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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 10-21-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02924

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Chomp, chomp: No. 2 UF manhandles No. 7 S. Caroligoj3l


o


Sunny and dry.
PAGE A4


CITRURJS COUNT Y






www.chronicleonline.com


Florida's Best Community l Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


COMMENTARY:
Faith _
and
politics
Andrew Welfel
speaks with local
residents about
the effects of
faith in the voting
booth./Page C1

LOCAL NEWS:
Sewer funds
It's not too late to apply
for help to link up to
sewer systems, county
officials say./Page A5
LOCAL NEWS:


In the pink
A walk raises awareness
and funds for breast
cancer efforts./Page A2
NATIONAL NEWS:
Coal 'wars'
Coal miners see their
way of life changing,
and blame the federal
government./Page A14
BUSINESS:









Windows 8
What do people think
about the new operating
system from Microsoft?
Find out./Page Dl


FDR park
Decades delayed, the
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Four Freedoms Park
opens in New York.
/Page A15


HOMFFRONT-


Local artist dies


Don Mayo loved natural world


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
He was more at home as
a fisherman, than anywhere
else. After regular fishing
trips to the Crystal River
area, he and his wife de-
cided to build a life in Cit-


rus County 28 years ago.
He spent many hours en-
joying his boat as he was ac-
companied by his two pals:
his yellow Labrador dog,
Pup, and his hen mallard
Topsider.
Everywhere he went on
the boat his hen mallard


would fly along side of him
while the Labrador would
ride on the boat. Not only
was this quality time for him
to enjoy with his pals, he was
able to clear his mind as the
creative side evolved.
On Thursday, Oct. 18,
well-known waterfowl and
marine artist Don Mayo
died at his Crystal River
home after a year's battle


SERVICES
* Look for information
about funeral services
in Mr. Mayo's obituary
in an upcoming edition
of the Chronicle.


with bladder
was 71.
See


Hernando.,

Heritage

Festival on

cow time
ERYN
WORTHINGTON ?
Staff Writer
C itrus County.
cattle were
sidetracked by
the illusion of
greener grass and lost...
track of time. They must.
have forgotten their
watches at home.
At about 1 p.m. Satur- '
day, spectators lined the
streets to wait for the
parade. The scheduled
time, evidently, was not
confirmed with the
cattle.
Apparently, on the
journey to the old Her-
nando School, some of .
the cattle decided to
create their own route
and head a different
direction. '
The proposed route
included a 25-mile, two-
day trek through the 1
woods and underbrush
which incorporated por- DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
tion of Potts Preserve Jessie Strickland whoops at the cattle Saturday from a safe perch high above
and the historic school his father Wil's knee. The Stricklands were among the riders intent on keeping
grounds. a slice of their family tradition alive by participating in the 11th annual South-
Once the participat- ern Heritage Festival and Cracker Cattle Drive at the Historic Hernando School.
ing cowboys rounded
the cattle up, they mi-
grated their way to town
for their grand
entrance.
Saturday marked the
11th annual Hernando
Southern Heritage Fes-
tival and Cracker Cattle
Drive in Hernando.
The Cracker Cattle
Drive is a re-enactment
of how life was in early
Florida.
"This celebrates the
way of life here in ." ;
Florida," said John ..
Grannan, chairman of .
the Hernando heritage
council. "Families -' -
would drive their cattle ',- .
across the county in the7
The sun casts a long shadow on the cattle drives that once were a regular oc-
See Page A5 currency throughout Citrus County.


cancer. He Chronicle file
Artist Don Mayo works on a
painting in 2006. Mayo died
Page A4 Thursday at age 71.

Election 2012


Balfour:


Lack of


training


hurt my


teaching

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER When
Sandy Balfour talks of the need for
teacher training, she speaks from
personal experience.
Balfour, hoping
to unseat Sandra
"Sam" Himmel as
Citrus County su-
perintendent of a
schools, taught ad-
vanced placement
English last year at
the Academy of En-
vironmental Sandy
Sciences. Balfour
It was her first candidate for
time teaching ad- superintendent
vanced placement, of schools.
also known as AP
Students who pass
the AP exam re-
ceive college credit.
Balfour, an ac-
complished teacher
in the Citrus
County School Dis-
trict, received no Sandra
formal training to Himmell
teach the AP class. incumbent
It didn't go too superintendmbent
well. of schools.
Balfour's results
were not only lowest of all AP
classes in the district, they were the
worst English results in the eight
years the district has had AP
See Page A6


* WHAT: Citrus County
Superintendent of Schools.
* WHO: Democrat incumbent
Sandra "Sam" Himmel;
Republican Sandy Balfour.
* TERM: 4 years.
* COVERS: All Citrus County.
* PAY: $117,198.
* ON THE BALLOT: Nov. 6
election.
* ONLINE: www.chronicleonline.
com/votersguide.


Nurseries
Decorate a child's
room./HomeFront


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword ............A16
Editorial .......... ..C2
Entertainment ..........B8
Horoscope .............B8
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B8
M ovies .................... A 16
O bituaries ................A6
Together................A18


|6 1184578 L2007 o


11-year-old faces


felony charges


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
An 11-year-old girl is fac-
ing felony charges after
leading police on a pursuit
through Citrus County, ac-
cording to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
The girl ran away from
her foster family in Tampa
five days ago and is facing
charges of grand theft as
well as fleeing and eluding
police Saturday
According to the arrest af-
fidavit, the alleged victim is
a state caseworker for the
Department of Children


and Families and the Part-
nership for Stronger Fami-
lies. While at the Depart-
ment of Children and Fam-
ilies parking lot in Inver-
ness, in the process of trying
to transfer the girl back to
her home in Tampa, the girl
jumped from the rear seat
of a black Dodge Journey
SUV to the driver's seat.
The victim told the girl
not to drive her car. How-
ever, the girl then locked
the doors and backed out
over the hedges, then con-
tinued to drive south on
U.S. 41.
Once deputies were noti-


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office deputies occupy the median of State Road 44 on Saturday in
Lecanto. Deputies pursued an 11-year-old girl after she took a car to avoid going back into
foster care, reports stated. The girl faces felony charges.


fled and given the descrip-
tion of the vehicle, they
began looking for the li-
cense plate that matched
the plate number
A deputy spotted the ve-


hicle and turned on his
sirens to make her pull over,
but she instead turned on
State Road 44 westbound.
The girl then accelerated
her speed and continued


westbound.
Deputies reported that, at
the intersection of Main
Street and Pleasant Grove
See Page A4


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
82
LOW
51


OCTOBER 21, 2012


I-- LS I U I N D 'd


AM





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pink Citrus


Walkers make

strides for

breast cancer

awareness
BROOKE PERRY
Correspondent
Whether it was for a
grandmother who
lost the battle
against breast cancer, a
daughter in remission or
just to support a good
cause, more than 150 peo-
ple came out to walk the
Withlacoochee State Trail
in Inverness on Oct. 20 to
raise money for breast can-
cer support and research.
Those participating
walkedl.5 miles, down the
trail until they turned
around at marked flags and
walked back for lunch at
the registration site.
The event was the sixth
annual walk hosted by Pink
Citrus, a Making Strides
Against Breast Cancer
Team. All of the money and
donations raised from the
event will go to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, but will
stay in the tri-county area
of Citrus, Hernando and
Pasco counties.
In addition to registra-
tion donations, drawing
tickets were sold for a
chance to win numerous
items, such as bedazzled
hats, pink tote bags and
various gift certificates.
"A lot of donations were
made from the raffles,"
Pink Citrus team leader
Rachel Vazquez said of the
outcome.
"We're very happy for the
people we have and the
people that came out."
Sharon Salazar, whose
daughter Monica was diag-
nosed with breast cancer,
helped for the first time.
"The tragedy actually
brought my family closer,"
Salazar said. "My daughter
was very well supported by
her friends, too; she's now
cancer-free."
Salazar was the team
captain of The Boobettes, a
group of 10 to 12 supporters
of her daughter who came
out to walk.
"I think the walk is won-
derful," member Jessica
Bordeaux said. "It's for a
great cause and it's awe-
some to see all these peo-
ple come out."
To see more upcoming
events, like and visit the
Pink Citrus Beating Breast
Cancer Team page on
Facebook.


Event helpers Erin Harper and Sharon Salazar have had peo-
ple in their families diagnosed with breast cancer.


Team Shelby, consisting of Charlie, Laura, Shelby and Shane
Beetow, walk as a family. Twelve-year-old Shelby raised
$2,500 herself last year to donate to Relay for Life. "We sup-
port the cause," her mother Laura said. "My son plays foot-
ball and he even wore black socks with pink bows."


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BROOKE PERRY/For the Chronicle
Some of the mothers and sisters of Sugarmill Woods came out to support the cause. Pauline
Gerbino, middle with fanny pack, appreciated the event. "We're in full support," she said.
"It's about time women get recognized."
Several
of The
Boobettes
walking
team
show their
-T !support
for friend
Monica
Lopez.
Jessica
Bordeaux,
second
from left,
put some
pink in
her hair
Saturday
morning
for extra
Sencour-
agement.


Event organizer Rachel
Vazquez shows off her pink
apparel.


We Welcome You To I


Value Dental Care

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Crystal River

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Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD


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A2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Meningitis victims face uncertain recovery


Marion County woman has

been in hospital since Sept. 27


Associated Press


OCALA Vilinda York
lies in her Florida hospital
bed, facing a dry-erase
board that lists in green
marker her name, her four
doctors and a smiley face.
Also on the board is this:
"Anticipated date of dis-
charge: NOT YET
DETERMINED."
The 64-year-old contracted
fungal meningitis after re-
ceiving three tainted steroid
shots in her back She's one
of 271 people nationwide
who are victims of an out-
break that began when a
Massachusetts compounding


pharmacy shipped contami-
nated medication. Twenty-
one people have died.
Like many trying to re-
cover, York, who has been
hospitalized since Sept. 27,
faces a long and uncertain
road. Many people have died
days or even weeks after
being hospitalized. Fungal
meningitis which is not
contagious is a tenacious
disease that can be treated
only with powerful drugs.
"I'm determined I'm
going to fight this thing," she
said. "The devil is not going
to win."
Dr William Schaffner, an
infectious disease specialist


who chairs Vanderbilt Uni-
versity's Department of Pre-
ventive Medicine, said the
treatment includes intra-
venous anti-fungal medi-
cines that are tricky to use.
"These are powerful
drugs. They're toxic," he
said. "You're walking a
tightrope because you want
to get enough into a patient
to have the therapeutic ef-
fect while at the same time
you're trying not to affect, or
to minimize the effect on the
liver and kidneys."
Even after leaving the
hospital, he said, patients
will continue anti-fungal
drugs for weeks or months.
The infectious disease
doctor handling York's case
did not immediately re-
spond to a phone message.
When York talks about the


past six weeks, tears run
down her cheeks. She
knows the disease is deadly
And if she needed a re-
minder, it's right there in
the headline from a local
newspaper on her hospital
bed: "Third death reported
in Marion County from fun-
gal meningitis."
York now passes her days
by talking on the phone to
two children and three
grandchildren who live out
of state, receiving visitors
from her church and reading
the Bible. And she has filed
a lawsuit against New Eng-
land Compounding Center
claiming negligence, and her
lawyer is getting calls from
others who were sickened.
She said she's "blessed,
not lucky," to be alive at this
point


Associated Press
Vials of the injectable steroid product made by New
England Compounding Center implicated in a fungal
meningitis outbreak were being shipped to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta from Minneapolis.


3.







CHARLIE BRENNAN/Chronicle
Residents of Meadowcrest and
those passing through the com-
munity east of Crystal River have
been seeing double when it
comes to street signs.


Double


dose of


stop signs

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
For inquiring minds who
wonder why there seems to be
double of every traffic sign on
Meadowcrest Boulevard the
answer is frangibility
Gone will be the shorter, dec-
orative wooden signage to be
replaced by taller, bigger metal
ones.
The federal Manual on Uni-
form Traffic Control Devices
(MUTCD) requires all traffic
signage meet certain standards,
and communities are being
given various deadlines to hit.
"They want the signs to be
frangible (to have give)," said
Robbie Anderson, manager of
the Meadowcrest Community
Association.
Anderson said the association
has been in talks for years with
Citrus County about taking over
Meadowcrest and Meeting Tree
boulevards. She said all efforts
for turnover are on hold, but it
was brought to the association's
attention when the traffic signs
did not meet MUTCD stan-
dards, causing the association
to assume unnecessary liability
"Our attorney also agreed,"
Anderson said. "The Meadow-
crest Community Association
Board unanimously agreed to
change all the Meadowcrest
Community signage. We are
currently in the process of in-
stalling new signs."
She said the association is
also re-striping roads and will
remove the old signs as soon as
all the new signs are up.
"The community's private
roads have public access and
we are doing what is right for
the safety of our visitors," An-
derson said.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@chronicle
online, com.


Correction
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Fire Rescue will offer free blood
pressure checks from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. today at Wal-Mart Super-
center, 2461 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness. This is a different
location than was reported in Satur-
day's Chronicle.
The Chronicle regrets the error.
Readers can alert Citrus County
Chronicle to any errors in news
articles by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by calling
352-563-5660.


CALL
i of the


Council to discuss short-term renta


Crystal River could

tweak ordinance
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Two topics
that generated a lot of discussion
but were tabled at the city council's
last meeting are front and center
Monday.
Council members will discuss
whether to tweak an ordinance
dealing with prohibitions on short-
term rentals in the city. The city's
current code prohibits resort hous-
ing units in any zoning districts
other than commercial
waterfront. Resort housing units are
defined in the in the city's Land De-
velopment Code as dwelling units,
other than hotels and motels, occu-
pied for less than three straight
months.
Some property owners and at
least one local Realtor are express-
ing concerns over the code provi-
sion and requesting the council
modify the provision.
Recent state law bars local gov-
ernments from restricting the prac-
tice, but municipalities that had an
ordinance before the law such as
Crystal River are grandfathered in.
After much discussion, the city at-
torney was instructed to determine
the effects of modifying the law


* WHAT: Crystal River City Council.
* WHEN: 7 p.m. today for council;
6 p.m. CRA.
WHERE: City Hall, 123 N.W.
U.S. 19.
CONTACT: 352-795-4216 or
crystalriverfl.org.

would have on the city
City Manager Andy Houston said
it will be up to the council to decide
which way to go on the issue.
The panel also will hear on first
reading a request by a resident to
increase the height limits for an ac-
cessory structure -waterside. Res-
ident Jack Reynolds' has asked to
build a structure to accommodate
his airboat.
On Sept. 6, the planning board
voted 6-1 to recommend approval to
increase the height of one of three
allowed accessory structures from
12 feet to 16 feet. The current height
of 12 feet will accommodate the air-
boat, but the structure would have a
flat roof, which may not be aestheti-
cally pleasing, Reynolds said.
Accessory structures include
dwellings such as guesthouses,
mother-in-law quarters, etc.; docks;
boathouses; fencing; storage build-
ings; greenhouses; swimming pools,
etc., according to the city There also
cannot be more than three free-
standing accessory buildings; can-
not be in the front yard and are


included in the impe:
surface and stormwater
requirements.
Setback distances seemed t
stumbling block. The city staff
fering a compromise: any acce
structure more than 12 f(
height would have to be a mir
of 10 feet from any side pr
line.
Council members also will:
Hear a third-quarter crin
port from Citrus County Sh
Office westside commander,
Danny Linhart;
Consider approval of an i
ment to rates and fees rela
water and sewer services;
Discuss future projects ai
orities for the CRA District in
pacity as the Comr
Redevelopment Agency,.
Officials said CRA panel
bers have previously deter:
they want to develop two l
projects one with the pro
riverwalk project moving fo
and with it not.
Officials approximately $2 r
in revenue will be generate
projects during the remaining
of the Community Redevelo
District. It is estimated the
walk project would require a]
imately half of that fundi
complete.
Chronicle reporter AB.
can be reached at 352-564-2
asidibe@chronicleonline. con


WILD



The Crystal
River

National
Wildlife

Refuge had
its annual
Refuge Day
celebration
Saturday at
the Three

Sisters
Springs
property
A number of
local

musicians
played folk
music.

Bekah Cook and Mary
Oesterle look at a free
poster about native animal
species Saturday at the an-
nual Refuge Day celebrate
at Three Sisters Springs in
Crystal River.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle




ds Campaign
TRAIL
rvious
runoff 0 Supervisor of Elections
to be a Susan Gill is sponsoring a
If is of- candidates' forum targeted
essory for high school students at
eet in 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24,
limum at Citrus High School.
operty 0 The Realtors Association
of Citrus County will host a
"Meet N Greet" with candi-
me re- dates and current legislators
eriff's from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednes-
Capt. day, Oct. 24, at 714 S. Scar-
boro Ave., Lecanto.
adjust- The Campaign Trail is a list-
ted to ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season.
nd pri-
its ca-
unity State BRIEF
mem-
mined
lists of Ex-US Rep. Sam
posed Gibbons honored
rward TAMPA- Mourners are
million gathering in Tampa to pay
ed for tribute to former U.S. Rep.
g term Sam Gibbons.
pment Gibbons died Oct. 10 at
river- the age of 92. The Tampa na-
pprox- tive served 17 terms in the
ing to House, rising to the head the
powerful Ways and Means
Sidibe Committee. He retired in
925 or 1997.
n. From wire report






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Housing advisory group to meet


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Affordable Hous-
ing Advisory Committee (AHAC) will
meet at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30, in
Room 166 in the Lecanto Government
Building.
On the agenda will be: Hardest Hit,
SHIP Shelter Plus Care, NSP 1 and 3,
Section 8, Homeless and Emergency
Solutions Grant and proposed 2013 fu-
ture AHAC meeting dates, among
other items.
This committee was formed to im-
prove the housing situation in Citrus
County by studying and developing
projects, coordinating with county




ARTIST Hi
Continued from Page Al 10V
WO
According to his wife, Sue
Mayo, "he was 90 percent
deaf. He has always appre-
ciated and studied in depth Some
the many aspects of nature. the pers
He was extremely well- former
known for his expert fly Bush Sr
fishing, saltwater sport fish- the late T
ing along with duck and ma- Anne Mu
rine guiding." man H. S
He was also well-known He w.
for his carving ability and Murray
sculptures both marine fan, and
and waterfowl. of the Fl


WHAT: Citrus County Affordable
Housing Advisory Committee.
WHEN: 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30.
WHERE: Room 166 in the
Lecanto Government Building.
CONTACT: Call 352-527-7520.


staff and making recommendations to
the Board of County
Commissioners.
The committee meets every third
Tuesday of the month.
If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Affordable
Housing Advisory Committee with re-



s true passion belonged to I

e for the water and woods.

vuld base his creations off t

illumination of the two.


of his works are in
onal collections of
President George
:, baseball legend
Ted Williams, singer
urray and Gen. Nor-
ichwarzkopf.
as an avid Anne
and Harrison Ford
always a supporter
orida Gators.


However, his true
belonged to his lov
water and woods. H
base his creations o
lumination of the tx
Sue Mayo said I
band never let his
disability get in his
She once asked h
with her onto thE
floor. She told himr


spect to any matter considered at this
public meeting or hearing, he or she
will need to ensure a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made which
shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Any person requiring reasonable
accommodation at this meeting be-
cause of a disability or physical im-
pairment should contact Housing
Services, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court
Key No. 12, Lecanto, FL 34461, 352-
527-7520, at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TYY telephone 352-
527-5901.


his she loved the words to the
his song.
He Even though he couldn't
hear the beat, he felt it
he through his feet. He contin-
ued to dance with her.
Then he turned to her and
said "I can't hear the words,
passion but I make up my own words
e for the about you."
[e would A celebration of his life is
)ff the il- being arranged by his wife
wo. and Brown Funeral Home.
her hus- Details will be announced
hearing as soon as they are final-
way ized. Sue Mayo said the fam-
iim to go ily thanks all for their
e dance continuing thoughts and
of how prayers.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Ricky Slater, 30, of North
Casaba Point, Dunnellon, at 2
a.m. Friday on a Citrus County
warrant for failure to appear in
court for original felony charges
of aggravated negligent
manslaughter of a child and
cruelty toward a child. No bond.
Brent Spicer, 34, no ad-
dress provided, at 1:52 p.m. Fri-
day on a Citrus County warrant
for violation of probation for
original felony charges of flee-
ing and eluding a law enforce-
ment officer and driving while
license suspended (habitual of-
fender). No bond.
Burglaries
SA commercial burglary was
reported at 8:20 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 16, in the 8400 block of W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa.
M A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 11:59 a.m. Oct. 16 in
the 8300 block of N. Bolder
Drive, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was
reported at 1:12 p.m. Oct. 16 in
the 9400 block of N. Travis
Drive, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was
reported at 2:49 p.m. Oct. 16 at
Melissa Drive, Beverly Hills.
Thefts
M A grand theft was reported


ON THE NET
Go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on
the Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.

at 8:44 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16,
in the 3000 block of E. Raccoon
Court, Inverness.
M A petit theft was reported at
10:29 a.m. Oct. 16 in the 900
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Lecanto.
M A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 12:22 p.m. Oct. 16 in
the 10600 block of E. Lucas
Trail, Inverness.
An auto theft was reported
at 12:36 p.m. Oct. 16 in the
5500 block of W. Yearling Drive,
Beverly Hills.
M A grand theft was reported
at 1:43 p.m. Oct. 16 in the 1300
block of Tamiami Lane,
Inverness.
A petit theft was reported at
5:55 p.m. Oct. 16 in the 9600
block of N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Dunnellon.
A petit theft was reported at
7:27 p.m. Oct. 16 in the 100 block
of S. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported
at 6:56 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16,
in the 2300 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.


FELONY
Continued from Page Al

Road, the light was red. The
girl did not stop, driving
through the red light.
A short while later, the
girl approached another red
light at the intersection of
North Croft Avenue and
S.R. 44 where traffic was
backed up. However, she cut
between two stopped vehi-
cles and drove over the side-


walk into the grassy area in
front of the Shell gas station
and continued westbound
on S.R. 44.
That is when deputies no-
tified the deputy in pursuit
that stop-sticks were being
set up to stop the girl.
However, when she
reached the intersection of
S.R. 44 and Scarboro Av-
enue, the girl saw the
deputies ahead and
abruptly stopped in the in-
side lane of S.R. 44.
Investigators asked the


girl why she had stolen the
vehicle. She said she did not
want to go back into the fos-
ter care. She did not stop
the vehicle, she said, be-
cause she was scared.
She was arrested and
transported to the Citrus
County Detention facility
The Chronicle is with-
holding the juvenile's name
because of her age.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-
563-5660 or eworthington
@chronicleonline.com.


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Fictitious Name Notices....................D7


M Meeting Notices.................................D7


S Miscellaneous Notices......................D7


Self Storage Notices..........................D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
S







S


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Sunny today.


82 64 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ecalus aily
W TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 82 Low: 51
Sunny and dry

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 84 Low: 55
Mostly sunny and breezy

.. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 57
f Partly cloudy and breezy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 83/61
Record 91/43
Normal 84/60
Mean temp. 72
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 4.40 in.
Total for the year 58.91 in.
Normal for the year 46.88 in.
*As of 7 p mrn at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.92 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 51
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 35%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
elm, ragweeed, grasses
Today's count: 7.2/12
Monday's count: 7.2
Tuesday's count: 7.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/21 SUNDAY 11:56 5:42 6:10
10/22 MONDAY 12:26 6:37 12:50 7:03
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
OCT. 29


NOV. 6


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:54 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:36 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ......................1:46 P.M.
MOONSET TODAY................................. NONE


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 10:01 a/6:05 a /7:20 p
Crystal River** 8:22 a/3:27 a 10:46 p/4:42 p
Withlacoochee* 6:09 a/1:15 a 8:33 p/2:30 p
Homosassa*** 9:11 a/5:04 a 11:35 p/6:19 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:25 a/7:17 a 11:19 a/8:34 p
9:40 a/4:39 a 11:56 p/5:56 p
7:27 a/2:27 a 9:43 p/3:44 p
10:29 a/6:16a -- /7:33 p


Gulf water
temperature


820
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.54 32.44 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.95 38.92 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 40.14 40.11 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.67 41.64 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


pc
pc
s
s
s
pc
s
.07 c
s
.03 pc
.16 s
.55 pc
.07 sh
s
s
s
pc
.05 pc
.01 pc
s
.16 pc
.04 pc
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
.01 s
s
s
.22 pc
s
pc
pc
.01 pc
pc
s
pc
pc
s
s
s


New Orleans 81 54 s 82 62
New York City 69 58 s 64 49
Norfolk 74 51 s 68 46
Oklahoma City 82 46 pc 85 67
Omaha 66 36 pc 79 57
Palm Springs 92 64 s 84 60
Philadelphia 67 55 s 67 49
Phoenix 91 66 pc 87 64
Pittsburgh 52 45 .12 s 57 42
Portland, ME 64 56 .28 pc 63 46
Portland, Ore 53 45 .22 sh 51 41
Providence, R.I. 74 59 .47 s 63 47
Raleigh 72 46 s 70 39
Rapid City 80 36 c 58 35
Reno 75 55 sh 63 44
Rochester, NY 57 46 .01 pc 58 45
Sacramento 77 54 pc 71 55
St. Louis 66 48 pc 78 60
St. Ste. Marie 58 39 pc 58 47
Salt Lake City 78 53 c 68 54
San Antonio 86 58 pc 90 72
San Diego 69 66 trace pc 69 63
San Francisco 65 56 pc 66 56
Savannah 78 50 s 75 52
Seattle 52 43 .02 sh 51 41
Spokane 50 39 rs 45 33
Syracuse 60 47 pc 59 44
Topeka 75 36 pc 80 65
Washington 69 51 s 68 48
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 95 Blythe, Calif. LOW 17 Angel Fire, N.M.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 91/78/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 59/53/c Mexico City
Athens 74/65/pc Montreal
Beijing 61/51/sh Moscow
Berlin 61/42/pc Paris
Bermuda 79/75/sh Rio
Cairo 87/67/s Rome
Calgary 32/14/sf Sydney
Havana 83/71/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 81/72/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 83/63/s Warsaw


66/62/sh
58/53/c
60/48/sh
80/51/s
51/45/sh
49/45/pc
61/56/sh
89/73/pc
74/60/pc
90/59/pc
68/63/pc
58/44/pc
62/42/s


C I T R U S


C O U N TY


For the RECORD


LHKON1CLJt
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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N I \ '-":'

S CoI house Inverness
SCourthouse office
To mpkins St. J square
S o 2 106 W. Main
41 Inverness, FL
S 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n .......................................................................... P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy....................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .................................................................. ............ Editor, 5 64 -293 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes....................................... .............. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .... ............... ............... M ike Arnold, 564-2930
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4FS Phone 352-563-6363
S1 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


LOCAL


A





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sewer connection funds still available


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

Funds to help county residents
connect to a sewer system in Crystal
River have gone unclaimed, ac-
cording to Citrus County Housing
Services.
"So far, 11 residents have applied
for funding," Lindsay Ubinas, Cit-
rus County Public Information Offi-
cer, said Wednesday
The low number of applications
means funding is available for
about 20 to apply, even though a
deadline of Oct. 1 had been set
When originally offered, the fund
contained about $220,000 to serve
at least 30 families' expenses, said
Heidi Blanchette, Housing Serv-
ices operations manager Antici-
pating more demand than
availability of funds, the county was
going to award funding through a
lottery system after the deadline.
Now the awards will be available
on a first-come, first-served basis
until funds are exhausted or all el-


igible applicants are served.
The funds, from the State Hous-
ing Initiative Partnership program
(SHIP) that assists very low, low
and moderate income families,
were earmarked for such residents
as those who are under a statutory
mandate to disconnect their
houses from septic tanks and con-
nect to a sewer system within one
year of the availability of the sewer
system.
SHIP funds are drawn from doc-
umentary stamp tax revenues.
Last month, the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners
(BOCC) voted unanimously to adopt
areas around King's Bay in unin-
corporated Crystal River as a spe-
cial assessment district
Although the assessment was
said to amount to about $2,310.06,
other estimated expenses included
$100 for a plumbing connection
permit, $700 for a plumber tie-in to
the sewer system, $50 for an envi-
ronmental health septic tank per-
mit, as much as $1,200 for septic


abandonment service, $125 for the
Crystal River connection fee and
$3,425 or $36.66 per month for 10
years for the Crystal River ex-
pansion fee. The city also is tacking
on a 25 percent surcharge for the
unincorporated area.
Blanchette said SHIP funds
could award an individual appli-
cant about $7,000 for permit, impact
and other fees necessary to connect
regional central water and/or sewer
service. Priority would be given to
hook-ups done in conjunction with
other state or federal funding
sources.
Eligible applicants would be
owner-occupied households with
an annual income of up to 80 per-
cent of area median income. Site-
built homes and mobile homes
constructed after June 1994, pro-
vided the home is classified as
"Real Property," are eligible for
assistance.
For a one-person household, the
maximum annual income to qualify
would be $26,950, or $30,800 for a


couple, or $38,500 for a family of
four
The SHIP award would not have
to be repaid if the recipient contin-
ued to live in the house for at least
10 years.
Since the assessment was
adopted last month, a nonprofit
group of residents called Free-
holders of Service Area 112-113-
114, the assessment district, has
filed a lawsuit against the county
and the city of Crystal River seek-
ing a judge to invalidate the inter-
local agreement between the city
and county that facilitated the
sewer expansion project
The lawsuit, however, would not
prohibit any member of the free-
holders' group from applying for
SHIP funds, said Peter Aare, the
group's attorney
The lawsuit, Aare said, was
aimed at the individual costs for as-
sessment-$2,310.06-and expan-
sion $3,425 that were "grossly
overinflated," and he represents a
body of property owners. But ap-


plying for SHIP funds, Aare said,
was a decision for each individual
homeowner
The BOCC will conduct a public
hearing regarding the assessment
at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov 13, at Citrus
County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness, for the purpose of
hearing objections to the confirma-
tion of the resolution that created
the special assessment district
Applications for SHIP funds are
being accepted at the Citrus County
Resource Center, Housing Services
Section, 2804 W Marc Knighton
Court Key No. 12, Lecanto, FL
34461.
The application and more de-
tailed information can be found
on the county's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click on De-
partments, Community Services,
Housing Services or call 352-527-
7520.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline. corn
or 352-564-2916.


HERITAGE
Continued from Page Al

winter time. The cattle
would spend their winter in
Ozello where the grass was.
That was in the days before
there were fences."
Furthermore, the festival,
which took place on the his-
toric Hernando School
grounds at the intersection
of U.S. 41 and Parsons Point
Road in Hernando, included
festivities for cowboys and
cowgirls of all ages.
Activities included food,
vendors with handcrafted
items, Chinese auction,
miniature horses and Zebu
cows.
Proceeds are used to re-
furbish the historic old Her-
nando School.
John Grannan, chairman
of the Hernando heritage
council, said the Colonial
Revival style building dates
back to the 1940s and was
part of the Works Projects
Administration (WPA) pub-
lic works project
Some 11 years ago, the
county school board
arranged for the historic
building to be demolished.


The Hernando Heritage
Council of the Citrus County
Historical Society decided
to save the historic school
and preserve it
Even though, the continu-
ing preservation requires
work and revenue, the Her-
nando Heritage Council of
the Citrus County Historical
Society had a vision for the
future.
"There has already been
over $500,000 put into the
school," said Kathy Johnson.
Stage and bathrooms have


been rebuilt, Johnson said,
along with installation of air
conditioner, wiring, water
system and a new roof.
'"A lot of the funding has
been from fundraisers like
this, grants and donations,"
Johnson said.
Johnson said they are des-
perate for volunteers to help
them refurbish the historic
building. Fliture plans for the
historic school includes a
museum and the opportunity
for the community to utilize
the space with community


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activities and meetings. son at 352-697-0793. porter Eryn Worthington at
For information, cal John- Contact Chronicle re- 352-563-5660, ext 1334.


al Dentistry
r Comfort
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* Fillings
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10/21/2012 10/27/2012 only in Citrus, Hernando, Pasco,
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LOCAL


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 A5


0


........ J


- r-le





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Kathleen
Cooper, 78
INVERNESS
The Celebration of Life
Memorial Service for Mrs.
Kathleen Roselynd Howard
Cooper of Inverness, Fla.,
will be at
4 p.m. Sun- .
day, Oct. 21, L
2012, at f
Chas. E. _
Davis Fu-
neral t
Home, In-
verness,
Fla. Family Kathleen
will receive Cooper
friends be-
ginning at 3 p.m. until the
time of service.
Kathy was born June 2,
1934, in Plainfield, N.J., the
daughter of the late Harri-
son and Catherine (Dono-
van) Howard. She died
peacefully at home under
the loving care of her family
and Hospice on Friday, Oct.
19, 2012. Kathy was married
in 1955 in New Jersey to her
high school sweetheart,
Frank Perrin Cooper Jr, for
57 years. They moved to
Youngstown, Ohio, in 1955
where they lived until retir-
ing to Inverness, Fla., in
1994. Kathy was a graduate
of Katherine Gibbs Secre-
tarial School in New York
City. She worked three years
as an executive secretary in
New Jersey and Ohio for
Steel Corporations; two
years as a personnel admin-
istrator for Celanese Corp.
of America; 25 years as a
legal assistant/paralegal in a
large Ohio law firm; and the
last nine years as a financial
administrator for a retired
attorney and his family
Kathy was also very active
in community affairs, as
well as an active member of
the Inverness Golf and
Country Club where she
was a primary writer/editor
of the club's monthly
newsletter, and served on its
board of directors. Kathy
enjoyed spending time with
her family and many
friends. She always dis-
played sincere interest in
those around her and was
blessed with genuine
friendships. She enjoyed
cruising, sewing, photogra-
phy and seeing the world.
Spending time each sum-
mer with her family at the
seashore was her most fa-
vorite destination. Kathy
also had a knack for organi-
zation. As a young mother,
she served as PTA presi-
dent, Cub Scout leader, com-
munity activist, as well as
organizing many events for
the neighborhood children
- swim meets, summer
reading groups, haunted
houses, lemonade stands
and summer plays, to name
a few. She was loved by
many
In addition to her many
friends and large family,
Kathy is survived by her
three children, Linda
Cooper Gray and Robert
Cooper of Inverness, Fla.,
and David (Karen) Cooper
of Atlanta, Ga.; and her five
grandchildren, David,
Jonathan and Matthew
Cooper of Atlanta, Ga., Jil-
lian Gray of Redondo
Beach, Calif., and Michael
Gray of Inverness, Fla. She
was preceded in death by
her brother, Harrison Ross
Howard Jr.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily suggests memorial dona-
tions to the Leukemia and
Lymphoma Team-In Train-
ing organization, which
raises funds to support re-
search in the fight against
blood cancers. http://pages.
teamintraining.org/los/
tinkerb13/camandjill.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. cornm.

Nancy
Purdy, 61
INVERNESS
Nancy L. Purdy, 61, Inver-
ness, died Friday, Oct. 19,
2012.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is as-
sisting the family with
arrangements.


Samuel
Jarrett, 81
FRITCH, TEXAS
Samuel Lewis Jarrett, 81,
formerly of Inverness, now
residing in Fritch, Texas,
died Oct. 18, 2012, at
Childer's Place under Hos-
pice care in Amarillo.
Sam was born Aug. 20,
1931, in Anderson, Ind., to
the late George and Mary
(Riggsby) Jarrett. He served
our country in the U.S. Navy
during the Korean conflict,
and retired after 26 years of
active and reserve service.
He was a district manager
for Sumter Electric Com-
pany for 15 years. Sam
joined the Rotary Club of
Inverness in 1974 and re-
mained a member for more
than 20 years, serving as
president during the 1991-
92 Rotary year. He received
the prestigious Paul Harris
Fellow Award in March
1992. He also was a member
of the First Christian
Church of Inverness.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife, Edna (Sor-
rells) Jarrett, Fritch, Texas;
two sons, Jonathan L. Jar-
rett, Fritch, Texas, and Tim-
othy L. Jarrett and wife,
Laurie, Inverness; one
grandson, Jonathan S. Jar-
rett and his wife, Kathie;
and one great-grandchild,
Kimber Mae Jarrett. He was
preceded in death by his
first wife of 53 years, Ina
Mae Jarrett, in 2003.
Sam's life will be honored
at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
24, at First Christian Church
of Inverness. Burial will fol-
low in Oak Ridge Cemetery
The family will receive
friends at the church from
10 a.m. until the hour of
service.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Edward 'Gene'
Kovalick, 64
HOMOSASSA
Edward "Gene" Kovalick,
64, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Wednesday,
Oct. 17, 2012, at Oak Hill
Hospital in Brooksville. He
was born Dec. 19, 1947, in
O m a h a ,
Neb., to
Stephen -
and Loretta
(Beardsley)
Kovalick.
He came
here seven
years ago
from Clark, Edward
N.J., where Kovalick
he retired
as a mortgage broker. He
was an avid golfer, enjoyed
fishing and amateur car rac-
ing and he was of the
Catholic faith.
In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by
his two brothers, Steve and
John Kovalick. He is sur-
vived by his wife, Diane, of
Homosassa; a brother,
Joseph Kovalick (Terry), of
New Tripoli, Pa.; and sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will
be 2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23,
2012, at the Strickland Fu-
neral Home Chapel in Crys-
tal River, with father
Ryszard Stradomski offici-
ating. The family will re-
ceive friends one hour prior
to service time. Private cre-
mation arrangements are
under the care of Strickland
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory Crystal River.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.conm.


Donnarae
Reller, 80
HERNANDO
Donnarae Reller, 80, of
Hernando, died Tuesday,
Oct. 16,2012.
A memorial service will
be at 10 a.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 24, 2012, at the Heinz
Funeral Home in Inverness.
Her family will receive
friends from 9 a.m. until the
hour of service. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.

Roger
Smith, 63
LECANTO
Roger A. Smith, 63, of
Lecanto, died Tuesday, Oct
9, 2012. Memorial gathering
will be from 11:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24,
2012, at VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos,
spanning the entire
column, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material are
charged at the same
rates.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.
The U.S. military
consists of five active-
duty services and their
respective guard and
reserve units: Army,
Marine Corps, Navy, Air
Force and Coast Guard.




Funeral Home for 50 Years"


Battery creator Ovshinsky, 89, dies


Associated Press

DETROIT Stan Ovshinsky, the self-
taught inventor who developed the nickel-
metal hydride battery used in the hybrid
vehicle industry, has died at his home in
suburban Detroit after a fight with cancer.
He was 89.
Ovshinsky, who ran Energy Conversion
Devices, a car battery development com-
pany, also created a machine that pro-
duced 9-mile-long sheets of thin solar
energy panels intended to bring cheaper,
cleaner power to homes and businesses.
His son, Harvey Ovshinsky, said his fa-
ther was passionate about science and al-
ternative energy, but also about civil rights
and other social causes. He said his father
died of complications from prostate can-
cer Wednesday night at his home in
Bloomfield Hills.
"Here was a man who spent his youth
and his adulthood determined to change
the world," the younger Ovshinsky said.
"That's not a 9-to-5 job. My father worked
tirelessly 24-7, even up until he got sick, to
change the world and its attitude toward
sustainable energy and alternate plat-
forms for information."
Stan Ovshinsky, for whom ovonics was
named, made possible such technological
discoveries as the solar-powered calcula-


TRAINING
Continued from Page Al

English classes, said Patrick
Simon, director of research
and accountability.
Himmel, a Democrat
seeking re-election to a
third term, has noted on the
campaign trail that while
Balfour talks about higher
academic results, her
own experience suggests
otherwise.
Balfour said that criti-
cism is unfair
"There's no training in
Citrus County for AP," she
said. "There's no support
for AP"
Himmel said that isn't the
case. She said teachers are
strongly encouraged to at-
tend statewide training -
most recently it was in Or-
lando and the district
matches them with teachers
who excel in specialized
programs such as AP and In-
ternational Baccalaureate.
And the district offers
numerous online resources
teachers can access
through the year, Himmel
said.
Plus, the academy is a
charter school. While its
staffers are employees of
the Citrus County School
District, curriculum is set
by an academy board of di-
rectors and overseen by di-
rector Ben Stofcheck.
Patrick Simon, director
of research and accounta-
bility, suggested Balfour
contact a teacher who is ac-
complished in advanced
study classes. Balfour said
she called someone she
knew at Crystal River High
School who teaches AP
classes. She took the
teacher to dinner, they dis-
cussed the class syllabus
and that was the end of her
training.


"I was told by
person to contact
for advice and I
said.
Balfour ackn
the district en
teachers to attend
out of the county.
by the time she
she'd be teaching
placement, it was
sign up for the tra
"The cutoff ha(
passed," she said
Himmel said t
emy could have
year to offer the A
class to give Balfo
attend training.
The district hW
vanced placemei
among the thr
schools and the
of Envir
Sciences.
Like dual-ei
and the Internati
calaureate proj
Lecanto High Sc
vanced placemen
who pass the fi
dardized test rec
lege credit for the
Simon said the
helpful for stud
don't pass the tes
He said the course
signed to prepare
for the rigors o
work.
He and Himme
district does no
teachers to receii
training prior to
an AP class. M
said, want the tra
volunteer for it.
"We try commi
fore compliance
said.
Following the e
school year, Ba
tended the wee]
training in Orlan
ticipation of tea
again this year.
she isn't teaching
lish at the acaden
mester and said

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* The Citrus County
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obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details.


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Associated Press
Stan Ovshinsky, a self-taught inventor who
developed the nickel-metal hydride battery
used in the hybrid vehicle industry, died at
his home Wednesday in suburban Detroit
after a fight with cancer. He was 89.
tor. Ovonics changes the electrical resist-
ance and structure of materials in re-
sponse to sunlight.
He never went to college, yet he earned
about 200 U.S. patents and was a fellow of
the American Physical Society and the
American Association for the Advance-
ment of Science. He received numerous
honorary degrees.


a district
a teacher
did," she

owledged
encouraged
d training
She said
learned
advanced
too late to
gaining.
d already


teach it in January if the
election doesn't go her way.
Himmel said the training
should help.
"I would expect to see a
better performance," Him-
mel said, "if she teaches it
again."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


the acad-
waited a II
P English
ur time to

as 22 ad -TM
nt classes


onmental

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\O1=OO2L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oct. 22 to 26MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, broccoli, applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Hot dog, un-
crusted PBJ, turkey super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Pulled barbe-
cued pork on bun, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
corn, dried fruit mix, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, macaroni
and cheese, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, green
beans, peaches, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, hot ham and cheese on
bun, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, peas, mixed fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich


stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken and
rice burrito, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, broccoli, mixed
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
macaroni and cheese, ham
super salad with ripstick, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden salad,
corn, dried fruit mix, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Pulled barbe-
cued pork with bun, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles,
pears, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, hot dog,
turkey super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, green beans, potato
roasters, applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, cheese pizza, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, peas,
peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuff, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita chicken
salad with wheat roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, fresh
broccoli, potato roasters, broc-
coli, dried fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken
with maxstix, turkey and gravy
on noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham


salad with wheat roll, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, potato triangles, cel-
ery, peas, peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Roasted
chicken with roll, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey salad
with wheat roll, pizza, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh baby car-
rots, baked beans, potato
roasters, mixed fruit, chilled
baked beans, juice, milk.
Thursday: fajita chicken and
rice with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick, ham
super salad with wheat roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans, po-
tato triangles, applesauce, cu-
cumbers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, spaghetti with rip-
stick, pizza, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, fajita chicken salad
with wheat roll, yogurt parfait
plate, baby carrots, cold corn
salad, potato roasters, corn,
peaches, juice, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, scal-
loped potatoes, green peas,
applesauce, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
tomato gravy, rotini noodles,
mixed vegetables, mixed fruit,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chicken chop
suey over steamed rice, green
beans, gingered carrots,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Tuna pasta
salad, marinated broccoli
salad, fresh orange, graham
crackers, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Oven-fried chicken
thigh, black-eyed peas, coun-
try vegetable medley, pineap-
ple, slice wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


Debating the debates


Eighty-seven million bate, the split screen was
Americans watched up almost continuously.
the first When did they
debate between start this?
presidential can- But the biggest
didates Barack flaw with the
Obama and Mitt current debate
Romney. You'd format is not
have thought with the candi-
Honey Boo Boo dates, but with
was going to ap- the moderators
pear on "Danc- and panelists.
ing With the The first de-
Stars." We'd JIM bate moderator
have learned MULLEN said a portion of
more, however, if the debate was
the two candi- about the econ-
dates had appeared on omy Great! Bring on a cou-
"Are You Smarter Than a ple of economists to ask
Fifth-grader?" some questions. Or a cou-
The first thing the mod- ple of CEOs. Or at least
erator does in a modern someone who can balance
debate is tell the TV audi- a checkbook.
ence the live audience has Journalists should re-
been instructed not to clap port what was said at a de-
or cheer for one candidate bate, not be part of it.
or the other. So the obvious Lincoln and Douglas did a
question is why is there fine job with no reporters
a live audience? The real at all on the stage.
audience is the gigantic TV Another super-silly de-
audience, not the tiny bate practice is to have the
group of people sitting on live audience or tweeters
their hands in the or emailers toss out ques-
auditorium. tions. Debate organizers
Why don't they stage the act like this is the greatest
debates in an empty studio thing since Hot Pockets,
of some recently canceled while I think it is a bad
celebrity TV talk show? idea and a waste of time. It
You wouldn't have to worry is not because I'm a snob,
about someone in the audi- or think the public isn't en-
ence breaking the rules in titled to ask politicians
favor of one candidate, questions. Instead, it
which is bound to happen comes from something I
sooner or later. experienced years ago dur-
There was no studio au- ing the folk music craze of
dience for the Kennedy/
Nixon debates, and they
went smoothly, so where
did this fake "tradition" of
live audiences begin? In
some TV executive's tiny,
tiny brain, no doubt. Or Ni
maybe it came from a Cer- graduate
tified Presidential Debate College, Gain
Consultant if there is As an opportunity to
such a thing. If not, you can experience what quality, pe
bet some university will be environment is like, we are offer
offering a Ph.D. in that cleaning (D1110), comprehensive ex
field any day now. (D0210) for $159.00.
It used to be the camera CALL US TO SCHEDULE AN AP
It used to be the camera .
would break away from the CITRUS (
speaker and focus on the
nonspeaking debater for a
reaction shot of him with a Citrus Memorial Allen Rid
"you just used the wrong Route 491, Lecanto, FL 34
fork" look on his face. But Visit us at www.citrusdenta
in the Obama/Romney de-


the early '60s.
There was a short-lived
fad for a thing called hoot-
enannies, in which the au-
dience would sing along
with the performers. So
you would pay good money
to see, say, Peter, Paul and
Mary, and instead of hear-
ing Peter, Paul and Mary,
you would hear the audi-
ence sing along with Peter,
Paul and Mary. But here's
the deal: I didn't pay to
hear you sing. I paid to
hear Peter, Paul and Mary
sing. Even if you were good
- and I'm sorry, but most
of you are not that's not
what I came to hear.
Everyone seemed to fig-
ure that out pretty quickly,
and hootenannies died a
quick, well-deserved
death, never to be heard
from again.
So instead of listening to
the audience sing, why not
have experts on foreign
policy, experts on health
care and experts on de-
fense ask the questions at a
presidential debate?
Whoops! I've answered
my own question. It would
make too much sense.

Jim Mullen's newest book,
"How to Lose Money in
Your Spare Time -At
Home," is available at
amazon.com. You can fol-
low him on Pinterest at
pin terest. com/jimmullen.


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exhibitors will share information and answer questions.
Colleges, universities, vocational schools and military
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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 A7


El





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


False commentary
On several occasions, I
have, in this space, ex-
pressed my dismay the
Chronicle persists in print-
ing letters from writers on
the left that consist of noth-
ing more than false com-
mentary on Republican
political positions.
John Read's utterly con-
temptible, totally menda-
cious column (Where the
GOP stands) is an example.
Some of his blather follows.
"Unemployment: The
Republicans have no real
plans beyond reducing
taxes on millionaires and
regulations on corpora-
tions." False.
The Republicans do have
a plan reduce taxes on
all individuals, both rich
and poor, and reduce re-
strictions on all businesses,
large and small.
"War: Get ready for the
next one (Iran)." A lie
spawned by MSNBC on
Oct 4 and reinforced by
Biden on the 11th.
"Tax Codes: The latest
push is for taxing the '47
percent' ... This means (the
poor) will pay more while
those at the top will have
their taxes cut." Baloney
Republicans will cut
everyone's taxes -no
exceptions.
"The Environment: They
want to kill the Environ-
mental Protection Agency"
Bunk.
"Medicaid: They want to
turn it over to the states..'.
LBJ already did that in
1965.
Please try to keep up, Mr
Read.
"Medicare: They want to
pay for it by vouchers
which will lose value over
time." Horse puckies.
The vouchers are op-
tional. Their value will
change with health care
costs.
"Social Security: They
want to privatize it." More
horse puckies.
Republicans want to give
young workers the option
to privately invest a portion
of their payroll taxes to
provide a supplement to
government benefits.
And so on ad nauseum.
Mr. Read's and his ag-


gressive disrespect for the
truth can be excused. In all
likelihood, he doesn't know
any better, but I know mem-
bers of the Chronicle staff
do.
If the Chronicle were to
allow only letters written
by intelligent and informed
liberals, it might convince
the rest of us that not all of
them are cretins.
That will be tough. Mr.
Read has left a lasting
impression.
John McFadden
Inverness

Debate falls short
The Chronicle usually
presents both sides of is-
sues in an exemplary
manor. The attempt at pre-
senting both sides of the
basic Republican vs. Dem-
ocratic Party in Sunday's
Commentary Section left a
great deal to be desired.
First, if you want to un-
derstand where the Repub-
licans stand on the issues,
don't ask a Democrat.
Mr. Read did an excel-
lent job of misrepresenting
everything Republicans
stand for. His piece read as
though it had been written
by Ed Schultz (a model of


fairness and objectivity) on
MSNBC. Yea, Right!
Mr. Hagaman did very lit-
tle better. After spending a
few paragraphs pointing
out vague faults in the
Obama administration, he
moved on to defend the Re-
publican position on reduc-
ing taxes on the wealthy
I hate to tell you, Mr.
Hagaman, but they are the
only ones (who) can afford
an increase in taxes. Every-
one else is stretched to the
limit.
If you are wealthy


enough not to have noticed:
gasoline, food, clothing,
tires, cars, everything has
gone up, except wages. And,
if you think we can reduce
a $1.2 trillion dollar deficit
with reductions in govern-
ment spending alone, you
may be a tea party candi-
date in the making.
Don't forget, those gov-
ernment employees you
would eliminate have
homes, families, mortgages,
buy groceries and con-
tribute to the GDP Yes, gov-
ernment spending is


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SUBMIT LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
U SEND LETTERS TO:
The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or email to
letters@chronicleonline.
com.

What I would like to see
is an article, written by a
Democrat, detailing how
they would pull or push
this country out of its eco-
nomic doldrums and ad-
dress the deficit and debt if
they are re-elected. Like-
wise, another one, written
by a Republican, for their
party. No smoke and mir-
rors or voodoo mathemat-
ics would be allowed in
either
With the Democrats sim-
ply demonizing Romney
and the Republicans wish-
ing on a star and promising
to reduce taxes and spend-
ing, I don't see how anyone
could make an intelligent
choice. Let's hope the up-
coming debates will give us
some specific details on
what they are proposing.
R.M. Sprott
Crystal River


1. -


A8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


OPINION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SoundOFF


:Letters to THE EDITOR=


After the port's
built, then what?
It's true building the port
will create a lot of jobs, but
after the port is finished no
export, no import, the upkeep
of the buildings, to pay the
people to run the place, to
keep the dredged canal, and
all the expenses of keeping it
open it's really ridiculous.
Using less Internet
equals weight loss
They say people need
jobs. Well, if they stopped
paying their bills and doing
their banking and doing their
buying on the Internet,
maybe people wouldn't be
losing their jobs. We're going
to wind up with no post office.
That's why they're getting so
fat, because they're too lazy
to get out and do the stuff
themselves like they used to.
Social Security at
risk since 1960s
I just read "Blame Democ-
rats" in the Medicare "Hot
(Corner)." If I recall, back in
the '60s they had the Job
Corps and the Peace Corps
under Kennedy and John-
son's administrations where
they borrowed and I said
borrowed money from So-
cial Security and never paid it
back. So that's where part of
the money went.
Do well drillers
need insurance?
I would like to find out if li-
censed well drillers have to
have insurance, if it's manda-
tory. And if so, where I can
find this out on the Internet or
by phone. I've tried state
agencies, environmental
agencies, several divisions of
Swiftmud, and nobody can
seem to direct me to find out
this information. Any informa-
tion would be helpful.

CALL SOUND OFF
m To submit Sound Off,
call 352-563-0579.


VoucherCare
My top five reasons to
vote against plans to turn
Medicare into "Voucher-
Care" are:
1. If you know it and you
like it, keep it.
Keep Medicare for you, if
you are currently on
Medicare and keep it for
future retirees. Don't pun-
ish Americans with
"VoucherCare" because
they are less than 55 years.
2. Medicare gives seniors
guaranteed benefits and
fixed premiums with an in-
surance plan that has been
around for almost 50 years.
"VoucherCare" tell sen-
iors you are on your own to
buy health insurance in the
private marketplace. Good
luck shopping among all
those new plans and find-
ing a plan you can afford
that might or might not pro-
vide the health coverage
you need.
3. Seniors on Medicare
have an 800-pound gorilla
on their side to negotiate
the best possible prices
from providers of health
care. It is like being on a
group employer health in-
surance policy that in-
cludes 49 million
employees. No private
health insurance company
can match the bargaining
power of Medicare.
For this reason,
Medicare, not "Voucher-
Care" is the far better
choice to fix long-term
problems of rising costs.
4. Medicare doesn't pay
CEO salaries and profits.
"VoucherCare" will.
Medicare is owned by the
American public and
Medicare premiums do not
include costs for CEO
salaries and profits.
"VoucherCare" will be
owned by private, includ-
ing for-profit insurance
companies and "Voucher-
Care" premiums will in-
clude costs for highly paid
CEOs and profits.
5. Medicare is for sen-


iors, for real people we
care about.
Seniors have paid into
Medicare all their working
lives and at retirement
earn a right to basic health
care needed for continued
productive lives.
"VoucherCare" is not for
people; it is for the idea of
smaller, corporate govern-
ment that cuts costs for
even our proudest pro-
grams without regard to the
human cost.
Wendy Horgan
Beverly Hills

Crime deterrent
Re: Special guest column
byAnthony Schembri
First off, I highly respect
Mr. Schembri for his crimi-
nal justice expertise and


regret he was ever termi-
nated from his commis-
sioner post in Citrus
County. A person of his
knowledge and character is
considered a threat or dan-
gerous by others in politics
with less knowledge or ex-
perience in these matters.
Mr Schembri has paid
his dues in law enforce-
ment matters! It is easier to
get rid of someone like
him, than any attempt to
compete with him in local
political matters.
I do take exception to
one of Mr. Schembri's per-
sonal feelings toward the
old saying that: Capital
punishment does not deter
crime!
Mr Schembri was refer-
ring to his watching the ex-
ecution of one Manuel


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lice officer while making a
simple traffic stop.
I want Mr. Schembri to
know I will be convinced of
that if I ever read where
Mr. Manuel Valle is back in
the courtroom trying to de-
fend himself in another
murder. Mr Valle cannot
commit another murder,
since he was put to death
by lethal injection Sept. 28,
2011.
So everyone can clearly
see that capital punish-
ment does deter crime!
John Chambers
Inverness

Figures lie
This is in response to
Leonard Pitts column enti-
tled "Conservatives deny


SUBMIT LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
All letters must be signed
and include a phone num-
ber and hometown, includ-
ing letters sent via email.
Send letters to: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or email to letters@
chronicleonline.com.

reality," which appeared in
the Oct. 15 Chronicle: If we
are to believe Mr. Pitts, the
government never lies, es-
pecially when the ideology
of the party in power
agrees with the writer.
I'll bet dollars to donuts
if this were a Republican
administration and like un-
employment numbers were
published, you'd be singing
a different tune. Liars fig-
ure and figures lie all
the time, Mr Pitts. Espe-
cially from an administra-
tion that has proven lies
are its stock in trade.
If the Obama administra-
tion were to be rated on the
basis of promises made and
kept, transparency and bi-
partisanship, we'd be talk-
ing a record low
percentage, but hey, who's
numbers would those be?
Miracle of miracles, with
one month to go before the
election, unemployment
numbers have mysteriously
declined!
Come on, Mr Pitts, the
American people didn't
just fall off the turnip
truck.
Wes Alexander
Beverly Hills


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Parties see gains coming from Medicare debate


DAVID EsPO
AP Special Correspondent

WASHINGTON -A little more
than two weeks before Election
Day, Republicans and Democrats
alike say Medicare is working to
their political advantage in cam-
paigns for the White House and
Congress.
They can't both be right, and no
matter which side is, this is one
campaign clash with conse-
quences extending well beyond
Nov 6.
Mitt Romney "would replace
guaranteed benefits with a
voucher system," says a commer-
cial President Barack Obama's
campaign aired in several states
this fall. "Seniors could pay $6,000
more a year. A plan AARP says
would undermine Medicare," it
adds, making claims that Democ-
rats in congressional campaigns
echo in ads of their own from New
York to California.
Not surprisingly, Republican
presidential nominee Romney de-
scribes the issue differently as he
describes what he and running
mate Paul Ryan want to do.
"You pay into Medicare for
years. Every paycheck. Now when
you need it, Obama has cut $716
billion from Medicare. Why? To
pay for Obamacare," one of Rom-
ney's ads says. "The Romney/Ryan
plan protects Medicare benefits
for today's seniors and strengthens
the plan for the next generation,"
it says, a pitch that party strategists
say is helping Republicans up and
down the ballot blunt a perennial
Democratic campaign attack.
Given the millions of dollars
both sides are spending, the win-
ner of the presidential election
may well be able to claim a
Medicare mandate. Add the near
certainty that deficit reduction
will be prominent on the 2013
agenda. Then factor in the official
estimate that the Medicare fund
that pays for inpatient care will
run out of money in a little more
than a decade.
The result is a near-certainty
significant change is coming for a
program that provides health care
to 49 million beneficiaries, the
large majority of them age 65 and
older
Like so much else in a grid-
locked capital in the throes of a
tight election, much depends on
where the argument begins.
A polling advantage on
Medicare for Obama and fellow


Associated Press
President Barack Obama speaks Friday about choice facing women in the
election, during a campaign event at George Mason University in Fairfax,
Va. As the election nears, Republicans and Democrats alike say Medicare
is working to their political advantage in campaigns for the White House
and Congress. They can't both be right, and no matter which side is, this
is one campaign clash with consequences extending well beyond Nov. 6.
Given the millions that both sides are spending, the winner of the
presidential election may be able to claim a Medicare mandate.


Democrats isn't surprising be-
cause surveys for decades have
shown the public favors them on
the issue. But a narrowing GOP
deficit would be, and that's what
Republicans say is happening, cit-
ing surveys in previous years that
showed a Democratic advantage
on Medicare of 20 points.
The polls vary A Washington
Post-ABC survey this month
showed Obama with a 54-41 ad-
vantage over Romney on Medicare
among likely voters, while a Pew
survey made it 46-43 for Obama.
"The Romney/Ryan Medicare
message has neutralized the
issue," GOP pollster David Win-
ston wrote in a memo for the
American Action Network in Au-
gust, shortly after Ryan, a Wiscon-
sin congressman, was placed on
the Republican ticket.
He and others say the passage of
Obama's health care plan has
given Republicans a new argu-
ment to make that passage of
the legislation involved cutting
$716 billion from Medicare over a
decade. It's a point independent
voters dislike about the president
more than anything else, accord-
ing to Charlie Black, a Republican
strategist and informal adviser to
Romney
But Mark Mellman, a Demo-
cratic pollster, said, "Nobody


would put up all these ads if we
didn't believe it was working."
Rep. Steve Israel of New York,
head of the Democratic Congres-
sional Campaign Committee, says
he has a two-word answer to the
GOP claims: Ron Barber. An Ari-
zona Democrat, Barber won a spe-
cial election in June to replace
Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Gif-
fords, who had been wounded in
an assassination attempt Both par-
ties test-marketed ads on Medicare
and Obama's health law in antici-
pation of the fall campaign.
The dispute over the ads them-
selves is no less intense.
Democrats reject the claim they
cut Medicare to help finance the
health law.
They say the law was financed
partially by reducing the pro-
jected growth of Medicare, not
cutting it. Ironically, it is the same
argument Republicans often fall
back on when they are accused of
seeking cuts to education or other
programs.
Democrats also say none of the
$716 billion came from cuts in
guaranteed benefits, but primarily
from reductions in projected pay-
ments to private insurers in the
Medicare Advantage program, as
well as reimbursements to hospi-
tals and other providers.
They also note that the health


Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks
Wednesday at a rally at Baldwin Wallace University in Berea, Ohio.


law eliminated the doughnut hole,
a gap in coverage that required
seniors with especially high pre-
scription drug costs to pay large
sums out of pocket.
But Republicans accuse Obama
and the Democrats of making false
accusations of their own.
They stress that neither Rom-
ney nor Ryan has proposed any
changes for current beneficiaries
or those within 10 years of en-
rolling in Medicare. They also cite
independent fact checks conclud-
ing that Democratic claims of a
$6,400 increase in out-of-pocket
costs for seniors under the GOP
approach are bogus, based on an
outdated version of Ryan's plan.
Republicans also say that un-
like Ryan's plan, Romney's does
not include a mandatory cap on
growth of the overall program to
guarantee budget savings. Rom-
ney has yet to release details of his
own proposal, or even a compre-
hensive description of ways in
which it differs from his running
mate's blueprint.
There's no doubt about the mil-
lions going into the campaign de-
bate on the issue.
Obama's campaign seized on
Medicare shortly after Romney
named Ryan as his running mate.
It spent nearly $16 million on ads
in eight battleground states for
several weeks beginning in mid-
August, according to records com-
piled by ad checkers. Romney
spent about $7.7 million over
roughly the same time period.
There the issue sat, until Rom-
ney's strong showing in the first


debate on Oct 3 and Obama's poor
one.
Suddenly, the president's cam-
paign was back on the air attack-
ing Romney over Medicare again,
trying to blunt the Republican's
gains in the polls.
Last week, Romney, too, men-
tioned Medicare in an ad that be-
gins by cataloging the high
unemployment and large deficits
during Obama's term. "He just
hasn't been able to put in place re-
forms for Medicare and Social Se-
curity to preserve them," the
commercial says.
A similar clash is playing out
more than two dozen Senate and
House races, largely along the
same rhetorical lines.
In California, Democratic chal-
lenger Raul Ruiz and the party's
campaign committee have both
paid for ads targeting Rep. Mary
Bono Mack's record on Medicare.
One accused her of "voting to end
Medicare, leaving seniors at the
mercy of insurance companies,
paying $6,400 more."
The sixth-term congressman
aired an ad of her own, and the
National Republican Campaign
Committee defended her as well.
"The truth: Mary voted to pro-
tect Social Security and Medicare.
She always will," the congress-
woman's ad said, before going on
to accuse House Democratic
leader Nancy Pelosi of being be-
hind the ads. It claimed the ads
were part of a campaign to put lib-
erals back in charge of the House.
"We get more taxes, higher spend-
ing, fewer jobs."


Draft order would provide cyberthreat info


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A new
White House executive
order would direct U.S. spy
agencies to share the latest
intelligence about cy-
berthreats with companies
operating electric grids,
water plants, railroads and
other vital industries to help
protect them from elec-
tronic attacks, according to
a copy obtained by The As-
sociated Press.
The seven-page draft
order, which is being final-
ized, takes shape as the
Obama administration ex-
presses growing concern
that Iran could be the first
country to use cyberterror-
ism against the United
States. The military is ready
to retaliate if the U.S. is hit
by cyberweapons, Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta
said. But the U.S. also is
poorly prepared to prevent
such an attack, which could
damage or knock out critical
services that are part of
everyday life.


The White House de-
clined to say when the pres-
ident will sign the order.
The draft order would put
the Department of Home-
land Security in charge of
organizing an information-
sharing network that rap-
idly distributes sanitized
summaries of top-secret in-


telligence reports about
known cyberthreats that
identify a specific target.
With these warnings, known
as tear lines, the owners and
operators of essential U.S.
businesses would be better
able to block potential at-
tackers from gaining access
to their computer systems.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Election 2012



Campaign costs: Who donates the most?


Deep-pocketed political donors
Top donors to Democratic and Republican presidential can-
didates and the organizations supporting their campaigns,
along with total amounts donated in 2012 in millions:


DEMOCRATS
E Jeffrey Katzenberg
Film producer and
CEO DreamWorks
Animation
I $2.6 million


REPUBLICANS


Hi


Sheldon Adelson
Owner Las Vegas
Sands casino empire
M $34.2


Irwin Jacobs Bob J. Perry
Founder/former Head of Houston real
chairman of Qualcomm estate empire
I 2.1 i 17.3


Fred Eychaner
Founder/publisher
Newsweb Corp.


1 I 2.1


I.qf


Harold Simmons
Owner Contran Corp.,
metals, chemicals and
waste management
i 16.5


Associated Press
President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney exchange
views during the second presidential debate Oct. 16 at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.


Top five donors

for Republican

Mitt Romney

Associated Press
WASHINGTON For a
casino mogul worth an esti-
mated $25 billion, $34.2 mil-
lion may sound like chump
change. Yet that's how much
money Sheldon Adelson has
donated so far to aid Re-
publican presidential can-
didate Mitt Romney and
organizations supporting
Romney this election, mak-
ing him the donor of donors
for the GOP
Other top donors giving
millions of dollars to aid
Romney's campaign include
a trio of Texas money
moguls and the head of a
south Florida-based energy
conglomerate. Their rank-
ings atop the list of Republi-
can donors shifted Friday as
new campaign donation to-
tals for September were re-
leased by the Federal
Election Commission. Adel-
son remained ahead of the
pack, but two of the Texas
donors switched places.
Those donors and others
are funding a presidential
election on track to cost
nearly $2 billion, with
money going toward indi-
vidual Democratic and Re-
publican campaigns as well
as independent, "super" po-
litical committees working
on the campaigns' behalf.
Political donations can
open doors closed to most
people. Big-dollar donors


METHODOLOGY
These rankings by The Associated Press, based on cam-
paign financial reports submitted to the Federal Election Com-
mission, include contributions to super PACs, presidential
campaigns, political parties and joint-fundraising committees.
Federal law limits maximum contributions to campaigns, par-
ties and affiliated committees, but federal court rulings have
stripped away such limits to super PACs. This analysis ex-
cludes secret-but-legal contributions that might have been
made to nonprofit groups, which can pay for so-called issue
ads that don't explicitly advocate for or against a candidate.
Such groups are not required to identify their donors.
Where available, the analysis considered donations "bun-
dled," or raised, from other wealthy donors for Mitt Romney
and President Barack Obama. Obama periodically identifies his
bundlers, although Romney has resisted calls to do the same.


are often invited to state
dinners at the White House
and other events with the
president. They also may be
asked to weigh in on public
policy, especially if it affects
their own financial inter-
ests. And the ranks of am-
bassadors, advisory panels
and other government jobs
traditionally are filled with
those who have been unusu-
ally generous during the
campaign.
Based on an examination
of more than 2.3 million cam-
paign contributions the
methodology is below The
Associated Press has ranked
the top five financial sup-
porters bankrolling the Re-
publican presidential run:
No. 1: Sheldon Adelson,
79, owner of the Las Vegas
Sands casino empire, is the
largest declared donor to the
Romney campaign, provid-
ing more than $34.2 million.
No. 2: Bob J. Perry, 80,
head of a Houston real es-
tate empire worth an esti-
mated $650 million, had
been at No. 3 but vaulted


into the No. 2 spot with $17.3
million.
No. 3: Harold Simmons,
81, owner of Contran Corp., a
Dallas-based conglomerate
worth an estimated $9 bil-
lion that specializes in met-
als and chemical production
and waste management, has
donated $16.5 million
No. 4: Robert Rowling,
58, head of Dallas-based
TRT Holdings, has given at
least $4.1 million to Repub-
lican Party and candidates
this election.
No. 5: William Koch, 72,
an industrialist whose
South Florida-based energy
and mining conglomerate is
worth an estimated $4 bil-
lion, has given $4 million to
the to the super PAC back-
ing Romney Restore Our
Future.


Top five donors

for President

Barack Obama

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Shrek
would be green with envy.
Movie producer Jeffrey
Katzenberg is animating the
presidential race this elec-
tion season, raising more
money than any other Dem-
ocratic donor.
The DreamWorks Anima-
tion CEO joins two other
media moguls, a personal-
injury lawyer and a philan-
thropist in giving millions of
dollars to help President
Barack Obama win a second
term.
Based on an examination
of more than 2.3 million
campaign contributions -
the methodology is below
- The Associated Press
has ranked the top five fi-
nancial supporters of
Obama's:
No. 1: Jeffrey Katzen-
berg, 61, Hollywood film
producer and chief execu-
tive of DreamWorks Anima-
tion, is President Barack
Obama's top donor with
$2.566 million when tallying
his contributions to a
"super" political committee,
money to Obama's cam-


Jon Stryker Robert T. Rowling
Michigan philanthropist Head of Dallas-based
TRT Holdings
I 2.1 4.1

:Steve Mostyn William Koch
Houston-based Head of south
personal injury attorney Florida-based energy,
mining conglomerate
I2.0 w 4.0


SOURCE: AP analysis of Federal Election Commission data


paign and the money he
arranged for others to write
for the president
No. 2: Irwin Jacobs, 78,
the founder and former
chairman of Qualcomm, has
given more than $2 million
to pro-Obama super PACs
and about $23,000 directly to
Obama's campaign and the
Democrats.
No. 3 (tie): Fred
Eychaner, founder of
Chicago-based alternative-
newspaper publisher
Newsweb Corp., has given
$1.5 million to the Priorities
USA Action super PAC. He's
also given more than
$60,000 to the president's
re-election committees, and
he's listed as a major


"bundler" for Obama, hav-
ing raised at least $500,000
for the president.
No. 3 (tie): Jon Stryker,
54, a Michigan philanthro-
pist, has given $2 million to
the Priorities USA Action
super PAC and has given
$66,000 in contributions to
Obama and the Democratic
Party.
No. 5: Steve Mostyn, 41,
a Houston-based personal
injury attorney, has given
more than $2 million to the
Priorities USA Action super
PAC that's helping Obama.
Mostyn, the former head of
the Texas Trial Lawyers As-
sociation, is a major backer
of Democratic candidates in
the state.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Presidential debate host


faces lengthy checklist


South Florida

college site of

Monday's event

Associated Press
BOCA RATON Is the
humidity in the hall just
right? Are there enough
hotel rooms nearby to hold
the hordes of campaign
staffers and journalists?
Will the candidates' dress-
ing rooms be big enough?
Landing a presidential
debate requires painstaking
adherence to a lengthy
checklist, not to mention
millions of dollars. Colleges
and universities big and
small have held the grand
events throughout the years,
and Lynn University is the
latest small liberal arts
school to play host Officials
say what set them apart
wasn't name recognition, but
a willingness to transform
campus life to pull it off.
The university has in-
vested about $5 million in
upgrades to prepare for the
arrival of President Barack
Obama and Mitt Romney on
Monday New entrances to
campus have been built, and
the computer network has
been upgraded. Sports
teams have been displaced,
performances have been de-
layed, and faculty and staff
members have been flooded
with added responsibilities.
But most on campus seem
to relish the opportunity,
and Lynn has added dozens
of classes inspired by the de-
bate, developed a debate
curriculum being used by
students from kindergarten
through high school around
the country, and is hosting
more election-themed
events than administrators
can count. Everything from
the books freshmen are as-
signed (First debate moder-
ator Jim Lehrer's "Tension
City" is required reading) to
the marketing campaign of
the admissions office ("What
the World is Coming To") to


Associated Press
Workers Luciano Ahumada, left, and Ivan Cortez
wrap up curtains on the stage Oct. 18 in preparation for the
upcoming presidential debate at Lynn University in Boca
Raton, Fla. Members of the media tour the Keith C.
and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center, the site
off the upcoming presidential debate at Lynn University.


the swag on sale in the book-
store has been affected.
"One of the things we
found most appealing about
Lynn is its willingness to
just dive in," said Peter
Eyre, a senior adviser to the
Commission on Presidential
Debates. "They have em-
braced this whole notion
that the debate is a larger
commitment to education."
To be considered as a de-
bate host, schools must sub-
mit proposals detailing their
adherence to countless cri-
teria, from the humidity in
the hall (not more than 50
percent) to the number of
nearby hotel rooms (at least
3,000) to the size of the dress-
ing rooms (750 square feet).
Guidelines dictate every-
thing from the precise di-
mensions of the stage to the
number of parking spots to
the carpeting. The applica-
tion comes with a $7,500 fee
and selected sites must pay
$1.65 million to the Commis-
sion on Presidential Debates
to cover costs.
The selected colleges have
been all sizes, all over the
country, public and private.
"It's sort of all over the
map," said Alan Schroeder,
a Northeastern University
professor who wrote "Pres-
idential Debates: 50 Years of
High-Risk TV"


As for Lynn, administra-
tors had initially figured they
would be lucky to land a vice
presidential event after a
bid to host a gubernatorial
debate fell through two years
ago. Until now, the school's
national exposure was lim-
ited mostly to tragedy: four
students and two professors
on a charity trip died in the
earthquake that devastated
Haiti in 2010.
The school has about 2,100
students hailing from across
the U.S. and 78 other coun-
tries. Lynn is a young insti-
tution at 50 years old, and
those on campus are taking
its low name recognition in
stride: T-shirts for sale in the
bookstore say, "We've never
heard of you either."
"This is a moment we've
been waiting for," Univer-
sity president Kevin Ross
said. "We've been seeking
and searching for a moment
where we could tell the
story of Lynn."
In the 1970s and 1980s, de-
bates were at non-academic
venues, such as the Walnut
Street Theater in Philadel-
phia and the Public Audito-
rium in Cleveland. The
debate commission was
formed in 1988 to oversee
the events and, since, has
emphasized holding them
on college campuses.


CH ONICLE
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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Lebanon links car bomb to Syrian crisis


Associated Press
A protester holds a placard with the Syrian revolution flag and
writing that reads, "God is great, the free people of Aleppo,"
and chants slogans against the killing of the country's
intelligence chief, Brig. Gen. Wissam al-Hassan and seven
others Saturday in Martyrs' Square, Beirut, Lebanon.


Protestors hit streets

while others mourn
Associated Press
BEIRUT Lebanese protesters
erected flaming roadblocks and gun-
men roamed the streets Saturday in a
city on edge after the assassination of
a top security official in a powerful car
bomb the prime minister linked to the
civil war in neighboring Syria.
The crisis raised a terrifying specter
for Lebanese who fear their country
could easily plunge back into cycles of
violence and reprisal that have
haunted it for decades.
Friday's blast in the heart of Beirut's
Christian area killed eight people, in-
cluding the country's intelligence
chief, Brig. Gen. Wissam al-Hassan. It
was the deadliest bombing in Beirut in
four years, shattering the country's un-
easy calm.


The government declared a national
day of mourning for the victims Satur-
day, but protesters burned tires and
set up roadblocks in anger
Sharbal Abdo, who lives in the
neighborhood where the bomb went
off, brought his 6-year-old son, Chris,
and 12-year-old daughter, Jane, to see
the destruction Saturday
"They were very afraid yesterday,"
he said. "They need to face this situa-
tion. It may be their future."
Lebanese Prime Minister Najib
Mikati on Saturday linked the bomb-
ing to al-Hassan's high-profile investi-
gation this summer that uncovered
what authorities called a plot by Syria
to provoke chaos in Lebanon with
bombings and assassinations.
"I don't want to prejudge the inves-
tigation, but, in fact, we cannot sepa-
rate yesterday's crime from the
revelation of the explosions that could
have happened," Mikati said at a news
conference following an emergency
Cabinet meeting.


Lebanese mourners light candles during
a vigil for Brig. Gen. Wissam al-Hassan
and seven others killed in a Friday
bomb attack.
Mikati, who opponents believe is too
close to Syria and the Shiite militant
group Hezbollah, offered to resign
after the bombing, but was asked by
President Michel Suleiman to stay


World BRIEFS

6 Afghan police
killed in attack
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan
-An Afghan police officer
and cook poisoned their col-
leagues at a checkpoint in an
assault coordinated with in-
surgent fighters that left six
dead in the country's south,
officials said Saturday.
It was the latest in a string
of attacks from inside the
Afghan army and police are
threatening to undermine the
partnership with international
troops which have been
the target of many attacks -
and the morale of Afghan
forces, who have suffered
equally heavy casualties from
such strikes.
Ex-spokesman for
Gadhafi arrested
TRIPOLI, Libya The
Libyan government on Satur-
day announced the capture
of Moammar Gadhafi's ex-
spokesman outside a be-
sieged town, as the oil-rich
North
f African na-
tion marked
the anniver-
sary of the
ousted dic-
tator's
death.
IVMoussa The
Ibrahim statement
by the
prime minister's office said
Moussa Ibrahim, who be-
came the international face of
the regime in its final months,
was captured as he was try-
ing to flee Bani Walid. The
town has been the site of
fierce fighting between pro-
government forces and fight-
ers holed up in what was
once a stronghold for Gadhafi
supporters.
London protesters
bash austerity
LONDON Tens of thou-
sands of demonstrators de-
scended on the British capital
Saturday in a noisy but
peaceful protest at a govern-
ment austerity drive aimed at
slashing the nation's debt.
Unions, anti-war cam-
paigners, left-wing leaders,
community groups and other
activists poured down Lon-
don's streets in a demonstra-
tion against reductions to
public sector spending which
officials are pushing through
to rein in the Britain's debt,
which stands at more than
$1.7 trillion.
Bombs, shootings
kill 17 in Iraq
BAGHDAD Back-to-
back bomb blasts in a
crowded Baghdad market
near a revered Shiite shrine
and a string of shootings tar-
geting government officials
killed at least 17 people
Saturday.
The bombings, which hap-
pened within about a minute
of each other, appeared be
aimed at intimidating Iraq's
Shiites, who are a frequent
target of Sunni insurgents.
Police said at least 11 people
were killed and 35 were
wounded.
-From wire reports


Fighting for jobs


A man speaks to the crowd Oct. 13 at a United for Coal event in Pikeville, Ky.

'War on coal' label obscures realities on the battlefield


Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, WVa. Drive
through the coalfields of Central
Appalachia, and signs of the siege
are everywhere.
Highway billboards announce
entry to "Obama's No Job Zone,"
while decals on pickup truck win-
dows show a spikey-haired boy pee-
ing on the president's name.
"Stop the War on Coal," yard signs
demand. "Fire Obama."
Only a few generations ago, coal
miners were literally at war with
their employers, spilling and shed-
ding blood on West Virginia's Blair
Mountain in a historic battle for
union representation and fair
treatment.
Today, their descendants are al-
lies in a carefully choreographed
rhetorical war playing out across
eastern Kentucky, southwestern
Virginia and all of West Virginia. It's
fueled by a single, unrelenting mes-
sage they now face a common
enemy- the federal government -
that has decided that coal is no
longer king, or even noble.
Assigning blame
Blame the president, the script
goes. Blame the Environmental
Protection Agency And now that it's
election season, blame all incum-
bent politicians even those who
have spent their careers in a deli-
cate dance, trying to make mines
safer while allowing their operators
to prosper
The war on coal is a sound bite
and a headline, perpetuated by
pundits, power companies and pub-


A political sign in a yard Oct. 16 in
Dellslow, W.Va., expresses how some
residents feel about coal production
and the president.


Amanda McCracken, of Big Stone Gap, Va., stands with her children,
Kaylee, 6, and Pryston, 8, at the Oct. 13 United for Coal demonstration in
support of her husband and their father, who is a coal miner.


lic relations consultants who have
crafted a neat label for a complex
set of realities, one that compels
people to choose sides.
It's easier to call the geologic,
market and environmental forces
reshaping coal cheap natural gas,
harder-to-mine coal seams, slowing
economies some kind of political
or cultural "war" than to acknowl-
edge the world is changing, and
leaving some people behind.
War, after all, demands victims.
And in this case, it seems, victims
demand a war
Building mines, jobs
Coal helped build America. It
powered steam engines on rail-
roads that opened up the West. It fu-
eled homes and factories. It made a
lot of people rich and others com-
fortable. By the early 1900s, more
than 700,000 men and boys worked
in the nation's mines, many for coal
barons offering opportunity and
brutality in equal measure.
The miners who resisted ex-
ploitation helped shape the princi-
ples of modern labor law: Pay by


the hour A week that lasts five days,
not seven. Black men and white
men paid the same.
To hear industry tell it, those who
remain are an endangered species
in the crosshairs of overzealous en-
vironmental regulators directly re-
sponsible for wiping out thousands
of jobs.
Assessing casualties
But in war, casualties are often
inflated. The numbers are eye-
catching, but details are lost.
In reality, U.S. Department of
Labor figures show the number of
coal jobs nationwide has grown
steadily since 2008, with consistent
gains in West Virginia and Virginia,
and ups and down in Kentucky.
There have been layoffs, to be
sure.
Between January and June, coal
companies in West Virginia, Vir-
ginia and Kentucky cut a combined
3,000 jobs. But mines in the Vir-
ginias still employed more people
at the end of June than at the same
points in 2008 and 2010, while Ken-
tucky was only down by 1,000.


WorldBRIEFS

Israeli troops take
over Gaza boat
JERUSALEM Israeli
troops on Saturday comman-
deered a Gaza-bound ship
that tried to break through Is-
rael's blockade of the
Hamas-ruled seaside strip,
the military said. European
lawmakers and other pro-
Palestinian activists aboard
did not resist, and the
Finnish-flagged vessel was
diverted to an Israeli port.
The trip by the ship, Es-
telle, marked the latest chal-
lenge to the air, land and sea
embargo of Gaza that Israel
imposed after the Islamic mil-
itant Hamas group seized the
territory in 2007. Israeli offi-
cials say they need to en-
force the blockade to prevent
weapons smuggling.
Hamas called for more at-
tempts to break the sea
blockade.
France 24 TV: Cairo
reporter attacked
PARIS A correspondent
for France 24 TV was "sav-
agely attacked" near Cairo's
Tahrir Square after being
seized by a crowd, the net-
work said Saturday. It was
the latest case of violence
against women at the epicen-
ter of Egypt's restive protests.
The news channel said in
a statement Sonia Dridi was
attacked around 10:30 p.m.
Friday after a live broadcast
on a protest at the square
and was later rescued by a
colleague and other wit-
nesses. France 24 did not
give further details about the
attack, but it said its employ-
ees were safe and it will file
suit against unspecified
assailants.
BMW to build
plant in Brazil
SAO PAULO Officials
say German automaker
BMW AG will build a factory
in southern Brazil.
Santa Catarina state Gov.
Raimundo Colombo said
BMW will invest $500 million
to build the plant.
-From wire reports

In the muck


Associated Press
A participant of the Wild
Sau Dirt Run 2012 is
covered with mud after
passing a barrier Saturday
in Obertriesting, Lower
Austria. The Wild Sau Dirt
Run is a cross-country and
steeplechase race for men
and women that goes over
the distances of 10 and 20
kilometers.











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans
Notes can be
found on Page
A17 of today's
Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


r l lI 1 "


pe-: I.:. Ir-e Chronicle
This week's Fall Foliage photo
contest winner was submitted by
online user "cruiseduck."
Floridian Fall Foliage is
represented by beautiful color on
rain trees as seen on King's Bay
in Crystal River. Go to
www.chronicleonline/fallfoliage
and upload your photos each
week. We will select the best
photos on Thursdays from the top
vote getters and publish them in
Sunday's newspaper each week.
You will not need to resubmit the
same photo each week; we will
consider all photos submitted for
the month at the end of each
week. Photos should not have
been taken before September
2011. Make sure you have
permission to use the photos if
you are not the original
photographer.


Rain trees on King5s bau


Better late than never


Decades delayed, FDR memorial park opens in New York


ULA ILNYTZKY
Associated Press Writer
NEW YORK
I t's been nearly 40
years since New York
City started planning
a memorial to
President Franklin
Roosevelt on an island in
the East River. Welfare
Island was renamed
Roosevelt Island, and
American architect Louis
Kahn was commissioned
to design a park honoring
the 32nd president.
The memorial park was never
realized until now.
The Franklin D. Roosevelt Four
Freedoms Park, on the southern tip of
2-mile-long Roosevelt Island between
the boroughs of Manhattan and
Queens, was dedicated Wednesday in a
ceremony attended by dignitaries
including former President Bill
Clinton and Mayor Michael
Bloomberg.
The park is named after Roosevelt's
Jan. 6, 1941, State of the Union ad-
dress, known as the Four Freedoms
Speech. Given before America got in-
volved in World War II, Roosevelt said
the way to justify the enormous sacri-


fice of war was to create a world cen-
tered on four essential human free-
doms: freedom of speech and
expression; freedom of worship; free-
dom from want; and freedom from
fear. The words were later incorpo-
rated into the charter of the United
Nations, which Roosevelt
helped create.
The park consists of a 4-acre triangu-
lar expanse of green, flanked by 120 lit-
tleleaf Linden trees leading to a
colossal bronze bust of Roosevelt at
the threshold of a square white-granite
open-air plaza.
The statue is an enlargement of a 28-
inch bust of Roosevelt, also a New
York governor, created by American
portrait sculptor Jo Davidson. It sits in
a stone niche, on the back of which a
passage from the Four Freedoms
speech is carved. The statue sits a
mere 300 yards across the river from
the United Nations headquarters.
"We hope visitors of different ages
will understand that the four freedoms
are the core values of democracy and
that each generation has to be sure to
protect them," said former U.S. Ambas-
sador to the U.N. William vanden
Heuvel, chairman of the Franklin D.
Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park LLC.
The park will open to the public
once arrangements for its operation
and maintenance are final,
officials said.
Gov Nelson Rockefeller and Mayor
John Lindsay first announced creation
of the memorial park and appointed
Kahn as its architect in 1973. Vanden
Heuvel, 82, who was there that day,
said Kahn completed the drawings a


year later but died of a heart attack.
That same year, Rockefeller became
vice president, and the city verged on
bankruptcy With no money, the park
was shelved.
The project was revived by vanden
Heuvel in 2005 after an Oscar-nomi-
nated documentary, "The Architect,"
about Kahn by his son, Nathaniel,
brought renewed interest to the
memorial.
Over the next seven years, $53 mil-
lion was raised, $34 million from pri-
vate donors. The rest came from the
city, $11 million, and the state,
$8 million.
The park had been embroiled in a
legal dispute with two of its major
donors over how prominently their
names would be displayed at the site.
The Alphawood Foundation, which do-
nated $10.8 million, reached an undis-
closed settlement, while the Reed
Foundation, which gave $2.9 million,
won a court judgment for its name to
be engraved in an area near the me-
morial bust as spelled out in a con-
tract. The park had argued that
"such a placement would dishonor a
great president and defile Kahn's
great work."
In the next several years, the park
hopes to transform a nearby aban-
doned 19th-century smallpox hospital
into a visitor's center. About 15,000
people live on the northern end of the
island, which is reachable by tram or
subway The park plans to work closely
with Cornell University, which is plan-
ning a graduate center on the island,
on a nearby dock to transport people
via water taxi and ferry


Tracing their roots

Pictured at the Ring of Kerry, a tourist trail in southwestern County Kerry
in Ireland, are members of the Dillon family tracing their roots. From left are:
Steve Glahn, Cindy Dillon Glahn, Ron Dillon Sr., Sarah Dillon, Jennifer Dillon and
Ron Dillon. The group had a wonderful time in a beautiful country with lovely
people from Dublin, Cork, Galway and Belfast.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VCATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Would wife mind


hubby's surrogate?


SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 21, 2012 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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D ear Annie: I want to
write an open letter
to my wife. She reads
your column and will see it
Dear Wife: There is ab-
solutely no doubt that our
relationship is based on
love. You are the best wife
and mother. Your love and
companionship are a bless-
ing to me and to
our children. We
have made a
wonderful life to-
gether, and I
hope to grow old
with you.
Why am I writ-
ing? Because the
only thing miss-
ing from our life
is sex. I do not
know why, and it '
may be the hectic
pace of our lives, AN N
but a year ago, MAIL
you quit making
love to me or
being responsive to my at-
tempts. I have taken you to
dinner and movies, made
special time alone, talked
with and listened to you
about everything. But with-
out fail, every time I try to
initiate intimacy, you turn
me down. I always feel like
some pervert afterward and
lay in bed fuming, frustrated
and resentful. But the rest of
our relationship causes me
to "lump it."
I understand that some-
thing has robbed you of your
desire, but mine is still here.
For that reason, I have
found someone else to have
sex with. You cannot possi-
bly understand the differ-
ence it has made in our
relationship.
I no longer resent you. I no
longer attempt to have sex
with you. The other woman
and I have no emotional at-
tachment and never will. It
is purely physical.


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity 4" (R)
ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Here Comes the Boom" (PG)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D.
7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Paranormal Activity" (R) 2 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m.,
9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.


"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Sinister" (R) ID required.
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Here Comes the Boom" (PG)
1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D.
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve" (PG-
13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Bovine animal
6 Mention
10 Storage place
15 A letter
18 Expression
of greeting
19 Canal country
21 Polo
22 Post
24 Planet's path
25 Surpass
26 Primp
27 Yearn
28 Quid quo
29 Word with coat
or linen
31 That place
33 Modify
35 Cutting tools
37 Jewish month
38 Watery-eyed
39 Disordered
collection
40 Coldness
42 Engage
in swordplay
43 Chuckle
44 Scold
46 Trick
47 Green or calling
48 Egg portion
52 Mental health
53 Work for the stage
54 Tremble
56 Put on
57 Grouchy ones
58 Mutilate
59 Tire in the trunk
60 Make expiation
62 "The of the
Ancient Mariner"
63 Prison official
65 Dine
66 Come out
67 Western Indian
68 Poker stake
69 Mild oath of old
71 Contour
73 Bartok or Lugosi
75 Old cry of disgust
76 Exalt
77 Golf standard
78 Tiny plant
82 Cover with crumbs
84 Cogito, sum
85 Vend


86 Drunken one
87 Place of shelter
90 Trouble
91 Fine point
93 City in Hawaii
94 Iroquoian Indians
95 Indistinct
97 Youngsters
98 Pinkish color
99 Terminate
100 Keenness of
judgment
102 Hirsute
104 Variety of pear
105 Profound
107 Surrounded by
108 Coffee variety,
for short
109 Horse-drawn
carriage
110 Heron
112 Was concerned
113 Feather pen
114 Famous in history
117 Yielded
118 Coagulated milk
119 New Haven's school
123 Knock over
124 Cockpit occupant
125 Digging tool
127 Upper limit (abbr.)
128 Seed appendage
129 Artless
131 Set fire to
133 Similar
135 Poison
136 Stage direction
137 Became less angry
138 Kitchen gadget
139 Spell
140 Song
141 Had unpaid bills
142 Turn aside

DOWN
1 Boutiques
2 firma
3 Ajoint
4 Whitney or
Wallach
5 Mil. group on
campus
6 Pertaining to
active agents
7 Bury
8 Sour
9 Running bird


10 Electric unit
11 Linger
12 Place for a house
13 Rink surface
14 End
15 Emotional
understanding
16 Bernard
17 Bum a bit
19 Dog breed
20 Insect part
23 Lascivious look
30 The nonclergy
32 Chop
34 Embrace
36 Copier of
documents
38 Group of players
39 Whittle
41 Porkpies or
pillboxes
42 Chassis
43 Hideout
44 Mineral also called heavy
spar
45 Paint
46 "- and Prejudice"
47 Confabulation
49 Bouquet
50 Protracted
51 Place for a patch
52 Scour
53 Went quickly
54 Symbol on a card
55 Sloping road
58 Craze
59 Add spices to
61 Abound
63 Thin cracker
64 Just about
66 "-to bed..."
70 Band's
engagement
71 Quick
72 Brings to a close
74 French cleric
76 Hold sway
79 Egyptian god
80 Give comfort to
81 Swiped
83 Sub-
85 Ascot
87 Pay attention
88 British composer
89 Travel on
90 On in years
92 Great Greek epic


93 Talk in a church 108 Pedestal part
95 Raged 109 Bowed
96 Leave out 111 Scott-Heron
98 Fossil fuel 112 Crunchy
101 Swerved vegetable
102 Unorthodox 113 Gave a price
believer 114 Attempt
103 Got a high 115 The Pentateuch
grade on 116 Express a thought
104 Reprove 117 Catlike animal
106 Baffle 118 Peru neighbor
Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


10-21


Priestly vestment
LA player
Put forth effort
Actor Brad -
Hoodwink
Pasternak
character
Cuckoo
Something sticky
Roman 54


@ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I know you would be hurt
to find out But it has made
our relationship stable. I no
longer dream about leaving
you. If nothing else, I hope
this letter will let you know
that my love for you is
strong. I simply have a basic
need that is getting filled
elsewhere. If things change
at home, I will
leave the other
woman for good
and never look
back. She is not a
replacement. I
would rather it be
you, but until
then, please for-
give me. Your
Husband
Dear Husband:
While we cannot
approve of your
IE'S "solution," we un-
BOX derstand it.
Men and
women who re-
fuse to be intimate run the
risk of having their partners
seek intimacy outside the
relationship. But your wife
may be perfectly happy with
this arrangement, content to
let you have your sexual
needs taken care of by
someone else, knowing that
you are committed to the
marriage.
If you are hoping this let-
ter convinces her to work on
her libido, we wouldn't
count on it. But you have
written a sensitive letter
that we hope will leave an
impression on others.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar Email
questions to anniesmail
box@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


A16 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


al





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Correction

Due to an editor's error, in-
correct information was printed
in the Veterans' Views column
in the Sunday, Oct. 14,
Chronicle.
Publix grocery stores are of-
fering special $8 tickets for pur-
chase to provide a whole turkey
to those in need, not a compete
turkey meal, as was printed.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.

Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 25, at Ocala Regional Air-
port Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328 for more
information.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. CCVC general meet-
ings are at 10 a.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly at the DAV
building in Inverness. All active
duty and honorably discharged
veterans, their spouses, wid-
ows and widowers, along with
other veterans' organizations
and current coalition members
are welcome. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537, or
at the meeting. Visit on the Web
at www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during


wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The auxiliary will serve a
shrimp scampi dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24,
at the post home. Everyone is
welcome at the dinners.
Donation is $7.
All profits from the dinners
support the many programs of
the American Legion Auxiliary.
For more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday, alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
All are welcome at the
Veterans Day celebration
Sunday, Nov. 11, at the post.
On the menu are hamburgers,
hot dogs and accompaniments.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch. Informa-
tion regarding any post events
is available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
There will be no Friday night
dinner on Oct. 26. All are wel-
come for a spaghetti dinner
from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 21. Cost is $5.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.


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Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The
public is welcome at bingo at 6
p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
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group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at ultrarayl 997
@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampabay
.rr.com. Call or visit the post for
regular and special events, as
well as meetings. Google us at
VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6. The
public is welcome at the Oct. 21
flea market beginning at 7 a.m.
Outside space is $5 (bring a
table) and inside space is $10.
Call the post at 726-3339 to re-
serve space. Proceeds benefit
the Cancer Aid & Research
Foundation.
The public is welcome at the
Saturday, Nov. 3, Bonanza
Bingo. Cost of $35 includes the
bingo packet and luncheon.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and


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monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-637-
5915 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
The Auxiliary welcomes all to
its annual Italian Extravaganza
Buffett from 5 to 7 p.m. Satur-
day, Oct. 27. On the menu are
traditional lasagna, spinach
lasagna, stuffed shells, meat-
balls, Italian sausage, salad
bar, hot garlic bread, desserts,
coffee, iced tea lemonade and
soda. Cost is $8.50. There will
be a Chinese auction, auction
and a cake auction. Entertain-
ment will be Sidney Smith
singing the National Anthem
and entertainment by Bernie
throughout the evening. Money
will be used to help buy Christ-
mas gifts for military and veter-
ans' needy families, Paws for
Patriots (a program that sup-
plies dogs for wounded war-
riors) and Operation Military
Kids (OMK), a one-week camp
for children of deployed military
members. For more informa-
tion, or to reserve a table for a
group of six or more, call Alice
at 352-860-2981, or 352-476-
7001; or the day of the dinner,
call 352-726-0444.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage, and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved


walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-697-1749. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.

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SUNSETi


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 A17





A18 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


U.S. Air Force (retired)
Col. and Mrs. Marcus C.
West celebrated their 70th
wedding anniversary on
Oct 20, 2012.
They were married in
Greenville County, S.C., in
the West family home. Hav-
ing been childhood sweet-
hearts, they married during
World War II.
Lt. West flew in the Ferry
Command, delivering
bombers to England, and
air-sea rescue out of
Hawaii. Later, he flew in the
Berlin Airlift and the Ko-
rean War. Mrs. West raised
two children: Marcus K.
West (deceased 1995) and
Mary Helen West, and she
moved nine times.
In the early 1960s, Maj.
West commanded an air-sea
rescue squadron at Home-
stead Air Force Base,


Leo H. and Nancy M.
Boutiette Jr. will celebrate
their 50th anniversary on
Oct 28, 2012.
The two have known each
other since third grade. The
couple were married in
East Bridgewater, Mass., on
Oct 28,1962.
Both are retired. Nancy
was employed by the Ply-
mouth County Sheriff's Of-
fice in Massachusetts, as


Florida, and in the late
1960s commanded a tactical
airlift group in Alabama,
followed by service on the
Pentagon Air Staff.
Prior to retirement, Col.
West commanded a close air
support group at Maxwell
AFB, Alabama, in the early
1970s.
The couple reside in Yan-
keetown and celebrated
their anniversary with din-
ner under the grape arbor
with their children, Mary
and Doug Owens; grandchil-
dren, Amy and Jonathan
Pruden; and great-grand-
children, Abigail and
William. Col. West is 92 and
Mrs. West is 91. They be-
came sweethearts when
Mrs. West was 8, and Marcus
brought her oranges every
week at their two-room
schoolhouse.


well as the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. Leo was a
registered barber, as well as
a truck driver. They have
lived in Citrus County for 21
years.
The couple have four chil-
dren: Leon III and David Sr
of Massachusetts and Debra
and John of Florida.
The couple have seven
grandsons and four grand-
daughters.


TOGETHER


70th ANNIVERSARY

The Wests


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VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last Thurs-
day monthly at VFW Post
10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Superior Bank.
Social hour follows. All Marines
and FMF Corpsmen are wel-
come. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. The Men's
Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the
second Monday. LAVFW
meets at 5 p.m. and the mem-
bership meeting is at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday at the
post. Call the post at 352-
447-3495 for information
about the post.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.



CHRO5NCLE

TODAY'S



NUMBER


Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on
Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park has
been selected as a location for
the display of the 35-foot-long
Purple Heart Portrait Mural
Memorial from Wednesday,
Oct. 24 through Wednesday,
Oct. 31. The memorial wall will
be on display inside the Park's
Visitor Center at the main en-
trance on U.S. 19. There will
be no charge to come and


view the memorial wall.
The Department of Florida
Military Order of the Purple
Heart Mural Memorial has the
faces and the names of our
fallen from 2001 through Dec.
31, 2011, from Afghanistan and
Iraq. There are more than 350
listed, including 11 females.
Citrus County has eight fallen
veterans.
The memorial also honors
the fallen from all our wars and
conflicts, with information on
casualties from the Revolution-
ary War onward. There are
panels honoring the fallen from
World War II, Korea and
Vietnam.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veter-
ans Appreciation Commem-
orative Pin. In keeping with


9301 West Fort Island Trail ij .
Crystal River, Florida 34429 Everything Outdoors
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com
(352)795-4211
C CITRUS' -COUNTYE"
Thanks!
being a subscriber. www.chronicleonline.com


I)1


In SERVICE


Christian E.
Rodriguez
Army PFC Christian
E. Rodriguez gradu-
ated from basic train-
ing at Fort Jackson,
S.C. in May.
Rodriguez com-
pleted an intensive,
nine-week training pro-
gram that included
Army values, traditions


<-



Christ
Rodri
U.S. A


and ethics, as well as beginning
the development of individual
basic combat skills with special
emphasis on weapon
proficiency and physical fitness
training.
He has recently completed
21 weeks of Advanced Individ-


ual Training in the field
of Avionics Mechanic.
Rodriguez was
awarded the Army
Achievement Medal in
a non-combat field,
where he distinguished
himself apart from his
ian E. comrades by meritori-
guez ous service or
Army achievement.
Rodriguez will partic-
ipate in a five-week as-
sessment and training program
for 160th Special Operations
Aviation Regiment; he will train
at Fort Campbell, Ky.
He is the son of Mike and
Susan Rodriguez of Inverness.
He is a 2011 graduate of Citrus
High School.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A15.


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Visit Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center at Sugarmill Woods for
exceptional healthcare. Need immediate attention? Our highly
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* Family Practice,Timothy Peterson, M.D. and Connie Bautista, ARNP
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[lEt


CITRUS MEMORIAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

this year's theme, "Honoring
our Military Retirees," the na-
tional symbol of the bald eagle
will represent the men and
women who made military
service a career. The image is
set in the outline of Citrus
County. The pins are available
for $3 each by calling the chap-
ter at 352-344-3464, or John
Seaman at 352-860-0123.
They are also available at the
Citrus County Veterans Serv-
ice Office. All proceeds benefit
Chapter 70's scholarship fund
and veterans' assistance
programs.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876.


50th ANNIVERSARY


The Boutiettes


Inverness Surgical Center Association invites you to attend an
educational seminar about "Diagnosis & Treatment of Skin, Breast, and
Colon Cancers." Seminar will be held at Sugarmill Country Club
(I Douglas St. Homosassa, FL) on November 14th, 2012 6-8pm.
Refreshment will be served. Please RSVP by November I Ith.
352-344-6732.


. I











SPORTS


Citrus County high school
golfers resume bids for
state berths Monday./B3




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Prep sports/B3
0 Golf, MLB/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 NFL/B5
0 Auto racing/B6
0 College football/B6, B7
0 Entertainment/B8


Harris, Weber rule at Crystal River Invite


CR boys, Lecanto
girls each take
cross country wins
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Local
cross country teams were treated
with the first chilly morning of the
season Saturday at the Crystal
River Invitational and the
times showed the weather's effect


on the runner's performances.
The boys team crown went to
Crystal River with 30 points to
Lecanto's 35. Trinity Catholic fin-
ished in a distant third with 97
points. Brooksville Central and
Citrus competed, but did not have
a team score.
The Lecanto girls took home the
team prize with 32 points followed
by Crystal River, which scored 38
total points in another close re-
sult. Trinity Catholic scored 96
points while Chiefland, Citrus and
Central Brooksville participated
without a team score.


You really knew
where to pick it up
and everything.
Brandon Harris
Crystal River junior said of the Pirates'
cross country course on Saturday.

Crystal River junior Brandon
Harris ran away with the boys race,
clocking a 17:02 on the 5K course.
Harris ran 26 seconds faster than
his county championship-winning
time on Tuesday on the same


course, which he credited to the
weather and the slightly wetter
conditions of the course.
"I'm not a really big fan of cold
weather," Harris said. "But I
think it helped me today I think
the (course) was a lot more com-
pact and, after racing Tuesday,
you really knew where to pick it
up and everything."
Crystal River teammate Corey
Pollard completed the mirror ef-
fect of the county championship
by finishing second in 17:32 and
running 25 seconds faster as well.
Lecanto's top finisher Sam Al-


Thorough beatdown


BCS No. 2 UF

drubs No. 7

South Carolina

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Florida
went 0-for-October last season,
with humbling losses to Ala-
bama, LSU, Auburn and Georgia.
It bothered coaches and play-
ers for a year.
It motivated them, too.
A year later, the Gators have a
chance to end the month with a
division title.
"I like this better," coach Will
Muschamp said. "So does every-
body else."
Jeff Driskel threw four touch-
down passes three of them
after turnovers and the third-
ranked Gators matched their
win total from 2011 with a 44-11
drubbing of No. 7 South Car-
olina on Saturday
The Gators avenged consecu-
tive losses to the Gamecocks, in-
cluding one a couple of years
ago that ended with Steve
Spurrier and his players cele-
brating a
More college division
football title in
For other D-I Swamp.
results, go to "We re-
Pages B6, B7. member
the feel-
ing, how
bad it hurt," center Jon Harrison
said. "We even had guys getting
emotional over it. We just used
that as pure motivation to come
out here and completely domi-
nate this team."
Florida's latest whatever-it-
takes win kept Muschamp's
team undefeated and put it on
the cusp of the Southeastern
Conference's Eastern Division
title. The Gators (7-0, 6-0 SEC)
can clinch a spot in the league's
championship game by beating
No. 13 Georgia next week in
nearby Jacksonville.
Florida won this one with
turnovers, stellar defense and
more halftime adjustments -
the kind of successful tweaks
that are making Muschamp and
his staff seem like the right fit in
Gainesville.
The Gators finished 7-6 last
season, barely avoiding the pro-
gram's first losing season since
1979. The struggles had out-
siders questioning whether
Muschamp could get Florida
back to national prominence.
He's got the team there now -


Associated Press
Florida tight end Jordan Reed celebrates Saturday after scoring a 1-yard touchdown on a pass from
quarterback Jeff Driskel against South Carolina during the first half in Gainesville. The Gators, ranked
No. 2 in the BCS standings, battered No. 7 South Carolina 44-11.


even if it hasn't always been
pretty
The Gators managed just 29
yards and two first downs in the
first half against South Carolina
(6-2, 4-2). But they led 21-6 thanks
to three turnovers.
Loucheiz Purifoy knocked the
ball out of Connor Shaw's hands
on the first play Lerentee Mc-
Cray recovered, giving Florida
the ball at the 2-yard line.
Driskel hooked up with Jordan
Reed on third down, putting the
Gators up early
It also was a sign of things to
come for the Gamecocks, who


had trouble holding onto the ball
all afternoon.
Ace Sanders fumbled on a
punt return that led to Driskel's
second TD pass. He found Quin-
ton Dunbar for a 13-yard score.
Dunbar spun out of DeVonte
Holloman's grasp before coast-
ing across the goal line.
On the ensuing kickoff,
Solomon Patton forced Damiere
Byrd to fumble. Chris Johnson
picked it up and nearly scored.
He was stopped at the 1, setting
up Driskel's third TD pass to
Reed. Driskel faked a handoff
and found Reed alone in the


back of the end zone, which
made it 21-3.
"I'd rather have 1 yard in front
of me than 75," Driskel said.
South Carolina failed to gen-
erate much offense. In fact, the
Gamecocks managed two field
goal in the first half thanks to
penalties and returned a
blocked extra point for two
points in the third quarter.
Shaw completed 9 of 20 passes
for 72 yards. He was benched in
the second half, replaced by
Dylan Thompson. Thompson

See Page B6


ford came home in third place
with a time of 17:52.
The girls winner, Citrus sopho-
more Alyssa Weber, had similar
feelings on the morning's tem-
perature and its effect on her
race but ultimately it was the
depth of competition in the meet
that pushed her to the finish line.
"I was behind Clarissa (Con-
sol); (we were) pacing each
other," Weber said of the race. "I
drafted off her and we were
pushing each other, side-by-side
See Page B2



FSU



downs



Miami


'Noles overcome

early 10-point

deficit vs. 'Canes

for 33-20 win

Staff
MIAMI Florida State,
ranked No. 14 in the Associ-
ated Press poll, overcame a
10-point first quarter deficit to
score a 33-20 victory at Miami
on Saturday night.
The Seminoles scored 17
unanswered points in the
fourth quarter to turn a tight
16-13 lead over the Hurricanes
into a comfortable victory
Florida State moved to 7-1
overall and 4-1 in the ACC
while the young Hurricanes
fell to 4-4 and 3-2.
Miami raced out to a 10-0
margin by the 7:32 mark in the
first quarter after a 9-yard
touchdown run by running
back Mike James and a 19-
yard field goal by Hurricanes
kicker Jake Wieclaw.
Florida State took a 13-10
lead at the end of the first half
on one of four field goals by
Dustin Hopkins.
Still clinging to just a three-
point advantage heading into
the fourth quarter, Florida
State broke the game open
with a pair of touchdown runs
by back Devonta Freeman
wrapped around a Hopkins
field goal.


Associated Press
Florida State quarterback EJ
Manuel passes over Miami's
Jimmy Gaines during the first
half Saturday in Miami.


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ooocuoz






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS


GT Page B2 smCT(
E


IN


THE


tAME


Entry youth sports signup is now


Parks and Rec

offers tennis lessons

for children

Special to the Chronicle
Registration will open on Mon-
day, Oct. 22 for the next session of
PL.A.Y.
The next session will include
flag football, basketball and cheer-
leading. Football will be at Bicen-
tennial Park on Tuesdays or
Thursday.
Basketball will be at the Citrus
County Resource Center on Mon-
days or Wednesdays and Cheer-
leading will be at Bicentennial
Park on Thursdays from 5 to 6 p.m.
Both basketball and football have
two timeslots available: 5 to 6 p.m.
or 6 to 7 p.m. So pick the time that
works for your schedule.
The PL.A.Y programs are de-
signed for children ages 3 to 5 and
the cost is $45 per child. Sign up
for more than one sport in a ses-
sion and save $10.
Spaces fill up fast and pre-reg-
istration is required, so be sure to
mark your calendar for the regis-
tration opening date.
For more information on the
PL.A.Y programs, please contact
Crysta Henry, recreation program
specialist for youth programs at
352-527-7543 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Elks planning Hoop
Shoot for 2012-13
West Citrus Elks Lodge will stage


Special to the Chronicle


The P.L.A.Y. program will begin accepting registration this Monday.


its 2012-13 Hoop Shoot Free Throw
Contest for county middle and pri-
mary schoolchildren at 9 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 1, at Lecanto
Middle School, 3800 W. Educational
Path.
Principal William Farrell and staff will
host the winners from Lecanto Elemen-


tary, Homosassa Elementary, Rock
Crusher Elementary, Crystal River Pri-
mary, Lecanto Middle, Crystal River
Middle and others. The lodge champi-
ons will advance to the district contest.
The district finalists will advance to the
state finals.
The state champions will compete


at a regional contest to determine the
contestants to compete at the national
finals. The lodge uses this exposure
to help attain funds for student schol-
arships and other projects in the
county to help the less fortunate.
For more information, call Hoop
Shoots Director Gene Murray at 352-


382-2709 or Jim Brumback at
352-503-7904.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County Parks &
Recreation and Tennis Pro Mehdi
Tahiri for youth tennis lessons.
Instruction will include conditioning,
drills, footwork, match play, doubles
and single strategy. The five-week
sessions will be at the Lecanto Com-
munity Park Tennis Courts on Sun-
days. Each session will run from
3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is open to boys
and girls ages 8 to 14 and costs $60
per child.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
YMCA offers
afterschool programs
The Citrus County YMCA's After-
school Enrichment Clubs are offered
at Central Ridge Elementary, Citrus
Springs Elementary, Crystal River
Primary, Floral City Elementary, For-
est Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant Grove
Elementary and Rock Crusher
Elementary.
Ages for the Y Afterschool Pro-
gram range from kindergarten
through fifth grade. Afterschool pro-
grams are a great way to end the
school day, and the first fall session
will offer kids the opportunity to par-
ticipate in flag football, cheerleading
and art.
For more information, call the Citrus
Y at 352-637-0132.


Adult softball leagues


ready to pitch soon


Haunted Hills

fun run slated

for Oct. 27

Special to the Chronicle
Co-ed softball is back!
The fall league will now be
starting on Nov 1, with the
$50 registration fee on Oct.
25. Games will be held at Bi-
centennial Park, on Thurs-
day nights, with games at
6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
League fees depend on the
number of teams that enter.
For more information call
recreation program special-
ist Jess Sandino at 527-7547.
Men's softball
league back soon
Men's softball is ready to begin
again. We are looking to start on
Nov. 1, with games slated for
Monday and Wednesdays. This
league is very competitive and
for adults 18 and over. League
fees depend on the number of
teams that enter.
For more information contact
Recreation Program Specialist
Jess Sandino at 527-7547.
'Haunted' Hills
fun run Oct. 27
Citrus Hills will host the Cit-
rus "Haunted" Hills 5K Fun Run
at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27,
in the neighborhood of Terra
Vista. The Halloween-themed
run will also include a one-mile
fun walk, as well as pizza and
music at the finish line.
The Citrus "Haunted" Hills
Fun Run will support the Citrus
Memorial Heart and Vascular
Center. Sponsors include HPH


RULE
Continued from Page B1

the entire race. Then it
comes down to the chute
and (who has the) best kick
at the end."
Weber rocketed into the
chute with a time of 19:50, a
full 20 seconds faster than
her county championship-
winning time and 12 sec-
onds ahead of second-place
finisher Crystal River sen-
ior Clarissa Consol, who ran
a time of 20:07.
Consol regained her regu-
lar form in the invite after


Hospice, Comfort Keepers and
the Citrus County Chronicle.
Registration begins at 3 p.m.
at Terra Vista's BellaVita Fit-
ness Center, 2125 W. Skyview
Crossing, Hernando. Partici-
pants may register in advance
at www.citrusroadrunners.org.
The registration fees are:
Adult pre-registration
(price good through Oct. 26 and
includes T-shirt) $20
Citrus Roadrunners and
Citrus Hills member preregistra-
tion (price good through Oct. 26
and includes a T-shirt) $18
Adult registration on race
day, Oct. 27 (T-shirt quantities
limited for day-of registrants) -
$25
Children 10 and younger
-$12
At the conclusion of the race,
prizes will be awarded for Top
Male and Female Runners in
standard age groups, Best
Costume Individual and Best
Costume Group.
For more information or to
sign up, visit www.
citrusroadrunners.org, or call
352-746-5828.
Tourney benefits
Wounded Warriors
Project
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will have its inaugural Vet-
erans Tournament fundraiser
for Wounded Warriors Project
on Dec. 8. Men, women and
youths are welcome. All pro-
ceeds will go to the Wounded
Warriors Project. Sponsors will
be accepted and recognized.
There will be two divisions,
NHPA-sanctioned players and
unsanctioned players.
Sanctioned players will follow
NHPA tournament rules, and will
pitch five games of 40 shoes.

an off day at the county
meet on where she placed
sixth.
"It was one of my better
times, especially for the
course," Consol said.
"There's a lot of sugar sand
which slows you down. But I
just went out here and ran
my race. I think I put too
much pressure on myself in
previous races, especially
(at county). I just went out
there and wanted to have a
good time."
Consol and Weber have
been the two runners duel-
ing against one another
every race this season. Of
their six meetings so far, the


Sanctioned players will be cred-
ited for their scores as in any
other NHPA tournament. Non-
sanctioned players will pitch
three games of 30 shoes; the
rules for these players will follow
the NHPA guidelines for scoring.
Thirty and 40 foot players will
play together. The 30-foot rule
will be as follows: 60 years and
older have the choice of pitch-
ing 30 or 40 feet. All women
and youths (17 and younger)
will pitch 30 feet. Physically
challenged players will have the
right to pitch 30 feet, regardless
of age. All others pitch 40 feet.
Entry fee will be $15. All play-
ers will receive a free ham-
burger or hot dog and a cold
drink after they have pitched. All
entries must be in before Tues-
day, Dec. 4, by 5 p.m. Entries
can be made by phone or
email; payment must be in by
Dec. 4, as time is needed to
form classes for sanctioned
players and a schedule for non-
sanctioned players.
The public is welcome to ob-
serve. Refreshments will be
served at a discounted price for
non-pitchers. For entry informa-
tion, call Ron Fair at
352-746-3924, or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
Beach volleyball
is a success
Beach Volleyball has come
to Citrus County! If you are in-
terested in playing, we will be
having several weekend four
on four tournaments coming
soon. Our next league will not
begin until February 2013,
though everyone is welcome to
come out and be a part of the
fun! For more information, call
Recreation Programs Specialist
Jess Sandino at 352-527-7547.

results are evenly split with
three victories apiece.
The Pirates senior ac-
knowledged the difference
in racing strategies between
herself and Weber
"I just try to set a good
pace and run my hardest
throughout the whole race,"
Consol said, "whereas she
kind of drafts on and she
knows that I don't have as
strong a kick as she does.
She did an awesome job and
she has a great kick."
Lecanto's top finisher
Chloe Benoist trailed the
lead pack coming into the
final push toward the fin-
ish, placing third with a


Sami's Poker Run
set for Nov. 3
The third annual Sami's
Poker Run, sponsored by the
Eagle Riders of Crystal River
Eagles 4272, will take place
Saturday, Nov. 3.
The daughter of Crystal
River Eagles 4272 member
Donna Harris, Samantha Har-
ris, 16, was killed in a rollover
crash on Oct. 16, 2010, in Ho-
mosassa. Sami was a junior at
Lecanto High School. Sami's
Run will provide Christmas gifts
for underprivileged children in
the community.
Registration is from 9:45 to
10:45 a.m. at the Crystal River
Eagles 4272, 5340 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
All vehicles are welcome.
Schedule: Kick-stands up at
11 a.m. First stop Sand Trap
in Weeki Wachee. Second stop
- IRRU in Floral City. Third
stop Inverness Eagles.

time of 20:43.
"Every one of my kids ran
their best time today," said
Crystal River boys coach
Tim Byrne of his team.
"Today the conditions really
helped out. If you're looking
across the board, I would
say most every team ran
their best times."
Lecanto girls coach Dan
Epstein was pleased over
the meet's results.
"Every time Lecanto and
Crystal River get together,
it's going to be a tough
meet," Epstein said. "And
it's nice because it makes
everybody better. When
you're coming into the meet


Fourth stop Thunder Inn in
Hernando. Fifth stop Fat
Daddy's in Crystal River.
For more information, call
Philip at 352-228-2131 or
Joanell at 352-228-2132.
Golf tourney
benefits food pantry
The third annual S.O.S.
(Serving Our Savior) Golf Tour-
nament will be Nov. 3 at Seven
Rivers Golf and Country Club.
All proceeds benefit the S.O.S.
Food Pantry for the needy of
Citrus County.
The tourney is co-sponsored
by five local churches and the
Chronicle.
There will be a $10,000 prize
for hole-in-one, and many other
prizes. Entrance fee is $60. For
more information for golfers
and hole sponsors, visit
www.sothec.org.
Golf tourney needs
group members
The Alzheimer's Family Or-

and blowing everybody
away, it's no fun. I'd rather
have close races."
Girls team scores: 1.
Lecanto 32; Crystal River 38;
Trinity Catholic 96; Chiefland
NTS; Citrus NTS; Central NTS.
Boys team scores: 1. Crys-
tal River 30; Lecanto 35; Trinity
Catholic 97; Central NTS; Cit-
rus NTS.
Girls top ten individuals: 1.
Alyssa Weber, Citrus 19:55; 2.
Clarissa Consol, Crystal River
20:07; 3. Chloe Benoist,
Lecanto 20:43; 4. Claire
Farnsworth, Lecanto 20:44; 5.
Chloe Lane, Crystal River
20:56; 6. Kate Mattingly,


ganization will have its 12th An-
nual Charity Golf Tournament on
Nov. 10 at Seven Springs Golf
and Country Club, New Port
Richey. Committee members
are needed to assist in the coor-
dination of the fundraising event.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization serves the central
Florida area, including Citrus,
Hernando, northern Hillsbor-
ough, Lake, Pasco, northern
Pinellas and Sumter counties.
The Florida Department of
Elder Affairs has determined
this region has more than
100,000 Alzheimer's disease
sufferers. By assisting the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, participants network with
local and regional profession-
als, golfers and concerned
members of the community
helping those afflicted with
Alzheimer's disease and their
families.
For more information, call
727-848-8888, or toll free at
888-496-8004.

Lecanto 21:12; 7. Brooke Ban-
ner, Trinity Catholic 21:30; 8.
Elizabeth Bruty, Crystal River
21:46; 9. Brittney Vickers,
Lecanto 21:50; 10. Lexi Moore,
Lecanto 21:51.
Boys t t en individuals:
1. Brandon Harris, Crystal
River 17:02; 2. Corey Pollard,
Crystal River 17:32; 3. SamAI-
ford, Lecanto 17:52; 4. Ben
Waller, Trinity Catholic 17:56;
5. Casey Purnell, Crystal River
18:11; 6. Justin Eichler,
Lecanto 18:14; 7. Jack Clark,
Lecanto 18:17; 8. Pedro Lopez,
Crystal River 18:20; 9. Alex
Pich, Lecanto 18:22; 10. Matt
Lopes, Lecanto 18:24.


Fishing for a good cause


Special to the Chronicle
Jessica Moore took first place in the children's division of Team Hope's Relay For Life
Family Fishing Tournament, which benefitted the American Cancer Society. The event
raised $4,525 for ACS.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


High School Regional Golf PREVIEW



Local golfers in state of hope


CR, Lecanto boys teams seek titles;

Pirate girls, Citrus'Kersh enjoy ",

surprise regional berths on the links


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent

Both Crystal River and Lecanto
boys golf squads have their eyes
set on the prize most coveted by all
golfers from the very beginning of
the season trips to the state
championship meets and a chance
to bring home the glory and recog-
nition that comes from such efforts
to their respective schools.
Both the Pirates and Panthers
arrive fresh at their regional tour-
naments having won their respec-
tive district titles last week.
Crystal River took the District
1A-8 title by an impressive 36
strokes over runner-up Nature
Coast and third place Dunnellon.
Lecanto won the District 2A-5
crown by seven strokes over Ocala
Forest. Ocala Vanguard took third
place.
Crystal River head coach Jere
DeFoor knows what his team is ca-
pable of doing when everyone
plays their best. The Pirates
placed second at last year's
regional tournament
"We did at districts what we
hoped we would do," DeFoor said.
"The kids shot well. And we'd like
to go into the regionals the same
way Saddlebrook had the lowest
score turned in from the three dis-
tricts. We were right there next to
them. If the kids go down there
and play good golf, we should be
in the top two."
Crystal River plays in the Re-
gion 1A-3 tournament at 9 a.m.
Monday at Saddlebrook Resort in
Wesley Chapel.
Lecanto travels to Ocala Golf
Club to face off in their Region 2A-
2 tournament at 9:30 a.m. Monday
"First off, we don't want to fin-
ish last," Lecanto head coach
Dave Soluri said with a chuckle.
"That may sound funny but we're
in a very tough region. We'd like to
finish in the top four or five. That's
our goal against the teams we're


playing who are in the state finals
every year so they're some real
quality teams. We want to do bet-
ter than we did last year at re-
gionals where we placed 10th out
of 12 teams."
Citrus freshman Camrin Kersh
finished in the top three at her
district tournament last week by
shooting an 89 at Ocala's Pine
Oaks golf course. Kersh is the lone
Hurricane golfer, male or female,
representing her school at the Re-
gion 2A-2 tournament, which is
9:30 a.m. Tuesday
The Crystal River girls team sur-
prised everyone with a third-place
finish at its district tournament.
The Pirates' girls golf program has
been suffering for several years
from lack of participation, but fi-
nally has a full team of mostly
young talent new to the sport.
"For the first year that we've had
a team," Crystal River girls' head
coach Claudia Sebold said, "the
girls have exceeded my expecta-
tions. We have never even expected
to get this far Every match they've
been doing better and better and
better Whatever the outcome is (in
the region) ... we've already had a
successful season."
Sebold also expressed the im-
pact her team is having on Crystal
River's fledgling girls golf program
and what it means for the future.
"I think this should really mean
something to Crystal River High
School," Sebold said. "For several
years we didn't even have a team
and now we have a team and
they're being very successful.
Maycee Mullarkey will hopefully
be the shining star Hopefully if we
can't make it as a team, she can be
the one from Crystal River who
goes to state.
"I'm ecstatic. Even the middle
schools girls are all excited," Se-
bold continued. "The girls coming
up next year are all excited to
play (in high school) next year
after what this team has done this


season."
Crystal River plays its regional
tournament at the Black Bear golf
course in Eustis at 9 a.m. Monday
The Pirates shot a 427 at the
district event.

Crystal River sophomore Matt
Allen came out of nowhere to shoot
an 18-hole round of 74 to pace the
Pirates to a District 1A-8 title at
The Dunes Golf Course in Weeki
Wachee on Monday. Crystal River
continues its state tournament
aspirations in the Region 1A-3 tour-
nament this Monday at Saddle-
brook Resort in Wesley Chapel.
Lecanto senior Drew
Cooke fired a 74 at The Country
Club of Silver Springs Shores on
Monday to help lead the Panthers
to a District 2A-5 championship by
seven strokes. Lecanto will need
four stellar rounds this Monday at
Ocala Golf Club to advance out of
what is considered a very tough
Region 2A-2 tournament.
Chronicle file photos


Valverde ready for World Series


Detroit closer

will likely see

pitching mound

Associated Press

DETROIT Jose
Valverde threw a few pitches
during Detroit's workout,
then returned to the dugout
as upbeat as usual.
Valverde's role for the
World Series still isn't clear,
but the right-hander doesn't
seem to mind.
"I don't care. All I want is
to be a champion," he said.
"If I had to start, I'd do it."
Valverde has been De-
troit's closer for three years
and didn't blow a save
through all of 2011, but this
postseason has been ugly He
lost Game 4 of the division
series against Oakland and
gave up four runs in the AL
championship series opener
against the New York Yan-
kees. The Tigers went on to
win that game and sweep the
series, but Valverde hasn't
been used since.
The World Series begins
Wednesday at either St
Louis or San Francisco.
Valverde sounds confident
he's made the necessary me-
chanical adjustments, and so
does manager Jim Leyland.
"I think everybody's mak-
ing too big of a deal of the
Valverde situation.
Valverde's going to be ready
There's nothing wrong with
Valverde. He's going to be
fine," Leyland said. "I got a
kick out of it. Nobody
wanted me to pitch him, but
everybody asks me every
day if he's going to be the
closer I don't know what
they expect, but I'm going to
just see what happens."
Leyland went with other
options after Valverde's melt-
down against the Yankees.
Left-hander Phil Coke got
the save in Games 2 and 3.
The more flexible ap-
proach to the late innings
allowed Leyland to use
Coke in crucial spots
against a New York lineup
that has plenty of left-


Associated Press
Detroit Tigers closer Jose Valverde hadn't pitched since blowing a four-run lead in Game 1
of the American League Championship Series on Oct. 13 against the New York Yankees.


handed power Against the
Cardinals or Giants,
Valverde might be back in
his old role. Aside from
Coke, Detroit's top relief
options include right-han-
ders Joaquin Benoit, Oc-
tavio Dotel and Al
Alburquerque. Benoit has
had difficulty keeping the
ball in the park this season.
"Sometimes the biggest
out is in the seventh inning
or eighth inning, not always
in the ninth inning," Ley-
land said during the series


against New York. "That's
why when you start going by
committee, that's what
'committee' means. You say,
'This is the most important
out I have to get. I will use
my bullet now and take my
chances later.'"
Still, Leyland sounds
ready for Valverde to con-
tribute again.
"To me, you've got to
pinch hit in the National
League cities, you're going
to have to use your pitchers,
so if you get behind, that's


just the way it is," Leyland
said. "I think he'll be a big
part of this World Series."
Coke, meanwhile, has
been in the spotlight more
than usual, and he's cer-
tainly enjoying the ride.
"I don't have any idea
what's going on. I just know
I'm having a good time,"
Coke said recently '"And we
have a common goal that
we're trying to achieve, and
the last thing I want to be
known for is the one that
didn't do his job."


Love III, Furyk in


final golf pairing


Associated Press

ST SIMONS ISLAND, Ga.
- Three weeks after they
were on stage together for
the closing ceremony at the
Ryder Cup, Davis Love III
and Jim Furyk wound up to-
gether in a place few people
would have imagined in
the final pairing at the
McGladrey Classic, both
wanting a win for different
reasons.
Love made a 15-foot birdie
putt on the 18th hole Satur-
day for a 4-under 66, giving
him a share of the lead with
Furyk, who also had a 66 by
doing most of his work early
He made a 45-foot birdie
putt over a slight ridge on
the second hole, added
three more birdies through
six holes, and settled for
eight pars at the end.
They were at 13-under 197,
two shots clear of Arjun
Atwal (69) and D.J. Trahan
(66), two players who could
avoid a return to Q-school
with a big week at Sea Island.
Love, the 48-year-old tour-
nament host and a Sea Is-
land resident since he was
14, has gone four years with-
out winning. Ryder Cup
captains typically are at the
end of their careers; the last
American to win after being
a captain was Tom Watson
in 1996.
Furyk spoke openly this
week about how even a win
at the McGladrey Classic


couldn't erase a lot of sour
memories this year, particu-
larly his failure to close out
wins at the U.S. Open and
the Bridgestone Invita-
tional, along with a 1-up
lead over Sergio Garcia with
two holes to play at the
Ryder Cup.
HanaBank
Championship
INCHEON, South Korea-
Suzann Pettersen shot a 4-under
68 on Saturday to extend her
lead to five strokes after the sec-
ond round of the LPGA Tour's
HanaBank Championship.
The Norwegian was 13
under on Sky 72 Golf Club's
Ocean Course. She opened
with a course-record 63.
South Korea's So Yeon Ryu
was second after a 70. Top-
ranked Yani Tseng, the defend-
ing champion, was 7 under
along with Germany's Sandra
Gal and South Korea's Se Ri
Pak. Pak had a 67, Gal shot 68,
and Tseng 70.
Perth International
PERTH, Australia Bo Van
Pelt shot a 5-under 67 to take a
one-stroke lead over fellow
American Jason Dufner after
the third round of the Perth In-
ternational.
Van Pelt had a 12-under 204
total at Lake Karrinyup. Dufner
also had a 67,
Argentina's Emiliano Grillo,
the second-round leader, was
10 under after a 73.


Associated Press
Tim Herron watches his drive Saturday off the 16th tee
during the third round of the McGladrey Classic PGA Tour
golf tournament in St. Simons Island, Ga.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 B3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FoT the 1re coTrd


Friday's late boxes == Florida LOTTERY


Eastside 26,
Crystal River 24
GE 0 14 7 5 26
CR 7 7 3 7 24
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CR Jo. LaFleur 3-yard run (J. McAteer kick)
Second Quarter
GE S. Jackson 34-yard run (J. Malu kick)
CR -T Reynolds 13-yard run (McAteer kick)
GE J.Walker 75-yard kickoff return (Malu
kick)
Third Quarter
CR McAteer 42-yard FG
GE S. Brown 15-yard pass from Jackson
(Malu kick)
Fourth Quarter
CR D. Dawsy 2-yard run (McAteer kick)
GE Safety
GE Malu 35-yard FG
Individual Leaders
Passing -GE: Jackson 10-18-125-1 -0; Rogers
4-5-45-0-1; CR: Reynolds 1-2-32-0-0; LaFleur
1-6-17-0-0.
Rushing GE: Jackson 16-83-1; Willis 11-28-
0; CR: Baldner 16-76-0; Reynolds 5-59-1;
LaFleur 16-44-1.
Receiving GE: Jackson 3-42-0; Walker 4-39-
0; McCray 3-43; Brown 2-24-1; CR: Franklin 2-
39-0.
Sacks CR: Hollis 2; Dawsy 1; Henriquez 1
Int- Hernandez 1

Lake Weir 37,
Lecanto 34
LEC 7 7 12 8 34
LW 3 13 7 14 37
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
LW B. Venezuela 29 yard FG
L C. Barber 42-yard run (kick good)
Second Quarter
LW -T Rotstein 26-yard pass to J. Hamilton
((kick good)
L C. Barber 9-yard pass to R. Marcic (kick
good)
LW -C. Blackburn 22-yard pass to J. Hamilton
(2-point try no good)
Third Quarter
L N. Waters 2-yard run (kick blocked)
LW- J. Hamilton 4-yard run (kick good)
L N. Waters 7-yard run (kick no good)
Fourth Quarter
LW C. Blackburn 55-yard pass to J. Etienne
(kick good)
LW M. Robinson 30-yard run
L T McGee 2-yard pass to A. Stephens (D.
Horton 2-point run good)
Individual Leaders
Passing L: C. Barber 8-12-79-1-0, T. McGee
9-12-68-1 -0, LW: C. Blackburn 11-15-247-2-0, T
Rotstein 1-1-26-1-0.
Rushing L: C. Barber 7-75-1, N. Waters 11 -
55-2, LW: M. Robinson 8-53-1, T Taylor 12-37-
0.
Receiving L: A. Stephens 9-84-1, R. Marcic 4-
18-1; LW: J. Hamilton 5-102-2, S. Evans 4-94-0,
J. Etienne 3-77-1.

Dunnellon 42,
Belleview 10
BEL0 0 0 10 10
DUN 14 14 7 7 42
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
DUN A. Jackson 11 -yard pass from J. Boley
(S. Williams kick)
DUN K. Parks 35-yard run (Williams kick)
Second Quarter
DUN Parks 7-yard pass from Boley (Williams
kick)
DUN C. Wentz 22-yard pass from Boley
(Williams kick)
Third Quarter
DUN Boley 62-yard run (Williams kick)
Fourth Quarter
BEL- E. Pitts 2-yard run (C. Irwin kick)
BEL -Irwin 34-yard field goal
DUN J.Williams 13-yard run (Williams kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing DUN: Boley 6-8-82-3-0; K. Jones 2-
2-27-0-0; BEL: Pitts 3-10-20-0-1.
Rushing DUN: Boley 8-123-1; D. Simms 2-
65-0; Parks 2-58-1; J. Swoll 6-48-0; J. Williams
4-37-1; BEL: P Maurice 11-22-0; Pitts 11-12-1.
Receiving DUN: Wentz 4-64-1; Jackson 1-9-
1; Parks 1-7-1; S. Claffey 1-10-0; BEL: D. Col-
ston 1-21-0.



Glantz-Culver Line
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG


at Buffalo 3Y2
at Minnesota 4
at Indianapolis 3
at Houston 4Y2
Green Bay 4
Dallas 2
at N.Y.Giants 6Y2
New Orleans 3
at N. England 11
at Oakland 5
Pittsburgh 1Y2


(4612) Tennessee
(40) Arizona
(4512) Cleveland
(4812) Baltimore
(4512) at St. Louis
(46) at Carolina
(51) Washington
(4912) at T. Bay
(4712) N.Y. Jets
(44) Jacksonville
(45) at Cincinnati


Monday
at Chicago 6 612 (4712) Detroit


NFL standings


N.Y Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo


Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


N.Y Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
Carolina
New Orleans


Chicago
Minnesota
Green Bay
Detroit


AFC
East
W L T
3 3 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
South
W L T
5 1 0
2 3 0
2 4 0
1 4 0
North
W L T
5 1 0
3 3 0
2 3 0
1 5 0
West
W L T
3 3 0
3 3 0
1 4 0
1 5 0
NFC
East

4 2 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
2 3 0
South
W L T
6 0 0
2 3 0
1 4 0
1 4 0
North
W L T
4 1 0
4 2 0
3 3 0
2 3 0


Pct PF
.833 173
.400 100
.333 114
.200 65

Pct PF
.833 161
.500 149
.400 116
.167 134

Pct PF
.500 170
.500 148
.200 87
.167 104


Pct PF
.667 178
.500 103
.500 178
.400 94

Pct PF
1.000 171
.400 120
.200 92
.200 141

Pct PF
.800 149
.667 146
.500 154
.400 126


17. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189.913.
18. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 189.827.
19. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 189.52.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 189.367.
21. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 189.268.
22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 189.268.
23. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.261.
24. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 188.851.
25. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 188.772.
26. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 188.646.
27. (37) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 188.633.
28. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 188.6.
29. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 188.37.
30. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 188.173.
31. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 188.147.
32. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 188.055.
33. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 187.859.
34. (91) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 187.761.
35. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 187.748.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 187.578.
37. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 187.474.
38. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 187.233.
39. (88) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 187.182.
40. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 186.896.
41. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (79) Kelly Bires, Ford, 187.285.
Failed to Qualify
44. (33) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 186.877.
45. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 186.027.
46. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 182.5.

Nationwide


On theAIRWAVESKansas Lottery
On the AIRWAVES 300 Results


West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 5 2 0 .714 165 100
Arizona 4 2 0 .667 110 97
Seattle 4 3 0 .571 116 106
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 111
Thursday's Game
San Francisco 13, Seattle 6
Today's Games
Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami,
Philadelphia, San Diego
Monday's Game
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 25
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 28
Jacksonville at Green Bay 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
New England vs. St. Louis at London, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Houston
Monday, Oct. 29
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.




MLB playoffs
AllTimes EDT
WILD CARD
Friday, Oct. 5
National League: St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3
American League: Baltimore 5, Texas 1
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)
American League
Detroit 3, Oakland 2
Saturday, Oct. 6: Detroit 3, Oakland 1
Sunday, Oct. 7: Detroit 5, Oakland 4
Tuesday, Oct. 9: Oakland 2, Detroit 0
Wednesday, Oct. 10: Oakland 4, Detroit 3
Thursday, Oct. 11: Detroit 6, Oakland 0
New York 3, Baltimore 2
Sunday, Oct. 7: New York 7, Baltimore 2
Monday, Oct. 8: Baltimore 3, New York 2
Wednesday, Oct. 10: New York 3, Baltimore
2, 12 innings
Thursday, Oct. 11: Baltimore 2, New York 1,
13 innings
Friday, Oct. 12: New York 3, Baltimore 1
National League
San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2
Saturday, Oct. 6: Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 2
Sunday Oct. 7: Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 0
Tuesday Oct. 9: San Francisco 2, Cincinnati
1, 10 innings
Wednesday Oct. 10: San Francisco 8, Cincin-
nati 3
Thursday, Oct. 11: San Francisco 6, Cincin-


nati 4
St. Louis 3,Washington 2
Sunday Oct. 7: Washington 3, St. Louis 2
Monday Oct. 8: St. Louis 12, Washington 4
Wednesday, Oct. 10: St. Louis 8, Washington 0
Thursday, Oct. 11: Washington 2, St. Louis 1
Friday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 9, Washington 7
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
American League
Detroit 4, New York 0
Saturday, Oct. 13: Detroit 6, New York 4, 12
innings
Sunday Oct. 14: Detroit 3, New York 0
Tuesday, Oct. 16: Detroit 2, New York 1
Wednesday, Oct. 17: New York at Detroit,
ppd., rain
Thursday, Oct. 18: Detroit 8, New York 1
National League
All games televised by Fox
St. Louis 3, San Francisco 2
Sunday, Oct. 14: St. Louis 6, San Francisco 4
Monday Oct. 15: San Francisco 7, St. Louis 1
Wednesday, Oct. 17: St. Louis 3, San Fran-
cisco 1
Thursday, Oct. 18: St. Louis 8, San Francisco 3
Friday, Oct.19: San Francisco 5, St. Louis 0
Sunday Oct. 21: St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at
San Francisco (Vogelsong 14-9), 7:45 p.m.
x-Monday, Oct. 22: St. Louis at San Fran-
cisco, 8:07 p.m.
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Wednesday, Oct. 24: Detroit at National
League (n)
Thursday Oct. 25: Detroit at National League
(n)
Saturday, Oct. 27: National League at Detroit
(n)
Sunday Oct. 28: National League at Detroit
(n)
x-Monday, Oct. 29: National League at Detroit
(n)
x-Wednesday, Oct. 31: Detroit at National
League (n)
x-Thursday, Nov. 1: Detroit at National
League (n)



Sprint Cup

Hollywood Casino
400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 191.36 mph.
2. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 191.238.
3. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.13.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.096.
5. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 190.988.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 190.853.
7. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 190.84.
8. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 190.813.
9. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 190.718.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 190.409.
11. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.389.
12. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 190.375.
13. (51) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 190.154.
14. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.134.
15. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 190.094.
16. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 189.94.


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ABC) American Le Mans Series: Petit Le Mans
(Taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Hollywood Casino 400 race
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) SRT Viper Cup: Watkins Glen
International (Taped)
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Hollywood Casino 400 race
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
4:30 p.m. (FOX) St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco
Giants. National League Championship Series Game 6
BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (FSNFL) NBA Preseason: San Antonio Spurs at
Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (ESPN2) WNBA Finals: Minnesota Lynx at Indiana
Fever Game 4
HORSE RACING
12 p.m. (FSNFL) West Virginia Breeders Classic (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) South Carolina at Florida (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Miami (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (FOX) New Orleans Saints at Tampa Bay Buccaneers
4 p.m. (CBS) New York Jets at New England Patriots
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Pittsburgh Steelers at Cincinnati Bengals
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: ISPS Handa Perth
International, Final Round (Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: McGladrey Classic, Final Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Winn Dixie Jacksonville Open,
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: KEB HanaBank
Championship, Final Round (Same-day Tape)
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating: Skate
America (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Toluca vs. Santos
2 p.m. (SUN) Women's College: Florida at Vanderbilt
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Tennessee at Mississippi
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Dallas at Seattle
VOLLEYBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Miami at Georgia Tech
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's College: Nebraska at Illinois

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Williams reaches



Luxembourg final


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
::.::.. .4-7-2
CASH 3 (late)
5-7-9

PLAY 4 (early)
S 5-4-4-4
PLAY 4 (late)
7 -9-5-2

FANTASY 5
ia Lotty 4-6-8-24-28

POWERBALL LOTTERY
4-21-28-31-44 16-25-26-27-40-53
POWER BALL XTRA
10 3


Associated Press

LUXEMBOURG Venus
Williams reached her first
final in almost 212 years at
the Luxembourg Open after
defeating Andrea Petkovic
of Germany 5-7, 6-4, 6-4 on
Saturday
Williams, hampered for
two seasons by injuries and
an autoimmune disease,
will play Monica Niculescu
of Romania in the final on
Sunday
While Niculescu has yet
to win her first WTA title at
25, Williams has won 43 sin-
gles titles overall, including
seven at Grand Slams. Her
last was in February 2010 in
Acapulco.
Petkovic, ranked 182nd,
kept up with Williams until
4-4 in the final set. Then she
dropped her serve and
Williams, ranked 41st,
closed out the match in 2
hours, 38 minutes.
Niculescu, ranked 70th,
reached her second straight
Luxembourg Open final by
beating Daniela Hantu-
chova of Slovakia, 6-1, 6-3.
Del Potro, Zemlja
reach final at Vienna
VIENNA- Top-seeded Juan
Martin del Potro and qualifier
Grega Zemlja advanced to the
final of the Erste Bank Open on
Saturday.
Del Potro, a runner-up last
year, defeated Gilles Muller of
Luxembourg 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5) to
reach his fourth final of the
year, while Zemlja rallied to
stun second-seeded Janko Tip-
sarevic 3-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2 to ad-
vance to a final for the first time.
The 70th-ranked Zemlja was
0-4 against top-10 players. The
Slovenian played 15 sets to get
to the final, Del Potro seven.
Del Potro is looking for his
12th career title and third of the
season after winning in Mar-
seille and Estoril. He is playing
his first tournament since re-


Saturday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (10) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 206 laps,
113.7 rating, 47 points, $91,143.
2. (2) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 206, 122.7, 43,
$65,718.
3. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 206, 107.8, 0,
$50,125.
4. (7) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 206, 103.1, 40,
$38,533.
5. (8) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 206, 109.3, 39,
$35,158.
6. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 206, 118.2, 0,
$24,190.
7. (21) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 206, 94.9, 38,
$32,208.
8. (14) Michael Annett, Ford, 206, 96.4, 36,
$28,508.
9. (12) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 206,111.7, 35,
$27,418.
10. (13) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 206, 98.9,
34, $27,783.
11. (27) Ryan Blaney, Dodge, 206, 98.3, 0,
$26,058.
12. (22) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 206, 80.7, 32,
$25,508.
13. (23) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 206, 81.6, 31,
$24,958.
14. (37) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 206, 62.3, 30,
$24,448.
15. (15) Eric McClure, Toyota, 205, 71.5, 29,
$24,888.
16. (5) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, fuel, 204,133.1,
0, $20,160.
17. (39) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 204, 56.9, 27,
$23,493.
18. (4) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, fuel, 203, 83.8,
26, $23,983.
19. (32) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 202, 51.2, 25,
$16,555.
20. (24) Jason Bowles, Dodge, 201, 65.7, 24,
$23,488.
21. (29) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 200, 65.3, 23,
$22,703.
22. (33) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, 200, 53, 0,
$16,125.
23. (26) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, engine, 199,
78.4, 21, $22,458.
24. (19) Scott Lagasse Jr, Chevrolet, accident,
197, 68.5, 20, $15,875.
25. (16) Hal Martin, Toyota, accident, 182, 57.6,
19, $22,683.
26. (3) Brian Scott, Toyota, 177, 71.9, 18,
$23,098.
27. (42) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 165, 46.3, 17,
$21,988.
28. (17) James Buescher, Chevrolet, engine,
155, 71.7, 0, $21,868.
29. (40) Derek White, Toyota, accident, 130,
42.3, 15, $21,718.
30. (31) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, vibration, 123,
41.4, 0, $15,440.
31. (9) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, accident, 109,
70.8, 13, $21,473.
32. (43) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, rear
gear, 75, 44.4, 12, $14,895.
33.(41) NurAli, Chevrolet, accident, 68, 38, 11,
$21,253.
34. (30) Scott Saunders, Ford, accident, 31,
47.2, 10, $14,675.
35. (11) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, water
pump, 24, 57, 9, $14,565.
36. (25) Blake Koch, Toyota, ignition, 24, 40.6, 8,
$14,455.
37. (36) Carl Long, Chevrolet, overheating, 23,
36.6, 7, $14,335.
38. (34) Timmy Hill, Ford, engine, 14, 37.1, 6,
$14,275.
39. (35) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet,
clutch, 14, 37.9, 5, $13,940.
40. (28) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, vibration, 9, 36.3,
0, $13,830.
41. (38) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, rear gear, 8,
30.9, 3, $13,725.
42. (18) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 4, 33.4,
2, $13,520.
43. (20) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, ignition, 4,
32.3, 1, $13,413.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 111.597 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 46 minutes, 8 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.288 seconds.
Caution Flags: 12 for 50 laps.
Lead Changes: 14 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-34; R.Stenhouse Jr.
35-37; RMenard 38-44; R.Stenhouse Jr. 45-53;
PMenard 54-58; R.Stenhouse Jr. 59-70;
PMenard 71-112; A.Dillon 113-117; PMenard
118-139; J.Allgaier140-142; PMenard 143-175;
K.Busch 176-183; PMenard 184; K.Busch 185-
205; R.Stenhouse Jr. 206.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): PMenard, 6 times for 110 laps; J.Logano,
1 time for 34 laps; K.Busch, 2 times for 29 laps;
R.Stenhouse Jr., 4 times for 25 laps; A.Dillon, 1
time for 5 laps; J.AIIgaier, 1 time for 3 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 1,136; 2. R.Sten-
house Jr., 1,130; 3.A.Dillon, 1,110; 4. S.Hornish
Jr., 1,038; 5. M.Annett, 986; 6. J.Allgaier, 974;
7. C.Whitt, 913; 8. M.Bliss, 820; 9. B.Scott, 758;
10. D.Patrick, 742.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.



BASEBALL
American League
TAMPA BAY RAYS Assigned OF Rich
Thompson and RHPWilking Rodriguez outright
to Durham (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Exercised
their 2013 option on RHP J.J. Putz. Traded OF
Chris Young and cash considerations to Oak-
land for INF Cliff Pennington and INF Yordy
Cabrera, then traded Cabrera to Miami for RHP
Heath Bell and cash considerations.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS Assigned SS
Hector Gomez outright to Nashville (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Reinstated
RHP David Herndon from the 60-day DL.


Associated Press
Memphis runner Brandon Hayes, right, looks to get away
from UCF's Clayton Geathers during the first half Saturday in
Memphis, Tenn. UCF scored a 35-17 victory over Memphis.


turning from a wrist injury that
sidelined him for more than a
month.

Tsonga, Berdych in
Stockholm final
STOCKHOLM Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga and Tomas Berdych will
play in the Stockholm Open
final after semifinal wins.
Top-seeded Tsonga advanced
after his opponent Marcos Bagh-
datis retired with a left groin
strain in the deciding set, with
Tsonga leading 6-4, 4-6, 5-2.
Berdych recorded a comfort-
able 6-3, 6-2 win over claycourt
specialist Nicolas Almagro of
Spain.
Berdych has a 2-1 edge over
Tsonga in previous meetings,
coming off his quarterfinal win
over the Frenchman in Shang-
hai this month.

Wozniacki, Stosur to
play for Kremlin Cup
MOSCOW Caroline Woz-
niacki and Samantha Stosur
both earned three-set victories
on Saturday to reach the final
of the Kremlin Cup.
Wozniacki advanced to her
third final of the season by
beating Sofia Arvidsson of Swe-
den 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-4, while Sto-
sur rallied past former No. 1
Ana Ivanovic 2-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Stosur has a 3-2 record
against Wozniacki, winning
their last two matches.
In a match with 18 breaks of
serve, the third-seeded Wozni-
acki won five consecutive
games against Arvidsson to
take the first set. Both players
then struggled with their serves
for the rest of the match.
The 11th-ranked Dane was
serving for the match at 6-5 in
the second set but was broken.
Wozniacki was broken again
while serving for the match at
5-3 in the third but finally
clinched the victory when the
46th-ranked Swede netted a
backhand in the 10th game.


Associated Press
Samantha Stosur returns a ball to Ana Ivanovic on Saturday
during a semifinal match at the Kremlin Cup tennis tourna-
ment in Moscow, Russia.




3-team trade sends


Bell to D'backs


Associated Press July. He finished with 19
saves in 27 chances and a
PHOENIX Heath Bell 5.09 ERA in in 73 games.
became the latest player jet- After failing to contend in
tisoned by the Miami Mar- the first season of their new
lins when he was dealt ballpark, the Marlins traded
Saturday to the Arizona Di- former NL batting cham-
amondbacks, who also ac- pion Hanley Ramirez to the
quired infielder Cliff Los Angeles Dodgers in July
Pennington from the Oak- and sent pitcher Anibal
land for outfielder Chris Sanchez and infielder Omar
Young Infante to the Detroit
Arizona obtained Pen- Tigers.
on inArizona general manager
nington and minor league Kevin Towers said Bell pro-
infielder Yordy Cabrera vides a right-handed power
from Oakland for Young and arm to help set up Putz and
cash, then sent Cabrera to Pennington adds the team
the Miami Marlins for Bell experience at shortstop and
and cash. second base.
Earlier in the day, Arizona Towers, who was general
exercised a $6.5 million op- manager in San Diego when
tion on closer J.J. Putz. Bell was the setup man for
The 35-year-old Bell has Trevor Hoffman, believes
151 saves the past four sea- the pitcher will benefit from
sons. He signed a $27 mil- a return to the NL West.
lion, three-year contract "I think he's excited to
with Miami last offseason kind of be able to clean the
but lost his closer's job in slate," Towers said.



Knights prevail in Memphis


B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


SCOREBOARD





NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Remember us?


Saints, Bucs

home game

will be on TV

Associated Press
TAMPA Slow starts that
have dumped the New Or-
leans Saints and Tampa Bay
Buccaneers into a hole in
the NFC South haven't
changed the way they feel
about themselves.
The division rivals enter
today's meeting of inconsis-
tent teams at Raymond
James Stadium eager to
build on victories they hope
will set the tone for the rest
of the season.
The Saints (1-4) continue
to deal with fallout from the
bounty probe that led to the
suspensions of coach Sean
Payton and others. Line-
backer Jonathan Vilma is
appealing the season-long
ban the NFL ordered for his
role in the program and ac-
tually could make his season
debut against the Bucs (2-3).
Vilma has been on the
physically unable to per-
form list while rehabbing
his surgically repaired left
knee and prac-
ticed for the first New C
time on Wednes- Saint
day. Interim at Tam
coach Aaron Bucs
Kromer has not
ruled out the 0 Time:
prospect of plug- today
going the ninth- U TV: FC
year pro into a
defense that's al-
lowed an NFL-high 456
yards and nearly 31 points
per game even if Vilma
pro's return winds up being
brief, with appeals hearings
set for NFL headquarters in
New York on Tuesday
"Is there a need?"
Kromer asked in response
to a question about using
the middle linebacker's
help. "There's always a
need for Jon Vilma on the
field if he's the Jon Vilma
that we remember, that we
all know who flies around
the field and makes every
tackle that's near him."
Drew Brees agreed
Vilma's presence makes a
difference.


E

II
)|


Associated Press
Tampa Bay wide receiver Vincent Jackson had four catches for 66 yards and two touch-
downs in the Bucs' 38-10 win over the Kansas City Chiefs last Sunday.


"Of course it would be
great to have him back. His
leadership, his productivity,"
the New Orleans star said.
"But in the end, you worry
about the guys
deans that you do have."
s (1-4) Brees believes
Bay the Saints, com-
ing off a bye week
(2-3) that gave them a
1 p.m. chance to rest
and savor their
first victory, have
X the makeup to
turn their season
around following an 0-4 start
The record-breaking
quarterback threw for 370
yards and a season-high
four touchdowns to pace a
31-24 win over San Diego
two weeks ago, also moving
ahead of Johnny Unitas for
sole ownership of the
league mark for consecutive
games with at least one
touchdown pass at 48.
Unitas held the previous
record for 52 years.
"We're a prideful group.
We've got great leadership,
great work ethic, great char-
acter. So you start like that
and you go: 'Man, this is not
what we all anticipated or all
expected.' Yet life is going to


throw that at you sometimes,
football is going to throw that
at you sometimes. You've
just got to find a way to stick
together, stay positive and
encouraging," Brees said.
"I think we've always felt
like as long as we do things
the right way, good things
are going to happen to us,
we're going to catch a break.
It just seems like everything
that could have gone wrong
went wrong those first four
weeks," Brees added. "But
we got better If you want to
look at the positive side of it,
the bright side, each week
you'd turn on the film and it
was like: 'Hey, I know it did-
n't end up in a winning re-
sult, but we got better and
we got closer and closer"
Tampa Bay opened the
season with a victory over
Carolina, then dropped
three straight to the Giants,
Cowboys and Redskins.
First-year coach Greg Schi-
ano used the team's bye
week to make some adjust-
ments, and the Bucs re-
turned last week to rout
struggling Kansas City 38-10.
Josh Freeman threw for a
season-high 328 yards and
three touchdowns, while


the defense limited Jamaal
Charles to 40 yards on 12
carries.
Receivers Vincent Jack-
son and Mike Williams rank
among the league leaders in
average yards per catch,
and there are finally signs of
a consistent running game
with rookie Doug Martin
sharing the workload with
LeGarrette Blount
So are the Bucs, with
their newfound downfield
passing attack equipped to
win a shootout with the
high-scoring Saints?
"We're going to be pre-
pared to do whatever it
takes," Freeman said.
Schiano is counting on an
improved defense to do its
part. That means stopping
the run and, of course, get-
ting pressure on Brees.
"You have to play run de-
fense, but I wouldn't sound
very intelligent if I got up
here and said No. 9 isn't
their team," Schiano said.
"You're not going to stop
Drew Brees, but you need to
do what you can do to slow
him down. There's a lot of
ways to do that that I'm not
going to get into. Ways we
think. We'll see if it works."


AFC East fit



to be tied up


Associated Press

FLORHAM PARK, N.J.
- First is also worst right
now in the unpredictably
equal AFC East.
The New York Jets, New
England Patriots, Miami
Dolphins and Buffalo Bills
are all 3-3, a rare logjam this
far into the season that has
coaches and players unsure
if they should be happy or
concerned or both.
"It's good news, bad
news," Jets coach Rex
Ryan said. "Let's face it,
we're tied for first in our
division, so that's great.
We're also tied for last. It's
a little depressing."
Since the NFL merger
in 1970, this marks only the
fourth time every team in
a division has the same
record after Week 6 or
later, and first since the
AFC East was knotted up
at 5-5 after Week 10 in
1987, according to STATS
LLC. The division was also
all tied up at 4-4 in Week 8
that same season but
things were already a bit
wacky because one week
was canceled because of a
players strike, and Weeks
4-6 were played mostly by
replacements.
The only other time it
has happened was in the
AFC Central after Week 9
in 1985.
"It's crazy," Jets tight end
Dustin Keller said. "The
whole division is just crazy
right now."
The gridiron gridlock


will clear a bit this week-
end, though, with the Jets
and Patriots set for a divi-
sion showdown at Foxbor-
ough. The Bills host the
Tennessee Titans, while
the Dolphins are on their
bye-week break.
'At this point going for-
ward, they're all going to be
important (games) and the
thing about football is the
next game is always more
important than the previ-
ous game in the NFL," Pa-
triots quarterback Tom
Brady said. "So a division
opponent is critical."
Next weekend should
shake things up a little
more with Buffalo off, New
England playing St. Louis
in London, and New York
at Miami in another AFC
East matchup.
"I guess the old saying
about the parity in the
NFL is true, at least
through six weeks of the
NFL season," Dolphins
coach Joe Philbin said. "I
really haven't watched
that. I don't go home and
watch a lot of football. I
don't really study other
teams. I'm more focused
on our own (team and)
where we're at. I think it
just speaks to the, at this
stage, the parity that exists,
especially in the AFC."
Some might say it's a
clear display of mediocrity
in the division the AFC
Least, some are calling it
- with no teams standing
out nearly halfway into the
season.


Associated Press
With all four AFC East teams holding a 3-3 record, the
entire division is in first place and last at the same time.


Jags, Raiders both reeling


Top backs don't

equalsuccess

for teams

Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. Mau-
rice Jones-Drew looks at
Oakland's Darren McFad-
den and sees a running back
who has the total package -
that rare combination of
size and speed that makes
other elite running backs in
the NFL take notice.
McFadden loves watching
Jones-Drew run the ball for
the Jacksonville Jaguars,
praising his tenacity that al-
lows him to get yards out of
the toughest of situations.
Jones-Drew and McFad-
den are widely considered
among the best running


backs in the NFL going into
today's game between the
Jaguars (1-4) and Raiders
(1-4). They have something
else in common that is much
less enviable: they have
been unable to turn their
teams into winners.
"It gets frustrating be-
cause you work so hard
throughout the week and
throughout the offseason to
get into your best shape,"
Jones-Drew said. "At the end
of the day we just want to go
out there and win some
games. Every loss is frustrat-
ing. But at the same time I
wouldn't want anything to
come easy to me or to us. We
have to fight for it When you
fight for things you earn it
and that happiness is much
more than when you're
given certain things."
Jones-Drew has made the
playoffs just once in his
seven-year career, coming


3afd


as Fred Taylor's backup in
2007. Since taking over the
starting job in 2009, the
Jaguars have failed to post a
winning record even though
he led the NFL in rushing
during that period.
A slow start this season
indicates possibly another
year of disappointment.
"I'm always optimistic. You
never know," Jones-Drew
said. "I think everybody's
mood is a sense of urgency
We dug ourselves a hole and
the only way to get out is to
take it one play at a time. We
can't really dwell on what
happened the last couple of
weeks. We had some games
that we felt we were leading
and got out of control."
McFadden came into the
league as a heralded college
player picked fourth overall
in 2008 and has shown the
ability to be a game-break-
ing back when healthy


CT-RuNiCLE
www~chronicleonline.com


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Central Citrus Rotary club's 22nd Annual Blood screening



ffBLOOD TESTING

FOR YOUR GOOD HEALTH!
o, Central^

k+CH5N ++ *SEVEN RIVERS
= REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

ONE DAY ONLY


Comprehensive Testing at
DRASTICAUY REDUCED PRICES!
Only $78.00*
Rotary Blood Screening Profile
(Includes: CBC, Lipid Panel, and Chemistry Profiles
including liver enzymes, glucose, and potassium, etc.)


Sat, Nov. 10,2012
6:30am to 9:30am
at the
Forest Ridge Elementary School
in Hernando


Additional $65.00 "Over $475 WI/ee !
PSA TEST (men only) Test for Prostate Cancer DO NOT EAT OR DRINK BEFORE YOUR TEST
...nothing to eat or drink for 12 hours before
Additional $65.00 and up to the test Complimentary coffee,
Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testingjuice and donuts will be served gtthe test


Additional $65.00
Cardiac C.R.P. TEST Used to help predict
if a person is likely to have heart disease.
Medicare does NOT cover a full screening. If you
don't have medical coverage, this is your chance
to afford a mpet blood screening.


SCUT HERE KEEP UPPER HALF AS A REMINDER -
SEND LOWER HALF WITH YOUR CHECK

PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED:


Pre-registration is required no later than Nov. 7, 2012.
Complete this form and return bottom
half with your check payable to:
Rotary Club of Central Citrus
do Ed Serra, CPA
6118 West Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34429


Blood drawn by
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
licensed phlebotomists and results reviewed by
Tonialatoya Eley, MD, Board ertfed n
Anatomic & Clinical Pathology, Hematology.
Please understand thatyou should discuss the
results of your tes(s) with your personal physician.


Central Citrus County Rotary Club's
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 B5


-----------------------------------


C77R






B6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012

AP No. 3 UF 44,
No. 9 S. Carolina 11
South Carolina 3 3 2 3- 11
Florida 7 1416 7-- 44
First Quarter
Fla-Reed 3 pass from Driskel (Sturgis kick),
14:01.
SC-FG Yates 35, 7:03.
Second Quarter
Fla-Dunbar 13 pass from Driskel (Sturgis
kick), 3:00.
Fla-Reed 1 pass from Driskel (Sturgis kick),
2:02.
SC-FG Yates 51, :00.
Third Quarter
Fla-Hines 6 run (kick blocked), 9:00.
SC-2-point defensive conversion by Hampton,
9:00.
Fla-FG Sturgis 42, 4:51.
Fla-Hammond 6 pass from Driskel (Sturgis
kick), :14.
Fourth Quarter
SC-FG Yates 30, 7:17.
Fla-Jones 1 run (Sturgis kick), 5:54.
A-90,833.
SC Fla
First downs 17 14
Rushes-yards 26-36 48-89
Passing 155 94
Comp-Att-Int 17-40-1 12-17-0
Return Yards (-13) 22
Punts-Avg. 7-39.6 7-54.3
Fumbles-Lost 4-3 0-0
Penalties-Yards 3-26 7-74
Time of Possession 24:32 35:28
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Carolina, M.Davis 6-20,
Miles 5-15, Lattimore 3-13, Ellington 1-3,
C.Shaw 9-(minus 2), Thompson 2-(minus 13).
Florida, Gillislee 19-37, M.Brown 5-18, Patton
2-15, Jones 3-11, T.Burton 5-10, Hines 2-9,
Driskel 9-(minus 5), Team 3-(minus 6).
PASSING-South Carolina, C.Shaw 9-20-0-72,
Thompson 8-20-1-83. Florida, Driskel 11-16-0-
93, TBurton 1-1-0-1.
RECEIVING-South Carolina, D..Moore 3-23,
Sanders 2-32, Cunningham 2-13, Lattimore 2-
9, Miles 2-5, Anderson 1-20, D.Smith 1-16,
Brent 1-14, Adams 1-12, M.Davis 1-6, Jones 1-
5. Florida, Reed 4-44, Dunbar 2-29, Hammond
2-16, Hines 2-7, Joyer 1-1, Gillislee 1 -(minus 3).
No. 16 Louisville 27,
South Florida 25
South Florida 3 0 7 15 25
Louisville 0 14 7 6-- 27
First Quarter
USF-FG Bonani 36, 11:03.
Second Quarter
Lou-Perry 1 run (Wallace kick), 14:49.
Lou-Wright 11 run (Wallace kick), 3:38.
Third Quarter
USF-A.Davis 12 pass from Daniels (Bonani
kick), 10:05.
Lou-Copeland 21 pass from Bridgewater
(Wallace kick), 7:29.
Fourth Quarter
USF-Price 13 pass from Daniels (Murray run),
8:02.
USF-A.Davis 12 pass from Daniels (Bonani
kick), 3:09.
Lou-E.Rogers 11 pass from Bridgewater (kick
blocked), 1:35.
A-50,167.
USF Lou
First downs 28 22
Rushes-yards 44-197 33-128
Passing 189 256
Comp-Att-Int 21-38-1 21-25-0
Return Yards 6 0
Punts-Avg. 3-44.3 4-31.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 7-58 9-75
Time of Possession 32:25 27:35
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Florida, Lamar 15-110, Mur-
ray 13-57, Shaw 4-30, Daniels 12-0. Louisville,
Bridgewater 10-74, Perry 11-29, Wright 11-27,
Team 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-South Florida, Daniels 21-38-1-189.
Louisville, Bridgewater 21-25-0-256.
RECEIVING-South Florida, Hopkins 5-54,
A.Davis 4-47, Price 3-38, Welch 3-21, Murray
2-12, Lamar2-3, D.Montgomery 1-8, Landi 1-6.
Louisville, Copeland 5-93, E.Rogers 4-47,
Wright 3-31, S.Radcliff 2-21, Perry 2-20, Heuser
2-16, Parker 1-18, J.Davis 1-6, Hubbell 1 -4.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 16 Louisville edges USF


hri.


I. i... .
" .. "-. e = .r .....


Associated Press
South Florida's Marcus Shaw runs past Louisville's Preston Brown during the third quarter Saturday in Louisville, Ky. The No. 16 Cardinals downed the Bulls.


Bulls' last gasp

effortfalls short in

27-25 setback

Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. Louisville
coach Charlie Strong hopes his
16th-ranked Cardinals have
learned they can't take any oppo-
nent for granted.
Teddy Bridgewater threw an 11-
yard touchdown pass to Eli Rogers
with 1:35 left, and the undefeated
Cardinals edged South Florida 27-
25 on Saturday for their best start
since 2006.
Louisville (7-0, 2-0 Big East) ral-
lied after yielding 15 straight points
to South Florida and a season-high
197 yards rushing. Senorise Perry
and Jeremy Wright each ran for a


touchdown for the Cardinals, who
can match the school's 8-0 start in
2006 on Friday night when they
host No. 21 Cincinnati.
B.J. Daniels threw three TD
passes in the second half, the last
one putting South Florida ahead
25-21 with 3:09 left. The Bulls had
one last chance for the win, but
Adrian Bushell intercepted
Daniels' last-gasp throw at the
Louisville 10 as time ran out.
"We've been fighting through a
lot of adversity, it's good to get
through another one," Louisville
linebacker Preston Brown said.
"We just wanted to keep our com-
posure. (We) knew with Teddy, he
would score. We just had to get the
stop after they scored."
South Florida (2-5, 0-3) has
dropped five straight games. It has
just one win in its last 12 confer-
ence games dating to last season.
"We had a chance to finish right
there," linebacker Sam Barrington


said. "It's crazy because there were
two minutes left in the game, and
I'm sitting there confident because
God finally blessed us and helped
us win. Now I'm talking on the
other end, and we lost the game.
It's definitely tough."
Louisville finished with four
sacks and a big goal-line stand late
in the third quarter.
Bridgewater was 21 of 25 for 256
yards and two TDs, and the sopho-
more quarterback also led the Car-
dinals with 74 yards rushing on 10
carries. He connected with nine
different receivers in his seventh
straight game with at least one
touchdown pass.
"There was a lot riding on that
game, bragging rights and things
like that," Bridgewater said. "I am
a guy from the state of Florida. I
played on high school teams with
some of their guys and grew up.
The game meant a lot to me."
South Florida outgained


Louisville 386-384, and Lindsey
Lamar ran for 110 yards against a
Louisville unit that came in ranked
26th nationally in run defense, al-
lowing an average of 114 yards per
game. The Bulls grabbed the lead
by scoring 15 straight points after
Louisville stopped them during a
goal-line stand in the third quarter
when South Florida thought it had
scored not once but twice.
First, Lamar appeared to score on
first-and-goal on a 4-yard run. But
officials ruled Lamar down at the 1.
Daniels tried to sneak in and was
stopped. Demetris Murray couldn't
score on third down. Then Daniels
pushed up through the left side on
fourth down and into the end zone.
But officials flagged Louisville
defensive end Marcus Smith for
jumping offside, forcing South
Florida to line up one more time.
Daniels kept the ball and was
stopped yet again, sparking a big
celebration by Louisville.


Associated Press
South Carolina quarterback Dylan Thompson is sacked by
Florida's Dante Fowler Jr. during the second half Saturday
in Gainesville. Florida defeated South Carolina 44-11.


Continued from Page B2

completed 8 of 20 passes for
83 yards, with an interception.
"Coach Spurrier told me at
halftime we were going to
make the change," Shaw
said. "He told me I wasn't
getting the job done. I was
completely supportive of
him. Bottom line today, we
just didn't execute."
The Gators put the game
away by scoring on all three
possessions in the third
quarter, getting a 6-yard TD
run by Omarius Hines, a field
goal and a 6-yard pass from
Driskel to Frankie
Hammond Jr
They made South Car-
olina's defensive front, which
dominated in the first half,
look suspect. They also bet-
ter controlled standout end
pass-rusher Jadeveon
Clowney, who gave them fits
early And they kept South
Carolina off balance with
creative play-calling that in-
cluded tight end Trey Burton


in the wildcat
"It was embarrassing for
us, very embarrassing to
lose," Spurrier said. "We've
got to reevaluate a lot of our
personnel and get players
out there who really want to
play for South Carolina.
Two weeks ago, I wouldn't
have thought this. We had a
bad one today LSU was bad
(last week). This one was
worse. We've got to regroup
somehow."
Driskel completed 11 of 16
passes for 93 yards. Mike
Gillislee ran 19 times for 37
yards. Reed caught four
passes for 44 yards.
Florida's defense and spe-
cial teams were much more
impressive.
The Gators held South
Carolina to 191 yards, includ-
ing minus-1 in the third quar-
ter Marcus Lattimore, who
didn't start because of a hip
injury, ran just three times
for 13 yards. And Florida
dominated every aspect of
special teams. In addition to
the two forced fumbles, Kyle
Christy had seven punts of at
least 50 yards.


Stenhouse steals victory


Driver sneaks

into N'wide's

Victory Lane

Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. -
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. rallied
from two laps down at
Kansas Speedway to sal-
vage his points day
Then he stole a win, as
well.
Stenhouse, the defending
Nationwide Series cham-
pion, lucked into his sixth
win of the season Saturday
when leader Kyle Busch
ran out gas heading into the
final turn. A late caution ex-
tended the race by six laps,
and it ran the fuel tanks dry
of several cars at the front
of the field.
Not Stenhouse, though.
Because he ran into Joey
Logano early into the race,
dropping him two laps
down during his stops for
repairs, he was on a differ-
ent pit sequence and had
plenty of gas to make it to
the end.
So he liked his chances
when he lined up fifth on
the final restart.
As the field prepared to
take the green, Sam Hor-
nish Jr. ran out of gas and
NASCAR called off the start.
It tacked on yet another lap,
and that cost Paul Menard,
who led a race-high 110 laps
but ran out of gas as the field
took the green.
Busch, who was seeking
his first Nationwide win of
the season and first in his
Kyle Busch Motorsports
entry, was the leader on the
restart and jumped out to a
comfortable lead. But his
tank ran dry as he exited
the third turn, and Sten-
house cruised past for the
improbable victory


Associated Press
Driver Ricky Stenhouse Jr., far left, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the Nation-
wide Series' Kansas Lottery 300 race Saturday at Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan.


"I saw Kyle and he was
really shaking it down the
back straightaway trying to
make sure it had a lot of
fuel and I thought it was
good to go," Stenhouse said.
"But right in the center it
ran out and I was able to
sneak by him on the outside
and get the win. That was
exciting."
The win tightened up the
Nationwide championship
race, too. Stenhouse was 13
points behind leader Elliott
Sadler at the start of the
race, but cut it to six points
with three races remaining.
"We knew we had to do
that. I didn't see the win
coming like this but I felt
we had a car that was capa-
ble of winning before we
got in the mess there with
(Logano)," Stenhouse said.
"We know we need to win
races and if we win the rest
we will win the champi-
onship no matter what. We
have good tracks coming up
for us and we are looking
forward to getting to them."


Austin Dillon finished
second to clinch the manu-
facturer championship for
Chevrolet.
Logano wound up third,
and was still smarting from
the early contact with Sten-
house. He made a point to
rub against Stenhouse's car
on the cool-down lap to
show his displeasure.
"I just got put in the
fence," Logano said. "It's
just a little early in the race
for fencing each other."
Stenhouse was trying to
clean debris off his grille
when he ran into Logano,
and Stenhouse team owner
Jack Roush assessed it as
"from what I saw was 100
percent Ricky's fault."
Stenhouse figured the
race was ruined at the time,
and focused on getting as
many points as possible.
"I thought the race was
over for us. I thought I had
killed it for us," Stenhouse
said. "I knew we would try
to salvage as many points as
we could. To be honest I


was thinking top-15 and to
try to get back one lap down
and it was one thing at a
time and we were able to do
that."
Sadler was fourth, and
like teammate Dillon had to
made a late pit stop for gas
to avoid running out of fuel.
"All the fuel mileage and
strategy, sometimes you just
end up on the wrong side of
it," said Sadler. "That last
caution just killed us and
took a lot of points from us.
Thought we managed it the
best we could. Running for
a championship, we had to
pit and give up track posi-
tion to make it to the end."
Cole Whitt was fifth and
followed by Busch, who has
won a Nationwide race
every year since 2004 but
has only three chances left
to keep his streak active.
"That's our year, man.
Nothing else to it than
that," said Busch, who led
29 laps. "What a frustrating
defeat. Oh, well. You get
defeated sometimes."


COLLEGE FOOTBALL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 6 LSU thwarts






challenge from TAMU


Associated Press
LSU running back Jeremy Hill breaks away for a touchdown Saturday against Texas A&M in College Station, Texas. LSU won the game 24-19.


No. 5 Irish survive

Cougars 17-14

Associated Press

COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
Jeremy Hill rushed for a career-
high 127 yards and a touchdown,
and the sixth-ranked Tigers rallied
from an early deficit to beat No. 18
Texas A&M 24-19.
Michael Ford also had a touch-
down run and Zach Mettenberger
threw a TD pass to Kadron Boone
for the Tigers (7-1, 3-1 Southeastern
Conference), who scored 21 points
off four Texas A&M turnovers.
A&M (5-2, 2-2) outplayed the
Tigers for much of the first half and
led 12-0, LSU's largest deficit since
the national championship game
against Alabama in January But
the Aggies gave away two costly
turnovers just before halftime, and
Boone's diving catch in the end
zone with 11 seconds left put LSU
up 14-12 at the break. Hill finished
off A&M with a 47-yard touchdown
run in the fourth quarter.
Johnny Manziel, A&M's dual-
threat redshirt freshman quarter-
back, completed 29 of 56 passes for
276 yards, but threw three inter-
ceptions and was sacked three
times. He was the SEC's leading
rusher coming into the game and
was held to 27 yards on 17 carries.
No. 5 Notre Dame 17,
Brigham Young 14
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -Theo Riddick
pounded his way for a career-high 143
yards and Cierre Wood added 114 yards.
Riddick had runs of 55 and 27, the
two longest rushes of his career, to
pace Notre Dame (7-0), which is off to
its best start in a decade and has a big
game ahead against No. 10 Oklahoma
next week. The Cougars (4-4) fell to 0-3
on the road as they surrendered a sea-
son-high 270 yards rushing.
Backup quarterback Tommy Rees,
starting in place of injured Everett Gol-
son, completed 6 of 7 passes in the first
quarter for 86 yards and a touchdown,
throwing four of those to Tyler Eifert.
But Rees missed his next seven
passes and the Irish attempted only
three passes in the second half.
Rees' only completion of the second
half was a 31-yard pass to TJ Jones
with a little more than a minute left in
the third quarter.
No. 1 Alabama 44,
Tennessee 13
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -Amari Cooper
caught two of A.J. McCarron's four
touchdown passes as No. 1 Alabama
defeated Tennessee 44-13 for its sixth
consecutive victory over the Volunteers.
Cooper finished with seven receptions
for 162 yards, including a 23-yard touch-
down in the first quarter and a 42-yard
score in the third. Cooper also had a 30-
yard touchdown nullified by a penalty.
McCarron went 17-of-22 for a career-
high 306 yards for Alabama (7-0, 4-0).
T.J. Yeldon rushed for 129 yards and
two touchdowns.
Tennessee (3-4, 0-4) has lost 11 of
its last 12 SEC games and is 0-14
against the Top 25 since Derek Dooley
took over the program in 2010.
No. 4 Kansas State 55,
No. 17 West Virginia 14
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Collin
Klein ran for four touchdowns and


threw three TD passes as No. 4
Kansas State got little resistance from
No. 17 West Virginia in a 55-14 victory
that turned a matchup of Heisman Tro-
phy contenders into campaign ad for
the Wildcats' quarterback.
Klein was 19 for 21 for a career-high
323 yards and ran for 41 yards for the
Wildcats (7-0, 4-0 Big 12).
It was no surprise the Mountaineers (5-
2, 2-2) were awful on defense, it's been
that way all season. For the second
straight game, though, Geno Smith and
the offense did nothing to keep it close.
Kansas State (7-0, 4-0) scored on its
first eight possessions, making it 52-7
with 2:25 minutes left in the third quar-
ter when Klein hit Tyler Lockett over the
middle for a 20-yard score.
No. 7 Ohio State 29,
Purdue 22, OT
COLUMBUS, Ohio Backup Kenny
Guiton came off the bench in relief of
injured Braxton Miller to lead touch-
down drives in the final minute of regu-
lation and Carlos Hyde scored on a
1-yard run in in overtime.
Purdue (3-4, 0-3 Big Ten) led 22-14
when Ohio State got the ball with just
47 seconds left in regulation. Guiton, in-
serted when Miller went out with an
undisclosed injury, hit Chris Fields on a
2-yard touchdown pass with 3 seconds
remaining. Guiton then found freshman
Jeff Heuerman on the conversion pass
to tie it at 22.
Hyde scored on a short plunge for
Ohio State (8-0, 4-0) before Purdue's
Caleb TerBush, who had two TD
passes, misfired on four passes in the
overtime.
Miller completed 9 of 20 passes for
113 yards with an interception and ran
for 47 yards on 12 carries before leav-
ing the game on the next-to-last play of
the third quarter.
No. 10 Oklahoma 52,
Kansas 7
NORMAN, Okla. Landry Jones
threw for 291 yards and three touch-
downs, and No. 10 Oklahoma scored on
a kickoff return and a punt return in the
same game for the first time in school
history while clobbering Kansas 52-7.
Justin Brown made up for a lost fum-
ble on his previous punt return by run-
ning his next chance back 90 yards and
diving at the pylon for the score. Roy
Finch then opened the second half with
a 100-yard runback to stretch the lead
to 45-0.
The Brown-Finch combo marked the
first time the Sooners (5-1, 3-1 Big 12)
have had two plays at least 90 yards
long in the same game.
James Sims scored on a shutout-
preventing touchdown run in the fourth
quarter for Kansas (1-6, 0-4).
No. 11 USC 50, Colorado 6
LOS ANGELES Matt Barkley
threw for 298 yards and six touch-
downs while setting Southern Califor-
nia's career record for TD passes, and
Robert Woods caught a school-record
four scoring passes while also surpass-
ing USC's career receptions mark in
the 11th-ranked Trojans' 50-6 victory
over Colorado.
Barkley and Woods climbed atop the
Trojans' record books during the most
prolific day of their three-year partner-
ship at USC (6-1, 4-1 Pac-12), connect-
ing on scoring throws of 39, 29, 17 and
3 yards in the first 35 minutes against
hapless Colorado (1-6, 1-3).
Barkley hit Woods with his 100th ca-
reer TD pass in the second quarter to


surpass Matt Leinart's USC and confer-
ence records. Woods passed Dwayne
Jarrett on USC's career receptions list a
few minutes later with his 217th career
catch, going 17 yards for another TD.
No. 13 Georgia 29,
Kentucky 24
LEXINGTON, Ky. -Aaron Murray
threw four touchdown passes to rally
No. 13 Georgia to a 29-17 victory over
stubborn Kentucky.
The junior finished 30 of 38 for 427
yards as the Bulldogs (6-1, 4-1 SEC)
stayed within reach of East-leading
Florida entering next week's showdown
against the Gators (7-0, 6-0) in Jack-
sonville, Fla.
Georgia, coming off a bye following a
35-7 loss at South Carolina, had to
work hard to get past Kentucky (1-7, 0-
5). Despite outgaining the Wildcats
504-316, the Bulldogs trailed three
times and needed Murray's fourth TD
for a cushion.
Two of Murray's scores were to
Tavarres King, who had nine receptions
for 188 yards included a 66-yard TD.
No. 14 Clemson 38,
Virginia Tech 17
CLEMSON, S.C. -Tajh Boyd ran
for two touchdowns and passed for an-
other and Jonathan Meeks had a 74-
yard interception return score and the
Tigers beat the Hokies for the third
straight time.
Andre Ellington had a 12-yard touch-
down run and 96 yards for the Tigers
(6-1, 3-1 Atlantic Coast Conference),
who relied on their much-maligned de-
fense to bail them out of this one.
Clemson finished with three intercep-
tions and twice stopped fourth downs to
end drives by the Hokies (4-4, 2-2).
Logan Thomas passed for 207 yards
and ran for 99, accounting for two Vir-
ginia Tech touchdowns. He was contin-
ually harassed by the Tigers and threw
two picks.
Boyd was 12 of 21 for 160 yards,
131 fewer than he averaged coming in.
Clemson tied a school record with its
11th straight home victory, something it
had done twice before from 1937-42
and 1989-91.
No. 15 Mississippi St. 45,
Middle Tennessee 3
STARKVILLE, Miss. Tyler Russell
threw for 191 yards and three touch-
downs, Johnthan Banks tied a school
record with his 16th career interception
and No. 15 Mississippi State pulled
away in the second half to beat Middle
Tennessee 45-3.
Mississippi State (7-0) led just 10-3
at halftime, but scored three touch-
downs in the third quarter to open a
comfortable lead in the non-conference
game. It was the ninth straight win for
the Bulldogs, dating to last season.
LaDarius Perkins shook Mississippi
State's offense out of an extended
drought midway through the third quar-
ter, bursting through the middle of the
line for a 64-yard touchdown to put the
Bulldogs ahead 17-3. He finished with
125 yards rushing on 20 carries.
No. 18 Texas Tech 56,
TCU 53, 30T
FORT WORTH, Texas Seth
Doege threw seven touchdowns, three
in overtime, and No. 18 Texas Tech
won 56-53 at TCU after blowing a late
10-point lead.
The game-winning pass was an 8-
yard throw to Alex Torres, which came
four plays after Jaden Oberkrom's


school-record sixth field goal had put
TCU ahead. Both teams scored touch-
downs in the first two overtime periods.
TCU (5-2, 2-2), the Big 12 new-
comer, has lost consecutive home
games for the first time since 1999.
After losing the final two home games
in 1998, they lost the 1999 season
opener at home.
Doege completed 30 of 42 passes
for 318 yards and Texas Tech (6-1, 3-1)
is already bowl eligible a year after its
first losing season since 1992.
TCU redshirt freshman Trevone
Boykin was 26-of-44 for 332 yards with
four TDs and two interceptions.
No. 19 Rutgers 35,
Temple 10
PHILADELPHIA- Gary Nova threw
four touchdown passes in the second
half to keep Rutgers undefeated.
Jawan Jamison had 114 yards rush-
ing and 81 receiving, Nova threw for
232 yards, and the Scarlet Knights (7-0,
4-0 Big East) rallied from a 10-0 half-
time deficit in their first game against
Temple (3-3, 2-1) since the Owls were
kicked out of the conference in 2004.
Held to just 110 total yards in the first
30 minutes, Rutgers was unstoppable
in the second half.
No. 22 Stanford 21, Cal 3
BERKELEY, Calif. Stepfan Taylor
ran for a career-high 189 yards and one
touchdown, and No. 22 Stanford got its
third straight Big Game victory.
In the 115th meeting between the
Bay Area schools and the first at re-
modeled Memorial Stadium, the sunny
and serene Strawberry Canyon setting
might have been Cal's best highlight.
The Cardinal outgained the Golden
Bears 475 to 217 yards, outrushed Cal
252 to 3 yards and never lost its grip on
the coveted Stanford Axe.
Stanford's Josh Nunes completed 16
of 31 passes for 214 yards and a touch-
down. He also fumbled and threw an
interception late in the fourth quarter
with the game well out of reach.
Cal (3-5, 2-3) had not scored so few
points in the Big Game since losing
10-3 in 1998.
No. 23 Michigan 12,
Michigan State 10
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Brendan Gib-
bons made a 38-yard field goal with 5
seconds left, helping the Wolverines (5-
2, 3-0 Big Ten) beat the Spartans (4-4,
1-3) for the first time since 2007 to
avoid a school-record, five-game losing
streak in the series.
Denard Robinson threw a 20-yard
pass to Drew Dileo to set up the game-
winning kick.
Michigan State's Dan Conroy made
a go-ahead field goal with 5:48 left after
a fake punt kept the drive alive. The
Spartans forced the Wolverines to punt
from midfield after going ahead, but
couldn't stop them when it mattered
most in the final minute.
It was the 900th win for Michigan,
college football's winningest program.
Robinson was 14 of 29 for 163 yards
with an interception and ran for 96
yards on 20 carries.
Toledo 29, No. 21 Cincy 23
TOLEDO, Ohio Toledo's Bernard
Reedy scored on a 91-yard kickoff re-
turn to lead the Rockets over No. 21
Cincinnati 29-23, handing the Bearcats
their first loss of the season.
Cincinnati (5-1) led just once, late in
the third quarter, but Reedy quickly
erased that with his third special teams
touchdown in three weeks, putting
Toledo up 26-20.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Wis.-Eau Claire 17, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 14
Wis.-LaCrosse 33, Wis.-Stout 18
Wis.-Oshkosh 28, Wis.-Whitewater 13
Wis.-Platteville 31, Wis.-River Falls 0
Wisconsin 38, Minnesota 13
SOUTHWEST
Cent. Arkansas 24, Lamar 14
LSU 24, Texas A&M 12
Louisiana College 41, Sul Ross St. 24
Mississippi College 24, Texas Lutheran 21
Oklahoma St. 31, Iowa St. 10
Prairie View 52, Alcorn St. 37
San Jose St. 52, UTSA 24
Stephen F Austin 44, Nicholls St. 10
TexasTech 56, TCU 53, 30T
Tulsa 28, Rice 24
FAR WEST
Air Force 28, New Mexico 23
Boise St. 32, UNLV 7
E. Washington 31, Sacramento St. 28
N. Arizona 21, UC Davis 7
N. Colorado 52, Idaho St. 14
Southern Cal 50, Colorado 6
Stanford 21, California 3
Utah St. 41, New Mexico St. 7
Weber St. 24, S. Utah 22


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 B7

College football
scores
EAST
Albright 41, King's (Pa.) 10
American International 27, Bentley 23
Bowling Green 24, UMass 0
Brown 21, Cornell 14
Bryant 27, Monmouth (NJ) 24
California (Pa.) 41, Gannon 0
Case Reserve 24, Oberlin 17, OT
Castleton St. 54, Anna Maria 33
Clarion 30, Lock Haven 28
Colgate 57, Georgetown 36
Cortland St. 24, Rowan 21
Dartmouth 21, Columbia 16
Delaware 47, Rhode Island 24
Delaware Valley 70, Misericordia 0
Duquesne 35, Sacred Heart 3
Hobart 35, RPI 7
Kansas St. 55, West Virginia 14
Kutztown 59, East Stroudsburg 33
Lafayette 30, Holy Cross 13
Lebanon Valley 41, FDU-Florham 14
Lehigh 42, Bucknell 19
Mass. Maritime 42, Maine Maritime 23
Merchant Marine 28, WPI 13
Merrimack 81, St. Anselm 35
Navy 31, Indiana 30
New Hampshire 28, Maine 21
Old Dominion 31, Towson 20
Pittsburgh 20, Buffalo 6
Princeton 39, Harvard 34
Robert Morris 37, CCSU 31
Rutgers 35, Temple 10
Salisbury 24, Alfred 21
Stony Brook 41, Gardner-Webb 10
Utica 43, Hartwick 7
W. New England 23, Plymouth St. 3
Wagner 31, St. Francis (Pa.) 24
Washington & Jefferson 40, St. Vincent 14
Widener 28, Lycoming 23
Wilkes 38, Stevenson 35
William Paterson 31, Morrisville St. 6
Yale 27, Penn 13
SOUTH
Alabama 44, Tennessee 13
Belhaven 35, Lindsey Wilson 7
Bethel (Tenn.) 33, Faulkner 21
Bethune-Cookman 48, Norfolk St. 3
Bridgewater (Va.) 31, Washington & Lee 14
Carson-Newman 21, UNC-Pembroke 10
Centre 31, Trinity (Texas) 14
Charleston Southern 31, Presbyterian 21
Chattanooga 20, Samford 13
Clemson 38, Virginia Tech 17
Coastal Carolina 34, VMI 7
Cumberland (Tenn.) 28, Campbellsville 23
Cumberlands 75, Virginia-Wise 13
Davidson 28, Campbell 21
Delaware St. 24, NC A&T 0
Elon 42, W. Carolina 31
Ferrum 21, Methodist 13
Florida 44, South Carolina 11
Fort Valley St. 35, Stillman 17
Georgetown (Ky.) 35, Pikeville 10
Georgia Southern 38, Furman 17
Georgia Tech 37, Boston College 17
Grambling St. 22, Va. Lynchburg 7
Guilford 38, Randolph-Macon 35
Hampden-Sydney 42, Shenandoah 21
Howard 21, Morgan St. 20
Indianapolis 45, Kentucky Wesleyan 14
Jackson St. 14, MVSU 7, OT
Jacksonville St. 31, Tennessee St. 28, OT
Kentucky Christian 21, Union (Ky.) 7
LaGrange 17, Maryville (Tenn.) 13
Lenoir-Rhyne 34, Mars Hill 21
Liberty 21, Concord 13
Livingstone 58, Winston-Salem 0
Louisiana-Monroe 43, W. Kentucky 42, OT
Louisville 27, South Florida 25
Miles 38, Lane 20
Millsaps 47, Rhodes 13
Mississippi St. 45, Middle Tennessee 3
NC State 20, Maryland 18
Newberry 31, Tusculum 17
Richmond 35, James Madison 29
SC State 27, Florida A&M 20, OT
San Diego 24, Jacksonville 7
Savannah St. 42, Edward Waters 35
South Alabama 37, FAU 34, 20T
St. Augustine's 34, Fayetteville St. 28, 30T
Troy 38, FlU 37
Vanderbilt 17, Auburn 13
Villanova 49, Georgia St. 24
Virginia Union 37, Bowie St. 13
Wake Forest 16, Virginia 10
Wofford 38, Appalachian St. 28
MIDWEST
Adrian 28, Olivet 8
Albion 24, Alma 3
Ashland 31, Malone 7
Baldwin-Wallace 39, Capital 16
Ball St. 41, Cent. Michigan 30
Bethel (Minn.) 41, Gustavus 21
Buena Vista 42, Loras 19
Butler 39, Morehead St. 35
Carroll (Wis.) 21, Grinnell 20
Central 31, Luther 14
Chicago 23, Hiram 7
Coe 47, Simpson (Iowa) 7
Concordia (III.) 38, Aurora 34
Concordia (Moor.) 38, Augsburg 31
Concordia (Wis.) 23, Lakeland 16
Culver-Stockton 21, Lindenwood 14
Dayton 45, Valparaiso 0
Drake 34, Marist 27, OT
E. Michigan 48, Army 38
Elmhurst 45, Millikin 42, OT
Ferris St. 56, Michigan Tech 49
Findlay 41, Lake Erie 17
Grand View 37, Siena Heights 25
Heidelberg 28, Muskingum 14
Hillsdale 34, Saginaw Valley St. 17
Hope 30, Kalamazoo 7
Illinois College 49, Knox 29
Indiana St. 23, W. Illinois 7
Kent St. 41, W. Michigan 24
Kenyon 21, DePauw 19
Lake Forest 35, Cornell (Iowa) 30
Mac Murray 24, Westminster (Mo.) 22
Marian (Ind.) 59, Concordia (Mich.) 7
Michigan 12, Michigan St. 10
Minn. Duluth 30, Bemidji St. 0
Minn.-Morris 35, Presentation 28
Minot St. 38, Minn.-Crookston 14
Missouri St. 24, Illinois St. 17
Monmouth (III.) 56, Lawrence 28
Mount Union 51, Otterbein 0
N. Dakota St. 54, South Dakota 0
N. Illinois 37, Akron 7
N. Iowa 27, S. Dakota St. 6
Nebraska 29, Northwestern 28
North Central 42, Carthage 10
North Dakota 40, Montana 34
Northern St. (SD) 28, St. Cloud St. 27
Northwestern (Minn.) 47, Martin Luther 26
Notre Dame 17, BYU 14
Ohio Dominican 45, Notre Dame Coll.7
Ohio St. 29, Purdue 22, OT
Ohio Wesleyan 34, Carnegie-Mellon 26
Rockford 34, Maranatha Baptist 14
S. Illinois 38, Youngstown St. 21
SW Minnesota St. 38, Upper Iowa 37
Sioux Falls 32, Augustana (SD) 31, OT
St. Scholastica 45, Crown (Minn.) 13
St. Thomas (Minn.) 51, Hamline 9
UT-Martin 27, SE Missouri 17
Wartburg 34, Dubuque 31
Washington (Mo.) 18, Denison 13
Wayne (Mich.) 38, N. Michigan 31
Wayne (Neb.) 48, Concordia (St.P) 21
Wilmington (Ohio) 13, Marietta 12
Wis. Lutheran 14, Benedictine (III.) 2












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hedren vs. Hitchcock


Associated Press
Luxembourg's Prince
Guillaume and Countess
Stephanie kiss Saturday on
the balcony of the Royal
Palace, with part of the
Luxembourg coat of arms
seen below, after their
wedding in Luxembourg.


Luxembourg
royals tie knot
LUXEMBOURG-
Luxembourg Prince Guil-
laume and Belgian
Countess Stephanie de
Lannoy have put the fin-
ishing touches on their
two-day wedding extrava-
ganza with a religious
ceremony at the tiny
duchy's Notre Dame
Cathedral.
Saturday's church wed-
ding drew onlookers lin-
ing the streets and royals
from around the globe in-
cluding Crown Prince
Naruhito of Japan, royal
couples from Sweden
and Denmark, and
Britain's Prince Edward
- Queen Elizabeth's
youngest child and his
wife, Sophie.
The couple also had a
civil ceremony Friday at
city hall.
Stephanie plans to re-
nounce her Belgian citi-
zenship to one day
become Luxembourg's
grand duchess. The tiny
country wedged between
France, Belgium and Ger-
many is an important fi-
nancial center and
continues to prosper de-
spite Europe's economic
trouble.

Sting moves
venue of concert
MANILA, Philippines
Sting
has
moved
the loca-
S- tion of his
"Back to
Bass
Tour"
concert in
Sting the
Philip-
pines following a petition



trees for a parking lot
and mall expansion in a
northern mountain city
The SM Mall of Asia
Arena said in a statement
Saturday changing the
site of the Dec. 9 concert
was "the decision of the
artist himself."
The petition said as a
champion of the environ-
ment, "Sting can't be sav-
ing rainforests and
enabling SM to rape the
environment at the same
time!" The SM group is
owned by the Philip-
pines' richest man, mall
mogul Henry Sy.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Sienna Miller portrays Tippi Hedren in a scene from the film "The Girl," which premiered at 9 p.m. Saturday. The
HBO movie dramatizes the making of Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" and his relationship with Hedren.

HBO's 'The Girl' reveals relationship between actress, director


LYNN ELBER
AP Television Writer

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -After
a private screening of HBO's "The
Girl" held for Tippi Hedren, her
friends and family, including
daughter Melanie Griffith, the reac-
tion was silence.
Make that stunned silence, as the
room took in the film's depiction of
a scorned, vindictive Alfred Hitch-
cock physically and emotionally
abusing Hedren during production
of "The Birds."
"I've never been in a screening
room where nobody moved, nobody
said anything," Hedren recounted.
"Until my daughter jumped up and
said, 'Well, now I have to go back
into therapy'"'
Hedren, 82, as polished and
lovely as she was taking her turn as
a rarified "Hitchcock blonde" in
"The Birds" (1963) and "Marnie"
(1964), tells the story with a casual
smile.
But her experience with Hitch-
cock, as detailed in "The Girl,"
which debuted at 9 p.m. Saturday, is
as jarring to watch as one of the
master's own dark suspense dra-
mas. Sienna Miller ("Layer Cake,"
"Factory Girl") plays model-turned-
actress Hedren, with Toby Jones
("The Hunger Games," "Infamous")
as Hitchcock.
In one horrific sequence, the
filmmaker withholds from Hedren
that real birds, not mechanical
ones, will be used in a scene in
which she'll be attacked at close
quarters. Then he subjects her to
five days of shooting, take after
take, leaving her injured and
distraught.
A physician forced Hitchcock to


MR. HITCHCOII



Toby Jones donned elaborate
prosthetics and a fake belly to
portray Alfred Hitchcock in the HBO
film "The Girl."

suspend production for a week to
allow Hedren to recover
"Hitch said we had to keep film-
ing," the actress recalled. "The doc-
tor said, 'What are you trying to do,
kill her?"'
Hedren, who regrouped and
worked with the British filmmaker
again on "Marnie," said the HBO
film shows only a slice of what was
also a rewarding period and
relationship.
"There wasn't time to show the
wonderful people I met, the won-
derful discussions Hitch and I had,
the great gift he gave me being not
only my director but my drama
coach," she said.
But she lost her admiration for
the man, if not the artist, when
Hitchcock punished her for rebuff-
ing his advances.
"I think we're dealing with such a
devious mind, one of genius, of in-
credible creativity," she said,


adding, "there is so much wrong
with that mind.... He was evil."
With the pair's irrevocable rift
after "Marnie," Hitchcock refused
to let her out of the seven-year con-
tract she'd signed. That allowed
him to quash her shot at other big
films, including Francois Truffaut's
"Fahrenheit 451" in 1966, Hedren
said.
She insists, credibly, she's never
played the what-if game. While she
couldn't capitalize on being a hot
property post-Hitchcock, Hedren
channeled her energies into family
and her dedication to helping ani-
mals, including founding the Sham-
bala wildlife preserve in Southern
California.
"He ruined my career, but he did-
n't ruin my life," Hedren said, who
has worked regularly in TV and ap-
peared in some films.
Jones, who donned elaborate
prosthetics and a fake belly to sim-
ulate Hitchcock's distinctive profile
and girth, said the filmmaker can't
be forgiven for behaving "ap-
pallingly" toward Hedren.
"But I also think he was very
naive emotionally and I don't think
it was sexual," the actor said.
"There was something so beautiful
and radiant about her that he wor-
shiped her"
Jones cautioned against making
one chapter into a biography:
"We're not saying this is Hitchcock.
This is a section of Hitchcock's life
based on verified, carefully re-
search facts."
Director Julian Jarrold said
Hitchcock biographer Donald
Spoto, along with Hedren, were the
main sources for screenwriter
Gwyneth Hughes. Hitchcock died in
1980 at age 80.


'Happy Endings' kicks off third season


FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.
"We got lucky. We
clicked," said Adam Pally,
one of the half-dozen stars
of "Happy Endings," ABC's
comedy about six friends
being funny in Chicago.
"We're all playful and don't
take anything too seriously
The six of us are trouble-
makers!"
"It's very much a team,"
Elisha Cuthbert chimed in,
"and I think that comes
across on camera. We just
really care about the well-
being of our show and each
other"


Birthday Someone you're likely to meet in a social situ-
ation in the year ahead could turn out to be a huge asset in
the commercial world. However, before asking any favors
of this person, be certain you have established a firm foun-
dation of respect.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be careful if someone with
whom you're involved is as determined to have his or her
own way as you are. Unfortunately, it is a formula likely to
promote a huge clash.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Even if it is extremely difficult
for you to 'fess up to your mistakes, defending them won't
do anything for you. Don't make excuses make amends.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -All those productive in-
tentions of yours will quickly go by the boards if someone
starts enticing you to participate in something fun. If it's
your day off and you can afford to relax, let 'er rip.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It might be best for you not


Isn't there even one mem-
ber of the cast Cuthbert
doesn't like?
"I don't like any of them,"
she answered, deadpan.
"It's a combination of like
minds," said Damon Wayans
Jr "We spend so much time
with each other, it's like we
became a family"
Wayans plays Brad, the
metrosexual exec who, as
this third "Happy" season
begins (Tuesday at 9 p.m.),
has been laid off from his
job. Or so thinks Jane (Eliza
Coupe), Brad's whippet-
slim, high-strung and lov-
ingly dominating wife, who
likes the idea of her man at
home waiting for her after


Today's HOROSCOPE
to establish any kind of objective that requires a lot of work.
Your tenacity and patience aren't likely to be up to snuff at
present.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't let yourself get in-
volved with anyone who makes you feel uncomfortable.
Chances are there is plenty of justification for your feelings.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) There is a strong possibility
the gauge you are using to establish the loyalty and trust-
worthiness of a prospective friend may be way off. Take a
second look.
Aries (March 21-April 19) You're not the type of person
who allows your companions to do your thinking for you,
and you're not apt to begin doing so. Stick to placid, unde-
manding pals to hang out with.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you increase the amount of
work you have to do, you'll not only make yourself ex-
tremely unhappy, but also throw off your focus and lower


her own workday
"It's very important to us
to not be a boring married
couple on TV," Coupe said.
"So we want our characters
to give and take like a real
relationship would be, and
be best friends, like a real
relationship should be. And
it's really important to us to
make sure they're weird
and quirky!"
Penny (Casey Wilson) is
resuming her eternal search
for Mr Right, but something
about her is new in the sea-
son opener: She is in a body
cast (don't ask). Meanwhile,
Max, the sarcastic and
openly gay slacker played
by Pally, falls in lust with


Penny's hunky physical
therapist.
Rounding out this sitcom
sextet are Dave (Zachary
Knighton), who, on the se-
ries' very first episode, was
ditched at the altar by his
panic-stricken fiancee, Alex
(played by Cuthbert). But
after last season, during
which the couple existed in
a laughably awkward limbo
within their circle of
friends, they are resuming
their romance this season.
"We're just gonna be
friends with benefits," Alex
said, "like in 'No Strings
Attached."'
"Casually seeing each
other," Dave summed up.


your productivity as a whole.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Normally, you're not a pos-
sessive person, but today for some reason you could start
to make unreasonable demands upon others. Get back in
character.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Sometimes it's wise to steer
a middle course, but not so if you're working on something
complicated that demands exactitude. Do what you have
to, and don't dilute your effectiveness.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There are lots of times when kind
words and gentle directives work far better than demands,
and today could be one of them. A soft approach not only
turns away wrath, it assures compliance.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you simply don't care, you
aren't likely to manage your resources as prudently as
would your friendly banker. That's probably the reason why
some have so much money and you don't.


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Actor Michael McMillian is
34. Reality TV star Kim Kar-
dashian is 32.
Thought for Today: "Hap-
piness is not a horse; you
cannot harness it."
- Russian proverb.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19
Mega Money: 20 26 30 40
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 $920
3-of-4 MB 55 $293
3-of-4 983 $48.50
2-of-4 MB 1,305 $25.50
1-of-4 MB 11,628 $2.50
2-of-4 25,647 $2
Fantasy 5: 3- 10- 14- 29- 32
5-of-5 3 winners $74,060.34
4-of-5 283 $126.50
3-of-5 8,997 $11
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18
Fantasy 5:16 22 23 25 31
5-of-5 2 winners $100,741.16
4-of-5 260 $124.50
3-of-5 7,612 $11.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Oct. 21,
the 295th day of 2012. There
are 71 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Oct. 21, 1962, the
Seattle World's Fair closed
after six months and nearly
10 million visitors. (President
John F. Kennedy, scheduled
to attend the closing cere-
mony, canceled because of
what was described as a
"head cold"; the actual rea-
son turned out to be the
Cuban Missile Crisis.)
On this date:
In 1797, the U.S. Navy
frigate Constitution, also
known as "Old Ironsides," was
christened in Boston's harbor.
In 1879, Thomas Edison
perfected a workable electric
light at his laboratory in
Menlo Park, N.J.
In 1917, members of the
1st Division of the U.S. Army
training in Luneville, France,
became the first Americans
to see action on the front
lines of World War I.
In 1944, during World War
II, U.S. troops captured the
German city of Aachen.
In 1959, the Solomon R.
Guggenheim Museum, de-
signed by Frank Lloyd
Wright, opened to the public
in New York.
In 1960, Democrat John F.
Kennedy and Republican
Richard M. Nixon clashed in
their fourth and final presi-
dential debate in New York.
In 1971, President Richard
Nixon nominated Lewis F.
Powell and William H. Rehn-
quist to the U.S. Supreme
Court. (Both nominees were
confirmed.)
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush said he
would try diplomacy "one
more time," but did not think
Saddam Hussein would dis-
arm even if doing so
would allow the Iraqi presi-
dent to remain in power.
Five years ago: Wildfires
driven by powerful Santa Ana
winds killed one person near
San Diego and destroyed
several homes and a church
in Malibu.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama declared
America's long and deeply un-
popular war in Iraq would be
over by the end of 2011 and
all U.S. troops "will definitely
be home for the holidays."
Today's Birthdays: Au-
thor Ursula K. Le Guin is 83.
TV's Judge Judy Sheindlin is
70. Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu is 63.
Actress-author Carrie Fisher
is 56. Christian rock musician
Charlie Lowell (Jars of Clay)
is 39. Actor Jeremy Miller is
36. Actor Will Estes is 34.











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


VOTING BOOTH DILEMMA:







ritual vs.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


It's unfortunate that social
justice trumps life for some.
The Rev. Mark Gabb
minister of St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church


gay marriage policies. This is
because anti-abortion and anti-
gay marriage rights are more of
a moral issue, while social jus-
tice issues occupy the gray
areas of Christian freedom.
Gabb doesn't agree with those
who compromise their religious
beliefs for secular ones at the
voting booth. He said he can't
separate the two, because his
conscience is guided by what
he believes spiritually It's im-
portant to vote for a candidate
with common values; the moral
values of a candidate will natu-
rally spill over into other politi-
cal decisions.
He believes the difference
between his views and those
who do compromise their reli-
gious beliefs is a new-age cul-
ture, which is hesitant to
impose its beliefs on others. He
said a person might be pro-life
but still think a woman should
have a right to choose because
it's her life.
For Gabb, the authority of
Scripture is absolute. Many oth-
ers simply choose to apply and


: ' ".o



Birth control is personal use which
is unnecessary; pregnancy is not an
illness.


1 Kay-Lynn Johnston
preschool director for Precious Lambs Preschool

The effect of Christian and Catholic beliefs in the voting booth


ANDREW WELFEL
For the Chronicle

P atricia Montemurri's
article last month in
the Detroit Free
Press explored the
divide among Ameri-
can Catholics regarding social
justice issues versus anti-
abortion, anti-gay marriage and
anti-birth control rights. It also
touched on hot topics such as
religious freedom and the role
the spiritual conscience plays
in the voting booth.
One Catholic man inter-
viewed in her article said he
doesn't buy all the dogma of the
church. Another interviewee, a
Catholic woman, said her faith
guides her evaluations, but
doesn't dictate how she will
vote.
Locally, the same divide can
be seen regardless of which
faith one subscribes.
The Rev Mark Gabb, of St.
Paul's Evangelical Lutheran
Church and School in Beverly
Hills, said it's not just a
Catholic issue; it's a Christian
issue, because many Christians
and Catholics share the same
general moral values.
He said he sees the same di-
vide among Christians that
Catholics experience. The split
predominantly favors the con-
servative side, which tends to
support anti-abortion and anti-


say "sometimes voting is not
voting" if done for the right
reasons.
A good number of voters have
neither a strong like nor dislike
for any of the candidates; for
those on the fence, he said, it's
important to research and pick
the better of the two. Another
alternative is the write-in vote,
but he urged caution. A minor-
ity candidate has never come
out of the blue and snatched
away a last second victory, so a
degree of common sense is
necessary
At the end of the day, God can
use anyone to be a candidate.
Gabb said there are examples
from history of those whom God
used but didn't agree with his
will. It's good for Christians to
keep that in mind as they enter
the voting booths.
Kay-Lynn Johnston, pre-
school director for Precious
Lambs Preschool in Beverly
Hills, said people who compro-
mise their beliefs are listening
to the wrong people. They are
turning spiritual matters into
social matters and forgetting
who the ultimate authority is.
Women who opt for abortion
are taking God's will out of it.
It's not a woman's will to choose
whether or not to have a baby,
but God's. She said after a time,
people start caving in and begin
See Page C4


believe what they want. They
forget this is in line with their
will, not God's will, he said.
Gabb said the Obama admin-
istration's mandate that reli-
gious employers offer health
care coverage for birth control
crosses the line of church and
state, because it directly in-
fringes on biblical principles.
Employees of the church
wouldn't even want the kind of
coverage that supplies abortive
drugs or pays for abortive
procedures.
"It's unfortunate that social
justice trumps life for some,"
he said. "It's the difference be-
tween quality of life and life
and death itself."
Voting is a privilege and
should be done responsibly He
said he wouldn't tell someone
he or she had to vote, but he
would encourage them to do so.
Voters often arrive at the voting
booth with little to no knowl-
edge of other minority candi-
dates on the ballot. It's unwise
to vote for someone you've
never heard of, although he did


Delving into the history of the PLO and Israelis


MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
Patrick Tyler, "Fortress
Israel" (New York: Farrar,
Straus and Giroux 2012),
562 pages, $35.
he subtitle of this
book summarizes the
author's core argu-
ment: "The Inside History
of the Military Elite Who
Run the Country And
Why They Can't Make
Peace."


The book asserts there
were several opportunities
over the years when the
Palestinian leaders (usu-
ally the PLO) and the Is-
raeli leadership had
reached a point where they
were willing to cut a mutu-
ally beneficial peace agree-
ment, even if it meant
substantial concessions by
both sides that was the
price for peace in the area.
But when those times


Book REVIEW
came, the Israeli leader-
ship refused because they
didn't trust the PLO and be-
cause the military hardlin-
ers in Israel pressured
government officials to re-
ject the olive branch in
favor of military actions
against the Palestinians
and their leaders. This is
not a book glorifying the
PLO many of its most vi-
cious attacks are described
and at other times, the PLO


"leadership" had lost con-
trol of various terrorist
groups in their midst. But
despite that, newspaper
correspondent Patrick
Tyler feels there could
have been agreements
reached beneficial to Tel
Aviv and the PLO.
Further complicating the
peace process, the Islamic
states in the area used the
Jewish threat as justifica-
tion for their dictatorships.


In the early days of the Cold
War, the rise of the military
regime of Abdul Nasser in
Egypt and his flirtation with
the Soviet Union caused
concern in Washington and
helped strengthen Ameri-
can support for the Jewish
state. The Egyptian leader
whipped up support in
many of the other middle
eastern states for "Nas-
sarism" by his verbal at-
tacks (and at times military)
See Page C5


Conserve


wherever


you can

W ith all the politi-
cal talk about
austerity, budget
cuts and being conserva-
tive about using our re-
sources, our daughter
Erin has taken notice and
is setting the standard.
She has long been into
conservation, being re-
sourceful and recycling.
She conserves water,
money and now letters.
Yes letters.
Erin, a professor at the
University of North
Florida in Jacksonville,
gave birth to her third
child last week.
Ted was just under 8
pounds and is in perfect
health.
Together, in the spirit of
conserving the alphabet,
her three children have
only 11 letters in their
names.
Elle, Jude and Ted.
In fact, there are only
six unique letters in the
names of her children.
She only used 23 per-
cent of the alphabet and
she got the job done. If we
sent Erin to Congress, she
would have that darn
budget balanced in no
time.
The Chronicle held
its political forum on
Thursday evening at the
College of Central Florida
and it was a packed
house. Much of the talk
was about conservation,
spending less and figuring
out our nation's problems.
As the local cam-
paigns wrap up, you get
the feeling that most of
these candidates really
don't like each other. I
suppose it is natural after
months of grinding
through a campaign that
you begin to look at your
opponent in the same way
you might view an ex-
spouse or the neighbor
who ran over your dog.
You just can't find much
nice to say
The race for sheriff
has been as cantankerous
as any and that is a shame.
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy has
built a tremendous de-
partment and they fight
crime with true passion.
As with any organization
built on the military
model, they don't take
criticism well.
When County Commis-
sioner Winn Webb has
criticized the department,
the response from those
who work at the sheriff's
department has been
quick and personal. No
one should be surprised
by that. Have you ever
criticized a Marineat aa
VFW Hall? See how that
works.
The unfortunate part
about the Dawsy-Webb
race is that Webb had be-
come a very good county
commissioner and now,
regardless of the elec-
tion's outcome, his serv-
ices will be lost in that
important job.
While public debate is
great, it's unfortunate
when candidates get so
unfriendly that they can
no longer recognize the
reality that there are pos-
itives and negatives about
almost every political
leader and every govern-
ment action. When candi-
dates (and politically
active citizens) become
too polarized, they see
every action of their oppo-
nents as evil.
We certainly see this on
See Page C4


A good number of voters have neither a
strong like nor dislike for any of the
candidates; for those on the fence, the
Rev. Mark Gabb said, it's important to
research and pick the better of the two.







Page C2 *SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012



PINION


"Nothing is easier than spending public
money. It does not appear to belong to
anybody. The temptation is overwhelming
to bestow it on somebody."
Calvin Coolidge, 1872-1933


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............... .................. publisher
M ike Arnold ....................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ .............. citizen member
Zifl Mac Harris ............................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ......... ..............guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ENDORSEMENT



Citrus County citizens


need Argenziano

in Tallahassee


In the race to select our rep-
resentative in the Florida
House, both candidates
have served in the position.
Rep. Jimmie T. Smith, R-In-
verness, is just completing his
first term officially represent-
ing District 34.
The challenger is Nancy Ar-
genziano and more than a
decade ago, she was elected to
be our representative in the


Florida House.
Argenziano
later graduated
from the House
and became the
Senator from Cit-
rus County. She
was then ap-
pointed to the
Florida Public
Service Commis-
sion where she


THE IS
District 3
Represent

OUR OP
Send r
Argenzian
Florida


fought for consumers in utility
rate cases.
Now Argenziano is back
where she began, fighting for a
position in the Florida House
of Representatives.
We believe voters should
support Argenziano and send
her back to Tallahassee as our
advocate.
Smith is a nice guy who has
Tea Party roots and an unas-
suming personality, but he is
not an independent thinker
and voted 100 percent along
the party line during the last
two legislative sessions.
Smith is the candidate of the
special interests. He has raised
more than $222,000 to fund his
fight for re-election because
the special interests in Florida
do not want Nancy Argenziano
back in Tallahassee. Out-of-
county interest groups have
given Smith 10 times what Ar-
genziano has managed to raise
in her grass root effort.
Our mailboxes are filled
every day with political adver-
tisements warning against a re-
turn of Argenziano.
To the independent voters of
Citrus County, that alone
should be reason enough to
send the feisty Argenziano
back to the Legislature.
Argenziano is feared be-
cause she does not suffer fools.
During her years in the House,
Senate and PSC she has fought
battles with most of the special
interest groups in the state.


Her legislative record is long
and accomplished.
Her reforms of the nursing
home industry protected sen-
iors from abuse. It was Argen-
ziano who authored the "Local
Sources First" legislation that
protects our water, and the Jes-
sica Lunsford Act that protects
our children.
She served as the chairman
of the House Elder Affairs
committee and
SUE:. later as chair of
SUE: the Senate Crimi-
34 State nal Justice, Gov-
ative race. e r n m e n t
Operations and
INION: Agriculture
Committees.
'o to thancy She knows how
Sto the state government
House. works and she is
willing to fight any
special interest that tries to
take advantage of Florida
residents.
Argenziano, who previously
served as a Republican in both
the House and Senate, is now
running as an Independent
candidate. She had a falling
out with the state GOP leader-
ship after Gov. Charlie Crist ap-
pointed her to the PSC and she
would not submit to all of the
party's demands.
We don't agree with every po-
sition Nancy Argenziano takes,
but we know that she will fight
for the safety and welfare of
Florida's consumers, senior
citizens and our environment.
She is highly ethical, incred-
ibly combative and well-in-
formed. Her style of legislative
leadership fits perfectly with
the cantankerous values of Cit-
rus County.
Rep. Jimmie T. Smith will
continue to follow the strict
GOP party line. If you favor
that direction, Smith is the
candidate who deserves your
support. The special interests
around Florida are writing big
contribution checks for him be-
cause they know they can
count on his vote.
But if you want to see some
changes in Tallahassee, Nancy
Argenziano would return to
Tallahassee and immediately
take center stage on the floor of
the House.
Citrus County deserves that
type of representation.


CHRONICLE ENDORSEMENTS

The Citrus County Chronicle Editorial Board has issued the following
endorsements leading up to the Nov. 6 General Election:
Vote "No" on Amendments 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 12
Vote "Yes" on Amendments 2, 10 and 11.
Vote "Yes" on School Referendum.
Vote "Yes" on retention of all three State Supreme Court Justices.
U.S. Senate: Bill Nelson.
U.S. House of Representatives, District 11: Rich Nugent.
Citrus County Sheriff: Jeff Dawsy.
State Representative: Nancy Argenziano.



OUND Stop telling other countries how to act
l ktn We have got to stop the federal government from


563-0579


telling other nations how they should act, how their
government should be. We have got to get out of their
business. ... We walk around with our nose in every-
body's business.
Any traveling repairmen out there?
I would like to know if there's anybody in the Inver-
ness area who does in-home service for TV repair.
Please give me a call at 726-5436.


Romney exhibiting presidential behavior


When, in his speech ac-
cepting the 1964 Repub-
lican presidential
nomination, Barry Goldwater
said "extremism in the defense of
liberty is no vice" and "modera-
tion in the pursuit of
justice is no virtue," a _
media wit at the con-
vention supposedly ex-
claimed, "Good God,
Goldwater is going to ( n"'
run as Goldwater"
When Mitt Romney de- /
cided to run with Paul
Ryan, many conserva- -
tives may have
thought, "Thank God, Georg
Romney is not going to OTH
run as Romney" V014
Not, that is, as the
Romney who 12
months ago, warily eyeing Iowa,
refused to say a discouraging
word about the ethanol debacle.
Rather, he is going to run as the
Romney who, less than two weeks
before announcing Ryan, told the
states Iowa prominent among
them that he opposes extend-
ing the wind energy production
tax credit, which expires soon.
This may seem a minor matter,
as well as an obvious and easy de-
cision for a conservative. The
wind tax credit is, after all, in-
dustrial policy, the government
picking winners and losers in de-
fiance of market signals indus-
trial policy always is a refusal to
heed the market's rejection of
that which the government sin-
gles out for favoritism. But
ethanol subsidies also are indus-
trial policy And just a few days
after Romney got the wind sub-
sidy right, nearly half of the 11
Republican senators on the Fi-
nance Committee got it wrong,
voting to extend it So even before
choosing Ryan, Romney was sid-
ing with what might, with a nod to
Howard Dean, be called the Re-
publican wing of the Republican
Party. For Romney, conservatism


is a second language, but he
speaks it with increasing fre-
quency and fluency
Romney embraced Ryan after
the sociopathic indifferent to
the truth ad for Barack Obama
that is meretricious
about every important
particular of the death
1 from cancer of the wife
of steelworkerJoe Sop-
tic. Obama's desperate
flailing about to justify
four more years has
sunk into such un-
hinged smarminess
that Romney may have
e Will concluded: There is
IER nothing Obama won't
DES say about me, because
he has nothing to say
for himself, so I will
chose a running mate whose seri-
ousness about large problems
and ideas underscores what the
president has become silly and
small.
He on whose behalf the Soptic
ad was made used to dispense
bromides deploring "the small-
ness of our politics" and "our
preference for scoring cheap po-
litical points."
Obama's campaign of avoid-
ance say anything to avoid the
subject of the country's condition
must now reckon with Ryan's
mastery of Obama's enormous
addition to decades of govern-
mental malpractice.
Obama is, by now, nothing if not
predictable, so prepare for
pieties deploring Ryan's brand of
"extremism" that has supplanted
responsible conservatism. Gold-
water, quoted above, infuriated
the sort of people who, regardless
of what flavor of conservatism is
in fashion, invariably purse their
lips and sorrowfully say: "We
think conservatism is a valuable
thread in our national fabric, etc.,
but not this kind of conser-
vatism." Goldwater's despisers
did not recognize his echo of


words by Martin Luther King Jr
15 months earlier
In his "Letter from Birming-
ham Jail," King wrote, "You
speak of our activity in Birming-
ham as extreme. ... But though I
was initially disappointed at
being categorized as an extrem-
ist, as I continued to think about
the matter I gradually gained a
measure of satisfaction from the
label. Was not Jesus an extremist
for love. ... Was not Amos an ex-
tremist for justice.... Was not Paul
an extremist for the Christian
gospel. ... Perhaps the South, the
nation and the world are in dire
need of creative extremists."
Remember this episode when
you hear, ad nauseam, that Ryan
is directly, and Romney now is
derivatively, an extremist for be-
lieving (a) that "ending Medicare
as we know it" will be done by
arithmetic if it is not done by cre-
ative reforms of the sort Ryan
proposes, and (b) that the entitle-
ment state's crisis cannot be
cured, as Obama suggests, by
adding 4.6 points to the tax rate
paid by less than 3 percent of
Americans.
When Ryan said in Norfolk,
"We won't replace our Founding
principles, we will reapply
them," he effectively challenged
Obama to say what Obama be-
lieves, which is: Madison was an
extremist in enunciating the
principles of limited government
- the enumeration and separa-
tion of powers. And Jefferson was
an extremist in asserting that gov-
ernment exists not to grant rights
but to "secure" natural rights that
pre-exist government.
Romney's selection of a run-
ning mate was, in method and
outcome, presidential. It under-
scores how little in the last four
years merits that adjective.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


t201Z
MRC.org/CMI
Dist.by King Features


If BAtUMAL TAR UW AMtCs WOtAL dAStW.


_ LETTERS to the Editor r


Biased journalism
After reading Mike Wright's
second article this morning (Oct.
4) on the front page of the Chron-
icle, and his previous article on
the same subject on Sept. 28, I
felt compelled to write this
letter
On Sept 27, 2012, my wife and I
went to the Beverly Hills Civic
Center to get a better under-
standing of the amendments that
will appear on this year's presi-
dential ballot Keep in mind that
neither one of us are associated
in any way with either our pres-
ent Sheriff Jeff Dawsy or candi-
date Winn Webb.
After reading Mr Wright's arti-
cle on the meeting in the Chroni-
cle of 28 September 2012, I
wondered if he attended the
same meeting that my wife and I
did. His first article mentioned
the need for the moderator to
caution the audience about
being disruptive, which he went
on to describe as Dawsy's sup-
porters heckling Winn Webb. My
wife and I sat right across the
aisle from the Webb supporters
and trust me, they were doing


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or email
to letters@chronicleonline.com.

their fair share of it both when
Dawsy took the stage and during
his presentation.
I felt a distinct bias from Mr
Wright's articles; being for Mr
Webb, and against Sheriff Dawsy
We all are certainly entitled to
our own opinions; however,
when a reporter distorts the
events and reports them in such


a biased manner, I do not con-
sider that good journalism. A
good reporter reports all the
facts and allows his readers to
make up their own minds.
Again, this same bias showed
up in this morning's article. This
does not help Mr Wright's credi-
bility and does not reflect well
on the Chronicle. I am sure oth-
ers who attended the meeting on
the 28th of September feel the
same way
Pete Raymond
Inverness

Invasion of privacy
With all the new road con-
struction going on and all the
new traffic lights going up, I no-
tice there are cameras mounted
at a lot of the intersections.
Some are heavy traffic areas
and some are not. My question:
who is paying for these cam-
eras? And who is paying to main-
tain these cameras? And lastly,
who is watching and why?
Big Brother?
Michael DeFrancisco
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


(
-E
H





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Everything you wanted to know about carrier pigeons, and more


B ased on my Back before cell
e x t e n s i v e phones, getting
research I information from one
looked it up on Google place to another wasn't
- the homing pigeon, always easy, but it
also known as a carrier could still be very
pigeon, is a important. Sometimes,
domesticated bird depending on the
which has been circumstances, the
derived from the Rock carrier pigeon was the
Pigeon. The wild rock Fred Brannen quickest perhaps
pigeon has an innate A SLICE the only way to get
ability to return to its OF LIFE that done.
own nest and this Take the bird with
talent made it relatively easy to you, roll up a message, place it in
breed a carrier pigeon, using the a small tube, tie the tube to your
rock pigeon as the stock. Carrier fine feathered friend's leg and let
pigeons have an estimated range it go. Shazzam! Air mail on its way
of 1,100 miles at a speed of some back home!
50 mph for up to 500 miles. That's History records the use of
one strong, fast bird! carrier pigeons by the Egyptians


and Persians more than 3,000
years ago.
Carrier pigeons were used
extensively in both modem world
wars. In fact, during these
conflicts, several birds were
recognized with medals. One
notable pigeon, one with the
lovely name of Cher Ami, was
awarded the French Croix de
Guerre (Cross of War) during
World War I for delivering 12
messages despite having been
badly injured.
That, my friends, is probably
everything you wanted to know
about properly trained, well-
behaved carrier pigeons, those
that actually did what they were
supposed to do.
Now, a frivolous little tale about

Letters to the EDITOR


one that didn't
A few days ago, a homing pigeon
decided our home was its home.
No, I'm not making this up and
I'm not guessing.
It was indeed a carrier pigeon
complete with a tagged leg, and it
landed on our front porch.
Not wanting to interfere, Cheryl
and I did nothing.
I wish I could say the same for
the bird.
The bird hung around for a
couple of days, using the back of
our porch swing as its roost. I'm
happy that he or she I certainly
couldn't tell which pointed his
or her business end away from the
seat of the swing to do what
pigeons do while roosting. Even


so, a lot of droppings were left on
the floor behind the swing.
On day three, the pigeon
realized it wasn't home and flew
on along its merry way
After the bird was gone, I was
the one charged with removal of
the post-pigeon residue.
That part wasn't pleasant, but I
gained something to remember
from the experience as a whole -
by doing research to write this
column, I skimmed through a lot
of carrier pigeon stuff; and, during
the cleanup detail, I had to get up
close and personal with some!
--In--
Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Secular government best out to be as derogatory, instead of praise-
worthy? "Moral," according to the diction-
We have a secular government in the ary, states: "principles of behavior in
United States guaranteed by the Constitu- accordance with standards of right and
tion. Yes, we have many Christian citizens wrong relating to morals or customs."
but we also have Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, You're either for right, or for wrong.
Agnostic, Atheist, Islamic, and Pagan citi- You're either for the massacre of inno-
zens. cent, defenseless, human lives living in
In this country our religious beliefs are the most secure place on the planet, the
personal, a matter of conscience. None of mother's womb, or you're for preserving
these religious people have the right to said lives.
make their personal beliefs law for all cit- You said: "The reason for getting an
izens. Because religious people cannot abortion should be entirely up to the
impose their beliefs on their fellow citi- 'pregnant female' (what is she, an ani-
zens, some have perceived this as an in- mal?), with the possible exception of the
fringement of their rights. Nothing could future father giving his opinion to her"
be further from the truth. r r i his opno t h
be further from they truth.How does the mother receive facts for
Because they had experienced bloody her best interest if she's only receiving
religious wars in Europe where people 'opinions' from the one person who is so
were killed when an opposing religious cowardly that he won't stand up to his re-

ing Fathers were very careful to create a Found- sponsibilities, and instead chooses abor-
ing Fathers were very careful to create a tion? If the mother is not given a chance to
new type of government that would not in- know the risks she is taking concerning
terfere with nor impose religious prac- her own body and the detrimental out-
tices or beliefs on its citizens. We have a h e dbyan th enhow
secular government in the United States comes caused by abortion, then how is
secular government in the United States that right for her? Oh, and 'future father'
and religious people better pray that it isthat right for hsnomer? Oh, and 'future father
stays that way.
Jo Darling You said: "When a woman wants an
Lecanto abortion, she usually has good reason."
Abortion reasons from Guttmacher In-
Stick with the truth stitute: Interfere with education, work or
ability to care for dependents, 74 percent
I am responding to the Chronicle's Asso- Can't afford baby, 73 percent Did not want
ciated Press article titled, "Tough spar- to be single mother, 48 percent. Good rea-
ring in first debate." Allow me to say sons??
whoever wrote this article did not view You said: "It is very important to know
the same debate as myself In fact, it ap- what is, and what is not your business."
peared the article was written before it If a pregnant woman is walking down
aired on TV! the streetgnand a man with a knife is walk-ing down
After yesterday's (Oct. 3) debate, I the a manwth a knfe is walk-
turned to all the major TV channels and ing toward her, would it be my business to
amazingly they all declared Mitt Romney help this woman? If a woman is about to

as the winner hands down! But then, they undergo a blind surgical procedure called
all watched the same debate as myself an abortion that may cause her irrepara-
all watched the same debate as myself. ble damage for the rest of her life, and
The Associated Press was totally irre- most assuredly take the life of her daugh-
sponsible in its mediocre coverage of this ter or son floating within her womb, is it
debate. And now I am truly wondering if my business to enlighten her so that she
anyone with a responsible position at the can make a knowledgeable decision? You
Chronicle actually watched the debate and bet it is!
if so, why was this nonsense placed in your
paper? You have a responsibility to stick Janine Enger
with the truth and if not, your newspaper Beverly Hills
is not worth the paper it is written on!
Terry Davey Life is precious

Thanks for support Those who push abortion are free to ex-
press their view, but those who are inter-
The Citrus County Veterans Foundation ested in protecting the unborn are
Inc. recently held its eighth annual Golf supposed to shut up and mind their own
Tournament, and on behalf of the Citrus business. So goes the direction of Donald
County Veterans Foundation Inc. I would V Vogill. That reminds me of a survey pub-
like to thank and recognize a loyal spon- lished several years ago, along with sev-
sor of this event Over the last three years eral other events.
Nick Nicholas has been a generous and The survey reported the biggest sup-
dedicated supporter volunteering his porters of abortion were single men be-
time, making donations and donating a tween the ages of 18 and 35. Is their
new automobile as a grand prize to the objective playing without paying? Those
first golfer making a hole in one on a des- men who fathered a child and abandon
ignated hole. Mr. Nicholas' continuous the mother or push her to abort are among
support has been invaluable to our the most despicable men in society.
fundraising efforts and a tremendous help When I was a youngster years ago, we
to our organization, whose sole purpose is found my mother crying. She explained
to assist eligible county veterans with that her friend was advised by the doctor
emergency financial needs. that the baby had to be "taken" so the
Again, on behalf of the Citrus County mother might live. Today the baby almost
Veterans Foundation, please accept our certainly would not have to be aborted.
most sincere gratitude for your charitable I recall my 16-year-old friend who was
support and helping make this year's seduced by a 27-year-old man. Her loving
event another successful event, and forgiving parents helped her through
Carlton J. McLeod the pregnancy and the baby was adopted
RADM, DC, USN, retired by a good family Unfortunately, this beau-
president tiful young friend of mine was tragically
Lecanto murdered by a serial killer.
Another wonderful woman confided to
It's busineme that she had an abortion. She recalled
It's my business that was her due day and if she would not
Why is it when people want, and do the have had the abortion the girl would be
right thing, they are looked upon as hav- celebrating her sweet 16th birthday Un-
ing "high moral standards" that you make fortunately, this woman's life ended alone


in an absolute tragedy
Life is precious to me, the living and
unborn.


Ken Geiger
Hernando


Political fact checks
I find it humorous that Frank Koegler
defends Republicans, who in his words,
"recognize there are desirable parts of the
Affordable Care Act, which they intend to
include in whatever replacement program
they have," the defining word here, being
"whatever."
Let's be clear, Romney and the Republi-
cans are proclaiming nothing short of re-
pealing the ACA, and have failed to reveal
any concrete plans to offer universal cov-
erage or even allow folks with pre-existing
conditions to purchase health insurance.
Although "Obamacare" is a conserva-
tive Heritage Foundation blueprint that
gives far too many benefits to the insur-
ance industry and doesn't do enough to
bring down costs, it's a far cry from what
we had before and a great place to start.
Koegler's reference to Romney/Ryan's
statements that the ACA steals $716 billion
from current Medicare recipients has
been declared false by independent fact
checker, Politifact. The $716 billion figure
Koegler threw out initially referred to re-
ductions and savings in future Medicare
spending over 10 years through waste
elimination and through reductions in
payments to insurers and hospitals. Re-
member that wonderful stipulation in the
bill that says 75 percent of premiums have
to go toward healthcare, instead of CEO
bonuses? That's one reason seniors are al-
ready getting reimbursed for over-pay-
ments. What could possibly be wrong with
that?
Politifact also rated as true, Obama's
statement that Romney and Ryan will turn
Medicare into a voucher system, causing
those 54 and younger to pay up to $6000
more per year.
Romney's statement that Obamacare
will cause 20 million people to lose their
current coverage was rated by Politifact
totally false.
Apparently, Koegler lives in a different
universe from the rest of us where he is
free to deny recalcitrant Republicans'
record use of the filibuster for no other
purpose than to deny the middle class and
thereby president Obama even the small-
est win. What do you expect from a Con-
gress that gets its marching orders from a
lobbyist that says, "We don't need them to
think, we just need them to sign stuff?" We
should fire any member of Congress (who)
signed the Norquist Pledge!


Harri


Machiavellianis
When I listen to Gov Romney
reminded that Machiavellianis
and well. Please read "The Pri
art of power by Niccolo Machia
Definition of Machiavellianis
litical theory of Machiavelli; esp
view that politics is amoral and
means however unscrupulous c
ably be used in achieving politic
E


Support for Rom
This letter is for Mitt Romne
Barack Obama told the people
going to support other countries
he turn his back to them like Is


countries like that when he is supporting
the wrong ones? This country is built on
God's trust.


James Briggs
Crystal River


Distressing Romney
Mitt Romney proposes to replace Oba-
macare with the private companies that
denied coverage for those with preexist-
ing conditions, terminated coverage at the
next policy anniversary date for those
who became ill, and had beancounters
controlling what a doctor could do.
Romney is distressed that Obamacare
has 15 unelected persons that are identify-
ing successful procedures getting good re-
sults in places like the Mayo clinic so they
can be used everywhere. If we go back to
the private health care system, every pro-
vider will have at least 15 unelected bean-
counters who are paid bonuses depending
on how many claims they have denied.
If the Romney plan provides good care
and saves money, why wait 10 years to
start it? The reason is that it's so bad it
would cause rioting in the streets. Rom-
ney said the private companies would use
American ingenuity to constantly improve
performance. So far they have only used
that ingenuity to improve profits, often il-
legally A Florida company was fined $1.7
billion for Medicare fraud.
Romney is also concerned that not a sin-
gle Republican voted for Obamacare. One
reason is that Mitch McConnell, the Sen-
ate minority leader, instructed Republi-
cans not to vote for anything that could
help Obama be reelected. The health in-
dustry also paid senators as much as two
million dollars to vote no and even Ginny
Brown Waite was paid $369,000.
It's shocking that the Massachusetts
health program that Romney signed into
law is nearly identical to Obamacare, but
is somehow not good for America. A provi-
sion of Obamacare requires that providers
use 80 percent of premiums for patient
care and that the largest companies use 85
percent for patient care. This year, many
companies are refunding money to cus-
tomers. It is also interesting that the dou-
ble-digit cost escalation of recent years
has been reduced.
On another subject, Romney talks of
creating millions of jobs if elected. Job
growth in Massachusetts, under Romney,
ranked 47th of the 50 states.
Stan Clewett
Homosassa

Media bias rampant
Two weeks ago I wrote rebutting Steve


et Heywood and Cokie Roberts' article on the lack of
SHomosassatrust for Mitt Romney I received a reply
telling me how swamped the Chronicle
was with letters and you didn't know when
sm or if my letter would be used. Heaven for-
y speak I'm bid the truth about Barack Obama should
3m is alive see the light of day, especially so close to
nce" on the the elections. Today the Robertses have
avellia. the huge advantage of your forum to tell
m: the po- us how desperate the GOP is that they
specially, the claim bias in the media. When 86 percent
that any of the American media supported Obama
an justifi- in the 2008 election, do you not think
cal power there may be just a hint of bias in the
media? Shameful hypocrisy is how I view
Earl Herring today's article. Of course there is bias in
Beverly Hills the media and for whatever reason your
paper and many others are in lockstep
ney with the liberal mindset, which at the rate
we are going in this country, will live to
y. President see the downfall of our once great country


Charles D. Kowalski
Hernando


he was
*s; why did
3rael and


\KMt
Wv~~&4 dir


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Who is the real Mitt Romney?


ell, Mitt Romney's "Etch-A-
Sketch" moment arrived during
the first Presidential debate. I've
been waiting for it, but he kept running
around the country being "severely con-
servative" and declaring his
love of all things conservative.
Then, the first debate rolled
around and abracadabra, ipso
presto the newly moderate
Mitt Romney emerged. .
Suddenly he is in favor of
compromise and "working with
the other side" and "of course
we need regulations." All the
stuff he had been adamantly
against just prior to the debate John
he was now in favor of. Once GUE
again, Americans were won-
dering who is the real Rom- COLL
ney? Frankly, we just don't
know. But he did give all of us, left or right,
something to agree on: Mitt Romney has
been lying to all of us. But he did put on a
good performance and, as was once said
"people prefer a good liar to a bad
performance."
In fact, at the beginning of the countless
Republican debates there was a right-wing
joke about Rick Perry, Michelle Bachman
and Mitt Romney that described them as "a
dope, a joke and a fraud." Well, the dope
and the joke are gone but the fraud is still
here. Mitt Romney has a history of being
on all sides of an issue and here is a par-
tial list of them (for more information,
Google "Mitt Romney flip flops"): abortion;
auto industry bailout; contraception; edu-
cation; gay rights; global warming; gun con-
trol; health care; immigration; poverty
programs; stimulus spending; Social Secu-
rity, the 47 percent and ... the list goes on.
From all appearances, Mr Romney tailors
his stances to whatever audience he is
speaking to. I know, I know, many politi-
cians are apt to do this, but really, Mitt
Romney has set new standards for flip-
flops. The end result is none of us really
know what he intends to do if elected.
One thing for certain that he and his
right-wing supporters intend to do is elim-
inate abortion as a choice for women. Do
not forget this: The Republican Party is out
to kill Rove v Wade. Across the country
where Republicans rule, many abortion
and family planning clinics are being leg-
islated or harassed out of existence. I un-
derstand and respect your opinions on this
if you are pro-life, since these are not easy
choices for women to make, but the law as
currently written gives women the right to


I


choose whether or not to terminate a preg-
nancy The law does not mandate abortion
- it is a choice it just makes it available
and recognizes a woman's right to privacy
and gives her options in her decisions
about reproduction. Many
Right-wingers want to do away
with this and return to the pre-
S 1973 days of illegal back-alley
abortions, which caused so
much harm to women. And as an
added bonus, they also want to
make many forms of contracep-
tion illegal. I know this is a sen-
sitive subject and space does not
allow me to go into it at length,
Read but suffice to say that most De-
"ST mocrats want this to be a choice
ST in an array of family planning
JMN options. If you want to have your
baby, then have it, just do not re-
move the option from women who are des-
perate and have nowhere to turn if forced
to give birth. After all, the Republican
Party also wants to reduce Medicaid as
much as possible and thereby jeopardizing
the life and health of the newborn and its
mother.
Finally, Mr. Romney has some kind of se-
cret plan to reduce our federal deficit.
How he plans to do this is a mystery He
wants to cut taxes across the board by 20
percent, keep Medicare and Social Secu-
rity intact for current retirees and increase
military spending on things like more nu-
clear submarines and a larger Navy He
wants training programs to bring our work-
force up to par with the rest of the world
and he wants to repeal Obamacare, yet
keep the popular options and eliminate
the individual mandate. That leaves him
with eliminating loopholes in the tax
codes. He won't say which ones, but there
is a lot of speculation that one of the things
he is looking at is the home mortgage in-
terest deduction which will, despite his de-
nials, greatly affect the middle class and
the real estate industry This is basically a
"trust me" budget, and we should all be
wary of what he intends to do.
Democrats, if you have not already voted
by mail we need you to understand that
there is a lot at stake, for women in partic-
ular and the middle class in general this
time around. Do not sit this one out Get out
there and vote.

John Read is the assistant public
information officer for the Citrus County
Democratic Executive Committee.


Setting the record straight

about where the GOP stands


In the Sunday, Oct. 7, issue of the Chron-
icle there was a headline titled "Where
the GOP stands." If one starts reading
the article, in just a few words, it becomes
apparent that it was written by someone
who has never looked at a Re-
publican policy In fact, there is
no factual truth to any point in
the article. It seems the article
was never reviewed for honesty,
just printed.
It is true that many people
should not vote, since they feel
no obligation to check on the
candidates or issues. This is
true of those in all political par- Robert I
ties and those not committed to
a particular party. Anyone who GUI
makes any effort to become in- COLI
formed would find the subject
of the referenced article offensive, as it is
so far from any reality.
The Republican Party wants everyone to
have the best possible employment they
can achieve. Of course, there are people
who believe they have a right to whatever
job they want. As far as family planning is
concerned, the Republican position has
moderated somewhat; however, it is still
the responsibility of people to only procre-
ate with the goal of producing wanted chil-
dren they plan to properly take care of. It is
not the responsibility of the general public
to provide them with birth control supplies
or abortions until they are ready to raise
children. If one wants to indulge, one
should be willing to assume the responsi-
bility for any and all expenses.
In Iraq it appeared that there was a
problem that needed to be addressed. In
Afghanistan, the effort was started in
earnest to find the procreator of the 9/11
war. We have subsequently established a
war policy of "no win," requiring our sol-
diers to only shoot after being shot at. This
produces unimaginable odds. Also, our
president can authorize as many air at-
tacks (drones) as he sees fit; even against
U.S. citizens. War should only be fought
with the intention of winning.
Tax codes have needed revision forever
There are many ways to help the environ-
ment without enriching some politically
connected persons by brokering permission
to violate environmental laws. We all want a
viable education delivered by committed
educators, nor restricted by destructive


R
I
I


union work rules. On voter suppression,
why should anyone vote if they cannot ver-
ify their identification. At any rate, they can
still vote by signing an affidavit and voting a
provisional ballot Medicaid, Medicare, and
Social security must all be re-
formed since they are doomed to
fail in their current state. I hear
repeatedly that the Republicans
want to kill these programs. In
the meantime Democrats con-
tinually seek to allow them to
fail.
What we are facing at this
time is a President who feels
that we all should be reduced to
agamanthe same level socially and eco-
EST nomically That is except for
UMN himself and his comrades. Such
a system has been tried numer-
ous times. The problem is that we are not
machines that can be programmed. The
former Soviet Union is the most dominant
example of this; people eventually proved
the system was a failure. As long a God is in
control, we will not be programmable and
I doubt if He will ever give up, even though
the Democrat party tried to eliminate Him
at their convention.
What our country needs is a group of
government leaders who believe in moving
our country forward. Instead, we seem to
continue to elect leaders who either have
plans to set up their own government or
those who find holding elective office so
exciting that they just do whatever they
have to do to fool enough people to vote for
them so they can stay in office. Since we do
not have the leaders we really need, we
must elect leaders who will most nearly
achieve what is needed.
This time it must be Republicans if we
are to survive as a free nation. The prob-
lems we face as a nation cannot be easily
solved and a new president will be lucky to
serve more than one term since things are
in such serious condition. Hopefully, we
will all soon realize what kind of leaders
we really need and we will be able to elect
them. Currently, we miss out on the real
leaders since the ability to raise money
tends to be top priority in elections.

Robert E. Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman. He
resides in Homosassa.


VOTING
Continued from Page C1

to justify their actions.
The health care mandate
definitely crosses a line it
shouldn't, she said. God's orig-
inal intent was for reproduc-
tion to come as a result of a
marriage. People want rela-
tionships and benefits nor-
mally intended for marriage
outside of marriage; they
don't want to face the respon-
sibility and consequences of
their actions.
She said people have other
options besides government,
such as abstinence. They for-
get honest taxpayers have to
pay for this health care.
"Health care is needing a
doctor's care," Johnston said.


"Do I expect the govern-
ment to pay for my aspirin
when I have a headache?
Birth control is personal use
which is unnecessary; preg-
nancy is not an illness."
She said every vote matters,
so it's important to vote re-
sponsibly Researching a sam-
ple ballot is a step in the right
direction. Finding Christian
coalition websites and voting
history websites are also help-
ful.
The most important thing
for any Christian to remem-
ber come election season is
always be involved, not just at
election time. Christians must
always be vigilant as they
walk through life. Johnston
said it's the duty of the people
to promote God and Christian
values; the government won't
do it for you.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

the national level with President
Obama and Gov Romney Public de-
bate is great. Demonizing your op-
ponent is not. It only makes it more
difficult to get on with the governing
once the elections are over.
Rep. Jimmie T Smith (R-Crystal
River) has had more than $200,000 do-
nated to his campaign and more than
$250,000 in PAC spending funneled
into this area to stop Nancy Argen-
ziano from going back to Tallahassee.
Argenziano is the former state
representative and senator from Cit-
rus County and she is one of the
most feared politicians in Florida by
those in positions of authority She is
feared because she says things ex-
actly as she sees them, and that
makes people uncomfortable.


Public debate is
great. Demonizing
your opponent is not.
It only makes it more
difficult to get on with
the governing once
the elections are over.

Argenziano was aggressive at the
Chronicle forum, and Rep. Smith
was articulate. Their styles are as
different as night and day And so
are their politics.
Rep. Smith is proud of his accom-
plishment of passing legislation to
force state workers to take drug
tests. Argenziano has been more out-
wardly focused on challenging the
status quo.


The outrage Argenziano feels
about what goes on in Tallahassee is
partially due to the fact that most
Floridians don't pay that much at-
tention to state government and it's
easy for powerful folks to manipu-
late what goes on.
In Florida, most of us are from
other states. We pay pretty good at-
tention to what happens on the local
level and we are all pretty tuned in
to the national debate. But state pol-
itics and the Tallahassee shenani-
gans don't always get the full
attention of voters.
The really good news is that
Election Day is only 16 days away,
and then we can get back to our real
lives. Even grand-baby Ted can be
pretty happy about that.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of
the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


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C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


COMMENTARY


VV


t





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Community Food Bank making a difference


Special to the Chronicle
Hunger does exist here in
Citrus County Let us in-
troduce a few of your
neighbors who are in need of food
assistance.
Kate is an ordinary girl, goes
to an ordinary school, and is part
of an ordinary family Her dad lost
his job a while back. They had to
spend all their savings. They sold
all they could. They maxed out
their credit cards. Their home is
now in foreclosure.
Kate and her family are in tough
times and often have no food to eat
Kate's parents visited one of the
local food pantries. The Commu-
nity Food Bank helps provide the
food pantry with pallets of food,
frozen meat and fresh vegetables.
Now Kate and her family have
something to eat until her dad finds
a job and can get back on his feet
Mary and Jim have been hap-
pily married for more than 30
years. Jim had both a good-paying
pension and Social Security. Mary
had a part-time job; she enjoyed
the extra money and the ability to
see her friends at work.
Jim later came down with a ter-
minal illness and Mary had to quit
her part time job to stay home and
care for him. Jim died a few months
later His pension stopped and
Mary was able to collect a part of
his Social Security check. It was not
enough to pay for the necessary ex-
penses such as the utilities, mort-
gage, food and her medications.
After the funeral, Mary's friends
stopped coming by the house. She


* To volunteer at a local food pantry, shelter, soup
kitchen or the Community Food Bank, visit
www.com munityfood bankofcitruscounty.org for
locations.
* Donate before the end of the year and become a
"Founding Friend" sponsor for life. To qualify, do-
nate at one of the following levels: "Founding
Friend Corporate" for $5,000; "Founding Friend
Family" for $1,200 annual/$100 monthly for a
year; or "Founding Friend" for $600 annual/$50
monthly for a year.
* Donate at Sweetbay locations. Look for the Com-
munity Food Bank canister displayed at each


was lonely without Jim and had no
one to talk to. Mary was depressed
... and hungry She remembered
her church had a soup kitchen as
one of their ministries. She paid a
visit one day and had a small bowl
of vegetable soup and a nice pot
roast, mashed potatoes and
vegetables.
Most of this food came from the
Community Food Bank, but was
prepared by volunteers from the
church each week. Mary already
felt better with this hot meal. She
knew she did not have the money
to buy food or the energy due to de-
pression of losing her husband and
not being able to make ends meet.
One of the volunteers at the
soup kitchen gave Mary a friendly
smile and asked her if she wanted
a warm cup of tea and a piece of
pie. The volunteer and Mary soon
learned they were both widows


checkout counter. Sweetbay will generously
match each canister donation, dollar for dollar,
through the end of November.
* All donations to the Community Food Bank of
Citrus County are tax deductible. Donate online
at www.communityfoodbankofcitruscounty.org, or
download a donation form and mail to Commu-
nity Food Bank of Citrus County, PRO. Box 2824,
Crystal River, FL 34423-2824. All major credit
card donations are accepted, as well.
* For more information about the Community Food
Bank, contact Executive Director Tom Chancey at
352-628-FOOD (3663).


and both lived in the same neigh-
borhood. Mary was no longer
alone in this world. Jim would not
want her to be alone, depressed or
hungry He always wanted the best
for her.
Susan is the mother of two
small children. Her husband had
a good-paying job, but lost his job
during the recession. He used to
be a happy, loving man, but after
many months of no work, he
started drinking and yelling at
Susan and the kids for no reason.
The kids were terrified of him.
Susan worried that he would fol-
low through on his threats. One
night she packed clothing for the
kids and herself and one favorite
toy for each child. A patrol deputy
gave her the address for a shelter
where she and the kids would be
safe while he visited her husband
about the threats.


The shelter was warm and car-
ing, and Susan and the kids were
assigned a bedroom where they
were all safe together. Each meal
was cooked with food from the
Community Food Bank and from
local donations.
Besides helping to prepare the
communal meals, cleaning their
room and the common areas, Susan
attended classes on how to deal
with abuse and depression while
dealing with her new life with the
kids but without her husband.
Little Mickey is now a proud
third-grader. He receives free and
reduced-price breakfasts and
lunches at school, which helps
him to focus on his class work. He
is excited about going to school
and grateful for the meals.
Mickey does not want the other
kids to know he is often hungry,
but in fact, 68 percent of his class-


Guest COLUMN

COMMUNITY FOOD BANK OF CITRUS COUNTY


Sound OFF


Democrats block Republicans Help repairing sewing machine they leave the country although we have a
more balanced and a better lan?


The "Who's responsible" call-in, the guy ...
don't even realize that the Democrats had
control of the House and the Senate the first
two years of Obama's term and they still
have control of the Senate. Harry Reid has
blocked every Republican bill that has come
out by not allowing it to come up to vote be-
cause he knew other fellow Democrats,
being it was an election year, would pass
something that was good for the country.


I have a Tuffsew sewing machine, walking
foot, heavy duty, that I need repair on. Any-
body who can repair this, please call at
447-3372. It is used to make sleeping bags
for the homeless.
Tax rich until they leave?
In our attempt to balance the budget and
relieve the debt, will we go the way of
France, taxing the rich outrageously until


Letters keep me laughing
I can't believe how misinformed your let-
ters to the editor writers are. You should re-
name Sound Off and call it "Comedy
calls." They sure keep me laughing.

Tired of politicians' calls
Democrats and Republican parties: Stop


calling my cell phone where I have to spend
my dime to listen to what you have to say. I
wouldn't vote for either one of you. ...

Help with vulture problem
Need some help from someone. How do
you get rid of vultures that are nesting on
your roof and crash down your screens so
they can get the water in the pool on your
lanai? If anyone can help me get rid of
these, I would appreciate it.


HISTORY
Continued from Page C1

against the new state of Is-
rael. However the astound-
ingly effective Israeli military
gained territory rather than
lost it Meanwhile, the Pales-
tinian Liberation Organiza-
tion representing the
Palestinians adopted terror-
ism as its strategy (assassina-
tions, bombings, airline
hijackings).
Israeli attacks against the
PLO usually were militarily
effective (which some ex-
ceptions such as the 1982 in-
vasion of Syrian territory
and the later attack on
Samu in Jordan) but this led
to escalating military con-
flict in the region. There
was the "seven day" war in
1967 which gave the Israelis
control over further terri-
tory and humiliated the
Egyptian and Syrian armies.
Meanwhile, the effective-
ness of Israel's army tripled
the nation's area.


The Nixon administration
made a major effort to calm
the region. Henry Kissinger
shuttled between the Is-
raelis and Egypt. Ronald
Reagan's attempt to get the
Iranians to cooperate by
providing them missiles (il-
legally) also ended in abject
failure.
In 1984 Reagan, after the
bombing of the military bar-
racks in Lebanon by terror-
ists, quietly pulled
American troops out of
Lebanon. The author pro-
vides a good account of how
Jimmy Carter at the 1978
Camp David meeting man-
aged to push the leaders
into a settlement agree-
ment. But the aftermath saw
an increase in violence be-
cause Palestinian extrem-
ists escalated the struggle
with an Israeli military that
didn't approve of the Camp
David agreements either.
Then, surprisingly, in
early 1992 the PLO repre-
sentatives and an Israeli
delegation reached the out-
line of an agreement after


secret negotiations in Oslo.
However, then-Israeli
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin was assassinated by a
young Israeli radical who
was part of the movement to
stop the peace efforts.
In 1995 without Rabin, the
negotiations collapsed. His
successors were far less
committed to the conces-
sions at Oslo if not openly
antagonistic.
Later peace talks were
made difficult because the
Israeli government was car-
rying out assassinations -
often by rockets from air-
planes of suspected lead-
ers of the terrorists.
One target was paraplegic
Sheik Yassin, the leader of
the Hamas movement in the
Palestinian-controlled terri-
tory An Israeli rocket at-
tack incinerated Yassin, his
body guards, and nine other
bystanders. The author
faults the Israelis for not
simply arresting him, which
Tyler believes would have
been relatively easy
The volume gives an in-


teresting history of Israeli's
successful efforts to build
nuclear weapons which
were outlawed, of course, by
the Nuclear Non-prolifera-
tion Treaty.
Beginning in 1957 with
the help of the French, the
Dimona nuclear reactor
was constructed. But they
hid its successful building of
nuclear weapons from
Washington, which champi-
oned the barring of addi-
tional countries getting
weapons. The Israeli gov-
ernment simply lied about
it. Eventually the existence
of the reactor was discov-
ered by the CIA but efforts
to visit the facility were
stalled for years.
Personally, I suspect pres-
idents Kennedy-Johnson-
Nixon probably didn't want
to have it known they knew
or suspected this unpleas-
ant fact But when it became
known Israel had nukes and
delivery capabilities, the
balance of power in the area
changed and led to the cur-
rent Iranian attempts to de-


velop a nuclear capability
The bottom line of this
book is over the years the
continued control of Israeli
politics by the old guard
which believed only mili-
tary power could protect Is-
rael and an effective peace
agreement was probably not
impossible.
On the other side, despite
efforts to thwart Palestinian
terrorists, their hatred of Is-
rael continually made it dif-
ficult to find grounds for an
agreement Author Tyler ar-
gues this military domi-
nance of Israeli foreign
policy may be ending as the
families of those who had to
fight to establish the Jewish
state give way to other lead-
ers who have a goal of peace
in the area.
Unfortunately in recent
years, the leaders in Tel
Aviv have allowed/encour-
aged their citizens to settle
in the occupied areas that
had been considered Pales-
tinian in previous negotia-
tions. This adds
significantly to the problem


of finding a middle ground
acceptable to both sides.
Whether the reader
agrees with this picture of a
dysfunctional Israeli gov-
ernment controlled by the
old-guard military leader-
ship, the volume is an im-
portant resource in our
attempts to understand
what may be coming next in
this explosive region. This is
a highly provocative book.


Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and US. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring. He served
as a chairman of the
Department of Government
and International Studies
for six years, was director
ofNotre Dame's 20
different foreign studies
programs for five years,
and held various other
teaching and
administration positions at
the university


Join Our Coloring Contest...
Prizes to be awarded in three age groups. Prize packages
will include: Two tickets to rodeo and gift package.


mates are receiving help from the
same school meal program. Home
is not so happy for Mickey because
often there is nothing to eat all
weekend.
Several kind volunteers stop by
the school each week with a back-
pack filled with food for the week-
end. This food comes from food
drives, money donations and, in
the near future, the Community
Food Bank will be able to provide
food for the backpacks. The kind
ladies see to it that no child goes
hungry in our community
MEm
These are challenging times in
Citrus County and all around the
world. There are several charities
in Citrus County that you could
support but what is more im-
portant than feeding those who
have little or no food?
There are people living among
us who, for the first time, are
struggling to make ends meet.
Those people are seniors, fathers,
mothers and, most of all, children.
Charity begins at home, and
there is no better time than now
for us to focus on making our com-
munity healthier and stronger by
providing food for those in need.
We honor God when we give to
the poor. Will you honor him today
by helping feed your neighbor?
--*--a
The Community Food Bank
Board of Directors are: John
Marmish, president; Duane
Dueker vice president; Jewel
Lamb, member; and Phil
Scarpelli, member


I Rig PwerCA


I CRY.1 STAK Ll J IO} S.Co] M_


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Specifics, not statistics
Did you hear the one about the
statistician? Probably ...
Commissioner Webb states that
Citrus County is not the second-
safest county and that crime is in-
creasing instead.
At closer inspection of the 2011
data and the way it was grouped,
16 out of 18 counties have less than
100,000 population, 13 out of the 18
counties have less than 50,000 pop-
ulation, and 9 out of the 18 coun-
ties have 20,000 or less population.
One county, Collier County, has a
population size of 323,785, more
than double that of Citrus. Only
one county, Santa Rosa, has a com-
parable population size to Citrus
County with a crime index rate per
100,000 lower than Citrus.
In order to accurately interpret
this data, you do have to compare
apples with apples, the data
should be paired according to
population size. Sheriff Dawsy is
correct when he states that Cit-
rus Country is the second safest
county.
One claim that I've heard when
speaking with law enforcement
personnel in and out of state, is
that official crime statistics mask
wide regional variations, and
population size is one important
variable.
Moreover, a jump or drop in
crime numbers can also occur
when laws change or, when the
definition of a crime becomes
more broadly or narrowly de-
fined, or when departmental pro-
cedures are set up to focus on
catching child predators on the
Internet, for example.


When a new detection method
is created, it also allows a crime
to be detected more often. This
doesn't mean that crime is in-
creasing; it means that there are
more methods in place to detect
the crime. The crime isn't neces-
sarily more frequent just because
more instances of it are being
found. It simply means they
weren't being caught before,
hence, a misleading UCR index.
The FDLE UCR states: "Per-
cent changes in number and rate
should be interpreted with
caution..'
This stat spat should be put to
rest already Statistics are impor-
tant, but they can be misleading.
Instead, let's hear how each can-
didate plans on economically
preserving or improving upon
the solid foundation that's al-
ready in place. Specifics please.
Edna Mattos
Hernando

GOP in bed with rich
How bad do Republicans have
to get before you realize that the
GOP has been hijacked by the
rich and powerful?
It began with Reagan, whose
policy wonks were more con-
cerned about campaign contribu-
tions than our economy Every
administration until his paid
down our enormous WWII deficit
spending which finally got us out
of the Great Depression (1929 to
1940s). Realizing what hap-
pened; Reagan raised taxes
11 times.
Trickle-down economics does


Letters to the EDITOR

LETTERS GUIDELINES
See Page C2 for information
about how to submit a letter
to the editor.
Letters must be no longer
than 350 words, and writers
will be limited to three letters
per month.
All letters must be signed
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and hometown, including
letters sent via email.

not create jobs. Since its continu-
ous promotion by the GOP the
bottom 90 percent of income
earners has had less than a 1 per-
cent increase in income; top 10
percent, 400 percent.
Companies only hire when de-
mand requires it. From where
comes demand middle-class
spending. Smart rich folks like
Buffet understand this. Others
are just driven by greed.
Pay-as-you-go policies of the
Clinton administration (estab-
lished before Republicans took
Congress) got our increasing debt
under control.
Then W, with more tax cuts for
the rich (and poor), off-budget
spending for two wars, and re-
fusal to regulate banking and
Wall Street, put us into the worst
recession since the Great De-
pression. The coup-de-grace was
passing the totally deficit-funded
Medicare Part D to win in 2004.
President Obama inherited the
worst economic situation since
Roosevelt. His stimulus program
and expansion of W's bailout
prevented the 20 percent Great


Depression unemploy
Failed stimulus? Seee
improved roads or bri
new solar panels? The
creased deficit is not f
creased spending C
spending increases ha
the lowest since Eisen
but decreased revenue
The tax code is total
mised, e.g., the top 16
tions pay no Income ta
Do you really believe
Romney can cut taxes
even more, increase d
(against what?) spend
anything in the budget
duce the deficit? Oh, h
to create jobs like h
governor of Massachu
they rated 47th in job
Doesn't really matte
you don't follow the G(
you will be cut off. Me
Democrats and Indepi
can be free thinking ai
across the board.


Bar


Liquor compi
Why would you be s
at (Inverness) City Cou
railroading a change i
ing ordinance requirii
restaurants serving al
cated no less than 300
churches, day-care cei
schools, public parks
braries?
Who attended the A
Council meeting when
quest to revise the exi
nance was first read?


*ment. Inverness residents, property
any newly owners of property to be affected,
dges or church, school, day care workers,
recent in- represented, as well as business
from in- owners in downtown who face
)bama's more food, wine, beer and alco-
ive been hol competition? Did the Council
shower hear from anyone at that meeting
es. on the ordinance change to be
lly compro- voted on?
corpora- I do hope our Town Manager,
ax. Frank DiGiovanni has prepared
e that an "overlay" of the properties to
for the rich be affected by this change, as re-
efense quested by a resident at the end
ing, not cut of the Sept. 18 meeting.
t, and re- It's all well and good to pro-
ie is going mote "an upscale, cultured,
le did as trendy, business-friendly environ-
setts when ment in the downtown area." It's
creation. quite another environment if
*r who, if hard liquor establishments can
P line, come closer than 300 feet from
anwhile daycare centers, schools, public
endents libraries, churches and parks.
nd vote The "likes" of a "well known"
highway bar should not come
into downtown Inverness within
ry Reichard less than 300 feet from the places
Homosassa stated previously
Perhaps it might be possible to
promise look at the type of liquor license
given to new businesses and
o surprised come to a compromise on dis-
incil not tance for a "full service" business
n an exist- selling food, wine and beer, as op-
ng bars and posed to businesses selling hard
cohol be lo- liquor and no food.
feet from Our town should also be for
enters, families, trendy or not Someone
and li- once said, "The great test of
Democracy is not majority rule. It
ugust City is the defense of minority right."


this re-
sting ordi-
Were


Nancy Deforge
Inverness


FLORIDA LO -.D...- |L






waste


COf
A Citrus F ,,.


sunday, c'November 4, 2012
receptionn begins at 6:30 p.m.
Dinner and dancing to follow at 7:30 p.m.
Proceeds to benefit
Scholarships Taking Elementary Promising Students
to CF (STEPS)for Citrus County students.

College of Central Florida
Citrus Learning and Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, Fla. 34461-9026

6Purchase your ticket online at wnmw.cfedu/foundation,
or contact Y3ustine govantes at 352-249-1207.
cSponsorship opportunities available,
RSVP by friday, Oct, 25 -ih tie optional n $100 per person
Advertisement sponsor
CHRONICLE
X.www.chronicleonline.com


Streets will be killed with
Seven LIVE lands!
Vendors Crafters
Great Local Food
Stone Crab Claws
Wine S leer
Chowder Cook-Off
IRRnMl tR U I P .50


Biloi, S ad SewOrens L Ti
W y St.Agstine
Octobr 25t














3 1 8 p h ihtfrAzhie' Awrns


qJ fg Sponsor ed by BUD
SL LIGHT
96.3 4;-
FellI ,, I...


Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church proudly hosts
Citrus County

o FFather

.Christmas


ClI )NONIC,:E
Tickets are $45 each (donation). Purchase at the church office,
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy CR 486
Monday-Friday, from 8 a.m. until 1Ip.m.
For more information please cal 527-0052, 419-5489,563-5932 or 270-3391


C6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Learning curve


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Ia W


Ii
*it


Associated Press
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer comments June 18 on the Windows 8 operating system. The PC industry is in a slump, as consumers show more
interest in tablet computers and smartphones. Officially, PC makers say they expect Windows 8, which launches Oct. 26, to get buyers to open
their wallets, but industry watchers and analysts are skeptical.

Early look at Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system baffles consumers


PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK The release of
Microsoft's Windows 8 operating
system is a week away, and con-
sumers are in for a shock. Win-
dows, used in one form or
another for a generation, is get-
ting a completely different look
that will force users to learn new
ways to get things done.
Microsoft is making a radical
break with the past to stay rele-
vant in a world where smart-
phones and tablets have eroded
the three-decade dominance of
the personal computer Windows
8 is supposed to tie together Mi-
crosoft's PC, tablet and phone
software with one look. But judg-
ing by the reactions of some peo-
ple who have tried the PC
version, it's a move that risks con-
fusing and alienating customers.
Tony Roos, an American mis-
sionary in Paris, installed a free
preview version of Windows 8 on
his aging laptop to see if Mi-
crosoft's new operating system
would make the PC faster and
more responsive. It didn't, he
said, and he quickly learned
working with the new software
requires tossing out a lot of what
he knows about Windows.
"It was very difficult to get used
to," he said. "I have an 8-year-old
and a 10-year-old, and they never
got used to it. They were like,
'We're just going to use Mom's
computer"'
Windows 8 is the biggest revi-
sion of Microsoft Corp.'s operat-
ing system since it introduced
Windows 95 amid great fanfare 17
years ago. Ultimately, Windows
grew into a $14 billion a year


IA


Jyll L. Stuart, president of Veracity Technologies, works on migrating
an app that runs on Windows Tablet to run on Windows 8 Azure Cloud,
during a Microsoft Windows 8 Developer Workshop on Friday at the
Kurz Purdue Technology Center, in West Lafayette, Ind.


business and helped make for-
mer Chief Executive Bill Gates
the richest man in the world for a
time. Now, due to smartphones
and tablets, the personal com-
puter industry is slumping. Com-
puter companies are desperate
for something that will get sales
growing again. PC sales are ex-
pected to shrink this year for the
first time since 2001, according to
IHS iSuppli, a market research
firm.
The question is whether the
new version, which can be run on
tablets and smartphones, along
with the traditional PC, can satisfy
the needs of both types of users.
"I am very worried that Mi-
crosoft may be about to shoot it-
self in the foot spectacularly," said
Michael Mace, the CEO of Silicon


Valley software startup Cera
Technology and a former Apple
employee. Windows 8 is so differ-
ent, he said, many Windows users
who aren't technophiles will feel
lost, he said.
Microsoft is releasing Windows
8 on Oct. 26, and it doesn't plan to
cushion the impact. Computer
companies will make Windows 8
standard on practically all PCs
that are sold to consumers.
Speaking to Wall Street ana-
lysts Thursday, Microsoft's chief
financial officer Peter Klein said
he isn't very concerned that user
confusion could slow the adop-
tion of Windows 8. When Mi-
crosoft introduces new features,
he said, people eventually realize
"those innovations have deliv-
ered way more value, way more


productivity and way better us-
ability." That's going to be true of
Windows 8 too, he said.
Instead of the familiar Start
menu and icons, Windows 8 dis-
plays applications as a colorful
array of tiles, which can feature
updated information from the ap-
plications. For instance, the
"Photos" tile shows an image
from the user's collection, and
the "People" tile shows images
from the user's social-media con-
tacts. (Microsoft is licensed to use
AP content in the Windows 8
news applications.)
The tiles are big and easy to hit
with a finger convenient for a
touch screen. Applications fill
the whole screen by default -
convenient for a tablet screen,
which is usually smaller than a
PC's. The little buttons that sur-
round Windows 7 applications,
for functions like controlling the
speaker volume, are hidden, giv-
ing a clean, uncluttered view.
When you need those little but-
tons, you can bring them out, but
users have to figure out on their
own how to do it
"In the quest for simplicity,
they sacrificed obviousness,"
said Sebastiaan de With, an in-
terface designer and the chief
creative officer at app developer
DoubleTwist in San Francisco.
Technology blogger Chris Pir-
illo posted a YouTube video of his
father using a preview version of
Windows 8 for the first time. As
the elder Pirillo tours the operat-
ing system with no help from his
son, he blunders into the old
"Desktop" environment and can't
figure out how to get back to the
See Page D4


Understanding the nonprofit organization


O organizations la-
beled nonprofit
are, more pre-
cisely and officially, titled
not-for-profit under state
and federal law. They
may be called non-for- :
profit, however should
and can be operated just
like a successful for-
profit business. Dr. Frederick
Granted, the main Herzog
business of a not-for- EXPERIENCE
profit is to fill an unmet
need, but they are al- MATTERS
lowed the make money
as long as they use it in the pursuit practices
of their mission and nonprofit position.
status. Fortune
Research reveals the number of established
nonprofit organizations in America cessful nc
might be close to the 1 million mark. played
Records indicate Citrus County organizati
over time has registered more than U Plano
700 such associations. Revenue the start]
coming into them has been esti- should ut
mated in the hundreds of millions. create an


These facts being
known is good reason to
manage the organiza-
tions carefully and con-
sistent with best
practices.
Unmet needs -
Nonprofits come into ex-
istence when someone or
a group of organizers dis-
cover an unmet need. Or-
ganizers design a plan of
how their new nonprofit
will cure the unmet
need. The best plan re-
quires applying best
from the very start-up

lately, there are protocols,
ed from thousands of suc-
)nprofits that can be em-
to ensure the new
ion will flourish.
ning for success From
p phase the new nonprofit
ilize the principals that
d bring the organization


through years of successful growth
into maturity. As time goes forward
changes in market conditions will
require the organization to adapt.
Leadership must be alert to what
is in the best interests of any change
to operations. Staying with the "old
ways" of doing things is a formula
for mission creep, loss of grants and
donations, failure and possible
forced dissolution.
Contemporary nonprofit man-
agement As in any industry ex-
perienced modern-day man-
agement is crucial for nonprofit
success. Most often volunteer
boards of directors lack the training
and experience of professionals in
nonprofit management Lawyers in-
corporate, CPAs file annual reports
and Association Executives manage
the nonprofit for success. All of the
above professionals have experi-
ence in their respective disciplines
and should be consulted at appro-
priate times.
Nonprofit resource center -


The time has come to establish a
Non-Profit Resource Center The
center will offer educational, man-
agement and counseling support by
way of an Institute for Nonprofit
Management. The Non-Profit Re-
source Center will be 501(c) 3 or-
ganization under the IRS code and
be dedicated to best practices in
nonprofit management.
The center services will include
all aspects of the startup phase
through development, growth plans
and management issues of the ma-
ture organization and more. In all
cases, best practices will be ad-
vanced and applied to yield greater
success.
Reader interest is encouraged.
Express your comments and
interest.

Dr. FrederickJ. Herzogis
immediate past chairman of Citrus
SCORE. He can be reached at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Just


say 'no'


to time


share
DEAR BRUCE: My
aging mother owns
a time share that
will be part of her estate
when she passes. What
options does the executor
of the estate have in deal-
ing with this unwanted
property? R.W, via
email
DEAR R.W: If you are
the heir, you are not
obliged to accept the time
share.
The best option is for
your mother to specifi-
cally mention the time
share in her will. Then
when she passes away,
you can specifically opt
not to accept it. You would
not receive any income
from the property, and you
would have no obligations
in terms of upkeep, etc.
The time-share corpora-
tion can choose to take it
back or let it default
Consult with your
mother and the attorney
who wrote her will, who
can easily make changes
to the will if needed.
DEAR BRUCE: Please
explain "going through
probate." Is this required
in all states? Reader,
via email
DEAR READER: Pro-
bate is the function of a
particular court responsi-
ble for the administration
of estates. Ordinarily, the
person running the pro-
bate court is called the
surrogate, which simply
means he or she is a
stand-in for the person
who has died.
If there is a will, it is
submitted to the surrogate
in the county where the
deceased person lived.
The will ordinarily ap-
points a personal repre-
sentative, or executor, to
handle the affairs of the
deceased as outlined in
the will.
If a person dies without
a will (intestate), the pro-
bate court may be asked to
appoint an administrator
to handle the decedent's
affairs.
A simple will rarely en-
counters problems in pro-
bate. It can go through the
probate process without
the services of an attorney
or, at the very most, with
an attorney who will work
on an hourly basis, not for
a percentage of the estate.
For a more complicated
estate, probate can be a
time-consuming process.
Many of the problems of
probate can be obviated
by establishing trusts,
which, in my opinion,
should never be done
without the services of an
attorney Trusts operate
outside the will and, as a
consequence, outside the
purview of probate court
Many people fear the
things that happen in pro-
bate because of the many
books that paint probate
as a terrible process. For
the average person, it is
not. The probate court
and the surrogate are not
the bad guys they are
often portrayed to be.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money
P.O. Box 7150, Hudson,
FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns.










D2

SUNDAY
OCTOBER 21, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan M.
this:
rSi rrFBI


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center presenting


sponsor at BWA's HEALTH & FITNESS Expo


Visitors get to 9

work robotic
surgical toolRI V E IVE
: ,. :.. ~L fN T [-[
Guests at the sixth annual .-
Women's HEALTH and FIT- _- -.....
NESS Expo were able to "
test their skills on the da
Vinci robotic surgical sys- .
tern, featured at SevenV
Rivers Regional Medical 4
Center's "health zone"
booth.
Once seated at the da
Vinci console, the user
could maneuver the robotic
arms of the surgical plat-
form to perform tasks much
like a real surgeon would as
other attendees watched ~ ~.
their progress on the high-
resolution monitor above Trey Thomas, foreground left, representative from Intuitive
the robotic arms. Surgical, and Thomas Antony, M.D., background right, local
Learn more about da gynecologist, each explain how the da Vinci robotic surgi- -
Vinci robotic surgery at cal system is used by physicians at Seven Rivers Regional Thank you, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, for being the Presenting Sponsor of this
SevenRiversRegional.com. to perform urological and gynecological procedures. year's BWA Women's HEALTH and FITNESS Expo.

News You CAN USE


DEADLINES
Oct. 25 Leadership Citrus class of
2013 applications are due. The five-month
class that promotes community and stew-
ardship will begin in January. Cost is $595
per person, $495 for Chamber members.
For more information on the program and
to download the application visit
www.leadershipcitrus.com.
Oct. 26 Taste of CF, A Citrus
Evening of Elegance will be Sunday,
Nov. 4. Reception begins at 6:30 p.m. with
dinner and dancing to follow at 7:30 p.m.
Proceeds benefit Scholarships Taking Ele-
mentary Promising Students to CF
(STEPS) for Citrus County students. Col-
lege of Central Florida, Citrus Learning
and Conference Center, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Purchase your ticket
online at www.CF.edu/Foundation or con-
tact Justine Govantes at 352-249-1207.
RSVP by Friday, Oct. 26. Black tie op-
tional. $100 per person.
Oct. 29 -Are you a Movember Bro?
Join Movember Citrus County today!
Send us a message or call Dorothy at
352-634-1823 or
Theressa at 352-
457-9644. Shave -
off is 5 to 6 p.m. ,
Oct. 29 at the .- '
Chamber office ll
in Inverness, 401
W. Tompkins St.
Oct. 29-- The NOVEMBER
Citrus County
Business Resource Alliance Partners are
presenting the workshop "The Value of
Relationships: Results Small Business
Owners Can Bank On" from 5 to 8:15
p.m. Tuesday, Oct, 30, at the College of
Central Florida Learning Center. Do you


want to increase your sales? Would you
like to earn more referrals from your cus-
tomers? Do you want to outperform your
competition? If the answer is YES, then
you won't want to miss out on this work-
shop -and plan to bring your employees!
Plus, you will hear from local business
owners as they share secrets of their suc-
cess during the panel discussion and Q&A
session following the presentation. The
featured presenter is Mona Marshall, certi-
fied as a senior professional in human re-
sources and the president of HR Power
LLC. We'd like to thank our sponsors,
Workforce Connection and Advanced Alu-
minum, for supporting our training efforts
and economic development in Citrus
County. Register online at www.citrusedc.
com or call Matthew at 352-795-2000.
CHRISTMAS PARADES
Dec. 1 Christmas in the Hills "The
Magic of Christmas" Parade Holiday Arts
& Crafts/Car Show in Beverly Hills. Visit
News/Events at www.citruscountycham-
ber.com for details, the flyer and applica-
tion information. Events start at 9 a.m.,
parade begins at 10.
Dec. 1 Crystal River Christmas Pa-
rade, "A Postcard Christmas" begins 6
p.m. Applications are available online at
News/Events at www.citruscountycham-
ber.com and at both Chamber offices; 28
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River and 401 W.
Tompkins St., Inverness.
Dec. 8 Inverness Christmas Parade,
"A Postcard Christmas" begins at noon.
Applications are available online at
News/Events at www.citruscounty
chamber.com and at both Chamber of-
fices; 401 W. Tompkins St., Inverness and
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River.


Oct. 26 Nature Coast EMS is pleased to announce the third
annual Trunk or Treat Halloween event scheduled for 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. Friday, Oct. 26. Trunk or Treat will be at Nature Coast EMS
Lecanto headquarters at 3876 W. Country Hill Drive behind the
Crystal Glen subdivision on Homosassa Trail. Bring the kids for
face-painting, haunted hallways, a kids' costume contest, free hot
dogs, treats, a movie and more! Free admission. Some of our par-
ticipating Trunk or Treaters are the Florida Highway Patrol, the Cit-
rus County Sheriffs Office and Fire Rescue, Bayflite and, of course,
Nature Coast EMS. Come have "spooktacular" fun with your family!
Oct. 26 and 27 It's time again for Haunted Tram Rides at
the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. Businesses, organi-
zations and families will be assigned locations on Pepper Creek
Trail. Rides begin at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and run until 11
p.m. In addition to tram rides, there will be clowns, face-painting,
a Halloween costume contest, refreshments and trinkets for the
kids. A haunted house for children will be set up in the Florida
room. Donations for admission: adult tram rides $5; children up
to age 12 are $3; and the children's haunted house is $2.
Oct. 27 and 31 Come celebrate Halloween with the 13th
annual super scream of "The Nightmare on Pine Bluff Street."


Citrus County Cruisin'
Oct. 26 to 28- The Cooter Festival
returns in 2012 with three days
loaded with fun, music, contests,
games, food, refreshments, turtle
races, barbecue cook-off, Cooter Idol
championship, triathlon, costume
contest and more. Free parking and
admission. More information is
available at http://wwwcooter
festival.com/.
Nov 3 Celebrate the blues from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the annual
Blues 'n' Bar-B-Que in Homosassa.
Tickets are $20 at the gate. The ticket
price is for the concert only Barbe-
cue will be cooked on site and Cuban
cuisine offered in the Museum Caf&.


Citrus Massage Therapy
presents Project October
Complimentary massages will be given
to those who donate to Cancer research,
organizations and foundations. Proof of
donation required before services are per-
formed. Complete details are available at
Project October (Oct. 1 to Oct. 31) under
News/Events at www.citruscounty
chamber.com or call 352-419-7949.
Local dentist earns
Mastership status
Dr. Richard C. Swanson, Crystal River,
earned Mastership status in the Interna-
tional Congress of Oral Implantologists
(ICOI) on Aug. 23. The awarding of the
mastership status is an honor that a pro-
fessional society such as the ICOI be-
stows on a dental professional involved in
dental implant treatment. The ICOI is dedi-
cated to communicating scientific knowl-
edge and improving the clinical practice of
dental implantology worldwide. Dr. Swan-
son's dental office is at 1815 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Call 352-795-
1223 or visit his website at www.
rswansondental.com.
Better Health Chiropractic
team earns certification
Better Health Chiropractic of Crystal
River-Lecanto is pleased to announce the
certification of its full support team: Mrs.
Wanda Curry, licensed chiropractic assis-
tant; Chris Buck, licensed chiropractic as-
sistant; and Mrs. Frankie Bowker, LMT;
are certified in medical weight loss "Medi-
wraps" and are now certified wrap techni-
cians. For more information or to schedule
a service, call 352-795-8911.


Come in through the Haunted Halloween maze, see the spooky
displays and picture tunnel, exit through the scary graveyard.
This free annual event is assisted by John and Dusty Porter, the
Peters family, the Bruno family and other neighbors and friends.
Hours are 7 to 10:30 p.m. Oct. 27 and 7 to 9:20 p.m. Oct. 31.
Donations to CUB will be accepted (food and/or money).
Oct. 26 and 27 Friends of Crystal River State Parks spon-
sors Haunted Halloween at Crystal River State Park for teens
(older than 12) and adults. Gate admission is a $5 donation to
the Friends groups and includes a "Terrifying Tram Tour" through
the fearsome forest, a "Slimy Swamp Walk" and a "Beastly Boat
Ride" down the creepy Crystal River. Food booth by Gulf Archae-
ology Research Institute and fortunes provided by Madame
Epoch. "Mortuary Photography" by Florida Public Archaeology
Network. Advance tickets available at the Park Visitors Center. A
free Kids Halloween Event from 3 to 6 p.m. will be open for chil-
dren younger than 12. For more information, call 352-563-0450.
Oct 31 Join the merchants at Crystal River Mall for Mall-0-
Ween on Wednesday. Trick or treating begins at 6 p.m. and
master magician Dallas Smith will wow you in the center court
starting at 7 p.m.


able at http://www.ncfblues.com.
S Travel a few miles north and
join the street festival as the Rotary
Club of Crystal River King's Bay
chapter presents the fifth annual
Stone Crab Jam on Saturday, Nov 3.
.* aThis street festival kicks off at 4 p.m.
on the south side of Cit-
rus Avenue all the way to
Cold beer, wine, soda, 7 the waterfront at King's
water, coffee and Bay Park in Crystal
desserts will stave off -, River, with music on
hunger and keep you en- CITRUS COUNTY three stages, food and
ergized. Please, no pets, Economic Dvopment craft vendors and beer,
coolers or outside food "c wine, soda and water
and drink, but revelers General admission tick-
are welcome to bring chairs for per- ets are only $5 and VIP tickets are
sonal comfort. Be ready to have a just $50 each. Find more informa-
great time! More information avail- tion at www.stonecrabjam.com/.


That Extra Mile


Sometimes, we find situa-
tions where a few individu-
als and organizations give
The Citrus County Chamber
a few extra reasons to smile.
We feel it is important to
take a moment to thank
them publicly. Just as the
You Caught My Eye Pro-
gram allows residents to ap-
plaud good customer
service, the Chamber
wishes to recognize those
who go That Extra Mile.
We THANK the Crystal
River Moose Lodge No. 2013
for always being willing to
lend us tables and chairs. At
last May's Law Enforcement
BBQ, the Moose loaned us
about 30 tables and 150
chairs so that people could
sit while they enjoyed
lunch. And just last month,
the Moose lent four tables
and 30 chairs when the
Leadership Citrus program
of the Citrus County Cham-


ber of Commerce had its
alumni reunion party.
The first week in October,
the Chamber put out an
email request one morning
for help to fold and stuff the
verification forms that we
mail to each one of our
members. Within 15 min-
utes, Jarrod McAlister, Na-
ture Coast Financial
Advisors, and Bill Hudson,
Land Title of Citrus County,
responded that they were
available and they came to
the office that afternoon.
Bill even brought his dog,
Duke, and though Duke was
less than helpful with fold-
ing and stuffing, he sure was
adorable. THANK YOU,
Jarrod and Bill, for stepping
up quickly and with smiles
on your faces. We appreci-
ate the other members who
also responded, although
we did not need additional
help.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Upcoming EVENTS
Oct. 23 TUESDAY Busi- River.
ness After Hours 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 15 Bus
at ALPACA MAGIC. Hours 5 to 7 p.
Oct. 30 Movember Shave GROVE RETAIL
Off, 5 to 6 p.m. at Inverness Nov. 29 Mov
Chamber of Commerce/EDC Show & Finale Pa
Office. BURKE'S IRISH I
Nov. 1 Business After Jan. 19 and 20
Hours 5 to 7 p.m. at HOS- Florida Manatee F
PICE OF CITRUS COUNTY. Crystal River. http
Nov. 8 Business After floridamanateefes
Hours SENICAAIR and CIT- Check out
RUS COUNTY BUILDERS AS- our complete E
SOCIATION preview the 35th calendar for
annual "Remodeling America" community,
Home & Outdoor Show. entertainment I
Nov. 9 11:30 a.m. to 1 and fundrais- E
p.m. November Chamber ing events.
Lunch at Plantation on Crystal Follow us on your


iness After
m. at FERRIS
STORE.
member Mo
arty, 6 p.m. at
PUB.
- 2013
Festival in
i://www.
stival.com.



U.


rsmartphone:


Hit these Halloween hauntings


I






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's connection


D3

SUNDAY
OCTOBER 21, 2012


Florida Public Utilities


September V. I. P.

Pat Spalding and Wade Hughes

jointly awarded September's honor


Pat Spalding and Wade Hughes
are proud to be honored by the
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion this month.
Florida Public Utilities (FPU)
has been providing energy to
homes and businesses throughout
Florida since 1924. In 2009, Chesa-
peake Utilities, a diversified en-
ergy company providing quality
service to customers and commu-
nities for more than 100 years, ac-
quired Florida Public Utilities,
providing FPU with long-term
growth opportunities and in-
creased revenue stream.
Wade was employed by FPU in
2003 as a service technician. Hav-
ing suffered an injury rendering
him unable to perform techni-
cian's duties, he was named com-


mercial sales account manager,
where he has found a comfortable
niche. He and his wife of 32 years
are the parents of three and
grandparents of three. They are
18-year veterans of the Crystal
River Church of God, where Wade
served as elder for nine years. He
enjoys church activities and the
brotherhood of close friends.
Pat Spalding, an FPU employee
for 11 years, has been an active
member of Builders Associations
and Chambers throughout
Florida. Having worked for a res-
idential developer for 20 years
prior to her term with FPU, she is
a seasoned industry professional
who values her role and her com-
mitment to energy efficiency She
enjoys dancing, bike riding and


-



Florida Public Utilities Inglis office representatives, from left, are: Matt Henderson, Steve Hetland, Pat Spald-
ing, Tyler Henderson, Denise Dunham, Wade Hughes and Phil Zimmer.


Zumba. "Spectator" is her sport of
choice, viewing with her two dogs!
Pat and Wade value the rela-
tionships they have developed
with Citrus County's industry pro-


fessionals and are grateful for
their impact in positively influ-
encing building trends with
cleaner, greener lifestyle alterna-
tives. They are pictured above


with the team of employees who
cooked for the association's steak
night and elections meeting in Au-
gust. Florida Public Utilities was
a sponsor of that event, as well.


2012 Awards & Installation Banquet


IMPORTANT
UPCOMING
CCBA EVENTS


0 Ro-mac Night CCBA
General Membership
Mixer-- 5 to 7 p.m.
Oct. 25, location
.TBD; mixer is open to
all members of the
Citrus County
Builders Association,
Citrus County
Chamber and
Hernando County
Builders Association.
2012 Home &
Outdoor Show,
presented by Home
Improvement
Sponsor Florida
Public Utilities -
Nov. 10 and 11, at
the National Guard
.. -Armory in Crystal
,River. Booth spaces
are now open to the
general public, with
restrictions.
U"Sponsorship
opportunities are now
Immediate Past President Wayne Bardsley, Quality Crafted Builders, right, available as well. Visit
presented Dusty Porter, Porter's Locksmithing, left, with the 2012 VIP of www.CitrusBuilders.
the Year award for her outstanding volunteer service to the CCBA. com or call 352-746-
9028 for information.
0 2013 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing
will be Feb. 23 at
7 Rivers Golf &
County Club with a
*portion of the
second Associate VP Mark Schroder of Kings Bay Engineering, left, pres- proceeds to benefit
nts outgoing President Wayne Bardsley, right, with the coveted 2012 the Boys & Girls
uilder of the Year award. Clubs of Citrus
County. Watch for de-
tails and registration
to open up by
month's end on www.
CitrusBuilders.com.
0 2013 CCBA Annual
Family Fishing
Tournament dates
have been set for
April 27 and 28 at
the Homosassa
Riverside Resort.
Online registration
will open in
November with
inclusion of the
popular Super Angler
Pass, which will be
offered again in
conjunction with the
m-m-Mel Tillis and
Friends Tournament.
For information, visit
immediate Past President Wayne Bardsley, Quality Crafted Builders con- First Vice President Michael Gilbert, Gold Crest Homes, right, presents John www.CitrusBuilders.
ratulates newly installed 2013 President Bill Larder, Larder & Sons Con- Porter, Porter's Locksmithing, left, with the prestigious 2012 Associate of com.
truction, and hands over the gavel, the Year Award.




35th annual Home & Outdoor Show


CITRUS COUNTY The 35th
annual "Remodeling America"
Home & Outdoor Show has a little
something to offer everyone.
Hosted by the Citrus County
Builders Association and Home Im-
provement Sponsor Florida Public
Utilities, this free event that covers
all things remodeling and renewing
boasts more than 25 unique ex-
hibitors for the 2012 show.
Show hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Nov 12, and 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Sunday, Nov 13, at the Crystal
River National Guard Armory Be
sure to mark the following high-
lights of the show on your calendar:
Lowe's free children's work-


shop at 10 a.m. Saturday
Fantastic Face Art by Anne
Adams all weekend.
Toys for Tots drop-off in the Cit-
rus County Builders Association
booth. Visitors are asked to bring a
new, unwrapped toy to the show for
the Citrus Builders Care Building a
Better Christmas gift distribution
that will take place Dec. 14 at the
Citrus County Builders Association
headquarters.
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile
will be at there, so please use our
show as an opportunity to help
build the blood supply for Citrus
County.
The Florida Home Builders


Association will host a free "Do it
Yourself" class for homeowners
about property protection from
wind damage. The class will cover
"Do It Yourself" residential mitiga-
tion techniques for the homeowner;
potential insurance premiums sav-
ings for implementing mitigation;


wind mitigation verification in-
spections and accompanying 1802
form; mitigation measures a li-
censed contractor can perform; and
preparing your home for a storm or
hurricane. These classes are one
hour long, and will be offered for
free to all attendees, at 10 a.m. Sat-
urday and 1p.m. Sunday during the
show. Attendees who complete the
class and its evaluation form will be
entered to win a $50 Lowe's Gift
Card (one gift card for each day).
New this year! The Florida
State Department of Business and
Professional Regulations will have
a booth to educate the public about
unlicensed activity and its dangers


to the homeowner The Citrus
County Building Department will
also be present with a booth that
will help educate consumers on
local unlicensed activity and per-
mitting requirements.
For more information, visit
www.CitrusBuilders.com or call
352-746-9028. Special thanks to our
fine sponsors for making this show
possible: Home Improvement
Sponsor Florida Public Utilities;
Platinum Sponsor Senica Air Con-
ditioning; Gold Sponsors Gold Crest
Homes, Citrus County Chronicle
and Gaudette Electric; Silver Spon-
sor Senica Air Conditioning. We'll
see you at the show!


S
e
B


Ir
g
st





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Billboards donated


Special to the Chronicle
Lamar Advertising Company donated billboards to Partners
for a Substance-Free Citrus for the "Synthetic Drug Aware-
ness" project. Lamar Advertising and the winners of the
poster contest were recognized at the Oct. 9 Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners meeting. From left are:
Katherine Alexander, Lecanto High School student and win-
ner of the Synthetic Drug Awareness poster contest; Shay
Langley, sales executive for Lamar Outdoor Advertising in
Ocala; Connie Ford-Raborne, account executive for Lamar
Advertising in Ocala; Stephanie Bandstra, Lecanto High
School student and winner of the Synthetic Drug Awareness
poster contest; and Renna Jablonskis, executive director for
Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus. This donation will help
spread awareness about synthetic drugs. The billboards fea-
ture the two winning designs from entries submitted by Cit-
rus County middle and high school students who created
posters on the theme "Synthetic Drugs are Dangerous." The
billboards can be seen on County Road 491, State Road 44,
U.S. 41 and County Road 486.


State association
marks 30 years
This October, Florida Hos-
pice & Palliative Care Associa-
tion (FHPCA) celebrates its
30-year anniversary of dedi-
cated service to hospice care in
Florida. Established as Florida
Hospices Inc. in 1982,
FHPCA's grassroots effort first
began in 1979 with the forma-
tion of the Florida State Hos-
pice Organization (FHSO).
FSHO was only in operation
from 1979 to 1982, and during
that time completed its primary
mission and purpose of passing
the hospice licensure law, get-
ting rules implemented and se-
curing passage of the Medicare
Hospice Benefit. With those
tasks completed, the organiza-
tion handed over the duties and
responsibilities to a successor
association, FHPCA, to con-
tinue the work.
"The association started off



WINDOWS
Continued from Page Dl

Start tiles. (Hint: Move the
mouse cursor into the top
right corner of the screen,
then swipe down to the
"Start" button that appears,
and click it. On a touch
screen, swipe a finger in
from the right edge of the
screen to reveal the Start
button.) The four-minute
video has been viewed more
than 1.1 million times since it
was posted in March.
"There are many things
that are hidden," said Raluca
Budiu, a user experience
specialist with Nielsen Nor-
man Group. "Once users dis-
cover them, they have to
remember where they are.
People will have to work
hard and use this system on
a regular basis."
Mace, the software CEO,
has used every version of
Windows since version 2.0,
which came out in 1987.
Each one, he said, built upon
the previous one. Users did-
n't need to toss out their old
ways of doing things when
new software came along.
Windows 8 ditches that tradi-
tion of continuity, he said.
"Most Windows users don't


with no staff and financial in a
shoebox. Now we have a full
staff with multiple projects,
committees, and initiatives hap-
pening everyday. We have ac-
complished a lot these past 30
years," said Mary Ellen Poe,
president of FHPCA and presi-
dent and CEO of Hospice of
Marion County. "Besides turn-
ing 30, this year has brought a
lot of changes for the associa-
tion. We've built a new website
to better inform the community
of hospice and palliative care
and adopted a new strategic
plan that will help the associa-
tion navigate today's chal-
lenges and opportunities. We
are confident FHPCA is pre-
pared and ready for the years
ahead."
Paul Ledford, executive di-
rector of FHPCA, said, "I've
been here for eight years now,
and have seen a lot of growth
and changes during that time. I
am very proud to work for an


Kinnard donates to project


Special to the Chronicle
Dr. Jeffery Kinnard donated $2,500 to Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus for the "Syn-
thetic Drug Awareness" project. This donation enabled four billboards to be put up in Cit-
rus County to help spread the warning of synthetic drugs. From left are: Heather Yates,
media relations coordinator of the Citrus County Sheriff's Office and board member of Part-
ners for a Substance-Free Citrus; Stephanie Bandstra, Lecanto High School student and
one of two winners of the Synthetic Drug Awareness poster contest; (not pictured-Lecanto
High School student Katherine Alexander); Renna Jablonskis, executive director for Part-
ners for a Substance-Free Citrus; Dr. Jeffery Kinnard, Kinnard Chiropractic; and Lt. Kevin Pur-
inton, facilitator of the Synthetic Drug Awareness Task Force for the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office. The billboards feature two winning designs from entries submitted by Citrus County
middle and high school students who created posters on the theme "Synthetic Drugs are
Dangerous." A total of 97 entries were submitted to the School Resource Officers. The two
winners, Stephanie Bandstra and Katherine Alexander, are students at Lecanto High School.
Posters were judged by the following: Sheriff Jeff Dawsy; County Commissioner Joe Meek;
Inverness City Manager Frank DiGiovanni; Dr. Jeffery Kinnard, Kinnard Chiropractic; Lt.
Kevin Purinton, Synthetic Drug Campaign Awareness Facilitator; Crystal River Mayor Jim
Farley; and Tom Rogers, owner of Graphic Elite Printing and Blue Heron Tees.


association with a mission to
assure quality and access to
hospice care for all Floridians. It
is something that drives you to
work hard every day. However,
this work could not be done
without the generous support
and involvement of our mem-
bers. It's because of their en-
ergy, dedication and expertise
that we've been going strong
for these 30 years."
FHPCA's 30-year anniver-
sary comes before the National
Hospice and Palliative Care
Month in November. This
month of recognition is a great
time to show appreciation for
the hard work of the many dedi-
cated staff in hospice and pal-
liative care. For more
information regarding hospice
and palliative care or FHPCA,
visit www.floridahospices.org.
Business alliance
plans workshop
HOMOSASSA- The Citrus
County Business Resource Al-


lance Partners will present the
workshop "The Value of Rela-
tionships: Results Small Busi-
ness Owners Can Bank On"
from 5 to 8:15 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct 30, at the College of Cen-
tral Florida Learning Center.
Do you want to increase your
sales? Would you like to earn
more referrals from your cus-
tomers? Do you want to outper-
form your competition? Then
bring your employees to this
workshop. Local business own-
ers will share secrets of their
success during the panel dis-
cussion and Q&A session fol-
lowing the presentation.
The featured presenter is
Mona Marshall, certified as a
senior professional in human
resources and the president of
HR Power LLC. Marshall has
more than 20 years of experi-
ence in the field, has studied
business law and business ad-
ministration and holds a degree
in accounting.
Cost is $15 per person for


Associated Press
Microsoft Corp.'s new Surface tablet computer is displayed June 18 at Hollywood's Milk Stu-
dios in Los Angeles. Windows 8 is designed for tablets and smartphones as well as PCs.


view their PCs as being bro-
ken to begin with. If you tell
them 'Oh, here's a new ver-
sion of Windows, and you
have to relearn everything to
use it,' how many normal
users are going to want to do
that?" he asked.
The familiar Windows


Desktop is still available
through one of the tiles, and
most programs will open up
in that environment. But
since the Start button is gone,
users will have to flip back
and forth between the desk-
top and the tile screen.
There's additional poten-


tial for confusion because
there's one version of Win-
dows 8, called "Windows
RT," that looks like the PC
version but doesn't run reg-
ular Windows programs. It's
intended for tablets and
lightweight tablet-laptop
hybrids.


members of the chamber or
commerce, EDC, SBDC and
SCORE; and $20 per person
for the general public. The Col-
lege of Central Florida, Learn-
ing Center is in Building L-4,
3800 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. To register online, visit
the "events" page at www.
citrusedc.com. To register by
phone or email, contact
Matthew at 352-795-2000 or
matthew@citruscounty
chamber.com.
Veterans may be able to at-
tend this workshop free of
charge. Go to http://vetsfast
launch.org/coupon-signup/ to
request a coupon to bring to the
seminar.
Realtors to meet
with candidates
The Realtors Association of
Citrus County will host a "Meet
N Greet" with candidates and
current legislators from 5:30 to
7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, at
714 S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto.


Budiu believes the transi-
tion to Windows 8 will be
most difficult for PC users,
because Microsoft's design
choices favor touch screens
rather than mice and key-
boards. Alex Wukovich, a
Londoner who tried Win-
dows 8 on a friend's laptop,
agrees.
"On a desktop, it just felt
really weird," he said. "It
feels like it's a tablet operat-
ing system that Microsoft
managed to twist and shoe-
horn onto a desktop."
Not everyone who has
tried Windows 8 agrees with
the critics.
Sheldon Skaggs, a Web de-
veloper in Charlotte, N.C.,
thought he was going to hate
Windows 8, but he needed to
do something to speed up his
5-year-old laptop. So he in-
stalled the new software.
"After a bit of a learning
curve and playing around
with it a bit more, you get
used to it, surprisingly," he
said.
The computer now boots
up faster than it did with
Windows Vista, he said.
Vista was Microsoft's most
recent operating-system flop.
It was seen as so clunky and
buggy when released in 2007
that many PC users sat out
the upgrade cycle and waited


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

Leadership Citrus
applications open
Applications are now being
accepted for the Leadership
Citrus Class of 2013.
Leadership Citrus has been
active in the community for 21
years, and participants have
gained a higher level of aware-
ness and understanding of Cit-
rus County and all it has to
offer.
Leadership Citrus is a five-
month program that meets
every other week. A limited
number of applicants will be se-
lected to participate in the pro-
gram by a committee made up
from the Leadership Citrus
Board.
The process involves filling
out an application and going
through an interview process.
Selected members will be noti-
fied through the mail in Decem-
ber and classes will start in
January.
Class membership is open to
Citrus County residents, and
members of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will re-
ceive a discount. Cost of the
class is $495 for Chamber
members and $595 for
nonmembers.
Applications can be found at
www.leadershipcitrus.com; ap-
plications are due by Oct. 25.


for Windows 7, which arrived
two and a half years later.
Companies and other institu-
tions wait much longer than
consumers to upgrade their
software, and many will keep
paying for Windows 7. Many
companies are still using
Windows XP released in
2001.
Colin Gillis, an analyst at
BGC Financial, is optimistic
about Windows 8, pointing
out that it's snappy and runs
well on PCs with limited pro-
cessing power, making it
suited for compact, tablet-
style machines. But he also
notes that through Mi-
crosoft's history, roughly
every other operating-system
release has been a letdown.
Intel Corp. makes the
processors that go into 80
percent of PCs, and has a
strong interest in the success
of Windows. CEO Paul
Otellini said Tuesday that
when the company has let
consumers try Windows 8 on
expensive "ultrabook" lap-
tops with touch screens, "the
feedback is universally posi-
tive." But he told analysts he
doesn't really know if people
will embrace Windows 8 for
mainstream PCs.
"We'll know a lot more
about this 90 days from now,"
he said.


CCHIRONICLE
GN- -
d ( wt% hronigeonline stom


September 30th October 24th


Are you a leaf peeper?
Do you miss watching
the leaves change color?

You are not alone; many others living in
Citrus County enjoy the warm weather but
long for the days when the changing
of the seasons meant an explosion of color.

We will select the best photos on
Thursday and publish them in
Sunday's newspaper each week.
We will also be featuring the winning
photos on our Facebook page.

Submit your photos online at
www.chronicleonline/fallfoliage


Saturday,
October 27, 2012
8:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m.




You are invited to participate!



Gather your friends, business associates, neighbors,
church groups, or club members to commit to a day
to give Withlacoochee State Trail a manicure!
To register as a volunteer, please call the
Nature Coast Volunteer Center at
352-527-5955 Lunch will be provided by
Walmart Super Center of Inverness.

S LIVE UNITED
Walmart
,,......


* ONE DAY ONLY ONE DAY ONLY i. f ,,
DAY OF CARING ON :-:
MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY SATURDAY
2012 FOOD DRIVE OCT. 27TH








JOINT PARTNERSHIP BY:
Citrus County Harvest
US Postal Service
Community Food Bank of
SCitrus County
United Way of Citrus County
Nature Coast Volunteer Center
Beverly Hills
Crystal River
Please place your non-perishable Floral City
food donation in a plastic bag (no Hemando
glass please) and hang on your *
mailbox for pick-up no later than Holder
8am by your mail earnrier or, if Homosassa
you have a post office box, bring
your donation to the post office. Homosassa Springs
For larger donations, more than I bag, Inverness
please bring to your local Post Office. 'L,
0 CiC QJBi Lecanto


D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


BUSINESS









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




^^f~Chronicle^


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 D5



ace an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fx( 253 65 TlFe (8 )5- 4 1EiT.Tii..ie lnc. b t: w cr ienn c


SWF seeking energetic
male companion 50-60
yrs old, likes to travel,
dance, have good
conversation, golf, has
good sense of humor,
non-smoker. Looking
for a kind heart, superfi-
cial need not respond
Blind Box 1808 c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429




Bedroom Set Queen,
Headboard Footboard,
side rails, night stand,
Big dresser, mirror
Armoire, three draws
$300.
PRIDE SCOOTER $300
(352) 527-1097
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 C/H/A New Carpet &
Tile, Nice Neighborhood
$650/mo (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
Newly remodeled 3/2,
$595. mo Ist. last, sec.
352-400-1501


MO V lI G'
SALE

CRYSTAL

RIVER
Indoor sale
Household items,
bedroom & living
room sets and more!
(352) 563-2492 Call for
an appointment
GE REFRIGERATOR
White with icemaker in
top freezer $100 Phone
352/637-4871
HERNANDO
Newly remodeled 3/2,
Lg. Lot $595. mo 1st.
last, sec. 352-400-1501
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW Lg fenced yd w/
nice shed. Rent $495/mo;
rent to own $3k down
$650/mo (352)634-3862
MERCURY
'08 Milan, Wh 4 door w/
grey lea int, All Power,
Exc Cond; 39k mi;
$12,800 obo 634-4524
TOY POODLES
(APRICOTS) One male
$400 & female $450 born
8/4 and almost fully potty
trained with first set of
shots and raised in a lov-
ing home. call 419-5662




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087




2 Cats, Male & Female 1
Mo. Eating on own,
litter box trained
To Good Home
(352) 794-7496
2 Free Pott Belly Pigs
Males
Free to good home
(352) 560-0249
3 yr old bulldog/boxer mix
tan, kid-loving, good with
other animals, housebro-
ken, free to a good home
(352) 586-4827
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens or as
mulch. U load and haul.
352-628-9624
Free 32" TV
You pick up
Call after 5pm
(352) 860-2090
Free Crib, light wood,
excel, cond.
no mattress & Tub
(352) 249-7804


FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
8 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
FREE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOME
3 females, 1 male,
Multi colored, litter
trained, Floral City
(352) 419-4221
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge


Beagle/Walker mix, 1-2
yrs old, white w/black and
brown, goes by "Anne",
lost in vicinity of Hwy 486
&Pine Ridge Blvd.
(352) 601-6118
Lost 2 Suitcases while
at the Jct of Van Ness
and Hwy 41 Sunday
evening at 8:30. One Ig
silver, one red med
size. Cash Reward!
Please call Lynn at
603-520-5811
Lost Cat
Gray short hair female
tiger Green Acres in
Homosassa Oct. 2
$50. Reward
(352) 503-6763
Lost Dog
Adult Female Lab Mix,
all Black with Feathery
tale. 10/18 Liesure Ac-
res, South of Grover
Cleveland
(352) 628-0221 or
(352)601-4665



FULL MOON FARM
Scenic Trail Rides,
$30/hr, Lessons, $25/hr,
Full Board, $300/mo.
Open House Sat. 10/20
12p-4p, free hotdog &
t-shirt (352) 628-1472



FL Headless Jumbo
Gulf Shrimp 16 ct @
$.7.50/Ib,10ct@ $8.50
Stone Crabs $6.00lb
Delivered (352)513-5038



I am Interested in learn-
ing conversational
Japanese. Please call
Robert
(352) 634-1141
Sr. Woman looking for
Sr. Woman 65+ com-
panionship in exchange
for Room and board
Located in Inverness
(352) 489-2099




EXECUTIVE
SECRETARY
Announcement
#12-62

Provides advanced
secretarial and
administrative work
for the Department
of Water Resources
Director. H.S Diploma
or GED with ad-
vanced course work
in office practices/
business procedures.
Six year's responsible
administrative secre-
tarial experience.
Previous supervisory
experience desired.
$12.30 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, October 26,
2012. EOE/ADA.


RE TATE
ASSISTANT
Send resume to:
reassist 1@yahoo.com
All applications kept
confidential
Receptionist/
Office Assistant

T, TH, F 9am-3pm
Strong phone &
computer skills.
Excel required
APPLY IN PERSON
w/resume 10a-2p
131 Hwy. 19N Inglis











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits, For
busy medical office.

F/T RECEPTIONIST
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
FAX RESUME TO:
(352) 563-2512

*SEVEN RIVERS

Employment
Opportunities
In the following areas:
* RN-Med/Surg Tele
Comp Rehab
Surgery ICU
ED. OB/L&D
Cath Lab
* Nurse Manager
OB/L&D
* RN Charge -ICU
nights ED
* RN -Core Measures
Coordinator
* RN Referral Devel-
opment Coord.
* OT COTA PT *
PTA. Med Tech II
* Network Analyst
* Warehouse Super.

APPLY AT:
www.SRRMC.com
phone 352-795-8462
fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug Tobacco
Free Workplace

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
# ,# r ,#A


- Home 4 Finder-
wwwchroninclehornmfinder .onm


Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Hospital RN's
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
www.
nurse-temps.corn
352-344-9828


Licensed &
Master's level
Therapists

The Centersis seeking
Licensed or Masters
Level Outpatient
Therapists for
positions in Lecanto.
Must have exp
working with adults
and/or adolescents
in a therapeutic
environment, &
MH/SA Co-occurring
populations. Exp with
not-for-profit, com-
munity mental health
desired. Licensed
positions require
e active Medicare
&/or Medicaid #, pro-
vider credentialing
(Cigna, BC/BS) de-
sired. Full benefits pkg

DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


Life Coach

The Centers
is seeking a Life
Coach for our Light-
house program in
Inverness. This
position provides
members (mentally ill
adults) with a pro-
gram based on the
Clubhouse model of
a work ordered day.
Some evening and
weekend work
required. Salary is
$8.25-$9.00/hr.
Acceptable driving
record & clean
background reqd.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us



LPN's, CNA's
All Shifts
Full Time & Part Time

Experience preferred.
Apply at:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
Drug Free workplace
Sign on BONUS
dselesvaae@superior
alf.com
tfoster@superior
alf.com


Residential SA
Tech

The Centers
is seeking Residential
Substance Abuse
Techs (Full-time and
PRN) for our Citrus
County Adolescent
Residential program
in Lecanto, FL Duties
focus on reducing or
minimizing the effects
of substance abuse,
a 12-Step recovery
process, assisting the
professional staff in
the assurance of
quality client care &
transporting clients.
Exp with troubled
adolescents reqd.
Must be available
for shift work & week-
ends. Acceptable
driving record &
clean background
reqd. 10% shift diff for
2nd/3rd shifts. Full
benefits pkg for
full -time positions
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


NEEDEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

Looking for reliable
staff. With Alzheimers
Experience. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing aide
experience pre-
ferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP


RN/LPN
11p-7a Full time

Apply in person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100





ATTENTION

NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in Enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722





SERVERS
Wanted for fast-paced
restaurant, only clean,
neat, reliable need apply
3297 S Suncoast Blvd.
(352) 503-6853





AC Lead Install
/Service Tech
Salary commensurate
with exp., Also
Sales/
Maintenance
Tech needed
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427





AC Lead Install
/Service Tech
Salary commensurate
with exp., Also
Sales/
Maintenance
Tech needed
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

Gel Coater/Mold
Maintenance

Exp. Required.
Custom Boat Builder
Apply In Person
9A-3P 131 Hwy. 19N
Inglis

PAINTERS
Mm. 10 yrs exp. reqd.
Must have license
& transportation
(352) 400-1404


We're Growing and need
experienced staff!!

Full Time positions available for
EXPERIENCED medical office staff
including authorizations, bitting,
scheduling, and medical records.
Ability to work in a fast-paced
environment required.
Applications without VERIFIABLE
experience will not be accepted.
Advanced computer skiLLs required.
High standard of patient concern and
compassion necessary, and a
professional attitude and appearance
is a must.
Excellent compensation package
including full benefits -Cardiac
experience commands a premium
wage!
Mon. Fri., 8-5, no weekends.
Apply in person to Citrus Cardiology
308 Highland BLvd., Inverness
or e-mail to
chaddock@citruscardiotogy.org.
NO PHONE CALLS!
"-"Y


Service Plumber
Needed, Valid DL,
APPLY TO
Blind Box 1809P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
106 W. Main St
Inverness, Fl. 34450





CITRUS MAIDS

Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925


GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Announcement
#12-63

Heavy manual work
involving grounds/
parks maintenance
tasks. Experience in
golf course mainte-
nance, sport turf
maintenance or
landscape mainte-
nance preferred.
Current valid Florida
Driver License
required. FULL TIME
POSITION WORKING
SUNDAY THRU THURS-
DAY $7.69 hourly to
start. Excellent bene-
fits. Must successfully
pass an employment
reference check,
level II background
check, physical
examination and
drug test.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, October 26,
2012 EOE/ADA


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle

CfflpI
*CHpILJ


B


COMPUTER
OPERATOR/TUTOR

Needed. $10 hr, P/T,
ebay exp. necessary.
Art interest helpful.
(352) 628-9128





YMCA OF THE
SUNCOAST
Group Exercise
Instructor
(2 positions available)

JOB SUMMARY
Under the direction
of the Fitness
Director/Coordinator
and consistent with
the mission of the
YMCA of the
Suncoast, the group
exercise instructor is
responsible for in-
structing safe, effec-
tive and fun group
exercise, as well as,
enhancing the qual-
ity and growth of the
program and reten-
tion of the partici-
pants. Base Pay:
$10.50 hourly
HOURS AND
LOCATION
Mornings -
Citrus Springs area
Evenings -
Inverness area
EDUCATION,
TRAINING
AND EXPERIENCE:
Must be at least 16
years old. Must be
able to attend
MSROM Silver
Sneakers training on
October 20, 2012.
Must become
CPR/AED and First
Aid certified in first 90
days of employment.
Must be able to
teach at least one
format of safe, effec-
tive and fun group
exercise classes that
meet all necessary
components and
safe guidelines in ac-
cordance with YMCA
of the USA accepted
practices of exercise
physiology. Creating
the Member
Experience preferred.
SPECIAL SKILLS
OR EQUIPMENT
REQUIRED:
Must be able to artic-
ulate and communi-
cate effectively while
instructing partici-
pants in proper exe-
cution of exercise
safety. Must have
current knowledge of
exercise class struc-
ture; demonstration
of cueing technique;
demonstration of cre-
ative choreography
and exercise variety.
In addition to effec-
tive communication
an instructor must
have a positive atti-
tude and ability to
work independently.
PLEASE SEND
APPLICATIONS AND
RESUMES TO SARA
BARGIEL
sbargiel@suncoastym-
ca.org
YMCA of the
Suncoast- Citrus
County Branch
3909 N. Lecanto High-
way Beverly Hills, Fl.
P 352.637.0132

YMCA mission: To put
Christian principles
into practice through
programs that build
healthy spirit, mind,
and body for all.


CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460

SITE MANAGER
FT Rolling Hills/Hillside
Apts., Flynn Manage-
ment Corporation
Fax 727-447-5516
jobs@flynnmanage
ment.com

TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Snowbirds are back.
Good Commission
pay. Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr









MASSAGE
THERAPY
Weekend Class NPR
OCT. 20, 2012

Massaae Days. NPR
November 19, 2012
March 18, 2013
July 22, 2013
November, 4, 2013
Massaae Niahts NPR
November 19, 2012
Jully 22, 2013
Massage Days.
Spring Hill
January 14, 2013
September 3, 2013
Massaae Niahts.
Spring Hill
January 14, 2013
September 3,2013

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




TWO (2) ANTIQUE RE-
PRODUCTION Cocoa
Tray end tables. $325 for
the pair. 527-6709
VINTAGE BOOKENDS
Pair of Lipper& Mann
Porcelain ZEBRAS
$75.00 can text pic call or
text 352-746-0401

^^^^7i


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
#,{,#,#,# #,


DISNEY'S original
Haunted Mansion 1969
33 1/3 record and story
book. $45 527-6709
KISSING FACES
SCULPTURE By John
Cutrone with stand can
text pic, call or text $95.
OBO 352-746-0401




GE REFRIGERATOR
bisque side-by-side with
icemaker/water in door -
$300 Phone
352/637-4871
GE REFRIGERATOR
White with icemaker in
top freezer $100 Phone
352/637-4871
GE Washer
& Dryer
2 years, Excel Cond.
$500 pair
(352) 746-9868
GE WASHER AND
DRYER white excellent
condition. $350.
352-513-5134
Large Capacity Washer
Works Great
$150 OBO
(352) 419-5231
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
YOGURT
MAKER-HAMILTON
BEACH used once, 6
glass jars
$12419-5549




2 OFFICE DESKS
5 FEET LONG WITH
DRAWERS $50 ea
352-613-0529




Hammer Down
Auctioneers
10/19- General Merch.
10/26- Tailgate Auction
11/2- General Merch.
We Buy Estates
6055 N Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389




8' STEP LADDER
Wooden IA 3001b. capac-
ity, good shape $50.00,
Sugarmill area, Call
382-0953 eves.
NEW VW/AUDI CAR
DIAGNOSTIC READER
$20 OBDII CAN U280
CODE READER
419-5981 INVERNESS




JVC DUAL CASSETTE
Plays, records, copies.
Nice sound, low hours.
TD-W309TN $25
341-0450
TELEVISION 36" SONY
GOOD CONDITION $75
352-341-6920
Televisions 19"
Sylvania w/ Stand $50;
9" portable $20; 24"
Hitachi $30 527-2223




DELL COMPUTER
Desktop Windows XP
w/keyboard & mouse,
Outlook, Word, Excel $75
352-382-3650
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON NX215
PRINTER/COPIER/SCAN-
NER Works great
with xtra inks $30.00
352-726-0686
HPA1430N PC HP
COMPUTER a1430n
dual-core 1GB 250GB
24xDVD 5.1 $100
341-0450
VIEWSONIC LCD DIS-
PLAY 19inch internal
speakers +DVI HDTV in-
put $100 341-0450




1999 Vermeer Stump
Grinder, 252 Series self
propelled, w/trailer
runs great ready to
work. $5,000. 795-9956




PICNIC TABLE GOOD
CONDITION
$85. 352-613-0529




LARGE BRASS AND
COPPERWARE COL-
LECTION Dozens of
quality international brass
and copper decor items
from the Middle East. Pri-
vate collection to include
large ornate brass trays,
lamps, tables, hand
wrought iron, camel sad-
dle ottomans, sword sets,
floor vase,
heavy brass footstools,
carved native wood oc-
casional tables and doz-
ens of assorted pitchers,
kettles, jugs and beautiful
items. All with
regional/cultural artwork,
design and patterns
unique to the Middle
East.
$1500.00 firm; no parting.
352-746-1486


Carte. 0Co0tot. quppotit.



Find out what these values can

mean for your career.

HPH Hospice, a non-profit agency serving Pasco
and Hernando Counties since 1984, and Citrus
County since 2005. Nursing candidates should have
at least one year of current experience working in
an acute care or medical surgical unit to fill the
following Registered Nurse positions:

RNs: Pasco & Citrus County

Case Manager
Full-time. Mon-Fri,

8:30am-5:00pm (weekend and on-call rotation)

Weekend RNs
Full-time, 32 hours per week. Sat & Sun,
8:30am-8:30pm + 8 hours during the week

Admission Nurse
Full-time, 4pm-12am, 32 or 40 hours per week.

To learn more about beeomidg a part
of our team, please visit our website at
www.hph-hospiee.org (under Careers)
or contact our recruiter: 727-863-7971
18107 Majestic Blvd.
Hudson, FL 34667







HP hos pce
EOE/DFWP orcs.pl..c.. -.P ..... <... 3


CLASSIFIED








D6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


4 Pc Bedroom Set
White Wicker, 2 Twin
Beds, Dresser, end ta-
ble, Matt/box spg, all
bedding. $85 564-0856

BEDROOM FURNITURE
5 drawer chest w/cabinet
$300; 2 matching
nightstands $100 ea;
mirrored headboard $75.
Can send pictures. Will
negotiate 352 503 7930

Bar stools, two, Town N'
Country solid oak $120
(352) 341-1941


BLACK LEATHER EASY
CHAIR 48 x 38, Large
and Comfortable, good
condition $75 Call 352
344 9190
DINNING TABLE FOR 8
Brand New, excellent
Condition, No chairs, just
table. Buy asap, $90
(352)465-1616
King Size mattress &
box spring, like new
clean, $125. obo
Oak China Cabinet,
good cond. $80. obo
(352) 422-1060


KITCHEN TABLE
Samsonite table w/4
chairs. Formica w/
wood trim. Chairs have
cushions & casters.
$200 (352) 527-2223
LAMP TABLE Solid
golden oak $30 Can
email picture call
382-7585
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
POWER LIFT
RECLINER black leather
Pristine condition. $900
new. Asking $190
(352)795-7813


Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen size boxspring,
mattress w/ chest of
drawers and dresser
$150.
Entertainment center
$50. (352) 795-7254
Queen size Mattress &
Box Spring
Like New $75
(352) 382-0347
Red Velour Recliner
like new $190, Black
rot-iron table w/glass
top $45 (352) 503-6149
Rocking Chairs
2 gliders; oak & white
w/ cushions $50 each
(352) 527-2223
SOFA navy blue with
touches of sage & rose,
showroom cond. $150.00
352-795-0288
TABLES COFFEE &
LAMP Teak with glass
tops Both $70 Can email
pictures call 382-7585
USED QUEEN MATT
SET Very clean,
non-smoker. $100.00
352-257-5722 for details
White Bedroom Set
Frame, 2 dressers,
Mirror, all bedding $250;
3 piece bleached oak wall
unit w/ glass doors $850
(352) 527-2223



1999 Vermeer Stump
Grinder, 252 Series self
propelled, w/ trailer
runs great, ready to
work. $ 5,000. 795-9956
Craftsman Riding
Mower 21 1/2 HP Briggs
& Stratton engine,
42" Deck, Overhead
Valve $500 (352)
746-7357





MOVI.GMS
SjSALE

CRYSTAL
RIVER
Indoor sale
Household items,
bedroom & living
room sets and more!
(352) 563-2492 Call for
an appointment

HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -noon
Saturday, Oct. 27th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020


Requirements:

* Ability to work overnight
Covered Truck, Van or SUV
Clean Driving Record
Credit & Background Check
*Access to your own help
Lifting and physical ability
Team Player
Must have a back-up plan
* Computer & Internet Access


Do you have what it takes?

* Attention to detail
* 365 Days/Year
* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented
* Flexible under pressure
* Positive Thinker
* Hard and smart worker
* Keen sense of urgency


I Deliver to stores and coin racks.
Experience preferred but not required.


CLASSIFIED



SHOMOSASSA
Sat & Sun. 8a-2p
3959 S. Delard Way

INVERNESS
Sat & Sun, 8- p.m
Camping/outdoor gear,
books, fitness gear,
kitchenware, power tools
& more.
5580 S. Bristol
Terrace




BELLY-DANCING OUT-
FIT 2 pieces-skirt and
top-Navy blue w/gold
beading-$25.00
352-220-2447
BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING SIZE 4 & 5 $25
352-613-0529
Brand new lavender part
dress, beaded belt, knee
length. Will email
pictures.
$60. (352) 628-7619
COWBOY BOOTS Acme
leather size 8.5 EW
brown marble great
shape from USA can text
pic $50.00 352-746-0401
HALLOWEEN COS-
TUME Wet T-shirt Con-
test Winner,shirt, sash
and tiara $15 OBO
352-220-2447
LADIES SIZE 8 dressy
suit, floral jacket, ruffled
chiffon skirt perfect for
swing dancing, $20
352-382-7707
LADIES SUIT size 8,
short-sleeve jacket and
skirt, linen, cream color,
$20 352-382-7707
PROM DRESS 1 pink
halter-style,size 6- 1 lite
green strapless,size 9/10-
$30 each OBO
352-220-2447
PROM DRESS 1 strap-
less black dress w/blue
and white accents full
length- size 7 $30 OBO
352-220-2447
WOMEN'S SUIT Navy
blue, size 8, wool jacket
and skirt, looks new, $20
352-382-7707




!!!!!!!!265/70 R15!!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****235/65 R17*****
Good tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
----275/65 R18 ----
Good tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
Bedroom Set Queen,
Headboard Footboard,
side rails, night stand,
Big dresser, mirror
Armoire, three draws
$300.
PRIDE SCOOTER $300
(352) 527-1097


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


50" Toshiba TV under
$200, Kenmore
side-by-side fridge, ice&
water in door under $200
(352) 341-1845
(352) 287-9124
DEPT. 56 NEW ENG-
LAND VILLAGE SERIES
Jannes Mullet Amish
Farm House. $30.00.
(352) 726 5753
DISNEY PARKS
VILLAGE SERIES
Olde World Antiques II
hand painted porcelain
house. $30.00 726 5753
DISNEY'S onginal
Haunted Mansion 1969
33 1/3 record and story
book. $45 527-6770
FISH TANKS
30 Gal. with stand,
hood, filter $90
20 Gal., with stand,
hood filter $70.
(352) 212-4454
FREE FIREWOOD
Seasoned firewood just
pick it up call 382-7585
Glider Rocker w/ foot
stool, and side stand
light $75
Heavy Duty Whirlpool
Dryer, $125.
(352) 795-7254
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
New Dooney & Bourke
Michael Kors, Fossil,
Handbags Under $200
Mirrors 8 panels 8" x 6'
$100 for all
352-341-1845, 287-9124
PICTURE BOOK Brook
stone Digital photo album
holds 500 pics like new
$75.00 call or text
352-746-0401
PICTURE BOOK Brook
stone Digital photo album
hold 500 pics like new
$75.00 OBO call or text
352-746-0401
SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
New Starter staggered
bolt pattern $35.00 call or
text 352-746-0401
Sofa & Two recliners
Queen Mattress Set,
end tables, TV's, other
household & kit. items
Christmas Items
MUST SELL **
Call for Info 897-4681
Swimming Pool Cover
23ft x 14.6ft, can be cut
smaller, excel. cond. $45
(352) 527-0143
Table w/ 4 captain
Chairs cushions
$60. obo
26" Bicycle Like New
18 speed $45. obo
(352) 628-7633
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE LIKE
NEW $10 ALL CONNEC-
TIONS 352-419-5981
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal
Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616


Kimball Console Piano
Very good condition
$500. obo
Queen Size Bed Room
Set $250. obo
(352) 746-0008



Harmar Hybrid Platform
Lift, for inside back of
Minivan or SUV, good
cond. see it work in my
van, $1500, after 4pm
(813) 760-9421



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying sterl-
ing silver flatware and
US silver coins
(352) 601-7074


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


WANTED

S Are You
Interested In:

Being your own
boss.

S Increasin potential
I earnings.

Growing your
exclusive area?

Working
-- independependently?

t \ ,V. Working with a
a .' successful company?

CCI TTRUS COLUN T


CH kONI LE
www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


CAMO HOLSTER Small
Uncle Mikes size 10 goes
on belt $15.00 call or text
352-746-0401
Club Car Golf Cart
Excellent condition and
excel. batteries $1500
(352) 527-3125
NIKE DRIVER 2011
Machspeed Str8-fit 11.5*
with UST Proforce A/L
Shaft w/wrench&HC $75.
Dunnellon 465.8495
RIDING BOOTS Ladies-
Black size 8- DAFNA
Riding Wear $20 OBO
352-220-2447
TWO R/C AIRPLANE
MOTOR'S 40-60 Size
Engines,$35.00 EA
352-503-2792
Utlt


FLATBED UTILITY
TRAILER
10ftX5ft
4 Ft loading ramp
single axle $800 OBO
(352) 207-5946
New Custom Design,
5ft-6 inch. long bed,
w/ 36" folding loading
ramp. New tires, never
on road, $800. negotia-
ble 352-419-6008



TODDLER BED Red
"Cars" plastic toddler bed
with mattress- $20 OBO
352-220-2447



TURQUOISE/SILVER
BRACELET $65 TUR-
QUOISE @ABALONE
SHELL NECKLACE $30
CALL 419-5981
VINTAGE BLACK JET
NECKLACE $10
VINTAGE FAUX BLACK
CAMEO PIN $10
INVERNESS 419-5981

Sel r wa


"NEW JAZZ BASS" ME-
TALLIC RED W/WHITE
PICKGARD FENDER
STYLE P&J PICKUPS
$75 352-601-6625
BASS COMBO AMP
20+WATTS,PERFECT
FOR SMALL
GIGS&PRACTICE $60
352-601-6625
BEST TRAVEL GUITAR!
MINISTER "STRAT"
W/ALLXTRAS, FULL
SIZE NECK&SOUND!
$90 352-601-6625
MITCHELL MD300S
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/XTRAS PREAMPP IN-
STALLED $100
352-601-6625



20 ft. Aluminum
extension Ladder
Kenmore
Trash compactor
$50 ea. (352) 503-9354
TABLE & CHAIRS light
wood square table &
4 chairs with hidden
leaf good cond. $85.
352-419-5549
WET/DRY VAC, Stinger,
2-gallon, $15
352-382-7707



7.62 X54R Brown Bear
rifle ammunition. 174
Grain FMJ. non-corrosive
pnmer. 54 ROUNDS. $30
527-6709
BYCYCLE
Trek 3900 27 speed,
Black & Silver. Comes w/
helmet & pump. Never
used. Retail $599, asking
$300/cash 352-586-1790
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails, $3000 Per Acre
352 634-4745


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condiflon or S tuation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369





2 Very Small Yorkie
Boys Socialized & Play-
full, Shots, health certs.,
& CKC Reg. 4-5 Ibs,
grown $600. ea. Parents
on site (352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258

AKC GREAT DANES
Black Beauties Health
Checked AKC
Male/Female
READY NOW $400
PAT 352-502-3607


ANGEL
ANGEL is a 4-year-old
Boxer mix who came
to the shelter be-
cause her owner
could not afford to
keep her. She weighs
46 pounds and is very
cute and affection-
ate. Is housebroken,
likes children, gets
along with other
dogs and also cats.
Just a little bit shy at
first. She had puppies
about 3-4 months
ago. She is used to a
family life and needs
a good home des-
perately. Fenced
yard is preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


BELLA
Bella T is a beautiful
Shepherd mix spayed
female, brindle, grey
and black in color,
brought to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. she
weighs 45 pounds, is
cooperative, walks
well on a leash, gets
along with other
dogs and doesn't
care about cats.
Housebroken and
Heartworm-negative.
About 4 years old.
Has a good personal-
ity, would make a
great pet for your
home. She is a very
sweet dog.
Please Call Joanne
at 352-795-1288.


deoes Dreet


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Retired nurse to pro-
vide care in your home
for individual w/ special
needs. (352) 895-7634




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554

40 YEARS EXPERI-
ENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
S* Grout Painting
S- Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


REMODEIN


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


MOPAR & JEEP CONNECTION
g!t Complete Mopar g
... Repair & Maintenance '
Engines Drivelines Oil Changes
Transmissions* Brake Service
WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS
inline---

performance-t
Inc.
680 E. Southland Ave.
CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell S
352-568-7591


GENERAC
Stand Alone ,
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377







BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000C42RI


ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT
OAK FIREWOOD 4x8
stacked & deliv. $80
(352) 621-1656




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vynil Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483


1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Paint/Remodel, Repairs,
Woodwork, Flooring,
Plumbing, Drywall,
Tile work Lic.37658/lns.
Steve 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k


CARPET & LC
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Special zn in: (leandfor
Carpet Stretching FREE- Ask
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates 1
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


AAA ROOFING
C 14u the ak6usteYs"
Free Written Estimate

$1OO OFF
SAny Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 0OCSE0

Sc: =.T.M


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Repair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352 ) 949-2292



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
ELAINE TO THE RESCUE
Free Estimate. At Your
Convenience. No Job
to Small (262) 492-3403
Exp House Keeper.
Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
We Will Clean Your
House, CHEAP
Call for FREE Quote
& Appt. (352) 476-1632



Complete Renovation
Kitchen countertop, tile,
tub to shower Lic#37801
(352) 422-3371

The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


Add an artisti tou(h to your existing yard
Sor pool or plan
.. something
t T o, completelyy new!

never dupicate

@II[?ll.ff?7Lo]AWIfM-, 104411[11
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
|1 COPES
i POOL AND PAVER LLC
Lic. CPC1456565 2.4 AS .3nl
& Insured V V352-400-3188





ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM INC.

352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus ic.#2396 LICENSED&INSURED


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


We Clean Windows nd o Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.w ndowgen e.com/springhill






TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Royce Green's

Floor C(are Services
(lean, Strip, Wax, Seal
Refinish
Tile, Terrazzo, Marble, Wood,
(arpet
Maintenance contractss
Licensed & Insored






Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
\ / Small Carpentry
S* Fencing
S* Screening
*Cean Dryer

Affo'JuNe & Dependable
Experience lifelong
Sd 352-344-0905
a cell 400-1722
| ured Lic.#37761


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A**{**{ ^^A*









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


American
Pit Bull Puppies
9 wks old, de-wormed,
have all shots, males and
females $200 each
(352) 503-7066
CKC German
Sheppard Pups
Male & Female 6
white/5 black & tan
$300-$500. ea
(352) 277-8046
Dachshunds Mini Long
Hair, Champion Blood
lines, 4 months old, BIk
&tan male $150
(352) 795-6870


000 r1



DOG TRAINING
Classes Oct 27 10am
In Lecanto
352-794-6314


DOUGIE
Dougie is a hand-
some 5 y.o. Hound
mix, weighs 40
pounds. Sweet, gen-
tle, a bit shy, but
loves people and
warms up quickly.
Dougie was placed
at the shelter through
no fault of his own. His
owner could no
longer afford to care
for him. He is a good
boy and would make
a great companion,
and desperately
needs a home of his
own.
Call Michelle @
352-726-5139.


---44.


EVE
Eve is a 2 1/2 y.o.
chocolate pit/terrier
mix, weight 35-40
pounds. Lean,
athletic, agile body.
Stands in a regal
posture. Has a high
energy spirit but a
very loving nature.
Runs and plays well,
loves toys, tug-of-war,
and belly rubs. Low
maintenance with a
short coat. Found
tied to a trailer but
still very trusting and
loving. Because of
her strength, would
do best in a home
with younger active
adults and older
children. Gets along
well with other dogs
and ignores cats.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.

" \. aS t .B.a...


MAKO
MAKO is a 4 y.o.
American Bulldog/
terrier mix who was
found abandoned
and tied to a tree.
He is an incredibly
sweet dog despite
his previously trou-
bled life. Weighs 73
pounds and isnd is neu-
tered, Heart-worm
negative, and house-
broken. He is very
affectionate and
very gentle, not a
fighter, just a very
good boy. A fenced
yard is preferred.
Call Joanne
@352-795-1288.


CLASSIFIED


Happy Guinea Pigs
smooth $15
abyssinian $20
curly hair $30
(352) 564-2442
Mini Chihuahua, CKC,
papers, 14 months old,
51bs, very smart.
$350
(352) 341-0934



i




OH SO PRETTY BABY
MINI PIGLETS Sweet,
very small, 1-2 weeks
old, excellent pets.
$300-$325 Pick up or
delivery Nov 1-2
850.348.9928
PIGEONS
Pet Homes Only
$10 ea. Dunnellon
(863) 843-2495 Cell
Pigeons, different types
(352) 795-1902








ROCCO
ROCCO is a 4 y.o.
Hound mix who
came to the shelter
because his owner
could not afford to
keep him. He is al-
ready neutered,
Heartworm-negative,
and housebroken.
Also microchipped.
He is a "family dog"
who misses the family
desperately. He gets
along with other
dogs and is playful
and friendly. He walks
well on a leash and is
a very good boy. A
fenced yard is pre-
ferred. Call Joanne
@352-795-1288.

SHAR-PEI
Beautiful male & female
6 mo old, Prefer to sell
as a pair for $900;
single $500 AKC,
Health certs & shots,
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
TOY POODLES
(APRICOTS) One male
$400 & female $450 born
8/4 and almost fully potty
trained with first set of
shots and raised in a lov-
ing home. call 419-5662




FULL MOON FARM
Scenic Trail Rides,
$30/hr, Lessons, $25/hr,
Full Board, $300/mo.
Open House Sat. 10/20
12p-4p, free hotdog &
t-shirt (352) 628-1472


Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Alumacraft
2010 16ft, V-hull, all
welded, yamaha 25hp 2
stroke w/trailer $5800
621-3764 or 302-3515

816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES

BOWRIDER
17.5 Caravel & Trailer
3.0 10, excel cond.
$4,995 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304

MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537

WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983























ALLEGRO BUS
2004, 40 ft., 3 slides,
400HP, 60k miles,
$95,000 Excel. cond.
(352) 795-9853

BOUNDER
32fT Motor home, Ford
V10 engine, low mile-
age, new tires, Sleeps
2-6. $16,500
(352) 220-6303

BT CRUISER
2004-26' mdl 5250 32k
miles Ford E450 V10
Triton gas eng, sleeps
4, 3 burner gas stove,
micro/conv oven, full
rear kitch, full bath, tv,
dvd, 4kw gen, many ad-
ditional extra's $28950.
352 489-4129

ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, Diesel, motor
home, 2005, 55k miles,
extras include diesel gen-
erator, wash/dryer
$74,495 obo Call Bill
(352) 419-7882

JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002

PLEASURE WAY
19ft., Excel-TD new tires
brakes, loaded 56k mi.
2.5k Gen. Many Extras
Excellent Condition
$27,500 (352) 621-9250





KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800

KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft.
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR &MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


MONTANA
200430 FT. 5th Wheel,
2 slide-outs, includes
slider hitch. $17,000.
(352)493-1195,538-6446
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




4 Tires 2057014
white wall, 90% tread,
on universal rims,
painted red over
chrome $195.
Bed extended for Ford
Explorer Sport, $75.
(352) 586-7691




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.org
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892




BMW
2003, 3251, 4DR
LEATHER, SUNROOF
PW, PL CALL 628-4600
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
Chevrolet
1988 Corvette
convertible 56k miles
$10,900.
352-341-0018



CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $20,000
call 1-352-503-6548
Chevrolet
'92 Caprice Station
Wagon, new tires, drives
like new, $5650
(352) 460-2162
CHEVY
'03, Malibu LS, 65K miles
sunroof., leather inte-
rior, auto, PW, PB,
$7,500 (352) 726-4689
CHEVY
2008 Cobalt Coupe
#11620pw pl, ItXFE,
5 speed, great fuel
economy! $9,995.
352-341-0018
Chrysler
'00 Sebrinng Convertible,
cold air, low mileage, ex-
cel. cond. Price Busters
on hwy 19, $3500 obo
(352) 795-5642




354-1021 SUCRN
UnitC-29
PUBLIC NOTICE

HEATH MINI STORAGE
5164 S. Floria Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
SALE OF CONTENTS
Pursuant to Florida Stat-


2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Edition Med Blue
w/32k miles. Mint Con-
dition $10,500 522-0505
Chrysler
2008 Sebring
convertible $12,900
352-341-0018
Chrysler
'95 Lebaron GTC con-
vertible, 6 cyl. auto,
cold a/c, top works
great, 103k, red, $2900
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
Ford
'00 Mustang
good cond. 97K miles
(352) 637-5778
FORD
'05, 500 Limited Gold,
smoke free, dealer
maint. 41K miles, $9,000
(352) 527-3124
FORD
'08, Crown Victoria
Intercepter Engine
White, runs & looks Ex-
cel. $8,500 382-9097
FORD
2001 MUSTANG
AUTO, 6CYL, PW, PL,
PRICED TO SELL
CALL 628-4600
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
HONDA
1988, CRX,
1 owner, 127k miles,
$6,000.
(352) 564-0697
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.org
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MERCEDES
'03, E500, 64k mi pewter
silver, stone leather in-
terior, showroom new,
garage kept,
never in accident
$15,000. (352)586-0341
Mercury
"97 Grand Marquis w/
trailer hitch, 4 good han-
cock tires, high mileage
$1100 OBO
(352) 249-7541
MERCURY
'08 Milan, Wh 4 door w/
grey lea int, All Power,
Exc Cond; 39k mi;
$12,800 obo 634-4524
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi. New
tires & battery
Book $16,700
Sell $14,300
(352) 302-0778
VW
2004 BEETLE
CONV., AUTOMATIC
FUN IN THE SUN
CALL 628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION












person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





ute 83.805, the entire
contents of the following
storage unit(s) will be sold
in order to pay for past
due rental, advertising
and other charges owed
by these tenants. The sale
will take place 2 weeks
from the first publication.


UADILAC 87_
Alante Convertible, de-
pendble, All pwr. V8, 30
mpg, great cond. $5,200
C.R. (727) 207-1619
CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426




BUICK
2004, Lesabre
limited $6,900
352-341-0018
Chevrolet
'03 Silverado, 4x4 V8 vor-
tex engine, 88k mi, new
tires, Exc cond. Carfax
$7500 obo
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
DODGE
'96 GMC Truck. 170k
miles; Just tuned-up.
$1500
(352) 697-1861
FORD
1995, F150 4X4...
RUNS GOOD.....PERFECT
HUNTING TRUCK.
CALL 628-4600
FOR DETAILS
Ford
'97 F150 XLT
ext. cab, 4x4, auto 5.4L
V8, red & silver, runs
great, a/c, $3800
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *k
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




'97 Yamaha Golf Cart
6 new Battenes, 36 volt,
full canvas, $1200
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
CHEVROLET
'10, Equinox, 2LT, Black
granit metalic, V6,very
clean 91 nnn miles


Chevrolet
2002 Suburban
4x4 $5900
)^ ^,1 ^^n^i


6 x6, ATV Amphibious
Vehicle, Swims,
$2,800 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304




Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $4,200.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688




UNIT C-29
Vickie Burkhalter
5450 Lake Maraaret Dr.
#1403. Orlando. FL 32812
UNIT C-31 A-9
Ira Stone
1258 Cypress Cove. In-
verness. FL34450
October 21,2012.


Misc. otice


346-1104 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA SITTING AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE 2011 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT FOR
WASTEWATER UTILITY SERVICES AREA 114 OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM METHOD
FOR THE LEVY, COLLECTION AND ENFORCEMENT OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
FOR THE PROVISION OF WASTEWATER SERVICES IN THE 2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2011 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Area 114, more
particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof, that
the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the governing
body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Service
Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 is considering the adoption of a
non-ad valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services commencing in
fiscal year 2013/2014 within said area and intends to use the uniform method for the
levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assessments as set forth in Sec-
tion 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the govern-
ing body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Serv-
ice Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 will conduct a public hear-
ing on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. in the Board of County Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida to consider the adoption of a resolution authorizing their use of the uni-
form method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assess-
ments. If this method of collection is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
Interested persons may appear at the hearing to be heard regarding the use of
the uniform method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem as-
sessments. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the County Com-
mission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, they will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be made.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least seven (7)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please use the TTY
Telephone (352) 341-6580.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA

2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114
EXHIBIT A

The 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District -
Area 114 consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads in which
a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements are con-
structed or reconstructed and all lots and parcels which are served or to be served
by a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements, located in
Citrus County, Florida, further described as follows:
AREA 114 DESCRIPTION: BEGINNING AT THE WEST 1/4 CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWN-
SHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTHERLY,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 371, PAGE 454, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 659, PAGE 454, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTH-
WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT BEING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF WEST FORT ISLAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44);
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, TO THE AFORE-
MENTIONED WEST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE
NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1898, PAGE 1261, OF SAID
PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
PARCEL 17E18S32 11110, AS SHOWN IN THE CITRUS COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERS
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 D7


-I-I

SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1069,
PAGE 2075, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINES OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 29, OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 60, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 29, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 28 OF SAID PALM
SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WESTERLY
(REAR) LOT LINES OF LOTS 16 THROUGH 28 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION,
TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY,
ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWEST-
ERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID
BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE
FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHWEST-
ERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO.
21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF THE AFOREMENTIONED PALM SPRINGS
VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT
LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 15, OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, TO THE
NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF LOT 8 OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ME-
ANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 8
OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHEASTERLY TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF LOT 1, PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 16, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY,
ALONG THE WATERWARD BOUNDARY OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, TO THE
SOUTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 14 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION; THENCE
SOUTH, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST;
THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1614, PAGE 1072, OF SAID PUBLIC
RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1732,
PAGE 86, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY,
ALONG THE WESTERLY AND NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2313, PAGE 2157, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 70, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND NORTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTH-
ERLY LINE OF SAID WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER THEREOF,
SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE WESTERNMOST CORNER OF SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 140, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER
THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHERNMOST POINT OF TRACT 13, AS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 343, PAGE 722, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID TRACT 13, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 792, PAGE 1146, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHWESTERLY
AND NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID SUNSET SHORES ADDITION
TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, OF SAID SUNSET
SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2018, PAGE 348, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 179, PAGE 313, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 812, PAGE
1726, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT
ALSO BEING ON THE WEST LINE OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 2310, PAGE 1585, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG SAID
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST FORT IS-
LAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44); THENCE WESTERLY,
ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, TO THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST 1/2 OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE SOUTHERLY, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY ISLANDS, STATE AND FEDERALLY OWNED CONSERVA-
TION LANDS, GOVERNMENTALLY OWNED LANDS, LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY AL-
READY SERVED BY A FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PER-
MITTED SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEM AND LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY WITHIN THE
CORPORATE BOUNDARY OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA.
October 14, 21,28 & November 4, 2012.


I


352-1021 SUCRN
Eig, To Vote- Paul A, Burns
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Paul A. Burns
3745 S. Sonny Ter
Homosassa, FL 34448

You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 21, 2012


347-1021 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO FILE AN APPLICATION TO VACATE A PLAT

Pursuant to F.S. 177.101(4), J & D Industries, Inc., a Florida corporation gives notice of
its intent to apply Citrus County, Florida, for a plat vacation of the following of real
property:

That certain rear lot line easement dedicated to public utilities lying between Lots 24
and Lot 25, Citrus Industries Industrial Park, Plat Book 13, Page 146, public records of
Citrus County, Florida, located in Section 31, Township 17, Range 19. The street ad-
dress being 561 E Overdrive Circle, Hernando, Florida 34452. Parcel Alternate Key
No. 2573465.

Notice given by:
J & D Industries, Inc.
Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire
Counsel for Applicant
October 14 & 21,2012.


351-1021 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
11/1/12 Special Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, November 1,2012 at 8:30 a.m. at the Realtors Association
of Citrus County, 714 Scarboro Ave., Lecanto, Florida.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
October 21,2012.


355-1021 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
N O T ICE OF MEETING
A Meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board and the Finance Committee will be
held on Tuesday, October 30, 2012 beginning at 3:00pm in the Board Room, located
on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502
W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida, to discuss all pending litigation and conduct a
Finance Committee and a regular meeting. The Finance Committee meeting will
begin at 3:00pm and the regular meeting at 3:30pm. At 5:00pm, an Attorney-Client
Executive Session meeting will be conducted. At the conclusion of the
Attorney-Client Executive Session meeting, the Citrus County Hospital Board meeting
will convene.
N 0 T I C E OF EXECUTIVE SESSION MEETING DURING MEETING
The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will hold an Executive Session meeting
during the October 30, 2012 regular meeting under the authority of Section
286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The Executive Session will be closed to the public to allow
the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees and their Chief Administrative Officer to
meet with the board's Attorney(s) to discuss the settlement negotiations or strategy
related to litigation expenditures in all pending litigations.

Present at the Executive Session will be Debbie Ressler, Robert Priselac, Krista Joseph,
Michael Bays, Ervin "Gene" Davis, Vickie LaMarche Chief Administrative Officer, Wil-
liam Grant General Counsel, Bruce Blackwell, Esquire, Clifford Shepard, Esq., Barry
Richard, Esq., Arthur England. Esq., Taylor Ford, Esq., Glenn Burhans, Esq., Bridget
Smitha, Esq., Vincent Falcone, Esq., and Court Reporter.

Please note that Vickie LaMarche is the COO of the Citrus County Hospital Board but
is the highest ranking administrative officer of the Citrus County Hospital Board.

The Executive Session will be held in the Board Room located on the second floor of
the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd, In-
verness, FL and will begin at 5:00pm. When the Executive Session commences the
door will be closed. At the conclusion of the Executive Session, the meeting of the
Board will be reconvened and the public is invited to rejoin.

Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board of-
fice at 352-341-2245. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this
Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness,
Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2245.
355-1012 SUCRN
October 21 2012.


353-1021 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notce under
Rcti-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of
QUALITY EMERGENCY VE-
HICLES, located at 3876
W. Country Hill Drive,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, in
the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register said
name with Florida De-
partment of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-


lahassee, Florida.
DATED at Citrus,
FL
this 17th day of October,
2012.
/s/Michael G. Hall, Na-
ture Coast EMS
President/CEO
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. October 21,2012.


I-Im-


Metn


Metn


Metn




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2013 Chevy Malibu LS


4


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2012 Chevy Silverado LS
Ext. Cab, Auto, VS, OnStar.Tow Packagel
Fin$lal$ 4


MSRP....................................... $31,690
DLR DISCOUNT..................... $3,022
REBATE..................................... $3,500
TRADE ASSISTANCE.............. $1,000
CASH ORTRADE..................... $2,500


2012 Chevyw Travese LS
Stk #C12326
FRmal -fA A 9N


2012 Chevy Cmrze LS
Sft Cl 2184, Auto, AC, CO, XM, OnrSt, 4 Dr.
gmnal $4A CUM


2012 Chevy

kt


'tm"
lip 1


MSRP...................................$30,750
DLR DISCOUNT.................... $1,751
REBATE..............................- $2,000
CASH OR TRADE................. $2,500


MSRP ................................... $18,880
DLR DISCOUNT....................... $900
REBATE.................................... $500
CASH OR TRADE.............-.... $2,500


Mo PLUS 0%/o
c xciN7 s


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2013 Chew Spari 5 Dr. LS
5-Speed. AC,Touchscreen. 1.2L 4 Cyl.


MSRP ..................................... 12,995
DLR DISCOUNT....................... $500
CASH OR TRADE.............-.... $2,500


O' T"


2012 Chevy Impala LT
AC, CD, Power Seatl, V, Great MPG!
F'mal Si$ C


MSRP ................................... $28,610
DLR DISCOUNT.................... $6,111
CASH OR TRADE.............- .... $2,500


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D8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


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The AUew, Totay Sophisicated

2013 Honda Accord
ACCORDABIUTY = AFFORDABILITY
AC*CORD verb (used without object)... to be in agreement or harmony; agree.


A -
* m.V'/V


New 212 Honda Fit
MODEL GEa 3CEXW, EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED
WITH AUTOMATIC, AC AND CRUISE


,* .. .I


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New 2012 Honda Accofd LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW. ALJTOMATIC.POWER PKG,
CIRISE.TRACTION CONTROL AND SO MUCH MORE


New 2012 Honda Civic Hytrid
ASM IS=T 1 ME, I lO lIESMifT TW E Ii.E1ETf'I MPMl FREE LiHK


New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL RMH3MW, CCME SEE WHYTHE CR-V ITHE BEST
SELLING COMPACT SUV I AMERICAl S EWHILE'HEY LAST


New 2012 Honda Ridgeline RT
MOD ELK1FECWW, 4Wi~ WTHEITRJH' INTHE "l. POWEFl FKG.
CRlSE hIMl,,V.'6 PFM1 AND A FIJE LKE 1D OIMER
rat rs.'u- -Y .1 L... J


New 2012 Honda Crosstonur EX-V6
MOCELIF 4leau rU'IMr1 HATCfIBcK WI1HSTI LE MIDCOMFORT,
AJLTIELL.JURY MEiUTS ACD ROOilV TO 0WHMAT fJ I
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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 D9


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III '


'11 RAM


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

80- MALIBU440-9054


4RSE I MDSECKMIN
1:80058"75:Ext1801


:so


$15633 $14930 $16650* $11,650
ORB245m' ,OR.234ma, OR260 OR o$182mO.


'10 RAM


tI.W iWRA"Wrijiliq v-ql(
:H-T i:It K'LAr f^ri l


' '09 JOURNEY '09 AVENGER
rIow'


I 24HR MSG-WIF'A'DSECI
* MVW)^-r- % '"7-8Lr Fv-"97C-Li/


'09 SENTRA


k Zik T


$12,3711 $1,934 $7,650 $10,550
OR$ 193O ,oR. 870 O. 120 .65.


' '9 TOWN& COUNTRY
........
b, -...a


EE 2RWH MDC I
1-80 :5-875 Et.549


$7,150 $14,150
OR$112Pm,o 0221IM


'04 SILVERADO


$9251
0R145 M,
S'04 IMPALA '
w ' *j


'09 ACCORD


:i Ii .
AL^:^ ^ .


'05 F250


'03 RAM


'08 SCION "
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$1Q839
P PRI ER
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05 PT CRUISER


limg


i r'03 MUSTANG


:11 S


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1::IT I b^i^


$8150 $C790
OR$127* OR$1 06Mo.


CRYSTAL "
AUTOMOTIVE ri
352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL
*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WAC. PAYMENTS ARE 72 MONTHS AT 3.99% APR WAC. PICTURES ARE FUL ILLUSTRATION PUR-
S wv, POSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK
ooocwvl ............................................^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


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D10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012






INSIDE
1 Sikorski's
r Attic
V PAGE E6


} OME I RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


A DIY Bedding Vignette
of bunting flags created
for a baby nursery from
ProjectNursery.com.
: : ,, 1 -,- i .


GOOD MOMS HAVE
STICKY FLOORS
DIRTY OVENS
AND HAPPY KIDS


9 0
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E2 SUNDA~~ OCTOBER 21, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


PRIVATE GATED ACREAGE!
* Very Tasteful Decor Great Room w/FP
* Kit/Wood Cab./Island MBR w/Walk-In Closet
* Elect. Hurr. Shutters 2/2/2 Car Garage
* Steele Frame Const. Secluded Area!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
FL IE SUTTON 352-287-3a7


Iwww.FloiidaLislinglnlo.com l


ENJOY LAKESIDE LIVING!!
* Kitchen w/Nook Nice Master Bdrm.
* Enjoy the Boardwalk Lots of Storage Space
* Diamond Bright Pool No Mow Low Maintenance
* Gated Community *3/2/2 Split Plan
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
frwww.ei esuonOi iiemax.ne
www-elliesullon@remax-nel


VERY CHARMING MOBILE
* Spacious Great Room Large Master BR
*Laminate in Liv. Areas Elec. Fireplace
* Great Yard/Peaceful Area Nice Scrn. Porch
*Close to Rivers/Lake/Gulf 2 Sheds/Storage
KELLY GODDARD 352476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 il
www FloiidaLislinglnlocom


INGLIS!!
2-3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage
home, country-style home, located on
1/2 acre, separate detached
workshop, fenced backyard, built-in
2005, well maintained, circular drive.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


PfltlI IV A A PPIUIU t:
* 3BD/2BA/2CG + POOL Remodeled Kitchen
* Granite Counters New Flooring
* Pool Has Pavers, Waterfall & Large Lanai
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


5849 H. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CC Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


1400 W. STAFFORD ST., HERNANDO
* 5BD/4BA/2CG New Roof & Updated Energy Effcient Windows
*Solar Heated Pool Light, Bright & Open Split Floor Plan
* Stainless Appliances Fireplace, Central Vac, Securiy System
* SaunaRoom Beautiful 1 Acre /Detached Workshop
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


HUMUI5A55A IPL
4 bedroom, 3 bath
Heartland home. Bank foreclosure.
DIRECTIONS: Main entrance
(Cypress Village Blvd. W) to left on second
Douglas St., to right on Linder Dr.
TONY VIGGIANO (352) 586-5772
TonyViggiano@gmaiL.com Tony Viggiano.com


Beautiful Open Floor Plan on 1+ Acre
*Built in 208 .4BR/2.5BA/2CG
* Over 2,600 S Ft. of Living Great Room
. Formal Dining Room Lanai
DIRECTIONS: Hwy. 491 to left on Mustang,
to right on Caledonia Dr., home on right.
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email: dawnwright@remox.et












REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


1In nIALl. nIVIrn
* Beautiful R/3BR/3B3CG Home Great Room w/Vaulted Ceilings
* Gourmet Kitchen Lg. Master Suite
*Caged Pool & Spa *900 Sq. Ft. Workshop
* 2 Covered Boat Slips Beautiful Natural FL Setting

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net 1


PINE RIDGE
WOWII Describes this beautiful Pine Ridge home No
expenses spared Large 3/2/2 split plan home with
separate office space Interior features boast light and
bright spaces, gourmet upgraded kitchen, travertne tile
throughout, formal dining, bar/sitting area, window
treatments and much more Exterior offers fresh paint,
solar heated pool, fenced rear yard, large patio area,
workshop, fenced garden to name a few l Wl
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


This gorgeous, fully furnished, 2/2/2 free-standing end
unit boasts 1,579 sq ft of waterfront living Recently
remodeled and updated w/Corian counters & new
carpet Includes all appliances Enjoy the enclosed patio
or shaded back deck, each allowing a serene view of the
Crystal River Preserve Boat slip w/16,000 Ib lift Call
for your private showing now
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


FEW OPPORTUNITIES
LIKE THIS REMAIN!
Ti:.. sous airy and immaculate
I, i....v.vucked away in an exclusive
I. ,i is directly across the street
Ih I. Historic Withlacoochee River.
IJ short drive to a public boat
i lIll. property is convenient to
i charming Dunnellon has to
mostu discriminating buyer
I.- ,- d and air conditioned lanai
., I a large lot and offers a
... f nature's unspoiled beauty.
SI the serenity! Offered well
,ont lacement cost...these prices
MILS #35691 won't last forever!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolls@aol.com
Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


46 BEECH STREET
SUGARMILL WOODS
*3BR/2BA/2CG Golf Course Home
* Great Home Lg. Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
* Gas Fireplace Caged Pool & Spa
* Beautiful Landscaped 1 Acre Well Maintained

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmerremax.net 1


FLORAL CITY
2 Bedrooms, 1 bath, concrete block home
large living room with fireplace, inside
laundry, corner lot 1.06 acres, carport
and large detached garage, 2 sheds,
BBQ pit and concrete slab for entertaining.


aurcn NICbE Dnnuulu ai4IL un A rnIVAIr
CORNER LOT. All prettied up and move-in
ready Split plan; great cooks kitchen w/
breakfast bar. Living and dining rooms
have sliders to large screened-in lanai;
inside laundry, large side-entry garage.
Priced right to sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


241N L aio Hw. Beel ilI2-82w wRMXcmI 0 .Mi*IIvres6760
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


I


E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All apples are not created equal


Some Red

Delicious are
more delicious


than others .

LEE REICH
For The Associated Press
The apple I handed my
daughter was no ordinary
Red Delicious. She was ..
about to sink her teeth into ,
more than a hundred years
of history
Red Delicious -the kind
-is one of the leading com-
mercial apple varieties in .
the world. But this particu- '.'
lar piece of fruit was some-
thing else: the original Red --
Delicious. And it's rare
today
For its origins, let's back-
track to 1872. The place: .
Peru, Iowa.
That's where an apple.
tree was sprouting, on Jesse "
Hiatt's farm, from some 1f-; "
seed dropped by chance.
The seedling was growing
from the still-living roots of
a tree Hiatt had cut down
once before. This time
around, he let it grow and ,
bear fruit. And this time, he
LEE REICH/Associated Press
See APPLES/Page E10 This undated photo shows Red Delicious apples in New Paltz, N.Y. Red Delicious is one of the leading commercial apple varieties in the world.


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"@ )
1 it 1 Irm|ill wols d
NANCY .tI
Cell: 352-634-4225
-N IO ETns KEYI REALTY INC.
-m t8015 S Suncoas Blvd Homosassa FL 382-1700






SOLAR HEATED POOL HOME!I FURNISHED & ON GOLF COURSE! I
3 Bed + Den / 2 Car + Workshop/Storage Area Newer Roof Shingles Split Bedroom Floor Plan
* Island Eat-In Kitchen Dual Pane Windows Thermo Glass Enclosed Florida Room has VIEW C
S* Tub + Shower & 2 Walk-In Closets in Master Cathedral Ceiling Wet Bar 2 CAR Garage C
$204,500 MLS#358001 $89,000 MLS#358019
PTakemyVirlIaftus B n I o I


91 W. FOREST OAK PL, BEVERLY HILLS
Very lovely well maintained 3 BR. 2.5 bath home with
solar heated pool and spa. Over 2500 SF of living
space with LR, DR, FR, eat-in kitchen, wet bar, and
summer kitchen. MLS 350752 $178,900


6143 N. WHISPERING OAK LP, BEVERLY HILLS
Large 2 BR, 2 BA solar heated pool home with private
backyard. Roof replaced in 05, new kitchen corian
countertop. This is a great winter or year round home
with easy upkeep. Community has club house, pool and
tennis court. Centrally located to all amenities.
MLS 355450 S149.500


105 W. FOREST OAK PL, BEVERLY HILLS
A great buy for the size of this home. 3 BR, 2.5 with oversized
eat-in kitchen, wet bar, and gas fireplace you will find this and
more in this home with over 2400 SF of living space. Great
location and easy access to main roads and Ocala.
MLS 355556 $145,900


185W.HOLLYFERN PL
Freshly painted 2 BR, 1.5 BA solar heated pool home.
Newer stainless steel appliances, stackable washer/dryer
and laminate flooring throughout the entire home. This is
a turnkey home that can e occupied quickly. Great
winter or year round home in quiet neighborhood.
MLS 358296 S107.000


Call Lili Garcia For Showings At 352-302-9129 A
OOOCZ112


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Myriad uses for an


over-the-door organizer


ver-the-door pocket organizers
work well for more than just
shoes. They're space-savers,
and the pockets can be labeled easily
Use one to organize socks, hats, gloves,
scarves, school/craft sup-
plies, pantry supplies such
as lunch snacks, or bath-
room essentials such as
washcloths, hair products,
soap, toothpaste or bath
poufs. The first reader tip
offers a couple more ideas:
Over-the-door organizer:
I use one to hold all of my
cleaning products. Obvi- Sa
ously, this isn't a good idea ara
if you have a young child in FRU
the house. It's easy for me LEVI
to see what I'm running low
on, too. The organizer pockets are big
enough to hold almost any cleaning
product, such as cans of Lysol and
large spray bottles. They work great
for toys, such as Barbies and stuffed
animals, too. -Becky M., Texas
Use for ice-cream tubs: I have sev-
eral of these that I use as mini-buck-
ets to mix liquid cleaner (Spic and
Span, Lysol, etc.) and hot water on
cleaning day The smaller size makes
them easy to carry from room to room.
I use the lids under large flowerpots.
- Connie, Ohio
Halloween lunch snack: For Hal-
loween, I like to fill a sandwich bag
with orange snacks, such as Cheetos,
cheese balls, cheese curls, Cheddar
chips or Doritos. Then I tie a green
bow at the top, and it looks like a fun
little pumpkin. Connie, Pennsylva-
nia
Caramel apples: My kids can never
eat a whole caramel apple. I slice the
apples and dip them in caramel, then
I roll them in sprinkles, mini choco-
late chips or M&M's. They're easier to
eat, and nothing gets wasted. Kelly,
e-mail
Bath toys: Squirting bath toys get
gross on the inside, no matter how
hard I try to squeeze all of the water
out. I decided to hot glue the holes
closed on rubber duckies and all of the
other little squirting toys in our tub.
Now, no water goes in, and the toys are
easy to wash. -Linda H., New York
Homemade baked goods: You can
reuse aluminum foil, parchment
paper or plastic wrap boxes. Cover the
box with giftwrap, line with wax paper
or tissue paper and tuck homemade


I


cookies, fudge, candies, mini muffins
or cupcakes inside. Gina F, Florida
Tea organizer: I had several boxes of
tea taking up a lot of cabinet space. At
first I thought I'd put them all into a
cookie tin, but I didn't want
to have to fish through it to
find what I wanted. I de-
cided to use a silverware
organizer. It's a wooden tray
and has six compartments.
I can slide the organizer
into a drawer or set it on top
of my microwave or on a
shelf in my pantry. It frees
Noel up a lot of space, and it
would make a cute gift idea,
GAL too. -Denise, California
NG Reuse dishwasher rack:
We got a new dishwasher,
but before tossing the old one, I took
out the bottom rack. It has wheels,
making it a good little under-the-bed
organizer I like to put my books in it,
so they don't clutter my nightstand. -
Barb, Wisconsin
MEN
Dear Sara: I'm looking for a Hal-
loween costume idea for a preschool-
age boy Any ideas? -Paige, Ohio
Dear Paige: How about dressing
him up as a juice box? Cut arm and
head openings out of a cardboard box.
Decorate the outside of the box to look
like a juice box. You can buy plumbing
tubing at your local hardware store to
make the straw. You could make a fa-
cial tissue box costume along the same
lines. Decorate a cardboard box to
look like a box of tissues, then use tis-
sue paper to create large facial tis-
sues. Or how about painting a
cardboard box to look like a Rubik's
cube? You can make a Lego brick cos-
tume out of a box, too. Cut holes for
arms and head. Glue or tape red or
blue Solo plastic cups to the box and
paint the entire box the same color as
the cups. The child can wear a hoodie
that matches the color, or make a
small Lego hat. For more costume
ideas, visit frugalvillage.
com/2009/10/01/make-frugal-
halloween-costumes.
Dear Sara: I need a very small gift
idea for multiple co-workers. I want
the gifts to be all the same, but cost no
more than $5. I need something quick
and easy the gifts aren't for a holi-
day or special occasion; I just want to


Perils of generator use


Important to weigh benefits against potential dangers


BERT HENDERSON
Special to the Chronicle

Natural disasters such as
floods and hurricanes can
leave you without electricity
for days or weeks. Having a
portable generator on hand
can save you from discomfort
and financial loss, i.e., frozen
foods, possible mold and
mildew invasion. But using a
generator after a power outage
can be very dangerous if you
don't consider the operational
issues associated with internal
combustion engines and elec-
trical power circuitry
Before you think about start-
ing up your generator when
you return to your home after
a hurricane or major storm,
check to see if your electrical
system has any water damage.
Get an electrician into your
home as soon as possible to re-
pair or replace damaged or
frayed wiring and wet outlets.
Inspect all wiring, panels, con-
duits, outlets, and equipment
for damage before restoring
electric service. Damaged


equipment may cause a shock,
fire hazard, or a premature
system failure. When power is
restored, insure that all elec-
trical outlets and appliances
throughout your home are
completely dry If power is re-
stored and a burning odor is
detected, even if there are no
visible signs of a fire or smoke,
immediately shut the system
down at the main breaker and
have your electrician re-in-
spect the electrical system.
When you use any cord-con-
nected electrically operated
power tool, that equipment
must be grounded or double
insulated. When using power
tools around any wet area, the
tools must be connected to
ground-fault circuit inter-
rupters (GFCIs).
And one more thing: If
power lines are lying or dan-
gling on the ground in and
around your property, do not
touch the lines. Notify your
utility company as soon as pos-
sible that the lines are dam-
aged or down. Do not attempt
to move or repair the power


lines, and if you're driving, do
not drive through standing
water if downed power lines
are in the water.
To have electrical service to
your home during external
power loss, a generator with an
electrical output large enough
to supply the peak electrical
demand for your property may
be considered.
Generators must be con-
nected by a qualified electri-
cian and operated strictly in
accordance with their manu-
facturer's instructions. If you
have a generator on-line with-
out the proper connection
equipment at the time power is
restored, a major fire could
erupt if the unit is not con-
nected correctly In addition,
and more importantly, a gener-
ator that is not properly con-
nected could become a fatal
hazard to the power company
line workers restoring power
in your area.
Better yet, instead of con-
necting the generator directly

See GENERATORS/Page E15


See FRUGAL/Page Ell


E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012











Creating do-it-yourself garden pathways


L ast week's
column
featured
creating buffer
zones around
yards. Inside of
my privacy
screen, a worn
path soon devel-
oped in the sand
from foot and gar- Jane
den wagon traf-
fic. Blowing the JAI
leaf litter onto GAR
the planting beds
from both sides quickly


I

I


Powerful, new,
easily started
gasoline blowers
are lighter than
battery operated
ones. A corded
electric blower
would need hun-
dreds of feet of
expensive 10-
Veber gauge outdoor
extension cord to
E'S reach the far cor-
DEN ners of an acre
lot. Admittedly,
gas machines have efficient


than battery or corded blow-
ers. Better brands at home
improvement stores are
guaranteed for five years.
Even this 105-pound great
granny has no trouble start-
ing one.
Sand trails need blowing
in fall after most of the
leaves drop but before
leaves start to decompose.


The deeper leaf litter over
plant root zones is an effec-
tive blanket to trap earth
heat and prevent frost pene-
tration over the winter Fall
blowing displaces naturally
scattered surface seeds with
the leaf litter. Because the
seeds are displaced, cannot
reach the soil or are cov-
ered too deeply, many will


decay and not sprout in the
spring. Blow again in early
February to displace any
additional seeds that
landed on the trail during
the winter.
My perimeter trail mean-
ders over 700 feet between
the existing trees. It is 5 feet
wide. I drove the garden
tractor through to knock


down a few trees, then back-
dragged its bucket to fill in
any deep depressions. Level
trails side-to-side for safer
walking and future mobility
scooter access. Line the
trail with purchased or res-
cued native plants such as
Coral Bean, Erythrina

See JANE/Page Ell


IrkCITUSI A IUL1IIIBUL1


bared a wide, sandy trail. two-stroKe engines, but do
Cheap, quick and easy. the job five times quicker


Real Estate BRIEFS NSrk.Joso TomBalfour UlAnus&HlJStda ArtPaty
l BRO ER/ASSOC,.REALR REACTOR EALR-BROER REALTOR


Baxleys hit new
milestone
ERA American Realty & In-
vestments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
level achieved by two of its In-
verness office agents for 2012.
Karen and Gary Baxley
have surpassed the $2 million
mark in closed sales volume in
2012.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the achieve-


ment of these
fine real es-
tate profes-
sionals.
Karen and
Gary can be
reached at I
the Inverness Gary and
office of ERA Karen
American Re- Baxley
alty by calling ERAAmerican
352-726- Real Estate.
352-726-
5855 or by email at karen.
baxley@era.com.


746-900


0vvvctus atu~a I


FLORA CT


10100 ROY THOMAS RD. 2372 W
3/1.5/2 356947 $279,900 4/2/2


.S N. r.rr
3/2/2 357718


842 W. COCKATIEL LP.
3/2/2 357166 $104,900


FER PALM
$148,500 1


PRIVATE AND CONV ENIE r! NEWLY UPDATED VILLA IN MEADOWCREST
3/2 home plus den on dead end street in center of Open living / dining area with French doors.
county. Fenced and gated 1 acre lot. Outbuilding / Glassed-in Lanai. Quiet location at back of
Workshop. Open living with solar tube. cul-de-sac. Active Community with Amenities.
$79,900 MLS#358079 $64,900 MLS#355845


SJackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney [
Realtor.. A HOUSE Realtor@
I -a1302-3179 SOLD N-f11' 287-9022
I.L A WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700 .

3/2/2, 30x18 kidney-shaped, solar
heated, self-cleaning pool, double
ane windows, newer carpeting,
itchen flooring, appliances & plan-
tntinn chi.ttrc l Avlf uintcrl mrnm


10013 E
3/2/2 357224


W. OLIVER 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR 400
Y28 $74,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900 2/2 354530 $128,000 2/2/2




. BASS I 521 N. HARRISON 78 S. LEE 27 5. FILLMORE
S$59900 2/2/2 5006 $54900 2/2/2356827 $59,000 3//1 356531 $53,900


I0 3/2 356299 $39,900


29 N. WASHINGTON I 64 LEE 3755 N. ROSCOE 6715 S. FRANKFURTER 45 S. MELBOURNE 2440 W. NUTILIS
2/1 356448 $39900 2/2/2 357886 $54,900 2/2 356615 $37,500 3/1.5/1 356952 $43900 354341 $84,900 3/2/1 358312 $62,90
3521 N. LECANTO HWY.. REVERLY HILLS. FL 445 1.-RRR-.7Ra-7100


. 3 CLIFFORD 5086 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 6121
2/2/2 355613 $57,900 3/2/2 357756 $149,900 3/2.5/2 3




6541 W. COPENHAGEN 7239 COTTAGE 9412E
3/2 356535 $89,500 CPt. 357796 $149900 2/2/23


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 ES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QERLY HILL
A-r
L


FOREST RIDGE

00


I BVERY HLL


HA


17 Zr







E6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information............................................... 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiikONN WE
0 --o ----,--

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


A sticky situation:


Fighting sandspurs

I f you have lived in the Sunshine State most likely to be encountered in land-
for any length of time, you are familiar scape situations: Southern Sandspur
with the dreaded sandspur. If you can't (Cenchrus echinatus) and Coast or Field
place it right away, envision the family pet Sandspur (C. spinifex). The difference be-
perched on three feet trying tween these two pesky plants is
desperately to remove barbed in the seed. The Southern sand-
burrs from between their foot spur fruit has a ring of coarser,
pads. You have got the picture! larger spines while the Coastal
Sandspurs are summer annu- Q sandspur is covered with the
als requiring only one growing A spines which hitchhike on
season for a seed to germinate, clothing, fur, or even tires to
grow, flower and produce the new locations.
seed for the next generation. The best management for
These weeds grow best under sandspurs in the home land-
full sun, with dry, sandy site Joan Bradshaw scape is to encourage vigorous
conditions. Does that sound like FLORIDA- growth of the desired turfgrass
your yard? Sandspur seeds so that it can outcompete with
begin growing in spring, and by FRIENDLY undesirable plants like the
the end of summer they have LIVING sandspur. This is accomplished
produced several seedheads, by making sure that the site is
each with many sandspurs. Frequently, adapted to growing grass in the first place,
sandspurs go unnoticed in the spring and taking care to apply the three rules of
when they blend into turf areas or road- Florida-friendly turf care: mow, irrigate
sides. Once sandspurs produce their fruit and fertilize correctly This translates into
bodies, the sticking begins with a mowing every seven to 14 days at a height
vengeance in fall. of 3 to 4 inches, watering following wilt,
In Florida there are at least eight
species of sandspurs, but two of these are See SANDSPURS/Page E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


DIY nursery

Real Estate


PAGE E8
Digest
PAGE E5


For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


A painting, a 100-year-old table... and a cookie jar


Dear John: I follow you in
the Citrus County Chronicle
paper weekly About 35-plus
years ago, my fa-
ther befriended a
painter and was
given a painting. It
is oil, and 24 inches
by 36 inches. On the
back of the painting
is "Bazo me
Moumovaia" by B
Cos. Burned into
the gold ornate John S
wood frame is
"Echo en Mexico." SIKOR
That is the sum AT
total of my knowl-
edge of the painting. This is
where I need your help. My
parents have both passed
away and I have inherited this
painting; my wife says the
frame is probably worth more
than the painting. Can you
help with more information
and possibly a price? C.S.,
Inverness


L


T
~1
t


Dear C.S.: I was not able to
find any information about the
artist This means the dollar
value is based on the
subject matter as a
decorative picture.
The frame was man-
p.T ufactured in Mexico
as marked, also indi-
Scating it was made
well into the 20th
century Potential
dollar value is catch-
korski as-catch-can.
Dear John: En-
SKI'S closed are some
IC photographs of our
"drawing table." I
hope you can help me know
more about it, as I know very
little. What is it and does it
have any value?
The table has been in my fam-
ily for more than 100 years and
all of the pieces work well.
There is no name on it Thank
you for any information that you
can provide. -E Y, Internet


Dear E.Y: You have a nurs-
ing table, also called a pa-
tient's table. I think it was
made in America prior to
World War I, so it is likely 100
or more years old. There is no
interest in the antiques furni-
ture marketplace. Potential
dollar value is below $100.
Dear John: I have a cobalt
blue Royal Lace cookie jar in
perfect condition despite
going through several genera-
tions of hungry children. My
parents got it soon after they
started manufacturing them,
because I remember it as a
small child. What might be a
price I could sell it at? -
JAG., Internet
Dear J.A.G.: Royal Lace is
one of the popular Depression
glass patterns. It was pro-
duced by the Hazel Atlas Glass
Company The company has
been in business in
Clarksville, West Virginia
since 1902. They produced the


Royal Lace pattern from 1934
to 1941. The pattern has been
reproduced for decades. If
genuine, your cobalt blue
cookie jar might sell for as
much as $200. To investigate
further, check with the folks at
Sparkle Plenty Glass. The
website is www.spglass.com.
Dear John: I spoke with a
very nice man in antiques who
referred me to you. I have a
Beatles album "Beat-A-
Mania," copyright 1962 Pick-
wick Int., L.I.C. N.Y It says "In
AuthentiPhonic ... Stereo
Spectrum Records." Can you
give me any information on
this?
See ATTIC/Page E7
The frame for this picture
was made in Mexico. The
painting itself is not by a
notable artist, so its sale
price would probably depend
on the buyer's fancy.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SANDSPURS
Continued from Page E6

and applying one pound of actual ni-
trogen per thousand square feet.
Scientists tell us that sandspur seeds
actually grow better if nitrogen fertil-
izer is low. If your yard needs addi-
tional assistance to tackle sandspurs,
consider this: it is easier to take care
of young seedlings than it is to kill ma-
ture plants with seed. Unfortunately
there are noherbicides that will make
the sandspurs disappear in the fall.
The better approach is to use a "pre-
emergent" herbicide in the spring,
being careful to use a herbicide that is
labeled for use on your kind of turf-
grass. Unfortunately, there are fewer
pre-emergent herbicide products
available for use on Bahiagrass than
there are for St. Augustine grass. Pre-
emergent herbicides are applied be-
fore weed seed germination.
Knowledge of weed life cycles is im-
portant, especially when herbicide ap-
plication is timed to attempt
pre-emergent control. If the chemical
is applied after weed emergence, pre-
emergent herbicides will have little or
no effect. This narrow window of ap-
plication timing is a potential disad-
vantage for many lawn care
companies and homeowners, who
often wait until too late in the spring
to apply the pre-emergent herbicide.
A general rule of thumb for pre-emer-


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

I also have a 5-by-7 inch signed Cary
Grant photograph that I have acquired
and have no use for. Are these things
worth anything? How do I go about
getting rid of them? Can you give me
any suggestions? K.K., Internet
Dear KK.: To investigate your Bea-
tles record, check the website
www.78rpm.com.
There is considerable interest in
Cary Grant signed photographs. I wish


gent herbicide application is to apply
Feb. 15 in central Florida, or when day
temperatures reach 65 to 70 degrees
for four or five consecutive days.
These application timings generally
coincide with blooming of landscape
plants such as azalea and dogwood.
So if your grass is a sticky minefield,
get your lawn in shape now, and make
a note on your calendar to apply a la-
beled herbicide product in the spring.
Next fall you will be able to reap the
rewards of your efforts enjoying your
Florida-friendly landscape rather
than pulling barbs from your socks or
Fido's fur.
For more information, call Citrus
County Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons without dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or
affiliations, genetic information and
veteran status as protected under the
Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment
Assistance Act.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is Director of
Citrus County Extension.

you had included a photo. If it is gen-
uine, it would likely sell in the $100 to
$200 range. Profiles in History is an
auction company on the West Coast that
specializes in movie memorabilia. The
website is www.profilesinhistorycom.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


SPOOKTACULAR BUY! ....1 'hnn .1, BRAND NEW LISTING... i .,i, ,,,.. l,,. -
.H n,.,, h A... p... i h M O V E IN R E A D Y . . l .. .. i l, ,.l .. ,
reenbelt. 20 Daisy St. Sugarmill Woods. BARGAIN PRICED winter reside. AN'T GO RONG AT THE PRICE remodeled home. Features open floor plan, screened porch, shed
AT $127,800! MLS 356875. Call Debbie Tannery 352-613- OF $54,900. MLS 358130. 6 Michael Dr. CallKathy w elec. Brand New roof! Just waiting for you! $74,900
3983 or Tonya Koch 352-613-6427. Chapman 352-476-4988 MLS 357708 call Vicki Love 352-697-0712
,.- -

A-11 I
BuY NOW WHILE THE INTEREST RATES ARE LOW" . ......
WHY IS THIS HOME NOT SOLD? You cannot find a 4 Absolutely Adorable 2/2/2 corner nestled on a double corner lot 4.54 ACRES CLEARED PASTURE FENCED 11
bedroom house in this rice range. Huge with a gigantic party with breathtaking Grandaddy Oaks! Home features living room + 20 Pole Barn featuring a 4 bedroom, 2 bath country home with
family room and fireplace. Several out buildings, garage and family room with fireplace, rear screened porch, detached workshop formal dining room, giving room w/fireplace, interior laundry,
carport, circular drive. OUTSTANDING PRICE OF in addition to garage, and updated kitchen. 4820 S World Wide FL Sunroom under air, 2 car garage, shed and so much more.
Chapman 352-476-4988 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. MLS 357808 Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034.
6. l


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular meetings for publi-
cation on the Community page each weekday.
* Include the name of the organization, the time, day and place of the
meeting, whether it meets weekly, biweekly or monthly, and whom to call
for details.
* Send in information attn: Community Page Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. E-mail to community@
chronicleonline.com.Include "Club Meetings" in the subject line.


STOP AND SMEll THE FLOw ERS ... b. % r..rr,, LET S M AKE A DEAL1 hI ,, n.I .l. .d I i 1-1. d I.
.EED S P A E I d k 1 . ....,.... ... I.... ... ...... I.... .. d I 1.. .. 1... 1 ... . h ... .A... ..n I ..I . 1, I. ... .

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LET YOUR IMAGINATION RUN FREE" i . ....... CHARMING 2 2 5 2 HOME WITH 1850 LIVING
ill I .. .. ... I. I 1 READY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCYI ,,n... i ....
lying. Home features living & family rooms, interior laundry, MINIMAL WORK NEEDED!! 3/2/1 Citrus Springs home living & family rooms, eat in kitchen, new range, new interior
en/office, shed, partial appliances, fully fenced, large master built in 1994 featuring split floor plan, vaulted & standard paint, some new fixtures, bonus room, interior laundry, breakfast
bathroom, and in need of some TLC. ONLY $39,9001! 6395 ceilings, rear screen porc, and eat in kitchen for ONLY ar and front covered porch. 257W Casurina PI., Beverly Hills
Iris Dr. MLS 357626 Call Km Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika $59,900. 11041 Tigerwood Terrace MLS 357012 Call Km ONLY $72,900 MLS 356269 Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752
;pires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Projects can add

personal touch

to baby's room

ELLEN GIBSON
For The Associated Press

Car seat, diapers, changing table,
crib, stroller, blankets, onesies: A
new baby is a bundle of joy that also
costs a bundle of cash.
Nursery decor is one area where
new parents can save some money by
creating their own design elements.
Opting for DIY doesn't mean miss-
ing out on the fun of browsing stores
and catalogs: Often a splurge item -
such as a $400 Jonathan Adler giraffe
lamp can serve as inspiration for a
cheaper, handmade version, says
Pam Ginocchio, co-founder of baby
design site Project Nursery
Handmade decorations also lend
the baby's room a unique personality,
she says, and give parents a project
to work on together before baby
arrives.
Here, Ginocchio, her business part-
ner, Melisa Fluhr, and a few other
DIY design bloggers share their fa-
vorite projects for baby's room.
Whether you're creating a cozy nest
at home or seeking ideas for a
shower gift, these crafts can add
warmth and style to a little one's
space.
Decoupage Tree
(from Pam Ginocchio and Melisa
Fluhr, ProjectNurserycom)
Wall trees have become a popular
trend in nursery d6cor; try this proj-
ect in lieu of a pricey vinyl decal.
scrapbook paper (any size), about
20 sheets for a 6-foot tree.
Mod Podge matte finish.
scissors.
2-inch-wide paintbrush or foam
craft brush.
paper bowl or plate.
ladder or step stool.
Step 1: Take fabric swatches from
your baby's bedding to a crafts or

See Page E9
A do-it-yourself decoupage tree cre-
ated for a baby nursery from Project
Nursery.com.
Associated Press


E8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A DIY picture frame mobile from ApartmentTherapy.com.


NURSERY
Continued from Page E8

paper store, and grab a mix of
printed, solid and glittered papers in
the same color family
Step 2: Start building the tree at
the part of the trunk where the limbs
begin to branch off. Cut or tear the
paper (imperfect edges give a vintage
feel), making each branch the thick-
ness and length you want. Apply the
Mod Podge to the back of each piece
with the paintbrush or craft brush,
and press the scrap against the wall.
With this glue, the piece will be
moveable at first if you don't like
your initial placement.
Step 3: Let it grow! As the limbs
reach out and up, tear the paper
thinner, just like on a real tree. Cre-
ate the tree trunk with various-size
scraps of paper using a collage tech-
nique. For a cute addition, hang the
baby's name off a low branch that
reaches out across the crib.
Step 4: Stack some of the leftover
paper and cut out simple leaves.
Cluster them along the branches. You
can adorn the tree with birds, butter-
flies or even rhinestones.
http://projectnursery. com/2012/06/d
iy-how-to-make-a-decoupage-tree/
No-sew Bunting Flags
(From Ginocchio and Fluhr, Pro-
jectNurserycom)
printed papers or fabrics.
ruler
colorful ribbon or pom-pom fab-
ric trim.
hot glue gun.
scissors.
Step 1: At a crafts or scrapbooking
store, pick out a variety of printed pa-
pers or fabric remnants.
Associated Press
See Page E14
KEY1 "Always There For You"
El GAlL COOPER
mom multimillion Dollar Realtor
S Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com





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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 E9







E10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012


APPLES
Continued from Page E3

tasted the fruit, and evidently
liked it enough to promote it
as a new variety, which he
named Hawkeye.
A couple of decades later,
in 1893, Stark Brothers Nurs-
ery was sponsoring a contest
for new apples. Hiatt entered
his Hawkeye, which Clarence
Stark declared "delicious."
But fate again almost cut
short this apple's career
when the slip of paper identi-
fying who had sent it was lost
Fortunately, Hiatt re-en-
tered the fruit in the follow-
ing year's contest. Stark
Brothers bought rights to
propagate the tree, attached
the name Delicious, and the
rest is history
To protect their invest-
ment, Stark Brothers erected


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a cage around Hiatt's tree to
prevent anyone from snip-
ping off branches to graft and
make into new trees.
The fruit that made
Clarence Stark's mouth
water was not the same as
the Red Delicious fruits on
today's grocer's shelves. That
original was nowhere near
as pointy in shape as today's
Delicious, nor as fully and
richly red. Those cosmetic
transformations came about
through mutations over the
years in the buds of Red De-
licious trees. Red Delicious
is prone to such spontaneous
transformations, and when a
branch grows from such a
bud, the whole resulting
branch and subsequent
branches from it carry on
the change.
On the theory that people
buy fruit with their eyes and
that redder is better, branches
bearing redder fruit were the


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ones used to propagate new
trees. Also propagated were
branches bearing more elon-
gated fruits, deemed to be
more appealing in the market
because they had more Red
Deliciousness. Those changes
led to various strains of Red
Delicious. The original was
called Starking, then came
Ruby Red, Royal Red, Top
Red, Starkrimson and hun-
dreds of others.
Those same mutations that
influenced color and shape
were also associated with
subtle changes in flavor
What's more, the fruit of
some of those strains colors
up as much as two weeks be-
fore harvest, which could re-
sult in some pretty
bad-tasting apples if an un-


scrupulous fruit grower were
trying to sell solely on eye
appeal.
But back to that apple my
daughter bit into: This tree
was propagated, by me, from
a branch of a branch of a
branch, and so forth, of the
original Red Delicious, the
same one that Stark and
Hiatt liked so much. (I got my
branch from Geneva, N.Y,
where the U.S. Department
of Agriculture maintains a
collection of hundreds of
apple varieties, old and new.)
My daughter is not an
apple lover, and I figured
that if any apple was going to
tickle her taste buds, this -
the original Red Delicious -
had to be the one.
It was.


HomeFront BRIEF


Rain harvesting
with rain barrels
The Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping program
has partnered with The Green
Footprint of Crystal River to
offer rain barrel workshops.
Participants help assemble
their own rain barrel to take
home after the class. The first
workshops will be from 10:30
a.m. to noon and 1 to 2:30
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at The
Green Footprint's new loca-
tion, 619 N. Citrus Ave., Crys-
tal River. The cost per barrel is
$45, which includes the nec-
essary spigot and overflow at-


tachment. For each barrel pur-
chased, The Green Footprint
donates $4 to a scholarship
fund for Citrus County stu-
dents pursuing a degree in a
field that promotes environ-
mental conservation, such as
environmental science, agri-
culture, horticulture or other
related fields.
Call Julie or Tracy at 352-
257-5403 to reserve a spot.
Pre-registration is necessary.
Those interested in more
green learning may register for
the Worm and Tumbler Com-
posting workshop slated for
10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday,
Dec. 1.


-I I:0 0-1 ALL O CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


4 Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING





"7ISiA 1064W. Diamond Shore
MLS #358227 $239,
No remodeling needed in
this newly renovated villa.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


A41/in 3605 N. Timothy Terr.
MLS #358123 $49,900
Nice 2BR/BA villa
in 55+ community on the Glen.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


p 156E. Glassboro Cl. 13 6A 535 E. Charleston Ct 144 E. Hartford St. \Atr 1935 S. Casey PI.
MLS #344656 $39,900 MLS #342358 $269,900 -4 -- MLS #354754 $169,900 St7 .lh_ ii ., Si, S 05.000
Now is the time to buy this lovely Beautiful 2007 nearly new Lovely 3/2/2 pool home Very clean 2/1/1 home
upstairs unit in Citrus Hills. Sanderson Bay built home. on the "Oaks" Golf Course. in a quiet area being sold w/extra lot.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil hotos,,
wwwF6.id Showc -s roSeries- cS


1-3 OPEN HOUSE 1-3




Keller Ct. 3700 N. Honeylocusl Dr.
$199,900 ,* i r.ls 1 = r. i S l.900
If Course. Beautiful 2/2/2 in quiet neighborhood.
trus Hills Directions: Rte. 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd.
Right, to left on Honeylocust to home on right
0478 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
iG NEW LISTING


2392 N. Loma PI.
frisas MLS #358186 $59,000
MAKE ME AN OFFER,
updated mobile on owner-owned land.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

give something little as a morale-
booster. -Kathi, Texas
Dear Kathi: How about a flowering
bulb in a tiny burlap sack? You can
wrap it in a tiny gift bag or clear cello-
phane. Or how about a cookie cutter
with a recipe card attached? You can
fill a mason jar with loose (wrapped or
unwrapped) candies or dollar-store
items such as lip balm, facial tissue or
lotion, or fill it with popcorn kernels
or coffee beans. You could give large-
sized candy bars or boxed theater-type
candy, too. Small sections of giftwrap
can be used as decorative wrappers
(rather than wrapping the entire bar
or box, simply wrap around and leave
the ends exposed), then add a little
bow.
Dear Sara: How do I store green
onions/scallions? I buy them at Wal-
Mart in a sealed plastic bag, but after
I open them and use a couple, they go
bad quickly I love fresh green onions,
but it can sure be a waste! Sue,
Texas
Dear Sue: You can stand them up-
right in a couple of inches of water in
a mason jar and place in the fridge or
on a counter. Cut off what you need
and watch them regrow within a few
weeks. Be sure to change or top off the
water every couple of days. Or, use
what you need now and chop and
freeze the rest to use for cooked
recipes, not raw.
Dear Sara: I tried making cupcake
cones. I filled the cones with batter
and baked them, but it was messy
Some of them exploded over the sides
of the cone. What did I do wrong? -
Tina, Illinois
Dear Tina: You probably overfilled
the cones. Fill the cones about 3/4 full
(roughly 3 tablespoons). Another

lu~ I Ifn


method is to use cupcake liners in
your pan, fill them 3/4 with batter, then
insert the cone on top of the batter and
bake. Once baked, simple remove the
liner and frost. The cake won't fill the
cone using this method, though. Some-
times I like to make cupcake cones
with a very flat top (fill less then 3/4
full before baking). Instead of frosting
them, I can add a scoop of ice cream
to the top.
Dear Sara: I need to bring in a Hal-
loween snack or some sort of treat for
my daughter's kindergarten class. I'm
not as creative as some of these crafty
moms, so I'm looking for something
cute and fun, but not too complicated.
Any suggestions? -Anna, Ohio
DearAnna: Buy a couple of bags or
crates of clementines. Use a Sharpie
marker to draw little jack-o'-lantern
faces on them. You can draw a face on
the top of clear plastic containers of
mandarin oranges, peaches or the in-
dividual containers of gelatin or fruit
and gelatin, too (sold by the case and
found in the refrigerated section at
grocery stores).
This next suggestion is a bit more
time-consuming, but I know you can
do it: Make homemade play dough and
pop a small ball of it into a clear plas-
tic bag, like the small cellophane bags
sold at craft stores (but even a plastic


See FRUGAL/Page E15


JANE
Continued from Page E5

herbacea; Greeneyes, Berlandia subacaulis;
Blazing Star, Liatris corms; rhizomes of Gold-
enrod, Solodago species, Dotted Horsemint,
Monard punctata; Florida paintbrush,
Carphephorus corymbosus; Atamasco lily,
Zephyranthes atamasco;Coontie, Zamia pumila
and other easily grown, low-maintenance
species.
A shorter, 70 foot path from the driveway
down the west side of the house and around to
the back patio seemed practical. I raked and
leveled one between a raised foundation bed
and the future grass firebreak. Where there is
heavier traffic in front of the garage side door,
I spread limerock siftings and create a gradual
ramp. Cover the path with commercial grade,
woven, 2 percent carbon black ground cover
fabric, available at landscape suppliers or local
nurseries. It really does last 20 years in full sun.
Green Tree, Cross Bayou, Color Country and I
have used-but-serviceable fabric at minimal
prices.
You may edge a path above the fabric with 4-
by-8 inch brick pavers to weigh down the fab-


2 ABOSH

9441


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


ELEGANT
CUSTOM BUILT HOME
In the equestrian section of Pine
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a
3600 interactive virtual tour at
www.mypineridgehome.com.


ric. Others may use rolls of plastic edging and 6
inch wire staples ($3 for 25). Lay flat rocks,
pavers or slate as stepping stones. Blow clean of
soil before adding only 2 inches of crushed
brick, red sandstone or river rock less than an
inch in diameter. Smaller fill rock can be blown
about when occasionally cleaning the path.
Deeper stones or bigger pebbles are difficult to
walk on.
Blow your path free of leaf litter, pine needles
and tracked-in soil. If debris accumulates be-
tween the rocks, windblown seeds may sprout
and take root. Seedlings are easily pulled,
killed by a light spray of 3 percent glyphosate
herbicide or prevented with applications of
pre-emergent herbicides in February, May and
September. Both a sandy nature trail and a
stone path are easy to create, inexpensive and
require little maintenance. Sit on a bench
alongside the trail, relax and enjoy your
handiwork.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gardener and
Consultant. Semi-retired, she grows thousands
ofnative plants. Visitors are welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion County garden. For an ap-
pointment call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


MAGNIFICENT WATERFRONT COMES TRUE!
MAINTENANCE-FREE 2/2/2 HOME Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
in the Moorings at Point 0 Woods. feet of seawall; stationary & float-
Completely remodeled. Move right ing dock; spacious modem 3/25
into Paradise. Enjoy tranquil home sits high and dry (never
privacy with nature preserve flooded) on 2 lots. This mati-
behind you. Most every room has culously maintained property is a
water view MX 5s1R4 S 1StL.tS m-nItt ;4.99n000


31213 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
oooczc8 Call Joe at 302-0910


5721 S. LIVE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
NATURE'S CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River and nestled in an area that preserved
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community most of its 1960's charm! Well main-
...... Take the on the Withlacoochee River tainted, fenced yard, sunroom. The perfect
... ... ..... ... $218,000 home away from home.
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #357468 $39,900






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well maintained 3/2/1
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle. Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, medical ... 1. ,... F.., your fenced
true masterpi. .... .. .... 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard I ... 11. ..... ... or private
Lake Tsala i ... room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
family to move right in! imaginable! ,... F :
000CYJ9 MLS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 i -,,- $69,900


13"KeRComwe"L


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Ell









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

FLORAL CITY
2BR, 1.5BA, All new kit.,
bath, flooring, incld's all
appliances, W/D stor-
age shed, MAcre plus
Deadend st. No Pets
No smoking $500. 1st.
Ist Sec. (401) 488-5512
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550 mo. Close to
Wal-Mart 352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW Lg fenced yd w/
nice shed. Rent $495/mo;
rent to own $3k down
$650/mo (352)634-3862

HOMOSASSA 3/2
'2 Acre, $425 mo.
352-212-2051 220-2447

INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
LECANTO
3/2, Ist Mo. Rent FREE
$600 mo+sec. wtr/garb.
incl.d (352) 628-5990





2 Bedrooms 1 V2, Bath
Large Florida Room
Washer, Dryer
Dishwasher
$7500 obo
(352) 527-9382


BEST
OF THE BEST
11 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
45 New and Used
Homes have been
Disounted for
Clearance. Come by
or Call (352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807

Inverness
2/2 Dbl wide, screen rm &
Ig. deck, 55+ park, great
view, exc cond., not
crowded $21,500 make
an offer (352) 419-7825
INVERNESS
3 months free lot rent
w/ purchase! 1 & 2 Bd
Homes starting @ $6900
Located in a 55+ park
on Lake. Lot rent $276.
month, Water Included.
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Brina Your Fishina Pole!
55+ Park on Lake
2BD 1.5 Bath $2000
352-476-4964
Mobile Home
for Sale
672 sq ft, and Lot
$19,500 Owner Finance
Kenny (352) 228-3406

New Jacobsen Model
Homes Sale! 13 Left
with up to $25,000 off.
Don't buy until you
shop North Pointe
Homes. 4545 NW 13th
St Gainsville, FL
(352) 872-5566

Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 ...30X76
4bd/3ba; $0 Down,
$399/Month
800-622-2832 x 210


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down.
This is a purchase
W.A.C, Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq it, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217




2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348
2 BR, 1/2, BA,12x56 MH
Nice Seasonal Home
Adult park, low lot rent
Carport, 2 screen
porches, some updates
$11,000 (352) 419-8275

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882


*' THIS OUT!
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926


IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 1988 Skylark
model, 2/2 furnished,
shed, screened lanai
352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090








-AfflCTION
RENTAL MANAGE.. N ...
I REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CirusCounlyHoneRentals.con
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
6 Polk St. (BH) .................... $550
2/1 cute, fenced backyard
1635 N. Greendale Dr. (CS) $1000
3/2/2 pool/RV parking
CRYSTAL RIVER
1910-B NW 12th Ave. (CR)...... S700
2/2 newer duplex
548 N. Gulf Ave. (R) .......... $750
3/1 Fenced yard, close to Rock Crusher Elem.
HOMOSASSA
5865 W. Vikre Path (H)....... $125
3/2/1 cozy home close to Rock Crusher Elem
1843 or 1845 Soldr PI. (H). REDUCED S685
2/2 Duplex, incl. lawn and water
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/LECANTO
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. (Her). $650
2/1 Dock with water view, Florida room
1933 Suelle Path (L).. REDIUED$1200
3/2/2 Inc. full memb., pool, tennis, gym


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

2/1/Screen Room........$550
3/2/2................. $950
2/2/Screen Porch Condo $600
2/2 Townhouse...........$700

2/2/1 Bonus Room......$600
2/2/Bonus Room........$650

2/1 OnACanal............$550
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
< Cheryl Scruggs,
. Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010















-I
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/BR $450.,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 Hse. 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, W/D, Cable
Big Yard (unfurnish opt.)
$600 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-455-8998
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Furnished
on Hunter's Springs, sun
deck, W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352)344-1025


Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. 2/1 $575 F/US.
Includes Water/ gar-
bage, W/D hook-up. Also
furnished units avail.
352-586-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb., maint.
Incl. New W/D, No pets,
$600. mo. 352-628-6700

INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp 2/1
House $650. 422-2393


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



EQ.AL.2.1
^ OPPORTUNITY


CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished, Clean
w/ membership
2/2 Unfurnished Villa
352-476-4242, 527-8002
INVERNESS
Windemere 2/2/1
end unit scrn. lanai,
near bike trail & down-
town, Maint. Free $700
mo. Incl. basic cable,
pool, & clubhouse.
325-344-3123, 637-5898




CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
CHA, Laun RM. CP $496
352-212-2051 220-2447




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Crys. Riv. Cottage
2/1, CH/A, Near Beach
Includes. Util. $695.
352-220-2447, 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
2 Bedroom. 2 Bath. Re-
modeled home on small
canal! Fully furnished with
washer & dryer! No
smokers. Small dogs
only. First, last and de-
posit. $1,000/month! Call
#813-526-4944
INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 C/H/A New Carpet &
Tile, Nice Neighborhood
$650/mo (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, EZ Terms $480.
352-697-1457
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878


BEVERLY HILLS
2/2 & FL RM.
15 E. Murray
$550. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
Newly remodeled 3/2,
$595. mo Ist. last, sec.
352-400-1501
Citrus Springs
2/2 $650/mo. $500 dep.
(352) 257-1777
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299, 364-2073
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs CC
Est, 3/2/2, Immaculate,
immediate occupancy
$950 mo. incl. lawn
maint. 352-494-3551
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$1,250. 352-419-4421
HERNANDO
Newly remodeled 3/2,
Lg. Lot $595. mo 1st.
last, sec. 352-400-1501
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Waterfront Home,
Ist & Sec. No pets
(352) 637-1142
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, 1st & Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-476-2860
INVERNESS
Country Living on Large
V2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
sep tic so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964




CYRSTAL RIVER
3/3 Waterfront. Three
Sisters Area. Furnished
with Dock. $1400/mo
(352) 854-2511
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
On/Off Water, Boat
Dock 352-302-1370


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060







ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV
Resort. Large Developed
site, plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,500. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com






FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Professional
OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo CentercCR
352-794-6280, 586-2990






3BR/2BA/2, Shed, New
Interior paint, carpet,
pool, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
Citrus Springs $149,900
(352) 476-5061


Beautiful Golf Home
on El Diablo.
2563 sq. ft. 4/3/2.
Granite in kitchen
all baths and wine
bar.S/S appliances
and many upgrades!
Close to shopping,
restaurants top rated
schools. $159,900
352-464-1320

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


4/BR/2BA Mitch Under-
wood built home on 1.2
acres. Cherry cabinets
and wood floors. Outdoor
kit w/ Jenn-air grill.
Heated spa, oversized
pool, gazebo and lovely
garden. (352) 746-0912



3/2/2 POOL HOME,
updated roof, AC, water
heater, SS Appl's, gran-
ite kit counter tops, and
resurfaced Pool
Reduced to $149,900
6090 N. Silver Palm Way
(352) 586-7691




Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, private lot
352-746-0002


CITRUS HILLS
3000+ sq ft home,
unfurnished, 3.5/3/2.5 on
golf course, w/pool, mem-
bership, lawn and pool
service incl. $1500/mo.
(352) 302-3705



Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Sat
& Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418


#1 Employment source is





kww chreole ne comr


H
2BR, 1 V2 BA, new
enclosed sunroom, at-
tached utility and Laun.
rm. storage bldg.,
furnished Immaculate.
5111 Castle Lake Ave.
S. of Inverness on SR 41
$39,900 (740) 255-0125
Approximately 1 Acre
3BR, 2 Full BA, Open
concept, new steel
roof, deck & caged
pool, carport, storage
bldg., Priced to sell
$82,500 5155 Bridget Pt
S. of Inverness on SR 41
(740) 255-0125
Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AH1
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557


Inverness Highlands,
Corner of Carol and Ten-
nyson. My Loss, Your
Gain, New Low Price.
HUGE 1 Family, on 2.8
residential acres, fenced,
CHA, 4 BR, 3 BA, pool,
deep well, whole house
water treatment, wired for
generator, COSTLY UP-
DATES in 2011. Offered
AS IS. $172,900. Owner
352-419-7017.




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/4M "
REALTY ONE

Homosassa
3/2/2cg corner lot on 1/2
acre, fireplace, central
air, owner financed 0%
interest Call Tom
(920) 224-2513

House for Sale
By Owner
Sugarmill Woods
352- 86-1772

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558




39 Greentree Street
Homosass, Fl 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Dont wait.
Almost 1/2 off Sugarmill
home. Originally sold for
259k asking 136,500. Will
list Nov 1st for 10k more.
Stainless steel,
granite(including bath-
rooms). Huge master
suite with double trey ceil-
ings and his + her closets
and separate sinks.
Phone: 352-346-7179
Email:
ryan49445@yahoo.com




2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $24,000.
(727) 439-9106


-I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
-******* - -


W I s
GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


4 BD, 4BA, on 2.5
acres, completely
remodeled,
Bring Horses
Charlene Pilgrim
Plantation Realty Inc
(352) 464-2215


CirsCut


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails, $3000 per Acre
352-634-4745

FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed
last assessed $25,000
ASKING $12,500 obo
813-792-1355




HOMOSASSA
90 x O110 ftLot, w/good
water, septic and im-
pact fee pd. $10K obo
Owner financing Easy
Terms (941) 505-9287

RESIDENTIAL LOTS
$300. down $100 mo
(352) 568-2849


Home Finder

www.chroniclehi m-finder.com


Fil Your DreuMz Hfome

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

783572


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 E13


4 BD, 4BA, on 2.5
acres, completely
remodeled,
Bring Horses
Charlene Pilgrim
Plantation Realty Inc
(352) 464-2215





5 ACRES 1948 Sq Ft.
2BR + Office/2 Bath
Furnished Home,
Bushnell, Turn key cond
cage inground pool
3,000 sf garage
mechanics dream
completely equipped
Information, Appoint.
(352) 569-4205


Wa2tefont
Homes^j







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NURSERY
Continued from Page E9

Step 2: Using a ruler, draw an 8-inch
line on the back of a piece of paper or
fabric. This will be the distance from
the point of your triangle to the base.
Turn the ruler perpendicular to one
end of the line and make a "T" by
drawing a line 6 inches long. Use the
ruler to connect the top edges of the
"T" to the point, making a triangle. Cut
out this first pennant and use it as a
template for the rest
Step 3: Line up your different-pat-
terned flags in the order you want. Lay
them side by side so they are pointing
down and almost touching. Apply hot
glue in a line across the top edge of
each triangle and affix the ribbon or
trim overtop.
(Optional: Add iron-on letters to the
flags to spell out baby's name.) Once
the glue dries, hang the bunting flags
like a banner or in a zigzag pattern.
http://projectn ursery.com/2012/05/di
y-no-sew-bunting-flags/
Clean and colorful
dresser drawers
(From Sherry and John Petersik,
YoungHouseLove.com)
You can get a similar effect from
contact paper, which comes in a wide
variety of colors and patterns. But you
can make your own if you're looking
for a different look.
Foam craft brushes.
Mod Podge matte finish.
Six sheets of patterned, heavy-
duty wrapping paper (or swatches of
colorful wallpaper or fabric).
Step 1: Wipe the insides of the draw-
ers with a moist rag. If they're musty,
wipe them with mineral spirits or
Murphy's Oil Soap and let them air
dry in the sun.
Step 2: After selecting six sheets of
wrapping paper (or however many
drawers you have), cut the sheets
down to the size of the drawers. If all
the drawers are the same size, use the
first rectangle as a template.
Step 3: Apply a thin, even coat of
Mod Podge adhesive to the bottom of
the first drawer. Mod Podge is 100 per-
cent water-based, so it won't stink up
baby's clothes.
Step 4: Glue the cut-to-size paper
rectangle to the bottom of the drawer
by pressing it along the center and out
towards the corners to eliminate bub-
bles or wrinkling. Repeat steps 3 and 4
for all drawers.
Step 5: Give the drawers four hours
to dry, then apply a thin top coat of
Mod Podge over the paper to protect
against wear and tear. Let everything
dry overnight and you're left with


fresh, durably lined drawers that pro-
vide a little dose of happy every time
they're opened.
http://wwwyounghouselove. com/201
0/03/nursery-progress-lining-our-
dresser-drawers/
Fabric Mirror
(From Carrie McBride, Apartment-
Therapy com)
fabric scraps.
fabric stiffener.
craft store mirror.
cardboard.
string.
super glue.
Step 1: When you design a space for
a little one, chances are you'll end up
with leftover fabric. This project is a
great way to use up those scraps. Lay
the fabric on pieces of aluminum foil.
Brush fabric stiffener onto the mate-
rial and smooth out bubbles or wrin-
kles. Let dry completely, then peel off
the foil.
Step 2: Sketch a lion or other animal
onto a piece of paper and cut it out.
Trace the shapes onto the back of the
stiffened fabric. Cut out fabric shapes.
The fabric stiffener will prevent the
edges from unraveling.
Step 3: Cut a small scrap of card-
board smaller than the mirror. Punch
two holes and tie a string through
them. Glue the cardboard onto the
back of the mirror This will allow you
to hang the fabric mirror when it's fin-
ished.
Step 4: Cut a large circle inside the
lion's mane (or the face of your ani-
mal). Line up the mirror in the hole
and glue it to the back of the fabric so
the edges are hidden. Let everything
dry completely, then hang.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/d
iy-fabric-mirrorhow-to-128837
Pretty As A Picture
Frame Mobile
(From McBride, ApartmentTher-
apycom)
8 mini frames (available at craft
stores; check the bridal section).

S*iwa Sn mw 63=VAm


LAUREL RIDGE ESTATES
2/2 Home featuring a study with built-in work
center. Newly remodeled kitchen with all new
stainless steel appliances. New tile floors, plus
much more. See it today!!
MLS #357769 $115,000
Directions: Rt. 486 to Forest Ridge Blvd., left onto Hollow
Ridge, left on Crestline, home is on the left.
AL ANTONI 352-220-8143
S AMERICAN 352-746-3600
ERA REALTY& INVESTMENTS [ 000CZ6R


one larger frame.
about 3 yards of ribbon, divided
into four uneven sections.
decorative paper
photos or art reduced to fit small
frames.
4 screw eyes.
fishing line or thin wire.
glue stick.
paint.
polyurethane.
Step 1: Paint the frames to make
them colorful. Some may need a light
sanding first. Add a coat of
polyurethane after the paint is dry
Step 2: If any of your frames has a
support arm on the back to prop it up,
pull it off. You want the back of the
mini frame to be completely smooth.
Step 3: Put your photos or artwork
in the small frames. (You could use ab-
stract art, photos of vintage trucks or
pictures of baby's cousins, for in-
stance.)
Step 4: To connect two small frames
vertically, run the ribbon behind the
artwork but inside the frame back. Cut
a piece of decorative paper the same
size as each frame back and with a
glue stick, paste it on.
Step 5: Remove the glass and back-
ing from the large frame. Hang the
four pairs of small frames from the
large frame by twisting four screw
eyes into the back of the large frame
and then tying a ribbon to each screw
eye.
Step 6: Tie a length of fishing line or
thin wire to each screw eye, then tie
all four pieces together so the mobile
hangs evenly Knot the end for attach-
ing to a ceiling hook.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/p
retty-as-a-picture-frame-mobi-144393


PERFORM NCE

www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
debbie@debbierector.com


Associated Press
A DIY Fabric Mirror of a lion from ApartmentTherapy.com.


.Lou Miele Realtor
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU"
Cell: (352) 697-1685


a AMERICAN
ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecato Hwy.
Beverly His, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600


1 1 n f i 1] :1 0 I i i I ItIC

I4/2/3 CUSTOM
B POOL HOME
2,875 sf living, huge
detached garage, gorgeous
professionally landscaped
acre lot and much more.
--,. .t -.. -- MLS #357791
a a& $324.900


C I C N LSI I # I #


E14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GENERATORS
Continued from Page E4

to your home's wiring system, consider con-
necting priority appliances like refrigera-
tors and fans directly to a portable generator
of the correct size. Overloading and voltage
fluctuations from the generator can cause
damage to the generator and appliances -
maybe even causing a fire.
To avoid carbon monoxide poisoning, op-
erate the generator in a well-ventilated area
- use an area that is designed to house the
generator that is dry and allows the engine
exhausts to be piped outside. If you have a
small-capacity generator, make sure the unit
is mounted and locked down outside the liv-
ing space to prevent equipment theft. Check
the oil in the generator each time fuel is
added and never put fuel into an operating
generator. Service and test the generator
regularly and have a long term fuel supply,
at least three days, so fuel does not run low
while utility companies try to restore power
to your area.
To purchase a generator without the


proper planning and understanding of their
operation can cause serious problems to
your family, including loss of life. Being
without power for a short period of time may
be uncomfortable, but consider that when
the utilities restore power, everyone in your
family will be there.
If you want additional information or have
questions, contact your local utility, county
extension office, or electrical contractor.


Bert Henderson, M.Ed., is a consultant for
sustainability, renewable energies, and is
involved in cutting edge "green" building
product research with AZS Consulting in
Gainesville. He is also a national speaker
in sustainability and writes and delivers
professional training programs in sustain-
ability renewable energies, energy effi-
cient design, and '"green" construction. He
has been a Sugarmill Woods resident for 23
years, a Florida resident for 53 years, and
is a retired faculty member with the Pro-
grams for Resource Efficient Communities
at the University of Florida and building
science faculty for the Bushnell Center for
Sustainability


FRUGAL
Continued from Page Ell

baggie would work). Tie
the top with curling ribbon
or a green chenille stem.
Again, draw a little jack-o'-
lantern face on it
Here's a play dough
recipe that uses powdered
drink mix to make the
dough orange:
Kool-Aid Play Dough
11/4 cups flour
1/4 cup salt.
1 packet unsweetened
orange Kool-Aid drink mix.
1 tablespoon cream of
tartar.
1 cup boiling water.
11/2 tablespoons oil.
wax or parchment
paper.
baggies.
Mix first four ingredi-
ents in a large bowl. Add


boiling water and oil; stir
with fork until cooled, then
mix with hands until well-
combined. Place on wax
paper; knead until no
longer sticky, adding addi-
tional flour a teaspoon at a
time until desired consis-
tency Store in refrigerator
in airtight container until
bagging and handing out.
Dear Sara: What kind of
food do you buy at the dol-
lar store? EL., Ohio
Dear E.L.: I can't re-
member the last time I
bought food at a dollar
store. I tend to shop there
to buy party supplies (es-
pecially cheap mylar bal-
loons), coloring books,
greeting cards, stocking
stuffers, some school sup-
plies, craft items and hair
accessories.
Dear Sara: In one of
your columns, a tip said to
use a dryer sheet to wipe


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 E15

off soap scum from a
shower door Is it used wet
or dry? I'd sure like to see
my door shine again! -
Marlene, e-mail
Dear Marlene: I spray
the door first (you can use
a vinegar and water mix-
ture) and then use the
dryer sheet to scrub. The
dryer sheet doesn't even
have to be a new one for
this to work.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (wwwfru-
galvillage.com), a Web site
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies
for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut
Street, Kansas City MO,
64106, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage. com.


Specilizin in Terra Vista Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
_Ta_94 & r B rentwoodResals (352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

REALTY G RO U P BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133* VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777


.L ... .........3 ..... I .. . ,$ 3 ,0 0 0
MLS 357971 $339,000
I I I


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2


MLS 357058


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODSIDE VILLAS
Really lovely Maderia model villa in upscale Terra Vista Shows like a model
with custom paint, lots of tile, enlarged lanai and an in ground spa for relaxing
MLS 354400 5199.000 MLS 354548


. ," DETACHED
Stunning mair
home is in in
model Custom
$209,900 MLS 356101


2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY, 4 BED, 2.5

)antry and professional landscaping, truly a
lovely neighborhood
$249.000 ,


Is Tl lm II M[nths o.r or


TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD
|piacious
Ills Golf I


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BEI
BRENTWOOD DETACHED VILLA 3 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR Lakeview Villas Nice unfurnished villa lo
Nicely maintained villa in Brentwood Open floor plan with large kitchen Lawn Center & Spa Open floor plan with upgrn
maintenance and Social Club Membership included Club Membership Included
#1767 $1.100 #1254


BATH, 2 CAR DETACHED VILLA 2 E
near the Bella Vita Fitness Fully furnished 2/2/2, with a
kitchen, carpet & tile Social decorated Enjoy maintenance-f
$1400


so vou can relax Oen oreat room. ma


I, =1


I= ,,I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S 'VV IIH I LI: F Ij. I.I.I I II.II H i I.l W ,i : - AI
-,, i. ,l ,il,,i ,. ,- ii, ,,i. ,ii l ,,,,,P hiM I..' S f
.,1,ii1. 6 .....ll il h lll l,lil.,l 1111 11" I .. US--- --- IS COUNIW. 1
I .I In...0 .l 1 j.1 .1. ill.1| 1.|.. rJ.. HI_ nO E R I
Mi = x, w7 ASKING $74,300 O0 oVEmRS .
Pat Davis 352 212 7280 37
View hstm ing: 'i c21paidavis. can


LOCATION LOCATION! $30,000!
I f I. I 1 i.I_ / i'hlr. b:.j ..... i I.U i. b. ilh


.J...l ... U I ..I h. ....... **.. .i pI . I l ...ifi
ii..fllf i .i .il' I.l.I pill I.f I... 'i'' hiP .

OWNER SAYS SELL MAKE OFFER!
Just call. Mail Paisons 634 1273


BRAND NEW
INVERNESS WATERFRONT HOME!


p' q ..11|..1 1, . in d .11 ..: lm i
Mi = i. /: ASKING 199K
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


3BR, 2BA, MH ON 1.3 ACRES
Unh. I .m.l ,11 .1i Uln01; .


MI = I: $69,900
Jeanne Pickiel 352 212 3410









CARES WASHED AWAY!

,I I h u l I I l l
1 I m "d. l, I ,i I. H, 1 I h1
,, I,. ,,, I.... h,, I i,, '. I,,
I, I,, ,, ,,r , ,, i,,,,, 1 , i,, 11 ..
Ml.1 = '".":/ NOW $155,000
Matill n Booth 637 4904


PRESIDENTIAL ESTATES
h. . l .e.ii ..:. i 'ii .i8 ilh. i h..< A .:iI
Ml i = `': v.:!.
A GREAT BUY! $109,900
Call Isaac Baylon 697 2493
lot youl personal lout.


F .... n 1 l .. i.f .. ,lm I'.I.J r. 1.. 1.1j.. ,....J h. "I

s,,,, ... l ,: . .i.; I d 1 1.; f '. j. j .. ..- .II f_

h.'.-..I b i. ,i..jJ R I-E HIIII.F- I L_ R PHI- I
l..i: = :,.i:.l $118,500
Pat Davis i3521 212 7280
Vieiw sting riviz, c2liatdaris corn


SHOWS LIKE A MODEL
ill i.. I I l ;l I ii : lihi;I.


Mi = i.) 1 ASKING $480,000
Call Jim Motion at 422 2173 lot fout
private lout of this elegant home


COMMERCIAL BUILDING


I.. h, .l. ,:Jl n ll.d 1 h)( ,:Jh; ,:Jl ..[ A h .: l
Jl. l. l l l T in l l i i 6 11
Mt i = .h'. A.i $165,000
Call Jim Moti ton at 422 2173 lot a tout.












2005 2/2 MOBILE
ON CANAL TO LAKE
6"..il ,,.I. I llih vy B1ili,
Mi', = .X::ii:/ $48,500
Call 14Wllaid Pichtel 2019871


I l-',:J' ")'i h .m.' I.1 "I1


Mi = l ONLY $59,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


1 1 [1.1H 1 .11 11h , h I1 I1 1, I h h



S337,500 ri i,
Pul Di, 352212 7280
I 111. -1-P l lL. diil LLJkrf.i cjm


ADJACENT TO THE
WITHLACOOCHEE STATE FOREST AWESOME ACERAGE
* 1 -;_ A .:ii ;_' j .li. fi lh _' ,:j lih l l :, ". b ,: l ullh il l,:i i..J i lh N .i i..:
* [ I.i. ;l I .:. ; .:.[, [ ,lll. lh l' V lh : .ill; ;" ;" 'I :I il l ll i l'll li ll

M l_ = ', $65,000 '.ill .: ,6, $75,000
Jeanne oa IVillaid Picktel 212 3410 Ruth Fiedetick 1352 563 6866


,:,l hl. ,inii ..ilii p&i, i

Mi_ = :.IhI ONLY $54,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BLOW OUT PRICE
220 E Glenn Inverness FL 34450
.iii ii. i i. ....J.l..jihilu l u.-....j l. ...l...... J jl jill 'i i-


b,,T.:,i L:, I b.i, .:i, ,j nilu.h INI, MIIi'. = ''.'!. rl ')
Call Ehas G Kiallah lot mote inlotmation
352.4002635


COUNTRY SETTING CLOSE TO TOWN


_" I.. .h ....... . .l i h ....l. .. I I_
i;:ll ,:llll |i i ~ i nlll; _" hl~ll ll i: i i: 111 ii I ijij. 1 11iI

Mi = i:i.4 $29,900
Call Jennie ot Chei'l lot appointment
352 726 9010


RIVER FRONT HOME ON THE
WITHLACOOCHEE DEEP WATER

I.. ,r i ii... .. .. .., n. ., .. . ... ..


Mi'. = .'i.i: OFFERED AT $425,000
Call Nlancj Jenks 352 400 8072


GOLF COURSE VISTAS

I. , IIIII ," ,1 I r ,i M 1......1 ,. l.h,:J.i .n ,, I a



l,.nt i i ... I..i.1 ... ..I ......1 .h l ,...i .
Mi = I.')i) $154,500
Call Dots Mine 422 4627


E16 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012