
outskirts of Cairo.
Hamas officials in Gaza have said


foot traffic rose the most in the Mid-
west, up 12.9 percent compared
with last year Traffic rose the least,
7.6 percent, in the Northeast, parts
of which are still recovering from
superstorm Sandy
ShopperTrak, which counts foot
traffic and its own proprietary sales
numbers from 25,000 retail outlets
across the U.S., had forecast Black
Friday sales would grow 3.8 percent
this year, to $11.4 billion.
While consumer confidence has
been improving, many people are
still worried about the slow eco-
nomic recovery, high unemploy-
ment and whether a gridlocked
Congress can avert tax increases
and government spending cuts -
the so-called "fiscal cliff" set to
occur automatically in January


Checklist to see if'fiscal cliff' deal rings tru


Associated Press


WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama and leaders of the lame-duck
Conres ma h be weeks awa v from


go shaking hands on a deal to avert the
I god dreaded "fiscal cliff." So it's natural to
wonder: If they announce a bipartisan
package promising to curb mushroom-
ing federal deficits, will it be real?
Both sides have struck cooperative
tones since Obama's re-election. Even
so, he and House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, the GOP's pivotal
bargainer, have spent most of the past
two years in an acrid political climate
in which both sides have fought stub-
bornly to protect their constituencies.
Obama and top lawmakers could
produce an agreement that takes a se-
rious bite out of the government's
Associated Press growing $16 trillion pile of debt and
dressed as puts it on a true downward trajectory
Lord Shiva, Or they might reach an accord head-
aturday in a ing off massive tax increases and
ring the an- spending cuts that begin to bite in Jan-
r in Pushkar, uary-that's the fiscal cliff-while ap-
hia. Pushkar, pearing to be getting tough on deficits
of Pushkar through painful savings deferred until
ilar Hindu pil- years from now, when their successors
t also fre- might revoke or dilute them.
eign tourists Historically, Congress and presi-
the town for dents have proven themselves capable
ttle fair and of either So before bargainers concoct
a product, and assuming they can,
-From wire reports here's a checklist of how to assess


their work:
OVERALL DEFICIT CUTS
Bargainers are shooting for a frame-
work setting future debt-reduction tar-
gets, with detailed tax and spending
changes to be approved next year but
possibly some initial savings enacted
immediately Obama has suggested 10-
year savings totaling $4.4 trillion.
TAXES
A deal that specifies where revenue
would come from would lay important
groundwork for next year's follow-up
bill enacting actual changes in tax
laws. The biggest clash has been over
whether to raise income tax rates on
earnings over $200,000 annually for in-
dividuals, $250,000 for families.
SPENDING
A serious agreement should specify
how much savings would come from
entitlements, meaning those big,
costly benefit programs such as Social
Security and Medicare. It also should
say how much would come from dis-
cretionary spending, which covers
federal agency budgets for everything
from the military and national parks
to food safety inspections and weather
forecasts.
Why the need for specificity?
Because spending for entitlements
occurs automatically, accounts for
nearly two-thirds of federal spending
and is the fastest growing part of the
budget


Associated F
Robert Folan-Johnson, foreground I
sits at a symbolic Thanksgiving I
table Wednesday during an ACT
protest outside the Beacon Hill reside
of Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., in Bost


Shopping coup


Day having defeated one of
UP Mubarak's former prime
nce ministers this summer in a
ton. closely contested election.


ey have developed a local arms
dustry Mashaal said earlier this
eek the group has received
weapons from Iran since Israel's
st Gaza offensive four years ago.
Hamas smuggles such weapons
to Gaza through tunnels under
e border with Egypt.
Israel and Hamas have clashed
peatedly over the years, most re-
ntly in the cross-border battle
at began Nov 14.
Meanwhile, tens of thousands of
aza children returned to school
iturday for the first time since
ghting ended late Wednesday.
bout half of Gaza's 1.6 million peo-
e are children.



Egyptian


judges

slam new


powers

Morsi grants

himselfcontrol

over courts
Associated Press
CAIRO Egypt's highest
body of judges slammed
Saturday a recent decision
by the president to grant
himself near-absolute
power, calling the move an
"unprecedented assault"
on the judiciary
The statement from the
Supreme Judicial Council
came as hundreds
protested outside a down-
town courthouse against
Thursday's declaration by
President Mohammed
Morsi. The president's de-
cision means courts cannot
overrule his decrees until
a new constitution and
parliament is in place, sev-
eral months if not more in
the future.
The judges' condemna-
tion of the president's
edicts are the latest blow to
Morsi, whose decision set
off a firestorm of contro-
versy and prompted tens of
thousands of people to take
to the streets in nationwide
protests Friday
Through their statement,
carried by the official
MENA agency, the judges
join a widening list of lead-
ers and activists from
Egypt's political factions,
including some Islamists,
who have denounced the
decree.
The Supreme Judicial
Council is packed with
judges appointed by for-
mer President Hosni
Mubarak. It regulates ju-
dicial promotions and is
chaired by the head of the
Court of Cassation.
Their move reflects a
broader sense of anger
e within the judiciary
against the president.
Some judges' groups and
prosecutors have already
announced partial strikes
to protest Morsi's decree.
Morsi has accused pro-
Mubarak elements in the
judiciary of blocking polit-
k ical progress. In the last
year, courts have dissolved
r the lower house of parlia-
ment as well as the first
S panel drafting the consti-
tution, both led by
his Muslim Brotherhood
group.
The edicts Morsi issued
mean no judicial body can
dissolve the upper house
- of parliament or the cur-
'T rent assembly writing the
new constitution, which
are led by the Brother-
hood. Supporters of Morsi
feared courts reviewing
cases against these bodies
might have dissolved them,
further postponing Egypt's
transition under the aegis
of a new constitution.
J They say Morsi has a
mandate to guide this
Press process as Egypt's first
eft, freely elected president,


Associated Press
Doris Leyva (from left), Midory Leyva and Lilia Castro rest, surrounded by shopping bags, in a seating area on
Black Friday at Wolfchase Galleria in Memphis, Tenn. They had driven from Oxford, Miss., on Thursday night to be
at the mall in time for early-opening sales.

Thanksgiving day discounts steal sales from Black Friday










EXCURSIONS


* Veterans N
be found on
A19 of
today's
Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Notes can
Page


itt\


isit


Ie


aris'


Associated Press
UNESCO-protected Chernivtsi University, pictured
Oct. 21 in Chernivtsi, a city of 250,000 in
southwestern Ukraine. Known as the Little Paris
or, alternatively, the Little Vienna of Ukraine,
Chernivtsi is a perfect place for a quiet romantic
weekend trip and a crash course in the painful
history of Europe in the 20th century.


Street musicians play Oct. 21 on the pedestrian-
only Olha Kobylianska street in Chernivtsi.


Journey through time in Ukraine's Chernivtsi


MARIA DANILOVA
Associated Press
CHERNIVTSI, Ukraine
Onion-domed Orthodox
churches. Solemn Catholic
cathedrals.
Cobblestone streets lined with
mansions. A movie theater built on
the ashes of a synagogue.


Chernivtsi's Jewish cemetery, one of the largest in easte
These landmarks stand as testaments to the shift-
ing identities of the Ukrainian city of Chernivtsi. As
wars raged and empires fell, Chernivtsi reflected the
heritage and traditions of its residents and rulers:
Austro-Hungarian, Jewish, Romanian, Soviet and
Ukrainian. Today, a walk around Chernivtsi is a jour-
ney through time, from a statue of a Habsburg em-
peror, to a deserted Jewish cemetery, to a Soviet tank.
But Chernivtsi has many faces. While it offers les-
sons in the often painful history of 20th century Eu-
rope, its elegant prewar architecture and
streetscapes have earned it the nickname of the Lit-


tie Paris or Little Vienna of Ukraine. Street signs may
be hidden by grapevines laden with fruit; wedding
processions parade down romantic cobblestone
streets, and portraits of Austrian rulers line the walls
of a cafe.
Chernivtsi was founded as a Slavic fortress on the
Prut River in the 12th century It was part of the me-
dieval principality of Moldavia until being annexed
by the Austro-Hungarian empire in the late 18th cen-
tury Renamed Czernowitz, it flourished under the
Habsburgs and grew from a small provincial town
into a bustling, ethnically diverse center of trade,
crafts, culture and education.
With the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in
1918 at the end of World War
I, the region became part of
Romania. Soviet forces
briefly occupied Chernivtsi
at the start of World War II,
but were soon ousted by
Nazi-allied Romanian
forces. The Red Army retook
it in 1944 and incorporated
it into the Ukrainian repub-
lic, which is now Ukraine.
The jewel of the city is a
giant palace-like complex
that originally housed Or-
thodox church leaders. It is
now the home of Chernivtsi
University and a UNESCO
heritage site. Built in the
late 19th century by the
renowned Czech architect
Josef Hlavka, the monumen-
tal central building turns
into a landmark Orthodox
church on one side and a
U iy .Se n soaring clock tower on the
er of t other On weekdays, the
campus is filled with stu-
*rn Europe. dents, but on weekends, it's
taken over by tourists walk-
ing slowly to appreciate its full magnificence. The
university's icon-lined Church of Three Saints is also
a popular destination for exchanging vows, while the
manicured bushes, lawns and park are perfect for
wedding photo shoots, the brides in white and
grooms in black, trailed by photographers and droves
of friends and family
University Street runs from the school to the Cher-
nivtsi movie theater, which serves as an unlikely re-
minder of the city's Jewish history Before the war,
Chernivtsi was a vibrant center of Jewish life, home
to several dozen synagogues and some 45,000 Jews, or


about a third of the city's population. Only a third of
the Jewish population survived the Holocaust and
the war, and most of them then emigrated to Israel
and the United States. Today, Chernivtsi has a total
population of 250,000 including little more than 1,000
Jews. Signs of Jewish life are few: two synagogues, a
small Jewish history museum, a Hebrew school and a
rundown Jewish cemetery, one of the largest in East-
ern Europe. The remains of the city's main syna-
gogue, which was partially destroyed during the war,
were turned into a cinema by the Soviets. Locals
have dubbed the blue building the Cinegogue.
Nearby is Theater Square, which was once the site
of a food bazaar and was called Elizabethplatz in
honor of the Austrian Empress Elizabeth. Now it is
home to the highly regarded Chernivtsi Drama The-
ater, built there at the beginning of the 20th century
Next to the Central Square and city hall is the pedes-
trian-only Olha Kobylianska street, named for a
Ukrainian writer and women's rights activist who cel-
ebrated this region in her works. Lined with elegant
two- and three-story houses from the turn of the 20th
century, the romantic cobblestone street, a popular
site for wedding processions, is dotted with benches,
trees and outdoor caf6s.
Popular eateries on Kobylianska include the Vi-
denska Kava (Vienna Cafe) and Koleso (The Wheel).
At Videnska Kava, customers slowly sip coffee under
solemn portraits of Austrian monarchs and tackle
giant servings of delicious cake big enough for two.
At Koleso, hearty Ukrainian fare includes banush,
traditional porridge made of corn flour boiled in sour
cream. Count Vorontsov's Wine Cellar on Shalom
Aleichem Street offers both regional and European
cuisine.
Try to catch an evening organ concert at the 19th
century Armenian Church, also built by Hlavka in a
mix of Roman, Byzantine and Gothic styles typical of
medieval monasteries of this region. Farther down
Armenian Street is St. Nicholas Cathedral, nick-
named "the drunken church" because the pillars of
its side domes are canted as if falling over This is
one of the few Chernivtsi churches that continued to
operate during the Soviet era, which is why its icons,
stained glass panels and the relics of Orthodox mar-
tyrs are well-preserved.
At the central bazaar on Chervonoarmiyska (Red
Army) Street, you'll find salo, the salted pork lard
that is a hallmark of Ukrainian cuisine. Villagers will
be selling eggs, milk "from just under the cow" and
freshly skinned poultry, and you might even spot a
tired middle-aged woman selling giant mushrooms
picked in the woods to subsidize her meager pension.
It's yet another side to this city's many identities, and
one you're not likely to find in the real Paris.


Trip to nation's capital
Monnie Bettuo recently visited Washington, D.C., to enjoy the beautiful fall
foliage and many points of interest. Here, she is in front of the Andrew Jackson
equestrian statue, the Washington Monument and the White House. She reported
it difficult to prepare oneself for the feelings experienced when visiting Arlington
National Cemetery; those of respect for the great sacrifice of the brave
servicemen and servicewomen who have given all to our country.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


rp


-WWPF"






A18 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


Talk to other parents


about 'bad' books


SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 25, 2012 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 8:30 I 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30111:00 11:30
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Celtic Woman -- Believe Classic Irish songs and Downton Abbey Revisited Behind- Downton Abbey Revisited Behind- Motown: Big Hits and
S[WED PBS 3 3 14 6 pop anthems. (In Stereo) 'G' the-scenes footage. (N) G' the-scenes footage. 'G' More (My Music)
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 DooWop Discoveries (My Music) 'G' a Downton Abbey Revisited 'G' Downton Abbey Revisited 'G' MI-5 '14' B
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0 [WF NB 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo Live) 14' B Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. (N) (In Stereo Live) cc
WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Revenge "Lineage" (N) 666 Park Avenue (N) News Sports
S ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' "Into the Deep"'PG' 'PG'c (In Stereo)'PG' Night
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0 [W ) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 at Chargers Stereo) B (In Stereo) N Stereo)'14' Cherry" (N) '14' 11pm (N) Program
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( FOX 13 13 13 13 (N) (In Stereo Live) 'PG' Simpsons Burgers 14 Show (In Stereo) B Notice'PG'
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WCLF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
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N WFTS ABC 11 11 11 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Revenge"Lineage" (N) 666 Park Avenue (N) News Castle'PG'
I ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' "Into the Deep"'PG' 'PG' B (In Stereo) 'PG' B
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Slave" (In Law & Order How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
*PGWo IND 12 12 16 'PG' 'PG' Theory Theory Stereo)'PG' "Girlfriends"'PG' '14' 14'
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Friends According King of Engagement CSI: Miami "Collateral CSI: Miami "Dissolved" Cold Case The *** "Hot Shots!"
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54 48 54 25 27 Texas Texas Wars PG' Wars PG Wars PG Wars'PG Wars PG' Wars PG Wars PG' Wars PG' Wars PG' Wars
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AJ 55 64 55 Baker, John Leguizamo. 'NR' "Hounded"'14' '14'm c'14'm 'Dead'14' Book Men
1 Finding Bigfoot: Further Finding Bigfoot (In Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot: Further Findin Bigfoot "CSI Findin Bigfoot (In
52 35 52 19 21 Evidence'PC' StereoN P(N) (In Stereo)'PG' Evidence'PG' Bigfoof (N) PG' Stereod PC'
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96 19 96 Reunion" Red Carpet ists. (N)'PG' guest Faith Evans. 'PG'
[BIAV0) 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Happens Atlanta
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on 98 45 98 28 37 The 46th AnnualCMA ** "Fireproof" (2008) Kirk Cameron.A divorcing couple **"Fireprof" (2008) KirkCameron.A divorcingcouple
98 45 98 28 37 Awards B turn to God to save their marriage. 'PG' turn to God to save their marriage. 'PG'
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid Paid Diabetes |Wall St. Fat & Fatter Steve Jobs: Bil. American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
IMNN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
Wiii 46 40 46 6 5 A.N.T Farm (In Stereo) Phineas Jessie Dog With a Gravity A.N.T Good- Dog With a Shake It Jessie A.N.T
n46 40 46 6 5 'G' and Ferb 'G'c Blog (N) Falls'Y7' Farm'G' Charlie Blog'G' Up!'G' 'G'm IFarm G'
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(UM) 29 52 29 20 28 Culkin, Joe Pesci, Daniel Stern. PG Comedy) Malcolm McDowell. Premiere. Comedy) Malcolm McDowell, Debi Mazar.
*** "Once Around" (1991) Richard Dreyfuss, **2 "Turner & Hooch" (1989) Tom *** "Georgia" (1995, Drama) Jennifer Jason "Suicide
118 170 Holly Hunter. (In Stereo) 'R' B Hanks. 'PG Leigh. (In Stereo)'R'B] 'Kings"
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) 30 60 30 51 Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. PG-13' Fantasy) Voices of Jay Baruciel. 'PGFantasy) Voices of Jay Baruchel. 'PG'
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59 68 59 45 54 Drama) Candace Cameron Bure.'NR'Bc Lawrence, Emily Hampshire. Premiere. N Romance-Comedy) Maria Thayer. N
3*2 Reo Tas" ** "Knight and Day" (2010, Action) Tom Boardwalk Empire (N) Treme'Tipitina" (In Boardwalk Empire
(IED 302 201 302 2 2 ,.i_, i. :,i ,' a Cruise. (In Stereo) 'P-13' 'MA' Stereo) 'MA' 'MA'
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303 202 303 Welterweights. (Taped) (In Stereo) BN Stiller. 'PG-13' Bc Heist Jason Sudeikis. (n Stereo) 'R
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Million Dollar Rooms Extreme Homes'G' Property Brothers'G' House Hunters Reno House Hunters Reno
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars The Real Story of
51 25 51 32 42 PG 'PG 'PG 'PG 'PG' PG 'PG 'PG PG PG Christmas 'PG
I 2 31 "The March Sisters at "Love at the Christmas Table" (2012) Danica ** "Liz& Dick" (2012, Docudrama) Lindsay ** "Liz & Dick"
24 38 24 31 Christmas" (2012) McKellar. Premiere.'NR B Lohan, David Hunt. Premiere. N (2012) B
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50 119 Everhart, Andrew Walker. NR'N TStars 'PG' Stars 'PG' Stars 'PG' Stars 'PG'
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(jMAXJ 320 221 320 3 3 Neeson. (In Stereo) PG-13' c Bonnie Bedelia. (In Stereo) 'R' ,.-ii, ii, ...... 'PG-13'B
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31 59 31 26 29 King" Nicolas Cage, Jon Voight, Harvey Keitel. 'PG' B Adventure) Harrison Ford. 'PG' B
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(TVLI 32 49 32 34 24 Cleveland |Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland |Cleveland Cleveland |Divorced Raymond |Raymond
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47 32 47 17 18 i :'napped. PG'm 'PG'B ccollege fair.'PG' Pan..."'PG' (2010)'R'Bc
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(WiGli f 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: I am in a
dispute with my kids'
middle school. For
the past two summers, the
school has recommended to
our eighth-grade students
several reading selections
that contain crude language
and explicit sexual content.
I don't understand why.
The "reading specialist"
who helped select the titles
says, "Kids need
to read things
that aren't pretty,
because life isn't
perfect." I argue
that they can -
read about all of
the imperfect
things in the
world in the
newspaper with-
out the lewd lan-
guage and sexual
content. I'm also
disgusted with ANN
the administra- MAIL
tion and school
committee for
supporting these recom-
mendations.
I'm not looking to ban any
books. Parents are free to
acquire these titles at book-
stores and libraries. I'm
only looking for the school
to exhibit some level of re-
spect when suggesting titles
for their students. Is this a
common situation? Can par-
ents no longer assume that
the books our schools are
giving to our kids are within
expected parameters? -
Sickened on the East Coast
Dear Sickened: We as-
sume you have read these
books and so have a fair
basis for your complaint.
Some books with offensive
language or content are
valuable selections because
problems are brought up in
a way that provokes a care-


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG)
4:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In
3D. 1:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No
passes.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part
2" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Wreck-it Ralph" (PG)
1:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG)
4:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Rise of the Guardians" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.


"Rise of the Guardians" (PG) In
3D. 1:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Red Dawn" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:15 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Life of Pi" (PG) In 3D.
1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part
2" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10 p.m. No passes.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG)
2 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Wreck-it Ralph" (PG) 4:50
p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Cloud Atlas" (R) 1:20 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 9:40 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Large house
and land
6 Cry
11 Cooks in water
16 Strike
20 Sun-dried brick
21 End
22 Simple watercraft
23 Force
25 Day of the movies
26 Appraised
27 Sitting -
of the world
28 Silly
29 Garment part
30 Exchanged
32 Funny fellow
34 Defunct airplane
35 Edible part
37 Mimic
38 Paul Rubens
39 Wealth
41 Avid
43 Did a farm job
44 Rica
46 Tagged
49 Cook of a kind
50 Heavenly
54 Pressed
55 Take delight
56 Fashion
57 Observe
58 Likewise not
59 Made public
60 Carved gem
61 macabre
62 Actor Jannings
64 Penalized
65 Exposes
66 Business machine
67 Impudent talk
68 Helper (abbr.)
69 Cut
70 Quid quo
71 Coral reef
72 Family member
74 Stringed
instruments
75 Plank
77 Type of Jamaican music
80 Native of (suffix)
81 Imprisons
82 High-fiber food
83 Chief
87 Fruit resembling grape-


fruit
89 Outspoken
90 Movie
91 Terrible
92 Came to be
93 Body organ
94 Stock market
fiasco
95 Write
96 Tier
97 Frosted
98 Block to prevent rolling
99 Profession
102 Locomotive
operator
105 Farm sound
106 Cotton fabric
107 A tooth
108 Dick or Petula
109 Short
110 Expunge
113 Edible grass
114 Smile broadly
115 Yarn
119 Baba
120 Fancy store of old
123 Did an usher's job
125 Night goddess
126 Language of India
128 Antelope
129 As above
130 Martini fruit
132 Insert in an artery
133 Marsh plant
134 Sheer
135 Tightwad
136 Circular current
137 Arches
138 Like a taproom
139 Turn inside out


DOWN
1 "-, I'm Adam"
2 Love
3 Opera heroine
4 Kimono sash
5 Lie
6 Grated against
7 Text
over a column
8 Horse opera
9 Employed
10 Mack or Nugent
11 Child's vehicle
12 Failed utterly


Stage direction
Courts
Clan
Strong drinks
Was triumphant
Inundated
Taut
Soaks flax
Stormed
Gem
Gaelic
Youthful person
Prodded
Short sleep
Cakes and -
Rescued
Yields by treaty
Margarine
Wrinkles
Nice smell
"- Godunov"
Flat cap
One with promise
Kind of column
Lost (2 wds.)
Suspicious
Wash cycle
Female animals
Way between seats
Grottoes
Kind of prize
Baton Rouge campus
(abbr.)
Ipso -
Kind of palm
Crackpot
Something sweet
Cook eggs
Long river
Spiked
Fast
Pop
Tire in the trunk
Sacred writings
In the company of
Witch assembly
Ebon
Become mellow
Belief
Ford or Fonda
Inuit
Clergyman
Dress
City in Peru
Stir violently
Legal right


99 Felony
100 Space or Stone
101 Floating platform
103 Something
different
104 Basic (abbr.)
105 Monet and
Debussy
106 Public speaking


Wince
Kitchen tool
Cry of
disappointment
Gladden
Lip-synced
Mark
Davis or Midler
Cordial flavoring


Paramour
Put forth effort
Mexican money
Mr. Cassini
Building locale
Cupola
A state (abbr.)
Call
Roman 54


Puzzle answer is on Page A23.


11-25


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ful and intelligent discus-
sion of issues that kids need
to hear and that parents are
often reluctant to bring up.
However, if you feel these
books do not accomplish
anything worthwhile, the
best way to alter the
school's choices is to get a
group of parents together
and raise your concerns
with the administration.
They are more
likely to listen to
multiple parents
who offer reason-
able objections.
Dear Annie: I
read the letter
from "N.Y, NY,"
the 34-year-old
who doesn't want
to see her ailing
grandparents
anymore because
one has dementia
IE'S and the other
BOX doesn't smell
good. I'm having
a hard time re-
plying in acceptable
language.
My dear father-in-law has
dementia and is unable to
care for himself. He's vis-
ited frequently by all of his
extended family, even those
who live hundreds of miles
away
My mom is in a wheel-
chair and is incontinent and
unable to bathe often. Her
grandchildren wish she
lived closer so they could
visit more often.
I envy adults who have
grandparents. "N.Y, N.Y"
doesn't indicate that her
grandmothers have been
abusive or unkind, and she
used to visit them
frequently Ultimately, her
shocking selfishness will
hurt her more than anyone
else. S from R


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


41





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
POST NEWS
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Lounge
open at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon on
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the American
Legion, American Legion Rid-
ers and 40/8 families have din-
ners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke entertain-
ers for the upcoming year. If in-
terested in being considered as
an entertainer or musician at
the post, call Elfi Baker or Patti
Foster at 352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
All are also welcome to a
ham and sweet potato dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Nov. 28, at the Post home.
Donation is $7. Donations from
the dinners help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For more
information, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. For Mon-
day golf league, call Leo Walsh
or John Kunzer, 746-0440. The
VFW Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer or Santos Colon at 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war


veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Baked pork chops are on the
menu for Friday, Nov. 30, from
5 to 6:30 p.m. cost is $8 and all
are welcome. Children younger
than 6 eat for $4.
All are welcome at a Tribute
to Patsy Kline on Sunday,
Dec. 16. Buffet dinner will be
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. followed by
the tribute. On the menu are
fried chicken, corn on the cob,
relish tray, coleslaw, pasta
salad, biscuits and dessert.
Tickets are $15 and can be pur-
chased at the post canteen.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The
public is welcome at bingo at
6 p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.


1


Michael B. Watson
Air Force Airman Michael
"Brandon" Watson has com-
pleted his basic military training
at Lackland
Air Force
Base, San
Antonio,
Texas.
Watson, a
2012 gradu-
ate of Crystal
e F River High
Michael B. School, is
Watson now at Shep-
U.S. Air Force pard AFB,
Wichita Falls,
Texas. He will be in tech school
until March 2013, training to be-
come an F-15 Strike Eagle
crew chief.
He was born in Ocala and
moved to Citrus County in
1998. Watson is the son of
Michael and Michele Watson,
longtime business owners here.
He will be home for the Christ-
mas holidays to spend time
with his family.

Seth A. Rosier
Army Pvt. Seth A. Rosier has
graduated from basic combat
training at Fort Jackson,
Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradition
and core values, physical fit-
ness and received instruction



0 Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email at ultrarayl997@
yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older


and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemi-
cal warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony,
marching, rifle marksmanship,
armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, mili-
tary courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot
marches and field training
exercises.
Rosier is the son of William
and Michele Rosier of Citrus
Springs. He is a 2010 graduate
of Lecanto High School.

Matthew Rentschlar
Air Force Airman Matthew M.
Rentschlar graduated from
basic military training at Lack-
land Air Force Base, San Anto-
nio, Texas.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness,
and basic warfare principles
and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Rentschlar is the son of
Adrienne Rentschlar of Crystal
River, and Mark Rentschlar of
Riverview. He is a 2010 gradu-
ate of Crystal River High
School.



who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampabay.
rr.com. Call or visit the post for
regular and special events, as
well as meetings. Google us at
VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number


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above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. Call
Alice at 352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at the American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. Visitors are always
welcome. Call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the


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meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/
Homosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495.

See VETERANS/Page A20


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 A19





A20 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


Advanced CERT Academy


Special to the Chronicle
On the weekend of Oct. 20, five members of the Citrus County Community Emergency Response Team
(CERT) attended an Advanced CERT Academy in Port Richey. From left are: Ron King, Diane Wells,
Jim Squires, Gloria Wells and Odie Malave. The class was sponsored by the Pasco County CERT, and
paid for with request for proposal grant from the state of Florida. The class included 10 hours of class-
room training on topics from radio communications, search and rescue, to first aid and CPR. There was
also a simulated disaster at the Grey Preserve in Port Richey. Participants were required to search,
find, treat and transport 100 local volunteers with simulated injuries. The volunteers were made up to
look like actual victims with everything from cuts and broken bones, to very severe injuries. The Cit-
rus County CERT members handled multiple tasks, including field communications, scribe, triage and
medical. For more information about CERT, visit www.citruscountycert.org, or email Bob Wesch at
bwesch@sheriffcitrus.org.



New Yorkers gather Dec. 20
O7 87S 41=11-W.


Special to the Chronicle
The New York Club of Citrus
County will meet at noon Thurs-
day, Dec. 20, at Inverness Golf
and Country Club. Fred Camp-
bell will provide a program of
music.
An optional gift exchange will
take place, with a $7 limit per
gift. Men should bring a gift for
a man, and women should bring
one for a woman.
On the menu are prime rib or


grilled tilapia, baked potato,
mixed vegetables, dinner rolls
and 6clairs for dessert. Tea,
soda and coffee provided. Cost
is $12, which includes tax and
tip. Lunch reservations must be
made by Wednesday, Dec. 12.
Mail your check to: New York
Club, PO. Box 641261, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Write your
menu choice on your check.
Meetings are normally con-
ducted at noon the second
Thursday monthly Visitors are


welcome, but must join after
two visits.
Annual dues are $6. The club
supports the work of CASA,
helping victims of domestic
violence.
Donations of household sup-
plies, toiletries, baby supplies
and money are appreciated.
Also needed are twin-size
sheets, bath towels, paper tow-
els and more.
For more information, call
Dorothy or Ed at 352-527-2332.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A19

Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at 3 p.m. the third
Thursday monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher,
secretary, at 352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber American Legion
Post 225 meets at 7 p.m. third Thursday
at the post home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible veterans
welcome. Call
Commander Tom Gallagher at 352-860-
1629 for information and directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD) sailors
meet at Denny's in Crystal River at 2
p.m. the fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard
and Merchant Marine Veterans of
World War II will meet at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill.

SERVICES
& GROUPS
Citrus County Veterans Coalition
provides food to veterans in need. Food
donations and volunteers are always
welcomed and needed. The CCVC is on
the DAV property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence, off U.S.
41 north. Hours of operation are 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably discharged
veterans, their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veterans' organi-
zations and current coalition members
are welcome. The CCVC is a nonprofit
corporation; donations are tax de-
ductible. Members can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537, or at the
meeting. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Disabled American Veterans Gerald
A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness an-
nounces the design and availability of
this year's Citrus County Veterans Ap-
preciation Commemorative Pin. In
keeping with this year's theme, "Honor-
ing our Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will represent
the men and women who made military
service a career. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The pins are
available for $3 each by calling the chap-
ter at 352-344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also available at
the Citrus County Veterans Service Of-
fice. All proceeds benefit Chapter 70's


scholarship fund and veterans' assis-
tance programs.
Hunger and Homeless Coalition
- Anyone who knows of a homeless
veteran in need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assistance or more
blankets is asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless Coalition at
352-382-0876, or pass along this phone
number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for those
couples and individuals interested in tak-
ing a trip to Hawaii with a group of vet-
erans, their families and friends. The
annual trek, coordinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran, is sched-
uled this year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai (Marriott),
Hawaii (stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina Resort).
Reservations should be made as soon
as possible. Call McLean at 352-637-
5131, or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, developed by non-
profit agency ServiceSource, is to meet
the needs of wounded veterans. Call em-
ployment specialist Charles Lawrence at
352-527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@servicesource.org.
The local Service Source office is at
2071 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with centerpieces with
their names on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired military per-
sonnel are needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military and non-
law enforcement programs.Criminal
background check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-
597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a partnering
agency with the Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tailored care for
veterans and their families. The program
is provided in private homes, assisted liv-
ing facilities and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and conditions
unique to each military era or war. It also
provides caregiver education and a
recognition program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH Hospice
care and programs do not affect veter-
ans' benefits. Call the Citrus Team Office
at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is as-
sociated with the national service organi-
zation, Yoga For Vets. Free classes to
combat veterans are offered by her at
several locations and times. Call her at
352-382-7397.


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(Formerly of
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Come see Citrus County's finest new jewelry showroom offering expert jewelry
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Insurance and estate appraisals available.
Expert cleaning Polishing Battery replacement
Fine watch repair, Rolex, Cartier, etc.
Keeping with our holiday tradition, refreshments and cocktails are served daily! Come see
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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 A21





A22 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


Trail Blazing donation of warmth


Special to the Chronicle
A donation of 32 baby blankets and two baby hats for new mothers and babies of the Women's & Family Center at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center was made possible by the men and women of the Trail Blazing Sams RV Chapter. Trail Blaz-
ing members presenting the donation are Charlie Voyton, Linda Voyton, Lynne Morneault and Albert Morneault. Accept-
ing the blankets and hats on behalf of the Women's & Family Center are Michaeline Llewellyn and Nancy Ferguson.



Mac users schedule classes


Register now to learn new computer skills


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Macintosh Users Group
(CMUG) meets the fourth Friday
monthly The club meets from 7 to 9
p.m. with an informal question-and-
answer session at 6:30 p.m. Guests are
welcome. The next meeting will be
Friday, Nov 30.
Because of the Christmas holiday,
CMUG will not have classes or a gen-
eral meeting in December; however,
the club will host the lab and work-
shops to assist members with equip-
ment and software.
Please see the News and Events


section of cmugonline.com for dates.
Remember to register with the appro-
priate person so the unpaid volun-
teers can schedule the work flow to
avoid being swamped.
Classes for November will be Apple
Contacts and Mail with Gus Kahwati
and iPad iTunes with Laurie Martin.
The schedule for the month is:
Monday, Nov 26, 1 to 5 p.m. Apple
Contacts and Mail class. Registration
required, email
ckmoss@tampabayrr.com.
Tuesday, Nov 27, 1 to 5 p.m. Mac-
intosh workshop. Registration re-
quired and indicate topic to be


covered. Email Bill Dean at
bjdean@embarqmail.com.
Tuesday, Nov 27, 6 to 9 p.m., iPad
iTunes class. Registration required,
email ckmoss@tampabayrr.com.
Thursday, Nov 29, 1 to 5 p.m.
Lab/tune-up. Registration required
and indicate topic to be covered.
Email John Engberg at mrbyte@earth-
link.net.
All events are in room 103, building
C4, at the College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus. Class fees are $10 for
single, $15 for a family and $20 for non-
members. Labs and workshops are for
members only and are free.
For more information about CMUG,
go to cmugonline.com and click on the
About Us button.


Jersey club


plans activities


Special to the Chronicle
The next meeting for the
New Jersey and Friends
Club will be at 1 p.m. Mon-
day, Dec. 3, at the VFW Post
4252 on State Road 200,
Hernando. Entertainment
will be provided by A
Matter of Taste.
Activities for December
for the New Jersey and
Friends Club include din-
ner at Texas Road House
in Brooksville at 4 p.m.
Dec. 5, and the Christmas
Show at the Show Palace
in Hudson at 11:30 a.m.
Dec. 15. Christmas dinner
at Stumpknockers in Inver-
ness will be at 3 p.m.
Dec. 25.
With winter approach-
ing, members are asked to
remember donations of
food items and clothing for
the Family Resource Cen-


ter. The club meets the first
Monday of each month un-
less there is a holiday, at
which time it is the second
Monday
The club bowls Thurs-
days at 10 a.m. at Sports-
man's Bowl on U.S. 41 in
Inverness. All are wel-
come; being from New Jer-
sey is not a requirement to
join. For more information,
call 352-527-3568.
The club is sponsoring
three upcoming bus trips
for the new year. The first
is to the Victory Casino
Cruise Ship on Jan. 9. On
Feb. 27, the club will go to
the Tampa Bay Downs
Race Track for a day at the
races. The trips are open to
all persons desiring to par-
ticipate; club membership
is not required. For more
information, call Mary
Anne at 352-746-3386.


Holiday program
set for Nov. 30
The City of Crystal River will
host a Christmas tree lighting
and holiday program at 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 30, at the Crystal
River Gazebo.
Luminaries will be available
for $2 each to honor loved
ones. The event is sponsored
by the Pilot Club of Crystal
River, a not-for-profit service
organization.
Nobles Ladies yard
sale coming up
The Nobles Ladies of the
Citrus Shrine Club will have a
yard sale beginning at 8 a.m.
Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day, Nov. 29 and 30 and Dec.
1, at the Citrus Shrine club-
house, 468 Woodlake Ave., In-
verness. (Take Independence
to Berry Street to Woodlake
Avenue.)
The Nobles Ladies help
support Shriners Children's
Hospital.


Jewelry class
on tap at library
The Citrus Springs Library
will host a jewelry class with
Edna Mikel at 1 p.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 29.
In this class, the student will
have the choice of making a
necklace, bracelet or earrings.
The class is free, but the stu-
dent will need to either bring
their own beads or they can
purchase beads at the class.
Call the library at 352-489-
2313 for more information or
to register for the class.
Classes offered
in African dance
Free classes in African
dance are offered at Central
Ridge Library.
For a schedule of classes
and to donate African instru-
ments (djembes, dun-duns,
foot and ankle bells), new or
used, call Sophia Phillip at
352-249-7283. Leave a mes-
sage if there is no answer.


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COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chances on


prizes to help


Relay effort


Special to the Chronicle
Team LKQ is selling tick-
ets for a Relay For Life
fundraiser Chances will be
to win up to five prizes in
drawings from Dec. 17
through 21.
Tickets are $2 each, three
for $5, eight for $10, 18 for
$20 and 40 for $40. Team
LKQ will draw one winning
ticket each day staring Mon-
day, Dec. 17.
Drawings will be for:
Monday, Dec. 17 an
RFL fire pit;
* Tuesday, Dec. 18 an
extra-large Tampa Bay Buc-
caneer hoodie, one large
Tampa Bay Buccaneer zip-
up hoodie, and four large
Harley-Davidson Tervis
Tumblers with lids and
straws;
* Wednesday, Dec. 19 a
pop-up camoflague pattern
Lucky Bum children's tent
with two children's chairs
and one medium-sized


adult chair;
Thursday, Dec. 20 a
Weber grill with a soft-side
Gator cooler;
Friday, Dec. 21 one
green Regions Bank bike
and three Collector Edition
Barbie dolls.
Ask any Team LKQ mem-
ber for tickets, or call Patti
Wood at LKQ Auto Parts,
800-541-3011, ext. 8509. To
donate and purchase tickets
online, go to main.acs
events. org/site/TR?
px8541580&pgpersonal&fr_
id49947. After an online do-
nation is made, you will re-
ceive an email receipt for
tax records.
Send that to Patti Wood
and request your name to be
put in the drawing pot, with
the amount of tickets
purchased.
Send receipts and re-
quests to: Patti Wood, Team
LKQ, LKQ Auto Parts, 4950
W County Road 486, Crystal
River, FL 34429.


Divorces 11/12/12 to 11/18/12
David Hastings, Crystal River
vs. Constance Hastings,
Crystal River
Misti Taylor, Crystal River vs.
Lemont Taylor, Crystal River
William A. Wells, Homosassa
vs. Bridgette A. Wells, Lecanto
Marriages 11/12/12 to
11/18/12
Christopher Lee Buchanan,
Crystal River/Heather Ryan
Damm, Crystal River
James Richard Cahela, Bev-
erly Hills/Lynsie Marie Kelley,
Beverly Hills
Robert Francis Newkirk, In-
verness/Barbara Lou Joseph,


Hernando
Brian Keith Smith, Lake
Panasoffkee/Tania Carrie
Hurst, Lake Panasoffkee
Charles Terry Vance, Wesley
Chapel/Marjorie Benjamin,
Hernando
Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a mat-
ter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the
Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us/. For proceedings
filed in another county, contact
the clerk in that area.


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Puzzle is on Page A18.

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Newcomers staying busy


Special to the Chronicle
Joining the Citrus Newcomers Club
for its Holiday Luncheon on Dec. 13
at Black Diamond Golf and Country
Club, will be the band ensemble from
Citrus High School, directed by Brian
York.
The meeting time is early for this
luncheon, which will be brunch
served by the Black Diamond staff.
The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m.


Bring an unwrapped toy for donation
to the Citrus County Resource Center
Reservations need to be made by
Dec. 7.
Members, don't forget about the an-
nual "Winter Wonderland" dinner
and dance on Saturday, Dec. 1, in the
Hampton Room at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. The cost is $35 per
person. There is also lunch at
Skyview at Terra Vista to look for-
ward to on Dec. 4, as well as a trip to


the Henry Plant Museum for a Victo-
rian Christmas Stroll on Dec. 10.
There is a trip planned for Feb. 3 to
the Show Palace in Hudson to see the
comedy "9 to 5." Cost is $45 per per-
son. New on the activities agenda is a
trip planned for March 1 to Tampa
Bay Downs. Check the website for
further information.
For more information, call Carolyn
Moss at 352-747-6446, or BJ Schuene-
man at 352-400-4799.


Be sponsor to help foster children's holidays be brighter


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Foster
Parent Association is in
desperate need of sponsors


for foster and foster/adop-
tive children for Christmas.
The association tries to
compensate for this time of
year when feelings of loss


are at their highest.
If you cannot shop for a
child for Christmas, CCFPA
would be happy to shop for
you, and donations are tax


deductible.
Call Lynn at 352-860-0373
until 9 p.m. and she will
match you with a child or
offer more information.


CHR www.chronieonLE
www chronicleonline.com


Get us your letter by

December 21 st and

we will get it to Santa!



Holiday
Cookie

0 t Contest


Don't forget
to Vote for
your favorite
4 i Holiday
Cookie Recipe!


Crystal River Mall
352-795-2585


Monday
10am-9pm


Tuesday
9am-9pm


Wednesday
9am-9pm


Thursday
8am-9pm


Friday
10am-9pm


Saturday
10am-9pm


1801 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River I
Mobil 1 Lube Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-795-2333 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-5pm 8am-3pm Closed
1050 SE Hwy 19, Crystal River
Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-489-5477
9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-5:30pm 9am-4pm Closed
20319 E.Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon

Badcock Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
352-726-6366 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm 10am-4pm
3690 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness

Badcock & More Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunda
352-795-5346 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-6pm 9am-5pm Closed
150 S.Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


Jim Green Jewelers
352-563-0633
1665 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River


Monday
10am-5pm


Tuesday
10am-6pm


Wednesday
10am-5pm


Thursday
10am-5pm


Friday
10am-5pm


Saturday
11 lam-3pm


For the RECORD


Experience the joys of Christmas

Light Displays in Citrus County


Entry Deadline 8pm December 10th

Submit up to 2 photos of your home.

Prizes To Be Announced


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Sunday
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Sunday
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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 A23





A24 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


Holiday performance in its seventh year


Special to the Chronicle
Brittany Barker, on pointe, and other dancers from the School of Dance Arts in Inverness, perform in last year's production of the Christmas classic, "The Nutcracker." The School of
Dance Arts will present its seventh annual production of "The Nutcracker," a ballet in two acts, at 6 p.m. Dec. 1 at Curtis Peterson Auditorium in Lecanto. Students from all areas of
Citrus County, ranging in age from 4 to 18, perform in the ballet. Tickets are $15 and seating is reserved. Call 352-637-4663 for information. Pictured is Jasmine Lopez from last year's
performance.




'Surviving the Holidays': Hospice to offer sessions


Special to the Chronicle
The Wings Grief Support Team
of Hospice of Citrus County will
present five "Surviving the Holi-
days" workshops. They will be
presented at locations in Ho-
mosassa, Beverly Hills, Lecanto,
Inverness and Inglis.
Most people who are in mourn-
ing or are experiencing a tragic
situation in their lives have a very


hard time facing the holidays.
Once pleasant expectations be-
come overshadowed by heart-
break, grief can make the holidays
times quite painful. Join Hospice
of Citrus County for encouraging
seminars to help survive the holi-
days and discover new reasons to
enjoy them again.
On Wednesday, Nov 28, a "Sur-
viving The Holidays" workshop
will be presented from 2 to


3:30 p.m. at the Hospice of Citrus
County Wings Community Educa-
tion Center, 8471 W Periwinkle
Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
On Tuesday, Dec. 4, a "Surviving
The Holidays" workshop will be
presented from 11 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
On Tuesday, Dec. 4, a "Surviving
The Holidays" workshop will be


presented from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at
the Hospice of Citrus County Hos-
pice House, 3350 W Audubon Park
Path, Lecanto.
On Thursday, Dec. 6, a "Surviv-
ing The Holidays" workshop will
be presented from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at
The Hospice of Citrus County
Clinical Office, 326 S. Line Av-
enue, Inverness.
On Thursday, Dec. 13, a "Surviv-
ing The Holidays" workshop will


be presented from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at
the Hospice of the Nature Coast
Clinical Office, 24-B State Road 40
East, Inglis.
The Wings Grief Support Team
offers programs at no cost, open to
the community.
For more information or direc-
tions, call 352-621-1500. Visit Hos-
pice of Citrus County on Facebook
or on the Web at wwwhospiceof
citrus.org.


Celebration of Lights


Wildlife park

plans annual

holiday wonderland
SUSAN STRAWBRIDGE
Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection's Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park, along with the Friends of Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife Park, will
host its annual Christmas Celebration
of Lights, a seven-evening event, from
Wednesday, Dec. 19, through Christ-
mas Eve, Dec. 24, and again on
Wednesday, Dec. 26. The park will
open at 5:30 p.m. on these evenings
and remain open until 9 p.m.
The Celebration of Lights will fea-
ture a synchronized light and sound
display in the Garden of the Springs
by Sebastian Hawes. Joe Dube will
host the nightly entertainment. Holi-
day lights, decorations, music and re-
freshments will create the setting for
the holiday wonderland. The Miss-L-
Toe Caf6 will be set up in the Garden
of the Springs with a selection of hol-
iday refreshments. A variety of enter-
tainment will be provided nightly, as
follows:
Wednesday, Dec. 19: The celebra-
tion kicks off with a toboggan slide
and six tons of snow. Zero Gravity
band will perform in the Garden of


Special to the Chronicle
The annual Christmas Celebration of
Lights will run from Wednesday, Dec.
19, through Christmas Eve, Dec. 24,
and again on Wednesday, Dec. 26, at
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.
the Springs. The evening is sponsored
by Cody's Original Roadhouse.
Thursday, Dec. 20: Come out and
enjoy a Cajun Night with music by
Cajun Dave, sponsored by Neon
Leon's Zydeco Steak House and
Lowes of Inverness.
Friday, Dec. 21: The evening fea-
tures a visit with Santa and Mrs.
Claus, along with performances by
Sophie Robitaile and Taylor Eve. The
evening is sponsored by Raymond
James & Associates.
Saturday, Dec. 22: Hearts to
Hands Deaf Choir performs in the
Garden of the Springs, sponsored by


Walmart of Homosassa Springs
Sunday, Dec. 23: Santa and Mrs.
Claus will visit with children and
Richard Michael Reyes will perform
in the Garden of the Springs. The
evening is sponsored by Citrus Kia.
Monday, Dec. 24 (Christmas Eve):
The Nature Coast Community Church
will present a nondenominational
candlelight service in the Garden of
the Springs starting at 6:30 p.m. Visi-
tors may bring nonperishable food
items to be donated to the We Care
Food Bank. The evening is sponsored
by Crystal Motors and Art by Annie.
Tuesday, Dec. 25 (Christmas Day):
Although no events are planned for
the evening, the park will be open
from 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 26: An After-
Christmas Oldies Party hosted by Joe
Dube with special performances by
Elvis (Billy Lindsey from Tampa)
throughout the evening. The evening is
sponsored by the Citrus Corvette Club.
A donation of $3 for adults and $1
for children ages 6 through 12 is sug-
gested. Children ages 5 and younger
are admitted free. For visitors' con-
venience, transportation will be pro-
vided by tram from the Visitor Center
parking lot on U.S. 19 to the west en-
trance on Fishbowl Drive.
For more information, call the park
office at 352-628-5343, ext. 1002, Mon-
day through Friday
Susan Stra bridge is park services
specialist at the Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State Park


Daystar Life Center


will provide free


haircuts to clients


Special to the Chronicle
Daystar Life Center of Cit-
rus County will give free
haircuts to their present
and previous clients from 9
a.m. to noon Dec. 3 and 4,
and Dec. 10 and 11, at the
Daystar Center.
Denise Kennard, execu-
tive director, said many of
Daystar's clients are unable
to afford a haircut and with
the holidays coming up,
Daystar has a volunteer bar-
ber to give haircuts to
clients for four days in

WATERING FINES
Effective Jan. 1, Citrus
County stopped issuing
warnings for first
offenders of local
watering rules.
The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100.
Second violations cost
$250, third or more
cost $500.
Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


December
Daystar helps the needy
in the county with food,
clothing and financial assis-
tance; other help offered is
assistance with applying for
food stamps, obtaining
needed identification docu-
ments, free bus rides to
medical appointments, re-
ferrals, toiletries to the
homeless (when available),
and free furniture to victims
of fire. Daystar is at 6751
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
Call 352-795-8668.

CLICK & SAVE
Check out local deals
offered at www.chron
icleonline.com.
Each deal will be avail-
able for purchase online
for 48 hours, but a mini-
mum number of cus-
tomers must participate
in order for the deal to
be available.
A new Click & Save deal
will be offered every
Monday, Wednesday and
Friday.


-


COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











SPORTS


No. 4 Ohio State
tried to complete an
undefeated regular
season against
arch-rival Michigan
on Saturday./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Boxing/B2
0 Dr. Ron Joseph/B2
0 Basketball/B2, B4
0 College football/B3
0 Golf/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL/B5
i Entertainment/B6


Red-hot TB meets NFC South leader Atlanta


Falcons brace for

challenge from

improved Bucs

Associated Press
TAMPA The high-flying At-
lanta Falcons and surging Tampa
Bay Buccaneers understand the
success of their seasons will be
determined by where they finish,
so they insist they're not bothered
by anything people outside their
locker rooms say about what
they've accomplished so far
The Falcons (9-1) opened with
eight consecutive victories and


own the NFC's best Bucs b
record, yet coach BUC la
Mike Smith and his Because
players constantly didn't se
are being reminded 85 perce
of past playoff fail- non-prer
ures and the harsh 72 hours
reality that another kickoff, tl
strong regular sea- not be sh
son won't mean
much without a
deep postseason run.
"We don't concern ourselves
with the noise outside of our
building. We try to stay focused
only on the things we have con-
trol of. That's going out and trying
to play the best football that we
can," Smith said.
"We live in one-week cycles in
the National Football League. ...


backed out
Tampa Bay
II at least
nt of its
nium seats
before
he game will
hown on TV.


Our focus is we've
got mission one
through 16. We take
them one at a time,
learn from them and
move on."
Smith just as well
could be speaking
for the Bucs, who
host the NFC South
leaders Sunday with


a chance to tighten the division
standings.
See Page B4
Tampa Bay quarterback Josh
Freeman has thrown 16 touchdown
passes against three interceptions
in the Bucs' last six games. In
those contests, Tampa Bay is 5-1.
Associated Press


Lights out at Doak


Associated Press
Florida running back Mike Gillislee celebrates in the end zone Saturday after a 9-yard touchdown run against Florida State during the first half in
Tallahassee. The No. 6 Gators used a big fourth quarter to down the No. 10 Seminoles 37-26.


UF scores 24points in fourth quarter to stifle Florida State 37-26 in


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida
coach Will Muschamp doesn't
have any doubt where his
team's next stop should be:
Miami for the BCS champi-
onship game on Jan. 7.
And the sixth-ranked Gators
made a strong case for consid-
eration Saturday by crushing
archrival Florida State.
Mike Gillislee ran for two
touchdowns and Florida
scored 24 straight points in a
span of less than nine minutes
in the fourth quarter to keep
its national title hopes alive
with a convincing win over the
10th-ranked Seminoles.
"We have a really tough
football team," Muschamp
said he left the field for
Florida's locker room. "We
should be playing for the na-


I
I
I
I
I
*


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I






OOOD8.


Tallahassee


tional championship."
Florida (11-1, 7-1 South-
eastern Conference) came
into the game fourth in the
BCS standings, and could find
itself in position to earn a spot
in the national championship
game if No. 1 Notre Dame
loses to Southern California.
The Gators' lone loss was in
late October to third-ranked
Georgia, and it will keep them
out of the SEC title game.
"Hopefully we can sneak
in," said Florida quarterback
Jeff Driskel, who completed
See Page B4
Florida State defensive end
Giorgio Newberry tackles
Florida receiver Ryan Parrish
during the first half Saturday
in Tallahassee.
Associated Press


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Irish knock off

USC, will play

for BCS title

Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Theo
Riddick rushed for 146 yards
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goals, and No. 1 Notre Dame
secured a spot in the BCS
championship game with a
22-13 victory over USC
Everett Golson passed for 217
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regular season since 1988, earn-
ing a trip to Miami on Jan. 7 to
play for the team's first national
title in 24 years.
Although they did little with
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up ith a grinding effort in this
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rivalry with USC (7-5).
Notre Dame's hard-nosed
defense appropriately made
the decisive stand in the final
minutes, keeping USC out of
the end zone on four plays from
the Irish 1 with 2:33 to play


Associated Press
Notre Dame quarterback
Everett Golson scrambles as he
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hawks fly high


Atlanta grabs

fifth straight

victory

Associated Press

ATLANTA- Jeff Teague
had 19 points and 11 assists,
Zaza Pachulia added 19
points and 12 rebounds,
and the Atlanta Hawks won
their fifth straight game
with a 104-93 victory over
the Los Angeles Clippers.
Blake Griffin scored 22
points and Chris Paul had
19 for the Clippers.
Los Angeles has lost a
season-high three consecu-
tive games after winning
six in a row.
Lou Williams finished
with 18 points and Josh
Smith added 17 for Atlanta.
Thunder 116,
76ers 109, OT
PHILADELPHIA- Kevin
Durant scored 37 points, Rus-
sell Westbrook had 30 and the
Oklahoma City Thunder beat
the Philadelphia 76ers
116-109 in overtime.
Serge Ibaka added 18 points
for the defending Western Con-
ference champions, who've
won nine of 11 to go to 104.
Thad Young had a season-
high 29 points and career-
high 15 rebounds, and Evan
Turner scored 26 points for
Philadelphia, which has lost
two in a row after winning
three straight.
Heat 110,
Cavaliers 108
MIAMI Ray Allen took a
pass from LeBron James and


Associated Press
Atlanta Hawks forward Al Horford goes up over Los Ange-
les Clippers forward Blake Griffin in the first half Saturday
at Philips Arena in Atlanta.


made a 3-pointer with 18.2
seconds left, and the Miami
Heat rallied from a seven-
point deficit in the final 1:52 to
beat the Cleveland Cavaliers
110-108.
James finished with 30
points for the Heat, who re-
mained perfect at home de-
spite leading for only 2
minutes, 29 seconds. Chris
Bosh scored 23 points,
Dwyane Wade added 18 and
Allen finished with 17 for the
Heat, who lost Shane Battier
in the third quarter to a
sprained right knee.


Cleveland had a good look
at the lead, but Wade blocked
Jeremy Pargo's jumper with 3
seconds left, and Allen added
one free throw to stretch the
lead to two. Cleveland con-
trolled the rebound with 0.6
seconds left, but never got
anything near the rim.
Bobcats 108,
Wizards 106, 20T
WASHINGTON Byron
Mullens scored 27 points,
Ramon Sessions had 20 and
Ben Gordon added 19 as the
Charlotte Bobcats earned their


seventh win of the season and
kept the Washington Wizards
winless with a 108-106 double-
overtime victory.
Last season, the Bobcats
went 7-59 in the lockout-short-
ened season, the lowest win-
ning percentage in NBA
history, but have already
equaled that victory total in
their 12th game.
Washington fell to 0-11 de-
spite the spark supplied by
Nene, who energized the Wiz-
ards during most of his 29 min-
utes, but in the end, the
Bobcats pulled out the win.
Martel Webster had 21
points for Washington and
Nene scored 19.
Sixers C Bynum
out indefinitely
PHILADELPHIA- Andrew
Bynum is out indefinitely and
there's no timetable set for his
first game with the Philadelphia
76ers.
The All-Star center was ac-
quired from the Los Angeles
Lakers in a four-team trade be-
fore the season. He had been
recovering from a bone bruise
on his right knee and his return
has now been pushed back
four times since the beginning
of training camp.
The Sixers were hoping
Bynum would be cleared to re-
turn to basketball activities by
Dec. 10 before he injured his
left knee while bowling two
weeks ago.
Sixers general manager
Tony DiLeo says Bynum has
"bilateral bone bruises and a
weakened cartilage state" in
his knees. Still, DiLeo de-
fended the trade that sent All-
Star forward Andre Iguodala to
Denver in the multi-team deal.


FSU women upset No. 17 Vanderbilt


Associated Press

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico Leonor
Rodriguez led five players in double
figures with 16 points as the Florida
State women's basketball team de-
feated No. 17 Vanderbilt 73-59 Satur-
day at the San Juan Shootout.
The Seminoles are 5-0 for the third
time in four years. The 14-point mar-
gin of victory was Florida State's
smallest this year, having beaten four
straight opponents by at least 30
points for the first time in program
history to begin the year.
The loss was the third straight for
the Commodores (3-3), all coming at
the hands of unranked foes.
Rodriguez hit four free throws in
the final 50 seconds to ice the game.
Natasha Howard (15 points), Alexa
Deluzio (14), Chasity Clayton (13) and
Chelsea Davis (10) also scored in dou-
ble figures for the Seminoles.
Florida State's Cheetah Delgado, a
second generation Puerto Rican,
dished out nine assists and made four
steals with family and friends in at-
tendance.
No. 6 Penn State 85,
Cal State Northridge
LOS ANGELES Nikki Greene scored
21 points and matched a career best with


20 rebounds, and No. 6 Penn State over-
came a 17-point first-half deficit to win the
Cal State Northridge tournament with an
85-73 victory over the Matadors.
Maggie Lucas scored 14 of her 23
points in the first half for the Lady Lions (5-
0). Alex Bentley added 19 points.
Penn State held Northridge (3-2) score-
less for a 6:30 span over both halves to turn
a 41-26 deficit into a 43-41 lead with 16:32
to play. The Matadors had gone on a 25-10
run to take a 33-16 lead in the first half.
No. 11 California 72,
Georgetown 56
BERKELEY, Calif. Layshia Clarendon
scored 20 points and Gennifer Brandon
added 13 points and 13 rebounds to lead
No. 11 California to a 72-56 victory against
Georgetown for the Cal Classic title.
Talia Caldwell had 12 points and nine
rebounds for the Golden Bears (5-0), who
shot 50 percent (27 of 54) from the floor
en route to winning their own tournament
for the eighth time in the last 10 years.
Sugar Rodgers scored 20 points and
Andrea White 15 for the Hoyas (4-2).
No. 13 Oklahoma 73,
Arkansas 70
HONOLULU Nicole Griffin scored a
career-high 19 points and Whitney Hand


added 14 points and nine rebounds for
Oklahoma, which overcame a 30-point
performance by Keira Peak.
Morgan Hook had 14 points and eight
rebounds for the Sooners (3-1), who led
26-19 at halftime. Griffin was 8 of 11 from
the field.
No. 25 UNC 85, La Salle 55
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Waltiea Rolle
had 15 points and 12 rebounds and North
Carolina scored the first 16 points of the
second half.
Xylina McDaniel opened the second half
with a jumper for the Tar Heels (5-0), who
trailed 32-31 at halftime, then added a 3-
pointer after a steal by Brittany Rountree.
Krista Gross added a jumper and Roun-
tree sank a 3-pointer for a 40-32 lead.
No. 13 Oklahoma 100,
Oregon 61
HONOLULU -Aaryn Ellenberg scored
27 points and No. 13 Oklahoma raced to a
100-61 win over Oregon in the Rainbow
Wahine Showdown.
Nicole Kornet had 15 points and Mor-
gan Hook scored 12 for the Sooners (4-1).
Maddie Manning added 11 points and
Portia Durrett had 10 points for Oklahoma,
which opened up a 55-35 lead. Ellenberg
made 7 of 12 shots from 3-point range
and was 10 of 18 overall.


Young athletes


turning to steroids


I recently came across an
American Medical Asso-
ciation email update
about childhood and
teenage athletes using ana-
bolic steroids to obtain the
magnificent body
our current era of
football players,
basketball play-
ers and models
have when they
strip off their
shirts and
demonstrate re-
markable six-
pack abs, biceps Dr. Ron
and chests. Dr Ro
Many times, it DOCT
is not primarily ORD
the result of hard
work alone. The
use and advocacy of steroids
has become rampant to help
build muscle mass not only
for body appearance, but
also as a performance-en-
hancing mechanism.
As in much in our current
society, we have reset our
standards and acceptance
to the artificial conveyances
provided by drug use in
sports.
A survey referenced in a
St. Paul, Minn. paper about
muscle-enhancing behav-
iors in 2,700 boys and girls at
20 middle schools and high
schools were the result of
images of men in the media
becoming more and more
muscular. At the same time,
the exposure to extremely
muscular athletes and mod-
els contributed to an adoles-
cent boy's dissatisfaction of
their bodies.
While not all athletes are
doing steroids and other
similar muscle and body-
building hormones, the in-
creasing number that are,
have a distinct competitive
advantage. Those kids doing
it purely to have that great
body to impress girl friends,
other gang members, im-
prove their body image or
for what-ever reason are at
significant risk of develop-
ing the complications of
steroids or hormone and
protein muscle enhance-
ment supplements that are
currently on the market.
I have written about this
previously, but what amazes
me most is this major health
hazard and athletic cheating
seems to be accepted or com-
pletely overlooked by educa-
tors, coaches and parents.
Teachers and coaches are
dismissed or placed on pro-
bation for poor choices such
as language, dress and a ton
of other deficiencies.
But I have never read
about a coach, teacher or
school administrator repri-
manded or dismissed for ac-
knowledging let alone
disallowing, prohibiting or
banning the use of steroids
by students or athletes.
What about those doctors
doing athletic and school
physical exams? Does the
prominent squared-off jaw,
protruding forehead with
lots of acne or atrophied tes-
ticles not ring any bells?
The use of banned sub-
stances for enhancing mus-


a
T,
34


Camacho taken off life support, dies in Puerto Rico


Associated Press

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -
Hector "Macho" Camacho was a
brash fighter with a mean jab and
an aggressive style, launching
himself furiously against some of
the biggest names in boxing. And
his bad-boy persona was not en-
tirely an act, with a history of legal
scrapes that began in his teens
and continued throughout his life.
The man who once starred at
the pinnacle of boxing, winning
several world titles, died Satur-
day after being ambushed in a
parking lot back in the Puerto
Rican town of Bayamon where
he was born. Packets of cocaine
were found were found in the car
in which he was shot.
Camacho, 50, left behind a rep-
utation for flamboyance lead-
ing fans in cheers of "It's Macho
time!" before fights and for
fearsome skills as one of the top
fighters of his generation.
"He excited boxing fans
around the world with his inim-
itable style," promoter Don King
told The Associated Press.
Camacho fought professionally
for three decades, from his hum-
ble debut against David Brown at
New York's Felt Forum in 1980 to
an equally forgettable swansong
against Saul Duran in Kissim-
mee, Florida, in 2010.
In between, he fought some of
the biggest stars spanning two


eras, including Sugar Ray
Leonard, Felix Trinidad, Oscar
De La Hoya and Roberto Duran.
"Hector was a fighter who
brought a lot of excitement to box-
ing," said Ed Brophy, executive
director of International the Box-
ing Hall of Fame. "He was a good
champion. Roberto Duran is kind
of in a class of his own, but Hector
surely was an exciting fighter that
gave his all to the sport."
Camacho's family moved to
New York when he was young and
he grew up in Spanish Harlem,
which at the time was rife with
crime. Camacho landed in jail as
a teenager before turning to box-
ing, which for many kids in his
neighborhood provided an outlet
for their aggression.
"This is something I've done all
my life, you know?" Camacho
told The Associated Press after a
workout in 2010. '"A couple years
back, when I was doing it, I was
still enjoying it. The competition,
to see myself perform. I know I'm
at the age that some people can't
do this no more."
Former featherweight cham-
pion Juan Laporte, a friend since
childhood, described Camacho
as "like a little brother who was
always getting into trouble," but
otherwise combined a friendly
nature with a powerful jab.
"He's a good human being, a
good hearted person," Laporte
said as he waited with other


friends and members of the
boxer's family outside the hospi-
tal in San Juan after the shooting.
"A lot of people think of him as a
cocky person but that was his
motto ... Inside he was just a kid
looking for something."
Laporte lamented that Cama-
cho never found a mentor to
guide him outside the boxing ring.
"The people around him didn't
have the guts or strength to lead
him in the right direction," Laporte
said. "There was no one strong
enough to put a hand on his shoul-
der and tell him how to do it"
George Lozada, a longtime
friend from New York who flew
to Puerto Rico on Saturday, re-
called that just hours after he
was released from prison after
serving a murder sentence, he
received a call from Camacho,
who was waiting outside his
apartment in a black Porsche.
"He said, 'Come down, I'm tak-
ing you shopping,"' Lozada said,
wiping away tears.
"Because of him, man, I got
what I got today," he said, point-
ing to pictures on his smartphone
of his 6-year-old daughter. "Be-
cause of Hector, I stopped the
drug scene ... He's helped so
many people."
Hector "Macho" Camacho died
Saturday after being taken off life
support. He was 50.
Associated Press


B2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


SPORTS


cle development is starting
earlier in kids with open
growth zones in their bones
and an undeveloped central
nervous system.
The earlier steroid-like
medication is
used, the more
potential ill af-
fects it can have.
Steroids lead to
increased irri-
tability and ag-
gression just
what an adoles-
cent needs. No
Jose parent wants
Joseph their child to
OR'S have increased
ERS risks of liver can-
cer, high blood
pressure, stunted
growth, baldness or infertil-
ity among a few associated
complications.
The journal Pediatrics,
recently noted "more than
40 percent of boys in middle
school and high school said
they regularly exercised
with the goal of increasing
muscle mass."
Not to be better athletes,
only for body image. In an-
other study, over 10 percent
of middle school and high
school boys admitted to ex-
perimenting with steroids.
It is not just boys, it is nearly
as prevalent among girls.
Joel Brenner, medical di-
rector of the Sports Medi-
cine Program at Children's
Hospital in Norfolk, Va., and
chair of the American Acad-
emy of Pediatrics Council
on Sports Medicine and Fit-
ness, notes "the use of
steroids and other perform-
ance-enhancing substances
is clearly dangerous and
needs to be avoided...inap-
propriate diet or exercise
can also be hazardous"
The obsession with kids
lifting significant weight
and in a compulsive manner
should be saved until after
puberty when adolescent
bodies are better equipped
for rapid muscle growth.
Excessive weightlifting in
early adolescence can lead
to significant joint, bone,
muscle and behavioral ab-
normalities. The muscle
bulk developed with steroid
and similar hormones, if not
maintained, will deteriorate
into fat.
With obesity being an
ever-growing epidemic, ado-
lescents with appropriate
aerobic exercise and train-
ing can build strength.
Steroids, growth hormone
and other hormone-rich
protein supplements are
never a good idea at any age.
Parents, teachers and
physicians need to be aware
these behaviors of excessive
weightlifting and steroid
use due to peer pressure
stemming from unsatisfac-
tory body images and the
need to become more com-
petitive athletically are a
growing health hazard.
Ron Joseph, M.D. is a
hand and shoulder orthope-
dic surgeon at SeaSpine Or-
thopedic Institute may be
reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Buckeyes finish unblemished


Associated Press


Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller flips a pass over Michigan linebacker Kenny Demens on Saturday in Columbus, Ohio.


No. 4 Ohio State

holds off Michigan

Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio Carlos
Hyde ran for 146 yards and Ohio
State's defense shut out Michigan
in the second half to complete a 12-
0 season with a 26-21 win.
It was a sweet win for the Buck-
eyes, just 6-7 last season with a loss
to their archrivals in a transitional
year in which they were facing
heavy NCAA penalties. After
Urban Meyer took the job as head
coach a year ago, they were socked
with a bowl ban after this season -
and still ran the table.
Ohio State (12-0, 8-0 Big Ten) is
ineligible for a BCS national title
but still has an outside shot at fin-
ishing No. 1 in the final Associated
Press Top 25 if other contenders
lose. Michigan (8-4, 6-2) will now
await a minor bowl bid.
No. 2 Alabama 49,
Auburn 0
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -AJ McCarron
passed for four touchdowns and Eddie
Lacy rushed for 131 yards and two
scores to lead No. 2 Alabama to a 49-0
victory over Auburn in the most lop-
sided Iron Bowl in 64 years.
The Crimson Tide (10-1, 7-1 South-
eastern Conference) clinched the West-
ern Division title outright and a spot in
the conference title game against No. 3
Georgia with the winner likely getting a
national championship shot.
None of that will come as easily as
this one. Auburn (3-9, 0-8) completed
the worst season for any team within
two years of winning an Associated
Press national title in what might have
been the last game for embattled coach
Gene Chizik.
No. 3 Georgia 42,
Georgia Tech 10
ATHENS, Ga. -Aaron Murray threw
two touchdown passes, Todd Gurley
and Keith Marshall each ran for a pair
of TDs, and Georgia stayed right in the
thick of the national championship race.
The Bulldogs (11-1) extended the
domination of the Yellow Jackets, beat-
ing their state rival for the 11 th time in


12 meetings. This one was a laugher
from the start as the home team scored
just over a minute into the game, built a
28-3 halftime lead and was up 42-3 be-
fore Georgia Tech (6-6) scored its lone
TD.
No. 5 Oregon 48,
No. 16 Oregon State 24
CORVALLIS, Ore. Kenjon Barner
ran for 198 yards and two touchdowns
despite leaving the game for a time with
an injury and the Ducks kept alive their
hopes for a spot in the Pac-12 title
game and even an outside chance at
the national championship.
De'Anthony Thomas, who helped
picked up the slack while Barner was
on the sidelines, ran for 122 yards and
three scores for the Ducks (11-1, 8-1).
Sean Mannion threw for 311 yards
and a touchdown but was intercepted
four times for the Beavers (8-3).
No. 9 Texas A&M 59,
Missouri 29
COLLEGE STATION, Texas-
Johnny Manziel threw for 372 yards
and three touchdowns and ran for two
more scores as No. 9 Texas A&M beat
Missouri 59-29.
The Aggies (10-2, 6-2 SEC) scored
touchdowns on their first six drives to
build a 42-7 halftime lead and coast to
their first 10-win season since 1998.
About the only drama in this one
came when Manziel, the Heisman Tro-
phy hopeful, was shaken up on a tackle
at the end of a run in the first quarter.
But Johnny Football missed just four
plays before returning with a brace on
his left knee. And it didn't seem to slow
him down one bit.
Missouri (5-7, 2-6) won't make a
bowl game in its first SEC season.
No. 11 Stanford 35,
No. 15 UCLA 17
PASADENA, Calif. Stepfan Taylor
rushed for 142 yards and two touch-
downs, Kevin Hogan passed for 160
yards and another score, and No. 11
Stanford beat No. 15 UCLA 35-17 Sat-
urday to win the Pacific-12 Conference
North title and a rematch with the Bruins
in the conference championship game.
The Cardinal (10-2, 8-1 Pac-12)
found out about 10 minutes before the
opening kickoff that No. 5 Oregon (11-
1, 8-1) had beaten No. 16 Oregon State
48-24, meaning they had to win to qual-


ify for another shot at UCLA-- a game
Stanford will host next Friday.
The Cardinal, who have three
straight 10-win seasons for the first
time, handed Oregon a 17-14 overtime
setback last weekend to put them-
selves in position to win the Pac-12
North title with a victory over the Pac-12
South champion Bruins (9-3, 6-3).
No. 13 South Carolina 27,
No. 12 Clemson 17
CLEMSON, S.C. Backup quarter-
back Dylan Thompson threw for three
touchdowns, Jadeveon Clowney had 4
1-2 sacks and No. 13 South Carolina
won its fourth straight over 12th-ranked
Clemson 27-17 as Gamecocks coach
Steve Spurrier became the school's vic-
tories leader.
Thompson got the call for the Game-
cocks (10-2) because starter Connor
Shaw sprained his left foot last week
against Wofford. And the Gamecocks
sophomore made the most of it with TD
passes of 13 and 6 yards to Bruce
Ellington and 34 yards to Ace Sanders.
The Tigers (10-2) were grounded by
Clowney, the Gamecocks star defen-
sive end who set his school's single
season-record with 13 sacks.
Spurrier won his 65th game in eight
seasons, surpassing Rex Enright for
most victories by a South Carolina
coach.
No. 14 Oklahoma 51,
No. 22 Oklahoma St. 48
NORMAN, Okla. Landry Jones
threw for 500 yards and three touch-
downs, and Brennan Clay scored on an
18-yard run in overtime to lift Oklahoma.
The Sooners (9-2, 7-1 Big 12) never
led during regulation, overcoming dou-
ble-digit deficits in both halves. Backup
quarterback Blake Bell tied it with 4
seconds left on a 4-yard keeper on
fourth-and-1.
Joseph Randle ran for 113 yards and
matched his career-high with four
touchdowns for Oklahoma State (7-4,
5-3), which settled for Quinn Sharp's
26-yard field goal in overtime.
On the Sooners' second play, Clay
got through traffic at the line of scrim-
mage and then broke through at-
tempted tackles by Daytawion Lowe
and Shamiel Gary to score the game
winner and set off a celebration on
Owen Field.


Pittsburgh 27,
No. 21 Rutgers 6
PITTSBURGH Tino Sunseri
passed for 227 yards and two touch-
downs in his final home game as Pitts-
burgh overwhelmed No. 21 Rutgers
27-6 on Saturday.
Ray Graham ran for 113 yards and a
score for the Panthers (5-6, 2-4 Big
East), who kept their hopes for bowl eli-
gibility alive while drumming the Scarlet
Knights.
Rutgers (9-2, 5-1) will still play No. 19
Louisville on Thursday with a Bowl
Championship Series berth on the line,
though the Scarlet Knights head home
with little momentum after the Panthers
dominated in their last game Heinz Field
as a member of the Big East, racing to a
21-0 halftime lead and coasting.
Rutgers quarterback Gary Nova
passed for 157 yards with a touchdown
and an interception.
Connecticut 23,
No. 19 Louisville 20, 3 OT
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Chad Christen's
30-yard field goal in the third overtime
gave Connecticut a 23-20 upset of No.
19 Louisville on Saturday.
Blidi Wreh-Wilson set up the Huskies'
winning score by intercepting Teddy
Bridgewater's pass intended for De-
Vante Parker in the end zone. The
Huskies ran three plays for 12 yards
before Christen's second OT kick gave
Connecticut (5-6, 2-4 Big East Confer-
ence) its second straight win.
Louisville (9-2, 4-2) dropped its sec-
ond straight but still has a chance for a
BCS bowl bid by beating first-place Rut-
gers (9-2, 5-1) on Thursday.
Bridgewater completed 30 of 53
passes for 331 and two touchdowns.
Ole Miss 41,
No. 25 Mississippi St. 24
OXFORD, Miss. Bo Wallace threw
for 294 yards and five touchdowns,
Donte Moncrief caught three TD
passes and Mississippi pulled away in
the second half to beat No. 25 Missis-
sippi State 41-24.
Ole Miss (6-6, 3-5 Southeastern
Conference) won the Egg Bowl for the
first time since 2008, breaking Missis-
sippi State's three-game winning streak
in the series. The Rebels also earned
bowl eligibility for the first time since
2009.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Johnson, Miami football hold off Duke 52-45


Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Fresh-
man Duke Johnson rushed
for season highs of 176 yards
and three touchdowns,
Stephen Morris had three
passing scores and Miami
held on to beat Duke 52-45
on Saturday and claim a
share of the ACC's Coastal
Division title.
In a wild affair in which
the teams combined for
1,229 total yards, Morris fin-
ished 15 of 25 for 369 yards
for the Hurricanes (7-5, 5-3)
- who never trailed but
could never really breathe
easy, either.
Sean Renfree threw for a
career-high 432 yards and a
career-high-tying four
touchdowns in his final
home game for Duke (6-6, 3-
5), which trailed by 21 late.
Brandon Connette's second


touchdown run of the day
pulled the Blue Devils
within seven points with
2:32 left.
After Ross Martin's on-
side kick went out of
bounds, Miami ran out the
clock to seal its first share of
a division title since joining
the ACC in 2004.
Morris' touchdown passes
covered 11 yards to Clive
Walford, 72 yards to Mike
James and 65 yards to Herb
Waters. James also had a 1-
yard scoring plunge late in
the first half.
Johnson scored on runs of
18, 6 and 65 yards. He fin-
ished his freshman year
with 947 yards rushing, eas-
ily surpassing Clinton Portis'
13-year-old school freshman
rushing record of 838 yards.
Johnson nearly threw a
touchdown pass, too, but re-
play officials determined


that his late 1-yard jump
pass to Walford on fourth-
and-goal bounced off the
end zone turf before he
could pull it in.
On Duke's next snap,
Renfree hit Jamison Crow-
der for a 99-yard touchdown
pass the longest play in
school history with 11:45
left. That pulled Duke
within 45-31. Renfree, who
was 36 of 59, added scoring
passes of 23 yards to Crow-
der and 10 and 6 yards to
Conner Vernon.
Connette had an early 4-
yard touchdown run. Crow-
der finished with eight
catches for 203 yards while
Vernon added 11 receptions
for 109 yards for the Blue
Devils, who will enter their
first bowl game since 1994
on a four-game losing streak
The Hurricanes were
playing their first game


since announcing earlier in
the week that they would
stay home from the postsea-
son for the second straight
year because of an NCAA
investigation that is ex-
pected to eventually lead to
stiff sanctions against them.
With Georgia Tech -
which Miami beat two
months ago headed to
Charlotte for next week-
end's title game, some fans
in the Hurricanes' corner of
Wallace Wade Stadium
proudly held posters bear-
ing anti-NCAA messages.
Miami scored on four of
its first six first-half posses-
sions and led 31-10 early in
the second half. James' scor-
ing dive with 8 seconds left
in the half made it 28-10 at
the break, and Jake Wieclaw
made it a 21-point game on
Miami's opening drive of
the half.


Associated Press
Duke safety Walt Canty trails as Miami tight end Clive Wal-
ford catches the ball for a first down in the second quarter
Saturday in Durham, N.C. Miami won the game 52-45.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 B3



UCF


blows


out UAB

Associated Press

ORLANDO Quincy Mc-
Duffie ran for three touch-
downs and Blake Bortles
threw for two scores to lead
Central Florida to a 49-24
win over Alabama-Birming-
ham on Saturday.
With the win, UCF (9-3, 7-
1) clinched Conference
USA's East Division title
and will face Tulsa in the
conference championship
game next Saturday Mc-
Duffie had scoring runs of 9,
8 and 43 yards in his final
home game for Central
Florida.
Bortles, who completed
17 of 23 for 225 yards, hit J.J.
Worton with scoring passes
of 18 and 4 yards. Lyle
Dankenbring returned an
interception 78 yards for a
score as the Knights took
advantage of numerous
Blazer mistakes to jump out
to a 35-10 halftime lead.
"We did what we had to
do, took advantage of some
opportunities and it was a
good day offensively," UCF
coach George O'Leary said..
Jonathan Perry threw for
307 yards, two touchdown
passes and a rushing score
for UAB (3-9, 2-6).
UAB outgained UCF 322-
237 in the first half, but
three drives inside the
Knights' 20-yard line ended
with no points. The Blazers
lost a fumble at the UCF 1-
yard line; failed to convert a
fourth-and-1 at the UCF 9;
and Austin Brown threw an
interception with UAB at
the Knights' 14.
"Anytime you get into the
red zone and don't come
away with points, it's going
to be a factor," UAB coach
Garrick McGee said. "But I
don't know if we played well
enough to beat a team that
was as sharp and razor fo-
cused as UCF was. We're
learning that you have to be
on your 'A' game to compete
when a team is flying
around and making plays
like UCF did."
McDuffie, who plays wide
receiver, scored all three of
his touchdowns on end-
around plays. The senior
ran six times for 79 yards.
Tailback Latavius Murray
had 94 yards on 15 carries
and a touchdown as the
Knights rolled up 229 yards
rushing.
"I'm happy for Quincy, he
had a great day," O'Leary
said. "That last (scoring)
play, I don't think they saw
him until he was 40 yards
down the field. All the plays
were well blocked by our of-
fensive line and Quincy's
execution was outstanding."
Perry took over at quar-
terback after Brown's inter-
ception and promptly hit
Patrick Hearn with a 76-
yard touchdown pass just
before halftime. The Blaz-
ers backup added a 2-yard
scoring run in the third pe-
riod and a 15-yard scoring
pass to Darrin Reaves in the
fourth that cut UAB's deficit
to 42-24 with 10:22 left in the
game.
The Blazers recovered
the ensuing onside kick, but
Kennard Blackman
dropped a pass from Perry
on fourth-and-two at the
UCF 23-yard line and the
rally died.






B4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012



Glantz-Culver Line
Today
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Cincinnati 7V2 812 (50) Oakland
Pittsburgh Pk 1 (3412) at Cleveland
at Indianapolis 3 3 (51) Buffalo
Denver 10 10/2 (44) at Kansas City
Tennessee 3 3Y2 (44Y2) at Jax.
at Chicago OFF OFF (OFF) Minnesota
Atlanta Pk 1 (50) at Tampa Bay
Seattle 3 3 (3712) at Miami
Baltimore 2Y2 1 (47) at San Diego
San Francisco 2 1 (49) at N. Orleans
at Arizona 3 1 12 (37) St. Louis
at N.Y. Giants 2Y2 2Y2 (50Y2) Green Bay
Monday
Carolina 1 212 (40/2) at Philly
Off Key
Chicago QB questionable





No. 6 Florida 37,
No. 10 Florida St. 26
Florida 3 10 0 24- 37
FloridaSt. 0 317 6- 26
First Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 39, 9:13.
Second Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 45, 6:53.
Fla-Gillislee 9 run (Sturgis kick), 5:26.
FSU-FG Hopkins 50, :00.
Third Quarter
FSU-O'Leary 6 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 10:27.
FSU-Manuel 1 run (Hopkins kick), 8:30.
FSU-FG Hopkins 53, 4:24.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 32, 13:27.
Fla-Gillislee 37 run (Sturgis kick), 11:01.
Fla-Dunbar 14 pass from Driskel (Sturgis
kick), 7:00.
Fla-Jones 32 run (Sturgis kick), 2:33.
FSU-Manuel 22 run, :00.
A-83,429.
Fla FSU
First downs 21 20
Rushes-yards 47-244 25-112
Passing 150 188
Comp-Att-Int 16-25-0 19-36-3
Return Yards 64 66
Punts-Avg. 4-43.3 3-41.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 3-2
Penalties-Yards 12-101 3-20
Time of Possession 36:20 23:40
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Gillislee 24-140, Jones 8-
81, T.Burton 1-24, Hines 2-11, Purifoy 1-8,
Driskel 11-(minus 20). Florida St., Manuel 12-
54, Freeman 8-37, Wilder 3-13, Pryor 2-8.
PASSING-Florida, Driskel 15-23-0-147, TBur-
ton 1-2-0-3. Florida St., Manuel 18-33-3-182,
Trickett 1-2-0-6, Team 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING-Florida, Reed 4-54, Dunbar 4-
25, Hammond 3-26, Gillislee 2-22, Hines 2-20,
T.Burton 1-3. Florida St., Greene 5-65, Shaw 5-
58, Wilder 4-31, R.Smith 2-7, Freeman 1-16,
O'Leary 1-6, Dent 1-5.
Miami 52, Duke 45
Miami 14 1417 7-- 52
Duke 3 714 21 45
First Quarter
Mia-Walford 11 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 6:59.
Mia-Du.Johnson 18 run (Wieclaw kick), 5:19.
Duke-FG Martin 43, 1:17.
Second Quarter
Duke-Connette 4 run (Martin kick), 8:57.
Mia-Du.Johnson 6 run (Wieclaw kick), 5:41.
Mia-James 1 run (Wieclaw kick), :08.
Third Quarter
Mia-FG Wieclaw 23, 11:10.
Duke-Vernon 10 pass from Renfree (Martin
kick), 7:18.
Duke-Crowder 23 pass from Renfree (Martin
kick), 5:17.
Mia-Du.Johnson 65 run (Wieclaw kick), 4:08.
Mia-James 72 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 2:34.
Fourth Quarter
Duke-Crowder 99 pass from Renfree (Martin
kick), 11:45.
Duke-Vernon 6 pass from Renfree (Martin
kick), 7:56.
Mia-Waters 65 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 7:37.
Duke-Connette 1 run (Martin kick), 2:32.
A-26,895.
Mia Duke
First downs 22 30
Rushes-yards 40-248 32-151
Passing 398 432
Comp-Att-Int 16-27-0 36-62-0
Return Yards 24 11
Punts-Avg. 4-41.0 4-44.3
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 11-84 5-35
Time of Possession 28:14 31:46
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Miami, Du.Johnson 16-176, James
17-67, D.Crawford 3-13, Waters 1-(minus 1),
Morris 3-(minus 7). Duke, Duncan 6-64, Snead
13-52, Thompson 6-29, Connette 4-10, Renfree
3-(minus 4).
PASSING-Miami, Morris 15-25-0-369,
D.Crawford 1-1-0-29, Du.Johnson 0-1-0-0.
Duke, Renfree 36-59-0-432, Connette 0-3-0-0.
RECEIVING-Miami, Walford 4-99, Dorsett 4-
83, James 3-97, Waters 1-65, Dye 1-29,
Du.Johnson 1-12, Hums 1-7, Thompkins 1-6.
Duke, Vernon 11-109, Crowder 8-203, Blakeney
4-35, Scott 4-22, Thompson 3-12 Gattis 2-34,
Duncan 2-8, Snead 1-6 Reeves 1-3.
UCF 49, UAB 24
UAB 0 10 7 7- 24
UCF 14 21 7 7- 49
First Quarter
UCF-Worton 18 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 12:40.
UCF-Murray 3 run (Moffitt kick), 6:37.
Second Quarter
UAB-FG Long 25, 6:40.
UCF-McDuffie 9 run (Moffitt kick), 4:13.
UCF-Dankenbring 78 interception return (Mof-
fitt kick), 2:34.
UAB-Hearn 76 pass from Perry (Long kick),
1:28.
UCF-Worton 4 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
:26.
Third Quarter
UCF-McDuffie 8 run (Moffitt kick), 8:02.
UAB-Perry 2 run (Long kick), 4:35.
Fourth Quarter


UAB-Reaves 15 pass from Perry (Long kick),
10:22.
UCF-McDuffie 43 run (Moffitt kick), 4:00.
A-28,602.
UAB UCF
First downs 26 23
Rushes-yards 27-89 39-229
Passing 510 244
Comp-Att-Int 37-56-1 18-24-0
Return Yards 0 112
Punts-Avg. 3-39.3 2-38.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 3-31 3-15
Time of Possession 29:57 30:03
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UAB, Reaves 18-71, Coles 3-27,
Perry 5-(minus 2), A.Brown 1-(minus 7). UCF,
Murray 15-94, McDuffie 6-79, B.Harvey 6-27,
Bortles 6-21, S.Johnson 4-5, Calabrese 1-3,
Godfrey 1-0.
PASSING-UAB, Perry 21-28-0-307, A.Brown
16-28-1-203. UCF, Bortles 17-23-0-225, Cal-
abrese 1-1-0-19.
RECEIVING-UAB, Hearn 8-201, Williams 8-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
... iCASH 3 (early)
... ..1 "0-7-6
CASH 3 (late)
t 6-1-1

PLAY 4 (early)
9-0-2-2
PLAY 4 (late)
4-7-2-9

FANTASY 5
Lotty 6-17-26-31-34

POWERBALL LOTTERY
22-32-37-44-50 26-28-36-41-50-51
POWER BALL XTRA
34 4


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
NBA
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Old Spice Classic, Final: Teams TBA
9 p.m. (ESPN2) DirecTV Classic, Final: Teams TBA
10 p.m. (FSNFL) San Diego State at USC
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Florida State (Taped)
NFL
4 p.m. (CBS) Baltimore Ravens at San Diego Chargers.
4 p.m. (FOX) San Francisco 49ers at New Orleans Saints
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Green Bay Packers at New York Giants
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Grey Cup Calgary Stampeders
vs. Toronto Argonauts

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


55, Reaves 6-52, Backman 5-78, J.Davis 4-66,
N.Adams 3-32, Herring 1-13, Accursio 1-8,
Coles 1-5. UCF, Godfrey 4-46, Perriman 3-55,
Floyd 3-45, Worton 3-36, Hall 1-19, McDuffie 1 -
17, Murray 1-11, S.Johnson 1-9, Reese 1-6.
Friday's box score

Cincy 27, USF 10
South Florida 0 0 3 7 10
Cincinnati 7 6 7 7 27
First Quarter
Cin-Kay 18 run (Miliano kick), 6:50.
Second Quarter
Cin-Kelce 3 pass from Kay (kick failed), 2:58.
Third Quarter
USF-FG Bonani 25, 8:01.
Cin-Winn 3 run (Miliano kick), 3:06.
Fourth Quarter
Cin-Winn 4 run (Miliano kick), 12:12.
USF-Murray 5 run (Bonani kick), 7:19.


A-21,171.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


USF
22
38-130
176
21-39-0
1
7-43.0
7-2
1-5
31:14


Cin
18
40-194
178
17-27-0
0
7-42.9
0-0
4-50
28:46


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Florida, Murray 19-68, Shaw
10-60, Floyd 8-7, Mitchell 1-(minus 5). Cincin-
nati, Winn 21-119, Kay 7-48, Abernathy 6-18,
Poteat 3-5, Fearing 3-4.
PASSING-South Florida, Floyd 21-39-0-176.
Cincinnati, Kay 17-27-0-178.
RECEIVING-South Florida, A.Davis 5-40,
Price 5-29, Marc 4-40, Welch 4-35, Murray 1-
18, D.Montgomery 1 -9, Hawkins 1 5. Cincinnati,
Kelce 7-58, Thompkins 3-57, Julian 3-22, Winn
2-7, McClung 1-26, Chisum 1-8.
College football
scores
EAST
Hobart 35, Wittenberg 10
Indiana (Pa.) 17, New Haven 14
Penn St. 24, Wisconsin 21, OT
Pittsburgh 27, Rutgers 6
Stony Brook 20, Villanova 10
Wagner 31, Colgate 20
Wesley 56, Cortland St. 6
Widener 28, Salisbury 7
SOUTH
Alabama 49, Auburn 0
Carson-Newman 38, Lenoir-Rhyne 35
Coastal Carolina 24, Bethune-Cookman 14
Florida 37, Florida St. 26
Georgia 42, Georgia Tech 10
Louisiana-Lafayette 52, South Alabama 30
Louisiana-Monroe 23, FlU 17, OT
Memphis 42, Southern Miss. 24
Miami 52, Duke 45
Middle Tennessee 24, Troy 21
Mississippi 41, Mississippi St. 24
NC State 27, Boston College 10
North Carolina 45, Maryland 38
South Carolina 27, Clemson 17
Southern U. 38, Grambling St. 33
Tennessee 37, Kentucky 17
UCF 49, UAB 24
UConn 23, Louisville 20, 30T
Valdosta St. 49, West Alabama 21
Vanderbilt 55, Wake Forest 21
Virginia Tech 17, Virginia 14
W. Kentucky 25, North Texas 24
Winston-Salem 37, Shippensburg 14
MIDWEST
Marian (Ind.) 45, St. Francis (Ind.) 34
Michigan St. 26, Minnesota 10
Minn. St.-Mankato 38, NW Missouri St. 35
Missouri Valley 10, Bethel (Tenn.) 7
Missouri Western 45, Henderson St. 21
Morningside 47, S. Oregon 44, OT
Mount Union 55, Johns Hopkins 13
Northwestern 50, Illinois 14
Ohio St. 26, Michigan 21
Purdue 56, Indiana 35
S. Dakota St. 58, E. Illinois 10
St. Thomas (Minn.) 24, Elmhurst 17
St. Xavier 35, Cumberlands 21
W.Texas A&M 33, Ashland 28
Wis.-Oshkosh 37, Bethel (Minn.) 14
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 52, Texas Tech 45, OT
Houston 40, Tulane 17
Mary Hardin-Baylor 63, Franklin 17
Oklahoma 51, Oklahoma St. 48, OT
Rice33, I UTEP24
SMU 35, Tulsa 27
UTSA 38, Texas St. 31
FAR WEST
BYU 50, New Mexico St. 14
CSU-Pueblo 28, Indianapolis 7
Colorado St. 24, New Mexico 20
Fresno St. 48, Air Force 15
Oregon 48, Oregon St. 24
San Diego St. 42, Wyoming 28
Stanford 35, UCLA 17
Utah St. 45, Idaho 9


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 8 3 .727 -
Brooklyn 7 4 .636 1
Philadelphia 7 6 .538 2
Boston 7 6 .538 2
Toronto 3 10 .231 6
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 10 3 .769 -
Atlanta 8 4 .667 11Y2
Charlotte 7 5 .583 212
Orlando 5 7 .417 412
Washington 0 11 .000 9
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 6 4 .600 -
Chicago 5 6 .455 11Y2
Indiana 6 8 .429 2
Detroit 3 10 .231 412
Cleveland 3 10 .231 4Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 9 2 .818 -
San Antonio 10 3 .769 -
Dallas 7 6 .538 3
Houston 6 7 .462 4
New Orleans 3 8 .273 6
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 10 4 .714 -
Denver 7 6 .538 212
Utah 7 6 .538 212
Portland 6 6 .500 3
Minnesota 5 6 .455 312
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 8 5 .615 -
Golden State 7 6 .538 1
L.A. Lakers 6 7 .462 2
Phoenix 6 7 .462 2
Sacramento 3 9 .250 412
Friday's Games
Atlanta 101, Charlotte 91
Orlando 108, Cleveland 104
Boston 108, Oklahoma City 100
Brooklyn 86, L.A. Clippers 76
Detroit 91, Toronto 90
Houston 131, New York 103
Memphis 106, L.A. Lakers 98
San Antonio 104, Indiana 97
Denver 102, Golden State 91
Phoenix 111, New Orleans 108, OT
Utah 104, Sacramento 102
Portland 103, Minnesota 95
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 104, L.A. Clippers 93
Oklahoma City 116, Philadelphia 109, OT
Charlotte 108, Washington 106,20T
Miami 110, Cleveland 108
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, late
Chicago at Milwaukee, late
Utah at Sacramento, late
Minnesota at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Detroit at New York, 1 p.m.
San Antonio at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Portland at Brooklyn, 3 p.m.
Phoenix at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
Boston at Orlando, 6 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Antonio at Washington, 7 p.m.
New York at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
Portland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Oklahoma City 8 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


FOOTBALL
National Football League
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS -Waived OL Rich
Ranglin. Signed WR Jamar Newsome from the
practice squad.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed LB Kaelin
Burnett from the practice squad.
TENNESSEE TITANS Released OL Kyle
DeVan. Signed RB Darren Evans from the prac-
tice squad.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
SYRACUSE CRUNCH Recalled D
Charles Landry from Florida (ECHL).
ECHL
ECHL Suspended Ontario F Derek Cou-
ture one game and Evansville LW Patrick
Kennedy pending review for their actions dur-
ing Friday's games.
Central Hockey League
MISSOURI MAVERICKS Signed F Evan
Vossen.
WICHITA THUNDER Signed FTodd Grif-
fith.
COLLEGE
ARKANSAS Announced football coach
John L. Smith will not return next year.


No. 13 Mizzou handles VCU


Associated Press

PARADISE ISLAND, Ba-
hamas Laurence Bowers
had 14 points and 11 re-
bounds and Phil Pressey
had 11 points and eight as-
sists, leading No. 13 Mis-
souri to a 68-65 victory over
VCU on Saturday in the
third-place game of the Bat-
tle 4 Atlantis.
Pressey gave the Tigers (5-
1) the lead for good with a 3-
pointer with 1:17 to play That
capped a run of five straight
possessions where the teams
exchanged the lead.
The Rams (3-3) turned the
ball over with 57 seconds


left. The Tigers called a
timeout with 10 seconds left
on the shot clock. Pressey
took the inbounds, dribbled
off a few seconds, then made
a move to the basket where
he ducked under a VCU
player and hit a flip shot as
the shot clock hit zero.
Troy Daniels of VCU
missed a 3 and the Tigers
ran out the clock.
The Tigers lost to No. 2
Louisville in the semifinals,
when they committed 23
turnovers. They had 14
against VCU.
Negus Webster-Chan and
Keion Bell had 12 points
apiece for Missouri.


No. 19 Memphis 52,
Northern Iowa 47
PARADISE ISLAND, Ba-
hamas Chris Crawford had
18 points and 12 rebounds,
and Memphis avoided losing
all three games in the Battle 4
Atlantis.
Joe Jackson scored 15 for
the Tigers (3-2), who were one
of four ranked teams in the reg-
ular-season tournament.
Deon Mitchell led the Pan-
thers (3-3) with 18 points and
five assists, but Northern Iowa
shot 31.4 percent (16 of 51), in-
cluding 7 of 27 (25.9 percent)
from 3-point range.


Same order of business


Mcllroy, Donald share final-day lead in Dubai


Associated Press

DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates Rory McIlroy sank a
short birdie putt on the 18th
hole Saturday to remain tied
with Luke Donald as the
world's two top-ranked
golfers pulled three shots
clear of a star-studded field
after the third round of the
Dubai World Championship.
The top-ranked McIlroy,
who has already wrapped
up the European and PGA
Tour money titles, struggled
early when he bogeyed the
first hole and missed several
makeable birdie putts. But
he improved on the back
nine, sinking a 30-foot eagle
putt on 14 to go with three
birdies for a 6-under 66.
Donald also had a 66 and
is tied with McIlory with a
17-under total of 199.
"I've done a majority of
my scoring this week on the
back nine and that's the way
it went today," McIlroy said.
"Took me a few holes to ad-
just. But once I got comfort-
able, I started to hit some
good shots and give myself
opportunities for birdies."
Donald had his third con-
secutive bogey-free round
and has now gone 100 holes
at the Dubai tournament
without one. If he wins Sun-
day without carding a bogey,
he will match the feat of
Sweden's Jesper Parnevik,
who won the 1995 Scandina-
vian Masters without drop-
ping a shot.



LIGHTS
Continued from Page B1

15 of 23 passes for 147 yards
and a touchdown. "We're a
resilient team."
He's not likely to get any
argument from Florida
State coach Jimbo Fisher,
who hoped a victory over
the Gators would not only
persuade pollsters that the
Seminoles belonged among
the elite, but win some posi-
tive attention for the At-
lantic Coast Conference.
"They controlled the line
of scrimmage up front,"
Fisher said. "They have a
very good team. They did a
great job."
The game matching two of
the nation's best defenses
went back and forth with the
Seminoles scoring 20 unan-
swered points to take a 20-13
lead late in the third quarter
They wouldn't score again
until the final play of the
game and victory out of
reach.
"Our guys understand
that it's about all 60 min-
utes," Muschamp said. "We



BUCS
Continued from Page B1

Tampa Bay (6-4) has won
four straight to climb back
into playoff contention and
has already surpassed its
win total from all of last sea-
son.
Still, there are skeptics
who question the turnabout
under first-year coach Greg
Schiano by pointing out
they've only won one game
against a team with a win-
ning record.
"That's to be expected.
That's just what people do,"
Bucs defensive tackle Ger-
ald McCoy said. "It's like,
well they did win four in a
row, but they beat who they
beat, let's see what they do
against the No. 1 team in the
NFL. You know what? We're
not worried about that If we
do what we do, go in there
and play the best Buc foot-
ball we can, we have a


Associated Press
Rory Mcllroy waves Saturday after he finishes on the 18th
hole during the third round of DP World Golf Championship
in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.


just really needed to be pa-
tient and wear them down."
Did they ever
Florida regained the lead
for keeps at 23-20 on
Gillislee's 37-yard run with
11:01 left in the final period
on the first play after
Florida State's EJ Manuel
fumbled, his fourth turnover
of the game. Gillislee fin-
ished with 140 yards rush-
ing, surpassing the
1,000-yard mark for the sea-
son early in the game.
Florida State (10-2, 7-1 At-
lantic Coast Conference)
was hurt by five turnovers in
the game. The Seminoles
will play Georgia Tech next
week in the ACC title game.
Florida State was hoping
to keep its own long shot na-
tional title hopes alive with
a third straight win over the
Gators, but couldn't.
The Seminoles had been
so dominant at home,
outscoring opponents 324-54
in six previous games here
with Clemson doing the
most damage when Florida
State prevailed in a 49-37
shootout in September.
Florida, not known for its
offense, rushed for 244 of its

pretty good chance."
The Falcons overcame six
turnovers, including Matt
Ryan's five interceptions, to
come from behind to beat
the Arizona Cardinals. The
Bucs pulled off an improba-
ble comeback themselves,
wiping out an 11-point
deficit in the final six min-
utes of regulation before
taking down the Carolina
Panthers in overtime.
Atlanta has won six of the
past seven meetings be-
tween the division rivals,
but most of the games have
been close, low-scoring af-
fairs.
This one could be just as
tight, though a lot more
points figure to be scored
with the usually accurate
Ryan facing the NFL's low-
est-ranked pass defense and
Josh Freeman leading a
Bucs offense that's scored a
league-high 205 points over
the past six weeks.
The Falcons are averag-
ing 27 points per game.


394 yards against the nation's
top-ranked defense, which
has benefited from a com-
paratively weak schedule.
And it was that schedule
and a 17-16 loss at North Car-
olina State last month that
has provoked questions
about how good the Semi-
noles were. They couldn't
capitalize on the opportunity
to prove the doubters wrong.
"We're better than them,"
Florida nose guard Omar
Hunter said. "You have to
finish the game. The fourth
quarter, that's the most im-
portant quarter."
Florida salted its victory
away on Driskel's 14-yard
touchdown throw to Quin-
ton Dunbar with seven min-
utes left and Matt Jones'
32-yard run with 2:33 left for
a 37-20 lead.
Caleb Sturgis kicked three
field goals for the Gators.
Florida State's Dustin Hop-
kins had field goals of 50 and
53 yards to tie former Geor-
gia kicker Billy Bennett's
NCAA record of 87 career
field goals.
Florida State scored 20
straight points to wipe out
an early 13-0 deficit

Tampa Bay is fourth in the
league at 28.7, with Free-
man throwing for 16 touch-
downs with just three
interceptions during a
stretch in which the Bucs
have won five of six follow-
ing a 1-3 start that included
losses to the New York Gi-
ants, Dallas Cowboys and
Washington Redskins.
Tampa Bay's lone setback
since September was a 35-28
loss to New Orleans in a
game that ended with a
game-tying TD pass being
wiped out by a penalty on the
final play of the game. The
Saints handed Atlanta's its
lone loss 31-27 two weeks ago.
"This is a very potent of-
fense. They're top 10 in a
number of what I call criti-
cal factors for a football
team," Smith said, noting
the Bucs are sixth in the
league in turnover ratio at
plus-9 and have prospered,
in part, by turning oppo-
nents' mistakes into touch-
downs.


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Titans running wild, Jaguars running on empty


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Tennessee Titans are run-
ning the ball as well as any-
one in the league right now.
Jacksonville's ground game
is headed in the other di-
rection and probably won't
get turned around until
Maurice Jones-Drew re-
turns from a foot injury
For two AFC South teams
built to run, the recent trend
has a lot to do with why one
of them has won three of its
last five games and the other
has dropped seven in a row.
The Titans (4-6) look to
keep it going Sunday in
Jacksonville, where the
Jaguars (1-9) are hoping to
begin to salvage what's
shaping up to be the worst
season in franchise history


Tennessee surely will
continue to feed Chris John-
son, who has 653 yards rush-
ing and four touchdowns in
his last five games.
Only Minnesota's Adrian
Peterson has more yards
rushing than Johnson over
the last seven weeks of the
season. And Johnson is
doing it against everyone,
averaging 6.0 yards a carry
against a string of defenses
that includes Pittsburgh,
Chicago and Miami.
The Jaguars are wary of
Johnson even though he
hasn't given them fits during
his five-year career. Other
than a 228-yard perform-
ance in 2009, Johnson has
just one 100-yard game and
one touchdown against
Jacksonville. He has aver-
aged just 44 yards in the last


three meetings.
But the Jags know this
could be different Not only
has Johnson been hot lately,
but Jacksonville has given
up at least 120 yards rushing
in eight of 10 games.
Jacksonville's ground
game has been almost nonex-
istent the last seven games.
The Jaguars are averaging
61.7 yards rushing a game
over that span and have
dropped to last in the league.
Jones-Drew injured his
left foot Oct. 21 at Oakland
and has missed the last four
games. He is no longer wear-
ing a walking boot, but won't
play against Tennessee.
Jacksonville thought
Rashad Jennings would be
able to fill in, but Jennings
struggled to see open holes
and seemed to go down


with any contact. He never
managed more than 60
yards rushing, and last
week at Houston was re-
placed by Jalen Parmele.
Parmele ran for 80 yards
in the 43-37 overtime loss to
the Texans, enough to se-
cure the starting job until
Jones-Drew returns.
In the meantime, the
Jaguars could be more of a
passing team.
Coach Mike Mularkey
benched injured starter
Blaine Gabbert early in the
week, then placed the for-
mer top-10 draft pick on in-
jured reserve with a right
forearm injury and a torn
labrum in his non-throwing
shoulder
Chad Henne will make
his first start in more than
year against the Titans.


Associated Press
Last Sunday, in relief of the injured Blaine Gabbert,
Jacksonville Jaguars backup quarterback Chad Henne threw
for 354 yards and four touchdowns in the team's 43-37
overtime loss to the Houston Texans.


Phins' salvage job


Miami needs

win at home

against Seattle

Associated Press

MIAMI The two rookie
quarterbacks on opposite
coasts in opposite confer-
ences bonded while train-
ing together over the
summer. They've stayed in
touch during the season,
swapping text messages this
week even as their teams
prepared to meet today
Russell Wilson and Ryan
Tannehill wished each
other good luck sort of.
"Hopefully he doesn't
have one of his better
games against us," Tan-
nehill said with a smile.
The pair of precocious
passers can compare their
first-year progress when
Tannehill and the Miami
Dolphins (4-6) host Wilson
and the Seattle Seahawks
(6-4). It's only the third
game this season to match
two rookie quarterbacks
from the stellar group that
also includes Indianapolis'
Andrew Luck, Washington's
Robert Griffin III and
Cleveland's Brandon Wee-
den, all starters since the
season opener.
"I'm very proud of this
rookie class," Wilson said.
"There are a lot of guys play-
ing. It's pretty fascinating
just how many guys we have.
It's a tremendous thing to be
able to play in the National
Football League at such a
young age. For that to con-
tinue down the road, we're
going to be playing for a long
time, and that's the great
thing about it."
Wilson and the Seahawks
are on the upswing of late,
with consecutive wins be-
fore a bye last week. Among
the five rookies, he has at-
tempted the fewest passes
but lead them all through
10 games with 15 touch-
down throws. His rating of
90.5 trails only Griffin's
104.6. Only one rookie -
Pittsburgh's Ben Roethlis-
berger finished his first
year with a higher comple-
tion average than Wilson's
62 percent.
By contrast, the Dolphins
and Tannehill have lost
three games in a row, in part
because he hit a rough


Associated Press
Miami Dolphins kicker Dan Carpenter attempts a field goal during the second half against
the Buffalo Bills on Nov. 15.


patch after making steady
strides early in the season.
He went 107 passes without
an interception, then threw
five in the past two games.
He's tied for 31st in the NFL
with only six touchdown
passes, and among the rook-
ies, his rating of 70.8 ranks
ahead of only Weeden.
"Ryan is fine," teammate
Reggie Bush said. "It's just
growing pains. We all got to
go through them."
Despite Tannehill's
slump, he's already earning
mentions in the same sen-
tence as Dan Marino. Tan-
nehill needs only 91 yards
passing to break the team
rookie record of 2,210 set by
the Pro Football Hall of
Famer in 1983.
Offensive coordinator
Mike Sherman, Tannehill's
head coach at Texas A&M,
said he's encouraged that
the young quarterback


learns quickly from his
mistakes.
"He has great recall of
everything that happens on
the field," Sherman said.
"He can tell you exactly
where all 11 guys are on the
field, why he made the de-
cision. He also will say that
wasn't a good decision....
"I don't see him regress-
ing. But if you don't win, the
quarterback's not going to
look very good."
Wilson hasn't looked very
good on the road, where the
Seahawks are 1-4. He has
thrown for four touchdowns
with eight interceptions in
those games, while at home
- where Seattle is un-
beaten he has 11 touch-
down passes and no
interceptions.
Now he and the Sea-
hawks will make the NFL's
longest trip to a hostile set-
ting and kick off at 10 a.m.


Seattle time. The rookie fig-
ures he can make the nec-
essary adjustments.
"Like I always say, a hun-
dred yards is a hundred
yards," Wilson said.
Motivation won't be a
problem, not with the Sea-
hawks in the thick of NFC
playoff race, and not when
bragging rights with Tan-
nehill are at stake. They be-
came good friends training
together this summer at IMG
Academy in Bradenton, Fla.
"There's a huge competi-
tiveness, not because we're
friends, but because I'm
playing for the Seahawks
and he's playing for the Dol-
phins," Wilson said. "That's
the way I look at it I'm try-
ing to help our team win."
Wilson faces a fellow
rookie QB for the first time,
while Tannehill and the
Dolphins lost a month ago
to Luck and the Colts.


NFL STATISTICS


NFL standings


New England
Buffalo
Miami
N.Y Jets


Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


N.Y Giants
Washington
Dallas
Philadelphia

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina


AFC
East
W L T
8 3 0
4 6 0
4 6 0
4 7 0
South
W L T
10 1 0
6 4 0
4 6 0
1 9 0
North
W L T
8 2 0
6 4 0
5 5 0
2 8 0
West
W L T
7 3 0
4 6 0
3 7 0
1 9 0
NFC
East
W L T
6 4 0
5 6 0
5 6 0
3 7 0
South
W L T
9 1 0
6 4 0
5 5 0
2 8 0


Pct PF
.727 407
.400 230
.400 187
.364 221

Pct PF
.909 327
.600 210
.400 219
.100 164

Pct PF
.800 267
.600 217
.500 248
.200 189

Pct PF
.700 301
.400 232
.300 208
.100 152


Pct PF
.600 267
.455 295
.455 242
.300 162

Pct PF
.900 270
.600 287
.500 287
.200 184


North
W L T Pct PF
Green Bay 7 3 0 .700 263
Chicago 7 3 0 .700 249
Minnesota 6 4 0 .600 238
Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267
West
W L T Pct PF
San Francisco 7 2 1 .750 245
Seattle 6 4 0 .600 198
Arizona 4 6 0 .400 163
St. Louis 3 6 1 .350 174
Thursday's Games
Houston 34, Detroit 31, OT
Washington 38, Dallas 31
New England 49, N.Y. Jets 19
Today's Games
Denver at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Miami, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Carolina at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 29
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 2
Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.


Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 3
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m.

AFC leaders
Week 11
Quarterbacks


Manning, DEN
Brady, NWE
Roethlis., PIT
Schaub, HOU
Dalton, CIN
P Rivers, SND
Flacco, BAL
Fitzpatrick, BUF
C. Palmer, OAK

A. Foster, HOU
Johnson, TEN
Ridley, NWE
J. Charles, KAN
McGahee, DEN
Spiller, BUF
R. Rice, BAL
Richardson, CLE
Green-Ellis, CIN

Wayne, IND
Welker, NWE
A. Green, CIN


Att Conm Yds
372 255 2975
393 256 2976
316 209 2287
330 216 2540
344 221 2559
340 228 2461
341 206 2495
323 202 2179
415 252 3035
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
249 949 3.81
170 862 5.07
185 842 4.55
172 821 4.77
167 731 4.38
109 723 6.63
164 697 4.25
180 670 3.72
182 638 3.51
Receivers
No Yds Avg
76 1003 13.2
73 890 12.2
64 911 14.2


Johnson, HOU 60 870 14.5 i
Thomas, DEN 57 933 16.4 "
Hartline, MIA 53 790 14.9
Gronkowski, NWE 53 748 14.1
Decker, DEN 50 621 12.4
B. Myers, OAK 50 554 11.1

NFC leaders
Week 11
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds
Rodgers, GBY 354 238 2619
Ale. Smith, SNF 217 152 1731
Griffin II, WAS 277 186 2193
Brees, NOR 401 250 3066
M. Ryan, ATL 397 268 3072
Freeman, TAM 319 180 2505
R. Wilson, SEA 253 157 1827
Romo, DAL 394 265 2916
Kolb, ARI 183 109 1169
Rushers
Att Yds Avg I
Peterson, MIN 195 1128 5.78
M. Lynch, SEA 212 1005 4.74 "
Do. Martin, TAM 197 1000 5.08 "
Morris, WAS 184 869 4.72 ,
Gore, SNF 157 831 5.29
L. McCoy, PHL 177 750 4.24
Bradshaw, NYG 151 675 4.47
Forte, CHI 144 641 4.45
Griffin IlI, WAS 93 613 6.59 "
Receivers
No Yds Avg I
Witten, DAL 73 636 8.7
B. Marshall, CHI 69 925 13.4
Ca. Johnson, DET 65 1117 17.2
Gonzalez, ATL 64 650 10.2
R.White, ATL 62 946 15.3
Harvin, MIN 62 677 10.9
Cruz, NYG 60 743 12.4 8


NFL Injury Report
OAKLAND RAIDERS at CINCINNATI BEN-
GALS RAIDERS: OUT: RB Mike Goodson
(ankle), RB Darren McFadden (ankle), DT
Richard Seymour (knee, hamstring). QUES-
TIONABLE: DE JackCrawford (toe), RBTaiwan
Jones (ankle). PROBABLE: S Tyvon Branch
(neck), WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (hamstring),
TE Brandon Myers (shoulder), RB Marcel
Reece (hamstring, quadriceps). BENGALS:
DOUBTFUL: WR Andrew Hawkins (knee), TE
Richard Quinn (hamstring). PROBABLE: C Jeff
Faine (hamstring), CB Adam Jones (calf), WR
Marvin Jones (knee), S Reggie Nelson (ham-
string), CB Terence Newman (head).
PITTSBURGH STEELERS at CLEVELAND
BROWNS STEELERS: OUT: WR Jerricho
Cotchery (ribs), T Marcus Gilbert (ankle), QB
Byron Leftwich (ribs), QB Ben Roethlisberger
(right shoulder). DOUBTFUL: S Troy Polamalu
(calf). QUESTIONABLE: WR Antonio Brown
(ankle). PROBABLE: S Will Allen (shoulder), G
Willie Colon (knee), DE Ziggy Hood (back), RB
Isaac Redman (concussion), LB Stevenson
Sylvester (hamstring). BROWNS: OUT: CB Dim-
itri Patterson (ankle), S Ray Ventrone (calf).
PROBABLE: TE Jordan Cameron (groin), WR
Josh Cooper (knee), WR Joshua Cribbs (back),
CB Joe Haden (oblique), DE Juqua Parker (shin),
RB Trent Richardson (chest, rib, finger), DT
Ahtyba Rubin (calf, back), DE Frostee Rucker
(shoulder, illness), G Jarrod Shaw (illness), CB
Buster Skrine (head), STJ. Ward (calf, back).
BUFFALO BILLS at INDIANAPOLIS COLTS
- BILLS: OUT: DE Mark Anderson (knee), CB
Aaron Williams (knee). QUESTIONABLE: DE
Spencer Johnson (ankle), RB Corey McIntyre
(knee), WR Brad Smith (hamstring). PROBABLE:
CB Ron Brooks (teeth), SJairus Byrd (back), DT
Marcell Dareus (shoulder), T Chris Hairston
(knee), RB Fred Jackson (concussion), DE Chris
Kelsay (neck), G Andy Levitre (knee), CB Leodis
McKelvin (groin), DE Shawne Merriman (groin),
CB Justin Rogers (hamstring), S Da'Norris
Searcy (hand), LB Kelvin Sheppard (back), RB
C.J. Spiller (shoulder), DT Kyle Williams (ankle),
DE Mario Williams (wrist, ankle), C Eric Wood
(knee). COLTS: DOUBTFUL: CB Vontae Davis
(knee). QUESTIONABLE: TE Coby Fleener
(shoulder), DE Cory Redding (hip). PROBABLE:
WR Donnie Avery (head), S Antoine Bethea
(ankle), RB Donald Brown (knee), NT Josh
Chapman (knee), QB Andrew Luck (knee), CB
Teddy Williams (hamstring).
TENNESSEE TITANS at JACKSONVILLE
JAGUARS-TITANS: DOUBTFUL: SAIAfalava
(ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB Xavier Adibi
(knee), RB Jamie Harper (ankle), WR Lavelle
Hawkins (ankle), TE Craig Stevens (hamstring),
T Byron Stingily (back). PROBABLE: WR Kenny
Britt (knee), QB Jake Locker (left shoulder), LB
Colin McCarthy (ankle). JAGUARS: OUT: RB
Greg Jones (thigh), CB William Middleton (con-
cussion). QUESTIONABLE: S Dwight Lowery
(ankle), CB Rashean Mathis (groin). PROBA-
BLE: C Brad Meester (foot).
DENVER BRONCOS at KANSAS CITY
CHIEFS BRONCOS: QUESTIONABLE: CB
Omar Bolden (concussion). PROBABLE: DE
Robert Ayers (groin), TE Virgil Green (hamstring),
RB Ronnie Hillman (hamstring), G Chris Kuper
(ankle), RB Knowshon Moreno (groin), CB Tracy
Porter (illness), WR Demaryius Thomas (knee),
DE DerekWolfe (quadriceps). CHIEFS: DOUBT-
FUL: T Branden Albert (back). QUESTIONABLE:
G Jon Asamoah (thumb), G Ryan Lilja (knee).
PROBABLE: WR Jon Baldwin (head, neck), WR
Dwayne Bowe (neck, back), TE Steve Maneri
(ankle), TE Tony Moeaki (shoulder, back).
MINNESOTA VIKINGS at CHICAGO BEARS
VIKINGS: DOUBTFUL: WR Percy Harvin
(ankle). QUESTIONABLE: DT Letroy Guion (foot),
G Charlie Johnson (toe). PROBABLE: DE Jared
Allen (shoulder), WR Stephen Burton (ankle), WR
Michael Jenkins (foot), P Chris Kluwe (left knee),
RB Adrian Peterson (ankle), CB Antoine Winfield
(knee). BEARS: OUT: WR Alshon Jeffery (knee).
QUESTIONABLE: QB Jay Cutler (concussion),
TE Kellen Davis (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Lance
Briggs (thumb), QB Jason Campbell (ribs), G
Lance Louis (ankle), WR Brandon Marshall
(shoulder), DE Shea McClellin (concussion), DT
Stephen Paea (shoulder), DE Julius Peppers
(thigh), DT MattToeaina (calf).
ATLANTA FALCONS at TAMPA BAY BUCCA-
NEERS FALCONS: OUT: S Charles Mitchell
(calf). QUESTIONABLE: WR Kevin Cone (groin),
DT Peria Jerry (quadriceps), WR Julio Jones
(ankle), CB Asante Samuel (shoulder), DT
Vance Walker (ribs), LB Sean Weatherspoon (ill-


ness, ankle). PROBABLE: DE John Abraham
(back), DT Jonathan Babineaux (neck), K Matt
Bryant (back), CB Christopher Owens (thigh),
QB Matt Ryan (finger), RB Michael Turner
(groin). BUCCANEERS: OUT: S Cody Grimm
(hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: CB Eric Wright
(Achilles). PROBABLE: DE Michael Bennett
(shoulder), S Ahmad Black (illness), CB Leonard
Johnson (heel), DE Aaron Morgan (shoulder),
WRTiquan Underwood (head), LB DekodaWat-
son (hamstring).
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at MIAMI DOLPHINS
- SEAHAWKS: PROBABLE: DE Red Bryant
(foot), G James Carpenter (concussion), RB
Marshawn Lynch (back), CB Byron Maxwell
(hamstring), DT Clinton McDonald (groin), DE
Greg Scruggs (oblique), LB K.J. Wright (con-
cussion). DOLPHINS: QUESTIONABLE: LB
Austin Spitler (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Karlos
Dansby (biceps), TE Anthony Fasano (hip), P
Brandon Fields (left knee), C Mike Pouncey
(ankle), S Jimmy Wilson (ribs).
BALTIMORE RAVENS at SAN DIEGO
CHARGERS RAVENS: OUT: CB Jimmy
Smith (abdomen). DOUBTFUL: CB Chris John-
son (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: DE Pernell
McPhee (thigh). PROBABLE: LB Brendon
Ayanbadejo (shoulder), NT Terrence Cody
(arm), TE Ed Dickson (neck), LB Dannell
Ellerbe (toe, finger), S James Ihedigbo (neck),
WR Jacoby Jones (ankle), DT Haloti Ngata
(shoulder), TE Dennis Pitta (head), S Bernard
Pollard (chest), S Ed Reed (shoulder), LB Ter-
rell Suggs (shoulder, ankle), LB Courtney Up-
shaw (shoulder), G Marshal Yanda (ankle).
CHARGERS: OUT: LB Larry English (calf), T
Jared Gaither (groin), WR Eddie Royal (ham-
string). DOUBTFUL: G Tyronne Green (ham-
string), TE Dante Rosario (hamstring).
QUESTIONABLE: DT Aubrayo Franklin (knee).
PROBABLE: S Atari Bigby (shoulder), P Mike
Scifres (right ankle), G Louis Vasquez (ankle).
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at NEW OR-
LEANS SAINTS 49ERS: QUESTIONABLE:
QB Alex Smith (concussion). PROBABLE: CB
Tarell Brown (knee), CB Chris Culliver (shoul-
der), S Dashon Goldson (ribs, calf), LBTavares
Gooden (shin), RB Frank Gore (ribs, wrist), WR
Randy Moss (finger), LB Aldon Smith (shoul-
der), S C.J. Spillman (finger), DT Will Tukuafu
(wrist), LB Patrick Willis (shoulder). SAINTS:
OUT: T Charles Brown (knee), DE Junior
Galette (ankle), CB Elbert Mack (concussion),
CB Corey White (knee). QUESTIONABLE: T
Zach Strief (groin). PROBABLE: LB Ramon
Humber (illness), RB Darren Sproles (hand).
ST LOUIS RAMS at ARIZONA CARDINALS
- RAMS: OUT: LB Mario Haggan (elbow).
DOUBTFUL: WR Danny Amendola (foot).
QUESTIONABLE: TE Lance Kendricks (knee),
S Rodney McLeod (calf). PROBABLE: RB
Steven Jackson (foot). CARDINALS: QUES-
TIONABLE: DE Calais Campbell (calf), WR
Early Doucet (ribs), QB Kevin Kolb (ribs), RB
LaRod Stephens-Howling (ribs). PROBABLE: S
Justin Bethel (shoulder), G Daryn Colledge
(foot), CB Jamell Fleming (back), CB William
Gay (groin), TE Todd Heap (knee), TE Jeff King
(knee), TE Mike Leach (back), RB William Pow-
ell (shoulder), S Kerry Rhodes (back), RB Al-
fonso Smith (illness), CB Greg Toler
(hamstring), RB Beanie Wells (toe).
GREEN BAY PACKERS at NEW YORK GI-
ANTS PACKERS: OUT: LB Terrell Manning
(shoulder), LB Clay Matthews (hamstring), LB
ErikWalden (ankle), S Charles Woodson (collar-
bone). QUESTIONABLE: WR Greg Jennings
(groin, abdomen), TE Andrew Quarless (knee).
PROBABLE:WR Donald Driver (thumb), RBJohn
Kuhn (hamstring), DT B.J. Raji (ankle), CB Sam
Shields (ankle), LB Vic Sooto (illness). GIANTS:
OUT: WR Domenik Hixon (ankle), LB Jacquian
Williams (knee). QUESTIONABLE: S Kenny
Phillips (knee), LB Keith Rivers (calf, knee).
PROBABLE: C David Baas (ankle, elbow), RB
Ahmad Bradshaw (foot), DT Linval Joseph (knee),
S Tyler Sash (ankle), G Chris Snee (ankle).
CAROLINA PANTHERS at PHILADELPHIA
EAGLES PANTHERS: DNP: DE Antwan Ap-
plewhite (hamstring), DE Greg Hardy (illness),
LB Jordan Senn (ankle). FULL: LB Thomas Davis
(not injury related), DT Dwan Edwards (not injury
related), DT Ron Edwards (not injury related), T
Jordan Gross (not injury related), C Geoff
Hangartner (knee), S Colin Jones (head), WR
Steve Smith (finger). EAGLES: OUT: RB Chris
Polk (toe). DNP: WR Jason Avant (hamstring),
RB LeSean McCoy (concussion), QB Michael
Vick (concussion). FULL: WR Riley Cooper
(knee), WR Mardy Gilyard (hamstring), DT Cullen
Jenkins (foot, ankle), G Danny Watkins (ankle).


H holiday Car Show M

Christmas in the Hills
S Parade & Festival

SSaturday, December I st 9am
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills Florida 34465
41 Car Show Registration Open to Cars 25
years and Older $10 at the gate.

First 50 cars receive a plaque.
* Eleven "Best Of'Awards included club participation.
* Valve cover racing.

Parade at 10 AM,Arts & Crafts at I I AM
41 Kids Fun Area & Live Music
Additional information visit
4k www.citruscountyparks.com or call 400-0960


1 Support Toys for Tots Bring a $
New, Unopened Gift
Fun orand Receive
the Whole a Free
Family! Hotdog
& Drink!E


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Marc Anthony
aids orphanage
SANTO DOMINGO,
Dominican Republic -
Singer Marc Anthony is
coming to
the aid of
an or-
phanage
in the Do-
minican
Republic.
A foun-
dation
Marc run by
Anthony Anthony
with
music and sports pro-
ducer Henry Cardenas
plans to build a new resi-
dence hall, classrooms
and a baseball field for
the Children of Christ or-
phanage in the eastern
city of La Romana. An-
thony attended the
groundbreaking cere-
mony Friday with his
model girlfriend Shan-
non de Lima.
Children of Christ Foun-
dation Director Sonia
Hane said Anthony visited
the orphanage previously
and decided to help. His
Maestro Cares Foundation
raised $200,000 for the ex-
pansion on land donated
by a sugar company The
orphanage was founded in
1996 for children who
were abused or aban-
doned or whose parents
were unable to care for
them.

'Downton Abbey'
to have 4th season
LONDON British
television channel ITV
has confirmed hit drama
"Downton Abbey" will re-
turn for a fourth season.
Filming of eight new
episodes for the award-
winning period series
will begin in southern
England's Highclere Cas-
tle and London's Ealing
Studios early next year
ITV said Friday as be-
fore, the opening and
closing episodes will be
feature-length, and the
series will continue the
story of the Crawley fam-
ily and their servants in
the 1920s.
The channel said an
extended special episode
for next Christmas is also
planned.
"Downton Abbey" has
won fans worldwide and
an average of 11.9 million
viewers in Britain
watched its third season,
which will premiere in the
U.S. on PBS in January

Bjork's vocal cord
surgery successful
LONDON Icelandic
singer Bjork said she has
had successful surgery to
remove a vocal cord
polyp.
The eccentric 47-year-
old singer said on her of-
ficial website she had
been trying to tackle the
problem with exercises
and diets since doctors
first discovered the polyp,
a benign growth on either
one or both of the vocal
cords, several years ago.
Bjork said she decided
to undergo laser surgery
and it has worked,
though she had to stay
quiet for three weeks.
She wrote: "Surgery
rocks! ... It's been very
satisfying to sing all them
clear notes again."
The singer apologized
for canceling various
shows earlier this year
From wire reports


Era of Hitchcock


Associated Press
Anthony Hopkins as Alfred Hitchcock in "Hitchcock." The new film "Hitchcock," which is set during the making of
the "Psycho," is only the latest expression of never-ending obsession of Hitchcock's most influential masterpiece.

After 'Psycho, 'a shower of violence hits Hollywood's movies


JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK For his first pro-
fessional acting job, a 22-year-old
Anthony Hopkins took a train from
South Wales to Manchester With
time to kill on a rainy day, he
dropped off his bags and headed to
the movies, where a long queue
wound outside the cinema.
"It was packed," Hopkins said. "I
sat down and I didn't know what the
hell I was in for I had heard stories
about it. When it got to the shower
scene, I don't think I've ever been so
scared in my life."
The movie was, of course, Alfred
Hitchcock's "Psycho," a film that 52
years after its shocking premiere
still hasn't released audiences from
its subversive thrall. The film, which
Hitchcock called "a fun picture,"
was revolutionary in its violence, its
sexiness, its sympathy to the per-
spective of the criminal mind and,
perhaps above all, its technique.
"What if someone really good
made a horror picture?" wonders
the British director, played by Hop-
kins, in the new film "Hitchcock."
Directed by Sacha Gervasi, it de-
picts the making of "Psycho" with a
keen focus on Hitchcock's relation-
ship and profession indebted-
ness to his wife Alma Reville
(played by Helen Mirren).
It is only the latest example of the
undying fascination with "Psycho,"
a film that ushered in a new dark-
ness in American movies, one with
a playful sense of irony toward vio-
lence but also a serious treatment
of that which had previously been
considered mere "schlock." Though
Hitchcock made a dozen films that
could easily be labeled master-
pieces, none seized audiences with
the same power as "Psycho."
Made for $800,000 at the end of
Hitchcock's contract with Para-
mount (which distributed the film
but left Hitchcock to finance it him-
self), "Psycho," based on Robert
Bloch's novel, went on to gross $32
million the biggest hit of his ca-
reer The director famously handed
out manuals to theaters with ex-
plicit directions not to let anyone in
after the movie began. Though most
critics dismissed the film then,
some finally began to consider
Hitchcock an artist of the highest
order most notably Robin Wood,
who called "Psycho" "perhaps the
most terrifying film ever made."
"We are (taken) forward and
downward into the darkness of our-
selves," wrote Wood. "'Psycho' be-
gins with the normal and draws us
steadily deeper and deeper into the
abnormal."
That "Psycho" killed off its star-


Birthday It behooves you in the year ahead to make a
point to increase the number of your work-related ac-
quaintances. Friends you make in the business world are
likely to be key to your success.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you ignore your com-
mon sense, you could easily reward someone you like but
who's undeserving, while barely acknowledging the per-
son who did the real work.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You'll function much bet-
ter in an important negotiation when you have time to
think things through. Be sure you know what you're doing.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Even though you're often
a creative thinker, you might not use this marvelous qual-
ity unless you're pushed into a corner. Rely on it if you
want to get ahead of the game.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Although your chances of
acquisition are extremely high, so are your probabilities


Janet Leigh after just half an
hour was only one of its many un-
heard-of elements. Scenes of Leigh
in her underwear were unusual for
their time, too, and prompted
lengthy negotiations between
Hitchcock and the censors. Even a
flushing toilet considered a vul-
gar sight had never been seen in
such a big movie.
Of course, the infamous shower
scene in which Leigh's Marion
Crane meets her demise imme-
diately recognizable from the
"screaming violins" of Bernard
Herrmann's score is the film's
piece de resistance. The ruthless
slicing wasn't of flesh, but of film: 70
shots in 45 seconds, a perfect mar-
riage of montage and murder A
prop man sounded the scene by
knifing casaba melons.
In his book "The Moment of'Psy-
cho': How Alfred Hitchcock Taught
America to Love Murder," the critic
David Thomson argues the influ-
ence of "Psycho" is everywhere in
movies, including "Bonnie and
Clyde," "Jaws," "Taxi Driver," many
of the films of Stanley Kubrick and
even the James Bond movies.
"Psycho," Thomson writes, let
"the subversive secret out," after
which "censorship crumpled like
an old lady's parasol."
"It's one of the most influential
films ever made," Thomson said. "It's
the beginnings of a flood of violence.
Violence becomes more acceptable
in film. It's a whole new attitude to
the criminal personality It becomes
more interesting in a way that had
never really operated before. It cele-
brates the director (Hitchcock) was
taken with a new seriousness after
that, and in turn, directors were."
In the famous interviews with
French director Francois Truffaut,
Hitchcock said he was most inter-
ested in "all the technical ingredi-
ents that made the audience
scream" and hoped "Psycho" would
be "a film that belongs to filmmak-
ers." That's certainly been true, as
"Psycho" has inspired perhaps the
most obsessive ode in Hollywood
history, the near frame-by-frame
1998 remake by Gus Van Sant.
In the every-decade polling done
by film magazine Sight & Sound,
Hitchcock's "Vertigo" (released two
years before "Psycho" to largely
negative reviews) earlier this year


Today's HOROSCOPE
for misusing that gain. Don't let "easy come, easy go" be
the axiom you live by.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Something you've been
hoping to accomplish can be achieved, provided you don't
allow negative thinkers to dissuade you from thinking oth-
erwise. Keep your eye and mind on the positive.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It behooves you to follow
your instincts when they urge you to remain positive
through difficult conditions. You could miss out on some
good opportunities if you don't.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Avoid an endeavor with a
close friend if it involves commercialism. Follow the wise
notion of business and pleasure usually mix like oil and
water.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't be reluctant to ride the
coattails of someone whom you recently went out of your
way to help. The receiving party will want to return the favor.


displaced Orson Welles' "Citizen
Kane" as the best film of all time,
according to voting critics. Among
the directors who have voted for
"Psycho" in past Sight & Sound
polls is the Australian filmmaker
Michael Haneke, maybe the only
living director who as proven by
his upcoming film "Amour" -
shares Hitchcock's skillfulness and
his attention to audience manipu-
lation through violence.
Among filmmakers who have
voted for "Psycho" is Errol Morris
who, years after seeing it, pursued
an interview with the real-life in-
spiration for Anthony Perkins' char-
acter, the serial killer Ed Gein, at
the Central State Hospital for the
Criminally Insane in Wisconsin.
Morris was then a graduate stu-
dent at U.C. Berkley, but the exten-
sive interviews he did with Gein (he
believes the only ever done) helped
set Morris on the path that would be
his life's work films that might in
some way be summarized by a
scene in "Psycho" that deeply af-
fected Morris. Near the end of the
film, a psychiatrist offers a pat, in-
sufficient explanation of Gein's psy-
chosis, which Pauline Kael called
"arguably Hitchcock's worst scene."
"You feel that all psychological
explanation is defeated," Morris
said. "It's the ultimate noir idea,
that somehow psychological expla-
nation isn't enough. It's defeated by
some kind of mechanism that
stands behind all of our plans and
our thoughts, our machinations. It's
the feeling of being haunted by the
inexplicable and the unknown."
In "Hitchcock," which is partly
based on Stephen Rebello's book,
"Alfred Hitchcock and the Making
of Psycho," Gervasi imagines the di-
rector communicating with Gein. A
more complex picture of Hitchcock
is also seen in the recent HBO film
"The Girl," which shows the making
of "The Birds" and Hitchcock's al-
leged tormenting of his star actress,
Tippi Hedren.
Fearing a negative portrait, the
Hitchcock estate didn't allow the
use of "Psycho" footage or dialogue
for "Hitchcock." But the film never-
theless takes pleasure in recreating
and imagining the circumstances of
making a film that still transfixes -
that in shrill violin notes, shrieked a
revolution.


Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) When a confidante goes out of
his or her way to offer you advice based on experience,
listen attentively and don't dismiss it too quickly. Take ad-
vantage of lessons learned.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be careful not to stir the wa-
ters in a partnership arrangement when your counterpart
has everything running smoothly, even if he or she is
doing things differently from how you would have done
them.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be supportive of your mate
when she or he is striving to do something that would be
of mutual benefit. Your encouragement could be the sin-
gle factor that makes it work.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you have to contend with
a similar situation to one that didn't work out because the
benefits weren't being equally distributed, apply what you
learned from your experience.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23
Mega Money: 2- 17 19 -41
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $2,123
3-of-4 MB 47 $889
3-of-4 1,151 $108
2-of-4 MB 1,750 $50
1-of-4 MB 14,510 $6
2-of-4 38,874 $4
Fantasy 5:16 17 20 25 31
5-of-5 4 winners $56,584.35
4-of-5 239 $144.50
3-of-5 8,026 $12
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22
Fantasy 5: 3 4 29 32 36
5-of-5 1 winner $164,113.38
4-of-5 163 $162.00
3-of-5 5,671 $13.00

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Nov. 25,
the 330th day of 2012. There
are 36 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 25, 1952, the play
"The Mousetrap," a murder
mystery by Agatha Christie,
first opened in London's West
End; it is the longest continu-
ously running show in history.
On this date:
In 1783, the British evacu-
ated New York, their last mili-
tary position in the United
States during the Revolution-
ary War.
In 1908, the first issue of
The Christian Science Moni-
tor was published.
In 1940, the cartoon char-
acter Woody Woodpecker
made his debut in the ani-
mated short "Knock Knock."
In 1963, the body of Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy was
laid to rest at Arlington Na-
tional Cemetery; his widow,
Jacqueline, lighted an "eter-
nal flame" at the gravesite.
In 1973, Greek President
George Papadopoulos was
ousted in a bloodless military
coup.
In 1986, the Iran-Contra af-
fair erupted as President
Ronald Reagan and Attorney
General Edwin Meese re-
vealed profits from secret
arms sales to Iran had been
diverted to Nicaraguan rebels.
In 1992, the movie "The
Bodyguard," starring Kevin
Costner and Whitney Hous-
ton, was first released.
In 1999, 5-year-old Elian
Gonzalez was rescued by a
pair of sport fishermen off the
coast of Florida, setting off an
international custody battle.
Ten years ago: Space
shuttle Endeavour arrived at
the international space sta-
tion, delivering one American
and two Russians, and an-
other girder for the orbiting
outpost.
Five years ago: Kevin
Dubrow, lead singer for the
heavy metal band Quiet Riot,
was found dead in a Las
Vegas home; he was 52.
One year ago: In a
friendly-fire incident that fur-
ther strained relations be-
tween the United States and
Pakistan, U.S. forces
launched airstrikes that mis-
takenly killed 24 Pakistani
troops at two posts along the
Afghan border.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Noel Neill is 92. Play-
wright Murray Schisgal is 86.
Pro Football Hall of Fame
coach Joe Gibbs is 72. Au-
thor, actor and economist
Ben Stein is 68. Actor John
Larroquette is 65. Retired
MLB All-Star Bucky Dent is


61. Dance judge Bruno To-
nioli (TV: "Dancing with the
Stars") is 57. Actress Jill Hen-
nessy is 43.
Thought for Today: "Re-
ject hatred without hating." -
Mary Baker Eddy, American
religious leader (1821-1910).


When it got to the shower scene,
I don't think I've ever been so scared in my
life."

Anthony Hopkins
who plays Alfred Hitchcock in a new movie recalls of watching 'Psycho."












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Focus on giving back


Chronicle file
Volunteers with the Family Resource Center help wrap Christmas packages for needy families. The local United Way and YMCA directors are spot-
lighting Giving Tuesday as an opportunity for members of the community, families and organizations to volunteer or participate in acts of giving.


Spend Tuesday,

AMY MEEK AND
JOHANNA CASTLE
Special to the Chronicle

We celebrate Thanksgiving
and we shop on Black Friday So
why not spend a day giving back.
Giving Tuesday is Nov 27. The
idea is based on a day where
charities, families, businesses
and individuals come together to
transform the way people think
about and participate in the giv-
ing season. The day encourages
families, communities and com-
panies to join in acts of giving.
Giving Tuesday is an opportu-
nity to join a national celebra-
tion and tell everyone about
what you are doing to give back
and why it matters. Whether
people choose to give money,
goods, services, advocate or vol-
unteer, giving just makes you
feel good.
In our roles as leaders of the
local United Way and local
YMCA, we have been given the
opportunity to spotlight Giving
Tuesday and share how each
person can truly make a differ-
ence. Right here in Citrus
County, many local charities
focus their efforts on helping
local people. We encourage
everyone to think about "giving"
as more than just the act of pur-
chasing tangible gifts. We all
know numerous people who are
difficult to "buy" a gift for in the
holiday season. Consider mak-
ing a contribution to a local
charity in their name, or set up a
time to volunteer with the per-
son in the community Giving
your time just might be the most
valuable gift of all.
The United Way has a strong
focus on education, income and
health and is specifically dedi-
cated to galvanizing local leaders
and organization to work to-
gether to tackle the root causes of
social need. Through our collab-


Nov. 27, offering your time to charitable organizations


VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
* UNITED WAY: 352-795-5483
Contributions can be made to United Way
1205 N.E. 5th St., Suite A, Crystal River, FL 34429
* Dec. 7 Earn It, Keep It, Save It volunteers need
financial literacy forum.
* New Community Garden in Beverly Hills volunteers
* Administration and event volunteers are always need

* YMCA: 352-637-0132
Contributions can be made to YMCA
3909 N. Lecanto Highway Beverly Hills, FL 34453
* Administration and Event Volunteers are always need
* Youth League Coaches are needed in January.

* DAYSTAR: 352-795-8668
* Volunteers needed in the thrift store and food pantry
* Volunteers needed for speaking engagements.

* GIRL SCOUTS: visit www.gswcf.org/, email kblair@g
call 813-504-6860.
* Volunteers needed to lead troops in Citrus County.

* FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 352-344-1001
* Volunteers needed to assist assembling Christmas p
needy families


orate work with local charities,
the school system, local govern-
ment, local businesses and nu-
merous local leaders, we are
working to move the dial for real,
lasting change. Whether it's help-
ing a mother finally get her GED
so she can earn family-sustaining
income or partnering with the Ag
Alliance to create a strategy for a
community garden, the United
Way is being bold in its quest for
improving Citrus County
A monetary gift can make ed-
ucational dreams a reality A gift


of time can be use
someone who is str
the school-life-wor
many working fami
gift of encouragement
make a difference
who is overwhelmed
throwing at them
board of directors
to a holistic view o
nity and strategic
programs address:
munity's greatest n
People who give
do it because they


cause. There is something spe-
cial about making a difference
and knowing you were a part of
making a person's life better in
some way. When people give to
the Y, they know the time they
ed for this have spent has helped a child
reach their potential or they
have helped an adult become
needed. stronger. If people give a mone-
ied. tary gift, they can feel confident
their contribution will make an
impact and have given a person
the opportunity to experience a
sense of community they might
otherwise not have had.
Sometimes the most valuable
ded. gift people can give truly is their
time. The Citrus County YMCA
is fortunate to have a strong net-
work of volunteers who serve on
the advisory board, as sports
coaches and support staff. Their
*. commitment to the cause has
helped enhance the programs
and the presence of the YMCA in
Citrus. Our advisory board holds
swcf.org or our organization accountable for
providing quality services that
are in the best interests of the
community. We are very thankful
our volunteers donate one of the
most precious gifts we all have to
aages for give the gift of their time.
packages or Citrus County is a very giving
community With the support of
- From staff reports our citizens and community
partners, we are able to accom-
plish more and have an even big-
ed to mentor ger impact. Giving Tuesday, for
ruggling with us, provides an opportunity to
rk balance so recognize all of the staff, donors,
lies face. The volunteers and partners of our
ent can really organizations. Giving Tuesday is
for someone not just the idea of giving on a
*d by all life is specific day, but truly a move-
n. Our local ment. When you reach out your
is committed hand to one, you influence the
f the commu- condition for all. What will Giv-
tally funding ing Tuesday inspire you to do?
ing our com- Amy Meek is the CEO of Citrus
eeds. County United Way Johanna
to the YMCA Castle is the executive director
believe in the of YMCA of Citrus County.


Take letter writing to a higher plane


here's nothing like
an election to
bring out the best
and worst in people.
It reminds me of the
Florida-Florida State
football game where so
much is invested by the
teams and the fans lead-
ing up to a three-hour
contest, and then half of Mike.
the stadium leaves PEP
cheering and the other
half in tears. PAl
I don't mean to trivial-
ize the election process, but like in
the UF-FSU example, our country,
and county, have chosen sides. And
it seems no amount of cajoling will
get the Romneys to accept the Oba-
mas and vice versa.
Actually, a healthy debate is a


A

P


good thing. Letter writ-
ing in a lot of ways is a
form of debate. Presum-
ably the letter writer re-
searches his or her topic
and analyzes what the
other side's arguments
are to present a cogent
rebuttal. They then have
to synthesize the mate-
krnold rial so it meets our crite-
I TO ria of 600 words we
are not looking for term
'ER papers here.
Many of our letter writ-
ers follow this format and I enjoy
reading their arguments left, right
and independent. Lately, and I as-
sume it is because the wounds of the
election are still fresh, the debate
has become personal. I would like to
go on record as saying it is OK to dis-


agree, even vehemently, with an-
other's position. But it should be the
ideas you are debating, not the per-
son's intelligence.
I would also call on letter writers
to keep the debate to the pages of
the Chronicle. It is never acceptable
to place phone calls to fellow letter
writers, chastising them over some-
thing they might have written.
Again, you do not have to like what
they have written, but should re-
spect them as a person and expect
the same respect in return.
Back to the idea that debate is
healthy I have always found if I lis-
ten to another's point of view, I
often can broaden my perspective
and become better educated on a
subject. I certainly am better able to
find the flaws in their thinking. That
said, I was recently educated on


what our young people the lead-
ers of our country in the future -
find important.
John Murphy, our circulation
manager, is scout leader of Troop
457 in Inverness. His troop recently
submitted a batch of letters as an
educational experience for their
communication merit badge. They
are all middle- and high-school-
aged young men, but their insight
on the important issues of the day
show a much more mature nature
that I feel some of our adult letter
writers could learn from.
Taylor writes about his disappoint-
ment in taxpayers' dollars being
spent to study the feasibility of Port
Citrus and suggests equal investment
in an environmental impact study

See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Horns


made for


beeping

On occasion, I drive
too fast. On occa-
sion, I get pulled
over for driving too fast.
I am a remorseful fast
driver, for which I always
admit the error of my
ways.
When a sheriff's deputy
pulls you over for going
too fast, being remorseful
is often rewarded by only
receiving a warning ticket
as opposed to a full-
fledged traffic ticket.
When a Florida Highway
patrolman pulls you over,
being remorseful may be
good for the soul, but as
far as traffic tickets go, it's
as useless as a vegetarian
at a hunt camp.
If you are driving too
fast and you meet the
highway patrol, you are
going to get a speeding
ticket That's their job and
they're good at it.
I recently had a con-
frontation with one of Cit-
rus County Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy's men and it was
probably my fault, but
there were extenuating
circumstances. I was not
speeding. In fact, while I
was in my car, I was not
even moving. And that
was the problem.
Our main office is in the
Meadowcrest community
and it's boxed in by bad
roads. On the south side is
State Road 44, where
everyone promises to in-
stall a traffic light, allow-
ing folks once again to
make a left-hand turn
going toward Inverness.
Since the county opened
its new west side office in
Meadowcrest, the road is
way too dangerous.
On the north side of
Meadowcrest is County
Road 486. The county is
widening the highway to
four lanes, so it is a
nightmare.
Last week, I was late for
a meeting in Beverly Hills
and I went out to make a
right-hand turn on C.R.
486. Right-hand turns are
the easy ones.
When I got to the inter-
section of Meadowcrest
Boulevard and C.R. 486,
an older model pickup
truck was already at the
intersection. I pulled up
behind the pickup and
waited my turn. After
about a minute, there was
an opening in the traffic to
make the easy right-hand
turn. But the driver in the
pickup truck did not
move. I waited another
full minute and there was
another opening. Again
the driver did not move.
Now I will admit I am
not the most patient per-
son in the world, but I as-
sumed the driver of the
pickup truck might have
fallen asleep. We have lots
of senior citizens in Mead-
owcrest and occasionally
they nod off.
When the pick-up truck
driver failed to turn right
after the third opportu-
nity, I did what any red-
blooded American would
do, I gave the horn a little
toot. It was not a stressful
slamming of the horn. It
was just a toot
Instead of responding to
my good-natured toot and
turning right, the driver
side door of the pickup
truck flew open and out
jumped a man in a sheriff's
department uniform. He
was mad. His arms were
flailing. Did I mention he
See Page C3







Page C2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012



PINION


"Time is the measure of business."
Francis Bacon, 1625


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............... .................. publisher
M ike A rnold ............................ ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ................................ editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. ............. citizen member
L fJ ^ Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................... ................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CORPORATE MALFEASANCE





Another




black eye




for Citizens
Already sporting a black Board of Governors raising an
eye for increasing home- eyebrow, the four investigators
owners' in- who uncovered
surance rates, THE ISSUE: the corporate
using its re-in- malfeasance were
section program Citizens' sordid terminated and
to slash coverage corporate culture. silenced with con-
and proposing the fidentiality agree-
transfer of $350 OUR OPINION: ments in an
million to private obvious attempt
insurers in low- Integrity, to sweep their
interest, forgiv- traccountabilitrency andust findings under
able loans, be restored. the rug. -
Citizens recently While the dis-
added another banding of the


black eye to its corporate rep-
utation by disbanding its Office
of Corporate Integrity (OCI).
In March, an anonymous tip-
ster triggered an internal in-
quiry by OCI investigators to
determine how Citizens officials
responded to previous allega-
tions of impropriety that in-
cluded sexual harassment,
drunkenness, public disrobing,
questionable severance pay-
ments and falsifying documents.
During the course of the OCI
investigation, a sordid corporate
culture that fostered, tolerated
and even rewarded corporate
excess and misconduct among
officials at the multi-billion, not-
for-profit, state-run property
and casualty insurer of last re-
sort was uncovered.
In response to the investiga-
tors' scathing findings, top Cit-
izens officials shot the
messenger. The OCI was
abruptly disbanded last month
under the ruse of a restructur-
ing effort purportedly aimed at
beefing up its fraud detection
system and avoiding unneces-
sary redundancies.
Furthermore, without a sin-
gle member of the Citizens


Handing out a thank you
Never enough thank you's, but
here is one: Thank you
for the CenturyLink for
the fast and courteous
service I received on
Nov. 19 and God bless.
Beautiful picture
I would like to say the
Tuesday, Nov. 20, page P
A3's picture taken by
Dave Sigler of the young
gentleman who got the
finalist is a wonderful CAL
picture. It says every- 563
thing and I just wanted t)
to say that Dave Sigler
took a beautiful picture.
Words do say everything.
Setting record straight
I can't believe the misinforma-
tion we have been getting on the
subject of coyotes here in
Florida. I moved to Florida more


I


(


OCI and the termination of its
investigators failed to raise the
eyebrows of Citizens' top offi-
cials, a report released last
week by Citizens' audit com-
mittee publicly revealed the
investigators' findings for the
first time, igniting calls for ac-
countability from public
watchdog groups.
With the public surfacing of
the latest revelations, Gov.
Scott, for the second time since
September, has called for an
investigation into Citizens' top
officials by requesting the
state's chief inspector general
"conduct a thorough review of
the terminations to determine
whether any of them were re-
taliatory in nature."
While the review is certainly
welcome, Gov. Scott is urged to
faithfully follow through on the
review's findings and force-
fully take the necessary action
to clean up the corporate
cesspit Citizens has apparently
become.
The citizens of Florida de-
serve no less than a state-run
insurer of last resort that is
guided by integrity, accounta-
bility and transparency


than 50 years ago and there were
no coyotes reportedly seen in this
area at that time.
The meat-eating
Illl ...:.. . ....:...i. ..


wiluldle consisted in
Florida of panthers,
wolves, bobcats, red
and gray foxes. Small
coyotes were very nu-
merous in Texas, and
they started to migrate
east toward Florida.


Along the way, they
*IPy mated with wild wolves
and large shepherd-
0)579 type dogs that (had)
J 9O gone wild. As a result,
by the time they got to
Florida, they were
much larger. Their appearance
these days is of a large mangy-
looking dog. They began killing
the deer population around here
and as a result, the Florida pan-
thers had to move North and
they moved up into the Carolinas.


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


Digesting Twinkies' lessons


"All Gods were immortal."
Stanislaw Lee
WASHINGTON
nd also brands, the gods of
the marketplace. Earth-
quakes may strike, dynas-
ties may fall and
locusts may devour the
crops, but Oldsmobile
and Pan Am are for-
ever Never mind.
But about the death ..-
of Twinkies: Write obit-
uaries in the subjunc- /
tive mood. Like
Lazarus, but for a rea-
son more mundane
than miraculous, this Georg
confection may be OT|
resurrected. VOI
In any case, the cri-
sis of Hostess Brands
Inc., the maker of Twinkies, in-
volves two potent lessons. First,
market forces will have their way.
Second, never underestimate
baby boomer nostalgia, which is
acute narcissism. The Twinkies
melodrama has the boomers
thinking as usual, about them-
selves: If an 82-year-old brand
can die, so can we. Is that even
legal?
The late Daniel Boorstin, his-
torian and Librarian of Congress,
said Americans belong to "con-
sumption communities." Are you
a Ford or Chevy person? Sears
Roebuck or Montgomery Ward?
Camels or Chesterfields? Wooed
by advertising, people plight
their troths to brands in mar-
riages often more durable than
boomers' actual marriages.
Hostess, which had 18,500 em-
ployees making and distributing
more than 30 brands made in 36
plants, had been in and out of
bankruptcy several times since
2004. Its terminal crisis began
Nov 9 when thousands of mem-
bers of the bakers union went out
on strike to protest wage, health
care and pension cuts imposed
by a court. The bakers objected to
a 17 percent increase in their


H
4


contribution for their health care
benefits.
Amazingly, Washington did not
offer Hostess a bailout. This dis-
criminatory policy may be a con-
stitutional violation denial of
equal protection of the
laws. Since the onset of
the financial crisis, the
government has de-
cided some SIFIs are
TBTF some system-
ically important finan-
cial institutions are too
big to fail. Why, any
fair-minded person
will ask, was Hostess
e Will not TBTF?
IER Granted, it was not
CES big in the technical,
crabbed, hairsplitting,
narrow-minded way
that "big" is normally under-
stood, as a boring matter of mere
size. It was, however, big in what
matters most in boomers'
minds. They fondly remember
opening their Roy Roger, Hopa-
long Cassidy or Davey Crocket
lunchboxes at school and finding
Twinkies nestled next to peanut
butter and jelly sandwiches
made of Wonder Bread (another
endangered Hostess species).
Stendhal said the only way ice
cream could be better is if it were
a sin. Boomers, a generation of
food scolds, became adults who
considered Twinkies and other
sugary things sinful. They should
be shedding scalding tears of re-
morse.
Anyway, why GM and not Host-
ess? The Troubled Asset Relief
Program, aka TARP was passed
to rescue financial institutions.
But Washington reasoned:
"What's legality among cronies?"
So soon TARP was succoring
GM, which was not a financial in-
stitution. It was not even a car
company It was a health care
provider unsuccessfully trying to
sell cars fast enough to generate
enough revenue to pay health
benefits for its employees and ap-


proximately twice as many
retirees.
Hostess had in its far-flung op-
erations 372 collective bargaining
agreements with various unions
that had sought and received -
shed no tears for complicit man-
agement- some interesting ben-
efits. The Teamsters liked the
rule that bread and pastries
might be going to the same place
but must go in different trucks.
The bakers rejected manage-
ment's final offer by a voice vote.
The Teamsters, who favored a
compromise, wanted a secret bal-
lot. This is insouciant insolence
by the Teamsters, who are situa-
tional ethicists. In Washington,
operating from impressive head-
quarters on prime real estate at
the foot of Capitol Hill, the
union's leadership has lobbied
Congress for the Employee Free
Choice Act. That is the Orwellian
title of legislation that would ef-
fectively abolish employees' right
to secret ballots in unionization
elections, replacing them with
"card check," whereby individu-
als confronted by union organiz-
ers sign a card indicating support
for the union.
The market said Hostess as
configured made no sense. If,
however, Twinkies and perhaps
other Hostess brands retain
value, the market will say so, and
someone will produce them.
Probably in a right-to-work state,
which is how "entrepreneurial
federalism" (another Boorstin
phrase) should work: Business
moves to states that make it wel-
come.
Whatever else a hospital ought
to do, supposedly said Florence
Nightingale, it ought not to
spread disease. And whatever
else unions should do, they
should not put employers out of
business.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost.com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


The false narrative
After the recent election, the
conclusion by conventional wis-
dom, any and all pundits, and
press is the results demonstrate
without a doubt the white (Anglo
Saxon?) majority is no longer the
dominant voting bloc. Fair
enough.
For a country that prides itself
and insists on not ascribing dif-
ferences other than physical be-
tween races, this is clearly
race-based thinking.
I take issue with the corollary
that states or assumes the new
majority subscribes to different
values and ideals than those of a
different racial makeup.
The jump to the next conclu-
sion, by all concerned, is the new
majority described as "non
white, brown, Asian, black" or
more recent non-white immi-
grants "is that their values and
priorities or reasons for immi-
grating or living in the USA are
somehow different from those
already here."
I do not believe the "new" ma-
jority does not aspire to the same
freedom and rights granted by
our Constitution which is, as we
know, the right to life liberty and
the pursuit of happiness as de-
fined by each individual.
The narrative that somehow


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352 564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

we will have to modify the ideals
and values which, warts and all,
have led this country to prosper-
ity never previously recorded, is
profoundly distressing, but is
eerily becoming dogma.
The narrative I see is a narra-
tive with an agenda, an agenda


that historically and inevitably
has led to the demise and de-
struction of a society, benefiting
less and less of the population.
The tower of Babel and the
word Balkanization come
quickly to mind.
Historically and with great ef-
fort, pain and hard work we all
forged and became a super
human alloy as it were: Ameri-
cans. In my opinion, the current
narrative is separating the alloy
components into weaker, more
vulnerable components and if
successful, will destroy our na-
tion as we know it
Robin Humphrey
Crystal River

Try voting by mail
In 1996, the State of Oregon
became the first state in the na-
tion to conduct a presidential
election entirely by mail, with
over 80 percent of registered vot-
ers participating.
In 2003, a University of Oregon
poll showed high favorability,
with registered Democrats 85 per-
cent and Republicans 76 percent
Florida legislators would do
well to investigate this proven
system.
Kathleen Burrows
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


llk





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thankful for Thanksgiving and day following


T hanksgiving has
already been cel-
ebrated this year
-it was Thursday, Nov.
22. But, for me, Thanks- q
giving and the days
which follow until
Christmas always sort
of merge and truly cre-
ate what one song-
writer described as the Fred B
"most wonderful time A SI
of the year."
As a little fellow, I OF I
not only knew Thanks-
giving meant I could seriously
start counting the days before a
visit from Santa Claus, but the
stuff my mother cooked ... my, my,
my Not only the turkey with corn-


3r
I

L
L


bread dressing, giblet
gravy, mashed pota-
-l toes, but also the
sweets such as banana
bread, fruit cake, sweet
potato pie, lemon
meringue pie. Yum,
yum, yum.
She always cooked a
turkey for both days;
rannen and, on Christmas, she
ICE would add a roasted
duck.
.IFE Boring?
No, not at all, just all
a part of the sensational, seasonal
memories.
In my earlier life, I didn't think
those holidays could get any bet-
ter, but they did. During the 1965


season, my life changed forever,
because I began my courtship of
Cheryl.
On the Wednesday before
Thanksgiving 1965, I received or-
ders directing me to report on
Dec. 13 to Fort Benning, Ga., for
five months of active duty as an
army reservist. Cheryl and I had
met for the first time the previous
July and had been doing some
modest flirting waves and
smiles when we saw each other.
But we'd not yet gotten down to
the business of figuring out what
came next, that is, not until the
Saturday after Thanksgiving.
I'm sure I've told this before -
more than once and I apologize
for telling it again, but on that Sat-


urday night, Cheryl and I were
once again in the same place at
the same time. We made a date for
the following Monday night; then,
after that first date, we were to-
gether as often as possible until I
had to go away
For those next two weeks, we
wasted no time. And, before I left,
we both knew our courtship would
continue by mail while I was gone
and hopefully, I could be home for
a few days during my time of ac-
tive duty. Some uncertainty re-
mained, but we both believed our
serendipitous relationship was
destined to become more.
What immediately followed
Thanksgiving 1965?
An unexpected action by the


folks at Fort Benning allowed me
to come home on leave for four
days at Christmas. Cheryl and I
spent those days coming to realize
we were truly meant to be to-
gether for the rest of our lives.
What else has followed since
Thanksgiving 1965?
Marriage; 47 additional Thanks-
givings; 47 Christmases; three
children; seven grandchildren;
and, an immeasurable multitude
of other wonderful things for
which my Cheryl and I give thanks
to God each and every day
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


= Hot Corner: PORT CITRUS=

Port Citrus bad idea
I'm wondering if there is any way to penetrate the
minds of the "officials" who think it is such a great idea
to go ahead with the gigantic boondoggle laughingly
called "Port Citrus." The majority of citizens that I have
had contact with do not want to spend what few dollars
they have left after taxes and the high price of gasoline
on a useless, totally unworkable project. Come on, Cit-
rus County. The only benefit is to the adjacent property
owners. This should come under the same category as
the stoplight at Ottawa a total waste of taxpayers'
money.
Money doubled for Port Citrus study
I could have sworn that the county was going to spend
$50,000 for a feasibility study and as true politicians
that has doubled. And they're trying to tell us in this
morning's paper that we got more for our money than
we should have. When politicians talk like that, look out.
Taking over nature
"Team OK's $100,000 port feasibility contract." Well,
it looks like the county commissioners (are) bound and
determined to take the "nature" out of the Nature
Coast. I think this whole thing should be up for a refer-
endum and the whole entire county vote. It seems to me
the people that I talk to, the majority of them don't
want the port and the county commissioners are jam-
ming it down our throats and wasting our time and
money. They're determined to push the port through if
they can and begin the ruination of the Nature Coast.
This is ridiculous. This is our coast, this is our county.
This is not the county commission's. It's not their
money; it's ours, it's the people's. Put it up to a vote.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Thank you, Cliff;
donate to HOF
We would like to recognize the
passing last week of Clifford E
Dungleman, 90, of Inverness.
Many residents of Inverness may
have known him as "the cat
man," the elderly gentleman who
fed our community's stray cats on
a daily basis and at his advanced
age doing so on his bicycle in the
heart of downtown Inverness.
Despite the divergent opinion
we may have about "feeding stray
cats" and its impact may have on
a community what was so im-
pressive was his earnest commit-
ment to taking care of these
creatures. To see Cliff (as he was
known by his friends) arrive at
his established scheduled feed-
ing locations (multiple times a
day), it was clear the cats he was
caring for had grown to rely on
him. What could have been a
feral cat that roamed the streets
in search for their next meal -
became homeless cats (by no
fault of their own) -came to rely
on the kindness and earnest
heart of this gentleman and thus
chose to stay in their established
location/corner or "colony"
While these community cats
have lost their friend Cliff, the
Humanitarians of Fla., Inc.
(HOF) who supported Cliff in his
unstoppable passion have taken
over the responsibility of over-
seeing these cat communities.
The HOF have pushed for and
are responsible for our county's
current Trap and Release (TNR)
program, which allows for the


PAPER
Continued from Page C1

Parker also feels taxpayer
dollars might be spent more
wisely He suggests some
schools overspend in tech-
nology while lacking enough
of the basics like paper -
to make it through the year.
Nicholas must have a di-
rect line to Secretary of
Transportation Ray LaHood,
because his concern is the
lack of laws in the state con-
cerning distracted drivers.
He was nearly run over in
his neighborhood by a driver
who was texting, but because
no laws are on the books, the
sheriff's office couldn't do
anything about it.
Miles is concerned about
the buying habits of
teenagers and young adults
who indiscriminately pay for
goods retailers intentionally
hike the price on and target
to their demographic. He


SUBMIT LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
* Send letters to: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Cr
River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to lette
@chronicleonline.com.


humane spaying and neutering of
cat colonies that are being re-
sponsibly fed by established citi-
zens, neighborhoods or rescue
organizations in the hopes that
these creatures in many cases
not human socialized to allow for
a direct adoption do not have
to be euthanized, but at the same
time, spayed/neutered to stem
the proliferation of the overpopu-
lation of domesticated cats.
Many of us in our downtown In-
verness community would donate
money or cat food to Cliff directly
to support his passion. In Cliff's
honor, please consider a donation
to the Humanitarians, both mone-
tary or via food. Please get to know
this established Citrus County ani-
mal welfare organization that not
only advocates for Citrus County
homeless pets but continues to
provide low-cost spay and neuter
options for our county citizens. Let
them know your contribution is "in
honor of Cliff." Thank you Cliff
Dungleman; your presence will be
missed in our community.
For more information or to do-
nate to the Humanitarians of
Florida Inc., PO. Box 924, Inver-
ness, FL 34451, (their spay/neuter
clinic is at 1149 Conant Ave, Crys-
tal River); 352-563-2370; www.hof-
spha.org/index.html.
Andrea and Winston Perry, Dana
Schenk-Sutter (Ritzy Rags &


correctly rationalizes if they
(the young consumers) stop
buying those products, the
prices will drop.
Joseph is saddened voters
could not understand the re-
turn on investment their ap-
proving the school tax
referendum would have
meant to education. He
notes the .25 mill was a small
outlay for something to en-
sure good teachers kept
their jobs and interesting
courses remained available.
Benjamin offers that band
practice should be treated
like sports in school, because
marching while playing and
carrying instruments can be
every bit as strenuous as play-
ing sports. After all, bands
stretch every day before
working out, and they regu-
larly enter into competitions.
Jonathan laments the two-
party system of government
and asks the media give
more coverage to third-party
platforms, allowing voters to
become better educated and


Glitzy Jewels), Dr. Jul
berger (Director, Citru
Animal Services), Lace
Blue-McLean (Invernes
Wellness), Brad and Pa
(Deco Cafe), Donna De
family, (The Ice Cream
Beth and Chef Michael
House Bistro, Mar
Teresa Earnest (Ear
Consulting), Judi and G
Dermark (Towne and Cc
Wood Furniture), StepI
LeRoy Rooks (Skoor
Market), Rafael Cabrer
Big Dog Rescue Direct
and Tim Channell (Stun
ers on the Square), S
Carter (neighbor a
County Animal
v


Call to action
Congress
OK, I've had about en
post-election political no
Republicans: Quit the
bellyaching and excuses
rats: Quit the hardly ear
congratulations. Let's fa
after the archaic and soi
esoteric electoral college
elected President Obam
seemingly large margin,
ular vote showed a less t
overwhelming 51-to-49-p
edge. And, even though 1
mocrats picked up sever
in the House and Senate


learn how those candidates
view the major issues.
Carmine cleverly crafted a
scenario where the religion
Pastafarianism was being
persecuted because of their
worship of the flying
spaghetti monster. (Some
consider this to be a real re-
ligion, but it started as a par-
ody to make a point about
religion and schools.) He
said the persecution sick-
ened him and he didn't be-
lieve in the Pastafarian
doctrine, but respected their
right to worship in their own
fashion.
He said, "It's so silly that I
can accept Pastafarianism
and I am only 14, but those
who have the audacity to call
themselves adults, can't."
Out of the mouths of babes.


Mike Arnold, editor of the
Chronicle, and can be
reached at 352-564-2930 or
marnold@chronicleonline.
comn.


have pretty much returned to the
pre-election status quo of Obama
ystal as president, the House with a
rs Republican majority and the
Senate with a Democratic major-
ity. Wow! Haven't the last couple
ie Rosen- of years been fun?
us County Now, despite all the billions of
* and Bob dollars spent in getting us ab-
ss Yoga & solutely nowhere insofar as polit-
itty Gibbs ical clout goes, there is one
eHart and really, really telling statistic we
n Doctor), all need to be concerned about:
, McLeod That is the fact that only 9 or 10
shall and percent of us think Congress is
iarry Van- doing a good job. Nine or 10 per-
ountry All cent! My goodness! Any employee
hanie and in any endeavor other than Con-
s Natural gress who (was) rated 10 out of
ra (Casita 100 in performance would not
tor), John last the day
mpknock- I know it is not a perfect com-
Samantha
nd Citrus prison, but it is close enough to
Services, be outrageous on the face of it.
volunteer ) Senators and Representatives:
Inverness Are you seeing these numbers?
As a body, you members of Con-
for gress have passed fewer laws
than any Congress in recent his-
tory! What are you doing besides
ough of promising not to do things? For
nonsense. example, all of you have prom-
jejune ised or vowed never to raise
3. Democ- taxes or tax rates ... Pretty stupid
ned, self promise, that one. The way you
ce it, people are spending our money
mewhat (or borrowing money from China
e re- as the case may be) you know
a by a taxes and/or rates must be in-
the pop- creased. Sure, expenses can also
than be cut back, so do some of that
percentt too. But spending decreases will
the De- not do all that is needed. Not by a
ral seats long shot. You know this!
, we I'm begging all of you politicians


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

was in a sheriff's department uniform?
It took me a few seconds to realize he
was not a regular sheriff's deputy, but a
volunteer community patrol person. He
walked back to my car, looked in the win-
dow and said "You can't beep your horn."
This was obviously an incorrect con-
clusion. I was in a car My car had a horn.
I had already demonstrated I was capa-
ble of beeping the horn. I beeped it again.
"No, you're wrong about that. I can
beep the horn," I told him.
The uniformed volunteer was not
impressed.
"I'm taking down your license number
and turning you in," he told me.
"For beeping my horn?" I asked in a
totally non-remorseful way
"You are not allowed to beep your
horn," he said.
He went back and looked at my li-
cense plate, but did not write it down. (I
mention the writing down thing, because
I have looked at my license plate a thou-
sand times and I can't remember a sin-
gle number in it.)


of both parties. Find some politi-
cal courage. Restudy what a politi-
cian is supposed to do, besides get
re-elected, that is. Enact legisla-
tion for the good of the country A
nice start would be a clean budget
that moves us closer to financial
stability and builds us a guardrail
in front of that impending "fiscal
cliff." Republicans, hike up your
shorts and accept some tax rate
increases (or adjustments if you
prefer) for the rich. Democrats,
hike up your shorts and work to-
ward meaningful spending cuts.
Every member of Congress, make
a pledge to do things such as find-
ing ways to compromise and reach
across the aisle whenever possible
for the good of the country in-
stead of pledges to not do things
and not compromise. Politics is
supposed to be all about rational,
clear-headed compromise for
goodness sakes!
Another area is Obamacare. It
is not all good. It is not all bad, ei-
ther Fix or eliminate the bad
parts and help improve the good
parts, from both sides of the
aisle.
All politicians: Put forth an ef-
fort to make this post-election pe-
riod and the next four-year
period revolutionary in seeing to
it we regain respect for our
elected representatives. Look at
how this period in our history
can be the greatest opportunity
in your political careers to really
make a difference.
Do it now.
Thomas Fallon
Lecanto


In the meantime, six cars now were
backed up behind me waiting to make
the easy right-hand turn.
"Why would my car have a horn if I am
not allowed to use it?" I asked in a con-
tinued non-remorseful way
He had no answer, but he was not
happy
To the best of knowledge they do give
them official-looking uniforms, but they
do not give weapons to the volunteer
community patrol people. If they did, he
would have shot me or at least shot my
horn.
I also admit if the volunteer was driv-
ing a sheriff deputy's car, I probably
would not have beeped my horn at him.
I am impatient, but not totally stupid.
We collectively give up individual
freedoms in this country for the greater
good. You can't yell "fire" in a crowded
movie theater without facing repercus-
sions. I can accept that rule. But I have
not given up the right to beep my horn.
Even if it was Sheriff Jeff Dawsy sleep-
ing in the car in front of me, I have the
right to beep the horn without being re-
morseful.
I am going to drive home now, but I
will probably wait until that helicopter
stops circling the building.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LITTETOM TCERBYTM OER


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle. He is also the spokesperson
against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs.


Letter to THE EDITOR


Loophole
vs. incentive
When does an incentive
become a loophole?
When Congress made
modifications in the tax
law, it was done to encour-
age business, an industry
or people to do something
to stimulate the economy
in the best interest of the
United States. For exam-
ple, (Congress) paid owners
of property not to plant
crops on their property to
maintain the price of farm
products that already ex-
isted, known as the farm
subsidy It gave businesses
a deduction on taxes if they
would hire more people,
maybe veterans, or control
the output of their prod-
ucts. It gave tax breaks to
all who file income tax re-
turns by adjustments to
gross income, deductions
to taxable income and
credits to the amount of tax
paid. It encouraged us to
buy a home, give money to
charities, pay taxes to local
and state governments and
invest money in savings ac-
counts such as 401K's and
Traditional or Roth IRA ac-
counts.
The purpose of the sav-
ings account is to encour-
age us to invest in our


future and hopefully be-
come less dependent on the
government and Social Se-
curity when we retire.
These were all good ideas,
and still are, at the time that
they were implemented
and were well received.
Times have changed
and so have we. Some of
these exceptions have be-
come outdated and as a
whole, the tax code should
be reviewed and possibly
replaced.
The tax law has been re-
vised too many times and
each time it seems to cre-
ate more problems than it
resolves. The more it is re-
vised, the more compli-
cated it becomes and
becomes unmanageable.
The term Effective Tax
Rate that it is now being
referred to is calculated
by dividing the actual
taxes paid by the gross in-
come. Everyone's effective
tax rate is much lower
than the tax rate we pay
on our taxable income.
Terms (words) are im-
portant and we have to un-
derstand how they are
used or we will be easily
misled. Liars can figure,
but figures don't lie.
Alfred E. Mason
Crystal River


SOUND OFF
* The Citrus County Chronicle invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.


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K-9 Karnival

December 2nd
Golden Dragon Acrobats
Christmas in Killarney

December 7th
Father Christmas Ball
The New Dawn Singers
Ft. Cooper Night of Lights

December 8th
Inverness Christmas Parade
Holiday Prelude
Ft. Cooper Night of Lights

December 9th
Holiday Prelude
Ft. Cooper Night of Lights
Silver Bells

December 12th
Hanukkah Celebration

December 14th
Adopt a Tree

December 15th
Homosassa Boat Parade
Toy Run
A Day at the Races

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The Joy of Christmas A Singing Celebration of Carols
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C4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


COMMENTARY


I PLATINUM SPO


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I T it


,polA*^











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Shopping small


Businesses lure

customers with

discounts after

Black Friday
Associated Press
NEW YORK After the
crowds have shopped at large
stores and sprawling malls on
Black Friday, many smaller
businesses are hoping Satur-
day will be their day
Thousands of small stores,
restaurants, spas and even
dry cleaners across the U.S.
will offer their own discounts
and promotions to draw holi-
day shoppers on what's known
as Small Business Saturday
American Express created
the day three years ago, it said,
to help small businesses strug-
gling during the recession. The
credit and charge card com-
pany encourages cardholders,
who have registered in ad-
vance online to make pur-
chases with their cards in
exchange for a $25 rebate paid
for by American Express, if
they buy something at a partic-
ipating business. American Ex-
press won't say how much the
promotion costs, but Susan
Sobbott, president of Ameri-
can Express OPEN, the com-
pany's small business division,
said it is a considerable
amount.
But even small merchants
who aren't officially part of the
event hope to get a bump in
revenue during a weekend
when they used to be all but
forgotten in an avalanche of
deep discounts offered by big
stores and online retailers.
Perhaps more important, the
day has become an opportu-
nity for small businesses to
build a corps of customers who
will come back year-round.
In Dixon, Ill., 51 small busi-
nesses have banded together
to recruit local artists and per-
formers to create a party-like
atmosphere Saturday. They
are also planning other events
for the holiday season. A year
ago, the combination of the
American Express rebate and
the events helped give the par-
ticipating businesses a collec-
tive revenue increase of more
than 50 percent on the Satur-
day after Thanksgiving, said
Lisa Higby, owner of Distinc-
tive Gardens, a nursery and
garden center there. But the
benefit goes beyond a one-day
jolt.
"It gives us a yearlong im-
pact, much greater exposure
for our business," Higby said.
American Express may have
intended to give small mer-
chants and card usage a
boost in a tough economy, but
Small Business Saturday is
also helping small merchants
get a bigger share of the spot-
light and spending between
Black Friday and Cyber Mon-
day, a shopping holiday
dreamed up to get people ex-
cited about shopping online on
the Monday after Thanksgiv-
ing. For some retailers, the
sales they get after people
push back from the Thanksgiv-
ing dinner table represents a
significant chunk of profit for
the year That hasn't been so
true for most small businesses.
Ninety-one percent of the 1,003
small business owners said, in
a survey commissioned by
Bank of America, the day after
Thanksgiving has little, or no,


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
A flag urging customers
to "Shop Local" is staked next
to A Basket Full store Friday in
Boalsburg, Pa. Owners of small
stores across Pennsylvania
hope to get a boost from "Small
Business Saturday" to encourage
holiday shoppers to spend money
in local communities.
Adrienne Sherard relaxes as
she gets a spa treatment at
Eden Organix spa from owner
Valerie Mason-Robinson, in
Highland Park, N.J. Eden
Organix, a spa in Highland Park,
N.J., will give customers a
10 percent discount on
products from 9 a.m. to noon,
said owner Valerie Robinson.
effect on their profit.
"Black Friday doesn't do
anything for us," said Leslie
Leahy, owner of The Hitching
Post, a gift shop in Reading,
Mass.
In fact, it's pretty quiet in
town, because so many people
are at the malls and big-box
stores, she said.
To make the most of Small
Business Saturday, many small
business owners offer dis-
counts as part of a marketing
strategy for the entire holiday
season. Leahy had good results
last year Revenue at The
Hitching Post rose 28 percent
on the Saturday after Thanks-
giving a year ago from the
same day in 2011. She doesn't
give discounts on her mer-
chandise, but the $25 rebate
from American Express drew
customers. This year, she and


Linda Esposito, owner of the Bella di Vita store in Boalsburg, Pa.,
which sells handmade soaps and other gifts, takes cash from a
customer Friday.


other retailers in town are
joining for a "buy local" week-
end. She will serve drinks and
treats for customers. American
Express sends organizing kits
to 50 chambers of commerce
around the country to help
communities create joint
Small Business Saturday
events, but many come up with
ideas about how to promote
the day on their own.
Some small business owners
will have the kind of early-bird
specials Black Friday is fa-
mous for
Eden Organix, a spa in High-
land Park, N.J., will give cus-
tomers a 10 percent discount
on the products it sells from 9
a.m. to noon, said owner Va-
lerie Robinson who is promot-
ing the event on Facebook,
Twitter and her own website.
She doesn't expect to get a big
revenue boost from the day -
she's more concerned about
drawing new clients and ce-
menting her relationship with


current ones.
"We want to build more of a
loyal customer base," Robin-
son said.
The event has helped some
small business owners turn a
day that was often a disappoint-
ment into a successful one. The
Saturday after Thanksgiving is
usually one of the slowest days
of the year for retailers in
Tribeca, the residential neigh-
borhood part of New York's fi-
nancial district. Many people
are away for the weekend, so
business drops at Babesta Cribz
and Babesta Threads, two
Tribeca stores. Owner Jennifer
Cattaui is taking part in Small
Business Saturday for the third
time, expecting she will get
enough of a revenue increase to
give her stores a normal take for
a Saturday
This year, Cattaui will give
customers 20 percent off
everything in her Threads

See Page D4


Falling for


time share


sales pitch


proves costly

Dear Bruce: While vacation-
ing in Las Vegas back in Feb-
ruary, my fiance and I
bought a time share at a local re-
sort. We thought it would be a good
deal and would be beneficial as our
family grew. Now, after owning it for
eight months, we are finding we
don't have the time to make it
worthwhile.
Is there anything we can do to get
out of this? Or are we stuck paying
the monthly amount, plus the an-
nual dues, for the next 10 years on
something we most likely won't
use? We are not looking to make a
profit, and we would be willing to
forfeit the amount we have paid so
far, as well as the free trips they
gave us.
Any advice would be helpful.
Love your column in the Yakima
(Wash.) Herald-Republic. R.D.,
via email
Dear R.D.: It would appear you
had a wonderful vacation, but I
have bad news for you. Many of us,
including this writer, have sat
through the time-share speeches.
These guys are very good at what
they do, as you have learned. They
persuaded you this was a deal you
couldn't pass up. The fact is, you
signed a contract, and they will do
their best to hold you to it.
You say you're not looking to
make a profit. I have news for you:
If you can get out with your whole
skin, you will be lucky. In most
cases, time shares cannot even be
given away, let alone sold.
Just to be sure about where you
stand, have an attorney review your
contract. I think, however, that you
will find you're out of luck.
Dear Bruce: I follow your column
in our local paper and find your ad-
vice to the point and helpful.
I have gone back to school after
working for several years. I am sin-
gle, and I saved for living expenses
during my school years. While work-
ing, I accumulated a small 401(k) of
about $20,000. Since I will not have
income during the next couple of
years, should I convert my 401(k) to
a Roth IRA? If I go with a broker, the
small amount in the 401(k) will
likely not earn much in today's
economy, while my former em-
ployer's 401(k) is a much larger pool
and should earn more. Does the tax
advantage from rolling over while I
have no income make sense? I think
the IRS will take about $3,000 of my
401(k). B.C., via email
Dear B.C.: Congratulations on
going back to school and providing
for your expenses. That says a lot
about your maturity.
You didn't say how long you've
been in school, but it's possible this
is your first semester and you
worked for perhaps half or more of
2012. If that is the case, you have in-
come this year, meaning this may
not be the appropriate time to con-
vert your 401(k) to a Roth IRA. You
might be advised to wait until next
year I would talk to a professional
accountant regarding your best
strategy
I can neither applaud nor dis-
agree with your observation regard-
ing whether you should go with a
broker or, as you put it, "a larger
pool." Examine how your 401(k) is
currently doing. Some employer
choices are doing well, and others
are not. The same thing can be said
about brokers. A broker may find
ways to outperform the employer's
pool.
Most important is you made a
wise move in going back to school
and have provided for your ex-
penses so you won't be digging a big
hole.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.comrn or
to Smart Money P.O. Box 7150,
Hudson, FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.










D2

SUNDAY
NOVEMBER 25, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan M.
this:
iii riCFB


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Crystal River Christmas Parade names Grand Marshal YOU CAUGHT


The Crystal River Christ- Now a fixture of Citrus
mas Parade is honored to county, McClellan has be-
have Dale McClellan, M & B come a spokesman for county
Dairy, as its Grand Marshal. agriculture and is one of the
Dale, most recently named founders of the Agricultural
the 2012 Sunbelt Expo South- Alliance of Citrus County,
eastern Farmer of the Year, is which started as a subcom-
also a county staple, much mittee of the Citrus County
like his milk and dairy Dale Economic Development
products. McClellan Council.
Even those who haven't M & B Dairy The alliance is now facili-
heard his name have proba- tated by the Citrus County Ex-
bly come in contact with some of his tension Services Division.
company's products. A humble man, who has learned


that failure can be the springboard to
success, Dale is a strong proponent
for the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce and the Economic Devel-
opment Council.
Always held the first Saturday of
December, the 2013 Crystal River
Christmas Parade is presented by the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
and the City of Crystal River.
This year, the parade will head out
from Citrus Avenue and proceed in
the southbound lanes of U.S. 19 to
Port Paradise Road.


MY EYE...M
Don Raymond
Senica Air Conditioning Inc.

... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Comfort Keepers sponsor of BWA Health & Fitness Expo
Jennifer Duca represented Comfort
Keepers, a home health agency pro- --- -,--- M if
viding in-home assisted living serv-
ices to senior and other persons with '
challenges to daily living. Comfort, .
Keepers guarantees the value of its L
services, backed by a quality care
staff and QA practices that con- p '
tribute to the Golden Guarantee pro-
vided. Truly a family run business, ,
four family members holding key po- 4 '
sitions putting truth in the statement
"Our Family Caring For Your Family."
Adhering to its slogan "Comforting
Solutions for In-Home Care" Comfort u
Keepers commitment is to cost ef- F
fectively support each client in
achieving their highest quality of life
possible. Office hours are Monday
through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 3 -
services are provided 24 hours,
seven days a week. Comfort Keepers i.-
is at 2244 State Road 44 W., -
Inverness. You may contact them at
352-726-4547 or at inverness@
comfortkeepers.com.


Welcome new Chamber member Christie Dental
The staff of Christie Dental are joined at
their ribbon cutting by Chamber Ambassa-
dors Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank;
C H I -I | Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Dan
F-) E N 1. Pushee, Associate Member; Janet Mayo,
Plantation on Crystal River; Tom Corcoran,
S.. .... Life Care Center of Citrus County; Crystal
.. ....... --Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; Betty
Murphy, Citrus Archives & Computers; and
noun-Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers, who wel-
comed Christie Dental to the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce. Dentists Dr. Linda
Witherow, Dr. Hang Tran and Dr. Tedra
Beckton of Christie Dental believe each pa-
tient should be treated as if they were fam-
ily and they will take the time to discuss
with you any issues found in your mouth and
treatment options. New patients are wel-
come and most insurance plans are ac-
cepted. This modern dental office is in the
Meadowcrest Business Park at 6015 W.
S,- Nordling Loop in Crystal River and is open
Monday through Friday. Call 352-795-5935.


Citrus County 'gives' year round for many causes


$10,000 raised for
Breast Cancer
Research at annual
October event
General Manager An-
drew Bartlett and Spa
owner Angela Oliverio,
along with their pictured
support team, present
Aveda Representative and
Cancer Survivor Amelia
Borders with this year's
Breast Cancer Awareness
fundraising results in the
amount of $10,000.
On Oct. 20, The Planta-
tion on Crystal River hosted
the fifth annual event pool-
side, along with Abitare
Salon & Day Spa and The
Spa at Plantation.
This year's event in-
cluded many items donated
through various local busi-
nesses which were raffled
off and presented as items
for silent bid, as well as
were auctioned off by
"Celebrity T-Shirt Wearers"
- local business leaders
within the community who
were live representatives of
package items up for bid.
All proceeds go directly
to the Estee Lauder Breast
Cancer Research Founda-
tion, a five-star charity or-
ganization and originator of
the popular Pink Ribbon
awareness campaign. For
participation in next year's
event, please call Angela at
352-563-0011.
Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County
accept $7,000
Twenty-six sponsors
made a $7,000 donation to
the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County possible on
Nov. 3 at the fifth annual
Kings Bay 5K. The sunrise
race, hosted by Seven
Rivers Regional Medical


gi


Front row, from left, are: Andrew Bartlett, General Manager of Plantation; Amelia Borders,
Aveda Development Partner; Lisa Villella, BCA Committee; Daniella Villella, Spa Team;
Cindy Long, Spa Team; Angela Oliverio, BCA Committee; Joseph Dailey, BCA Committee;
and Melissa Benefield, BCA Committee. Back row, from left, are: Micheal Mancke, Di-
rector of Sales Plantation; Megan Rayen, Spa Team; Chef Eric Smith of Plantation; Tiana
Festa, Spa Team; Genevieve Barrett, Spa Team; Allison Colson; and Aveda Development
Partner. Not pictured are Terra Ross, BCA Committee; and Tara Dixon, BCA Committee.


Center, brought more than
200 athletes to the beautiful
shores of Crystal River.
"We love that Kings Bay
5K offers residents a safe
and fun way to exercise,"
said Amy Kingery, event co-
ordinator. 'At the same
time, the race benefits local
nonprofit agencies that pro-
tect the well-being of our
community"
The 2012 sponsors were:
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory; Annett Bus
Lines; Cancer & Blood Dis-
ease Center; Mike Scott
Plumbing; Potu Cardiology;
Robert L. Feldman, M.D.,
PA.; Sunshine Gardens As-
sisted Living for Memory
Impaired; TeamHealth; Cit-
rus Hematology & Oncology;
Citrus Orthopaedic & Joint
Institute; Clementine Bou-
tique; College of Central
Florida; Edward Jones -
Crystal River; Fernando Es-
clopis, M.D.; Nature Coast
EMS; Seven Rivers Vascu-
lar; Holiday Inn Express -
Crystal River; HPH-Hospice


Trail Blazing donation


A donation of 32 baby blankets and two baby hats for new
mothers and babies of the Women's & Family Center at
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center was made possible
by the generous men and women of the Trail Blazing Sams
RV Chapter. Trail Blazing members presenting the donation
were Charlie Voyton, Linda Voyton, Lynne Morneault and
Albert Morneault. Accepting the blankets and hats on be-
half of the Women's & Family Center were Michaeline
Llewellyn and Nancy Ferguson.

of Citrus County; Ink-4-Less cle; Hometown Values; New
Plus Inc.; C.R. Anesthesia; A Concepts International Hair
Crystal River Kayak Com- Salon; and Kings Bay Ro-
pany; Citrus County Chroni- tary Stone Crab Jam.


Get pumped up for


upcoming Florida

Manatee Festival


Join us Jan. 19 and 20,
2013, as we celebrate the
manatee with boat tours,
crafters, marketplace ven-
dors, a fine art show, fantas-
tic food and a kids area.
Unique for 2013 is an op-
portunity to tour Three Sis-
ters Springs at no charge.
This joint effort of the
Florida Manatee Festival,
Friends of the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge
Complex and U.S. Fish and
Wildlife will take you di-
rectly to the Three Sisters
Springs on Saturday ONLY
for tours. As always, our local
boat captains will be ready
on Saturday and Sunday to
take you on a 30-minute tour
around the area to view the
manatees.
The waterfront beer gar-
den will swing with the
sounds of the popular
Tampa-based Mighty Mon-
gos, and their combination of
pop and reggae as well as
local Cajun/Zydeco/rock fa-
vorite Cajun Dave and the
Dixie Swingers on Saturday.
Sunday offers traditional
country/bluegrass music by
Bob & Sheila Everhart and
the great central Florida
Susan Smith rock band that
plays everything from Aretha
Franklin to Linda Ronstadt
A second entertainment
area has been added this


Citrus County
Cruisin'
Nov 30 to Dec. 2 Com-
munity Theater: "Win,
Lose or Die" at the Central
Ridge Community Center
Friday and Saturday
shows at 6 p.m.; Sunday
show at 3 p.m. Central
Ridge Community Center
Member price $20, non-
member $25. All tickets in-
clude a Themedd" dinner
and each show will benefit
a Citrus County charity.
Season is four shows-$70
members/$80 nonmem-
bers. 77 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills. For information,
call 352-342-6427.
Dec. 1 Parade in the
Hills, Holiday Arts &
Crafts/Car Show. The fes-
tivities include the 10 a.m.
parade that moves down
Beverly Hills Boulevard
from Lecanto Highway to
the Civic Center, a car show,
a kids area and an outdoor
selection of arts & crafts.
For information, visit www.
citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-746-4882. Event
runs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Dec. 1 Enjoy the lights
and sounds of Christmas at
the annual Crystal River


year in the children's area in
the park by City Hall on the
east side of U.S. 19. Currently
scheduled in that venue are
Breez, Shazahdi, Emily Rose
and Zero Gravity
When you are not viewing
the friendly manatees or lis-
tening to live music, wander
the stores on Citrus Avenue
and shop the varied selec-
tions of the many crafters
that come from near and far
This year we have secured
an additional wine/beer gar-
den right there on Citrus Av-
enue. Then cross U.S. 19 and
enjoy the works of fine artists
from around the area. Local
merchants will be on hand to
discuss their services. A chil-
dren's area will feature age-
appropriate music and other
kid-friendly activities.
The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, the Rotary
Club of Crystal River, the City
of Crystal and sustaining
partner, The Citrus County
Chronicle team up to bring
you this annual event In
2013, this two-day event is
presented by Crystal Motor
Car and the Tampa Bay
Times, and sponsored by Na-
ture Coast Financial Advi-
sors, Nature Coast Healthy
Living Magazine, Hometown
Values Magazine, Florida
Virtual School and the Fox
96.3/ Citrus 95.3.








Christmas Parade, pre-
sented by the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce and the City of Crys-
tal River. Always on the
first Saturday in Decem-
ber, the parade begins at 6
p.m. and will once again
travel south on U.S. 19
from Citrus Avenue to Port
Paradise Road. The theme
this year is "A Post Card
Christmas." More informa-
tion available at www.
citruscountychamber com.
Dec. 8 Santa and Mrs.
Claus visit Citrus County
once again for the annual
Inverness Christmas Pa-
rade, presented this year
by B & W Rexall Drug, the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce and the City of
Inverness. The parade
kicks off at noon from Pizza
Hut and proceeds east on
U.S. 41/S.R. 44 to Highland
Boulevard. Held the sec-
ond Saturday of December,
this year's parade theme is
'"A Post Card Christmas."






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's lonneition


D3

SUNDAY
NOVEMBER 25, 2012


35th annual Home & Outdoor Show


The 35th annual Home & Out-
door Show, conducted Nov 10 and
11 at the National Guard Armory in
Crystal River, found much success
with more than 1,200 people in at-
tendance throughout the event
For the second year in a row, toys
were collected for the Marine Corps
Reserve Toys for Tots and more
than $500 in funds were raised for
the program as well, thanks to the
innovative thinking and generosity
of Dave Hutchins from Bay Area Air
Conditioning and his staff.
Show visitors were able to learn
about everything from natural gas
to wind mitigation and everything
in between while getting their faces
painted, their taste buds tempted
and their blood drawn. The Annual
Home & Outdoor Show offers a
great service to CCBA members,
local businesses and consumers
each year by putting them all to-
gether in one place to promote
shopping locally For information
on the fine businesses that were
featured in this year's show and to
stay tuned for the 2013 show, visit
www.CitrusBuilders.com.
Thank you 2012 "Remodeling
America" Home & Outdoor Show
Sponsors & Committee Members
for helping to make our 35th an-
nual Home & Outdoor Show a fab-
ulous weekend!
2012 Show Sponsors
Home Improvement Sponsor:
Florida Public Utilities
Platinum Sponsor: Senica Air
Conditioning
Gold Sponsors: Citrus County
Chronicle, Gaudette Electric and
Gold Crest Homes
2011 Committee Members
Chairman Eric Swart, Citrus
Pest Management
Co-chair Dusty Porter,
Porter's Locksmithing
Secretary Roger Carlson,
Quality Crafted Builders
Bill Larder, Larder & Sons
Construction
John Porter, Porter's
Locksmithing
Sam Jones, Florida Pest
Control
Pat Spalding and Wade
Hughes of Florida Public Utilities
Special thanks to Lowe's, John
and Dusty Porter of Porter's Lock-
smithing, Randy Clark of Clark
Construction, Ron Lieberman of
Steel Structures of Florida, Gas-
ton Hall of Hall Brothers of CC
Inc., John Decker of Tropical Win-
dow Inc., the LifeSouth Commu-
nity Blood Centers and the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce.


Best of Show: Deem Kitchen & Bath proudly displays three consecutive years of Best of Show awards after
receiving the 2012 Best of Show by Exhibitor Vote on Nov. 11, 2012, at the National Guard Armory. From left
are John Deem, Pat Deem and Michael Deem.


-
THE ONLY BUGS
ES WE CAN'T CONTROL
CONTROL ARE LITTERBUGS !
P N~RO A lermite Lawn General Household Pests


Most Informative Booth winner by Exhibitor Vote: Florida Pest Control,
for the 2012 Home & Outdoor Show. Pictured are Florida Pest Control -
David Striglio, left, and Sam Jones, right.


Lowe's $50 gift card winners were
chosen from drawings each day of
people who attended the Florida
Home Builders Association Wind
Mitigation
& Hurricane
Protection "
Class each -
day during
the 35th an-
nual Home -
& Outdoor r .
Show.
AB 0 VE:
Saturday's
win ner :
Ellen Man-
ning with
husband,
Cur, right.
RIGHT: Sun-
day's win- f .
ner: Eleanor
Smith.


Home & Outdoor Show Co-chair Dusty Porter of Porter's Locksmithing, left,
presents Mike Deem of Deem Kitchen & Bath, right, with the People's
Choice Award at the CCBA's Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 15. People's
Choice is voted on by visitors to the Home & Outdoor Show each year.


CALL FOR ENTRIES
* The 2013 Spring Parade of Homes for Citrus and Her-
nando counties has been set for March 16 to 24,
2013, with an entry deadline of Thursday, Jan. 10.
* Entry to the Parade of Homes is $1,475 for the first
model or sales office, with a second entry for $500
and each additional entry for $350 each.
* Sponsorships are also now available.
* Parade of Homes participation is open to all Florida
Home Builders Associations who have a model and/or
sales office in Citrus and/or Hernando County who are
interested in a proven method of traffic and lead
generation.
* For more information, please contact 352-746-9028.


Important upcoming CCBA events


The annual Building a Better Homes by calling 352-527-1040.
Christmas Toys for Tots distribution, 0 2013 Jim Blackshear Memorial
hosted by Gold Crest Homes in con- Golf Outing will be Feb. 23 at the
junction with Citrus Builders Care, Seven Rivers Golf & County Club
will be Friday, Dec. 14, at the with a portion of the proceeds to
CCBA. There is a waiting list benefit the Boys and Girls
for gift assistance through Club of Citrus County. Watch
this program. For more in- = for details and registration
formation on donating to or to open up by month end
volunteering for this pro- -A j on www.Citrus
gram, please contact An- a Builders.com.
jela Wright at Gold Crest U 2013 CCBA An-


nual Family Fishing Tournament,
sponsored by Exclusive Platinum
Sponsor FDS Disposal will be April
27 and 28 at the Homosassa Riverside
Resort. Online registration for entries
and sponsorships is now open and in-
cludes the return of the very popular
Super Angler Pass, which will be of-
fered again in conjunction with the
m-m-Mel Tillis and Friends Tourna-
ment. For more information, visit
www.CitrusBuilders.com.


Tips to keep your home safe during the holidays


With the holiday season
upon us, the Citrus County
Builders Association en-
courages everyone to cele-
brate safely and offers the
following safety tips from
the U.S. Consumer Product
Safety Commission.
Trees:
When purchasing an ar-
tificial tree, look for the
label "Fire Resistant." Al-
though this label does not
mean the tree won't catch
fire, it does indicate the tree
will resist burning and
should extinguish quickly
When purchasing a live
tree, check for freshness. A
fresh tree is green, needles
are hard to pull from
branches and do not break
when bent between your
fingers. The trunk butt of a
fresh tree is sticky with
resin, and when tapped on
the ground, the tree should
not lose many needles.
When setting up a tree
at home, place it away from
fireplaces and radiators.
Because heated rooms dry
live trees out rapidly, be
sure to keep the stand filled
with water. Place the tree


out of the way of traffic and
do not block doorways.
Lights:
Indoors or outside, use
only lights that have been
tested for safety by a recog-
nized testing laboratory,
which indicates confor-
mance with safety stan-
dards. Use only lights that
have fused plugs.
Check each set of lights,
new or old, for broken or
cracked sockets, frayed or
bare wires, or loose connec-
tions, and throw out dam-
aged sets. Always replace
burned-out bulbs promptly
with the same wattage
bulbs.
Use no more than three
standard-size sets of lights
per single extension cord.
Make sure the extension
cord is rated for the in-
tended use.
Never use electric
lights on a metallic tree. The
tree can become charged
with electricity from faulty
lights, and a person touch-
ing a branch could be elec-
trocuted.
Before using lights out-
doors, check labels to be


sure they have been certi-
fied for outdoor use.
Stay away from power
or feeder lines leading from
utility poles into older
homes.
Fasten outdoor lights
securely to trees, house
walls, or other firm supports
to protect the lights from
wind damage. Use only in-


sulated staples to hold
strings in place, not nails or
tacks. Or, run strings of
lights through hooks (avail-
able at hardware stores).
Turn off all holiday
lights when you go to bed or
leave the house. The lights
could short out and start a
fire.
Use caution when re-


moving outdoor holiday
lights. Never pull or tug on
lights they could unravel
and inadvertently wrap
around power lines.
Outdoor electric lights
and decorations should be
plugged into circuits pro-
tected by ground fault cir-
cuit interrupters (GFCIs).
Portable outdoor GFCIs can
be purchased where electri-
cal supplies are sold. GFCIs
can be installed perma-
nently to household circuits
by a qualified electrician.
Decorations:
Use only non-com-
bustible or flame-resistant
materials to trim a tree.
Choose tinsel or artificial
icicles of plastic or non-
leaded metals. Leaded ma-
terials are hazardous if
ingested by children.
Never use lighted can-
dles on a tree or near other
evergreens. Always use non-
flammable holders, and
place candles where they
will not be knocked down.
In homes with small
children, take special care
to avoid decorations that
are sharp or breakable,


keep trimmings with small
removable parts out of the
reach of children to avoid
the child swallowing or in-
haling small pieces, and
avoid trimmings that resem-
ble candy or food that may
tempt a child to eat them.
Wear gloves to avoid eye
and skin irritation while
decorating with spun glass
"angel hair."
Follow container direc-
tions carefully to avoid lung
irritation while decorating
with artificial snow sprays.
Fireplaces:
Use care with "fire salts,"
which produce colored
flames when thrown on wood
fires. They contain heavy
metals that can cause intense
gastrointestinal irritation
and vomiting if eaten. Keep
them away from children.
Do not burn wrapping
papers in the fireplace. A
flash fire may result as
wrappings ignite suddenly
and burn intensely
Get a free brochure
with more holiday decorat-
ing safety tips at CPSC's web
site: http://www.cpsc.gov/
cpscpub/pubs/611.html.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Chiropractic business
changes location
Well Adjusted Chiropractic,
formerly at 1027 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hernando, has
moved to 6565 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Ste. B., Crys-
tal River. It is open for business.
Capt Mike's cruises
up and running
Capt. Mike's Lazy River
Cruises could not run the boat
tours for seven weeks because
the Withlacoochee River came
up 5 feet in one night after tropi-
cal storm Debby in August.
Now the water has receded
and Capt. Mike's Lazy River
cruises are running seven days
a week out of Stumpknocker's
Restaurant off State Road 200.
Call for a reservation at 352-
637-2726 or visit www.lazyriver
cruises.com.
Citrus Memorial
to host career fair
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem is looking to hire employees
for nursing and allied health po-
sitions in Citrus County.
Company representatives
will be on-hand to interview
qualified candidates for posi-
tions from 1 to 5 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 29, at the Historic School
House on the main hospital
campus, 502 W. Highland Blvd.
in Inverness.
Open positions are in:
0 Cardiac catheterization
0 Critical care
0 Emergency services
0 Neuro telemetry
0 Home health care
T Physical and occupational
Therapy
Cytotechnology
During the fair, candidates
can meet managers and assess
the company culture while
learning about hours, pay and
training. Benefits include full
health care, a 403(B) plan, tu-
ition assistance and more.
Those wanting to move forward
will be invited for a final
interview.
Applicants should bring cur-
rent copies of resumes and
dress in business appropriate
attire. Interested attendees
should apply online prior to the
fair at www.citrusmh.com/
careers. For information or to
register for the fair, call 352-
344-6934.



SMALL
Continued from Page D1

store, which sells clothing,
accessories and toys, and 10
percent off the furniture
and strollers sold in her
Cribz store. And she will
have some giveaways, such
as accessories for strollers.
She's also joining with
about 20 other local busi-
nesses to promote one an-
other. The stores, which


Schlabach Security donates alarm system


--SCHLABACH SECURITY

SCHLABACH SECURITY

Cs,..


Special to the Chronicle
Jarey Schlabach, president of Schlabach Security and Sound Inc., first learned of Filter Youth Development when George
Schmalstig of Filter came to the Central Citrus Rotary meeting. Afterward, Schlabach visited the site and decided to make
a donation. From left are Schmalstig, Schlabach and Keith Taylor. Filter Youth Development is a nonprofit organization in
Inverness, founded by Schmalstig and Chris Caravetto in March 2011. Filter motivates and mentors youths using Honda
mini-bikes, courtesy of NYPUM (National Youth Project Using Minibikes). Integral to NYPUM's design is an essential
mentoring component that guides and supports youths to make good decisions, all centered on exciting and challenging
activities. Filter is NYPUM's 43rd program in the nation. Schlabach Security and Sound Inc. donated the installation and
components for a full perimeter and motion-detected alarm system to protect the mini-bikes. If a burglar opens a door, the
alarm sounds and police are dispatched immediately. Mike Falasca, technician for SSS, installed the system. Schlabach
can be reached at 352-527-3201.


Diaz-Fonseca
receives certificate
Inverness businesswoman
and Drywell Group managing
member
Sophia Diaz-
Fonseca re-
cently
received a
certificate of
completion
through the
Sophia Diaz- Small Busi-
Fonseca ness Institute
at the College
of Central Florida in Lecanto.
SCORE member Dale Malm
conducted the course entitled,
"Steps of Business Success."
The four-week course explored
basic business skills, data col-
lection, data interpretation and
marketing.
The information Sophia
gained will help her bring new
skills and knowledge to her
management and leasing of the
Masonic Business Center and
newly acquired Pine Avenue


include a wine store and
bakery, will give customers
maps showing them other
stores taking part in Small
Business Saturday
"By virtue of banding to-
gether and promoting our-
selves as a unit, it will up the
entire amount of traffic,"
Cattaui said.
Small businesses that
don't accept American Ex-
press cards are having pro-
motions of their own.
Benny's, a chain of 32 stores
in New England that sell


Business Center in Inverness.
The Masonic Business Center
is a three-story, restored 1910
office building with a ballroom
and the Pine Avenue Business
Center is a one-story, modern
office building. Both buildings
are different in form and leasing
structure, therefore require dif-
ferent business skills and mar-
keting plans, including a
website and use of social
media.
The course was a good intro-
duction to what was needed to
build Sophia's business. Con-
tact Sophia at www.drywell
group.com. For information on
courses available through Cit-
rus County SCORE Chapter
646, email jgreenbrs@tampa
bay.rr.com.
McFarland-Bryant
attends convention
Dr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant
of Better Health Chiropractic,
P.A., in Crystal River, returned
from the Florida Chiropractic
Society Convention.


housewares, toys, hardware
and clothing, is offering spe-
cial prices on merchandise
ranging from Christmas tree
lights to electric fireplaces.
Co-owner Arnold Bromberg
said the 88-year-old com-
pany has done this on Black
Friday as well as Saturday
for many years.
"You always have to have
something different on the
two days after Thanksgiving
to get customers in," he said.
A search of the special
web page set up for Small


McFarland-Bryant studied


Dr. Cheryl
McFarland-
Bryant


the bio-
physics tech-
nique and
CBP correc-
tive care for
better posture
resulting in
better health.
She also
studied clini-
cal radiology
of different


types of arthritis, extremity ad-
justing of arms and legs, "Heal-
ing Power of Science
Philosophy and art of Chiro-
practic" and "Family Wellness
Chiropractic."
Lecanto sleep clinic
accredited
Sleep Clinic of America in
Lecanto recently received pro-
gram accreditation from the
American Academy of Sleep
Medicine (AASM).
"The American Academy of
Sleep Medicine congratulates
Sleep Clinic of America on ful-


Business Saturday reveals
many businesses most peo-
ple don't think of as places to
buy gifts, including restau-
rants and dry cleaners tak-
ing part. One such business,
Dublin Cleaners in Dublin,
Ohio, has experienced a
sharp increase in business
during the past three years
on what is typically the
store's slowest day of the
year. Owner Brian Butler
said customers want to take
advantage of the $25 rebate.
Last year, his Saturday after


filling the high standards re-
quired for receiving accredita-
tion as a sleep disorders
center," AASM President Dr.
Sam Fleishman said. "Sleep
Clinic of America is a significant
resource to the local medical
community and will provide ac-
ademic and scientific value in
addition to the highest quality
care for patients suffering from
sleep disorders."
To receive accreditation for a
five-year period, a sleep center
must meet or exceed all stan-
dards for professional health
care as designated by the
AASM. These standards ad-
dress core areas such as per-
sonnel, facility and equipment,
policies and procedures, data
acquisition, patient care and
quality assurance. Additionally,
the sleep center's goals must
be clearly stated and include
plans for positively affecting the
quality of medical care in the
community it serves.
Sleep Clinic of America is di-
rected by Dacelin St. Martin,


Thanksgiving revenue was
up 300 percent from the
same day in 2009, before
Small Business Saturday
began. The revenue in-
crease was enough to offset
the $4,000 to $5,000 in trans-
action fees he paid to Amer-
ican Express for the year
Although the Thanksgiv-
ing weekend is shopping-fo-
cused, American Express
purposely created the pro-
gram so any small busi-
nesses could take part. The
company has found restau-


M.D., who is board certified in
Sleep Medicine. The clinic is at
1980 N. Prospect Ave. off
County Road 486 (Norvell
Bryant Highway) in Lecanto.
The American Academy of
Sleep Medicine is a profes-
sional medical society for clini-
cians, researchers and other
health care providers in the field
of sleep medicine. As the na-
tional accrediting body for sleep
disorders centers, the AASM is
dedicated to setting standards
and promoting excellence in
sleep medicine health care, ed-
ucation and research.
Former CF VP
Harvey honored
Dr. Jim Harvey, a longtime
Citrus County
community
member and
former senior
vice president
at the College
of Central
Florida, has
been recog- Jim
nized again Harvey
for his
accomplishments.
Harvey was inducted into the
Hall of Fame of the Florida Col-
lege System Activities Associa-
tion as a Distinguished Service
Award Winner. The award is
given to individuals who have
provided significant leadership
and service to the FCSAA Ex-
ecutive Committee and its
many activities. He also re-
ceived the Distinguished Serv-
ice Award from the Association
of Florida Colleges. The award
recognizes members of AFC for
exceptional achievement at the
chapter, region, commission
and/or state level.
Harvey retired from the Col-
lege of Central Florida in June
2012 with 33 years of service in
the Florida College System in-
cluding 13 at CF. The awards
were presented at the fall con-
ference of the Association of
Florida Colleges, held Oct. 31
to Nov. 2 in Palm Harbor.

BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.



rants are the top choice for
consumers wanting to use
the $25 rebate, followed by
bakeries, clothing stores,
gift shops and bookstores.
Butler isn't offering any
discounts on dry cleaning,
but uses the $25 savings from
American Express as a way
to build his customer base.
He starts by sending emails
to customers and advertises
on Facebook and Twitter
about the savings. One Tweet
reads: 'AmEx will pay your
tab in our store. No strings!!!"


Classifieds,


7. .


To place an ad, call 563-5966


- --
-' ~ -


- 4
- -


o --


Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


A~ ~.U


I.ax 35) .6.56 1TolFre (88. 52240 1 m il lasiidsa *icenln .m ebi-:ww hrnclonie0o


Lonely widow active,
attractive, looking for
gentleman for
companionship, 75?.
Blind Box 1814M c/do
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429



You \\oi Id first

Need .ijobl
or ;i
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

Classifieds
M M-j~i Mui~~iia j~


**CRYSTALRIVER**
3b/2ba den newer c/h/a
carpet & vinyl, very clean
RV Hkup. $39.900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340

CHICKENS Adult Laying
Chickens for Sale, RI
Reds, NH Reds &Aus-
tralorps. $12/each
352-344-0905

FLORAL CITY
2+Br/2Ba on
Withlapopka Island;
2 docks, good fishing
Asking $500,1st & Sec
(352) 419-4072 or
(727) 842-2921

HERNANDO 1 ACRE
Workshop 24x40w/ac
Kit-log cabin look+den/fpl
$$$ under 50k $$$
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352)634-6340

INVERNESS/DNTWN
***MELODY PARK***
2/2/carport $11,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352) 634-6340


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



BENGAL TIGER CAT
10 yr old male, very affec-
tionate, neutered and well
cared for.(352) 794-6499
or (732) 674-2678
Chihuahua & Pit mix
6-8 months old male
light brown w/ white chest
Free to good home
(352) 220-2369
FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy access
Pine Ridge
352-746-3545


FREE KITTENS
11 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
FREE KITTENS
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
FREE
Macaw Blue and Gold
10 yrs old, needs a good
home, comes w/xtra
large cage &
free-standing perch
(352) 621-9810
FREE White,
micro-chipped,
spayed, kitty very
loving....Allergies in my
home! 352-527-1399



FRESH CITRUS@
BELLAMY GROVE
Navals, Gift Shipping,
Collard, Mustard greens
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378
Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077


NOW OPEN *
FRESH CITRUS FRUIT
352-726-1154 Floral City


CHIHUAHUA
Male brown w/white
pack, 7mo old named
Creppy. Last seen on
Ray st, Hernando
352-400-2475
Female large blue eyed
cat; long hair; white with
mixed grey & tan.
Microchiped. Inverness
Broyhill and Carnegie.
352-201-0559;
352-422-7425
Lost Cat
Sugarmill Woods,
Cypress Blvd.,small
black shyindoor catmay
respond to Kong,BFF
best feline friend is
unconsolable.
small reward offered.
Please call 352-382-4397
Lost Male Cat
Orange & White w/ or-
ange mustache lyr old,
neutered, chipped
Alice Point off of Oak
Lawn (352) 228-7682


Large Male Neutered
Boxer found on Thrasher
St. Please Call to
describe.(352) 503-9421


License Plate: Minne-
sota Handicap tag
4061HL. Found in
Inverness
(352) 634-1500






NEED A NEW
CAREER?
CAREER PREPARATION
COURSES
Starting Jan./Feb. '13
FIVE-WEEK PROGRAM
MEDICAL ASST. $1,420
TWO-WEEK PROGRAM
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT, $475.
PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


S #1 Emploment sources

www.chronicleonline.com


.... .nels..
ANGELS
SEEKING ANGELS
Experienced
caregivers
for private duty
in elderly clients' homes.
I ... 1 I ,1 .I,
1** r In 1 ,
CNA preferred.
Call Visiting Angels
M-F 8-5
-352 620-8484



FIT Medical
Insurance Biller
Experience required,
Benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1795M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429


F/T RN
IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429
F/T-P/T
Phelbotomist
For physicians office
with benefits and
competitive salary
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1786M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429







Classifieds


iia!-i


D4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


BUSINESS


MW
,AM6-6ba ..,






SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 D5


IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's
Hospital Experience
ICU, ER, CCU, Med.
Surge, Tele, Labor
& Delivery, Daily Pay,
Apply nine at www.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828

SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRlvers
Realonal.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace
MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES
*Pharmacist
*EMT
"Radiology
"Receptionist/Biller
"Physical Therapy
Receptionist/ Biller
"Lab Tech
Fax Resume to:
Human Resources
352-527-3401 or email
lindak@citrusdiabetes
treatment.com
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T, DIETARY AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

PTA
We are currently seek-
ing a PTAto work in a
great outpatient setting.
This is a F/T position
with benefits. Interested
Candidates must be FL
licensed and have the
ability to work with
patients of all ages
Salary Negotiable
Call 352-795-4114
for more info or Fax
Resume 352-563-2438

THERAPIST/
PSYCH NURSE
for a busy psychiatric
practice, will work pit
initially pis rsvp fax
352-726-7582


-U
EXPERIENCED
LINE COOK
6 NIGHTS, Inglis Area
Some Italian cuisine,
Call Btw. 10AM-6PM
352-447-2406 for appt

TakingAppllcations
Breakfast Coo
Line Cook &
Bus Boy
Full tlme & Part time,
Apply 2pm -3pm
A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19
Crystal River
NO PHONE CALLS


m-I

License Real Estate
Associate FT or PT
Good Commissions
Inverness Horizon
Realty 352-212-5222



AUTO TECHS & Experenced
taler Needed. CompettB Pay &
Benefits. ASE & or Ford Certified
I i n e
techs. Call (352)493-4297 for
R u s s
Hall for in person resumeAnter-
V I e w
appointment.

PLUMBERS
WANTED
Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at: 4079 S Ohio
Ave, Homosassa




*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the
CUSTOMER
RELATIONS DEPT
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary.
Call Michelle
352-436-4460

Light Equipment
Operator
Announcement
#12-68
Semi-skilled work in
the operation of
automotive public
works equipment
and performing
manual labor.
Graduation from HS
or GED. Must have


a valid Florida CDL
Class "A" with
endorsement "N"
combination air
brakes or be able to
obtai in 90 days
of appointment.
$9.22 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, November 30,
2012. EOE/ADA.


BELLAVITA
pa & Fitness
Center
Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs
Front Desk Reception
Housekeeping/Locker
Room Attendant
Fitness Desk Staff
Aerobic Instructors
Massage Therapists
Skincare Specialists
Nail Techs
Spa Coordinator
APPLY IN PERSON
2125W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
NEWSPAPER

CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am-5pm
Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle

CHONICLE

TELEMARKETERS
WANTED
Good Commission
pay. Apply In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr




LOCAL BRIDAL/
FORMAL WEAR
Business for Sale
All Equipment and
Inventory Included
CALL (352) 563-0722



DOLLS
Cinderella & Bride Doll
2ft w/ stands $100 ea
(352) 746-9896
LIONEL TRAIN LAYOUT
4'4" X 7', Complete
Village. Many bldgs,
bridges, ice skating pond
& trees. HO gauge. Like
New $550. 352-212-8500











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




4 Person Hot Tub,
w/ all accessories
+ chemicals
$200 obo
Cell (518) 420-5373
Citrus Springs


DRYER
$100 with 90 day
warranty, call/text
352-364-6504
FRIGIDAIRE CHEST
FREEZER 8.8cf Like
new,$329 new, sale$150
352-400-0141
GE STOVE
FLAT TOP -White
2yrs old. Features Steam
clean oven. $350
352.419-7077
KENMORE 25'CU
STAINESS STEEL side
by side, w/water & ice,
4yrs old exc. cond. $800
352-897-4196
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryersFREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER
$100 with 90 day
warranty, call/text
364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352-263-7398


sALE
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
FRI. 11/23 @ 6p, Tools
& mics. Sat 11/24 @ 6p
gen. merch. Sun 11/25
@ lp Tailgate/ box lots
"WE BUY ESTATES*
6055 N. Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



AIR COMPRESSOR
CRAFTSMAN 5 HP 25
GAL 110/220 W/HOSE
$150. SCROLL SAW 16"
VAR.SPEED $40
352-527-4319


HITACHI 46"
PROJECTION TV
inc. glass stand
asking $400
352-628-5340



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



4 FT Box Blade $400;
John Deere 1 bottom
Plow $400; All fit on a
small utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812
CULTIVATOR
1 row cultivator $100;
Pig Pole $100.
Both fit on small
utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812
Spike Tooth Harrows
/ Section Spike $100;
3 Point Hitch $300.
Both fit on small
utility tractor.
(352) 628-0812



GENERATOR
BRIGGS & STRATTON
5250 watts uses once!
$650 new, Selling $400
352-527-8993



2 BAR STOOLS, high
back, swivel, oak, like
new $75 ea. Both for
$100 352-794-3591
2 New Power Recliners,
Flexsteel Sage custom
fabric, $750 ea; China
Cabinet, Transitional
style, with glass, $150
(352) 795-9230
3 PC LIVING RM SET
Elegant burgandy couch,
loveseat & wing chair.
Exec. Cond.$900
352-232-1246
3 Piece Lane
Living Room,
good cond. $3,200 New
Asking $800.
(352) 637-1074
Leave Message
CLEAN COMFY SEC-
TIONAL SOFA tan cotton
wine/green flowers $275
352-897-4154
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
DAYBED
Wood wicker & wrought
iron. Dark wood two
mattresses. Very good
shape. Asking $575
call 352-503-6018
Entertainment Center
Oak L54" H49" D19" $75
OBO 352-726-6274
KINCAID Master Bedrm
set Qn Sz Bed, 2 night
stands, Chest, & Dresser
w/Mirror.Dark Cherry.
$350
Call (352)270-3772 or
(352)464-1591
KITCHEN TABLE w/
CHAIRS(6) solid wood,
light color for $75.00
Call (352)464-1591
LIVING RM COUCH &
LOVE SEAT- WHITE
$400 352-860-4414
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OVERSTUFFED CHAIR
Excellent condition. Blue.
$50 Call 352-628-3418
PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SIZE MAT-
TRESS AND BOX SPR-
ING Queen size mattress
and box-spring 100.00
352 794 6606
QUEEN SIZE
MATTRESS AND
BOXSPRING queen size
mattress and boxspring
$100 352-794-6606
RECLINER CHAIR. TAN
In very good condition.
$60 352-628-3418.
SLEEPER SOFA
Blue Denim, Good
Condition $150
352-746-4232
SLEIGH BED Queen Sz,
solid wood, walnut color,
pristine condition,barely
used. $250.00 Call
(352)464-1591 or
(352)270-3772
SOFA BED $100
patricem08@gmail.com
or leave message
860/368-8947
(Inverness)
Sofa Sleeper Dark
Plaid, on casters
queen size, $250.
Large bureau with mir-
ror & armoire, blonde
$150.352-232-1246
TWO SOFA'S
1 Floral print, 1 Merlot,
$100 ea. o/b/o
352-382-1885
VINTAGE DRESSER W
MIRROR Medium oak, 2
full sz drawers, 2 half
drawers. $200 Call
(352) 270-3772 or
(352) 464-1591
White Wash Entertain-
ment Center $85
352-382-1885



CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER Auto 46",
Kohler 16.5HP, yard cart,
dethatcher attachment,
15gal elect.
sprayer. $650 obo
352-400-0141
MANTIS TILLER


$125.00
352-527-4319
Troy Bilt pony 17.5 HP,
42in cut 7 speed, Briggs
& Stratton engine. The
cart is a 10 cu. ft. utility
dump cart. Excel.
cond, barely 6 months.
Asking $750. 637-7237



PALMS QUEEN 8' Beau-
tiful Healthy Queen
Palms 8' tall in 18' pots
$75 352-270-3527



BEVERLY HILLS
45 Lee St.
Sat. & Sun. 8 am to ?
tools, furniture, gym
equip., Ig bird cages,
toys, well pump, play-
ground set, misc.


HOMOSASSA
Sat & Sun 8a-until
Suaarmill Estate Sale
Furn., Grandclock & misc
14 Deer Drive
INVERNESS
Huge Yard Sale *
Antiques, Furn. & MORE
201 N. Citrus Avenue
WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944




MOVIt4G
S A L, E
KING BR SET, DINING
RM, LIVING RM, MISC
TABLES, CHAIRS &
TV'S ALL EXC. COND.
352-586-0566



COAT
Red Wool 3 qtr length
coat; size 20-22
$75 (352) 746-9896
JEWELED beautiful
beaded jacket, great for
cruises or dinner parties.
Size s/m, never worn.
cost $35. 352-344-3485



(4) OPERA CD SETS
cost $50.00+ ea.-sell
$20.00 ea. or all $75
more info call
352-527-9982
18 INCH GARLAND
SLEIGH AND 11 INCH
SANTA $10 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
352-419-5981
1950'S VINTAGE
NAPCO JAPAN
CHRISTMAS SANTA
AND ANGEL $30 E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
6' MIZERAK POOL
TABLE, A-1 condition
plus pool cues, $125
352-212-0000
AQUARIUM 40 GAL Hex-
agon with stand $100.00
201-4522
ARTIST'S
For $300 you can buy
$500 worth of new and
very usable oil painting
supplies. (352) 527-8528
BIRD CAGE FOR
MEDIUM SIZE BIRD
White.20x30x34H. On
stand with coasters. $50
352-726-5753
BOAT
12FT Aluminum $275
DOG KENNEL 12 X 7
CHAIN LINK W/DOOR
$225
352-232-1246
Brand New Char Broil,
BBQ Grill II Go Ice
Portible w/ soft side
coolers, set up and
take down $180.
(239) 728-1062 Cell
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman, no
manual *sorry*, white col-
ored, $15 (352)465-1616
CAMERA
Canon Rebel Zoom w/
case. Used twice $125
(352) 628-3570
DECK BOAT COVER
21 FT Hurricane w/polls
$850 new Selling $400
352-527-8993
Digital Samsung Camera
s 1050. Brand new 10.1
megapixel 5x optical
zoom 3.0tft lcd $100.
352-344-3485
DISNEY PRINT
"FLATTERY" -cert.#838
of 2000 sizel8"by
24"-$100. For more info
call 352-527-9982
EXT LADDER 20'
Fiberglass/Alum
Ex Cond- cost NEW $225
$100 352-270-3527
FOOTBALL TABLE
Table/various game
combo. $75
563-1241 after 4p.m.
Fresh Florida 15ct.
"JUMBO SHRIMP-
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
FI Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077
GE TELEPHONE
ANSWERING MACHINE
$10 LIKE NEW ALL
CONNECTIONS
Inverness 352-419-5981
GOLD FLATWARE Com-
plete Service for 12
Never used/no scratches
$100 352-270-3527
HOLMES AIR 1500W
HEATER/FAN Ok condi-
tion, Automatic shutoff,
Heats up to 180 sq. ft.
area, $10 (352)465-1616
IBM PERSONAL
WHEELWRITER
Typewritter
elite/pica print wheels &
access. $350 OBO
352-628-3076
LALA LOOPSY Ferris
wheel, tree house, dolls &
accessories. $50.00 for
all 352-563-5206
Lawn Edger
3HP Edger needs carb
kit. $100 352-382-7074
MIRROR CHINESE Motif
ExCond. solidwood frame
28"x48" $40
352-270-3527
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
MUST SELL, xmas de-
cor, 52"tv, glass end &
coffee tbles, chaise
lounge 352-897-4681
ROCKWELL SCOUTING
"1979" 50 first day
covers- matching gov.
stamps $100
352-527-9982


SUBWOOFERS sound
dynamics rts
series1000-100 watts
rms/400 peak-like new
$50 352-527-9982
TANNING BED Full size
tanning bed 100.00 or
best offer 352 794 6606
TANNING BEDS
10 min stand up, 15 min
w/facial beds, 20 min.
beds, spray tan booth
mk offer 352-586-8698
THOMAS KINKADE
6ft pull up tree fully
decorated $75.00
352-527-1399
THREE GLASS TABLE
TOPS, 40" -$100, 20"
-$40, 19"-$35 obo
352-212-0000
WEDGEWOOD CHINA
Lavender Cream mfg
1957-1983 Never used
Nochips/cracks/crazing
$40 352-270-3527


TOYOTATHON









AT VILLAGE TOYOTA


2013 TOYOTA







CO B I

Auto Trans, PW, PL, CD

Wl k' -o -=


T130050 W

MSRP $17,800
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 2,805




Sor LEASE


p14,99 58r$159


ToyotaCare
Featuring a complimentary maintenance plan
with roadside assistance.


2012 TOYOTA




CAMRY





0%S


for 60 mos.

or



Lease for


89 ,mo.


2012 TOYOTA 2012 CAR OF THE YEAR
"BEST GREEN CAR"




PRIUSzr,





0% 48#. -


for148mos.


or



Lease for


2012 TOYOTA
EXTENDED CAB TUNDR









for 60 mos.

or






s500 OFF

Remaining 2012's In Stock







@ VILLAGE TOYOTA

www.illaueovola.com CRYSTAL RIVER


352,628.5100 S3
*0% W.A.C. All leases with $2,399 Cash Cap Reduction, 36 Mos, 12k Per Year, All Offers While Supplies Last.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


tii


I--


*lOlmIImL


2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to GO GREEN!!!



AND 0% APR for 72 Mos.
i


2912 Chevy Impala LT
Sku #C1 2125, Auto AC, Onstar.Was $26,610


2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13025. Auto, 4cyl.Was S24,596
.$40 ACA


212 Chevy averse LS
Stk #C12326. Auto, Seats 7T.Was $30,750


2012 Chevy Slverado T
Stk #CT1236, Ext Cab.Was $30,750


2012 Chevy Cnze LS
Stk MC12267, Gas Samrill Was S18,800
S4AI MAf


I111


* I I


'4


D6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


___ .......... -....


oIl


A II:






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-
TANNING BED
sunquest tanning bed
$100 OBO 352-794-6606



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying
sterling silver flatware
and US silver coins
(352) 601-7074



"NEW"LAGUNA ELEC-
TRIC GUITAR GREAT
STARTER FOR KIDS
& ADULTS,$50
352-601-6625
"NEW"STRAT STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
HSS(slight blem)PLAYS
PERFECT! $60
352-601-6625
BUYING
Guitars, Banjos &
Mandolins,Fender,
Gibson & Martin
any condition
(443) 463-3421
DOBRO BLUES GUITAR
W/ case and extra's.
Beautiful condition $350
(352) 746-9470
MADE IN U.S.A.! PEA-
VEY 40W BASS COMBO
AMP STUDIO
USED,NOT ABUSED
$100 352-601-6625
MITCHELL MD100SCE
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
CUTAWAY GUITAR
W/GIGBAG & EXTRAS
$100 352-601-6625
PIANO
STORY & CLARK
LOVELY MAPLE
UPRIGHT & STOOL.
GOOD COND. $1200
352-232-1246
SMALL P.A. MIXER PRO
QUALITY, 8 CHANNELS,
W/ONBOARD DIGITAL
EFFECTS $100
352-601-6625



FLUTED QUICHE DISH
LIKE NEW $10 2AIR
BAKE COOKIE SHEETS
$10 INVERNESS
352-419-5981

YOU'LL % THIS!
KING SIZE MATTRESS
sealy posturpedic
with box spring and
frame, used 3 years,
very, very clean
like new, asking only
$300 Homosassa, SMW
860-883-3431
NIKKO"Happy Holiday"
dishes for eight w/all
the bells & whistles. Plus
table cloth & napkins. All
you need for your holiday
table! $700; Colorful wool
Rug 4X5" (imported)
746-9896
TEA SETS
W/ cake plates for six
$30; 1 set with Teapot
Sugar & Creamer $45
(352) 746-9896


BOWFLEX ULTIMATE II
home gym center
with all upgrades and
accessories $900
352-697-2771



30.06 Remington Game
Master model 760 pump
with scope, sling,case,clip
with shells $350.00
352-228-9181
Club Car Golf Cart
reconditioned by manu-
facturer 2010, new
batteries, side curtain,
ext. top, seats 4, exc.
cond. must sell $1750.
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CUSTOM KYDEX
HOLSTERS $40 call for
details 352-637-3894
GARMIN GPSMAP
.76CX Garmin 76Cx
handheld mapping GPS.
Color screen. Great for
marine, outdoor or
geocashing. Absolutely
like new! $175.
352-527-0433
GOLF CART
93 Club Car, Great
Condition, New Batteries,
Asking $995
(352) 201-6111
GOLF CART
Electric, EZ Go
excellent cond.
$2,500 (352) 503-2847
Home Defense
12 Gauge Winchester
S-auto, 18V2" Barrel
Case & ammo included
$350.(352) 637-1074
Leave Message
OCEAN KAYAK 12 ft Sit
upon, color:(Blue) plus
paddle and padded rod
holder 352-795-3460
$385.00
PUSHPOLE 18'2-piece
Moonlighter fiberglass.
Never used, w/ hardware.
A great Christmas gift!
$250. 352-628-0447.
Leave message.
Remington field
master 572, $300.
Lacrosse venom snake
boots, size 9% New
$75
(352) 441-0645



CARGO TRAILER
5 x 9 x6, EZ-Hauler
Aluminum, black &
silver, New, $2,500
obo (352) 513-4369



BABY TOY Cruise
Around Activity Lion
$10.00 352-400-5650
BABY TOY Rainforest
melodies and lights
deluxe gym. Newborn
and up. $15.00
352-400-5650


ROCKING HORSE
Today's kids brand, good
condition doesn't make
sounds, $35
(352)465-1616



DIAMOND RING
% carat tw, 14 ct white
gold. SIZE 9, Original
price $525, Asking $150
(352) 341-1955
WATCH
Ladies diamond
bezeled rolex, new con-
dition w/ all paperwork
$1900 (352) 423-0289



NINTENDO Wll FIT.
Comes with the wii
board, plus yoga mat,
and board cover. Asking
$60 o.b.o. 352-422-6311
NINTENDO Wll white.
Comes with, Wii console,
two controllers and
several games. Asking
$100. 352422-6311


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

WHITE NINTENDO Wll
in flawless condition and
comes with games, con-
trollers, etc. Asking $100
itsmeejenn@yahoo.com



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369

WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacement
China Most Patterns
Crystal Waterford Lenox
Sterling Flatware Lladro
Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Elec-
tronics Stereo Turntables
Billiard Cues Coins &
Jewelry and Scraps Best
Prices Paid Chris @
352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
$$$$$$$$


tackle, tools, Antique
coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944
WANTED TO BUY
Stamp Collections
US Postal History


14 Tiny Yorkies $600.
-$700. ea. Small, Tiny &
Very Tiny Only 5
females, Raised in
loving home. CKC Reg.
health certs., & puppy
pacs. Parents on site
come watch them play
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com


BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
2 Males & 4 Females,
Available after Nov 5th
AKC and all Shots
$1,500 to $1,750 call for
info (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732

FREE MALE B&W CAT
Decl & Neut approx 5 yrs
old. Dominate lap cat.
Needs home. Call
352-400-4676 for Info.

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure Breed Pups, light
colors, 4 fem 2 males,
shots & H/C. Parents on
Premises $450 ea
352-628-6050

Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net


I I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"# "# "-^ "# *


I Livesto


CHICKENS Adult Laying
Chickens for Sale, RI
Reds, NH Reds & Aus-
tralorps. $12/each
352-344-0905






MUST SELL

BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855


CHRoNIC LE


18ft PONTOON
30 Johnson,no trailer
good shape.$1200
321-303-6453


Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES


Your World

94'l4e 4A


Howlto



You St h

Your Da


&Online //


...c.o .. I

CHI ONICLE 63CHi5 NioC6



(352) 563-5966 -


e =hra'.- 0


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia In-
continency No Prob .
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383


Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXP- Slabs,
Driveway,Patios,Found
-ation Repair #CBC057
405, (352) 427-5775



All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238
302-8090
Lic# CC2544


ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *k



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST, SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V*FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!.!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM




Add an artist 10ouh to your existing yard
Sor pool or plan
something
S- Iompletely new!
"Often imitate |
never duplicated"


SOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVERSPECIALIST
1 COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 352-400-388
& Insured 352q-400j3188


All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
Repair. Remodel.
Additions,
Free est.
(352) 949-2292
STEVEN GIBSON
Handyman & Maint.
Services 20+ yrs., Exp.
(352) 308-2379



Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
NATURE COAST
CLEANING
Res/Comm, No Time
Wasted 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
*352-227-7373**



AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
352-563-9824, 228-7320
LAWNCARE N MORE
Fall Clean-up, leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244



MOBILE THERAPY
Holiday Special 20%off
call Jenna,Lic.MA58428
*(352) 897-5238*



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


WINDOW
GENIE.
We Clean Windows and a Whole tot More
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
I FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill




NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT



DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! o
352-220-9190


Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
QUALITY PAINTING
Affordable Reliable
Insured References
Call Doug 352-270-6142



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
WINTER SPECIAL
$35 for Driveways
up to 60ft!
Ann's 352-601-3174



All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


I ROF ING I


AAA ROOFING
Cal the / .Aak6uste"s
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC57537 000D41M


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM, NC.


352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


|ww.chronicleonline.comf|


WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452



Your World

94l9 e44de4M/U


CHiOMNCLE


CARPET & c
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Special izing in: lenituore
Carpet Stretching .FR -HAsk.
Carpet Repair Ho
352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


REMODEIN


GENERAL A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377
352-621-124


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Fire wd.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



WORK-A-HOLIC for hire
sml tree removal,hauling,
ext. painting, pressure
& window washing
**352.227.7373**


*Tree trimming/removal '
* Stump grinding
* Dry oak firewood for sale


Licensed & Insured




World Class
Window Tinting
Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estmates
352-465-6079 aa ,_









Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
SClean Dryer
Vents
Afforda.be & Dependable
i Expenence lifelong
L 352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
... wured Lic.#37761


Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print


I


/ / -1C I.:~



~ *


I


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 D7


=m I ::I


SEA CHASER
2008 1800 RG (18') V
hull. 90 Yamaha 4 stroke,
only 82 hours. Warranty
until
11-30-2014.Aluminum
trailer
Great flats or bay boat.
Excellent condition, al-
ways stored in-
side.$14,900. Call
352-601-6656


I.. ..remI r 'l o-I ,, I


I


11


LL







D8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012



-I a


BASS BOAT
1985, 16ft Bayliner
Needs work 85HP force
eng., galvinized trailer.
$600. (352) 507-1490
Looking for an 18 ft
SeaArk. Boat, motor and
trailer(352) 270-8225
RANGER BASS BOAT
1994, w/ranger trail trailer
150Johnson motor, ask
$4500 352-212-3732
TRI PONTOON BOAT
A & M, 27 ft, fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $19,500
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




06' BIG HORN 5th
WHEEL HEARTLAND
37 FT, 4 Slide,
non- smoker, no pets,
LOADED $25,900
302-632-9163
5X8 -$850.00
Cargo Transport
side-door. Wheels
packed new jack stand.
getdahl@yahoo.com
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$7500 obo 352-422-8092



JAYCO 30 ft.
2000 yr, Clean, qn. bed,
with Canopy & Load
Leveler $4,750 (352)
563-1465, 228-1802
KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




NEW TIRE
sells for $108, will take
$75firm, Wheel for 05
Dodge Caravan $20
352-476-5265
SET OF 4 CORVETTE
rims, c5, very good cond.
$400 Century fiberglass
cargo cover fits S10 p/up
ask $200 352-628-5340
TONNO COVER
NEW, fits 8ft pick-up
bed, cost $450 new, sell
for $230 352-476-5265




$CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
*k Low Payments
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
05' LINCOLN TOWN
CAR GARAGE KEPT,
Two-Tone, LOADED 65K
$10,500. 352-860-0164


mB3H^


2006, TSX, 98K miles,
NAV, Sunroof, Sporty
$14,800
Call 352-232-1481
AUDI
2001 A4, Quattro AWD
83K miles, MUST SEE!!
$7,200
(352) 978-3571
BUICK LESABRE
01 Custom, senior
owned,garage kept, Ik
new, new tires,68kmi.
$5800 864-353-4298
CADILLAC
2011, CTS Sedan,
14k miles, NAV sunroof
$29,995.
Call (352) 422-0360
CHEVROLET
1985 Monte Carlo 2DR
repainted, rebuilt en-
gine. Runs great, just
needs transmission
hose. Asking $2800
352-270-4098
CHEVROLET
2001 IMPALA,
$4,995
352-341-0018



CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Ed., Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Cond
$8000 352 522-0505
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
$4,500
352-341-0018
FORD
2000 Mustang. If you like
Mustang Cobra convert.
*Must see this car*
$4975(352) 382-7001
FORD
2001 Focus Wagon SE,
4 Cyl, great gas milage,
exc cond, clean in/out, no
rust or dents, all working
good. 95K mi. $3500
(352) 613-4702
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call 352-302-3704
HONDA
2004 Element, 186K
miles, EX, Automatic
$5,200
Call (352) 978-3571
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
Ilkenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
$19,950
Call 352-232-1481
MERCURY
1998 Grand Marquis
must sell 1200.00 OBO
1-352-628-1809
NISSAN '98
Sentra GXL, 64k mi.,
excel cond. new tires,
battery, Bk. Val. $4,800
(352) 795-2415
PONTIAC
2004 SUNFIRE,
$2,995
352-341-0018
SUZUKI
2007 Forenza,
CLEAN, Only 52K miles
$6,500.
Call 352-302-3704
TOYOTA
2004, Camry XLE V6,
42K miles One Owner
$10,850.
Call (352) 422-0360
TOYOTA
2007, Pruls, 91K miles,
Super Clean with
warranty $10,300.
Call 352-978-3571
VOLKSWAGON
CONV. 2003, GLS
garage kept, leather int.
Ik new, 60k miles $5800
352-634-3806










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^*^ *A- A AA -


mBSS^


FORD
1965 F250,
100% RUST FREE
ARIZONA TRUCK.
V8 I/
AUTOMATIC.
BRIGHT ORANGE.
NEW DOOR PANELS,
SUN VISORS.
MANY NEW PARTS.
$5,995.
607-387-6639




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusg.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
GMC
2003 Box Truck
$6,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2005, Tacoma
Reg. Cab 5 speed,
Bed Topper $8,800
Call 352-422-0360
TOYOTA TACOMA
07, pre-runner, sr5
4dr, v6, auto, $16k
727-776-4645




CHEVROLET
2002 SUBURBAN
$5,995.
352-341-0018
GMC
2003 Yukon SLT
Exc cond New tires. Well
maintained.108,000mi
Load w/Onstar
$9,450 OBO
(207)-730-2636




CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600




KIA
'08, Sorrento LX, sport
utility, 1 owner car, ex-
cel. working cond. 112k


Yamaha
'05, Raptor, 50CC,
like new, 30 hrs on mo-
tor, will hold for xmas
$950, 352-726-9151




HARLEY-DAVIDSON 04'
Ultra classic. Runs great!
New tires, brakes &
battery. EXTRAS!!
$8500 or OBO
352-601-4722
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $3,500.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688




KAWASAKI
2006 VULCAN VF900
Custom. Only 7000
miles, garage kept
$3500 (352) 464-1495



KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 525 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 Phone
352-726-8124

YAMAHA
2004 Silverado w/ wind-
shield, sidebar, & foot
rest, Exc Cond,17,800 mi
$3500 (352) 270-8225

Meetin
Notices


370-1125 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, November 28, 2012 @ 9:00AM in
the Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons
interested are invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code
Compliance Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you
have questions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Allen, David R. & Rae Nell
10 W Murray St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The maroon Chrysler 300 parked on the property.
Allen, David R. & Rae Nell
10 W Murray St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Baldree, Joyce E. & Perry, Deborah S.
7819 E Allen Dr, Inverness, FI 34450
Construction of a structure (Shed) without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County
Code of Ordinances Chapter
18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, al-
ter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to
this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without
first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: A shed
Baylon, Roger S. & Idaisa
25 Beverly Hills Blvd, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3190(D), Accessory Uses; All home
occupation work or products shall be conducted within a building, and no display of
merchandise, products, or advertising shall take place outside of or be visible from
outside the building.
Baylon, Roger S. & Idaisa
25 Beverly Hills Blvd, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural


CLASSIFIED

Meting
Notice


lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tool box, wood, 3 trailers full of tree debris, a
crate, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Beaudwin, David
321 S Jackson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Beaudwin, David
321 S Jackson St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep,
dump,store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The dark colored car parked on the property.
Brown, Melita "REPEAT VIOLATION"
67 N Fitzpatrick Ave, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed
buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and
which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recy-
clable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except
junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste dis-
posal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on
agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of
the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Cardboard, blocks, household gar-
bage, plastics, foam, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unen-
closed area.
Coble, Harvey & Sheila M.
100 S Jeffery St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
DiCillo EST, Kenneth ATTN: Jacclyn Kidwell Walker
4389 S Alpine Ave, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Blankets, towels, sheets, and miscellaneous
trash and debris.
DiCillo EST, Kenneth ATTN: Jacclyn Kidwell Walker
4389 S Alpine Ave, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Dinanath, Hansa & Chandra
2602 E Jupiter St, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Kitchen appliances, garbage, metal, plastic, ti-
res, 2 piles of tarps with debris under them, and other miscellaneous materials being
stored in an unenclosed area.
Dipietro, David ATTN: BB&T
9705 N Cortlandt Dr, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Dyess, Curtis E. & Teresa L. "REPEAT VIOLATION"
5312 W Atlanta Ln, Dunnellon, FI 34433
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Expired permit
#200711819 for a 9x14 room addition with no final inspection.
Esteves, Xiomara A.
5536 W Dayflower Path, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Fuller, A R
1135 S Maplenut Way, Inverness, Fl 34450
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Fuller, AR
1131 S Otto Pt, Inverness, FI 34450
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car tires, metal and plastic debris, large amounts of
tree debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Giandonato EST, Richard M. ATTN: Richard J. Giandonato
6710 W Blackbird Ln, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Harris Revoc Trust
104 S Desoto St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Harrison, Linda Sue "REPEAT VIOLATION"
9454 N Caressa Way, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling
such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard,
garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of
vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III,
Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household gar-
bage, car parts, car tires, broken furniture, metal and plastic debris, and other mis-
cellaneous trash and debris.
Ingley, Elsie F
7904 E Gator Ct, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of household garbage, buck-
ets, appliances, tires, household items, and miscellaneous junk.
James M. Heck Revocable Inter Vivos Trust "REPEAT VIOLATION"
3118 N Whitewater Ter, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner r tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Carpet remnants, mattresses, broken furniture,
and other miscellaneous trash and debris."APPEAL OF FINE IMPOSED AT 9/19/12
HEARING"
Johnston Amber & Emilio
3946 S Apopka Ave, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a


lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash and miscellaneous trash and debris.
Lambert, Don ATTN: Caroline Stice "REPEAT VIOLATION"
2020 S Comforter Pt, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Lofty, Sandra
6275 S Lima Ave, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Two (2) boats and an RV are located on the property. "APPEAL OF FINE IM-
POSED AT 8/15/12 HEARING"**
Lofty, Sandra


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6275 S Lima Ave, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash, mattresses, table, chairs, furni-
ture, gas cans, a large amount of tires, and miscellaneous trash and debris. "APPEAL
OF FINE IMPOSED AT 8/15/12 HEARING"
McDermitt, Ronald
25 S Haid Ter, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A trailer with miscellaneous materials being
stored on it which is in an unenclosed area.
Merone, Gary & Salinas, Mabel
5417 W Cougar Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Nicosia, Blase & Jacqueline
11734 N Citrus Ave, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Paduano, Ralph & 0. Theresa
4577 E Liza Knowlton Dr, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Phillips, Frances
2144 E Shales Ct, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Plauche, Christine
7819 W Riverbend Rd, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Putnam, Fred W. & Vicki L.
6121 W Grover Cleveland Blvd, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household items and household garbage.
Reyes, Roy & Leticia
9307 N Citrus Springs Blvd, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Multiple bags of household garbage, broken
household items, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Roesler, Kenneth E. & Brenda J.
3842 N Webb Pt, Hernando, FI 34442
Construction of a structure (Shed) without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County
Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: A
shed located to the right side of the property.
Schlitz, Brendan J.
9440 N Milam Way, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Smith, Warren E. & Barbara Sue
1231 S Otto Pt, Inverness, FI 34450
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Wheeler, Richard E. & Barbara J.
303 S Johnson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A blue color reclining chair and a counter top
or vanity like item in the rear of the property.
Wheeler, Richard E. & Barbara J. "REPEAT VIOLATION"
303 S Johnson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.


November 25, 2012


MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE


367-1202 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to DISTRICT SERVICES CENTER HVAC REPLACEMENT PROJECT will
be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time 10 Janu-
ary 2013 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200,
1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids
received will be opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.

Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at District Services Center, Building 100, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698.

B. Conference will occur 11 December 2012, 10:00 A.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from
VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC., 1111 NE 25TH AVE, SUITE 401, OCALA, FL 34470
PHONE NO: (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus
County School Board in the amount of $ 50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will
be made upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
November 18, 25 & December 2, 2012.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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800-440-9054
F 2011 CHEVROLET ( 2011 DODGE 7 2011 CHRYSLER "
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Inverness, FL


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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H Section E SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


Sikorski's
P Ac H PAGE E6


A set of three Alpaca
Chubby Penguin ornaments
made of soft alpaca blend
wool by rural Peruvian
women. Crate and Barrel
collaborated on the
collection with a fair trade
group that helps the women
earn money to support and
sustain their families.
Crate & Barrel/Associated Press


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E2 SUNDA'I~ NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


L ,1


Enter house #2905


SO VERY PRIVATE!!
* Kitchen Has SS Appl. Home Never Lived In
* 2/3/1 + 24x24 Gar. Large Attached Carport
SBoat/RV Parking 400 Amp. Elec. and 19-Seer A/C
*4.75 Acres/Fenced Short Dnve to Gulf/Rivers
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
F IE SUTTON 352-287-31a7


JI


I www.FloiidaLislinglnlo.c om Lf II


11* i



ENJOY THE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE!
*2/2/2 Car Gar Eat-In Kitchen
* Large Lanai w/Hot Tub Screened Porch in Front
* Dbl. Pane Tinted Windows Nice Decor
* Comm. Pool/Clubhouse Well-Kept Home
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Flo idaLislinglnlo. com


ri- n E-Jncu lu -ALL In LUV.
This cheerfully remodeled 3/2 home oozes charm l New stucco, new
tie, new kitchen, new granite, new appliances and new interior and
extenor pait this house shines like a new pennyll Master bedroom
with vaulted ceiling and new deck New guest room balcony also
takes advantage of the spectacular view The covered boat sip with
observation deck has been refurbished and power added Full
irngation system You've not seen value like this
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotls@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


11985 N. GOLDENDALE AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL
* Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
* 2BD/2BA w/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875









THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY KNOCKING!
If you love Florida freshwater fishing, you'll
love Lake Rousseau! This property is partially
fenced with 1962 mobile ome, a boat dock
and a charming screened room near the
water's edge. With 78 feet on the water, there
are lots of possibilities! Don't wait to see it.
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolfs@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com .


HAPPY

THANKSGIVING
From
Barbara Mills

REALTY ONE





I M *


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REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828
__.1 +


ri'


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


UU 11UI moo UUI on this Pine
Ridge deal! Lovely 3/2/3+ den boasts a
solar heated pool & spa, gas fireplace, RV
pad with 50 amp, large open kitchen.
Upgrades include flooring, custom window
treatments and baths. Enjoy your morning
coffee in the breakfast nook overlooking
your pool.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


HORSES
2/2 on 731 acres with 10 paddocks with water
and shelter 2-stall barn with tack room and
1/2 bath This home has been remodeled and has
1,056 sq ft of living gas, gas fireplace, large
screened room and a country feeling with open
floor plan and beamed ceiling Come see this
beautiful property
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200 i
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


SUPER NICE BRENTWOOD 3/3/2 ON A PRIVATE
CORNER LOT. All prettied up and move-in
ready. Split plan; great cooks kitchen w/
breakfast bar. Living and dining rooms
have sliders to large screened-in lanai;
inside laundry, large side-entry garage.
Priced right to sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


242 N. Lecni Hw. eel il 2-8210 .Mi ,Ivres6760
8375 S. Iucos Bld. Honssa6870 w.*ueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


THE KELLY /! ELLI TE4 11 gE: MA1


BEST PRICE CONDO AT

SAWGRASS LANDINGS
Great furnished condo with
community dock & pool. Great
little place to hang out in
SCALLOPING SEASON
or on weekends.


LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.comr


SEVEN RIVERS GOLF & CC
Truly for the discriminating buyers Gorgeous custom built
3/3/3 pool home overlooks the 6th fairway and green
with all the bells and whistles Features include poured
concrete construction, aluminum roof, Cupela skylights,
wraparound decks, summer kitchen, pavere driveway and
pooi decks, deluxe island kitchen, granite, Italian tile
flooring, huge master suite, Florida room, bonus room,
closets galore Much morel See this fine home and fall in
love with the view
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net
VIRTUAL TOURS at www.martha.sather.remax.com


BEAUTIFUL 3/2 HOME on 2.5 well-
maintained acres in Homosassa. Laminate
floors, kitchen open to living area by long
breakfast bar, oversized master, huge storage/
pantry, newer roof, drain field and A/C. Bring
your animals and enjoy the country lifestyle,
yet still close to all amenities.
IODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com


INFO LINE







19786 SW 88TH PLACE RD.
RAINBOW SPRINGS
* Nice 3BR/2BA/20G Home Lg Kitchen w/Eat-In Area
* Great Room/Dining Room 'Office/Den
* Lg Utility Rm w/Extra 13x8 Hobby Rm Screened Lanai
* Beautiful Landscaping Move-In Ready

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to
submit information
about regular meet-
ings for publication
on the Community
page each weekday.
Include the name of
the organization, the
time, day and place
of the meeting,
whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom
to call for details.
Email to community
@chronicleonline
.com. Include "Club
Meetings" in the
subject line.
For special events or
fund-raisers, submit a
separate news
release.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 E3


Real Estate DIGEST


RE/MAX
agents
gain
elite
status
The asso-
ciates and
staff of
RE/MAX Re-
alty One are
very pleased
to announce
that Cheryl
Lambert and
Ron McEvoy
have qualified
for the 2012
Multi-Million
Dollar club.
Each of these
Realtors has
closed in ex-
cess of $2


Cheryl
Lambert
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Ron
McEvoy
RE/MAX
Realty One.


million in sales volume this year.
Cheryl is an agent in the In-
verness RE/MAX office and
Ron works out of the Crystal
River RE/MAX location. They
each join an elite group of Real-
tors who have qualified for the
award this year.
Craven Realty agent
does it again
Congratulations to Michele


Michele
Rose
Craven
Realty.


Rose of
Craven Re-
alty, who has
sold over $2
million closed
sales so far in
2012. Michele
has obtained
million dollar
status many
times over the
years since


Err ---- I ^ ^ -


Amnida&SKkJohnso n TomBalor UllAvenus &HalStnair ArtPaty
B0OKER/ASSOC. -EALTOR, R REACTOR RALTORBROK REACTOR


2001. You can contact her at
352-212-5097 and isellcitr-
uscounty@yahoo.com.
Lewis hits new
sales mark
Congratulations to Nancy
Little Lewis of EXIT Realty
Leaders in Crystal River, who
has passed $3 Million in closed
sales so far in 2012! Call her at
352-794-0888.


Nancy
Little Lewis
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


746-9000


0vvwciru0atby So


REAL ESTATE, INC.
r5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
MIS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAt,: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


Realtor


AGET[ N DTlYl SEVE IDY1 A:I VWEEKr!


I CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 2 5 bath DW CRYSTAL RIVER Riverfront home w/3
M/H by Skylme on4 5 acres of land Country .... i .. i i .
kitchen, dining rm, family rm, wood burning i , ,,. , ,I I

1I


4002W PINTO 4935 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 2968 W. BEAMWOOD 6121
422358356 $249,900 3/2/2 357718 $138,900 3/2/2 358435 $198,500 3/2.5/2




9328 NCITRUSSPRINGS BLVD. 277N. MATHESON 2047W. PARAON LN. 7768 N. SARAZEN
3/2/1 356581 $69,900 3/2/2 357083 $94,900 3/2/Z2 358792 $149,900 3/2/2 354564 $139,900




-37/_5 9 I | 7 $ I 2 4 3 $05


N. SILVER PALM 842 W. COCKATIEL LR
358309 $148 500 3/2/2 357166 $99,900




2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR. 510 W. PLAYER PATH
2/2/2 354530 $128,000 2/2/1 358921 $96,500


I


64 S LEE =
2/2/2 357886 $54,900

90e' L


eO


3755 N. ROSCOE 9412 E. FERNWOOD PL. 13290 S. OAKVIEW
2/2 356615 $34,900 2/2/2 357736 $74,900 4/2.5 358122 $124,900


CIRS CIRU SPIG tIEEL HIL BEELAIL NENS

101

'2372 W SNOlWY ECRET PL 8597 NDOA WAY I orn.~,e,~I 895 W BEAKRUSHfl riuitr I U O.C


4/2/2 356193 $189,900 3/2/2 358108 $137,500 2/2 358739 $84,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 3/2/2 357224 $59,500




29 N. WASHINGTON 16 S. ADAMS 27 S. FILLMORE 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 45 S. MELBOURNE
2/1 356448 $39, 2/1 356532 $900 00 $ 3/1/1 356531 $53,900 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 354341 $84,900
3-21 N. LECANTO HWY.. REVERLY HILLS. FL 344G-5 1-RRR-7Ra-7100


-I


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T "11111103TRUS RIDGE REA


[












Senna: A butterfly host and nectar plant


here are about 260
species of Senna in the
legume family of plants.
Many were formerly thought to
be in the Cassia genus. There
are still about 100 plants classi-
fied as Cassias. The best fea-
ture of Sennas is their bright
yellow fall flowers. From Octo-
ber through November locally,
Senna bushes are covered with
flowers.
Florida has a few native Sen-
nas: small, herbaceous annuals
or short-lived perennials. Most
popular garden Sennas are ex-
otic species from tropical and
sub-tropical Central and South
America. In their original re-
gions, they would be evergreen
perennial shrubs, small trees or
non-woody herbaceous plants
that would flower throughout


the year. Several
have naturalized in
Florida and become
unwanted invasive
pest plants.
Coffeeweed or
Sicklepod, S. obtusi-
folia, occurs as a
roadside weed
throughout Florida
but originated in
Central and South
America. This an-
nual spreads rapidly
from seeds and can


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


grow 5 feet tall. Frost kills it, but
seedlings sprout by March the
next year. Compound leaves
arranged in three opposite
pairs of leaflets along a 6-inch
midrib have six oval leaflets. As
with most Sennas, there is a
nectar gland on the leaf stem


between the first
pair of leaflets a
magnet for adult but-
terflies. It has be-
come a host plant for
Florida's Cloudless
Sulphur and Sleepy
Orange butterfly
caterpillars.
Candlestick Plant,
S. alata, is a popular
perennial garden
plant in Central and
South Florida. It
dies for winter at the


first frost and should be cov-
ered with pine needle mulch to
protect it from killing hard
freezes locally In Citrus County,
growth is 6 to 8 feet each year.
Leaves are to 20 inches long

See JANE/Page E5


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
The best feature of Sennas is their bright yellow fall flowers. From October
through November locally, Senna bushes are covered with flowers.


2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
a _194 _&BrentwoodResale s(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

REALTY GROUP BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133* VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777





B SINGLEE FAMILY 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3 CAR, WOODSIDE
SINGLE FAMILY 4 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH I
One of the few Paloma Model homes available Great open floor plan, hard ..... ...... . .... .
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS d , .. ... .. I "de DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
You wll love comimg home to his lovely 2 bedroom + den home featuring an : m ... ., ... l.. ...1. oms Luxurious Lantana Model This open floor plan has a beautifully mirrored I l ,, ,, ... I
extended lanai with an inground spa Open floor plan with tile and carpet have direct bath access Loaded with upgrades, central vac, surround sound, formal dining room with butler pantry Large eat in kitchen Spac -ir.- Ir-,t ..... i .... .... .... .. ,, .. i ,
Located on a cul-de-sac street in the desirable community of Terra Vista The designer double entry i . . . .. . .1 i i.. t room overlooks the private screened Lanai 2 bedrooms plus a i .... l , ..... I T F T I ...... ..... i ,
lifestyle you deserve at a price you can afford MLS 352371 $189,000 come see this spectac .... $399,000 complete this lovely home MLS 352909 $199,000 I I$ 359,000





DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
,,, i.,,,, ,,,,i,,,,,,, ,,. DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLA
Beautiful maintenance free home, 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2 car garage, open floor DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
I . i ..., plan design with a great use of space, Sunroom with plantation shutters Come and see this really nice custom Windward on the 5th hole of Skyview Golf 1. .. ... .. ... 1. I 11 ,. .i 11 ... .
,,er. -,,I,, h hi . I .. i, d professional landscaping, Superir ,t, f t .- .;-r room Course Both guest bedrooms boast their own full baths The expanded lanai 1 1 .... 1 ..
R e a d y ....... ..... . 1 1 ,, , I , 1 i I . . I . . 1 , I i I , I .. I . ,i , , I , 1
MLS 354548 $249,000 MLS355853 $209,000 .. .. ..i. .. ...... i' 11$225,000 ..... i i $ 293,000





"I- -



DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
This home comes with all the luxuries you'd pr. t fr- th, .j..1-,rd-,,,,,t This lovely 2 Bedroom + Den home features an extended lanai with an DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
2 bedroom plus a den, 2 bath and 2-car i.p. .,. ,,i...... ..... inground spa Open floor plan with tile and carpet Located on a cul de-sac in BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR Immaculate unfurnished home in the Community of Brentwood Open floor
with hot tub, plantation shutters, triple ... .. the desirable community of Terra Vista Social Membership Included Furnished Townhome in Brentwood for rent Nice 2/Bd with 2 1/2 baths King in, ... .... ..... ... .. , .. .
water fountain and it backs up to the park $1,600 #1223 $1,300 Master Coes wth the Citrus Hils Social Club Membership 1190 $1,000 i i....i... i,,,. ...ii .i $1,100


E4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

with seven to nine pairs of opposite
leaflets. Candlestick comes from Cen-
tral and South America, grows easily
from seed or cuttings and feeds cater-
pillars of Cloudless Sulphur and Or-
ange-barred Sulphur butterflies. Fall
flower spikes are bright yellow, up to
12 inches long, with dozens of pea-like
blossoms. Seeds mature in a four-an-
gled pod. Sow seed in early spring
locally
The most popular and readily avail-
able Senna, S. bicapsularis, is a shrub
that flowers prolifically for four to six
weeks from October through to De-
cember or until killed by frost. Com-
mon names included Christmas Senna
- a now-insensitive and little-used
term.
Older gardeners called it "Cassia,"
and now should make the effort to call
this beautiful butterfly host plant
Senna. It does not spread by seed in


frost-prone Central and North Florida
and is deciduous locally.
Some gardeners cut it to the ground
after frost kill. Protect roots with pine
needles. Otherwise, lanky 12-foot-tall
stems which survive winter may be
trimmed to 3 or 4 feet before leaves
bud in March.
An old, woody plant can be rejuve-
nated by simply removing the biggest
trunk at ground level and allowing
new stems to grow from the well-es-
tablished roots. New stems can be
topped to promote business when
about 3 feet tall in May without jeop-
ardizing the fall flowers. Seed sets
readily in the tropics and in South
Florida this Senna can become an in-
vasive pest plant. A wind- and frost-
protected site near a building, but
with a full sun exposure, is ideal lo-
cally Protected Sennas may reach 12
feet tall and need 10 to 12 feet of di-
ameter to droop from the weight of the
masses of showy flowers.


Jane Weber is a Professional


000 BOSH
SGITTA
Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (35I
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com






ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN -
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
In the equestrian section of Pine comer lot withmatureoaktrees and lots
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a of privacy! Very well maintaintained, new
360' interactive virtual tour at roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and
360 interactive virtual tour at ~move right in! Community features golf,
www.mypineridgehome.com. tennis, clubhouse.
MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded
and private setting perfect retreat!
S I ... ... .1 Take the
MLS #353046 $400,000






CLASSIC AND
CONTEMPORARY
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A
true masterpiece in a park-like setting off
Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for your
family to move right in
OODCFK LS #357471 $425,000


I BARTH |I
IAI TPROTLE


Gardener and Consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands
ofnative plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an appointment
call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


I 311 w 1w i st I


LANDK 352-726-5263
www.landmarkinverness.com


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


."'TIRED OF TURKEY?

SFeast your eyes on

kTERFRONT GETAWAY! 2/1 cozy home, 1/3 acre these tasty deals
al-front w/oaks, fenced & large screened lanai. A little TLC WATERFRONT-ACREAGE & P
make it shine! $68,500. MLS 356493. 5503 S. Marlin 1260 E Wacker, Hernando. $44,500 around a wellkept 2/2 pool home
Tonya Koch 352-61 3-6427/Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983 living at its best ONLY $129,900
1304 CLAYMORE ST, Inverness ...................$45,000
. 11609 E Salmon Way, Floral City ................$48,500
'"34330 Umbrella Rock, Webster ..................$55,900
_9145 E Goldfinch Lane, Inverness............... $56,500
56171 5 ASHLEY TER, Inverness ...................$57,900


2) 2 2 0 -0 4 6 6 THE CAT'S MEOW! 2-story country style, spacious 3/3
) 2 2 0 -0 6 6 home built 1985, nestled on wooded 1.6 acres on Lake Nina.
gbarth@myflorida-house.com 3600 E Perry St., Inverness, $174,900, MLS #356550.
Tonya Koch 352-613-6427.





A BOATER'S DREAM COUNTRY LIVING IS THE LIFE YOU NEED. 42/2,
COME TRUE! family rm w/fireplace, FL room, 20 X 20 pole barn w/stall. So
Sailboat water (no bridges); 240 much more! MOVE-IN ready! Horses welcomed! Bring your
feet of seawall; stationary & float- offer! $179,900 8478 E Haines C., MLS 357808
ing dock; spacious modem 3/25 Jean Cassese 352-201-7034
home sits high and dry (never .
flooded) on 2 lots. This meticu-
lously maintained property is a
must see! $499,000 .


*5721 S. LIVE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
NATURE'S CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
BEST KEPT SECRET OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River and nestled in an area that preserved
Oaks East, a gated waterfront community most of its 1960's charm! Well main-
on the Withlacoochee River tainted, fenced yard, sunroom. The perfect
$218,000 home away from home.
will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #357468 $39,900


LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New: roof
the right setting for living the Florida 10/12, A/C & e-panel 01/12, windows
lifestyle Open and airy with the 0111, W/H 2009! Florida room, fenced
plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, backyard, 2 sheds, corner lot, quiet
190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of location with lots of green Close to town,
room to dock all the water toys ... 1: .1 ... 1. ... ". .' I Fr for you?
imaginable! .1 i i .. i. . ,
MLS#354435 $489,000 $ 68,900


295 S Thayer Ave, Lecanto..................
642 W Diamondbird Lp, Hernando.......
8535 Gospel Island Rd, Inverness.........
15 Gerbera, Homosassa......................
3291 WEST C-476, Bushnell...............
5430 E Tangelo Ln, Inverness..............
893 W Colbert Ct, Beverly Hills............
8084 ATWOOD DRIVE, Webster...........
1067 CR 467 Lake Panasoffkee..........
2625 SW 156TH PL, Ocala.................
140 W Frisco Lane, Citrus Springs........
10679 Halls River Rd, Homosassa........
7416 E Gospel Island Rd, Inverness......
2244 CR 478A, Webster, FL 33597....
9 Whitewood St, Homosassa...............
7426 Allen Dr, Inverness ....................
01oln0 W Bl n Cn, -t r Hmn


ONE MORE THING TO BE ,P ....
THANKFUL FOR. Great home & 618 Sea Holly Dr, Brooksville..................
a wonderful price. 3/2/2 on 2 + 1192 W Diamond Shore Lp, Hernando.....
acres, pool w/Ige lanai & much 48 Cypress Blvd, Homosassa..................
more. MLS 353220, $215,000. 197 Linder Dr, Homosassa......................
3101 5. Graymor Pth 8847 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa.........
Kathy Chapman 352-476-4988 5884 N Hazelwood Dr, Beverly Hills........
1401 E Allegrie Dr, Inverness..................
S 30 Pine St, Homosassa..........................
__ __ __ ~4320 Indianhead, Hernando...................
CALL TOMIKA SPIRES-HA


bEi Si
BEST
C' L *I


w/open floor plan. Floida
MLS 351929




......-. .>-'3B


....$60,000 FANlTASTIC FIND ,,, .
$61,000 ONLY 567,800 11ii'., I,-,I i ."'
$69300Jean Cassese 352-201-7035

...$75,900

...$79,900
....$79,900
$80,900 DOWNTOWN DUPLEX HAS IT ALL! Great location in the
...$84,900 heart of Inverness. Great condition w/newer central A/C and
heat units & more. MLS 348670 ONLY $134,900
....$95,000
....$98,900
....$99,900
....$99,900
..$101,900 .-".
..$109,900 JUST WAITING FOR YOU! Open living 2/2/1 beaufully
updated & remodeled home. Features open floor plan, screened
..$109,900 porch, shed w/elec. Brand New roof! 620 Balboa, Inverness
*..$ |$68,500 MLS 357708 Vicki Love 352-6970712
..$112,000
..$119,900
.$159,900
$159,900
$1 64,900 NOTHING NAUGHTY ABOUT THIS NICE HOUSE! A
S jewel with a pool! 3/2/2 Citrus Springs, fresh interior paint,
$..174,900 new flooring, priva fencing, dinin area, living room, covered
Spatio, split & open oor plans, breakfast bar, move in ready. All
..179,900 this for only $98,900! MLS 359044. Tomika Spires-Hanssen
352-586-6598.
$184,900
.$195,000 "'
..$231,000
NSSEN


d 352-586-6598 1/2 PRICE SUNDAY NO but we got your attention!
CHIROPRACTORS DELIGHT.... House has Good Bones! OR KIMBERLY FULLER Smashing Bank Owned Sugarmill Woods 2006 4/3/2 home
Bank-cwned 4/2 Inverness fixer upper, pool home for w uIM E L u n Iw/3049 living for ONLY $164,500. New paint, boring &
$67,900! Come take a peek! MLS 357766. 352-212-5752 appliances. MLS 359019.
Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 For Appt Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.


A I


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 E5


I







E6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012




=HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Deadwood: Let sleeping logs lie


T his time of year, as the leaves
begin to fall in wooded areas
around the county, you may
have noticed dead or dying trees often
missing a top or most of the smaller
branches. After a tree has toppled
over it may seem rather useless, but
these trees have value to
wildlife. Standing dead or
dying trees, called "snags,"
may look ghostly and unin-
habited, but they teem with
life.
More than 50 kinds of
Florida mammals, birds,
reptiles and amphibians,
plus swarms of insects, spi-
ders, millipedes and other Joan B]
invertebrates use snags for FLOE
dens, nesting and feeding FRIE
sites, caching food, perch-
ing, preening and LIV
courtship.
Downed and rotting logs provide
moist and earthy homes for lizards,
moles, earthworms, millipedes, cen-
tipedes and more. Squirrels will cache
their food within the soft fibers of
fallen trees. Toppled trees also are im-
portant in forest regeneration. Some
rotten logs, known as nurse logs, pro-
vide a growing medium rich in nutri-
ents for tree seedlings to get a


healthy start in life.
Ever "snag" your line while fishing?
As frustrating as it is to lose a lure,
every good angler knows that fallen
logs in a pond or stream provide trout,
bass and other fish with a sheltered,
shady place to rest and feed. Downed
logs in or near water are es-
F pecially vital and should be
spared at all costs. And
while you're cutting your
line free, you'll probably
startle a few turtles lazily
sunbathing on a log.
The loose bark of dis-
eased and fallen trees shel-
ters a multitude of tiny
adshaw creatures. Just turn over a
I|DA- rotting log and watch the
ODLY insect activity. The swarm-
ing, creeping, slithering
ING tangle of ants, spiders, bee-
tles, worms and slugs pro-
vides a nutritious cafeteria lunch for
many birds, mammals, reptiles and
amphibians.
Cavity dwellers such as woodpeck-
ers, wrens and chickadees are vora-
cious insect eaters, though the insects
they eat may not live in deadwood.
Pileated woodpeckers actively seek
out elm and pine trees infested with
wood boring insects. A house wren can


feed 500 insects to its young every
summer afternoon and a swallow can
consume 1,000 insects every 12 hours.
In fact, these birds act as natural pes-
ticides and help keep insect popula-
tions in check.
For safety reasons, weakening trees
need to be removed if there is a po-
tential of them toppling onto struc-
tures or causing human injury For
declining trees in an area that is not a
threat to people or structures, re-
member: Deadwood is good wood for
wildlife. While a tree may be deterio-
rating, other life goes on ... and on.
For information on snags, contact
Citrus County Extension at 352-
527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and agricultural needs.
Programs and activities offered by the
Extension Service are available to all
persons without regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion, or national
origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is the director of
University ofFlorida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension Service.


I


'Majolica' pitcher probably a reproduction; sizing up a censer


D earJohn: I have a question
about the fish pitcher in
the two pictures. It has
been in my family since
I was a little girl. I am
now 78. It belonged to
my great-great-uncle,
he gave it to my mom,
and now, it is mine. The
color photos are a true
color, the bottom is
white with a few green
lines across the bottom
with 39 on it, maybe the John S
price at that time. My SIKOF
family lived in Gary, In-
diana. The vase is prob- AT
ably Majolica. Please
give me your opinion. There are
no cracks or chips and it is in
good condition. S.Z, Inverness
Dear S.Z.: Majolica is generally
a brightly colored tin glazed pot-
tery It was made in England, Eu-
rope, and America throughout the
19th century and into the early
20th century It has been a spe-
cific category of collecting for


I
1


decades. Reproductions have
been produced for a long time. In
the photo, your figural open
mouth fish motif
pitcher's colors display
a lack of depth, one in-
dication of a reproduc-
e. 1 tion. Also, you mention
W, that the base of your
. l pitcher is white; origi-
nals are not. I think you
have an oldish
reproduction.
ikorski Dear John: I have
been reading your col-
umn for many years. I
TIC also try to listen to you
on the radio. I have the
ceramic figure in the photograph.
The men are holding up the cen-
ter part and it has a dragon cover.
It is very ornate with a silvery,
shiny glaze. I would like to know if
you know what it is and the value.
My mother gave this to me about
35 to 40 years ago. It has a sticker
on the bottom that says Wildwood.
There are no chips on it and it is


in excellent condition. S. W,
Inverness
Dear S.W: You have a censer
being held by the two young men
on either side. It was made of
good-quality porcelain in China
sometime after World War II. The
overall condition appears to be
excellent. Potential dollar value
is below $100.
Dear John: I would like to
know if you could give me a name
of someone to look at my astro-
naut autographs. I have the three
that first landed on the moon -
Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins
and Edwin Aldrin. I was given
them about thirty years ago as a
gift. I would like to know if they
are real or auto-penned. B.,
Internet
See Page E7
This odd-looking object being
held by two men is a censer for
incense. It was likely made some-
time after World War II.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Although this pitcher in the shape of a
fish appears to be Majolica, it is likely
an older reproduction.

ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Dear B.: The collecting marketplace
for astronaut and space shuttle mem-
orabilia continues to grow in interest.
If your autographs are genuine, the
potential dollar value would be in the
$1,000 range. Future increase in value
is likely To have the signatures au-
thenticated, contact www.psacard.com
- they specialize in the subject.
Dear John: I listen to your show
every chance I get and have always
been entertained and informed. My
question is about a side table that has
been in the family at least 60 years. I
have never seen anything like it. I am
sending a picture. Here are the di-
mensions: The top is 30 inches wide by
16 deep, the height is 28 inches. As you
can see, the table is dark, but where it
is chipped the wood is light Anything
you can tell me would be greatly ap-
preciated. -J, Internet
Dear J.: I think your library table
was made in Italy between World War
I and II. The overall style is taken from
the 17th to early 18th century. The
painted colors are referred to as poly-
chrome decoration. For more infor-
mation, you can do research at your
local library or on the Internet under
the topic of polychrome furniture.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 E7


Time to winterize tools for spring


Associated Press

You can avoid the silent treatment
from your power tools in the spring by
providing some tender loving care be-
fore storing them in the fall.
Gasoline-powered garden gear isn't
guaranteed to start when it's left idle
for extended periods of time, say 30
days or more. A thorough cleaning is
essential.
"The first thing you want to do is
take a blower and clean everything
off the leaves and debris that have
built up over the growing season,"
said Mike Ballou, a product manager
with John Deere. "This is the time for
maintenance."
Don't delay taking equipment to a
dealer if you don't have the time or in-
clination to do the work yourself, Bal-
lou said. Not only will that extend its
working life, but it also will save you
time and money
"What a lot of dealers do is have
service specials in the wintertime to
attract customers," he said. "Other-
wise, there's a two-week backup in
the spring because everyone tends to
put things off."
Some steps you can take now to en-

Norm Overfield
Realtor ,
352-586-8620
www.normoverfiel d.
homesandland.com


Ask a Veteran

__-_ 352-564-0333
6050 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Hometown Crystal River, FL
Realty normoverfield@yahoo.com

i n j r'm It


sure your tools are ready when the
weather warms up again:
Change the oil and spark plugs in
gasoline-powered equipment before
storing it away
Dump leftover fuel into your ve-
hicles. The shelf life for gasoline gen-
erally is 30 to 60 days, Ballou said.
"Run your equipment until all the old
fuel is gone, and then add fresh along
with some fuel stabilizer. Let that run
five minutes or so, giving it enough
time to cycle through the carburetor.
That prevents sludge from forming
and gumming up the fuel system."
Disconnect the batteries. "Every
two months, put them on a charger
and charge them back to full," Ballou
said. "At that point, you've done what
you need to ensure they'll start again
in the spring."
Here are some additional tips to
ease seasonal garden chores:
Buy an extra set of lawnmower
blades and another chain for your
chainsaw. "That way you'll always

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
S Fora FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$7.2 million already closed by Oct. 31,2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
T Learn More
'm (352) 746-9924


have one on hand while the dull
blades are being balanced and sharp-
ened," Ballou said.
Clean or replace air filters to aid
engine combustion.
Store your equipment and fuel in

See Page E8


Learn The Art of

Real Estate Investing

We've developed this investor education
program and the acconmpan. ing technology
tools because %\ e kno\\ the right way to
build health h in A melican real estate.

Reg.ier Nio% For Free at I I .e\irealt lealer..comi

,- a

rT' Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney |
M Realtor', A HOUSE Realtor@
302.3179 SOLD N.-ne! 287-9022
T WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 ID R


4316 N. BACALL, BEVERLY HILLS
OAKWOOD VILLAGE. Don't pass
this beautiful home up. Tile floors,
large master with huge walk-in
closet, newA/C '06, living and family
room. MLS 357097


31213 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
000DCF8 Call Joe at 302-0910


1111F1.I' -e LA VL11 a 1


c^






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Choose gifts that
give back
KIM COOK
Associated Press
Gift giving feels good, and can
feel even better if you know your
purchase is helping those less for-
tunate. Luckily, a number of home
d6cor retailers partner with chari-
table organizations; many do so
year round, with additional initia-
tives during the holiday season.
As you're making your list this
year or primping your own home
for the holidays, you iliiht con-
sider giving somethiniL thit
not only looks good hiut li p-
ports good works. '
At www.pillowdre.i '
project. com, a fair-
trade business
started by Denver- 6 .
based Renee Ri- f' '% t d
etmeijer and
Laura Tilley, '. .
you'll find
silk, cot-. .1 *
ton or .
hemp
throw-
pillow
cases from South
Africa, Vietnam and
Thailand. Prices
range from $25 to $40
per case; sales from
the Vietnamese ones
support KOTO, which pro-
vides hospitality work training for
homeless teens, while sales
See Page Ell


i ,
-.1 .


,>piri
of rn



of the




(as
'^'i


Crate and Barrel's Alpaca Snowy
Owl ornaments are made of soft al-
paca blend wool by rural Peruvian
women. Crate and Barrel collab-
orated on the collection with a
fair trade group that helps
the women earn money to
support and sustain
their families.


* J


TOOLS
Continued from Page E7
a clean, dry place, said Randy Scully, na-
tional service manager for STIHL Inc., a
manufacturer of chainsaws and other


handheld equipment. "That helps prevent
rust and corrosion."
Lubricate and tighten moving parts.
That includes wheel bearings and throttle
cables. Tillers, mowers, string-cutters and
chain saws take terrible beatings and tend
to loosen up over time. "Anything that's not
quite right or broken, get it repaired,"


Scully said. "Clean away oil that's dripped
onto handles or working surfaces for
safety."
Get to know your product instruction
manual, Scully said. "It has complete list-
ings of things in there about what should be
checked and how often."
John Deere, STIHL and many other man-


ufacturers have begun emphasizing easier-
to-maintain designs for do-it-yourself
equipment operators.
"For example, no tools are needed for
changing the oil in our newer garden trac-
tors," Ballou said. "We're trying to make
things simple to extend their working
life."


E8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


I *'%*


-:: :, [? 1 I-,? ::








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




-Chrgnicle


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 E9


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate Classifieds


Classifieds In Print


and


Irv Online


A ll


The Time






r* i ..Su. *1111117 I -E3I3331B anlllll111111111 For R 1ICot


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!


DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, $425/ $400 dp
Lrg Lot (727) 480-5512

HERNANDO
Lrg. 2/1/2A Remodeled
Next to Citrus Hills, 1 yr.
Lease. No Pets, $495.
mo.+ Sec. 352-344-3084


HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last & Sec
(352) 382-5661
HOMOSASSA
2Br/1% BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
INGLIS
2/2, Close to Plant
on 1 acre Clean, Quiet
$550. (352) 447-6016



BAD CREDIT RENT-TOOWN.
1 3 t h
Street homes of Alachua, FL.
N o w
has lard/home pkg's. Ready to
m o v e
in NOW! Call
386-418-0424
DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, Large Lot,
Quiet Area $28,000
(727) 480-5512
Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95% re-
modeled inside, 1.25 ac-
res half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see! 74K
(352) 621-0192


AUCTION: FL Properties!
2 Operating Car Washes,
Residential, Commercial
& Waterfront Land


Properties in Six Counties
Many Will Sell Regardless of Price I
* Waterfront, Commercial &
Residential Land Throughout FL
* 2 Operating Car Washes
Dunnellon & Crystal River, FL
* Single Family Residence in Inglis, FL
SMarion, Levy, Citrus, Lake, ,,_
Suwannee & Hamilton Counties
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Driggers, III,
ic. Real Estate Broker, FL
Lc#AU707 &AB3145 1 10%BP I-I
TRANZoN. 877-374-4437


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq.ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807

INVERNESS
2/2 Stoneridge Landing
55+ Gated Community
Pool & Club House 28x40
End Glass Lanai & Furni.
$22,900 352-341-0473
INVERNESS
3 months free lot rent
w/ purchase! 1 & 2 Bd
Homes starting @ $6900
Located in a 55+ park
on Lake. Lot rent $276.
month, Water Included.
352-476-4964
Palm Harbor Stilt
Homes, Waterfront,
Beach, 34 Years
Experience
www.plantcitv.palm
harbor.com
John Lyons
800-622-2832 x 210
USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




FLORAL CITY
2+Br/2Ba on
Withlapopka Island;
2 docks, good fishing
Asking $500,1st & Sec
(352) 419-4072 or
(727) 842-2921


-CRYSTALRIVER-
3b/2ba den newer c/h/a
carpet & vinyl, very clean
RV Hkup. $39.900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
HERNANDO 1 ACRE
Workshop 24x40w/ac
Kit-log cabin look+den/fpl
$$$ under $50k $$$
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352)634-6340
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 476-7077
HOMOSASSA
DBL MH, pool, 4 rentals,
2 + acres, 2 workshops,
Owner Fin. 20% DOWN
$160K 352-628-0304




2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

INVERNESS 2/2
completely remodeled
carport,scnrm,w/attached
storage shed, plywood
floors, drywall, $10,500
352-419-4606
INVERNESS/DNTWN
"*MELODY PARK*-
2/2/carport $11,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352) 634-6340

STONEBROOK MHP
2BR, 2BA, 1200 sq. ft.,
Fully Furnished
Lakeview Homosassa
$40,000., MUST SEE!
(352) 628-9660


Inverness, FL 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Com-
pletely updated DW
home on Lake Hender-
son 55+Park. Ph


LECANTO 55+ PARK
1997 West 14x66 3b/2ba
w/cp non-smoker-move
in condition, newer heat
pump, split floor plan, ca-
thedral ceilings thruout.
Glass & Screened FL
room & open deck w/craft
room, outside storage
shed. $245 rent incl.
water, sewage & gar-
bage, ALL appliances
incl. Asking $23.000obo
mobilhome.shutterfly.
corn/ 352-400-8231






-ACTIONF
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTrY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.litrus(ounlyHonmeRenltals.om
LECANTO
1933 Shonelle Path (......REDUED $1,000
3/2/2 Incl. Full Mmb. Pool, Tennis, Gym
3069 W. Bermua Dunes Dr. (L) .50
2/2/2 Griat Home in Black Diamond
CRYSTAL RIVER
1055 N. Hollywood Or. ((R).......$795
2//] liCuteHomnothCdln re, Srened Bck Porch
9782 W. LIurel Oaks Ln. (CR) ....$875
3//1 on Acre, Flonda Room, Large Country Kitchen
HOMOSASSA
8158W. Miss Maggie Dr. (H)......$675
2/1/1 Cottageon Water, Fenced Backyiard
6944 W. Grant St. (H)................ $700
2/2/1 Cute, Centrally Lcated
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
9432 E. Gable (INV)..............$700
2/2/1 Roomy with Screened Porch
6315 N. Srewood Dr. (HER).....$700
2/1 Cute Home w Fl rida Roo, Nice Backyar d


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Brinq us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

4/2 On ACanal........$750
3/2/2 .... S...$825
2/2/2.. .............$675
2/2 DpleCe uteSCIea...$600
3/2/2 ...............$950

3/1.5 ................$650
2/2 Bonus Room ......$650
2/1/1 ................$600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
2 Cheryl Scruqqs.
I Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; dock
$695/mo (352) 287-5020
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, Wash/Dryer
828 5th Ave. NE (unfurn.
opt.) $600 + sec 727-
455-8998, 727-776-3120

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857


CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Completely
Furn. on Hunter's Sprgs,
sun deck, W/D rm. All
util. incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. IncI Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450/$500
no pets 697-0310
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb., maint.
IncI., peaceful No pets.
$600. plus mo. 628-6700

INVERNESS
2 B/R's Available
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


I QUAL OSI N.
OPPORTUNITY
1.--- - J
INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393


Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
1 Bedroom $396;
2 Bedrooms $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer.










Perfect Location
Office/Retail. High
Visibility. Beautiful
Historic Inv. Down-
town Courthouse Sq.
700 sq.ft. 628-1067




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn w/ member-
ship, Seasonal/Annual
352-476-4242, 527-8002




HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
1/1, $435. incl. garb/Wtr
Pets? No smoking. 1st
& sec. 352-212-4981




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


HERNANDO
Room to rent w/private
bath & entrance; utilities
incld, free WIFI. $385 mo.
(352)341-0787
LECANTO
1b/1lba, furn. Handyman
cottage porch, 5 acr.
pking, quiet, water&trash
pk up, incl. pets ok, ref's
$450mo. Blind Box1812P
CC Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429



CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Uke New
352-302-1370
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800



INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162, 795-1878
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1 1/2 w/family rm Newly
remodeled inside & out.
W/D hook up. Fenced
$750. 352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 2 bath.$600.
Garage, new flooring,
ceramic tile baths,
modern kitchen. Call
352-697-0195
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1%, Good neighbrhd.
Close to schools $675.
mo. 352-409-1900
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office fenced yard, on
over .AC, on Hwy 200
$875.+Sec., 344-3084








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
Country Living on Large
/2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212



CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; Furnished
$695/mo (352) 287-5020

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
FLORAL CITY
Room, Includes FREE
Dish & Long Distance
(352) 726-4049



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th-Wheel with
slides. Screened gazebo
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowne r.com
352-843-5441
FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Marie-Elena Carter
Broker Associate
Realtor
Accredited Buyer's
Representive
&
Certified Distress
Property Expert
Only Way Realty
352-422-4006
www.cartermaria.com

Motivated seller
wants this aonell
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


-3
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial






9
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




OZELLO
-approx. 2.5 acres-
commercial .w/boatramp.
and gulf access, 3, 18',
roll-ups, $149k
call 352-634-3862



BEVERLY HILLS
4 bedroom. 4+ bath.
6118 W. Glory Hill St.
Open House Sat and
Sun 17th, 18th. 4,200
under air 6,300 under
roof, efficiency apartment.
Pool spa indoor & out.
Must see asking $435k
appraised @ $430k
tzclan@ceturylink.net
352 464 1495



REMODELED 2/2/1
103 S Desoto. 1208 sf
New: appliances, paint,
flooring, light fixtures,
fans. Updated kit/baths.
$45,900.527-1239




YOU'LL v THIS!

CLEARVIEW
ESTATES
3+BR/ 2.5 BA, 2+Garage
on 1 acre. Clear views up
and down the trails. Too
many extras, must see.
Mid $200's 352-860-0444
Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, Private lot
352-746-0002



Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




2 Bedroom, 1 Bath,
1 car garage, New Roof,
laminate, flooring,
1000 sq. ft, $57,000,
352-419-6719


must sell!
$164,900, 3030 S Jean
Ave. Inverness, FL, Bank
Owned. Only $164,900
for this large 3/3/2 home
w/ workshop & beautiful
screened pool. Jessica
Wood 352-427-8863,
www.irwDronerties.com
Inverness Highlands,
4 BR, 3 BA, Pool, Corner
of Carol and Tennyson.
2.8 acres, fenced, CHA,
deep well, UPDATES
in 2011. Offered As Is.
$174,900. 352-419-7017.
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Sale. Nego.
(908) 322-6529

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $41,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AH1
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/IMC
REALTY ONE




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558
WALDEN WOODS
Adult Community
2/2, DW+Carport, Furn.
Close to Community
Center, Pool, $25,000
Call 352-428-6919






MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY,
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available
MINI FARM
5 Acres(2 lots) adj
Pine Ridge/C.Springs
3/2/2, block home
w/lots of extras! $185K
(352) 564-8307


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857


Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den & famn.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925


YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO TO
www.
BestN'u-re'Coast
Properties.com
To view
great waterfront
properties"


Home o Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Ftin Yowr aruamn Hons

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehoti iefinder.com


Hme


Hme


E10 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


Waterfro
Home


S^3^ ,

EFIT Fir







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GIFTS
Continued from Page E8

from the South African
cases benefit the Open Arms
orphanage in Malawi.
'"Accept and Be" is the
sentiment expressed on a
limited-edition, graffiti-
esque poster printed in pig-
mented inks and available at
CB2 for $16.95, with all sales
going to the Trevor Project,
a national non-profit that fo-
cuses on suicide prevention
among gay youths.
The retailer has been in-
volved for several years
with San Francisco's Cre-
ativity Explored, a collec-
tive of developmentally
disabled artists. Each sea-
son presents a different col-
lection of home accessories,
and this fall there is an in-
teresting variety of soft


SWEEPING CIRCULAR DRIVEWAY!
* Corner cul de sac location 2333 sq ft of living
3/2/2 pool built in 2007
Corian kitchen stainless steel appliances
Family room with fireplace
Radiant barrier for great efficiency
I Snail shower jetted tub dual sinks
S'_ #354014 $219,000


CUSTOM GOLF COURSE!
4+office/2/3 .59 acre
* Overlooks #1 fairway on the Pine course
* 2880 sq ft of living well for irrigation
* Remodeled kitchen newer appliances
Side entry 3-car garage 2 openers
New roof 2011 newAC/heat 2006 3
#354992 $159,000 ,I


CQ^ "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225
Asuarnmillwoods
PONTICOS a Asw
SMulti-Million SSS Producer ESRA KEY 1 REALTY INC.








HEATED POOL & GREAT CUL-DE-SAC HOME
PRIVATE BACKYARD! IS PRICED RIGHT!
3 Bedrooms + Office/Den 2004 Built Double Pane Windows 2006 Roof Shingles t
Cathedral Great Room Cul-de-Sac 3 Bed/2 Bath/2 Car Well for Sprinklers
Large Eat-In Kitchen & Updated Appliances Living & Family Rooms Gas Fireplace
S$164,000 MLS#358806 $124,500 MLS#356458
Take myvirlual tosrse 11 1 1 ,T?'T-


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Ell


goods, plates and prints, in-
cluding Anne Connelly's vi-
brant, impressionistic
"Color Field" rug and Se-
lene Perez' charming trio of
owls printed on white cotton
velvet. (Rug, $399; pillow,
$39.95; www.cb2.com)
CB2 also aims to donate
500,000 meals through food
banks nationwide this holi-
day season; each interac-
tion with the retailer, online
or in person, with or without
a purchase, will count to-
ward the goal.
Rural Peruvian women
crafters are supported by
Crate & Barrel, which is
selling the artisans' win-
some holiday ornaments. A
trio of plump little penguins
or owls ($29.95) and a quar-
tet of woodland creatures
($39.95) are hand-knit from
alpaca blend wool.
(www.crateandbarrel. com)
For travelers and animal


lovers on your list, have a
look at Carol Stevenson's
hauntingly intimate photo-
graphic prints of elephants,
taken at a sanctuary in
Thailand, at www.thetravel-
erscollection.com. Sales of
the signed, numbered, lim-
ited-edition works benefit
the Golden Triangle Asian
Elephant Foundation
($1,895 and up).
If you'd like to peruse a
larger variety of gifts, check
out www.giftsthatgive.com.
Hundreds of home d6cor
and design houses, includ-
ing Jonathan Adler, Simon
Pearce, Lily Pulitzer and
Michael Aram, are repre-
sented on the site, and $1
out of every $5 goes to the
cause of your choice -
among them, Cancer Care,


Lupus Foundation and Save
the Whales.
For a romantic gift, con-
sider a boudoir pillow from
Anne Koch's washable silk
Braille collection for kumi
kookoon; each is embel-
lished with the phrase "I
love you" in Braille ap-
pliqu6, and a percentage of
sales goes to the American
Foundation for the Blind.
($110-$200, www.ku-
mikookoon.com)
At Bloomingdales,
celebrities including Diane
Von Furstenberg, Kellan
Lutz and Matt Lauer have
been enlisted to create or-
naments benefiting the
Child Mind Institute, which
focuses on children's mental
health. (wwwblooming
dales.com)


BEST '
AERT", Of Citrus
g-- Inc. e'd rok
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 FaCbook
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL



Looking for A Realtor who knows Pine Ridge? I am an
avid carriage driver, have 3 horses and my own farm I know the
inventory in Pine Ridge and I am happy to acquaint you with this
wonderful community filled with equestrian enthusiasts, golfers,
tennis players and nice people' These are just a few of the
homes and lots available in this fantastic community Check out
the community and all of the listings available on my website or
call me for a personal tour of the area


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-
563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be pre-
pared to leave a detailed message.


I -A BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
I IMMACULATE WATERFRONT-HERNANDO, FL Commercial location several blocks from Old I
S3BR/2BA upgraded home on Hernando Lake. Almost Courthouse. Former flower shop.
1/2 acre lot. Must seel $249,900 MLS#353564 $105,000 MLS#356806


WATERFRONT PARADISE-FLORAL CITY, FL
2 story stilt home situated on 2 plus acres. In-law
suite down stairs Lots of trees and privacy.
$169,900 MLS#358757


BANK OWNED-INVERNESSL, FL
Spacious 2BR/BA pool home. Fireplace in LR.
1 acre with detached garage.
$79,998 MLS#356908


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 ,
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (2i302-6714 |


A CAPTIVATING COUNTRY RETREAT! HORSE LOVER'S DELIGHT!
EI' . ,, ', acres in this gorgeous What a value in this lovely horse property with
4 ,: ,11-r. ge home located on the barn on 1 5 acres, 3 BR, 2 Baths and a sol
horse trails and close to the equestrian center heated poo Beautifully and lovingly remodel
This is a staycation at its finest Sit in your kitchen throughout in 2007, it is open, airy, private an
and enjoy nature from the surrounding views spacious Located on the horse trails of Pin
Why would you ever want to leave' Only Ridge, it is the perfect place to call home Newl
$399,000 MLS 358707 listed at only $279,000 MLS 358909
4668 N Buffalo
This well located 1 acre lot near the Equestrian Center is priced to sell now.
Go and see it and call for more information and to write the offer.
MLS 354424 $22,000


SKEY1 "Always There For You"
REALTY GAIL COOPERe
ME i multimillion Dollar Realtor
ERA Cell: (352) 634-4346
o Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com
,..".. ,.,4,


SAV MNE









E12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* I l.:.a .:.'. I.,ill. aiahi



Mi, i= ,i:./71 $375,000
Call Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
I:'I'Ir'. CillusCounl 'Sold. coin










INVERNESS, VACANT LAND SALE
h l. It I .c i ,: h.bicli. .i hi :.v ill ih .l...
h.)i..l,;ili i.A 6.6 ..,; ill i mi Iil :;i
l_ .. ,:lh d II aill I IIII hIll "ll ; I
Mi__ = ,"7'I')_ $29,000
David KuuI., Cell 95438358786
Ofl: 352 726 6668


READ THIS AD
II y.,,J n al .iI 1,Jl -Il,, a, l 1 1.l 1h
,:va i l l, 11,,i lll i ,I ,i(I: i a ll in h,1 ,.:11-I


9,Ill I i a ,1l; I ,il'., I ,ill I'III if II II- IIau
$74,900
Ruth Fiedenck I 352 563 6866


l .lh hin -l l III.)( IIIIIl I .. .)I III
.ii l .,, al l I i-ill i lal- i IvIl In i a innl ll, anal
MAi i = :..\
NEWLY PRICED AT $44,900
Mailyn Booth 637 4904










COUNTRY SETTING CLOSE TO TOWN




Mi=13 i-.I.1' $29,900
Call Jennie o0 Cheijl loi appointment
3527269010


WIDE OPEN WATERFRONT
I ,I I .. d 1 -1 1 -- 1 -1,



i- = '.1 ASKING $189,000
Pal Da,s 35212212 280
Ien hlistng I.i n II c2p.iid.it is corn








PRISTINE RANCH






Mii ''..'- ml $375,000
MI 5 = -I.5.:?,.1 $375,000-
Call Jim Minton at 422 2173
toIn see this cattleman s dieam


I-' Inl. inn HI.l in.anld .nn 1 .i .l;- -1 .1 .

I.,an I LII. Ih H nniiien .11iii-ne hlilihb. d
Ml 5 = '-..'/ $72,000
loniame 0 Regan 586 0075


GET AWAY FROM IT ALL!!
V Wil.li.. l i.il h. .il. f H II.IId..I. H, i.ll .1 .y I
:1111: : .,.. || I. |.'.. .': .. I 1 ., i t .....l l..Ji .

Sl: lll .lh llll~ I .II h d .d l ,i rl, h I I [p i II l llh l ll

Mli = .:.II_ $99,000
Call Dons Minev '352 422 4627













* PF I. hill. ill.i
* All aiLI all,.in.: h ..I

Mi_5 = W,7/Il i$90,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


LOTS OF VALUE HERE
Miil i I....I nvilh I .v IIII i I,$n, i- Il;: ,

i.nhi ..l,:ill _" _' w .Il ih. l.lI'.' l R.V i.,il l 1..
l. | 5.l 1 l ,:I, I f i l 1. .,: ,l.l..h. i ,l I.I/y
MlI = .Il ASKING $228,000
Pat Davis 352 212 7280
View sting at: c21paldais. corn


PHIME SUGAHMILL WUUDS
GOLF COURSE TOWNHOME
S ; l.n.1.. ... h.,,in I n. .,n ..an-
* II I ., 1 I ,,ill I I l l l i i lll.,',n-
* 11i 1 I,,.,,.. ,, :
* ln.-, In. i'll .i VVhcni'i n l'nnln.annsu,
OFFERED AT ONLY $63,500
Call Elhas G. Kiallah 352 400 2635


2/1/1 WEST HIGHLANDS HOME
li Inh iiny-l a,/i ld inn l,i l n- a il ,:l i l,11; .1.i
usiil l hb.l'll II ii -llnl/irn IL i allh, i ,i
In .I ll.l.n ll... i. I Ii. i M1 L I = .n'l -I: ._

Teiij R. Blanco 352.419.9252
tle i'bhlanco.com


CUL-DE-SAC LOT
Alm.ir I .,. Pil.- hn6 l.jH -.ii in .
.rllllllllllll III' li i.a 1 llll- .lhll-ll

MIal = .d 352 $24,900
Call IIda 352 270 0202


* Pi4 I Ii l b, lli1 n Il. 11i1 l l y J1 -

* ri,'j s s ,\liil \ Ali H I ,....11 ,I I l h, 1. II:.,
* i, .i ll 1 1, h1 a i.l, 1 i .ai .linl i 11. I .11,
Mi. a= .. i I $140,000
Call Casel Keaise J R1' MotIon Real
Estate 352 726 6668


COMFORTABLE LIVING
AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE

[-..l, I h ..lIl W lllll I 1 ,11 ll-a I I IIII I

W1ll l .i. ..... I." K.I,. T.,,.l ,in.) l....il lhi. l, I:1 i.. l..i. l,
kl .. I..., r j HIIM
Ml.-. = ,-.ii $48,900
Pal Davis 352 212 7280
lViewi hosting c2loaldaris corn


_"" ,j

..1: .l ._ lnr lla l III. ,ii .lI..,-i l ..a1.I^,,
in 11 ili .n i i i :n .a i l li fvr
I i.f, i 6 1s..n II

ONLY $84,900
Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


OPEN WATERFRONT ..n il.l t il.i
- l,, .1 h, a i h 11 1 .1 lI] lll h lll a I iii, 11 h ,i il
|.ii. llni l l,.4.1. 111 ,il. .i ii

Ml5 =' ,.1., ASKING $119,900
Call Jim Motion at 352 422 2173
to wel: the potential of this beaulilul
:'atelthont piopeity'


REDUCED RIVERFRONT!
H l I II. II _"11 .. :. ilp l c y h.l yl r I vi. i inlh
i WI -vIl 11 p- i I. I,i l,lIp ,ain.l n Ia,iu i lh:

li:.n Ia :.v e P sr 3,: 52-1 h- i ,:l iI $189K
Call Ouade Feeseir 352 302 1699