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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-04-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02937

Full Text



No offense: UF's defense carries team to victory/Bl


V V



Mostly sunny weather
today.
PAGE A4


SEEIT ,
0i ONPGD7TOYOTA


CITRU-S CO U N T Y






SN www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 89


Sleep in Sunday
Don't forget to set
clocks back
one hour
o \ at 2 a.m.
- Sunday.
8 LOCALAP


LOCAL:


Crab jam time
Locals chow down on
seafood while listening
to music at the annual
Stone Crab Jam in
Crystal River./Page A2
LOCAL:
Charged
Registered sex offender
faces new sexual abuse
charges./Page A4
LOCAL:
Mapping it out
SWFWMD adds handy
tools at kiosks to help
navigate trails./Page A4
STATE:
Long lines
Florida's early voters
wait for hours to cast
their ballots before
Election Day./Page A5
LOCAL:







Close shave
Local men remove facial
hair to raise awareness
about health issues this
month./Page A6
OPINION:
Endorsements
Check out who Chronicle
readers plan to vote
for./Pages AO1 and All
COMMENTARY:


Mentally ill
NAMI provides voice for
those dealing with
mental issues./Page Cl


BUSINESS:


Uneasy life
Great Recession takes
toll on residents from all
walks of life./Page Dl


Annie's Mailbox ......A20
C lassifieds ................D4
Crossword ...........A20
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment ..........B8
Horoscope ................B8
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B8
Movies ... .......... A20
Obituaries ................A8
Together..................A 22


6 111 1158!2 7 o


Voter audits bring anger, confusion


Mail lists resident's

recent voting record
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
Voters already feeling bom-
barded with every type of political
advertising have another mail
piece to direct their anger.
Two national organizations have
sent reports to millions of voters


On the Web:
getliberty.org
MoveOn.org

across the country informing them
of their voter history and their
neighbor's.
Citrus County Supervisor of Elec-
tions Susan Gill said her office re-
ceived complaints late last week
from voters who wondered how the
organizations know whether they


voted in 2004 and 2008. Gill said
whether a person votes or not is
public record. Who the person votes
for is not.
Gill said she doesn't understand
the logic of the mail pieces.
"I really don't understand the
purpose of this, other than it's mak-
ing voters very angry," Gill said.
Early last week, voter "audits" from
a Virginia-based organization called
Americans for Limited Government
arrived in mailboxes. The audits
show the addressee's voting history


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Thousands of art enthusiasts turned out Saturday for the 41st annual Festival of the Arts on Courthouse Square in
downtown Inverness. The event continues today from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.





Artistic fever


Annual festival

brings out the art
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Citrus County
residents and artists congregated
Saturday at the 41st annual Festi-
val of the Arts in historic downtown
Inverness. The longest-running ju-
ried art show in Citrus County fea-
tured an assortment of fine arts,
crafts, food and talent.
Amid serene weather, vendors
and artists displayed their artwork
as crowds stirred around the
grounds of the Courthouse Square.
Local artist Kim Shields, a mem-
ber of the Art Center of Citrus
County and Citrus Watercolor Club,
collected artwork from the crowd
by sitting on the top step of the Old
Courthouse.
"I love coming to the art festival
yearly," Shields said. "I have been
asked to do one of the booths. How-
ever, I enjoy coming down and try-
ing to catch the atmosphere called
'plein air.' I'm trying to catch the
flavors, colors and excitement of
what is going on. I make a quick
note as quickly as possible and then
I take it home and develop it into
something else."
"En plein air" is a French phrase
meaning "in the open air," most
commonly used to describe the
practice of painting outdoors.
Shields is currently developing an
art series on Inverness.
Across the street, Donna Ratcliff
of Georgia smiled proudly at her
display of garden pieces.
"These are all different types of
glass for the garden," she said.
"When my little kitty died, I could-
n't find a headstone I liked, so I
started making pet headstones.
Also, there are birdbaths here. I




Unique pieces
peppered.
display tables
at the annual
art festival in
Inverness.


Sue Mitchell, left, and her friend Sue Penrod, both of Citrus Springs, dis-
cuss some of the unique artwork on display.


collect glass from all over and then
make garden pieces out of them. "
Her display featured diverse
shapes and colors of glass she as-
sembled to create her garden con-
figurations. She collects the glass
used in her work from thrift stores
across the United States. Each
piece of artwork is unique in its
own way; no two are the same.
Among the festival were two
white tents featuring school art-
work from county students chosen
to exhibit at the festival.
"Students, if they want to, can
bring a piece of their art upstairs in
the courthouse for a personal cri-
tique by the student judges," Pati
Smith said. "We want them to know
that all of their participation is ap-
preciated."
In addition to displays and sales,
artists were judged on their creation.
"There are six divisions for judg-
ing," Smith said. "Five divisions
are of fine arts. The sixth division


I enjoy coming
down and trying to
catch the
atmosphere called
'plein air.' I'm trying
to catch the flavors,
colors and
excitement of what
is going on.
Kim Shields
local artist and member of the
Art Center of Citrus County

is hobbies and crafts. All divisions
have to be the work of the artist
themselves."
Nancy Pearson, co-director of
the festival, said 42 pieces were
picked for judging.
"It is a big honor just to be one of
the 42 selected for judging out of all
of the artwork here," Pearson said.
The winners are:
Best of Show
* Scott Anderson, Crystal River,
"Blackjack Dad Table"
Division 1
(oils, acrylics, mixed media)
* Robert Goodlet, Dunnellon,
"Fireball"
See Page A5


for 2004 and 2008 and include the
same information for his neighbors.
"We have conducted an audit of
public voting records in your neigh-
borhood, and wanted to present you
with the findings of past civic par-
ticipation in your community," the
letter read.
Along with voting columns for
2004 and 2008, it includes a column
for 2012 with "pending" alongside
each name.
See Page A2




District


decides


on land


surplus


SWFWMD

to discuss status

at meeting

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
Southwest Florida Water
Management District
(SWFWMD) officials are on
the last leg of evaluations of
its lands and to determine
which parcels will be de-
clared as surplus.
On Tuesday, SWFWMD's
governing board subcom-
mittee will have a hearing
at district headquarters in
Brooksville to review prop-
erties in Area 4, which in-
cludes Citrus County Robyn
Felix, SWFWMD spokes-
woman, said the water dis-
trict has been working its
way up from the southern
portion of the district
"We have been evaluating
the lands that we are the
sole owner of or the lead
manager of, which is about
261,000 acres," Felix said.
Felix said the board has
directed district staff to look
at whether there is the po-
tential to declare any of the
agency's lands as surplus to
increase the efficiency of
the land resources pro-
gram. Potential surplus
properties, she said, no
longer meet the original ac-
quisition purpose or do not
provide water resource
benefits such as flood con-
trol, recharge, water stor-
age, water management,
conservation and protec-
tion of water resources,
water resource and water
supply development, or
preservation of wetlands,
streams and lakes. So far
the agency has only pro-
posed to declare as surplus
less than 1 percent of these
lands, or about 1,361 acres,
Felix said.
In Citrus County,
SWFWMD staff is recom-
mending 73 acres out of
9,380 in Potts Preserve and
.5 acre out of 16,438 in the
Flying Eagle Preserve to be
surplus.
Besides Potts Preserve
and Flying Eagle, the other
lands being evaluated in
this area are: Panasoffkee
See Page A4

SWFWMD
SUBCOMMITTEE
MEETING
WHEN: 10a.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 6.
WHERE: District
Headquarters, 2379
Broad St. (U.S. 41
South), Brooksville.
FYI: watermatters.org/
surpluslands. There is
a public comment area
online.


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
82
LOW
54


I S U N D





A2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


VOTER
Continued from Page Al

"As a further service, we
will be updating our records
after the expected high
turnout for the Tuesday, No-
vember 6, 2012 election. We
will send an updated vote
history audit to you and
your neighbors with the re-
sults," it said.
The letter is stamp-signed
by William Wilson, presi-
dent of Americans for Lim-
ited Government.
Barbara Pellerin, a Ho-
mosassa Republican, was
outraged.
"Whether my neighbors
vote is none of my busi-
ness," she said. "Whether I
vote is none of my neigh-
bor's business. What's the
sense to this whole thing?"
Rick Manning, a
spokesman for Americans
for Limited Government,
said in a statement the or-
ganization sent the audit to
encourage voter participa-
tion.
"We firmly believe that
people who sit on the side-
lines and do not engage in
selecting our leaders are
abandoning not just their
right to a say but are dimin-
ishing everyone's rights,"
Manning said.
He said the audit targets
voters "who have a ten-
dency to vote but for what-
ever reason have failed to
do so at the most critical
moments. We unapologeti-
cally urge these voters to ex-
ercise their right to vote, a
goal which we are confident
everyone applauds."
The voter audits are re-
ceiving plenty of attention.
A Google search of "Ameri-
cans for Limited Govern-
ment" includes newspaper
stories from Ohio and Mon-
tana where voters have the
same complaints as those in
Citrus County. The conser-
vative-based organization,
ALG, said on its website it
takes a nonpartisan ap-
proach to limiting the role
of government.
Manning's statement said
voter rolls are fair game for
encouraging people to vote
on Election Day
"Ultimately it is our hope
that what our mail piece ac-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


complishes is an increase in
participation in the
process," he said.
Another Citrus voter, Cit-
rus Hills Republican
William Pace, said he re-
ceived the mail piece, but
the neighbors that it used to
compare voting records did
not.
"I'm not sure what value
it has," he said. "I'm not
sure what they're trying to
accomplish. I don't really
care if people know if I've
voted or not."
Now a second organiza-
tion, the liberal-based
MoveOn.org, is sending a
similar "voter report card"
to millions of voters across
the country
The mail piece also lists
the addressee's voting his-
tory Rather than compare it
with particular neighbors, it
compares the individual
with the neighborhood av-
erage.
Gill said she received a
call from a voter who re-
ceived the MoveOn.org
piece. She said the voter
was not happy Voters, Gill
said, are fed up with the
2012 election.
"They just want it to be
over," she said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 563-
3228 or mwright@chronicle
online.com.


Singing, seafood at the annual Stone Crab Jam


I I.s 2
TrimFace, a rock/pop/reggae group from Beverly
Hills, entertains a crowd at the start of the Stone Crab Jam.
The band performs original songs as well as covers from
bands like Sublime and Pepper. Pete Hunt and
Southern Branded play at the Citrus Avenue stage. Hunt is
a Nashville recording artist from Brooksville.


BROOKE PERRY/Chronicle
Sally Long of Inverness enjoys some stone crab claws near
the water during the fifth annual Stone Crab Jam on Sat-
urday, Nov. 3. Each order of claws came with a mallet for
easy breaking. "It's not a pretty business, but it sure is
yummy," Long said.


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I NANCY ARGENZIANO


What we need are bills which:


1. Compel disclosure when legislation delivers
special benefit to legislators, their families
and associates


2. Propose a ballot amendment restraining the
legislature when it files ballot amendment
proposals

3. As my 2006 bill attempted, put political
robo calls on the do not call list

4. Change the language prohibiting water
extraction from "significant harm" to "any
identifiable harm"


5. Promote job creation by advancing Florida
to where it is an honest, decent, fair state in
which to do business


6. Require all educational efforts to subscribe to
the same tests and standards


7. Require real time disclosure of political ad
funding and responsibility


8. Permit bulk discounted prescription drug
purchasing in state administered programs


9. Provide for elected official recall

10. Give the Ethics Commission more
independence and ability to prosecute
officials



NancyArgenziano.com


I Paid by Nancy Argenziano, Independent, for Florida House 34
00OD5GO


LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4,2012



TATE0&


C LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Democrats providing
rides to polls
Democrats who need rides
to their precinct polls on Elec-
tion Day will be provided with
free transportation between
9 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Call Citrus County Demo-
cratic Headquarters at 352-
513-4803 if you need
assistance getting to your
polling place.
Golf tournament
delayed
The fifth annual Richard
"Spike" Fitzpatrick Memorial
Golf Tournament planned for
Saturday, Nov. 17, has been
temporarily postponed.
Shawn Fitzpatrick, 31, the
son of "Spike" and one of the
key organizers of the benefit
tournament, passed away
suddenly last week.
According to a family
spokesperson, the tourna-
ment will be rescheduled in
the spring of 2013.
Applicants sought
for planning board
The Citrus County Com-
mission is accepting applica-
tions for the Planning and
Development Commission,
which meets the first and
third Thursdays of the month.
The length of the meetings
will depend on the length of
the agenda. Occasionally it
may be necessary to have
special meetings that would
be scheduled for another day.
All applicants must be a
permanent resident of Citrus
County. Citizens with experi-
ence in architecture, urban,
rural or regional planning,
landscape architecture, envi-
ronmental science, civil engi-
neering, real estate or
surveying are encouraged to
apply. In the event the county
commission is unable to ap-
point someone from the
above categories, it can ap-
point anyone deemed as
qualified. No member may
serve more than eight con-
secutive calendar years.
Obtain an application at
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commissioners/advboards/
advisoryconsideration.htm
and return completed form,
Attn.: Joyce Henderson, to:
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Land Development Division,
Suite 141, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Citrus Springs
MSBU to convene
Citrus Springs Municipal
Service Benefit Unit will meet
at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7,
at Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus
Springs Blvd.
For more information,
call Larry Brock at 352-527-
5478.

Tallahassee
Bondi reaches deal on
mortgage settlement
After a monthslong feud,
Florida's attorney general and
the state Legislature reached
a deal Friday intended to clear
the way for $300 million in
mortgage settlement money to
finally start flowing.
The money is the state's
direct share of a massive $25
billion national settlement
with five of the nation's
largest mortgage lenders.
Attorney General Pam Bondi
relented to the idea state leg-
islators will get to vote on
where the money winds up.
The new deal also calls for
$74 million to go straight into
the state's main budget ac-
count, where lawmakers can
use it anyway they want.
The settlement was an-
nounced last spring, but leg-
islators for months insisted the
state constitution prevented
Bondi from spending the money
without legislative approval.
Instead, Bondi will ask a


legislative budget panel to
sign off on spending the first
$60 million between now and
the end of the year. Another
$200 million will be approved
by the full Legislature when it
convenes in March 2013.
-From staff and wire reports


Soul food


/


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Michael Zayne, 15, plays a guitar solo Saturday afternoon during a song performed by The High Cotton Striders
during the Blues 'n Bar-B-Que event on West Yulee Drive in Homosassa.


Michele Goodenow, left, and her sister Cathy
McDaniel encourage Zayne and The High Cotton
Striders. Zayne is Goodenow's son.


Mike Gufford plays the drums along with bass guitarist Jim
Anderson, right, and lead guitarist Zayne as they perform a
song written by the 15-year-old.


Suit filed in Beware scam, warns C.R. man


airport spat
Associated Press
TAMPA The Hills-
borough County Aviation
Authority has filed a law-
suit against the Hernando
County Commission be-
cause the commission
changed the name of the
regional airport.
The Tampa Tribune re-
ported Hernando County
commissioners recently
agreed to change the name
of Hernando County Air-
port to Brooksville-Tampa
Regional Airport.
On Thursday, the Hills-
borough County Aviation
Authority responded by
filing a lawsuit in U.S.
District Court in Tampa
against the Hernando
board. The lawsuit al-
leges, among other things,
trademark infringement
and false advertising.
The Hillsborough Avia-
tion Authority lawsuit
said consumers are likely
to be confused between
services offered by the
Hillsborough Aviation
Authority and the airport
in Brooksville.


/


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Just say no.
More than just an anti-drug message, it
applies to telephone callers who ask for
your credit card number
That sounds like common The
sense, but scam artists are
tricky and can catch you off- really a
guard, and they especially
prey on the elderly people
But scam artists wanting except
to trick 86-year-old Fred r
Breeland of Crystal River the pub
have another thing coming.
Earlier this week, a
woman saying she was call- Crystale
ing about Breeland's sub- scam attempt per
scription to the Weekly
Standard told him it was due to expire in
December and asked if he would like to
renew it. She even knew his name.
However, the most recent copy of the
magazine had just come in the mail, and as
he looked at the label where the expira-
tion is located and read it was July 2013
and not December 2012, he started to get
suspicious especially when the caller
told him, "Oh, that's not the expiration
date; that's the date that deals with our
contract with the post office as to mailing."
He told the woman he was interested in
renewing his subscription, even though he
was suspicious. When she said to stay by
the phone and someone else would call
him to set things up, that's when he knew


ir


his hunch was correct.
"She was the contact and the next per-
son's the closer," Breeland said. "That's the
person who really gets on your nerves."
He said the second person called and
started asking about his credit card.
"I knew what they were
re's not doing, especially once they
started asking me for my
anything credit card number. I said,
'Send me a bill and I'll send
can do you a check,' but they said,
to alert "You've been paying with a
credit card; if you give me
lic. your number I'll take care
of it."'
Breeand That's when Breeland
an recently had asked, "What credit number
petrated on him. do you have in your
records?" When the person
couldn't give him an answer, he hung up
the phone and within 20 seconds the
phone rang again.
"That really floored me they called
back and kept insisting they needed my
credit card number," he said.
Breeland said he called the Weekly
Standard and was told they never do tele-
phone solicitations of any kind. Next, he
called Consumer Services in Tallahassee
to register his complaint.
"There's really not anything people can
do except to alert the public, and that's
what I'm doing," he said. "If they call you,
don't give anyone your information over
the phone, not your Social Security num-
ber, or bank information or credit card."


CCHB


makes


counter-


offer to


settle


suits

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Negotia-
tions continue between two
boards involved with Citrus
Memorial Health System in
the hopes of resolving 12
legal disputes.
The Citrus County Hospi-
tal Board this week sent a
counter-offer to the Citrus
Memorial Health Founda-
tion that would settle all
lawsuits and counter claims
pending between the two
groups.
In return, the CCHB re-
quests equal membership
on the foundation board of
directors.
It also requests that the
CCHB have final approval
over foundation budgets
and the hiring of a chief ex-
ecutive officer.
Foundation attorney
Clark Stillwell received the
written offer Thursday
"The offer is in good faith,"
he said. "The board has to
sit down and discuss it"
CCHB also offered to pay
$4 million by March 2013 of
a disputed $11 million that
the foundation says the hos-
pital board owes in property
tax revenue dating back to
2009. The foundation's con-
tention that the CCHB re-
neged on payments is the
basis of one pending lawsuit.
Both sides believe settle-
ments are within reach
after three years of disputes
that fractured a longstand-
ing working relationship be-
tween the CCHB, which
owns the hospital, and the
foundation board of direc-
tors, which leases it from
the CCHB.
The settlement talks coin-
cide with Gov Rick Scott's
removal of three trustees.
Their replacements, plus a
fourth who filled a yearlong
vacancy, joined trustee
chairwoman Debbie
Ressler in calling for recon-
ciliation which founda-
tion members and hospital
officials have wholeheart-
edly embraced.
Members of the two boards
met in September without
attorneys present to discuss
ways to settle the disputes.
They also met together for
the first time last week in a
closed strategy session.
The foundation offered to
settle all lawsuits, but left
blank any a mount the CCHB
might pay to settle the $11
million dispute. According
to transcripts of the founda-
tion's Oct. 22 meeting, board
members hoped to settle for
$4 million to $6.5 million.
The counter-offer is to drop
all lawsuits and pay CMHS
$3 million immediately and
$1 million by March. It would
also require that membership
of the foundation be five di-
rectors, five trustees and
one medical chief of staff.
Trustees are also seeking
approval of the foundation
budget and final approval
on employment contracts for
the chief executive officer.
CCHB attorney Bill Grant
said the CCHB is not re-
questing hiring or firing
rights for the CEO, only that
it approve any final contract.
Negotiations do not include
the so-called governance case
under review by the First
District Court of Appeal.
The foundation is suing to
overturn a 2011 state law


that gives hospital oversight
to the CCHB. A Tallahassee
circuit court judge ruled in
the CCHB's favor and the
foundation appealed.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 563-
3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nativagate trails with new maps


SWFWMD

adds helpful

tools at kiosks

Special to the Chronicle

Visitors will find it easier
to navigate some of their fa-
vorite trails, thanks to new
features at some of the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District's
properties.
The district created new
trail maps and other infor-
mation at kiosks on site to
enrich the experience
when exploring properties.
The new trail maps were
created for 16 of
the agency's most
popular properties using
detailed information,
including global position-
ing coordinates.
The properties with the
new maps are:
Conner Preserve
(Pasco).




LAND
Continued from Page Al

outlet tract; Lake Panasoff-
kee; Halpata Tastanaki Pre-
serve; Chassahowitzka River;
Weekiwachee Preserve;
Tsala Apopka Outfall Canal
and Annutteliga Hammock
According to SWFWMD,
the process being followed
is staff makes surplus rec-
ommendations to the
board's subcommittee. Once
approved by the subcom-
mittee, the recommenda-
tions must be approved by
the Florida Department of


Cypress Creek Pre-
serve (Pasco).
Deep Creek Preserve
(DeSoto).
Edward W Chance Re-
serve Gilley Creek Tract
(Manatee).
Flying Eagle Preserve
(Citrus).
Green Swamp Wilder-
ness Preserve East Tract
(Polk, Sumter, Lake).
Green Swamp Wilder-
ness Preserve Hampton
Tract (Polk).
Green Swamp Wilder-
ness Preserve West Tract
(Pasco).
Halpata Tastanaki Pre-
serve (Marion).
Lake Panasoffkee
(Sumter).
Lower Hillsborough
Wilderness Preserve (Hills-
borough).
Potts Preserve (Citrus).
Serenova Tract at
Starkey Wilderness Pre-
serve (Pasco).
Upper Hillsborough
Preserve Alston Tract
(Pasco, Polk).
Upper Hillsborough


Environmental Protection
(DEP). Once approved by
DEP, the recommendations
must again be approved by
the full board. Felix said
once this round of evalua-
tions is complete,
SWFWMD will look at prop-
erties it cooperatively owns
and manages with other
agencies, such as local gov-
ernments and the state, to
determine whether there
are "any management effi-
ciencies that can be
achieved."
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


Preserve Upper Hills-
borough Tract (Pasco,
Polk).
Weeki Wachee Pre-
serve (Hernando).
"The new maps will help
guide visitors through the
property," said Carmen
Sanders, the district's land
use and protection supervi-
sor. "The GPS coordinates
will correspond with num-
bered trail intersections
and make it easier for visi-
tors to pinpoint their exact
location."
The maps are part of an
ongoing effort to update in-
formation at district prop-
erties. In recent years, land
use specialists marked Dis-
trict trails using an im-
proved system.
Hiking is the greatest use
of district lands with more
than 850 miles of hiking
trails open to the public.
Many trails are near popu-
lated areas and open for
bird watching, jogging, bi-
cycling and backpacking.
New information also
can be found in the kiosks


explaining the recreation
opportunities at each prop-
erty and the District's
mission.
"These posters were cre-
ated to explain to our visi-
tors why the district
acquires and manages
lands and how those relate
to water management,"
Sanders said.
The district purchases
and manages conservation
lands to protect water re-
sources and preserve and
restore Florida ecosys-
tems. More than 343,000
acres of conservation lands
in the region are open to
the public for recreation
opportunities.
Visit WaterMatters.org/
Recreation for a complete
list of district properties
and recreational opportu-
nities. Recreational Guides
also can be downloaded or
ordered at WaterMatters.
org/Publications/. The 152-
page booklet features maps
of district-owned lands and
the recreational uses
allowed.


Registered offender


faces new charges


of sexual abuse


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer

HOMOSASSA-A regis-
tered sexual offender with
ties to Hernando County
was arrested Fri-
day on charges of
sexually abusing
an 11-year-old girl,
according to the 3
Citrus County .
Sheriff's Office. .
Randy Lee
Fletcher, 36, itiner- ':'
ant, faces charges Ral
of lewd and lasciv- Flet'
ious molestation charge
and failure to re- lewd
port address lasci,
change. His bond moles
is $27,000.
Reportedly, the child
confided to a family mem-
ber that Fletcher solicited
her for sex. The family
friend reported the accu-


n
tc

v
t


stations to a child protec-
tion team for investigation.
She told investigators
Fletcher made sexual ad-
vances toward her and
asked her inappropriate

motel room. She
said Fletcher had
been drinking al-
coholic beverages
and said her soda
tasted peculiar
when she returned
from the bath-
idy room.
cher Kirkland report-
d with edly told investiga-
and tors he was alone
'ious with the girl in a
ration, hotel room. How-
ever, he claimed
the girl made sexual ad-
vances toward him.
He was transported to
the Citrus County Deten-
tion Center


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Susan Gill Supervisor of Elections......A10, All



B id Notices ...................................................... D 7



Meeting Notices ............................................... D 7


.. Miscellaneous Notices....................................D6


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
PC
s
s
PC
s
PC
s
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds around 10 knots.
Seas 1 foot or less. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Sunny to
partly cloudy today.


82 55 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exuse daily
u TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 82 Low: 54
Mostly sunny

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 59
Partly cloudy

* g.W-,-i w TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 77 Low: 49
Scattered showers, possible storms, rain
chance 40%0

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 84/51
Record 89/33
Normal 81/55
Mean temp. 68
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 47.82 in.
*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 58
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


65

8%


Ragweed, grass and elm
Today's count: 3.5/12
Monday's count: 5
Tuesday's count: 3.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/4 SUNDAY 10:27 4:15 10:51 4:39
11/5 MONDAY 10:18 4:06 10:42 4:30
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT....................... 5:42 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:46 A.M.
4 C o MOONRISE TODAY.................10:23 PM.
NOV.t NOV. 13 NOV. 20 NOV.28 MOONSET TODAY...................... 11:23A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:41 a/3:53 a 9:33 p/4:41 p
Crystal River* 6:02 a/1:15 a 7:54 p/2:03 p
Withlacoochee* 3:49 a/12:03 a 5:41 p/11:51 a
Homosassa*** 6:51 a/2:52 a 8:43 p/3:40 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:28 a/4:41 a 10:27 p/5:29 p
6:49 a/2:03 a 8:48 p/2:51 p
4:36 a/12:39 p 6:35 p/--
7:38 a/3:40 a 9:37 p/4:28 p


F'cast
s
pc
pc
ts
pc
pc

s
s


Gulf water
temperature

74

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 31.61 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.69 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.85 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.32 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data, If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


-"t-*
---___ ss -



LC - -
ngaleE i
go 90s
B .lo ,., 0s "e "


.- Below
10S J^ _
,,e.v.,* .


Honolu.l
85/71
'8 ,
80s


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 46 37 pc 44 26
Albuquerque 68 52 s 70 40
Asheville 71 34 sh 60 38
Atlanta 77 50 ts 72 49
Atlantic City 50 41 pc 51 37
Austin 86 57 pc 80 58
Baltimore 48 43 pc 51 32
Billings 61 31 c 60 42
Birmingham 82 49 ts 70 44
Boise 65 42 pc 64 37
Boston 53 43 pc 51 32
Buffalo 42 35 pc 40 30
Burlington, VT 44 40 pc 41 22
Charleston, SC 72 43 ts 80 56
Charleston, WV 50 31 pc 52 34
Charlotte 69 33 sh 64 43
Chicago 45 37 pc 47 34
Cincinnati 46 29 .09 pc 50 30
Cleveland 42 39 s 46 36
Columbia, SC 77 39 ts 76 49
Columbus, OH 48 41 s 47 31
Concord, N.H. 52 42 pc 48 23
Dallas 84 61 pc 75 55
Denver 56 34 pc 66 35
Des Moines 55 37 c 56 41
Detroit 47 30 s 44 32
El Paso 79 55 pc 78 48
Evansville, IN 57 39 .02 pc 54 33
Harrisburg 46 41 pc 49 31
Hartford 52 43 pc 49 28
Houston 84 63 .43 ts 80 62
Indianapolis 41 35 .08 pc 49 30
Jackson 84 57 ts 73 50
Las Vegas 78 53 s 80 57
Little Rock 83 51 pc 62 43
Los Angeles 69 56 s 81 59
Louisville 50 39 .14 pc 54 35
Memphis 83 54 .48 pc 61 42
Milwaukee 44 31 pc 45 33
Minneapolis 43 37 pc 47 35
Mobile 83 60 pc 82 58
Montgomery 85 51 pc 79 51
Nashville 82 39 .07 pc 58 36
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


S MInin-Srlul, - ,30 "
-- l i- s1-,e.. .

140 s '*
o 50,-
DFW
- -L




FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 84 61 ts 80 60
New York City 51 41 pc 50 37
Norfolk 52 42 sh 51 41
Oklahoma City 67 47 pc 68 43
Omaha 55 28 c 59 40
Palm Springs 90 62 s 91 62
Philadelphia 49 43 pc 51 34
Phoenix 85 61 s 89 61
Pittsburgh 45 35 pc 45 29
Portland, ME 53 42 pc 49 27
Portland, Ore 63 54 .13 sh 64 52
Providence, R.I. 55 42 pc 50 31
Raleigh 61 34 sh 57 41
Rapid City 55 22 c 59 34
Reno 70 36 s 69 35
Rochester, NY 41 36 .03 pc 41 31
Sacramento 73 48 s 78 53
St. Louis 51 44 pc 54 37
St. Ste. Marie 38 29 c 38 22
Salt Lake City 63 39 pc 64 40
San Antonio 85 63 pc 82 61
San Diego 69 57 s 80 61
San Francisco 71 52 s 74 58
Savannah 77 47 ts 81 56
Seattle 60 53 .02 sh 62 53
Spokane 52 43 .19 c 56 45
Syracuse 44 37 pc 41 28
Topeka 61 36 pc 62 43
Washington 50 45 pc 52 36
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 92 Alice, Texas LOW 12 Gunnison, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/75/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 48/40/sh Mexico City
Athens 77/63/s Montreal
Beijing 45/33/r Moscow
Berlin 50/40/sh Paris
Bermuda 73/68/c Rio
Cairo 87/70/c Rome
Calgary 49/39/pc Sydney
Havana 82/66/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 76/64/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 81/66/pc Warsaw


60/51/sh
51/40/sh
61/46/r
65150/ts
42/31/c
43/36/sh
57/43/sh
82/69/ts
68/64/r
73/56/pc
61/55/pc
40/27/pc
54/47/c


C I T R U S.


COUNTY T


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Communlty kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
I- IMeadowcrest
44s office
,a .-ll Brani Hvi, 1624 N.
Dunkerield. n H Meadowcrest
Dunker er -Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A ve Crystal River,
A "1 \ ,"Madowrei FL 34429
N 1:1 il

I IInverness
Courthouse office
TompkinsSt. g square
S106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld ................................................ ............................ .. E d itor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes....................................... ............. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories ........................................ Mike Arnold, 564-2930
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I-


A4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


LOCAL


t '


m ,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ART
Continued from Page Al

Divisions II & III
(watercolor, graphics,
drawings, paintings and
photography)
* Lynn Ferris, Beverly Hills,
"Long Drink of Water"
Division IV
(three-dimensional fine arts
-sculpture, glass, original
work in pottery, textiles,
wood, etc.)
* Leland Williams, Crescent
City, "Two Legacies"
Hobbies and Crafts Awards
* Suzanne Krougold, first
place
* Donna Ratcliff, second
place
* Bernie Schaub, third place
Student Awards
of Excellence
Lecanto High School
* Wineshka Morales, paint-
ing
* Courtney O'Brien, draw-
ing
* Kevin McDonald, drawing
* Daisy Souther, mixed


STATE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Wanda and Keith Lawrence look through printed artwork Saturday morning at one of the
many and varied art booths.


media
* Brian Imparto, photo
* Adrianna Barnard, photo


* Ben Washington, ceramic
sculpture
Crystal River High School


* Matthew Wheat, sculpture u Valerie Marsac, ceramic
sculpture


* Star Gonzalez, functional
ceramics
* Kalhemir Arroyo, func-
tional ceramics


Citrus High School
* Rebecca Balint, drawing
* Katie Zerbo, photography


,dr




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* Jessica Ford, photography
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CREST School
* Christian Cook, drawing


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 A5


Florida voters


face long lines


Associated Press
ORLANDO Floridians
waited for hours in some
cases to cast their ballots
on the last day of early vot-
ing Saturday, but Gov Rick
Scott stood firm against
calls from Democrats and
independent groups to give
residents one more day to
vote before Tuesday
Amid long lines across
the state, Democratic U.S.
Sen. Bill Nelson stood out-
side one jammed polling
place in Orange County to
call on the Republican gov-
ernor to extend early voting
through Sunday but to no
avail.
The face-off was the lat-
est over what Democrats
allege are Republican ef-
forts to limit participation
because early voting is


widely seen as benefitting
Democrats in some states.
Scott and state officials
continued to insist there
were no reasons to keep
polls open beyond the eight
days already authorized in
state law. The GOP-
controlled Florida Legisla-
ture last year rolled back
the number of early-voting
days from a maximum of 14
days to eight days. The
move triggered a legal bat-
tle, but the reduction was
upheld by federal courts.
During a Republican
campaign event Friday in
Orange Park, Scott stressed
any Florida voter who got
in line before polls closed
Saturday would get a
chance to vote.
"People are getting out to
vote. That's what's very
good," Scott said.


Co Specialty

S Cars


2006 MERCEDES-
BENZ C230
Affordable Mercedes luxury.
NP5743A
$14,668


2005 FORD
THUNDERBIRD
Limited edition and
collectable. N2T342D
$20,668


2007 PONTIAC 2012
SOLSTICE CONVERTIBLE MAZDA 3
Hard to find collectable Only 9k miles on this 31 I
Pontiac. NP5758A sport. N2(236A
$18,968 $19,968
^fl? -aB~--Vamy


2008 FORD
MUSTANG BULLITT
Limited edition Bullitt #4453 with
only 8k miles. N2T138A
$24,668


2007 MERCEDES-
BENZ GL450
One owner and a must see.
N2TO30B
$32,968


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness CR486
(352) 726-1231
nicknicholasford.com Nick Nicholas
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5


S C I T R U S C 0 U N TY

HI pONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com




Holiday

Cookie

Contest
www. chronicleonline.com/cookiecontest2012
Submission Deadline: November 12th
Voting Begins November 13th
Voting Ends November 20th
Bake-off Judging November 30th
The holidays are "
right around the
corner, and we
want to put
together the
ultimate Christmas
cookie jar! Is your
signature holiday cookie ecked
out with frosting, drizzled with
chocolate, or something else
fabulous? Do you have a
favorite festive cookie that
wows the crowd around the
Christmas tree? Share it online
at chronicleonline.com/
cookiecontest2012 -Vote for
your favorite. The winning
baker will be
awarded a
$50 Publix
Gift Card.


nkiF li will


be required to bring one dozen
cookies for judging to the
Chroncile office on Wednesday
November 30, 2012 and
taste-tested by a panel of
local celebrity
judges. ?


4"1


mmmmmmm --


OC7NR









Local men shave for healthy cause

Residents raising awareness by "...'

growing mustaches or beards .... !


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Gentlemen, start your
electric shavers or grab your
Bic it's Movember
To bring awareness to
men's health issues such as
testicular and prostate can-
cer, men nationwide are
shaving off their mo'ss"
(moustaches) and beards
and starting November
clean-shaven, then letting
the hair on their upper lip
grow all month.
Men who normally do not
sport facial hair are also en-
couraged to put their razors
down.
The point is, when some-
one either asks, "What hap-
pened to your 'stache?" or
"What's with the lip cater-
pillar?" men can use it as an
opportunity to tell other
men to see their doctor for
regular checkups, including
a PSA test and digital
prostate cancer exam.
"It's about growing men's
awareness," said Dorothy
Pernu, director of market-
ing and communication for
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, one of the
November Citrus County
sponsors along with the
Agricultural Alliance of Cit-
rus County, Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce and
the Economic Development
Council. "Twenty-four con-
versations happen for every
November mustache
grown," she said.
This past Tuesday, 22 men
- many from the Agricul-
tural Alliance of Citrus
County came to a "shave-
off" event at the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce building in Inver-
ness, with Dale McClellan,
Ag Alliance president and
owner of M&B Dairy in
Lecanto, volunteering to go
under the blade for the sec-
ond year in a row no mo
for him.
"October is for women
and breast cancer aware-
ness, and that's important,"
he said. "This is for men's


According to
Movember.com:
One in six men will be
diagnosed with prostate
cancer in their lifetime.
A new case is
diagnosed every
2.2 minutes.
A man dies from
prostate cancer every
15.6 minutes.
A man is 35 percent
more likely to be diag-
nosed with prostate
cancer than a woman is
to be diagnosed with
breast cancer.
Incidence rates are sig-
nificantly higher in
black men.

cancer, like prostate and
testicular We want to make
people aware of it."
He said last year he re-
turned from vacation scrag-
gly-faced from not shaving
and someone asked him if
he was getting ready for
November. He had never
heard of it, But after re-
searching it, he decided it
would be a good way to
launch the new Ag Alliance
Facebook page and bring
awareness to men's health
issues.
More than 150 men par-
ticipated countywide last
year and about 300 people
attended a Mo Show and Fi-
nale Party at Burke's of Ire-
land in Crystal River,
cheering on 30 men who
competed in four mustache
categories: Unique Mo,
Best-Looking Mo, Biggest
Mo and Lamest Mo.
This year the Mo Show
and Finale Party and
Celebrity Bartending event
will begin at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov 29, at
Burke's of Ireland, 564 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
"So far we have commit-
ments from 80 men," Pernu
said Wednesday
Among this year's partici-
pants include men from
Seven Rivers Regional


Special to the Chronicle
Men who participated in the Movember Shave Off on Tuesday at the Chamber of Commerce building in Inverness were,
front from left: John Grannan, Mike Johnson, Richard Munsell, Dale McClellan, Jeff Inglehart, Wayne Kelley, Ben
Thompson, Jim Fleischer, Leon McClellan and Keith Pullius. Back, from left: Brian Brown, Dave Douglas, Ryan Downs, Bryan
McClellan, Bill Scheiterle, Matt Avery, Travis Anderson, Trevor Anderson and Leroy Rooks.


Medical Center, Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce board of directors,
Agricultural Alliance of Cit-
rus County, Economic De-
velopment Council, Board
of County Commissioners,
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice, Citrus County Chroni-
cle, Kings Bay Rotary, ORS


Home Care, Burke's of Ire-
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ter/University of North
Florida.
In January, Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center
will be offering 100 appoint-
ments to men over age 50 for
a PSA test and digital
prostate cancer exam.
Watch the Chronicle for


more information about
how to participate.
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about Movember Citrus
County, upload or comment
about photos of your fa-
vorite mo or learn more
about men's health issues,
go to Facebook.com/
MovemberCitrus.


5thAnnua

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OUTDOOR
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CRONiCLE


LA


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Special to the Chronicle
Carol Condiff, a beautician at Sunflower Springs Assisted
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ber of Commerce building in Inverness.


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A6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


F


' 0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Kent Hamilton
Jr., 37
CRYSTAL RIVER
Kent V Hamilton Jr., 37, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012,
at his home in Crystal River
He was born Oct. 12, 1975, in
Gainesville, to Kent and
Judy (Trudel) Hamilton Sr
He was a
lifelong res-
ident of
Crystal
River He
was a com-
S puter pro-
grammer.
S He enjoyed
Kent computers
Hamilton Jr. and photog-
raphy and
loved spending time with
his nieces and nephews and
he attended the Gulf to Lake
Baptist Church in Crystal
River.
Kent was preceded in
death by his grandmother,
Mary Waterbury; his grand-
fathers, Roger Trudel and
Edgar Hamilton; and his
brother, Perry Hamilton.
Survivors include his
mother, Judy Trudel of Crys-
tal River; his father, Kent
Hamilton Sr. of Citronelle;
brother, Rick Hamilton
(Keeli) of Inverness; three
sisters, Tricia Langenmayr
(Kurt) of Crystal River, Jen-
nifer Henley (Jessie) of Ho-
mosassa and Catherine
Hamilton of Crystal River;
his grandmother, Violet
Hamilton of Citronelle; his
godmother, Delores Ed-
mond of St Petersburg; and
his nephews and nieces,
Robert Haddick, Blair Hug-
gins, Chris Hodgkins, Allen
Hamilton, Austin Hamilton,
Jase Henley, Sabrina Teix-
eira, Alicia Waterbury, Vic-
toria Hamilton, Tara
Hodgkins, Kali Trudel,
Paris Dillion, Mia Hamilton
and Malena Hamilton.
A funeral service will be
conducted at 7 p.m. Monday,
Nov 5, 2012, at the Strick-
land Funeral Home Chapel
in Crystal River with the
Rev Lloyd Bertine officiat-
ing. A visitation will be one
hour prior to service time.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


Katherine 'KT'
Lee, 87
BEVERLY HILLS
Katherine "KT" Lee, 87,
of Beverly Hills, died Friday,
Nov 2, 2012. She was born
Oct. 31, 1925, to Katherine
(Broderick) Ryan and
Michael J. Ryan. She retired
from Long Island Railroad
and moved
to Beverly
Hills from
Auburn -
sdale, N.Y,
in 1993.
Katherine
was a mem-
ber of Our
Katherine Lady of
'KT' Lee Ghr ace
Church,
Beverly Hills Garden Club,
Beverly Hills Civic Associa-
tion and USABDA. She was
secretary of Irish Social
Club since June 1996 and
the treasurer of United Res-
idents of Beverly Hills for
eight years.
Katherine was preceded
in death by her husband,
Thomas J. Lee; her son,
Thomas J. Lee Jr.; her
daughters, Charlene E. Graf
and Katherine T Lee; and
her sister, Margaret Bau-
mann. Survivors include
her daughter, Bernadette
Zarefes (Theodore) of
Staten Island, N.Y; her
sons, Timothy J. Lee
(Katharine) of Decatur, Ill.,
Terrance J. Lee (Mary Ann)
of Vancouver, Wash., and
Tegan J. Lee (Christine) of
Scarsdale, N.Y; her grand-
children, Stephanie, Gre-
gory, Tristan, Kerry, Jessica,
Kelly, Michael, Trevor,
Nicole and Elizabeth; and
several nieces and nephews.
For those who wish, me-
morial contributions may be
made to Hospice of Citrus
County Inc., Hospice of the
Nature Coast, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills FL
34464. Cremation arrange-
ments have been entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


Etta
Kendrick, 88
LECANTO
Etta Jo Kendrick, 88,
Lecanto, died Oct. 31, 2012,
at Hospice of Citrus County
under the loving care of her
family and the hospice staff.
Etta Jo was born July 23,
1924, in Batesville, Ark., to
the late James and Florence
Kirby Etta Jo served our
country in the the Marine
Corps as a stenographer and
court reporter; she was ex-
tremely proficient in Gregg
shorthand. A graduate of
FSU with a degree in home
economics, she was a loving
wife and mother who en-
joyed being a homemaker
and traveling. She was a
charter member of Faith
Presbyterian Church in Tal-
lahassee.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her husband of 67
years, Barnes R. Kendrick
Sr; four sons, Barnes R.
Kendrick Jr. (Karen), Jack-
sonville, Fla., James E.
Kendrick (Therese), Inver-
ness, Franklin D. Kendrick,
Tallahassee, Fla., and
Shawn Culbertson, Sop-
choppy, Fla.; her daughter,
Lelia E. Kendrick, Jack-
sonville; brother, Jack Kirby,
St Marks, Fla.; three grand-
children; two great-
grandchildren; and
one great-great-
granddaughter.
A celebration tribute to
Etta Jo's life will be Satur-
day, Nov. 10, 2012, at 2 p.m.
at Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. Inurnment will be at
a later date at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. The family requests
donations in Etta's memory
to Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of
flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


George
Seavey, 75
DUNNELLON
George William Seavey,
75, of Dunnellon, Fla.,
passed
a w a y
Wednesday,
( Oct. 31,
2012. He
Swas born
Oct. 26,
1937, and
was mar-
George ried to his
Seavey beautiful
devoted
wife Alicia for 51 years.
He is survived by his chil-
dren, Wallie Seavey of Tuc-
son, Ariz., Christina Seavey
of Dunnellon and Lynda
Jackson-Taylor (Andy) of
Montgomery, Ala.; 12 grand-
children, Maya Pittman,
Christopher Hancock, Sara
Hancock, Mary Alice Han-
cock, Alesia Beavers, An-
drew Taylor, Nolan Jackson,
Shawn Goolsby, Alicia Ruth
Jackson, Matthew Taylor,
Melody Taylor and Sophia
Taylor; and six great-grand-
children. He was preceded
in death by his parents and
two brothers, all of Maine.
He graduated from Calais
Memorial High School in
1955 and enlisted in the U.S.
Air Force at the age of 17,
retiring after 33 years of
honorable service. He then
worked for the Dunnellon
Post Office for 16 years. He
was actively involved in St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church. He was a lifetime
member of the VFW, ELKS,
American Legion and a
fourth-degree Knight of
Columbus.
The funeral service will
be 2 p.m. Monday, Nov 5,
2012, at St John the Baptist
Catholic Church, Dunnel-
lon, with Fr. Kevin Mac Gab-
hann officiating the service.
Repast to follow in church
hall. Arrangements by


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free and paid obituaries.


Roberts Funeral Home,
19939 E. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon, FL 34432. Con-
dolences may be left at
RobertsofDunnellon.com.
Family suggests memorial
donations may be made to
Hospice of Marion County,
3231 S.W 34th Ave., Ocala,
FL. 34474.


OBITUARIES
* A flag will be included for
free for those who served
in the U.S. military.
(Please note this service
when submitting a free
obituary.) Additionally, all
obituaries will be posted
online at www.chronicle
online.com.


See DEATHS/Page A8


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A8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


DEATHS
Continued from PageA7

Ken Able, 52
HERNANDO
Ken Gregory Abel, 52, of
Hernando,
Fla., passed
a w a y
Wednesday,
Oct. 31,
2012, at Cit-
rus Memo-
rial hospital
in Inver-
Ken ness, Fla.
Abel He was
born Oct. 1,
1960, in Melbourne, to
Ralph and Alice (Jarvis)
Abel. He came here 46 years
ago from Apopka, living
most of his life in Citrus
County. He was a 1978 grad-
uate of Crystal River High
School. He was of the
Protestant faith. Ken en-
joyed life, his friends and
his family
He was preceded in death
by his father, Ralph Abel,
Aug. 23, 2012. He is survived
by his mother, Alice Abel of
Hernando; three brothers,
Glenn Abel of Hernando, Jeff
Abel (Leann) of Williston and
Eric Abel (Claudia) of Her-
nando; and four nieces, Jes-
sica, Emma, Erin and Elise.
A memorial service will
be at 11 a.m. Monday, Nov 5,
2012, at the Strickland Fu-
neral Home Chapel in Crys-
tal River. There will be a
visitation one hour prior to
the service time. The family
suggests those who wish in
lieu of flowers to do some-
thing nice for someone you
don't know in Ken's memory
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Judith 'Judy'
Martinko, 67
HERNANDO
Judith "Judy" Mary Mar-
tinko, of Hernando, Fla.,
passed away with her family
by her side Nov. 1, 2012, at
the age of 67 years. She was
born April 3, 1945, in Mil-
waukee, Wis., the daughter
to the late Harold and Marie
(Szymarek) Kaye. Left be-
hind to cherish her memory
are her beloved husband of
46 years, Wayne; daughters,
Kelly (Leonard) Wachniak
of Greenfield, Wis., and
Kerry Willms fiance6, Dale
Chartier) of Brookfield,
Wis.; son, Trent Martinko, of
La Porte, Ind.; brother,
Robert (Janice) Kaye of No-
blesville, Ind.; and "Nanna"
to four grandchildren, Ben-
jamin Wachniak, Justin
Willms, Kaitlyn Willms and
Hunter Martinko.
Judy's wishes for a private
service for immediate fam-
ily members will be held.
Family and friends, please
keep her remembered in
your heart. Judy's family
will fondly remember her
love of golf and dog training.
Fero Funeral Home has
been entrusted with the
arrangements for Judy
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Barbara
Harvey, 81
FLORAL CITY
Barbara Jean Harvey, 81,
Floral City, died Nov. 1,
2012, at Woodland Terrace.
Barbara was born Sept. 1,
1931, in Paragould, Ark., to
the late
S William and
Sy bil
(Morten)
Rogers. She
enjoyed
dealing in
V antiques,
\ reupholster-
Barbara ing many of
Harvey the pieces,
reading and
was an excellent cook.
Barbara is survived by
her husband of 62 years,
Melvin A. Harvey; sons,
Myron A. (Diane) Harvey,
Long Beach, Miss., and
James (Lynn) Harvey, St. Pe-
tersburg, Fla.; her daughter,
Elizabeth A. Linhares, (Sam
Mudd), Inverness; two
grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
her siblings, R.V Rogers and
Reba Perisho.
A celebration tribute to
Barbara's life will be Satur-
day, Nov 10, 2012, at 11 a.m.
at First United Methodist
Church of Floral City. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
arrangements. There will be
no calling hours at the fu-
neral home. Inurnment will
be at a later date at Florida
National Cemetery in Bush-
nell. The family requests do-
nations in Barbara's
memory to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in
lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Lyle Cowart Sr.,
49
DUNNELLON
Lyle F Cowart Sr, 49,
Dunnellon, passed away
Tuesday, Oct 30, 2012, at Cit-
rus Memorial hospital, In-
verness, Fla. He was born in
Watertown, N.Y, was an
auto mechanic and moved
to Dunnellon in 2009 from
Tampa. He enjoyed riding
his Harley-Davidson motor-
cycle and socializing with
friends at The Loft. He
loved to cook, maintain the
lawn, garden and house-
hold; he was adventurous
and enjoyed boating and
fishing, living life to the
fullest and most important,
spending quality time with
his family and friends.
Survivors include his son,
Lyle F (Hana) Cowart Jr;
mother, Dolores Cowart;
brothers, Bobby 0. (Dawn)
Cowart and Richard Earl
Cowart; former wife, Denise
Cowart; and daughter, Nic-
hole Heck. Lyle was prede-



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ceased by his father, Bobby
0. Cowart, and brother,
Bryan Edward Cowart.
A family gathering will be
at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov 10,
2012, at the residence of
Mrs. Dolores Cowart. In lieu
of flowers, the family re-
quests donations to the
American Heart
Association, National Cen-
ter, 7272 Greenville Ave.,
Dallas, TX 75231. Online
condolences may be offered
at robertsofdunnellon.com.
Arrangements entrusted to
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon.

James Faso, 52
FLORAL CITY
James P Faso, 52, of Flo-
ral City, Fla., died Thursday,
Nov 1, 2012. He was born
Dec. 9,1959, in Chicago, Ill.,
the son of Martin and Sarah
Faso. James moved to Flo-
ral City in 1997 from Naples,
Fla. He was the owner of
Faso and Sons Trucking.
The joy of his life was
spending time with his
grandchildren. He also en-
joyed riding his Harley and
boating.
He was preceded in death
by his brother, Jeffery Faso,
and his grandparents,
Philip and Jennie Faso and
James and Marge Manly
James is survived by his
parents, Martin and Sarah
Faso of Floral City, Fla; his
sons, Chase Faso (Jody) of
Inverness, Fla., Kam Faso
(Stephanie) of Citrus
Springs, Fla. and Nicholas
Faso (Samantha) of Inver-
ness, Fla.; his best friend,
Dianna Faso of Floral City,
Fla.; sister, Gina Portillo
(Michael) of Oak Brook, Ill.;
and five grandchildren,
Colby, Kade, Collin, Lani
and Truitt.
The family will receive
friends at Heinz Funeral
Home on Saturday, Nov 10,
2012, from 10 a.m. to the
hour of service. A memorial
service will begin at 11 a.m.
with HPH Hospice Chaplin
Carl Hemphill officiating.
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation in Inverness is han-
dling the arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of arrangements.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.
U.S. flags denote mili-
tary service on local
obituaries.


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Associated Press
Angy Rivera, left, and Melissa Garcia Velez participate in an immigrant rights rally
March 16 in New York. The two are members of the New York State Youth Leadership
Council, a nonprofit, youth-led organization that fights for immigrant rights.


Pondering her future


Young, illegal

immigrant

fearless, free

Associated Press
NEW YORK Angy
Rivera glided through the
airport as though she
owned it, giddy with ex-
citement at her brave new
world. Then she saw the
security guards and froze.
After a lifetime of
avoiding any public place
where she might be asked
for identification, had she
just made the biggest mis-
take of her life? Would she
be stopped, arrested, de-
tained and deported?
Nervously, she handed
over her boarding pass.
The security guard
barely glanced at her
Colombian passport, ques-
tioned her about a tube of
hair mousse and waved
her through. Elated, she
boarded the plane.
"I am flying for the first
time," the 22-year-old
criminal justice student
from Queens wrote in a
jubilant essay
"I left something up in
between the air and
clouds," she wrote. "Not
my luggage. Fear."
That pulsing fear that
had part of her life for 19
years, since her mother
brought her here from
Colombia gone, swept
away by President Barack
Obama's announcement


in August some young illegal
immigrants would be al-
lowed temporary status and
work permits.
Now she could visit the
Department of Motor Vehi-
cles, just to witness the crazy
lines her friends com-
plained about. Now she
could savor the simple
pleasure of walking home at
night without the nagging
fear any little incident might
trigger her deportation.
This is the way it is for hun-
dreds of thousands of young
men and women who sud-
denly can be sheltered from
deportation under Obama's
policy So far, about 180,000
have applied for the pro-
gram, and nearly 4,600 have
been approved, according to
U.S. Citizenship and Immi-
gration Services; with a flick
of a bureaucratic switch,
young immigrants are com-
ing out of the shadows.
But Rivera is special.
"Angy is our rock star,"
jokes a friend, Melissa Gar-
cia Velez.
In the past two years,
Rivera has become one of
the most visible leaders in a
nationwide movement of
young people brought here
illegally as children and
fighting for the right to stay
Along with Velez, she is a
member of the New York
State Youth Leadership
Council, a nonprofit, youth-
led organization that fights
for immigrant rights. Her
funny, pointed videos about
the perils of navigating a life
that is "undocumented and
unafraid" are posted on the
Internet Her "Ask Angy" ad-


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


:Endorsement LETTERS


Go in new direction
I have two high school-
aged children who have
been in the Citrus County
school system for the last
six years. Meeting their ed-
ucational needs has been
an uphill battle.
My son is now a senior
and, as we have heard as
we've visited colleges, this
is not the time to slack off.
Colleges look to make sure
a student is taking chal-
lenging coursework
throughout their senior
year My son requested all
Advanced Placement
courses this year. When he
received his schedule
there was not one AP
course given to him in the
fall semester This will
likely be the last transcript
available to submit with his
college applications. My
son plans to pursue a de-
gree in engineering. At a
recent college visit he was
asked if he has taken his
AP Physics, Chemistry and
Engineering courses. Cit-
rus County doesn't offer AP
Physics, only Honors. At his
high school, Physics is of-
fered once per year and at
the same time as Chemistry
2 and Engineering 3, which
would be typical senior
level courses. A student
can't take AP Chemistry in
the spring semester with-
out first having taken
Chemistry 2 in the fall. His
choices were to take
Physics and forgo three
high level science courses
or to start an engineering
track with no Physics!
My point in all of this is
that there are flaws in the
school system that must be
addressed. Being an A rated


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OFFICIAL GENERAL ELECTION BALLOT
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOVEMBER 6,2012


TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE.
Use a blue or black ink pen.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your vote may not count.
To vote for a candidate whose name is not printed on the ballot, fill in the oval, and write in the candidate's name on the blank
line provided for a write-in candidate.


PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
0 Mitt Romney REP
Paul Ryan
0 Barack Obama DEM
Joe Biden
I Thomas Robert Stevens OBJ
Alden Link
0 Gary Johnson LBT
James P. Gray
0 Virgil H. Goode, Jr. CPF
James N. Clymer
0 Jill Stein GRE
Cheri Honkala
CD Andre Barnett REF
Kenneth Cross
(D Stewart Alexander Soc
Alex Mendoza
D0 Peta Lindsay PSL
Yari Osorio
C Roseanne Barr PFP
Cindy Sheehan
0 Tom Hoefling AlP
Jonathan D. Ellis
C Ross C. "Rocky" Anderson JPF
Luis J. Rodriguez

Write.in


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
0 Connie Mack REP
0 Bill Nelson DEM
CD Bill Gaylor NPA
0 Chris Borgia NPA
( Write-in
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
DISTRICT 11
(Vote for One)
C Richard B. "Rich" Nugent REP
0 H. David Werder DEM
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 34
(Vote for One)
0 Jimmie T. Smith REP
C Nancy Argenziano INT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(Vote for One)
C Angela Vick REP
C Phillip F. Mulrain DEM
SHERIFF
(Vote for One)
0 Winn Webb REP
C Jeffrey J. Dawsy DEM
0 Write-in
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
(Vote for One)
h_ i 'l b iic u P E _:
i rrl,'o Sa.n, Tirr.m.l Lf'Ett


JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice R. Fred Lewis of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
0 YES
0 NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Barbara J. Pariente of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
O YES
0 NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Peggy A. Quince of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
O YES
0 NO

City of Crystal River
Precinct 105
CITY COUNCIL MEMBER
SEAT 5
(Vote for One)
-0 Robert Holmes
C Keith M. Shewbart


Homosassa Water Dislrci
Precinct 302 2 and 305 2
HOMOSASSA SPECIAL
WATER DISTRICT
SEAT 3

I ,,1,1,r ,, '... l.


school system doesn't tell
the entire story We need a
school system that wants
our children to reach their
full potential and provides
them the means to achieve
this. We must aim higher.
As a teacher, Sandy Bal-
four has high standards in
the classroom. She gives
her students the tools nec-
essary to meet those high
standards. I believe she will
do the same thing for the
school district if elected su-
perintendent Sandy Bal-
four can help us aim higher.
Jane Mueller
Hernando

Balfour deserving
As we enter the home
stretch for the 2012 elec-
tion, I find myself wanting
to express knowledge of a
particular candidate run-
ning for Citrus County
School Superintendent -
Sandy Balfour As I have no
motive to endorse Sandy (I
have no children nor would
I benefit in any way from
her position), I wanted to
let her and potential voters
know how I feel about the
journey she's been through
regarding this election.
I've known Sandy Bal-
four for more than 12 years
and have been fortunate
enough to watch as her
children have grown and
thrived. Through those
years, I've listened to her
express her concern for the
school system and her de-
sire to make things better.
The children of this county
need to be concerned
about their future in the
job markets that will exist.
They need to ensure their


skills and knowledge will
be competitive with not
only the Citrus County job
market, but the job markets
that exist in Florida, the
nation and the world.
Our school system is in
need of serious changes.
My husband and I own a
small technology business
and it has been difficult
finding the skills we need
here in Citrus County, and
actually considered moving
to a larger city that might
provide a more educated
skill set. At that time we
had already employed a
small group of local people
(who) were invaluable to
our success, so elected in-
stead to hire and move
folks to our area. These
were jobs we would prefer
to provide to local resi-
dents; however, even new
graduates from high school
weren't skilled enough to
be considered as interns.
To grow our community,
we need to improve and ed-
ucate our future leaders to
be more competitive in a
changing world. I believe
Sandy Balfour has a proven
record within the school
system, learning and grow-
ing in many positions. She
will make real changes
here in our community
Jeanne W. Wright
Hernando

Voting for Himmel
I would like to take this
time to thank all the people
of Citrus County who par-
ticipated in this year's pri-
mary election, especially
the 5,000 who voted for and
supported my campaign.
Although I did not win the


Republican nomination for
superintendent of schools,
I did gain a wealth of
knowledge and experience
that hopefully (is) going to
help me in 2016!
The citizens of Citrus
County have proven to be
very caring and knowledge-
able people when it comes
to education, and for that
reason alone I am sure
they are going to look close
and hard at this position
over the next four years.
I would especially like to
thank my fiance, Melanie
Whitelaw, and my lovely
daughter, Heather Verlato,
for all of their hard work
and support during the
campaign. As a candidate
there is not enough hours
in the day to hold down a
regular job and do the
things necessary to run a
viable, successful cam-
paign on your own. I thank
you guys and love you guys
for your tireless effort.
As far as the general elec-
tion is concerned, it is my
belief when choosing a su-
perintendent, you must
look at all phases and ac-
tions of a person's profes-
sional career before doing
so. In evaluating a candi-
date, one must not look at
the party affiliation when
making their choice but de-
termine who actually pos-
sesses the knowledge, skill,
character and ability to
lead a large number of peo-
ple effectively Even though
I disagree with some of the
current superintendent's
methods of communication
and some of her governing
policies, I still believe she
is by far the only qualified
candidate left in the race.


Requirement
You must show a
early or at the pol
and signature ID
101.043 (2)).
Acceptable F


Sam Himmel possesses the
experience to know and un-
derstand the problems and
concerns a changing educa-
tional climate can create.
Ms. Himmel has the abil-
ity to adapt to those climate
changes and understands
that sometimes the need for
change in an organization
outweighs her own personal
need for gratification. So,
with that said, and with the
huge gap in effective lead-
ership experience between
the remaining two candi-
dates, I hereby endorse and
support the only viable can-
didate left in the race San-
dra "Sam" Himmel.
Thank you very much
Citrus County
Robert J.
"Rob" Cummins II
Crystal River

Re-elect Himmel
When you vote this No-
vember, I strongly urge you
to vote to re-elect Superin-
tendent Himmel.
As a parent of a recently
graduated Citrus County
high school student, I can
tell you what we heard on
our tours at the University
of Florida and other equally
selective schools. Your child
must have access to a rigor-
ous high school curriculum
with opportunities to earn
college credit through pro-
grams such as the Interna-
tional Baccalaureate
Program, Advanced Place-
ment or dual enrollment


t for Voters
photo and signature ID when voting
lls. Voters who do not show a photo
must vote a provisional ballot (F.S.

fVnf id Phl t ID.


t~ceptami lorms ol il llia l oo :io 1
* Florida Driver's License
* Florida ID
* US Passport
* Military ID
* Student ID
* Debit or Credit Card with Photo
* Retirement Center ID
* Neighborhood Association ID
* Public Assistance ID
Has Your Signature Changed
Since You First Registered?
Signatures on mail ballots are checked against your
most recent signature on file. Update your signature by
completing a voter registration application and
delivering it to the elections office.



(: The ultimate
voting machine...YOU
VOTE 2012


Thanks to the options my
son had attending Citrus
County schools, he was ac-
cepted into every university
to which he applied, and
even matriculated as an in-
coming sophomore right out
of high school.
Citrus County School
District has been an A-plus
school district for seven
consecutive years. As a Re-
altor, I can share with you
that quality of local public
schools is one characteris-
tic all potential newcomers
name as a top priority
Families relocating to Cit-
rus County do the research
and are impressed that the
Citrus County School Dis-
trict ranked 12th among
Florida's 67 districts and
that Mrs. Himmel has been
a responsible steward of
taxpayer dollars, ensuring
and maintaining programs
such as athletics, music,
art, career and technical
education that many other
districts have cut in these
trying fiscal times. Despite
decreased funding, she has
overseen an increase in
student achievement
Please join me in sup-
porting Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel for Superintendent of
Citrus County Schools and
do your part to foster
growth in our community
and more importantly, in
every individual child.
Brian Murray
Beverly Hills


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Prepare Now for the General Election
ASK YOURSELF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
0 Is the address and name on my voter
information card correct?
O Do I have the appropriate photo ID and
signature to bring when voting?
[ Do I know enough about the candidates and
amendments to make an informed decision?
[ Do I know where my polling location is to
cast my vote?
Early Voting Dates and Locations
Early voting will run from the 10th to the 3rd day prior to each
election. Show your acceptable photo and signature ID, to
receive a ballot. Lack of photo and signature ID will require
you to cast a provisional ballot. (FS 101.043(2))
Early Voting Dates and Hours
October 27 November 3, 2012 Saturday to Saturday
(including Sunday)
Hours: 7a.m. to 7p.m.
Early Voting Locations
Central Ridge Library -425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
Crystal River Elections Office -1540 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River
Homosassa Public Library 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa
Inverness City Hall 212 W. Main St., Inverness
Call Now for Your Mail Ballot
(352) 341-6740 or apply online at www.votecitrus.com.
The last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election
is October 31, 2012 by 5p.m.


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THE


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General Election


Sample Ballot


TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 6, 2012
POLLS OPEN FROM
7a.ni. to 7p.m.


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A10 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


OPINION


d4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Endorsement LETTERS


Re-elect Dawsy
From the time I was
hired as a deputy sheriff in
1980, until the time I re-
tired from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office in
2010, I have seen several
both qualified and non-
qualified individuals run
for the office of sheriff. To
reach a decision in choos-
ing the sheriff of Citrus
County for the next four
years, one must look at the
overall experience of the
individual. This should in-
clude years of law-enforce-
ment experience, areas of
expertise and business ad-
ministration. You may want
to consider formal educa-
tion such as college de-
grees in criminal justice
and business administra-
tion. In today's law enforce-
ment setting, education is a
must based on administra-
tive issues, criminal issues
and civil issues which must
be handled on a day-by-day
basis. Not only must you
look at any college educa-
tion, it would also be rec-
ommended to ask about
any in-house criminal jus-
tice courses mandated by
the state or self taken by
the candidate.
I have always felt that
there is no room for poli-
tics in law-enforcement;
the No. 1 issue is public
safety. You can only cut the
budget so much before you
start endangering the citi-
zens. In the past, a candi-
date running for sheriff
was elected and had very
little experience in law en-
forcement. I could tell the
difference working for that
administration versus Jeff
Dawsy's administration. I


have worked with both
candidates that are run-
ning for sheriff and I con-
sider both of them my
brothers in law enforce-
ment. Based on their over-
all backgrounds in law
enforcement, I would rec-
ommend to re-elect Sheriff
Dawsy due to his past ex-
perience as sheriff of Cit-
rus County along with his
education and law
enforcement experience.
Re-elect Sheriff Dawsy in
November because he cares
for the citizens of Citrus
County.

John P. Plevell
Retired law enforcement
for 32 years
Citrus Springs

Proven leader
We have known Sandra
"Sam" Himmel for many
years and have the utmost
respect for her.
She is a woman of princi-
ple, devotion and caring
who believes in doing what
is right and just. She re-
spects her country, county,
and the children she serves
as superintendent of
schools. She is concerned
with every child and works
constantly to provide each
with the tools for success.
Sam has a servant's heart,
a leader's strength and an
abiding faith to seek the
best for all the children.
Re-elect Sandra "Sam"
Himmel, a proven and suc-
cessful leader and a person
of merit, as Superintendent
of Schools.

Tommy and MaryAnn
Williams
Inverness


ENDORSEMENT GUIDELINES

The Chronicle has enacted its practice of asking that
endorsement letters be limited to the reasons writers
are supporting candidates.
Endorsement letters are subject to editing to keep the
emphasis on reasons for support vs. criticism.



Himmel the choice Vote Sam Himmel


Sandra "Sam" Himmel is
the clear choice to lead Cit-
rus County Schools for the
next four years and de-
serves to be re-elected as
our superintendent. In the
eight years that Mrs. Him-
mel has served as our su-
perintendent, Citrus
County moved from a "B"
district to an "A" district, a
rating Citrus has achieved
for the past seven years.
Additionally, Citrus County
Schools has been recog-
nized as a high-performing
district for the sixth year in
a row, one of only five dis-
tricts in Florida that have
earned this distinction.
This rating was earned
through a combination of
student academic achieve-
ment and integrity within
the state's financial audit
of the district
The Citrus County School
District is currently ranked
12th among the 67 Florida
districts. With the imple-
mentation of the State
Common Core Curriculum
and the rigorous PARCC
Assessments on the hori-
zon, our students, staff, and
district need the proven
leadership of Mrs. Himmel
in order to continue its
path of excellence and out-
standing achievement.

Cathy Murphy
Crystal River


Let's keep Sam Himmel
as superintendent of Citrus
County Schools.
As parents, business
owners and longtime resi-
dents of Citrus County we
appreciate the many car-
ing, concerned and tal-
ented individuals who have
worked hard to make our
community an exceptional
place to raise families, edu-
cate our kids, work and
play
One of the most outstand-
ing individuals we've
known and respect is our
Superintendent of Citrus
County Schools, Sam Him-
mel. Sam has always de-
manded a curriculum that
provides for academic ex-
cellence and student suc-
cess in our schools.
Under Sam Himmel's
leadership and along with
the help of many fine, dedi-
cated teachers, the Citrus
County schools have
ranked academically
among the highest in
Florida. Sam has encour-


NO. I
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 28
Health Care Services
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to prohibit laws or rules from
compelling any person or employer to
purchase, obtain, or otherwise provide for
health care coverage; permit a person or an
employer to purchase lawful health care
services directly from a health care provider;
permit a health care provider to accept direct
payment from a person or an employer for
lawful health care services; exempt persons,
employers, and health care providers from
penalties and taxes for paying directly or
accepting direct payment for lawful health care
services; and prohibit laws or rules from
abolishing the private market for health care
coverage of any lawful health care service.
Specifies that the amendment does not affect
which health care services a health care
provider is required to perform or provide;
affect which health care services are permitted
by law; prohibit care provided pursuant to
general law relating to workers' compensation;
affect laws or rules in effect as of March 1,
2010; affect the terms or conditions of any
health care system to the extent that those
terms and conditions do not have the effect of
punishing a person or an employer for paying
directly for lawful health care services or a
health care provider for accepting direct
payment from a person or an employer for
lawful health care services; or affect any
general law passed by two-thirds vote of the
membership of each house of the Legislature,
passed after the effective date of the
amendment, provided such law states with
specificity the public necessity justifying the
exceptions from the provisions of the
amendment. The amendment expressly
provides that it may not be construed to

contracts, network agreements, or other
provider agreements contractually limiting
copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or other
patient charges.

OYES
C NO


aged individuals from dif-
ferent parts of the county,
state and political parties
to join together for the bet-
terment of Citrus County's
students.
On Nov 6, we recom-
mend you vote for and re-
elect Sandra "Sam"
Himmel as superintendent
of Citrus County Schools.

Karen and Jim Morton
Inverness

Faith in abilities
Other than the presiden-
tial race, I have not voiced
strong opinions about any
of the statewide or local
races, but want to give my
personal support for Sam
Himmel as superintendent
of schools.
I base my support on two
primary factors: 1) Sam has
become a personal friend
and partner in serving our
community. I have grown to
deeply respect her values,
wisdom and integrity. I also
have the honor of serving
as her Pastor, and appreci-
ate her faith and the way
she lives that out in every-
day life. 2) As the son of a
mother who is a retired ed-
ucator and a father who
taught in public schools
and was an administrator
for several years, I have
studied her record. Citrus
County is fortunate to have


a leader who grew up here,
deeply loves this commu-
nity, and has poured her
passion into her job.
The statistical results
speak for themselves, but
still do not tell the whole
story Sam understands
how a quality education
opens up opportunities to a
young adult that impact a
family for generations. In
the midst of several consec-
utive years of budget cuts,
her steady leadership has
empowered our adminis-
trators and teachers to con-
tinue to challenge students
to excel.
I do not know her oppo-
nent, so I make no judg-
ment about her abilities. I
merely know what I see -
a leader who is continuing
to do an exceptional job in
a challenging role.
If you have met Sam then
you know that she has a joy
in her life that is real and
authentic, and she will con-
tinue to serve with all her
heart. I am voting for Sam
Himmel for Citrus County
Superintendent of Schools,
and am asking/encouraging
you to do the same. And if
you are a person of faith,
please pray for her regu-
larly as she seeks wisdom
from above.

Pastor Greg Kell
Inverness


1102-FCRN1


CARD AI


NO.2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6 ARTICLE XII,
SECTION 32
Veterans Disabled Due to Combat
Injury; Homestead Property Tax
Discount
Proposing an amendment to Section 6 of
Article VII and the creation of Section 32 of
Article XII of the State Constitution to
expand the availability of the property
discount on the homesteads of veterans
who became disabled as the result of a
combat injury to include those who were
not Florida residents when they entered
the military and schedule the amendment
to take effect January 1, 2013.
O YES
O NO


NO.3
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 1 AND 19 -
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32
State Government Revenue Limitation
This proposed amendment to the State
Constitution replaces the existing state revenue
limitation based on Florida personal income
growth with a new state revenue limitation
based on inflation and population changes.
Under the amendment, state revenues, as
defined in the amendment, collected in excess
of the revenue limitation must be deposited into
the budget stabilization fund until the fund
reaches its maximum balance, and thereafter
shall be used for the support and maintenance
of public schools by reducing the minimum
financial effort required from school districts for
participation in a state-funded education
finance program, or, if the minimum financial
effort is no longer required, returned to the
taxpayers. The Legislature may increase the
state revenue limitation through a bill approved
by a super majority vote of each house of the
Legislature. The Legislature may also submit a
proposed increase in the state revenue
limitation to the voters. The Legislature must
implement this proposed amendment by
general law. The amendment will take effect
upon approval by the electors and will first
apply to the 2014-2015 state fiscal year.
C YES
o NO


1102-FCRN

I I I I I


NO. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 28
Prohibition on Public Funding of Abortions;
Construction of Abortion Rights
This proposed amendment provides that public
funds may not be expended for any abortion or
for health-benefits coverage that includes
coverage of abortion. This prohibition does not
apply to an expenditure required by federal
law, a case in which a woman suffers from a
physical disorder, physical injury, or physical
illness that would place her in danger of death
unless an abortion is performed, or a case of
rape or incest. This proposed amendment
provides that the State Constitution may not be
interpreted to create broader rights to an
abortion than those contained in the United
States Constitution. With respect to abortion,
this proposed amendment overrules court
decisions which conclude that the right of
privacy under Article I, Section 23 of the State
Constitution is broader in scope than that of the
United States Consttution.
O YES
NO
NO. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 3
Religious Freedom
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution providing that no individual or
entity may be denied, on the basis of religious
identity or belief, governmental benefits,
funding or other support, except as required by
the First Amendment to the United States
Constitution, and deleting the prohibition
against using revenues from the public treasury
directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect,
or religious denomination or in aid of any
sectarian institution.
O YES
( ) NO


CARD B

NO.9
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6 ARTICLE XII,
SECTION 32
Homestead Property Tax Exemption for
Surviving Spouse of Military Veteran or
First Responder
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to authorize the Legislature to
provide by general law ad valorem
homestead property tax relief to the
surviving spouse of a military veteran who
died from service-connected causes while
on active duty or to the surviving spouse of
a first responder who died in the line of
duty. The amendment authorizes the
Legislature to totally exempt or partially
exempt such surviving spouse's
homestead property from ad valorem
taxation. The amendment defines a first
responder as a law enforcement off icer, a
correctional officer, a firefighter, an
emergency medical technician, or a
paramedic. This amendment shall take
effect January 1, 2013.

DYES
NO
NO.10
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 3 ARTICLE XII,
SECTION 32
Tangible Personal Property Tax
Exemption
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to:
(1) Provide an exemption from ad valorem
taxes levied by counties, municipalities,
school districts, and other local
governments on tangible personal property
if the assessed value of an owner's
tangible personal property is greater than
$25,000 but less than $50,000. This new
exemption, if approved by the voters, will
take effect on January 1, 2013, and apply
to the 2013 tax roll and subsequent tax
rolls.
(2) Authorize a county or municipality for
the purpose of its respective levy, and as
provided by general law, to provide
tangible personal property tax exemptions
by ordinance. This is in addition to other
statewide tangible personal property tax
exemptions provided by the Constitution
and this amendment.
O YES
C NO


NO.11
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6
Additional Homestead Exemption; Low-
Income Seniors Who Maintain Long-Term
Residency on Property; Equal to Assessed
Value
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to authorize the Legislature, by
general law and subject to conditions set forth
in the general law, to allow counties and
municipalities to grant an additional homestead
tax exemption equal to the assessed value of
homestead property if the property has a just
value less than $250,000 to an owner who has
maintained permanent residency on the
property for not less than 25 years, who has
attained age 65, and who has a low household
income as defined by general law.

C YES
CONO
NO. 12
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE IX, SECTION 7
Appointment of Student Body President to
Board of Governors of the State University
System
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to replace the president of the
Florida Student Association with the chair of
the council of state university student body
presidents as the student member of the Board
of Governors of the State University System
and to require that the Board of Governors
organize such council of state university
student body presidents.
(-YES
S NO
SCHOOL DISTRICT
REFERENDUM
Referendum Regarding Levying for Four
Years 0.25 Mills for Necessary Operating
Expenses of School District
Shall the School District of Citrus County add a
total of 0.25 mills to the ad valorem millage for
necessary operating expenses to maintain
academic programs and retain teaching
positions for the fiscal years beginning July 1,
2013 and ending four fiscal years later on June
30, 2017?

(_ YES
( NO


CARD
NO.4
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 4,6 ARTICLE XII, SECTIONS 27, 32, 33
Property Tax Limitations; Property Value Decline; Reduction for
Nonhomestead Assessment Increases; Delay of Scheduled Repeal
(1) This would amend Florida Constitution Article VII, Section 4 (Taxation;
assessments) and Section 6 (Homestead exemptions). It also would
amend Article XII, Section 27, and add Sections 32 and 33, relating to the
Schedule for the amendments.
(2) In certain circumstances, the law requires the assessed value of
homestead and specified nonhomestead property to increase when the
just value of the property decreases. Therefore, this amendment provides
that the Legislature may, by general law, provide that the assessment of
homestead and specified nonhomestead property may not increase if the
just value of that property i s than the just value of the property on the
preceding January 1, subject to any adjustment in the assessed value due
to changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property which
are assessed as provided for by general law. This amendment takes effect
upon approval by the voters. If approved at a special election held on the
date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, it shall operate
retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general
election, shall take effect January 1, 2013.
(3) This amendment reduces from 10 percent to 5 percent the limitation on
annual changes in assessments of nonhomestead real property. This
amendment takes effect upon approval of the voters. If approved at a
special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference
primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012. or, if approved at
the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1,2013.
(4) This amendment also authorizes general law to provide, subject to
conditions specified in such law, an additional homestead exemption to
every person who establishes the right to receive the homestead
exemption provided in the Florida Constitution within 1 year after
purchasing the homestead property and who has not owned property in
the previous 3 calendar years to which the Florida homestead exemption
applied. The additional homestead exemption shall apply to all levies
except school district levies. The additional exemption is an amount equal
to 50 percent of the homestead property's just value on January I of the
year the homestead is established. The additional homestead exemption
may not exceed an amount equal to the median just value of all
homestead property within the county where the property at issue is
located for the calendar year immediately preceding January 1 of the year
the homestead is established. The additional exemption shall apply for the
shorter of 5 years or the year of sale of the property. The amount of the
additional exemption shall be reduced in each subsequent year by an
amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of the additional exemption
received in the year the homestead was established or by an amount
equal to the difference between the just value of the property and the
assessed value of the property determined under Article VII, Section 4(d),
whichever is greater. Not more than one such exemption shall be allowed
per homestead property at one time. The additional exemption applies to
property purchased on or after January 1,2011, if approved by the voters
at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference
primary, or to property purchased on or after January 1, 2012, if approved
by the voters at the 2012 general election. The additional exemption is not
available in the sixth and subsequent years after it is first received. The
amendment shall take effect upon approval by the voters. If approved at a
special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference
primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at
the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1,2013.
(5) This amendment also delays until 2023, the repeal, currently
scheduled to take effect in 2019, of constitutional amendments adopted in
2008 which limit annual assessment increases for specified
nonhomestead real property. This amendment delays until 2022 the
submission of an amendment proposing the abrogation of such repeal to
the voters.
YES
C)NO


NO.5
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 2, 11,AND 12
State Courts
Proposing a revision of Article V of the State Constitution relating
to the judiciary. The State Constitution authorizes the Supreme
Court to adopt rules for the practice and procedure in all courts.
The constitution further provides that a rule of court may be
repealed by a general law enacted by a two-thirds vote of the
membership of each house of the Legislature. This proposed
constitutional revision eliminates the requirement that a general
law repealing a court rule pass by a two-thirds vote of each
house, thereby providing that the Legislature may repeal a rule of
court by a general law approved by a majority vote of each house
of the Legislature that expresses the policy behind the repeal
The court could readopt the rule in conformity with the public
policy expressed by the Legislature, but if the Legislature
determines that a rule has been readopted and repeals the
readopted rule, this proposed revision prohibits the court from
further readopting the repealed rule without the Legislature's prior
approval. Under current law, rules of the judicial nominating
commissions and the Judicial Qualifications Commission may be
repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the
membership of each house of the Legislature. Under this
proposed revision, a vote to repeal those rules is changed to
repeal by general law enacted by a majority vote of the legislators
present. Under current law, the Governor appoints a justice of the
Supreme Court from a list of nominees provided by a judicial
nominating commission, and appointments by the Governor are
not subject to confirmation. This revision requires Senate
confirmation of a justice of the Supreme Court before the
appointee can take office. If the Senate votes not to confirm the
appointment, the judicial nominating commission must reconvene
and may not renominate any person whose prior appointment to
fill the same vacancy was not confirmed by the Senate. For the
purpose of confirmation, the Senate may meet at any time. If the

The Judicial Qualifications Commission is an independent
commission created by the State Constituton to investigate and
prosecute before the Florida Supreme Court alleged misconduct
by a justice or judge. Currently under the constitution,
commission proceedings are confidential until formal charges are
filed by the investigative panel of the commission. Once formal
charges are filed, the formal charges and all further proceedings
of the commission are public. Currently, the constitution
authorizes the House of Representatives to impeach a justice or
judge. Further, the Speaker of the House of Representatives may
request, and the Judicial Qualifications Commission must make
available, all information in the commission's possession for use
in deciding whether to impeach a justice or judge. This proposed
revision requires the commission to make all of its files available
to the Speaker of the House of Representatives but provides that
such files would remain confidential during any investigation by
the House of Representatives and until such information is used
in the pursuit of an impeachment of a justice or judge. This
revision also removes the power of the Governor to request files
of the Judicial Qualifications Commission to conform to a prior
constitutional change. This revision also makes technical and
clarifying additions and deletions relating to the selection of chief
judges of a circuit and relating to the Judicial Qualifications
Commission, and makes other nonsubstantive conforming and
technical changes in the judicial article of the constitution.
C YES
0 NO


I 12FR


OPINION


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 All





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hot Corner: SAN DY


Letters to THE EDITOR


Where's aid from
other countries?
I'm calling the Chronicle
in reference to the disaster
that Sandy caused our East
Coast in New York, New Jer-
sey. It's amazing when other
countries have disasters,
the first one that's there (is)
the United States of Amer-
ica. Where are these other
countries, China, Russia,
Great Britain, Australia?
How come there's no aid
from them?
That's why we need to
quit giving money to Pak-
istan and everyone else
and put money into our
own country. You don't see


More state 0C
coverage
Dear Gerry Mulli-
gan: Again, I ap-
preciate your
article in Sunday's
paper (Oct. 21),
but most of us pay
pretty good atten- CAL
tion to what hap- 563-i
pens (at the) local
level, that's true. If
we don't get the full atten-
tion on state politics, I would
say that part of it is the
newspaper coverage. The
media doesn't cover a lot of
things. You know, I read
everything I can get to find
out how my representatives
voted and what's going on.
We get little sound bites of
what you think is important.
First thank-you
in seven years
This is me. I want to call
and thank you for the first
time in seven years. The
Chronicle, really, I really en-
joyed your paper today (Oct.
21). You told it like it is. I re-
ally appreciate it. Thank you
very much. I waited a long
time to see this. I thank you,
I thank you. Keep up the
good work. I'm going to
keep buying your paper.
Thank you for the truth.
Tax money should
go to schools
I'm against any more
money being raised for the


nobody coming to our aid,
so let Americans take care
of themselves and to heck
with the other countries.
Storm is great
tragedy
A national TV network re-
ported a storm called
frankenstorm Sandy is a
much worse tragedy than
people can imagine. Only
15 percent of homeowners
have flood insurance and
many people have let their
payments drop behind for
just ordinary homeowners
insurance, because of the
economy. This is a tragedy
of unbelievable proportions.

|ND school system
JND until they use all
our money to
teach the kids in-
stead of benefits
and retirement
benefits for the
teachers, just like
in Wisconsin and
other places. The
Money doesn't go
)7 to the kids, so I'm
against giving any
more money- a nickel -
to the schools.
Thanks for help in
parking lot
On Monday, Oct. 22, I
fell in the parking lot of
Winn-Dixie, Beverly Hills.
My cart's front wheel
caught in the rough paving
and stopped, but I didn't.
Thanks to the good Lord,
nothing broken, only
bruises and my pride.
Many thanks to those who
came to assist me, espe-
cially the gentleman that
picked me up, literally.
Again, thank you. May the
Lord bless everybody.
Collecting food
Recently was the postal
employees drive for needy
people for food. We were to
put our bags of groceries
on our mailboxes. I did so,
as did many others. I think
the postal employees de-
serve a note of congratula-
tions and thank you for
their efforts of doing this
extra work on their job.


Middle class suffers
Mr. McFadden says the
GOP has a plan: Reduce
everybody's taxes.
Let's face facts, the super-
large corporations that are
now legally defined as
"small businesses" are the
only businesses that will re-
ally benefit from "these" tax
reductions. The other 97
percent of small Mom-and-
Pops will gain very little.
The middle class are the
folks (who) are suffering,
while CEOs are getting
huge bonuses and $400-mil-
lion retirement packages
or golden parachutes. Rom-
ney says the rich are pay-
ing 60 percent of the tax
revenue to the country
Keep one very important
fact in mind: They are
doing this despite the fact
that these people are only
paying 14 percent taxes.
They are making unimagin-
ably obscene incomes
while middle-class people
are losing their homes!
If they were paying the
same rate as the rest of
working America, think of
how much better every-
body would be doing.
If Romney wants to sim-
plify the tax structure, how
about a change to taxing
capital gains just like
wages? The middle class
makes their money through
wages and the rich make
their money through capital
gains. It should all be taxed
the same, without any caps
and with escalating per-
centages for income tax and
Social Security It's only fair
The government puts that
money to work, injecting a
huge amount of money into
infrastructure and it would
make Social Security more
than solvent When was the
last time Walmart, or any
other private company,
built or rebuilt a bridge or
highway? The government
pays for things like that, but
the rich just put their
money in the bank!
Let's say an individual
were to adopt Romney's
budget strategy Then, in
order to pay off your over-
whelming credit card debt,


you should:
1) Quit your good-paying
job and take a low-paying
job (reduce taxes),
2) Buy a new car ($2 tril-
lion to the military) and
then you would be able to
quickly pay off your huge
credit card debt, right?
Anybody see the logic and
mathematical errors in this?
Roger Dobronyi
Inverness

Affordable Care Act
Seniors relax. Gov Rom-
ney's charge that $716
billion is being "ripped"
from Medicare by the Af-
fordable Care Act (ACA) is
clearly debunked by former
Florida governor and Sen.
Bob Graham in Sunday's
(Oct. 21) Tampa Bay Times.
Gov. Graham correctly
points out the $716 billion
supposedly "taken" from
Medicare is not a cut to the
services Medicare recipi-
ents receive. The $716 bil-
lion actually reflects savings


achieved in four areas.
First, Medicare Advan-
tage, a 2003 addition to
Medicare, which costs the
government an additional
$12 billion a year over orig-
inal Medicare, will be
phased out over the next
six years. At the end of that
time, all Medicare recipi-
ents will be on original
Medicare, benefiting from
many additional features,
such as free preventative
testing, the ACA provides.
Second, the annual rate
of payment increases to
service providers will be
reduced. Providers' pay-
ments will still go up, but
not as fast as before, saving
billions of dollars.
Third, strict er mit re-
quirements the ACA de-
mands of service providers
will eliminate billions of
dollars of Medicare fraud.
Fourth, savings will be
achieved from money that
will no longer have to be
paid to hospitals that serve
a disproportionate number


of low-income, uninsured
patients. These patients
now will have coverage
under the ACA.
This totals $716 billion,
all achieved from savings,
not "takeaways."
Perhaps it's time for
everyone to take a deep
breath. We need to dial
back the hate-fueled,
Obama-bashing rhetoric.
Let's also shut down the
nonstop whining about al-
most everything since our
president took office in
January 2009.
I am a senior, a veteran, a
retiree, and an independ-
ent voter. I'm ready to give
the Affordable Care Act a
chance. It's an improve-
ment over what we had,
which was nothing.
Find the time; read Gra-
ham's article. It sets the
record straight about Rom-
ney's claim that $716 bil-
lion is being "ripped off"
from Medicare.
Paul Longerich
Beverly Hills


INVERNESS SURGICAL

Af ASSOCIATION
A Citrus Memorial Health System Facility


Invites You to Attend
An Educational Seminar with
Torr Carmain, MD






nal
From
iells
or, Diagnosis & Treatment of Skin,
making Breast, and Colon Cancers

Refreshments
Wednesday ~ Nov. 14th, 2012 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Sugarmill Country Club, 1 Douglas St., Homosassa, Fl
Please R.S.VP. by: Nov. 11,2012
L Brian Ball ~ 352-344-6732


-Ca


A12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


OPINION


q
c





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* Lifelong Citrus County Resident
* Retired Law Enforcement Officer
* 17+ years with Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
* County Commissioner
-Elected '08
* Navy Vet & Pro-2nd Amendment

WinnWebb.com


I


Winn Webb For Sheriff


WIEBB





[ integrity



krAccountability



IrLeadership


ARE YOU SAFER?


* I WILL reduce Crime in Citrus County- 13% crime increase is
unacceptable.
* I WILL reduce the top heavy command of the SO and put that
spending into reducing crime in Citrus County especially the
drug crime.


* I WILL eliminate unnecessary spending and invest that
money in our community and citizen safety.
* I WILL NOT ALLOW the drug and other criminal
activities of the surrounding counties to move into Citrus
County because of lack of leadership and enforcement.


I WILL:
* Cut down on unnecessary expenses starting by selling the Sheriff's Plane
* Establish an itemized line-item budget to hold the Department
accountable on spending


ENDORSED BY: Citrus County Right to Life, Florida Right to Life
RECOMMENDED BY: Citrus County Realtors Association, Florida Realtors Association
Highest Rating of "AQ" by the National Rifle Association
I wol iet taktefllwn-uprtr1o l


Scott Harbison
Mary White
Jimmy White
Rosella Hale
John Hale
Dale Malm
Sharon Malm
Natlie Malm
A.J. Pennington
MaryAnn Lynn
Jodi Bartel
Alan Bartel
Debbie Ressler
Tom Ressler
Ford Shively
Harry Shivley
Gloria Fisher
Steve Burch
Lunda Burch
Dick Cofran
Star Rojas
Armando Rojas
Marseilles White
Jonny White
Victoria White
Spencer White
Andrew White
Frank Carter
Joel Smoyer
Fred Daniels
Linda Daniels
Paul Schwein


Barbara Schwein
Linda Hartman
Marlele Hendiquila
Paul Agius
Mary Agius
Ted True
Kay Webb
Sue Webb
Charlene Williams
Betty Jo Robinette
Kris Williams
Daniel Harbison
Scott Harbison
BF Edwards
Lynette Edwards
Del Stutman
Bob Geraghty
Rick Spence
Suzie Spence
Richard Hunt
Michelle Hunt
Jennifer Kanter
April Margagliano
Harry Arnold
Norm Overfield
Charles Mizell
Terry Cox
Kenneth Witkowich
Gerald Naber
John Littnan
Wayne Snyder
Frank Yuelling


Krix Bentz
Robret Eldredge
Robert Hagaman
Giovanni Van Del Abbeel
James McIntosh
Steve Parker
Noel Estrada
Michael Anger
Wendy Echert
Dave Cohee
Shirley Cohee
Tyler Jordan
Kim Kresho
Shirley Fulcher
Aaron O'Brien
Keith Vershraege
Danny Margagliano
Gina Arnold
Shirley Overfield
Charity Mizell
Williard Cox
Lori Witkowich
Jack Latvala
Dale Merrill
Jean Snyder
Beverly Yueling
Rhonda Bentz
Darlene Parker
Nancy Hagaman
Isabela Van Den Abbeele
John Dowd
Jackie Kulp


Elene Carter
John Mclssac
Dan Coraran
Vince Kresho
Woodie Fulcher
Amber Jordan
Kim Kresho
Heather O'Brien
Susan Turner
Wallace Turner
Allan Waller
Diane Waller
Carol Allen
Richard Allen
Jane Boone
RoseMarie Boone
Frank Ballot
Rich Fruitiger
Lyne Fruitiger
Kari Peters
Glenda Zellner
John Zellner
Sue Littnan
Nick Littnan
Diana Rohde
Clyde Rohde
Robert Holsein
Mary Ann Fulkerson
Randy Fulkerson
Virginia Griffin
James Griffin
Tim Ott


I Winn

*.WEBBJ


Karen Ott
Brownie Dunn
Gary Bryant
Wendy Eckert
Dan Beck
Bonnie Beck
Dan Boone
Henry Van Heuveln
Jo Van Heveln
Reyna Bell
Carrie Johnson
Tom Johnson
Gary Matthews


Trish Enberg
Bill Larder
Amanda Oneal
Gloria Volsario
Ed Volsario
Linda Ross
Alan Ross
Idona Davis
John Mclsaac
Paul Van Leeuwen
John Hart
Annette Hart


POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY WINN WEBB, REPUBLICAN FOR CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF.


TOTAL CRIME
2007 to 2011

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

-10.0%

-20.0%

-30.0%
MARION SUMTER HERNANDO CITRUS
-10% -20% -7% +13%

Source Florida Department of Law Enforcement


STOLEN PROPERTY
2007 to 2011


MARION SUMTER HERNANDO CITRUS
-13% -27% -6% +18%


Source Florida Department of Law Enforcement


VIOLENT CRIMES
2007 to 2011


20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

-10.0%

-20.0%


MARION SUMTER HERNANDO CITRUS
-23% -26% -24% +8%


Source Florida Department of Law Enforcement


WE ARE GOING IN THE WRONG DIRECTION!
In the past 4 years Citrus County has fallen from the 13th safest county to the 18th safest county in Florida.


As County Commissioner,
Winn voted to eliminate
$50 million from the county
budget in four years with little
or no loss of services.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 A13


LEDO YOU WANT FISCALLY RESPONSIBLE LEADERSHIP? I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today's suburban mall


an endangered species


he clerks were standing around in
the fancy lotion shop, pretending to
look busy No one was even inside
looking. The only customer in the home
electronics store appeared to be
returning something. The shoe
store had a few shoppers, but
there was plenty of room to walk

anyone.
The few people ambling '
around the uncrowded mall ..
were not carrying shopping bags.
They stopped at the kiosks in the
main aisle and looked at the tie-
dyed T-shirts and the calendars Ji
and the gold necklaces, but MUL
pretty much everyone who
wanted a gold necklace already
had one. The CD/DVD store looked pretty
empty, too. The fancy card shop was de-
serted; the As Seen on TV store, empty
It was 4 in the afternoon on a weekday
Most people were still at work except for
teenage girls, who arrived in groups of
three or four and disappeared into the
movie theater Maybe all these stores are
packed the rest of the time, but while I was
there, the mall was scarily empty Maybe
when the movies let out there is a rush.
But one little shop was booming while
the others languished. It was the smallest
store in the mall, and it had six clerks who
were helping two customers apiece. It was
the cellphone store, and you'd have thought
it was giving away free bacon. I think one of
the people in line was the manager of the
fancy card shop.
The smallest store that's probably paying
the least rent is raking in the most dollars.
Each cellphone costs, what, $200? $400?
"But sometimes the phone is free. No
wonder there's a line," you might say Yes, if
you commit to a monthly plan that will cost
you, on the low end, $2,400 by the time you
finish it in two years, the store will give you
some kind of phone. Not the best phone, but
a phone.
So the cellphone store "gives" you a $200
phone and you give it $2,400 or more. Wow,
what a bargain!
OK, I'm going to say a stupid old-man
thing. Here it comes: "My first car didn't


cost $2,400." The one I'm driving now didn't
cost much more. (I traded in my clunker for
a beater)
This "bargain" is killing the other stores
in the mall. I wonder how much
the average shopper spends at
the gift and card shop? How
much will those roving gangs of
teens spend at the DVD store?
Anything close to $2,400 over two
years? And if you spend $100 a
month on your phone plan, that's
$100 a month that you're not
spending on fancy lotions, new
shoes or DVDs.
M If only that were the end of it
LEN Smartphones also let you check
and compare prices among
stores. It's called the "showroom
effect"
Say you are shopping for a new TV You
go to the electronics store in the mall, find
the model you like and scan the bar code
into your smartphone. Then the phone will
tell you where you can buy the TV cheaper
Places like Best Buy become the show-
rooms for Amazon.com and other online re-
tailers that pay no rent for space in the
mall.
The next time you wonder how an online
store can offer free shipping, maybe it's be-
cause the online retailer is paying rent only
on a cheap warehouse, not an expensive
storefront.
As I was soaking up the frenzy at the
phone store, I noticed a gaggle of teens
streaming out of the multiplex, all of them
phoning or texting as they passed me, the
card shop, the DVD store and the lotion
store on the way out to the parking lot. Tak-
ing a quick look around, I noticed every sin-
gle person in the place was on a phone.
People can send a birthday greeting card
from their phone, they can listen to music
on it, they can watch a movie, they can buy
lotion cheaper online. How long can these
other stores last?
-

Jim Mullen's newest book is called "Kill
Me, Elmo: The Holiday Depression Fbn
Book." You can reach him at
JimMullenBooks. com.


Home-grown, healthy, helping others


Special to the Chronicle

Memberships are still
available for The Path Farm
Co-op project. Participants
can enjoy a variety of
healthy greens, kale, cab-
bage, broccoli, cauliflower
and other winter veggies
grown naturally using envi-
ronmentally friendly re-
sources such as worm


castings, river muck
and other nutrient-rich
resources.
Supporting The Path's
Farm Co-op means helping
the men and women at The
Path shelter improve their
lifestyles. The Path farmer,
staff and clients grow, har-
vest and pack the produce
and participants receive a
basket of locally grown veg-


tables on a weekly basis.
The co-op program has also
been able to offer "You Pick
It" days, an opportunity for
co-op members to pick their
own produce.
Call 352-527-6500, ext. 5,
for more information or to
sign up.


Nov. 5 to 9 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Hot dog, un-
crusted PBJ, turkey super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, baked
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Barbecued
pulled pork on bun, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, baked French fries,
dried mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, macaroni
and cheese, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, green
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, hot ham and cheese on
bun, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, sweet peas, chilled
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.

Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich


stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken and
rice burrito, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
macaroni and cheese, ham
super salad with ripstick, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden salad,
sweet corn, dried fruit mix, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Barbecued
pulled pork on bun, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, baked beans, potato
triangles, chilled fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, hot dog,
turkey super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, green beans, potato
roasters, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, cheese pizza, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.

High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, pizza,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato
roasters, steamed broccoli,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken


plate, turkey and gravy over
noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham
super salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, cold corn salad, potato
triangles, sweet peas, celery,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued
chicken with roll, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey
super salad with roll, pizza,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, chilled baked beans, po-
tato roasters, chilled fruit,
baked beans, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham
super salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, potato
triangles, cucumber coins,
celery, chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, spaghetti
with ripstick, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
potato roasters, sweet corn,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced turkey with
turkey gravy, potatoes O'Brien,
carrot coins, sugar cookie,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Beef and mush-
room penne pasta, mixed veg-
etables, garlic spinach,
pineapple, slice wheat bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken
thigh with chicken gravy,
mashed potatoes, green
beans, graham crackers, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger patty
with bun and ketchup and
mustard, baked beans, yellow
corn with diced tomato, mixed
fruit, slice whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad, beet
and onion salad, three-bean
salad, citrus fruit, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.

Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon. Call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


I)1


Timothy N.PetersonM.D. Connie Bautista, ARNP L. David Wells, Director George S. Mavros, Director Emily Mintner,
of Diagnostic Imaging of Professional Services Rehab Manager


rates may vary uepeiuinry on uepuosit amount an availauDlity. CLertain ,.
restrictions and penalty for early withdrawals may apply. *Promotional 12
incentive from First American Trust may be included to obtain APY Bank B1
accounts FDIC insured to the legal limits. Complete details are important. -""
000D5W APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED MEMBER


AND READY TO SERVE YOU.

Visit Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center at Sugarmill Woods for
exceptional healthcare. Need immediate attention? Our highly
trained and skilled staff is ready to serve you.
* Family Practice,Timothy Peterson, M.D. and Connie Bautista, ARNP
* Diagnostic Imaging including X-ray and Ultrasound
* Digital Mammography, Bone Density, Mobile CT Scan and MRI
* Laboratory Collection Services
* Rehabilitation Services including Physical, Occupational and Aquatic Therapy
We're here in Sugarmill Woods when you need "CITRUS". Call or visit us today.

S........--- '-. Service Centers
Primary Care Doctor- M-F 8am-5pm: 352-382-5000
SSugarmillWoods Main Number: 352-382-6155
Diagnostic Imaging M-F 8am-5pm
Laboratory Collection Center
PIOANI '~ M-F 6:30am-5pm
POE : .. Rehab & Aquatic Therapy M-F 8am-5pm
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L. cuo,,. Monday-Friday 8am to 5pm
Medicare, medicaid, and most insurance

at Sugarmill Woods plans accepted.
S- 7945 S. Suncoast Boulevard in Homosassa


.- citrusmh.com


OOODOX1


lEti


CITRUS MEMORIAL

oKiz/Wi4/y0n-


HEALTH


SCREENING


Friday, November 16

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Anne Marie Newcomer, OD
Please RSVP 352.628 3029
Homosassa Eye Clinic
4564 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34446
In association with:
6L1 ^.CATARACT &
gI_ LASER INSTITUTE
UC "Excellence...with love"
StLukesEye.comrn
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


Inverness Surgical Center Association invites you to attend an
educational seminar about "Diagnosis &Treatment of Skin, Breast, and
Colon Cancers." Seminar will be held at Sugarmill Country Club
(I Douglas St. Homosassa, FL) on November 14th, 2012 6-8pm.
Refreshment will be served. Please RSVP by November I Ith.
352-344-6732.


A14 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


COMMUNITY


11
Ll


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Christmas


spirit for all


Adopt a tree for family


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in conjunction
with Lowe's Home Improve-
ment and the Citrus County
Chronicle, will sponsor a
holiday event for individu-
als, families or businesses.
Adopt a tree for $15 and
help a family in need. At the
time of donation, Lowe's
will provide a voucher for 10
percent off all Christmas
decorations. Trees will be
delivered to the Central
Ridge Community Center at
Beverly Hills; all partici-
pants need to bring are
lights and decorations.
On Dec. 14, bring the
lights and decorations to the
Central Ridge Community
Center at 2 p.m. and enjoy
an afternoon of holiday


in need


music and treats.
At the end of the evening,
three trophies will be
awarded to the best corpo-
rate tree, the best civic
group tree and the best fam-
ily/friends tree. The lighted
holiday trees will remain on
display for four days, and
will then be donated to local
families in need.
Stop by Central Ridge
Community Center at Bev-
erly Hills, the Lowe's serv-
ice desk in Inverness or the
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation office to pur-
chase a tree.
Trees will be delivered to
the community center and
will be ready for partici-
pants to decorate.
For more information,
visit Citruscountyparks.com
or call 352-746-4882.


Selling snowflakes

Ornaments go on Memory Trees


Special to the Chronicle
The Gulf to Lakes Pilot
Club members are selling
snowflake ornaments for
the 16th annual Candlelight
Service at Fero Memorial
Gardens Cemetery, 5891 N.
Lecanto Highway, slated for
6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13.
Snowflakes may be pur-
chased for $2 in honor or in
memory of a loved one,
friend, co-worker, or pet.
The name of the honoree
will be attached to each
snowflake and placed on
the Memory Trees.
Refreshments are avail-
able at 5 p.m. prior to the
luminary service. At 6 p.m.
the musical program will
begin.
The public is invited to


purchase a snowflake from
any Pilot Club member and
to attend the inspirational
candlelight ceremony
Gulf to Lakes Pilot Club
members will also be sell-
ing snowflakes immedi-
ately before the program
begins.
Proceeds from the
snowflake sales go to local
charities that the Pilot Club
supports.
The Memory Trees will
be lit and on display the en-
tire month of December at
Fero Memorial Gardens
Cemetery.
For information about
the project or Candlelight
Service, or to purchase a
snowflake ornament from a
Pilot Club member, call
Anita at 352-341-4898.


Over $50 worth of savings in
today's SmartSource insert.


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(1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 441
341-0813


VISIT US

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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 A15


,kip





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOCCAS fundraiser


Worth NOTING

Donations needed for Christmas at park


Fort Cooper State Park
needs donations of Christmas
items for its "An All American
Christmas" this year.
The trees in the recreation
hall will be decorated in red,
white and blue. People wish-
ing to donate lights, decora-
tions and artificial trees in
these colors (primarily white)
that are in good condition may
bring them by the park at
3100 S. Old Floral City Road,
Inverness.
Items can even be Fourth
of July decorations. Nights of
Lights it is a charitable event,


when the park is decorated in
its holiday finest. There will be
entertainment, refreshments,
and a visit by Santa Claus.
Entrance fee is a nonper-
ishable food item, new toy or
cash that is donated to Citrus
United Basket a local charity.
Donations of pet food for
Citrus County Animal Services
are accepted for its program
to assist pet owners who have
fallen on hard times, so they
are able to feed their pets.
For more information, call
Dianne Drye, park ranger, at
352-726-0315.


Forum links volunteers to opportunities
11


9j


Special to the Chronicle
Representatives from Park Lane Jewelry, from left, Olive Radeker, Kristine Hamilton, Barbara Verbout and Reggie Costa
presented a check for $3,500 to Friends of Citrus County Animal Services board members Chris Vanerka and Anne
Mangano from a recent benefit staged at Black Diamond. (Not pictured are Beth Howard and April Bragdon of Park Lane).
Other friends and supporters present were Beth Smith of McLeod House Bistro, Barnaby the dog and Donna Kilbury.


Learn where you can make
a difference and discover your
niche in community service.
The Nature Coast Volunteer
Center and Retired and Sen-
ior Volunteer Program host a
forum for people to link up
with volunteer opportunities.
This is an opportunity to
meet with NCVC/RSVP staff
and volunteer managers
throughout the county and
learn about their programs
and opportunities for volunteer
service.
Opportunity Links will be
from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Nov. 14, at the Citrus
County Resource Center
Cafe, 2804 W. Marc Knighton


Court in Lecanto.
NCVC/RSVP works on a
community-wide basis to de-
velop high-impact volunteer
programming.
Through building relation-
ships with nonprofit, school,
faith-based and other groups,
NCVC/RSVP plays a critical
role in leveraging volunteer
power to the fullest effect.
For information, call 352-
527-5955 or email
ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Visit on the Web at
www.naturecoastvolunteer
center.org. Persons with dis-
abilities requiring reasonable
accommodations may call
ahead to 352-527-5955.


News NOTES


Model railroaders Garden club
to elect officers will convene Nov. 9


The Citrus Model Railroad
Club will have its election of of-
ficers for 2013 during its meet-
ing at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.
6, at the Robinson Horticulture
Building of the Citrus County
Fairgrounds.
In addition to the election, the
program will include a video of
the upper New England rail-
roads, specifically the Maine
Central. All are welcome.
For more information, call
Bob Penrod at 352-797-6315.
Flotilla to meet
in Homosassa
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of
the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 6, at the West Citrus Com-
munity Center, 8940 W. Veter-
ans Drive, Homosassa. Visitors
are welcome.
The Auxiliary is active in as-
sisting the U.S. Coast Guard
with promoting homeland secu-
rity, public instruction of safe
boating, vessel safety exams,
safety patrols on the rivers and
coastal waters, search/rescue
and law enforcement air patrols
and many other activities.
For more information, call
Bob Currie at 352-232-1516.


Floral City Garden Club will
meet at noon Friday, Nov. 9, at
the Community Building on
East Orange Avenue.
The program will start at
12:30 p.m. and the business
meeting will be at 1:30 p.m. No-
vember's program will be of-
fered by Jane Weber,
discussing azaleas and
camellias. Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thou-
sands of native plants.
All meetings are open to the
public. For more information,
call club President Christine
Harnden at 352-341-3247.
Timeshare owners
meet in Sarasota
Getting the most from your
timeshare unit will be the domi-
nate topic at the next Florida
Timeshare Owners Group
meeting at 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov.
11 at the Palm Aire Country
Club in Sarasota.
Guest speaker will be Neil
Kolton, director of sales and
service for the Interval Interna-
tional trading company.
To RSVP, email Frank Debar
at fdebar433@gmail.com or
call 941-351-1384.


OVHA annual
meeting is Nov. 7
The Oakwood Village Home-
owners Association will have its
annual meeting and election at
1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at
the Lions Club.
The speaker is Sgt. Chris
Evans of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. Refreshments
will be served. For information,
call Dee at 352-249-7651.
Bonsai club
plans workshop
Buttonwood Bonsai Club will
have a public workshop at 9:30
a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Key
Training Center, 130 Height St.,
Inverness.
Chinese elms will be sold at
the workshop for $25, including
a Chinese elm, pot, soil and the
instructions on how to make it
into a bonsai.
For more information, visit
buttonwoodbonsai.org, or call
President Bob Eskeitz at 352-
556-499 or Corresponding Sec-
retary Duane Finch Sr. at
352-726-9261.
Learn about palms
at free clinic
Growing palm trees in Citrus
County can be a reality if we
pick the correct tree for our


area. The November free Mas-
ter Gardener Plant Clinics' topic
will be "All About Palms," cover-
ing their selection, nutrition and
potential problems.
The schedule is:
Wednesday, Nov. 7, at 2
p.m., Floral City Library.
Friday, Nov. 9, at 1:30
p.m., Coastal Region Library,
Crystal River.
Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 1
p.m., Lakes Region Library,
Inverness.
Wednesday, Nov. 14, at
1:30 p.m., Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
Wednesday, Nov. 21, at 1
p.m., Citrus Springs Library,
Citrus Springs.


Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 2
p.m., Homosassa Library.
Master gardeners will also
offer a repeat of the October
topic, "Plant Cold Protection," at
1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at
Lakes Region Library).
There will be no clinics dur-
ing December due to travel and
the holiday season. The free
clinics will return in January.
For more information, call


This approximate two to two
and one half-hour bird walk will
take place beginning at 8 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 10.
The walk will be led by mem-
bers of the local Audubon Soci-
ety and is open to all
experience levels of birders.
Bring your binoculars, field
guides, bug repellant and any-
thing that would enhance the
experience.


32-527-5700UU. Fort Cooper State Park is at
Fort Cooper 3100 S. Old Floral City Road in
to host bird walk Inverness.
Normal park entrance fee of
All are welcome to come ex- $3 per vehicle (with up to eight
plore the trails in search of birds people in vehicle) is required.
that call Fort Cooper State Park For more information, call the
home. park at 352-726-0315.


Q oin us for a unique and supportive

remem rance service presented by HPH Hospice

chaplains and bereavement counselors to

memorialize and celebrate the lives of those who

have gone from our sight but not from our hearts.


Wednesday, November 7, 2012
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
9225 West Fishbowl Drive
Homosassa, FL 34448
2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





a not-for-profit organization initially licensed 1984


I www.newstudyinfo.co


4,4e


A16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Habitat hammers in Homosassa


~


Ii
I


Special to the Chronicle
Future Habitat
homeowner Anne Robbins,
left, stands with her father,
Russell Lewandowski, and
sister, Shannon Hubbard,
under the frame of what will
be the front door to her new
home on Hazelton Terrace in
Homosassa. I : Ashley
and Delancy Gibson work to-
gether on their newly framed
Habitat home in Homosassa.


HOW TO HELP
To volunteer your time
to help Habitat for
Humanity build homes
for Citrus County
residents, call the of-
fice at 352-563-2744.
Habitat for Humanity
can also use volunteers
in its Restore and in
the office. Call 352-
563-2744.


More families to receive homes


STEPHANIE HAGINS
Special to the Chronicle
The usually peaceful
suburbs surrounding
Hazelton Terrace in Ho-
mosassa have been a hub-
bub of activity these past
few weeks, buzzing with
drills and chainsaws.
Trucks make deliveries of
concrete and trusses.
A foreman gives instruc-
tion. Volunteers ask ques-
tions. All the while, the
beat of a hammer a
Habitat hammer keeps a
rhythmic pace on the job
site.
"These homes are sched-
uled to be completed in
about three months," Habi-
tat construction manager
James Baldwin said.
"We've got to keep up a
consistent pace around
here."
Baldwin was referring to
the two adjacent homes
being built by Habitat for
Humanity of Citrus County.
Floor plans for each home
contain three bedrooms,
two full baths, one laundry
room and a galley kitchen.
Anne Robbins, divorced,
and a single mother of two,
is on track to receive one of
the homes. Her parents
help watch the children
while she works to save


money for the mortgage
down payment and satisfy
the 500 "sweat equity"
hours required by Habitat.
"I appreciate that Habi-
tat is encouraging me to get
back on my feet and into
this home," Robbins said.
"Its hard work but (it) will
be worthwhile for my fam-
ily if I can stay focused and
moving forward."
And indeed the organiza-
tion is moving forward.
After completing 15 homes
throughout Citrus County
last year, Habitat for Hu-
manity has plans to build
another 15 during the next
12 months five of which
are in the vicinity of Hazel-
ton Terrace.
When complete, the affil-
iate will have constructed
100 homes in Citrus County
since its inception in 1993.
Marie Peterson, who re-
sides next door to the
Habitat properties on
Hazelton Terrace, wel-
comes the new families.
"How wonderful to have
young people moving into
our neighborhood," she
said. "We enjoy watching
the people and the equip-
ment, and all the goings on.
And who knows I might
even volunteer a little
hammering here and
there."


1590 S SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMC
FOR MORE INFO: (352)


Si


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4


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 A17












SN A-TION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Y CHRONICLE


Cooler than you Obama seems to have early-vote lead
Cooler tanyo sem


KEVIN M. COX/
The Galveston County Daily News
Megan Poznecki of Santa
Fe rides a motorized cooler
up The Strand on Saturday
during the Lone Star Rally
in Galveston, Texas. The 11th
annual four-day rally drew
thousands of bikers from
around the country.

Grandma claims $23M
prize just in time
SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.
- For more than five months
- while Julie Cervera strug-
gled to pay a $600 electrical
bill, feed her family and keep
the cable company from shut-
ting off her service she was
a millionaire without knowing it.
Meanwhile, her $23 million
lottery ticket languished in the
glove compartment of her car.
On Thursday, someone
texted her a photo of her
daughter, Charliena Marquez,
buying the winning ticket for
her at a Palmdale Liquor
store. The photo had been re-
leased by lottery officials
searching for the mysterious
winner of the May drawing.
"I put my 99-cent glasses
on, and I had to put two pairs
on to see it," said Cervera, 69.
She recognized her daughter
in the grainy photo, but still
couldn't read the caption.
"I thought she robbed a bank
because I couldn't see the
words on top," Cervera said
with a laugh. "So I put on a third
pair (of glasses) and it said
she won. I was like, 'No way!'"
Back in May, mother and
daughter were driving home
together when Marquez felt
queasy and asked her
mother to pull over so she
could buy a bottle of water.
"She always gets carsick,"
Cervera said.
Cervera asked her daugh-
ter to buy her a lottery ticket
and dug in her purse trying to
find a dollar. Marquez protested
but eventually used her own
money to purchase a Super
Lotto Plus ticket for her mom.
The ticket was set to expire
Nov. 26.
"My grandkids are all going
to be taken care of, and my
(three) daughters," Cervera
said. "I'm just so happy. I'm
going to buy me a pair of
Reeboks."
She also has two adopted
sons, ages 5 and 9, who have
developmental disabilities.
IRS lax churches
and politics
NEW YORK For the past
three years, the Internal Rev-
enue Service hasn't been in-
vestigating complaints of
partisan political activity by
churches, leaving religious
groups who make direct or thinly
veiled endorsements of politi-
cal candidates unchallenged.
The IRS monitors religious
and other nonprofits on every-
thing from salaries to spending,
and that oversight continues.
However, Russell Renwicks,
a manager in the IRS Mid-
Atlantic region, recently said
the agency had suspended
audits of churches suspected
of breaching federal restric-
tions on political activity. A
2009 federal court ruling re-
quired the IRS to clarify which
high-ranking official could au-
thorize audits over the tax
code's political rules. The IRS
has yet to do so.
"The impression created is
that no one is minding the
store," said Melissa Rogers,
director of the Center for Reli-
gion and Public Affairs at
Wake Forest University Divin-
ity School in North Carolina.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama heads
toward Election Day with an
apparent lead over Repub-
lican Mitt Romney among
early voters in key states that
could decide the election.
Obama's advantage, how-
ever, isn't as big as the one
he had over John McCain
four years ago, giving Rom-
ney's campaign hope the
former Massachusetts gov-
ernor can erase the gap on
Tuesday


More than 27 million peo-
ple already have voted in 34
states and the District of Co-
lumbia. No votes will be
counted until Election Day,
but several battleground
states are releasing the
party affiliations of people
who have voted early
So far, Democratic voters
outnumber Republicans in
Florida, Iowa, Nevada, North
Carolina and Ohio five
states that could decide the
election. Republicans have
the edge in Colorado, which
Obama won in 2008.


Obama dominated early
voting in 2008, building up
such big leads in Colorado,
Florida, Iowa and North
Carolina, according to vot-
ing data compiled by The
Associated Press.
"In 2008, the McCain
campaign didn't have any
mobilization in place to re-
ally do early voting," said
Michael McDonald, an
early voting expert at
George Mason University
who tallies voting statistics
for the United States Elec-
tions Project.


McDonald said he sees a
shift toward Republicans
among early voters, which
could make a difference in
North Carolina, which Obama
won by the slimmest of mar-
gins in 2008, only 14,000
votes. The Republican shift,
however, might not be
enough to wipe out Obama's
advantage in Iowa and Ne-
vada, which Obama won
more comfortably in 2008.
In Colorado, Florida and
Ohio, get ready for a long
night of vote-counting on
Tuesday


Associated Press
The half of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge attached to Brooklyn is lit while the half attached to Staten Island is dark
Friday in New York. The cost of the storm could exceed $18 billion in New York alone.




Some power, but...


Associated Press

NEW YORK The lights were back
on Saturday in lower Manhattan,
prompting screams of sweet relief from
residents who had been plunged into
darkness for nearly five days by super-
storm Sandy But that joy contrasted
with deepening resentment in the city's
outer boroughs and suburbs over a con-
tinued lack of power and maddening
gas shortages.
Adding to the misery of those without
power, heat or gasoline were dipping
temperatures. Mayor Michael
Bloomberg urged older residents with-
out heat to move to shelters and said
25,000 blankets were being distributed
across the city
"We're New Yorkers, and we're going
to get through it," the mayor said. "But
I don't want anyone to think we're out
of the woods."
Bloomberg also said that resolving
gas shortages could take days. Lines
snaked around gas stations for many
blocks all over the stricken region, in-
cluding northern New Jersey, where
Gov Chris Christie imposed rationing
that recalled the worst days of fuel
shortages of the 1970s.
Perhaps nowhere was the scene more
confused than at a refueling station in
Brooklyn, where the National Guard
gave out free gas an effort to allevi-
ate the situation. There, a mass of honk-
ing cars, desperate drivers and people
on foot, carrying containers from empty
bleach bottles to five-gallon Poland Spring
water jugs, was just the latest testament
to the misery unleashed by Sandy
Domingo Isasi, waiting in a gas line
on Staten Island, minced no words
about the divide he perceived between
Manhattan and the outer boroughs.
"The priorities are showing, simply
by the fact that Manhattan got their
power back," he said, adding that
Staten Islanders are used to being
lower on the list. "We're the bastard
kids who keep getting slapped in the
head and told to shut up."
At a gas giveaway station in Queens,
the scene was calmer but not happier
More than 400 cars stretched for more
than a dozen blocks, with one tanker
filling cars one at a time. A police car
pulled alongside a car about 250th in
line, and officers told the driver they
hoped there would still be gas by the
time he got there.
The 5,000-gallon trucks from the De-
fense Department had been dispatched
to five locations around the New York
City metropolitan area.
"Do not panic. I know there is anxiety
about fuel," Gov Andrew Cuomo said.
Ten people were arrested at gas sta-
tions on Friday in various disputes over
line jumping, police said. And fears


A sign is bent over at a gas filling station without power Saturday in
Cranford, N.J. After Monday's storm surge from Sandy, many gas sta-
tions in the region are without power and those that are open have
very long lines. At noon Saturday, a gas rationing system ordered by
Gov. Chris Christie went into effect.


about crime, especially at night
in darkened neighborhoods, per-
sisted. Officers in the Midland
Beach section of Staten Island
early Saturday saw a man in a
Red Cross jacket checking the
front doors of unoccupied houses
and arrested him for burglary
Gas rationing went into effect
at noon in 12 counties of north-
ern New Jersey, where police en-
forced rules to allow only
motorists with odd-numbered li-
cense plates to refuel. Those
with even-numbered plates
would get their turn Sunday
President Barack Obama vis-
ited the headquarters of the Fed-
eral Emergency Management
Agency for an update on recov-
ery efforts and said: "There's
nothing more important than us
getting this right."
He cited the need to restore
power; pump out water, particu-
larly from electric substations;
ensure that basic needs are ad-
dressed; remove debris; and get
federal resources in place to
help transportation systems
come back on line.
More than 2.6 million people
remained without power in sev-
eral states after Sandy came
ashore Monday night.
About 900,000 people still were
without electricity in the New
York metropolitan area, includ-
ing about 550,000 on Long Island,
Cuomo said. About 80 percent of
New York City's subway service
has been restored, he added.
The restoration of power beat
the sunrise Saturday in the West
Village, though just barely Elec-


tricity arrived at 4:23 a.m., said
Adam Greene, owner of Snack
Taverna, a popular eatery
"This morning, I took a really
long, hot shower," he said.
Greene said one woman had
stopped in Saturday to drop off
$10 for the staff, saying she re-
gretted she didn't have enough
cash to tip adequately during the
blackout.
He joked that 28th Street,
above which had power, was like
"Checkpoint Charlie."
"You crossed 28th Street and
people were living a comfortable
life," Greene said. "Down here it
was dark and cold."
Throughout the West Village,
people were emerging from their
hibernation, happy to regain
their footing. Stores started to re-
open. Signs at a Whole Foods
Market promised that fresh
meat, poultry and baked goods
would return Sunday
Aida Padilla was thrilled that
the power at her large housing
authority complex in Chelsea
had returned late Friday "Thank
God," said Padilla, 75. "I
screamed and I put the lights on.
Everybody was screaming. It was
better than New Year's."
Asked about whether she had
heat, she replied, "Hot and cold
water and heat! Thank God, Jesus!"
New York City's parks re-
opened Saturday, and with Sun-
day's New York City Marathon
canceled, many of the runners
who had come to town for the
race worked out their frustra-
tions with a jog through Central
Park.


About 35 percent of voters
are expected to cast ballots
before Tuesday, either by
mail or in person.
Voters always can cross
party lines when they vote
for any office, and there are
enough independent voters
in many states to swing the
election, if enough of them
vote the same way Still,
both campaigns are follow-
ing the early voting numbers
closely, using them to
gauge their progress and
plan their Election Day
strategies.


World BRIEFS

What's old is new


Associated Press
This undated image released
Friday by Egypt's Supreme
Council of Antiquities shows
a statue in a recently dis-
covered complex of tombs
south of Cairo.
4,500-year-old tomb
found in Egypt
CAIRO Czech archaeol-
ogists have unearthed the
4,500-year-old tomb of a
Pharaonic princess.
Mohammed EI-Bialy, who
heads the Egyptian and
Greco-Roman Antiquities de-
partment at the Antiquities
Ministry, said that Princess
Shert Nebti's burial site is sur-
rounded by the tombs of four
high officials from the Fifth
Dynasty dating to around
2,500 B.C. in the Abu Sir
complex near the famed step
pyramid of Saqqara.
Inscriptions on the pillars of
the Princess' tomb indicate
she is the daughter of King
Men Salbo.
"She is the daughter of the
king ... so the question is, are
we going to discover other
tombs around hers in the
near future? We don't know
anything about her father, the
king, or her mother, but hope
that future discoveries will an-
swer these questions," El-
Bialy said.
Israel: Syrian tanks
enter Golan DMZ
JERUSALEM Three
Syrian tanks entered the de-
militarized zone in the Golan
Heights on Saturday, prompt-
ing Israel to complain to U.N.
peacekeepers, a military
spokesman said. The foray
would be the first such viola-
tion in 40 years and hikes
concerns that violence from
Syria's civil war could heat up
a long-quiet frontier.
Israel's relatively low-key
response of turning to the
U.N. suggested it did not see
the Syrian armor as an imme-
diate threat.
Misidentified 2010
crash victim reburied
WARSAW, Poland A re-
peat burial was held Saturday
for Ryszard Kaczorowski,
Poland's last president-in-exile,
whose body was misidentified
and buried in the wrong grave
following a 2010 plane crash
in Russia that killed 96 people.
Forensic experts confirmed
last week his body had been
confused with that of another
victim and was buried in the
wrong grave. Officials would
not release the name of the
other victim.
-From wire reports











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be found
on Page A21 of
today's "
Chronicle. W


SLiving Computer Museum


otj is r blends nostalgia, technology
DONNA GORDON BLANKINSHIP
A ^Associated Press


Associated Press
lan King, senior vintage systems engineer at the Living Computer Museum in
Seattle, stands Oct. 30 by a memory module of a DEC PDP-10 computer from the
early 1970s that holds 16 kilobytes of computer memory. The working machine is
part of the collection of running computers at Paul Allen's newly opened museum.


Wr SEATTLE
or tourists with an interest in Seattle's role
as a high-tech hub, there hasn't been much
here to see, other than driving over to
Microsoft headquarters in Redmond to
take pictures of a bunch of buildings.


But Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen
has just opened the Living Computer
Museum, with displays of old machines
- all in working order along with a
geeky wish list of items he'd like to add,
just in case anybody out there has an
old tape drive or super-computer
sitting around.
Visitors who stop by the nondescript
building in an industrial section of
Seattle south of the baseball stadium
are likely to see technicians in white
lab coats working on the machines. But
this place is not just for nerds and
techies. Since the museum's Oct. 25
opening, many visitors have been fami-
lies, and their questions have not been
the expected queries concerning tech-
nical specs of machines, but rather
where did the curators find these arti-
facts and what were they used for
And items here are not behind glass
with "Do Not Touch" signs. This is a
place where you're welcome to pull up
a chair and relive the days when you
played Congo Bongo on a Commodore
64 instead of doing homework.
Visitors of a certain age are also al-
most guaranteed to see the first per-
sonal computer they ever touched -
Radio Shack TRS-80 or an early Apple,
perhaps- but the centerpieces of the
collection are the bigger, older, flashier
machines.
One of the oldest examples is a PDP-
7 made by Digital Equipment Corpora-
tion. It's the size of an office cubicle
and was designed in the mid-1960s to
do just one operation in a physics lab at
the University of Oregon. The curators
believe it is the only working model of
this machine in the world.
The machine has a fraction of the
computing power of a modern cell
phone and is a lot more expensive to
maintain.
Displays throughout the small mu-
seum explain how much computers
have evolved in the past 50 years and
feature some amusing old photographs,
including one shot of Allen sitting at a
keyboard with a young Bill Gates look-
ing over his shoulder.
People can visit the museum and ac-
cess some of its computers virtually by
requesting a login on the facility's
website.


IF YOU GO
Living Computer Museum:
2245 First Ave. S., Seattle.
Open noon to 8 p.m. Thursday;
noon to 5 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
Adults, $5; students, seniors,
active military, $2; children
12 and younger, free.
www.livingcomputermuseum.org


Among the museum staff's plans for
the future are a special tour focused on
the history of Microsoft and a lab
where visitors can interface with some
of the older machines.
All the equipment is from Allen's per-
sonal collection and the people who
run the museum say the high-tech bil-
lionaire is committed to putting more
cash into building his collection for
both educational and nostalgic value.
"He's extremely passionate about
this place," said Christina Siderius, a
spokeswoman for Allen's company,
Vulcan Inc.
Allen is a collector of epic propor-
tions, but he doesn't keep his toys
locked away in a private vault; he likes
to share. He has two other museums in
the Seattle area: the Flying Heritage
Collection featuring his airplanes, and
the Experience Music Project popular
culture and science fiction museum,
filled with guitars, album covers, movie
and band posters, costumes, props and
toys.
Between the science fiction displays
at the EMP and the new computer mu-
seum, Allen has almost single-handedly
given geeks and many others -
several good reasons to visit Seattle.
"We are a tech capital," Siderius
said. "To have something that pays trib-
ute to that is appropriate."
Allen himself doesn't hang out at the
museum or show visitors around, but
he has an appropriate surrogate in Ian
King, the museum's senior systems
engineer.
"I'm a collector myself. I have about
30 machines in my basement," said the
bearded, kilt-wearing King.


Lake Panasoffkee: Sportsman's paradise


JOE KORNECKI III
.%prial ht tbh, (Cihrrnicl
L ake Panaso,,fkee is a 4.800-acre lake in1
Sumter Cotiun. home to abundant \vwildlite
and excellent fishing opportunities that
have attracted \ isitois f'or generations.
LargemoI uth b)as. Iluei2llI. \wari',:itlth. cra)ppie and
catfish are some of the fish a n.lers can catch
Lake Panasoffkee is a sprin-tfed lake and it
drains into thle \Vithlacoolhee Ri\ en Pri ncess'
Lake via tie Outlet Riter e or about W1t\vo IIles It
is here that the ( CitIr and Suliiiter co'nt. \ lines
form a bouindal v on tlie rin\er
The Lake Panasoffkee area is ,otf historical
.significance. The Outlet River w\as home to, a


Paleo-I ndian cuiliture. and d ri n nthe Second
Seminole \Var l835-42i IT S Armni militias and
Seminole Indians crossed the Outlet RiN era nd a
pitched battle \\as thought about \\here Cou nt.\
Road 470 crosses the Outlet
In 1842. Willam in Jenkins W\orth. coinmmander of
UI S forces. led his troops to, sc,'our Lake Tsala
Apopka. \\Val hio S\ a ip. Co\ e of the
\Vithlacchee and Lake Pa nasofkee tori a n
remain in Sein'oles
The to\vn of Panasotfkee in the late 1800s \\as
t\\ice as large as Jackson\ ille and \\as a thrn in-,
center tfor the ctarits industry\ hlio er.e the
freezes ot 1883 a nd 1895 brought the citrus
industry to a halt Lake Panasotfkee underwent a
decade-lionng restoration prioMect that \\as


coinpletede in 2008 to remove sediment to return
the lake back to its natural state.
Lake Panasoffkee and Panasoffkee Outlet are
public lands managedI bI the Sout hwest Florida
Water Ma nageiement District and have ma nI
'recreational opportunities.
Visit the \website at wtwo'.aternmatters.or_ to
find out iore information on these lands
.lso. Jumnper Creek W\LA is a segment of the
Withlacoochee State Forest with two access poi nts
in Lake Panasoftkee Sinipl. enter keyword
\Vithlac.ochee State Forest for more information
For ignore inI1orlnation about Lake Panasotfkee in
general. visit the w ebsite at \ \v\ panasof'kee.com.


- -~---.,. ~.----- - I~.E


Anniversary trip

Dr. Larry and Beverly Steed celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary by taking
a cruise and land tour of Alaska. This picture of the couple was taken in
Denali National Park with Mount MckKinley in the background. Their golden
anniversary was celebrated aboard the ship on Aug. 26, 2012.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VCATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Remember intent


of Veterans Day


SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 4, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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(HIST] 51 25 51 32 42 PG'c 'PG C 'P*G' PG' *PG 'PG "Revenge" (N) PG ''PG'
I 38 1 "Fatal Honeymoon" "The Eleventh Victim" (2012) Jennie Garth. A "Left to Die" (2012 Docudrama) Rachael "The Eleventh Victim"
24 38 24 31 (2012) Harvey Keitel. killer targets a therapist's patients.'NR' Leigh Cook. Premiere. NR B (2012)'NR'c
*** "Circle of Friends" (2006, Suspense) Army Wives "Soldier Army Wives "Walking Army Wives "Strategic Army Wives
50 119 Julie Benz.'NR' cN On" PG' Bc Wounded"'PG' Alliances"'PG' "Supporting Arms"'PG'
**N 0 **' "Transit" (2012) Jim Caviezel. **2 "Horrible Bosses" (2011, Comedy) Jason *2 "This Means War"(2012) "Voyeur's
S 320 221 320 3 3 "Paul"'R' (In Stereo) R' Bateman. (In Stereo) NR 'N Reese Witherspoon. 'PG-13' Web"
MiSNBJ 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) |Hardball Matthews The Ed Show (N) |Rachel Maddow The Last Word |The Ed Show
Inside 9/11: Zero Hour Terrorist attacks of Sept. "SEAL Team Six: The Raid on Osama bin Doomsday Preppers "SEAL Team Six:
I(W)B 109 65 109a 44 53 11, 2001.'PG' Laden"(2012) Cam Gigandet.'NR' (N) 14' Osama bin Laden"
WiCj 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious |Victorious Victorious |iCarly'G' See Dad |** "LegallyBlonde"(2001)'PG-13' |Nanny Friends |Friends
(WN) 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Next
(XYJ 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl
Larry Wilmore's Race Dexter "Swim Deep" Homeland "Q&A" (In Dexter "Do the Wrong Homeland "A Dexter "Do the Wrong
340 241 340 4 Religion & Sex 'MA' cc Stereo) 'MA' Thing" MA' Gettysburg Address" (N) Thing" 'MA'
EEli 732 112 732 Formula One Racing NASCAR Victory SPEED Center (N) Wind Tunnel With Dave My Classic Car Crazy Formula One Racing
732112 732 Lane (N) (Live) Despain (N) Car 'G
7 *** "Kick-Ass" (2010, Action) Aaron Johnson, ** "The Punisher" (2004) Thomas Jane. An FBI agent ** "The Punisher" (2004)
37 43 37 27 36 Mark Strong. (In Stereo) R seeks revenge for the murder of his family 'R Thomas Jane. (In Stereo) 'R
"Jack and Jill" *** "21 Jump Street" (2012, Comedy) Jonah "Ghost Rider: Spirit of **+ "Click" (2006) Adam Sandier.
370 271 370 (2011) Adam Sandier. Hill, Brie Larson. (In Stereo) R' BcVengeance" (2012) 'PG-13' m (In Stereo) PG-13' c
n 36 31 o3 Fishing the Sport Sportsman College Football Clemson at Florida State. TaylorMade: Outside Fitness
SUN) 36 31 36 Flats Fishing the Ropes Truth
31 59 31 26 29 R'~Sand Sharks" (2011) "Swamp Shark" "2 Headed Shark Attack" (2012, Action) Carmen Electra, Charlie "Shark Zone" (2003)
S 31 59 31 26 29 (2011) 'R' 0 Connell. A monster shark sinks an educational ship. NR' C Dean Cochran. r R'
(IBS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Yes Man" (2008) Jim Carrey. *** "The Hangover" (2009, Comedy) 'R' ** "Yes Man" (2008) Jim Carrey.
i*** "Fiddler on the Roof" (1971, Musical) ***n "The Pink Panther" (1964, Comedy) *** "The Lion" (1962, Drama) William Holden,
169 53 169 30 35 Topol, Norma Crane.'G' Peter Sellers, David Niven. NR'B Capucine, Trevor Howard. NR'
MythBusters"Wheel of MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters "Mini Myth Battlefield Cell (N) (In America's Doomsday MythBusters "Mini Myth
(nB 53 34 53 24 26 Mythfortune" PG' 'PG' Medley" (N) Stereo) PG' Plan (N) PG' Medley" N
CTL( 50 46 50 29 30 Medium |Medium Medium |Medium Long Island Medium: Medium |Medium Breaking Amish 14 Medium |Medium
S 350 261 35 ** "Blues Brothers 2000" (1998 Musical ** "Real Steel" (2011 Action) Hugh ** "The Tempest" (2010, Drama) Helen
L J 350 261 350 Comedy) Dan Aykroyd, Joe Morton. PG-13' Jackman. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Mirren. (In Stereo)'PG-13'
*** "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines" ** "Clash of the Titans"(2010, Fantasy) Sam ** "Clash of the Titans"(2010, Fantasy) Sam
(W) 48 33 48 31 34 (2003) Arnold Schwarzenegger. 'R' Worthington.'PG-13' (DVS) Worthington. 'PG-13' (DVS)
(IIN) 38 58 38 33 *** "OvertheHedge" (2006) 'PG' Looney |Dragons Cleveland |King/Hill King/Hill IFam. Guy Fam.Guy Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 No Reservation No Reservation Extreme Houseboats Extreme Houseboats Extreme Houseboats My Life People
iITVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout 'PG' Wipeout PG out 'PG'j Pawn Pawn Conspiracy
(YLI 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M'A*S*H M'*A*SH M*'A*S*H M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H Raymond |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |King
L 47 Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special *** "Casino Royale"
(S 47 1 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit 14 Victims Unit 14 Victims Unit 14 Victims Unit'14 (2006)'PG-13'
Bridezillas Cristal loses Bridezillas "Cristal & Bridezillas "Natalie & Bridezillas Natalie Bridezillas (Season Bridezillas "Natalie &
S117 69 117 her mind. 14' Janelle"'14'B Cristal" 14'B Nunn flips out. '14 Finale) (N) 14' Cristal" 14 B'
WVN-AJ 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: Veterans
for Peace is inter-
ested in returning the
Nov 11 celebration back to
its original intent of cele-
brating peace, rather than
war and warriors.
We would like to
ask all churches
to ring their bells
11 times on Nov
11 at 11 a.m. and
have a moment of
prayer for peace.
On Nov 11,
1918, an
armistice was
signed to stop
war between the
nations that had ANN
been fighting MAIL
World War I. In
1928, peaceful
nations met in Paris and
signed the Kellogg-Briand
Pact, legally banning all
wars. In 1938, Congress
made Armistice Day official.
In 1954, however, Congress
moved to change the word
"armistice" to "veterans,"
which also changed the
focus of the celebration from
peace to war. Veterans for
Peace is asking all churches
to ring their bells on Nov 11
and have a moment of
prayer for peace. Samuel
I. Winstead, Veterans for
Peace
Dear Annie: I am a 17-
year-old straight-A student
and have sound judgment
for most things, but I'm not
sure about this.
I have started seeing
"Michael," a 25-year-old guy
I know it's a big age differ-
ence, but everything else
about our relationship is
perfect. So far, we have only
gone out to public places and


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Wreck-it Ralph" (PG) 1:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG)
4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Fun Size" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m. No passes.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R)
ID required. 1:45 p.m.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" 3D (R)
ID required. 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity 4" (R)
ID required. 7:45 p.m.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Flight" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m.. No passes.
"Wreck-it Ralph" (PG) 4:30 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.


"Wreck-it Ralph" 3D (PG)
1:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No Passes
"Chasing Mavericks" 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m.
"Cloud Atlas" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Fun Size" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m. No passes.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" 3D (R)
ID required. 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
No passes.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R)
ID required. 2 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity 4" (R)
ID required. 7:05 p.m.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) 3D.
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Move with grace
6 Destiny
10 Prank
15 Grilled dinner fare
20 Place of refuge
21 Indigo dye
22 --and well
23 Necktie
24 Young bird
25 Indian of Peru
26 Grow mellow
27 Roman lyric poet
28 Dir. letters
29 Part of the arm
31 Story
33 Part
35 Basic (abbr.)
36 Not loose
37 Greatest degree
39 Newt
41 Science fiction creation
44 Hold tight
45 Summit
48 Bid
53 'When Met Sally"
54 Secular
55 Large deer
57 Callas or Sharapova
58 Settled after flight
59 Girl
60 Owned
61 Sew loosely
63 "- Worry Be Happy"
64 Wood fastener
65 Bathe
66 The City of Light
68 Musical sound
70 Cry of surprise
71 Actuality
72 Laundry room item
74 Long river
76 Escargot
79 Old anesthetic
81 College subject (abbr.)
83 Moderate
87 Enamel
88 Radio part
89 Regretted
91 Crystal-filled rock
92 Burning
94 Purple color
96 Davis or Midler
97 Range in Chile
98 Frond
100 Enlighten
102 Look after
104 Advanced degree


Let fall
Wipe out
Cry from a sentry
Get hitched
Burden
- and void
Rd. cousin
Kite appendage
Adore
Ray flower
About
Unsuccessful
Hazard
Pester in fun
Florida county
Pickle flavoring
Knob
Enemy
Show to be false
Untamed
- the lily
Encourage
Debatable
One of a pair
- canto
Simply awful
Grant
Person, place
or thing
The ones there
Vacation spot
Dull
Gaelic
Browned bread
Ache
Put the kibosh on
Marsh plant
Leggy creature


DOWN
1 Thug
2 Kind of tennis
3 Wight or Ely
4 Pass away
5 Where river
meets sea
6 Swoon
7 "- Karenina"
8 A twitching
9 Stretchy
10 Goods on board
11 Assumed name
12 Spot on a card
13 Perpetually
14 Gambling haven
15 ---Magnon
16 Rabbit relative
17 Ellipse


Tempo
Plant part
Restaurant VIP
Carry with effort
Elec. unit
Dictionary
Legal wrong
"Exodus" author
Spigot
Male animal
Guy
Lock brand
Ship with two masts
Cut
Fruit stone
Coup d'-
Nine days' wonder
Leaping creature
"- kleine
Nachtmusik"
Appraise
Endured
Caution
River in Italy
Varnish ingredient
Tresses
Grow together
Did a certain dance
Overture
Exude
Swanky
Last exam
Marine mammal
Traveled way
Correct, as a text
Spring
Seize
Feel poorly
Gratuity
After deductions
Seed vessel
Dutch commune
In medias -
Delay
Merit
Painting on a wall
Ignoble
To go lame
South American rodent
Annex
Piece of ground
Flexible tube
Information
Entreaty
Frozen rain
News
Wickedness
Proofreader's


notation
- Moines
Youngster
Discussion
Furnish
Ump's cousin
Scarlet
Wine merchant
Artist's colors
Pair


Big success
Eject
Act like a ham
Curtsied
Died down
Full of bloodshed
- fixe
"Mona -"
Kind of prize
Prey


143 Ardor
145 Erato, for one
146 Wild swine
147 Being (Lat.)
148 Latvian
150 Container
for coffee
152 Business abbr.
154 Mine's yield
156 Glutton


Puzzle answer is on Page A22.


11-4


2012 UFS, Dist. bv Universal Uclick for UFS


for limited amounts of time. I
feel like I am being smart
about this, but if I look at the
situation objectively, the age
difference gives me pause.
My parents do not know
about my relation-
ship with Michael,
and I feel horrible
hiding it. I have
confided in one
friend so that if I
need her, she can
pick me up and
drive me home. I
feel as if I am safe,
but still, I don't
know what to do.
Should I tell
IE'S Michael to wait
BOX until I am old
enough for this to
be appropriate? I
don't want him to find some-
one else and forget about
me. I really like him, and I
don't want him to get into
any legal trouble. Lost in
Love
Dear Lost: Your gut is
telling you that this is not an
appropriate relationship. We
are strong believers in heed-
ing your inner voice. It's try-
ing to tell you to back away.
Michael may be a great
guy, and the age difference is
not what counts here. It's
that you are 17, and your
level of experience (in all
areas) is limited. He is 25
and probably looking for
something more serious
than you are prepared for,
and you shouldn't be rushed.
Not to mention, we worry
about a 25-year-old who is
romantically pursuing a high
school student. Please con-
fide in your parents, let them
meet Michael in person, and
then they can advise you.


A20 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


11






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Emeritus at Barrington
Place invites veterans to join
the facility for a special break-
fast in their honor.
At 9:30 a.m. Monday,
Nov. 12, Emeritus at Barrington
Place will serve breakfast to its
veteran residents and invites
community of veterans to come
join them. Call 352-746-2273 to
reserve a spot.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All pro-
ceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort). Reservations should
be made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-5131,
or email dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Lunch-
eon for Military Women will
take place at noon Monday,
Nov. 12, at the Crystal River
Woman's Clubhouse, 320 N.
Citrus Ave, Crystal River. Those
who have never received an in-
vitation in the past may call
Leslie Martineau at 352-
746-2396 to be added to the
mailing list.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service-
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.
* Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-5976961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-


giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the na-
tional service organization,
Yoga For Vets. Free classes to
combat veterans are offered by
her at several locations and
times. Call her at 352-


382-7397.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie
veterans are welcome. For
more information, call Charlie
Jensen at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 15, at Ocala Regional Air-
port Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for more
information.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty
and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-


profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the
meeting. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
Thanksgiving dinner will
be served at the post from
2 to 5 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served


IDOLLYV'W IIOOD TOUS
Serving Express Shuttles To Tampa's
Spring Hill 'O Seminole Hard Rock Casino
8 YEARS *- 1.1.l 1 .


B
I ~


I
CHI


DAY N
AUTERS


$675


BILOXI BREAKAWAY
AT THE
BEAU RIVAGE RESORT
4 DAY, 3 NIGHT
ESCAPE
$50 free play, 4 buffets
Tour Date November 18
s229- p p dbi occupancy
$359- single
Biltmore Candlelight
Christmas
4 Days, 3 Nights
5 Meals, 1 Show, admission to
Biltmore House, Winery Tour,
Tour of Asheville & Much More'
Tour Date Nov. 8 & Dec. 6
$399 p p dbl occupancy
$499 single
AN OLD FASHIONED
CHRISTMAS IN FORT
MYERS, FLORIDA
2 Day 1 Night GETAWAY
Includes Broadway Show
"Miracle on 34th Street", tour
of Edison/Ford Homes. Hot
Apple Cider & Cookies.
Admission to beautiful Marine
Selby Botanical Garden &
shopping at St. Armand's Circle
Tour Date Dec. 16 Limited
Seating Call For Pricing


www.hollywoodtoursfl.com


ONLY
$20oo
Per Person
DAY TRIPS ONLY


CASINO
EXTRAVAGANZA
To Hollywood Florida
3 Days 2 Nights Pkg. includes

5 casino's, total 5 meal vouchers, 2 buffets.
Tour Date November 29
$145d p p dbl occupancy
$175- single
3 DAY/2 NIGHT NEW
YEAR'S EVE PARTY
WITH A CHANCE TO WIN
$2013 EVERY HOUR
From 3 30 11 3Opm
ITS LUCKY 13 ATIMMOKALEE CASINO
4 Casinos, $100 Free Play, 2
meals plus 4 meal vouchers.
Live entertainment,
complimentary cocktails from
Tour Date: December 30
$204 p p dbl occupancy
$294 single
"PIGS IN PARADISE RIB COOKOFF"
WEEKEND GETAWAYTO
IMMOKALEE CASINO
Includes $60 FREE PLAY,
Two $5 Meal Vouchers,
1 Breakfast Buffet
Tour Date November 17
Guaranteed Best Price!
85 p p dbl occupancy
s15oo single
f tra l refd #ST38623


2 DAY 1 NIGHT
GETAWAY TO SOUTH
BEACH MIAMI "THE
MAGICAL CITY"
Includes 3 meals. World
famous Polynesian Dinner
Show, admission to the Exotic
Fruit and Spice park. Tour of
Millionaire's Row, Fisher Island
and Art Deco District
Tour Date November 19
$179 p p dbl occupancy
$199 single
Bok Tower Gardens
"Florida's Best Garden"
Nov. 26,2012 Day trip
General admission Pinewood
Estates and lunch & Much more!
Call For Tour Dates $54pp
ST. AUGUSTINE
3 DAY, 2 NIGHT
On/Off 1 hr. narrated trolly tour,
admission to Oldest Store
Museum, scenic cruise, 5 meals,
transportation, beach front hotel
Tour Date October 23
27900 p. p. dbl occupancy
$368 single


erry subject to change without not Transpoaton proded byHolly d Tours SpnngHill


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352) 527-8855


during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The auxiliary will serve a
roast pork dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, at the post
home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Every-
one is welcome. Donation is $
7. All are also welcome to a
ham and sweet potato dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Nov. 28, at the Post home.
Donation is $7. Donations from
the dinners help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For more
information, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.


GROCERY
Bakery, Deli, Meat,& Produce
OVERNIGHT
Cashiers, Customer Service
Supervisors, Maintenance,
Unloading & Stocking


All are welcome at the Veter-
ans Day celebration Sunday,
Nov. 11, at the post. On the
menu are hamburgers, hot
dogs and accompaniments.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch. Informa-
tion regarding any post events
is available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
The Poppy Drive will be Fri-
day, Nov. 9. No dinner that
night. The Veterans Day Cere-
mony at noon Sunday, Nov. 11,
will be followed by a picnic fea-
turing pulled pork plate, potato
salad, coleslaw, baked beans
and rolls. Music by Mike.
Cost is $6.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.


FRONT END
Cashiers, Customer Service
Desk, People Greeters
PROFESSIONAL
Pharmacy


We are the only place in North
America where you can legally swim
and interact with the manatees in the
wild. Your tour leaves directly from
the dock at the Plantation's very own
Adventure Center. Your experienced
guide will fill you in on all the facts
and fun of the manatees as well as the
history and nature of Kings Bay and
Crystal River.

For information contact
352-795-4211
or 800-632-6262


MAINTENANCE
Technicians
RECEIVING
Backroom Inventory
Associate


Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone

See VETERANS/Page A22


SALES ASSOCIATES
Lawn & Garden, Electronics,
Wireless, Toys, Housewares,
Shoes, Stationary Assembler,
Dry Grocery


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person based on double occupancy.



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I DayTrip To Hard Rock Casino
TAMPA $25 FREE Play $5 Meal Voucher
TAMPA Wednesday pick-up Homosassa:
US 19 Wal-Mart parking lot 8:00 AM


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As an Associate with Walmart, you will receive competitive wages and may be eligible for a variety of traditional and
non-traditional benefits that enhance your career, compensation, home and life. Below is just a sample of positions for
which we are currently accepting applications.


For more information on how you can become a part of the great Walmart team,please visit our hiring center:
Walmart Hiring Site
2704 Woodview Lane Lecanto, FL 34461 (352) 527-1741
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..........


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 A21






A22 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A21

Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.One
of the DAVA's projects is mak-
ing lap robes and ditty, wheel-
chair and monitor bags for
needy veterans in nursing
homes. All who wish to help in
our projects are welcome. We
need to make the items certain
sizes, so please call for infor-
mation. We also collect toiletry
items for the veterans. Good,
clean material and yarn are
needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The
public is welcome at bingo at 6
p.m. Thursday.
Outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Sat-
urday, Nov. 17. All-you-can-eat
breakfast is from 7:30 to 10:30
a.m. Cost is $5.
Free Thanksgiving dinner to
be served from noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 22. All are wel-
come; donations not required,
but will be accepted.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email
him at ultrarayl 997@
yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regular
and special events, as well as
meetings. Google us at VFW
4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea,


including territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-
697-3151 for information about
the post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente


Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at 860-
1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Nov. 10 and
Dec. 8.


Jersey club plans activities


Special to the Chronicle

The next meeting for the New Jer-
sey and Friends Club will be at 1 p.m.
Monday, Nov 5, at the VFW Post 4252
on State Road 200, Hernando. Guest
speaker will be from the Audibel
Hearing Center.
Activities for November include
dinner at 4 p.m. Nov 7 at Cody's Road
House on U.S. 19 in Crystal River, and
Thanksgiving dinner at 3 p.m. Nov 22
at the Rustic Ranch on State Road 44


in Inverness.
With winter approaching, members
are asked to remember your dona-
tions of food items and clothing for the
Family Resource Center. The club
meets the first Monday of each month
unless there is a holiday, at which time
it is the second Monday
The club bowls Thursdays at 10 a.m.
at Sportsman's Bowl on U.S. 41 in In-
verness. All are welcome; being from
New Jersey is not a requirement. For
information, call 352-527-3568.


The club is sponsoring three up-
coming bus trips for the new year The
first is to the Victory Casino Cruise
Ship on Jan. 9. On Feb. 27, the club will
go to the Tampa Bay Downs Race
Track for a day at the races. Then, on
March 20, the group will journey to
Clearwater for a luncheon cruise on
the Majestic Cruise ship. The trips are
open to all persons desiring to partic-
ipate; club membership is not re-
quired. For more information, call
Mary Anne at 352-746-3386.


Animal Services offers obedience classes


Special to the Chronicle

A free six-week dog obe-
dience class is offered to
anyone adopting a dog from


Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices. A $20 donation is re-
quested for privately owned
dogs.
To pre-register for the


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A20.

GLIDE FATE CAPER CHOPS
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P H D DiROP ERASE HAL VViWE D
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TEASE DADE D ILL D HAND LE
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YEARN N ENDED REED EGRETT
11-4 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


next class, visit the shelter
at 4030 S. Airport Road in
Inverness (behind the
county fairgrounds) or the
website at wwwcitruscrit-


ters.com to complete an ap-
plication. Proof of rabies
vaccination and county li-
cense are required. Call
352-746-8400.


C \ C I T R U S-,'-.-C 0 U N T Y



.-11 NH_|. www.chronicleonline.com

Voters Guide
Learn all about the candidates
-I. from the Citrus County Chronicle's
| # B | online voters guide.
Scan code above
with smart phone
for instant access






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Provides you with what you need to make strong choices
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www.chronicleonline.com/votersguide


50th ANNIVERSARY


The Smiths


Fred and Elayne Smith
of Beverly Hills celebrated
their 50th wedding an-
niversary Oct. 27, 2012.
The couple married Oct.
27, 1962, in Chicago. Now
both retired, they have
lived in Citrus County for
four years.
They have eight chil-
dren: Lauren Sorensen of
Orland Park, Ill.; Freddy


Smith of Morton Grove, Ill.;
Jack Smith of Lansing, Ill.;
Kathy Smith of Ed-
wardsville, Ill.; Dan Smith
of Darien, Ill.; Missy
Schultz of Orland Park, Ill.;
Sandy LePree of Beverly
Hills; and Lori Winslow of
Cape Coral.
They have 40 grandchil-
dren and 22 great-
grandchildren.


50th ANNIVERSARY


The Pittses

Anne and Michael Pitts
celebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary Oct. 27,
2012, at Our Lady Of Fa-
tima Catholic Church with
the renewal of their vows,
accompanied by their two
grandchildren, Tiffany
Hiebert and Dominic
Pitts. -Iwo
Following the ceremony,
Anne and Michael enter-
tained many family and ..
friends with a reception at
Tuscany on the Meadows,
while some danced to the
beat of Southern Expo-
sure. Lasting memories
were made on that day.


New ARRIVAL


Aden James Elmore

Erin Altemus and David
Elmore announce the birth
of a son, Aden James El-
more, at 3:55 a.m. on Oct. '
24, 2012, at Seven Rivers -.
hospital.
The baby weighed 7
pounds, 11 ounces and was
20 inches long.


For the RECORD


Divorces 10/22/12
to 10/28/12
David Hastings, Crystal
River vs. Constance Hastings,
Crystal River
Michele M. Klemm,
Homosassa vs. Zachary
Klemm, Homosassa
Octavio A. Montalva,
Hernando vs. Pauletta
Browning Montalva, Inverness

Marriages 10/22/12
to 10/28/12
Glenn Peter Jordan,
Hernando/Betty Jean Jordan,
Hernando


Corey Lamar Kendrick,
Crystal River/Tiffany Lynn
Leshko, Crystal River
Richard Waldo Leverett,
Inglis/Robin Lynn Deline,
Inglis
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the
clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in
that area.


IHO LI 'WOOiD TOUJS
Serving Express Shuttles To Tampa's
Spring Hil ,l NINo/ Seminole Hard Rock Casino
8 YEARS ,I.,...J .U - .ll.1.m,


www.hollywoodtoursfl.com


DAY F 8y
CHRERSQ ~ $2X
Scm~ s $2Y
3'a. -


Biltmore Candlelight
Christmas
4 Days, 3 Nights
5 Meals, 1 Show,
admission to Biltmore
House, Winery Tour, Tour
of Asheville & Much More!
Tour Date Nov. 8 & Dec. 6
$399 p. p. dbl occupancy
$499 single
2 DAY, 1 NIGHT CASINO
GETAWAY TO
HOLLYWOOD, FL
4 Casinos, $105 Free Play,
4 Meal Vouchers, 1 Buffet
This is the trip you
don't want to miss!
Limited Seats
WELCOME BACK
SNOWBIRDS SPECIAL!
$99 pp dbl occupancy
Call for Tour Dates & Pricing
DISCOVER ATLANTA
3 DAY/2 NIGHT
Experience 4 meals,
world of Coca Cola, CNN,
Aquarium, Centennial
Park & much more.
Tour Date Feb. 19
$320 p. p. dbl occupancy
$390" single
BILOXI
BREAKAWAY
AT THE
BEAU RIVAGE
RESORT
4 DAY, 3 NIGHT
ESCAPE
$50 free play, 4 buffets
Tour Date November 18
s229 p. p. dbl occupancy
$359" single


Trip To Hard Rock Casino
5 FREE Play $5 Meal Voucher
Wednesday pick-up Homosassa:
S 19 Wal-Mart parking lot 8:00 AM


2 DAY 1 NIGHT
GETAWAY TO SOUTH
BEACH MIAMI "THE
MAGICAL CITY"
Includes 3 meals. World
famous Polynesian Dinner
Show, admission to the
Exotic Fruit and Spice park.
Tour of Millionaire's Row,
Fisher Island and Art Deco
District
Tour Date November 19
$179 p p dbl occupancy
$199 single
Bok Tower Gardens
"Florida's Best Garden"
November 26
Day trip,
General admission
Pinewood Estates and
lunch & Much more!
$54pp
CASINO
EXTRAVAGANZA
To Hollywood Florida
3 Days 2 Nights
Pkg. includes

5 casino's, total 5 meal
vouchers, 2 buffets.
Tour Date November 29
*145" p. p. dbl occupancy
$17500 single
AN OLD FASHIONED
CHRISTMAS IN FORT
MYERS, FLORIDA
2 Day 1 Night GETAWAY
Includes Broadway Show
"Miracle on 34th Street", tour
of Edison/Ford Homes. Hot
Apple Cider & Cookies.
Admission to beautiful Marie
Selby Botanical Garden &
shopping at St. Armand's Circle
Tour Date Dec. 16 Limited
Seating Call For Pricing


ONLY
s20o"-
Per Person
DAY TRIPS ONLY


"PIGS IN PARADISE RIB COOKOFF"
WEEKEND GETAWAY TO
IMMOKALEE CASINO
Includes $60 FREE PLAY,
Two $5 Meal Vouchers, 1
Breakfast Buffet
Tour Date November 17
Guaranteed Best Price!
8500 p p dbl occupancy
$11500 single
IT'S A SMOKY
MOUNTAIN
CHRISTMAS
GATLINBURG / PIGEON FORGE TENN
4 DAYS 3 NIGHTS
Pkg. includes: 5 Meals & $12
meal voucher. Admission to
Dollywood theme park
featuring live ice skating.
Tickets to Dixie stampede
dinner show, shopping &
much more! Limited tickets
Tour Date Nov. 30, Dec. 14
3 DAY, 2 NIGHT GETAWAY
TO KEY WEST
4 meals, World Famous
Polynesian Dinner Show,
$25 free play, on/off trolley
in Key West, air boat ride
& lots of sightseeing
Tour Date November 6
1 89M p.p. dbl occupancy
*219oo single
3 DAY/2 NIGHT NEW
YEAR'S EVE PARTY
WITH A CHANCE TO WIN
$2013 EVERY HOUR
From 3 30 -11 30pm
ITS LUCKY 13 ATIMMOKALEE CASINO
4 Casinos, $100 Free Play,
2 meals plus 4 meal vouchers.
Live entertainment,
complimentary cocktails
from 11:30- 12:30, plus
shopping at St. Armand's Circle
in Sarasota.
Tour Date: December 30
$204 p p dbl occupancy
$294 single
mightrips SPRING HILL-PICKUP US19 &Trenton


PlckupiocatlonlnH nando Pasco C~rus Pin Has&Hliisborough(S I ctTrlps)


-- iT
, OEaISuIT.. RNEW FRON.12s'sjCjj .i reISJpr.I nH.J.i.Bll.
ALIvji il ?ylfjI iI~ i !!!tBJjii


TOGETHER


S Lo675 s
$675


SCl


TAMPA
U











SPORTS


No. 4 Notre Dame 4
needed three
overtimes to decide
game with Pitt./B3



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 College football/B3
0 NBA, golf/B4
0 High school sports/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL previews/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Lecanto football
could pick up
another win
According to an article in
the Ocala-Star Banner
newspaper Saturday, the
Vanguard football team
self-reported to the FHSAA
it used an ineligible player
during a 48-0 victory over
Lecanto on Oct. 26.
A possible punishment
for the infraction could be
for Vanguard to vacate its
victory to the Panthers.
"Worst-case scenario is
we forfeit the Lecanto
game," Vanguard coach
Alex Castaneda told the
Star-Banner.
Should that be the case,
Lecanto's record would
move to 5-4 overall and
1-3 in District 6A-6. Cur-
rently, the Panthers are
4-5 and 0-4.
Vanguard won't find out
its punishment until some-
time this upcoming week,
but if Lecanto picks up the
extra win, it would make
the Panthers eligible to
play a bowl game prior to
the start of the FHSAA re-
gional football playoffs.
Lecanto could also be-
come bowl eligible without
a Vanguard forfeit by
defeating Crystal River on
Friday.
Fort Lamed
wins BC Classic
in upset
ARCADIA, Calif. Fort
Lamed, a 9-1 long shot, led
all the way to win the $5
million Classic by a half-
length Saturday, capping a
weekend of upsets at the
Breeders' Cup.
Brian Hernandez Jr.,
aboard the winner, cele-
brated his 27th birthday
with the biggest victory of
his career. Game On
Dude, the 7-5 favorite who
was beaten in the closing
strides a year ago at
Churchill Downs, was sev-
enth in the field of 12.
Fort Larned ran 1 1/4
miles in 2:00.11 in the
showcase race of the two-
day world championships at
Santa Anita that was shown
in prime time for the first
time. Just four favorites won
in the event's 15 races.
Fort Lamed, a 4-year-old
colt, paid $20.80 to win.
Trainer lan Wilkes had
never won such a big race.
Harvick wins at
Texas, Nationwide
title chase tied
FORT WORTH, Texas -
Kevin Harvick led 127 laps
and won the NASCAR Na-
tionwide race at Texas for
the fifth time Saturday night,
while Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
got even with Elliott Sadler
for the season points lead
with two races left.
Stenhouse fought a
loose car much of the
night, and managed a
fourth-place finish to make
up his six-point deficit to
Sadler, who finished 11th.
From staff, wire reports


Mastering new systems


Bucs and Raiders

learning the ropes

Associated Press
OAKLAND, Calif. Ronde Bar-
ber and Carson Palmer spent years
in the NFL mastering familiar sys-
tems that helped them excel at
their crafts.
Coaching changes in Tampa
Bay and Oakland this offseason
led to new roles for the two veter-
ans that both feel have energized
their careers.
After a bit of an early learning
period, the two stars have regained
that comfort level heading into
Sunday's meeting in Oakland be-
tween Barber's Buccaneers (3-4)


Tampa Bay Bucs (3-4)
at Oakland Raiders (3-4)
Time: 4 p.m. today
TV: FOX

and Palmer's Raiders (3-4).
"I looked at it as a challenge, es-
pecially some of the new terminol-
ogy," Barber said. "But it was a fun
thing to do, though. It took some
time, obviously I didn't pick it up I
the first week. ... But it was some-
thing that I looked forward to and
really tried to embrace. I think that
attitude kind of helped me make
the transition a little easier"
Barber has moved from corner-
back in a defense that almost al-
Associated Press
ways featured two deep safeties Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Josh Freeman has thrown nine
See Page B5 touchdown passes and one interception in his last three starts.


November


better


for Bulls

USF able to

hold off UConn,

snap losing streak

Associated Press
TAMPA B.J. Daniels ran
for a first-quarter touchdown
before leaving in the fourth
with an injury as South
Florida stopped a school-
record six-game losing streak
by beating Connecticut 13-6 on
Saturday night.
Daniels was hurt on a 15-
yard run inside the UConn 10
just over five minutes into the
fourth. The senior quarter-
back couldn't put any weight
on his left leg as he was
helped from the field.
The Bulls settled for a 28-
yard field goal by Maikon Bo-
nani later in the drive to take
a 10-6 advantage. Bonani
See Page B3


Associated Press
South Florida quarterback B.J.
Daniels celebrates after scor-
ing a first-quarter touchdown
Saturday against Connecticut
in Tampa.


Associated Press


GAINESVILLE Florida has
reason to celebrate, although it's
not enough to elicit much reac-
tion from coach Will Muschamp
or his players.
Mike Gillislee took a screen
pass and went 45 yards for a
touchdown, and the No. 8 Gators
used stifling defense to stave off
Southeastern Conference new-
comer Missouri 14-7 on Saturday
Florida rebounded from a
turnover-filled loss to rival Geor-
gia, clinched at least a share of
the SEC's Eastern Division and
eclipsed last season's win total.
The Gators hardly seemed to
care.
"I took this job understanding
fully the expectation is to go to At-
lanta and win a championship,"
Muschamp said. "I've made my


comment about how I feel about
your season if that's not accom-
plished. We've made strides, but
we're not where we want to be."
Florida could still get there.
The Gators (8-1, 7-1 SEC) need
the Bulldogs to lose one of their
remaining games, against Missis-
sippi on Saturday or Auburn next
week, to clinch a spot in the
league title game.
At times, Florida looked less than
interested in staying in the SEC
hunt The Gators were shut out in
the first half, managing 111 yards
and failing to contain Missouri
quarterback James Franklin.
But like it has in so many other
games this season, Florida played
considerably better in the second
half.
The Gators turned two short
fields into touchdowns, with Omar-
ius Hines scoring on a 36-yard jet


sweep to tie the game in the third
before Gillislee put Florida ahead
for good in the fourth.
"We gave up too many big plays,"
Missouri linebacker Will Ebner
said. "We put this loss on our back,
because we allowed them to score
more points than our offense
scored. We're never going to blame
someone else. You've got to have
each other's back. We shut them
out the first half, why couldn't we
do it in the second half?"
Jeff Driskel lofted a pass to
Gillislee in the right flat, and with
two blockers out front, Gillislee
made one cut and went untouched
for his eighth score of the season.
The defense did the rest, stop-
ping Missouri on six consecutive
drives that ended in Florida
territory
See Page B2


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Hanging by a thread


Associated Press
Florida senior running back Mike Gillislee runs 45 yards for a touchdown as Missouri's Zaviar Gooden tries to
catch him during the second half Saturday in Gainesville. No. 8 Florida defeated Missouri 14-7.

No. 8 Florida avoids scare, beats SEC foe Missouri 14-7


CHE LET


000D5A3






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS


G Pae T2- SUN
E


IN


THE


tAME


Parks and Recreation offering programs


Men's softball

starting again

Special to the Chronicle
Men's softball is ready to begin
again Nov 19, on Mondays and
Wednesday. The league is very
competitive and for adults 18 and
older.
League fees depend on the
number of teams that enter. For
more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Rec's Recreation
Program Specialist Jess Sandino
at 352-527-7547.
Men's Flag Football
The current standings for men's flag
football are:
First Blue (6-1)
Second Pink (5-2)
Third Gray and Red (3-3)
Fourth Purple (2-3)
Fifth Camo (2-5)
Sixth Black (1-6)
Kickball
The current standings for adult co-
ed kickball are:
First- KickinNutz (10-2)
Second Cane Swagger (8-3)
Third Misfits (6-5)
Fourth Fun Times (5.5-3.5)
Fifth Mid Florida Arbor (5-4)
Sixth Salty Dogs (5-5)
Seventh Conviction (2.5-6.5)
Beach Volleyball
This league is competitive and fun.
Teams bring out their families and
game faces every Tuesday night.
The league will start up again
around March, and Parks and Recre-
ation is hoping for even more than 10
teams in the upcoming season. It's
$40 per team to play.
For more information, call recreation
program specialist Jess Sandino at
527-7547.
P.L.A.Y.
Spaces are filling up fast for the
next session of P.L.A.Y., which will in-
clude flag football and cheerleading.
Football will be Tuesdays or Thurs-
days at Bicentennial Park, while
cheerleading will be on Thursdays
from 5 to 6 p.m. at Bicentennial Park
Football has two timeslots available: 5
to 6 p.m. and 6 to 7 p.m.. So pick the
time that works for your schedule.
The P.L.A.Y. programs are designed
for children ages 3 to 5 who aren't
quite ready for the organized sports
leagues. These programs teach the
basics of each sport, while encourag-
ing teamwork. Each participant will re-
ceive a P.L.A.Y. T-shirt and the
appropriate sports equipment required
for each sport. The cost is $45 per
child. Sign up for more than one sport
in a session and save $10.
Remember spaces are filling up fast
and pre-registration is required, so
sign your athlete up today.
For more information on the P.L.A.Y.
programs, contact Crysta Henry,
recreation program specialist for youth
programs at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Horseshoe club
slates tourney
Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club will
have a National Horseshoe Pitching
Tournament on Saturday, Nov. 10.
Anyone can sponsor the tourna-
ments held each month, Septem-
ber through May each year.
Sponsor for this tournament is Vicious
Cycle, 5184 S. Florida Ave., Suite 2,
Inverness. A banner will be placed at
the tournament for Vicious Cycle.
Spectators are welcome to come and
watch the players.


Special to the Chronicle
The P.L.A.Y. programs are designed for children ages 3 to 5 who aren't quite ready for the organized sports
leagues. These programs teach the basics of each sport, while encouraging teamwork. Each participant will
receive a P.L.A.Y. T-shirt and the appropriate sports equipment required for each sport. The cost is $45 per
child. Sign up for more than one sport in a session and save $10.


The club welcomes new members.
All levels of play are welcome. To be-
come a member of the BHHC, call
Ron Fair at 352-746-3924, or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
Tourney benefits
Wounded Warriors
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club
will have its inaugural Veterans Tour-
nament fundraiser for Wounded War-
riors Project on Dec. 8. Men, women
and youths are welcome. All proceeds
will go to the Wounded Warriors Proj-
ect. Sponsors will be accepted and
recognized. There will be two divi-
sions, NHPA-sanctioned players and
unsanctioned players.
Entry fee will be $15. All players will
receive a free hamburger or hot dog
and a cold drink after they have
pitched. All entries must be in before
Tuesday, Dec. 4, by 5 p.m. Entries can
be made by phone or email; payment
must be in by Dec. 4, as time is
needed to form classes for sanctioned
players and a schedule for non-sanc-
tioned players.
The public is welcome to observe.
Refreshments will be served at a dis-
counted price for non-pitchers. For
entry information, call Ron Fair at
352-746-3924, or email rfair3@
tampabay.rr.com.
Elks planning Hoop
Shoot for 2012-13
West Citrus Elks Lodge will stage its
2012-13 Hoop Shoot Free Throw Con-


test for county middle and primary
schoolchildren at 9 a.m. Saturday,
Dec. 1, at Lecanto Middle School,
3800 W. Educational Path.
Principal William Farrell and staff
will host the winners from Lecanto Ele-
mentary, Homosassa Elementary,
Rock Crusher Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Lecanto Middle, Crystal
River Middle and others. The lodge
champions will advance to the district
contest. The district finalists will ad-
vance to the state finals.
The state champions will compete
at a regional contest to determine the
contestants to compete at the national
finals. The lodge uses this exposure to
help attain funds for student scholar-
ships and other projects in the county
to help the less fortunate.
Competitors will be in two divi-
sions, one for boys and one for girls,
with age categories of 8 to 9, 10 to
11 and 12 to 13; age determined as
of April 1,2013.
For more information, call Hoop
Shoots Director Gene Murray at
352-382-2709 or Jim Brumback at
352-503-7904.
B-rlna, M 0 B__ Adnffa


Lecanto Community Park Tennis
Courts on Sundays. Each session
will run from 3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is
open to boys and girls ages 8 to 14
and costs $60 per child.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
YMCA offers
afterschool programs
The Citrus County YMCA's After-
school Enrichment Clubs are offered
at Central Ridge Elementary, Citrus
Springs Elementary, Crystal River Pri-
mary, Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa Ele-
mentary, Inverness Primary, Lecanto
Primary, Pleasant Grove Elementary
and Rock Crusher Elementary.
Ages for the Y Afterschool Program
range from kindergarten through fifth
grade. Afterschool programs are a
great way to end the school day, and
the first fall session will offer kids the
opportunity to participate in flag foot-
ball, cheerleading and art.
For more information, call the Citrus
Y at 352-637-0132.


rarKs a Rec oui ers
youth tennis lessons Rally for Cure on Nov. 9
a* C-it c, Uillc


Come join Citrus County Parks &
Recreation and Tennis Pro Mehdi
Tahiri for youth tennis lessons.
Instruction will include condition-
ing, drills, footwork, match play, dou-
bles and single strategy. The
five-week sessions will be at the


ax rluus nls
Rally for a Cure will begin with an
8:30 a.m. shotgun start Friday, Nov. 9,
at Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club's
Oaks Golf Course.
Men and women are invited to par-
ticipate. The fee is a $20 check made


out to Rally for the Cure, as well as
golf and cart fees. Prizes and events
favors will be given.
Sign up at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club or email Dorothy
Ammerman at dammerman@
tampaby.rr.com for more information.
Donations are accepted.
Call the Citrus Hills pro shop for
more information at 352-746-4425.
Citrus Hills women
plan golf scramble
The Citrus Hills Women's Club will
host a nine-hole Fabulous '50s Golf
Scramble on Nov. 30 at the Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club's Meadows
course. Cost is $37.50 and includes
cart rentals and lunch in the Country
Club's Garden Room, all with a Fabu-
lous '50's theme. The day begins at
8:30 a.m. with a continental breakfast
of home-baked treats, and sales of
putts and Mulligans. Games during
play will add to the fun, and lots of
prizes will be awarded at the luncheon.
Proceeds will go the CHWC's Schol-
arship Program, which awards scholar-
ships to deserving Citrus and Lecanto
high schools' seniors, and help local
charities the CHWC sponsors.
This event is open to all women
golfers and every year is a sell-out. A
scramble is a wonderful golf game for
beginners, too. Pick your cart mate or
let us do it for you. Call Carol at 352-
746-0697 or Maryellen at 352-527-3843
for more information and to sign up.
USCG Flotilla
to meet Nov. 6
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary will meet at 7
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, at the West Cit-
rus Community Center, 8940 W. Veter-
ans Drive, Homosassa. Visitors are
welcome.
The Auxiliary is active in assisting
the U.S. Coast Guard with promoting
homeland security, public instruction
of safe boating, vessel safety exams,
safety patrols on the rivers and
coastal waters, search/rescue and
law enforcement air patrols and many
other activities.
For more information, call Bob Cur-
rie at 352-232-1516, or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
Auxiliary offers
Paddlesports America
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary offers Paddle-
sports America, a safety program de-
signed to attract the novice paddle
enthusiasts. This four-hour program
presents five chapters of safety
information.
Topics include: Know Your Paddle-
craft, Before You Get Underway, Oper-
ating Your Boat Safely, Legal
Requirements of Boating and Boating
Emergencies.
The program will be offered from 7
to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, Nov.
13 and 15, at the West Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 8940 W Veterans Drive.
Homosassa. A fee of $20 for materials
will be charged.
For more information, call Anna
Hughes at 352-621-6963, or Ned
Barry at 352-249-1042.
Flotilla to do
GPS training
Interested in learning how to use
that GPS you have for your boat?
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 15-
01 Crystal River will offer a two-day
comprehensive class from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, and Saturday,
Nov. 17.
Class size is limited to 10 people for
more one-on-one instruction. Call
Linda Jones for more information at
352-503-6199.


FLORIDA
Continued from Page BI

"I always tell them, 'You're
the firemen. Go put the fire
out,"' Muschamp said. "I don't
care how bad it's blazing. Go put
it out And regardless of the sit-
uations and circumstances,
when you walk on the field, your
job is to stop them.... It's an op-
portunity for greatness. You go
out and make a stop on the goal
line. You want to be great, be put
in those situations and do it"
Florida's defense has done it
all season, the main reason it's
in this position, and the offense
needed to be bailed out again
against Missouri (4-5, 1-5).
The Gators finished with 276
yards, went 2 of 13 on third
down and struggled to get any-
thing going in the passing game.
Driskel completed 12 of 23


passes for 106 yards, with
nearly half of that coming on
the screen pass. Gillislee ran 16
times for 68 yards his fourth
consecutive game under 70
yards. And Florida's offensive
line was overmatched again.
"I'm a realist and I believe in
being honest and calling it the
way it is," Muschamp said. 'And
when it stinks, it stinks.... We've
been able to win and do what
we had to do to win the games
- I'm not trying to downgrade
it at all. This football team has
as much resolve as a football
team that I've been around."
That showed down the
stretch on defense.
Josh Evans sealed the vic-
tory, intercepting Franklin's
fourth-down pass in the end
zone with 5 seconds remaining.
The Tigers drove to the 21-yard
line, but had to try to make
something happen as the clock
wound down.


"That's actually like a great
feeling," Florida defensive
tackle Sharrif Floyd said. "Can
their offense make big plays on
a defense that's coming? We're
relentless and that's how we
want to play and that's how we
strive to play every week."
Franklin, who sprained his
left knee against Vanderbilt on
Oct 6 and sat out all or part of
the last two games, finished
with four interceptions. He
completed 24 of 51 passes for
236 yards. He overthrew open
receivers much of the day and
had less mobility than normal.
"We just couldn't get any
completions," Franklin said. "I
know (teammates) are trying to
have my back, but we can't turn
the ball over four times."
Still, Franklin ran for 29
yards and burned Florida sev-
eral times with scrambles.
Florida was flat to start the
game, no surprise since it was a


noon start and came after a dis-
appointing loss against Geor-
gia. The Gators turned the ball
over six times in the 17-9 loss
that left them needing help to
get to Atlanta.
They vowed to play better
this week, but it didn't exactly
happen. They avoided
turnovers, though, which is key
for their grind-it-out style.
"When you have a defense
like our defense has been play-
ing, just don't turn the ball
over," Driskel said. "We turned
the ball over a lot against Geor-
gia and we end up losing. It
comes down to taking care of
the ball and taking shots when
they come."
Florida running back Mike
Gillislee, right, celebrates his
touchdown with wide receiver
Quinton Dunbar during the sec-
ond half Saturday against
Missouri in Gainesville.
Associated Press






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pluck of the Irish


di .
Opp. ..


Associated Press
Notre Dame quarterback Everett Golson dives into the end zone in front of Pittsburgh linebacker Joe Trebitz for a two-point conversion to tie the score
late in the fourth quarter Saturday in South Bend, Ind. No. 4 Notre Dame defeated Pittsburgh 29-26 in triple overtime to stay undefeated.


No. 4 ND rallies down Pittsburgh in OT,


Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. Everett
Golson scored on a quarterback
sneak in the third overtime and
threw two touchdown pass during
Notre Dame's fourth-quarter
comeback.
Notre Dame (9-0) won despite Ray
Graham rushing for 172 yards for
Pitt (4-5), which missed a potential
game-winning field goal in overtime.
Golson threw an 11-yard touch-
down pass early in the fourth.
Notre Dame's chances for a come-
back appeared to end when Pitt's
K'Waun Williams intercepted Gol-
son in the end zone.
But the Irish defense held and
Golson completed a 45-yard pass
to DaVaris Daniels at the Pitt 5.
Golson then threw a 5-yard TD
pass and ran in the two-point con-
version to tie the game.
No. 1 Alabama 21,
No. 5 LSU 17
BATON ROUGE, La. T.J. Yeldon
took a swing pass from A.J. McCarron
and went 28 yards for a touchdown with
51 seconds remaining, giving top-
ranked Alabama a stunning 21-17 vic-
tory over No. 5 LSU in Death Valley.
The Crimson Tide (9-0, 6-0 South-
eastern Conference) showed it could
come from behind after Zach Metten-
berger rallied the Tigers (7-2, 3-2) from
a 14-3 halftime deficit.
LSU had a chance to put the game
away in the closing minutes, driving into
Alabama territory and forcing the Tide
to use its timeouts. But Drew Alleman
missed a field goal, and McCarron took
over. He completed three straight
passes before reading an LSU blitz,
flipping a pass to Yeldon. The freshman
broke one tackle and faked out another
defender for the winning TD.
No. 2 Oregon 62,
No. 18 USC 51
LOS ANGELES Kenjon Barner
rushed for a school-record 321 yards
and five touchdowns, Marcus Mariota
threw four TD passes, and No. 2 Ore-
gon produced another landmark offen-
sive performance in a 62-51 victory
over No. 18 Southern California.
Josh Huff caught two touchdowns,
and De'Anthony Thomas and Daryl
Hawkins also caught scoring passes for
the Ducks (9-0, 6-0 Pac-12), who out-
lasted USC in a back-and-forth second
half to extend their winning streak to 12
games since the Trojans (6-3, 4-3) won
in Eugene last season.
Oregon's 730 yards and 62 points
were the most ever allowed by USC,
which began playing football in 1888.
Barner set a rushing record for a
USC opponent by the third quarter, top-
ping Curtis Enis' 241 yards for Penn
State in 1996, and smashed the school
record shortly afterward as the Ducks
gradually pulled away in their closest



BULLS
Continued from Page B1

added a 50-yard kick to extend the
lead to 13-6 with four and a half
minutes left.
South Florida (3-6, 1-4) had
dropped 12 of its last 13 Big East
games dating to November 2010.
The Bulls squandered a 20-point
halftime lead en route to a 37-36
loss to Syracuse on Nov 27.


game of the year.
No. 3 Kansas State 44,
Oklahoma State 30
MANHATTAN, Kan. Collin Klein
piled up more than 300 yards of offense
before leaving in the third quarter with
an undisclosed injury, and No. 3
Kansas State remained unbeaten with
a 44-30 victory over Oklahoma State.
Klein had thrown for 245 yards and
run for 64 more before sneaking in for his
50th career rushing touchdown with 9:47
left in the third quarter. The Heisman Tro-
phy frontrunner didn't return to the field
on the Wildcats' next offensive series.
Oklahoma State's Wes Lunt also left
with an injury after throwing his third in-
terception in the third quarter. The
freshman quarterback, who missed six
weeks with a knee injury earlier this
year, threw for 184 yards and a touch-
down before giving way to Clint Chelf.
By that point, the Wildcats (9-0, 6-0 Big
12) simply had to protect a 38-17 lead.
No. 6 Ohio State 52,
Illinois 22
COLUMBUS, Ohio Carlos Hyde
rushed for 137 yards and three touch-
downs, and Braxton Miller passed for
two scores and ran for another to lead
Ohio State past Illinois.
The Buckeyes (10-0, 6-0 Big Ten)
maintained the upper hand in the Lead-
ers Division heading into a bye week.
They have games remaining at Wis-
consin on Nov. 17 and against rival
Michigan at home a week later.
Miller, considered a Heisman Tro-
phy hopeful, had 18 carries for 73
yards and completed 12 of 20 passes
for 226 yards.
It was the sixth straight loss for Illi-
nois (2-7, 0-5) and its 11th Big Ten loss
in a row.
No. 7 Georgia 37,
Ole Miss 10
ATHENS, Ga. -Aaron Murray threw
four touchdown passes and Georgia
overcame a slow start to beat Missis-
sippi and move one win away from a
spot in the SEC championship game.
Georgia (8-1, 6-1) trailed 10-0 before
scoring 37 unanswered points. The
Bulldogs can clinch the SEC East title
and second straight trip to the confer-
ence championship game with a win at
Auburn next week.
Ole Miss (5-4, 2-3) used blitzes to
record five sacks in the first half. The
defensive gambles left opportunities for
Murray, who completed 21 of 28
passes for 384 yards with no intercep-
tions and touchdown passes of 66, 40,
42 and 28 yards.
No. 10 Clemson 56,
Duke 20
DURHAM, N.C. -Tajh Boyd threw
for 344 yards and tied a school record
with five touchdown passes for the sec-
ond straight week to help No. 10 Clem-
son beat Duke 56-20.


Chad Christen had two field
goals for UConn (3-6, 0-4), which
has dropped six of eight following
a season-opening victory over Mas-
sachusetts. The Huskies were com-
ing off a bye week.
South Florida played without
linebacker Sam Barrington, who
was suspended for the game. The
team said the Bulls' leading tackler
was cited by police for driving with
a revoked license.
Daniels put the Bulls up 7-0 on a
5-yard TD run with 4:08 left in the


No. 1 'Bama beats No. 5 LSU


DeAndre Hopkins caught three of
those TD tosses in the opening quarter
for the Tigers (8-1, 5-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference), who scored 42 points by
halftime and rolled to their fifth straight
win all by at least 14 points. Sammy
Watkins and Martavis Bryant also had
first-half touchdown catches, helping
Clemson rack up nearly 500 yards by
halftime and 718 for the game.
The win moved Clemson into a tie with
No. 9 Florida State atop the ACC's Atlantic
Division, though the Seminoles beat the
Tigers in September for the head-to-head
tiebreaker in the division race to reach the
ACC championship game.
The loss dropped Duke (6-4, 3-3) a
game behind Miami for the Coastal
Division lead.
No. 14 Oklahoma 35,
Iowa State 20
AMES, Iowa Landry Jones threw
for 405 yards and a season-best four
touchdowns and Oklahoma beat Iowa
State to move coach Bob Stoops into a
second-place tie with Bud Wilkinson on
the Sooners' career win list.
Stoops got his 145th win and is 12
shy of tying Barry Switzer for most in
school history.
Brennan Clay ran for 157 yards as
the Sooners bounced back from a loss
to Notre Dame. Oklahoma (6-2, 4-1 Big
12) has won 20 straight following a de-
feat in the regular season.
Steele Jantz threw for 191 yards for
Iowa State (5-4, 2-4). The Cyclones lost
their 21 st straight home game against
the Sooners, a stretch of futility that
dates back 52 years.
No. 15 Stanford 48,
Colorado 0
BOULDER, Colo. Kevin Hogan ig-
nited Stanford's sputtering offense and
helped the Cardinal hand Colorado its
first shutout at home in 26 years.
Hogan picked apart the nation's
worst defense, throwing for 184 yards
and running for 48 more in just two
quarters of work, and the Buffaloes
were powerless to respond, gaining 76
yards of offense behind a trio of over-
whelmed quarterbacks.
The Cardinal (7-2, 5-1 Pac-12)
handed the Buffs (1-8, 1-5) their first
shutout at Folsom Field since a 28-0
loss to Oklahoma on Nov. 15,1986,
snapping a streak of 150 straight games
in which the Buffs had scored at home.
No. 16 Texas A&M 38,
No. 17 Mississippi St. 13
STARKVILLE, Miss. Johnny
Manziel threw for 311 yards and ran
for 129 yards and two touchdowns,
leading Texas A&M to a win over Mis-
sissippi State.
Manziel, a redshirt freshman, com-
pleted 30 of 36 passes. He ran for a 37-
yard touchdown in the second quarter
that helped the Aggies build a 31-0 lead
by early in the second half.


first. He set a school record for ca-
reer rushing touchdowns with 25
on the score.
UConn got within 7-3 when
Christen made a 50-yard field goal
two seconds before halftime. His
second field goal of the game, from
37 yards with 4:28 to go in the third,
made it 7-6.
The Huskies had failed to score
during the second half in their pre-
vious three games.
South Florida threatened to ex-
tend its early lead midway through


The SEC's leading rusher added an
8-yard touchdown run in the fourth
quarter.
Texas A&M (7-2, 4-2 SEC) has won
all five of its road games this season.
Christine Michael ran for 50 yards and
two touchdowns and Ryan Swope
caught nine passes for 121 yards.
Tyler Russell completed 19 of 30
passes for 212 yards for Mississippi
State (7-2, 3-2).
Texas 31,
No. 20 Texas Tech 21
LUBBOCK, Texas David Ash
threw for 264 yards and three touch-
downs to lead Texas past Texas Tech
for its third straight win.
Mike Davis had a career-high 165
yards on four catches, one a 75-yarder
from Ash in the second quarter for the
Longhorns (7-2, 4-2), who remain alive
in the Big 12 race. Freshman
Johnathan Gray had 106 yards on 20
carries for Texas.
Seth Doege threw for 329 yards and
a touchdown for Texas Tech (6-3, 3-3),
which was badly hurt by penalties, in-
cluding a touchdown being called back
in the fourth quarter for holding.
The Red Raiders had to settle for
field goals on four trips to the red zone.
No. 21 Nebraska 28,
Michigan State 24
EAST LANSING, Mich. Taylor
Martinez threw a 5-yard touchdown
pass to Jamal Turner with 6 seconds left
and Nebraska remained tied with Michi-
gan atop the Big Ten Legends Division.
The Cornhuskers (7-2, 4-1) scored
two touchdowns in the final 7:02 to
erase a 24-14 deficit. The winning
score was set up by a pass interference
call in the end zone on Michigan State's
Darqueze Dennard, which gave Ne-
braska the ball at the 5.
Le'Veon Bell ran for 188 yards and
two touchdowns for the Spartans (5-5,
2-4).
Martinez rushed for 205 yards and
two touchdowns, becoming the career
leader in total offense for Nebraska,
which is unbeaten in seven meetings
with Michigan State.
TCU 39,
No. 23 West Va. 38, 20T
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Corey
Fuller caught a 25-yard touchdown
pass and Trevone Boykin threw to Josh
Boyce for the 2-point conversion, lifting
TCU over West Virginia.
TCU (6-3, 3-3 Big 12) got the victory
after West Virginia (5-3, 2-3) went
ahead on Geno Smith's 25-yard TD
pass to Stedman Bailey in the second
overtime.
On TCU's possession, Boykin
handed off to B.J. Catalon and he
pitched to Brandon Carter, who threw to
Fuller in the end zone. Boyce then
caught the 2-point conversion.


the second, but UConn cornerback
Dwayne Gratz intercepted Daniels'
pass in the end zone.
South Florida was the only FBS
team in the nation without an in-
terception until safety Jon Lejiste
picked off Chandler Whitmer's
pass at the USF 10 with 6:27 re-
maining in the game.
A late UConn drive ended with
50 seconds to go when Elkino Wat-
son intercepted a Whitmer pass.
Whitmer has thrown 13 intercep-
tions this season.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Wis.-Platteville 62, Wis.-Stout 20
Wis.-Whitewater 19, Wis.-Eau Claire 10
Youngstown St. 13, South Dakota 10
SOUTHWEST
Alabama St. 35, Prairie View 21
Ark.-Pine Bluff 49, Texas Southern 3
Arkansas 19, Tulsa 15
Arkansas St. 37, North Texas 19
Baylor 41, Kansas 14
Hardin-Simmons 65, Texas Lutheran 58, 20T
Mary Hardin-Baylor 54, E.Texas Baptst 20
Sam Houston St. 70, SE Louisiana 0
Sul Ross St. 58, Howard Payne 17
Texas 31, Texas Tech 22
FAR WEST
E.Washington 34, Cal Poly 17
Fresno St. 45, Hawaii 10
Montana 24, Weber St. 21
Montana St. 20, Sacramento St. 17
N. Arizona 50, Idaho St. 10
N. Colorado 32, Portland St. 28
Oregon 62, Southern Cal 51
San Jose St. 42, Idaho 13
Stanford 48, Colorado 0
UNLV 35, New Mexico 7
Utah 49, Washington St. 6
Utah St. 38, Texas St. 7
Wyoming 45, Colorado St. 31


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 B3

College football
scores
EAST
Albright 48, Misericordia 0
Alfred 40, Frostburg St. 14
Army 41, Air Force 21
Bentley 24, S. Connecticut 14
Bloomsburg 24, West Chester 23
Bridgewater (Mass.) 31, Mass. Maritime 21
Brown 20, Yale 0
Bryant 34, Sacred Heart 14
Bucknell 27, Fordham 24
Buffalo 27, Miami (Ohio) 24
CCSU at Monmouth (NJ), ppd.
Castleton St. 34, Husson 14
Colgate 65, Lafayette 41
College of NJ 14, Morrisville St. 0
Dartmouth 44, Cornell 28
Delaware Valley 23, Wilkes 7
Gallaudet 29, Mount Ida 22
Harvard 69, Columbia 0
Hobart 34, St. Lawrence 14
James Madison 31, Maine 7
Junlata 14, Moravian 6
Lebanon Valley 34, King's (Pa.) 19
Lehigh 36, Holy Cross 35
Lycoming 32, Stevenson 7
Merrimack 43, Assumption 40
Muhlenberg 24, Ursinus 17, OT
Navy 24, FAU 17
New Hampshire 28, William & Mary 25
New Haven 37, American International 6
Penn 28, Princeton 21
Robert Morris 17, Duquesne 13
Rowan at Kean, ccd.
Salisbury 63, Ubca 23
St. Anselm 52, Seton Hill 45
Stonehill 43, Pace 7
Stony Brook 45, VMI 7
TCU 39, WestVirginia 38, 20T
Thiel 16, Westminster (Pa.) 10
Towson 34, Delaware 27, OT
W. New England 38, Mass.-Dartmouth 12
Wagner 30, Albany (NY) 0
Washington & Jefferson 27, Geneva 17
Washington (Mo.) 10, Case Reserve 7
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 24, Southern U. 23, OT
Appalachian St. 31, Georgia Southern 28
Auburn 42, New Mexico St. 7
Austin Peay 56, Culver-Stockton 0
Bethel (Tenn.) 42, Lindsey Wilson 17
Bethune-Cookman 24, Morgan St. 13
Birmingham-Southern 45, Centre 14
Carson-Newman 66, Tusculum 36
Catawba 19, Brevard 13
Chattanooga 45, W. Carolina 24
Clemson 56, Duke 20
Coastal Carolina 55, Gardner-Webb 33
Cumberland (Tenn.) 49, Bluefield South 0
Cumberlands 26, Kentucky Christan 15
E. Illinois 31, Tennessee Tech 24
East Carolina 48, Houston 28
Emory & Henry 20, Shenandoah 17
FlU 28, South Alabama 20
Faulkner 31, Campbellsville 24
Ferrum 48, LaGrange 24
Florida 14, Missouri 7
Georgetown (Ky.) 77, Union (Ky.) 0
Georgia 37, Mississippi 10
Georgia Tech 33, Maryland 13
Guilford 24, Catholic 10
Howard 20, Hampton 10
Jackson St. 53, Grambling St. 17
Lane 38, Benedict 21
Lenoir-Rhyne 44, Newberry 21
Liberty 26, Charleston Southern 12
Louisiana College 70, Mississippi College 28
Louisiana Tech 51, UTSA 27
Louisiana-Lafayette 40, Louisiana-Monroe 24
Louisville 45, Temple 17
MVSU 33, Alcorn St. 9
Marshall 38, Memphis 28
Maryville (Tenn.) 34, NC Wesleyan 13
McNeese St. 42, Nicholls St. 10
Morehead St. 49, Davidson 14
Murray St. 49, Tennessee St. 28
NC A&T 16, Florida A&M 3
NC Central 23, Delaware St. 20, 20T
Norfolk St. 33, Savannah St. 21
Old Dominion 53, Georgia St. 27
Rice 49, Tulane 47
Richmond 39, Rhode Island 0
Samford 24, Wofford 17, 20T
South Florida 13, UConn 6
Tennessee 55, Troy 48
Texas A&M 38, Mississippi St. 13
The Citadel 38, Elon 24
Trinity (Texas) 48, Sewanee 7
Tuskegee 27, Miles 17
UAB 27, Southern Miss. 19
UCF 42, SMU 17
UT-Martin 49, Jacksonville St. 47
Valparaiso 41, Campbell 21
Vanderbilt 40, Kentucky 0
Virginia 33, NC State 6
Virginia Union 19, Virginia St. 14
Wake Forest 28, Boston College 14
washington & lee 45, Hampden-Sydney 42, 30T
MIDWEST
Adrian 20, Albion 19, OT
Ashland 49, Tiffin 21
Augsburg 58, Macalester 41
Bemidji St. 35, Minn. St.-Moorhead 25
Benedictine (III.) 34, Maranatha Baptist 6
Buena Vista 29, Simpson (Iowa) 27
Butler 19, Jacksonville 16
Central 31, Wartburg 28
Cincinnati 35, Syracuse 24
Coe 35, Luther 7
Concordia (Wis.) 45, Aurora 31
Dayton 28, Drake 13
Denison 39, DePauw 20
Doane 55, Dordt 6
Dubuque 45, Loras 0
E. Kentucky 31, SE Missouri 7
Elmhurst 41, Carthage 24
Findlay 38, Malone 14
Grand Valley St. 35, Wayne (Mich.) 13
Greenville 27, Northwestern (Minn.) 16
Gustavus 41, Carleton 27
Illinois College 50, Cornell (Iowa) 28
Illinois St. 17, Indiana St. 10
Indiana 24, Iowa 21
Kalamazoo 17, Alma 13
Kent St. 35, Akron 24



Minn.Duluth53,Mary14
Minn. St.-Mankato 27, Sioux Falls 13
N.Dakota St. 21, Missouri St. 17
N. Illinois 63, UMass 0
N.Iowa 40, W. Illinois 0
N. Michigan 33, Saginaw Valley St. 28
Nebraska 28, Michigan St. 24
North Dakota 33, S. Utah 29
Northern St. (SD) 52, Minn.-Crookston 20
Northwood (Mich.) 38, Ferns St. 33
Notre Dame 29, Pittsburgh 26, 30T
NofreDameColl.31, Walsh 28
Ohio Dominican 44, Lake Erie 14
Ohio St. 52, Illinois 22
Oklahoma 35, Iowa St. 20
Penn St. 34, Purdue 9
Ripon 50, Monmouth (III.) 47
S. Dakota St. 16, S. Illinois 12
SW Minnesota St. 35, Concordia-St. Paul 28
Siena Heights 31, Waldorf 21
St. Cloud St. 57, Minot St. 10
St. John's (Minn.) 55, Hamline 10
St.Norbert20,Grinnell 12
St. Olaf 24, Bethel (Minn.) 17
St. Scholastica 28, Minn.-Morris 21
St.Thomas (Minn.) 21, Concordia (Moor.) 7
Trine 49, Olivet 21
W. Michigan 42, Cent. Michigan 31
Wayne (Neb.) 17, Upper Iowa 14
Wheaton (III.) 35, North Central 21
Winona St. 73, Augustana (SD) 35
Wis. Lutheran 34, Rockford 14
Wis.-LaCrosse 38, Wis.-River Falls 17
Wis.-Oshkosh 56, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 31






B4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


North Marion 24,
Dunnellon 7
NM 0 10 7 7 24
DH 0 7 00-7
Scoring Summary
Second Quarter
DH J. Boley 1-yard run (Williams kick)
NM R. Wilkerson 9-yard pass from B. Hall
(Hatcher kick)
NM Hatcher 32-yard field goal
Third Quarter
NM B. Martin 17-yard pass from Hall
(Hatcher kick)
Fourth Quarter
NM D. Harmon 3-yard run (Hatcher kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing NM: Hall 10-22-87-2-1; DH: Boley
5-13-41-0-2.
Rushing NM: Harmon 24-134-1; DH: Swoll
11-59-0; Boley 20-53-1.
Receiving NM: M. Wilkerson 4-40-0; DH:
Jackson 2-28-0.
Interceptions NM: J. Autry, N. Rawls; DH: L.
Brown.
Crystal River 47,
Belleview 28
CRHS 14 7 0 26 47
BELL 7 11 10 0 28
First Quarter
C- Franklin 10 pass from LaFleur (kick failed)
B- Maurice 76 kickoff return (Irwin kick)
C- MacAteer 83 punt return (Baldner run)
Second Quarter
B- FG Irwin 39
C- Franklin 80 pass from LaFleur (MacAteer
kick)
B- Williams 17 pass from Pitts (Ehrhart pass
from Pitts)
Third Quarter
B- Pitts 1 run (Irwin kick)
B- FG Irwin 42
Fourth Quarter
C- Baldner 20 run (MacAteer kick)
C- MacAteer 18 pass from LaFleur (MacAteer
kick)
C- Baldner 51 pass from LaFleur (run failed)
C- LaFleur 13 run (kick blocked)
Individual Leaders
Rushing: B: Maurice 22-117, Pitts 16-89; CR:
Baldner 14-175, LaFleur 4-31, Dawsy 9-28
Passing: B: Pitts 5-20-0-49; CR: LaFleur 6-9-1 -
186.
Receiving: B: Williams 2-29, Colston 2-12; CR:
Franklin 3-109, Baldner 2-59.
Gainesville 49, Lecanto 0
Gainesville 49,
Lecanto 0
Gainesville 35 7 0 7 49
Lecanto 0 0 0 0 0
First Quarter
GV R. Webb 13-yard run (A. Holloway kick)
GV C. Harrison 2-yard run (Holloway kick)
GV C. Thompson 80-yard pass from Mark
Cato (Holloway kick)
GV K. Young 36-yard pass from Cato (Hol-
loway kick)
GV L. Prunty 17-yard pass from Cato (Hol-
loway kick)
Second Quarter
GV Prunty 11-yard run (Holloway kick)
Fourth Quarter
GV K. McGriff 36-yard run (S. Hunter kick)
Individual leaders
Rushing --GV: K. McGriff 1-36-1; Prunty 3-30-
1; Lec: Osburn 5-15-1.
Passing GV:Cato 6-6-180-3-0; Lec: McGee
11-22-80-0-1.
Receiving GV: Thompson 1-80-1; Lec:
Forges 4-49-0.
Master's Acad. 41,
Seven Rivers 0
SR 0 0 0 0 0
TMA 1314 7 0 41
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
TMA B. Dickens 46-yard run (kick failed)
TMA S. Kearney 3-yard run (G. Sander kick)
Second Quarter
TMA Z. Lowe 42-yard pass to H. Anger
(G. Sander kick)
TMA S. Kearney 42-yard INT return (G.
Sander kick)
TMA C. Iturrioz 23-yard run (G. Sander kick)
Third Quarter
TMA Z. Lowe 1-yard run (G. Sander kick)
Individual leaders
Passing- TMA: Z. Lowe 1-1, 42 yards, TD.
Rushing SR: J. Iwaniec 22 car., 90 yards;
TMA: B. Dickens 6 car, 66 yards, TD.
Receiving-TMA: H.Anger 1 rec., 42 yards, TD.





No. 8 Florida 14,
Missouri 7
Missouri 0 7 0 0-- 7
Florida 0 0 7 7- 14
Second Quarter
Mo-Lawrence 1 run (Baggett kick), 6:10.
Third Quarter
Fla-Hines 36 run (Phillips kick), 9:03.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Gillislee 45 pass from Driskel (Phillips
kick), 13:32.
Mo Fla
First downs 23 11
Rushes-yards 35-99 33-170
Passing 236 106
Comp-Att-lnt 24-51-4 12-23-0
Return Yards 22 105
Punts-Avg. 7-41.1 8-41.4
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards 5-25 4-25
Time of Poss. 33:57 26:03
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Missouri, Lawrence 18-34, Murphy
4-32, J.Franklin 11-29, Berkstresser 2-4.
Florida, Gillislee 16-68, Hines 1-36, Driskel 6-
31, Jones 6-24, T.Burton 1-8, M.Brown 2-6,
Team 1-(minus 3).
PASSING-Missouri, J.Franklin 24-51-4-236.
Florida, Driskel 12-23-0-106.
RECEIVING-Missouri, Green-Beckham 6-73,
McGaffie 4-47, Murphy 3-20, Moe 3-12, Lucas
2-28, Sasser 2-26, Washington 2-23, McGriff-
Culver 1-5, Lawrence 1-2. Florida, Reed 3-16,
TBurton 229, Dunbar 2-13, Hammond 2-10,
Gillislee 1 -45, Hines 1 -0, M.Brown 1 -(minus 7).
UCF 42, SMU 17
SMU 3 7 0 7- 17
UCF 7 1414 7- 42
First Quarter
UCF-Hall 21 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
5:39.
SMU-FG Hover 32, 1:18.
Second Quarter
UCF-Murray 23 run (Moffitt kick), 13:57.
SMU-Gilbert 4 run (Hover kick), 6:41.
UCF-Murray 20 run (Moffitt kick), 2:57.
Third Quarter
UCF-Bortles 10 run (Moffitt kick), 12:06.


UCF-Murray 28 pass from Godfrey (Moffitt
kick), 7:30.
Fourth Quarter
UCF-Perriman 18 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 7:37.
SMU-Gilbert 12 run (Hover kick), :30.
SMU UCF
First downs 16 25
Rushes-yards 31-126 39-241
Passing 133 155
Comp-Att-lnt 16-29-0 12-17-0
Return Yards 4 29
Punts-Avg. 5-43.6 2-42.5
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 7-53 2-20
Time of Poss. 32:51 27:09
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-SMU, Z.Line 21-96, Gilbert 10-30.


SCOREBOARD


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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: AAA Texas 500 race
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: AAA Texas 500 race (Same-
day Tape)
BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Phoenix Suns at Orlando Magic
FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at Indianapolis Colts
4 p.m. (CBS) Pittsburgh Steelers at New York Giants
4 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Oakland Raiders
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Dallas Cowboys atAtlanta Falcons
GOLF
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Charles Schwab Cup
Championship Final Round
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship -
Final Round (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Toluca vs. Monarcas
2 p.m. (FOX) English Premier League: Liverpool vs.
Newcastle United (Same-day Tape)
MLS conference semifinals
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Sporting Kansas City at Houston Dynamo
9 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Galaxy at San Jose Earthquakes
VOLLEYBALL
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Wisconsin at Penn State

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


SO YOU KNOW

On Thursday night, Citrus High School soccer player Lizzie
Rinaldi scored Citrus' third goal by heading in a corner kick to
push the 'Canes' lead to 3-0 over rival Crystal River. Citrus
won the match 5-2.


Correction

In an article about the Crystal River girls soccer team's 2-1
loss to Vanguard on Friday night, the Pirates' lone goal was
attributed to the wrong person. Melissa Cang Cuesta scored
Crystal River's goal. The Chronicle regrets the error.


UCF, Murray 23-155, Bortles 6-33, S.Johnson
6-29, McDuffie 3-25, Team 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-SMU, Gilbert 16-29-0-133. UCF,
Bortles 10-15-0-110, Calabrese 1-1-0-17, God-
frey 1-1-0-28.
RECEIVING-SMU, D.Johnson 6-46, Z.Line 4-
51, J.Johnson 3-15, Holman 2-13, Thompson
1-8. UCF, Murray 2-41, Tukes 2-30, Hall 2-22,
McDuffie 2-20, Godfrey 2-7, Perriman 1-18,
Reese 1-17.
USF 13, UCONN 6
UConn 0 3 3 0- 6
South Florida 7 0 0 6 13
First Quarter
USF-Daniels 5 run (Bonani kick), 4:08.
Second Quarter
Conn-FG Christen 50, :02.
Third Quarter
Conn-FG Christen 37, 4:28.
Fourth Quarter
USF-FG Bonani 28, 7:53.
USF-FG Bonani 50, 4:26.
Conn USF
First downs 20 17
Rushes-yards 31-43 34-81
Passing 284 202
Comp-Att-Int 24-38-2 20-32-1
Return Yards 0 34
Punts-Avg. 6-42.5 6-38.7
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 5-60 5-49
Time of Poss. 31:52 28:08
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UConn, McCombs 18-47, Mc-
Cummings 5-33, Whitmer 8-(minus 37). South
Florida, Murray 10-37, Shaw 11-34, Daniels 10-
23, Floyd 1 -(minus 5), Team 2-(minus 8).
PASSING-UConn, Whitmer 24-38-2-284.
South Florida, Daniels 19-29-1-199, Floyd 1-3-
0-3.
RECEIVING--UConn, Davis 7-98, N.Williams 6-
48, Smith 3-40, McCombs 3-28, Griffin 2-29,
Phillips 1 -21, Delahunt 1-15, T.Jones 1 5. South
Florida, Welch 5-39, Marc 3-47, Price 3-45, A.Davis
3-32, Shaw 3-7, Mitchell 2-23, Murray 1-9.



Sprint Cup

AAA Texas 500
Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 191.076 mph.
2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.382.
3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 190.127.
4. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 190.067.
5. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 189.994.
6. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 189.76.
7. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 189.607.
8. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 189.534.
9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189.474.
10. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 189.46.
11. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 189.294.
12. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 189.274.
13. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 188.99.
14. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 188.976.
15. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 188.923.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 188.798.
17. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 188.627.
18. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 188.396.
19. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 188.357.
20. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 188.337.
21. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 188.042.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 187.996.
23. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 187.78.


24. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 187.565.
25. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 187.435.
26. (51) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 187.389.
27. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 187.35.
28. (37) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, 187.266.
29. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 187.227.
30. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 186.858.
31. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 186.858.
32. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 186.541.
33. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 186.477.
34. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 186.471.
35. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 186.413.
36. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 186.368.
37. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 186.066.
38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 185.867.
39. (91) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 185.714.
40. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 184.906.
41. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 185.586.
Failed to Qualify
44. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 185.103.
45. (79) Kelly Bires, Ford, 183.088.
46. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 176.655.



NBA standings


EA!


Brooklyn
New York
Philadelphia
Boston
Toronto

Orlando
Miami
Charlotte
Atlanta
Washington

Milwaukee
Chicago
Indiana
Cleveland
Detroit


STERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000


1 2 .333
0 2 .000
Southeast Division
W L Pct
1 0 1.000
2 1 .667
1 1 .500
0 1 .000
0 2 .000
Central Division
W L Pct
2 0 1.000
2 1 .667
2 1 .667
1 2 .333
0 2 .000


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 3 0 1.000
Dallas 2 1 .667
Houston 2 1 .667
New Orleans 2 1 .667
Memphis 1 1 .500
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Minnesota 1 0 1.000
Portland 2 1 .667
Oklahoma City 1 1 .500
Utah 1 2 .333
Denver 0 3 .000
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 2 0 1.000
Golden State 1 1 .500
Phoenix 1 1 .500
Sacramento 0 3 .000
L.A. Lakers 0 3 .000
Today's Games
Philadelphia at New York, 12 p.m.
Phoenix at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Oklahoma City 7 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.


SR X-C I


Warriors girls

finish third in

District 1A-5

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

The Seven Rivers Chris-
tian girls cross country team
qualified for the Region 1A-
2 meet on Nov 9 by placing
third at Thursday's District
1A-5 meet at St. Francis
Catholic High in Gainesville.
The regional event for the
Warriors will be at Santa Fe
College in Gainesville on


heading 1

Friday The girls will race at
9:30 a.m. If the team quali-
fies, they will advance to the
state meet on Nov 17.
Seven Rivers coach Adam
Jones said this was the first
Seven Rivers girls team to
advance past the district
level in nine years.
The Warriors had 79
points. Oak Hall was first
with 16 points and
Gainesville PK.Yonge took
second with 78.
"We got beat by a second or
two," Jones said. "They did a
lot better than I expected. I
knew we had a chance to ad-
vance. There were four
teams that could advance."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




to region

For Seven Rivers, Olivia
Huegel came in ninth with a
21:58, while teammate Paige
Eckart finished 11th in a
time of 22:56.
Gabriela Vissicchio had a
23:06 for the Warriors to
take 12th and Allison Green
was crossed the finish line
for 23rd with a 25:14.
Alexis King was 24th with
a time of 25:15. Also running
were Reilly Cash and Mad-
die Jeffes.
The Seven Rivers boys
did not qualify.
"The boys had a good
race, but our best finisher
was 29th," Jones said. "That
was Sterling Gardner."


Nuggets burned


Miami Heat

sink Denver

Associated Press

MIAMI Ray Allen had a
four-point play with 6.7 sec-
onds left that put Miami
ahead for good, Chris Bosh
scored 40 points and the Heat
held off the Denver Nuggets
119-116 on Saturday night
LeBron James finished
with 20 points, 11 assists and
nine rebounds, and Allen
scored 23 for the Heat, who
escaped when Danilo Galli-
nari's 3-point try with 2 sec-
onds left bounced off the rim.
Dwyane Wade added 14
points for Miami (2-1).
Kenneth Paried and Andre
Iguodala each scored 22 for
Denver, which fell to 0-3.
Nets 107,
Raptors 100
NEW YORK Brooklyn
made a winning return to major
pro sports as the Nets beat the
Toronto Raptors 107-100 in the
first game at Barclays Center.
After a 55-year wait that was
extended a couple of extra
days by Superstorm Sandy, the
borough finally has a team of its
own again, and the Nets think
it's going to be a good one.
Brook Lopez scored 27
points and Deron Williams
added 19 points and nine as-
sists for the Nets. C.J. Watson
finished with 15 points and Joe
Johnson had 14.
Celtics 89,
Wizards 86
WASHINGTON Paul
Pierce scored 27 points and the
Boston Celtics beat the Wash-
ington Wizards 89-86 for their
first victory.
A night after what their coach
called a "flat game," the Celtics
held the Wizards to 1-for-14
shooting at the start, then were
barely better at the end.
Washington's only scoring in
the first 8 minutes came on
Kevin Garnett's goaltending
call, and Pierce hit a key 3
down the stretch to help Boston
improve to 1-2.
Hornets 89, Bulls 82
CHICAGO Greivis
Vasquez scored 18 points and
the New Orleans Hornets beat
the Chicago Bulls 89-82 on Sat-
urday night even though they
were missing Anthony Davis.
Robin Lopez and Jason
Smith scored 16 apiece. Ryan
Anderson added 12 points and
13 rebounds, and the Hornets
hit 20 of 23 free throws to get


K--

Associated Press
Miami Heat forward LeBron James drives past the Denver
Nuggets' Danilo Gallinari on his way to dunking the ball in
the fourth quarter Saturday at the AmericanAirlines Arena
in Miami.


the win even though Davis was
nursing a mild concussion.
Luol Deng had 19 points and
eight rebounds for Chicago.
Nate Robinson scored 15, and
Marco Belinelli added 13 against
his former team.
Pacers 106,
Kings 98, 2OT
INDIANAPOLIS George
Hill scored 18 points, including
the first four in the second
overtime, to lead Indiana past
Sacramento 106-98 in double
overtime.
It was a remarkable defensive
performance for the Pacers (2-1).
Sacramento managed only
three baskets in the final 10:45,
and the Kings (0-3) never led
over the final 35 1/2 minutes.
Marcus Thornton scored 26
points and DeMarcus Cousins
had 21 points and 13 rebounds
for Sacramento.
Hill got help from David West,
who had 18 points and 18 re-
bounds, and Paul George, who
had 16 points and 17 rebounds.
Trail Blazers 95,
Rockets 85, OT
HOUSTON Rookie
Damian Lillard scored 20
points, including eight in over-
time, and the Portland Trail
Blazers slowed down James
Harden in a 95-85 win over the
Houston Rockets.
Harden led the Rockets with
24 points in his home debut,
but he wasn't as dominant as
he was in the first two games.
LaMarcus Aldridge added 27
points and 11 rebounds for the
Trail Blazers.
Spurs 110, Jazz 100
SAN ANTONIO Tony


Parker had 24 points and 10
assists to help the San Antonio
beat Utah 110-100.
Tim Duncan added 19 points
and 11 rebounds for San Anto-
nio (3-0). Danny Green had 21
points and Kawhi Leonard 13.
Duncan and Parker com-
bined to score seven points in
the final 4 minutes to preserve
the victory and give the Spurs
their best start since the 2007-
2008 season.
Mo Williams scored 29 points
to lead Utah (1-2), leading the
team's rally in the third quarter.
Paul Millsap added 17 points,
Al Jefferson 16 and Gordon
Hayward 15.
Mavericks 126,
Bobcats 99
DALLAS O.J. Mayo
scored 30 points and the Dallas
Mavericks remained unbeaten
against the Charlotte Bobcats
with a 126-99 victory.
Mayo made a career-high
seven 3-pointers, including one
that put the Mavericks ahead for
good late in the second quarter
and another that started a 24-8
run for a 76-61 lead in the third.
Dallas improved to 16-0 all-
time against Charlotte.
Ramon Sessions led Char-
lotte with 22 points.
Bucks 105,
Cavaliers 102
MILWAUKEE Brandon
Jennings hit a 3-pointer at the
buzzer to give the Milwaukee
Bucks a 105-102 victory over
the Cleveland Cavaliers.
The referees used video re-
play to confirm the shot left Jen-
nings' hand with one-tenth of a
second left on the clock.


Westwood on top in China


Lehman takes

lead at Charles

Schwab

Associated Press

SHENZHEN, China -
Lee Westwood shot an 11-
under 61 on Saturday for a
share of the third-round
lead with Louis Oosthuizen
in the HSBC Champions.
Oosthuizen, the 2010
British Open champion,
came into the weekend with
a five-stroke lead over the
field, but struggled with his
putting and had a 70.
The South African had a
chance to retake the lead
with a 15-foot birdie putt on
the 18th hole, but missed by
inches the last of many
near misses.
Westwood and Oosthuizen
were at 18-under 198. Phil
Mickelson was three stroke


back after a 66. Ernie Els
briefly surged into a share of
the lead on the back nine be-
fore dumping his ball into a
reservoir on the 15th hole
and taking a double bogey.
He shot a 69 and was tied for
fourth with Bill Haas (66) and
Ian Poulter (65) at 14 under
Mizuno Classic
SHIMA, Japan South
Korea's Lee Bo-mee shot an 8-
under 64 to take a four-stroke
lead after the second round of
the Mizuno Classic.
Lee, a regular on the Korean
tour, had a 10-under 134 total
at Kintetsu Kashikojima.
Japan's Rikako Morita was
second after a 68.
American Angela Stanford
shot a 71 and was tied for third at
4 under with South Korea's Na
Yeon Choi, France's Karine Icher
and Japan's Ayako Uehara.
Top-ranked Yani Tseng was 3
under after a 70 in the event
sanctioned by the LPGA Tour
and Japan LPGA.


Charles Schwab
Championship
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Tom
Lehman took the lead in the
Charles Schwab Cup Champi-
onship and moved closer to be-
coming the first player to win
the season points title two
straight years.
Lehman birdied the final hole
for an 8-under 62 and a one-
stroke lead over Fred Couples
on Saturday in the Champions
Tour's season-ending event.
Couples also shot a 62, making
two eagles.
Lehman was 17 under after
three days in perfect conditions
on Desert Mountain's Cochise
Course. He entered the week
second behind Bernhard
Langer in the points competi-
tion for a $1 million annuity.
Langer was tied for 10th at 6
under after a 70.
Jay Haas followed his sec-
ond-round 60 with a 69 to drop
two strokes back.






NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


'Phins bound for playoffs?


Associated Press

No playoff races are decided in
early November For the Dolphins
(4-3) and Colts, however, just see-
ing themselves in strong con-
tention for a wild-card spot has to
be very satisfying.
For the rest of us, it sure is sur-
prising. And one of them will be 5-
3 after they meet in Indianapolis
on Sunday
The Colts (4-3) have looked pretty
good since being routed by the Jets
in their fifth game. Granted they
have beaten Tennessee and Cleve-
land in close contests, but the matu-
rity they have shown as the schedule
progresses has been impressive.
Pittsburgh (4-3)
at New York Giants (6-2)
Despite injuries and inconsistencies,
the Steelers have won three of their last
four and are beginning to make noises in
the AFC. Their depth has been tested,
but fill-ins such as running back
Jonathan Dwyer, tackle Mike Adams and
safety Will Allen have come through.
This game also presents two quarter-
backs from the Class of 2004 who have
each won a pair of Super Bowls: Pitts-
burgh's Ben Roethlisberger and New
York's Eli Manning.
Dallas (3-4)
at Atlanta (7-0)
Now here's a novel way to attempt
turning around a free-fall: Dallas takes
on the league's only unbeaten team,
one that looked almighty in handling
Philadelphia on the road last week.
The Cowboys are destroying them-
selves with turnovers (minus-11, worst
in the NFC, with a conference-high 19
giveaways) and mental mistakes rang-
ing from wrong pass routes to missed
blocking assignments and blown cover-
ages. It's gotten ugly.
In Atlanta, it keeps getting prettier, with
the Falcons off to their best start. Tight
end Tony Gonzalez, who claims this is
the final year of a Hall of Fame caliber
career, needs one TD catch to reach 100.
Buffalo (3-4)
at Houston (6-1)
The Bills should have been thankful
for the bye with the way they have been
playing. The Texans should have said
"no, thanks."
Houston has been the AFC's most
balanced team so far, and its defense
excels in most every area, from pressur-
ing the quarterback to blocking passes
to stopping the run to forcing turnovers.
No one has protected the ball better, ei-
ther, with just six giveaways.
Returning to the home of the confer-
ence's best team is Mario Williams, the


Associated Press
Indianapolis quarterback Andrew Luck and the Colts host Miami at
1 p.m. today. The winner of the game enhances its playoff hopes.


former Texans defensive end who signed
the richest contract in NFL history for a
player on his side of the ball: $100 million
over six years. Buffalo hasn't gotten
much on its return.
Chicago (6-1)
at Tennessee (3-5)
Titans RB Chris Johnson has been
revitalized recently, but now faces the
stingiest run defense in the NFL.
Chicago also has a ball-hawking sec-
ondary and has a league-high 16 inter-
ceptions (tied with the Giants) and 23
take-aways. Among those picks are six
returned for TDs, the most of any team
in NFL history through seven games.
Lance Briggs and Charles Tillman are
the first teammates with two intercep-
tions for TDs apiece.
By contrast, Tennessee has forced
only eight turnovers.
Arizona (4-4)
at Green Bay (5-3)
Their last meeting was an epic, a 51-
45 overtime victory for Arizona in the
2009 playoffs that ended on, of all
things, a defensive score.
That was a rare win for the Cardinals
in this series: Green Bay is ahead 44-
23-4 and has won six of the last seven
regular-season meetings. Adding to Ari-
zona's challenge is its four consecutive
defeats in which it couldn't protect the
quarterback; it has allowed 39 sacks.
Green Bay shares the league lead
with the Cardinals with 26 sacks, led by


Clay Matthews with nine.
Denver (4-3)
at Cincinnati (3-4)
Vintage Peyton Manning has resur-
faced in Denver, and the second half of
the season could be something special
for the Broncos. Only one team with a
current winning record, Baltimore on
Dec. 16, remains on the schedule.
Manning is 7-0 against Cincinnati
with 17 TD passes and three picks. He
has thrown for at least three TDs in four
of those games. In his first season as a
Bronco, Manning has thrown for at
least 300 yards and three TDs in each
of his last four games, the first player to
do so since Steve Young in 1998.
Baltimore (5-2)
at Cleveland (2-6)
Following their worst performance of
the season, and with injuries hitting
them as hard as any opponent, the
Ravens were fortunate to have a bye
last week. They also might be fortunate
to return against the Browns, whom
they beat 23-16 on short rest in Week 4.
Baltimore has won nine in a row
against Cleveland, but returning star
Terrell Suggs, the 2011 Defensive
Player of the Year who came back
quickly from an offseason torn Achilles
tendon, knows the Ravens need to step
it up. That's particularly true on de-
fense, where they normally are among
the league leaders, but rank 28th over-
all and 30th against the rush.


Philadelphia (34)
at New Orleans (2-5)
The Philly phanatics are up in arms
over just about everything concerning
the Eagles these days. Sounds as if
they're ready to write off the season
and get rid of Andy Reid, Michael Vick
and the Liberty Bell.
In the Saints, Philadelphians might
have met their match for woe-is-us disap-
pointment. Little has gone right in the Big
Easy since the league punished Saints
coaches, players and management in the
bounties scandal that still lingers.
That doesn't mean this will be a
snoozer of a prime-time game. On the
contrary, the Saints' defense might be
the perfect tonic for an Eagles attack
that has scored the fewest points (120)
in the NFC.
Minnesota (5-3)
at Seattle (4-4)
Oddly, two of the Vikings' defeats
came against a rookie quarterback:
Luck and Robert Griffin III. They face
another in Russell Wilson, but this
game could be decided on the ground.
Minnesota's Adrian Peterson leads the
NFC with 775 yards rushing and Seat-
tle's Marshawn Lynch is next at 757.
Each team has been efficient on de-
fense, and with Jared Allen on a sacks
streak (six consecutive games) and
Chad Greenway leading the league in
tackles (81), Minnesota might seem to
have an edge. Then again, Seattle is 3-
0 at home and stops the run well.
Carolina (1-6) at
Washington (3-5)
Spotlighting the quarterbacks is the
easy route in examining NFL games,
but it is the correct approach for this
one. Carolina's Cam Newton, last
year's top offensive rookie but strug-
gling in 2012, faces off against Griffin,
whose excitement quotient might be
higher than Newton's.
Both teams have struggled lately, but if
Newton and RG3 are on track, it should
make for some highlight reel plays.
Detroit (3-4) at
Jacksonville (1-6)
The Lions might have discovered a
new threat on offense to balance the
passing game in Titus Young. Replac-
ing the injured Nate Burleson opposite
star receiver Calvin Johnson, Young
took advantage of single coverage
while Johnson was double- and even
triple-teamed to catch nine balls for 100
yards and two TDs against Seattle.
He could have another field day
against a Jacksonville pass defense
that ranks 25th in yardage.


NFL standings


New England
Miami
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland

Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Dallas
Washington

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina

Chicago
Minnesota
Green Bay
Detroit

San Francisco
Arizona
Seattle
St. Louis


AFC
East
W L T
5 3 0
4 3 0
3 4 0
3 5 0
South
W L T
6 1 0
4 3 0
3 5 0
1 6 0
North
W L T
5 2 0
4 3 0
3 4 0
2 6 0
West
W L T
4 3 0
4 4 0
3 4 0
1 7 0
NFC
East
W L T
6 2 0
3 4 0
3 4 0
3 5 0
South

3 4 0
2 5 0
1 6 0
North
W L T
6 1 0
5 3 0
5 3 0
3 4 0
West
W L T
6 2 0
4 4 0
4 4 0
3 5 0


Pct PF
.625 262
.571 150
.429 171
.375 168
Pct PF
.857 216
.571 136
.375 162
.143 103
Pct PF
.714 174
.571 167
.429 166
.250 154
Pct PF
.571 204
.500 185
.429 139
.125 133

Pct PF
.750 234
.429 120
.429 137
.375 213
Pct PF
1.000 201
.429 184
.286 190
.143 128
Pct PF
.857 185
.625 184
.625 208
.429 161
Pct PF
.750 189
.500 127
.500 140
.375 137


Thursday's Game
San Diego 31, Kansas City 13
Today's Games
Arizona at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Houston, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Denver at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y Giants, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Open: N.Y Jets, New England, San Francisco,
St. Louis
Monday's Game
Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.

Glantz-Culver Line
Today
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
Denver 312 312 (4712) at Cincinnati
at Green Bay 1012 10 (4312) Arizona
Miami 2 2Y2 (43) at Indianapolis
Baltimore 3 312 (4212) at Cleveland
at Houston 11 10 (4712) Buffalo
atWashington 312 312 (47) Carolina
Detroit 4 4 (44) at Jacksonville
Chicago 412 312 (4312) atTennessee
at Seattle 4 412 (3812) Minnesota
at Oakland 112 112 (46) Tampa Bay
at N.Y. Giants 312 312 (4712) Pittsburgh
at Atlanta 412 4 (4712) Dallas
Monday
at N. Orleans 4 3 (52) Philadelphia


BUCS
Continued from Page B1

that had become a staple for
years in Tampa to safety in a
more varied approach under
new coach Greg Schiano.
With three interceptions,
including one returned for a
touchdown, a sack, a forced
fumble and eight passes de-
fensed the 37-year-old Bar-
ber has helped improve one
of the league's worst de-
fenses a year ago.
"He absolutely flashes on
film," Palmer said. "He
makes plays, he's great in
coverage. He makes a couple
of unbelievable intercep-
tions off tipped balls. He'll
come up and tackle Adrian
Peterson and stuff him. He's
everywhere. He makes plays.
He's playing as good a foot-
ball as I've seen him play"
Palmer's change hasn't
been nearly as dramatic as
Barber's under new coach
Dennis Allen and offensive
coordinator Greg Knapp but
has also been a success.
Instead of switching posi-
tions, he merely changed
systems from the classic,
drop-back passing game he
was used to in Cincinnati
and Oakland to a West Coast
system that called on him to
use more rollouts, ball fakes
and short passes than he
traditionally had employed.
The changes have worked
well for Palmer, who has his
highest passer rating in five
years (85.7), is on pace for a
career-high in yardage (4,437)
and has a career-low inter-
ception rate of 1.9 percent.
"He understands where
to deliver the football," Bar-
ber said. "If you give him
certain looks, he's going to
make the right reads. You
got to expect that out of him.
He's not one to make many
mistakes. Obviously we're
going to do our best to try to
force him into them. He's a
10-year guy now, so there's
not much that he, like me,
hasn't seen."
The Bucs and Raiders
have followed the paths of
their team leaders a bit.
After slow starts where both
teams finished September
with 1-3 records, both are


starting to play their best
football of late.
Tampa Bay is coming off a
36-17 win at Minnesota,
marking their third straight
game with at least 28 points
and 400 yards of offense.
The Bucs have paired one
of the league's stingiest run
defenses with a high-
powered offense with quar-
terback Josh Freeman re-
gaining his form from two
years ago. With big-play re-
ceivers Vincent Jackson and
Mike Williams on the outside
and a capable running game
led by rookie Doug Martin,
Freeman has thrown for
1,010 yards, nine touch-
downs and just one intercep-
tion the past three weeks.
"Everyone is getting a lit-
tle bit better and it adds up,"
Schiano said. "That doesn't
mean anything it's looking
forward. It gives them confi-
dence, it should give them
confidence that 'Hey, this is
what we're capable of but
you're only as good as your
next outing.' That's what we
need to do. We need to go
out and do a little bit better


this week against Oakland.
That's what we have to try"
Oakland has won two
straightfollowing a last-second
loss at undefeated Atlanta.
Last week's win in Kansas City
was perhaps the Raiders' most
complete of the year
The offense played
turnover-free after the first
play of the game, the defense
controlled the line of scrim-
mage and pestered Brady
Quinn and Matt Cassel all
day and the offensive line
gave Palmer plenty of time to
throw in the 26-16 victory
'"A lot of the things are just
working out the kinks of our
offense," said running back
Darren McFadden, who had
a season-high 114 yards
rushing last week. "We're
getting there a lot better
where we were a month ago.
The last couple of games
we've been pretty consistent
with the running game.
We've been pretty consistent
as far as running the ball,
throwing the ball, and I feel
like it's something we have
to keep sticking with."


central citrus Rotary club's 22nd Annual Blood screening I



,ffert.ae BLOOD TESTING


FOR YOUR GOOD HEALTH!
ok Central


N + rEON + @E EVEN RIVERS
1ks U + REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

ONE DAY ONLY


Comprehensive Testing at
DRASTICALLY REDUCED PRICES!
- Only $78.00*
Rotary Blood Screening Profile
(Includes: CBC, Lipid Panel, and Chemistry Profiles
including liver enzymes, glucose, and potassium, etc.)


Sat., Nov. 10, 2012

6:30am to 9:30am
at the
Forest Ridge Elementary School
in Hernando


Additional $65.00 Over $475 Value!!!
PSA TEST (men only) Test for Prostate Cancer DO NOT EAT OR DRINK BEFORE YOUR TEST
...nothing to eat or drink for 12 hours before
Additional $65.00 and up to the test. Complimentary coffee,
Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testing juice and donuts will be served after the test.
Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testing


Additional $65.00
Cardiac C.R.P. TEST Used to help predict
if a person is likely to have heart disease.
Medicare does NOT cover a full screening. If you
don't have medical coverage, this is your chance
to afford a complete blood screening.


T UC HERE KEEP UPPER H R --


6 SEND LOWER HALF WITH YOUR CHECK

PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED:


Pre-registration is required no later than Nov. 7, 2012.
Complete this form and return bottom
half with your check payable to:
Rotary Club of Central Citrus
c/o Ed Serra, CPA
6118 West Corporate Oaks Dr.
. Crystal River, FL 34429


O Blood Screening Test............$78.00 $_


Optional PSA (men only)....$65.00 +$__ City:
1 Optional Thyroid Panels.......$65.00 +$_ Telephone:
J Optional Cardiac C.R.P........$65.00 +$__.


Blood drawn by
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
licensed phlebotomists and results reviewed by
Tonialatoya Eley, MD, Board Certified in
Anatomic & Clinical Pathology, Hematology.
Please understand that you should discuss the
results of your tests) with your personal physician.
F- orMoe nf, all (52 5 7-26


Central Citrus County Rotary Club's
22nd Annual Blood Screening

Use ONE REGISTRATION FORM per person please.
(Make photocopies if needed.)


)( YOU MUST SIGN BELOW
Name:
FIRST MIDDLE INITIAL


Social Security #:
Address:


State:_ Zip:


/ / Age: E MALE O FEMALE


TOTAL $__


The patient identified above consents to the procedures which may be
performed on an outpatient basis; limited to laboratory procedures.
The undersigned certifies that he/she has read the foregoing and is the patient, the patient's legal representative,
or is duly authorized by the patient as the patient's general agent to execute the above and accept its terms.
PLEASE READ A SIGN FORE SENDING IN.
NO RESERVATIONS.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.
Patient/Parent/Guardian/Conservator/Responsible Party Date

If other than patient, indicate relationship Witness Signature Date
Witness Signature Date


Citrus County Executives' Association
invite you to attend a fundraiser to benefit

VOICES FOR

CHILDREN

I.

L..




AUCTION
THURSDAY ~ November 8,2012
5:00 PM ~ 8:00 PM

M Tuscany on the Meadows
Citrus Hills Lodge
350 E Norvell Bryant Hwy
Hernando, FL 34442
Tickets are only $15 each and include appetizers and a paddle for
unlimited participation In Q t Mc '
Bring a roll or two of quarters so you can play all evening and win for only
quarters...
Thousands of dollars of merchandise wilt go home with our Guests that
evening, no limit to how many times you can win!!
There will be Incredible raffles donated by local businesses.

.......


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 B5


I


lr aLI lUaL.e












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Cusack developing
Limbaugh film
LOS ANGELES -
Actor and outspoken lib-
eral John Cusack is de-
veloping a movie about
conservative radio host ==
Rush Limbaugh, Cusack's
produc-
tion com-
pany said
Friday
The
working
title is
"Rush,"

Rush New
Limbaugh Crime
Productions confirmed,
offering no other details.
Hollywood director
Betty Thomas, who's set
to work on the film, said
the production company
is putting finishing
touches on a script that
will star the actor Pro- Director/produi
duction is set for next the upcoming m
year, Thomas said. a love of fast ve
Limbaugh is in the
front ranks of colorful
and provocative media
figures. Earlier this year,
Limbaugh called a H o
Georgetown law student
a "slut" and a "prosti-
tute" on air for arguing to Sa
Democrats in Congress SJ4
that health plans should
pay for contraception. Associ
This week, the host
mocked Republican New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie here's nc
for his romancec" with similarly
President Obama after a dusty f
Christie praised the pres- vehicles, a rebE
ident's response to the af- overpowering
termath of Hurricane Lucas is the he
Sandy Luke Skywalke
Cusack as Limbaugh His filmmaki
isn't typecasting, politics walker Ranch,
aside. Cusack is a slender, from the Holly
dark-haired 46-year-old, machine he on
while Limbaugh is 61, may as well be
balding and portly But of Endor
Hollywood's makeup ex- That's why tl
perts have probably had nouncement th
greater challenges. the "Star Wars'
A publicist for Limbaugh entire Lucasfil
said Fhidayhe would check Walt Disney Co
with the host for com- billion is like a
ment. The agency repre- outer space.
sending Cusack, Creative Lucas built lh
Artists Agency, declined Marin County i
comment on the project, largely to avoic
Thomas is a former ac- Los Angeles-ba
tress ("Hill Street Blues") aim was to fini:
and an Emmy-award win- series- his wa
ning director ("Dream On") Today the en
whose big-screen films surpassed the
include Howard Stemrn's maker's origin
"Private Parts" and "The covers 6,100 ac
Brady Bunch Movie." of the industry
visual effects c
SingerAimee Mann trial Light & M
debuts'Sandy' with its headqi
Francisco prop
TARRYTOWN, N.Y. into books, vidE
Singer Aimee Mann has a dise, special ef
new song born of her ex- ing. Just as Ana
perience riding out this became the vil
week's superstorm in a Lucas -once t
Brooklyn hotel. grown to becor
Called "Sandy" and empire.
sung to the tune of Barry "What I was
Manilow's "Mandy," the stay independe
humorous song cheered a make the movi

dience in umentary "Em
New "But now I've f
York's the head of a c
Westch- become the vei
ester trying to avoid.
County After the blo
on Thurs- nouncement Ti
day night pressed a desire
Many of much of his for
Aimee the atten- ucational cause
Mann dees experimental f
found a warm room almost youth. Still, the
as inviting as the music, those who've f
She sang: "Oh Sandy now contemplated
we hate you as much as years and said
Osama, after Con Ed ex- another "Star
ploded. Oh Sandy, and Chris Growing up i
Christie is calling Obama, fornia town of]
glad I already voted." pendent streak
Mann, a California resi- young Lucas. T
dent, was in the New York a walnut ranch
area for a week's worth of owned a station
shows. Two had to be his fictional pr
rescheduled because of had no interest
the storm, family business.
-From wire reports


Birthday There is a good chance that you could be ex-
tremely fortunate in the year ahead in dealings with close
friends or family. Handle the social/business balance
wisely.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Unless you are productively
involved today, there is a strong possibility you could be
quite restless and moody. It behooves you to strive to be in-
dustrious, not indolent.


Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Even though your busi-
ness instincts will be finely honed, you might put more effort
into the evaluation of others' situations than you will in your
own financial growth.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you remind yourself that
important one-on-one relationships must be handled with
extreme care at all times, harmony will prevail. If you don't,
it'll be another story.


Associated Press
cer George Lucas poses for a portrait March 13, 2008, in Las Vegas. Lucas wrote and produced
novie "Star Wars: The Clone Wars." There's no mistaking the similarities. A childhood on a dusty farm,
vehicles, a rebel who battles an overpowering empire, Lucas is the hero he created, Luke Skywalker.




loted in rebellion


le ofLucasfilms surprising given creator's history


iated Press

- LOS ANGELES
o mistaking the
;ies. A childhood on
arm, a love of fast
el who battles an
empire George
*ro he created,
er
ing outpost, Sky-
is so far removed
wood moviemaking
ce despised, that it
on the forest moon

his week's an-
hat Lucas is selling
" franchise and the
m business to The
o. for more than $4
laser blast from

his film operation in
near San Francisco
I the meddling of
ised studios. His
sh the "Star Wars"
y.
terprise has far
68-year-old film-
al goals. The ranch
res and houses one
's most acclaimed
companies, Indus-
agic. Lucasfilm,
quarters now in San
per, has ventured
eo games, merchan-
ffects and market-
akin Skywalker
lain Darth Vader,
he outsider- had
me the leader of an

trying to do was
ent so that I could
es I wanted to
says in the 2004 doc-
pire of Dreams."
found myself being
corporation ... I have
ry thing that I was

ckbuster sale an-
'esday, Lucas ex-
re to give away
tune, donate to ed-
es and return to the
filmmaking of his
move stunned
followed him. He'd
retirement for
he'd never make
Wars" film.
in the central Cali-
Modesto, the inde-
was strong in
'he family lived on
i and Lucas' father
nery store. But, like
otege Luke, George
t in taking over the
s. Lucas and his fa-


their fought when George made it
clear that he'd rather go to college
to study art than follow in his fa-
ther's footsteps.
Lucas loved fast cars, and
dreamed that racing them would
be his ticket out. A near-fatal car
crash the day before his high
school graduation convinced him
otherwise.
"I decided I'd better settle down
and go to school," he told sci-fi
magazine Starlog in 1981.
As a film student at the Univer-
sity of Southern California, he ex-
perimented with "cinema verite,"
a provocative form of documen-
tary, and "tone poems" that visual-
ized a piece of music or other
artistic work.
Lucas' intellectual explorations
led to an interest in anthropology,
especially the work of American
mythologist Joseph Campbell,
who studied the common thread
linking the myths of disparate cul-
tures. This inspired Lucas to ex-
plore archetypal storylines that
resonated across the ages and
around the world.
Lucas' epic battle with the
movie industry began after
Warner Bros. forced him to make
unwanted changes to an early
film, "THX 1138." Later, Universal
Pictures insisted on revisions to
"American Graffiti" that Lucas felt
impinged on his creative freedom.
The experience led Lucas to in-
sist on having total control of all
his work, just like Charlie Chaplin
and Walt Disney in their heyday
"In order to get my vision out
there, I really needed to learn
how to manipulate the system be-
cause the system is designed to
tear you down and destroy every-
thing you are doing," Lucas said
in an interview with Charlie Rose.
He shopped his outline for
"Star Wars" to several studios be-
fore finding a friend in Alan Ladd
Jr, an executive at 20th Century
Fox. Despite budget and deadline
overruns, and pressure from the
studio, the movie was a huge suc-
cess when it was released in 1977.
It grossed $798 million in theaters
worldwide and caused Fox's stock
price at the time to double.
In one of the wisest business
moves in Hollywood history,
Lucas cut a deal with distributor
Fox before the film's release so
that he could retain ownership of
the sequels and rights for mer-
chandise. Over the decades, mer-
chandising has formed the
bedrock of his multibillion-dollar
enterprise.
Industrial Light & Magic, the
unit he started in a makeshift
space in the Los Angeles suburb
of Van Nuys, moved to the ranch


Today's HOROSCOPE
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -When the alarm goes off,
climbing out of bed might not seem like such a good idea.
Once you start moving around, however, you'll quickly be-
come active.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If there is a single someone
who you are attracted to, let your feelings be known, if
there's no reason not to.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Your ability to gauge the
wants of associates could prove to be an extremely valu-
able quality. You'll be able to win them over by sensing and
responding to their needs.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Even though you might use
your sense of humor to have fun with people, you won't re-
spond kindly to similar treatment from others. Instead of
laughing, you're apt to overreact.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Mental pursuits rather than


in northern California and lent its
prowess to other movies. It broke
ground using computers, motion-
controlled cameras, models and
masks. Its reach is breathtaking,
notably among the biggest science
fiction movies of the 1980s: "E.T
The Extra-Terrestrial," "Polter-
geist," "Back to the Future," "Indi-
ana Jones and the Raiders of the
Lost Ark," "Star Trek II: The
Wrath of Khan" and more.
"Between him and (Steven)
Spielberg, they changed how
movies got made," said Matt
Atchity, editor-in-chief of movie
review website Rotten Tomatoes.
These days, the talent at ILM
has spread around the globe, and
many former employees have be-
come top executives at other spe-
cial effects companies, said Chris
DeFaria, executive vice president
of digital production at Warner
Bros.
"You meet anybody who's a sig-
nificant executive or artist at a
company, they've spent their time
at ILM or got their start there.
That's probably one of George's
greatest gifts to the business," De-
Faria said.
But the goliath Lucas created
began to weigh on him. Fans-
turned-critics felt the "Star Wars"
prequel trilogy he directed fell
short of the first films. Others be-
lieved his revisions to the re-re-
leased classics undid some of
what made the first movies great.
Giving up his role at the head of
Lucasfilm may shield him from
the fury of rebellious fans and
critics. He said in a video re-
leased by Disney that the sale
would allow him to "do other
things, things in philanthropy and
doing more experimental kind of
films."
"I couldn't really drag my com-
pany into that"
Still, Lucas is not planning on
going to a galaxy far, far away
Speaking on Friday night at
Ebony magazine's Power 100
event in New York, Lucas said:
"It's 40 years of work and it's been
my life, but I'm ready to move on
to bigger and better things. I have
a foundation, an educational
foundation. I do a lot of work with
education, and I'm very excited
about doing that."
This week he assured the in-
coming president of Lucasfilm,
Kathleen Kennedy that he'd be
around to advise her on future
"Star Wars" movies -just like the
apparition of Jedi Knight Obi-Wan
Kenobi helps Luke through his
adventures.
"They're finishing the hologram
now," he told Kennedy "Don't
worry"


physical ones are what will interest you. You are likely to be far
more interested in balancing the books than lifting any barbells.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Your take-charge, mother-
hen instincts will instantly respond when you see someone
floundering. You'll help without hesitation, to the benefit of all.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Without realizing it, you could in-
stinctively jump in and upstage somebody who is trying to
impress others. You won't be showing off, just responding
to their lead, but it won't look that way to others.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be positive and persistent about
your hopes and aspirations. Don't let any kind of self-doubt
cause you to believe that you're not entitled to fulfillment.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It's one of those days when, for
no reason in particular, everything you do will be closely ob-
served by others. Be especially mindful to conduct yourself
in ways that will enhance your image.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Mega Money: 3 4 11 37
Mega Ball: 8
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $3,215
3-of-4 MB 79 $533.50
3-of-4 1,346 $93.50
2-of-4 MB 1,901 $46.50
1-of-4 MB 15,140 $6
2-of-4 39,585 $3.50
Fantasy 5:23 24 30 33 34
5-of-5 1 winner $228,799.53
4-of-5 256 $144
3-of-5 8,301 $12
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Fantasy 5:1 3 23 33 36
5-of-5 1 winner $205,997.79

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Nov. 4,
the 309th day of 2012. There
are 57 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 4, 1942, during
World War II, Axis forces re-
treated from El Alamein in North
Africa in a major victory for
British forces commanded by
Lt. Gen. Bernard Montgomery.
On this date:
In 1862, inventor Richard
J. Gatling received a U.S.
patent for his rapid-fire
Gatling gun.
In 1922, the entrance to
King Tutankhamen's tomb
was discovered in Egypt.
In 1924, Nellie T. Ross of
Wyoming was elected the
nation's first female governor
to serve out the remaining
term of her late husband,
William B. Ross.
In 1939, the United States
modified its neutrality stance
in World War II, allowing "cash
and carry" purchases of arms
by belligerents, a policy fa-
voring Britain and France.
In 1979, the Iran hostage
crisis began as militants
stormed the United States
Embassy in Tehran, seizing
its occupants; for some, it
was the start of 444 days of
captivity.
In 1980, Ronald Reagan
won the White House as he
defeated President Jimmy
Carter by a strong margin.
In 1995, Israeli Prime Min-
ister Yitzhak Rabin was as-
sassinated by a right-wing
Israeli minutes after attending
a festive peace rally.
In 2008, Democrat Barack
Obama was elected the first
black president of the United
States, defeating Republican
John McCain.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush barnstormed
through four battleground
states Iowa, Missouri,
Arkansas and Texas in a
final appeal for Republicans in
Congress; Democrats worked
for a strong voter turnout to
tilt key races their way.
Five years ago: King Tu-
tankhamun's face was un-
veiled for the first time to the
public more than 3,000 years
after the pharaoh was buried
in his Egyptian tomb.
One year ago: A Syrian
peace plan brokered just days
earlier by the Arab League
unraveled as security forces
opened fire on thousands of
protesters, killing at least 15.
Today's birthdays: Ac-
tress Doris Roberts is 82. Ac-
tress Loretta Swit is 75.
Blues singer Delbert McClin-
ton is 72. Former First Lady
Laura Bush is 66. Actress-
comedian Kathy Griffin is 52.
Actor Ralph Macchio is 51.
"Survivor" host Jeff Probst is
51. Rapper-producer Sean


"Puffy" Combs is 43.
Thought for Today: "No
one is so eager to gain new
experience as he who
doesn't know how to make
use of the old ones." Marie
Ebner von Eschenbach, Aus-
trian writer (1830-1916).











COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ENDORSEMENTS
* To see endorsement
letters, see Pages
A10, All and 12 in
today's section.


Little
Tommy Tucker
teaches about
synthetic
drugs.
/Page C4M


THE BATTLE OF MENTAL ILLNESS


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Perception vs. reality


Providing a voice

for those who are

mentally ill

MARILYN BOOTH
Special to the Chronicle
I just read a guest edito-
rial written by Sandy
Roth, on behalf of chil-
dren whose interests
are protected by volun-
teers willing to be
trained as Guardians ad Litem.
Kudos to her for her excellent
writing style, presenting her
case so well and inspiring me to
write a similar editorial.
In a society that often shows
signs of fraying at the seams,
volunteer organizations have
had to step in to somehow bal-
ance the scales for the vulnera-
ble parts of that society NAMI
Citrus is such a volunteer
organization.
We are also blessed in Citrus
County to have the thriving or-
ganization called the "Key
Training Center," which has
benefited not only from the
masterful leadership of Chet
Cole, but by the public percep-
tion that these are totally inno-
cent folks. They have been
made this way by an accident of
birth, thus creating a sympathy
factor that translates into finan-
cial support, for which we all
are grateful, as Key is a most
amazing, productive and
needed place.
Why do I give valuable space
to Guardian Ad Litem programs
and Key, when my passion is for
NAMI? NAMI is a national or-


BY THE NUMBERS
* One in four adults experience a mental health disorder in a given
year.
* One in 10 children live with a serious mental or emotional
disorder.
* Major depressive disorder affects 6.7 percent of American
adults.
* One in 17 adults lives with a serious mental illness.


* Nearly half all lifetime cases of
three-quarters by age 24


ganization with state offices,
then local groups such as NAMI
Citrus.
The ancient perception is suf-
ferers bring this on themselves
through a "weak personality" or
"no backbone." All those tales
of misinformation translate to
what we call stigma (and battle
constantly) makes our cause
"unpopular," while it is actually
produced by many of the same
genetic, geographic or social
situations that can produce re-
tardation. The correct name for
mental illness is "biological
brain based disorder" or words
to that effect.
There is a definite corollary
between the population served
by Guardians ad Litem, and the
families served by Key and
NAMI. Ms. Roth mentions sub-
stance abuse. This often occurs
when sufferers are trying to
self-medicate with alcohol or
(drugs) instead of having ade-
quate medical care and diagno-
sis, leading to children being
born who are intellectually
challenged; and with so many
other horrible effects bad drugs
can cause to a fetus.
Drug abuse can lead to seri-


Compromise on abortion


Republican candidates for
office Troy Akin and
Richard Mourdock are
sticking with their posi-
tions on rape and in-
cest. In effect, they ..
believe even if a woman
becomes pregnant as a
result of rape or incest
(certainly a form of rape
in itself), she must be
compelled and forced
to bring the baby to full
term. In other words,
she will first be raped John
by her attacker and GUJ
again by the state. COL
To address this issue,
the Republican Party
platform calls for a "Human Life
Amendment" to the Constitution
which would, presumably, include
no exceptions for anything, per-
haps not even the life of the
mother. No exceptions. If you are


IE
.U


pregnant, even from a rape or in-
cest, then you must have the baby
As far as I know, the Republican
platform does not
~. specifically go into how
each and every preg-
nancy will be moni-
tored or how criminal
penalties will be meted
out for doctors and pa-
tients. Will new prisons
be built to house all the
hundreds of thousands
of women who become
Read pregnant over the
"ST years and go on to have
JMN abortions? Talk about
small government -
this is Big Brother gov-
ernment at its worst. How many
government bureaucracies will be
necessary to keep track of all this?
How will all this be paid for?
See Page C4


mental illness begin by age 14;


Source: NAMI VOICE.


ous child neglect It can lead to
mental illness, and that is
where NAMI comes in, and to
point out why you should seri-
ously consider placing your vol-
unteer efforts with NAMI!
Why would anyone want to
volunteer for a cause that is
"not popular," deals with "hard
situations," miserable people,
etc.? The answer has many
parts: This is a cause that could
easily come "camp on your
door."
If you have adequate private
insurance, you are indeed for-
tunate. Sometimes the vicissi-
tudes of life camp on those
least able to deal financially
with it. Especially, I want you to
know Florida ranks at the very
bottom of the 50 states in
monies spent on mental health
issues, despite being the fifth
wealthiest state in the Union.
Won't you write to Gov Scott
today demanding an explana-
tion?
Many have no idea our local
center is not a government
agency, but a nonprofit, just as
is NAMI. They do their best
with donations, grants and gov-
ernment programs such as


Medicaid, an unbelievable chal-
lenge to serve a hurting popula-
tion, and with more people
coming into our county every
day, needing services.
Our local NAMI group does
many things:
Has a Warm Line for infor-
mation and referral.
Furnishes monies to causes
deserving of it, such as the Men-
tal Health Court.
Supplies emergency mone-
tary aid, depending on circum-
stances.
Has purchased a home
through a county program to
offer one family decent housing
at a reasonable price. (We
would like to do so much more!)
Our board is just about
evenly divided between those
who see an opportunity to put
their volunteer time to an ex-
cellent cause, despite having no
personal experience with
"mental illness," and several
who have family members
touched by this problem. We
problem solve, we look for ways
to raise badly needed funds, we
volunteer with a speakers' bu-
reau to make the public more
aware of this spectrum of needs
and through it all, have a great
sense of camaraderie. It would
be an extreme rarity that we
would have to deal with anyone
having any kind of crisis: that is
strictly left to the professionals.
At present we have need for a
board member, skilled with
numbers, and for community
persons willing to have an ex-
pense-paid three-day weekend
for training, for one of the many
NAMI classes; to become certi-
fied leaders in a particular area.
See Page C3


Last call to elect Romney
We will soon see the final pressure forced them to admit a
result of the current pres- lie. Still, no one has been disci-
idential campaign, plined by the administration or
It amazes me the race ...- the media.
for president has stayed !!;*, Recently there was a
so close. Too many peo- sound off comment by
ple apparently still be- someone who thinks
lieve a bankrupt poor people can sup-
government can con- port each other. Take a
tinue to spend funny look at the former So-
money indefinitely viet Union to see how
The fact that our am- well that works. Also,
bassador in Libya was remember, when we
considered expendable Robert Hagaman are forced into poverty,
should scare all of us. I there will be the over-
am amazed the Libya GUEST seers who will continue
issue is almost com- COLUMN to live well until the
pletely ignored in the revolution hits. Making
newspapers and most airwave everyone equal by impoverishing
news. It is quite frightening some all of us is no answer A much bet-
YouTube video that practically no ter goal is to encourage everyone
one ever saw was blamed for this to aim for their highest potential,
incident, and then the administra- culturally and financially
tion spokespersons insisted the
video was to blame for days until See Page C4


Almost


free of


politics
We are almost free.
Our televisions
will be returned.
Our mailboxes will no
longer be filled with gross
lies and distortions.
Our street corners will
be free of people waving
signs.
I am, of course, talking
about Election Day, which
takes place Tuesday for
folks who haven't partici-
pated in the early voting
opportunities.
This election season has
been the worst on record
because the U.S. Supreme
Court decided the Citizens
United vs. Federal Election
Commission (2010) case
and freed up corporations
and foundations to pump
hundreds of millions of
third-party dollars to slash
and attack candidates on
both sides of the aisle.
The nation's highest
court wanted to extend
First Amendment rights of
free speech to corpora-
tions and political action
committees. Instead, the
true voices of candidates
on all levels have been
drowned out by an ex-
traordinary cacophony of
calculated anger and ma-
nipulation, all fueled by
anonymous contributions.
In Citrus County, we
have seen the impact in
the race for the Florida
House of Representatives
where many hundreds of
thousands of dollars have
been pumped into the
campaign for a job that
pays no more than
$29,000. It makes no sense.
The election process is
being stolen by money,
much of it coming from
outside of the county
Some final thoughts on
the elections:
First, I hope Citrus
County voters reject all of
the constitutional amend-
ments placed on our elec-
tion ballot by our state
legislators. None of these
are citizen initiatives -
all of them have been de-
veloped via backroom
deals by our legislators. If
we vote "No" on every
amendment, maybe they
will get the message.
Next, it would be great
to see Citrus citizens vote
'Yes' to continue the 0.25
property tax for our pub-
lic schools. Most citizens
say they support a strong
public school system. Vot-
ing to continue the exist-
ing 0.25 tax is a good way
to show that support.
Our biggest challenge as
a nation will come the day
after the election. For the
past three years, our two
major political parties
have vetted candidates
through the process and
have selected their top
choices.
Both are good men.
Barack Obama and Mitt
Romney are intelligent,
well-spoken and rational
men who have prepared
to lead the nation.
Both of these candi-
dates have very different
stands on many of the is-
sues and that's a good
thing. On some issues they
agree, but on health care,
taxes, education, immi-
gration and regulations -
they have very different
views.
This election should not
be based on where
Obama was born or what
tax bracket Romney finds
himself in. It should be


Page C4







Page C2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012



PINION


"You can never plan the future by the past."
Edmund Burke, 1729-1797


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
S Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz............... .............. citizen member
L fJ ^ Mac Harris ........ .................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..... ................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............. .................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TRICKLING AWAY




Residents must



demand smarter



water policies


Compromise can be ugly,
but it's better than
nothing.
Nothing, however, is what
those concerned with the fu-
ture of Citrus County's water-
ways should be fighting for.
On Tuesday, the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD) approved
a recommenda-
tion to set mini- THE IS
mum flows and
levels (MFLs) for Minimu
the Homosassa and le,
and Chassahow- Homosa
itzka rivers. At Chassal
issue is the riv
amount of water
to be withdrawn OUR 01
from those rivers
to meet increased Citi
demands for must l
water resources vigi
in the region, and
the degradation of plant and
animal life in those river sys-
tems.
The demand is coming not
just from an increase in resi-
dents, but from businesses -
SWFWMD recently approved a
10-year water-use permit for
Heatherwood Investments
LLC of Crystal River and
Mistletoe LLC of Ocala to with-
draw in excess of 76,000 gallons
of water per day from the
King's Bay watershed. The cost
of that permit, as readers may
recall, was $50. The companies
plan to sell the water to bot-
tling firm Consolidated Water
Group LLC of Ocala, which
may turn around and sell it
back to local residents.
No one disputes the quality
of the rivers is in decline; they
just disagree about the causes.
SWFWMD maintains environ-
mental degradation in the
rivers is due not to water with-
drawals, but other factors -
not surprising, coming from an
agency whose representative
told the Chronicle in Septem-
ber the district is concerned
with issues of water quality,
and not quantity.
"We have looked at the plant
life in the Homosassa River and
it is correct that they are dying,
but we don't know why,"
SWFWMD spokeswoman Robin
Felix told a Chronicle reporter.
They don't know why but
they're sure it's not due to flow
levels.
Residents maintain flow lev-
els have everything to do with
the health of the river systems,
and we agree. SWFWMD


S
r

a
h
e

P
z
re
la


wouldn't have spent nearly a
decade studying the flow re-
ductions were they inconse-
quential.
We also question SWFWMD's
methodology. State law says
MLFs cannot result in "signifi-
cant harm" to habitat, but fails
to define the term. The district,
with consultation, defined it as
a 15 percent poten-
;SUE: tial loss of habitat.
We still find that
m flows figure to be arbi-
els for trary, and question
ssa and its quantification.
owitzka What's more,
rs. water quality has
declined during
IN ION: the years of study,
further muddying
ens, the matter.
main SWFWMD's
ant. studies are but a
snapshot of
decades-long degradation that
has gone largely undocu-
mented, and to base permanent
water withdrawals off such a
snapshot is poor stewardship of
a precious resource.
Because we feel water levels
are so closely tied to fluvial
health, we insist no withdrawal
from rivers should be permit-
ted if environmental damage
will occur.
It's hard for SWFWMD to
preach reuse and conservation
when it's simultaneously reduc-
ing river flows and giving away
tens of thousands of gallons of
water per day Individuals can't
hope to make a dent in those
numbers, and will quite frankly
throw their hands in the air -
if they're being polite when
told to set up a rain barrel in
the face of a bottling permit.
In the agency's defense, its
hands are often tied by obliga-
tions to state statute, but we feel
individuals in the bureaucracy
could and should be doing
more to prevent what they must
know are imprudent and un-
sustainable policies. The dis-
trict delayed establishment of
the MFL proposal to gather fur-
ther public comment, but the
time and energy directed to-
ward setting flow levels would
have been more productively
spent on the development of
water reuse rather than water
redistribution.
The health of the county de-
pends on the health of its waters,
and the same can be said for the
region. Residents cannot afford
to forget this, even if SWFWMD
sometimes appears to.


CHRONICLE ENDORSEMENTS

The Citrus County Chronicle Editorial Board has issued the following
endorsements leading up to the Nov. 6 General Election:
* Vote "No" on Amendments 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 12.
* Vote "Yes" on Amendment 2, 10 and 11.
* Vote "Yes" on School Referendum.
* Vote "Yes" on retention of all three State Supreme Court Justices.
* U.S. Senate: Bill Nelson.
* U.S. House of Representatives, District 11: Rich Nugent.
* Citrus County Sheriff: Jeff Dawsy.
* State Representative: Nancy Argenziano.
* Superintendent of Schools: Sandra "Sam" Himmel.
* Citrus County Clerk of the Court: Angela Vick.
* Crystal River City Council: Keith Shewbart.


Positives of public schools


ELLIE ESLER
Special to the Chronicle
Why do we need to support
our public schools? Let's
begin with the word
"public." Public schools are for
everyone, not a chosen few. Pub-
lic schools are charged with edu-
cating every child in every
community, regardless of the
child's ability, background, social
or economic status, behavior or
physical or learning disabilities.
Because of this requirement, Cit-
rus County schools have two spe-
cialized facilities for students
with special needs Renais-
sance and CREST.
On the other hand, private, re-
ligious and charter schools can
pick and choose their students.
Most of these non-public schools
have an application and selec-
tion process, allowing them to ac-
cept only students who fit the
school's preferences. Even after
a student is enrolled, if he or she
is a behavior problem, doesn't
work hard enough or has special
needs the school is not equipped
to handle, the student is sent
home. And all of these schools re-
quire the parents to pay a tuition
fee and often many other costs.
Public schools are responsible
to the public. Their doors are al-
ways open to members of the
community Some of the people
who administer our schools, such
as the superintendent and school
board members, are directly
elected by the community. The
teachers and individual school
administrators must be qualified
and licensed by the state and are
answerable to the public through
yearly evaluations. Non-public
schools can be and often are -
run and staffed by people without
certification.
How do we know if our public
schools are doing a good job?
Public schools are accountable to
the community through state-
mandated tests. While there is
much disagreement about the
tests themselves and the ways
they are used, the scores are
made public every year, so par-
ents and others in the community
can see how their schools and
therefore their children are
doing.
What about non-public
schools? Non-public schools have
no such accountability system.
Students attending private, char-


Other VOICES


ter or religious schools do not
take the state-mandated tests, so
there is no way to compare them
with our public schools. This is
not to say many of the non-public
schools fail to provide a good ed-
ucation. We all know many of
them are doing their job. But
when we hear non-public schools
are better, there is no data to back
up this statement.
And what does the public get
from their schools? Public
schools provide a broad-based
curriculum covering all areas
needed for successful participa-
tion in the society as a whole. Of
course, we have all heard stories
of the teenage clerk in the fast-
food outlet who can't make
change. But we've also heard of
students in our high schools who
win regional, state and some-
times national awards for aca-
demics, business, agriculture,
auto mechanics and on and on.
And we should remember vast
numbers of the people we count
on every day doctors, law en-
forcement, teachers, medical
technicians, business owners -
received their basic education in
public schools. The technician
who drew your blood at your last
check-up was probably educated
in a public school.
Although all public school stu-
dents receive a broad basic edu-
cation, they have the opportunity
for specialized training within
that framework. Consider, for ex-
ample, Citrus County's own Ma-
rine Science Academy and
Crystal River High School's med-
ical program, among others. Non-
public schools, of course, can and
often do offer specialized pro-
grams as well. Frequently, these
schools specialize in one or two
areas, which is the reason some
parents select them.
And what about cost? Since
public schools are supported by
public funds, just what does this
support cost the taxpayers? Cit-
rus County Schools spend be-
tween $3,500 and $3,600 every
year on each student. This
amount includes school build-
ings, salaries for teachers and
other employees, classroom ma-
terials, buses, textbooks and
everything else required to edu-
cate children, right down to the
paper towels in the restrooms.
Non-public schools receiving


tax money as vouchers for stu-
dents from low-performing
schools receive $4,300. That often
does not cover the cost, so par-
ents are forced to pay additional
fees. What's more, if a voucher
student returns to the public
school, the voucher money re-
mains with the non-public school.
That's a pretty good deal, but not
for the taxpayers.
Obviously, society benefits
from public schools in many
ways. So who benefits from non-
public schools? Of course, the
families who choose and pay for
the specialized programs do so
because their own needs are
being met. In addition, many of
the schools are backed by groups
of investors who expect a return
on their investment; in other
words, these schools are for-
profit businesses. In Florida, the
most prominent investor group is
the Foundation for Excellence,
whose board of directors is
headed by ex-governor Jeb Bush
and includes a variety of busi-
nessmen, media moguls and at-
torneys, including Wal-Mart CEO
William Simon. Their program
centers on charter schools using
technology and computerized
learning backed by the expensive
and extensive testing already
costing Florida's public schools
hundreds of millions of dollars.
Finally, public schools are an
American tradition. As early as
1647, Massachusetts required
towns to hire a schoolmaster
Thomas Jefferson called for free
public education for all children.
By the 1850s all of the states sup-
ported free education in reading
and writing for all children. In the
following 150 years, the need for
an educated citizenry has become
much more extensive and schools
have expanded greatly, of course.
But the tradition remains.
So why do we need to sup-
port our public schools? Because
education is the established right
of every citizen of the United
States of America and can be best
and most widely provided
through our public schools.
--In--
Ellie Esler is a retired language
arts teacher and reading
specialist who volunteers in the
Title I Reading program at
Crystal River Primary School.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Non-profit working
I just wanted to thank the Cit-
rus County Chronicle for writing
an article about our nonprofit
organization, ServiceSource.
ServiceSource is a leading dis-
ability resource nonprofit that
serves more than 14,000 individu-
als annually through a range of
employment, training, habilita-
tion, housing and other support
services. One of our primary goals
is to assist people with disabilities
to return to the workforce.
Although we have been in
Citrus County since 1998, we
seem to be little known in the
community and would like to
change that. As October is Na-
tional Disability Employment
Awareness Month, we thought it
would be a good opportunity to
introduce ourselves and to en-
courage local employers to con-
sider hiring individuals with
disabilities.
ServiceSource partners with
the State of Florida Division of


Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
to provide career counseling,
pre-employment skills training,
job development, placement and
maintenance and job accommo-
dation assistance. We can also
help employers navigate the
process of hiring a qualified
worker with a disability and pro-
vide information on tax incen-
tives, accommodations, and
much more. ServiceSource has
served thousands of individuals
with disabilities, helping people
become be vital, contributing
members of the workforce and
community. We are also a mem-
ber of the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce and provide serv-
ices to people in Citrus, Marion,
Levy and Hernando counties.
We hope business owners and
hiring managers in Citrus County
will consider hiring disabled
workers now and in the future.
Charles Lawrence
Employment Specialist
Service Source


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the opin-
ion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a letter
to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will not
be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be lim-
ited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to letters
@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vote even if it is for none of the above


We, as Americans, have dates during a period of up to 34
many opportunities to days before the first Wednesday in
vote. There are state and December. In fact, the first
local elections as well presidential election,
as the granddaddy of which had to wait until
them all, the election the ratification of the
of the president of the Constitution in late
United States. These 1788, and with the
multitudinous foregone conclusion
elections are at brought on by the
various times. But the enormous popularity
biggie, the of George Washington,
presidential election, lasted from Dec. 15,
is on a specific date Fred Brannen 1788, until Jan. 10,
the Tuesday, after the 1789.
first Monday in A SLICE President Obama is
November during OF LIFE the 44th president of
years divisible by four. the United States. With
That means Tuesday, Nov. 6, is the confusion of Grover Cleveland
Election Day being elected to nonconsecutive
It hasn't always been this way terms, making him the 22nd and
Until 1845, Congress allowed 24th president, some would say
states to set their own election Obama is the 43rd president. But


those who have the final word on
such things say he is the 44th.
I mean no disrespect to any of
the following by not prefacing
their names with the title of
President, but to save column
space, please allow me to list them
this way: Truman, Eisenhower,
Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford,
Carter, Reagan, Bush 1, Clinton,
Bush 2 and Obama. Numbers 33
through 44. These are the fellows,
a total of 12 of 'em, who have
served in our land's highest office
during my lifetime. My opinion?
None were always right, none
were always wrong, all were at
times misguided, but all tried to
do their best under some
extremely difficult circumstances.
After reaching what was the
legal age during my era, 21 years
old, thus far, I've voted in 10


presidential elections. I've voted
for five winners and five losers,
but the only election which brings
me shame is the one only one -
in which I didn't vote at all. Did I
have an excuse? Of course. Was it
good enough? No.
This election season, much has
been said about the rights of
younger people to vote, the rights
of convicted felons to vote and
about the shortcomings of politics
in general. We all have our
personal opinions.
I used to think virtually all
opinions rested in one of two
camps those who want to know
what government is going to do for
them and those who want to know
what government is going to do to
them. Since I've grown older and
have retired, I'm not nearly so
dogmatic. I'm now of the opinion


government does some of both -
things to and things for all of us.
Please let me close out my
ramblings for today this way:
Is voting a right or a privilege?
It is both and more, it's also a duty.
Don't do as I did that one time,
don't find an excuse. Vote.
If you haven't already voted by
mail or voted early, get out there
Tuesday and do it.
Finally, if you find, as I have a
few times, you can't hold your
nose long enough to stomach
voting for any of the candidates
listed for a particular office, make
a statement ... draw your own box
and write in "none of the above."
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


ILLNESS
Continued from Page C1

By adhering to established
NAMI training, this en-
ables lay persons to con-
duct classes, usually 12
' weeks in duration, or hold
support groups, for which
there is a crying need. (Pun
intended!)
We had a 12-week class
for those needing to deal
more effectively with a
family member afflicted
with mental illness, con-
ducted by a husband-and-
wife team, certified by
NAMI to present this class.
Speaking for myself, a life
of tennis, golf and bridge


VOT RFOARI MG


would be so "me" centered,
I would feel something
lacking. Don't give up these
good things, however! In-
stead, enrich your life even
more by reaching out to a
truly worthwhile endeavor
As Sandy Roth states so
well, you would gain a
deep sense of satisfaction,
knowing you had made a
difference! At NAMI we
see success stories that
make us glow! I am be-
seeching you to call our
NAMI Warm Line today to
hear opportunities for
service (352-342-2273).

Marilyn Booth is a found-
ing board member for
NAMI Citrus.


ENDORSEMENT LETTERS
* To see political endorsement letters, see Pages
A10, All and 12 in today's section.
* The Citrus County Chronicle will not run any
more endorsement letters after today since the
election is Tuesday, Nov. 6.


Fact checking Citrus County's school system statistics


Recently some school dis- learning gains by gender, race,
trict and state rankings ethnicity, poverty, special needs,
have been used etc. FCAT scores can
on the campaign trail only compare students
that I have not been in Florida public
able to link with any schools with each other
real data I have seen. FCAT scores were used
As a Citrus County in assessing adequate
School Board member yearly progress via No
since 1998, the begin- :- Child Left Behind as
ning of the "account- each state used their
ability movement," I own assessment tests
have always been at the and independently
forefront of requesting Pat Deutschman chose a level for profi-
data and relying on both GUEST ciency They were not
internal and external COLUMM comparable. In fact,
measurements to deter- that was one of the
mine the effectiveness great flaws of the NCLB


of policies, programs and spending.
So, it was a great surprise to
hear a candidate repeatedly de-
clare Florida's schools were 46th
out of 50 states. While 46th in what
category has never been clearly
defined, the only one Florida falls
in the bottom of that I know of is
per pupil funding by the state. And
in that, I wholeheartedly agree,
we need to do much better.
As for student achievement,
there is a multitude of data for
every conceivable category: stu-
dent performance in reading,
math or science in grades 3
through 10; Advanced Placement
tests, SAT, ACT; graduation rate;



-M!77=


system; one state's criteria could
be much more difficult or much
easier than the next state's. There
will not be any national student
achievement test until at least
2014 when the Common Core
Standards and assessment sys-
tems are implemented in the ma-
jority of states in the U.S. Until
then, it's a guess at best.
Florida has developed a complex
formula for combining all the
scores and coming up with a grade
for each school and each school dis-
trict When Florida is compared to
other states using somewhat com-
parable data, the state is well within
the top 25 percent of all states.


In Citrus County, for instance,
our student enrollment numbers
are not significant enough to make
a dent in state assessment scores,
yet our students excel and surpass
most other school districts in
Florida. This means they could
well be tops in the U.S. and the
world. Local test scores are not re-
ported on international assess-
ments, so we have no way of
knowing how Citrus County stu-
dents perform to begin with, but
there is no reason to suspect they
excel only on the FCAT.
Trying to compare student test
scores from different states or
countries is often accomplished
by comparing apples to oranges. I
prefer to look instead at the out-
comes, because that is what really
matters. For instance, the U.S.
continues to be a world leader
economically An education in one
of our universities is the most
sought after by foreign students.
America holds by far and away the
most patents in the world.
What is also interesting to me are
the ways Citrus County schools com-
pare with schools from other coun-
tries whose students outscore the
U.S. as a whole. We share the same
significant commitment to profes-
sional development of our teachers,
ensuring strategies and techniques


are consistent throughout the dis-
trict and are effective. Our schools
are remarkably alike in student per-
formance there are no differ-
ences caused by zip code or
demographics. We pay a lot of atten-
tion to class size and provide extra
support to students who are strug-
gling, allowing for individualized in-
struction and personal attention.
Like the other high-performing
countries, our teachers are con-
tinually doing their own assess-
ments to ensure students have
mastered the curriculum. Teams
of teachers meet periodically to
review all student data of every
student, making sure none "fall
through the cracks." We also pro-
vide strong social safety nets with
collaboration between the
schools, social services, the sher-
iff's office and home.
Students at risk of dropping out
are identified early and we have
credit recovery programs at every
middle and high school. Ninth-
grade academies have proven an
effective deterrent to dropping
out and have increased the gradu-
ation rate. Teachers develop last-
ing relationships with students
purposefully
Collaboration is important as
evidenced by our principals meet-
ing with each other often to share


best practices. A cultural of con-
tinual improvement is imbedded
in every school I visit The school
board is focused on using data to
make good decisions and a great
amount of good will is among the
administration, school board,
teachers, parents and community
- leadership matters.
These measures have proven to
be effective in raising student
achievement in Citrus County
schools as well as school systems in
places such as Shanghai, Singa-
pore, Japan, Finland and Canada
- credited with the highest stu-
dent performance. While there are
still many differences, the com-
monalities are plentiful in Citrus
County schools.
As a result, the Citrus County
school system has earned a grade
of "A' and at the same time has
been rated as a "high performing
district" for six years in a row.
There are only two other school
districts in Florida who have ac-
complished this same distinction!
So when I hear we are not meas-
uring up, I know better. Our teach-
ers and students know better. Now
you know better, too.
--In--
Pat Deutschman is a member of
the Citrus County School Board.


Citrus County Chronicle


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HAGAMAN
Continued from Page C1

For years, labor leaders got their
members to forgo wages by striking
while they enjoyed their generous
salaries. Even now those leaders con-
tinue to be honored by their members.
At the same time, employers have
reached their limits of giving benefits
that exceed the company's ability to pay
Of course, public service unions can get
their excesses because politicians keep
their jobs by giving whatever is asked
for. This also has reached the breaking
point and we face real problems.
The European nations are dealing
with the problem now. We need to look
at their public reaction. We will soon
face the same situation in our country
Many of the European countries have
gone beyond our financial crises. The re-
sult is their citizens, used to supposedly
"free everything," have turned to vio-
lence to continue their "free" govern-
ment subsistence.
We have a chance to begin to turn the
corner with new leadership. It will not
be a smooth ride and many will lose pa-
tience with a new leader as he tries to
right the ship. However, if we get more
of what we have experienced during the
past four years, it is really frightening.
For the good of all in our nation, I sin-
cerely hope Mitt Romney is our next
president. The problems are so great he
will not have an easy time, but the other
choice guarantees the final chapter of a
great nation. I hope we can all celebrate
Nov 6 or whenever the election is de-
cided. In the meantime, vote Mitt. Our fu-
ture depends on it.

RobertE. Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman. He
resides in Homosassa.


I ITETMM UKRBYTMRGR


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier
lifestyle. He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and
prescription drugs.


READ
Continued from Page Cl

Rape is defined as "using
force" to compel a victim to have
sex with the offender There may
be "grievous bodily harm" to the
victim. The perpetrator may
threaten to harm or kidnap the
victim in the commission of the
crime. He (and they are nearly al-
ways men) may render the victim
unconscious or he may adminis-
ter a drug to impair the victim's
ability to appraise or control her
conduct There are other variants
on what constitutes rape, but for
the sake of argument let me focus
on what one normally considers


rape: a man forcing himself on a
woman or girl.
While statistics vary widely,
rape is a commonplace occur-
rence, and some rape victims be-
come pregnant as a result of the
attack. Most Democrats recog-
nize this gruesome fact of life and
come down on the side of the
mother's right to abort the fetus if
she so desires. After all, how
much love and nurturing can be
expected from a mother to an in-
fant who is a constant daily re-
minder of what happened to her?
Now, I'm sure some mothers
are just fine with having the
baby and would side with Re-
publicans on their stance on
abortion. But I suspect most
would rather not be forced to


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

based on the very dif-
ferent paths these men
would like to take the
country
Neither path is evil
- they are just differ-
ent.
The huge amount of
campaign spending
does not make our elec-
tions better The bil-
lions of dollars spent on
campaign advertising
camouflages the real is-
sues.
At least we live in a
country where we get to
make the final deci-
sion.
Whoever is elected,
let's hope both parties


give birth to and pay for at least
the next 18 years for someone
who was forced upon her.
Since there is probably noth-
ing I can say to convince right-
to-lifers there are numerous
valid reasons for why a woman
should have the right to her re-
productive options, let me pro-
pose a compromise. If women
are to be forced to have un-
wanted babies, construct a na-
tional database of supporters of
the right-to-life agenda. This can
be incorporated into the various
government agencies tasked to
keep track of pregnancies.
When a woman is refused an
abortion and gives birth, then
the infant will be delivered to
whoever is at the top of the data-


can settle down and
work together to re-
solve the incredible
problems facing our na-
tion. We are all tired of
politicians pointing fin-
gers and blaming the
other side. We need co-
operation and people
who can work together
to problem solve.
The only debate I
want to listen to after
Election Day involves
how much the Gators
will beat the Seminoles
by on Nov. 24. Now
that's something worthy
of a good discussion.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him
atgmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


base. If your name comes up
next, you get the next baby
I realize those on the right
will roar with outrageous indig-
nation over this proposal, but
the way I see it is if you are will-
ing to force the birth on the
mother, then you should, in turn,
be forced to raise it. Ridiculous,
you say, how can I, who had
nothing to do with this, be forced
to raise someone I do not want
and will not nurture or love?
Well, that sounds like a rape,
doesn't it?

John Read is the assistant
public information officer for
the Citrus County Democratic
Executive Committee.


JOIN THE GtLF TO LAKES PILOT CLUB AS WE KICK
OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON HITH OUR ANNUIAL...

;ii.+


Pell\rr-i:n t lRlII .EL G iP LE OF -, _, .. CilI.I._l
Gulf to Lakes H _*. Lecinto

Public Tree Viewig
Thursday, Nomember 15, 2-8pm
In a festive ettmng, \viewv nore than
T, Entv-\ ie beautitullt decorated
( i istinas Trees.
Raffle ticket, fi'r Tree' and Chine-et "
.ALItction ite01m \% ill be \allable
t'l p lucha- c
Admission:
A t0 \ 1.1 nol -peri-hati ti.c item f d I 1
,-. b llen Ill (-Citrul ULnited Ba.-ket
Gala Evept
Friday% EBening. November 16
In purch,.l ci' i l,,! !.- lhm orc '
!!'it,'!!id~iili1 c.,l! y-' i-^'i-' ^ ^ ^ H B


CH NICLo


Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church proudly hosts
Citrus County

SFather

Christmas

f A Ball


III


SFriday December 7, 2012
All proceeds for "Serving Our
. Savior" (SOS) Food Pantry
0'l "Cocklails appelizers hour 6pm-7pm
/ Dinner 7pm-8prnm.
a Dance & Special E% enis 8p.m.-Ilp.mrn
Chel Cole Life
,a Enrichmenl Cenler
| 5399 W. Gulf Io Lake Hwy..
Lecanlo. FL 34461-8531

* .) Semi-Formal Attire

Cli lI()NI(:1.E
Tickets are $45 each (donation). Purchase at the church office,
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy CR 486
Monday-Friday, from 8 a.m. until I p.m.
For more inormnan please Al 527-0052 119-5489 563-5932 or 270-3391


Suncoast Harmony Chorus


Specd
Sally I
iea
Bioad.
Impi


Prest5 s



Sally's Helltday
al Guest Irenealy swudda l Slow


,e UHolla
ai Holiday
ressions I -
,und.u [ 1cmb.r nl'2 ? i-pm
/. (uru lidliirnum lit Flridl.i A
I ..r r 5kel in ,nn J|ll" 200

Maria 352-382-0336


A( Advanced ticket sale: $8.00 ea
L ,'' -" Group of 6 or
OOOCKUV


more: $6


November 4th
Inverness Festival of the Arts
Bark in the Park
Made in America Religions in the American Context
Taste of CF

November 7th
4th Annual Fall Arts & Crafts Show

November 8th
Voices for Children Auction

November 9th
Healthy Living Fair

November 10th
Blood Testing Cenral Citrus Rotary
Citrus County Recycles
Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
Fall Book Sale
Annual Home and Outdoor Show
George Welsh Golf Fundraiser

November 11 th
Fall Book Sale
Annual Home and Outdoor Show
Veterans Day Parade

November 15th
Parade of Public Tree Viewing
Caruth Camp Challenge
Parade of Trees Gala Evening & Auction

November 16th
Parade of Trees Gala Evening & Auction
Trash to Treasures Sale
Citrus Stampede Rodeo

November 17th
Citrus Stampede Rodeo
Sgt. Dennis Flanagan Never Forget 5K/1 Mile Walk
Winter Wonderland Craft Show
Yankeetown Seafood Festival


At the Door: $10.00 ea
.00 ea CR


On your way to the Seafood Festival
help the Children of Homosassa and
enjoy a pancake breakfast!!!

Where? First United Methodist at the corner
of Bradshaw and Yulee
When? November 10, 2012 7am 11 am
What's for Breakfast? All you can eat
pancakes with sausage, orange juice and
beverage
Why? To raise funds for Reading is
Fundamental in local elementary schools
Who? Kiwanis Club of Homosassa


$5 per person
Tickets
available /
at the door!


Children I
under 12

Free!

For more information call
352-628-5281 or 352-628-1470
00CY48


C4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


COMMENTARY


ofs


CHONIE









I4, S COUNTY CHRONICLE

BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Life in uneasy economy


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Ray and Candice Arvin pose inside their home Oct. 19 in Charlotte, N.C. A Romney supporter, Ray Arvin used to own a small business with five
employees, selling equipment to power companies, but he went out of business in 2009. He's now a salesman for another equipment company.


Great Recession takes toll on citizens

from different places, ages, occupations


Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Here
was Chas Kaufmann's life before
the Great Recession: $28,000 in
restaurant tabs in a year, cruises,
house parties with fireworks.
His Mr. Gutter business was
booming in the Pennsylvania
Poconos.
Now: "We mainly shop at
Sam's Club and portion out our
meals. We spend $4 to $5 a night
on eating."
He and his wife use space
heaters in their elegant house
and leave parts of it cold. The
Hummer is gone, and he drives
a 2005 pickup. On Nov 6, Kauf-
man is voting for Mitt Romney
Lower down the ladder, the re-
cession put Simone Ludlow's life
in a full circle. Laid off by an At-
lanta hotel company in 2009,
Ludlow, 32, bounced from job to
job for two years, got by with a
"very generous mother," still
makes do by renting a room in a
house owned by friends, and is
back working for the company
that let her go. She's voting for
President Barack Obama.
For four years, the bumpy
economy cut an uneasy path. It
raked small towns and big cities,
knocked liberals and conserva-
tives on their backs, plagued Re-
publicans and Democrats alike.
It was the worst economic set-
back since the Depression, and
it didn't take sides.
Stories of struggle
Across the country, Associated
Press reporters asked people to
talk about their livelihoods be-
fore and after the December
2007 to June 2009 recession and
how those experiences have
shaped their politics in the pres-
idential election just days away
Their answers help illuminate
why the race is so close. In this
time of great polarization, their
stories bridge the partisan di-
vide, showing resilience and op-


timism are shared traits, too, and
that no one seems to think either
candidate can work miracles.
"Our potential doesn't rely on
an election and one man or even
a ballot," said Ben McCoy, 35, of
Wilmington, N.C., creative direc-
tor for 101 Mobility, a company
that sells, installs and services
handicapped access equipment.
"I don't think either candidate
for president has the conviction
to go as far as we need to go to re-
ally get back to stability."
Economic well-being, for him,
will come from personal deci-
sions by his wife and himself, not
Washington.
"We will roll up our sleeves
and cut the family budget down
to the core if we have to, where
we know we're going to eat and
we know the lights are going to
stay on, and that's it," he said.
"We'll do it. We won't laugh and
dance about it, but we'll do it."
Recession effects
In the Charlotte area, the re-
cession played a cruel trick on
Obama supporter Tamala Har-
ris, wrecking the Charlotte hous-
ing market after she quit a job to
go into selling real estate. It
drove Romney supporter Ray
Arvin out of business selling in-
dustrial equipment from North
Carolina and cleaned out his re-
tirement savings with not that
many years left to start from
scratch. Both have more hope
than you might think.
Harris, 38, is back in Charlotte
after getting her master's in
business from the University of
Rochester in New York. During
the worst of the calamity, she
used loans and scholarships to
advance her education, and
looks back on it all as a time that
made her dig deep.
"It made me realize what was
important," she said. "It's just not
the material things and having
See Page D3


Associated Press
Hilda Mitrani, 51, of North Miami Beach, Fla., has a marketing
consulting company and is among many feeling squeezed by a
painfully sluggish economic rebound.

For Miami woman, belt is still tight
Associated Press
MIAMI On the eve of the 2012 elections, The Associated Press inter-
viewed dozens of Americans to try to gauge the economic mood of the na-
tion. People were asked about jobs, housing, gas prices, retirement and
other issues. Among them was Hilda Mitrani, 51, of North Miami Beach,
Fla. The Great Recession and slow economic recovery have devastated
her public relations and marketing business. But Mitrani says positive
signs are emerging.
Mitrani's long-time clients are spending cautiously, if at all and she
has had to adjust her own lifestyle as a result.
She delays making home repairs. She keeps an eye on the thermostat.
And only occasionally, she's able to treat herself to a new pair of shoes.
"It's been a hard recovery," says the single mother of two children.
Mitrani is among many feeling squeezed by a painfully sluggish eco-
nomic rebound. Unemployment remains high at 7.8 percent. Average pay
trails inflation. And the economy is growing too slowly to accelerate hiring.
Mitrani's clients in the nonprofit and health care sectors are reluctant to
spend on public relations when they may need that money for supplies or
other basics, she says. So Mitrani, who used to employ two part-time
workers, now runs the business alone.
But even with lower overhead, she still feels squeezed.
"You're not sure if you're going to get paid this month or next month, or
if you're going to have a new client to replace the project that you just fin-
ished," she says.
Routine utility bills feel like a burden. And thinking about college tuition
payments her daughter is a junior at Washington University in St. Louis
- is "nerve-wracking."
More than anything else, though, she laments the endless string of pay-
ments for insurance. "Between the car, the house, the health so much
See Page D3


Learn to manage, optimize small-business assets


T he assets on the
balance sheet of a
business are listed
in decreasing order of
liquidity. Cash is at the
very top of the asset col- .'.
umn since it is immedi- i 2
ately available for use.
Less-liquid assets follow,
such as receivables and
inventory, because these Dr. Fr
assets require time to He
convert to useable cash. EXPEF
That makes them less liq- EXPE
uid. MAT
Other categories of
business assets are even less liquid
than inventory Equipment and real
estate are two in that group. This
class can provide the business with
value. However, as we have wit-


ederick


r
R
1


nessed in the present
economy, real estate can
take a long time to sell
and be replaced by cash.
There is one asset not
listed on any balance
sheet. It's better than
cash, is immediately
available and has high
value. This asset is
called the owner.


zog Business owner
HENCE Traditional accounting
rERS principles consider cash
as the most available
business asset. What could be bet-
ter and more available for immedi-
ate use? The answer is easy ... it's
the owner!
Who knows more, or should,


about the business? Who is better
able to convert a prospect to cus-
tomer? Who is the responsible indi-
vidual? Who has the power to make
things happen?
Answer: the owner.
How many owners understand
they can be more powerful than
cash on the balance sheet? Many do
not. Every owner should sense and
build the latent power they possess
relative to their value in business.
Power of ownership
What empowers owners as they
start and grow a business? It ap-
pears to be a collection of several
entrepreneurial components: Prac-
tical experience and expertise, per-
sonal ambition to build something
with a strong sense of independence


and deep belief of self-confidence.
Studies reveal entrepreneurs add
continuing education as the back-
drop for sustaining their success.
Continuing education
A personal commitment to con-
tinuing education is evident as a
strong characteristic of today's en-
trepreneurial success. Citrus
County businesspeople have a wide
range of continuing education ven-
ues. If technical education is de-
sired, there is WTI.
The College of Central Florida
provides a large inventory of aca-
demic studies. SCORE has the
steady and experienced mentoring
of seasoned business owners. Citrus
SCORE offers the most immediately
See .Page D3


No teen


needs


$1M
Dear Bruce: It may
seem trivial to be
asking this ques-
tion, as there are so many
people out there having
such a hard time, but I do
have a concern about my
granddaughter. When she
turns 18, her trust will ex-
pire, at which time she
will be able to withdraw in
excess of $1 million that
was left to her by her de-
ceased father. Obviously,
my daughter doesn't want
her to have immediate ac-
cess to this money and
blow it; she would like to
know how to invest it for
her. Any suggestions? -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: Leaving
this amount of money to
someone at the tender age
of 18 was an incredible ex-
ercise in poor judgment.
Far too many times, kids
who are left with exces-
sive amounts of money
when they are little grow
up to be young adults who
you wish could not get
their hands on the money
For example, if the
money was left to them
when they were 10 and
they spent the next eight
years hanging out with the
wrong crowd, stealing,
doing drugs, etc. The last
thing you'd want is for
kids like this to have this
kind of money
You, your daughter and
your granddaughter should
sit down with a trained and
recommended financial
adviser. You will have to
trust the adviser to know
where the money should
go. That is the best thing for
all parties. I wish you well.
Dear Bruce: My hus-
band and I are 82, and we
don't have a will. My hus-
band has refused to get
one, and I don't think at
this late date I'm going to
convince him otherwise.
If we both die without a
will, will our children
have any problem getting
our home and our bank
account? We don't have
any bills, and our home
and automobiles are paid
for Reader, via email
Dear Reader: The an-
swer to your question is:
Yes! You bet they will have
problems! You are talking
about leaving your home
with undivided interest to
more than one child,
which is always a mistake.
For goodness' sake, you
should have simple recip-
rocal wills, one to the
other and one to your sur-
viving children. At the
very least, one of you will
have to be appointed ad-
ministrator of the estate
by the probate court,
which will involve some
expense.
I have written many
columns on this subject,
expressing my well-
defined view that there al-
ways should be a personal
rep or administrator
(which you currently don't
have) and instructions to
them in a will that the
home should be disposed
of and the monies divided.
Not having a will is a huge
disservice to the people
you leave behind.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. co
m or to SmartMoney, P0.
Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of gen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future
columns.










D2

SUNDAY
NOVEMBER 4, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan M.
this:
rSi r.*FB


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Citrus Memorial Health System a


sponsor of BWA Health
CITRUS MEMORIAL
HEALTH SYSTEM opened -
its $17 million state-of-the-
art Heart and Vascular Cen- 1
ter in 2004. Now, eight years a *4 '
later it has 3,000 open heart ,, :
surgeries, 20,000 cardiac, y
catheterizations, and 5,000
stents under its belt.The V,
Citrus Memorial Heart and
Vascular Center is home to
Citrus County's only heart
surgery program and is
known for its innovative de-
sign, outstanding clinical
outcomes and for keeping
up with some of the most
amazing technological ad-
vancements and procedure
methods that make it a ing including EKG, stress catheterize
leader in heart and vascu- testing and calcium scoring insertion, o
lar care. It also performs along with both diagnostic valve repa
non-invasive cardiac test- and interventional cardiac and cardio


On the

move
SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER: Christopher A.
Keen, M.D., was ap-
pointed to the medical
staff. Dr. Keen specializes
in orthopedics. He earned
his medical degree from
Virginia Commonwealth
University School of Medi-
cine in Richmond, VA,
where he also completed a
residency in orthopaedic
surgery. He then com-
pleteda fellowship in hand
and upper extremity sur-
gery at University of Mis-
sissippi Medical Center in
Jackson, Miss. "Dr. Keen's
education, experience and
passion for helping people
align with the hospital's
mission to provide excel-
lence in health care," said
Joyce Brancato, chief ex-
ecutive officer. "He will
provide the best quality
care for our patients. "For
more information about
the hospital and its med-
ical staff, visit SevenRivers
Regional.com.

STORERIGHT SELF
STORAGE, Lecanto, wel-
comes its new assistant
manager, Billie Nicholls.
She lives in Inverness with
her husband, Nick. She is a
member of the IR-RU so-
cial club in Inverness and
has 2 parrots. Billie's past
work experiences include
Southeast Milk Inc. in
Belleview, Fla., and Kostin,
Ruffkess & Company, CPAs
of Springfield, Mass. A rap-
idly growing company,
StoreRight has purchased
five stores within the last
two years, and is focused
on customer service.
StoreRight manager
Nancy Wheeler says: am
thrilled to have Billie as part
of my team here at
StoreRight. Right Place,
Right Price!" For more in-
formation on StoreRight
Self Storage in Lecanto,
visit http://www.store
right.com or call 352-527-
9777.

EXERCISE YOUR
RIGHT TO VOTE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6
Visit votecitrus.com for
precinct information,
polling hours and
sample ballots.


Citrus County Cruisin'
Nov 10 Enjoy the annual Veter-
ans Day parade in Inverness. This
patriotic parade begins at 10 a.m. at
Citrus High School, proceeds down
U.S. 41/ State Road 44 South to his-
toric downtown square and ends
with a memorial ceremony at the
historic courthouse. Call the Citrus
County Chronicle at 563-6363 or
Chris Gregario at 795-7000 for more
information.
Nov 10 and 11 -Enjoy the annual
Seafood Festival sponsored by the
Homosassa Civic Club and given in
the historic district of Old Ho-
mosassa. The art show is judged and
non-judged and there is a food court
and vendors who provide their
seafood and other specialties. $2
entry donation, and children are
free! No pets allowed. Saturday, 8


& Fitness Expo


ation, pacemaker
pen-heart surgery,
air, lung surgeries
pulmonary reha-


bilitation. 502 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness, Fl 34452
352-344-6416, www.citrus
mh.com.


The award goes to...


DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH
AND REHAB CENTER! The
company reviewed its in-
volvement within the commu-
nity and determined that
Citrus County was lacking in
short-term, post-operative
care facilities. The recent
completion of the remodel
now provides the facility with
52 private rooms, 22 of which
are private suites with per-
sonal shower facilities. Ad-
ministrator Sue Korman is
proud to represent Diamond
Ridge, saying, "It is a great fa-
cility, with a great staff." And
evidently Citrus County
agrees, awarding Diamond
Ridge Health and Rehab Cen-
ter Best of the Best in 2012.


(7~


I


JoLea Shadley and Linda Pursley accept the October New
Image Award for Diamond Ridge Health and Rehab Center.
Pictured with them are Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast
Bank; John Murphy, Citrus County Chronicle, and Josh Wooten,
president/CEO, Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.


Promoting health and safety


Nature Coast EMS recently participated
in two local community events including
the second annual St. Francis Festival at
Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church in
Lecanto. The festival featured a pet fair
with several activities including pet adop-
tions and a dog-walking parade. The event
concluded with a "pet blessing" for those in
attendance.
Nature Coast EMS also recently partici-
pated in the fourth annual Health & Fit-
ness Fair at Village Cadillac. The fair
featured various health organizations and
support groups. Nature Coast EMS fea-
tured its new medical alert systems and
electronic medicine dispenser. Visitors also
registered for a professional emergency
first-aid kit developed by Nature Coast
EMS professionals.
Citrus Memorial Hospital is listed as one
of America's 100 Best Hospitals for General
Surgery- in 2013 by HealthGrades AND


one of America's 100 Best Hospitals for
Spine Surgery'"for two years in a row (2012-
2013). The hospital has also received recog-
nitions in the specific fields of orthopedics,
neuroscience, gastrointestinal and critical
care.
The 2013 HealthGrades hospital quality
outcomes are free to the public at
www.HealthGrades.com. HealthGrades in-
dependently measures hospitals based on
data that hospitals submit to the federal
government No hospital can opt in or out of
the analysis, and no hospital pays to be
measured. HealthGrades risk adjusts for
patient demographic characteristics and
clinical risk factors, thereby taking into ac-
count how sick patients are upon admis-
sion. More information on the American
Hospital Quality Outcomes 2013: Health-
Grades Report to the Nation, including the
complete methodology, can be found at
www. HealthGrades. com/quality.


Schlabach Security Donates alarm

system to Filter Youth Development


Jarey Schlabach, president of Schlabach
Security and Sound Inc. (SSS), first learned
of Filter Youth Development when George
Schmalstig of Filter Youth Development
came to his Central Citrus Rotary Meeting.
Shortly thereafter he visited the site and
decided to make a donation. Jarey says, "I am
very impressed with the Filter Youth De-
velopment and the positive influence this
program will have on these young kids. Fil-
ter has a huge potential in Citrus County!"
Filter Youth Development is a nonprofit
organization in Inverness, founded by
George Schmalstig and Chris Caravetto in
March of last year. Filter motivates and
mentors kids using Honda mini-bikes cour-


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. For more information, visit
www.homosassaseafoodfestival.org.
Nov 10 and 11 Cruise the Crys-
tal River Armory during the 35th an-
nual "Remodeling America" Home


tesy of NYPUM (National Youth Project
Using Minibikes). Integral to NYPUM's de-
sign is an essential mentoring component
that guides and supports youths to make
good decisions, all centered on exciting and
challenging activities. Filter is NYPUM's
43rd program in the nation.
Schlabach Security and Sound Inc. do-
nated the installation and components for a
full perimeter and motion detected alarm
system to protect the mini-bikes. If a bur-
glar opens a door, the alarm sounds and po-
lice are dispatched immediately Mike
Falasca, technician for SSS, installed the
system. Schlabach can be reached at 352-
527-3201.


& Outdoor
Show. The
show is open
to the public
S. from 9 a.m. to
CITRUS COUNTY 4 p.m. atu
Economic Development 4 p.m. Satur-
Council. nc. day and 10
a.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday More information is avail-
able under the Events/Calendar tab
at www.citrusbuilders.com.
Nov 16 and 17 Citrus Stampede
Rodeo at the Citrus County Fair-
grounds, Inverness. 8 p.m. both
nights, gates open at 5:30 p.m. Visit
www.citrusstampederodeo.com.
Nov 24 -Take a scenic drive west
on Ozello Road to the seventh an-
nual Ozello Arts and Fine Crafts Fes-
tival. Enjoy strolling through the
vendors and consider picking up
holiday gifts. No pets. More infor-
mation at www.ozello.net.


Make your reservations now for
November & December lunches


The November Chamber
Member lunch is Friday,
Nov 9 at Plantation on Crys-
tal River. Please join us as
we recognize our veterans.
Our guest speaker is Asa
Lanum, a computer indus-
try expert with over 30 years
experience in hardware
and software, and a highly
sought-after speaker on in-
novation. In honor of Hos-
pice Month, this lunch is
sponsored by HPH Hospice.
Networking begins at 11:30
a.m. Reservations close at
noon Thursday, Nov 8, so
sign up now before it's too
late. To receive discounted,
prepay pricing, log in under
the Members Only tab, www.
citrus county chamber.
com/External/WCPages/
WCPortal/PortalLogin.aspx
?ReturnURL=%2fwcportal
%2fportalstartpage.aspx.
While you are logged in,
place your reservation for


the December Business
Women's Alliance Lunch
being held Wednesday, Dec.
5 at Plantation on Crystal
River This lunch is the one
time a year that men may
join the professional women
to expand their contact
base, meet new business
leaders and share knowl-
edge. Join us as Health and
Empowerment Coach Katie
Humphrey speaks on "7
Core Steps to Revolutionize
Your Life." Sponsored by
Nature Coast Bank, net-
working begins promptly at
11 a.m. at Plantation on
Crystal River. Reservations
close Nov 30. Register and
pay prior to Nov 23 for $20;
regular cost $25 the Nov 23
to Nov 30. Log onto www.
citruscountychambercom to
make your reservation. Do-
nations of non-perishable
food will be accepted for the
food bank.


Chamber website continues to
improve, interact with community


Have you visited www.
citruscountychamber.com
recently? There are many
changes happening to make
it easier for members and
visitors to use the website
information to be active in
the community.
For instance, parade in-
formation is available for
all three county Christmas
parades.
Float entries for the Dec. 1
"The Magic of Christmas"
Parade HolidayArts & Crafts/
Car Show in Beverly Hills
will be accepted until Nov.
24. There is a $500 prize for
overall best float. More in-
formation is available at
352-726-4882 or www.citrus
countyparks.com and the
form is available at www.
citruscountychamber com.
Events start at 9 a.m.; pa-
rade begins at 10 a.m.
Applications are also on
the web site for the Dec. 1
Crystal River Christmas Pa-
rade, which begins at 6 p.m.,
and for the Dec. 8 Inverness
Christmas Parade, which
begins at noon. The theme
for both parades is '"A Post-
card Christmas." You will find
the applications online at the


News/Events tab at www.
citruscountychamber.com
and at both Chamber of-
fices: 401 W Tompkins, In-
verness and 28 N.W Hwy. 19,
Crystal River. Application
deadline for the Crystal
River and Inverness parades
is Nov. 16. The Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce always welcomes vol-
unteers to assist with these
two parades. Email jeff
@citruscountychambercom
if you would like to help us
out before, during, after the
parades.
Additionally, the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce is pleased to an-
nounce members now have
the ability to list job open-
ings on our website. Go to
www citruscountychamber.
com and click on the Quick
Link Help Wanted. This is
just one more way that we
are adding value to your
Chamber membership. If
you are job-hunting, you
will want to check in to our
website regularly to keep
an eye on positions avail-
able. Currently there is a
general office position
available.


S "like"us on


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Ev ModayNihtatO6.
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FngtHueC 1 rDgtL4


The Chamber is always on the 'cutting edge' of
technology. Cindi Fein co-hosts with Melissa Benefield
and shares the many ways the Chamber of Commerce
can keep your business progressively moving forward
with their Mobile Website. One click on your smart
phone and you've got links to local businesses, events,
news and exclusive coupons. All for FREE! Got BEIBER
FEVER? Justin Beiber makes an appearance on
Chamber Chat! Learn how you can win tickets to his
January 2013 concert through Insight Credit Union in
Inverness. Jim Ferrara Branch Manager tells us how a
simple text can make you a big winner! The winning
doesn't stop there-- Watch Chamber Chat to find out
how you can win a 2013 Chevrolet from Love Chevrolet
for $2s. Ed Lattin shares with us how we can get a
chance to win a BRAND NEW CAR and help the Boys &
Girls Club of Citrus County. Dwight Hooper from
Hooper Funeral Home and Crematory returns to tell us
about a special event that honors the memories of our
loved ones. As the holiday season approaches, the
passing of our loved ones can make the holidays a
difficult time. Find comfort in joining others at the
Holiday Service of Remembrance on Sunday
November i1th at Hoopers Funeral Home in Inverness.
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday
at 6pm, Thursday at eam and Friday at ipm on WYKE--
Bright House Ch 16 or Digital 47.Want your business,
organization or upcoming community event featured
on Chamber Chat? Email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber Chat on
Facebooki


low-


I


-V





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST

Workforce sets No- Leadership Givers Appreciation night Wells Fargo for United Way
vember events


OCALA- November prom-
ises to be a monster month for
job seekers in Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties with Workforce
Connection offering nearly 80
free workshops and recruiting
events, including a
Monster.com Power Seeker
Workshop to help college and
VoTech students put the "hire"
in "higher education" and a Fall
Career Fair featuring 17 local
employers.
In addition, the calendar fea-
tures open resume labs, com-
puter basics, and workshops
designed to help job seekers
sharpen interview skills and de-
velop job-search strategies as
well as programs focusing on
the needs of military veterans
re-entering the civilian labor
force.
New this month is a targeted
resume workshop which helps
job seekers tailor their resume
on a job-specific basis to high-
light their unique skills and fit
for a position of interest.
"We have added nearly 30
more workshops to this month's
calendar in addition to an array
of exciting training and recruiting
events," said Workforce Connec-
tion CEO Rusty Skinner. 'There
really is something for everyone
at every skill level and at loca-
tions throughout our region."
There is no charge to attend
any of the programs, but partici-
pants must be fully registered
with Workforce Connection
through the Employ Florida
Marketplace (EFM) at
www.EmployFlorida.com, and
additional workshop registration
may also be required.
Complete program and regis-
tration information is available
at Workforce Connection's Cal-
endar of Events at www.clm
workforce.com. The following
programs take place at Work-
force Connection's one-stop re-
source centers in Chiefland,
Inverness and Ocala, as well as
at the College of Central
Florida's (CF) Ocala and Citrus
County campuses and various
community locations:
Beyond Barriers: Path-
ways to Employment is for
those whose background is-
sues create a barrier to finding
a job. The workshops take
place on Nov. 9 and Nov. 30 at
1:30 p.m. in Ocala.
Caregiver Services Re-
cruiting Event Caregiver Serv-
ices is hiring Licensed Practical
Nurses (LPNs), Registered
Nurses (RNs), Home Health
Aides and Certified Nursing As-



LIFE
Continued from Page D1

things to improve your status.
I know that people are in
such a rush to have things.
They feel that is a validation
-'Oh, I have this, I have that'
I was one of them. So, for me,
I found it was a time to reflect
on your character and re-
build again. It was a wonder-
ful time to realize when you
don't have certain things -
money is not coming, or
houses are not selling -
who's really in your corner"
Arvin, 47, is starting over,
too.
In 2001, he and his wife
bought a small company
that sold equipment to
power utilities and the avia-
tion industry Business
hummed until 2007, when
five big customers filed for
bankruptcy and the couple
raided their retirement and
savings accounts to keep the
enterprise afloat It sank in
2009. Now he travels five
states in a 2005 Suburban as
sales representative for a
business supplying equip-
ment to electric and gas
companies, bringing home
$50,000 to $60,000 after taxes
and travel expenses.
"Am I doing better? Yes.
But I've lost so much. I'm
starting new. I'm confident
in my ability to work hard
and do well with what I do."
Economic factors
Polls consistently find the
economy is the top concern
of voters, and Romney tends


to get an edge over Obama
when people are asked who
might do better with it
Whether that truly drives



HERZOG
Continued from Page D1

useable help, which is expe-
rience. Experience matters:
Let SCORE put that asset on


Special to the Chronicle
Capital City Bank recently hosted the Leadership Givers Appreciation Night at the Crystal Special to the Chronicle
River branch. United Way Leadership Givers are those contributorswho donates more than Wells Fargo recently kicked off its annual United Way
$1,000 a year. Capital City Bank also recently kicked off its United Way workplace cam- Workplace Campaign. The United Way of Citrus County
paigns. The United Way of Citrus County appreciates the commitment that Capital City appreciate the commitment Wells Fargo provides year after
Bank provides year after year to the organization and community. Pictured, from left, are: year to the organization and community. Pictured, from left,
Amy Meek, United Way president; Jennifer Barber, United Way director of finance and op- are: Amy Meek, United Way president; LeeAnne ORohrer,
erations; Cindy Clark, Capital City Bank market leader III AVP; and Ray Thompson, Capital service manager; and Beth Wickstrom, officer and store


City Bank president.
sistants (CNAs) on Nov. 8 from
noon to 4 p.m. at CF's Univer-
sity Center (building 41, room
112), in Ocala. Apply in person;
no appointment necessary. For
information, call 800-434-
JOBS, ext. 1145.
Computer Basics is de-
signed for those new to tech-
nology or with entry-level
computer skills. Sessions are
set for Nov. 6 and Nov. 20 at
3:30 p.m. in Chiefland and Nov.
2 and Nov. 16 at 1:30 p.m. in
Ocala.
Employ Florida Market-
place Essentials, Nail that Inter-
view and Optimal Resume
workshops take place on Nov.
15 and Nov. 29 beginning at
8:15 a.m. in Ocala. "Nail that In-
terview" workshops are also
held on Nov. 14 and Nov. 28 at
8:15 a.m. in Chiefland and Nov.
16 and Nov. 30 at 1:15 p.m. in
Inverness.
Fall Career Fair offers the
perfect opportunity for any job
seeker to meet area employers,
explore career options, learn
about Workforce Connection
services and register with Em-
ploy Florida. The career fair
takes place Nov. 15 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at CF's Learning
and Conference Center in
Lecanto.
Mobile Resource Unit
(MRU) provides job seeker



MIAMI
Continued from Page Dl

of the income goes to insur-
ance that it's hard to get
ahead," she said.
She rations health care for
herself to cut down on co-
pays. And when her daughter
needed medical attention ear-
lier this year, she found her-
self saying dueling prayers in
the hospital.
"Please don't let this cost
an arm and a leg. And please
let her be OK," Mitrani recalls
saying.
Mitrani is resigned to the
fact that her retirement won't
be as comfortable as her par-
ents'. Compared with her par-

how Americans vote is a cru-
cial question for Election
Day
Other factors often came
into play with the people
who talked to AP Republi-
cans didn't buy the Romney
campaign's portrayal of
Obama as a one-man wreck-
ing crew in economic af-
fairs. Democrats didn't see
him as a savior They all re-
alize life is more compli-
cated than that.
Beth Ashby, 38, an artist
and freelance photographer
in North Hollywood, Calif.,
is a registered Democrat
who thinks Obama is bad for
her savings. If he's re-
elected, she said, "I think
I'm going to be less likely to
set money aside in my in-
vestments. I might be safer
just storing it in the shoe
box under the bed."
Romney, she said, "seems
to have a head for business."


your balance sheet.
Citrus County SCORE is
on the campus of the Col-
lege of Central Florida in
Lecanto. Call 352-249-1236
for information. We do not
charge for our services and
we have multiple booklets


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will be considered for publica-
tion. Images taken with most cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
* Submissions about specific prices of products or
sales events are considered advertising and are not
eligible for Business Digest.


services and resources every
Monday at 10:30 a.m. at the
Bronson Library and Tuesday
at 12:30 p.m. at the Williston Li-
brary. The MRU is available the
second Wednesday at 10 a.m.
at the Town Hall in Inglis, and
the third Wednesday at 10 a.m.
at the Cedar Key Library.
Monster.com Power
Seeker Workshop: "The Best
You: On Paper, Online and In
Person" takes place on Nov. 13
from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the
College of Central Florida Klein
Conference Center. It is de-
signed to help any postsec-
ondary student stand out from
the crowd in today's tough labor
market.
"Navigating the Career
Fair" on Nov. 5 from 2-4 p.m.
also targets the special needs


ents' generation, Mitrani be-
lieves Americans today are a
bit more materialistic and
might need to ratchet back ex-
pectations a bit. There's evi-
dence this is happening:
Consumers have been saving
and reducing debts more, and
spending less, than before the
financial crisis.
Still, Mitrani sees some rea-
son for optimism. The stock
market is coming back: The
Standard & Poor's 500 stock
index is up more than 12 per-
cent this year. And slowly,
clients are beginning to in-
quire about using her services
in 2013.
"They're asking for propos-
als and planning expansions,"
she says. "They're starting to
talk about the future."

But he's turned her off on
environmental issues, abor-
tion and "some of his com-
ments involving women."
Obama or a third-party un-
known will get her vote.
Oil boom
Dave Hinnaland, 51, a
fourth-generation sheep
and cattle rancher who co-
owns the family's 17,000
working acres outside Cir-
cle, Mont., simply seems
hard-wired to vote for a Re-
publican president. As the
national economy sank, the
local economy shot ahead
thanks to booming oil pro-
duction in the Bakken oil
fields to the east. The days
of $300-a-month house
rentals, when people's pick-
ups were more expensive
than their homes, are over.
"When this area was set-
tled 100 or more years ago,
there were people who took


on business help.


Dr Frederick J Herzog is
immediate past chairman
of Citrus SCORE. He can
be reached via email at:
therzog@tampabayrrcom.


of postsecondary students and
focuses on helping prepare for
the Fall Career Fair as well as
other recruiting events.
"Navigating the New World
of Work" two-day workshop
takes place Nov. 13 to 14, Nov.
20 to 21 and Nov. 27 to 28 in
Ocala beginning with sessions
at 8:15 a.m. for new job seek-
ers and those with barriers to
employment and at 1:15 p.m.
for displaced professionals. It is
also offered Nov. 6 to 7 and
Nov. 20 to 21 at 8:15 a.m. in
Chiefland and Nov. 8 to 9 at
1:15 p.m. in Inverness. The
workshops cover how to iden-
tify abilities and transferable
skills, job search strategies/tar-
geted resume development, in-
terviewing skills/follow up and
how to work effectively with


a chance and moved out
here," he said. "They
worked hard and were able
to build something for them-
selves and their families."
So his message to all in
Washington: "Let us have the
means and options to chart
our own path. Don't ham-
string us with rules and reg-
ulations. And let people that
are willing to go out to work
take a chance, let them have
the opportunity to do it. We
don't need a big hand hover-
ing over our head telling us
what we can and cannot do."
Warning signs
If the recession spared oil
and gas lands, Kaufmann, of
Kunkletown, Pa., saw it com-
ing in the gutter trade,
specifically when he started
noticing nearly all of his cus-
tomers' checks were drawn
on home-equity credit lines.
"How long do you think


manager.
their own Workforce Connec-
tion placement specialist.
"Navigating the New World
of Work" (Community Work-
shop) offers many of the high-
lights of the two-day sessions
but in a two-hour format. The
condensed workshops take
place in Citrus County on Nov.
5 at 2 p.m. at the Coastal Re-
gion Library in Crystal River,
Nov. 13 at 10 a.m. at the Cen-
tral Ridge Library in Beverly
Hills, and on Nov. 14 at 4 p.m.
at the Homosassa Library. They
will also be held in Marion
County on Nov. 8 at 4 p.m. at
the Belleview Library, Nov. 13
at 2 p.m. the Forest Library in
Ocklawaha, Nov. 14 at 10 a.m.
at the Dunnellon Library, Nov.
16 and Nov. 30 at 9 a.m. at the
Silver Springs Shores Re-
source Center, Nov. 29 at 4
p.m. at Taylor College in Belle-
view, and Nov. 29 at 5:30 p.m.
at the Forest Community Cen-
ter in Ocklawaha.
Open Resume Labs are in
Ocala every Monday through
Friday at 9 a.m. and also at 2
p.m. Monday, except Nov. 12,
22 and 23, when all centers are
closed for the holidays. Drop-
ins are welcome and no addi-
tional registration is required
but space is limited.
Retooling and Refueling for
Veterans Three-day workshop


this is going to last?" he re-
called asking his wife. "I
said, 'I just did a home-
owner, the wife lost her job,
and without her job, he can't
afford the mortgage.' That's
when we started buckling
down. I said, 'You know
what? It's time.'
"What happened is, the
banks overextended all
these people. People were
buying clothes, putting in in-
ground pools, putting gut-
ters up where they didn't
need to be replaced. I was
putting gutters up when
people didn't need gutters. I
would tell them. But they
wanted to change the colors.
You ride by those houses
now and they either have
three feet of grass or the
windows are boarded up."
His gross income has
been halved since 2006 and
2007. No cruises since he
turned 60 five years ago.


starts Nov. 6 at 8 a.m. and pro-
vides tools and strategies to
help U.S. military veterans stay
focused and successful during
career transitions. Participants
must meet eligibility require-
ments and must register by re-
ferral from their Local Veterans
Employment Representative
(LVER). To learn more or regis-
ter, call 352-732-1700, ext. 1430
or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1430.
Targeted Resume Work-
shops Designed for those who
have already created basic re-
sumes and are ready for ad-
vanced resume development to
highlight skills on a job-specific
basis. Workshops take place
Nov. 1,6, 15, and 29 at 8:30
a.m. in Ocala with sessions for
professionals on Nov. 6, 13, 20
and 27 also in Ocala; and on
Nov. 13 and Nov. 27 at 8:30
a.m. in Chiefland and Nov. 13,
20 and 27 at 1:30 p.m. in
Inverness.
Workforce Connection's one-
stop resource centers are in
Citrus County at 1103 E. Inver-
ness Blvd., Inverness; in Levy
County at 109 N.W. Third Ave.,
Chiefland; and in Marion
County at 2703 NE 14th St.,
Ocala. To sign up for any of the
workshops, call 352-291-9552
or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1410 or
register online at https://www.
timecenter.com/wcworkshops.


Family circle
Cruises aren't on the hori-
zon for Cristian Eusebio, 20,
either. He makes $10.50 an
hour as a bank teller in
Springdale, Ark. He lives at
home with a father who
works at a food-packaging
plant that's been cutting
staff and a mother who
found work at a warehouse
store. The family refinanced
before their home mortgage
ballooned, skipped a vaca-
tion to pay down a debt and
pinched pennies.
"It could have gotten
worse, but it got better be-
cause my mom got a job, my
sister got a job and then
later in high school, I got a
job," he said. "It has gotten
better, but I think it's just be-
cause more of us are work-
ing. Some of us pay one bill.
The other one pays an-
other."


9301 W. Ft. Island Trail
PLANTATION Crystal River
.IL on Crystal River www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 D3








D4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012










Classifieds


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


iK^^ ^aBl^Bh .iC ," '"*" ,. "" ^'a.
,-.


- ':*. .. f ..
'RI - .-It"





~ .


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Man in his 60's
would like to find Lady
who Love outdoors
(352) 382-5661







11/6 Vote first! Then visit
PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
Daulsfurnitureonline.com



Cleaner Wanted
Timely and Accurate.
Must pass background
check. Transportation
needed. P/T position
302-6418 LV MSG


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th-Wheel with
slides. Screened gazebo
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441



GMC
2003 Yukon SLT
Exc cond New tires. Well
maintained.108,000mi
Load w/Onstar
$10,250
(207)-730-2636


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^* ** **


Mas. Bd Rm w/Ba. Pool
$450/ref's. 352-249-7804
Grounds Keeper &
Handyman
40 hrs weekly. Must have
valid drivers lic.
Drug free work place
(352) 628-7175
HOMOSASSA
3/2 $750mo. First, last
+ sec. 352-476-1080
or 352-476-0174
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, 1st & Sec.
$850/mo. 352-476-2860
LANDOU
86' Pontoon boat 18FT
Great shape. Motor is a
28 special. $1200
321-303-6453
LECANTO
1 b/1ba, furn. Handyman
cottage porch, on 5 acr.
pking, quiet, water &trash
p/up,incl. pets ok, ref's
$450mo. Blind Box#1812
CC Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
PAINTING,
Wall & Ceiling Repairs,
Carpentry. Call Doug.
Ins. 352-270-6142
SECRETARY DESK
Solid Pine, Nice. $75.00
352-513-4027, leave
mess.
STAMPING UP Art
stamps $30.00, two com-
plete set sets plus misc
stamps 352-513-4027,
leave mess.
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558
TREATMENT
COORDINATOR
F/T financial/treatment
coordinator for a very
busy dental office. Daily
and monthly bonus in-
centives. Friendly atmos-
phere and great benefits.
Dental or sales back-
ground a plus but not
necessary. Please fax
cover letter and resume
to 352-873-2002
VENDORS NEEDED
Looking for vendors to
sell craft related items
at our parking lotsale,
November 17th.
Space is limited so
book early. Space is
$10. and tables are
$10. For more info.
pls call 352-637-4200.
Also looking for
talented instructors.



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


IFrei l:Msi *.-i Siffl S .c I bsit w cronceoic



-eSrcso -tDmstcM -dica Pofss -onaSal -s e^^ I-bGeera


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers, Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



2 Free Cats
3 yrs. old, Neutered
Male House pets, never
outside, gray & orange
(352) 628-0214
3 Kittens
6 weeks old
Litter trained & have
shots 352-682-3631
BENGAL TIGER CAT
10 yr old male, very affec-
tionate, neutere d and well
cared for.(352) 794-6499
or (732) 674-2678
Fertilizer Horse Manure
Mixed with pine shavings.
Great for gardens. You
load and haul.
352-628-9624
FREE CATS & DOGS
To Good Home
(352) 287-9410
FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy access
Pine Ridge
352-746-3545
Hound dog, "Sammy" 7
mo. old, 30 Ibs.,
brown/white and black,
good dog, with nice tem-
perment, attention
loving,shots, and micro-
chipped free to a good
home
(352) 201-5017
OneToilet American
Standard 1970's style
Color Yellow
352-564-0540
Call after 10 a.m. please




SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
1.5 mi. E. from Hwy 41
on Eden Dr., Inverness
Watermelons, Mustard
Greens, Squash,
8:30a-5p, Closed Sun.
352-726-6378




BENGAL CAT
she is brown/beige
w/large spots. Will come
to the name KitKat, lost
in the vicinity of Citrus
Hills, in Gilcrest. needs
medication.
Reward offered
352-613-4908
Long Haired BIk Cat w/
white undercoat. Large
Male 2 yrsold. Neutered
and chipped. Tom-tom
was lost on 10/21 in Bev-
erly Hills. Has been seen
on N. Columbus St.
(352) 527-1519


on Saturday evening at
Homosassa Springs
Haunted House. MANY
FAMILY PHOTOS. If
found pls call
(352) 726-2338
LOST DOG
mixed breed, light brown
w/some white, approx
451bs, 2 yr old male, shy,
sweet, had red leash on
lost on April Court, Floral
City 352-287-0722
Lost Male Cat
Orange & White w/ or-
ange mustache lyr old,
neutered, chipped
Alice Point off of Oak
Lawn (352) 228-7763
RedChorkie
Yorkie/Chihuahua mix
lost in vicinity of 5th St,
Crystal River
(Hunter Springs)
Please Call
352-563-5986
Small Black Kitten,with
white circle around
nose, 4 white feet,
Heritage Acres
Homosassa
(352) 621-0632



Found Cat,
Young Multi Color,
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 527-2327



Christmas Decorations
are Missing. Please help
make our residents
have a memorable
holiday season,
by donating
Decoration and Trees
to BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W NORVELL
BRYANT HWY Lecanto




TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444
WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER
Is now accepting
applications for
P/T employment.Child
care work exp required
Apply M-F, 12pm-2pm,
No Phone Calls.



SECRETARY
Office assistant/secretary
needed for real estate of-
fice. Ambitious, quick
learner with the ability to
multi-task. Real estate
experience preferred.
Fast paced work environ-
ment providing quality
service. Come be a part
of our awesome team!
Please send resume to
aoc.chon@gmail.com.


S. Working
independently?

.- j* Workin with a
a success ul company?

SCIT uR U .S COU NTY Y


HIRONICLEE
www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201

Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Do you have what it takes?

* Attention to detail

* 365 Days/Year

* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented

* Flexible under pressure

* Positive Thinker

* Hard and smart worker

* Keen sense of urgency


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966









ANGELS
SEEKING ANGELS
Experienced
caregivers
for private duty
in elderly clients' homes.
Seeking AM/PM, weekends
and 24-hr help. References
i 1h 1 1 . .... I
CNApreferred.
Call Visiting Angels
( M-F 8-5
1(352) 620-8484


CNA
11pm-7am Full time
and PRN
Apply in person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100

F/T Medical Office
Position

billing and collections
exp a plus. Enjoys fast
paced environment.
Fax: Resume
352-746-5904


CITRUS MEMORIAL


HOT JOBS!
Currently seeking an
w Employee
Health Nurse and
w Home Health
Director of Nursing.
EOE.
Please applv online:
http://www.citrusmh
.com/careers/

INSURANCE
VERIFICATION
SPECIALIST

TMC, a company
committed to service
excellence, has a full
time position availa-
ble for an Insurance
Verification Specialist
at our Homosassa/
Sugarmill location.
Candidate must have
2+yrs verifying
medical billing exp.
and good communi-
cation skills. We
offer competitive
compensation and
benefits including
medical, dental, life
and PTO.
Please apply online @
www.therapymgmt
cornn

*SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug/Tobacco
Free Workplace

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

MEDICAL
BILLING
SPECIALIST
TMC, a company
committed to service
excellence, has a full
time position availa-
ble for a Medical/
Billing Specialist at
our Homosassa/
Sugarmill location.
Candidate must have
2+ yrs medical billing
exp. and good com-
munication skills.
We offer competitive
compensation and
benefits including
medical, dental, life
and PTO.
Please apply online @
www.therapymgmt
cornn


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

Nursing Instructor
Master's Preferred
or Bachelor's degree
in Nursing.
Active RN License
or eligible to be li-
censed in the state of
Florida.
Three years or more
related work experi-
ence or a combina-
tion of work and
teaching experience.
Must have experi-
ence working with
computers and tech-
nology to deliver or
support instruction.
Proven strong com-
munication skills and
the ability to work
with people from di-
verse backgrounds
and experiences.
* Proven academic
understanding.
* Able to work a
flexible schedule.
* Active community
connection to assist
students with employ-
ment opportunities.
Qualified applicants
can submit their
resume to our Human
Resource Department
at employment@
taylorcollege.edu


of Citrus County

RN/LPN
11 p-7a Fulltime & PRN
APPLY IN PERSON
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100

RN's LPN's CNA's
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
www.
nurse-temps.comrn
352-344-9828

RN's, LPN's, CNA's
ALL SHIFTS, FT &PT
Health Care
Experience Preferred.
ACTIVITIES
COORDINATOR
With ALF Experience
DIETARY AIDES

COOKS

WAITRESSES
With ALF Experience
APPLY WITHIN
HETITFFNTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Cir
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility

THERAPIST/
PSYCH NURSE
for a busy psychiatric
practice, will work p/t
initially pls rsvp fax
352-726-7582

TREATMENT
COORDINATOR
F/T financial/treatment
coordinator for a very
busy dental office. Daily
and monthly bonus in-
centives. Friendly atmos-
phere and great benefits.
Dental or sales back-
ground a plus but not
necessary. Please fax
cover letter and resume
to 352-873-2002




Fire Plans
Examiner
Announcement
#12-65
Reviews develop-
ment and fire pro-
tection plans for new
and existing buildings
for compliance with
applicable codes
and ordinances.
Four years work
experience in fire
protection, construc-
tion, architecture or
a related field or any
combination of train-
ing and experience
that demonstrates
ability to perform
duties of position.
Beginning pay
$17.85 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online. This
job is open until filled.
EOE/ADA


Experienced
Accounting Clerk
Bookkeeping, payroll
Tax prep. exp. a plus.
Please Send Resume:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1811P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429



FL LICENSED
THERAPIST
NEEDED
PT-FL lic. therapist to
work with juvenile sex
offenderclients. SO
Exp required. Please
fax resume to Brandi
Smith at
352-379-2843



Florida Yards and
Neighborhoods
Coordinator
Announcement
# 12-64
Professional, techni-
cal position providing
leadership for devel-
opment, implemen-
tation, delivery and
evaluation of a
comprehensive
water conservation
program in coopera-
tion with the Univer-
sity of Florida, Florida
Yards and Neighbor-
hoods Program and
Southwest Florida
Water Management
District (SWFWM D).
Funding from
SWFWMD is reviewed
annually. Bachelor's
degree required.
Ability to design,
teach and conduct
community based
educational pro-
grams. Must possess a
current valid Florida
Driver license.
Beginning salary
$1,107.03 B/W.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, Nov. 9, 2012
PREVIOUS
APPLICANTS FOR
THE PROGRAM EXTEN-
SION AGENT FYN
NEED NOT REAPPLY.
EOE/ADA



Library
Communications
Facilitator
Announcement
# 12-66
Professional work
in managing the
marketing, public
relations and com-
munity outreach for a
public library system.
Bachelor's degree
in public relations,
communications,
marketing, design
or related field.
Substantial computer
knowledge and
experience.
Starting Pay
$1,107.03 bi-weekly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461 to
apply online by
Friday, November 16,
2012 EOE/ADA







BREAKFAST COOK
Apply in person at
206W. Tompkins St.
between 1pm and 2pm







AC SALES/TECHS
WANTED

Experience preferred.
Benefits, $50K+
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427



Now Hiring
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$8501wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460


NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460




Cabinet
Manufacturing
Experienced shop
help needed. Must
have laminating &
building exp. reliable
transportation
PT with FT Potential
Salary based on
experience contact
DEEM CABINETS
3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave
Homosassa

Exp Granite Counter top
Fabricator

Apply in person at
1577 N Florida Av.
Hernando, Fl
(352) 302-1543







RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough, Trim,
& Service
& OFFICE PERSON
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit 4
Wildwood




Grounds Keeper &
Handyman
40 hrs weekly. Must have
valid drivers lic.
Drug free work place
(352) 628-7175

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

LOOKING FOR
PERSON
Girl Friday responsi-
bility from House-
keeping to Fin. Assist.
Must like animals
Avail. if necessary
7 days week.
Live in or Not
(352) 522-1109
11am-6pm Only

SERVICE WORKER
-PUBLIC
SERVICES
The City of Dunnellon
is accepting
applications for the
position of Service
Worker. Duties
include but are not
limited to: tree trimm-
ing and removal,
road and right of way
repair work, lawn
maintenance and
landscaping. Basic
carpentry and heavy
equipment operation
skills a plus. Eligible
candidates must
have a valid Florida
Driver's License.
Must obtain a job de-
scription and submit
a City of Dunnellon
Employment
Application package
to the City Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431,
(352) 465-8500.
Package can be
obtained at
www.dunnellon.org.
Electronic
applications/resumes
not accepted.
Starting pay is $9.17
per hour. Application
deadline 11/16/12.
Positions will remain
open until filled.
E.O.E., DFWP.


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



H Hl



Cleaner Wanted
Timely and Accurate.
Must pass background
check. Transportation
needed. P/T position
302-6418 LV MSG




12 ACRES
PRIME REAL ESTATE
8 MOBILE HOMES
Good Income r
Lots of possibilities.
Own. Finan., Reason-
able down payment
(352) 212-6182




STORAGE OFFICE
SPACE
30ft x 25ft
mini-warehouse $180/mo
10ft x 20ft storage unit
$55/mo
10ft x 25ft storaGE UNIT
$65/mo
25ft x 25ft office $400/mo
Phone 352-302-1935



Antique electric lamp
large glass tinted shade,
no chips or cracks $150
(352) 795-0830
Antique Small nursing
rocker
$75.00
(352) 795-0830
Antique Woven Straight
back chair $50.00
(352) 795-0830
CHINA CLOSET
ANTIQUE Vintage deco,
glass door shelves,call
for photo. $100.00.
352-513-4473
SMALL ELECTRIC IRON
inches long, works fine
$25.00 firm 3523821191


Colectble


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^* ** * *


FULL-TIME POSITIONS














BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE




*1112-40011DN


SINGLE COPY



CONTRACTOR



WANTED

Are YouI

Interested In:


* Beina your own
boss?

* Increasing potential
earnings.

* Growing your
exclusive area?


Requirements:

* Ability to work overnight
* Covered Truck, Van or SUV
Clean Driving Record
Credit & Background Check
* Access to your own help
* Lifting and physical ability
* Team Player
* Must have a back-up plan
* Computer & Internet Access


Deliver to stores and coin racks.
Experience preferred but not required.









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRYER $100 with trade
in of broken one. 90 day
warranty. delivery extra
call/text 352-364-6504
DRYER, Whirlpool, exc
condition, hardly used,
$99.00 (352) 464-1591
GE REFRIGERATOR
White. 18" Cu In.
Some rust by hinge.
Works great. $100
732-977-2616
Range Electric LG,
Electric Stainless, Glass
Top Range w/ convec-
tion oven, less than
2 yrs. old $350.
(352) 794-3252
Refrigerator
GE, dble doors, black,
$350
Gas Stove, GE
$100
(352) 270-5242
REFRIGERATOR
Small white apt. size
$50.00 352-513-4473
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Stackable Washer/Dryer
good condition $100
(352) 270-5242
WASHER $100 with
trade in of your old one.
90 day warranty. delivery
extra call/text
352-364-6504
WASHER AND DRYER
Whirlpool Washer and
Dryer Set White,
$125.00 for set. Inquires
please call 352-794-6219
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each, Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352-263-7398




COMPUTER DESK
With drawer. Blonde
wood. Good Condition.
$60
352-613-0529
LATERAL FILE
For Sale Like new! $195
352-527-3552
TABLE 96"X30"
Metal legs fold under.
Faux wood-grain top has
some marks. $20
732-977-2616




HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS

11/9 Kit/Bath/Laun. Sale
prev. @ 4, auction @ 6
Sat, 11/10, gen. merch.
Sun11/11,tailgate/box
lots, starts @1pm
WE BUY ESTATES
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389


Craftsman Radial Arm
saw 9"
with lower Drawer
cabinet & 7 blades
$125.
(352) 637-9694
CRAFTSMEN Diamond
Plated locking tool box
(for full size trucks)
w/ bedliner "Like New"
352-212-5143



50 Inch Samsung Plasma
TV
and Magnavox Blu Ray
Player. Asking $500.00
For Both or OBO. Call
726-7128.
AIWA STEREO
1pc w/dble cassette, 160
watts, good condition
$75 o/b/o 352-794-3768
Charbroiled BBQ Gnll,
propane, excellent condi-
tion. Bought at Big Lots
$100 Firm
(352) 794-3768
COLOR TV 27 IN.
Cable ready.
Good picture $30.00
(352)513-4473
COLOR TV. 21 IN.
Works good.
Cable ready $25.00
352-513-4473
GLASS TV STAND
Black frame 55"W x
22"D x 20"H Like New
Call or text for pic $95.00
352-746-0401
SONY TV 28"
w/quality oak wood
stand like new
$235 3-5-527-3831
TV 32" SANYO
black, good condition
$85 o/b/o 352-794-3768
TV 32" SHARP
Silver, good condition
$85 o/b/o 352-794-3768



DELL COMPUTER
Desktop Windows XP
w/keyboard & mouse,
Outlook, Word, Excel $60
352-382-3650
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
Gateway Laptop
good condition
$140
(352) 949-2893
HP PRINTER
Color Laserjet CP1215,
barely used & exc cond.
$65.00
Call (352)464-1591



2 Black Stools,
w/ detachable leg
extentions $40.
Large TV Armoire w/
slide in doors, could be
change computer armoire
(352) 897-4196


2 END TABLES
Maple with Brass pulls on
drawer. Great condition.
$120.00 for both.
Call (352) 464-1591
11/6 Vote first! Then visit
PAUL'S FURNITURE &
THRIFT SHOP. Open
every Tues-Sat at at 9:00am
Homosassa 628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
6ft Custom Couch
& Chair, off white floral
$295 for both
352-794-3907
Beautiful Natural wood
Hutch Cupboard, 72" tall,
38" wide, 18" deep, $125
(352) 563-5955
BEDROOM FURNITURE
King Size,
Headbrd,Footbrd,
2 nightstands (3 drwr)
Mahogany $180.00
Call (352)464-1591
Bowflex Extreme
All cables, pulleys and
Power rods in perfect
working cond. Complete
with bent lat bars, squat
bar, leg attachment and
instruct, man. $250
John 352-527-0716
BROYHILL 68" BUFFET
Sideboard, bamboo motif
$200 Lg. Coffee Table
four storage compart-
ments $100
352-628-3949
BROYHILL
NIGHTSTAND
w /3 drws, maple (med)
Vintage, great condition.
$95.00 (352)464-1591
CHINA CABINET Solid
Wood beautiful Pecan
Finish. Glass framed
doors/sides,mirrored
lighted back,bottom draw-
ers,$495. 352-382-0069
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
Computer Desk
great condition, $25
352-249-7283
Dining Room Table
$100, 2 Indonesian
buffet tables $80 ea.
great condition
352-249-7283
Dining room table,
Cherry wood, 4ft,
no chairs $39 cash
(352) 419-6719
EASY CHAIR
SURRY COLLECTION
Living room, beautiful
piece of furniture. $25.00
352-513-4473
ETHAN ALLEN
DROP-LEAF COFFEE
TABLE Antique Pine
$50.00 352-382-4911
GLASS TABLE 60"x36",
4 chairs (blue/pink
pattern) Excellent Cond.
$100
Inverness 732-977-2616
Glass Table
with 4 chairs $100.
Love Seat $100.
Day Bed $100
Ask about other items!
(352) 270-5242


Kimball
Console Piano
$350.
(352) 726-3989
King Size mattress &
box spring, like new
clean, $125. obo, Oak
China Cabinet, good
condition $80. obo
(352) 422-1060
KITCHEN CHAIRS (6)
Light wood, exc condition,
Amish style, spindle back
w/ contour seat.
$160.00
Call (352)464-1591
Leather Sofa & Chair,
Wood coffee table, 2yrs
old in excellent condition
paid $2200
asking $700
(352)697-5530
LIVING ROOM SET
2 PC microfiber taupe
loveseat & sofa
mlnt/exc condition, mov-
ing, must sell $550 OBO
(352) 586-8713
LOVESEAT/MATCHING
CHAIR. Light pastel
colors, no stains or rips.
$75.00 or OBO
815-275-6330
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
MULTICOLOR SOFA
Very clean-$100.00
352-257-5722 for details.
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
ROCKER RECLINER
Clean, and in working
condition.
$80.00 352-257-5722
for details.
SECRETARY DESK
Solid Pine, Nice. $75.00
352-513-4027, leave
mess.
TV STAND Black frame
Glass top & shelves
55"W x 22"Deep x 20"H
Like new call or text for
pic $95.00 352-746-0401
TWO CHERRY END
TABLES, need slight
refinish, dk marble tops
$95 firm 352-794-3768
TWO TWIN BEDS
w/mattress & springs
bkcase hdbd, two 3
drawer dressers & night-
stand, white, linens incl.
$200. 352-382-0608
USED QUEEN
MATTRESS Clean-
no boxsprnng-$80.00
352-257-5722 for details
WICKER BEDROOM
SET inc. triple dresser
two (2) drawer night-
stands, dresser mirror
queen headboard
$650 for all
352-746-2329
WICKER SWEETHEART
Single Headboard
White (can be sprayed
any color) $20.00
352-513-4473


CLASSIFIED




Full size, good cond.
$65.00 352-513-4473
WINDSOR BLONDE
WOOD CHAIRS
(3 matching).
$25.00 ea or 3 for $70.00
352-513-4473
WINDSOR SLIDING
ROCKER Blonde wood.
Good cond. $35.00
352-513-4473



30" MURRAY RIDING
MOWER with bagger
$600.00. 352-746-2434
JOHN DEERE
2 bag/bagger for rding
mower, like new, ong
$325, sell for $165
352-563-5387
Murray Riding Lawn
Mower 30" 11HP
with bagger.
Very good condition.
$400 352-465-2853
SEARS LAWN
TRACTOR
42inch mower, 17.5hp
asking $450
352-746-2329
SEARS RIDING
LAWNMOWER 42"
16.5hp, good mower
needs idler pulley $175
352-613-4002



BOSTON FERN
16.5 ft x4.5 high
beautiful! $125 firm
352-621-0778
TWO GOLDEN RAIN
TREES, 12ft tall in large
containers $40 each
Citrus Springs
352-489-3120



CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday & Sun. 9a-3p
HUGE SALE guitars, toys,
office furn., antique tbl.
electron., tools, collec.
452 SE Paradise Pt. Rd.
INVERNESS
Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. 8am
MOVING SALE **
Everything Must Go!
9425 Beech Circle
LECANTO
Sat Nov 3rd, Sun Nov 4th
MOVING SALE
Hoosier Cab, furn, riding
& push mower, 15ft boat
w/trailer,.70hp outboard
runs great $800, fibgl
dingy, jeep, nice hshld,
5280 W Shaker Place
Cinnamon Ridge
518-361-0951






WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944


BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING
SIZE 5 PANTS, SHIRTS
& JACKETS $40
352-613-0529




!!!!!225/70 R19.5!!!!!
Great tread!! Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****255/70 R17*****
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
2 AIR COMPRESSORS
1. Extreme contractor
roofer series 125 psi, 8
gal. dual valve. 5.5 hsp
Honda $425
2.Power train roofers
model 150 psi, dual cyl-
inder head, 5.5 hsp
Honda, 8 gal $475
352-613-2944
40 PIECE SOCKET SET
in the box $20.00
352-382-1191
50 hp Outboard Motor
Pts, fits Force, Mercury,
Tohatso $90, Lg. Crafts-
men toolbox 11 drawer
$110 315-466-2268
2-R/C ENGINES
2-$35.00 Each. .46 Size
352-503-2792
Beautiful New F/Q aqua
silk Bedding set/ incl.
bedspread skirt, 2 shams
w/embroidered peacocks
and single window treat-
ment, 3 dec. pillows $150
Full Size mattress + box
spring, rarely used $60
352-382-2906
CAT LITTER BOX
LARGE brand new paid
$195.00 has electrical
problem $45.00 takes
care 3 cats 352 382 1191
Chaise Lounge, Honda
Generator, 52" TV RCA
Glass coffee/end tables,
Roybia weed eater,
Lots of Chrismas Items
Call for Info 897-4681
COMFORTER SET
HANNAH MONTANA
FULL INCL SHEETS &
PILLOW CASES $40
352-613-0529
COMPANION TOOL
AND WRENCH SET
brand new, paid $169.
great buy $70.
352-382-1191
CRAFTSMAN POWER
DRILL brand new
paid $149. Sell $70.
352-382-1191
GLASS TOP 40 X 40 X
1/4" Beveled Glass for
top of table $20 call Ruth
352-382-1000
HORSE STEP STOOL
Heavy duty plastic two
step for mounting
horse $15. (new cost
$50.) 352-270-3909


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 D5



^ MPLI PRINTER fTRP6 by -3f2 MINICASTER LAP
works good needs cable like new, nice boat cover STEEL,
10.00 352-382-1191 $45.00 352-382-1191 Great "STEEL" Sound
Kenmore Washer & White Maytag w/extras $85
Dryer $275. Washer & Dryer 352-601-6625
Couch & Dining Table Excellent condition
$300. $400.
(352) 341-3300 Celina Hills
(352) 637-3673
missionincitrus.com Noritake China
Citrus County's Only ;B si ,, service for 8, includes
Emergency Homeless service pieces,&
& Veteran's Shelters 24 matching goblets,
Now 80-100 a night Berkel Slicer, Like New Great for Holidays!
includes 18 children 14" Knife, /2 HP Motor $270 cash
EMERGENCY FUNDS Lightly Used, Cost SMW(352) 503-7875
& Other needs are $1,850 Asking $900. Two Lazyboy Carlyle
nee5ded-at4th8tme. Also Deli Meat Display High Leg Recliners
352-794-3825 Case $200. Cherry Wood Arms &
PICNIC TABLE (352) 628-2167 Burgundy fabric $100
5FOOTLONG . each or $150 forpair
GOOD CONDITION Inquiries please call
$85 E i m n 352-212-9507
352-613-0529 CAR LIFTI
POOL CLOCK look out at For back of vehicle. Will
your pool and see what work for wheelchair or
temp it is $3.00 scooter $50 PILATES REFORMER
352-382-1191 (352) 5635611 PLATES REFORMER
R/C AIRPLANE Sig LIFT CHAIR $50.00 352-513-4027,
Fazer-5 servo's. $75.00 Light beige, 2 mo old and leave mess.
352-503-2792 barely used. Originally Pro-Form 695LT Tread
ROUND CONCRETE $2000; asking $800. mill, likenew, 2 yrs old,
PICNIC TABLE (352) 563-5611 commercial or personal
W/2 benches$150 MEDICAL BOOKS, for use, $500 obo, serious
homemade quilt tops nursing school."math for inquiries only
2 for $50 352-795-7254 meds",Drug calculations (352) 302-5468
SEA NYMP BOAT 15FT process and problems" RECUMBENT EXER
Steel hull with "V" bottom $10.00 each 513-4473 BIKE $90.00
$400 352-382-4511 Portable/Traveling 352-382-3895


SEWING MACHINE
New Home Model 535,
w/ case to be portable. In
pristine condition. $60.00
Call (352)464-1591
STAMPING UPArt
stamps $30.00, two com-
plete set sets plus misc
stamps 352-513-4027,
leave mess.
Submersible pump
2 wire & 3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
THOMAS KINKADE
6FT PULL-UP TREE
comompletely decorated
$75.00 352-527-1399
Tires
225/55 R16
Great tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
Ultra Kitchen Aid 300
watt w/ attmnts;
Cuisinart Food Proces-
sor, Queen Pasta Maker
w/ attmnts & motor
$275(352) 746-5514
Upright Freezer
&
Bowflex Extreme
$200. obo
(352) 419-5231
VENDORS NEEDED
Looking for vendors to
sell craft related items
at our parking lotsale,
November 17th.
Space is limited so
book early. Space is
$10. and tables are
$10. For more info.
pls call 352-6374200.
Also looking for
talented instructors.


wheelchair; 3 wheeled
walker with hand
brakes $150 for both
(352) 746-5514
WALKER
3 wheel fold-up
with brakes. $45
352-601-0766



1 Roll of 40 Liberty
Nickels $50
352-476-6885
1 Roll of 50 Indian Head
Pennies(Cents) $50
352-476-6885
3 Nice "Morgan"
Silver Dollars
$100
352-476-6885
10 Nice Mercury Dimes
$30.00
352-476-6885
10 U.S. Proof Sets
$100
352-476-6885
50 Rolls of Wheat Cents
$100
Call 352-476-6885
BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying sterl-
ing silver flatware and
US silver coins
(352) 601-7074



COMBO BASS AMP 20+
WATTS YOUR CHOICE
OF AMPEG BA-10B OR
ACOUSTIC B20 $50
352-601-6625


2 FLY RODS W/REELS 6
FT $35 both OBO.
2 vintage cane poles 3
pc $40 both OBO.
352-220-4074
2 RIFLES Remmington
700 30.6 Cal., $700 &
T/C Muzzle Loader
45 Cal. $300.
Both S/S, scope sling &
Case (352) 795-8628
4 x 8 Utility Trailer
2 ft. sides
$300
(352) 795-8628
12' JOHN BOAT
aluminum,3 seats,
with oarlocks.
$100.00 352-341-3842
12' FIBERGLASS
CANOE square stern,
12'6" long, 2'6" beam,
suitable for small motor.
$50.00 352-341-3842
ABU GARCIA
COMMODORE ROD
11.6 ft heavy action w/
master spinning reel $60
OBO 352-220-4074
AGU GARCIA
CONOLON 300 ROD 8 ft
olympic 1075 7.6 ft,
Silstar pt 70 7ft Sammurai
6 ft $45.for all 220-4074
AK 47 ARSENAL SGL21
w/red dot scope
$775 Bushmaster M4
gas piston w/access &
red dot sight $875
352-613-4002
Aluminum Dog Box
for a Ford Pickup.Two 18'
Galvanized tree stands.
call 352-220-4289


-esma


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Retired nurse to pro-
vide care in your home
for individual w/ special
needs. (352) 895-7634





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERI-
ENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3517


Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VIRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Repair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352) 949-2292




Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
NATURE COAST
CLEANING
Res/Comm, No Time
Wasted 352-564-3947


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



YOGA Basics/Flow
classes.$7/class/person
Monday 6 pm. Call
412-721-7332 for info.


Bath
Complete Renovation
Kitchen countertop, tile,
tub to shower Lic#37801
(352) 422-3371
**-A***
The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
352-563-9824, 228-7320
FALL CLEAN-UP
lawns, leaves, bushes
hauling, pressure-
washing 352-726-9570



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

PAINTING,
Wall & Ceiling Repairs,
Carpentry. Call Doug.
Ins. 352-270-6142





MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300






Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


#1 Employment source is


vvvwww.chronicleonline.com


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


IREMODEIN


GENERAL g
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians I
ER0015377

352621124


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
S SmaLL Carpentry

Screening
Clean Dryer

Afforduale & Dependable
Experience lifelong
S352.344-0905
S cell' 400-1722
red Lic.#37761


tistitoh to your existing yard A R F I
_ 0 pool or planVROOFING
something Call th "/1eakusteYs"
S. completely new! Free Written Estimate
"Often ated, $
never dupicate $ 100 O FF

l.ll*l'lildi.J:]l I Any Re-Roof
YOURINTERLOCKING BRICKPAVE PECIALIST Must present coupon at timecontractis signed
Lic./ins. CCCO57537 D4M

II POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 35240031881


CARPET & LW
*lL UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

S n Furniture
Specializing in: C(leaned for
Carpet Stretching FREE Ask
Carpet Repair Howl
352-282-1480 cell w
352-547-1636 office
L Free In Home Estimates f
Li, & Ins LifetmeWarranty U





WINDOW

We (ean Windows and Whole Lot More'
*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

I FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers


Grout Painting
Residential &
o I< ''j- Commercial

586-1816 746-9868





BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce -Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estmates
352.465-6079 a-


Royce Green's

Floor C (are Services

Clean, Strip, Wax, Seal
Refinish
Tile, Terrazzo, Marble, Wood,
(arpet

Maintenance contractss
Lkensed & lInsured
O (352)344-2132


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.

352-621-088
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextaluml3@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED







TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090


I


II


I









D6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails, $3000 Per Acre
352 634-4745
Club Car Golf Cart e
reconditioned by manu- *
facturer 2010, new
batteries, side curtain,
ext. top, seats 4, exc.
cond. must sell $2450.
352-527-3125

Concealed Weapons * 1A
Permit Course Tell that spi
DAN'S GUN ROOM person
(352) 726-5238 Happy Biri
with a classifi
Golf Clubs, wdn shaft under Hap
pings $120, Golf Cart top Notes.
w/frame $80 Only $28.
cell 315-466-2268 includes a

RUGER 454/45COLT Call our Cla.
ALASKAN 2.5" BBL Dept for de
(As new, 6 rds fired) 352-563-5
Must Have
C.W.P & D.L.
$650 FIRM
860-639-9920

SAIGA 308 HUNTING
RIFLE heavy 21" barrel
thumb hole stock, 3 mags WANT TO BUY
scope mount & scope or MOBILE Any
$575 352-613-4002 Condition or Si
VINTAGE ZEBCO XRT80 Call Fred, 352-7:
ROD W/ REEL 12 FT
$50. obo 352-330-4074 WANTED Rods,
tackle. tools. Ai


Single Axle Galvinized
Trailer, Flat 7ft x 12 ft.
$250.
7ft x 18ft Was boat
Trailer 1 Axle $300.
(352) 603-2761
UTILITY TRAILER
28 ft., 8 ft, x 7ft
box, insulated
former construction site
trailer $1,500
(352) 603-2761
UTILITY TRAILER
6 x 12 enclosed dbl.
rear door & single side
door $1,000 firm
(352) 220-8326


Ua


f I*





ecial

iday"
led ad
ppy
50
photo

ssified
tails
966






HOUSE
SArea
tuation.
26-9369

Reels,
Anitu


coll., knive/sword, hunt-
ing equip. 352-613-2944


$$$$$$$$
WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacement
China Most Patterns
Crystal Waterford Lenox
Sterling Flatware Lladro
Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Elec-
tronics Stereo Turntables
Billiard Cues Coins &
Jewelry and Scraps Best
Pnces Paid Chris @
352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
$$$$$$$$


CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
$275.00 Purebreed
female chihuahua
puppies 2 left white with
brown spots will be small.
8 weeks old born August
30,2012. Has not had
shots yet.Can be regis-
tered. If interested call
352-613-3917

CKC German Shepherd
Pups
Male & Female 6 white
5 black & tan
$300-$500. ea.
(352) 277-8046

DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com


FRANKIE
Frankie is a 7-y.o.
spayed Shepherd/
Golden Retriever mix,
weighs 40 pounds.
She gets along with
other dogs after
proper introduction,
but does not like cats.
She is housebroken,
obedient and affec-
tionate. She is fine on
a leash, but her fa-
vorite thing is to walk
around the yard with
her human friend. She
would be an excel-
lent companion dog
for an adult who is
looking for a buddy.
Call Nadia
(352) 201-6743


ENGLISH BULLDOG
Beautiful 4 month old
male AKC and all shots
$800 or b/o call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure Breed Pups, light
colors, 4 fem 2 males,
shots & H/C. Parents on
Premises $450 ea
352-628-6050

Macaw Blue and Gold
10 yrs old, needs a good
home, comes w/xtra large
cage & free-standing
perch $1500 obo
(352) 621-9810

SHAR-PEI
Beautiful male & female
6 mo old, Prefer to sell
as a pair for $900;
single $500 AKC,
Health certs & shots,
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732



Livestock


*




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


CLASSIFIED



03 SEAPRO
17ft' cc, 90hp, Yamaha
Lowrance ff & gps, new
bat, boat cover, Bimini
top, alum trailer, new axle
& bunks, $7600
352-419-5363aft.5pm
21 FT PROLINE CC
175 Johnson; with alumi-
num trailer, radio, fish
finder, & bimini $5500
(352) 726-4517
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
Dock Space Available 24'
max; Reduced rates
Nov-Feb w/ 1 yr lease.
Manatees + Swim= fun
(352) 563-1817
KAYAKS
2 Old Town 12ft & 1 per-
ception 10ft, never used
Custom trailer, racks
352-746-6273
LANDOU
86' Pontoon boat 18FT
Great shape. Motor is a
28 special. $1200
321-303-6453
Looking for an 18 ft
SeaArk. Boat, motor and
trailer(352) 270-8225
TRI PONTOON BOAT
A & M, 27 ft, fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $19,500
352-613-8453







Employment
source is...


* * * * I-- .wwwchronicleonline comI


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, Diesel, motor
home, 2005, 55k miles,
extras include diesel gen-
erator, wash/dryer
$74,495 obo. Call Bill
(352) 419-7882
JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002




KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800

SMAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945


Get the Facts: Florida Newspapers


Your local newspaper is a vital community asset. It provides local news

and advertising not available anywhere else. It is a community partner that

assists business' to communicate with customers and keeps residents well

informed. Florida newspapers, serving the communities of Florida yesterday,

today and tomorrow.


FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... VIBRANT AND VITAL...

GET THE FACTS.


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


OOOBXHJ


CITRUS COUNTY



www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010


300 6 Cylinder Engine
$400.
4 Speed Transmission
$125.
(352) 382-5661





$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892





$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

ACURA
2007, RL Navigation,
Nice, Black on Black
$14,800
(352) 628-5100

FORD
2005 Explorer, Sport
Trac, X:T 4 x 4, Leather
41K miles, $13,950
(352) 628-5100

CADILLAC
2011 CTS, Only 14K
miles, Navigation &
Sunroof $29,700.
(352) 628-5100

AUDI
2001 A4 Quattro AWD
83K miles MUST SEE!!
$7,200
Call 352-476-6059

BUICK
'96, Park Ave., v6, auto,
sunroof., runs & drives
great,or trade $1,900 obo
352-447-2366
CADILLAC
2005, STS, V6 LEATHER
VERY CLEAN...
CALL 352-628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION

Mis. otce


CADILLAC
2011 CTS, Only 14K
miles, Navigation &
Sunroof $29,700.
(352) 628-5100
CHEVROLET
2004 Cavalier,
extra clean, $5,99
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005 Equinox Is
45,329 miles $10,995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt LT Coupe,
Auto, Silver, Garage kept,
66k mi, $7950 OBO
(352) 344-1688
CHEVY
'03, Malibu LS, 65K miles
sunroof., leather inte-
rior, auto, PW, PB,
$7,500 (352) 726-4689
CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Edition Med Blue
w/37k miles. Mint Condi-
tion $8750 522-0505
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information

DODGE
2005, Ram 1500 SLT
117K Miles Leather
$8,800.
Call (352) 476-6059
FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
$4,995
352-341-0018
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2009 Mustang, leather,
8,837 miles, $18,995
352-341-0018
HONDA
1988, CRX, white
1 owner, 127k miles,
(352) 564-0697
HONDA
1998 ACCORD
AUTOMATIC, RUNS
GOOD PRICED TO SELL..
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR APPOINTMENT
HONDA
2003 Accord EX V-6,
Leather, Sunroof, Runs
Great, 180K Miles $4,900
Call 352-220-2875
HONDA
NEW 2012 ACCORD
$18836, CALL
352-628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION
HONDA
NEW 2012 CIVIC.
$17398....CALL
352-628-4600 FOR
APPOINTMENT TO SEE
HYUNDAI
2003, SONATA.
AUTOMATIC.. PW.. PL
CALL 352-628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION
MERCURY
'08 Milan, Wh 4 door w/
grey lea int, All Power,
Exc Cond; 39k mi;
$12,800 obo 634-4524
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi. New
tires & battery
Book $16,700
Sell $14,300
(352) 302-0778


OLDSMOBILE
Intrigue 2000, 4dr, 6 cyc,
160k mi, nice ride $1200
obo (352) 220-3430

SUZUKI
2007 Forenza,
Clean, Only 52K miles
$6,500.
Call 352-476-6059

TOYOTA
2004 Camry XLE, V6,
42K miles, One Owner
$11,700.
Call 352-476-6059

TOYOTA
2004 Camry XLE, V6,
42K miles, One Owner
$11,700.
Call 352-476-6059

TOYOTA
2004, Avalon XLS,
80K miles, Xtra Clean
$10,700
Call 352-476-6059

TOYOTA
2007 Prius 91K miles,
Super Clean, with
warranty $10,300
Call 352-476-6059

TOYOTA CAMRY
2007 LE Sedan, 23k mi.
new tires, exc. cond.
$13,900 obo, call Don
352-212-8123
VOLVO
2004 C70 Convertible,
leather, power top,
30,244 miles $10,995
352-341-0018


1970 CHEVROLET
CHEVELLE
SS 396/350HP, original,
$7400 OBO, email or call
for details:
gegenh7@msn.com /
863-657-4599.

AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. Nov. 4. 2012
1-800-438-8559








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


ir^ id r


346-1104 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA SITTING AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE 2011 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT FOR
WASTEWATER UTILITY SERVICES AREA 114 OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM METHOD
FOR THE LEVY, COLLECTION AND ENFORCEMENT OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
FOR THE PROVISION OF WASTEWATER SERVICES IN THE 2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2011 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Area 114, more
particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof, that
the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the governing
body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Service
Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 is considering the adoption of a
non-ad valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services commencing in
fiscal year 2013/2014 within said area and intends to use the uniform method for the
levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assessments as set forth in Sec-
tion 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the govern-
ing body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Serv-
ice Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 will conduct a public hear-
ing on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. in the Board of County Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida to consider the adoption of a resolution authorizing their use of the uni-
form method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assess-
ments. If this method of collection is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
Interested persons may appear at the hearing to be heard regarding the use of
the uniform method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem as-
sessments. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the County Com-
mission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, they will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be made.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least seven (7)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please use the TrY
Telephone (352) 341-6580.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114
EXHIBIT A
The 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District -
Area 114 consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads in which
a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements are con-
structed or reconstructed and all lots and parcels which are served or to be served
by a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements, located in
Citrus County, Florida, further described as follows:
AREA 114 DESCRIPTION: BEGINNING AT THE WEST 1/4 CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWN-
SHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTHERLY,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 371, PAGE 454, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 659, PAGE 454, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTH-
WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT BEING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF WEST FORT ISLAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44);
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, TO THE AFORE-
MENTIONED WEST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE
NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1898, PAGE 1261, OF SAID
PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
PARCEL 17E18S32 11110, AS SHOWN IN THE CITRUS COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERS
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1069,
PAGE 2075, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINES OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 29, OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 60, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 29, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 28 OF SAID PALM
SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WESTERLY
(REAR) LOT LINES OF LOTS 16 THROUGH 28 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION,
TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY,
ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWEST-
ERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID
BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE
FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHWEST-
ERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO.
21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF THE AFOREMENTIONED PALM SPRINGS
VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT
LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 15, OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, TO THE
NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF LOT 8 OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ME-
ANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 8
OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHEASTERLY TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF LOT 1, PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 16, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY,
ALONG THE WATERWARD BOUNDARY OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, TO THE
SOUTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 14 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION; THENCE
SOUTH, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST;
THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1614, PAGE 1072, OF SAID PUBLIC
RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE








SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 D7


CADILAC '87
Alante Convertible, de-
pendble, All pwr. V8, 30
mpg, great cond. $3,500
C.R. (727) 207-1619
CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426



$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVROLET
11, Silverado, 1500 LT
Crew cab, Short bed.
20" tires nerf-bar steps,
window vents, 5.3L V8
onstar, xm radio,
15,000 mi $25,000
(352) 344-0089
DODGE
2010 RAM 2500 ST pkg
diesel, crewcab, short
box, 16K 5th wheel hitch
23,700 mi like new
$32,000
352-586-1125
FORD
2005 Explorer, Sport
Trac, X:T 4 x 4, Leather
41K miles, $13,950
(352) 628-5100
FORD
Red 1994 F1504x4, Su-
per cab w/ full Leer Cap,
Spotless and Original
$6500 (352) 465-5874
GMC
2008 Sierra C/K1500
Denali, Crew Cab, AWD,
25,800ml.,black, leather
sunroof, navigation, DVD,
excellent condition,
warranty, extras,$12,200
sndd@netscape.com
GMC
Sonoma 1995 Extended
Cab. Runs Great! $1995
352-464-3897
TOYOTA
2005, Tacoma, Reg
Cab, 5 speed,
Bed Topper $8,800.
Call 352-476-6059



GMC
2003 Yukon SLT
Exc cond New tires. Well
maintained.108,000mi
Load w/Onstar
$10,250
(207)-730-2636
GMC
White 1999 Yukon w/
trailer brakes. V8, rack
roof, window covers, bug
guard, 113K mi. Asking
$5,000.(352) 795-4454
JEEP
2001"TJ Low Mileage
All Deck Out $11.500


92 JEEP
WRANGLER
black, soft top 4.0, 5SP
manual, exc. shape, 117k
$5500 518-361-0951
CHEVY
1987 stepside p/u 87
runsgood,drives
good,many newer
parts,V8-5.7 auto 4 wheel
drive needs very little
$2500 obo 7 am to 7pm
352-220-4143 Robert



DODGE
2003 Caravan Sport
$3,800 or Best Offer
352-220-4634
MERCURY
2005 Monterey Mini Van
Fully load, in good
condition. 28,660 mi
$11,500 352-746-6499
PONTIAC
2002 Montana
V6,automatic, extended
length, 7 passenger(4
buckets), leather seats,
cruise control, new tires,
trailer hitch, 102,000 mi-
les. Asking $5,500. Call
352-586-0568



BMW
2000 K1200LT full dress
with hard bags and trunk.
New tires, fresh service,
abs brakes, cruise,
reverse,CDsW/dual
controls, power wind-
shield, heated seat and
grips,and more. grey and
silver. 27000 mi. $4200
352-449-9800
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $3,500.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688


KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 525 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 Phone
352-726-8124
SCOOTER
2008 KMD 150cc,
3 wheel articulated
scooter. Overhead can-
opy. 94 miles Never
used. Slight front end
damage. Needs minor
service/repair. New
$4000, asking $1250
OBO (352) 503-6988
YAMAHA
2004 Silverado w/ wind-
shield, sidebar, & foot
rest, Exc Cond,17,800 mi
$3500 (352) 270-8225


SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1732,
PAGE 86, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY,
ALONG THE WESTERLY AND NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2313, PAGE 2157, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 70, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND NORTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTH-
ERLY LINE OF SAID WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER THEREOF,
SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE WESTERNMOST CORNER OF SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 140, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER
THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHERNMOST POINT OF TRACT 13, AS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 343, PAGE 722, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID TRACT 13, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 792, PAGE 1146, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHWESTERLY
AND NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID SUNSET SHORES ADDITION
TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, OF SAID SUNSET
SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2018, PAGE 348, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 179, PAGE 313, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 812, PAGE
1726, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT
ALSO BEING ON THE WEST LINE OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 2310, PAGE 1585, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG SAID
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST FORT IS-
LAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44); THENCE WESTERLY,
ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, TO THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST 1/2 OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE SOUTHERLY, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY ISLANDS, STATE AND FEDERALLY OWNED CONSERVA-
TION LANDS, GOVERNMENTALLY OWNED LANDS, LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY AL-
READY SERVED BY A FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PER-
MITTED SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEM AND LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY WITHIN THE
CORPORATE BOUNDARY OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA.
October 14 21 28 & November 4 2012.


361-1104 SUCRN
7711-14CC Tourist Development Council Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
November 4, 2012.

364-1104 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 8, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
November 4, 2012.


359-1104 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the negotiating team of the Citrus County Port Au-
thority will meet on Monday, November 19, 2012 at 9:00 AM at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461, to negotiate
an agreement for the Scope of Work with TranSystems for the Port Citrus Feasibility
Study. Said agreement will then be presented, if appropriate, to the Citrus County
Port Authority for consideration of approval. The attendees will be:
Port Authority Member/Rebecca Bays
Port Director/Brad Thorpe
Port Legal Counsel/Richard Wesch
Assistant County Administrator Ken Frink
Representatives of TranSystems
This meeting will be open to the public.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the negotiating team or the
Citrus County Port Authority with respect to any matter considered at this meeting,
he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which
record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
BY:
Dennis Damato
Chairman
November 4, 2012.

362-1104 SUCRN
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO QUOTE
ITQ 008-13
Cattle Grazing Lease
for the
Inverness Airport
Citrus County desires to lease 152 (one hundred and fifty-two) acres of Inverness Air-
port property for the purpose of cattle grazing until such time as the future growth of
the airport is warranted.
Quotes are to be submitted on or before November 19, 2012 @ 2:00 PM via fax or
e-mail to Quincy Wylupek @ fax 352-527-5482 or E-mail-
auincv.wvlupek@bocc.citrus.fl.us
To obtain a copy of the Quotation Documents for this announcement, please visit
the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on
the left hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Man-
agement & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
November 4, 2012.

363-1104 SUCRN
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 006-13
Veterinary Services
Back-up to the County
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide back-up veterinary services for Citrus County Animal Services. The pri-
mary service offered will be sterilization of dogs and cats. Emergency veterinary ser-
vices may be needed such as x-rays, blood draws, and basic stabilization of animals.
Citrus County Animal Shelter will be responsible for the transfer of these animals to
the veterinary clinic. Pick up of animals will be the responsibility of the adoptee cli-
ents. Multiple Bidders may be awarded contracts for these services
Minimum Reauirements For Submittina A Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Bidders must possess an active Veterinarian's License in the State of
Florida.
2. Must poses a Veterinarian establishment premise permit registered for all pracic-
ing locations in Citrus County through the Department of Business and Regulations.
3. Bidders practicing locations must be located within Citrus County.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before December 4, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path: Suite 266:
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for December 4, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
November 4, 2012.


VILLAGE TOYOTA

.... CRYSTAL RIVER


'OVOTA


2013


TOYOTA


MSRP $17,800
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 2,805







14,9 95for159s


2012 TOYOTA




CAMReY

Auto, PW, PL, Cruise, CD

MSRP
CLEARANCE SAVINGS



p18,49


$22,895 T121117
4,400


5* or LEASE

for8189


2012 TOYOTA



P RIUS -.

Auto, Cruise, Push Button I 0...-1
Start, Bluetooth, CD ......... 121504


MSRP $24,840
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 3,000


$21 Wn or LEASE

1,840for219




2012 TOYOTA TURA

EXTENDED CAB T UNOR


4.0L V6 DOHC 24V WT-I1 270 HP/278 LB,
5-Speed Automatic Trans Automatic
Limited-Slip, Power Windows/Door
Locks, Cruise, Remote Keyless
Entry System

MSRP 28,315
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 6,316




$21,999






0 VILLAGE TOYOTA

www.villagetovota.com CRYSTAL RIVER

STohy3aCare 352-628-5100

*AII leases with $2,399 Cash Cap Reduction, 36 Mos, 12k Per Year, All Offers While Supplies Last.


I Misc. N


I Misc. N


I Msc Nti


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Metn


Metn


Metn


I Bi


I ^^Bi oc


I Bi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


FIN CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
NO^^ MATTER A WHR YOU PAN TBUY
^^^^^B~ ~~~~~~~~~ A^U^V^V ^^^^^^y ^^^^^^^


'12 SENTRA


Is $14,999*
OPER
OR $235MO.
'12 FRONTIER



i $15,999*
OR $250WAP
'12 CHARGER



I$ s20,999l
OR $PER
'12 CAMARO



e$24,999*
OR $391 PoE.


'12 IMPALA


IFOR$14,999*
OR C PER
'12 CRUZE 1


I $15,9991
OR $PER
'12 NV '



i$ s20,999*
OR $ PER
OR $38MO.: J


BoR$26,999
OR $422oER


'12 500


Fio$14,999
OR PER
'$2351MO.
'12 ALTIMA


BUY
Fo.$17,999
OR $282 PER
'12 CARAVAN I


'' $21,999
OER
\O $344&oT'
'12 CORVETTE

I 24HRRE DME EITH L
1-0-5" 55Et.80


352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL
*PRICE AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE FOR72 MONTHS AT 3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRA-
.0.D5TY TION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


D8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


I






INSIDE
| 1Sikorski's
A Attic
V !M PAGE E5


A local specimen
of an American
Persimmon tree.
JANE WEBER


1'' ]


*- ,


',-<-


.4, I '


"I.W. .- ..: r.-I I


,, Zu;.
a .. -; " .. n ": .. .


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


r>^


I Fif SMwA









E2 SUNDA~~ NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


I ELLI uuumuniu of&-t-u-luou Ci
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Flo idaLislinigilo.com









BEST OF THE BEST!!
* Beautiful Pool/Spa Real Cooks Kitchen
Plantaton Shutters Hurricane Trusses
* Relaxing Master Gated Comm./Large Lot
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Swww.FlolidLislinagil oo.cons


RENTALS ..

AVAILABLE

Visit

AB ]


1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

+
3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


NEARLY

$100 MILLION

in Closed

Sales Volume
Call RE/MAX Today











REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


INGLIS!!
10 acres of pasture, fenced and
cross-fenced, 3 bedroom,
2 bath, inground pool, small shed
row-style barn, needs some TLC.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


DO NOT MISS OUT on this Pine
Ridge deal! Lovely 3/2/3+ den boasts a
solar heated pool & spa, gas fireplace, RV
pad with 50 amp, large open kitchen.
Upgrades include flooring, custom window
treatments and baths. Enjoy your morning
coffee in the breakfast nook overlooking
your pool.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


PRICED LOWERED!!!
*3/2/2 Canal Front *3,323 Sq. Ft. Living
* 1.06 Acres Oaks & Fruit Trees Built 1992- Updated 2010
* Beautiful Unique Design Beautiful Unique Design
* Newer Appliances Top-of-the-Line Water System
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kunningham@remax.net


in reLIuIn UUVE
This gorgeous, fully furnished, 2/2/2 free-standing end
unit boasts 1,579 sq ft of waterfront living Recently
remodeled and updated w/Conrian counters & new
carpet Includes all appliances Enjoy the enclosed patio
or shaded back deck, each allowing a serene view of the
Crystal River Preserve Boat slip w/16,000 Ib lift Call
for your private showing now
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


*3/2 with Attached 2-Car Gar New Roof in 2008
2 Separate Detached Carports Double Lot
16-Inch Tile & Laminate Throughout Vaulted Ceilings
12x20 Utility Shed New Granite in Kitchen
* 4x6 Utility Shed 8x20 Screened Lanai
Hurncane Shutters
Private Yet Convenient To Shopping
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolls@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


Minutes to the Gulf, private setting with
2BR/2BA, a total of 2,51 2 sq. ft. under roof.
Fireplace, open floorplan with great room.
Covered dock with electric. A must see home.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 1
Emal barbaraimils@earthlink.net 1


This brand new listing includes a family room with
fireplace, split bedrooms Granite counters, stainless
steel appliances, self-cleaning, caged pool, laminate
flooring and more Huge lot on open lakefront with a
dock Has everything Needs nothing
THE REAL ESTATE DOCTOR AT (352) 212-6002
JOHN HOLLOWAY, SR.
CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO
Email: johnHolloway@tampabay.rr.com
www.TheHollowayTeam.com


home features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, a waterside
office, solar-heated pool, and situated on a deep water
canal with 10,000# boat lift This home has too many
features to list but some include engineered piling
system 6' exterior walls, hurricane panels for doors
and windows, Trex "wood" dock w/stainless screws,
vinyl double-pane windows instant hot water at every
faucet, lawn 4+ car garage with additional storage/
workshop space
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmeridh.com _


242 N. Lecni Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
835S Snos Bv. oro1s 62-70 ww.our Inielsfeco 50 NE Hwy 9Ias ivr7524


r1 11E nlUUE EOIuIEO
* 3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
* Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
* 2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


1035 S. BROOKFIELD DR.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG + POOL Remodeled Kitchen
* Granite Counters New Flooring
* Pool Has Pavers, Waterfall & Large Lanai
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


bb5D W. HUNIHl5 HlUUD" iIHULtk
CRYSTAL OAKS
* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home Livng Rm. & Family Rm.
*Lg. Office or 4th BR Lg. Master Suite
* Kitchen w/lsland / Lots of Cabinets Heated Pool/Lanai
NewAC 2010 / Lots of Upgrades
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


An introduction


to persimmon


Bought a "Japanese"
Persimmon two springs
ago from Craig Collins of
Color Country It had small
fruits growing on
it, so it was a fe-
male plant.
Originating in
China and culti-
vated for cen-
turies in Japan,
this edible Asian
persimmo n,
Diospyros kaki
tree was a female
twig grafted on Jane
root stock of the JAN
American Per- GARI
simmon, D. vir-
giniana. The fruit
grew to about 3 inches in di-
ameter and turned a golden
yellow as it ripened. When it
felt soft, it was ready to eat
fresh from the tree. Avail-
able in supermarkets lo-
cally, this temperate fruit is
sweet, flavorful and has a
pleasant aroma.
There are about 475
species of persimmon na-
tive to Asia, Africa and the
Americas. Female persim-


mon flowers need to be fer-
tilized by pollen from male
flowers of the same species.
The second spring, my fe-
male tree had
blossoms, but as
there were no
males nearby, she
failed to bear
fruit There seem
to be no male
kaki persimmons
available for sale
locally or on the
Internet. Please
Veber call me if anyone
E'S has one, so I
DEN could try grafting
a male twig onto
native local root-
stock next spring.
Encyclopedic plant
botanicas are large books
that list and describe thou-
sands of plants alphabeti-
cally by scientific name. The
last bit of information is
usually the zones where a
plant can grow: for example
Z5-9, H10-6. American Per-
simmon, commonly called


See JANE/Page E8


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Persimmon fruit can be eaten fresh, or combined with other
ingredients to make delicious muffins. American Persimmon
readily grows from seeds distributed by wildlife that eat the
ripe fruit in October and November locally. Some look-alike
seedlings are male, others female.


I E ID D A W EK


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
A-W 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
ENIN (352) 634-2371 Cell
ERKA bob@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bida om


| Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney m-n
m Realtor.- A HOUSE Realtor
It U 302-3179 SOLD.oNa 287-9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 ..D5C

2/2/2 with office /3rd
bedroom and pool. Huge
20 x 20 Florida room.
-5Move-in condition,
H/A/C in 11', oversized
garage. Calling out buy me.


I HY NEW N THE MAR


m s a n .


This 3 bedroom, 2 bath, garage, waterfront
home, has been charmingly refur ished (baths,
kitchen, interior and exterior paint, flooring, all
new front windows) AND...on the Inverness Lake
Chain for hours of boating and fishing pleasure,
starting out from your own dock. Seller has
replaced waste lines with PVC at great expense.
This home now looks young, feels young. So
conveniently accessible both to downtown, historic
Inverness and to 1-715. Though on the open lake,
it is NOT in a flood zone.
$156,500 MLS 358651


ALS 0 ATM G.


ASSA-1988 3bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2 acre,
ng & family rooms & wood ........ INVERNESS beautiful panoramic view of the
; roof over in 2000; both i 1. lake from the having room of this 2 bedroom,
I recently; dbl paned windows, 1 bath home w/country kitchen, breeze way
at rees, dead end paved road, #352370 between house and one c .. .. T .. I
has path to floating dock I4 4-n yI 1.......


.O~
-t


m


m


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 E3


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFrontis a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHiiONiCLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to submit information about regu-
lar meetings for publication on the Community page
each weekday.
Send in information attn: Community Page Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to (352) 563-3280, attention: Club
meetings.


A feast



of fall



flowers

Ponce de Leon was so enamored
by the bountiful blooms found in
Florida in 1513 that he aptly
named the sunshine state "Pascua de
Florida," meaning "Feast of Flowers."
Florida cer-
tainly lives up to
its name, with
flower blossoms
brilliantly dis-
played through-
out the entire
year. While gar-
deners to the
north are
mulching their Joan Bradshaw
flower beds and FLORIDA-
preparing their FRIENDLY
plants for the
long winter LIVING
sleep, gardeners
in the Sunshine State are preparing
for another colorful bloom season.
Each season has its stars, and fall
flowering perennials have some of the
best. Fall flowering plants have all
season to grow, so many of them are
tall and stately Fall bloomers also
tend to blossom in the jewel tones of
the season, deep purples, rusts, scar-
let and gold. A few fall showstoppers
that are looking their best this time of
See FLOWERS/Page E9


COMMON NAME
African Iris
Allamanda
Beach Sunflower
Beauty Berry
Begonia
Blanket Flower
Blue Daze
Blue Porterweed
Bottle Brush
Butterfly Bush
Butterfly Weed
Button Bush
Canna
Clerodendrum
Clock Vine
Crape Jasmine
Crossandra
Crown of Thorns
Fire Bush
Fire Cracker
Firespike
Ginger
Golden Dew Drop
Pentas
Periwinkle
Plumbago
Roses
Salvia
Shrimp Plant
Swamp Lily
Thryallis


SCIENTIFIC NAME
Dietes vegeta
Allamanda neriifolia
Helianthus debilis
Callicarpa americana
Begonia cvs.
Gaillardia pulchella
Evolvulus glomeratus
Stachytarpheta jamaicensis
Callistemon viminalis
Buddleia
Asclepias curassavica
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Canna cvs.
Clerodendrum speciosissimum
Thunbergia grandiflora
Tabernaemontana divaricata
Crossandra infundibuliformis
Euphorbia milii
Hamelia patens
Russelia equisetiformis
Odontonema strictumr
Hedychium spp.
Duranta erecta
Pentas lanceolata
Catharanthus roseus
Plumbago capensis
Rosa
Salvia coccinea
Pachystachys lutea
Crinum americanum
Galphimia glauca


FLOWER COLOR
White, Yellow
Yellow
Yellow
Purple fruit
Pink, Red
Red, Orange
Blue
Blue
Red
White, Purple
Orange
White
Orange, Yellow
Red
Blue
White
Peach
Red
Orange
Red, White
Red
White
Blue
Red, White
White
Blue
Various
Red
Yellow
White
Yellow


CAROLE LISTER
AMW Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA A cell: 422-4620 "<'y1
Office: 382-1700


If-I *U.11J ~ ~ BcU ~ ~ I


7 MEDINAH DRIVE
* 312/2 villa On the GC
* Family room Gas fireplace
* Enclosed lanai Side turn garage
* Includes all lawn & shrub care
#356937 $129,000


16 SALVIA COURT W
* 3/2 %/2 '/ On 2 oversided lots
* Heated pool Summer kitchen
* Family room Fireplace + built-ins
* Den Upgrades throughout
#356188 $244,500


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"' O

L Cell: 352.634-4225
PONTICOS LI KEY 1 REALTY INC.
10 8015 S SuncastBlvd ,Homosassa FL 382-1700






REMARKABLE POOL & 3 CAR GARAGE HOME! COMPLETELY REMODELED ON GOLF COURSE
Jelled Tub, Separate Shower, 2 Walk-In Closets Gourmet Kitchen w/Cherry cabinets Granite (ounters,
Updated Roof Shingles & A/C Well for Lawn Stainless Appliances & Porcelain Tile Floors
* DEEP 3 Car Garage for Boat, Workshop/Storage Tiger Wood Floors in Den/Office 2 Car Garage
S $217,000 MLS#358251 $167,500 MLS#358613


. -.- I
PERFECT FOR A LARGE FAMILY? RARE AND PRIVATE END UNIT CONDO!
*4+Office/2/3 with golf course views L .2/2 one-story condo on #3 green of Cypress
*Vaulted family room has gas fireplace Updated kitchen has stainless steel
SUpdated kitchen newer appliances Raised panel cabinetry
Master suite has separate sitting room Hardwood flooring in dining and Great Room
* Large 3-car side entry garage *, 'Convenient to SMW's Country Club
* New roof 2011 new AC 2006 Home warranty for the buyers
#354992 $159,000 #354159 $66,000
See Vrtua Tour @ IwJre IlehoesJucomg


vA


E4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


%%-ww.listerlistings.com I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 E5

Porcelain seagull probably not a Meissen


Dear John: Attached I
have sent you some pic-
tures of what I think is
a Meissen seagull figurine.
Would you be able to give me
some information on this piece
of porcelain? The information
on the bottom looks like All 18
with 7040 under that. PB.,
Internet
Dear PB.: The marks on
your porcelain figural seagull
do not indicate it was made by


the world famous Meissen
porcelain manufactory There
were numerous porcelain
companies that made good-
quality lookalike products in
the Meissen style. You have
what appears to be a commer-
cial-grade figurine. Potential
dollar value is catch-as-catch-
can.
Dear John: I have a framed
picture of "The End of The
Trail." It has been in the family


for about 50 years, I believe. It
has John Drescher Co. Inc.
N.Y in the bottom left corner.
Also, it has the negative litho-
graph in plastic taped to the
back. Do you know anything
about this, or possibly where I
might find any information
about it? I tried to look online
but alas, I am not very com-
puter literate. -AH., Internet
See Page E6


mwrira- a I
John Sikorski
SIKORSKI'S
ATTIC


rkIhILPU L1IDIbU1t REA I'S


Amanda & Iirk Joinson Tom Balfour Ul Aenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BRO -Rf/ASSOC EALTOR REACTOR ALTOR -BROER REALTOR


746-9000,


0w~ctrs0 Suyco


Special to the Chronicle
This porcelain sculpture of a seagull is most likely not a prod-
uct of the world-famous Meissen firm, well-known for its
porcelain products. It appears to be a commercial-grade
reproduction.



INlB S
UA


10013 E. BASS 521 N. HARRISON 7I 5. LEE 27 S. FILLMORE 15 S. FILLMORE 4506 N. TUMBLEWEED
3/2/2 57224$59,900 2// 50036 $54,900 2/2/23567 $5,0 // 551$53,900 22Z354359 $49,900 /23629 $39,900

LS BANK OWNED-INVERNESSL, FL wa
BR/BA with bonus room 1 car garage. Spacious 2BR/BA pool home. Fireplace in LR. ..
l1 acre with detached garage.
$27,500 MLS#358151 $79,998 MLS#356908 29 N. WASHINGTON 64 S LEE 3755 N ROSCOE 6715 S FRANKFURTER 45 S. MELBOURNE 2440 W. NAUTILIS
2/ 356448 $39900 2/2/2 357886 $54 900 2235665 $37500 35 356952 43900 35434 $84900 32 35832 $6290
CALL Roy Bass TODAY c o2r72662471 3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100
E BAi th bo nusm room c arugre. 21com Afpe o Ho me.302-6714


I


BEVERLY HILLS


OWNEi"llil'NANCING


BEVERLY HILLS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E5

Dear A.H.: "The End of the Trail" was originally pro-
duced as a bronze figural piece by James Earle Fraser,
born in Minnesota in 1876 and died in Connecticut in 1953.
Fraser belonged to numerous art leagues, associations,
artist societies and won numerous awards for his works in
bronze at various expositions. He produced a wide range
of figural bronzes, including depictions of Plains Indians.
"The End of the Trail" is a bronze figure of an Indian on
horseback slumped forward with his spear at rest. This
work, "End of the Trail," was so popular at the time it was
reproduced in prints by numerous printing companies.
Your print would sell below $50.
Dear John: I am in possession of several powder horns,
some with shot still in them, a pistol, a wooden canteen
and a saber I inherited them from my husband. I would
like to sell them. They are located at my daughter-in-law's
on Long Island, New York. I would like to know if they
would bring more value up there than if I brought them
back to Florida and sold them here. Also, if you could tell
me how to find an outlet for them, I would be most appre-
ciative. -L.M. Y, Internet
Dear L.M.Y: Powder horns are a specific category of col-
lecting, as well as the other Revolutionary War items you
own. I suggest you contact Skinner Auctions in Boston, they
specialize in the items you have. The website is www.
skinnerinc.com. Good luck.
Dear John: I enjoy reading Sikorski's Attic in the Citrus
County Chronicle's HomeFront. I am not looking for a huge
sale, however I am seeking to find the value of my carving
set. I bought a Toledo steel carving set in Toledo, Spain in
1972. I have searched for info online, my results only found
Toledo Steel Swords. I would appreciate any assistance
you could give me. -JM., Internet
DearJ.M.: There is no specific collector interest in your
carving set. This leaves dollar value at the catch-as-catch-
can level.

John Sikorski has been a professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He hosts a call-in radio show, Siko-
rski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box 2513,
Ocala 34478 or asksikorski@aol.com.



BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


DIGEST PHOTOS
* Headshots of real estate agents
and associates submitted for the
Real Estate Digest are kept on file
in the Chronicle Editorial Depart-
ment. It is the responsibility of
the individuals submitting news
notes to ensure headshots have
been sent to the newsroom, and
to advise staff of any name
changes.
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper expo-
sure: neither too light nor too
dark.
* Photos submitted electronically
should be in maximum-resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.


--I !IE_-VI0 A O CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


* Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil S S
www.Forid howcse-rpertis-co


OPEN HOUSE 1-3




4 1lt:1 1820 E. Gate Dancer Cir.
MLS #356176 $283,600
Quality 3/2.5/3 home with many feature & great view.
Directions: Rte. 44 to Clearview entrance, to first
right into Belmont Hills, turn right on E. Gate Dancer
and Istleft tohome on theleft.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146
NEW LISTING


SMLS#357317 $114,900
Beautiful 2/2/2 pool home in quite a neighborhood.
Directions: Rte. 486 to north on Forest Ridge Blvd., to
right on Valerian PI., to home on corner ofHoneylocust.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


NEW LISTING




'?oia 6152 N. Silver Palm Way
MLS #358583 $121,000
MUST SEE this charming,well
maintained 3/2/2 pool home.
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507


11 I 5141S. Season Po Dr.
MLS#358532 $S80,000
3/2/2, great rm. with a majestic
stone wood-burning fireplace.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


741 E. Hartford St.31-3b 1542 N. Kilel e e 22 N. SI. Lucie Pt
MLS #358695 $72,900 ( ita OUA-i 1206 E. Triple Crown Lp. 015 MLS #347586 $169,000 MLS #349694 $95,000
Maintenance free allows time MLS #355676 $194,180 A short sale home Exceptionally nice refurbished villa
to enjoy club membership. Well built and so well kept 3/2/2 beauty. on a quiet cul-de-sac. w/wood cabs & new appl.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Mark Casper 352-634-0499 Mark Casper 937-219-6949 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
PENDING PENDING PENDING PENDING




580 E. Keller Ct 3690 W. Treyburn Palh /A/, n8 N. Enslqin PI. el@5'l' i 15 E. Hartlord SL 14a
ill MLS #354108 $199,900 MLS #358373 $139,900 MLS #358473 $78,000 MLS #356447 $65,000
Elegant pool home Lovely 3/2/2 home in breathtaking Beautifully maintained 2/2/1 villa, Corner ground level gem of a condo
on the Oaks Golf Course. neighborhood, pride of ownership. with NO steps.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Tami Mayer 352-476-1507 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Mark Casper 352-476-8136
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


IPINE IDE H I


31213 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
00OD56T Call Joe at 302-0910


WONDERING IF YOU

SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!

WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
x Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
0 $7.2 million already closed by Sept. 30, 2012

Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit wwwbuyfloridahomesnowcom
M To Learn More C

REALTOR (352) 746-9924 '+


Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!




BST Of Citrus
viwInc. rlFusa
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 Facebwk
Hwy. 19, 4% miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


E6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


_.. .... !







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


GOT A NEWS TIP?


Palmer, Barnes
hit new highs
Realtor Len Palmer
has exceeded another
milestone in sales vol-
ume this year. He re-
cently passed the $3
million mark in closed
sales.
Len is a veteran Real-
tor who works out of the
Lecanto office of
RE/MAX Realty One, lo-
cated on County Road
491. Len specializes in
the Beverly Hills and
Central Ridge areas of
Citrus County. The asso-
ciates and staff of
RE/MAX congratulate
Len on this outstanding
accomplishment.


Len Palmer
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Lucy Barne
RE/MAX
Realty One.


The associates and staff of RE/MAX Re-
alty One would also like to recognize Lucy
Barnes, who recently passed the $4 mil-
lion mark in closed sales volume.
Lucy is a 30-year veteran to the real es-
tate profession and works out of the Crys-
tal River office of RE/MAX Realty One. She
has experienced tremendous success in
the waterfront residential market in west
Citrus County. The brokers of RE/MAX
congratulate Lucy on her tremendous
success.


EXIT Realty shines
in recent report
The Wade Team is proud to announce
that EXIT Realty Leaders has taken place
in every category in the monthly broker re-
port for Exit Realty Florida In August. The
office was No. 9 in top 25 offices in new
listings taken, No. 5 in top 25 offices for
total listings, No. 11 in top 25 offices for
total agent count, No. 9 in top 25 offices in
sales volume, No. 10 in top 25 offices in
sales volume per agent, No. 10 in top 25
offices in closed sides, No. 11 in top 25 of-
fices in closed sides per agent, and No. 7
in top 25 offices in gross closed
commissions

DIGEST GUIDE
News notes submitted without
photos will not be reprinted if the
photo is provided later.


Norm Overfield
Realtor
352-586-8620
www.normoverfield.
homesandland.com


Ask a Veteran1


SHometown
Realty


* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


352-564-0333
6050 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
normoverfield@yahoo.com


Swww.dudleysauction.com
dFtiiO A iidTIONS


ruun MuI IUIIO
THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 FRIDAY, NOV. 9, 2012 10AM
5748 W. PAPRIKA LP., HOMOSASSA
3PM Homosassa Real Estate Auctions
4000 S. FLORIDAAVE., INVERNESS
Estate Adventure Auction
'98 Lincoln Continental, antiques,
furniture, household, tools 800+ lots. "LIKE NEW" 3/2 hill home in Preserves of
Cinnamon Ridge, amazing landscaping,
Bring truck. $200K invested, but will sell to settle estate.
SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 2012 2 HOMOSASSA LOTS
9010 E. PORTLAND (Heatherwood), INVERNESS 5310 S. BENTON TER.
On-Site Killer Pool Home & Contents Auction
Contents 9am Real Estate 10am



NEW LIFE IN THE RV selling it all home & contents over $300K Lots sold at 5748 W PAPRIKA LP, HOMOSASSA
invested WOW, what a place 3/2, work/craft building, pool, patio, Following 10AM Sale
bar, fully upgraded, PLUS 2 adjoining lots FULL TO THE ROOF, F wil Sl
w/furniture, decorator items, crafts TWO AUCTION RINGS ABSOLUTE -
S ,,DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S Florda Ave., Inverness, F BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
(1/2 mleS. of the Fairgrounds)
Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold DudleysAuctionAb1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All dimensionsareapprox.mol +-) 10% Buyers Premium.Announcements from the blocktake precedent.


.. .- S .^ ~HOME & BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ,i,. ,i i-
BUY! I 1" "' u U TUU L ii,.liiiui UI .I I Jdl Iiul ,
n Leisure Aaes! Sparous home updated & liing on Hwy. 19 11Propy zoned Pr ofessional Bus./Offce!
MLS #355536. Tomika Spires-Hanssen Stores/Residential. MLS #355456. 8847 Suncoast Blvd.
1 Fuller 352-212-5752. St 49.900. Tomika Snires-Hanssen 352586-6598.


DIAMOND AVE! ... ..... GIDDY ON UP , ,I,, ,, ",,I I,,, d,, I,, I I,-n
living room Florida room shed GINORMOUS 4/2 doublewide w/fireplace, fenced yard, 2 sheds, new
lnA room, Florida room, shed N 00N4/2 doubt we w
infield. MLS #357400. $49,900. A/C, screen porch & tucked on one acre! MLS #355478.
1 REDUCED TO $49,900. Kim Fuller 212-5752.


II


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E3

Possum Wood or White Ebony, grows natu-
rally from northern cold Zones Z5 to 9 in
the south of Central Florida. It tolerates
heat zone H10 in Central Florida north to
H6 of Delaware, New Jersey and Maryland.
Plants cannot be grown successfully out-
side of their comfort zones.
American Persimmon readily grows from
seeds distributed by wildlife that eat the
ripe fruit in October and November locally
Some look-alike seedlings are male, others
female. Gardeners can't tell them apart
until the female sets fruit after five to 10
years. Genetic testing is available to lab sci-
entists. Growers propagate cuttings and
grafts from known stock trees.
American Persimmon can reach 70 feet
tall in a sheltered river valley with rich al-
luvial soil. In cultivation, it seldom gets
taller than 20 to 30 feet, with a diameter of
10 to 15 feet It makes a fine deciduous lawn
specimen or summer shade tree beside a
driveway or parking lot. In September the


leaves turn burgundy before they fall. Ripe
fruit, about an inch in diameter, can be
picked or will drop naturally It is delicious
eaten raw.
Black Sapote, D. digyna, native to tropi-
cal Mexico and Central America, Zones 11-
12, can be grown in the Florida Keys. Black
piano keys were formerly made from the
now-rare evergreen Sri Lankan ebony tree,
D. ebenum.
Dunnellon farmer Mary Anderson gath-
ered persimmons from her lawn, pinched
off the dry calix, washed them, added a lit-
tle water and mashed them into pulp to re-
move the seed. Mary boiled the sieved pulp
to remove the excess water and to sterilize
the puree. Pulp can be preserved in jars or
frozen in freezer bags for later use.
Persimmon makes a fine jam. Mary made
muffins and a quick bread using persim-
mons and apples. I enjoyed persimmon
muffins in Mary's farm kitchen with cups of
tea and good conversation.


MARY ANDERSON'S
MUFFINS
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour.
1/2 cup granulated white sugar.
1/2 cup brown sugar.
1 tsp salt.
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon bark.
1/4 tsp ground allspice.
3 1/2 tsp baking powder.
S2 eggs.
S3 tbsp light oil (eg. Canola oil).
1 1/2 cups 2 percent milk.
1 1/2 cups diced tart apple.
1 cup persimmon pulp.
1/2 cup sunflower seed or substitute
chopped nuts.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly
grease muffin tins. Gather a basket full of
ripe, dark-brown, soft American Persim-
mon fruit. Wash well under flowing tap
water Remove stiff dried calyxes from the
top. In a large pot add a cup of water to the


American Persimmon can reach 70 feet tall in a
sheltered river valley with rich alluvial soil.


fruit and mash the fruit to a pulp. Strain
through a colander or sieve to remove the
black seeds. Save seeds to feed wildlife or
plant in the forest. Boil the pulp about 15
minutes to reduce the water content.
Blend dry ingredients in a large bowl. In
a second bowl, lightlybeat two eggs and stir
in the wet ingredients. Add the wet ingre-
dients to the dry and stir until just mixed.
Do not beat. Consistency should be that of
thick pancake batter Blend in fruit and
nuts. Dump by the spoonful into greased
muffin tins to about 3/4 full. Bake immedi-
ately in pre heated oven at 400 degrees for
30 minutes or 375 degrees for 45 minutes.
Remove from oven when brown on top and
when an inserted toothpick comes out
clean. Serve warm with butter and jam.
Yields 12 large muffins.
U-
Jane Weber is a Professional Gardener
and Consultant Semi-retired, she grows
thousands ofnative plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an appointment,
call 352-249-6899 or email
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
a _194 _&BrentwoodResale s(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

REA LTY G GROUP BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133* VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777







DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS 3 BED, 2.5 BATH 3 CAR, FOXFIRE SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
This home comes with all the luxuries you'd expect from this gated community i ..... ..... .i .. 1.. bedroom, 2 bath 2 car home One of Terra Short Sale BREATHTAKING Davinc Deluxe pool home on oversized lot Sits on Very popular Windw .. I -ii I. I,, .I l. I. I. tl ,-..t u fl ,
2 bedroom plus a den, 2 bath and 2 car .r high ceilings, enclosed lanai .. rthefoyer and be instantly captivated bythe a culdesac with a circular driveway Some of the many features include a plan, expanded and .. . ,. ... .
with hot tub, plantation shutters, triple . our backyard overlooking the ..... .... I 1 I I ..... ..... .. .. 1. gourmet kitchen, oversized pool with extended lanai and luxurious master bath i... .. ... i, .. . .. .......
water fountain and it backs up to the park Perfect for tan g Enjoy all this home has to offer
MLS 358636 $304,900 i O $249,000 MLS 333026 $399,000 MLS 357971 $339,000






DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLA
Well maintained 2 bedroom 2 bath, 2 car garage plus den and a pool An Pristine villa with beautiful landscaping features 2 BR, 2 BA, plus den 2 car DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
garage, upgraded cabinets in kitchen, tiled counter tops, butler s pantry, whole DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, DEN, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
house stereo system, in wall pest control system, spectacular sunsets, and view Maintenance 1... I1 1 "' Ih I..... 1. I" ..II . 1 . .... i I
i ,,i, ,,,h i. .. ....i i ... .... ., " ,,P ,-J ,-A.- th r ,,,i ,I 11 .. 1 .. .. .
i' 232,000 11 i $259,000 I $175,000 I $375,000




_- -- 7




DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR SKYVIEW VILLAS
1 DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD ....... ...........
,1~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ,*~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i . ~ decorated Enjoy maintenance-free living so you can relax Open great room, makes ,, i, ,,, ,, ,, ,,, , ,i ,. ,, ,,, ,,,i ,
#3124 $1300 1 $1,500 #3259 $1200 #3288 $1600
I I IT


E8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLOWERS
Continued from Page E4

year are showcased on the accompanying chart.
Scheduling color in the landscape all year
doesn't just happen; it requires preparation to
choreograph blooms throughout the year. It is
important to choose the right plants for Citrus
County, taking into account its blooming cycle.
To assist you in the plant selection process,
visit the Florida-friendly plant database located
at www.Floridayards.org
For additional information, please contact
Citrus County Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the public with
the University of Florida/IFAS's knowledge, re-
search, and resources to address youth, family,
community, and agricultural needs." Programs
and activities offered by the Extension Service
are available to all persons without regard to
race, color, handicap, sex, religion, or national
origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is director of University of
Florida/IFAS Citrus County Extension.


Learn about



palms at clinic


Special to the Chronicle

Growing palm trees in Cit-
rus County can be a reality if
we pick the correct tree for
our area. The November free
Master Gardener Plant Clin-
ics' topic will be 'All About
Palms," covering their selec-
tion, nutrition and potential
problems.
The schedule is:
2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov 7,
at Floral City Library
1:30 p.m. Friday, Nov 9, at
Coastal Region Library, Crys-
tal River.
1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov 13, at
Lakes Region Library, Inverness.


1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov
14, at Central Ridge Library,
Beverly Hills.
1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov 21,
at Citrus Springs Library, Cit-
rus Springs.
E 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov 27, at
Homosassa Library
Master gardeners will also
offer a repeat of the October
topic, "Plant Cold Protection,"
at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov 10, at
Lakes Region Library).
There will be no clinics dur-
ing December due to travel
and the holiday season. The
free clinics will return in Jan-
uary. For more information,
call 352-527-5700.


Rain harvesting



with rain barrels


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping pro-
gram has partnered with The
Green Footprint of Crystal
River to offer rain barrel
workshops.
Participants help assemble
their own rain barrel to take
home after the class. The first
workshops will be from 10:30
a.m. to noon and 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Nov 10, at The
Green Footprint's new loca-
tion, 619 N. Citrus Ave., Crys-
tal River. The cost per barrel
is $45, which includes the
necessary spigot and over-


flow attachment. For each
barrel purchased, The Green
Footprint donates $4 to a
scholarship fund for Citrus
County students pursuing a
degree in a field that pro-
motes environmental conser-
vation, such as environmental
science, agriculture, horticul-
ture or other related fields.
Call Julie or Tracy at 352-
257-5403 to reserve a spot.
Pre-registration is necessary
Those interested in more
green learning may register
for the Worm and Tumbler
Composting workshop slated
for 10:30 a.m. to noon Satur-
day, Dec. 1.


000BOSH

Ni GITTA
Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (352
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com






ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN -
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
the equestrian Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
In the equestrian section of Pine comer lot with mature oaktrees andlots
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a of privacy! Very well maintained, new
360 interactive virtual tour at roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and
360 interactive virtual tour at move right in! Community features golf,
www.mypineridgehome.com. tennis, clubhouse.
MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000


o w e ... .. ...... .




NATURE'S
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community
... i .... Take the on the Withlacoochee River
... ... ... $218,000
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven!






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is
the right setting for living the Florida
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight.
true masterpi .... 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of
Lake Tsala .i.... ... room to dock all the water toys
family to move right in! imaginable!
000D4AsMLS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000


t BARTH
REALTOR
) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com





A BOATER'S DREAM
COME TRUE!
Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
feet of seawall; stationary & float-
ing dock; spacious modem 3/25
home sits high and dry (never
flooded) on 2 lots. This mati-
culously maintained property is a
mTsit e! ;499n000


4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
2 Office: 352-746-3600

PINE RIDGE
POOL
In-law suite,
on golf course, 4 bed,
3 bath, 3 car gar.
Loaded!
MLS #355285
$324,900

PINE RIDGE
POOL HOME
2.75 private park-like
acres, 3 bed, 2.5 bath,
2 car & detached 2 car
garage w/carport.
MLS 357513


5721 S. LIVE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
and nestled in an area that preserved
most of its 1960's charm! Well main-
tained, fenced yard, sunroom. The perfect
home away from home.
MLS #357468 $39,900
lo C.. .-. -. t


520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
This charming, very well-maintained 3/2/1
home has a lot to offer: close to town,
medical ;... I 1. i .,. V.., your fenced
backyard I. ... ,. ... or private
patio Everything is neat and clean, just
1i ,. $69,900


U -


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 E9









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966


- e7.


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


:(352) 5635665 1 Toll F.i.ii-w *88) 80 6mail: classifieds)hronicieoninecom I .6b : -


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
CRYSTAL RIVER
Beautiful, 3BR, 11 ABA,
Single Wide w/addition,
$360mo (352)621-5309
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182



2 Bedrooms 1 'A, Bath
Large Florida Room
Washer, Dryer
Dishwasher
$7500 obo
(352) 527-9382
BAD CREDIT RENT-TOCWN.
1 3 t h
Street homes of Alachua, FL.
N o w
has brdihome pkgt. Ready to
m o v e
in NOW! Call
386-418-0424
BEST
OF THE BEST
11 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
45 New and Used
Homes have been
Disounted for
Clearance. Come by
or Call (352) 621-9181

Lecanto 55+ Park.
2BR/1BA Carport and
Screened Porch.
$11,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807

Inverness
2/2 Dbl wide, screen rm &
Ig. deck, 55+ park, great
view, exc cond., not
crowded $21,500 make
an offer (352) 419-7825

INVERNESS
2/2 Stoneridge Landing
55+ Gated Community
Pool & Club House 28x40
End Glass Lanai & Furni.
$22,900 352-341-0473

INVERNESS
3 months free lot rent
w/ purchase! 1 & 2 Bd
Homes starting @ $6900
Located in a 55+ park
on Lake. Lot rent $276.
month, Water Included.
352-476-4964

New Jacobsen Model
Homes Sale! 13 Left
with up to $25,000 off.
Don't buy until you
shop North Pointe
Homes. 4545 NW 13th
St Gainsville, FL
(352) 872-5566


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down.
This is a purchase
W.A.C, Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/Mo
Loaded
3/2 From $399/Mo
Loaded. $0 Down.
Singlewides $299/MO
800-622-2832 ext 210


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




CRYSTAL RIVER
3b/2ba, den,newer c/h/a
carpet & vinyl, very clean
RV Hkup. $39,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash 586-9498
HERNANDO 1 ACRE
new log cabin kitchen
2br/lba,den w/ real fp,
fncd,24X40 wkrm w/ac,
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352)634-6340
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925



2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348
2 BR, 11, BA,12x56 MH
Nice Seasonal Home
Adult park, low lot rent
Carport, 2 screen
porches, some updates
$11,000 (352) 561-4738
Melody Park Inverness
DNTW 2/2/cp $11,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352) 634-6340


12 x 40ft, 2 BR, Park
Model with 12 x 24 yr
round family room.
Cen. Air/Heat, 10 x 24
covered porch w/ lake
view. All appl's +
washer & dryer, 2 car
carport, 2 sheds, near
Dunnellon Move In
Ready Rent $240 Mo.
Asking $10,000
(352) 489-4656
55+ Community
3 BR, 2 BA, on Lake
Henderson, All
amenities, pool, dock
clubhouse. Asking
$14,900. (352) 201-5637

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 1988 Skylark
model, 2/2 furnished,
shed, screened lanai
352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
LECANTO 55+ PARK
1997 West 14x66 3b/2ba
w/cp, non-smoker-move
in condition, newer heat
pump, split floor plan, ca-
thedral ceilings thruout.
Glass & Screened FL
room & open deck w/craft
room, outside storage
shed. $245 rent incl.
water, sewage & gar-
bage, ALL appliances
incl. Asking $27,000
mobilhome.shutterfly.
com/ 352-400-8231
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090





DUNNELLON 2/2
Rent or Sale New AC,
Lrg. Lot $425. $400 dp
$28,000 (727) 480-5512


ACTION

[ REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.itrus(ounlyHonmeRentals.comn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPR/LECANTO
3069W. ermudaDunesDr. (L).. $850
2/2/2 Great home in Black Diamond
3025 N. Bton(reeli(ir.().....$900
3/2/2 FURNISHED in Black Diamond
CRYSTAL RIVER
2561 N. Seneca Pt. (R).... $1200
2/2 Waterfront DW mobile FURNISHED
1910-B NW 12thAve. (CR)...... $700
2/2 Cute duplex with nice sized rms
HOMOSASSA
6944 W. Grant St. (H)......... $700
2/2/1 Cute, centrally located
1416 W. Kendal t.(H)....... $100
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 acre
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/LECANTO
8614 E. Aquarius Dr. (Inv)..... $750
3/1 Waterfront home, pnic area end dock
1933 SanellePat (L).. REDIKED SI200
3/2/2 Inc. full memb, pool, tennis, gym


















CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2, Doublewide, $600
3/2, Seasonal, $1,200
2/2/1 House $600.
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
AGENT (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CH/A, W/D, Cable,
Big Yard (unfurnish opt.)
$600 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-776-3120


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

4/2 On A Canal...........$750
3/2/2.................$950
2/1/Screen Room........$550
2/1/1.................. $600
2/2 Townhome...........$650
2/2 Duplex, Tile Floors...$600

2/1/1 Bonus Room.......$600
2/2/Bonus Rm, Fen. Yd. $650
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
I Cheryl Scruggs,
8 Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


-I

Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
incl. all utilities, furn.
private cottage.
$550mnthly
352-220-6100
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
inside and out. 2/1 $575
Includes Water/ gar-
bage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Quiet, Clean
$575. mo. incld's water
352-563-2114, 257-6461

HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450/$500
no pets 697-0310

INVERNESS
2/1 $650. 1/1 $450
Near hosp. 422-2393

INVERNESS
2/1, Storage Rm $475
mo.+ Sec. 352-634-5499

Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
1 Bedroom $396;
2 Bedrooms $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."











Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa


INVERNESS
1 BR $450 month.
Tiny Pets OK. 527-8154




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
LECANTO
1b/1 ba, furn. Handyman
cottage porch, on 5 acr.
pking, quiet, water &trash
p/up,incl. pets ok, ref's
$450mo. Blind Box#1812
CC Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429



CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370
HOLDER
3/2/2 2000 sq. ft. home
Lg. fenced yard. dog ok
$800mth 352-302-7303



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, turn-key,
fenced yrd. 3 Blocks from
Golf Course/Progress
Energy Training Cntr.
Sec + Credit Check $750
Call 352-220-6032
INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA,Shed,
$550. mo 352-795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2 & FL. RM.
15 E. Murray
$525. 352-422-2798
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299, 364-2073


BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2, Immac., all appl.
Finest gate guarded com-
munity in Citrus County.
Rent incl. lawn maint. ca-
ble TV $1,075. /mo. Paul
352-746-9585
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg. 3/2/2
On % Acre, fenced yard,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Close to Rainbow
River & Historical District
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HOMOSASSA
3/2 $750mo. First, last
+ sec. 352-476-1080
or 352-476-0174
HOMOSASSA
3/2 W/ Den $650
$500 sec. No pets
(352) 586-1212
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, 1st & Sec.
$850/mo. 352-476-2860
INVERNESS
2 bdrm 1 bath. updated
kitchen, wood floors
352-201-0842
INVERNESS
2/1 $650., 1/1 $450
Near Hosp. 422-2393
INVERNESS
Country Living on Large
1/2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
like new, 2/2 villa near
pk, $625 (352) 212-4873
PINE RIDGE
3 bedroom. 2 bath. Pool
Home! $1300/mo
Bob@Coldwell Banker
Next Generation
352-634-4286

PINE RIDGE
3 bedroom. 2 bath. Pool
Home! $1300/mo
Bob@Coldwell Banker
Next Generation
352-634-4286


I_

Nw


7

ED




Ilia


E10 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012


"f' "



ta ,J








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUGARMILL
WOODS
4 BR. 3 BA. Beautiful
2006 built home. High
ceilings, Corean
counters, neutral colors.
$1100/mo. plus utilities.
Call 352-382-2521


-I
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; Furnished
$900/mo (352) 287-5020
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225



BEVERLY HILLS
Room. All Util. incl.'d
$300. mo. 352-212-5143
Citrus Hills/Condo
Mas. Bd Rm w/Ba. Pool
$450/ref's. 352-249-7804




AUCTION: Residential Lotsl
106 Lots in
Florida
Will Sell Regardless of Price
over a Minimum Bid of
$300 per Lot
Nov. 6-14
ONLINE AUCTION ONLY
249 Lots in the Southeast!
FL, GA, SC, NC, VA & TN
Tranzon Driggers 0
Walter J. Driggers, III, a|
Lic. Real Estate Broker, 8
FL Lic# AU707 & AB3145 >


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
*******


E IAl S tALI in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th-Wheel with
slides. Screened gazebo
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial




9


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Rel stt


OPEN HOUSE
Sun 11/4 lpm-4pm
Custom 3/2 Offered at
$134,500
Canterbury Lake
Estates
3119 E Brigadoon Ct
Hwy 486 to Canterbury
Lake Est Entrance, to L
on E Brigadoon CT to
home on Rt
Plantation Reality
Jo DeMarcus
(352) 220-2658




FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Profes-
sional OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo Center,CR
352-794-6280, 586-2990
Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa



3BR/2BA/2, Pool, New
Carpet, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
REDUCE $110,900
(352) 476-5061



3/2/2 POOL HOME,
updated roof, AC, water
heater, SS Appl's, gran-
ite kit counter tops, and
resurfaced Pool
Reduced to $149,900
6090 N. Silver Palm Way
(352) 586-7691



Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, Private lot
352-746-0002
OPEN HOUSE
SUN 11/4 1PM-4PM
3 Story Town home,
2149 SF living area in
Citrus Hills
261 E Hartford St
From Hwy 486 to Citrus
Hills Blvd, rt on Hartford
Big 5, unit 6B
Call 613-2644 for info



Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Sat
& Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418
Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Tr
(352) 419-7418




1006 Princeton Ln
3/2/2, Fam. Rm,
$39,900 287-6196


Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AH1
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Crystal River Village
2 bedroom. 2 bath. 1991
Nobility in excellent
cond. ,fully furnished.
For photos on-line see
Crystal River Village
H.O.A Lot 384 $12,800
OBO Call Roger
Weaver at 330-205-0506








OPEN WATER
VIEWS!
135'
Seawall
12030 W Bayshore,
Crystal River
3 Bed/2 Bath/2 CG
2044 Uv/SF $259,000
MLS#358273
T. Paduano/Realty
Connect
352-212-1446





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Homosassa
3/2/2cg corner lot on 1/2
acre, fireplace, central
air, owner financed 0%
interest Call Tom
(920) 224-2513





SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Bd, 2 Bth, 2 Car Gar.
Well, Lawn sprinklers
Solar Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$105,500 352-382-1448


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real EstateL...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


1 #1 Employment source is I


Iwww. ch ron-i ci eon line. corn_


CirsCu


Home Finder

www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


UnL Your DrmuI Howm

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Get Results


In The Homefront

Classifieds!


It agg"ll I
MICHELE ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


Cir sC n y


Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den & fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails, $3000 per Acre
352-634-4745
FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed
last assessed $25,000
ASKING $12,500 obo
813-792-1355



HOMOSASSA
90 x 110 ft Lot, w/good
water, septic and im-
pact fee pd. $10OK obo
Owner financing Easy
Terms (941) 505-9287

RESIDENTIAL LOTS
$300. down $100 mo
(352) 568-2849


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Ell


Waterfront
Homes I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


10 ACRES ON THE RIVER!
A I, .l l.. l -l 1,n.i pli .. d If.. i'll
H I e I pil i i ,; v d 1),il IIie i ,vsnUil p.i.j

$149,900
Owner is very molivaled Bring all oilers!
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699
I 1


M ..v, ... I .Is _" _" 1 luilh, i l..l.



W n..l hi, l: llll 1, Ih.li ,1; il h ,i
Call Mat/ha Snydet 352-476 8727
ask lot /ie =355579.


GREAT CORNER LOCATION
h.N ,..]. b.] ... l..' .1.t.- F- l L I i
. I. jfh.l. .l f ,:. .),:.,al .). i 1,. ... 1. ..'.
t 1sll'. i .' .. f .d.' .. s I %f

$279,000 MiN. = './
Call Jim Morton lor a tout at 422 2113.


GREAT LOCATION!
,i d 1...i l ..II Ht. 4 ,,4 ~i 11d i l l lii l ..I
.I....1ng~g..o~ n 1,1 f.., :d' All... ,d inh. l l..Inlc


'''iii,, I ii .,i F .h,, iiihlit- I Hill
Mi. =i 334::il $16,500
Call Nilda Cano 352 270 0202


.. ... ..... .... .. .... ...... .. .......... ,,



lh. = '.-ii $179,900
iIl.iij Prsons 352 634 1273









WATERFRONT 2/2 ON DOUBLE LOT


.v,uil hll'l Hf i i.i i hI bii I. u l.ill il .iI'Il FII I

..i I I 'Ie I|| ...i h rJ. .l l,..i ..l u fl H 'II ..hi

Sl. = ..:.:1 ASKING $69,900
PaD.jI ,is 3 3??1?7?80 iJilil ?/lp.iM.i inm


* F,.v.il I.iFi l V iiF.i
* A .11il i f IN LI-I NIT
* Bh. I..ill ,iJv li ,i l ,l
II ,, hdin.] If. llh. ha
* F* iviliy .iiil FI..vIII>I ii il Ir i
Mi5 = u;,,I- $84,500
Jeanne at Willaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
:':iw'r:. CIItusCouni;'Sold. comn


SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACI
* I A .: I f l .: I:, l. 1 IL
* lF ii .ii iii L i iih i.i F- : ,II ''1
* II. I illl .. ipp

Mi 5 =19 3717 $264,500
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


WINDERMERE

Ir .i,,' ,,, ,,,, h 1


rlii ". ASKING $97.000
P D, ,s,-3522127280
I'l,' l ulll 2/lorndi. co-.


FI ,, it .. I.i.i I 1- F ii l.F ..uu. l..iF...-
H _-.hF.l I...F *Iii .... Ii.- i ..11 e .1"u l..F Iu.-. -
H F. -i, i i -i . I .I h J h ..ju ,''i .. h .u u '.u1F hi ..i h.l -

It'. = 3 ': $44,900
Call Donts Minet 352 422 4627 loI appi


THESE 2 SIDE-BY-SIDE LOTS 3 Inl.n. _" I,h11. _" ,:.. ii.,,i. ini. i ,i
ON GULF TO LAKE HW Y. I il i:iI i ...-1 iiF .l.. .j..jil ,u-iluin..l,.ni l
Z7 .. l.1 p I I,...l i li lh .. .. l.1 :...: .l l | I ':'l/ I .FI s ll 7 111 JH _1l 1
h .. v l I. l II II I l. i ... . I .l ..IIIII .. I-I llI] H .'iii ii.. I .i .Id l i

Mit = 3'Fi.: ASKING $100,000 Mti = ..//;'h. ASKING $59,900
Call Jim Motion 422 2173 Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072


.... lla pih I_ rl.,q l l_. j.l i.: ,ll% L .hill



Mit 5 = 3.i:iu $89,900
Ask loi Maidyn Booth 637 4904


LAKE FRONT SUPER SALE!
C a2 ,pad, 16est3 23 I ... ,l lII .. I

:,,,,, , ,,,,i,,,i, ,i $77,500!
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


IN PERFECT CONDITION

II..... l lh l i. n h'l hl ii. .l l.. i. i l. l i .l....l


Ml = I .-, $139,800
PJ D.A s ,352 212 7280
I'en hlitng 111111 c2/1p.ditd.s corn


MOTIVATED SELLERS!
1 l0 11hiii "l li [w il i |
Mih = 3-. .X ./ $109,900
Call Isaac Baylon 352 697 2493













* 1. 7 l.l h il

Mti5 = ./'..7: $145,000
Jeanne at Willaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
i i'it'r. ciituscounti'sold. conm


INVESTMENT PROPERTY

1 6 ,,lh ,, ,ii.h i ,t l ,)i i F sii l ,: I,,(I plh.' h
b II. 1"ii lhF I t F h l '. 111 Fl i 'l'll .

Mi. = U '3h,3 ASKING ONLY $70,000
Call Emil liupu at 302 1713


__11


E12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012