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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-18-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02951

Full Text



Football: Lecanto ends with loss to Cocoa Beach /B1


Partly cloudy and
breezy..
PAGE A4


I -- S UI N I D :


TOYOTATHON


at VILLAGE
TOYOTA SEEIT
VOLUME ONPG118 ISSUE 10TYOTA
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 103


WORLD NEWS:

641 11-


for the food


Traders


target


Twinkies


Rocket hits
Israel shoots down
rocket bound for Tel
Aviv./Page A16
LOCAL NEWS:
Food tracker
A local church creates a
database to track food
donations for all area
charities./Page A2
BUSINESS:









Shop sensibly
Follow five tips to steer
clear of debt during the
holidays./Page Dl

COMMENTARY:


Changing
US electorate looking
different; outcomes of
election change, too./
Page C1

OPINION:
More letters
Read letters and Sound
Off./Pages A12, A13


HOMEFRONT:


Cottages
Backyard bungalows
are becoming an
attractive option for
many homeowners.
/HomeFront
LOCAL NEWS:
Rotary rally
Local clubs join forces
to remodel the Boys and
Girls Club facility in
Inverness./Page A3


FNTFRTAINMFNT-


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Sydney Bruce from the Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church in Crystal River hands out the turkeys Saturday at the
Thanksgiving Food Alliance Giveaway at the Inverness Walmart.

Thanksgiving Feeding Alliance meal giveaway helps crowds


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
-INVERNESS
ith her baby in her
*hIopp'ing cart, Kat-
rma Piechocki was
afraid Thanksgiving
would not be possi-
ble this year for her three young
children. Standing in a long line at
Inverness Walmart was something
she was willing to do as a mother
Recently, she had a baby and
found herself unemployed. Her fi-
anc6 is the only source of income
for their family However, his in-
come does not go very far, as utili-
ties are their priority.
"We are here to get dinner for
Thanksgiving," Piechocki said. "We
probably would have just eaten
regular food. We hope we will have
enough for everyone to eat."
Anthony Belcastro also was hop-
ing to feed his family for Thanks-
giving. Father of eight, Belcastro
felt he had to be independent and
provide for his family on his own
by standing in line.
"With the economy being bad,
everyone needs a helping hand,"
Belcastro said. "There is also a lot
of unemployment. Everyone is
doing what they can to survive.
Everyone needs to help everyone.
Today is really important to us
and to all these families."
Saturday morning, volunteers
congregated at the Inverness Wal-
mart parking lot to come face-to-
face with individuals and families
in need for the seventh annual
Thanksgiving Feeding Alliance


The Path of Citrus County proudly provided fresh organic lettuce grown on
its Hernando farm.


Communityplans feast in Hernando


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HERNANDO There's no
place like Hernando.
Back in the day, the old men in
the neighborhood would sit out on
a bench under the tree and talk.
They would tell of the phosphate
mines and they'd keep watch and
keep the neighborhood safe.
The women of the neighbor-
hood would feed anyone and
everyone who came to the house.
They helped raise each other's


children.
Today, the younger generation
wants to bring back some of that
sense of "It takes a village to raise
a child" and multi-generational
closeness. Last year, the young
adults decided to organize a com-
munity Thanksgiving dinner in
the park in the center of the
neighborhood, complete with
Freddie Simmons' sweet potato
pie and Melanie Simmons' fa-
mous fruit pizza with a cookie
See Page A9


SPage A9


Transitioning
'Twilight' stars take on
new roles./Page B6


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ............ D4
Crossword ..............A18
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment .......... B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................... A18
Obituaries ........... A6
Together.............. A20


S IIJH|1LL 2 I0 I o


State buys private landfill for toll road


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Another small step to-
ward building Suncoast
Parkway 2 has been taken
by the Florida Turnpike
Enterprise.
It has purchased a Class
III landfill parcel of about
136 acres on County Road
486 for $2.5 million, ac-
cording to Inverness Real-
tor James Morton.
"It's right across the
street from Pine Ridge,"
said Morton, who handled
the sale on behalf of the
owner, Rooks Properties
LLC. "We just put in a four-
way stop sign and light.
They've just increased the
size of the road and Wal-
mart's just down the road."
The parkway would cut
through the middle of this


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Florida Turnpike Enterprise recently purchased this
construction and debris landfill along County Road 486 for
$2.5 million.


land. The purchase raises
the question of advancing
the start of road
construction.
"Is the Suncoast Park-


way coming through?"
Morton asked. "The an-
swer to that has been yes
all along: It's just a ques-
tion of when. What we


were told is that there are
no immediate plans to start
construction, but what the
parkway authority has
done is identify some criti-
cal-path parcels. It's in
their best interest to buy
and bank land until they
have funding and alloca-
tion for the continuation of
the parkway So they have
identified some key
parcels, this being one of
them."
Class III landfills receive
only yard trash, construc-
tion and demolition debris
or other approved materi-
als that are not expected to
produce leachate solu-
tion containing contami-
nants that poses a threat
to public health or the
environment


Page A4


KERA WILLIAMS/Standard-Examiner
Curtis Smout stands in line
Friday with a stack of
Twinkies at the Hostess
Thrift Shop in Ogden, Utah.
Hostess Brands Inc., the
maker of the spongy snack
with a mysterious cream fill-
ing, said Friday it would shut-
ter after years of struggling
with management turmoil,
rising labor costs and the
ever-changing tastes of
Americans even as its pantry
of sugary cakes seemed sus-
pended in time.

Prices going up

fast online

Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO -
Twinkies are being sold on
the Internet like exquisite
delicacies.
Hours after Twinkie-
maker Hostess announced
its plans to close its doors
forever, people flocked to
stores to fill their shopping
baskets with boxes of the
cream-filled sponge cakes
and their sibling snacks -
Ding Dongs, Ho Hos and
Zingers.
Late Friday and Saturday,
the opportunists took to
eBay and Craigslist. They
began marketing their
hoard to whimsical collec-
tors and junk-food lovers
for hundreds and in
some cases thousands of
dollars. That's a fat profit
margin, when you consider
the retail price for a box of
10 Twinkies is roughly $5.
Greg Edmonds of Sher-
man, Texas is among those
See .Page A2

HOSTESS BRANDS
Hostess Brands Inc.
said Friday it will move
to liquidate the
company after failing to
emerge from its second
Chapter 11 bankruptcy
filing in less than a
decade. The company
said buyers have
already expressed
interest in some of its
brands, meaning they
could find a second life.
DESSERTS
CupCakes
Ding Dongs
Donettes
Funny Bones
Ho Ho's
Sno Balls
Twinkies
Yodels
BREAD
Beefsteak
Butternut
Home Pride
Merita
Nature's Pride
Wonder


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
76
LOW
52


NOVEMBER 18, 2012


C ICITRU-S CO U N T Y






riwww.chronicleonline.com
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1









Group compiles database for food sharing


Goal is to reduce

waste, redundancy
ANDREW WELFEL
Special to the Chronicle
Nature Coast Ministries is pro-
viding a way for local charities
and churches to centralize their
data and monitor food distribu-
tion; it is an effort to combat those
in need taking more than their fair
share of food.
NCM is a nonprofit organization
that maintains independence
from the government by running
on private donations only
Tom Slagle, who heads up NCM,
said people are taking advantage
of the system. With as many as six
locations in Citrus County that
give out food to the needy, many go
to every place they can and take
more food than they need, he said.
This results in others in need
being deprived.
NCM has developed a solution.
Jeremiah Morris, a volunteer for
NCM, has modified software with
the help of a company in Orlando.


The software was originally in-
tended for keeping track of docu-
ments; now it keeps track of
people, he said.
It's taken six months to design
and configure the software to
meet NCM's specific needs. He
has been working on it in his spare
time Fridays and Saturdays when
he's not taking classes at the Col-
lege of Central Florida.
When a person requests help
from NCM, he or she fills out a
data sheet. The information is
typed into a database that can be
accessed by any local charity
through NCM's website with a
code given only to the charitable
organizations. Viewable informa-
tion is limited; except NCM, the
organizations can only see where
a person has been, what he or she
has received and on what date.
The physical copy of the sheet is
locked away to protect confiden-
tiality. It contains other entries
such as Social Security number,
race, date of birth and family
members to create a larger pro-
file. He said this profile is then
used by the U.S. government as
census data to ascertain how


With as many as
six locations in
Citrus County that
give out food to the
needy, many people
go to every place
they can and take
more food than they
need, he said. This
results in others in
need being deprived.
much government aid should be
given to the shelters that receive
government assistance.
Right now, Morris is working on
converting all of NCM's old, phys-
ical sheets to the online database.
Once the job is done, it will greatly
reduce the hassle of keeping so
many physical copies and elimi-
nate the complicated paper trail
from multiple forms, he said.
Before this system can be fully


implemented, representatives
from the organizations that give
food and clothing to the needy
need to know how to use the sys-
tem. Earlier this month, Slagle
conducted a class to show how it
works and what to expect with the
new system.
NCM allots 17 pounds of food
per person in every family All the
food comes in grocery bags that
have been weighed to make sure
they're as close to 17 pounds as
possible. NCM is one of the only
places in Citrus County that also
gives away meat along with veg-
etables, bread and packaged
goods, he said.
This system of universalizing
and centralizing data is essential
if NCM wants to keep running.
Right now, there's a growing
trend and it's not a good one, Sla-
gle said. Families who come to
him for help have recently in-
creased demand, and NCM's
dried goods are drying up. The
Saturday before last, the shelves
were empty.
According to its records, NCM
helped out 156 individuals in Au-
gust 2011; in August, 1,159 re-


ceived assistance.
Numbers are rapidly growing
because of a stagnant economy
and a recent surge in recognition
of what NCM is doing, he said.
Slagle said he's concerned be-
cause food supplies are running
low and the winter months are fast
approaching. Typically, as many
homeless snowbirds make their
way south to escape the cold
weather, they create a temporary
spike in demand.
NCM is an organization that
helps homeless and poor people
in Citrus County. Its Crystal River
thrift store receives donated
items, sells them and uses the
profits to buy food, clothing and
other essentials that people need.
This enables Slagle to evaluate
people who need help on a case-
by-case basis, he said. For exam-
ple, government regulations
mandate that a shelter that re-
ceives government aid must por-
tion out its supplies equally.
Without this interference, he is
able to determine who is really in
need and who isn't and can give to
each family or individual accord-
ing to his or her need.


TWINKIES
Continued from Page Al

who believe Twinkies are
worth more now that Host-
ess Brands Inc. has closed
its bakeries. He lost his job
as a sales representative
eight months ago, so he is
hoping to make some money
feeding the appetites of
Twinkie fans and
connoisseurs
After spending a couple of
hours driving around to
stores Friday, Edmonds
wound up with 16 boxes of
Twinkies and Ding Dongs.
He started selling them Sat-
urday on eBay, advertising
three boxes for a hefty price
of$300.
"I could really use the
extra money since I'm un-
employed," Edmonds, 50,
said. "I figure I better sell
them pretty quickly because
I am not sure how long this
novelty is going to last"
Contrary to popular be-
lief, Twinkies don't last for-
ever. Most bought in stores
Friday carry an expiration
date of early December,
If buyers don't bite, Ed-
monds isn't sure what he
will do with his supply He
doesn't even like them.
"I do like to have a Ding
Dong every once in a while,
though," he said.
John Stansel of Tampa,
Fla., blanches at the thought
of eating a Twinkie. He's a
self-described health nut.
Yet he, too, rummaged
shelves late Friday at a
neighborhood Walgreens
and then again early Satur-
day at Target and a grocery
store. He spent about $100
for 20 boxes of Twinkies and
Ding Dongs. His goal: sell
them for about $1,000 and
put the money to good use.
"Maybe I will hire a per-
sonal trainer for myself or
go do some shopping at
Whole Foods or donate the
money to a charity to fight
diabetes," Stansel, 40, said.
"No matter what, I figure I
am getting sugar off the
streets."
Although Hostess is shut-
ting down, it's still possible
Twinkies, Ding Dongs and
Ho Hos could make a come-
back. That's because Host-
ess is planning to sell its
brands and other assets at
an auction to be overseen by
a U.S. bankruptcy judge in
New York. Several potential
buyers could emerge for
Twinkies, particularly with
the recent outpouring of
affection.


Associated Press
Customers shop Friday afternoon at the Sweetheart Outlet
store in Casper, Wyo. The store, which will close Monday, is
a casualty of the Hostess liquidation.


A hearing on Hostess' liq-
uidation request is sched-
uled for Monday morning.
Not all online sellers are
demanding top dollar. Some
boxes are being listed at $5
to $20.


Others are willing to
barter: "I am willing to trade
a box for some good micro-
brew A real quality six
pack," offered a thirsty New
York seller on Craigslist.
Despite his disdain for


junk food, Stansel confesses
he won't sell a few of his in-
dividually wrapped
Twinkies. He plans to give
them to his nostalgic friends
and family as stocking
stuffers for Christmas.


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A2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MDS







Page A3- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Rotarians rally to spruce up facility


Boys & Girls Clubs'facility in Inverness remodeled |P


Special to the Chronicle
What happens when some busy
Rotarians from Inverness begin a
mentoring program at the Boys &
Girls Clubs? They notice the facil-
ity is rather stark, lacks warmth
and reflects the former identity of
the building (the old Inverness Po-
lice Department).
While the Rotarians continue
the mentoring, they launch a plan
to meld funding from their local
Rotary Club of Inverness and the
Rotary District and join forces
with some local businesses and
workers to give the Inverness Boys
& Girls Clubs facility a much-
needed "sprucing up."
In August, the Rotary Club of In-
verness allotted $2,000 to get the
project going. Rotarians Debbie
Scott and Bonnie Rybak joined
forces and submitted the paper-
work for a matching Rotary Dis-
trict Simplified Grant. The
application was approved and the
matching funds ($2,000) came
through in mid-September Then,


the real work began.
For two solid weekends in Sep-
tember, paint was scraped, walls
were sanded and multiple layers
of fresh paint were added. A wall
area was removed, opening up a
new and vibrant recreation room
with a new air hockey table and a
"surfer theme."
Four tall bookshelves filled with
books bought at the Friends of the
Library book sale now line a wall
in the "power hour" study room.
The inviting atmosphere encour-
ages the B&G kids to browse and
read.
Where frayed carpet once ex-
isted, new carpet lays. Computer
tables were built into the walls
and a wireless router will remove
the need for wires.
Rotarians from local judges to
successful bankers wielded dust
mops, paintbrushes, tool kits, steel
wool and, eventually, plants and
mulch for the new flower beds.
Friends and family of local the
local Rotarians and students from
Citrus High's Interact Club joined


forces to complete the project. It
was a labor of love and many local
businesses either donated or pro-
vided a huge discount on products
and services. Some businesses in-
cluded Joe's Carpet, Keith Scott
Enterprises, Likwid Communica-
tions Inc., Marks Flooring, Mary
Lundberg, the Olbek Family, the
Path Shelter, Sportsmen's Bowl,
Stanley Steemer, Jen and Rob
Tessmer Jr
The highlight of the project was
hearing the children say, "This is
sooooooooo cool!" again and
again.
The Rotary Club of Inverness'
"sprucing-up" project was com-
memorated by the presentation of
a plaque the evening of Oct. 18, at
the B&G Clubs' "Lights On" open
house event.
The Rotary Club of Inverness
continues to mentor the children.
It further supports this commu-
nity's youths through recognition
programs (Students of the Month,
Upward Bound), scholarships
($15,000 this year to Citrus High


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The dedication last month of the spruced-up Inverness Boys & Girls Clubs
facility was observed at the "Lights On" open house. The Rotary Club of
Inverness undertook the renovation project at the Evelyn Waters Boys &
Girls Clubs facility. Presenting the plaque commemorating the project
are Rotary President Eloy Nufiez, Jeff Fowler, Eric Williams, Melissa
Olbek, project co-chair Debbie Scott, Tony Pauelsen, Ron Lundberg,
project co-chair Bonnie Rybak, Paul Perregaux, Mark Yerman, Inverness
Boys & Girls Clubs assistant director J.J. Jackson, Trish Thomas, Ron
Resare, Inverness Boys & Girls Clubs Director Amber Mekelburg
Williams, Mary Lundberg, Boys & Girls Clubs county Executive Director
Terri Stewart and Cyntha Resare.


School graduating seniors going
on to college; $500 to WTI voca-
tional students; $450 to WTI GED
candidates), and through financial


support to other local charities
such as the United Way, the Com-
munity Food Bank, and many
others.


Lecanto students


collect supplies


for homeless vets


MIKE WR
Staff Wr
LECANTO -
ing season, and
the Lecanto sc
plex are primed
Students at
Lecanto High S
Lecanto Middle
nated box loads
the VFW Post 100
tribution to hom
erans in the
area.
Donations
include cloth-
ing, food,
bandages, toi-
letry items
and shampoo.
They also do-
nated empty
coffee cans,
which the
homeless use
to carry
crackers and
other items.
Pat Sistran,
with the VFW
1 0 0 8 7
Women's Aux-
iliary, said
the donations


IGHT VFW members picked
iter up the items this past
week, though the donation
It's the giv- drive takes place through-
students in out the year Castorina said
hool com- CREST students wanted to
for it. coincide the donations
CREST, with Veterans Apprecia-
.chool and tion Week.
School do- Lecanto Middle School
of items to language arts teacher
087 for dis- Stephanie Hampton-Hill
neless vet- said about 30 students par-
Hernando ticipated in the project.
"I know
kids this age
I know get a bad
kids this age ra" she
get a bad rap. I brought this
up to them.
brought this up They don't
even know
to them. ... I the need this
Community
just said, 'go has. I just
nuts with said, 'go nuts
with it."'
it.' And nuts
they did. Stu-


Har
Lecanto
languac


help an unknown number
of homeless veterans who
live in a shelter or the
woods in Hernando.
"I think it's absolutely
amazing what these stu-
dents are doing," she said
Friday "This year is even
better than last year"
This is the second year
Lecanto students donated
items for homeless veter-
ans, said Susan Castorina,
who organizes the drive.


5tephanie d e n t s
npton-Hill brought in
) Middle School items from
ge arts teacher, home or
saved their
own money to shop for the
veterans.
Eighth-grader Emily
Plumb said helping veter-
ans is the least she can do,
considering their service to
the country
"It changes you," she
said. "It makes me feel
more down to earth."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


~.


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Lecanto Middle School eighth-graders from left, Dawn
Gaskin, Dalton Smith, Lauren Miller and Cassidy Lanham
- carry bags and boxes of donated items Friday to a van
for distribution to homeless military veterans.


Veterans manager available
to assist with benefits
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has announced a veterans'
case manager will be on site every
Wednesday, beginning Nov. 28, at
Lakes Region Library at 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness, to assist veterans applying for
benefits and provide information for other
veterans' benefits.


AroundTHE COUNTY
To make an appointment, call 352-527-
5915.
Women Political Network meets
Tuesday at resource center
The Women's Political Network of Citrus
County will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 20, at the Citrus County Resource
Center. Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill
will review the details on the recent election.
This is a mandatory meeting for all


members of WPNCC to vote on the elec-
tion of the leadership of WPNCC for 2013.
The group's annual Christmas luncheon
is noon Sunday, Dec. 2, at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. Featured speakers are
Commissioner Scott Adams, U.S. Rep.
Rich Nugent and Amy Meek, chief execu-
tive officer of Citrus County United Way.
For information, call Jeanne McIntosh at
352-746-5660 or 352-484-9975.
-From staff reports


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The hay was flying around Saturday during the Inverness 2012 Grand Prix at the Citrus County Courthouse. The
box stock seniors were running qualifying laps Saturday to get the feel of the track when one car flew into the
hay bales, bringing out the yellow flag.


Making



the




TURN


-- --- --

J _


ABOVE: The tag-tag senior car got loose in the turn onto Martin
Luther King Avenue and needed help out of the hay bales.
BELOW: The track has been changed since last year making the
track along Apopka a serpentine-shaped course, causing drivers
to slow down as they approach the courthouse.


The Old Citrus County Courthouse is a scenic
backdrop Saturday as carts race down a main
thoroughfare in Inverness.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Recount under way in West-Murphy race


Associated Press

FORT PIERCE- Tens of thousands
of ballots in one Florida county were
painstakingly fed through scanners
Saturday as U.S. Rep. Allen West clung
to hope that a recount could keep the
freshman Republican and conserva-
tive firebrand in Congress.
A judge allowed the recount to go
forward in St. Lucie County over the
objections of Democrat Patrick Mur-
phy, the unofficial winner of the race.
Though the recount is not mandated
by state law because Murphy's margin
of victory is above the legal threshold,
St. Lucie Circuit Judge Larry Schack
said either candidate could still for-
mally contest the election if he be-
lieved it was unfair.
Both sides remained mum on their


LANDFILL
Continued from Page Al

Class III landfills do not
accept general household
waste.
These landfills have a
construction and demoli-
tion (C and D) permit. Sand
is sold to make five-acre
cells to replace the sand
with C and D debris. The
landfill land use adds to its
value.
"The price reflects not the
amount of the land but the
use of the land," Morton
said. "It's hard to get those
things permitted and the li-
abilities are horrendous.
There is a great deal of reg-
ulation. It's a highly re-
stricted and highly
regulated industry"
The county is considering
using the site, which is
closed as the state has taken
ownership.
"There's nothing official
yet," said Casey Stephens,
director of the Division of


next possible legal move, the direction
largely being determined by the re-
count's results.
"I don't know what's going to hap-
pen from here, quite frankly," Murphy
attorney Sean Domnick said.
The unofficial tally has Murphy with
a 50.3 percent share of the ballots, a
1,907-vote lead above the half-per-
centage point threshold for a full re-
count. The Democrat is the winner in
the eyes of the state and was in Wash-
ington, D.C., this week attending
House orientation.
Still, West's campaign has charged
all sorts of malfeasance in the count-
ing of ballots. Election officials in St.
Lucie County have acknowledged
some errors and last Sunday con-
ducted a partial recount of three days
of early-voting ballots. It did little to


Solid Waste Management.
"The state did buy the
Rooks landfill."
Talks so far are "very pre-
liminary," Stephens said,
and have not yet reached
the negotiations stage for an
agreement to cover a lease
and assign responsibilities
for the liabilities designated
by the Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion (FDEP).
"Before we do anything,
we want to do a thorough
due diligence," Stephens
said. "Obviously, we would-
n't do anything until we dis-
cussed it with the board of
county commissioners."
County staff would pres-
ent negotiated terms of an
agreement with the state to
commissioners for approval
to use the landfill, which
Stephens said would be use-
ful in his division's
operations.
"It's definitely yes, we
would be able to use it,"
Stephens said. "It's an excit-
ing opportunity for the
county."


quiet the cries of unfairness from
West's most vocal supporters and the
county's canvassing board agreed late
Friday to recount the other five days
of early ballots.
When they realized the ballots were
no longer divided by the day they were
cast, they decided to recount all 37,379
early-voting ballots.
Tim Edson, West's campaign man-
ager, said his candidate was simply
trying to make sure all votes were
counted.
"Murphy's efforts bring to mind the
dark times in our nation's history
when politicians tried to manipulate
the law to suppress the votes," he said.
Murphy's campaign has argued
some ballots have now been counted
three times and the outcome of the
race isn't changing.


Morton called it a win-win
situation. With the county
using the site and accepting
some degree of FDEP lia-
bilities, the Florida Turn-
pike Enterprise (FTE) could
have more opportunity to
focus on funding Suncoast
Parkway 2. In return, the
county could take some
pressure off its Central
Landfill.
This is the sixth such pur-
chase FTE has made for
Suncoast Parkway 2, accord-
ing to Christa Deason, FTE
public information officer.
Other sites include one near
West Cardinal Street, Ho-
mosassa; Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa; two
near State Road 44 in
Lecanto; and one near
County Road 495 in Crystal
River.
Road construction won't
start yet.
"Suncoast 2 is not in our
current five-year work pro-
gram," Deason said. "This
property was slated for com-
mercial development and
the Turnpike made a protec-


tive purchase of this parcel."
Deason said no other pur-
chases are scheduled to be
made in the near future.
FTE is leasing three of the
previously acquired proper-
ties.
"This is a wise business
decision, as it allows us to
recoup our investment
while we are waiting for
permitting and construction
to begin," Deason said.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicleon-
line.com or 352-564-2916.


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Citrus County Schools
are out this week for the
Thanksgiving holiday.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced meatloaf
with mushroom gravy,
scalloped potatoes, green
peas, applesauce, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
tomato gravy, rotini noodles,
mixed vegetables, mixed fruit,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Thanksgiving


celebration: Sliced turkey and
gravy, mashed sweet pota-
toes, green beans with red
pepper, cranberry sauce,
cranberry loaf, whole-grain roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Thanksgiving
holiday. All sites closed.
Friday: Thanksgiving
holiday. All sites closed.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on
Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and
vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Morabito said the fire service is seeking volun-
teers to serve alongside paid staff at all stations. For
information, call John Beebe, volunteer coordinator,
at 352-527-5406.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle
M. w


Ficitious Name Notices...........D6



Bid Notices................................D6


: Miscellaneous Notices..............D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
c
pc
pc


c
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
s

PC
PC
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy in exposed
areas. Partly sunny today.


NIA NA NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 76 Low: 52 *
Partly cloudy and breezy

Bi MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 56
Partly cloudy to mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 55
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 73/55
Record 88/28
Normal 78/51
Mean temp. 64
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 48.69 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.11 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 60
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 58%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
composites, grasses, palm
Today's count: 4.9/12
Monday's count: 4.6
Tuesday's count: 4.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/18 SUNDAY 9:36 3:22 10:04 3:50
11/19 MONDAY 10:34 4:21 11:00 4:47
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
NOV. 28


DEC. 6


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:35 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:57 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY .........................11:27 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY.......................... 10:46 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:53 a/4:02 a 9:50 p/4:58 p
Crystal River** 6:14 a/1:24 a 8:11 p/2:20 p
Withlacoochee* 4:01 a/12:08 p 5:58 p/--
Homosassa*** 7:03 a/3:01 a 9:00 p/3:57 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:53 a/4:59 a 10:42 p/5:50 p
7:14 a/2:21 a 9:03 p/3:12 p
5:01 a/12:09 a 6:50 p/1:00 p
8:03 a/3:58 a 9:52 p/4:49 p


Gulf water
temperature


68
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.23 30.23 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.53 38.53 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.66 39.66 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.10 41.10 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


-1 70s
- -,, i._
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 66 47 s 66 53
New York City 51 39 s 52 41
Norfolk 52 45 sh 57 50
Oklahoma City 62 33 sh 63 49
Omaha 62 39 pc 60 43
Palm Springs 78 57 pc 76 52
Philadelphia 55 35 pc 54 39
Phoenix 76 56 pc 76 54
Pittsburgh 55 27 s 53 34
Portland, ME 48 30 s 45 27
Portland, Ore 50 45 .73 r 53 48
Providence, R.I. 51 35 s 50 34
Raleigh 56 34 sh 56 43
Rapid City 61 33 pc 61 35
Reno 54 42 .15 sh 52 32
Rochester, NY 55 27 s 50 31
Sacramento 62 55 .70 sh 61 49
St. Louis 57 31 s 61 45
St. Ste. Marie 42 26 pc 49 38
Salt Lake City 58 42 c 54 36
San Antonio 68 42 pc 68 58
San Diego 71 60 pc 67 55
San Francisco 64 59 .17 sh 63 53
Savannah 60 42 sh 62 51
Seattle 54 44 .33 r 50 45
Spokane 50 34 .04 sh 45 38
Syracuse 50 26 s 50 29
Topeka 63 31 pc 62 44
Washington 55 36 pc 51 40
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 83 Punta Gorda, Fla.
LOW 9 Alamosa, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/75/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 51/32/c Mexico City
Athens 68/60/pc Montreal
Beijing 50/34/pc Moscow
Berlin 47/35/c Paris
Bermuda 75/72/pc Rio
Cairo 78/63/s Rome
Calgary 41/30/pc Sydney
Havana 81/63/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 79/72/c Toronto
Jerusalem 69/55/sh Warsaw


62/51/pc
46/36/s
63/41/pc
73/48/s
37/26/s
32/28/c
51/39/sh
76/65/pc
63/55/pc
75/55/sh
58/41/pc
45/32/pc
44/37/c


s
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC
PC
s
sh
s
s
s
sh
s
c
s
s
s
c
s
pc
pc
s
pc
s
s
s
pc
s
s
PC
s
.09 pc
s
s
s
PC
s
s
s


C I T R U S.


C U N TY -


Nov. 19 to 21 MENUS


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
I- IMeadowcrest
44s office
Sa. i.ll Brunt H.v, 1624 N.
Dunkerlield Meadowcrest
Dunker edr .-Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A ve Crystal River,
A "1 \ ,Madowrei FL 34429
N 1:1 :

I IInverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. s square
0 8 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ... .............. ................................................. P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy....................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes....................................... ............. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ....................... Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............. .................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4FS Phone 352-563-6363
1 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-


A4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


STATE/LOCAL


A




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Stamp prices to rise 1 cent
Associated Press


WASHINGTON The
cost of mailing a first-class
letter will go up by a penny
in January
The Postal Regulatory
Commission on Friday ap-
proved the proposed rate
increase, which raises the
price of a first-class domes-
tic stamp to 46 cents.
The price of a postcard
will increase from 32 cents
to 33 cents, while a new
global "forever" stamp will
allow customers to mail let-
ters anywhere in the world
for one set price of $1.10.
Currently, the prices for in-
ternational letters vary
The prices go into effect
Jan. 27.
The U.S. Postal Service,


U(-,--D]


2006 MERCEDES-
BENZ C230
Affordable Mercedes luxury.
NP5743A
$14,668


2005 FORD
THUNDERBIRD
Limited edition and
collectable. N2T342D
$20,668


Postal payments pummel profits
Shrinking mail volume and federally mandated payments to
shore up future retiree benefits are creating record red ink at
the U.S. Postal Service.
Operating profits
$4 billion

-4
-8 _
Mandated payments begin
-12
'01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12
SOURCE: U.S. Postal Service AP
which posted a record an- to the rate of overall
nual loss of $15.9 billion, inflation.
proposed the rate increase It will make only a small
last month. dent in the mail agency's fi
The rate increase is tied nancial losses.


Specialty

Cars


2007 PONTIAC
SOLSTICE CONVERTIBLE
Hard to find collectable
Pontiac. NP5758A
$18,968


2008 FORD
MUSTANG BULLITT
Limited edition Bullitt #4453 with
only 8k miles. N2T138A
$24,668


2012
MAZDA 3
Only 9k miles on this 31 I
sport. N2(236A
$19,968


2007 MERCEDES-
BENZ GL450
One owner and a must see.
N2T030B
$32,968


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness CR-486
(352) 726-1231
nicknicholasford.com Nickichoas
L SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5


CitrsDWABETES
Treatment Center


!iZT^< U!L. WV A


..,CZ- -m-M& -.-., x
Nov. 24 INVERNESS -Inspirational & Gospel Show 4:00
Nov. 24 INVERNESS -Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 6:00
l Dec. 8 BRADENTON -Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 3:00
1 Dec. 30 LAKELAND -Inspirational & Gospel Show 4:30
- Dec. 30 LAKELAND -Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 7:00
Jan. 12 CLEARWATER -Inspirational & Gospel Show 4:30
Jan. 12 CLEARWATER -Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 6:30
1 Our last show in Florida will be 3130 in Lakeland Very special


352.564.0444 I


Diabetes can affect your entire family. Citrus Diabetes Treat-
ment Center and Physician's Weight Loss are experts at treating
Diabetes, a chronic illness with potentially serious complications
including blindness, limb amputation and death. Today, many
complications of Diabetes are preventable and physicians play a
key role in preventing and controlling the disease.

Our medical weight loss staff is committed to helping you lose
weight quickly and safely, but most importantly, to helping you
keep the weight off long term. One of the best ways to help con-
trol and prevent Diabetes is to follow a healthy eating and exercise
plan. Our physician-directed weight loss programs offer strategies
unavailable to non-physician weight loss programs.

Contact us today and get back to living your life.


NATION


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Mickey
Young, 66
HOMOSASSA
Mickey M. Young, 66, of
Homosassa, passed away
Nov 14, 2012, at his home.
A native of Clearwater, he
was born
Jan. 17,
1946, to Vic-
tor and
Dorothy ,,. ,
(Carr).
Young.
Mickey
wore many
hats during Mickey
his lifetime, Young
though it
was not long enough. His
life was cut way too short.
He did commercial fishing
with his father for a number
of years and also helped
him in his licensed painting
business. He even helped
him paint the Belleview
Biltmore in Clearwater He
was also a ditch digger, con-
crete block layer, construc-
tion worker, bookkeeper,
commercial fisherman and
crabber He and his wife of
36 years also owned a retail
mom-and-pop grocery/deli
store called Combo Carry
Out in Ozona, Fla. He also
owned his own shrimp boat
for a number of years and
had a retail bait and tackle
store and wholesale sup-
plies for bait stores from
Ruskin to Steinahatchee,
Fla. He did not want to de-
pend on Mother Nature for
his living anymore, so he
and his wife Melody de-
cided to drive an 18-wheel
truck for a living that lasted
for 10 years. They drove as a
team for Werner Trucking.
When Mickey could no
longer drive a truck due to
his health, he retired and
worked around their home
in Homosassa, Fla. He took
care of the house, did the
shopping, cleaning and all
the cooking so his wife
could go to school to become
an R.N. She now works for
Hospice of Citrus County in
Homosassa, Fla.
Mickey leaves behind his
wife, Melody; two daugh-
ters, Vicki Moore and hus-
band, Gary, of St.
Petersburg, Fla., and Carri
Mclver and husband, Mikey,
and their two children, Con-
nor and Hannah, of Keller,
Texas; and many cousins
from Citrus County includ-
ing Ed, Evelyn and Ruth
Ann Brannen of Dunnellon,
Fla., Tex (Ruben) Beales of
Dunnellon, Fla., and many,
many others. His family was
his life, and he will be
greatly missed by all.
Funeral Service of Re-
membrance will be at 10:30
a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, with Chaplain
Jonathan Beard of Hospice
of Citrus County officiating.
Interment will follow at Syl-
van Abbey Memorial Park in
Clearwater at 3 p.m. Friends
will be received from 6 to 8
p.m. Monday, Nov 19, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa. In lieu of flowers,
please send a contribution
to a charity of your choice or
to Hospice of Citrus County,
8471 W Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa, FL 34446.
www.wilderfuneral.com


C W
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation Ivera &i
Memorial Care

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323 I






OFHOMOSASSA, Inc.
www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.comrn

f More

Than Just
Lorrie Verticals
ST ,,
,S '* 2" Faux Wood
'44' *Woven Woods
Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments
Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19,nexttoSugarmill Family Rest.)


Frederick
Bancroft, 94
HOMOSASSA
Frederick Bancroft, 94, of
Homosassa, died Wednes-
day, Nov 7, 2012, in
Brooksville.
Inurnment service will be
at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
24, 2012, at the Fountains
Memorial Park Cemetery in
Homosassa under the direc-
tion of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory Crys-
tal River





Waymon 'Bill'
Hayes, 82
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waymon Lewis "Bill"
Hayes, 82, of Crystal River,
Fla., joined the Heavenly
Lord on Nov 4, 2012, at the
Hospice House in Lecanto.
He was born Jan. 4, 1930,
in Gainesville, Ga., to
Charles M. and Edna 0.
(Byers) Hayes. Bill was a re-
tired union pipe fitter and
served his country in the
U.S. Marine Corps and the
U.S. Army, receiving two
Purple Hearts and two
Bronze Stars. He was pre-
deceased by his first wife,
Judy; his second wife,
Mabel; and his brother,
James.
Survivors include three
sons, Charles, Leonard and
Wesley Sr; and two daugh-
ters, Megan and Vicky; his
brother, Tom (Jan) Hayes of
Valdosta, Ga.; and one
grandchild, Wesley Jr; also
several stepchildren, espe-
cially Cindy Smith who,
along with his best friends
Bobby and Lori, took care of
Bill in his later years.
Visitation will begin at 10
a.m. Tuesday, Nov 20, at the
Brown Funeral Home in
Lecanto, Fla., until service
time at 11 a.m. with Chaplin
Bors Posso officiating. Per
Bill's wishes, casual dress is
requested.
Private cremation will fol-
low the services.
In lieu of flowers, please
send memorial donations to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Envelopes
will be available at the fu-
neral home.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.


Alice Miller, 92
GAINESVILLE
Alice M. Miller, 92, of
Gainesville, Fla., passed
away Fri-
day, Nov. 9,
2012, at
No rth
Florida Re-
gional Med-
ical Center
She was
born June
11, 1920, in
Cleveland, Alice
Ohio, to r
Leon and
Leah Marie Ledogar
Hauger She met and mar-
ried her husband of 68
years, Albert B. Miller, dur-
ing World War II when she
was a Marine and he was a
Navy officer After the war,
she accompanied him on his
tour of duty as a Foreign
Service officer in Thessa-
loniki, Greece. She traveled
with him extensively
throughout Europe and
other parts of the world.
Upon their return to the
United States, she provided
continuing support to her
husband's business career
and became an accom-
plished hostess of innumer-
able dinner parties. She was
an artist of substantial abil-
ity and a passionate bridge
player
She is survived by her
husband, Albert, of
Gainesville; daughter, Kerry
Miller Bartlett of Marietta,
Ga.; three grandchildren;
and three great-grandchil-
dren. One of her great-
grandchildren, Gavin
Bartlett, has cystic fibrosis,
and in lieu of flowers, the
family requests donations
be made in memory of his
great-grandmother to the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
via Gavin's page at
http://www.cff.org/great_
strides/TeamGavinCFF
Funeral services will be
at 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 19,
2012, in the chapel of
Williams-Thomas Funeral
Home Downtown, 404 N.
Main St., Gainesville, with
Fr. John Phillips officiating.
Interment will follow in
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell at 1 p.m., with
military honors.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline.com.

MILITARY SERVICE
0 The U.S. military
consists of five active-
duty services and their
respective guard and
reserve units: Army,
Marine Corps, Navy, Air
Force and Coast Guard.





&RMT. RY
Invrns
*** ass


Nina Rees, 88
LECANTO
Nina May Rees, 88, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
Nov 14 at Life Care Center
in Lecanto, Fla.
Born June 4, 1924, in
Newark, Ohio, to the late
John A. and Mary (Liv-
ingston) Roberts, Nina
moved to Citrus County 11
1/2 years ago from Houston,
Texas. Nina was a member
of the First Church of God in
Inverness, Fla.
She is survived by her five
children, William (Patricia)
Rees of Ontario, Calif., Carl
R. "Bob" (Beverly) Rees of
Beverly Hills, Fla., David
(Debbie) Rees of Houston,
Texas, Charlotte (Ronald)
Boyer of Beverly Hills, Fla.,
and Tammy (Howard) Kane
of Ocala, Fla.; two sisters,
Lucille Graham of Newark,
Ohio, and Beverly Bradford
of Eugene, Ore.; and numer-
ous grandchildren, great-
grandchildren and
great-great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be from 2 to
4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Monday,
Nov 19, at the Brown Fu-
neral Home in Lecanto, Fla.
Funeral services will be at
11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov 20, at
the First Church of God on
Jasmine Street in Inverness,
Fla. Burial will follow at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
U.S. flags denote
military service on local
obituaries.



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William Tarr Sr.
INGLIS
William Lewis Tarr Sr, of
Inglis, Fla., died Nov. 15,
2012.
William
was born
and raised
in Ithaca,
N.Y., to
Charles and M
Helen
(Szabo)Tarr.
He gradu- William
ated from Tarr Sr.
Cornell Uni-
versity and competed in golf
at the Eastern Open in 1958.
He was a Korean War vet-
eran of the U.S. Air Force.
He is survived by daugh-
ters Caroline Brown and
Julie Tarr; son, William Tarr
Jr; and two grandchildren,
Darby and Maverick
Zoccali.
A memorial service will
be at2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.
21, at Hope Church, 7100
142nd Ave. N., Largo, Fla.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.VeteransFuneralCare.
com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's pol icy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos,
spanning the entire
column, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material are
charged at the same
rates.
s The national database
Legacy.cornm maintains
the Chronicle's obituar-
ies and guest books.



To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
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Donald
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LAKE PANASOFFKEE
Donald A. Williams, 79,
Lake Panasoffkee, died Sat-
urday, Nov. 17, 2012, under
the loving care of his family
and Cornerstone Hospice at
the Lane Purcell Hospice
House.
Donald was born June 23,
1933, in Cheybogan, Mich.,
to the late Francis and
Nancy Williams. He served
our country in the U.S. Air
Force. Donald retired as a
supervisor with General
Motors. He enjoyed feeding
and taking care of his ani-
mals and being with his
grandchildren. He made
friends everywhere he
went.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his daughters, Laura
(David) Robbins, Flint,
Mich., and Pamela (Dave)
Duncan, Temperance,
Mich.; six grandchildren,
Nicole, David, Denise, John,
Kim and Marc; and three
great-grandchildren; his
brother Junior and sisters
Pearl, Gwen, Donna and
Barb. He was preceded in
death by his wife of 60 years,
Joyce, on Dec. 3, 2011; his
only son, Donald A.
Williams Jr; and a sister,
Beverly
The family will receive
friends in visitation from 1
to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov 20,
2012, at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home, with mili-
tary honors from VFW Post
4337 of Inverness at
3:30 p.m.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


First Thanksgiving


'Family Feud'


(Jim Mullen is on vacation this week.
This column is from the archives.)
H historians agree that the
Pilgrims really did cele-
brate a first Thanksgiv-
ing. But it wasn't turned into a :. l
regular yearly celebration until
Abraham Lincoln made it offi-
cial during the middle of the ji
Civil War, some 250 years later.
New documents have come to
light that may explain why
"Never again," writes John
Alden in a letter found in a MUL
newly discovered cache of pa-
pers composed by the original
passengers of the Mayflower.
"Six long hours we have spent looking at
the hind end of a horse on the overly
crowded road to the house
of my parents and lo, for "My wyfe
what? To see my brother
with whom I barely speak Of none,
and his harpy wyfe who so
disrespecteth me and mine tell fro
in a backhanded way? bearing o
"He starteth acting like a
wee child immediately, that sh
from the time we stepped
from the carriage until the rather bE
time we have departed. He
bringeth up small jealousies witches
and grievances from our day in D
youth long ago. His unhap-
piness is like a contagion, a than be
pustule that never heals.
'Letteth it go and getteth a compare
life,' he has made me wish family
to scream, and more times family a
than one. We should be offspring.
spending less time together,
not more, me thinks." family b(
"One unpleasantry fol-
lows another as I suffer my of salted
uncles and aunts to runneth
on and on about my cousins They m
- how well they are doing, my hea
how much money they are
sending to their parents,
what comely grandchildren they have pro-
duced. Yet I knoweth these same cousins.
They are base and low and would soil them-
selves if they were ever made to do a day's
work.
"They wish their parents dead and spend
their days making plans to squander their
inheritance in a warmer clime. Their small
children understandeth not the meaning of
the word 'no.' They runneth around and
screameth all day when peace and quiet
are called for The spawn of Satan himself


would make more pleasant company
"And my handsome wyfe cares not for
the way my mother prepareth
the meal. 'She useth not oysters
in the fowl's stuffing,' she rails at
me. 'She putteth not the bird in
S a paper bag in the hearth.' It
maketh me fatigued to hear such
words. Yet Priscilla's own stuff-
ing would not winneth any
praise even in the land of my
birth, where they can taste not
the difference between condi-
YM ment and composite. She
.LEN knoweth not, but secretly I giveth
my portions of her bounty to the
hound beneath the table. It tea-
cheth him not to beg.
"My wyfe speaks ill of none, yet I can tell
from the bearing of her body that she would
rather be ducking witches
speaks ill on a cold day in December
than be in the company of
yet I can my family and their off-
spring. As if her family be a
)m the barrel of salted fish. Her sis-
her body ters make it well known that
their spouses buy them
e would more kitchen tools than I do
and that the corn from their
ducking labor is bigger and better
than that of my own. They
on a cold maketh my head hurt Were
ecemrber they not aboard, the journey
of the Mayflower could have
in the been as a fun ship cruise.
With them, it was the hate
|y of my boat. Had the voyage lasted
but one week more, 'twas
nd their they who were going over
As if her the side or'twas I.
"It occurred to me sud-
a barrel denly that we may have left
the woodstove on at home.
Sfish. ... Priscilla volunteered that it
may be true as she had often
iaketh noticed my forgetful habits.
d hurt." Happily, we fled the festivi-
ties. On the road home we
spoke not to each other for
many hours. 'Let us hope we can do this
again next year,' at last I spoke. It got a
hearty laugh as Priscilla knew I was in per-
fect jest In truth, you could not make us do
that again were four hundred years to pass.
And for that, we gave thanks."

Jim Mullen's newest book is called "Kill
Me, Elmo: The Holiday Depression Fbn
Book "Email him at
JimMullenBooks. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THANKFUL
Continued from Page Al

meal giveaway
Doug Lobel, the volunteer executive
director for the Thanksgiving Feeding
Alliance, said 3,000 men, women and
children would benefit from a turkey
dinner with the sides on Thanksgiving
Day
Citrus County citizens provided rev-
enue to enable meals to be provided
for families in need this Thanksgiving.
"Nine hundred and sixty families
are registered which equals to about
3,000 men, women and children,"
Lobel said. "The other day we had col-
lected $10,800 from Publix customers
in Citrus County, between five stores.
Hopefully, by the time they finish col-
lecting before Thanksgiving, we won't
owe them anything."
Publix offered customers the op-
portunity to donate $8 toward the pur-
chase of a 10- or 11-pound turkey for
the Thanksgiving Feeding
Alliance.
One thousand people were regis-
tered to pick up boxes for their family
Six hundred people were registered
for the Inverness Walmart location,
while 400 were at the We Care Food
Pantry in Old Homosassa.
Families registered through the
pantry or the Salvation Army These
families were guaranteed a turkey and
a box of food.
If they were unable to preregister,
recipients found themselves waiting
in another line to register.
"For registration, they must have an
electric or water bill or some proof of
Citrus County residence," Lobel said.
"Also, they needed some form of gov-
ernment agency that has determined
them needy. Furthermore, if they have
children, they have to prove the chil-
dren are a part of their family with a
Social Security number"
As the day went on, recipients over-
took the parking lot as they waited to
receive their meal.
Volunteers accompanied each shop-


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The Hope and Healing music ministry from the Citrus County Community Church
performed a set of Christian songs while sharing their ministry with the volunteers
and residents attending the activities.


ping cart to help assist the family in
their process of collecting cardboard
boxes of food.
They took them through the line,
then to their cars or to other booths if
they needed more assistance. The vol-
unteers would then accompany them
to their cars and bring the shopping
carts back. This process was a way of
keeping the line going but also a way
of seeing if people needed other forms
of help they could direct them to.
Items available for pickup were: or-
anges, bread, rice, kidney beans, pinto
beans, sweet peppers, lettuce, corn,
yams, baked beans, pears, chicken
noodle soup and turkeys.
"We are the conveyers of the food,"
Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisted said.
"We don't provide the food, God does
that."
What Plaisted mainly saw during
the event was, "The outreach by folks
in this county to those in needs was
amazing. Everyone steps forward in
this county. If you need something,
someone is here to help you. This is a
county created by God, the most loving


county that I have ever been in."
The New Church Without Walls
started the Thanksgiving giveaway 10
years ago when the Rev Doug Alexan-
der saw a need in the community.
"The whole community came to-
gether to give," Alexander said. "The
need was so big, we had to incorporate
with agencies and churches."
A welcoming atmosphere was cre-
ated by the combination of smiling
faces, live music, hot dogs, clowns and
face painting. Local organizations of-
fered informational stands and Cub
Scouts handed out cups of hot choco-
late and lemonade.
Everyone involved did not mind
waking up early to help distribute food
to a family in need this Thanksgiving.
"For some of these people, this is all
they have," Alexander said. "For them
to come out here, it takes a lot pride to
get in these lines to take care of their
families."
Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthing-
ton can be contacted at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington@chronicle
online.com.


FEAST
Continued from Page Al

crust, a cream cheese top-
ping and fruit placed artis-
tically on top.
They opened it up to
anyone who wanted to
come, not just Hernando
residents. That's the way
this community does
things.
They're doing it again
this year, beginning at 1
p.m. Thanksgiving Day,
Nov 22 at Hernando Park.
"Last year a lot more
showed up than was ex-
pected, but we always
make enough food, just in
case," said Luke Simmons,
one of the event organiz-
ers. "It was fun to see peo-
ple hugging who hadn't
seen each other in 40
years. People were saying,
'Do you remember me? I
used to push you on the
merry-go-round when you
were 4.'
"A lot of the homeless
guys, who were more than
welcome they came and
we had a ball," he said.
Simmons and the others
wanted to have an event
like this so the old-timers
could tell stories and pass
on the history and heritage
of their community to the
younger generations.
He laughed and said last
year the older folks got
talking and even way past
dark they wouldn't go
home.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 A9

Hernando Park
is at the
northwest
corner of
County Road
486 and
U.S. 41.

'After it was over, I heard
from a lot of people from
Dunnellon, Crystal River
and Inverness who said they
had no idea we were having
this and would've come, so
this year I sent fliers to the
churches. We expect a big
turnout," he said.
This year they're includ-
ing a break dancing con-
test, volleyball, music and
other activities, and, of
course, the stories of grow-
ing up in Hernando.
It's open to anyone who
wants to come. Just follow
your nose to the smell of
awesome food and your
ears to the sound of
laughter
Hernando Park is in the
small community of Her-
nando at the northwest
corner of the intersection
of County Road 486 and
U.S. 41. Enter through
Railroad Way off County
Road 486.
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. corn or
352-564-2927.


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Pakistan struggles in race to develop armed drones


Associated Press

KARACHI, Pakistan -
Pakistan is secretly racing to
develop its own armed
drones, frustrated with U.S.
refusals to provide the air-
craft, but is struggling in its
initial tests with a lack of
precision munitions and ad-
vanced targeting technology
One of Islamabad's closest
allies and Washington's
biggest rivals, China, has of-
fered to help by selling Pak-
istan armed drones it
developed. But industry ex-
perts say there is still uncer-
tainty about the capabilities
of the Chinese aircraft
The development of un-
manned combat aircraft is
especially sensitive in Pak-
istan because of the wide-
spread unpopularity of the
hundreds of U.S. drone
strikes against Taliban and
al-Qaida militants in the
country's rugged tribal re-
gion bordering Afghanistan.
The Pakistani government
denounces the CIA strikes
as a violation of the coun-
try's sovereignty, though sen-
ior civilian and military
leaders are known to have
supported at least some of
the attacks in the past. Pak-
istani officials also call the
strikes unproductive, saying
they kill many civilians and
fuel anger that helps mili-
tants recruit additional
fighters allegations de-
nied by the U.S.
Pakistan has demanded
the U.S. provide it with
armed drones, claiming it
could more effectively carry
out attacks against militants.
Washington has refused be-
cause of the sensitive nature
of the technology and doubts
Pakistan would reliably tar-
get U.S. enemies. The U.S.
has held talks with Pakistan
about providing unarmed
surveillance drones, but Is-
lamabad already has several
types of these aircraft in op-
eration, and the discussions
have gone nowhere.
Inaugurating a defense
exhibition in the southern
city of Karachi last week,
Pakistani Prime Minister
Raja Pervaiz Ashraf indi-
cated Islamabad would
look for help from Beijing
in response to U.S.
intransigence.
"Pakistan can also benefit


Associated Press
Visitors look at Pakistan-made unmanned aircraft Thursday at a defense exhibition in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan is se-
cretly racing to develop its own armed drones, frustrated with U.S. refusals to provide the aircraft, but is struggling in its
initial tests with a lack of precision munitions and advanced targeting technology.


from China in defense col-
laboration, offsetting the un-
declared technological
apartheid," said Ashraf.
Pakistan has also been
working to develop armed
drones on its own, said Pak-
istani military officials and
civilians involved in the do-
mestic drone industry, all of
whom spoke on condition of
anonymity because of the
classified nature of the
work.
Pakistan first began
weapons tests seven or eight
months ago with the Falco,
an Italian drone used by the
Pakistani air force for sur-
veillance that has been
modified to carry rockets,
said a civilian with knowl-
edge of the secret program.
The military is also con-
ducting similar tests with
the country's newest drone,
the Shahpur, he said. An un-
armed version of the Shah-
pur was unveiled for the
first time at the Karachi
exhibition.
The weapons tests have
been limited to a handful of
aircraft, and no strikes have
been carried out in combat,
said the civilian.
Pakistan lacks laser-
guided missiles like the


Hellfire used on U.S. Preda-
tor and Reaper drones and
the advanced targeting sys-
tem that goes with it, so the


military has been using un-
guided rockets that are
much less accurate.
While Hellfire missiles


are said to have pinpoint ac-
curacy, the rockets used by
Pakistan have a margin of
error of about 100 feet at


best, and an unexpected
gust of wind could take
them 1,000 feet from their
intended target, said the
civilian. Even if Pakistan
possessed Hellfires and the
guidance system to use
them, the missile's weight
and drag would be a chal-
lenge for the small drones
produced by the country
Pakistan's largest drone,
the Shahpur, has a
wingspan of about 22 feet
and can carry 110 pounds.
The U.S. Predator, which
can be equipped with two
Hellfire missiles, has a
wingspan more than twice
that and a payload capacity
over four times as great.
Pakistani drones also
have much more limited
range than those produced
in the U.S. because they are
operated based on "line of
sight" using radio waves,
rather than military satel-
lites. The Shahpur has a
maximum range of 150
miles, while the Predator
can fly more than five times
that distance.
The British newspaper
The Guardian reported
Tuesday that Pakistan was
working on an armed drone
but did not provide details.


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A12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


Buy used boiler
I'm calling the Chronicle
in response to your "County
jail in hot water" because
now the boiler needs to be
replaced and they're talking
$250,000 to replace it.
Where's logistics? You have
plenty of state prisons in
the state of Florida that
were shut down that have
active working boilers. A lit-
tle call to the governor and
a little logistics will go a
long way and save taxpay-
ers' money. You don't need
to buy something new.
There's plenty of boilers
available in the state of
Florida in all the prisons
that were shut down.
Clear political signs
Today is Monday, Nov. 12.
The elections are over -
thank God. Now it is time
for you, the winners, the los-
ers and the whatever, to pick
up your signs off the grass
and get rid of them for an-
other four years. I don't care
if you lost or won; get your
election signs out of sights.
It is enough. We have been
harassed enough.
Thanks for dinner
We would like to extend a
very special thank you to the
nice couple who paid for our
dinner at Bentley's Restau-
rant on Sunday, Nov. 11, at
12:30 to 1:30 p.m. We sat
at the end wall area just be-
hind you. Your special
thoughtfulness is much ap-
preciated and may God be
with you always. Thank you.
Postal holidays
I was just wondering when
I see the post office workers
taking off for all these holi-
days. I was also wondering,
do they get paid? Is it a paid
holiday or do they have to
do without their pay? Be
worth knowing.
Editor's note: Postal work-


Sound OFF
ers are federal employees and
during 2012 they will receive
10 paid holidays.
C-SPAN costs
Mr. Editor: Who pays for
the programs on C-SPAN? Is
that a tax-paid program? Is
that for official use only?
Can you please get us some
information for this? Appre-
ciate your help.
Editor's note: Cable-Satel-
lite Public Affairs Network is a
(C-SPAN) is a nonprofit organ-
ization funded by subscriber
affiliate fees.
Poor court audio
We like to watch the Cit-
rus County Court on WYKE
but the audio is so bad, you
can't hear what the attor-
neys are saying or even
what the judge is saying.
And the two ladies up there
by the judges (are) flipping
papers so loud. And right
now it's just static on there.
You can't understand what
anybody's saying.
Offending online poll
Your online poll this week
is sort of offensive to me. I
object to the way it's writ-
ten. There's no correct an-
swer that says how I feel. I
do not think that we're
going to see less gridlock,
but it's not because we're
not cooperative; it's be-
cause there's a fundamental
difference of beliefs. As a
Republican and independ-
ent, I believe in smaller gov-
ernment. I believe they
should cut spending across
the board. There's so many
spending issues that are
just unbelievable. I believe
that a small tax increase,
even though I'm in one of
the highest brackets, would
not be inappropriate, but
not as long as they're
spending on things that are
so wasteful and giving
money to other countries.
So this is the problem.


Could be armadillos
About those pigs tearing
up somebody's yard: It
might not be pigs. It could
be armadillos, because they
tear it up just as well as
those pigs do. Good luck.
Turn off and tune out
I wonder how many thou-
sands of Republicans have
left the party and turned off
Fox News. I know I have.
Thanks for my meal
This is for the person or
persons who picked up the
tab for me and my wife's
meal at Denny's on Oct. 26.
Thank you very much. Your
act of kindness was greatly
appreciated and we will en-
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OPINION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Not factual
Fred Snook of Sugarmill
Woods makes two major er-
rors in his Nov 11 letter to
the Chronicle.
First, what he considers
conservative news from
Fox is not news at all, it's
commentary
News is the statement of
facts and facts in and of
themselves are neither
conservative nor liberal.
They are just facts. Now, if
you start talking about
those facts and twisting
them to fit your own per-
sonal bias, then they be-
come commentary
Fact is, when Fox was try-
ing to trademark "fair and
balanced" for its news divi-
sion, they stated the com-
mentary from their talking
heads was part of their en-
tertainment division, not
their news division; little
better than "Family Guy"
but less entertaining.
His fear of Fox going off
the air is obviously the rant-
ing of a Fox viewer "The
Simpsons" alone guarantees
Fox's continual survival.
The second problem is
praying for "our" God to in-
tercede. He must mean
"his" God. My God is pretty
happy with the situation,
not that it makes a lot of dif-
ference to Him. I hope Mr.
Snook is planning on wait-
ing a very long time for this
intercession. His God hasn't
interceded personally in
any situation for more then
2,000 years, but that's a dis-
cussion for another time.
Oscar R. Fick Jr.
Beverly Hills

Missing the mark
Cal Thomas, writing in
"Other Voices," laments the
disappearance of Amer-
ica's values.
I also miss the simpler
life of bygone days. In those
days, neighbor helped
neighbor, social programs
meant community action,
volunteers rushed to aid
others stricken by natural
disaster, churches spon-
sored meals for the hungry


Oh, but we also do that
today, don't we? Then, what
is Cal talking about?
The days to which he al-
ludes were also days when
black and white didn't mix,
when the destitute lived and
died in their poverty, when
the debt-ridden were con-
signed to "poor houses,"
when everyone other than
white Anglo-Saxon Protes-
tant was assigned a deroga-
tory label. The government's
silence resounded.
Mr Thomas lays many ills
of today's America on a gov-
ernment that affords all citi-
zens opportunities to
advance. He blames moral
fallout and cultural decay
(at the) beginning in the
1960s, the genesis of civil
rights. Mr Thomas regards
Obama's re-election as "mir-
roring the self-indulgent,
greedy and envious nation
we have become."
If Cal would chastise the
super-rich, whose taxation
rate is below the rates of
teachers or policemen or
soldiers, the wealthy corpo-


rations escaping taxation
from overseas profits, the
wealthy with their lawyers
and loopholes, then, that
assessment rings true. But
characterizing 50 percent
of American voters nega-
tively and failing to hold
accountable the above-
named pillagers of Amer-
ica is unseemly from a
talented commentator as
Cal Thomas.
Cal doesn't smell the cof-
fee. America's torch is
passing to a younger gener-
ation determined to have
personal and economic
"liberty and justice for all."
Larry Brown
Homosassa

Flawed assessment
Nov 13's letters column
features Joe Mazza's list of
character slurs he believes
are the reasons conserva-
tives disapprove of our
president. Smokescreen ac-
cusations that conservatives
are racists are really getting
old and don't merit a re-


sponse, but for rebuttal pur-
poses I will say most conser-
vatives would rejoice at the
opportunity to replace our
president with a Herman
Cain or Allen West. It is
these practices used by the
left to side-step the real
weaknesses of their chosen
one and his strategies that
have divided our country
The color of a man or
where he is born takes no
skin off my nose, but our
national debt is peeling us
to the bones along with our
grandchildren. Our reasons
for opposing the Dem's are
far less shallow than the
left's reasons for support.
Your president bought
votes from single issue, me-
minded blocks such as gays,
illegals and those who con-
fuse birth control responsi-
bility with health care.
They held no regard for in-
tegrity from the most highly
exalted and powerful man
on earth, who, during the
worst unrest we have seen
in the middle-East in
decades, turned away our


strongest ally in the region
to instead meet with con-
victed drug dealer turned
racist rapper Jay Z, and
Pimp with a Limp, all the
while denying for weeks
what everyone knows to be
true about the Libyan mas-
sacre. Joe Wilson's "you lie"
outburst turns out to have
been extremely accurate
and prophetic.
Mr Mazza, your letter is
full of the ignorance exhib-
ited when we re-elected an
ineffective president. Your
contended issues are at the
bottom of the list if they are
even on the list Do you re-
ally believe the 9,000 ex-
Boeing employees just
released are more worried
about the sex of your part-
ner than how to buy Christ-
mas gifts for their kids?
Remember "It's the econ-
omy stupid!"?
On behalf of 49.1 percent
of America, let me thank all
of you who voted for the
flawed and failed ideolo-
gies like those bankrupting
Europe and coming soon to


your neighborhood.
Mitch Simmons
Crystal River

Common practice
In response to the caller
who has "deer dogs," treats
them as he believes to be
well, and has "never seen"
cut-off, mutilated ears: this
procedure is quite common.
Many in my family were
and are hunters. However,
none of them kept dogs in
pens or cages. And when it
was cold, they had warm
beds indoors. They were
retrievers, not attackers;
therefore, weren't "set on"
any wild animal.
I, too, "have seen grown
men cry over the loss" of
wonderful dogs who died
during so-called hunts,
killed by wild hogs, bears
and even frightened deer
As a former hunter, both
bow and rifle, I believe I
am fairly knowledgeable. I
never used a tree stand, be-
cause I preferred to actu-
ally hunt. I never used dogs
for anything other than
what they were bred to do;
flush and retrieve.
There is more abuse and
neglect than most people
care to think about, espe-
cially if they personally take
decent care of their dogs. I
frequently see and report
caged, malnourished, pa-
thetically-treated Southern
hunting dogs. These inno-
cent animals are kept so
thin, their ribs protrude.
They cower and whine be-
cause they are cold and
hungry They have minimal
cover and no fresh water
Perhaps the anonymous
caller would be interested in
visiting a few rescue facili-
ties to realize the extent of
abuse done to animals by hu-
mans, hunters or not
There's a lot more to caring
for a dog than Purina and
shots. Ask any veterinarian.
Go online and research
abused pitbulls. It's a sad re-
ality and there aren't enough
happy endings to sad stories.
Joanie Welch
Inverness


COSMETIC PLASTIC SURGERY


BREAST AUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


OPINION


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 A13








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Florida Lottery
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Frito Lay Co.
J.W. Morton 21st Century
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Allstate Insurance
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Sew & Sew Quiliting
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Domino Pizza
Publix Super Markets Inc.
Corporate Office
Lakeside CC
Historical Downtown Affordable
Automotive
The Little Golf Shop
David M. Rom State Farm
Insurance
Tire Kingdom
3115 E. Gulf to Lake
Tires Plus
Red's Restaurant
Tire Kingdom 750 NE 5th Ave.
Collision Tech
Dan's Clam Shack
Citrus Springs G&CC
Little Italy Deli & Bakery
Rustic Ranch
A to Z Pool
West Coast Eye Institute
Schlabach Security
Golden Corral
Subway
N.Y. Style Car Wash
Florida Jewelers
Walgreens 4020 N. Lecanto
Ace Hardware
2585 N. Florida Ave.
Backyard Pool & Spa
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George's Wholesale Tire
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Sunshine Light


Angelo's Pizzeria
Chuck Everidge State Farm
Altman's Pest Control
Regal Entertainment
Sally's Beauty Supply
Sugar Mill Woods CC
Mark and Kimberly Immel
Morgan, Keegan Inc.
Century 21 Real Estate
1645 W. Main
Launderland
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The Little Flower Shop
Dave's Tree Svc
CVS Pharmacy
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Fat Daddy's
Art Center of Citrus County
Ivy Nails
Inverness Family Practice
All About Promotions
Mama's Kountry Kafe
R. J. Eldredge Co.
Frankie's
Bright House
Be Clean
Nick Nicholas Ford
Emily's Restaurant
Jimmy T's NY Deli
McLeod House Bistro
Michael G. Gzerwinski P.D.
Guido's Italian Ristorante
New England Pastry & Cafe
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Dunes Golf Course
Chronicle Newspaper
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Cracker Barrel
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Democrats stiffen against trimming benefits


Inflation adjustment of Social Security key issue at stake


Associated Press
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama's re-election has
stiffened Democrats' spine against
cutting popular benefit programs
such as Medicare and Social Se-
curity. Their new resolve could be-
come as big a hurdle to a deal that
would skirt crippling tax in-
creases and spending cuts in Jan-
uary as Republicans' resistance to
raising tax rates on the wealthy
Just last year, Obama and top
Democrats were willing during
budget negotiations with Republi-
cans to take politically risky steps
such as reducing the annual infla-
tion adjustment to Social Security
and raising the eligibility age for
Medicare.
Now, with new leverage from
Obama's big election victory and a
playing field for negotiations that
is more favorable in other ways,
too, Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid and other Democrats are
taking a harder line.


"I've made it very clear. I've told
anyone that will listen, including
everyone in the White House, in-
cluding the president, that I am
not going to be part of having So-
cial Security as part of these talks
relating to this deficit," Reid, D-
Nev, told reporters.
Reid's edict would appear to take
a key proposal off the table as an in-
gredient for a deal on avoiding the
"fiscal cliff," the year-end combina-
tion of expiring President George
W Bush-era tax cuts and harsh
across-the-board spending cuts.
At issue is the inflation adjust-
ment used by the government to
calculate cost-of-living adjust-
ments for Social Security and
other federal programs. A less
generous inflation measure that
takes into account consumers
finding alternatives when prices
go up could reduce deficits by
more than $200 billion over the
next decade.
It's a no-brainer for many
budget wonks because it means


gradual, less noticeable curbs to
the growth of benefits. It also
means about $70 billion more tax
revenues over 10 years because
automatic rises in tax brackets to
account for inflation would be
smaller.
That new inflation index,
known as chained Consumer
Price Index, is a magic elixir for
budget writers. But it's anathema
to many liberals, who say moving
to the new cost-of-living measure
could cut average retiree benefits
by about $600 a year a decade
after taking effect and mean a cut
of about $1,000 a year after 20
years.
"Think about it this way You're
standing on the deck of a boat and
you're in very deep water and they
want you to swim, but they're
going to put a log chain around
your ankle," Sen. Tom Harkin, D-
Iowa, told a group of liberal ac-
tivists assembled for a rally
Thursday in a Senate hearing
room. "That's chained CPI."


Associated Press
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, left, with House Speaker
John Boehner of Ohio behind him, speaks to reporters Friday outside the
White House in Washington following a meeting with President Barack
Obama to discuss the economy and the deficit.


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NATION


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WldBRIEFS Obama builds legacy with Asia
IlalF dlnwn


m m .v.W.m


Associated Press
An activist of the Hindu
nationalist party Shiv Sena
removes the party flag from
the headquarters Saturday
after the news of the death
of party leader Bal
Thackeray, portrait seen
background, in Mumbai,
India. Thackeray died
Saturday after an illness of
several weeks. He was 86.


Egyptian train hits
bus, 49 kids killed
ASSIUT, Egypt-A speed-
ing train crashed into a bus
carrying Egyptian children to
their kindergarten Saturday in
central Egypt, killing at least
49 and prompting a wave of
anger against the government
in Cairo.
More than 50 children be-
tween 4 and 6 years old were
on board when the bus was
hit, a security official said,
adding it appeared the rail-
road crossing was not closed
as the train sped toward it.
The crash is the worst such
tragedy to hit the country
since its first freely elected
president, Mohammed Morsi,
took office last summer, and
will likely give ammunition to
critics who say he has done
little to improve life for ordi-
nary Egyptians.
Turkish journalist
set free by captors
ANKARA, Turkey -A Turk-
ish cameraman captured by
Syrian forces while covering
fighting in the city of Aleppo in
August has been released
and will return to Turkey, the
delegation that negotiated his
freedom with Syrian President
BasharAssad told Turkish
media on Saturday.
Cameraman Cuneyt Unal
and reporter Bashar Fahmi
- a Jordanian citizen of
Palestinian origin had
been missing since August.
They were believed to have
been captured by Syrian gov-
ernment forces. Both were
working for the U.S.-based
Alhurra TV.
Turkish legislator Hasan
Akgol said Saturday that Unal
was in Damascus and would
return to Turkey later in the
day with a Turkish opposition
party delegation, which held
talks with Assad and other
Syrian officials for his release.
There was no information on
Fahmi's whereabouts.
Police: 3 dead in
Finland shooting
HELSINKI Three people
were shot dead in southwest-
ern Finland, most likely in an
attack motivated by jealousy,
Finnish police said Saturday.
No others were injured in
the shooting by a farmhouse
in the small town of Alavus,
350 kilometers northwest of
Helsinki.
Officers were alerted to the
scene by a passer-by around
noon Saturday, then found the
bodies of a man and a woman
- both shot with a gun in a
car outside the house. The
body of the suspected
shooter, a man born in 1949,
was found lying nearby, lead-
ing police to believe he took
his own life after the attack.
Police would not say when
the shooting took place, but
national tabloid Iltalehti said it
occurred overnight.
In a statement, police said
jealousy was thought to be
the motive, saying the sus-
pected killer earlier had a re-
lationship with the woman but
that had ended "ages ago."
-From wire reports


President visits

Southeast Asia

for fourth time

Associated Press
BANGKOK For Presi-
dent Barack Obama, ex-
panding U.S. influence in
Asia is more than just coun-
tering China or opening up
new markets to American
businesses. It's also about
building his legacy.
Fresh off re-election,
Obama will make a signifi-
cant investment in the effort
during a quick run through
Southeast Asia that begins
Sunday. In addition to stops
in Thailand and Cambodia,


the president will
make a historic visit
to Myanmar, where
his administration
has led efforts to
ease the once pariah
nation out of inter-
national isolation.
The trip marks Bar
Obama's fourth visit Ob.
to Asia in as many
years. He kicks off his
schedule in Bangkok. With a
second term now guaran-
teed, aides said Obama will
be a regular visitor to the re-
gion for the next four years.
"Continuing to fill in our
pivot to Asia will be a critical
part of the president's second
term and ultimately his for-
eign policy legacy," said Ben
Rhodes, Obama's deputy na-
tional security adviser
The president's motiva-


a
a


tions in Asia are per-
sonal and strategic.
Obama, who was
born in Hawaii and
lived in Indonesia as
a child, has called
himself America's
first "Pacific presi-
ack dent." The region
ma gives him an oppor-
tunity to open up
new markets for U.S. com-
panies, promote democracy
and ease fears of China's
rise by boosting U.S. mili-
tary presence in area.
The president, like many
of his predecessors, had
hoped to cement his foreign
policy legacy in the Middle
East. He attempted to revive
peace talks between Israel
and the Palestinians. But
those talks stalled, and fresh
outbursts of violence be-


tween Israel and the Pales-
tinians make the prospects
of a peace accord appear in-
creasingly slim.
In Asia, however, Obama
will be viewed as something
of an elder statesman. The
region is undergoing signifi-
cant leadership changes,
most notably in China,
where the Communist Party
tapped new leaders last
week. Japan and South
Korea will hold new elec-
tions soon.
"Most of the leaders he'll
meet with will not have a
tenure as long as he will as
president," said Michael
Green, an Asia scholar at
the Washington-based Cen-
ter for Strategic and Inter-
national Studies. "So he'll
go into this in a very strong
position."


Bombarding blasts


Associated Press
Smoke rises during an explosion from an Israeli forces strike Saturday in Gaza City. Israel bombarded the
Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip with nearly 200 airstrikes early Saturday, the military said, widening a blistering assault
on Gaza rocket operations by militants to include the prime minister's headquarters, a police compound and a vast
network of smuggling tunnels. Palestinians inspect the rubble of a destroyed house after an Israeli airstrike
Saturday in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip.

Israel bombs Gaza Strip and shoots down rocket


Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip Israel
destroyed the headquarters of
Hamas' prime minister and blasted
a sprawling network of smuggling
tunnels in the southern Gaza Strip
on Saturday, broadening a blister-
ing four-day-old offensive against
the Islamic militant group even as
diplomatic efforts to broker a cease-
fire appeared to be gaining steam.
Hamas officials said a building
used by Hamas for broadcasts was
bombed and three people were in-
jured. The injured were from Al
Quds TV a Lebanon-based televi-
sion channel. The building is also
used by foreign news outlets in-
cluding Germany's ARD, Kuwait TV
and the Italian RAI and others.
The Israeli military spokesman was
not immediately aware of the strikes
but said they were investigating.
In neighboring Egypt, President
Mohammed Morsi hosted leaders
from Hamas and two key allies,
Qatar and Turkey, to seek a way to
end the fighting.
"There are discussions about the
ways to bring a cease-fire soon, but


there are no guarantees until now,"
Morsi said at a news conference.
He said he was working with
Turkey, Arab countries, the U.S.,
Russia and western European
countries to halt the fighting.
Israel launched the operation
Wednesday in what it said was an


effort to end months of rocket fire
out of the Hamas-ruled territory It
began the offensive with an unex-
pected airstrike that killed Hamas'
powerful military chief, and since
then has relentlessly targeted
suspected rocket launchers and
storage sites.


Migration change eases return for defectors


Native Cubans

can go home

under new law

Associated Press
HAVANA Sydney Gre-
gory has never met her fa-
ther, an Olympic silver
medalist in fencing who de-
fected from the Cuban team
at a tournament in Lisbon in
2002 when she was 15 days
old. But he recently rang
from Italy with good news:
Papa's coming home to visit
"I'm very happy," the 10-
year-old girl said, smiling in


her school uniform with a
headband holding back her
jet-black hair. "My father
called me on the phone and
told me he's going to come.
I'm going to meet him!"
Under Cuban law, those
who abandoned their home-
land have had to apply for
permission to return, even
for the kind of brief family
visit Elvis Gregory hopes to
make. Many high-profile
people considered desert-
ers have had their requests
to return rejected by a
communist-run government
that complained about the
large financial investment it
made in their careers. Some
didn't even bother to ask,
knowing their petitions


would be turned down.
But a change taking effect
in January will make it sim-
pler for Cubans to visit the
homeland they abandoned. It
essentially establishes a sin-
gle set of rules governing the
right of return that will apply
to everyone who left illegally,
no matter what the circum-
stances of their departure.
The new rules could po-
tentially affect many lead-
ing cultural and athletic
figures, from musicians and
doctors to ballet dancers
and former Yankee pitcher
Orlando "El Duque" Her-
nandez. Tens of thousands
of people once considered
traitors could now be
welcomed home.


Associated Press
Maria Victoria Gil, mother of
swordsman Elvis Gregory,
shows a framed photo of her
son at her home Friday in
Havana, Cuba.


NationBRIEFS

Memoriam


Associated Press
Midland, Texas, resident
Jerry Cook places a wreath
his mother made and two
U.S. flags Friday at the
location where a train
struck a flatbed trailer
carrying veterans in a
parade Thursday afternoon,
killing four.

West Texas town
begins recovery
MIDLAND, Texas -Two
days after a train suddenly
plowed into a parade float,
killing four war veterans, the
city of Midland, investigators
and the victims' families
began what likely will be a
long, painful recovery.
The truck that served as
the parade float had been re-
moved from the tracks and
federal investigators were
working to determine what
exactly happened, including
whether the parade had
enough warning to clear the
tracks. Investigators meas-
ured distances, photographed
the site and tested equip-
ment, trilling the warning bells
periodically.
Residents in the town
planned a weekend candle-
light vigil.
Deputy: Truck hit
by plane in Maine
OWLS HEAD, Maine -A
small plane that crashed
shortly after takeoff, killing
three, first struck a pickup
truck crossing the runway to
pick up a pilot who had
parked in a hangar, authori-
ties said Saturday.
The Cessna 172 was
heading north on the Knox
County Regional Airport run-
way early Friday evening
when it struck the truck, which
was authorized to be on air-
port grounds, Knox County
Chief Deputy Sheriff Tim Car-
roll said. The plane continued
to climb and as it turned to
the east, it spiraled downward
about 200 to 300 yards into
the thick woods and immedi-
ately burst into flames, the
sheriff's office said.
The victims are believed to
be one Maine resident and
two from outside the state,
Carroll said.
Man with strange
watch arrested
OAKLAND, Calif. -A
Southern California man was
arrested at Oakland Interna-
tional Airport after security of-
ficers found him wearing an
unusual watch they said
could be used to make a tim-
ing device for a bomb, author-
ities said Friday.
Geoffrey McGann, 49, of
Rancho Palos Verdes was
taken into custody Thursday
night after he tried to pass
through airport security with
an ornate watch that had
switches, wires and fuses, ac-
cording to Sgt. J.D. Nelson, a
spokesman for the Alameda
County Sheriff's Department.
A bomb squad arrived
within five minutes and deter-
mined there were no explo-
sive materials in the watch,
Nelson said.
Coast Guard looks
for 2 after fire
NEW ORLEANS Two oil
workers remained lost at sea
Saturday, a day after a torch
being used to cut an oil pipe
ignited a blaze that severely
burned four others workers
on a production platform in
the Gulf of Mexico.
The four burned workers
are in critical but stable
condition.
-From wire reports











EXCURCRISIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be
found on Page -
A19 of today's
Chronicle.


HIKING


rown of t




ontinent


THE GLACIER NATIONAL PARK


Glacier National Park


Barry Schwartz
ROAD LESS
TAKEN


his summer, I joined
a group of friends
from around the
country to backpack
through Glacier National
Park in Montana.
In part, we were helping Matt Mat-
son, who recently turned 75, complete
his Continental Divide trek from Mex-
ico to Canada, following the spine of
the continent along the mountainous


Continental Divide Trail. His endeavor
has taken five summers and started as
a Rotary Club project to publicize the
nonprofit Continental Divide Trail.
Glacier National Park is part of the
Crown of the Continent Ecosystem.
The park was created in 1910 and most
of the park infrastructure roads,
inns, etc. were built in the 1930s.
One hundred and fifty years ago
there were 150 glaciers actively mov-
ing. Today, only 25 remain and they
could be gone in another 10 to 20
years.
The park is on the Canadian border,


in the northwestern portion of
Montana.
Our trek of 30-plus miles started
from the Many Glacier area, headed
west for eight miles, then north follow-
ing the divide for 20-plus miles to the
border of Canada.
The first two days involved steep
climbs over 7,000-foot passes. After
that, it was smooth sailing downhill.
As a safety precaution I had the
route preloaded in my GPS to keep us
from getting lost and I also carry a
SPOT, which is a satellite GPS messen-
ger system that receives a signal from


my SPOT transponder and then sends
the location to a server that anyone on
the Internet with my code can access
on the Web and locate me on the map.
It also has a 911 button in case there
is an emergency; the SPOT monitoring
service will send help.
All in our group carried bear spray
as an emergency deterrent. At each
primitive backcountry campground,
the park provides a separate "kitchen
area" away from tent platforms and a
tall pole so you can easily hoist your
food above the reach of any wandering
bear


Granite Park CG
.1. --,--,-, ,




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Fifty Mountain CG




E---- ,
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Day 1: Many Glacier
to Granite Park

Today we covered 7.6 miles with a 2,200-foot ascent from 5,000 to 7,200 feet. We
started our trek from the large campground at the Many Glacier area of the park.
We ate dinner and breakfast at the lodges in the area. We hit the trail around 9:30
a.m.
We headed west about 4.5 miles to Swift Current Pass. The pass is a formidable
wall with a steep trail cut into the rock face with many switch-backs to take you
over the top of the Continental Divide. Once over the top, it was a short hike to
the Granite Park Chalet, an inn that is a seven-mile hike from the park loop road.
We chose to continue another half mile to the campground. We did see several
grizzlies, but they were a mile away, down a valley The park is noted for its 300
grizzly bears.

The elevation profile of the route.


resulted in a beautiful display of wildflowers. We fi-
nally arrived in camp at about 6 p.m.
A deer "stalked" our campsite and when we
climbed into our tents for the night, she decided to
take one of our trekking poles. Probably due to the
fact that the soil in the park is mineral poor and the
animals are always on the search for salt. Phil man-
aged to distract the deer and get her to drop his pole.
Day 3: Fifty Mountain
to Kootenai Lake
This day's hike was nine miles with a 2,000-foot


The intrepid hikers: Lee Willis, Mat Matson, Curt Harris,
Phil Toohey and Barry Schwartz.

Day 2: Granite Park
to Fifty Mountain
Today, we hiked 12 miles going up 2,400 feet and
crossed a 7,400-foot pass. The first part of the trek,
along the Highline Trail, involved negotiating around
the Ahern snow field that was blocking the trail. It
was a challenge dropping off the narrow trail and
going down the steep drop-off with 40-pound packs
on our backs.
We walked for many miles through the remains of
a very large forest fire that engulfed a portion of the
park in 2003. While the trees have not returned yet,
the recycling of the minerals from the ash has


knee-aching descent.
A cold front moved in during the night so it was
much cooler in the morning and low-lying clouds
were hanging in the valleys. Today's trek was mostly
downhill as we moved off the high pass into the val-
leys that lead to Waterton Lake and the Canadian
border
We got to the Kootenai Lake campground by 4 p.m.
We were able to camp near the lake and watch sev-
eral moose feeding as they walked through the lake.


Wildflowers thriving after a forest fire.


Moose feeding at the lake.


Day 4: Kootenai Lake
to Goat Haunt Ranger Station
Our last day on the trail was a short, downhill
stretch of three miles to the Canadian border It was
an easy day as we hit the trail early to catch the 11:30
boat at the Ranger Station. It was a short hike, mostly
downhill to the Goat Haunt Ranger Station by Water-
ton Lake. The lake straddles the border and goes


Granite Park Chalet was built in the 1930s. It is now op-
erated as a walk-in lodge with no services. You must
carry food and bedding.
through Glacier and Waterton national parks in
Canada. Together, the two parks are called an
International Peace Park.
A short music video of the trip photos can be found
on YouTube at: www.youtube.com/watch?voL-
LAypY6BKg.
My GPS track of the trip is posted on Everytrailat:
www.everytrail.com/viewtrip.php?trip_idl723748.


Barry Schwartz and his wife, Bette, live at the end
of Ozello Trail with their mountain-climbing dog,
Rowdy. They are retired teachers who now split their
time between Ozello and the Colorado Mountains.
During the past 30-plus years, they have been hiking,
climbing, scuba diving, sailing or driving through
at least 50 countries around the world.
Email him at schwartzbb@gmail.com.


Anniversary on the road

Richard and Joanne Tuxbury of Homosassa spent seven weeks touring the
beautiful United States to celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary. They
traveled 11,578 miles, visited 11 national parks and three national monuments.
This photo was taken at the Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. Bridal Veil
Falls can be seen on the right.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
CATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Story and photos by Barry Schwartz Special to the Chronicle


7800,
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A18 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


Wife wants old


husband back


SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 18, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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S[WTP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 New England Patriots. (N) Stereo) N (In Stereo) N Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14'm 11pm (N)
S WTVT FOX 13 13 13 3FOX136:OONews(N) Bob's Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Burn
0 FOX13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) Burgers Show Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad'14 (In Stereo) B Notice'PG'
D [WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos The 40th Anniversary American Music Awards (N)'14, D,L,S' News Inside Ed.
WCF ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
E (WCI IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child 'G' Miracles Wommack Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
SWFTS ABC 11 1 1 News World America's Funniest The 40th Anniversary American Music Awards Musical acts are honored. News Castle'PG'
W ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' (N) (In Stereo Live)'14, D,L,S' cc
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Deceit" Law & Order How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
Wo IND 12 12 16 '14' 'PG' Theory Theory 'PG' "Atonement"'PG' '14' '14'm
] WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "The Amityville Horror"(2005) 'R' Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Tampa Whacked Born-Ride Honor
_ [WACX)TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Paid Paid Journey World Connec Jim Raley Dayna Brody
Friends According King of Engagement CSI: Miami "Chip/Tuck" CSI: Miami Reality Cold Case "Into the *l "Scary Movie 2"
cWT w 4 4 4 12 12 'PG' to Jim Queens '14' star's murder. '14 Blue"'14'B (2001)'R'
E Casita Big Rotary Sunflower Inverness Your Citrus County Court I Spy'Y' TheCisco Black
S WYKE FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Spotlight Kid 'G' Beauty
D CWOGX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang Burgers Cleveland Simpsons |Burgers |Fam. Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 Big Bang Big Bang
M CWVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comned. Noticiero Thalia Habftame Mira Quien Baila "La Gran Final" (N) (SS) |Sal Comed. Noticiero
I [WPX ION 17 Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl House'14'B House'14'B House'14'cc
5448 54 25 27 To Be Announced Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
S 54 48 54 25 27 Wars PG' WarsPG' Wars PG' WarsG' Wars PG' WarsPG' Wars Wars PG' Wars Wars'PG'
S 5***5 64 55 "Terminator2: Judgment Day" (1991) The Walking Dead"Say The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Comic
55 64 55 Arnold Schwarzenegger.'NR' Bc the Word"'t4' "Hounded" (N) '14' Hounded"414' Dead'14' Book Men
1 Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bifoot (In Finding Bigfoot (N) (In Finding Bigfoot (In
(___ 52 35 52 19 21 "The Albino"'14' (In Stereo)'14' N (In Stereo)'PG' Stereo)'P' Stereo) Stereo) 'PC'
) **96 19 96 "Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins" (2008, Comedy) "Battlefield America" (2012, Drama) Marques Houston, Don't Don't
96 19 96 Martin Lawrence. 'PG-13' Bc Mekia Cox.'PG-13' m Sleep! Sleep!
[BIAV0) 254 51 254 Real Housewives Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl.
** "Accepted" (2006, Comedy) ** "Dumb & Dumber" (1994) Jim Carrey. Two witless Tosh.0 Brickleberry Key & "Half
Ci 27 61 27 33 Justin Long.'PG-13' wonders take a cash-laden briefcase to Aspen. '14'c Peele'14 Baked"
i 98 45 98 28 "Starsky BigTexas BigTexas *** "Rocky l"(1979, Drama) SylvesterStallone. Underdog Philly ** "Rocky IV"(1985) Sylvester
98 45 98 28 37 & Hutch" Heat'PG' Heat'PG fighter gets another shot at heavyweight champ.'PG'c Stallone. (In Stereo)'PG'
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid Paid Diabetes Wall St. Millions |Millions Apocalypse 2012 American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
(tW ) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG'
S 46 40 46 6 5 *** To} Slo .1 "Sofia the First: Once Dog With a Austin & Shake It Jessie A.N.T Good- Jessie Shake It
46 40 46 6 Upon" Blog'G' Ally'G' Up! 'G' cGc Farm'G' Charlie 'G'c Up! 'G'
(ESPNl 33 27 33 21 17 NASCAR Racing SportsCenter (N) (Live) c BCS MLS Soccer: Western Conference, Final Leg 2 SportCtr
[ES N2J 34 28 34 43 49 Basket College Basketball College Basketball |NASCAR SportCtr Soccer
(EWTN) 95 70 95 48 Devotions Crossing |World Over Live Sunday Night Prime G.K. |Rosary Dawn of America'G' God Bookmark
S 29 52 29 20 28 "Santa Baby 2: Christmas Maybe" (2009, *** "Holiday in Handcuffs" (2007, Romance- "12 Dates of Christmas" (2011, Comedy-
29 52 29 20 28 Comedy) Jenny McCarthy, PaurSorvino. Comedy) Melissa Joan Hart. Drama) Amy Smart, Mark-Paul Gosselaar.
S7 "The Others" (2001, Suspense) Nicole ***2 "Sophie's Choice" (1982) Meryl Streep. A death- ** "Falling in Love" (1984)
118 170 Kidman. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c camp survivor makes a home in 1947 Brooklyn. Robert De Niro.'PG-13'
(EJ 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday |FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Thanksgiving Live Cupcake Wars (N) The Next Iron Chef All-Star Family Cook- Restaurant Stakeout
(JSNFLJ 35 39 35 Bull Riding |XTERRA World PokerTour UFC Unleashed (N) Driven |XTERRA World PokerTour
S** "Twilight" (2008, Romance) Kristen **2 "The Twilight Saga: New Moon" (2009) Kristen Stewart. Bella **2 "Twilight" (2008)
30 60 30 51 Stewart, Robert Pattinson.'PG-13' finds herself drawn into the world of werewolves. 'PG-13' 'PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Central |LPGATourGolfCMEGroupTitleholders, Final Round. |Big Break Greenbrier Chasing |PatriotCup |Central
"The Most Wonderful Time of the Year" (2008, "t's Christmas, Carol!" (2012, Fantasy) Carrie "Eve's Christmas" (2004, Comedy-Drama)
ALL 59 68 59 45 54 Drama) Henry Winkler.c Fisher. Premiere. c Elisa Donovan.'NR'c
"Crossfire Hurricane" **t "Safe House" (2012 Action) Denzel Boardwalk Empire (N) Treme "Poor Man's Boardwalk Empire
tiB 302 201 302 2 2 (2012)'NR' Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' 'MA' c Paradise" (N) 'MA 'MA' N
SM303 202 303 Boxing RealTime With Bill ** "We Bought a Zoo" (2011) Matt Damon. ** "The Eagle" (2011, Action) Channing
S 303 202 303 BMaher 'MA' (In Stereo)'P' BTatum. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
HIlTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Huntlntl Million Dollar Rooms Extreme Homes'G' Property Brothers'G' House Hunters Reno House Hunters Reno
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Superstorm 2012: Hell Swampsgiving 'PG'm Outback Hunters (N)
(M ) 51 25 51 32 42 'PG 'PG 'PG 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' and High Water '14'm
3 2 "Under the Mistletoe" "Holiday High School Reunion" (2012, "Holiday Spin" 2012, Drama) Ralph Macchio, "Holiday High School
EJ 24 38 24 31 (2006) 'NR c Romance-Comedy) Rachel Boston. NR' c Garrett layton. Premiere. c Reunion"
** "In the Name of Love:A Texas Tragedy" ** "Dark Beauty" (2008, Suspense) Elizabeth *** "Unstable" (2009, Suspense) Shiri
([WIN) 50 119 (1995, Drama) Laura Leighton. c Berkley, Alicia Coppola. 'NR' Appleby, Kathy Baker. 'NR'm
1 *** "Rise of the Planet of theApes" (2011) ** "Contraband" (2012, Action Mark *** "Bridesmaids" (2011, Comedy) Kristen
320 221 320 3 3 James Franco.'PG-13'B Wahlberg, Ben Foster. (In Stereo R c' Wiig, Rose Byrne. (In Stereo) 'NR c
CM SNBC 42 41 42 Caught on Camera ICaught on Camera Caught on Camera |Maximum Drama (N) To Catch a Predator |Lockup: Raw
The Truth Behind Superstorm 2012 Border Wars 'Traffic" Drugs, Inc. (N)'14' Alaska State Troopers Border Wars "Traffic"
(W) 109 65 109 44 53 UFOs: Popped '14' (N)'14 '14'
(ICij 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious liCarly 'G' Sponge. |Sponge. See Dad **| "Aquamarine"(2006) Sara Paxton.'PG' m Friends |Friends
tDWN) 103 62 103 Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's Oprah's Favorite Things: 2012 (N) 'PG' Married to the Army Favorite Things
(DXYD 44 123 Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' c Law Order: Cl
Untold History of the Dexter Dexter and Homeland 'The Dexter "Argentina" (N) Homeland "I'll Fly Dexter "Argentina"
340 241 340 4 United States'14' Hannah grow closer. Clearing" cc'MA' Away" (N)'MA' 'MA' cc
Lucas Oil Late Model NASCAR Victory SPEED Center (N) Wind Tunnel With Dave My Classic Car Crazy Formula One Racing
732 112 732 Dirt Series (N) Lane (N) (Live) Despain (N) Car 'G' U.S. Grand Prix.
** 2 "The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift" *** "Independence Day" (1996) Will Smith. Premiere. Earthlings vs. *** "Independence
tPilI 37 43 37 27 36 (2006, Action) Lucas Black.'PG-13' evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Day"(1996)
** "John Carter" *** "The Muppets" (2011, Comedy) Jason ** "Just Go With It"(2011) Adam Sandier, ** "The Butterfly
IZ) 370 271 370 (2012) c Segel. (In Stereo) 'PG' Nicole Kidman. (In Stereo)'PG-13'Bm Effect" (2004) 'R
Ship Florida Fishing the College Football Florida State at Maryland. (Taped) Sport Sportsman Saltwater
S 36 31 36 Shape TV Sports. Flats Fishing Exp.
YEY 31 59 31 26 29 "Resident Evil" *Il "Resident Evil: Afterlife" (2010, Horror) "Zombie Apocalypse" (2011, Horror) Ving "Rise of the
31 59 31 26 29 (2002)'R' c Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter.'R' Rhames, Taryn Manning. R' Zombies" (2012)'NR'
rjaS] 49 23 49 16 19 ** "17Again"(2009) c IGrinch **** "The Wizard of Oz" (1939) 'G' Grinch |*** "Madagascar" (2005)
S3 **** "It Happened One Night"(1934) ** "Plymouth Adventure" (1952, Historical "Captain John Smith and My
M 169 53 169 30 35 Claudette Colbert, Clark Gabfe. 'NR' Drama) pencerTracy 'NR'N cPocahontas" (1953)'NR' Country
( 53 America's Most Secret: MythBusters "Storm MythBusters (N) (In MythBusters (In Stereo) Breaking Breaking MythBusters (In Stereo)
53 34 53 24 26 Structures'PG' Chasing Myths"'PG' Stereo)'PG' PG' Magic (N) Magic (N) 'PG'
(TLE 50 46 50 29 30 Sister Sister Sister |Sister Sister |Sister Sister Wives (N)'14 Breaking Amish:The SisterWives'14'
"The ** "Angels Crest" (2011, Drama) *** "Source Code" (2011) Jake "Brake"(2012) Stephen Dorff. "Elephant White"
U(IJ 350 261 350 Heavy" Thomas-Dekker. R c Gyllenhaal.'PG-13'm (In Stereo)'R'm (2011) Kevin Bacon.
n 48 33 48 301 34*** "The Bourne Supremacy" (2004, *** "The Bourne Ultimatum" (2007, Action) Matt Damon, *** "The Bourne Ultimatum"
) 48 33 48 31 34 Suspense) Matt Damon. PG-13' cNJulia Stiles, Joan Allen. PG-13'm (DVS) (2007) Matt Damon.'PG-13'
TIpN) 38 58 38 33 ** "National Treasure"(2004)'PG' Looney |Dragons Oblongs |King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 The Layover Extreme Pools 'G' Luxury Yachts 'G' Extreme Yachts 'G' Extreme Yachts 'G' Extreme Yachts 'G'
uiITVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout 'PG' c Wipeout'PG' B Woutout 'PG' BGPawn Pawn World's Dumbest...
(YLI 32 49 32 34 24 MA*S*H |M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond IKing
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special **2 "It's Complicated"
(US&) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 (2009)'R'
Biggest Bridezilla Bridezillas Attack of the Bridezillas Where Are Bridezillas Erica's nasty Bridezillas "Krystal & Bridezillas Where Are
) 117 69 117 Meldowns Momzillas They Now? 3.0 attitude.'14' Gabrielle"'14' They Now? 3.0
(WGN-A] 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Portland Trail Blazers. |News


Dear Annie: Not too
long ago, my life was
perfect: great mar-
riage, good kids, well estab-
lished in our community
and a fantastic sex life.
Three years ago, at the
age of 49, my husband re-
tired after a 30-year career
in law enforcement. He re-
tired with no plans, hobbies,
friends or passions. Now
our life is hell.
Four months before his
retirement, my husband be-
came stressed and his en-
tire personality changed.
He has periods of obnoxious
highs, but most days are vio-
lent lows.
He sleeps 12 hours a day,
has gained more than 50
pounds and
complains con-
stantly of health
issues (although
numerous doc-
tor visits show
nothing). He
slams doors,
throws things, is
verbally abusive
and makes
threats of physi-
cal violence.
Everything he
says is negative, ANNI
and he spends a MAILI
great deal of
time making his
family feel horrible and un-
worthy
He is paranoid and con-
trolling. I quit my job in my
mid-20s to be an at-home
mom. He threatens to cut
me off financially and re-
minds me that it's his car,
his home, his money
Prior to his retirement,
we were happy, talked about
everything and couldn't
keep our hands off of each
other. Now, we never talk,
and sex happens twice a
year
Everyone in the family
has suggested he get help,


Today s MOVIES


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"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
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No passes.
"Flight" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) In 3D.
4:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
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(PG-13) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2 p.m.,


4 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5 p.m.,
5:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
8 p.m., 8:30 p.m., 10 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Flight" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 4:50 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) In 3D.
1:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
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"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R) In
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"Argo" (R) 1:45 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Two pints
6 Poplar tree
11 Ignominy
16 Hauls
21 Hot the collar
22 Buffalo
23 Sophia the actress
24 Turn aside
25 Make confused
26 Emissary
27 Made a choice
28 Formal reception
29 "A Boy Named -"
30 For one
32 Fellow
34 Cram
36 Service branch (abbr.)
37 Protagonist
39 Prompted
41 Furrows
43 Abbreviation
on a marquee
44 Cozy place
45 Old word
for a pirate
48 Playing cards
50 Gaelic
52 Game piece also called
rook
55 Banister
57 Tube
59 Swanson or
Estefan
63 Lubricated
64 Leisurely walk
66 Developing quickly
68 Ill-behaved kid
69 Milk portion
70 Help
72 Haute, Ind.
73 - standstill
74 Legal matter
75 Nose-bag filler
76 Drive
78 Spoken vote
79 Walk
80 Stuck fast
82 Literary collection
83 Gusty
85 Fixed gaze
86 Directed
87 Cousin to an assn.
88 Plaything
89 Scary yell
90 "- of Two
Cities"
93 Comical writing
95 Jewel


In disarray
Additional
Sickroom item
Teach
Cut into cubes
Cry at a bullfight
Wrath
Rub against
Bovine sound
Under the weather
Begone!
Overly sweet
City in Denmark
Dish
Uses with others
Legal wrong
Powdery dirt
Medicine man
ABA mem.
Perjurer
Magic
Strikebreaker
Have a bite
Newts
Name of 12 popes
Idem
- de mer
Girl in the funnies
Exploit
Boast
Young boy
Mimicking
Scoundrel
Something extra
In the company of
Actress
Zellweger
Heron
Gambling game
Stove
Tire surface
Greek letter
Old anesthetic
Engender


DOWN
1 Suppress
2 Excessive
3 Legless animal
4 Kinsman (abbr.)
5 Sapling
6 Old computing
device
7 Generous
8 Opp. of WNW
9 Yearn
10 Stage direction
11 Like some spoons
12 Skip


Fine and liberal
Encounters
Tolerate
Young farm animal
- Maria
Variety show
Long lock
Arterial insert
Land measure
Fanatic
Something
inauthentic
Musical group
Journal
Ignore
Elemental gas
Ancient
- de Janeiro
Short tail
Flavoring for gin
Hooded snake
Ventilated
Cut drastically
Andes animal
Faddish
Rope for a cowboy
- alia
Wide open
Molt
Backtalk
"The Picture
of Dorian -"
Pesky plant
Morning moisture
Liberate
Metal mass
Metric measure
Halt
Fashion magazine
Branch
- de plume
A few
Set of clothes
Male deer
Wrongly
The Pentateuch
Betel palm
White with age
Liquor
Merchandise
Edgar
Burroughs
Not widespread
Gladden
Stop from acting
Castigate
Also
Hand out
Huntley or Atkins


Organic compound
Pry
Does in
Grouchy one
Cleveland's lake
The dawn
personified
- capital
Lustrous fabric
"For --jolly good fel-


low..."
Pulled
Itinerary (abbr.)
Computer-screen blip
Hurt
Antic
Skirt shape (hyph.)
Bit of color
Costly fur
Exclusively


Puppy's problem
Inched
On in years
Nobleman
Traffic sound
Apparel
UFT cousin
Animal doc
Extreme degree
Spoil


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


11-18


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


but he says it's all our fault.
People avoid us, we have no
friends, and our kids steer
clear. It breaks my heart.
I love my husband deeply,
but cannot stand the mon-
ster he's become.
How do I get this man
help when he clearly does
not want it? It's taking a ter-
rible toll. Want My Hus-
band Back
Dear Want: Your husband
may be bipolar, his retire-
ment may have triggered se-
vere depression, or his
anxiety may have pushed
him over the edge.
But he needs professional
assistance. His behavior
sounds increasingly abu-
sive, which could be dan-
gerous to those
around him.
Since he seems
willing to see a
physician, please
notify the doctor in
advance of your
husband's behav-
ioral issues.
Also contact
NAMI (nami.org)
and the Depres-
sion and Bipolar
Support Alliance
E'S (dbsalliance.org).
3OX And we strongly
recommend the
National Domestic
Violence Hotline (thehot-
line.org).


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737
Third St., Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox, visit
the Creators Syndicate Web
page a t www crea tors. com.


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
Thanksgiving dinner will be
served at the post from 2 to
5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 22.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Lounge
opens at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon on
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Legion Auxiliary, Sons of the
American Legion, American Le-
gion Riders and 40/8 families
have dinners from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays.
The post is currently consid-
ering new bands, deejays and
karaoke entertainers for the up-
coming year. If interested in
being considered as an enter-
tainer or musician at the post,
call Elfi Baker or Patti Foster at
352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
All are also welcome to a
ham and sweet potato dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Nov. 28, at the Post home.
Donation is $7. Donations from
the dinners help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For more
information, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. For Mon-
day golf league, call Leo Walsh
or John Kunzer, 746-0440. The
VFW Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer or Santos Colon at 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.


Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
There will be no Friday night
dinner on Nov. 23.
Thanksgiving dinner will be
served from 3 to 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 22. Tickets are $10.
Baked pork chops are on the
menu for Friday, Nov. 30, from
5 to 6:30 p.m. cost is $8 and all
are welcome. Children younger
than 6 eat for $4.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.One
of the DAVA's projects is mak-
ing lap robes and ditty, wheel-
chair and monitor bags for
needy veterans in nursing
homes. All who wish to help in
our projects are welcome. We
need to make the items certain
sizes, so please call for infor-
mation. We also collect toiletry
items for the veterans. Good,
clean material and yarn are
needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw
4337.org for information about
all weekly post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. Dunnellon Young
Marines meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at bingo
at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Free Thanksgiving dinner to
be served from noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 22. All are wel-
come; donations not required,
but will be accepted.
For information about activi-


ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at ultrarayl997
@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com. Call or visit the post
for regular and special events,
as well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its


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activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at
1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly. Any veteran who has
seen honorable service in any
of the Armed Forces of the U.S.
is eligible for membership if
said service was within Korea,
including territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-
697-3151 for information about
the post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
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Homosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the
American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3


p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call
Commander Tom Gallagher at
860-1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will meet at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All pro-
ceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort). Reservations should
be made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-5131,
or email dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.

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A20 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Portas


Vito and Maria Porta of
Beverly Hills celebrated
their 50th anniversary at a
surprise party at Pine Ridge
Community Center on Nov.
3, 2012.
The party was given by
their children and their
families, Tana Carney and
Michael (Mickey) Porta, of
Citrus County. A 1950s
theme celebrated the cou-
ple's "50 Rockin' Years of
Marriage."
Maria DiPaolo and Vito


j

Salvatore Porta exchanged
wedding vows Nov. 3, 1962,
in Hallandale. They have
resided in Citrus County for
11 years, after moving here
from Davie, where they
lived for 28 years. Maria is a
retired travel agent for
Seminole Indians in South
Florida, and Vito is retired
as a loan officer/mortgage
broker in South Florida.
In addition to their two
children, the couple have
five grandchildren.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Nixons
J.D. and Connie Nixon
celebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary Oct. 13,
2012, with several out-of-
town and out-of-state guests
at a party hosted by their
daughter, Brenda, and their
son, Tom, and his family
from Tokyo, Japan.
The couple were married
in Hyde Park, Mass., on Oct.
12, 19962.
After living in Alaska,
Main and Europe, they set-
tled in Inverness in 1994.


For the RECORD


Divorces 11/5/12 to 11/11/12
Thurmon Carlyle,
Hiawassee, Ga. vs. Constance
B. Carlyle, Beverly Hills
Elizabeth A. Morgan, Citrus
Springs vs. Kevin D. Morgan,
Citrus Springs
Marriages 11/5/12 to 11/11/12
Jeremiah Cook Champion,
Inverness/Karri Ann Cater,


Inverness
Boris Dimitriev, Floral
City/Eleanor Dunn, Floral City
Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a
matter of public record, avail-
able from each county's Clerk
of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us/.


Humane Society oF CITRUS co.


Sterling


Special to the Chronicle
If you love the Doberman
breed, you must appreci-
ate what a beauty Sterling
is. He is a well-behaved,



VETERANS
Continued from Page A19

Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old
Homosassa Veterans' Me-
morial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement
programs.Criminal back-
ground check and member-
ship are required. Email
Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a
partnering agency with the
Department of Veterans Af-
fairs (VA), provides tailored
care for veterans and their
families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war.
It also provides caregiver
education and a recognition
program to honor veterans'


well-trained gentleman. He
is 6 years old and weighs
about 75 pounds. Sterling
is housebroken, is good
with people and walks
great on lead. Sterling will
do best as an only dog. He
is neutered and up to date
on medical. An approved
adoption application and
adoption fee are required
to adopt. To access an
adoption application or
view additional available
pets, visit the website at
www.roomforonemore.net.
For more information, call
Karron at 352-560-0051.


services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs
do not affect veterans' bene-
fits. Call the Citrus Team Of-
fice at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with
the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets. Free
classes to combat veterans
are offered by her at several
locations and times. Call her
at 352-382-7397.
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition provides food
to veterans in need. Food do-
nations and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north.
Hours of operation are 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inver-
ness. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and
widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members
are welcome.
The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation; dona-
tions are tax deductible.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537, or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.


In SERVICE


Robert Chandler
Robert Chandler, U.S. Navy,
has been promoted to the rank
of lieutenant commander on
Oct. 1,2012. He is currently
stationed at
Naval Station
S Naples, Italy,
with his wife,
Jennifer, and
their daugh-
ters, Madison
and Olivia.
IThe oldest
Robert daughter,
Chandler Alexis, is a
U.S. Navy freshman
studying at
the University of Oregon.
Chandler enlisted in the
Navy in 1992. His current job
title is electronics warfare offi-
cer (EWO) for Commander
Sixth Fleet in Europe, manag-
ing theater surface and air elec-
tronic capability assets.
He is a Citrus High School


graduate, the son of Rich and
Debbie Chandler and grandson
of Marie Privett.

Travis A. Goss
Air Force Reserve Airman
1st Class Travis A. Goss gradu-
ated from basic military training
at Lackland Air Force Base,
San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness
and basic warfare principles
and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Goss is the son of Yadira
Goss of Ocala and Todd Goss
of Inverness.
He is a 2011 graduate of
Dunnellon High School.


ANNOUNCEMENTS
Forms for engagements, weddings, anniversaries, first
birthdays and births are available from the Chronicle.
Announcements are published each Sunday on the
"Together" page. For forms, call Sarah Gatling,
community editor, at 563-5660, or make a request via
email to community@chronicleonline.com.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.

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TOGETHER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











SPORTS


Florida State will
play for the ACC title
after dispatching
Maryland./B3



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Auto racing/B2, B3
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Hurricanes finish third in Hermann Duals


Gulf wins Citrus

wrestling tourney

in Inverness
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
Inverness Citrus, the host of the


Rob Hermann Hurricane Cup
Duals, fought a good fight on
the mat Saturday as the Hur-
ricanes compiled a 3-2 record
to place third behind runner-
up Belleview (4-1) and the
champion Gulf of New Port
Richey (5-0).
The important aspect for
Citrus, even though it wasn't
crowned champion, is the
Hurricanes bonded into a
more cohesive squad.


For mor
photos,
on this s
www.chr
online.c


"We have three freshmen and two
sophomores .... we had two missing
weight classes," Citrus head coach


Jeff Wood said. "We built ourselves as
a team today ... it was the first time
they enjoyed being a team.
"We have four words that we want to
instill in this team," Wood continued.
"Family, intensity, valor and excellence.
We're trying to get these kids to step up
as a family ... and they wrestled well
overall."
The first match of the day didn't go
well for the 'Canes, as they fell to
Belleview 51-29. Benjamin
Boles (126-pound class),
Xavier Randolph (132-pound
class) and Josanty Vega of the
152-pound class won by way
of falls for the Rattlers. The
e positives for Citrus were
click Austin Renaud (170-pound
;tory at class), Brandon Taylor (182-
ronicle pound class), and Stephen
om. Mackey(195-pound class) and
Bradley Wiesenauer (220-
pound class) won by falls.
In the second match, Citrus handily
defeated Lake Weir 48-30 as Citrus
was victorious with four pins and


three technical falls. Josh Juergens-
meyer (182-pound class), Taylor and
Wiesenauer won by way of first-pe-
riod technical falls. Chris Mosher
(120-pound class), Jacob Nolen (145-
pound class), Perry Reneer (152-
pound class) and Renaud won by pins
over Lake Weir foes.
In the third and most competitive
match of the day for the 'Canes, Justin
Trinh (106-pound class) and Joseph
Epstine (126-pound class) won by falls
for Ridgeview. The match came down
to a deciding contest, and Juergens-
meyer won for Citrus 39-33 with a
first-period fall against the Panthers'
Devontae Gibson.
"It was really awesome to see


Page B4


Citrus' Chris Mosher pinned Lake
Weir's Khari Thornhill on Saturday
in the 120-pound division during the
Rob Hermann Tournament at Citrus
High School.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


Simply outmanned


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Lecanto sophomore Ardante "DeDe" Anderson scores in the fourth quarter against Cocoa Beach in The Gridiron Classic bowl game against
Cocoa Beach at Lecanto High School. The Panthers fell 41-17 to the visiting Minutemen to finish the 2012 season with a 5-6 record.

Panthers end season with 41-17 home setback to Cocoa Beach in bowl game


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO David Dessent
arrived as advertised and left
with a team record to add to his
single-season passing record.
The Cocoa Beach senior com-
pleted 15-of-23 passes for 198
yards and three touchdowns and
fellow Minuteman senior Manny
Shaw added two defensive
touchdowns to help their team
to a 41-17 bowl victory in the
Panther Gridiron Classic on Sat-
urday, establishing a new mark
for the program's most wins in a
season at nine.
Lecanto (5-6) still took away a
few bright spots. The offense
had its best performance in a


month with 290 total yards and,
thanks to sophomore running
back DeDe Anderson's late 85-
yard halfback scoring pass to
junior Ricky Marcic as well as
his five-yard rushing TD in the
fourth quarter, the Panthers
outscored Cocoa Beach (9-2)
14-13 in the second half.
"I was proud of our effort and
that we didn't quit," said Pan-
thers second-year coach McKin-
ley Rolle, who challenged his
See Page B4
Lecanto freshman quarterback
Travis McGee (12) was under
seige all day long against an ag-
gressive Cocoa Beach defense.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


-------------------------------------


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headline


runners


Cross country

competitors end

year at state
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
TALLAHASSEE The
pressure was off for the Citrus
County high school cross
country racers Saturday at the
FHSAA state meet at
Apalachee Region Park.
The Crystal River girls and
the Lecanto girls simply en-
joyed spending time at their
final meet
Getting there was the tri-
umph. No one was expected
to take a title, and the runners
could just enjoy being there.
Citrus girls runner Alyssa
Weber had the best finish. She
was 35th with a time of 19:38.
It was the second straight
state run for the sophomore.
"I felt good," Weber said. "It
was a good run. The cold was
the same for everyone."
"She left it all out there on
the course," said Citrus coach
James Martone. "We are all
proud of her"
Crystal River's Brandon
Harris, the county's lone male
representative, was 39th with
a time of 17:03.
"I beat the one I wanted to
beat," said Harris, referring to
Nature Coast's Cody Van Nat-
ters. "It was a good time."
The Lecanto girls were able
to enjoy being a part of Chloe
Benoist's seventh and final
run at the state meet.
Benoist was 71st with a time
of 20:21. The Lecanto girls fin-
ished 19th with 469 points.
The Panthers had not been
to the state meet in several
years and, this year, they were
able to cap the season with a
trip to state for Benoist's final
race. She competed three
years at state for Seven Rivers
See PRage B4


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Stenhouse Jr. wins 2nd straight Nationwide title


Associated Press

HOMESTEAD Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. left little
doubt he's ready for a
promotion.
Stenhouse became the
sixth driver to win consecu-
tive championships in
NASCAR's Nationwide Se-
ries. He finished sixth Sat-
urday in the season finale at
Homestead-Miami Speed-
way, edging Elliott Sadler
for the title.
"A lot of people put a lot of
effort into this and I'm just
the lucky guy who gets to


drive it," said Stenhouse,
who finished the season
with six wins.
About the only drama in
the race was whether Sten-
house would play it safe. He
did, but not without a few
close calls. His Roush Fen-
way Racing team even had
to remind him several times
during the final 10 laps to
avoid potential pitfalls.
Stenhouse eventually
obliged.
"We're a group of racers
and that's what racers do
- they race hard," Sten-
house said.


Regan Smith won the 300-
mile race, giving team
owner Dale Earnhardt Jr. a
victory
"These guys worked hard
all year long, and we're
going to do the same next
year and contend for a
championship," Smith said.
"That's our plan. Hopefully,
tonight was part of a state-
ment right there."
Kyle Busch was second,
followed by Brendan
Gaughan, Sam Hornish Jr.
and Austin Dillon. Danica
Patrick was 19th in her final
Nationwide race before


moving to the Sprint Cup
Series full time.
After recording eight Na-
tionwide victories last sea-
son, Busch went winless in
the second-tier series in
2012. He had 18 wins across
NASCAR's top three series
in 2011, but has one this year
Busch dominated the race
early, but couldn't get past
Smith in the closing laps.
Smith did some smoky
burnouts, then headed to
Victory Lane. But Sten-
house had dibs on the big-
ger celebration.
Stenhouse became the


first since Martin Truex Jr.
in 2005 to win back-to-back
titles in the developmental
series. Sam Ard (1983-84),
Larry Pearson (1986-87),
Randy LaJoie (1996-97) and
Dale Earnhardt Jr. (1998-
99) also accomplished the
feat.
For Stenhouse, it was the
perfect ending to his Na-
tionwide career. Stenhouse
is moving to Sprint Cup next
season, replacing Matt
Kenseth for team owner
Jack Roush.
Stenhouse started the fi-
nale fourth and had a 20-


point lead over Elliott. He
needed to finish 16th or
better to clinch another
trophy
The lead would have been
considerably tighter had
Sadler not wrecked last
week at Phoenix.
But Sadler triggered a
three-car accident that
brought the race to a halt
and essentially ruined his
championship hopes. It
was reminiscent of last
year, when Sadler also fin-
ished second to Stenhouse
after some late-season
setbacks.


Keep run going


Bucs look to sweep

struggling Panthers

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers and Carolina Panthers
are like two ships passing in the night
The Bucs have won four of their
last five games to improve to 5-4 and
put themselves in playoff contention
in the top-heavy NFC. The Panthers
(2-7) have lost five of six and the only
meaningful postseason question left
is whether coach Ron Rivera will be
back for a third season.
The Bucs look to stay hot Sunday
when they go for a series sweep of the
Panthers. Tampa Bay beat Carolina
in the season opener 16-10.


Tampa Bay
Bucs (5-4) at
Carolina
Panthers (2-7)

* Time: 1 p.m.
today.
* TV: FOX.


"I think
guys are get-
ting a little
more comfort-
able with
what we're
doing," said
Bucs first-
year coach
Greg Schiano
said of his
team's recent


success.
It appears that way
Since the bye week, the Bucs have
played like a completely different
team despite losing four starters to
injury and trading away a fifth in cor-
nerback Aqib Talib to the New Eng-
land Patriots.
Amid those distractions, the Bucs
have rediscovered their offense, av-
eraging 35.6 points per game over the
past five games. They have scored no
fewer than 28 points per game during
that span.
Quarterback Josh Freeman has
thrown 13 touchdown passes and only
one interception, while versatile run-
ning back Doug Martin has rushed for
615 yards and six touchdowns, includ-
ing 251 yards and four scores two weeks
ago against the Oakland Raiders.
He may only be a rookie, but Martin
has Carolina's respect-and attention.
"It's all about yards after contact,"
Panthers cornerback Captain Munner-
lyn said of Martin. "Guys are not bring-
ing him down. You have to gang tackle
him. If you try to bring him down by
yourself, it's not going to work."
Rivera called Martin a "dynamic"
football player.
"He's the running back a lot of peo-
ple envisioned he would be," Rivera
said. "He runs with a low center of
gravity and has great cutback ability.
You have to pay attention to him on
check downs. He will sneak out of the
backfield and they will run some
screens with him."
Martin has 15 receptions for 243
yards and a touchdown in the past
five weeks to go along with his gaudy
rushing numbers.
As is so often the case in the NFL,


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers rookie running back Doug Martin is third in the NFC
with 862 rushing yards and tied for the conference lead with 8 touchdowns.


when the running game is clicking the
passing game follows, and that's what
has happened in Tampa. Nobody in
the NFC has been as hot as Freeman.
He's throwing the ball like a marks-
man and his confidence is soaring.
Conversely, the Panthers haven't
been able to consistently establish a
running game which Rivera said has
been the team's biggest bugaboo this
season.
The struggles started in the opener
against the Bucs, when they were
held to 10 yards rushing in a 16-10
loss to Schiano's energy-infused de-
fense. Things were so bad that day
that receiver Kealoha Pilares fin-
ished as Carolina's leading rusher.
No one saw that one coming.
Last season, the Panthers de-
stroyed the Bucs on the ground, rush-
ing for a ridiculous 433 yards and
seven TDs in two games against them
while outscoring their division foes
86-35. Cam Newton, in particular, was
unstoppable scoring a total of eight
touchdowns four rushing and four
passing in the series sweep.
The Bucs turned the tables in the
season opener, holding Carolina to
301 total yards. Newton was a non-
factor after Schiano and his staff
spent months preparing for Car-
olina's zone read option, which was


Newton's bread and butter in his stel-
lar rookie season. He had 4 yards
rushing on five carries.
"Coming from college we had seen a
lot of zone read and that's the wave and
crave of college football right now,"
Schiano said. "We had some things that
we thought might be effective."
Running back Jonathan Stewart
believes the Panthers have to get
back to what they do best running
the ball.
"That means holding the blocks a
little longer and finding the holes,"
Stewart said.
But perhaps that's a strategy best
suited for another day The Bucs are,
after all, first in the league against the
run and last against the pass.
The problem the Panthers have is
they aren't exactly lighting it up in the
passing game.
In a 36-14 loss to Denver last week,
Newton was harassed all game by Von
Miller and sacked seven times. Things
were so bad the Panthers went out
and signed free agent guard Jeremy
Bridges to start against the Bucs.
"The toughest thing for a quarterback
is if he's getting hit, why is he getting
hit?" Rivera said. "Do you lose confi-
dence in (whether you) are being pro-
tected or not? Do you lose confidence
in your decision-making ability?"


NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Buffalo
Miami
N.Y. Jets

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland

Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
NATION

N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


East
W L T
6 3 0
4 6 0
4 6 0
3 6 0
South
W L T
8 1 0
6 3 0
4 6 0
1 8 0
North
W L T
7 2 0
6 3 0
4 5 0
2 7 0
West
W L T
6 3 0
4 5 0
3 6 0
1 8 0


Pot PF
.667 299
.333 230
.444 187
.333 175

Pot PF
.889 250
.667 186
.400 219
.111 127

Pot PF
.778 254
.667 207
.444 220
.222 169

Pct PF
.667 271
.444 209
.333 191
.111 146


NAL CONFERENCE


East
W L T
6 4 0
4 5 0
3 6 0
3 6 0
South
W L T
8 1 0
5 4 0
4 5 0
2 7 0
North
W L T
7 2 0
6 3 0
6 4 0
4 5 0
West
W L T
6 2 1
6 4 0
4 5 0
3 5 1


Pot PF
.600 267
.444 188
.333 156
.333 226

Pot PF
.889 247
.556 260
.444 249
.222 163

Pot PF
.778 242
.667 239
.600 238
.444 216

Pot PF
.722 213
.600 198
.444 144
.389 161


Thursday's Game
Indianapolis 27, Jacksonville 10
Sunday's Games
New Orleans 31, Atlanta 27
Minnesota 34, Detroit 24
Denver 36, Carolina 14
Tampa Bay 34, San Diego 24
Tennessee 37, Miami 3
New England 37, Buffalo 31
Baltimore 55, Oakland 20
Cincinnati 31, N.Y Giants 13
Seattle 28, N.Y Jets 7
St. Louis 24, San Francisco 24, OT
Dallas 38, Philadelphia 23
Houston 13, Chicago 6
Open: Arizona, Cleveland, Green Bay, Washington
Monday's Game
Pittsburgh 16, Kansas City 13, OT
Today, Nov. 15
Buffalo 19, Miami 14
Today, Nov.18
Cleveland at Dallas, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, N.Y Giants, Seattle, Tennessee
Monday, Nov.19
Chicago at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Manning, DEN 330 230 2705 21 6
Brady, NWE 358 232 2645 18 3
Roethlis., PIT 316 209 2287 17 4
Schaub, HOU 275 173 2013 13 6
Dalton, CIN 315 203 2329 18 11
P Rivers, SND 300 204 2203 15 12
Flacco, BAL 309 186 2331 13 7
Fitzpatrick, BUF 296 185 2011 17 10
C. Palmer, OAK 375 230 2723 15 9


Hassel., TEN

A. Foster, HOU
Johnson, TEN
Ridley, NWE
J. Charles, KAN
McGahee, DEN
R. Rice, BAL
Spiller, BUF
Richardson, CLE
Greene, NYJ
Re. Bush, MIA

Wayne, IND
Welker, NWE
Green, CIN
Thomas, DEN
Hartline, MIA
Bowe, KAN
Decker, DEN


221 138
Rushers
Att Yds
221 872
170 862
172 814
155 734
160 676
144 657
87 632
152 575
154 567
126 555
Receivers
No Yds
69 931
66 810
58 820
54 891
49 741
49 626
48 598


Gronkowski, NWE 46 611 13.3 41 8
Johnson, HOU 46 597 13.0 60t 2
B. Myers, OAK 44 499 11.3 29 2
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
A. Foster, HOU 12 10 2 0 72
A..Green, CIN 9 0 9 0 54
Gronkowski, NWE 8 0 8 0 48
Decker, DEN 7 0 7 0 42
R. Rice, BAL 7 7 0 0 42
To. Smith, BAL 7 0 7 0 42
H. Miller, PIT 6 0 6 0 38
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NWE 33-33 20-23 53 93
Janikowski, OAK 16-16 21-22 52 79
Suisham, PIT 19-19 20-21 52 79
Tucker, BAL 27-27 17-18 56 78
S. Graham, HOU 29-29 15-17 51 74
Bironas, TEN 23-23 16-19 53 71
Nugent, CIN 25-25 15-17 49 70
Vinatieri, IND 16-16 18-24 53 70
NFC leaders


Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Comrn
Rodgers, GBY 327 219
Ale. Smith, SNF 217 152
M. Ryan, ATL 351 240
Freeman, TAM 273 155
Brees, NOR 374 230
Griffin Ill, WAS 262 172
R.Wilson, SEA 253 157
Kolb, ARI 183 109
Stafford, DET 388 248
Bradford, STL 288 179
Rushers
Att Yds
Peterson, MIN 195 1128
M. Lynch, SEA 212 1005
D. Martin, TAM 173 862
Morris, WAS 164 793
Gore, SNF 140 753
McCoy, PHL 162 705
Bradshaw, NYG 151 675
Forte, CHI 123 578
Griffin Ill, WAS 81 529
M.Turner, ATL 140 529
Receivers
No Yds
B. Marshall, CHI 67 904


Witten, DAL
Harvin, MIN
Gonzalez, ATL
Johnson, DET
Cruz, NYG
R. White, ATL
Fitzgerald, ARI
Colston, NOR
D. Bryant, DAL
Tc
Ja. Jones, GBY
D. Martin, TAM
And. Brown, NYG
A. Peterson, MIN
Cobb, GBY
Colston, NOR
Cruz, NYG
J. Graham, NOR
B. Marshall, CHI

Tynes, NYG
M. Bryant, ATL
Walsh, MIN
Gould, CHI
Hanson, DET
Barth, TAM
Akers, SNF


Yds TD
2383 25
1731 13
2771 20
2257 18
2847 25
1993 8
1827 15
1169 8
2722 11
2072 10

Avg LG
5.78 74
4.74 77t
4.98 70t
4.84 39t
5.38 37
4.35 34
4.47 37
4.70 46
6.53 76t
3.78 43
Avg LG
13.5 45


66 585 8.9 35 1
62 677 10.9 45 3
61 617 10.1 25 6
60 974 16.2 51 2
60 743 12.4 80t 7
54 823 15.2 59 4
51 585 11.5 37t 4
47 652 13.9 40 7
45 590 13.1 55 3
Scoring
touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
8 0 8 0 48
8 7 1 0 48
7 7 0 0 44
7 7 0 0 44
7 0 6 1 42
7 0 7 0 42
7 0 7 0 42
7 0 7 0 42
7 0 7 0 42
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
25-25 28-31 50 109
25-25 22-25 55 91
21-21 23-24 55 90
26-26 18-21 54 80
22-22 18-20 53 76
29-29 15-19 57 74
24-24 15-21 63 69


Recreation BRIEFS


Volleyball club hold
Dec. tryout at CRHS
Attention interested volleyball
players, the Reflect Sports Vol-
leyball Club will have an open
tryout for any interested players
from any county schools be-
tween the ages of 11 to 17.
The tryout will be Sunday,
Dec. 9 from 2 to 6 p.m. at
Crystal River High School.
Any interested players/
parents need to contact Mike
Ridley for a packet of informa-
tion concerning the packet and
the club.
New coaches Deana New-
man and Brooke Hinkle will
lead the teams.
Any questions may be di-
rected to club director Mike
Ridley at 352-566-7789 or
via email at ridleym@
citrus.k12.fl.us.

Tourney benefits
Wounded Warriors
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will have its inaugural Vet-
erans Tournament fundraiser
for Wounded Warriors Project


on Dec. 8. Men, women and
youths are welcome. All pro-
ceeds will go to the Wounded
Warriors Project. Sponsors will
be accepted and recognized.
There will be two divisions,
NHPA-sanctioned players and
unsanctioned players.
Entry fee will be $15. All play-
ers will receive a free ham-
burger or hot dog and a cold
drink after they have pitched. All
entries must be in before Tues-
day, Dec. 4, by 5 p.m. Entries
can be made by phone or
email; payment must be in by
Dec. 4, as time is needed to
form classes for sanctioned
players and a schedule for non-
sanctioned players.
The public is welcome to ob-
serve. Refreshments will be
served at a discounted price for
non-pitchers. For entry informa-
tion, call Ron Fair at
352-746-3924, or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
Beach volleyball
back in March
Beach volleyball is going
great! The league is competi-
tive although fun at the same


time. Teams bring out their fam-
ilies and game faces every
Tuesday night.
The league will start up again
around March, and we hope for
even more than 10 teams in the
upcoming season. It's $40 a
team to play. For more informa-
tion, call Citrus County Parks &
Rec's recreation program spe-
cialist Jess Sandino at
352-527-7547.
Elks planning Hoop
Shoot for 2012-13
West Citrus Elks Lodge will
stage its 2012-13 Hoop Shoot
Free Throw Contest for county
middle and primary schoolchild-
ren at 9 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 1,
at Lecanto Middle School, 3800
W. Educational Path.
Principal William Farrell and
staff will host the winners from
Lecanto Elementary, Ho-
mosassa Elementary, Rock
Crusher Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Lecanto Middle,
Crystal River Middle and oth-
ers. The lodge champions will
advance to the district contest.
The district finalists will ad-
vance to the state finals.


The state champions will
compete at a regional contest to
determine the contestants to
compete at the national finals.
The lodge uses this exposure to
help attain funds for student
scholarships and other projects
in the county to help the less
fortunate.
Competitors will be in two di-
visions, one for boys and one for
girls, with age categories of 8 to
9, 10to 11 and 12to 13;age
determined as of April 1,2013.
For more information, call
Hoop Shoots Director Gene
Murray at 352-382-2709 or Jim
Brumback at 352-503-7904.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County
Parks & Recreation and Tennis
Pro Mehdi Tahiri for youth
tennis lessons.
Instruction will include condi-
tioning, drills, footwork, match
play, doubles and single strat-
egy. The five-week sessions will
be at the Lecanto Community
Park Tennis Courts on Sun-
days. Each session will run
from 3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is


open to boys and girls ages 8
to 14 and costs $60 per child.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540, or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Afterschool
programs at YMCA
The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
are offered at Central Ridge
Elementary, Citrus Springs El-
ementary, Crystal River Pri-
mary, Floral City Elementary,
Forest Ridge Elementary, Ho-
mosassa Elementary, Inver-
ness Primary, Lecanto
Primary, Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary and Rock Crusher
Elementary.
Ages for the Y Afterschool
Program range from kinder-
garten through fifth grade. After-
school programs are a great
way to end the school day, and
the first fall session will offer
kids the opportunity to partici-
pate in flag football, cheerlead-
ing and art.
For more information, call the
Citrus Y at 352-637-0132.


Citrus Hills women
plan golf scramble
The Citrus Hills Women's
Club will host a nine-hole Fab-
ulous '50s Golf Scramble on
Nov. 30 at the Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club's Meadows
course. Cost is $37.50 and in-
cludes cart rentals and lunch in
the Country Club's Garden
Room, all with a Fabulous '50's
theme. The day begins at 8:30
a.m. with a continental break-
fast of home-baked treats, and
sales of putts and Mulligans.
Games during play will add to
the fun, and lots of prizes will
be awarded at the luncheon.
Proceeds will go the CHWC's
Scholarship Program, which
awards scholarships to deserving
Citrus and Lecanto high schools'
seniors, and help local charities
the CHWC sponsors.
This event is open to all
women golfers and every year
is a sell-out. A scramble is a
wonderful golf game for begin-
ners, too. Pick your cart mate
or let us do it for you. Call Carol
at 352-746-0697 or Maryellen
at 352-527-3843 for more infor-
mation and to sign up.


NFL STATISTICS


B2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Terps women upset


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Chatilla van
Grinsven scored 18 points and Saint
Joseph's stunned No. 5 Maryland 50-
49 on Saturday.
The Hawks (2-1) defeated a ranked
team for the first time since a victory
over No. 15 Auburn on Dec. 29, 2007.
Saint Joseph's had dropped 10
straight games to the Terrapins be-
fore this one but held Maryland
scoreless over the final seven min-
utes.
Alyssa Thomas had 16 points and 15
rebounds while Laurin Mincy added
14 points for the Terrapins (2-1), who
opened the season with a 39-point vic-
tory over Mount St. Mary's and a 43-
point win over Loyola.
But Maryland, a regional finalist in
last season's NCAA tournament,
couldn't shake the Hawks, even after
building a 47-38 lead with 9:10 re-
maining.
WOMEN

No. 3 Duke 84,
Presbyterian 45
DURHAM, N.C. Tricia Liston and
Haley Peters each scored 21 points, lead-
ing Duke to a rout of Presbyterian.
Liston had nine rebounds and four as-
sists and was 4-for-6 from 3-point range.
Chelsea Gray added 12 points for the
Blue Devils (1-0), who have appeared in
the Elite Eight in each of the past three
seasons.
Junior guard Karlee Taylor led Presby-
terian (1-2) with a season-high 14 points.
Duke center Elizabeth Williams, who has
been hampered with a stress fracture in
her right leg since the Blue Devils' NCAA
tournament games in March, sat out the
first 10 minutes but finished with eight
points and five rebounds in 11 minutes.
Freshman guard Alexis Jones started
for Duke, scoring eight points with six as-
sists.
No. 6 Kentucky 80,
High Point 45
LEXINGTON, Ky. -A'dia Mathies
scored all of her 17 points in the first half
to help Kentucky rout High Point.
The Wildcats (2-1) recovered after a 85-
51 loss Tuesday at No. 1 Baylor.
Cheyenne Parker finished with 13
points and 16 rebounds for the Panthers
(1-2).
High Point stuck around for the first
eight minutes. Tayler Tremblay made a
jumper to bring High Point within 14-10.
The Wildcats rolled off 12 straight points
over a 4-minute span.
A 10-0 Kentucky run to close the half
gave it a 23-point lead at the break.
The Wildcats scored 39 points off 32
turnovers by High Point.
No. 14 West Virginia 75,
SC-Upstate 45
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Bria
Holmes scored 14 points off the bench to
lead a balanced offensive as West Virginia
defeated South Carolina Upstate.
Jennie Simms also had 11 off the bench
for West Virginia, while starter Averee
Fields pitched in 10.
Tyra Smith scored 10 points in the los-
ing effort for SC Upstate.
No. 20 Ohio State 78,
Winthrop 53
COLUMBUS, Ohio Darryce Moore
and Tayler Hill scored 16 points apiece as
Ohio State cruised past Winthrop.


Associated Press
Saint Joseph's Ashley Prim steals the ball away from Maryland's Malina Howard
during the second half Saturday in Philadelphia. Saint Joseph's won 50-49.


Ashley Adams added 14 points, six
blocked shots and four assists for the
Buckeyes (2-1), who have won 23 con-
secutive home games, the longest active
streak in the Big Ten.
Ohio State jumped out to a 14-2 lead in
the first meeting between the two pro-
grams.
Ahead 31-20 with 3:43 left until the
break, the Buckeyes closed out the half
on a 12-0 run.
Ohio State, which has now hit at least
one 3-pointer in 122 straight games, was
7 of 14 from long range compared to 4 of
16 for the Eagles (1-1).
No. 20 St. John's 73,
Hofstra 47
NEW YORK Nadirah McKenith
scored 24 points while Shenneika Smith
added 18 points and 15 rebounds to help
No. 20 St. John's beat Hofstra 73-47 on
Saturday.
Smith also had five assists for the Red
Storm (2-1).
St. John's held a seven-point lead with
7 minutes left in the first half before McK-
enith took over to break the game open.
She had 12 of the Red Storm's final 17
points before the half. The senior point
guard got her run started by hitting a 3-
pointer and capped it off with a three-point
play with 30 seconds left.
St. John's led 43-31 at the break. The
Red Storm dashed any hope of a Hofstra
comeback by scoring 10 of the first 14
points in the second half.
MEN
No. 4 Ohio State 69,
Rhode Island 58
UNCASVILLE, Conn. Deshaun
Thomas scored 25 points and grabbed 10


rebounds and No. 4 Ohio State beat
Rhode Island 69-58 in the Hall of Fame
Tip-Off tournament in Connecticut.
Lenzelle Smith Jr. added 15 points,
Aaron Craft had 13 points and four assists
for the Buckeyes (2-0) who struggled with
the Rams (0-3) well into the second half.
Xavier Munford had 16 points to lead
Rhode Island, which trailed by just four at
halftime.
No. 20 Notre Dame 78,
BYU 68
NEW YORK Jack Cooley had 19
points and 13 rebounds to lead No. 20
Notre Dame to a 78-68 victory over BYU
in the third-place game of the Coaches vs.
Cancer Classic.
Jerian Grant had 19 points 17 in the
second half and Eric Atkins added 16,
including the 3-pointer that gave the Fight-
ing Irish a cushion after the Cougars had
pulled within 63-61 with 4:28 to play.
Atkins hit the 3 28 seconds later and
that was the fifth of six attempts from be-
yond the arc in the second half after the
Irish had gone 1 of 7 from there in the first
half.
South Florida 68,
Loyola of Chicago 50
TAMPA- Kore White scored 15 points,
Anthony Collins added 11, and South
Florida beat Loyola of Chicago 68-50.
Victor Rudd had 10 points for the Bulls
(2-1), who beat Maryland-Eastern Shore
78-59 on Friday night.
"We played well," South Florida coach
Stan Heath said. "We're steadily getting
better and better. I know we've got a ways
to go, but the energy and the intensity on
the defensive end was very strong."
Loyola (2-2) got nine points each from
Devon Turk and Ben Averkamp.


Rondo dishes out


20 assists in win


Associated Press

BOSTON Jason Terry
scored 20 points and Rajon
Rondo tied his season high
with 20 assists as Boston beat
Toronto 107-89 on Saturday.
Paul Pierce added 19
points and six rebounds and
Kevin Garnett scored 15 for
Boston, which took a 17-
point lead in first quarter,
then held off several runs by
the Raptors before pulling
away midway through the
second half.
Rookie Jared Sullinger
had his first career double-
double with 12 points and 11
rebounds.
Andrea Bargnani and
John Lucas led Toronto with
15 points apiece. DeMar
DeRozan, Jose Calderon,
Terrence Ross and Linas
Kleiza scored 10 each for
Toronto, which has strug-
gled to a 2-7 start.
Jazz 83, Wizards 76
WASHINGTON -Al Jeffer-
son scored 21 points, Gordon
Haywood added 15 in his first
game as a reserve this season,
and the Utah Jazz kept the
Washington Wizards winless
with an 83-76 victory.
The Jazz committed 19
turnovers but pulled away in the
fourth quarter while closing a
four-game road trip with a
sloppy performance and got
away with it because they were
playing the Wizards. Washing-
ton became only the second
team in NBA history to start 0-8
in back-to-back seasons.
Jordan Crawford scored 20
points for the Wizards.


Mavs 103, Cavs 95
CLEVELAND O.J. Mayo
scored 19 points and the Dallas
Mavericks used a pair of 9-0
runs in the fourth quarter to de-
feat the Cleveland Cavaliers
103-95.
Chris Kaman scored 15
points while Vince Carter and
Darren Collison added 14
apiece for Dallas, which won on
the road for the second time in
six games.
Kyrie Irving, who left the game
briefly in the third quarter with a
finger injury, led Cleveland with
26 points, but the Cavaliers lost
their fifth straight game.
Grizzlies 94,
Bobcats 87
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Mike
Conley scored 20 points and
the Memphis Grizzlies beat the
Charlotte Bobcats 94-87 for
their eighth consecutive victory.
Zach Randolph added 18
points and 12 rebounds, and
three other players scored in
double figures for the Grizzlies,
who own the NBA's best record
at 8-1. Rudy Gay had 16 points
and Marc Gasol and Tony Allen
scored 12 apiece.
Memphis led by as many as
17 points in the fourth quarter.
Byron Mullens scored 18
points and Kemba Walker
added 17 for the Bobcats, who
cut the Grizzlies' lead to five
points three times in the final
period, the last at 92-87 on Bis-
mack Biyombo's dunk with 13
seconds remaining.
Charlotte had won three
straight.


Associated Press
Boston Celtics point guard Rajon Rondo (9) drives past
Toronto Raptors guard Jose Calderon in the first quarter
Saturday in Boston.


Keselowski will start finale from front of field


Associated Press
HOMESTEAD Brad
Keselowski got some help
on the last day of practice
for NASCAR's Sprint Cup
season finale at Homestead-
Miami Speedway
Pole sitter Joey Logano
was involved in a three-car
accident during the first of
two practice sessions Satur-
day, switched to a backup
car and will start from the
rear of the field Sunday
That will move Ke-
selowski, who had qualified
third, to the front when the
green flag drops Sunday
Marcos Ambrose will start
on the outside.
And if Keselowski leads
the first lap, he will extend
his points lead from 20 to 21
in the 400-mile race. He
needs to finish 15th or bet-
ter to clinch the title, which
would be the first for long-
time NASCAR team owner
Roger Penske.
"I certainly wasn't ex-
pecting to be on the front
row," Keselowski said. "It's
different from what we're
used to, but it's different in
a good way ... If I can take
the lead without wrecking
myself, then that's what I'm
going to do."
Keselowski seemed a lit-
tle tighter than usual Satur-
day, quite possibly starting to
feel the pressure as he goes
for his first championship.
Fellow title contender
Jimmie Johnson, who will


start 10th in the finale, has
done all he can to make Ke-
selowski feel uncomfortable.
"Ready to race for sure,"
Johnson said. "Very pleased
with how our car finished
up. It's really nothing for me
to lose sleep about tonight.
It's an easy night for me. ...
Easy from my standpoint
because I've got nothing to
lose. We'll see what they do
on the other side."
Johnson also thoughts
about how he would like see
the first lap unfold.
"I hope (Keselowski)
tries really, really, really
hard to lead that first lap,"
Johnson said. "I know Am-
brose next to him is going
to try hard, too. That could
be good for me."
Keselowski knows John-
son is messing with him and
is a little envious of his
position.
"I don't ignore it, but if we
could change places, I bet
he would in a heartbeat,"
Keselowski said.
Keselowski was faster
than Johnson in practice
Saturday. Keselowski
turned the faster lap and
edged Johnson with a better
10-lap average.
"I think we're a top-five
car right now," Johnson said.
"Winning? We'll work on that
tonight and put some final
touches on it. But I knew
coming into this weekend I
was going to have a big hill to
climb with the (No. 2) car
and the points lead that they


have. They've done their
part; they've been very com-
petitive all weekend long.
"We'll just have to see
how that race goes tomor-
row."
At least one competitor
believes Keselowski's No. 2
Dodge has a decided advan-


tage over Johnson's No. 48
Chevrolet.
"Those guys are executing
really well, and from what
I've seen so far this week-
end, I just don't think the 48
has the speed to run with
those guys anyway," Joe
Gibbs Racing driver Denny


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Hamlin said. "So I think that
they're going to have to rely
on something catastrophic
happening to the 2."
The championship con-
tenders avoided both
wrecks in practice.
Hamlin and Greg Biffle
were running side by side,


with Logano right behind
them on the outside, when
they made connect and
started spinning. Logano got
caught up in the mess.
"I was the innocent by-
stander once again and
drove into it," Logano said.
"It's unfortunate."


I I








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SPORTS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 B3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cocoa Beach 41,
Lecanto 17
CB 13 15 13 0 41
LH 0 3 0 14 17
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CB A. Griffin 27-yard pass from Dessent (C.
Myron kick)
CB- Shaw85-yard interception return (kick fail)
Second Quarter
LH Leiva 30-yard field goal
CB J. Eveillard 2-yard run (A. Griffin 2-point
pass from Dessent)
CB- B. Lewis 7-yard pass from Dessent (Myron
kick)
Third Quarter
CB M. Riley 35-yard pass from Dessent
(Myron kick)
CB- Shaw 20-yard fumble return (kick fail)
Fourth Quarter
LH Anderson 5-yard run (run fail)
LH Marcic 85-yard pass from Anderson (Wa-
ters 2-point run)
Individual Leaders
Passing CB: Dessent 15-23-198-3-1; LH:
McGee 7-16-70-0-3; Anderson 1 -2-85-1 -0.
Rushing- CB: Eveillard 14-77-1; LH: McGee 3-
47-0; Waters 11-44-0; Anderson 6-33-1.
Receiving CB: Riley 4-81-1; LH: Marcic 3-105-1.
Citrus 58,
University 21
CH 21 16 7 14 58
UH 0 14 0 7 21
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CH D. Chapes 1-yard run (A. Killeen kick)
CH -S. Smith 10-yard run (Killeen kick)
CH J. Pouncey 80-yard punt return (Killeen
kick)
Second Quarter
CH Chapes 7-yard run (Killeen kick)
UH J. Diaz 85-yard KO return (C. Godoy kick)
CH -- A. Killeen 34-yard field goal
CH S. Smith 15-yard run (PAT fail)
UH Diaz 40-yard pass from R. Cianciotto
(Godoy kick)
Third Quarter
CH A. White 11-yard run (Killeen kick)
Fourth Quarter
CH Chapes 45-yard run (Killeen kick)
UH C. Negron 9-yard pass from Diaz (Godoy
kick)
CH Pouncey 77-yard run (Killeen kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing CH: C. Bogart 2-4-8-0-0; UH:
Cianciotto 4-9-68-1-1.
Rushing CH:Chapes 31-167-3; Pouncey 4-
122-1; White 10-82-1; Smith 3-40-2; UH: Diaz
10-80-0; M. Foster 9-44-0.
Receiving CH:D. Wyatt 1-8-0; Chapes 1-0-0;
UH: Diaz 3-60-1; Negron 2-17-1.
Interceptions-CH: A. Bogart 45-yard return.





No. 10 FSU 41,
Maryland 14
Florida St. 14 13 7 7- 41
Maryland 0 0 7 7 14
First Quarter
FSU-Freeman 5 run (Hopkins kick), 9:16.
FSU-O'Leary 10 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 9:04.
Second Quarter
FSU-FG Hopkins 26, 14:51.
FSU-FG Hopkins 40, 11:05.
FSU-Greene 30 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 1:32.
Third Quarter
Md-Dorsey 33 pass from Petty (Craddock
kick), 10:27.
FSU-Freeman 2 run (Hopkins kick), 3:12.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-Wilder 22 run (Hopkins kick), 5:27.
Md-Dorsey 42 pass from Petty (Craddock
kick), :25.
A-35,244.
FSU Md
First downs 21 10
Rushes-yards 41-237 34-34
Passing 160 136
Comp-Att-Int 19-26-1 8-19-0
Return Yards 16 20
Punts-Avg. 3-35.3 7-43.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 3-2
Penalties-Yards 7-55 3-34
Time of Possession 34:31 25:29
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida St., Freeman 16-148,
Wilder 8-52, Smiley 4-17, Pryor 4-13, Abram 3-
12, Team 1-(minus 2), Manuel 5-(minus 3).
Maryland, B.Ross 11 -30, Diggs 5-29, Reid 2-6,
Pickett 2-1, Petty 14-(minus 32).
PASSING-Florida St., Manuel 17-23-1-144,
Trickett 2-3-0-16. Maryland, Petty 8-19-0-136.
RECEIVING-Florida St., Greene 4-50,
O'Leary 3-46, Benjamin 3-7, Pryor 2-26,
Haulstead 2-16, Shaw 2-11, Freeman 2-(minus
2), R.Smith 1-6. Maryland, Diggs 3-45, Dorsey
2-75, Pickett 1-6, King 1-5, B.Ross 1-5.

No. 7 Florida 23,
Jacksonville St. 0
Jacksonville St. 0 0 0 0 0
Florida 10 0 7 6- 23
First Quarter
Fla-Gillislee 7 run (Sturgis kick), 6:02.
Fla-FG Sturgis 21, 2:22.
Third Quarter
Fla-Bostic 7 interception return (Sturgis kick),


10:38.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 44, 14:06.
Fla-FG Sturgis 47, 11:41.
A-82,691.
JvSt
First downs 12
Rushes-yards 29-48
Passing 194
Comp-Att-Int 16-28-1
Return Yards 0
Punts-Avg. 8-39.8
Fumbles-Lost 0-0
Penalties-Yards 5-36
Time of Possession 29:24


Fla
18
36-202
154
14-22-0
38
4-42.3
0-0
5-35
30:36


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Jacksonville St., James 13-30,
TPope 3-13, Ealey 6-9, Brown 2-2, Bonner 1-1,
Coates 1 -(minus 2), Ivory 1-(minus 2),
Blanchard 2-(minus 3). Florida, Gillislee 20-122,
Jones 8-65, TBurton 3-14, Hines 1-5, Brissett
2-(minus 2), Team 2-(minus 2).
PASSI NG-Jacksonville St., Ivory 14-25-1-169,
Coates 1-2-0-5, Bonner 1-1-0-20. Florida, Bris-
sett 14-22-0-154.
RECEIVING-Jacksonville St., TSmith 5-48,
Cooper 3-93, Bonner 3-23, Ealey 2-13, Brown
2-12, Ellis 1-5. Florida, Hines 3-37, Dunbar 3-
29, T.Burton 3-26, Reed 2-42, Hammond 1-11,
Gillislee 1-8, Jones 1-1.
Miami 40, USF 9
USF 0 3 0 6 9
Miami 3 13 14 10 40
First Quarter
Mia-FG Wieclaw 39, 11:11.
Second Quarter
Mia-FG Wieclaw 22, 14:22.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 37, 9:43.
Mia-Thompkins 15 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 9:24.
USF-FG Bonani 23, :00.
Third Quarter
Mia-Du.Johnson 8 run (pass failed), 11:06.
Mia-Waters 87 pass from Morris (Dorsett pass
from Morris), 7:31.
Fourth Quarter
Mia-Walford 65 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 14:09.


For the :remor d


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On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Ford EcoBoost 400 race
1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Ford EcoBoost 400 race
(Same-day Tape)
NBA
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Toronto Raptors
9 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Bulls at Portland Trail Blazers
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (SUN) Florida vs. Middle Tennessee State in Tampa
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Hall of Fame Tip-Off Classic: Teams TBA
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Puerto Rico Tip-Off, Final: Teams TBA
8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Charleston Classic, Final: Teams TBA
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Connecticut at Texas A&M
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Jacksonville State at Florida (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Maryland (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Jacksonville Jaguars at Houston Texans
1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Carolina Panthers
4 p.m. (CBS) Indianapolis Colts at New England Patriots
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: South African Open -
Final Round (Taped)
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: CME Group Titleholders -
Final Round
FIGURE SKATING
2 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix: Trophee Eric Bompard
Cachemire (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Deportivo Toluca
FC vs. Chivas
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Eastern Conference Final, Leg 2 -
Houston Dynamo at D.C. United
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Western Conference, Final Leg 2 -
Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle Sounders FC
11:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Indoor Futsal World Cup final
(Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
1:30 p.m. (SUN) South Carolina at Florida

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


USF-FG Bonani 25, 10:02.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 33, 6:46.
USF-FG Bonani 32, 2:01.


A-38,869.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


USF
22
29-154
204
23-43-2
(-3)
5-34.4
1-1
7-59
29:27


Mia
22
31-92
456
24-36-0
7
3-40.3
2-1
9-86
30:33


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Florida, Murray 16-108,
Shaw 10-39, Battles 1-3, B.Eveld 1-2, Floyd 1-
2. Miami, Du.Johnson 13-66, James 8-25,
Dorsett 3-13, D.Crawford 3-10, Hughes 1-1,
Morris 3-(minus 23).
PASSING-South Florida, Floyd 20-35-2-175,
B.Eveld 3-8-0-29. Miami, Morris 21-32-0-413,
RyWilliams 3-4-0-43.
RECEIVING-South Florida, Murray 6-25,
Mitchell 5-46, Price 4-30, Marc 3-57, Shaw 2-6,
Hawkins 1-32, A.Davis 1-4, D.Montgomery 1-4.
Miami, Dorsett 11-104, Waters 4-130, Walford 3-
135, Thompkins 3-80, Du.Johnson 2-5, Kidd 1-2.
Tulsa 23, UCF 21
UCF 0 14 0 7-- 21
Tulsa 10 013 0- 23
First Quarter
TIsa-FG Schwarz 41, 6:53.
TIsa-Garrett 70 pass from Green (Schwarz
kick), 3:51.
Second Quarter
UCF-Perriman 21 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 10:26.
UCF-Bouye 76 interception return (Moffitt
kick), 3:14.
Third Quarter
TIsa-Garrett 20 pass from Green (kick
blocked), 9:47.
TIsa-Garrett 13 pass from Green (Schwarz
kick), 5:11.
Fourth Quarter
UCF-Murray 2 run (Moffitt kick), 9:01.
A-19,725.
UCF TIsa
First downs 14 26
Rushes-yards 34-66 53-209
Passing 169 252
Comp-Att-Int 13-31-0 21-34-1
Return Yards 95 0
Punts-Avg. 9-37.3 6-37.2
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1
Penalties-Yards 3-15 0-0
Time of Possession 28:52 31:08
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UCF, Murray 22-60, Godfrey 1-8,
McDuffie 1-5, Hall 1-3, Team 1-(minus 2), Bor-
ties 8-(minus 8).Tulsa, Watts 20-122, Singleton
18-64, Green 6-15, Douglas 7-9, Carter 1-1,
Team 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-UCF, Bortles 13-31-0-169. Tulsa,
Green 21-34-1-252.
RECEIVING-UCF, Hall 3-27, McDuffie 2-49, Per-
riman 2-33, Godfrey 2-31, Worton 2-12, Reese 1 -
10, Murray 1-7. Tulsa, Garrett 7-130, TRoberson
4-41, Watts 4-38, James 3-32, Carter 3-11.



Sprint Cup

Ford EcoBoost
400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Homestead-Miami Speedway


Homestead, Fla.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
Note: Joey Logano wrecked in practice Satur-
day, sending him to the back of the start since
he will be using a new car.
1. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 175.342.
2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 175.092.
3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 175.001.
4. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 174.887.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 174.752.
6. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 174.644.
7. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 174.565.
8. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 174.452.
9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 174.081.
10. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 173.98.
11. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 173.969.
12. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 173.93.
13. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 173.807.
14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 173.74.
15. (88) Dale EarnhardtJr., Chevy, 173.472.
16. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 173.11.
17. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 173.077.
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 172.988.
19. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 172.662.
20. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 172.64.
21. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 172.563.
22. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 172.546.
23. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 172.507.
24. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 172.474.
25. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 172.265.
26. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 172.106.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 172.057.
28. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 171.881.
29. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 171.756.
30. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 171.745.
31. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 171.679.
32. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 171.63.
33. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 171.581.
34. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 171.483.
35. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 171.445.
36. (10) David Reutimann, Chevy, 171.222.
37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 170.832.
38. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 170.762.
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 170.665.
40. (11) D. Hamlin, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 170.692.
43. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 176.056.
Failed to Qualify
44. (79) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 170.277.
45. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 170.057.
46. (91) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 170.036.
47. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 169.609.

Nationwide

Ford EcoBoost 300
Results
Saturday
At Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead, Fla.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (10) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200 laps, 135.4
rating, 0 points, $77,100.
2. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 130.3, 0,
$67,325.
3. (16) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 200, 109,
0, $56,693.
4. (11) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 111.3, 41,
$43,958.
5. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 123.6, 40,
$39,783.
6. (4) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 108.8, 39,
$33,783.
7. (7) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 101.6, 37,
$28,583.
8. (20) Ryan Blaney, Dodge, 200, 98.8, 0,
$27,258.


9. (2) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 115.7, 36,
$27,033.
10. (8) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 200, 92.4, 34,
$26,583.
11. (6) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200,93.1, 33,
$24,783.
12. (32) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 80.9, 32,
$23,633.
13. (14) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 84.8,
32, $23,233.
14. (15) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 200, 86.4, 0,
$16,565.
15. (17) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 200, 78.8, 30,
$24,023.
16. (5) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 82.3, 0,
$16,750.
17. (18) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 200, 86.7, 27,
$22,608.
18. (25) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 200, 68.1, 26,
$22,493.
19. (24) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 72.6, 25,
$15,865.
20. (13) Scott Lagasse Jr., Chevrolet, 199, 69,
24, $16,430.
21. (22) Kevin Swindell, Ford, 199, 75.3, 24,
$15,645.
22. (23) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 199, 66.3,
22, $22,003.
23. (31) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 198, 53.7, 21,
$15,400.
24. (28) David Starr, Toyota, 198, 60.4, 0,
$15,285.
25. (19) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 197, 56,
0, $22,093.
26. (34) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 197, 45.7,18,
$21,488.
27. (30) Eric McClure, Toyota, 196, 48.5, 17,
$21,373.
28. (21) Andrew Ranger, Ford, 195, 50.9, 16,
$14,790.
29. (35) Jason Bowles, Toyota, 195, 42.7, 15,
$21,153.
30. (26) Hal Martin, Toyota, 195, 45.8, 14,
$21,343.
31. (42) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 193, 33.9, 13,
$20,933.
32. (33) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 190, 35.1, 12,
$14,350.
33. (41) Robert Richardson Jr, Chevrolet, 188,
37.6, 11, $14,295.
34. (37) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, accident,
177, 49.6, 10, $20,698.
35. (38) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, engine, 147,
36.4, 9, $20,663.
36. (27) John Blankenship, Chevrolet, accident,
92, 54.7, 8, $20,628.
37. (39) Juan Carlos Blum, Chevrolet, engine,
92, 34.6, 7, $14,095.
38. (12) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 66, 67.2,
6, $20,478.
39. (9) Blake Koch, Toyota, fuel pump, 40, 53, 5,
$13,885.
40. (43) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 17, 34.7,
4, $13,700.
41. (29) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, vibration, 6,
32.5, 3, $13,625.
42. (36) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, overheating, 6,
30.5, 0, $13,575.
43. (40) Dexter Stacey Ford, engine, 0, 28.3, 1,
$13,506.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 128.817 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 19 minutes, 44 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.375 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 24 laps.
Lead Changes: 13 among 10 drivers.
Lap Leaders: K.Busch 1-49; J.Logano 50;
K.Busch 51-67; E.Sadler 68-70; K.Busch 71-93;
R.Smith 94-95; D.Patrick 96-99; S.Hornish Jr.
100-105; A.Dillon 106-148; R.Stenhouse Jr.
149-150; K.Wallace 151-152; A.Dillon 153-175;
K.Swindell 176-178; R.Smith 179-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Busch, 3 times for 89 laps; A.Dillon, 2
times for 66 laps; R.Smith, 2 times for 24 laps;
S.Hornish Jr., 1 time for6 laps; D.Patrick, 1 time
for 4 laps; E.Sadler, 1 time for 3 laps;
K.Swindell, 1 time for 3 laps; R.Stenhouse Jr., 1
time for 2 laps; K.Wallace, 1 time for 2 laps;
J.Logano, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 1,251; 2.
E.Sadler, 1,228; 3. A.Dillon, 1,227; 4. S.Hornish
Jr., 1,146; 5. M.Annett, 1,082; 6. J.AIIgaier,
1,076; 7. C.Whitt, 994; 8. M.Bliss, 902; 9.
B.Scott, 853; 10. D.Patrick, 838.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 6 1 .857 -
Brooklyn 5 2 .714 1
Boston 6 4 .600 11Y2
Philadelphia 5 4 .556 2
Toronto 2 7 .222 5
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 7 3 .700 -
Charlotte 4 4 .500 2
Atlanta 4 4 .500 2
Orlando 3 5 .375 3
Washington 0 8 .000 6
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 5 2 .714 -
Chicago 5 3 .625 Y2
Indiana 4 6 .400 2Y2
Cleveland 2 7 .222 4
Detroit 1 9 .100 5Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 8 1 .889
San Antonio 7 2 .778 1
Dallas 6 5 .545 3
Houston 4 5 .444 4
New Orleans 3 4 .429 4
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 7 3 .700 -
Minnesota 5 4 .556 112
Utah 5 6 .455 212
Denver 4 5 .444 212
Portland 4 5 .444 212
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 6 2 .750 -
Golden State 5 4 .556 112
L.A. Lakers 4 5 .444 212
Phoenix 4 6 .400 3
Sacramento 2 7 .222 412
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 99, Utah 93
Indiana 103, Dallas 83
Orlando 110, Detroit 106
Golden State 106, Minnesota 98
Oklahoma City 110, New Orleans 95
Memphis 105, New York 95
Portland 119, Houston 117, OT
Atlanta 112, Sacramento 96
L.A. Lakers 114, Phoenix 102
Saturday's Games
Boston 107, Toronto 89
Utah 83, Washington 76
Dallas 103, Cleveland 95


Memphis 94, Charlotte 87
Denver at San Antonio, late
New Orleans at Milwaukee, late
Chicago at L.A. Clippers, late
Miami at Phoenix, late
Today's Games
Indiana at New York, 12p.m.
Orlando at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Brooklyn at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Portland, 9 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Washington, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at Utah, 9 p.m.


Choi takes lead at
LPGA's Titleholders
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -
U.S. Women's Open champion
Na Yeon Choi was steady after
a careless three-putt bogey
early in her third round Saturday
at the Titleholders and finished
with a 3-under 69 to take a one-
shot lead into the final round of
the LPGA Tour season.
Choi limited her mistakes,
even as those around her were
dropping shots in a tough wind
at Twin Eagles.
Ai Miyazato quickly gave up
her one-shot lead at the start of
the round when a chip rolled
back to her feet beyond the
par-5 second hole and led to
double bogey.
Choi hit a hybrid 5-wood to 15
feet for birdie on the par-3 17th
and closed with a two-putt for




RUN
Continued from Page BI

Christian and has been to
state all four years at
Lecanto.
"I'm happy about my
whole career," Benoist said.
"It's kind of bitter sweet. I
think about next year and I
know there is no next year.
I'm happy I could lead the
girls team to the state meet."
"I am proud of all of
them," said Lecanto coach
Dan Epstein. "They all ran
well. Brittany Vickers had a
breakout race.
"I would say her
(Benoist's) season ended on
a very good note. All season,
we wanted to have a team
behind Chloe. The girls
pulled through. There's no
way you can be disap-
pointed about how they ran
today There's 165 schools in
our classification and we
finished 19th. We didn't
make it out of the district




WRESTLE
Continued from Page B1

everyone come together as a
team," Juergensmeyer said.
"We worked hard, but we
have a lot of areas that need
work. I think it will be a
good season ... I'm excited
about it."
Six 'Canes got victories by
pins: John Loggins (heavy-
weight), Dalton Tinsley (132-
pound class), Nolen,
Reneer, Tarique Cabanas
(160-pound class), and Tay-
lor, as Citrus blew away the
North Marion Colts by a 54-
24 score.
A stout Gulf team routed
the 'Canes 54-27 in the fifth
and deciding match, which
earned the Buccaneers the
championship cup. Seven
Buccaneers won by fall or
pin: Kenny Hayes (heavy-
weight), Spencer Baxter
(160-pound class), Dylan


par to reach 12-under 204. That
gave her a one-shot advantage
over Miyazato, who made four
birdies on the back nine and
salvaged a 71.

Jimenez on top on
European Tour
HONG KONG Spain's
Miguel Angel Jimenez shot a 2-
under 68 for a share of the Hong
Kong Open lead with New
Zealand's Michael Campbell.
Campbell had a 69 to match
the 48-year-old Jimenez, the
2005 and 2008 winner, at 10
under. Italy's Matteo Manassero,
coming off a playoff victory in the
Singapore Open, was a stroke
back along with China's Zhang
Lian-wei. Manassero had a 64,
and Zhang shot 69 in the event
sanctioned by the European and
Asian tours.


last year.
"I told her this is your last
race. She is like a legend.
It's a great way to finish her
career In the next couple of
years, our girls should be
here. It's sad to see Chloe
go. She's been part of the
running community for
eight years."
It was a bittersweet expe-
rience for some of the Crys-
tal River girls. Clarissa
Consol, a senior, was 46th
with a time of 20:24.
The Pirates, who made
state last year, were 17th
with 411 points.
Consol ran only in her
senior year, as did Chloe
Lane.
"It's the first time here
and my last race," Consol
said. "I'm happy to be with
this team. This is the best
group of girls I have ever
worked with. I love them."
"It's so great to see them
go out with a bang," said
Crystal River coach Lisa
Carter "They ran great. I am
so proud of them."


McAllister (182-pound
class), Jared Kruse (195-
pound class), and Sam
Spence (220-pound class)
won by falls. Anthony
Agazarm of the 120-pound
class and Josh Newman of
the 152-pound class beat the
'Canes by way of pin. Nolen
and Renaud earned pins for
Citrus.
Anthony Agazarm (light-
weight), Spencer Baxter
(middleweight), and Kenny
Hayes (heavyweight) re-
ceived the Fred Drew
"Heart of a Lion" Outstand-
ing Wrestler Awards for the
tournament. The three Gulf
grapplers beat every oppo-
nent by fall or pin.
"I was happy to see we
worked really hard and
bonded as a team," Mosher
said. "That was something
that never happened in the
last four years ... I'm glad I
beat wrestlers worth
wrestling ... we have to per-
severe and fight hard."


DAVE SIGLERIChronicle
Citrus' Austin Renaud pinned Lake Weir's Tyler Martinez on
Saturday during the Rob Hermann Hurricane Cup Duals.


SIMPLY
Continued from Page BI

squad to get better for next
season after the game.
"We're looking toward
working to get faster and
stronger this offseason," he
said. "That's the message. I
was talking to mostly under-
classmen there and it was
well received."
Dessent already held the
Brevard County record for
most passing yards in a sea-
son, and touchdown passes
to three different receivers
in each of the first three
quarters put him at 37 pass-
ing TDs for the season.
The Class 4A Minutemen
shut down their aerial at-
tack in the fourth quarter,
allowing junior running
back Jamaal Eveillard
(game-high 77 rushing
yards, game-high five recep-
tions) to carry most of the
remaining load.


"We surprised a lot of peo-
ple out there winning nine
games," said the 6-4, 250-
pound Dessent, who has yet
to receive a college offer.
"We worked hard ever since
last season ended, and we
believed in ourselves. It was
a team effort."
Panthers freshman quar-
terback Travis McGee con-
tinued to show great
potential in place of an in-
jured Christian Barber as
he completed seven passes
for 70 yards while rushing
three times for a team-high
47 yards. But three inter-
ceptions, including two to
Shaw, proved costly
Junior Nile Waters had 11
carries for 44 yards and
added a two-point conver-
sion run on a misdirection
play for the Panthers.
In the second quarter,
Lecanto sophomore Luis
Leiva nailed a 30-yard field
goal and junior Alizah
Robinson picked off a
Dessent pass.


= Golf B RIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

College football
scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 63, CCSU 34
Brown 22, Columbia 6
Bucknell 24, Bryant 21
Buffalo 29, UMass 19
Colgate 41, Fordham 39
Cortland St. 20, Framingham St. 19
Dartmouth 35, Princeton 21
Harvard 34, Yale 24
Hobart 38, Washington & Lee 20
Holy Cross 24, Georgetown 0
Indiana (Pa.) 27, Shepherd 17
Johns Hopkins 42, Washington & Jefferson
10
Lehigh 38, Lafayette 21
Maine 55, Rhode Island 6
Monmouth (NJ) 26, Robert Morris 21
Navy 21, Texas St. 10
Oklahoma 50, West Virginia 49
Penn 35, Cornell 28
Penn St. 45, Indiana 22
Salisbury 17, Rowan 9
Shippensburg 58, Bloomsburg 20
St. Francis (Pa.) 44, Sacred Heart 24
St. John Fisher 63, Castleton St. 7
Temple 63, Army 32
Towson 64, New Hampshire 35
Villanova 41, Delaware 10
Virginia Tech 30, Boston College 23, OT
Wagner 23, Duquesne 17
Wesley 73, Mount Ida 14
Widener 44, Bridgewater (Mass.) 14
SOUTH
Alabama 49, W. Carolina 0
Arkansas St. 41, Troy 34
Auburn 51, Alabama A&M 7
Austin Peay 38, Tennessee Tech 31
Bethune-Cookman 21, Florida A&M 16
Chattanooga 24, Elon 17
Clemson 62, NC State 48
Coastal Carolina 41, Charleston Southern 20
Cumberlands 42, Mid-Am Nazarene 24
Drake 32, Jacksonville 29
East Carolina 28, Tulane 23
Florida 23, Jacksonville St. 0
Florida St. 41, Maryland 14
Gardner-Webb 21, Presbyterian 15
Georgia 45, Georgia Southern 14
Georgia Tech 42, Duke 24
Hampton 27, Morgan St. 17
Howard 41, Delaware St. 34
Jackson St. 37, Alcorn St. 11
Kentucky 34, Samford 3
LSU 41, Mississippi 35
Lenoir-Rhyne 21, Fort Valley St. 6
Liberty 33, VMI 14
Louisiana-Lafayette 31, W. Kentucky 27
Louisiana-Monroe 42, North Texas 16
Marist 28, Campbell 7
Marshall 44, Houston 41
McNeese St. 35, Lamar 0
Memphis 46, UAB 9
Miami 40, South Florida 9
Middle Tennessee 20, South Alabama 12
Mississippi St. 45, Arkansas 14
Morehead St. 76, Valparaiso 24
Murray St. 42, SE Missouri 35
NC A&T 22, NC Central 16, OT
Old Dominion 38, James Madison 28
Richmond 21, William & Mary 14
SC State 27, Savannah St. 13
San Diego 17, Davidson 10
South Carolina 24, Wofford 7
The Citadel 42, Furman 20
UT-Martin 35, Tennessee St. 26
Utah St. 48, Louisiana Tech 41, OT
Vanderbilt 41, Tennessee 18
West Alabama 41, Miles 7
MIDWEST
Cent. Michigan 30, Miami (Ohio) 16
E. Michigan 29, W. Michigan 23
Elmhurst 27, Coe 24
Franklin 42, Adrian 10
Indianapolis 31, Midwestern St. 14
Iowa St. 51, Kansas 23
Kent St. 31, Bowling Green 24
Marian (Ind.) 42, Northwestern (Iowa) 32
Michigan 42, Iowa 17
Missouri Western 57, Minn. Duluth 55
Morningside 40, Montana Tech 35
Mount Union 72, Christopher Newport 14
N. Dakota St. 38, Illinois St. 20
N. Iowa 38, Missouri St. 13
NW Missouri St. 35, Harding 0
Nebraska 38, Minnesota 14
Northwestern 23, Michigan St. 20
Notre Dame 38, Wake Forest 0
Ohio St. 21, Wisconsin 14, OT
Purdue 20, Illinois 17
Rutgers 10, Cincinnati 3
S. Dakota St. 31, South Dakota 8
S. Illinois 35, W. Illinois 0
St. Francis (Ind.) 22, Baker 17
St. Thomas (Minn.) 48, St. Norbert 17
St. Xavier 31, William Penn 0
Syracuse 31, Missouri 27
W.Texas A&M 38, Chadron St. 30
Wis.-Oshkosh 55, St. Scholastica 10
Wittenberg 52, Heidelberg 38
Youngstown St. 27, Indiana St. 6
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 42, Prairie View 41
Cent. Arkansas 48, E. Illinois 30
MVSU 34, Texas Southern 3
Mary Hardin-Baylor 59, Louisiana College 20
Oklahoma St. 59, Texas Tech 21
Rice 36, SMU 14
Stephen F Austin 34, Northwestern St. 17
Texas A&M 47, Sam Houston St. 28
Tulsa 23, UCF 21
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 46, Washington St. 7
Boise St. 42, Colorado St. 14
Cal Poly 42, N. Arizona 34
E. Washington 41, Portland St. 34
Montana St. 16, Montana 7
N. Colorado 28, North Dakota 27
Nevada 31, New Mexico 24
UC Davis 34, Sacramento St. 27
UCLA 38, Southern Cal 28
UTSA 34, Idaho 27
Washington 38, Colorado 3
Weber St. 40, Idaho St. 14
Wyoming 28, UNLV 23
The AP Top 25 Fared
No.1 Oregon (10-0) vs. No. 14 Stanford. Next:
at No.15 Oregon State, Saturday.
No.2 Kansas State (10-1) lost to Baylor 52-24.
Next: vs. No. 18 Texas, Saturday, Dec. 1.
No.3 Notre Dame (11-0) beat Wake Forest 38-
0. Next: at No.21 Southern Cal, Saturday.
No. 4 Alabama (10-1) beat Western Carolina
49-0. Next: vs. Auburn, Saturday
No. 5 Georgia (10-1) beat Georgia Southern 45-
14. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Saturday
No.6 Ohio State (11-0) beat Wisconsin 21-14,
OT Next: vs. No. 23 Michigan, Saturday.
No. 7 Florida (10-1) beat Jacksonville State 23-
0. Next: at No. 10 Florida State, Saturday.
No.8 LSU (9-2) beat Mississippi 41-35. Next: at
Arkansas, Friday.
No. 9 Texas A&M (9-2) beat Sam Houston State
47-28. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday.
No. 10 Florida State (10-1) beat Maryland 41-
14. Next: vs. No. 7 Florida, Saturday.
No. 11 Clemson (10-1) beat NC State 62-48.
Next: vs. No. 12 South Carolina, Saturday.
No. 12 South Carolina (9-2) beat Wofford 24-7.
Next: at No. 11 Clemson, Saturday.


No. 13 Oklahoma (8-2) beat West Virginia 50-
49. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday.
No. 14 Stanford (8-2) at No. 1 Oregon. Next: at
No. 17 UCLA, Saturday
No. 15 Oregon State (7-2) vs. California. Next:
vs. No. 1 Oregon, Saturday.
No. 16 Nebraska (9-2) beat Minnesota 38-14.
Next: at Iowa, Friday.
No. 17 UCLA (9-2) beat No. 21 Southern Cal
38-28. Next: vs. No. 14 Stanford, Saturday.
No. 18 Texas (8-2) did not play Next: vs. TCU,
Thursday.
No. 19 Louisiana Tech (9-2) lost to Utah State
48-41, OT. Next: at San Jose State, Saturday.
No. 20 Louisville (9-1) did not play. Next: vs.
UConn, Saturday
No. 21 Southern Cal (7-4) lost to No. 17 UCLA
38-28. Next: vs. No. 3 Notre Dame, Saturday.
No. 22 Rutgers (9-1) beat Cincinnati 10-3. Next:
at Pittsburgh, Saturday.
No. 23 Michigan (8-3) beat Iowa 42-17. Next: at
No. 6 Ohio State, Saturday.
No. 23 Texas Tech (7-4) lost to Oklahoma State
59-21. Next: vs. Baylor, Saturday.
No. 25 Kent State (10-1) beat Bowling Green
31-24. Next: vs. Ohio, Friday.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 B5


FSU wraps up division


UFPhandles fax St.;

Kansas St., Oregon

both fall

Associated Press

COLLEGE PARK, Md. Devonta
Freeman ran for 148 yards and two
touchdowns as Florida State
earned a spot in the Atlantic Coast
Conference championship game
with a 41-14 win over Maryland.
Florida State (10-1, 7-1) led 27-0
at halftime and cruised to its fifth
straight victory The Seminoles
clinched the league's Atlantic Divi-
sion title for the second time in
three years and will play for its
13th ACC crown on Dec. 1.
EJ Manuel completed 17 of 23
passes for 144 yards and two scores
to supplement a running game that
gained 237 yards.
Operating against an injury-
plagued Maryland team using a
linebacker at quarterback, Florida
State allowed 170 yards.
No. 7 Florida 23,
Jacksonville St. 0
GAINESVILLE No. 7 Florida used
a strong defensive effort to overcome a
sluggish offensive performance.
The Gators scored a touchdown on
their first possession when Mike
Gillislee plowed into the end zone from
7 yards out. But that was the only offen-
sive touchdown all day from Florida.
The Gators (10-1) also scored on a
7-yard interception return by Jonathan
Bostic early in the third quarter. Caleb
Sturgis added three field goals from
21, 44 and 47 yards out to complete
the scoring.
Florida's defense allowed a 76-yard
pass completion on the first play of the
game, but held the Gamecocks to 176
total yards the rest of the game. Jack-
sonville State, an FCS program that
plays in the Ohio Valley Conference,
completed its season with a 6-5 record.
No. 1 Oregon loses to No.
14 Stanford in OT, 17-14

Baylor 52,
No. 2 Kansas St. 24
WACO, Texas Glasco Martin ran
for three touchdowns, Lache Seastrunk
had 185 yards rushing with an 80-yard
score and Baylor again upset the BCS
picture with a late-season victory, beat-
ing second-ranked Kansas State 52-24.
A week after the Wildcats (10-1, 7-1
Big 12) took over the No. 1 spot in the
BCS standings following Alabama's
loss, another team will get its chance
on top. And undefeated Notre Dame
could get its championship shot.
K-State quarterback Collin Klein
may be a Heisman Trophy front-run-
ner no more after throwing three inter-
ceptions while being pressured and
harassed all night by Baylor (5-5, 2-5).
He threw for 286 yards, but had only
39 yards on 17 carries.
Nick Florence, the successor to Heis-
man winner Robert Griffin III threw both
of his touchdowns in the first half when
the Bears jumped out to a 28-7 lead.
On the same November weekend
last season, Baylor upset then fifth-
ranked Oklahoma after two teams
ahead of the Sooners had already lost
that day.
No. 3 Notre Dame 38,
Wake Forest 0
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Everett Gol-
son threw touchdown passes of 50, 34
and 2 yards, Cierre Wood scored on a
68-yard run and Notre Dame finished
the season undefeated at home for the
first time since 1998 in a 38-0 win over
Wake Forest.
The Fighting Irish improved to 11-0
for the first time since 1989 and need to
beat Southern California to finish a reg-
ular season undefeated for the first time
since 1988, the last time they won a na-
tional championship. The Demon Dea-


Associated Press
Florida State running back Devonta Freeman runs past Maryland defenders Matt Robinson, left, and Dexter
McDougle in the second half Saturday in College Park, Md. Florida State won 41-14.


cons (5-6) fell to 1-33 all-time against
top 5 teams, their lone win coming
against No. 4 Tennessee in 1946.
No. 4 Alabama 49,
Western Carolina 0
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. Eddie Lacy
rushed for three first-half touchdowns
and AJ McCarron set Alabama's single-
season record for passing TDs.
The Crimson Tide (10-1) rebounded
from a loss to No. 9 Texas A&M by
building a 42-0 halftime lead against
the Catamounts (1-10), a Football
Championship Subdivision team with
two wins in as many seasons. It was Al-
abama's third shutout of the season.
McCarron completed all six of his at-
tempts for 133 yards and his 21st
touchdown before exiting midway
through the second quarter.
No. 5 Georgia 45,
Georgia Southern 14
ATHENS, Ga. -Aaron Murray
threw four touchdown passes and Todd
Gurley became only the second true
freshman in Georgia history to rush for
1,000 yards.
Georgia (10-1) reached 10 wins for
the eighth time in Mark Richt's dozen
seasons as coach. Georgia Southern
(8-3) had a shot at the halftime lead,
only to get scuttled by a penalty, and
Murray took control from there.
No. 6 Ohio State 21,
Wisconsin 14
MADISON, Wis. Carlos Hyde
scored on a 2-yard run in overtime and
the Buckeyes stayed perfect.
The Buckeyes (11-0, 7-0) clinched
the Leaders Division title outright with
the win. But they are ineligible for the
postseason as part of their punishment
for NCAA violations under former coach
Jim Tressel, and the best they can hope
for is to end the year unbeaten and to
maybe capture the AP Top 25 title.
Montee Ball scored his 78th touch-
down, tying Travis Prentice's major-col-
lege record for career scores. But he
fumbled on what would have been the
record-breaker with 2:46 left in regulation.
No. 8 LSU 41, Ole Miss 35
BATON ROUGE, La. Jeremy Hill
scored his third touchdown with 15 sec-
onds left to lift LSU to a victory.
The game included seven turnovers,
numerous momentum swings and long
touchdowns, perhaps none better than
Odell Beckham Jr.'s 89-yard punt return
for a score that evoked memories of
Billy Cannon's famous return against
the same team, along the same side-
line, for the same yardage back in 1959.
Beckham's return tied the game at 35,
but LSU (9-2, 5-2 Southeastern Confer-
ence) still needed a pair of clutch sacks
by Anthony Johnson and Lavar Edwards


to drive Ole Miss (5-6, 2-5) out of routine
field goal range later in the fourth quar-
ter, setting up the winning drive.
No. 9 Texas A&M 47,
Sam Houston St. 28
COLLEGE STATION, Texas-
Johnny Manziel threw for 267 yards
and three touchdowns, and ran for 100
yards and two more scores in a bit
more than a half for Texas A&M.
The redshirt freshman threw an 89-
yard touchdown pass to Uzoma
Nwachukwu on A&M's first offensive
play of the second half. The dual-threat
quarterback then attempted the extra
point, but it sailed wide right, ending the
Heisman hopeful's day with A&M (9-2)
leading 40-0.
No. 11 Clemson 62,
N.C. State 48
CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd threw
for five touchdowns and ran for three
more scores to lead Clemson to a
record-shattering win.
The Tigers (10-1, 7-1 Atlantic
Coast) gained 754 yards, two off the
school record. The 110 combined
points were just seven off the ACC
record set by Georgia Tech and North
Carolina last week.
The Wolfpack (6-5, 3-4) led 24-13
early in the second quarter before Clem-
son scored 42 straight. Boyd was re-
sponsible for every Clemson touchdown.
The junior was 30-for-44 for 426 yards
and ran for 105 yards the combined
531 yards set another school record.
No. 12 South Carolina 24,
Wofford 7
COLUMBIA, S.C. Kenny Miles
rushed for 127 yards and a touchdown
and South Carolina pulled out a closer-
than-expected 24-7 win over an FCS foe.
The victory gave Steve Spurrier his
64th win in eight seasons with the
Gamecocks (9-2), tying him with Rex
Enright for most ever in program his-
tory. But it wasn't until a 17-point fourth
quarter that Spurrier and South Car-
olina could rest easy in this one.
Adam Yates' 23-yard field goal broke
a 7-all tie with 11:57 to go. After the Ter-
riers (8-3) failed on a 4th-and-1 at their
34, Connor Shaw threw an 8-yard
touchdown pass to Ace Sanders to
widen the lead.
No. 13 Oklahoma 50,
West Virginia 49
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Landry
Jones threw six touchdown passes, in-
cluding a 5-yarder to Kenny Stills with
24 seconds left, to lift No. 13 Oklahoma
to a wild 50-49 win over West Virginia.
Jones finished with 554 passing
yards to break his own school record.
He needed a terrific game to offset the
performances of West Virginia's tandem


of Tavon Austin and Stedman Bailey.
The Sooners (8-2, 6-1 Big 12) could-
n't hang onto a 31-17 halftime lead.
West Virginia went ahead 49-44 with
2:53 left on Bailey's 40-yard TD catch,
but Jones led Oklahoma 54 yards for
the go-ahead score.
No. 17 UCLA 38,
No. 21 USC 28
PASADENA, Calif. Brett Hundley
passed for 234 yards and a touchdown
and rushed for two more scores as
UCLA clinched the Pac-12 South title
and snapped a five-game losing streak
in the crosstown rivalry.
Eric Kendricks blocked a punt and
made a fourth-quarter interception for
the Bruins (9-2, 6-2 Pac-12).
A year after USC obliterated the Bru-
ins 50-0 in a game that led to a coach-
ing change in Westwood, UCLA
punctuated its one-year revitalization
under Jim Mora with its first win over
the Trojans (7-4, 5-4) since 2006 -just
their second in 14 years.
Matt Barkley passed for 301 yards
and two touchdowns, but threw two in-
terceptions in the Trojans' third loss in
four games.
No. 23 Michigan 42,
Iowa 17
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Devin Gard-
ner accounted for six touchdowns to
help Michigan rout Iowa.
The Wolverines (8-3, 6-1 Big Ten)
weren't stopped on offense by the hap-
less Hawkeyes (4-7, 2-5) until Gardner
threw an interception early in the fourth
quarter.
Gardner threw three touchdowns
and ran for three scores. He became
the first Michigan quarterback to ac-
count for six TDs since 1983 when
Steve Smith had as many passing and
rushing scores in a game at Minnesota.
Denard Robinson started at running
back and took snaps at quarterback
and ran 13 times for 98 yards in his last
home game.
Oklahoma State 59,
No. 23 Texas Tech 21
STILLWATER, Okla. Isaiah Ander-
son had a career-best 174 yards receiv-
ing and caught three long touchdown
passes from Clint Chelf in his final home
game for Oklahoma State.
Zack Craig blocked a pair of punts,
returning one for a touchdown, as the
Cowboys (7-3, 5-2 Big 12) won their
fourth straight in the series and the sec-
ond in a row in decisive fashion. The
Red Raiders' 66-6 loss in last season's
game was the most lopsided defeat in
the program's history.
Chelf passed for 229 yards in his
second career start. J.W. Walsh, who
had what coach Mike Gundy called a
season-ending injury four weeks ago,


Morris throws for 413, Miami rolls past USF


Tulsa edges UCF

in C-USA battle

Associated Press

MIAMI For the second straight
year, Miami beat South Florida to
become bowl-eligible.
And now, the Hurricanes' fate is
up to the university's decision-
makers once again.
Stephen Morris threw for 413
yards and three scores, Herb Wa-
ters had an 87-yard touchdown
catch for Miami's longest reception
in more than five years and the
Hurricanes rolled past South
Florida 40-9 on Saturday for their
sixth win, the magic number for
postseason eligibility Miami (6-5)
would finish no worse than tied for
first in the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence's Coastal Division by beating
Duke next weekend.


-. . -- .. . - . l .. .


South Florida running back Marcus Shaw is tackled by Miami
Gionni Paul during the second half in Miami.
Clive Walford (135), Waters (130) Miami, and Duke John
and Phillip Dorsett (111) all topped for 66 yards and anoth
the 100-yard receiving mark for the Hurricanes.


Tulsa edges UCF 23-21 in
battle of C-USA leaders
TULSA, Okla. Cody Green con-
nected with Keyarris Garrett for three
touchdown passes Saturday and Tulsa
held on to beat UCF 23-21 in a battle of
Conference USA division leaders.
The win sealed the West Division title
for Tulsa (9-2, 7-0) and gives the
Golden Hurricane the upper hand for
home-field advantage for the champi-
onship game Dec. 1.
Trey Watts ran for 122 yards for
Tulsa, and Green finished with 252
i. yards passing, going 21 for 34 with an
interception. The three scoring passes to
Garrett went for 70, 20 and 13 yards -
Associated Press the last one making it 23-14 Golden Hur-
Associated P ricane with 5:11 left in the third quarter.
Linebacker UCF (8-3, 6-1) came within two
points on Latavius Murray's 2-yard run
ison rushed with 9:01 to play, but Tulsa ran nearly
er score for seven minutes off the clock and the
Knights never got another first down.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


'ILl


Associated Press
Vanessa Williams plays
Olivia Doran, right, and
Terry O'Quinn plays Gavin
Doran in the ABC series,
"666 Park Avenue," which
premiered Sept. 30. ABC
announced Friday it was
canceling the show.

2 freshman TV
series canceled
LOS ANGELES -
Three low-rated new TV
series are getting the ax.
ABC is saying goodbye
to fresh-
man dra-
mas "Last
Resort"
and "666
ParkAv-
enue"
after 13
episodes
Andre each.
Braugher "Last
Resort"
stars
SAndre
Braugher
and Scott
Speed-
man as of-
ficers of a
U.S. nu-
Scott clear sub
Speedman targeted
by the
government. It airs at 8
p.m. Thursday
The other canceled
ABC drama, "666 Park
Avenue," is a supernatu-
ral tale set starring Terry
O'Quinn and Vanessa
Williams. It airs at 10 p.m.
Sunday
ABC didn't announce
Friday what will replace
the two series after they
finish their runs.
At CBS, the curtain is
down on the sitcom "Part-
ners." It's about two pals
- one gay, one straight
(Michael Urie, David
Krumholtz). Starting
Monday, it will be re-
placed for now with com-
edy reruns at 8:30 p.m.

Parker, Butler
host Nobel concert
LOS ANGELES -
Sarah Jessica Parker and
Gerard Butler are adding
to the star wattage at the
Nobel
Peace
Prize
Concert.
The ac-
tors will
be the
hosts of
the 19th
Sarah annual
Jessica ent

Oslo, Nor-
way Jen-
nifer
Hudson
and Seal
are
among
I ur the per-
Gerard former.
Butler The Eu-
ropean
Union captured the prize
this year
Past winners of the
Nobel Peace Prize in-
clude Nelson Mandela,
Mother Teresa, former
Vice President Al Gore
and President Barack
Obama.
-From wire reports


HT


Associated Press
Sam Riley, left, Kristen Stewart, and Garrett Hedlund will star in "On the Road," a film based on the iconic Jack
Kerouac novel. Stewart and her two "Twilight" co-stars now will seek roles outside of the fantasy series.


Where do th

CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic

LOS ANGELES Kristen Stew-
art, Robert Pattinson and Taylor
Lautner have walked their last "Twi-
light" red carpet with the arrival this
weekend of the series finale "The
Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -
Part 2." Now, they must step into ca-
reers of their own, using the super-
stardom the multi-billion-dollar
franchise has provided them.
Making that transition from a
beloved film series with a fervent fan
base can be tricky Do you stick to the
same kinds of roles people came to
love you for and maintain the safety
of familiarity? Or do you veer drasti-
cally in the other direction to prove
to the world you have range that
you're so much more than just a
mopey teenage girl or a hunky set of
abs?
"Harry Potter" star Daniel Rad-
cliffe, for example, has successfully
made choices to showcase his versa-
tility, from appearing on stage naked
in a Broadway production of"Equus"
to the gothic horror film "The Woman
in Black." His "Harry Potter" co-star,
Emma Watson, played a damaged
party girl this year in "The Perks of
Being a Wallflower," a character who
couldn't have been more different
from the fastidious Hermione
Granger
The three core "Twilight" stars
have all struck while the iron was hot,
making a variety of films in between
the five "Twilight Saga" installments
about high schooler Bella Swan and
the vampire and werewolf who com-
peted for her affections.
Stewart was the best known of the
"Twilight" trio before being cast as
Bella. She'd played Jodie Foster's
daughter in the 2002 thriller "Panic
Room" and a commune singer who
befriends Emile Hirsch's character
in Sean Penn's Oscar-nominated
"Into the Wild" (2007).
Her choices between the "Twi-
light" movies have run the gamut,
from playing a young Joan Jett in the
2010 biopic "The Runaways" to a
fairy-tale warrior princess in this
summer's "Snow White and the
Huntsman." Next month, she'll ap-
pear in "On the Road," based on the
iconic Jack Kerouac novel.
"Kristen seems to do a lot of indie
movies. 'Snow White and the Hunts-
man' is more of an outlier in terms of
being a blockbuster," said blogger
and "Twilight" expert Cleolinda
Jones, author of the "Movies in 15
Minutes" series. "But it seems like
she's got the kind of personality


Birthday Your social world could be extremely active in
the year ahead, which is well and good. However, you must
not let it take precedence over your material affairs. Give
priority to those skills that pay the bills.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A certain situation could
take a favorable twist, enabling you to rectify a situation
that has thus far proven to be unsolvable. Make the most
of it.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) One of your best assets
is your ability to view matters in their proper perspective.
You won't let any small mishaps be blown totally out of
proportion.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Because you are usually
able to make the most out of what you have at hand, your
probabilities for personal gain look to be quite encouraging,
even when the pickings are slim.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Even though you're usually


ie main trio ofstars go from here?













I Robert Pattinson, left, and Kevin Durand star in "Cosmopolis."
Taylor Lautner, right, and Lily Collins are in a scene from
"Abduction."


where she's got to do what she has to
do ... she's not thinking in terms of ca-
reer strategy."
Andrei Constantinescu of the Dal-
las-based Legacy Casting said he'd
like to see Stewart mix it up even
more.
"Her non-'Twilight' film choices
are bold and different to a point, but
her dark and broody acting style, sim-
ilar to her real-life persona, is a bit
played," said Constantinescu, whose
work as an extras casting director in-
cludes the TNT series "Dallas." "I'd
love to see her in a romantic work-
place comedy like 'The Devil Wears
Prada."'
Pattinson has made some of the
most daring and impressive choices
of the three of them. Before being
cast as the swoony vampire Edward
Cullen, the lanky British actor ap-
peared in another blockbuster fran-
chise as Hogwarts student Cedric
Diggory in 2005's "Harry Potter and
the Goblet of Fire." In 2009, he played
Salvador Dali in the barely seen "Lit-
tle Ashes," and last year he starred
opposite Reese Witherspoon in the
circus romance "Water for Ele-
phants"- although Associated Press
reviewer David Germain wrote there
was "barely a spark" between the
two.
But Pattinson also has worked with
the likes of David Cronenberg, star-
ring this year in the acclaimed Cana-
dian director's financial drama
"Cosmopolis," which takes place al-
most entirely inside a limousine. And
he'll soon work with Cronenberg
again in "Maps to the Stars," and
begin shooting Werner Herzog's
"Queen of the Desert"
Jones said Pattison has wisely cho-
sen to parlay his "Twilight" fame to
collaborate with serious directors
and actors.
"He knows he has a certain box of-
fice appeal so the fangirls are going
to see him no matter what he's in,"
she said. "People are willing to work


Today's HOROSCOPE
reluctant to interfere in the affairs of others, you might find it
necessary to step in and offer advice to a pal who is having
trouble finding answers.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't be reluctant to speak
up if you feel you're not getting your fair share in a situation
that involves something quite valuable. No one will step up
for you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You should have an ex-
tremely good time being with good friends, with one
cavaeat: They might look to you as their source for paying
the bill when it arrives.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Positive developments will
transpire in spite of you starting off with a bum attitude. Sit-
uations you thought would be negative are likely to turn out
just the opposite.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) In your involvements with
friends, make yourself focus on all their wonderful qualities


with him the first time, they see all
this potential he has, then they want
to come back and work with him
again."
Constantinescu echoed those
thoughts: "He's the one to watch for
additional films down the line," he
said. "We are just scratching the sur-
face with Robert"
Then there's Lautner, who was just
15 when he auditioned for the role of
the sensitive, muscular werewolf
Jacob Black He'd appeared in a few
films by then, including playing the
title character of Sharkboy in 2005's
"The Adventures of Sharkboy and
Lavagirl in 3-D." In between the "Twi-
light" films, he stuck to lighter fare.
He was part of the ensemble cast of
2010's "Valentine's Day" in a roman-
tic subplot opposite Taylor Swift
But Lautner's leading-man debut
was last year's "Abduction," a title
that naturally inspired plenty of puns
about his famously toned frame. The
thriller from director John Singleton
found Lautner playing a high-school
student who gets caught up in a web
of intrigue. AP reviewer Jake Coyle
wrote Lautner "handles himself rea-
sonably well" but the script was the
film's "major deficiency"
Constantinescu said he doesn't ex-
pect Lautner will stray far from
crowd-pleasing fare.
"He's very good at playing the
young, muscular jock or hero," he
said. "Similar to Kristen, I'd love to
see roles that offer Taylor different
objectives than to be the hero, take
his shirt off and save the day How-
ever, I'm not sure that the public
would believe him as anything more
than the borderline superhero he has
become famous for"
Jones agreed: "He's not going to be
in the next mumblecore indie
movie," she said of Lautner "I'm not
sure where he goes with this after age
30. His current trajectory is kind of
clear, but I don't know what happens
when he grows out of his dimples."


rather than just their flaws. Everyone has imperfections, in-
cluding you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Be smart and refuse to dis-
cuss career matters with anyone who has a negative atti-
tude. Your confidante could prove to be a detriment to your
mindset.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You're a natural-born arbitrator,
so don't hesitate to use your talents when two companions
are unable to find middle ground. Don't let them ruin the fun
for everybody else.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Assignments and/or chores
that confront you aren't likely to be as difficult as you envi-
sion. Do less complaining and much more performing.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) A close friend of yours who
is aligned with a group you'd like to get involved with
could make some introductions and fulfill your fondest
wishes.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16
Mega Money: 1 5 17 26
Mega Ball: 20
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 4 $5,016.50
3-of-4 MB 66 $664.50
3-of-4 1,383 $94.50
2-of-4 MB 1,928 $47.50
1-of-4 MB 15,115 $6
2-of-4 39,906 $3.50
Fantasy 5:2 9 10 19 21
5-of-5 4 winners $56,411.01
4-of-5 484 $75
3-of-5 13,031 $7.50
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Fantasy 5:9 16 27 31 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 270 $555.00
3-of-5 8,460 $20.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Nov. 18,
the 323rd day of 2012. There
are 43 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 18,1942, "The
Skin of Our Teeth," Thornton
Wilder's Pulitzer Prize-
winning allegory about the
history of humankind, opened
on Broadway.
On this date:
In 1865, "The Celebrated
Jumping Frog of Calaveras
County" by Mark Twain was
first published under the title
"Jim Smiley and His Jumping
Frog" in the New York Satur-
day Press.
In 1883, the United States
and Canada adopted a sys-
tem of Standard Time zones.
In 1910, British suffragists
clashed with police outside
Parliament on what became
known as "Black Friday."
In 1928, Walt Disney's first
sound-synchronized ani-
mated cartoon, "Steamboat
Willie" starring Mickey Mouse,
premiered in New York.
In 1966, U.S. Roman
Catholic bishops did away with
the rule against eating meat on
Friday outside of Lent.
In 1987, the congressional
Iran-Contra committees is-
sued their final report, saying
President Ronald Reagan
bore "ultimate responsibility"
for wrongdoing by his aides.
In 1991, Shiite Muslim kid-
nappers in Lebanon freed
Anglican Church envoy Terry
Waite and Thomas Suther-
land, the American dean of
agriculture at the American
University of Beirut.
Ten years ago: U.N. arms
inspectors returned to Iraq
after a four-year hiatus, call-
ing on Saddam Hussein's
government to cooperate
with their search for weapons
of mass destruction.
Five years ago: Chris
Daughtry's band won favorite
pop-rock album for "Daugh-
try," as well as breakthrough
artist and adult contemporary
artist at the American Music
Awards.
One year ago: In an inci-
dent that prompted national
outrage, campus police at the
University of California, Davis
used pepper-spray on nonvi-
olent Occupy protesters (the
school later agreed to pay $1
million to settle a lawsuit filed
by the demonstrators).
Today's Birthdays: Au-
thor-poet Margaret Atwood is
73. Actress Linda Evans is
70. Rock musician Herman
Rarebell is 63. Comedian
Kevin Nealon is 59. Pro Foot-
ball Hall of Fame quarterback
Warren Moon is 56. Actor
Owen Wilson is 44. Actor


Mike Epps is 42. Actor
Damon Wayans Jr. is 30.
Thought for Today: "It is
impossible to defeat an igno-
rant man in argument." -
William G. McAdoo, Ameri-
can government official
(1863-1941).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


OF VOTERS


Associated Press
Lama Khatib votes in her first election Nov. 6 in Council Hill, III. A native of Syria, Khatib became a naturalized
citizen 40 days ago. Jacob Hermes votes on Election Day in Bradfordton, III. Independent voter Hermenegildo Mendoza of Anchorage, Alaska,
said he cast his ballot for Democrat Barack Obama and Republican U.S. Rep. Don Young, Alaska's sole representative in the U.S. House.
Jackson County, Fla., resident Sonjia Armstrong voted at a polling place in Capbellton, Fla.

US electorate looking different every four years; outcomes of elections change too


Associated Press
WASHINGTON It's not just
the economy, stupid. It's the de-
mographics the changing face
of America.
The 2012 elections drove
home trends that have been em-
bedded in the fine print of birth
and death rates, immigration
statistics and census charts for
years.
America is rapidly getting
more diverse, and, more gradu-
ally, so is its electorate.
Nonwhites made up 28 per-
cent of the electorate this year,
compared with 20 percent in
2000. Much of that growth is
coming from Hispanics.
The trend has worked to the
advantage of President Barack
Obama two elections in a row
now and is not lost on Republi-
cans poring over the details of
Tuesday's results.
Obama captured a command-
ing 80 percent of the growing
ranks of nonwhite voters in 2012,
just as he did in 2008. Republi-
can Mitt Romney won 59 percent
of non-Hispanic whites.
Romney couldn't win even


though he dominated among
white men and outperformed
2008 nominee John McCain with
that group. It's an ever-shrinking
slice of the electorate and of
America writ large.
White men made up 34 per-
cent of the electorate this year,
down from 46 percent in 1972.
"The new electorate is a lag-
ging indicator of the next Amer-
ica," said Paul Taylor of the Pew
Research Center. "We are mid-
passage in a century-long jour-
ney from the middle of the last
century, when we were nearly a
90 percent white nation, to the
middle of this coming century,
when we will be a majority-
minority nation."
Another trend shaping the fu-
ture electorate is the stronger in-
fluence of single women. They
vote differently from men and
from women who are married.
Fifty-four percent of single
women call themselves Democ-
rats; 36 percent of married
women do. With women marry-
ing later and divorcing more, sin-
gle women made up 23 percent of
voters in the 2012 election, com-
pared with 19 percent in 2000.


Assessing winners,


losers of the election


Our election is over and the big losers are
the citizens of our United States.
Some may say the Republicans lost in a
big way It is true many of our candidates, in-
cluding our candidate for president, lost. Yet, the
principles of smaller government, fiscal respon-
sibility and social responsibility have not gone
away Even the evangelicals, many of whom
helped cause this great loss, still believe in God
and would have their chosen party also believe
in Him.
Sure, some will say, in the end, the Democrats
wound up choosing God as part of their platform.
Those who believe that either did not watch the


. PageC3


Robert Hagaman
GUEST
COLUMN


The changing electorate has
huge implications for public pol-
icy and politics.
Suddenly, immigration over-
haul seems a lot more important,
for one thing.
Ask white voters about the
proper role of government, for
another, and 60 percent think it
should do less. Ask Hispanics
the same question, and 58 per-
cent think the government
should do more, as do 73 percent
of blacks, exit polls show.
You can hear it in the voice of
Alicia Perez, a 31-year-old immi-
gration attorney who voted Nov.
6, at a preschool in Ysleta, Texas.
"I trust the government to take
care of us," she said. "I don't
trust the Republican Party to
take care of people."
Sure, the election's biggest
issue, the economy, affects
everyone. But the voters decid-
ing who should tackle it were
quite different from the makeup
of the 1992 "It's the economy, stu-
pid," race that elected Democrat
Bill Clinton as president.
Look no further than the bat-
tleground states of campaign
2012 for political ramifications


flowing from the country's
changing demographics.
New Western states have
emerged as battlegrounds as the
Hispanic population there
grows. In Nevada, for example,
white voters made up 80 percent
of the electorate in 2000; now
they're at 64 percent. The share
of Hispanics in the state's elec-
torate has grown to 19 percent;
Obama won 70 percent of their
votes.
Obama won most of the battle-
grounds with a message more in
sync than Romney's with mi-
norities, women and younger
voters, and by carefully targeting
his grassroots mobilizing efforts
to reach those groups.
In North Carolina, where Rom-
ney narrowly defeated Obama, 42
percent of black voters said they
had been contacted on behalf of
Obama, compared with 26 per-
cent of whites, exit polls showed.
Obama got 31 percent of the
state's white vote, but managed to
keep it competitive by claiming
96 percent of black voters and 68
percent of Hispanics.
See Page C4


US presidential election


is over; now what?

t last, the election is over! I was as sick-
and-tired of all the ads, debates, nasty
: comments and money politics as anyone
S- I just wanted it to be over. And then, Barack
Obama won and now the conservatives are
4 aghast.
So, what now? Barack Obama is still in office,
Congress looks to be as deadlocked and adamant
as ever and now we face a "fiscal cliff" and yet
another debt-limit debate looms. All of it possibly
culminates in the economy and life as we know
John Read it ends abruptly and horribly
J ohn Read As you may recall, this situation was put in
GUEST place because Congress could not come to an
COLUMN
See Page C3


United


Way


needs


help

Nonprofit is chang-
ing the way it does
business in Citrus
County and it needs your
help.
Let me get the sales
pitch out of the way up
front. The United Way of
Citrus County is depend-
ent on small contributions
from thousands of people
to raise the funds it needs
to support good deeds in
our community
Most of the time re-
quests for contributions
go to employees in the
workplace. But in Citrus
County, more than half of
the households are occu-
pied by retirees. So work-
force pledges don't work.
That's why I am once
again asking each house-
hold in the county to make
a one-time contribution of
$31.12 to the United Way
organization. You can
send your contribution di-
rectly to me at Gerry Mul-
ligan, The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.
If you want to send a
larger contribution, that
would be great. But if
each one of the 31,000
households that receives
a Chronicle sent in $31.12,
the United Way would
achieve its annual cam-
paign goal.
The exciting change at
the United Way, under the
leadership of executive
Amy Meek and finance di-
rector Jennifer Barber, is
the group is taking more
of a leadership role.
In past years, United
Way provided funds to 19
nonprofit agencies serving
Citrus County. Now the
group is going to become
more aggressive. Instead
of letting the agencies do
their individual jobs and
hope the important com-
munity needs are met, the
United Way is going to re-
serve some money to iden-
tify needs and provide
grants to agencies wanting
to design projects address-
ing them.
For instance, one of the
big challenges in our com-
munity is unemployment.
A result of unemployment
is people without jobs
often have trouble getting
enough food for them-
selves and their families.
Giving food assistance is
a meaningful short-term
answer Helping someone
find full-time employment
is a long-term answer With
a full-time job, a worker
can purchase food, pay
taxes and become a con-
tributing member of soci-
ety Some folks don't have
the skills to find work; they
don't have the transporta-
tion to get to work or the
money to buy gas.
Dealing with barriers to
success and putting peo-
ple to work is the broad
strategy There are three
See .Page C3

To donate to the
United Way, send
contribution to:
Gerry Mulligan,
Citrus County
Chronicle/United
Way, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429







Page C2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan......... .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ....... ........................... editor
Charlie Brennan ........................ editor at large
Curt Ebitz.........................citizen member
L fJ ^ Mac Harris ............................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ......... .................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


KING'S BAY CLEANUP





Broaden




discussion




on clearing




waterways


Commissioner Joe Meek
suggests boldly moving
forward on water-quality
issues by funding a harvester
to help with a local service or-
ganization's King's Bay
cleanup project.
The purchase of
a harvester would THE IS
undoubtedly King's Ba
speed the Kings prop
Bay Rotary Club's
One Rake at a OUR OI
Time project, but U
we caution Develop
against jumping to broade
the aid of a singu-
lar approach
without taking ONE
time to discuss AT A
and orchestrate a
broad approach U For more
that incorporates about hel
the King's Bay the proje
project. @aol.con
Meek's proposal 727-643-
suggests spending
$225,000 of the
county's water quality re-
serves, which total $538,000, on
a harvester and its operational
costs. The data suggests the
expenditure would reap
immediate rewards.
In its first year, Rotarians
and other volunteers removed
more than 105 tons of lyngbya
algae from the bay, an average
of 575 pounds per work day
During the second year, an
additional 168 tons have been
removed so far, using hand and
mechanical harvesting. The
mechanical harvesting has
helped to more than double
the volume of lyngbya being re-
moved from King's Bay
Art Jones, who conceived of
the project and spearheads the
operation, said "lyngbya
hoards nutrients and as it de-
cays it releases those pollu-
tants back into the water
column, feeding more algae
growth."
Jones said removing pollu-
tants starves the lyngbya. He
recently made his case for a
second harvester that can
reach deeper than the current


Stop illegal hunting
I would like to know where the
Citrus County Sheriff's
(Office) is up in the north
end of Crystal River in 0
Crystal Manor. We have il-
legal hunting going on all
the time and nobody puts
a stop to it.
Editor's note: Illegal
hunting is under the juris-
diction of the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation CAL
Commission. You may re- Q
port violations to the FWC 0 ~
Wildlife Alert Program at
888-404-3922.
Searching for meaning
I hear a lot of people talking
and when they talk, they use a


S
ay


P
p
r


F
;1

p
ct
M
7


I

(


harvester. The plan is to re-
move 1,000 tons of lyngbya this
year and by the end of the third
year have three boats working
on removing 5,000 tons.
We have gone on record sup-
porting the King's
Bay project, but
;SUE: would like to see
,cleanup it in a broader
osal. plan, including
solutions for sep-
INION: tic pollution and
stormwater
)lan with runoff. The prob-
scope. lem we see with
focusing on only
one facet of water
RAKE quality is the root
TIME cause of the pollu-
tants in the water
information feeding the lyng-
ing with bya not being ad-
temail Art dressed. Once the
or call King's Bay project
659. runs its five-year
course, a plan
needs to be in
place to stop stormwater runoff
and septic pollution from feed-
ing a whole new generation of
aggressive algae growth in
King's Bay
The city of Crystal River has
partnered with the county to
address septic pollution with
their King's Bay sewer project,
but stormwater runoff contin-
ues to be a concern.
We propose the county and
city work together to develop a
three-prong, long-term plan ad-
dressing septic, stormwater
and lyngbya removal. This way,
the current efforts of the Kings
Bay Rotarians won't be wasted
when pollutants are allowed to
stream back into King's Bay,
spoiling the pristine water
once again.
One Rake at a Time deserves
the community's support, and
we are heartened by the com-
missioner's interest in con-
tributing a harvester to the
cause, but would like to see a
broader plan, including a
multi-government/private part-
nership, be developed from
this discussion.


phrase, "Blah-blah-blah-blah-blah,
if you will." What in the heck does
"If you will" mean? I don't under-
stand that. So if you can
J help me, it's "if you will"

So can you help me out a
RF little bit and somebody
B please call in and tell me
when they use the phrase
"If you will," what does
that mean?
i*o Only in Citrus
7 Only in Citrus County
would the building of
homes be controlled by
the school board. What in the
world ever happened to Citrus
County? We had sensible people
running it back in the late '60s
and early '70s.


"When we do the best that we can, we
never know what miracle is wrought
in our life, or in the life of another."
Helen Keller, 'Out of the Dark' 1913


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Providing Christmas for kids


S ince 1775, the
Marine Corps
has defended
freedom and Democ-
racy a duty they
have fulfilled with
honor, courage, and
commitment. As they
have fulfilled that duty,
Marines have earned a *
well-deserved reputa- Paul
tion of toughness. GUI
But there's another
side to the Marine COLUI
Corps: the side that
springs from a genuine concern
for the communities in which
they live, and a deep compassion
for the under-privileged children
of America. That's the side that
exemplifies the spirit of the Ma-
rine Corps. That side is found in
the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve
Toys for Tots program.
The honor of administering the
Toys for Tots program in Citrus
County falls exclusively on the
shoulders of the Marine Corps
League Detachment 819, Morgan
Patterson Commandant. These
Marines who have served our na-
tion in World War II, Korea, Viet-
nam and Iraq volunteer their
time to ensure every needy child
who resides in Citrus County will
share the magic of Christmas.
The Toys for Tots goal nation-
wide is one major toy and a stock-
ing stuffer How this is
accomplished is an amazing story
that began in 1947 and is re-
peated every year to the present.
The Toys for Tots Foundation in
Triangle, Va., is the governing en-
tity that provides the guidance
and preciseness as to how the
program is administered. The
Foundation provides all the nec-
essary materials to accomplish
the mission locally



atgW'^


Pilny
EST
MNIST


How are these and
all toys collected and
purchased, distrib-
uted? We, Marines, do
not sign individuals up
for toys except for ex-
tenuating circum-
stances such as
children of deceased
combat veterans, resi-
dents who lost their
possessions from fire
and theft. We will go
the extra mile to en-
sure children will not


be denied a Christmas present.
We have developed a partnership
with Citrus United Basket, Salva-
tion Army, Family Resources and
the Citrus Builders Care Associ-
ation. We provide these local
groups toys for distribution. They
do the sign-ups.
In order to receive our toys,
these groups have developed a
database of needy Citrus County
children. They share their data-
base to ensure equitable distri-
bution. Citrus County residents
can only sign up with one agency
Missed sign-ups? We have an
arrangement with Citrus United
Basket. They will be there until
Christmas Eve. No needy Citrus
County children will go without
toys. The Toys for Tots Marines
have guaranteed to provide the
toys to all who qualify.
We are off to a great beginning
for 2012. We have already re-
ceived and distributed several
thousand toys to our partners.
We also have received and dis-
tributed several thousand chil-
dren's books from Scholastic Inc.
This was made possible through
the national Toys for Tots literacy
program sponsored by UPS
stores and Scholastic Inc. These
quality books have been given to


the Citrus library department
and will be distributed at no cost
to Citrus County residents. We
have agreed to partner with the
Inverness Elks Florida Therapy
Services and will provide spe-
cialized toys designed to assist in
disabled children's physical
therapy
Several Toys for Tots events are
scheduled in December The
Withlacoochee Technical Insti-
tute of Criminal Justice will have
its annual Snowman Shootout at
1 p.m. Dec. 7 at Lecanto. This is
exclusive to law enforcement
personnel. The Nature Coast
Young Marines, Frito-Lay per-
sonnel and Marines from Detach-
ment 819 will be at Walmart
supercenter in Inverness on Dec.
15 and 16. For more details and
events, visit toysfortots.org.
A word of caution. We do not
sell golf balls, T-shirts, toys or
Christmas ornaments for the pur-
pose of raising money These
items are given gratis to our spon-
sors and volunteers. We never
place volunteers at intersections
or on roadways in Citrus County
to solicit donations. These are all
unauthorized activities. We ask
you call 911 if you witness these
activities. We will prosecute
those responsible.
We are able to accomplish this
goal through the support of our
local businesses, our citizens and
the Toys for Tots Foundation. We
cannot thank you all enough.
Thanks!
On behalf of the Marines of Cit-
rus Detachment 819, we wish
everyone a very Merry Christ-
mas. Semper Fi!
--in--
PaulPilny is the local
coordinator for Toys for Tots.


AM I AtM1 TANULKAM
GTtLL W&VL A COUML- 30X%
OF ROSTS2 TNWiKG


''I

19


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Don't stop swimming
with manatees
As a frequent visitor to Crystal
River from my home in Hillsbor-
ough County, I find it troubling
there seems to be growing pres-
sure to prevent people from
swimming with the manatees.
There is no stronger economic
engine (outside of the nuclear
power plant being in full opera-
tion, I'd imagine) than tourists
who come to Crystal River from
all over the world to have an en-
counter with these gentle, love-
able creatures. No experience in
Florida compares to getting into
the clear waters at Kings Spring
or Three Sisters Springs and
meeting face-to-face with a
1,200-pound animal who wants
nothing more than to have its
belly rubbed.
People pay a lot in the form of
airfare, hotel fees, gas, food,
kayak rentals, etc., to do just
that! A large percentage of the
money spent stays in Crystal
River Talk about a great eco-
nomic engine the humble
manatee.
What better way to stimulate
the local economy than by hav-
ing people from Europe, Japan,
England and all points north and
south come to the only place in
the world where you can get up
close and personal with these in-
telligent and engaging mammals.
I've met many who have come
here from those (places) and
from many other nations as well.
That, and having world-class
guide facilities, companies like
Birds Underwater, which take


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

people out and teach them the
right way to interact so mana-
tees are respected and pro-
tected, while ensuring they will
have an experience of a lifetime.
I mean, c'mon. What truly says
Florida more than swimming
with the manatees?
I strongly encourage the lead-
ers at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service to carefully consider
how much of an economic im-
pact swimming with the mana-
tees has to Crystal River And
consider how wrong it would be


to see it taken away by denying
hard-working local Floridians
the ability to do business here
while denying people from all
over the world the opportunity
to experience the real Florida
first-hand, right here in Crystal
River
Ron Thuemler
Florida Master Naturalist
Tampa

In defense
of the manatee
Citrus County is hypocritical
in its use of manatees as an icon.
Development has pumped out
the aquifer to the extent there is
no clear water and, once abun-
dant, lush green vegetation for
the manatee to graze on.
Flow from King and Hunter
Springs is reduced to a mere
trickle of what it once was.
Septic tanks are the scapegoat
... reduced water flow has im-
paired the flushing effect for
storm water runoff.
The springs, compared to flow
a few years ago, are dead.
Crab carcasses, the bottom
feeders, litter the area.
The natural recharge system
for the aquifer has been stripped
off, covered with asphalt.
In the interest of manatees,
the EPA needs to put Citrus
County under a microscope and
Tallahassee needs to get off their
butts. Pristine Waterways Act...
SFWMD should be investigated.
Paul Gugelman
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A tale of two elections from


finally. The elec-
tions are over.
No more inces-
sant phone calls from
one party or the other 1
trying to get us to vote
for their candidates;
and, no more of the irri-
tatingly intrusive tele-
vision commercials.
I didn't expect it, Fred B
even so, the post-elec- A SI
tion pictures in the pa-
pers on the morning of OF L
Nov 7, pulled at my
heartstrings both those which
showed the joy of victory and
those which showed the sadness
of defeat.
Not that I've ever run for public
office I haven't Nonetheless, for
a decade my work was intractably
intertwined with statewide poli-
tics. From 1969 to 1979, I worked


3rannen
LICE
LIFE


for the state banking de-
partment, which was di-
rectly under the
supervision of the state
comptroller who was, at
that time, an official
elected by Florida's vot-
ers.
A pretty good job had
been done to remove
technical expertise
from the spoils system.
During the early going,
I was a protected, state-
career-service em-


ployee which meant an incoming
elected official could not summar-
ily dismiss me without cause. It
sounds good, unless you've ever
worked where you knew you
weren't wanted.
For the first five years, I was
pretty much able to stay away
from the political side. But in the


1974 election, my elected 1
man lost. Frankly, even though
that time I only knew the ele
official from afar, my star
risen on the local level and I
in what could become a very
ble position to the newly elect
official. Though still a career-
vice employee, I was the super
ing examiner in the Orla
office. I remember what I felt
night the incumbent lost to
Lewis. It was a night I felt fear
loss of the election would al
me personally
And, it did, but not in the w
expected.
I secretly hoped the newly ele
Gerald Lewis wouldn't notice m
all. But that didn't happen.
Without boring readers with
details, by 1976, Comptro
Lewis had not only noticed
he'd leap-frogged me from a f


different viewpoints

boss supervisor position over a myriad then experiencing first-hand a
,h at of Capitol bureaucrats to be the grand victory celebration.
cted assistant director of the depart- Two elections seen from differ-
had ment. That, too, sounds great. But ent perspectives.
was with such a promotion, it was nec- I don't regret my involvement in
visi- essary to move to Tallahassee, state politics. I learned much, most
cted work in the Capitol and (drum- important that win or lose, the sun
-ser- roll) forfeit career-service status. comes up the next day; and, though
rvis- As the assistant director, I was a this fact may be momentarily ob-
ndo political appointee and served at scured, the electorate does not
the the pleasure of the elected offi- control God's plan for our lives.
Mr cial. Not only that, when the 1978 In our case, by the following
the election came, I was a member of election, in 1982, my family and I
effect Comptroller Lewis' re-election en- had left the world of politics be-
tourage. It meant I accompanied hind entirely. We were enjoying
vay I him on the campaign trail as an the good life we'd found the
adviser when he met with the pub- provision He had made for us -
cted lic or press and questions were right here in Citrus County! I don't
ie at asked regarding his function as regret my political past, but nei-
the state banking commissioner their do I miss it!


ithe
)ller
me,
field


In 1974 hiding in my bedroom
at home, hoping to survive defeat;
and, 1978 I worked diligently to
secure what was a landslide and


--In-
Fred Brannen is an Inverness res-
ident and a Chronicle columnist.


Letter to
THE EDITOR

Don't cut trees
To: Tom Davis, Crystal River
Airport Manager, and the Cit-
rus County Commissioners.
It is bad enough tax dollars
from many are used to fund
small airports that service a few,
mostly non-taxpayers. This is to
the flight lesson people, mostly
from other countries: your train-
ers with the blue fuselage that
circle above our homes often
below the 500-feet minimum
required above homes!
But now you want trees re-
moved from someone else's
property that were there well
before you lengthened the run-
way? Does it ever stop? Why do
we need two airports?
J.D. Bruggeman
Citrus Springs


READ
Continued from Page C1

agreement about how to reduce our deficits
and national debt Instead, Congress
passed the Budget Control Act of 2011, es-
sentially kicking the can down the road to
2013. In the meantime, we had an election
and no one paid our fiscal issues much at-
tention because the circus was in town. But
now that it is looming, both parties are
scrambling to avoid this sword of Damo-
cles. In fact, some of us may be glad, since
the cliff will force spending cuts across the
board (including the military), and reduce
the deficit by $600 billion, at least accord-
ing to the Congressional Budget Office's
projections. Unfortunately, this debate will
probably continue until the last possible
moment and, hopefully, be resolved to some
bitter form of satisfaction at least as
much as our current political environment
is ever satisfied in these winner-take-all
times.
Personally, I hope they resolve it some-
how, because we have a tenuous recovery
that we are trying to get on more solid foot-
ing. If we slide back into recession we all
will be hurt-no one gets out of this in one
piece. Also, as the world's premier econ-
omy and common currency standard, we
owe it to the rest of the world to be pru-
dent and responsible in how we manage
our affairs, socially and economically We
may not all get along so well these days,
but bigger things are afoot and we need to
be careful. Let us not let our emotions and
agendas get in the way of sensible solu-
tions to complex issues.
Finally, on the topic of insensible solu-
tions and social Darwinism, where the
strong survive and the weak are killed, I
was reading the Chronicle letters to the ed-
itor from Tuesday, Nov 13, and came across
a disturbing rant about which persons
should not be allowed to vote. According to
the author's 19th century worldview, hu-
mans have no intrinsic value and are enti-
tled to nothing from the greater society at
large. Furthermore, he feels anyone who
does not pass a so-called "voter test"
should be prevented from voting. He goes
on to say we all need to have a little "skin


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

three broad impact areas where
the Citrus County United Way will
issue grants income, health and
education.
One of the grant areas might be a
request for proposals to prepare peo-
ple to return back to work The num-
bers will be small, but every person
who goes back to work is one less
person getting assistance.
Under the education impact area,
a grant proposal might be helping
residents attain their GEDs. Too
many county residents don't even
have that simple piece of paper to get
them in the door for a job. WTI in In-
verness has the program but what
about transportation, babysitting or
mentoring to help the individual get
to WTI and earn the diploma?
Just like every other community in
America, Citrus County has its own
unique problems needing to be ad-


dressed. Going forward, the United
Way board is going to identify some
of those needs and ask agencies to
design specific programs to address
them. Some of the funding might go
to existing United Way agencies that
want to address the needs. But other
agencies might step in and be part of
the solution.
And that will be the big difference
in our United Way It's going to look
for solutions and measurable results.
Some of the efforts won't work, but
some will. By getting to the root
causes of the problems, the commu-
nity has the opportunity to make
long-term changes in residents' lives.
Those changes happen one person
at a time.
If you want to be part of the solu-
tion in Citrus County, make a contri-
bution to the United Way Your help
is needed.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of
the Chronicle. His email address is
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


in the game other than your entitlement
benefits."
He claims he is not suggesting we "go
back to a poll tax," but people should be
able to answer basic questions about our
form of government, the U.S. Constitution
or how many members are in the Senate
and House, etc. I agree in a perfect world
we would all be knowledgeable about cur-
rent events and our politics and govern-
ment. But that is not the reality of
everyday life for many of us.
His ridiculous proposals beg the ques-
tion of how would he administer this test?
Would there be a written questionnaire?
Will questions be posed whilst people are
on the voting line or will there be some sort
of pre-screening one could do from home?
Not everyone is interested in who Tim
Geithner is (Secretary of the Treasury), or
how many members are in the Senate (100)
or House of Representatives (435). In
truth, a lot of people vote for their party
out of habit, emotion and brand affiliation
without necessarily knowing much about
current events or how the government is
constructed (do schools no longer teach
these things? or do people just forget over
time what they learned in the ninth
grade?) No, most people have lives that in-
clude work and family They don't have
much time or inclination for following pol-
itics. Not all of us sit around and stew
about these things.
Unfortunately, there are stupid and un-
informed people all over the country and
one would not have to look very hard to
find them.
Finally, our intrepid author concludes
with "Give me a break. The world is about
to come to and end as we know it...."
Well, guess what? The world as we know
it is always coming to an end things
never stay the same. Predictions of the
world coming to an end have been with us
for thousands of years and we are still
here. And you say you think we should
have some "skin in the game" in order to
vote? Well, I see from your comments you
have skin in the game and I see it is thin.


John Read is the assistant public
information officer for the Citrus County
Democratic Executive Committee.


HAGAMAN
Continued from Page C1

convention or are willing to
believe anything President
Obama and his czars tell
them. The poor leader who
called for the vote was obvi-
ously stunned at the first
vote and could not believe
after three votes it was still
a resounding "No."
Had this election taken
place one year ago, the out-
come would likely have
been the way it should have
been. After all the months of
demonizing Mitt Romney, by
the mainstream press and
the Obama campaign, ap-
parently the old saying "if
you tell the lie enough times
it will become believable"
proved to be a reality.
The great apology tour
coupled with aiding the
overthrow of several Middle
East governments, only to let
them be replaced by
America-hating govern-
ments, should have given
our voters great pause. Yet,
even an attack on our sover-
eign territory in Libya did
not faze our leader or the
press. President Obama
paid lip service to the event,
then hurried to Las Vegas to
continue his goal in life; his
perpetual campaign. In the
meantime, a CBS reporter,
who it now appears to have
had access to information
otherwise, joined the debate
over the issue with false in-
formation. She was sup-
posed to be a moderator, not
part of the debate.
It is very likely George
Bush will be blamed for our
continued decline as an eco-
nomically strong nation as
well as our being respected


Three Civil War books


available at museum


JOHN GRANNAN
Special to the Chronicle

When reading about the Civil
War, the accounts I have en-
joyed the most were those con-
taining diary entries and letters
written by individuals who lived
during the horrible conflict. To
read what they wrote as the war
engulfed them has more of an
impact than some author's in-
terpretation of what happened.
For the collector of books
about the Civil War, the mu-
seum store at the Old Court-
house Heritage Museum has
three books with a Florida con-
nection. One of those is about a
Florida family who lived on the
St. Johns River The book is
"Rose Cottage Chronicles -
Civil War Letters of the Bryant-
Stephens Families of North
Florida." It was out of print, but
now has been reprinted in pa-
perback by the University of
Florida Press.
The authors are Arch Fredric
Blakley, a military historian,
and Ann Smith Lainhart and
Winston Bryant Stephens Jr,
both descendants of the Bryant-
Stephens families. Numerous
family diaries and letters were
utilized to give the reader a
sense of how the war affected
the writers.
The Bryant family moved
from Massachusetts to Florida
in 1841 and settled in Welaka in
Putnam County The Civil War
would separate the family po-
litically and geographically
The father would remain a
Union man and leave Florida
in 1861 but his four sons would
defend their state and fight for
the Confederacy The only
daughter would marry into the
Stephens family who lived in
Marion County
There is a connection to our
local area with several refer-


in the world as a leader
Some are making such com-
ments even now. How sad!
Now that the 99 percent
and the 47 percent have spo-
ken, they can prepare to re-
ceive their just reward. Of
course, the middle class also
will suffer for it as we all be-
come part of the 99 percent
or 47 percent
Why, you say? Where do
you expect the funds to
come from to give everyone
"free" medical care, forgive
college students their stu-
dent loans and punish suc-
cess at every point. Also, as
has been discovered in
Greece and pretty much
throughout the European
Union, governments trying
to be all things to all people
cannot long survive. Also,
when our president de-
means the wealthy while he
is one of them, how can you
believe anything he says? In
fact how did he become a
multi-millionaire without
any visible source of wealth
creation effort? Why has
that not been a question?
As I mentioned earlier in
this article, the middle class
will pay dearly We always
do. Have you looked at the
price of groceries lately?
Also, any other staple items
we purchase continue to in-
crease in price. At the same
time, middle income has de-
creased sharply Business
will continue to hold back
since they never know what
the next move will be to
make it difficult to keep up
with ever increasing govern-
ment regulations and de-
mands on their success.
So far there is no discus-
sion about reducing our na-
tional debt. The word
"deficit" is being tossed
around, but reducing the


ences to William and Martha
Priest, who lived across the St.
Johns River with their eight
children and 11 slaves. After
the war, the Priest family
would move to Red Level,
where some of their descen-
dants still reside and live all
across Citrus County,
Another book with local ties
is "A Small but Spartan Band -
The Florida Brigade in Lee's
Army of Northern Virginia." It
was written by Zack C. Waters
and James C. Edmonds. Waters
is descended from Early Allen
who left Crystal River to join
the Confederate Army He was
wounded at the Battle of Cold
Harbor His brother, Eason,
was killed. They were in the
Crystal River Coast Guards
formed in 1861 which later be-
came part of the Florida Ninth
Regiment, Company C, which
surrendered with Lee at Appo-
mattox.
A third book is "Thunder on
the River The Civil War in
Northeast Florida" by Daniel
Schafer, professor emeritus of
history at the University of
North Florida. It details the
battle between the Union and
Confederate forces over con-
trol of the St. Johns River Jack-
sonville was captured multiple
times by Union forces, which
would abandon it and then re-
turn for another conquest. The
constant upheaval of life for
those who lived along and near
the river is documented with
many families changing alle-
giances to whichever side con-
trolled their local area.
All of these books are for sale
at the Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum Store, the best little
bookstore in Inverness. The
museum is open from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Friday
For more information, call
352-341-6427.


deficit only means our debt
will not increase as fast.
President Obama uses the
word deficit repeatedly to
confuse people. Under his
plan, we will continue to
spend into oblivion and any
more revenue will be com-
mitted to new spending
proposals.
You may think this is just
an angry Republican rant.
However, there were mis-
takes made by the Republi-
cans as well.
First off, the lack of effort
to get out the vote may have
played a role. Some thought
Republicans were so over-
whelming in numbers the
extra effort was not needed.
Such a sentiment was sug-
gested by some in Citrus
County
The major problem
seemed to be reluctance to
push harder for our conser-
vative values. This is com-
pounded by the
overwhelming effort in the
mainstream media to
repackage any real conser-
vative position as "extreme."
Extreme they are in many
cases, but they are ex-
tremely correct.
Another difference is Re-
publicans do not fully sup-
port anyone who bucks the
establishment. At the same
time, Democrats continue to
protect even some of the
most scandalous acts and
behavior of their own and
Democratic Party voters just
say: "well the Republicans
did such and such" as an ex-
cuse for their bad behavior
While this election is a sad
one for all of us including
the 99 percent and the 47
percent we can only hope
and pray God's plan is to
keep us from the "end
times" a little longer


,J~ (
Sq! U Tl WOWLL wS
Kf.TI OLAWNTOCOMPROA
AW A LjvLTOO[M


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 C3





C4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


FACES
Continued from Page C1

Young voters in the state,
two-thirds of whom backed
Obama, also were more often
the target of Obama's cam-
paign than Romney's: 35 per-
cent said they were contacted
by Obama, 11 percent by
Romney Among senior citi-
zens, two-thirds of whom
voted Republican, 33 percent
were contacted by Obama, 34
percent by Romney
Howard University soci-
ologist Roderick Harrison,
former chief of racial statis-
tics at the Census Bureau,
said Obama's campaign
strategists proved them-
selves to be "excellent de-
mographers."
"They have put together a
coalition of populations that
will eventually become the
majority or are marching to-
ward majority status in the
population, and populations
without whom it will be very
difficult to win national
elections and some
statewide elections, partic-
ularly in states with large
black and Hispanic popula-
tions," Harrison said.
One way to see the trend
is to look at the diversity of
young voters. Among voters
under 30 years old this year,
only 58 percent are white.
Among senior voters, 87 per-
cent are white.
Brookings Institution de-
mographer William H. Frey
said policymakers and
politicians need to prepare


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A LOOK AT THE CHANGING MAKEUP OF U.S. ELECTORATE
A look at how much various demographic groups' share of the vote has changed since 2000,
the year Republican George W. Bush defeated Democrat Al Gore, who narrowly carried the popular vote but lost the Electoral College:


* HISPANICS 17 percent of U.S. population
Share of 2000 vote: 7 percent
How they voted for president:
Gore: 62 percent
Bush: 35 percent
Share of 2012 vote: 10 percent (up 3 percent-
age points)
How they voted for president:
Obama: 71 percent
Romney: 27 percent
* BLACKS 12 percent of U.S. population
Share of 2000 vote: 10 percent
How they voted for president:
Gore: 90 percent
Bush: 9 percent
Share of 2012 vote: 13 percent (up 3 percent-
age points)
How they voted for president:
Obama: 93 percent
Romney: 6 percent
* WHITES 63 percent of U.S. population


for a growing "cultural gen-
eration gap."
"Both parties are getting
the message that this is a
new age and a new Amer-
ica," Frey said. "Finally, the
politics is catching up with
the demography"
Just as Republicans need
to do a better job of attract-
ing Hispanics, Frey said,
Democrats need to do more
to reach out to whites.
The face of Congress is
changing more slowly than


the electorate or the popu-
lation, but changing it is.
House Democratic leader
Nancy Pelosi of California
was happy to highlight the
news for the first time in his-
tory, more than half the
members of her caucus next
year will be women, black,
Hispanic or Asian. She said
it "reflects the great diversity
and strength of our nation."
House Speaker John
Boehner of Ohio, whose
caucus is far more white


Share of 2000 vote: 81 percent
How they voted for president:
Bush: 54 percent
Gore: 42 percent
Share of 2012 vote: 72 percent (down 9 per-
centage points)
How they voted for president:
Romney: 59 percent
Obama: 39 percent
* SINGLE WOMEN 26 percent of
U.S. population age 15 and older
Share of 2000 vote: 19 percent
How they voted for president:
Gore: 63 percent
Bush: 33 percent
Share of 2012 vote: 23 percent (up 4 percent-
age points)
How they voted for president:
Obama: 67 percent
Romney: 31 percent
* MARRIED WOMEN 25 percent of
U.S. population age 15 and over


and male, said Republicans
need to learn to "speak to all
Americans you know, not
just to people who look like
us and act like us."
Former Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice, one of
the GOP's most prominent
black women, said the party
needs to understand "the
changing demographics in
the country really necessi-
tate an even bigger tent for
the Republican Party"
"Clearly we are losing im-


Share of 2000 vote: 33 percent
How they voted for president:
Bush: 49 percent
Gore: 48 percent
Share of 2012 vote: 31 percent (down 2 per-
centage points)
How they voted for president:
Romney: 53 percent
Obama: 46 percent
* WHITE MEN 31 percent of U.S. population
Share of 2000 vote: 38 percent
How they voted for president:
Bush: 60 percent
Gore: 36 percent
Share of 2012 vote: 34 percent (down 4 per-
centage points)
How they voted for president:
Romney: 62 percent
Obama: 35 percent
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau 2011 statistics.
Exit polls conducted for The Associated Press.


portant segments of that
electorate and what we
have to do is to appeal to
those people not as identity
groups but understanding
that if you can get the iden-
tity issue out of the way, then
you can appeal on the
broader issues that all
Americans share a concern
for," she said.
All sides know the demo-
graphic trends are sure to
become more pronounced
in the future.


In the past year, minority
babies outnumbered white
newborns for the first time
in U.S. history By midcen-
tury, Hispanics, blacks,
Asians and multiracial peo-
ple combined will become
the majority of the U.S.
Since 2000, the Hispanic
and Asian populations have
grown by more than 40 per-
cent, fueled by increased
immigration of younger
people as well as more
births.


M 1 A ll'P CI S, CH Ail I.lililClf :C .ult lti lC S LI.ING !,:I. I.-F1lE : l -7.r. nlir lir il:
5TATI|: j:.E fllTA nOI I1E' r TIMPL I hiDORMIEMErJ AFl IB AL Cn REiE:-kqEitllMJiTl.N B TIHE Tj1 IE


Fr ee of RememDrance
Place an ornament on a Tree of Remembrance
to honor or memorialize someone. I


December 1st
Christmas in the Hills Parade/Arts & Crafts & Car Show
Christmas Parade Crystal River
The Nutcracker
Television Auction
Strings for a Season
K-9 Karnival


Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church proudly hosts
Citrus County

S" Father

Christmas

Ball

0 Friday December 7, 2012
All proceeds for 'Serving Our
S Savior" (SOS) FoodPantry
Cocktails/appetizers hour 6pm-7pm
Dinner 7pm-8pm.
/ Dance & Special Events 8p.m.-Hp.m.
SI Chet Cole Life
0 Enrichment Center
5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
# Lecanto, FL 34461-8531

Semi-Formal Attire


Tickets are $45 each (donation). Purchase at the church office,
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy CR 486
Monday-Friday, from 8 am. until 1 p.m.
For more information please cal 527-0052,419-5489, 563-5932 or 270-3391


December 14th
Adopt a Tree

December 16th
The Joy of Christmas A Singing Celebration of Carols
Citrus Springs Christmas Parade

December 19th
Celebration of Lights

December 20th
Celebration of Lights

December 22nd
Crystal River Boat Parade


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I.


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS __
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




A SHOPPING


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Five tips to steer clear of debt during holidays


DAVE CARPENTER
AP Personal Finance Writr r
-CHICAGO
Black Friday deals are start] i,
early this year, and that me.Ins
more pressure to spend, spend.
spend.
As the holiday shopping season e\-
pands and retailers make impulse
buys ever-easier via smartphone .nd
otherwise, consumers have to be extr.j-
disciplined to avoid money trouble
Many are willing to indulge. The Nji-
tional Retail Federation forecasts hlii-
day sales to rise 4.1 percent to $586; 1
billion this year, a bigger increase thnu
usual over the past 10 years. Shoppers
are expected to spend an average
$749.51 in November and December
with many shelling out much more
Weak economy? What weak ecoi 0 \ i\v
Unfortunately, many will take
months to pay off the goodies the.\
bought for loved ones or (shh) the.i-
selves at doorbuster deals and other
special offers.
Among the potential debt traps tor
the unwary this year:
Special Black Friday shopping.
hours actually begin Thursday, No\ 22.
at major retailers, even as early as 8
a.m. Thanksgiving Day Ramping up
the temptation level, websites tra: ki n-w.
Black Friday sales have been send-
ing emails with "leaked" sales
specials since Halloween.
Some credit card issuers
have mailed blank checks for
their customers to use, just in
time for the holiday shopping
crush. Interest rates on these
cash advances can run 20
percent or more if you don't
pay off your card within the
prescribed period. '.*
Card issuers increas- V
ingly are attaching spending
requirements to generous
rewards and bonus offers
they dangle ahead of Black
Friday, making you spend
with their card in order to
earn them. That's sinking a
much bigger hook into the
consumer than the past
trend of merchants offering
peeks at their sales in ex-
change for Facebook "likes."
"Opening a new credit
card just to get a 'deal' is
never a good idea," said Jeff
Somogyi, an editor at deal
aggregator Dealnews.com.
"Getting into a new financial
entanglement just to get a
jump on Black Friday sales
is probably an even worse
idea."
This doesn't mean you
have to shun all holiday
sales in order to remain fi-
nancially responsible.
But remember: Smart
spending for the holidays
isn't all about finding the
best deals. It's important to
be on your toes to prevent
Black Friday and the days
surrounding it from dooming
you to too much debt
Some tips to keep spend-
ing under control and debt,
if any, to a minimum:
1. Have a plan.
Make a list of who you're
shopping for, what items you
hope to find and how much
you intend to spend on each
person. Stick to it! Your plan
should call for you to start
your shopping online, at
least to compare prices and
look for deals before you
head for the stores. Avoid
impulse purchases. And


Understanding ins, outs of nonprofit agencies


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


Register to ask for
donations
It's the law! All Florida
nonprofit organizations who
intend to solicit donations in
Florida to support their
causes must register this in-
tent with the state of Florida.
Careful review and comple-
tion of the filing documents is
crucial. The filing is an an-
nual requirement. Managers
and volunteers are responsi-
ble to ensure the registration


is performed in a timely fash-
ion. This regulation is one of
the obligations that impact
not-for-profit organizations.
When there are important
regulations to which officers,
directors and staff need to
address and accomplish, the
Not-For-Profit Organization
Resource Center can help.
Nonprofit resource
center to open soon
The Not-For-Profit Organi-
zation Resource Center will


guide and counsel officers,
staff and volunteers in non-
profit organizations' best
practice management. The
Resource Center will be a
Florida State 501(c) 3 not-for-
profit organization.
More information will
come in the Nonprofit Briefs
column.
Need for a nonprofit
Resource Center
The complexities and de-
mands placed on and ex-


pected of all nonprofits come
from many directions. The
federal and state governments
monitor them more closely
than ever The IRS has in-
creased scrutiny over non-
profit management,
governance concerns and non-
taxable privileges are abused.
Economic pressure for
more revenue in support
service programs has the po-
tential for nonprofits to seek


Page D3


Attorney

can help


to change

name
Dear Bruce: I would
like to change my
name back to my
former name. Do I have to
hire an attorney for this,
or can I just make a peti-
tion and present it to the
courts? Reader, via
email
Dear reader: You can
handle almost all of these
kinds of matters yourself,
but I don't suggest you do
so. Depending on the state
where you live, the
complexity can vary
demonstrably
I would have an attor-
ney handle something as
important as this. I would
never take a chance and
do it myself. Too many
things can go wrong.
Dear Bruce: I'm sure
you've been asked this be-
fore, but I'm going to ask it
again.
A friend told me when a
person dies, the estate/
- family is not responsible
for credit card debt the de-
ceased has accrued. This
doesn't seem right, but I
would like to get the
straight story, so I'm com-
ing to you. B.T, via email
Dear B.T.: I do get this
question a lot, but I'm
happy to answer it again.
What you heard is true
sometimes. It depends
on who signed for the
card, whose name is on
the card, whether other
people were allowed to
charge using this card, etc.
On balance, if only the
deceased had the card,
the family may not be re-
sponsible. But the estate
certainly is. If there are
assets in the estate, those
obligations must be re-
tired before any remain-
ing assets are divided
among the heirs.
Dear Bruce: I am plan-
ning to purchase a home.
My lender requires a
lender's title insurance
policy Do I need to pur-
chase an owner's title pol-
icy? Everyone tells me I
don't need one because if
the title is clear for the
lender, it should be clear
for the owner. Reader,
via email
Dear reader: Problems
do arise from time to time,
which is why the lender
requires the title insur-
ance. It will cost you rela-
tively little to extend the
title insurance to you, and
it will be with you as long
as you own the home.
I would never consider
purchasing a piece of
property on which I did
not have a title policy I
hope you will consider
buying this insurance.
Dear Bruce: My daugh-
ter and her husband re-
cently received $20,000
from a lawsuit. She is a
stay-at-home mom, and he
works. I know this is a
very general question, but
where is the best place for
them to invest this
money? I know CDs are
out, as they earn just
about nothing. Sandy in
Pennsylvania
Dear Sandy: You are
right when you say if your
daughter were to invest in
CDs, she would receive
only a pittance as a return.
CDs are the least desir-
able way to go unless you
are absolutely certain you
don't want to take any risk
whatsoever
To receive a better re-
turn, your daughter will
See .Page D3





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D,

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NOVEMBER


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-.-
Accepting the award for Superior Residences is Theressa Foster, with Gerry Mulligan, publisher of the Citrus County
Chronicle and treasurer of the Chamber; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank and ambassador for the Chamber; and
Josh Wooten, president and CEO of the Chamber.
Superior Residences of Lecanto! Superior Residences opened its doors in
September and is the proud recipient of the November New Image Award
from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Our passion is caring for
residents and their families who are suffering from Alzheimer's and dementia.
Our motto is "live the moment ... love the moment." This 80-resident memory care
facility is part of a larger organization, Superior Residences, which owns, oper-
ates or manages six assisted living communities throughout the state of Florida.



Innovation, compassion, appreciation


wrap up the year in Chamber lunches


Happy Thanksgiving
from the Citrus
County Chamber
of Commerce!
As you begin your
holiday season, we
encourage you to...


Buy

Lecal
SPEND IT HERE KEEP IT HERE



Check out all of our
upcoming events at
www.citruscounty
chamber.com.

H Wf


T he Citrus County Chamber of Commerce held its final
lunch of 2012 on Friday, Nov. 9. About 100 Chamber mem-
bers attended the event, held at Plantation on Crystal River,
which honored veterans and Hospice Month and featured Asa
Lanum, a sought-after speaker on innovation. HPH Hospice
sponsored the event and brought several guest speakers in-
cluding, at left, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Jason Godwin, an Army
National Guard Blackhawk helicopter pilot who completed
two combat tours. Godwin humbly thanked us for supporting
him and the troops and received a standing ovation. At right is
Asa Lanum, relating one of his anecdotal stories on innovation
that covered failures and successes for companies such as
Apple and McDonald's as well as products such as Mylar


Welcome new member


Crow's Nest Antiques


Holding the scissors are owner Juanita Swing and her partner Butch Eaton, pictured here
with Chamber ambassadors from left: Sarah Rtts, First International Title; Tom Corcoran,
Life Care Center of Citrus County; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers;
Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee, associate member; Crystal
Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; Dan Pushee, associate member; Bill Hudson, Land Title
of Citrus County; Jenee Vickers, Kiddie Kampus Learning Center; Janet Mayo, Plantation on
Crystal River; Jeanne Green, The Grove Downtown; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George.
Chamber ambassadors welcome Crow's Crow's Nest Antiques is at 1384 N. Cit-
Nest Antiques to the Citrus County Cham- rus Ave. in Crystal River and is open from
ber of Commerce. Stop by and enjoy their 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday
selection of decorative and useful goods. They can be reached at 352-564-0347.


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE ...
Cheryl Jacob
Citrus County Chronicle

... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Sponsorships, vendor

space still available


Looking for an economi-
cal way to get your company
name out into the market-
place? Well we have two
fantastic options for you!
SPONSORSHIP
Choose the level of sponsor-
ship that your company can
afford! We have sponsorship
opportunities for the Christ-
mas parades as well as Man-
atee Festival and
Strawberry Festival. There
are many sponsorship levels
available for these events,
and it is a simple, inexpen-
sive way to put your com-
pany name in front of more
than 10,000 people at a pa-
rade and more than 15,000
people at a festival. Contact
Keith Pullias today at 352-
795-3149 or keith@


citruscountychamber.com if
you are interested in a spon-
sorship opportunity.
MARKETPLACE VEN-
DOR Complete your ap-
plication NOW for vendor
space at the 2013 Florida
Manatee Festival and the
2013 Floral City Strawberry
Festival. There is not a more
economical method to put
your company name in front
of more than 15,000 people
over a two-day period. Your
company does not have to
be a Chamber member to
take part in this opportunity.
The Marketplace vendor
spots are filling quickly, so
contact Jeff Inglehart today
at 352-795-3149 or jeff@
citruscountychamber.com to
reserve your space.


6 n"like"uson


PO faceDbook -





Calling all Mo Bros and Mo Sistas! November, or should I say
November is Men's Health Awareness Month and Mo Bros across
Citrus County are growing out their 'Staches to raise awareness!
Dorothy Pernu Marketing and Communications Director at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center co-hosts Chamber Chat this week.
Dorothy shares with us how men over 50 can receive a VIP coupon for
a free prostate screening at the Mo Show and Finale Party. Dale and
Leon McClellan--two of our Mo Bros-- will show off their stubble so
far. Will they be keeping their mustache? Find out at the Mo Show
and Finale party at Burkes of Ireland Pub on Thursday November
29th at 6:U00pm. The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce wants to
encourage you to SHOP LOCAL this holiday season. Now through the
holidays we will be featuring local Citrus County merchants. This week
we are excited to have Lori Lenoir from Glass Garage and Martha Ann
Brunsink from Pepper Creek Pottery. These talented ladies will be
bringing some fantastic items and the best part is that they are all
handmade right here in our community. Give a gift that is truly
unique! Is preserving your good credit at the top of your holiday wish
list? Rhonda Lcstinsky- First Vice President of Nature Coast Bank--
shares with us how we can make wise financial decisions this holiday
decision. Nature Coast Bank tells us why they are your hometown
bank!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday 6prm--
Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every week! If yonu would like your
business or local event featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@iaol.com. "LIKE"
Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past segments and updates on
our weekly show!


Chamber members: Making news and on the move


Holiday Inn Express wins
IHG Torchbearer Award
The Holiday Inn Express Crystal
River received the IHG (InterContinen-
tal Hotels Group) 2012 Torchbearer
Award, the company's most prestigious
award. The Torchbearer Award was
presented during the 2012 IHG Ameri-
cas Investors & Leadership Conference
in Orlando on Oct. 24 to 26.
The Holiday Inn Express Crystal River
was chosen from the IHG system of more
than 4,500 hotels. A Torchbearer trophy,
the company's symbol of excellence, will
be on permanent display at the hotel.
Nearly 5,000 franchise owners, oper-
ators and company officials attended
the conference.
The Holiday Inn Express Crystal
River, a valued Chamber member since
March 2009, is at 1203 N.E. Fifth
Street, Crystal River. They can be
reached at 352-563-1111.


CMHS welcomes
Dr. William R. Brown
Citrus Memorial Health System wel-
comes William R. Brown, D.P.M., to its
active medical staff. Dr. Brown completed
podiatric surgical residencies at both
Kaiser Foundation Hospital in California
and Richmond Heights General Hospital
in Ohio. In addition to being a skilled po-
diatric surgeon, he specializes in foot
and reconstructive rearfoot and ankle
surgery. Brown is board-certified by the
American Board of Podiatric Surgery and
the American Board of Podiatric Ortho-
pedics and Primary Podiatric Medicine.
He is a member of the American Podi-
atric Medical Association, American
Professional Wound Care Association
and the American College of Foot and
Ankle Surgeons.
Dr. Brown practices at Inverness Sur-
gical Association. The facility is at 403
W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.


Healthy Living Magazine
welcomes Cathy Holland
Healthy Living Magazine is pleased to
announce a new addition to its market-
ing team. Please give a warm welcome
to Cathy Holland. Cathy and her hus-
band are natives of Pasco County, and
she has spent most of her working ca-
reer fundraising for local and national
organizations.
To learn more about this popular
magazine in the Nature Coast, visit
www.naturecoasthealthyliving.com.
Dr. Ravi Sharma addresses
Veterans Day luncheon
Chamber Member Ravi Sharma,
board-certified cardiovascular surgeon,
Premier Vein Center, Homosassa,
spoke on heart and vein diseases to the
Spring Hill chapter of the Military Offi-
cers Association of America (MOAA).
Members of MOAA attended from


Citrus and Hernando counties and the
surrounding area.
Premier Vein Center, a valued
Chamber member since March 2012,
provides solutions for all vein disorders.
They are in Homosassa and The
Villages. Call them at 352-621-0777.

Better Health Chiropractic
attends FCS Convention
Dr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant of Bet-
ter Health Chiropractic, PA, Crystal
River, just returned from the Florida Chi-
ropractic Society Convention. There
she studied the Biophysics Tech-
nique/C.B.P. corrective care for better
posture resulting in better health. She
also studied clinical radiology of differ-
ent types of arthritis, extremity adjusting
of arms and legs, "Healing Power of
Science Philosophy and art of Chiro-
practic" and "Family Wellness Chiro-
practic." Better Health Chiropractic, a


valued Chamber member since Octo-
ber 1994, is at 6166 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River, and can be reached at
352-795-8911.
All About Nature
sets up shop in mall
All About Nature has moved their
popular store from Citrus Avenue to a
larger shopping environment at the
Crystal River Mall, effective Nov. 1. The
shop proudly features the addition of
several local farm-produced goods now
available: local pepper jellies, local
honey, local goat milk soaps, local
cedar birdhouses and more!
They can be reached at 352-
563-1425. Visit www.allaboutnature.org
for a partial list of products at the store.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to
Saturday, 12 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday.
They are open for holiday shopping and
manatee season daily until 9 p.m. and
from 12 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday.


m


90





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST

Businesses of the month at Crystal River Mall


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE LEFT: Crystal River Mall manager Millie Bresnahan, left, congratulates August Business of the Month winner Jenny Arcadipane of F.S. Music. ABOVE RIGHT: Piercing Pagoda
manager Katie Doran, left, accepts the September Business of the Month award. Standing next to Doran is Crystal River Mall manager Millie Bresnahan.


Two mall stores
recognized
Crystal River Mall recently
started a Business of the Month
recognition award for the tenant
that creates an outstanding vi-
sual appearance of the store,
creative displays, use of adver-
tising, thinking outside the box
and, last but not least, cus-
tomer service.
The Crystal River Mall Au-
gust Business of the Month
goes to F.S. Music, which con-
ducted a Summer Rock Camp
that culminated in a concert
performance at Center Court.
F.S. Music staff have shown ini-
tiative by bringing in signature
events and vendors from out-
side, such as Fender Guitar for
a free string change and the
Tribute to American Bandstand
Concert.
The Crystal River Mall
September Business of the
Month goes to Piercing



HERZOG
Continued from Page D1

revenue inconsistent with
their tax exempt status. Uni-
formed management can
spell the loss of tax exemp-
tions and possible dissolu-
tion. The list of issues and
concerns is almost endless.
The Not-For-Profit Re-
source Center can help.
Best practices
in management
Almost never-ending de-
mand exists for constant
awareness and understand-
ing of the regulations im-
pacting the life of a
nonprofit organization.
Expectations and re-
quirements for informed



SENSE
Continued from Page D1

the balance before you run
one up.
3. Beware of
special card offers.
In addition to rewards
and bonus deals, issuers are
tempting consumers by of-
fering incentives such as no-
interest balance transfers,
extra perks by meeting cer-
tain spending levels and in-
creased cash back in
specified categories. Resist
the bait. Companies know
that many won't; that's the
reason total consumer
credit card debt is close to
$600 billion. "No deal is a
good deal if you can't afford
it," says Gail Cunningham of
the National Foundation for
Credit Counseling.
4. Use layaway.
Take advantage of the
resurgence of holiday lay-
away programs. Retailers
from Kmart and Sears to



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

have to take a degree of risk.
Whether this is in a mutual
fund that is somewhat con-
servative to aggressive is a
question only she and her
husband can answer
I would suggest they talk
to a financial planner who
can guide them through the
options. I'm assuming they
are young since you say your


Pagoda, which took advantage
of free mall advertising using
table tents, posters, marquee
and website. The manager also
inquired about another table for
displays, which in turn helped
increase sales for the month.
Piercing Pagoda also keeps a
customer's list and advises
them of special events.
For more information about
these events, leasing opportu-
nities or Crystal River Mall, con-
tact the mall office at
352-795-2585, visit www.the-
crystalrivermall.com or Like it
on Facebook at The Crystal
River Mall.
A thriving mall for the many
tourists that visit the area, an-
chor stores include Belk,
JCPenney, Kmart and Regal
Cinema. The mall also includes
a variety of specialty shops and
eateries. Crystal River Mall is
on the north side of Crystal
River along U.S. 19.
Visit the newest tenants: All

management have grown
larger than ever antici-
pated. Here are just a few of
the important concerns:
Legal structure and re-
quired document filing; se-
lecting the correct IRS
nonprofit status; generating
bylaws; applying for state
and federal tax exemptions;
identifying and selecting
volunteers to manage and
govern the organization; es-
tablishing appropriate pro-
grams to generate revenue
in support of financial obli-
gations and timely govern-
mental filings. Nonprofit
management principals are
a must for success.
The principals not
the personalities
For many years, a well-
meaning person could

Toys R Us and Walmart
have lowered or waived fees
this year shoppers pay to
participate in these inter-
est-free, pay-over-time pro-
grams. With stores eager not
to lose customers to the
competition, debt-conscious
consumers can snag gifts at
attractive prices while not
having to pay an extra fee
just to avoid buying with
their credit cards.
5. Get creative.
Find it difficult to stick to
a holiday spending budget?
Give gift cards and make
something personal to go
with them. Or give experi-
ences instead of "stuff" -
perhaps a shared hike, na-
ture outing or special
home-cooked meal. Or vol-
unteer together at a soup
kitchen, homeless shelter
or nursing home if your gift
recipient doesn't want
more material items, sug-
gested Pamela Yellen, a fi-
nancial services consultant
and personal finance au-
thor The gifts people re-
member the most, as she
points out, are often free.

daughter's a stay-at-home
mom. If they can do without
this money and just let it
work for them, they will
have a nice little amount
down the road.

Send questions to
brnuce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money P.O. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions of general inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


About Nature, Erica's Boutique,
Get Memorable Office and
Printing Supplies and Wrestling
World FL.
Citrus Memorial to
host career fair
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem is looking to hire employ-
ees for nursing and allied
health positions in Citrus
County.
Company representatives
will be on hand to interview
qualified candidates for posi-
tions from 1 to 5 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 29, at the Historic School
House on the main hospital
campus, 502 W. Highland Blvd.
in Inverness.
Open positions include those
in:
0 Cardiac Catheterization
0 Critical Care
0 Emergency Services
0 Neuro Telemetry
0 Home Health Care

launch a nonprofit organi-
zation to fill an unmet need.
That can still be done today
However, the path to initial
and long-term success today
is much more complex.
Launching the nonprofit, its
middle game and long-term
success requires well-in-


Physical and Occupational
Therapy
Cytotechnology
During the fair, candidates
can meet managers and as-
sess the company culture while
learning about hours, pay and
training. Benefits include full
health care, a 403(B) plan, tu-
ition assistance and more.
Those wanting to move forward
will be invited for a final
interview.
Applicants should bring cur-
rent copies of resumes and
dress in business appropriate
attire. Interested attendees
should apply online prior to the
fair at www.citrusmh.com/ca-
reers. For information or to reg-
ister for the fair, call
352-344-6934.
Capt Mike's cruises
up and running
Capt. Mike's Lazy River
Cruises could not run the boat
tours for seven weeks because

formed management.
People make things hap-
pen. Best practices are tools
and organization manage-
ment principals is the foun-
dation on which a
successful nonprofit is built
to last.
Remember, it's the prin-


C I TRUST .- COUNTYo i

CHwwChoNiCLE
wwwchronicleonline.com


the Withlacoochee River came
up 5 feet in one night after tropi-
cal storm Debby in August.
Now the water has receded
and Capt. Mike's Lazy River
cruises are running seven days
a week out of Stumpknocker's
Restaurant off State Road. 200.
Call for a reservation at 352-
637-2726 or visit www.lazyriver
cruises.com.
Falkowski new ER
medical director
Oak Hill
Hospital an-
nounces the
appointment
of Robert
Falkowski,
M.D., as
emergency
department
medical di- Robert
rector effec- Falkowski
tive Nov. 18.
Dr. Falkowski has served as

cipals that matters, not the
personalities. People come
and go from organizations.
Informed and motivated
volunteers drive the suc-
cess, but it's the principals
of good management that
allow the organization a
long successful life.


an emergency room physician
at Oak Hill Hospital for the past
11 years. Dr. Falkowski is board
certified in emergency medicine
and has served on many med-
ical staff and Oak Hill Hospital
committees during the past
years of his tenure as an emer-
gency room physician.
Dr. Falkowski attended
Stonehill College in Massachu-
setts and received his medical
degree from the University of
Massachusetts Medical School
in Worcester. He also com-
pleted his internship and emer-
gency medicine residency at
Allegheny General Hospital in
Pittsburgh, Pa. (MUG)
Chiropractic facility
changes location
Well Adjusted Chiropractic,
formerly at 1027 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Hernando, has
moved to 6565 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Ste. B., Crystal
River. It is open for business.

-0-
Dr FrederickJ. Herzog,
Ph. D., is executive direc-
tor of the Not-For-Profit
Organization Resource
Center He can be reached
via email: therzog@
tampabay.rrcom.


p


Get us your letter by

December 21 st and

we will get it to Santa!




Holiday

O^Cookie

* Contest



Don't forget
to Vote for
Your favorite
SHoliday
Cookie Recipe!


Experience the joys of Christmas

Light Displays in Citrus County


Entry Deadline 8pm December 10th

Submit up to 2 photos of your home.

Prizes To Be Announced


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 D3


BUSINESS









D4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


CLASSIFIED



To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds

In Print


and

Online

All

The Time


CLEARVIEW ESTATES
3+BR/ 2.5 BA, 2+Garage
on 1 acre. Clear views up
and down the trails. Too
many extras, must see.
Mid $200's 352-860-0444

CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460

HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
Saturday, Nov. 24th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020

HOMOSASSA1
2Br/1' BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 1PM-3PM
7724 Glendale Ct.
4BR/4BA 2.5 Acres,
Horse Friendly
Door Prize-First 5,
Plantation Realty
Charlene Pilgrim,
Realtor 352-464-2215




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers, Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087




3 Kittens 9 wks old
2 orange & white
1 white & black
Eat Good, Use Litter
Box
(352) 628-1783
BORDER COLLIE MIX
Housebroken,shots
spade, 5 yrs old. Very
affectionate. 527-4990
FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy access
Pine Ridge
352-746-3545
FREE KITTENS
10 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
FREE KITTENS
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
FREE: Two fruit trees.
Honey Murcotte and
Homosassa orange. You
must dig. About 3' tall.
Must be moved.
352-628-3076. No calls
before 9 am or after 8 pm
please.
LG PINE CONES
you will collect and haul
pis call 352-212-6356
REFRIGERATOR
apt size, 352-628-2150




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Navals, Gift Shipping,
Collard, Mustard greens
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378

Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
Fl Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077




Black Labrador Retnever,
about 1& 1/2 yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy",lost in
vicinity of W. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
BLACK PRESCRIPTION
SUNGLASSES
IN BLACK HARD CASE
LOST @ PIZZA HUT on
HWY 44 INVERNESS.
352-795-1648
DIAMOND RING LOST
Nov11th Between the
Church of Nazarene
Hernando & Wendys
Homosassa.
352-628-3763


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^* ** * *


In i B B-., [l i n ^ -.-1 i ,fB ,[ J




-665 1 -Toll Free: -888) 852-2340 mi:ca____^__ncen -in^co I ebste www^ch-rncoleo


name is Shadow, he's
very friendly, approx.
801bs 352-364-2646
INFLATABLE PUMPKIN
LOST in Pine Ridge @
5915 Larkspur Way.
Please call 352-746-3852
Lost Cat
Sugarmill area near, Pine
Dr & Sycamore. Female
adult black & white name
Spobbie. 352-503-2908
Lost
Marriage Licence
Near parking lot of
Motor Vehicle
in Inverness
Call (352) 560-3874
MAN'S RING
Sentimental
Lost in Inverness or
Dunnellon area. Please
call 352-746-1915




CALICO CAT
found in Homosassa
on W Lincoln Ln
pls call 352-212-6356




IN NEED OF EMER-
GENCY ASSISTANCE
have been in hospital for
an extended time.
**need good working
vehicle
**job placement
assistance
**anyway you can help
PIs Call 352-746-1240

NOTICE

A Transition
Committee meeting
of the Citrus County
Hospital Board
will be held on
Monday, November
26, 2012 at 1:30pm
in the in the Adminis-
trative Conference
Room, located on
the second floor of
the Citrus Memorial
Health System
Administration
Building, 502 Highland
Blvd., Inverness,
Florida to discuss:
Long range plann-
ing/ transition. Other

Copies of the
Agenda are availa-
ble by calling the
Citrus County
Hospital Board at
352-341-2245.
Any person wishing to
appeal any decision
made by this Board,
with respect to any
matter considered at
such meeting, must
ensure that a verba-
tim record of the pro-
ceedings is made,
which record must in-
clude the testimony
and evidence upon
which the appeal is
to be based.

Persons who require
special accommoda-
tions under the
American with
Disabilities should
contact the
Citrus County
Hospital Board Office,
123S. Pine Ave.,
Inverness, Fl. 34452
(352) 341-2245.





NEED A NEW
CAREER?
CAREER PREPARATION
COURSES
Starting Jan./Feb. '13

FIVE-WEEK PROGRAM
MEDICAL ASST. $1,420
TWO-WEEK PROGRAM
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT, $475.
PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119




Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
Fl Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077




2 Mausoleum Crypts
in Fero Memorial
Gardens, 3rd level, Bldg
F, side by side $15,000
(352) 270-9305




PT OFFICE ASST

**Corrected e-mail **
Mon-Wed 9-5 Crystal
River, $8/hr, General
Office and MS Office
skills required. Fast
paced. Familarity with
Citrus County a must!
Send Resume to:
ccccrecention(U
amail.com

RECEPTIONIST
Great Position with
long-term potential! High
energy individual with
strong communication
and multi-tasking skills.
Responsible for perform-
ing secretarial and recep-
tionist duties. Position
begins part-time requiring
18 hours per week. In-
termediate to advanced
skills in MS Word. Ability
to handle multi-line phone
system and strong phone
skills. Must be positive
and outgoing while main-
taming a professional atti-
tude and demeanor.
Email resume to
receptonis2541@yahoo.comor
Taxto
352-746-5861.


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966










ANGELS
SEEKING ANGELS
Experienced
caregivers
for private duty
in elderly clients' homes.
Seeking AM/PM, weekends
and 24 hr help. References
..-,, ii ,, ..... I

CNApreferred.
Call Visiting Angels
t M-F 8-5
1(352) 620-8484


CNA/HHA's
Live In Needed
$175. a day

Anlyv in Person
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
581 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Lecanto 34461
(352) 637-3111


FIT Medical
Insurance Biller

Experience required,
Benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1795M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429


F/T-P/T
Phelbotomist

For physicians office
with benefits and
competitive salary
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1786M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429


FRONT OFFICE

Experience preferred
Attn Candi
Fax resume
(352) 489-9400


@fSEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team

Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Reaional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace


Live In Care
Giver

Mature Person
For elderly gentle-
man. Must have
driver's lic.duties incl:
light housekeeping,
cooking and laundry
Ref's Req.
Call for more info.
(352) 628-2777


Residential SA
Tech

The Centers is seeking
Residential
Substance Abuse
Techs (Full-time &
PRN) for our Citrus
County Adolescent
Residential program
in Lecanto FL. Duties
focus on reducing or
minimizing the effects
of substance abuse,
a 12-Step recovery
process, assisting the
professional staff in
the assurance of
quality client care &
transporting clients.
Exp with troubled ad-
olescents reqd. Must
be available for shift
work & weekends.
Acceptable driving
record & clean back-
ground reqd. 10%
shift diff for 2nd/3rd
shifts. Full benefits pkg
for full-time positions
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify.
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

* Billing Clerk
* Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.

Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T, DIETARY AIDE

Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

RN's. LPN's. CNA's
ALL SHIFTS, FT &PT
Health Care
Experience Preferred.

MDS Coordinator
RN Preferrd LPN okay
MDS/Careplan
Experience required

RN
UNIT MANAGER

RN
WEEKEND SUPERVISOR

RECEPTIONIST
PART TIME


HE AER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Cir
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility

TBOSS Therapist

The Centers is seeking
Masters Level Thera-
pist for TBOSS position
in Citrus County.
Must have min 2 yrs
exp working with
adults, children & ad-
olescents providing
individual, group &
family therapy.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify.
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us





COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-

College of
Central Florida

The college is
recruiting for a
Director of
Marketing and
Public Relations.
Candidate
requirements are a
Bachelor's degree
from an accredited
college or university,
in public relations or
a related field, i.e.,
marketing, journalism
or communications.
Accreditation in
Public Relations (APR)
recommended. A
minimum of four
years of experience
in a related market-
ing, communications
or publications field
required. This position
is open until filled.
A copy of transcripts
must be submitted to
be considered for this
position.

How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit electronic
application, pool au-
thorization card and
unofficial transcripts
online. Email copy
of transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or
fax to 352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, FL
34474
CF is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer

Correspondence
Coordinator

The Centers is seeking
a Correspondence
Coordinatorforour
Lecanto Medical
Records dept.
This is a highly confi-
dential, responsible
position that works in-
dependently provid-
ing client information
with appropriate re-
lease. Excellent com-
munication skills re-
quired as this position
regularly connects
with Attorney's, So-
cial Security office, &
clients. Must be flexi-
ble, organized, &
have basic computer
skills. HS Diploma and
a minimum of 3 yrs
related exp. Full
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify.
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


Evaluators

The Centers is seeking
a Licensed Evaluator
(adults) and Master's
level Evaluator
(children) for our Cit-
rus County programs.
Florida LCSW, LMHC
or Master's Degree in
a field of Human Ser-
vices with exp reqd.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify.
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us



Supported Hous-
ing Specialist

The Centers is seeking
a Supported Housing
Specialist. This
position works directly
with mentally ill adult
clients and within the
community to secure
housing through
outreach efforts, &
programs (PATH,
Shelter Plus Care).
Must have excellent
communication skills,
be flexible, & willing
to travel/transport.
HS Diploma & min
3 yrs related exp.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify.
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us







COOKIPREP
Experience only. Apply in
person between the
hours of 8am 2pm:
5490 S US Hwy 41
Inverness


EXPERIENCED
LINE COOK

6 NIGHTS, Inglis Area
Some Italian cuisine,
Call Btw. 10AM-6PM
352-447-2406 for appt







AUTO TECHS & Expenenced
D e
tailr Needed. Competitive Pay &
Benefits. ASE & or Ford Certfed
S i n e
techs. Call (352)493-4297 for
R u s s
Hall for in person resumeAnter-
v i e w
appointment.


Securitas
Security
Services, Inc.

is currently hiring for
Armed Security
Officers for the
Crystal River site
located at the
Progress Energy
Nuclear Facility in the
Citrus County area. If
you enjoy working in a
physically
demanding,
professional
environment, have ex-
cellent customer serv-
ice skills, and are dedi-
cated to doing a great
job, this may be the
opportunity for you!

Minimum
Requirements:

*Reliable transportation
*Eligible to work in
the U.S.
*High School
Diploma or G.E.D
*21 years or older
*Good written & verbal
communication
skills.

Military background or
previous Security
experience is
preferred, but NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED. Willing to
submit to background
procedures including
drug screen and back-
ground check.

ALL APPLICANTS
ARE WELCOME.
WOMEN ARE EN-
COURAGED TO
APPLY. To learn more
about Securitas Secu-
nty Services Inc. in your
area, visit us at
www.secunrtasinc.com

ALL interested
applicants
PLEASE VISIT
www.secuntaslobs.com
and find your
location of interest to
apply; once you have
done so select the
Armed Secunty Officer
(Energy) Crystal River
as your selection. All
interested applicants
must complete the
online application. Ap-
plications will be acces-
sible online from
November 14, 2012
through November21,
2012. Contact Angela
Singletary at
anqela.sinqletarvy,
securitasinc.com with
any questions.

Secuntas is an
EOE/M/F/DV
employer


HITCH INSTALLER
WIRING TECH

must have at least 5 yrs
exp., references, valid
drivers license, own
transp, mechanically
inclined, welding exp.
helpful, no others need
to apply. 352-489-9609
leave message

NICK NICHOLAS
FORD LINCOLN
In Crystal River

AUTOTIVE
SERVICE TECH.
Ford or ASE certified
Good Benefits, 401K,
& Medical Plans.
We're looking for a
long term relation-
ship. Apply in Person.
Mon. Fri. 8a-5p
Ask for Greg.












ADVERTISING
SALES ASSISTANT
Part Time

Assisting Sales Reps
* Creating (insertion
orders)
* Printing reports as
needed from the
accounting system
* Analyze reports,
/research customer
billing issues
* Filing
* Other administrative
functions as
necessary/needed

* Assist the team with
filing paperwork
* Checking the teams
in-basket and distrib-
uting the work
* Provide back up for
the pre-print calendar
* Answering the
phones and assisting
customers
* Assist the Sales
Manager and Sales
Director as needed

This position is a
29 hour position.
Must have excellent
customer service skills
and strong computer
skills.

Send Resume to
dikamlot@chronic
leonline.com



1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

EOE and Drug Screen
required for
final candidate


Animal Services
Technician
Announcement
#12-70

Manual labor work
taking care of
impounded animals


ence dealing with
the general public
desirable. Must have
sufficient physical
strength and agility to
handle or restrain
large or potentially
dangerous animals.
Must be euthanasia
certified within 6
months of hire date.
MUST BE ABLE TO
WORK A FLEXIBLE
SCHEDULE, INCLUD-
ING WEEKENDS.
Must possess a
current valid Florida
Driver License. Start-es
ing pay $8.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, November 23,
2012 EOE/ADA


Community
Center Aide
Announcement
# 12-69

Full time position as-
sisting volunteers and
clients at the Central
Ridge Community
Center in Beverly Hills.
Hours and days of
work varies weekly.
Must be able to lift at
least 50 pounds.
Must possess valid
Florida Driver License.
Starting pay
$7.69 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department, 3600 W
Sovereign Path, Suite
178, Lecanto, FL
34461 to apply online
by Friday, November
23, 2012 EOE/ADA

CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460

GROOMER

Exp. Pet Groomer
Call 352-527-3215

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County*
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am -5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle





TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Good Commission
pay. Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr


BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YMCA
Diabetes Prevention
Program Lifestyle
Coach-Part Time

Location:
Citrus County
Pay Range: $9.10
to $18.10
Description:
The YMCA Diabetes
Prevention Program
lifestyle coach will facili-
tate Diabetes Preven-
tion
Additional Info:
Must be at least 16
years old. Looking for
individuals with group
facilitation
Contact Name:
Summer Dodge at
352.573.0034 or
sdodge@suncoast
ymca.org

YMCA
Enrichment
Instructor
Part Time

Location:
Citrus County Schools
Shift: 3:00-6pm
Hire Range:
7.85 per hour
Additional Info:
Must be at least 16
years old. Previous
child care experience
preferred. Looking for
instructors in the areas
of dance, team sports,
cheerleading, art,
science and music.
Contact Name:
Sara Bargiel,
352.637.0132 or
sbargiel@suncoast
ymca.org





LOCAL BRIDAL/
FORMAL WEAR
Business for Sale
All Equipment and
Inventory Included
CALL (352) 563-0722




ANTIQUE BOOKENDS
Lipper& Mann
porcelainZebras, pair
can text pic call or text
$75 352-746-0401
BUDWEISER
Galvanized Tub w/woodtop
Great for man cave! $150
352-364-3121
DOLLS
Cinderella & Bride Doll
2ft w/ stands $100 ea
(352) 746-9896
JIM BEAM DECANTER
In box- beautiful with gold
and design $15.00
352-212-2051
KISSING FACES
SCULPTURE By John
Cutrone with stand call or
text can text pic $90 OBO
352-746-0401
A












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





DISHWASHER
GE, white $40.00
352-628-2150
DRYER 90 DAY
WARRANTY $100
call/text 352-364-6504
DRYER Electric, works
good, $75 obo
352-637-3636
GE Self Cleaning
Electric Stove,
excel. condition $200
(352) 341-5182
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
TURKEY FRYER
MASTERBUILT
BUTTERBALL, USED
ONCE $95.00
(352) 527-8993
WASHER 90 DAY WAR-
RANTY $100 call/text
352-364-6504
WASHER electric, works
good, $75 obo
352-637-3636
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can De-
liver. 352 263-7398




BABCO 160 BENCH
VISE, large size, (over
$100 new) good condi-
tion, $60, (352) 465-1813
Dunnellon
COMPRESSOR
$50
352-419-4058




HITACHI 46"
PROJECTION TV
inc. glass stand
asking $400
352-628-5340




INTERIOR DOOR
MASONITE 8'H X 2'W
-$30.00 (352) 527-8993
MIRROR BEVELED
PLATE GLASS MIRROR
39"H X 62"W $30.00
(352) 527-8993
NEW EXTERIOR DOOR


JAMB Complete w/
weather strip, aluminum
threshold 3'-0"x6'-8" call
or text $40 352-746-0401



Dell Computer w/17"
LED Flat screen monitor,
wireless enabled, mouse,
keyboard, windows xp.
Works very good $125
(352) 249-7033
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
PLAY STATION 2
Complete system, guitar
hero accessories, assort-
ment of games. $80
352-201-2665


GENERATOR
BRIGGS & STRATTON
5250 watts uses once!
$650 new, Selling $400
352-527-8993



PATIO TABLE
W/CHAIRS square glass
top table/w 4 swivel
chairs,umbrella w/stand
$75 352-503-7827



2 DINING ROOM SETS
Oak Table & 6 chairs
w/hutch $750 set
Washed oak Table
& 4 chairs $750 set
352-212-0615
or 352-212-9507
2 Leather Stress
Free recliners $75 or
$100 ea. 1 Rattan
Couch & Chair $300
All excellent
352-601-4722
3 BAR STOOLS
Wrought iron swivel
w/ upholstered seats $100
352-527-9266
3 Pc. Queen Bedroom
Set $350.
Trundle Day Bed with
covers & Sham $275.
(352) 697-1483
3 Piece Lane
Living Room,
good cond. $3,200 New
Asking $800.
(352) 637-1074
Leave Message
6 Pc. Bedroom Set,
queen, Incl's mattress/
boxspring $250.6 Pc.
Bedroom Set, queen,
Incl's mattress/ boxspr-
ing $250.352-621-1624,
(717)-418-1151
1 -Hi Back Wicker Rocker
like new ,cost $129
Sell $75.00
352-586-1566
13" Color TV $20
Black Desk Chair $25
(352) 382-1885
ANTIQUE IRON
BED/MATTRESS $550
352-212-0615
352-212-9507
BUNK BED SET Includ-
ing mattresses, ladder
and all hardware. $100
352-201-2665
Cherry Desk, file cabi-
net & credenza set
$600 for all
352-212-0615
or 352-212-9507
CLEAN COMFY SEC-
TIONAL SOFA tan cotton
wine/green flowers $275
352-897-4154
COFFEE & SOFA TABLE
LEATHER & ASH WOOD
$300. 2 BROWN SOFAS
$50 EA. 219-688-3546
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
CURIO CABINETS
pr.of cherry $150. ea.
Lg. lightwood cabinet
$200. 352-212-0615
or 352-212-9507
CUSTOM COUCH
& CHAIR
Off White & Floral
Excellent Condition $195
352-794-3907
Desk $50
Leather Recliner $75.
2 Living Room
Table Lamps $100.
352-621-1624,
717-418-1151
DINING ROOM SET
walnut, w/two leaves & 4
chairs, exc. condition
$250 352-628-4360
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
custom made, solid oak
7ft wide x 8ft tall
$900obo 352-726-5832
Entertainment
Center-$75
swivel top TV cabinet-$20
352-419-4058
Glass Top Dining
Table w/4 chairs $100
352-382-1885
Hide-A-Bed &
Love Seat $450.
Dining Table w/ leaf. 4
matching Chairs $200
352-621-1624,
717-418-1151
KING BOOK CASE
HEAD BOARD
Real wood $45. 2 Stools
wrought iron & rattan. $40
352-406-3267
KITCHEN SET
Wrought Iron $100.
Leather Sofa Set $400.
219-688-3546
Leather Sofa & Chair
Wood coffee table, 2yrs
old in exc. cond pd $2200
$700 or Trade for guns
(352)697-5530
LIVING ROOM SET
8 Piece Set, 1 yr old, light
blue includes sofa, chair,
ottoman, coffee table, 2
lamps, 2 end tables pd
$1600 asking $1100
(352) 726-0061
LONG GUN CABINET
triangular, curved glass
front, good cond. $480
352-382-1248
LOVESEAT
Broyhill w/rolled arms, off
white & reversible
cushion. Perfect
condition. 352-746-6975
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
MOVING SALE
selling bedroom, living
room furniture in great
shape and great prices!
also misc. accessories
pls call 352-382-3497
NEW LAZY BOY
Rocker/Recliner
5 mo old $350.
GREAT XMAS GIFT!
(352) 489-1335
PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
POTTERY BARN EN-
TERTAINMENT CENTER
Excellent condition. $65
352-201-2665
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808


Quality 5 piece
Queen Bedroom Set
Used 6 months
$500.
(352) 897-4667
QUEEN BEDROOM
SUITE-OAK
w/extra pieces,
great shape $750
Dble Reclining Love
Seat $450
352-212-0615
or 352-212-9507
QUEEN SIZE BED
pillow top $125
Qn. white headboard $25
352-344-4192
Queen size sofa hide a
bed. Very good condition
$150.
Executive Desk
Excel. Condition $95
(352) 637-5755


NOW HIRING
Pl II TIRA l D D ITlrlKIt Q








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Recliner
Light Burgundy
$65.
(352) 212-8979
Reclining Sofa & Love
seat Select Steel, green
microfiber, $550.
Glass top patio table &
6 chairs & 2 matching
chase lounges &
matching side tables
$400. (352) 697-1483
SOLID WOOD CHEST 5
drawers- $60.00 or OBO.
352-220-2447
Solid WoodCoffee
Table-$50 firm
352-419-4058
TV STAND Like new
black & glass 55" wide x
22" deep x 20" high call
or text for pic. $90.00
352-746-0401
TWO SOFA'S
1 Floral print, 1 Merlot,
$100 ea. o/b/o
352-382-1885
White Wash Entertain-
ment Center $85
352-382-1885
WICKER HEADBOARD
queen, w/matching night
stands, queen mattress,
boxspnring & frame
$300 for all
352-341-2574



CRAFTSMAN
LAWNMOWER Self pro-
pelled $70
firm.Inverness.Henry
(352) 201-9445
Troy Built Lawn Tractor
Automatic Transmission
2 yrs. old, w/ bag
catcher & cart
Org. $1,500 Asking $900
(352) 860-1303


aal
CRYSTAL RIVER
Trash and Treasure Sale
Cry. Riv. Women's Club
Sun. Nov. 18th, 8a-2p
Collectibles, clothing,
Hshold, jewelry, crafts,
Christmas, Lots more!
320 N. CITRUS AVE.
LECANTO
Sat & Sun 8a-3p HUGE!
6115 S. Esmeralda Terr.
LECANTO
Sat, 17th, Sun, 18th
8am to 1pm
1180 N Prospect Ave
PINE RIDGE
Sat. & Sun 7:30-3:00.
491 Pineridge Blvd.
Right Lena, Right
6014 N. Kingwood Terr
WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944




HOMOSASSA
MOVING SALE
Daily, 10 to 4,many items
9239 W Sweet Apple Ct
Gated Comm. Call First
Forest View Est.
@960 S Suncoast Blvd
352-794-3094




3 LEATHER JACKETS
Women Sz. 10-14, $65
for all. BIk, Brn & Light
beige. Call after
9 am 352-513-4027
COAT
Red Wool 3 qtr length
coat; size 20-22
$75 (352) 746-9896
SIZE 8 WEDDING
DRESS Oleg Cassini
Gown, worn once,
bustled. Beautiful detail.
$100 352-201-2665
WESTERN BOOTS


CAMO HOLSTER Small
Uncle Mikes size 10 goes
on belt $15 call or text
352-746-0401
CHARCOAL GRILL
WEBER $65.00
(352) 527-8993
COOLER IGLOO
WHITE $75.00
(352) 527-8993
DECK BOAT COVER
21 FT Hurricane w/polls
$850 new Selling $400
352-527-8993
ELECTRIC LETTER
SHREDDER shred your
important papers 15.00
352-382-1191
FLOORMATS
WEATHERTECH LEXUS
RX CUSTOM MATS -
GRAY $65.00
(352) 527-8993
Free Standing fireplace
$350 obo Great Cond.
Ford F250 Super Duty
Brush Guard & Rails
$300. Like new
352-400-4947226-6170
Fresh Florida 15ct.
**JUMBO SHRIMP**
@$5.00/lb, 9ct @7.00/lb
Fl Stone Crabs @6.00/lb
delivered (352)795-0077
GAS GRILL BRINKMAN
PRO SERIES W/COVER
$65.00 (352) 527-8993
HARLEY PIPES NEW
ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT
FLT 1340/1450
SLIDE ON'S $100
352-464-0316
IBM PERSONAL
WHEELWRITER
Typewritter
elite/pica print wheels &
access. $350 OBO
352-628-3076
INNOTEK DIGITAL DOG
TRAINER Digital Ad-
vanced trainer 300 yards-
ADV-300P- $60.00
352-212-2051
KITCHEN CANNISTER
SET $15 LIKE NEW 4


PEBBLEBEACH
NATIONAL PRO AM
COTTON CARDIGAN
$25 SIZE XL NEVER
WORN 352-419-5981
PICTURE BOOK
Brookstone digital photo
album holds 500 pics in
box great xmas gift $75
call/text 352-746-0401
REAL ESTATE LIBRARY
Includes books, tapes, &
forms. $20.00
352-212-2051
SMALL AIR
COMPRESSOR Cambell
Hausfield 10 gallon on
wheels. Ok shape $65
352-464-0316
SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
STARTER New stagered
bolt pattern $35 call or
text 352-746-0401
SMOKER
MASTERBUILT
ELECTRIC SMOKER -
$100 (352) 527-8993
SOLO TUBE BRAND
NEW NEVER IN-
STALLED 4"-12" pitch
ALLACCESORIES
100.00 464 0316
SUBWOOFERS sound
dynamics rts series
1000- 10watts rms/400
watts peak like new
$50.00 352-527-9982
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW-ALL CONNEC-
TIONS INVERNESS
352-419-5981
THREE GLASS TABLE
TOPS, 40" $100, 20"
$40, 19"-$35 obo
352-212-0000
TIRES 275/55/20 50%
tread $50 each call
352-464-4280
TRUCK TOOL BOX
Weatherguard full size.
Black. $475
352-406-3267
TwoLarge shell oil
paintings-$50 each
352-419-4058


GOLDEN BELL BAR- Acme brown marble SEPARATE CONTAIN TYPEWRITER CANON,
RELL CACTUS Large & leather size 8.5EW great ERS WITH TOPS IN Electric like new, extras,
beautiful $20. Also large VERNESS 352-419-5981
jade plant $20 shape call or text for pic. VERNESS 352-4195981 w/manual, auto correct
352-212-2051 $45 352-746-0401 LARGE LETTERED $35 352-382-3650
TELEPHONE you can WALLPAPER
T see these numbers real 3 DOUBLE ROLLS $25
clear $15.00 NEW-PREPASTED
352-382-1191 VINYL 165 SQ FT
4 MEDIUM SIZED Fl- LAWYER'S BOOK 352-419-5981
DUNNELLON BERGLASS PET CARRI- CASE NEW $80 WICKER TEA CART,
MOVING SALE ERS AND1 CAT CAR- 352-212-2264 decorative AND useful,
Nov 18, 19, 20 RIER 20.00 EACH MAG WHEELS TSW excellent condition, $95,
10am to 4pm 352 464 0316 MAG WHEELS 5 LUG in Dunnellon,
pr. loading ramps $50 6'MIZERAK POOL 17" DIAMETER-4 $100 (352) 465-1813
lawn spreader $15 TABLE, A-1 condition (352) 527-8993

2 varmint cages $25 plus pool cues, $125 METAL CARPORT
Craftsmen chain saw 352-212-0000 12 X 21 X 8FT Ivory, in
$30, guitar w/amp $120 8ft Red Collectible good cond. You take Berkel Commerical
3781 SW Portulaca Ct Coca Cola Canoe down and haul away. Grade Meat Slicer,
w/ 2 paddles $300.obo Paid $1200+ Asking $500 Like New, 14" Knife, '
HERRY'S 352-637-6042 352-489-3264 HP Motor,Lightly Used,
MARKET DAY ANTIQUE CHILDS missionincitrus.com Cost $1,850 Will sell for
FREE VENDOR SPACE! ELECTRIC IRON mint Citrus County's Only $1100 obo. Also
Produce, Seafood, condition it really works Emergency Homeless Deli Meat Display
Floral Needed! $25firm 352-382-1191 & Veteran's Shelters Case $200. t
Outdoor Flea Market ARTIST'S Now 80-100 a night (352) 628-2167 t
held on the grounds For $300 you can buy includes 18 children f y
8471 W Periwinkle Ln $500 worth of new and EMERGENCY FUNDS ta
HOMOSASSA very usable oil painting & Other needs are
(behind Wendy's) supplies. (352) 527-8528 needed at this time.
Last Saturday Every 352-794-3825 2 Power Lift Chair
Month 8am -Noon Brother Sewing Machine Recliners,
Saturday, Nov. 24th $40. NEW BUBBLE TYPE 1 medium $275.
Call Caroline at Brother electric typewriter SKYLIGHT 26 BY 26 1 Large $350.
352-527-2020 $40. Like New ONLY 50.00 Both excel cond.
352-527-202 (352) 628-6901 352 464 0316 (352) 270-8475


CLASSIFIED



4 WHEEL WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY $75.00
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS ON
EACH 20.00 EACH
352 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
ALUMINUM WITH
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
CLEAN & STERILIZED
$30. 352-464-0316
HOSPITAL BED
Complete with head &
footboards,rails. Pristine
condition. $195
(352)795-7813
LARGE SHOWER
CHAIR WON'T FIT IN
BATHTUB SHOWER
ONLY NICELY PADDED
40.00 352 464 0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOT REST
GOOD SHAPE $100.00
352-464-0316
TOILET SEAT RISER 4
INCH BRAND NEW
WITH HANDLES FOR
SUPPORT ONLY 25.00
352 464 0316




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying
sterling silver flatware
and US silver coins
(352) 601-7074


"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC CUTAWAY
W/GIGBAG,STRAP,
TUNER,ETC $100
352-601-6625
BUYING
Guitars, Banjos &
Mandolins,Fender,
Gibson & Martin
any condition
(443) 463-3421
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
SHORT SCALE
LAGUNA L50 MAT
BLACK, BLACK
CHROME,$50
352-601-6625




KENMORE
Refrigerator almost new
25 cubic ft, SS, side by
side, w/ water & ice in
door. Excellent condition
$800 (352) 897-4196
NIKKO"Happy Holiday"
dishes for eight w/ all
ie bells & whistles. Plus
ible cloth & napkins. All
ou need for your holiday
able! $700; Colorful wool
Rug 4X5" (imported)
746-9896
TEA SETS
W/ cake plates for six
$30; 1 set with Teapot
Sugar & Creamer $45
(352) 746-9896


Bowflex Extreme
All cables, pulleys and
Power rods in perfect
working cond. Complete
with bent lat bars, squat
bar, leg attachment and
instruct. man. $250
John 352-527-0716
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE WITH
HANDRAILS USA MADE
$100 352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT. FAN & ARMS
WORK.ONLY $85.00
352- 464-0316
EXERCISE MACHINE
(BODY BY JAKE) IT RE-
ALLY WORKS YOU OUT
ONLY 60.00
352 464 0316
RECUMBANT
EXERCISE BIKE
(STAMINA)WORKS
W/ARMS ONLY $100.00
352-464- 0316
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
ONLY 60.00
3524640316



2- VINTAGE
CAME POLES 3-pc.
15.00 each 220-4074
2- FLY FISHING RODS
6 FT. $15.00 EACH
OBO 220-4074
ABU GARCIA
COMMODORE ROD
11.6 ft. heavy action
w/master spinning reel.
55.00 obo 220-4074
ABU GARCIA
CONOLON 300 8 FT.,
OLYMPIC 1075 7.6 FT
30.00 BOTH 220-4074

a and read
AR-15'S RIFLES, BUSH-
MASTER, SMITH &
WESSON, CORE 15.
COLT. ALL NEW. AS
LOW AS $736.00
352-447-5595
CAMO HOLSTER Small
Uncle Mikes size 10 goes
on belt $15 call or text
352-746-0401
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CART
93 Club Car, Great
Condition, New Batteries,
Asking $995
(352) 201-6111
Home Defense
12 Gauge Winchester
S-auto, 18V/2" Barrel
Case & ammo included
$350.(352) 637-1074
Leave Message
LEFT HAND GOLF
CLUBS steel shafts all
numbers. 6 clubs/
15.00/ea. Hard to Get
352-382-1191
RUGER 10-22 carbine
16" ss bbl, wood entire
length, unfired/inbox
$300 860-639-9920
SILSTAR PT 70 7FT.
FISHING ROD AND
SAMURAI 6 FT FISHING
ROD $15. EA. obo
220-4074


Fiess
Equipmnt^


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944


WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacement
China Most Patterns
Crystal Waterford Lenox
Sterling Flatware Lladro
Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Elec-
tronics Stereo Turntables
Billiard Cues Coins &
Jewelry and Scraps Best
Prices Paid Chris @
352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net





14 Tiny Yorkies $600.
- $700. ea. Small, Tiny &
Very Tiny Only 5
females, Raised in
loving home. CKC Reg.
health certs., & puppy
pacs. Parents on site
come watch them play
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039 *


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 D5


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAAAAAAA^


m


Remmington Model
700, 300 ultra mag
w/adj burns scope
$750 obo 352-537-4144
VINTAGE ZEBCO
XRTBO REEL W/12 FT.
ROD $45.00 OBO
220- 4074


Sell r Swa


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Cert. CNA/Med Tech
5 yrs. Exp. Affordable
Inverness area Only
(352) 476-8174





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXP- Slabs,
Driveway,Patios,Found
-ation Repair #CBCO57
405, (352) 427-5775


#1 Employment source is














www.chronicleonline.comr


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
S Small Carpentry

SScreening
Cl lean Dryer
,. Vents
A fo'ratle & Dependable
'i txperence lifelong
352.344-0905
cell 400-1722
.. 5ured Lic.#37761


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S*
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515


Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *

HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570

Repair. Remodel.
Additions,
Free est.
(352) 949-2292


Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
NATURE COAST
CLEANING
Res/Comm, No Time
Wasted 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
352-563-9824, 228-7320
LAWNCARE N MORE
Fall Clean-up, leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570


-I.
AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
QUALITY PAINTING
Affordable Reliable
Insured References
Call Doug 352-270-6142




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300


IREMODEIN


GENERAL IA
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377



352-621-1248^J


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?






05SAPPEAR FOR LESS

IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190


World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Esimates
352,465,6079 l
ICy" A C. *7 --
JJ"0"U7 4-mr


WINTER SPECIAL
$35 for Driveways
**** up to 6Oft! ****
Ann's 352-601-3174









LEGAL / Professional
SAVE divorce, custody
wills, deeds, etc. Guaran-
teed docs 352-341-2173




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR &MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.

COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Fire wd.
352-628-2825





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


TILE '


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090
Lic #CC2544






GENIE.
We Clean Windows and o Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

a FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/sp nghill





AAA ROOFING
Call the M 4ak6usters"
Free Written Estimate

O$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCOc57537 ~ D4M


Add an orlisli touch to your existing yard ALL E ERIOR
o pool or plain ALL EXTERIORA
sonnelhin I .. ..
S mpleln.I W ALUMINUMINC.


nrO FAX 352-621-0881

ILAr lli 6" Seamless Gutters
OUR INTERLOCIKNGBRICKPAVERSPECIALIST Screen Rooms Car Ports
| C O P ES Hurricane Protection
POOL AND PAVER LLC allextaluml3@yahoo.com
Licensed 352-400-3188 Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED
& Insured 32401V 8I\WU


DOG We call this dog
"Wags" because his tail
never stops wagging.
His foster Mom says he
loves all dogs and peo-
ple, making him a great
family or companion
dog.Wags is a 40 Ib,
happy, friendly, lovable
dog with a strong de-
sire to please. This
charming, 1 year old
pit/terrier is neutered,
heart-worm neg, and
up to date on all shots.
He's eager to give all
his love to his forever
people. Call Karen @
218-780-1808
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
2 Males & 4 Females,
Available after Nov 5th
AKC and all Shots
$1,500 to $1,750 call for
info (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure Breed Pups, light
colors, 4 fern 2 males,
shots & H/C. Parents on
Premises $450 ea
352-628-6050
GREAT DANE PUPPY
Black Female 3.5 Months
AKC
Shots/Papers/Health
Check $800
352-502-3607
LABRADOODLE PUP-
PIES Ready 11/16. Six
sassy puppies in a variety
of colors. Health certs,
shots, dewormed. $500.
352-410-0080
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofauas.net


Livestock


8HP YAMAHA 2STOKE
OUTBOARD ENGINE
LIKE NEW $950
352-344-9479



ASTROGLASS
16 ft, Red Bass Boat,
90HP Johnson
$3,000 obo
(352) 726-3786



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
a -,i


I


SEA CHASER
2008 1800 RG (18')V
hull. 90 Yamaha 4 stroke,
only 82 hours. Warranty
until
11-30-2014.Aluminum
trailer
Great flats or bay boat.
Excellent condition, al-
ways stored in-
side.$14,900. Call
352-601-6656






You \\ rid ld ir

Need a .job
or a

qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!



LCM--M.i.i.im. UEiij








D6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012

Boats


2005,15ft, 8 hp Nissan,
trailer, everything like
new, $2000
352-860-2152
Harris Kayot
2000, Pontoon Boat
26' w/trailer, $8,000
352-628-7444
JON BOAT
18 ft., flat bottom,
all new decking, 25H
mercury, GPS & Trailer
$4,000 (352) 563-0328
Looking for an 18 ft
SeaArk. Boat, motor and
trailer(352) 270-8225
TRI PONTOON BOAT
A & M, 27 ft, fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $19,500
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com









B





5X8 -$850.00
Cargo Transport
side-door. Wheels
packed new jack stand.
getdahl@yahoo.com
BRIDGEVIEW
2011 381 KWT
38'Bndgeview trailer w/4
sides 4 sale.42" tvconan
countertopsresidential
refrigerator, Whirlpool
washer/dryer,4 burner
stove,2wardrobes
w/mirrored
doors,awning,front win-
dow awning,day/night
shades,fireplace center
island, central AC, Asking
$35,000 Phone
(610) 597-9936
KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
MAC'S MOBILE RV J
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Li/Ins.
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945


NEW TIRE
sells for $108, will take
$75firm, Wheel for 05
Dodge Caravan $20
352-476-5265
SET OF 4 CORVETTE
rims, c5, very good cond.
$400 Century fiberglass
cargo cover fits 10 p/up
ask $200 352-628-5340
TONNO COVER
NEW, fits 8ft pick-up
bed, cost $450 new, sell
for $230 352-476-5265
TRUCK TOPPER
for 2001 1/2 ton gmc
Pick-Up, Excellent
Condition $75
352-628-2150



$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financin For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ



$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa ora
WE DO IT ALL'
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
*i Low Payments ak
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
*******SOLD*******
HONDA CIVIC 4CYL
2000, 4dr. sedan, silver,
auto, ac, cd, 55k miles
very good cond. $6200


2011 MUSTANG GT
5.0 PREMIUM
CONVERTIBLE
$10,000 extras. Candy
Red metallic tinted,
Automatic, Used as a
show car. Only


5,560miles, 400hprw
$ 39,798.00
352-270-8541
ACURA
2006, TSX, 98K miles,
NAV, Sunroof, Sporty
$14,800
Call 352-232-1481
AUDI
2001 A4, Quattro AWD
83K miles, MUST SEE!!
$7,200
(352) 978-3571
CADILLAC
2011, CTS Sedan,
14k miles, NAV sunroof
$29,995.
Call (352) 422-03604


HMtV ULtl
2001 IMPALA,
$4,995
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Edition Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Con-
dition $8000 522-0505
DODGE
2000 Avenger..might
need starter. Asking $900
call 352-270-4098.
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
$4,500
352-341-0018
FORD
2000 Mustang. If you like
Mustang Cobra convert.
Must see this car*
$4975(352) 382-7001
FORD
2001 Focus Wagon SE,
4 Cyl, great gas milage,
exc cond, clean in/out, no
rust or dents, all working
good. 95K mi. $3500
(352) 613-4702
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call 352-302-3704
HONDA
09" Accord 4dr EXL V-6
Green, 26K Like new.
$19,800 (352) 895-9864
HONDA
2004 Element, 186K
miles, EX, Automatic
$5,200
Call (352) 978-3571
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, ITS
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
$19,950
Call 352-232-1481
MERCURY
'08 Milan, Wh 4 door w/
grey lea int, All Power,
Exc Cond; 39k mi;
$12,800 obo 634-4524
MERCURY
1998 Grand Marquis
must sell 1200.00 OBO
1-352-628-1809
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi. New
tires & battery
Book $16,700
Sell $14,300
(352) 302-0778
PONTIAC
2004 SUNFIRE,
$2,995
352-341-0018
SUZUKI
2007 Forenza,
CLEAN, Only 52K miles
$6,500.
Call 352-302-3704
TOYOTA
2004, Camry XLE V6,
42K miles One Owner
$10,850.
Call (352) 422-0360
TOYOTA
2007, Pruis, 91K miles,
Super Clean with
warranty $10,300.
Call 352-978-3571

Misc. otice


CLASSIFIED


FORD 1923
T-BUCKET FIBER-
GLASS 454 Chevy
830 rated HP
street legal, $17,000
352-344-9502





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consignmentusa.or
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *k
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
FORD
1988 F150 BLACK
SHORTBED, 6 CYL. 5
SPEED, MANY NEW
PARTS, RUNS GREAT,
18 MPG. $1200
352-256-8488, 897-7479
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
ForAn A appointment
FORD
Red 1994 F150 4x4, Su-
per cab w/full Leer Cap,
Spotless and Original
$6000 (352) 465-5874
GMC
2003 Box Truck
$6,995
352-341-0018
SOLD
FORD
2000 Ranger, 5 spd
runs great, asking $2000
TOYOTA
2005, Tacoma
Reg. Cab 5 speed,
Bed Topper $8,800
Call 352-422-0360



***** GMC *****
White 1999 Yukon SLT
w/towing package. 113K
mi. Excellent Cond!
**Asking $3200**
(352) 795-4454
CHEVROLET
2002 SUBURBAN
$5,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
01" Explorer Sport,
"red" 2dr w/towing, 98K
$4900 352-527-4484

Mis. otce


Clasi


368-1118 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
CALL CENTER AND CUSTOMER SERVICE TRAINING
Workforce Connection is currently assisting several call centers within Citrus, Levy
and Marion counties for recruitment and placement services. These call centers are
experiencing various issues with attracting qualified talent as well as retaining current
employees. These difficulties stem from the lack of available preparatory training for
high paced, technical and high stress call center jobs.
Workforce Connection is currently seeking training proposals from providers capable
of providing call center and customer service and associated skills training to Work-
force Connection customers.
Interested firms may obtain a complete copy of the RFP document by contacting:
Val Hinson
Workforce Connection
3003 SW College Rd, Suite 205
Ocala, FL 34474
352 873-7939, ext 1203
FAX: 352 873-7911
vhinson@clmworkforce.com
Closing on this RFP 11-29-12 at 4:00 p.m.
Workforce is an Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are
available upon request to individuals with disabilities using TTY/TDD equipment via
the Florida Relay Service at 711.
November 18,2012.


367-1202 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to DISTRICT SERVICES CENTER HVAC REPLACEMENT PROJECT will
be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time 10 Janu-
ary 2013 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200,
1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids
received will be opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at District Services Center, Building 100, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698.
B. Conference will occur 11 December 2012, 10:00 A.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from
VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC., 1111 NE 25TH AVE, SUITE 401, OCALA, FL 34470
PHONE NO: (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus
County School Board in the amount of $ 50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will
be made upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
November 18, 25 & December 2, 2012.


369-1118 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Nolce under
Ficl-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of TSM,
located at 6745 North
Myara Avenue, Crystal
River, Florida 34428, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register said name with
Florida Department of
State, Division of Corpora-
tions, Tallahassee, Florida.


DATED at
Crystd RIver
this 15th day of
Novemember, 2012.
/s/ Edward
Gerrits
Managing Member
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. November 18 2012.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2003 Yukon SLT
Exc cond New tires. Well
maintained. 108,000mi
Load w/Onstar
$9,450 OBO
(207)-730-2636



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600



DODGE 10"
Grand Caravan SXT
Bright Silver 39Kmi senior
owned, book $18,000.
Sell $15,500
(941) 730-2359



Yamaha
'05, Raptor, 50CC,
like new, 30 hrs on mo-
tor, will hold for xmas
$950, 352-726-9151



HARLEY '98
XL1200 Sportster
custom. 8k mi., Lots of
extras & new stuff
$3200,OBO
(352) 382-0403
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 04'
Ultra classic. Runs great!
New tires, brakes &
battery. EXTRAS!!
$8500 or OBO
352-601-4722
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $3,500.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688



KAWASAKI
2006 VULCAN VF900
Custom. Only 7000
miles, garage kept
$3500 (352) 464-1495


KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 525 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 Phone
352-726-8124
YAMAHA
2004 Silverado w/ wind-
shield, sidebar, & foot
rest, Exc Cond,17,800 mi
$3500 (352) 270-8225

Misc Noti


2013 TOYOTA


COR





Auto Trans, PW, PL, CD J.
co J-


T130050 W
MSRP $17,800
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 2,805




or LEASE


$149995tfor'159


ToyotaCare
Featuring a complimentary maintenance plan
with roadside assistance.


2012 TOYOTA




CAMRY





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for 60 mos.

or



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$00QQQ OFF


Remaining 2012's In Stock






VILLAGE TOYOTA
www.villagetovota.com CRYSTAL RIVER -



352-628-5100
*0% W.A.C. All leases with $2,399 Cash Cap Reduction, 36 Mos, 12k Per Year, All Offers While Supplies Last.


TOYOTATHON









AT VILLAGE TOYOTA


I Bi


I ^^BidNtc


I Bi





INSIDE
H Sikorski's
Attic
V M PAGE E6


SOME I RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


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E2 SUNDA'I~ NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


NKW KUU S5HINULtk NUVtkMUK ZUIZ!
o2/2/1 Car Gar Well-Kept Vacation Home
* Great Front Porch Screen Porch in Back
* Very Quiet Area Inside Laundry/Extra Storage
* Access to Pool/Tennis Next to New Carpet!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Email. Kelly-G t emax.nel


--2'372828


Pint NIDUti
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875

Lt'^ 1 '"y Fol21
r-~ ~ ~ ~ LINE* "*a~a,
^:- '::le^^828


3501 W. BLOSSOM DR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
* Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
*2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


BAMMM!! Bank-owned large 4/2/2
corner lot home in beautiful Sugarmill Woods!!
Never lived in home. Ready for new owners
immediately. Functional split plan home
features formal dining area, living room, family
room, plant shelves, tray ceilings, neutral
colors and more. Call right now for your
private showing!!
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 o-J
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.comn


115 Feet on the WATER Kevlar Hurricane Shutters
Gorgeous Landscaped Acre
Oversized Extended Boat Dock
2001 3/2/2 Car Attached Garage
New A/C in 2011
Owner Says Sell!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com





T--




REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


-1 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
|__ ,English or Spanish


* Gorgeous Kitchen 2.80 Private Acres
* Fenced and Gated Great for Gardening
* Huge Great Room 2/2/2 Car Gar.
* Master Suite w/FP!!! Steel Frame Const.!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Email: KellyG@remax.net


242 N. Ieai Hwy. Beel Hil 2-82w w*MXcmI10 .Mi ,Ivres6760
837 S. Iucos BldHro*s 2-80w w aueoslelifl-on54N w.1,Cy lRvr7524


RIELLI uuuMMunMu ,o&t IUUU iIU
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloiidaLislinginlo.com 0


__ ':'',637.2828-






1J I
8372 N. SAXON WAY
CITRUS SPRINGS
* Beautiful 4BR/3BA/3CG Home Kitchen w/Eat-In Area
* Lg. Great Room Family Rm. w/Fireplace
* Nice Master Suite Tiled Endclosed Lanai
* Garage Vented wlHeat & Air Privacy Fenced Backyard
Fully Furnished
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpulmer@remax.net


.'-563 ,2828






19786 SW 88TH PLACE RD.
RAINBOW SPRINGS
* Nice 3BR/2BN20G Home Lg Kichen w/Eat- In Area
* Great Room/Dining Room *Office/Den
* Lg Utility Rm w/Extra 13x8 Hobby Rm *Screened Lanai
* Beautiful Landscaping Move-In Ready

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenplilmer@remax.net


ON DOUBLE LOT
Big backyard with large deluxe shed and above-
ground pool Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath home
has a huge family room and a nice screened porch
Fencing, new roof, 2-car garage and many other
amenities Located in a great neighborhood near
shopping and schools Call anytime
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 V9
Email stevevarnadoe@remax.net


3BR/2BA home with 2-car garage,
large screen room, total of 2,746
sq. ft. under roof. Split plan, close to
Rails-to-Trails, large corner lot.
A must see home.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I
Email brbarajmills@earthlink.net 1


IM IHJd VI SPECIAL!. $69,90 FOR lBOT!


E2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's time to let go of sentimental clutter


D ear Sara:
Are you
sentimen-
tal with material
possessions, and
do you have a
hard time getting
rid of them? We
had my great
aunt and great
uncle over for Sara
supper this FRU
evening, and the LIV
topic of being
sentimental with "things"
came up. My uncle said that
as he ages, he's finding he is
more and more sentimental
about stuff he was given
over the years. He says it's
hard to get rid of things be-
cause of the memories the
objects are associated with.
Personally, when I attempt
to rid out, I have such a hard
time stuffing things into the


14


bag for Goodwill
and letting them
go. I feel sick to
my stomach with
^- sentimental feel-
ings during the
process, but I do
feel liberated
when I drop it off
for good. I even
Noel have a hard time
GAL getting rid of my
NG daughter's toys. I
feel guilty trying
not to be sentimental, as if
I'm being insensitive and
perhaps don't love that per-
son enough to keep and
cherish the item. Do you
have the same problem? -
Q.M., Canada
Dear Q.M.: I am not terri-
bly sentimental over things.
I've experienced a loss of
possessions, and it really
changed my perspective


Real Estate DIGEST


about what is important to
me. I'm prone to cherishing
photos, ornaments and art-
work that my children have
created. I enjoy them now
and I display them, but I
plan to gift them to my kids
when they're older (if they
want them). Otherwise, no, I
don't hang on to much of
anything. I don't even carry
a purse anymore. I loved
getting rid of toys in my
house. I have four kids, and
it was a wonderful parental
milestone to reclaim a play-
room and make it better


suited for older kids.
I don't need material ob-
jects to hold on to memo-
ries. My little family is my
top priority, and I focus on
creating new memories and
making a space for my fam-
ily members to live in that
isn't cluttered with stuff.
Maybe rather than donating
family gifts, you could give
them to other family mem-
bers or sell them. It often
helps assuage feelings of
guilt to know that these
items are going to a good
home. You don't have to be


the family museum.
You explained what your
"problem" is pretty clearly
You feel guilty and insensi-
tive. I'd like you to consider
that the family and friends
who have given you all of
these items would not want
you to feel burdened by
them. Where are all of these
items being kept now? If
they're stuffed into boxes or
closets, they aren't being
treated like treasures, and
you can live without them.
Keep what is useful to you
and keep what you ab-


solutely love (some things
are worth keeping), but give
it a place or space that
shows it's important to you.
That space can be created
when you let go of the things
that don't matter. Regarding
collections, try to cut them
in half to get started. But
you'll have the liberated
feeling you mentioned if you
can get them down to a sin-
gle favorite item and let go
of the rest. You can always
take photos of items for

See FRUGAL/Page E5


-tJI -- ALL OF0CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


(m Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


EXIT Realty agents
hit new highs
Congratulations to Nancy
Ayres of EXIT Realty Leaders

Hills, who
has sold $1.9
million in
closed sales
so far in 2012.
Nancy is an
extremely pro- Nancy
fessional Ayres
agent, who is EXIT Realty
very knowl- Leaders.
edgeable
about Citrus County. You can
contact her at 352-527-1112.


Charlene Peggy
Angelo Price
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.
Charlene Angelo and
Peggy Price of EXIT Realty
Leaders in Crystal River have
passed $3 million in closed
sales so far in 2012.
Charlene and Peggy make
an unstoppable team. You can
contact them at 352-794-0888.


S -., Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor,.' A OUSE Realtor
I 302.3179 SOLDON-3,k 287.9022 \
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 DODD


S S S
For a Vru Tou MultipleP*ots,
Sm- S
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
e-=. A n4 -M


-fll 241 W Hollyfern PI.
MLS#357605 $69,900
Beautiful 2/2/2 home located on corner lot.
Directions: Rte 486 to right on forest Ridge Blvd. to
right on Camomile to home on corner ofHollyfern.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


o 3MZ9S i W uanlodll ur.
o MLS#358091 $221,000
GOLF COURSE HOME!
8th Green Little Pine course.
Teresa Boozer352-634-0213






2302 Colby St.
4 MLS#356263 $139,900
TRIPLEX, GREAT INVESTMENT.
Each unit2 bdrm/1.5 bath.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


S71 ) l 1390 W Double Eagle Ct.
MLS#358364 S615,000
On Skyview's 15th Fairway in Foxfire,
a very prestigious cul-de-sac.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523






/./( 669 W National St.
MLS#357802 $199,000
3/2.5/2 Beautifully styled and
meticulously maintained.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


S..t~ 2864 N Churchill Way
MLS#357929 $137,500
Immaculate custom 3/2/2
with spa on lanai.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


f MLS#357704 $517,500 MLS#358113 $309,900
BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY ESTATE Gorgeous 5 bed/3 bath pool home with
ON 10 ACRES!! 6/4/3 pool home. lovely landscape.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Joy Holland 352-464-4952


.// 571 W Massachusetts St. 4' 3831 W Northcrest Ct.
T+'5S MLS#356487 $189,900 MLS#355149 $169,900
One of a kind pool home in Citrus Hills Lovely 3/2/2 great room plan Rusaw
on a pretty wooded acre lot. built model.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523

US-




l 1320 Lake Shore Dr. 790 E Gilchrist Ct 27-2a
MLS#351954 $99,000 MLS#357670 $59,900
Well Kept home w/a great view of Very attractive and much sought after
Lake Spivey. ground level condo.
Sandra Olear352-212-4058 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


1 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the B
M- Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity. -


BEST BARGAIN Completely remodeled, FG BEAUTIFUL CURB APPEAL Central H/A '03,
architectural roof, loads of tile, white appl. A/C in re-roof 10/12, beautiful tile, nice carpeting, new
'09, Ig workshop w/elec, Ig rooms. MLS 356805 kitchen counters, turn key, shed. MLS 358133
43 S LINCOLN., BEVERLY HILLS 61 S TYLER, BEVERLY HILLS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 E3












So-called 'minor' bulbs should get more attention


LEE REICH
Associated Press

Fall planting is in full
swing. As you nestle tulips,
daffodils, hyacinths and cro-
cuses into the soil, don't neg-
lect to also plant some
minor bulbs "minor" only
because they aren't well
known, not because they
lack quality.
Many of these bulbs are so
minor as to even lack com-
mon names. But botanical
names are not all that cum-
bersome. After all "crocus,"
"hyacinth" and "narcissus"
are botanical names. Some
names of minor bulbs are
even fun to say: Puschkinia,
for example, rolls smoothly
off the tongue once you
sound it out and, for me,


conjures up an image of a
friendly, stuffed clown doll.
Blue and bluish
Puschkinia in very early
spring sends up strappy
leaves and 6-inch flower
stalks, atop which sit clus-
ters of white flowers striped
with shadings of grayish
blue. It's the perfect bulb to
tuck into a partially shaded
rock garden or under trees
and shrubs.
Plant puschkinia this year
and the planting will be-
come increasingly beautiful
over the years as the bulb
naturalizes, increasing its
numbers by self-seeding.
Another early bloomer
that should become better

See BULBS/Page E5


LEE REICH/Associated Press
Muscari in spring in New Paltz, New York. Fall planting is in
full swing. As you nestle tulips, daffodils, hyacinths and cro-
cuses into the soil, don't neglect to also plant some minor
bulbs, "minor" only because they are not well known, not
because they lack quality.


I BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


COME SEE OUR MODELS!




ESTB, DOf Citrus
Inc.
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056


;ugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront



tfl


Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


000DARX

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
-MAS CRYSTAL RIVER,FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633 Realtor
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES @ALEXRE.COM
AGEt I l I 3N DTYl I SEVN iDAvJ A W EK





HOMOSASSA 2006 D/W M/H on a little
over 5 acres of land, fully fenced, with HERNANDO 1985 S/W M/H with enclosed
3 bedrooms, 2 bath ....... 1 lten and screen porch 3BR/IBA, w/3rd bedroom having
island, cathedral & lovely it's own entry 2 carports, workshop w/electric
setting Gasfireplace,insidelaundry #355549 & 3 sheds i .. i .utiful rear yard, covered
PRICE REDUCED TO $155 000 frontporch 1'll; $48,000





CRYSTAL RIVER 1998 Bibukuty D/W HERNANDO Furnished 2 BR, 1 BAhome
M/H with 3BR, 2BA, front deck, 2 tier rear w/fenced yard on 3 sides and a canal on the other,
deck w/hot tub, workshop w/concrete floor, which is dry at present, but when wet has access
End of road, cute, cozy and private, cathedral I *I i i ,,
ceilings throughout. #357413 $69,000 '" g'oi





CRYSTAL RIVER Handyman/woman special. BEVERLY HILLS 2BR, 1 full bath, &
Estate sale, 3BR, 2BA, 2 car gar, 1/3 acre, needs ,, T ,,
about $10,000 worth of work to make thls home ,, .1 ... I ... I
worth $79,000. Newer dishwasher & range,........ i ...
wood burning fireplace. #358966 $55,900 ,. .. li .1.1





CRYSTAL RIVER Totally renovated m CRYSTAL RIVER Open & bright 2 BR,
1.1 1 .. 1 ... ". 1." located Large country kitchen, family room
and a workshop Owner finance w/20% down with 11......... .. . 1. with
avyment #357225 $99.500 vinyl ... I i ,4'.


E4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WL-ML


S







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E31

reminiscing. Also, it might
help if you had a goal.
Maybe you've always
wanted something and did-
n't have the space or money
Reward yourself for purging
the things that are cluttering
your life.
Dear Sara: Do you have
recipes for dishwashing de-
tergent and the Jet-Dry
Rinse Agent stuff that goes
in the dishwasher? -
Margie, email
Dear Margie: Vinegar
works well as a rinse aid. I
do have multiple dish-
washer detergent recipes on


BULBS
Continued from Page E4

known is chionodoxa. Again,
the first step is to slowly
sound out the name. Then
plant it and wait a few
months for the rich blue
flowers, small but in great
numbers, as many as a
dozen per stem.
Two other dainty blue
flowers for early and mid-
spring are, respectively,
squill and muscari. (See?
Not all minor bulbs have
botanical or unfamiliar
names.)
Muscari, especially, natu-
ralizes readily to the extent
that patches of lawn given
over to it look in mid-spring
like a piece of blue sky has
dropped on the ground.
Rounding out the
spectrum
The minor bulb palette is
not restricted to blues and
whites: Allium sphaero-
cephalon, sometimes known
as round-headed leek, is a
beauty displaying "Tootsie
roll pops" of reddish purple
in late spring. You might rec-
ognize from the botanical
name that this bulb is in the
onion family and, except for
its color, it does indeed re-
semble chives in bloom. Like
chives, it likes lots of sun.
Let's return to blues and
whites, this time to some
bulbs that are somewhat fa-
miliar but which you might


my community forums that
you can try Visit frugalvil-
lage.com/forums/make-
yourself/79736-homemade-d
ishwasher-detergent.html.
However, I don't recom-
mend homemade dish-
washer detergent, because
results vary so greatly and
some can actually void your
warranty. If your dish-
washer is older and you
simply want to give a home-
made version a try, the
recipes that contain citric
acid seem to work the best.
MEN
Cake stands are pedestals
you can use to display more
than just cake. Set one on
your dining room table or on
the counter and use it for
condiments, spices, salt-and-

forget: snowdrops, dwarf
irises and Spanish blue-
bells.
As implied by their name,
the nodding, white flowers
of snowdrops do appear
very early, providing flowers
in winter a very welcome
sight.
Dwarf irises, appearing a
bit later, are dainty cousins
of Siberian irises, growing
only a few inches tall and
with intensely blue flowers
- a particularly charming
sight when their dark blue
petals catch hold of a few
flakes of newly fallen snow.
Spanish bluebells are gi-
ants among these minor
bulbs, growing over a foot
high. The bell-like flowers
come in a range of colors,
including shades of blue,
but also pink and white.
One last minor bulb,
windflower (Anemone
blanda), has been a "major"
bulb in my garden for a cou-
ple of decades and is be-
coming more "major" all the
time as it keeps spreading.
This plant has everything:
frilly foliage that looks good
right up until it melts back
into the ground, and blos-
soms in a range of pastel
colors. The most endearing
quality is the form of the
flower, which is like a daisy
even though the two plants
are unrelated. A daisy look-
alike is welcome in early
spring both for itself and for
foreshadowing the sum-
mery true daisies that lie
ahead.


pepper shakers or syrups
and dressings. Stack them to
serve appetizers or cookies.
They can hold a pretty
arrangement of plants, such
as African violets. Or use
one on your dresser to hold
perfume bottles.
The first reader tip shares
another useful way to reuse
a cake stand:
Cake stand use: I found a
cake stand at the flea market
and I was using it to display
candles, but decided I like
using it in the kitchen on the


counter next to the sink. I
don't like the counter clut-
tered, so I use the cake stand
to keep dish soap, sponges
and hand sanitizer off of the
counter but still within
reach. -Diane, Illinois
Easy-pour salad dressing:
Over the years, I have come
to depend on those little
disks in the top of salad
dressing bottles. If I don't
check a new bottle, I some-
times dump on way more
then I should! You can pop
the disks out with a keen


knife and wash them in the
dishwasher, then insert them
into bottles that don't come
with them. There seem to be
only two sizes, and they're
small enough to keep several
of each on hand. -Paul M.,
Washington
Easy-clean George Fobre-
man grill: I use my six-
burger-sized George
Foreman grill at least twice
a week. I normally would
put a few wet paper towels
in it after use and close it
until I was ready to do the


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 E5S

after-dinner dishes, at
which point a soapy bristle
brush would get it clean in a
few minutes. I still hated
cleaning it, though, because
inevitably little greasy soap
droplets would be splat-
tered all over my work area
during the process, creating
another mess to clean up.
Not anymore! I just cover
the grill in aluminum foil
before using it. Con-
stance, Colorado

See FRUGAL/Page E7


LrkhITUPI I REA ti2S


Amanda & k Johnson Tom Balfour Avnus Hl Steier ArtPaty
BROKER/ASSOC.REALR,GRI REACTOR REALTOR-BROKER REALTOR


746-9000-


0 -w~ ir s a t u~ a 0I


- -
3755 N. ROSCOE 9412 E. FERNWOOD PL. 13290 S. OAKVIEW
2/2 356615 $34,900 2/2/2 357736 $74,900 4/2.5358122$1224,900


2372 W. SNOWY EGRET PL. 8597 N. DORA WAY 895 W. BEAKRUSH 15 S. FILLMORE 10013 E. BASS
4/2/2 356193 $189,900 3/2/2 358 $137,500 2/2/2 358739 $84,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 3/2/2 357224 $59,500


- mu w am
9 N. WASHINGTON 16 S. ADAMS 27 S. FILLMORE 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 45 S. MELBOURNE
2/1 356448 $39,900 2/1 356532 $42,900 1 56 $53900 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 354341 $84,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


CRYSTAL RIVER
aw







E6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information............................................... 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CIik oUii iE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Trim holiday treats


Make wise choices this season to


During the holidays,
there are plenty of
desserts and candy
to tempt us. Of course,
sweets are available
throughout the
year, so it is im-
portant to have a
plan to reduce
the added sugars
that we con-
sume.
The Dietary
Guidelines of
2010 and My-
Plate recom-
mend limiting Monice
the solid fats and CONS
added sugars SCIE
(SOFAS) in our SCI
diets. The most
important way to reduce
our consumption of sweets
and sugary treats is to avoid
purchasing them. Once
they are in our homes, they
can be extremely difficult
to resist
Sugary foods and drinks


are calorie-dense, but have
few or no nutrients. Added
sugars come from products
such as sodas, sports and
energy drinks, cakes and
cookies, ice
cream, and
other desserts.
There are
some tips to re-
duce added sug-
ars, including:
Serve small
portions of
treats by using
smaller bowls
Payne and plates for
UMER these foods.
C Drink water,
NCE 100 percent
juice, fat-free
milk, or unsweetened tea,
instead of sodas, energy
drinks, and other sugary
drinks.
Eat fruit for dessert.
Don't reward yourself
with sweets. Instead, give
yourself non-food rewards,


keep off weight

such as a special activity, a
movie rental, or a massage.
Limit sweets to special
occasions.
Sweets don't have to be
eliminated completely, but
be aware of how much and
how often you consume
them.
Consuming more calo-
ries than we use no matter
what their source (carbohy-
drates, fats, or proteins)
leads to weight gain over
time. Citrus County Exten-
sion is offering a weight
management class in Janu-
ary 2013 to help people
manage their weight, utiliz-
ing recommendations from
the Dietary Guidelines of
2010.
This weight control class
will provide research-
based information on how
to change eating and activ-
ity patterns leading to

See WEIGHT/Page E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inside...


Backyard cottages
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Spinning wheel details more interesting than provenance


Dear John: I am enclos-
ing some pictures of a
spinning wheel that my
father bought from
a Mr. Whipple in
Faribault, Min- F
nesota sometime
during the 1960s.
Mr. Whipple was a
descendant of
Bishop Henry B.
Whipple, 1822-1901,
and Cornelia Whip-
ple, 1816-1890. Mr John S
Whipple claimed
that the spinning SIKOF
wheel had be- AT
longed to Cornelia
Whipple and was brought over
from Bavaria. I do not have a
problem with the Bavarian
origins; that it belonged to
Cornelia is another story It is
30 inches to the top of the
lead-lined wheel and 56
inches overall in height. Any-
thing you can tell me about the
little spinning wheel would be


L
li

T
~1
t


appreciated. -D.F, Lecanto
Dear D.E: Wow, what a
fancy spinning wheel. The lit-
tle carved gnomes
have a wonderful
Look and detail.
They are in my
opinion more inter-
esting than the
spinning wheel. I
- doubt it would en-
hance market value
even if you could
korski prove it belonged to
Cornelia Whipple.
ISKI'S To research your
IC spinning wheel, try
the website Spin-
ning Wheel Collector at
www.spwhsl.com. For re-
search about the possible
Whipple connection, try the
Minnesota Historical Society.
Dear John: I am 81 years old
and my wife and I will be sell-
ing our home and renting a
small apartment Among other
items we are selling and hope


to sell are two oil paintings
about 50 years old. One is
"Central Park in Winter" and
the other shows two hunters
returning from the forest.
They were painted and
signed by Bogomir Bogdavic,
deceased. Both are in excel-
lent condition. I only know his
works were handled by South-
west Gallery in Dallas, Texas.
Could you give me any idea
what they are worth and can I
sell them? -JK, Homosassa
Dear J.K: Bogamir Bog-
danovic was born in Yu-
goslavia in 1923 and lived
until 2011. He moved to New
See ATTIC/Page E12
This spinning wheel allegedly
dates from the 19th century
and was brought to the U.S.
from Bavaria. Its origin is less
interesting than its intricately
carved details, such as the
gnome shown at right.
Special to the Chronicle


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

Pumpkin pie in a jar: Create pump-
kin pie in a jar using a can of pumpkin
puree, brown sugar, crushed cinna-
mon graham crackers, vanilla ice
cream or pudding and whipped top-
ping. Combine the pumpkin puree
and brown sugar (1/4 cup or to desired
taste). Layer a couple of tablespoons
of each ingredient in mason jars and
serve. Linda, Ohio


WEIGHT
Continued from Page E6

permanent weight management. Par-
ticipants will learn how to prepare
food with less fat, sugar, and sodium.
We will walk together during each
class, so each participant will be re-
quired to have their doctor fill out a
medical permission sheet, giving per-
mission to exercise. Each participant
will also fill out a liability waiver form.
The weight management class will
run every Wednesday from 10 to
11:30 a.m. from Jan. 9 to Feb. 27. The
cost of the eight-week class is $15 per
participant, which covers the cost of
the program materials. Only check or
money orders will be accepted. Pre-
registration by Friday, Dec. 28, is re-
quired. Class is limited to 40
participants.
Call Monica Payne at the Extension
office at 352-527-5713.

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$7.2 million already closed by Oct. 31, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
EALTo (352) 746-9924

ffl~tft


ME
Dear Sara: During the winter, my
carpet gives static shocks. Is there any
way to stop this? My cat thanks you. -
Jill, New York
DearJill: To avoid static electricity,
you can add moisture to the air by
using a humidifier, boiling water or
simmering potpourri on the stove. You
can also try bringing in some house-
plants, or spraying the carpet with a 4-
to-1 mixture of water and fabric
softener
Dear Sara: My kids take off their
clothes in the bathroom when they

Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions, or
affiliations.


Monica Payne is the Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.

11a)py Thanksgiving







Debbie Cleary
Realtor Associate
Your CLEAR Choice in Real Estate 1Hometown
debbieclearyfl@yahoo.com IRealty
www.debbiecleary.com 6050 W Gulf to Lake Hwy,
Crystal River, FL
352-601-6664 office 352-564-0333

"l 1 n ,T711k MTTITn I


shower. Their dirty clothes never
make it to the hamper in their bed-
room. I'm tired of nagging every single
day How do you get kids to put their
clothes into a hamper and not leave
them on the floor? Gina, California
Dear Gina: If possible, put the ham-
per in the bathroom or a more acces-


sible place. Otherwise, try waiting to
do their laundry rather than gathering
it off the floor ASAP for them again
and again. Let it pile up. They need a
consequence for their actions, and
when they run out of nicely laundered


See FRUGAL/Page E13


86 Woodfield Cir. Sugarmill Woods
Directions: Hwy 19 to left in Sugarmill entrance-
Cypress Blvd-to Cypress Circle-to Cypress Blvd
E- to Left on Corkwood to left on Woodfield.

:4:9 -


31213 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
00oDAE3 Call Joe at 302-0910


BIG & BEAUTIFUL .',, I,,,I ....... INVERNESS POOL HOME FOR 45K7 That's coa erd
, d l ,, l ,, , I r,. h -, ,,. I ,, ,, I , l .. . n I .n" ,t l " | C H E A P C H E A P C H E A P I . .. . .. .. . . I I . . 1 1. I1,, ,, l n , , ,, I, ,, . ..... . . . I .,, ,, ,,l l ,11.
Home boasts living & family rooms, formal dining room, interior w/attached 1 car carport, dining area, living room, utility area, kitchen, blinds, dining area, 1 car carport, front covered porch,
laundry, vaulted ceilings & more! $179,900. 5884 N. Hazelwood blinds pantry 12x23 screen porch appliances fenced & shed Ipartial appliances. In need of some TLC. 1304 Claymore St.
Dr. MLS 355174. KimberlyFuller 352-212-5752. $38,500. MLS #357883. Tomika Spires Hanssen 352-726-5263. MLS #357719. Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 E7












COTTAGE INDUSTRy


-:' . ^ /. ;-.. : : -, ." ., '. *. ...:* ; *. '.., ... **
S,-*.,Ji:,. -..... .* .I.. . .., . ,* ... *-* ./,* ,- ,,
L,;, w 9 .'. "." - ..;,i. ., .' ^ ,
<",,',-:: .'" .*W :' , .'.-. -
" .. -,. ... L .... ". *. .
J VA'~4** ~ *


Ja' *- -''".' -1 '.',.".,': '",e *1"'-''
*" ** -': ". : ... .. " "


Associated Press
In a publicity photo provided by Cabin Fever, a prefabricated cabin used as a backyard artist studio is shown in Pasadena, Calif. The Zip model, by Cabin Fever in Miami, comes
flat-packed and can be assembled in just a few days.

Looking for extra space? Backyard bungalows becoming attractive option for many homeowners


Associated Press

Something small is afoot. Backyard cot-
tages from 800-square-foot bungalows to
Lilliputian studio cabins are springing
up behind houses in many cities, some of
which have changed zoning laws to ac-
commodate them.
Often, the cottages are built for aging
parents or grown children. Sometimes,


they're rented out for extra income, or are
used as studios or offices.
"Backyard cottages increase density in
a nice way," says Bruce Parker, principal
of the Seattle-based design collective Mi-
crohouse. "They use existing infrastruc-
ture and ... they're inherently sustainable.
A cottage is the antithesis of a big house
on a tiny lot"
Seattle updated its zoning laws in 2009


to allow for "accessory dwelling units" on
single-family lots of at least 4,000 square
feet. (Permits are needed depending on
the size of the cottage and whether it has
plumbing and electricity.)
While Parker had been designing small
homes for several years, the microhouse
law inspired him to focus on backyard
dwellings. Soon, he was teaching classes
on backyard cottages with the Seattle firm


NCompass Construction.
About 90 percent of his students, he
said, wanted to build a cottage for their
parents.
"Rather than paying thousands of dol-
lars a month for assisted living, you can
have your parents with you and they can
help with the kids but everyone gets


Page E9


PF-t
f.-:.


Es SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


...... ............. ......... ......,.....
^--,._.. ""^ .;: ?. _








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COTTAGES
Continued from Page E8


their own space," says Parker.
Often, it's the parents who pay to
build the cottages. "It's an investment
for their comfort and a way to im-
prove their children's property," says
Parker. "One pragmatic woman told
me she hoped her great-granddaugh-
ter would use it for college housing
after she was gone."


In Portland, Ore., which changed
zoning rules in 2010 to allow for back-
yard cottages, Jasmine Deatherage
and her mother, Diane Hoglund,
looked for a house with a large yard
specifically with this living arrange-
ment in mind.
"We really wanted to live together,"
says Deatherage. "I have a 2-year-old
and my mom will be taking on some
of the child care. It's a special time to
live together"


Page E12


r .'









fr-we'


* ~i.


_- J

.


". a-'


Associated Press
An undated photo provided by Cabin Fever shows a prefabricated backyard studio under construction
in Cabin Fever's manufacturing plant in Miami. The cabin was disassembled after this photo was
taken, and shipped to Alpine, Texas, where it was reassembled in the owner's backyard.


NEW LISTING ** GATED NEIGHBORHOOD TOLL FREE 1 -800-543-9163 HUNTERS RIDGE **GATED COMMUNITY
Livable luxury radiates throughout this Z500 sq. ft. 3 BR, LL F EE I- -- 4 bedroom 3 bath Pool home Casual and formal
2 BA PLUS den/office. Volume ceilings throughout walk in areas Open fully equipped kitchen with nook
cloets* glimmering wood floors and high stylethroughout J.W M O RTO N REAL ESTATE adjoins large family room 4th bedroom makes
this home Caged-inground heated pool Elegant master 1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL34450 ideal suite for guests. Zero-scaped homesite
suite Shows like a MODEL HOME with all the whistles and and Century 2 Real Estate Corporation overlooking the woods Furniture optional $5,000 *
bells!! Don't miss this one MOVE-IN READY! Equa Hou -a ;* : r.- r Great snowbird retreat ***ready for occupancy!!
Offered at $249,900 I E INDEPENDENTLY C .. -'Lo -'E O C. EP TED Priced to sell at $174,900.




C/THH ft--- |H -.- OF INVERNESS CITRUS HILLS **BOLD & BEAUTIFUL** WITHLIAOCHEESTATEFORESTINYOURBACKYARnl
CITY OF INVERNESS 4BR PLUS office, 2.5BAs, original owner, decorator
CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT upgrades. Formal living and casual areas, quality tile Ride Out your back gate intO the forest 3 Bedroom,
WATERFRONT LOTS HISTORIC HOME floors. Frn. rm. w/gas fpl. Caged inground pool, 2 bath COUNTRY HOME Open floor plin with formal dining
ONLY $8,900 $19,900 1,300 sq. ft. Cracker home Lots of rooms for volume ceilings, Transom windows for natural GREAT ROOM fireplace and an ISLAND KITCHEN the
Homes only neighborhood Access to Floral City chain offices Showrooms Many uses Great lot tub This home has over ite sth ft. living rea aef would love. 5nd 3cres with BARN round pen
of lakes paved roads Minutes to downtown with ample parking Separate storage building car gar. All neutral colors. Retired owner has paddocks and your OWn gate into the forest. RYV storage
Inverness, hospital and shopping. City water and sewer MLS #351246 GREAT maintained this home-looks like new!! Price below building. MIS 11356440
PRICED TO SELL.....CALL FOR PLAT PRICED AT $139,900!! MLS #357936 replacement at $299,900. MLS #357668 PRICE REDUCED NOW $279,900





INERIESSE F &COUNTRYOLUB IAERFROHNT I HE CITRUS HILLS
Timeless elegance and comfort This 3BR, 2.5BA pool home Eloquent ehgance that is priceless!! This custom "Rutenburg"
feature forma l din. rmI In. eat-in kit. overlooking wondeul home has over 6200 sq. ft. of liv. area. Winding oak staircase NEW WATERFRONT LISTING NEW WATERFRONT LISTING
POOL area with summer kit Huge master suite with corner accents the huge entry foyer. Formal and casual areas. In-law Affordable waterfront home 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, DW MAINTENANCE FREE LIVING AT ITS FINEST!!
office rea, split BRs, am. rm with wood-burning fpl, Ig suite on first floor offers great space for the grandparents. Kit. mobile home with stucco outside and shingle roof High style and low maintenance. Spectacular water views!
has all the whistles and bells. Center ishnd plus a truly walk-in Large open living room 2 spacious bedrooms This home has been updated throughout! 2 bedroom,
insidelaundry PLUS climate controlled largestorage closet in pantry. an. rm. opens to large ENTERTAINING AREA around the Workshop* boat dock* Ouiet neighborhood on north 2 bath, 2-car, den, plus screen lanai. Upgraded
garage 2 car r plus golf cart torage Boat house, lush caged-in pool. 4car gar. Priced below replacement. Membership end of Lake Tsala Apopka. appliances. This home is move-in ready! MLS #tt 359051
landscaping. OFFERED AT $224.900. KM avail.MLS #336464 $640.000 MLS 359043 $38,900 PRICED RIGHT $129,900


Looking for A Realtor who knows Pine Ridge? I am an avid carriage driver, have 3 horses
and my own farm I know the inventory in Pine Ridge and I am happy to acquaint you with this
wonderful community filled with equestrian enthusiasts, golfers, tennis players and nice people
These are just a few of the homes and lots available in this fantastic community Check out the
community and all of the listings available on my website or call me for a personal tour of the area
.' A CAPTIVATING -- HORSE
COUNTRY -- LOVER'S 4668 N Buffalo
RETREAT! .DELIGHT! This well located
"- 3 our pra .E 1 acre lot near the
Gorgeous 4 Equestrian Center is
Sr geum r priced to sell now. Go
,J 1-- . ,^ I on the .... rf. B 'W .'": -.' '" ",,.,-" and see it and call for
I-, trains ande n more information and
equestrian center This isa staycaon at its finest Sit remodeled throughout in 2007, lt is open, airy to write the offer.
in your kitchen and enjoy nature from the private and spacious Located on the horse trails of MLS 354424
surrounding views Why would you ever want to Pine Ridge, lt is the perfect place to call home Newly
leave? Only $399,000 MLS 358707 listed at only $279,000 MLS 358909 $22,000


0001BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com










Ridge next to riding trails. Take a
3600 interactive virtual tour at
www.mypineridgehome.com.
MLS #355468.$410,000

r--


CLASSIC AND
CONTEMPORARY
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A
true masterpi .1'
Lake Tsala i i. .., .. I
family to move right in!
000D946 MLS #357471 $425,000


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


MOVE RIGHT IN -
BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
corner lot with mature oak trees and lots
of privacy! Very well maintained, new
roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and
move right in! Community features golf,
tennis, clubhouse.


A BOATER'S DREAM
COME TRUE!
Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
feet of seawall; stationary & float-
ing dock; spacious modem 3/25
home sits high and dry (never
flooded) on 2 lots. This mati-
culously maintained property is a
mnn s1 ;499n000


S5721 S. LIVE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
NATURE'S CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
BEST KEPT SECRET OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River and nestled in an area that preserved
Oaks East, a gated waterfront community most of its 1960's charm! Well main-
on the Withlacoochee River tainted, fenced yard, sunroom. The perfect
$218,000 home away from home.
will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #357468 $39,900








LIVING ON THE WATER!
This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well-maintained 3/2/1
lifestyle. Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, medical ...I 1. ;. V.., your fenced
190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard I. or private
room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
im aginable! ..;... .. .. :..'
MLS #354435 $489,000 i, ,- $69,900


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 E9








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chronicle


To place an ad, call 563-5966



Classifieds


In Print


.and



Online


All


The Time


Fa:(5)5356 1Tolre(8885-30 1Eil: I *S wl i


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
CRYSTAL RIVER
2Br. 1Ba. $495mo Fridge,
Stove, Wash-Dryer,
Watr-Trsh 352-587-2555
HERNANDO
Lg. 3/1 V2, new vinyl, car-
pet, cntrtop, AC units,
etc. next to Cit. Hills, lyr
Ise. No Pets, $550. mo.
$1,500 sec. 344-3084
Hernando/Cit. Hills
3/2 dw, 1/2 acre fenced,
paved road $625/mo
(352)795-7813
HOMOSASSA
2 br. 1 ba. $375mo
1st, Last & Sec
(352) 382-5661

HOMOSASSA J
2Br/Iy BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696

INVERNESS
2BR/1BA in a 55+
community. $450
(352) 249-9160


-r.

DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, Large Lot,
Quiet Area $28,000
(727) 480-5512


BAD CREDIT RENT-TO-OWN.
1 3 t h
Street homes of Alachua, FL.
N o w
has landhome pkgt. Ready to
m o v e
in NOW! Call
386-418-0424
FLORAL CITY
Furni. 2/1 in a park. Scrn
rm & carport, Ig workshop
w/elect. Lot rent $160mo.
Selling $8500
(352) 287-3729
HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807
Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95% re-
modeled inside, 1.25 ac-
res half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see! 74K
(352) 621-0192
Inverness
2/2 Dbl wide, screen rm &
Ig. deck, 55+ park, great
view, exc cond., not
crowded $21,500 make
an offer (352) 419-7825
INVERNESS
2/2 Stoneridge Landing
55+ Gated Community
Pool & Club House 28x40
End Glass Lanai & Furni.
$22,900 352-341-0473
INVERNESS
3 months free lot rent
w/ purchase! 1 & 2 Bd
Homes starting @ $6900
Located in a 55+ park
on Lake. Lot rent $276.
month, Water Included.
352-476-4964
Lecanto 55+ Park.
2BR/1BA Carport and
Screened Porch.
$11,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit


New Jacobsen Model
Homes Sale! 13 Left
with up to $25,000 off.
Don't buy until you
shop North Pointe
Homes. 4545 NW 13th
St Gainsville, FL
(352) 872-5566

Palm Harbor Homes
14 x 50 Mobile Condo
2/2 $29,900
Park Special
800-622-2832 ext 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash 586-9498
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925


-U

2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348


12 x 40ft, 2 BR, Park
Model with 12 x 24 yr
round family room. Cen.
Air/Heat, 10 x 24 covered
porch w/ lake view. All
appl's, 2 car carport, 2
sheds, near Dunnellon
55+ community. $240mo
lot rent. Asking $10,000
for Mobile Home
(352) 489-4656
55+ Community
3 BR, 2 BA, on Lake
Henderson, All
amenities, pool, dock
clubhouse. Asking
$14,900. (352) 201-5637
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
LECANTO 55+ PARK
1997 West 14x66 3b/2ba
w/c. non-smoker-move
in condition, newer heat
pump, split floor plan, ca-
thedral ceilings thruout.
Glass & Screened FL
room & open deck w/craft
room, outside storage
shed. $245 rent incl.
water, sewage & gar-
bage, ALL appliances
incl. Asking $23000obo
mobilhome.shutterfly.
corn/ 352-400-8231
STONEBROOK MHP
2BR, 2BA, 1200 sq. ft.,
Fully Furnished
Lakeview Homosassa
$40,000., MUST SEE!
(352) 628-9660




Inens I 45


RENTALMANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHonmeRentals.com
BEVERLYHILLS/CITRUSSPR/LECANTO
3069W. Bermuda Dunes Dr. (L) ..$3850
2/2/2 Great home in Black Diamond
7635 N. Greendale Dr. ((S)........$900
3/2/2 Screen pool parng for boat or RV, pool rnant.
CRYSTAL RIVER
11255W. Bayslre Dr. (C(R).......$850
2/2 Waterfront Condo with great amenities
11246 Freshwater Path (CR) ...$1,200
2/2/1 Strind Lni, FURN I, A lioobl L inigrS t
HOMOSASSA
8158 W. Miss Maggie Dr. (H)......$675
2/1/1 Cute Cottage on W tr, Fnced Bakyard
5865W. Vikre Path (H).............. $725
3/2/1 cozy home near Rock Crusher Elem
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/
LECANTO/CITRUS HILLS
9432 E. Gahle C.L (INV).............. $700
2/2/1 Roomy with Screened Porch
1933 amielle Path ()...REDUCED $1200
3/2/2 Incl. Full Memb Poo lennis, Gym



J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

4/2 On A Canal........ $750
3/2/2 ............... .$825
2/2/2 .....D..........$675
2/2 Duplex Cute & Clea...$600
3/2/2 ...............$950

3/1.5 .............. $650
2/2 Bonus Room ......$650
2/1/1 ................$600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
; Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 waterfront DW, $600
2/2, Doublewide, $600
3/2, Seasonal, $1,200
2/2/1 House $600.
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
AGENT (352) 382-1000



Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR/1.5BA; dock
$900/mo (352) 287-5020
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, Wash/Dryer
828 5th Ave. NE (unfurn.
opt.) $600 + sec 727-
455-8998, 727-776-3120
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Quiet, Clean
$575. mo. incld's water
352-563-2114, 257-6461
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450/$500
no pets 697-0310
INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393


r INVERNESS 9
I 2 B/R's Available I
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Ave I
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




INVERNESS
2/1, Storage Rm $475
mo.+ Sec. 352-634-5499




Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
1 Bedroom $396;
2 Bedrooms $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."



o


Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn w/ member-
ship, Seasonal/Annual
352-476-4242, 527-8002




HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
1/1, $435. incl. garb/Wtr
Pets? No smoking. 1st,
last & sec. 212-4981

INVERNESS
1BR, W/D $450
352-527-8154





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HERNANDO
On private prop. Wood
burning stove, utilities
included. $450 mo. or
weekly (352)341-0787
LECANTO
1b/1 ba, furn. Handyman
cottage porch, 5 acr.
pking, quiet, water&trash
pk up, incl. pets ok, ref's
$450mo. Blind Box1812P
CC Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429




CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800



INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, C/H/A, Wash/Dry
1st MONTH FREE
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162, 795-1878
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2, Immac., all appl.
Finest gate guarded com-
munity in Citrus County.
Rent incl. lawn maint.
cable TV $1,075. /mo.
Paul 352-746-9585
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1 1/2 w/family rm Newly
remodeled inside & out.
W/D hook up. Fenced
$750. 352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421
HOMOSASSA
"THE MEADOWS"
3/2/2 $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Home 2/1 Mobile
No pets (352) 637-1142
INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
like new, 2/2 villa near
pk, $625 (352) 212-4873


E10 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
Country Uving on Large
V2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212

INVERNESS
Move in Special, 3/2
on water $650., 1 st, last
sec., 352-400-1501


SUGARMILL
WOODS
4 BR. 3 BA. Beautiful
2006 built home. High
ceilings, Corean
counters, neutral colors.
$1100/mo. plus utilities.
Call 352-382-2521





CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; Furnished
$900/mo (352) 287-5020


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611

FLORAL CITY
Room, Includes FREE
Dish & Long Distance
(352) 726-4049


INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-586-9932



DUNNELLON
1 BR Accross from Lake
Rosseau, $750 mo. all
utilities, cable TV, Min. 3
mos (352) 794-6244,


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifiedts!


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060






ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th-Wheel with
slides. Screened gazebo
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOU SG
OPPORTUNITY



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifieds!I


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Profes-
sional OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo Center, CR
352-794-6280, 586-2990
HERNANDO
Over 2,200 SF, Multi-Rm
Office or Home & Office
or Day Care Center. ETC
on Hwy 200, for More Info
Call (352) 344-3084
Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa
OZELLO
-approx. 2.5 acres-
commercial .w/boatramp.
and gulf access, 3, 18',
roll-ups, $149k
call 352-634-3862



3BR/2BA/2, Pool, New
Carpet, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
REDUCE $110,900
(352) 476-5061



BEVERLY HILLS
4 bedroom. 4+ bath.
6118 W. Glory Hill St.
Open House Sat and
Sun 17th, 18th. 4,200
under air 6,300 under
roof, efficiency apartment.
Pool spa indoor & out.
Must see asking $435k
appraised @ $430k
tzclan@ceturylink.net
352 464 1495



REMODELED 2/2/1
103 S Desoto. 1208 sf
New: appliances, paint,
flooring, light fixtures,
fans. Updated kit/baths.
$45,900. 527-1239




CLEARVIEW ESTATES
3+BR/ 2.5 BA, 2+Garage
on 1 acre. Clear views up
and down the trails. Too
many extras, must see.
Mid $200's 352-860-0444


Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, Private lot
352-746-0002



Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418



Inverness Highlands,
4 BR, 3 BA, Pool, Corner
of Carol and Tennyson.
2.8 acres, fenced, CHA,
deep well, UPDATES
in 2011. Offered As Is.
$174,900. 352419-7017.
Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $41,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AH1
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday IPM-3PM
7724 Glendale Ct.
4BR/4BA 2.5 Acres,
Horse Friendly
Door Prize-First 5,
Plantation Realty
Charlene Pilgrim,
Realtor 352-464-2215




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/,lMC
REALTY ONE
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558




SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448


Si


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.








SUGARMILL WOODS





IMMACULATE
Sugarmill Woods 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Nearly 1/2
off Luxurious Sugarmill
Woods Home. 3% com-
mission. Sold in 2006 for
$259k. asking: $136500.
Contract fell through 3/2
with office. Best 3/2 in
Sugarmill for price. Move
in ready. 2050sq ft.
Granite/Stainless Steel.
Double trey ceilings(10ft).
New landscaping.
YOUTUBE video link.
OPEN HOUSE: 11/18
from 11-1. 39 Greentree
St, Homosassa 34446
Ryan: 352-346-7179 or
ryan49445@yahoo.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


MINI FARM
5 Acres(2 lots) adj
Pine Ridge/C.Springs
3/2/2, block home
w/lots of extras! $185K
(352) 564-8307


Home Finder


www.chroniclehumefinder.com


Fint Yoar Dreasw HotWme


Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.ch roniclehormefinder.com


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 E11







E12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


COTTAGES
Continued from Page E9

Before her mother bought the
house, they asked the previous
owner to build a basic single-car
garage, which they plan to convert
into a fully functioning mother-in-
law cottage by next summer.
While not every young family
would opt to have their parents so
close, Deatherage notes that it's
common historically and globally
"My husband is from Mexico
where it's very normal to live with
your family," she says. "His whole
family lives together and if we
lived there we'd live with them
too."
For other homeowners, back-
yard cottages are an opportunity
for small-scale entrepreneurship.
Bob DiPalma of Burlington, Vt.,
didn't set out to run a mini-hotel
out of his yard but the project
"crept up on me." While rehabili-
tating their 100-year-old barn, he
and his wife saw the opportunity
to convert the space into an apart-
ment above a garage. They drew
up designs, hired a contractor and
soon had a fully-functioning vaca-
tion rental.
"Over the last four years, we've
had really wonderful guests who


have appreciated the space," Di-
Palma says.
Sometimes, the need for more
space is just a need for ... more
space.
"So many people are working
from home," says Gayle Zal-
duondo, principal of the Miami-
based Cabin Fever, which sells
prefab cabins. "Rather than going
offsite, they're adding a cabin.
People need more space, but
they're not comfortable upsizing
to a larger house, especially in this
economy"
Some of her customers want a
guest house, while others are
artists, musicians and independ-
ent service providers -from free-
lance graphic designers to
massage therapists.
Unlike the fully outfitted minia-
ture homes being used for rental
properties and mother-in-law
quarters, small backyard cabins
without kitchens and bathrooms
do not require permits in many
states.
"We have a model you can build
in a weekend," says Zalduondo. "It
comes flat-packed. It's tight and
weather-proofed and you don't
even need to pour a full slab. You
can just prepare a lightweight
foundation and put the cabin on
top of it."
Seattle resident Isaac Vicknair


pioneered a new kind of off-the-
grid, backyard living in his quest
for affordable housing. He builds
simple 8-by-8-foot sheds in ex-
change for free rent in them for
three to six months after
completion.
"It's a great deal for everyone,"
says Vicknair "They cost me about
$800 in materials and then I save
around $5,000 in rent while I live
there. All the homeowner has to
pay for is the electricity I use,
which is almost nothing."
Vicknair picks a neighborhood
he wants to live in and posts fly-
ers advertising his trade pro-
posal. He says he generally
receives calls from three or four
interested parties, and takes the
project that seems most
appealing.
The cabins are built without
plumbing or electricity, so Vick-
nair runs an extension cord from
the house and makes do with a
space heater, electric skillet, small
fridge and a couple of lamps. He
bought a portable marine toilet
that he sets up behind the cabin,
and he showers at friends' houses
or the gym.
"The only downside is it's really
hard to get a date to come back to
a miniature house in a backyard,"
says Vicknair "But I don't think
I'm ever going to pay rent again."


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

York City in 1957. He won numer-
ous awards and medals from var-
ious artist associations and
leagues. There is growing inter-
est in his works. I think it would
be better to hold onto them for
now.
Currently the two paintings
you have would likely sell in the
$250 to $500 range each. If you
are determined to sell, you might
contact the gallery in Dallas you
mention that has handled his
work, or perhaps Heritage Auc-
tions, www.ha.com, in Dallas
might sell them for you.
Dear John: I recently acquired
the family Bible. The most recent
copyright is 1885. It is in poor
condition and I would like to
have it restored and rebound. I
have not been able to find a local
restoration and binding company
I was wondering if you had any
information on a reputable book
service locally C.H., Internet
Dear C.H.: I suggest you con-
tact Paul Sawyer, bookbinder. I
have had several letters from
readers who have used his serv-
ices and were quite pleased with
his work. The website is


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

www.sawyerbinder.com and the
phone number is 386-253-1161.
Dear John: Attached are pic-
tures of two pocket watches I ac-
quired from an 80-year-old
woman back in the earlyl980s.
She did not know much about
them.
Do you think they have any
value? Is there anywhere in
north central Florida I could get
them appraised? -S.S., Internet
Dear S.S.: The two open-face
pocketwatches made by Elgin
and Illinois are of specific collec-
tor interest. In order to help you
with potential dollar value, I
need better photographs and
more information. Open the back
of the case and record all the in-
formation that appears on the
movement.
Also record whatever appears
on the inside of the back cover of
each case. Then I will finish the
story


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business
for 30 years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box 2513,
Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


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FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

clothes, they'll catch on quickly
Let them know if they don't use
the hamper, they can wash their
own clothes. I do understand it's
often easier to simply pick it up,
but they won't learn anything
other than that you would never
let them go without their favorite
clean clothes.
You can also let kids know that
using a hamper is a family rule
that everyone follows, and explain
the reasons: It saves laundry-sort-
ing time, keeps the house from
looking messy and helps them
care for their belongings. Reward
them for using the hamper. It
doesn't have to be anything big -
a sticker, a fun treat, an extra story
at bedtime, etc. Occasionally, they
might still slip and need a re-
minder, but do not allow them to
slip twice or they can end up going


right back to leaving them on the
floor all over again. Hold them ac-
countable for their actions.
Dear Sara: I have a rabbit and
am so sick of the mess and smell
of the cage. I know that sounds
bad, but do you have any sugges-
tions for making this easier to han-
dle? Gloria, Washington
Dear Gloria: I'm not a rabbit ex-
pert, but our family does have an
indoor bunny I would use a litter
box filled with paper-based litter
(Eco-Straw or Yesterday's News),
shredded paper or pellet litter,
and some hay If you clean it daily
or every other day, it's not as big of
a chore as cleaning an entire cage
tray Obviously, the longer you
wait, the worse it gets. Your rabbit
will love being in the box because
of the hay A rabbit typically won't
start soiling other areas in its cage
unless the box is dirty, so you won't
have to clean the big bottom tray
as often if you stay on top of the lit-
ter box. It's really pretty painless
if you make it a daily habit


NmE
Food containers can make great
little organizers. For example,
Velveeta boxes are sturdy and just
the right size to use for a variety of
solutions. They're wonderful to
hold small items such as tea bags,
pens, batteries, Scotch tape and
scissors.
The first reader tip shares how
she reuses a Velveeta box.
Velveeta boxes: I wrapped some
of the boxes with contact paper and
use them as utensil organizers in
my kitchen drawer Four boxes fit
perfectly, and now I have more
room to stack all of my spoons,
knives and forks. -Lisa F, Florida
Food combinations: I have a
couple of recipe tips that I can't be-
lieve I didn't know until now. The
first one is for red beans and rice,
which I've been eating since I
could eat. I recently discovered
that putting just a bit of cinnamon
in the dried beans as they cook
makes a world of difference. The
other tip is for chili again, I


think I've cooked a thousand pots
of chili in my life. I recently dis-
covered an added tablespoon or so
of Hershey's unsweetened cocoa
makes it wonderful! It's just a deli-
cious and rich flavor. -Sue, Texas
Colorful jack-o'-lanterns: In-
stead of using candles inside our
carved pumpkins, we use glow
sticks. The larger ones work best,
but any size will work. They glow
in awesome neon colors and I
don't worry about them being
blown out by the wind, plus my
kids can enjoy the glow sticks for a
while after Halloween. -
Michelle D., Illinois
Pallet garden: I used an old pal-
let to make a vertical garden. I sta-
pled landscape fabric on the sides
and back, and left the top open.
Then I placed the pallet on the
ground on its back and I planted
my plants starting with the top
first. Finally, I filled with plants
and soil in the openings between
the slats. Gail W, Florida
Pumpkin-shaped snack: For my


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 E13

son in kindergarten, I made
chocolate-covered pretzels in the
shape of pumpkins for him to take
to his class party. Use mini twist
pretzels and orange Wilton candy
melts (mix red with yellow if you
can't find orange, or Wilton also
sells gel colors to add to candy
melts or chocolate). Melt the
candy wafers or chocolate accord-
ing to package directions. Dip
pretzels into the melted candy or
chocolate and place them on wax
paper Either add a green M&M on
the top to form a stem or add a
Tootsie Roll. Tada! Little pretzel
pumpkins. -Alissa J., Wisconsin


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (www.frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers practical,
money-savingstrategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
Street, Kansas City MO, 64106, or
email sara@frugalvillage.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Miracle plant or the next kudzu?


Associated Press

OXFORD, N.C. It's fast-grow-
ing and drought-tolerant, produc-
ing tons of biomass per acre. It
thrives even in poor soil and is a
self-propagating perennial, so it
requires little investment once es-
tablished.
To people in the renewable
fuels industry, Arundo donax -
also known as "giant reed" is
nothing short of a miracle plant.
An Oregon power plant is looking
at it as a potential substitute for
coal, and North Carolina boosters
are salivating over the prospect of
an ethanol bio-refinery that would
bring millions of dollars in invest-
ment and dozens of high-paying
jobs to hog country
But to many scientists and envi-
ronmentalists, Arundo looks less
like a miracle than a nightmare
waiting to happen. Officials in at
least three states have banned the
bamboo-like grass as a "noxious
weed"; California has spent more
than $70 million trying to eradi-
cate it. The federal government
has labeled it a "high risk" for in-
vasiveness.
Many are comparing Arundo,
which can reach heights of 30 feet
in a single season, to another ag-
gressive Asian transplant the
voracious kudzu vine.
More than 200 scientists re-


cently sent a letter to the heads of
federal agencies including the En-
vironmental Protection Agency
and the Departments of Agricul-
ture and Energy, urging them not
to encourage the commercial
planting of known invasives like
Arundo.
"Many of today's most problem-
atic invasive plants -from kudzu
to purple loosestrife were in-
tentionally imported and released
into the environment for horticul-
tural, agricultural, conservation,
and forestry purposes," they wrote
Oct. 22. "It is imperative that we
learn from our past mistakes by
preventing intentional introduc-
tion of energy crops that may cre-
ate the next invasive species
catastrophe particularly when in-
troductions are funded by tax-
payer dollars."
Mark Conlon, vice president for
sector development at the non-
profit Biofuels Center of North
Carolina in Oxford, hates the com-
parison with "the weed that ate
the South."
"There's no market for kudzu,"
says Conlon, who is among those
promoting a proposed $170 mil-
lion, 20 million-gallon-a-year
ethanol project here and
Arundo's role in it. "There's no
reason to manage it. It was thrown
out in the worst places you can
think of and left there."


Industry, environmentalist clash

over introduction of giant reed


His message about Arundo: It'll
be different this time. We can con-
trol it.
But Mark Newhouser, who has
spent nearly 20 years hacking this
"nasty plant" from California's
riverbanks and wetlands, has his
doubts.
"Why take a chance?" he asks.
The back wall of the North Car-
olina biofuels center's lobby is
dominated by a large timeline, be-
ginning with the General Assem-
bly's 2006 recognition of the state's
potential as a biofuels leader
The display ends with a panel
declaring "10 percent in 10 Years"
- meaning that by 2017, a decade
after the center's creation, offi-
cials hope companies here will be
producing the equivalent of a
tenth of the liquid transportation
fuels consumed in the state annu-
ally, or 600 million gallons of re-
newable biofuel a year.
"An extraordinarily audacious
goal," W Steven Burke, the cen-
ter's president and CEO, says
proudly
Near the middle of the timeline
is this: "November 2011: 50-acre
energy grass propagation nursery
established with Arundo donax."
The center's staff has explored
a variety of biofuel raw materials,
from food crops like corn, sugar
beets and industrial sweet pota-
toes, to cottonwood and loblolly
pine trees. Even pond scum or
duckweed. All were either hard to
raise in quantity, too expensive or
more valuable for other uses.
The staff also studied so-called
"energy grasses" giant Miscant-


hus, coastal Bermudagrass,
switchgrass. Out behind the cen-
ter, farming director Sam Brake
planted test plots of four varieties
of sorghum.
But for hardiness, ease of culti-
vation and maintenance, and,
above all, yield per acre, none
comes even close to Arundo
donax.
"Wow! Exclamation point," says
Burke, who, in his matching gray
suit and shirt and with his snow-
white hair and beard, evokes the
evangelical preacher.
Believed to have sprung from
the Indian subcontinent, Arundo
has spread around the globe. Eu-
ropeans have been using it for
centuries in the production of
reeds for woodwind instruments.
Like kudzu, which came to the
United States as part of Japan's
exhibit at the 1876 Centennial Ex-
position in Philadelphia, Arundo
arrived here in the mid- to late
19th century And also like kudzu,
Arundo was once touted as a per-
fect crop to help stem erosion. In
California and Texas, farmers,
ranchers and government workers
enthusiastically planted it along
waterways and drainage ditches.
Shallow rooted, the canes would
break off and move downstream,
starting new stands.
Arundo has become "natural-
ized" in 25 warmer-weather states,
according to a USDA weed risk
analysis released in June.
In banning it, California, Ne-
vada and Texas have said the
plant crowds out native species
and consumes precious water.


See PLANT/Page E15


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The Tennessee Exotic Pest
Plant Council lists it as a "Signifi-
cant Threat." Virginia officials
have labeled it "moderately inva-
sive." The West Virginia Division
of Natural Resources has catego-
rized giant reed as "occasionally
invasive." But that might change if
it were to be promoted as a com-
mercial crop, says Elizabeth
Byers, a vegetation ecologist with
the agency's wildlife diversity
unit.
"I certainly wouldn't want to see
any invasive species used as bio-
mass," she says. "Because they
can escape."
North Carolina is keeping an
eye on Arundo, but the folks in Ox-
ford say past need not be pro-
logue.
Earlier this fall, Chemtex Inter-
national christened the world's
first commercial-scale cellulosic
ethanol plant in the northwest
Italian city of Crescentino. Turn-
ing inedible biomass into sugars,
the company hopes to produce up
to 20 million gallons of fuel a year.
By mid-2013, Chemtex wants to
break ground on a like-sized plant
that would employ 67 people in
North Carolina. It has set its sights
on the little city of Clinton, in the
heart of hog country
David Crouse, a soil scientist at
North Carolina State University,
says energy grass production and
the Tar Heel State are "a logical
match" depending on which
grass it is.
Spread across the state's coastal


E14 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012


See VIJirtul T.IIIsl,.AU w.resalehomes.I^u.com. I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PLANT
Continued from Page E14

plain are about 100,000 acres of
so-called sprayfields, onto which
industrial farming operations
pump millions of gallons of hog
and chicken waste per year. In
order to comply with federal clean
water regulations for runoff of nu-
trients such as nitrogen, many of
those fields are already planted
with energy grasses, chiefly
coastal Bermudagrass.
In terms of yield, Arundo far
outpaces the competition up to
20 dry tons per acre, versus 3 to 6
tons for Bermuda. So planting
Arundo would require far less
land to supply Chemtex's fiber
needs. The problem is, the fields'
owners also need to worry about
absorbing the nitrogen in the ma-
nure and the jury is still out as to
whether Arundo would be a good
fit.
"If it's not, it's not where we
need to be on the swine farms,"
Crouse says.
Brake and his colleagues in Ox-
ford are trying to figure that out.
On a farm a few miles from the
biofuels center, a dense patch of
what look like anorexic palm trees
waves in the light autumn breeze.
They tower over the 6-foot-2 farm-
ing director.
Brake planted this quarter-acre
plot ofArundo donax in 2010. He's
been applying fertilizer at four dif-


ferent rates zero to 120 pounds
per acre to gauge the plants' nu-
tritional needs, as well as their
ability to absorb nitrogen.
Even in the tightly packed, red-
clay soil, they have thrived. Brake
steps into the thicket and strug-
gles to wrap his arms around a
clump.
"It's about maybe 3 foot in di-
ameter," he says.
So far, yields from North Car-
olina test plots have averaged
from 5.8 dry tons per acre at the
Oxford site to just over 11 tons in
the sandy loam soils in which most
Chemtex suppliers would be
planting, though NCSU soil scien-
tist Ron Gehl notes these are not
yet "mature stands."
Brake grabs an Arundo stalk
and walks until it's parallel with
the ground. Tiny seeds cascade to
the ground, clinging to a visitor's
wet shoes.
"You afraid of becoming Johnny
donax-seed?" he asks with a
chuckle. The seeds are sterile, he
says reassuringly
Brake points to a joint on the
stalk where a small sprout or
"node" peeks out.
"Each node is a potential plant,"
he explains. "That makes it easy to
propagate."
And that's what gives so many
pause.
In the 16 years since Arundo
was first identified in California's
Sonoma Creek Watershed, Mark
Newhouser has developed an at-
tack strategy.


First, workers spray the mature
cane with herbicide, then move in
with the large flail mowers. If that
doesn't do the trick, it's time for
chain saws.
"And then you'd still have all of
these stumps of cane sticking up
everywhere," he says. "You can't
even walk through there."
The cost: Up to $25,000 per acre.
To address such concerns in
North Carolina, state agriculture
officials teamed up with the biofu-
els center last year to craft a set of
"best management practices" for
energy crops. Among them are not
planting directly adjacent to
streams and irrigation canals, and
establishing buffer zones of at least
20 feet around production fields.
They are listed as "voluntary"
But anyone wishing to do business
with Chemtex would have to sign a
contract agreeing to certain
ground rules, says executive vice
president Paolo Carollo. He points
out that a $99 million USDA loan
guarantee announced this spring
also came with certain mitigation
measures.
Noting that Chemtex has al-
ready made conditional agree-
ments to plant 10,000 acres near
Clinton, Carollo points to a factory
near Venice, Italy, that, from 1937
to 1962, used Arundo grown on
12,000 nearby acres in the produc-
tion of fabric, including Rayon.
"And they never had issues of
spread," he said in a phone inter-
view from the company's head-
quarters in the coastal city of


Wilmington. When production
ceased, he said, those acres were
converted back to pasture land.
Attempts to commercialize
Arundo donax in other parts of the
U.S. have met with limited success.
When a company proposed to
use Arundo for power generation
in Florida, the state Department
of Agriculture and Consumer
Services drafted regulations re-
quiring permits for plots larger
than 2 acres. Although some per-
mits have been issued, the large-
scale project that prompted the
regulations never materialized.
And when Portland General
Electric decided to convert a
power plant from coal to biomass,
Oregon state agriculture officials
conducted a risk assessment for
Arundo. Last year, the state au-
thorized a 400-acre "control area,"
prohibiting plantings within a
mile of water bodies and requir-
ing growers to post a $1 million
eradication bond.
In a statement released last
March, the Native Plant Society of
Oregon accused the state of under-
stating the risks. It cited research
suggesting that Arundo's sterile
seeds might, through "genetic mod-
ification," become fertile.
When Chemtex announced its
plans for North Carolina, the En-
vironmental Defense Fund and
others petitioned the state to have
Arundo declared a noxious weed,
and to ban it. Officials expect to
make a decision by early next


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 E15

Federal action could take
longer.
In January, the EPA gave
Arundo preliminary approval
under the federal renewable fuel
standard program meaning
producers could qualify for valu-
able carbon credits. When envi-
ronmental groups complained
that the decision was at odds with
an executive order aimed at pre-
venting the spread of invasive
species, the agency agreed to re-
evaluate the crop.
Without the EPAs renewable
fuels designation, Arundo would
be less profitable to grow. And
without Arundo in the mix, says
Conlon, "I would be greatly con-
cerned" about the Chemtex proj-
ect and the state's grand plans.
"North Carolina's on the
precipice of becoming an eco-
nomic powerhouse around this
whole idea of advanced biofuels,"
Conlon says. "There's room down
there to build five or six of these
facilities, if and when we can fig-
ure out the right balance between
environmental concerns and eco-
nomic viability."
Burke notes that Arundo has
been sold in the state for years as
an ornamental, without any prob-
lem. To him, it's a no-brainer.
It's naive to think man can truly
control nature, says Newhouser in
California.
"You know, that's the thing with
weeds. They know no boundaries,
and they don't recognize fences.
They don't follow rules."


* 4 Exam Rooms, Doctor Office, Kitchen,
Bookkeeping, Front Office, Reception
* $13/sf; $1,820/mth + 6% sales tax
* 204 S. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
* Convenient patient access/abundant parking
* 2 blocks to Citrus Memorial Hospital
Century 21, J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc.
1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450
Siand mCentury 21 RealEstte Corpo on INDEPENDENTLYOWNED AND OPERATED
Equal Housing Opportunity
- Office: 352-726-6668 or Cell: 352-14".?17
Owner/Builder: Wayne Cooper 3~..-=.. ..


I M AMERCAM ROB HARD Lou Miele Realto.
E A"REALWT& B ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU"
e eI WES.L Snto cell (352) 270.0130 Cell: (352) 697.1685
Bev.i. lls eOfe (352) 746-3600



OPEN HOUSE
SUN., NOV. 18 11AM-2PM
Is^SftL. .LAUMLIfinijMf


- AMERICAN
ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecato Hwy.
Beverly His, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* II f I..il l. .II .JL I .1.1 .1J
* l .a l I .1. I .I. I ..

Mt 5 = 3_.W. $80,000
Jeanne om Wilaid Pickiel 352212 3410
wI'tr,''. CiltiusCountlrSold. coin


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
;. Ih ,i,,,i 1 I l.,k l h ..i l ... .. I.. .ll....i.l h ..I
,,, hlll,1 hinlll, iiii Ij.I III ,:]1F h I

I,,,, ,iAl i:.i "1 i $49,900
Mai'y Paisons 352634 1273


-I I OM ULE IMUDILE DU R UUI I IUIUO
SHOWS LIKE A DOUBLEWIDE

11... li l zz,li .1i
I .iiall l hlll' Ii z.. .l aura 1i 1'' l aijllll
Mt 5 = l'.'IIII. $27,900
Call Ndilda Cano t3521270 0202


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

lal .l I ..' ..l1l II,.al .Ia II.l , l ",,1



$95,000
Call Jim Motion at 352 422 2173 lot
I out personal tout of Emetald Hills


CITRUS bPHINGb
_" ,' _" I ,L II, .1 l. l 1 l: .i ,il ,.ai II I, i i .i .- Il'a

Mt i = ',.' L' $59,900
loiiaine 0 Regan 586 0075


SELLERS MOTIVATED
lilll Ba .in I, 35 .2i62ll 3

MIi= .'. $109,900
Call Isaac Baylon ,` 352 697 2493


... ..:. d...h .. : I. .. ... I.Iai I all



M'. = ;'..'.. ASKING $64,900
Pat Davis 1352/212 72580
Viem. hiding pictuevii nil c2/patdis com


00111lK 11U111 %p IVIIVIM UEIII
SHOPPING CENTER
I .44 of . l i il .111 l 4 1 I lll r .1 .. h.I


Ml = -.4,. OFFERED AT ONLY $262,000
Cll i, a, C ha aillhfill liaa ainaia a 16.2 JOMO e261i


10 ACRES ON THE RIVER!
A a a I- la 'l.a I l.a i' I i p ll'' .l a ) i Fll I
H Ji .I A a-' a. i i I.il IIaF .,,i.au l ,'."i
ihi i I IIill a-. I aailalah l hIa il'' F ila-l
$149,900
IJ all1 II ia-i ~ l, t ail al-'l I i.Ii 3 l .a ll in -
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


_G 1,,1111 liii.1
A ll L.' li.' i..a:.-

M l = ,,QM l'j $95,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
wii'ti'. CiltusCounti Sold. corn


LAKE FRONT SUPER SALE!
I _" ,:lalv al-v l V1IIa 1 ; al ,Ill ill 1 llih aIill

'I L ,. _" ,l ,,afaa a ,ll l' l ..
Ownei is molivaled $77,500!
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


INVERNESS TRIPLEX
_~5.1. so ..ll i .; Ib i 1 6. 1 ;. I .l I. I iii n ;

aa ll-a F,, c ,: i l il.ja . ll i l

Mi 5 = 3'i 33 ASKING $250,000
Call Emil lupu lot you, personal lout
at 302 1713


GOOD TASTE GOOD BUY
Vi.l.a l Ih.i 3 1.1. 'l.a' vI.a.hj --la..F l-Fh
-'..a-a-I .a- l.afl.a ..11 halv il I ..... I l I.. l a'a, ,,l

MNt 5 = 3-:' $119,900
Pat Davis 352/1212 7280
View, listing: ,: ,,w,'. c21paldavis. corn


* I.,l l .... I,' h- ...a Ii

* 1ll .1 VV. l l Ia..:. I J .i. :l l.i ..i :1 .a .
Mt 5 = 3,::73 $139,000
Jeanne Pickiel 352 212 3410
tIt'ri CiltusCount1 Sold. con


i- l.J. ....J Iw.l lI ,j .. h I.. lh fi il

I.,. III .I ....J Vl lll.i. 'ii i -ll l' h i b' ll''il'l '


OFFERED AT $535,000
Mfai Paisons 352 634 1273


GREAT LOCATION FOR A DR'S OFFICE OR ""'" .......'"'" '""' '"
MEDICAL LAB NEXT TO CITRUS MEMORIAL
ll a '.....' a a Ia,,,, N I i h ... 'h i h

I',' ") ;l:',:' I':' '"' l:'.i""i; M = "7..'''. r ASKING $228,900
ML. ='I44' ASKING $225,000 Pat Dlns ,352i212 1280
Call Jim Motton 422 2173 lot youl tollt I',ell listing p 1 c21/p.id.i, is cornm


Fo..,, lh .j I,. .. I- I..h lh ...l d j. l i.....I
S II, i l. l ..l . l l. . l I.aI, I. .I


MI' t. =3 l NOW $155,000
Ask foi Matil n Booth 637 4904


E16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012