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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 10-20-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02923

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District bout: CR football faces Eastside in crucial game /B1
--- _


M A


Sunny and nice
in Citrus County.
PAGE A4


I


State: No wrongdoing in Goocher case

K 7]| Attorney found no prooflinking Smith and Grant to Democratic candidate i


Bill Grant
a former Citrus
County
Republican
Party
chairman.


LOCAL:


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER A
state investigation acknowl-
edged the emergence of a
mystery candidate in the
House of Representatives
District 34 race looked sus-
picious, but it found no
criminal wrongdoing.


Assistant State Attorney
Mark Simpson released
his report Friday that con-
cluded complaints of med-
dling by state Rep. Jimmie
T. Smith and Inverness at-
torney Bill Grant in the
Democratic primary could
not be substantiated.
Simpson concluded
Robert Goocher's candi-


dacy for state House
seemed "suspect" due to
his lack of actual campaign-
ing. However, accusations
by Floral City resident and
two-time county commis-
sion candidate Jim
Brunswick that Grant and
Smith spoke to him about
placing a prop in the elec-
tion had no substance.


The assistant state attor-
ney never spoke with
Grant or Smith.
Grant, a former county
Republican Party chair-
man and strong Smith sup-
porter, at first agreed to
meet with Simpson but
later declined after speak-
ing with his own attorney
Smith agreed to meet with


Simpson but said he
couldn't meet until Oct. 24.
Simpson said he could see
no reason to wait for a
Smith meeting since he
had no evidence to Jimmie T.
support Brunswick's Smith
accusations. state
"From review of the representative
for Citrus
See Page A4 County.


Pinned
Husband and wife pin
on their new ranks
aboard the USS
WASP/Page A3

WORLD:

_. SI


Beirut blast
A car bomb killed eight
in Lebanon on Friday,
including a top security
official./Page A13

RELIGION:
Forgiveness
You
can
forgive
but can
you
really
forget
like the
Bible
says to?/Page Cl
RELIGION:


New life
Historic chapel in North
Carolina undergoes
restoration./Page C1
OPINION:
Endorsements
Check out the Chronicle
Editorial Board's pick
for sheriff./Page A12
OPINION:
Public input
Local residents endorse
candidates for the
upcoming election.
/Pages A8 and A9


Comics . . . . .C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ........ A12
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ....... .C9
TV Listings ....... C7


6 184178 2002! 5U


Crabbers net first round ofstone crabs this season


ERYN
WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer

Citrus
County
has been
a little crabby
lately, because
fresh stone
crabs are here
and ready for
consumption.


On Oct. 15, stone crabbers
throughout Florida headed
out to sea to find success as
the season got under way
Charlie's Stone Crab Co.,
partners with Charlie's Fish
House and Seafood Restau-
rant on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River, was among the crab-
bing operations looking to
meet restaurant and market
demand while filling orders
Monday
However, stone crab claws
do not just crawl onto a plate
bathed in butter. The process
is a little more complicated.
A crabber's journey techni-
cally began 10 days prior On
Oct 5, crabbers were allowed


to set traps with bait for what I
is known as a soaking period.
By law they were unable to e
pull their traps until Oct 15,
when the season which "
runs through May 15 starts.
So, how does a stone crab
claw ultimately make its way
to the butter blanket?
Charlie's Stone Crab cap-
tains and crews, on six dif-
ferent boats, begin their
workday at 5 a.m. With a 12-
to 14-hour day ahead of
them, workers head out to DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
their traps 18 to 35 miles Joe Lolly and Paul Loughridge unload stone
away, where the water depth crabs off the boat "Kevin Josh" on Tuesday at
reaches about40feet. Charlie's Fish House docks in Crystal River.
Crabbers hope for a good year since last
See Page A2 year's catch was below what was expected.


Election 2012


Congressional, local candidates vie for votes at forum


Nugent, Werder

debate issues facing

area residents
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
LECANTO -Both congressional
incumbent Rich Nugent, R-
Brooksville, and his Democrat op-
ponent David Werder, Spring Hill,
consider themselves Washington
outsiders, but that's where the sim-
ilarities stop.
They faced off Thursday night at
the Chronicle political forum at the
College of Central Florida's Learn-
ing and Conference Center, ad-
dressing a crowd of about 450.
See .Page A5


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
About 450 people packed the College of Central Florida's Learning and
Conference Center to hear general election candidates tout their merits
Thursday night.


Vick familiar with

office; Mulrain has

management skills
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
LECANTO Experience and fa-
miliarity with the office or actual
management experience that's
what the race for the clerk of the
circuit court boils down to, accord-
ing to candidates Phillip Mulrain,
Democrat, and Angela Vick,
Republican.
At the Chronicle political forum
Thursday night at the College of
Central Florida's Learning and
See Page A5


CITRUS COUNTY






Swww.chronicleonline.com
Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


TODAY
& next
morning
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I IN1S-11.ID E I





A2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


CRAB
Continued from Page Al

Once the captain reaches
the preset traps, they begin
harvesting. Three men on
the back of the boat begin
pulling traps and breaking
the claws off crabs.
According to the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion (FWC), "stone crab claws
must be at least two-thirds
inches in length when meas-
ured from the elbow to the
tip of the lower immovable
portion of the claw. Also, both
claws of the stone crab may
be taken if the claws are of
legal size, but this practice
leaves the crab with few al-
ternatives to defend itself
from the predators."
A stone crab's claw will
grow back in one to two
years.
FWC added "crabs that
are returned to the water
with one claw intact will be
able to obtain more food in
a shorter amount of time
and therefore regrow its
other claw faster."
Next, trappers bait the
trap again and return it to
the water.
"By the time you get that
one back in the water, your
hook has already caught an-
other one," said Phil
Kofmehl, a second-genera-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


tion crabber and owner of
Charlie's Fish House.
Per line of traps, there are
100 to 110 traps on them.
"While the guys are
pulling those 100 to 110
traps, it is quite labor inten-
sive and fast moving,"
Kofmehl said.
Bigger boats pull a total of
1,000 to 1,200 traps a day
Kofmehl said once traps
have been pulled, they deter-
mine where the future pro-
ductive areas will be. He
explained successful crab-
bers are continuously moving
traps to find better bottom.
"Sometimes you win,
sometimes you wasted your
effort," Kofmehl said.
"There is a lot of trial and
error. Crabs move around...
But guessing which direc-
tion they are going is just a
guess."
After a 12-hour day, crab-
bers begin their two-hour
ride back, arriving close to
5p.m.
Upon arriving back at the
dock, workers unload their
boat for the first phase of
sale production. Uncooked
claws are weighed and
sorted for quality and then
sent to the boiler. Boiling
the claws immediately after
harvest ensures the meat
does not stick to the inside
of the shell.
After boiling for eight
minutes, stone crab claws


are "flash chilled" in an ice
bath for 10 minutes.
Next, claws are assigned
their own grade. In a grad-
ing room, they are dumped
into sanitized tubs and
wheeled to the sorting table
for the cooked weight. Then
they are separated into cat-
egories of large, medium
and "floaters" for shipping.
According to third-gener-
ation crabber Casey
Kofmehl, Charlie's Stone
Crab Company's large claws
weigh more than 3.1 ounces.
Medium are 3.0 ounces and
less. Floaters have thin
shells, not as much meat
and float to the top.
"Floaters are a sweeter
taste in my opinion," Casey
Kofmehl said.
Once weighed and sorted,
claws are put into boxes and
sent to the cooler for icing
and holding.
To ensure freshness,
Charlie's Stone Crab Co.
never freezes the claws.
Their goal is for the claws to
leave their cooler and be
shipped out before the next
day's boats come in.
Once the claw reaches the
market for purchase, it is
ready for butter and lemon
time.
The outlook for stone crab
season this year based on
the first week is uncertain.
Red flags are already up.
"There have been signs


this year of octopus off
shore," Phil Kofmehl said.
"It's a red flag that this is
going to be an octopus kind
of a season. You move away
from them because the
crabs are moving from
them. However, the octopus
are after food too, so they
follow."
Nevertheless, crabbers
are always optimistic.
"Start has been modest by
comparison of previous
years," Phil Kofmehl said.
"We hope to see things pick
up when we get some
weather."
Crabs are motivated by
the weather. Kofmehl said
the rougher the weather, the
more "aggressive" stone
crabs become. And the
weather for the start of the
season has not been ideal
for crab production, he ex-
plained. When cold fronts
head into the area, gener-
ally production picks up.
Kofmehl said tempera-
tures cooling off this week-
end will help a little and he
is not complaining.
"It's a start and we will
take what we can get,"
Kofmehl said.


For the RECORD
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary was reported at 2:32 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18, in the 4600 block of N. Plum Tree Point, Crystal River.
A vehicle burglary was reported at 7:12 p.m. Oct. 18 in the
400 block of E. Highland Boulevard, Inverness.
Thefts
SAn auto theft was reported at 3:14 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, in
the area of E. Bushnell Road and E. Daniels Road, Floral City.
An auto theft was reported at 7:10 a.m. Oct. 18 in the 9200
block of W. Sleepyoak Court, Crystal River.
iAgrand theft was reported at 10:59 a.m. Oct. 18 in the 11800
block of N. Blitzen Point, Dunnellon.
SA grand theft was reported at 11:50 a.m. Oct. 18 in the 1300
block of N.E. Third Avenue, Crystal River.
iA grand theft was reported at 3:10 p.m. Oct. 18 in the 1100
block of Knob Hill Street, Inverness.
M A petit theft was reported at 4:38 p.m. Oct. 18 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
Vandalisms
SA vandalism was reported at 12:59 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18,
in the 4700 block of N. Crestline Drive, Beverly Hills.
A vandalism was reported at 7:43 p.m. Oct. 18 in the 3400
block of S. Dover Terrace, Inverness.

ON THE NET
For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.


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LOCAL


ul







Page A3 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY


Jobless rate drops below 10 percent


Memorial dedication
Sunday in Homosassa
Last October, when the
Old Homosassa Veterans
Memorial was unveiled,
about 500 people came out
to view it.
On Sunday, nearly a year
later, the public is invited to
the dedication of the third
phase of the memorial, which
includes a granite marker
with the names of local Pur-
ple Heart recipients engraved
on it.
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 8189 erected the me-
morial, which includes em-
blems of the five branches of
military service and
POW/MIA logo, plus 54 indi-
vidually sponsored monu-
ment stones containing the
names of Citrus County vet-
erans, living and deceased.
The ceremony begins at
2:30 p.m., rain or shine, at
the memorial site across from
Homosassa Elementary
School.
For information, call Shona
Cook at 352-422-8092.
Crystal River to
conduct hydrant tests
The city of Crystal River will
be conducting its annual fire
hydrant flow and pressure
checks from Oct. 22 to Nov. 30.
Residents may experience
a slight drop in pressure and
slight discoloration of the
water. For more information,
call the city's water depart-
ment at 352-4216, ext. 311 or
312; the Public Works De-
partment at ext. 314, or Veo-
lia Water at 352-795-3199.
Free blood pressure
checks offered
The Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Fire Rescue will be of-
fering free blood pressure
checks from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
today and Sunday at the Dol-
lar General, 6958 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City.
For more information, call
352-344-8723.
WAIT training
workshop slated
Aspire Pregnancy and
Family Services, home of the
River Project, will host a
WAIT (Why Am I Tempted)
community mobilization work-
shop conducted by Shelly
Donahue, national WAIT
trainer/speaker, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 24, at St. Scholastica
Parish Center, 4301 W.
Homosassa Trail, Lecanto.
The cost is $25 and in-
cludes lunch. Register by
email at kari@riverproject.
info or call 352-356-8058.
Manufactured home
group meets Oct. 24
Legislators will attend a
town hall meeting on Oct. 24,
hosted by a group that repre-
sents residents of manufac-
tured and mobile home
communities.
Citrus County Citizens
Coalition, a group started by
Edward Green of Walden
Woods in Homosassa, has
invited State Sen. Charles
Dean, State Sen. Mike
Fasano and State Rep. Jim-
mie T. Smith as speakers at a
meeting at 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, Oct. 24, at the Walden
Woods Clubhouse.
Questions will be taken
from the audience.
-From staff reports


Correction
Republican Winn Webb
claimed Thursday at the
Chronicle political forum that
crime was up 12.8 percent in
Citrus County between 2007
and 2011, which is a different
figure than reported in Fri-
day's Chronicle. Webb's
claims were disputed by
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy at the
same forum, who claimed
crime has been down in the
county by 12 percent since
1998.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by


mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Positive trend

continues

Special to the Chronicle
According to Workforce Connec-
tion, the unemployment rate for its
Citrus, Marion, Levy Couny region
dropped to 9.8 percent in Septem-
ber, down 0.3 percent over the
month and down 2.4 percent from
one year ago. Out of an expanded
labor force of 210,164, there were
20,522 jobless, a drop of 583 over the
month and 5,049 fewer than one
year ago.
At the same time, the number of
employed in the region in Septem-
ber increased by 2,076 to 189,642.
The September 2012 unemploy-
ment rates, released Friday by the


Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity (DEO), were 9.9 per-
cent in Citrus County, down 0.4 per-
cent over the month; 9.8 percent in
Marion County, down 0.3 percent;
and 9.4 percent in Levy County,
down 0.4 percent. Florida's not-
seasonally-adjusted unemployment
rate was 8.6 percent in September,
down 0.4 percent, and the national
unemployment rate was 7.6 per-
cent, down 0.4 percent.
Workforce Connection CEO Rusty
Skinner said the September em-
ployment numbers show a contin-
ued trend in three critical
indicators across all three counties
with expansion of the labor force,
increase in the number of people
with jobs and a reduction in the
number of unemployed.
"This is all very positive, this is
the second month in a row and
these positive indicators are a very


good sign for our three counties,"
Skinner said. "We're pleased the
trend of improvement has contin-
ued and we're excited about the
hope and prospects for those still
looking for work. We're hoping this
trend continues."
Skinner also said that the region's
progress is a "testament to the sus-
tained collaborative efforts of our
economic development and busi-
ness partners." In September, 539
employers posted 1,516 jobs with
Workforce Connection, a 48 percent
increase in employers over the year
and a 78 percent spike in job open-
ings. Last month, Workforce Con-
nection also saw a record 1,232 job
placements.
Here is the employment break-
down for each county:
Citrus County's labor force in-
creased by 287 over the month to
56,996; the number of employed


rose 502 to 51,374 and those without
jobs dropped by 215 to 5,622. One
year ago, there were 6,817
unemployed.
Marion County's labor force
grew by 583 to 136,089, the number
with jobs increased by 929 to
122,788 and those unemployed
dropped by 346 to 13,301. During the
same time last year, there were
16,790 without jobs.
Levy County's labor force in-
creased by 317 to 17,079, employ-
ment is up by 360 jobs to 15,480 and
the number of unemployed fell by
43 to 1,599. In September 2011,
there were 1,964 jobless.
According to DEO, all 67
counties had declines in their
unemployment rate over the year,
while 58 counties had declines in
their unemployment rates over the
month, eight held steady and one
county's rate increased.


Pinned together


Couple receives

new Navy ranks
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
As a teenager and young adult,
Kristin Sthole described herself
as a party girl.
Now at 29, the 2000 Lecanto
High School graduate has turned
her life around, "180 degrees
plus," as her grandmother, Sylvia
Caulkins, described it.
Last month, the now-Chief Ma-
chinist's Mate Kristin Sthole and
her husband, Chief Machinist's
Mate David Sthole, had the priv-
ilege of pinning their new ranks
on each other aboard the USS
Wasp in Norfolk, Va.
David Sthole is assigned to the
Wasp and Mrs. Sthole is assigned
to Navy Cargo Handling Battal-
ion 11, in Jacksonville.
Caulkins and her husband,
Nick, both attended the cere-
mony Sept. 14.
"We're so proud of her," Mrs.
Caulkins said.
Sthole had been on the high
school swim team and then got a
job as a dental assistant.
"She had a really good job, but
she had a bad attitude," Caulkins
said. "She was a party girl and
had a really hard life."
She said her granddaughter re-
alized she was out of control and
needed discipline and direction.
She needed to be able to take
directions.
"She came to us one day and
told us she was joining the Navy,"
Caulkins said. "We were shocked.
But she said there was more to
life than partying and she needed
to do this."
After basic training and techni-
cal school, Sthole went to Japan,
where she met her now-husband.
The couple has been married al-
most five years.
When they returned to Florida,
they headed for Jacksonville and
bought a house. Mrs. Sthole is
currently serving in the active re-
serves and going to school to be a
dental assistant.
Spouses serving in the same
branch of the military is not un-
common; however, pinning each
other's rank on is. It was a first for
the USS Wasp.
The pinning ceremony aboard
the Wasp came after a six-week
Navy-wide training that began
July 31. The rank of chief petty of-


Special to the Chronicle
Husband and wife David and Kristin Sthole pin each other's rank of chief petty officer on one another, a first
for the USS Wasp, the ship to which David Sthole is assigned. Kristin Sthole, a 2000 Lecanto High School
graduate, is in the active reserves in Jacksonville.


ficer, created in 1893, designates
an increased position of leader-
ship and responsibility.
In a Sept 15 edition of a USS
Wasp newsletter, David Sthole said
being able to do this was a dream


come true. He said with the excep-
tion of their wedding day, it was the
proudest moment of his life.
Likewise, his wife said doing
this together was like a new com-
mitment in their relationship.


"We couldn't be more proud,"
Caulkins said.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn
or 352-564-2927.


TPO urged to push parkway priority


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
INVERNESS The Sun-
coast Parkway 2 project
made it onto the list of 10
high-priority major trans-
portation initiatives at No.
7, but should be higher, a
county consultant said
Thursday
"From Citrus County's
perspective, we thought
Suncoast should be higher
up the list due to the fact
that you all made it your
highest priority in your list
to FDOT last month," said
Bob Clifford, consultant in
management services to the


Citrus County Transporta-
tion Planning Organization
(TPO) at its board meeting.
Suncoast 2 was ranked
No. 7 on a list compiled by
the West Central Florida
Chairs Coordinating Com-
mittee (CCC), a legislatively
created body responsible for
developing plans, programs
and policies for coordinat-
ing the activities of TPOs
and Metropolitan Planning
Organizations (MPOs)
throughout the region.
In September, the TPO
sent a priority list of projects
to the Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT), with
Suncoast 2 at the top.


Clifford said the CCC's list
was partly based on readi-
ness, and that Suncoast 2 "is
certainly more ready than
some of the projects ahead
of it." It also met criteria for
its connectivity to other
projects, he said.
Clifford also said talks
were going well for the TPO
joining Hernando County
MPO.
"In the coming months,
we are going to need to en-
gage the board members
themselves in the process,"
Clifford said.
The staffs of both groups
have been continuing infor-
mal conversations. Two con-


cerns have been raised so
far: apportionment of seats,
as Hernando is the larger
county, and where the com-
bined MPO would be lo-
cated, as Hernando's is
housed in county govern-
ment office space in
Brooksville.
Clifford offered sugges-
tions for the latter concern,
including using office space
on the Lecanto campus of the
College of Central Florida.
The timing was good for
merging now with Her-
nando MPO, Clifford said,
because it currently is work-
ing on its long-range trans-
portation policy that it will


adopt in December 2014.
In a partnership, Clifford
said, Citrus County would
be able to take $350,000 to
the table from a federal
funding allocation he was
advised about by FDOT
Officers were elected.
They are: chairman In-
verness City Councilwoman
Jacqui Hepfer; vice chair-
man County Commis-
sioner Rebecca Bays; and
secretary Crystal River
City Councilwoman Paula
Wheeler
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916.






A4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012



GOOCHER
Continued from Page Al

campaign records and in-
terviews of the contribu-
tors to Goocher, there is no
evidence to indicate any
connection between
Goocher and Grant or
Smith," Simpson's report
stated.
Simpson interviewed
Goocher, a 25-year-old me-
chanic, who denied any in-
volvement with Smith or
Grant. He said he decided
on his own to run for office.
Simpson said Goocher
was brought to his office
under subpoena, meaning
he could not be prosecuted
for what he said.
"He stated he knew of
Rep. Jimmie Smith, but he
has never spoken to him
and was not asked by him
to run," the report stated.
Simpson, in a phone in-
terview Friday, said he had
nothing to pin on either
Smith or Grant.
"Without Goocher, we
don't have a case," he said.
"Grant and Smith are not
going to come in, lay their
head on the block, hand me
an axe and say, take a
whack."
Simpson's report noted
Brunswick's criminal his-
tory, which includes traf-
ficking in marijuana and
cocaine in the 1980s.
Brunswick also has had
two unsuccessful runs for
Citrus County Commission.
Brunswick could not be
reached for comment
Friday.
Nancy Argenziano, run-
ning as an Independent in
the state House race
against Smith, had made
the complaint to the State
Attorney's Office after
Brunswick approached her
about a phone call he sup-
posedly received from


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grant. Brunswick
said Grant wanted
him to run for office
to take votes from
Argenziano and of-
fered to "make it
worth your while" if
he did so.
Grant said Friday Nan
he could not dis- Arger
close details of con- runs
versations with Indepe
Brunswick because against
he is a former T. Si
client. Brunswick
hired Grant in 2010 to de-
fend him in a mortgage
foreclosure case; Grant
withdrew from the case
and said Brunswick owed
him $2,600.
However, Grant said he
did not promise Brunswick
anything to run for state
House.
"That never happened -
never happened," Grant
said.
Argenziano said the re-
port, while not concluding
criminal activity took
place, nonetheless con-
nects Smith with Goocher.
Simpson interviewed of-
ficials with two political ac-
tion committees, FLOPAC
and FOCCE, both Winter
Park-based groups associ-
ated with optometrists.
Both gave $500 each to
Goocher's campaign.
Simpson said he was try-
ing to determine why they
were supporting Goocher.
He spoke to Dr. Ken Law-
son, legislative liaison to
the Florida Optometric As-
sociation. Lawson said he
didn't know Grant or
Goocher.
"He did state he knew
Jimmie Smith, but not per-
sonally. He also stated
Smith called him and
stated Goocher was a 'good
guy,' "the report stated.
Argenziano said that
shows Smith knew
Goocher. In previous inter-
views with the Chronicle,


r
in
a
e

r


- Smith said his only
knowledge of
Goocher was
Smith's ex-wife gets
her oil changed at
Bob's Car Care in
Inverness, owned
by Goocher's father.
"What really gets
ziano me is Jimmie Smith
as an calling the lobbyist
rndent and saying Goocher
Jimmie was a good guy," Ar-
nith. genziano said. "I
find that incredibly
incriminating."
Smith did not return
phone calls for comment.
As for Brunswick saying
Grant offered him an in-
centive to run for office,
and that Smith later said
they had found somebody
else, Simpson said he does-
n't know if it's true.
"We meet people, we
need to size them up pretty
quick," Simpson said.
"Through my findings, I
can't find anything to sup-
port what he's alleged. I'm
not calling anybody a liar.
There's no credible evi-
dence that Mr. Smith has
done anything wrong."
Simpson's report said
Goocher wanted to run for
office to make a difference
but stopped his campaign
after just a few weeks be-
cause, Goocher said, he
"was being trash talked"
and wanted to give up.
Goocher is a Democrat
but never voted. He didn't
vote in the primary either,
which he lost to Lynn
Dostal with just 28 percent
of the vote.
"Does it seem strange?
Yeah, it seems strange,"
Simpson said. "I have to
deal with what I can prove
in a criminal context. I ac-
knowledge it looks a little
suspect."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 563-
3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com


Junior Achievement celebrates


Special to the Chronicle

Business owners and civic leaders at-
tended the 2012 Celebrate Junior Achieve-
ment breakfast Thursday, Oct 4 at Citrus
Hills Lodge.
The program, emceed by Dennis Miller
of WYKE, featured testimonials by Forest
Ridge Elementary School students and
Kelly Bradford of Citrus High School, who
demonstrated the value of the Junior
Achievement programs in Citrus County.
Superintendent of Schools Sandra
"Sam" Himmel and Inverness City Man-
ager Frank DiGiovanni spoke about the
impact of Junior Achievement in building
better citizens and preparing students for
successful careers.
The program included updates on cur-


Kelly
Bradford,
of Citrus
High School,
and John
Dohmen,
Junior
Achievement
Board chair,
are at the
Celebrate
Junior
Achievement
Event.
Special to the
Chronicle


rent as well as future Junior Achievement
programs. Mrs. Fairella Cook from Inver-
ness Middle School spoke about the posi-
tive impacts she has witnessed in her
classroom because of Junior Achievement.
For volunteer opportunities, call John
Dohmen at 249-7544.
In addition to thanking attendees, Jun-
ior Achievement recognized the following
businesses for their contributions in sup-
porting Junior Achievement Citrus County:
Merrill Lynch Wealth Management, Way-
bright Real Estate Inc., HR Solutions in
Tandem, Quick Books Assist, Accent Car-
pet, Bay Area Air Conditioning, Summit
Highlands Construction, Capital City Bank,
SunTrust Bank, Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, Kennedy for Kids, Central
Ridge Insurers LLC, and Ink-4-Less.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





Lien Notices

. ....... ....................... 16


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
pc
s

pc


s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
T.illi Iij :
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
s
s
s
s
s


pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light to moderate
chop. Mostly sunny skies today.


HI LO PR HI LO PR
85 67 0.00 86 66 trace

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 47
Sunny and nice

.... .....................SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING

High: 81 Low: 54
Cool morning; Sunny skies

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 84 Low: 59
Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 84/62
Record 92/47
Normal 84/60
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 4.40 in.
Total for the year 58.91 in.
Normal for the year 46.80 in.
*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.85 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. (
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 59'
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Elm, ragweed and grass
Today's count: 7.2/12
Sunday's count: 6.9
Monday's count: 7.1
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/20 SATURDAY 10:55 4:40 11:24 5:10
10/21 SUNDAY 11:56 5:42 6:10


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 6:55 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ............. 7:36 AM.
MOONRISE TODAY.........................12:57 PM.
OCT. 2 NV. 6 NOV.13 MOONSET TODAY...................... 11:52 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. S.:.mi- n,-r. 1pl -irii ,-: 1, .1l, i :.r d l. ii:.:nl
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:01 a/5:09 a 11:13 p/6:16 p
Crystal River* 7:22 a/2:31 a 9:34 p/3:38 p
Withlacoochee* 5:09 a/12:19 a 7:21 p/1:26 p
Homosassa*" 8:11 a/4:08 a 10:23 p/5:15 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
10:01 a/6:05a -- /7:20 p
8:22 a/3:27 a 10:46 p/4:42 p
6:09 a/1:15 a 8:33 p/2:30 p
9:11 a/5:04 a 11:35 p/6:19 p


Gulf water
temperature


84
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.54 32.54 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.95 38.95 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 40.14 40.14 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.67 41.67 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be able for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211,

THE NATION


-,40s Biings -


s= De-s. s ,, ,
.fCsCO Oe si K na CIt I
" :' -- ea- .0... .e 0
70s -
L range ne @ 70s


90s El P~..,


SDFW
Mefopme -- .
"'* 8Os
Houslon
t. **


"'IN


*.


M.ami
; -'


. Anchorage ..
I '


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 64 54 2.28 sh 66 43
Albuquerque 77 47 s 77 51
Asheville 66 37 pc 64 41
Atlanta 74 51 s 68 48
Atlantic City 71 63 35 pc 69 49
Austin 83 43 s 85 69
Baltimore 76 63 92 pc 66 42
Billings 65 42 pc 67 35
Birmingham 72 46 s 71 46
Boise 68 43 trace pc 57 34
Boston 63 54 .04 sh 73 50
Buffalo 66 43 sh 54 45
Burlington, VT 60 53 1.62 sh 67 47
Charleston, SC 78 61 s 77 54
Charleston, WV 68 43 c 58 39
Charlotte 71 53 S 68 43
Chicago 52 44 .02 pc 57 44
Cincinnati 57 42 .08 sh 57 38
Cleveland 61 48 .02 sh 54 44
Columbia, SC 79 56 .27 s 73 46
Columbus, OH 59 48 .26 sh 54 40
Concord, N.H. 62 46 .46 sh 74 43
Dallas 78 51 s 83 69
Denver 74 31 s 80 46
Des Moines 49 43 .07 pc 62 45
Detroit 58 47 .09 sh 54 44
El Paso 84 52 pc 88 63
Evansville, IN 56 49 .08 pc 63 45
Harrisburg 68 57 26 pc 63 41
Hartford 69 57 58 pc 72 46
Houston 83 52 s 87 69
Indianapolis 53 46 .17 pc 57 42
Jackson 74 47 s 76 50
Las Vegas 85 59 s 84 63
Little Rock 70 49 s 76 55
Los Angeles 73 66 s 69 62
Louisville 58 49 .03 pc 59 44
Memphis 68 55 pc 72 53
Milwaukee 50 42 pc 57 42
Minneapolis 52 44 .21 pc 58 47
Mobile 78 47 s 77 51
Montgomery 78 43 s 74 45
Nashville 66 45 pc 65 42
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 80 58 s 79 59
New York City 66 61 .89 pc 69 50
Norfolk 78 65 s 74 44
Oklahoma City 72 49 s 81 62
Omaha 48 43 .09 pc 65 46
Palm Springs 98 66 s 92 65
Philadelphia 74 64 .37 pc 68 47
Phoenix 93 66 s 92 68
Pittsburgh 65 44 sh 50 41
Portland, ME 63 46 .29 r 67 49
Portland, Ore 60 55 .07 sh 53 43
Providence, R.I. 68 53 .14 sh 71 48
Raleigh 78 59 .13 s 72 43
Rapid City 62 26 pc 75 40
Reno 83 43 s 71 40
Rochester, NY 63 46 .04 sh 56 44
Sacramento 80 61 s 79 52
St. Louis 54 47 .01 pc 62 46
St. Ste. Marie 54 45 .02 c 56 41
Salt Lake City 72 41 s 75 51
San Antonio 81 50 s 85 70
San Diego 75 66 s 72 66
San Francisco 70 64 s 70 54
Savannah 81 66 .14 s 76 52
Seattle 59 55 .16 sh 50 42
Spokane 61 48 sh 50 35
Syracuse 66 51 .84 sh 59 46
Topeka 59 50 pc 72 50
Washington 76 63 .24 pc 67 45
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 100 Thermal, Calif. LOW 14 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/79/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 60/49/c Mexico City
Athens 79/62/s Montreal
Beijing 69/46/pc Moscow
Berlin 66/48/s Paris
Bermuda 81/76/c Rio
Cairo 88/67/s Rome
Calgary 33/16/sf Sydney
Havana 86/70/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 80/72/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 81/63/s Warsaw


67/54/s
57/45/pc
63/51/sh
76/49/pc
61/47/pc
54/42/s
63/58/sh
85/70/pc
75/62/s
81/65/pc
64/54/pc
51/41/sh
63/45/s


C I T R U S.


C O U N TY


CHRONICLE
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Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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SI I Inverness
Courthouse office
TompkinsSt. s square
0 8 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
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OCT. 21


I-


LOCAL


Alin~r~i
Allni





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Congressional
incumbent Rich
Nugent,
R-Brooksville, left,
and his Democrat
opponent
David Werder
present their
qualifications for
the U.S. House of
Representatives,
District 11, on
Thursday night at
the Chronicle
political forum.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle



DEBATE
Continued from Page Al

Here are some highlights:
Nugent, who retired
after 10 years as Hernando
County sheriff, said he has
had a career and opposes
career politicians.
"One of the first things I
did when I went to Washing-
ton was put into place a
piece of legislation called
Congress is Not a Career to
change the way Congress
operates," he said, explain-
ing part of the reason Wash-
ington is broken many
politicians forget they are
elected to serve the public,
not be served by them.
Werder, a former truck
driver and multiple-time
candidate for various of-
fices, said he likes to use
humor to get his points
across.
"I'm going to do some-
thing tonight that most
politicians won't do, I'm
going to lie to you I was
once a mortician," he said.
He went on to tell a story
about two women who
brought their deceased hus-
bands to him for burial. The
first wanted her husband
buried in a black suit in-
stead of the gray one he had
on. The second woman
brought her deceased hus-
band who was wearing a
black suit. To solve the situ-
ation, he switched the men's
heads.
"What makes me different
from my opponent I'm
willing to stick my head out
a little further and say
things other candidates
aren't," he said. "One of the
things I'm outraged about is
what's happening to Ameri-
cans abroad ... I'm calling
for a holy war, not with guns
and bullets but with sanc-
tions and prayers. I'm ask-
ing Americans to pray that
all radical extremists will
have dreams, and that the
dreams will be of Jesus and
they will become enlight-
ened because they live in
countries where they have
dogs that have more rights
and freedoms and liberties
than women do."
Regarding reducing the
deficit and national debt,
Nugent said the cuts Con-
gress has made aren't
enough. He said part of the
answer is to get people back
to work to increase the tax
base. He added Social Secu-
rity and Medicare need to
be reformed and it's tragic
to have people on Social Se-
curity living below the
poverty level.
"Americans have always
taken care of their seniors,
and we need to continue


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 A5


* What: U.S. House of Representatives, District 11.
* Who: Democrat David Werder; Republican in-
cumbent Rich Nugent.
* Term: 2 years.
* Covers: Citrus and all or parts of Hernando,
Lake, Marion and Sumter counties.
* Pay: $174,000.
* On the ballot: Nov. 6 election.
* On the Web: www.chronicleonline.com/voters-
guide.


that legacy," he said.
He also agreed with a
slow, incremental raising of
the retirement age, noting
when Social Security was
first introduced and the re-
tirement age was set at 65,
adult males generally died
at age 63.
"That was good for the
government," he said, "but
it's not that way any more."
Werder suggested put-
ting a price tag on every pro-
posed Congressional bill
and where the money will
come from before it gets
voted on might help reduce
the deficit and debt. He
added he's against raising
the retirement age.
Nugent likes Mitt Rom-
ney's idea of "flattening" the
tax code to make it simpler
Werder not only wouldn't
eliminate any income tax
deductions but would sup-
port more deductions, such
as for solar energy usage.
When asked about the
manatee protection rules
for King's Bay, Nugent said
his main complaint and con-
cern was the lack of input
from those the ruling af-
fected most, namely the
people of Citrus County
"We should have a right to
have a say in the decisions
that affect our lives," Nu-


gent said. "They didn't get
public input from you, the
folks that live here, nor from
the elected officials that
represent you."
When asked his opinion
about manatees, Werder
used his trademark humor
and quipped, "Are they hav-
ing problems with people
riding them?"
Regarding oil drilling
off the coast of Florida, both
candidates said they're for
it. Werder said he would
like to see drilling on the
coast and he would propose
every Florida citizen re-
ceive a dividend check for
mineral rights.
Nugent said he believed
the question of drilling in
Florida or any state should
be a state issue.
"I'm not opposed to
drilling," he said. "I am op-
posed to over-government
regulations."
Finally, the two candi-
dates differed on the fed-
eral health care law.
Nugent said he opposed it
and voted against it saying,
"It's not the federal govern-
ment's role to manage my
and my family's health care."
Werder said he's not against
the health care plan "in any
way, shape or form for any
American for any reason."


CLERK
Continued from Page Al

Conference Center, the
candidates squared off,
touted their resumes and
made their cases for being
elected to the office being
vacated by Betty Strifler,
the current clerk who is
retiring after 24 years.
Here are some
highlights:
Even though she was-
n't present, Betty Strifler
received applause from
the audience for her serv-
ice in office.
Vick said her 22 years
working in the Clerk of
Courts Office, especially
the past five as chief
deputy clerk, qualifies her
to "take the reins and
carry on the standard of
excellence for which the
clerk's office is known for"
She added her qualifi-
cations include a Bache-
lor of Arts degree in
business management
and accounting from St.
Leo University in 2000,
and in the past 22 years
she has performed nearly
every duty in the office.
"I understand the func-
tions of the clerk's office in
a detailed way," she said.
Also, in the past five
years as chief deputy
clerk, she has overseen all
the areas of operation,
from court records to
human relations and in-
formation technology
As his opening state-
ment, Mulrain said he re-
alized back in January he
was "not the chosen can-
didate" and he's not going
to be endorsed by the
Chronicle.
"That's a given if you
understand the politics of


Add an artist tioudi to your existing yard
or pool or plan
something
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* What: Citrus County Clerk of Courts.
* Who: Democrat Phillip Mulrain; Republican Angela
Vick.
* Term: 4 years.
* Covers: All Citrus County.
* Pay: $117,198.
* On the ballot: Nov. 6 election.
* On the Web: www.chronicleonline.com/votersguide.


Citrus County," he said.
His remarks were met
with faint applause.
He explained he has
served 10 years in three
branches of the military, has
graduated from eight voca-
tional or trade schools, has
been a Notary Public for 27
years, has served as a civil-
ian contractor twice in Iraq
and belongs to several civic
organizations. Most notably,
he said he has 40 years of
management experience.
"Our county is looking for
new management, and the
clerk of courts is a manage-
ment position, managing
budgets and employees -
I've done both," he said.
The issue of morale was
brought up, in particular the
departure of several long-
time employees "for reasons
unknown." Mulrain has pre-
viously made this an issue.
"When long-term employ-
ees leave in hard economic
times, you wonder why," he
said.
He said as clerk, if elected,
he would implement regular,
open monthly meetings with
employees as he had done
when he was in management
in other places.


"The more harmony you
have with your employees,
the more harmony they will
have with the public," he
said.
Vick said from her per-
spective morale is excellent,
noting more than 75 percent
of the employees have been
there more than 15 years.
"We have an excellent
open-door policy," she said,
adding, if elected, she would
have a "walk-around" man-
agement style and would
welcome input and ideas
from the staff.
In closing, Vick reiter-
ated her 22 years of experi-
ence in the clerk's office
and her service-oriented
personality
"My goal is to make the of-
fice the best environment
for the public to get the in-
formation they need to
make the decisions they
need to make," she said.
Mulrain stressed his ex-
perience in all areas of
management, from book-
keeping, payroll and ac-
counting to staff training
and public relations.
"Knowledge of the job
doesn't always reflect good
management," he said.


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A6 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

OBITUARIES





John Briggs, 86
HERNANDO
Mr. John G. Briggs, Sr, age
86 of Hernando, Florida,
died Friday, October 19,2012
in Lecanto, FL. John was
born August 3,1926 in North
Kingstown, RI, son of the
late George
and Mar-
garet
(Cullen)
Briggs. Mr
Briggs
served
seven years
Sin the U. S.
John Briggs Navy. Dur-
ing WWII, he served aboard
the USS Antietam in the Asi-
atic-Pacific Theatre Cam-
paign. He retired from
General Dynamics, Electric
Boat Division, in 1988 serv-
ing 26 years. His work in-
cluded test missions on
nuclear submarines, of
which John was quite proud.
He moved to Citrus Hills, FL
in 1988. John was an avid
golfer and gardener; and in
his younger days enjoyed
skiing, bowling, and softball.
A golfing highlight for John
was playing in the Spanish
Pro-Am in Madrid, Spain
with the great Scottish
golfer, Sam Torrance. John
was a die-hard Red Sox fan.
John was preceded in
death by his sisters, Mary
Myrtle Briggs (Kennedy)
and Margaret Olive Briggs
(Gobeille) and son-in-law,
John Sabo. Survivors in-
clude his loving wife of 61
years, Gloria (Phelps)
Briggs, two sons, John G.
Briggs Jr. and Daniel L.
Briggs, daughter, Patrice
Briggs Sabo, daughter-in-
law, Mary Anne Briggs, and
two grandchildren, Nicholas
and Amy Briggs.
Private family services
will be held at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
FL. Friends who wish may
send memorial donations to
HPH Hospice, 3545 N.
Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills,
FL 34465. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralH o me c o m.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory

Anne
McNiff, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Anne L. McNiff, 86, for-
merly of Beverly Hills, Fla.,
died in Spring Hill Thurs-
day, Oct. 18, 2012. A mau-
soleum chapel service is at
noon Monday, Oct. 22, at
Fero Memorial Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted to
Fero Funeral Home.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's policy permits both
free and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be sub-
mitted by the funeral
home or society in
charge of arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


Gas. E. 2a,, u
Funeral Home
Burial Shipping
Cremation


Cremation MVetera hahIr

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Retired deputy solves canine crimes


Forensics learned

in police work used

for dog attacks

Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE Two Rott-
weilers killed an 83-year-old man
in Alabama. A two-day-old infant
was mauled to death in Pennsylva-
nia. A two-year-old girl died after
she was bitten by a pit bull in West
Virginia.
Jim Crosby has worked all of
these cases as a canine crime scene
investigator.
The retired Jacksonville, Fla.,
sheriff's lieutenant relies on foren-
sic tools such as bite molds and
measurements, necropsy results
and saline swabs. His goal: to de-
termine why a dog mauled a per-
son, and whether it should be
rehabilitated or destroyed because
of its behavior.
"I speak dog," said the 54-year-old
Crosby, who lives with three curly
coated retrievers and two miniature
wirehaired Dachsunds. "No, it's not
whispering. There's no whispering
involved."
Crosby said dog bites are often
far more complex than they appear,
and they shouldn't be handled with
a knee-jerk reaction of instantly
killing the dog.
Among the few forensic experts
on dog bites in the country, Crosby
is writing a book called "Working
the Worst: A Guide to Investigating
Dog Related Fatalities." It's in-
tended as a manual for detectives
and animal officers.
"I found that nobody ever ap-
plied the kind of stuff we did in po-
lice work to dog attacks," said
Crosby, who is also the breed res-
cue chairman of the Curly Coated
Retriever Club of America.
There aren't many in his line of
work. Two men in California pro-
vide forensic evaluations and ex-
pert testimony during cases, and


Jim Crosby began his new career as a canine crime scene
after retiring from the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office.


both are animal behavior experts.
Crosby differs because he comes
from a traditional law enforcement
background.
His second career began soon
after he retired in 1999 after 22


years with the Jackso
iff's Office. First he
trainer. Then he start
about dog behavior a
there weren't any stand
enforcement investigate


dures for dog bites.
Now he travels the country to
help animal control departments,
lawyers and police agencies with
dog-mauling investigations. He's
worked on 17 fatal dog bite cases in
recent years, paying his own way
for some of those first consulting
jobs. Now, he's getting paid by ani-
mal shelters, prosecutors and even
defense attorneys to investigate.
But he'd like to find a university, in-
surance company or other business
that will pay him to do research
and forensic work.
Through his work, Crosby met
Victoria Stillwell, a dog trainer and
host of cable channel Animal
Planet's "It's Me or the Dog," and a
friendship blossomed. The two are
scheduled to give presentations at
the National Dog Bite Awareness
Conference in Denver on Nov 2.
"I'm more like his nurse, where I
hand him the stuff, the saline and
the swabs," Stillwell said recently
on her weekly podcast. "Where he
and I really work well together is
that we watch the dog's behavior.
We really find out why What was in
the dog's circumstance that made
this dog do this?"
The cases Crosby investigates
are often grim. In many, the offend-
ing dogs haven't been properly so-
cialized or trained, and the victims
are often children. So far in 2012,
there have been 27 fatal dog bite
cases reported nationwide; and
thousands more non-lethal bites.
"It's usually a perfect storm of
things," he said. "Most commonly,
there's some kind of human failure."
He is currently working the case
of an 83-year-old man in Leeds,
Ala., who was killed by his neigh-
bor's two Rottweilers.
Associated Press Crosby is helping police and
investigator prosecutors build a manslaughter
case against the dogs' owner, who
was found to have 33 other Rott-
nville Sher- weilers on his property. Crosby has
became a looked at photos of the attack, in-
Led thinking terviewed witnesses and analyzed
nd realized necropsy results of the two respon-
lardized law sible dogs, which were shot by offi-
ation proce- cers after the attack.


Endangered woodpeckers moved to new homes


Officials want

to bolster small

groups of birds

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS It's
autumn, the season to carry
endangered woodpeckers
to new territory
More than 80 pairs of ju-
venile red cockaded wood-
peckers are being moved
from big groups in Florida,
Georgia, Louisiana and
Texas forests to bolster
small groups in those states
and in Mississippi, Ala-
bama and Arkansas.
In Louisiana, eight pairs
were moved Monday from
the Kisatchie National
Forest four to the War-
ren Prairie Natural Area
in south-central Arkansas,
and four elsewhere in the
Kisatchie.
Thursday night, biolo-
gists in the forest's south-
western Calcasieu Ranger
District caught seven more
pairs of the 5- to 7-inch-
long black-and-white birds,

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which are named for a few
tiny red feathers on their
heads. All 14 birds were des-
tined for the more northerly
Winn Ranger District, said
Steve Shively, the Calcasieu
district's head biologist.
At their new homes,
males and females are put
into neighboring man-made
woodpecker holes. Artifi-
cial holes are needed be-
cause few longleaf pines
are old enough to have
heartwood softened by a
fungus, allowing easier ex-
cavation by the cardinal-
sized woodpeckers.
The nest boxes, set into
tree trunks 22.5 feet off the
ground, have fronts armored
with steel and entry holes
lined with PVC pipe to keep


other kinds of woodpeckers
from making the entryways
too big for the intended oc-
cupants, Shively said.
This year, biologists plan
to move 83 pairs, about the
number moved in each of
the past several years, said
Will McDearman of Jack-
son, Miss., the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service biologist in
charge of the species recov-
ery plan. There aren't
enough young birds to go
around, so most small
groups get outside addi-
tions every other year, he
said. Once an area has 30
breeding pairs, it's on its
own.
The birds' preferred
habitat is longleaf pine,
which once covered 90 mil-


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lion acres from Texas to
Virginia. Logging left fewer
than 3 million acres, in frag-
mented chunks. Without
enough good habitat, the
birds went on the endan-
gered list in 1970.
They've been found nest-
ing in cavities as low as 12
feet and as high as 50 feet
from the ground. They drill
holes around the tree so sap
will leak out, making the
trunk too sticky or slick for
rat snakes, their biggest
predator.
They nest in breeding
groups, with up to four
males helping incubate and
feed the chicks from a
breeding pair. The U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service


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estimates that the number
of such groups across 11
southern and southeastern
states had risen from 5,627
in 1995, to 6,105 in 2006 and
more than 7,000 now. Be-
cause the groups are so
variable, there's no good
total population estimate,
McDearman said.
In addition to the states
involved in this year's
moves, they're also found in
North and South Carolina,
Oklahoma and Virginia.
Biologists wanted five
pairs Monday from the Cal-
casieu District, but wound
up with three pairs and
three unmatched males,
which were released, Shiv-
ely said.










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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2.21
1'




-~. ~ /



I
-
~~bU
=TZI7f;;

-'I.

-7>


-- -^_--

----'4


1 down


8.9 million to go.






Every year, more than 8.9 million

newspapers are delivered in Citrus

County and in most cases, delivered

one at a time. This miracle of efficiency

is possible thanks to the hard work and

dedication of newspaper carriers.

We applaud their efforts and have

designated October 20 as

International Newspaper Carrier Day.

It's a day to show your appreciation

to the people who deliver your news

every day. So, take a moment to

thank your carrier. But do it quickly.

There's still lots of work to be done.


- ~ :3)


Carriers of the Month


October 2011
Opie Ringley


JanuarN. 2012
Marion Monluori


NMaN 2012
Marty Dorreman


November 2011
Brian VanDyke


February 20112
Frank Pa. ne


June 20(12
Todd Percell


December 2011
Miss. & Elias Espat


March 2012
Robert Johnson


April 2012
Greta Kleyn


August 21112 September 2012
Linda Carter Robert Johnson


Jul\ 2012 I not pictured i Jean Thrasher


Single Copy Carriers
Carriers who deliver newspapers to coin-operated racks and in store locations
are called Single Copy Carriers. At this time, the Chronicle has contracted
8 carriers who travel all of Citrus County and into Levy and Marion Counties
to deliver newspapers. The carriers goal is to have newspapers in racks
early in the morning for the many folks who are on the road headed to work.

\ C I T R U S 0 U N

CHRNI-.CLE
www.chronicleonline.com


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Endorsement LETTERS


Qualified sheriff
On Nov 6, we will be vot-
ing for Sheriff of Citrus
County I do not believe this
should be a political deci-
sion. I am a conservative
and do not agree with most
of the Democratic platform,
especially big government
and spending that contin-
ues to increase our national
debt. We need a return to
personal responsibility and
smaller government.
However, in selecting a
person to be sheriff, the de-
cision should be based on
who is most qualified to
keep Citrus County and its
citizens safe. Sheriff Dawsy
has done this and is
continuing to do it.
Citrus County ranks as the
second safest county in
Florida with regard to
crime. He has reduced the
sheriff's department budget
each of the past for years
while maintaining a safe en-
vironment He has also been
given command of the fire
department and has in-
creased its efficiency He
stresses continuing educa-
tion and physical fitness and
he leads by example. This
provides for better chances
of advancement in the Cit-
rus County departments or
other police, sheriffs or fire
departments. People in
these departments seem to
enjoy this atmosphere and
morale is very high.
We are lucky to have
Sheriff Dawsy in Citrus
County He deserves to be
re-elected.
Bob Balogh
Homosassa

Vote for Webb
I am writing to endorse
Winn Webb for Sheriff; my
campaign in the Republican
primary was always about
bringing positive changes to
our sheriff's office.
We need a sheriff for all
of the people, we need a
sheriff who is committed to
the constitution and laws of
the State of Florida, we
need a sheriff who spends
our hard-earned tax dol-
lars wisely and docu-
mented in a clear and open
line item budget. We need a
sheriff, who holds his
deputies accountable in a
fair, equitable, and open
process, while respecting
their rights. We need a
sheriff who will provide
training and leadership to
our deputies to help them
succeed in serving us.
During the primary cam-
paign, it was clear both Mr.
Webb and I shared these
same beliefs. Our differ-
ences were over who was
better equipped to meet
this challenge.
On Aug. 14, Mr Webb was
given the opportunity by
you to seek the office of
sheriff. Mr Webb and I have
spoken at length and I am
confident he is aware of the
issues in our sheriff's office.


ENDORSEMENT GUIDELINES
* The Chronicle has enacted its practice of asking that
endorsement letters be limited to the reasons writers
are supporting candidates not why they won't sup-
port candidates.
* Endorsement letters are subject to editing to keep the
emphasis on reasons for support vs. criticism of their
opponents.


Our sheriff likes to laud his
experience, training and
education as making him
uniquely qualified to hold
this office for yet another
term. However, only Mr.
Webb has pledged to have
an open line item budget, to
reduce the command staff
and give a much needed
pay raise to line personnel.
He has pledged to have an
open and fair disciplinary
process, and will not accept
political contributions from
his employees.
I urge you to vote for Mr.
Webb, to allow him the op-
portunity to return the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office
to you our citizens.
Steven Burch
Chief of Police, retired

Back into office
I support and am voting
for Nancy Argenziano for
Florida House of Represen-
tatives, District 34. Nancy
has the experience that we
need in Tallahassee. She
works for and remembers
the people here at home.


She has fought for us
against electric rate in-
creases, for quality care in
nursing homes, for our mil-
itary and elderly, and she is
still the same person as she
always has been.
She sponsored the Jes-
sica Lunsford Act and has
passed many, many bills in
Tallahassee.
Nancy thinks for herself
and reaches across the
aisle. She goes up against
the big guys for us when
necessary with courage and
conviction. Her dedication
is unending and she has the
experience that we are now
lacking in Tallahassee.
Let's vote Nancy back
into office and help her
fight our battles!
Sally A. Van Osdell
Inverness

A team player
Sandy Balfour is the per-
fect person for the position
of Citrus County School Su-
perintendent. Her experi-
ence in the classroom, at a
supervisory level and in


the community proves she
is a well-rounded individ-
ual who has what it takes to
get the job done.
I have known Sandy
since she began pursuing
her career in education. As
her supervising teacher in
her senior internship at the
elementary level, I knew
she was going to go far She
had the determination to
excel in her career. Sandy
was always open to sugges-
tions and willing to try new
ideas. In encouraging her
to loop from fourth grade to
fifth grade with her stu-
dents, she gained a whole



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TODAY'S



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new understanding of the
differences in curriculum
and how important it is to
make a smooth transition
for students.
She is a natural working
in education. Sandy relates
well to the students, par-
ents and teachers she
worked with daily She was
always there for whoever
needed her help. Working
side by side with Sandy in
the classroom, she brought
new innovative ideas that
benefited everyone. She
has a deep understanding
of the connections and gaps


in curriculum.
Sandy Balfour is a team
player who supports fac-
ulty and staff, has great
teacher/parent relation-
ships, and focuses on indi-
viduals who need her
guidance. She has the ex-
perience at all levels of ed-
ucation. She is committed
to the team and making ed-
ucation work well for all in-
dividuals. Vote Sandy
Balfour for Citrus County
Superintendent of Schools.
Karen Battle
Clearwater


* Easily build your own sample ballot based on your home
address.
All information provided by the candidates themselves.
Provides you with what you need to make strong choices
about who the best people are to represent you.
www.chronicleonline.com/votersauidi


CHRONICLE
H R S -. COUNTY



O 0 :www.chronicleonline.com




U Holiday

o ^ Cookie


O Contest
www.chronicleonline.com/cookiecontest2012
Submission Deadline: November 12th
Voting Begins November 13th
Voting Ends November 20th
Bake-off Judging November 30th
The holidays are -
right around the
corner, and we
want to put
together the
ultimate Christmas
cookie jar! Is your
signature holiday cookie ecked
out with frosting, drizzled with
chocolate, or something else
fabulous? Do you have a
favorite festive cookie that
wows the crowd around the
Christmas tree? Share it online
at chronicleonline.com/
cookiecontest2012 -Vote for
your favorite. The winning
baker will be
awarded a
$50 Publix
Gift Card.


iF al~.-mnis~ts will


be required to bring one dozen
cookies for judging to the
Chroncile office on Wednesday
November 30, 2012 and
taste-tested by a panel of
local celebrity
judges. A t


Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-Ins
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Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

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lmmmmmmm --


A8 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


OPINION


C7NR





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Old firehouse
Within the past few
months, the Chronicle has
published two articles and
one editorial about the con-
flict between the Citrus
County We Care Food
Pantry and the Homosassa
Civic Club over future
usage of the Old Ho-
mosassa fire station.
I believe your readers as
well as the Board of County
Commissioners should
have additional informa-
tion along with additional
perspective to help with
making judgments and de-
cisions.
The We Care Food
Pantry was founded in 2007
by Diane Toto, who was
then president of the Ho-
mosassa Civic Club. As a
matter of fact, the food
pantry began as a commit-
tee project within the civic
club. Toto remained presi-
dent of the civic club until
2010, while she also
chaired the annual Ho-
mosassa Seafood Festival.
Until this past month, the
We Care Food Pantry
rented space at the Ho-
mosassa Civic Club build-
ings and property And,
since 2008, the We Care
Food Pantry rents the old
firehouse from the BOCC
for dry goods storage. The
food pantry to this day dis-
tributes food bi-monthly to
more than 800 families
from that firehouse facility.
The Homosassa Civic
Club now wants the fire-
house exclusively for their
new vision of usage: an
adult literacy center and
for after-school programs.
This does sound great and
well intentioned. But let's
analyze.
First, what will be the
start-up costs to refit that
old firehouse to accommo-


(o(C(0 201


Letters to THE EDITOR


date seniors and
What about cost
room furniture,
books and softw
portant, what ar
club's plans to fi
fied teachers an
school counsel
how many adult
dren does the ci
project to serve?
Shouldn't adu
programs be lef
perts, such as th
our library system
school district, o
munity college?
not an after-schc
program be part
the Homosassa
School across th
from the old fire
To conclude, I
the Chronicle ai
BOCC should su
We Care Food P
which has a pro
time record of r
serving hundred
citizens.


Da%


Know the
This letter is i
to a guest column
with your head.
I wholehearte
"voters should t
edgeable of the
the person for w
vote especially t
affect their lives
But I must tak
tion to the sugg(
British Broadca
Economist and
York Times are
that are "non-pa
not so; each has
liberal bias that
to miss or ignor
needs to do to v
to Google any of
sources, let's sa
eral bias?" or "B


d children? bias?" or "Economist lib-
s of class- eral bias?" and review the
computers, results.
are? As im- Examples of such a
-e the civic search include:
ind quali- "Arthur S. Brisbane, the
.d/or after- departing ombudsman of
rs? Also, The New York Times, ar-
s and chil- gues in his final column
vic club the paper's liberal world-
? view colors its news cover-
lt literacy age and favors progressive
t to the ex- standpoints over conserva-
rose with tive ones. Brisbane said
m, the The Times treats the Oc-
or the com- cupy Wall Street move-
And, can- ment and gay marriage
ool "more like causes than
tnered with news subjects," thanks to
Elementary the paper's hive-like at-
Le street mosphere of "political and
house? cultural progressivism"
I believe that is "powerfully shaped
nd the by a culture of like minds."
pport the In 2011, Peter Oborne
antry wrote, "Rather than repre-
ven, real- senting the nation as a
esponsibly whole, it (the BBC) has be-
ds of local come a vital resource -
and sometimes attack
weapon for a narrow, ar-
vid Schmidt rogant left-liberal elite.
Homosassa "The Economist claims
that it "is not a chronicle
biases of economics." Rather, it
in response aims "to take part in a se-
in, "Vote vere contest between intel-
,, ligence, which presses
y agree forward, and an unworthy,
dly agree timid ignorance obstruct-
be knowl-
policies of ing our progress.
vhom they It takes an editorial
those that stance which is supportive
s directly" of free trade, globalization,
free immigration and some
ke excep- socially liberal causes.
estion
sting, the We are all free to choose
the New our sources of information.
sources But to represent the above
artisan" sources as "non-partisan"
a distinct is a "stretch" by any rea-
's difficult sonably objective stan-
e. All one dard. Best to know the
erify this is nature of the "lair" before
f these entering.


y "NYT lib-
BBC liberal


television news si
feed mostly on flu
tionalism and irr
to sell their prodi
Could it be som
want free express
ideas until they d
that there are ide
than their own?
Al


ince they
iff, sensa-
elevancy
uct."
ie folks


-- Endorsement LETTERS


True cha
We the peopi
County have ne
better legislate
Nancy Argenzia
Nancy has al
a true champion
people and mos
remember her
has never put p
politics in froni
was right for he
or her constitute
has always foug
fight for the pec
rus County witi
grace, courage
tegrity that is u
modern politics
For those of
member her wc
state represent
ing for her is a
Those of us wh
know her need
ing to the lies, p
crap and trashy
vertisements ai
and meet her b
cast their vote.
genziano is ind
American Inde
because her we
ways transcend
san lines.


Ki


Elect Be


sion of I met Sandy Balfour
discover when I became her son's
*as other guidance counselor. She
was an English teacher at
Crystal River Middle
Schroedel School. She became one
Hernando of my peers when she be-


mpion
e of Citrus
*ver had a
r than
ano.
ways been
)n of the
st of us who
know she
)artisan
t of what
er district
cents. Nancy
ght the good
n"l0 nf 'if-


came an English teacher
at Crystal River High
School. She was our
Teacher of the Year. I saw
her interactions with me
as a parent and as an edu-
cator with parents, stu-
dents and our peers.
Sandy Balfour has been
a parent of a student of
the Citrus County school
system as well as an edu-
cator of the elementary,
middle, high school and
administrative levels.


upie ut t- Through her experi-
h a level of ences in the Citrus County
and in- school system, which in-
nrivaled in cludes coordinator at the
s today Academy of Environmental
us who re- Sciences and board trustee
ork as our at the College of Central
ative, vot- Florida, she has shown her
no brainer knowledge of management
o do not skills in budgeting, curricu-
stop listen- lum assessment, policy de-
partisan cisions and staffing. She
y attack ad- has the ability and willing-
nd go out ness to work with students,
before they parents, teachers, and ad-
Nancy Ar- ministrators.
eed a true My husband and I no
pendent longer live in Citrus
Drk has al- County However, if we did,
led parti- we would vote for Sandy
Balfour for Citrus County
m Morrison Superintendent of Schools.
Homosassa Please use your citizen's
right and vote for the fu-
ilfour ture of our counties, states
and country


Pamela F Knowles
Murphy, N.C.
Former Citrus County
English teacher,
department chairman and
guidance counselor


ENDORSEMENT GUIDELINES
* The Chronicle has enacted its practice of asking that endorsement letters be limited
to the reasons writers are supporting candidates not why they won't support can-
didates.
* Endorsement letters are subject to editing to keep the emphasis on reasons for sup-
port vs. criticism of their opponents.


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The column goes on to
say "First, turn off cable


Hot Corner: OBAMA'S HISTORY


10-part series
This is for the person who
wanted information about
Obama. The Washington Ex-
aminerjust did a 10-part se-
ries on Mr. Obama. It's a
very enlightening 10-part
series. Get online and read
it.
Go see Obama film
To the person who wanted
to see something about
Obama's history in Wednes-
day morning's paper (Sept.
26): I would tell you to go to
the mall and see the movie,
"2016." It tells you all about
the Obama family
Documentary
Regarding the Sound Off
called "Obama's history":
The writer said he doesn't
know anything about the
history of Obama. Please,
please, if you need to know
the history, a documentary
film or movie is being shown
in Crystal River at the cin-
ema and it documents all of
the life story of President
Obama. Go see it
Obama book
In reference to the person
who wrote in stating they'd
like to learn more about
Obama's history: There is a
current movie out right now
in right here in Citrus
County called "2016:
Obama's America." It's
based on the book that
Obama wrote himself titled,
"Dreams From My Father,"


not "Of My Father" is no longer showing at the
(Editor's Note: The movie movie theaters.)

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OPINION


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 A9


4mly ft_











AI STUDA, CTBET2,H01 SMOCKSEiuCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


I HowTKs *I '1,H"TI f i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1669590 9.44 -.03 Vringo 60911 3.93 -.22 SiriusXM 1340309 2.92 -.02 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1404575143.39 -2.43 CheniereEn 52167 15.70 -.34 Microsoft 771635 28.64 -.86 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
AMD 1071082 2.18 -.44 AmApparel 33219 1.06 -.20 Clearwire 695606 1.85 -.18 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
GenElec 1032659 22.03 -.78 NovaGldg 26463 5.00 -.10 Cisco 633980 18.04 -.57 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SprintNex 799892 5.65 -.13 NwGoldg 24037 11.85 -.02 PwShs QQQ595571 65.68 -1.61 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd-Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Ch % Ch Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
BarcShtC 15.40 +3.85 +33.3 SDgo pfC 23.31 +2.31 +11.0 MagicJck s 23.03 +2.57 +12.6 ing qualification. n Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
PrUVxST rs 28.96 +3.33 +13.0 SwGA Fn 9.22 +.60 +7.0 US Concrte 7.45 +.79 +11.9 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
CapOnewt 23.60 +2.64 +12.6 MeetMe 4.05 +.25 +6.6 RiverbedT 23.06 +2.37 +11.5 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt-Right to buy security ata specifiedprice. s-
XinyuanRE 3.08 +.28 +10.0 CoastD 2.02 +.12 +6.3 e-Future 4.40 +.37 +9.2 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
ManpwrGp 39.53 +3.55 +9.9 Aerosonic 3.46 +.20 +6.1 UniPixel 6.18 +.49 +8.6 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Mdbklns 6.18 -1.61 -20.7 USAntimny 2.06 -.29 -12.3 PKxewrks 2.43 -.62 -20.3
AMD 2.18 -.44 -16.8 Arrhythm 2.32 -.26 -10.0 BGMed 2.47 -.48 -16.3 ITD_ _r=_
VOCEnTr 16.13 -3.17 -16.4 DocuSec 2.85 -.31 -9.8 MarvellT 7.57 -1.26 -14.3


Chipotle 243.00 -42.93 -15.0 Medgenwt 3.20 -.30 -8.6 Cempran 6.90 -.91 -11.7
CorpExc 46.30 -7.00 -13.1 ComstkMn 2.70 -.24 -8.2 HowardBcp 6.31 -.84 -11.7


DIARY


694 Advanced
2,353 Declined
87 Unchanged
3,134 Total issues
128 New Highs
34 New Lows
3,812,342,359 Volume


DIARY


148 Advanced
272 Declined
36 Unchanged
456 Total issues
10 New Highs
3 New Lows
73,428,053 Volume


466
1,971
115
2,552
47
80
2,139,590,654


52-Week
High Low Name
13,661.72 11,231.56Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 4,531.79Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 422.90Dow Jones Utilities
8,515.60 6,898.12NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,102.29Amex Index
3,196.93 2,441.48Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,158.66S&P 500
15,432.54 12,158.90Wilshire 5000
868.50 666.16Russell 2000


Last
13,343.51
5,082.16
483.76
8,324.14
2,408.53
3,005.62
1,433.19
14,959.87
821.00


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
-205.43 -1.52 +9.22+13.00
-74.38 -1.44 +1.24 +5.57
-3.60 -.74 +4.11 +6.87
-118.67 -1.41 +11.33+12.02
-25.72 -1.06 +5.71 +8.53
-67.25 -2.19 +15.37 +13.96
-24.15 -1.66 +13.96 +15.74
-248.71 -1.64+13.42+15.28
-16.12 -1.93 +10.81 +15.24


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BeoSBrasil 7.18 -.16
BkofAm 9.44 -.03
BkA pfUcld 25.38 +.02
BkApfYcld 25.37 +.00
ABBLtd 19.32 -.43 BkMontg 60.01 -.64
ACE Ltd 80.52 -1.18 BINYMel 24.68 -.30
ADTCpn 38.80 +.24 Barday 14.91 -.55
AESCorp 11.04 -.11 BariPVixrs 34.99 +2.12
AFLAC 49.69 -.42 BarrickG 38.78 -.14
AGL Res 40.74 -.50 Baxter 61.92 -.82
AK Steel 5.51 -.28 Beam Inc 55.30 -1.61
ASA Gold 24.13 -.03 BeazerH rs 18.41 +.29
AT&TInc 35.32 -.70 BectDck 75.65 -1.24
AbtLab 66.15 -.49 Bemis 32.42 -.38
AberFitc 32.01 -.44 BerkHaA133841.00-1559.00
Accenture 67.75 -1.15 BerkH B 89.26 -1.36
AdamsEx 11.27 -.17 BestBuy 17.25 -.24
AMD 2.18 -.44 BigLots 29.22 -.72
Aeropostf 13.19 +.20 BioMedR 19.38 -.18
Aetna 43.54 -.76 BIkHillsCp 35.66 -.65
Agilent 35.75 -.89 BlkDebtStr 4.29 +.03
Agnieog 52.67 -.02 BlkEnhC&l 12.94 -.15
Agriumg 104.40 -1.07 BlkGlbOp 13.73 -.34
AirProd 79.99 -5.36 Blackstone 15.67 -.04
Albemarle 55.33 -.39 BlockHR 17.11 -.18
AlcatelLuc 1.12 ... Boeing 74.01 -.25
Alcoa 9.01 -.20 BostBeer 109.16 -.74
Allergan 92.21 -2.64 BostProp 109.53 -1.93
Allete 41.67 -.36 BostonSci 5.22 -.18
AlliBGIbHi 15.85 +.01 BoydGm 6.37 -.35
AlliBlnco 8.61 -.03 Brandyw 12.48 -.18
AlliBern 16.35 -.25 BrMySq 33.81 -.48
Allstate 42.01 -.61 Brookdale 24.14 -.11
AlphaNRs 8.97 -.18 Brunswick 22.72 -1.06
AlpTotDiv 4.41 -.10 Buckeye 47.37 -.35
AIpAlerMLP 16.64 -.15 BurgerKn 14.10 -.49
Altria 32.63 -.46 CBREGrp 19.11 -.47
AmBev 41.34 -.49 CBSB 33.74 -.32
Ameren 32.96 -.17 F Inds 206.68 -4.92
AMovil 26.28 -.26 OH Engy 64.92 -.08
AmAxle 12.02 -.23 CMSEng 24.30 -.02
AEagleOut 22.54 -.35 CNO Find 9.66 -.27
AEP 44.98 -.29 CSSInds 18.81 -.80
AmEx 56.86 -.75 CSX 21.10 -.26
AmlntGrp 35.70 -1.51 CVS Care 46.20 -.39
AmSIP3 7.62 ... CYS Invest 13.26 -.12
AmTower 73.84 -1.65 CblvsnNY 18.39 -.13
Amerigas 44.65 -.14 CabotOGs 44.48 -.57
AmeriBrgn 40.28 -.40 CalDive 1.49 +.01
Ameteks 34.04 -1.33 CallGolf 6.02 -.07
Anadarko 70.34 -1.54 Calpine 18.40 -.01
AnglogldA 33.21 +.64 Cameron 55.21 -.84
ABInBev 85.57 -.80 CampSp 35.22 -.24
Annaly 15.98 -.12 CdnNRsgs 31.25 -.16
Anworth 6.20 -.07 CapOne 60.75 +3.45
Aonplc 52.55 -1.06 CapOne pfP 25.30 +.02
Apache 86.87 -1.85 CapiiSrce 7.78 -.05
Aptlnv 26.86 +.33 CapMplB 14.64 -.53
AquaAm 25.24 -.44 CardnlHIth 41.26 -.48
ArcelorMit 16.28 -.27 CarMax 33.30 -.09
ArchCoal 7.91 -.44 Carnival 38.19 -.62
ArchDan 28.52 -.55 Caterpillar 83.86 -2.76
ArmosDor 14.83 -.90 Celanese 37.26 -.95
ArmourRsd 7.04 -.12 Cemex 8.97 -.25
Ashland 69.96 -1.04 Cemigpfs 12.43 +.27
AsdEstat 14.71 +.01 CenterPnt 21.41 -.28
ATMOS 35.95 -.58 CntryLink 38.96 -.39
AuRicog 8.06 -.08 Checkpnt 8.09 -.35
Avnet 27.85 -.24 ChesEng 20.81 -.77
Avon 16.48 -.68 ChesUfi 46.95 -.90
BB&TCp 29.78 -.20 Chevron 113.38 -1.28
BCEg 43.19 -1.15 ChicB&l 38.29 -1.15
BHPBillLt 71.14 -.72 Chieos 18.91 -.26
BP PLC 43.10 -.43 Chimera 2.67 -.04
BRT 6.60 ... ChinaMble 54.09 -.61
BakrHu 44.75 -2.35 Chipofe 243.00 -42.93
BallCorp 42.66 -.29 Cigna 49.66 -.48
BeoBradpf 15.87 -.12 CindBell 5.57 -.06
BeoSantSA 7.64 -.18 Citgroup 37.16 -1.26


CleanHarb 48.92 -1.23
CliffsNRs 44.45 -1.34
Clorox 74.99 -.64
CloudPeak 19.79 -.10
Coach 56.00 -1.37
CobaltlEn 21.73 -.26
CCFemsa 134.71 -1.39
CocaColas 37.40 -.44
CocaCE 31.20 -1.04
Coeur 29.23 -.27
CohStlnfra 18.48 -.19
ColgPal 107.74 -2.26
Comerica 29.43 -.22
CmwREIT 14.55 -.21
ComstkRs 19.96 -.04
Con-Way 28.08 -.41
ConAgra 28.26 -.50
ConocPhils 57.45 -.82
ConsolEngy 35.21 -.87
ConEd 60.47 -.26
ConstellA 35.65 -.65
Cnvrgys 15.89 -.40
Cooper Ind 74.20 -.53
Corning 13.52 -.22
CosanLtd 15.85 +.18
CottCp 8.12 -.17
Covidien 56.40 -1.12
Crane 42.03 -.61
CSVS2xVxS 1.40 +.12
CSVellVSt 17.27 -1.15
CredSuiss 23.49 -.75
Cummins 91.93 -1.19
Ctec 67.03 +.84

DCTIndl 6.56 -.04
DDRCorp 15.68 -.16
DNP Selct 9.93 +.01
DR Horton 21.48 -.07
DSWInc 61.97 -1.65
DTE 61.41 -.28
DanaHldg 12.90 -.39
Danaher 53.34 -.11
Darden 53.83 -1.38
DeVry 21.55 -.31
DeanFds 18.30 +.36
Deere 84.99 -1.87
DeltaAir 10.00 -.21
DenburyR 16.21 -.39
DeutschBk 44.48 -1.89
DevonE 62.00 -.65
DiaOffs 70.52 -.89
DiamRk 8.87 +.01
DigitalRIt 65.24 -1.15
DxFnBullrs 113.82 -4.29
DirSCBear 15.62 +.87
DirFnBear 16.64 +.57
DirSPBear 17.31 +.84
DirDGIdBr 25.88 -.33
DirDGIdBII 15.63 +.13
DrxTcBear 9.42 +.59
DrxEnBear 7.44 +.32
DirEMBear 11.52 +.54
DirxSCBull 57.87 -3.64
Discover 39.62 -.81
Disney 51.90 -.52
DoleFood 12.21 +.02
DollarGen 47.17 -.12
DollarTh 84.75 -.36
DomRescs 53.51 -.07
Dover 58.08 +.14
DowChm 29.86 -.36
DuPont 49.34 -1.08
DukeEn rs 65.51 -.09
DukeRlty 15.07 -.08
Dynegyn 18.95 -.40
E-CDang 4.05 -.13
EMC Cp 24.58 -.42
EOG Res 113.07 -1.68


EastChem 56.08
Eaton 45.81
EatnVan 28.79
EVEnEq 11.07
EVTxMGlo 8.92
Ecolab 69.07
Edisonlnt 47.40
EducRlty 10.50
EdwLfSci 86.14
Ban 10.91
BdorGldg 14.34
EmersonEl 48.25


FordM 10.18 -.25
ForestLab 34.90 -.42
ForestOil 8.69 -.01
FMCG 41.18 -1.25
Freescale 9.25 -.26
Fusion-io 27.55 -.23

GATX 42.92 -1.88
GabelliET 5.55 -.05
GabHIthW 9.37 -.03
GabUIl 7.68 -.09
GafisaSA 4.23 -.22


Hanesbrds 33.16
Hanoverlns 38.90
HarleyD 43.88
HarmonyG 8.14
HartfdFn 22.08
HawaiiEl 26.25
HItCrREIT 59.77
HItMgmt 7.38
HlthcrRlty 23.31
Heckmann 4.21
HeclaM 6.51
Heinz 57.71


iShS&P100 65.82 -1.20
iShChina25 37.13 -.32
iSCorSP500143.86 -2.61
iShEMkts 41.50 -.66
iShiBxB 122.80 +.22
iShB20T 121.74 +1.63
iS Eafe 54.14 -.74
iShiBxHYB 92.96 -.47
iShMtg 14.62 -.09
iSR1KG 65.54 -1.21
iSR2KV 73.04 -1.28
iShR2K 81.85 -1.69


CHI,)NICLE
www.chronicleonline.com




SPay











563-5655

*o-l It's rEZ 'O

*Charge rmay vary at first transaction and at each vacation start
*I


EmpDist 21.63
EnbrdgEPt 29.97
EnCanag 23.91
EndvSilvg 8.80
EngyTsfr 42.25
EnPro 36.25
ENSCO 59.02
Entergy 71.23
EntPrPt 53.54
EqtyRsd 57.13
EsteeLdrs 62.93
EthanAI 29.42
ExeoRes 8.80
Exelon 37.01
ExxonMbl 92.15
FMC Tech 44.37
FairchldS 11.78
FamilyDIr 65.10
FedExCp 92.11
FedSignl 5.96
Ferrellgs 18.31
Ferro 2.74
RdlNFin 22.61
FidNatlnfo 32.41
Fifth&Pac 10.64
FstARn n 23.81
FstHorizon 9.33
FTActDiv 8.40
FtTrEnEq 12.30
FirstEngy 45.98
Fluor 57.16
FootLockr 35.96


GameStop 23.12
Gannett 18.24
Gap 36.37
GenDynam 67.17
GenElec 22.03
GenGrPrp 19.47
GenMills 39.99
GenMotors 24.59
GenOn En 2.78
Genpact 17.58
Genworth 5.63
Gerdau 8.96
GlaxoSKIn 45.33
GoldFLtd 12.06
Goldcrpg 43.29
GoldmanS 123.62
Goodyear 12.39
GrafTech 10.32
GtPlainEn 22.66
Griffon 9.78
GpFSnMxn 14.07
GpTelevisa 23.53
GuangRy 17.97
Guess 24.96
HCA HIdg 30.05
HCP Inc 45.08
HSBC 49.10
HSBCCap 25.70
HalconRrs 7.07
Hallibrtn 34.98
HanJS 16.92
HanPrmDv 14.20


HeimPayne 50.17 -1.36
Hertz 14.34 -.39
Hess 54.28 -1.04
HewlettP 14.48 -.32
HighwdPrp 33.20 -.01
HollyFront 38.18 -.35
HomeDp 61.89 +.09
HonwIllnt 62.49 +1.07
Hormel 28.90 -.60
Hospira 31.31 -.78
HospPT 23.18 -.42
HostHofis 15.55 -.13
HovnanE 4.38 +.07
Humana 74.98 -.74
Huntsmn 15.61 -.35
Hyatt 39.18 +.06
IAMGIdg 15.53 +.07
ICICI Bk 39.35 -.66
ING 8.95 -.26
iShGold 16.77 -.18
iSAsfia 24.56 -.26
iShBraz 54.39 -.73
iShEMU 31.31 -.52
iShGer 23.22 -.33
iSh HK 18.23 -.26
iShltaly 12.70 -.35
iShJapn 9.14 -.12
iShKor 57.43 -1.51
iShMex 67.95 -.72
iShSing 13.36 -.20
iSTaiwn 12.83 -.27
iShSilver 31.09 -.64


iShUSPfd 40.11 -.11
iShREst 64.78 -.61
iShDJHm 20.87 -.01
iStar 8.67 -.18
Idacorp 44.56 -.24
ITW 60.79 +.04
Imafon 5.31 -.09
IngerRd 46.35 +.69
IngrmM 15.34 -.09
IntegrysE 55.18 -.43
IntcnfEx 130.20 -.27
IBM 193.36 -1.60
InfiGame 13.00 -.47
IntPap 37.42 -.73
Interpublic 10.90 -.20
Invesco 24.63 -.56
InvMtgCap 20.87 -.25
IronMtn 34.08 +.30
ItauUnibH 14.53 -.23

JPMorgCh 42.32 -.69
Jabil 17.19 -.07
JanusCap 8.56 -.51
Jefferies 14.40 -.38
JohnJn 71.86 -.66
JohnsnCfi 26.19 -.56
JonesGrp 13.54 -.02
JoyGlbl 62.21 -.73
JnprNtwk 17.79 -.41
KBHome 16.90 +.17
KBR Inc 30.78 -.88


KCSouthn 78.43 +1.05 Medids 43.30 -.06
Kaydons 21.46 -.17 Medtrnic 42.00 -1.18
KA EngTR 27.56 -.32 Merck 47.03 -.93
Kellogg 52.09 -.41 MetLife 35.93 -1.18
KeyEngy 7.23 -.16 MetroPCS 10.97 -.18
Keycorp 8.74 -.04 MetroHIth 10.48 -.26
KimbClk 86.88 -.80 MKors n 55.05 -1.42
Kimco 20.58 -.27 MidAApt 64.50 -.57
KindME 84.71 -1.15 MobileTele 17.37 +.08
KindMorg 34.97 -.90 MolsCoorB 44.03 -.57
KindrMwt 3.85 -.08 Molyeorp 11.05 -.57
Kinrossg 10.10 -.02 MoneyG rs 16.14 -.75
KnghtCap 2.50 -.11 Monsanto 88.69 -1.29
KodiakOg 9.82 -.08 MonstrWw 7.12 -.38
Kohls 52.93 -.69 Moodys 45.62 -.96
KrispKrm 7.77 -.16 MorgStan 17.53 -.26
Kroger 25.13 -.07 MSEmMkt 14.72 -.23
LDKSolar .71 -.10 Mosaic 53.97 -.72
LSICorp 6.46 -.11 MotrlaSolu 50.23 -.53
LTC Prp 32.89 -.21 MurphO 62.20 -1.01
LaZBoy 16.72 -.20 NCRCorp 22.18 +.02
Ladede 42.81 -.29 NRG Egy 23.28 +.01
LVSands 45.28 -.77 NV Energy 18.70 -.29
LeapFrog 9.01 +.27 NYSE Eur 24.41 -.38
LeggPlat 25.86 -.26 Nabors 14.89 -.51
LennarA 38.73 +.05 NatFuGas 52.96 -.94
LexRltyTr 9.51 -.10 NatGrid 56.41 -.27
Lexmark 21.68 -.24 NOilVarco 80.70 -1.33
LbtyASG 4.09 -.05 NatRetPrp 32.09 -.16
LillyEli 52.86 -.95 Navistar 19.04 -1.50
Limited 48.60 -.41 NewAmHi 10.66 -.07
LincNat 25.33 -.41 NJRscs 45.86 -.28
Lindsay 76.73 -.27 NewOriEd 17.37 -.22
Linkedln 106.72 -2.15 NYCmyB 14.53 +.13
LockhdM 92.89 -1.43 NYlmes 10.67 -.16
Lorillard 117.28 -.89 Newcastle 7.89 -.02
LaPac 15.66 -.05 NewellRub 20.60 -.33
Lowes 32.64 +.07 NewfldEx 34.14 .50
L BA 533 NewmtM 54.90 -.07
1 B NewpkRes 6.72 -.57
M&TBk 103.70 -1.18 Nexeng 25.40 -.38
MBIA 1029 -51 NextEraEn 71.72 -.33
MDU Res 21.98 -17 NiSource 25.42 -.27
MEMC 2.45 -.05 NielsenH 31.45 +15
MFAFnd 8.16 NikeB 96.45 -1.12
MCR 10.24 +.09 NobleCorp 39.81 +.33
MGIC 2.02 NokiaCp 2.74 -.06
MGMRsts 11.06 -.11 Nordsrm 56.43 -.73
MackCali 27.65 -.33 NorfkSo 65.64 -1.06
Macquarie 43.00 -.17 NoestUt 39.71 -.09
Macys 39.99 -.47 NorthropG 70.27 -.86
MagelMPts 43.92 -.58 Novarts 63.14 -.58
Magnalntg 44.33 -.80 Nucor 40.53 -.47
MagHRes 4.35 -.20 NustarEn 51.47 -.38
Manitowoc 15.26 +.89 NuvMuOpp 15.60 +.01
ManpwrGp 39.53 +3.55 NvPfdlnco 9.77 -.10
Manulifeg 12.44 -.28 NuvQPf2 9.36 -.03
MarathnO 30.59 -.64 OGEEngy 57.07 -.46
MarathPet 54.94 +.15 OcciPet 84.35 -1.17
MktVGold 51.73 +.21 OcwenFn 35.70 -.36
MVOilSvs 40.79 -.76 OfficeDpt 2.41 -.02
MV Semi n 30.49 -.72 Oi SAs 4.03 -.08
MktVRus 28.91 -.50 OldRepub 10.63 -.08
MktVJrGld 23.64 -.30 Olin 21.61 -.69
MarlntA 37.53 -1.36 OmegaHIt 24.12 -.12
MarshM 34.35 -.63 Omnicom 48.91 -.74
MStewrt 2.90 -.07 OnAssign 19.19 -.58
Masmo 15.04 -.12 ONEOKs 47.62 -.79
McDrmlnt 10.98 -.32 OneokPtrs 60.20 -.53
McDnlds 88.72 -4.14 OpkoHlIth 4.42 -.27
McGrwH 56.09 +.29 OrientEH 11.79 +.74
McKesson 90.20 -1.14 OshkoshCp 29.64 -.29
McMoRn 11.76 -1.00 OvShip 3.25 -.29
McEwenM 4.61 -.06 OwensCorn 32.26 +.13
MeadJohn 70.22 -1.22
Mdbklns 6.18 -1.61
Mechel 6.98 -.30 PG&E Cp 42.78 -.43
MedProp 11.53 +.08 PNC 59.42 -.42
PNM Res 21.61 -.34


PPG 117.73 -1.36 RPM 27.00 -.47
PPL Corp 29.78 -.37 Rackspace 64.75 -1.26
PVR Ptrs 25.94 -.09 RadianGrp 4.66 -.21
PallCorp 63.28 -.26 RadioShk 2.44 +.03
Pandora 9.10 -.27 Raleorp 73.17 -.60
ParkerHan 78.50 -6.57 RangeRs 68.83 -1.67
PeabdyE 25.89 -1.55 RJamesFn 37.55 -.64
Pengrthg 6.51 -.09 Rayonier 49.17 +.22
PennVa 4.94 -.04 Raytheon 55.87 -1.19
Penney 26.01 -.81 Realogyn 36.90 +.70
Pentair 42.58 -.56 Rltylnco 40.94 -.39
PepBoy 10.17 -.08 RedHat 50.73 -1.52
PepeoHold 20.06 +.16 RegionsFn 7.13 -.09
PepsiCo 69.88 -.88 RepubSvc 28.34 -.28
PerkElm 28.57 -.86 Revlon 14.57 -.68
Prmian 14.90 -.13 ReynAmer 41.95 -.82
PetrbrsA 21.97 -.16 RioTinb 51.00 -1.09
Petrobras 22.80 -.21 RiteAid 1.15 -.02
Pfizer 25.76 -.28 RobtHalf 27.24 +1.31
PhilipMor 88.12 +.12 RockwAut 69.92 -2.70
Phillips66 n 44.64 -.92 RockColl 54.04 -.77
PiedNG 32.25 -.07 Rowan 34.28 -.32
Pier 1 20.34 -.33 RylCarb 32.01 -.56
PimoStrat 11.70 -.09 RoyDShllA 68.74 -.50
PinWst 53.63 -.54 Royce 13.05 -.08
PitnyBw 14.27 -.22 RoceiB 25.90
PlainsEx 38.00 -.67
PlumCrk 44.08 -.43
Polaris 88.05 -.30 SAIC 10.89 -.19
PostPrp 49.23 +.54 SAPAG 70.21 -.74
Potash 40.58 -.69 SCANA 49.12 -.40
PwshDB 28.00 -.43 SKTIcm 15.36 -.08
PSSrLoan 24.93 -.02 SpdrDJIA 133.11 -2.06
Praxair 104.88 -3.09 SpdrGold 166.97 -1.82
PrecDrill 8.15 -.18 SpdrEuro50 32.34 -.69
PrinFnd 28.16 -.43 SPMid 179.59 -2.78
ProLogis 35.57 -.81 S&P500ETF143.39 -2.43
ProShtQQQ 25.65 +.60 SpdrHome 26.11 -.06
ProShtS&P 34.19 +.57 SpdrLehHY 40.42 -.18
PrUltQQQs 55.67 -2.82 SpdrS&P RB 27.95 -.18
PrUShQQQ 29.95 +1.37 SpdrRetl 62.21 -1.10
ProUltSP 60.63 -2.16 SpdrOGEx 56.14 -1.09
ProShtR2K 25.42 +.49 SpdrMetM 45.66 -1.16
PrUltSP500 688.87 -4.90 STMicro 6.13 -.33
PrUVxSTrs 28.96 +3.33 Safeway 16.35 -.17
PrUltCrude 29.70 -1.31 StJoe 19.75 -.45
PrUShCrde 41.83 +1.76 Suude 39.50 -.24
ProVixSTF 18.68 +1.12 Salesforce 149.01 -1.09
ProUltSilv 50.14 -2.14 SallyBty 23.52 -.32
ProctGam 68.57 -.90 SJuanB 14.77 +.09
ProgsvCp 22.92 -.16 SandRdge 7.06 -.23
PrUShSPrs 54.84 +1.79 Sanofi 44.55 -1.04
PrUShL20 rs 64.36 -1.75 Sdichlmbrg 74.00 -.80
ProUSR2K 27.80 +1.05 Sdichwab 13.32 -.32
PUSSP500rs38.73 +1.87 ScrippsNet 63.19 +.43
Prudent 58.04 -1.85 SeadrillLtd 41.43 -.21
PSEG 32.71 -.61 Seadrill n 24.37
PubStrg 138.02 +.30 SealAir 15.95 -.56
PulteGrp 17.89 +.24 SenHous 21.79 -.22
PumaBio n 22.38 ... Sensient 35.47 -1.99
PPrIT 5.75 -.02 ShawGrp 43.69 -.67
QEP Res 31.79 +.12 SiderurNac 5.57 -.21
QuanexBld 19.80 -.26 SilvWhtng 39.29 +.07
QuantaSvc 23.55 -.59 SilvrcpMg 5.96
QntmDSS 1.53 -.07 SimonProp 153.54 -1.26
Questar 20.35 -.43 Skechers 17.33 -.49
QksilvRes 4.59 -.12 SmithAO 58.92 -.12
Quiksilvr 3.18 -.11 SmithfF 20.31 -.72




The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.96 -.01
AbdnEMTel 20.70 -.22
AdmRsc 31.77 -.58
Adventrx .72 +.01
AlexeoRg 3.85 -.08
AlldNevG 39.45 -1.10
AmAppared 1.06 -.20
Argan 16.75 -.51
AfiatsaRg .18
Aurizong 4.69 -.10
AvalnRare 1.75 -.07
Bacterin 1.27 -.07


Banrog 4.60
BarcGSOil 21.80
Bionime 3.80
BrigusGg 1.02
Carderog .60
CelSd .37
CFCdag 22.23
CentGoldg 66.78
CheniereEn 15.70
CheniereE 22.04
ChinaShen .27
ClaudeRg .75
ClghGlbOp 11.35
ComstlMn 2.70
Contango 51.14


-.16 CornstProg 5.63 -.01
-.51 CornstTR 6.38 -.06
-17 CornerstSt 7.31 .12
+.02 CrSuiHiY 3.24 -.02
01 Crosshr 14 +01
- 21
-.21 D ourEg .23
+.34 DenisnM g 1.34 -.04
-.34 DocuSec 2.85 -.31
+.33 EVLtdDur 17.01 +.08
-.01 EVMuni2 13.90 +.06
-.01 EllswthFd 7.30 -.03
-.09 EmeraldOil .76 -.03
-.24 EnteeGold .43 +.03
-.85 ExeterRgs 1.40 +.01


GamGIdNR 14.23 -.20
GascoEngy .14 -.00
Gastargrs 1.09 -.02
GastarpfA 17.73 -.92
GenMoly 3.58 -.13
GeoGloblR .11 +.00
GeoMnefcs .29 -.03
GoldResrc 17.58 -.43
GoldStdVg 1.65 -.06
GoldenMin 4.42 -.05
GoldStrg 2.01 +.01
GranTrrag 5.35 +.09
GtPanSilvg 1.91 -.06


Hemisphrx .69 -.01
HstnAEn .40 -.01
ImmunoCII 1.99 -.08
ImpacMtg 10.70 -.20
ImpOilgs 45.55 -.77
InovioPhm .69 +.01
IntellgSys 1.56 +.11
IntTowerg 2.66 -.01
Inuvo 1.07 -.08
Iteris 1.64 +.02

KeeganRg 4.02 +.02
LadThalFn 1.30 -.07
LkShrGldg .81 -.01
LongweiPI 2.14 -.01


NthnO&G 16.21 -.53 Richmntg 4.00 -.05
NovaBayP 1.29 +.00 Rubi 3.72 -.03
NovaCpp n 2.55 +.10
Meeaieo 2.405 -.025 SamsO&G .88 -.01
Metalim g 240 -01 San mstgrs 13.59 .16
MdwGoldg 1.68 -.08 ParaG&S 2.48 SynergyRs 4.13 -.08
MinesMgt 1.33 +.04 PhrmAth 1.05 -.06 TanzRyg 5.04 -.02
NavideaBio 2.69 -.07 PlatGpMet 1.03 -.01 Taseko 2.84 -.13
NeoStem .72 +.01 PolyMetg 1.09 -.02 TravelCts 5.03
NBRESec 4.75 ... Protalix 5.02 -.09 TriangPet 7.07 -.23
Neuralstem 1.12 -.02 PyramidOil 4.16 -.13 USGeoth .34 +.03
Nevsung 4.68 -.07 QuestRMg 1.29 -.05 USAnfmny 2.06 -.29
NwGoldg 11.85 -.02 RareEleg 4.34 -.19 Ur-Energy .93 -.03
NAPallg 1.65 ... Rentech 2.48 -.06 Uranerz 1.52 -.05
NDynMng 3.69 -.11 RexahnPh .47 +.01 UraniumEn 2.35 -.14


VangMega 49.32 -.84
VantageDrl 1.88 +.03
VirnetX 27.79 -.52
VistaGold 3.40 -.14
Vringo 3.93 -.22
Walterlnv 41.34 -1.17
WFAdvlnco 10.47 -.08
YMBiog 1.61 -.06


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 45.53 +.26
ASMLHId 52.18 +.84
Abiomed 19.70 -.63
Abraxas 2.15 -.04
AcadaTc 24.51 -.52
AcadiaHI n 21.77 -.43
AcadiaPh 2.40 -.08
Accuray 6.43 -.04
Achillion 10.25 -.67
AcmePkt 16.23 -.61
AeordaTh 23.30 -.71
AcfvsBliz 11.18 -.12
Actuate 6.08 -.01
AdobeSy 33.24 -.24
Adtran 15.83 -.13
Aegerion 19.65 -1.29
Aegion 19.30 -.28
AEterngrs 2.28 -.12
Affymax 24.47 -2.87
Affymetrix 3.55 +.01
AirTrnsp 3.94 -.06
AkamaiT 36.37 -.91
Akorn 12.51 -.48
Alexion 107.62 -6.05
Alexzars 5.27 -.20
AlignTech 27.68 -.50
Alkermes 18.76 -.66
AllscriptH 13.58 -.09
AlnylamP 17.32 -.51
AlteraCp If 32.51 -.69
AlterraCap 24.38 -.37
Amarin 11.26 -.51
Amazon 240.00 -4.85
ACapAgy 33.04 +.04
AmCapLd 11.89 -.17
ACapMtg 24.82 -.24
ARItyCTn 11.76 -.13
AmCasino 18.35 -.27
Amgen 87.16 -2.63
AmicusTh 5.86 -.22
AmkorTch 4.26 -.13
AmpioPhm 3.96 -.16
Amyris 2.90 -.05
AnalogDev 38.45 -.78
Anlogic 74.76 -3.26
Analystlnt 3.97
Ancestry 29.18 -.50
AngiesL n 9.32 -.44
Ansys 68.85 -1.90
AntaresP 3.86 -.07
AntheraPh .95 -.03
vA123 .12 +.05
ApolloGrp 20.39 -.78
Apollolnv 7.94 -.08
Apple Inc 609.84 -22.80
ApldMat 10.84 -.35
AMCC 4.50 -.06
Approach 26.99 -1.02
ArQule 2.69 -.06
ArenaPhm 9.19 -.36
AresCap 17.28 -.08
AriadP 23.14 -1.18
ArkBest 7.60 -.60
ArmHId 28.10 -.40
ArrayBio 4.49 -.38
Arris 13.03 +.01
ArubaNet 18.99 -.77
AscenaRts 20.97 -.21
AscentSolr .97 -.07
AsialnfoL 10.69 -.12
AspenTech 24.67 -.57
AspnBio rs 2.69 -.03
AssodBanc 12.90 +.34
AstexPhm 2.65 -.20
athenahlth 73.31 -6.76
Athersys 1.20 +.04
Atmel 4.62 -.23
Autodesk 30.47 -1.12
AutoData 58.42 -.69
Auxilium 20.56 -.88
AvagoTch 33.19 -.86
AvanirPhm 3.18 +.01
AVEO Ph 7.74 -.54
AviatNetw 2.37 +.04


AvisBudg 17.03
Aware 5.90
BBCNBcp 12.29
B/EAero 43.41
BG Med 2.47
BGC Ptrs 4.66
BJsRest 37.92
BMC Sft 40.34
Baidu 112.38
Bazaarvcn 13.96
BeacnRfg 30.19
BeasleyB 4.78
BedBath 60.24
BerkHBcp 23.20
BioRetLab 31.07
BioDIvrylf 5.64
Biocryst 4.50
BioFuel rs 6.94
Biogenldc 145.65
BioMarin 42.29
BioSanters 1.34
BioScrip 9.09
BIkRKelso 9.92
Blckbaud 24.00
Blueora 17.28
BobEvans 37.58
BonTon 11.64
BostPrv 9.62
BreitBurn 19.92
Brightcvn 12.24
Broadcom 33.33
BroadSoft 35.93
BrcdeCm 5.46
BrooksAuto 7.33
BrukerCp 11.77
BuffabWW 83.92
BldrFstSrc 4.87
CA Inc 24.51
CBOE 28.97
CH Robins 60.73
CME Grp s 56.50
CVBFnd 11.19
CadencePh 3.73
Cadence 12.61
Caesars n 6.39
CalaStrTR 10.17
CalAmp 8.95
CdnSolar 2.63
CapCtyBk 10.47
CapFedFn 11.60
CpstnTrb h .97
Cardiom gh .27
CareerEd 3.60
CaribouC 11.94
Carrizo 26.49
CarverB rs 3.73
Caseys 49.27
CatalystPh 1.66
Catamarn s 48.42
CathayGen 18.11
Cavium 31.68
Celgene 75.16
CellTher rs 1.50
CelldexTh 5.64
Celsion 4.70
CentEurop 2.81
CentAI 7.60
Cepheid 30.59
Cereplast h .24
Cerner 70.43
CerusCp 3.30
Chartlnds 70.86
CharterCm 78.54
ChkPoint 41.72
Cheesecake 33.73
ChelseaTh 1.35
ChipMOS 11.36
ChrchllD 64.03
CienaCorp 12.43
CinnFin 39.53
Cintas 41.88
Cirrus 38.22
Cisco 18.04
CitzRepBc 18.65
CitrixSys 64.16
CleanEngy 13.11
Clearwire 1.85
ClevBioL h 1.83


-.38 CogentC 21.98 -.41
-.25 CognizTech 68.77 -.60
-.12 CogoGrp 2.35 -.03
-1.31 Coinstar 43.83 -1.64
-.48 ColdwCrsh 3.78 +.07
-.15 CollabJpun 10.02
-1.62 Comcast 36.95 -.34
-.76 Comcspd 36.03 -.28
-.80 CmcBMO 37.68 -.07
-.56 CommSys 10.60 -.14
-.71 CommVIt 55.77 -1.16
-.12 Compuwre 9.57 -.13
-.78 Comverse 6.43 -.06
+.14 ConcurTch 66.22 -.84
-1.05 Conmed 27.35 -.82
-.26 ConstantC 17.10 -.38
+.14 CopanoEn 31.75 -1.61
-.37 Coparts 27.17 -.18
-3.91 CorinthC 2.51 -.22
-.53 CorOnDem 28.99 -1.00
-.06 Costeo 94.78 -1.55
-.36 Creelnc 28.88 -.10
-.08 Crocs 16.38 -.23
+.09 Ctrip.eom 19.34 -.52
-.40 CubistPh 45.66 -1.59
-1.38 Curis 4.01 -.19
-.20 Cymer 75.75 +1.62
-.15 CypSemi 9.67 -.40
+.01 CytRxrs 2.52 +.02
-.36 CytoMneth .73 +.01
-1.24 4.04 -.24
+.05
-.14
-.12 DealrTrk 27.96
-.29 DeckrsOut 37.08 -1.36
-2.21 Delcath 1.67 -.04
-.04 Dell Inc 9.55 -.25
-.40 Dndreon 4.33 +.02
-.50 Dennys 4.71 -.22
-.68 Dentsply 36.91 -.84
-1.16 Depomed 6.21 -.24
-.13 DexCom 13.68 -.44
-.20 DigRiver 13.97 -.48
-.11 Diodes 15.00 -.74
-.32 DirecTV 51.35 -.72
-.12 DiscCmAh 60.44 -1.33
-.29 DiscovLab 2.85 -.10
-.04 DishNetwk 35.47 -.27
-.15 DollarTrs 39.15 -.21
-.02 DonlleyRR 10.49 -.26
-.02 DrmWksA 20.78 -.80
-.01 DryShips 2.38 -.05
-.18 Dunkin 32.33 +.01
+.09 DurectCp 1.47 -.09
-.70 DyaxCp 2.97 -.20
DynMat 13.40 -.63
-.27 Dynavax 4.38 -.17
-.05 E-Trade 8.57 -.85
-2.01 eBay 49.97 -.86
-.45 EaglRkEn 10.14 -.16
-1.33 ErthLink 6.88 -.07
-3.32 EstWstBcp 21.61 +.08
-.01 EducDevel 4.00
-.35 8x8 Inc 5.93 -.32
-.23 ElectSd 12.06 -.49
-.23 ElectArts 13.08 -.75
-.29 EFII 17.89 +.85
-2.45 EndoPhrm 30.32 -.58
-.01 Endocyte 9.58 -.48
-1.68 Endobgix 13.15 -.15
-.02 EngyXXI 34.19 -1.05
-1.39 Entegris 7.89 -.26
+.03 EntropCom 5.52 -.16
+.30 Equinix 182.84 -3.43
-1.08 Ericsson 9.05 -.13
-.02 ExactScih 9.84 -.16
-.90 Exelids 4.72 -.22
-.54 ExddeTc 3.15 -.13
-.19 Expedias 52.10 -2.18
-.30 Expdlnfi 35.32 -.22
-.51 ExpScripts 62.56 -1.23
-.28 ExtrmNet 3.30 -.02
-.57 Ezcorp 19.21 -.42
-.11 F5 Netwks 95.84 -1.21
-.75 FLIRSys 19.37 -.20
-.34 FX Ener 6.23 -.23
-.18 Facebookn 19.00 +.03
-.65 Fastenal 43.76 -.98


FedMogul 8.40 -1.04 Infinera 4.83 -.12
FifthStRn 10.70 -.10 InfinityPh 24.25 -1.29
FifthThird 15.02 -.10 Informat 29.22 +.61
Fndlnst 18.16 -.40 Infosys 43.69 -.75
Finisar 11.65 -.54 Insulet 20.99
FinLine 20.85 -.34 IntgDv 5.78 -.23
FstCashFn 45.64 +.47 Intel 21.27 -.41
FMidBc 12.88 +.11 InteractB 14.09 -.57
FstNiagara 8.24 -.04 InterDig 34.39 -1.20
FstSolar 23.54 -1.60 Intrface 14.04 -.26
FstMerit 14.12 -.07 InterMune 9.25 -.57
Fiserv 75.31 -.55 InfiSpdw 26.17 -.16
Flextrn 5.96 -.16 Intersil 6.94 -.14
Fluidigm 15.21 -.48 Intuit 59.82 -.80
FocusMda 23.99 +.03 IntSurg 538.35 +2.53
Fonar 5.22 -.28 InvRIEst 8.33 -.04
Fortnet 19.72 +.19 IRIS Int 19.49 +.01
ForwrdA 32.54 +1.93 IronwdPh 12.63 -.63
Fossil Inc 89.35 +.60 Isis 9.35 -.27
FosterWhl 22.97 -1.07 Itron 41.94 -.64
Francesca 29.38 -.86 IvanhoeEh .51 +.03
FronterCm 4.76 -.13 IMa 14.88 -1.17
FuelCell .93 -.04
FultonFncl 9.79 -.05
JASolarh .62 -.09
JDASoft 34.05 -.05
GSVCap 7.87 -.23 JDSUniph 10.17 -.31
GTAdvTc 4.77 -.25 JacklnBox 25.46 -2.22
GalenaBio 1.92 -.09 Jamba 2.31 -.06
Garmin 38.93 -.82 JamesRiv 5.00 +.15
Genomic 34.42 -.26 JazzPhrm 55.37 -2.10
Gentex 16.96 -.56 JetBlue 5.20 -.11
Gentherm 11.47 -.43 JiveSoftn 11.52 -.74
Genfiva h 9.93 -.20 JoesJeans 1.07 -.05
GeronCp 1.44 -.09 JosABank 49.11 -.99
Gevo 1.95 -.05 K Swiss 2.50 -.20
GileadSd 66.59 -1.70 KIT Digif 2.25 -.16
GladerBc 14.85 -.07 KLATnc 45.58 -.99
GluMobile 3.28 -.17 KeryxBio 2.76 -.24
GolLNGLtd 38.89 -.57 KiOR 5.10 -.42
GolubCap 15.68 -.26 KraftFGpn 46.03 -.37
Google 681.79 -13.21 Kulicke 9.45 -.37
GrCanyEd 21.63 -1.07 LKQCps 20.43 -.37
GrLkDrge 7.01 -.12 LPL Find 27.58 -.56
GreenMtC 23.93 -.90 LSI Ind If 6.83 -.06
Groupon n 4.69 -.22 LamResrch 35.37 -.64
GuarantyBc 1.95 +.01 LamarAdv 39.05 -.57
GulfRes 1.36 +.16 Landstar 48.52 -1.09
GulfportE 32.32 -.68 Lattce 3.69 +.18
H&EEqs 15.16 +.01 LeapWirlss 5.98 -.09
HMN Fn 3.64 LedPhrm 2.23 -.03
HMS Hdgs 27.06 -.34 LibGlobA 62.10 +.08
HainCel 59.72 -.23 LibCapA 112.64 -.66
Halozyme 5.79 -.25 LibtylntA 20.03 -.14
HancHId 30.22 -.33 LibVentAn 53.18 -.47
HansenMed 1.78 -.04 LifePtrs 2.29 +.07
Harmonic 4.27 -.12 LifeTech 47.36 -1.52
Hasbro 39.05 ... LimelghtN 2.10
HawHold 5.22 -.10 LincElec 39.80 -1.24
HIthCSvc 23.90 -.22 LinearTch 31.20 -.40
Healthwys 10.91 -.19 LinnEngy 41.33 -.34
HrfindEx 13.46 -.21 LinnCon 38.41 -.46
HSchein 74.91 -.65 Liquidity 39.94 -.39
HercOffsh 5.03 -.07 LivePrsn 15.61 -.67
Hologic 20.46 -.93 LocalCorp 2.69 -.21
HmLnSvcn 19.35 +.75 LodgeNeth .35 +.01
HomeAway 25.34 -.65 Logitech 8.62 -.20
HorizPhm 3.12 -.10 LogMeln 20.09 -.41
HotTopic 9.05 -.40 LookSmth .81 +.01
HubGroup 31.25 -.18 Lulkin 56.60 -.86
HudsCity 8.64 -.11 luulemna 6903 -562
HuntJB 57.33 -.90 i eI
HuntBncsh 6.45 -.16
IAC Inter 52.69 +.03 MBFncl 18.99 -.19
IdexxLabs 97.59 -1.37 MCG Cap 4.81 -.02
IPG Photon 57.91 -1.34 MGE 52.59 -.94
iShACWI 47.02 -.73 MIPSTech 6.99 -.15
iShs SOX 49.47 -1.53 MKS Inst 23.44 -.51
iShNsdqBio 139.40 -4.34 MTS 51.62 -1.85
IconixBr 18.57 -.14 MagicJcks 23.03 +2.57
IdenixPh 4.15 -.16 Majeseo 1.09 -.02
Idenfive 1.10 +.03 MAKOSrg 15.05 -.33
Illumina 46.68 -.45 ManhAssc 61.69 +.38
ImunoGn 14.52 -.84 MannKd 1.98 +.01
Imunmd 3.39 -.08 MarvellT 7.57 -1.26
ImpaxLabs 24.98 -.79 Masimo 21.93 -.86
inContact 5.89 -.22 Mattel 37.50 -.29
Incyte 17.22 -.54 Mattson .79 -.04


MaximlnIg 26.64 -.75 PaneraBrd 161.85 -7.69
MaxwlT 7.49 -.37 ParamTch 20.22 -.72
MedAssets 17.28 -1.01 Parexel 29.83 -1.03
MedicAcIn 3.17 +.06 ParkerVsn 1.60 -.06
MediCo 24.58 -.40 Patterson 33.49 -.43
Medivatns 52.95 +1.84 PattUTI 17.31 -.50
MeleoCrwn 13.93 -.23 Paychex 32.55 -.41
Mellanox 77.01 -.98 Pegasys If 22.69 -.91
MentorGr 15.39 -.54 PnnNGm 41.98 -.92
MercadoL 85.23 -3.20 PennantPk 10.82 -.01
MergeHIth 3.33 -.10 PeopUtdF 12.29 +.25
Merrimkn 6.93 -.44 PeregrinP .75 -.03
Microchp 31.35 -.37 PerfectWld 10.44 +.07
MicronT 5.45 -.20 Perficient 10.97 -.96
MicrosSys 48.51 -.97 Perrigo 117.77 -1.43
MicroSemi 18.53 -.49 PetSmart 68.61 -1.12
Microsoft 28.64 -.86 Pharmacyc 62.24 -6.13
Mindspeed 3.34 -.12 PhotrIn 4.86 -.19
Misonix 4.27 -.12 Pbielwrks 2.43 -.62
Molex 26.57 -.30 PluristemT 3.85 -.11
Momenta 14.00 -.49 Polymom 9.47 -.21
Mondelez 27.01 -.41 Pool Corp 42.94 +.77
MonroMuf 33.60 -.26 Popular rs 18.98 -.30
MonstrBvs 53.32 -2.71 Power-One 4.41 -.03
Mylan 23.65 -.48 PwShs QQQ 65.68 -1.61
MyriadG 25.87 -.59 Pwrwvrsh .39 +.03
NABIBio 1.80 ... PranaBo 2.70 -.19
NETgear 37.32 -.39 PresLf 13.94 -.02
NICESys 32.00 -.91 Presstekh .50 +.00
NIl HIdg 7.55 -.06 PriceTR 65.35 -1.06
NPS Phm 9.31 -.46 priceline 560.50 -21.88
NXP Semi 22.21 -.99 PrimoWtr .77 -.02
Nanosphere 3.02 -.11 PrivateB 16.63 -.05
NasdOMX 24.27 -.30 PrUPQQQs 52.91 -4.12
NatPenn 8.63 -.02 PrognicsPh 3.25 -.01
NektarTh 9.79 -.63 ProgrsSoft 18.66 -.34
Neonode 4.15 -.20 PUShQQQrs41.48 +2.82
NeptuneTg 3.59 -.12 ProspctCap 11.84 -.14
NetApp 29.95 -.32 PureBio rsh 1.29 -.06
NetEase 53.01 +.40 PureCycle 2.53 -.24
Netfiix 64.98 -2.38 QIAGEN 17.24 -1.04
NtScout 25.17 +.96 QlikTech 20.55 -.45
NetSpend 10.30 -.01 Qlogic 9.44 -.35
Neurcrine 7.77 -.24 Qualeom 58.75 -1.21
NYMtgTr 6.63 -.10 QualityS s 18.15 -.72
Newport 10.54 -.27 Questeor 24.99 -.77
NewsCpA 24.91 -.51 RF MicD 3.65 +.03
NewsCpB 25.36 -.48 RPX Corp 9.69 -.09
Nordson 57.50 -.99 Rambus 4.79 -.15
NorTrst 47.10 -1.22 Randgold 120.55 +.65
NwstBcsh 12.19 +.05 RaptorPhm 4.85 -.03
Novavax 2.21 -.14 Regenrn 158.24 -2.48
NuVasive 13.36 -.35 Regulus n 4.72 +.26
NuanceCm 22.34 -.19 RentACt 33.68 -.83
Nvidia 12.11 -.76 RschMotn 7.76 -.08
NxStageMd 11.85 -.43 Responsys 9.19 -.40
OCZTech 1.30 -.08 RexEnergy 13.35 -.32
OReillyAu 80.58 +.66 RigelPh 9.00 -.45
ObagiMed 12.40 -.10 RiverbedT 23.06 +2.37
Oclaro 2.17 -.03 RosttaGrs 5.29 -.26
OdysMar 2.96 +.01 RosettaR 47.37 -1.00
OldDomFs 30.37 -.44 RossStrss 61.88 -.74
OmniVisn 13.92 -.44 Rovi Corp 13.60 -.74
OnSmcnd 6.03 -.23 RoyGId 86.58 +.38
Oneothyr 5.16 -.31 rue21 31.09 -.31
OnyxPh 85.19 -2.81
OpenTbleh 43.59 -.39
OpbmerPh 10.59 -.32 SBACom 66.10 -.60
Oracle 30.48 -.64 SEI Inv 21.19 -.38
OraSure 9.30 -.20 SHFL Ent 14.75 -.43
Orexigen 6.15 -.11 SLMCp 16.61 -.35
Orthfx 40.01 -1.54 STEC 6.01 -.23
OtterTail 23.83 -.22 SalixPhm 40.31 -.37
Overstk 11.10 -.02 SanDisk 44.02 +1.16
SangBio 5.77 -.22
Sanmina 7.99 -.42
PDCEngy 31.29 -1.33 Santarus 9.52 -.16
PDLBio 8.25 +.03 Sapient 10.26 -.18
PLXTch 4.34 -.18 Sareptars 24.41 -2.12
PMCSra 4.87 -.18 Satconrsh .25 +.13
PSSWrld 21.85 -.23 SavientPh 2.13
Paccar 40.41 -.43 Schnitzer 28.37 -1.54
PacBiosci 1.22 -.03 SchoolSp 2.04 +.12
PacEthan h .38 -.01 SdClone 5.90 -.33
PacSunwr 1.89 -.11 SdGames 7.95 -.26
PadraPhm 16.30 -.58 SeagateT 27.90 -.07
PainTher 5.28 -.55 SearsHIdgs 58.72 -2.29
PanASIv 21.17 -.22 SeattGen 26.04 -.90


SelCmfrt 30.73
Selectvlns 19.54
Semtech 24.47
Sequenom 3.50
SvcSource 8.37
ShandaG s 3.51
Shire 87.89
ShoreTe 4.89
Shutterfly 29.84
SifyTech 2.51
SigmaAld 72.67
SilganHId 42.67
Silicnlmg 4.34
SilcnLab 35.54
SilicnMotn 14.67
Slcnware 5.13
SilvStdg 15.12
Sina 56.14
Sindair 12.50
SiriusXM 2.92
SironaDent 55.02
Skullcandy 11.94
SkyWest 11.43
SkywksSol 22.14
SmartBal 12.15
SmartTcg 1.44
SmithWes 9.76
SodaStrm 37.04
Sohu.cm 38.44
Solazyme 9.86
SoltaMed 2.95
SonicCorp 9.88
Sonus 1.79
SouMoBc 24.13
Sourcefire 42.81
SpectPh 11.51
SpiritAir 17.36
Splunkn 31.51
Spreadtrm 20.88
Staples 11.23
StarSdent 3.20
Starbucks 45.69
SfDynam 12.56
StemCells 2.20
Stericyde 91.87
SMadden 44.53
Stratasys 62.06
Stayer 56.38
SunHIth 8.46
SunesisPh 4.90
SunPwr h 4.35
SusqBnc 10.08
SwisherH If 1.40
SycamNet 5.76
Symantec 17.43
Symetricm 6.42
Synaeorn 6.12
Synapfcs 23.75
SynrgyP rs 4.19
Synopsys 32.00
SyntaPhm 8.21
Syntrolm h .65
TTMTdh 9.28
tw teleom 26.15
TakeTwo 10.98
Tangoe 13.03
TASER 6.38
TechData 44.17
TICmSys 1.78
Tellabs 3.24
TescoCp 9.86
TeslaMot 27.74
TesseraTch 13.85
TetraTc 25.00
TxCapBsh 47.32
Texlnst 27.81
TexRdhse 16.78
Theravnce 24.22
Thoratec 34.80
ThrshdPhm 5.01
TibcoSft 26.47
TitanMach 22.42
TiVo Inc 9.94
Towerstm 3.78
TractSupp 93.97
TrimbleN 46.01
TripAdvn 29.93
TriQuint 4.87


TrueRelig 25.88 +.10
TrstNY 5.70
Trustmk 23.45 -.22
UTStarcm .97 -.01
UllWrldwd 14.40 +.52
UltaSalon 94.78 -.77
Ultratech 28.88 -1.04
Umpqua 11.98 -.07
Unilife 2.57 -.05
UtdOnln 5.47 -.08
US Enr 2.01 -.03
UtdStatn 27.63 -.02
UtdTherap 54.86 -1.61
UnivDisp 32.27 -1.68
UnivFbr 36.47 -.93
UnwiredP 1.42 +.04
UranmRsh .41 -.01
UrbanOut 37.09 -.82


VCAAnt 20.14 -.50
VOXX( Inf 6.30 -.23
ValueClick 16.60 -.53
VanSTCpB 80.59 -.09
Veeeolnst 29.49 -.52
Veli 7.52 +.09
VBradley 29.74 -.76
Verisign 47.37 -1.33
Verisk 46.50 -.46
VertxPh 50.24 -2.39
ViacomB 54.67 -.90
Vical 3.64 -.23
VirgnMdah 32.80 -.02
ViroPhrm 27.96 -1.80
VistaPrt 34.19 -1.79
Vivus 20.60 -.46
Vodafone 28.38
Volcano 26.85 -.21
Volterra 17.82 -.61
WarnerCh 12.37 -.38
WashFed 17.02 +.17
WaveSys h .83 -.11
Web.com 17.35 -.40
WebMD 14.23 +.03
WendysCo 4.19 -.12
WernerEnt 22.06 -.43
WDigital 34.88 -.67
Westmrld 8.46 -.62
Wstptlnn g 29.35 -1.00
WetSeal 2.96 -.05
WholeFd 96.65 -3.24
WillsL pfA 10.02 -.01
WilshBcp 6.29 +.04
Windstrm 9.91 -.20
Wintrust 37.64 +.05
WisdomTr 7.05 -.22
Woodward 33.12 -1.24
WrightM 20.47 -.78
Wynn 115.62 -2.68
XOMA 3.21 -.17
XenoPort 9.84 -.05
Xflinx 33.06 -.61
Xyratex 7.54 +.14
YRC rs 6.72 -.04
Yahoo 15.84 -.16
Yandex 22.24 -.17
Yongye 5.51 -.05
ZaZaEngy 1.70 -.13
Zagg 7.90 -.22
Zalicus .65 +.02
ZIlow 36.61 -.41
ZonBcp 21.45 -.03
Zopharm 4.35 -.32
Zpcar 6.62 -.18
ZxCorp 2.90 +.02
Zogenix 2.60 -.13
Zoltek 7.37 -.18
Zumiez 25.99 -.68
Zyngan 2.40 -.11


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.7390 4.7340
Australia .9681 .9648
Bahrain .3770 .3769
Brazil 2.0280 2.0290
Britain 1.6014 1.6062
Canada .9934 .9853
Chile 474.28 472.80
China 6.2547 6.2539
Colombia 1798.90 1797.50
Czech Rep 19.08 18.98
Denmark 5.7272 5.7114
Dominican Rep 39.42 39.42
Egypt 6.1068 6.1078
Euro .7678 .7657
Hong Kong 7.7501 7.7505
Hungary 214.21 212.35
India 53.840 53.605
Indnsia 9610.00 9587.00
Israel 3.8269 3.8214
Japan 79.28 79.23
Jordan .7085 .7079
Lebanon 1504.00 1504.00
Malaysia 3.0505 3.0360
Mexico 12.8652 12.8543
N. Zealand 1.2256 1.2210
Norway 5.6615 5.6363
Peru 2.584 2.579
Poland 3.15 3.14
Russia 31.0315 30.7980
Singapore 1.2210 1.2190
So. Africa 8.6567 8.6570
So. Korea 1106.05 1104.30
Sweden 6.5768 6.5680
Switzerlnd .9285 .9253
Taiwan 29.26 29.25
Thailand 30.73 30.68
Turkey 1.7959 1.7962
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6731
Uruguay 19.8499 19.8499
Venzuel 4.2953 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.10 0.11
6-month 0.14 0.16
5-year 0.75 0.66
10-year 1.76 1.66
30-year 2.94 2.83



S FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Dec 12 90.44 -2.09
Corn CBOT Dec 12 76112 +3/4
Wheat CBOT Dec 12 87212 +4
Soybeans CBOT Nov12 153414 -1174
Cattle CME Dec12 127.27 -.78
Sugar (world) ICE Mar13 20.23 +.44
Orange Juice ICE Jan 13 113.25 -1.00



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1722.80 $1758.00
Silver (troy oz., spot) $32.0/3 $33.633
Copper (pound) $3.648b $3./14b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)1613.00 $16b /.1U

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE= New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... ... ... 5.51 -.28 -33.3 Lowes .64 2.0 21 32.64 +.07 +28.6
AT&T Inc 1.76 5.0 47 35.32 -.70 +16.8 McDnlds 3.08 3.5 17 88.72 -4.14 -11.6
Ameteks .24 .7 20 34.04 -1.33 +21.3 Microsoft .92 3.2 15 28.64 -.86 +10.3
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 85.57 -.80 +40.3 MotrlaSolu 1.04 2.1 25 50.23 -.53 +8.5
BkofAm .04 .4 25 9.44 -.03 +69.8 NextEraEn 2.40 3.3 14 71.72 -.33+17.8
CapCtyBk ...... 10.47 -.15 +9.6 Penney 26.01 -.81 -26.0
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 43 38.96 -.39 +4.7 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 13 17.61 -.08 +3.3
Citigroup .04 .1 12 37.16 -1.26 +41.2 RegionsFn .04 .6 17 7.13 -.09 +65.8
mwREIT 1.00 6.9 20 14.55 .21 1 SearsHIdgs .33 58.72 -2.29 +84.8
mwREIT 1.00 6.9Smucker 2.08 2.5 21 84.76 -.61 +8.4
Disney .60 1.2 17 51.90 -.52 +38.4 SprintNex ......5.65 -.13+141.5
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.7 17 65.51 -.09 Texlnst .84 3.0 19 27.81 -.95 -4.5
EnterPT 3.00 6.8 20 44.33 -.46 +1.4 TimeWarn 1.04 2.3 17 44.93 -.95 +24.3
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.5 12 92.15 -1.33 +8.7 UniFirst .15 .2 14 68.66 -.87 +21.0
FordM .20 2.0 8 10.18 -.25 -5.4 VerizonCm 2.06 4.6 42 45.16 -.62 +12.6
GenElec .68 3.1 18 22.03 -.78 +23.0 Vodafone 1.99 7.0 ... 28.38 ... +1.2
HomeDp 1.16 1.9 22 61.89 +.09 +47.2 WalMart 1.59 2.1 16 75.62 -.94 +26.5
Intel .90 4.2 9 21.27 -.41 -12.3 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 15 35.79 -.32 +8.3
IBM 3.40 1.8 13193.36 -1.60 +5.2 YRC rs ... ... ... 6.72 -.04 -32.6


m


A10 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: EVPTxMEmI 47.10 -.56
Balancp 17.09 -.14 Eaton Vance A:
RetInc 9.01 +.01 ChinaAp 16.89 -.24
Alger Funds B: AMTFMuInc 10.50 -.01
SmCapGr 6.89 -.12 MulbCGrA 8.57 -.16
AllianceBern A: InBosA 5.95
GblRiskp 17.48 -.03 LgCpVal 19.72 -.27
GIbThGrAp63.26 -1.17 NatlMunlnc 10.24 -.02
SmCpGrA 38.51 -.59 SpEqtA 16.00 -.21
AllianceBern Adv: TradGvA 7.38 +.01
LgCpGrAd 30.11 -.56 Eaton Vance B:
AllianceBern B: HIthSBt 10.83 -.15
GIbThGrBt 54.19 -1.00 NatlMulnc 10.24 -.02
GrowthBt 27.37 -.47 Eaton Vance C:
SCpGrBt 30.66 -.48 GovtC p 7.37 +.01
AllianceBern C: NatMunInc 10.24 -.02
SCpGrC t 30.84 -.48 Eaton Vance 1:
Allianz Fds Instl: FItgRt 9.10 -.01
NFJDvVI 12.91 -.20 GblMacAbR 9.97
SmCpVi 31.33 -.44 LgCapVal 19.78 -.26
Allianz Funds C: FBR Funds:
AGICGrthC 26.49 -.48 Focuslnvtn51.27 -.71
Amer Beacon Insti: FMI Funds:
LgCaplnst 21.91 -.30 LgCappn 17.40 -.21
Amer Beacon Inv: FPA Funds:
LgCaplnv 20.75 -.29 Newlnco 10.61
Ameri Century 1st: FPACres 28.70 -.30
Growth 28.21 -.47 Fairholme 31.56 -.92
Amer Century Adv: Federated A:
EqGroAp 24.45 -.41 MidGrStA 34.99 -.60
EqlncAp 8.00 -.09 MuSecA 10.78 +.01
Amer Century Inv: Federated Insti:
AIICapGr 30.85 -.62 KaufmnR 5.32 -.10
Balanced 17.52 -.16 TotRetBd 11.63 +.03
DivBnd 11.28 +.03 StrValDvlS 5.17 -.05
EqInc 8.00 -.09 Fidelity Adv FocT:
Growthl 27.93 -.47 EnergyT 37.05 -.50
Heritagel 22.73 -.43 HItCarT 23.42 -.51
IncGro 27.54 -.47 Fidelity Advisor A:
InfAdjBd 13.41 +.05 Nwlnsghp 22.72 -.40
IntDisc 9.88 -.13 StrlnA 12.78
InfiGrol 11.00 -.14 Fidelity Advisor C:
NewOpp 8.17 -.13 Nwlnsghtn21.41 -.38
OneChAg 13.20 -.16 Fidelity Advisor I:
OneChMd 12.64 -.12 EqGrln 65.82 -1.23
RealEstl 23.49 -.19 EqInin 26.71 -.35
Ultra 25.99 -.52 IntBdl n 11.73 +.02
Valuelnv 6.37 -.10 Nwlnsgtl n 23.04 -.41
American Funds A: Srlni n 12.94
AmcpAp 21.20 -.34 Fidelity AdvisorT:
AMulAp 28.53 -.39 BalancT 16.63 -.16
BalAp 20.31 -.20 DivGrTp 13.29 -.21
BondAp 12.96 +.03 EqGrTp 61.39 -1.15
CaplBAp 53.05 -.41 EqInT 26.30 -.34
CapWGAp 36.35 -.45 GrOppT 41.35 -1.00
CapWAp 21.59 -.01 HilnAdTp 10.33 -.03
EupacAp 40.05 -.50 IntBdT 11.70 +.01
FdlnvAp 40.23 -.66 MulncTp 13.76
GIblBalA 26.57 -.19 OvrseaT 17.33 -.18
GovtAp 14.57 +.03 STFiT 9.35
GwthA p 33.69 -.52 StkSelAIICp 20.38 -.32
HI TrAp 11.30 -.01 Fidelity Freedom:
IncoAp 18.15 -.14 FF2010n 14.33 -.09
IntBdAp 13.77 +.01 FF2010K 13.13 -.08
InflGrlncAp 30.20 -.38 FF2015n 11.98 -.08
ICAAp 30.68 -.45 FF2015K 13.20 -.08
LtTEBAp 16.39 ... FF2020n 14.51 -.11
NEcoAp 28.23 -.47 FF2020K 13.63 -.10
NPerAp 30.54 -.37 FF2025n 12.10 -.11
NwWrldA 52.80 -.51 FF2025K 13.79 -.13
STBFAp 10.09 +01 FF2030n 14.41 -.14
SmCpAp 39.23 -.56 FF2030K 13.94 -.14
TxExAp 13.15 +01 FF2035n 11.94 -.14
WshAp 31.53 -.42 FF2035K 14.04 -.16
Ariel Investments: FF2040n 8.33 -.10
Apprec 44.77 -.79 FF2040K 14.08 -.16
Ariel 49.64 -.95 FF2045K 14.23 -.18
Artisan Funds: Fidelity Invest:
Inl 23.68 -.31 AIISectEq 13.02 -.19
IntllnstI 23.85 -.30 AMgr50n 16.35 -.11
InfiValr 29.01 -.40 AMgr70rn 17.38 -.17
MidCap 37.59 -.82 AMgr20rn 13.37 -.02
MidCapVal 21.39 -.29 Balancn 20.18 -.18
BBH Funds: BalancedK 20.17 -.19
CorSeIN 17.66 -.21 BlueChGrn 49.23 -.98
Baron Funds: BluChpGrK 49.28 -.98
Asset 51.54 -.72 CAMunn 12.93 +.01
Growth 57.43 -.84 Canada n 54.24 -.68
SmallCap 25.83 -.42 CapApn 29.77 -.50
Bernstein Fds: CapDevOn 11.91 -.19
IntDur 14.25 +.03 Cplncrn 9.44 -.02
DivMu 14.90 ... ChinaRgr 28.07 -.48
TxMgdlnl 13.63 -.14 CngS 465.09
Berwyn Funds: CTMunrn 12.11
Fund 31.72 -.62 Contran 77.94 -1.38
BlackRock A: ContraK 77.96 -1.38
EqtyDiv 20.14 -.25 CnvScn 24.82 -.29
GIAIAr 19.59 -.16 DisEqn 24.57 -.43
HiYInvA 8.03 -.01 DiscEqF 24.57 -.43
InflOpAp 31.67 -.36 Divlntin 29.26 -.31
BlackRock B&C: DivrslntKr 29.25 -.31
GIAICt 18.21 -.15 DivStkOn 17.51 -.29
BlackRock Insti: DivGth n 30.08 -.46
EquityDv 20.18 -.26 EmergAs r n28.30 -.49
GIbAllocr 19.69 -.16 EmrMkn 22.15 -.29
HiYldBd 8.03 -.01 Eqlncn 47.53 -.62
Brinson FundsY: EQIIn 19.84 -.26
HiYldlYn 6.37 ECapAp 18.46 -.17
BruceFund404.17 -1.38 Europe 30.56 -.24
Buffalo Funds: Exch 323.88
SmCapn 28.28 -.62 Exportn 22.82 -.37
CGM Funds: Fidel n 36.02 -.58
Focusn 28.91 -.37 Fifty r n 20.15 -.37
Mutt n 28.57 -.20 FItRateHi r n 9.96
Realty n 29.02 -.29 FrlnOnen 29.36 -.37
CalamosFunds: GNMAn 11.81 +.01
GrwthAp 50.64 -.92 GovCnc 95.55 61 +.02
Calvert Invest: Goncn 55 -2.17
Incop 16.62 +.03 G oINI n 21.29 -.32
Incop 16.62 +03 GrowCoF 95.58 -2.17
InEqAp 13.61 -.18 GrowthCoK 95.56 -2.17
SocialAp 30.51 -.24 GrSratr9n 20.29 -.30
SocBdp 16.64 +.04 GiStratn 20.29 -.30
SocEqAp 37.916. .56 Highlncr n 9.34 -.01
TxF Lgp 1 -6.63 ndepnn 25.52 -.50
Cohen & Steers: IntBd n 11.14 +.02
RltyShrs 68.49 -.52 IntGovn 10.87 +01
Columbia Class A: InfnMun 1066
Acornt 29.63 -.52 InflDiscn 3211 .34
DivEqlnc 10.62 -.16 InflSCprn 20.01 -.18
DivOpptyA 8.82 -.12 InvGrBdn 11.67 +.02
LgCapGrAt26.84 -.45 InvGBn 8.00 +.02
LgCorQAp 6.62 -.12 Japanr 9.39 -.10
MdCpGrOp 10.08 -.17 JpnSmn 9.03 .15
MidCVIOpp 8.24 .11 LgCapVal 1155 -.18
PBModAp 11.30 -.09 LatAm 50.10 -.44
TxEAp 14.30 LevCoStkn 30.73 -.48
SelComm A 42.02 -.95 LowP rn 39.09 -.51
SLowPrn 39.09 -.51
FrontierA 10.82 -.19 LowPriKr 39.07 -.51
GlobTech 20.10 -.42 Magellnn 73.94 -1.23
Columbia Cl 1,T&G: MagellanK 73.91 -1.22
EmMktOpln8.42 -.12 MDMurn 11.67
Columbia Class Z: MAMunn 12.75
AcornZ 30.75 -.54 MegaCpStknl1.97 -.19
AcornlntZ 40.02 -.46 MIMunn 12.53
DivlncoZ 15.04 -.20 MidCapn 29.63 -.42
IntTEBd 11.03 MNMunn 12.03
LgCapGr 13.50 -.35 MtgSecn 11.37 +.01
ValRestr 49.77 -.79 Munilncn 13.54
Credit Suisse Comm: NJ Mun r n 12.32
ComRett 8.42 -.08 NwMktrn 17.85 -.02
DFA Funds: NwMill n 33.23 -.54
InflCorEqn 10.17 -.12 NYMunn 13.72
USCorEql n12.26 -.20 OTCn 59.21 -1.40
USCorEq2nl2.12 -.19 OhMunn 12.39
DWS Invest A: 0lOIndex 10.32 -.18
CommAp 19.45 -.31 Ovrsean 31.59 -.25
DWS InvestS: PcBasn 24.67 -.36
CoreEqtyS 18.14 -.28 PAMunrn 11.48
CorPlslnc 11.27 +.03 Puritnn 19.54 -.19
EmMkGrr 15.89 -.26 PuritanK 19.53 -.19
EnhEmMk 11.24 -.01 RealElncr 11.49
EnhGlbBdr 10.39 RealEn 31.93 -.22
GIbSmCGr 38.43 -.51 SAIISecEqF 13.04 -.19
GIblThem 22.53 -.33 SCmdtyStrtn9.27 -.09
Gold&Prc 15.17 -.07 SCmdtyStrFn9.30 -.09
HiYldTx 13.10 ... SrEmrgMkt 16.36 -.20
IntTxAMT 12.20 SEmgMktF 16.41 -.21
InflFdS 42.19 -.61 SrslntGrw 11.71 -.09
LgCpFoGr 32.90 -.78 SerlnllGrF 11.75 -.09
LatAmrEq 41.25 -.58 SrslntVal 9.23 -.11
MgdMuniS 9.56 ... SerlnliValF 9.25 -.12
MATFS 15.31 ... SrlnvGrdF 11.68 +.03
SP500S 19.10 .33 StlntMun 10.88
WorldDiv 23.73 -.31 STBFn 8.59
Davis Funds A: SmCapDiscn23.28 -.29
NYVenA 36.35 -.48 SmllCpSrn 17.73 -.28
Davis Funds B: SCpValur 15.61 -.18
NYVenB 34.54 -.46 StSelCVrn11.86 .18
Davis Funds C: StkSIcACap n28.34 -.44
NYVenC 34.88 -.46 StkSelSmCp 19.81 -.34
Davis FundsY: Stratlncn 11.45
NYVenY 36.80 -.48 StrReRtr 9.79 -.02
Delaware Invest A: TaxFrBr n 11.69
Diverlncp 9.46 +.01 TotalBdn 11.02 +.02
SMIDCapG 24.19 -.42 Trendn 78.63 -1.43
TxUSAp 12.34 ... USBIn 11.93 +.02
Delaware Invest B: Utilityn 19.18 -.19
SelGrBt 35.05 -.67 ValStratn 30.76 .42
Dimensional Fds: Value n 74.70 -1.03
EmMCrEqnl9.12 -.29 Wrldwn 20.06 -.30
EmMktV 28.65 -.43 Fidelity Selects:
IntSmVan 15.24 -.12 Aim 38.27 -.44
LargeCo 1132 -.19 Bankingn 19.67 -.08
TAUSCorE2n9.86 -.16 Biotchn 112.56 -3.60
USLgVan 22.72 -.36 Brokrn 49.23 -.77
USMicron 14.81 -.30 Chemn 115.37 -2.22
USTgdVal 17.38 -.29 ComEquipn21.14 -.39
USSmalln 23.10 -.42 Compn 60.66 -.96
USSmVa 26.75 -.50 ConDisn 27.62 -.44
IntlSmCon 15.33 -.14 ConsuFnn 14.74 -.08
EmMktSCn20.44 -.28 ConStapn 81.83 -.81
EmgMktn 26.17 -.39 CstHon 47.31 -.24
Fixdn 10.35 ... DfAern 83.92 -1.11
IntGFxlnn 13.08 +.03 Electrn 42.35 -1.47
IntVan 15.90 -.23 Enrgyn 52.97 -.71


Glb5Fxlncnll.26 +.01 EngSvn 68.66 -1.03
2YGIFxdn 10.13 EnvAltEnrn15.99 -.34
DFARIEn 26.27 -.20 FinSvn 61.01 -.70
Dodge&Cox: Goldrn 41.48 -.06
Balanced 77.47 -.74 Health n 146.32 -2.98
GblStock 9.05 -.14 Insurn 53.52 -.77
Income 13.93 +.02 Leisrn 101.53 -3.47
InflStk 33.39 -.50 Material n 71.52 -1.26
Stock 120.65 -1.64 MedDIn 61.28 -.89
DoubleUne Funds: MdEqSysn 28.15 -.55
TRBdIn 11.40 +.02 Mulhndn 57.13 -.59
TRBd Npn 11.39 +.01 NtGas n 31.87 -.49
Dreyfus: Pharm n 15.74 -.28
Aprec 44.90 -.67 Retail n 62.64 -.70
CTA 12.41 +.01 Softwrn 85.22 -1.55
CorVA Techn 99.17 -2.14
Dreyf 9.83 -.15 Telcm n 51.91 -.97
DryMidr 29.30 -.41 Transn 51.39 -.68
GNMA 16.12 +.02 UtilGrn 58.43 -.42
GrChinaAr 31.96 -.37 Wirelessn 8.15 -.13
HiYIdAp 6.61 -.01 Fidelity Spartan:
StratValA 30.61 -.46 5001dxlnvn 50.82 -.86
TechGroA 32.82 -.62 5001dx l 50.82 -.86
DreihsAclnc 10.58 ... Inllnxlnvn 33.53 -.38
Driehaus Funds: TotMktlnv n 41.62 -.70
EMktGr 28.61 -.41 USBondl 11.93 +.02


I-*'p lmB la llT IB--. B
Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn 40.00 -.63
5001dxAdv n50.82 -.86
IntAd r n 33.55 -.38
TotMktAd r n41.63 -.70
USBondl 11.93 +.02
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.58 -.51
OverseasA 22.40 -.15
First Investors A
BIChpAp ...
Eqtylncop 7.69 -.10
GloblAp 6.83 -.10
GovtAp 11.43 +.02
GrolnAp 16.58 -.25
IncoAp 2.62
MATFAp 12.55 +.01
MITFAp 12.91
NJTFAp 13.78
NYTFA p 15.30
OppAp 29.60 -.47
PATFAp 13.84 +.01
SpSitAp 23.83 -.44
TxExlnco p 10.29
TotRtAp 16.79 -.14
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.25 +.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.90
ALTFAp 11.93
AZTFAp 11.50
CallnsAp 12.98
CAIntAp 12.18
CalTFAp 7.53
COTFAp 12.45
CTTFAp 11.47
CvtScA p 15.05 -.15
Dbl TFA 12.25
DynTchA 32.72 -.61
EqlncAp 18.27 -.24
Fedlntp 12.58
FedTFAp 12.74
FLTFAp 11.98
FoundAlp 11.18 -.14
GATFA p 12.79
GoldPrMA 35.30 -.08
GrwthAp 49.61 -.76
HYTFA p 10.93
HilncA 2.07 -.01
IncomAp 2.26 -.01
InsTFAp 12.61
NYITFp 11.94
LATFAp 12.05
LMGvScA 10.30
MDTFAp 12.02
MATFAp 12.19
MITFAp 12.35 +.01
MNInsA 12.99
MOTFA p 12.75
NJTFAp 12.64
NYTFAp 12.16
NCTFA p 12.98
OhiolAp 13.12
ORTFA p 12.60
PATFAp 10.96
ReEScAp 16.79 -.14
RisDvAp 37.57 -.59
SMCpGrA 36.62 -.68
Stratlnc p 10.74
TtlRtnAp 10.52 +.02
USGovAp 6.84 +.01
UbIsAp 14.29 -.10
VATFAp 12.27
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.45 -.03
IncmeAd 2.24 -.02
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.28 -.01
USGvC t 6.80 +.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.51 -.28
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 23.15 -.20
ForgnAp 6.67 -.09
GIBdAp 13.50 -.03
GrwthAp 19.09 -.31
WorldAp 15.87 -.25
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.48 -.20
ForgnC p 6.50 -.09
GIBdCp 13.53 -.02
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.72 -.14
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Sl Inc 12.09 +.03
US Eqty 45.23 -.76
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust III:
CHIE 22.91 -.19
Quality 23.53 -.35
GMOTrust IV:
InllntrVi 20.48 -.27
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.33 -.17
Quality 23.54 -.35
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.82 -.72
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 38.35 -.56
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.40 -.49
HiYield 7.39
HYMuni n 9.34
MidCapV 38.72 -.57
ShtDrTF n 10.67
Harbor Funds:
Bond 13.00 +.02
CapAplnst 42.15 -.91
Intllnv t 59.06 -.59
Inl r 59.76 -.59
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.01 -.60
DivGthAp 21.15 -.30
IntOpAp 14.62 -.16
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppl n 33.08 -.60
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.43 -.73
Div&Gr 22.00 -.32
Balanced 21.42 -.21
MidCap 28.05 -.35
TotRetBd 11.88 +.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 10.96 +.08
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.31 -.25
HIthcareS 17.75 -.34
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.96
IVA Funds:
Wldwidelr 16.18 -.17
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.63 -.17
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.20 -.61
Ublibes 18.01 -.11
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.91 -.06
Chart p 18.02 -.24
CmstkA 17.81 -.25
Constp 23.66 -.43
DivrsDivp 13.64 -.17
EqlncA 9.29 -.10
GrlncAp 21.27 -.31
HilncMu p
HiYldcp 4.39
HYMuA 10.10 +.01
InlfiGrow 28.16 -.31
MunilnA 13.95
PATFA 17.10
USMortgA 13.09 +.01
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.93
US Mortg 13.03 +.02
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 13.00 -.06
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.31 -.32
AssetStAp 25.17 .32
AssetSbl r 25.43 -.32
HilncAp 8.57
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.12 +.03
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.17 +.03
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 28.23 -.35
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondnl 12.12 +.03
ShtDurBd 11.02 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.44 -.20
JPMorgan Sel Cls:
CoreBdn 12.11 +.03
HighYIdn 8.18 -.01
IntmnTFBdn 11.41 +.01
LgCpGr 23.95 -.49
ShtDurBd n 11.02 +.01
USLCCrPIsn23.15 -.44
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 27.11 -.20
ContrarnT 14.18 -.22
EnterprT 64.22 -1.05
FIxBndT 11.06 +.02
GllUfeSciTr 30.64 -.68
GIbSel T 9.64 -.14
GITechTr 18.19 -.34
Grw&lncT 34.37 -.44
JanusT 31.49 -.51
OvrseasTr 33.06 -.80
PrkMCValT 22.07 -.27
ResearchT 31.72 -.58
ShTmBdT 3.11


TwentyT 61.67 -1.28
VentureT 58.99 -1.19
WrldWTr 45.40 -.68
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.42 +.02
IncomeA p 6.74
RgBkA 14.76 -.12
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.74
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.76 -.19
LSBalanc 13.53 -.12
LSConsrv 13.50 -.03


Name NAV Chg
LSGrwth 13.47 -.16
LSModer 13.36 -.07
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.39 -.22
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.80 -.23
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 129.51 -2.03
CBApprp 16.12 -.23
CBLCGrp 23.98 -.43
GCIAIICOp 8.74 -.13
WAHilncAt 6.24
WAMgMup 17.23
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.76 -.40
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.39 -.59
CMValTrp 41.92 -.96
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 31.25 -.62
SmCap 30.28 -.50
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.12 -.04
StrlncC 15.54 -.08
LSBondR 15.06 -.04
StrIncA 15.46 -.07
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.82 -.01
InvGrBdY 12.83 -.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 12.05 -.16
FundlEq 13.28 -.20
BdDebAp 8.11 -.01
ShDurlncAp 4.65
MidCpAp 17.41 -.24
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.68
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.65
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.84 -.31
MIGA 17.38 -.29
EmGA 47.67 -.86
HilnA 3.57
MFLA
TotRA 15.25 -.11
UtilA 18.91 -.20
ValueA 25.63 -.32
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.56 -.26
GvScBn 10.50 +.02
HilnBn 3.58
MulnBn 9.02
TotRBn 15.26 -.10
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.75 -.32
MFS Funds Instl:
InflEqn 18.38 -.24
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.12
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.06 -.17
GovtBt 9.01 +.01
HYIdBBt 6.09
IncmBldr 17.68 -.14
InflEqB 10.75 -.17
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 38.33 -.53
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 83.01 -1.09
Managers Funds:
Yackamanpnl9.18 -.28
YacktFocn 20.59 -.30
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.56 -.06
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.25 -.12
AsianGllnv 18.01 -.17
Indialnvr 17.55 -.45
PacTgrlnv 23.36 -.45
MergerFdn 15.88 -.07
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 11.05 +.01
TotRtBdl 11.05 +.02
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.93 -.01
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.71 -.27
MontagGr I 25.87 -.44
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 16.15 -.15
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 14.06 -.16
MCapGrl 34.74 -.50
Muhlenkn 56.59 -1.09
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.76 -.52
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 31.94 -.47
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.37 -.15
GblDiscA 30.04 -.37
GIbDiscZ 30.49 -.36
QuestZ 17.90 -.15
SharesZ 22.73 -.28
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.37 -.26
Geneslnst 49.82 -.67
Intir 17.11 -.19
LgCapV Inv 27.99 -.47
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.61 -.69
Nicholas Group:
HilncIn 10.04
Nicholasn 48.48 -.70
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.06
HiYFxlnc 7.51
SmCpldx 9.30
Stkldx 18.10
Technly 15.64
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 17.00
LtMBAp 11.26
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.38
HYMunBd 17.00
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 21.66 -.15
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.16 -.72
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.18 -.33
Globall 22.20 -.32
Intl I r 19.52 -.21
Oakmark 49.52 -.74
Select 33.24 -.41
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.54 -.04
GIbSMdCap 14.67 -.14
LgCapStrat 9.83 -.13
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.29
AMTFrNY 12.24 +.01
CAMuniAp 8.83
CapApAp 48.40 -.87
CaplncAp 9.25 -.03
DvMktAp 34.33 -.30
Discp 63.38 -1.26
EquityA 9.61 -.15
EqlncAp 26.05 -.42
GlobAp 61.88 -.95
GIbOppA 29.28 -.90
GblStrlncA 4.33
Gold p 35.70 -.23
IntBdA p 6.59 -.01
LtdTmMu 15.12 +.01
MnStFdA 37.50 -.61
PAMuniAp 11.51 +.01
SenFltRtA 8.31
USGvp 9.82 +.02

AMTFMu 7.25
AMTFrN 12.25 +.01
CplncBt 9.07 -.03
EquityB 8.81 .14
GblSfrlncB 4.35 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.40
RoMuAp 16.95
RcNtMuA 7.57
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 34.02 -.29
InliBdY 6.59
IntGrowY 29.67 -.37
Osterweis Funds:
Sklncon 11.67
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.88 +.01
TotRtAd 11.57 +.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 11.29 +.01
AIIAsset 12.76 -.03
ComodRR 7.02 -.06
Divlnc 12.28
EmgMkCur 10.54 -.03
EmMkBd 12.45 -.01
Fltlnc r 8.94 -.01
ForBdUnr 11.55 -.02
FrgnBd 11.29 +.01
HiYId 9.60 -.01
InvGrCp 11.34 +.03
LowDu 10.64 +.01
ModDur 11.16 +.01
RealRtnIl 12.57 +.05
ShortT 9.88 +.01
TotRt 11.57 +.02
TRII 11.12 +.03
TRIll 10.18 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIlAstAutt 11.22
LwDurA 10.64 +.01
RealRtAp 12.57 +.05
TotRtA 11.57 +.02
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIlAstAutt 11.11 +.01


RealRtCp 12.57 +.05
TotRtC t 11.57 +.02
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.57 +.05
TRtnp 11.57 +.02
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP11.28 +.01
TotRtnP 11.57 +.02
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.68 -.42
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.19 -.49


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.95 +.02
InfiValA 18.51 -.26
PionFdAp 41.94 -.65
ValueAp 12.29 -.16
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 10.39 -.05
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.48 -.06
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.28 +.01
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.93 -.21
BIChip n 45.09 -.94
CABondn 11.54
CapAppn 23.23 -.18
DivGron 26.41 -.37
EmMktBn 14.23 -.01
EmEurop 18.78 -.12
EmMktSn 32.34 -.41
Eqlncn 26.48 -.36
Eqlndexn 38.65 -.65
Europe n 15.60 -.23
GNMAn 10.06 +.02
Growth n 37.22 -.77
Gr&ln n 22.54 -.37
HIthSci n 43.11 -1.07
HiYield n 6.93 -.01
InsflCpG 18.51 -.40
InstHiYId n 9.76 -.01
MCEqGrn 29.65 -.50
IntlBondn 10.18 -.02
IntDisn 45.17 -.36
Intl G&l 12.71 -.18
InflStkn 13.95 -.19
Japan n 7.69 -.10
LatAm n 41.00 -.55
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 11.13
MidCap n 57.96 -.96
MCapVal n 25.32 -.36
NAmer n 35.25 -.55
NAsian 16.19 -.25
New Eran 44.48 -.69
NHorizn 35.14 -.77
N Incn 9.96 +.02
NYBondn 11.94
OverSSFn 8.31 -.11
PSIncn 17.21 -.12
RealAssetr nl .33 -.13
RealEstn 21.02 -.17
R2010n 16.69 -.13
R2015n 12.98 -.13
R2020n 17.99 -.20
R2025n 13.18 -.16
R2030n 18.93 -.26
R2035n 13.38 -.20
R2040n 19.04 -.29
R2045n 12.68 -.19
SciTecn 25.95 -.75
ShtBd n 4.86
SmCpStk n 35.56 -.65
SmCapVal n38.77 -.62
SpecGrn 19.44 -.32
Speclnn 13.04 -.01
TFIncn 10.59 +.01
TxFrHn 11.86
TxFrSIn 5.72
USTIntn 6.27 +.01
USTLgn 13.77 +.15
VABondn 12.35
Value n 26.63 -.41
Principal Inv:
Divlnfllnst 9.95 -.11
LgCGI In 10.20 -.19
LT20201n 12.71 -.11
LT20301n 12.55 -.13
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.14 -.33
HiYldAp 5.68 -.01
MuHilncA 10.34
UllityA 12.11 -.12
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.09 -.39
HiYIdBt 5.68
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 32.86 -.58
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.18 +.02
AZTE 9.55
ConvSec 20.24 -.16
DvrlnAp 7.67 -.01
EqlnAp 17.34 -.23
EuEq 19.78 -.28
GeoBalA 13.37 -.10
GIbEqtyp 9.43 -.13
GrInAp 14.77 -.22
GIblHIthA 47.69 -.87
HiYdAp 7.93 -.01
HiYd Inx 6.13 -.04
IncmApx 7.22 -.01
IntGrlnp 9.46 -.13
InvAp 14.68 -.24
NJTxAp 9.87
MultCpGr 54.71 -.97
PATE 9.55
TxExA p 9.08
TFInAp 15.73
TFHYA 12.73
USGvAp 13.61 +.02
GIblUtilA 10.73 -.09
VoyAp 22.07 -.51
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.75
DvrlnBt 7.61 -.01
Eqlnct 17.19 -.23
EuEq 18.91 -.25
GeoBalB 13.22 -.10
GIbEqt 8.48 -.12
GINtRst 17.99 -.28
GrlnBt 14.51 -.22
GIblHIthB 37.94 -.70
HiYIdBt 7.92 -.01
HYAdBbtx 6.01 -.03
IncmBtx 7.16
IntGrlnt 9.35 -.13
InlfGrth t 14.12 -.20
InvBt 13.17 -.21
NJTxBt 9.86
MultCpGr 46.68 -.83
TxExBt 9.08
TFHYBt 12.75
USGvBt 13.54 +.01
GlblUtilB 10.69 -.09
VoyBt 18.51 -.43
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.24 -.21
LgCAIphaA 44.20 -.67
Value 25.51 -.36
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.56 -.22
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.11 -.28
PennMulr 11.69 -.22
Premierl r 19.70 -.34
TotRetlr 13.91 -.22
ValSvc t 11.67 -.23
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.50 +.03
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.21 -.40
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.59 -.31
Schwab Funds:
HIlthCare 20.94 -.38
lOOOInvr 40.81 -.68
S&P Sel 22.68 -.38
SmCpSl 21.31 -.42
TSMSelr 26.14 -.43
Scout Funds:
Intl 31.95 -.33
Selected Funds:
AmShD 44.14 -.55
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 35.09 -.49
Sequoia 162.74 -1.97
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.31 -.83
SoSunSCInv t n22.07-.33
St FarmAssoc:
GwEh 56.90 .87
Stratton Funds:
MuI-Cap n 37.65 -.59
RealEstate n31.03 -.18
SmrCapn 55.26 -.78
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.17 +.03
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.40
TotRetBdl 10.27 +.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.02 +.02
Eqldxlnst 10.98 -.18
IntlEqllnst 15.88 -.17
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 19.26 .20
Third Avenue Fds:
InllValnstr 16.37 -.17
REVallnstr 26.60 .20
Valuelnst 48.80 .64
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.61 -.14
IncBuildAt 19.02 -.15
IncBuildCp 19.02 -.15
IntValuel 27.21 -.13
LtTMul 14.69
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.04
Income 9.37 +.02
Tocqueville Fds:
Gold t 72.62
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.68 -.01
Flexlncp 9.40 +.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 35.10 -.72
Tweedy Browne:


GblValue 25.10 -.10
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.53 -.39
ChinaReg 7.19 -.06
GIbRs 10.04 -.10
Gld&Mtls 13.14 -.04
WdPrcMn 12.75 -.03
USAA Group:
AgvGt 36.03 -.66
CABd 11.09
CrnstStr 23.21 -.16
GovSec 10.35 +.01
GrTxStr 14.68 -.11


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 16.31 -.28
Gr&lnc 16.20 -.26
IncStk 13.73 -.21
Inco 13.55 +.03
Inl 24.87 -.33
NYBd 12.53
PrecMM 30.94 -.03
SciTech 14.46 -.26
ShtTBnd 9.28 +.01
SmCpStk 14.66 -.26
TxElt 13.72
TxELT 13.94 +.01
TxESh 10.85
VABd 11.68 +.01
WIdGr 20.86 -.27
VALIC :
MdCpldx 21.16 -.30
Stldx 26.98 -.46
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.48 -.29
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.79 -.22
CAITAdmn 11.75
CALTAdm nn11.99
CpOpAdl n 77.07 -1.46
EMAdmr r n 34.76 -.51
Energyn 116.75 -1.68
EqlnAdm nn51.28 -.70
EuroAdml n 58.29 -.57
ExplAdml n 73.19 -1.27
ExtdAdm n 44.90 -.72
500Adml n 132.29 -2.22
GNMA Adn 11.02 +.01
GrwAdrnm n 36.59 -.68
HlthCr n 62.91 -.87
HiYldCp n 6.08
InfProAdn 29.16 +.09
ITBdAdmlln 12.16 +.03
ITsryAdml n 11.75 +.03
IntGrAdm n 59.38 -.64
ITAdmlIn 14.40
ITGrAdmrn 10.49 +.02
LtdTrAdn 11.19
LTGrAdml n l.09 +.10
LTAdmln 11.80
MCpAdml nl00.54 -1.52
MorgAdrnmn 61.61 -1.17
MuHYAdm nl 1.27
NYLTAdn 11.83
PrmCap r n 72.28 -1.25
PALTAdm n 11.74
ReitAdm r rn 92.92 -.69
STsyAdml n 10.78
STBdAdmlnlO.66 +.01
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.87
STIGrAdn 10.88
SmCAdm n 37.97 -.66
TxMCaprn 72.20 -1.18
TlBAdmln 11.17 +.03
TStkAdm n 35.68 -.60
ValAdmln 23.16 -.34
WellslAdrnm n59.59 -.17
WelltnAdm n59.56 -.52
Windsorn 50.01 -.74
WdsrllAdn 52.56 -.66
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.99
CapOppn 33.35 -.64
Convrtn 12.90 -.10
DivApplnn 23.80 -.39
DivdGron 17.02 -.22
Energy n 62.17 -.89
Eqlnc n 24.46 -.34
Explr n 78.58 -1.36
FLLTn 12.23
GNMAn 11.02 +.01
GlobEqn 18.37 -.26
Grolnc n 30.60 -.51
GrthEqn 12.28 -.25
HYCorpn 6.08
HlthCren 149.07-2.06
InflaPron 14.85 +.05
InflExplrn 14.51 -.17
IntlGrn 18.65 -.21
InlfiVal n 30.07 -.37
ITIGraden 10.49 +.02
ITTsryn 11.75 +.03
LifeConn 17.26 -.08
LifeGro n 23.55 -.28
Lifelncn 14.73 -.02
LifeModn 20.96 -.17
LTIGraden 11.09 +.10
LTTsryn 13.25 +.15
Morg n 19.85 -.38
MuHYn 11.27
Mulntn 14.40
MuLtdn 11.19
MuLongn 11.80
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.38
NYLTn 11.83
OHLTTE n 12.73
PALTn 11.74
PrecMtlsrn 17.60 -.13
PrmcpCorn 15.12 -.24
Prmcp r n 69.62 -1.21
SelValurn 21.14 -.20
STARn 20.73 -.16
STIGraden 10.88
STFed n 10.87
STTsry n 10.78
StratEqn 21.04 -.31
TgtRetlncn 12.22 -.04
TgRe2010n24.44 -.12
TgtRe2015nl3.53 -.10
TgRe2020 n24.04 -.21
TgtRe2025nl 3.70 -.13
TgRe2030n23.51 -.27
TgtRe2035snl4.16 -.18
TgtRe204O0n23.26 -.32
TgtRe2050 n23.16 -.31
TgtRe2045 nl4.61 -.20
USGron 20.95 -.39
USValuen 11.95 -.18
Wellsly n 24.59 -.08
Welltn n 34.48 -.30
Wndsron 14.82 -.22
Wndsll n 29.61 -.37
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n99.08 -1.06
ExtMktln 110.82 -1.78
MidCplstPl n09.55-1.66
TotlntAdm r r24.12 -.28
Totlntllnstr n96.45 -1.12
TotlntllP r n 96.47 -1.12
TotlntSig rn 28.93 -.33
500Sn 132.28 -2.23
Balancedn 23.79 -.21
EMktn 26.45 -.38
Europe n 25.01 -.25
Extend n 44.84 -.72
Growth n 36.59 -.68
LgCaplxn 26.43 -.44
LTBndgn 14.60 +.14
MidCapn 22.13 -.34
Pacific n 9.66 -.12
REITrv n 21.78 -.16
SmCappn 37.91 -.66
SmlCpGth n24.28 -.48
STBndn 10.66 +.01
TotBndn 11.17 +.03
TotllntIn 14.41 -.17
TotStk n 35.67 -.60
Valuen 23.16 -.34
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.79 -.22
DevMklnstn 9.51 -.10
Extlnn 44.90 -.72
FTAIIWIdl r n85.80 -1.01
Grwthlstn 36.59 -.68
InfProlnstn 11.88 +.04
Instldxn 131.41 -2.21
InsPIn 131.42 -2.21
InstTStldxn 32.29 -.54
lnsTStPlus n32.30 -.54
MidCplstn 22.21 -.34
REITInstrn 14.38 -.11
STIGrlnstn 10.88
SCInstn 37.97 .66
TBIstn 11.17 +.03
TSlnstn 35.68 -.60
Valuelstn 23.16 -.34
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 109.27 -1.84
GroSig n 33.88 -.63
ITBdSign 12.16 +.03
MidCpldxn 31.73 -.48
STBdldxn 10.66 +.01
SmCpSig n 34.21 -.59
TotBdSgln 11.17 +.03
TotStkSgl n 34.44 -.57
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.95
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 9.94 -.10
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 9.53 -.12
CorelnvA 6.71 -.08
DivOppAp 15.75 -.18
DivOppCt 15.57 -.18
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.61 -.82
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.50
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 21.54 -.30
Opptylnv 39.78 -.55
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
Growth 42.59 -.92
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.43 -.88
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.83
Western Asset:


CrPIsBdF1 p11.68 +.02
CorePlusl 11.68 +.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.21 -.25


Weak earnings drag





market down 205



S&Pfares even A DAY ON WALL STREET


worse Friday

Associated Press


NEW YORK Poor cor-
porate earnings reports
pounded the stock market
Friday in a sour end to an
otherwise strong week of
trading. The Dow Jones in-
dustrial average fell more
than 200 points for its worst
day in four months.
Disappointing results from
three giants of the Dow -
Microsoft, General Electric
and McDonald's were
partly to blame. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
fared even worse, as wide-
spread worries about compa-
nies' ability to keep churning
out better profits drove the
broader market down.
Through Thursday, with
115 companies in the S&P
500 reporting, earnings have
dropped 3.7 percent com-
pared with a year earlier, ac-
cording to Thomson Reuters,
a financial data provider, and
ING, a financial company
"And once you get one
quarter of negative earn-
ings, it's a precursor," said
Doug Cote, chief market
strategist at ING Investment
Management in New York.
"It's the cockroach theory: If
you find one, there's proba-
bly many more."
Heading into this earnings
season, financial analysts
had estimated corporate
profits for July through Sep-
tember would fall compared
with the same period a year
ago. That would be the first
such decline in three years.
The Dow sank 205.43
points, or 1.5 percent, to
close Friday at 13,343.51.
The S&P lost 24.15, or 1.7
percent, to 1,433.19. The
Nasdaq composite index,
hammered by a second ugly
day for Google, lost 67.25
points to 3,005.62, a 2.2 per-
cent decline.
The big drops Friday left
the Dow and S&P clinging to
gains for the week.
All 10 industry groups in


O ct. 19 2 0 12 .................................................................. 14 ,5 0 0
Dow Jones
ind ustria ls ............................ 13,500

--------12,500
-205.43 V 12,500

13 ,343 .5 1 ...........I................. ........... I.......... 1........ 11,500
M J J A S 0
Pet. change from previous: -1.52% High 13,545.49 Low 13,312.22


O ct. 19 2 0 12 .................................................................. 3,50 0
N a s d a q .................................................................. 3 ,250
composite 3,000

-67.24 2,750

3,005.62 ..,........... ............... .......... ......... 2,500
M J J A S 0
Pet. change from previous: -2.19% High 3,066.56 Low 3,000.27


O ct. 19, 2012 ......................... .. ... ... ... ................ .. .. 1,600

S ta n d a rd & .................................................................. 1,500
Poors 500 1,400

-24.15 1,300

1,433.19 .......... .. ..... .. ........ . .. ......... ..... .. 1,200
M J J A S 0
Pet. change from previous: -1.66% High 1,457.34 Low 1,429.85


the S&P 500 fell, led by tech-
nology and materials stocks.
Google continued its
slump, losing $13.21 to
$681.79, a day after its earn-
ings report was accidentally
released hours ahead of
schedule. The report raised
questions for Google and
other Internet companies
about ads that target mobile
devices.
It's been a tough week for
technology companies. IBM
pointed to Europe's trou-
bles and slowing business
spending when it posted
weaker revenue than ana-
lysts expected. Intel, the
world's largest maker of
computer chips, blamed the
global economy and sliding
computer sales for pushing
net income down.
The bad news kept piling
up Friday Sagging PC sales
and trouble in Europe took
a toll on Microsoft's net in-
come. Its stock lost 86 cents,
or 3 percent, to $28.64. Mar-
vell Technology Group and
Advanced Micro Devices,
which also make chips, sank
sharply
McDonald's profit shrank
as a strong dollar hurt inter-


national results, which ac-
count for two-thirds of its
business. The fast-food
giant's stock lost $4.14, more
than 4 percent, to $88.72.
General Electric, a bell-
wether of the economy, fell
3 percent. The company re-
ported stronger profits
early Friday, but its rev-
enue missed Wall Street's
expectations.
Orders for new equipment
and services sank, mainly
because wind turbine or-
ders have fallen because a
key U.S. federal subsidy for
wind power expires at the
end of the year. GE's stock
lost 78 cents to $22.03.
As corporate earnings roll
in, banks and so-called con-
sumer discretionary compa-
nies, which include luxury
stores and hotels, are pro-
jected to report the best
growth.
Analysts expect compa-
nies dealing in metals and
other materials to report the
worst results, followed by
energy companies. But it's
technology companies like
IBM, Intel and Google
whose results have grabbed
the most attention.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


fell more than 3 percent, part of Taj Mahal Palace hotel and
a broad market decline. Thursday in the Oberoi hotel

Strong dollar hurts across town before launch-

McDonald's results ing in New Delhi early next year.
Banana Boat recalls


NEW YORK -Tough com-
petition in the U.S. and the
weakening economy abroad
was a double whammy for
McDonald's in the third-quarter,
sending the burger chain's net
income down nearly 4 percent.
McDonald's said it was ad-
justing some of its plans to deal
with the pressures, including
stepping up advertising for its
dollar menu and bringing back
the popular McRib sandwich
nationally in December to drive
traffic into U.S. stores.

Starbucks opens

first India store

MUMBAI, India Starbucks
inaugurated its first store in
India on Friday in a historic
building in southern Mumbai as
the Seattle-based coffee giant
seeks growth in a market long
associated with tea drinkers.
After more than six years of
studying the local market, Star-
bucks is making a rapid-fire
entry into Asia's third-largest
economy. Coffee houses are
still a relatively new trend in
India, and the chains already
in business sell cappuccinos
and lattes well below Starbucks'
usual prices.
The company, in a joint ven-
ture with Tata Global Bever-
ages, plans to open two
additional stores in Mumbai
next week Wednesday in the


spray-on sunscreen

WASHINGTON -The
maker of Banana Boat sun-
screen is recalling some half-
million bottles of spray-on lotion
after reports a handful of peo-
ple have caught on fire after ap-
plying the product and coming
in contact with an open flame.
Energizer Holdings said Friday
it is pulling 23 varieties of Ultra-
Mist sunscreen off store shelves
due to the risk of the lotion ignit-
ing when exposed to fire.
The recall includes aerosol
products like UltraMist Sport,
UltraMist Ultra Defense and Ul-
traMist Kids.

Bank supervisor

step closer to deal

BRUSSELS European
leaders took a step toward cre-
ating a single supervisor for
banks in countries that use the
euro Friday but refused to pin
down a start date.
Although the leaders meet-
ing in Brussels said their deci-
sions on the watchdog the
single supervisory mechanism
- were key to shoring up
lenders and eventually giving
them access to loans from Eu-
rope's bailout fund, many ob-
servers were struggling to
figure out exactly what had
been achieved.
From wire reports


I NE^^^ ~WYORKSTOCjECHNGE I


Name Last Chg
Smucker 84.76 -.61
SonocoP 31.65 -.55
SonyCp 12.15 -.20
SoJerInd 51.49 -.63
SouthnCo 46.64 -.16
SthnCopper 36.97 -.19
SwstAirl 8.88 -.10
SwstnEngy 35.25 -.74
SpecraEn 29.62 -.12
SprintNex 5.65 -.13
SP Mabls 37.09 -.79
SP HIthC 40.60 -.74
SP CnSt 35.71 -.43
SP Consum 46.58 -.85
SP Engy 73.83 -1.18
SPDRFncl 16.11 -.22
SP Inds 36.79 -.63
SPTedch 29.29 -.68
SP UI 37.11 -.30
StdPac 7.70 +.05
Standex 43.50 -1.08
StanBlkDk 70.27 +.08
StarwdHfl 55.72 -1.92
StateStr 44.66 -.27
Steris 35.78 -.67
SllwtrM 10.27 -.27
StratHotels 5.91 -.06
Styker 52.64 -.97
SturmRug 46.59 -1.53
SubPpne 43.12 -.43
SunCmts 44.25 -.24


Suncorgs 33.99
SunstnHl 10.28
Suntech .75
SunTrst 28.63
SupEnrgy 20.84
Supvalu 2.19
Synovus 2.35
Sysco 30.92
TCF Fncl 11.01
TDAmeritr 15.76
TE Connect 32.94
TECO 17.89
TIM Part 17.93
TJXs 42.55
ThawSemi 15.22
TalismEg 13.12
Target 62.23
TeckRes g 31.67
TelefEsp 13.65
TelData 25.42
Tenaris 38.88
TenetHItrs 23.51
Teradata 72.29
Teradyn 14.12
Terex 23.60
TerraNitro 212.52
Tesoro 38.16
TetraTech 5.98
TevaPhrm 40.49
Textron 25.51
Theragen 1.52
ThermoFis 58.04


ThomCrkg 2.77
3M Co 92.94
Tiffany 64.20
TW Cable 99.70
TimeWarn 44.93
Timken 38.75
TitanMet 12.12
TollBros 35.10
TorchEngy 1.32
Torchmark 51.10
TorDBkg 83.37
Total SA 51.39
TotalSys 23.03
Transocn 48.52
Travelers 73.51
Tredgar 16.75
TriContl 16.23
TrinaSolar 4.13
TwoHrblnv 11.91
Tycolntis 27.58
Tyson 16.44
UBSAG 13.05
UDR 24.71
UIL Hold 36.09
UNS Engy 42.74
USAirwy 11.47
USG 24.48
UltraPtg 23.86
UniFirst 68.66
UnilevNV 36.64
UnionPac 123.77
UtdContl 20.13


UtdMicro 1.93 -.05 Wabash 6.46
UPS B 72.30 -1.31 WalMart 75.62
UtdRentals 38.58 -1.36 Walgrn 35.79
US Bancrp 34.23 -.17 WalterEn 38.27
US NGs rs 23.09 +.13 WsteMInc 32.53
US OilFd 33.34 -.73 Weathflnfi 12.20
USSteel 22.15 -.71 WeinRIt 27.79
UtdTech 77.99 -1.24 WellPoint 61.82
UtdhlthGp 55.66 -.35 WellsFargo 34.34
20.48 -.33 Wesco nf 63.50
WestarEn 30.07
WAstEMkt 16.24
ValeSA 18.11 -.34 WstAMgdHi 6.30
ValeSApf 17.45 -.31 WAstlnfOpp 13.37
ValeantPh 56.44 -1.63 WstnRefin 25.53
ValeroE 29.53 -.11 WstnUnion 17.93
VangTSM 73.29 -1.29 Weyerhsr 28.01
VangREIT 65.54 -.55 Whrlpl 87.05
VangEmg 41.81 -.66 WmsCos 34.97
VangEAFE 33.58 -.46 WmsPtrs 53.40
VarianMed 58.42 -.72 Winnbgo 12.60
Vectren 29.31 -.36 WiscEngy 38.50
Ventas 64.54 -.16 WTIndia 18.40
VeoliaEnv 11.01 -.25 Worthgtn 22.56
VeriFone 31.68 -.41 XLGrp 25.43
VerizonCm 45.16 -.62 XcelEngy 28.04
Visa 139.97 -1.91 Xerox 6.98
Vishaylnt 8.85 -.17 Xylem n 24.22
VMware 83.65 -1.91 Yamanag 19.33
Vornado 81.30 -1.03 YingliGrn 1.66
WGL Hold 39.55 -.59 YumBrnds 70.09
WPXEnn 17.69 -.18 Zimmer 62.69


US home sales

dip 1.7 percent

WASHINGTON U.S. sales
of previously occupied homes
fell in September after hitting a
two-year high in August, in part
because fewer homes were
available for sale.
The National Association of
Realtors said Friday sales
dipped 1.7 percent to a season-
ally adjusted annual rate of
4.75 million. That's down from a
rate of 4.83 million in August,
which was the highest in more
than two years.
Sales are still up 11 percent
from a year earlier. They re-
main below the more than 5.5
million economists consider
consistent with a healthy
market.

GE 3Q earnings rise;

revenue disappoints

NEW YORK General
Electric Co.'s transformation
into a simpler industrial com-
pany seems to be helping its
bottom line.
The top line, though, is lag-
ging slightly.
GE's net income rose 49 per-
cent in the third quarter to $3.49
billion, or 33 cents per share.
On an adjusted basis, GE
earned 36 cents per share, in
line with analysts' expectations
and up 13 percent from a year
earlier.
Revenue rose $1 billion, or 3
percent, to $36.35 billion. Ana-
lysts were looking for revenue
of $36.95 billion and GE shares


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 All







Page A12 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012



PINION


"The trouble with this country is that there are too many
politicians who believe, with a conviction based on
experience, that you can fool all of the people all of the time."
Franklin P. Adams, "Nods and Becks" 1944


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ......................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz................................. citizen member
ZJS Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ........... ................. copy chief
"'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ENDORSEMENT





Dawsy best




qualified




for sheriff


he race for Citrus County
sheriff pits four-term in-
cumbent Jeff Dawsy
against first-term county com-
missioner and former sheriff's


deputy Winn
Webb.
Both candidates
are respected
family men with a
long history of
civic involvement.
However, they dif-
fer sharply when
it comes to man-
agement of the
sheriff's office.


THE IS
Citrus C
sher

OUR OP
Incumbe
Dawsy i
qualify


Webb has built his campaign
largely around criticism of how
the incumbent spends money,
and accusations the sheriff has
not properly managed his
budget.
Dawsy explains independent
evaluations of expenditures
for law enforcement by the
non-partisan TaxWatch show
Citrus County's expenditures
for law enforcement are far
lower than the average for the
state. In its most recent report,
TaxWatch said Citrus County's
per person cost of law enforce-
ment is $236.75, while the aver-
age cost for counties in the
state is $579.83 per person.
The sheriff manages a de-
partment that includes the nor-
mal law enforcement
functions, along with emer-
gency management for the
county, fire services, court-
house security, animal control,
neighborhood watch and
school crossing guards.
Last year, when the county
commission voted 4-1 to move
fire services into the sheriff's
department, Webb voted
against the move. Today, he
said the sheriff has "too many
irons in the fire." Though if
elected sheriff, he would keep
fire protection in the depart-
ment, because it would cost
money to move it back to
county commission control.
One of the issues in the cam-
paign has been education and
background. Dawsy holds a
bachelor's degree in criminal
justice and a Master of Busi-
ness Administration, while
Webb has only a high school
education.
Another issue is experience


and background. Dawsy has
successively broader manage-
ment within the sheriff's office
and 15 years' experience as
sheriff, while Webb's law en-
forcement experi-
;SUE: ence is limited to
SUE: his 17 years as a
countyy deputy. However,
riff. Webb has experi-
ence as the owner
INION: of a small busi-
ness and has
ent Jeff served as a county
is best commissioner
fled. After the
charges and
counter-charges of a hard-
fought campaign, the choice
for voters is who they believe is
best prepared to lead public
safety in the county.
While we have at times been
critical of Dawsy for spending
decisions, and while we wish
his department were more
open with information for the
news media, we believe he is
the clear choice for sheriff and
deserves another term in office.
Although Webb has made a
major issue of the sheriff's
budget, he has acknowledged
he does not fully understand it.
In a recent meeting with the
Chronicle Editorial Board,
Webb said he would cut 10 per-
cent from the budget, but he
said he doesn't know exactly
where, because he doesn't
know where the money is
spent.
Webb is a very nice man, and
a serious candidate, but he has
a limited educational and man-
agerial background. Instead of
defining where he wants to
take the department and how
he would manage public safety,
he has focused primarily on
criticism of spending decisions
by the incumbent. While rais-
ing some legitimate issues, he
has failed to articulate a clear
vision of what he would do dif-
ferently as the leader of a large
and complex organization, and
how as sheriff he would make
the county safer
Dawsy has a solid educa-
tional and managerial back-
ground, and he has a
successful record of leadership
in public safety. For these rea-
sons, we urge voters to choose
Jeff Dawsy as sheriff.


CHRONICLE ENDORSEMENTS
The Citrus County Chronicle Editorial Board has issued the following
endorsements leading up to the Nov. 6 General Election:
* Vote "No" on Amendments 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 12
* Vote "Yes" on Amendments 2, 10 and 11.
* Vote "Yes" on School Referendum.
* Vote "Yes" on retention of all three State Supreme Court Justices.
* U.S. Senate: Bill Nelson.
* U.S. House of Representatives, District 11: Rich Nugent.
* Sheriff: Jeff Dawsy


ENDORSEMENT GUIDELINES
* The Chronicle has enacted its practice of asking that endorsement
letters be limited to the reasons writers are supporting candidates
not why they won't support candidates.
* Endorsement letters are subject to editing to keep the emphasis
on reasons for support vs. criticism of their opponents.


Rising momentum,


he presidential
election could
come down to
this question: What's
more important, en-
thusiasm or optimism?
National polls show
the candidates are es-
sentially tied, but be-
hind those numbers,
each side can find en-
couraging news. For
Republican Mitt Rom-
ney, it's the surge of ex-
citement generated by
the first debate. In the


Cokie
Steven ]
OTH
VOII


latest ABC News/Washington Post
poll, 59 percent of Romney back-
ers voiced "strong enthusiasm"
for their candidate, a jump of 11
points in two weeks and a stun-
ning 33-point leap since May
Some of this was inevitable, as
Republicans who backed other
candidates in the primaries swal-
lowed their disappointment and
switched to Romney But the first
debate clearly accelerated that
shift, and intensity matters in pol-
itics. All votes are not equal. En-
thusiastic supporters are more
likely to vote, volunteer, recruit
their friends and give money And
for the first time, Romney back-
ers are showing more zest than
Team Obama.
Intensity matters, but so does
optimism. Ronald Reagan under-
stood this very well, running for
re-election in 1984 on the bril-
liant slogan, "It's morning again
in America." Bill Clinton con-
sciously copied Reagan's sunny
outlook, starring in a biographi-
cal film at the Democratic con-
vention in 1992 titled "The Man
From Hope." Barack Obama, of
course, tapped into the same sen-
timent four years ago with his fa-
mous rallying cry of "Hope and
Change."
Persistent unemployment and
economic stagnation have badly
tarnished the glow surrounding
Obama, and that's why in the sec-
ond debate, Romney kept repeat-
ing his effective argument the


middle class has been
"crushed" by Obama's
policies. But while it's
hardly morning in
America, voters are
starting to see streaks
of light in the sky and
feel a bit more, well,
hopeful.
In the ABC
and News/Washington Post
Roberts poll, 42 percent said
HER the country was
headed in the right di-
CES reaction, with 56 per-
cent saying it's on the
wrong track. Those aren't great
numbers, but just a year ago they
were far worse for the president
22 percent to 74 percent. Half
of all voters approve of Obama's
job performance, an increase of 8
points from a year ago. An opti-
mism arrow pointing upward fa-
vors the incumbent.
A close reading of the polls re-
veals some additional variables
to keep your eye on during the
final weeks of the campaign:
Religion. Romney struggled
with white evangelical Christians
during the primaries, but four out
of five now support him. So do 54
percent of white Catholics. Rom-
ney's Mormonism can be a touchy
subject, but religious talk tends to
help Republicans, and he used
the second debate to recall the
pastoral and missionary work
he's performed for his church.
Age. Obama wins over-
whelmingly among voters
younger than 40; Romney leads
with seniors older than 65. The
problem for Democrats is seniors
vote far more often than young-
sters. That's why the president
will spend so much time on col-
lege campuses, hoping not only
students will vote but they will
use social media to encourage
their friends to vote as well.
Buyer's remorse. Fourteen
percent of Obama voters from
2008, one in seven, say they're
supporting Romney That's dev-
astating for the president, and it's


optimism

why a recent Romney ad features
a litany of disappointed Obama
backers repeating the phrase, "I
was wrong ...." In this week's de-
bate, Romney reinforced this ar-
gument, telling those voters they
didn't have to "settle" for a strug-
gling economy
Gender. In the ABC/Post poll,
Obama's edge among women
shrinks to 7 points, half his mar-
gin of four years ago. Expanding
the gender gap is critical for the
president's chances, which is why
he used the second debate to in-
voke his female relatives (mother,
grandmother, daughters) and em-
phasize his concerns for women's
health and equal employment
laws. He was helped out by Rom-
ney's ham-handed reference to
"binders full of women," which
became an instant Internet
meme and is likely to show up in
future Democratic ads.
Likability. Romney faces a
huge likability gap. By 2 to 1, vot-
ers find the president friendlier.
By 13 points, they'd prefer Obama
to baby-sit their child. And the
confrontational tone of the sec-
ond debate did little to improve
either candidate's likability quo-
tient.
Wealth. Voters still distrust
Romney's priorities. Fifty-seven
percent say he'll favor the
wealthy, while two out of three
say Obama supports the middle
class. That's why the president
used the debate to emphasize
Romney's personal finances and
reinforce the impression his op-
ponent does not understand or
care about the problems of ordi-
nary folks.
But perhaps the most critical
fault line is enthusiasm for Rom-
ney versus optimism about the
economy Which proves more
powerful could decide the next
president.

Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


American offer
Here's an offer that every
American Republican or De-
mocrat- can't refuse.
Only if you were "born in
America" could you say you
were investing billions and shed-
ding gallons of blood for our
country and our freedom. Wast-
ing billions and shedding gallons
of blood in defense of any other
country has never yielded posi-
tive results, just look at Korea
and Vietnam. I suggest we refuse
fighting foreign wars especially
for countries that hate our guts
anyway We have enough domes-
tic wars of our own.
Here is my suggestion: Have
any friendly country whose sov-
ereignty is being illegally threat-
ened by hostile forces send some
of their troops to us. We will
train and arm them and when
they get proficient they can go
back to their countries and train
their troops to do their own
fighting. This way we will save
billions of dollars and gallons of
American blood.
When I joined the U.S. Navy in
1956 I1 swore to "defend the Con-
stitution of the United States of
America against all enemies for-
eign and domestic." After serv-
ing for 32 years I still didn't see,
nowhere in that oath, any other
country mentioned. Who knows,


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

maybe this plan will help our
economy crisis and eliminate
shedding the blood of our young
men and women of the Armed
Forces. God Bless America!
Gabriel A. Rodriguez
Homosassa


Soldiers sacrifice
We the people of Florida are
very happy with our president.
We do not wish to be the laugh-
ingstock of the world in this elec-
tion. We also realize not all
people like to follow the rules.
Why are members of certain
parties denying our soldiers the
help they desperately need?
They were sent to do a job. They
did their job. Some come home
injured and need extra help.
Others did come home only to be
buried and mourned by all.
Why is it the majority of poor
people lose their sons and
daughters? Why is it such a few
of the elite are willing to sacri-
fice their lives?
I am so proud of all our sol-
diers. They have the courage
and bravery that more of us
need.
The people who start the wars
are the ones who should be on
the frontlines leading the troops.
Even our history shows our lead-
ers led the troops. Example,
Gen. George Washington. If it
was still that way, wars probably
would not happen as quickly as
they do now.


Betty Benting
Floral City


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.











N


ATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS WorlBRIEFS
FestiveWeapons industry thrivingMascot?
Festive predicted Obama term would bMascot?

SNRA had predicted Obama's term would be 'most anti-gun' | te


Associated Press
Lady-in-waiting Kaitlyn
Martin waits backstage Fri-
day during the 2012 Texas
Rose Festival Coronation
matinee performance at the
University of Texas at Tyler
Cowan Center in Tyler,
Texas.


Bomb threat shuts
down Texas A&M
COLLEGE STATION,
Texas Texas A&M Univer-
sity's campus was shut down
for about five hours Friday
after an emailed bomb threat
prompted an evacuation of
more than 50,000 people and
a building-by-building search.
A&M Police Lt. Allan Baron
said officials were still search-
ing some buildings late Friday
afternoon, but no bombs had
been found and people were
being allowed to come back
on campus to retrieve per-
sonal belongings and their
cars. Evening activities on
campus, about 100 miles
northwest of Houston, were
set to go on as planned.
Scout abuse files
spark interest
PORTLAND, Ore. -The
online release of files show-
ing the Boy Scouts of Amer-
ica's cover-up of decades of
sexual abuse has created in-
terest among Americans who
want to know who the alleged
abusers are and whether
people who molested them
as Scouts are in the files.
The files were released
Thursday. The attorneys who
argued the 2010 civil case
that led to the files being
made public uploaded the
files to their firm's website
and said more than 200,000
people tried to access the
files within three hours.
The files contain details about
proven molesters, and also un-
substantiated allegations.
Amtrak train hits
110 mph in test
JOLIET, Ill. -An Amtrak
passenger train has reached
a speed of 110 mph for the
first time in Illinois.
The train reached the
speed Friday morning in a
modest milestone for Presi-
dent Barack Obama's high-
speed rail vision. The five-car,
two-locomotive train zipped
through the central Illinois
countryside, hitting its high
speed between the towns of
Dwight and Pontiac.
The 30-mph increase from
the route's current top speed
is a morale booster for advo-
cates of high-speed rail. But
some rail experts question
whether the route will become
profitable.
Judge to consider
OJ freedom bid
LAS VEGAS A Nevada
judge will take testimony and
evidence on former football
star O.J. Simpson's claim that
he was so badly represented
in his Las Vegas armed rob-
bery and kidnapping trial that
he should be freed from
prison and get another trial.
Clark County District Court
Judge Linda Marie Bell on
Friday dismissed four of 22
grounds on which Simpson's
appeals lawyer seeks his
release.
But the judge agreed to
consider 18 claims, including
whether trial lawyer Yale
Galanter had a conflict of in-
terest and shouldn't have
handled Simpson's case.
Galanter declined comment
Friday.
Simpson remains behind
bars, serving nine to 33 years
in prison.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama has
presided over a heyday for
the gun industry despite pre-
dictions by the National Rifle
Association four years ago
that he would be the "most
anti-gun president in Ameri-
can history" Gun buyers fear
Obama wants to restrict their
purchases, especially if he
were re-elected.
An analysis by The Associ-
ated Press of data tracking
the health of the gun indus-
try shows sales are on the
rise, so much that some gun


Associated Press
BEIRUT A powerful car bomb
tore through the heart of Beirut's
Christian sector Friday, killing a top
security official and seven others in
a devastating attack that threatened
to bring the war in Syria directly to
Lebanon's doorstep. The blast
sheared the balconies off apart-
ment buildings, upended cars and
sent dazed rescue workers carrying
bloodied children into the streets.
Dozens of people were wounded
in the blast, the worst the Lebanese
capital has seen in more than four
years. The state-run news agency
said the target was Brig. Gen. Wis-
sam al-Hassan, head of the intelli-


manufacturers can't make
enough guns fast enough.
Major gun company stock
prices are up. The number of
federally licensed, retail gun
dealers is increasing for the
first time in nearly 20 years.
The NRA is bursting with
cash and political clout And
Washington has expressed
little interest in passing new
gun laws, despite renewed
calls to do so after recent
deadly shootings in Colorado
and Wisconsin.
Obama has made no prom-
ises to impose new gun con-
trol legislation and doesn't
have the support in Con-


gress or among voters even
if he did. During this week's
presidential debate, Obama
suggested renewing a U.S.
ban on assault weapons and
coming up with an overall
strategy to reduce violence,
but both Obama and Repub-
lican presidential nominee
Mitt Romney said the gov-
ernment needs to enforce
gun laws already on the
books.
"The driver is President
Obama. He's the best thing
that ever happened to the
firearm industry," said Jim
Barrett, an industry analyst
at C.L. King & Associates


gence division of Lebanon's domes-
tic security forces.
Al-Hassan, 47, headed an investi-
gation over the summer that led to
the arrest of former Information
Minister Michel Samaha, one of
Syria's most loyal allies in Lebanon.
"Whenever there is a problem in
Syria, they want to bring it to us,"
said Karin Sabaha Gemayel, a sec-
retary at a law firm a block from the
bombing site, where the street was
turned into a swath of rubble,
twisted metal and charred vehicles.
"But you always hope it will not
happen to us. Not again," she said.
Samaha is accused of plotting a
campaign of bombings and assassi-
nations in Lebanon at Syria's be-


Inc. in New York.
Tennessee lawyer Brian
Manookian said he never
considered himself a gun
enthusiast like others in his
state. He owns only one
handgun. But the firearms
industry has proved so lu-
crative for him that he's en-
thusiastic now. Manookian
and his business partner,
Gary Semanchik, opened a
$5 million firearms retail
and training complex in
September in Nashville.
Inventory is selling three
to four times faster than
they expected since the fa-
cility opened.


hest, to spread sectarian violence in
Lebanon. Also indicted in the Au-
gust sweep was one of the highest
aides to Syrian President Bashar
Assad.
A senior Lebanese police official,
speaking anonymously because he
was not authorized to talk to the
media, said Samaha confessed to
having personally transported explo-
sives in his car from Syria to Lebanon
with the purpose of killing Lebanese.
Analysts said al-Hassan's killing
was a clear signal that Lebanon
cannot insulate itself from the Syr-
ian conflict, which has been the
most sustained and powerful chal-
lenge to the 40-year Assad family
dynasty.


In food-crazy New Orleans, food 'deserts' persist


Fresh produce,

affordable

groceries hard

to come by

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS -
Dwayne Boudreaux's mem-
ories of the Circle Food
Store in New Orleans 7th
Ward neighborhood are so
vivid he can walk through
its colonnade of arches into
the dark and empty shell
and give a guided tour of
how it was before Hurri-
cane Katrina.
He points to where the
registers once rang, patrons
cashed paychecks, children
lined up to buy school uni-
forms and neighborhood
cooks shopped for dressed
wild game, live turtles for
soups and abundant fresh
produce.
"Everybody knew us for
the fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles," Boudreaux said. "We
were the bell pepper capital


Associated Press
Dwayne Boudreaux stands Friday outside his Circle Food
Store in New Orleans. The store was destroyed in Hurricane
Katrina and is being renovated.


of the city."
Seven years after Katrina
flood waters inundated
most of New Orleans, the
store's barren insides are
emblematic of a problem
that neighborhood activists
say was exacerbated by the
catastrophe: In a city known
for its food, fresh produce
and affordable groceries are
hard to come by in some
neighborhoods.
In the hard-hit Lower 9th
Ward, activists planned to
call attention Saturday to


the "food desert" with a fes-
tival including live music,
cooking demonstrations
and a "pop up" outdoor gro-
cery in a church parking
lot.
"It will be an actual gro-
cery store, not just a
farmer's market," said
Jenga Mwendo, a commu-
nity organizer.
Mwendo said about 30
percent of residents in the
Lower 9th Ward lack per-
sonal transportation, mak-
ing a trip to the nearest


full-service grocery outlet-
a Walmart in the neighbor-
ing city of Chalmette -
problematic.
Lower 9th resident
Gertrude LeBlanc, 76, has
her own car And she needs
it to get quality food. There
are convenience stores
closer to home, but the
prices are high. "For a per-
son on a fixed income, with
no food stamps, it's hard,"
Leblanc said.
The problem with access
to food in the neighborhood
stretches back before the
storm: Mwendo said there
hasn't been a full-service
grocery there in 20 years.
And price is not the only
problem she sees with con-
venience stores. "It's poor-
quality food," she said.
City officials are trying to
increase access to fresh,
high quality food with a
program called Fresh Food
Retailer Initiative, which
includes a low-interest
loan program for super-
markets, grocery stores and
other fresh food retailers
and the use of federal eco-
nomic development block
grants.


Bomb blasts Beirut


Associated Press
A Lebanese firefighter extinguishes flames Friday at the scene of an explosion in the mostly Christian
neighborhood of Achrafiyeh, Beirut, Lebanon.

Dozens wounded, 8 dead, including top security official


Associated Press
A golden lion tamarin, sit-
ting on a branch in the At-
lantic Forest region of Silva
Jardim, in Brazil's state of
Rio de Janeiro, is bouncing
back from near extinction
just in time to run for
mascot of Rio's 2016
Olympics. The recovery ef-
fort that raised their popu-
lation to 1,700 has become
an international example of
effective conservation, top
experts said.

Castro rumor mill
continues to churn
HAVANA- The rumor mill
surrounding the health of
Fidel Castro churned anew
on Friday, despite a letter
from the aging Cuban revolu-
tionary published by state
media and denials by rela-
tives at home and in the
United States that he is on
death's door.
Social media sites and some
news organizations have re-
ported allegations by a
Venezuelan doctor that Castro,
86, had suffered a massive
stroke, was in a vegetative state,
and had only weeks to live,
though the same doctor, Jose
Rafael Marquina, has made
some claims before that have
not panned out.
Al-Qaida suicide
raid kills 14
SANAA, Yemen Sus-
pected al-Qaida suicide
bombers disguised in military
uniforms stormed into an
army base in southern Yemen
on Friday, killing 14 soldiers
and wounding more than 20,
Yemeni officials said.
The dawn assault on the
coastal base in Abyan
province involved four suicide
bombers in an army pick-up
truck laden with explosives
and a gunbattle with soldiers
who were caught sleeping.
Protesters riot in
duty-free zone
PANAMA CITY -
Panama's anti-riot police used
tear gas and fired into the air
to disperse protesters in the
Caribbean city of Colon who
oppose a new law that allows
the sale of state-owned land
in the duty-free zone next to
the Panama Canal.
Hundreds of protesters
burned tires and threw objects
at police in Colon's downtown,
but began leaving the area
after the confrontation with po-
lice. Local media say several
people have been detained.
US carrier cruises
disputed seas
HO CHI MINH CITY, Viet-
nam -America has sent a
nuclear-powered aircraft car-
rier on a cruise through the
South China Sea, projecting
its power in waters that are
fast becoming a focal point of
its strategic rivalry with Beijing.
The USS George Washing-
ton's mission could raise
hackles in China, which is
locked in disputes with Viet-
nam, the Philippines and
other governments over own-
ership of islands in the region.
Few rulings in
Sept. 11 case
GUANTANAMO BAY
NAVAL BASE, Cuba -A
weeklong pretrial hearing for
the Sept. 11 terrorism case
has come to a close at Guan-
tanamo Bay without rulings on
the most important of more
than two dozen motions.
The judge said he will rule
later on security rules for han-
dling classified evidence that
defense lawyers argue would
make it impossible for them to
defend their clients.
-From wire reports





A14 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


AT AA I we believe our advertising
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S- - - - -- - - -


OF_


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SPORTS


No. 2 UF takes
on No. 9 South
Carolina today
at 3:30 p.m./B2



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 College football/B2
U Prep sports/B3, B4
U NFL/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, auto racing/B5
0 NHL, MLB/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Giants stave off elimination in Game 5


San Francisco

coasts to 5-0 win

over St. Louis
Associated Press
ST LOUIS Barry Zito
pitched the San Francisco Giants
back into the NL championship
series, dominating into the eighth
inning of a 5-0 victory over the St.
Louis Cardinals on Friday night
that narrowed their deficit to 3-2.
San Francisco Giants third base-
man Pablo Sandoval blows a bub-
ble Friday as he fields a ball hit by
the St. Louis Cardinals' Jon Jay
during the fifth inning of Game 5 of
the National League Championship
Series in St. Louis.
Associated Press


The defending champion Car-
dinals might have thrown away a
chance to clinch a second straight
World Series trip. Pitcher Lance
Lynn's toss on a possible forceout
deflected off the second-base bag,
paving the way for the Giants'
four-run fourth.
Pablo Sandoval homered for
the second straight night and Zito
made an extremely rare offensive
contribution with a perfectly ex-
ecuted bunt for an RBI single.
The Giants' win in Game 5 sent
the series back to San Francisco.
Game 6 will begin Sunday in the
twilight at AT&T Park, with Ryan
Vogelsong pitching against the
Cardinals' Chris Carpenter.
Once again this postseason, the
Giants benefited from a big error.
Needing three straight wins at
Cincinnati to avoid elimination in
the division series, San Francisco
began its comeback on a bobble
by third baseman Scott Rolen in


Heartbreaking loss


Field goal with

no time left sinks

CR football
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Gainesville Eastside won in
dramatic fashion, as sopho-
more kicker Joseph Malu
kicked a 35-yard field goal in
the waning seconds to lift the
Rams to a 26-24 victory over
Crystal River
at Earl Bram-
lett Stadium
on Friday
night in a cru-
cial District
For more 5A-5 contest.
photos, click Cr y stal
on this story at River head
www.chronicle coach Greg
online.com. Fowler was
visibly emo-
tional after the tough loss,
which dampened the Pirates'
playoff chances.
Crystal River (4-3, 1-2) took
the lead in the first quarter,
when senior quarterback Joe
LaFleur ran a touchdown in
from 3 yards out, which was set
up by a Ty Reynolds to Sam
Franklin 32-yard reverse pass.
John McAteer converted the
extra point for a 7-0 lead.
Eastside tied the score in the
second quarter, as Rams quar-
terback Sir Jackson sprinted
past the Pirates' defense from
34 yards out. Crystal River re-
gained the lead 14-7 with 5:39
remaining in the half after Ty
Reynolds' burst up the middle
for a 13-yard touchdown run.
On the ensuing kickoff, senior
Jamari Walker ran the kickoff
back 75 yards for a touchdown
to tie the score at 14-14 going
See Page B4

Eastside 26
Crystal River 24


* CR's next
game is 7:30
p.m. Friday
at home vs.
Dunnellon.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crystal River High School's Ty Reynolds manages to break some tackles and turn upfield Friday
during the first quarter against Gainesville Eastside at Earl Bramlet Stadium in Crystal River. The Pi-
rates' playoff aspirations took a big hit when Eastside nailed a 35-yard field goal with no time left to
deal Crystal River a 26-24 District 5A-5 loss. Crystal River had taken a 24-21 lead in the fourth
quarter on a Destin Dawsy touchdown run but couldn't hold the advantage.


the 10th inning that gave the Gi-
ants the go-ahead run in Game 3.
The Giants improved to 4-2 on
the road this postseason and have
won Zito's last 13 starts, with the
last setback Aug. 2. They're aver-
aging more than six runs a game
during the streak, although the
lefty didn't need much help in
this one.
Zito looked like the same guy
who won the 2002 AL Cy Young
award. He retired 11 batters in a
row in one stretch while scatter-
ing six hits with six strikeouts in 7
2/3 innings.
Giants catcher Buster Posey
twice tapped Zito on the chest
when he was pulled in the eighth
inning. It was Zito's first postsea-
son win since 2006, shortly before
he left the As and signed a $126
million, seven-year contract with
San Francisco.
See Page B4



Lake Weir


squeaks


by Lecanto

Missed signal on

late kickoff dooms

Panthers in loss
STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
CANDLER In a bout of con-
stant exchanged punches, there
are times when the eventual loser
suffers the most in the match due
to self-inflicted wounds.
Such was the case for the
Lecanto football team Friday
night, falling 37-34 in a seesaw
District 6A-5 battle with host
Lake Weir
After regaining the lead 26-23
at the end of the third quarter, the
Panthers watched Lake Weir
march down the field 79 yards to
begin the fourth, capped off by a
55-yard touchdown pass from
Hurricanes quarterback Cutler
Blackburn to Jernir Etienne. He
then took the screen from the left
side, danced his way around sin-
gle coverage, to wide open space
down the sideline to the endzone,
making it 30-26.
But Lecanto (4-3, 0-2 district)
looked poised to respond yet
again, taking the ball to midfield
under the direction of freshman
backup quarterback Travis
McGee.
But a bad snap fell to the
ground in front of the signal
caller, and the Hurricanes' Corey
Croteau recovered.
Lake Weir scored again late in
the final quarter on a 30-yard
dash to the end zone by Malik
Robinson, and McGee and com-
pany's late efforts fell just short.
"Obviously that fumble, we got
the ball and the momentum, but
it's unfortunate. We just have to
bounce back and get better," said
See Page B4


Lake Weir 37
Lecanto 34


* Lecanto's
next game is
7:30 p.m.
Friday at
Vanguard.


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B2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

College football
schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Saturday, Oct. 20
EAST
New Hampshire (5-2) at Maine (2-4),
Noon
Rutgers (6-0) at Temple (3-2), Noon
Sacred Heart (2-4) at Duquesne (4-2),
Noon
CCSU (1-5) at Robert Morris (1-5), Noon
Wagner (3-3) at St. Francis (Pa.) (3-4),
Noon
Bowling Green (4-3) at UMass (0-6), Noon
Penn (2-3) at Yale (1-4), Noon
Cornell (3-2) at Brown (3-2), 12:30 p.m.
Bucknell (1-5) at Lehigh (7-0), 12:30 p.m.
Georgetown (3-4) at Colgate (3-3), 1 p.m.
Holy Cross (1-5) at Lafayette (4-2), 1 p.m.
Bryant (1-6) at Monmouth (NJ) (3-3),
1 p.m.
Harvard (5-0) at Princeton (3-2), 1 p.m.
Dartmouth (3-2) at Columbia (1-4),
1:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh (2-4) at Buffalo (1-5), 3:30 p.m.
Rhode Island (0-6) at Delaware (4-2),
3:30 p.m.
Indiana (2-4) at Navy (3-3), 3:30 p.m.
Gardner-Webb (1 -5) at Stony Brook (6-1),
4p.m.
Old Dominion (5-1) atTowson (3-3), 7 p.m.
Kansas St. (6-0) at West Virginia (5-1),
7p.m.
SOUTH
Tennessee St. (7-0) at Jacksonville St.
(3-3), Noon
Virginia Tech (4-3) at Clemson (5-1), Noon
Auburn (1-5) at Vanderbilt (2-4),
12:21 p.m.
Wake Forest (3-3) at Virginia (2-5),
12:30 p.m.
Morgan St. (3-3) at Howard (4-2), 1 p.m.
San Diego (3-3) at Jacksonville (6-1),
1 p.m.
FlU (1-6) at Troy (3-3), 1 p.m.
Presbyterian (2-5) at Charleston Southern
(2-4), 1:30 p.m.
NC A&T (3-3) at Delaware St. (3-3),
1:30 p.m.
Georgia Southern (5-1) at Furman (2-5),
1:30 p.m.
Coastal Carolina (2-4) at VMI (2-4),
1:30 p.m.
Edward Waters (1-3) at Savannah St.
(0-6), 2 p.m.
W. Carolina (1-6) at Elon (2-4), 3 p.m.
Boston College (1-5) at Georgia Tech
(2-4), 3 p.m.
Va. Lynchburg (1-5) at Grambling St.
(0-6), 3 p.m.
Wofford (5-1) at Appalachian St. (5-2),
3:30 p.m.
South Carolina (6-1) at Florida (6-0),
3:30 p.m.
Villanova (5-2) at Georgia St. (1-6),
3:30 p.m.
Concord (4-3) at Liberty (2-4), 3:30 p.m.
South Florida (2-4) at Louisville (6-0),
3:30 p.m.
NC State (4-2) at Maryland (4-2),
3:30 p.m.
James Madison (5-1) at Richmond (4-3),
3:30 p.m.
FAU (1-5) at South Alabama (1-5),
3:30 p.m.
Norfolk St. (2-5) at Bethune-Cookman
(4-2), 4 p.m.
MVSU (2-4) at Jackson St. (3-4), 4 p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe (4-2) at W. Kentucky
(5-1), 4 p.m.
Davidson (0-6) at Campbell (1-5), 6 p.m.
Samford (4-2) at Chattanooga (3-3),
6p.m.
SC State (2-5) at Florida A&M (3-4),
6p.m.
North Carolina (5-2) at Duke (5-2), 7p.m.
Georgia (5-1) at Kentucky (1-6), 7 p.m.
Idaho (1-6) at Louisiana Tech (5-1), 7p.m.
Middle Tennessee (4-2) at Mississippi St.
(6-0), 7 p.m.
Marshall (2-4) at Southern Miss. (0-6),
7p.m.
Ark.-Pine Bluff (4-2) at Southern U. (3-3),
7p.m.
Alabama (6-0) at Tennessee (3-3), 7 p.m.
East Carolina (4-3) at UAB (1-5), 7 p.m.
UCF (4-2) at Memphis (1-5), 8 p.m.
Florida St. (6-1) at Miami (4-3), 8 p.m.
E. Kentucky (5-2) at Tennessee Tech
(2-4), 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
N. Illinois (6-1) at Akron (1-6), Noon
Purdue (3-3) at Ohio St. (7-0), Noon
Minnesota (4-2) at Wisconsin (5-2), Noon
Valparaiso (0-6) at Dayton (3-4), 1 p.m.
Army (1-5) at E. Michigan (0-6), 1 p.m.
Marist (2-4) at Drake (5-2), 2 p.m.
Missouri St. (1-6) at Illinois St. (6-1), 2 p.m.
UT-Martin (5-2) at SE Missouri (2-4),
2p.m.
Ball St. (4-3) at Cent. Michigan (2-4),
3:30 p.m.
W. Michigan (3-4) at Kent St. (5-1),
3:30 p.m.
Michigan St. (4-3) at Michigan (4-2),
3:30 p.m.
Nebraska (4-2) at Northwestern (6-1),
3:30 p.m.
BYU (4-3) at Notre Dame (6-0), 3:30 p.m.
Montana (3-4) at North Dakota (3-4),
3:40 p.m.
S. Illinois (4-3) at Youngstown St. (4-2),
4p.m.
S. Dakota St. (5-1) at N. Iowa (1-5), 5 p.m.
Morehead St. (1-5) at Butler (5-2), 6 p.m.
N. Dakota St. (5-1) at South Dakota (1-5),
7p.m.
Cincinnati (5-0) atToledo (6-1), 7p.m.
Indiana St. (5-2) atW. Illinois (3-3), 7p.m.
Penn St. (4-2) at Iowa (4-2), 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Iowa St. (4-2) at Oklahoma St. (3-2), Noon
LSU (6-1) at Texas A&M (5-1), Noon
San Jose St. (4-2) at UTSA (5-1), 2 p.m.
Alcorn St. (3-4) at Prairie View (1-5),
3p.m.
Nicholls St. (1-4) at Stephen E Austin
(2-4), 3 p.m.
Texas Tech (5-1) atTCU (5-1), 3:30 p.m.
Rice (2-5) at Tulsa (6-1), 3:30 p.m.
Lamar (3-4) at Cent. Arkansas (5-2),
7p.m.
Kansas (1-5) at Oklahoma (4-1), 7p.m.
McNeese St. (4-2) at Sam Houston St.
(4-2), 8 p.m.
Baylor (3-2) at Texas (4-2), 8 p.m.


Tulane (1-5) at UTEP (1-6), 8p.m.
FAR WEST
Stanford (4-2) at California (3-4), 3 p.m.
Weber St. (0-7) at S. Utah (3-4), 3 p.m.
New Mexico St. (1-5) at Utah St. (5-2),
3p.m.
UNLV (1-6) at Boise St. (5-1), 3:30 p.m.
Idaho St. (1-5) at N. Colorado (1-5),
3:35 p.m.
Colorado (1-5) at Southern Cal (5-1),
6p.m.
New Mexico (4-3) at Air Force (3-3), 7p.m.
Sacramento St. (5-2) at E. Washington
(5-1), 7:05 p.m.
UC Davis (3-4) at N. Arizona (5-1),
7:05 p.m.
Portland St. (2-4) at Cal Poly (6-0),
9:05 p.m.
Washington (3-3) at Arizona (3-3), 10 p.m.
Wyoming (1-5) at Fresno St. (4-3),
10:30 p.m.
Utah (2-4) at Oregon St. (5-0), 10:30 p.m.
San Diego St. (4-3) at Nevada (6-1),
10:35 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Miami bracing for huge FSU test


Associated Press

MIAMI Al Golden's opinion might
frighten the Miami faithful this week.
The Hurricanes' coach has already seen
his team endure two blowout losses this
season, by 39 points to Kansas State and by
38 against Notre Dame. And with all re-
spect to the Wildcats and Fighting Irish,
currently the No. 4 and No. 5 teams in the
nation, Golden believes there's an even bet-
ter team looming on Miami's
schedule. No. 12 FSI
That team is Florida State at Miami
- the team coming to visit
Miami tonight. U Time: 8 p
The 12th-ranked Semi- U TV: ABC
noles (6-1, 3-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference) have won their
last two meetings with Miami (4-3, 3-1), and
are overwhelming favorites to add to that
streak. In a series where 10 of the last 11
matchups have been decided by eight
points or less, many not until the final sec-
onds even, Florida State is a three-touch-
down favorite.
Maybe those oddsmakers heard Golden
singing the Seminoles' praises.
"I believe it's the best team that we've
played this year," Golden said. "I know
there's two other teams that are ranked
higher than them right now. I think this is
the most talented team we've seen this year,
the most complete team."
True, the Seminoles are rolling. Florida
State entered the weekend ranked third na-
tionally in points scored this season (322)
and sixth nationally in points allowed (81).


L

3.


And, yes, while those numbers were fat-
tened up with season-opening wins over
Murray State and Savannah State by a com-
bined 124-3 count, it's not like Florida State
hasn't been impressive every other game
this season, either
Well, except for one game.
"Two weeks ago, we learned a lesson,"
Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said.
That was the game at North Carolina State
one where double-digit favorite Florida
State went on the road, facing
J (6-1, 3-1) an opponent coming off a
(4-3, 3-1) loss, and was supposed to roll
to an easy win, only to get
m. today beaten 17-16.
Sound familiar? Florida
State, on the road again this
week, big favorites again,
facing an opponent coming off a loss.
Rest assured, Fisher has talked plenty to
his team during practices for Miami about
avoiding the same trap door that the Semi-
noles found two weeks ago.
"You do have to play the whole game,"
Fisher said. "Our kids have understood that
lesson. I think the leadership of the team
understands that and I think they'll rein-
force that and will get it across. They know
each game has a one-week lifespan. It's one
win or one loss, and you only get 12 of them,
so you better make them all special."
Players hardly need to be told about the
significance of a Miami-Florida State game.
Florida State running back Devonta Free-
man and the No. 12 Seminoles travel to
Miami tonight for an ACC rivalry game.
Associated Press


.r




-..-. ..
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&4:2- _--


Gamecocks in the Swamp


Gators don't want

USC celebrating in

Gainesville today

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE The last time
South Carolina played at Florida, the
Gamecocks celebrated a division title.
Coach Steve Spurrier got doused
and carried to midfield. Players
hooted and hollered on the side-
line, in the locker room and on the
flight home.
The Gators remember it vividly
"That's a feeling you'll never for-
get," safety Josh Evans said.
No doubt,
NO. 9 S. third-ranked
Carolina Florida (6-0, 5-0
6.- 4-. Southeastern
(1 4-1) Conference) will
at No. 2 UF use that 36-14
(6-0, 5-0) loss as motiva-
m. tion when the
Time: ninth-ranked
3:30 p.m. Gamecocks (6-1,
today 4-1) return to
TV: CBS The Swamp on
Saturday
"It's definitely revenge," Evans
said. "It would mean a lot to this
team and definitely the roll we're on
this year trying to stay undefeated."
No titles are on the line in this
one, but the winner will take com-
mand in the Eastern Division. Mak-
ing it to Atlanta for the SEC
championship game is the top goal
for both teams, and Saturday's loser
will need help getting there.
"We realize it's an extremely im-
portant game down there in The
Swamp," Spurrier said. "Hopefully
our guys will be ready to play their
best one of the year."
South Carolina is coming off its
worst game of the season.
Marcus Lattimore was held to 35
yards rushing, Connor Shaw threw
two interceptions and the Game-
cocks allowed 258 yards rushing in
a 23-21 loss at LSU. The Tigers out-
gained South Carolina 406-211,


Associated Press


Florida running back Mike Gillislee (23) has 624 yards and seven touchdowns rushing in 2012.


recorded four sacks and converted
11 of 19 times on third down.
"It was just frustrating," South
Carolina linebacker DeVonte Hollo-
man said. "Some plays, we were at
the point of attack and did not make
those plays that we've been making
all year I felt like we kind of took a
punch and we didn't give one back
sometimes. Being more physical,
that's what we're working on."
Being healthier might help, too.
Lattimore, who ran 40 times for a
career-high 212 yards and three
touchdowns two years ago in
Gainesville, has a bruised hip that
kept him out of practice this week
and will keep him out of the starting
lineup Saturday Standout defensive
end Jadeveon Clowney has a foot
problem that has limited him in prac-
tice. Defensive tackle Kelcy Quarles
won't play because of a shoulder in-
jury, and defensive linemen Byron
Jerideau and J.T Surratt have been


slowed by sprained ankles.
And a flu bug has worked its way
through the team, affecting receivers
Ace Sanders and Bruce Ellington.
Florida, meanwhile, is getting
several players back in time for the
stretch run.
Defensive end Dominique Easley
(knee) and linebacker Jelani Jenkins
(hamstring) are expected to return to
the starting lineup Saturday So are
left tackle Xavier Nixon (upper
body), guard James Wilson (eye) and
center Jon Harrison (elbow).
Florida's offensive line has been
key to the team's ground attack.
Senior Mike Gillislee is averaging
a little more than 102 yards rushing
a game. Two weeks ago against LSU,
he ran 34 times for 146 yards and
two touchdowns.
Quarterback Jeff Driskel is aver-
aging 54 yards a game on the ground
and has scored four times. Last week
at Vanderbilt, Driskel set a school


No. 16 Cards wary of USF


Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. The
No. 16 Louisville Cardinals
know that South Florida's
mission today is to turn its
season around with a big
win.
The Cardinals know first-
hand how a key victory can
turn things around; they just
don't want the Bulls doing it
at their expense.
A senior-laden South
Florida squad that was ex-
pected to challenge for the
Big East championship has
lost four straight since a 2-0
start leaving the Bulls at
a crossroads coming out of a
bye week.
Meanwhile, Louisville (6-
0, 1-0) returns home from a
35-day absence with its best
start since 2006 and hungry
to follow up last week's con-
ference win at Pittsburgh.
Keeping the Cardinals fo-
cused on continuing their
roll is their memory of


No. 16 Louisville
(6-0, 1-0) at
USF (24, 2-0)
Time: 3:30 p.m. today
TV: ABC

being in the Bulls' position
a year ago.
"They're fighting for their
lives right now," Louisville
left tackle Alex Kupper
said.
The Cardinals remember
what that feels like.
They started 2-4 last year
before beating Rutgers 16-
14 to end a three-game los-
ing streak. The Cardinals
went on to win five of their
final six games and claim a
share of the Big East title.
Louisville has won 11 of its
last 12 regular season games.
Its remaining schedule is
against the Big East, starting
next Friday with unbeaten
and No. 21 Cincinnati.
But Cardinals coach


Charlie Strong is stressing a
one-game season approach
to his players.
"Well, right now, you're
sitting at 6-0 so you like the
position you're in," he said.
"But you still have six more
games to go play We just
can't get full of ourselves.
We still have games in front
of us.
"We're not even thinking
about Cincinnati. Our only
focus right now the only
team we need to worry
about right now is South
Florida. If our players take
on that attitude then we'll
be fine but we can't look
down the road," he said.
For South Florida coach
Skip Holtz, today's game
represents "a fresh start"
"It's kind of a restart but-
ton," he said about the sec-
ond half of the Bulls' season.
"We can't change the first
six games, but we can learn
from it, evaluate it (and)
move on as a football team."


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record for rushing by a quarterback
with 177 yards. He had touchdown
runs of 13,37 and 70 yards.
"If we can get the run stopped
and make them one-dimensional,
we'll do very good," South Carolina
linebacker Shaq Wilson said.
The Gators have the same game
plan, even if it's backup Kenny
Miles carrying the ball instead of
Lattimore.
Without Lattimore last season,
the Gamecocks ran for 215 yards in
a 17-12 win against Florida.
Brandon Wilds had 120 yards
rushing, and Shaw added 88 yards
and two scores on the ground.
"Shaw is just a winner, a guy that
creates plays with his legs, does a lot
of good things for their football
team," Florida coach Will
Muschamp said. "The play is never
dead with him. He can create so
much with his legs and he's a tough,
hard-nosed, competitive guy"


Saturday

November 3
7:30 a.m.
Hunter Springs Park
Crystal River

RUN OR WALK!
Register Online:
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Household divided as CR, Lecanto splits meet


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER -
While a general school ri-
valry is the norm for Citrus
County schools, one sibling
rivalry intensified a meet
Tuesday night at Bicenten-
nial Pool. And though only
one team left as the victors,
both siblings left smiling.
Crystal River senior
Marissa Penn watched her
Lady Pirates swim to a 100-
85 victory over Lecanto
while her younger brother,
Lecanto freshman Jacob
Penn and his Panther team-
mates swam to a 112-74 vic-
tory at Bicentennial Park.
"It works out really,"
Marissa Penn said. "Our girls
got a win, and Jacob's boys
got a win, so it's all good."
Brother Jacob, however,
found the matchup kind of
difficult


"I know a lot of kids on
this Crystal River team, so
it's hard going against
friends," he said. "But, it's
fun swimming against my
sister competitively"
The sibling rivalry within
the Penn household goes
back and forth throughout
the week, Marissa said, mak-
ing the matchup almost as in-
tense as it was billed to be.
Both schools have had big
success on the season, and it
was definitely an anticipated
meeting, considering both
teams met on what is now
neutral ground.
'This was the meet, and we
knew it all year long that we
were looking forward to,"
Lecanto coach Matt
Bouthillier said. "You know,
this is our first year practic-
ing at this pool, so we're kind
of playing second fiddle to
Crystal River They practice


early, we practice late. So,
this was definitely a matchup
we were looking forward to."
For the girls, Crystal
River's Abigail Brown took
home a clean sweep through-
out her events. She took first
in the 200 free (2:16:01), edg-
ing out teammate Anna Lane
(2:19:48) and Lecanto's Hay-
ley Bottona (2:25:96). Brown
also claimed the 500 free
(6:09:26), again edging Lane
(6:12:75) by just more than
three seconds. Lecanto en-
joyed a 1-2 finish in the 200
IM, as senior captain Marissa
Buck (2:58:39) was overcome
late by teammate Anabel
Marchildon (2:47:68).
Marchildon also found suc-
cess in the 100 breaststroke,
as she slid into first place
(1:23:75), edging Marissa
Penn (1:24:08) by the
slimmest of margins.
"Our girls swam well


tonight," Crystal River coach
Bill Wells said. "We had a lot
of great individual perform-
ances, so we're very happy
with that"
Crystal River's boys had
two wins on the evening, both
coming from sophomore
standout Dylan Earnheart
He remained dominant in
the 100 fly (1:00:21), taking
first over Lecanto's Caleb
Heinzman (1:04:78), and in
the 200 IM, where Earnheart
(2:13:28) took first over
Caleb's older brother J.D.
Heinzman (2:22:57).
"Individually, I think swam
pretty well," Earnheart said.
"There's good competition at
Lecanto, so that pushed me.
But as a team, there are some
things we need to work on.
Getting the relays down is
one of them."
Lecanto sophomore Lane
Ramsey surprised some peo-


ple on the night, as he slipped
past teammate Steven Swartz
(2:09:77) and Crystal River's
Hunter Eamheart (2:10:84) to
take first in the 200 free with
a time of 2:08:51. But Swartz
had his wins, as he edged out
teammate Jacob Penn (56:65)
to take first place in the 100
free, landing a time of 56:19.
He was also part of a dom-
inant 400 freestyle relay
team, consisting of himself,
J.D. Heinzman, Ramsey and
Penn, that secured a first-
place finish with a time of
3:53:71, almost 27 seconds
faster than the second-place
relay, also consisting of
Lecanto swimmers Caleb
Heinzman, Justin Sobol, John
Adams and Ronnie Crowe.
For Bouthillier, he had
only one thing to say
"We swam with a lot of
heart tonight," he said. "We
look at the cumulative score


first, because to us, that's
what matters. We're one
team. And we approach our
meets as one team. We did
have a lot of strong individual
performances on the night,
and that made for a very ex-
citing meet. But, hats off to
Crystal River They have a
great team over there, and
I'm positive they're going to
do great at districts. This was
a very positive experience,
and I couldn't ask for more
from our team."
For Crystal River's Marissa
Penn, the meet sparks a bit-
tersweet feeling, as it will be
her last at Bicentennial Park.
"It's a tough feeling," she
said. "It's bittersweet in the
fact that I'm going to miss
everybody once the season is
over obviously, but to see that
I've made it this far, and have
improved as much as I have
is a great feeling," Penn said.


Associated Press
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, left, appointed former NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue on Friday to hear the appeals
of four players suspended in the New Orleans Saints bounties scandal.





Different look


Goodell appoints former commish Tagliabue to hear appeals


Associated Press

NEW YORK- NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell appointed predecessor
Paul Tagliabue to hear the appeals of
four players suspended in the Saints'
bounty scandal.
Goodell said Friday he notified
Jonathan Vilma, Will Smith, Scott Fu-
jita and Anthony Hargrove, as well as
the players' union, that Tagliabue
would be the hearing officer to "de-
cide the appeals and bring the matter
to a prompt and fair conclusion."
The union and the four players had
asked Goodell to recuse himself, con-
tending he could not fairly rule.
Their second set of appeals will be
heard Oct. 30.
"Any time we move towards a fair
evaluation of the evidence it is a pos-
itive development," said Peter Gins-
berg, Vilma's attorney "Commissioner
Goodell's belated recognition that he
cannot possibly serve as an impartial
and unbiased arbitrator is certainly a
positive development. And we have
enormous respect for Paul Tagliabue.
"Having said that, we now need to
learn whether Commissioner Tagli-
abue plans to provide to us the fun-


damental rights that Commissioner
Goodell ignored, including the right
to examine the accusers and to see
the evidence, and also we need to
consider that Commissioner Tagli-
abue is counsel to the law firm rep-
resenting Commissioner Goodell in
Jonathan's defamation lawsuit, as
well as representing the NFL in
Jonathan's challenge to the entire
process in this matter."
Vilma was suspended for the 2012
season and Smith was banned four
games for his role in the bounties pro-
gram. Fujita, now with the Browns,
was barred three games, since re-
duced to one. Hargrove is a free agent
whose suspension was reduced from
eight games to seven.
"I have held two hearings to date and
have modified the discipline in several
respects based on my recent meetings
with the players," Goodell said. "I will
have no role in the upcoming hearings
or in Mr Tagliabue's decisions.
"Paul Tagliabue is a genuine foot-
ball authority whose tenure as com-
missioner was marked by his
thorough and judicious approach to
all matters," he added. "He has many
years of experience in NFL collective


Tough go

Associated Press


fol


AUSTIN, Texas Lance Arm-
strong said he has been through a
"difficult couple of weeks" and
urged supporters of his cancer-
fighting charity to stand behind its
mission.
"The mission is bigger than me.
It's bigger than any individual,"
Armstrong said Friday night in his
opening remarks at Livestrong's
15th anniversary celebration.
Armstrong has been turned into
an outcast in professional cycling
and most of his personal sponsors
dropped him this week after the
Nike said Wednesday it is severing
ties with Armstrong, citing insur-
mountable evidence that the cyclist
participated in doping and misled the
company for more than a decade.
Associated Press


bargaining matters and an impecca-
ble reputation for integrity."
Tagliabue was NFL commissioner
from 1989-2006 and is a lawyer. For
part of that time, Goodell was the
league's general counsel.
Goodell said he consulted with
NFL Players Association executive
director DeMaurice Smith before ask-
ing Tagliabue to hear these appeals.
The collective bargaining agreement
with the union that was reached to
end the lockout in August 2011 gave
Goodell exclusive authority to hear
appeals of discipline for conduct
detrimental or to appoint someone to
hear and decide an appeal.
Goodell periodically has appointed
others to hear appeals for club fines,
personal conduct suspensions and for
matters concerning drug and steroid
policy
"To be clear, I have not consulted
with Paul Tagliabue at any point about
the Saints' matter, nor has he been any
part of the process," Goodell said.
"Furthermore, under our process the
hearing officer has full authority and
complete independence to decide the
appeal and determine any procedural
issues regarding the hearings."


:Armstrong

U.S. Anti-Doping Agency released a
massive report detailing perform-
ance-enhancing drug use by the
seven-time Tour de France winner.
USADA has ordered him banned
from cycling for life and stripped of
his Tour de France victories.
Armstrong, who denies doping,
didn't address the USADA report or
the doping charges in his remarks.
Instead, he focused on the mission
of the foundation he started in 1997.
Armstrong was diagnosed in 1996
with testicular cancer that had
spread to his lungs and brain.
"I am ... truly humbled by your
support," Armstrong said after re-
ceiving a standing ovation from the
crowd of 1,700. "It's been an inter-
esting couple of weeks. It's been a
difficult couple of weeks for me
and my family, my friends and this
foundation."


49ers grind way



past Seahawks


Associated Press


SAN FRANCISCO -Jim
Harbaugh's San Francisco
49ers sure have a knack for
leaving tough losses behind.
They've never lost two
games in a row under the
reigning NFL Coach of the
Year
This time, the 49ers had
all of four days and no
choice but to forget in a
hurry; first place in the NFC
West was on the line.
Alex Smith threw a 12-
yard touchdown pass to De-
lanie Walker late in the
third quarter and San Fran-
cisco held off the Seattle
Seahawks 13-6 Thursday
night to give the 49ers a vic-
tory in their long-awaited
division opener.
"Coming off a loss, we
wanted to go out there and
get that mojo back," line-
backer Patrick Willis said.
"We never lost it, but at the
same time, you never want
to lose a game. It's a bad
taste in everybody's mouth.
We just knew we had to
come out and play great
football against this team
tonight."
It wasn't all that pretty,
but that hardly matters to
the Niners.
They're alone in first
place for now.
"You lose, you move on
and you get ready for your
next opponent," defensive
tackle Justin Smith said. "It
just happened to be Seattle,
who's in our division."
Frank Gore ran for 131
yards and the 49ers (5-2)
hung tough on defense late
in a game featuring two
teams allowing fewer than
16 points per game.
Alex Smith went 14 of 23
for 140 yards in a second
straight subpar performance.
Walker's score was San
Francisco's first touchdown
in seven quarters after an
embarrassing 26-3 loss to
the New York Giants on
Sunday in a lopsided re-
match of the NFC champi-
onship game.
NFC rushing leader Mar-
shawn Lynch finished with
103 yards for Seattle (4-3).
It's now Harbaugh 3, Pete
Carroll 0 since these coach-


ing rivals started facing off
in the NFL last year after all
those memorable moments
in the college game.
"That was the most phys-
ical 30 minutes of football
in the second half that I
have ever seen our football
team play," Harbaugh said.
"It's a sweet win. It was a
real football fight, and our
guys won it."
The 49ers improved to 5-0
after regular-season defeats
since Harbaugh took over
before last season.
Pulling off this one could
give the 49ers some momen-
tum, too. It was the first of
two straight prime-time
games for San Francisco,
which doesn't play again
until Oct. 29 at Arizona.
The defensive fight left
the animated coaches shak-
ing their heads and holler-
ing on opposite sidelines all
game, offering plenty of en-
tertainment for the sellout
crowd of 69,732 at balmy
Candlestick Park.

49ers 13,
Seahawks 6
Seattle 3 3 0 0- 6
San Francisco 3 0 7 3- 13
First Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 52, 5:29.
SF-FG Akers 38, :26.
Second Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 35, 12:07.
Third Quarter
SF-Walker 12 pass from Ale.Smith (Akers
kick), 4:29.
Fourth Quarter
SF-FG Akers 28, 5:24.
A-69,732.
Sea SF
First downs 13 18
Total Net Yards 251 313
Rushes-yards 29-136 32-175
Passing 115 138
Punt Returns 2-5 3-70
Kickoff Returns 0-0 2-41
Interceptions Ret. 1-4 1-1
Comp-Att-Int 9-23-1 14-23-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-7 2-2
Punts 4-48.5 5-45.6
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 3-20 5-40
Time of Possession 27:59 32:01
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Seattle, Lynch 19-103, Turbin 4-17,
Wilson 3-10, Washington 2-4, Robinson 1-2.
San Francisco, Gore 16-131, Hunter 9-31,
Ale.Smith 5-11, K.Williams 1-3, Kaepernick 1-
(minus 1).
PASSING-Seattle, Wilson 9-23-1-122. San
Francisco, Ale.Smith 14-23-1-140.
RECEIVING-Seattle, Obomanu 3-50, Rice 2-
32, Baldwin 2-15, Lynch 1-13, Robinson 1-12.
San Francisco, Gore 5-51, Crabtree 4-31,
Hunter 2-14, K.Williams 1-18, Moss 1-14,
Walker 1-12.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Seattle, Hauschka
51 (WL).


Associated Press
San Francisco running back Frank Gore had 182 yards of
total offense against the Seattle Seahawks during the
49ers' 13-6 victory late Thursday night.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012



MLB playoffs
All Times EDT
WILD CARD
Friday, Oct. 5
National League: St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3
American League: Baltimore 5, Texas 1
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)
American League
Detroit 3, Oakland 2
Saturday, Oct. 6: Detroit 3, Oakland 1
Sunday, Oct. 7: Detroit 5, Oakland 4
Tuesday, Oct. 9: Oakland 2, Detroit 0
Wednesday Oct. 10: Oakland 4, Detroit 3
Thursday, Oct. 11: Detroit 6, Oakland 0
New York 3, Baltimore 2
Sunday, Oct. 7: New York 7, Baltimore 2
Monday, Oct. 8: Baltimore 3, New York 2
Wednesday, Oct. 10: New York 3, Baltimore
2, 12 innings
Thursday, Oct. 11: Baltimore 2, New York 1,
13 innings
Friday, Oct. 12: New York 3, Baltimore 1
National League
San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2
Saturday, Oct. 6: Cincinnati 5, San Francisco
2
Sunday, Oct. 7: Cincinnati 9, San Francisco
0
Tuesday, Oct. 9: San Francisco 2, Cincinnati
1, 10 innings
Wednesday Oct. 10: San Francisco 8, Cincin-
nati 3
Thursday, Oct. 11: San Francisco 6, Cincin-
nati 4
St. Louis 3,Washington 2
Sunday, Oct. 7: Washington 3, St. Louis 2
Monday, Oct. 8: St. Louis 12, Washington 4
Wednesday Oct. 10: St. Louis 8, Washington
0
Thursday, Oct. 11: Washington 2, St. Louis 1
Friday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 9, Washington 7
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
American League
Detroit 4, New York 0
Saturday, Oct. 13: Detroit 6, New York 4, 12
innings
Sunday, Oct. 14: Detroit 3, New York 0
Tuesday, Oct. 16: Detroit 2, New York 1
Wednesday, Oct. 17: New York at Detroit,
ppd., rain
Thursday, Oct. 18: Detroit 8, NewYork 1
National League
All games televised by Fox
St. Louis 3, San Francisco 2
Sunday, Oct. 14: St. Louis 6, San Francisco 4
Monday, Oct. 15: San Francisco 7, St. Louis
1
Wednesday, Oct. 17: St. Louis 3, San Fran-
cisco 1
Thursday Oct. 18: St. Louis 8, San Francisco
3
Friday, Oct. 19: San Francisco 5, St. Louis 0
Sunday, Oct. 21: St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at
San Francisco (Vogelsong 14-9), 7:45 p.m.
x-Monday, Oct. 22: St. Louis at San Fran-
cisco, 8:07 p.m.
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Wednesday, Oct. 24: Detroit at National
League (n)
Thursday, Oct. 25: Detroit at National League
(n)
Saturday, Oct. 27: National League at Detroit
(n)
Sunday, Oct. 28: National League at Detroit
(n)
x-Monday, Oct. 29: National League at Detroit
(n)
x-Wednesday, Oct. 31: Detroit at National
League (n)
x-Thursday, Nov. 1: Detroit at National
League (n)
Giants 5, Cards 0
San Francisco St. Louis
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pagan cf 5 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 0 1 0
Scutaro 2b 4 1 1 0 Beltran rf 4 0 1 0
Sandovl3b 4 2 2 1 Hollidy If 4 0 0 0
Arias 3b 0 0 0 0 Craigib 4 0 1 0
Posey c 4 0 1 0 YMolin c 4 0 2 0
Pence rf 4 1 0 0 Freese 3b 4 0 1 0
Beltlb 3 0 0 0 Descals2b 4 0 1 0
GBlanc If 2 1 0 0 Kozma ss 2 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 4 0 1 2 Lynn p 1 0 0 0
Zitop 2 0 1 1 J.Kellyp 0 0 0 0
SCasillp 0 00 0 SRonsnph 1 0 0 0
A.Huffph 1 0 0 0 Rosnthlp 0 0 0 0
Romo p 0 00 0 Boggs p 0 00 0
Schmkrph 1 0 0 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 56 4 Totals 33 0 7 0
San Francisco 000 400 010 5
St. Louis 000 000 000 0
E-Lynn (1). DP-San Francisco 1. LOB-San
Francisco 5, St. Louis 7. 2B-Craig (1), Freese
(2). HR-Sandoval (2). SB-Belt (1), Beltran (1).
S-Zito.


San Francisco
ZitoW,1-0
S.Casilla
Romo
St. Louis
Lynn L,0-1
J.Kelly
Rosenthal
Boggs
Mujica


R ER BB SO

0 0 1 6
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1


Umpires-Home, Ted Barrett; First, Jerry Layne;
Second, Gary Darling; Third, Chris Guccione;
Right, Greg Gibson; Left, Bill Miller.
T-3:03. A-47,075 (43,975).



Glantz-Culver Line
For Oct. 20
NCAA Football
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Nebraska 612 612 (6112) at N'western
at Wisconsin 1712 17 (4512) Minnesota
Army 3 2 (61) at E. Michigan
Ball St. 312 3 (65) at Cent. Mich.
Bowling Green 17 18 (50Y2) at UMass
N. Illinois 14 1612 (66) at Akron
Georgia 27 26 (58) at Kentucky
at Virginia 512 3/2 (5212) Wake Forest
North Carolina 11 1012 (6312) at Duke
NC State 5 3 (44) at Maryland
Cincinnati 8 6 (64Y2) at Toledo
at Georgia Techl4 14 (63) Boston College
Rutgers 5 4 (41Y2) at Temple
at Air Force 11 11 (56Y2) New Mexico
San Jose St. 15 11 (5512) at UTSA
at Utah St. 30 31 (5612) N. Mexico St.
at Clemson 9Y2 8 (62) Virginia Tech
at Boise St. 28 28 (54Y2) UNLV
at Notre Dame 13Y2 13 (40Y2) BYU
Alabama 20 20 (55) at Tennessee
Stanford 212 3 (4812) at California
at Arizona 6 7Y2 (63Y2) Washington
at Ohio St. 16Y2 1812 (62) Purdue
at Michigan 11V2 9Y2 (43) Michigan St.
at Navy 3 212 (61) Indiana
Texas Tech +22 1Y2 (55) atTCU
at Southern Cal41 40Y2 (57Y2) Colorado
Florida St. 17Y2 21 (57) at Miami
at Oregon St. 10Y2 10 (46Y2) Utah
at West Virginia 4 2Y2 (73) Kansas St.
LSU 2 3Y2 (52) at Texas A&M
at Florida 3 3Y2 (41 2) S. Carolina
at Vanderbilt 7 6Y2 (44Y2) Auburn
at Kent St. 3Y2 3Y2 (53) W. Michigan
at So. Miss. 3 3Y2 (65) Marshall
UCF 2312 22 (50) at Memphis
at Louisville 8 6 (5412) South Florida
at La. Tech 30 30Y2 (74) Idaho
at Okla. St. 14 14 (60Y2) Iowa St.
at Oklahoma 35 35 (57Y2) Kansas
at Texas 10Y2 9 (80) Baylor
Pittsburgh 11 9 (54) at Buffalo
East Carolina 4 2Y2 (55Y2) at UAB
at Iowa 2 2Y2 (42) Penn St.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
1-3-9
CASH 3 (late)
S. 9 9-0-1
PLAY 4 (early)
S 5-1-4-0
PLAY 4 (late)

FANTASY 5
3 10-14-29-32
MEGA MONEY
20 26 30 40
oida Lottery MEGA BALL
9


On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Hollywood Casino 400 practice
1:30 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing (Taped)
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: Kansas Lottery 300 race
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Kansas Lottery 300
race (Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Preseason: San Antonio Spurs at Miami Heat
FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Virginia Tech at Clemson
12 p.m. (MNT) Auburn at Vanderbilt
12 p.m. (ESPN) LSU at Texas A&M
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
12 p.m. (FX) Iowa State at Oklahoma State
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Pennsylvania at Yale
12:30 p.m. (CW) Wake Forest at Virginia
3 p.m. (FOX) Stanford at California
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Georgia Tech
3:30 p.m. (NBC) BYU at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m. (CBS) South Carolina at Florida
3:30 p.m. (ABC) South Florida at Louisville
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) UNLV at Boise State
7 p.m. (FOX) Kansas State at West Virginia
7 p.m. (ESPN) Alabama at Tennessee
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Middle Tennessee State at Mississippi State
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Georgia at Kentucky
7 p.m. (SUN) Kansas at Oklahoma
8 p.m. (ABC) Florida State at Miami
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Utah at Oregon State
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Iowa State at Oklahoma State
(Same-day Tape)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: ISPS Handa Perth
International Third Round (Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: McGladrey Classic Third
Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Winn Dixie Jacksonville Open -
Third Round (Same-day Tape)
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: KEB HanaBank
Championship Second Round (Same-day Tape)
1:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: ISPS Handa Perth
International Final Round
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Tottenham
Hotspur vs. Chelsea.
1 p.m. (FSNFL) English Premier League: Newcastle United
vs. Manchester United (Taped)
5:30 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: America vs.
Leon
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Philadelphia Union at Houston
Dynamo
VOLLEYBALL
2:30 a.m. (SUN) Missouri at Mississippi. (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY
8:30 a.m. Citrus, Lecanto, Crystal River at Crystal River
Invitational


at Tulsa 21 21Y2 (63Y2) Rice
at UTEP 16Y2 16Y2 (52)Tulane
at Fresno St. 15Y2 16/2 (63) Wyoming
at Nevada 6Y2 6Y2 (66) San Diego St.
at W. Kentucky 1Y2 3Y2 (52Y2) La.-Monroe
at Miss. St. 20Y2 19 (56) Middle Tenn.
at Troy 612 612 (56) FIU
at So. Alabama 212 412 (44) FAU
NFL
Sunday
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG


at Buffalo
at Minnesota
at Indianapolis
at Houston
Green Bay
Dallas
at N.Y. Giants
New Orleans
at N. England
at Oakland
Pittsburgh

at Chicago


312 3Y2 (46/2) Tennessee
4 612 (40) Arizona
3 2 (4512) Cleveland
412 612 (4812) Baltimore
4 512 (4512) at St. Louis
2 2 (46) at Carolina
612 6 (51) Washington
3 2 (4912) at T Bay
11 1012 (47Y2) N.Y Jets
5 4 (44) Jacksonville
112 1 (45) at Cincinnati
Monday
6 6Y2 (47Y2) Detroit


NFL standings


N.Y. Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo


Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


AFC
East
V L T
3 3 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
South
V L T
5 1 0
2 3 0
2 4 0
I 4 0
North
V L T
5 1 0
3 3 0
2 3 0
1 5 0
West
V L T
3 3 0
3 3 0
1 4 0
1 5 0


Pct PF
.500 133
.500 188
.500 120
.500 137

Pct PF
.833 173
.400 100
.333 114
.200 65

Pct PF
.833 161
.500 149
.400 116
.167 134

Pct PF
.500 170
.500 148
.200 87
.167 104


NFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 178 114
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125
Washington 3 3 0 .500 178 173
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 94 119
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113
Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 120 101
Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125
New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71
Minnesota 4 2 0 .667 146 117
Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 154 135
Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 137
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 5 2 0 .714 165 100
Arizona 4 2 0 .667 110 97
Seattle 4 3 0 .571 116 106
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 111
Thursday's Game
San Francisco 13, Seattle 6
Sunday's Games
Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami,
Philadelphia, San Diego
Monday's Game
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 25
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 28
Jacksonville at Green Bay 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
New England vs. St. Louis at London, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Houston


Tigers strike Rattlers


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

DUNNELLON The
Dunnellon football squad
played smothering defense
and deployed a balanced of-
fensive assault to handily de-
feat Belleview 42-10 and
improve its District 5A-5
record to 2-1 at Ned Love
Field on Friday night
The Tigers (3-4, 2-1) piled
up 460 total yards -422 more
than the Rattlers (2-5, 0-3) -
while getting 6-for-8 passing
for 82 yards and three TDs
and 123 yards and a TD on
eight carries from senior
dual-threat Jordon Boley
"We haven't had a drop-
back passing game like that
in a long time," Dunnellon
coach Frank Beasley said.
"Jordon's playing at a high
level for us right now, and
(senior tight end) Connor
Wentz, (senior receiver)
Andre Jackson and (junior
receiver) L.D. Thomas are
doing good things for us.
"I'm really proud of our
kids," he added. "We have
good senior leaders and our
kids have never come out
and had a bad practice.
We've been down, and we've
been hurt, but credit our kids
and staff with battling
through."
The Tiger defense, which
allowed just three yards in
the first half, has held its last
two opponents to under 100
total yards combined to get


Dunnellon 42
Belleview 10
S" The
Tigers' next
( game is
7:30 p.m.
Friday at CR.

the team right back into the
district race after a 1-4 start
overall.
"Our defensive line is
pretty salty and our line-
backers are starting to play
really well too," Beasley said.
'A kid that doesn't get much
recognition for us on defense
is (senior end) Dana Wash-
ington. He and (junior defen-
sive lineman) Keiwan Jones
are a big force down in there.
It's tough sledding running
against us.
"I'm really pleased with
where we're at," Beasley
added. "We just have to con-
tinue to ride the wave of mo-
mentum. That happens
sometimes with 17-year-old
kids."
Wentz had a game-high 64
receiving yards on four re-
ceptions, which included a
22-yard touchdown late in
the second quarter.
A 62-yard scoring run by
Boley on an option keeper
early in the third quarter put
Dunnellon ahead 35-0 and
forced a running clock for
much of the second half.
"(Tigers offensive coordi-
nator) Tommy Sutton saw


some things Belleview was
doing schematically that
opened up some read-option
stuff out of our pistol, and
their backside defensive end
was coming hard so Jordon
read that and kept it and
came off the edge and did a
good job," Beasley said.
Boley credited his offen-
sive line's recently improved
play with a lot of his team's
offensive success.
"Our offensive line is a big
key," he said." We stopped
sticking our hand in the dirt
and getting after people like
we're known for We've
started doing that again and
it's showing.
"If we can come out and
run and throw the ball like
that, it's hard to stop," he
added.
The Tigers stay in the dis-
trict with a game at Crystal
River next Friday and a con-
test with North Marion in
two weeks.
"We're really excited,"
Beasley said of his team's up-
coming matchups. "We've
been clamping down on it
and not wanting to talk about
it, but now it's here. Our
coaches and players are
chomping at the bit to get to
those two big rivalry games.
We know Crystal River has
a great ball team," Beasley
continued. "It's going to be a
physical football game.
Those are the kind that we
like, so we're going to go and
see what happens."


Sports BRIEFS


Panthers v'ball falls at Forest;
JV caps unbeaten season
The Lecanto varsity volleyball team suffered a
25-10, 25-11, 25-18 loss at Forest late Thursday
night.
Panthers standouts included Courtney Rymer
(6 assists, 4 kills), Marie Buckley (6 kills, 5 solo
blocks), Amanda Pitre (2 solo blocks) and Sa-
vannah Weller (13 digs)
Also Thursday night, the Lecanto junior varsity
volleyball finished the season undefeated with a
victory over Forest.

Crystal River volleyball ends
regular season victorious
The Crystal River volleyball team scored a 25-
14, 25-18, 23-25, 29-27 victory late Thursday
night at The Villages.
The victory ends the Pirates' regular season
record at 19-6. Crystal River is the No. 1 seed in
the upcoming District 5A-7 tournament at Eustis.
Emily Laga led the CR defense with 37 digs
and added two aces and Kylie Sisk had a season-
high 10 kills, to go with 13 assists and 15 digs.
For the Pirates, Casidy Newcomer had a ca-
reer high of 25 kills and added 25 digs and 3
aces; Laynee Nadal contributed 15 digs, Olivia
Hudson had 5 kills and 3 blocks, and Marissa


Pool had the match-winning kill.



GIANTS
Continued from Page BI

Zito was left off the post-
season roster when the Gi-
ants won the 2010 World
Series because he had
pitched so ineffectively He
started Game 4 of the divi-
sion series against the
Reds earlier in this year's
playoffs and lasted only
2 2/3 innings.
Lynn, an 18-game winner
his first year in the rotation,
failed to make it out of the



LOSS
Continued from Page BI

into the intermission.
In the third quarter, McA-
teer kicked a 42-yard field
goal to put the Pirates up 17-
14, but Eastside answered
back when Jackson found
tight end Seth Brown open
for a 15-yard touchdown pass
to put Eastside up 21-17.



SQUEAKS
Continued from Page B1

Lecanto coach McKinley
Rolle.
McGee (9-for-12 for 68
yards and a touchdown) was
impressive in fourth quar-
ter, coming in for injured
Christian Barber, who ex-
ited the game earlier in the
half.
Down 37-26 with less than
two minutes remaining,
McGee hooked up with wide
receiver Austin Stephens
five times, including a two-
yard strike into the end zone
for a touchdown with 37 sec-
onds remaining. Stevens
finished with 84 yards on
nine catches.
After D'Andre Horton ran
in the two-point conversion


Lemon has huge night,
Syracuse beats UConn 40-10
SYRACUSE, N.Y. --Alec Lemon had eight
catches for 166 yards to help set up three touch-
downs, caught an 11-yard scoring pass, and
Syracuse beat Connecticut 40-10 on Friday
night to spoil Huskies coach Paul Pasqualoni's
return nearly eight years after he was fired by the
Orange.
A loss for Syracuse (3-4, 2-1 Big East) not only
would have been embarrassing, it would have
made reaching a bowl game a daunting task with
five games left. The Orange snapped a five-
game losing streak against UConn (3-5, 0-3).
The Syracuse defense repeatedly pressured
quarterback Chandler Whitmer, stuffed the Con-
necticut run game, finally created a turnover that
led to a score, and Lemon was unstoppable. He
had receptions of 41 yards and a career-long 68
yards to set up scores late in the second period
and on the first possession of the third to help
break open the game, then caught a short one
over the middle as the Orange wreaked havoc
on both sides of the ball.
Jerome Smith finished with a career-high 133
yards rushing on 19 carries, Ryan Nassib was
14 of 20 for 251 yards passing, and Ross Kraut-
man kicked four field goals as the Orange
racked up 502 yards offensively and did not
commit a turnover.


fourth for the second time in
the series.
The Cardinals are seek-
ing consecutive pennants
for the first time since 1967-
68, and trying to advance for
the second year in a row as a
wild-card entry One more
win would set up a rematch
of the 2006 World Series
against the Tigers, which
the Cardinals took in five
games.
Lynn struck out five of the
first 10 batters, sailing
through the first three in-
nings with no balls hit out of
the infield. His undoing was


The Pirates battled back
and again took the lead. On a
fourth-and-2 at the Eastside 2
yard line, Destin Dawsy pow-
ered his way in for a touch-
down to give Crystal River a
24-21 lead. The Rams were
threatening, when they drove
to the Crystal River 1 yard
line and were stopped short,
as it appeared the Pirates
were going to be victorious,
but the Rams still had over
two minutes left


to make it 37-34, Lecanto
kicked off-- but not the on-
side kick that was called,
and Lake Weir (2-5, 1-2) was
able to kneel down to run
the clock out
Rolle stated an onside
kick was called, and there
was a communication
breakdown.
"We don't blame anything
or anybody," Rolle said.
"There were several parts
of that game where we
could've done something to
change the outcome."
Barber finished 8-for-12
for 79 yards and a touch-
down before leaving the
game, while also rushing for
80 yards and a score to lead
Lecanto early
Nile Waters rushed for 55
yards on 11 carries, finding
the end zone twice (both in
the third quarter). Each of


a wild throw off the second-
base bag attempting to get a
forceout on a comebacker
that paved the way for San
Francisco's four-run fourth.
The Giants had runners
on first and second with one
out when Lynn gloved a tap-
per by Hunter Pence,
wheeled and waited a bit
while rookie shortstop Pete
Kozma hustled to second.
But Lynn threw a low dart
off the bag with the ball
bounding into shallow right
field and Marco Scutaro
scoring without a play from
second.


The Pirates took a safety
after being stopped for no
gain on the first two downs
to bring Eastside within a
point at 24-23. Eastside
began its winning drive in
Crystal River territory at
the 48, and executed their
double-wing offense well to
set up Malu's thrilling game-
winning field goal to lift the
Rams to victory
Crystal River hosts Dun-
nellon at 7:30 p.m. Friday


Waters' scores gave the Pan-
thers the slim lead at the
time.
For the Hurricanes,
Blackburn finished an im-
pressive 11-for-15 passing
for 247 yards and two touch-
downs, while Ja'Rael
Hamilton ran for 105 yards
and two scores on just five
rushes.
Rolle praised his team,
especially the late effort,
and his young quarterback.
"For Travis to come in as a
true freshman in a tough sit-
uation, to be able to lead our
offense down there and step
up, and everybody else to
step up around him," Rolle
said. "I was really proud of
that It says a lot about our
team, and about him."
Lecanto travels to Van-
guard on Friday for a 7:30
p.m. start.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kahne sitting on Kansas pole


Driver out front

for Sunday's

Sprint Cup race

Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. Every
championship contender knew
that starting position would be
paramount at repaved Kansas
Speedway, where getting to the
front after the green flag drops
could present a problem.
Kasey Kahne and Clint Bowyer
will have the luxury of starting
there.
Kahne earned the pole for Sun-
day's race by shattering the track
record with a lap of 191.360 mph,
and Bowyer qualified behind
Michael Waltrip Racing teammate
Mark Martin in third Friday
"That was a fast lap," Bowyer
said, basically summing up the lap
turned by everyone. "It's unreal
how much that gets your attention."
Kahne is fifth in points with five
races left in the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship, while
Bowyer is fourth after his win last
week at Charlotte. Both of them are
chasing leader Brad Keselowski,
five-time champion Jimmie John-
son and Denny Hamlin.
"It's hammer-down, man," said
Bowyer, a native of Emporia, Kan.
"Looking forward to practice to-
morrow. I think we've done a good


Associated Press
Kasey Kahne holds the pole award Friday at Kansas Speedway for
Sunday's Sprint Cup race in Kansas City, Kan. Kahne won the pole position
with a speed of 191.360 mph.


job so far. Still got a long ways to go."
Not as far to go as Keselowski.
He'll be one of the drivers trying
to meander their way through the
field over the repaved surface after
qualifying 25th. The only Chase
driver to qualify worse was three-
time champion Tony Stewart, who
will start 33rd for Sunday's race.
"We just have more work than we
wanted," Keselowski said. "Track
position is important. If you don't
qualify well, you just have to make
sure that your car is fast in race
trim, and that's what we'll try to do


tomorrow."
All 43 cars in the field broke the
previous track record of 180.856
mph set by Matt Kenseth in 2005,
though that came as no surprise.
Drivers were turning laps in excess
of 190 during practice, and cars
were approaching 205 mph before
letting up entering the corners -
speeds not seen over the track
since IndyCars were running on it
"All the drivers are high-fiving
each other because we came back
here alive," joked Kyle Busch,
who qualified fourth. "The mini-


mum speed through the corner is
amazing."
Johnson, who will start seventh,
said he was "as brave as I could be."
"You're just driving your guys out
and doing everything you can all
the way around," he said. "You
know it's fast. You just don't know if
it's fast enough."
Kansas Speedway underwent a
massive renovation over the sum-
mer that replaced the old, worn-out
surface with new pavement while
creating variable banking in the
corners. It was a necessary step
after massive chunks of asphalt
chipped off the track during the
April race weekend.
Still, the decision was met with
consternation from many drivers
who have seen multiple lanes and
the ability to pass disappear at
other tracks that have undergone
resurfacing projects.
Martin said he's concerned that
one lane along the bottom of the
track will make it difficult to pass.
That's been the case at some other
repaved tracks.
"It's a new track now. I mean, it
really is, and we're going to have to
learn as we go," Martin said. "We
can't find out tomorrow in practice
what the track is going to be like
Sunday It's just not going to happen.
This track is coming in very slowly"
Hamlin qualified ninth after
wrecking the car he intended to use
for Sunday's race when he clipped
the wall entering Turn 1 near the
start of testing on Thursday


SPORTS


NHL



lockout



extends

Associated Press

NEW YORK The NHL
wiped out the third week of
the regular season Friday as
the lockout dragged on, leav-
ing no more wiggle room if
the league hopes to play a
full 82-game schedule.
A day after the NHL
turned down three counter-
proposals from players, the
league canceled 53 more
games. A total of 135 games
through Nov 1 have been
scratched, which amounts
to 11 percent of the season.
"As expected," New York
Rangers goalie Martin
Biron told The Associated
Press in a text message. "We
continue to work hard to
find an agreement and get
back to playing hockey"
In its third lockout since
1994, the NHL is sticking to
its most recent proposal that
stated a full 82-game-per-
team schedule could be
played if the season begins
by Nov 2. The league says a
deal must be reached with
the union by next Thursday
for that to happen.
Two weeks ago, the league
called off 82 games from
Oct 11-24.
On Thursday, the union
rejected the NHEs proposal
made two days earlier that
offered a 50-50 split of
hockey-related revenues
and ensured a full regular-
season schedule. In brief
talks, the players countered
with their trio of offers that
were, in turn, quickly dis-
missed by the league.
"We are disappointed that
the NHL has canceled more
games as a result of the
owners' lockout," said for-
mer player Mathieu Schnei-
der, now the NHLPA special
assistant to the executive di-
rector. "The players made
another major move in the
negotiations this week in an
effort to end the lockout, by
presenting the owners with
a proposal that gets to a
50-50 split of revenues."


Host with the most


Associated Press
Davis Love III watches his ball down the eighth fairway Friday during the second round of The McGladrey Classic PGA Tour golf tournament in St.
Simons Island, Ga.

Ryder Cup captain Love III in the hunt at PGA event he hosts in Georgia


Associated Press

ST SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -
Davis Love III might have found
the perfect tonic for any Ryder Cup
hangover playing golf, and play-
ing well on a Sea Island course he
knows better than anyone.
In his third straight tournament
since his U.S. team lost a big lead on
the final day at Medinah, Love hit a
6-iron to 3 feet on the 17th hole that
put him in the final group going into
the weekend at the McGladrey
Classic, where he is becoming more
than just a tournament host.
Love was one shot behind Arjun
Atwal, who is running out of time to
keep his PGA Tour card. Atwal made
an adjustment in his putting stroke
earlier in the week and watched it
pay off in a big way at Sea Island for


a 63, his best score of the year
Atwal, whose two-year exemption
from winning in Greensboro, N.C.,
expires this year, is No. 175 on the
money list and has only two tourna-
ments left to finish in the top 125.
He opened with three straight
birdies and took the outright lead
with a wedge into 5 feet on the fifth
hole, his 14th of the round.
Atwal was at 10-under 130,
though this tournament has a dis-
tinct Ryder Cup feel going into the
final two days. It starts with Love,
the American captain, who moved
to Sea Island when he was 14.
Love was tied with Jim Furyk, who
hasn't played since his bogey-bogey
finish in the Ryder Cup and is mak-
ing his final PGA Tour appearance of
the year Furyk was plodding along
Sea Island, a few birdies on his card,


when he rolled in an 18-foot birdie
putt on the 14th, converted a two-
putt birdie from 100 feet away just off
the green, and made a third straight
birdie on the 16th from about 12 feet
He wound up with a 65.
David Toms was tied with them
until he made bogey on the final
hole for a 67, though he was still
only two shots out of the lead. Bud
Cauley, who shared the first-round
lead, wasn't as crisp with his irons
and had to settle for a 70. He also
was two behind, still in great shape
as he pursues his first PGA Tour
win. Gavin Coles joined them at 132
after six birdies in a round of 65.
HanaBank Championship
INCHEON, South Korea Norway's
Suzann Pettersen shot a course-record
9-under 63 to take a one-stroke lead


after the first round of the LPGA Tour's
HanaBank Championship.
Pettersen birdied five of her first six
holes and nine of the first 15 on Sky 72
Golf Club's Ocean Course.
Sweden's Karin Sjodin opened with
a 65, and South Korea's So Yeon Ryu,
Moon Hyun-hee and Kim Ha-neul
were three strokes back at 66 along
with Japan's Ai Miyazato and Spain's
Azahara Munoz.
Perth International
PERTH, Australia -Argentina's
Emiliano Grillo moved closer to securing
his European Tour card for next season,
shooting a 5-under 67 to take a four-
stroke lead in the Perth International.
The 20-year-old Grillo had two ea-
gles and two birdies at Lake Karrinyup
to finish at 11-under 133.


Tigers' triumphant return home


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Penguins star Sid-
ney Crosby, seen here speak-
ing to reporters on Thursday,
is among the group of NHL
players that saw another
week of the 2012-13 season
canceled. Now the earliest
the league will resume is
early November.


Associated Press

DETROIT The next few days
may feel a bit familiar to Detroit
manager Jim Leyland.
The Tigers will have to wait a
while before starting the World
Series. Detroit won the AL pen-
nant Thursday, wrapping up a
four-game sweep of the New York
Yankees. Now the Tigers won't
play again until next Wednesday,
when they open on the road
against the winner of the NL
championship series between St
Louis and San Francisco.
In 2006, Leyland's Tigers swept
Oakland in the ALCS, finishing that
series Oct 14. The World Series
didn't start until Oct 21, and Detroit
lost to St Louis in five games.
"I do think the lull between our
playoff and the World Series did


work against us in 2006," Leyland
said recently "Now, that's not to
take anything away from the St.
Louis Cardinals. But all of a sud-
den, our emotion went from so
high to just a blah, looking at
each other for six days of staring
at each other with really no ac-
tion. That's hard."
The Tigers have workouts
planned at Comerica Park from
Saturday through Monday The
big question now is how the lay-
off will affect Detroit's sterling
starting rotation, which has a 1.02
ERA so far in the postseason.
The Tigers breezed past the
Yankees, with the starters allow-
ing only two runs in the series.
Justin Verlander made three
starts in the playoffs, allowing
only two runs in the first inning
of his first start and the ninth in-


ning of his most recent start
If the trend continues, Detroit
should be very tough to beat, es-
pecially with an offense that fi-
nally broke out for eight runs in
Game 4 against the Yankees.
Verlander was a rookie in 2006,
and the team didn't make the play-
offs again until last year, when the
Tigers lost in the ALCS. The ace
right-hander can appreciate the
journey a bit more now than in '06.
"It's different because that
seemed like it was easier. We
were ahead all year," Verlander
said.

Detroit Tigers pitcher Phil Coke
celebrates Thursday after winning
Game 4 of the American League
Championship Series against the
New York Yankees in Detroit.
Associated Press


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 B5

Sprint Cup

Hollywood Casino
400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 191.36 mph.
2. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 191.238.
3. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.13.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.096.
5. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 190.988.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 190.853.
7. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 190.84.
8. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 190.813.
9. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 190.718.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 190.409.
11. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.389.
12. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 190.375.
13. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 190.154.
14. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.134.
15. (22) Sam HornishJr, Dodge, 190.094.
16. (56) Martin TruexJr, Toyota, 189.94.
17. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189.913.
18. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 189.827.
19. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 189.52.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 189.367.
21. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 189.268.
22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 189.268.
23. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.261.
24. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 188.851.
25. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 188.772.
26. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 188.646.
27. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 188.633.
28. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 188.6.
29. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 188.37.
30. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 188.173.
31. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 188.147.
32. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 188.055.
33. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 187.859.
34. (91) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 187.761.
35. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 187.748.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 187.578.
37. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 187.474.
38. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 187.233.
39. (88) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 187.182.
40. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 186.896.
41. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (79) Kelly Bires, Ford, 187.285.
Failed to Qualify
44. (33) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 186.877.
45. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 186.027.
46. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 182.5.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Tom Hanks lets
obscenity slip
NEW YORK-ABC
and Tom Hanks are apol-
ogizing after the actor let
slip a
swear
word dur-
ing a live
appear-
ance on
"Good
Morning
America."
Tom Hanks Hanks
telegraphed his "f-bomb"
during an interview Fri-
day Anchor Elizabeth
Vargas had asked him to
speak in his character's
British accent in the
movie "Cloud Atlas."
Hanks said that it was
"mostly swear words,"
but Vargas told him to go
ahead anyway
He began speaking in a
mumble but the obscen-
ity was clearly audible.
ABC removed it for sub-
sequent feeds of the show
in the Midwest and West.
Vargas quickly said,
"We are so sorry, 'Good
Morning America."'
Hanks also apologized.

Biel, Timberlake
marry in Italy
LOS ANGELES -
Justin Timberlake and
Jessica Biel got married.
"It's great to be mar-
ried, the ceremony was
beautiful
and it was
so special
to be sur-
rounded
by our
family
and
friends,"
Jessica the cou-
Biel ple said
in a state-
ment released Friday to
People magazine.
The 31-year-old Tim-
berlake and 30-year-old
Biel were wed in south-
ern Italy. The couple got
engaged in December
after dating for several
years.


Fans ups(
guns, Ma
DENVER -
orado fans are
after music su
Madonna used
ing a perform;
Madonna st-





P--


Madonna
ous performance
According t(
the station rec
eral calls Frid
concert-goers
were offended
guns and viole
of her show in
cent events in
that included
shooting at a t
ing a Batman
July 20 that le:
dead.
In a stateme
beginning the
Madonna said
not condone tf
guns. She said
using the guns
of intolerance
pain I have fel
ing my heart b


et about
donna
- Some Col-
upset
Lperstar
d guns dur-
ance.
arted her
show
Thursday
night at
the Pepsi
Center in


Spreading gossip


Associated Press
A five-foot tall puppet with outlandish red lips, a shrill voice and a penchant for salacious details rules Puerto
Rico's gossip circuit, with legions tuning into her show, "La Comay," every afternoon, ready for the latest
bombshell.

Puerto Rico enthralled by cheeky newscaster puppet


Associated Press

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico No
one is safe from the crosshairs of La
Comay
This five-foot-tall character with
a foam head painted with outra-
geous red lips, a shrill voice and a
penchant for salacious details rules
Puerto Rico's gossip circuit, with le-
gions tuning into her show every af-
ternoon ready for the latest
bombshell. La Comay dishes it out
with ominous music playing in the
background, talking about everyone
from Mexican crooner Luis Miguel
to Puerto Rico's own Miss Universe
beauty queen Zuleyka Rivera.
With her trademark
'Ayayayayayay!" shriek punctuated
by the kind of wailing sirens re-
served for nuclear meltdowns, La
Comay delivers what has consis-
tently been one of the most popular
shows in Puerto Rico for a decade.
"Ladies and gentlemen, listen to
this," La Comay says in one show
while going after a well-known local
journalist 'Apparently and allegedly,
the reporter and crew member ap-
parently and allegedly were drunk"
With a wicked drawl, she asks,


"Have I mentioned the name?" A
drag queen then appears in a clip
repeating one of La Comay's catch-
phrases, which translates roughly
as: "Throw it out there, Comay!
Throw it out there!"
The program has been derided
for being over-the-top sensational-
ist and for broadcasting derogatory
comments against women and gays,
but "Super Xclusivo" remains the
main news source for thousands in
the U.S. territory and hundreds of
Puerto Ricans in Florida and New
York. The island comes to a stop
every afternoon to watch La Comay
not only talk small-town gossip but
also expose government and busi-
ness corruption scandals.
"It's an addiction," said Iris
Laboy, a longtime follower in San
Juan. "It is the TV show with the
most impact in Puerto Rico."
That isn't lost on government offi-
cials, including the island's gover-
nor, its justice secretary and the
Senate president, all of whom have
granted La Comay live interviews
while sometimes shunning other
media. Gubernatorial candidate
Rafael Bernabe raised eyebrows
when he recently rejected an invi-


station to appear on the program, be-
coming one of the first campaigning
politicians to skip the La Comay's
hot seat in recent history
Alvin Cuoto, spokesman for Bern-
abe's People's Working Party, said
not appearing on the gossip show
was a question of principles.
"It's a very hard decision because
we recognize the rating the program
has, especially among the working
class," Cuoto said. "But, without a
doubt, we know that for another
Puerto Rico to become a reality, we
have to maintain our principles."
La Comay is played by comedian
Antulio "Kobbo" Santarrosa, who
repeatedly ignored requests to be
interviewed through his spokes-
woman. Every day, Santarrosa slips
on stockings, high heels, a dress and
skin-colored plastic gloves with red
nails painted on them. The final
touch is the foam head, which fea-
tures long, frizzy brownish blonde
hair, a black mole on its left cheek
and a large mouth through which
Santarrosa peers.
La Comay never reveals her
sources, and she relies heavily on
the phrase "apparently and al-
legedly" to back up stories.


Male nude posters plaster Vienna, draw complaints


Associated Press


Denver VIENNA Naked men of all sizes
with a gun and shapes are appearing on Vienna
scene, kiosks as a prestigious museum kicks
which she off an exhibit of male nudity
has used But outside the exhibition, organizers
in previ- are being forced into cover-up mode
aces. after a storm of complaints that the ad
o KUSA-TV posters are offensive.
ceived sev- In a show titled "Nude Men from 1800
ay from to Today," the Leopold Museum opened
saying they its doors Friday to examine how artists
I she used have dealt with the theme of male nu-
ence as part dity over the centuries.
light of re- "Mr Big" a more than 12-foot high
the state full-frontal photo mounted on plywood
a mass and depicting a naked young man in an
heater dur- indolent sprawl is set up near the
movie on show's entrance, lest there be any doubt
ft 12 people what visitors are about to see.
Inside, around 300 art works are on
ent before display including the controversial
tour, photograph that is raising the ire of Vi-
she does ennese. Created by French artists
he use of Pierre & Gilles, "Vive La France" shows
she is three young, athletic men of different
as symbols races wearing nothing but blue, white
and "the and red socks and soccer shoes.
It from hav- No visitors were complaining Friday
)roken." as they filed past that photo and even
-From wire reports more graphic examples of male nudity,


Birthday: Circumstances and unforeseen changes that
might have impeded your progress in the past can be used
as stepping-stones in the year ahead. Because you've
learned quite a bit, you should now be able to profit from
your experience.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You're not likely to invite chal-
lenge, but you might surprise yourself as to how well you
perform when and if you are tested by abrasive people or
adverse circumstances.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you're anchored to one
spot too long, you could quickly become moody and irrita-
ble. Arrange your schedule so that you'll be free to move
around both mentally and physically.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you choose to apply your-
self, you have the ability to take a situation of small promise
and turn it into something that could be extremely profitable.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Having the freedom to


including some depicted in sex acts.
"I've seen worse on late-night TV" said
Franz Steiner, 27, as he left the show.
Not so in the city Posters of the three
men were given impromptu fig-leaves
- lines of red tape covering their pri-
vate parts.
The complaints clearly caught the mu-
seum by surprise. Vienna's turn-of-the-
century decadence allowed erotic artists
such as Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt
to flourish, and has turned these days
into complacent acceptance of displays
of the flesh. Today, lingerie ads are racy
and one popular daily paper regularly
features pictures of half-naked women.
Vienna's public transport system re-
acted laconically earlier this week to re-
ports that a young woman on a
downtown subway line was dressed in
nothing but knee-high boots.
"We know that everyone has a differ-
ent temperature comfort zone," the
agency said in a statement. "But we do
not think that our subways are so warm
that one has to get undressed."
But there seems to be less tolerance
for shows of male nudity Museum offi-
cials say they received a flood of com-
plaints by last week, mostly from
outlying districts heavily populated by
new immigrants from Muslim countries.


Today's HOROSCOPE
function in an independent manner will be of great impor-
tance. Try not to be put in a position where you can't call
any of your own shots.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Usually, you're a gregarious
and outgoing type who enjoys people from all walks of life.
Yet, today, you are likely to step out of character and be a
withdrawn isolato.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Progress can easily be
made in a new endeavor that has captured your attention
and fancy. It'll be easy for you to see things realistically and
act in a practical manner.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It may be of extreme impor-
tance to know that your efforts are being acknowledged
and appreciated. You'll relish all tributes and compliments.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Even though you'll project an
easygoing, philosophical ambiance, you'll still take your in-
volvements with others very seriously. Pragmatism will take


Associated Press
The Leopold Museum in Vienna has
been forced to cover up a graphic
poster advertising a new show
devoted to male nudity, after
protests it is offensive. The show -
"Nude Men from 1800 to Today" -
opened Friday, and looks at how
artists have dealt with the theme of
male nudity over the centuries.


precedence over warmth.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Your strong suit is to be of
assistance, as best you can, to anybody with whom you
share a joint involvement. Your pep and enthusiasm will
prime both your engine and your partner's.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A strong desire for compan-
ionship is likely to be extremely pronounced in you, but if
this is to be satisfied, you need to pick the right person. A
poor choice would contribute to your malaise.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Give vent to your industrious-
ness instead of indulging your playful inclinations. Being
productive and engaging in something worthwhile will be
essential to your gratification.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) With this being the end of the
week, participate in some form of activity that provides you
with a little fun and relaxation. Taking a break from your
work routine will provide many peripheral benefits.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18
Fantasy 5:16 22 23 25 31
5-of-5 2 winners $100,741.16
4-of-5 260 $124.50
3-of-5 7,612 $11.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Oct. 20,
the 294th day of 2012. There
are 72 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Oct. 20, 2011, Moammar
Gadhafi, 69, Libya's dictator for
42 years, was killed as revolu-
tionary fighters overwhelmed
his hometown of Sirte and cap-
tured the last major bastion of
resistance two months after his
regime fell.
On this date:
In 1803, the U.S. Senate
ratified the Louisiana Pur-
chase.
In 1944, during World War
II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur
stepped ashore at Leyte in
the Philippines, 2 1/2 years
after saying, "I shall return."
In 1947, the House Un-
American Activities Commit-
tee opened hearings into
alleged Communist influence
and infiltration in the U.S. mo-
tion picture industry.
In 1967, seven men were
convicted in Meridian, Miss.,
of violating the civil rights of
three slain civil rights workers.
In 1968, former first lady
Jacqueline Kennedy married
Greek shipping magnate Ar-
istotle Onassis.
In 1972, President Richard
M. Nixon signed into law the
General Revenue Sharing
Act, which allocated $30 bil-
lion over five years to state
and local governments.
In 1973, in the so-called
"Saturday Night Massacre,"
special Watergate prosecutor
Archibald Cox was dismissed
and Attorney General Elliot L.
Richardson and Deputy Attor-
ney General William B. Ruck-
elshaus resigned.
In 1987, 10 people were
killed when an Air Force jet
crashed into a Ramada Inn
hotel near Indianapolis Inter-
national Airport after the pilot,
who was trying to make an
emergency landing, ejected
safely.
Ten years ago: With a
U.S. invasion looming, Iraqi
President Saddam Hussein
issued an amnesty decree
releasing everyone from pick-
pockets to political prisoners
from prison.
Five years ago: Republi-
can Congressman Bobby
Jindal, the U.S.-born son of
Indian immigrants, was
elected governor of
Louisiana; he became the
first non-white to hold the job
since Reconstruction.
One year ago: Greek law-
makers passed a deeply re-
sented new austerity bill,
caving in to the demands of
international creditors in
order to avoid a national
bankruptcy as a second day
of riots left one protester
dead and more than 100
people wounded.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
William Christopher is 80.
Singer Tom Petty is 62. Actor
William "Rusty" Russ is 62.
Actress Melanie Mayron is
60. Retired MLB All-Star
Keith Hernandez is 59. Labor
Secretary Hilda Solis is 55.
Rapper Snoop Dogg is 41.
Actress Katie Featherston is
30. Actress Jennifer Nicole


Freeman is 27.
Thought for Today: "Next
to ingratitude, the most
painful thing to bear is grati-
tude." Henry Ward
Beecher, American clergy-
man (1813-1887).











RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


New lease on life


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


DELAYNA EARLEY/The Beaufort Gazette
A recent photo shows St. Paul's Catholic Church on Carteret Street in Beaufort, S.C. which is being restored. Supporters hope to return the
structure to how it looked when it was built in 1846.


Historic chapel

ERIN MOODY
The Beaufort Gazette

BEAUFORT, S.C.
standing in the middle of
St Peter's Chapel on a re-
cent Friday, Beekman
Webb painted a picture with
words, describing what the
church once was and what it
could be again.
The peeling walls will be cov-
ered with fresh drywall and
painted, according to Webb, the
owner of Beekman Webb Con-
struction of Beaufort. The floor-
ing will be covered with smooth
planks. Exposed rafters will be
hidden by a new ceiling. The
1960s-era, multicolored stained


in Beaufort, S. C, undergoing badly needed restoration


glass and aluminum windows
will be replaced with wood and
period-style glass to look as they
did when the chapel was built in
1846.
"I don't think anyone alive has
seen it like this," said Webb of
the eventual finished product,
which will be as close to its orig-
inal appearance as possible.
St. Peter's Catholic Church is
restoring the chapel where its
congregation started. It was the
only Catholic church between
the Broad River and Charleston
until 1987, said the current pas-
tor, the Rev Paul MacNeil.
The intent is to open the
chapel for special services,
small weddings and funerals


and, eventually, public tours a
few afternoons a week, parish-
ioner Pat Green said. She al-
ready is fielding phone calls
from those seeking reservations.
"I think everyone is just so ex-
cited to see life being put back
in the building," she said.
For almost 150 years, the
downtown chapel, which seated
up to 140 people, was the center
of Catholic life in the area. In
1987, St. Peter's moved services
to a 450-seat church on Lady's
Island.
A sanctuary with a capacity of
1,200 was completed in 2006 on
what is now a 30-acre campus on
Lady's Island Drive.
The chapel's lot at 710


Carteret St. was deeded to the
church in the early 1800s by
Michael O'Connor for $33, and
records indicate he paid to build
the chapel. It was badly dam-
aged by a hurricane in 1898 and
repaired the following year
In the 1940s, the building was
expanded to twice its original
size by enclosing the front porch
and adding the front altar Those
changes will remain, Webb said.
Determining how it originally
looked has been a challenge.
Webb is basing the renova-
tions on photos from church
archives, but those only date to
about 1920, he said. The current
See Page C5


Forgive


and


'forget'

Editor's note: A Chroni-
cle reader requested that
we reprint this column
that first ran in July 2004.
It's a good one, so here
goes.
Several weeks ago, a
friend and I were
talking about ghosts
in closets -things people
say they've forgiven and
forgotten, but they really
haven't.
We talked about how
difficult it is for people to
forgive, and wondered
aloud if it's even possible.
Or, if it is possible and
it must be since God tells
us to forgive others "just
as in Christ God has for-
given (us)" and if he tells
us to do something, he al-
ways makes a way to do it
- is it possible to forget?
My friend and I were re-
ally asking whether, once
there's a ghost in your
closet, a haunting unfor-
giveness, can it ever go
away, and how is that even
possible?
It's probably one of
those questions without

See Page C5


Floral City church welcomes new pastor


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Special to the Chronicle
On Sunday, Oct. 7, the Rev
John L. Rothra began serv-
ing First Baptist Church of
Floral City as its new pastor
He succeeded the Rev.
Eddie Quates, who had
served as interim pastor
Last month, under the lead-
ership of Pauling Hibbard,
FBC held a well-attended



Fall fun
First Baptist Church of
Lecanto will sponsor a "Fall
Festival" at 5 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 27. The meal will consist of
a "hobo stew," which is really
chicken or beef stew. Guests
are asked to bring one can of
their favorite vegetable to add
to the stew. There will also be
indoor games and a movie ap-
propriate for families with chil-
dren. Everyone is invited. The
church is on County Road 491
South, one half mile south of
the intersection of State Road
44 and C.R. 491.
Red Level Baptist Church,
11025 W. Dunnellon Road,
Crystal River, will host its an-
nual "Fall Festival" from 5 to 7
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27. Every-
one is welcome to come out
and enjoy free games, a cake
walk, bounce house, hayrides,
horse rides and food. Call 352-
795-2086.
The public is invited to a
"Fall Festival" from 2 to 7 p.m.
today at Joy & Praise Fellow-
ship, 4007 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills. Enjoy free food,
games and fun.
Inverness Church of God
will host a "Fall Fest" from 6 to
8 p.m. Friday at the church, 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Admis-


"Retirement Party" for Pas-
tor Eddie, who was retiring
at the age of 81.
Pastor John relocated from
Fort Worth, Texas, where he
was working on his doctorate
degree. He was a candidate
at FBC with a fantastic ser-
mon, a well-attended ques-
tion-and-answer session, and
was overwhelmingly voted in
on a written ballot



sion is free. Activities include a
hayride, games and prizes, and
a chili cook-off. The public is in-
vited to attend this great time of
fun, food and fellowship. Call
the church at 352-726-4524.
Everyone is invited to a
"Fall Festival" from 1 to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27, at First Bap-
tist Church of Rutland eight
miles east on State Road 44.
There will be games and prizes.
The church will also host a
"Trunk or Treat" event from 5 to
7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31.
Hernando United
Methodist Church will have its
old-fashioned Pumpkin festi-
val for the community from 4 to
6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27. Fes-
tivities include a hayride, cake
walk, games, ball tosses,
horseshoes, fish pond and
more. After the "trunk or treat"
parade, there will be free hot
dogs and a drink. Put on your
costume, bring a friend and
have some old-fashioned,
made-in-America fun. Tell Mom
to bring her camera and take
your picture with the scarecrow.
This is a free event.
The community is invited
to a "Fall Fest & Trunk or
Treat" from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 28, at First Presbyterian
Church, 206 Washington Ave.,
Inverness. "Trunk or Treat" is a


Pastor John has prepared
himself extremely well for
his new ministries at FBC.
At the age of 9, he realized
his sinful status, repented of
his sins, and accepted Jesus
as his personal savior His
father was on active duty in
the U.S. Air Force, and re-
tired in 1991. As a military
child, John moved exten-
sively, living in multiple


Religion NOTES
fun part of "Fall Fest" where
people decorate the trunk of
their car, and children "trick-or-
treat" from car to car. This is a
fun and safe family alternative
to trick-or-treating.
Reflections Church invites
everyone to a "Fall Festival"
from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct.
28, at Citrus Springs Middle
School. Enjoy fun events,
games, inflatables, crafts and
concessions, then climb aboard
the "Candy Train" and arrive
where the treats are waiting for
you. Costumes are welcome,
but not necessary.
"Trunk or Treat" will take
place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 31, at First
Christian Church of Inverness,
2018 Colonade St. (behind the
RaceTrac on State Road 44).
Children from Inverness and
surrounding communities are
invited to this annual church-
sponsored safe trick-or-treating
event. Church members will
park their cars in the parking lot
and open up their decorated
trunks or backs of their vehicles,
then kids will go to each car to
"Trunk-or-Treat" and load up on
candy served from the open car
trunks. Call 352-344-1908.
All children and teenagers
are invited to First Baptist
Church of Floral City's annual


states and in Germany In
1996 John met his wife,
Olivia, and they were mar-
ried in 1999. God has blessed
them with three children:
Lauren, Lindsay and David.
At the age of 28, he sur-
rendered to God's call to the
ministry, was licensed in
September 2002, entered
seminary in 2003, and was
ordained in March 2004. He



"Harvest Festival" from 6 to 9
p.m. on Halloween, Wednes-
day, Oct. 31, at Floral City Park
on Parkside Avenue. There will
be more than 25 booths of con-
tests, games and activities with
candy, treats and more. This
fun-filled event, for which atten-
dees are invited to wear cos-
tumes, is put on by FBC Floral
City's adults and teenagers.
Harvest Fest Coordinator Jen-
nifer Pensinger has labored
many long and hard months for
many years to ensure the
event's continual success.
St Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a "Trunk & Treat"
at6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31.
"Fall Harvest Bazaar"
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, Nov. 2 and 3, at
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa at the corner of
Yulee and Bradshaw (off U.S.
19). Two days of exciting
shops: Craft, Kitchen, Bake
Shoppe & Cookie Walk, Hidden
Treasure Shoppe, Book
Shoppe, Christmas Wonder-
land Shoppe, Plant & Garden,
Technology, Man Cave, and
Silent Auction. Hosted by the
United Methodist Women and
Serendipity Men of the Church,
with proceeds benefiting local
and worldwide charities. Visit
www.1umc.org.


graduated in 2007 with his
Master of Divinity from
Southwestern Baptist Theo-
logical Seminary in Fort
Worth, Texas, with a con-
centration in evangelism
and missions. Immediately
following graduation, John
entered the Ph.D. program
at Southwestern, where he
is currently a doctoral can-
didate in evangelism.



Crystal River Foursquare
Gospel Church invites every-
one to saddle up and ride on
over to its "Fall Festival" from
4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at
the Hager Corral, 1160 N.
Dunkenfield Ave., Crystal River.
Mosey on over for a stompin'
good time featuring fun, food
and games for buckaroos of all
ages. Call 352-795-6720.
Sale away
SA flea market and bake
sale will take place from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at
the St. Lawrence Altar Society,
320 E. Dade St., off C.R. 301.
Hot dogs and drinks available.
All donations appreciated. For
table reservations, call Mrs.
Petty at 352-793-7773.
Joy Lutheran Church, 83rd
Place, Ocala, will have its an-
nual indoor yard sale and
bake sale from 7:30 a.m. to 2
p.m. today in Swenson Hall.
The public is invited. Find furni-
ture, tools, gardening items,
kitchen and house wares,
linens, books and craft sup-
plies, and baked goods. Lunch
is served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Call Edie Heinzen at 352-854-
6816 or Patty Corey at 352-
854-0660.

See Page C2


The


Tallit

One of the most
beautiful and
meaningful ritual
objects in Judaism is, in
my opinion, the tallit, or
prayer shawl. This bibli-
cally mandated item has
for centuries character-
ized the Jew by its distinc-
tive design and has served
as a powerful spiritual
symbol of God's
protection.
The idea for the tallit
comes from the Book of
Numbers (Num. 15: 37-40),
where Moses is instructed
by God to bid the Is-
raelites to put fringes on
the corners of their gar-
ments so as to act as a re-
minder to follow God's
laws and not be tempted
to engage in pagan prac-
tices like the nations
around them. It was a cus-
tom in Bible times to at-
tach a talisman to one's
clothing, but in the case of
the Israelites, their pur-
pose was for the pursuit of
moral and ethical living.
As time wore on and
costumes changed, the
fringes were worn on a
portable garment, i.e. a
shawl-like garment which
could fit over one's every-
day outfit. When, during
history and times of per-
secution it became dan-
gerous to advertise that
one was a Jew, a small gar-
ment worn under cloth-
ing, called a tallit katan,
was worn. This garment is
See Page C5


MAI-----f -A





C2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page Cl

The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church, will host its annual
"Holiday Bazaar and Craft
Fair" from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fri-
day, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, Oct. 27, and 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, in the
Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Christmas
and holiday treasures, hand-
made crafts, jewelry, live plants,
books, toys and games. Raffle
drawing at 1:30 p.m. Sunday.
The Our Lady of Grace monthly
flea market will also take place
outside from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
that Saturday. Refreshments
available. Call Fran Wagner at
352-527-0723 or Joan Reinhart
at 352-527-7064.
An indoor yard sale will
take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27, at Holy Faith
Episcopal Church, 19924 W.
Blue Cove Road, Dunnellon.
Call the church office at 352-
489-2685.
The Holidaze Crafters of
Hernando United Methodist
Church annual "Holidaze Craft
Sale" is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, Nov. 9
and 10, at 2125 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County Road
486), Hernando. More than 25
exhibitors will bring handmade
items made in the USA. The
UMW will sell home-baked
goods.
The Ladies of Faith
Lutheran Church have ex-
panded its "16th Annual
Bazaar" into a super sale. The
bazaar will take place from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Satur-
day, Nov. 9 and 10, at the Crys-
tal Glen Subdivision off State
Road 44 and County Road 490.
Handmade crafts and quilts,
holiday items, silent auction,
trash 'n' treasure items (no
clothing). Ticketholders for the
silent auction need not be pres-
ent to win. This is a Thrivent Fi-


RELIGION


nancial for Lutherans-spon-
sored event. Call 352-
527-9390.
The Ladies Guild of Bev-
erly Hills Community Church
will host a "Christmas Bazaar"
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 9, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 10, at the Jack
Steele Fellowship Hall, 82 Civic
Circle. Items for sale include
white elephant, handmade
crafts, Christmas gifts, knits,
toys, jewelry, bake sale and re-
freshments. There will be a raf-
fle of two handmade quilts.
The Altar and Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host its an-
nual flea market from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, in Fa-
ther Stegeman hall at the cor-
ner of U.S. 41 and State Road
40 in Dunnellon. Hundred of
items will be for sale, including
the famous boutique table. Re-
freshments will be sold at a
nominal fee.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Call 352-726-1707.
Worship
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rock Acres Industrial Park, 6843
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday. Regular church serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
The ministry website is
Covenant-Love.com. Call Pas-
tor Brian Kinker at 352-
601-4868.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Vespers
at 5 p.m. today and Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, (off U.S. 41 North,
across from Dollar General).
The Holy Myrrhbearers ask at-


tendees to bring a box or can of
food for distribution at Family
Resource Center in Hernando.
The public is also invited to at-
tend Great Vespers in The Vil-
lages at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at
St. George Episcopal Church,
1250 Paige Place, Lady Lake.
A Bluegrass come-as-you-
are service featuring Annie and
Tim's United Bluegrass Band
will take place at 5 p.m. today
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S.19), Crystal River.
Sunday worship services in-
clude the early service with
communion at 8 a.m., Sunday
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. with coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with communion at
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
Faith Lutheran Church
welcomes everyone to its Sat-
urday service at 6 p.m. and
Sunday service at 9:30 a.m.
This week Pastor Lane's ser-
mon is from Mark 10:23-31, ti-
tled, "The First and the Last."
Fellowship follows the Sunday
service, then Sunday school
and adult Bible study at 11 a.m.
The adult study is continuing
the book of Revelation. Satur-
day and Sunday are also local
Board of Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans voting days in the
fellowship hall. Call 352-527-
3325 or visit faithlecanto.com.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, offers the following Sun-
day activities: SONrise Sunday
school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the
9 a.m. service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for
all services except the 7:45
a.m. class. On Sunday evening,
Connection classes are offered
and AWANA begins at 5:15.
Midweek worship service for
adults is at 6 p.m. Wednes-


days. For the youths, there is
"Ignite," and for children,
"Wednesday Worship Kids."
Call the office at 352-726-1252
or visit www.fbcinverness.com.
St. Anne's Church (a
parish in the Anglican Com-
munion) will celebrate the 21st
Sunday after Pentecost at the 8
and 10:15 a.m. services. Our
Father's Table is hosted from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.
The "Recovering from Food Ad-
diction" group meets at 1 p.m.
Thursday. Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets at 8 p.m. Friday
and Monday. All are welcome to
join St. Anne's at 6 p.m. Sun-
day, Oct. 28, for a Bluegrass
Gospel sing-along. Annie and
Tim's United Bluegrass Gospel
Band will perform. Ice cream
will be served after.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. Sunday wor-
ship schedule includes tradi-
tional services at 8 and 11 a.m.,
contemporary service at 9:30
a.m., Sunday school hour at
9:30 a.m., and coffee hour from
9 to 11 a.m. This Sunday, the
Rev. Craig S. Davies will
preach on the topic: "Commit-
ted To Christ, Six Steps To A
Generous Life -Are You
Ready to Grow in your Prayer


Life?" with readings from Luke
6:12-19.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. Sunday
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. Children's church is
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Adult Sunday school is at 9:30
a.m. and the children and youth
Sunday school is at 1 p.m., fol-
lowing lunch at 12:15 p.m. The
Feed My Sheep Ministry will
host a hot lunch at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday for those in need.
Following at 12:30 p.m. is a
healing and Holy Eucharist
service celebrating St. James
of Jerusalem. The food pantry
is open from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Tuesday and Wednesdays.
Inverness Church of
God, 416 U.S. 41 S., Inver-
ness, has Sunday worship
services at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
The first Sunday monthly is
designated for children to have
a special time together in the
Children's Church room during
the 10:30 a.m. worship service.
The remaining Sundays, chil-
dren remain in the auditorium
for worship with their parents.
Sunday school begins at 9:30
a.m. with classes for everyone.
Adult Bible class is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in rooms 105 and
106. The youth group meets at
7 p.m. Wednesday in the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Youth Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for pre-k through the
eighth grade) meets from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday. This in-
cludes K.I.D.'s Choir practice
from 6 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s dinner
from 6:30 to 7; and Mis-
sionettes and Royal Rangers
Bible study classes from 7 to 8
p.m. Call 352-726-4524.
At First Baptist Church
of Floral City, Pastor John L.
Rothra will teach the Bible fol-
lowing this pattern of subjects:
Sunday morning blended serv-
ice at 8:30 a.m. and traditional
service at 11 a.m. through
the book of Philippians. Sunday
evening service at 6 p.m. se-
ries on "What We Believe and
Why: Doctrines of the Christian
Faith." Wednesday evening
service at 6:30 p.m. devo-
tionals and prayer. Additional
Wednesday evening activities
for children and youth include:
AWANA for children led by Mike
Johnson and others at 6:30
p.m. OTEG for youth (Ordinary
Teens, Extraordinary God) led
by Josh and Jennifer
Pensinger. The church is at
8545 E. Magnolia St., Floral
City. Call 352-726-4296.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.

See Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! I

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA ;


C Cr tal
0 River
Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



K Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon



ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
Saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
II I ,, ., r ,- t
.] I .1 H..i i .. .


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School |
All Ages 9:30AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


'ST. ANNE'S
ST CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


Attend


the worship

service oh


your

choice...


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


THE
SALVATION
AKD II CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
712S. cbol ve
/ It


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AII Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


West Homosassa
Citrus 9st First United
HEPK, YOU'LL FIND
Church of Christ A CAKIN FM ILY Methodist
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. IN CH KIS! church
Crystal River, FL 34465 C KYSTXL Everyone
352-564-8565 Riv K Becoming
]D0 A Disciple
www.westcitruscoc.com N ITD Disciple
W. Deep Woods Dr. ) T THODIST .


US Hwy.19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


CH U KCH H
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30


Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
- A Stephen Ministry Provider .


I Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am


Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


Let's do Lunch.

Weekdays at Noon








Chat with Chronicle Journalist
Nancy Kennedy on our Facebook page
http://www.facebook.com/citruscountychronicle


0 Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page C2

Sunday. A coffee fellowship
will follow the service. Bible
study is at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The Faith Journey video series
continues the first Wednesday
monthly; lessons that help ex-
plain the Scriptures as related
to the culture and land of bibli-
cal times. On subsequent
Wednesday, a study and dis-
cussion of the book of Eph-
esians continues. The church
meets at the Inverness
Woman's Club, 1715 Forest
Ridge Drive. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the 21st Sunday
after Pentecost with a com-
bined Holy Eucharist service at
9:30 a.m. Sunday. A nursery is
provided. (No Saturday serv-
ice.) There is a healing service
and Eucharist at 10 a.m.
Wednesday. SOS is from 9
a.m. to noon Thursday at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church.
Evening Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday. The congregational
meeting will follow the service.


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbefloralcity.org




















HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

op


Miidg

Vosor

r for Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell BryantHwy. (486)
( 1 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM M 7
individuall Hearing Devices


RELIGION


A coffee hour follows the meet-
ing. The church is barrier free
and offers a free CD ministry,
large-print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. Regular
worship service times are 8:30
and 11 a.m. with Christian edu-
cation studies at 9:45 a.m. The
church is on County Road 486
opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard
in Hernando. Call 352-
746-7161.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service is at
6. Midweek services are at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Young Musi-
cians/Puppeteers meet at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Bible
study for ages 11 and older is
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the second
and fourth Fridays monthly in
the fellowship hall. The church
is on East Parsons Point Road
in Hernando.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions: 855-426-4542.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes
member Joan Burnett to the
pulpit at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.


U Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com























Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM-..................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM-..................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1% mi.eastof US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


She will speak about the June
2012 Unitarian Universalist Jus-
tice Assembly at the Phoenix,
Ariz., Convention Center to
which she was the NCUU dele-
gate. The fellowship meets at
7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus
Springs. Call 352-465-4225.
Find a church home at
Abundant Life of Crystal
River, 4515 N. Tallahassee
Road, Crystal River. Sunday
morning service is at 10:30 and
the midweek service is at 7
p.m. Wednesday. Visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org or
call 352-795-LIFE.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Pastor Jack Alwood's
sermon is "Homecoming." Two
adult Sunday school classes
begin at 9 a.m. Joy Class con-
tinues to study the New Testa-
ment. Independent Class will
not meet this Sunday, but move
on to the study of Buddhism on
Sunday, Oct. 28. The study is
based on "Christianity and
World Religions" by Adam
Hamilton. The Forum meets at
6 p.m. Wednesday to discuss
issues and current events. This
week's guest speaker is Dave
Moore of Beth-el Farmworkers
Mission of Wimauma, Fla.
We all have vampires in
our lives. They're not the ones
with pale skin and bloodthirsty


Community Church




Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.qenesiscommunitvchurch.org
Authentic Love* Relevant Faith
Embracing Community


Attend

the worship

service of

your ',

choice...


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
o.... Floral City, FL.


fangs, but they do suck the life
out of us. They live in your city,
across the street and maybe
even under your own roof. So
how do you love the people
who drain you? How do you
handle your dysfunctional rela-
tionships? How do you make it
work when all you want to do is
run? It's time to learn how to
hug a vampire. Start this Sun-
day at 11 a.m. at Gravity
Church, 801 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
The public is invited to
worship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
Call 352-726-0100.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
meet at 9 a.m. Sunday and 10
a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Sunday morning worship serv-
ice is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at the
junction of U.S. 41 and State
Road 40. Call the church office
at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa, 10540 W Yulee
Drive, weekly schedule: Sun-
day school for all ages at 9 a.m.
followed by morning worship at
10:25. Youth Bible study is at
4:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall.


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigni
4:00 pm

Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352) 746-9422


1 Faith
Lutheran

Church(L.C.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


Sunday evening Bible study be-
gins at 6. Life Care Center is
open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Call 352-
628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. Call 352-382-2557.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services are at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study is at 6
p.m. Wednesday in the
chapel. Everyone is welcome.
Call 352-746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7


Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)


^B-F---.


Q, Hernando
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 C3

p.m. Everyone is welcome. The
church is at the intersection of
State Road 44 and U.S. 19.
Call Evangelist George Hick-
man at 352-794-3372 or 352-
795-8883, or email
georgehickman@yahoo.com.
First Church of God of
Inverness, 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to Sun-
day morning worship services
at 10:30. Call 352-344-3700.
Music & more
Everyone is invited to join
with the choir of First Lutheran
Church of Inverness in its pres-
entation of "The Festival of
Nine Lessons & Carols," at
10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 23, at the
church. Six mandatory Satur-
day morning rehearsals will
take place from 10 a.m. to noon
on Oct. 27, Nov. 3 and 17, and
Dec. 1, 15 and 22. The choir is
looking for additional singers in
all four voice parts. Call Choir
Director Sue Bjorkman at 352-
540-9610 or email sbjorkman
@1stlutheran.net.
The Dunnellon Presbyte-
rian Church Concert Series
for Fall-Winter 2012-13 will
begin at 3 p.m. Sunday with the
University of Florida School of
Music Chamber Ensemble's
presentation featuring works by
Dvorak, Ravel and Brahms per-

See NOTES/Page C5


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! a '

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Homosassa Springs
SEVENTH-DAYADVENTiS CHURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion BRIEFS


Saudi Arabia says Islamic hajj
pilgrimage starts Oct. 25
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia has
announced that the Islamic hajj pilgrimage,
which attracts around 3 million Muslims world-
wide each year, will begin on Thursday, Oct. 25.
The kingdom's High Court, comprised of reli-
gious scholars who serve as judges, announced
Tuesday that Eid al-Adha celebrations coinciding
with the pilgrimage will start on Oct. 26.
Hajj is among the five pillars of Islam and is re-
quired of all able-bodied Muslims at least once in
their lifetime. Already some 1.4 million people
from 160 countries have arrived in the holy city
of Mecca in Saudi Arabia for hajj, which accord-
ing to Islam traces the steps of prophets such as
Muhammad, Abraham and Ishmael.
Hajj is a spiritual experience aimed at foster-
ing closeness to God, the cleansing of sins and
a sense of unity and equality among Muslims.
Judge: Couple cannot change
their last name to ChristlsKing
NEW YORK -Ajudge has told a Staten Is-
land pastor and his wife that they cannot take
the Lord's name in vain.
Civil Court Judge Philip Straniere has ruled
that the couple could not change their last name
to ChristlsKing.
Michael and Angela Nwadiuko expressed dis-
appointment in the ruling.
The judge cited the separation of church and
state in his ruling earlier this month.


The couple's request six years ago to change
their son Jeremy's first name to JesusIsLord also
was denied by the same judge.
Their daughter's name is Rejoice.
Effort to restore church from
Underground Railroad
NEW ALBANY, Ind. -An ambitious effort to
restore a southern Indiana church that was part
of the Underground Railroad has received a
boost from a foundation, but organizers say
there's much work to do.
The News and Tribune reports the Horseshoe
Foundation of Floyd County has agreed to pro-
vide $25,000 toward the estimated $400,000
cost of repairing the Town Clock Church in New
Albany.
Foundation Executive Director Jerry Finn says
project supporters have begun sending grant
proposals to charitable organizations and plan to
ask congregations to join the project.
He says the goal is to begin some of the work
this year.
The church served as a safe haven for slaves
who were trying to make their way north to free-
dom during the 1860s.
Vatican cardinal causes stir,
shows alarmist Muslim video
VATICAN CITY- A Vatican cardinal has
caused a stir at a meeting of the world's bishops
by screening an alarmist video about the inroads
that Islam is making in Europe and the world.
Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson, the


Ghanaian head of the Vatican's office for justice
and peace, aired the YouTube clip this weekend
during the synod of bishops, a three-week gath-
ering of top churchmen to map out strategies to
halt the decline of Christianity.
A spokesman who briefed journalists on the
closed-door session said some bishops ques-
tioned the statistics and appropriateness of it
being aired. Vatican Radio called the clip a "4-
year-old, fear-mongering presentation of statis-
tics" that have been widely debunked.
News reports said Turkson subsequently apol-
ogized, saying he didn't mean to cause any harm.
Myanmar won't allow Islamic
group to open liaison office
YANGON, Myanmar Myanmar's govern-
ment will not allow the Organization of Islamic
Cooperation to open a liaison office after thou-
sands of Buddhist monks and laypeople
marched to protest the plan.
Sectarian tensions have been running high in
Myanmar's western Rakhine state after clashes
in June between Rakhine Buddhists and Bengali
Rohingya Muslims which left nearly 90 people
dead and displaced tens of thousands. Muslim
mosques and Buddhist temples were burned
down during the unrest.
Myanmar's state press had reported that the
government and the OIC agreed last month to
open an office in Yangon to provide aid for peo-
ple displaced by the fighting, and the OIC sent a
team to investigate the violence.
On Monday, the Information Ministry cited the


President's Office as saying that "the opening of
the OIC office will not be allowed as it is contra-
dictory to the aspirations of the people."
The OIC has 57 member states and seeks to
be the voice of the Islamic world.
The anti-OIC protests were held in four Myan-
mar cities, including Yangon, the country's
largest city, where about 5,000 people partici-
pated. Some said they were marching to safe-
guard Buddhism.
Archbishop OKs group that
wants gays to be chaste
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -A group that preaches
chastity among gays and lesbians is starting a
local chapter in Louisville with the permission of
Roman Catholic Archbishop Joseph Kurtz.
Kurtz says the Connecticut-based group known
as Courage has a goal to "promote chaste living"
by abstaining from sex outside of a heterosexual
marriage. The group was founded in 1980.
The chapter meetings operate under the
Twelve Step concept used by Alcoholics Anony-
mous and similar groups. Steps include such
things as admitting one's addiction or compul-
sion, striving for moral reform and seeking help
from a higher power.
Angelo Sabella, an assistant to the national di-
rector of the group, said Courage does not con-
duct therapy that seeks to change a person's
sexual orientation. But he said the group has in-
vited advocates for change therapy to talk with
Courage groups to let participants know about it.
From wire reports


FIRST 46Yearsof
Bringing Christ
FIR I to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A1.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson

NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
li ,lit I ,h. it" ',i. ,,i , i,.,, l.
i t the Inverness Womans (
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siud., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
*I /ri, 1, to I i, I, ; 'I1.II I, t 14 "


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor

Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion


9:45 AM
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship O
j OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. I.arrv Power


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all11


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


"FirstFor Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRiSTIAN 1
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
g : 7 1 ..
344-1908


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...................8:30 AM
Sunday School......................... 9:30AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes.................7:00 -m
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00
Teens............................. 7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call /
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon

Ejo PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperanos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711









fi road

tist


ch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
X Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
.......[. P', i.-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!

:*








VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P..

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
:. .catholicweb.com .:


BELIEVERS
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CITRUS CAMPUS
Join us this month
Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012
From 6:30-8pm
Powerful Worship,
Bible Teaching,
and Prayer for the Sick.
at the Holiday Inn Express of
Crystal River
(1203 NE 5th St.,) Hwy. 44
Pastors Adam & Shatiel Brant
More information?
Call 352-610-2560
or email us at
I ,i i B,.IhI. ,r,,.Id ,i- ro,


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


First United
Vic ory Methodist



iIocS, <(Church


0)


C4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


RELIGION


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 US, Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8 A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
9:00and 11:00A.M. /
726-1670

COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH









SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260







All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033








Hwy.44E@
- Washington Ave., Inverness
I Sunday Services *
0 Traditional
* 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
* Casual Service I
* 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service *
Tapes & CD's Available *
" Sunday School for all ages
. 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided *
Fellowship & Youth Group1
5 to 7 PM
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org I
Podcast: FPC inv.com *

* Church Office 637-0770 U
Pastor Craig Davies
U





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

formed by members of the elite
string chamber music program
at the University of Florida and
the Graduate Piano Trio in resi-
dence at the University. The
program will be directed by
Steven Thomas, DMA, assis-
tant professor of cello at the
School of Music, University of
Florida. Free admission. The
public is invited. Love offering
received for the artist. Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church is at
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
The Nature Coast Com-
munity Band under the direc-
tion of Cindy Hazzard, will open
Veterans Appreciation festivities
with two concerts at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27, at First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa and at 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day, Oct. 28, at Cornerstone
Baptist Church in Inverness.
The theme of the concerts is
"Honoring Our Military Retirees."
The program will include "The
Homefront; Musical Memories of
WWII" by James Christensen,
complete with an original air-raid
siren; "Variations on A Korean
Folk Song" by John Barnes
Chance: "Mekong" by Robert W.
Smith, featuring many interest-
ing non-Western traditional in-
struments; "Journal ForA
Soldier" by Brian Balmages, a
Soviet Union march from the
Cold War, and other interesting
pieces to complete the narrated
program. Call 352-601-7394.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N Florida Ave.,
will host a six-month concert
series. The first concert at 6
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, will fea-
ture nationally known gospel
singer Brian Arner. The entire
list of concerts can be found on
our website: www.hernandon-
azarene.org.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41), will host the Dixie
Echoes in concert Sunday,
Nov. 11. Celebration Sounds,
the church's choir and orches-
tra, will open the concert at 5:45
p.m. No charge for this per-
formance; a love offering will be
collected.
Mount Olive Missionary
Baptist Church is in need of
musician/pianist for its chan-
cel choir. Interested candidates
must submit a copy of their re-
sume on or before Oct. 30 to:
Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist
Church, c/o Personnel Commit-
tee, P.O. Box 327, Crystal
River, FL 34423.
Saturday Night Gospel
Jubilees take place at 6 p.m.
the last Saturday monthly at
First Church of God, Inverness.
Bring your instruments. Food
and fellowship follow in the so-
cial hall. No charge. The church
is off U.S. 41 North, one mile
north of Kmart on Jasmine
Lane. Call 352-726-8986 or
352-344-3700.
Food & fellowship
Third Saturday supper is
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. today in the
Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall
at Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus



GRACE
Continued from Page Cl1

an answer, or a situation
without a solution unless
God does something to
change the heart of the one
who won't forgive. And what
about forgiving and forget-
ting? Can you do one and
not the other?
Sometimes when you talk
to someone who just wants
to argue about God, he or
she will ask, "Is there any-
thing God can't do? Can he
make a rock so heavy he
can't move it?"
But other times, someone
in earnest will ask about
something that seems like a
God-impossibility For ex-
ample, someone once asked
me about the "forgetness" of


God.
At first I smiled at the
made-up sounding word.
Maybe the person meant
"forgetfulness." But when
you think about it, forgetness
is probably the better word,
the more God-like word. For-
getfulness is more human.


CHAPEL
Continued from Page Al

windows, which were
stained by monks in Georgia
in colors influenced by the
Lowcountry, will be re-
placed with restoration


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publi-
cation of submitted material. The earlier Chronicle
editors receive submissions, the better chance of
notes running more than once.
* Religious events: 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication
Saturday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is avail-
able. The Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on
color pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River, or by e-mail to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com.


Springs. Menu includes barbe-
cue chicken, baked beans,
coleslaw, rolls, dessert, coffee
and tea for $10 for adults and
$5 for children. Tickets can be
purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the church
at 352-489-1260.
The public is invited to a
Thanksgiving revival at 7:30
p.m. nightly Wednesday
through Friday, Nov. 7-9 with
host Bishop Samuel Graham,
Pastor Barbara Graham and
Bible Way, at 208 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. A Thanksgiv-
ing turkey dinner with all the
trimmings will be served Satur-
day, Nov. 10. Call 352-
249-7159.
The Hernando United
Methodist Men will host their fall
"Save a Child" fish fry from 4
to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, at the
church, 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486).
Menu includes Joe Duteau's
fried fish, french fries or grits,
coleslaw, hushpuppies, dessert
and drink for $7.50. After ex-
penses, the balance will be
sent to the Florida United
Methodist Children's home in
Enterprise.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers take
place from 4 to 6 p.m. the third
Friday monthly in the Jack
Steele Hall at 86 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. A donation of $8
per person, $15 for two and $4
for children 12 and younger in-
cludes all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce, Ital-
ian bread, dessert and coffee or
tea. Tickets available at the door.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the corner
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, hosts its fish
fry the first Friday monthly in
the church pavilion. Cost is $7
for adults and $3.50 for chil-
dren. Open to the public.
Special events
"Pioneer Club," a chil-
dren's program for K-5 through
sixth grade, is offered at 6:45
p.m. Wednesday while school
is in session, at Heritage Bap-
tist Church, 2 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills. Activities include Bible
stories, crafts and games. Call
352-746-6171.
House of Power's 7th
Annual Conference is Thurs-
day through Sunday, Oct. 28,
featuring the Singing Ovations,
Spiritwind, David Jill and Rusty.
Services are at 6 p.m. Friday,
10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Saturday,
and 11 a.m. Sunday followed
by dinner on the grounds.
Everyone is welcome.
HPH Hospice, "Healing
people's hearts in Citrus
County" will host a free semi-
nar for clergy, parish nurses,

"Oh, no! I forgot to buy laun-
dry soap!" God would never
forget to buy laundry soap.
Forgetness is something
different.
Once someone reminded
Red Cross founder Clara
Barton of something hurtful
done to her years before.
However, she acted as if she
had never heard of the inci-
dent. When someone
pressed her, asking, "Don't
you remember?" she
replied, "No. I distinctly re-
member forgetting it."
That's forgetness.
In the Bible, God's people
are always pleading for the
Lord not to remember their
sins any more. God answers
one ancient prophet by say-
ing, "I, even I, am he who
blots out your transgres-
sions, for my own sake, and
remembers your sin no
more" (Isaiah 43:25).
When it comes to God's
forgetness, maybe his is like
Clara Barton's (or more ac-
curately, hers is like his).
Maybe he remembers that
he forgets. And the times
when our own guilty con-
sciences dredge up the past

glass. A parishioner is do-
nating the difference in the
extra cost for the windows,
he said. The window panes
will arrive in about a month.
In 2007, the chapel was
closed when St. Peter's
began shoring up the build-
ing's foundation, which had


begun to shift, causing the


Stephen Ministers and others
who provide outreach for their
congregation from 9 to 11 a.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 31, at the
HPH Team Office, 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway (in the Winn-
Dixie Shopping Plaza in Bev-
erly Hills). David McGrew, M.D.,
medical director, and Tom Bea-
son, manager of Spiritual Care
for HPH Hospice, will provide
an informative presentation on
how to speak to those who are
facing a serious illness. "Does
God hear me? Is He listening?"
will address ways to help atten-
dees learn words of wisdom
and guidance to help those
questioning their faith during a
stressful time. A light brunch will
be served, and advanced regis-
tration is required. Call 352-
527-4600 for reservations.
There will be a "Women's
Retreat" on Saturday, Nov. 3,
at Holy Faith Episcopal Church,
19924 W. Blue Cove Road.,
Dunnellon. The Episcopal
Church Women will host a full-
day retreat led by Dr. Peg
Davis, whose theme is "ECW
- Embracing Christ Within."
Coffee, sweets and a light
lunch provided. The $15 fee
covers all, including retreat ma-
terials. Call the church at 352-
489-2685.
The Ladies Auxiliary
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 will host a "Bunco Bo-
nanza" on Saturday, Nov. 3, at
the K of C Hall, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County Road
486), Lecanto. Doors open at
10:30 a.m. and play begins at
12:30 p.m. The $12 ticket in-
cludes a brunch of finger foods.
Door prizes, raffle prizes and
cash prizes awarded. For reser-
vations, call Char at 352-746-
9490 or Bernita at
352-344-0235.
Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church in Citrus
Springs is a partner site for the
42nd National Theological
Conference in New York City
on Nov. 9-11, offering the op-
portunity for clergy and lay peo-
ple to participate locally via a
webcast over the Internet. The
church will project the broad-
cast on a large screen with
sound system. This year's
theme is "Radical Christian Life:
Equipping Ourselves for Social
Change." Sister Joan Chittister,
keynote speaker, and Father
Richard Rohr, preacher, will
offer tools for making the con-
nection between contemplation
and social action. During the
conference there will be pre-
sentations by Sister Chittister,
OSB, and "creative work ses-
sion" conversations led by local
leaders. Registration fee is $25;
a continental breakfast and
lunch on Saturday will be avail-

and we remind him of our
failures- let the ghost out
of the closet? That's when
he reminds us that if we
truly belong to him, he for-
gets our sin by choice, not
because of forgetfulness or
a "senior moment."
I love that about God, and
Lord knows I have a lot I
need forgetness for. But he
can do that because he's
God. Offering forgetness
isn't so easy for us humans
who tend to keep ghosts
around for haunting.
That brings me back to
the conversation with my
friend. I know this is true:
Some people have suffered
horrendous abuse or have
had plain old rotten stuff
done to them. I also know
that God says to forgive
those who "trespass against
us." I know that some peo-
ple say they can't forgive, yet
God implies that we can be-
cause he says we must,
which means the real issue
is that we won't. That's how
the ghosts get in the closet,
and it's our own stubborn
refusal to forgive and forget
that keeps them in there.

walls to bow.
Webb said the foundation
is now stable.
"Unfortunately, when
they built these old build-
ings, they didn't know about
Highway 21 and the
(Richard V Woods Memo-
rial) bridge and these big


trucks that would be idling


able for a freewill offering. Reg-
istration is at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov.
9, followed by a welcome and
opening address by Sister Chit-
tister at 7 p.m. Registration with
breakfast and a morning prayer
begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, Nov.
10. Creative work sessions will
be at 9 and 10 a.m. Lunch at
noon will be followed by small
group discussions with brief
video presentation and interac-
tion with Sister Chittister. Sun-
day worship at 9:30 a.m. will
include Trinity Institute Liturgical
materials including the Ritual of
Commissioning. To register, call
352-489-5511 or email us at
hopevangelical@bellsouth.net.
The Unity Mystery Din-
ner Theater Team will present
mysteries for the audience to
solve. Dinner is served. Sched-
ule: Friday and Saturday, Dec.
14 and 15 "Santa's Untimely
Demise"; Friday and Saturday,
March 15 and 16 "Murder
Most Green." Call the box office
at 352-746-1270.
Announcements
Gulf to Lake Church is col-
lecting coats for schoolchildren
in grades K-8 (sizes 6 through
juniors up to adult small).
Cayla's Coats Ministry was
started in memory of Cayla
Barnes, who passed in 2010.
Her mother, Jessica Barnes, is
a teacher in the county and
sees first-hand the need for
kids inadequately dressed for
our occasional cold weather.
Coat donations are accepted at
the church, 1454 N. Gulf Ave.
(off State Road 44 across from
Meadowcrest). Call the church
at 352-795-8077 or Joan Cook
at 352-422-2635.
A GriefShare seminar is
offered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday through Nov. 14
at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. Call 352-746.6200 or
visit www.sevenrivers.org.
Before- and after-school
care is available in Citrus
Springs for children through fifth
grade at North Oak Baptist
Church. Call 352- 489-3359.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave., Inverness. Call
352-860-0052 or 352-586-5174
or email trustingheartministry
@yahoo.com.
A Bereavement support
group in Homosassa meets
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday
in the back hall at St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19, just south
of Cardinal. Call Anne at 352-
212-0632.
Live & learn
Our Lady of Grace
Church invites the public to
learn about the Catholic faith at
its RCIA program. Call the
church office at 352-746-2144.
Nature Coast Commu-
nity Bible Study (CBS) contin-
ues its 30-week study of the
books of Amos and Isaiah from
9:45 to 11:45 a.m. Thursday at
First Baptist Church of Beverly
Hills, at the intersection of
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491) and Forest Ridge
Boulevard. Call Terry at 352-
382-2365, Lori or Ron at 352-
746-7581, or Linda at
352-746-1698.

Someone once said
that when you refuse to for-
give, you allow the other
person to control you. Bit-
terness and resentment bite
like a snake, and it's the one
who refuses to forgive who
gets bitten. But that's not
why we should forgive. We
forgive because God says so.
We forgive because we have
been forgiven much.
I don't know if it's possible
to ever truly forget, but I
know it's possible to forgive,
because with God, nothing
is impossible. And if nothing
is impossible, then that
means it's possible even to
forget. So, I've just an-
swered my own question.
Hey maybe I've even
answered yours.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
-I Know the Real Secret,"


"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace. "She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.

in front of the church,"
Green said.
The renovations will take
several more months, Webb
said.
Meanwhile, Green looks
forward to sharing the his-
toric chapel with the commu-
nity She calls it "a big part of
the Lowcountry history."


TALLIT
Continued from Page C1

mainly used today by Or-
thodox Jewish men, where
dangling from under their
coats or peeking out from
under their shirts, the tell-
tale fringes, or tzizit, can be
seen. In times of persecu-
tion, these fringes could be
hidden to avoid detection.
Today, the tallit is a
proud symbol of Jewish
spirituality. It is worn at all
morning services and at
Kol Nidre, the eve before
Yom Kippur. Traditionally,
it is worn during the day so
that one can see the
fringes. The custom of
wearing the prayer shawl
on Kol Nidre originated
with the idea that all Jews,
rich or poor, were equal be-
fore God on the eve of the
Day of Atonement and
when dressed with a tallit,
all were uniform.
The tallit is often kissed
reverently during a portion
of the service Jews call the
Shema, the statement of
Jewish faith that God is
one. During the passage
from Numbers that men-
tions the fringes, they are
gathered together and
lightly kissed in devotion.
The tallit and its fringes
are also used when a per-
son is called up to the
Torah to make the blessing
before the reading. This
act is called an alliyah,
from the Hebrew word
meaning "to go up." Here,
the worshiper takes a cor-
ner of the tallit, touches it
to the portion being read,
and then kisses the fringes.
This shows devotion to the
Torah and its precepts.
When the tallit is first put
on, many Jews raise it over
their heads as a kind of tent
or shelter before beginning
prayer This beautiful act of
spirituality symbolizes the
Shekhinah, or presence of
God. In this case, the tallit
acts as a kind of tent of pro-
tection for the worshiper.
Keeping this concept in
mind, in my Reconstruc-
tionist congregation, we
drape the tallit over our
neighbors' heads so that we
are all under God's tent of
peace during a portion we
call the Blessing of Peace.
In more traditional syna-
gogues, it is called the
Priestly Blessing, from the
time of the Temple in
Jerusalem, when the priests
would bless the people.
A tallit can also be used
as a chuppah, or wedding
canopy In this case, the
shawl is held aloft by four
poles attached to each of
the sides. The bride and
groom stand under this
canopy while the wedding


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 C5

officiant makes the tradi-
tional seven wedding
blessings. In keeping with
this wedding concept, the
same idea is applied when
a new Torah is dedicated
in a congregation. The
community is symbolically
"wedded" to the Torah in a
commitment of love and
devotion. In 2010, I stood
under such a canopy when
our congregation dedi-
cated our Torah.
A tallit can be found in
many lengths and sizes,
from one especially for the
thirteen-year-old bar/bat
mitzvah to oversized ones
for taller men. The fabrics
can range from silk, wool
or permitted synthetics but
cannot contain shatnetz, a
forbidden mixture of wool
and linen. (See "Wearing a
Kosher Suit," in Oct. 6 edi-
tion of the Chronicle) The
designs are varied, but
popular themes are
cityscapes of Jerusalem,
Jewish stars, Lions of
Judah and the matriarchs
and patriarchs. While the
traditional colors consist of
black or blue stripes along
the bottom, modern tallitot
come in a variety of hues,
some mimicking Joseph's
coat of many colors. Many
people design their own
tallit, reflecting their indi-
vidual needs and symbol-
ism. While traditionally
worn only by men, in lib-
eral branches of Judaism,
women have taken on this
mitzvah (commandment)
and have used it as a vehi-
cle for self-expression.
The important parts of
the tallit are the fringes.
This is what I call Jewish
macram&. This series of
prescribed knots is at-
tached to all four corners
of the tallit There are eight
strands of yarn or string
used to make the fringes,
called tzizit. The letters in
Hebrew for this word add
up to 600, since letters in
Hebrew also stand for
numbers, such as in
Roman notation. If you add
the 600 and the eight
strands and five knots,
which are made in each
corner, we have 613, which
are the number of com-
mandments in the Torah.
Since the tallit is consid-
ered holy, worn tallitot are
buried with respect in a
Jewish cemetery. And at
the end of life, some Jews
elect to be buried in their
tallit, thus wrapping the
soul in spirituality on its
way back to the creator.


Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She
can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


























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COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Hear about
benefits changes
TLC Rehab will host a free
educational seminar on
"Medicare Benefits Changes
2012-13" with Dr. Jason
Kelsey, doctor of physical
therapy, and Heather Meloy,
physical therapy assistant.
The public seminar will be
offered from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Thursday, Oct. 25, at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
505 E. Hartford St., Her-
nando. It will be offered again
from 2 to 4 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 25, at Seven River Golf
& Country Club, 7395 W.
Pine Brook St., Crystal River.
All interested persons
are invited.
Refreshments will be pro-
vided and there will be a raf-
fle drawing. Due to limited
seating, reservations are re-
quested with Danielle Lesher,
352-382-1141.
Entries sought for
holiday parades
Applications for entries in
the 2012 Christmas parades
in Crystal River and Inver-
ness are now available at the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce offices or on its
website: www.citruscounty
chamber.com.
This year's theme is "A
Postcard Christmas." Crystal
River hosts its Christmas pa-
rade at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
1, and Inverness hosts its
Christmas parade at noon
Saturday, Dec. 8. Call the
Chamber for more details at
352-795-3149.
Art Center calls
for entries
Artists are invited to submit
works for competition in the
second annual Exhibition at
the Art Center of Citrus
County on County Road 486
in Citrus Hills.
Entries will be received
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 23 and
24. Best of Show, first, sec-
ond, third places and honor-
able mentions in four
categories will be awarded at
an artists' reception at 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 2.
Jurors are Spring Hill artist
Fred Mannarino and local
artist Marian Fox. Artists may
submit up to five entries for
the juried and judged show.
For a prospectus, call 352-
746-0924 or visit artcenterof
citruscounty.org.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Hershey Kiss


Special to the Chronicle
Hershey Kiss is as sweet
and delectable as his
namesake. This beautiful,
almost 2-year-old boy has a
most unusual silky
medium-haired coat that
has a smoky undertone to
it. Right now we are run-
ning an adoption special -
all adult cat adoption fees
are half price at $27.50.
We also have many more
cats and kittens that need
homes. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m Mon-
day through Saturday at
the Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Please drop
by and enjoy our felines in
their cage-free, homestyle
environment. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/shel-
ters/fl186.html.


Special to the Chronicle

The Homosassa River Garden Club
is asking for community help in its an-
nual cleanup at Stage Stand Cemetery
on State Road 19 in Homosassa. The
historic cemetery dates back to the
1830s and is the burial place of many
families that helped settle the county.


All are welcome from 8 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Oct. 27. Bring tree trimmers,
chainsaws, loppers, rakes and small
garden tools.
Leaf bags will be provided
Saturday, Oct. 27, is also Make a Dif-
ference Day, America's largest annual
day of volunteering. Do something
good for the community, learn some


Cleanup help needed


Club keeps historic cemetery in order


Special to the Chronicle

Senior Friends for Life
will travel to Homosassa, for
the River Safari's Cruise,
10823 W Yulee Drive, on
Tuesday, Oct. 23, for a back-
water tour on a pontoon
boat.
Meet at 10:30 a.m. at the
dock. Cost is $19.50. The
tour begins at 11 a.m. The
tour is 1 hour and 30 min-
utes. It will be a historically
narrated ride on the Ho-


Special to the Chronicle

Local attorney Marie Blume of In-
verness will discuss all aspects of
guardianship and financial planning
at a free public presentation at 10:30
a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, at the Chet
Cole Life Enrichment Center at the


mosassa River to the Salt
River After the tour, the
group will have lunch at
Neon Leon's Zydeco Steak
House, 10350 W. Yulee
Drive. Reservations must be
made by calling Myrna
Hocking at 352-860-0819.
On Monday, Nov 12, the
club will have its monthly
meeting at the Inverness
Golf& Country Club, 3150 S.
Country Club Blvd. Regis-
tration will begin at 11 a.m.
It would be helpful if atten-


dees could bring exact
change. Lunch will follow at
11:45 a.m. On the menu are
house salad and rolls,
turkey with dressing or
ham, green beans, mashed
potatoes and pumpkin pie.
A program will follow.
Reservations must be made
be calling Myrna Hocking at
352-860-0819, or Teddie
Holler at 352-746-6518.
The Friends will carpool
Tuesday, Nov 20, to Wild-
wood to visit the Russell


Key Training Center, 5521 Buster
Whitton Way, Lecanto.
Discussion will focus on such topics
as planning for future financial help
and physical assistance, and making
decisions whether to seek guardian-
ship of a child, and what kind.
Guardianship can range from man-


Stover Candy Co., 950 Indus-
trial Drive. The group will
meet there at 10 a.m. At
11:30 a.m., the group will
have lunch at the Speckled
Butterbean, 5995 Signature
Drive. At 1 p.m., they will go
to the antique shop across
the road from Russell
Stover to shop. Reserva-
tions must be made by call-
ing Myrna Hocking at
352-860-0819, Teddie Holler
at 352-746-6518,or Claire
Quigley at 352-563-1998.


New board for Newcomers


Special to the Chronicle
New board members of the Citrus Newcomers Club for 2012-13 in back, from left, are: Kathy O'Donoghue, Julie DePinto,
Cindy Cusack, Bev Goethe, Sharon Gatz, Sonia Seward, and Sue Pellegrino; in front, from left, are: Bunny Bucci, President
BJ Schueneman, Jeannette Taylor, Carole Signoretti, Cathy Uvanni and Sandy Anderson. Not pictured are: Carolyn Moss,
Margaret Alberts, Janet Greig, Dianne Shreve, Eve Grenawalt and Chris Harvey. Citrus Newcomers Club provides a place
where newcomers to Citrus County can get together, socialize, and meet other newcomers. For more information, call
Sandy Anderson at 352-527-8136.




Learn about planning for disabled loved ones


aging banking services, to powers of
attorney, to full (plenary) guardian-
ship.
How do you plan your resources to
make sure your child is cared for? Can
your child have his own money or
should it be protected? How much
does this planning cost and what help
is available?
All are welcome. Call Stephanie
Hopper at 352-344-0288.


history and make some new friends.
All help is greatly appreciated.
The Homosassa Garden Club has
been working on this cemetery for the
past six years, and has made a big dif-
ference with the community project. It
wants to have a historical plaque
established there to tell about the
history
Sponsors are needed to help defray
the cost. Call Ruth Hawn at 352-
382-5867 for more information.


Cruiser
Quilts

October is the second
delivery of Cruiser
Quilts to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
for the year, and this
time Creative Quilters
donated 60 quilts.
Detective Dodi Pruitt
from the Community
Crimes Unit came to
receive the quilts from
Barbara Gardner, left,
and Karen Crosby. She
explained the quilts
would be divided
between four offices to
be used in the field,
mostly for children who
have been through a
traumatic experience
and need comfort.
JOAN NOVAK/Special to the
Chronicle


a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24.
For more information, call
Mary Anne at 352-746-3386.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


News NOTES

Post to have
flea market
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary will
stage a flea market beginning
at 7 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 21, at
the post, 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. The public is
welcome.
Outside space is $5 (bring
a table) and inside space is
$10. Call the post at 352-726-
3339 to reserve space. Pro-
ceeds benefit the Cancer Aid
& Research Foundation.
Autumn event for
homeless pups
Celebrate autumn with
Friends of Citrus County Ani-
mal Services (FOCCAS) and
Citrus County Animal Shelter.
FOCCAS is sponsoring an
Autumn Colors adoption pro-
motion through Oct. 22. All
dogs of autumn colors
(brown, yellow, red, rust) are
half off adoption fees. A $30
adoption fee will include
spay/neuter, microchip
and all age-appropriate
vaccinations.
All dogs that are already
spayed or neutered are also
half off on adoptions.
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices is at 4030 S. Airport
Road in Inverness, behind the
fairgrounds. It is open 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Tuesday through
Saturday.
Brits and friends
to meet Oct. 22
The British American So-
cial Club will host a manatee
PowerPoint presentation by
Ivan Vincente from the U.S.
Fish & Wildlife Service at its
meeting at 7 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 22, in the Holiday Inn Ex-
press, 903 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness. Refresh-
ments will be available.
The club meets the fourth
Monday monthly and wel-
comes all who have an inter-
est in or association with
Britain and the Common-
wealth, its history or culture.
Visit the website at www.brita-
mclub.com for more informa-
tion, or call Judi Mathews at
352-527-2581 or Dave Jones
at 352-382-3418.
Rose Society
to gather Oct. 21
OCALA- Marion County
Rose Society meets at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21, at the
Marion County Ag Center Au-
ditorium, 2232 N.E. Jack-
sonville Road (County Road
200A), Ocala.
Meetings are open to all
who want to have fun learning
about and sharing their love
of roses. Visit www.marion
countyroses.org or call 352-
341-0564.
Coin Club gets
together in B.H.
The Beverly Hills Coin Club
will meet at 5:30 p.m. Mon-
day, Oct. 22, at the Central
Ridge Library in Beverly Hills.
There are no dues. The
club's purpose is to bring
local coin collectors together,
and for numismatic
education.
For details, call Joe at 352-
527-2868.
Elks lodge to host
bloodmobile
West Citrus Elks Lodge
No. 2693 will host the Life-
South Bloodmobile from 3 to
6 p.m. at the lodge on Grover
Cleveland Boulevard, east of
U.S. 19.
The public is welcome to
stop by and contribute. Any-
one who gives blood will re-
ceive a coupon for a free well
drink in the lodge.
Jerseyans, Friends
plan picnic in park
New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County will
have a picnic at Whispering
Pines Park in Inverness at 10


Go have fun with some Friends


Social seniors planning morning tour of river, trip to candy plant


Local attorney to offer free presentation





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


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f**3 "Cowboys & ** "Life as We Know It" (2010) Katherine "The Girl" (2012) Sienna Miller. Boardwalk Empire "The Girl"
[HB] 302 201 302 2 2 |Aliens"(2011) sa Heigl, Josh Lucas. (In Stereo)'PG-13'xc Premiere. (In Stereo) a 'MA cc
i *** "Rise of3the Planetof the Apes"(2011) Treme Toni searches Treme Antoine does a The Newsroom "5/1" True Blood "Hopeless"
303 202 303 James Franco.'PG-13'x for a killer. 'MA' good deed.'MA' MA' cc MA' cc
(HiT 23 57 23 42 52 High Low Hunt Intl House Hunters Reno Love It or List It'G' Love It or List It'G' Hunters Hunt IntlI Hunters Hunt Intl
Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun The Men Who Built America America enters an Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
HIST 51 25 51 32 42 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn age of enlightenment. 'PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
"My Nanny's Secret" (2009, Suspense) Haylie "A Nanny's Revenge" (2012, Suspense) Jodi "A Mother's Nightmare" (2012, Suspense)
LIFE 24 38 24 31 Duff, Jessica Steen.'NR'Ec Lyn O'Keefe. Premiere. NR' c Annabeth Gish, Jessica Lowndes. NHR'
"Reviving Ophelia" (2010, Drama) Jane "Fab Five: The Texas Cheerleader Scandal" My Life Is a Lifetime Beyond the Headlines:
LM) 50 119 Kaczmarek, Kim Dickens, Nick Thurston. a (2008) Jenna Dewan. 'NR' cc Movie a Carlina White
"Anchorman: Legend **, "The Runnin Man" (1987) Arnold Hunted Sam Hunter ** "Contraband" (2012, Action Mark
320 221 320 3 3 of Ron" Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) 'R' cc returns to work. 'MA' Wahlberg, Ben Foster. (In Stereo 'R' c
ISNBC 42 41 42 Documentary Documentary IDocumentary Documentary Documentary |Documentary
109 65 109 44 3 Being: Liverpool'14, L Drugs, Inc."Meth"'14' Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers Doomsda Preppers Alaska State Troopers
C) 109 65 109 44 53 '14' '14' Bugged Out (N) '14'
__ 1C0 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious |Victorious Victorious |Victorious Big Time iCarly'G' Victorious |Victorious Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Friends Friends
(iWD 103 62 103 Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's lyanla, Fix My Life Sweetie Pie's
fWXl 44 123 ** "Enough" (2002) Jennifer Lopez. cc ** "Monster-in-Law" (2005) 'PG-13' s ** "Monster-in-Law" (2005) 'PG-13'c
Homeland "State of Jay Mohr: Funny for a Boxing Danny Garcia vs. Erik Morales. Garcia vs. Morales, WBA Super World light welterweight
340 241 340 4 Independence"'MA' Girl 'MA, LEc title and WBC light welterweight title. (N) (Live) 'PG, L
On the NASCAR SPEED My Ride My Ride NASCAR Racing Motorcycle Racing Monster Energy Cup: Las
732 112 732 Edge Perfor. Center (N) Rules'14' Rules'14' Vegas. (N) (Live)
Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction
la EJ 37 43 37 27 36 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
TAnB370 271 370 Boss'MA' ***Y "Moneyball" (2011) Brad Pitt. A baseball manager **Y "Carnage" (2011) Jodie *** "The Ides of March" (2011)
370 271 370 challenges old-school traditions. 'PG-13' s Foster, KateWinslet. 'R' a Ryan Gosling. 'R' s
College Football Rice Fitness NBA Preseason Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Miami Heat: Inside the Inside the Inside the
36 31 36 at Tulsa. (N) Truth (N) Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. Crown Heat Heat Heat
*** "Stake Land" **Y "Daybreakers" (2009, Horror) Ethan ** "Underworld: Rise of the Lycans" (2009, *** "Stake Land"
31 59 31 26 29 (2010)'R'[c Hawke, Willem Dafoe.'R' cc Horror) Michael Sheen.'R' c (2010)'R' c
fiS) 49 23 49 16 19 King |Big Bang Big Bang |MLB MLB Baseball American League Championship Series, Game 6: Teams TBA. |MLB
*** "The Prisoner of Zenda" (1952, ***Y "Camille"(1936 Romance) Greta Garbo, **** "Gi i"(1958, Musical) LeslieCaron,
LiiiJ 169 53 169 30 35 Adventure) Stewart Granger. 'NR' s (bVS) Robert Taylor. 'NR' sc (bVS) Maurice C*evalier. 'G' s (DVS)
I (Almost) Got Away Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In
( 5LT J 53 34 53 24 26 With It'14' c Stereo) '14 c' Stereo) '14 cc Stereo) '14 c' Stereo) '14 c Stereo) '14 cc
(iE) 50 46 50 29 30 Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life
i*** "The Cry of the *** "Blackthorn"(2011, Western) Sam ** "Night of the Demons" (2009) "The Frankenstein Syndrome"
350 261 350 Owl" (2009) 'R' Shepard, Eduardo Noriega. 'R' MonicaKeena. 'R' c (2010) Ed Lauter.'NR' c
**, "Why Did I Get *** "Hitch" (2005) Will Smith. A smooth-talker helps a shy *** "Hitch" (2005) Will Smith. A smooth-talker helps a shy
(iil)D 48 33 48 31 34 Married?"(2007) accountant woo an heiress.'PG-13' accountant woo an heiress.'PG-13'
TOON 38 58 38 33 Gumball |Gumball **Y "Hoodwinked!"(2005)'PG' Venture King/Hill King/Hill |Cleveland Dynamite |Boon
TRFl 9 54 9 44 Americas Scar. Legends Of Alaska Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
truTi 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout 'PG' s Wipeout 'PG' s Wipeout 'PG' s Repo Repo Most Shocking
(1TL) 32 49 32 34 24 Cosby |Cosby Cosby |Cosby Cosby |Cosby Raymond |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |King
S7 ** "Couples Retreat" (2009, Comedy) Vince ** "Eat Pray Love" (2010, Drama) Julia Roberts. Premiere. A divorcee "Mr. Deeds" (2002)
47 32 47 17 18 Vaughn, Jason Bateman.'PG-13' sm embarks on a global quest to change her life. 'NR' cc Adam Sandler.
My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David David Tutera- David, My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David
117 69 117 Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Divas and Disasters Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled
1WiliA 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: CI Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine Bones'PG' c


West
A 9852
VA8
K QJ 10 2
Q Q9


10-20-12


A 7 6 5 4 3 2
East
4 10 7 6 4 3
V K 10 9 2
9 8 5


South
A AKQJ
V QJ 5 4
S7 3
SK 10 8

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East


1 NT
34N
3 NT


Pass
Pass
Pass


24
34
Pass


Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: + K


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Confucius said, "You cannot open up a book
without learning something."
I hope you cannot read this newspaper column
without learning something. And during the play,
sometimes you have to unblock open up a
suit.
Look at today's diagram. South is in three no-
trump. This would be fine, given that clubs are 2-
1, except that West has led the diamond king. Once
that ace is removed from the dummy, how can
South get seven club tricks?
Minor-suit transfers arise rarely, but they do
have their moments. Here, North responded two
spades, showing six-plus clubs and zero-plus
points. South rebid three clubs to say that he had
a club fit. (With bad clubs, South would have rebid
two no-trump.) Now North's three spades showed
a singleton or void in that suit. (With four spades,
long clubs and game-going values, North would
have started with Stayman.) South signed off in
three no-trump.
South starts with seven top tricks: four spades,
one diamond and two clubs. But he must take at
least nine tricks on the run. If he loses the lead,
the defenders will cash too many red-suit tricks.
The only way to cash seven club tricks is first to
discard a club from the South hand. So declarer
must duck the first trick. And if West continues
with a second diamond, he must duck again. (If
West shifts, South leads another diamond himself.)
Then, even if West switches, South can cash his
club king, play a club to the ace, and discard his
last club on the diamond ace.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
VEEKO / E
I III

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
ZALPA



MACSUP



REEPIX
-F-FT L I


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek




a'r.







THEY HAP NO CHANCE OF
WINNING THE BALL-ON
RACFE BECAUSE THEY
COULDN'T ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: TITHE GOOEY UNSEEN MARTYR
I Answer: The horse with the overly negative attitude
was a "NEIGH-SAYER"


ACROSS
1 Job to do
5 CEO aides
8 Fill the hull
12 Comics pooch
13 Mouser
14 Santa -
15 Habit, maybe
16 Arctic herd
18 Do finger
painting
20 Pub pint
21 RR terminal
22 Infants' wear
25 Economic ind.
28 Low voice
29 11th U.S.
president
33 Talisman
35 Lawsuit cause
36 Halfhearted
37 Eyetooth
38 Quiz
39 Culture
medium
41 Bastille Day
season
42 Strange


45 Private eye
Spade
48 Zodiac animal
49 Desert plant
53 Like crepe
paper
56 Object on
radar
57 Greasy
58 Famous
cathedral
town
59 Charged
particles
60 Rouse from
sleep
61 Vote for
62 Dueler's
weapon
DOWN
1 Apparel
2 "Bonanza"
brother
3 Foal's parent
4 Shish -
5 Old TV hookup
6 Songs of
triumph


Answer to Previous Puzzle


FRI SCAB G N
MEET HULL LIS
TEAS ARTISAN
STREAKS NADER
T LGEK LTD E
NAFU MOZART
U F AKIN TARS
GIRD ALEC HAH
TOUCHE RASPY
GUN OERE
BOGUS SWEARBY
ERUPTION BILEE
DEL ERLE ICON
SOP REED CAB


7 Pasture
entrances
8 Arith. term
9 Greek war god
10 Twosome
11 Poet Pound
17 Mesh fabric


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Wearing
vestments
23 Cole who
was "King"
24 one's
wheels
25 Concert
proceeds
26 Santa Fe loc.
27 Butterfly
stage
30 Drama award
31 Gave
temporarily
32 Painter Paul -
34 An arm or
a leg
35 Talk King
37 Train unit
39 Flowering
shrub
40 In a plucky
manner
43 Peeve
44 Jazz pianist
Blake
45 Flat-bottomed
boat
46 Diva's tune
47 Exploit to the
max
50 Filly's footfall
51 Movie
52 Basilica area
54 TV science
guy
55 Color


ear Annie: "Looking for a
Relationship, Too" asked
where to meet men. You
suggested bookstores,
grocery stores, hard-
ware stores, laundro-
mats and sporting
events, and while tak-
ing college courses,
playing golf, softball
and basketball, doing
volunteer work and
traveling. Then you
asked your readers for
their ideas.
People often over-
look dance classes as ANIN
an excellent way for MAIL
men and women to
meet each other. Many
of these people are single and
available. There is a vast array of
dance styles for every possible in-
terest: Latin, swing, ballroom,
square dancing, country-western,
jazz, ballet, from the elegant and
slow to the wild and sexy By its
very nature, dance brings men
and women together in close
physical contact.
Those who dance tend to have
positive outlooks, enjoy fun times
and are socially outgoing. I often
find dates as a direct result of
being in the dance world. -
Dancing in California
Dear California: Thanks for
your upbeat suggestion. Many
readers told us that the best
place to meet men was in church.
Here's more:
From El Paso, Texas: Take up
shooting! Men are at the gun
show, and guys like a gal with
good aim. To win a man and keep
a man, a woman needs to engage
in activities that men like, too.
Iowa: I live in a small rural


community and have found that
going to estate auctions and flea
markets (even farm sales) can be
quite "helpful" in
meeting single men. I
also recommend going
car shopping.
California: I am a
53-year-old guy, so I
will come at it from a
different angle. Want a
relationship? Reverse
the situation. Why
should a guy pick you?
Do you have great
hair, a nice smile or a
IE'S good career? Don't be
BOX shy about using what
you have. No one will
do it for you. Let him
know why he should date you in-
stead of the woman across the
room.
Ask friends for some brutal
honesty. If you find a common
criticism, take it to heart. Do you
love bright blue eye shadow?
Most guys don't Ditto for women
who wear dresses that look like
tents or women who smell like
goats. Finally, be realistic. If you
keep going after those hunky
young surfer types, and you don't
look like a model, you will spend
a lot of nights alone.
North Carolina: After my di-
vorce, I dated a few men and
found the good ones are hard to
come by Then I friendedd" an old
high school boyfriend on Face-
book. Back then, he was the first
guy my parents allowed me to
date. He was gorgeous and liked
me a lot. After all these years, we
started talking again, got together
and began a wonderful relation-
ship. He is the love of my life, and
we will be married soon.


Chicago: Try the lake or a bil-
liards hall. Guys love to play pool
and go fishing. Also try the li-
brary or dog park. (Borrow a dog
from a friend if you don't have
one.) And remember, a mug shot
is not a dating photo.
California: I would say to first
look for a relationship with your-
self. If you want to take a class,
play golf or do volunteer work, do
those things for yourself, not be-
cause you might meet someone.
Otherwise, if you don't meet any-
one, you'll be disappointed. I
can't tell you how many times I
have gotten involved in some-
thing hoping to meet a man, and
then, rather than simply enjoying
the event, I could only focus on
the fact that meeting someone
wasn't happening. I would also
say there is richness in groups of
women, such as a church group.
Those friendships are precious.
- Been There, Done That


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www creators. com.


North
A- --
V 763
+ A64


10-20


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 C7


I






C8 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


Peanuts


Pickles


, -


COMICS


(NEVER TR TO 6ET UPPER
FlE MINUTES EARLY..1






^L i j K:TIl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


THERE 15 A W15E MAN ON
TOP OF THIS MOUNTAIN ,
o i

For Better or For Worse





For Better or For Worse


1 6E55 11 TA16 A
SIGN OF OL.9 AGE,
RING5 ON A 5Af'fRVAY
NIGHT A~YoS O HoPE
I15 NOT FOR Yo3,


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


LOOKS LIKE MAYBE WE
WE'RE GOING SHOULD WEAR
TO A COSTUME MARDI GRAS
PARTY WHETHER HEADS TO
WE'RE WANTED CONCEAL OUR
i R NOT. IDENTITY.


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


OUR ONLY HOPE FOR
LONG-TERM SURVIVAL
IS TO INNOVATE IN
WAYS THAT CANNI-
BALIZE OUR CURRENT
PRODUCTS.






The Born Loser -


THE DOWNSIDE IS THAT
YOU'LL LOSE A FORTUNE
IN CEO COMPENSATION
WHEN OUR REVENUE DIPS
IN THE SHORT RUN.


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"My goodness, there's going to be so
much to see, Big Ben, Buckingham Palace,
the Tower of London -- but I guess I don't
have to tell you. I'm sure this isn't your first
trip across the pond."


Doonesbury


Big Nate

LET'S GET THIS
DONE, FLASH, 50
r CAN HAVE MY
GYMNASIUM BACK'
OKAY, KI.P,
1, AC-K UP
S ON THE
S STOOL!




Arlo and Janis -


I'M SENPWI6 YOU
A PICTURE OF ME
RIGHT NOW. CHECK
IT OUT, OKAY?





.T --, l -

-^^ ^ l /I


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Mommy, they don't make you do
homework in heaven, do they?"


LiKE FAT-ER, LiKE GONN.

Betty


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity 4" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Here Comes the Boom" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D. 9:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Paranormal Activity" (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
8 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.


"Alex Cross" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Sinister" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Here Comes the Boom" (PG) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:35 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D. 9:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) 1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: d sl-nbO N


"XG UT VBP KMOT UXZZBPLX UBLMHZ,


SBGGTSYXSPY SPHYPLT; YKXZ,


ETGYHTUTG, XZ YKT SBUAXGMYXBG JKXSK


UMWTZ YKT RTLNTSY UMG." UMLW YJMXG

Previous Solution: "I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every
form of tyranny over the mind of man." Thomas Jefferson
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-20


r -~ ____


OKAY, MAYBE NOT SO


OKAV, MAYBE NOT 50
WISE AFTER ALL


ER -.THA TH-
E[W e1ReLLIN I
ME T\ E CLOTHES
ARE PRY





i. J:-I_- -


THANKS. ILL STOP BY
YOUR HOVEL LATER
WITH SOME IDEAS FOR
RUINING YOUR LIFE,
TOO.


ME AND MY B6 MOUTH! GE


IT WA6 ON SALE.


I'M GOING TO DAG'S....HE'S SHOWING
A REPLAY OF THE 4IGH SCHOO-D
"GAME OF TH4E WEEK" THAT II
ALEXANDER QUARTERBACKED-


(ELL.HE DID STOP SHORT OF HAVING A MILITARY FLVO. '
I ..
ULTONS ALEX


iH.'-^i 1; I. *. . 7 :S^RR.OPM v 7' -,


AMP THE LAg'TONE is TO
REfMND YOU OF WHEN YOU
GOT THE RACELET

P'I ,,S,


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES






SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 C9


Classifieds |


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tinme


-I- --l.ol.Iol 1I0MVINOMM^oEn
Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclonlne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~co


SWF seeking energetic
male companion 50-60
yrs old, likes to travel,
dance, have good
conversation, golf, has
good sense of humor,
non-smoker. Looking
for a kind heart, superfi-
cial need not respond
Blind Box 1808 c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429



Alumacraft
2010 16ft, V-hull, all
welded, yamaha 25hp 2
stroke w/trailer $5800
621-3764 or 302-3515
BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET!
SAT. Oct. 27nd
8AM to 2PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd.
BYCYCLE
Trek 3900 27 speed,
Black & Silver. Comes w/
helmet & pump. Never
used. Retail $599, asking
$300/cash 352-586-1790
CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Edition Med Blue
w/32k miles. Mint Con-
dition $10,500 522-0505
Citrus Springs
Moving Sale
Sat. ONLY, 8a-2p
tools, hsehld, yard equip,
xmas, furniture, & more!
9069 N Harris Way


#1Employmentsourceis


CRYSTAL RIVER
11290 W. Coral Ct.
SAT/SUN. Oct. 20, 21
9AM-3PM Quality
Houshold Goods,
Miss this & You'll Cry!
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, W/D, Cable,
Big Yard (unfurnish opt.)
$600 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-455-8998
Dachshunds Mini Long
Hair, Champion Blood
lines, 4 months old, BIk
&tan male $150
(352) 795-6870
Floral City
Sat 10/20 8a-2p
Estate Sale, household
goods, furn, tools.
Everything must go!
7686 E Savannah Dr
Floral City/Duval Is.
9340 E. FERRIS COURT
Saturday, 8AM-? HUGE!
Halloween Costumes,
Home Decor & MORE!
GE REFRIGERATOR
bisque side-by-side with
icemaker/water in door -
$300 Phone
352/637-4871
GE Washer
& Dryer
2 years, Excel Cond.
$500 pair
(352) 746-9868
HERNANDO
1/1 Furnished, $100/wk.
$400 sec $500 Moves In.
352-206-4913, 465-0871
HOMOSASSA
Fri. 19 & Sat. 8a-2p
3959 S. Delard Way
Inverness
2/2 Dbl wide, screen rm &
Ig. deck, 55+ park, great
view, exc cond., not
crowded $21,500 make
an offer (352) 419-7825


1988, CRX,
1 owner, 127k miles,
$6,000.
(352) 564-0697
INVERNESS
Ridgewood in Foxwood
Fri n Sat guns collectibles
linens clothes Dell PCs
tools furn more
INVERNESS
Sat 8am-3pm
HUGE SALE!
6445 E. Morley St
INVERNESS
SATURDAY Oct. 20,
Household items, Craft
patterns Furn. & Dryer
3038 S. Rose Ave.,
Seven Lakes Estates
Many hundreds of beanie
babies, like new, cheap
(352) 637-0015
SEASONED SPLIT
OAK FIREWOOD 4x8
stacked & deliv. $80
(352) 621-1656



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



2 Cats, Male & Female 1
Mo. Eating on own,
litter box trained
To Good Home
(352) 794-7496
2 Free Pott Belly Pigs
Males
Free to good home
(352) 560-0249
3 yr old bulldog/boxer mix
tan, kid-loving, good with
other animals, housebro-
ken, free to a good home
(352) 586-4827
Free 32" TV
You pick up
Call after 5pm
(352) 860-2090
FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
8 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
FREE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOME
3 females, 1 male,
Multi colored, litter
trained, Floral City
(352) 419-4221
FREE KITTENS
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge


Dedygle/VVdWler mix, 1-2
yrs old, white w/black and
brown, goes by "Anne",
lost in vicinity of Hwy 486
&Pine Ridge Blvd.
(352) 601-6118
Lost 2 Suitcases while
at the Jct of Van Ness
and Hwy 41 Sunday
evening at 8:30. One Ig
silver, one red med
size. Cash Reward!
Please call Lynn at
603-520-5811


Sudoku ****** 4puz.om


85 2 9 4


4 6


7 3


6 8


5 4 3 9


LOSt .Cat
Gray short hair female
tiger Green Acres in
Homosassa Oct. 2
$50. Reward
(352) 503-6763
LOST CAT
Yellow, male, neutered
Has chip,
Evergreen Ave.
Homossasa
(352) 503-6426
Lost Dog
Adult Female Lab Mix,
all Black with Feathery
tale. 10/18 Liesure Ac-
res, South of Grover
Cleveland
(352) 628-0221 or
(352)601-4665



Found: Gray Male
Schnauzer dog found in
Citrus Springs area on
Travis Drive off Country
Club and 41. Can't tell
how old not a puppy.



FULL MOON FARM
Scenic Trail Rides,
$30/hr, Lessons, $25/hr,
Full Board, $300/mo.
Open House Sat. 10/20
12p-4p, free hotdog &
t-shirt (352) 628-1472



FL Headless Jumbo
Gulf Shrimp 16 ct @
$.7.50/Ib,10 ct @ $8.50
Stone Crabs $6.001lb
Delivered (352)513-5038



I am Interested in learn-
ing conversational
Japanese. Please call
Robert
(352) 634-1141
Sr. Woman looking for
Sr. Woman 65+ com-
panionship in exchange
for Room and board
Located in Inverness
(352) 489-2099



REAL ESTATE
ASSISTANT
Send resume to:
reassist 1@yahoo.com
All applications kept
confidential

Receptionist/
Office Assistant
T, TH, F 9am-3pm
Strong phone &
computer skills.
Excel required
APPLY IN PERSON
w/resume 10a-2p
131 Hwy. 19N Inglis










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Hospital RN's
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
WWW.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828


LPN's, CNA's
All Shifts
Full Time & Part Time
Experience preferred.
Apply at:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
Drug Free workplace
Sign on BONUS
dselesvaae@superior
alf.com
tfoster@superior


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT
Looking for reliable
staff. With Alzheimers
Experience. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing aide
experience pre-
ferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP

RN, LPN, CNA's
ALL SHIFTS, FT &PT
Health Care
Experience Preferred.
Director of
Admissions for ALF
APPLY WITHIN
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Clr
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility




SERVERS
Wanted for fast-paced
restaurant, only clean,
neat, reliable need apply
3297 S Suncoast Blvd.
(352) 503-6853




AC Lead Install
/Service Tech
Salary commensurate
with exp., Also
Sales/
Maintenance
Tech needed
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427


AC Lead Install
/Service Tech
Salary commensurate
with exp., Also
Sales/
Maintenance
Tech needed
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

Gel Coater/Mold
Maintenance
Exp. Required.
Custom Boat Builder
Apply In Person
9A-3P 131 Hwy. 19N
Inglis

PAINTERS
Min. 10 yrs exp. reqd.
Must have license
& transportation
(352) 400-1404


3 6 We're Growing and need
experienced staff!!

_7 2 Iy _Full Time positions available for
SEXPERIENCED medical office staff
including authorizations, billing,
8 3 1 5 7 scheduling, and medical records.
Ability to work in a fast-paced
environment required.
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and environment required.
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9. Applications without VERIFIABLE
experience will not be accepted.
if Iof our" Advanced computer skills required.
structures High standard of patient concern and
withstand compassion necessary, and a
T 2 A A120mph .. professional attitude and appearance
Installations b BrianCBC 1253853 .win is a must.

352-62 -7519 Excellent compent compensaton package
including full benefits Cardiac
R -iEng F--- experience commands a premium
IF E R I'""wage!
Permit EST Mon. Fri., 8-5, no weekends.

I Eng n eesApply in person to Citrus Cardiology
E ien308eHighland Blvd., Inverness
Up to $200 value I or e-mail to
- - chaddock@citruscardiology.org.
*Siding-Soffit Fascia Skirting Roofovers- Carports -Screen Rooms Decks Windows Doors Additions NO PHONE CALLS!
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com ..


Service Plumber
Needed, Valid DL,
APPLY TO
Blind Box 1809P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
106 W. Main St
Inverness, Fl. 34450





CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

COMPUTER
OPERATOR/TUTOR
Needed. $10 hr, P/T,
ebay exp. necessary.
Art interest helpful.
(352) 628-9128


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pmr
Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle

CHikoNICLE


YMCA OF THE
SUNCOAST
Group Exercise
Instructor
(2 positions available)
JOB SUMMARY
Under the direction
of the Fitness
Director/Coordinator
and consistent with
the mission of the
YMCA of the
Suncoast, the group
exercise instructor is
responsible for in-
structing safe, effec-
tive and fun group
exercise, as well as,
enhancing the qual-
ity and growth of the
program and reten-
tion of the partici-
pants. Base Pay:
$10.50 hourly
HOURS AND
LOCATION
Mornings -
Citrus Springs area
Evenings -
Inverness area
EDUCATION,
TRAINING
AND EXPERIENCE:
Must be at least 16
years old. Must be
able to attend
MSROM Silver
Sneakers training on
October 20, 2012.
Must become
CPR/AED and First
Aid certified in first 90
days of employment.
Must be able to
teach at least one
format of safe, effec-
tive and fun group
exercise classes that
meet all necessary
components and
safe guidelines in ac-
cordance with YMCA
of the USA accepted
practices of exercise
physiology. Creating
the Member
Experience preferred.
SPECIAL SKILLS
OR EQUIPMENT
REQUIRED:
Must be able to artic-
ulate and communi-
cate effectively while
instructing partici-
pants in proper exe-
cution of exercise
safety. Must have
current knowledge of
exercise class struc-
ture; demonstration
of cueing technique;
demonstration of cre-
ative choreography
and exercise variety.
In addition to effec-
tive communication
an instructor must
have a positive atti-
tude and ability to
work independently.
PLEASE SEND
APPLICATIONS AND
RESUMES TO SARA
BARGIEL
sbargiel@suncoastym-
ca.org
YMCA of the
Suncoast- Citrus
County Branch
3909 N. Lecanto High-
way Beverly Hills, Fl.
P352.637.0132
YMCA mission: To put
Christian principles
info practice through
programs that build
healthy spirit, mind,
and body for all.


JANITORIAL/
MAINTENANCE
Full to Parttime position,
some heavy lifting.
APPLY IN PERSON
Thurs. 18 th thru. Sat. 20
Only 12N-4pm
Bring References
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL
1801 NW Hwy 19
Mall Office, Crystal Riv.
No Phone Calls*

SITE MANAGER
FT Rolling Hills/Hillside
Apts., Flynn Manage-
ment Corporation
Fax 727-447-5516
jobs@flynnmanage
ment.com

TELEMARKETERS
WANTED
Snowblrds are back.
Good Commission
pay. Apply In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr









MASSAGE
THERAPY
Weekend Class NPR
OCT. 20, 2012

Massaae Days. NPR
November 19, 2012
March 18 2013
July 22, 2013
November, 4, 2013
Massage Nights NPR
November 19, 2012
Jully 22, 2013
Massaae Days.
Sprina Hill
January 14 2013
September 3,2013
Massage Niahts.
Spring Hill
January 14 2013
September 3,2013

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Rlchey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




TWO (2) ANTIQUE RE-
PRODUCTION Cocoa
Tray end tables. $325 for
the pair. 527-6709
VINTAGE BOOKENDS
Pair of Lipper& Mann
Porcelain ZEBRAS
$75.00 can text pic call or
text 352-746-0401



DISNEY'S original
Haunted Mansion 1969
33 1/3 record and story
book. $45 527-6709


8 5G 2 319 4 7 1 Is
4113^ 867 2<9S 5
2 719 114-5 6 8 3
7 312 916 5 4 8
5 G64 7 8 2 3 1 9
9S81 4a513 7 2 6
3 247 59328 1 6 4
1 915 67-4 8 3 2


KISSING FACES
SCULPTURE By John
Cutrone with stand can
text pic, call or text $95.
OBO 352-746-0401
Many hundreds of beanie
babies, like new, cheap
(352) 637-0015


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

THEME T-SHIRTS,
CAPS Maine,Liberty,RR,
Halo,Google,Thomas,
Conan O'Brien, unused,
$5-$15 352-382-7707



2006 GE GAS DRYER
model DRSR483GD3CC
MINT condition bisque
color $100 352-746-3227
GE REFRIGERATOR
bisque side-by-side with
icemaker/water in door -
$300 Phone
352/6374871
GE REFRIGERATOR
White with icemaker in
top freezer $100 Phone
352/6374871
GE Washer
& Dryer
2 years, Excel Cond.
$500 pair
(352) 746-9868
GE WASHER AND
DRYER white excellent
condition. $350.
352-513-5134
Large Capacity Washer
Works Great
$150 OBO
(352) 419-5231


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
YOGURT
MAKER-HAMILTON
BEACH used once, 6
glass jars
$12 419-5549



2 OFFICE DESKS
5 FEET LONG WITH
DRAWERS $50 ea
352-613-0529




DUDLEY'S
AUCTION
3 AUCTIONS
Estate Adventure
Auction 10/18
3pm come anytime
4000 S Florida (US 41S)
Inverness
'06 Impala, Furniture,
Appliances, New
Items, Tail Gate
equipment, Tools,
Mower, Decorator
items, 700+lots
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
10/19 prey 9am
Auction 10am
42S Tyler St Beverly
Hills 2/1 starter
-retirement home
family room garage
& carport great in-
vestment opportunity
SOLD REGARDLESS
OF PRICE
Celebration of Arts
10/20 prevllam
Auction 1pm
3 estates, profes-
sional artist & Illustra-
tor, Autographs -
Guitars, records,
phoots of musicians
& actors, -play
manuscripts- erotica,
film info & more
LIVE & ON LINE
www.dudleysauction.c
om
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384
Hammer Down
Auctioneers
10/19- General Merch.
10/26- Tailgate Auction
11/2- General Merch.
We Buy Estates
6055 N Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389


How To

Make Your

Dining Room Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
quickly!




(352) 563-5966



www.chonilenline.o 0 U

www.chronicleonline.com


You've Got It!






Somebody







Wants







It!

























~ C i T R U 5 06-.C O U N T Y E


CHRONICLE



(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED







C10 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


8' STEP LADDER
Wooden IA 3001b. capac-
ity, good shape $50.00,
Sugarmill area, Call
382-0953 eves.
NEW VW/AUDI CAR
DIAGNOSTIC READER
$20 OBDII CAN U280
CODE READER
419-5981 INVERNESS




321N FLAT SCREEN TV
High def, works great
asking $100.00
352-302-5468
JVC DUAL CASSETTE
Plays, records, copies.
Nice sound, low hours.
TD-W309TN $25
341-0450
TELEVISION 36" SONY
GOOD CONDITION $75
352-341-6920
Televisions 19"
Sylvania w/ Stand $50;
9" portable $20; 24"
Hitachi $30 527-2223




DELL COMPUTER
Desktop Windows XP
w/keyboard & mouse,
Outlook, Word, Excel $75
352-382-3650
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON NX215
PRINTER/COPIER/SCAN-
NER Works great
with xtra inks $30.00
352-726-0686
HPA1430N PC HP
COMPUTER a1430n
dual-core 1GB 250GB
24xDVD 5.1 $100
341-0450
VIEWSONIC LCD DIS-
PLAY 19inch internal
speakers +DVI HDTV in-
put $100 341-0450




1999 Vermeer Stump
Grinder, 252 Series self
propelled, w/ trailer
runs great, ready to
work. $5,000. 795-9956




PICNIC TABLE GOOD
CONDITION
$85. 352-613-0529




4 Pc Bedroom Set
White Wicker, 2 Twin
Beds, Dresser, end ta-
ble, Matt/box spg, all
bedding. $85 564-0856
Bar stools, two, Town N'
Country solid oak $120
(352) 341-1941
BEDROOM FURNITURE
5 drawer chest w/cabinet
$300; 2 matching
nightstands$100 ea;
mirrored headboard $75.
Can send pictures. Will
negotiate 352 503 7930
BLACK LEATHER EASY
CHAIR 48 x 38, Large
and Comfortable, good
condition $75 Call 352
3449190
DINNING TABLE FOR 8
Brand New, excellent
Condition, No chairs, just
table. Buy asap, $90
(352)465-1616
King Size mattress &
box spring, like new
clean, $125. obo
Oak China Cabinet,
good cond. $80. obo
(352) 422-1060
KITCHEN TABLE
Samsonite table w/4
chairs. Formica w/
wood trim. Chairs have
cushions & casters.
$200 (352) 527-2223
LAMP TABLE Solid
golden oak $30 Can
email picture call
382-7585
LARGE BRASS AND
COPPERWARE COL-
LECTION Dozens of
quality international brass
and copper decor items
from the Middle East. Pri-
vate collection to include
large ornate brass trays,
lamps, tables, hand
wrought iron, camel sad-
dle ottomans, sword sets,
floor vase,
heavy brass footstools,
carved native wood oc-
casional tables and doz-
ens of assorted pitchers,
kettles, jugs and beautiful
items. All with
regional/cultural artwork,
design and patterns
unique to the Middle
East.
$1500.00 firm; no parting.
352-746-1486
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500


RECLINER black leather
Pristine condition. $900
new. Asking $190
(352)795-7813
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen size boxspring,
mattress w/ chest of
drawers and dresser
$150.
Entertainment center
$50. (352) 795-7254
Queen size Mattress &
Box Spring
Like New $75
(352) 382-0347
Red Velour Recliner
like new $190, Black
rot-iron table w/glass
top $45 (352) 503-6149
Rocking Chairs
2 gliders; oak & white
w/ cushions $50 each
(352) 527-2223
SOFA navy blue with
touches of sage & rose,
showroom cond. $150.00
352-795-0288
Stratolounger@
Tailgater Tulsa Rocker
-Recliner Black, Heat &
Massage, A-1 cond.
$275; Click-clack sofa
bed, $100.
Call 352-419-7017
TABLES COFFEE &
LAMP Teak with glass
tops Both $70 Can e-mail
pictures call 382-7585
Triple Dresser
with mirror,
Mans 5 drawer chest
$300.
352-563-0640,
cell 352-697-2111
USED QUEEN MATT
SET Very clean,
non-smoker. $100.00
352-257-5722 for details
WALL UNIT 12' wide x 7'
tall. Med wood. 3 sec-
tions, can be separated.
$95 527-1239
White Bedroom Set
Frame, 2 dressers,
Mirror, all bedding $250;
3 piece bleached oak wall
unit w/ glass doors $850
(352) 527-2223




1999 Vermeer Stump
Grinder, 252 Series self
propelled, w/ trailer
runs great, ready to
work. $5,000. 795-9956
Craftsman Riding
Mower 21 1/2 HP Briggs
& Stratton engine,
42" Deck, Overhead
Valve $500 (352)
746-7357




BEVERLY HILLS
Moving Sale Fri & Sat
8a-4p misc. household
goods, furn, saws,
garden, new generator
6315 Pine Ridge Blvd
BEVERLY HILLS
Moving Sale Fri & Sat
8a-4p misc. household
goods, furn, saws,
garden, new generator
6315 Pine Ridge Blvd




BEVERLY HILLS
Sat & Sun 8a -??
41 S Columbus St

BEVERLY HILLS
Sat Oct 20 9-2pmr
19 E Lemon ST

Beverly Hills
Sat. 8a-?
85 S Barbour St.
CITRUS HILLS
Sat. 20 & Sun. 21 7a-2p
Fishing gear, hshold
items, Jewlry, 1999
Cobra, Bass Boat,
1999 GMC Sierra 1500,
1940 W Pearson Street
Hwy. 44 to Otis, Rt. on
Union, Immed. Left on
Quartz at corner of
Quartz & Pearson
Citrus Springs
Moving Sale
Sat. ONLY, 8a-2p
tools, hsehld, yard equip,
xmas, furniture, & more!
9069 N Harris Way
CRYSTAL RIVER
773 SE US Hwy 19
Thurs-Sat Estate Sale!
Something for Everyone!
Antiques Furniture Col-
lectibles Household Items
$8000 Organ & Vintage
Dolls & Toys!
FLORAL CITY
Community Garage
Sale. Duval Island,
Crescent Loop,
Great stuff, Don't miss
this one. Fri 19 8a-2p &
Sat. 20 8a-12N
Floral City
Sat 10/20 8a-2p
Estate Sale, household
goods, furn, tools.
Everything must go!
7686 E Savannah Dr


CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri & Sat 8a-2p
656 W Pitler Place
Floral City/Duval Is.
9340 E. FERRIS COURT
Saturday, 8AM-? HUGE!
Halloween Costumes,
Home Decor & MORE!
HERNANDO
Sat. & Sun. 9a-3p MISC
1095 E. Triple Crown Lp.
HOMOSASSA
2478 S. Bolton Ave. Fri
and Sat 10/19 & 20
8am 1pm
an extreme variety house
& office items, toys, patio
table, crafts & collectibles
HOMOSASSA
47 Torenia Verbenas Ct,
Sugarmill, ESTATE
SALE, Sat, Oct 20, 9-3
HOMOSASSA
7441 S Greengate Pt
guns, ammo, fishing,
household collectables
furniture, tools and more
Fri. & Sat only 9-2



HOMOSASSA
8975 W White Dogwood
Dr ESTATE SALE.
Fri/Sat,9-4PM.
Queen bed, tables,
dressers,bookcases,
patio set; washer/ dryer;
collectibles; Mad River
Canoe; much more!
Homosassa
Moving Sale
Sat. 8:30a-?
furn, hsehld items,tools
11941 W Timberlane Dr

F HOMOSASSA
Sat. & Sun. 8a-2p
3959 S. Delard Way
HOMOSASSA
Sat. 8am & Sun. 9am
Hshold., Tools, Electronic
7096 W. Pershing Drive
*NO EARLY BIRDS*
HOMOSASSA
Saturday 20th 8a-2p
4222 S. Brian Point
HOMOSASSA
Saturday, 20th, 8a-2p
Home furnishings
& Yard Tools.
19 Enclave Point
HOMOSASSA
Special Olympics
Plant and Yard Sale,
Sat, Oct. 20th, 9a-?
Pooch Parlor Parking
Lot, 1831 S. Suncoast
Blvd, near Harley
Davidson 352-795-5896
INVERNESS
10/20 & 10/21
990 N. Leisure Pt.
INVERNESS
A Multi-Family Sale
Golf, Kids, Bikes,
Dishes, & household
Saturday Only
9807 E. Lake Tahoe Dr
(Seven Lakes Estates)
INVERNESS
Fri. Sat. & Sun. 10a-3p
comics, collectibles,
street fighter II archade
game, house full of fur-
niture. Too Much to List
4769 S. Worldwide Dr.


INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
Fri. 19 & Sat 20, 9-2p
615 Whitney Ave
Everything must go
See Pics. @ www.
invernessantiaues.com
INVERNESS
Ridgewood in Foxwood
Fri n Sat guns collectibles
linens clothes Dell PCs
tools furn more
INVERNESS
Sat & Sun, 8- p.m
Camping/outdoor gear,
books, fitness gear,
kitchenware, power tools
& more.
5580 S. Bristol
Terrace
INVERNESS
Sat 8am-3pm
HUGE SALE!
6445 E. Morley St
Inverness
Sat. 8a-2p
1124 Woodcrest Ave
INVERNESS
SATURDAY Oct. 20,
Househid items, Craft
patterns Furn. & Dryer
3038 S. Rose Ave.,
Seven Lakes Estates




Homosassa
Oct. 20th 8a-2p
Furniture, garden and
household items
19 Enclave Pt




BELLY-DANCING OUT-
FIT 2 pieces-skirt and
top-Navy blue w/gold
beading-$25.00
352-220-2447
BOYS WINTER CLOTH-
ING SIZE 4 & 5 $25
352-613-0529


Brand new lavender part
dress, beaded belt, knee
length. Will email
pictures.
$60. (352) 628-7619
Christian Dior
Mink Coat $500
Gray Mink Stole $250
Call anytime after
8am to 9pm
(352) 382-1630
COWBOY BOOTS Acme
leather size 8.5 EW
brown marble great
shape from USA can text
pic $50.00 352-746-0401
HALLOWEEN COS-
TUME Wet T-shirt Con-
test Winner,shirt, sash
and tiara $15 OBO
352-220-2447
LADIES SIZE 8 dressy
suit, floral jacket, ruffled
chiffon skirt perfect for
swing dancing, $20
352-382-7707
LADIES SUIT size 8,
short-sleeve jacket and
skirt, linen, cream color,
$20 352-382-7707
PROM DRESS 1 pink
halter-style,size 6- 1 lite
green strapless,size 9/10-
$30 each OBO
352-220-2447
PROM DRESS 1 strap-
less black dress w/blue
and white accents full
length- size 7 $30 OBO
352-220-2447
WOMEN'S SUIT Navy
blue, size 8, wool jacket
and skirt, looks new, $20
352-382-7707




!!!!!!!!265/70 R15!!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
.....235/65 R17.....
Good tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
----275/65 R18----
Good tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
50" Toshiba TV under
$200, Kenmore
side-by-side fridge, ice&
water in door under $200
(352) 341-1845
(352) 287-9124
BARNES AND NOBLE
COLORED TOUCH
SCREEN NOOK Brand
new, asking $100.00
352-302-5468
BIRD CAGE
32x21x36in.On stand
62in. Bar spacing 1/2 in.
Ex.condition.$100.
726-5753
DEPT. 56 NEW ENG-
LAND VILLAGE SERIES
Jannes Mullet Amish
Farm House. $30.00.
(352) 726 5753
DISNEY PARKS
VILLAGE SERIES
Olde World Antiques II
hand painted porcelain
house. $30.00 726 5753
DISNEY'S original
Haunted Mansion 1969
33 1/3 record and story
book. $45 527-6770
FISH TANKS
30 Gal. with stand,
hood, filter $90
20 Gal., with stand,
hood filter $70.
(352) 212-4454
FREE FIREWOOD
Seasoned firewood just
pick it up call 382-7585
Glider Rocker w/ foot
stool, and side stand
light $75
Heavy Duty Whirlpool
Dryer, $125.
(352) 795-7254
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
New Dooney & Bourke
Michael Kors, Fossil,
Handbags Under $200
Mirrors 8 panels 8" x 6'
$100 for all
352-341-1845, 287-9124
PICNIC TABLE GOOD
CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529
PICTURE BOOK Brook
stone Digital photo album
holds 500 pics like new
$75.00 call or text
352-746-0401
PICTURE BOOK Brook
stone Digital photo album
hold 500 pics like new
$75.00 OBO call or text
352-746-0401
SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
New Starter staggered
bolt pattern $35.00 call or
text 352-746-0401
Sofa & Two recliners
Queen Mattress Set,
end tables, TV's, other
household & kit. items
Christmas Items
MUST SELL *
Call for Info 897-4681


CLASSIFIED



Swimming Pool Cover
23ft x 14.6ft, can be cut
smaller, excel. cond. $45
(352) 527-0143
Table w/ 4 captain
Chairs cushions
$60. obo
26" Bicycle Like New
18 speed $45. obo
(352) 628-7633
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE LIKE
NEW $10 ALL CONNEC-
TIONS 352-419-5981
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal
Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616




Kimball Console Piano
Very good condition
$500. obo
Queen Size Bed Room
Set $250. obo
(352) 746-0008




Collapsible wheelchair, 3
wheel walker
w/handbrakes & pouch,
tripod cane, bath bench,
port. pot, folding 4 leg
walker ALL $300
(352) 746-5514
Electric go-go cart, Elite
traveler, used once,
w/battery,charger, basket
$600
(352) 746-5514
Harmar Hybrid Platform
Lift, for inside back of
Minivan or SUV, good
cond. see it work in my
van, $1500, after 4pm
(813) 760-9421




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
Collector buying sterl-
ing silver flatware and
US silver coins
(352) 601-7074




"NEW JAZZ BASS" ME-
TALLIC RED W/WHITE
PICKGARD FENDER
STYLE P&J PICKUPS
$75 352-601-6625
BASS COMBO AMP
20+WATTS,PERFECT
FOR SMALL
GIGS&PRACTICE $60
352-601-6625
BEST TRAVEL GUITAR!
MINISTER "STRAT"
WALL XTRAS, FULL
SIZE NECK&SOUND!
$90 352-601-6625
MITCHELL MD300S
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/XTRAS PREAMPP IN-
STALLED $100
352-601-6625




20 ft. Aluminum
extension Ladder
Kenmore
Trash compactor
$50 ea. (352) 503-9354
Kitchenaid Ultra power
300 watt w/att, Original
cuisinart food processor
w/att, Pasta Maker
Queen w/electric motor,
ALL $400
(352) 746-5514
NEW BATHRM FAUCET
Bronze never used in box
with paperwork $55-orig
cost $89 419-5549
TABLE & CHAIRS light
wood square table &
4 chairs with hidden
leaf good cond. $85.
352-419-5549
WET/DRY VAC, Stinger,
2-gallon, $15
352-382-7707




7.62 X54R Brown Bear
rifle ammunition. 174
Grain FMJ. non-corrosive
primer. 54 ROUNDS. $30
527-6709
BYCYCLE
Trek 3900 27 speed,
Black & Silver. Comes w/
helmet & pump. Never
used. Retail $599, asking
$300/cash 352-586-1790
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails, $3000 Per Acre
352 634-4745
CAMO HOLSTER Small
Uncle Mikes size 10 goes
on belt $15.00 call or text
352-746-0401
Club Car Golf Cart
Excellent condition and
excel, batteries $1500
(3521 527-3125
NIKE DRIVER 2011
Machspeed Str8-fit 11.5"
with UST Proforce A/L
Shaft w/wrench&HC $75.
Dunnellon 465.8495


RIDING BOOTS Ladies-
Black size 8- DAFNA
Riding Wear $20 OBO
352-220-2447
TWO R/C AIRPLANE
MOTOR'S 40-60 Size
Engines,$35.00 EA
352-503-2792




FLATBED UTILITY
TRAILER
10ftX5ft
4 Ft loading ramp
single axle $800 OBO
(352) 207-5946
New Custom Design,
5ft-6 inch. long bed,
w/ 36" folding loading
ramp. New tires, never
on road, $800. negotia-
ble 352-419-6008




TODDLER BED Red
"Cars" plastic toddler bed
with mattress- $20 OBO
352-220-2447




TURQUOISE/SILVER
BRACELET $65 TUR-
QUOISE @ ABALONE
SHELL NECKLACE $30
CALL 419-5981
VINTAGE BLACK JET
NECKLACE $10
VINTAGE FAUX BLACK
CAMEO PIN $10
INVERNESS 419-5981


Sell r Swa


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Retired nurse to pro-
vide care in your home
for individual w/ special
needs. (352) 895-7634




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


,111

itui \\iI'kl llrst.





C i ,


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554

40 YEARS EXPERI-
ENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775





All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT
OAK FIREWOOD 4x8
stacked & deliv. $80
(352) 621-1656


Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vynil Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245





#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST, SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483

1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Paint/Remodel, Repairs,
Woodwork, Flooring,
Plumbing, Drywall,
Tile work Lic.37658/Ins.
Steve 352-476-2285


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handvman
v FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Repair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352) 949-2292




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
ELAINE TO THE RESCUE
Free Estimate. At Your
Convenience. No Job
to Small (262) 492-3403
Exp House Keeper.
Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
We Will Clean Your
House, CHEAP
Call for FREE Quote
& Appt. (352) 476-1632


BSBa

Complete Renovation
Kitchen countertop, tile,
tub to shower Lic#37801
(352) 422-3371




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO ITALL!II
352-563-9824, 228-7320

JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN
OUTS
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.







Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

783572


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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THE ALL NEW 2013 NISSAN
ALTIMA
We changed everything
except the name.
OUR MOST INNOVATIVE ALTIMA EVER!
The All New Nissan Altima Gets 38 MPG.t
Drive 684 miles on a single tank.


BLOW THE DOORS OFF... ALL FOUR OF THEM.
THE 2013 ALTIMA SV HAS BETTER OVERALL ACCELERATION PERFORMANCE
THAN THE HONDA ACCORD SE, HYUNDAI SONATA AND TOYOTA CAMRY SE


2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE


2012
NISSAN
VERSA


BUY FOR
1 1,996*
Model 11462 VIN 287990
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT
THIS PRICE


2012
NISSAN
SENTRA


BUY FOR
$1399


2012
NISSAN
FRONTIER


BUY FOR


2012
NISSAN
ROGUE


N /


BUY FOR
$17,99(
Model 22112 VIN 287304
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT


2012
NISSAN
JUKE


BUY FOR
$17,996
Model 20112 VIN 114701
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT
THIS PRICE


CRYSTAL
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352-564-


1971


937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


**PRICES INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER
FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE, DEALER FEE OF
$599.50. LEASE IS 24 MONTHS, 24,000 MILES. $0.15 PER MILE OVER. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR
SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. BASED ON EPA ESTIMATE ON MONRONEY LABEL. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE MAY VARY.


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$01 r STARTING
S21 500IVISRP
$ Q PER MONTH
24 MONTH LEASE
With $2,999 Due At Signing. Model# 13013 VIN# 129758


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The AN-New, Totaly Sophisticated

2013 Honda Accord
ACCORDABILITY = AFFORDABILITY
AC'CORD verb (used without object)... to be in agreement or harmony; agree.


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New 212 Honda Fit
MODEL GE8H3CEXW, EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED
WTrH AUTOMATIC, AJC AND CRUISE


., ... -


New 2012 Honda Accord LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW. AUTOMATC.POWER PKG,
CRUISETRACTION CONTROL AND SO MUCH MOfIE



New 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid
IIOELfI4RXFNA.,UMllfRTrTWSMD REM ,MtWG RLL. t.E-W E
ASSJ WfSIETEI lOWuMil NiU,11P.ELLti SM U iEIi T 'NEELIM


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New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL RM3H3EW, COME SEE WHYTHE CR-V ISTHE BEST
SELLING CO CT SUW 14 AMERCAJ SAVE MWE THEY LAST


New 2912 Honda Ridgeline RT
MOtJEL YKI1FCEW.4'WD WTTTETRUNK INTI BED P IOWER PKG.
M0CMffOXIK., POEI AAND A RIDE ULE NO OTHER
a", -p t-'l-s: m '._ Lm .'


New 2012 Honda Cwusstour EX-V6
MCOTFli~.JW, AUTOMATIC HAT.WACKI WH STYLE A iCFWOT,
ALL THE LtUA MENOWM A) To DIATDUIhEEfl


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2013 Chevy Malibu LS


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2012 Chevy Silverado LS
Ext Cabe Auto, VS, OnStarTow PackageT


2012 Chevy Travese LS
Stk #C12326
FRWal -fA A 9N


2012 Chevy Cmrze LS
Stk C1 2184, Auto, AC, CO, XM, OnSt, 4 Dr.
Egnal $4A LCU


2012 Chew Volt


4 % "
lip 1


MSRP ....................................... $31,690
DLR DISCOUNT..................... $3,022
REBATE..................................... $3,500
TRADE ASSISTANCE.............. $1,000
CASH ORTRADE..................- $2,500


MSRP ...................................$30,750
DLR DISCOUNT.................... $1,751
REBATE..............................- $2,000
CASH OR TRADE................. $2,500


MSRP ................................... $18,880
DLR DISCOUNT....................... $900
REBATE .................................... $500
CASH OR TRADE.............-.... $2,500


PLUS 0/o
x 72 Mnaths


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2013 Chevy Spari 5 Dr. LS
5-Speed. AC., Touchscreen. 1.2L 4 Cyl.


MSRP ..................................... 12,995
DLR DISCOUNT....................... $500
CASH OR TRADE.............-.... $2,500


O*OT"


2012 Chevy Impala LT
AC, CD, Power Seat, VS. Great MPGF
Wl $dt4 A


MSRP...................................$28,610
DLR DISCOUNT.................... $6,111
CASH OR TRADE.............- .... $2,500


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ISIT OUR NEW-STEEOFITHI


2012 GMC TERRAIN SLT-1

48 x*\


IPOD INPUT, SATELLITE RADIO, CRUISE,
REAR BACK UP CAMERA, BEST IN CLASS


From 27,395


O0!r 60mo.*


2012 GMC SIERRA EXT. CAB
SLE


SAE 88,000(3)


A NEW LEASE


ON LUXURY EXPERIENCE 0 BUICK


L TSINCLDE:* PEIAL24MOTHLAS e2 EASMANTNAC


2012 BUICK VERANO


AUTOMATIC, POWER OPTIONS,
AM/FM/CD/XM, BLUETOOTH,
ONSTAR, STABILIRAK
IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -


$1m99LEASE (2)
2012 BUICK LACROSSE ASSIST


AM/FM/CD/MP3, XM RADIO,
USB PORT, BLUETOOTH, CRUISE
- IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -


$2 59LEASE (2)


2012 BUICK REGAL TURBO


ALLOY WHEELS, STABILITRAK,
CRUISE CONTROL,
POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS
- IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -


$229 o.
$ 2 LEASE (2)


2012 BUICK ENCLAVE


AUTOMATIC, POWER OPTIONS,
ALUMINUM WHEELS,
BLUETOOTH, AM/FM/CD/XM
- IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -

$299 o.
$2 9 LEASE (2)


All offers are separate and cannot be combined. (1) Prices are plus tax, tag, title, $3,000 down cash or trade equity, $499.50 dealer fee, and include all incentives, rebates and discounts where applicable. (2) 24 mo. closed end lease. Total due at signing:
Verano $2,219, Regal $3,079, LaCrosse $3,229, Enclave $3,509.12,000 mi/year, $.18/mi. for overage, WAC. Payments are plus tax, tag and title, $499.50 dealer fee and include all incentive, rebates, and discounts where applicable. (3) On select models,
WAC. For trade assistance, must show proof of ownership of a 1999 or newer Buick or GMC and trade in a 1999 model year or newer vehicle. Not available with some other offers. Does not include leases. Must Take delivery by 12/31/12. See dealer for details.* On select
models, WAC. See dealer for details. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. Sorry, all prior sales excluded.

2004 BU K LESABRE 2006 CHE COBALT 2005 NISSAN TERRA 2006 CHE AVALANCHE 2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GS
I P _2004 BUICK LESABRE T I 2006 CHEVY COBALT I I 2005 NISSAN XTERRA I I 2006 CHEVY AVALANCHE I I 2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GS I


I AUTOMATIC, LEATHER, FULL PWR.


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1 S.;95,I


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1 89,713


2010 KIA SPORTAGE LX



POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, A/C


LEATHER, AUTOMATIC


2007 HUMMER H3 2007 SATURN SKY 2010 NISSAN MURANO 2011 TOYOTA RAV4



AWD, SUNROOF, AUTOMATIC CONVERTIBLE, RWD, AUTOMATIC V6, AM/FM/CD/REAR AIR 4CYL, AUTOMATIC, 28 MPG

tPrices are plus tax,tag, title, $499.50 dealer fee and include $2,000 down cash or trade equity.Vehicles subject to prior sale due to aggressive pricing and early print deadlines.


VIEW OUR ENTIRE
INVENTORY ONLINE!


Inglis
Crystal River
EAGLE
Homosassa a
Springs 0a
Halls River Rd.


1 11


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Dunnellon


Hwy. 98 -


Spring Hill Hwy.50


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REGGIE TERRY


2012 FORD FUSION


Inverness

Brooksville


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORDY GURD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Primary organ of intelligence (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair ofwords (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Hayseed's dilemma (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Famed Ono's hot chocolate drinks (2) syllables in each word.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclckfor UFS


4. Arrow-container donor (2)


5. Heavy boozer's puppy loves (2)


6. Prenoon alert (2)


7. Fisherman choker (2)


aISNVHIS HrETONV 'L ONINXHvM ONINHOI I'9 SHHSIHD SHSfll
uaAID faAIfb 'l SVoDo0 SOxOxc8 XId SxoIH fIVlH NIVai i
10-20-12 SHRASNV









LY INSURED
&tgw) workers ,COMP m
CBC1252474

WILL CONSTRUCTION 'E .

352-628-2291 i
www.PreventDryerFiresNow.com 15 Years -



-ed mmB


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


2 Very Small Yorkie
Boys Socialized & Play-
full, Shots, health certs.,
& CKC Reg. 4-5 Ibs,
grown $600. ea. Parents
on site (352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
AKC GREAT DANES
Black Beauties Health
Checked AKC
Male/Female
READY NOW $400
PAT 352-502-3607
American
Pit Bull Puppies
9 wks old, de-wormed,
have all shots, males and
females $200 each
(352) 503-7066








ANGEL
ANGEL is a 4-year-old
Boxer mix who came
to the shelter be-
cause her owner
could not afford to
keep her. She weighs
46 pounds and is very
cute and affection-
ate. Is housebroken,
likes children, gets
along with other
dogs and also cats.
Just a little bit shy at
first. She had puppies
about 3-4 months
ago. She is used to a
family life and needs
a good home des-
perately. Fenced
yard is preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219


BELLA
Bella T. is a beautiful
Shepherd mix spayed
female, brindle, grey
and black in color,
brought to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. she
weighs 45 pounds, is
cooperative, walks
well on a leash, gets
along with other
dogs and doesn't
care about cats.
Housebroken and
Heartworm-negative.
About 4 years old.
Has a good personal-
ity, would make a
great pet for your
home. She is a very
sweet dog.
Please Call Joanne
at 352-795-1288.

BLACK PUG PUPPIES
3 boys and 1 girl, $500
ea. POP, CKC, HC.
Playful & loving.
352-400-1230
CKC German
Sheppard Pups
Male & Female 6
white/5 black & tan
$300-$500. ea
(352) 277-8046
Dachshunds Mini Long
Hair, Champion Blood
lines, 4 months old, Blk
&tan male $150
(352) 795-6870


DOG TRAINING
Classes Oct 27 10am
In Lecanto
352-794-6314


EVE
Eve is a 2 1/2 y.o.
chocolate pit/terrier
mix, weight 35-40
pounds. Lean,
athletic, agile body.
Stands in a regal
posture. Has a high
energy spirit but a
very loving nature.
Runs and plays well,
loves toys, tug-of-war,
and belly rubs. Low
maintenance with a
short coat. Found
tied to a trailer but
still very trusting and
loving. Because of
her strength, would
do best in a home
with younger active
adults and older
children. Gets along
well with other dogs
and ignores cats.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.
Happy Guinea Pias
smooth $15
abyssinian $20
curly hair $30
(352) 564-2442








MAKO
MAKO is a 4 y.o.
American Bulldog/
terrier mix who was
found abandoned
and tied to a tree.
He is an incredibly
sweet dog despite
his previously trou-
bled life. Weighs 73
pounds and is neu-
tered, Heart-worm
negative, and house-
broken. He is very
affectionate and
very gentle, not a
fighter, just a very
good boy. A fenced
yard is preferred.
Call Joanne
@352-795-1288.
Mini Chihuahua, CKC,
papers, 14 months old,
51bs, very smart.
$350
(352) 341-0934







OH SO PRETTY BABY
MINI PIGLETS Sweet,
very small, 1-2 weeks
old, excellent pets.
$300-$325 Pick up or
delivery Nov 1-2
850.348.9928
Parrot Yellow Nape
Female needs mate
to have babies.
Call Jean
(352) 465-0980
PIGEONS
Pet Homes Only
$10 ea. Dunnellon
(863) 843-2495 Cell







ROCCO
ROCCO is a 4 y.o.
Hound mix who
came to the shelter
because his owner
could not afford to
keep him. He is al-
ready neutered,
Heartworm-negative,
and housebroken.
Also microchipped.
He is a "family dog"
who misses the family
desperately. He gets
along with other
dogs and is playful
and friendly. He walks
well on a leash and is
a very good boy. A
fenced yard is pre-
ferred. Call Joanne
@352-795-1288.
SHAR-PEI
Beautiful male & female
6 mo old, Prefer to sell
as a pair for $900;
single $500 AKC,
Health certs & shots,
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732


(35j) /a5-Iauz
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net



FULL MOON FARM
Scenic Trail Rides,
$30/hr, Lessons, $25/hr,
Full Board, $300/mo.
Open House Sat. 10/20
12p-4p, free hotdog &
t-shirt (352) 628-1472


Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

C.R./HOMOSASSA
2/1 Furn. Mobile Homes
Nice, clean, quiet park
short/ long term.
Mobiles for Sale with
Finan. 352-220-2077
FLORAL CITY
2BR, 1.5BA, All new kit.,
bath, flooring, incld's all
appliances, W/D, stor-
age shed, 2Acre plus
Deadend st. No Pets
No smoking $500. 1st.
Ist Sec. (401) 488-5512
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550 mo. Close to
Wal-Mart 352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA 3/2
'2 Acre, $425 mo.
352-212-2051 220-2447
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
LECANTO
3/2, Ist Mo. Rent FREE
$600 mo+sec. wtr/garb.
incl.d (352) 628-5990



2 Bedrooms 1 /2, Bath
Large Florida Room
Washer, Dryer
Dishwasher
$7500 obo
(352) 527-9382
BEST
OF THE BEST
11 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
45 New and Used
Homes have been
Disounted for
Clearance. Come by
or Call (352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807
Inverness
2/2 Dbl wide, screen rm &
Ig. deck, 55+ park, great
view, exc cond., not
crowded $21,500 make
an offer (352) 419-7825


3 months free lot rent
w/ purchase! 1 & 2 Bd
Homes starting @ $6900
Located in a 55+ park
on Lake. Lot rent $276.
month, Water Included.
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Brina Your Fishina Pole!
55+ Park on Lake
2BD 1.5 Bath $2000
352-476-4964
Mobile Home
for Sale
672 sq ft, and Lot
$19,500 Owner Finance
Kenny (352) 228-3406
New Jacobsen Model
Homes Sale! 13 Left
with up to $25,000 off.
Don't buy until you
shop North Pointe
Homes. 4545 NW 13th
St Gainsville, FL
(352) 872-5566

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down.
This is a purchase
W.A.C, Call to See
352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/Mo
Loaded
3/2 From $399/Mo
Loaded. $0 Down.
Singlewides $299/MO
800-622-2832 ext 210
USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183


CLASSIFIED




YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/long
term 352-220-2077




HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217




2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348
2 BR, 1/2, BA, 12x56 MH
Nice Seasonal Home
Adult park, low lot rent
Carport, 2 screen
porches, some updates
$11,000 (352) 419-8275

V THIS OUT!
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 CI5


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 1988 Skylark
model, 2/2 furnished,
shed, screened lanai
352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090





ACMON-
SRENTAL MANAGEMENT 1
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.Citrus(ounlyHonmeRentals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
6 Polk St. (BH) .................... $550
2/1 cute, fenced backyard
1635 N. Greendale Dr. (CS) $1000
3/2/2 pool/RV parking
CRYSTAL RIVER
1910-B NW 12thAve.((R)......$100
2/2 newer duplex
548 N. Gulf Ave. (CR)..........$150
3/1 Fenced yrd, closetoRock Crusher Elem.
HOMOSASSA
5865 W. Vikre Path (H)....... $725
3/2/1 cozy home close to Rock Crusher Elem.
1843 or845 Solr F1.(H). REDUCED $685
2/2 Duplex, incld. lawn and water
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/LECANTO
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. (Her). $650
2/1 Dock with water view, Florida room
1933 Siaelle Path ().. REDUCED S1200
3/2/2 Inc. fullmemb.,pool, tennis,gym


CRYSTAL RIVER
I/BR $450. ,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 Hse. 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, W/D, Cable
Big Yard (unfurnish opt.)
$600 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-455-8998
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Furnished
on Hunter's Springs, sun
deck, W/D rm. All until.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


CRYSTAL RIVER
SNICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. 2/1 $575 F/L/S.
Includes Water/ gar-
bage, W/D hook-up. Also
furnished units avail.
352-586-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb., maint.
Incl. New W/D, No pets,
$600. mo. 352-628-6700
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp 2/1
House $650. 422-2393




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished, Clean
w/ membership
2/2 Unfurnished Villa
352-476-4242, 527-8002
INVERNESS
Windemere 2/2/1
end unit, scrn. lanai,
near bike trail & down-
town, Maint. Free $700
mo. Incl. basic cable,
pool, & clubhouse.
325-344-3123, 637-5898




CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
CHA, Laun RM. CP $496
352-212-2051 220-2447
HOMOSASSA
2BR, $495. mo. Nice
Area (352) 422-1932




HERNANDO
1/1 Furnished, $100/wk.
$400 sec $500 Moves In.
352-206-4913, 465-0871


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Crys. Riv. Cottage
2/1, CH/A, Near Beach
Includes. Util. $695.
352-220-2447, 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
2 Bedroom. 2 Bath. Re-
modeled home on small
canal! Fully furnished with
washer & dryer! No
smokers. Small dogs
only. First, last and de-
posit. $1,000/month! Call
#813-526-4944
INVERNESS
Furnished Waterfront
Home 2 Bd., 1.5 bath
home with central AC,
$595. 352-476-4964


I^L-i

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, EZ Terms $480.
352-697-1457
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2 & FL. RM.
15 E. Murray
$550. 352-422-2798
Citrus Springs
2/2 $650/mo. $500 dep.
(352) 257-1777
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299, 364-2073
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs CC
Est, 3/2/2, Immaculate,
immediate occupancy
$950 mo. incl. lawn
maint. 352-494-3551


Bi pt -
,. -


40k!4



~sJ
OOOSXHD


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers calr
352-563-5592.


CITRUS ,COUNTY


- CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Florida Fish and WildIlfe Conservaton Commission;
ht://tinyurl.com/nttp-my wc-custhlp-com-app


II E III I







C16 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$1,250. 352-419-4421
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Waterfront Home,
Ist & Sec. No pets
(352) 637-1142
INVERNESS
Country Living on Large
V2 acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba.
home. Garden and
fenced areas. Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964
N CRYSTAL RIVER
Lake Rouseau Area,
lease w/ option, 2/1 w/
lake privileges, $540/ mo
1st & dep.(352)795-0161




CYRSTAL RIVER
3/3 Waterfront. Three
Sisters Area. Furnished
with Dock. $1400/mo
(352) 854-2511

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/long
term 352-220-2077




Citrus Hills/Condo
Mas. Bd Rm w/Ba. Pool
$450/ref's. 352-249-7804




CRYSTAL RIVER
On/Off Water, Boat
Dock 352-302-1370



** ** *

BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
** **-*


Coast Landings RV
Resort. Large Developed
site, plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,500. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Open House


- American
MEN Realty &
ERA Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41, Inverness, FL
800-476-2590
352-726-5855


FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Professional
OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo CenterCR
352-794-6280, 586-2990





3BR/2BA/2, Shed, New
Interior paint, carpet,
pool, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
Citrus Springs $149,900
(352) 476-5061


Beautiful Golf Home
on El Diablo.
2563 sq. ft. 4/3/2.
Granite in kitchen
all baths and wine
barS/S appliances
and many upgrades!
Close to shopping,
restaurants top rated
schools. $159,900
352-464-1320





4/BR/2BA Mitch Under-
wood built home on 1.2
acres. Cherry cabinets
and wood floors. Outdoor
kit w/ Jenn-air grill.
Heated spa, oversized
pool, gazebo and lovely
garden. (352) 746-0912





3/2/2 POOL HOME,
updated roof, AC, water
heater, SS Appl's, gran-
ite kit counter tops, and
resurfaced Pool
Reduced to $149,900
6090 N. Silver Palm Way
(352) 586-7691

DUDLEY'S
AUCTION
3 AUCTIONS
Estate Adventure
Auction 10/18
3pm come anytime
4000 S Florida (US 41S)
Inverness
'06 Impala, Furniture,
Appliances, New
Items, Tail Gate
equipment, Tools,
Mower, Decorator
items, 700+lots
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
10/19 prev 10
Auction 10pm
42S Tyler St Beverly
Hills 2/1 starter
-retirement home
family room garage
& carport great in-
vestment opportunity
SOLD REGARDLESS
OF PRICE

Celebration of Arts
10/20 prevl1 am
Auction 1pm
3 estates, profes-
sional artist & Illustra-
tor, Autographs -
Guitars, records,
phoots of musicians
& actors, -play
manuscripts- erotica,
film info & more
LIVE & ON LINE
www.dudleysauction.c
om
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384




Citrus Hills
Citrus Hills
3000+ sq ft home, unfur-
nished, 3.5/3/2.5 on golf
course, w/pool, member-
ship, lawn and pool serv-
ice incl. $1500/mo.
(352) 302-3705

Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready,
2/2/2, private lot
352-746-0002





Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Sat
& Sun. 1Oa-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




2BR, 11/2' BA, new
enclosed sunroom, at-
tached utility and Laun.
rm. storage bldg.,
furnished Immaculate.
5111 Castle Lake Ave.
S. of Inverness on SR 41
$39,900 (740) 255-0125

Inverness Highlands,
Corner of Carol and Ten-
nyson. My Loss, Your
Gain, New Low Price.
HUGE 1 Family, on 2.8
residential acres, fenced,
CHA, 4 BR, 3 BA, pool,
deep well, whole house
water treatment, wired for
generator, COSTLY UP-
DATES in 2011. Offered
AS IS. $172,900. Owner
352-419-7017.

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AH1
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557


3BR, 2 Full BA, Open
concept, new steel
roof, deck & caged
pool, carport, storage
bldg., Priced to sell
$82,500 5155 Bridget Pt
S. of Inverness on SR 41
(740) 255-0125


Homosassa
3/2/2cg corner lot on 1/2
acre, fireplace, central
air, owner financed 0%
interest Call Tom
(920) 224-2513
House for Sale
By Owner
Sugarmill Woods

352-586-1772
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558



39 Greentree Street
Homosass, Fl 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Dont wait.
Almost 1/2 off Sugarmill
home. Originally sold for
259k asking 136,500. Will
list Nov 1st for 10k more.
Stainless steel,
granite(including bath-
rooms). Huge master
suite with double trey ceil-
ings and his + her closets
and separate sinks.
Phone: 352-346-7179
Email:
ryan49445@yahoo.com


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comrn
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
** ** *


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available













MICHELE ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


Irene Duffy

407-230-3508


I O EN OU E ST, C.0


9428 E. SOUTHGATE DR., INVERNESS
Beautiful home on Lake Henderson.
Directions: Hwy. 44 W to left Gospel Island Rd.,
to left on Southgate Dr. 000CYP.


Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty




5 ACRES 1948 Sq Ft.
2BR + Office/2 Bath
Furnished Home,
Bushnell, Turn key cond
cage inground pool
3,000 sf garage
mechanics dream
completely equipped
Information, Appoint.
(352) 569-4205

Waedront
Homes^^^


CLASSIFIED



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails, $3000 per Acre
352-634-4745
FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed
last assessed $25,000
ASKING $12,500 obo
813-792-1355




2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $24,000.
(727) 439-9106




HOMOSASSA
90 x 110 ft Lot, w/good
water, septic and im-
pact fee pd. $10K obo
Owner financing Easy
Terms (941) 505-9287

RESIDENTIAL LOTS
$300. down $100 mo
(352) 568-2849




Alumacraft
2010 16ft, V-hull, all
welded, yamaha 25hp 2
stroke w/trailer $5800
621-3764 or 302-3515
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
BOWRIDER
17.5 Caravel & Trailer
3.0 10, excel cond.
$4,995 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983


Office Open
7 Days a Week
ALLEGRO BUS
LISA VANDEBOE 2004,40 ft., 3 slides,
400HP 60k miles,
Broker (R) Owner $95,000 Excel. cond.
Plantation Realty (352) 795-9853
352-634-0129
www.plantation BOUNDER
g . 32fT Motor home, Ford
realtylistings.com V10 engine, low mile-
CRYSTAL RIVER age, new tires, Sleeps
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2(36. $16,500
2 boat slips near Kings (352) 220-6303
Bay $429,000. Make BT CRUISER
Offers 352-563-9857 BT CRUISER
2004-26' mdl 5250 32k
miles Ford E450 V10O
Triton gas eng, sleeps
4, 3 burner gas stove,
micro/cony oven, full
wi er rear kitch, full bath, tv,
dvd, 4kw gen, many ad-
ditional extra's $28950.
352 489-4129
ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, Diesel, motor
home, 2005, 55k miles,
extras include diesel gen-
erator, wash/dryer
$74,495 obo Call Bill
(352) 419-7882


'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002
PLEASURE WAY
19ft., Excel-TD new tires
brakes, loaded 56k mi.
2.5k Gen. Many Extras
Excellent Condition
$27,500 (352) 621-9250




KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
MONTANA
2004 30 FT. 5th Wheel,
2 slide-outs, includes
slider hitch. $17,000.
(352)493-1195, 538-6446
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



4 Dunlop Tires 31x10.5
R15LT all with aluminum
rims $400 obo
(352) 795-5642
4 Tires 2057014
white wall, 90% tread,
on universal rims,
painted red over
chrome $195.
Bed extended for Ford
Explorer Sport, $75.
(352) 586-7691



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! "*
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
It In. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892






CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $20,000
call 1-352-503-6548


Chevrolet
1988 Corvette
convertible 56k miles
$10,900.
352-341-0018

Chevrolet
'92 Caprice Station
Wagon, new tires, drives
like new, $5650
(352) 460-2162

CHEVY
'03, Malibu LS, 65K miles
sunroof., leather inte-
rior, auto, PW, PB,
$7,500 (352) 726-4689

CHEVY
2008 Cobalt Coupe
#11620 pw, pl, It, XFE,
5 speed, great fuel
economy! $9,995.
352-341-0018

Chrysler
'00 Sebring Convertible,
cold air, low mileage, ex-
cel. cond. Price Busters
on hwy 19, $3500 obo
(352) 795-5642

CHRYSLER
2007 PT CRUISER
Touring Edition Med Blue
w/32k miles. Mint Con-
dition $10,500 522-0505

Chrysler
2008 Sebring
convertible $12,900
352-341-0018

Chrysler
'95 Lebaron GTC con-
vertible, 6 cyl. auto,
cold alc, top works
great, 103k, red, $2900
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office

DAEWOO
'97 Leganza, nice in
and out, needs timing
belt, $500. obo
(352) 464-5582

DUDLEY'S
AUCTION
3 AUCTIONS
Estate Adventure
Auction 10/18
3pm come anytime
4000 S Florida (US 41S)
Inverness
'06 Impala, Furniture,
Appliances, New
Items, Tail Gate
equipment, Tools,
Mower, Decorator
items, 700+lots
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
10/19 prey 10
Auction 10pm
42S Tyler St Beverly
Hills 2/1 starter
-retirement home
family room garage
& carport great in-
vestment opportunity
SOLD REGARDLESS
OF PRICE

Celebration of Arts
10/20 prev11 am
Auction 1pm
3 estates, profes-
sional artist & Illustra-
tor, Autographs -
Guitars, records,
phoots of musicians
& actors, -play
manuscripts- erotica,
film info & more
LIVE & ON LINE
www.dudleysauction.c
om
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384

Ford
'00 Mustang
good cond. 97K miles
(352) 637-5778

FORD
'05, 500 Limited Gold,
smoke free, dealer
maint. 41K miles, $9,000
(352) 527-3124

FORD
2001 MUSTANG
AUTO, 6CYL, PW, PL,
PRICED TO SELL
CALL 628-4600

FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763


HONDA
1988, CRX,
1 owner, 127k miles,
$6,000.
(352) 564-0697
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MERCEDES
'03, E500, 64k mi pewter
silver, stone leather in-
terior, showroom new,
garage kept,
never in accident
$15,000. (352)586-0341
Mercury
"97 Grand Marquis w/
trailer hitch, 4 good han-
cock tires, high mileage
$1100 OBO
(352) 249-7541
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi. New
tires & battery
Book $16,700
Sell $14,300
(352) 302-0778
VW
2004 BEETLE
CONV., AUTOMATIC
FUN IN THE SUN
CALL 628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION




CADILAC '87
Alante Convertible, de-
pendble, All pwr. V8, 30
mpg, great cond. $5,200
C.R. (727) 207-1619
CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BUICK
2004, Lesabre
limited $6,900
352-341-0018
Chevrolet
'03 Silverado, 4x4 V8 vor-
tex engine, 88k mi, new
tires, Exc cond. Carfax
$7500 obo
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
DODGE
'96 GMC Truck. 170k
miles; Just tuned-up.
$1500
(352) 697-1861
FORD
1995, F150 4X4...
RUNS GOOD.....PERFECT
HUNTING TRUCK.
CALL 628-4600
FOR DETAILS
Ford
'97 F150 XLT
ext. cab, 4x4, auto 5.4L
V8, red & silver, runs
great, alc, $3800
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(3521 794-6069 Office


LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




'97 Yamaha Golf Cart
6 new Batteries, 36 volt,
full canvas, $1200
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
CHEVROLET
'10, Equinox, 2LT Black
granit metalic, V6,very
clean, 21,000 miles
$23.790 (352) 465-5054




Chevrolet
2002 Suburban
A ,A Agonn


MAX IV
6 x6, ATV Amphibious
Vehicle, Swims,
$2,800 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304




Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1300CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $4,200.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE
Exc tires, with reverse,
Approx 70K mi. Selling
due to health. Asking
$4,000 OBO
(352) 476-3688
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688




264-1020 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bid-
ding on the premises
where said vehicles)
have been stored and
which is located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
6403 W. Homosassa Trail,
HomosassaCitrus County,
Florida the following:
DOS: 10/31/12 @8AM
2002 SATURN
VIN#1G8ZY12792ZI80748
1999 FORD
VIN#1 FAFP52U4XG327687
1997 MERCURY
VIN#4M2DU55P9VUJ45766
1997 GMC
VIN#1GTEC19R7VE556126
1993 FORD
VIN#1FAPP15J9PW104517
DOS: 11/03/12 @8 AM
2001 VOLKSWAGON
VIN#3VWCC21V91 M803881
2007 CHONGQING
VIN#LHJLC79U77B001583
DOS: 11/07/12 @ 8 AM
2004 DODGE
VIN#2B3HD46R54H625081
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale in
cash only. Vehicle(s) sold
as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement, between
owner & obligated party.
October 20 2012.


CHRONICLE I






(352) 563-5966


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


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*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
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certified pre-owned
C H IkYS IE H EE I ICEL- I AD


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CRYSTAL
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1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville 2077 Highway 44W Inverness

352-564 1971
*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WAC. +0%APR FINANCING IS AVAILABLE FOR 36 MONTHS ON SELECT YRS, MAKES & MODELS.
300CGVH NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. WAC. PICTURES ARE FUL ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


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