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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 10-28-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02931

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Discover: Find the annual magazine /Inside


Partly cloudy to sunny,
windy.
PAGE A4


I-- S o U N I D r_ '


SO YOU KNOW
Delivery of today's
Chronicle may
have been delayed
due to addition of
Discover.
Early deadlines
Saturday night
prevented the
publication of
some lottery
numbers today.





Truck drives
cargo plane
through area
On Saturday morning,
a C130 Hercules Cargo
plane was transported
from east to west on S.R.
44 across Citrus County.
Expected to start at 7
a.m. in Wildwood, Robert
Brueckner transported
the plane through Citrus
County to Crystal River.
Having caught on fire
in Key West, British Co-
lumbia decided to pur-
chase the cargo plane
and refurbish it. Once it is
refurbished, Canada's
westernmost province
plans to use the older
cargo plane again.
According to Brueck-
ner, his final destination
for Saturday was Ala-
bama. However, his jour-
ney continues through
the United States until he
reaches Canada.
Brueckner is a resident
of New York. However,
his father-in-law, Leslie
Burdick, is a Citrus
County resident.
-From staff reports


HOMEFRONT:


Candy corn
Orange, white and
yellow are popular
colors./HomeFront


BUSINESS:


Plas
TREM W~~IT"1SE


I -9',...-z .-- ,"L
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Norman Busche, owner of Nature Coast Outpost on the Chassahowitzka River, said he feels the impact of taking
water from the river will negatively impact the river. "Why would you even tamper with an ecosystem that has been
deemed an Outstanding Florida Waterway?" he said. "This is one of the nicest rivers on the entire west coast of
Florida. It's not huge, but it's beautiful."

Activists urge attendance atfinal vote meeting Tuesday


JIM HUNTER
Special to the Chronicle
For Homosassa resi-
dent Ron Miller, a long-
time Citrus County
environmental activist, it
will be a moment that de-
cides the future of the
Homosassa and Chassa-
howitzka rivers, and he
has put out a call for any
citizens who care about
the rivers to mobilize.
On Tuesday, the re-
gional water district gov-
erning board will
conduct a final adoption
hearing at its headquar-
ters on what Miller calls
the approval of the re-
duced flow plans for the
Homosassa and Chassa-
howitzka rivers.
The Southwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict calls it the adoption
of minimum flows and
levels for the rivers,
something being done by
the state's water districts
for all the fresh water


bodies in the state.
The plan says 3 percent
of the flow of the Ho-
mosassa could be taken
before the minimum flow
would be reached. The
plan would allow for 9
percent of the flow of the
Chassahowitzka to be re-
duced. Those levels are
the points at which sig-
nificant impact on the
rivers could occur, ac-
cording to district studies ..
and conclusions.
The minimum flow .
proposed for the Ho-
mosassa had been 5 per-
cent, but intensive
protests and lobbying
from Citrus residents and
groups like the Save the
Homosassa River Al- i .
liance got the water dis-
trict to reassess the flow
and reduce the percent-
age. District officials
most recently said 1 per-
cent would be considered
already used; so, in ef-
fect, the minimum flow
The shallow, clear water of the Chassahowitzka River
See Page A10 flows to the Gulf of Mexico.


Board to decide

withdrawals

from rivers
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
To locals and visitors in
the know, the Chassahow-
itzka is the languid river
where paddlers would drift
and the adventuresome
would spelunker in its un-
derwater caves.
The Native Americans
called the riverine area the
land of the hanging pump-
kins, or Chassahowitzka, for
the ubiquitous hanging
gourds that draped the hard-
wood hammock.
Today, the 5-mile-long
river and its tributaries still
beckon, but according to
local residents, the once-
pristine waterway with its
aqua-colored springs is
under threat from a recom-
mendation by the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD) staff.
The water district's board
of governors is on the verge
of voting on possible changes
to the "Minimum Flows and
Levels" (MFLs) of the Chas-
sahowitzka and Homosassa
rivers. The vote will take
place at a 9 a.m. meeting
Tuesday at the SWFWMD of-
fice in Brooksville.
According to Norm
Busche owner of Nature
Coast Outpost, which in-
structs people on the finer
points of paddling it's
been heartbreaking watch-
ing the gradual deteriora-
tion of the Chassahowitzka
River
"The hardwood is dying. It
used to be, the water was
crystal clear and you could
see the sandy bottom. There
is less fish and the old-
growth Cypress is dying all
See F Page A9

WHAT: Southwest
Florida Water
Management District
meeting.
WHEN: 9 a.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 30.
WHERE: District
headquarters, 2379
Broad St. (U.S. 41
South), Brooksville.
INSIDE: Read a column
by division director Mark
Holland./Page All


Hot toys
Get tips to help find
holiday gifts./Page D1
COMMENTARY:


Septic talk
Jim Stevenson writes
about the politics of
septic tanks./Page C1


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ..............A18
Editorial................. .... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ....................A18
Obituaries ..............A6
Together..................A20


6 1181178112110 I oEI L


108 and still feisty


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Eleanor
Hartman was still a rela-
tively young woman when
she retired as an elementary
school volunteer in Houston.
She was 100 at the time.
Hartman celebrated her
108th birthday Oct. 19 at
Arbor Trail Rehab and
Nursing Center in Inverness
where she's a resident
Recently, Hartman invited
the Chronicle to hear some
of her stories and take her
picture with her birthday
flowers.
"The newest grandbaby
came," she said of her grand-
daughter's grandchild.
"At my birthday they had a
clown she wiggled a little
bit And two men sang."
At 108, Hartman walks
with the help of a walker.
She spends her days travel-
ing the hallways in her
wheelchair, cheering people
up.
"Some of the people here
are so sad," she said. "So I
tell them hello. If they're
asleep, I give them a push -


not really."
When she still lived in
Houston, she went to Sunday
school and church on Sun-
days at the church across the
street from her house, and
on Monday she volunteered
at various schools. At one
school, they had a class for
young mothers and Hartman
loved to rock the babies.
"I didn't change them or
carry them; I just rocked
them," she said. "I'm not
bragging, but they said I was
the best elementary school
volunteer in the district"
Originally from Crowley,
La., she was 2 years old when
the family moved to Texas.
"We came in a wagon
straight on to Houston and
stopped right across the
street from the Anson Jones
School," she said. "There
was a big write up about it,
but I don't know if it was the
first school in Houston like
they say
"At that time there were
streetcars everywhere, but
most people walked they
didn't have the 10 cents to
ride," she said.
Her father and brother


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Eleanor Hartman, a resident at Arbor Trail Rehab and Nursing Center in Inverness, recently
celebrated her 108th birthday.


built the house they lived in.
After she finished school,
Hartman worked for the
phone company for five
years, then she married her
husband, William. They had
two daughters.


William died in 1969.
"Mama died young," she
said. "She was 61. Papa died
at 104. Never sick in his life.
He just went to sleep."
One day, it was about 9 in
the morning, in December -


Hartman remembers be-
cause she was writing out
her Christmas cards, getting
ready to visit a granddaugh-
ter- and a man entered her

See Page A5


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
45


CITR -S C 0 U N T Y






HRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Best Community l Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 118 ISSUE 82





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


StateBRIEFS


Sheriff: 1993
murder solved
MULBERRY- Investigators
say they have solved the 1993
slaying of a pregnant Polk
County woman with the arrest
of her son.
Polk County sheriff's investi-
gators said Friday they have ar-
rested Christopher Shane
Knight, who was 19 when his
39-year-old mother Jahala Wat-
son was stabbed to death. He
remains jailed on second-
degree murder and manslaugh-
ter charges.
Sheriff Grady Judd said the
two constantly fought. Judd
said a witness said the pair was
arguing June 20, 1993. Judd
said Knight ordered the witness
from the home, which quickly
went quiet. Watson was never
seen alive again.
Her body was found two
days later along a road.
Man points laser
at helicopter
ORLANDO -A Florida man
is facing federal charges after
he was arrested for allegedly
pointing a laser at a sheriff's de-
partment helicopter.
Prosecutors said Friday that
23-year-old Dimitry Maksim-
chuk of Orlando shined the
laser into the cockpit of a Semi-
nole County Sheriff's Depart-
ment helicopter in July.
If convicted he faces up to
five years in prison and
$250,000 in fines. The charges
come from a new law enacted
because of a growing number
of incidents in which pilots have
been distracted or temporarily
blinded by lasers.
Maksimchuk's court-
appointed attorney did not im-
mediately respond to an email
seeking comment.
Florida voters
up 6 percent
TALLAHASSEE Florida
has nearly 12 million voters
who will be eligible to vote in
the crucial presidential election.
State officials early Saturday
released new voter registration
numbers showing the number
of active voters has grown
6 percent to a total of about
11.94 million.
President Barack Obama
carried Florida in 2008, but he
is locked in a tight race with
GOP rival Mitt Romney in the
swing state that could decide
the election.
The new registration num-
bers show the gap between
Republicans and Democrats is
smaller than it was in 2008.
There are nearly 536,000
more Democrats than Republi-
cans. There are 4.78 million
Democrats and 4.24 million
Republicans.
The number of voters not af-
filiated with any party, however,
grew at a substantially faster
rate than either major party.
State revenue
tops estimate
TALLAHASSEE Florida's
state general revenue
collections are exceeding
expectations.
A monthly report by the Leg-
islature's Office of Economic
and Demographic Research
shows September's collections
exceeded state economists' es-
timate by $54.6 million, or
2.8 percent.
Cumulative general revenue
collections three months into
the 2012-13 budget year stood
at $162.6 million, or 2.9 per-
cent, over estimate.
The majority of the state's
general revenue comes from
sales tax, which was up by
24 million in September and by
$36.3 million for the budget
year.




TODAY'S



NUMBER


Collections of beverage
taxes, hospital fees, the docu-
mentary stamp tax on real es-
tate transactions and the
intangibles tax also came in
over estimate.
Corporate income tax collec-
tions, though, were under esti-
mate by $6.5 million in
September and $4.7 million for
the year.
Judge OKs boy's
Easter invitations
TAMPA--Afederal judge
says an elementary school was
wrong when it banned a fourth-
grader from passing out invita-
tions to a religious-themed
Easter egg hunt.
U.S. District Judge James D.
Whittlemore issued an injunc-
tion Friday. It came after the
Hillsborough County schools
did not object to an earlier mag-
istrate's ruling the boy's First
Amendment rights had been vi-
olated when his school's princi-
pal barred him from passing out
the invitations.
The boy was not named. His
mother, Kimberly Gilio, con-
tacted Christian legal organiza-
tions, which filed the lawsuit.
The boy had asked permis-
sion last April to distribute the
invitations during a non-
instructional period.
They invited children to the
church-sponsored event where
they could learn "the true
meaning of Easter."
-From wire reports


Art's value in eye of beholder


n a recent art heist from
a Dutch museum,
thieves got away with a
Picasso, a Monet, a few
Gauguins and Matisses.
But, fortunately, they didn't
get away with anything of
value.
There is sim-
ply no way to sell
stolen art this fa-
mous. Re-
spectable col-
lectors won't
touch the stuff
and would gladly
turn in the
thieves; the
criminals can't JI
trust disrep- MUL
utable collectors
- no honor
among thieves and all that.
The entire exercise of art
theft is a waste of every-
one's time and money The
paintings are usually recov-
ered; the thieves are ar-
rested, poorer than they
were when they started;
and there's a good chance
the art itself is damaged or
destroyed in the process.
So I wondered to my
artistic friend Lars why a
museum would bother to
hang an original piece of
art. Why not just put a
photo of the painting in a
frame? What's the differ-
ence? We'd still be seeing
the same picture.
Lars was appalled.
"There's nothing like see-


ing the original," he said.
"But modern digital pho-
tography could duplicate
any painting, stroke for
stroke, and even show the
texture of the paint, the tiny
crackling, the overstrokes,"
I explained.
"The museum
* could hang an
exact duplicate.
What's the dif-
ference?"
He explained
to me I was a
bourgeois bar-
barian and a
fool.
M "That's a little
.LEN harsh. 'Exact du-
plicate' may be
redundant, but
lots of smart people say it."
"That's not what I'm talk-
ing about," Lars vented. "An
original painting has value;
the copy does not. No mat-
ter how good it is, the copy
is a counterfeit."
I don't buy it. If a piece of
art is good enough to hang
in a museum, if it's good
enough for you to fly to
Rome or Paris to see, isn't
an inexpensive copy of it in
your home just as good?
Are the colors any differ-
ent? Is the composition any
different? Is the size any
different? Is the inspiration
any different? If you put it
in a gilded frame exactly
like the one in the museum,


could anyone tell the
difference?
The only thing that would
actually be different is the
value. But if price is what
makes a painting worthy,
why don't people simply
hang money on their walls?
"Ohhh, did you see that?
He has $100 million hang-
ing on his living room wall.
Isn't it beautiful? Don't you
love the green color, the
shape of the bills?"
"I hear it's all counterfeit
bills."
"Ewwww! It's the ugliest
thing I've ever seen. How
vulgar The original is soooo
much better!"
When I hear about ex-
perts spending years trying
to figure out if a work by
Leonardo da Vinci is real or
a fake, I have to wonder:
What's the difference? If it
is so similar that even the
experts can't tell after a
week or two whether it's a
fake, it must be pretty good.
What they're arguing
about after that is not art,
but price. Who is bourgeois
now?
If it ever turns out that
"Mona Lisa" in the Louvre
is a fake, will all the mil-
lions of tourists feel duped?
"I went all the way to
Paris to see that piece of
junk? I want my money
back," as if looking at a
work of art behind bullet-,


Me, I like the
fakes. You don't
have to insure
them, and you
don't have to
worry about
someone
stealing them.

bomb-, fire- and theft-proof
glass is better than looking
at a copy
Me, I like the fakes. You
don't have to insure them,
and you don't have to worry
about someone stealing
them.
The only reason people
know all my Picassos, Mon-
ets, van Goghs and Gau-
guins are fake is that they
know I'm not a billionaire.
But even if I were, is that
how I'd spend my money? A
$50 million painting could
send a lot of kids to college,
it could buy a lot of medi-
cine, it could help people
who are out of work, it
could change a lot of lives.
That's something you can't
fake or steal. It's a work of
art.


Reach author Jim Mullen
at JimMullenBooks. com.


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Page A3 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Volunteers make a difference in one day


Local organizations, businesses tackle projects across county ,


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
Strangers showed up at a park
before the sun even rose. They all
were there for one reason to
volunteer
"When we put a call out to vol-
unteers, our volunteers are the
best anywhere," Nature Coast Vol-
unteer Center Supervisor Laurie
Diestler said. "They step right up."
About 75 pre-registered volun-
teers joined forces Saturday for
the annual Make a Difference Day,
an initiative started by USA Week-
end magazine. Make a Difference
Day is America's largest day of
volunteering, which is every year
on the fourth Saturday of October
"Make a Difference is a contri-
bution day for us to give back to
the community," Withlacoochee
State Trail manager Joe Howard
said. "I think there is no better
way to be a community servant


than to come out and do some-
thing meaningful."
United Way of Citrus County
merged its national Day of Caring
with Make a Difference Day to
focus on the impact volunteers
can have on a community.
"We are always excited to part-
ner with the Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center and the Retired and
(Senior) Volunteer Program on
projects within the community,"
United Way CEO Amy Meek said.
"Today, we are out here at the fit
trail, which is right off of the With-
lacoochee State Trail. It is a great
project for United Way, because
we focus on three main areas: ed-
ucation, income and health."
This year's focus project was to
add mulch, donated by Home
Depot, to the Withlacoochee State
Trail's fitness area in Inverness.
Diestler explained four different
exercise areas off the trail are not
normally used by the public,


which is why mulch was added to
them Saturday
"This exercise area is looking
more inviting now that we have all
of this done," Diestler said.
This year's local organizers were
Nature Coast Volunteer Center and
Retired & Senior Volunteer Pro-
gram, United Way of Citrus County,
Withlacoochee State Trail, Crystal
River Home Depot and Wal-Mart
Supercenter in Inverness.
After completing the fitness
area, volunteers added shrubbery
and mulch around the caboose
near Liberty Park.
"None of them are here for
themselves," Diestler said. "They
are just doing whatever needs to
be done. We want that mindset to
spread like a fever We want peo-
ple to see how much of an internal
reward it is by volunteering.
"If people are looking for a job,
the best thing they can do is come
out and volunteer." she said.


SK **" i "' S r.- ..
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Several groups took part in Make a Difference Day on Saturday in
Inverness. The Home Depot team, from left, are: Melanie Marks, Julie
Shutt, Gail Dixon, Massimo Mozzachiodim, Paul Burrows, Maureen
Nursick and Jason Farber.

"They might meet someone who Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
knows someone that is looking for thington can be contacted at 352-
an employee. Make that connec- 563-5660, ext 1334, oreworthington
tion down the line." /)chronicleonline com


Crawling with cooters


Sonny Cooter r

throws annual ,

party in Inverness -

ERYN WORTHINGTON 0
Staff Writer
With cooler temperatures and
a breeze in the air, Sonny Cooter j
knew Saturday was going to be ,.
a day to party.
Sonny spent his morning -
primping and shinning his shell -
as he prepared to meet his
many fans. Once he arrived at
the ninth annual Great Ameri-
can Cooter Festival, he listened
and danced to music at Liberty
Park in Inverness.
Sharon Skeele-Hogan, spe-
cial events director for the city
of Inverness, helped Sonny get
acquainted with all attendees.
"It is a wonderful small-town
feel," Skeele-Hogan said. "We
have our own festival in cele-
bration of Sonny the Cooter"
Local organizations set up
booths as they distributed infor-
mation to the community.
"The thing that is amazing to .. Z"A"fl
me is the number of volunteers .
that are here," Skeele-Hogan
said. "This truly is an example V'
of everyone pulling together to .. :-
make it happen. It's amazing." .....
Many participants were seen
partaking in the food vendors' .-
offerings. Everything from ket-
tle corn and funnel cakes to
roasted turkey legs, hungry DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
mouths indulged in their fa- ABOVE: Ember Kamman, 9, prefers the Cooter turtle statue at Liberty Park to the blow-up rides Saturday at the ninth annual Cooterfest
vorite bites. in Inverness. Cooter mania continues today with the Great Cooter Triathlon and Cooterween begins with costume contest at 1 p.m.


From live turtle races, bounce
houses, duck races and Little Miss
Cooter Princess, children and turtles
of all ages had something to do.
Even though Sonny was extremely
happy to interact with all of his
friends and fans, little girls running
for Little Miss Cooter Princess could
not contain their excitement.
Darla Edwards, 7, knew she would
be able to represent her community.
"I want to do Little Miss Cooter fes-
tival, so I can be in the Christmas pa-
rade," she said.
One of her competitors, 5-year-old
Stella Fink, knew pageants were
meant for her
"We thought it would be fun," said
Stella's mother, Ashley Machine-Fink
"We watch the 'Toddlers and Tiaras'


COOTERFEST
Sunday is the final day of the annual
event. Activities during the day include:
Great Cooter Triathlon in the
morning.
Cooterween at noon.
Costume contest at 1 p.m., with
competitions for children, adults and
even a Pet "Paw-ty!"
"Duck-Duck-Cooter" race at the
lake.

show. She likes the makeup and frilly
dresses. She is a very girly girl."
Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthing-
ton can be contacted at 352-563-5660,
ext 1334, or eworthington@chronicle
online.com.


Cadets divulge mission of Civil Air Patrol program


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Civil Air
Patrol cadets John Korycki
and Levi Muscott brought
messages to Inverness Mid-
dle School students during
Red Ribbon Week.
The Civil Air Patrol, both
said, provides fun and ex-
citement for children ages
12 to 21.
Korycki, a Citrus High
School junior and Muscott,
who attends the College of
Central Florida, visited
Fairella Cook's business
class as part of Red Ribbon


* WHAT: Civil Air Patrol Citrus County squadron.
* WHEN: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.
* WHERE: DAV Building, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
near U.S. 41.
* ON THE WEB: Google "Civil Air Patrol Composite
Squadron 315 Florida."


Week. It marked a partner-
ship for the Civil Air Patrol's
Drug Demand Reduction
program and IMS.
Marlene Korycki, the
Drug Demand Reduction of-
ficer, said the Civil Air Pa-
trol, or CAP provides plenty
of opportunity.
"You don't necessarily


have to have an interest in
the Air Force to be part of
CAP" she told students.
The Civil Air Patrol's his-
tory dates back the week be-
fore the Pearl Harbor
attack. Civilians with a love
of aviation volunteered to
defend the country In 1948,
Congress passed a law es-


tablishing the Civil Air Pa-
trol as an auxiliary of the
Air Force. The primary mis-
sion areas are aerospace
education, emergency serv-
ices and cadet programs.
John Korycki, a cadet first
sergeant, attended glider
flying camp in Georgia
where he met CAP cadets
from across the country
"There are cadets from
everywhere that partici-
pate," he said.
Muscott, a second lieu-
tenant, said cadets assist in
emergency situations, such
as hurricane relief.
He described a one-week


boot camp that focused on
leadership and preparation.
He said it's not the same as
a military boot camp.
"It's not quite as long and
it's not quite as harsh," he
said. "It's a lot of fun."
Muscott said he joined
the Civil Air Patrol because
his family has a military his-
tory spanning four decades.
"I wanted to be a fighter
pilot," he said. "I have a lot
of military blood running
through me."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. corn


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Civil Air Patrol cadet 2nd Lt.
Levi Muscott explains the
CAP program to Inverness
Middle School students.


Stella Fink
receives
the final
touches
on her
make-up
by her
mother
Ashley
Machine-
Fink
before the
Little Miss
Cooter
Beauty
Pageant
on
Saturday
at Liberty
Park in
Inverness.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Neighbors



charged in



countywide



vandalism

ERYN WORTHINGTON 10:30 p.m. to purchase mar-
Staff Writer bles. They planned to play a
prank on a friend. Kobel
Two men are facing had built a large sling shot
charges of vandalism to win- and wanted to find larger
dows of businesses, resi- marbles that would fit in-
dences, vehicles and a home side the sling.
with marbles across Citrus After leaving Wal-Mart,
County, according to Kobel asked Cook to
the Citrus County find a clearing so he
Sheriff's Office. could shoot marbles
Richard Daniel with his slingshot.
Cook, 27, and While looking for a
Michael James clearing, Kobel
Kobel, 20, both of began shooting mar-
South Sandburg bles out of the pas-
Point, Homosassa, senger side of the
were arrested Friday vehicle.
on 16 counts of crim- Richard Kobel told
Cook Kobel told
inal mischief and one Co deputies the only
count of shooting a place he could recall
deadly missile into a broken windows at
building. Bonds were was Arby's in Crystal
set at $18,000 each. o River However, he
Upon investiga- did remember driv-
tion, it was learned F.k: ing down Longfellow
Cook and Kobel used Street, South Sun-
glass marbles and a coast Boulevard,
sling shot at a velocity Michael Yulee Drive, Halls
high enough to break Kobel River Road and Ho-
glass to businesses mosassa Trail, all in
and vehicles. Glass marbles Homosassa, and State Road
were collected as evidence at 44, County Road 486 and
several locations. Roosevelt Boulevard in Bev-
Wal-Mart surveillance erly Hills.
showed two men buying a Upon searching the vehi-
large amount of marbles cle, investigators found a
and leaving in a green Ford sales tag that read "mar-
Explorer bles" and the number "50"
According to the arrest re- and a mesh bag containing
port, Cook drove himself glass marbles.
and Kobel to Homosassa's They were arrested and
Wal-Mart Supercenter in a transported to the Citrus
green Ford Explorer at County Detention facility.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Jeffrey Smith, 23, of West
Amelia Court, Homosassa, at
11:37 a.m. Monday on felony
charges of trafficking in stolen
property, grand theft, giving false
information to a metal recycler
and burglary of an unoccupied
residence. He is accused of
stealing multiple items, including
an air compressor, tools and
copper wire from a home on
West Green Acres Street in Ho-
mosassa. He is also accused of
selling stolen items to recyclers,
according to his arrest affidavit.
Bond $67,000.
Chance Clark, 19, of
South Rock Crusher Road, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:20 a.m. Monday
on felony charges of automobile
theft and burglary of an unoccu-
pied residence. According to his
arrest affidavit, he is accused of
burglarizing a home on East
Murray Street and stealing a
Honda dirt bike. Bond $7,000.
Vanessa Cunningham,
24, of Northeast Fifth Avenue,
Crystal River, at 2:30 p.m. Mon-
day on a felony charge of grand
theft. According to her arrest af-


fidavit, she confessed to stealing
a tiller from a shed on Northeast
Fifth Avenue. Bond $2,000.
Terry Arnold, 39, of Palm
Drive, Inglis, at 3:15 a.m. Tues-
day on a Citrus County warrant
for failure to appear in court for
an original felony charge of ha-
bitual driving while license sus-
pended. No bond.
Christopher Sellers, 30, of
South John Dale Point, Ho-
mosassa, at 8:17 a.m. Tuesday
on a Citrus County warrant for a
felony charge of possession of a
short barrel rife/shotgun. Bond
$5,000.
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 1:42 a.m. Wednes-
day, Oct. 24, in the 11000 block
of N.Academy Drive, Dunnellon.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:57 a.m. Oct. 24 in the
2400 block of N. Railroad Way,
Hemando.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 3:36 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 25, in the 5300 block of S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 4:24 p.m. Oct. 25 in
the 2100 block ofW. Riley Drive,
Dunnellon.


A residential burglary was
reported at 9:40 p.m. Oct. 25 in
the 1200 block of N. Rabeck
Ave., Lecanto.
Thefts
An auto theft was reported
at 3:25 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
24, in the 3500 block of E.
Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hemando.
An auto theft was reported
at 6:07 a.m. Oct. 24 in the 8500
block of W. Oak Street, Crystal
River.
SA petit theft was reported at
10:56 a.m. Oct. 24 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 10:58 a.m. Oct. 24 in the 6600
block of N. Carl G. Rose High-
way, Hemando.
A grand theft was reported
at 11:20 a.m. Oct. 24 in the 1600
block of S.E. Paradise Circle W.,
Crystal River.
SA petit theft was reported at
1:01 p.m. Oct. 24 in the 2800
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 3:41 p.m. Oct. 24 in the 2800
block of N. Rivers Edge Boule-
vard, Crystal River.


ON THE NET
SFor more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.


SA petit theft was reported at
1:16 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, in
the 1700 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
SA petit theft was reported at
1:16 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, in
the 1700 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
SA petit theft was reported at
3:37 p.m. Oct. 25 in the 2000
block of State Road 44 West, In-
vemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 5:07 p.m. Oct. 25 in the 3600
block of E. Ming Court,
Inverness.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported
at 10:16 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25,
in the 900 block of E. Overdrive
Circle, Hemando.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




SBid Notices..........................D9

~A.

SMMeeting Notices..................D9



Miscellaneous Notices.......D9


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 82 52 s Miami 83
Ft. Lauderdale 82 62 s Ocala 79
Fort Myers 83 60 s Orlando 82
Gainesville 78 44 s Pensacola 69
Homestead 82 62 s Sarasota 80
Jacksonville 78 46 s Tallahassee 73
Key West 83 72 pc Tampa 79
Lakeland 81 50 s Vero Beach 83
Melbourne 82 56 s W. Palm Bch. 81


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds around 20 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Expect mostly
sunny and breezy conditions today.


78 67 0.00 76 65 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusteaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 75 Low: 48
Partly cloudy to sunny; windy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 69 Low: 40
Breezy and cooler

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 49
Sunny but cool

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 75/63
Record 94/38
Normal 83/58
Mean temp. 69
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 4.50 in.
Total for the year 59.01 in.
Normal for the year 47.37 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.65 in.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/28 SUNDAY 4:37 10:49 5:00 11:11
10/29 MONDAY 5:21 11:32 5:44 11:55
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


S N 13 N 20
NrOV 6 NOV. 13 NOV. 20


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:00 a/12:59 a 6:00 p/1:31 p
Crystal River** 3:21 a/10:53 a 4:21 p/10:54 p
Withlacoochee* 1:08 a/8:41 a 2:08 p/8:42 p
Homosassa*** 4:10 a/12:30 p 5:10 p/-


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:29 a/1:32 a 6:38 p/2:07 p
3:50 a/11:29 a 4:59 p/11:25 p
1:37 a/9:17 a 2:46 p/9:13 p
4:39 a/12:31 a 5:48 p/1:06 p


C I T R U S


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
5







S


Gulf water
temperature


79
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.08 32.01 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.82 38.80 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 40.01 39.99 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.48 41.46 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany 63 53 c 60 50
Albuquerque 59 32 s 66 44
Asheville 68 51 sh 52 36
Atlanta 80 60 w 62 38
Atlantic City 65 52 sh 63 57
Austin 63 45 s 66 41
Baltimore 68 58 r 60 51
Billings 39 30 pc 53 37
Birmingham 54 49 pc 58 37
Boise 52 33 sh 63 44
Boston 60 49 c 60 50
Buffalo 48 45 .66 sh 45 39
Burlington, VT 65 46 pc 63 51
Charleston, SC 69 65 .17 w 73 50
Charleston, WV 55 47 .03 sh 49 37
Charlotte 73 60 w 69 42
Chicago 48 34 pc 48 38
Cincinnati 54 44 .02 c 51 37
Cleveland 50 46 .47 sh 49 38
Columbia, SC 75 65 w 72 43
Columbus, OH 51 46 .39 sh 50 38
Concord, N.H. 66 43 c 57 47
Dallas 59 38 s 63 39
Denver 50 24 pc 55 34
Des Moines 46 37 pc 51 31
Detroit 56 41 c 48 38
El Paso 67 43 s 71 45
Evansville, IN 56 37 s 54 33
Harrisburg 64 59 sh 56 46
Hartford 64 58 c 60 48
Houston 66 48 s 70 45
Indianapolis 53 36 pc 52 32
Jackson 59 46 s 60 36
Las Vegas 76 50 s 79 55
Little Rock 59 38 s 59 37
Los Angeles 88 62 s 80 59
Louisville 56 43 pc 54 33
Memphis 57 41 s 57 37
Milwaukee 44 32 pc 46 35
Minneapolis 43 28 c 44 30
Mobile 65 51 s 66 40
Montgomery 66 54 s 64 40
Nashville 53 43 .06 pc 56 35
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 64 53 s 65 50
New York City 65 60 sh 61 53
Norfolk 67 63 .07 r 66 57
Oklahoma City 54 31 s 62 34
Omaha 46 27 pc 53 35
Palm Springs 90 60 s 89 62
Philadelphia 67 58 sh 60 53
Phoenix 85 58 s 89 61
Pittsburgh 52 46 .18 sh 48 39
Portland, ME 61 43 pc 55 50
Portland, Ore 58 50 .43 r 60 55
Providence, R.I. 67 50 c 61 50
Raleigh 66 62 w 64 46
Rapid City 46 18 pc 46 35
Reno 70 36 pc 72 40
Rochester, NY 53 48 .18 sh 47 41
Sacramento 79 47 pc 80 54
St. Louis 52 34 pc 54 33
St. Ste. Marie 47 31 pc 42 30
Salt Lake City 59 35 pc 62 44
San Antonio 64 48 s 68 42
San Diego 84 57 s 80 61
San Francisco 78 55 pc 73 55
Savannah 78 67 w 75 49
Seattle 53 48 .58 r 58 51
Spokane 43 36 .06 sh 50 48
Syracuse 64 53 sh 55 45
Topeka 48 24 pc 56 32
Washington 70 59 r 61 49
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 95 Fullerton, Calif. LOW 2 Alamosa,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/77/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 50/41/c Mexico City
Athens 79/71/sh Montreal
Beijing 61/31/pc Moscow
Berlin 46/30/c Paris
Bermuda 80/76/sh Rio
Cairo 84/66/s Rome
Calgary 46/29/s Sydney
Havana 78/66/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 80/55/c Toronto
Jerusalem 79/63/s Warsaw


64/44/s
50/42/c
55/35/pc
73/52/ts
62/48/c
47/32/r
49/41/pc
90/73/pc
63/46/sh
67/53/c
68/49/r
42/36/sh
35/24/c


For the RECORD


COUNTY N


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 60
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 60%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
ragweed, grasses, elm
Today's count: 5.6/12
Monday's count: 5.8
Tuesday's count: 4.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


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,0 8 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 6:48 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW....................7:41 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................6:04 PM.
MOONSET TODAY ........................ 6:34 A.M.


I-


A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Housing advisory group to meet Tuesday


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Affordable
Housing Advisory Committee
(AHAC) will meet at 5 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 30, in Room 166 in the
Lecanto Government Building.
On the agenda will be: Hardest
Hit, SHIP Shelter Plus Care, NSP


1 and 3, Section 8, Homeless and
Emergency Solutions Grant and
proposed 2013 future AHAC meet-
ing dates, among other items.
This committee was formed to
improve the housing situation in
Citrus County by studying and de-
veloping projects, coordinating
with county staff and by making


recommendations to the Board of
County Commissioners.
The committee meets every
third Tuesday of the month.
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Afford-
able Housing Advisory Committee
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this public meeting or


hearing, he or she will need to en-
sure a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which shall
include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
Any person requiring reason-
able accommodation at this meet-
ing because of a disability or


physical impairment should con-
tact Housing Services, 2804 W
Marc Knighton Court, Key No. 12,
Lecanto, FL 34461 (352-527-7520),
at least two days before the
meeting.
If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TYY telephone
352-527-5901.


108
Continued from Page Al

house and put a knife to her
stomach, demanding money
"First he said he wanted
gold, but I tricked him. I did-
n't have my rings on that day
so I told him I didn't have
any gold," she said. "I had a
screen door with a good lock
on it, but he jimmied it. That
knife it was a rusty-look-
ing thing. I didn't know if he
was a dope head or what he
was. He had a coat on and a
mask on his face."
She thinks she was
around 95 at the time. When
she told the man she didn't
have any gold, he demanded
money So she got her purse
and opened up one part of it
and pulled out three one-
dollar bills.
"Ooooh, he was mad," she
said. "He said, 'Don't you got
any more?' I was calm I
wasn't scared. I said, 'Yes,
can't you wait?' On the other
side of my purse I had three
10s and a five.
"I saw him later on the
street," she said. "He used to
ride around on a bicycle
with all kinds of tools. When
he was at my house I said,
'My son will be here in a
while.' That was a lie, be-
cause I didn't have a son."
Hartman came to Florida
four years ago after a fall in-
jured her leg. Her grand-
daughter lives nearby
Hartman said she's look-
ing forward to the upcoming
elections. She always votes,
although she said she's nei-
ther a Republican nor a De-
mocrat.
"I liked Roosevelt he
was the first president I ever
voted for," she said. "I liked
Carter, although a lot of peo-


ple didn't. I liked the one
that was from Missouri (Tru-
man), but I can't remember
his name. You know, the one
who had a daughter who
thought she could sing. That
was when the Depression
was real bad, but he helped
get us out of it."
As for living a long,
healthy life, she said her ad-
vice is simple: "Use common


sense! Get up early and go to
bed early The first thing you
do, eat plenty of fruits and
vegetables. You can eat
meat, but get mostly fruits
and vegetables.
"I never smoked, never
drank My husband didn't ei-
ther," she said. "Pay your
bills, if you can. Treat other
people as you wish to be
treated. That's important"


A.


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Crystal River
Alon.-Fri. 8:30-4:30
Sat. 9:00-12:00

(552) 564-278
SHOWROOMI

-1 A A W A AI


* VOTE PRO-LIFE *
Please join Citrus County Right to Life and the
Family and Pregnancy Life Center of Citrus County for our
Annual Bike/Walk for Human Life 9 AM Saturday, Nov. 3,2012
at the trailhead of Rails-to-Trails.
Please attend our Rally for Life at 11AM,
Saturday, Nov. 3,2012 at Liberty Park.
Special guests include: Local pro-life candidates
Jimmie T. Smith, (R) candidate for re-election
as State Rep. District 34
Benjamin Clapper, Dir. of Take Florida Back for Life,
a Campaign of National Right to Life Victory Fund

National Right to Life Committee PAC Endorsements
PRESIDENT: Mitt Romney
VICE PRESIDENT: Paul Ryan

Florida Right to Life PAC Endorsements
U.S. SENATOR: Connie Mack
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS DISTRICT 11:
Richard B. "Rich" Nugent
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 34: Jimmie T. Smith
Citrus County Right to Life Recommendations
CLERK OF THE COURT: Angela Vick
SHERIFF: Winn Webb











2012 Early Voting Dates:

Saturday, Oct. 27 Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012
(7am 7pm)
Vote YES for Amendment #6 and Amendment #8
Citrus County Right to Life
519 Cabot Street
Inverness, FL 34452
352-563-7017
kathy98@mindspring.com
www.citruscountyrighttolife.com
Friend us on i Facebook: Citrus County Right to Life
"A Right to Hope...A Right to Tomorrow...A Right to Life"
Paid Political Advertising Paid for by Citrus County Right To Life Independent of Any Candidate
519 Cabot Street, Inverness, FL 34452


* ** I HiB1^^yB



COME VISI I TUSOROMT IEWOURflVA
SELECTION OFPAVERSTILEANDWOODFLORI
^Tv~~~iJ ~ ~i '-![V '*IJIi^1Y*i 'TT


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 A5


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9 W





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Irene
DeLaby, 90
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Miss Irene E. De-
Laby, age 90, of Homosassa,
Florida, will be held 2:00
PM, Friday,
November
2, 2012 at
the Ho-
mosassa jp
Chapel of
Hooper Fu-
neral
Homes. Cre-
mation will Irene
be under DeLaby
the direc-
tion of Hooper Crematory,
Inverness, Florida. The
family requests expressions
of sympathy take the form of
memorial donations to the
Homosassa Wildlife Park or
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Online con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Miss DeLaby was born
August 12, 1922 in Chicago,
IL, daughter of the late
George and Bessie (Hurt)
DeLaby She died October 6,
2012 in Lecanto, FL. She
worked as a high school
teacher in Fox Lake, IL and
moved to Homosassa,
Florida from Ely, MN in
1989. Her hobbies included
fishing, canoeing, camping,
playing baseball and she
loved driving the tractor at
the farm where she worked.
Mrs. DeLaby was a member
of the Friends of Florida
State Parks and Volunteer
Ambassador for the Divi-
sion of Recreation and
Parks, always working for
the betterment of the volun-
teers with over 26,000 volun-
teer hours in the state park
system.
Survivors include her
best friend for over 60 years,
Shirley Roseman of Ho-
mosassa, cousin, Otto
Vosahlik, and her pet, Kit
Cat

www.chronicleonline.com

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com
Cin 'iiplna
L s4daspiort rndae


George
Hamill, 60
HOMOSASSA
George N. Hamill, 60, of
Homosassa, passed away
Oct. 20, 2012, at Morton
Plant Hos-
pital in
Clearwater.

of Buffalo,
N.Y, he was
born Oct. 17,
1952, to
Norman
and Char- George
lotte (Gree- Hamill
enough)
Hamill. George moved to
this area in 1969 from Pinel-
las County and was a retired
private truck driver, as well
as a shrimping commercial
fisherman. George was also
a well-known talented
handyman who could fix or
build anything.
He is survived by his chil-
dren, Norman Hamill,
Spring Hill, Rich Hamill
(wife Jennifer), Land O'
Lakes, and Tiffany Stoessel
(husband Mike), Connecti-
cut; parents, Norman
Hamill (wife Tracey,
George's stepmother) and
Charlotte Greenough, Ho-
mosassa; brother Alan
Hamill and sister Sharon
Estep, both of Homosassa;
grandchildren Cole, Court-
ney, Bree, Edward and Vic-
toria; nephews Michael,
Thomas, Alan Jr and nieces
Anna and Denise. Mr
Hamill was preceded in
death by a nephew, the late
Shane Paul Schippers.
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


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military service on local
obituaries.






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Robert
Higdon, 75
INVERNESS
Robert Joe Higdon, 75, of
Inverness, Fla., passed away
Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, at
the Crown Court Adult Liv-
ing Facility under the care
of his family and Hospice of
Citrus County.
He was born Oct. 10, 1937,
in Monterey, Tenn., to Mar-
vin Robert and Jessie Eliza-
beth (Andrews) Higdon. He
came here 30 years ago from
Vandalia, Ohio, where he re-
tired from North American
Trucking of Indiana. He was
a U.S. Navy veteran, a mem-
ber of Masonic Lodge No.
133 Floral City, Fla., and the
Bethel Baptist Church of
Hernando, Fla.
He was preceded in death
by his son, William Marvin
Higdon, May 1971; and a
daughter, Patricia Anne
Carte, December 2003;
brothers, Johnny Higdon,
1999, and Bill Higdon, 2008.
Surviving are his loving wife
of 56 years, Harriet, of In-
verness, Fla.; a son, Robert
Joe Higdon Jr of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; two daugh-
ters, Cathrine Rollen (Louis)
of Crystal River and Christy
Higdon of Georgia; two sis-
ters, Sue Smith of Floral
City and Alice Artz
(Richard) of Guntersville,
Ala.; 13 grandchildren;
and numerous great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be conducted at 11 a.m.
Thursday, Nov 1, 2012, at
Bethel Baptist Church in
Hernando, Fla., with the
Rev Nile Stein officiating.
In lieu of flowers, the family
suggests that those who
wish may make a memorial

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Inverness
Homosassa
Beverly Hills
(352) 726-2271
1-888-746-6737
www.HooperFuneralHome.comn


contribution to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory assisted the
family with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.




Harry
Horton, 87
LECANTO
Harry Edward Horton, 87,
of Lecanto, Fla., passed
away Friday, Oct. 26,2012, at
Citrus Memorial hospital,


Inverness.
He was
born April
14, 1925, in
Chaumont,
N.Y., to the
late Harry
E. and
Marie (Al-
lard) Hor-
ton. Harry
served in
the U.S. Air


Harry
Horton
Force in the


South Pacific during World
War II. He was a graduate
electrical engineer of Fair-
leigh Dickinson University,
and prior to retirement, was
a senior engineer for the
Sony Corporation. He
moved to Lecanto in Febru-
ary 1995, coming from May-
wood, N.J.
Harry is predeceased by
darling Marie and Marge,
and survived by dear Sylvia
and Bobby Private arrange-
ments under the direction
of Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, Fla.
DEADLINE
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


Douglas
Jones II, 35
HOMOSASSA
Douglas Edward Jones II,
35, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Thursday, Oct.
25, 2012, in
Lecanto.
Douglas
was born
Dec. 25,
1976, in
Norfolk, Va., -
to Douglas
and Debra
(Miller)
Jones. He Douglas
arrived in
the area in
1996, coming from
Carmichaels, Pa., and was
an automobile mechanic for
Citrus Kia and attended
Crystal River Church of
God. Douglas enjoyed
coaching soccer, football
and baseball, and was past
president of Nature Coast
Flag Football League. He
loved spending time with
his family and his children.
Douglas is survived by his
loving wife of 17 years, Misty
Jones. Other survivors in-
clude two sons, Codie and
Zachary, of Homosassa; one
daughter, Vanessa, of Ho-
mosassa; his parents, Dou-
glas and Debra Jones of
Lecanto; and one sister,
Donna Jean Patat, of
Canonsburg, Pa.
Memorial services for
Douglas will be scheduled
by the family at a later date.
Private arrangements are
under the care of Chas. E.


Davis Funeral Ho
Crematory, Invern
Sign the guest
www chronicleonli

* Obituaries must
verified with the
home or society
charge of the
arrangements.


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Destin, along with a grandson, Nathan. We reside in Beverly Hills
I'm veryactive in our community and am currently te President of the Bo
Directors for Jessie's Place and the Fundraising Chairperson for United Way.
I have been honoredto be your Sheriffforover 15years andhave served C
County and the citizens of Florida for over 30years in the law enforcement profess
A vote for Jeff Dawsyis a vote foran independentlaw enforcement profe
who is uniquely qualified and well prepared to continue to lead the Citrus County S
Office now and in the years to come.


Since becoming your Sheriff, here are some of the critical init
our agency has taken on and accomplished:
SAchieved state accreditation, 2000 -Reaccredited 2003, 20
*Achieved national accreditation, 2007 *Reaccredited 2010
SConsolidated police services with City of Inverness, 2004
SBegan administering Child Protective Investigations, 2006
*Consolidated police services with City of Crystal River, 2007
*Partnered with Citrus County School System to establish Cit
County Public Safety Training Center, 2009
SConsolidated enforcement section of Citrus County Animal
Control Services, 2009
SConsolidated Citrus County Fire Rescue services, 2011

RE-ELECT SHERIFF JEFF DAWSY NOV
THE RIGHT CHOICE...NOW, MORE THAN P
For More Info Visit jeffdawsy.COm Paid by Jeff Dawsy, Democrat, for


Gloria
Gaspard, 69
HOMOSASSA
A celebration of life for
Gloria Spencer Gaspard, 69,
will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 30, 2012, at VFW Post
8119, 8856 W Veterans
Drive, Homosassa. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Wilder
Funeral Home, Homosassa.

Raymond
Long, 73
FLORAL CITY
Raymond J. Long, 73, of
Floral City, Fla., passed
away Monday, Oct. 15, 2012,
at his home
under the
loving care --*
of his family .
and Hos-
pice of Cit-
rus County.
He is sur-
vived by his
wife of 54 Raymond
years, Car- Long
olyn; chil-
dren, Tina Ammeraal (Jim),
Deanna Birr (Eric) and Scott
Long; sisters, Norma Cirello
and Margaret Pennell.
A celebration of life open
house will be from 2 to 4
p.m. Saturday, Nov 17, 2012,
at the Floral City Commu-
nity Center In lieu of flow-
ers, the family requests
donations be made to
Hospiceofcitrus.org or
Pancan.org.
See Page A8


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A6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fresh Seafood
'N Great Steaks
Clawdaddy's Raw Bar and Grill opened January 2007. Specializing
in fresh seafood, such as grouper, tilapia, mahi-mahi, and while in
season crab claws: king, snow, dungeneous, and stone. Like the
raw bars in the Keys, they too shuck their oysters fresh from
Apalachicola Bay. Steaks and ribs are also on the menu and a
crowd pleaser surely. Our tiki theme lounge is where we have the
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also works well for the local business professionals who want a quick lunch or
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New owners, Kevin Leach and Ray Bass, have completely renovated the
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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 A7


1 6 1 /:


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I- J . .





A8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Nancy
Purdy, 61
INVERNESS
Nancy Lee Purdy, 61, In-
verness, died Friday, Oct 19,
2012, under the loving care
of her family and Hospice of
Citrus County
Nancy was born Oct. 10,
1951, in Great Lakes, Ill. She
is preceded in death by her
parents, the late Ret. Master
Sgt. Carl H. Purdy and
teacher Mary Eleanor
(Newsom) Purdy; and her
beloved aunt, Sarah Eliza-
beth Newsom; and her cats
Nick and Nora.
Nancy was employed as
director of training at
Chicago-Read Mental
Health Center, a position
she held for more than 20
years. Nancy was active at
St. Margaret's Episcopal
ministry in the food pantry
and Pastoral Care Commit-
tee and enjoyed helping
people in those capacities.
She was an avid reader,
sometimes reading three
books a day on her Kindle.
She enjoyed cooking, crafts
and calligraphy, and studied
and taught sign language.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her brother and sis-
ter-in-law, James and Gail
Purdy, Homosassa; niece


Sarah and her husband,
Paul; and their son Julian
Stewart of Tallahassee. She
leaves behind dear friends,
her brother-in-law Carl Gi-
anfrancisco; neighbors Marj
Fields, Steve and Ginni
Crandall of Inverness;
Theresa Strickland of Ho-
mosassa; Philip Goodwin of
River Forest, Ill.; Gloria
Langley of Torrance, Calif.;
Susan and Sarah Murieta of
San Pedro, Calif.; and her
cat Agatha.
Nancy was very close to
numerous members of St.
Margaret's Episcopal
Church -where a Requiem
Eucharistic Service will be
at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov 3,
with Fr. Eugene Reuman,
celebrant.
This will be a celebration
of Nancy's loving life and a
remembrance of her huge
heart.
The family asks, in lieu of
flowers, donations be given
to St. Margaret's Food
Pantry to assist in feeding
the less fortunate in Citrus
County
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
cor or phone 352-
563-5660 for details
and pricing options.


Chester
Scott Jr., 81
BEVERLY HILLS
Chester Paul Scott Jr, 81,
Beverly Hills, died Satur-
day, Oct. 27, 2012.
Interment will be in Ver-
mont. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home With Crematory




Roy
Sullivan, 92
ST. PETERSBURG
A Funeral Mass for Mr.
Roy L. Sullivan, age 92, of St
Petersburg, Florida, will be
held 10:00 AM, Monday, Oc-
tober 29, 2012 at the Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church with Father James
Johnson officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at Calvary
Catholic Cemetery, Clear-
water, Florida under the di-
rection of the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Home. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
w w w. Ho o p e r Fun eral
Home.com.
Mr. Sullivan was born May
18, 1920 in Pittsburgh, PA,
son of Leonard and Mary
(Gorius) Sullivan. He died
October 25, 2012 in Inver-
ness, FL. Mr. Sullivan was a
Navy veteran serving during


World War II. He was Cap-
tain of the New York City
Fire Department for 28
years and managed a little
league team for many years.
He retired and moved from
New York City to St. Pete
Beach in 1975. Mr. Sullivan
was a member of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church,
Inverness, St. John Vianney,
St. Pete Beach, Knights of
Columbus, Holy Name Soci-
ety of New York City Fire
Department; VFW, New
York, and Serra Club, NY
Mr. Sullivan was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents and son, Edward
Sullivan. Survivors include
his wife of 67 years,
Josephine G. Sullivan of St
Pete Beach, son, Thomas
(Kathleen) Sullivan of St.
Petersburg, 3 sisters-in-law,
Rosemary Crooks and
Shirley Coleman, both of In-
verness, Dorothy (Richard)
Domina of RI, brother-in-
law, Robert (Rose) Nunes of
Wildwood, 5 grandchildren,
Lorraine Brown of NY,
Susan Cote of GA, Edward
Sullivan of NY, Thomas Sul-
livan of Largo, and
Christina Tishuk of Largo,
and 7 great grandchildren.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition
of the Chronicle.


Maxine
Whitlock
FLETCHER, N.C.
Maxine Whitlock, 98, of
Fletcher, N.C., died Monday,
Oct. 22, 2012, at Beystone
Heath and Rehabilitation.
A native of Cisne, Ill., she
was a daughter of the late
Olin and Ruth Fairleigh
Golden. She was also pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, Clarence Lester
Whitlock; two sons, Richard
Lee Whitlock and Gerald
Arlen Whitlock; as well as
one daughter, Barbara La-
June Whitlock.
Maxine was very happy to
have been a Jehovah's Wit-
ness all of her life.
She is survived by two
daughters, Cheryl Wagner
and her husband, Bob, of
Fletcher and Karla Kenyon
of Chicago, Ill.; as well as
four grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be at the Kingdom Hall in
Inverness at 3 p.m. Satur-
day, Nov 3, 2012.
Groce Funeral Home at
Lake Julian in Arden, N.C.,
is assisting the family, and a


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

memorial register is avail-
able online at wwwgroce
funeralhome.com.

John
Wolfhagen, 87
INVERNESS
John Leo Wolfhagen
passed Oct. 27, 2012, under
the loving care if HPH Hos-
pice and wife Roberta.
He was born May 26, 1925,
in Brunssum, Holland,
came to America in 1955
and became an American
citizen July 14, 1970. He
owned his own general con-
tracting business in West
Palm Beach, Fla., and re-
tired to Inverness in 2001.
He was an active member of
Elks Lodge 2522 and Loyal
Order of Moose.
John was a very private
man and wishes to remain
so. There will be a private
cremation handled by
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

* Read obituaries at www.
chronicleonline.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

FLOWS
Continued from Page Al
over the place because of
saltwater intrusion,"
Busche said from his perch
on the boat ramp near the
campground.
Busche said in his eight
years on the river since re-
locating from South Florida,
he has noticed a precipitous
degradation of the
ecosystem.
"If you go down some of
these creeks here," Busche
said, "it looks like a hurri-
cane just went through. It was
not like that just a few years
ago. Now they (SWFWMD)
are talking about withdraw-
ing more water I don't know
what they are thinking."
The petition
Hope Corona-whose or-
ganization, the Chassahow-
itzka River Restoration
Committee, is also against
the proposed flow changes
- said she, too, has noticed
"significant" degradation of
plant and fish life.
"We also have seen a sig-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Norman Busche operates a business along the banks of the Chassahowitzka River.
nificant reduction in vallis- We think the saltwater in- role in all of this," Corona She said
neria (freshwater eelgrass). trusion is playing a major said. seeking the


her group is
restoration of


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 A9
the river and would like
SWFWMD to rethink its pro-
posals and instead restore
more flow to the rivers.
A group called Friends of
the Chassahowitzka and Ho-
mosassa has launched an
online petition at www.
change. org/petitions/help-
save-springs-for-florida-
manatees-say-no-to-
reductions-in-flow urging
the rejection of the flow
proposal.
The group cites, among
other things, "these spring-
fed coastal rivers are legally
designated as Florida Out-
standing Waterways," and
are home to federally en-
dangered species, including
the West Indian Manatee.
They "have already suffered
significant degradation in
recent years, and should be
statutorily protected from
further degradation and
loss of spring flow."
SWFWMD's position
Doug A. Leeper, chief en-
vironmental scientist at
SWFWMD, said the water
district sets MFLs to gird
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A10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


FLOWS
Continued from Page A9

against significantly harmful
withdrawal to water resources
or the ecology of an area.
The agency has set a 15 per-
cent threshold for significant
harm.
Leeper said the agency col-
lected the best available data
and coupled it with the opin-
ions of peer review panels -
one for each river before
coming up with the recom-
mendations.
The peer review panels
were comprised of independ-
ent scientists "who looked at
the data and were found to be
reasonable."
Leeper added the district
has used the same approach
it is using now in Chassahow-
itzka and Homosassa to pro-
tect other water resources.
Furthermore, he said when
SWFWMD first came out with
MFL proposals for the two
rivers in 2010, the percentage
of flow reductions were
higher than they are cur-
rently Leeper said if the pro-
posals are adopted by the
board, the issue could be re-
visited in a decade and "all of
the data at that time will be
considered."
He said numerous input
sessions were conducted with
stakeholders and members of
the public. Leeper said what
was gleaned from those ses-
sions was combined with "ad-
ditional science approach" to
come to the current proposal.
Proposals the governing
board will vote on Tuesday are:


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chassahowitzka River
System, up to a 9 percent re-
duction in flows. According to
SWFWMD, existing with-
drawals have reduced flows
by 1 percent, meaning this
new minimum flow would
allow an additional 8 percent
reduction. The previous pro-
posal sought an 11 percent re-
duction in flows.
Homosassa River System,
up to 3 percent reduction in
flows. Again, because existing
withdrawals have reduced
flows by 1 percent, according
to SWFWMD, this new mini-
mum flow would allow an ad-
ditional 2 percent reduction.
The previous proposal was
for a 5 percent reduction in
flows.
"We've had an extensive
public input process over the
last several years," Leeper
said. "As a result of that
process, the revised mini-
mum flows are more protec-
tive and based on the best
data available."
"We will present the staff
recommendations to the gov-
erning board on Tuesday and it
will be up to the board to make
the final decision," he added.
Florida Springs
Institute
Dr. Bob Knight, of the H.T
Odum Florida Springs Insti-
tute, said while he is not op-
posed to MFLs in theory,
these proposals are flawed.
"If they are saying we are
currently at 1 percent and
that is meeting the water
needs of the communities
around the rivers, why go up
8 percent in one river and up
3 percent in another?" Knight


queried.
He said if SWFWMD ab-
solutely has to set MFLs, why
not add only an extra percent
to account for growth in de-
mand. He said by SWFWMD's
own analysis, a 1 percent re-
duction in both rivers should
provide adequate groundwa-
ter availability for another 20
to 40 years.
The institute's website
states its mission is to provide
a focal point for improving
the understanding of springs
ecology and foster the devel-
opment of science-based edu-
cation and management
actions needed to restore and
protect springs throughout
Florida.
Knight said as it stands
right now, water consumption
in the district is 1.1 billion gal-
lons of water per day (gpd).
He said if you add the St.
Johns and Suwannee river
districts, the water use jumps
to 2.6 billion gpd. Knight said
in those three water districts
4.7 billion gpd have been allo-
cated through permitting.
"What I would like to see is
for us stop issuing new per-
mits," he said. "While I am
not advocating a moratorium
on permitting, I would like to
see a system where we hold
things where they are and
reuse permits. A lot of the
state's springs and rivers are
stressed and need time to re-
cover. We think all develop-
ment should be more
conservative. We don't need
to make things worse."
Chronicle reporter AB.
Sidibe can be reached at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


ACTIVISTS
Continued from Page Al

would be 2 percent.
Still, any allowed reduction would be
too much, according to Miller and oth-
ers who are dismayed at how the rivers'
environments and their head-springs
have been degraded in recent times.
In a statement as the vice president of
the alliance, he said: "Small spring
water flow reductions destroy the fresh-
water-salt water balance that is funda-
mental to the estuarine web of life. We
all know these rivers and springs are al-
ready highly stressed, and the removal
of more water will lead to their
destruction.
"But no matter. The march to destroy
the aquifer plows on."
Opponents of the minimum flow say
the computer models used to figure the
minimums are badly flawed.
For one thing, Miller said, "There is a
real problem with measuring it in a
tidal influenced river"
This region's coastal springs and
rivers are distressed already, he said,
and environmental changes already
show impact of reduced flow.
"They should set and cap the mini-
mum at zero where the level is now,"
Miller said.
Brad Rimbey, a Chassahowitzka resi-
dent who has been fighting the mini-
mum flows proposed for the
Chassahowitzka River, said the water
district touts the science behind its pro-
posal. "They don't have sufficient data
sets to come to a meaningful
conclusion."
In addition to having insufficient
data, he said, the district does not com-
pletely understand the river systems,
how they work with all the influences
on them.
"Look at the degradation that has al-
ready occurred in the river," he said.


"They don't have a clue."
In addition, he said, both rivers are
designated as Outstanding Florida Wa-
ters and allowing anything to increase
saltwater intrusion would be degrading
an OFW, which is illegal. The district, he
said, contends the OFW designation
only applies to point-source pollution,
but he disagrees.
He also cites the anti-degradation
provisions of Florida law that were
adopted pursuant to the Federal Clean
Water Act and said these protections
must be applied in the minimum flows
process.
Finally, he asked, how can the district
reduce the minimum flow number for
the Homosassa and not the Chassahow-
itzka? While he is not a hydrologist, he
is a registered engineer and said he un-
derstands their modeling and it doesn't
work.
"I don't buy much of their science," he
said.
Rimbey and Miller said it makes a dif-
ference when large amounts of people
show up to protest measures locals are
against. He said 110 people came to the
last hearing, which was in Lecanto. This
time, more Citrus residents and officials
who are concerned are needed to pro-
tect the future of the rivers.
Miller said the county commissioners,
though seeming sympathetic individu-
ally, have not endorsed the residents de-
mand the current river flows be the
minimum flows, but he would welcome
their support.
Tuesday's meeting will be in the gov-
erning board room of the district's head-
quarters, which is on the west side of
U.S. 41, about seven miles south of
Brooksville, just south of the airport.
The address of the headquarters is 2379
Broad St. (U.S. 41).
The approval agenda is early in the
meeting. Miller said anyone going
should be in the board room at 9 a.m.
sharp.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Director: Minimum flows will protect river systems


MARK HAMMOND
Special to the Chronicle
In recent weeks, there have
been a number of articles
concerning the setting of
minimum flows and levels
(MFLs) for the Chassahowitzka
and Homosassa river systems.
State law requires minimum
flows and levels to be set for
rivers, streams, estuaries and
springs and identify the limit
beyond which further with-
drawals will significantly harm
the water resources or ecology
of the area.
For the past seven years, sci-
entists with the Southwest
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict have been studying the
Chassahowitzka and Ho-
mosassa river systems to deter-
mine these thresholds. During
the district's analyses, the most
sensitive indicators were used
- manatee habitat for the Chas-
sahowitzka River and salinity
habitat for the Homosassa
River. Scientists also used data


Guest COLUMN

and methodologies consistent
with previously set MFLs. This
method was reviewed by an in-
dependent panel of scientists
and was determined to be sci-
entifically sound.
Further studies considered
existing water withdrawals, fu-
ture sea level rise and effects of
potential flow changes on water
quality. The District's updated
minimum flow recommenda-
tions for the Chassahowitzka
and Homosassa river systems
are now more protective than
previous proposals and will en-
sure future water withdrawals
do not harm these precious re-
sources.
In addition, district staff con-
sidered extensive public input
throughout this process through
a number of workshops, Gov-
erning Board meetings and
nearly two dozen meetings with
community groups and other in-
terested stakeholders.


The MFL recommendations
for the Chassahowitzka and Ho-
mosassa river systems are based
on science, and it is the district's
intent to comply with its statu-
tory requirements as well as
balance the needs of all water
users while protecting the river
systems.
The district's Governing
Board will vote on these MFLs
at their meeting Tuesday, Oct.
30. For information, visit Water
Matters.org/SpringsCoastMFL.

Mark Hammond is resource
management division director
for the Southwest Florida
Water Management District

This image is from the 223-
page PDF "Recommended
Minimum Flows for the Ho-
mosassa River System, July 15,
2012" available on the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District's website.
Courtesy of Southwest Florida Water
Management District


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Zombies to invade US


Marines, police

prep for mock
attack Oct. 31

Associated Press
SAN DIEGO Move over
vampires, goblins and
haunted houses, this kind of
Halloween terror aims to
shake up even the toughest
warriors: An untold number
of so-called zombies are
coming to a counterterror-
ism summit attended by
hundreds of Marines, Navy
special ops, soldiers, police,
firefighters and others to
prepare them for their
worst nightmares.
"This is a very real exer-
cise, this is not some type of
big costume party," said
Brad Barker, president of
Halo Corp, a security firm
hosting the Oct. 31 training
demonstration during the
summit at a 44-acre Para-
dise Point Resort island on
a San Diego bay "Every-
thing that will be simulated
at this event has already
happened, it just hasn't hap-
pened all at once on the
same night. But the training
is very real, it just happens
to be the bad guys we're


This is a
very real
exercise, this is
not some type of
big costume
party.
Brad Barker
president of Halo Corp.,
a security firm hosting
the training demonstration.

having a little fun with."
Hundreds of military, law
enforcement and medical
personnel will observe the
Hollywood-style production
of a zombie attack as part of
their emergency response
training.
In the scenario, a VIP and
his personal detail are
trapped in a village, sur-
rounded by zombies when a
bomb explodes. The VIP is
wounded and his team must
move through the town
while dodging bullets and
shooting back at the invad-
ing zombies. At one point,
some members of the team
are bit by zombies and must
be taken to a field medical
facility for decontamination
and treatment.

Nation BRIEFS


Alabama constitution: Vote
looms on amending history
MONTGOMERY, Ala. Segregation ended
decades ago in Alabama, swept away by the
civil rights marchers who faced down police dogs
and fire hoses in the early '60s. But segregation
is still mandated by the state's constitution, and
voters on Nov. 6 will get only their second
chance in years to eliminate an anachronism
that still exists on paper.
Amendment 4 the proposal to delete the
constitution's archaic language affirming segre-
gation is tucked amid routine issues of sew-
ers, bonds and city boundaries on a crowded
Election Day ballot. It's a striking call to see if Al-
abama will repeat what it did in 2004, when resi-
dents narrowly voted to keep the outdated and
racially controversial language, bringing national
ridicule upon the state.
The second time won't be any easier than the
first, because Alabama's two largest black politi-


"No one knows what the
zombies will do in our sce-
nario, but quite frankly no
one knows what a terrorist
will do," Barker said. "If a
law enforcement officer
sees a zombie and says,
'Freeze, get your hands in
the air!' What's the zombie
going to do? He's going to
moan at you. If someone on
PCP or some other psy-
chotic drug is told that, the
truth is he's not going to
react to you."
The keynote speaker be-
forehand will be a retired
top spook former CIA Di-
rector Michael Hayden.
"No doubt when a zombie
apocalypse occurs, it's going
to be a federal incident, so
we're making it happen,"
Barker said. Since word got
out about the exercise,
they've had calls from "every
whack job in the world"
about whether the U.S. gov-
ernment is really preparing
for a zombie event
Called "Zombie Apoca-
lypse," the exercise follows
the federal Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Preven-
tion's campaign launched
last year that urged Ameri-
cans to get ready for a zom-
bie apocalypse, as part of a
catchy, public health mes-
sage about the importance
of emergency preparedness.


cal groups are urging a "no" vote. They say the
proposed changes would wipe out some racially
charged language, but would retain segregation-
era language saying there is no constitutional
right to a public education in Alabama.
Gun found inside book donated
to Indiana library
VALPARAISO, Ind. -An employee at a
northwest Indiana library found a gun inside a
hollowed-out book donated to the branch.
The Times of Munster reported Saturday police
in Valparaiso are holding the gun as evidence.
Assistant Library Director Phyllis Nelson said
an employee at the Valparaiso branch of the
Porter County Public Library discovered the
antique-looking firearm when she opened the
book earlier this week.
Police describe the weapon as a gold, wooden
handled, 31-caliber, single shot, black powder gun.
Police have determined the gun was not stolen.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Romney woos Florida; Obama heads north


Candidates

keep pace in

final l0 days

Associated Press
PENSACOLA, Fla. -Jug-
gling politics and storm
preparations, Mitt Romney
dangled a plea for biparti-
sanship before early voters
in Florida on Saturday as
Barack Obama worked to
nail down tiny New Hamp-
shire's four electoral votes.
Both campaigns scrambled
to steer clear of a most un-
likely October surprise, a
superstorm barreling up the
East Coast.
With just 10 days left in an
extraordinarily tight race,
Hurricane Sandy had both
campaigns ripping up care-
fully mapped-out itineraries
as they worked to maximize
voter turnout and avoid any
suggestion they were put-
ting politics ahead of public
safety
The campaigns pressed
every possible angle in
search of advantage -
even paying attention to
punctuation.
Obama's campaign signs
for months have said: "For-
ward." Now they say: "For-
ward!"
Romney, who has been
striking a more moderate
tone as he courts women
and independents in the
campaign's home stretch,
campaigned across Florida
with a pledge to "build
bridges" with the other
party.
He coupled that message
with digs at Obama for
"shrinking from the magni-
tude of the times" and ad-
vancing an agenda that
lacks vision. Noting Obama
supporters like to chant
"four more years" at the
president's campaign ral-
lies, Romney picked up on
his crowd's own chant at the
Pensacola Civic Center and
said: "I like '10 more days' a
lot better."
His warm-up act was


Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, left, and President Barack Obama
continue campaigning across the country 10 days before the election.


more biting: Sen. Marco
Rubio, R-Fla., told the
crowd Obama was advanc-
ing "the ideas of countries
that people come here to get
away from." Pressed later
on what countries he was
referring to, Rubio said,
"any big-government coun-
try in the world" and specif-
ically referred to Mexico
and Latin America.
Obama hauled his cam-
paign to New Hampshire,
where he told volunteers at
a Teamsters hall in Man-
chester that: "We don't know
how this thing is going to
play out. These four elec-
toral voters right here could
make all the difference."
It takes 270 electoral votes
to win the election. Obama
is ahead in states and the
District of Columbia repre-
senting 237 electoral votes;
Romney has a comfortable
lead in other states with 191
electoral votes. The rest lie
in nine contested states that
are too close to call, New
Hampshire among them.
The president adjusted
his campaign speech at a
Nashua rally to appeal to
voters in low-tax New
Hampshire, hammering
Romney for raising taxes
and fees as governor of
neighboring Massachusetts.
Obama accused Romney
of running in Massachusetts
on a pledge to lower taxes,


then making life more ex-
pensive for the middle class
after taking office.
"All he's offering is a big
rerun of the same policies,"
Obama told a crowd of 8,500
gathered at an outdoor rally
on an unseasonably warm
October day
The president said Rom-
ney even raised fees in Mas-
sachusetts on obtaining a
birth certificate, "which
would have been expensive
for me." It was a veiled ref-
erence to opponents of the
president who have incor-
rectly said he was born out-
side the United States.
Copies of his birth certificate
have been in high demand.


The candidates worked to
lock down every possible
early vote without intruding
on emergency preparations
as the storm's expected
track looked to affect at least
four battleground states:
North Carolina, Virginia,
Ohio and New Hampshire.
Romney scrapped plans
to campaign in Virginia on
Sunday, and switched his
schedule for the day to Ohio.
At a rally in Kissimee, Fla.,
he urged supporters to keep
those in the storm's path "in
your mind and in your
hearts."
"You know how tough
hurricanes can be," he told
the Floridians.


Vice President Joe Biden
canceled a Saturday rally in
coastal Virginia Beach, Va.,
to allow local officials there
to focus on disaster pre-
paredness and local secu-
rity concerns.


ACitrs ,F .'


Sa Rubio' daughter
hospitalized after


accident
LAKEWOOD CREST, Fla.
- The 12-year-old daughter
of Florida Sen. Marco Rubio
has been airlifted to Miami
Children's Hospital after a
Saturday motor vehicle
accident.
The Republican senator
was notified of the accident
while coming off stage after
a rally with GOP presidential
candidate Mitt Romney on
Saturday afternoon.
A Rubio spokesman re-
ports that the girl is in stable
condition.
The senator campaigned
with Romney at two Florida
rallies on Saturday and was
scheduled to attend a third
before being picked up by a
state police cruiser along
Romney's motorcade route.
-Associated Press


waste


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POLITICS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 A13


_^^^^^^_
Calfll ffor re





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NEWS


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Emeritus at Barrington
Place invites veterans to join
the facility for a special break-
fast in their honor.
At 9:30 a.m. Monday, Nov.
12, Emeritus at Barrington
Place will serve breakfast to its
veteran residents and invites
community of veterans to come
join them. Call 352-746-2273 to
reserve a spot.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort). Reservations should
be made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-
637-5131, or email dmclean8
@tampabay.rr.com.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All pro-
ceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
The Citrus County Veterans
Service Office will also have the
pins available at the Veterans
Fair on Saturday, Nov. 3, at
Crystal River Mall.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who


knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Lunch-
eon for Military Women will
take place at noon Monday,
Nov. 12, at the Crystal River
Woman's Clubhouse, 320 N.
Citrus Ave, Crystal River. Those
who have never received an in-
vitation in the past may call
Leslie Martineau at 352-
746-2396 to be added to the
mailing list.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service-
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.
* Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the na-


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tional service organization,
Yoga For Vets. Free classes to
combat veterans are offered by
her at several locations and
times. Call 352-382-7397.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty
and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.


Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and


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Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
All are welcome at the Veter-
ans Day celebration Sunday,
Nov. 11, at the post. On the
menu are hamburgers, hot
dogs and accompaniments.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch. Informa-
tion regarding any post events
is available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
The Halloween party will
begin at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 31. Entertainment will be
karaoke with Mike.
All are welcome for a barbe-
cued ribs dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, Nov. 2. Cost is $10.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist


disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who

See VETERANS/Page A15


Nicole Baker, R.D.H.
graduated from Santa Fe
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As an opportunity to meet our new staff member and
experience what quality, personalized care in a relaxing
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cleaning (D1110), comprehensive exam (D0150), and full mouth xrays
(D0210) for $159.00.
CALL US TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT AT 352-746-3800.

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A14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


m


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A14

wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The
public is welcome at bingo at 6
p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.


Call or visit the post for regular
and special events, as well as
meetings. Google us at VFW
4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
The public is welcome at the
Saturday, Nov. 3, Bonanza
Bingo. Cost of $35 includes the
bingo packet and luncheon.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), orAmerican Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and


airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.


The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage, and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets


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Welcome home














Special to the Chronicle
Operation Welcome Home (OWH) conducted a ceremony Sept. 29 to honor Lance Cpl.
Lance Fagan returning from a tour at Camp Dwyer, Helmand Province, Afghanistan,
with the Marine Corps' 1st Maintenance Battalion 1st Supply Company Rein. Rather
than conduct the ceremony at a local veterans' club in the usual fashion, Crystal
River's Liquid Lagoon threw a welcome home party for Fagan. Most Citrus County vet-
erans' organizations were represented and presented him with items honoring his serv-
ice. OWH President Barbara Mills presented a large basket filled with gift cards and
other items donated by local businesses and private citizens. Fagan will be assigned
in his final year of service at Camp Pendleton, Calif., and after discharge plans to re-
turn to Citrus County to attend the Law Enforcement Academy and become a Citrus
County Deputy Sheriff. OWH always needs gift cards and monetary donations to allow
the organization to continue its program. To donate or learn more about OWH and
how to help, call Barbara Mills at 352-422-6236, or email John Stewart at
cornhusker69@yahoo.com.


at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-726-
5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 A15

tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-
5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men'sAuxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-
0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at 860-
1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.


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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



P"jayers Syrian holiday truce in tatters
Prayers


Bombs, gunfire

end cease-fire
Associated Press
BEIRUT -A Syrian war-
plane flattened a three-story
building, suspected rebels
detonated a deadly car
bomb and both sides traded
gunfire in several hotspots
across the country Saturday,
activists said, leaving a U.N.-
backed holiday truce in tat-
ters on its second day


Associated Press
A Bangladeshi Muslim child
offers prayers to mark Eid
al-Adha on Saturday in
Kishoreganj, north of
capital Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Eid-al-Adha, or the Feast of
the Sacrifice, is celebrated
to commemorate the
prophet Ibrahim's faith in
being willing to sacrifice his
son.


Panicking cow kills
Palestinian
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -
A panicking cow killed a
Palestinian man who was try-
ing to slaughter the beast on
Saturday during the Muslim
celebration of Eid al-Adha, a
Gaza health official said.
Muslims around the world
slaughter sheep, cows and
goats during the four-day hol-
iday that began Friday to
commemorate the sacrifice
by their Prophet Ibrahim -
known to Christians and Jews
as Abraham.
But accidents are common
as people frequently buy ani-
mals to slaughter at home in-
stead of relying on professional
butchers.

Protest



Ioll.


Associated Press
Protesters shout slogans
against austerity measures
announced by the Spanish
government as they march
to Parliament on Saturday
in Madrid, Spain. Spain's
public finances have been
overwhelmed by the cost of
rescuing some of its banks
and regional governments.
One Spaniard in four is
unemployed.

Lebanese PM
won't resign
BEIRUT Lebanon's prime
minister said his resignation is
"out of the question" after rais-
ing the possibility following the
assassination of a top intelli-
gence official last week.
Many in Lebanon blamed
Syria and its Lebanese ally
Hezbollah for the Oct. 19 car
bomb attack that killed the in-
telligence chief. Lebanon's
opposition has demanded the
resignation of Mikati's
Hezbollah-dominated govern-
ment, saying it is too cozy
with the Syrian regime.
AI-Qaida leader
urges kidnapping
CAIRO The leader of al-
Qaida has urged Muslims to
kidnap Westerners to ex-
change for imprisoned ji-
hadists, including a blind
cleric serving a life sentence
in the United States for a
1993 plot to blow up New
York City landmarks.
In an undated two-hour
videotape posted this week
on militant forums, the
Egyptian-born jihadist Ayman
al-Zawahri also urged sup-
port for Syria's uprising and
called for the implementation
of Islamic Shariah law in
Egypt.
He said abducting nation-
als of "countries waging wars
on Muslims" is the only way
to free "our captives, and
Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman,"
the Egyptian cleric.
-From wire reports


The unraveling of the
cease-fire marked the latest
setback to ending Syria's
civil war through diplomacy
Foreign military interven-
tion is unlikely, raising the
grim prospect of a drawn-
out war of attrition between
President BasharAssad and
those trying to topple him.
The proposed four-day
truce during the Muslim
holiday of Eid al-Adha had
been a long shot from the
start since international me-
diator Lakhdar Brahimi
failed to get solid commit-


ments from all combatants.
Fighting dropped off in the
first hours of the cease-fire
Friday, but by the end of the
day, activists said 151 people
had been killed in bombings
and shootings, a standard
daily toll in Syria.
On Saturday, the first
regime airstrike since the
start of the truce reduced a
three-story building in the
Arbeen suburb of the capi-
tal, Damascus to rubble,
killing at least eight men,
said the Britain-based Syr-
ian Observatory for Human


Rights, which compiles re-
ports from activists.
In the remote eastern
town of Deir el-Zour, as-
sailants detonated a car
bomb near a military police
compound, then opened fire
at those rushing to the
scene, killing a total of eight
people and causing exten-
sive damage, the Observa-
tory said. Syrian media
denied there were casual-
ties. The attack bore the
hallmarks of Jabhat al-
Nusra, a radical rebel-allied
Islamic group that has re-


jected the cease-fire.
The Syrian air force also
bombed rebel positions Sat-
urday during a fierce battle
for control over the main
road linking Aleppo, Syria's
largest city, with the capital,
activists said. Earlier this
month, rebels seized Maaret
al-Numan, a town along the
highway and besieged a
nearby military base, dis-
rupting regime supplies to
embattled Aleppo. The Syr-
ian air force has responded
with sustained bombing
raids on area villages.


Weather WATCH




When storms collide


Superstorm threat

launches mass

evacuations
Associated Press
SHIP BOTTOM, N.J. Forget
distinctions like tropical storm or
hurricane. Don't get fixated on a
particular track. Wherever it hits,
the rare behemoth storm inex-
orably gathering in the eastern
U.S. will afflict a third of the
country with sheets of rain, high
winds and heavy snow, say offi-
cials who warned millions in
coastal areas to get out of the way
"We're looking at impact of
greater than 50 to 60 million peo-
ple," said Louis Uccellini, head
of environmental prediction for
the National Oceanic and Atmos-
pheric Administration.
As Hurricane Sandy barreled
north from the Caribbean -
where it left nearly five dozen
dead to meet two other power-
ful winter storms, experts said it
didn't matter how strong the storm
was when it hit land: The rare hy-
brid storm that follows will cause
havoc across 800 miles from the
East Coast to the Great Lakes.
"This is not a coastal threat
alone," Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency director Craig
Fugate said. "This is a very large
area."
New Jersey was set to close its
casinos this weekend, New York's
governor was considering shut-
ting down the subways to avoid
flooding and half a dozen states
warned residents to prepare for
several days of lost power.
Sandy weakened briefly to a
tropical storm early Saturday but
was soon back up to Category 1
strength, packing 75 mph winds


Associated Press
A worker boards up the windows of a store Saturday as Hurricane Sandy approaches in Ocean City, Md.


about 335 miles southeast of
Charleston, S.C., as of 5 p.m. Ex-
perts said the storm was most
likely to hit the southern New
Jersey coastline by late Monday
or early Tuesday
Governors from North Car-
olina, where heavy rain was ex-
pected Sunday, to Connecticut
declared states of emergency
Delaware ordered mandatory
evacuations for coastal commu-
nities by 8 p.m. Saturday
New Jersey's Chris Christie,
who was widely criticized for not
interrupting a family vacation in


A satellite image of Sandy is seen Saturday at the National Hurricane
Center in Miami. Early Saturday, the storm was about 335 miles


southeast of Charleston, S.C.


Florida while a snowstorm pum-
meled the state in 2010, broke off
campaigning for Mitt Romney to
return home.
"I can be as cynical as anyone,"
the pugnacious chief executive
said in a bit of understatement
Saturday "But when the storm
comes, if it's as bad as they're
predicting, you're going to wish
you weren't as cynical as you oth-
erwise might have been."
In Ship Bottom, just north of
Atlantic City, Alice and Giovanni
Stockton-Rossini spent Saturday
packing clothing in the backyard,


a few hundred yards from the
ocean on Long Beach Island.
Their neighborhood was under a
voluntary evacuation order, but
they didn't need to be forced.
"It's really frightening," Alice
Stockton-Rossi said. "But you
know how many times they tell
you, 'This is it, it's really coming
and it's really the big one' and
then it turns out not to be? I'm
afraid people will tune it out be-
cause of all the false alarms be-
fore, and the one time you need
to take it seriously, you won't.
This one might be the one."


5 REASONS WHY SANDY IS
EXPECTED TO BE SUPERSTORM
1. A NORTHBOUND HURRICANE: Hurricane Sandy is moving
slowly toward the north-northeast and is expected to continue
its current path parallel to the Carolinas over the weekend. It's
expected to become an extratropical storm, which are systems
driven by temperature contrasts in the atmosphere.
2. EARLY WINTER STORM: Sandy is expected to merge with a
wintry system from the west, at which point it will become the
powerful superstorm.
3. ARCTIC AIR FROM THE NORTH: Frigid air coming south from
Canada is expected to collide with Sandy and the wintry storm
from the west, creating a megastorm.
4. HIGH TIDES COULD WORSEN FLOODING: A full moon means
the tides will be higher than usual, which will make it easier for
the storm's powerful winds to push water into low-lying areas.
5. COMBO OF SNOW, WIND INCREASES RISK FOR WIDE-
SPREAD POWER OUTAGES: Hurricane-force winds of 74 mph
could send tree branches into power lines, or even topple entire
trees and power poles. Those left standing could succumb to
snow, which could weigh down still-leafy branches enough to
also topple trees.
-Associated Press


Caribbean cleans up after Sandy f]


At least 58 dead

afterHurricane
Associated Press
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
- The Caribbean death toll
from Hurricane Sandy rose
again sharply Saturday,
even as the storm swirled
away toward the U.S. East
Coast. Officials said the hur-
ricane system has cost at
least 58 lives in addition to
destroying or badly damag-
ing thousands of homes.


While Jamaica, Cuba and
the Bahamas took direct
hits from the storm, the ma-
jority of deaths and most ex-
tensive damage was in
impoverished Haiti, where
it has rained almost non-
stop since Tuesday
The official death toll in
Haiti stood at 44 Saturday,
but authorities said that
could rise. The country's
ramshackle housing and de-
nuded hillsides are espe-
cially vulnerable to flooding
when rains come.
"This is a disaster of
major proportions," Prime


Minister Laurent Lamothe
told The Associated Press.
"The whole south is under
water"
He said the death toll
jumped Saturday because it
was the first day that au-
thorities were able to go out
and assess the damage,
which he estimated was in
the hundreds of millions of
dollars, the bulk of it in lost
crops.
Nineteen people are re-
ported injured and another
12 are missing, according to
Haiti's Civil Protection
Office.


ar-u.---j !--- -- -- -- --I
Associated Press
Locals walk across the flooded streets Thursday
of La Plaine, Haiti, after Hurricane Sandy caused
flooding.










EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Veterans Notes.
can be found
on Page A14
of today's
Chronicle.

f1w


Chronicle online

Chronicle online


I


users


share the beauty of nature in pictures


The Citrus County
Chronicle hosted an
online contest during
October where
readers sent in fall
color photos. The
winner for the final
week was Palmer
Chapel -
Cataloochee Valley in
the Waynesville/
Maggie Valley. N.C.,
area, taken by online
user "griffsretr."


Honorable mentions were ...


Autumn in the Country is a shot of a typical fall day in the countryside.
It was submitted by online user "rstrickll."


Visit to a Canadian National Park was submitted
by online user "jmlomanta," who wrote
"exploring one of Quebec's National Parks
is an experience never
to miss."

F, ^^f


Tahoe with 'Twain'

On a recent visit to Reno, Nev., Tom Hampton of Inverness and Patricia Sorlingas
of Floral City enjoyed a luncheon cruise on Lake Tahoe with "Mark Twain." Lake
Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the United States and the 10th deepest in
the world, with a maximum depth of 1,645 feet and an average depth of 1,000
feet. The lake is 6,225 feet above sea level.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Uiim
4II






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Daughter-in-law


entitled to opinion


SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 28, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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SAC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Revenge"Forgiveness" 666 Park Avenue (N) News Sports
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0 [WTSP]CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo)B (In Stereo) N Stereo)'14' c Dawn" (N) '14' 11pm (N Program
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GOLF 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf |Central |Golf CIMB Classic, Final Round. From Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
"Bailey's Mistake" "The Good Witch" (2008, Drama) Catherine "The Good Witch's Charm" (2012, Drama) Frasier PG Frasier PG'
S59 68 59 45 54 (2001) Bell,Chris Potter, Sarah Power. Catherine Bell, Chris Potter. c
2 21 32 2 2 "Alvin-Chipwrecked" *** "Unstoppable"(2010, Action) Denzel Boardwalk Empire Treme "Careless Love" Boardwalk Empire
II 302 201 302 2 2 Washington. (In Stereo) PG-13' c "Sunday Best"'MA' (N) 'MA' "Sunday Best"'MA'
f 1303 202 >303 i Boxing RealTime With Bill ***t "The Descendants" (2011, Drama) *** "Black Swan"(2010, Drama) Natalie
303 202 303 Maher'MA' George Clooney (In Stereo) R' Portman. (In Stereo) 'R'
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Huntlntl Million Dollar Rooms Home Strange Home PropertyBrothers'G' House Hunters Reno House Hunters Reno
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars PaPawn Starsawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Outback Hunters "Bad The Real Story of
(IST 51 25 51 32 42 PG *PG' *PG' PG 'PG' 'PG' *PG' 'PG' Moon" (N)'14' Halloween'PG
"Stalked at 17" (2012) "Taken Back: Finding Haley" (2012, "Abducted: The Carlina White Story" (2012, "Taken Back: Finding
LIEJ 24 38 24 31 'NR' Suspense) Moira Kelly Davi Cubitt.'NR' Docudrama) Aunjanue Ellis. c Haley"(2012)
"Deadly Hope"(2012) Alana De La Garza. A "Double Cross" (2006, Suspense) Yancy "My Fmily's Secret" (2010, Suspense)
50 119 doctor becomes the target of a killer. 'NR' Butler, Bruce Boxleitner. 'NR' Nicholle Tom, Philip Riccio.'NR'
*** "My Cousin Vinny" (1992, Comedy) Joe ** "Contagion" (2011, Suspense) Marion "The Hangover Parti l"(2011) Life on Top
A 320 221 320 3 Pesci. (In Stereo) R' c Cotillard. (In Stereo) PG-13' c Bradley Cooper.'R' c
MSNBC 42 41 42 Caught on Camera [Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Sex Slaves ILockup: Santa Rosa
S 109 65 1 Alaska State Troopers Drugged "High on Drugged "High on rugs, Inc. "Alaska Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers
(WG 109 65 109 44 14 53 ICrack'"14' Heroin" '14' Heroin Rush" (N)'14' (N 14 '14'
(NICj 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious IVictorious Victorious ISponge. See Dad ***| "JurassicPark"(1993)SamNeill.'PG-13' |Friends
OWNJ 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now?
IOXYI 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl
** "IAm Number Dexter "Run" (In Homeland Brody runs Dexter"Swim Deep" Homeland "Q&A" (N) Dexter"Swim Deep"
SHOWlJ 340 241 340 4 Four"(2011)'PG-13' Stereo) MA' into Carrie. MA' (N)'MA' 'MA' 'MA' m
NASCAR Dumbest SPEED Center (N) NASCAR Victory Wind Tunnel With Dave My Classic CarCrazy Australian V8Supercars
S 732 112 732 Victory L. Stuff (Live) Lane (N) Despain (N) Car G' Gold Coast 600.
iil 37 43 37 27 36 ** "The Last House Stephen King's It Maine friends struggle with the embodiment of evil. (In Stereo) '14, V ** "The Crazies"
ISPJE 37 43 37 27 36 ontheLeft" (2010)'R'
** "Little Black *** "The Muppets" (2011, Comedy) Jason ** "The Vow"(2012, Romance) Rachel ** "Battle: Los
AZ 370 271 370 Book" (2004) 'PG-13' Segel.(In Stereo) PG' McAdams. (In Stereo) PG-13' c Angeles"(2011) c
IN 36 31 3Fishing the Sportng Sportsman College Football Duke at Florida State. (Taped) Seminole Saltwater Into the
UN 36 31 36 Flats Fishing GametimeExp. Blue 'G'
"Nightmare on Elm "Halloween H20:20 "Pulse" (2006, Horror) Kristen Bell. Premiere. Sinister supernatural *2 "FeardotCom"
l 31 59 31 26 29 St. 5: Child" Years Later" (1998) forcesare behind a popular new Web site. PG-13' (2002)'R'
rTBS] 49 23 49 16 19 "Talladega Nights: Ricky Bobby" "Meet the Fockers" (2004) Robert De Niro. I "Meet the Fockers"
S3 **2 "Knights of the Round Table" (1953) *** "20 Million Miles to Earth" ** "Earth vs. the Flying **2 "First Men in the
TM) 169 53 169 30 35 RobertTaylor.'NR' (DVS) (1957) William Hopper. Saucers" (1956) Hugh Marlowe. Moon"(1964)
I 53 34 53 24 26 hBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters"Hail MythBusters "Fright Brainwashed (N) (In Flipping the White MythBusters "Fright
( 53 34 53 24 26 M'P'tG Hilinx"'PG'c Night" (N) c Stereo)'14, V'c House (N)B Night" '
TLC 50 46 50 29 30 Hoard-Buried Breaking Amish 14' Medium Medium Medium |Medium Breaking Amish 14 Medium |Medium
S 350 0 "Lucky"(2011) Colin Hanks. A wannabe serial *** "Traffic" (2000) Michael Douglas. The war on drugs *** "Night Catches Us" (2010)
i 350 26J 1 350 killer wins the lottery R' brings many casualties and few victories. 'R' Anthony ackie. 'R'
** "Resident Evil: Extinction" (2007, Horror) **** "The Dark Knight"(2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles ** "Men in Black II"
I(WI 48 33 48 31 34 Mila Jovovich, Oded Fehr.'R a vicious criminal known as the Joker. PG-13' (DVS) (2002)'PG-13'
(TOON] 38 58 38 33 "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man" Ben 10 |Dragons Cleveland |King/Hill King/Hill IFam. Guy Fam.Guy Venture
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Halloween Ext. Making Monsters Making Monsters (N) Making Monsters Americas Scar. Creepy Destinations
IruTVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout'PG' Wipeout PG Wpout'PG' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
(TVI 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond |Raymond Raymond |Raymond Raymond Kin
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special ** "Eat Pray Love"
(USA) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 (2010) 'NR'
Bridezillas 'Tabby & Bridezillas Cristal loses Bridezillas "Cristal & Bridezillas "Natalie & Bridezillas Natalie Bridezillas"Cristal &
(WE 117 69 117 Davina"'14' her mind.'14' Janelle"'14' Cristal"'14'0 Nunn flips out. 14' Janelle"'14'
iWGN-Al 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers!Blooers! Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay 30Rock 30Rock


Dear Annie: When my
son married six
years ago, my wife
and I welcomed his bride
into our family with open
arms. I knew my daughter-
in-law had views that were
much different from mine,
but I was confident that we
could coexist. I
helped them
with projects in
their new home,
and we got along
rather well. We
attended din-
ners and get-to-
gethers at their
house.
The waters got
rather rough
when I discov-
ered she had
written a letter ANN
to the editor in MAIL
our local paper
that contra-
dicted my beliefs and prin-
ciples.
I brought up the subject
with my son, and it led to a
lengthy argument. I cer-
tainly recognize that we are
privileged in this great
country to be able to ex-
press ourselves openly, but I
believe there is such a thing
as propriety.
I considered the letter a
personal affront, and it ulti-
mately caused alienation.
My son did not even wish
me a happy Father's Day or
acknowledge my birthday
this past year.
I told my son I am willing
to talk about the situation
anytime they want, but so
far they have declined.
What is your opinion? -
Dad
Dear Dad: We think you
took something personally


STodays MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Fun Size" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R)
ID required. 1:40 p.m.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R) ID
required. In 3D. 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity 4" (R)
ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Cloud Atlas" (R) ID required.
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7p.m.
"Fun Size" (PG-13) 2 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.


"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R)
ID required. In 3D. 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Silent Hill: Revelation" (R)
ID required. 1:30 p.m.
"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity" (R)
ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
8 p.m. No passes.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1:35 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D.
7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m.
"Chasing Mavericks" (PG)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Relating to the pope
6 Amino--
10 Numerical
information
14 Hang in folds
19 Efface
20 Aloof one
22 Fixed gaze
24 Became less
severe
25 Nimble
26 Weighing device
27 Addition result
28 Chose
29 Snow or traffic
30 Cordial flavoring
32 Danger
34 Polynesian idol
35 Took the stage
39 Rousseau title
41 Bangtail
43 Part of the eyeball
45 Mother----
47 Zoo denizen
48 Concealed
51 Old court dance
53 Elderly
55 Food container
56 -Baba
59 Right away! (abbr.)
61 Funny fellow
62 Praise
64 Lamentable
66 Barrier for water
68 Lofty
70 Greek messenger god
72 "- a Rainy Night"
73 Courtroom events
75 Ray flower
77 Luxurious boat
79 Like the Sahara
80 Admiration
82 Tall and slim
84 Grouch
86 Crop of a bird
88 Challenged
90 Town in Nevada
91 Establishes anew
95 Alma -
97 Employee
101 Alexander
Graham -
102 Droops
104 Rome's river
106 Brook


108 Assumed name
110 Go by
112 Tense
114 Letter after rho
115 Slugger
117 Simmer slowly
118 Association
120 Kite appendage
121 Electric--
122 Cushion
124 Witnesses
126 Remarkable player
(slang)
128 Itinerary (abbr.)
129 Skull cavity
131 macabre
133 Chopped
135 Hurdles
139 Game of golf
141 Peace pipe
145 Bubbly beverage
146 A Great Lake
148 Headquartered
150 Kind of show
151 Growing outward
153 Retreads
155 Essential
157 Hopeless one
158 Dei
159 Big sandwiches
160 Each
161 Hand tool
162 Observes
163 New Year's Eve word
164 Eagle
165 Tale

DOWN
1 Tranquillity
2 Elemental gas
3 Spray or war
4 Snoozing
5 Sheltered side
6 Hirtand Pacino
7 Drug-yielding plant
8 Silly
9 Set the
boundaries
10 EST relative
11 Surmounted
12 Spud
13 Where Noah landed
14 volente
15 Bird of prey
16 Moving about
17 Looks


18 Van Halen or
Izzard
21 Amber, e.g.
23 Call forth
31 Rainesor
Fitzgerald
33 On the up-and-up
36 Liquor
37 Monumental
38 Alice's cat
40 Score in golf
42 Painter-- Matisse
44 Shocking
46 Exhausted
48 Lame
49 River in France
50 Confederate
president
52 Rice Burroughs
54 Three Musketeers cre-
ator
56 Marketplace
57 Angry
58 Frosted
60 Earthy fuel
63 Stage setting
65 Wings
67 Put into office
69 Hastened
70 Provide with water
71 Mouselike animal
74 Goat antelope
76 Line of stitches
78 Male voice
81 ACurie
83 Abominable
snowman
85 Egyptian god
87 "The Time
Machine" author
89 Obligation
91 Pass along
92 The cream
93 Louver
94 Reported
numbers,
for short
96 Attain
98 Grow together
99 British composer
100 Send money
101 Innocent one
103 Go too fast
105 Held sway
107 Fable
109 Brown pigment


Cuss
Old garment
Spread out West
- Raton, Fla.
Minnesota city
Uppity one
Brooding
Brooks or Gibson
Something sculpted
Sequence


132 Urbane
134 Simple boat
135 The bounding main
136 Small drum
137 Lean
138 Pitiful
140 Prevent from
acting
142 Tropical fruit
143 Arab VIP (var.)


Towel material
Fluorescent
Mend
Curve shape
Compass pt.
Drain opener
Petrol


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


that was not intended to in-
sult you. Your daughter-in-
law is entitled to write a
letter to the editor express-
ing her views whether or not
you agree with her. Unless
she publicly named you as
an adversary, you should
have let it slide. In fact,
touchy subjects
should be off lim-
its unless you
know you can
have a debate
without creating
ill will.
You need this to
go away in order
to regain your re-
lationship. Call or
write your son.
Apologize for
opening this can
E'S of worms and
BOX promise not to
bring up the sub-
ject in the future.
Say you "agree to disagree."
We hope your daughter-in-
law will accept the
ceasefire.

Dear Readers: Today is
Mother-in-Law Day Please
give yours a call.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254. To find
out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features
by other Crea tors
Syndicate writers, visit
www creators. com.


A18 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


I
.|


10-28





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oct. 29 to Nov. 2 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, ce-
real variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
spaghetti with ripstick, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled fruit,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken with ripstick, turkey
super salad with ripstick, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad,
baked beans, chilled fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
mozzarella maxstix, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
ham super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled fruit,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken sandwich,
cheese pizza, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.

Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,


DAY
COSTESO


TAMPA


Biltmore Candlelight
Christmas
4 Days, 3 Nights
5 Meals, 1 Show,
admission to Biltmore
House, Winery Tour, Tour
of Asheville & Much More!
Tour Date Nov. 8 & Dec. 6
$399 p. p. dbl occupancy
$499 single
2 DAY, 1 NIGHT CASINO
GETAWAY TO
HOLLYWOOD, FL
4 Casinos, $105 Free Play,
4 Meal Vouchers, 1 Buffet
This is the trip you
don't want to miss!
Limited Seats
WELCOME BACK
SNOWBIRDS SPECIAL!
$99 pp dbl occupancy
Call for Tour Dates & Pricing
DISCOVER ATLANTA
3 DAY/2 NIGHT
Experience 4 meals,
world of Coca Cola, CNN,
Aquarium, Centennial
Park & much more.
Tour Date Feb. 19
3200 p. p. dbl occupancy
$39000 single
BILOXI
BREAKAWAY
AT THE
BEAU RIVAGE
RESORT
4 DAY, 3 NIGHT
ESCAPE
$50 free play, 4 buffets
Tour Date November 18
$22900 p. p. dbl occupancy
$35900 single


juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
breaded chicken sandwich, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled fruit,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, nacho rounds, ham super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, Mexi-
cali corn, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
barbecued roasted chicken with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, baked beans, potato tri-
angles, chilled fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese, turkey super salad with
ripstick, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
chilled fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, chilled fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.

High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby


r._- www.hollywoodtoursfl.com
Day Trip To Hard Rock Casino ONLY
$25 FREE Play $5 Meal Voucher 2 0--
Wednesday pick-up Homosassa: P r P ...
US 19 Wal-Mart parking lot 8:00 AM DAY TRIPS ONLY


2 DAY 1 NIGHT
GETAWAY TO SOUTH
BEACH MIAMI "THE
MAGICAL CITY"
Includes 3 meals. World
famous Polynesian Dinner
Show, admission to the
Exotic Fruit and Spice park.
Tour of Millionaire's Row,
Fisher Island and Art Deco
District
Tour Date November 19
$1 79 p p dbl occupancy
$199 single
Bok Tower Gardens
"Florida's Best Garden"
Nov. 26, 2012
Day trip,
General admission
Pinewood Estates and
lunch & Much more!
$54pp
CASINO
EXTRAVAGANZA
To Hollywood Florida
3 Days 2 Nights
Pkg. includes

5 casino's, total 5 meal
vouchers, 2 buffets.
Tour Date November 29
*1450 p. p. dbl occupancy
1 750 single
AN OLD FASHIONED
CHRISTMAS IN FORT
MYERS, FLORIDA
2 Day 1 Night GETAWAY
Includes Broadway Show
"Miracle on 34th Street", tour
of Edison/Ford Homes. Hot
Apple Cider& Cookies.
Admission to beautiful Marie
Selby Botanical Garden &
shopping at St. Armand's Circle
Tour Date Dec. 16 Limited
Seating Call For Pricing


Pick-up location in Hernando, Pasco Citrus, Pnellas & Hllsborough (Select Trips) Pck


"PIGS IN PARADISE RIB COOKOFF"
WEEKEND GETAWAY TO
IMMOKALEE CASINO
Includes $60 FREE PLAY,
Two $5 Meal Vouchers, 1
Breakfast Buffet
Tour Date November 17
Guaranteed Best Price!
8500 p p dbl occupancy
"11500 single
IT'S A SMOKY
MOUNTAIN
CHRISTMAS
GATLINBURG / PIGEON FORGE TENN
4 DAYS 3 NIGHTS
Pkg. includes: 5 Meals & $12
meal voucher. Admission to
Dollywood theme park
featuring live ice skating.
Tickets to Dixie stampede
dinner show, shopping &
much more! Limited tickets
Tour Date Nov. 30, Dec. 14
3 DAY, 2 NIGHT GETAWAY
TO KEY WEST
4 meals, World Famous
Polynesian Dinner Show,
$25 free play, on/off trolley
in Key West, air boat ride
& lots of sightseeing
Tour Date November 6
$18900 p. p. dbl occupancy
*219" single
3 DAYI2 NIGHT NEW
YEAR'S EVE PARTY
WITH A CHANCE TO WIN
$2013 EVERY HOUR
From 3 30 11 30pm
IrS LUCKY 13 ATIMMOKALEE CASINO
4 Casinos, $100 Free Play,
2 meals plus 4 meal vouchers.
Live entertainment,
complimentary cocktails
from 11:30- 12:30, plus
shopping at St. Armand's Circle
in Sarasota.
Tour Date: December 30
$204 pp dbl occupancy
$294 single
nighttnps SPRING HILL- PICK UP US 19 &Trenton


carrots, fresh broccoli, potato
triangles steamed broccoli,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds with
rice, turkey and gravy with noo-
dles and ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey super
salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, potato roasters,
sweet corn, celery, chilled fruit,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Turkey wrap,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
ham super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby


carrots, chilled baked beans,
potato triangles, dried fruit mix,
dried baked beans, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad, maxstix, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden salad,
green beans, potato triangles,
cucumber coins, juice, milk.
Friday: Pulled pork barbe-
cue on bun, spaghetti with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, fajita chicken super
salad with roll, pizza, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, cold


corn salad, potato triangles,
peas, chilled fruit, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casse-
role, garlic spinach, Italian veg-
etable medley, mixed fruit, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Grape juice, Salis-
bury steak, noodles with brown
gravy, garden peas, dinner roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef salad
(ham, cheese, whole boiled
egg, tomato), French dressing,
carrot-raisin salad, special Hal-
loween dessert, slice whole-


grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken parme-
san, California vegetables,
Italian flat beans, peaches,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Meatballs with brown
gravy, rice pilaf, mixed vegeta-
bles, pears, slice white bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information, call
-527-5975.


BR's Feed & Western 4434 E. Arlington St., Inverness
Citrus County 4-H Office 3650 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto
EPW BCitrus County Fair Office 3600 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
Country Feed & Supply 7120 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa
RO DEO I IOEO Crystal River Chamber of Commerce 3495 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
Easy Livin' Furniture 4100 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
SGunter's Farm & Feed 3187 W. Dunnellon Rd., Dunnellon
Hay Barn 7298 S. Florida Ave., Floral City
Bruce Kaufnan All proceeds Hillbilly's Tack & Feed 5844 Carl G. Rose, Hernando
onsirucAion benefit the Inverness Chamber of Commerce 401 Tompkins St., Inverness
br eight 34 230 Citrus County 4-H McFarlin Feed & Supply 1703 N. Florida Ave., Hernando
Sho s 4 SUPERIOR Service Master of Citrus County 275 NE U.S. 19, Crystal River
house of Lecanto ES epr
N- MEsMOR.'ARE V VanNess Auto Parts 1876 N. Florida Ave., Hernando
CcbNji.CLE ADULTS: s18 ('15 ADVANCE)
*, UB'NUG CHILDREN 4-11 YRS.: '5 ('4 ADVANCE)
knal CHILD 3 & UNDER: FREE
S1 ' CALL FOR SPECIAL GROUP RATE 10 ADULT TICKETS OR MORE FRIDAY NIGHT ONLY
Fo odoInomtinCal(52 6442


OFFSHORE
F"ISHINGRCHAR ERS
Cspr D,:nC C,,sr, R: R,,
GROUPER IS OPEN
s15000


. ,17 1 ( ,
S352-422-4640 ,
split Charters Can Be Arranged


by Ora's Travel the fun bus with snacks
IP Casino Resort Special $149pp
or Beau Rivage Resort $169pp
10/21, 11/11, 11/20, 12/23
Top Of The World 12/23 Cherry Wood Pine Run
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fine with all the other dogs at
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on vaccinations. An approved
adoption application and
adoption fee are required. To
access an adoption applica-
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visit www.roomforonemore.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Divorces 10/15/12 to 10/21/12
Sierra Daniel, Crystal River
vs. Robert W. Daniel,
Crystal River
Janice Y. Edge, Inverness
vs. Robert D. Edge, Inverness
Erika H. Griffin, Inverness
vs. Steven M. Griffin,
Inverness
Christopher Harris,
Inverness vs. Audrey Harris,
Hernando
Marc Manders, Inverness
vs. Jessica Manders,
Inverness
Helen V. Milum, Lecanto vs.
Kenneth J. Milum,
Madisonville
Dennis W. Perry, Lecanto
vs. Susan A. Perry, Lecanto
Lonnie Alfred Stacy,
Homosassa vs. Crystal Nicole
Stacy, Homosassa
Randall Frank Stout,
Inverness vs. Heather Sue
Stout, Inverness
Glenn Paul Tocha, Beverly
Hills vs. Denise Ann Tocha,
Beverly Hills
Jesica Carolina Wachter,
Goose Creek, S.C. vs. Tristen
Jay Wachter, Citrus Springs
Gina Louise Wilson, Crystal
River vs. Steven William
Wilson, Crystal River
Rodney Worthington, Floral
City vs. Jennifer Worthington,
Floral City
Marriages 10/15/12 to 10/21/12
William Steven Baxley,
Beverly Hills/Lori Lynn Catlin,
Homosassa
Rodney Robinson Blake,
Boca Raton/Corinne Petrie
Hubbell, Crystal River


Charles Corbin Blakemore,
Franklinton, N.C./Elizabeth
Susanne Matlock,
Franklinton, N.C.
Julian Clark Caruthers,
Beverly Hills/Irma Lee Perry,
Beverly Hills
Steven Thomas Doherty,
Floral City/Jennifer Rose New,
Floral City
James Loyal FoustJr.,
Inverness/Cheryl Lynette
Faulkner, Floral City
Leonard Phillip Giordano,
Inverness/Nicole Darcy
Biscardi, Inverness
Terry Michael Janis,
Homosassa/Kay Louise
Somogye, Homosassa
Roger Douglas Narney,
Floral City/Maria Lynne
Chonaiew, Floral City
Patrick Joseph Rash,
Crystal River/Alysha Ann
Johnson, Crystal River
Michael David Scott,
Hernando/Kristina Lynne
Howard, Hernando
Erik Karl Seith,
Homosassa/Ann Marie
Chaney, Homosassa
Cameron Jesse Simecka,
Wamego, Kan./AshlyAnne
Leinbaugh, Beloit, Wis.
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in
that area.


In SERVICE


Robert O'Steen
Army Pvt. Robert S.
O'Steen has graduated from
One Station Unit Training
(OSUT) at Fort Leonard
Wood, Waynesville, Mo.,
which included basic military
training and advanced individ-
ual training (AIT).
During basic military train-
ing, the trainee received in-
struction in drill and ceremony,
weapons qualification, map
reading, tactics, military cour-
tesy, military justice, physical
fitness, first aid, and Army
doctrine, history, principles
and traditions.
During AIT, the soldier com-
pleted the military police spe-
cialist course to acquire skills
to provide combat area sup-


port, conduct battlefield circu-
lation control, area security,
prisoner of war operations,
civilian internee operations,
and law and order operations.
The trainee performed as a
team member in support of
battlefield operations, installa-
tion law and order operations
and security of Army
resources and installations.
Additional training included
providing peacetime support
to the military community
through security of resources,
crime prevention programs,
and preservation of law and
order.
O'Steen is the son of
Robert and Claudia O'Steen
of Homosassa. He is a 2011
graduate of Lecanto High
School.


The children and grand-
children of Richard and
Janet Yant will host a be-
lated open house Nov 4 at 1
p.m. to celebrate the cou-
ple's 50th wedding anniver-
sary. It will be at 605 S.
Thompson Ave., Lecanto.
Janet and Dick were mar-
ried July 8, 1962, in Lima,
Ohio.
They moved to Lecanto in


1981, where they owned and
operated JDP Kennel until
2006.
They also own and oper-
ate Nature Coast Charters
in Crystal River.
The couple have a son,
Jerry (Crystal River), and
daughter, Pamela (Cedar
Key), and three grandchil-
dren, Holly, Heather and
Jacob.


Wedding

Graziano/Breeden


dinner, hosted by both fami-
lies, followed immediately
at the Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.
The bride was carried
into the ceremony by a
horse-drawn carriage
decked in the purple and
green colors matching the
wedding party The
Perceron horse, "Charlie,"
which calls Avalon Stables
of Pasco/Hernando his
home, performed his duties
with grace and elegance.
The couple is now enjoy-
ing a weeklong cruise
through the Carribean.
They will make their tempo-
rary home in Fort Riley,
Kan., the groom's present
duty assignment.


Nichole Marie Graziano
and Shawn Robert Breeden
were married Oct 20, 2012.
Nichole is the daughter of
Sheilah Graziano of Ho-
mosassa and the late Dane
Wojtyna. Shawn is the son of
Robert and Lisa Herrin-
Breeden of Homosassa.
The groom is in the U.S.
Army and has just competed
a tour of duty in South
Korea. The new bride is a
recent graduate of the Uni-
versity of Central Florida
and is an employee of
Moscello's Restaurant.
The ceremony was con-
ducted on the waterfront of
the Crystal River Archaeo-
logical State Park, with the
ministerial duties per-
formed by Brother Michael
Herrin. A reception and


Leo H. and Nancy M.
Boutiette Jr will celebrate
their 50th anniversary on
Oct. 28, 2012.
The two have known
each other since third
grade. The couple were
married in East Bridgewa-
ter, Mass., on Oct. 28, 1962.
Both are retired. Nancy
was employed by the Ply-
mouth County Sheriff's Of-
fice in Massachusetts, as


well as the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. Leo was a
registered barber, as well
as a truck driver. They have
lived in Citrus County for
21 years.
The couple have four
children: Leo III and David
Sr. of Massachusetts and
Debra and John of Florida.
The couple have seven
grandsons and four grand-
daughters.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.


10-28


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Central Citrus Rotary club's 22nd Annual Blood screening



ae BLOOD TESTING

FOR YOUR GOOD HEALTH!
Ok Genttal
C, + r + l SEVEN RIVERS
+ pJ JL Lj REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

ONE DAY ONLY
Comprehensive Testing atSat Nov. 10, 2012
DRASTICAUY REDUCED PRICES
Only $78.00*" 6:30am to 9:30am
Rotary Blood Screening Profile at the
(Includes: CBC, Lipid Panel, and Chemistry Profiles Forest Ridge Elementary School
including liver enzymes, glucose, and potassium, etc.) in Hernando

Additional $65.00 '*Oer $475 WIeu!
PSA TEST (men only) Test for Prostate Cancer D OT EAT OR DRINK BEFORE YOUR TEST
...nothing to eat or drink for 12 hours before
Additional $65.00 and up to the test. Complimentary coffee,
S, T3 u & T juice and donuts will be served aftr the test.
Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testing


Additional $65.00
Cardiac C.R.P. TEST Used to help predict
if a person is likely to have heart disease.
Medicare does NOT cover a full screening. If you
don't have medical coverage, this is your chance
to afford a compete blood screening.


CUT HERE KEEP UPPER HALFAS A REMINDER -
SEND LOWER HALF WITH YOUR CHECK

PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED:


Pre-registration is required no later than Nov. 7, 2012.
Complete this form and return bottom
half with your check payable to:
Rotary Club of Central Citrus
do Ed Serra, CPA
6118 West Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34429


Blood drawn by
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
licensed phlebotomists and results reviewed by
Tonialatoya Eley, MD, Board Certied In
Analomic & Clinical Pathology, Hematology.
Please understand that you should discuss the
results of your tes's) with your personal physician.


Cn Central Citrus County Rotary Club's
22nd Annual Blood Screening

Use ONE REGISTRATION FORM per person please.
(Make photocopies if needed./


X YOU MUST SIGN BELOW
Name:
FIRST MOLE fA


I eet Social Security #
S0 Blood Screening Test ..... ....$78.00 $ Address:


I Optional PSA- (men only)....$65.00 +$__
0 Optional Thyroid Panels.......$65.00 +$_


State: Zip:


Telephone: ( _


D Optional Cardiac C.R.P. .....$65.00 +$.
S p naCardiac0 $Birthdate: I I Age:__ MALE O FEMALE
TOTAL $__
The patient identified above consents to the procedures which may be
performed on an outpatient basis; limited to laboratory procedures.
The undersigned certifies that he/she has read the foregoing and is the patient, the patient's legal representative,
or is duly authorized by the patient as the patent's general agent to execute the above and accept its terms.
PLEASE READ ANfOSIGNE E SENDING IN.
NO RESERVATIONS.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED. ._
IPafr eri .ranC ii p t njr.t In ic te er, l,: 'R -.ssp:. r>! >bl. ParT, Da t e
If other than patent, indicate relationship rD
WitnebssSignature Date


OUR PRO FOOTBALL


CONTEST

AND FIND OUT!


One weekly winner will receive
a Large Pizza and 2 Liter Soda
from Papa Johns!
www.papajohns.com



SC I0 T R UES_ 'CA0 UM T V



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www.chronicleonline.com/profootballcontest


For the RECORD


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Yants


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Boutiettes


P A PIA L E sC DDDDA TIAM D R A P E
PAE NALC0 N E R DS T AAR E E ARS E D
AGILIENSCALE TOTALEOPTED
C"O NEE AN I SE P E R I L T I K I


H DIM IU E A D I N AL
AISIAP CA RD L IAU T R A G C
L E VEE HI G H HE R MES I LOV
TR I A LS D A I SY YAC TBAR ID
E TE REEDY SOR HEAD
C R A W D A R E D0R E N O
R STORES 0MATE R WO R E-R
B E L L lW I L T T B E RIRI N L E T
A L I AS A P SE T AUT 0 I GMA
BATTER ST EW CLUBTA IL

S N IU D AN E D I E D
OBSSACUSS R.OSND CCALUMET
EN AA HURRNSBASED G G MRE
AGE NUS HEROS EVT A VE O R
ANOTENU SIH ESY NE E RNE STU O RY
iN I TIESgI N- E g -I TIO-


A20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012











SPORTS


IMPORTANT NOTE FOR READERS
SBecause of early deadlines, the World Series,
several college football games and lottery numbers
were unavailable at press time. Please see
Monday's Chronicle for complete coverage.


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 NFL, golf/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 College football/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


No. 11 Seminoles hammer Blue Devils


FSU coasts to

48-7 victory at

home vs. Duke
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE EJ Manuel
tossed two touchdown passes and
Devonta Freeman ran for two
more scores to lead No. 11
Florida State's Tyler Hunter cele-
brates his punt return for a touch-
down Saturday against Duke in
the first quarter in Tallahassee.
Florida State won the game 48-7.
Associated Press


Florida State to a 48-7 victory
over Duke on Saturday.
Florida State's win coupled with
North Carolina State's loss to
North Carolina puts the Seminoles
back in control of the Atlantic
Coast Conference's Atlantic Divi-
sion while Duke (6-3, 3-2) dropped
out of the undisputed lead in the
league's muddled Coastal Division.
Florida State (8-1, 5-1) rolled up
560 yards in offense while limit-
ing Duke to 232.
Tyler Hunter returned a punt
75 yards for a score and Dustin
Hopkins kicked a career-best 56-
yard field goal to help the Semi-
noles offset four fumbles.
Duke quarterback Sean Ren-
free completed 13 of 21 passes for


Late to the party


Associated Press
Georgia running back Todd Gurley does a version of the Gator chomp in front of Florida fans after scoring a touchdown during the first half
Saturday in Jacksonville. No. 12 Georgia forced six turnovers of No. 3 Florida in a 17-9 victory


No. 3 UF doesn't show up, losing six turnovers to No.


Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE -
Georgia's defense was far
from soft against rival
Florida.
And now the Gators are
no longer undefeated and
no longer in charge in the
Southeastern Conference's
Eastern Division.
The 12th-ranked Bull-
dogs stuffed No. 3 Florida
from every angle, forcing
six turnovers in a 17-9 vic-
tory Saturday that left
them on the cusp of the
SEC championship game.
Call it the World's
Largest Outdoor Turnover
Party, and it gave Georgia
consecutive wins in the se-
ries for the first time since
1989. These have to be two
of the most significant vic-
tories of coach Mark


Richt's tenure.
The Bulldogs (7-1, 5-1
Southeastern Conference)
can clinch the East and a
spot in the conference title
game with wins against
Mississippi and Auburn
the next two weeks.
If they play defense like
they did against Florida,
getting to Atlanta should be
a mere formality.
The Bulldogs did little
on offense until Aaron
Murray found Malcolm
Mitchell for a 45-yard
touchdown with 7:11 re-
maining that put them
ahead 17-9. Mitchell spun
out of Loucheiz Purifoy's
tackle attempt and went
mostly untouched the rest
of the way Florida kept the
drive alive with Do-
minique Easley's holding
penalty on third down.


Georgia sealed its fifth
victory in the last 23 games
in the rivalry with what
else? a defensive play
Jarvis Jones knocked the
ball out of Jordan Reed's
hands near the goal line,
and teammate Sanders
Commings recovered in
the end zone with 2:05 left.
Jones had another huge
game against Florida (7-1,
6-1). The senior, who had
four sacks in last year's 24-
20 victory, finished with 13
tackles, three sacks and
See Page B4
Florida tight end Jordan
Reed is stripped of the ball
by Georgia linebacker
Jarvis Jones, rear right,
near the goal line late in
the fourth quarter Saturday
in Jacksonville.


12 UGA in 17-9 loss


92 yards before being knocked
out of the game in the second
quarter with an unspecified head
injury Anthony Boone was 3 of 15
for 37 yards against a Florida
State defense that leads the ACC
in virtually all categories.
Duke coach David Cutcliffe said
after the game Renfree would be
further evaluated by medical per-
sonnel, but still wasn't feeling very
good after the game.
Florida State, which has an
open date before returning to ac-
tion Nov 8 at Virginia Tech, is un-
beaten in 18 games against Duke
and has won by 19 or more points
in each of those games. It became
clearly quickly Saturday
See Page B4



Giants try


to extend


W.S. lead

Note: Game 3 of

MLB's World

Series not available

atpress time

Associated Press
DETROIT Frost coming off
their breath, Pablo Sandoval and
the San Francisco Giants finished
their workout at Comerica Park,
headed back to the clubhouse
and pulled off their hooded
sweatshirts and parkas.
Halfway to a championship,
they weren't about to let a little
chill bother them.
"The cold weather, obviously
we're going to have to deal with,"
pitcher Ryan Vo-
gelsong said Fri-
day "But it's the
World Series."
The Giants ,
take a 2-0 lead '
over the Detroit / -
Tigers into Game
3 on Saturday
night, with Vogel- Iigue
song set to start Cabrera
against Anibal TigersTriple
Sanchez. Tigers' Triple
anchez.l Crown winner.
Vogelsong has
been a postseason ace so far this
month, going 2-0 with a 1.42 ERA
in three starts. Facing tempera-
tures that could drop into the low
30s was hardly a problem for him.
"I don't suspect that cold
weather is going to be much of an
issue. If I am thinking about how
cold it is, it means I'm not think-
ing about what I'm doing on the
mound," he said.
For Triple Crown winner
Miguel Cabrera, Prince Fielder
and the Tigers, something better
change real soon besides the
weather or their year is going to
end real shortly They totaled
only three runs and 10 hits while
losing twice in San Fanacisco.
The Tigers are hoping a switch
in scenery the ivy hanging on
the center-field backdrop at Com-
erica has turned to autumn colors
since the AL championship se-
ries and a flip in pitchers
might help.
Throttled by left-handed
starters Barry Zito and Madison
Bumgarner at AT&T Park, the
Tigers are eager to see the right-
handed Vogelsong. Any right-
hander, in fact: Detroit batted .275
See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS


G Page B2 -, CT(



4SET


IN


THE


AME


Men's softball


starting soon


District champion CR volleyball hosts regional playoff game Wednesday


FlagfootbaI

kickball standings

updated

Special to the Chronicle
Men's softball is ready to begin
Nov. 19, to play on Mondays and
Wednesday. This league is very
competitive, and for adults 18
and over.
League fees depend on the
number of teams that enter.
For more information, con-


tact recreation
cialist Jess
352-527-7547.


program spe-
Sandino at


Men's Flag Football
The current standings for adult
men's flag football are as follows:
1. Blue (5-1)
2. Pink (4-2)
3. Gray & Red (3-2)
4. Purple (2-3)
5. Camo & Black (1-5)
Kickball
The current standings for adult
co-ed kickball are as follows:
1. Kickin' Nutz (10-2)
2. 'Cane Swagger (8-3)
3. Misfits (6-5)
4. Fun Times (5.5-3.5)
5. Mid-Florida Arbor (5-4)
6. Salty Dogs (5-5)
7. Conviction (2.5-6.5)


Special to the Chronicle
The members of the Crystal River volleyball's District 5A-7-winning volleyball team are back row, from left: man-
ager Noel Palmer, Samantha Pauley, Jamie Jaster, Myrcia Powell, Kylie Sisk, Casidy Newcomer, Sabrina Scott,
Laynee Nadal, Vickie Ridley, Cassidy Wardlow and coach Mike Ridley. In the front row, from left are Aspen
Phillips, Marissa Pool, Delaney Owens, Olivia Hudson, Emily Laga, Megan Creech and Victoria Warne.


Special to the Chronicle
The P.L.A.Y. programs for football, basketball and
cheerleading are accepting registration now.



Youth programs


coming up


Special to the Chronicle
Registration is now open
for the next session of PLAY
The next session will include
flag football, basketball and
cheerleading. Football will
be held at Bicentennial Park
on Tuesday or Thursdays.
Basketball will be at the
Citrus County Resource Cen-
ter on Mondays or Wednes-
days and Cheerleading will
be at Bicentennial Park on
Thursday from 5 to 6 p.m.
Both basketball and foot-
ball have two timeslots
available: 5 to 6 p.m. or 6 to
7 p.m. So pick the time that
works for your schedule.
The PL.A.Y programs are
designed for children ages 3
to 5 who aren't quite ready for
the organized sports leagues.
These programs teach the ba-
sics of each sport, while en-
couraging teamwork. The
cost is $45 per child. Sign up
for more than one sport in a
session and save $10.
Spaces are filling up fast
and pre-registration is re-
quired, so sign your little
athlete up today
For more information on
the PL.A.Y programs, please
contact Crysta Henry at
352-527-7543 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Elks planning Hoop
Shoot for 2012-13
West Citrus Elks Lodge will
stage its 2012-13 Hoop Shoot
Free Throw Contest for county


middle and primary schoolchild-
ren at 9 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 1,
at Lecanto Middle School.
Principal William Farrell and
staff will host the winners from
Lecanto Elementary, Ho-
mosassa Elementary, Rock
Crusher Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Lecanto Middle,
Crystal River Middle and oth-
ers. The lodge champions will
advance to the district contest.
The district finalists will ad-
vance to the state finals.
Competitors will be in two di-
visions, one for boys and one
for girls, with age categories of
8-9, 10-11 and 12-13; age de-
termined as of April 1, 2013.
For more information, call
Hoop Shoots Director Gene
Murray at 352-382-2709 or Jim
Brumback at 352-503-7904.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County
Parks & Recreation and Tennis
Pro Mehdi Tahiri for youth ten-
nis lessons.
Instruction will include condi-
tioning, drills, footwork, match
play, doubles and single strat-
egy. The five-week sessions will
be at the Lecanto Community
Park Tennis Courts on Sun-
days. Each session will run
from 3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is
open to boys and girls ages 8
to 14 and costs $60 per child.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540, or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.


Whopper of a catch


Citrus County girl

catches big bonefsh

Special to the Chronicle
AnnaBelle Touchton, an 8-year-old
Citrus County resident, caught a 7-pound
bonefish approximately 19 3/4 inches
long near the Inglis area on Sept 1.
Touchton was on a four-hour-long
charter fishing trip with Capt Clay
Shindler won by her 7-year-old sister
Kaitlynn through the YMCAs "The Best
Dad Ever" contest for Father's Day
Shindler took AnnaBelle, Kaitlynn,
brother James Touchton and father
James "Buddy" Touchton on the ven-
ture out into the waters.
Because bonefish have a reputa-
tion for not being good eating,
AnnaBelle released it back into the
water.
According to Sherri Touchton, the
three children's grandmother, every-
one had a great time. Sherri Touchton
also said all of the Touchton children
have been fishing for about a year.
Horseshoe club
slates tourney
Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club will have
a National Horseshoe Pitching Tourna-
ment on Saturday, Nov. 10.
Anyone can sponsor the tournaments
- held each month, September through
May each year. Sponsor for this tourna-
ment is Vicious Cycle, 5184 S. Florida
Ave., Suite 2, Inverness. A banner will be
placed at the tournament for Vicious
Cycle. Spectators are welcome to come
and watch the players.
The club welcomes new members. All
levels of play are welcome. To become a
member of the BHHC, call Ron Fair at
352-746-3924, or email rfair3@
tampabay.rr.com.
Tourney benefits
Wounded Warriors
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club will
have its inaugural Veterans Tournament
fundraiser for Wounded Warriors Project
on Dec. 8. Men, women and youths are
welcome. All proceeds will go to the
Wounded Warriors Project. Sponsors will
be accepted and recognized. There will be
two divisions, NHPA-sanctioned players
and unsanctioned players.
Entry fee will be $15. All players will re-
ceive a free hamburger or hot dog and a
cold drink after they have pitched. All en-
tries must be in before Tuesday, Dec. 4,
by 5 p.m. Entries can be made by phone
or email; payment must be in by Dec. 4,
as time is needed to form classes for
sanctioned players and a schedule for
non-sanctioned players.


Special to the Chronicle
AnnaBelle Touchton, an 8-year-old Citrus County resident, caught a 7-pound
bonefish approximately 19 3/4 inches long near the Inglis area on Sept. 1.


The public is welcome to observe. Re-
freshments will be served at a discounted
price for non-pitchers. For entry informa-
tion, call Ron Fair at 352-746-3924, or
email rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
5K to benefit
Boys & Girls Clubs
Runners and walkers of all fitness lev-
els are invited to participate in the Seven
Rivers Regional King's Bay 5K on Satur-
day, Nov. 3. The race begins at 7:30 a.m.
at Hunter Springs Park in Crystal River;
registration starts at 6:30 a.m.
Pre-registered athletes are guaranteed
a race T-shirt and a free ticket to the
Stone Crab Jam. Pre-registration fee is
$20; race-day registration fee is $25; Cit-
rus Road Runners Adult Club member
pre-registration fee is $18.
Seven Rivers Regional hosts the King's
Bay 5K to promote health and wellness
while benefiting local nonprofit organiza-
tions with a mission to do the same. This
year, $6,775 will be presented to the Boys
& Girls Clubs of Citrus County, thanks in
part to the 2012 presenting sponsor,
Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory.


Since 2008, race sponsors have given
$15,700 to support United Way of Citrus
County, American Cancer Society, Eck-
erd Youth Alternatives and YMCA of the
Suncoast.
Door prizes, refreshments and enter-
tainment are provided for athletes and
guests. Visit SevenRiversRegional.com or
call 352-795-8344 for pre-registration or
additional details.
Sami's Poker Run
set for Nov. 3
The third annual Sami's Poker Run,
sponsored by the Eagle Riders of Crystal
River Eagles 4272, will take place Saturday,
Nov. 3.
The daughter of Crystal River Eagles
4272 member Donna Harris, Samantha
Harris, 16, was killed in a rollover crash on
Oct. 16, 2010, in Homosassa. Sami's Run
will provide Christmas gifts for underprivi-
leged children in the community.
Registration is from 9:45 to 10:45 a.m.
at the Crystal River Eagles 4272, 5340 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
For more information, call Philip at 352-
228-2131 or Joanell at 352-228-2132.


SCST swimmer takes gold at state meet


Drennan take

two firsts

Special to the Chronicle
For some, winning a gold
medal at a state champi-
onship is something they
only dream about.
For Sun Coast Swim
Team swimmer Derek
Drennan, it is a reality
Earlier this month, Dren-
nan competed against 320
other athletes in the State
Aquatic Championship of
the Special Olympics at the
North CountyAquatics Cen-
ter in Sebastian, Florida.
For the second year in a
row, Drennan brought home


gold around his neck
This year, Drennan
brought home two gold and
a silver medal, taking first
all around in the 25- meter
freestyle with a time of
15.24, first all around in the
25-meter backstroke with a
time of 19.81, and second all
around as a member of the
100-meter freestyle relay
"He really wants to be a
better swimmer and is fo-
cused on improving. He
brings energy and enthusi-
asm to practice and is a
great teammate to our
swimmers," coach Cliff
Dyer said. "I'm extremely
proud of his accomplish-
ments and honored to
coach him."
On the SCST, Drennan


I ..~ sm -- -Us


special to me unronicle
Citrus County resident Derek Drennan took two firsts and a
second in the State Aquatic Championship of the Special
Olympics at the North County Aquatics Center in Sebastian.
takes the success in stride on the team.
as he practices with the At the pool he isn't "spe-
other advanced swimmers cial," he is simply Derek.


Special to the Chronicle
P.L.A.Y. participants play some indoor basketball.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




SPRT


Van Pelt narrowly missed 59 in Malaysia


Hamlin wins
truck race at
Martinsville
MARTINSVILLE, Va. -
Denny Hamlin ducked
under Matt Crafton with
five laps to go and won the
NASCAR truck series race
at Martinsville Speedway.
The victory was Hamlin's
second in the truck series
and came as the champi-
onship standings were sig-
nificantly jumbled.
Ty Dillon, who has led
since mid-September, cut a
tire with 48 laps to go and
went from running sixth to
finishing 28th.
James Buescher, only
one point behind Dillon to
start the day, finished 18th
but assumed the points
lead by 21 over Dillon.
The final eight laps fea-
tured a mad dash and
Nelson Piquet Jr. wound
up second, angering a lot
of drivers with his aggres-
sive driving.
Joey Coulter was third,
Crafton finished fourth and
Scott Riggs was fifth.
Keselowski
insists he's not
feeling title heat
MARTINSVILLE, Va. -
Brad Keselowski talks like
racing continues to be
business as usual.
The 28-year-old is lead-
ing the standings in
NASCAR'S Chase for the
Sprint Cup, and while his
margin over five-time
champion Jimmie Johnson
is only seven points, and
perennial contender Denny
Hamlin is only 20 points
behind, Keselowski quickly
dismisses talk that being
chased in the chase
means pressure.
Keselowski qualified
32rd for Sunday's race,
which could make him vul-
nerable to getting caught
up in an accident. But
Johnson and Hamlin have
started back in the field
here and rallied for good
finishes.
Hamlin said Keselowski
can hope to convince him-
self there's no pressure on
him, but said the pressure
will surely crank up as Ke-
selowski gets closer to re-
alizing his championship
dreams.
Magic waive 3
players, pick up
Vucevic option
ORLANDO The Or-
lando Magic waived a trio
of players and picked up
the contract option on an-
other in preparation for the
start of the regular season.
General manager Rob
Hennigan trimmed his roster
to 15 players Saturday,
waiving forwards Quentin
Richardson, Justin Harper
and Chris Johnson. The
Magic also exercised the
third-year contract option on
7-foot center Nikola Vucevic.
Vucevic, now under con-
tract through the 2013-14
season, was acquired from
Philadelphia this summer as
part of the multi-team deal
that sent Dwight Howard to
the Los Angeles Lakers.
Richardson was the
most tenured of the players
waived, having appeared in
105 games with the Magic
the past two seasons.
From wire reports


Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia -
Bo Van Pelt missed a chance for a
59 on Saturday when he closed with
a double bogey in the third round
of the CIMB Classic.
Van Pelt, the defending cham-
pion in the unofficial PGA Tour
event, birdied four of the first six
holes, then birdied five in a row
from the eighth on the par-71 Mines
Resort course. He had two more
birdies to reach 11 under in the
round and only needed one more to
break 60.
However, he hit his approach on
the par-4 18th into the greenside
bunker and needed a chip and two


putts to finish. He ended up with a
9-under 62 for a share of the third-
round lead with Robert Garrigus at
16 under.
Garrigus had 69. Chris Kirk shot
a 63 to move to 15 under.
Tiger Woods birdied five of the
first eight holes, but had three bogeys
and a double bogey on the back nine
and finished at 69. He was 11 under
BMW Masters
SHANGHAI Sweden's Peter
Hanson shot a 2-under 70 to take a
one-stroke lead over Ryder Cup
teammate Rory Mcllroy after the third
round of the European Tour's BMW
Masters.
Hanson, the KLM Open winner last


month, had a 15-under 200 total at
Lake Malaren.
The top-ranked Mcllroy, the winner
last year when the event was an unoffi-
cial tournament, had a 69.
LPGA Taiwan C'ship
YANG MEI, Taiwan South Korea's
Inbee Park shot an 8-under 64 to take a
two-stroke lead after the third round of
the LPGA Taiwan Championship.
Park had two eagles and five birdies
to reach 18-under 198 at the Sunrise
Golf and Country Club. The tour
money leader won the LPGA Malaysia
two weeks ago for her second victory
of the year.
Norway's Suzann Pettersen was sec-


ond after a 66. She won last week in
South Korea.
AT&T Championship
SAN ANTONIO Mark Calcavec-
chia shot a 3-under 69 on Saturday to
increase his lead to four strokes after
the second round of the Champions
Tour's AT&T Championship.
Calcavecchia, three strokes ahead
after the completion of the rain-delayed
first round, had an 8-under 136 total on
TPC San Antonio's Canyons Course.
The Montreal Championship winner in
June, he had 26 putts one-putting the
final five greens and six of the last seven.
Kenny Perry was second after his
second straight 70.


Expect points Sunday


Scoringparade:

Saints at Broncos

Associated Press

The welcoming committee for
Joe Vitt as he returns from his six-
game suspension to again be the
Saints' interim coach consists of
Peyton Manning and the revitalized
Broncos.
Maybe Vitt wants to stay away an-
other week.
New Orleans chose Vitt to stand
in for Sean Payton while the head
coach is banned for the 2012 season
for his role in the team's bounties
program. Aaron Kromer then was
the interim-interim coach and the
Saints lost their first four before re-
bounding with two victories.
Having Vitt back might add some
continuity for New Orleans. Facing
Manning and Denver might add
some headaches.
If not historic, certainly impres-
sive. Denver has gone through a
gantlet in the early season and sur-
vived with a 3-3 record. The defeats
are two three of the league's pre-
mier teams: Atlanta, Houston and
New England, two on the road.
The action began Thursday night
with Tampa Bay (3-4) scoring a 36-
17 victory at Minnesota (5-3).
Off this week are Baltimore (5-2),
Buffalo (3-4), Cincinnati (3-4) and
Houston (6-1).
New England (4-3) vs.
St. Louis (3-4) at London
The Rams have played well at home,
so shifting this game 4,000 miles away
isn't a particularly good idea. But at least
they went over to England early; the Patri-
ots decided not to depart until week's end.
New England coach Bill Belichick
won't let his players think about any-
thing but football -American football,
not soccer when they get over there.
"The time change, the travel that's
certainly different than most normal
games," Belichick said, "but it's not any-
thing we haven't dealt with before."
Atlanta (6-0)
at Philadelphia (3-3)
One of the more impressive stats in the
NFL is Andy Reid's record after bye
weeks: 13-0. Stretching that will be difficult
against the league's only unbeaten team.
Reid fired defensive coordinator Juan
Castillo after the Eagles' last game, so
Todd Bowles gets to design something
to slow Matt Ryan, Tony Gonzalez and
an offense that makes big plays.
The Falcons' performance has been
their best ever; they've not been unde-
feated this deep into a season.
Carolina (1-5)
at Chicago (5-1)
Everything is going right for the
Bears and wrong for the Panthers.
Two days after Carolina's general
manager was fired, star linebacker Jon
Beason went on injured reserve with
right knee and left shoulder problems


Associated Press
Unless the New Orleans Saints' defense has suddenly improved, Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning
figures to be able to find holes to exploit tonight.


that will require surgery. In the past two
weeks, the Panthers also lost center
Ryan Kalil and cornerback Chris Gam-
ble to season-ending injuries. They've
dropped four in a row.
Chicago has won four straight, allow-
ing a total of 34 points. These Monsters
of the Midway are led by the secondary,
where Charles Tillman, Tim Jennings
and Major Wright have been superb.
New York Giants (5-2)
at Dallas (3-3)
Ah, home sweet home for the Gi-
ants, who are 3-0 in Cowboys Stadium.
"Certainly you want to protect your
home-field advantage and certainly play
well at home," Cowboys coach Jason
Garrett, said, "but you want to play well
on the road, you want to play well in the
parking lot, you want to play well on the
moon. Our players hear me say that a
lot. It will be a great challenge for us at
our place on Sunday against this foot-
ball team."
New York found a pass rush against
Washington, although it still was spotty.
And if this one is close near the end,
count on Eli Manning to produce.
San Fran. (5-2) at Arizona
(4-3), Monday night
Arizona has lost three straight, in
great part because it can't protect its
quarterbacks. This is hardly the
matchup for fixing that problem: San
Francisco has the league's stingiest
and most physical defense.
The Cardinals are the only team in the
league not to allow more than 21 points.
Of course, they're not likely to score that
many against the Niners, whose 100
points given up are the fewest for any
club that's played seven games.
Washington (3-4)
at Pittsburgh (3-3)
For fans into quarterbacks who keep
plays alive, this is the game. Sensa-
tional Redskins rookie Robert Griffiin III


put on quite a show in the Meadow-
lands last Sunday with his speed and
shiftiness not to mention a strong
and pinpoint arm. Ben Roethlisberger
does it with his strength and power.
Both banged-up defenses are vulner-
able to such exploits, especially Wash-
ington's if LB London Fletcher's
231-game streak ends because of
hamstring and balance issues.
Jacksonville (1-5)
at Green Bay (4-3)
This is a tough enough assignment
for the reeling Jaguars with Maurice
Jones-Drew on hand. MJD won't be at
Lambeau Field, sidelined for several
weeks with a sprained left foot.
Green Bay has its offense in form
after some sloppiness, but will be with-
out defensive leader Charles Woodson
in the secondary. Woodson broke his
right collarbone.
"He's a guy people have to account
for every time," Aaron Rodgers said. "I
know if I was playing our defense, I
would want to know where he's at."
Seattle (4-3)
at Detroit (2-4)
The Lions are on a short week after
their offense was invisible Monday night
in Chicago. The Seahawks haven't
played since Oct. 18, when they did lit-
tle with the ball at San Francisco.
Seattle has won the last three in the
series, and could make the day miser-
able for Detroit's offense if it can't find a
running game. Plus, Lions QB Matthew
Stafford has five TD passes and six in-
terceptions one season after throwing for
41 TDs with 16 picks. The Seahawks'
defensive strength is in the secondary.
Indianapolis (3-3)
at Tennessee (3-4)
Two inconsistent teams with improv-
ing outlooks, particularly the Titans,
whose offense has come alive the last
two weeks with Matt Hasselbeck in for


injured QB Jake Locker, and running
back Chris Johnson finally finding his
way. But Tennessee's defense has
struggled: it has only nine sacks, ranks
30th in yards surrendered and has just
seven takeaways.
But the Colts have forced only three
turnovers, dropping them to minus-9 in
turnover margin. Still, they've beaten
Minnesota and Green Bay, albeit at
home; Indy is 0-2 on the road.
Miami (3-3)
at New York Jets (3-4)
The Dolphins probably should have
beaten the Jets in Week 3, with usually
reliable Dan Carpenter missing some
makable field goals. Since throwing two
interceptions at Arizona on Sept. 30,
Ryan Tannehill has none in two games.
He has a quarterback rating of at least
91.0 in each game during that span,
with Miami winning twice.
The Jets have not swept Miami in
Rex Ryan's three-plus years as their
coach.
San Diego (3-3)
at Cleveland (1-6)
After that debacle at home against
Denver in which they blew a 24-0
lead, the Chargers had two weeks to
lick their wounds and find some solu-
tions. A key will be if they can improve
that ragged pass defense; they're al-
ready stingy against the run.
Cleveland has stayed close in most of
its games, but also has lost four in a row
and nine of the last 11 against San Diego.
Oakland (2-4)
at Kansas City (1-5)
Once among the fiercest and most
anticipated rivalries, Raiders-Chiefs has
become barely watchable. At least Oak-
land has the excuse of going through a
transition period, and it comes off an
uplifting comeback victory. That the
Raiders fell behind so badly against
weak Jacksonville is another story.


NFL Stats CENTRAL


AFC Leaders
Week 8
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TI
Manning, DEN 227 154 1808 1
Roethlis., PIT 235 155 1765 1
Brady, NWE 285 186 2104 1
Schaub, HOU 222 140 1650 1
Locker, TEN 106 67 781
Dalton, CIN 243 156 1831 1
Fitzpatrick, BUF 218 133 1435 1
C. Palmer, OAK 241 148 1732
P Rivers, SND 209 139 1492 1
Rushers
Att Yds Avg L(
A. Foster, HOU 168 659 3.92 4
J. Charles, KAN 115 591 5.14 91
Ridley, NWE 135 589 4.36 2
R. Rice, BAL 106 524 4.94 4
Spiller, BUF 72 523 7.26 5(
C. Johnson, TEN 110 496 4.51 8:
Re. Bush, MIA 98 434 4.43 65
Greene, NYJ 124 432 3.48 2
McGahee, DEN 100 432 4.32 3
Green-Ellis, CIN 125 431 3.45 2
Receivers
No Yds Avg L(
Welker, NWE 54 688 12.7 5
Wayne, IND 47 666 14.2 3(
A.. Green, CIN 44 636 14.5 7:
Ant. Brown, PIT 36 442 12.3 2
Ke.Wright, TEN 36 304 8.4 3
Gronkow.,NWE 35 434 12.4 4
Lloyd, NWE 35 407 11.6 2
A. Johnson, HOU 34 444 13.1 6(
Decker, DEN 34 441 13.0 5


Bowe, KAN 34 427 12.6 33t
Scoring
Touchdowns


TDRush
A. Foster, HOU 10 9
A..Green, CIN 7 0
H. Miller, PIT 5 0
Greene, NYJ 5 5
Gronkow., NWE 5 0
R. Rice, BAL 5 5
Richardson, CLE 5 4
Spiller, BUF 5 4
Battle, SND 4 3
Chandler, BUF 4 0
Kicking
PAT
Gostkowski, NWE 23-23 1
S.Graham, HOU 25-25 1
Tucker, BAL 18-18 1
Suisham, PIT 12-12 1
Nugent, CIN 19-19 1
P Dawson, CLE 15-15 1
Folk, NYJ 18-18 1
Janikowski, OAK 9-9 1
Bironas, TEN 17-17 1
Vinatieri, IND 10-10 1


Rec Ret
1 0
7 0
5 0
0 0
5 0
0 0
1 0
1 0
1 0
4 0


NFC Leaders
Note: Does not include Bucs-Vikings'
Thursday game
Week 7
Quarterbacks
Att Cor Yds TD II
Rodgers, GBY 262 1831979 19
Griffin III, WAS 189 1331601 7
M. Ryan, ATL 236 1601756 14
Brees, NOR 273 1662097 18


3 Ale. Smith, SNF
Manning, NYG
Freeman, TAM
ts Ponder, MIN
60 Kolb, ARI


Morris, WAS
M. Lynch, SEA
A. Peterson, MII
Gore, SNF
Bradshaw, NYG
Griffin III, WAS
L. McCoy, PHL
D. Martin, TAM
S. Jackson, STL
Forte, CHI

Harvin, MIN
Cruz, NYG
Gonzalez, ATL
B. Marshall, CH
J. Nelson, GBY
Fitzgerald, ARI
Ca. Johnson, D
R. White, ATL
Cobb, GBY
D. Bryant, DAL


Cruz, NYG
Jam. Jones, GB
Griffin III, WAS
J. Nelson, GBY
Rudolph, MIN


190 1271427
265 1692109
187 1041538
227 1521492
183 1091169
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
138 658 4.77
147 652 4.44
N 136 652 4.79
103 601 5.83
104 492 4.73
64 468 7.31
111 459 4.14
100 408 4.08
S 101 380 3.76
80 366 4.58
Receivers
No Yds Avg
53 577 10.9
50 627 12.5
43 430 10.0
S 41 577 14.1
40 532 13.3
40 459 11.5
ET 38 592 15.6
37 553 14.9
37 435 11.8
36 378 10.5
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec
7 0 7
3Y 7 0 7
6 6 0
5 0 5
5 0 5


Colston, NOR 5 0 5 C
V. Jackson, TAM 5 0 5 C
Morris, WAS 5 5 0 C
Roberts, ARI 5 0 5 C
And. Brown, NYG 4 4 0 C
Kicking
PAT FG LG
Tynes, NYG 20-20 19-21 49
Walsh, MIN 15-15 16-17 55
Zuerlein, STL 9-9 17-20 60
Ja. Hanson, DET 11-11 16-17 53
Akers, SNF 18-18 13-18 63
M. Bryant, ATL 18-18 13-14 55
Gould, CHI 18-18 12-13 54
Hauschka,SEA 11-11 13-15 52
Barth, TAM 16-16 10-12 57
Feely, ARI 13-13 11-14 61
NFL standings


New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


AFC
East
W L T
4 3 0
3 3 0
3 4 0
3 4 0
South
W L T
6 1 0
3 3 0
3 4 0
1 5 0
North
W L T
5 2 0
3 3 0
3 4 0


Pct PF
.571 217
.500 120
.429 159
.429 171
Pct PF
.857 216
.500 117
.429 149
.167 88


Cleveland

Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


N.Y Giants
Philadelphia
Dallas
Washington

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina


Chicago
Minnesota
Green Bay
Detroit

San Francisco
Arizona
Seattle
St. Louis


1 6 0
West
W L T
3 3 0
3 3 0
2 4 0
1 5 0
NFC
East
W L T
5 2 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
3 4 0
South
W L T
6 0 0
3 4 0
2 4 0
1 5 0
North
W L T
5 1 0
5 3 0
4 3 0
2 4 0
West
W L T
5 2 0
4 3 0
4 3 0
3 4 0
340


Thursday's Ga
Tampa Bay 36, Minnesota 17
Sunday's Gan
Jacksonville at Green Bay, 1


.143 147 180 Indianapolis atTennessee, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Pct PF PA Miami at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
.500 170 138 San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
.500 148 137 Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
.333 113 171 Seattle at Detroit, 1 p.m.
.167 104 183 Washington at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
New England vs. St. Louis at London, 1 p.m.
Pct PF PA Oakland at Kansas City, 4:05 p.m.
.714 205 137 N.Y Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
.500 103 125 New Orleans at Denver, 8:20 p.m.
.500 113 133 Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Houston
.429 201 200 Monday's Game
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.
Pct PF PA Thursday, Nov.1
1.000 171 113 Kansas City at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
.429 184 153 Sunday, Nov.4
.333 176 182 Arizona at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
.167 106 144 Chicago atTennessee, 1 p.m.
Pct PF PA Buffalo at Houston, 1 p.m.
.833 162 78 Carolina at Washington, 1 p.m.
.625 184 167 Detroit at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
.571 184 155 Denver at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
.333 133 150 Baltimore at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Pct PF PA Minnesota at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
.714 165 100 Tampa Bay at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
.571 124 118 Pittsburgh at N.Y Giants, 4:25 p.m.
.571 116 106 Dallas at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
.429 130 141
ame Open: N.Y Jets, New England, San Francisco,
St. Louis
ies Monday, Nov. 5
p.m. Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


Citrus 63,
Lake Weir 41
LW 3 6 13 19--41
CH 13 23 14 13- 63
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CIT D. Chapes 25-yd run (kick good)
CIT D. Chapes 9-yd run (kick failed)
LW B. Venezuela 37-yd FG
Second Quarter
CIT B.Whaley 24-yd run (2-pt try failed)
LW J. Hamilton 25-yd run (2-pt try failed)
CIT A. White 1 -yd run (kick good)
CIT D. Chapes 8-yd run (kick good)
CIT -A. Killeen 42-yd FG
Third Quarter
LW C. Blackburn 27-yd pass to K. Reynolds
(kick good)
CIT J. Pouncey 30-yd run (kick good)
CIT B. Whaley 2-yd run (kick good)
LW -T Rotstein 3-yd run (kick blocked)
Fourth Quarter
CIT D. Chapes 1 -yd run (2-pt try failed)
LW -C. Blackburn 48-yd pass to J. Etienne (2-
pt try failed)
CIT B. Whaley 6-yd run (kick good)
LW C. Blackburn 80-yd pass to K. Reynolds
(2-pt try failed)
LW C. Blackburn 43-yd pass to J. Kiner (kick
good)
Individual Leaders
Passing LW: C. Blackburn 21-41-535-4-1;
CIT: C. Bogart 1-1-20-0-0.
Rushing LW: J. Hamilton 5-76-1; CIT: D.
Chapes 19-200-4, A. White 9-75-1, B. Whaley
18-74-3, J. Vineyard 8-59, J. Pouncey 7-46.
Receiving LW: K. Reynolds 3-177-2, J. Eti-
enne 5-142-1, S. Evans 9-134, J. Kiner 1-43-1;
CIT: S. Smith 1-20.

Dunnellon 40,
Crystal River 29
DH 6 13 7 14 40
CR 7 7 9 6 29
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
DH J. Swoll 1-yard run (kick fail)
CR Jo. LaFleur 10-yard run (J. McAteer kick)
Second Quarter
DH Boley 1-yard run (run fail)
CR S. Franklin 15-yard pass from LaFleur
(McAteer kick)
DH Boley 40-yard run (S. Williams kick)
Third Quarter
CR Safety
CR Franklin 39-yard pass from LaFleur
(McAteer kick)
DH Boley 12-yard run (Williams kick)
Fourth Quarter
CR -T Reynolds 15-yard pass from LaFleur
(kick fail)
DH Swoll 70-yard kick return (Williams kick)
DH -Swoll 6-yard run (Williams kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing DH: Boley 2-3-15-0-0; CR: LaFleur
6-9-107-3-0.
Rushing DH: Swoll 21-152-2; Boley 14-98-3;
CR: Dawsy 17-75-0; Baldner 20-64-0; LaFleur
5-37-1.
Receiving DH:Williams 1-8-0; C. Wentz 1-7-
0; Franklin 2-54-2; Baldner 2-21-0; C. Gadson
1-17-0; Reynolds 1-15-1.
Interceptions DH: C. Jackson.

Vanguard 48,
Lecanto 0
VHS 7 27 7 7- 48
LHS 0 0 00- 0
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
V- Files 13 run (Buck kick)
Second Quarter
V- Files 20 run ( Buck kick)
V Files 72 punt return (pass failed)
V Jamerson 15 pass from Robles (Buck kick)
V Bracey 1 run (Buck kick)
Third Quarter
V Sweet 14 run (Buck kick)
Fourth Quarter
V Denson 18 pass from McNair (Buck kick)
Individual Leaders
Rushing -V: Files 8-86, Sweet 7-72; L: Waters
10-29.
Passing -V: Robles 7-11-0-112, McNair 2-4-0-
30; L: McGee 8-15-1-7.
Receiving-V:Thornton 4-21, Denson 2-30; L:
Forges 3-9.

Seven Rivers 42,
CFCA 35
SRCS 14 14 8 0 42
CFCA 6 0 14 15 35
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
SRCS -J. Iwaniec 27-yd run (J. Iwaniec run)
SRCS -J. Iwaniec 58-yd run (run failed)
CFCA J. Ogburn 75-yd kickoff return (kick
failed)
Second Quarter
SRCS -J. Iwaniec 44-yd run (run failed)
SRCS -J. Iwaniec 92-yd run (K. Massulo run)
Third Quarter
CFCA B. Moore 4-yd run (R. Balderamos
run)
SRCS J. Mazza 21-yd run (Iwaniec run)
CFCA -J. Cunningham 2-yd run (run failed)
Fourth Quarter
CFCA -T. Laylor 5-yd run (B. Moore run)
SRCS -J. Iwaniec 52-yd run (run failed)
CFCA B. Moore 5-yd run (J. Lyle kick)



CIMB Classic
Saturday
At The Mines Resort and Golf Club,
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Purse: $6.1 million
Yardage: 6,909, Par: 71
Third Round
Bo Van Pelt 70-65-62--197 -16
Robert Garrigus 64-64-69 -197 -16
Chris Kirk 69-66-63-198 -15
Brendon de Jonge 68-65-66 -199 -14
Jbe' Kruger 66-64-69--199 -14
Brian Harman 64-70-66-200 -13
Tom Gillis 65-70-66-201 -12
Nick Watney 71-65-65 -201 -12
Greg Chalmers 66-66-69-201 -12
Gaganjeet Bhullar 65-72-65 -202 -11
Jeff Overton 64-70-68-202 -11
Tiger Woods 66-67-69 -202 -11
Ben Crane 68-66-68 -202 -11
Kevin Na 67-66-69 -202 -11
Ricky Barnes 66-71-66 -203 -10
Pat Perez 67-68-68 -203 -10
Bill Haas 70-65-68--203 -10
Trevor Immelman 72-63-68-203 -10
Jason Dufner 68-72-64-204 -9
John Senden 72-66-66--204 -9
Seung-Yul Noh 71-66-67-204 -9
Carl Pettersson 69-67-68--204 -9
J.B. Holmes 66-70-68-204 -9
Martin Laird 68-67-69--204 -9


Marcus Fraser 70-70-65--205 -8
Thaworn Wiratchant 72-65-68--205 -8
Anirban Lahiri 71-66-68--205 -8
Troy Matteson 63-69-73 -205 -8
SeanO'Hair 69-72-65--206 -7
Masanori Kobayashi 69-71-66--206 -7
JohnsonWagner 70-69-67-206 -7
John Huh 70-68-68--206 -7
Charlie Wi 69-66-71 -206 -7
Scott Piercy 75-68-64 -207 -6
Prom Meesawat 70-69-68--207 -6
Bob Estes 69-68-70 -207 -6
Ryan Palmer 69-68-70-207 -6
Marc Leishman 75-67-66--208 -5
JimmyWalker 69-68-71--208 -5
CameronTringale 71-69-70-210 -3
Kevin Stadler 67-68-76 -211 -2


SCOREBOARD


For the record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S. CASH 3 (early)
1-5-2
CASH 3 (late)
1-2-8

PLAY 4 (early)
3-9-1-0
PLAY 4 (late)
1-2-4-3

deS Lottry Because of early
,oa,"L OTfy deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida
Lotto and Powerball numbers
were unavailable. Please see
Monday's Entertainment
page for the result.



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1:45 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Tums Fast Relief 500 race
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Big O Tires Nationals (Same-day Tape)
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Tums Fast Relief 500
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
2012 World Series Game 4
8 p.m. (FOX) San Francisco Giants at Detroit Tigers
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida vs. Georgia (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Duke at Florida State (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at New York Jets
1 p.m. (FOX) Atlanta Falcons at Philadelphia Eagles
4 p.m. (FOX) New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys
8:20 p.m. (NBC) New Orleans Saints at Denver Broncos
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: BMW Masters Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Sunrise LPGATaiwan
Championship Final Round (Same-day Tape)
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Tour Championship Final
Round
5:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: AT&T Championship -
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
BULL RIDING
4 p.m. (NBC) PBR Tour Finals
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR World Championship Part 1
(Taped)
FIGURE SKATING
2 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating: Skate
Canada
SOCCER
9:25 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Everton vs.
Liverpool
2 p.m. (62 UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Pumas vs. America
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Seattle Sounders at Los Angeles Galaxy
TENNIS
2 p.m. (ESPN2) WTATeb-BNP Paribas Championships
final (Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) North Carolina at Wake Forest
1 p.m. (SUN) Alabama at Tennessee

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


David Lipsky
William McGirt
Kyle Stanley
Danny Chia
Siddikur Rahman
Shaaban Hussin
Scott Hend


68-73-71-
70-70-73-
69-70-74-
66-75-73-
73-74-69-
74-73-70-
70-77-70-


-212 -1
-213 E
-213 E
-214 +1
-216 +3
-217 +4
-217 +4


LPGA Taiwan C'ship
Saturday
At Sunrise Golf and Country Club,
Yang Mei, Taiwan
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,506, Par: 72
Third Round
a-amateur


Inbee Park
Suzann Pettersen
Yani Tseng
Catriona Matthew
Cristie Kerr
Na Yeon Choi
Belen Mozo
Julieta Granada
Chella Choi
Ai Miyazato
Anna Nordqvist
Azahara Munoz
Paula Creamer
llhee Lee
Haeji Kang
Pornanong Phatlum
So Yeon Ryu
Lexi Thompson
Michelle Wie
Jennifer Johnson
Jodi Ewart
Vicky Hurst
Sarah Jane Smith
Nicole Castrale
Paige Mackenzie
Beatriz Recari
Hyo Joo Kim
Pernilla Lindberg
Lizette Salas
Alison Walshe
Mariajo Uribe
Jessica Korda
Jenny Shin
Momoko Ueda
Mo Martin
Eun-HeeJi
Lindsey Wright
Karine Icher
Meena Lee
Sandra Gal
Mina Harigae
Sydnee Michaels
Veronica Felibert
Candle Kung
Hee Young Park
Mindy Kim
Caroline Hedwall
Danielle Kang
Wei Ling Hsu
Giulia Sergas
Katie Futcher
Yun-Jye Wei
Jennifer Rosales
Hsuan-Yu Yao
Cindy LaCrosse
Kristy McPherson
a-Doris Chen
Katherine Hull
Gerina Piller
Dewi Claire Schreefel
Jennifer Song
Maria Hjorth
Sophie Gustafson
Jennie Lee
Karin Sjodin


65-69-64-
69-65-66-
67-69-66-
70-66-68-
70-69-67-
74-67-66-
73-68-66-
70-69-68-
69-71-68-
71-69-68-
71-69-68-
71-68-69-
69-73-67-
72-69-68-
72-70-68-
68-73-69-
71-70-69-
72-69-69-
71-72-68-
73-69-69-
72-71-69-
71-73-69-
71-73-69-
68-75-70-
72-71-70-
71-72-70-
71-71-71-
73-68-72-
69-71-73-
71-67-75-
73-73-68-
76-68-70-
73-71-70-
73-70-71-
74-72-69-
75-69-71-
73-70-72-
74-73-69-
75-71-70-
74-71-71
72-73-71 -
76-69-71 -
73-71-72-
73-71-72-
68-76-72-
76-73-68-
74-71-72-
68-75-74-
75-74-69-
75-74-69-
77-71-70-
75-73-70-
74-73-71
75-72-71
75-71-72-
76-70-72-
72-72-74-
72-72-74-
73-72-74-
70-74-75-
71-73-75-
78-73-69-
72-74-74-
73-73-74-
74-75-72-


Amanda Blumenherst
Becky Morgan
Karen Stupples
Christel Boeljon
TirananYoopan
a-Jayvie Agojo
Jimin Kang
a-Ssu-Chia Cheng
Meng Chu Chen
MiJung Hur
a-Yu Hsin Chang


74-76-72-
77-72-76-
73-75-77-
79-78-69-
80-72-75-
78-77-73-
73-78-78-
73-75-81-
80-76-75-
74-79-79-
80-82-78-


222 +6
225 +9
225 +9
226 +10
227 +11
228 +12
229 +13
229 +13
231 +15
232 +16
240 +24


AT&T Championship
Saturday
At TPC San Antonio (ATT Canyons
Course), San Antonio
Purse: $1.85 million
Yardage: 6,923, Par: 72
Second Round
Mark Calcavecchia 67-69-136 -8
Kenny Perry 70-70-140 -4
Brad Faxon 74-67 -141 -3
EstebanToledo 74-67-141 -3
MarkWiebe 72-70-142 -2
Willie Wood 70-72-142 -2
David Frost 71-71 -142 -2
Bernhard Langer 74-68-142 -2
Fred Funk 73-69-142 -2
Chip Beck 71-71 -142 -2
KirkTriplett 74-69-143 -1
Tom Lehman 75-68-143 -1
Jim Thorpe 75-69-144 E
Joel Edwards 74-70 -144 E
Tom Kite 70-74 -144 E
Jay Don Blake 74-70 -144 E
Bobby Wadkins 70-74 -144 E
Steve Pate 74-70 -144 E
Tommy Armour III 73-71 -144 E
Gil Morgan 72-73-145 +1
Bill Glasson 73-72-145 +1
Chien Soon Lu 74-71 -145 +1
Jay Haas 72-73-145 +1
Ted Schulz 75-70-145 +1
Mark Brooks 72-73-145 +1
Jeff Hart 76-70-146 +2
David Peoples 74-72-146 +2
Tom Pernice Jr. 72-74-146 +2
Peter Senior 73-73-146 +2
Jeff Freeman 76-70-146 +2
Robin Byrd 73-73-146 +2
Mark Mouland 72-74-146 +2
Mike Reid 74-73-147 +3
Roger Chapman 77-70- 147 +3
Mike Goodes 76-71 -147 +3
Corey Pavin 75-72-147 +3
Sandy Lyle 75-73 -148 +4
Larry Nelson 77-71-148 +4
Olin Browne 75-73-148 +4
Brad Bryant 77-71 -148 +4
MarkO'Meara 74-74-148 +4
Steve Jones 76-72 -148 +4
Bob Niger 71-77-148 +4
Loren Roberts 76-73-149 +5
Mark McNulty 78-71 -149 +5
Tom Jenkins 77-73-150 +6
Gene Sauers 77-73-150 +6
Trevor Dodds 74-76 -150 +6
Michael Allen 76-74-150 +6
David Eger 77-73- 150 +6
Bobby Clampett 78-72-150 +6
Andrew Magee 78-72-150 +6
Ben Bates 77-73-150 +6
Dick Mast 75-75- 150 +6
Lance Ten Broeck 75-76-151 +7
Mike McCullough 75-76-151 +7
Steve Lowery 76-75 -151 +7
Blaine McCallister 75-76-151 +7
Rick Fehr 76-75-151 +7
Phil Blackmar 78-73-151 +7
Joe Daley 76-75-151 +7
Jeff Sluman 77-74-151 +7


Bob Gilder
Gary Hallberg
Larry Mize
Peter Jacobsen
Morris Hatalsky
Rod Spittle
Hale Irwin
Duffy Waldorf
Scott Simpson
Jim Rutledge
Russ Cochran
Wayne Levi
Ben Crenshaw
Jim Gallagher, Jr.
Dan Forsman
Tom Purtzer


-151 +7
-151 +7
-152 +8
-152 +8
-153 +9
-154 +10
-154 +10
-154 +10
-155 +11
-156 +12
-156 +12
-156 +12
-157 +13
-157 +13
-158 +14
-159 +15


Sprint Cup

TUMS Fast Relief
500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway,Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 97.598.
2. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 97.533.
3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 97.427.
4. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 97.392.
5. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 97.382.
6. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 97.272.
7. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 97.257.
8. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 97.247.
9. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 97.158.
10. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 97.108.
11. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 96.968.
12. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 96.963.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 96.959.
14. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 96.904.
15. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 96.869.
16. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 96.84.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 96.835.
18. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 96.835.
19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 96.75.
20. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 96.716.
21.(98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 96.706.
22. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 96.681.
23. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 96.652.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 96.578.
25. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
96.533.
26. (51) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 96.391.
27. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 96.273.
28. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 96.156.
29. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 96.141.
30. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 96.112.
31. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 96.063.
32. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 96.015.
33. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 95.985.
34. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 95.976.
35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 95.922.
36. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 95.922.
37. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 95.811.
38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 95.675.
39. (91) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 95.574.
40. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 95.545.
41. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 95.54.
42. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 95.204.
43. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 94.898.
Failed to Qualify
44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 94.609.
45. (37) J.J. Yeley Chevrolet, 94.609.



MLB playoffs
All Times EDT
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
San Francisco 2, Detroit 0
Wednesday, Oct. 24: San Francisco 8, Detroit 3
Thursday, Oct. 25: San Francisco 2, Detroit 0
Saturday, Oct. 27: San Francisco at Detroit,
late
Today, Oct. 28: San Francisco (Cain 16-5) at
Detroit (Scherzer 16-7), 8:15 p.m.
x-Monday Oct. 29: San Francisco at Detroit,
8:07 p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct. 31: Detroit at San Fran-
cisco, 8:07 p.m.
x-Thursday, Nov 1: Detroit at San Francisco,
8:07 p.m.



Glantz-Culver Line
For today
Major League Baseball
World Series
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Detroit -135 San Francisco +125
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
New England-x 6V2 7 (47) St. Louis
atTennessee 3 3/2 (47) Indianapolis
at Green Bay 14/2 15 (45Y2) Jacksonville
San Diego 3 3 (43/2) at Cleveland
at Philadelphia 2/2 3 (43/2) Atlanta
at Detroit 112 2 (43) Seattle
at N.Y Jets 3 2 (39'2) Miami
at Chicago 7'2 7'2 (43) Carolina
at Pittsburgh 4 4/2 (46)Washington
at Kansas City 1 112 (412) Oakland
N.Y Giants +1 V22 (47/2) at Dallas
at Denver 6/2 6 (55) New Orleans
Monday
San Fran. 612 7 (38) at Arizona
x-at London



BASEBALL
American League
MINNESOTATWINS-Announced RHP PJ.
Walters refused outright assignment and
elected free agency.
TAMPA BAY RAYS Announced OF Rich
Thompson refused outright assignment and
elected free agency.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Assigned RHP
Tyson Brummett outright to Buffalo (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS -Claimed SS
Gustavo Nunez off waivers from Pittsburgh.
CHICAGO CUBS Assigned RHP Justin
Germano, OF Joe Mather and RHP Blake
Parker outright to Iowa (PCL). Announced RHP
Manuel Corpas refused outright assignment
and elected free agency.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Reinstated SS
Rafael Furcal from the 15-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ATLANTA HAWKS Waived G James An-
derson and F Damion James.
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS Waived F/C
Michael Eric, F Eric Jones and G D'Aundray
Brown.
DALLAS MAVERICKS Signed F/C Melvin
Ely and F Chris Douglas-Roberts.
MILWAUKEE BUCKS-Waived G Mustapha
Mustapha Farrakhan, G Eddie Gill, G Orien
Greene and FAlando Tucker.
OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER --Waived G
Andy Rautins, C Daniel Orton and F Hollis
Thompson.
ORLANDO MAGIC Waived F Quentin
Richardson, F Justin Harper and F Chris John-
son. Exercised their third-year option on C
Nikola Vucevic.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CAROLINA PANTHERS- Signed DT Nate
Chandler. Released DT Frank Kearse.
CLEVELAND BROWNS Placed LB Scott
Fujita on injured reserve. Signed DL Brian San-
ford from the practice squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Released LB
Brandon Marshall and OL Herb Taylor. Signed
QB John ParkerWilson from the practice squad.
Activated DE John Chick from the physically-


unable-to-perform list.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Signed DB
Malcolm Williams from the practice squad.


HAMMER
Continued from Page B1


things weren't going to
change.
The Seminoles scored on
their third play of the game
when Manuel hit Rashad
Greene in stride for a 71-
yard touchdown and didn't
let up, racing to a 31-0 lead
just four minutes into the
second quarter.
But after adding two
quick touchdowns in the
first five minutes of the
third quarter to take a 45-7
lead on Manuel's 35-yard
scoring pass to Kelvin Ben-
jamin, Florida State bogged
down with mistakes and
managed just Hopkins'
record-breaking field goal
in the final 25 minutes.
Hopkins had appeared to
have broken the conference
record for career field goals
held by former Maryland
kicker Nick Novak with a
51-yarder, but Florida State
was whistled for delay of
game and he then drilled
his career best with ease for
the new mark of 81. He is six



PARTY
Continued from Page B1


two forced fumbles.
He helped the Bulldogs
respond as well as possible
to safety Shawn Williams'
criticism of "playing too
soft" earlier in the week.
Williams had a point after
Georgia allowed at least 20
points in six of its first seven
games and gave up 206
yards rushing last week at
Kentucky.
Jones missed that game
with a sprained ankle. With
him back, Georgia looked
like a different defense, and
it surely helped that Florida
self-destructed at every
turn.
The Gators got behind
early in a game that will be
remembered for turnovers,
countless flags, chippy play
and stout defense. Quarter-
back Jeff Driskel fumbled
twice on Florida's first
three plays. Georgia recov-
ered the second one, which
set up Todd Gurley's 10-yard
touchdown run.
Gurley finished with 118
yards on the ground, but
most of it came early
The Gators settled down
defensively and intercepted
three passes from Murray,
who completed 12 of 24



WORLD
Continued from Page B1


against righties, .253 vs. lefties.
"Sometimes you can't ex-
plain it," Tigers catcher Alex
Avila said before a workout
Friday. "In our case, we've
had trouble all year with left-
handed pitching, which is
strange because we have a lot
of good hitters on the team."
"It'll be a nice change, obvi-
ously, to face a right-hander
because we've had more suc-
cess," he said."
The Tigers will see Vogel-
song, followed by fellow right-
hander Matt Cain in Game 4.
"We've gone through spurts
this whole season where
we've thrown the ball like this
as a staff," Vogelsong said.
"We obviously had our down-
time there in the middle of
September and at the end of
August"
'And we're just all kind of
hitting our stride here at the
same time. It's up to me and
Matt now to keep it going over
here in Detroit"
With the Series in the AL
city, Vogelsong will be re-
placed by a designated hitter
in the batting order Giants
manager Bruce Bochy said he
was leaning toward using
Hector Sanchez, a .280 hitter
during the regular season who
has yet to play in the Series.
"It's always good to be in
the lineup," Sanchez said.
"Being the DH when it's cold,
I might come back inside to
take swings and stay warm
during the game."
Tigers manager Jim Ley-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

shy of former Georgia
kicker Billy Bennett's NCAA
mark of 87.
Hopkins has already
smashed the previous ACC
scoring record and his 429
points are 10 points shy of
the NCAA record held by
former Boise State kicker
Kyle Brotzman.
Freeman, who finished
with 105 yards rushing,
scored on runs of 9 and 14
yards and James Wilder Jr
chipped in with 70 yards
and a 1-yard TD run. The
two sophomores have taken
over for leading rusher,
Chris Thompson, who suf-
fered a season-ending knee
injury in last week's 33-20
win at Miami.
Duke's Conner Vernon
caught three passes to ex-
tend his nation's best string
to 44 consecutive games
with at least one catch.
North Carolina State (5-3,
2-2) had previously con-
trolled its destiny in the At-
lantic Division on the
strength of a 17-16 win over
the Seminoles earlier, but
lost the advantage with a 42-
35 loss Saturday at North
Carolina.


passes for 150 yards. But
they managed just two field
goals off those turnovers.
Florida made it 10-9 on
Caleb Sturgis' 50-yard field
goal in the fourth, but
Driskel's mistakes proved to
be too much to overcome.
The Gators, who turned
the ball over just four times
in their first seven games,
had four in the first 36 min-
utes Saturday
Driskel fumbled twice,
threw two interceptions and
was sacked five times. He
completed 14 of26 passes for
185 yards. Mike Gillislee fin-
ished with 77 yards rushing.
Florida coach Will
Muschamp said all season
how small his team's margin
for error was. It really
showed Saturday as the
Gators got behind early and
failed to make a comeback.
The Gators had been 3-0
when trailing at halftime,
but they didn't make the
same successful halftime
adjustments that carried
them in wins against Texas
A&M, Tennessee and LSU.
Florida was held under
200 yards passing for the
fourth consecutive game.
The Gators finished with
266 yards of offense and 95
yards in penalties.
Georgia had 273 yards of
offense and was flagged 14
times for 132 yards.


land plans to insert speedy
rookie Quintin Berry and
Andy Dirks in his outfield.
A few big hits would cer-
tainly energize the Tigers. So
might a few breaks, they
believe.
"The ball just hasn't rolled
our way yet," Berry said.
"They got a hit off the third-
base bag. They had a bunt
that wouldn't go foul. They
made great catches in left
field.
"But no excuses. We're
back at home, this is our
chance."
No mistaking that the Se-
ries has shifted from Califor-
nia to Michigan.
In San Francisco, it was
downright balmy in the 60s,
and made for a pair of pic-
ture-perfect settings to play
ball.
"We have got heaters in the
dugout for both teams, obvi-
ously Ours is going to be a lit-
tle warmer than theirs, I
think, tomorrow night," Ley-
land said. "But that's all right
We're not going to tell them
that. I'm just kidding."
"You know what? It's cold,
but I mean this is the World
Series. It's cold for everybody
It's cold for the fans, the beer
is cold, everything is cold. It's
great Enjoy it"
While the Tigers have lost
five straight World Series
games dating to 2006 against
St. Louis, they've also won
five postseason home games
in a row. Detroit began that
string last year in the ALCS,


took two against Oakland this
year in the division series and
then finished off an ALCS
sweep of the Yankees.


Associated Press
San Francisco Giants base runner Hunter Pence steals sec-
ond Saturday as Detroit Tigers shortstop Jhonny Peralta
takes the throw during the second inning of Game 3 of the
World Series in Detroit.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 10 USC shocked


Down they go:

Gators, Trojans,

unbeatens fall

Associated Press

What a tough day to be a highly
ranked team.
All sorts of ambitions came
crashing down in a handful of Top
25 upsets on Saturday, none more
costly than No. 3 Florida's loss to
Georgia.
The 12th-ranked Bulldogs stuffed
the Gators, giving Florida its first
loss of the season and damaging
their chances to make the SEC title
game, let alone the BCS title game.
Southern California's national
title hopes took another hit when
they were upset in the desert New
Arizona coach Rich Rodriguez got a
signature win of the sort that mostly
eluded him at Michigan, bumping
off the Trojans 39-36 thanks to a
huge day by quarterback Matt Scott
Two other unbeaten fell, too -
both to teams from the Mid-Ameri-
can conference. No. 18 Rutgers was
beaten at home by Kent State and
No. 23 Ohio lost to archrival Miami
of Ohio across the state in Oxford.
Those games burst the bubble on
promising seasons for programs
looking for a spot in the BCS chase.
USC, meanwhile, was toutedas a
likely title contender and still could
have made the BCS championship
game if it ran the table following its
loss to Stanford in September Seem-
ingly in control with a 28-13 lead, the
Trojans let the lead slip away.
No. 2 Oregon 70,
Colorado 14
EUGENE, Ore. Kenjon Barner
rushed for 104 yards and two touch-
downs, and No. 2 Oregon easily took
care of Colorado in advance of next
weekend's Pac-12 showdown with USC.
De'Anthony Thomas rushed for an-
other score and added a 73-yard punt
return for a touchdown before most of
the Ducks' offensive starters were
pulled midway through the second
quarter. Redshirt freshman quarterback
Marcus Mariota passed for 136 yards
and two TDs.
The Ducks (8-0, 5-0 Pac-12) built a
56-0 lead by halftime and their 70
points were the most they'd ever
scored against a conference opponent.
It was Oregon's 11th straight overall vic-
tory dating to a 38-35 loss at home to
USC last season.
Christian Powell rushed for 127 yards
and two touchdowns for the Buffaloes
(1-7, 1-4), who lost their fourth straight.
The Ducks piled up 617 yards in total
offense, including 425 on the ground,
and the Buffs simply could not keep up.
Colorado went into the game ranked
112th in the nation on defense, allowing
an average of 489 yards. Oregon had
447 by halftime.
No. 4 Kansas State 55,
No. 15 Texas Tech 24
MANHATTAN, Kan. Collin Klein
accounted for four touchdowns, and
Arthur Brown returned an interception
37 yards for another score.
Klein was 19 of 26 for 233 yards and
two touchdowns, and had 83 yards and
two more scores on the ground bol-
stering his credentials for the Heisman
Trophy. Most of the offense came in the
second half as the Wildcats (5-0 Big 12)
blew open a 13-10 game to improve to
8-0 for the first time since 1999.
John Hubert added 64 yards and two
rushing TDs, and Angelo Pease also
scored for Kansas State, which came
into the game trailing only Alabama and
Florida in the BCS standings.


Associated Press
Southern California's Silas Redd loses the ball from a tackle by Arizona's Marquis Flowers during the first half
Saturday at Arizona Stadium in Tucson, Ariz.


Seth Doege threw for 331 yards and
two touchdowns for the Red Raiders (6-
2, 3-2), but also had a costly intercep-
tion. Doege had thrown for 13
touchdowns in wins over West Virginia
and TCU the last two weeks to jump
into the Heisman conversation.
Arizona 39,
No. 10 USC 36
TUCSON, Ariz. Matt Scott had
469 total yards and accounted for four
touchdowns, helping Arizona over-
come a huge day by Southern Califor-
nia's Marqise Lee.
Lee caught 16 passes for a Pac-12-
record 345 yards and two touchdowns
to help USC (6-2, 4-2 Pac-12) build a
15-point lead midway through the third
quarter.
But Scott led Arizona (5-3, 2-1) back,
throwing for 369 yards and three touch-
downs, including a 7-yarder to David
Richards that put the Wildcats up 39-28
with just over 5 minutes left.
The Trojans answered quickly with
Silas Redd's second rushing touch-
down, from 10 yards, but remain stuck
on 799 wins as a program after Matt
Barkley's last-ditch pass into the end
zone was swatted down.
Scott finished 27-for-50 passing and
ran for 100 yards before missing Ari-
zona's final possession with an undis-
closed injury.
Austin Hill had 10 catches for 259
yards to help the Wildcats hold on for
the upset victory after coming up just
short against the Trojans a year ago.
Barkley threw for 493 yards and
three touchdowns on 31-of-49 passing,
but threw two interceptions. USC had
five turnovers and 13 penalties for 117
yards as its national championship
hopes faded.
No. 17 South Carolina 38,
Tennessee 35
COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw
threw three touchdowns and ran for an-
other score, and No. 17 South Carolina
overcame the loss of tailback Marcus
Lattimore.
Tyler Bray had driven the Vols to


South Carolina's 19 with 1:08 left when
he was hit from behind by defensive
end Jadeveon Clowney. The ball
popped loose and linebacker Shaq Wil-
son recovered.
Tennessee (3-5, 0-5 Southeastern
Conference) forced a punt and got the
ball back with 36 seconds to go, but Vic-
tor Hampton intercepted a long pass from
Bray to dose it out for South Carolina.
More pressing, though, is the loss of
Lattimore to a serious injury. The junior
was taken to a hospital after hurting his
right knee in the second quarter.
Shaw finished with a career-high 356
yards passing and the Gamecocks (7-
2, 5-2) rolled up 510 yards after manag-
ing only 368 combined the previous two
weeks in losses at LSU and Florida.
Tight end Justice Cunningham had six
catches for 108 yards and receiver
Bruce Ellington had six catches for 101
yards as South Carolina won three
straight over the Vols for the first time in
a series that began in 1903.
Bray passed for 368 yards and four
touchdowns, three to Zach Rogers.
Kent State 35,
No. 18 Rutgers 23
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Defensive end
Mark Fackler returned his second inter-
ception 25 yards for a touchdown, and
Kent State forced five other turnovers in
its biggest win since it started playing
football in 1920.
The Golden Flashes (7-1) had been 0-
22 against ranked teams, but they ended
the best start for Rutgers (7-1) since the
Scarlet Knights were 9-0 in 2006.
Kent State intercepted Gary Nova six
times and recovered a fumble to give
the Mid-American Conference its sec-
ond straight win over an undefeated Big
East team. Toledo knocked off Cincin-
nati last week.
Spencer Keith threw touchdown
passes of 1 yard to Zack Hitchens and
15 yards to Josh Boyle, the latter giving
the Golden Flashes a 35-17 lead with
11:30 to play. Dri Archer, the nation's
leader in touchdowns coming into this
week, scored on a 7-yard run, and
Trayion Durham tallied from 3-yards out.


No. 11 FSU 48
Duke 7
Duke 0 7 0
Florida St. 17 1414
2 First Quarter
FSU-Greene 71 pass from Manuel
kick), 11:20.
2 3 FSU-Hunter 75 punt return (Hopk
4:51.
ed about FSU-FG Hopkins 26, 1:52.
Second Quarter
FSU-Wilder 1 run (Hopkins kick), 13
py Valley, FSU-Freeman 9 run (Hopkins kick),
't happen Duke-Duncan 3 run (Martin kick), 4:
Shit with Third Quarter
the Jerry FSU-Freeman 14 run (Hopkins kick
e Jery FSU-Benjamin 35 pass from Manuel
andal. kick), 10:14.
n't muite Fouth Qurte


1.
down run
arter put

1 rolled to
at he fin-
;Lehman
ft in the
version

a career-

f a come-
ared and
e started
3.
miller got
Then on
hit Jake
e middle,
e. The 72-


FSUFG Hopkins 56, 940.
FSU-FG Hopkins 56, 9:40.


Duke
13
33-103
129
16-37-0
0
12-40.5
1-0
10-95
31:30


A-71,467.
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Poss.


Nova, the Big East's top offensive
player last week, threw touchdowns of
19 yards to Tim Wright and 24 to Bran-
don Coleman. Jawan Jamison scored
on a 2-yard run to cut Rutgers' deficit to
12 with 10:35 to play, but the Scarlet
Knights never got closer.
No. 21 Boise State 45,
Wyoming 14
LARAMIE, Wyo. D.J. Harper
rushed for 105 yards and two touch-
downs to lead No. 21 Boise State to its
seventh straight win.
Harper scored on runs of 12 and 3
yards, and Joe Southwick completed
20 of 28 passes for 198 yards and one
interception for the Broncos (7-1, 4-0
Mountain West). The Boise State of-
fense was an efficient 12 of 14 on third
down conversions and scored on all
five its red zone opportunities.
Boise State's defense held the Cow-
boys below their 25.6 scoring average,
recorded four sacks and limited Wyoming
to 106 yards below its average.
Wyoming (1-7, 0-4) was without head
coach Dave Christensen, who was fined
$50,000 and suspended by the school
for the week over his conduct after a 28-
27 loss to Air Force on Oct. 13. Chris-
tensen confronted Falcons coach Troy
Calhoun on the field, accusing the Fal-
cons of faking an injury to their starting
quarterback in the fourth quarter.
Miami (Ohio) 23,
No. 23 Ohio 20
OXFORD, Ohio Ohio gambled by
going for one more play instead of a
tying field goal, and Tyler Tettleton was
sacked as time ran out.
The Bobcats (7-1, 3-1 Mid-American
Conference) went for it all in their first
game as a ranked team since 1968,
when they finished the season at No.
20. They had a little history on their side
Ohio had won the last six games in
one of the MAC's edgiest rivalries.
Instead, the rivalry got another no-
table ending.
Kaleb Patterson kicked a 31-yard
field goal with 1:24 left, giving Miami (4-
4, 3-1) the lead with its first fourth-quar-
ter points in the last three games.


3, No. 12 Georgia 17,
No. 3 Florida 9
0- 7 Florida 0 6 0 3- 9
3- 48 Georgia 7 0 3 7- 17
First Quarter
o ns Geo-Gurley 10 run (Morgan kick), 12:02.
ins kick), Second Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 38, 7:05.
Fla-FG Sturgis 22, 2:43.
Third Quarter
3:50. Geo-FG Morgan 29, 8:34.
11:09. Fourth Quarter
25. Fla-FG Sturgis 50, 9:41.
14:34. Geo-Mitchell 45 pass from Murray (Morgan
(Hopkins kick), 7:11.
A-84,644.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Poss.


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Duke, Duncan 13-46, Snead 7-26,
Boone 4-15, Powell 5-12, Thompson 2-4, Con-
nette 1-3, Team 1-(minus 3). Florida St., Free-
man 12-104, Wilder 13-70, Smiley 9-42, Pryor
6-32, Abram 1-8, Manuel 5-4, Greene 1-1.
PASSING-Duke, Renfree 13-21-0-92, Boone
3-15-0-37, Team 0-1-0-0. Florida St., Manuel 8-
16-0-282, Trickett 1-5-0-17.
RECEIVING-Duke, Blakeney 4-38, Vernon 3-
12, McCaffrey 2-31, Reeves 2-19, Crowder 2-
16, Scott 2-16, Snead 1-(minus 3). Florida St.,
R.Smith 3-112, Benjamin 3-77, Greene 1-71,
Dent 1-22, Wilder 1-17.


Fla
15
41-81
185
15-28-2
41
3-46.7
6-4
10-95
33:41


Geo
14
35-123
150
12-24-3
23
5-37.2
0-0
14-132
26:19


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Gillislee 22-77, Debose
1-6, Hines 1-4, Patton 1-0, T.Burton 3-(minus
2), Driskel 13-(minus 4). Georgia, Gurley 27-
118, Marshall 4-4, Murray 2-3, Team 2-
(minus 2).
PASSING-Florida, Driskel 14-26-2-185,
T.Burton 1-1-0-0, Team 0-1-0-0. Georgia,
Murray 12-24-3-150.
RECEIVING-Florida, Reed 5-74, Dunbar 3-
40, Gillislee 2-40, T.Burton 2-23, Joyer 1-6,
M.Brown 1-2, Hines 1-0. Georgia, Mitchell 5-
74, Brown 2-30, Gurley 2-23, Conley 1-10,
Hall 1-10, Alex.Ogletree 1-3.


Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Braxton
Miller was his usual self, running for 134
yards and accounting for three touch-
downs a week after getting knocked out of
a game, leading No. 9 Ohio State to a 35-23
victory against Penn State on Saturday
Ryan Shazier returned an intercep-
tion 17 yards for a score early in the third
quarter that gave the Buckeyes (9-0, 5-0
Big Ten) the lead for good, and the Nit-
tany Lions (5-3, 3-1) and coach Bill
O'Brien had their five-game winning
streak snapped in a matchup of the Big
Ten's bowl-banned perennial powers.
Miller missed the fourth quarter
against Purdue after a hard tackle sent
him to the hospital with a case of
whiplash. He declared himself good to
go by the midweek.
Was he ever. The Heisman campaign
can resume.
The sophomore quarterback reached
100 yards rushing for the sixth time this
season, carrying 25 times, and only
avoiding contact when it was convenient
He also passed for 143 yards.
Matt McGloin and the Nittany Lions
had turned an 0-2 start into a reason for


Nittany Lions fans to get excit
football again.
It felt like a big game in Hap
something many thought would
this year after Penn State was
crippling NCAA sanctions for
Sandusky child sexual abuse scz
But the Nittany Lions were
ready to step up in competition
Miller's second 1-yard touch(
in the final 3:40 of the third qu
Ohio State up 28-10.
McGloin and Penn State then
an 18-play touchdown drive th,
ished with a 2-yard pass to Matt
to make it 28-16 with 9:49 le
fourth quarter. The 2-point co
try was stopped.
McGloin finished 27 for 45 for
high 327 yards.
With plenty of time to pull of
back, the Penn State crowd ro
waved pom-poms as Ohio Stat
its next drive backed up to its 8
A couple of tough runs by M
the Buckeyes off the goal line.
third-and-3 from the 28, Miller
Stoneburner in stride over the
and the wide receiver was gone
yard touchdown made it 35-16.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Ark.-Pine Bluff 10, MVSU 0
Bethany (WV) 26, Thiel 13
E. Texas Baptist 34, Mississippi College 24
Hardin-Simmons 85, Sul Ross St. 42
Houston 45, UTEP 35
Louisiana College 44, Texas Lutheran 37, OT
Mary Hardin-Baylor 68, Howard Payne 6
Mississippi 30, Arkansas 27
Oklahoma St. 36, TCU 14
Rice 44, Southern Miss. 17
SMU 44, Memphis 13
Sam Houston St. 56, Lamar 7
Texas Southern 23, Grambling St. 20
Utah St. 48, UTSA 17
FAR WEST
Arizona 39, Southern Cal 36
Boise St. 45, Wyoming 14
Fresno St. 49, New Mexico 32
Montana 70, Idaho St. 24
Montana St. 55, North Dakota 10
N. Arizona 12, N. Colorado 10
Oregon 70, Colorado 14
Portland St. 49, UC Davis 21
S. Utah 30, E. Washington 27
San Jose St. 31, Texas St. 20
UCLA 45, Arizona St. 43


Miller, No. 9 OSI



beats Penn St 35-


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 B5

College football
scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 23, Sacred Heart 20
Ball St. 30, Army 22
Bentley 38, Merrimack 21
Boston College 20, Maryland 17
CCSU 32, St. Francis (Pa.) 30
Castleton St. 28, Gallaudet 20
Colgate 47, Bucknell 33
Columbia 26, Yale 22
Cornell 37, Princeton 35
Fordham 36, Holy Cross 32
Georgetown 20, Lafayette 17
Gettysburg 42, Moravian 20
Harvard 31, Dartmouth 14
Hobart 42, Union (NY) 34
Indiana (Pa.) 45, Clarion 0
Johns Hopkins 35, Ursinus 17
Juniata 24, McDaniel 7
Kent St. 35, Rutgers 23
Lycoming 38, Wilkes 7
Mass. Maritime 35, Westfield St. 13
Mercyhurst 24, Edinboro 21
Monmouth (NJ) 28, Duquesne 27
New Hampshire 40, Rhode Island 20
Oberlin 39, Hiram 0
Ohio St. 35, Penn St. 23
Penn 20, Brown 17
Pittsburgh 47, Temple 17
Rowan 47, Morrisville St. 0
Shippensburg 49, Bloomsburg 42
Susquehanna 24, Franklin & Marshall 17
Toledo 25, Buffalo 20
Towson 49, Villanova 35
Utica 31, Alfred 7
Wagner 23, Robert Morris 13
Widener 34, Albright 29
Williams 34, Hamilton 26
SOUTH
Alabama St. 31, Alabama A&M 13
Appalachian St. 38, W. Carolina 27
BYU 41, Georgia Tech 17
Bethel (Tenn.) 32, Cumberland (Tenn.) 30
Bethune-Cookman 42, NC Central 17
Bridgewater (Va.) 27, Emory & Henry 21
Butler 31, Davidson 20
Carson-Newman 35, Brevard 19
Charleston Southern 42, Edward Waters 7
Coastal Carolina 36, Liberty 12
Cumberlands 62, Campbellsville 19
E. Illinois 24, E. Kentucky 7
Elizabeth City St. 27, Virginia Union 21
FAU 34, Troy 27
Fayetteville St. 47, Livingstone 29
Ferrum 35, Greensboro 12
Florida St. 48, Duke 7
Furman 31, Elon 17
Gardner-Webb 38, VMI 7
Georgia 17, Florida 9
Hampden-Sydney 68, Guilford 24
Hampton 21, Savannah St. 13
Jacksonville St. 38, Murray St. 35
James Madison 28, Georgia St. 21
Johnson C. Smith 27, St. Augustine's 21
Kentucky Christian 22, Pikeville 10
Lane 28, Kentucky St. 14
Lenoir-Rhyne 44, Wingate 13
Maine 24, William & Mary 10
Mars Hill 23, Tusculum 20, OT
Middle Tennessee 38, North Texas 21
Morehead St. 70, Campbell 28
NC A&T 30, Norfolk St. 9
Navy 56, East Carolina 28
North Carolina 43, NC State 35
Old Dominion 31, Delaware 26
Prairie View 49, Southern U. 29
Rhodes 14, Sewanee 10
SC State 41, Howard 23
SE Missouri 48, Austin Peay 27
South Carolina 38, Tennessee 35
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 38, Kentucky Wesleyan 27
Stony Brook 56, Presbyterian 17
Tennessee St. 22, Tennessee Tech 21
Thomas More 38, St. Vincent 3
Tulane 55, UAB 45
Virginia-Wise 14, Union (Ky) 10
W. Kentucky 14, FlU 6
Winston-Salem 62, Shaw 31
Wofford 24, The Citadel 21
MIDWEST
Adrian 38, Kalamazoo 7
Albion 21, Olivet 15
Ashland 42, Findlay 21
Augustana (I11.) 38, Carthage 13
Augustana (SD) 35, Concordia (St.P) 27
Aurora 56, Lakeland 17
Baker 29, Culver-Stockton 9
Bemidji St. 37, St. Cloud St. 20
Bethel (Minn.) 56, Hamline 21
Bowling Green 24, E. Michigan 3
Buena Vista 14, Luther 7
Carroll (Wis.) 31, Cornell (Iowa) 14
Cent. Michigan 35, Akron 14
Central 27, Loras 10
Coe 35, Wartburg 7
Concordia (Moor) 51, Carleton 27
Concordia (Wis.) 40, Rockford 3
Doane 48, Hastings 16
Dubuque 45, Simpson (Iowa) 40
Ferris St. 35, Wayne (Mich.) 24
Grand Valley St. 42, Hillsdale 23
Greenville 34, Westminster (Mo.) 22
Illinois College 34, Monmouth (11.) 31
Illinois St. 33, N. Iowa 21
Indiana 31, Illinois 17
Indiana St. 45, South Dakota 14
Kansas St. 55, Texas Tech 24
Lake Erie 27, Walsh 20, OT
Lake Forest 17, Ripon 7
Lawrence 24, Grinnell 14
Marist 44, Valparaiso 7
Martin Luther 30, Mac Murray 27
Miami (Ohio) 23, Ohio 20
Michigan St. 16, Wisconsin 13, OT
Minn. Duluth 38, Minn.-Crookston 14
Minn. St.-Mankato 42, Wayne (Neb.) 35
Minn.-Morris 30, Crown (Minn.) 29, OT
Minnesota 44, Purdue 28
Minot St. 31, Minn. St.-Moorhead 10
Missouri 33, Kentucky 10
Missouri St. 42, W. Illinois 3
N. Dakota St. 23, S. Illinois 17
N. Illinois 48, W. Michigan 34
N. Michigan 21, Northwood (Mich.) 13
Nebraska-Kearney 24, Cent. Missouri 18
North Central 52, Illinois Wesleyan 0
Northern St. (SD) 65, Mary 17
Northwestern 28, Iowa 17
Northwestern (Minn.) 21, Eureka 17
Notre Dame Coll. 36, Malone 19
Ohio Dominican 31, Tiffin 14
Pittsburg St. 20, Truman St. 6
S. Dakota St. 41, Youngstown St. 28
Saginaw Valley St. 34, Michigan Tech 23
Sioux Falls 54, Upper Iowa 41
St. Francis (Ind.) 31, Siena Heights 7
St. John's (Minn.) 31, Gustavus 17
St. Norbert 42, Beloit 7
St. Scholastica 20, Presentation 17, OT
St. Thomas (Minn.) 30, Augsburg 14
St. Xavier 54, Concordia (Mich.) 10
Texas 21, Kansas 17
Trine 45, Hope 28
Wheaton (lll.) 27, Millikin 17
Winona St. 47, SW Minnesota St. 20
Wis. Lutheran 48, Maranatha Baptist 0
Wis.-Oshkosh 41, Wis.-LaCrosse 7
Wis.-Platteville 24, Wis.-Eau Claire 17
Wis.-River Falls 24, Wis.-Stout 14
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 17, Wis.-Whitewater 14
SOUTHWEST












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Schwarzenegger
dons role of Conan
LOS ANGELES -
Arnold Schwarzenegger
is coming back as
Conan the Barbarian.
Universal Pictures said
Califor-
nia's for-
mer
governor
will star
in "The
Legend of
Conan,"
an action
Arnold film being
Schwarzenegger vel-
oped for the actor Dead-
line Hollywood was the
first to report the news
Friday.
The 65-year-old
Schwarzenegger starred
in two previous films
about the mythic hero:
1982's "Conan the Bar-
barian" and 1984's
"Conan the Destroyer."
Schwarzenegger told
Deadline he loves the
character and is "hon-
ored" to play him again.

Billy Idol plays
fan's birthday
SEATTLE-A Seattle

having
Billy Idol
play his
26th
birthday
party
made for
the great-
Billy Idol est night
of his life.
Michael Henrichsen
spent two years persuad-
ing the British rock icon to
play his party, and it fi-
nally paid off at the
packed Showbox SoDo
club Friday
First, Idol guitarist
Steve Stevens played him
"Happy Birthday" in the
middle of a solo. Then
Idol called Henrichsen
onto the stage for a rendi-
tion of the song.
Henrichsen's '80s cover
band even got to play the
opening act.
Idol told The Associ-
ated Press that Henrich-
sen's effort stood out
from other fan requests
because of his campaign
involved four "Billy Idol
Aid" charity concerts that
raised $13,000 for the
Northwest Harvest food
bank and the American
Red Cross. Idol said
agreeing to play Henrich-
sen's party in Seattle
might help fans see an-
other side of him.

Cleveland honors
Chuck Berry
CLEVELAND Still
rocking' at 86, music leg-
end Chuck Berry prom-
ised a comeback Saturday
with six new songs, some
written 16 years ago.
The Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame and Museum hon-
ored him with an award
and tribute concert
"I'm going to come
back and push them out
if you know what I mean,
somehow," Berry said.
The rock pioneer with
early hits including "Roll
Over Beethoven," "Sweet
Little Sixteen" and
'"Johnny B. Goode," would-
n't tip his hand about the
new songs or when they
might be released.
"They might be old, but
they are the same type of
music that I have been
playing," he said.
-From wire reports


Athlete reinvented


Associated Press
Keith Miller, left, plays Zuniga in Bizet's "Carmen" with Elina Garanca in the title role at the Metropolitan Opera
in New York. Miller, a former University of Colorado fullback, has reinvented himself, going from the gridiron to the
stage and will appear in Verdi's "Un Ballo in Maschera," at the Metropolitan Opera.


Singer journeys from fullback on gridiron


Associated Press

NEW YORK Keith Miller was
a bruising fullback out of the Uni-
versity of Colorado who never quite
made it to the National Football
League. He has, however, become a
star at the Metropolitan Opera.
How Miller made the unlikely
transition from football to the pin-
nacle of opera is an all-American
story of reinvention, made all the
more amazing by the fact he had no
formal musical training when he set
out to become a singer
"This is the real thing, this is the
juice," the 38-year-old Miller said.
"Instead of a number, you're a char-
acter, but the spirit of competition
is the same, and you do it for the
love of the art versus the love of the
game."
It began almost by chance in 1994,
while still at Colorado, when he
took his girlfriend to see a traveling
production of the Broadway musi-
cal "The Phantom of the Opera." He
was so enthralled tears rolled down
his face. He bought a CD and
learned the songs.
Then he got some real opera
recordings, singing along in his
bass-baritone voice, "kind of like
karaoke."
But it was still nothing more than
a hobby Singing along to "The Mar-
riage of Figaro" and "Don Gio-
vanni" was something he did to pass
the time while the 6-foot, 265-pound
Miller lifted weights, ran sprints
and studied playbooks in pursuit of
a pro football career.
Miller, a three-year starter at Col-
orado best known as a blocking
back for 1994 Heisman Trophy win-
ner Rashaan Salaam, bounced
around the fringes of professional
football. He played in the European
league, the Arena Football League
and U.S. spring football leagues, al-
ways keeping in shape for a possi-
ble shot with the NFL.
In 2001, he was in Fargo, N.D.,
training for a workout with the Den-
ver Broncos, when he saw a flier an-
nouncing an open opera audition
for the Pine Mountain Music Festi-
val in Michigan.
On a whim, he showed up.
"I figured, what the heck!" he
said, his voice rippling into a low
laugh that echoes his rich singing
bass.
He performed the only aria he
knew, from Mozart's "Don Gio-
vanni." To his surprise, he got the
job, plus four other offers.
Miller then had to learn the


Birthday -Although persons you've helped in the past
might try to even accounts in the year ahead, many of
your biggest opportunities are likely to come through in-
dividuals whom you've never aided. Make the most of
the doors that open for you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Just because you have
the ability to focus your mental and physical forces on
an important objective, don't expect others to do so.
They might find it to be far too overwhelming a task.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Familiar faces and
customary routines might bore you to tears. If this is the
case, look for new playgrounds and playmates.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you're feeling high-
strung, don't take it out on innocent family members or
co-workers. They're not responsible for your emotional
surges and outages.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Your mental faculties are


whole part, poring over the score
and picking out notes on a piano
late into the night.
"It was like a baby learning to
walk," he said.
He still had to be formally trained
- for four years at Philadelphia's
Academy of Vocal Arts, a top groom-
ing ground for future stars. Then,
days before his 2006 graduation,
came the decisive break.
He auditioned for the Met's
Young Artist Development Program
and didn't get in. Instead, the com-
pany actually hired him for Puc-
cini's "Madame Butterfly,"
broadcast live in high definition to
movie theaters worldwide.
He has now sung with the Wash-
ington National Opera, the Seattle
Opera, and other companies across
the country and in Italy, England
and Canada, plus the New York
Philharmonic and at Carnegie Hall.
This season, Miller appears at the
Met in Verdi's "Un Ballo in
Maschera" ("A Masked Ball"), open-
ing Nov 8, followed by a global high-
definition broadcast Dec. 8.
As his career grows in a competi-
tive field, "it's like looking at an op-


Today's HOROSCOPE
your most promising asset, making it possible for you to
do exceptionally well in all situations that emphasize
communication and unique ideas.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take note your chart em-
phasizes your material interests to be the most promis-
ing arrow in your quiver, making it possible for you to
have many successful transactions of this nature.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Your natural boldness and
determination always make you a force to be reckoned
with. Your drive to finish a vital project will once again
prove this to be true.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Because you'll roll up your
sleeves and get dirty while others will be all talk and no
work, you'll be the one who reaps the rewards.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Another chance encounter
will bring you into contact with someone whom you re-
cently met and liked. This time, both of you will make


to Figaro on stage


ponent in football even if I have
flaws or things I need to work on, I
will outwork the other person," he
said. "If somebody is quick, I'm
quicker, and no matter what their
best card is they lay on the table,
you still have the ace."
From home in New York, he trav-
els 10 cities in nine months last
year- with his wife, Sage, and baby
Josephine.
In the summer, Miller directs Col-
orado's Crested Butte Music Festi-
val, which includes training
children to perform. He pumps up
their spirits with inspirational talk
- the kind he has given himself
through the years.
"This was me," he said, pulling
out a current driver's license with a
1996 photo showing him at 265
pounds, with a thick, almost 20-inch
neck and a 52-inch shoulder span.
He's now a relatively svelte 200,
with 44-inch shoulders.
The singer stays fit, running
about five miles a day and lifting
weights, but looking so different
from his fullback days in the ID pic-
ture that "sometimes, I have trouble
with airport security."


sure you'll get to know each other far better.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Even though you'll wel-
come knowing some assistance is available to you,
you'll fare far better by operating as independently as
possible.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Because you're not apt to be
bashful about expressing your strong opinions, others
won't be left guessing as to where you stand on critical
issues, making everyone's life easier.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) It behooves you not to be
dependent upon anybody else's financial assistance.
Even those who are extremely generous are likely to at-
tach some strings to any arrangement.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Guard against inclinations
to unwittingly dominate companions. Even though you
may not mean to do so, you could be far more assertive
than you intend.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26
Mega Money: 27 30 37 40
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $3,912.50
3-of-4 MB 42 $408
3-of-4 858 $59.50
2-of-4 MB 1,399 $25
1-of-4 MB 12,015 $3
2-of-4 26,888 $2
Fantasy 5:6 8 17 27 36
5-of-5 1 winner $218,098.02
4-of-5 337 $104
3-of-5 9,934 $9.50
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25
Fantasy 5:6 8 9 11 17
5-of-5 3 winners $65,208.29
4-of-5 479 $65.50
3-of-5 11,551 $7.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Oct. 28,
the 302nd day of 2012. There
are 64 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Oct. 28,1962, Soviet
leader Nikita Khrushchev in-
formed the United States he
had ordered the dismantling of
missile bases in Cuba; in ex-
change, the U.S. secretly
agreed to remove nuclear
missiles from U.S. installations
in Turkey.
On this date:
In 1636, the General Court
of Massachusetts passed a
legislative act establishing
Harvard College.
In 1776, the Battle of White
Plains was fought during the
Revolutionary War, resulting
in a limited British victory.
In 1858, Rowland Hussey
Macy opened his first New
York store at Sixth Avenue
and 14th Street in Manhattan.
In 1886, the Statue of Lib-
erty, a gift from the people of
France, was dedicated in
New York Harbor by Presi-
dent Grover Cleveland.
In 1919, Congress enacted
the Volstead Act, which pro-
vided for enforcement of Pro-
hibition, over President
Woodrow Wilson's veto.
In 1936, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt rededicated the
Statue of Liberty on its 50th
anniversary.
In 1980, President Jimmy
Carter and Republican presi-
dential nominee Ronald Rea-
gan faced off in a nationally
broadcast, 90-minute debate
in Cleveland.
Ten years ago: American
diplomat Laurence Foley was
assassinated in front of his
house in Amman, Jordan, in
the first such attack on a U.S.
diplomat in decades.
Five years ago:
Argentina's first lady, Cristina
Fernandez, claimed victory in
the country's presidential
election; she became the first
woman elected to the post.
One year ago: NBA Com-
missioner David Stern can-
celed all NBA games through
November after labor negoti-
ations broke down for the
second time in a week.
Today's Birthdays:
Musician-songwriter Charlie
Daniels is 76. Actor Dennis
Franz is 68. Olympic track
and field gold medalist Bruce
Jenner is 63. Actress Annie
Potts is 60. Microsoft co-
founder Bill Gates is 57. Ac-
tress Daphne Zuniga is 50.
Actress Lauren Holly is 49.
Talk show host-comedian-
actress Sheryl Underwood is
49. Actress Jami Gertz is 47.
Actor-comedian Andy Richter
is 46. Actress Julia Roberts is


45. Country singer Brad Pais-
ley is 40. Actor Joaquin
Phoenix is 38.
Thought for Today: "Next
to excellence is the apprecia-
tion of it." William Make-
peace Thackeray, British
author (1811-1863).


r_











COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


.. ..A



',,._ fl-_


Thepolitics ofyour septic tank

JIM STEVENSON
Special to the Chronicle

My wife and I have a septic tank
that processes the waste from
our home, and I know its specific
location in the yard. Some homeowners
have never thought about their septic tank
and have no idea where it is. That means
they have never had their tank pumped.


The septic tank's company
employee who pumped our tank
a year ago said he has had to
empty some tanks out with a
shovel because they have never
been maintained. It is out of
sight, out of mind. Just flush it
and forget it until sewage backs
up in the bath tub or spills onto
the lawn.
Some regard septic tank main-
tenance as a nuisance and an
unwanted expense. All but ap-
proximately 1,200 homes in Tal-
lahassee are connected to the
city's central sewer Those who
are connected pay a reasonable
monthly utility fee for this serv-


ice. Some have central sewer
available in front of their homes
but have refused to hook up be-
cause of the connection fee and
the city has not required them to
do so.
During the 2010 legislative
session, the Legislature passed a
septic tanks law thanks to the
leadership of Sen. Lee Constan-
tine, R-Altamonte Springs. The
law required septic tanks be in-
spected every five years to en-
sure they are properly treating
household sewage.
Soon after the session, several
legislators began efforts to re-
peal the law during the 2011 ses-
sion. In the 2012 session, they
were successful, essentially neu-
tering the law. In fact, it is now
worse than the original law.
This is about money! Public
health is being ignored. Appar-
ently, many homeowners don't
want to take responsibility by
paying for the proper disposal of
their own poop. They choose to
flush it and forget it.
See Page C3


Changes coming for the American Dream


JOHN MCFADDEN
Special to the Chronicle
Samuel P Huntington:
"Who Are We? The Chal-
lenges to America's Na-
tional Identity" (New York:
Simon and Schuster 2004)
428 pages.
MEN
President Obama was
right
He said that in the
coming election we Ameri-
cans will decide what sort of
country we want to live in -
one of conservative and
capitalist or one of liberal
and socialist.
Eight years ago, noted po-
litical scientist Samuel P
Huntington foresaw this


change. I suppose many oth-
ers did as well, but he saw
something the rest of us are
only beginning to
comprehend.
What we are experienc-
ing is not just a clash of po-
litical ideals, but the
divergence of two distinct
and mutually incompatible
cultures. Whatever the out-
come of this election, the
changes in the next four
years will be nearly
irreversible.
Sounds overly dramatic
doesn't it. A quick look in-
side Sam Huntington's
"Who Are We?" might con-
vince you otherwise.


SBook REVIEW
The way we were
Huntington's first point is
that, historically, there has
been broad agreement as to
what constitutes the Ameri-
can Dream, or what he calls
The American Creed (used
interchangeably), which he
defines as those things that
by broad agreement "bind
us together and form our as-
sumptions as to what is right
and wrong, appropriate and
inappropriate."
He lists them: "... the Eng-
lish Language; Christianity;
religious commitment; Eng-
lish concepts of the rule of
law, the responsibility of


rulers, and the rights of in-
dividuals; the dissenting
values of individualism, the
work ethic and the belief
that humans have the ability
and the duty to create
heaven on earth, a 'city on a
hill,' ... a society dedicated
to the principle of protect-
ing the essential dignity of
the individual human."
Of these, language and in-
dividualism are crucial; lan-
guage because it denies the
foreigner access to Amer-
ica's political and economic
benefits and encourages na-
tive speakers to exclude
them, and individualism be-
cause capitalism thrives


best on individual
achievement.
He summarizes with a
well-known description of
The Creed: "The American
dream that we were all
raised on is a simple but
powerful one if you work
hard and play by the rules
you should be given a
chance to go as far as your
God-given ability will take
you."
The second point he
makes is that it was these
qualities that drew the
"huddled masses" to our
country "It was never a po-
litical ideal (democracy) but
a cultural one (the Creed)....

See Page C4


County


suffers


a tough


week
D during election
time, it is easy to
get caught up with
the insignificant.
He said. She said. They
said.
Then along comes a
week like we've had.
Inverness attorney
Richard Shawn Fitz-
patrick, 31, died this week
after a long illness.
Shawn had the whole
town rooting for him since
he took over his father's
law practice in 2007. He
was the third generation
of Fitzpatricks to practice
law in Inverness, and he
was way too young to die.
Shawn's dad was
Richard "Spike" Fitz-
patrick and his grandfa-
ther was Charles B.
Fitzpatrick. Both were
high-profile attorneys
with big personalities and
successful practices.
Spike was on the front
page of the newspaper
regularly, as he was the
school board attorney and
handled many of the high-
est-profile cases of his
time.
While Shawn was in law
school, Spike got ill with
cancer His last wish was
to live long enough for
Shawn to take over the
family practice, but that
didn't happen. Spike died
in 2006 while Shawn was
still finishing up school.
It was during the in-
terim that an interesting
thing happened attor-
neys and judges through-
out Inverness pulled
together to help keep
Spike's law practice oper-
ating while Shawn fin-
ished up school. When
Shawn graduated and
passed the Bar, he walked
into the family practice.
It was a proud day for
the family and the Inver-
ness legal community.
Now tragedy has again
hit the Fitzpatrick family,
and it's hard to figure it
out. At 31 years old,
Shawn was already leav-
ing a mark on Citrus
County. He volunteered
on a number of important
charity boards such as
Hospice and Citrus Me-
morial. He was getting in-
volved in nonprofit
organizations and doing
all the right things.
He was one of the lead-
ers of the next generation
of Inverness.
Shawn had the family
sense of humor When he
held an open house at the
law firm in 2007, he hung
on the wall a job rejection
letter something that
most of us would not do.
But the letter was from
the University of Florida
where Shawn had made
application to become the
head football coach. UF
suggested in the rejection
letter that at 26 he was
probably not ready for the
job.
Shawn's sister Meagan is
now also an attorney and
she will continue the fam-
ily practice in Inverness.
Condolences go to the
family. Shawn's death is a
loss to the entire commu-
nity.
On at least a dozen oc-
casions, Don Mayo asked
me to go fishing on his
boat.
See Page C3







Page C2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28. 2012



PINION


"Patriotism is as fierce as a fever,
pitiless as the grave, blind as a stone,
and irrational as a headless hen."
Ambrose Bierce, 1842-1914


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ................... ..................... publisher
M ike A rnold .................................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. ..................citizen member
Mac Harris ........... ................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ........... ...... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


POLITICAL MANIPULATION




Voters should be


mad about election


shenanigans


It might not be the offense of
the decade, but Citrus
County voters are smart
enough to understand that
there have been a lot of
shenanigans going on in the
District 34 Florida House race.
An investigator with State At-
torney Brad King's office is-
sued a report last week that
said accusations
of manipulation
in the elections THE I!
could not be sub-
stantiated and Who is
would not be in- manipu
vestigated further. elect
Again, voters
are smart enough OUR 01
to understand that State atto
manipulation has too ,
been the name of
the game in this
contest and we all know the
reason why Nancy Argenziano
is running as an independent
candidate trying to unseat in-
cumbent Rep. Jimmie T Smith
(R-Inverness), and that has a
lot of people in Tallahassee
worried.
Argenziano has previously
served as both the state repre-
sentative and state senator
from Citrus County and she has
a well-earned reputation for
battling with legislators in
leadership positions. Argen-
ziano was a Republican, but
she called her own party's
leadership out so many times
that the party and the candi-
date parted ways.
The last thing the legislative
leadership in Tallahassee
wants is for Argenziano to re-
turn. She knows where all the
bodies are buried and she's not
afraid to dig them up. Hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars
have been pumped into
Smith's campaign from out of
county special interest groups
in an effort to stop Argenziano.
Once all the spending is tal-
lied, this will turn out to be one
of the most expensive Florida
House elections ever held.
A Democratic candidate -
Robert Goocher was in-
serted into the race in an effort
to protect Rep. Smith. The the-
ory was if Goocher won the
Democratic primary and Ar-
genziano was an independent,
he would siphon off votes from
Argenziano and Smith would
be guaranteed a victory.
The money used to support
Goocher's campaign came
from Republican fundraisers.
Goocher himself never cam-
paigned and refused to speak
with newspaper reporters. In-
verness attorney Bill Grant, an
adviser to Rep. Smith, was tied
back to the Goocher family, as
was Rep. Smith. There were of-
fice rentals, hospital board rec-
ommendations and other
connections that deserved
scrutiny.
Now, we admit State Attor-
ney Brad King has a lot of im-
portant cases to spend his time
on. He prosecutes those ac-
cused of murder, child abuse
and other far more heinous
crimes. Spending any amount


S
ti

i

P
o
so


of resources investigating this
silliness simply takes away
from those far more important
matters.
But we have to remind every-
one that our elections are seri-
ous business. Our country has
survived all these years be-
cause we have mostly avoided
the treachery of permitting the
fat-cat party
bosses from
;SUE: pulling the wool
over the eyes of
ying to the voters.
ate our A complaining
ons? witness in this
case apparently
INION: lacked credibility,
rney quit according to the
oon. state attorney The
witness Jim
Brunswick told
the Chronicle he was asked to
help Rep. Smith and become
the Democratic candidate in
the race before Goocher got in-
volved. The state attorney's of-
fice did not follow up on the
Republican connection to the
funding that mysteriously
came to the Democratic candi-
date. They did not look at the
mailings done by GOP political
operatives on behalf of the
Democratic candidate.
They also did not find it odd
that lobbyists for the state op-
tometric association said Rep.
Smith contacted them and said
his Democratic opponent was
"a good guy" and deserved a
campaign contribution from
them.
Think about that: An incum-
bent Republican legislator
contacts a lobbyist supporting
a campaign contribution for
his Democratic opponent. That
might happen in Russia, but
that's not the way politics
works in this country unless
someone recently changed the
rules.
Rep. Smith was asked to
have an appointment with the
state attorney to answer ques-
tions, but he said he was too
busy with his campaign and
put off the interview. The in-
cumbent has refused to answer
questions from Chronicle re-
porters and instead insists all
queries be emailed. Appar-
ently, his state GOP handlers
must guide his every step.
We are surprised the state at-
torney would conclude the in-
vestigation without inter-
viewing the representative.
We hate to see political in-
siders try to mess with elec-
tions. But these are the same
folks who pack our mailboxes
each day with political adver-
tisements filled with half-
truths, mistruths and outright
untruths. To expect some level
of ethical behavior is probably
too much to ask.
But we do expect the state at-
torney's office or the Florida
Division of Elections to be in-
dependent enough to dig into
allegations that folks are trying
to tinker with our elections.
The entire affair dismays us
and places a cloud of manipu-
lation over the election.


SO YOU KNOW
* Find the Chronicle Editorial Board's endorsements for the General
Election on Page C3 today.


Mugging our descendants


WASHINGTON
he election eve mood is
tinged with sadness stem-
ming from well-founded
fear America's new government
is subverting Amer-
ica's old character.
Barack Obama's
agenda is a menu of
temptations intended
to change the nation's
social norms by mak- /
ing Americans com- r
fortable with the
degradation of democ-
racy. This degradation
consists of piling up Georg
public debt that binds OTI
unconsenting future VOI
generations to finance
current consumption.
So argued Nicholas Eberstadt,
an economist and demographer
atAmerican Enterprise Institute,
in "A Nation of Takers: America's
Entitlement Epidemic." This
booklet could be Mitt Romney's
closing argument.
Beginning two decades after
the death of Franklin Roosevelt,
who would find today's govern-
ment unrecognizable, govern-
ment became a geyser of
entitlements. In 2010, govern-
ment at all levels transferred
more than $2.2 trillion in money,
goods and services to recipients
- $7,200 per individual, almost
$29,000 per family of four. Before
1960, only in the Depression
years of 1931 and 1935 did federal
transfer payments exceed other
federal expenditures. During
most of FDR's 12 presidential
years, income transfers were a
third or less of federal spending.
But between 1960 and 2010, enti-
tlements exploded from 28 per-
cent to 66 percent of federal
spending. By 2010, more than 34
percent of households were re-
ceiving means-tested benefits.
Republicans were more than
merely complicit, said Eberstadt:
"The growth of entitlement
spending over the past half-cen-
tury has been distinctly greater
under Republican administra-
tions than Democratic ones. Be-


H
Ic


tween 1960 and 2010, the growth
of entitlement spending was ex-
ponential but in any given year,
it was on the whole more than 8
percent higher if the president
happened to be a Re-
publican rather than a
Democrat. ... The
Richard Nixon, Gerald
Ford and George W
Bush administrations
presided over espe-
cially lavish expan-
sions of the
entitlement state."
Why, then, should we
e Will expect Romney to re-
IER verse Republican com-
DES plicity? Because by
embracing Paul Ryan,
Romney embraced
Ryan's emphasis on the entitle-
ment state's moral as well as fi-
nancial costs.
As evidence of the moral costs,
Eberstadt cites the fact that
means-tested entitlement recipi-
ence has not merely been destig-
matized, it has been celebrated as
a basic civil right. Hence the stun-
ning growth of supposed disabili-
ties. The normalization and then
celebration of dependency help
explain the "unprecedented exit
from gainful work by adult men."
Since 1948, male labor force
participation has plummeted from
89 percent to 73 percent Today, 27
percent of adult men do not con-
sider themselves part of the work-
force: "A large part of the jobs
problem for American men today
is not wanting one." Which is why
"labor force participation ratios
for men in the prime of life are
lower in America than in Europe."
One reason work now is nei-
ther a duty nor a necessity is the
gaming defrauding, really of
disability entitlements. In 1960,
an average of 455,000 workers
were receiving disability pay-
ments; in 2011, 8.6 million were
more than four times the num-
ber of persons receiving basic
welfare benefits under Tempo-
rary Assistance for Needy Fami-
lies. Nearly half of the 8.6 million
were "disabled" because of


"mood disorders" or ailments of
the "musculoskeletal system and
the connective tissue." It is, said
Eberstadt, essentially impossible
to disprove a person's claim to be
suffering from sad feelings or
back pain.
"In 1960," Eberstadt said,
"roughly 134 Americans were en-
gaged in gainful employment for
every officially disabled worker;
by December 2010 there were
just over 16." This, in spite of the
fact that public health was much
better, and automation and the
growth of the service/information
economy had made work less
physically demanding. Eberstadt
said collecting disability is an in-
creasingly important American
"profession":
For every 100 industrial work-
ers in December 2010, 73 "work-
ers" were receiving disability
payments. Between January 2010
and December 2011, the U.S.
economy created 1.73 million
nonfarm jobs but almost half
as many (790,000) workers be-
came disability recipients. This
trend is not a Great Recession
phenomenon: In the 15 years
ending in December 2011, Amer-
ica added 8.8 million nonfarm
private sector jobs- and 4.1 mil-
lion workers on disability rolls.
The radiating corruption of
this entitlement involves the col-
laboration of doctors and health
care professionals who certify
dubious disability claims. The ju-
dicial system, too, is compro-
mised in the process of setting
disability standards that enable
all this.
America's ethos once was what
Eberstadt called "optimistic Pu-
ritanism," combining an affinity
for personal enterprise with a
horror of dependency Nov 6 is a
late and perhaps last chance to
begin stopping the scandal of
plundering our descendants'
wealth to finance the demands of
today's entitlement mentality.
--In--
Contact George Will via email at
georgewill@washpost. com.


SLETTERS > to the Editor


Double stop signs
One time I was driving home
in the dark and hit a broken-off
stop sign in the highway The
broken end came up through the
floor directly pointed at my
wife's chest. Luck was with me
and I was able to stop and re-
move the sign. Otherwise, we
were lucky as if I hit something
else the pointed end may have
penetrated her chest and heart.
Stop signs can be a danger.
In regard to Meadowcrest stop
signs, I am confused on whether
or not I should stop twice and be
legal. Your article raises some
interesting questions.
First, is this private property
and intrusion by the county is
not legal? What does frangiblee"
really mean? As an engineer, it
means easily fractured or bro-
ken, not "to have give" that
means ductility of steel posts.
Where did all the money come
from to fool around with stop
signs? Is Meadowcrest or is the
county paying this cost? Is the
federal MUTCD manual a law or
a guide? Do all these people
know what is what? Can a court


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

case stand as implied by the
lawyer? Is wood more dangerous


than steel and if so, what are the
test results if any exist on me-
chanical properties of wood vs.
steel?
My recommendation is, next
time, these people should hire a
good engineer plus a lawyer to
establish what is what before
starting out on these activities. I
think the answers to my ques-
tions would be rather interesting.
Charles MacNeill
Crystal River

Stealing signs
Re: Reply to Lois Kathryn
Bennin "Sign stolen"
Attention: your claim Romney
supporters damage/destroy
Obama signs. My claim Obama
supporters damage Romney
signs.
Attention... both wrong. Anti
Americans, anti sign, anti mili-
tary vandals are destroying signs
including street and stop signs.
Note... we should not allow
ourselves to be divided.
Lillian Jones
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Down but not out in dire circumstances


J am certainly no ex- grandson. Instead, the
pert I'm not subject is the second
even sure I qualify John's, second wife,
as an amateur but, Lydia.
most recently I've Lydia first appears
begun to play at ge- in the census of 1880 as
nealogy; and, so far, the 3-year-old daugh-
I've found the most in- ter of John and Jane
formative tool has Coleman, living in Clay
been the U.S. census County, Fla. In the
records. Fred Brannen 1900 census, she is the
I'm not about to try A SLICE wife of James Rhoden
to relate all of the OF LIFE and the mother of two
things I've discovered. sons. In the 1910 cen-
There's already way too much sus, at the age of 33, she is listed as
stuff for a single column; besides, the head of the household, a wid-
I suspect it would sort of be like owed mother of four, who then
showing slides of a vacation lived in Baker County, Fla.
who really cares? Between the 1910 census and
But,I am finding some interest- the 1920 census, much happened
ing characters. to Lydia, most of which I've had to
For instance, mypaternal great- put together from memories and
great-grandfather was a fellow myths passed on to me by word of
named John W Brannen, who, ac- mouth... the gap between the 1910
cording the the 1850 census, was and the 1920 censuses left me with
born in Georgia in 1809. In 1850, little in official records. Nonethe-
he was living in Columbia County, less, in brief, around 1914, Lydia
Fla., with his wife, Eliza, and sev- married John Brannen. Between
eral children, one of whom was to then and his death in 1919 a
become my great-grandfather, death which was caused by the
James. James would go on to Spanish flu pandemic that killed
marry Nancy and in 1869, they millions of people between 1918
would have a son, also named and 1920 she gave birth to three
John, who would be my more children, Katie, Louis and
grandfather. Fred. You can see now the story is
But today, the column isn't getting a little bit closer to me with
about a string of Brannen males, the birth of Fred, who if you
which is now up to Fred 4, the first haven't guessed already, was my
John's great-great-great-great- father.


I'm running out of space, so let
me wrap this up.
What I gleaned from my re-
search was Lydia was an incredi-
bly strong woman. Before anyone
had even heard of equality of the
sexes, she wasn't trying to break
through a glass ceiling, but she
knew she had to find a way to dig
a living out of the dirt in Baker
County to feed her children and
she did.
In November 1919, Lydia was a
widow, once more. The circum-
stances were dire. She was down,
but she wasn't out.
I suppose the most heart-rend-
ing tale I remember hearing
about this era is when the "do-
gooders" came and offered to
"take" her children, she firmly
replied, "It's time for you to
leave. These are my children. We
will live together; and, if it ever
comes to it, we'll die together;
but, whatever we do, we'll do it
together."
I'm glad to have been able to put
together a part her story But even
more, I'm thankful she is a part of
my story, a forebear whose
strength and determination be-
came a big piece of the puzzle as
to how I came to be me.
Columnist's note: I am provid-
inga photo with today's column. It
could be considered by some to be
a heartbreakingpicture ofpoverty,
one best kept under wraps, but to


Special to the Chronicle
Katie, Louis and Fred (Sr.) Brannen, circa 1920.
me, it is the picture ofLydia Cole- -
man Rhoden Brannen's grit, her
determination, and I personally Fred Brannen is an Inverness
take pride in it. resident and Chronicle columnist.


Himmel effective;
vote her back in office
I have worked for the school district
more than 20 years. During that time, I
have worked under four superintend-
ents. Sam has always cared about and
has an open door policy to staff and
families. She listens, she cares and she
is proud of our county and students.
She has done an amazing job with
the budget, making sure our students'
needs are met. What she says to you
today, will be the same tomorrow and
the next. She is honest, dedicated
and caring. We have flourished under
her guidance. She is optimistic even
in trying times, and keeps the staff
morale up.
I urge everyone to vote for Sandra
"Sam" Himmel for Superintendent of
Schools. Let's keep one of the best
and most effective elected officials
Citrus County has ever had.
DJ Bryan Oliver
Floral City

Balfour's passion
deserves vote
Sandy has the passion, back-
ground, education and experience
for the job. She has been a parent,
teacher and administrator in the Cit-
rus County Schools and can take and
apply each of those experiences.
Sandy also has the distinct ability to
understand what our teachers face


Endorsement LETTERS

ENDORSEMENT
GUIDELINES
The Chronicle has enacted its
practice of asking that endorse-
ment letters be limited to the rea-
sons writers are supporting
candidates not why they won't
support candidates.

and how the board can work with
teachers to better educate our chil-
dren. Sandy has the education and
the experience from her time on the
Board of Directors of College of Cen-
tral Florida to handle our budgets
and manage our board and schools.
I have had the opportunity to speak
with Sandy on several occasions and
can tell she is the person for the job.
Sandy will never settle for second best
She will not rest until we not only
have the best schools in the state, but
one of the best districts in the nation.
We can do better and Sandy will work
with parents, teachers and adminis-
trators to make this happen. Sandy
will make a difference and will make
our schools better.
Mitch Raynes
Homosassa

Dawsy friend
of small business
For 111/2 years, I have been privi-
leged to be the managing general
partner of a 31-year small business in


CHRONICLE EDITORIAL BOARD ELECTION ENI


The Citrus County Chronicle Editorial
Board has issued the following en-
dorsements leading up to the Nov.
6 General Election:


and 11.
* Vote "Yes" on School Referendum.
* Vote "Yes" on retention of all three
state Supreme Court justices.


* Vote "No" on Amendments 1, 3, 4, U U.S. Senate: Bill Nelson.
5, 6, 8, 9 and 12. 1M I ,,,,,,, D, -


* Vote "Yes" on Amendments 2, 10



STINK their o
STINK Wh
thousa
Continued from PageC1 place
protect
Some politicians think we ow
only about the next election. owners
A statesman thinks about to spell
the next generation. dollars
The purpose of a septic to mail
tank is to kill harmful bacte- to prot
ria in human waste to pro- belong
tect drinking water, Irrespa
swimming areas and oysters It co
and scallops from contami- owner
nation. Citizens can choose on the
to protect the health of their utility
community. They have the erly pi
opportunity to be good the se
neighbors by ensuring their It cost
septic tank is properly main- a septi
trained so as not to contami- to $3.7
nate their neighbor's (and five-ye


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Every time he did, I found
an excuse not to take him up
on the offer.
In my defense, his wife
Sue would usually call me at
10 a.m. on a Tuesday and say
that Don wanted to go fish-
ing with me the next morn-
ing.
It was a Wednesday I
have a job. I have a newspa-
per to run. I can't just drop
everything and go fishing.
The world would probably
end if I did that
After a while, it became a


m u.zj. I IUUse UI I epresI I LaIVes,
District 11: Rich Nugent.


Dwn) drinking water
n needed, we spend
nds of dollars to re-
he roof on our house to
t the house because
n it. Yet some home-
s rebel when required
nd a couple hundred
; once every five years
ntain their septic tank
ect drinking water that
:s to everyone. Selfish?
onsible?
costs to flush. Home-
s in Tallahassee pay
average $40 to the
every month to prop-
rocess their waste at
wage treatment plant.
s about $225 to pump
ic tank. That amounts
75 per month over a
ear period. That's


bit of a greeting between us.
"Let's go fishing," Don
would say "My pet duck and
dog will go with us."
"Give me a call," I would
tell him.
I never made it happen.
Don died last weekend at
71 years old after fighting off
cancer for the last few years.
Don Mayo was a well-
known artist from this part
of Florida and he loved to
travel the rivers and flats of
the Nature Coast where he
painted wildlife scenes.
He was deaf, so communi-
cation was often difficult.
While he sometimes strug-
gled to make his point in a
conversation, he could com-


Citrus County. During that time, I
have come to know Sheriff Dawsy
and many of the deputies of the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office quite
well. I have come to respect them as
a well-led, highly trained and effi-
cient organization.
With a shrinking budget in today's
economy, Sheriff Dawsy has main-
tained the highest of standards in
staffing, training and equipping the
department. As a small businessman,
I recognize all too well how difficult
and challenging that can be.
Tax dollars are being spent fru-
gally and wisely by the sheriff's de-
partment. They are difficult to come
by in this economy Crime is down!
This is a statistic almost unheard of
in an economy that is struggling with
high unemployment.
Historically, crime balloons dramat-
ically when unemployment is high.
The downward trend Citrus County is
experiencing goes directly to the vi-
sion and leadership of our sheriff
I for one am proud to be operating
a small business in Citrus County. I
am proud of our clientele. I am
proud of our law enforcement offi-
cers. I am especially a proud sup-
porter of Sheriff Jeff Dawsy His
vision, drive, and involvement help
make Citrus Countnf a great lace tfn


work, live and play
James D.
Kane's A


)ORSEMENTS
* Citrus County Sheriff: Jef
* State Representative: Na
Argenziano.
* Superintendent of Schoo
"Sam" Himmel.
* Citrus County Clerk of th
Angela Vick.


about the cost of a cappuc-
cino coffee once a month.
Standard septic tanks
were designed to control
harmful bacteria. They
were not designed to control
nitrate. In springsheds, the
effluent from septic tanks
flows through the aquifer to
our springs. Nitrate flowing
from the drainfield, at a
concentration of 60 to 70
milligrams per liter, is de-
grading our springs. Some
viruses can also be trans-
mitted to the groundwater
by septic tanks.
State agencies with the
responsibility and expertise
on this issue are silent. They
dare not speak because of
the anti-government and
anti-regulation political cli-


municate with his artwork
in a special way
Through his paintings, he
told stories of beauty about
the scenery and wildlife of
our community. He fre-
quently managed to work
his strong patriotic feelings
into his art.
His paintings ended up in
the collections of many fa-
mous people. For a number
of years he donated a paint-
ing that was made into a
poster to celebrate the
Florida Manatee Festival in
Crystal River
Just this past summer, I
sat with Don in his Crystal
River home with Chet Cole
of the Key Center. Don was


mate. Perhaps
leaders should c
wisdom and see
of agency ex
agency heads or
relations staff).
Prior to every
are reminded
vote contributes
democracy You
tic tank affects tI
our drinking wa
health of our sp


Jim Stevenson i
coordinatorfor.
and Wakulla SI
Working Groups
chairman ofti
Springs Task F
him atflorida
comcast


= Hot Corner: HOMEWORK


Welcome to 47 percent club
To the person who thinks children have too much
homework: Teachers today are responsible for the 3R's
- reading, writing and arithmetic -
plus science, computers and more, OUND
not to mention art, music and PE. And
don't forget the seminars on manners 1
and anti-bullying. Additionally, break-
fast and lunch must be provided to
most. All of this must be accom-
plished in six hours a day. Your child
must perform at a certain level in
order to progress via state testing. CA
And his teacher is responsible if he
does not meet the "benchmarks." But, 563-0579
hey, let's not stress the little darlings
with a bit of homework. Tell them that
they don't need to study and work hard to be successful.
The government will provide for them. Instead of teach-
ing them to be independent, thinking and functioning
members of society, tell them the government will take
money from the rich and give it to them. Then welcome
them to your club, the 47 percent...
We've all had homework
Another parent (who) doesn't want to deal with their
child's homework. Get over it. We all had homework as a
kid. Your problem is you're too lazy and don't want to
spend time with your child. You'd rather get him to bed
and be on the computer end of story.

Remember when you were in school


Today is Oct. 11, Thursday, and I'm responding to
"Too much work." Has it been that long since you were
Hewitt, GM in school that you forgot we went to school for seven
ce Hardware hours? We had to come home, we had to get dinner and
Homosassa do our homework. Why should these kids be any differ-
ent? Their lack of so many skills is unreal. They can't
count, they can't spell and half of them can't read. They
need the homework and they need parents to make sure
ff Dawsy. they do it.
ff Dawsy.
ncy Homework needed to be competitive
On Thursday, Oct. 11, someone wrote in to Sound Off
)ls: Sandra complaining about the homework for schoolchildren. The
reason they should be doing homework and a lot more is
ie Court: we rate No. 46 out of 67 counties in quality of educa-
tion. Internationally, the United States is No. 17 in the
quality of education. Our schools and our kids need to
do more so we can compete internationally and locally.
Getting a job depends on an education.
our elected
demonstrate Take degree to private sector
kthe advice Now we have another teacher calling in Sound Off
:perts (not about all the hours they got to put in, hours at home
theirpublic grading, three hours five nights a week ... complaining
about the pay again. And if they think they're worth so
election we much, why don't they just take the degree they got and
our single go out into the public sector and that will tell them what
to a healthy they're really worth instead of working for some govern-
r single sep- ment agency like the education system. So, you know,
he quality of they asked to come to the school system; maybe they
water and the can ask to go somewhere else. But I think they're going
rings, to be surprised they're probably getting overpaid where
they are for what they got. So take your credentials, go
to the private sector and that's really where you're going
s the former to see what you're worth. And if you're worth more,
Ichetucknee good luck to you, buddy.
pringBasin
;and former Work should be done in classroom
heFlorida This is in response to the excessive homework in the
rce. Email paper. It asks to respond. That is very true; there's too
_springs@ much. Remember, teachers are hired to teach, not to tell
netstudents to go home and do all this and learn from it.


having prints made of his
latest masterpiece and they
were being sold to raise
money for the Key Center.
He was sick, but Don was
always raising money for
those in need.
He overcame his own lim-
itations and excelled at his
chosen craft. And he spent a
lifetime looking out for
other people.
I will forever regret that
we never took that fishing
trip.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 C3


itntivpq


'"'


---


~Citi~ '





C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

The millions that came to
America came because of
our culture and the eco-
nomic opportunities it
provided."
In other words, any
changes in our culture eat
away at The Dream.
The New Creed
Beginning in the mid-60s
powerful movements began
to challenge the impor-
tance, the substance and
even the desirability of the
American Creed. "America
to them was not a national
community of individuals
bearing a common culture,
history and creed but a con-
glomerate of different races,
ethnicities and subcultures
in which individuals were
defined by their group
membership and not a com-
mon nationality."
At the heart of this move-
ment were the concepts of
"multiculturalism" and
"equal opportunity" both of
which are conceptually in-
tolerant of individualism
and common language.
Rather, the focus turned
on separate communities of
individuals, categorized ac-
cording to race, ethnicity,
gender, language, sexual
orientation and economic
status, to name but a few.
The movement began in
our colleges and universi-
ties. "Liberal political be-
liefs fostered among


academics, intellectuals,
journalists and others, feel-
ings of sympathy and guilt
concerning those whom
they saw as victims of exclu-
sion, discrimination and
oppression."
Next, the New Creed drew
in lawmakers. "Even conser-
vative politicians accepted
this 'New American Creed.'
They discovered that focus-
ing on the specific needs of
distinct groups was easier
than trying to find a hazy
middle ground somewhere
within their constituents' po-
litical positions."
The result was the legal-
ization of multiculturalism
and diversity in the forms of
Affirmative Action, and
Equal Opportunity. In brief,
"Our political leaders had
exchanged the principles of
equality of opportunity and
respect for the principles of
equality of result or
condition."
Diversity and multicultur-
alism also allowed newly ar-
rived immigrants, mostly
Mexican, to "maintain the
cultures of their countries of
origin even though their cul-
tural values differed widely
from America's."
Huntington is especially
concerned by the fact that
Hispanic immigrants are
encouraged to keep their
own language. "For the first
time in our history we are
becoming a bilingual
nation."
The New Creed turns the
idea of an American "melt-
ing pot" inside out. "Earlier
waves of immigrants were


subjected to intense pro-
grams ofAmericanization to
assimilate them into Ameri-
can society. ... Once, immi-
grants came to this country
to be Americans. Now they
come to be in America."
Fixing the
broken system
Without modification, the
budget deficit, Medicare
and Social Security won't
survive. Huntington's in-
sights make the differences
in liberal and conservative
approaches easier to
understand.
The deficit: Both propose
putting money into the econ-
omy but in opposing ways.
Republicans want to
allow wage earners to keep
more of their earnings by
lowering taxes on individu-
als and corporations. If con-
sumers and businesses are
left with more of their earn-
ings, they'll spend them,
creating more jobs and in
turn additional money to be
taxed.
Democrats propose in-
jecting more federal money
into the economy, which will
have the same effect as the
Republican approach. By
maintaining government
control over public assets,
the government can insure
their fair and equitable
distribution.
Health care: Both Repub-


lican and Democrat propos-
als provide health insur-
ance for all.
The Republican plan has
the option of accepting
Medicare as it is or choosing
to receive a voucher which
consumers can use to buy
their own insurance, pay
their medical bills directly
or invest in the market, cre-
ating Medical Savings Ac-
counts. The idea is to allow
consumers the ability to
manage their own personal
health care.
The Democrats want to
take health care out of the
hands of private insurers
and, over time, create a sys-
tem of single payer health
insurance. Their idea is to
make certain that the disad-
vantaged get the same care
as the wealthy
Social Security: The Re-
publican position is that
young workers should be
given the option of investing
a small portion of their SSI
payments in the market,
creating individual ac-
counts expecting, thereby, to
increase benefits when they
retire.
The Obama Administra-
tion is willing to negotiate
changes in SSI but only "...
without subjecting Ameri-
cans' guaranteed retire-
ment income to the whims
of the stock market"


He never raises the most important
question: So what?


COMMENTARY


JOIN THE GULF TO LAKES PILOT CLUB AS WE KICK
OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON I'ITH OUR ANNUAL....


t lfe4 &CFe teP 'et

RC r MiCi ..El. GN L OFl-H , Cili
Gulf to Lake's HW-\v, Lecainto


Public Tree Viewipg
Thursday, Noiember 15, 2-8pm
In a festive setting. view more thlln
Ti nixh -fi\e beautifulIl decorated
( In iritmas TrIees.
Raffic ticket fr Tree' and Chine"il C
.-AIt ti,'n ic1in \, ill be a ailabkl
t>I p r:lha-c
Admission:
A t0%\ .'1 n, _-pcri-lhaLc tofood itlni
l,- bheni Iclit (tr; L'nlited BaJIket B
Gala Evet
Friday EBening. November 16
Io I'lr. ac [Ilr kcaio h l iI o orc

1.-^1i-i 1 ,i-" ,


CHpNICL


41st Anniversary


Hist<
U


November 3rd & 4th, 2012


9:3oam 4:30pm
ric Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL


Food
Refreshments
Free Parking
Free Admission


o


Fine Arts
Crafts .
E Juried Art Show
Student Display 4



Sponsored by:


The Festival of the Arts Committee, the City of
Inverness and the Citrus County Chronicle
Call 726-2611 for Information


cooc


Saturday, iiter3, 2012


$20 Pre-Registered
$25 Race Day
T-shirt and free Stone Crab
Jam entry guaranteed to
pre-registered.

Door Prizes
by A Crystal River Kayak
Company and New Concepts
International Hair Salon


Saturday

November 3
7:30 a.m.
Hunter Springs Park
Crystal River

RUN OR WALK!
Register Online:
CitrusRoadRunners.org
proudly i,', n6 iii ,



BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CITRUS COUNTY

hosted by
SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

presented by


cooper
-II FUNERALIHOMES
& CREMATORY
in partnership with

r l col nty


www.inverness-fl.gov





wvs


The Streets will be killed with
SSeven LIVE lands!
SVendors f Crafters
reat Local Food
Stone Crab Claws
Wine eer
Chowder Cook-Off
ADMISSION 5 V.I.P. $50
Hurry! V.I.P. is limited.


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QIg py Sponsored by /f UD
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Similarities
with a difference
In each of the three cases,
Republicans place control
of the reforming process in
individuals' hands, con-
vinced the individual is
most qualified to decide the
course of action that best
suits his needs.
In each case, the Democ-
rats leave control of the re-
forms in government hands
equally convinced the gov-
ernment is in the best posi-
tion to ensure a fair and
equitable distribution of na-
tional goods and services.
Conclusions
Huntington's preview of
America's changing culture
is not without fault. Indeed,
there are many But two are
hard to defend.
He ignores the possibility
that coming generations of
immigrants' attachments to
cultural norms of their par-
ents will dissipate and that
they will willingly join in
The American Dream and
invigorate it.
Even more serious is that
he never raises the most im-
portant question: So what?
All of the nations in Eu-
rope and Canada have cre-
ated reasonably successful
socialist societies and if
they perform poorly, Mar-
garet Thatcher (British
Prime Minister 1979-1990)
has proven that adjustments
can be made.
But Huntington's ability to
explain, from a distance of
eight years, the difficult


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

choices that face us come
Nov 6 easily overpowers the
imperfections of this work.
In fact, he also explains the
partisan logjam that plagues
our legislative processes.
Huntington is regarded at
one of the world's foremost
thinkers. Several of his
dozen books are in their
third and fourth printings
("The Soldier and The
State" is in its 14th). He had
the extraordinary ability to
look the world in the eye.
Most importantly, he has
provided us the insights we
need to make an informed
decision on election day; do
we want to keep the Ameri-
can Dream that made this
nation so successful or has
The Dream's time passed, so
we should look to a different
approach to our way of life?
One last thought. It would
be easy to portray Samuel
Patrick Huntington as
larger than life.
Perhaps he is.
[]
John McFadden retired
from the Army as a
lieutenant colonel after23
years of service. He holds a
Master's Degree in Middle
East studies from New
York University and a
Ph.D. in political science
from George Washington
University He has taught at
the graduate and
undergraduate level at the
U.S. Army Special Warfare
Center at Fort Bragg NC,
George Washington
University and The
University of Connecticut


I


i












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dynabody marks 20 years in business


PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Dynabody Fit-
ness Club in Inverness is celebrat-
ing its 20th anniversary of doing
business in Citrus County
"Our core business is fitness,
that's what we're about," said An-
drew Moreno. "We have programs
to address the needs of everybody"
Moreno is the owner of Dynabody
and a staunch advocate of personal
fitness as a lifestyle. Under his own-
ership the club has taken the lead
in various local fitness initiatives.
He has owned the business for the
past five years, a period of growth,
innovation and enhancements to


both programs and facilities.
He said it has evolved to meet
customer needs and scheduling de-
mands and offers more viable fit-
ness options. And during that
period the industry has changed,
with fewer full service fitness facil-
ities available.
"We have a lot of people who
never belonged to a fitness club
prior to moving to the Inverness
areas," Moreno said, explaining the
club's demographics. "They are
newly retired and we have to have
the programs and sensibilities that
do no harm and have programs that
they can make progress with to
reach their fitness goals."
"So there is a lot of work on our


part to make sure that the fitness
experience for every person who
walks through the door is as good as
we can get it."
The result has been a client base
that spans all ages and levels of fit-
ness with customers from all over
the county
To meet the fitness of its mem-
bers, the club is open 24 hours a day,
Monday through Friday, with busi-
ness hours on Saturday and Sunday
"It is important to be hands-on
with members," he said. "It is im-
portant for staff to be here to be able
to respond with good information."
Dynabody has a staff of 34, some of
whom have been there up to 15 years.
The club has a variety of mem-


bership options available. He said
they also cater to snowbirds who
can freeze their membership while
they are back up North.
Moreno likes to see members ac-
tively using the facilities. He recom-
mends they come at least three times
a week and do something physically
at least six times a week, especially
those who hold sedentary jobs.
"We feel that if you are active, if
you are fit, you are healthier, you
are more productive in every part
of your life and have a better self-
image," Moreno said. "Generally
speaking you are more successful."
"We have been here 20 years, and
with success the club can be here
another 20 years," he said.


Savvy shopping


Strategies for

finding hot toys
MAE ANDERSON
Associated Press

It's that season again, when
parents begin the scramble for
the next toy their child can't live
without
While there's no breakout hot
toy for Christmas this year so
far as parents know, that
doesn't mean the most popular
presents will be easy to find.
This year, stores are being cau-
tious with inventory, so some
toys might be scarce on store
shelves when the holidays get
nearer.
But never fear: Here are some
strategies to make sure that
whatever toy your child wants,
from the latest Monster High
doll or robotic Furby pet to the
child-size LeapPad Explorer, is
under the tree without having
to pay exorbitantly on eBay or
elsewhere.
SHOP EARLY: Toy makers
and retailers are working more
diligently than ever to ensure
that there won't be a large over-
supply of toys after the holidays
are over, which ends up costing
them money
Jim Silver, an analyst at Time
toplaymag.com, predicts the
hottest toys will be scarce by
Dec. 1 a time when many peo-
ple are just starting to think
about Christmas gifts. So even
though your child's thoughts
may still be on Halloween, now
is the time to figure out what he
or she wants and start shopping.
MAKE A RESERVATION:
Fortunately, this year stores are
making it easy to shop early,
with layaway services and other
offers. So even if you don't have
the cash yet, you can still start
shopping. Toys R Us, Wal-Mart
and Kmart have dropped fees,
minimum balances and other


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Associated Press
Know someone eager to try out the Sonic the Hedgehog Collection Erector set? Here are some shopping
strategies that might help get the season's hot toys.


We all know
what each other's
kids want, so if we
see something,
we'll buy it and
swap later.

Emily Vanek
ColoradoMoms.com owner shares
shopping lists with her friends to
optimize her chances.

requirements to make it easier
than ever to use layaway pro-
grams. In addition, Toys R Us
this year launched a "hot toy"
reservation system, which lets
parents reserve hot toys before
they even hit shelves.
GO ONLINE: Not only can
ordering toys online make shop-
ping quicker and easier, it's also


Beware job scams


W ith Halloween
just a few days
away, now is an
ideal time to talk about
tricks and treats.
Let's start with some
pretty scary tricksters -
employment scammers.
We are hearing reports
from workforce boards
throughout the state about Laura
an increasing number of WORK
these creepy ghouls CONNE
usurping the names of le-
gitimate businesses and
organizations to trick jobseekers into
responding to their ads. And once
they do respond, the jobseekers are
told they have to send money for so-
called training for jobs that don't ac-
tually exist.
These scammers are obviously un-
scrupulous preying on folks who
are most vulnerable but unfortu-
nately, they are also very crafty and
very good at what they do. Despite
the warnings on nearly every page of
the Employ Florida Marketplace, for
example, these scammers know that
it's easy for jobseekers to get excited
and let their guard down when they
find what they believe is a promising
opportunity
So what can you do? You know that
old saying, caveat emptor: let the
buyer beware. The bottom line is, if


Byrnes
FORCE
SECTION


something sounds too
good to be true, it probably
is too good to be true.
Claims of guaranteed em-
ployment and demands
for upfront fees are defi-
nite red flags. When
searching through job ad-
vertisements, whether on-
line or in the classified,
keep these tips in mind:
Research the com-
pany to make sure it is the
real deal (to ensure a busi-


ness is authentic, contact
the Better Business Bureau at
wwwbbb.org).
Keep your email address private
and do not provide your Social Secu-
rity number or any sensitive infor-
mation to an employer unless you
are confident they are legitimate.
Be wary of any employer offer-
ing a job without an interview.
Be alert for any employer charg-
ing fees to either employ, find place-
ment or provide training.
Investigate thoroughly any em-
ployer requesting you transfer funds
or receive packages for reshipment,
especially if they are located overseas.
Avoid vague offers, exaggerated
claims of possible earnings or prod-
uct effectiveness, or any job posting


Page D4


a trove of information. Check
out a brand's Facebook page or
Twitter hashtag to find other
people looking for the same toys
who may have tips on where to
find them. In addition, using a
shopping cart on Amazon may
help you save money Amy
Barseghian, mother and blogger
at mommy-mentor com, recom-
mends filling up your Amazon
cart with toys but waiting to
actually buy them. If an item in
your cart gets cheaper, Amazon
will send you an alert.
BE SMART ABOUT STORE
STOCKING: The days of run-
ning from store to store trying to
find the hot toy are over, be-
cause most stores have added
online services that can tell you
which location has a product in
stock. Many also offer ship-to-
store options or same-day deliv-
ery If they don't, experts
recommend calling before you
go. If the store doesn't have an


item, make them do the work of
calling other locations to locate
what you want. Timing is key,
Emily Vanek, mother of three
sons and owner and editor of
ColoradoMoms.com, says. She
advises, if possible, to go shop-
ping at lunch on Fridays, when
stores are freshly stocked right
before the weekend rush.
"That's how we scored quite a
few toys," she says.
ENLIST YOUR FRIENDS:
Your best weapon for finding
hot toys may be your social cir-
cle. Vanek says she makes a list
of all the toys on her list and
then shares it with her friends,
who also have their own lists.
"We all know what each
other's kids want, so if we see
something, we'll buy it and swap
later," Vanek says. If the other
person already has that toy, just
return it "It beats looking for
something on eBay and spend-
ing two or three times as much."


140 characters or less


"Drinking iced #pumpkincof-
fee while writing my #inthe-
memetime column for
@citruschronicle"
T he above
"tweet" may not
make much
sense to you, but hope-
fully, after you read
this column, it will.
First, what is a tweet?
A tweet is a relatively
short message (140
characters or less) that
you convey to your fol- Daniell
lowers on a social IN 1
media website called MEME
Twitter
Twittercom has
been around since 2006, and in
six short years now has more than
140 million users, more people
than the number who voted in the
last presidential election.
So who are these 140 million
people? They are you and me,
your neighbor down the road, the
president of the United States,
the actor from that sitcom you
love, the rescue dog organization,
department stores, your best
friend's daughter, your local com-
munity newspaper- the list goes
on. Anyone who has an email ac-
count and use of a computer can
have a Twitter account.
You can use Twitter to tell your


friends what you are doing
tonight. Think of it as a mass text
message. Or you can tell your fol-
lowers about the sale
your store is having.
Who you think should
be our next president.
S What TV show you
think is terrible. What
you ate for breakfast.
Or what a student said
to you that melted your
heart today
If a clothing store
Kerese has a Twitter account,
rHE and you follow their
'TIME feed, you will be given
instant notifications of
sales and promotions
- some of which won't be offered
to anyone other than their Twitter
followers.
I think a large part of the ap-
peal of Twitter is #celebrities.
Yes, I #hashtagged it! (I'll get to
that in a bit.) Lots of celebrities
use Twitter Some are actually the
celebrities, and some are people
hired by celebrities to handle
their personas on social media
sites.
You might be surprised,
though, that many celebrities ac-
tually make their own posts -
Whoopi Goldberg, Donald

See Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Divide


mom's


trust
DEAR BRUCE: My
mother passed
away six months
ago. She had a trust set up,
and we were told in the
trust she had put aside
money for her children.
My father is still alive, and
he may need some of the
money that was left to us.
How long should we
wait before delving into
this? I don't need the
money, but one of my sib-
lings does, and she keeps
pressing us to look into
this as she could use her
share. I'm not sure what to
do. Linda, via email
DEAR LINDA: I under-
stand what your sibling is
saying, and I have no
problem with it. There are
legal matters to be de-
cided here, and how long
the family should wait de-
pends in some measure
on the specific verbiage in
the trust
It's clear what your
mother wanted to accom-
plish, and it's equally
clear you are concerned
with your father's welfare.
You didn't mention how
much money is involved
here, but if other family
members are in need of
the money and you are
not, why not go ahead and
have the trust divided?
The individuals who
would like to help out
your dad can do so, and
those who don't wish to, or
cannot, don't have to.
You have no obligation I
know of to use any of this
trust money that was left
to you for your father's
care. There are decisions
to be made.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I are 82, and we
don't have a will. My hus-
band has refused to get
one, and I don't think at
this late date I'm going to
convince him otherwise.
If we both die without a
will, will our children
have any problem getting
our home and our bank
account? We don't have
any bills, and our home
and automobiles are paid
for Reader, via email
DEAR READER: The
answer to your question
is: Yes! You bet they will
have problems! You are
talking about leaving your
home with undivided in-
terest to more than one
child, which is always a
mistake.
For goodness' sake, you
should have simple recip-
rocal wills, one to the
other and one to your sur-
viving children. At the
very least, one of you will
have to be appointed ad-
ministrator of the estate
by the probate court,
which will involve some
expense.
I have written many
columns on this subject,
expressing my well-de-
fined view that there al-
ways should be a personal
rep or administrator
(which you currently don't
have) and instructions to
them in a will that the
home should be disposed
of and the monies divided.
Not having a will is a huge
disservice to the people
you leave behind.
DEAR BRUCE: My
home has been in a trust
for about five years. When
my husband passed away,
it was put in my name. Do
I need to keep it in a trust;
if so, for how long; and
See Page D4


e
I










D2

SUNDAY
OCTOBER 28, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan .
this:
rSi r.*FB


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Genesis Women's Center

Medical Spa a sponsor of

BWA Health & Fitness Expo


Take a good look at the photo and remember these faces,
they are Citrus County's Business Leaders of Tomorrow!

Welcome our new 'Business
Leaders of Tomorrow'


Dr. Carlos Rodriguez speaks to an attendee about the serv-
ices that Genesis Women's Center Medical Spa offers to
women and men, such as laser toenail fungus treatments,
medical weight loss, and much more. Genesis Women's
Center Medical Spa is at 800 Medical Court E., Inverness;
352-726-7667; www.medspaatgenesis.com.


The young professionals'
group of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce has
regrouped and redirected
itself as Business Leaders
of Tomorrow. We know you
will welcome these young
leaders and assist them in
their quest to contribute to
the community and repre-
sent the Chamber.
New members are: Ryan
Bishara, Suncoast Plumb-
ing & Electric; John
Dickey, Williams, Mc-


Cranie, Wardlow & Cash;
Brittany Jones, Citrus
95.3/96.3 the Fox; Jennifer
Martin, Nature Coast Fi-
nancial Advisors; Todd
Martin, Jarrod McAlister,
Nature Coast Financial
Advisors; Courtney Pol-
lard, Citrus County Chroni-
cle; Courtney Pullias,
Citrus County School
Board; AnneMarie Saxer,
Horizon HomeCare; and
Shannon Straight, State
Farm.


Spotlight on Citrus County business


Today we put the me
spotlight on Coastal Tr
& Sign Co. Inc. Ow
Ellen and Lenny Coi
joined the Chamber sh
after opening their bus
21 years ago. In their
years as Cham-
ber members,
many businesses
and individuals at'
have called upon
them for assis-
tance, sometimes Ap
with very little
lead time.
The range of
services they


offer is extensive last n
and includes tro-
phies, plaques, yOU sa
engraved signs,
name badges, handiu
show ribbons, the b
flags, full color
digital printing, out 1
vehicle lettering,
decals, magnetic signs, ban-
ners, bumper stickers, etc.
In fact, if you attended the
Industry Appreciation BBQ
at M & B Dairy last month,
you saw their handiwork in
the banner out front


mber Writers say to write about
trophy what you know, and it seems
zners in business it works well to
nforti stick with what you know.
lortly Ellen agrees, telling us
iness they chose this business be-
19 1/2 cause "my husband Len's
background is in
If yOU printing and
tended the since we used to
ended e own a printing
Industry company previ-
ously, we had a
)preciation good graphics
background,
BBQ at which is defi-
ir nitely needed in
& B Dairy this business."


nonth,
w their
work in
manner
front.


When you
think signs and
awards, think
Coastal Trophy
& Sign Co., 708
N.E. Sixth St.,
Crystal River, FL
34428.
The shop is


open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday
Owners Ellen or Lenny
Conforti are reachable at:
ctssigns@hotmail.com,
phone 352-563-0295 or fax
352-563-0225.


November is upon us


Shave it off and then just
say YES to facial hair! The
official shave off takes
place from 5 to 6 p.m. this
Tuesday, Oct. 30, at the
Chamber office in Inver-
ness, 401 W Tompkins St
November is a world-
wide movement to raise
awareness and funds for
men's health issues, specif-
ically cancers affecting
men. Join the Mo Bros!
If you haven't registered
your participation yet,
please contact Dorothy
Pernu at dorothypernu
@hma.com to get your
name/team added to the


Citrus County
Cruisin'
Nov 3 Celebrate the
Blues from 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. with the annual
Blues'n Bar-B-Que in Ho-
mosassa. Tickets are $20
at the gate. The ticket
price is for the concert
only Bar-B-Que cooked
onsite, Cuban cui-
sine in the Mu-
seum Cafe, cold I
beer, wine, soda, cus
water, coffee and
desserts. Please,
no pets, no coolers, no
outside food or drink; you
may bring chairs. More
information is available
at www.ncfblues.com.
Travel a few miles
north and join the street
festival as the Rotary
Club of Crystal River-


NOVEMBER
roster. Your Mo Sistas will
be watching you!
And then on Nov 29 we
will rate the Mos at Burke's
Irish Pub in Crystal River
during the Mo Show & Fi-
nale Party at 6 p.m.


S i"-^



Kings Bay presents the
fifth annual Stone Crab
Jam on Saturday, Nov 3.
This street festival kicks
off at 4 p.m. on the south
|^ side of Citrus Ave
all the way to the
" ,waterfront at
I- King's Bay Park
in Crystal River,
with music on
three stages, food and
craft vendors and beer,
wine and soda/water.
General admission tick-
ets are only $5, and VIP
tickets are just $50 each.
More information is
available at
www. stonecrabj am. com/.


Ellen Conforti with a sampling of the products offered at
Coastal Trophy & Sign.


Give a shout out to employees

who focus on Customer Service

The Citrus County appearing in the newspaper,
Chamber of Commerce is the Citrus County Chamber
proud to promote its "You of Commerce sends a letter
Caught My Eye" program. to the employee's manager
The program allows resi- noting the recognition. We
dents and visitors to recog- are excited to offer such in-
nize employees who go teraction between busi-
beyond in their atten- nesses and community
tion to Customer Serv- residents. Please note: Busi-
ice. In addition to the ness must be within
employee's name k Citrus County
r ----------- ----------------*
I YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
for OUTSTANDING Customer Service!
I I
IPERSON you are nominating:
I I
I I
IBUSINESS they work for:

ADDRESS of business:

City:

I DATE of contact:

WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?



Your Name:

Your Phone Number:

SDate Submitted:
I I
SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: CINDI FEIN,
S CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
28 N.W. U.S. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
L_---------------------- J


If you build it,


you can enter it


in three parades


Dec. 1 Parade in the
Hills float entries are still
being accepted for the "The
Magic of Christmas" Parade
Holiday Arts & Crafts/Car
Show in Beverly Hills.
There is a $500 prize for
overall best float.
More information is avail-
able at www.citruscounty
chamber.com for details, the
flyer and application infor-
mation. Events start at
9 a.m., parade begins at 10.
Application deadline is
Nov 24.
Dec. 1 Crystal River
Christmas Parade, "A Post-
card Christmas" begins at 6
p.m with all the lights and


sounds of Christmas. Appli-
cations are available online
at News/Events at www.citr-
uscountychambercom and
at both Chamber offices: 28
N.W U.S. 19, Crystal River;
and 401 W Tompkins St., In-
verness. Application dead-
line is Nov 16.
Dec. 8 Inverness Christ-
mas Parade, "A Postcard
Christmas" begins at noon.
Applications are available
online at News/Events at
www.citruscountychamber.
com and at both Chamber
offices: 401 W Tompkins St,
Inverness; and 28 N.W U.S.
19, Crystal River. Applica-
tion deadline is Nov 16.


Citrus County health providers

positioned to serve community


The Citrus Memorial Dia-
betes Center, the only cen-
ter in the county recognized
by the American Diabetes
Association, now offers
monthly diabetes self-man-
agement education classes
at Citrus Memorial Health-
care Center at Sugarmill
Woods. These classes,
taught by a registered dieti-
tian and certified diabetes
educator, offer an opportu-
nity for those living with di-
abetes to learn about the
importance of physical ac-
tivity, meal planning and
medication.
Other topics discussed in-
clude blood glucose moni-
toring, problem solving and
coping as well as reducing
the risk for diabetes-related
complications such as heart
or kidney disease. To regis-
ter for a class or to schedule
an individualized one on
one appointment, call 352-
341-6110. A physician refer-
ral is required.


Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center is Citrus
County's Know Your Stats
resource. Led by cancer sur-
vivor and football Hall-of-
Famer Mike Haynes and
fellow legend Harry Carson,
Know Your Stats was cre-
ated by the American
Urological Association
Foundation and the Na-
tional Football League. It
asks men to know their risks
and seek out screening op-
tions for prostate cancer.
The hospital kicks off the
campaign this month with
daily health tips available at
facebook.com/srrmc.
Additionally, Seven
Rivers Regional is now
scheduling appointments
for a free prostate cancer
screening on Jan. 30, 2013.
The prostate cancer screen-
ing is available to men older
than 40 who have not re-
ceived a PSA test since Jan-
uary 2012. Call 352-795-1234
for additional information.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce

Upcoming EVENTS
Oct. 30 Movember Shave Nov. 20 **CHANGE IN
Off, 5 to 6 p.m. at Inverness DATE** Business After Hours
Chamber of Commerce/EDC 5 to 7 p.m. at FERRIS
Office. GROVE RETAIL STORE.
Oct. 30 5 to 8:15 p.m. Nov. 29 Movember Mo
Workshop: "The Value of Rela- Show & Finale Party, 6 p.m. at
tionships," organized by the Cit- BURKE'S IRISH PUB.
rus County Business Alliance. Jan. 19 and 20 2013
Nov. 1 Business After Florida Manatee Festival in
Hours 5 to 7 p.m. at HOS- Crystal River. www.florida man-
PICE OF CITRUS COUNTY. ateefestival.com.
Nov. 8 Business After Check out our complete cal-
Hours SENICAAIR and CIT- endar for
RUS COUNTY BUILDERS AS- community, R~*
SOCIATION preview the 35th entertainment
annual "Remodeling America" and fundrais-
Home & Outdoor Show. ing events, in- I
Nov. 9 --11:30 a.m. to 1 eluding I gmri l
p.m. November Chamber HALLO-
Lunch at Plantation on Crystal WEEN activities. Follow us on
River. your smartphone:


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Medical office plans Village Cadillac Toyota health fair
Oct. 30 'Pink Party' rI t- = -1-1


In honor of Breast Cancer
Awareness Month, Sisto Plastic
Surgery will host a "Pink Party"
from noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 30.
Join us as we celebrate the
lives of our survivors and cher-
ish the precious memories of
those who so bravely fought in
the fight against breast cancer.
Sisto Plastic Surgery is at
131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness.
RSVP by Monday: Call 352-
344-9400.
Perrone joins
executive council
HERNANDO Gregory
Perrone, registered investment
advisor representative, branch
owner, financial adviser, at The
Shoppes of Citrus Hills, 2657
N. Forest Ridge Blvd., Her-
nando, was
recently
named a
member of
the 2013
Executive
Council.
Executive
Council hon- Gregory
ors are pre- Perrone
sented only to those financial
advisers who have demon-
strated an extremely high level
of commitment to clients
through personal service and
professional integrity. Re-quali-
fication is required annually.
Perrone, who joined Ray-
mond James in 1998, has more
than 14 years of experience in
the financial services industry.
Raymond James Financial
(NYSE-RJF) is a Florida-based
diversified holding company
providing financial services to
individuals, corporations and
municipalities through its sub-
sidiary companies.
Home & Outdoor
Show coming soon
The 35th annual "Remodel-
ing America" Home & Outdoor
Show has a little something to
offer everyone. Hosted by the
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion, the free event covers all
things remodeling and renew-


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The halls were decked with pink recently as Village Cadillac Toyota hosted a free health fair
for Citrus County residents at its Homosassa showroom. Mary Brown, right, and her pup
visited the Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center booth to talk to Maritza Lara, physical
therapy manager at Seven Rivers, and Bruno Silva, a massage therapist at the hospital. The
health fair was in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.


ing, and boasts more than 25
exhibitors for the 2012 show.
Show hours are 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, and 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11,
at the Florida National Guard
Armory in Crystal River.
Highlights include Lowe's
free children's workshop at 10
a.m. Saturday; Fantastic Face
Art by Anne Adams all week-
end; and the LifeSouth
bloodmobile.
Toys For Tots drop-off will be
at the Citrus County Builders
Association booth. Visitors are
asked to bring a new, un-
wrapped toy for the Citrus
Builders Care "Building a Better
Christmas" gift distribution to
take place Dec. 14 at the CCBA
headquarters.
The Florida Home Builders
Association will host a free,
one-hour "Do it Yourself" class
for homeowners about property
protection from wind damage.
The class will cover "Do It Your-


self" residential mitigation tech-
niques for the homeowner; po-
tential insurance premiums
savings for implementing miti-
gation; wind mitigation verifica-
tion inspections and
accompanying 1802 form; miti-
gation measures a licensed
contractor can perform; and
preparing your home for a
storm or hurricane. The classes
will be at 10 a.m. Saturday and
1 p.m. Sunday during the show.
Attendees who complete the
class and its evaluation form
will be entered to win a $50
Lowe's Gift Card (one gift card
for each day).
New this year is the Florida
State Department of Business
& Professional Regulations
booth to educate the public
about unlicensed activity and its
dangers to the homeowner.
The Citrus County Building
Department will also be present
with a booth to help educate
consumers on local unlicensed


activity and permitting
requirements.
For more information, visit
www.CitrusBuilders.com or call
352-746-9028. Sponsors are:
Home Improvement sponsor
Florida Public Utilities; Platinum
sponsor Senica Air
Conditioning; Gold sponsors
Gold Crest Homes, Citrus
County Chronicle and Gaudette
Electric; and Silver sponsor
Senica Air Conditioning.
Sandlin joins McCall
Communications
A new public relations mar-
keting consultant, Lena B. San-
dlin of Sandlin Consulting,
recently moved from the
greater Cincinnati area to
Ocala, joining McCall Commu-
nications.
Educated at University of
Cincinnati and Miami University
with 25 years of experience in
marketing, public relations, de-
velopment, fundraising and lob-


bying, Sandlin has served as a
community liaison for zoning,
housing code
authority, de-
velopment di-
rector for a
bricks-and-
mortar capital
campaign,
chair of "The
Yearlings" L B.
and Hadas- Sandlin
sah donor
fundraising committees,
founding charter member of NK
Cattleman's Association, owner
and vice president of two six-
figure companies, lobbied in
D.C., Ohio and Kentucky,
professional fundraiser event
coordinator for mayors, com-
missioners, city council mem-
bers, and Eric Cantor, Nancy
Pelosi, Bill Clinton, Gov. Ted
Strickland, current Gov. Steve
Beshear, and President Barack
Obama.
Her consulting company,
Sandlin Consulting LLC, pro-
vides services for Stirrups and
Strides and the Ocala Eques-
trian Complex on 60th Avenue.
McCall Communications has
been in business for 30 years,
and a competitor in the wireless
industry since the late 1980s.
McCall Communications now
boasts five Sprint showroom
franchises and are preferred
retail dealers, McCall Business
Telephone Services, along with
an inventory/warehouse/service
center.
Contact Sandlin at McCall
Technology Group, 1202 S.W.
17th St., Ocala; 352-369-1600
ext. 239; www.mccallcommuni
cations.com; or Isandlin@
mccallcomm.com.
Banks announce
branch acquisition
ORLANDO Old Florida
National Bank announced Oct.
19 that it received regulatory
approval for the acquisition of
the Crystal River branch of
Orange Bank of Florida. Old
Florida National Bank currently
operates nine branches in
Orange, Seminole and Citrus
counties. The acquisition ex-
pands Old Florida's presence in
Citrus County to two locations,


serving the east and west
markets.
Old Florida anticipates the
transaction will be completed in
the first quarter of 2013.
John Burden, president and
CEO of Old Florida National
Bank, said, "We are always
looking at partnerships and op-
portunities for expansion to bet-
ter serve our customers where
they live and work. The expan-
sion of our presence in Citrus
County will allow us to bring
additional services to both retail
and business customers of
Orange Bank in Crystal River,
as well as better serve our ex-
isting customers in Citrus
County with a secondary
branch location."
Under the terms of the
agreement, Old Florida will
acquire the building, fixed
assets and loans as well as
assume all customer deposits.
Old Florida National Bank is
a federally chartered,
locally-owned and managed
independent bank serving both
consumer and business cus-
tomers. Founded in 1982 and
headquartered in Orlando, Old
Florida has more than $630
million in assets and nine full-
service locations, including two
Orlando branches and
community branches in
Altamonte Springs, Apopka,
College Park, Inverness, Lake
Mary, Longwood and Winter
Park. Visit www.oldfnb.com.
Sample nutrition
items at mall
GNC in Crystal River Mall will
offer product sampling of the
latest in nutritional and protein
supplements from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, in Center
Court. Sample protein shakes
and other nutritional items,
such as pre-workout supple-
ments and protein bars. For in-
formation, contact GNC at
352-795-4545.
For more information on
leasing opportunities or events
at Crystal River Mall, contact
the mall office at 352-795-2585
or visit www.thecrystalrivermall.
com.

See DIGEST/Page D5


56% of American workers have saved less
than $25,000 for retirement, and 46%
have saved less than $10,000!!*

Call today to see how we can help!


J. Michael Todd
FINANCIAL ADVISOR
8546 W Homosassa Trail. Suite 1
Homosassa, FL 34448


*7


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Cell: (352) 634-0627 Financial Service.
L www.toddfinservices.com
*According to ebri org, March 2011, Issue Brief #355, figure 18 Securities offered through Investors Capital Corporation,
Members FINRA/SIPC Advisory Services offered through Investors Capital Advisory 230 Broadway, Lynnfield, Mass, 01940 800-949-1422


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Citrus County Chronicle


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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 D3


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D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page D1

claiming "no experience
necessary"
Exercise extra caution when
replying to unsolicited emails for
work-at-home employment as well
as for employers who conduct
their interviews in a home setting
or in motel rooms.
If you believe you have been vic-
timized, contact the Attorney Gen-
eral's Fraud Hotline at
866-966-7226.
My best advice? While search-
ing online job boards is a good
place to start, and EFM is cer-
tainly the place to start, don't let
your efforts begin and end there.
Drop by the Workforce Connec-
tion one-stop center at 1103 E. In-
verness Blvd., in Inverness, or call
352-637-2223, and line up an ap-
pointment with one of our trained
placement specialists. There's no
charge, and they'll be able to help
you weed out questionable job


BUSINESS


postings as well as optimize your
search.
Career help
So much for those nasty trick-
sters; now on to the promised
treats, and we have a full bag of
them.
Navigating the Career Fair:
This two-hour workshop is de-
signed for college and postsec-
ondary vocational students to help
them put the hire in higher edu-
cation, starting with the Fall Ca-
reer Fair on Nov 15 (more on that
in just a bit). The workshop takes
place from 2 to 4 p.m. Monday,
Nov 5, at the College of Central
Florida's Learning and Confer-
ence Center in Lecanto. Partici-
pants will learn the how to create
an effective, targeted resume, per-
fect their personal "two minute
marketing pitch" and discover
other ways to make a good im-
pression at the career fair. Sign up
online at www.CFedu/PatriotJobs
or call 352-637-2223, ext. 3206.
Fall Career Fair: Community
job seekers are invited to join post-


secondary students from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Thursday, Nov 15, at CF's
Learning and Conference Center
Participants will be able to ex-
plore career options, learn about
Workforce Connection programs,
register with the Employ Florida
Marketplace (EFM) and, impor-
tantly, meet with employers, in-
cluding Champs Software, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, Comfort
Keepers, Hospice of Citrus County,
Spherion Staffing and Telecom
Service Bureau. Participants
should dress professionally let
me repeat, dress professionally:
no flip flops, cutoffs, jeans (whole
or holes or rips), nothing too tight
or too short In other words, dress
like you mean business.
If you would like help prepping
for the career fair, your next job in-
terview or your general employ-
ment search, we have these options:
Navigating the New World of
Work: This two-day workshop
takes place Nov 8 and 9 from 1:15-
5 p.m. at the Workforce Connec-
tion center in Inverness. This
hands-on workshop will help you


identify your job strengths and
transferable skills, develop strate-
gies for targeting your resume,
market yourself more effectively
using EFM, learn new ways to
connect with employers, and im-
prove your interview skills. For in-
formation, call 352-637-2223 or
800-434-JOBS or find the work-
shop and register online at
https://www.timecenter.com/
wcworkshops.
Community Workshops: If all
that sounds good, but you don't
have the time to commit to the full
workshop, we highlight some of
the best tips in our two-hour "Nav-
igating the New World of Work"
Community Workshops. These
take place at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.
5, at the Coastal Region Library in
Crystal River; at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov 13, at the Central Ridge Li-
brary in Beverly Hills; and at 4
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, at the
Homosassa Library in Ho-
mosassa. Again, you may call for
information (352-637-2223/800-434-
JOBS) or sign up for the workshop
of your choice at https:wwwtime


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

center com/wcworkshops.
If you'd like to hone in on your
resume to get it ready for a spe-
cific job or want to improve your
interview skills, the Targeted Re-
sume workshop is offered Tues-
day, Nov 13, Nov 20 and Nov 30 at
1:30 at the Inverness one-stop cen-
ter Nail That Interview takes
place at 1:15 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16
and Nov 30, also at the Workforce
Connection center in Inverness.
All workshops and services are
offered at no charge. You can see
the full calendar of events by vis-
iting our website at www.clm-
workforce.com. Also, be sure to
stay on top of upcoming events
and get the latest tips and hot job
alerts by following us on Twitter
@WorkforceCLM.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is a Florida
certified workforce professional
and communications manager at
Workforce Connection. Contact
her at 352-291-9559, 800-434-5627,
ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@
clmworkforce. com.


MEME
Continued from Page D1

Trump, Miley Cyrus, Justin
Bieber and Slash, to name a
few. Sometimes, celebrities
will even answer your tweet
This interaction makes
users feel close to their fa-
vorite celebrities.
Terms you
should know
Hashtag You have
probably heard the term
hashtag before, maybe from
your kids or on television. In
a recent episode of the sit-
com "Parks and Recre-
ation," I heard a character
say hashtag about 12 times
in one scene. #Hashtags are
key words or phrases within
a tweet. Once a word or
phrase is hashtagged like
#pumpkincoffee it be-
comes a clickable, so a user
can find other tweets by
users who have hashtagged
the same word. Something
like #pumpkincoffee will
turn up lots of results, but a
hashtagged phrase like
#inthememetime will prob-
ably only turn up my tweet
or the very remote possibil-
ity of someone else's post
talking about this column.
This is a good way to find
people tweeting about simi-
lar topics.


The most important thing you should MONEY
I mum w. m


know whether you decide to get a
twitter account or not: It's called
TWITTER, not tweeter; you send a
tweet on twitter. This will at least
keep you from getting made fun of by
your peers, kids and/or grandkids.


Retweets, simple
enough if you want to share
someone else's tweet so
more people will see it,
mean you click the retweet
button below their post and
retweet it. This sends out
that person's post on your
Twitter feed so all of your
followers can now see it, too.
Mentions are, you
guessed it, when someone
gets mentioned in a tweet.
Like in my tweet at the be-
ginning of this column, I
mentioned @citruschroni-
cle, which is the Twitter ac-
count for the Citrus County
Chronicle. If you wanted to
mention me in a tweet, you
would type @DKerese.
Messages are ways
users can contact other
users without everyone they
both follow knowing about
it.
These are all the basics of
tweeting and, really, you just
learn it as you go like
most things. The most im-


portant thing you should
know whether you decide to
get a twitter account or not:
It's called TWITTER, not
tweeter; you send a tweet on
twitter. This will at least
keep you from getting made
fun of by your peers, kids
and/or grandkids.
Follow the Citrus County
Chronicle @citruschronicle
and follow Citrus
County Chronicle sports
@CitrusCoSports.

Danielle Kerese is the
multi-media designer at
the Citrus County
Chronicle. She has spent
countless hours designing
websites and otherInternet
ventures and is happy to
share her knowledge with
you. If there is something
you have seen online that
you just don't understand,
email herat
DKerese@chronicle
online.com.


Continued from Page D1

what are the benefits of
doing so? PR, via email
DEAR PR.: I don't know
the answer as to whether
your house has to be kept in
a trust. Without details
about your financial life, no
one could give you a
straight answer.
Why was your name put
on the trust five years ago?
Was that part of your hus-
band's directions in a will
or some other instrument,
or did he do it before pass-
ing away?
In general, I don't see any
reason for a home to be in a
trust, but there may be
some very substantial cir-
cumstances in your life that
would make this a good
move.
Before doing anything,


you should sit down with
competent counsel and
find out exactly what would
happen in terms of taxes,
etc., if you took your home
out of the trust, and per-
haps its effect on other ob-
ligations in your life. Then
you can make an intelligent
judgment.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band became very ill a few
years ago. He went and saw
an attorney, brought home
some paperwork and I
signed it. He died shortly
after
I now find out what I
signed was a quitclaim
deed. I have no idea what
that is and what we did. Is
this something I should
have signed? L.E, via
e-mail
DEAR L.P: A quitclaim is
simply someone giving up
their rights not necessar-
ily their responsibilities -
in a piece of property If a


mortgage is still in place,
they are still responsible
for it, but they no longer
have rights.
You didn't indicate to
whom the quitclaim deed
was signed over; I'm hoping
it was you. If not, you prob-
ably should consult an at-
torney to get it straightened
out.
U
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
com or to Smart Money
PO. Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be
provided. TheBruce
Williams Show can now be
heard at wwwbruce
williams.com on the Made
in America Broadcast
Network


C I T R U S C U NT Y


CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com





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Contest
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Submission Deadline: November 12th
Voting Begins November 13th
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Bake-off Judging November 30th

The holidays are
right around the
corner, and we
want to put
together the %
ultimate Christmas
cookie jar! Is your
signature holiday cookie dcked
out with frosting, drizzled with
chocolate, or something else
fabulous? Do you have a
favorite festive cookie that
wows the crowd around the
Christmas tree? Share it online
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iF lists will


be required to bring one dozen
cookies for judging to the
Chroncile office on Wednesday
November 30, 2012 and
taste-tested by a panel of
local celebrity I
judges.


9301 West Fort Island Trail || J
Crystal River, Florida 34429 Everything Outdoors
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com
(352)795-4211
CC I T fr U Sf0 C O o 0 U N T Y -r
Thanks! CiONiiEc
being a subscriber. ww.chronicleonl.om
^ ^_ www.chronicleonline.com


4"1

ok - 5'


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



DIGEST
Continued from Page D3


Nature Coast EMS
doesn't do calls
LECANTO Recently, more
phone calls and mail soliciting
funds for local EMTs and para-
medics have come back in full
swing. These calls are being
made on behalf of the Citrus
County Professional Para-
medics and EMTs Local 365
Union and International Associ-
ation of EMTs and Paramedics.
Nature Coast EMS is not affili-
ated with this solicitation and
our paramedics and EMTs do
not benefit from the donations
made. Nature Coast EMS is a
not-for-profit organization and
accepts donations; however,
we do not solicit in this manner.
The EMTs and paramedics
employed by Nature Coast
EMS are represented by a
union, International Association
of EMTs and Paramedics, Local
365. The Union participates
with a professional fundraising
company. This company calls
people and asks for donations
on behalf of the "EMTs and
paramedics in Citrus County."
The Local 365 has the legal
right to hire marketers to raise


BUSINESS


money for their union as a sep-
arate entity from and without
authorization by Nature Coast
Emergency Medical Services.
Nature Coast EMS does not
receive any money that is con-
tributed to the IAEP, Local 365,
and is not affiliated with said so-
licitation/fundraising efforts.
Inquiries as to the status of a
solicitor can be made with the
Department of Consumer Af-
fairs at 800-435-7352, or go the
agency's website a
www.doacs.state.fl.us.

SRRMC welcomes
Christopher A. Keen
CRYSTAL RIVER On
Aug. 13, Christopher A. Keen,
M.D., was appointed to the
medical staff
at Seven
Rivers Re-
gional Med-
ical Center.
He special-
izes in or-
thopaedics.
"Dr. Keen's
education, Christopher
experience Keen, M.D.
and passion
for helping people align with the
hospital's mission to provide ex-
cellence in health care," said
Joyce Brancato, chief executive
officer. "He will provide the best


quality care for our patients."
Keen earned his medical de-
gree from Virginia Common-
wealth University School of
Medicine in Richmond, Va.,
where he also completed a res-
idency in orthopaedic surgery.
He then completed a fellowship
in hand and upper extremity
surgery at University of Missis-
sippi Medical Center in Jack-
son, Miss.
"With open hands, we wel-
come Dr. Keen to the Seven
Rivers Regional family," said
William V. Harrer III, M.D., chief
of staff.
For information about the
hospital and its medical staff,
visit SevenRiversRegional.com.
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center, a 128-bed general,
medical/surgical acute care fa-
cility serving Citrus, Levy and
south Marion counties, opened
its doors in 1978. Visit Seven
RiversRegional.com.

Fall Festival at
Cadence Bank
Cadence Bank, 301 U.S. 41
S., Inverness, will host a Fall
Festival from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 3, featuring
Family Adventure Camp (water
wars), sheriff's office Child ID
system, the FOCUS Camaro, a
local fire department, local


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 D5


BUSINESS DIGEST CMHS honors volunteers


Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.


artists, vintage car show and
face painting. Enjoy Anytime
Fitness Zumba by Christina
and performances by Dance
Central. Free hot dogs and
chips, lemonade and dessert.
The bank will collect food for
Citrus United Baskets (CUB),
so bring donations and enjoy a
fun day for the whole family.
Formore information, call
352-726-8772.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Memorial Health System recently named its two most
recent volunteers of the month, George Mitchell, right, and
Bonnie Steffen, left. Mitchell began his volunteer career in
2006 and has served more than 1,000 hours running errands
for the pharmacy. Steffen has volunteered for seven years,
accumulating a total of 3,500 hours. She began in the ad-
mitting department and now serves as the secretary for the
auxiliary. Both volunteers were nominated by co-volunteers
and members of the hospital staff. "George and Bonnie are
fantastic volunteers," said Penny Zaphel, Citrus Memorial's
manager of volunteer and community services. "George has
been a comfort to many of our volunteers and Bonnie serves
with a pleasant attitude and beautiful smile. They are to be
commended." For information on volunteering at CMHS, call
Zaphel at 352-560-6298.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


.0tS. .AS 9 .* .


Man in his 60's
would like to find Lady
who Love outdoors
(352) 382-5661
Single White Widow
looking for one honora-
ble one woman man.
I am a one man,
woman. With plenty
to offer this kind of man.
If you have some time
to spend with me.
You should be 65-80
Do not apply if this
does not fit you.
Send Response to:
Blind Box 1810P
Citrus Co. Chronicle,
106 W. Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450



Beautiful Natural wood
Hutch Cupboard, 72" tall,
38" wide, 18" deep, $125
(352) 563-5955
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, 26 N. Melborne
CHA, Nice Back Yard
(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
38 S Jefferey $36,900
just completed remodel
of 2/1 cp SUN 12-3
352-527-1239
CUSTOMS
For All ages & Sizes,
Rent or Own
SCARY LOW PRICES
(352)436-4154
MOTORIZED CHAIR
W/CHARGER
Exc. Cond/Make Offer
352-503-2385
PET RESORT
TECH
FOR UPSCALE PET
RESORT IN
LECANTO
Must be personable,
hard wking, reliable,
exp w/dogs in an open
setting. Must be willing
to learn & be flexible to
work holidays and
weekends.
Reliable transp,
office, computer exp.
helpful. Able to pass
back ground & drug
test. Email
teejaal@yahoo.com
NO WALK INS
Pro-Form 695LT Tread-
mill, like-new, 2 yrs old,
commercial or personal
use, $500 obo, serious
inquiries only
(352) 302-5468



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


CASH PAID
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID -$200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



3 Mirrors
2 are 3x9; 1 is 3x6,
no frames
(352) 382-1211
Bangal Cat
2 /2 years old female
spayed, with papers
needs home with no
other cats. Call Happy
(352) 560-7690
fer horse manure mixed
with pine shavings great
for gardens. U load and
haul 352-628-9624
FREE
2 working toilet retro
colors blue & yellow
(352) 564-0540
Free Fancy Tail
Guppies
you catch, bring container
352-746-7044
FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
Free Hottub 80 x 80"
Needs heater and new
cover, must remove
from stilt home
(352) 527-9779
FREE KITTENS
8 wks old
Different Colors
including calico
(352) 212-4061
Free Kittens
to good Home
weeks old
Littered trained
(352) 746-5654
FREE KITTENS
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
Free Poodle
7 yr. old female
free to good home
352-364-3333
Free to a Good Home
3 Hogs
2 Males, 1 Female
352-303-0928
WHEELCHAIR
manual type $40
Folding Walker,
four leg type as new $25


LOST (.aT
black &white short hair
Bauer & Highview
Lecanto area
please call if seen
(859) 492-7908


Your Community,


NOTICED.


School District Budgets
Local Tax Changes l
Property Auctions
Public Hearings
Adoptions ( III ) m (l.E
Find out about public notices in:
Citrus County Chronicle
Or search online at:
www.floridapublicnotices.com


Gray short hair female
tiger Green Acres in
Homosassa Oct. 2
$50. Reward
(352) 503-6763
Lost small Black Terrier
in the Mini Farms
(352) 422-3033
Papillion, male,
Tri colored
near Regina & Wash-
ington Beverly Hills
(352) 246-1098
Pontiac Starter Key, Door
Key & Misc Keys. Lost in
Homosassa. REWARD
(352) 503-2323



KEYS At Hickory Hills
Community Bldg on
E Gulf to Lake. Found at
beginning of October.
Call to identify.
352-637-3156



4 Tickets to the
FSU vs. Duke Game,
face value $180.
Selling $120
(352) 464-7511



Assisted Living Center
looking for organ or piano
in good working condition
to be donated.
(352) 422-2719
Christmas Decorations
are Missing. Please help
make our residents
have a memorable
holiday season,
by donating
Decoration and Trees
to BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W NORVELL
BRYANT HWY Lecanto
LATHER
Is Looking Work
Part time/Piece work
commercial, residen-
tial. Have own tools
& scaffold 35 yrs exp.
Dave (352) 267-4830




TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444



Part-Time
Bookkeeper
Mon-Thur 8:00-3:30 pm
2 yrs exp Quick Books
MS Office skills required,
Computer savvy. Send
resume w/references to
bonniedraccfl.com



HOUSEKEEPING
PERSON
Opening on house-
keeping staff at Citrus
Hills. Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including laun-
dry, as well as offices
and models needed.
Flexible part-time
schedule to include
weekends.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




CAREGIVER
With Medtech, CPR/FA
For Assistant Living
Call 344-5555 Ext. 102

CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits, For
busy medical office.

F/T RECEPTIONIST
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
FAX RESUME TO:
(352) 563-2512

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

*SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRlvers
Realonal.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanle Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace

LPN's, CNA's
All Shifts
Full Time & Part Time
Experience preferred.
Apply at:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
Drug Free workplace
Sign on BONUS
dselesvaae@superior
alf.com
tfoster@superior




Your World






CHRpIC.LE


Hospital RN's
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
WWW.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828

MEDICAL ASSIST.
Busy medical practice
needs Exp MA, Fax
Resume 352-795-9698

OPEN HOUSE/
JOB FAIR
THURSDAY,
November Ist
Two Sessions:
9:00 am and 12:00 N
%I .


Tours will be
rgriven,
rreshments
available.
Come See Who We
Are & Who We Serve.
New Horizons
Village is a
premier residential
care facility for
developmentally
disabled adults.
We are currently
seeking Full-Time
Habilitative Training
Instructors. Adult Day
Training Staff & LPN's
to provide care &
trading to these
individuals. Various
shifts available.
Basic lob
auallfcatlons Include:
r A desire to provide
quality care to our
residents.
r HS diploma or
equivalency.
r Ability to pass a
post-offer physical
exam, mandatory
drug test, criminal
background Investl-
gatlon, and reference
Inquiry.
r Valld Florida Driver
License
New Horizons Village
offers:
- Competitive
wages, excellent
benefits, & a tobacco
-free campus.
PLEASE JOIN US AT:
1275 N. Rainbow
Loop, Lecanto, FL
34461(352) 746-3262.
Applications
will be available.


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

Billing Clerk
*Receptionist
*Medical Asst.
Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


Nursing Instructor
Master's Preferred
or Bachelor's degree
in Nursing.
Active RN License
or eligible to be li-
censed in the state of
Florida.
Three years or more
related work experi-
ence or a combina-
tion of work and
teaching experience.
* Must have experi-
ence working with
computers and tech-
nology to deliver or
support instruction.
* Proven strong com-
munication skills and
the ability to work
with people from di-
verse backgrounds
and experiences.
* Proven academic
understanding.
* Able to work a
flexible schedule.
* Active community
connection to assist
students with employ-
ment opportunities.
Qualified applicants
can submit their
resume to our Human
Resource Department
at employment@
taylorcollege.edu

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT
Looking for reliable
staff. With Alzheimers
Experience. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing aide
experience
preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/H HA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


WE ARE
COMFORT
KEEPERS
KEEPING SENIORS
IN THEIR OWN HOME
HHA's/CNAs to
provide Personal
Care Services
Also Homemakers
to provide company
ionship, light house-
keeping, and meal
preparation. All shifts
avail., flexible hrs. To
learn what becoming
a Comfort Keeper is
all about, Visit Us At
2244 Hwy 44 West
Inverness, FL
(352) 560-4254
Cmforl

Each Office
Independently Owned
Lic HHA-299992888


Director of Citrus
County Services
The Centers is seeking
a Director for Citrus
County Services.
This is a highly
responsible profes-
sional administrative
position which in-
cludes the planning,
organizing, coordi-
nating, and direction
of all activities of the
program. FL Li-
censed or Master's
degree in Human Svc
related discipline with
3 yrs related exp, 2 yrs
supervisory exp &
willingness to reside
and participate in
the Citrus County
community to facili-
tate effective ser-
vices required.
Submit Salary
requirement.
Full benefits pack-
age, DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


,,- .
C. L nl 't
^ ^ ^


Do you want to be
part of a high
performance team?
TLC is looking for a
results driven,
dynamic marketing
rep for Citrus County.
A professional to
directly market TLC
outpatient Physical
Therapy services to
both current and
prospective clients.
Competitive salary &
benefits. Car allow-
ance & results driven
bonus structure.
Must have 2-3
years marketing
experience.
Please apply online
at www.
therpymgmtjobs.com
or fax resume to
352-382-0212.





Employment
source is...



w chronicleoninne


Are You
Interested In:

* Being your own
boss
* Increasing potential
earnings.
* Growing your
exclusive area?
* Working
independently?
* Working with a
successful company?


C H' R U S .c.O COU N T Y AE

www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Requirements:
* Ability to work overnight
SCovered Truck, Van or SUV
* Clean Driving Record
Credit & Background Check
* Access to your own help
Lifting and physical ability
Team Player
SMust have a back-up plan
* Computer & Internet Access


Do you have what it takes?
* Attention to detail
* 365 Days/Year
* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented
* Flexible under pressure
* Positive Thinker
* Hard and smart worker
* Keen sense of urgency


Deliver to stores and coin racks.
Experience preferred but not required.


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


WANTED


I OE HONDA I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ir


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2013 Chevy Malibu LS


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Ilv :;


2012 Chevy Silverado LS
ExL Cab, Auto V8, OnStar, Tow Packager
ina$i4 fti


22 Chevy ravese LS
Stk VC12326
Final *A A d%


2012 Chevy Crze LS
Stk #C12184, Auto, AoC, M XMD, OnStar.4 Dr.
Final $4 A n


4 m
11 -IN.


2012 Chevy VY


;I C C : c


MSRP........................................ $31,690
DLR DISCOUNT....................... $3,022
REBATE..................................... $3,500
TRADE ASSISTANCE ..............- $1,000
CASH OR TRADE .................... $2,500


MSRP ..................................... $30,750
DLR DISCOUNT....................- $1,751
REBATE.................................- $2,000
CASH OR TRADE................- $2,500


MSRP ................................... $18,880
DLR DISCOUNT..................- $900
REBATE...................................$500
CASH OR TRADE ...............- $2,500


PLUS 0/o
x 72 Mlths!


o i :af


2013 Chevy Spark 5 Dr. LS
5-Speed. AC, Touchscmren, 1.L4 CyL


MSRP ...................................$12,995
DLR DISCOUNT......................- $500
CASH ORTRADE ..............- $2,500


2012 Chevy Impala LT
AC, CD, Power Seat, V6, Great MPGI
wal o$4A aa


MSRP ...................................$28,610
DLR DISCOUNT...................- $6,111
CASH ORTRADE................- $2,500


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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The A'ew, Totary Sopisticated

2013 Honda Accord
ACCORDABIUTY = AFFORDABILITY
AC*CORD verb (used without object)... to be in agreement or harmony; agree.


' I i~


New 212 Honda Fit
MODEL GEB3CEXW, EQUIPPED NOT STRIPED
WITH AUTOMATIC, AC AND CRUISE


,* ..- .I


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New 2012 Honda Accold LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW. ALUTOMATC.POWEIR PKG,
CRUISE.TRACTION CONTROL AND SO MUCH MORE



New 2012 Honda Civic HyWid
IdaFIE uPF3 C1THrimlF.& RKEID 4EFI' All. AuflIJo
A l6S t S 11U IOD= ESM~ ifh TW E IElTSU 1TfiP MUl FRE LiHK



New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL RMHMEW, CCME SEE WHYTHE CRV 5THE BEST
SELLUG COMPACT SM AMERICA SAEWHILEHEY LAST



New 2012 Honda Ridgeline RT
MOD E~K1FXCEW, i4 WITHE T IETR INTHE BE. POWERl FRG.
CRISE CiQLV6 POFYW AND A F ]E LKE 1D OIMER
rat-s^ -Y J


New 2012 Honda Crsstour EX-V6
MOLCLIFCI9lea auuM1un HATCfIB K WI1HSTI E MIDCOMFOIT,
AJLTIELLUJRIY MBIATS AKD ROOWIO DO WHATWU i D
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D8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


ABSOLUTE
HIGHEST PAY

For reliable, moti-
vated team players,
part time, full time.
ALL POSITIONS
Fax Resume 621-7865
or email: managing
@yahoo.com
or Call 352-436-3706

Experienced
Bartender

Accepting Application
10a-1:30 & 2-4p
Apply In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19
Next to Mr. B's C.R.
Drug Free Work Place

THE GRILLE
at CITRUS HILLS

Is Now Hiring all
Restaurant Positions.
We will be
interviewing for
Server, Bartender,
Host/Hostess, Busser,
Expo/Runner, Line
Cook, Dish, and Prep
workers. Please
Apply In person at
505 E Hartford St
Tuesday-Saturday
between 2-4:30pm.

^^^^^I


Experienced
SOUS CHEF
LINE COOKS
DISHWASHERS
Needed for Upscale
Restaurant
Call (352) 746-6727
For application
appointment




BUSY BODY SHOP In
need of ambitious
AUTOMOTIVE PAINTER
Experience required
(352) 6284878

Key Training Center

F/T Diesel
Mechanic,
working on company
vehicles, primarily
diesel vehicles/buses.
HS Diploma/GED
required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

MASON TENDERS

Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and from
work in Citrus & sur
rounding counties
(352) 302-2395







RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough, Trim,
& Service
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit 4
Wildwood

UTILITY BILLING
CLERK

The City of Crystal
River
is seeking applicants
for the position of
Utility Billing Clerk.
Must be able to work
with a great degree
of accuracy, have
excellent organiza-
tional skills, and have
the ability to work
with people in
difficult situations.
Must have a back-
ground in account-
ing and have an eye
for detail.
Resumes will be
accepted until
November 2, 2012,
and may be sent to
Finance Director,
City of Crystal River,
123 NW Hwy. 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428. A copy of the
job description is
available on our
website:
www.crystalriverfl.org
Equal Opportunity
Employer


Now Hiring
Exp. Aluminum
Installers

(352) 628-7519




*CALL NOW*

Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the
CUSTOMER RELATIONS
DEPARTMENT.
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary.
Call Michelle
352-436-4460

Maintenance
(part time)

25 Hours A Week
3pm to 8pm
(Sunday thru Thurs)
General Maint.
Duties Experience
APPLY AT
505 HARTFORD ST.
HERNANDO, FL 34442

NEWSPAPER
CARRIER

WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper carriers
are independentN
contractors, not0
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



C-----je

PET RESORT
TECH
FOR UPSCALE PET
RESORT IN
LECANTO
Must be personable,
hard wking, reliable,
exp w/dogs in an open
setting. Must be willing
to learn & be flexible to
work holidays and
weekends.
Reliable transp,
office, computer exp.
helpful. Able to pass
hak nroiind R drua


1.


Part-Time
Office Assistant,
M-F 12:30-4:30pm
in Homosassa.
Proven MS Office
Skills required.
Send resume and
3 references to
theresa@lumc.org.










MASSAGE
THERAPY



Massaae Days. NPR
November 19 2012
March 18, 2013
July 22, 2013
November, 4, 2013
Massage Nights NPR
November 19 2012
Jully22, 2013
Massaae Days.
Spring Hill
January 14 2013
September 3,2013
Massage Niahts.
Sprina Hill
January 14, 2013
September 3,2013

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com





12 ACRES
PRIME REAL ESTATE
8 MOBILE HOMES
Good Income *
Lots of possibilities.
Own. Finan., Reason-
able down payment
(352) 212-6182


Collect ble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
"Call our Classr eeifiedI


CLASSIFIED



GE REFRIGERATOR
bisque side-by-side with
icemaker/water in door -
$300 Phone
352/6374871
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
VACUUM CLEANER
Hoover bagless upright.
excellent condition. $25.
352-746-1832
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each, Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Cond. Can Deliver
352 263-7398
WASHER$100 with trade
in of broken machine. 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504



2 OFFICE DESKS WITH
DRAWERS; 1 BLONDE
1 DARK WOOD. GOOD
CONDITION $50 EACH
353-613-0529



HAMMER DOWN
H AUCTIONEERS H
11/2- General Merch.
11/9 Kit/Bath/Laun. Sale
prev. @ 4, auction @ 6
WE BUY ESTATES
6055 N. Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



Power Boss
Portable Generator
5250 watts, never used
B & S engine,
on wheels $499
(352) 746-7044
TROY-BILT PORTABLE
5550 WATT GENERA-
TOR, USED TWICE,
WITH GENERATOR
ADAPTER CORD SET,
NEW 5-GALLON PLAS-
TIC GAS CANS, NEW
TIRES, USER'S MAN-
UAL. GREAT
ON-THE-JOB SITE
POWER SOURCE. $600
CALL 352-503-9376
(HOMOSASSA)



DVD/CD/VHS/AM/FM
PLAYER Panasonic with
cables and instructions
for TV hook up. $30.
352-746-1832
MAGNOVOX
27" color TV, cable ready,
good picture $30.00
513-4473
MAGNOVOX TV 21"
color TV, works good
cable ready $25.00
513-4473




YOLII 01 .i lI St.'

E[I La


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DELL COMPUTER
Desktop Windows XP
w/keyboard & mouse,
Outlook, Word, Excel $75
OBO 352-382-3650
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
Gateway Laptop
good condition
$140
(352) 949-2893



1962 Case 530 Tractor
Runs good, 5 attach. &
trailer included $6,000
Call (352) 344-4576



2 Black Tools,
w/ detachable leg
extensions $40.
Large TV Armoire w/
slide in doors, could be
change computer ar-
moire (352) 897-4196
CHAIR LIVING ROOM
comfy,clean $10.00.
Call for photo
bargain 5134473
CHINA CABINET Solid
Wood beautiful Pecan
Finish. Glass framed
doors/sides,mirrored
lighted back,bottom draw-
ers,$495. 352-382-0069
Dining Room Table with 6
Chairs, Hutch. Natural
wood. $800; Lighted
bookcase or china cabi-
net dark wood $300
(352) 524-1144
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER good size,
wood look with room for
TV& shelves for books.
$15.00 513-4473
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
beautiful Surry Collection
comfy, dark royal blue,
maple, trim. $15.00 bar-
gain 5134473
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Qn. Sz. Brass
Headboard, $25
40" Beige Metal round
coffee table w/ insert
$30. (352) 897-4196
Round Glass 70" table,
beautiful bass, 4 pad-
ded chairs, w/ large
matching bakers rack,
excel. cond. $350.
(352) 637-1617
SLIDING ROCKER
WINDSOR CHAIR.
Blonde wood good cond.
$30.00 513-4473
WHICKER HEAD
BOARD full size. good
cond.$65.00 5134473
WHICKER HEAD-
BOARD. Sweetheart
single headboard. $25.00
513-4473
WICKER BEDROOM
SET inc. triple dresser
two (2) drawer night-


WINDSOR CHAIRS
BLONDE WOOD three
dinning chairs $75.00 or
split $25.00 each
513-4473




2 Kabota Diesel
Tractors B7100
90% rubber 4w drive &
2w drive w/ attachment,
mower, tiller, blade, etc.
352-795-7517
2009 Lawn Machine
Lawn Mower, only used
18 mo. by owner,
like-new cond. Lawn
trailer & leaf blower incl.
$750 (352) 628-1923
LAWN MOWER $45
good condition
352-777-1256
SEARS LAWN
TRACTOR
42inch mower, 17.5hp
asking $450
352-746-2329




BOSTON FERN
16.5 ft x4.5 high
beautiful! $125 firm
352-621-0778






INVERNESS
Wed, Oct 31st,
Thurs, Nov 1st, 8 to 5
116 Daisy Lane




BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING 5 OUTFITS & 2
JACKETS SIZE 5 $40
352-613-0529

CUSTOMS
For All ages & Sizes,
Rent or Own
SCARY LOW PRICES
(352) 436-4154
Ladies SAS Shoes
Sz 9, Black $35
352-873-2277




2 RAINBARRELS WITH
HOSE CONNECTION
ON BOTTOM 50 GAL.
75.00 EACH
3524640316
4 WHEEL WALKER-
hand brakes and wheel
locks, folds for storage,
adjustable, Ex. $50.
352-628-0033
10 x 20 Superior SHED
with garage door,
$3,000 obo
(352) 457-0547
18 PRS EYES GLASSES
$15. ASSORTMENT OF
PRESCRIPTION, SUN-
GLASSES AND READ-
ERS 352-419-5981
50" Toshiba TV under
$200, Kenmore


Beautiful New F/Q aqua
silk Bedding set/ incl.
bedspread skirt, 2 shams
w/embroidered peacocks
and single window treat-
ment, 3 dec. pillows $150
Full Size mattress + box
spring, rarely used $60
352-382-2906
Bedroom Set Queen,
Headboard Footboard,
side rails, night stand,
Big dresser, mirror
Armoire, three draws
$300.
PRIDE SCOOTER $300
(352) 527-1097
GE TELEPHONE
ANSWERING MACHINE
$10 LIKE NEW. ALL
CONNECTIONS. INVER-
NESS 351419-5981
Glider Rocker w/ foot
stool, and side stand
light $75
Heavy Duty Whirlpool
Dryer, $125.
(352) 795-7254
GPS Magellan Maestro
model 4700. Top of the
line. voice activated.
Used once $100
(352) 344- 3485
HARLEY DAVIDSON
FLEECE PAD 60X60
Nylon backing,
100 yr Anniversary
$40 352-400-5650
HORSE MOUNTING
STEP polyethylene 2-
10"steps 15"hx8"w good
cond $15. Pine Ridge
352-270-3909
Kenmore 70 Series
Heavy Duty Dryer $50.
New black 351/2" Wide
TV Stand, $55.
(352) 897-4196
Leather Recliner, Glass
coffee + end table,
chaise lounge, genera-
tor, pressure washer,
Lots of Christmas Items
MUST SELL
Call for Info 897-4681
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
NEW 26 INCH SKY-
LIGHT CLEAR BUBBLE
TYPE 50.00 464 0316
PICNIC TABLE
5 FOOT LONG GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
ROUND CONCRETE
PICNIC TABLE
W/2 benches$150
homemade quilt tops
2 for $50 352-795-7254
SANTA SITTING IN
SLEIGH $15 PERFECT
TABLE DECORATION
INVERNESS
352419-5981
SIMPSONS SEASON 1
DVD BOX SET $8
860-2475
WALLPAPER 3 DOUBLE
ROLLS $25 NEW
UNOPENED 165 SQ FT
VINYL PRE PASTED IN-
VERNESS 352-419-5981
Wll CONSOLE AND


4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75.00 464 0316
Bathtub Safety Rail
Medline Deluxe
$15.00
352-628-4210
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUSTA-
BLE LEGS 20.00 EACH
352 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
AND WALKER new,
never used. commode
$24, walker $15.
352-746-1832
Harmar Hybrid Platform
Lift, for inside back of
Minivan or SUV, good
cond. see it work in my
van, $1500, after 4pm
(813) 760-9421
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
ONLY $100.00
352 464 0316
Merits 3 wheel electric
scooter, red, like-new, for
adults $500
(352) 628-4540
MERITS SCOOTER
Excellent Condition
Originally $1300.
will sell for $500 cash
352-564-8155
MOTORIZED CHAIR
W/CHARGER
Exc. Cond/Make Offer
352-503-2385
Power Lift Recliner
Battery Back -up
$250.
Tan Leather Love Seat.
$40. Both good cond.
To see (352) 527-0878
Toilet Safety Support
w/hand rails and
magazine rack
$15.00
352-628-4210
WALKER 3 WHEELS
WITH BRAKES ONLY
$50.00 464 0316
WALKER,
w/brakes,basket,seat
Good condition $65.00
352-628-4210
Wanted to Buy
Used Wheel chair
(352) 419-6186
WHEELCHAIR
$49.00 firm 637-7142



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying sterl-
ing silver flatware and
US silver coins
(352) 601-7074




"MARTIN LOOK"
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
DREDNAUGHT
ROSEWOOD/ABALONE
$100 352-601-6625
Casio WK-3000 music
keyboard workstation


..... ..... ..&g .*.- ....... stands, dresser mirror side-by-side fridge, ice& BALANCE BOARD ....... .-... ...
test. Email Dept for details e t a 1(1u queen headboard water in door under $200 +ACCESSORIES Crate CA15 acoustic
teejaal@yahoo.com 352-563-5966 $650 for all (352) 341-1845 LIKE NEW 75.00 guitar amp $80.
NO WALK INS "" 3 |"__ ( ,I,* 352-746-2329 (352) 287-9124 352-527-0324 352419-4464


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179





Retired nurse to pro-
vide care in your home
for individual w/ special
needs. (352) 895-7634






SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERI-
ENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
FIcRid Y*Ur trwU, hO~tfe ROCKY'S FENCING
Search Hundreds of Local Listings Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
www.chroniclehomefinder.com 352 422-7279 *


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3517




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vynil Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Repair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352) 949-2292


AAA ROOFING WDI
CUth all Makhmte, w.ea.WindomandaWholeLotMom.!i
Free Written Estimate- Window Cleaning

$ 100 OFF Window Tinting
n- Ro Pressure Washing
Any Re-Roof Gutter Cleaning
Must present coupon at time contract is signed -G t lea i
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 ...CSE. FREE ESTIMATES

352-683-0093
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


PO IANA VE


Add an artisiK touf to your existing yard
Sor pool orplan ALL EXTERIOR,
something .
implelelynew! ALUMINUM INC
"Oftenimitated,
never dupicatel 352-621-0881




i POOL AND PAVER LLC all extaluml3@yahoo.com
Lic. CPC14r56565 3 JA-4 0 i Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED
& Insured j


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557
WILL CLEAN HOUSE
or RUN ERRANDS
Reliable & References
(352) 341-1197




Complete Renovation
Kitchen countertop, tile,
tub to shower Lic#37801
(352) 422-3371

The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lice/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826


AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244





A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790





Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL a Professional
(352) 464-4418


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
SPools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
,"^ Grout Painting
I ," '1 Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713
Spe
(ar

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Lic




MOPAR& JEEP CONNECTION
(f1 Complete Mopar C
.. Repair & Maintenance
Engines Drivelines Oil Changes
Transmissions* Brake Service
WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS
inline-++-

performance-I
Inc.
680 E. Southland Ave.
CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell 5
352-568-7591







Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Royce Green's
Floor Care Services

(lean, Strip, Wax, Seal
Refinish
Tile, Terrazzo, Marble, Wood,
(arpet
Maintenance Contracts
Licensed & Insured

Y (35Z) 344-Z13Z



REMODEIN


I LUINUM __I












Keyboard/Guitar amp
$25. 352419-4464
Fender Frontman 15G
Guitar amp $25.
352419-4464
Fender Rumble 15 Bass
amp $35. 3524194464
ITS CHRISTMAS! JAZZ
STYLE BASS W/AMPEG
OR ACOUSTIC AMP &
EXTRAS $100
352-601-6625
Peavey Max 112 Bass
amp $80. 3524194464
Peavey Vypyr 15 watt
guitar amp $50.
352419-4464
Sheet Music Stand $5.
352419-4464




COMFORTER & SHAMS
QUEEN beige/tan
reversible Very clean
and nice $20. Pine Ridge
352-270-3909
COMFORTER SET
Reversible light/dark gray
incl sheets/shams/sheers
Clean & Nice $20.
352-270-3909
MANSFIELD PORCE-
LAIN TOILET Tank Alto
160, Bowl Alto 135 Bis-
cuit, New 352-400-5650
$99.00




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE WITH
HANDRAILS USA MADE
ONLY 100.00
352 464 0316
EXERCISE BIKE
stationary bike $90.00
352 382 3895
EXERCISE BIKE
WESLO 605 Stationary
Bike, Like New $100
(352) 382-5883
Pro-Form 695LT Tread-
mill, like-new, 2 yrs old,
commercial or personal
use, $500 obo, serious
inquiries only
(352) 302-5468
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE STAMINA
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO ONLY 100.00
352 464 0316


-I
7.62X54R Brown Bear
rifle ammunition. 174
Grain FMJ. Non-corrosive
primer. 54 rounds. $20
527-6709
BICYCLE Ladies/Girls
26" Mongoose Redondo
MGX, 21Spd,aluminum
frame, mountain tires,
comfort seat. Excel cond,
$95.00 352-281-8073
BIKE CARRIER Holly-
wood over the trunk bike
carrier. Like new.$60.00
352-697-3217
BYCYCLE
Trek 3900 27 speed,
Black & Silver. Comes w/
helmet & pump. Never
used. Retail $599, asking
$300/cash 352-586-1790
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails, $3000 Per Acre
352 634-4745
Club Car
'08 Electric Golf Cart
$2300
352-220-3277
Club Car Golf Cart
reconditioned by manu-
facturer 2010, new
batteries,side curtain, ext.
top, seats 4, exc. cond.
must sell $2650.
352-527-3125
COLD STEEL POCKET
BUSHMAN KNIFE
Brand new in box $35
860-2475
GOLF CLUB SET.
Spaulding. Eleven clubs
plus bag. Men's
right-handed. Never
used. $60. 746-9443




FLATBED UTILITY
TRAILER
10ftX5ft
4 Ft loading ramp
single axle $800 OBO
(352) 207-5946
UTILITY TRAILER
6 x 12 enclosed dbl.
rear door & single side
door $1,000 firm
(352) 220-8326




CAR SEAT FOR
TODDLE NEW $30 CAR
SEAT INFANT $15
bounce $20 deluxe
352-777-1256
CHANGING TABLE $30;
Brown wood rocker $15,
infant car seat $15
352-777-1256
HIGH CHAIR GOOD
Condition Light Brown
$20; high chair blue $15,
Green stroller $20
352-777-1256
STROLLER $35 NEW
BROWN AND PINK
SWING $20, MUSICAL
BOUNCE $10
352-777-1256




GOLD EARRINGS 14 ct
dangles very pretty de-
sign must see 99.00
Homosassa
(352) 364-2669


m ^^^


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situaton.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


AKC GREAT DANES
Black Beauties Health
Checked AKC
Male/Female
READY NOW $400
PAT 352-502-3607








ANGEL
ANGEL is a 4-year-old
Boxer mix who came
to the shelter be-
cause her owner
could not afford to
keep her. She weighs
46 pounds and is very
cute and affection-
ate. Is housebroken,
likes children, gets
along with other
dogs and also cats.
Just a little bit shy at
first. She had puppies
about 3-4 months
ago. She is used to a
family life and needs
a good home des-
perately. Fenced
yard is preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
$275.00 Purebreed
female chihuahua
puppies 2 left white with
brown spots will be small.
8 weeks old born August
30,2012. Has not had
shots yet.Can be regis-
tered. If interested call
352-613-3917
Dachshunds Mini Long
Hair, Champion Blood
lines, 4 months old, Blk
&tan male $150
(352) 795-6870
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com


MAKO
MAKO is a 4 y.o.
American Bulldog/
terrier mix who was
found abandoned
and tied to a tree.
He is an incredibly
sweet dog despite
his previously trou-
bled life. Weighs 73
pounds and is neu-
tered, Heart-worm
negative, and house-
broken. He is very
affectionate and
very gentle, not a
fighter, just a very
good boy. A fenced
yard is preferred.
Call Joanne
@352-795-1288.



AA
--- "






NOBLE
Noble is a 10 year-old
bloodhound mix who
was found as a stray.
He is already neu-
tered and is house-
broken. He is very
friendly and
people-oriented. He
loves to walk on a
leash and also to run,
which is why a
fenced yard would
be preferred. He gets
along with other dogs
and cats are also fine
with him. He is just 80
pounds of a very
happy dog, but he
wants a happy home
of his own!
Please call Sam or Ed
@ 352-621-4982.


home, comes w/xtra large
cage & free-standing
perch $1500 obo
(352) 621-9810
SHAR-PEI
Beautiful male & female
6 mo old, Prefer to sell
as a pair for $900;
single $500 AKC,
Health certs & shots,
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
TOY POODLES
(APRICOTS) One male
$400 & female $450 born
8/4 and almost fully potty
trained with first set of
shots and raised in a lov-
ing home. call 419-5662


^^^n I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Alumacraft
2010 16ft, V-hull, all
welded, yamaha 25hp 2
stroke w/trailer $5800
621-3764 or 302-3515
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
CRESTLINER
14' Aluminum fishing
boat. W/ galvanized
trailer & 9.9 HP outboard.
$750 (352) 628-7818
Dock Space Available 24'
max; Reduced rates
Nov-Feb w/1 yr lease.
Manatees + Swim= fun
(352) 563-1817
PONTOON BOAT
22 ft.,
Sweetwater,
(352) 621-1207




















ALLEGRO BUS
2004 40 ft., 3 slides,
400HP, 60k miles,
$95,000 Excel, cond.
(352) 795-9853

BOUNDER
32fT Motor home, Ford
V10 engine, low mile-
age, new tires, Sleeps
2-6. $16,500
(352) 220-6303

ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, Diesel, motor
home, 2005, 55k miles,
extras include diesel gen-
erator, wash/dryer
$74,495 obo Call Bill
(352) 419-7882
JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002




JAYCO 30 ft.
2000, Clean, qn. bed,
with Canopy $5,950
obo (352) 563-1465
(352) 212-1960
KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft.
sleeps 8 air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
MONTANA
2004 30 FT. 5th Wheel,
2 slide-outs, includes
slider hitch. $17,000.
(352)493-1195,538-6446
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides New ti-
res, excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




300 6 Cylinder Engine
$400.
4 Speed Transmission
$125.
(352) 382-5661
CAR ENGINE
454 Crate engine,
complete
(352) 621-1207




$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID- $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
It In. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892





$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

CADILLAC
2005, STS, V6 LEATHER
VERY CLEAN...
CALL 352-628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION



CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $19,000
call 1-352-503-6548

CHEVROLET
2004 Cavalier,
extra clean $5,99
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005 Equinox Is
45,329 miles $10,995
352-341-0018

CHEVY
'03, Malibu LS, 65K miles
sunroof., leather inte-
rior, auto, PW, PB,
$7,500 (352) 726-4689
CHEVY 05
TRAILBLAZER 4wd
56K miles, Exc. Cond.
wrnty, $9,500
352-249-7756

CHEVY
2005 Malibu Classic 4 dr
sedan, full power, 112K
actual miles, very well
kept, no smoking ever.
$4800 (352) 563-5931
Bernie

CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Edition Med Blue
w/32k miles. Mint Con-
dition $10,500 522-0505

Chrysler
'95 Lebaron GTC con-
vertible, 6 cyl. auto,
cold a/c, top works
great, 103k, red, $2900
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
$4,995
352-341-0018
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2009 Mustang, leather.
8,837 miles, $18,995
352-341-0018
HONDA
1998 ACCORD
AUTOMATIC, RUNS
GOOD PRICED TO SELL..
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR APPOINTMENT

Misc. Notice


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1970 CHEVROLET
CHEVELLE
SS 396/350HP, original,
$7400 OBO, email or call
for details:
gegenh7@msn.com /
863-657-4599.
CADILAC '87
Alante Convertible, de-
pendble, All pwr. V8, 30
mpg, great cond. $5,200
C.R. (727) 207-1619
CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster.
matching numbers.
LeMans blue. converti-
ble 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426







Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






$ CHEAP $
RENTALS
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


Misc. Notice


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 D9


CLASSIFIED




HONDA
NEW 2012 ACCORD
$18836. CALL
352-628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION
HONDA
NEW 2012 CIVIC.
$17398....CALL
352-628-4600 FOR
APPOINTMENT TO SEE
HYUNDAI
2003, SONATA.
AUTOMATIC..PW..PL
CALL 352-628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION
INFINITY
'04, G35, Sedan,
org. owner, immac.
44k mi. $14,900
(352) 527-4870
LINCOLN
2010 MKZ Excellent con-
dition, 30k miles. Loaded.
Asking $20k.
Call 637-2226
Mercury
"97 Grand Marquis w/
trailer hitch, 4 good han-
cock tires, high mileage
$1100 OBO
(352) 249-7541
MERCURY
'08 Milan, Wh 4 door w/
grey lea int, All Power,
Exc Cond; 39k mi;
$12,800 obo 634-4524
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi. New
tires & battery
Book $16,700
Sell $14,300
(352) 302-0778
OLDSMOBILE
Intrigue 2000, 4dr, 6 cyc,
160k mi, nice ride $1200
obo (352) 220-3430
VOLVO
2004 C70 Convertible,
leather, power top,
30,244 miles $10,995
352-341-0018


346-1104 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA SITTING AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE 2011 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT FOR
WASTEWATER UTILITY SERVICES AREA 114 OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM METHOD
FOR THE LEVY, COLLECTION AND ENFORCEMENT OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
FOR THE PROVISION OF WASTEWATER SERVICES IN THE 2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2011 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Area 114, more
particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof, that
the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the governing
body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Service
Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 is considering the adoption of a
non-ad valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services commencing in
fiscal year 2013/2014 within said area and intends to use the uniform method for the
levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assessments as set forth in Sec-
tion 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the govern-
ing body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Serv-
ice Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 will conduct a public hear-
ing on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. in the Board of County Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida to consider the adoption of a resolution authorizing their use of the uni-
form method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assess-
ments. If this method of collection is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
Interested persons may appear at the hearing to be heard regarding the use of
the uniform method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem as-
sessments. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the County Com-
mission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, they will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be made.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least seven (7)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please use the TTY
Telephone (352) 341-6580.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FLORIDA


OF CITRUS COUNTY,


2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114
EXHIBIT A
The 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District -
Area 114 consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads in which
a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements are con-
structed or reconstructed and all lots and parcels which are served or to be served
by a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements, located in
Citrus County, Florida, further described as follows:
AREA 114 DESCRIPTION: BEGINNING AT THE WEST 1/4 CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWN-
SHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTHERLY,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 371, PAGE 454, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 659, PAGE 454, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTH-
WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT BEING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF WEST FORT ISLAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44);
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, TO THE AFORE-
MENTIONED WEST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST: THENCE
NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1898, PAGE 1261, OF SAID
PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
PARCEL 17E18S32 11110, AS SHOWN IN THE CITRUS COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERS
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1069,
PAGE 2075, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINES OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 29, OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 60, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 29, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 28 OF SAID PALM
SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WESTERLY


24 ft. Box Truck
For Sale at Auction to
Highest Bidder
2000 Freight Liner
Sold as Is Vin
#1FV3EJFD51HG90188
Closed Bidding To be
opened Nov. IstlOa
536 Hickory Smoke
House Rd Hopkinsville
KY, 42240
(270) 886-4995

CHEVY 97
Silverado 2500
Ext Cab, 2wd,
low mileage
352-794-6709
DODGE
2010 RAM 2500 ST pkg
diesel, crewcab, short
box, 16K 5th wheel hitch
23,700 mi like new
$32,000
352-586-1125
Ford
'97 F150 XLT
ext. cab, 4x4, auto 5.4L
V8, red & silver, runs
great, alc, $3800
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
FORD
Red 1994 F150 4x4, Su-
per cab w/ full Leer Cap,
Spotless and Original
$6500 (352) 465-5874




CHEVROLET
'10, Equinox, 2LT, Black
granit metalic, V6,very
clean, 21,000 miles
$22.590 (352) 465-5054
JEEP
'02 Liberty Sport, 4x4,
Loaded, 80,000 mi,
$8000 (352)726-0135




CHEVY
1987 stepside p/u 87
runsgood,drives
good,many newer
parts,V8-5.7 auto 4 wheel
drive needs very little
$2500 obo 7 am to 7pm
352-220-4143 Robert




PONTIAC
2002 Montana
V6,automatic, extended
length, 7 passenger(4
buckets), leather seats,
cruise control, new tires,
trailer hitch, 102,000 mi-
les. Asking $5,500. Call
352-586-0568




Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10.000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $4,200.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688



KAWASAKI
2007 Vulcan 2000
Classic Lt Factory 2053
cc in mint condition with
only 525 miles. Looks
and runs great Red and
Black with many extras.
$6750 Phone
352-726-8124


Misc. Notice


357-1028 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL DISTRICT
INVITATION TO BID/REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS #12-01
DESIGN-BUILD HELICOPTER HANGAR AND PESTICIDE STORAGE BUILDING

The Citrus County Mosquito Control District, "District", requests that interested parties
submit formal sealed bids/proposals for the above referenced project.
The District is requesting proposals from qualified design-build firms to design and
build a Helicopter Hangar and Pesticide Storage Building on a site adjacent to the
District's Headquarters on North Lecanto Highway in Lecanto, Florida. The general
style and design of the building will be consistent with the District's adjacent Head-
quarters Building. The project must be ready for occupancy on or before August 1,
2013. The District reserves the right to withdraw and cancel this invitation to
bid/propose, at any time without liability to any bidders or prospective bidders. The
District reserves the right to retain all proposals submitted and to use any ideas in a
proposal regardless of whether that proposal is selected. The specifications and re-
quirements package which governs this request may be obtained from Joel Jacob-
son, Director, 968 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 by contacting the Director at
iiacobson@citrusmosauito.ora and requesting an electronic copy of the documents.
Attendance at a pre-bid/proposal conference is MANDATORY. The conference will
be held on November 6, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. 968 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto Fl. Sealed
bids/proposals must be received at the District office on or before 10:00 a.m. De-
cember 12, 2012. All questions should be directed to Joel Jacobson, Director at
iiacobson@citrusmosauito.ora
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any and all for-
malities. By order of the Board of Commissioners of the Citrus County Mosquito Control
Dis-
trict.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
abilityor physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Mosquito Control
District,968 N. Lecanto Hwy. Lecanto, Fl. 34461 (352) 527-7478, at least two days before
the meeting.
Any person who wishes to appeal any decision made by the Board, Agency or
Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, will
need a record of the proceedingsand that for such purpose, may need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, whichrecord includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
Robert Milan,
Chairman of the Board
October 28,2012.


358-1028 SUCRN
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 007-13

CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Program
CDBG 11DB-L4-05-19-01-H18
Housing Rehabilitation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to furnish all labor and materials to rehabilitate one (1) single family home for its
Community Development Block Grant Program. The single (1) home is as follows:
1102 N. Crause Point Lecanto, FL 34461
The scope of the work for the above shall be provided to potential Bidders at the
mandatory pre-bid conference scheduled for November 5, 2012. Additional infor-
mactin concenhg the pre-id conference is provided beow.A prices shall hdude d lbor, supeMr in,
materials, eqipmentendservicesnec-
essary to do a workman like job. No contractor or subcontractor may participate in
this work if ineligible to receive federal or state funded contracts. Financing of the
work will be provided, in whole or in part by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
Citrus County and their agent will act as agent for the owner in preparing contract
documents, inspecting, and issuing payments. However, the contract will be be-
tween the owner and contractor. Bids, work performed and payments must be ap-
proved by the owner and the agent.
All Bidders must complete an application, submit such to the County's consultant,
Guardian CRM, Inc., and be pre-approved by them prior to bid submittal. Contact
Guardian CRM, Inc., Phone (863) 899-6695 or Fax (863) 774-2114 for an application.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on November
5, 2012 at 10:00 am at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 219 located at
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a
Mandatory Walk through of each location.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before November 8, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path: Suite 266:
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for November 8, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle on October 28, 2012


(REAR) LOT LINES OF LOTS 16 THROUGH 28 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION,
TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY,
ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWEST-
ERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID
BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE
FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHWEST-
ERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO.
21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF THE AFOREMENTIONED PALM SPRINGS
VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT
LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 15, OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, TO THE
NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF LOT 8 OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ME-
ANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 8
OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHEASTERLY TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF LOT 1, PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 16, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY,
ALONG THE WATERWARD BOUNDARY OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, TO THE
SOUTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 14 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION; THENCE
SOUTH, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST;
THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1614, PAGE 1072, OF SAID PUBLIC
RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1732,
PAGE 86, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY,
ALONG THE WESTERLY AND NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2313, PAGE 2157, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 70, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND NORTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTH-
ERLY LINE OF SAID WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER THEREOF,
SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE WESTERNMOST CORNER OF SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 140, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER
THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHERNMOST POINT OF TRACT 13, AS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 343, PAGE 722, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID TRACT 13, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 792, PAGE 1146, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHWESTERLY
AND NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID SUNSET SHORES ADDITION
TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, OF SAID SUNSET
SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2018, PAGE 348, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 179, PAGE 313, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 812, PAGE
1726, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT
ALSO BEING ON THE WEST LINE OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 2310, PAGE 1585, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG SAID
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST FORT IS-
LAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44); THENCE WESTERLY,
ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,TO THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST 1/2 OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE SOUTHERLY, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY ISLANDS, STATE AND FEDERALLY OWNED CONSERVA-
TION LANDS, GOVERNMENTALLY OWNED LANDS, LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY AL-
READY SERVED BY A FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PER-
MITTED SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEM AND LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY WITHIN THE
CORPORATE BOUNDARY OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA.
October 14, 21,28 & November 4, 2012.


356-1028 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Jon A, Esteves
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Jon A. Esteves
242 NE 7th Ter
Crystal River, F 34428
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 28, 2012


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. No


Meetng^O^
I Ntics :


Meeting^
I Ntics :


Meng
I Ntics


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
ol'800=440=9054


$13999
OR$225mo
r 2010 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY


$15999l $15999 $13999
LoR$25 8 'PR OR$.258'8O OR$225MEORo


S2009 CHEVROLET
TAHOE


$11,999 $112999
OR$2 14'M. O.232R


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


352-564-1971


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


* WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL


937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


**PRICE INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE
$599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 72 MONTHS AT 4.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 66 MONTHS AT 5.99% APR WITH
...M. APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


2011 HONDA
CIVIC


$14999
OR$241 *P


2010 DODGE
RAM


2010 NISSAN
ALTIMA


-I


$13999
oR$225 MO.


2010 DODGE
JOURNEY



$14999
OR$241*PERMO.


$16999
,ORS274'm
MO.


S 2007 FORD
MUSTANG


2007 CHRYSLER
300
/C---^


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


-L


FIND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE!j~l;~~~
-N-0- I-M- -A :T TER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUYI II I


D10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


\





H Section E -SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


OME I RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


INSIDE
SSikorski's
SAttic
SM PAGE E4


ESTATE GUIDE


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.44









E2 SUNDA~~ OCTOBER 28, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


* uorlani/ ewer Pppi. DeaunTUI Lanascape
* 3/2/2 Car Gar. Split Plan Large Green Belt Area
SPaint & Lawn in 2011 New Roof Shingles/AC
* Very Well Cared For! This is a Must See!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloridaListinglnfo.com


HUGE FLORIDA ROOM!
*2/2/2 Split Plan Liv. Rm. has Stone FP
*Nice Appl. Kitchen Pretty Dining Rm.
* Updated HVAC/Roof Jenn-Aire in Summer Kit.
* Close to Gulf/Rivers Nice Corner Lot!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloridaListinglnfo.com


BUILT IN 2004, THIS SPACIOUS HOME
REALLY takes advantage of it's GORGEOUS
OPEN WATER VIEW Super Energy Efficient with
a tankless water heater and thermal pane windows
After a day on the water tell fish stories on your
comfortable 10x36 screened lanal Extra storage in
an 8x12 shed for your toys Priced well below
replacement value
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


5989 N. ORCHIS TER.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
S2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
SOffice or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


11985 N. GOLDENDALE AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL
SFurnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
* 2BD/2BA w/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


How much
home can I
comfortably
afford?
h For more information call:
Celeste Seales
352.564.2250
NMLS ID:432391
Bankof America I Home Loans
Bank of enca NA. MemberFDIC Equal Haung Lelnder Cr and colat



2INFO LINE
S.32l"h-2282
Enter house 1313






TOTALLY FENCED ACRE!
Real nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. TWO
screened porches. Shingle roof new in
2011. Inside, new carpet, laminate floor and
paint. Split plan. New appliances. Washer
and dryer included. Carport. CENTRAL
WATER plus well!
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 ]
Email: jenniferSlollz@remax.net
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


PRISTINE 2003
4/3/3 SOLAR-HEATED POOL HOME
on SMW cul-de-sac. Corian, granite, coffered
ceilings, hardwood floors, well for irrigation,
workshop in screened garage, new appliances,
side-fenced yard for children or pets, new
landscaping, new A/C. Move-in ready and
model perfect.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com











REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


I InEu nnnIA 1i. "
Bank-owned: 4/2/2 in
Sugarmill Woods. Built in 2008 and
in nice condition with upgrades.
DIRECTIONS 19 S to left on 98, to right on Oak
Village Blvd S, to left on Matricana Ct, to right on
Heuchera Court
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


UAIinI In InI wuuua
Charming little cabin on 10 acres in
Crystal River. No utilities, but the
building has lots of possibilities.
Fenced property and a nice little pond
on the site.

STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: steevevrnadoe@remax.net


CANTERBURY
* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Lg. Kitchen wlEat-ln Area
* Plantation Shutters
* RBaceard w/Privacv HPl ns


SGreat Room
* Ceramic Tile Floors Throughout
SCaged Pool & Lanai


LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


PRICED LOWERED!!!
S4/3/4 on 10 Acres *3,612 Sq. Ft. of Uving
* Covered Patios on 3 Sides Pool & Hot Tub
* Detached Garage w/Office Pole Barn
* Fenced and Gated Great Price, Won't Last Long!


2 i H BI 0WMi Inre
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


BEVERLY HILLS
* Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Home Ceramic Tile Floors Throughout
* New Roof 2007 Lg. Kitchen w/Newer Appliances
* Caged Pool w/Solar Panels Well-Maintained/Lots of Upgrades
*Nicely Landscaped on 1 1/2 Lots

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


FURNISHED
CINNAMON RIDGE
Spacious 2BR/2BA mobile home.....on
2 lots 160x136. Walk-in closets,
cathedral ceilings, large Florida room with
window A/C, carport, utility room, public
water, roof over and much more.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarjmills@erthlink.net


m


E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fa L INF






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Snapdragons for


winter bedding


in your garden


Some plants a
als that spro
flower and
set seed during
one year Plants
that germinate
and grow one
year, then over-
winter are called
biennials. These
hardy plants
flower during the
second year, pro-
duce seed then
die. If a plant
lives for more
than two years, it
is called a peren-
nial. Perennials


are annu-
)ut, grow,


off in late fall after they
have set viable seed for next


year's crop. They
die as soil tem-
peratures fall or
are killed by the
first frost. Plant
tender annuals
from seed under
glass early in the
year in Florida
and plant them
out in the garden
Jane Weber after the last frost
JANE'S in March.
Half-hardy
GARDEN plants may sur-
vive short, light
may be frosts, but will be killed by


short-lived or last many longer freezes. Some plants
years.
Tender annual plants die See JANE/Page E6


| l Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtorl. A HOUSE Realtor
S302.3179 soLDt manl 287.9022
The G n Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 PDNP.

I. ,, C iT O, i ,I E I RO 1 NC


I BEATI!FLCUT (HO ER!!UO- U111 Ti11 !NC


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


Theroux hits new
high at ERA
ERA American Realty & In-
vestments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
level achieved by one of its In-
verness office agents for 2012.
Dawn Theroux has sur-
passed the $3 million dollar
mark in closed sales volume in
2012.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the


Dawn
Theroux
ERAAmerican
Realty.


achievement
of this fine
real estate
professional.
Dawn can be
reached at
the Inver-
ness office of
ERAAmeri-
can Realty
by calling
352-726-


5855 or by email at dawn
therouxera@tampabay.rr.com.


Landmark agents
make their mark
Landmark Realty of In-
verness is pleased to an-
nounce the team of Tomika
Spires-Hanssen and Kim-
berly Fuller have exceeded
$8 million dollars in sales for
the year 2012. They special-
ize in foreclosures and in-
vestment properties.
Call either Tomika at 352-
586-6598 or Kim at 352-212-


Tomika Kimberly
Spires-Hanssen Fuller
Landmark Landmark
Realty. Realty.
5752, or call Landmark Realty
at 352-726-5263.


Lr ChITRU RIULIDE BEL1ALT


manda & irk Jlnsm Tom Ballour U Avewus & H Steiner Art Paty
BRO-i/ASSOC. -:EALPTO R RE ATOR RtA TOR-BROKER REACTOR


746-9000,


07 0vv~irs atu~a I


FORT


3 CLIFFORD"
2/2/2 355613 $57,900




4506 N. TUMBLEWEED


-HEMM-


Real Estate DIGEST


* Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!


^^yr f ^ ""i 1 ]


I Of Citrus
Inc. Fla v a
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 Facbook
Hwy. 19, 4/2miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


CRYSTAL RIVER
7: .
Or X-111,
..No AK


BEVERLY HILLS


:INS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 E3


... .. ..


I BVERY HLL







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
......... .....................................advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
...... ......................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


2012 The Year of the Bat!


Each year, on the last night of Oc-
tober, millions of children
across the U.S. dress up in cos-
tumes and take to the street for a
spooky dose of trick-or-treat.
In keeping with the Halloween
theme, let's shed some light on a mis-
understood creature of the
dark, the bat
Curiously, bats have been
feared and maligned by
man since the Dark Ages.
Some of this fear stems
from the misconception .,
that most bats carry rabies
when, in fact, less than one-
half of one percent carry
the disease. In actuality Joan B1
bats are an essential link in FLOI
the balance of nature. In FRIE
Florida, bats provide a
valuable service by con- LIV
suming mosquitoes and
other night-flying insects while pos-
ing little threat to human health.
To create global awareness of the
importance and benefits of bats, a two-
year-long initiative, "The Year of the
Bat," was undertaken by The Conven-
tion on the Conservation of Migratory
Species of Wild Animals.
There are estimated to be about
1,100 species of bats worldwide, ac-


counting for about 20 percent of all
mammal species. Only 39 occur in the
United States and of those, 18 occur in
Florida. Nine species of bats are
found in Citrus County, all of which eat
mosquitoes and other insects.
Florida bats are highly beneficial,
because they consume
tremendous numbers of
night-flying insects, includ-
ing mosquitoes. According
to Bat Conservation Inter-
national, a single bat can
capture 500 to 1,000 mos-
quitoes in a single hour!
Bats locate insects at night
using a very sophisticated
adshaw sonar system (echoloca-
IDA- tion), emitting supersonic
NDLY sounds and listening for
echoes. Bats are most fre-
ING quently seen on warm
nights feeding over bodies
of water, around buildings or forest
edges, or around lights. During the
day, bats find shelter in a variety of se-
cluded places, preferring small, dark,
poorly ventilated spaces that heat up
during the day Tree cavities, snags,
and especially unpruned cabbage
palms are important roost sites.
The Seminole bat roosts in Spanish
moss and the Northern Yellow bat


roosts in palm fronds. Due to increas-
ing urbanization, the number of these
natural roosting sites has been re-
duced, and window shutters, drain
pipes, billboards, roof tiles, and attics
have become popular roosting site
substitutes.
You probably haven't thought much
about it, but bats are mammals whose
forelimbs form webbed wings, making
them the only mammals naturally ca-
pable of true and sustained flight. By
contrast, flying squirrels and gliding
possums simply glide rather than fly,
and can only glide for short distances.
Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs,
as birds do, but instead flap their
spread-out digits, which are very long
and covered with a thin membrane.
Due to loss of habitat, bat popula-
tions are on the decline throughout
the United States. Disturbance of nat-
ural and man-made roosting sites in
buildings, old trees, and caves is a
major factor in this decline. Another
factor is active and persistent perse-
cution by people not aware of the bat's
gentle nature and beneficial activities.
Once bats have been excluded from
one habitat it is often possible to pro-
vide alternative habitats. Uncut wood-

See BATS/Page E5


Vase is an example of Bristol Glass; sizing up silver setting


Dear John: The enclosed
picture shows a vase that
my mother had for many
years. It has no markings on the
bottom, but I remember my
mother saying the vase
used to sit in her
grandmother's parlor.
My mother died at the
age of 100, seven years
ago so this vase has to
be over a hundred
years old. It is a very
delicate vase made of
very thin porcelain, I
believe. The flowers John S
appear to be painted SIKOR
on it with gold etching
throughout the design AT
and around the top
and bottom.
I would really love to know
more history about it if you have
any information that would be of
help. I do not plan to sell it, but
would like to know an approxi-
mate value for insurance pur-
poses. -J W, Homosassa


L

I
i
I
I


Dear J.W: I think your vase is
made of a glass referred to as
Bristol Glass. It was a decorative
glass made in Bristol, England as
early as the 17th century and on
through the Victorian
era. The majority of
the glassware made
during the late 19th
century was light-
S weight and opaque like
your pretty hand-
painted vase. Potential
dollar value is below
$100.
korski Dear John: Attached
SKI'S is a photo of a painting
in our family since
IC 1950. It is signed by
L.W Atkins. I can find
nothing about Atkins. The image
may have come from an engrav-
ing and been put on the canvas by
Atkins.
I have seen the image in a
frame recently The smaller pic-
ture could not have been copied
from my painting or I would


know the copy Also, 17 years ago,
I think I saw a reproduction of an
engraving in a frame about 14
inches by 10 inches. You can tell
the difference in the quality of
the art Any information to trace
the original source you can give
me will be appreciated. R. W,
Internet
Dear R.W: I was not able to
find any biographical informa-
tion or sales records for L.W
Atkins. The subject matter has
the look of a storybook theme. I
think it was produced in Europe.
It is not possible to speak to the
issue of quality without physical
examination. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
DearJohn: I have been given a
sterling silver Strasbourg
pat.1897 service for eight with
four serving pieces that was
given to my grandparents in the
1930s. I was looking for any infor-
mation on this set that would
help me in determining the
value. I was looking to purchase a


car for my daughter and wanted
to know if it would be in my best
interest to piece out, sell as a set
or melt down. Any information
would be appreciated. B.M.,
Internet
Dear B.M.: There is no specific
collector interest in your flat-
ware. The dollar value is based
on interest in the pattern or sil-
ver weight. To check and see
what you could sell the set for in
the pattern matching market,
contact Replacements Ltd. in
Greensboro, North Carolina at 1-
800-REPLACE (737-5223) or on-
line at www.replacements.com.
In addition, get a couple of bids
from local silver buyers. You will
then have the information you
See ATTIC/Page E5
This hand-painted vase appears
to be an example of Bristol Glass,
a type of glassware produced in
Bristol, England up to the late
19th century.
Special to the Chronicle


E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


r







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



BATS
Continued from Page E4

lots, snags, and viable wetlands
with open water are important
bat habitats if they can be
found.
You can do your part by
building and installing a bat
house in your community. One
of the most successful bat
houses in Florida is in
Gainesville across from Lake
Alice on Museum Road. Arrive
shortly before sunset to witness
the amazing spectacle of more
than 100,000 bats emerging
from the bat house to begin
their night's work of devouring
approximately 300 million in-
sects. For more information,


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


S 4394 N. Indianhead Rd.
S MLS #357441 $229,900
Elegantly 3/3/2 Sweetwater custom home
on 1.30 acres.
Directions: Rte. 486to north on Annapolis, to
end of road, to right on Indianhead, to #4394.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING





VigAllleli 3640 W. Treyburn Palh
MLS #358373 $139,900
Lovely 3/2/2 home in breathtaking
neighborhood.
Tami Mayer352-476-1507


\.ita 1390 W. Double Eagle CI.
S MLS#358364 $615,000
Impressive home on Skyview's 15th
Fairway, a very prestigious cul-de-sac.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
NEW LISTING


TIfilt 314S. Fillmore St.
t MLS #358326 $99,500
A beautifully renovated 3/2/2
pool home.
Teresa Boozer352-634-0213


7Jita 675 W. Doerr Path
MLS#358289 $225,000
Customized 3/2/2 Antigua model
with nice Florida Rm.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING


titully maintained 2/ I/ villa,
pride of ownership.
esa Boozer 352-634-0213


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING





tcis 7195 E. Everenl Ln.
MLS#358483 $142,900
Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath home
located on an acre lot.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


370 E. Glassboro Ct. 20
MLS#358475 $64,91
Furnished upstairs 2/2 +carport,
exceptionally clean.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


PENDING PENDING




S 3709 N. Buckwheat Pt. s 'a" R 4Ietbfw 791 E. Hartford St. 29-2b 10S. DesotoSt.
MLS #356804 $99,000 636 E. Gllchrist Ct. 23-4b MLS#333948 $77,000 MLS#357381 $34,900
SERIOUSLY? A furnished Pine Ridge MLS#355255 $59,900 Nicely remodeled, open kitchen Freshly painted 2 bedroom, 1 bath
pool home on an acre. Lovely views from this 2/2.5 townhouse. w/a breakfast/dining counter. Beverly Hills home.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Matt Robinson 937-219-6949 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Jo Ann Martin 352-616-2239
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
S Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 E5


call Citrus County Extension at
352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS's
knowledge, research, and re-
sources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and
agricultural needs. Programs
and activities offered by the
Extension Service are avail-
able to all persons without re-
gard to race, color, handicap,
sex, religion, or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is the natu-
ral resource conservation fac-
ulty for specialized programs
in Citrus, Hernando, Pasco
and Sumter County University
ofFlorida/IFAS Extension
Service.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

need to tell whether it is
worth more to sell for
pattern interest or sil-
ver weight. Good luck.
Dear John: We pur-
chased a home with
contents and it included
a beautiful Art Deco
vanity. It looks old but is
in great condition. It is
entirely covered with
mirrors and glass. How
can we determine its
worth? LLS.M.,
Palm Coast
Dear L.L.S.M.: The
single picture was not
very helpful. I do not


Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


think the mirrored van-
ity was made during the
Art Deco period. It was
likely manufactured
after World War II, circa
1950-60. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-
can.


John Sikorski has been
a professional in the
antiques business for
30years. He hosts a
call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO.
Box 2513, Ocala 34478
or asksikorski
@aol.com.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news
releases about upcoming community events. Call
352-563-5660 for details.


SKE "Always There For You"
REAY GAIL COOPER
mum multimillion Dollar Realtor
I ER Cell: (352) 634-4346
S Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindsprinq.com


OL O MG F ER AWA


. B PND NEW CARPETING!


S2+office2 villa golf course views L 3+office/2/3 pool home
SOffers 1682 sq. ft. in living area Set on 2 elevated boulevard lots
* New roof in 2008 Dual pane wndows well for the yard
* NewAC/heat September 2012 i Island kitchen opens to family room
* Skylights in kitchen and both baths 800 sq. ft. garage gives great options
* Home warranty for the buyers *. 'Home warranty for the buyers
#356549 $79,900 #356183 $237,000
LOOKING~ ~~ FOR WITE GEAA? BRN E CREIG


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
o ,cE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MaL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


041 -


retor


I G 1ET DUT ID A I W


PINE RIDGE Short sale, gorgeous 4 bedroom,
HOMOSASSA Oak Village, SMW, quiet cul 3 .11.. ... .... .. 11. .I i, 1 spa, all
le sac 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home on I i 1 1 ki then,
v/huge window enclosed lanai Breakfast nook, quartz counter tops, wood cabmets, island, all
family room, diong area, living room and GE apphances, family room w/fireplace
greenbelt out back #355544 $150,000 #355166 $375,000




IOMOSASSA Nice older mobile w/2
bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear INVERNESS Beautifullyrenovated
creened porches. Newer roofover in 2010, 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath condo w/high ceiling in
iewer appliances approximately 2 years living room, end unit, 2 story w/spiral
Ald. FULLY fenced backyard with shed. staircase, balcony overlooking the water.


I1 I [ ; -- Sr-I O ALL O C C N


Fo a Vru T o M P o os,

S 6. F .d -c P S r opeSrties.


NEW LISTING







E6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


JANE
Continued from Page E3

cannot endure the torrid,
hot and wet summers in
Florida. These grow best
during cooler weather.
Snapdragon, a perennial, is
sold in Florida as a winter
bedding annual plant. It tol-
erates cooler days and brief
morning frosts.
There are about 40
species in the Antirrhinum
genus. Most evolved around
the western Mediterranean.
A few originated in western
North America, but no snap-
dragon is native to Florida.
Snapdragon flowers re-
semble the face of an ani-
mal. The botanical name,
Anthirrhinum, means nose-
like in ancient Greek. The
French call snapdragon
Wolf's Mouth or "guerule de


loup." Germans and Italians
call them lion's mouth in
their own languages.
The short-lived garden
snapdragon, A majus, orig-
inally from Spain, is a bushy
perennial valued for its
spikes of long-lasting flow-
ers. These snapdragons
rarely flower well after
their first year. The plant is
susceptible to a fungus
called snapdragon or An-
thirrinum Rust. Once the
plant has finished blooming
about February in north
Central Florida, it can be
pulled up and added to the
compost pile.
As soon as they become
available in the fall, plant
snapdragons in well-
drained, fertile soil and full
sun during Florida winters.
Amend sandy soil with
ample organic material such
as the fine mulch from Cen-
tral Landfill on State Road


44 between Lecanto and In-
verness. Top dress the bed
with an insulating blanket of
natural pine needles to pro-
tect the soil and roots from
expected brief frosts. If deep
enough, pine needles will
also deter sprouting weed
seeds from reaching the soil
and setting roots.
The top mulch also pre-
vents the sun from evapo-
rating soil moisture. Water
newly planted snapdragons
daily for a week or two, then
taper off watering as they
become established. Watch
for wilting, which indicates
the plant needs more water.
Winter garden Snapdrag-
ons are a cultivar in the Cor-
ronette series of Fl hybrids.
Selected and bred for com-
pactness and dense flower-
ing, snapdragons come in a
variety of colors. The seeds of
cultivars are usually not vi-
able or are sterile. Plant may


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

reach 18 to 24 inches high
and be of similar diameter.
Snip off spent flower heads,
a practice called dead head-
ing, to encourage repeat
flowering over the winter.
Cultivars have larger blooms
clustered heavily on tall,
erect spikes. They will all be
of similar height and size.
Winter bedding plants
brighten the garden from
fall to spring. Enjoy a
change of color while other
perennials are dormant and
resting over the winter.


Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion Countygarden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


Learn The Art of

Real Estate Investing


We've developed this investor
education program and the
accompanying technology tools
because we know the rig hl \\ a tIo
build wealth in American real estate.


Register NoU For Free al
\i \ \ .exitreall leu.a ers.cun


Spereializ in B ?Terra VisTerra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
_a 194_ _rnwodRsl s(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
REALTY G RO UP w e i al l ru BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777






DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
3 BED, 2.5 BATH 3 CAR FOXFIRE This home small about ou DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLA
Short Sale BREATHTAKING Davncl Deluxe pool home on oversized lot Sits on expanded with an open Beautiful maintenance free home, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2-car garageopen floor C.
a cul-de-sac with a circular driveway Some of the many features include a furniture, and open fire I plan design with a great use of space, Sunroom with plantation shutters, SINGLE FAMILY 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE
gourmet kitchen, oversized pool with extended lanal and luxurious master bath cabinets, solid surface .pr,-r -t -f -1---1 ---t -,, ..-ir-d,.. -r room Spectacular Terra Vista home Situated on a cul de sac, beautiful views Custom
Perfect for entertaining Enjoy all this home has to offer Professional de .... .. i ........... ........ .. details with upgrades galore Professionally decorated Pool, Spa, extended
MLS 333026 $399,000 MLS 354017 $219,900 MLS 355853 $209,000 lanal with extensive landscape MLS 356255$499,000




SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 5 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Spectacular 3/3/5 with gorgeous golf course view nestled on a corner lot
Beckons its new owner a warm welcome home Home has desirable southeast
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 3 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR SKYVI VILLAS exposure with a 12x24 pool, builtin fireplace, builtin entertainment center
Wellmaintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage plus den and a pool An Stunning maintenancefree home, 3 bedroom,2baths,2-car This ATTRACTIVE 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR VILLA ,,P.-ir-d r-A-. -, 2.c --,r.an.e. Ttrt ..-ir-.A- -tinless steel
1 J gmllu d ii Mainenance fre i I 1 ,oeautfully landscaped -i,.
"" ". I home is in immaculate condition, professionally decorated. I, 1. a t te e I r and c i
md m whm.. p lot Lots of tile, e ,I,,,I,,,,.throughout and much, .........,
model Custom home with many upgrades more Sit, relax and enjoythe water gardenfrom the lanal .. ... ...
$232,000 MLS356101 375,000 MLS 356273 $293,000 i. ii 3I I $469,000









DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS I TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD
Lakeview Villas Nice unfurnished villa located near the Bella Vta Fitness Fully furnished 2/2/2, with a den, detached villa in Terra Vista Beautifully BRENTWOOD DETACHED VILLA 3 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR Spacious 2/25townhomewith great room, modern kitchen wth eating nook, spacious
Center & Spa Open floor plan with upgraded kitchen, carpet & tile SocalClub decorated Enjoy maintenance-free ving so you can relax Open great room, makes Nicely maintained villa in Brentwood Open floor plan with large kitchen Lawn ils Golf
Membership Included i maintenance and Social Club Membership included
#1254 $1400 $1,500 #1267 1 ,100 #3259 $1200
I I!







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HomeFront BRIEFS


Rain harvesting
with rain barrels
The Citrus County Florida-Friendly
Landscaping program has partnered with
The Green Footprint of Crystal River to
offer rain barrel workshops.
Participants help assemble their own
rain barrel to take home after the class.
The first workshops will be from 10:30 a.m.
to noon and 1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
10, at The Green Footprint's new location,
619 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. The cost
per barrel is $45, which includes the nec-
essary spigot and overflow attachment. For
each barrel purchased, The Green Foot-
print donates $4 to a scholarship fund for
Citrus County students pursuing a degree
in a field that promotes environmental con-
servation, such as environmental science,
agriculture, horticulture or other related
fields.
Call Julie or Tracy at 352-257-5403 to re-
serve a spot. Pre-registration is necessary.


Those interested in more green learning
may register for the Worm and Tumbler
Composting workshop slated for 10:30
a.m. to noon Saturday, Dec. 1.
Learn about palms at
gardening clinic
Growing palm trees in Citrus County can
be a reality if we pick the correct tree for
our area. The November free Master Gar-
dener Plant Clinics' topic will be "All About
Palms," covering their selection, nutrition
and potential problems.
The schedule is:
2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Floral
City Library.
1:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9, at Coastal
Region Library, Crystal River.
1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, at Lakes Re-
gion Library, Inverness.
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, at
Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21, at Citrus
Springs Library, Citrus Springs.


000BOSH

l GITTA
Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (35
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com






ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN -
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
In the equestrian section of Pine coerlot with mature oak trees and lots
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a of privacy! Very well maintained, new
360 interactive virtual tour at roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and
teractive v tour at move right in! Community features golf,
www.mypineridgehome.com. tennis, clubhouse.
MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000







NATURE'S
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community
,,*. ,i .. ,,,,, i T akethe on the Withlacoochee River
... ... ... $218,000
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven!







CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is
the right setting for living the Florida
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight
true masterpil .... ,i 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of
Lake Tsala .i.. .. room to dock all the water toys
family to move right in! imaginable!
00OD2FDMLS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000


2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, at Ho-
mosassa Library.
Master gardeners will also offer a repeat
of the October topic, "Plant Cold Protec-


tion," at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Lakes
Region Library. There will be no clinics dur-
ing December.
From staff reports


311 W.Main St.,Inverness

A352-726-5263
www.Iandmarkinverness.com



LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY



DOWN & DIRTY

M DEALS


A BARTH
REALTOR
2) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


A BOATER'S DREAM
COMES TRUE!
Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
feet of seawall; stationary & float
ing dock; spacious modem 3/25
home sits high and dry (never
flooded) on 2 lots. This mati
culously maintained property is a
mt 1 see! ;499.000


5721S. VE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
and nestled in an area that preserved
most of its 1960's charm! Well main
tainted, fenced yard, sunroom. The perfect
home away from home.
MLS #357468 $39,900
n i ... .- i .. Il


520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
This charming, very well maintained 3/2/1
home has a lot to offer: close to town,
. medical :... i ,,. F.., your fenced
backyard i ... ... ... or private
patio Everything is neat and clean, just
S $69,900


The Prices are Down and some
of the houses are Dirty!
8738 E Moonrise, Floral City...................$16,900
8491 Central, Brooksville ......................$28,500
6528 108th, Belleview..........................$30,000
7969 Northlake, Floral City .....................$34,900
6177 W Nielsen Ct, Homosassa ..............$37,900
6395 N Iris Dr, Hernando........................$39,900
1328 NE 5th, Crystal Rier......................$42,500
3716 E Beck St, Inverness......................$44,900
1304 Claymore Street, Inverness.............$45,000
11609 E Salmon Way, Floral City............$48,500
11041 Tigerwood Terrace, Citrus Springs..$59,900
295 SThayerAve, Lecanto......................$60,000
642 W Diamondbird Lp, Hernando...........$61,000
34330 Umbrella Rock, Webster...............$63,000
5671 S Ashley Ter .................................$67,900
257 WCasurina PI., Beverly Hills ............$72,900
1226 CR 463B Lake Pan........................$74,900
1991 CR 652A, Bushnell ......................$74,900
3291 WEST C-476, Bushnell .................$75,900
8084 Atwood Drive, Webster..................$80,900
5430 ETangelo Ln, Inverness..................$84,900
15 Gerbera, Homosassa..........................$84,900
893 W Colbert Ct Beverly Hills.................$90,900
10679 Halls River Rd., Homosassa..........$99,900
2244 CR 478A, Webster, FL 33597......$101,900
6225 N Misty Oak Terr, Beverly Hills......$109,900
9 Whitewood St, Homosassa.................$117,900
618 Sea Holly Dr, Brooksville................$129,900
51172 W Legion Ct, Hernando..............$149,900
48 Cypress Bvd, Homosassa.................$159,900
1192 W Diamond Shore Lp, Hernando...$169,900
8847 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa........$174,900
1407 E Allegrie Dr, Inverness.................$184,900
5881 N Petuna Terrace,Bev Hills............$192,900
30 Pine St, Homosassa.........................$195,000
CALL KIM FULLER (352) 212-5752 OR TOMIKA
SPIRES-HANSSEN (352) 586-6598


BEST
t_ I


OWNED WATERFRONT HOMOSASSY BUY!
one car attached carport, living room, partial appliar
porch, and a rear deck great for entertaining.
$89,900! MLS# 356654. Call Kim Fuller 352-2
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.


IHOME! 1997 4/3/2 Pool home in Clearview Estates for only
$184,900! Home boast new interior paint, caged inground pool,
new appliances, new AC, formal living & dining rooms, interior
laundry, den, eat in kitchen, rounded corners, 2 master suites, pool
bath, covered lanai... MLS 356261. 1407 Allegrie. Call Kim Fuller
352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. 1


I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0


and~ cd nCIO e


Get creative with U%2-5,

these sweet X4

seasonal staples

KIM COOK
Associated Press
One of the most enduring of Halloween
icons, candy corn is now over 130 years old.
Back in the early 1900s, when the little
striped treat was one of a variety of fondant .
novelties crafted into shapes like turnips, .- .
chestnuts and leaves, workmen had to run .
buckets of hot, sugary slurry back and forth
across molds to make it Today, companies ,
like Jelly Belly and Brach's produce over 35
million pounds of candy corn most of it
around Halloween.
"One of the reasons candy corn has re-
mained so popular is that it's a 'limited edi-
tion.' This is really the only time of year you
can easily get it, and that limited availability
makes it attractive," says Susan Whiteside, .
spokeswoman for the National Confectioner's
Association.
Candy corn has become not only a staple of
the trick-or-treat bowl, but an inspiration for
seasonal decor
Whether you're setting a festive scene or
just indulging a nostalgic affection, there are
lots of ways to use candy corn. You can even
make some yourself both edible and non-
edible versions.
Candy corn kernels have more visual im-
pact en masse than individually An array of
clear lidded jars filled to the brim looks won-
derful. Dump a bag or two in the bottom of a
hurricane or large vase; add a pillar candle, U4
Halloween ornament, or twisty branches
painted black or gold and you've got a great
centerpiece. A vy y
Woman's Day magazine suggests hot-gluing
kernels to Styrofoam balls for colorful bowl
fillers. (wwwwomansdaycom)
Candy corn topiaries can be made by stud-
ding foam or paper cones, adding stems, and An image provided by
placing in pots. Wreaths made of rows of Woman's Day shows a
candy, hung with a black ribbon, look striking. garland threaded with
And while you've got the glue out, consider candy corn as a decoration
adding a few candy corns to twigs to create for Halloween.
candy "blossoms." Or, if you're patient, try Associated Press
stringing kernels into a garland for the mantel
or door frame.
Making faux candy corn is easy, with a few
craft materials in the signature colors of or-
ange, yellow and white. Wool retailer Lion
Brand provides free online patterns to
See Page E10


E8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012











Cutting gardens yield beauty indoors and out


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Cut flower gardens are attractive
options for those who don't like re-
moving the best blooms from their bor-
ders and beds for indoor display
The bouquets also open new av-
enues for creativity along with becom-
ing something personal to share. And
perhaps best: The cuttings can grow
into a profitable sideline.
"Ours is a hobby gone berserk," said
Gail Burr, who with her husband
Steve, operates Everlastings and Time
Country Gardens in the Finger Lakes
region of central New York.
"We always had an interest in garden-
ing so when we retired, we started sell-
ing our bouquets and arrangements,"
she said. "The Canandaigua (N.Y)
Farmers Market is our primary venue,
although we also sell for weddings."
The price of a Burr garden bouquet
runs $8 and climbs to around $25 for
something larger, like a hospital spray
"In my mind, flowers that bring
beauty into the home should be af-
fordable." Burr said. "Typical florist
prices are precipitous for many."
The roots of cutting gardens go back
to the Victorian era or to wealthy
landowners who grew flowers for the
manor house, said Debra Prinzing, au-
thor of "The 50 Mile Bouquet" (St.
Lynn's Press, 2012).
"That's what we think of as cutting
gardens," she said. "One row of sun-
flowers, one of snapdragons, one row
of zinnias. Now, though, we're looking
at adding cutting ingredients to natu-


lu~ i Ifn


ral gardens. There's enough variety
there that you wouldn't have a bare
spot."
Which blooms are best for bou-
quets? The choices are vast, and in-
clude annuals, perennials, bulbs,
fruits, vegetables and flowering woody
stems. Think lilacs, zinnias, peonies,
mums, hydrangeas and sunflowers.
Don't forget roses, dahlias, cattails,
succulents, kale, grasses and lilies.
Many people have begun planting
perennials in their cutting gardens
with new genetics that produce
tougher plants, more blooms and
longer flowering times, said Anthony
Tesselaar, president and co-founder of
Tesselaar Plants, in Silvan, Australia.
"Once cut, these newer plants come
back with even more flowers that
grace the garden," Tesselaar said.
Some suggestions for prolonging the
beauty of cut botanicals:
Cut the flowers when they're dew
fresh in the morning rather than
wilted from the afternoon sun.
Use sharp shears to prevent
crushing the stems, which reduces the
flow of water to the blooms.
Use a commercial floral preser-
vative to acidify the container water.
Homemade formulas include table
sugar and bleach. "Adding some
lemonade also extends the life of the


water," Tesselaar said.
Growing a cutting garden is one
thing. Knowing how to create a stun-
ning display with the cut flowers is
quite another. Here are some tips:
Use a dominant flower or flowers.
Many designers prefer working with
uneven numbers, Prinzing said.
Insert a vertical feature, such as a
flowering branch or some ornamental
grass.
Drape the arrangement with
spillerss" (vines, foliage, fruit) that
soften its look.
Cut flower gardens boost the long-
standing tradition of garden-to-
garden sharing, Prinzing said.
"I have a friend who saves inexpen-
sive glass vases," she said. "When
someone leaves her house, they al-
ways leave with a bouquet of roses
from her house."

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE MarketAnalysis and Marketing Plan
$7.2 million already closed by Sept. 30, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
ET v To Learn More
!i. (352) 746-9924


A bouquet of
fresh cut
flowers sits
next to a
rural mailbox
near Lang-
ley, Wash.
Associated Press


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
ERNANDO, FL Commercial location several blocks from Old
ando Lake. Almost Courthouse. Former flower shop.
0OMLS#353564 $105,000 MLS#356806


S BANK OWNED-BEVERLY HILLS, FL
1 BR/1 BA with bonus room. 1 car garage.
Fenced corner location.
$27,500 MLS#358157


BANK OWNED-SPRING HILL FL
3BR/2BA pool home. Large family room
w/fireplace.
$59,900 MLS#356883


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (352)302-6714 "


.


3/2/3 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
00OD2IG Call Joe at 302-0910


IT'S TIME TO MOVE!


Debbie Cleary
Realtor Associate Homeown
Your CLEAR Choice in Real Estate met
debbieclearyfl@yahoo.com Realty
www.debbiecleary.com 6050W Gulf to Lake Hwy,
352-601-6664 ffCrystal Rive r 352-564-0333
352-601-6664 Office 352-564-0333


Bouquets offer a number of advantages for careful gardeners


I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








E10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012



CANDY
Continued from Page E8

crochet stuffed toys and little
carry bags. (www.lionbrand
.com)
Get out the paint pots and
paint the top and base of or-
ange traffic cones for clever
Halloween-night driveway
markers. Better Homes & Gar-
dens' website offers instruc-
tions to make a door decoration
by cutting a foam cone in half
lengthwise, painting it and
adding dried fall plant mate-
rial. Spray paint gourds and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


pumpkins for more entryway
decor (wwwbhg.com)
Ready-made decor with the
candy corn motif is easy to find;
look for string lights (www
lightsforalloccasions.com), vo-
tive holders (www.pierl.com),
throw pillows (www.wayfair.
com) and fabric. (www.bug
fabric.com)
Finally, if you're up for mak-
ing your own treats, Food Net-
work star Alton Brown has a
recipe online. (wwwfood
network.com) Evoke the idea of
candy corn by creating tricolor
gelatin or sherbet parfaits, and
topping pretzels or cupcakes
with tinted icing.


Nabisco is selling a limited
run of Oreos with candy-corn-
colored filling. (www.target.
com)
Jamie Lothridge, a middle-
school teacher and avid baker
in Toledo, Ohio, who blogs
about her passion at www
mybakingaddiction.com, has al-
ready repurposed the Oreos by
turning them into truffles.
"As a recipe developer, new
ingredients get my creativity
flowing. I've long been a candy
corn fanatic, and autumn is my
favorite season, so making a
recipe with all my favorite
things is kind of a dream come
true," she says.


I!l


Real Estate


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966


C a Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


-aX: 1352) 563-5M I Toll I'll (888 I 852 -2340 1 Em il: 1 s I e ~ + I*I i 11ocl n e o I 4 wI. I wne


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

Crystal Riv.IDunn.
3/2/2, $750. 1st. last
$500 Sec. 352-489-9239

FLORAL CITY
2BR, 1.5BA All new kit..
bath, flooring, incld's all
appliances, W/D, stor-
age shed, /2Acre plus
Deadend st. No Pets
No smoking $500. 1st.
Ist Sec. (401) 488-5512


HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550 mo. Close to
Wal-Mart 352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW Lg fenced yd w/
nice shed. Rent $495/mo;
rent to own $3k down
$650/mo (352)634-3862




BEST
OF THE BEST
11 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
45 New and Used
Homes have been
Disounted for
Clearance. Come by
or Call (352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&l, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807


Large Florida Room
Washer, Dryer
Dishwasher
$7500 obo
(352) 527-9382

Inverness
2/2 Dbl wide, screen rm &
Ig. deck, 55+ park, great
view, exc cond., not
crowded $21,500 make
an offer (352) 419-7825

INVERNESS
3 months free lot rent
w/ purchase! 1 & 2 Bd
Homes starting @ $6900
Located in a 55+ park
on Lake. Lot rent $276.
month, Water Included.
352-476-4964

INVERNESS
Bring Your Fishina Pole!
55+ Park on Lake
2BD 1.5 Bath $2000
352-476-4964

New Jacobsen Model
Homes Sale! 13 Left
with up to $25,000 off.
Don't buy until you
shop North Pointe
Homes. 4545 NW 13th
St Gainsville, FL
(352) 872-5566


Lecanto 55+ Park.
2BR/1BA Carport and
Screened Porch.
$11,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down.
This is a purchase
W.A.C, Call to See
352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units
Must Go! New Homes
Start at $39,900
800-622-2832 ext 210
USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182


FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash 586-9498

HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925




2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348

12 x 40ft, 2 BR, Park
Model with 12 x 24 yr
round family room.
Cen. Air/Heat. 10 x 24
covered porch w/ lake
view. All appl's +
washer & dryer. 2 car
carport, 2 sheds, near
Dunnellon Move In
Ready Rent $240 Mo.
Asking $10,000
(352) 489-4656


2 BR, 1%, BA,12x56 MH
Nice Seasonal Home
Adult park, low lot rent
Carport, 2 screen
porches, some updates
$11,000 (352) 561-4738
55+ Community
3 BR, 2 BA, on Lake
Henderson, All
amenities, pool, dock
clubhouse. Asking
$14,900. (352) 201-5637

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 1988 Skylark
model, 2/2 furnished,
shed, screened lanai
352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090


=fCnONi
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.(ilrus(ounlyHomeRenloals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
6 Polk St. (BH) .................... $550
2/1 cute, fenced backyard
229 S. Monroe (BH) ............ $550
2/1 cute, updated home
CRYSTAL RIVER
1055 N. Hollywood (r. ((R)....$850
2/2/1 carport, screened back porch
1910 NW 12th Ave.-B (R). $700
2/2 cute duplex with nice seed rooms
HOMOSASSA
5865 W. Vikre Path (H) ....... $725
3/2/1 cozyhome close to Rock Crusher lm.
6944 W. Grant St. (H)........ $700
2/2/1 cute, centrally located
INVRNiSS/HiRNANDO/LECANTO
6315 N. horewood Dr. (Her). $650
2/1 Dnk with water uew, Florrd room
1933 Shmelle Path (L)..REDUED$1200
3/2/2 Inc. full memb.,pl, tenns,gym


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

2/1/Screen Room........$550
3/2/2........... .$950
2/2/Screen Porch Condo $600
2/2 Townhouse...........$700

2/2/1 Bonus Room......$600
2/2/Bonus Room........$650

2/1 On ACanal............$550
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
- Cheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
352-726-9010


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


These glass hurri-
canes are filled
with colorful
candy corns
nestling pillar can-
dles inside, an in-
teresting tabletop
display suggested
by Woman's Day
magazine's craft
editors.
Associated Press


Real Estat



* in
Mangeen IInc ..]



1 4 DROOM
Cal l For Deta]iolos









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3/2 waterfront DW, $600
2/2, Doublewide, $600
3/2, Seasonal, $1,200
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 House $600 mo.
AGENT (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, W/D, Cable
Big Yard (unfurnish opt.)
$600 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-455-8998
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Furnished
on Hunter's Springs, sun
deck, W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


-I
CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. 2/1 $575 F/L/S.
Includes Water/ gar-
bage, W/D hook-up. Also
furnished units avail.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all until. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec.,352-634-5499
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Quiet, Clean
$575. mo. incld's water
352-563-2114, 257-6461
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450/$500
no pets 697-0310
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool. Garb.. maint.
Incl. New W/D No pets,
$600. mo. 352-628-6700
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp 2/1
House $650. 422-2393

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall.
Quite. Clean.
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719





Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
1 Bedroom $396;
2 Bedrooms $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771

"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."




U'l-Jll LrN1I




Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa



CITRUS HILLS
UPGRADED 2/2/1, Pool,
Tennis. Starting at $750
mo. Call owner: 527-8599
CITRUS HILLS
UPGRADED 2/2/1, Pool,
Tennis. Starting at $750
mo. Call owner: 527-8599


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HOLDER
3/2/2 2000 sq. ft. home
Lg. fenced yard. dog ok
$800mth 352-302-7303




INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
1 BR, $475. mo., close
to shops (352) 344-4324
BEVERLY HILLS
1&2 Bedroom homes.
C/H/A. 1st Month Free
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + Fm. Rm, New CHA
$575. mo. 352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, 26 N. Melborne
CHA, Nice Back Yard
(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, EZ Terms $450.
352-697-1457
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2 & FL. RM.
15 E. Murray
$550. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2, Inground Pool, gar
age. Fl. Rm. C/A. W/D
$675/mo. $1,200 move
in. 954-294-0531
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/1 $500. mo.
Block home
352- 804-9729
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2. Immac.. all appl.
Finest gate guarded
community in Citrus
County. Rent incl. lawn
maint. cable TV $1,050.
/mo. Paul 352-746-9585
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2, W/D.
auto garage opener.
nice appliances. $825.
352-382-1373.
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299, 364-2073
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs CC
Est, 3/2/2, Immaculate,
immediate occupancy
$950 mo. incl. lawn
maint. 352-494-3551
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg. 3/2/2
On % Acre, fenced yard,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Close to Rainbow
River & Historical District
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p


HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, 1st & Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-476-2860
INVERNESS
Country Living on Large
/2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964




CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA; Furnished
$900/mo (352) 287-5020

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
On/Off Water, Boat
Dock 352-302-1370




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/MIK"
REALTY ONE

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


*******
BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060


Coast Landings RV
Resort. Large Developed
site, plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,500. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




BEVERLY HILLS
38 S Jefferey $36,900
just completed remodel
of 2/11 cp SUN 12-3
352-527-1239




FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Profes-
sional OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo Center,CR
352-794-6280, 586-2990
Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$54,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




3BR/2BA/2, Pool, New
Carpet, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
REDUCE $113,900
(352) 476-5061


Beautiful Golf Home
on El Diablo.
2563 sq. ft. 4/3/2.
Granite in kitchen
all baths and wine
bar.S/S appliances
and many upgrades!
Close to shopping.
restaurants top rated
schools. $159,900
352-464-1320




3/2/2 POOL HOME,
updated roof, AC, water
heater, SS Appl's, gran-
ite kit counter tops, and
resurfaced Pool
Reduced to $149,900
6090 N. Silver Palm Way
(352) 586-7691



2/2/2 split floor plan, 1800
SF. Nearly new roof &
AC. Front and back porch
w/ attic. Great location
near park, pool & tennis
crts. (352) 563-5611



Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, private lot
352-746-0002



Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Sat
& Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
Crystal River Village
2 bedroom. 2 bath. 1991
Nobility in excellent
cond. ,fully furnished.
For photos on-line see
Crystal River Village
H.O.A Lot 384 $12,800
OBO Call Roger
Weaver at 330-205-0506




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/M "
REALTY ONE


CmSi


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


Homosassa
3/2/2cg corner lot on 1/2
acre, fireplace, central
air, owner financed 0%
interest Call Tom
(920) 224-2513
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof.
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558



39 Greentree Street
Homosass, Fl 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Dont wait.
Almost 1/2 off Sugarmill
home. Originally sold for
259k asking 136,500. Will
list Nov 1st for 10k more.
Stainless steel,
granite(including bath-
rooms). Huge master
suite with double trey ceil-
ings and his + her closets
and separate sinks.
Phone: 352-346-7179
Email:
ryan49445@yahoo.com










Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
Sugar Mill Woods
3 Bedroom, 3Bath,
2 Car Garage Solar
Heated Pool,
25 Sycamore Circle
$105,500 352-382-1448


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515



Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


Cir sCo t


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails, $3000 per Acre
352-634-4745
FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed
last assessed $25,000
ASKING $12,500 obo
813-792-1355




2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $24,000.
(727) 439-9106




HOMOSASSA
90 x 110 ft Lot, w/good
water, septic and im-
pact fee pd. $10K obo
Owner financing Easy
Terms (941) 505-9287

RESIDENTIAL LOTS
$300. down $100 mo
(352) 568-2849


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 E11


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


5 ACRES 1948 Sq Ft.
2BR + Office/2 Bath
Furnished Home,
Bushnell, Turn key cond
cage inground pool
3,000 sf garage
mechanics dream
completely equipped
Information. Appoint.
(352) 569-4205
OPEN HOUSE
Sat& Sun 10am-6pm
3BR/2.5BA; 3140 sq ft
on 1 Acre; 1881 County
Rd 243D; 2mi from
175/turnpike $239,900
(352) 748-9185




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists









E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* A i-I j
* V: I 1' .. .ll. .j 1. ll .i I'

SV. Ii ..p.: ]h.:. .I,. .: _" .la.n il,. h.:..

Ml = -;X: QI7 $375,000
Jeanne Pickiel 2123410
I'I'i:'. CillusCountj'Sold. comn


I, ,, ", 'a ,i,, ,,
HELLO SNOWBIRDS



Ti.: I ll I i 11. III.: I l. l l.i l: .:i_.:ll:. : I. I:.il I .1 1.i

l.: .,.. ", ii $74,900
Ruth Fiedeick I 352 5636866


V.mlll O= I n la Dn IIu I r.1L
COUNTRY CHARMER!
. l** 1 ,1 1 J :,l l .I.i11 *..: l. i I v... I: i.. 1 1.
I..n A f Ml. j pf...:l lh

PRICED TO SELL ,- $269,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


LOTS OF VALUE HERE

Im p ll ... ]'.l I.....I l . I, t, .: : UI'I
hl i I;. ;i W ...I- ..I, l.I .l.] EV II, I ..'
.Ih UI0 II..fi I ,... IIh..:. l..: h,,il, Ii
MI = :.I:II:IC ASKING $228,000
Pal Davis 352212 7280
View sting at. c21paldavis. corn
I I


UUUBLkWIUk Ib IN rPHp1FI UUNUIIIUN
h i l l . i i. llllall]' h ii I ij'
.I- l. lii I I

h i l h 11 I h I 'm ,
$79.000 FOR FAST SALE!!!
C11 DJr 3 Al~ 'n I, ipp 352 422 4627


REDUCED!
_" _" mu.11. ,i I...1 :1 3 1|1 .|I.i ..l .l ].ii,.1.]



ONLY $84,900
Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


THREE BEDROOM, TWO BATH
IN CITRUS SPRINGS
I Mlll l hn l wl..I.. I. .: : y 'i liII
Ml = '^'.: _
SHORT SALE $109,900
Call Isaac Baylon 352 697 2494


WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER
PROPERTY

I 166 11, 1 ,i:l ,: I I. i lllh ll I P....I Alill IIll

Call Maitha Snydei 352 4768727
to pieviewv ask lot hle =357103.


hll ilhl 1 IIIII I H h IIInaIIIIII I11 IIahln III hlllllllllI

11 ..II 1 ..- I 1 I I II1 11 I h ll I.

Ml.- = :.,i.4 $119.900
PalDavis 3522112.7280
VIiew lhstmng rrziviv c2/paldaris com









INVERNESS. COMMERCIAL
WATERFRONT BUILDING

h I 'd I.- .. I I II

1 1 i I ii. ll ..... h .. I . ,6 h I.
I i i i ill i 1 l i .. d h 1"1 r

I. lhrl~.. nl 'l.l h I .1 l 1.. 1 '1' I II I l. h I I I I I
ri: = I.- $189.000
DO~l. hAwr Cell 9~43S3 SS96 01I 3b2 ;26 666S


HERNANDO

1 1 1.II H .i...L I l \|. ,:, :.l l. ,:, . = l, l


1,Ll =I :. 1,. $34,500
Call Nilda 13521 2700202


PRISTINE RANCH
..II .' 11 .. 111,.. .. -... I,- 1 11'. 'd hfl -...
II. II 1 1 11 1 I 111111.
h I l l I l I-I III l l- I II l ll- 1 I 1 1 l

I 1 1 l II I l I I 11111 1 1
Mli.-. =:.i.l $375,000
Call Jim Mo ton at 4222/73
to see this cattleman s dieam


COZY. CUTE AND CONVENIENT

l l h h.:.ll I. l l: l h:l.i .l ll.:l l l hI.: I..1 .. III


M l = 'I : E.
NEWLY PRICED AT $44,900
Manlyn Booth 637 4904


OH, WHAT A VIEW!

i ll 'i.-. I. 111 . I.jl. I:
* A l, 1 .l I. ,.iII.':i .jil I: Iini 1.. I, I. l .1.1. I:
SMII1 H MIIIl H Ill-H"ii
Ml = I~ Il-..:. $475,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


* I:, II.I ,I I.: I .l. :.: I 6 ., II ,

* .I .ll:l ......l l I... I I i, dll iil .l .ll H
* llll : .l' .'1. I ,l'l' : .:.. lj. llI)P .ill
Mli = ',:'i $179,500
Jeanne ot Wdlaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'i'I'. ciltuscounti'sold. com










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j







2Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


I Do you have a
Munroe story to tell?
Go to facebookcom/MunroeRegional
to share your Munroe experience.


Marie Buchman loves to cook. But when Marie fell down her back steps, she suffered a severe compound fracture of her left
arm. The ambulance rushed her to Munroe Regional, but still, Marie was afraid that her injury would mean that her cooking days
might be over. But before long, she was home and back to making the Biscotti that everyone loves so much.

Marie tells the story best: "You know, when you have an accident like I did, you want to go where you know you're going to get the
best care. I had two operations on my arm, and each time, I had the best of care. If I ever have to go in the hospital again, I'll be right
back there with the doctors I trust. And the hospital that I trust. Munroe Regional is my hospital."
Marie's story is just one more reason why there is a real difference in the quality of care at Munroe Regional. But it's no surprise.
After all, as the only community owned hospital in Marion County, we believe that every one of our patients, every citizen of
Marion County-anyone who entrusts their care, their family, their children and their life to Munroe Regional-deserves the best.
We believe that you deserve a hospital this good.

To watch Marie's entire story, visit MunroeRegional.com/myhospital.


Munroe
Regional
Medical Center


13 You I www.MunroeRegional.com


000CK9K






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 3


You love the adventure.


We love to get you them!
Cross-town or cross-country, off-road or on, we've got the vehicle to make your adventures last a lifetime!


f JiSK PU OIMA "? t=I_
'07"80-7 1. WOA *SmauI 0 U 2 U W P a U! M W W N A t+osb


Servicing All Makes & Models Visit Our Motorsports Accessory Store!


2209 Highway 44 West
Inverness
on Highway 44 West
in Inverness
352.341.0018
www lovechevysales.com


2021 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
on Highway 19 between
Homosassa & Crystal River
352.621.3678
www.lovemotorsportsfl.com


2219 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
on Highway 19 between
Homosassa & Crystal River
352.628.4600
www.lovehonda.com


000CK8W




4Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


D


214 US Hwy. 41 S., Inverness, Fl 34450 Phone 726-1021


,VOME OF Tj
881
Breakfast
tHE RESTAURANT
-and-
EleugiZ CatZerWn
Cef Stephen Digiovanni
PHARMACY & DURABLE
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
C,1 'io 'ulit 1 Iht, J i. 0ti 'i,, Pain -V'linigt ni w/, i Jti ,i t/ Equipment,
Diabetes Care & Foot Wear
DIABETES SHOPPE
I-t di, al Supplies & Equipment, /ti/ :t, i of D ,,ug i ,' next to the Plhia, ni '
FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE! "Mnsuce Accept
SERVING CITRUS COU[Y
SINCE 1930


SOME OF Tbg
88o
Breakfast
NHE RESTAURANT
Pharmacy Hours:
9:00am-6:00pm Mon.-Fri.
9:00am-1 pm Sat.


J UNITED STATES
POSTAL SERVICES
Post Office Hours:
7am-4pm Mon.-Fri. 7am-1 2pm Sat.
Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 6:30am-8:00pm
Saturday 6:30am-6pm
Sunday 6:30am-4:00pm


UGS
* Fax 726-0164
\. __ =Los


2011 ./ I/mh .A .'./9//
<.... tWfn lW,
t inr 'U


P


B&Y


*/xal




Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 5


It's all about chiice.


-an equal oppoi


Scollege-


i--2,
COLEG o


Apply now, www.


Hi
.a.jl
Sii~n


plcringfL ean. I
application &eadftne'1 r. 10.


r1 MW


Visit tf


f1it


.earnir


and Conference Center.


I


mS


Event and meeting
facilities rental available.
Call 352-249-1210.


a m ;-;;; ;2::.."".... -..
m F-nd us oam- 'YJi teda with our
face;b9ook. aceboolka,


)0 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
352-746-6721


.a~l


Ir -


* Associate Degrees
* Bachelor Degrees
* Certificate Programs


&Ip~






6 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


I CITRUS

CARDIOLOGY
Consultants, P.A.
www.citruscardiology.org

fWelcoinwmya t/Ae nlewest mnen6mw
0C, / C W q & O~c W &tec


a0'4


, CANL CAN

Nuclear Cardiology Nuclear Medicin
Accredited Comprehensive
Nuclear Medicine Laboratory


Kenneth L. Savage, MD Dennis J. Walker, MD


Hari Kannam, MD


SWe are proud to be an
Accredited Nuclear
e Cardiology Laboratory







Gisela Trigo, MD, FACC Louis Delfin, MD, FACC


Nishant Nerella, MD


We Are There For You
When You Need Us


We Are A Full Service Practice Serving JavierM. Gonzalez, MD, FACC Stephen H. Stark, MD, FACC SrinivasAttanti, MD, FACC SumanPasupuleti, MD
Citrus County Five Days A Week


Same Day Appointments Available
In Most Cases


Citrus Cardiology offers a comprehensive set of
diagnostic and monitoring testing to met all our cardiac
needs. The practice also offers numerous in-office
services for patients to enjoy a seamless continuum of
care under one roof.


At the core of Citrus Cardiology's Hospital Service is a
laser-like focus on the heart of each patient. Every patient
expects and receives exceptional medical treatment
delivered with the personal attention of a compassionate
team of doctors and technicians all concentrating on
healing the heart of a very special person: You or
someone you love.


b6vvce1efelc6T iawaxcw bawe.
When a heart problem arises, we understand the concerns,
questions and fears that you face. We provide each patient with
clear information and honest compassion along with the best
cardiac care possible.


fcysfwt 760 S.E. 5th Terrace
i? e/, Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-4165


308 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(352) 726-8353 Vnwetwes*







Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 7


or decades Discover, Citrus County's premier
lifestyle magazine, has served to help
residents, natives, snowbirds and newco' i I
find the uniqueness of the area.
Whether it's an art exhibit, the glimpse
of an eagle or manatee, a concert in the
park, the fireworks that celebrate
Independence Day kids playing in a park or
those special Florida sunsets, most readers
realize that Citrus County is the special
place reflected in these pages.
This year, we've included lots more photos
than normal.
The response to our annual Discover -
photo contest was terrific, with readers
sending over 200 photos. And we've included
as many as possible in the publication. --.
Thanks go out to all who participated by --
sharing some of their favorite photos so
others can see Citrus County through their
eyes and lenses.
So once again, let this magazine be your -
guide, for that is its purpose to discover and -
rediscover the charm and captivation of Citrus t.o. -
County
It is a new experience that never gets old. -
Whether you are a first time visitor, a .
descendant of a iii i. *i h iil\ orsomeone ,,, :
who just wants to relax -welcome to Discover.




ABOUT THE COVER: This year's
Discover cover photograph was
submitted by June Hunte as part of the
Discover photo contest where winners had
their photos published in the magazine. .

a kayak at Three Sisters Springs.



Citrus Publishing

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Gerry Mulligan .................................... ............. Publisher

Crystal River, FL 34429 Ken Melton .......................................Community Affairs Editor

352 63 6 3 63 Cindy Connolly ....................Community Affairs Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling ............................................Community Editor


www.chronicleonline.com


Trista Stokes..................................Advertising Sales Manager






8 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


Luis R. Annoni, MD Darshan V. Patel, MD
Medical Director


Huang-Ta Lin, MD


Raul Jimenez, MD


Rajiva Goyal, MD


Kenneth H. Yamamura, MD


727-869-5565 toll-free 855-534-4325
14000 Fivay Road, Hudson, FL 34667 YourHeartBeat.com
flM Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point
Medical Center of Trinity
S Oak Hill Hospital
TOGETHER PROVIDING CARDIOVASCULAR SERVICES AT A HIGHER STANDARD*


SArrhythmia.
V CENTER OF FLORIDA
Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 9


DS-t' C


Communities ......................... .Pages 12-26
Floral City ........................................ Pages 12-13
Lecanto .............................. ........................ P age 14
C central R idge ................................................ age 16
Hernando ....................................................Page 18
Inverness ............................ ..................... Page 19
Crystal River .................................................Page 22
Hom osassa ................................... ............Page 23
O zello .......................................................... Page 24
Chassahowitzka............................................Page 25



Parks ............................................Pages 32-42
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park .............................Pages 32-33
Beverly Hills Parks .................................Page 34
Citrus Springs Parks ...............................Page 34
Crystal River Parks......................................Pages 34-36
Dunnellon Parks ................................. ....Page 36
Floral City Parks ................................. ....Page 38
Hernando Parks ............................................Page 38
Homosassa Parks ...................................Page 38
Inglis/Yankeetown Parks..........................Page 40
Inverness Parks ..................................ages 40-42
Lecanto Parks ..................................................Page 42
State Parks .................................................. Page 42


Places of Interest/
Things to Do ....................................Pages 48-58
Old Historic Courthouse ......................Pages 48-49
Art Center of Citrus County .....................Page 50
Citrus County Fair ...................................... Page 50
Citrus County Speedway ............................Page 50
Coastal Heritage Museum..........................Page 52
Fallen Heroes Memorial ..............................Page 52
Ferris Groves .............................................. Page 53
Floral City Heritage Museum
and Country Store ......................................Page 54
Floral City Labyrinth .................................Page 54
Florida Artists Gallery ...............................Page 56
Full Moon Drum Circle ................................Page 56
Heritage Village .......................................... Page 56
Homosassa Butterfly..................................Page 56
Monkey Island ............................................ Page 58
Olde Mill Gallery and Printing Museum......Page 58



Festivals and Events ............Pages 64-87
Manatee Festival............................... ages 64-65
Monthly Events .......................................... Page 66
November 2012 Events ...................Pages 67-71
December 2012 Events ...................Pages 72-76
January 2013 Events ............................Pages 77-78
February 2013 Events .....................Pages 78-79
March 2013 Events .............................Pages 79-82
April 2013 Events ................................Pages 82-84
May 2013 Events ........................................ Page 84
June 2013 Events ...................................... Page 85
July 2013 Events ........................................ Page 85
August 2013 Events ..................................Page 86
September 2013 Events ..............................Page 86
October 2013 Events ..........................Pages 86-87


photo by Judy Wanamaker


) n






10 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


SW.cw


On Stage ................................... Pages 90-96
Art Center of Citrus County ................ages 90-91
CF Perform ing Arts .................................... Page 92
Citrus Community Concert Choir ..............Page 92
Citrus County Jazz Society ...................Page 92
Curtis Peterson Auditorium ...................Page 92
Jazz at the Museum....................................Page 93
Music in the Park....................................... Page 93
Nature Coast Community Band ................Page 93
Nature Coast Friends of Blues ................Page 95
The Nutcracker ............................................Page 95
Second Sunday Sunset Drum Circle ........Page 96
Sugarm ill Chorale ...................................... Page 96
Suncoast Harmony Chapter of
Sweet Adelines .......................................... Page 96
Woodview Coffee House..............................Page 96



The Great Outdoors/
W ild life ........................................... Pa ges 98-111
Withlacoochee State Forest .....................Page 98
Birding Trails .............................................. Page 99
Hiking and Biking Trails....................Pages 100-102
Cam ping .................................................... Page 103
Equestrian Trails ...................................... Page 106
Whooping Cranes.........................Pages 107-108
Swimming with the Manatees....................Page 109
Eagle Snag ..................... ...... .............. Page 111



Water ...................................... Pages 116-125
Scallop Season ..............................Pages 116-117
Boating ...................................................... Page 118
Chassahowitzka National
W wildlife Refuge.......................................... Page 118
Cooter Pond .............................................. Page 119


Crystal River National
Wildlife Preserve ...................................Page 119
Diving/Snorkeling .................................Page 120
Dragon Boat Racing .............................Page 120
Fishing ...................................................... Page 120
Fort Island Gulf Beach .............................Page 121
Kayaking/Canoeing/Boating .................Page 121
Marine Science Station ..............................Page 121
Playful porpoises.......................................Page 121
Puddle in the Pines ....................................Page 121
Swimming with the Manatees....................Page 122
Tarpon ............................... ...................... Page 122
Tsala Apopka Chain of Lakes .................Page 123
Boat Ramps.....................................Pages 124-125



History ................... ...................Pages 128-132
County celebrates 125 years ....................Page 128
Mannfield Facts ............................... ....... Page 129
Coastal Heritage Museum..........................Page 130
Crystal River State
Archeological Site .................................... Page 130
Crystal River Raid .................................... Page 130
Fallen Heroes War Memorial......................Page 131
Ferris G roves ............................................Page 131
Floral City Heritage Days ..........................Page 131
Floral City Heritage Museum
& Country Store..........................................Page 131
Fort Cooper Days ................................Page 131
Historic Homosassa -
Home of David Yulee..................................Page 132
Homosassa Heritage Day ..........................Page 132
Light Shine ................................... ..........Page 132
Old Courthouse Heritage Museum ..........Page 132
Olde Mill Gallery and Printing Museum....Page 132
Southern Heritage Festival
and Cattle Drive ..........................................Page 132
Yulee Sugar Mill .............................. ....... Page 132




Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 11


IllI


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12 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Steve Stackhouse


photo by Steve Stackhouse


photo by Judy Lane


J)


Ji


Organizations are

making the community

a hot destination


City" have come together to get
things rolling in Floral City a com-
munity named for the wild flowers that
grew -and still grow -all over the area.
It's also a community known for the
natural beauty of its lakes and the Avenue
of the Oaks -Orange Avenue or County
Road 48. That canopy of moss-draped oak
trees attracts folks from all over who
come to photograph that scenic stretch of
highway
And while there's no doubt that the
scenery is a big part of Floral City's charm,


an active heritage council, an ambitious
merchants association and a bustling art
gallery all add more reasons to visit.
Throw in the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce Strawberry Festival and the
annual plant sale and yearly garden tour
by the Floral City Garden Club and it's easy
to see why the
town is busier
than ever.
The Floral Flor
City Heritage
Council
operates the
Heritage Hall Museum and Country
Store and has created self guided tours
of the historic district, listed on the
National Register of Historic Places.
A brochure is available at the museum,
8394 E. Orange Ave.
The council sponsors the Floral City Her
itage Days in early December and provides
Snippets of History at its quarterly meet


ing, where speakers provide information
on the areas rich history.
The Floral City Merchants Association
puts on Bikes & BBQ each year and the
Florida Artists Gallery offers continuous
classes and other education programs.
And those organizations complement
each other to
make events
1 even more ap-
St Y pealing. At the
recent
merchants'
Bikes & BBQ,
the heritage council opened the museum
and store free of charge and had ribs and
brisket, music and children's events, while
the art gallery was the location for a
custom and classic motorcycle show.
With gorgeous scenery, interesting
history and more fun events, it's easy to
see why the town is becoming
increasingly popular as a destination.


rJ


photo by Judy Lane


photo by Judy Lane


~(;1


I








Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 13


Photos from

"Images of America Floral City"




Miss Mattie, as she .
was called by .
everyone in Floral i
City, was town
postmaster for
nearly 40 years.
She was often seen -
wheeling the day's i,-
mail into the post
office for sorting.
Local kids often
helped her wheel
the cart from the o, ,
train station to the
post office, where
she would reward
them with a piece
of candy.


A valuable phos-
phate deposit was
found near Floral
City a few years
before the big -
freeze of 1894-95
devastated the
citrus-dependent '
economy. It did not
take long for the -
local economy to
shift from citrus to
mining and export
of phosphate.



Siblings Lillian,
Pamela, Faye and 4
Joe Ann Black play
on the banks of
Lake Tsala Apopka
with a patient pony
in the 1950s. The
water level was ex-
traordinarily low at
this time, producing
extensive beaches
that were popular
with the locals.


See the above photos
and many images never
published before in
"Images of America Flo-
ral City," which is avail-
able for sale at the Floral
S" City Heritage Museum
Store, 8394 E. Orange
Ave., Floral City, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fridays
and Saturdays. The cost
of the book is $21.99.


Chronicle
file photos







14 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Cindy Connolly


photo by Caylin Lopes


Uuunt' U CI itiil

-I
1J \ I tv\ \ \ fI f \ '


Chronicle file photo


Education and

government centers

have the area thriving

D on't let the rural nature of Lecanto
fool you, because the area is home
to educational complexes, a govern
ment center and medical facilities.
Houses are scattered between pastures
kept short by grazing cattle.


However, looks are dece
has come a long way from
dleground" it was in the la
original name reflected it;
nings as the halfway
point between the
Withlacoochee River
and the old stage
stand, where fresh
horses replaced weary
ones.
Now straddling the corr
Lecanto Highwayis a com


giving. And Lecanto eludes a thriving community college and ex-
the isolated "mid pansive government center, the county's cen
te 1880s when its tral health department, and an educational
s humble begin complex with four schools that includes the
Curtis Peterson Audito
rium a popular enter
*Lemnto 1tainment venue.
And also calling
Lecanto home is the
sprawling Withla
coochee State Forest that offers hiking,
idor of the horse trails, camping areas, picnic shelters
munity that in and fishing.


photo byAnna Mosley
photo by Anna Mosley


photo by Phyllis Savage





Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 15


Cataract & Implant Specialists
Glaucoma Treatment Dry Eyes
SEyelid Surgery* Diabetic Eye Problems
Macular Degeneration
d, LENS It When

Centr Experience
Sunco3stE Center CountS
Eye Surgery Instte Most ..
Toll Free
SEVERY 800-282-6341
Established 1982
www.suncoasteyecenter.com
Eye Care for You


LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D.
Board Certified
Ophthalmologist


221 N.E. Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL
352-795-2526



ALAN M. FREEDMAN M.D.
Board Certified
Ophthalmologist


14003 Lakeshore Blvd.
Hudson, FL
727-868-9442


47
A^


-.~" L *u* "*';''*


SI11


rMs







16 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Claire Phillips Laxton


Chronicle file photo


photo by Kaycee Hutchins


Beverly Hills, Citrus

Springs and Pine

Ridge are the trio

Nestled in the rolling hills between
County Road 491 and County
Road 486 is Beverly Hills.
Sam Kellner developed the
community over 1I \ .. ago as a com-
munity for northerners looking to spend
their retirement years in weather that
was warm in the winter.
Beverly Hills is now attracting first
time homebuyers who are making the
community more diverse with young
families now in the mix of retirees who
live in the neighborhoods.
It boasts a skateboard park, shopping
centers, medical offices, restaurants,
parks, golf courses and the county's


J


largest library, which hosts the county
11'i.1ii \ \ ,i r -, ~ administrative offices.
Located in northern Citrus County,
Citrus Springs began in January1970 a
dream of the Mackle brothers and their
development company, the Deltona
Corporation.
The brothers wanted a community for
people of modest retirement income to
come and enjoy a Florida lifestyle.
The once retirement haven is now a
community with a lively mix of retirees
and young families, all living in the scenic
rolling hills, known for its tall pines.
Pine Ridge has the distinction (, I,, In *l
the largest equestrian center in Citrus
County.
It is a deed-restricted community of
more than 10,000 acres with almost 5,000
lots ranging in size from one to five and a
half acres. The landscape is dotted with
rolling hills, wooded areas, natural vegeta
tion, and its namesake pine trees.
It is a perfect place for equestrians to


live. From the picturesque pastures to the
stables and riding trails, it is a horse
lover's delight. A large number of lots in
Pine Ridge Estates are certified for the
stabling of horses, and there is approxi
mately 30 miles of horse trails for the 100
plus horses
stabled on
various lots C e
throughout
the cornm- Central
munity
Nestled
within the
94 acre
Commu-
nity Center
Complex
are four tennis courts, shuffleboard
courts, a state-of the-art covered chil
dren's playground, gazebo, multiple eques
trian arenas and the active community
center with its game room and full
kitchen.


KBB


Chronicle file photo


photo by Claire Phillips Laxton


_i ___





Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 17


...C.If? Your Hometown
DIS O Furniture & Mattress Store


FURNITURE








HUGE SELECTION OF
MATTRESSES
.Laytex,
Memory Foam,
Chiropractic

i3.Symbol.
p 1Mattress
& Sterling Thomas
3106 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
tHwY. 411 Nort of Fairgrounds
726-2999
www.AshleyFurniture.com
Mon., Fri. & Sat. 9am-5pm Sun. 11am-5pm
OPEN UNTIL 8PM
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
V/SAJ DISCOVER






18 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


Chronicle file photo


photo by Cindy Connolly


I

F-


IJ


Community continues to shine
through changing times
T o some, it may only seem like a quiet community that
requires motorists to slow down as they drive through
on their way to someplace else.
However, slowing down is part of Hernando's charm.
A glimpse of the Hernando pool of Lake TsalaApopka is a
reflection of a pleasant, laid-back lifestyle that can be found in
the small community.
On and near the lake, old cracker-style homes, mobile home
communities with character and newer, upscale homes
combine to form a comfortable mix of diversity.


'p ~


photo by Robert Lisotta


Jr


A haven to boaters and anglers, its quiet allure keeps anglers
coming back to try their luck.
Retirees, working folks and families come together to enjoy
sunset at the beach, a walk along the Withlacoochee State Trail
that cuts through
the community
or to look for a
treasure in some Hrd
of its shops.
The Villages of
Citrus Hills has
expanded among the
woodlands, rolling hills and meticulously groomed golf courses,
turning that area into prestigious neighborhoods.


photo by Philip Sapp


photo by Judith Peterson


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Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 19


photo by Cheryl Charles


photo by Chuck Charles


photo by Judith Peterson


J i uf J J U^ f J
gjr g pli J i c






With a thriving collection of restaurants,
Town takes its role as businesses and boutiques, the city serves as a
t h s io destination for those looking for an enjoyable
Vent host se sly getaway where a friendly, simpler and safe
lifestyle can be discovered.
his award-winning city with the The fact that the Withlacoochee State Trail
historic Citrus County Courthouse is only a short distance from downtown
serving as the i. mi .11.1il.. means the city has become a bicyclers' para
serves as the hub for a variety of spe dise with bike lanes on the ii \', ii.i. ,
cial events all year routes permitting
From parades those wishing to
and festivals to leave the trail easy
concerts and access to
culture, residents downtown.
and visitors are This is a commu
drawn to Inverness nity with a deep
for its authenic small-town lifestyle respect for its past
enhanced by its lakefront location that is and environment i 1 il, ,. ,,\ II ig its role as
showcased by gorgeous city parks. the vibrant "heart" of Citrus County


photo by Sherri Vince


photo by Judith Peterson


photo by Robe Lisotta
photo by Robert Lisotta








20 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Kaycee Hutchins


photo by Gordon Whitehead


photo by Judy Lapuma


photo by Linda Geno


photo by Cindy Connolly


RI 8 FA~tE
^^smss






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 21


S f
I


FIrll
li 71 Ti L


I1


WE ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE

THE UPCOMING OPENING

OF OUR NEW MEDICAL FACILITY

IN DECEMBER OF 2012.
The 20,000 sq. ft. building will contain:
* A complete radiology department with
CAT Scan, X-Ray, MRI and
Ultrasound capabilities
* An urgent care center
* Physical Therapy Department
* A complete pharmacy
We are excited to provide this wonderful,
complete medicalfacility to the community and
look forward to a healthy relationship with you.


Ii n11 H-


GET YOUR CURVES BACK
Our medical weight loss physicians will custom
tailor a plan for you that will help you lose weight
quickly and safely and keep the weight off long term
/ Lose 15 to 25 pounds your first month
/ Lower your risk of heart disease, diabetes,
high blood pressure and more
/ A proven combination of diet, exercise and
medication
/ Receive a 1 month supply and a welcome kit
when you sign up
/ Plans for Men and Women of all ages
Eihab H. Tawfik, MD
Board Certified in Internal Medicine
Weight Loss Expert
Anita Grabowski,ARNP
352-564-0444
www.citrusdiabetestreatment.cor
7394 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River 10089-91 Cortez Blvd.,Brooksville


Diabetes Care rTnel&Trenll
Eihab H. Tawfik, MD
Board Certified in Internal Medicine
Diabetes Expert
Anita Grabowski, ARNP
352-564-0444
wwwxitrusdiabetestreatment om
J Insulin Pump Initiation
& Management
/ Excellent Medical Weight
Loss Program
/ Hypertension &
Cholesterol Treatment
/ Treatment & Screening
of Diabetes Vascular
Complications & Nerve
Damage
/ Wound Care and
Much More...
ACCEPTING
NEW PATIENTS





22 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


Photo by Virginia Bennett


fI
r
^J^

I J
SCl~


City is home to history and the
West Indian Manatee
Long known as the "Gem of the Nature Coast, Crystal
River is a destination that provides most everything
that visitors to Citrus County expect and love.
Crystal River blends small-town charm, an interest
ing history and a wealth of ecological attractions, delighting
visitors year-round with its unique collection of things to see
and experience.
The historic downtown features a collection of shops and
restaurants at Heritage Village and the Coast Heritage Mu
seum in the historic WPA 1 it ldii ig constructed in 1939.
And then there's the almost infinite I' ...ilil \ I, i ii,.,\ I. ,


I r

(e-


photo by Holly Richards


the outdoors.
Whether you stay on land or take to the water, the Crystal
River area treats visitors and
residents to nature at its best.
Bird watching, hiking, biking,
boating, canoeing, kayaking,y s t
diving, swimming, fishing,
scalloping and more are found in
abundance.
And then there the star R i
attraction of Crystal River the
manatee.
It's one of the few places where
folks can get up close and swim with the gentle sea cows. And
that lures visitors from all over the world to come for an awe
inspiring experience.


photo by Mike Ramsell


I \






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 23


photo by Phyllis Savage


photo by Stan Pasek


l r


C


Springs and river serve as

attraction for community

The Homosassa Spring produces about 100
cubic feet of water every second of every day.
All that water becomes the Homosassa
River, which flows nine miles to the Gulf of
Mexico and forms the hub of the community.
Residents and tourists il il. -.1 i i.v the relaxed envi-
ronment, whether it is watching the wildlife that flour
ishes in the forests and hammocks or wetting a
fishing line.
The picturesque beauty of narrow tree-lined streets
curving around Old Homosassa with its art galleries,
boutiques, waterfront restaurants, motels and mari


nas make it a boaters' paradise.
There's also a good supply of history going back to
the time when Native Americans called the area "place
where peppers grow" when it served as a seasonal
gathering place for ancient nomadic tribes.
The David Yulee
Plantation was
formed in 1846, and
was destroyed Homo sassa
during the Civil
War. The ruins of
the plantations
mill are a state park that
reminds visitors of the areas fascinating past.
Bringing the town's history even closer is a group -
the historic committee of the Homosassa Civic
Club -that has placed historic markers at
important locations.


F


photo by Diana Pyle


photo by DeeDee Wilcox






24 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Courtney McLaughlin Stafford


LJfilrIr


I I


Life on the water is key
for these residents

ife in Ozello a low lying coastal community-
L is centered around the water, the core of the
residents'lifestyle.
Tucked between Crystal River and Ho
mosassa, Ozello area is a collection of islands, inlets
and peninsulas hugging Citrus County's Gulf coast.
The area is scenic, unspoiled, teeming with wildlife
and home to some of the most spectacular sunsets in
the state.
This unincorporated
c community is perhaps
Best known for the
Ozello y is perhaps
Ozello Trail, a 9 mile nar
row road that curves
and zigzags until it ends
at the Gulf of Mexico.
Kayaking and fishing are also popular activities
here among the lush oak hammocks, salt marshes
and jumping mullet.


photo by Jane Vandenbergh


photo by Jeanne Obedzinski


photo by John Touchberry


Citrus County Solid Waste Management
2012 Recycling Up-Date
It's been almost eleven months since the NEW Single Stream
Recycling Program was implemented. The switch to single
stream has increased citizen participation by nearly
150o and increased the volume of recyclables
collected to over 3000 tons, which is a great
start. Not only has the new Single Stream
Recycling program been an environmental
success it has also reduced program cost by
$300,000 dollars from the previous dual
stream collection method.
The Board of County Commissioners would like
to take this opportunity to thank the citizens of the County for
supporting Single Stream Recycling through your increased
recycling participation. Your continued support will help the
county reach the State of Florida's new recycling goals.
To further these recycling efforts the Board of County
Commissioners is rolling out another new recycling program
for 2013 that will enhance our recycling goals. The
Landfill will now be accepting concrete waste
free of any other debris, at no charge, from
Businesses and residents. The concrete
collected through-out the year will be
processed into a useful recycled concrete
aggregate product that will be utilized on
Other County projects further reducing cost.
For more information please contact Solid
Waste Management.
Come visit the Eagle Snag Trail located at the
Central Landfill in Lecanto to see our
Bald Eagles, Hawks and other
species of birdlife. Call for more
information regarding days and times
for access to the Eagle Snag Trail.
Solid Waste Management (352) 527-7670
landfillinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us
WHY TRASH IT WHEN YOU CAN RECYCLE IT


ily






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 25


bIJrd


photo by June Hunte


photo by Steve Stackhouse


ru


fI U


River connects this
coastal community


With over 31,000 acres of
saltwater bays, estuaries and
brackish marshes at the
mouth of the Chassahowitzka
River, the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife
Refuge dominates the area and makes it an
unspoiled natural paradise.


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Meridien
Research
C, SE 1 s aI


Mildred V. Farmer, MD
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
St. Petersburg Tampa *
Brooksville Bradenton


352-597-8839
16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601
www.newstudyinfo.com


Chassahowitzka


The river is the lifeblood of the area. ing, hikii g hu iti ig and birding.
The river's sole public ramp can be found The wildlife refuge, established in 1941, is
at Chassahowitzka River Campground, the home to over 250 species of birds,
place to begin for exploring the river and over 50 species of reptiles and amphibians,
it's surrounding marshes. and at least 25 different species of mam-
A variety of outdoor activities can be en- mals, including the endangered West
joyed, including boating, kayaking, canoe Indian Manatee.



r Ltoure CoastMglt1
.En g e c M...... .......... ...... N


mergecy Medical Services
"Serving with Excelence and Compassion"
CPR & First Aid Classes 0 Paramedic & EMT School
S^ Nature Coast EMS Explorers Post
Nature Coast EMS Citizen's Academy fe
'i l Nature Coast EMS Email Newsletter ^AaW-anl
Professional Emergency First Aid Kits
Continuing Education Classes for Medical Professionals


COMING SOON!
* Nature Coast EMS On-Call
Medical Alert System
* Electronic Medicine Dispenser

(352) 249-4700


3876 W. Country
Lecanto, FL 34461
i i i


Hill Dr.


00CHVI


www.naturecoastems.org
nmmmmmmmmmm


111111111100-00


1
y,,
4e






26 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Anna Strait


photo by Jill Lyles


photo by Diana Pyle photo by Caylin Lopes


Take me fishing.
So I'll always remember you.


f OR S S 11 I N ;, f l A C-1 I ;,N A N
T I : LI. l\ V I R .t ENT


BENNINGTON
Quiet, clean-burning, fuel-efficient. That's the kind of portable
power you're looking for. And that's why you should drop by and pick
up one of our lightweight, compact Yamaha Four Strokes. From 25hp
to our 2.5hp dynamo, they're made to order for small fishing boats,
/ sailboats, canoes and tenders and for making memories.




SYAMAHA


* Center Console Boats* Bowriders* Jon Boats Pontoon Boats Trailers* Parts & Accessories* Service
APOPJA. AAAME.


3260 East Gulf to Lake Highway Inverness, FL 34453
just east of Walmart on Hwy. 44


352-726-7773


www. apopkamarine .co m


pnoto ny rnyms savage


photo by Caylin Lopes


(ffo


0001& 0W-S&,q





Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 27


CENTRALLY LOCATED, SERVING CITRUS COUNTY & SURROUNDING AREAS FOR OVER 25 YEARS.
HUNDREDS OF VEHICLES ALL MAKES & MODELS


EXPERIENCE THE EAGLE ADVANTAGE:
Free full tank of gas at initial delivery Free first year maintenance Free local shuttle service
Free lifetime inspection while you own the vehicle Free safety check during service hours
SALES HOURS: Mon. Fri: 8:00 8:00 Sat. 8:30 6:00 Sunday: 11:00 3:00 SERVICE HOURS: Mon. Fri: 7:30 5:30 Saturday 8:00 4:00 Closed Sunday






28 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


js dasfrom $j99 r~~amara S. Young EA
.;~, ,.Tax & Accounting Service, LLC

i .. 0J I *Tax Preparation Personal and Business
"_ Financial Statements for Small Business
Inc. Notory Public Service Pick Up & Drop Off Available
5 4 t r-Ntammyyoungtax.net
.\ sw i q,,3-5944. 10321 N. Dauphine Terrace. Dunnellon. FL 34433
7 6-277.8 .-795-2496 Fax 352-795-874' '...: ) -,4,- :"

Over 20,000 titles in pre-owned
books available WAY BELOW
original purchase price.
9 0 lCrystal
Rivers DIRK :
Largest AUTO CLINIC an
Book 1o_ ,-.= E TE -,. F: ,-,,-
Store CALL TODAY (3521795-3681
I 13 Biocks East Of Hwy. 19) 823 E. HIGHWAY 44, CRYSTAL RIVER .... ..
kathleen ,poehousebooks.corn 795-3887


Come Visit Us For
* Stains in Carpet Dirty Grout
i Mold and Mildew


Janitor
Juraction... .
FJrmniw S& Ennterllus
5220 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
352-746-4385 Fax 352-746-9543
P Hours: 9am-5pm, Monday-Friday


Commercial Cleaning Products and Supplies
Warranty Shop for Hoover, Eureka and more!
We can repair any vacuum guaranteed!


dJlTil.r ] BTtll W-. SPFL I _ISTS


7765 W. Gulf oi Lake Hw.. Crystal River
i(ext to Manatee Lanes)
->- --- ^ -,*> sJ\/l^


Visit Our New

Showroom

I .aU..aa _* V("


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Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 29


Diva Or Not, We Treat
Them All Like Rock Stars!


atM Bow Wow AZ'
eeat Boutique Ete., Inc. ,
st Where your pet is #1 INail Trim
Mon., Tues. Thus. & Fri. 8 am 5 pm Wed. & Sat. 8 am Noon, reopen 5 pm IReg5 0 cpo n
Sun. & Holidays 8 am- 5 pm (Pick up and drop off only)
5625 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River 352-795-1684


PORTER'S

LOCKSMITHING
Mobile Locksmithing Services:
* Key Duplication a Basic Safe Work
* Locks Serviced, Installed & Repaired
Owner John L. Porter Hours: Bus: 564-0668
Cash or Checks Only M-F, 9-5 Cell: 634-0029


We Have Many Properties To
Furnished or Unfurnished U Short
Waterfront or Non-watel
Check our website often. Our Inventory
www.citruscountyhomerentals
OVER 10S- YER SEVN -
Rental ManACTIO Realty, Inc.
Rental Management Realty, Inc.


Choose From
t or Long Term
front
changes daily.
;.com

417 NE 2nd Street
Crystal River
352-795-RENT
7368


3036H BETTY
FLEAKLEY
I

- OIL CHANGE & FILTER ROTATE & BALANCE TIRES
- COMPUTER DIAGNOSTIC 4 WHEEL ALIGNMENT 'Firestone
MOST TIRES IN STOCK 2nrIl ESTonE
CALL FOR OUR CURRENT SPECIALS
I' US HWy. 19 S. ACROSS FROM AIRPORT PLAZA ON US 9) 795-5118


I


The Plantation Offers:
Dining Golf Spa Diving Water Sport Activities
I Callfor Details!

PLANTATION

9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River, FL
I 352-795-4211 ____i_ _ _
wwwPlantationOnCrystalRiver om


I


Be:,
te







30 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


ED'S TACKLE SHOP

\ We have a Full Line of
Fresh & Salt Water Tackle
S .Also: Rod & Reel Repair, Ice, Snacks, Soda
983 N. Suncoast Blvd. (South U.S. 19)
on Fri m to 5:30 pm Airport Plaza, Crystal River, FL
Saon F5 am to 5:300pm Serving Citrus County for 30 years in the same location!
Sun 5 30 am to 2:00 pm 352-795-4178







I A


* DIAMONDS
* ESTATE JEWELRY
* LARGE BRIDAL SECTION
* GEMSTONES
* 14K, 18K, PLATINUM, SILVER
* SEIKO & PULSAR WATCHES


* APPRAISALS BY
APPOINTMENT
* RESTORATIONS,
REPAIRS, BUYERS
PRECIOUS METALS
& ESTATES


J IIll Exteell J OWOIOT S


\ tears In A


Crystal River Shopping Center
1665 SE Hwy. 19
|7563-063 Next to F.,. ri. Crystal River
Jim Geenleeler
a * *


.. i t or cl for an "- We fill
propane
SERVICES AVAILABLE:
Filler Replacement Tune-Ups Brakes
n Transmission Flush Computer Diagnostics I
Headlight Restoration RainX Treatment
SDifferenlial Service Tie Rotation
Mobil 1 Synthetic Inlerslale Batteries
l CVAxles* Much More
Locally Owned (352) 795-2333 1050 SE Hwy. 19 Crystal River


Locally Owned Service Sales* Rentals* Repairs
Locally Owned
& Operated by ACCEPTING MEDICARE, MEDICAID AND MOST INSURANCES
Wes and Windy Stanton

N O ouVT FoOCKT COSTS
WITH MEDICARE & SUPPLEMENT ON SCOOTERS,
POWER WHEELCHAIRS OR DIABETIC SHOES
S* 'If yvou qualift
SWe Carry All Home Medical Equipment
u a iy n M I I INC. Including Hospital Beds & Wheelchairs
Diabetic Shoes Available and In Stock
609 U.S. Hwy. 19, Crystal River (352) 564-1414 We Buy Used Scooters, Lifts & Wheelchairs


-p89





Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 31


O00CMOP


FOR A

REASON


Come see what sets us apart from other
automotive dealers in Citrus County.


^ A~s-


. VILLAGE TOYOTI
CR M S TA..L R I V ER M


MAKING


A STATEMENT


At Village Toyota you can FEEL the difference, SEE the difference, and best of all DRIVE the difference.
Since 2001, Toyota has won the most Total Quality AwardsTM, has been rated highest in
dependability and has the most fuel-efficient cars, trucks and SUV's among all automakers. Toyota's
longevity speaks for itself with 80 percent of Toyotas sold in the last 20 years being still on the road
today. Toyota's exclusive Star Safety SystemTM comes standard on every Toyota.
As far as innovation and heading into the future, Toyota's innovation has helped Toyota develop
more hybrids that are on the road today than all other automakers combined.
Toyota prides itself on being there for you, day in and day out. It's why more than
22 million people rely on Toyota. Toyota has the perfect combination of craftsmanship, ,.
hard work and forward-thinking. It's called quality, and it's the foundation of every Toyota.

....m..


SToyotaCare


www.vi I ag etoyota com
352-628-5100


Wells Fargo Advisors


Ellen Zane
CFP", ChFC"
Financial Advisor
PIM Portfolio Manager

At 1100 SE Hwy. 19 (2nd Floor), Crystal River, FL 34429
352.601.1002 direct
855 A78 3502 toll free 352564.2011 fax
Email: ellen.zane@wellsfargo.com
2012 Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC. Member FINRA/SIPC.
Investment and Insurance products:
NOT FDIC-lnsured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value
Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC, is a registered broker-dealer and a separate non-bank affiliate
ooCU of Wells Fargo & Company.






32 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Brian Imparato


photo by DeeDee Wilcox


Anew(



Improvements at park
include shore bird aviary
and the river walk and
manatee viewing
The completion of two projects a
river walk and manatee interpret
station area and a new shore bird
aviary brought substantial
changes to the Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park to benefit
park visitors while helping to preserve
the spring environment.
The shore bird aviary -a photogra
pher's dream is four to five times larger


photo by Joe Lube





at the park


than the original shore bird exhibit. It is a
75- by 75-foot cylindrical structure that in-
cludes a waterway and pond with plenty
of native plant landscaping.
The structure -encompassing 1,125
square feet allows visitors to enter the
aviary for close-up views
of the birds, which pro
vides great opportunities
for nature photography.
The project was funded by P a
a $100,000 donation from
the Felburn Foundation.
Visitors to the aviary
will discover a wide variety of Florida
shore birds including ospreys, black
crowned and yellow crowned night
herons, little blue herons, green herons,
stilts, terns, ruddy turnstones and more.


I


The second $100,000 project the river
walk and manatee interpretation area -
was funded by the Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park.
It replaces the paved sidewalk and fenc
ing around the spring with an elevated
boardwalk and a 72 by 26
foot observation deck
with bleachers and a
Sk s glass viewing area.
k L The new boardwalk a
total of 3,612 square feet
gives visitors an unob
structed view of the first
magnitude springs and the manatee
program, which are offered three times
each day


photo by Jane Mastrototaro


photo by Judy Wanamaker







Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 33


photo by Joe Dube


photo by John Touchberry


Park is home to

endangered species










Florida
panther











Red
wolf











Key
deer











Whooping
cranes










West
Indian
manatee







34 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Jill Lyles


photo by Anna Mosley


Beverly Hills


Beverly Hills Community Park:
997 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills
Softball, basketball, skate park, walking
trail and picnic tables

Central Ridge District Park:
6905 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills
Three baseball fields
and softball field P c

Eagleton Park:
New York Blvd, Beverly Hills
Park benches

Water Tower Park:
4 Laurenshire St., Beverly Hills
Jogging trail, picnic tables and
playground


Citrus Springs


Citrus Springs Tennis Courts:
9940 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs
Tennis courts

Wesley Jones Park:
2510 W. Castina Dr., Citrus Springs
Basketball court, picnic tables,
playground, softball field and volleyball


Crystal River


Bicentennial Park:
501 N. Baseball Point, Crystal River
Picnic tables, tennis courts, racquetball,
baseball, basketball, playground
equipment and pool


Copeland Park:
k 850 NE 3rd St.,
Crystal River
SPavilion, playground,
picnic area, basketball
court and fishing pond

Fort Island Gulf Beach:
16000 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
Beach, volleyball, grills
and picnic tables

Fort Island Trail Park:
12073 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
Boat ramps and docks, fishing pier
and picnic facilities

Hunter Springs Park:
104 NE 1st Ave., Crystal River
Pavilion, picnic area with grills,
pier, kayak launch and beach


photo by Judy Wanamaker


photo by DeeDee Wilcox


photo by Loretta McDermid


photo by Judy Lane


pnoto Dy mary mayer


photo by Philip Wilchynski


photo by Brian Imparato





Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 35


" e iy USfo1 y Ia F
" IeI SI I* at1I i *W k g I T r l
*WhispInverness P

government CenterR eaun rantete, i Co
Florid12 \\. Aain S treet, In ern ss, FB nL 3 44510
. 11f (352) 726-2611 Li

.\\ .11\: In\erness-F 1. Gov :







36 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Jane viastrototaro


Crystal River


King's Bay Park:
268 N.W. Third St.,
Crystal River
Two pavillions, picnic shel-
ter, playground, fishing dock


LeGrone Park:
425 S.E. Eighth Ave.,
Crystal River
Playground, tennis court,
racquetball
court


Little Springs I
Park:
634 N.W.
Second Ave.,
Crystal River
(behind City Hall)
Creative Playground,
gazebo, picnic tables


at]


Ozello Community Park:
410 N. Pirate Point,
Crystal River
Picnic tables and boat ramp

Ozello Park:
2045 S. John Brown Drive,
Crystal River
Picnic tables


Dunnellon


Blue Run of
Dunnellon Park:
County Road 484 at
Rainbow River, Dunnellon
352-671-8560
Waterfront recreation
opportunities


photo by Jill Lyles


Chatmire
Community Park:
10999 S.W. 200th Ave.,
Dunnellon
352-671-8560
Picnic area and
a playground

Eugene Martin Park:
W. Gene Martin Lane,
South Dunnellon
Picnic tables, grills, softball,
basketball and playground

KP Hole:
9435 S.W. 190th
.S Ave. Road,
S uDunnellon
352-489-3055
Water recreation
and tube, canoe
and kayak rental


Rainbow
Neighborhood Park:
9801 190th Ave. Road,
Dunnellon
352-671-8560
Overflow parking for KP
Hole Park as needed.

South Dunnellon
Tot Lot:
1930 W. Test Court,
Dunnellon
Playground


photo by Judy Wanamaker


photo by Brian Imparato


I II I II I 'b
photo by Judy Lane


photo by John Funderburk
photo by John Funderburk


photo by Philip Wilchynski


photo by Cheryl Charles
photo by Cheryl Charles





Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 37


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38 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


Floral City

Floral Park:
9530 S. Parkside Ave., Floral City
Picnic tables, tennis courts, racquetball,
softball, basketball, shuffleboard, horseshoes,
volleyball, soccer, picnic tables and
playground equipment


Keating Park:
8820 E. Metcalf Lane, Floral City
Volleyball

Trail's End Park:
7594 S. Old Oaks Drive,
Floral City
Fishing pier and playground

Withlapopka Park:
11104 E. Flounder Drive, Floral City
Playground
Hernando


Hernando Park:
2552 N. Railroad Way, Hernando
Playground and basketball

Homosassa

Bluebird Springs:
8950 W. Bluebird Springs Lane, Homosassa
Picnic tables, grills and playground


Parks


Fire Station Park:
8350 W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa
Picnic tables, grills and playground


Homosassa Springs Recreation Park:
4210 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa
Baseball field, basketball court, two
multi-purpose fields, two jogging trails, picnic
tables, playground, six soccer fields and
tennis court


Hernando Beach:
3699 E. Orange Drive, Hernando
Beach, picnic tables, grills, volleyball,
shuffleboard and playground


photo by Gary Kuhl photo by Jill Lyles


- -N--



F'


ROOM TO

RELAX,
Enjoy some "me" time with
our luxurious amenities.


or difficulty
ive a i


ip you from going to
with inpatient and (


ordinary place
tient physic


ROOM FOR

EVERYONE,
Our amenities are for everyone.
Pets are welcome to visit!


res and doing ext
il, occupational a


home program, wound care, incontinence management, lymphedem
ed care programs.
SCardiac Rehab, Stroke Rehab, and Orthopedic Rehab Biodex In
Accreditation by JCAHO
t that Life Care Center has gone through this evaluation shows an extraordinary commit


athe


ordinary things. Impro
d speech therapy, our
apy or any of many oth
System VitalStim


Life
Care n
Center
of Citrus County


KEEP THE

FIRE.
Get back in the game with our short-term
and outpatient rehabilitation programs


352.746.4434
3325 W. Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto
LCCA.COM
Joint Commission Accredited


photo by Philip Wilchynski


pair
ty t


Don't let
your abili
rehab-to
specialize


A






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 39


[e
mmI


LAWN CARE
Insects Fungus Weed Control
Fertilizing Tree/Shrub Spraying

PEST CONTROL
Fleas Scorpions Spiders Bees
Rodent Control Ants Roaches


"TOTAL CARE" LAWN
* Fertilizing & Nutrients
* Insect Elimination & Prevention
* Fungus Elimination & Prevention
* Weed Elimination & Prevention


TERMIDOR


SHRUB & TREE CARE
* Shrub Specific Fertilizers
* Mites Elimination & Prevention
* Fungus Elimination & Prevention
* Insects Elimination & Prevention
* Palm & Tropical Care Program






40 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


-1


-1TL~


photo by Gary Kuhl


Inglis/Yankeetown

Bird Creek:
8000 Highway 40 West,
Yankeetown

Children's Park:
6243 Harmony Lane next to
YankeetownTown Hall
Playground

Fisherman's Park:
6251 Riverside Drive
On the beautiful
Withlacoochee River P C
an Outstanding Florida
Waterway (OFW)

Winding River Garden Park:
5551 Riverside Drive
On the beautiful Withlacoochee
River an Outstanding Florida
Waterway (OFW)

Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve:
1001 Old Rock Road, Yankeetown
Yankeetown's 413-acre estuarine
wild lands with lakes, stream, wet
lands, salt marshes and a 4,500-
square-foot museum and
educational center


Irl


Inverness

Bryant Park:
1611 Tuttle St., Inverness
Playground, picnic tables

Cooter Pond Park:
181 U.S. 41 S., Inverness
Board walk with interpretive
signage, picnic areas, a pavilion,
walking paths and a nature trail

Eden Park:
k 614 Park Lake,
Inverness
Fishing pier, boat ramp,
grills, picnic tables and
playground

Highland Park:
3755 E. Kirk St., Inverness
Playground and basketball

Hillcrest Park:
301 Hunting Lodge Drive,
Inverness
Lakefront picnic tables, grills and
bank fishing


1


_ ~r _~_i I


000C02W


657 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, FL
352-564-1400 www.theshoppesofheritagevillage.com


HOSTING THESE EVENTS!
MARKET DAY WITH ART & TREASURES
The Second Saturday of Each Month
SCARECROW FESTIVAL 3rd Saturday of October
SPRING EGGSTRAVAGANZA Saturday Prior to Easter Weekend

JOIN OUR VIP CLUB

10TH CONE FREE

Full Line of Amish Goods!
OUR OWN CANDLE COMPANY
nm ~OPEN 7 DAYS: Mon.-Fri. 10am-6pm
Sat lOam-5pm Sun Noon-3pm
564-031 1 639 N. Citrus Ave. i CANDY SHOP
-iTXc[115si( St, ye5


BOUTIQUES



srghton.
,o4J4 707 N. Citrus Ave., Suite D
352-563-2582 7lomm ahttt.

SEye Exams
S Eyeglasses
Contacts
ll cli 1 Accessories OPTICAL/VISION CENTER
S WHERE ECLECTIC FUNK MEETS
.. %,, SIMPLE ELEGANCE IN EYEWEAR
631 N. Citrus Ave., Suite C DIOR- VERSACE /4'
352-795-2020 rcosT ROBERTO
,crt mymezmereyes.com DEL MA. CAVALLI






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 41


HERE WHEN YOU NEED CITR


by The Society of
Thoracic Surgeons for 2011


Proud to
Services ranked
* Heart & Vascular Center
* Orthopedic Services
* Emergency Department
* Diagnostic Imaging
* Obstetric Services


show our medals!
among the best in the nation.
* Pediatric Unit General Surgery
* Rehabilitation Services Home Health Agency
* Same Day Surgery 'Women's Services
* Wound Care and Hyperbaric Philanthropy Department
* Two Walk-in Clinics


CITRUS MEMORIAL

02ee^z&014W


502 W. Highlmad Bhld. Inverness, FL 34452 I 352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com


II







42 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


Inverness

Holden Community Park:
4229 S. Rainbow Dr., Inverness
Five soccer fields, basketball, walking
trail, picnic tables and playground

Liberty Park:
286 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness
Pavilions and sand courts

Mossy Oak Park:
1056 Mossy Oak Drive, Inverness
Lakefront picnic tables and grills

Sportsman's Park:
95 N. Twin Lake Drive, Inverness
Picnic tables and playground


Wayside Park:
1010 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness
Picnic tables and grills


Parl


Wallace Brooks Park:
399 E. Dampier St., Inverness
Playground, shuffleboard courts, fishing
pier, picnic tables and grills

Whispering Pines:
1700 Forest Drive, Inverness
Tennis, racquetball, basketball, athletic
fields, nature trails, pool, pavilions, picnic
tables, playground and water playground

White Lake Park:
602 White Blvd., Inverness
Half-court basketball pad, benches,
picnic table

Lecanto

Lecanto Community Park:
3505 W. Educational Path, Lecanto
Baseball field, two basketball courts, two
multi-purpose fields, two horseshoe pits,
two racquetball courts, two tennis courts
and jogging trail


Crystal River Preserve State Park:
3266 N. Sailboat Ave.
Crystal River
352-563-0450

Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park:
4150 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
352-628-5343

Fort Cooper State Park:
3100 S. Old Floral City Road
Inverness
352-726-0315

Rainbow Springs State Park:
19158 S.W. 81st Place Road
Dunnellon
352-465-8555
Swimming, snorkeling, canoe-
ing, and kayaking. Canoes
and kayaks can be rented at
k s the headsprings. A picnic area
at the spring includes tables,
grills, and pavilions. For large
gatherings, private pavilions
can be reserved. Tubing is not allowed in
the headsprings area of the park. Tubers
can launch at the Tube Entrance on S.W.
180th Avenue Road. The Campground
Entrance with a full-facility campground is
about nine miles from the day use area.
The headsprings Entrance is located
three miles north of Dunnellon on the east
side of U.S. 41. The campground is lo-
cated on S.W. 180th Avenue Road about
two miles north of County Road 484 and
two miles south of State Road 40. The
Tube Entrance is located 1.4 miles south
of the campground Entrance on S.W.
180th Avenue Road.

Withlacoochee State Trail:
Parallels U.S. 41 through Citrus County
352-726-2251

Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins Historic State
Park:
3400 N. Museum Pointe, Crystal River
352-795-3817


State Parks


Crystal River Archaeological
State Park:
3400 N. Museum Point, Crystal River
352-795-3817


photo by Liz Brown


photo by Anna Mosley


photo by Neil Sawyer






Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 43


DANIEL'S
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING, INC.
4581 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 726-5845
L-.:erne # CACC'-42.73
IA,_, D T m.


I Can Help You

Find Your Dream Home

GITTA BARTH


li i 1~ in r l ll.ll il .


EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENII I I II I II II II III


SML3 SI REALTOR .'
(352) 220-0466
J I j ih rw l lt r iJii a ]r : ,.


MlI ni. 1 ii. i L,'-- NI rlt I. iT'lr I Pi i f. FRACTIONAL& FACIAL RESURFACING
I\ I. .'r t i1 -, lm'tr. I Tir T. Ti iirr. I LASER HAIR &VEIN REMOVAL
L\rr ITF \ ii. ri.i 1 I B.I',\ I. r I |i- fI 'Cl I RADIESSE I LATISSE
r I I. I O f v i i.-. ifI
1 - -
L,%,LIl..T,\M kI'PI. i I I A 1- MEDSPAAI T NESIS.C O
lANALIEMNT 1l'i IFII. Il I. -'III IAST INVRNISS IL 34452


iOT mDEBl
Bankruptcy May Help!
Call us for a free consultation.
Paul Millello P.A. '- "
107 B. West Main St., Inverness, FL (3521637-2222 -..


S.V1


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44 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


David Rom


352-341-3276


www.davidmrom.com


DUDLEY'S AUCTION
''- I--m m -- II II ... 1.









L. ,e & Dr.dIhe B- :1-:11".
REAL ESTATE BOUGHT & SOLD ESTATES,



~f DUDLEY'S AUCTION

SERVICES OFFERED W/CONSIGNMENTS OR CASH BUYOUT


eP E1MT tI I R 4 1es11
Q LC, J ,1_r1 l ie P ,dd,,,,]
E lale_: D,:... ,zIr,,] Per-or, al PDr.,:,er, jppri ,_, l
11.000 sq. ift. Auction Facility Elrenslbe Tar ideleJ- ndu ,dua, Mardealng Plans
REAL ESTATE BOUGHT & SOLD, ESTATES,
FORECLOSURES, GUARDIANS, RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

10i1"0 S Florida.-,e US 41Si In eriiess FL 352-637-9588
',JA l,, 4 ,-l: l' : A -, I "il b --j- 1 1--,,I -E I:, 1 ,- I, :I , '~:. ',!-jJ L,,: : & -4i 1 =_ 4 1J


Offering a Variety of Classes/Workshops
to Improve Your Overall Well Being!
VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR CLASS SCHEDULES
www.yogawithlace.com
Inverness
a andWellness 118 N. Pine Ave.
SCnter Downtown Inverness
ete (352) 726-7060


R4
^=


Gira S. Shahl, M.D
e,- F F i .__ i F iT i F1 IlT _Fl--l T

to Compassion & Conmmunication

ffce 352-726-7800


...No Ho e -s:,;


W


Seminole
A,, nu .
In, rn e.
Flcridj3 -4452


New Homes
Starting At


S27,995
Includes Set-up,
S Anchoring, Skirting, Steps,
A/C & Appliances and
Window Treatments

The ZACK

Includes Anchoring, Set-up Skirting, Steps,
,, A/C & Appliance Package


PRESTIGE HOMES CENTER OFINVERNESS


a a
W Lif inuace

shudn.wat


I


Discover Why You Voted Us
Your Carpet & Flooring Store
6 YEARS RUNNING!
Reasons to Shop at Michael's Flooring
Friendly, Knowledgeable Staff NO high pressure sales
FREE in-home estimates Best qualified installers
Largest selection of laminate & hardwood flooring
Michael has served all your flooring needs for 28 years
Family owned and operated


INC. --
Open Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5, Sat. 9-4 Evenings by appointment.
~ 341-0813 e
www.mlchaelsfloorcoverlnglnc.net
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
(1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Licensed & Insure


I,, v Us On
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Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 45


WTI C


We Carry Exclusive Salon Products
-The best for your Hair Care -
Kenra Platinum and Healium 5
OUR COLOR LINES INCLUDE KENRA COLOR
AND KEUNE SO PURE ORGANIC COLOR
Hair Color Waxing Manicures
Soft Diffusion Pedicures Hair Extensions
Straightening Services
All Clients can enjoy our Loyalty Points Program and New Clients
will receive over $100 in savings toward future services
www.facebook.com/EclecticEnds
3850 E Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness 352-344-2394


Mml iNI Phsleil ITmur
Jaya P. Gurnani, PT, RPT
"Rehabilitation, Occupational & Physical Therapy"
INVERNESS BEVERLY HILLS
3787 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. 3777 N. Lecanto Hwy.
(352) 341-1101 (352) 527-3337

We will beat any legitimate collision repair estimate


GUARANTEED!


408 Lake Street, Inverness Areas ot Practice:
lora@loralaw.com 408 Lake Street, Inverness Auto Accident Wrongful Death
LORALAW.com 3 52-6 37-1 960 .Boat/Watercraft Motorcycle/ATV's
(Also licensed in Michigan) Pedestrian Animal Attacks


We'll Tow It...
Then We'll Fix It Right!
3001 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Inverness
352-400-0360


FLANAGAN'S
Fntprnris I C


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46 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013

Serving Citrus County and surrounding areas wiith .
quality aind integrity thYit goes far beyond 'luhatl is expected..'




-- qRi : pv Rich1 T y
andiG. ORY FUNERAL
Esta i hed in 1990 DIRECTOR
5431:0 Gulf to Lake H". Lecanio, Fla. 352-795-0111 Toll Free 877-795-0111


- CAT BOARDING ONLY -


kt Your cat will have soooo
Such fun in our playroom!
352-860-1688 i
2 Miles S. Of Inverness Airport ,Mg
AFTER HOURS:
726-0633


-I e


Lumber & Marine Supply
Mon thru Fri 7am to 5pm and Sat 8am to 12 30PM


DOMESTICS ...
* Ash
* Cherry
* Hickory
* Hard Maple
SSoft Maple
Mahogany


* Red Oak
* White oak
* Walnut
* Cypress
* Birch
* Poplar
* More!


EXOTICS...
* Teak
* Zebrawood
* Purpleheart
* Padauk
* Wenqe
* More!


6971 W. Homosassa Trail. Homosassa. FI
352-628-1400
Toll Free: 1-877-647-1400
TritonlumberXtalwind.Net

"Your One Stop
Deck & Dock Shop!"
Boat Lifts
Floating Docks/Hardware
Dock Hardware
Marine Lumber
Composite Decking
Hardwood Lumber


Reconnecting Your Life
...Through Better Hearing

Call for a FREE Two Week Trial Today!
100% Satisfaction Guaranteed
Professional Hearing Centers 76-H A
www.InvernessHearing.com 726-HEAR ;


Amp
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.....r i 1 R Ii i


^ ^ Sislie n BCACO567.ULI


Call Stephen Finegan, Sr.
-" . I '
,-CFFA


Serving Citrus County Since 1985
423 Hwy. 41 South Inverness
OFFER GOOD THROUGH 3/31/13


At Triton Lumber We Now Carry...
: j :. : ,,l jl l :i ,' : I,,:,l d I: Ij. ',1 ::c Tl L, : W :1, :, :5 Il :l,' '," :1 ,:, 1 |:. :. : l:. 1: ,: : II.: lu ill .) ,. l,:,l,. I : l l. :, :,,


WE DON'T JUST MEET PRICES, tf5
WE BEAT PRICES! tt
Citrus County's Oldest Flooring Store Since 1970 *ri*
2001 2002 2003
www.joescarpet.com HWY.41,INVERNESS ir
IJ SrC cr HWll 726-4465 ooooo
o s C ar e lt HWY.44,CRYSTAL RIVER ',ig
Your Total Flooring Store 795-9605 2007 2008 2009
+ VINYL + WOOD + CERAMIC TILE 'I
+ CARPET + LAMINATE + AREA RUGS (Crystal Riverstoreonly) 2010 2011 2012


JJ


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Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013 47


Citrus County's a beautiful place to live. Let's keep it that way.


OUR MISSION:
To Keep Citrus* '
County Beautiful
by facilitating and
promoting 1
education in solid
waste handling,
motivating anti-
litter solutions &
changing ag Crew
business practices SnaNBogCrw
while contributing to the beautification of Citrus
County.
ELEMENTARY & PRIMARY SCHOOL READINGS...
Thanks to all those who volunteered to go and read
with students. The handmade notes and cards from
the students proves that we're on the right track
delivering the recycling message. Students were
given a copy of the book to read to them. A grant
from Keep America Beautiful and a sponsor from
Waste Management made this project possible.


GREAT AMERICAN CLEANUP... We
participate in the Great American
Cleanup by doing just that. Through
local media we've made it known that
we will assist any neighborhood or
community by supplying materials and
assistance in obtaining the proper
permits & dumping fee waivers.
SNAG 'N' BAG... Four new Snag 'n''
Bag signs with bag and used
monofilament recycling receptacles have
been installed in Crystal River, Hunter Inverness CitManagerFrankDigiovanni
Springs, Pet's Pier, behind Charlie's Fish House
Restaurant, and donors. If yo
behind the Best help please
Western Crystal River
Resort. Snag 'n' Bags
are available at most Get I-n
boat launching ramps Tod
in the county.
New Cigarette Disposal Receptacle


NO MORE BUTTS... Last Year 2.5
trillion cigarettes were littered in the
US. With the help from a CLPP Grant
from Keep America Beautiful we are
teaming up with the City of Crystal
River to distribute 2 dozen cigarette
disposal receptacles & hundreds of
pocket ash trays.
WE NEED YOU! WE NEED YOUR
FAMILY, FRIENDS, NEIGHBORS,
COLLEAGUES, ETC.
KCCB, a nonprofit 501-c(3), is looking
for volunteers, observers, members and
u would like to become a member or
call 352-746-9393.

evolved
ay! CIEEP
ay! /CITRUS kk


For more information visit us online at www.kccbinc.org.
Keep Citrus County Beautiful Partners -aaI 9


CITRUS COU-NTY l )
C' r -,1T 1 S f T n !*w.ehron lc)oll!.oir


W a
WASTE MANAGEMENT


I P
VV^jiAXTCraI:







48 Discover Citrus County, 2012-2013


photo by Cathy Kapulka


photo by Dave Sigler


/Ip I


Old Historic Courthouse

marks a century of

serving the community

he Old Historic Courthouse has
Thad quite a year as the commu
nity gathered to celebrate its
100th anniversary
Fueled by the phosphate boom and
thriving timber, turpentine and cattle in
dustries, a growing county needed a larger
courthouse. So, on May 1,1911, the county
commission approved a resolution to con
struct a new' 1il, l1li
Now listed on the National Register of
Historic Places, the Old Courthouse was
built in 1912 at a cost of $55,885. It served as
the Citrus County Courthouse until 1978,
when a more modern facility was built


about a block away
Today the historic courthouse is the
headquarters for the Citrus County His
torical Society. It houses county archives
and special collections, as well as the of
fices of Citrus County's Historical Resource
Officer.
It is also
the site of
the Old
Court-
house Inter
Heritage
Museum.
The build
ing includes a copper cupola with a clock
face on each of the four sides, topped with
a belvedere with miniature columns. The
' it 1l 111 ; i s uniquely situated on a square
lot at a 45-degree angle to the street grid.

Museum exhibits and store
Permanent exhibits in the Old Court


J


house Heritage Museum include displays
and artifacts devoted to Citrus County's
pre-history and its pioneer days, and to
more recent developments, such as the
impact of the citrus and film industries on
Central Florida. Traveling exhibits, such as
Florida Cowboys: The Last Frontier, come
to the museum on a
regular basis. The
museum store offers
s t hard to find books
e about Florida history
ecology and geology
as well as gift items.

Second-floor Courtroom
People in Inverness still talk about the
magical summer of 1961, when Elvis Presley
came to Citrus County to film his ninth
movie, "Follow That Dream." The climactic
courtroom scene was filmed entirely in
the courtroom and included many towns
people as extras.


Chronicle file photo


Chronicle file photo


I