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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-11-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02944

Full Text



Veteran's Day: Honor those who served the USA


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
81 -
LOW Partly cloudy and
56 breezy. PAGE A4
wv PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO UNTY Y





ie RONICLe
'www.chronicleonline.com
Best Community k-Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


SEEIT





ONPGD. 8 TOYOTA


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 96


Final results: Obama wins Fla.


Cookie contest
deadline nears
Time is running out to
enter your favorite cookie
recipe in the Chronicle's
Cookie Contest. Share
recipes or vote for your
favorite recipe online at
chronicleonline.com/
cookiecontest2012. The
winning baker receives a
$50 gift card. Entries will
be judged Nov. 30, during
a bake-off at the Chroni-
cle office. All entries must
be received by Monday.


NATIONAL NEWS:





R 140

BiWJ~


Harassment
Emails from Petraeus'
mistress leads to his
resignation./Page A16
HOMEFRONT:


Romney: 49.1 percent, Obama: 50


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Presi-
dent Barack Obama was de-
clared the winner of Florida's
29 electoral votes Saturday,
ending a four-day count with a


razor-thin margin that nar-
rowly avoided an automatic re-
count that would have brought
back memories of 2000.
No matter the outcome,
Obama had already clinched
re-election and now has 332


electoral votes to Romney's 206.
The Florida Secretary of
State's Office said with almost
100 percent of the vote
counted, Obama led Republi-
can challenger Mitt Romney 50
percent to 49.1 percent, a dif-
ference of about 74,000 votes.
That was more than the half-
percent margin where a com-


puter recount would have been
automatically ordered unless
Romney waived it.
There is a Nov 16 deadline
for overseas and military bal-
lots, but under Florida law, re-
counts are based on Saturday's
results. Only a handful of over-
seas and military ballots are
See Page A14


President
Obama
declared the
winner of
Florida's 29
electoral votes
Saturday.


Veterans on parade


Bountiful
Update the traditional
cornucopia without
diminishing its sense of
plenty and celebration.
/HomeFront


RISINESS:


Flood sale
What's happening in the
used-car market in the
days since superstorm
Sandy?/Page D1

OPINION:
This is
not a
Democratic or
a Republican
issue. This is a
fundamental
citizenship
issue.


OPINION:
More letters
Read more letters to the
editor and Sound Off.
/Pages A12 and A13


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ..............A18
Ed itorial............. ........ C 2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................... A18
Obituaries ................A6
Together..................A20


. 111|17111111 007l o


.. 1. 1" V l o "- C IT R US u u n , .......



DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Anthony Napolation and members of the Korean War Veterans Association joined veterans from all the branches
of military in fighting on the Korean Peninsula after World War II. The Citrus County Veterans Day Parade has be-
come a tradition that helped to make the area one of the most patriotic in Central Florida.


Builders want break

from school impact fees


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Impact
fees and the school dis-
trict's role in approving new
development come before
the Citrus County School
Board on Tuesday as the
county's builders want re-
lief in both areas.
The board will review a
proposed change to an inter-
local agreement with the Cit-
rus County Commission that
allows the school district to
sign off on large-scale resi-
dential development. The
approval, called concur-
rency, ensures safeguards
are in place to prevent school
overcrowding caused by stu-
dent growth.
Board members rejected
a similar request from the


* WHAT: Citrus County
School Board meeting.
WHEN: 3 p.m. Tuesday.
WHERE: School Board
offices, corner of State
Road 44 and Mont-
gomery Avenue,
Inverness.
ONLINE:
www.citrus.kl2.fI.us.
Citrus County Builders As-
sociation in April.
Builders are also seeking
a moratorium on school im-
pact fees to stimulate
construction.
Assistant Superintendent
of Schools Kenny Blocker
said the district has no
plans for a new school dur-
ing the next five years.
See Page A4


County honors

armed services
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS
War II Navy veteran
Vic Buck takes his
place under the
same oak tree on Main
Street in front of the Old
Courthouse in Inverness to
watch the Veterans Day
parade.
Although legally blind,
the one-time county veter-
ans' service officer comes
every year.
"I come MORE
with all the INSIDE
other veter-
ans to show 0 See
our sup- Veterans
port," he Day
said Satur- photos
day before around
this year's nation.
parade /Page
began. "Plus, A15
I enjoy a
good
parade."
Nearby,
10-year-old
Chase Mal-
lard sat For more
with his photos, click
family, hav- on this story at
ing come all www.chronicle
the way online.com.
from Her-
nando County.
"It's for the veterans," he
said. "They served, and
they all wanted to help our
country and make sure no
one bad comes here."
He added he wants to
join the Navy when he's old
enough, just like his cousin
and his grandfather.
As the parade made its
way down Main Street, with
first responders leading the
way, parade watchers
waved flags and shouted,
"Thank you!" Some ap-
plauded. Others saluted.
Then came color guards
and marching bands, mili-
tary vehicles, elected offi-
cials, dozens of veterans
groups and local elemen-
tary school children
See Page A5


BOCC setting King's Bay plan


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
The county looks ready to pitch in with
the cleanup of King's Bay
Commissioner Joe Meek will propose
spending $225,000 of the county's water
quality reserves on the
cleanup when the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC)
meets Tuesday.
"While there are many
issues and worthy projects,
I would like to highlight
one specific project and
work to get the city, county Joe Meek
and state government county
along with private individ- commissioner.
uals and businesses all
striving to fund and execute a single project
that improves the quality of King's Bay and
actually moves forward to make a differ-
ence," Meek told the Chronicle.
Meek said he organized a meeting Oct.
26 at the Inverness administration con-
ference room with that project in mind. It
was attended by state Sen. Charles Dean,


Every rakeful
removed is less pollution
in the water.
Art Jones
president-elect of Kings Bay Rotary.
R-Inverness; Crystal River Council-
woman Paula Wheeler; Art Jones, presi-
dent-elect of the Kings Bay Rotary; Mike
Czerwinski, environmental consultant;
Steve Lamb, president of Crystal Motors;
Dr. Paresh Desai; County Administrator
Brad Thorpe; County Attorney Richard
Wesch; Public Works Director Ken Frink;
Director of Water Resources Ken Cheek;
Aquatics Director Mark Edwards; and
Chris Zajac and Colleen Thayer of the
Southwest Florida Water Management
District.
Jones presented his "One Rake at a
Time" program, a service project started
by the Rotary club more than one year
ago. In its first year, Rotarians and other
See Page A4




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Nov. 14, 20 at 10:00 am & 2:00 pm


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Allen West still won't concede election


Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH -
Firebrand Republican Rep.
Allen West was defeated by
Democratic challenger
Patrick Murphy, according
to the state's vote count Sat-
urday, but the incumbent
won't concede.
The state issued complete
but unofficial results showing
Murphy with a lead of 2,442
votes, or 50.4 percent That's
beyond the half-percent mar-
gin needed to trigger an auto-
matic recount. A handful of


overseas and military ballots
remain outstanding, but
under state law the decision
for a recount is based on Sat-
urday's count
Murphy declared victory
early Wednesday morning
and has held his lead ever
since, even as thousands of
absentee and provisional
ballots were processed. He
issued a statement Saturday
saying it was time to put the
campaign behind. He called
his win a signal voters were
tired of the extremism West
represented.


West s
campaign
insists there
are many
unanswered
questions in
the race,
mostly cen-
tered in St. Allen West
L u c i e was defeated
County, the in the U.S.
only one of House race.
three coun-
ties in the district that Mur-
phy won. They are
concerned votes were
counted twice and have
asked to review sign-in
books from the polls to en-
sure the number of voters


matched the
ballot count
"We'r e
simply not
going to just
walk away
from the
race until
Patrick we see that
Murphy the num-
beat Rep. bers add
Allen West. up," West
campaign
manager Tim Edson said.
West's only path forward
appears to be through the
courts. Under state law, he
still could contest the election
if misconduct or fraud might
have changed its result


"If I come out on the short
end of the stick, guess
what?" West told WPEC-TV
on Friday "I salute the flag,
I wish you good luck and I
continue on, and hopefully
my replacement will be able
to go up and contend with
these monumental issues."
The race was the coun-
try's most expensive House
race and one of the most
closely watched. Both sides
had raised nearly $21 mil-
lion as of Oct. 17, according
to the nonpartisan Center
for Responsive Politics, and
Super PACs poured in about
$6.6 million.
West is a former Army


lieutenant colonel who was
elected in 2010 on a wave of
tea party support. He is one
of only two black Republi-
cans in the House. He had a
constant string of headline-
grabbing statements, from
calling a majority of con-
gressional Democrats com-
munists to saying President
Barack Obama, Rep. Nancy
Pelosi and others should
"get the hell out of the
United States."
Murphy 29, was a political
newcomer who portrayed
West as an extremist who
has done little else in Wash-
ington than stoke partisan
fires.


Around the
COUNTY

Closures, changes in
hours for Veterans Day
All county offices will be
closed Monday in obser-
vance of Veterans Day and
will reopen as usual Tuesday.
For more information about
Citrus County and events,
visit www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
The Citrus County Cen-
tral Landfill will close at 2:30
p.m. Monday. The adminis-
trative office will be closed. It
will open for regular business
Tuesday. For more informa-
tion, call 352-527-7670 dur-
ing office hours or visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click
on departments, then Public
Works, then Solid Waste
Management.
Crystal River City Hall
will be closed Monday.
Garbage collection will be
Monday.
Inverness City Hall will
be closed Monday.
Most area banking insti-
tutions will be closed Monday.
Aerial manatee
survey on refuge
Staff from the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge con-
ducted an aerial survey of
manatees Nov. 8. A total of
318 manatees was counted
along the survey route,
stretching from the Cross
Florida Barge Canal, near In-
glis, south to the Homosassa
River. Included along this
route are Crystal River, Kings
Bay, the discharge canal of
the Crystal River Power
Plant, Salt River and the Ho-
mosassa River, which in-
cludes the Blue Waters.
Wednesday's count was:
King's Bay- 185
adults plus 28 calves 213
total.
Crystal River 6
adults plus 1 calf 7.
Salt River 2 adults
plus 1 calf 3.
Power Plant Discharge
Canal 41 adults.
Cross Florida Barge
Canal none.
Homosassa River (Blue
Waters) 48 adults plus 3
calves 51.
Lower Homosassa River
- 2 adults plus 1 calf 3.
Total: 284 adults and 34
calves 318.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service is the principal Fed-
eral agency responsible for
conserving, protecting and
enhancing fish, wildlife and
plants and their habitats for
the continuing benefit of the
American people.
Citrus Y expands


group em
The Citrus Co
will open its four
ercise location n
Citrus Springs a
Evangelical Luth
9425 N. Citrus S
The Citrus Co
will introduce thE
gram and locatic
demonstrations
5 p.m. Tuesday,
There will be bo
and light snacks
door prizes. Atte
observe and par
classes that day
The new loca
classes in Pilate
circuit on a regu
ginning Thursda


A candlelight stroll


Floral City steers visitors

to artists, businesses with

annual luminary walk

SAMANTHA KENNEDY 0
Correspondent
Lights and local artists' work made a chill- "| .
ing evening in Floral City one to remember.
The Luminary Art Walk took place by can- n
delight, allowing artists to proudly display
their work, and spectators the chance to stroll
through downtown Floral City, seeing first-
hand how talented the county's citizens are.
Many businesses in the area stayed open
past normal business hours to accommodate
the crowds and supply an indoor spotlight for
artists' work.
More than 150 artists and vendors found
refuge from the chilly weather inside Pam's
Forgotten Treasures and Gifts, which was
showcasing its very best work.
Dal Tompkins, who was among the crowd,
paints in the historic Florida Highwaymen
style. Traditionally, this style is self-taught
and displays mostly oil-based painted land-
scapes, which were sold door-to-door rather
than showcased and sold in art galleries.
During the evening, Tompkins demon-
strated painting in this style and chatted with
spectators.
The historic Reid House, more commonly
known as the "Pink House," hosted the
Friends of the Floral City Library The group
catered to aspiring artists and art lovers by
selling and displaying books pertaining to art
and different techniques and styles.
The Floral City Needle Artists warmed
their hands inside the Floral City Community
Building to demonstrate their knitting,
sewing and crocheting talents. Recently, this
group took on a project in honor of Breast
Cancer Awareness Month, creating and do-
nating 42 pillows in the shape of hearts to be
used by women recovering from breast |l
surgery.
The Knight House accommodated the'
Florida Artists Gallery, where about 50 artists
displayed their work. Food was served in a
cafe-style atmosphere.- -
Hundreds of people contributed to the suc-
cess of the night.
"It really was a great time," said Bill Cov-
ington with the Florida Artists Gallery.




Seafood smells overtake Homosassa


Annual festival

serves up taste

dishes, artistry

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA-Smells of
fried seafood and childhood
treats were widespread as


Kercise artists drew crowds Satur-
day to the Homosassa Arts,
>unty YMCA Crafts and Seafood Festival.
th group ex- Blocks from the Ho-
iext week in mosassa River, the 38th an-
t the Hope nual smorgasbord of
leran Church, seafood vendors and craft
springs Blvd. exhibitors continues today
untyYMCA until 4:30 p.m. throughout
e new pro- the historic district of Old
on with free Homosassa.
at 4:30 and Fried clam strips, peel-
Nov. 13. and-eat shrimp, homemade
titled water crab cakes, boiled crab legs
, along with and smoked mullet dip are
ndees can among the selections to eat.
rticipate in the Seafood lovers car partake
for free. of the food across from the
o fer Homosassa Elementary
tion will offer School for a $2 donation.
s and cardio Attendees receive an en-
lar basis be- trance ticket for door prizes
y, Nov. 15. where eight to 10 tickets are
-From staff reports called every hour


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Janet Moses appreciates the folk art of glass paintings at
the annual Homosassa Arts, Crafts and Seafood Festival.


"My mom and dad enjoy
the prizes and to walk
around," 8-year-old Jennie
Thomas said. "However, I
love eating the chocolate
bananas."
"I was so excited this
morning when my mom said
we were coming here," she
continued.
In addition to the fresh
seafood, an assortment of
treats such as fried Oreos,
chocolate-covered bananas
and funnel cakes accom-
pany the selections. For


those who do not like
seafood and don't have a
sweet tooth, they can satisfy
their appetites with fried
green tomatoes, gyros and
other succulent dishes.
Besides enjoying the food,
many festival-goers browsed
among the diverse collec-
tion of arts and crafts.
Sundry mediums of artistic
creations provided partici-
pants the opportunity to ap-
preciate and purchase arts
and crafts.
"This is my second year of


attending," said Darlene
McLeam of Ontario,
Canada. "This is a wonder-
ful show that Homosassa
has here."
Handmade jewelry show-
cased her booth with differ-
ent touches added to each
piece.
"There is so much traffic
here and everyone is eager
to buy," McLeam said. "I do
quite well here."
Debi Dwyer, owner of
Debi Dwyer Designs, sat un-
derneath her umbrella as
onlookers gazed at her
hand-rolled glass. Varieties
of shapes and sizes hung
from strings and the sun
glistened through to portray
different colors.
"It takes me hours to do
them," she said. "However,
that's my job. I travel to dif-
ferent events. I love doing it.
I probably have hundreds of
them."
Exhibitors brought wood-
working, drawings, shell
creations and more to ex-
hibit the talents of Citrus
County and the country
Homosassa Civic Club,
which advances civic devel-
opment, uses the money
raised from the festival for
scholarships.


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: Chuck Chesnul
plays Friday night in
the Knight House
during the annual
Floral City Luminary Art
Walk. LEFT: Visitors to
the annual event dine
in a local caf6.
Businesses in downtown
Floral City stayed
open after hours to
participate in the
annual luminary art
walk.



State BRIEF

Police: Man holds
family hostage
LEHIGH ACRES -A
hostage situation between
an armed man and two
family members in south-
west Florida ended
peacefully.
Lee County Sheriff's
deputies headed into a du-
plex early Saturday morn-
ing after reports of
gunshots where they say
an armed man was holed
up inside with two family
members.
Sheriff's spokesman Lt.
Larry King said hostage ne-
gotiators talked with the
man inside while one of the
women escaped through a
back window. But the man's
mother, who is in a wheel-
chair, was still inside. Ne-
gotiators eventually
convinced him to bring her
outside. At that time, the
unidentified suspect was
arrested.
Authorities said the inci-
dent escalated from an ar-
gument the night before.
The Fort Myers News-
Press reported charges
may be pending.
-From wire report


Vote beyond recount range






A4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


BOCC
Continued from Page Al

volunteers removed more
than 105 tons of lyngbya
algae from the bay, an aver-
age of 575 pounds per work
day
During the second year,
an additional 168 tons have
been removed so far using
hand and mechanical
harvesting.
"The more lyngbya we re-
move, the better, because
lyngbya hoards nutrients
and as it decays it releases
those pollutants back into
the water column, feeding
more algae growth," Jones
said. "Every rakeful re-
moved is less pollution in
the water. Less pollutants
means less food for new
algae to consume. The more
we remove, the more we
start to starve lyngbya and
slow its growth."
Jones has told commis-
sioners: "We need a har-
vester that can reach down
deeper to remove 3- to 4-
feet-thick layers of lyngbya
at depths of up to 10.5 feet"
The current harvester can
reach down to only 4 to 5
feet and must work around
low tides. Jones said the Ro-
tarians' goal is to remove
more than 1,000 tons of lyng-
bya this year and, in the pro-
ject's third year, to have
three boats working to re-
move more than 5,000 tons.
Jones wrote a letter to
commissioners requesting
$225,000 from water quality
reserves for the project. He
also requested a similar
sum from the water district.
According to Frink in a
memo to Thorpe: "It was
clear that his grass roots ef-
forts to clean Kings Bay
have been embraced by the
community and are making
a difference. A group of us
was able to witness this per-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LYNGBYA CLEAN-UP

* On Nov. 15, 16 and 18, Kings Bay Rotary is hosting a
three-day marathon lyngbya clean-up project at
Hunter Springs Park in Crystal River. From 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday and Friday, 20 students from the Acad-
emy of Environmental Sciences, under the direction of
AES science teacher Nancy Pruette, will be there. They
will work with the Marine Science Station and help
with the "One Rake at a Time" service project started
by the Rotary in September 2011.
* Earnie Olsen, a biologist/teacher and boat caption at
the Marine Science Station, will bring students by boat
to the park. He was involved in helping set up the
hands-on learning field trip.
* On Sunday, Nov. 18 the last day of the three-day
marathon the work day is from 1 to 3 p.m. A church
group of 10- and 11-year-olds is coming out to help,
along with their teachers. Other groups are invited to
join the work day at Hunter Springs Park that Sunday
afternoon. The more adult supervision the better. The
more people helping, the better to get rid of invasive
lyngbya algae.
* For more information, contact Art Jones by email at
MrAWJones@aol.com or call 727-643-7659; or, show
up and sign in at the Kings Bay Rotary tent.


sonally during an onsite
visit on Oct. 16."
On Tuesday, Meek will
propose an action plan to
the BOCC to include:
Developing a memoran-
dum of understanding be-
tween Citrus County and the
city of Crystal River support-
ing Kings Bay Rotary's "One
Rake at a Time" program.
Using $225,000 of the
county's water quality re-
serves toward the program
by purchasing a harvester
and transport barge (esti-
mated at $160,000) and lease
it to Save Crystal River Inc.
to remove lyngbya from
within King's Bay
Using the balance of the
$225,000 by contributing it to
Save Crystal River Inc. for
the operation of the
equipment.
Submitting an off-cycle
cooperative funding request
to the water district, lever-
aging the county's and city's
commitment to the project.
Meek said the city of Crys-


tal River also would con-
sider a financial
contribution.
"I especially want to high-
light that this is a true part-
nership that includes a
public/private partnership
to improve our bay," Meek
said. "This will help the fan-
tastic work of Art Jones and
the Kings Bay Rotary, and
also the numerous citizens
and organizations dedi-
cated to improving Crystal
River. We will take this
agreement to (the water dis-
trict) to match the $225,000
from the county"
Meek said the funding
would come from the
county's water quality fund,
which is specifically set
aside to improve the
county's water quality
"This project does that
and sends a signal that we
are finally moving forward
and serious about address-
ing and improving our envi-
ronmental situation," Meek
said.


Regional traffic safety team to meet


Special to the Chronicle

The West Central Community Traffic
Safety Team (CTST) invites interested cit-
izens to attend its next meeting from 1 to 2
p.m. Wednesday, Nov 14, at the Sheriff's
Emergency Operations Center in Lecanto.
CTSTs are locally based groups of high-
way safety advocates who are committed
to solving traffic safety problems through
the efforts of city, county and state agen-
cies plus private industry representatives
and local citizens working together toward
a common goal of improving traffic safety
in their community
Teams integrate engineering, enforce-


IMPACT
Continued from Page Al

However, the district is
reluctant to eliminate im-
pact fees on the chance that
any residential construc-
tion spurt could create the
demand for a new school
faster than planned.
Impact fees are one-time
charges on new construc-
tion to pay for the impacts
of growth in such areas of
roads and schools.
Builders believe impact
fees place them at an un-
fair competitive disadvan-
tage to area counties that
charge lower or no impact
fees. The county's Develop-
ment Services director,
Vince Cautero, said he has
never seen data to support
that contention.
A representative of the
CCBA approached county
commissioners in Septem-
ber, asking to remove
school concurrency from
the approval of residential
developments. Commis-
sioners agreed to pursue
that with the school board
and request buy-in for a
moratorium on school im-
pact fees.


ment, education and emergency services.
By working together with interested citi-
zens and other traffic safety advocates
within their communities, the CTSTs help
to solve local traffic safety problems re-
lated to the driver, the vehicle and the
roadway
One common goal of each Community
Traffic Safety Team is to reduce the num-
ber and severity of traffic crashes within
their community
To be included on the agenda or for
more information, contact Jeanette Rouse
at 813-975-6256, Jeanette.rouse@dot.
state.fl.us; or Sue Littnan at 352-563-9939,
ext. 235, slittnan@elc-naturecoast org.


While the county com-
mission decides impact-fee
amounts, commissioners
say they don't want to make
that decision without seek-
ing guidance first from the
school board.
Builder Randy Clark ap-
proached commissioners
Tuesday for an update.
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe said the county sent
a letter Oct. 10 to the school
district and hasn't heard
back.
Commission Chairman
Winn Webb blamed school
officials for ignoring the
issue.
"You have certain people
who are just dragging their
feet," Webb said. "It irri-
tates everybody"
Actually, according to
school district records, the
district received two letters
from the county: Oct. 23
dealing with the interlocal


agreement and Oct. 25 re-
garding impact fees.
Blocker said the district
couldn't respond until the
next school board meeting,
which is Tuesday
"We haven't ignored the
county," he said.
Superintendent of
Schools Sandra "Sam"
Himmel said she opposes a
moratorium on school im-
pact fees unless the county
does likewise for its
programs.
"We can't ever lose sight
that impact fees are strictly
for growth," she said. "If we
get growth, are we going to
raise taxes to build our
schools?
"My recommendation is
we want what everybody
else gets."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


eal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


l Meeting Notices......................D8


Surplus Property...................D8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PRP -HI LO PR HI LO PR
81 41 0.00 I NA N A A N 1-. J72 36 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc

pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc

pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 to
4 feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a moderate chop. Partly to mostly
sunny today.


NA NA A 78 46 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusteaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 81 Low: 56
Partly cloudy and breezy

i l MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 58
Partly cloudy; 10% chance of a stray shower

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 60
Partly sunny; 10% chance of a shower

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 77/42
Record 91/36
Normal 80/53
Mean temp. 60
Departure from mean -7
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 48.28 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.25 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 49
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 39%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
ragweed, composites
Today's count: 4.0/12
Monday's count: 5.2
Tuesday's count: 5.0
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/11 SUNDAY 2:25 8:38 2:52 9:05
11/12 MONDAY 3:14 9:28 3:43 9:57
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


S
NOV.13 NOV. 20


0
NOV. 28


DEC. 6


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 5:38 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:52 A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY...........................4:13 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY............................ 3:53 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 2:42 a/11:18 a 3:55 p/11:25 p
Crystal River** 1:03 a/8:40 a 2:16 p/8:47 p
Withlacoochee* 12:03 p/6:28 a 11:30 p/6:35 p
Homosassa*** 1:52 a/10:17 a 3:05 p/10:24 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
3:22 a/12:07 p 4:49 p/-
1:43 a/9:29 a 3:10 p/9:33 p
12:57 p7:17 a /7:21 p
2:32 a/11:06 a 3:59 p/11:10 p


Gulf water
temperature


71
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.97 30.97 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.59 38.59 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.75 39.75 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.20 41.20 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany 54 40 pc 62 46
Albuquerque 53 42 s 41 21
Asheville 71 30 s 69 46
Atlanta 70 42 pc 71 55
Atlantic City 61 31 s 65 53
Austin 83 62 ts 80 44
Baltimore 63 32 s 67 50
Billings 21 9 .17 sf 22 12
Birmingham 71 41 pc 73 58
Boise 40 22 pc 38 28
Boston 55 40 pc 59 51
Buffalo 53 43 s 71 54
Burlington, VT 45 33 pc 53 46
Charleston, SC 72 39 pc 75 56
Charleston, WV 74 34 s 74 53
Charlotte 72 31 s 71 53
Chicago 66 50 .22 r 63 38
Cincinnati 73 39 s 69 54
Cleveland 63 46 .09 s 69 52
Columbia, SC 76 34 s 73 56
Columbus, OH 71 48 .03 s 68 55
Concord, N.H. 52 31 pc 58 39
Dallas 81 65 ts 72 40
Denver 56 27 .23 pc 39 16
Des Moines 78 58 c 49 26
Detroit 62 48 trace pc 65 52
El Paso 73 60 pc 56 29
Evansville, IN 73 44 pc 70 45
Harrisburg 56 33 s 63 45
Hartford 57 39 pc 66 49
Houston 83 57 ts 82 58
Indianapolis 72 47 pc 68 44
Jackson 76 45 ts 77 56
Las Vegas 53 42 s 55 40
Little Rock 76 51 ts 77 44
Los Angeles 62 50 s 67 47
Louisville 74 48 pc 71 52
Memphis 74 50 ts 75 49
Milwaukee 65 48 r 58 36
Minneapolis 69 44 .05 c 42 22
Mobile 75 47 s 75 61
Montgomery 75 37 s 75 56
Nashville 73 40 pc 73 56
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 78 54 pc 78 67
New York City 55 42 s 64 52
Norfolk 68 37 s 70 55
Oklahoma City 77 62 pc 59 30
Omaha 77 58 c 37 20
Palm Springs 67 47 s 68 44
Philadelphia 57 37 s 66 52
Phoenix 65 54 s 62 43
Pittsburgh 66 37 .02 s 72 51
Portland, ME 51 27 pc 54 44
Portland, Ore 46 37 r 48 42
Providence, R.I. 57 38 pc 60 49
Raleigh 74 36 s 73 52
Rapid City 34 18 .13 c 26 12
Reno 39 23 .03 pc 42 30
Rochester, NY 51 39 .03 s 71 54
Sacramento 58 36 pc 58 34
St. Louis 81 57 ts 69 33
St. Ste. Marie 36 32 .31 sh 57 44
Salt Lake City 34 28 .20 sf 33 20
San Antonio 81 64 ts 81 47
San Diego 64 57 .04 s 67 55
San Francisco 59 49 s 60 51
Savannah 73 39 pc 75 59
Seattle 46 31 r 47 43
Spokane 31 21 trace pc 33 25
Syracuse 53 43 .01 s 66 48
Topeka 75 66 sh 43 24
Washington 65 38 s 68 52
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 90 Harlingen, Texas
LOW -6 Lewistown, Mont.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 87/74/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 50/43/sh Mexico City
Athens 66/54/c Montreal
Beijing 35/32/s Moscow
Berlin 54/39/sh Paris
Bermuda 74/69/pc Rio
Cairo 73/62/pc Rome
Calgary 27/20/pc Sydney
Havana 80/62/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 80/69/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 60/51/sh Warsaw


59/47/pc
48/35/pc
56/40/pc
74/47/pc
50/37/pc
30/27/pc
52/37/pc
89/75/pc
67/62/sh
73/61/pc
65/54/sh
63/52/s
55/48/pc


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


LHRKONICLE
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N 11

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Courthouse office
TompkinsSt. s square
0 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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News and feature stories ............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
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I-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PARADE
Continued from Page Al

dressed in red, white and
blue shouting, "USA! USA!"
The trombone slides in the
Crystal River Middle School
marching bands were even
wrapped in patriotic
wrappers.
As is tradition, following
the parade the Lecanto Mid-
dle School band played a
medley of military anthems
as the "llth Hour" memo-
rial service began on the
lawn in front of the Old
Courthouse Heritage
Museum.
County Commissioner
John "JJ" Kenney welcomed
the assembled crowd with
an invitation for all Marines
to rise to wish the Marine
Corps a happy birthday with
a loud "Ooh rah!"
Also traditional, a place of
honor was set for the "un-
seen guest," representing
those who were prisoners of
war and those missing in ac-
tion. Sandy Balfour, recent
candidate for Superinten-
dent of Schools, sat in as the
unseen guest.
"This year, we honor our
military retirees," said In-
verness Mayor Bob Plaisted.
"We love our veterans ... and
our military retirees who
continue to serve their fel-
low man. It's in their blood.
They eat, drink and live to
serve."
Guest speaker and parade
Grand Marshal, Air Force
Chief Master Sgt. John
Stewart (retired) served 27
years, including a tour of
duty in Vietnam during the
Vietnam War.
He had some scathing re-
marks for our nation con-
cerning our lack of honoring
veterans. In his own words,
here are some of the points
he made:


WATERING FINES
The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100 for
first offenders of local
watering rules. Second
violations cost $250,
third or more cost
$500.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 A5


School Superintendent Sandra "Sam" Himmel and Pat
Deutschman walk in the Veterans Day Parade in downtown
Inverness. The school system teaches students respect for
veterans and often presents patriotic performances for area


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle honored and taken care of
Children wave flags and cheer Saturday as veterans pass by in the Citrus County Veterans when they return home.
Association Veterans Day Parade along Main Street in Inverness. Abraham Lincoln made a
promise to veterans, that we


Over the past 30 to 35
years as a nation, we've
begun to lose our spirit and
more and more we're for-
getting our patriots, patriot-
ism and our veterans. If it
continues, our veterans' fu-
tures look very bleak
I'm deeply concerned
about the upcoming budget
cuts and planned reduction


in forces and other military
changes ... that will without
a doubt impact an already
existing flawed veterans'
support system.
We seem to think that by
electing self-serving, mili-
tary hating politicians we
would not be harmed as a
nation. We stupidly believe
that it's not necessary to


maintain vigilance against
the world's bad guys.
We've forgotten that the
price of freedom is eternal
vigilance backed by a strong
military that is prepared to
prevent war-not start war,
but prevent it. And it must
be a military that America
totally supports and one
that is remembered and


as a nation would take care
of them, but we are failing
and not keeping that
promise.
Veterans do not deserve
government red tape. Veter-
ans do not deserve govern-
ment budget cuts. Veterans
do not deserve government
broken promises. We do de-
serve prompt high-quality
medical care, rapid re-


sponse to compensation
claims... and for those com-
ing back with PTSD, they
deserve to get the help and
counseling they so desper-
ately need.
It is our government's re-
sponsibility to take care of
our veterans, because we
veterans took care of our
government.
MEN
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online, com or 352-564-2927.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Bruce Davis, 92
INGLIS
Bruce P Davis, 92, of In-
glis, died Friday, Nov. 9,
2012, at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center in
Crystal River.
Private cremation
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory, Crys-
tal River
Patricia
Gaiewski, 68
OCALA
Ms. Patricia Anne
Gaiewski, 68, of Ocala, Fla.,
passed away Nov 8, 2012.
Patricia was born in New
York on April 28, 1944, to
parents, Antonio and Delia
(Fullmer) Sawlski. She
moved from Smithtown,
N.Y, to Inverness, Fla., in
1972 and worked at Big Lots
there in the 1990s. For the
past three years, she lived in
Magnolia Walk Apartments
in Ocala.
She is survived by her
daughter, Lisa Gaiewski of
Ocala; son, Warren
Gaiewski and wife, Carolyn
Trimble, of Lavon, Texas;
daughter, Elizabeth Bedwell
and husband, Robert, of
Chattanooga, Tenn.; grand-
children, Kelsey and Jacob
Bedwell of Chattanooga,
Tenn.; and brother, Robert
Sawlski.
Arrangements are under
the care of Roberts Funeral
Homes Bruce Chapel East,
352-732-9944.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


Deaths ELSEWHERE


Associated Press
Tuskegee Airman Lt. Col.
Herbert Carter is seen Jen.
20 in Montgomery, Ala.
Carter died Thursday, Nov. 8.
He was 95.
Herbert
Carter, 95
TUSKEGEE AIRMAN
TUSKEGEE, Ala. Re-
tired Lt. Col. Herbert Eu-
gene Carter, one of the
original Tuskegee Airmen
who broke color barriers in
World War II, has died.
Tuskegee Mayor Johnny
Ford said Carter died
Thursday afternoon at East
Alabama Medical Center.
He was 95.
The Tuskegee Airmen
were the first black aviators
in the U.S. military During
World War II they were
trained as a segregated unit
in central Alabama at
Tuskegee Institute, now
Tuskegee University. Carter
was in the first group that
trained for the 99th Fighter


Squadron.
They were prohibited
from fighting alongside
white counterparts and
faced severe prejudice, yet
became one of World War
II's most respected fighter
squadrons.
Carter flew 77 missions
and crashed landed only
once.
Tuskegee's mayor or-
dered flags in the town
flown at half-staff. Funeral
arrangements are pending.
Bill Tarmey, 71
BRITISH ACTOR
LONDON Actor Bill
Tarmey, who for 30 years
played loveable rogue Jack
Duckworth on the British
soap opera "Coronation
Street," died Friday at the
age of 71, the show's pro-
ducers said.
Tarmey died on the Span-
ish island of Tenerife. He
had been in poor health for
many years with heart prob-
lems and other ailments.
"I could make it easier on
myself. I could give up
smoking. I could go and sit
in a rocking chair," Tarmey
once said. "But that would-
n't be me. That would kill
me sooner than the old
ticker would."
Work-shy, pigeon-fancying
Jack and his tart-tongued
wife Vera, played by Liz


Dawn, were among the
longest-running characters
on the soap, which is set in
a working-class town in
northwest England. Their
rocky but enduring relation-
ship was at the emotional
heart of the fictional com-
munity of Weatherfield.
Tarmey was a former la-
borer and nightclub singer
who first appeared on "Coro-
nation Street" in 1977 as an
extra. He was made a regular
two years later and stayed
until 2010. Some 11 million
people watched his final
episode, in which Jack died
peacefully in his armchair
He was also a singer, and
had two top-40 singles in
Britain, including a cover of
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Emeritus at Barrington
Place invites veterans to join
the facility for a special break-
fast in their honor.
At 9:30 a.m. Monday, Nov.
12, Emeritus at Barrington
Place will serve breakfast to its
veteran residents and invites
the local community veterans to
come join them. Call 352-746-
2273 to reserve a spot.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Lunch-
eon for Military Women will
take place at noon Monday,
Nov. 12, at the Crystal River
Woman's Clubhouse, 320 N.
Citrus Ave, Crystal River. Those
who have never received an in-
vitation in the past may call
Leslie Martineau at 352-
746-2396 to be added to the
mailing list.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 15, at Ocala Regional Air-
port Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-


day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty
and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
Thanksgiving dinner will
be served at the post from
2 to 5 p.m. Nov. 22.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,


Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families.
The American Legion Riders
at Post 155 will host a poker
run Saturday, Nov. 17, for the
benefit of USMC Cpl. Josh
White, who suffered multiple in-
juries in Afghanistan.
Registration begins at 9 a.m.
with last bike out by 11 a.m. at
the American Legion, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal
River. Stops include Mike's
Pub, Jake's Bar and Grill,
Sleepy Hollow, Thunder Inn
and Amvets Post 40 in Inglis,
with last bike in atAmvets by
4 p.m. Coffee and doughnuts
will be served, at no charge, at
registration.
There will be a $10 charge
per poker hand, and a $6 cost
to purchase a meal at the
Amvets, with $1 from each
meal served to be given to Josh
White. All vehicles are welcome
to participate.
Call poker run chairman
Moe LaBelle at 352-476-2911.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call


Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The auxiliary will serve a
roast pork dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, at the post
home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Every-
one is welcome. Donation is $
7. All are also welcome to a
ham and sweet potato dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Nov. 28, at the Post home.


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Donation is $7. Donations from
the dinners help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For more
information, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
All are welcome at the Veter-
ans Day celebration Sunday,
Nov. 11, at the post. On the
menu are hamburgers, hot
dogs and accompaniments.


Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch. Informa-
tion regarding any post events
is available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for
membership.
The Veterans Day Ceremony
at noon Sunday, Nov. 11, will be
followed by a picnic featuring
pulled pork plate, potato salad,
coleslaw, baked beans and
rolls. Music by Mike. Cost is $6.
Baked chicken is on the
menu for Friday, Nov. 16, from
5 to 6:30 p.m. cost is $8 and all
are welcome. Children younger
than 6 eat for $4.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The


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A8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A7

chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
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tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information.


Mlake Xour
Reservations
0 Now.
AW e t G 9301W. Fort Island Trail,
BA o o lCrystal River
SP 352-795-4211
at Plantation on Crystal River www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The
public is welcome at bingo at 6
p.m. Thursday.
Outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Sat-
urday, Nov. 17. All-you-can-eat
breakfast is from 7:30 to 10:30
a.m. Cost is $5.
Free Thanksgiving dinner to
be served from noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 22. All are wel-
come; donations not required,
but will be accepted.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive


in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at ultrarayl997@
yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in


Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regular


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

and special events, as well as
meetings. Google us at VFW
4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.


Page A9


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page AS

American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information.
The post will host a New
England Boil from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 17.Menu will
consist of ham shank, boiled
potatoes, carrots, cabbage and
onion, salad, desserts, coffee,
tea and soda for $8.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the


VETERANS


Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
N American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585


E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-


634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at


7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All el-
igible veterans welcome. Call
Commander Tom Gallagher at
860-1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will meet at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 A9

design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. ppro-
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A1I SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


Heartfelt thanks for



giving all year long


Thanksgiving is just
one day out of the
year, and it's typically
when we think of the things
we have experienced
throughout the past year
and are thankful for. Many
of us gather around a table
where servings of turkey,
stuffing, vegeta-
bles and desserts
are arranged in A
an attractive
order, ready to
contribute to an
after-meal
slumber.
Some of us,
myself included,
don't wait for a
single, special Barbara
day to recognize VETEI
the positive VIE
things that make
up our lives, but
rather, express our appreci-
ation on a continuing basis
for there are so many peo-
ple, things and experiences
to be thankful for. Here are
just a few of the things I am
extra-thankful for as this
year's November feast is
being planned:
I am thankful for today's
technology that allows us to
reconnect and stay in touch
with others. I'm also thank-
ful for the medical advances
that allow us to fight and
often win against illnesses
that would have had a much
bleaker outcome just a few
years ago.
I am thankful for the
loved ones who surround
me, not only in a physical
way, but in spirit and from
distances great and small. I
am thankful for the support-
ive friends, colleagues and
associates who provide
humor, wisdom and solace
when it's needed the most.
I am thankful for the
many people and places in-



VETERANS
Continued from Page A9

Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to


volved in Citrus County's
various food banks and food
pantries that allow so many
to have nutritious food
when it is needed the most.
I'm thankful for Chuck
Fettes and the staff at the
Citrus County Veterans
Service office, where vet-
eran-related in-
formation and
_0 assistance may be
obtained. I'm
thankful for the
Disabled Ameri-
can Veterans
.**o (DAV) organiza-
tion in Citrus
County, which
graciously allows
Corcoran the Citrus County
ANS' Veterans Coali-
WS tion (CCVC) to
share the head-
quarters building
for meetings and events.
I'm thankful that we have
not just one, but two people
at Workforce Connection in
Inverness who are dedi-
cated to assisting veterans
in their search for
employment.
I'm thankful for the CCVC
for giving me this wonderful
opportunity to do the re-
search and spread the word
to veterans and their fami-
lies through the written
word. I'm thankful to the
Chronicle for allowing
space for this column to
appear
I'm thankful to Anne
Black of HPH Hospice for
welcoming me as her
monthly guest on her
WYKE show, "Every Day is
a Gift." Anne is a wealth of
information and inspira-
tion, and any family who has
experienced the help and
support of a Hospice team
will know how fantastic this
organization is and how spe-
cial its people are.


Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa


I'm thankful to all the vol-
unteers out there who give
their time and energy to
help others. I'm thankful for
all the sellers and buyers
who participate in the
CCVC's monthly yard sales.
I'm thankful to those who
donate to our food bank and
to our organization. I'm
thankful to those who par-
ticipate in the ceremonies
honoring our veterans lo-
cally, at the cemetery in
Bushnell and across the
nation.
I'm especially thankful to
our military servicemen,
servicewomen and service
animals past, present and
future for making sacri-
fice their way of life in order
to preserve and protect our
freedom.
I'm thankful to the fami-
lies and friends of these mil-
itary service members, who
endure the hardships of de-
ployment and the ever-
mounting challenges that
face them every day
And finally, I am thankful
to my readers, especially
those who are kind enough
to let me know when I've
made a difference in their
lives with the information I
offer in this column.
This year, take an extra
moment or two to think of
the things you are thankful
for Whether they're basic or
complex, I'm willing to bet
there are at least a few.
Above all else, do your
best to keep this holiday
season a safe one.

Barbara L. Corcoran is the
public information officer
of the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition Inc. She
maybe contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl. org.
Visit www ccvcfl. org.


Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
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Resort). Reservations should
be made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-5131,
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.


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Dec. 30 LAKELAND -Inspirational & Gospel Show 3:00
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Jan. 12 CLEARWATER -Inspirational & Gospel Show- 3:00
Jan. 12 CLEARWATER -Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 5:00
Jan. 20 INVERNESS -Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 3:00
Jan. 27 BRADENTON -Inspirational & Gospel Show 3:00
Jan. 27 BRADENTON -Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 5:00
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Feb. 10 OCALA Inspirational & Gospel Show 3:00
Feb. 10 OCALA Regular Oldies Show 3 hours 5:00

Our last show in Florida will be 3130 in Lakeland Vey special
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COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


R





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nov. 13 to 16MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, ce-
real variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken with ripstick, turkey
super salad with ripstick, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad,
green beans, warm apple
slices, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger
sliders, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dipper plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, chilled fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Turkey and gravy,
ham super salad bowl, un-
crusted PBJs, garden salad,
green beans, seasoned


mashed potatoes, sweet potato
souffle, apple crisp, roll, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken sandwich,
cheese pizza, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Veterans Day
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, nacho rounds, ham super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, Mexi-
cali corn, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Turkey and
gravy, ham super salad, un-


crusted PBJs, garden salad,
green beans, seasoned
mashed potatoes, sweet potato
souffle, apple crisp, roll, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese, turkey super salad with
ripstick, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, chilled fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-


fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Veterans Day.
Tuesday: Chicken nacho
rounds with rice, turkey with
gravy and noodles with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cold corn salad,
potato roasters, sweet corn,
celery, chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Turkey and
gravy, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, ham super salad
with roll, pizza, garden salad,
green beans, seasoned
mashed potatoes, sweet potato


souffle, roll, apple crisp, potato
roasters, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, green beans, potato tri-
angles, cucumber coins, celery,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Friday: Pulled pork barbe-
cue on bun, spaghetti with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, fajita chicken super
salad with roll, pizza, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, cold
corn salad, potato triangles,
sweet peas, chilled fruit, juice,
milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Frankfurter with
bun, mustard, coleslaw, baked


beans with tomato, carrot coins,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday Cele-
bration: beef and macaroni with
cheese, green beans, corn with
red pepper, yellow cake, slice
Italian bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce, herb
mashed potatoes, spinach,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Barbecue pork riblet,
green peas, mashed potatoes,
chunk cinnamon apples, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


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It's hard to find the words to express my thankfulness and
appreciation to everyone, especially to the voters who have
placed their confidence in me as the next Clerk of the Circuit
Court for Citrus County.This has been a truly rewarding and
educational experience.The best part has been the
opportunity to meet many new citizens of this county and
sharing the role and duties of the Clerk.


I am committed to performing the statutory duties of this office to the best of my
ability. I also give you my humble thanks for your confidence and support.

I remain accessible and available for contact via my office (352) 341-6480.

SWith sincere thanks and gratitude, Angela Vick
o


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 All


~ r

3





A12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


Letters to THE EDITOR


Semantics lesson
Two of the most often for-
eign words used worldwide
are Philo and Agapa, with
each originating in the orig-
inal version of the New Tes-
tament written in Hellenist
Greek at the time period
after the death of Jesus in
approximately 1 A.D.
Both words have been in-
terpreted as love, which
has as many meanings as
there are people. Basically
though, philo means
friendship and agapa is in-
terpreted as love. However,
the interpretations are
often misrepresented, used
with similar meanings, and
to many mean the same
thing.
However, philo is a lesser
form of love and minimizes
personal and interpersonal
commitment and responsi-
bility. But Agapa is the gold
standard for the ultimate in
affection and responsibil-
ity
Agapa love basically is a
feeling/action for another
that places oneself in mini-
mal regard for self-giving
and/or self-gratification.
Real agapa always requires
concern and regard for
other's feelings and for the
ultimate good of others.
When one thinks of high re-
gard for another, "Love
(agapa) is the theme, Love
is supreme, sweeter it
grows, ever it glows!"
William C. Young
Crystal River

Federal forces
There was an editorial in
today's (Nov 8) paper by
William C. Young regarding
the use of federal forces in
areas of this country hit by
national disaster He ques-
tions why the president has
not sent in federal troops to
the states affected by Sandy
The answer is what is
called the Posse Comitatus
Act This federal law along
with other specific direc-
tives prohibits the deploy-
ment of U.S. troops on
American soil. Like all
laws passed by Congress,


there are exceptions, but in
general the president has
limited options.
The law was passed after
the Civil War through a
brokered deal between the
Republicans and the
Southern Democrats to get
Rutherford B. Hayes
elected president. The
Southern Democrats
wanted the federal troops
(who) were still occupying
the South out Hayes got an
additional 20 contested
Electoral College votes
granted by the congres-
sional coalition and be-
came president The law


was passed and the troops
removed along with the re-
strictions affecting the fu-
ture use of U.S. troops on
American soil. One of the
exceptions is the use of the
National Guard, which
technically is part of the
U.S. military, but operates
with state oversight.
In 2006, President Bush
got changes to the law
which would allow troops
for national disasters but
the law reverted back in
2008.
However, the military
does get involved in human
relief and technical efforts,


which can be read about in
an article found through a
Google search "Army North
supporting Sandy disaster
response."
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills

LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
All letters must be
signed and include a
phone number and
hometown, including
letters sent via email.
Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone
numbers will not be
published or given out.
Letters must be no
longer than 350 words,
and writers will be lim-
ited to three letters per
month.
Send letters to: The
Editor, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or
email to letters@
chronicleonline.com.


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OPINION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A,.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Good people here
Recently, I was touched
by the kindness of mem-
bers of our community -
yes, here in Citrus County
On election day, I was
walking toward the en-
trance of the Meadowcrest
County office building, and
in front was a pretty young
girl in a wheelchair who I
had never met. I smiled to
her and started walking by
She stopped me by saying
"You look nice."
This got to my heart, as
here she was in a wheel-
chair paying me a
compliment!
I said darling, thank you
and gave her my card -
telling her to call me so I
could hear what she would
like to see happen as I am a
candidate for county
commission.
That evening, since it was
election night, I was close to
the Supervisor of Elections
office, and unknowingly
dropped my cell phone, as I
was helping my invalid aunt
- also in a wheelchair
Later, I realized my cell
phone was missing and
could not find it anywhere.
Well, about 5 a.m., I received
a call from my cousin from
Albuquerque, N.M., who told
me someone had found my
telephone. I was able to call


SHCER.
I0COmWC51 09 711


Letters to THE EDITOR


this person, who is an em-
ployee of Terry's Lawn Care,
and thank him, as he called
long distance to get my cell
phone back to me even
though he was a stranger!
He was close to the Super-
visor of Elections office, so I
told him to leave it there.
Thanks to this kind gentle-
man and the staff of the Su-
pervisor of Elections office
- I got my cell phone back!
Believe me there are good
people in Citrus County I
just had to say so!
Renee
Christopher-McPheeters
Crystal River
Conservative news
Today is election day
This is the day we decide if
we are going to continue
down the road to socialism.
Who was the new Chroni-
cle writer (Pierre Tristam)
today, or have I been fortu-
nate and not read him be-
fore? The only place to look
to for conservative news is
Fox News. And his column
devoted much of the space
being critical of Fox. Led by
the socialist press, Fox is
now in danger of being re-
moved from the air
We are asked to be satis-
fied with the St Pete Times
(or whatever their name) or


the Chronicle. Yet Citrus
County is a conservative
county And they would have
us believe they are fair
May our God intercede, I
pray
Fred E. Snook
Sugarmill Woods


Found: Silver purse
I found a little silver coin purse in the parking
lot directly in front of the sheriff's thrift store. It
had cash in it and it had a seashell in it. I did
take it in and turn it into the sheriff's
thrift store. So if anyone dropped a lit-
tle silver coin purse in that area, that's
where they can claim it.
When is tea party?
I've always enjoyed tea. In fact, my f


favo
whe


rite constant comment: Tea party, i
n does the tea party start?
Leave water alone CALL
'/n \


As far as Swiftmud is concerned, it 563-
should be concerned with the pollu-
tion of our waterways. Other than
that, leave the waterways alone. You don't need
to be doing nothing to it ... Leave the water
alone.
Where do we donate?
Today's paper, Oct. 31, Sound Off section,
someone said donate to pets. She didn't list
where. Can you put in a thing on where you can
donate for pets to help people feed their pets?
Criteria for getting published
I have called Sound Off four times to voice
my opinion on different situations and none of
my letters have been printed in Sound Off.
Would you please be kind enough to let us
know what criteria is needed to get our letters
printed? They seem to be very biased. So give
us that information and hopefully you'll print this.


-INEA Nj


177EiTfrTIY


v p 35th Annual



r OUTDOOR
kI.^ SHOW


November 10 & 11, 2012
at the National Guard Armory, Crystal River
Saturday: 9am 4pm Sunday: 10am 3pm
Bring a toy for Toys for Tots
For more information visit:
www.CitrusBuilders.com
or call (3521 746-9028


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CHRIC)LE


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Dr. Ledger is a great guy and
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Dr. Ledger and his staff made me feel
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(352) 628-3443


Editor's note: We typically only publish a
small percentage of all Sound Offs. We give
higher priority to letters and columns where the
writer is not anonymous and typically provides
a more focused and cogent argument
Sor explanation of an issue. Obviously
JND Sound Offs that belittle, slander or
Slibel others will not be used.
Help find missing man
I think this is a serious issue that
I'm going to bring up. There's a miss-
ing man in Citrus County and people
have been, some people have been
looking for him. And in the area where
)579 he did go missing, the Crime Watch
guy was driving by and stopped to
see what we're doing. We were walk-
ing. So we mentioned it to him, showed him the
flier that was made, and he knew nothing about
it. Isn't that a little bit strange? I mean if it was a
child, a little girl or little boy, a woman, would it
be any different? Shouldn't Crime Watch know
what to look for while he's driving around?
Why so many amendments
I ask you, Mr. Editor, why were there 12
amendments on the voting this year, especially
with such a very important presidential vote?
There should never have been 12 amendments
and it should never be again that there are 12
amendments on any voting. Let's get that down
to one or two or three at a time. You've got
votes every two years. Spread them out. Don't
put them all on one vote and then especially
when we had a critical presidential voting time.


OPINION


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 A13


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A14 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


Associated Press
The ice skating rink in New York's Rockefeller Center shows the results of Tuesday's pres-
idential election. President Barack Obama won Ohio, Wisconsin, Virginia, Iowa, New Hamp-
shire, Colorado and Nevada, seven of the nine battleground states where the rivals and
their allies poured nearly $1 billion into dueling television commercials. Romney captured
only North Carolina. The final swing state Florida remained too close to call until re-
sults were tallied Saturday.

FINAL
Continued from Page A1 ""


believed to remain
outstanding.
It's normal for election su-
pervisors in Florida and
other states to spend days
after any election counting
absentee, provisional, mili-
tary and overseas ballots.
Usually, though, the election
has already been called on
election night or soon after
because the winner's mar-
gin is beyond reach. T wor
"Florida has spoken Doral.
loudly in support of moving
our nation forward," Ashley of 10 1
Walker, the Obama cam- Hispa
paign's director for Florida, The p
said in a news release. She choicE
added the win was a testa- ers yo
ment to the campaign's vol- Rep
unteers and staff. Mitt
When reached by phone white
Saturday, Mitt Romney's In i
communications director who v
Gail Gitcho said the cam- date i
paign had no comment. memo
Obama's win came in part emerge
from heavy support from One
black, Hispanic and it was
younger voters. Exit polls and th
conducted for The Associ- presic
ated Press showed Obama part
was favored by more than 9 so cl


ker prepares boxes of absentee ballots to be scanned
ay at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department in


black voters and 3 of 5
nic voters in Florida.
resident also was the
e of two-thirds of vot-
unger than 30.
publican challenger
Romney led among
and older voters.
;he end, the facts of
oted for which candi-
n Florida faded into
mry as voting issues
ged election night.
election night this year,
difficult for officials -
he media to call the
lential race here, in
because the margin was
ose and the voting


stretched into the evening.
In Miami-Dade, for in-
stance, so many people
were in line at 7 p.m. in cer-
tain precincts that some
people didn't vote until
after midnight
The hours-long wait at the
polls in some areas, a
lengthy ballot and the fact
Gov Rick Scott refused to
extend early voting hours
has led some to criticize
Florida's voting process.
Some officials have vowed
to investigate why there
were problems at the polls
and how that led to a
lengthy vote count


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Paying our respects


Veterans and their families are silhouetted as they watch a
Veterans Day program Friday at Southwestern High School
in Hazel Green, Wis.


SAM CRAFT/The Paris News, AP Photo


All other photos by Associated Press
The U.S. flag whips in the wind Saturday at the
Red River Valley Veterans Memorial as patrons visit the
Paris, Texas, landmark during a Veterans Day program.
Submarine veteran Lawrence Check, who served
on the USS Sam Houston, adjusts his garrison cap during
the 31st annual Veterans Day Parade on Saturday in
downtown Atlanta. : Jesse Grindey Jr. reacts at the
sight of his father's photo Friday while his mother, Mary
Grindey, nuzzles him during a Veterans Day program
featuring a memorial to Staff Sgt. Jesse Grindey at
Southwestern High School in Hazel Green, Wis. Jesse
Grindey died in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan this year.


A volunteer walks among U.S. flags at the graves of de-
ceased veterans Saturday at the National Cemetery in
Bourne, Mass. Hundreds of volunteers placed thousands of
flags in the cemetery in advance of Veterans Day.


James Collier III, 2, waves a
U.S. flag as the 31st annual
Veterans Day Parade makes
its way through downtown
Atlanta on Saturday.


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BREAST AUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS. D.M.D., M.D.


NATION


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 A15











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NtionBIEF Sick, frail struggle most after Sandy

Soaring


A bald eagle sc
of waning crest
Thursday, Nov.
Shenandoah Ri
Strasburg, Va.


4.3 earth
reported
WHITESBUR(


Associated Press
NEW YORK Some of society's most
vulnerable people the elderly, the dis-
abled and the chronically ill have been
pushed to the brink in the powerless, flood-
ravaged neighborhoods struggling to re-
cover from Superstorm Sandy
The storm didn't just knock out electric-
ity and destroy property when it came
ashore in places such as the Far Rockaway
section of Queens. It disrupted the fragile
support networks allowing the neighbor-
hood's frailest residents to get by
associated Press Here, the catastrophe has closed phar-
oars in front macies, kept home care aids from getting to
scent moon
8, near the elderly clients and made getting around in
ver south of a wheelchair impossible. The city has
recorded at least two deaths of older men
in darkened buildings.
For some living in the disaster zone, it
has all been too much.
quake When a team of medics and national
I in Ky. guardsmen turned up at Sheila Goldberg's
apartment tower in Far Rockaway on Fri-
G, Ky. The day to check on the well-being of residents,


U.S. Geological Survey is re-
ported an earthquake cen-
tered in Kentucky also rattled
other states nearby.
The USGS website says
the epicenter of the 4.3 mag-
nitude earthquake Saturday
afternoon was about 10 miles
west of Whitesburg. Resi-
dents in nearby Virginia, West
Virginia, Tennessee, North
Carolina, South Carolina, In-
diana, Ohio and Georgia also
reported feeling the temblor.
National Weather Service
spokesman Jeff Carico said
employees at the office in
Jackson, which is 60 miles
northwest of Whitesburg, felt
the ground shake for 15 sec-
onds. He says the office has
gotten numerous calls, but so
far no one has reported any
serious damage.

WorldBRIEFS

Learn latin






'

Associated Press
Pope Benedict XVI issued a
decree Saturday creating a
new pontifical academy for
Latin studies to try to boost
interest in the official
language of the Roman
Catholic Church that is out
of widespread use.


Vatican computer
tech convicted
VATICAN CITY- A Vati-
can court Saturday convicted
a Holy See computer techni-
cian of helping the former
papal butler in the embar-
rassing leak of confidential
papal documents and gave
him a two-month suspended
sentence.
Claudio Sciarpelletti, a 48-
year-old Italian who is a com-
puter program analyst in the
Vatican's Secretariat of State,
had testified earlier in the trial
he had played no role in help-
ing to leak the documents,
which later formed the core of
an Italian journalist's book al-
leging corruption in high ranks
of the Vatican bureaucracy.
Syria's opposition
urges West to help
DOHA, Qatar The newly
elected leader of Syria's main
opposition group slammed the
international community for
what he called inaction, saying
Saturday fighters are in des-
perate need of weapons to
break the stalemate with Pres-
ident BasharAssad's forces.
George Sabra's comments
came as his Syrian National
Council struggled with other
opposition groups to try to
forge a cohesive and more
representative leadership as
rebels step up attacks against
regime forces.
Two suicide car bombers
struck a military camp in the
southern city of Daraa on
Saturday, killing at least 20
government soldiers and
prompting clashes in the
area, activists said.
-From wire reports


floor by floor, the 75-year-old burst into
tears and begged for help caring for her 85-
year-old husband.
"This is a blessing. I'm at my wit's end,"
she sobbed.
Her husband, Irwin, has a pacemaker,
wears a colostomy bag, and needs her help
to do almost everything. When the power
was on, Goldberg said, "I could take care of
him by myself and survive."
But for days, the building had no heat or
electricity. There were no open stores to
buy food. Until the end of the week, there
was no water or elevators either, meaning
the Goldbergs, on the 25th floor, had to cart
water up the steps to flush the toilet. A bad
stench permeates much of the building.
"I'm running out of my blood pressure
medication. We're both going to drop dead
in this apartment," Sheila said.
The medical team said it would make
arrangements to transfer Irwin to a medical
facility, at least temporarily
City and federal officials, and a growing
army of volunteers, are trying hard to make
sure families like that don't fall into despair


Occupy Sandy: Onetime protesters on
Wall Street find new cause
Associated Press
NEW YORK The social media savvy that helped Occupy
Wall Street protesters create a grass-roots global movement last
year is proving to be a strength in the wake of superstorm Sandy
as members and organizers of the group fan out across New
York to deliver aid including hot meals, medicine and blankets.
They are the ones who took food and water to Glenn Nisall, a
53-year-old resident of Queens' hard-hit and isolated Rockaway
section who lost power and lives alone, with no family nearby.
"I said: 'Occupy? You mean Occupy Wall Street?"' he said. "I
said: 'Awesome, man. I'm one of the 99 percent, you know?"'
Occupy Wall Street was born in late 2011 in a lower Manhat-
tan plaza called Zuccotti Park, with a handful of protesters pitch-
ing tents and vowing to stay put until world leaders offered a fair
share to the "99 percent" who don't control the globe's wealth.
The world heard the cry as that camp grew and inspired
other ones around the globe. Ultimately, though, the movement
collapsed under its leaderless format, and Occupy became
largely forgotten. But core members, and a spirit, have per-
sisted and found a new cause in Occupy Sandy.


Ultimate sacrifice


Associated Press
Jason Machado, of Fairhaven, Mass., walks among U.S. flags at the graves of deceased veterans Saturday at the National Cemetery in Bourne,
Mass. Hundreds of volunteers placed thousands of flags in the cemetery in advance of Veterans Day.

Veterans'commemorations under way


Associated Press
Saturday marked the first of
what will be three days of Veter-
ans Day commemorations across
the United States.
The holiday falls on a Sunday,
and the federal ob-
servance is Mon- For Vete
day It's the first pho
such day honoring see Pa
the men and
women who
served in uniform since the last
U.S. troops left Iraq in December
2011.
It's also a chance to thank those
who stormed the beaches during
World War II a population that
is rapidly shrinking with most of
those former troops now in their
80s and 90s.
At the Vietnam Veterans Me-
morial in Washington, a steady


stream of visitors arrived Satur-
day morning as the names of the
58,000 people on the wall were
being read over a loudspeaker
Some visitors took pictures,
others made rubbings of names,
and some left mementos: a
leather jacket, a
rans Day flag made out of
tos, construction
ge A15 paper, pictures of
young soldiers
and even several
snow globes with an American
eagle inside.
Alfred A. Atwood, 65, of Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., was visiting the
wall for the first time.
"I've just never been able to do
it," Atwood said of visiting the
memorial, which was completed
in 1982.
Atwood, who later became a po-
lice detective, said he knows a


Vietnam veteran Brian Delate, center, chats with French war veterans
Joseph Crouzilhat, left, and Pierre Martinez as he ties a yellow ribbon
to the tree that survived the terror attack Saturday during the Veterans
Day observance at the 9/11 Memorial in New York.


number of people on the wall, but
the one name he wanted to find
Saturday was his friend Ronald L.
Wright The two had grown up to-
gether, and when Atwood decided


to join the Marines at 18 there was
no stopping Wright, Atwood said.
Wright died in 1968 when he
stepped on a land mine, Atwood
said.


Official: Paramours' emails led to probe


Associated Press
David Petraeus, the retired four-star
general who led the U.S. military
campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan,
resigned Friday as director of the CIA
after admitting he had an affair.


Petraeus resigns after

affair discovered
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The scandal
that brought down CIA Director
David Petraeus started with harass-
ing emails sent by his biographer
and paramour, Paula Broadwell, to
another woman, and eventually led
the FBI to discover the affair, U.S.
officials told The Associated Press
on Saturday


Petraeus quit Friday after ac-
knowledging an extramarital affair
The official said the FBI investiga-
tion began several months ago with a
complaint against Broadwell, a 40-
year-old graduate of the U.S. Military
Academy and an Army Reserve offi-
cer That probe led agents to her
email account, which uncovered the
relationship with the 60-year-old re-
tired four-star general, who earned
acclaim for his leadership of the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The identity of the other woman
and her connection with Broadwell
were not immediately known.


Concerned the emails he ex-
changed with Broadwell raised the
possibility of a security breach, the
FBI brought the matter up with Pe-
traeus directly, according to the of-
ficial, who spoke on condition of
anonymity because he was not au-
thorized to publicly discuss the in-
vestigation. The FBI approached
the CIA director because his emails
in the matter were in most instances
sent from a personal account
Petraeus decided to quit,
abruptly ending a high-profile ca-
reer that might have culminated
with a run for the presidency


)I

II











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I L LE


* Veterans Notes
can be found on
Page A7 of today's
Chronicle.


THOSE' WHO SERVE)


Unu


a


Great Salt Lake


rican oasis


where bison, avocet & antelope play


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle


Great Salt Lake
he first words uttered by Brigham
Young, the Mormon pioneer, when
he crested the Wasatch Mountains
of Utah and laid eyes on the valley
Nel Sawyer below, were, "This is the place," but
SPONTANEOUS
TRAVELER I surmise that he meant the entirety
of the beautiful bowl-shaped valley,
surrounded by low-lying mountain ranges, rather
than any specific feature.


Whatever Young's intent, this valley
did indeed become the new home of
his disciples who migrated on foot and
by cart from Missouri. There is no
record of exactly when they tasted the
water of the beautiful shimmering lake
that stretched the length of the valley
below them.
There is a good reason to believe,
however, that the Great Salt Lake was
so named at the first taste of the water,
especially after just having trudged
more than 1,000 miles across deserts
and plains! Now for the question: Is it
really salty? Well, Young's next words
could well have been, "Don't drink the
water!" Thus, the Great Salt Lake was
appropriately tagged.
The salinity of the water is between
3.5 and eight times the salinity of the
ocean undrinkable.
As the largest body of water in the
United States between the Mississippi
River and the Pacific Ocean, it is also
the fourth-largest terminal lake no
outflow in the world. The lake is lo-
cated on the western boundary of what
is now Salt Lake City and extends
south and north approximately 30
miles, nearly to the city of Ogden.
It is obligatory upon anyone visiting
the lake for the first time to take a
swim. Be aware, however, that "swim"
in the salt-laden water really means
simply taking a dip while simultane-
ously raising your feet and hands in the
air. Yes, it can be done. This ceremo-
nial swim usually lasts only a few min-
utes, but the sensation of burning eyes
and skin will last a bit longer. I've
never known anyone getting a certifi-
cate of completion for the event, but it
is a unique photographic opportunity.
It is a unique world, including brine
shrimp and brine flies, which coexist
and are important in the diet of birds,
and an array of invertebrates that in-
habit the surrounding wetlands.
The combination of the desert loca-
tion, the super salty water and the
broad range of both land and bird
species dependent on this unusual
water feature qualifies the Great Salt
Lake as one of the world's most
unusual oases.
The lake is a major link and stopover


point for migrating water- and shore-
birds so that they can rebuild reserves
before flying on to South America or
the Arctic. It is estimated that 5 million
waterbirds, including avocets, grebes,
and California gulls, to name a few,
pass through this region every season.
In addition to the watery side of this
story, there is Antelope Island which


m.j*EP WI I.a-im.j.- 'r + i. .*.s.rM.
offers an arid break from the popular
ski areas of Alta, Brighton and Deer
Valley, on the slopes of the nearby
Wasatch Mountains.
The island covers approximately 42
square miles, with terrain running the
gamut from waters-edge grasses, sage
brush, a variety of desert flora, to rocky
promontories. Due to the shallowness


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
CLOCKWISE: Free range bison in a 600-
plus herd; avocets on the lake; easily
spooked pronghorn antelope; autumn
colors in the desert.
of the lake, its size can vary signifi-
cantly due to water runoff from the
mountains, rain and evaporation dur-
ing the dry season.
Antelope Island is a bonus attraction
to the migrating birds, as it adds many
miles of shoreline excellent habitat
for the birds' resting and feeding on
their long journey
Antelope Island doubles as a sanctu-
ary for approximately 600 free roaming
bison as well as pronghorn antelope,
bighorn sheep, and numerous other
desert animals. We also saw rabbits
and coyotes among the explosion of
wild sunflowers that brighten the land-
scape in summer and fall.
There are a variety of camping facili-
ties for both daytime and overnight
camping, along with numerous well-
marked hiking trails leading to various
points of interest and stunning views.
Hunting, however, is not allowed.
A seven-mile causeway has been re-
built in recent years, linking the island
to the mainland at the town of Layton,
near Ogden. A state-of-the-art museum
and visitors' center round out the serv-
ices and amenities of the island.
Access is easy: From Salt Lake City
(and the local airport) take 1-15 north to
Layton. Highway signage gives ample
notice and directions to the causeway I
suggest you pack a lunch, or at least
snack food and water, as there are only
a couple of vending machines on
the island.
Our day at Antelope Island was well
spent as the panoramic views and
events of encountering numerous
wild animals were well beyond our
expectations.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer have been
residents of Crystal River for 27years.
They travel frequently having been to
48 states, 64 countries and seven
continents. Contact Neil via email to
gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


Visit to China
On a recent vacation to China, Russ and Gloria Burt of Sugarmill Woods enjoyed
the cities of Shanghai, Xian and Beijing. A great thrill was to walk the Great Wall
of China and to visit the Terracotta Army depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang,
the first Emperor of China, dating from the 3rd Century, B.C. Another treat was to
the Panda Zoo, along with a five-day cruise on the Yangtze River, enjoying the
sights and beautiful gorges.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






A18 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


Teen sad about


societal pressure


SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 11, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
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SN 46 40 46 6 5 Ally Up!'G' Farm Charlie Blog (N) Ally (N) Up! (N) Up!'G' ICharlie Ally c Farm
(ESPNl 33 27 33 21 17 NASCAR SportCtr SportsCenter (N) (Live) c BCS MLS Soccer Conference Final: Teams TBA.(N)(Live) SportCtr
ESPNJ 34 28 34 43 49 NHRA Dra Racin NHRA Drag Racing Automobile Club of Southern California Finals. NASCAR Now (N) SportCtr Poker
EWTN 95 70 95 48 Devotions |Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime G.K. Rosary Roundtable God Bookmark
S 2 5 2 2 2 ** "The Last Song"(2010, Drama) Miley **2 "The Notebook" (2004, Romance) Ryan Gosling. Premiere. A man Bunheads "A
29 52 29 20 Cyrus, Greg Kinnear, Liam Hemsworth. PG tells a story to a woman about two lovers. NR Nutcracker in Paradise"
"Arizona ** "Blank Check" (1994) Brian ** "Greedy" (1994, Comedy) Michael J. Fox, ** "Life With Mikey" (1993) "29
FX 118 170 Summer" Bonsall. PG' Kirk Douglas, NancyTravis. PG-13' Michael J. Fox.'PG' Palms"
(FNI 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday |FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox NewsSunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners |The Next I Next IronRedemption Cupcake Chef(N) The Next Iron Chef Iron Chef America Restaurant Stakeout
(FSNFLJ 35 39 35 Bull Riding TERRA WorldPokerTour UFC Unleashed UFC |XTERRA World PokerTour
30 60 30 51 ** "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (2009, ** "Predators" (2010, Science Fiction) Adrien ** "Predators" (2010, Science Fiction) Adrien
X 30 60 30 51 Action) Hugh Jackman, will.i.am.'PG-13' Brody Topher Grace. R' Brody Topher Grace. R
GOLF 72767 727 Central PGATourGolf |BigBreak Greenbrier Longest |Longest Central
59 68 59 45 *** "A Princess for Christmas" (2011, "The Christmas Secret" (2000, Fantasy) "Debbie Macomber's Call Me Mrs. Miracle"
HA 59 68 59 45 54 Comedy) Katie McGrath, Roger Moore. c Richard Thomas, Beau Bridges.'G'm (2010, Drama) Doris Roberts. c
i"Little Fockers" **'"Tower Heist" (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. Boardwalk Empire (N) Treme "Don't You Leave Boardwalk Empire
B 302 201 302 2 2 (2010)'PG-13' (In Stereo) PG-13' c 'MA' Me Here" MA MA' c
303 202 303 The Pacific'MA' The Pacific Leckie "Alvin and the Chipmunks: ** "Larry Crowne" (2011) Tom "Cinema Verite"
S 303 202 303 returns home.'MA' Chipwrecked" (2011 'G' Hanks.'PG-13' c (2011) Diane Lane.
IHGVl 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Million Dollar Rooms Extreme Homes'G' PropertyBrothers'G' House Hunters Reno House Hunters Reno
The Men Who Built America JP Morgan estab- The Men Who Built America The changing face Outback Hunters 1 Things 10Things
(fiS) 51 25 51 32 42 lishes a bank in NYC.'PG' of America. (N) 'PG' "Ghost Croc"'PG' About About
S"Undercover "The Christmas Consultant" (2012, Comedy) "Dear Santa" (2011) Amy Acker. A party irl "The Christmas
24 38 24 31 Christmas" (2003) David Hasselhoff, Caroline Rhea. c has to change her ways or get cut off.'N Consultant" (2012) c
"Born Bad" (2011, Suspense) Meredith "Seven Deadly Sins" (2010, Crime Drama) Dreama Walker, Jared Keeso, Rachel Melvin. A
(IN) 50 119 Monroe, Bonnie Dennison.'NR' female sheriff uncovers dark secrets while investigating a murder. NR N
S 1 "The Pool **b "The Day After Tomorrow" (2004) Dennis "Chronicle" (2012) Dane ** "n Time" (2011, Science Fiction) Justin
320 221 320 3 Boys"'R' Quaid. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c DeHaan. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Timberlake. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c
MSNBC) 42 41 42 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera |Maximum Drama Sex Slaves |Lockup
53Doomsday Preppers Space Dive Felix Baumgartner's 120,00 foot Drugs, Inc. "Hawaiian Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers
(WG 109 65 109 44 5 Bugged Out14' jump. (N) Ice"PG' (N) 14 14'
WiCK) 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious liCarly'G' Sponge. ISponge. See Dad "Legally Blonde 2:Red, White & Blonde" INanny Friends Friends
(OWN) 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next
IOXY) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' c Law Order: Cl
n 30 21 30 4 *** "Ransom"(1996) Dexter "Do the Wrong Homeland "A Dexter "Chemistry"(N) Homeland "The Dexter "Chemistry" (In
SI 340 241 340 4 Mel Gibson. Thing" c Gettysburg Address" c (In Stereo) N Clearing" (N) 'MA' Stereo) N
Building SPEED NASCAR Victory The Hendrick Racing Wind Tunnel With Dave SPEED Center (N) Auto Racing
732 112 732 Circuit Center (N) Lane (N) Story Despain (N) (Live)
Band of Band of Brothers Winters becomes Band of Brothers Easycompany Band of Brothers "The Breaking Band of Brothers (In
SlI 37 43 37 27 36 Brothers battalion leader'MA' defends Bastogne. MA' Point" (In Stereo) 'MA' Stereo) 'MA' m
T** "The Vow"(2012) Rachel ** "Spy Kids 3: Game Over" *** "Moneyball" (2011) Brad Pitt. A baseball manager "Tron:
ST Z 370 271 370 McAdams.'PG-13' B (2003) Antonio Banderas. challenges old-school traditions. PG-13' c Legacy"
S 3 31 3 NBA Basketball Miami Heatat Memphis Grizzlies. From the Heat Live! College Football Florida State at Virginia Tech. (Taped)
SUN 36 31 36 FedEx Forum in Memphis, Tenn. (Live) (Live)
"The ** "Outlander" (2008, Action) James Caviezel. An alien "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra" (2009, Action) Channing "Name of
SY 31 59 31 26 29 Mist"'R' joinsforces with Vikings to hunt his enemy'R' Tatum, Dennis Quaid.'PG-13' King"
fBS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "The House Bunny" (2008) 'PG-13' ** "Valentine's Day" (2010) Jessica Alba.'PG-13' ** "Valentine'sDay"(2010)
165 1 5 **** "National Velvet" (1944, Drama) Mickey ***n "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing" **B "The Seventh Sin" (1957, Drama) Eleanor
M I169 53 169 30 35 Rooney'G' c (DVS) (1955) Jennifer Jones.'NR' ,N Parker, Bill Travers.'NR'
I MhBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (N) (In Sex in America (N) Breaking Magic (Series MythBusters (In Stereo)
(IS 53 34 53 24 26 'PGt' 'r PG c Stereo) PG c MA' Premiere) (N 'PG' c
(TL) 50 46 50 29 30 Breaking Amish 14' Breaking Amish 14' Breaking Amish'14' Breaking Amish'14' Breaking Amish:The Breaking Amish 14'
350*** 1 3 The Italian Job" (2003) MarkWahlberg. *** "Our Idiot Brother" (2011) ** "Barry Munday" (2010) Patrick ** "Crash Dive"
___ CJ 350 261 350 (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Paul Rudd. 'R' cc Wilson. (In Stereo) '' c (1997) 'R' c
T 48 33 4 31 34** "Clash of the Titans" (2010, Fantasy) Sam *** "300" (2007, Action) Gerard Butler. Badly outnum- **2 "Pirates of the Caribbean:
(W) 48 33 48 31 34 Worthington.'PG-13' (DVS) bered Spartan warriors battle the Persian army. R Dead Man's Chest" c
(flfN) 38 58 38 33 *** "Robots"(2005, Comedy)'PG' Looney Dragons Cleveland |King/Hill King/Hill Fam.Guy Fam.Guy |Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 House |Hunters Tricked Out Trailers Killer RV Upgrades Extreme RVs (N)'G' Extreme RVs (N)G' Extreme RVs (N)'G'
ItruTVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout'PG' c Wipeout'PG' c Wipeout'PG' Pawn Pawn World's Dumbest...
TVIJ 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
NCIS Tip on terrorists NCIS A petty officer is NCIS "Caged" Women's NCISA blogger turns NCIS "Endgame" (In "The UglyTruth"
(A 47 32 47 17 18 was a trap. 14' murdered.'PG' prisonriot.'14' up dead.'14' Stereo)'14' (2009)'R'
Bridezillas Where Are Bridezillas Where Are Biggest Bridezilla Bridezillas Natalie & Bridezillas Erica's nasty Biggest Bridezilla
E 117 69 117 They Now? They Now? 2.0 Me downs Raquel"'14' attitude.'14' 0Me downs
[WGN-Al 18 18 18 18 20 Videos IoopersBloopers! ers! Mother Mother Mother Mother jMother News jReplay 30Rock 3ORock


ear Annie: I am a
teenager In our soci-
ety, the central mes-
sage is that you need to look
perfect and have tons of
money It's drilled into our
heads every day, and I feel
the pressure.
Clothing companies tell
me I need to wear their la-
bels to be popu-
lar, cosmetic
companies con-
vince me with air-
brushed models
that their makeup ..
will make me
look flawless, and
weight programs
promise to give
me the perfect
body. People un-
dergo surgery to
make their faces ANN
and bodies more
appealing be- MAII
cause they have
been brainwashed into be-
lieving the body they were
given isn't good enough.
While all this goes on,
there are simultaneous ad-
vertisements for suicide hot-
lines, medication for
depression, and help with
bulimia and anorexia. I am
sick of it I don't want to feel
like I must look like every
Photoshopped model in the
magazines to be accepted. I
am beginning to question
the society I live in. Is there
anything to do? Teen
Lacking Self-Esteem
Dear Teen: You sound like
a pretty smart cookie to us.
You already understand that
the reason behind such ad-
vertisements is to sell prod-
uct, and that the pressure to
be "flawless" is manufac-
tured by companies that
benefit from your pur-
chases. This pressure is in-
ternalized and can breed
insecurity in those who don't


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
1 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 1:20 p.m.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) In 3D.
4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R)
In 3D. 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Argo" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Skyfall" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
1:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.


"Flight" (R) 12:45, 4:20, 7:35.
No passes.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) In 3D.
1:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Wreck-It Ralph" (PG) 4:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Cloud Atlas" (R) 12:55 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R) In
3D. 3:50 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R)
12:50 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity 4" (R)
7:50 p.m.
"Argo" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:15 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Card or coffee
6 Skidded
10 Long river
14 Leeway
18 On the other side
20 Stage skirt
21 Part of the eye
22 Employed
24 Kind of daisy
25 Press
26 So-so grades
27 Long, loose
overcoat
29 Hardy character
30 Pack animal
32 Liquid meas.
34 Road's edge,
in London
36 Kiln
37 Curve shape
38 Blow
39 Carpenter or
Valentine
41 Bread mass
43 Palter
44 Let loose
45 reality
47 High-fiber food
49 Wince
52 Musical sound
53 Barge
55 Stimulating drink
59 Prize
60 Put a label on
62 Wrack and -
64 Gay
65 Cause of infection
66 Connected group
67 Be in the red
69 At once
71 "The King--"
72 Eagle
73 Nest on a height
74 Farm tool
75 Chekhov or Bruckner
77 Time per.
78 "A Doll's House" author
80 Love affair
82 Prayer beads
84 Eschew
85 Send
87 Crystal-gazer
88 Wild disturbances
89 Frank admission
90 Soothsayer
92 Space between seats
93 Exclude
94 Approaches


96 Snaky creature
97 One of
the Seven Dwarfs
99 Snooze
102 African plant
104 Payable
105 JFK's predecessor
106 Gazette
107 Native
of Scandinavia
108 Bridge seat
110 Hindu goddess
112 Top or silver
114 Engine
115 Followed
117 Judge
119 Haven for
shoppers
120 Attach firmly
121 Rainbow
123 Gymnast's
specialty
125 Reduce
126 Title for a cleric (abbr.)
129 Cook
131 "- -Joy"
132 Delicate fabric
133 Dustcloth
136 Salt lake in Asia
138 Old instrument
140 Damp
141 Exhaust
142 Ali -
143 Well-mannered
145 Merriment
147 Thing
149 Call forth
151 -boom
152 Orchestra member
153 tide
154 City in Ohio
155 Let
156 Cistern
157 Oldman or Busey
158 Passover meal


DOWN
1 Discernment
2 Dull pains
3 Alloy of copper and zinc
4 Deprivation
5 Superlative suffix
6 Circus prop
7 Entice
8 Japanese
statesman
9 Blue denim
10 Central part


11 "- Got a Secret"
12 Onion relative
13 Support
for a canvas
14 Pie plant
15 Lubricate
16 Thereabouts
(2 wds.)
17 Sheet or scrap
19 -Langhorne
Clemens
23 Mr. Arnaz
28 Itinerary (abbr.)
31 Employ
33 Skill
35 Rip off
38 Crisscrossed bars
39 Monarchs
40 Mother-of-pearl
42 Get along
44 Shape
45 Prevailing fashion
46 Costello or Gehrig
48 Grandma
49 Fury
50 Pitcher
51 Meat-eating
52 Car for hire
54 Victor
56 Link together
in a series
57 Church officers
58 Wet outside
60 Gull
61 Condemn
63 a chance!
66 Provoked
68 Dishonest one
70 Fretful one
73 Chinese or
Japanese, e.g.
74 Jumped
75 High card
76 Loud
79 Package
adornment
80 de Janeiro
81 After deductions
83 Costa del -
84 King Arthur's paradise
85 Bedcover
86 Time periods (abbr.)
89 Demean
91 Pay attention
92 Mimic
95 Sea bird
97 Dilly---
98 Fall birthstone
100 Soon


Saucy
Small decorative case
San -, Calif.
Old Greek thinker
Rounded roof
Flavoring plant
Pasture
Leaving out
Pure
Language variety
Tuesday, Wednesday,


and Thursday
Special quality
Firmament
Shelter
- de deux
Knock
Love god
Courage
Disease of plants
Like some gravy
Sped


Tolerate
Croc's cousin
Wrinkle
Isle of banishment
Grizzly
Hepatic secretion
Stannum
Long, long time
Light meal
- Alamos


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


11-11


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


feel they measure up.
We know it's difficult, but
remember that those who
are interested primarily in
superficial appearances
aren't particularly appeal-
ing in the long run. Please
don't feel obligated to attract
such people. There are
plenty who still value in-
tegrity, intelli-
g e n c e ,
confidence and a
good personality.
If you cultivate
those traits, your
self-esteem will
develop right
alongside them.
Dear Annie:
We recently re-
ceived a wedding
invitation for a
IE'S Friday wedding
that starts at 5:30.
-BOX I think that is too
early for a Friday
night wedding. It borders on
rude by asking people to
take time off from work or
rush like crazy to get there
on time. What do you think?
-Keep Your Guests in Mind
Dear Keep: While bridal
couples should not put
undue burdens on their
guests, they do get to decide
what time to start their wed-
ding. (It would be impossible
to please everyone.) Many
weddings begin with some
socialization before the ac-
tual ceremony, so you may
not be as late or as rushed as
you think Please try to enjoy
yourself and wish the couple
well without resenting the
inconvenience to you.


Email questions to annies
mailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Humane Society
OF CITRUS CO.

Mocha


Special to the Chronicle
Mocha takes a little while to
warm up to new people, but
once she gets to know you
she truly blossoms. She has
a great personality and is re-
ally a character; she even
"smiles." Mocha is about 5
years old and weighs about 8
pounds. Mocha will do best
in an adult home and would
probably do best as an only
dog. An approved adoption
application and adoption fee
are required. To access an
application or view additional
adoptable pets, visit the
website at www.roomfor
onemore.net. For more infor-
mation, call Karron at 352-
560-0051.


COMMUNITY


It's all about spamming the globe


My email program,
which touts itself as
the best in the
world, promises effective
spam filtering, easy-to-
organize mailing lists and
hassle-free ac-
cess from any-
where. It does all
of that And, like
all other email
programs, it ran-
domly throws
real email into
the spam file.
It's like hiring a
moving company
to get your furni- J
ture across town
and finding out M
six months later
that the box with your wed-
ding pictures didn't make
the trip because the van
driver threw it out on a
whim. "Sorry Who knew
you'd want something like
that?"
It's only when you get an
email from something that
should have automatically
been put in your spam file,
like "worldsraunchiest-
sexvideos" or "tryvia-
grafree," that you
investigate. Sure enough,
most of the stuff in the junk


file will be junk amazing
junk, obvious junk.
You wonder who would re-
spond to "Get prescriptions
at half price" from A. Nony-
mous. How can he afford to
do it? Because he
makes the pills in
his basement
from sawdust,
cornstarch and
food coloring and
there isn't any
real medicine in
them, that's how.
And he passes the
savings along to
M you, the soon-to-
LE be-dead con-
sumer. One of his
big selling points
is that he's never had a com-
plaint How could he? All his
customers are dead or in
comas. Now there's a busi-
ness plan.
Sex, medicine and money
are the three big junk mail
themes. Apparently, no one
with an email address is get-
ting enough of these three
things or, if they are,
they're paying too much for
them. So when you see an
email for half-price Viagra,
it's a spam trifecta: sex, med-
icine and money, all in one


email.
Not that there is any get-
ting away from ED. The com-
mercials are all the same: A
guy in good shape, about 45,
is windsurfing or rock climb-
ing or cycling or jogging. He
couldn't be in better shape;
he couldn't be more attrac-
tive. But he suffers from a
horrible affliction that I had
never thought of as a big
problem until Viagra was ad-
vertised on TV in 1999.
It's odd that now impo-
tence can be talked about a
thousand times a day on TV
but I feel awkward mention-
ing it here, because people
will write letters saying how
disappointed they are to
read about this kind of filth
in a family newspaper Be-
cause, as we all know, the
family that reads the news-
paper together hey!
Would you stop sexting and
listen to me? I'm over here!
Look down!
Watching ED commer-
cials with the sound off,
you'd think the companies
were selling a cure for rock
climbing, surfing, cycling,
jogging, cooking or garden-
ing. And while a cure for
those activities is desper-


ately needed and would no
doubt improve countless
lives, that's not the drug
that's being sold. It is a cure
for a condition that, in many
cases, is caused by consum-
ing too much beer and/or
watching too much TV in-
stead of exercising.
How many windsurfers
and rock climbers suffer
from ED compared with
men whose only exercise is
climbing in and out of their
cars when they go to the
doctor who is treating their
adult-onset diabetes? And
then to Hooters for lunch?
Why do I never get spam
telling men there's a free
cure for some cases of ED?
All you have to do is take a
shower and shave and stop
walking around the house in
dirty sweatpants. Coming
home sober, washing the
dishes and cleaning the
bathroom without being
asked have been known to
work, too. But who is going
to spam you with that?
There's no money in it.

Jim Mullen can be reached
on the Web at
JimMullenBooks. com.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 A19

For the RECORD

Marriages
Micah Loren Cook,
Homosassa/Sarah Denise
Betancourt, Beverly Hills
Glenn William Jackson III,
Homosassa/Jessica Lynn
Simmons, Homosassa
Jamie Alan Sheppard,
Crystal River/Michelle Renee
Owens, Crystal River
Jeremy Daniel Small,
Atlanta, Ga./Misty Lynn
Parker, Carrollton, Ga.
Jarred Joseph Zane,
Citrus Springs/Ashley Marie
Yermal, Citrus Springs
Divorces
Eleanor Dunn, Floral City
vs. Philip Joseph Dunn,
Inverness
Susan M. Gomes,
Homosassa vs. Jose S.
Gomes, Lecanto
Ronald Longley, Franklin,
N.C. vs. Sylvia J. Longley,
Crystal River
Patrick A. Marley vs. Laura
Marley
Daniel C. Morrow,
Inverness vs. Susan A.
Morrow, Citrus Springs
Sheila Rembas, Inverness
vs. John Robert Rembas,
Inverness
Jeffery C. Seymour, Ocala
vs. Deborah L. Seymour,
Crystal River


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Thursday, November 15 10 a.m. -2 p.m.

College of Central Florida Citrus Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
Citrus Learning and Conference Center

Meet with local employers including Champs Software, Citrus County Sheriff's Office, Comfort Keepers,
Hospice of Citrus County, Spherion Staffing, Telecom Service Bureau and more!

Explore career options Learn about Workforce Connection programs Register with Employ Florida

Workforce Connection staff on hand to assist with applications.

No charge to attend! Dress professionally and bring copies of your resume.


W O RKF E For information,
W O RKFORCE_ call 352-637-2223 or 352-249-1213


CITRUS LEVY MARION


www.cl mworkforce.com
For the latest job alerts and updates,
follow us on Twitter@WorkforceCLM


I COLLEGE of

CENTRAL

FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity college-


Workforce Connection is a member of Employ Florida and an equal opportunity/program Auxiliary aids/services are available to persons with
disabilities. Telephone numbers may be reached via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Accommodations: call 352-840-5700, ext. 7878 or
e-mail accommodations(d)clmworkforce. com at least three business days in advance.


I I


- I


t


f
il






A20 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


50th ANNIVERSARY


The Vojanecs


New ARRIVALS


Courtney & Anthony Baird


Kristina and Christopher
Baird of White Plains, Md., an-
nounce the birth of twins on
Thursday, July 26, 2012, at
Southern Maryland Hospital.
CourtneyAnn Elaine Baird,
born at 4:24 p.m., weighed 3


pounds, 11 ounces. Anthony
Christopher Baird, born at 4:34
p.m., weighed 3 pounds, 13
ounces.
Grandparents are Herb and
Ann Bustamante, and Larry
Carol Baird.


Mason Jonce Strickland


Retired Command Sgt.
Major Karel and Jane Vo-
janec of Floral City will cel-
ebrate their 50th wedding
anniversary Sunday, Nov.
11, 2012.
The couple exchanged
nuptial vows Nov 11, 1962,
in North Carolina. Karel is
retired from the U.S. Army
Special Forces and Jane is
retired as an executive sec-
retary to the Orange County
zoning director. The have
lived in Citrus County for 12
years.


The couple have three
daughters: Cindy Brown of
Orlando, Mary Hamilton of
DeLand and Nancy Vojanec
of St. Petersburg. Grand-
children are Karel Mullen
and Emily Mikulsi. Great-
grandchildren are Kaitlyn
Mikulski and Luke and
Loura Mullen.
The Vojanecs were to cel-
ebrate their golden anniver-
sary at a dinner given by
their daughters and family
at Old World Restaurant in
Floral City.


Tara and Jonce Strickland of
Lake Panasoffkee announce
the birth of a son, Mason Jonce
Strickland, at 6:08 p.m.
Wednesday, July 18, 2012, at
Citrus Memorial hospital. The


baby weighed 8 pounds, 4
ounces.
Grandparents are Herb and
Ann Bustamante, and Lonny
and Dora Strickland.


* Send your announcements for Together news to
community@chronicleonline.com.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.
T A B L E IS I I N I" B I E IEE 0I OIIM
ACR OS S T UT UU V E YA H RE D
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P IL T EIG L EE IT E M E L I C I T
SO N IC0T BO EE N E A P T O L E D O
R E N T T AIN K G A RYEID I E I R


11-11


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclck for UFS



Nov. 16-17. 20121


FOR THE RECORD

* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. For proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in that area.



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Hay Barn 7298 S. Florida Ave., Floral City
Hillbilly's Tack & Feed 5844 Carl G. Rose, Hernando
Inverness Chamber of Commerce 401 Tompkins St., Inverness
McFarlin Feed & Supply 1703 N. Florida Ave., Hernando
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0 1 11W .11"I


I I A "


TOGETHER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


i











SPORTS


Bucs WR Vincent
Jackson faces a
familiar team when
Tampa Bay hosts
the San Diego
Chargers today./B2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreation briefs/B2
0 High School sports/B3
0 Golf, basketball/B3
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Dr. Ron Joseph column/B4
0 NBA/B4
0 College football/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Gators fight tooth and tail to avoid upset


No. 7 UF runs back blockedpunt to


Associated Press
Florida linebacker Jelani Jenkins runs for the game-winning touchdown
Saturday after picking up a blocked punt with seconds left against
Louisiana-Lafayette in Gainesville. Florida won 27-20.


beat UL-Lafayette,
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Florida
players jumped around on the
sideline, then rushed the field in
celebration.
It was more like a collective
sigh of relief.
The seventh-ranked Gators
staved off the biggest upset in
school history Saturday, but
couldn't get the help needed to
win the Southeastern Confer-
ence's Eastern Division.
Jelani Jenkins returned a
blocked punt 36 yards for a touch-
down with 2 seconds remaining,
capping the comeback and giving
Florida a 27-20 victory against
Louisiana-Lafayette.
"I'm speechless," said Florida
cornerback Loucheiz Purifoy, who


but lose SEC East
blocked the kick. "I've never seen
a game end like that We overcome
adversity. That's what we do."
The Gators (9-1) needed Auburn
to upset Georgia later in the day,
but the Bulldogs won 38-0 and
clinched a spot in the league title
game.
No one, though, was thinking
about that game late in this one.
Florida did little on offense
most of the day and looked to be
in serious trouble when quarter-
back Jeff Driskel left the game
with a sprained right ankle.
The Ragin' Cajuns (5-4) led 17-
13 in the third quarter after
Alonzo Harris' 2-yard run and a
blocked punt for a touchdown on
the ensuing drive. Brett Baer's
22-yard field goal a huge stand


Top 10 teams fall
No. 1 Alabama and No. 9
Louisville each see their
undefeated seasons go up
in flames Saturday.
Page B5

for Florida's defense made it
20-13 early in the fourth.
But Florida backup Jacoby
Brissett rallied the Gators. After
a shaky start that included two
sacks and a near interception in
his first four throws, Brissett
found tight end Jordan Reed
down the middle for a 39-yard
gain and then hit Quinton Dun-
bar for 3-yard score with 1:42
remaining.
"It's difficult to come in during
the middle of a series for a quar-
terback," Florida coach Will
Muschamp said. "I think he did a
fantastic job."


Tickets punched for state


<:"-'.:-: .- T:.Z"" *: r .-r -- ..:

DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
A pack of Lecanto girls cross country runners takes off Saturday morning during the start of the Region 3A-2 meet at Lecanto High School. The Panther girls and Citrus' Alyssa
Weber all qualified for the Class 3A state meet this Saturday in Tallahassee.


Lecanto, CRgirls
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
LECANTO In the end,
Chloe Benoist got by with a lit-
tle help from her friends.
The Lecanto senior did not
qualify for the Class 3A state
meet as an individual but will
happily run in Tallahassee next
Saturday because her team
qualified for the event by fin-
ishing fifth overall. The Pan-
thers hosted the Region 3A-2
meet Saturday morning at
Lecanto High School.
Citrus High's Alyssa Weber
qualified as an individual. The
sophomore finished seventh
with a time of 19:56, her best
time this year
Benoist, who will be making
her seventh trip to state, was 19th


teams, Citrus' Weber, Pirates' Harris all qualify for state cross country meets


with a time of20:31. She was trou-
bled by calf problems, according
to her coach Dan Epstein.
Lecanto freshman Claire
Farnsworth led the Panthers by
finishing ninth at 20:00.
"I had a pretty good day,"
Farnsworth said. "I had a PR
(personal record). I wanted to
get top 15."
"I'm kind of disappointed,"
Benoist said. "I'm really happy
to work with coach Epstein. He
is awesome."
"I'm happy I'm going," said
Weber, who also ran at state as a
freshman.
"This girl is the strongest,
most focused athlete," Citrus
girls coach Michelle Kiddy said
of Weber "She is also humble. I


Page B4


Pirates girls cross country comes in third at Region 2A-2 meet


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
ORLANDO Both Crystal
River boys and girls cross country
teams were forced to run very tac-
tical races Saturday morning at
Lake Nona High School for the
Region 2A-2 meet. Due in large
part to the 5K course's narrow
paths and sharp turns, the course
forced many runners to jostle for
position for the entirety of the race.
But the Lady Pirates were up to
the challenge, placing third overall
out of 12 teams despite coming
into the meet seeded sixth.
"The girls did phenomenal
today," Crystal River girls head


coach Lisa Carter said. "They
packed in and they all ran with
good form and (looked) great."
The top six teams advance to
the state meet as well as the top
15 individuals.
Nature Coast won the regional
title with a team score of 54, two
points better than second place
Lake Highland Prep. Crystal River
combined for 93 points in third,
while Gulf (108), Bishop Moore
(118) and Lake Nona (146) finished
fourth, fifth and sixth, respectively.
Lake Nona freshman Adair
Lyden ran a fantastic race to win
the girls race in 19:30. Lyden led
the race from start to finish without
a single threat to her daunting lead.


Crystal River senior Elizabeth
Bruty placed sixth in a personal
record time of 20:47. Lane was
followed closely by fellow senior
teammate Chloe Lane in ninth
place (21:00). Lane passed three
runners down the home stretch
with a perfectly timed kick.
Clarissa Consol finished in 13th
place with a time of 21:09.
"It was really flat," Lane said of
the course. "But the grass was
pretty uneven. It was really hard to
pass people."
"I got a little claustrophobic in the
beginning," Consol said. "Just trying
to get around people (was hard)."

See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Familiar face


Chargers know

Jackson well

Associated Press

TAMPA If anyone can
appreciate what Vincent
Jackson can do for an of-
fense as much as the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers, it's proba-
bly the San Diego Chargers.
One of the NFEs most pro-
ductive receivers in seven
seasons with his old team,
Jackson has helped trans-
form the Bucs into an enter-
taining, high-scoring act
The Chargers (4-4) enter
their first game against their
ex-teammate with the same
record as Tampa Bay (4-4),
however the Philip Rivers-
led offense hardly resembles
what Jackson left behind
when he signed a five-year,
$55.55 million contract as a
free agent in March.
"It goes without saying
that you certainly miss a
great player like Vincent
Jackson. He was a great
teammate, a good buddy of
mine and obviously a great
player for us," Rivers said.
"You miss having him here.
He's having a heck of year,
and you pull for him every
week except this one."
While Jackson is averag-
ing a league-leading and
career-best 22.9 yards
per reception on 31 catches
for 710 yards through eight
games, the mistake-prone
Chargers have sputtered of-
fensively with Rivers
throwing for 12 touchdowns
with 10 interceptions.
Uncharacteristically, the
Bucs are fifth in the NFL in
scoring at 28.3 points per
game, thanks in part to Josh
Freeman completing nearly
57 percent of his passes for
1,257 yards, 11 touchdowns
and one interception over
the last four weeks.
Rookie Doug Martin is
coming off back-to-back
games with over 200 total
yards from scrimmage, in-
cluding 251 rushing and
four TDs in last week's 42-
32 victory over the Oakland
Raiders.
The 29-year-old Jackson,
whose 18.7 yards per catch
average is best in the NFL
for receivers with at least
100 receptions since 2008,
has a 216-yard game this
season and has scored six
touchdowns, five of them in
the past five games.
His presence has helped
fellow receiver Mike
Williams (29 catches, 504
yards, 17.4 average, five
TDs) and also opened
things up for Martin, who's
third in the league with 794
yards rushing.
"Vincent has been really
great for our offense, espe-
cially for our receivers. He
came into a situation where


Associated Press
Tampa Bay wide receiver Vincent Jackson signed a $55.5 million deal for five years with
the Bucs after leaving the San Diego Chargers as a free agent.


he is clearly the elder states-
man. Other than Vincent, it
is a young room," Bucs first-
year coach Greg Schiano
said.
"From day one he has
been providing leadership,
a work-ethic
on the field, Blacke
work-ethic Toda
in the class- b Todaywen
room, teach- Bucs and
ing our guys Chargers i
how to be a
true profes-
sional," Schiano added.
"He has been a really fine
ambassador for our team in
the community We feel for-
tunate to have him."
While emphasizing he's
appreciative of a group of
targets that include tight end
Antonio Gates and receivers
Malcolm Floyd, Robert
Meachem, Eddie Royal and
Danario Alexander, Rivers
talked about what kind of
player Jackson is both on the
field and in the locker room.
He pointed out that while
the 6-foot-5, 230-pound re-


ceiver rarely played on spe-
cial teams except in cer-
tain situations with the
Chargers that Jackson kept
a detailed notebook about
San Diego's specialty units.
"He's just a real commit-


ed out
p.m. contest
he Tampa Bay
San Diego
s blacked out.


ted player.
He practiced
hard, he pre-
pared hard
and was
good in the
locker room.
You can't say


enough positive about my
experience with him and
the professional he is,"
Rivers said.
Jackson had three 1,000
yard receiving seasons and
was a two-time Pro Bowl
selection with the Charg-
ers, finishing with 272 re-
ceptions for 4,670 yards and
37 touchdowns in 92 games.
"Because he's big and fast
and physical, it's easy to just
label him a deep target and
a jump ball guy But he's
much more than that,"
Rivers said. "It was unusual


for a guy with his size, both
height and strength, to be as
diverse as he was. He was
really good on underneath
stuff, the quick slants, all
those things. ... Obviously
he's a stretch-the-field kind
of guy He's averaging 22
yards a catch, but I think he
was just so diverse."
Now he's doing the same
things for Tampa Bay, which
averaged a NFL-leading 34
points, 472 yards and 9.6
yards per game in October.
The Bucs began November
with a season-best 515 total
yards at Oakland.
"It's fun. We've got a lot of
different weapons. Our of-
fensive coaches do a great
job of giving teams differ-
ent looks and spreading the
ball around," Jackson said.
"With as many weapons
as we have, they're bringing
it every ballgame. We're in
every ballgame, and give
ourselves a chance," Jack-
son added. "We've got a
great defense that's playing
well."


NFL standings


New England
Miami
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo


Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


AFC
East
I L T
5 3 0
1 4 0
3 5 0
3 5 0
South
I L T
7 1 0
6 3 0
3 6 0
S8 0
North
I L T
6 2 0
5 3 0
3 5 0
2 7 0
West
I L T
5 3 0
1 4 0
3 5 0
7 0


Pct PF
.625 262
.500 170
.375 168
.375 180

Pct PF
.875 237
.667 186
.333 182
.111 127

Pct PF
.750 199
.625 191
.375 189
.222 169

Pct PF
.625 235
.500 185
.375 171
.125 133


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF
N.Y Giants 6 3 0 .667 254
Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 133
Dallas 3 5 0 .375 150
Washington 3 6 0 .333 226
South
W L T Pct PF
Atlanta 8 0 0 1.000 220


Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


1 4 0
3 5 0
2 6 0
North
I L T
7 1 0
6 3 0
5 4 0
1 4 0
West
I L T
6 2 0
5 4 0
1 5 0
3 5 0


.500 226
.375 218
.250 149

Pct PF
.875 236
.667 239
.556 204
.500 192

Pct PF
.750 189
.556 170
.444 144
.375 137


Thursday's Game
Indianapolis 27, Jacksonville 10
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Denver at Carolina, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Miami, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at New England, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at Chicago, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Cleveland, Green Bay, Washington
Monday's Game
Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 15
Miami at Buffalo, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 18
Cleveland at Dallas, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, N.Y Giants, Seattle, Ten-
nessee
Monday, Nov. 19
Chicago at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Manning, DEN 292 203 2404 20 6
Roethlis.r, PIT 298 200 2203 16 4
Brady NWE 320 209 2408 16 3
Schaub, HOU 249 159 1918 12 4
Dalton, CIN 285 182 2130 14 11
P Rivers, SND 263 175 1866 12 10
Fitzpatrick, BUF 256 158 1674 15 9
C. Palmer, OAK 330 201 2355 13 8
Flacco, BAL 276 165 1990 10 6
Hassel.,TEN 220 138 1367 7 5
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
A. Foster, HOU 192 770 4.01 46 10


Johnson, TEN
Ridley, NWE
J. Charles, KAN
R. Rice, BAL
McGahee, DEN
Richardson, CLE
Spiller, BUF
Re. Bush, MIA
Greene, NYJ


78 562
122 534
139 509
Receivers


No Yds Avg LG
Wayne, IND 69 931 13.5 30t
Welker, NWE 60 736 12.3 59
A..Green,CIN 51 735 14.4 73t
Decker, DEN 46 583 12.7 55
Thomas, DEN 45 756 16.8 71t
Bowe, KAN 45 571 12.7 46
Gronkowski, NWE 43 580 13.5 41
Johnson, HOU 42 562 13.4 60t
Ant. Brown, PIT 42 499 11.9 27
Ke.Wright, TEN 42 381 9.1 35
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret
A. Foster, HOU 11 10 1 0
A..Green, CIN 8 0 8 0
Decker, DEN 7 0 7 0
Gronkowski, NWE 7 0 7 0
H. Miller, PIT 6 0 6 0
R.Rice,BAL 6 6 0 0
Richardson, CLE 6 5 1 0
0. Daniels, HOU 5 0 5 0
Greene, NYJ 5 5 0 0
Luck, IND 5 5 0 0
Kicking
PAT FG LG
Gostkowski, NWE 29-29 17-20 53
Janikowski, OAK 14-14 19-20 52
Vinatieri, IND 16-16 18-24 53
Suisham, PIT 18-18 17-18 52
P Dawson,CLE 16-16 17-17 52
S. Graham, HOU 28-28 13-15 51
Tucker, BAL 20-20 15-16 56
Nugent, CIN 21-21 14-16 49
Succop, KAN 11-11 16-18 52
Bironas,TEN 19-19 13-16 47
NFC leaders
Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD
Rodgers, GBY 327 2192383 25
M. Ryan, ATL 299 2062360 17
Smith, SNF 209 1451659 12
Brees, NOR 342 2092549 22
Freeman, TAM 253 1412047 16
Griffin III, WAS 262 1721993 8
R.Wilson, SEA 234 1451639 13
Kolb, ARI 183 1091169 8
Manning, NYG 318 1942426 12
Cutler, CHI 241 1441774 12
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG
Peterson, MIN 168 957 5.70 74
M. Lynch, SEA 185 881 4.76 77t
Martin, TAM 154 794 5.16 70t
Morris, WAS 164 793 4.84 39t
Gore, SNF 119 656 5.51 37
L. McCoy. PHL 146 623 4.27 34


Bradshaw, NYG
Forte, CHI
Griffin III, WAS
M. Turner, ATL


Harvin, MIN
B. Marshall, CHI
Witten, DAL
Cruz, NYG
Fitzgerald, ARI
Gonzalez, ATL
Johnson, DET
R. White, ATL
Cobb, GBY
Colston, NOR

To

Jam. Jones, GBY
Do. Martin, TAM
Cobb, GBY
Cruz, NYG
B. Marshall, CHI
And. Brown, NYG
Colston, NOR
Griffin III, WAS
V. Jackson, TAM
A. Peterson, MIN


Tynes, NYG
M. Bryant, ATL
Walsh, MIN
Gould, CHI
Ja. Hanson, DET
Barth, TAM
Akers, SNF
Hauschka, SEA
Zuerlein, STL
D. Bailey DAL


141 618 4.38 37 4
107 539 5.04 46 3
81 529 6.53 76t 6
127 514 4.05 43 4
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
62 677 10.9 45 3
59 797 13.5 39t 7
58 538 9.3 35 1
57 717 12.6 80t 7
51 585 11.5 37t 4
50 495 9.9 25 4
48 767 16.0 51 1
47 709 15.1 59 4
45 500 11.1 39t 6
44 626 14.2 40 6
Scoring
touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret Pts
8 0 8 0 48
8 7 1 0 48
7 0 6 1 42
7 0 7 0 42
7 0 7 0 42
6 6 0 0 38
6 0 6 0 36
6 6 0 0 36
6 0 6 0 36
6 6 0 0 36
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
24-24 26-29 50 102
22-22 20-23 55 82
19-19 19-20 55 76
26-26 16-18 54 74
19-19 17-19 53 70
25-25 13-17 57 64
21-21 14-19 63 63
17-18 15-18 52 62
10-10 17-20 60 61
13-13 15-17 51 58


Recreation BRIEFS


YMCA expands
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCAwill
open its fourth group exercise
location next week in Citrus
Springs at the Hope Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church, 9425 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd.
"We are so excited to provide
our wellness programs now in
the northern end of the county,"
said YMCA Program Director
Sara Bargiel. "It is a great op-
portunity for us and we are
thankful to Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church for opening
their doors to serve as a host
location for these group exer-
cise classes."
The Citrus County YMCA will
introduce the new program and
location with free demonstra-
tions at 4:30 and 5 p.m. Tues-
day, Nov. 13. There will be
bottled water and light snacks,
along with door prizes. Atten-
dees will be able to observe and
participate in the classes that
day for free. The new location
will offer classes in Pilates and
cardio circuit on a regular basis
beginning Thursday, Nov. 15.
The Y currently has three
other areas in the county where
group exercise classes are of-
fered, including Homosassa, In-
verness and Crystal River. For
more information, call the
YMCA office in Beverly Hills at
352-637-0132, or visit online at
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Elks planning Hoop
Shoot for 2012-13
West Citrus Elks Lodge will


stage its 2012-13 Hoop Shoot
Free Throw Contest for county
middle and primary schoolchild-
ren at 9 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 1,
at Lecanto Middle School, 3800
W. Educational Path.
Principal William Farrell and
staff will host the winners from
Lecanto Elementary, Ho-
mosassa Elementary, Rock
Crusher Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Lecanto Middle,
Crystal River Middle and oth-
ers. The lodge champions will
advance to the district contest.
The district finalists will ad-
vance to the state finals.
The state champions will
compete at a regional contest
to determine the contestants to
compete at the national finals.
The lodge uses this exposure
to help attain funds for student
scholarships and other projects
in the county to help the less
fortunate.
Competitors will be in two di-
visions, one for boys and one
for girls, with age categories of
8-9, 10-11 and 12-13; age de-
termined as of April 1, 2013.
For more information, call
Hoop Shoots Director Gene
Murray at 352-382-2709 or Jim
Brumback at 352-503-7904.

Tourney benefits
Wounded Warriors
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will have its inaugural Vet-
erans Tournament fundraiser
for Wounded Warriors Project
on Dec. 8. Men, women and
youths are welcome. All pro-
ceeds will go to the Wounded


Warriors Project. Sponsors will
be accepted and recognized.
There will be two divisions,
NHPA-sanctioned players and
unsanctioned players.
Entry fee will be $15. All play-
ers will receive a free ham-
burger or hot dog and a cold
drink after they have pitched. All
entries must be in before Tues-
day, Dec. 4, by 5 p.m. Entries
can be made by phone or
email; payment must be in by
Dec. 4, as time is needed to
form classes for sanctioned
players and a schedule for non-
sanctioned players.
The public is welcome to ob-
serve. Refreshments will be
served at a discounted price for
non-pitchers. For entry
information, call Ron Fair at
352-746-3924, or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
Men's softball
starting again
Men's softball is ready to
begin again Nov. 19, on Mon-
days and Wednesdays. The
league is very competitive, and
for adults 18 and older.
League fees depend on the
number of teams that enter. For
more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Rec's recre-
ation program specialist Jess
Sandino at 352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
back in March
Beach volleyball is going
great! The league is competi-
tive although fun at the same
time. Teams bring out their fam-


ilies and game faces every
Tuesday night.
The league will be starting up
again around March, and we
are hoping for even more than
10 teams in the upcoming sea-
son. It's $40 a team to play. For
more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Rec's Recre-
ation Program Specialist Jess
Sandino at 352-527-7547.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County
Parks & Recreation and Tennis
Pro Mehdi Tahiri for youth ten-
nis lessons.
Instruction will include condi-
tioning, drills, footwork, match
play, doubles and single strat-
egy. The five-week sessions will
be at the Lecanto Community
Park Tennis Courts on Sun-
days. Each session will run
from 3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is
open to boys and girls ages 8
to 14 and costs $60 per child.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540, or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
YMCA offers
youth programs
The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
are offered at Central Ridge El-
ementary, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary, Crystal River Primary,
Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock


Crusher Elementary.
Ages for the YAfterschool
Program range from kinder-
garten through fifth grade. After-
school programs are a great
way to end the school day, and
the first fall session will offer
kids the opportunity to partici-
pate in flag football, cheerlead-
ing and art.
For more information, call the
Citrus Y at 352-637-0132.
Citrus Hills women
plan golf scramble
The Citrus Hills Women's
Club will host a nine-hole Fabu-
lous '50s Golf Scramble on
Nov. 30 at the Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club's Meadows
course. Cost is $37.50 and in-
cludes cart rentals and lunch in
the Country Club's Garden
Room, all with a Fabulous '50's
theme. The day begins at 8:30
a.m. with a continental break-
fast of home-baked treats, and
sales of putts and Mulligans.
Games during play will add to
the fun, and lots of prizes will
be awarded at the luncheon.
Proceeds will go the
CHWC's Scholarship Program,
which awards scholarships to
deserving Citrus and Lecanto
high schools' seniors, and also
help local charities the CHWC
sponsors.
This event is open to all
women golfers and every year
is a sell-out. A scramble is a
wonderful golf game for begin-
ners, too. Pick your cart mate
or let us do it for you. Call Carol
at 352-746-0697 or Maryellen
at 352-527-3843 for more infor-


nation and to sign up.
Auxiliary offers
Paddlesports
America
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of
the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
offers Paddlesports America, a
safety program designed to at-
tract the novice paddle enthusi-
asts. This four-hour program
presents five chapters of safety
information.
Topics include: Know Your
Paddlecraft, Before You Get
Underway, Operating Your
Boat Safely, Legal Require-
ments of Boating and Boating
Emergencies.
The program will be offered
from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday, Nov. 13 and 15, at
the West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W Veterans Drive.
Homosassa. A fee of $20 for
materials will be charged.
For more information, call
Anna Hughes at 352-621-6963,
or Ned Barry at 352-249-1042.
Flotilla to do
GPS training
Interested in learning how to
use that GPS you have for your
boat? U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Flotilla 15-01 Crystal River
will be offering a two-day com-
prehensive class from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, and
Saturday, Nov. 17.
Class size is limited to 10
people for more one-on-one
instruction. Call Linda Jones
for more information at
352-503-6199.


NFL STATISTICS


B2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nice recovery


Beljan shakes off

panic attack to

maintain Disney lead

Associated Press

LAKE BUENA VISTA Doctors
told Charlie Beljan he was in good
enough health to leave the hospital
Saturday morning, but perhaps not to
play golf. With his job on the line and
his name atop the leaderboard for the
first time, Beljan ignored the recom-
mendation and was glad he did.
One day after a panic attack so se-
vere that he struggled to breathe and
feared for his life, Beljan managed
just fine in the Children's Miracle
Network Hospitals Classic. Despite a
pair of early bogeys, and one nervous
moment when he felt his chest
tighten, he had a 1-under 71 that gave
him a two-shot lead at Disney
Suddenly, the 28-year-old rookie
has a chance to do more than just
keep his card. He's one round away
from winning on the PGA Tour.
He stayed overnight in the hospital
- with his shoes on for most of the
night and only got about an hour of
sleep. This is the final PGA Tour
event of the year, and Beljan is at No.
139 on the money list. Only the top 125
keep their cards, and Beljan likely
would need to finish around 10th.
Beljan said he started to feel some
of the same symptoms from Friday as
he approached the turn. He ate a
sandwich, tried to calm himself, and
back-to-back birdies to start the back
nine certainly helped. He closed with
six straight pars to reach 13-under
203. That gave him a two-shot lead
over Brian Gay (67), Josh Teater (67)
and Charlie Wi, who was tied with
Beljan until two sloppy bogeys at the
end for a 70.
When last seen at Disney, Beljan
was gasping to draw a big breath and
sitting in the fairway to wait his turn
to hit. Paramedics followed him
around the back nine after a spike in
his blood pressure. After signing for a
64, Beljan emerged from the scoring
room strapped into a stretcher and
was loaded into an ambulance.
Lorena Ochoa Invitational
GUADALAJARA, Mexico Inbee Park
moved into position for her third victory of
the year, shooting a 6-under 66 to take a
two-stroke lead into the final round of the


Associated Press
Charlie Beljan hits his tee shot on the ninth hole Saturday during the third round
of the Children's Miracle Network Hospitals tournament in Lake Buena Vista.


Lorena Ochoa Invitational.
The South Korean player had a 15-
under 201 total at Guadalajara Country
Club. She won the Evian Masters in France
in July and the LPGA Malaysia last month
and leads the LPGA Tour money list.
Park also is trying to catch Stacy Lewis
in the player of the year points race, but
has to win Sunday and next week in the
season-ending Titleholders to have any
chance to pass Lewis.
Cristie Kerr was second after a 67.
So Yeon Ryu was third at 12 under after
a 67. Second-round leader Angela Stanford
was another stroke back after a 72, and
Karine Icher had a 69 to reach 9 under.
Lewis, coming off her tour-leading
fourth victory of the year last week in
Japan, was tied for sixth at 8 under with
Michelle Wie, Candie Kung and Hee
Kyung Seo. Trying to become the first
U.S. player of the year since Beth Daniel
in 1994, Lewis shot a 71. Wie followed her


second-round 75 with a 67.
Ochoa was 3 under after a 70. The
Mexican star won 27 LPGA Tour titles be-
fore retiring at age 28 in 2010. She missed
the event last year before the birth of son
Pedro in December.
Singapore Open
SINGAPORE Denmark's Thomas
Bjorn had a one-stroke lead over Eng-
land's Chris Wood when third-round play
in the rain-soaked Singapore Open was
suspended because of darkness.
Bjorn was 9 under overall with 15 holes
left in the third round. Wood also com-
pleted three holes in the round. Officials
are still planning to play 72 holes unless
storms cause more delays Sunday in the
event sanctioned bt the European and
Asian tours.
Top-ranked Rory Mcllroy was 4 under
with nine holes left, and Phil Mickelson
was 1 under with 14 holes remaining.


Logano races to Nationwide win


Associated Press


AVONDALE, Ariz. Ricky
Stenhouse Jr moved a big step
closer toward defending his Na-
tionwide Series championship
with a strong run at Phoenix In-
ternational Raceway
He also got some help from El-
liott Sadler, who had a rough day
start to finish.
The two title contenders
started Saturday tied for the
championship, and likely would
have gone into next weekend's
finale at Homestead-Miami
Speedway locked into a tight
race. But as Stenhouse battled
Joey Logano and Brian Vickers
for the lead headed to the white
flag, Elliott Sadler imploded 10
positions behind them.
Sadler was racing hard for
12th with Justin Allgaier and


Cole Whitt when he triggered a
three-car accident.
"I just got loose. It's hard to put
this into words," Sadler said. "It's
been a long, great season and my
guys deserve better effort from
me than wrecking the car on the
last lap."
The accident brought the race
to a halt, and Sadler had to sit in
his battered car as NASCAR
cleaned the track.
Once cleared, he returned to
pit road for some futile repairs,
but the race went on without him
into overtime.
Logano pulled away in his Joe
Gibbs Racing Toyota for his ninth
win of the season, with Vickers
finishing second.
Stenhouse wound up third,
and Sadler, his wounded car
sputtering and sparking, was
22nd.


Associated Press
Joey Logano poses in Victory Lane after winning
the Nationwide Series race Saturday at Phoenix
International Raceway in Avondale, Ariz.


Earnheart comes


in 22nd at state


CR sophomore swimmer lone


county boy at
JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent


Class 1A event
swim," he said. "I definitely
could have done better. It
was cold this morning, and


ORLANDO It's a feat in that might have affected me
and of itself to make it to a a little. But, I swam my
state meet, but to do so when fastest, and am pretty happy
you're only a sophomore is with how it turned out."
something entirely different. That feeling, however, was
That's where Dylan Earn- not mirrored by Paul Earn-
heart found himself Satur- heart, a Crystal River volun-
day morning, as he was teer coach and Dylan's
staring down his Class 1A father
state opponents early in the "We couldn't be prouder of
cool morning air. Dylan," he said. "If you look
Earnheart came in to the at the top swimmers in the
state meet after a strong state, you'll see most of them
showing at the Region 1A-1 are seniors, maybe a few
event, where he swam a juniors here and there. Sc
2:05:91 in the 200 individual for him to get this far at his
medley event, and placed age is outstanding. We could-
sixth in his region. But it was n't be happier for him."
known coming in that the When the day was over
competition would step up. Dylan wanted it to be made
"It's a really fast region," clear that he didn't get tc
Earnheart said. "We knew where he's at without help
Bolles was good, but there a Help thatwas provided byhis
lot of really good swimmers older brother Hunter, whc
here." was there cheering Dylan on
A tough region is enough from the very beginning, and
to push anybody, and Dylan whom Dylan wanted to dedi-
wouldn't disappoint. He left cate his season to.
the day placing 22nd in the "I got into swimming be-
state after clocking in a cause of Hunter," Dylan
2:07:07 in the preliminary said. "So everything I've
IM race. done this season has been
"Well, it wasn't my best for him."


Citrus places second

in Preseason Pounder


Hurricanes

wrestling may

be rebuilding
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
INVERNESS A new
look Citrus Hurricanes
wrestling team took to the
mat and placed second Sat-
urday morning in the Por-
celli Preseason Pounder.
Steinbrenner of Lutz was
the champion, as the War-
riors knocked off the Admiral
Farragut Bluejackets of St.
Petersburg 48-30 in the first
match. In the second match,
Citrus routed the Bluejackets
54-24 to set up the champi-
onship match with Stein-
brenner, which was won by
the Warriors by a 54-23 score.
Citrus is trying to over-
come the graduation of Nick
McLean, who finished third
in the state at 160 pounds
last year, and the transfers of
brothers Taylor and Colton
Jackson to The Villages.
Taylor Jackson is a two-
time state champion.
"In the first match, our
veterans wrestled well," Cit-
rus coach Jeff Wood said.
The 'Canes started off hot
right out of the gate, as Chris
Mosher (113-pound class)
defeated the Bluejackets'
Jack Pohter with a first-pe-
riod pin at the 1:15 mark.
Trailing 12-6, the 'Canes
Freddy Quandt (138-pound
class) came up with a first


period pin 40 seconds in to
tie the score.
The next two victories by
Citrus came by forfeit in the
145 and 152 pound classes for
a 24-12 lead. Two more for-
feits in the 170 and 182 pound
classes by the Bluejackets
gave Citrus a 36-18 cushion.
The 'Canes' Stephen
Mackey defeated Wencong
Zhang in the 195-pound
class, while Bradley Wiese-
nawr (220 pounds) and
heavyweight Eric Woods
were victorious for Citrus as
it went on to a sound victory
Citrus didn't encounter
smooth sailing against Stein-
brenner, as they fell behind
by a 24-0 score. Ben Behers
and Ryan Schoal were both
victorious by falls in the 120
and 126 pound classes, re-
spectively, for the Warriors.
Jake Silverman (132-
pound class) and Christian
Rodriguez (138-pound class)
also added victories by way
of fall before the 'Canes
Jacob Nolen (145-pound
class) pinned the Warriors'
Will Verstigui at 2:34 of the
second period to give Citrus
its best result of the champi-
onship match. However,
Steinbrenner cruised the
rest of the way to the even-
tual victory
"We're a young team, and
this tournament showed our
strengths and weaknesses,"
Wood said. "We got to con-
tinue to work hard to main-
tain our tradition... through
adversity comes persever-
ance ... and through perse-
verance comes success."


College BASKETBALL



No. 15 Missouri rolls past Southern Illinois


Central Florida outrebounds South Florida 45-26dur


Associated Press

COLUMBIA, Mo. Laurence
Bowers had 20 points and seven
rebounds in his return from a
knee injury that sidelined him all
of last season, leading No. 15 Mis-
souri to an 83-69 season-opening
victory over Southern Illinois-Ed-
wardsville on Saturday
Bowers outscored the Cougars
10-2 by himself during a two-
minute stretch early in the second
half for the Tigers, who are
ranked to start the season for a
third straight year.
Phil Pressey scored 13 of his 19
points in the first half and Alex
Oriakhi, part of a strong transfer
class, had 15 rebounds and eight
points for Missouri.
Jerome Jones hit five 3-pointers
and scored 17 points for SIU Ed-
wardsville, which was held to 33
percent shooting.
No. 22 Notre Dame 58,
Evansville 49
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Jack Cooley
scored the first nine points of the
game and finished with 19, Scott Mar-


tin had 17 rebounds and Notre Dame
beat Evansville in the season opener.
Cooley got the Irish off to a quick
start and it wasn't until he took his first
breather 5:34 in that another Notre
Dame player scored when Eric Atkins
hit a jumper. Cooley had 13 points on
4-of-4 shooting in the opening half to
help send the Irish into the break with
a 28-21 lead.
UCF 74, USF 56
TAMPA- Isaiah Sykes had 26
points and 11 rebounds to lead Cen-
tral Florida past South Florida 74-56
on Saturday night in each team's sea-
son opener.
Keith Clanton, the Conference USA
Preseason Player of the Year, added
16 points and 16 rebounds for Central
Florida, which has won 10 consecutive
season openers.
South Florida got 22 points from
Jawanza Poland.
The Bulls were coming off a strong
season in which South Florida won 22
games and reached the third round of
the NCAA tournament. It was the
school's first appearance in the NCAA
tourney since 1992.
UCF outrebounded the Bulls 45-26.


WOMEN'S
No. 6 Kentucky 90,
Delaware State 50
LEXINGTON, Ky. The Kentucky
women played the type of game they
needed to in preparation for Tuesday's
showdown against top-ranked Baylor.
A'dia Mathies had 16 points, six as-
sists and four steals to lead the No. 6
Wildcats over Delaware State 90-50
Saturday in the season opener.
The Wildcats looked sharp through-
out as they tuned up for the daunting
task of facing Brittney Griner and the
defending NCAA champion Lady
Bears, who have won 41 straight
games.
Kentucky shot 54 percent against
the Hornets, including 10 of 22 from 3-
point range.
No. 12 Oklahoma 69,
Creighton 48
OMAHA, Neb. -Aaryn Ellenberg
scored 19 points to lead Oklahoma to
a season-opening win over Creighton.
Whitney Hand added 14 points and
eight rebounds for the Sooners, who


ing easy 18-point victory in Tampa
shot 48 percent from the field. Ellen-
berg went 8 of 12 from the floor, in-
cluding 3 for 4 from 3-point range.
No. 16 Vanderbilt 82,
McNeese St. 71
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Tiffany
Clarke scored 24 points and Christina
Foggie added 18 to lead Vanderbilt
past McNeese State in the season
opener for both teams.
Jasmine Lister had 10 assists for
Vanderbilt, which led 41-39 at the
break and opened the second half
with a 23-9 that pushed it to 64-48 with
11:57 to play.
No. 21 Purdue 82,
SC-Upstate 47
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. KK .. ,
Houser scored 17 points, leading four
Purdue players in double figures, and -"
the 21st-ranked Boilermakers beat
South Carolina-Upstate 82-47.
Drey Mingo added 15 points and Associated Press
Courtney Moses and Taylor Manuel Missouri's Earnest Ross is covered
contributed 12 points apiece for Pur- by Southern Illinois-Edwardsville's
due in its season opener. The Boiler- Jerome Jones during the first half
makers led 38-25 at halftime in the Saturday in Columbia, Mo. The No.
first meeting between the schools. 15 Tigers won the game 83-69.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crystal River 36,
Lecanto 9
CR 7 13 0 16 36
LH 7 2 0 0 9
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
LH N. Kortendick 36-yard fumble return (L.
Leiva kick)
CR S. Franklin 19-yard pass from J. LaFleur
(J. McAteer kick)
Second Quarter
CR D. Baldner 36-yard run (kick blocked)
CR Baldner 15-yard run (McAteer kick)
LH Safety
Fourth Quarter
CR Baldner 4-yard run (Baldner run)
CR McAteer 34-yard pass from LaFleur (AJ
Bostic run)
Individual Leaders
Passing CR: LaFleur 7-15-151-2-1; LH: T.
McGee 8-20-68-0-1.
Rushing CR: Baldner 17-145-3; T Reynolds
5-72-0;Dawsy 8-52-0; LH: N. Waters 7-16-0; D.
Anderson 5-15-0; McGee 6-3-0.
Receiving CR: Franklin 5-104-1; McAteer 1 -
34-1; LH: R. Marcic 3-46-0; A. Stephens 3-18-0.
Interceptions- CR: D. Dawsy;LH: A. Robinson.
Kick Blocks LH: D. Horton.
Citrus 49, Fivay 0
Citrus 7 35 7 0 49
Fivay 0 0 0 0 0
First Quarter
Cit B.Whaley 10-yard run (A.Killeen kick)
Second Quarter
Cit D. Chapes 3-yard run (Killeen kick)
Cit -Chapes 1-yard run (kick failed)
Cit Safety
Cit Chapes 45-yard pass from Cody Bogart
(kick failed)
Cit -J. Pouncey 4-yard run (Killeen kick)
Cit- Chapes 2-yard run (Killeen kick)
Third Quarter
Cit N. Fernandez 7-yard run (Killeen kick)
Individual Leaders
Rushing Cit: Chapes 18-84-3, Pouncey 8-50-
1, Whaley 8-34-1; Fiv: Erwin 20-66-0.
Passing Cit: C. Bogart 2-4-56-1-0; Fiv: T.
Degen 4-12-79-0-2.
Receiving -Cit: Chapes 1-45-1, J. Vineyard 1-
19-0; Fiv: A.Meyer 4-85-0.
Dunnellon 28,
Williston 14
WIL 0 0 0 14 14
DUN 14 0 0 14 28
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
DUN -J. Boley 17 yard run (kick good)
DUN -J. Boley 5 yard run (kick good)
Fourth Quarter
WIL S. Cochlin 5 yard pass to D. Strange (2-
pt try good)
DUN -J. Boley 2 yard run (kick good)
DUN J. Swoll 8 yard run (kick good)
WIL S. Cochlin 35 yard pass to D. Strange
(no kick, time expired)
Individual Leaders
Passing-WIL: S. Cochlin 7-14-148-2-0; DUN:
J. Boley 5-6-159-0-0.
Rushing -WIL: K. Neal 6-48, D. Strange 2-47;
DUN: J. Swoll 28-159-1, J. Boley 14-73-3.
Recieving -WIL: D. Strange 3-60-1, T Williams
2-44, T Donald 1-40; DUN: A. Jackson 3-77, C.
Wentz 2-33.





No. 7 Florida 27,
La.-Lafayette 20
Louisiana-Lafayette 3 014 3- 20
Florida 3 7 3 14- 27
First Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 38, 11:22.
ULL-FG Baer 49, 4:02.
Second Quarter
Fla-TBurton 2 pass from Driskel (Sturgis kick),
:07.
Third Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 21,12:43.
ULL-Harris 2 run (Baer kick), 8:35.
ULL-Comminie 22 blocked punt return (Baer
kick), 4:03.
Fourth Quarter
ULL-FG Baer 22, 13:11.
Fla-Dunbar3 pass from Brissett (Sturgis kick),
1:42.
Fla-Jenkins 36 blocked punt return (Sturgis
kick), :02.
A-86,482.
ULL Fla
First downs 12 16
Rushes-yards 30-96 34-149
Passing 171 162
Comp-Att-Int 16-23-0 19-26-0
Return Yards 41 52
Punts-Avg. 7-36.7 8-39.9
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 5-45 10-79
Time of Possession 28:09 31:51
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Louisiana-Lafayette, Harris 20-68,
Peoples 3-22, Broadway 6-8, Team 1-(minus 2).
Florida, Driskel 12-76, Gillislee 14-45, Hines 3-
37, TBurton 1-3, Team 1-(minus 2), Jones 1-
(minus 3), Brissett 2-(minus 7).
PASSING-Louisiana-Lafayette, Broadway 16-
23-0-171. Florida, Driskel 13-16-0-98, Brissett
6-8-0-64, Reed 0-1-0-0, Team 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING-Louisiana-Lafayette, Peoples 10-
73, Maxwell 3-34, Surgent 1-48, Brown 1-8,
Thompson 1-8. Florida, Reed 5-85, Dunbar 4-25,
Gillislee 4-8, Hines 3-29, T.Burton 2-9, Ham-
mond 1-6.
Virginia 41, Miami 40
Miami 14 10 7 9-- 40
Virginia 21 7 0 13 41
First Quarter
UVa-Gooch 7 pass from Rocco (Jarrett kick),
11:00.
Mia-Hurns 8 pass from Du.Johnson (Wieclaw
kick), 8:32.



LECANTO
Continued from Page B1

wish I had 20 like her."
Lecanto's girls were fifth
as a team with 166 points.



CR
Continued from Page B1


Bruty's finish was about a
minute better than her pre-
vious personal record.
"I'm really proud of my-
self," Bruty said of her per-
formance. "I've been
working for this for four
years."
Crystal River sophomore
Alexis Ulseth (22:38) and
senior Kristen Dunlap
(22:39) finished 34th and 35th
respectively, while team-


FOr lthe record


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Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
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CASH 3 (late)
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On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
SUNDAY
AUTO RACING
3 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: AdvoCare 500 race
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAAutomobile Club of Southern
California Finals (Same-day Tape) (CC)
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: AdvoCare 500 race
(Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Brooklyn Nets
6 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Memphis Grizzlies
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Alabama State at Florida
BOXING
4:45 p.m. (HBO) Erislandy Lara vs. Vanes Martirosyan
(Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Louisiana-Lafayette at Florida (Taped)
9 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Virginia Tech (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Tennessee Titans at Miami Dolphins
4 p.m. (FOX) Dallas Cowboys at Philadelphia Eagles
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Houston Texans at Chicago Bears
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Children's Miracle Network
Hospitals Classic Final Round
BULL RIDING
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR World Championship Part 2
(Taped)
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix: Cup of Russia (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Pumas vs. Atlante
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS Eastern Conference Final -
Houston Dynamo vs. D.C. United
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS Soccer Conference Final -
Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle Sounders
TENNIS
9 a.m. (ESPN2) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals: First
Semifinal
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals:
Second Semifinal
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Kentucky at Arkansas

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


UVa-Jennings 6 pass from Rocco (Jarrett
kick), 5:33.
Mia-Du.Johnson 95 kickoff return (Wieclaw
kick), 5:21.
UVa-PSims 6 run (Jarrett kick), 1:40.
Second Quarter
Mia-Hurns 12 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 14:56.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 30, 8:16.
UVa-Parks 3 run (Jarrett kick), 4:00.
Third Quarter
Mia-Walford 9 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 7:52.
Fourth Quarter
Mia-Dorsett 35 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 11:38.
UVa-Jennings 5 pass from Rocco (Jarrett
kick), 5:33.
Mia-Safety 4:19.
UVa-McGee 10 pass from Rocco (pass failed),


:06.
A-45,870.
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Mia
20
33-233
187
18-26-0
26
4-34.0
1-1
6-42
23:46


UVa
27
33-94
388
40-52-1
0
3-35.0
0-0
6-35
36:14


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Miami, Du.Johnson 16-150, James
12-52, Morris 5-31.Virginia, Parks 12-42, Jen-
nings 1-21, Richardson 3-12, Rocco 4-7, PSims
3-6, PJones 10-6.
PASSING-Miami, Morris 17-25-0-179,
Du.Johnson 1-1-0-8. Virginia, Rocco 29-37-0-
300, PSims 11-14-0-88, PJones 0-1-1-0.
RECEIVING-Miami, Dorsett 6-103, Hums 4-
37, James 2-17, Walford 2-13, Waters 1-8,


The top six teams qualify for
the state meet. The top 15
individuals also qualify for
the state meet
Lecanto met one of its
goals by getting to the state
meet.
"This year, we knew we


mate Marin Williams (24:24)
finished 62nd to round out
the Pirates' squad.
The Crystal River boys fin-
ished eighth overall with a
team score of 230.
Lake Nona won the re-
gional title with 47 points fol-
lowed by runner-up Lake
Highland Prep (80), third
place Nature Coast (97),
fourth place Gulf (115), fifth
place Bishop Moore (117)
and sixth place Villages
(198).
The boys' race was won by
Lake Nona's George Velez
after a hard-fought battle


Da.Johnson 1-6, Du.Johnson 1-4, Hagens 1-
(minus 1). Virginia, Terrell 9-127, Jennings 7-57,
PJones 7-37, Parks 4-36, McGee 4-26,
Ti.Smith 3-65, Scott 3-25, Gooch 1-7, Phillips
1-6, Swanson 1-2.



Glantz-Culver Line
Today
NFL
Sunday
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG


at N. England
N.Y. Giants
at Tampa Bay
Denver
at Miami
at Baltimore
Atlanta
Detroit
at Seattle
Dallas
at San Fran.
at Chicago

at Pittsburgh


12 11 (52) Buffalo
6 4 (48'2) at Cincinnati
212 3 (4712) San Diego
512 4 (47) at Carolina
612 6 (44)Tennessee
712 712 (4612) Oakland
1 2/2 (5312) at N. Orleans
+3 2 (46) at Minnesota
6 6 (38Y2) N.Y. Jets
+1 11/2 (44/2) at Phila.
12 11/2 (38Y2)St. Louis
1 1 (40/2) Houston
Monday
12/2 12/2 (42) Kansas City


BASEBALL
National League
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Announced
manager Davey Johnson will return next sea-
son and become a consultant in 2014.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS-Announced coach
Kevin McHale is taking a leave absence. Named
assistant coach Kelvin Sampson interim coach.


had a chance," said Lecanto
coach Dan Epstein. "Our
goal at state is to be in the
Top 20."
At the Region 1A-2 meet
in Gainesville on Friday,
Seven Rivers Christian's
Olivia Huegel finished 30th


throughout against Lake
Highland's Payton Bailey,
who finished second. Velez
held off Bailey at the line by
two seconds 16:34 to 16:36
- after the two runners
sprinted side by side down
the chute.
Crystal River junior Bran-
don Harris (17:41) placed
11th overall as the lone Pirate
to advance to the state meet
Harris ran hard and
smart, keeping himself at-
tached to the chase packs be-
hind the Velez/Bailey duel
up front.
"I expected to run a way


Time to paddle


During the weekend,
on the waters of
Kings Bay and the
Crystal River, you will see
boats, kayakers, crabbers,
swimmers and people
standing on the
water.
Yes, from far
away, it looks as if
someone is walk-
ing on water. But
it is really an an-
cient form of
surfing, that has
evolved into the
new craze ofpad-
dleboarding. Dr. Ron
Proponents say DOCT
it may feel like
walking on water ORD
because paddle-
boarding works on the flat
water of a lake, pond, bay or
river and doesn't necessar-
ily involve waves. I must say
some of my friends are pad-
dleboarding the rapids on
the head waters of the Col-
orado River.
Paddleboarding is like
surfing. It can be calm or you
can literally surf on a wave,
but with a paddle. I guess
the best analogy would be
like snowboarding with a ski
pole for balance. In order to
hold a person standing up in
flat water, the board is
thicker and more buoyant.
If you are one of the man-
atee gurus sitting in a kayak
low in the water, your per-
spective of manatees will
change dramatically as you
peer down into the water,
especially if you use polar-
ized sun glasses.
Injuries occur more to
your ego than to your shoul-
ders, legs or back. As a mat-


ter of fact, this is a great
workout for those who have
low back or other spine is-
sues. You never have to bend
from the waist, thus avoiding
aggravating a back issue.
This sport is
gaining popular-
ity as a high-in-
tens i ty,
low-impact and
aerobic exercise
platform for that
solitary and re-
laxing time to
spend with your-
self communing
Joseph with nature, while
OR'S getting a great
workout at the
ERS same time. Group
fitness classes
from calisthenics to yoga are
also available in many com-
munities.
Some paddleboard advo-
cates note that you use 85
percent of your body's mus-
cles, especially the abdomi-
nal core muscles.
Maintaining balance is para-
mount and while doing so,
the abdominal core muscles
are strengthened in an al-
most imperceptible manner.
Core training is any kind
of workout that targets the
muscle groups in the ab-
dominal mid-section and
back. These muscles join
the lower body to the upper
body. Training on unbal-
anced surfaces is very effec-
tive for building core
muscles groups.
These core muscles are
vital in not only good pos-
ture and good health, but
are the basics of any sport-
ing endeavor. Paddleboard-
ing differs from traditional


Bulls shake Twolves


Associated Press

CHICAGO Nate
Robinson scored 18 points
and the Chicago Bulls beat
Minnesota 87-80 on Satur-
day night, ending the Tim-
berwolves' three-game
winning streak.
Robinson played 31 min-
utes after starting point
guard Kirk Hinrich left the
game with a right hip
strain in the second quar-
ter Hinrich had 11 points
in the period to help
Chicago beat Minnesota for
the sixth straight time.
Rockets 96,
Pistons 82
HOUSTON James
Harden scored 20 points,
Omer Asik had 14 and the
Houston Rockets beat the
winless Detroit Pistons 96-82
in their first game without
coach Kevin McHale.
The team announced earlier
Saturday that McHale was
taking an immediate leave of
absence to deal with a family
matter.
Celtics 96,
Bucks 92
MILWAUKEE Paul Pierce
scored 25 points and Kevin
Gamett added 18 as the Boston
Celtics rallied for a 96-92 victory
over the Milwaukee Bucks.
Boston (3-3) got even with
the Bucks after Milwaukee
knocked off the Celtics 99-88
in Boston on Nov. 2.
Monta Ellis led the Bucks
with 32 points, while Samuel
Dalembert added 14 points
and eight rebounds.
Rajon Rondo had 10 points
and 10 assists for the Celtics,
giving him 30 straight games
with 10 or more assists, the
third-longest streak in NBA
history.


with a time of 21:55. None of
the Seven Rivers Christian
School girls were able to ad-
vance to state.
"This is the first year, we
had a winning record,"
Seven Rivers coach Adam
Jones said. "We placed in


faster time," Harris said. "I
thought this course was
going to be pretty easy but it
didn't come out the way I
had planned. I'm glad I'm
going to state but I would
rather have run in the 16s."
Senior Corey Pollard gut-
ted out an 18:54, good
enough for 46th place, de-
spite nursing a cold. Pedro
Lopez (19:38) nabbed 60th
place, while Hunter
Roessler (20:17) and Austin
Bass (20:19) finished to-
gether in 67th and 68th place
respectively Casey Purnell
(21:38) and John Bester


Bobcats 101,
Mavericks 97, OT
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Rookie Michael Kidd-Gilchrist
had a career-high 25 points
and 12 rebounds to help the
Charlotte Bobcats snap a 16-
game losing streak against the
Dallas Mavericks with a 101-
97 overtime win.
Kidd-Gilchrist was 8 of 12
from the field and had a pair
of key offensive rebounds off
missed foul shots late in the
game.
O.J. Mayo scored 22 points
and Vince Carter had 19
points for the Mavericks.
Pacers 89,
Wizards 85
INDIANAPOLIS Paul
George scored 20 points and
the Indiana Pacers beat the
winless Washington Wizards
89-85.
Roy Hibbert added seven
points, 11 rebounds and two
blocks for the Pacers (3-4), who
stopped a three-game slide.
Emeka Okafor and Bradley
Beal had 17 points apiece for
the Wizards (0-5), and A.J.
Price finished with 12 points
and 14 assists.
76ers 93,
Raptors 83
TORONTO Thaddeus
Young, Jrue Holiday and Nick
Young scored 16 points
apiece and the Philadelphia
76ers beat Toronto 93-83,
their fifth victory in six meet-
ings with the Raptors.
Spencer Hawes had 12
points and 11 rebounds, Dorell
Wright added 15 points and
Philadelphia won its third
straight, with all three victories
on the road. It's the first time
the 76ers have done that
since February 2003.


the top three in seven of our
10 meets. The other runners
are Gabriella Vissicchio,
Paige Eckart, Allison Green,
Alexis King, Reily Cash and
Maddy Jeffes.
"One of our goals was to
beat PK. Yonge. We beat


(22:33) placed 84th and 87th
place to complete Crystal
River's efforts in the meet.
"(Harris) actually cashed
in on those kids he hasn't
beaten yet from previous
races (this season)," Crystal
River boys head coach Tim
Byrne said. "Even though
the times weren't exception-
ally fast, he ran a terrific
race."
The Dunnellon High boys
cross country team com-
peted in the meet with sen-
ior Victor Chicas-Aguilar
(last week's District 2A-5
champ) placing ninth in


resistance training where
isolated muscle groups are
trained on a static or stable
platform.
A paddleboarder has to
constantly balance and ad-
just body weight and posi-
tion on the board as well as
from one foot to the other
while propelling their body
and the board forward over
the paddle. A paddle stroke
involves a pronounced rota-
tion of the boarder's mid-
section with a forward
component much like an ab-
dominal crunch. All of this
occurs while balancing the
force generated by the foot
pressure on the board.
This is a sport that has a
short but relatively difficult
learning curve, yet can
progress new devotees, in as
little as 10 minutes to a great
way to workout. My 7 year
old accompanies me sitting
on the front of the board to
turn this into a daddy-
daughter sport.
Having gone through
paragliding, kite boards and
wind boarding, paddle
boarding is simple, not gear
oriented and like running is
right out your door on the
closest body of water. It is
simple and fun and can be
enjoyed by almost all. Pad-
dleboarding is an ideal new
challenge for people who
enjoy exercising in the great
outdoors and who don't
mind getting wet.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
surgeon at SeaSpine Ortho-
pedic Institute, may be
reached at rbjhand@
cox.net


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 4 0 1.000 -
Philadelphia 4 2 .667 1
Brooklyn 2 2 .500 2
Boston 3 3 .500 2
Toronto 1 5 .167 4
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 5 1 .833 -
Atlanta 2 2 .500 2
Charlotte 2 3 .400 2/2
Orlando 2 3 .400 2/2
Washington 0 5 .000 4/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 4 2 .667 -
Milwaukee 3 2 .600 '2
Indiana 3 4 .429 1'/2
Cleveland 2 4 .333 2
Detroit 0 7 .000 4/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 5 1 .833 -
Memphis 4 1 .800 /2
New Orleans 3 2 .600 1V2
Dallas 4 3 .571 1'2
Houston 3 3 .500 2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 4 2 .667 -


Minnesota
Denver
Utah
Portland


L.A. Clippers
Golden State
Phoenix
Sacramento
L.A. Lakers


4 2
3 3
3 4
2 3
Pacific Division
W L
4 2
3 3
3 4
2 4
2 4


Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 93, Toronto 83
Indiana 89, Washington 85
Charlotte 101, Dallas 97, OT
Chicago 87, Minnesota 80
Houston 96, Detroit 82
Boston 96, Milwaukee 92
Utah 94, Phoenix 81
San Antonio at Portland, late
Denver at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Orlando at Brooklyn, 3 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Miami at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Oklahoma City 7 p.m.
Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Utah at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Miami at Houston, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Atlanta at Portland, 10 p.m.


them. We placed 11th but
beat PK. Yonge which
placed 12th. We wanted to
get some girls with PRs. We
did that We had a good sea-
son. There is a sense of ac-
complishment. That's why
you coach."


17:37 and advancing to Sat-
urday's state meet. Dunnel-
lon placed 12th overall out of
14 teams with 298 points.
Dunnellon finishers in-
clude: Kevin Hanson (20:30,
71st place), D'Andre Mun-
ford (20:35, 73rd place),
Jonathan Padilla (20:58,80th
place), Steven Shields (22:49,
90th place), Charles Cross
(23:52,95th place) and Travis
Colston (24:02, 99th place).
The cross country state
meet is Saturday morning
with the Class 2A girls' race
at 8 a.m. followed by the 2A
boys' race at 8:50 a.m.


B4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


SCOREBOARD


1
r
M






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

College football
scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 38, Duquesne 31
Albright 26, Lebanon Valley 14
Bentley 20, Assumption 13
Bridgewater (Va.) 42, Catholic 14
Brown 28, Dartmouth 24
Bryant 28, CCSU 25
Buffalo 29, W. Michigan 24
Cincinnati 34, Temple 10
Colgate 35, Lehigh 24
Columbia 34, Cornell 17
Cortland St.16, Ithaca 10
Dayton 21, Marist 17
Fordham 36, Lafayette 27
Georgetown 10, Bucknell 3
Gettysburg 38, Franklin & Marshall 31
Hobart 43, Rochester 24
Indiana (Pa.) 41, Shippensburg 10
Kutztown 47, Edinboro 21
Lock Haven 15, Cheyney 7
Lycoming 38, Misericordia 0
Maine 51, Georgia St. 7
Merchant Marine 33, St. Lawrence 12
Merrimack 62, St. Anselm 26
Mount Ida 52, Castleton St. 28
Muhlenberg 45, Moravian 7
New Haven 37, American International 12
Penn 30, Harvard 21
Princeton 29, Yale 7
Robert Morris 21, Sacred Heart 17
Rutgers 28, Army 7
S. Connecticut 13, Stonehill 10
St. Francis (Pa.) 45, Monmouth (NJ) 31
St. John Fisher 55, Utica 20
Syracuse 45, Louisville 26
Towson 41, Rhode Island 10
Villanova 35, James Madison 20
Wagner 31, Holy Cross 30
West Chester 33, Clarion 12
Widener 42, Delaware Valley 23
Wilkes 44, King's (Pa.) 32
William Paterson 37, W. Connecticut 16
SOUTH
Alabama St. 31, Southern U. 30
Alcorn St. 34, Texas Southern 24
Appalachian St. 33, Furman 28
Ark.-Pine Bluff 24, Grambling St. 17
Bethune-Cookman 49, Savannah St. 7
Campbellsville 23, Bluefield South 14
Carson-Newman 35, Mars Hill 17
Charleston Southern 28, Gardner-Webb 10
Clemson 45, Maryland 10
Coastal Carolina 65, Presbyterian 7
Cumberlands 33, Lindsey Wilson 32, 20T
Delaware St. 35, Hampton 27
E. Kentucky 55, Murray St. 24
Emory & Henry 38, Guilford 10
FAU 37, W. Kentucky 28
Florida 27, Louisiana-Lafayette 20
Florida A&M 22, NC Central 21
Georgia 38, Auburn 0
Georgia Southern 69, Howard 26
Georgia Tech 68, North Carolina 50
Jackson St. 35, Alabama A&M 21
Jacksonville 40, Campbell 14
Jacksonville St. 38, Austin Peay 23
LSU 37, Mississippi St. 17
Lenoir-Rhyne 44, Catawba 14
Liberty 28, Stony Brook 14
Louisiana College 45, Hardin-Simmons 37
MVSU 22, Prairie View 20
Maryville (Tenn.) 22, Ferrum 17
Memphis 37, Tulane 23
Missouri 51,Tennessee 48, 40T
NC A&T 17, SC State 7
NC State 37, Wake Forest 6
Norfolk St. 30, Morgan St. 0
Old Dominion 41, William & Mary 31
Rhodes 31, Centre 24
Richmond 23, Delaware 17
Sam Houston St. 52, Northwestern St. 17
Samford 26, Elon 15
South Carolina 38, Arkansas 20
Tennessee Tech 45, UT-Martin 44, OT
Texas A&M 29, Alabama 24
The Citadel 27, VMI 24
Thomas More 75, Mount St. Joseph 6
Troy 41, Navy 31
UAB 38, Marshall 31
Union (Ky) 60, Pikeville 59
Virginia 41, Miami 40
Washington & Lee 42, Shenandoah 23
Webber International 13, Apprentice 12
Wingate 42, Tusculum 17
Wofford 16, Chattanooga 13, OT
MIDWEST
Adrian 17, Huntingdon 16
Ashland 65, Notre Dame Coll. 0
Augsburg 49, Carleton 24
Augustana (SD) 38, SW Minnesota St. 35
Aurora 47, Rockford 20
Baker 40, Graceland (Iowa) 7
Bemidji St. 49, Minot St. 0
Benedictine (11.) 28, Lakeland 3
Benedictine (Kan.) 34, Culver-Stockton 7
Bethel (Minn.) 27, St. John's (Minn.) 22
Carroll (Wis.) 49, Illinois College 14
Cent. Michigan 34, E. Michigan 31
Coe 34, Central 13
Concordia (111.) 62, Maranatha Baptist 26
Concordia (Moor.) 29, Gustavus 10
Concordia (Wis.) 17, Wis. Lutheran 14
Cornell (Iowa) 32, Grinnell 27
Davidson 28, Valparaiso 27, OT
Doane 17, Concordia (Neb.) 7
Drake 45, Butler 20
Dubuque 34, Buena Vista 28, OT
E. Illinois 39, SE Missouri 20
Ferris St. 32, N. Michigan 31
Findlay 26, Walsh 7
Franklin 58, Hanover 29
Hillsdale 14, Northwood (Mich.) 3
Hope 28, Albion 20
Iowa Wesleyan 41, Concordia (Mich.) 7
Kalamazoo 31, Olivet 16
Kent St. 48, Miami (Ohio) 32
Macalester 45, Hamline 21
Michigan 38, Northwestern 31, OT
Michigan Tech 35, Wayne (Mich.) 13
Millikin 55, Carthage 13
Minn. Duluth 49, Northern St. (SD) 31
Minn. St.-Mankato 70, Upper Iowa 7
Minn.-Crookston 37, Mary 36
Minnesota 17, Illinois 3
Monmouth (11.) 49, Knox 35
N. Dakota St. 20, S. Dakota St. 17
N. Iowa 24, South Dakota 21
Nebraska 32, Penn St. 23
North Central 37, Augustana (111.) 6
Ohio Dominican 56, Malone 7
Purdue 27, Iowa 24
Ripon 56, Lawrence 55
Saginaw Valley St. 55, Grand Valley St. 52
Simpson (Iowa) 21, Luther 10
Sioux Falls 24, Wayne (Neb.) 14
St. Cloud St. 39, Minn. St.-Moorhead 37
St. Norbert 20, Lake Forest 10
St. Thomas (Minn.) 35, St. Olaf 21
Tiffin 34, Lake Erie 14
Trine 35, Alma 27
UMass 22, Akron 14
Wartburg 55, Loras 7
Winona St. 49, Concordia (St.R) 31
Wis.-Eau Claire 28, Wis.-River Falls 7
Wis.-Oshkosh 27, Wis.-Stout 18
Wis.-Platteville 57, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 7
Wis.-Whitewater 24, Wis.-LaCrosse 0
Wisconsin 62, Indiana 14
Wittenberg 47, Oberlin 20
Youngstown St. 31, W. Illinois 7
SOUTHWEST
Kansas St. 23, TCU 10
Lamar 34, Nicholls St. 24


Mary Hardin-Baylor 59, Mississippi College 0
McMurry 47, Bacone 14
North Texas 24, South Alabama 14
Oklahoma 42, Baylor 34
Oklahoma St. 55, West Virginia 34
SMU 34, Southern Miss. 6
Sul Ross St. 50, E.Texas Baptist 37
Texas 33, Iowa St. 7
Texas Lutheran 47, Howard Payne 6
Texas Tech 41, Kansas 34, 20T
Tulsa 41, Houston 7
UCF 31, UTEP24
UTSA 31, McNeese St. 24
FAR WEST
Arizona 56, Colorado 31
Boise St. 49, Hawaii 14
Colorado St. 33, UNLV 11
E. Washington 31, UC Davis 28
Montana St. 65, Portland St. 30
N. Colorado 42, Weber St. 34
S. Utah 35, N. Arizona 29, 30T
San Diego St. 28, Air Force 9
San Jose St. 47, New Mexico St. 7
Southern Cal 38, Arizona St. 17
Stanford 27, Oregon St. 23
Wyoming 28, New Mexico 23


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


No. 1

Associated Press

Before Oregon, Kansas State and
Notre Dame took the field, they got
some good news.
No. 15 Texas A&M upset No. 1 Al-
abama 29-24 on Saturday taking one
less unbeaten team out of the race
for the BCS championship game.
Johnny Manziel and the Aggies
shook up the national title race in
Tuscaloosa, Ala., jumping out to a
quick three-touchdown lead and
then holding on at the end to Al-
abama's 13-game winning streak.
The Southeastern Conference
has won the last six BCS champi-
onships, but with Alabama losing
and three other teams unbeaten, it
will be tough for the SEC to even
get in the game without help.
No. 2 Oregon, third in the BCS
standings, played California late
Saturday night No. 2 Kansas State
was at TCU and No. 4 Notre Dame
was at Boston College.
Alabama would likely need to
win out and have two of those three
teams lose to reach the national
title game.
No. 3 Kansas State 23,
Texas Christian 10
FORT WORTH, Texas Collin Klein
ran for two touchdowns and No. 3
Kansas State bolstered its national title
hopes with a 23-10 victory at Big 12
newcomer TCU.
The Wildcats improved to 10-0 for
only the second time under coach Bill
Snyder, and moved within two wins of
likely reaching their first BCS champi-
onship game.
Only a few minutes after the start of
Kansas State's game, and a rare
turnover by Klein, SEC newcomer Texas
A&M finished off its 29-24 victory at Ala-
bama, the No. 1 team in the BCS stand-
ings and AP poll. The Aggies win gave
their old Big 12 rivals at K-State a boost.
TCU (6-4, 3-4 Big 12) didn't take ad-
vantage of Klein's interception on the
fourth play of the game.
No. 5 Georgia 38, Auburn 0
AUBURN, Ala. -Aaron Murray
passed for 208 yards and three touch-
downs, freshman tailbacks Todd Gurley
and Keith Marshall each ran for more
than 100 yards and No. 5 Georgia over-
whelmed Auburn 38-0, sending the
Bulldogs back to the SEC champi-
onship game.
Georgia (9-1, 7-1 Southeastern Con-
ference) was methodical in its dominat-
ing win. It scored the first shutout for
either team in the series since the Bull-
dogs' 28-0 win in 1976.
Auburn (2-8, 0-7 SEC) was held to
238 yards, including 57 yards rushing,
as its disappointing season with embat-
tled coach Gene Chizik suffered an-
other embarrassing low.
Georgia, the Eastern Division cham-
pion, earned its second straight trip to
the Dec. 1 SEC championship game in
Atlanta.
No. 9 LSU 37,
No. 23 Mississippi St. 17
BATON ROUGE, La. Zach Met-
tenberger passed for 273 yards and
two touchdowns, and ninth-ranked LSU
kept alive faint hope of a Southeastern
Conference title with a 37-17 victory
over No. 23 Mississippi State.
Looking sharp a second straight week,
Mettenberger completed 19 of 30 passes
without an interception. His top target
was Jarvis Landry, who had nine catches
for 109 yards both career highs in-
cluding a 19-yard touchdown to help the
Tigers (8-2, 4-2 SEC) beat the Bulldogs
(7-3, 3-3) for the 13th straight time.
Mettenberger's other scoring pass
went to Spencer Ware, fullback J.C.
Copeland scored on a 1-yard plunge
and Craig Loston returned an intercep-
tion 100 yards for a score.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 B5


'Bama blemished


Associated Press
Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel reacts Saturday during the second
half against Alabama at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala. No. 15
Texas A&M won 29-24. At left is Alabama defensive back John Fulton.


Tyler Russell was 26 of 38 for 295
yards and a touchdown that got the
Bulldogs as close as field goal in the
third quarter before they faded in their
third straight loss to a ranked team.
No. 10 Clemson 45,
Maryland 10
CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd threw
for 261 yards and three touchdowns as
Clemson won its sixth straight and
record 12th in a row at Death Valley.
Clemson (9-1, 6-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference) had little trouble with the
banged-up Terps (4-6, 2-4), who again
started linebacker Shawn Petty at quar-
terback because of season-ending in-
juries to their four scholarship passers.
The Tigers ended things early as Boyd
passed for a 13-yard touchdown to
Adam Humphries and a 28-yard score to
DeAndre Hopkins. In between, Clemson
defensive end Corey Crawford brought a
Petty fumble 16 yards for a touchdown
as part of his team's 21-point first quarter.
Syracuse 45,
No. 11 Louisville 26
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Ryan Nassib
threw for 246 yards and three touch-
downs, Jerome Smith ran for 144 yards
and Syracuse handed Louisville its first
loss of the season.
Playing in the last home game of his
SU career, Nassib directed an offense
that gained 524 total yards.
The Orange (5-5, 4-2 Big East) blew
the game open with three touchdowns
in the second quarter and Louisville (9-
1,4-1) allowed more points than it had
in any game this season.
Teddy Bridgewater completed 36 of
49 passes for 426 and three touch-
downs for Louisville.
No. 12 South Carolina 38,
Arkansas 20
COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw
threw for two touchdowns and ran for
another score for South Carolina.
Shaw was 15 of 23 for 279 yards for
the Gamecocks (8-2, 6-2 Southeastern


Conference), who finished with six
league wins for only the second time in
20 years in the SEC.
Arkansas (4-6, 2-4) will now have to
beat both Mississippi State and LSU to
make a bowl game after starting the
season No. 10 in the country.
No. 14 Oklahoma 42,
Baylor 34
NORMAN, Okla. Landry Jones
threw for 277 yards and two touch-
downs, Damien Williams ran for 99
yards and two scores and Bob Stoops
moved into sole possession of second
place on the school's career wins list.
Backup quarterback Blake Bell
scored on a 55-yard keeper in the
fourth quarter for the longest run by a
quarterback in the Stoops era.
Lache Seastrunk ran for 91 yards
and three touchdowns for Baylor (4-5-,
1-5 Big 12), the last score getting the
Bears within eight with 1:26 to play after
quarterback Nick Florence got in on the
2-point conversion.
No. 15 Stanford 27,
No. 13 Oregon St. 23
STANFORD, Calif. Kevin Hogan
threw for 254 yards and three touch-
downs in his first collegiate start, and
Stanford overcame four turnovers to
rally past Oregon State.
Cody Vaz fumbled late in the fourth
quarter to give the Cardinal (8-2, 6-1)
the ball at the Beavers 29. The only
Oregon State (7-2, 5-2) turnover turned
out to be the difference.
Hogan hit tight end Zach Ertz for a
13-yard touchdown for the go-ahead
score and Stanford stopped the
Beavers twice more. The Cardinal will
head to second-ranked Oregon next
week with a chance to take over sole
control of the North Division and move
closer to a spot in the conference
championship game.
No. 18 Nebraska 32,
Penn State 23
LINCOLN, Neb. Taylor Martinez


threw a 5-yard touchdown pass to
Jamal Turner for Nebraska's first lead,
and the Cornhuskers overcame a dou-
ble-digit, second-half deficit for the
fourth time this season.
Ameer Abdullah ran for 116 yards on
a career-high 31 carries, and Martinez
finished with 104 yards as the Huskers
pounded away on the ground on a
windy afternoon at Memorial Stadium.
The Huskers (8-2, 5-1 Big Ten), down
14 points at half, got TD runs of 1 and 2
yards from Imani Cross to tie it at 20.
Martinez threw 56 yards to Kyler
Reed on a third-and-5 and, three plays
later, found Turner on a short slant in
the end zone for the lead with 10:57 left.
Penn State (6-4, 4-2) looked ready to
regain the lead, but tight end Matt
Lehman fumbled into the end zone and
Nebraska recovered.
No. 19 Texas 33,
Iowa State 7
AUSTIN, Texas David Ash passed
for 364 yards and two touchdowns and
Texas honored former coach Darrell
Royal by whipping Iowa State.
Ash had a 61-yard touchdown pass
to Mike Davis in the first quarter.
Johnathan Gray ran for two touch-
downs for the Longhorns (8-2, 5-2 Big
12), who won their fourth in a row.
Texas paid tribute during the game to
Royal, who died Wednesday at age 88.
Texas lined up in the wishbone, the for-
mation Royal introduced to college foot-
ball in 1968, on the Longhorn's first
play. Instead of a run, Texas ran a trick
play that resulted in a 47-yard pass.
Steele Jantz passed for 133 yards for
the Cyclones (5-5, 2-5) but was under
constant pressure from the Texas de-
fense.
No. 21 USC 38,
Arizona State 17
LOS ANGELES Marqise Lee
caught 10 passes for 161 yards and a
touchdown, Curtis McNeal rushed for
163 yards and two more scores, and
Southern California bounced back from
consecutive losses against skidding
Arizona State.
Matt Barkley threw for 222 yards and
three TDs while becoming the leading
passer in conference history for the Tro-
jans (7-3, 5-3 Pac-12), who overcame a
slow start and five turnovers to snap
their two-game skid. USC hasn't lost
three straight since 2001, former coach
Pete Carroll's first season.
Taylor Kelly passed for 174 yards
and Alden Darby returned an intercep-
tion 70 yards for a touchdown for the
Sun Devils (5-5, 3-4), who lost their
fourth straight.
No. 24 Rutgers 28, Army 7
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Brandon
Coleman caught his second touchdown
of the game on a 31-yard pass from
Gary Nova with 8:49 to play and Rut-
gers survived a valiant effort by mis-
take-prone Army.
In bouncing back from its first loss and
a two-week layoff that featured Hurri-
cane Sandy and a Nor'easter that
dumped a foot of snow in New Jersey,
the Scarlet Knights (8-1) scored three
times in the final nine minutes. They also
got a 2-yard touchdown run from Savon
Huggins and a 73-yard fumble return by
Duron Harmon in the final minute.
No. 25 Texas Tech 41,
Kansas 34
LUBBOCK, Texas Running back
Eric Stephens threw a 3-yard jump
pass to Darrin Moore for a touchdown
in double overtime to lead Texas Tech
past Kansas.
Kansas had a chance to tie but
Michael Cummings couldn't connect
with Tre' Parmalee in the end zone on
fourth-and-9.


QB Rocco rallies Virginia past Miami, 41-40


Associated Press

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -
Michael Rocco knew where he
wanted to go with the ball, and
flashed his intended target a look.
"He gave me a little, basically,
don't (mess) this up" look, tight end
Jake McGee said after he caught a
game-wining 10-yard pass from
Rocco with 6 seconds to go Satur-
day The play capped Virginia's
rally from a 10-point, fourth-quarter
deficit that stunned Miami 41-40.
McGee made the catch at the
back of the end zone, but Rocco
didn't entertain the idea that his
tight end had stepped out.
"Not the way we were feeling
right then," Rocco said before ac-
knowledging that seeing the replay
was "pretty special."
The TD pass was Rocco's fourth
of the day and gave Virginia (4-6, 2-
4 Atlantic Coast Conference) its
second consecutive victory follow-
ing a six-game losing streak. It was
the Cavaliers' third straight win
against the Hurricanes.
The Cavaliers still need to beat
North Carolina on Thursday night
and then Virginia Tech to become
bowl eligible, but after thumping
North Carolina State 33-6 last week
and rallying against the Hurricanes,


it's looking more like a possibility
"We put ourselves in a big
enough hole where we can't lose
again," McGee said. "We've got to
keep doing it."
Miami (5-5, 4-3) lost despite three
touchdown passes from Stephen
Morris and a brilliant performance
by Duke Johnson. The freshman
ran for 150 yards on just 16 carries,
returned a kickoff for a touchdown
and threw a TD pass.
The victory also means the Hurri-
canes need to win at Duke on Nov 24
to claim their first Coastal Division
title, and a spot in the ACC champi-
onship game. The school is still de-
termining whether it would accept
the berth, or self-impose a postseason
ban for the second season in a row
while an NCAA investigation into its
compliance practices continues.
In the end, Miami's inability to
derail Rocco's precise passing let it
down.
"It was terrible," Miami coach Al
Golden, a former Virginia assistant,
said of allowing Virginia to convert
nine of 14 third down plays.
Miami wide receiver Phillip Dorsett
is tied up by Virginia linebacker
Trent Corney on Saturday in
Charlottesville, Va.
Associated Press












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE-

AP source: Bieber,
Gomez break up
NEW YORK -A
source confirms to The
Associated Press that
Justin Bieber is no longer
Selena Gomez's
"boyfriend."
The source is not au-
thorized to discuss the
split with the press and
spoke on condition of
anonymity.
The
breakup
appar-
ently hap-
pened
last week.
Distance
and their
busy
Justin schedules
Bieber were
cited as
factors.
Bieber,
18, is
touring to
promote
his latest
album,
S "Believe,"
Selena which
Gomez contains
the hit
"Boyfriend." Gomez, 20,
is filming a "Wizards of
Waverly Place" reunion
for the Disney Channel.
The pair made their re-
lationship public in Feb-
ruary 2011.
E! News was the first to
report the split.
Bieber seems to be
doing OK, at least pub-
licly On the red carpet of
Wednesday's Victoria's
Secret fashion show he
said, "I'd rather be here
than anywhere in the
world."

Fisher honored
for sharing story
SALT LAKE CITY-
Writer-actress Carrie
Fisher has been honored
for her candor in dealing
with her bipolar disorder
and for raising aware-
ness about the condition.
Fisher received the
Utah Film Center's Kim
Peek Award for Disability
in Media on Friday night
in Salt Lake City.
Fisher, who starred as
Princess Leia in the Star
Wars trilogy and is the
daughter of late singer
Eddie Fisher and actress
Debbie Reynolds, shared
her journey during "An
Evening With Carrie
Fisher," sponsored by the
film center

Sotheby's to sell
Jagger's letters
LONDON Handwrit-
ten letters from Rolling
Stones frontman Mick

his for-
mer lover
Marsha
Hunt will
be auc-
tioned in
London
next
month.
Mick Hunt is
Jagger an Ameri-
can-born
singer who was the inspi-
ration for the Stones'
1971 hit "Brown Sugar"
and bore Jagger's first
child.
Sotheby's said Satur-
day that Hunt has tasked
the auction house with
selling 10 letters written
from the set of Jagger's
film "Ned Kelly," which
was shooting in Australia.
-From wire reports


Final writings


Associated Press
Science fiction writer Ray Bradbury is seen Nov. 15, 2000, at the National Book Awards in New York. Two pieces
released this fall were written late in life by the science fiction/fantasy master, who died in June at age 91.


Two briefBradbury stories released this fall


HILLEL ITALIE
AP National Writer

NEW YORK Ray Bradbury was
in failing health during his final
years, but he could still reminisce
about his love for books or finish a
brief and mysterious Christmas story.
Two pieces released this fall were
written late in life by the science
fiction/fantasy master, who died in
June at age 91. He contributed "The
Book and the Butterfly," an intro-
duction to this year's edition of
"The Best American Nonrequired
Reading." And he conceived a stark
encounter between a young boy and
a man he believes is Santa Claus in
"Dear Santa," which appears in the
holiday issue of Strand Magazine,
based in Birmingham, Mich.
The publication of each work was
made possible, in part, by deep ad-
miration for the author Strand
managing editor Andrew Gulli, who
befriended Bradbury in 2009, has
featured several Bradbury works
and had an informal agreement
with him for "Dear Santa."
"I never heard anything back or
received a contract for a couple of
months," Gulli wrote in a recent
email, adding the final word did not
arrive until the day of Bradbury's
death. "I was picking up my mail
and opened up an envelope to find
Ray's signature on the contract."
Dave Eggers, who edits the "Non-
required" series, once contributed
a story to a Bradbury tribute an-
thology and knows a close associate
of Bradbury's, the author and jour-
nalist Sam Weller Based in San
Francisco, Eggers helps a student
committee compile the anthology
and allows the students to choose a
writer for the introduction.


"In the past they (the introducers)
have ranged from Beck to Guillermo
Del Toro to Judy Blume," Eggers, a
National BookAward finalist for his
novel "A Hologram for the King,"
wrote in an email Thursday
"Last year the kids voted to ask
Ray Bradbury, and because I knew
Sam, and because I grew up a few
towns from Bradbury's native
Waukegan, Ill., I thought we might
have a shot. When Sam let us know
he agreed, the students and I were
flabbergasted. His intro was won-
derful of course so full of undi-
minished joy. He passed on a few
weeks after sending it to us."
"The Book and the Butterfly" is a
three-page tribute to reading and
how it nurtured Bradbury's extraor-
dinary imagination. He describes
visiting his local library in Waukegan
at age 7 and startling the librarian by
borrowing 10 books a week On "mag-
nificent autumn nights," he would
hurry home and read about every-
thing from Egypt to physiology.
"The books I brought home from
the library caused me to think about
the origins of life and the universe,"
writes the author of "The Martian
Chronicles," "Fahrenheit 451" and
other classics. "How did it start?
Where does it end? I recall Mid-
western summer nights, standing on
my grandparents' hushed lawn, and
looking up at the sky at the confetti
field of stars. There were millions of
suns out there, and millions of plan-
ets rotating around those suns. And
I knew there was life out there, in
the great vastness. We are just too
far apart, separated by too great a
distance to reach one another"
His mind was a rocket ship, but
"Dear Santa" is a written in a
clipped, chilly style, as if Dashiell


Hammett had been commissioned
to write a sketch for The Radio City
Christmas Spectacular No names
are given, except for Santa. The lo-
cation is not identified. The mood is
dreamlike and much of the action
takes place through dialogue.
"Oddly enough the older Ray got,
the less patience he had for adjec-
tives and the more skeletal his style
was, which for an editor is a
dream," Gulli wrote in his email.
"Often times authors will slip into
phases especially when they start
getting on in years where they will
pad a very simple story with a lot of
things that should be edited out of
the manuscript."
The story begins with a boy stand-
ing in the back of a long and slow-
moving line to meet Santa. A tall
stranger stops the boy and asks his
age.
"Twelve," the boy says.
The stranger warns he may well
be older when he finally gets to
Santa. As the boy approaches the
front, he whispers his age to Santa,
who insists the boy is lying and
sends him away, complaining the
boy is too heavy to sit on him, as if
the boy himself might be turning
into Santa.
Outside, the boy spots a tall, blue-
cheeked man and they walk to-
gether The boy is convinced the
man is Santa, the man gives nothing
away The boy says he will write him
during the next holiday season, and
insists he knows where to address
the letter As they part, the boy has a
final question.
"My dear Santa, sir, please tell
me, do you believe in you?"
"Maybe right now I'm beginning
to believe," the man says. "I think I
owe you thanks."


Wall Street Journal BEST-SELLERS


FICTION
1. "The Racketeer" by John Grisham
(Doubleday)
2. "The Mark of Athena" by Rick Riordan
(Hyperion Books)
3. "The Sins of the Mother" by Danielle
Steel (Delacorte Press)
4. "The Casual Vacancy" by J.K. Rowl-
ing (Little, Brown)
5. "The Panther" by Nelson DeMille
(Grand Central Publishing)
6. "A Winter Dream" by Richard Paul
Evans (Simon & Schuster)
7. "The Bone Bed" by Patricia Cornwell
(Putnam)


Birthday Your ability to effectively communicate with
people from all walks of life will be greatly enhanced in the
year ahead. You'll be able to make your points whether you
do so in person or through one of your usual avenues.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Several endeavors to which
you've given considerable time yet have never received the
type of returns that you hoped for could finally begin to pay
off.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) You might begin under-
going some major transformations regarding your fondest
hopes and expectations. At the head of the list will be es-
tablishing a better set of values.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Chances are you'll be far
more effective over the next few weeks if you can operate
independently. Only if a partnership arrangement guaran-
tees certain advantages should one be made.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you've wanted to make a


8. "NYPD Red" by James Patterson,
Marshall Karp (Little, Brown)
9. "Gone Girl" by Gillian Flynn (Crown
Publishing Group)
10. "Dork Diaries 5: Tales From a Not-
So-Smart Miss Know-It-All" by Rachel
Renee Russell (Aladdin)
NONFICTION
1. Barefoot Contessa Foolproof' by Ina
Garten (Clarkson Potter)
2. "Killing Kennedy" by Bill O'Reilly, Mar-
tin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)
3. "The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook" by
Deb Perelman (Knopf)
4. "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen with


Today's HOROSCOPE
trip of some distance and duration, this is a good day to
start getting your act together. You're in an excellent cycle
for traveling to faraway places.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Plans to which you have al-
ready given considerable thought should not be changed at
the last minute. If your concepts are good, everything will
work out to your satisfaction.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- In a partnership arrange-
ment, greater control and influence might be given to your
counterpart. In order to keep the peace, don't make any
waves.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you make it your greatest
priority, the possibility of achieving an important objective is
excellent. Give it your undivided attention, and it will pay off.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There are strong indications
that you are likely to meet someone new who will end up
having a strong and wonderful influence on your social life.


Kevin Maurer (Dutton Books)
5. "Jesus Calling: Enjoying Peace in His
Presence" by Sarah Young (Integrity
Publishers)
6. "Killing Lincoln" by Bill O'Reilly, Martin
Dugard (Henry Hold & Co.)
7. "Guinness World Records 2013" by
Guiness Book Records (Guiness Book
Records)
8. "Ricky Is the New Safe" by Randy
Gage (John Wiley & Sons)
9. "Rod" by Rod Stewart (Crown Archetype)
10. "LEGO Ninjago: Character Encyclo-
pedia" by DK Publishing (DK Publishing)
The Associated Press


If not today, then soon.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Make those necessary alter-
ations to a financial development that hasn't lived up to ex-
pectations. Chances are, the adjustments you'll make will
turn out to be perfect.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) A new cycle you recently entered
could turn out to be not only exciting but also extremely for-
tunate in terms of new friends and social contacts. Be sure
to get out and mingle a lot.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The general trends that affect
your material well-being over the coming months are likely
to turn out to be extremely favorable. It's time to dedicate
your time to profitable endeavors.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you rely more upon yourself
and less upon others, your success will be substantially en-
hanced. Establish your own goals and set your own
timetable.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9
Mega Money: 13 20 27 35
Mega Ball: 18
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $3,914
3-of-4 MB 51 $839
3-of-4 1,210 $105.50
2-of-4 MB 1,515 $59
1-of-4 MB 13,581 $6.50
2-of-4 33,661 $4
Fantasy 5: 8- 10- 12 21 -31
5-of-5 2 winners $112,792.10
4-of-5 378 $96
3-of-5 11,618 $8.50
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
Fantasy 5: 2- 12- 19- 31 -35
5-of-5 0 winners $0
4-of-5 272 $555.00
3-of-5 8,2727 $21.00

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY-

Today is Sunday, Nov. 11,
the 316th day of 2012. There
are 50 days left in the year.
This is Veterans Day in the
U.S., Remembrance Day in
Canada.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 11,1918, fighting
in World War I came to an
end with the signing of an
armistice between the Allies
and Germany.
On this date:
In 1620, 41 Pilgrims
aboard the Mayflower, an-
chored off Massachusetts,
signed a compact calling for
a "body politick."
In 1909, President William
Howard Taft accepted the rec-
ommendation of a joint Army-
Navy board that Pearl Harbor
in the Hawaiian Islands be
made the principal U.S. naval
station in the Pacific.
In 1921, the remains of an
unidentified American service
member were interred in a
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
at Arlington National Ceme-
tery in a ceremony presided
over by President Warren G.
Harding.
In 1966, Gemini 12 blasted
off from Cape Kennedy with
astronauts James A. Lovell
and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Jr.
aboard.
In 1987, following the fail-
ure of two Supreme Court
nominations, President
Ronald Reagan announced
his choice of Judge Anthony
M. Kennedy, who went on to
win confirmation.
Ten years ago: Iraqi law-
makers denounced a tough,
new U.N. resolution on
weapons inspections as dis-
honest, provocative and wor-
thy of rejection. But the Iraqi
parliament said it ultimately
would trust whatever President
Saddam Hussein decided.
Five years ago: Marking
his fifth Veterans Day since
the invasion of Iraq, Presi-
dent George W. Bush hon-
ored U.S. troops past and
present at a tearful ceremony
in Texas.
One year ago: Heralding
the end of one war and the
drawdown of another, Presi-
dent Barack Obama ob-
served Veterans Day at
Arlington National Cemetery
by urging Americans to hire
the thousands of servicemen
and women coming home
from Iraq and Afghanistan.
Today's Birthdays:
Comedian Jonathan Winters
is 87. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-
Calif., is 72. Golfer Fuzzy
Zoeller is 61. Actor Stanley
Tucci is 52.
Thought for Today: "Old
myths, old gods, old heroes


have never died. They are
only sleeping at the bottom of
our mind, waiting for our call.
We have need for them.
They represent the wisdom
of our race." Stanley Ku-
nitz, American poet laureate
(1905-2006).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


CHILDREN OF


While one American girlpretended to play war, Europeans lived through it


DORIS BUTT
Special to the Chronicle
Our bingo game had
finished and we began to
visit for a while. Soon the
subject turned to our
lives growing up. Edna
began talking in her soft
English accent Suddenly,
all was quiet
Born in 1935, she was a
child in England during
World War II. Edna said
when the sirens warned
of an air raid, her family
headed for shelter built
in their backyard. Even
her school had a shelter
Although the bombs
never destroyed anything
near her home, she could
see the flames made by
the phosphorus bombs
dropped on the far-off
cities. One did take out
the back end of her
grandmother's home that
was a distance away
She continued to live in
what was left of the house.
When she visited, Edna
was not allowed to play in
the rubble. Her father,
who lost six brothers in
the war, did not have to
serve. He was assigned to
seeing after the welfare of
those in their community
Edna clearly remem-
bers the great celebra-
tion when the war was
over She later came to
the United States when
she had the opportunity,
because she knew Eng-
land would take a long
time to recover
And there I sat, with
my childhood recollec-
tions of playing make-be-
lieve war games with my
imaginary playmate
Mert, totally innocent of
what war was really like.
My father was too old for
the service. No one else
in our family served in
the war (Later, husband
Ray and our son's service
age fell in peace time.)
Edna's recollections of
her childhood in war-torn
England stayed with me.
So when I heard of Hilda
Wohlmann, whose child-


Special to the Chronicle
This photo of a four German children was taken during World War II. From left, are
the Wohlmann siblings: Ingrid, Ranier, Hildegard (Hilda) and Dieter.


And there I sat with my childhood
recollections of playing make-believe war games
with my imaginary playmate Mert, totally innocent
of what war was really like.

Doris Butt


hood was spent in Ger-
many during the war, I
asked her to share her
story
When we met, the first
thing she shared was a
group of photos from her
youth. One stood out from
all the rest. It is of four
young children Hilda,
her brothers and sister
(pictured above). Chil-
dren of war, I thought.
Like Edna's experi-
ences, Hilda, born in 1931,
shared the sirens, the shel-
ter runs and fiery night-
time views. She was not in
a target area; however,
planes bombing the cities
sometimes dropped their
leftover bombs at random.
Hilda's father was
called to the service
early, because he was ed-


ucated and the educated
were called first. Hilda's
mother had to care for
four small children in
their father's absence.
Hilda saw her father for
10 days during the next
seven years. Part of that
time, he was a prisoner of
war She praised her
mother for managing to
give them a great quality
of life under trying
circumstances.
When the war was over
and the Americans came
through, her family hid in
the cellar on piles of po-
tatoes, unsure of what the
soldiers had in mind for
them.
Peeking through a tiny
window, Hilda remem-
bered seeing among the
soldiers going by the first


Voters: No to pitchfork politics


Thank goodness that's over. The presiden-
tial campaign of 2012 did not, in fact, last
long enough to be measured in geologic
time, but poll-scarred and ad-weary voters can,
perhaps, be forgiven for feeling as if it did.
Barack Obama and his supporters will be, un-
derstandably, jubilant his lease on the Pennsyl-
vania Avenue mansion has been extended for
four more years. But Tuesday night's vote is also
noteworthy for a reason only tangentially related
to the fortunes of the incumbent president. One
can argue or maybe the better word is "hope"
- voters did more than re-elect Obama on
See Page C3


black person she ever
saw. They soon learned
the Americans were kind.
Her sister had beautiful
curls and a pretty face.
The soldiers loaded her
pockets with candy and
liked to have their pic-
ture taken with her
After the war, Hilda
studied English and be-
came an interpreter She
eventually married an
American soldier and
moved to the United
States.
Neither Hilda nor
Edna played war games
as I did during that time.
They just tried to live as
normal a life as possible
amid the horrors of war
There was no time to talk
of hate.
During the European


conquest in World War II,
some 13 countries were
invaded, while Mert and
I safely played our little
war games.
Now I have lived some
77 years without the fear
of bomb raids, foreign in-
vasion or the poverty that
war can bring. And there
is a reason for my peace-
ful years the protec-
tion of our military
It came at a great
price. In World War II, we
lost 419,800 of the
16,000,000 soldiers. How-
ever, when you add the
civilian deaths from
bombing raids, famine,
disease and the Holo-
caust, estimates vary
from 37 to 54 million, or
about 2.5 percent of the
world's population.
Afterward World War
II, there were the Korean
War, the long years of the
Vietnam War and the
Gulf War All took their
toll of lives, both military
and civilian. With our
nearly 8,000 deaths in
Iraq and Afghanistan, an
estimated 132,000 civil-
ians have lost their lives.
And we must not forget
the wounded, both physi-
cally and mentally
Figures change
quickly, but in my find-
ings we now have
1,445,000 actively serving
in the armed services
today They serve in 830
installations in at least
150 countries. Add an-
other 833,000 in the re-
serves and national
guard who are ready to
go. Our military budget is
$550 billion. Our military
is responsible for peace
in the world, near and far,
and the well-being of its
people.
So today our children
are safe as they laugh and
play. No sirens, no bombs,
no fear of invasion. We
must always be thankful to
those who protect them.

Doris Butt is a Chronicle
ambassador


Four more years of decline


Cal Thomas
OTHER
VOICES


Great nations and proud empires have al-
ways collapsed from within before they
were conquered from without.
President Obama's re-election mirrors the
self-indulgent, greedy and envious nation we are
rapidly becoming.
Pollsters Michael Barone and Dick Morris got
it horribly wrong. Both predicted a 300 electoral-
vote win for Romney. It was President Obama
who reached that mark.
The central message coming out of the elec-
tion seems to be we are no longer the America of
our Founders, or even the America that existed
See- Page C3


Saying


goodbye


after


elections
elections always
mean new people
come to the front
and represent us at vari-
ous levels of government.
But as we get ready for all
of the new ideas, let's give
pause for a moment and
remember the people who
are leaving the public eye
and returning to civilian
life.
In Crystal River, city
Councilwoman Maureen
McNiff decided not to seek
re-election to another
term on council. McNiff
has been an infrequent
visitor to the newspaper
headlines, but she has
done a very good job on
the city council.
She is smart, has done
her homework and asked
informed questions. You
could tell she was one of
those elected officials
who actually read all the
back-up materials pro-
vided to her
As a longtime employee
of the water management
district in Brooksville, Mc-
Niff knows how govern-
ment works from the
inside. She used the
knowledge to move Crystal
River in a better direction.
Winn Webb will offi-
cially step down as a mem-
ber of the county
commission this month
and that's a darn shame.
Webb decided not to seek
re-election this year and
instead mounted an unsuc-
cessful campaign for sher-
iff. The first-term county
commissioner had made
the decision to run for
sheriff when incumbent
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy had al-
ready announced he was
not seeking re-election.
As irony would have it,
Webb's own county com-
mission created the incen-
tive for Dawsy to stick
around for another term.
When the county stumbled
with its leadership of fire
services and decided to
turn the effort over to the
sheriff's office, Dawsy was
intrigued with the chal-
lenge of making the depart-
ment work. He decided to
run for another term to ac-
complish the task
Webb was a very good
commissioner and a good
policy maker His leader-
ship will be missed.
Betty Strifler has been
the Clerk of the Court for
24 years and she now goes
off into retirement.
Strifler was almost never
in the news during those
years, because she was
just busy doing her job. As
a rule, clerks only make
news when they have
done something wrong,
and that never happened
in Strifler's case.
She ruled a steady ship
and got the job done. Her
chief assistant, Angela
Vick, was elected last
week to replace her in the
job.
Ron Kitchen is also
stepping down from his
position after he ran an
unsuccessful campaign to
unseat County Commis-
sioner Dennis Damato in
the Republican primary.
Kitchen has served as
mayor and city council
member for many years.
School board member
Bill Murray, a longtime
educator in the school sys-
tem, is stepping down


Page C3


Leonard Pitts
OTHER
VOICES







Page C2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11,2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. ................... publisher
Mike Arnold ................... ........................... editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ ................. citizen member
Mac Harris ..................... .......... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ..... ....... ...... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


NATIONAL EMBARRASSMENT






Florida





fumbles





elections


Three days after last
week's general elec-
tion, well after all 49 of
the other states had reported
election results, ballots were
still being counted in two
metropolitan Florida coun-
ties and the state had not de-
clared a winner
of the presiden- THE I
tial election.
However, un- Florida v
like the disas- drags on
trous 2000
election, the OUR 01
Florida vote this The syst
year did not de- down
termine who
would become
president. So the delay has
not received the same level of
attention, but the failure to
report results of a general
election in a timely manner is
nonetheless an embarrass-
ment to the state and should
be a call to action.
After the 2000 presidential
election, when Florida votes
were counted and recounted
for more than a month before
the presidential election was
decided, the election system
in the state was reformed
under the direction of a 2002
federal law called the Help
America Vote Act (HAVA),
passed largely as a result of
the Florida election fiasco.
The 2004 and 2008 presi-
dential elections were rela-
tively uneventful. But this
year, as a result of multiple
factors, the system broke
down again in some of the
state's most populous coun-
ties. Some of the factors lead-
ing to a broken system are
political. Some are financial
and systemic. But all are
fixable.
One of the more often cited
political factors was the Re-
publican state legislature's
decision to cut the number of
early voting days from 14 to
eight days. This was believed
by many to be an effort to sup-
press Democratic votes, and
even after there were reports
of long lines in early voting,
Gov. Scott refused to follow
the lead from former Gov.
Charlie Crist and extend
early voting hours.
The shorter time for early


S



P
e
i. F


voting, coupled with the un-
necessary length of the ballot
caused by the legislature put-
ting 11 constitutional amend-
ments on it, created a
situation bound to create
problems. But these alone do
not explain the fiasco in some
of the state's
5SUE: most urban
areas.
te count Some of the
for days. other possible
reasons include
'INION: inadequate fund-
m broke ing in some elec-
Fix it. tions offices
created by tight
county budgets,
shortage or breakdown of vot-
ing equipment, and legisla-
tive limitations on where
early voting places can be lo-
cated. For example, accord-
ing to elections officials, state
law limits early voting loca-
tions to libraries, city halls or
elections offices. The result
is in large urban areas, find-
ing sufficient early voting lo-
cations may be difficult, even
if funding is available.
With many possible causes,
it appears no single issue led
to the current reporting mess,
and no single action would
correct it.
In order to address and re-
solve these issues, we urge
our legislative delegation to
support creation of a
statewide commission that in-
cludes elections supervisors,
legislators and experienced
business managers, and au-
thorize this commission to in-
vestigate the whole range of
issues that led to this year's
breakdown.
We then urge our legisla-
ture to listen to and act on
these recommendations and
make it easier for Florida
residents to vote, and for
these votes to be tabulated
and reported in a timely
manner.
This is not a Democratic or
a Republican issue. This is a
fundamental citizenship
issue. And we urge our law-
makers to take the issue seri-
ously and take non-partisan
actions to prevent another
Florida election debacle four
years from now.


Unite with Democrats
To the Republican Party: They
need to unite with the Democrats.
They need to stop hindering us.
They need to help us find and
make this country better. They
need to give up what they were
doing and they need to act now.
Stand united America
United we stand, divided we
fall. God bless America.
Will Congress listen?
The people have spoken. Now
will Congress listen? I'm hoping


the party of "no" will occasionally
say "yes." We are the United
States of America, so let's unite.
Stop thinking party
I wish someone would explain
to me how people think. Congress
has the lowest approval rating
ever. Congress has accomplished
almost nothing. Overall, the peo-
ple keep voting in the incumbents.
Please explain why you would vote
in House and Senate members
who have not only not done their
job, but have done less than their
job. Stop thinking party and start
thinking individual.


"It would be a great reform in politics if wisdom could
be made to spread as easily and as rapidly as folly."
Sir Winston Churchill, "The Churchill Wit" 1965


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Starting all over again


"Nothing's impossi-
ble Ihave found,
For when my chin is
on the ground,
I pick myself up,
Dust myself off,
Start all over again."
from the 1936
movie "Swing Time"
WASHINGTON
conservatives Georg
should jauntily OTI
sing as Fred As- VOI
taire and Ginger
Rogers did in a year in
which the country's chin was on
the ground. Conservatives are
hardly starting from scratch in
their continuing courtship of an
electorate, half of which em-
braced their message more
warmly than it did this year's
messenger.
The election's outcome was
foreshadowed by Mitt Romney
struggling as long as he did to sur-
mount a notably weak field of Re-
publican rivals. His salient
deficiency was not of character
but of chemistry, that indefinable
something suggested by the term
empathy. Many voters who
thought he lacked this did not
trust him to employ on their be-
half what he does not lack, eco-
nomic understanding.
On Feb. 11, 2011, the person
who should have been the Re-
publican nominee laconically
warned conservatives about a
prerequisite for persuading peo-
ple to make painful adjustments
to a rickety entitlement state.
Indiana's Gov. Mitch Daniels
said: "A more affirmative, 'better
angels' approach to voters is re-
ally less an aesthetic than a prac-
tical one. With apologies for the
banality, I submit that, as we ask
Americans to join us on such a
boldly different course, it would
help if they liked us, just a bit."
Romney was a diligent warrior
Next time, Republicans need a
more likable one.
And one who tilts toward the
libertarian side of the Republi-
can Party's fusion of social and
laissez-faire conservatism. Most


ge Will
HER
CES


voters already favor
less punitive immigra-
tion policies than the
ones angrily advocated
by clenched-fist Re-
publicans unwilling to
acknowledge immi-
grating risking un-
certainty for personal
and family betterment
- is an entrepreneur-
ial act. The speed with
which civil unions and
same-sex marriage
have become debat-


able topics and even mainstream
policies is astonishing. As is con-
servatives' failure to recognize
this: They need not endorse such
policies but neither need they de-
spise those, such as young peo-
ple, who favor them. And it is
strange for conservatives to turn
a stony face toward any reconsid-
eration of drug policies, particu-
larly concerning marijuana,
which confirm conservatism's
warnings about government per-
sistence in the teeth of evidence.
With much work the most
painful sort: thinking to be
done, conservatives should
squander no energy on recrimi-
nations. Romney ran a gallant
campaign. Imitation is the sin-
cerest form of politics, and Re-
publicans should emulate
Democrats' tactics for locating
and energizing their voters. Lib-
erals have an inherent but not in-
superable advantage: As
enthusiasts of government, to
which many of them are related
as employees or clients, they are
more motivated for political ac-
tivity than are conservatives, who
prefer private spaces. Never
mind. Conservatives have a com-
mensurate advantage: Americans
still find congenial conser-
vatism's vocabulary of skepticism
about statism. And events on-
going economic anemia; the reg-
ulatory state's metabolic urge to
bully will deepen this vocabu-
lary's resonance.
It is frequently said and proba-
bly true many people are more
informed when picking a refrig-


erator than when picking a pres-
ident. This may, however, be ra-
tional ignorance because the
probability of any individual's
vote mattering to an election's
outcome is negligible compared
to the effort required to acquire
information and vote. (Elections
are run by governments, so it is
unwise to expect them to be run
well, but really: Are hours-long
waits at polling places in-
evitable?) Fortunately, the elec-
toral vote system, by requiring 51
presidential elections, multiplies
the chances of competitive con-
tests and of votes with magnified
importance.
As the stakes of politics in-
crease with government's size, so
does voter engagement. And 2012
redundantly proved what 2010
demonstrated. The 2010 elec-
tions, the first after the Supreme
Court's excellent Citizens United
decision liberalized the rules
about funding political advocacy,
were especially competitive. So-
cial science confirms what com-
mon sense suggests: More
spending on political advocacy
means more voter information
and interest The approximately
$2 billion spent in support of this
year's presidential candidates -
only about two-thirds as much as
Procter & Gamble spent on U.S.
advertising last year surely
contributed to the high turnout in
targeted states.
Media and other "nonpartisan"
- please, no chortling dismay
about "too much money in poli-
tics" waned as seven of the 10
highest-spending political enti-
ties supported Democrats and
outspent the three supporting
Republicans, according to the
Wall Street Journal.
The advocacy infrastructure
being developed by both sides in
the post-Citizens United world
will, over time, favor the most
plausible side, which conserva-
tives know is theirs.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Collecting for Sandy
On Saturday, Nov 3, at the
Stone Crab Jam Festival in Crys-
tal River, we raised a total of $86
for the Red Cross relief effort for
the victims of Hurricane Sandy
We'd like to thank all those who
contributed to this cause. In ad-
dition to that, 10 percent of our
gross earnings were donated to
the Crystal River Rotary Club
Kings Bay Charitable Founda-
tion for local charities.
We will continue to collect do-
nations for the Red Cross through
the end of November at the next
two local events where we will be
serving food. Look for the Cookin'
Good mobile kitchen at Gulf
Coast Marine Services, 10918
West Yulee Drive, Homosassa,
across from the elementary
school, right outside the entrance
to the Homosassa Seafood Festi-
val, Nov 10 and 11. Look for us
also at the Yankeetown Seafood
Festival, on Riverside Drive in
Yankeetown on Nov 17 and 18.
While many of us have experi-
enced hurricanes Florida style,
the northeast is beginning to cool
down for winter, and many resi-
dents there are still without elec-
tricity and heat. Many of you, like
us, know somebody who has
been directly affected by Sandy


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Others know people who may
have been indirectly affected. Ei-
ther way, it is a human tragedy
and our hearts are heavy.
Thank you to those (who) have


already given, and thank you in
advance to those (who) will be
donating in the future. We will
follow up at the end of the
month to inform Chronicle read-
ers of the total amount collected
for Hurricane Sandy Red Cross
relief efforts.
Betsy and Steve Schwartz
Cookin' Good owners
Beverly Hills

Event a success
We would like to thank all
those who helped make the SOS
(Serving our Savior) Golf Tour-
nament another great success
this year
Hosted at Seven Rivers Coun-
try Club on Saturday, Nov 3, we
had over 70 golfers. We made
over $6000 for our food bank,
which feeds over 100 families
per week. A special thanks to the
Citrus County Chronicle for the
helpful advertising, the Crystal
River Current for the great arti-
cle, and to Paul James, Marion
Walker and all of the volunteers
and golfers (who) helped make
this tournament a fun time for
all.
Jim Gilbert
board member SOS


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: UNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Combined topics of Facebook, cousins, cats


acebook. Back when Face- Cousins. My good brother
book first came to be, I was- William and I have a ton of first
n't impressed cousins unfortu-
and asked Fred 3, nately, as the years
"Why would people have passed, the num-
waste their time sitting i ber is beginning to de-
around reading mun- f crease. Still, both of
dane drivel about what our parents came from
is going on in other large families and at
folks' lives?" one time, the total
My beloved son number of first
replied, "Sounds a lot cousins we shared was
like your column, Dad, 32, some of 'em as old
only people get to re- re rannen as our parents. Since I
spond to what they A SLICE was the baby of the ba-
read." OF LIFE bies -both of our par-
Touche, my boy, ents were the youngest
touche. in their respective families I am
Nonetheless, I still have not be- near the bottom in age of the en-
come a Facebooker Cheryl, yes. tire group. Our fathers staged
But me, no. I sort of like walking their personal population explo-
down my own one-way street with sion in the 1945-46 season and pro-
Sound Off and an occasional letter duced three of my cousins and me,
to the editor as my only potholes. but that was it, the final hurrah,


until 14 years later when cousin
Donice was born.
I would never judge, but by all
appearances, she was perhaps
what one might call an oopss." Be
that as it may, she's certainly a
marvelous, beautiful, witty person
I'm happy is in my life. But I think
my wife is even happier about that
at times than am I.
As a matter of fact, I think it
works both ways. Virtually all of
my cousins probably like Cheryl
better than they do me. It seems
that immediately after she be-
came my wife, they decided she
was a keeper; but, sometimes,
they still consider throwing me
back. Along with several other
cousins, Donice and Cheryl are
Facebook friends.
Cats. Once upon a time, we had
a cat Samantha. On daughter
Becky's 10th birthday, one of her


friends saved a kitten from a box
of giveaways out in front of a su-
permarket and used it as a birth-
day gift. Lucky us. No kidding,
really, I mean it lucky us.
Samantha remained a member of
our family until she passed 17
years later.
On the combined subjects of
Facebook, cousins and cats, Don-
ice sent the following helpful hint
to Cheryl a few nights ago regard-
ing how to clean your cat and your
toilet bowl in one fell swoop:
"Put the lid of the toilet up and
add 1/8 cup of pet shampoo to the
watering the bowl; pick up the cat
and soothe him or her while you
carry the kitty toward the bath-
room; in one smooth movement,
put the cat in the toilet and close
the lid -you may need to stand on
the lid; at this point, the cat will
self-agitate and make ample suds;


ignore the noises that come from
the toilet, the catis actually enjoy-
ing this; flush the toilet three or
four times this provides a
"power-wash" and rinse; have
someone open the front door of
your home be sure there are no
people between the bathroom and
the front door; stand well back, be-
hind the toilet as far as you can,
and quickly lift the lid; the cat will
rocket out of the toilet, streak
through the house and run outside
where he or she will dry off; and,
both the cat and the toilet will be
sparkling clean!"
One final note: Please be as-
sured no cats were harmed in any
way during the production of this
column!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness res-
ident and a Chronicle columnist.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Christianity did
influence founders
In his Nov 5 letter, Jeff
Guertin registered his dis-
agreement with the high
school senior, (Sarah Pappas)
who on Oct 22 wrote about the
importance of Christianity in
the founding of America
("Founded on Faith").
Ms. Pappas was correct in
her portrayal of the powerful
influence of Christianity on
our founders. She could cite
literally hundreds of authori-
ties with documented evi-
dence in hand to back her up.
As for Mr Guertin, I pre-
sume from his banal argu-
ments he might cite the works


of extreme left-wing r
ists which he has swa
and done so without c
As for me, I along w
Pappas could direct h
him many authorities
recommend The Fede
pers) to demonstrate 1
lacy of his views but h
reject them also wit
question.
So instead, I will an
Pappas' final question
will it take to return t
principles American
founded on?"
Answer: More peop
you and fewer like yo
John I


revision-
llowed
question.


Forgetting where we
came from


'ith Ms. My great-great-great grand-
iim to father Charles Carol passed
(I could away on Nov 14, 1832, as the
eralist Pa- last living signer of the Decla-
the fal- ration of Independence. He
ie would was the sole survivor of an as-
hout sembly of as great men as the
world has witnessed. He was
iswer Ms. the only Catholic among the
n: "What signers but of the 56 men, 54 of
o the them were members of Chris-
was tian churches which included:
Anglican, Congregational,
)le like Episcopalian, Presbyterian,
ur critic. Catholic and Unitarian. Addi-
tionally, four were current or
McFadden fulltime ministers.
Inverness When the men met on July 4,


1776, to sign the Declaration
only John Hancock signed that
day and the delegates spent
time in prayer and did not
complete signing until July 16.
Even George Washington at-
tended church. One of the
problems in our society today
is we tend to forget our Cre-
ator and put our hope on
politicians or worldly values.
Lloyd Hughes
Hernando

TO SUBMIT A LETTER
U Write to The Editor, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Or e-mail letters@chronicle
online.com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

from his position after losing his re-elec-
tion bid in the primary Murray has been
an incredible cheerleader for the
schools and always found good things to
say about folks. His team building skills
will be missed.
Nancy Argenziano was not an in-
cumbent, but it felt like it. Argenziano
lost in her longshot bid to unseat incum-
bent Jimmie Smith in the Florida Dis-
trict 34 House race. She had previously
served as our representative, senator
and as a Public Service Commissioner.
But Argenziano left the Republican
Party and ran as an Independent, prov-
ing to be too difficult of a task. Her flam-
boyant leadership will be missed.
Regardless if you supported these
public servants or not, they all shared a
common desire to lead. They put them-
selves and families through many diffi-
cult times to make things better. They
each deserve our appreciation.
And a final note we as Floridians
need to be embarrassed by the poor per-
formance of some of our election lead-
ers. More than 48 hours after the
national election was completed,
Florida still was not able to announce
which presidential candidate won the
state.
It took so long we became irrelevant.
Florida couldn't make a difference to the
outcome, and I guess we should be
happy about that. But we once again
have proven ourselves to be a third-
world nation when it comes to running
elections. Susan Gill, the Citrus County
Supervisor of Elections, did an excellent
job with the local results. We had our
numbers out by 8 p.m. on Election Day
But some of the counties in South
Florida and the Panhandle were still
counting two days later. People should
lose their jobs over this fiasco and Gov
Rick Scott should step in and order an
independent investigation of the fiasco.
After all of that campaigning, Floridi-
ans didn't even get a say in who should
be President. The incompetence is an
outrage.
The public officials responsible
should be ordered to spend two weeks in
a small room at a Holiday Inn Express
tied to a chair while watching commer-
cials for Romney and Obama. No food,
no water, no mercy


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


PITTS
Continued from Page C1

Tuesday night. They also repudiated
the scorched-earth extremism and
acute cognitive dissonance that have
come to characterize the Republican
Party in recent years.
Rush Limbaugh recently said some-
thing interesting (will wonders never
cease?) on his radio show.
As reported by Politico, he told lis-
teners, "There's not a whole lot of love
for conservatives in the Republican
Party. Except now, where the party will
take anything they can get to win."
As he sees it, the GOP prefers to woo
independents to prove "they win with-
out the base of the party. Now, the De-
mocrats are not embarrassed of their
base. The Republicans, in large part,
are."
The GOP is embarrassed by its base?
One is by no means sanguine this is
true, but one can't help but hope, fer-
vently, that it is. It would be a welcome
sign Republicans are not, in fact, com-
mitted to a policy of electoral suicide
and a future of ballot box irrelevance.
It is hard not to believe they are,
given the way the party has stubbornly
relied for victory on an ever-narrowing
slice of the American demographic.
They have either lost, or are at signifi-
cant disadvantage with, a wide array
of Americans: blacks, women, gays,
Muslims, Hispanics and more. The
people whose votes the party com-
mands tend to be older, white, evan-
gelical and male. And as that cohort of
the electorate fades in prominence,
the danger is it will take the GOP with
it.
And yet, rather than seeking to ex-
pand its outreach and broaden its ap-


peal, the party has inexplicably cho-
sen to double down on its shrinking
base. Worse, it has chosen to appeal to
that base with a platform of fear mon-
gering, xenophobia, demagoguery and
inchoate anger so extreme as to make
Ronald Reagan seem almost a hippie
by comparison.
It has embraced the politics of pitch-
forks and bomb throwing wherein can-
didates must compete with one
another to see who can say the most
bizarre and outrageous thing and
where moderation is a sin against or-
thodoxy
It should have told us something
when the previously moderate Mitt
Romney pronounced himself "se-
verely conservative" on the way to
winning the GOP primary. One does
not use that word to modify things one
approves or is comfortable with. When
have you ever heard someone de-
scribe themselves as "severely happy"
or "severely content?"
His use of that word strongly sug-
gests Romney's discomfort with the
pose he was required to take, and the
fact that he was required to take it.
Now as Romney fades into the rear-
view mirror, one can only hope his
party takes the right lesson from this
defeat, that it transforms itself into a
party with some appeal to the rest of
us as opposed to one that demonizes
the rest of us to appeal to a very few.
Tuesday night, the nation did not
just choose a president It chose a fu-
ture. And "severe" conservatism does
not seem to be a part of it


Leonard Pitts is a columnist for the
Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza,
Miami, Fla., 33132. Readers may
contact him via email at lpitts@
miamiherald. com.


THOMAS
Continued from Page C1

during World War II, which produced our
"greatest generation."
Instead, the election validates the enor-
mous cultural shift taking place since the
'60s when a countercultural bomb was
dropped on society, producing moral fallout
that continues to this day
I am a child of the "greatest generation."
My parents believed I should learn to take
care of myself. They would have been too
embarrassed to ask for help, if they needed
it. If they did, they would turn to family first,
or to a friend or neighbor. There were fewer
social programs then, so people mostly did
without, living only on what they truly
needed. It said something about your char-
acter if you refused to strive toward self-suf-
ficiency.
In 2012, nothing appears to embarrass us.
Snooki. Honey Boo Boo. Reality TV wives.
Look at what is paraded before us as normal.
Oppose the new normal and it's you who are
the anomaly.
Young people are taught in public schools,
at major universities, on television and in
movies, every life choice is acceptable and
every tenet open to interpretation. In poli-
tics, some proclaim it is right to oppose the
successful and envy the rich to the point
where they must be denigrated and penal-
ized for their success with higher taxes. No
one has to be personally responsible. No ed-
ucation; no motivation; no life plan? No
problem. The government will take care
of you.
One thing Romney might have done better
is to have featured more people who had
overcome government dependence by em-
bracing the values he was promoting. Exam-
ple trumps philosophy and success should
trump victimhood. Inspiration follows per-
spiration. But in our "entitlement" age even


that might have been impossible to
overcome.
Other signs of cultural decay are accepted
with little notice. According to data from the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
40 percent of babies born in America are
born to unmarried women. Shrug. Abortion
clinics continue to operate. Yawn.
There is no longer any cultural corrective
because we have abandoned the concept of
objective truth. Nothing is right or wrong, be-
cause that suggests a standard by which right
and wrong might be defined. Personal choice
is the new "standard," which is no standard
at all. One might as well develop individual
weights and measures.
Politicians bid for votes, making promises
they can't keep to voters who will believe
anything, as long as it appeals to greed, envy
and their sense of entitlement. This under-
mines our culture. This fuels our massive
debt, weakening our economic power and
America's standing in the world.
Standards used to be defined and mostly
accepted, if not always universally practiced.
Many grew out of religious principles. Ac-
cording to a recent Pew Poll, a growing num-
ber of people, especially young people, no
longer believe in God or religion. In this, and
in our increasing flirtation with socialism,
America is becoming more like Europe. Gov-
ernment seems to be replacing God as the
only acceptable "deity."
So what is the answer? Should conserva-
tives throw in the towel and say America, as
passed down to us by previous generations,
is no more? That was President Obama's an-
nounced goal four years ago when he prom-
ised to "fundamentally transform America."
He's doing it and sufficient numbers of us ap-
pear happy to let him. When they realize
what they have done, however, it may well be
too late to reverse course.


Readers may e-mail Cal Thomas at
tmseditors@tribune. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hot Corner: SUPERSTORE SANDY


Turning away workers
I just heard Gov. (Chris) Christie say how
much help he is trying to have
from everybody ... I would like to O
ask him one question: Why are
they turning away nonunion work-
ers who could help with the power
that is needed so desperately in
these situations with the storm,
Sandy? Now this needs to be
stopped. These union people
should be thankful there are those CAL
(who) are nonunion (who) are will-
ing to help the people (who) have 563
been hurt the most.
Put America first
Kudos to the person who sent in the arti-
cle about the storm, Sandy, that no other
country that we've heard of have offered us
any kind of help when we're always send-
ing help to them. I agree wholeheartedly
with you. America's got to start thinking
about America first.
Where's the help?
When the tsunami hit Japan, we were the
first ones over there. Now that we have a
disaster here in the Northeast, where's the
Japanese? Where's any of the countries
that we've helped? Just wondering.
Refusing help from Cuba
A caller today asks, "Where is the aid
from the other countries in our current dis-
aster?" When New Orleans people were suf-
fering during the Katrina disaster, Cuba
offered to send doctors to help. Cuban doc-
tors are among the most respected in the
hemisphere, but our administration re-


I


fused, saying we didn't need help. This cav-
alier refusal was viewed as arrogance by
the rest of the world.
JND End of world coming
L What a disaster this world is in.
I believe it's the end of the world
coming, but what about all these
people suffering? I have friends in
Staten Island and nobody's come
to help them. What a disgrace.
The whole place is gone.


,,,,, Pray for storm victims


5JO' I lived through Hurricane Andrew
in Homestead and I know how hard
things are. We didn't have electricity for
three months in Homestead. Everything was
destroyed. I know how those people up
North feel and I just hope everybody can
take time to pray for those people.
Send cargo planes to North
I'd like to have somebody explain to me
why the richest country in the world, the
greatest country in the world, can send cargo
planes and all kinds of equipment and every-
thing around the world to Haiti and to people
suffering from tsunamis and everything else,
but cannot come together and send cargo
planes into New York, New Jersey and heli-
copter supplies, generators, food, clothing to
the people in this country. This is by far the
most ridiculous thing I've ever seen.
Where is FEMA in this?
The people in Staten Island and New Jer-
sey are begging for the necessities like food,
water, electricity and fuel for their genera-
tors and cars. Where is FEMA? I haven't
seen a FEMA vehicle or trailer in five days.


SOUND OFF
* The Chronicle invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject.
You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.


Elizabeth Echols


FULL
CARD


Director of Circulation John Murphy presents
Elizabeth Echols with a check for $300.

The Citrus County Chronicle is excited to announce
Elizabeth Echols is the winner of the full Bingo card.
Echols told the Chronicle that she planned on donating
half of the prize money to her church and the other half
will be used to help pay for her TR ... -, ..u..,T


step daughter to come visit her
and her husband in Florida.


I~JHR~ONICL1I~


w


SCitl




rCharity



f


22nd Annual Craft Show
Saturday, November 17
9 am until 3 pm


Supported : Shop with a Cop
Sponsored by the


F wwwchronilceonlinecom
Food and Beverages Available


i Crytal River Nat'I Guard Armory
Across from Home Depot
8551 West Venable Street


Free Admission
Free Parking


Iree of Remembranc
Place an ornament on a Tree of Remembrance
to honor or memorialize someone.
Crystal River Mall
November 23 -
December 24, 2012
10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Donate $25 or more
and receive a 2012 :.
"Winter Wonderland" ..
brass ornament. I

benefitting... Hec- '4 M

www.hospiceofcitrus.org F-bk = R itecO


DEp&.


Bouc ard
Insurance


CIiRpNiCE


Christmas-"i

9n5 Hills Parade

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THANK YOU
TO OUR
SPONSORS!



U^


E F"2012
NUTCA CKER
DECEMBER I, 2012
M Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Lecanto
SOffice (352) 637-4663
reserved Seats $1 5.00
*VIP Package Available


November 16th
Parade of Trees Gala Evening & Auction
Trash to Treasures Sale
Citrus Stampede Rodeo

November 17th
Citrus Stampede Rodeo
Sgt. Dennis Flanagan Never Forget 5K/1 Mile Walk
Winter Wonderland Craft Show
Yankeetown Seafood Festival

November 18th
Yankeetown Seafood Festival
Golf Tournament

November 23rd 26th
Tree of Rememberance

December 1st
Christmas in the Hills Parade/Arts & Crafts & Car Show
Christmas Parade Crystal River
The Nutcracker
Television Auction
Strings for a Season


December I
Golden Dragc
Christmas in K

December
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The New Daw

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Inverness Chri



33


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on Acrobats
:illarney

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OIDD7DA 'ncludP: Sbn Comeno T.Sit. ProgranmAd. Ery to Pm ow *A Plum Pa & mo


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- I


C4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


OPINION


I -A I U S POl e L


I


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1


109x&












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Soaked by Sandy


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Cars are submerged at the entrance to a parking garage Oct. 30 in New York's Financial District in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy.

Claims about flood-damaged vehicles inundating used-car market aren't true


TOM KRISHER
APAuto Writer

DETROIT
In the days since superstorm
Sandy, an alarming predic-
tion has flashed across the
Internet: Hundreds of thousands
of flood-damaged vehicles will
inundate the nation's used-car
market, and buyers might not be
told which cars have been
marred.
Not true, according to insur-
ance-claims data reviewed by
The Associated Press. The ac-
tual number of affected vehicles
is far smaller, and some of those
cars will be repaired and kept by
their owners. The dire predic-
tions are being spread by a com-
pany that sells vehicle title and
repair histories and by the
largest group representing
American car dealers.
They claim the number of cars
damaged by Sandy could be
larger than when Hurricane Ka-
trina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005
and marred more than 600,000
vehicles. But an AP analysis of
claims data supplied by major
insurance companies shows the
number of cars reported dam-
aged so far is a fraction of that.
The companies State Farm,
Progressive, New Jersey Manu-
facturers and Nationwide -
have received about 31,000 car-
damage claims.
"It's not anything near what
we're talking about in the Kat-
rina situation," said James Ap-
pleton, president of the New
Jersey Coalition of Automotive
Retailers, a statewide associa-
tion of more than 500 dealers.
Frank Scafidi, a spokesman
for the National Insurance
Crime Bureau, an insurance
company group that monitors
fraud and other trends, con-
curred, saying insurers watched
by his group are logging far
fewer claims than they did with
Katrina.
"It doesn't translate to there's
going to be 2, 3, 400,000 cars out
of this thing just because this is


Vehicles are submerged on 14th Street near the Consolidated Edison
power plant Oct. 29 in New York.


such a huge geographic storm,"
Scafidi said.
Other large insurers, such as
Farmers, Allstate, Geico, Liberty
Mutual and USAA, either did not
return calls or declined to re-
lease claims information.
Because many communities
are still cleaning up from the su-
perstorm, more claims are
bound to come in. But the total is
not likely to grow significantly
Ten days after Sandy, the rate of
claim submissions is already
starting to slow. And many of
those cars will have relatively
minor damage unrelated to
water, meaning they can be fixed
and returned to their owners.
About 14,000 new cars were
also damaged by Sandy while
they sat on docks in the New
York area awaiting shipment to
dealers. But most of those vehi-
cles won't end up on sales lots.
Automakers will have severely
damaged cars crushed because
they don't want their brand
name hurt by substandard vehi-
cles circulating in the
marketplace.
To be sure, flood-damaged
cars can be a serious problem.
Once a vehicle is dried out, the
damage may not be immediately
apparent, so the car can often be
sold to an unsuspecting buyer.


It's not
anything near what
we're talking about
in the Katrina
situation.

James Appleton
president of the New Jersey
Coalition of Automotive Retailers
Beneath the surface, the water
can damage computers that con-
trol everything from the gas
pedal to the entertainment sys-
tem. Saltwater, like that from
Sandy's storm surge, is especially
harmful, causing corrosion in
electrical and mechanical parts
that can pose problems for years.
Companies such as Carfax, a
Centreville, Va., provider of ve-
hicle-history reports, stand to
benefit if more buyers are wor-
ried about the risk of purchasing
a flooded car The company
charges $39.99 for a single re-
port, although it also contracts
with dealers and manufacturers,
so many reports cost less. About
170 million reports are viewed
each year.


SEVEN TIPS FOR
AVOIDING A
FLOOD-DAMAGED CAR
a Run the car's vehicle
identification number
through Carfax at www.
carfax.com, AutoCheck at
www.autocheck.com, or
VinCheck at www.nicb.org/
theft and fraud awareness/
vincheck. The services can
usually tell you if a car's
been damaged or if it's
been totaled by an
insurance company.
* Have the car inspected by a
mechanic, who can put it on
a lift and check the
undercarriage for water
damage or debris from
flood waters.
* Check the interior yourself
for signs of water damage.
Sniff for a musty smell.
Look for signs of freshly
shampooed carpet. Check
under the floorboard carpet
for water residue, rust, or
water stain marks. Look
under the dashboard for
dried mud or other flood
residue. Check for rust on
screws in the console and
other areas where water
wouldn't normally be
present.
* Check the trunk for moldy
smells, water stains, rust or
debris.
* Look under the hood for
mud or grit in the alternator,
behind wires and around
small openings in starter
motors and power steering
pumps.
* Follow wires to check for
signs of rust, water residue
or corrosion.
* Check the undercarriage for
evidence of rust or flaking
metal that wouldn't nor-
mally be on newer vehicles.
Source: NationalAutomobile
Dealers Association


See Page D3


For military veterans, thank you not enough


F irst and foremost,
thank you. For the
thousands of veterans
in Citrus County who bravely
served our country, words
cannot express the deep
sense of gratitude we have
for the contributions and sac-
rifices you have made.
When it comes to sacri-
fices, struggling to find a job
should not be one of them.
Yet that's exactly where Ger-
ald, Robert, Mark, Ricky,


Raul, Arthur and Robert
found themselves. Their
service spans tours during
peacetime as well as times of
war, and for nearly every mil-
itary branch. All have had
civilian jobs, but now finding
a job has become increas-
ingly difficult.
And that's what brought
them recently to Workforce
Connection's "Retooling and
Refueling for Veterans"
workshop.


Mark, an Army veteran
who served in the Vietnam
War, told me "for the past 15
years, I didn't need a resume,
and I didn't have a clue about
how to write a resume or sell
myself to people who haven't
a clue about who I am, what I
know and what I have done."
He said he sent out 100 re-
sumes, but only got back two
replies.
Arthur, who served in spe-
cial operations forces and


military intelligence the
lone survivor of an elite team
of 12 moved to our region
from Arizona to help his
mother, who suffers from
Alzheimer's. The move
meant leaving a good job
counseling others on the "op-
posite side" of the employ-
ment fence.
"I never thought I'd be in
this situation," he said.

See Page D3


OK to



split


mom's



trust
DEAR BRUCE: My
mother passed
away six months
ago. She had a trust set up,
and we were told in the
trust, she had put aside
money for her children.
My father is still alive, and
he may need some of the
money that was left to us.
How long should we
wait before delving into
this? I don't need the
money, but one of my sib-
lings does, and she keeps
pressing us to look into
this as she could use her
share. I'm not sure what to
do. Linda, via email
DEAR LINDA: I under-
stand what your sibling is
saying, and I have no
problem with it. There are
legal matters to be de-
cided here, and how long
the family should wait de-
pends in some measure
on the specific verbiage in
the trust
It's clear what your
mother wanted to accom-
plish, and it's equally
clear you are concerned
with your father's welfare.
You didn't mention how
much money is involved
here, but if other family
members are in need of
the money and you are
not, why not go ahead and
have the trust divided?
The individuals who
would like to help out
your dad can do so, and
those who don't wish to, or
cannot, don't have to.
You have no obligation I
know of to use any of this
trust money that was left
to you for your father's
care. There are decisions
to be made.
DEAR BRUCE: My
mother purchased six
acres of land about 60
years ago outside of Rich-
mond, Va. There were
eight children; now there
are only five. My parents
have since passed away,
and now we siblings want
to sell four of the six acres.
One of my brothers said
when we sell this prop-
erty, we will have to give
the children of our de-
ceased siblings a share of
the proceeds. I don't see
why we would. Who is
right? Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Who
owns this property now?
When your parents died,
what, if anything, was
done with the land? Was it
transferred to you? Is it
still in an active estate?
What did your parents'
will, if there was one, say
about passing on the
acreage if one or more of
the heirs had died? All of
these questions have to be
answered.
If the remaining five
siblings have this property
in their names now, other
things being equal, I don't
see any obligation to
share, other than some
moral obligation to the
children of your deceased
siblings.
If you want to get back
to me with more detailed
answers to my questions
above, I can delve into this
a little further with you.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money,
P.O. Box 7150, Hudson,
FL 34674.


Laura Byrnes
WORKFORCE
CONNECTION










D2

SUNDAY
NOVEMBER 11, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan REl.
this:
B Ir,%- 'W


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Advanced

Urology a

sponsor of

BWA Health &

Fitness Expo

Fran Pulice, P.A. from
Advanced Urology, speaks
to a patient about the
options that are available to
treat urinary incontinence.
Advanced Urology
Specialists was a sponsor of
the successful Health &
Fitness Expo. In business
for 25 years, Advanced
Urology Specialists has two
locations in Citrus County
to offer female and male
medical urology. Feel free to
contact Denise Griffin or
Sheri Hicks. The two loca-
tions for appointments are
609 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness, FL 34452 and
352-726-9707; and 3475 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa,
FL 34448 and 352-628-
7671. The offices are open
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Email them at dgriffin@
cfuscare.com or visit their
website at www.advanced
urologyspecialists.com.


Upcoming DEADLINES


Open House by Boat Plantation
Realty offers a leisurely cruise along the
Crystal River to check out waterfront
homes for sale! Join us at 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 15, as we view condos and
homes ranging from $150,000 to
$500,000. If you're looking for the perfect
opportunity to mix business and pleasure,
this is it! Watch the manatees play while
you check out the wonderful areas Crystal
River has to offer. Spaces are limited. If
you are an interested buyer, call 352-795-
0784, ask for Kristi or email plantationlisa
@yahoo.com to reserve your spot today!
County Christmas Parades Float Ap-
plications Make a float once and par-
ticipate in THREE parades. Begin on
Beverly Hills Boulevard with the Parade in
the Hills. Float entries for the Dec. 1 pa-
rade will be accepted until Nov. 24. There
is a $500 prize for overall best float. The
theme this year is "The Magic of Christ-
mas." More information is available at 352-
726-4882 or www.citruscountyparks. com
and the form is available at www.
citruscountychamber.com. The parade is
part of the Christmas in the Hills Event that
features a holiday arts and crafts show,


classic car show and kids' fun area. Events
start at 9 a.m., parade begins at 10 a.m.
Later that day, you can display the lights
and sounds of the season in the Saturday,
Dec. 1, Crystal River Christmas Parade be-
ginning at 6 p.m. This evening parade is
brought to you by the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce and City of Crystal River.
Save the float for one week and partici-
pate in the Dec. 8 Inverness Christmas
Parade, brought to you by the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce and City
of Inverness and presented by B & W
Rexall Drug. The Inverness parade begins
at noon.
The theme for both of these parades is
"A Postcard Christmas." You will find the
applications online at the News/Events tab
at www.citruscountychamber.com and at
both Chamber offices: 401 W. Tompkins,
Inverness and 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. Application deadline for the Crystal
River and Inverness parades is Nov. 16.
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
always welcomes volunteers to assist with
these two parades. Email jeff@citruscounty
chamber.com if you would like to help us
out before, during, after the parades.


Tour of recycling facilities Go on a
FREE guided tour of the three recycling
facilities in the county on Nov. 15. Tour in-
cludes viewing the sorting process of sin-
gle-stream recyclables, learning how
electronics are recycled and how different
types of material are managed as well as
how non-recyclable items are disposed of
at the landfill. Meet at 9:45 a.m. at the In-
verness Wal-Mart parking lot (southeast
corner closest to Wendy's). This tour is
hosted by Keep Citrus County Beautiful
Inc., Citrus County Solid Waste Division,
F.D.S. Disposal Inc. and Technology Con-
servation Group. Registration is required
for this FREE event: Call 352-201-0149
prior to Nov. 15.
Food Collection for CUB -Arbor Trail
Rehab is having its fourth annual Citrus
United Basket food drive for Thanksgiving
this Nov. 10 through Nov. 19. Donations
can be dropped off at Arbor Trail Rehab,
611 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, FL
34453. Help the less fortunate by donating
canned goods, boxed goods, anything
perishable is accepted. Thank you in ad-
vance for your generosity. If you have ad-
ditional questions, call 352-637-1130.


October Business After Hours Networking Events and Shave Off


In October, Chamber
members enjoyed two Busi-
ness After Hours Mixers.
On Oct. 11, members visited
Nature Coast EMS and en-
joyed networking, music,
door prizes, beverages and
food from Elegant Catering.
On Oct. 23, Alpaca Magic
USA opened its doors to
chamber members and in-
troduced us to many of its
100 alpacas. There were
drawings for prizes every
half hour and wonderful
food and beverage as we
enjoyed the beautiful back
yard patio and wandered
through the greenery and
alpaca store.
Oct. 29 was the official
Shave Off for the month of
November Men grow facial
hair to become billboards
for men's health causes.
November is brought to you
by the Ag Alliance of Citrus
County, Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Cit-
rus County Economic De-
velopment Council and
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center.


From left are: Jeff Inglehart, Chamber Special Events Coordinator; Ron Bray, Paramedic
Instructor; Cira Schnettler, Chamber Administrative Manager; Katie Lucas, Public Infor-
mation Officer at Nature Coast EMS; Michael Bays and Rebecca Bays; Mike Hall, CEO/
President of Nature Coast EMS; and Ray Valdivia, Field Supervisor.


NOVEMBER


Applications being accepted for the Code Review and Appeals Board


The Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners is currently accepting
applications for the Code Review and
Appeals Board (CRAB).
The Code Review and Appeals
Board reviews any locally proposed
technical amendments to building
standards or regulations and makes


recommendations to the Citrus
County Board of County Commission-
ers. It also hears appeals of code in-
terpretations and makes decisions on
variations and modifications con-
cerning technical codes and stan-
dards. It makes recommendations to
the BOCC on changes to Article II,


Chapter 18 of the Citrus County Code.
To get an application online go to:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commissioners
/advboards/advisoryboards and re-
turn to: Department of Planning and
Development, 3600 W Sovereign Path,
Suite 111, Lecanto, FL 34461, Attn:
Julia Vascimini.


Sponsor,



vendor and/



or volunteer


There are a number of
sponsorship opportunities
still available to place your
business front and center.
The Florida Manatee Festi-
val in January and the Flo-
ral City Strawberry Festival
in March both have numer-
ous levels of sponsorship.
Just imagine, your company
front and center for up-
wards of 20,000 people dur-
ing each of the two-day
festivals. There is not a
more economical way to ad-
vertise your company
Speaking of economical,
there are also sponsorships
available for the Crystal
River parade, brought to
you by the Chamber and the
City of Crystal River, as well
as for the Inverness Christ-
mas parade, brought to you
by the Chamber and the City
of Inverness and presented
by B&W Rexall Drugs. We
have estimated crowds at
the parades of more than
10,000 people a captive
audience for promoting
your business.
For sponsorship details,
contact Keith Pullias at 352-
795-3149 or keith@citrus
countychamber com.
Speaking of crowds, make
sure your business scoops
up one of the remaining
Marketplace Vendor spots
available at the Manatee
Festival and Strawberry
Festival. Each of these two-
day festivals brings in about
20,000 people. The cost of a
booth at the Manatee Festi-


YOU CAUGHT

MY EYE ...
Dene Moyher
Insurance Resources and
Risk Management


val that provides you with
this face-to-face contact is
an unbelievable low cost of
$185 for Chamber members
and $240 for non-members!
Details are available at
www.citruscountychamber.
com. Manatee Festival
booth space is going quickly,
and reservations are due
before Thanksgiving.
Want behind-the-scenes
excitement and a feeling of
accomplishment? Consider
volunteering! The Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce is always looking for
volunteers to help before,
during and after the Crystal
River and Inverness pa-
rades. Working with the
floats, bands and walking
groups puts you in the mid-
dle of some of the best fun
around!
Maybe you are more in-
trigued with the upcoming
festivals, Manatee Festival
in January and/or the
Strawberry Festival in
March. These two-day
events require a lot of extra
hands and while there is no
money exchanged for your
time, you will make new
networking connections and
friendships as well as gain a
deeper understanding and
appreciation of all that
these festivals offer to the
community
To secure Marketplace
Vendor space or enlist as a
volunteer, contact Jeff Ingle-
hart at 352-795-3149 orjeff@
citruscountychamber.com.


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Upcoming EVENTS
Nov. 13: Ribbon Cutting -
Christie Dental, 8:30 a.m. at
6015 W. Nordling Loop.
Nov. 20: Business After CITRUS COUNTY
Hours FERRIS FARMS Chamber of Commerce
RETAIL STORE, historic FloralREXALL DRUGS Inverness,
City, 5 to 7 p.m. noon.
Nov. 29: Movember Mo Dec. 13: Business After
Show & Finale Party, BURKES Hours/Parade Winners, 5 to
IRISH PUB, 6 p.m. 7 p.m.
Dec. 1: Crystal River Jan. 19 and 20: Florida
Christmas Parade, 6 p.m. Manatee Festival in Crystal
Dec. 5: BWA December River, www.floridamanatee
Luncheon at Plantation on festival.com.
Crystal River, 11 a.m. Check out li
Dec. 6: Business After Hours our complete
- B & W REXALL DRUGS, 5 calendar for
to 7 p.m. community, r
Dec. 8: Inverness Christmas entertainment L r-
Parade, presented by B&W and fundraising events.


-- "like"us on
facebook









I've got good news and bad news. The bad news is-- Did you know that
there are over 70 cancer causing chemicals in one cigarette? The good
news is-- There are now even more ways to help you kick the habit!
Melissa Wood- Health Educator with Tobacco Free Florida- co-hosts
Chamber Chat this week and shares with us how easy it can be to put
out that last cigarette-- and never look back! Sue Fullerton joins us to
talk about the 9th Annual Evening of Dinner and Auctions on Friday
November 30th at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. This is an event
you don't want to miss because for every 6 cents raised the state with
match it with 94 cents! Funds raised go to benefit the Early Learning
Coalition of the Nature Coast. Linda Rodgers of Suncoast Schools
Federal Credit Union tells us how to stay out of debt this holiday
season and tells us about their $10,000 credit card payoff giveaway.
Linda also shares with us the many ways Suncoast Schools FCU gives
back to our community. It's Rodeo Time! Put on your cowboy hats and
come on out to the 17th Annual Citrus Stampede Rodeo at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds November 16th & 17th. 4H Foundation Director
Larry Brooks tells us why this years rodeo is going to be bigger and
better-- and that's no bull!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday 6pm--
Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every week!
If you would like your business or local event featured on Chamber
Chat-- at no cost to you-- Email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@(aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for
clips of past segments and updates on our weekly show!


--J


A


B





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Workforce warns
about scams
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties cautions job-
seekers to be alert for scam-
mers usurping the names of
legitimate businesses and
organizations to take advan-
tage of those looking for work.
Workforce Connection CEO
Rusty Skinner said the regional
workforce board decided to
issue the warning after hearing
about the problem from other
workforce boards. In Panama
City, the Gulf Coast Workforce
Board recently reported scam-
mers posted jobs on the Em-
ploy Florida Marketplace luring
jobseekers who, when they re-
sponded, were instructed to
send money in advance for "re-
quired" job training, he said.
"Scammers are unscrupu-
lous, clever and are often very
good at what they do," Skinner
said. "It is unconscionable that
these imposters are taking
money from people who are
diligently seeking employment."
The Employ Florida Market-
place, or EFM, is the state's pre-
mier online job bank and used by
all 24 regional workforce boards.
Even though EFM posts scam-
ming warnings on nearly every
page, Skinner said when some-
one is searching for work and
finds what appears to be a prom-
ising job, "it's easy to get excited
and let your guard down."
Skinner noted there have
been no reports of similar em-
ployment scams in Citrus, Levy
and Marion counties. He hopes
to keep it that way by alerting
jobseekers to warning signs,
such as claims of guaranteed
employment and requests for
payment of up-front fees.
In order to protect them-
selves, jobseekers are asked to
keep the following tips in mind:
Research the company to
make sure it is the real deal (to
ensure a business is authentic,
contact the Better Business
Bureau at www.bbb.org).
Keep your email address
private and do not provide your
Social Security number or any
sensitive information to an em-
ployer unless you are confident
they are legitimate.
Be wary of any employer of-
fering a job without an interview.
Be alert for any employer
charging fees to either employ,
find placement or provide
training.
Investigate thoroughly any
employer requesting you trans-
fer funds or receive packages
for reshipment, especially if
they are located overseas.
Avoid vague offers, exag-
gerated claims of possible
earnings or product effective-
ness, or any job posting claim-
ing "no experience necessary."
Likewise, jobseekers should
exercise caution when replying
to unsolicited emails for work-
at-home employment as well as
for employers who conduct
their interviews in a home set-
ting or in motel rooms.
Anyone who suspects they
have been victimized in an em-
ployment scam should contact
the Attorney General's Fraud
Hotline at 866-966-7226.


Virtual dementia training


Special to the Chronicle
More than 17,000 Citrus County residents are 65 or older. Of those, more than 7,000 are 85 or older making Citrus
County the third oldest county in Florida and fifth in the nation. Given the demographic makeup, Nature Coast EMS recently
provided virtual dementia training for its team members through Mederi Caretenders. Pictured are team members trying
to complete simple tasks while their motor, visual and hearing skills purposely have been hampered. This enables the team
to get a small glimpse of life as a victim of either of these debilitating diseases. By adding this training to its education
practicum, Nature Coast EMS professionals can recognize the signs of dementia and Alzheimer's disease and how to pro-
vide less-stressful medical care for a patient suffering with these issues.


CF set to host
energy summit
OCALA- The College of
Central Florida will host an En-
ergy Summit from 11:45 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, at
the Ocala campus in the Ewers
Century Center, 3001 SW. Col-
lege Road.
The summit will feature Rep.
Seth McKeel of Lakeland, mem-
ber of the House Energy and
Utilities Committee, who will
speak about energy policy-mak-
ing in Florida. An additional pres-
entation will be made by Kevin
Reed from the Ocala Power
Plant Business Incubator. The
program is supported by a grant
from Progress Energy Florida, a
subsidiary of Duke Energy.
"Congratulations on hosting
this important summit," McKeel
said. "I look forward to partici-
pating and working together to
achieve responsible energy pol-
icy in our state."
There is no cost to attend the
summit, which includes a lunch-
eon. Due to limited seating,
participants must RSVP via
email to scroggid@cf.edu.
New business offers
legal documents
Cheryl J. Pence, has just
started a new business, Legal
Documents For Less. You may
have seen
some of her
new yellow
and black
S.- *. signs around
town. This
new business
will prepare
Cheryl J. legal docu-
Pence ments for in-
dividuals in
the areas of divorce, child cus-
tody, wills, living wills, living
trusts, deeds, estate adminis-
trations, adoptions, guardian-
ships, conservatorships, etc.


These documents will be af-
fordable, reliable and guaran-
teed to be accepted by the
clerk of court and accomplish
the purpose for which they are
prepared.
The driving force behind this
new business is the extreme
need for this service in general
and in particular, given the state
of our economy. Many people
can no longer afford to pay
hundreds or thousands of dol-
lars for these documents. At the
same time, they are more than
willing to take the prepared
documents to the courthouse
and file them for themselves.
The result is a win/win solution
meeting a current and acute
need and challenge.
Pence practiced law in Geor-
gia for more than 20 years and
was a city planner in Atlanta for
almost 10 years before gradu-
ating from Emory University
School of Law. Pence also has
a Master's Degree in City Plan-
ning from Georgia Tech. She
has been an active Real Estate
broker in Florida with Cheryl
Pence Realty and Consulting
Services since 2003. With her
experience in real estate and
city planning, she will be avail-
able to assist individuals or
companies with land use and
zoning issues or applications.
During the past three years,
Pence has been preparing per-
sonal legal documents for an
online company, and those doc-
uments have been successfully
filed and taken to their legal
completion in at least 15 differ-
ent states.
Pence brings substantial ed-
ucation and experience to this
endeavor. She can prepare
these documents for almost
any state. So while they can be
for Citrus and surrounding
counties, she can prepare them
for filing throughout Florida and
in most states.


The driving force for launch-
ing her own business is to
lower the cost of the documents
for her clients. She will not have
the extensive overhead of
larger companies, nor does she
have the need for excessive
profit from this endeavor.
"I see his as part of my life
ministry, and I am God driven,
not greed driven," Pence said.
Pence is an active member
of Floral City First Baptist
Church. Contact Pence at
cherylpence62@yahoo.com or
at 352-446-2010.
Holiday Inn Express
in CR wins award
ATLANTA- The Holiday Inn
Express Crystal River, Fla., re-
ceived the IHG (InterContinental
Hotels Group) 2012 Torchbearer
Award, the company's most
prestigious award.
The Torchbearer Award was
presented during the Oct. 24 to
26 IHG Americas Investors &
Leadership Conference in
Orlando.
The Holiday Inn Express
Crystal River is one of only 102
properties within the Americas
chosen from the IHG system of
more than 4,500 hotels for
achieving the highest levels of
excellence in all aspects of op-
eration from quality to cus-
tomer satisfaction. A 2012
Torchbearer trophy, the com-
pany's symbol of excellence,
will be on permanent display at
the hotel.
"It is my pleasure to name
the Holiday Inn Express Crystal
River as one of the top-notch
hotels in our industry," said Kirk
Kinsell, president of the Ameri-
cas IHG. "This hotel embodies
the heart of our brand promise
and continues to make IHG
properties known and admired
throughout the world, continu-
ing our mission to deliver 'Great
Hotels Guests Love.'"


Nearly 5,000 franchise own-
ers, operators and company of-
ficials attended the 2012 IHG
Americas Investors & Leader-
ship Conference.
Citrus Memorial
welcomes Brown
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem welcomes William R.
Brown, DPM, to its active med-
ical staff.
Brown completed podiatric
surgical resi-
dencies at
Kaiser Foun-
dation Hos-
pital in
California and
Richmond
Heights Gen-
Dr. William eral Hospital
R. Brown in Ohio. In
addition to
being a skilled podiatric sur-
geon, he specializes in foot and
reconstructive rear-foot and
ankle surgery.
Brown is board-certified by
the American Board of Podiatric
Surgery and the American
Board of Podiatric Orthopedics
and Primary Podiatric Medicine.
He is a member of the Ameri-
can Podiatric Medical Associa-
tion, American Professional
Wound Care Association and
the American College of Foot
and Ankle Surgeons.
Brown practices at Inverness
Surgical Association with Drs.
Golkar, Carmain, Fernandez,
Pham, Hegarty and Michael
Brown. The facility is at 403 W.
Highland Blvd., Inverness. They
are accepting new patients.
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem is a 198-bed, not-for-profit
community hospital that pro-
vides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. More
than 150 physicians and 1,000
employees provide a wide
range of services at the Inver-


.JOO


SANDY
Continued from Page D1

Carfax, a privately held subsidiary of the
R.L. Polk & Co. automotive data firm, put out
a news release Tuesday speculating Sandy's
toll on cars would exceed the damage left by
Katrina.
In an interview, company spokesman
Larry Gamache said early indications were
more vehicles could have been damaged in
the densely populated Northeast than were
damaged by Katrina in 2005 along the more
sparsely populated Gulf Coast He estimated
half of them, more than 300,000, would find
their way back onto the market as used cars.
"I think it's partly due to the breadth of the
storm and the intensity of the storm and
where the storm hit," Gamache said.
A spokeswoman for Experian, which runs
a Carfax competitor called AutoCheck, said
the area blasted by Sandy has 9 million reg-
istered cars, far more than in the Gulf region
struck by Katrina.
On Wednesday, the National Automobile
Dealers Association put out a statement es-
timating 200,000 or more flooded cars could
be resold as used.
The trade organization warned the storm
could crimp the supply of clean used cars,
potentially driving up prices. But its esti-
mate was based on reports from third par-
ties that showed 600,000 cars were damaged
in Katrina and Sandy would cause about
one-third of the dollar damage from Katrina.
"There was not an incredible amount of
science behind it," said Jonathan Banks, ex-
ecutive automotive analyst with the NADA
Used Car Guide.
Katrina overwhelmed low-lying areas of
the Gulf Coast, including New Orleans,
which is below sea level, causing widespread


flooding. Many people in Katrina's path did-
n't evacuate, and car dealers didn't have
many options to protect inventories.
In hard-hit NewJersey, flooding from Sandy
was mainly confined to a strip along the coast
from Atlantic City to New York, and most peo-
ple evacuated those areas, Appleton said.
In the western part of the state, "unless a
tree fell on your car, your car wasn't even at
risk," he said.
Chris Basso, another Carfax spokesman,
said the company relied on an estimate from
a trusted industry source in putting out its
news release. He said it was just an estimate.
The final number won't be known for a while.
"All we're trying to do is make sure people
are looking out for these cars," he said. "Be-
cause eventually they're going to make their
way back onto the road."
Regardless of the predictions, thousands
of flood-damaged cars will certainly be
resold, and buyers need to be cautious.
Unlike automakers who destroy badly
damaged inventory, dealers, insurance com-
panies and others often resell flooded cars
to recoup their losses.
If the cars were declared total losses by in-
surance companies, states require them to
get new titles branding them as flood-dam-
aged vehicles. But some sellers don't disclose
that, and some even move the cars from state
to state to wash the branding off the titles.
So even if the numbers are far smaller
than the estimates, anyone buying a used car
in the coming months should check the title
and repair history and have the car in-
spected by a mechanic. Buyers can also do
their own inspection, sniffing for musty
odors and checking for mud and debris
under the dashboard.
"People just have to be a little smart about
this," said Scafidi, of the insurance company
group. But he added, "We don't want to sit
here and say the sky is falling."


BYRNES
Continued from Page D1

According to the U.S. Census Bureau's
2011 American Community Survey, which
provides the most recent data available,
of the 7,603 working-age veterans (ages 18
to 64) in Citrus County, 3,555 were in the
labor force and 3,172 were employed. The
Citrus County unemployment rate for vet-
erans last year was 10.7 percent down
significantly from 15 percent in 2010 and
below the 11.9 percent rate for the civil-
ian population, but still uncomfortably
high.
"Retooling and Refueling for Veterans"
is one of the programs Workforce Con-
nection offers for vets, starting with our
team of Local Veterans Employment Rep-
resentatives (LVERs) and Disabled Vet-
erans Outreach Program (DVOP)
specialists.
The mission of our LVER and DVOP
personnel is to provide priority work-
force services to veterans. That includes
job placement, information about the
local job market, assessments and career-
interest testing, referral to training pro-
grams and help securing funds to
complete training or retraining.
In addition, our LVERs and DVOPs can
tell you about benefits for unemployed
veterans, such as the Vow to Hire Veter-
ans Act's new Veterans Retraining Assis-
tance Program (VRAP), which gives
unemployed veterans ages 35 to 60 finan-
cial assistance to train for high-demand
occupations.
Gerald, an Army veteran who served in
Vietnam until 1965 and was in the Na-
tional Guard for 10 more years, recently
had been downsized and credits his


LVER with "keeping me informed" about
his job-search options.
Raul, who was discharged from the Air
Force in 1980, echoed that belief, saying
his LVER "kept me up-to-date and
helped me out a lot."
For Randy, a Navy vet who moved to
the area from Indiana, the workshop was
a real eye-opener
"I've been so set in my ways; it gets you
out of the rut of thinking a certain way,"
he said. "I would tell any veteran to take
this course; it will definitely help you
down the road."
It is an understatement to say this band
of brothers, brought together by their
common service and shared struggles,
had become tight in the three days of the
workshop.
Ricky, an Army veteran who served 10
years, said of the experience, "I'm proud
just to be in here with these people ... it
just overwhelms me."
Mark agreed.
"I'll stand up and salute every one of
these men or anyone else in uniform," he
said.
That's something we can all take to
heart, today in honor of veterans every-
where and every day
Veterans Job Information services are
available at the Citrus County Workforce
Connection Center, 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., Inverness. To make an appoint-
ment or learn more, call 352-637-2223 or
800-434-JOBS.


Laura Byres, APR is a certified work-
force professional and communications
manager at Workforce Connection.
Contact her at 352-291-9559 or
800-434-5627, ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@
clm workforce. com.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 D3


ness campus and medical of-
fices and clinics in Citrus and
Sumter counties. Citrus Memo-
rial is fully accredited by the
Joint Commission and is fully li-
censed by the state of Florida.
Crystal River Mall
has new stores
Crystal River Mall is pleased
to announce its newest tenant,
Wrestling World FL, owned by
lifelong wrestling fan Marty
George and his wife, Theresa.
Wrestling World carries ac-
tion figures, books, magazines,
videos, DVDs, T-shirts and
other wrestling trinkets. George
also carries karaoke equipment
and CDs. Wrestling World is by
the Kmart corridor.
All About Nature has
moved its popular store from
Citrus Avenue to a larger shop-
ping environment at the Crystal
River Mall effective Nov. 1. The
mall offers the opportunity to
expand the nature-themed mer-
chandise as well adding mana-
tee gifts. The store may be
found across from Cafe
Impressions in the mall.
Rodger and Pat Osborne
have owned the store since
May 2008 when they pur-
chased the inventory of the
Vanishing Breeds store in
downtown Inverness. All About
Nature will continue to focus on
local products, too. The shop
proudly features the addition of
several local farm-produced
goods now available: pepper
jellies, honey, goat milk soaps,
cedar birdhouses and more.
The store can be contacted
at 352-563-1425 or visit www.
allaboutnature.org. Hours are
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday
through Saturday, noon to 5:30
p.m. Sunday.
All About Nature will be open
for holiday shopping and mana-
tee season daily until 9 p.m.
Monday through Saturday.
For information on leasing
opportunities, mall events or
The Crystal River Mall, contact
the mall office at 352-795-2585;
visit www.thecrystalrivermall.
com or Like the mall on
Facebook.
Inverness attorney
marks 30 years
Inverness attorney Cliff
Travis noted his 30th anniver-
sary of the practice of law in
Citrus County. A 1982 graduate
of the Cumberland School of
Law, he came to Inverness in
October of the same year and
operated the local office of the
firm Infantino & Berman after
passing the Florida Bar Exam
on the first try.
"I grew up in the '50s and '60s
in Zephyrhills and by then it was
just becoming part of north
Tampa," he said. "I came up here
and found a great little town sur-
rounded by lots of hunting and
fishing areas, and I put down
roots. My son was born here and
I have made lifelong friends here,
and I'm very fortunate to have
had many, many clients who
have become friends."
Travis still actively practices
in civil matters such as per-
sonal injury, family law and pro-
bate, and has in recent years
See DIGEST/Page D4






D4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


BUSINESS


Villages Services conducts seminar DIGEST

i Nl I,, -* r H Continued from Page D3


s6 e4 t worked extensively in criminal
defense cases.
'e '"I am one of the veteran
S' lawyers who the courts would
look to appoint to the defense
1 of homicide cases when the
S state brought a death penalty
murder trial," he said. "I've de-
fended people in homicide
cases here and in Hernando,
Sumter, Marion and Pasco
counties. The courts and the
Special to the Chronicle Bar say 'death is different,'
Villages Services Cooperative hosted a seminar for property associations Oct. 3. The top- these aren't traffic cases or
ics discussed ranged from property rental issues to collections and foreclosure process. somebody a couple mullet over
Linda Deptola, a licensed community association manager and Robert Tankel, P.A., a spe- the limit, when the courts need
cialist in homeowner's issues were the presenters. Villages Services Cooperative is a full to appoint counsel to defend
service management firm on County Road 486 in Hernando. For information, visit www.vil- somebody in a murder case,
lagesservices.net or call 352-746-6770 and speak to Geri Bond. they go to the lawyers with


some mileage on them."
Travis was a 1972 graduate
of Zephyrhills High School. After
several years in the U.S. Army,
he graduated from Florida State
in 1978 with dual majors, several
minors and a varsity sports letter
award. He is an Eagle Scout and
served as Cubmaster of Pack
302 in Inverness. Most recently,
he has served as district chair-
man of the Withlacoochee Dis-
trict in the Gulf Ridge Coundl,
BSA for the past three years and
has led 58 Boy Scout troops and
Cub Scout packs essentially,
all the units in Citrus, Sumter
and Hernando counties.
After moving to Inverness,
Travis immediately became in-
volved in local service and char-
itable organizations, including
the Citrus County Fair Associa-
tion, Inverness Sertoma, Citrus


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County Art League, Citrus
Lodge No. 118, F&AM. He was
a longtime committee member
of Ducks Unlimited and Friends
of the NRA local chapters. He is
a Patron Member of the Na-
tional Rifle Association and
been a life member for 40
years. He was a founding direc-
tor of Citrus County United Way
and a founder of CASA (Citrus
Abuse Shelter Association), for
which he was nominated for the
annual Tobias Simon Pro Bono
Award presented by the Florida
Bar at the Florida Supreme
Court in Tallahassee. He previ-
ously served as president of the
Tri-County Bar Association.
His office is across the street
from the courthouse at 107 N.
Apopka Ave. Call 352-344-2664,
fax 352-344-5720 or email
clifftravis@tampabay.rr.com.


To place an ad, call 563-5966





IClassifieds


In Print


I and


Online


All


P The Time


mi= is u.. %w ,Sr9I* .,.*cS.


Lonely widow active,
attractive, looking for
gentleman for
companionship, 75?.
Blind Box 1814M c/do
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429




BEVERLY HILLS
Pine Ridge
Nov 15, 16, 9 to 5
Nov 17, 9 to2
Huge 3 day sale entire
hshld priced to go, din-
ing & bedrm sets, mo-
torcycle, flatscreen,
leather sofa, diving
gear, tools, art, tread-
mill, bikes, Fender gui-
tars, cash only please
5746 N. Pecan Way
COFFEE & SOFA TABLE
LEATHER & ASH WOOD
$300. 2 BROWN SOFAS
$50 EA. 219-688-3546
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; Furnished
$900/mo (352) 287-5020
FORD
01" Explorer Sport,
"red" 2dr w/ towing, 98K
$4900 352-527-4484
INVERNESS
3/2 townhome, unfur-
nished, 1241 sq ft, 2 sto-
ries, $700/mo, $500/Sec.
Call Myriam Reulen
352-613-2644
KITCHEN SET
Wrought Iron $100.
Leather Sofa Set $400.
219-688-3546
LIVING ROOM SET
8 Piece Set, 1 yr old, light
blue includes sofa, chair,
ottoman, coffee table, 2
lamps, 2 end tables pd
$1600 asking $1100
(352) 726-0061



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352)201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



2 Free Cats
Male neutered &
Female, spayed
1 all black w/ green
eyes, 1 calico.
Shots Very Loving
(352) 302-2422


You've Got It!



Somebody



Wants



It!


2 Free Kittens
10 wks, white w/ blue
eyes 1 male, 1 female
(352) 442-4131
2 Small Dogs,
good personality house
trained, good with
elderly and children
(352) 419-6410
3 "FREE" CUTE
KITTENS
Black and White &
one Gray striped.
(352) 216-6668
3 KITTENS
3mo Old cute & cuddly
352-422-3158
3 Kittens 9 wks old
2 orange & white
1 white & black
Eat Good, Use Litter Box
(352) 628-1783
Brindle Pit Boxer
mixed puppy, 9 mo's
old, very playful,
needs good home
(352) 220-8554
FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy access
Pine Ridge
352-746-3545
FREE KITTENS
10 wks old
Different Colors
including calico
(352) 212-4061
FREE
Minolta Copy Machine
& Lexmark Printer
(352) 613-4969
FREE SPA/HOT TUB
Motor & Pump works,
round, 6 ft. Dia
(352) 795-7312
To Good Home: 6
month all grey cat, neu-
tered current on shots,
1.5 yr old grey & white
cat also neutered and
current on all shots
(352) 257-5856
Youg Adult Cat
Spayed and declawed.
Female White Calico
Free to good home.
Good with other pets.
Please leave message
(352) 419-4095




BELLAMY GROVE
1.5 mi. E. from Hwy 41
on Eden Dr., Inverness
WILL BE CLOSED
FOR SWEET CORN
TIL MONDAY PM
351 2-7 C2-67


HOUSE KEYS
"Pink Tweety" & gate
keys lost between Crystal
River & Arrowhead.
352-726-2890
Lost Chihuahua
Brown & white
approx. 6 yrs. old
Autumn & Legend
Homosassa
352-364-1755
MINI SCHNAUZER
Grey 3yrs old female
8 1/2 lbs. Has chip!
Call Don 352-382-3993



2 DOGS FOUND
East of the river,near 48
Floral City/Sumter Co.
352-201-5383
Found
Jack Russel Puppy
Old Mill Tavern,
Old Homosassa
(352) 628-6537
SET OF KEYS
Gospel Island on Sunday
(352) 637-0035
Square bifocal eye
glasses, Bronze color.
Found in Parking Lot at
Key Training Ctr on Rt 19
(352) 795-0295




NEED A NEW
CAREER?
CAREER PREPARATION
COURSES
Starting Jan./Feb. '13
******..*********
FIVE-WEEK PROGRAM
MEDICAL ASST. $1,420
TWO-WEEK PROGRAM
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT $475.
PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


Christmas Decorations
are Missing. Please help
make our residents
have a memorable
holiday season,
by donating
Decoration and Trees
to BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W NORVELL
BRYANT HWY Lecanto



PT OFFICE ASST
Mon-Wed 9-5 Crystal
River, $8/hr, General
Office and MS Office
skills required. Fast
paced. Familiarity with
Citrus County a must!
Send Resume to:
cccreception(gmail.com










Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966








ANGELS
SEEKING ANGELS
Experienced
caregivers
for private duty
in elderly clients' homes.
Seeking AMPM, weekends
and 24-hr help. References
and full background
check required!
CNA preferred.
Call Visiting Angels
M-F 8-5
-1352 620-8484

DENTAL
HYGIENIST
P/T Dental Hygienist.
Are you a team player
with a great attitude
looking for an office
that meets your
expectations? If so
Send resume to
office@sierra
dentalgroup.com

FRONT OFFICE
STAFF
Cardiology
practice seeks
front office staff.
EHR experience
preferred.
E-mail resume to
resume4879iaD
tamnabav.rr.com

Medical Assistant
/Certified Medi-
cal Assistant/ LPN
Seeking a Certified
Medical Assistant or
LPN to work at a
family medical clinic
in Crystal River, Fl.
Chosen candidate
will assist with all
aspects of clinic,
including rooming
patients, vital signs,
giving vaccines,
scheduling patients,
and various other
duties as needed by
physician or nurse
you are working with.
Must be a graduate
from accredited
Medical Assistant Pro-
gram or LPN. Current
demonstrated
clinical proficiency
with phlebotomy
required, proficiency
in EKG desired.
Minimum of five years
healthcare experi-
ence in a similar
setting.
Please emall resume
and salary
requirements to:
Info@health-wellcare
.com


FIT RN

Oncology Experience a
plus, but not
required. Excellent
Pay & benefits.
Fax Resume to:
352-795-2017

@SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team

Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRlvers
Realonal.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN'S LPN'S CNA'S
HOSPITAL, REHAB,
HOSPICE

All SHIFTS AVAILABLE
Call (352) 283-8507
or Apply Online
www.staffamerica


RN's. LPN's. CNA's
ALL SHIFTS, FT &PT
Health Care
Experience Preferred.
MDS Coordinator
RN Preferrd LPN okay
MDS/Careplan
Experience required

RN
UNIT MANAGER
RN
WEEKEND SUPERVISOR

RECEPTIONIST
PART TIME

APPLY WITHIN
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Clr
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility




FL LICENSED
THERAPIST
NEEDED
PT-FL lic. therapist to
work with juvenile sex
offenderclients. SO
Exp required. Please
fax resume to Brandi
Smith at
352-379-2843

INCOME TAX
PREPARER
Local CPA firm seek-
ing seasonal Income
Tax Preparer. Must
have experience in
Individual, Corpora-
tion and Partnership
returns with knowl-
edge of state and
federal taxation.
Experience in
QuickBooks and
ProSysterms fx Tax is
preferred. Applicants
submit resumes to
mindvy@wmwccpa
.com or send to:
PO box 895
Inverness, FL 34452




AC SALES/TECHS
WANTED

Experience preferred.
Benefits, $50K+
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427
Account Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460 to
Schedule an Interview


FIBERGLASS
PATCHERS

NOW HIRING!
Monterey Boats is
looking for experi-
enced fiberglass
repair workers/
patchers with marine
or auto body experi-
ence. Premium pay
and benefits includ-
ing medical, dental,
life, paid holidays
and vacation as
well as a great work
environment...
even a boat
purchase option!
APPLY IN PERSON
email resume to
jobs@montereyboats.
com or send resume
to Monterey Boats,
HR: 1579 SW 18th St.,
Williston, FL 32696.
Fax (352) 529-0095
EOE M/F/H/IV DFWP.


r PLUMBERS q
HELPER
Must have driver's
I license. Apply @ I
4079 S Ohio Ave.
Homosassa, FL

G--e---




Building
Maintenance/
Custodian
Needed P/T,
FL driver's license,
reliable transportation
experience preferred.
Send resume to
P.O. Box 1630
Lecanto, Fl 34460
Or Call 352-513-4963

CUSTOMER
ASSISTANCE
NEEDED
This sales position is
for persons who can
work with little super-
vision and following
directions on how to
advertise your prod-
uct. You will be work-
ing as an independ-
ent consultant with an
excellent support
group,interested per-
son Should
contact:wilssmit@aol.c
om

DOMINO'S PIZZA
NOW HIRING

DRIVERS
CSR
PIZZA MAKER
Ilnverness,637-5300
Citrus Hills,527-1240


Exp. Appt. Setters
Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Barb (352) 726-1002


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



-- ---J


FLORAL
DESIGNER
Exp. only! Needed for
Holiday & possible P/T.
352-726-9666

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

MOBILE HOME
PARK MGR
Retired couple to live-in &
manage sm (age) + 55
mobile home park
727-799-4906

P/T Temporary
Positions Open

Reliable transportation
required, ref. needed
Work is outdoors.
CONTACT
352-513-4960
Extensions 2 or 4





PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP

* Are you a customer
service champion?
* Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
* Organized &
detailed oriented?
* Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
* Avail. weekdays
& weekends?
Join the Citrus County
Chronicle's
Circulation team!

Send Resume &
Cover Letter to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or Apply In Person

EOE, drug screening for
final applicant

TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Good Commission
pay. Apply In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr





TEMPORARY
SEASONAL
LIFEGUARD
Announcement
#12-67

Temporary part time
position. Skilled
duties lifeguarding
at Bicentennial Park
Pool and Central
Ridge Pool. May
guard for swim les-
sons, birthday parties
and special events.
MUST POSSESS
AND MAINTAIN THE
FOLLOWING
CERTIFICATIONS:
CURRENT RED CROSS
LIFEGUARD, FIRST AID
AND CPR/AED FOR
THE PROFESSIONAL
RESCUER. WE
WILL NOT TRAIN. Must
possess a valid Florida
Driver License.
Flexible schedule,
10 35hours weekly.
$8.50 hourly.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
visit our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online.
This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.




SMALL ELECTRIC IRON
inches long, works fine
$25.00 firm 3523821191


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





JACUZZI
Mint green and white,
wood frame. Excellent
condition $700 or OBO
352-344-4635



DRYER 90 DAY WAR-
RANTY $100 with trade in
of broken machine.
Delivery extra, call/text
352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
Magic Chef
21Dx19Wx33H. $40.00
352-503-9354
REFRIGERATOR
WHIRLPOOL white,
68Tx31 Dx31W,
icemaker, glass shelves,
left door pull, clean &
excellent. $200.00
352-746-1486
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER 90 DAY WAR-
RANTY $100 with trade in
of broken machine.
delivery extra call/text
352-364-6504
WASHER AND DRYER
Whirlpool Washer and
Dryer Set White,
$125.00 for set. Inquires
please call 352-794-6219
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each, Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352-263-7398
WASHING MACHINE
used but works well,
white, all hosed included
$45 (352) 794-3592



LATERAL FILE
For Sale Like new! $195
352-527-3552



HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS

11/9 Kit/Bath/Laun. Sale
prev. @ 4, auction @ 6
Sat, 11/10, gen. merch.
Sunl11/11,tailgate/box
lots, starts @1pm
WE BUY ESTATES
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



10" RIOBI TABLE MITER
SAW Well used but
works great. Many years
left iin it.$20. 201-6135
CRAFTSMEN Diamond
Plated locking tool box
(for full size trucks) w/
bedliner "Like New" $135
352-212-5143
LADDER 20' aluminum
extension ladder. $40.00
352-503-9354
Large assortment of
various tools
(352) 527-2029
Miller Wire Welder
110 V, 70 amp, flux
core only $175.
(352) 746-0911
Leave Message
RIOBI SS30 WEED
CUTTER Heavy duty,
gas, attachment system,
includes edging tool. $25.
352-201-6135.


SAW Works well. $20.
On stand w/ casters. 10"
miter saw ($20) fits on top
for double use. 201-6135.
Various Oxygen,
Acetylene Regulators &
Torches, $35 $75 ea.
746-0911 Leave Mess.



50 Inch Samsung Plasma
TV
and Magnavox Blu Ray
Player. Asking $500.00
For Both or OBO. Call
726-7128.



Dell Computer w/17"
LED Flat screen monitor,
wireless enabled, mouse,
keyboard, windows xp.
Works very good $125
(352) 249-7033
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Office Jet Copier
$50.
352-746-0911
Leave Mess.



2 Leather Stress
Free recliners $75 or
$100 ea. 1 Rattan
Couch & Chair $300
All excellent
352-601-4722
2 Twin Mattress's,
box springs & medal
frames with linens
all included
All like new,
$150 (352) 746-9380
3 BAR STOOLS
Wrought iron swivel
w/ upholstered seats $100
352-527-9266
3 Pc. Queen Bedroom
Set $350.
Trundle Day Bed with
covers & Sham $275.
(352) 697-1483
6 Pc. Bedroom Set,
queen, Incl's mattress/
boxspring $250.6 Pc.
Bedroom Set, queen,
Incl's mattress/ boxspr-
ing $250.352-621-1624,
(717)-418-1151
96" X 30" Folding Table
w/ metal legs, formica,
faux wood top (some
minor marks) $20 OBO
732.566.1590
Bar Stools, 3 leather 29"
seat height. From
non-smoking house,
excellent condition $150
for all 352-601-2412
BED ROOM SET
Queen Bed, dresser, 2
end tables, desk. Will sell
separately or as a set.
$200 OBO
352-270-8503
COFFEE & SOFA TABLE
LEATHER &ASH WOOD
$300. 2 BROWN SOFAS
$50 EA. 219-688-3546
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
Desk $50
Leather Recliner $75.
2 Living Room
Table Lamps $100.
352-621-1624,
717-418-1151
DESK
Large, pure wood,
50"W', 30D, 30" H
$50. (352) 637-9694
Dinette Set
4 chairs 4/ casters
$125.
(352) 746-5723
Leave Message
DINING AND LIVING
ROOM SET
Matching almond lacquer
with gold trim dining table
& leaf with 6 parsons
style cloth chairs. Same
style coffee table,
sofa table,
brass lamps and framed
wall art.
$175.00 all 352-746-1486
Dining Rm Set oak,
double pedestal w/ 2
leafs, 2 captain chairs,
4 side chairs, hutch,
serving tbls. & pads,
new cond. paid $9000.
Selling $1,200, 527-3965
DINING TABLE
Ashley inlaid tile -top
w/ leaf & 6 chairs. $300
OBO. Entertainment
Center Oak w/ bifold
doors. $200 OBO
828-332-0214


Dining Room Table
$100, 2 Indonesian
buffet tables $80 ea.
great condition
352-249-7283
Glass Coffee Table and
End Table. White
Washed Wrought Iron
$150 OBO
(352) 794-3592
GLASS DINING TABLE
60"X36" 4 chairs
(blue/pink pattern) Exc.
Cond. $100. Inverness.
732.977.2616
HEAVY DUTY 4 RATTAN
Bar Stools (blonde)
w/padded seats. $200
(352)249-3259
Hide-A-Bed &
Love Seat $450.
Dining Table w/ leaf. 4
matching Chairs $200
352-621-1624,
717-418-1151
KING BOOK CASE
HEAD BOARD
Real wood $45. 2 Stools
wrought iron & rattan. $40
352-406-3267
King Sleep Number
Bed,
$1,200. obo
(352) 489-4687
KITCHEN SET
Wrought Iron $100.
Leather Sofa Set $400.
219-688-3546
LEATHER RECLINER
Beige, Like New $200
Rattan Couch w/ Dk
Green Cushions $175
OBO (352) 794-3592
Leather Sofa & Chair
Wood coffee table, 2yrs
old in exc. cond pd $2200
$700 or Trade for guns
(352)697-5530
LIVING ROOM SET
2 PC microfiber taupe
loveseat & sofa
mint/exc condition, mov-
ing, must sell $550 OBO
(352) 586-8713
LIVING ROOM SET
8 Piece Set, 1 yr old, light
blue includes sofa, chair,
ottoman, coffee table, 2
lamps, 2 end tables pd
$1600 asking $1100
(352) 726-0061
MOVING
FURNITURE SALE
(352) 726-6228
PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Quality 5 piece
Queen Bedroom Set
Used 6 months
$500.
(352) 897-4667
QUEEN BEDROOM SET
Almond color lacquer with
gold trim modern style
queen mattress,
boxspring, frame,
headboard, triple dresser,
large mirror, 2 night-
stands, Great shape.
$300.00 352-746-1486
QUEEN BEDROOM
SUITE Double dresser,
chest of drawers, night
table, & headboard
w/frame. Brushed ash
w/faux marble top. Like
new 2 years old. $495.
Phone 352-344-5854 or
email lwyatt97@gmail.com
Queen size sofa hide a
bed. Very good condition
$150.
Executive Desk
Excel. Condition $95
(352) 637-5755
Reclining Sofa & Love
seat Select Steel, green
microfiber, $550.
Glass top patio table &
6 chairs & 2 matching
chase lounges &
matching side tables
$400. (352) 697-1483
SOFA
Flexsteel Sleeper,
green/beige tweed. $200
OBO. Electric Oak
Fireplace w/ mantel
$400 828-332-0214


TABLE AND CHAIRS
Rattan glass top table
and four chairs pur-
chased 1 year ago from
Leaders, used maybe
twice down sized our
home. $1000 new asking
$499 phone
1-740-705-9004
Sugarmill Woods
TABLE TOP Heavy Glass
40"X60", Beveled ribbon
on perimeter. Some
minor scratches. No
pedstal. $10. 201-6135.


ICletb






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TWO TWIN BEDS
w/mattress & springs
bkcase hdbd, two 3
drawer dressers & night-
stand, white, linens incl.
$200. 352-382-0608
WOOD HUTCH
Glass shelves, doors
& mirror back w/light.
$400 (727)348-3867



30" MURRAY RIDING
MOWER with bagger
$600.00. 352-746-2434
LAWN MOWER
21' Lawnboy, self pro-
pelled, 4HP, $75 OBO
(352) 382-5804
RECHARGABLE ELEC-
TRIC MOWER. 24-volt
lead battery. Good for sm
yard. $25. 352-201-6135.
Riding Lawn Tractor
42" Craftsman, Electric
start, 17.5 HP, w/ grass
catchers, auto trans.
Like New! $575
352-382-0485
Troy Built Lawn Tractor
Automatic Transmission
2 yrs. old, w/ bag
catcher & cart
Org. $1,500 Asking $900
(352) 860-1303



INVERNESS
Fri. Sat, & Sun., 8a-4p
Furn., Tools, 2 garden
tractors, elect. 2 key-
board console organ,
fabrics, & Much More
7820 Gospel Is. Rd
INVERNESS
HUGE INDOOR SALE,
Harley St & Croft Ave,
Fri/Sat, 11/16-11/17,
8AM-1PM, Daycare Sup-
plies, office equipment,
too much to list!
INVERNESS
Sat & Sun 8a-4pm
Over 300 items, bird
cages, Silk plants, furn.,
Pool vac. antique tea
cart, Starwars & jewelry.
1616 E Pacific Lane
WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944




BEVERLY HILLS
Pine Ridge
Nov 15, 16, 9 to 5
Nov 17,9 to2
Huge 3 day sale
entire hshld priced to
go, dining & bedrm
sets, motorcycle, 1988
Corvette, custom show
car 33k mi., $9,000obo
flatscreen, leather sofa,
diving gear, tools, art,
treadmill, bikes,
Fender guitars, cash
only please
5746 N. Pecan Way
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 House Estate Sale
Sat, Nov 10 thru Sat,
Nov 17, 10 to5 daily
6201 Pine Circle


PARTY DRESS Size 8,
knee length, lavender
strapless party dress with
beaded belt. $60 Email:
Busbeee@gmail.com
WEDDING DRESS
Kathryn LaCroix w/vail
Ivory, size 14. Like New
$225 352-746-9868




1 HP POOL
MOTOR/PUMP Like new!
Used six months. $95.00
352-563-1519
4 PET TAXI MEDIUM
SIZE $20 ea.
352-464-0316
5 DRAWER CHEST
Light Wood $80
352-212-2264
40 PIECE SOCKET SET
in the box $20.00
352-382-1191
50 hp Outboard Motor
Pts, fits Force, Mercury,
Tohatso $90, Lg. Crafts-
men toolbox 11 drawer
$110 315-466-2268
BREAD MAKER, DAK
TURBO BAKER 2, USED
VERY LITTLE IN VERY
GOOD CONDITION $25
352-726-9983
BUBBLE SKYLIGHT 26
BY 26 NEW, NEVER
BEEN INSTALLED
$50.00 352-464-0316
CAT LITTER BOX
LARGE brand new paid
$195.00 has electrical
problem $45.00 takes
care 3 cats 352 382 1191
Chaise Lounge, $100
obo Glass coffee $120
obo & end tables, $100
obo, 52" RCA TV, $150
Call for Info 897-4681
Chaise Lounge, $100
obo Glass coffee $120
obo & end tables, $100
obo, 52" RCA TV, $150
Call for Info 897-4681
COMPANION TOOL
AND WRENCH SET
brand new, paid $169.
great buy $70.
352-382-1191
COMPUTER PRINTER
works good needs cable
10.00 352-382-1191
CRAFTSMAN POWER
DRILL brand new
paid $149. Sell $70.
352-382-1191
DINETTE SET
W/4 Canister Chairs
$100
828-332-0214
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER by
Heallthmath, Like New
$50 352 -726-9983
FIREWOOD
Seasoned & Split 4X8 ft
rack $70. 352-201-1970
Full size truck rack
$200. obo
(352) 419-5231
Hexagon Aquarium,
w/filter, air pump, light,
35-40 gallons $125
(352) 201-4522


Uenmore2ajs.r
Dryer $275.
Couch & Dining Table
$300.
(352) 341-3300
LAWYER'S DESK
NEW $80
352-212-2264
METAL CARPORT
12 X 21 X 8FT Ivory, in
good cond. You take
down and haul away.
Paid $1200+ Asking $500
352-489-3264
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
NERF BARS
Dodge 1500 Cub-Cab
Stainless steel $80
352-503-2605
NEW HARLEY PIPES
FITS FLT 1340/1450
ONLY $100
352-464-0316
POOL CLOCK look out at
your pool and see what
temp it is $3.00
352-382-1191
R/C AIRPLANE Sig
Fazer.5-Servo's $65.00
352-503-2792
R/C ENGINES 2-$35.00
Each 40-46
352-503-2792
Submersible pump
2 wire & 3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
TRUCK TOOL BOX
Weatherguard full size.
Black. $475
352-406-3267
White Maytag
Washer & Dryer
Excellent condition
$400.
Celina Hills
(352) 637-3673
YAMAHA GOLFCART
gas, $700. obo
8ft Coca Cola Canoe
w/paddles $300.obo
352-637-6042



Berkel Slicer, Like New
14" Knife 1/2 HP Motor
Lightly Used, Cost
$1,850 Asking $900.
Also Deli Meat Display
Case $200.
(352) 628-2167



2 Power Lift Chair
Recliners,
1 medium $275.
1 Large $350.
Both excel cond.
(352) 270-8475
3 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES GOOD
SHAPE $50.00
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUSTA-
BLE LEGS 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316


WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75.00 (352)-464-0316
BLACK 4 PRONG
CANE GOOD SHAPE
ONLY $20.00
352-464- 0316
HOSPITAL BED
Complete with head &
footboards,rails. Pristine
condition. $195
(352)795-7813
LIFT CHAIR
Light beige, 2 mo old and
barely used. Originally
$2000; asking $800.
(352) 563-5611
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOT RESTS
ONLY $100.00
352-464-0316
NEW TOILET SEAT 4 IN.
RISER WITH HANDLES
$25.00
352-464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying sterl-
ing silver flatware and
US silver coins
(352) 601-7074



Disc for Lowery XL
Organ. 40 discs that
contain professional and
well known organ play-
ers. $50 obo 746-4613



KENMORE
Refrigerator almost new
25 cubic ft, SS, side by
side, w/ water & ice in
door. Excellent condition
$800 (352) 897-4196
MANSFIELD
PORCELAIN TOILET
Tank-Altol 60, Bowl-Alto
135 NEW $85.
352-400-5650
Noritake China
service for 8, includes
service pieces,&
24 matching goblets,
Great for Holidays!
$270 cash
SMW(352) 503-7875
Two Lazyboy Carlyle
High Leg Recliners
Cherry Wood Arms &
Burgundy fabric $100
each or $150 for pair
Inquiries please call
352-212-9507



Bowflex Extreme
All cables, pulleys and
Power rods in perfect
working cond. Complete
with bent lat bars, squat
bar, leg attachment and
instruct, man. $250
John 352-527-0716
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE WITH
HANDRAILS.USA MADE
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316


CLASSIFIED



ELIPTICLE Nordic track
elipticle barely used
$699 new asking $350
Sugarmill Woods phone
1-740-705-9004 anytime
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE STAMINA
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316



2 RIFLES Remmington
700 30.6 Cal., $700 &
T/C Muzzle Loader
45 Cal. $300.
Both S/S, scope sling &
Case (352) 795-8628
1889 38 S&W hammer-
less short, nickle w/80
rounds, excel, cond. $425
Browning 22 lever action
w/scope excel, cond.
$375 352-613-0393
AK 47 ARSENAL SGL21
w/red dot scope
$775 Bushmaster M4
gas piston w/access &
red dot sight $875
352-613-4002
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Golf Clubs, wooden shaft
& ping putter $120, Golf
Cart top w/frame $80
cell 315-466-2268
SAIGA 308 HUNTING
RIFLE heavy 21" barrel
thumb hole stock, 3 mags
scope mount & scope
$575 352-613-4002
TERRA TRIKE ROVER
$950.00 Hardly used.
Over $200 in extras (100
psi tires. Rear Basket.
Mirror. Horn. Flag.
Water cage) Call Lou at
352-344-1024



4 x 8 Utility Trailer
2 ft. sides
$300
(352) 795-8628



2 TODDLE CAR SEAT
$30,20, 2 INFANT CAR
SEAT 15 EA, bounce
deluxe $20 musical
352-777-1256
3 HIGH CHAIR
$25,20,15,SWING MUSI-
CAL $20,rocker $20
352-777-1256
FIRST YEARS NB
-TODDLER BATHTUB
Pink, Comfort Deluxe
baby bathtub $10.00
352-400-5650
FISHER-PRICE GO
BABY GO!
CRUISE-AROUND LION
$15.00 352-400-5650
FISHER-PRICE RAIN-
FOREST MELODIES
AND LIGHTS DELUXE
$20 352-400-5650
PRECIOUS PLANET
2-IN-1 CRIB PROJEC-
TION MOBILE $30.00
352-400-5650


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 D5


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944

WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacement
China Most Patterns
Crystal Waterford Lenox
Sterling Flatware Lladro
Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Elec-
tronics Stereo Turntables
Billiard Cues Coins &
Jewelry and Scraps Best
Prices Paid Chris @
352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net














BELLA
Bella is a beautiful
shepherd mix spayed
female, about 4
years old, brought to
the shelter because
her family lost their
home. Weighs 45
pounds, walks well on
a leash, gets along
with other dogs and
ignores cats.
Heartworm-negative
and housebroken.
Fenced yard is pre-
ferred. She is very,
very playful, also can
jump a low fence.
We'd like to do a
home visit.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


DIXIE
Dixie is a 1-year-old
female border collie
mix who became
homeless because
her owner could not
afford to keep her.
She is a beautiful, af-
fectionate little dog,
Heartworm negative.
She gets along with
other dogs and cats,
walks well on a leash
and is very eager to
please her human
friends. She is house-
broken also. She
loves to sit by your
side and to be affec-
tionate with you. She
is very playful and
would make a good
companion for your
home. She is a lively
young dog and a
fenced yard is
preferred.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288


DOG We call this dog
"Wags" because his tail
never stops wagging.
His foster Mom says he
loves all dogs and peo- SADIE
pie, making him a great Sadie is a 7-y.o.
family or companion Beagle/Rottweiler mix
dog.Wags is a 40 Ib, who came to the
happy, friendly, lovable shelter when her
dog with a strong de- owner passed away.
sire to please. This She is housebroken,
charming, 1 year old spayed, heartworm
pit/terrier is neutered, -negative and
heart-worm neg, and well-behaved.
up to date on all shots. Medium-sized dog,
He's eager to give all gets along with other
his love to his forever dogs and kids also.
people. Call Karen @ She has big, soulful
218-780-1808 brown eyes and a
cute underbite. Loves
to walk and be with
"1 'll' "ill her human family. Is
YLIIII '" ,Idi J Irst. very affectionate,
and can sit, shake
Lw, 1 and get her own
leash for a walk. Call
CHI eON1CILE Crystal or Gerome
Classzfeds I at 352-533-4332.



#1 Employment source is








www.chronicleonline.con


DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039 *

ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
2 Males & 4 Females,
Available after Nov 5th
AKC and all Shots
$1,500 to $1,750 call for
info (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure Breed Pups, light
colors, 4 fem 2 males,
shots & H/C. Parents on
Premises $450. ea
352-628-6050


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






03 SEAPRO
17ft' cc, 90hp, Yamaha
Lowrance ff & gps, new
bat, boat cover, Bimini
top, alum trailer, new axle
& bunks, $7600
352-419-5363aft.5pm





MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2800
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855


IREMODEIN


CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3517



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
veFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
s FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
* FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


WINDOW
GENIE.
We Ocean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill



110 *ll In"A
Add an artistic touh to your existing yard
I -or pool or plan
something
- n (-ompletely new!
"Often imitntee
never duplicate"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVERSPECIALIST
COIPIEAS
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 1 -aa A -
& Insured 352q-400 j3188


B&T Property Maint.
Licensed and Insured
We do it all!
Call for free Estimates!
352-364-2721
Handyman Dave
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570



Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
NATURE COAST
CLEANING
Res/Comm, No Time
Wasted 352-564-3947





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.





All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
352-563-9824, 228-7320

FALL CLEAN-UP
lawncare & more,
leaves, bushes,
hauling 352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over" Your Old One!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estimates
352-465-6079 I


Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
PAINTING,
Wall & Ceiling Repairs,
Carpentry. Call Doug.
Ins. 352-270-6142



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Handy-
man services, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.

352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allIextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus li. #23'96 - IICEFNSFlD&INSIRIEID


LEGAL / Professional
SAVE divorce, custody
wills, deeds, etc. Guaran-
teed docs 352-341-2173






All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090
Lic # CC2544





L Royce Green's
S Floor (are Services
S Clean, Strip, Wax, Seal
S Refinish
Tile, Terrazzo, Marble, Wood,

) Carpet
Maintenance Contracts
Licensed &-Insured
.c (35Z) 344-Z13Z


GENERAL A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians I
ER0015377

352-621-124


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Fire wd.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


AAA ROOFING
Calul 4ke" ;/akustes "
Free Written Estimate

$sl00 OFF

Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000D41M








When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
i- Grout Painting
| ([ > Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
SCLean Dryer
,. Vents
S Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
S wured Lic.#37761


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Cert. CNA/Med Tech
5 yrs. Exp. Affordable
Inverness area Only
(352) 476-8174
Retired nurse to pro-
vide care in your home
for individual w/ special
needs. (352) 895-7634




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


^^^ ^^


BIANCHI CONCRETE lic eIE 13U0i99
INC.COM ins/lic #2579 352- 726-2907
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete A 5 STAR COMPANY
Textures, Stamp,Spray GO OWENS FENCING
Crack repair, Staining, All Types. Free Est.
driveways, pool decks, Comm/Res. 628-4002
Licl/ins 352-527-1097
BOB BROWN'S
| P0 Fence & Landscaping
#1 Em entsource is 352-795-0188/220-3194
iWROCKY'S FENCING
wwwcrnieoniFree Est., Lic. & Ins.,
Swww.chronicleonline.com 352 422-7279 *k


*Tree trimming/rem0oval
* Stump grinding

* Dry oak firewood for sale


LicenseId & Insured


ISloSaM


doesaire: "I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2013 Chevy Malibu LS


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2012 Chevy Traverse LS

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2012 Chevy Cne LS
Stk #C12184, Auto, AC, CO, XM. OnStar, 4 1k.
rnal $4 A C


2012 Chevy Vot


2013 Chevy Spak 5 Dr. LS
5-Spend, AC, Thuchreen, 1.2L 4 CyL


2012 Chevy Impala LT
AC. CO Pwr eat, V ,Gt MPG
T- $4Q OO


MSRP ...................................30,750
DLR DISCOUNT...................- $1,751
REBATE.................................- $2,000
CASH OR TRADE................- $2,500


MSRP ...................................$18,880
DLR DISCOUNT..................- $900
REBATE...................................- $500
CASH OR TRADE ................- $2,500


PL
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MSRP ................................... $12,995
DLR DISCOUNT......................- $500
CASH OR TRADE ..............- $2,500
I


MSRP ................................... $28,610
DLR DISCOUNT....................- $6,111
CASH OR TRADE ................- $2,500


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TheA-tew, Totally Sogpiisticated

2013 Honda Accord
ACCORDABILITY = AFFORDABILITY
AC'CORD verb (used without object)... to be in agreement or harmony; agree.


New 2013 Honda Fit
MODEL GEH3CEXW. EQUIfED NOT STRIPPED
WITH AUTOMATIC, AC AND CRUISE


New 2012 Honda Accord LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW. AUTOMATICPOWER PKG,
CRFlISE.TRACTION COITOL AND SO MUCH MORE


New 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid
I.B* Sti Mi LT i~ll Ci'TRlBUl R.I'W3-ll IUM wli EX:.
ASa~~Srsw -sOsa Ufmsw~o mU U. BUJETDOo HttPSFflE w


New 2912 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL flH3CEW. COiE SEEWHYTHE CRVY ISTHE BEST
SELUNG 0IMCT SUV iN AMEICA! SVEWEVLETHEY LASP


New 2012 Honda Ridgellne RT
MOEiF2cYME, 'O.DWTHTHE TRJ T N TE BER POWt P
CRISE CiDTRFc W PUiMR MND A RICE LIKE NO .m.H.


New 2012 Honda Crossur EX-V6
WICEH.F1H3C. AJIJLITAT D HATCHABCKWITVH SfELEANID IT
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D8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


21 FT PROLINE CC
175 Johnson; with alumi-
num trailer, radio, fish
finder, & bimini $5500
(352) 726-4517
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
GULF to LAKE MARINE
*WE PAY CASH $$ *
For Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Harris Kayot
2000, Pontoon Boat
26' w/trailer, $8,000
352-628-7444
JON BOAT
18 ft., flat bottom,
all new decking, 25H
mercury, GPS & Trailer
$4,000 (352) 563-0328
Looking for an 18 ft
SeaArk. Boat, motor and
trailer(352) 270-8225
aa. -1


SEA CHASER
2008 1800 RG (18') V
hull. 90 Yamaha 4 stroke,
only 82 hours. Warranty
until
11-30-2014.Aluminum
trailer
Great flats or bay boat.
Excellent condition, al-
ways stored in-
side.$14,900. Call
352-601-6656
SEA NYMP BOAT 15FT
Steel hull with "V" bottom
$400 352-382-4511

TRI PONTOON BOAT
A & M, 27 ft, fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $19,500
352-613-8453

















JAMBOREE
05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002



BRIDGEVIEW
2011 381KWT
38'Bridgeview trailer w/4
slides 4 sale.42" tv,corian
countertops,residential
refrigerator, Whirlpool
washer/dryer,4 burner
stove,2wardrobes
w/mirrored
doors,awning,front win-
dow awning,day/night
shadesfireplace center
island, central AC, Asking
$35,000 Phone
(610) 597-9936
KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33 3 slides. New ti-
res excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835



FORD 351 Cleveland
4 bolt main bare block
$100 352-613-0393




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 call AJ



$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440



2011 MUSTANG GT
5.0 PREMIUM
CONVERTIBLE
$10,000 extras. Candy
Red metallic tinted,
Automatic, Used as a
show car. Only
5,560miles, 400hprw
$ 39,798.00
352-270-8541


ACURA
2007, RL, Navigation
NICE, Black on Black
$14,800
Call 352-978-3571
AUDI
2001 A4, Quatro AWD
83K miles, MUST SEE!!
$7,200
(352) 628-5100
Buick
'08 Lucerne, 41k miles,
excel. cond. $15,900
(352) 794-3907
BUICK
'96, Park Ave., v6, auto,
sunroof., runs & drives
great,or trade $1,900 obo
352-447-2366
CHEVROLET
2004 Cavalier,
extra clean, $5,99
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005 Equinox Is
45,329 miles $10,995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt LT Coupe,
Auto, Silver, Garage kept,
66k mi, $7950 OBO
(352) 344-1688
CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Edition Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Condi-
tion $8750 522-0505
DODGE
2000 Avenger..might
need starter. Asking $900
call 352-270-4098.
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
$4,995
352-341-0018
FORD
2000 Mustang. If you like
Mustang Cobra convert.
*Must see this car*
$4975(352) 382-7001
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2009 Mustang, leather,
8,837 miles, $18,995
352-341-0018
FORD
'99, Crown Victoria
68k miles
$4,000
(352) 489-5066
HONDA
09" Accord 4dr EXL V-6
Green, 26K Like new.
$19,800 (352) 895-9864
HONDA
2003 Accord EX V-6,
Leather, Sunroof, Runs
Great, 180K Miles $4,900
Call 352-220-2875
HONDA
2004 Element, 186K
miles, EX, Automatic
$5,200
Call (352) 978-3571
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
LINCOLN
'99 Continental, white
w/ gray leather interior,
all the bells and whistles
$2,990obo 352-897-4490
MERCURY
'08 Milan, Wh 4 door w/
grey lea int, All Power,
Exc Cond; 39k mi;
$12,800 obo 634-4524
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi. New
tires & battery
Book $16,700
Sell $14,300
(352) 302-0778
SUZUKI
2007 Forenza,
Clean, Only 52K miles
$6,500.
Call 352-302-3704
TOYOTA
1999 Camry LE, Only ,
62K miles, $5,995..
Call 352-422-0306
TOYOTA
2004 Camry XLE, V6,
42K miles, One Owner
$11,700.
Call 352-476-6059


TOYOTA
2004, Avalon XLS
80K miles Xtra Clean
$10,700.
Call (352) 302-3704
TOYOTA
2004, Camry XLE V6,
42K miles One Owner
$1 1,700.
Call (352) 422-0360
TOYOTA
2007, Pruls, 91K miles,
Super Clean with
warranty $10,300.
Call 352-978-3571
VOLVO
2004 C70 Convertible,
leather, power top,
30,244 miles $10,995
352-341-0018


FORD 1923
T-BUCKET FIBER-
GLASS 454 Chevy
830 rated HP
street legal, $17,000
352-344-9502






Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVY 97
Silverado 2500
Ext Cab, 2wd,
low mileage
352-794-6709
FORD
1988 F150 BLACK
SHORTBED, 6 CYL. 5
SPEED, MANY NEW
PARTS, RUNS GREAT,
18 MPG. $1200
352-256-8488, 897-7479
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
Red 1994 F150 4x4, Su-
per cab w/ full Leer Cap,
Spotless and Original
$6000 (352) 465-5874
GMC
Sonoma 1995 Extended
Cab. Runs Great! $1995
352-464-3897
TOYOTA
2005, Tacoma
Reg. Cab 5 speed,
Bed Topper $8,800
Call 352-422-0360



CHEVROLET
2008 Tahoe LTZ, 34,600
miles, black, leather, 4X4,
DVD, navigation, war-
ranty, excellent condition,
$11400,
awan@netscape.com
DODGE
2001 Durango BIk, sport
package, tool/luggage
rack. $2,800 O.B.O.
443-806-4343


CLASSIFIED


01" Explorer Sport,
"red" 2dr w/towing, 98K
$4900 352-527-4484
GMC
2003 Yukon SLT
Exc cond New tires. Well
maintained.108,000mi
Load w/Onstar
$10,250
(207)-730-2636
GMC
White 1999 Yukon SLT
w/ towing package. 113K
mi. Excellent Cond!
Asking $4495.
(352) 795-4454



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600



DODGE 10"
Grand Caravan SXT
Bright Silver 39Kmi senior
owned, book $18,000.
Sell $15,500
(941) 730-2359
FORD
2011, Econollne E350
XLT, 12 Passenger Van
40K miles $16,995
Call 352-302-3704
FORD
94" 15 Passenger E350,
$2000 OBO.
352-427-2388



HARLEY '98
XL1200 Sportster 8k mi.,
Lots of extras & new stuff
$3250, Evening only
(352) 382-0403
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 04'
Ultra classic. Runs great!
New tires, brakes &
battery. EXTRAS!!
$8500 or OBO
352-601-4722
HARLEY-DAVIDSON
2000 FXDC Dyna Super
Glide Custom Nice clean
bike black on black 28k
asking $5500.00 obo
352-476-6512
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $3,500.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688


KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 525 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 Phone
352-726-8124
YAMAHA
2004 Silverado w/ wind-
shield, sidebar, & foot
rest, Exc Cond,17,800 mi
$3500 (352) 270-8225



918-1130 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, Novem-
ber 10, until November
302012.
Pub:November 10 thru 30,
2012.


366-1111 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
There will be a meeting on Monday, November 19, 2012 at 3:30pm with Citrus
County Hospital Board Trustees Debbie Ressler and Mike Bays and the Citrus Memo-
rial Health Foundation, Inc. Directors Robert Collins and Sandra Chadwick in the
Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Ad-
ministration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. This notice informs and no-
tifies the public that members) of the Citrus County Hospital Board and Citrus Me-
morial Health Foundation, Inc. will be in attendance at a joint conference. The Citrus
County Hospital Board of Trustees will not vote or conduct business. Additional Citrus
County Hospital Board Trustees may be present.
The Citrus County Hospital Board Trustee(s) will be active participantss. This notice in-
forms the public that two or more members of the Citrus County Hospital Board shall
participate with one or more Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. Director(s) to
discuss:
Citrus County Hospital Board and Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Charty
Care Policies.
Other.
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at
352-341-2245. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
November 11,2012.

365-1111 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO BID
The Citrus County Mosquito Control District is offering the following equipment thru
Sealed Bids.
2005 Polaris 4 Wheeler (M711) in fair condition
2005 Polaris 4 Wheeler (M712) in fair condition
2005 Polaris 4 Wheeler (M713) in fair condition
2005 Polaris 4 Wheeler (M714) in fair condition
2005 Polaris 4 Wheeler (M715) in fair condition
2005 Polaris 4 Wheeler (M716) in fair condition
2004 Honda 4 Wheeler (M732) in fair condition
2004 Honda 4 Wheeler (M734) in fair condition
2004 Honda 4 Wheeler (M735) in fair condition
All items sold in "as is, where is" condition without representation or warranty. Any
potential
purchaser may inspect and examine the condition of these vehicles prior to submitt-
ing any bid.
Successful bidder will be required to sign a release form transferring all liability of the
item.
Winning bidder has 24 hours to pick up and remove item from the property, after
which the
next highest bidder will be awarded the item.
These items may be seen Monday thru Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Bid sheets are
available
at the District Headquarters, 968 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, Fl. 34461. All bids must be
received
by 4:00 p.m. on November 20, 2012.
Bids will be awarded at the regular Board Meeting on December 13, 2012 at 3:45
p.m.
Further information may be obtained by contacting the office at (352) 527-7478.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any and all for-
malities.
By order of the Board of Commissioners of the Citrus County Mosquito Control Dis-
trict.
Robert Milan
Chairman of the Board
Any person who wishes to appeal any decision made by the Board, Agency or
Commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, will need a record of
the proceedings,
and that for such purpose, may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made,
which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
November 11,2012.


A
1,-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VILLAGE


TOYOTA

CRYSTAL

p RIVER


a


impd
Lilln


urn""


MSRP $17,800
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 2,805


14,995 for 159


2012 TOYOTA



CAMRY


Auto, PW, PL, Cruise, CD i

MSRP $22,895
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 3,900





$18,995*


T121117



or LEASE

for 189


2012 TOYOTA -


PRIUSI '



Auto, Cruise, Push Button
Start, Bluetooth, CD '.121504


MSRP $24,840
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 2,500


$;22,30 oorLEASE


,0340 fors219





2012 TOYOTA

EXTENDED CAB ITUN R








Entry System

MSRP 28,315
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 6,000




p22,1315







@ VILLAGE TOYOTA

www.villagetoveta.com CRYSTAL RIVER

ToyotaCare526285100


*All leases with $2,399 Cash Cap Reduction, 36 Mos, 12k Per Year, All Offers While Supplies Last.





Section E SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


i Sikorski's
.P PAttic
PAGE E4


ESTATE GUIDE


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ift







E2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


LINE


:2417 -NFO'LINE
(352 637.2828
CEnterhou0 828


BRING YOUR ANIMALS!!
* Almost 10 Acres Open Pastures
* Large Scrn. Pool 20x36 Barn
Huge Great Room Fully Fenced w/Gate
* Great Appliances Peaceful Area
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 Ti
EiEmail, elliesullon.a leinax.nel


* Gorgeous Kitchen 2.80 Private Acres
* Fenced and Gated Great for Gardening
* Huge Great Room 2/2/2 Car Gar.
* Master Suite w/FP!!! Steel Frame Const.!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Ermaail. KellyG.teimax.ael M 5


VtK: WtLL-KtPI!!
* Great Florida Room Eat-In Kitchen
* Nice Master Bath Large Built-Ins
* Lots of Cabinets Updated Windows
* 2/2/2 Car Gar Imperial Model!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Email. KellyG. meimax.nel


BEST PRICE CONDO AT

SAWGRASS LANDINGS
Great furnished condo with
community dock & pool. Great
little place to hang out in
SCALLOPING SEASON
or on weekends.



LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.crystalriverfl.com


5849 H. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CC Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875

242








6145 W. RIO GRANDE DR.
PINE RIDGE
,3BD/2BA/2CG Under Construction
* Dream Custom Home Builder Feature 2,464 SF Living
Call Listing Agent for Details
PETER & MARVIA KOROL |
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


* 3/2 with Carport Hardwood Floors
* New Kitchen Updated Baths
* New Appliances New Deck & Balcony
* Granite Covered Boat Slip
* New Paint Inside and Out
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotlls@ol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


2 BUMELIA COURT SUGARMILL WOODS
* 2BR/2BA/2 Car Gar. Open Floor Plan
SLiving Rm. & Family Rm. Super Efficient Kitchen
* Formal DR Breakfast Nook
SQuality Floor Tile Re-Roof 2005
* Central Atrium Private Screened Patio
* Close to SMW CC & Golf Course
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 F
Email. lounlley@tampabay.rr.com











REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

+


SI'


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UINE i"'146374~
2828 2'63.2828
I.i Enter I"us,
awl
oill
a _-


1b4U W. CANNUNUALt U1IVtI
MEADOWCREST
* Nice 2BR/2BA/20G Home Lg. Great Room
* Eat-In Kitchen Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Deep Lot Well Maintained

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpllmer@remax.net


BAMMM!! Bank-owned large 4/2/2
corner lot home in beautiful Sugarmill Woods!!
Never lived in home. Ready for new owners
immediately. Functional split plan home
features formal dining area, living room, family
room, plant shelves, tray ceilings, neutral
colors and more. Call right now for your
private showing!!
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 I
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


32)2417 INFO LIN'E
(321 63 X28
; ~~Enter 111to,.10


e- C.--
Eprima

Rim.. l~li


3889 N. PASSION FLOWER WAY
BEVERLY HILLS
SNice 3BR/2BN2CG Pool Home Ceramic Tile Flors Throughout
*NewRoof 2007 'Lg. Kitchen w/Newer Appliances
* Caged Pool wSolar Paneb Well MaintainedLots of Upgrades
* Nicely Landscaped on 11/2 Lots
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpnlmer@remax.net


DO HOT MISS OUT on this Pine
Ridge deal! Lovely 3/2/3+ den boasts a
solar heated pool & spa, gas fireplace, RV
pad with 50 amp, large open kitchen.
Upgrades include flooring, custom window
treatments and baths. Enjoy your morning
coffee in the breakfast nook overlooking
your pool.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


2421 N. H e H s -w .


BEAUTIFUL 3/2 HOME on 2.5 well-
maintained acres in Homosassa. Laminate
floors, kitchen open to living area by long
breakfast bar, oversized master, huge storage/
pantry, newer roof, drain field and A/C. Bring
your animals and enjoy the country lifestyle,
yet still close to all amenities.
IODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@dtrusrealty. om


LARGE 3/2.5/2 HOME
on 2 acres with pond. Large master
suite. Caged inground pool, huge lanai,
fireplace in family room and cooks
kitchen. Owner ill and must sell.

JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferSloliz@remax.net
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com i


7 RIVERS GOLF CLUB
* Elegant Open Floor Plan Large Lot -.68 Acres
*3/2.5 with Oversized Garage No HOA
* Backs Up to Conservation Area 10x31 Enclosed Lanai

SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylponls@aol.com
Website: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com


CINNAMON RIDGE
This 2/2 Home of Merit DW has been completely
renovated Upgrades include maple kitchen
cabinets, new counter & floors, maple vanities &
solid surface tops both baths, gas fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, skylights, bay window, Ig closets, front &
back decks New roofover 2007 MOVE-IN
CONDITIONI Cute as a button Priced to sell
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: marthl.sather@remax.net
VIRTUAL TOURS at www.martho.sather.remax.com


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net











Sunflowers thrive in fall Florida gardens


all flowers
often are
yellow or
purple. Golden-
rods, Sol-
idagospecies,
bloom from Sep-
tember to Octo-
ber Gay Feather,
Liatris, flowers
about the same Jane
time. Bright, flat-
topped panicles JAP
of Florida Paint- GAR
brush, Carphep-
horuscurymbosus, follow
later from October through
November. Narrowleaf Sun-
flower, Helianthus angusti-
folia, is native throughout
the eastern United States.
These native plants are
readily available in native
nurseries locally
Narrowleaf Sunflower is
naturally a tall plant, about
4 to 6 feet There are about
30 members of the He-
lianthus genus in the South-
east. They have a tendency
to cross-pollinate. Hybrid
plants sprout from cross-
pollinated seeds that may
have different characteris-
tics from their mother.
Perennial sunflowers can
be propagated from the rap-
idly spreading roots. A
clump can outgrow its allot-


I
"V
I
N


ted space in the
garden in a few
years. Plants
grown from pro-
liferating roots
are identical
clones of the par-
ent stock. Nar-
ro w leaf
/ Sunflowers
Veber bloom in Septem-
ber through to
E'S early November
DEN in the north part
of Central
Florida. Leaves die off after
flowers fade and seeds ma-
ture. Butterflies sip nectar
in season. Small songbirds
eat the tiny seeds.
Gardeners usually cut
sunflower stalks back to the
ground after they have flow-
ered, then cover the roots
and emerging basal leaves
for next year's plants. Two
inches of natural pine nee-
dles, commercially sold as
small bales called Pine
Straw, are sufficient to top
dress beds and provide pro-
tection from frost over the
winter. Harvest needles
from nearby pines, which
shed needles in October and
in the spring.
Sunflowers are grown for
their showy bright yellow
flowers. There is sometimes


mis-identification of plants,
particularly hybrid
seedlings. Cross-pollinated
seeds may not be viable or
capable of producing plants.
If a plant grows exception-
ally tall, from 6 to 9 feet, and
flowers later in October and
November, it may be a hy-
brid, with parentage from
the Muck Sunflower, H. sim-


ulans. Leaves of both are
narrow and about 4 inches
long. Both are rough-tex-
tured and produce masses
of fall flowers. The similar
Florida Sunflower, H. flori-
danus, is very closely re-
lated and difficult to
differentiate. Some plants-
men consider the trio to be
different forms of a single


species. Genetic testing will
eventually clarify and cor-
rect past errors in naming
plants.
By any name, narrowleaf
sunflowers can add color
and height to the back of a
perennial flower bed.
Growth tips can be pinched
early in summer a time or
two to promote branching


and lower height. The flow-
ering is so dense that very
tall plants may topple under
the weight of so many flow-
ers. Early tip pruning can
prevent the height problem.
Pinch after July and there is
a risk of taking off the form-
ing flower buds.

See JANE/Page E10


rk ChIT U ILI RbUL1E .


knanda & irk Jonsm Tom Ballour UL Aeus & Hi Stener Art Paty
BRoKtE/AMOC. REALTORC? REACTOR tALTOR-BROKER REACTOR


746-9000,


I'~~ ~ ~ ~ II IA.
0 .0 Slai


14K
aO .5-


Real Estate DIGEST


Canchola Joins
EXIT Realty
Yolanda Canchola
recently joined EXIT
Realty Leaders in
Crystal River.
EXIT Realty Leaders


I


Yolanda
Canchola


is at 730 N. Suncoast
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429.
For more information
about Canchola, call
352-794-0888 or visit
www. exitrealty
leaders.com.


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney A t
S Realtor.-. A OUSE Realtor@ 1t "L' -- _OOW11 FIN. NG- '
A30239 SON 2879022 1 0013 E BASS 521 N HARRISON 7 LEE 27 S. FILLMORE 15 S. FILLMORE 4506 N. TUMBLEWEED
302' 3/2/2 357224 $59,500 2/2/2 350036 $54,900 2/2/2 356827 $59,000 3/1/1 356531 $53900 2/2 354359 $49,900 3/2 356299 $39,900
The Golden Girl WEEKS REA. 4.WEEK REALTY, 5 BEVERL HIS BLVDr um 0

35 N. RSO 7466700 F F7.7
S29 N. WASHINTON 64 S LEE 3755 N. ROSCOE S. FRANKFURTER 45 S. MELBOURNE 3750 W HONEYLOCUST DR
S356448 $39900 2/2/2 357886 $54900 2/2 35665 37,500 3/1.5/1 356952 F43900 354341 $84,900 3/2/2 358885 $92,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY.. BEVERLY HILLS. FL 344-5 1*-RRR-7R97100


101 S. BARBOUR ST. 3 CLIFFORD
2/2/2 354334 $59,900 2/2/2 355613 $57,900


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 E3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
'F


0WNEi"FI'NANCIN_6_


BEVERLY HILLS


-~ .~r~


U







E4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
......... .....................................advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
...... ......................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

C HikONIC"LE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Rodeo benefits 4-H


Get ready to rodeo!
The Citrus Stam-
pede Rodeo is rollin'
into Inverness with shows
at 8p.m. Friday, Nov 16 and
Saturday, Nov 17. This is a
profes-
sional r
rodeo,
with cow-
boys and
cowgirls -
comin g
into town
f r o m
from
across the
country
to corn- Amy Duncan
pete. The YOUNG
Citrus
County 4- IDEAS
H Foun-
dation volunteer directors
have been working hard all
year preparing to bring you
this exciting family event.
Call the rodeo informa-
tion line for ticket pricing
and outlet locations: 352-
564-4525.
This PRCA rodeo is a
family night out. Food and


V1T1


Special to the Chronicle


other merchandise vendors
will be available starting
when the gates open at 5:30
p.m. Highlights of the rodeo
include a free Kiddie Cor-
ral for the little ones to play
games and get their own
rodeo "back number" like
the big cowboys and cow-
girls wear.


Another kid favorite is
the boot scramble during
intermission. Here's how it
works: All of the partici-
pants will remove one of
their shoes, the shoes are
hauled to the other end of
the arena and tossed about.

See RODEO/Page E5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inside...


Modern cornucopias
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Compote; WWII map; Porgy and Bess program book


D earJohn: Enclosed is a
photograph of a center-
piece that has been
around since at
least 1925. I am in-
cluding a drawing
of the marking on
the bottom.
L.R.N, Beverly
Hills
Dear L.RN.: The
incomplete draw-
ings you included
of the marks on the John S
underside of your
compote are not SIKO
complete enough to AT
help identify the
maker. The attractive green
opalescent glass bowl that sits
on top of the metal base does
not look like it was made for
the base. Without better pho-
tos that is all I can say Poten-
tial dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: My late father-
in-law was stationed in Guam


i

T


at the end of World War II and
we found a block print, on
linen as it appears, in his be-
longings. It is a map
of Leyte Island, the
site of MacArthur's
return to the Philip-
1 pines. I only know
about the impor-
tance of the con-
- quering of Leyte
from the Japanese
from Wikipedia. My
korski wife wonders if this
print is of any value
S S to a collector -
IC G.H., Citrus Springs
Dear G.H: World
War II memorabilia is a large
category of collecting. The
linen map is a nice piece of
memorabilia but is low on the
totem pole of collector inter-
est. Potential dollar value is
low. For more specific infor-
mation about it, contact the
specialty war memorabilia
auction company Manion's In-


international at www.manions.
com.
Dear John: I have a very de-
tailed and large program book
from the original play "Porgy
and Bess." It appears to be
from 1952. It lists and pictures
all the actors, and scenes and
lyrics as well, I believe. It
measures approximately 10
inches by 14 inches. I also
have a smaller program hand-
out. My father saved this for
years and I was wondering if it
had any resale value. K.C.,
Internet
Dear K.C.: I imagine you
have triggered some pleasant
Remember When moments
for a lot of our readers.

See ATTIC/Page E5
Though an attractive combina-
tion, it's unlikely this metal
base was originally intended
to go with this glass bowl.
Special to the Chronicle


.. -~i:---=L~prs


4- 4_-_







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



RODEO
Continued from Page E4

Then on a signal to go, it
is a race for the first boy
and first girl to find their
own shoe, get it back on
their foot, and run across
the finish line.
A few tips for success and
a fun time: white socks will
never be the same after
running in the red clay, so
don't wear brand new
pretty socks! And there are
only so many varieties of
youth sneakers and boots -
so label your shoes with an
identifying mark to be sure
that your child comes home
with his or her own shoe,
and not someone else's!
Following the rodeo
events, there is a free auto-
graph session in the arena.
Autographable posters are


provided to everyone to get
signed by the rodeo celebri-
ties, Miss Rodeo Florida,
cowboys and cowgirls.
All proceeds benefit the
Citrus County 4-H Youth De-
velopment program. 4-H is a
community of young people,
across America, learning
leadership, citizenship and
life skills. Positive youth de-
velopment, like 4-H through
the University of Florida/
IFAS Citrus County Exten-
sion, provides opportunities
for young people to feel safe,
respected, intellectually
stimulated and engaged in
their community
4-H Youth Development
uses experiential, re-
searched-based educational
opportunities that help
youth become competent,
caring, confident, connected
and contributing citizens of
character Recent studies in-
dicate that youth spending


time in positive youth activi-
ties, like 4-H, are less likely
to become involved in high-
risk behaviors, have higher
school attendance and
grades, better conflict man-
agement practices, better
work habits and are more in-
volved in the community
4-H involves more youth
than just the "farm kids" who
raise an animal for the
county fair. Today, 4-H has
more members who live in
cities and towns than those
from rural areas. 4-H uses
many different projects to
engage youth in areas of in-
terest Opportunities exist in
subjects like rocketry, robot-
ics, biofuels, renewable en-
ergy, and computer science.
4-H Science, Technology, En-
gineering and Math (STEM)
programs are improving the
science literacy and aptitude
of America's youth.
Volunteers, under the guid-


ance of extension profession-
als and staff, are the people
who enable 4-H to reach
more kids than any youth or-
ganization. People volunteer
for 4-H for many reasons.
There is a special sense of ac-
complishment in helping a
new generation of young peo-
ple grow and learn.
For more information on
4-H, visit wwwflorida4h.
org, or call the County Ex-
tension/4-H Office at 352-
527-5712.
Citrus County Extension
connects the public with the
University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address
youth, family, community
and agricultural needs. Pro-
grams and activities offered
by the Extension Service
are available to all persons
without regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion or
national origin.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

Theatrical memorabilia is a
category of collector inter-
est. Potential dollar value
for your Porgy and Bess
items is below $100.
DearJohn: I love listening
to your radio show and
reading the articles, as
there is always some inter-
esting tidbit to be learned. I
was wondering if there is
any interest in an old floor
model Telefunken tube
radio with a record player
on top. It is in operating con-
dition and is pretty, but is
taking up too much space. -
PW, Internet
DearPW.: Collectors have
the same problem you have
space constraints. Not only
that but small tabletop mod-
els were manufactured in a


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 E5

larger variety of styles than
floor models. They were
usually bought as fashion-
able additions to the home
and were reflective of the
latest trends in style.
Telefunken is a name
widely recognized by radio
collecting aficionados as
well as the general public.
Small countertop Tele-
funken radios are of interest
to collectors. Large console
models are difficult to sell.
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30years. He
hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send ques-
tions to Sikorski's Attic, PO.
Box2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


Seiii in Ter Vist Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
Terrace a lGL Offce inte
__t a r9&BrntwodReal (352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
REALTY G RO UP P. r sa lt ropc BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133* VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777




T
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 4 BED, 4 BATH, 2 CAR GARAGE DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
PLUS GOLF CART GARAGE, FOXFIRE Skyview Villa detached maintenance free home in upscale country club DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
AS GOOD AS IT GETS I One of a kind, immaculate Custom pool/spa home with community of Terra Vista Spacious Great Room floor plan with 2 bedrooms and Excellent view of the 5th hole of the Skyview Golf Course this 3/2/2 maintenance DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
guest suite, situated on the best home site in Foxfire on Skyview Golf Course Den Beautiful .. I .... ...II i i , i. i ..... b. i. ,. ,. I I free villa is a fantastic buy at this price The villa has a therapeutic step in tub in Luxurious Lantana Model This open floor plan has a beautifully mirrored formal
Professionally ,I .... i I .....1. I ....I, ., enjoy exclusive living in screened lanai I .. ..1 r I '1 ..1 "....... . .. I .11 1t h i. I" , I .. ... ,i .. 11, reasy ,t tl t It I ,r t
thispremierc i ... .... I... .. glassblockshower andwindow treatmentsthroughout 1, I .. .. Ii. i .. ii. I .. .. i i ending i i I .... I .. .. ii .,, I .. . .. 1.
MLS 355511 $589,000 MLS355198 $229,000 breezes MLS 354569 $224,900 lovely home MLS 352909 $199,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
i fabulous panoramic viewl Don't miss this 3/3/2 home on

1 y painted
IIi 376,500


SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 2 BATH, FOXFIRE _
Enjoy the lifestyle in elegance & luxury 3/2 plus den This home includes a gas DETACHED
fireplace, plantation shutters From the paver drive, professionally landscaped Enjoy maintenance
home site, feel transformed as you enter the doors where beauty and upgrades
surround you Relax in peace & tranquility in the "lagoon look" lanai area
MLS 358725 $385.000


L MAn, WUUVVILW VILLm
//office in Terra Vista's Dua pane
$229.900


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS

S.. .' ' .. i I ' ,1 9,900
I.'. I I I11 111111 111 .1I 1 11 111 $169,900I 1 I1 111.


TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLAS 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SOUTHGATE VILLA!
Nice furnished end unit townhome in Brentwood Open floor plan, eat in kitchen, Immaculate unfurnished home in the Community of Brentwood Open floor plan I i ,i,,, .. i i, , i + den/office, 2 bath, 2 car .. i i
bath downstairs, complete with washer & dryer Social Club Membership Included with lots of space Formal Dining area, breakfast nook and Den Social Club ide the Screened Lanai i
) #1277 $1.100 MomhVprhin Innnrlid 417?n2 $1.100 nrestinins nated TerraVista nf Citrus Hills #3323 u1.675


I I


Terms 6 Months or More
Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! Social Membership included with all Rentals


j


,
,


, I












Goats get rid of unwanted vegetation


re d


Associated Press
Lani Malmberg, right, and her son, Donny Benz, direct a heard of goats to graze near Three Springs, Colo. Malmberg is the
co-owner of Goat Green, a company that uses goats to manage unwanted vegetation and help recondition soil.
I 1 I- S- ALLOF CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


For a Vir l T r or Me P os

www.Forid howcse-rpertis-co


7 giWoa 5395 N Allamandra Dr.
MLS#358165 $325,000
This unassuming exterior belies hidden
treasures! 3/2.5/2 pool home on one acre.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


fe S# 4257 N Mayan Dr. Lt 1421 W Laurel Glen Path
MLS#357081 $296,950 ML#351452 $274,700
Spacious 4/3/3 plus a den on a lovely Beautiful 22/2+ den & just the right size
wooded acre. expansive pool deck.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


in--na c
ao 1312W Sphere Pl. ll 1875 W Pearson St.
S MLS#357532 $229,900 -' MLS#351889 $199,999
4/2/2 pool home on a beautifully Unique 3/2/2 plus den on a wooded
elevation 1 acre. 1 acre lot.
Teresa Boozer352-634-0213 Mark Casper 352-302-3146


S.1
aB L 691 E Knightsbridge PI.
MLS#350197 $199,900
The perfect family pool home with
privacy galore.
Mark Casper352-476-8136


Z\,"it 1671 N Dimaggio Path
ia MLS#357775 $239,000
PRICED TO SELL! 3/2/2 on the 2nd
fairway of Skyview.
Sandra Olear352-212-4058


kL'if- ---
.illts 165 E Ireland Ct.
MLS#354308 $199,000
Updated 3/2/2 Oaks Golf Course Home.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


PENDING


NEW LISTING




04iNJaS 8225 N Duval Dr.
r MLS#358732 $141,000
Perfect size home on a "WOW"
golf course lot.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


S883 W Sunbird Palh
7/Zjue MLS#357882 $89,500
Largest villa 3/2/2 model on a
quiet cul de sac.
Mark Casper352-476-8136


ImL
jn bfAf 303 E Hartford St. 4-5a
MLS#358844 $74,900
Fully furnished 2/2+carport near
community pool.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


S.iUl' 241 W Hollyfern PI.
MLS#357605 $69,900
Beautiful 2/2/2 home located on
corner lot.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


' 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the B
Prudential logo and the Rocksymbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


EMERY COWAN
The Durango Herald

DURANGO, Colo. -
Bone-dry dirt crunched un-
derneath Lani Malmberg's
boots as she walked across a
65-acre stretch of land just
west of Mercy Regional
Medical Center. Only a few
withered tumbleweeds
managed to hold onto the
barren area of dirt that has
been the unfortunate victim
of drought, unsustainable
grazing practices and a now
sparsely populated prairie
dog town.
But if Malmberg is al-
lowed to work her magic,
she said, in three years the
land will look as lush as a
golf course.
Her secret: 850 goats.
Malmberg is the co-owner
of Goat Green, a company
that uses goats to manage
unwanted vegetation and
help recondition soil. Malm-
berg and her 29-year-old
son, Donny Benz, travel the
western half of the country
together with the goats,
going wherever they're
needed. The goats have
been used for weed man-
agement, erosion mitiga-
tion, reseeding, soil
restoration and fire-fuel
reduction.
"They're a living, moving
landscaping machine,"
Malmberg said. The goats
provide an alternative to
machinery and chemical
herbicides, she said.
The company is in the
middle of a three-week en-
deavor to bring the soil back
to life on the barren patch of
land in the Grandview area.
The property is owned by
Kim Crader Buffalo, but
Chevron Corp. operates a
well there, and it is paying
for the operation to "assist
the landowner's efforts to im-
prove the land," according to
an email sent by Chevron
spokeswoman Cary Baird.
The impetus for the
revegetation efforts came
when officials from the
county and the Colorado Oil
and Gas Conservation Com-


mission reinspected a
Chevron-owned holding
pond located on the Crader
property. The holding pond,
used for exploration and
production wastewater, was
grandfathered into a
statewide rule governing
those waste-management
locations. But when a riding
arena was built across the
road, officials decided
Chevron needed to bring
the pond into compliance
with the state's security,
fencing and signage re-
quirements, said Karen
Spray, the commission's en-
vironmental protection
specialist.
The pond wasn't being put
to much use, so Chevron de-
cided to close it and reclaim
the land, Spray said.
Chevron is moving away
from the use of holding
ponds in its operations
across the globe, Baird said.
Chevron decided to ex-
pand its reclamation work
beyond the pond and hired
Goat Green to do the work.
The company has used
Malmberg and her goats on
other projects in Wyoming
and the Piceance Basin
near Grand Junction.
In addition to Chevron,
the company has done work
for city and county govern-
ments, the Department of
Defense, federal public
lands agencies and private
operations. Malmberg's
prices range from 50 cents
per goat per day to $5 per
goat per day
For the Durango job, the
goats take daily five-plus
mile walks around the open
space on the property. They
nibble on shrubs, trees and
weeds that are unpalatable
to most grazing animals. As
they meandered through
the hills and gullies behind
the hospital, the goats
scrambled up and down the
steep hillsides to nibble on
the sparse scrub brush and
Gambel oak.
"This is perfect goat coun-
try. Horses and cattle


See GOATS/Page E7


E6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The biggest bang



for your kitchen



remodeling buck


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


BERT HENDERSON
Special to the Chronicle
Most people don't have $40,000 to
$50,000 to do a major kitchen remod-
eling. But, if you're desperate and
want to improve the looks of your
kitchen and not have a huge price tag,
you might want to consider the follow-
ing tips from the remodeling experts.
Consider doing some of the work
yourself, like the nasty back-breaking
low-skill work of removing flooring,
cabinets, tile, etc. Labor costs can take
a remodeling price tag through the
roof. Don't, however, try to do the com-
plicated projects you may not have
done or have no experience with, such
as electrical, plumbing, roofing, in-
stalling air conditioning, etc. leave
those to the experts.
To further reduce your overhead,
pick out stock or modular factory-
built cabinets over the custom-de-
signed units. Remember, a larger
cabinet costs less than two smaller
ones with the same storage capacity.
Another option might be to paint the


GOATS
Continued from Page E6

wouldn't survive out here," Benz said
as he walked behind the goats.
As they eat, the goats ingest and di-
gest the nutrients and minerals stored
in plants around the area. Weed seeds
also are destroyed by going through
the goat's digestive tract. Then they
come back and release those elements
in their feces and urine, boosting soil
health and preparing it for new plant
growth. Part of Malmberg's job is to di-
rect those nutrients to specific loca-
tions by herding the goats to walk and
bed down in certain areas.
As they walk around the barren
area, the goat's tiny hooves till the soil,
breaking up the ground's hard
drought-stricken crust and working in
the nutrient-rich goat poop.
"We're infusing a giant shot of living
energy that feeds the microbial activ-
ity below the soil," she said.


existing cabinets you have. If you
properly sand, prime, and use a good-
quality paint on your wood cabinets,
the surface finish looks great and lasts
a long time.
Try to design around what you al-
ready have in your home, like existing
walls, electrical wiring, plumbing, and
windows. If an appliance must be
moved, consider the refrigerator first,
because the refrigerator is the least-
costly appliance to replace.
Replace your old fixtures like lights,
faucets, and sinks. New cabinet knobs
and handles can make a low-cost
world of difference.
You can make the kitchen look
larger by using lighter colors and tex-
tured surfaces. Put in a kitchen island
instead of a free-standing table. The
island can serve two purposes, one as
a work space and the other as an eat-
ing space.
Shop around for the best deal you
can find on good quality flooring. You
might find a high-quality remnant at a
See BUCK/Page Ell

At the end of their contract, Malm-
berg will reseed the area with a mix of
legumes, yarrow and native grasses
that should start to germinate this
spring, assuming they get enough
moisture this winter.
Goat Green also is doing work for
Three Springs. The goats are browsing
on undeveloped land owned by Three
Springs to help with weed reduction
and fuels reduction in forested areas.
Then Goat Green will do revegetation
work on a parcel Three Springs is
planning for future development, said
Kurt Prinslow, planning manager.
When she's done, Malmberg and
Benz will load the goats onto semi-
trailers and move on to the next job.
Malmberg calls herself the "gypsy goat
lady," though with her hard hat, sun-
bleached hair and jean shirt, she looks
better fitted to climb onto a construc-
tion site than amble among goats.
She's also a business woman, well-
practiced at pitching her service.
"This is one-stop shopping," she
said.


. .:.:.... I Jl'Ur,7uu: ull o see Ill IIivi. $215,000 MLS#353220 301 Groymor Path Kath)
SUPER HOUSE + MLS#356262 Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752. Chapman 352-476-4988
DUPER PRICE =
YOUR NEW _
HOME!
Bank-owned 3/3/2 Fairview Estates Pool
Home w/ 2,801 living for ONLY
$231,900! New int. paint & flooring, formal MRS. CLEAN SAYS'BRING ME AN OFFER! I, .." .- -
living & dining, family rm. w/wet bar & i,.hn h ........ .... ,. i i .. ..I . d. :-1 : .
fireplace...MUST SEE! MLS#358696 "";72 d i *I ,I 4 .
Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. 1.. 2.


CUTIE PETUTIE DOLL HOUSE! I ...... i,.. I. .1 .. - -
I iiuii iuI.. iu L llh b.iiiy Iuuiiil, i THIS HOUSE WAS THE BOMB B
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Fuller 352-212-5752. MLS#357766 Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-58(


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 E7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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E8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Company specializes


in environmentally


friendly rooftops


FRAN DANIEL
Winston-Salem Journal

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Charlie
Lovett and his wife, Janice, found the
cure for an ugly flat roof on their Win-
ston-Salem home about a year ago -
a rooftop garden.
The Lovetts, who live in the Buena
Vista area, made the decision after
talking to Jennifer Stiles of Green
Roof Gals.
Green Roof Gals is a company based
in High Point that creates environ-
mentally friendly rooftop gardens. It is
owned by Stiles and her business part-
ner, Carol Lawless.
Charlie Lovett recalled a recent
construction project at his home that
included a new screen porch and a
second-story office. Every time he
looked out his office window there
was the ugly white, rubber rooftop, ru-
ining the view of his backyard garden
and its focal point a man-made
waterfall.
"Now when I look out the window, I
see my lovely rooftop garden in the
foreground, and the rest of my garden
in the background," Lovett said.
Green roofs have been around for
years in Europe but are a fairly new
concept in the United States. They are
primarily found in large cities, includ-
ing Chicago, Seattle and Atlanta. Dif-
ferent types of green roofs, including
herb gardens and grass roofs, are

I I


often created on apartment buildings
and hospitals in urban settings.
Wendi Hartup, the natural resource
extension agent for the Forsyth
County Cooperative Extension, said
that in large Western cities, people
tend to have prairie meadow types of
rooftop gardens called vegetated gar-
dens that feature such plants as wild
flowers, tickseed and Black-Eyed
Susans.
"We don't have a lot of green roofs in
North Carolina because we just don't
plan ahead for that type of thing struc-
turally on a building," Hartup said.
She believes it's easier and less ex-
pensive if people plan out green roofs
before they build structures.
Stiles said that green roofs provide a
lot of benefits, such as doubling the
life of roofs.
"They last 25 years longer than a tra-
ditional roof," Stiles said.
The rooftop garden that Green Roof
Gals did for the Lovetts also helped
with water control.


See Page E11


SEAN D. ELIOT/The Day
Jim Costello, Senior Manager for LiveRoof sales at Prides Corner Farms in Lebanon, Conn., shows the
sections of the green roofing systems growing at the company.


iO il i.. E HOS .A -3 -


3/2/3 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
000D7H4 Call Joe at 302-0910


I Thinking of renting your home?
0 WE'VE GOT TENANTS!
.a Call us today for Full Service Property Management
SHomeroujnr (352) 527-2428
PI property Maonagement www.citruscountyrentals.com


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
SFora FREE MarketAnalysis and Marketing Plan
$7.2 million already closed by Oct. 31, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
S To Learn More -
(352) 746-9924 '


IThis wonderful
Townhome is
freshly painted
inside and out
and has new
Berber carpet.
Step through
Sthe front door
and see all the
way out to the
grassy back
yard. Wide
open great
room with sliders to the glass enclosed
Florida room. Nice size kitchen, half bath
and indoor laundry all downstairs.
Upstairs is the Large Master bedroom
with its own balcony; second bedroom
and two full baths. Call me today. Great
rice at $67,500 MLS 358139


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 E9







E10 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012


MODERN
Continued from Page E8

sophisticated yet still warm
and homey (www.westelm.com,
$39)
Pottery Barn has a selection
of realistic-looking faux pump-
kins, gourds, dried artichokes
and figs which can be reused
each year. You could mix them
or use multiples of just one.
(www.potterybarn.com, $14.50
and up). Consider incorporat-
ing a few pheasant feathers
and, to amp up the flair, some
copper or bronze glitter.
Martha Stewart's craft edi-
tors suggest making mini cor-
nucopias out of chair caning, or
larger ones for door decor The
small ones, stuffed with tissue
and a handful of nuts, make
clever party favors. The big ver-
sions, filled with pear
branches, seeded eucalyptus


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


and dried flowers, would look
great right through to winter's
holiday season. (wwwmartha
stewart.com)
Craft suppliers stock
grapevine horn-shaped bas-
kets; they're available in sizes
from 12 to 48 inches
(www.brena.com, $22 to
$263.30), and even mini place-
card or table-favor sizes.
(www.factorydirectcraft.com,
$1.49)
You can create your own
horn-shaped receptacle out of
all sorts of materials. Artist Na-
talie Raevsky has instructions
on her blog to make one out of
paper mache, lined with
burlap and wrapped with raffia.
(www.nraevskyblogspot.com)
Or make a mold by sanding a
foam cone into the shape of a
horn, wrapping it with jute and
painting it with glue. When the
glue dries, pull out the foam
and fill. (wwwholiday-crafts-
and-creations.com)


Better Homes and Gardens'
November issue has a chic,
easy twist on the cornucopia:
Wrap double layers of shim-
mery gold-green floral mesh
into a loose horn shape and fin-
ish with a silky ribbon.
(wwwbhg.com) Gilded or glit-
ter-dusted nuts and fruit would
look spectacular among some
candles, or go with a simple
cluster of dried hydrangea.
For a minimalist, rustic or
edgier look, form some hard-
ware-store aluminum chicken
wire into the horn and fill with
pine cones. Edible versions are
a fun project for children to
help with.
The Idea Room has instruc-
tions for one made of bread
dough (www.theidearoom.net)
or, if you'd like to place yours
on the Thanksgiving dessert
table, make one out of choco-
late that can be filled with
berries and grapes. (wwwthe
chocolatebelles.com)


Learn about palms
at plant clinics
Growing palm trees in Citrus County
can be a reality if we pick the correct tree
for our area. The November free Master
Gardener Plant Clinics' topic will be "All
About Palms," covering their selection,
nutrition and potential problems.
The schedule is:
E 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, at Lakes


JANE
Continued from Page E3

Grow sunflowers in full sun in well-
drained, sandy soil amended with
ample humus or decayed vegetable
mater Add more humus annually to en-
rich the soil and promote good plant
growth. Chemical fertilizers become un-
necessary after the soil is well amended.
I have added eight dump truck loads
to my front half-acre of cultivated gar-
dens and lawns in the Marion County


Region Library, Inverness.
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, at
Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
E 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21, at Citrus
Springs Library, Citrus Springs.
E 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, at Ho-
mosassa Library.
There will be no clinics during Decem-
ber due to travel and the holiday season.
The free clinics will return in January. For
more information, call 352-527-5700.

sandhills. The back half-acre is natu-
ral forest of Turkey Oaks, Longleaf
Pines, Saw Palmettos, Flag Paw Paws,
Gopher Apple, bracken fern, grasses
and wildflowers. Fall flowers thrive in
cultivated beds and in the wild.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant. Semi-retired,
she grows thousands of native plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County garden. For an
appointment call 352-249-6899 or
contact JWeberl2385@gmail.com.


A 3AULT TELLUW MUDILL
Snowbird alert! The immaculate exterior will give you a clue to the spotless
interior! Two BR, 2 baths with carport and two sheds, plus dock. Roofover keeps
this home in good condition. Furnished, if you like! $54,900 MLS 356551
Tim Donovan 220-0328





D*I *.iBBons .S. Apo a I. ol


OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING!
Hurry to a quiet Highlands neighborhood where you will find this 3/2/2, seven years old,
with original owner. Split BR plan, L-shape living room and dining room with casual dining
n well-apponted kitchen, and rear screen room. MLS #355048. $89,900
Marilyn Booth, your hostess 637-4904


NANCY PONTICOS
if1 P M Multi-Million $$$ Producer
|I l Cell: 352-634-4225 W KEY 1 REALTY INC. _
', 8015 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa FL 382-1700 t m L 1
;i n7r1 Il:k
-: -.asE~~P(rpa


CITRUS HILLS FINEST! QUALITY BUILT POOL HOME ON ACRE!
* 3 Bedrooms + Office, 3 Full Baths, Larger 2 Car Garage + Separate Shed
* Large Master Suite w/Garden Tub + Wrap-Around Shower & Dual Sinks
* Gorgeous Island Kitchen w/Cherry Wood Cabinets & Zodiac Counters
SDoule Pane Windows & Doors Lanai & POOL have Southern Exposure
$324,500 MLS#357266
e my viruial tous ,


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
IMMACULATE WATERFRONT-HERNANDO, FL Commercial location several blocks from Old
3BR/2BA upgraded home on Hernando Lake. Almost Courthouse. Former flower shop.
1/2 acre lot. Must see! $249,900 MLS#353564 $105,000 MLS#356806
E i, M M .. "a ZH


WATERFRONT PARADISE-FLORAL CITY, FL
2 story stilt home situated on 2 plus acres. In-law
suite down stairs. Lots of trees and privacy.
$169,900 MLS#358757


BANK OWNED-INVERNESSL, FL
Spacious 2BR/BA pool home. Fireplace in LR.
1 acre withdetached garage.
$79,998 MLS#356908


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (52302-6714 "'


A T V DA A




HOMOSASSA 2006 D/W M/H on a little over HOMOSASSA Off Rockcrusher, lovely 3
5 acres of land, fully fenced, w/3 bedrooms, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car garge home w/circular
I ... ...... 1. .. ...island, cathedral & driveway, large workshop, inground 1
,,,in I ,,. I I ttm g G as fireplace, 1 ........ ... .. i ..... .. .. .. .
inside laundry #355549 PRICE REDUCED ' I ......... ', ... I
TO $165,00 rm w/heatolate, i., 14, .I 1 1, ,,,


DUNNELLON 1998 nobility D/W M/H w/3
CRYSTAL RIVER totally: .. I 1 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 25 acres Master bath
1 bath home with carpl. I ..n'i I I garden tub w/ dbl vanity & shower country
downtown crystal river, Ig laundry room, l...... . i ... I, .,, orkshopw/
currently rented on month to month basis, make i i.. ... i.... i l, l $65,000
a nice investment #356613 $53,000




CRYSTAL RIVE NORTH 2 bedroom, 2
HOMOSASSA 1980 d/w m/h w/3bedroms, 2 i .11 ... i ... ..- ,
baths, carport, paved road, screen porch, I... J I I I ..... ..
.1 ... i. i. .. i ,I. I ......... you can be used commercially under
inside,new by to shopping #355194 $60,000 conditions #355006 $180,000







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ROOFS
Continued from Page E9

"We used to have water
cascading off that part of the
roof and overflowing the gut-
ters; now that just isn't a
problem," Charlie Lovett
said. "It also insulates the
porch, which means that we
can use it more days of the
year. When it's 90 (degrees)
outside, it's only about 80 on
our screen porch."
Stiles said that green roofs
also reduce air pollution.
"Plants filter the air," she
said. They take in the carbon
dioxide and put off oxygen.
Plants themselves take the
pollutants and filter the pol-
lutants out of what water they
don't use."
Hartup said that a reduc-
tion in air pollution depends
on the type of plants put on
the roof.
In North Carolina, sedums
- little succulent plants -
are typically used to create
green roofs.
"Those aren't going to
probably reduce as much air


pollution as a tree would, or
shrubs, but every little bit will
count and help in some way,"
Hartup said.
She said that there's still a
lot of ongoing research to de-
termine some benefits of
green roofs, including the ef-
fects on water quality
The Lovetts have had their
green roof for about a year
Green Roof Gals put in dif-
ferent types of plants, includ-
ing blue spruce and creeping
sedums.
Stiles said that garden
roofs can be any size but the
roof has to be able to hold the
weight
"You want to make sure
that your roof can hold about
40 pounds a square foot," she
said.
The average price for a
green roof created by Green
Roof Gals is about $35 a
square foot.
Stiles and Lawless have 24


years combined experience
as professional gardeners
and also operate their own
separate businesses. Stiles is
the owner of Jennifer Stiles
Professional Gardener in
High Point, and Lawless has
Sand Hill Fine Gardening in
Pleasant Garden.
Stiles said she had been
reading about and research-
ing green roofs for years be-
fore asking Lawless to team
up with her to form Green
Roof Gals in 2011.
She said it's been a slow
start but they're getting the
word out about their com-
pany and have done several
rooftop gardens in the Triad.
The company specializes


Lawless said the benefits of green
roofs make her happy they started
the company.


000BOSH

Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


in residential rooftop gar-
dens but wants to also grow
the commercial side of its
business.
Lawless said the benefits
of green roofs make her
happy they started the
company
"It's a great concept and I
hope that it catches on like
wildfire," Lawless said.
Stiles said they are having
fun teaching people about
green roofs.
"It's so environmentally
friendly and is such a positive
thing," Stiles said. "The posi-
tive environmental aspects of
this are what really drew me
to it"
The Lovetts love their
rooftop garden.
"It gives me this beautiful
peaceful view out my office
window as I sit at my desk
and, as a writer, that's impor-
tant to me," Charlie Lovett
said.


BUCK
Continued from Page E7

large discounted price for a
smaller kitchen. And don't
forget to compare prices
that include installation.
Consider talking to your
remodeling contractor be-
fore you start your project
and get their input for where
you can get the best prices
for products based on what
you want to do. Also discuss
your options for contributing
to the project That way the
contactor can do his or her
construction plan based on
what you will do as part of
the project They might be
able to give you some direc-
tion, such as what parts of
the project to avoid and
based on your skill level,
how much you can con-
tribute to the project


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


Learn The Art of

Real Estate Investing

We've developed this investor education
program and the acconpa ll illg technology
tools because e \\ e know the right way to
build \\ ealth ill Anlerican reil e,,tate.

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t CitrusCounty


BEAUTIFUL SWEETWATER
RIDGEWOOD 2
3/2/2 golfcourse home. Close to the Country
Club. This home features upgrades &
beautiful golf course views. A must see.
Make an offer. $234,000
2 Pine St., Homosassa
Su armill Woods. MLS# 357518
O ( 3 1


A BOATER'S DREAM
ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN COME TRUE!
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
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In the equestrian section of Pine t with matreoak andlot feet of seawall; stationary & float
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5721 S. LIVE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
NATURE'S CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River and nestled in an area that preserved
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MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #357468 $39,900






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family to move right in! imaginable!' L, ,I ... :..
DDDDBPC MLS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 1 '. $69,900


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Ell

U
Bert Henderson, M.Ed., is a
consultant for sustainabil-
ity renewable energies,
and is involved in cutting
edge "green" building
product research withAZS
Consultingin Gainesville.
He is also a national
speaker in sustainability
and writes and delivers
professional training pro-
grams in sustainability re-
newable energies, energy
efficient design, and
"green" construction. He
has been a Sugarmill
Woods resident for23
years, a Florida resident
for 53years, and is a re-
tired facultymember with
the Programs for Resource
Efficient Communities at
the University ofFlorida
and building science fac-
ulty for the Bushnell Cen-
terfor Sustainability


A


L reaileam KELER WILLIAMS
Our Team Serves Your Dre~m.. R E A L T Y




Happy Veteann' DIyl



www.CitrusSold.com

(352) 637-2777

687 S. Adolph Pt. Lecanto, FL 34461





^







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spotlight on cider: Fall's


quintessential beverage


KATHRYN REM
The (Springfield) State
Journal-Register

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -Jason Wood sits
on a wooden apple crate in the Curtis
Orchard cider house, picking apples
out of a bin one after another after
another, all day long.
He turns each apple over in his
hand, visually inspects it and then
tosses it gently either into a bin of per-
fect apples that will be sold to cus-
tomers or a bin of seconds that will be
pressed into cider
"I'm looking for cosmetic differ-
ences, bruises or holes, said the
Tolono man.
"All the apples in here are good
quality. We're looking for hail-grade,
those that have maybe been through a
hail storm. We're looking for the less-
than-perfect apples for the cider," said
Randy Graham, the cider house man-
ager and one of the owners of Curtis
Orchard in Champaign.
"A rotten apple gets kicked out. It af-
fects the flavor of the cider and the
shelf life," he added.
Wood, 42, is on the front end of the
cider-making process, a fast-moving,
well-honed operation that churns out
about 1,800 gallons of apple cider per
day Curtis Orchard is open from late
July to mid-December
The cider is made in a 2,000-square-
foot room behind the orchard's gift
shop and cafe. It's loud and busy there,
with a forklift frequently moving bins
of apples here and there. The smell of


fresh apples permeates the space.
"When we work, we have to move
fast because we make a lot of cider in
one day," Graham said. The orchard
has 5,000 apples trees of many vari-
eties.
Making cider
After the apples have been graded,
they are washed with water and fed
into a grinder that chops the apples
into small pieces. The chunks are then
pressed between two nylon belts,
which extract the juice.
The juice goes into a holding tank,
while the apple pulp, called "po-
mace," is collected and later spread
on the ground in the apple orchard.
It's organic matter that amends the
soil. Besides the pulp, the pomace
contains the skins, seeds and stems of
the fruit.
The juice is pumped through a tube
from the holding tank into a balance
tank. At this point, Graham samples it
The apple cider at Curtis Orchard is
blended from a variety of apples,
which may include Golden Delicious,
Jonathan, Red Delicious, Honeycrisp,
Braeburn, iFji and Gala.
"You want it to have body, sweetness
and tartness. At this point we can cor-
rect it. If it's running tart, we put a
sweet apple in. If it's too sweet, we put
a tart apple in," Graham said.
He said cider made early in the sea-
son tends to be tart, because tart ap-
ples are harvested early Late-season

See CIDER/Page E13


Designers give storage



tips for off-season items


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

It's that time of year again,
when we pull out the blankets
and sweaters and stash the last
of the warm-weather items
until spring arrives.
Many homes lack the space
needed to store everything
right where we use it. So sea-
sonal things get shuttled
around and sometimes even
misplaced.
If the serving dishes you use
only at the holidays are
stacked way up at the top of
your pantry, "you may find
yourself running out and buy-
ing something you've already
got, because you can't remem-
ber what you have or you can't
get to it," says Atlanta-based in-
terior designer Mallory Mathi-
son.
Many of her clients struggle
with insufficient closet space
for storing items that are only
used for a few months each
year
Here, Mathison and interior
designers Brian Patrick Flynn
and Molly Luetkemeyer offer
advice on creatively storing off-
season items in ways that max-
imize every inch of space and
make it easy to retrieve what
you need.
All three designers love fur-
niture that offers hidden stor-


age. A bench with storage
space inside is perfect for
boots, and bins containing
scarves, gloves and hats.
Or add a large coffee
table/ottoman combination to
your living room: "They're an
easy way to sneak a bit more
seasonal storage into a room,
without having to add extra
closet space or add pricey, big-
ticket furniture pieces," says
Flynn, founder of the design
website decordemon.com.
"You can find a ton of storage-
ottoman-coffee tables on web-
sites like overstock.com or
hayneedle.com."
For families with pets, Flynn
suggests creating a sleeping
space for a small dog or cat
that doubles as seasonal stor-
age. "To do this, I take a flea-
market dresser, usually a
highboy with four to six draw-
ers, then remove the bottom
two for use as an open lounge
space for pets, complete with a
removable cushion," he says.
Use the remaining drawers
above for seasonal items like
off-season clothing.
Maximize
under-bed spaces
Many people use the space
under their master bed for sea-
sonal storage. Luetkemeyer
suggests doing the same with
every bed in the house.


Tuck clear plastic bins
under children's beds (and a
guest bed, if you have one), la-
beling each one clearly
You can rotate items in and
out of these bins during the
year one holding swimsuits
all winter might hold sweaters
in summer If you know that all
under-bed space is designated
for seasonal items, it will be
easier to track down the once-
a-year items you're seeking.
Also, see whether any sofas
or other large pieces of furni-
ture might have room under-
neath for flat storage bins.
Try creative carpentry
Mathison suggests having
built-in cabinets added along
the walls on both sides of your
bed. Creating this architec-
tural niche for your bed "is to-
tally cozy, and it also creates
great concealed and/or open
storage," she says.
Another built-in option: If
your kitchen cabinets don't go
all the way to the ceiling, add
extra closed storage on top for
seasonal serving dishes and
table linens. Or have a row of
very shallow shelves (no more
than 3 or 4 inches deep) added
to one wall of your kitchen or
pantry You can prop up dish-
ware or serving pieces you

See STORAGE/Page E13


Alan
DeMichael
RJealtor
352-613-5752
I


"AMERICAN
ERA REALTY& INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
'1- 352-746-3600 Office


OPE HOSE TODA NOO TO33P


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1i.l $325.000
5600 W. YEARLING DR.
Dir:491 to Pine Ridge Blvd., Left on Pony, to Left on Bonanza,to Right on Yearling. Home on Right.


ALWAYS THERE OR YOU'
Fran Perez
Realtor A
cell (352) 586-8885


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GENTLEMEN'S HORSE FARM
Come and see this 5.7 fenced
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warranty provided. MLS#353470
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Realtor ERA 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
352.476-5582 Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600


-M|"..--- "
ilL..s r


E12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STORAGE
Continued from Page E12

rarely use, creatively storing them
while adding some beauty to your
walls.
Also, search your home for bits of
square-footage that aren't being used,
such as a crawl space under a stair-
case. Hire a handyman to add a small
door and turn that empty space into a
cabinet.
Consider changing your kitchen
seating: Swap out chairs for built-in
benches with hidden storage, then
hide rarely-used items there.
"Seasonal things that inspire you
should be left out as much as possi-
ble," Flynn says. "I use a ton of wall
hooks in my spaces, mostly to be able
to hang up favorite pieces of clothing
which add decorative flair to a room."
In a bedroom, a cluster of favorite
flannel shirts can look great on deco-
rative hooks, and the same goes for
winter jackets. In summer, hang your
favorite T-shirts or swimsuits on those
same hooks while the winter items are
put away
Maximize closet space by adding
shelves up high if there aren't any,
then keep a small step-ladder in the
closet for accessing high items,
Luetkemeyer says. Add inexpensive,
battery-powered lights to dim closets,
and increase shelf space by adding a
row of canvas hanging shelves.
In a guest room closet, if you have
one, Mathison suggests using two rows
of hanging canvas shelves one filled
with items your guest may need, such
as extra towels and soap, and the
other left empty so your guest can put
out some of the clothes they brought.
Then use the rest of the closet for your
seasonal things. It will be clear to the
guest what space is theirs and what
isn't.


If winter items will be hung in a
closet, Flynn opts for "thick wooden
hangers or sculptural modern alu-
minum hangers to keep the structural
integrity of coats or heavy pants." For
lighter summer items, Luetkemeyer
recommends slim, foam-covered
hangers that take up less space and
won't let items like camisoles slip off.
Consider splurging on rebuilding
your closets with exactly the shelving
and hanging space you want: "This
way, every closet in the house can
work for all seasons," says Flynn. "We
spend a ton of money on our cars and
have garages built for them, right?
Well, we spend just as much on our
wardrobes, so why not invest in a
space to store that investment?"
Mathison suggests keeping seasonal
things like coats in clear plastic gar-
ment bags on rolling racks in a base-
ment or attic. They'll stay clean, and
when it's time to swap them with the
opposite season's items in your main
closets, having items grouped in gar-
ment bags will make it simpler to
transport them quickly back and forth.
Rolling garment racks are easy to
find and affordable, but it's important
to choose good quality ones so they
don't bend under the weight of winter
clothing.
Mathison is also a fan of coordi-
nated bins or baskets to organize
smaller items (gloves, hats, swimsuits,
goggles) in closets. It's easy to move
these bins out of your main closet into
a basement or attic during the off-sea-
son.
Luetkemeyer points out that the
change of season is a great time to
identify items you don't use and get rid
of them. Consider donating sheets or
blankets you rarely use to a charity or
shelter Do the same with bulky winter
coats and sweaters.
You'll save space for seasonal items,
and also embrace the meaning of the
holiday season.


CAROLE LISTER KEY
A Multi-Million Dollar Realtor REALTY
ERA Cell: 422-4620 fEY MERA"
Office: 382-1700
M IE-mail


CIDER
Continued from Page E12

cider is generally sweeter.
"We have a following for the
early tart cider Europeans like
cider with a bitter, stronger fla-
vor. Americans like it sweet,
mellow and mild," Graham
said.
Once he's satisfied with the
flavor, the juice is flash-pas-
teurized. It's heated to 166 de-
grees for about eight seconds,
then cooled to 55 to 60 degrees.
Pasteurization kills any bacte-
ria that may have gotten into
the cider from the skin of the
fruit. No preservatives are
added.
"Start with cold and end
with cold. That's the key to
shelf life," he said.
Curtis Orchard was founded
by Paul Curtis, a former pro-
fessor at Parkland College in
Champaign.
He had a small hog and
grain farm that produced a
meager yield for the labor that
went into it. Wanting to diver-
sify and increase production,
he planted 700 apple trees on


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit in-
formation about regular meet-
ings for publication on the
Community page each weekda
SInclude the name of the organ
zation, the time, day and place
of the meeting, whether it
meets weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom to call for
details.


"Always There For You"
GAIL COOPER
multimillion Dollar Realtor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
ice: (352) 382-1700x309
me: homes4u3(Dmindsnrina.com


the property in the mid-1970s.
They did well, and he added to
that number in subsequent
years.
In 1980, he sold his first ap-
ples to the public and today
Curtis Orchard & Pumpkin
Patch draws 160,000 visitors a
year.
In addition to selling fresh
apples and cider, the operation
has a pumpkin patch, petting
farm, corn maze, miniature
golf, pony rides, cafe and gift
shop. The Flying Monkey cafe
serves hot and cold sand-
wiches, salads, drinks (such as
cider slush and hot spiced
cider) and sweets (such as
caramel apples, apple fritters
and apple doughnuts.)
The gift shop carries an
array of gifts, toys and kitchen
gadgets, plus syrups, honey,
popcorn, soup mixes, noodles
and other food items. And, not
surprisingly, there's a big in-
ventory of apple products,
such as apple butter, apple
crisp mix and apple-cinnamon
pancake mix.
The apple cider sells for
$4.99 for a half-gallon and $7.99
for a gallon.
Curtis Orchard employs 85


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 E13

people, and six of them make
the cider.
Paul Curtis and his wife,
Joyce, own Curtis Orchard
along with their daughter Deb-
bie Graham and son-in-law
Randy Graham.
Graham is often asked the
difference between cider and
juice.
"The simple answer is'noth-
ing.' Cider is an old-fashioned
name for juice," he said.
ButAmericans have come to
know apple juice as a clarified,
shelf-stable product that has a
weaker taste than cider.
Cider, Graham said, "has
pectin and fiber in it. Hold a
bottle up to the light and you'll
see cloudiness. It's pasteurized
but not sterilized. And it still
tastes like the fresh apple it
came from."
Years ago, the word "cider"
referred to hard, or fermented
cider, while the non-fermented
cider was called "sweet cider,"
Graham said.
But terminology has
changed over the years. Now,
"cider" typically means sweet
apple cider, while "hard cider"
is the term used for the fer-
mented, alcoholic stuff.


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell
ER A bob@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bidaviscom


For the discerning buyer with high
expectations. A 43' inviting front porch
3 baths, 3-car garage with a 2nd story
(1,532 SF) plumbed for a full apartment.
10 Venting-skylights; the kitchen of your
dreams with a 6-burner gas range, 2
convection ovens, hammered copper farm
sink; gorgeous baths, a bonus (office/
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uietest of appliances; almost totally energy efficient. Set far back on 2.65 fenced acres, for a private
country setting yet so close to town. $399,000 MLS 358805


107 PINE STREET 10 NORFOLK LANE W
* 2/2/2 Sports pool 3/2/3 Heated pool
* Upgrade kitchen Granite Family room Gas fireplace
* Cathedral ceilings Nice decor 2,400 sq. ft. mol Enclave location
#351230 $110,000 #355999 $249,900
13 SCHEFFLERA COURT
4/2/2 Large family room
m* 4 Walk-in closets Large eat-in kitchen
Newer appliances Private court
#350062 $149,000


I ~ -~ -~


GREAT PRICE GREAT GETAWAY!
* 2/2 end unit condo overlooks golf course
Spacious floor plan newer carpeting
*AC/heat new in 2004
Unit has assigned covered parking
Community pool small clubhouse
Home warranty for the buyers
#358256 $79.900


VALUE PACKED OFFERING!
3+office+bonus room/2.5 baths
Expanded floor plan w/3527sqft living area
Corian stainless steel appliances
* Gorgeous heated pool/spa with rock waterfall
Tiled family room electric fireplace
* Security system three 14-seerAC/heat units
#356810 $299.000


I OPE H


I See ....lL rtua l .I......@ wres l -eh o e lu









E14 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012








Real Estate


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 563-5966



Classifieds


In Print


and


T .... Online

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The Time


- FaX.'1352) 5W-5665 I T Freei (888) 852-2340 1 Email:I I I- -I w I. hhrni lon e o


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
2Br. 1Ba. $495mo Fridge,
Stove, Wash-Dryr,
Watr-Trsh 352-587-2555
DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, $425/ $400 dp
Lrg Lot (727) 480-5512
HERNANDO
Lg. 3/1'2, new vinyl, car-
pet, cntrtop, AC units,
etc. next to Cit. Hills, lyr
Ise. No Pets, $550. mo.
$1,500 sec. 344-3084
HOMOSASSA
3/2 dbl wide. Lg lanai &
deck.. Newer appl. includes
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ing fans, dbl lot. Located on
deadend Rd. References
1st, last& sec. $650mo.
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HOMOSASSA
3/2 W/ Porch & Deck
$650/mo. 1st&Sec
603-860-7455





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DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
2/2, CHA, Large Lot,
Quiet Area $28,000
(727) 480-5512
FLORAL CITY
Furni. 2/1 in a park. Scrn
rm & carport, Ig workshop
w/elect. Lot rent $160mo.
Selling "as is" $8500
(352) 287-3729

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq.ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
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Dbl. Wide 3/2 95% re-
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55+ Gated Community
Pool & Club House 28x40
End Glass Lanai & Furni.
$22,900 352-341-0473

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3 months free lot rent
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Located in a 55+ park
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Ask for Brit

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CRYSTAL RIVER
3b/2ba, den,newer c/h/a
carpet & vinyl, very clean
RV Hkup. $39,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340

FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
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Nice, Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash 586-9498


HERNANDO 1 ACRE
new log cabin kitchen
2br/lba,den w/ real fp,
fncd,24X40 wkrm w/ac,
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352)634-6340
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925




12 x 40ft, 2 BR, Park
Model with 12 x 24 yr
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55+ community. $240mo
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for Mobile Home
(352) 489-4656
55+ Community
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amenities, pool, dock
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LECANTO 55+ PARK
1997 West 14x66 3b/2ba
w/cp, non-smoker-move
in condition, newer heat
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RENTAL MANAGEMENT
S REALTY, INC
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPR/LECANTO
3069 W. Bermuda Dunes Dr. (L) .3850
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11255W. Bayshre Dr.(CR).......$850
2/2 Waterfront Condo with greet amenities
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2/2 cute duplex with nice sized rooms
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6944 W. Grant S (H).................$700
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3/2/1 cozy home near Rock Crusher Elem
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545 E. Alaska Dr. (H)................775
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1933 Snelle Path ()...REDUED $1200
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J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
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Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
352-726-9010


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2/2/1 House $600.
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
AGENT (352) 382-1000
FLORAL CITY
3/11 /, Wood Acreage,
6mo rental $850 or
352-212-2264




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; dock
$900/mo (352) 287-5020
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, W/D, Cable
Big Yard (unfurnish opt.)
$600 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-776-3120
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550.3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
inside and out. 2/1 $575
Includes Water/ gar-
bage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450/$500
no pets 697-0310

INVERNESS
2 B/R's Available
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
S Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


EQUAL HOUSING I
OPPORTUNITY
L--- -- J
INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Storage Rm $475
mo.+ Sec. 352-634-5499

Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349

Now Accepting
Applications

Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
1 Bedroom $396;
2 Bedrooms $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771

"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."




o[Mgfief


Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




INVERNESS
3/2 townhome, unfur-
nished, 1241 sq ft, 2 sto-
ries, $700/mo, $500/Sec.
Call Myriam Reulen
352-613-2644
INVERNESS
Windemere 2/2/1
end unit, scr. lanai, near
bike trail & downtown,
Maint. Free $700 mo.
Incl. basic cable, pool, &
clubhouse.
352-344-3123, 637-5898




CRYSTAL RIVER
SPECIAL 1ST MO FREE!
3/1 CHA, W/D Hkup.,
Trash/Lawn Inc $500mo
Lisa 352-503-2050

INVERNESS
2BR, Country-Uke
Setting $550 mo. 1st &
Last 352-527-8154




CRYSTAL RIVER
Efficiencies Cottages
new, very private, furn.
all utilities incld'd., $500
mo. (352) 220-6100

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

LECANTO 1/1
$100. wk incld's, elect/
water garb. 586-1212
LECANTO
1b/1ba, furn. Handyman
cottage porch, 5 acr.
pking, quiet, water&trash
pk up, incl. pets ok, ref's
$450mo. Blind Box1812P
CC Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Uke New
352-302-1370
HOLDER
3/2/2 2000 sq. ft. home
Lg. fenced yard. dog ok
$800mth 352-302-7303




INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, C/H/A, Wash/Dry
1st MONTH FREE
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162, 795-1878
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2, Immac., all appl.
Finest gate guarded com-
munity in Citrus County.
Rent incl. lawn maint.
cable TV $1,075. /mo.
Paul 352-746-9585
CITRUS HILLS
$1050/mo Reduced
Beautiful Home, 3/2/2
End. Pool, AC Fl. Rm.
Must See! 352-302-0431
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, W/D, auto gar-
age opener, newer
appl'S, snroom. Newer
home, good neighbrd.
$825. mo. 352-382-1373
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm cottage ideal for
one or two. Good rental
history a must.
1st/last/sec $400+ elec.
352-628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
HOMOSASSA
"THE MEADOWS"
3/2/2 $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMOSASSA
2/1 Home 2/1 Mobile
No pets (352) 637-1142
HOMOSASSA, 3/2
w/ Den $600+ $500 sec.
No pets (352) 586-1212
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 312/2, 1st & Sec.
$850/mo. 352-476-2860
INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
Country giving on Large
/2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
like new, 2/2 villa near
pk, $625 (352) 212-4873
INVERNESS
Move in special Clean
2 or 3 BR 1BA/1,
1st, last & sec $575
352-400-1501
PINE RIDGE
3 bedroom. 2 bath. Pool
Home! $1300/mo
Bob@Coldwell Banker
Next Generation
352-634-4286
Sugar Mill Woods
Immac 3+/2/2 on Golf
Course, Lanai, Hot tub,
Kit appls, W/D;
$1,200/mo. w/ lawn
main. 382-7554

Sugar Mill Woods
Immac 3+/2/2 on Golf
Course, Lanai, Hot tub,
Kit appls, W/D;
$1,200/mo. w/ lawn
main. 382-7554



CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; Furnished
$900/mo (352) 287-5020
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225



BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
CRYSTAL RIVER
$400mo. Everything
included. Furnished
w/fireplace. 1st & Last.
352-794-3230
INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352 586-9932



Large Storage Unit
30 X 45, 1350 tl. sq. ft.
Separate electrical
meter. $400 month
352-382-1070 or
352-697-0458

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/MKKS
REALTY ONE



BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Kara Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
-******* - -


ES AlE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th-Wheel with
slides. Screened gazebo
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


-U
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com










OPEN HOUSE

BY BOAT
Join us
Thurs., Nov. 15th
at 4:00 p.m.
for a leisurely cruise along the
Crystal River to check out waterfront
homes for sale! We will be viewing
condos and homes ranging
from $150,000 to $500,000.
Watch the manatees play while
you check out the wonderful areas
Crystal River has to offer.
Spaces are limited, if you
ore an interested buyer
please call Plantation Realty
(352) 795-0784
ask for Kristi or email
plantationlisa@vahoo.com
to reserve your spot today!

BEVERLY HILLS
SUNDAY, 12N-3p
Remodeled :
2/2/1 103 S. DESOTO
$47,900.
2/1/CP.38S.JEFFERY
$36,900.
352-527-1239



FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Profes-
sional OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo Center,CR
352-794-6280, 586-2990
HERNANDO
Over 2,200 SF, Multi-Rm
Office or Home & Office
or Day Care Center. ETC
on Hwy 200, for More Info
Call (352) 344-3084
Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa



3BR/2BAI2, Pool, New
Carpet, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
REDUCE $110,900
(352) 476-5061


H
Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, Private lot
352-746-0002




Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352)419-7418




Inverness Highlands,
4 BR, 3 BA, Pool, Corner
of Carol and Tennyson.
2.8 acres, fenced, CHA,
deep well, UPDATES
in 2011. Offered As Is.
$174,900. 352-419-7017.

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financingr
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AH1
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFMC
REALTY ONE






4
OPEN WATER VIEWS!
135' Seawall
12030 W Bayshore,
Crystal River
3 Bed/2 Bath/2 CG
2044 Liv/SF $259,000
MLS#358273
T. Paduano/Realty
Connect
352-212-1446




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Homosassa
3/2/2cg corner lot on 1/2
acre, fireplace, central
air, owner financed 0%
interest Call Tom
(920) 224-2513


The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$95,000 352-382-1448

IMMACULATE
Sugarmill Woods 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Nearly 1/2
off Luxurious Sugarmill
Woods Home. 3% com-
mission. Sold in 2006 for
$259k. asking: $136500.
Contract fell through 3/2
with office. Best 3/2 in
Sugarmill for price. Move
in ready. 2050sq ft.
Granite/Stainless Steel.
Double trey ceilings(10ft).
New landscaping.
YOUTUBE video link.
OPEN HOUSE: 11/18
from 11-1. 39 Greentree
St, Homosassa 34446
Ryan: 352-346-7179 or
ryan49445@yahoo.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


Sellers I have
SOLD 23 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Home e Finder


FiMn Your tDreu, Home,
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds.


CirsCut


CirsCut


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Watrrn


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 E15


Vaat-


Lt F a le









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Z --=s-. i. ..3--
INVERNESS HIGHLANDS!
I I.:, 1hlll. I IIb.f.).ll .l I II.l .:.I l,. 1ci u i
Ilcil ..I..hll n: n i ,le.l .[.[udt~l'll..e ..IIl m' II: jllll



M Mi = :'..//. $65,900
Call Mait' Pa/sons 352 634 1273


2668 S. PLEASANT GROVE RD.
I i A i. h 'i m,,~lh yi, ih iii

3 1 ,61. j. l,: .h ,: ,I. .l ,Ji l ,116 1 1 .661 .

MI.I = .I.:N~/1 $375,000
Jeanne Pichkel 212 3410


DON'T CRAMP YOUR STYLE
Il, I II II. 1 1 pl. I l In
1.... ..... "..


lay"11 1- 1 1.1.. 1 1l 1. 01 A.-

Pat Davis i352/2127280
VIiei listing ilzi it c2/laldaris comn


YOUR CHRISTMAS WISH LIST
i .ll,,...... r .. h. . d I ,.., ,, i r. I 1 .
.',1 ,,1hi ,, 1, .6. ,6111. i,, I 1, 61 h,,, I1 I, h.I I li
lI.I h..1 1 1 111 11I ,,I. 6 I,,,6,6.


Call Ioda, Mailha Snvdti 352 416 8121
and ask lor lilt =358119


SHOWS LIKE A MODEL


H- iII j I i j 'i l,,i'I ll I .i i-

MI 5 = .1) ASKING $480,000
Call Jim Motion at 422 2173 lot youi
private lout of this elegant home


_.Il ..u _I.11. 1a _' .]. sl.:.i] .l.] I '.- Ih I...

Al.ch l ,|n,| n I. .c I , lIi.. I I, .il l.I


Mi 5 = 3.:11: $99,000
Call Dois Mmne ,-' 352422 4627


barVI: I ULAH
INVERNESS POOL HOME!
H l III Ic, IIl, Ii lJIl J 1f I pU1 II .I l


Mi 5 = '.: :: PRICED AT ONLY 219K
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699










MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING .,







Call Jim Mo ton at 352 422 21/3 cell


ARE WE THERE YET?
S119,000 at 714 Newton Ave. for 2724 UR
S ...'... .,,,,,,,,,., 1,, ,. i .... ,,, ,,1.I 5,,,,,1,
* 4 ,i, h .-i, ..,. ii ., hI
* .,. ,,- ,,,l ., i II
C I C i lIt.t r1 t le'| ': rL1 e rL th


FOXWOOD ESTATES 1 2 ACRE
* ?,6 Ijilli l h. II 'l,-'
* N -. ...,k.'' .l,''.8. .-.i ,il .' .1ih ...I..'..I.'
Ml -'= 3'.-i'1 $115,000
I'I'i'. citIIscounIItsold. corn
Jeanne & IVillaid Pickhel 212 3410


SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACE
* S P~*, A BA ..: .l I,., i n,.l.ih:
* Ll-u ,|i i'.'ii Uk. ,il..J .'lh'


Mi 5 = 35.:Il $264,500
Call Chatles Kelly 352 422 2387


LAKE SIDE COUNTRY CLUB
* I. IJ I .1 .11 : :..]l l

* I mh.i .h .m. ii ...v l -" I1111'l .. II I .
Mi 5 = 3i.: 3.: GREAT BUY S150,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
ir'i'i'r CitlusCount rSold. com


CUSTOM BUILT HOME
. q '_ lfil.1 lh I 1i.l 1 h . %. Fl.j i6 lh .
j1 l I i' .n iI wi l l i: I di Il .llll Il I ,II"l 1


, 'l'i.-i h l'All i'dl,1 *i ll I ;h 1i:I
Mi 5 = '..://' $236,000
Tell' Blanco 352.419 9252
letythlanco.como


WHAT A SWEET SNOWBIRDS NEST, OR
A FULL TIME NEST FOR THAT MATTER
V .vi i ,1. I .1-,1 I h lh 1, l hll i .lv.l
I :. i .. I .. l i i
Mi_ = :>.:I' ONLY $54,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


POOL HOME ON ACREAGE


oI.. il RV I16 .11W
ll lll", 11b I l lill ii l ",_0 1|l I ,,,lh.6lllllh
cl. I.. I ..il hi..I, vy.nilh II.. [lI ,,,,,:; I)l.l..il miIm l ,
Mi l = 3Iid, $148,900
Pat Davis t3521212 7280
Vieir all listings: isis'irl c21paldavis. corn


CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME
* 'BK bilh w .1,a -.J i.iii.ii
S I hI 1 ,11il I ..ej, .
* U IH R H .ind. rji .

Ml-. = i.- II $204,500
Call Charles Hellj 352 422 2387


2/2 ON LAKE TSALA APOPKA
..., . .) .). ..... ,. i.,, ,: , Ii ., il 1,I,,


II .n ; l . I I ..... I. 1" I h. i 1. 1 m] .. l.

ni; ='.-'I. ASKING $149,900
IVancl Jenks 352 400 8072
tut tu l l.l...lh u ...u. npu-lf lr....cue .....-.


EXCELLENT BUY ON CLOSE-IN PROPERTY

Im. il. N.l.. l..ii l iill h: .1 ..ti .,:1l .i l.. M.. nl
ll, (I .III llll l Illr l ii Ill : 1 P1.,I I llUll i
_p..il l..l 1. _l.i l l.uil.hlll l .:. H I}JA
Mi 5 =I '.:. ASKING $74,300
Pat Davis 352 212 7280
View listing i'i'irs c21paldaris. corn


)wuwin'
SE hi


HIGHLANDS SPECIAL

T I. l pil.. ..) f ll I. .I


$77,600
Ruth F~edeick 1 352 563 6866


FHA AND USDA BUYERS WELCOME!

J1 ,:.h| i .. i l n .1.i I ii. (ii i, .,i. :..:.i
I I,1 _1 I I. I. 1..I ,: ll ,11 _1 I jl l i.. l

Mi I =- 3,I I OFFERED AT ONLY S67,900
Call Ehas G. Kiallah at 352 400 2635
lot mole inlomation


* .. h / t..ill. ,l,,.,ml lM.lh
* I h .. .I il .. Wi ll.l .i.i ....l. F -

* _.1'1 .i ll ll h1 h pe ll 1 .11 .i
Mll = .:,-.l 3 $44,000
14Willaid Pichtel 3522019871


E16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012