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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 10-14-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02917

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Tough sledding: No. 4 UF puts ranking on line at Var V1

TODAY C. I CITRUS COUNTY






6 PAGE A4 __________www.chronicleonline.com
www.chronicleonline corn


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 68


Chronicle's
political forum
this Thursday
The Citrus County
Chronicle's candidate
forum is 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Col-
lege of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
Doors open at 6 p.m.
The forum will fea-
ture speeches from
candidates for Con-
gress, state repre-
sentative, clerk of
courts, sheriff and
superintendent of
schools. The format
includes questions
from a panel of
Chronicle editorial
board members.
Candidates are
also invited to re-
serve tables for their
campaign items.
WYKE-TV Channel
49 and chronicle
online.com will
broadcast the forum
at dates to be
announced.
For more informa-
tion, call political re-
porter Mike Wright at
352-563-3228.
-From staff reports

'NIGHT' AUTHOR:


Hair today? Grab a razor


On National Be Bald and Be Free Day, county's shiniest share bare-all tell-alls


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Goodbye comb overs. (Goodbye combs.)
So long shampoo and conditioners, volu-
minizers and gels, and hello razor.
According to the buzz, men are increas-
ingly bidding farewell to their receding
hairlines and embracing the chrome-dome
look.
We salute you, Michael Jordan and Andre
Agassi. Long may you live, Bruce Willis,
George Foreman and Elmer Fudd.
Today, Oct 14, is National Be Bald and Be
Free Day
A recent study from the University of
Pennsylvania, "Shorn Scalps and Perceptions
of Male Dominance," found that men with
shaved heads are perceived to be "more
masculine, dominant and, in some cases, to
have greater leadership potential than those
with longer locks or with thinning hair."
"It's a matter of national pride," said Ho-
mosassa baldie Ricky Williams. "As my wife
reminded me, our national bird is the


American bald eagle, not the 'flowing locks
of hair' eagle."
Longtime bald guy Steve Childs shaved
his hair off in 1996 after a $50 bet from his dad.
"It was a bloody mess at first," he said,
"but now I rarely cut myself."
He said the secret to a nice shine is slap-
ping on some aftershave.
For Scotty Chmura, a 25-year-old Inver-
ness college student and drummer for
Mighty Mongo and newly shorn shav-
ing off his trademark bleached blond spikes
was less a matter of national pride than a
matter of making peace with the inevitable.
"I've had a receding hairline since middle
school," he said. "Bleaching my hair was
cool, until I realized I was killing my hair."
He said he often practices with his drum
set in front of a mirror, and as he was watch-
ing himself earlier this summer in prepa-
ration for the band's Warped Tour gig he
had a "just-shave-it" moment
He went to the barbershop, and as the
See Page A8


Heart talk
Elie Weisel speaks
about his latest book,
"Open Heart."/Page B8
COMMENTARY:








Death debate
Anthony Schembri talks
about the polarizing
issue of the death
penalty/Page C1
BUSINESS:


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The Welch family has been an instrumental part of Citrus County's history for nearly 50 years. The children all worked in the business. Brad Welch,
left, is the services manager, Rick Welch is the general manager and Lori McKettrick is the office manager at Welch's Cabinets and Appliances.
The sign in front of the siblings is the first their father Dick Welch painted when he opened the company in 1963.




A family-built affair


Conspiracy?
After timely drop in
unemployment, conspir-
acy theories abound -
and some spring from
unlikely sources.
/Page D1


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS
When the late Dick Welch first came
to Inverness from Ohio in 1948, he
wasn't planning on staying.
But he loved the hunting and fishing haven he found and the pine
tree wilderness for miles and miles.
He decided he could make a decent living building plywood fishing
boats. He met and married Mazie and settled down to raise a family
When boat builders and boat buyers turned to fiberglass and away
from wood, Welch looked around at all his woodworking tools, checked
out some books from the library and taught himself cabinetry
Welch Cabinets, which would become an Inverness institution, was born
Just shy of 50 years later, three of the four children of Dick Welch -
See Page A7


Chain won't confirm new location
PAT FAHERTY .- 4
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Site work
could begin next month on a
new shopping center in
Inverness.
The project many are call- .
ing the "new Publix shopping DAVE 1Eh
center" has been in the plan- The Publix at Inverness Regional
ning stage for the past 18 The Publix at Inver has been open
months. Shopping Center has been open
The 8-acre site is located be- since 1984. It's been speculated
The 8-acre sites located be- that the store will move to a
teen Montgomery Avenue, new location, but the grocer
See Page A8 won't confirm the move.


Tailor-made
Returning veterans go
from leading the charge
in combat to running
their own businesses.
/Page A16

Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds................ D5
Crossword ............ A18
Editorial .................. ..C2
Entertainment ..........B8
Horoscope................ B8
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B8
Movies ..... ......... A18
Obituaries .... .......... A6
Together................ A20


|6 1|Il184578 200711 o


Smith: 'I've done


exactly what I said'


Jimmie
T. Smith


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER When Jim-
mie T Smith first ran for state rep-
resentative two years ago, he
promised to be accessible, visible in
the community and to listen to con-
stituents.
Now Rep. Smith, seeking
re-election, says he has done just that
Smith said one of most popular
bills, requiring drug testing for wel-
fare recipients, was suggested to
See Page A5


Election 2012

* WHAT: State
Representative
District 34.
WHO: Independent
Nancy Argenziano;
Republican incum-
bent Jimmie T
Smith.
TERM: Two years.
COVERS: All of
Citrus County and
a small portion of
Hernando County.
SALARY: $29,052.
ON THE BALLOT:
Nov. 6 election.
ON THE WEB:
www.chronicle
online.com/
votersguide


Argenziano: 'I fight


with the bad guys'


Nancy
Argenziano


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Challengers
to incumbents usually spend
months getting their names out to
voters.
That isn't an issue for Nancy Ar-
genziano, who faces incumbent Jim-
mie T Smith in the Nov 6 election
for state House of Representatives
District 34.
Argenziano is no stranger to Cit-
rus County politics. She was first
See .Page A5


After years
of fighting
a losing
battle with
his receding
hairline,
25-year-old
Scotty
Chmura
joined the
ranks of the
bald and free
when he
shaved off
his trade-
mark spiky
blond hair.
Today is
Be Bald and
Be Free Day,
so grab a
razor, gents.

DAVE SIGLER
/Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OCTOBER BOTH 2012


PRESENTED BY VILLAGE
CADILLAC-TOYOTA-SCION
in conjunction with our sponsors

4th Annual

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Get a $10 Publix Gift Card
and Breast Cancer goody bag
with every donation!
Bake Sale!
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Um


A2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


I


Si,


dWW
d







Page A3 -SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Airport


to install


upgraded


landing


lights

Appraisal of

facility under

discussion
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
LECANTO Crystal
River Airport will get
new landing lights next
month.
"Construction will start
Nov. 2 for the base-
mounted LED (light-
emitting diode) lights,"
Quincy Wylupek, engi-
neering project manager,
reported Thursday to the
Citrus County Aviation
Advisory Board.
Board Chairman
Kennedy Smith asked if
the construction would
disrupt the use of the air-
port. Wylupek said most
of the work would take
place at night.
Tom Davis, president
of Crystal Aero Group
Inc., which operates the
airport, spoke on the sub-
ject of appraisal of the
airport. Under a mandate
from the Federal Avia-
tion Administration, air-
ports must be appraised
for their fair-market
value to draw compar-
isons for the costs of serv-
ices offered.
The county, which has
airports in Crystal River
and Inverness, would
need to comply to con-
tinue to receive FAA
grants. Smith said Inver-
ness Airport, for exam-
ple, received funding for
$6.2 million of construc-
tion that cost the county
only $380,000, showing
how important FAA
grants are to the county.
"I am not arguing with
the mandate, but with
what the study will say,"
Davis said.
He was concerned a
fair-market value ap-
praisal would be con-
ducted by a consultant
who would look only at
land values, not the many
services the airport
provides.
Davis questioned how
an appraiser would draw
comparisons to similar
properties. He said Crys-
tal River Airport has pro-
vided a wide variety of
services such as fuel,
hangars, maintenance,
training, rentals, pilots
and veterans training.
Not all of the services
were profitable.
"On an economic scale,
it's hard for the small air-
port to pay its own way,"
Davis said. "Some serv-
ices are losers, but we
have to have them there."
Setting a lower ap-
praisal on an airport be-
cause market values have
been declining could
repel new business.
"If it's a mistake, then
we all lose," Davis said.
Crystal River Airport
has a great deal of future
potential, Davis said, and
displayed his own com-
parison study of the 11
airports in the Continu-
ing Florida Aviation Sys-
tems Planning Process
(CFASPP) north central
region, showing Crystal
River offers the most
services within the
group.
Wylupek said no plan is
in process yet to perform
an appraisal of the air-
ports.
Smith said while it


would appear the county
is getting good value from
its airports, the idea of
having a consultant come
in seemed reasonable.
Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormer can be
reached at cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com or
352-564-2916.


No beans about it


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
ABOVE: Rub Ya' Right Barbecue's Mark Mlynski has Holly Youger taste a batch of chili Saturday at the Southeast Regional Chili Cookoff
Championship at Nature's Resort in Homosassa. Rub Ya' Right describes its chili as a pure Texas chili; no beans, no fillers and 16 spices make
up the CASI Award-winning chili. BELOW: Nancy Week, Lisa Gray and Danny Week try some of GrannyB Chili at Nature's Resort in Homosassa.
Brenda Smith-McKenzie was the chili cook and described the different chilis she was serving.

Chili connoisseurs taste beanless concoctions at international cook-off contest


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA No beans al-
lowed! Meat, gravy and smack-
talking required.
Connoisseurs got a mixture of
all three Saturday at the 46th an-
nual Chili Appreciation Society
International (CASI) chili cook-
off at Nature Coast's RV Park in
Homosassa.
CASI, a nonprofit organization,
hosts more than 600 chili cook-
offs internationally each year to
raise money for various charities.
Proceeds from Saturday's chili
cook-off were donated to the
local 4-H club in Lecanto. Inter-
nationally, they raise more than a
million dollars annually for char-
ities and scholarships.
The top three teams automati-
cally qualified to attend the Ter-
lingua International Chili
Championship in Terlingua,
Texas, which is the first Saturday
in November each year. A stan-
dard chili year runs from October
to October. Therefore, competi-
tors compete for the Terlingua
trip for the following year.
"CASI has particular rules,"
Sunshine State Park President
Candace Arevalo said. "Meat and
spices only There are no vegeta-
bles or beans allowed."
Nonetheless, chili cooks travel
around the world benefiting
charities and competing for brag-
ging rights and smack talking at
the Terlingua International Chili
Championship.
However, one traveling cook
left his hometown of Terlingua,
Texas, to travel to Homosassa for
the chili cook-off.


"We don't get to travel as much
as we use to," James Taylor said.
"But we wanted to get away for a
few days and heard that Ho-
mosassa was hosting their cook-
off. We love it here and decided
to come."
What's his secret recipe?
"First off, you don't put beans
in a chili," Taylor said. "One of
the key things to look for in com-
petition chili is not to be able to
identify anything but meat and
gravy. Gravy is what we call it."
What is his strategy in
competing?
"You want it to be spicy but not
pepper hot," Taylor said. "If a
person takes a bite of chili and it


Campaign TRAIL
The Citrus County Chronicle's political forum is at 7
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, at the College of Central Florida
in Lecanto. Information: Mike Wright, 352-563-3228.
Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill is sponsoring a
candidates' forum targeted for high school students at 7
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, at Citrus High School.
Jimmie T. Smith, Republican incumbent for state
House District 34, and Winn Webb, Republican for
sheriff, will be the guest speakers at the Women's Politi-
cal Network of Citrus County meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 16, at the Citrus County Resource Cen-
ter, 2804 Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Information:
Jeanne McIntosh, 352-484-9975 or 352-746-5660
evenings.
Winn Webb, Republican for sheriff, will have a
fundraiser from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20,
at Frank Ballots on the corner of U.S. 41 and County
Road 48 in Floral City.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel, Democrat for superinten-
dent of schools, will have a barbecue fundraiser at 7
p.m. Friday, Oct. 19, at the Davis residence, 3500 E.
Oak Trace Path, Inverness. Information: 352-563-9419
or 352-637-5191.
The Campaign Trail is a listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season. Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at mwright@chronicle
online.com.


3 V .-
hurts them, you know that they
are going to judge down on it You
want it to look good, taste good,
smell good and be very
powerful."
Texas chili cookers coming to
Florida has become a friendly
competition of its own. Like
school rivalries, chili cooks seem
to feel the same way
"There is a large (contingent)
from Texas there today," Kitty
Dolan said. "There is a Texas-
Florida rivalry. There is a lot of
smack-talking, but we are all fam-
ily at the end of the day"
Family is exactly what draws
most chili cooks in continuing the
traveling competition.


"I have a sista' in each state,"
Arevalo said. "It is the friend-
ships that you make along the
chili trail."
With the friendship they have
established, most cooks don't
mind giving their special recipe
out to "wannabe" chili cooks.
However, Taylor knows cooking
the recipe is the true secret.
"You can give someone a
recipe but you can't cook it for
them," Taylor said.
Winner recipes are on the web-
site www.casichili.net
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


State BRIEFS

Stone crab season Fungal meningitis Father of missing UF
to help fishermen case in Escambia Co. student to help police


MARATHON Florida's com-
mercial fishermen are hoping win-
ter visitors will flock to the Sunshine
State for stone crab season.
Gary Graves is vice president of
Keys Fisheries, the largest
processor of the crab's tasty claws
in the Florida Keys. He said a
strong winter tourism season for
the state normally translates into
higher fiscal yields for the industry.
Graves said some 75 percent of
all claws harvested by Florida's
commercial fishermen remain in
Florida and are mostly consumed
by visitors. He added consumers
should expect slightly higher sea-
son-opening prices, due to fuel
cost increases for fishermen. He
expects retail seafood market
prices to be about $10 per pound
for medium claws, $16 for large
and $21 for jumbos.
The stone crab season runs
Monday through May 15.


TALLAHASSEE Florida now
has 10 confirmed cases of fungal
meningitis.
The Florida Department of
Health confirmed Saturday that
Escambia County has its case of
fungal meningitis associated with
contaminated steroid injections
from the New England Com-
pounding Center. A 47-year-old
man who received treatment from
Pain Consultants of West Florida
in Pensacola was injected with
one of the tainted shots.
Six facilities in Florida have re-
ceived and used the contaminated
injections. Florida Surgeon General
and Secretary of Health Dr. John
Armstrong said they do not antici-
pate "more patients will be affected"
as the investigation continues.
Health officials said the number
of cases nationwide have sick-
ened at least 197 people, includ-
ing 15 deaths across 13 states.


CEDAR KEY The father of a
missing University of Florida stu-
dent is helping investigators deter-
mine whether a body found in
rural Levy County is his son.
Gainesville Police said they are
assisting the Levy County Sheriff's
Office with the discovery and pro-
cessing of a human body found
Friday in Cedar Key. Police de-
clined to release more information.
The Miami Herald reported Car-
los Aguilar is traveling from Miami
to meet with investigators. He said
police told him they have a body
matching his son, 18-year-old
Christian Aguilar, who was last
seen in a Gainesville Best Buy
store with his friend, 18-year-old
Pedro Bravo. Bravo was charged
with first-degree murder. Police
say Bravo told them he beat
Aguilar unconscious and left him
in a parking lot.
From staff reports






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Politicians spar over


medical histories


Associated Press

MIAMI Florida congress-
woman Debbie Wasserman
Schultz is sparring with her
Republican challenger over
whether it's appropriate on
the campaign trail to high-
light being a cancer survivor
Republican Karen Har-
rington is accusing Wasser-
man Schultz of referring to
her battle with breast cancer
in a recent campaign flier to
score political points.
"I was fortunate. I had
good insurance and great


doctors. Today, I'm a sur-
vivor. But like every breast
cancer survivor, I now have
a pre-existing condition,"
Wasserman Schultz says in a
campaign flier. She has un-
dergone seven major sur-
geries in the past year,
including a double
mastectomy.
Harrington, whose own
campaign website briefly
mentions she, too, is a can-
cer survivor, sharply criti-
cized the flier in both a
press release and in a
fundraising email.


State BRIEFS

State workers comp TD Bank: Customers
rates climb steeply exposed in data breach


TALLAHASSEE Florida's
workers compensation insurance
rates have climbed from 40th to
29th most expensive in the na-
tion over the last two years.
That 11-point increase was
reported in a study released
this week by the Oregon De-
partment of Consumer & Busi-
ness Services. It issues a
comparison of rates in the 50
states on Jan. 1 of each even-
numbered year.
The Florida Office of Insur-
ance Regulation noted in a
news release Friday that the
Sunshine State's rate of $1.82
per $100 of payroll is still below
the national median of $1.88.
Businesses and other em-
ployers buy workers compen-
sation insurance to cover
on-the-job injuries.
Florida Insurance Commis-
sioner Kevin McCarty said the
study shows that the state
needs to be proactive in consid-
ering legislation to keep its
rates nationally competitive.


CHERRY HILL, N.J. TD
Bank has begun notifying about
260,000 customers from Maine
to Florida that the company
said may have been affected by
a data breach.
Company spokeswoman Re-
becca Acevedo confirmed in
emails Friday to The Associ-
ated Press that unencrypted
backup data tapes were mis-
placed in transport in March.
She said the tapes contained
personal information, including
account information and Social
Security numbers, but the com-
pany is not aware of any mis-
use of customer information.
Still, TD Bank has not ruled out
the possibility and is monitoring
the situation.
She said the company is
sending letters to customers
whose data was on the tapes,
and is offering them free credit
monitoring and identity theft
protection.

-From wire reports


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Kerri Lee O'Brien, 32,
Beverly Hills, at 10 a.m. Tues-
day was arrested on charges of
two counts of burglary, two
counts of petit theft, violation of
sub sections felony level, viola-
tion of sub sections misde-
meanor level, grand theft and
utter and publish a forged instru-
ment. Bond $21,500.
Jamie Danyell Brunk, 36,
Dunnellon, at 2:41 p.m. Tuesday
was arrested on a warrant on
charges of grand theft and en-
deavor to traffic in stolen prop-
erty. Bond $27,700.
Andrew Jesus Cannon,
23, S Apopka Ave., Inverness, at
5:20 p.m. Tuesday was arrested
on a charge of battery. Bond
$500.
Robert J. Jordan, 25,
Dunnellon, at 6:44 p.m. Tuesday
was arrested on charges of
grand theft and burglary. Bond
$7,000.
Melody Hannah Touch-
ton, 24, Inverness, at 11:44 p.m.
Tuesday was arrested on a
charge of aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon. No bond.
Stephen Douglas Fusco,


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports. Also under Public Informa-
tion on the CCSO website, click on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each type of crime occurs in Citrus
County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of bur-
glary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are archived at
www.chronicleonline.com.


25, Beverly Hills, at 9:04 p.m.
Wednesday was arrested on a
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Joseph Marc Ackerman,
45, Homosassa, at 9:29 p.m.
Wednesday was arrested on a
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Patrick Antwon Johnson,
28, NE 1st St., Crystal River, at
1:29 a.m. Thursday was ar-
rested on a charge of posses-
sion of a controlled substance.
Bond $5,000.
Mary Jane Sancher, 41, N
Reynolds Ave., Crystal River, at
1:29 a.m. Thursday was ar-
rested on charges of possession
of a controlled substance and
tampering with evidence. Bond
$7,000.
Judy Campbell, 56, Crys-


tal River, at 12:56 p.m. Thursday
was arrested on charges of en-
deavor to traffic stolen property,
grand theft and violation of
pawnbroker. Bond $9,000.
Brent T. Spicer, 34,
Brooksville, at 2:15 p.m. Friday
was arrested on a charge of
theft. Bond $2,000.
DUI arrests
Joseph Jeffrey Knight,
22, Fredrick Road, Fruitland
Park, at 10:58 p.m. Tuesday
was arrested on a charge of
driving under the influence
(DUI). Deputies reportedly found
Knight following behind another
vehicle at approximately four
feet in distance, swerving from
lane to lane, braking erratically.
He reportedly smelled of alco-
hol. Field sobriety tasks were
performed. Bond $1,000.


Pamela Mamie Dicks, 42,
W Sunrise Lane, Homosassa, at
4:06 a.m. Thursday was ar-
rested on a charge of driving
under the influence (DUI).
Deputies reportedly found Dicks
swerving over the double yellow
line twice within 250 feet. Field
sobriety tasks were performed.
Bond $500.
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 6:23 a.m. Thursday,
Oct. 11, in the 2500 block of E.
Marcia St., Inverness.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 7:20 a.m. Oct. 11 in the
1500 block of S. Regal Pt.,
Inverness.
A residential burglary was
reported at 1:24 p.m. Oct. 11 in
the 7800 block of E. Watson St.,
Inverness.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported at
9:46 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, in
the 10 block of Douglas Ct. S.,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at4:21 p.m. Oct. 11 in the 40 block
of S. Columbus St., Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported at
10:40 p.m. Oct. 11 in the 2200
block of E. Goldpearl Lane,
Hemando.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





: Meeting Notlces..........................D7



Lien Notices V................................ D7



mMgiscellaneous Notices.........D6, D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR ,Hl LO PR| |HI LO PR
NA \, NA NA NA K.. 80 62 NA


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort M1,tr

Homestead

Key West
Lakeland
'.1liellj ULUrIni


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
sh
pc
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Be-i: n
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
pc
pc


ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PRI HI LO PR
86 64 NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
forecast by, r1


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 67
.. Partly cloudy and warm

. ................ ........................ MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 63
Partly :liid,, 10% chance of a PM shower

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 56
Sunny and nice

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Safurridv 86/64
,-,,,.1 .93/47
Normal 86/62
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0 00 in.
Total for the month 4 40 in.
Total for the year 58 91 in.
Normal for the year 46.30 in.
"As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal. 3-4 low. 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.13 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 pmrn 49
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Ragweed, elm, grasses
Today's count: 7.3/12
Monday's count: 7.4
Tuesday's count: 7.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
ir.hi.iF.rljGi (AFTERNOON)
10/14 SUNDAY 4:40 10:53 5:06 11:20
10/15 MONDAY 5:32 11:46 6:00 12:13


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT
SUNRISE TOMORROW
0 O O 0 MOONRISE TODAY
OC1 15 OCT. 21 OCT.a28 N1.6 MOONSET TODAY


732AM
.6:31 AM


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777, For more
S.. ..., se visit the Divsion of Forestrys Web site

WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 pm., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Tri.,r-. i, ,an.j ,ir n -udl. _-
ODD addresses i ., :. u V '... .I I i...r 'Illrl^l:l,.
H irii. .-.Ilrrirni .ihl i Jiut-off nozzle or l.il.. ini.l].iti..rl .. ri..,n : :rir i .. such aS
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
I."r ar -...a,u-. I li,, 'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. So v .- r, .-.- 1 rwainl'~. rri i; .111 ii, ir,r" 1 .,J.1 Iial
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
I,, r Ii River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313. unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahovtzka' 506 02 a 555 p/ 25 p
Crystal River" 3.27 a10:47 a 4,16 pl :04p
Wihlacoochee' ~ 14 a:8.35a 2.03 p8'52 p
Honosassa'" 4 6 a.12:01 a 5.05 p/12:24 0


""At Mason s Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5 39a/1:42 643p 209p
400 ai 1:31 a 5.04 p/11:43p
1 47a/919 a 25l1 p9:31 p
4.49a/12.41 a 553p/108p


rjrririe I winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Skies will be
parily cloudy today.


Gulf water
temperature


80
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.91 n/a 35.52
Tsala Arp.,-pi Hr I .id. 39.08 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apjpiih,..,-in 40.26 n/a 40.60
Tsala App: Ir. FiLr1 Ci i 41.73 n/a 42.40
eveis; re[Kmr!d in f!S above sea leve! Fl00d liay; for lakes are baied on 2 33-year look the 1 niai
l fooi which has a 43-prce hane o b ed or needed in any o year his data is
obtained Irom !e So thwest Foida Water M anage Ien Disi and rs sublec ci rev sion in o mve
il t ne Osric or the Un tel Stales GeologcaJ n Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the se ol
Is data t ou hav any qsieaons you shouE Kinta th O Hydra ogNal Data Seeon at 352) 7%- 7

THE NATION


{ Sxn 70s
MFfWVV^C 3

64


gas


los
5200
IAn ','-,h .-,,
-'.." .
/


.~~~~~~~~ - ..n1Blt -: _
494P

.I -.
S .- T



DFW -
11,, 7743 / --IBl T-
'- MIB^ .- IL


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 52 25 sh 66 55
AlbuquerQue 65 40 s 72 47
Ashevlle 63 48 68 52
Atanta 79 60 pc 77 63
Atlant City 57 31 pc 72 64
Austin 85 73 05 Is 83 59
Baltimre 58 35 pc 73 60
Bi;lngs 66 48 pc 72 49
Brminghan 82 65 pc 78 60
Bfse 69 53 02 pc 73 47
Boston 53 35 sn 67 60
Butlao 51 30 03 is 70 53
Bulington. VT 53 26 sh 60 55
Charleston SC 73 58 p 82 64
Charleston WV 74 36 pc 77 59
Ciaiote 68 45 pc 75 57
Chicago 64 43 21 ts 69 45
Clcinnati 74 36 Is 74 50
Cleveland 64 34 O1 Is 74 52
Cou SC 75 56 pc 81 60
Columobus OH 70 38 Is 75 51
Concom NH 52 23 sh 58 54
allas 84 72 pc 84 58
Denver 55 40 51 s 70 45
Des Mones 77 53 77 pc 65 44
Detroi 55 32 10 ts 73 48
El Paso 77 60 s 80 55
Evasville, IN 79 49 ts 75 51
Harisbujrg 57 30 pc 70 53
Hartor! 54 28 c 67 58
Housn 89 68 s 88 68
Ind:napos 69 43 ts 72 48
ackson 84 57 ts 81 61
s Vegas 75 55 s 82 63
LidIe Rock 82 60 pc 82 55
Los Angeles 72 58 s 80 65
uLoisvile 75 44 I 74 53
Memph s 83 66 is 80 57
Milwaukee 61 45 76 r 61 43
Mmneapos 54 46 04 pc 59 39
Mobile 85 59 pc 85 66
Montgomer 87 60 pC 83 65
Nashve 79 53 is 78 58


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
fmfair, h-hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs-rainisnow mix, s;.unny., shshowers;
sn-snow: Iswthunderstorms, w=windy.
2012 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday


City H L Pcp. Fcst H
New Odreans 85 65 pc 84
New York City 53 38 pc 71
Norto 63 53 ic 77
Oklahoma City 75 64 256 s 81
Omaha 73 52 38 s 69
Palm Sprngs 85 57 s 95
Philadelphia 59 37 pc 73
Pnonix 81 61 s 94
P tslurgh 66 30 c 73
Portland. ME 52 29 sh 58
Portland. Ore 65 55 r 66
Proidence. R.I 53 31 sh 65
Raleign 67 42 PC 75
RapdCW 74 48 s 70
Reno 71 42 s 76
Rochester NY 52 28 ts 70
Sacramento 76 48 s 82
St Louis 78 57 ts 76
St Se Mane 45 33 24 r 52
Sai lake Cty 61 46 s 68
San Atonio 87 74 ts 84
San Dieo 73 59 s 80
San Fancisco 72 52 pc 70
Savannah 83 60 pc 82
Seattle 61 55 12 r 60
Spokane 59 49 03 c 64
Syracuse 53 29 sh 68
Topeka 70 60 30 s 73
Wasington 60 41 pc 74
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & 1
HIGH 98 Laredo, Texas
LOW 16 Saranac Lake, NY
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 89 78its
Amsterdam 54/47/sh
Athens 84 71/Ipc
Beijlng 67 43/c
Berlin 56/46 pc
Bermuda 79,77/sh
Cairo 87/71/s
Calgary 67/44/pc
Havana 82/73 Is
Kong 85,76/pc
Jerusalem 82/65/s


Usbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Parins
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


I L
68
62
63
53
46
60
68
53
57
56
59
59
44
46
53
57
50
40
64
66
55
65
48
57
45
62
LOW


68 57 sh
53:36/s
71 43 sh
76/49/s
52/46/r
48/41 c
50/41/sh
76/63/sh
72 59/c
71 59/sh
71 59 sh
65/49;r
*I,. 1,'


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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S Courthouse office
To mpkins St. square
S n 2 106 W. Main
41 44Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
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Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ......................... .................................. Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.......................................................... Classified M manager, 563-3255
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories ........................................ Mike Arnold, 564-2930
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


* 0os


"I.""


LE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SM IT H self off to one
SMITH Many of tho
have come fror
Continued from Page Al SchoolDistrict
him by someone at raised some
Howard's Flea Market. a campaign ma
He said he uses Facebook, that said he wa
Twitter and email to per- advocate for pi
form constituent outreach. in the entire I
And Smith said no repre- Smith stood
sentative before him has despite some
spent as much time inter- rus County e
acting with citizens and or- agree with.
ganizations as he has. Smith gave
"I've done exactly what I After learnir
said when Iran the firsttime," wanted to sc
Smith told the Chronicle end-of-course
Editorial Board last week. the winter bre
"I've been the most active with the sei
representative this commu- Smith raised
nity has ever had." ing an educat
Smith, an Inverness Re- meeting with
publican, faces former state Education off
Sen. Nancy Argenziano in After that
the Nov 6 election. Argen- state agreed
ziano is running as a member County's requ
of the Independent Party Housememb
Smith said he doesn't al- to sponsor six
ways agree with constituents, sion. Of Smi
but he listens to all sides. scored bills, 1
"You cannot close your- houses of the


ARGENZIANO
Continued from Page Al
elected to the state House in 1996, then to the
Florida Senate in 2002. She left the Legislature
in 2007 to become a member of the Public
Service Commission and resigned in October
2010 just months before her term ended.
Now Argenziano is back, this time hoping
to boot Smith from office as a member of
the Independent Party of Florida.
"It's appropriate to go back and ring the
bell," she said.
Argenziano made her name via brash,
no-holds-barred representation. She took
on party leaders, influential lobbyists and
special interest groups. Critics say she's too
brash, too difficult to work with.
And now that she's not a member of ei-
ther major political party, opponents say
she will find no allies in Tallahassee.
Argenziano said she's heard that before,
and proved people wrong.
"That was said in nearly every election I've
had," Argenziano told the Chronicle Editorial
Board last week. "I fight with the bad guys.
I had great relationships with the good guys.
There are still plenty of good guys left."
She added: "The bad guys are always
going to be the ones to say I can't get along
with everybody"
On the other hand, Argenziano is sharply
critical of Smith who, she said, voted 100
percent with Republican leadership on
major bills.
"If he showed one ounce of independ-
ence I may not be in the race," she said.


issue," he said.
se discussions
m Citrus County
officials. Smith
eyebrows with
il piece in June
as the strongest
iblic education
Legislature.
d by that claim,
votes that Cit-
educators dis-
this example:
ig the county
schedule state
exams prior to
eak to coincide
mester's end,
the issue dur-
ion committee
Department of
icials present.
meeting, the
with Citrus
est.
bers are allowed
bills per ses-
th's 12 spon-
1 passed both
Legislature.


"The bills I ran came from
my connection to the com-
munity," he said. "I run issue
bills trying to fix what's bro-
ken in government"
The drug-testing bill for
welfare recipients, he said,
is a crowning success. While
critics have pointed out a
relatively small percentage
of positive drug tests, Smith
said the results don't show
the people who have quit il-
legal drugs because they don't
want to lose state assistance.
"It's absolutely one of the
best things I've ever done,"
he said.
Smith acknowledged his
re-election bid against Ar-
genziano does not fit the tra-
ditional incumbent vs.
challenger race because Ar-
genziano is a former member
of the House, Senate and
Public Service Commission.
"I have a proactive work
ethic," Smith said. "I don't
demagogue anybody At no
point has she said she can
work with the Republicans."


And she is perplexed by Smith's claim
that he is the most active legislator Citrus
County has ever had.
"How does he know who came before him
and what we did?" she said, referring to Citrus
County legislators who served before him.
Argenziano's choice to run as an Independ-
ent came about by accident. After leaving
the PSC, Argenziano stayed in Tallahassee and
planned a run for Congress. However, a new
state law required anyone who wanted to
switch parties to run for office need to do so
within one year of qualifying. Argenziano,
then a Republican, went to the local elections
office and registered Independent-- think-
ing it was the same as no-party affiliation.
When Argenziano announced her plans
to run for the U.S. House as a Democrat,
she learned she couldn't because Inde-
pendent is a viable political party and it
was too late to change parties. She sued to
have the law overturned but lost.
Argenziano said she won't change parties
again if elected to the state House.
"I think I've always been an independ-
ent," she said.
Argenziano differs with Smith's support
for drug-testing bills, the education "parent
trigger" bill, and legislation that stops local
governments from enacting ordinances lim-
iting the type and frequency of fertilizer
Argenziano said she would support legis-
lation allowing counties and cities to con-
trol fertilizer sales to stop pollution in
water bodies like King's Bay
"We have an incredible resource right
here that makes us a lot of money," she said.
"What he should be doing is protecting the
resource."


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10 am-12 noon



at Citrus Hills Golf


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Registration is required

due to space limitations.

Please call

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to reserve your space by

Mon., October 15th.

Light refreshments will also be provided.
Open to serve Citrus County families, Superior Residences of
Lecanto is offering a host of other educational opportunities.
Please call for a copy of our calendar of events.

sAssisted living license #12256


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Ruth Embree, 83
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ruth Ellen Allen Embree,
83, of Crystal River, passed
away Friday,
Oct 12,2012.
She was
born in St.
Petersburg
on Dec. 20,
.j 1928, to the
1 a t e
9'- Leonard
Ruth and Agatha
Embree ( E 1 b o n )
Allen. She
was married to Howard
Douglas Embree on Feb. 4,
1947, who preceded her in
death in 1995. They had four
children, Doug Embree,
Mark Embree, Wayne Em-
bree (Debbie) and Linda
Collins (Gene). She has eight
grandchildren and nine
great-grandchildren.
Ruth attended Wildwood
Elementary School and
Wildwood High School and
graduated from St. Peters-
burg High School. She re-
tired from the Pinellas
County Tax Collector's of-
fice as an office manager
after 28 years of service.
After retiring, Ruth and
Howard enjoyed traveling
to England, France, Italy,
Scotland and Alaska. Ruth
moved to Wildwood in 1996,
then to Inverness and fi-
nally Crystal River, where
she spent the remainder of
her life. As a direct descen-
dant of a Revolutionary War
veteran, she was proud to be
a member of the Daughters
of the American Revolution
as well as a member of
United Daughters of Con-
federacy Ruth was a life-
long Republican, enjoyed
talking about politics and
had a huge collection of ele-
phants to represent her Re-
publican spirit. Ruth
enjoyed traveling, spending
time with family and friends
and researching family ge-
neaology The Allen family
was one of the first settlers
in Clearwater She loved her
dogs Corky and Dash.
A celebration of Ruth's life
will be at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct 16, 2012, at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory Burial will follow
at Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. The family
will receive friends in visita-
tion from 11 a.m. until the
hour of service.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Joslyn
Dixon, 92
BEVERLY HILLS
Joslyn B. Dixon, 92, of
Beverly Hills, died Friday,
Oct 12,2012, under Hospice
of Citrus County care. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.


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2. Double Bingo $200
3. Full Card Bingo $300


Joseph
DiPietro, 88
CITRUS SPRINGS
C. Joseph DiPietro, 88, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., for-
merly of Saddle Brook, N.J.,
passed
1 away Fri-
S day, Oct. 12,
-' -_ '^W 2012. He
Swas a WWII
veteran of
the U.S.
Army, life-
time mem-
Joseph ber of VFW
DiPietro Post No.
4864 in Cit-
rus Springs, American Le-
gion and 55-year member of
the Elks.
He is survived by his wife
of 63 years, Jeannette; five
children; eight grandchil-
dren; and four great-grand-
children.
A memorial gathering will
be held for family and
friends at a later date. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

William 'Craig'
Wright, 64
HOMOSASSA
William C. "Craig" Wright,
64, of Homosassa, passed
away Saturday, Oct 6,2012, at
his home. A native of Des
Moines, Iowa, he was born
March 22, 1948, to William
and Shirley (Yates) Wright
Craig, as he was widely
known, was a retired me-
chanical engineer for the
U.S. Department of Energy,
serving in several locations
around the United States. He
came to Homosassa in March
2005 from Gatlinburg, Tenn.,
and attended First Christian
Church of Chassahowitzka.
Mr Wright is survived by
his wife of nearly 23 years,
Shirley A. Wright, Ho-
mosassa; son, Gregory Kin-
kle, Pinole, Calif.; parents,
William and Shirley Wright,
Baxley, Ga.; and brother, Brad
Wright, also of Baxley, GA
Interment will take place
in his home state of Iowa at
a later date. Wilder Funeral
Home in Homosassa is han-
dling the arrangements.
www.wilderfuneral.com.

* Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


Albert
Rodriguez, 92
LECANTO
Albert C. Rodriguez, 92, of
Lecanto, died Friday, Oct.
12, 2012. Arrangements are
entrusted to Fero Funeral
Home.

Albert
Festa, 87
Albert Paul Festa, 87, died
Thursday Oct 11,2012. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.

Kathryn
Kleftis, 53
BEVERLY HILLS
Kathryn A. Kleftis, 53, of
Beverly Hills, died Wednes-
day, Oct. 10, 2012. Services
will be private.
Arrangements are en-
trusted to Fero Funeral
Home.

Joanne
Pironti, 91
CRYSTAL RIVER
Joanne Pironti, 91, of
Crystal River, died Friday,
Oct. 12, 2012. Graveside
service will be at 1 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 15, 2012 at
Fero Memorial Gardens.
Arrangements are en-
trusted to Fero Funeral
Home.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free
and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be veri-
fied with the funeral
home or society in
charge of arrangements.
A flag will be included for
free for those who served
in the U.S. military.
(Please note this service
when submitting a free
obituary.) Additionally, all
obituaries will be posted
online at www.chronicle
online.com.
The U.S. military con-
sists of five active-duty
services and their re-
spective guard and re-
serve units: Army,
Marine Corps, Navy, Air
Force and Coast Guard.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


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In Loving Memory of 6onya Fulmer

SIt has been two years
since you passed and we
think of you daily. We
love and miss you and
are waiting till the day
we meet again.
From your loving husband Charles, children
Hollie & Chuck, and all of the grandchildren.


*N C I T R U S9$, CO UNTY

CHffNICLE

Political Forum
Thursday, October 18th

College of Central Florida
Forum Starts at 7pm
Doors Open at 6pm

Meet the local candidates
and hear their positions.

Sheriff
U.S. House of
Representatives District 11
Florida House of
Representatives District 34
Superintendent of Schools
Clerk of Courts

For more information call
Mike Wright 352-563-3228
000CSTJ


Associated Press
The Space Shuttle Endeavour slowly moves along city streets Saturday on a 160-wheeled
carrier in Inglewood, Calif. After slowly surmounting a key obstacle, Endeavour maintained
a heading through the streets of Los Angeles toward its retirement home at a museum.



Shutle heads to museum


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES At
every turn of Endeavour's
stop-and-go commute
through urban streets, a
constellation of spectators
trailed along as the space
shuttle ploddingly nosed
past stores, schools,
churches and front yards.
Having escaped out of
Earth's atmosphere two
dozen times, Endeavour's
slow-speed trek Saturday
to its retirement center
took it through the working
class streets of southern
Los Angeles.
In an instant, the shuttle
crossings became part of
history
Along the 12-mile
course, people marveled
at the engineering. Some
rooted for Endeavour
when it appeared it might
clip a light post. Others
wondered if it could just
hurry up to its destination.
Crowds gathered in front
of Inglewood High School
before sunrise Saturday to
watch Endeavour roll by at
2 mph. Many were bundled
up sipping coffee. By late
afternoon, some 30,000







A C-
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"This is great for the city as
a whole. It makes us proud,"
said Martinez, a project di-
rector for a nonprofit whose
family took turns taking pic-
tures of one another as the
shuttle slowly inched by
Endeavour was scheduled
to inch into the California
Science Center late Satur-
day to spend the rest of its
years as a museum piece.
Unlike other high-profile
events like the Academy
Awards or the Rose Parade,
the procession was centered
in some of the area's most
economically downtrodden
and troubled places. The
shuttle passed several gritty
areas and shuttered busi-
nesses, and rolled down many

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WELCH
Continued from Page Al

Rick and Brad Welch and
Lori McKettrick, each hav-
ing worked at the business
they inherited from their fa-
ther since they were old
enough to hold a broom or a
dust rag will close the
business Dec. 13.
On Sept. 14 they signed
papers selling the property
their father purchased in
1963. A development company
purchased it with plans to
build a shopping plaza, re-
portedly to be home to a
Publix. Publix will not con-
firm it plans to locate to the
area of the Welch property.
Tears, laughter
and fond memories
Tears came to Brad
Welch's eyes as he spoke
about the day they signed.
"This has been my whole
life I've done nothing
else," he said. "From the
time I was old enough to walk,
I was here. It's the only job
I've ever had, so this is an
empty hole."
Rick Welch, oldest son of
Dick Welch, has been the
general manager; Brad Welch,
the service manager and Lori
McKettrick, office manager
Their youngest sister, Tina
Brooks, lives in Jacksonville
and works in health care.
"Dad first worked out of
the old Allen lumber com-
pany on North Apopka next
to the railroad tracks," Rick
Welch said. "He started out
as Welch Boatworks."
He started Welch Cabinets
just as the building boom in
Citrus County was under way.
His was one of the first cab-
inet shops in the county, which
he built on the property that
now sits on State Road 44.
"People made fun of Dad
back then, asking, 'Why did
you build so far out of
town?'" McKettrick said.
"Back then, the area was
just pine trees," Rick Welch
said. "There was no school
board building, no WTI, no bank
or Pizza Hut no nothing."
"People used to be afraid
to drive to Crystal River at
night," Brad Welch said. "It
was just one black hole."
As the area exploded with
growth, especially in the
Highlands area of Inverness,
Dick Welch added selling
appliances to the business,
since kitchen cabinets and
refrigerators and stoves went
hand in hand. In 1965, the
business changed to Welch
Cabinets and Appliances.
"In its day, this was the
place to get a summer or
after-school job," Brad
Welch said. "Dad was al-
ways one for taking people
in and under his wing, train-
ing and teaching them."
McKettrick said many
current community leaders
had at one time worked for
Dick Welch.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 A7


A second store opened in
Crystal River in 1979, which
closed this past June.
The cabinet shop part of
the business closed in 2001,
10 years after Dick Welch
died at age 68.
"The business took a big
hit when all the big-box stores
started coming into the area,"
McKettrick said, "but we've
kept a following of loyal cus-
tomers. That's going to be
the hardest thing all the
friends we've made."
Some of the Welch siblings'
fondest memories of their
dad revolve around his in-
volvement in the community
Dick Welch volunteered for
everything fire depart-
ment, sheriff's office. He'd
host fish fry dinners out in
front of his store and Hal-
loween parties, a tradition
son Rick carried on and
then some. They used to rent
the county auditorium and
pack it with up to 1,000 people.
"Many relationships started
with the Halloween party,"
recalled Rocky Hensley, friend
of Rick Welch for more than
55 years. "Folks came from
all over the county good,
clean fun with good folks. The
Welch family has left their
mark on so many worthwhile
causes the Citrus County
4-H Rodeo, Citrus County
Chamber events, Strawberry
Festival, Manatee Festival,
as well as what they do for
their church family, always
willing to lend a hand and
help when asked.
"This is truly a business
that was family-built and
sustained over many years
by hard work and caring for
the community where they
live and work," he said.
Family legacy
The Welch siblings agree
it's time to close up shop and
do something else. What
that will be, they don't know.
They're still trying to grasp
the concept of not going to
the same place they've gone
to for the past 50 years.
"I hope we've brought good
to the community," McKettrick
said. "Growing up here,
then raising our own chil-
dren here, it's always been
about family and hometown
values. Having our business
has been a great way to make
a living and gave us the op-
portunity to employ quite a
few people and meet many
others who became great
friends as well as customers.
But participating in all the
volunteer work and giving
back has probably been the
most important thing we've
accomplished."
Brad Welch said their dad
told them it didn't matter if
they made a lot of money
"Dad told us if you treat
people fair you'll make a fair
living, and we have," he said.
McKettrick added, "We've
decided we were never meant
to be rich, but we're rich in the
ways that matter, which is our
family That's what matters."


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DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The Welch Family is pictured celebrating the opening
of a 2000-square-foot appliance showroom.


Dick Welch, acting as
president of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce,
congratulates Hernando resident
Frank E. Kauffman on a
prize-winning fish in the March
1963 Citrus County Chronicle.


Brad Welch was one of the
first babies born in the new
Citrus Memorial hospital.
"This has been my whole
life I've done nothing
else," Welch said when dis-
cussing the family's deci-
sion to close up shop.
"From the time I was old
enough to walk, I was here.
It's the only job I've ever
had, so this is an empty
hole."


For more
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www.chronicle
online.com.


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CITRUS MEMORIAL





A8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


BALD
Continued from Page Al

barber made the first few
cuts with the clippers,
Chmura said the topogra-
phy of his head looked like
an aerial map and the bald-
ing spots looked like lakes
among little stumpy trees.
He said when the barber
was finished, he felt like a
kid at an awkward middle
school dance.
"I didn't know what to
do," he said. "How do I act?
I'm bald now. I have no
identity now. When my hair
was white and spiky, every-
one could see me."
He said he still considers
himself a "newbie baldie,"
although he no longer has
to wear a beanie to hide the
bandages, scars and scabs
from cutting himself
shaving.
"I shave every two or
three days now," he said.
"Otherwise I look like a re-
jected Chia Pet."
Also, he has discovered, a
bald head is a magnet for
people wanting to rub it,
which may or may not be a
welcome gesture depend-
ing on whose hands are
doing the rubbing.
"Wear sunscreen,"
Chmura warned for those
considering going hairless.
"I learned that the hard
way"'


GOT A
NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle welcomes
tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the
newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared
to give your name,
phone number, and the
address of the news
event.
Approval for story ideas
must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before
a reporter is assigned.
You can also submit
news tips online via
www.chronicleonline.com.
Just click "Submit news
at the top of the main
page and choose the
type of news you'd like
to submit.


How to shave your head
* After buzzing your head, gather up your shaving
cream and a new razor, preferably one designed for
head shaving yes, there is such a thing and hop
in the shower. Let the hot water soften your scalp and
relax your scalp muscles, then lather up.
* Take a breath, relax, then start making long, smooth
strokes. Experienced shavers say it gets easier and
less bloody and, with practice, should eventually take
two to five minutes every two or three days.


Like Chmura,
County Commis-
sioner Dennis
Damato started to
go bald in his 20s.
"My dad and un-
cles were all bald,
so I knew it was
coming," he said. Br
Damato had the Thc
classic shiny-on-
top, hairy-on-the-sides ton-
sure going on until he
faced cancer surgery on
top of his head in 2007.
That's when he went into
the bathroom and shaved
everything.
"It was great," he said. "If
I knew it would feel this
good, I would've done it in
fifth grade."
His second scalp surgery
required a skin graft taken
from his thigh, so now he
has leg hair growing on top
of his head.
Damato adds a coolness
factor to his baldness by
wearing skull caps to
match his clothing and his
mood.


Although County
Administrator
Brad Thorpe never
resorted to a comb
over to hide his
baldness, when he
was a county com-
missioner in the
rad 1990s he did wear a
irpe very convincing
hairpiece.
He said deciding to come
out of the baldness closet
was a relief.
"Hairpieces are expen-
sive, they're hot and re-
quire a lot of care," he said.
"Shaving your head is so
freeing. Hats fit better -
they're snugger and you get
a better fit, a better seal. I
think being bald is more ac-
ceptable nowadays than it
used to be.
"I am bald," Thorpe said.
"And I am free."

Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


STORE
Continued from Page Al

State Road 44 and U.S. 41. It
fronts on S.R. 44, currently
the site of Welch Cabinets
and Appliances.
It has been referred to at
city council meetings as the
new Publix, but the super-
market chain has refused to
confirm it is building a new
store or relocating the exist-
ing one. The chain has five
stores in Citrus County.
Publix is now located a
short distance away in the
20-acre Inverness Regional
Shopping Center on U.S. 41.
The store is 38,520 square feet,
compared to the proposed
46,013-square-foot store
planned for the new center.
According to the site plan
for the new shopping center,
a small retail space will be
attached to the main store
and a 12,000-square-foot de-
tached retail space. The
center will have 250 parking
spaces.
Getting to the site-planning
stage was a complicated
process for Benderson De-


velopment Co., a national real
estate company that owns
and manages more than 700
properties in 38 states.
Todd Mathes, an agent for
Benderson, explained the
project went to the Inverness
Planning and Zoning Com-
mission inJuly2011, presented
by attorney Clark Stillwell.
Putting the plan together in-
volved negotiations with
several property owners,
Citrus County and the city.
The site required a special
exception from the city, a
variance for signs and for the
city to vacate some streets.
The project had early
support from both the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
and the Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil, with both committing to
work with potential tenants
to help fill the space that will
be vacated if Publix moves.
Lee Alan, real estate man-
ager for Sweetbay Super-
markets, opposed the plan
on traffic and access grounds
in asking the commission to
deny the application. Edward
Silvera, managing member
of Surrey LLC, owner of In-
verness Regional Shopping


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Center, said it opposed the
application.
Commissions voted unan-
imously to recommend the
council approve the appli-
cation. But council approval
took more than year. The
process was delayed be-
cause needed property was
tied up in bankruptcy court.
Later that month the coun-
cil approved the sign vari-
ance. During council discussion
in April 2012, the minutes
show there was concern
about the stability of the re-
maining businesses in the
event of Publix's departure.
Inverness Development Di-
rector Ken Koch said Beall's
Outlet had submitted plans
to improve its store.
Last month, Stillwell said,
a final agreement was
reached with the city of In-
verness and deals were closed
on the other three parcels
needed for the project.
"We haven't scheduled a
date to break ground yet,"
Mathes said. "We are reviewing
site bids now. It could be in
about 30 days in November"
As of Oct. 11, no city build-
ing permits had been issued
for project.


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A10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012



After 50


years,


light


shines


on Cold


War

Associated Press
HAVANA The world
stood at the brink of Ar-
mageddon for 13 days in Oc-
tober 1962 when President
John E Kennedy drew a
symbolic line in the Atlantic
and warned of dire conse-
quences if Soviet Premier
Nikita Khrushchev dared to
cross it.
In the five decades since
the nuclear standoff be-
tween Washington and
Moscow, much of the long-
held conventional wisdom
about the missile crisis has
been knocked down, includ-
ing the common belief that
Kennedy's bold brinksman-
ship ruled the day
On the eve of the 50th an-
niversary of the Cuban mis-
sile crisis, historians now
say it was behind-the-scenes
compromise rather than a
high-stakes game of chicken
that resolved the faceoff,
that both Washington and
Moscow wound up winners
and that the crisis lasted far
longer than 13 days.
Among the common be-
liefs about the Cuban mis-
sile crisis that have been
reevaluated:
CONVENTIONAL WIS-
DOM: The crisis was a tri-
umph of U.S. brinkmanship.
REALITY: Historians say
the resolution of the stand-
off was really a triumph of
backdoor diplomacy
Kennedy resisted pressure
from aides advising that he
cede nothing to Moscow and
even consider a pre-emptive
strike. He instead engaged
in intense behind-the-
scenes diplomacy with the
Soviets, other countries and
the U.N. secretary-general.
Attorney General Robert
E Kennedy met secretly with
the Soviet ambassador on
Oct 27 and conveyed an olive
branch from his brother:
Washington would publicly
reject any invasion of Cuba,
and Khrushchev would
withdraw the missiles from
the island. The real sweet-
ener was that Kennedy
would withdraw Jupiter nu-
clear missiles from U.S. in-
stallations in Turkey, near
the Soviet border.
Nevertheless, the
brinkmanship myth persists,
with President George W
Bush in 2002 citing the missile
crisis as a historical lesson
in fortitude that justified a
preemptive invasion of Iraq.
CONVENTIONAL WIS-
DOM: Washington won, and
Moscow lost
REALITY: The United
States came out a winner,
but so did the Soviet Union.
The Jupiter missiles are
sometimes described as
nearly obsolete, but they
had come online just months
earlier and were fully capable
of striking into the Soviet
Union. Their withdrawal,
along with Kennedy's assur-
ance he would not invade
Cuba, gave Khrushchev
enough to feel he had saved
face and the following day
he announced the imminent
dismantling of offensive
weapons in Cuba.
Soon after, a U.S.-Soviet
presidential hotline was es-
tablished and the two na-
tions initiated discussions
that led to the Limited Test
Ban treaty and ultimately the
nuclear Non-Proliferation
Treaty


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Feds OK plan to ID source of Gulf sheen


Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Federal offi-
cials said late Friday they have ap-
proved a joint plan from BP and
Transocean to identify the source
of a sheen in the Gulf Of Mexico as-
sociated with the 2010 Deepwater
Horizon oil spill.
Officials said in a news release
that the federal on-site coordinator
approved the joint plan on Thurs-
day Coast Guard Capt. Duke
Walker had required the plan, and
federal officials informed BP and


Transocean they might be held re-
sponsible for the costs of identify-
ing the source and the cleanup.
Federal scientists and BP say oil
appears to have leaked last month
from the drilling wreckage lying at
the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico
near where a BP well blew out in
2010, causing the nation's worst off-
shore spill.
A probe started after a sheen was
discovered Sept. 16 in the waters
near the site indicates the oil may
have seeped from a mile-long metal
tube. called the riser, which con-


nected the Deepwater Horizon
drilling rig to the Macondo well.
The plan calls for "satellite ob-
servations and mobilizing remotely
operated vehicles to examine the
original Macondo well area includ-
ing the wreckage, debris and the
riser on the sea floor," according to
the news release.
The Coast Guard will oversee the
remote vehicle mobilization Sunday,
with operations taking place early next
week logistics and weather permitting
The well itself, capped after more
than 200 million gallons of oil spewed,


is not believed to be leaking, offi-
cials said. The oil sheen posed no
environmental threat because it
was a small amount of oil and was
far from land, federal officials said.
The announcement of oil leaking
out comes at a sensitive time as BP
and the Justice Department nego-
tiate terms of a possible settlement
to resolve government's claims against
the oil giant. Several billion dollars
are at stake if the talks produce a
settlement for what likely will be
record-setting civil and criminal
penalties.


Chinese whistleblower punished Nonprofit organizations
are invited to submit


Associated Press
BEIJING A Chinese
man has been ordered to
serve seven days in deten-
tion for posting details on-
line about the case of a
former police chief that
set off a political firestorm
this year, state media re-
ported Saturday
The leaked information
revealed that Wang Lijun,
the former police chief of
the southwest city of
Chongqing, traveled to
Beijing accompanied by
national security officers
in February after leaving
a U.S. Consulate in the
nearby city of Chengdu,
where he had divulged in-


formation that brought
down high-profile politician
Bo Xilai.
The information rebukes
the initial official explana-
tion for Wang's absence
after he left the consulate,
which said he was on vaca-
tion receiving therapeutic
treatments. The leaked de-
tails also offer a glimpse
into how Beijing reacted to
Wang's failed bid at the con-
sulate to defect to the U.S.
The scandal involving Wang
and Bo has rocked China's
top leadership as it pre-
pares for next month's once-
in-a-decade power transition
to the next generation of
leaders.
Citing information from


the local national security
bureau, the state-run
Chengdu Daily newspaper
said an airline worker gave
Wang's personal informa-
tion to a friend. The leaked
information includes the
identification numbers of
Wang and a national secu-
rity officer as well as flight
information, apparently
gleaned from travel docu-
ments. The paper identified
the friend as a hotel em-
ployee whose surname is
Mao and said he posted the
information online.
By doing so, Mao "leaked
national security work secrets
on purpose," the paper said.
It said Mao signed the pa-
perwork accepting the pun-


ishment Friday afternoon
and was led away by na-
tional security personnel.
The airline worker, whom
the newspaper identified
only by the surname Wang,
received a warning, the
Chengdu Daily said.
While in the U.S. Consulate,
Wang Lijun revealed his sus-
picions Bo's wife murdered
a British businessman.
Since then, Bo's wife, Gu
Kailai, has been convicted
and sentenced to death with
a two-year reprieve for the
murder. Wang was sen-
tenced to 15 years in prison
for defection, bribery, abuse
of power and bending the
law for personal gains.


news releases about
upcoming community
events.
* Write the name of the
event, who sponsors it,
when and where it will
take place and other
details.
* Include a contact name
and phone number to
be printed in the paper.
* News releases are sub-
ject to editing.
* Call 563-5660 for
details.
* Multiple publications
cannot be guaranteed.
Submit material at
least two weeks prior to
the event date.


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LOUISE WILLIAMS, OWNER

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Local Art & Art Classes

352-503-7063
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Homosassa
TUESDAY-SATURDAY 8-4



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Value Dental Care a


"The major lesson is the
necessity of compromise
even when faced with a cri-
sis like that," said Robert
Pastor, former national se-
curity adviser for Latin
America under President
Jimmy Carter.
Pastor said he had many
discussions about the crisis
over the years with his late
father-in-law, Robert McNa-
mara, who was Kennedy's
defense secretary Pastor said
domestic politics made it
tough for Kennedy and suc-
cessive presidents to heed
that lesson, as evidenced by
Kennedy's intense efforts to
keep the deal secret.


6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.
Crystal River

352-794-6139


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oct. 15 to 19 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Tuesday: Roasted chicken
withy ripstick, turkey super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, green
beans, warm apple slices, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
mozzarella maxstix, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, peaches, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Chicken
nuggets, ham super salad,
with ripstick, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, baked
French fries, applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken sandwich,
cheese pizza, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, corn pears,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Tuesday: Ham, egg and


cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Tuesday: Fajita chicken
and rice, corn dog, ham super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, Mexi-
cali corn, applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
roasted chicken with ripsticks,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, baked beans, potato tri-
angles, peaches, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese, turkey super salad
with ripstick, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, green
beans, warm apple slices, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
peas, mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast


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Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate break-
fast round, cereal and toast,
grits, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuff, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Tuesday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, turkey
and gravy noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey salad with
wheat roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, corn,
celery, potato roasters,
peaches, cold corn salad,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Turkey wrap,
pizza, chicken alfredo with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, ham salad with
wheat roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, chilled baked

PAID HEALTH ADVERTISEMENT
Horse Liniment
Erases Pain
HIALEAH, FL An ingredient often
used to treat inflammation in racehorse's
legs, is now back on the market in its
original doctor recommended clinical
strength formula.
According to a national drug store
survey, the formula at one time became
so popular that it rose to the top of
pharmacy sales for topical pain relievers.
But the company marketing the product
at the time changed the formula and
sales plummeted. One of the inventors of
the original formula has brought it back
to the market under the trade name
ARTH ARREST and says it can relieve
pain for millions.
ARTH ARREST works by a dual
mechanism whereby one ingredient
relieves pain immediately, while a
second ingredient seeks out and destroys
the pain messenger signal before it can
be sent to the brain. Considered a
medical miracle by some, the ARTH
ARREST formula is useful in the
treatment of painful disorders ranging
from minor aches and pains to more
serious conditions such as arthritis,
bursitis, rheumatism, tendonitis,
backache and more.
ARTH ARREST is available in a
convenient roll-on applicator at
pharmacies without a prescription or call
1-800-339-3301.Now at select:
Wat9e'i9


beans, potato tirangles, juice,
milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey salad with
wheat roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, green
beans, potato roasters, mixed
fruit, cucumbers, celery, juice,
milk.
Friday: Pulled pork barbe-
cue on bun, pizza, spaghetti
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with wheat roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-


rots, cold corn salad, potato
triangles, peas, peaches,
juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Cream of tomato
soup, apple juice, meatloaf
sandwich on whole-grain bun,
ketchup, package of raisins,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter with
bun and mustard, coleslaw,
baked beans with tomato, car-
rot coins, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday cele-
bration: Beef and macaroni
with cheese, green beans, corn
with red pepper, slice Italian
bread with margarine, piece of


yellow cake, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce, herb
mashed potatoes, spinach,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Barbecued pork
riblet, green peas, mashed po-
tatoes, chunky cinnamon ap-
ples, slice whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


BEVERLY HILLS LIQUORS
3898 N. Lecanto Hwy., (Hwy 491) Beverly Hills, FL 34465

(352) 746-7723


VODKA
(1.75 L + tax)
Stravinsky .... ..$12.99
Svedka....................$...18.99
Stoli 800 .....................$29.99

Skyy........................$23.99
Russian Standard......$21.99
Absolute 800..............$29.99
Sobieski 800............... $17.99
Pearl............$...$14.99 + tax


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RUM
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Don Q Rum....$14.99


Admiral Nelson.........$14.99
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Mount Gay.................$19.99
Cruzan...................$.... 18.99
Ron Abuelo...............$18.99
Appleton.................$21.99








Mr. Boston $999
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Pinnacle
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- $3.00 MIR
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WHISKEY
(1.75 L + tax)
LTD................... 13.99 + tax
rebate $3.00 on 1 Btl.
$7.00 on 2 Btl.
Benchmark........$15.99 + tax
$3.00 MIR
$12.99
Jim Beam .................$22.99
Mist/Early Times........$ 17.99
Jameson...................$37.99
MISC
(1.75 L + tax)
Kahlua.....................$29.99
St. Brendan's............$19.99
E&J Brandy.........$...$18.99

WINE
Barefoot .........1.5L $9.99
Beringer White Zin.....1.5L $9.99
Carlo Rossi ...........3L $11.99
Gallo Family ........1.5L $6.99
Riunite ................1.5 $8.99
Frontera ..............1.5 $8.99
Woodbridge ......1.5 $10.99
Corbett Canyon ....3L $11.99


Canadian


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Club ................1.75L $17.99
Southern
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Jack Daniels .....1.75L $31.99
Canadian
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thank-you LETTERS


Friends of books
Thank you Citrus County!
Once again you have shown
your love of books and read-
ing as well as recognition of
great bargains. Your sup-
port of the Friends of Citrus
County Library System and
our libraries was fantastic.
In the recently completed
fall book sale you turned
out to shop the many quality
books, CDs, DVDs, puzzles
and games at discount
prices. Thousands of book
lovers attended the five-day
sale, scooping up the beau-
tiful Faerieland selections
and most of the other 80,000
items on display The fall
fundraiser brought
$47,143.03 to our libraries
and the Citrus County Sys-
tem. Our grand total since
FOCCLS began in fall 2001
is now $708,557 well over
half a million dollars.
With the budget con-
straints on all services and
the even greater use of the
libraries, these figures are
particularly significant
This money has enabled the
libraries to provide new
books and other materials
requested by patrons to add
even more to our libraries'
importance and satisfaction
in the community
In addition to helping our
libraries, the Central Ridge,
Coastal Region and Lakes
Region Friends partners
again collected donations
for the Dolly Parton Imagi-
nation Library project
which provides a book a
month for children from
birth to age 5. Our cus-
tomers contributed $370 to
help defray expenses of
$30-a-year per child for
postage to continue the de-
livery of these great books.
As a direct result, 10 chil-
dren on the waiting list will
receive their books.
Our sales are huge under-
takings, and we owe their
success to many community
organizations. We are very
grateful to the many indi-
viduals and groups who
helped to make the fall sale
another triumph.
The Citrus County Chron-
icle, as in the past, has been
a great co-sponsor of the
semi-annual event We es-
pecially appreciate the help
from Deb Kamlot, the staff
of the community and news
departments including Edi-
tor Mike Arnold, reporters
Eryn Worthington and Matt
Beck, and editors of the
weeklies as well as the ship-
ping department for use of
the truck and driver.
Thank you to Steve
Sachewicz and Quest
Wealth Management for do-
nating a laptop computer to
raffle and for underwriting
refreshments for our volun-
teers. His contributions
were responsible for more
than $1,070 of our total.
We also thank WYKE-TV
for its continued support;
the staff of the Citrus
County Auditorium and
Parks and Recreation for
their friendliness and assis-
tance; the many energetic
Rotarians of Inverness for
setting up more than 100 ta-
bles; the Citrus High School
Air Force JROTC students
for distributing 1,140 jam-
packed banana boxes in set-
up and for after sale
clean-up; the Inverness
Wal-Mart Supercenter for
banana boxes and the Crys-
tal River Publix and Crystal
River Sweetbay for supply-
ing plastic bags; and Sue
and Tom Smith of Maja
Signs & Designs for provid-
ing our bright yellow flags
and updating our banner.
Many thanks as well to the
entire library staff and our
faithful courier, Lee Seag-
reaves, for their help in col-
lection and delivery of
donated materials.
The success of these
fundraisers also depends
on the hard work and devo-
tion of the FOCCLS volun-
teers. To the 135 Friends
who worked this sale, many
thanks for your energy and
enthusiasm. Finally, and


most importantly, we salute
the people of Citrus County
who make these events pos-
sible by their contributions
of quality books and by
their patronage of the sales.
We couldn't succeed with-
out you!
FOCCLS accepts your do-
nations year-round. Volun-
teers are now at work
sorting, pricing and packing
boxes for our next sale,
March 8 through 12, at the
Citrus County Auditorium.


Please read-return-recycle.
Drop off your gently used
books, games, puzzles, CDs
and DVDs at the checkout
desks of Central Ridge,
Coastal or Lakes Region li-
braries. We look forward to
seeing you in the Spring!
Sue Haderer, president
Friends of the Citrus County
Library System
Hernando

Service funds
The Cornerstone Baptist
Student Ministry would like
to thank the following busi-
nesses for sponsoring the
fourth annual "Send Them
to Serve" golf tournament
The money raised is used
to send students on mission
trips and camps. The CBC
Student ministries tries to
do everything we can to en-
courage students "love their
neighbor" The funds raised
will be used to not only im-
pact the lives of our CBC
students, but also the lives
of people throughout the
world. We encourage all
members of our local com-
munity to please support
these community minded
businesses.
CORPORATE SPON-
SORS: Bob Riddell Enter-
prise, Citrus County
Chronicle, McCann & Baird
Flooring-Apollo Beach,
Fla., and Nick Nicholas
Ford Inverness, Crystal
River
HOLE SPONSORS: Ace
Hardware, Air Mechanical
& Services Corporation, An-
gelotti's Restaurant, Auto-
mated Building Co., Babb
H. Adams, Jr LLC, Center
State Bank of Inverness,
Central Florida Electric of
Ocala, Charles Davis Fu-
neral Home, Chuck
Everidge State Farm Insur-
ance of Inverness, Collision
Tech, CR Harley Davidson,
Daisy Cakes, Dash Trans-
port, David Rom State Farm
Insurance of Inverness, The
Ice Cream Doctor of down-
town Inverness, Insulating


I


Coating of Inverness, JAJR
LLC, Joe's Deli of Inver-
ness, Lamphier & Company
of Sanford, Mid State Glass
of Inverness, Mitch Duncan
Plumbing of Inverness,
Papa J's Restaurant of In-
verness, Russell Adams Re-
alty of Land O'Lakes, Sam
Himmel of Citrus County
Superintendent of Schools,
Suncoast Dermatology of
Lecanto, Van Allen Insur-
ance of Inverness, Door
Prizes Donated, Advanced
Discount Auto of Inverness,
Angelotti's Restaurant of In-
verness, Army Recruiters,
AutoZone, Bob's Car Care of
Inverness, Citrus Chiro-


practice, City Tire of Inver-
ness, East Cove Auto,
Golden Corral of Inverness,
The Lake House B & B of
Inverness, McClouds Bistro,
New Concepts, Ridgeline
Tire & Service, Sweet Bay
of Inverness, Whalen Jewel-
ers, Golf Donated, Citrus
Hills Golf& Country Club,
Plantation Inn Golf Course,
Twisted Oaks Golf& Coun-
try Club, Lakeside Golf &
Country Club, Citrus
Springs Golf & Country
Club, Point O' Woods Golf &
Country Club, Inverness
Golf & Country Club and
Brooksville Golf & Country
Club.


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to pick up your
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St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church
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A12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


OPINION


I


oll





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Endorsement LETTERS


Webb will trim fat
Winn Webb demonstrated
his sincere desire to trim
the county's budget by elim-
inating an unnecessary re-
quest for funding that
duplicates services cur-
rently being performed.
As a case in point, the
BOCC was asked to approve
a request for $23,000 as
matching funding to con-
tinue the Small Business
Development Center (SBDC)
activities in Citrus County.
Winn cast the deciding vote
to reject the request
His negative vote was not
popular with many citizens,
who do not understand the
proposed services offered
by the SBDC is a redundant
program currently pro-
vided by Dr Herzog and
the highly qualified profes-
sionals of SCORE.
He was fully aware his
deciding vote might affect
his candidacy for sheriff,
but this is Winn Webb. If
elected, you can expect the
same efforts to stop waste
by unnecessary expendi-
tures.
Jimmy White
Homosassa

High standards
When we think of those
in law enforcement, per-
sonal integrity, strength of
character, high principles
and moral conviction are
what we look for.
Winn Webb provides a
high standard of the exam-
ples we desire and expect
from those who take an
oath to protect us. His lead-
ership style is of a humble
servant, good listener, car-
ing friend and dedicated
official.
True to his elected posi-
tion and true to his family,
Winn Webb is a man who
can be counted on to act as
he speaks and believes.
When wrong, he admits it.
When right, he takes time
to explain it. His impartial-
ity to all the citizens of his
native Citrus County is re-
freshing.
The time is now to elect a
new sheriff in Citrus


County. Winn Webb has our
vote.
MaryAnn Fulkerson
Floral City

Compassionate
We are three senior citi-
zen ladies who wish to lend
our endorsement and sup-
port of Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
in his campaign to continue
as our sheriff for another
term.
We have lived in and
loved "our" Citrus County
for a collective total of
more than 125 years. We
are personally acquainted
with Jeff Dawsy and his
family and extended family
Jeff has served Citrus
County with his integrity
and knowledge since he was
first elected. We know he
will continue to serve and
represent Citrus County
when he is re-elected.
We have known Sheriff
Dawsy to be honest as well
as compassionate while re-
maining tough on crime,
criminals and all aspects of
activities detrimental to
the well-being of our
county His experience and
immaculate record as a
proven leader mean we cit-
izens will continue to feel
safe and well-protected in
our homes, our places of
employment and even
while enjoying our recre-
ational endeavors.
Please join us in our
votes for Sheriff Dawsy
There is an old saying
which reads, "If it ain't
broke, don't try to fix it."
Apologies for the bad Eng-
lish, however the sheriff's
office is not broken -
there is no need for
"fixin'."
Judith (Hodgkins) Casper
Rosemary (Richey)
Branham
Lona (Sottrel) Prevatt
Crystal River

Impressive person
I first met Jeff Dawsy in
1972 when I became en-
gaged to his cousin, Tom. I
clearly remember how im-
pressed I was with his
character and the maturity


ENDORSEMENT GUIDELINES
* The Chronicle has enacted its practice of asking that
endorsement letters be limited to the reasons writers
are supporting candidates not why they won't sup-
port candidates.
SUBMITTING LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express their opin-
ions in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and include a phone num-
ber and hometown, including letters sent via email.
Phone numbers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fair-
ness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers
will be limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-
3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com.


he displayed for such a
young man.
Even now, 40 years later,
I continue to be impressed
with him not only as a lov-
ing and devoted member of
our family, but an outstand-
ing sheriff whose charac-
ter, qualifications and
dedication are all beyond
reproach.
Jeff has devoted his life to
serving others, which is evi-
dent by his service in the Air
Force and his more than 25
years as a criminal justice
professional. He regards
being sheriff as a once-in-a-
lifetime opportunity to bet-
ter serve his community
He always has the best
interests and concerns of
Citrus County citizens up-
permost in his mind. His
intense commitment to en-
sure public safety has re-
sulted in Citrus County
becoming one of the safest
counties, with populations
more than 100,000, in
Florida.
Sheriff Dawsy possesses
the experience, the skills to
lead, the passion for serv-
ice and the personality to
get things done that the of-
fice of sheriff requires. Jeff
is a proven leader with a vi-
sion for our future who is
not afraid to make tough
decisions in these challeng-
ing times. His knowledge of
the sheriff's office and the


duties the sheriff must per-
form is second to none.
As sheriff, Jeff has devel-
oped several outstanding
and award-winning pro-
grams. As a mother and
grandmother, I'm most im-
pressed with the programs
he's developed that ad-
dress the concerns we all
share for the children of
Citrus County. Such pro-
grams as Jessie's Place (a
child advocacy center), the
Internet Crimes Against
Children Unit, the Child
Protective Investigations
Unit and the Sexual/Preda-
tor Unit are making our
county a safer place for
children.
I strongly encourage the
voters of Citrus County to
re-elect Sheriff Jeff Dawsy,
recipient of the 2011 Na-
tional Law Officer of the
Year Award.
Vicky Kane
Pine Ridge

Right choice
There couldn't be a bet-
ter time to vote Nancy Ar-
genziano back into office.
With the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District giving away our
water to companies that
will capitalize on it after
sending it into other coun-
ties, we need a representa-


tive who has experience
and success at protecting
our water rights.
Nancy's dedication to the
people of Florida is evi-
dent in the legislation she
has sponsored and sup-
ported. "Local sources
first," "Kidcare," "Silver
Savers prescription drug
program," "Assisted care
community protections,"
"Florida Efficient Govern-
ment Act," and so on are
bills she has written. Her
laws protect the vulnerable
in Florida children, eld-
erly and resources.
After sponsoring 208 bills
to protect Florida's citizens
and their water, it is evi-
dent that Nancy is a dedi-
cated and a hard worker.
We need her now more
than ever.
Roger Dobronyi
Inverness

Best choice
The election for sheriff
of Citrus County should be
of concern to all citizens of
Citrus County, because the
safety of the community de-
pends on the performance
of Sheriff Dawsy and his
department.
The incumbent, Sheriff
Dawsy, has proven he is a
person of exceptional char-
acter and integrity who is
fully qualified to manage
an organization of well-
trained personnel, whose
performances allow citi-


zens to reside in a safe
community.
Sheriff Dawsy is not only
a highly skilled law en-
forcement official, but a
person who has demon-
strated he cares about the
community, as evidenced
by his many charitable ac-
tivities that benefit less for-
tunate citizens.
Being a person with
more than 30 years of law
enforcement and security
management experience, I
recognize and appreciate
the demonstrated ability of
Sheriff Dawsy to manage a
large complex organiza-
tion, where occasional mis-
takes or errors may occur,
but are promptly and effec-
tively corrected in a trans-
parent manner that
precludes any hint of dis-
honesty or corruption.
The opponent of Sheriff
Dawsy clearly does not
possess law enforcement
supervisory or manage-
ment experience or any
proven ability to manage a
high-tech, multifaceted or-
ganization. The lack of
these necessary qualifica-
tions would endanger pub-
lic safety.
Residents of Citrus
County should support and
re-elect Sheriff Dawsy be-
cause, not only is he the
best choice, but it will be a
vote for their own safety
and security.
Byron Marshall
Crystal River


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OPINION


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 A13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Endorsement LETTERS


Crime deterrent
Vote Jeff Dawsy for Citrus
County sheriff on Nov 6!
Being a local business
owner for the past 37 years
in Citrus County, crime pre-
vention is very important to
me. For the past 15 years,
Jeff Dawsy has fulfilled his
responsibilities as sheriff
in all aspects. Although
crime cannot be com-
pletely eliminated, Citrus
County crime statistics
from the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement
year after year have re-
ported a decrease under
Sheriff Dawsy's leadership.
Local businesses and cit-
izens are encouraged to as-
sist the sheriff's office in
deterring crime by using
good practices in securing
doors and windows, having
adequate lighting around
your building and various
other tips the sheriff's of-
fice offers with a residen-
tial or commercial security
survey service.
The Community Oriented
Policing and Public Safety
Officer programs partner
volunteers to help keep
eyes on the community to
help prevent crime. Patrol
deputies routinely check
on the businesses after
hours along with the sher-
iff's office aviation unit that
patrols the county nightly
to deter crime.
Being a part-time deputy
for the sheriff's office for
many years I know first-
hand the presence of the
helicopter assists in pre-
venting crime, gives backup
support to road patrol offi-


cers, along with helping find
an elder with Alzheimer's or
dementia or a child who has
wandered from their safe
environment
Sheriff Dawsy proac-
tively implements the pro-
cedures and provides the
necessary equipment to
protect public safety and
prevent crime. We need to
keep Jeff Dawsy as sheriff
I encourage you to join me
on Nov 6 and vote for Jeff
Dawsy
Dave Warren
Crystal River

Proactive
I am writing this letter in
support of Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy I have been a resi-
dent of Citrus County for 11
years. I have traveled to
many places in the country
and have witnessed and
read the serious crimes in
those places, as opposed to
the crime in Citrus County
We are lucky to have a
sheriff who cares about the
people in this county He
has done an admirable job
of keeping the crime low. I
feel very safe living in Cit-
rus County.
I have talked to a lot of
my friends/neighbors, who
have moved to Citrus
County over the years from
different states. They tell
me the extent of the crime
and how helpless/scared
they felt living there.
He is so involved in the
community and had started
so many programs like: Cit-
izens Academy, Public
Safety Program, Sexual Of-


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ENDORSEMENT GUIDELINES
* Endorsement letters are subject to editing to keep the
emphasis on reasons for support vs. criticism of their
opponents.


fender/Predator Unit, In-
ternet Crimes Against Chil-
dren Unit, Victims
Advocacy Program, Com-
munity Oriented Program,
Public Safety Officers Pro-
gram, Seniors Against
Crime Program, Safety
Town, a place to teach kids
safety, and Jessie's Place, a
service center dedicated to
helping children who have
experienced abuse or
neglect.
I would encourage the
citizens of this county to
vote for Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
in order to keep Citrus
County safe, so not only
those who live here con-
tinue to do so, but become a
focal point for people from
other states to move here.
Carol Pecar
Inverness

Inspiring
It is indeed our pleasure
to endorse Sam Himmel to
continue as our Citrus
County superintendent of
schools.
We have known Sam
since she was a little girl -
she has always been a posi-
tive inspiration in anything
she aspires to accomplish
- faith, family, friends and
career
We have grandchildren
in the Citrus County School
System and are always so
proud of the accomplish-


ments they have been able
to achieve within a supe-
rior school system.
We are so proud to tell
others of our school system,
which has continued to im-
prove under the leadership
of Sam Himmel she al-
ways has the children's
welfare and education in
the forefront of her mind.
Sam always responds to
concerns and makes in-
formed decisions. Again,
the students come first.
We feel her leadership is
outstanding and encourage
you to vote for Sam Him-
mel on Nov 6 for Citrus
County superintendent of
schools. You won't be
disappointed.
Albert and Marilyn Jordan
Inverness

Guts over glory
A brief background. I was
born decades ago in Boston
City Hospital Irish her-
itage and, of course,
Catholic. I served 20-plus
years in the Army, includ-
ing three deployments. A
second career lasted 23
years as a member of the
media.
During all the time I was
eligible to vote I have had
my grandfather rolling over
in his grave, because I have
voted Republican and In-
dependent in addition to
Democrat.


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During 17 years in Crys-
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tered as NPA (no political
affiliation). Recently, I have
tried to digest the facts in
your, and others, election
information publications -
not the trash put out by
special-interest parties.
From the first time I
heard and observed Nancy
Argenziano, I felt she was
working for me. In her pres-
ent position, I feel the same
way She has more shall I
say "guts" than most of
her neutered contempo-
raries (a bunch of lemmings
from both parties).
She has my interests -
and that of her public -
uppermost, I feel.
Do yourselves a favor -
bring back Nancy
Argenziano!
W.L. Pickett
Crystal River

Interests at hear
I plan to vote for Nancy
Argenziano to represent
Citrus County in the
Florida House on Election
Day She has proven in
both words and actions that
she has the best interests of
the citizens of this county
front and center
This past week I brought
into my home a mailing full
of lies and innuendo about
Ms. Argenziano. If you read
these mailers, you would


*swam


think Nancy spent her time
in North Carolina fiddling
while Citrus County
burned, calling in only to
check on the progress of
the fire. Or you might be-
lieve she moved to Talla-
hassee because she
couldn't stand Citrus
County one more minute. If
you read only this, you
wouldn't know she moved
to Tallahassee because it's
somewhat untenable to
commute every day to her
job there when she was ap-
pointed to the Public Serv-
ice Commission.
Nancy Argenziano can't
buy this election she
doesn't have the money
The special interests and
lobbyists seem to have very
substantial funds at their
disposal and a belief the
people of Citrus County are
too dumb to recognize de-
ception and condescension
when they see it.
Nancy has been en-
dorsed by union workers,
firefighters, state troopers,
law enforcement officers,
healthcare and public serv-
ice workers, the Florida
Education Association -
the list goes on. These are
the people who make a dif-
ference in our everyday
lives and they have all en-
dorsed (Nancy Argenziano).
I urge you to join them.
Maria Weiser
Hernando


-DECISION


12012


Before You Vote


ass'


THE RACE FOR U.S. SENATE
Florida voters face an important decision in the race for U.S. Senate. Read
continuing coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debate to
learn more about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter
the most to you. For more information visit www.beforeyonvote.org.

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A14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


OPINION


Bu F% .,u





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Endorsement LETTERS


Controlling costs
I must interject my opin-
ion again and address the
comments published con-
cerning the race for sheriff.
One of my neighbors said if
it's not broke, don't fix it. I
agree with this but for one
exception.
A 16-year-old car needs
more maintenance and is
less dependable than a
new one. If a new model
can be had for less money,
it makes sense to replace it.
When we as taxpayers
have to pay for things such
as armored cars or high-end
automobiles for the top ech-
elon of any department, we
are not really more safe, we
are just paying more for
less deputies on the ground.
My friend Winn Webb


walked the streets under
three different sheriffs
with a total of 17 1/2 years
without a verbal or written
reprimand. His winning
way and pleasant personal-
ity won the hearts of many
of the people he came in
contact with. He knew he
worked for the people and
was under the management
of the sheriff.
The sheriff works for the
people, too, and must be
diligent with their money
Winn Webb was enticed
by his friends to run for
county commissioner so a
conservative voice would
bring spending under con-
trol. Within the four years
Winn served on the BOCC,
the cost of government was
reduced almost $50 million.
Some say he did not do it


alone, and this would be
true, because he worked
with the like-minded to
reach a goal.
Winn would work with the
team he puts together to
find ways to bring costs
under control. Well-trained
deputies know where the
waste is. In an effort to im-
prove their lot in life and
their safety, they will make
things known to their sheriff
if they believe he will listen.
Winn Webb is a good
judge of character and in
my opinion is a man of the
highest character himself. I
ask level-headed conserva-
tives join with me to elect
Winn Webb our Republican
candidate as our sheriff.
Fred Daniels
Floral City


Taking care
I want to start out by say-
ing my husband and I met
Winn Webb and his wife
while attending an Ameri-
can Legion Honor Guard
dinner I sat next to Mrs.
Webb and we started talking
and both of them were so
nice and down-to-Earth
people. I said my husband
and I would like to help
campaign for Winn to be
sheriff.
You see, we have lived in
our home for 27 years and I
am very disappointed in
how bad our neighborhood
has gotten in Homosassa. I
read in the paper two to
three times a week about
various problems in a two-
block radius of our home all
around us, and this is scary


We love our h
plan to be burie
So we don't wan
anywhere else.
want to be safe,
like if Winn Wel
elected, he wou
of our sheriff's
keeping all of u
It's really an
meet good peop
truly care about
County resident


Experience


ome and keep him in office to con-
Ad close by tinue the very best service
it to move available. Sheriff Dawsy
We just his sworn officers and civil-
and I feel ian employees take their
bb gets duties seriously and all are
ld take care professionals whom we cit-
department, izens deserve to have car-
s safe. trying out the duties of
honor to public protection.
)le who Forget politics. It doesn't
t Citrus matter at all when it comes
ts. to public safety, as no politi-
Mary White cal party will save your life.
Homosassa The people in law enforce-
ment uphold and carry out
e counts our laws; they are the ones
who protect all of us.


Of course, I'm voting for
Sheriff Jeffrey Dawsy!
We all want the best qual-
ified and experienced per-
son as sheriff of Citrus
County. Sheriff Jeffrey
Dawsy is the man. We must


Continue to be safe. Keep
Sheriff Jeffrey Dawsy on
the job! Vote Jeffrey Dawsy
for Citrus County Sheriff!
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OPINION


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 A15














NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WorldBRIEFS

Remnants


Associated Press
Afghan children jump from
a destroyed car left on the
side of a road Oct. 12
in the outskirts of Kabul,
Afghanistan.


Egyptian standoff
comes to end
CAIRO Egypt's top

Reached an
agreement
egui with the
ahmoud country's
president to
keep his job
Saturday
despite ear-
Abdel- lier at-
Meguld tempts to
Mahmoudown last
him, ending a standoff that
had prompted accusations of
interference in judicial affairs.
President Mohammed
Morsi had ordered Prosecutor
General Abdel-Meguid Mah-
moud to step down last
Thursday in an apparent bid
to appease public anger over
the acquittals of ex-regime of-
ficials accused of orchestrat-
ing violence against
protesters last year.
Turkish premier
slams Council
ISTANBUL- Turkey's
prime minister sharply criti-
cized the U.N. Security Coun-
cil on Saturday for its failure
to agree on decisive steps to
end Syria's civil war, as
NATO ally Germany backed
the Turkish interception of a
Damascus-bound passenger
jet earlier in the week.
Recep Tayyip Erdogan told
an international conference in
Istanbul the world was wit-
nessing a humanitarian
tragedy in Syria.
Russia and China, two of
the five permanent Security
Council members, have ve-
toed resolutions seeking to put
concerted pressure on Dam-
ascus to end the conflict and
agree to a political transition.
Bomb kills 17
people in Pakistan
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -
A car bomb tore through a
crowded bazaar outside an
office for anti-Taliban tribal
elders Saturday in northwest-
ern Pakistan, killing at least
17 people, officials said.
The blast in the town of
Darra Adam Khel was the lat-
est to strike the troubled area
near the Afghan border, show-
ing militants still pose a threat
to the stability of key U.S. ally
Pakistan despite government
offensives against the Taliban
and their supporters.
No group immediately
claimed responsibility, but the
Pakistani Taliban have staged
similar attacks in the tribal re-
gion of Darra Adam Khel to
punish elders for backing se-
curity forces in offensives
against militants.
Iran: Ready for
nuclear flexibility
TEHRAN, Iran Iran is
ready to show flexibility at nu-
clear talks to ease Western
concerns over its contentious
nuclear program, its foreign
ministry spokesman said Sat-
urday, as tensions rise in the
standoff between the Islamic
Republic, Israel and the West.
The remarks by Ramin
Mehmanparast, published by
the official IRNA news
agency, underscore Tehran's
push to resume talks with
world powers as Western
sanctions squeeze the econ-
omy tighter and the European
Union weighs a boycott of
Iranian natural gas.
-From wire reports


Race tightens as second debate nears


Nov. 6 election only

three weeks away
Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. It's
either candidate's race to win as
President Barack Obama and Mitt
Romney prepare for their second
debate Tuesday night, with three
weeks to go until the election and
voting under way in many states.
The Republican challenger had
trailed the Democratic incumbent
in national polls for weeks, but now
has drawn even, benefiting from a
boost of enthusiasm following a
strong first debate performance 10
days ago. While Romney's standing
has improved in some states,


Obama retains an
edge in the hunt for
the 270 electoral
votes needed to
take the White
House. The presi-
dent also has far
more ways than
Romney to reach Barak
that magic number Obama
But that's not
enough to calm nervous Democrats,
even as they revel in Vice President
Joe Biden's pull-no-punches turn on
the debate stage Thursday night
against GOP vice presidential nom-
inee Paul Ryan. They are looking for
an equally aggressive Obama to
show up for the prime-time town-
hall style debate in Hempstead, N.Y
"The race is tightening," said Mo
Elleithee, a Democratic campaign


strategist and former
aide to Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton during
t her primary cam-
paign against Obama
in 2008. "It will be
very, very close." But,
he added, "The pres-
Mitt ident will win re-
Romney election."
Steve Schmidt,
the chief Republican strategist four
years ago for GOP nominee John Mc-
Cain, acknowledged Obama's edge
but said it could be erased if the
president comes off as defensive or
dismissive in the second debate as
he did in the first
"If he has another debate per-
formance anywhere near that vicin-
ity, it's going to go south for him,"
Schmidt said.


Dressing the part


Associated Press
Marine Corps veteran Tim Hudak of Alexandria, Va., center, is handed a jacket by store manager Kim Cleverdon,
right, during a fitting for a new suit provided by Brooks Brothers on Sept. 20, in West Hartford, Conn. Hudak is
participating in the University of Connecticut's Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities.


Returning vets

swell ranks of US

entrepreneurs
Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn. -As a truck
driver for the U.S. military in
wartime Iraq, Ed Young racked up
7,000 miles, facing a constant threat
of attack that left him struggling with
depression and suicidal thoughts.
Four years later, he is driving long
hauls again, but now in the U.S. as
one of a growing number of veter-
ans turning entrepreneur The Navy
veteran who had seen his post-war
life spiraling out of control said his
Connecticut-based car transporta-
tion business has helped put him on
the road to recovery
Young received training to run
his enterprise through a program
for disabled veterans at the Univer-
sity of Connecticut, one of many ef-
forts emerging nationwide to help
returning service members start
small businesses.
"The biggest thing I got out of it
was, no matter what, don't give up
on your idea," said Young, 26. "Ba-
sically it's like in the military Just
accomplish the mission. That is
your job, to accomplish your mis-
sion, no matter what."


Marine Corps veteran Jared Luce of Coventry, Conn., right, is fitted
with a new suit by assistant store manager Kathy Bartosiak.
Army Reservist Tiffany Mellers of Bridgeport, Conn., right, poses for staff at
a Brooks Brothers store while being fitted for a new suit as Air Force
veteran Janette Blackmore of Maryland, left, watches.


More than 200,000 people are dis-
charged from the U.S. military each
year, and advocates say they often
possess qualities that make good en-
trepreneurs: resourcefulness, a
taste for risk-taking and a can-do at-
titude. Nonprofit groups, state gov-
ernments and U.S. agencies are
providing business training aimed
at giving them new purpose and eas-
ing their transition to civilian life.
Already, veterans are well-
represented in the entrepreneurial
ranks. Nearly one in 10 small busi-
nesses are veteran-owned, and re-
tired service members are at least
45 percent more likely than those
without active-duty military experi-
ence to be self-employed, according
to the U.S. Small Business Adminis-
tration. As troops return from Iraq
and Afghanistan, some see an op-
portunity not only to help them find
work, but for veteran entrepreneurs
to provide a jolt to the U.S. economy
"We think this is an opportunity
where we're going to have a lot of
veterans who have the right skills to
be entrepreneurs," said RhettJepp-
son, associate administrator for vet-
erans' business development at the


SBA. "We can help prepare them for
the opportunities out there."
Unlike GIs who played a famed
role in growing the U.S. economy
after World War II, however, this gen-
eration is returning to the worst eco-
nomic slump since the depression.
Young, who graduated last year
from the Entrepreneurship Boot-
camp for Veterans with Disabilities
at UConn, had to apply to 10 banks
before landing a $24,000 loan to buy
a truck and start his business, Black
Knight Services. After completing
more than $75,000 in sales in the
first six months of the year, he said
he is looking to buy more trucks, but
for now he operates out of his apart-
ment in Milford, Conn., when not on
the road.
"It has its ups and downs, but I
love it 100 percent," he said. "Un-
fortunately, I really can't stand peo-
ple that much. At least I'm just by
myself and with my thoughts."
It's been a dramatic turnaround
for Young, who began drinking
heavily after returning from Iraq in
2009. He hit bottom when he was ar-
rested in 2010 for threatening to
hurt his two young children.


Last week's feisty confrontation
between Biden and Ryan set the
stage for Tuesday's presidential de-
bate and gave Republicans an open-
ing to intensify their criticism about
Obama's foreign policy Romney has
jumped on Biden's assertion "we
weren't told" of an official request
for more security at a consulate in
Libya that was attacked by terrorists
who killed the U.S. ambassador The
White House spent Friday trying to
explain what Biden meant.
Expect the issue to arise Tuesday
As the debate looms large as one
of the final opportunities to affect
the trajectory of the race, both cam-
paigns are working feverishly in the
nine most competitive states Col-
orado, Florida, Iowa, Nevada, New
Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio,
Virginia and Wisconsin.


Muslim


leader


sparks


criticism

Brotherhood's

statements

condemned
Associated Press
CAIRO A fiery tirade
against Jews by the Egypt-
ian Muslim Brotherhood's
leader highlights one of
the foremost diplomatic
challenges facing the
country's new Islamist
President Mohammed
as he
balances
popular
sentiment
with the
need for
security
relations
with Israel. Mohammed
T h e Badie
Brother- said Jews were
h o o d' s spreading
supreme corruption.
leader
Mohammed Badie called
on Muslims worldwide
this week to defend
Jerusalem, saying "Zion-
ists only know the way of
force." He said Jews were
spreading "corruption,"
had slaughtered Muslims
and desecrated holy sites.
Badie's condemnation
went well beyond the
harsh criticism of Israel
and its policies common in
Egypt, opening even
greater friction between
the country's most power-
ful political group and its
Jewish neighbor And it
will put more pressure on
Morsi, who ran for presi-
dent as a Brotherhood
candidate, to take a more
assertive role than his
predecessor had in the Is-
raeli-Palestinian conflict.
Morsi made no public
comments about Badie's
remarks, the strongest
criticism against Israel
since Morsi took office in
June. His spokesman,
Yasser Ali, did not imme-
diately respond to phone
calls seeking comment.
Eli Shaked, a former Is-
raeli ambassador to Egypt,
said the Brotherhood's
statement was aimed at de-
flecting attention from
Morsi's troubles in his first
100 days in office, from fuel
shortages to mounting piles
of garbage on the streets.
"Every time there is do-
mestic tension in the new
Egypt, Israel and the Jews
will be targeted and every
time the Egyptian street is
tense or protests, the Mus-
lim Brotherhood will
bring the anti-Semitic
genie out of the bottle," he
said Saturday
Israel has increasingly
become worried about the
ascendance of the for-
merly repressed Brother-
hood to power after last
year's ouster of Hosni
Mubarak, who was often
pictured warmly greeting
Israeli officials in Cairo.










EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes
can be found on
Page A19 of
today's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


all /olia


-: i-:- 'I 1 -.,lne Chronicle
This week's Fall Foliage photo
contest winner was submitted
by online user "Fundy." Autumn
splendor is represented by
Middle Falls in Letchworth
State Park, N.Y. Go to
www.chronicleonline/fallfoliage
and upload your photos each
week. We will select the best
photos on Thursday from the
top vote-getters and publish
them in Sunday's newspaper
each week. You will not need to
resubmit the same photo each
week: we will consider all
photos submitted for the month
at the end of each week.
Photos should not have been
taken before September 2011.
Make sure you have permission
to use the photos if you are not
the original photographer.


Gut-busting food, bacon-flavored lemonade, baboons






What more could you want in a fa


CHUCK BARTELS
Associated Press
LITTLE ROCK, Ark.
Fried Kool-Aid on a stick,
livestock shows, carnival
games and a troupe of
performing baboons await
patrons of the Arkansas State Fair,
organizers said of the annual
event, which opened Friday.

For the first time in more than a decade, the Lit-
tle Rock fairgrounds will feature a roller coaster
among its spinning and twisting rides sure to be
a challenge to keep all that fair food from reap-
pearing. Who would want to lose a roast beef
sundae?
Fair director Ralph Shoptaw said one culinary
innovation offered this year is Oreos, funnel cakes
and Kool-Aid, all deep-fried and on a stick.
But fear not, unadventurous eaters: "We have the
traditional stuff, too corn dogs and pineapple
whip ice cream," Shoptaw said.
More than 400,000 people are expected to attend
the fair during its run through Oct. 21. The fair
opens daily at 11 a.m.
Jim Youker of Raleigh, N.C., will sell quart tum-
blers of regular and flavored lemonade, including
bacon, a recipe he said took a while to perfect.
Youker said he tried infusing simple syrup with
his own bacon flavoring but the quality was incon-
sistent. Youker somehow found a commercial sup-
plier of the flavoring, and the drink was born.
"You only need half a squirt," he said as he of-


Associated Press
Toy plush animals sit on the midway Thursday at the
Arkansas State Fairgrounds in Little Rock, Ark. The fair
is scheduled to run through Oct. 21.


fered samples during a fair preview. The smoky
flavor lingers, but refills for those with a taste for it
are $4, a dollar cheaper than the first quart.
Food and fast-moving rides aren't the only attrac-
tions. The baboon act, Wild About Monkeys, will
have three shows daily, alternating with pig races
and Welde's Big Bear Show, which features per-
forming grizzly bears.
Shoptaw said there are about 7,000 animals en-
tered in an array of blue-ribbon competitions with
between 3,500 and 4,000 exhibitors. In the barns,
patrons can find cattle, sheep, pigs, horses, rabbits,
chickens and goats. There are also about 4,000
entries in the arts and crafts divisions.
Fair admission includes nightly entertainment
that ranges from country performers to a Pink
Floyd tribute band and classic rock acts. Daily ad-
mission is $8 for adults, $4 for children; ride
coupons cost extra. Tickets for professional bull
riding at Barton Coliseum on Oct. 19 and 20
start at $10.
The fair also has two museums, one devoted to
the fair itself and one on rock 'n' roll music, which
features memorabilia from acts from years past.
Shoptaw said state police and Little Rock police
will provide security on the grounds, with Pulaski
County Sheriff's deputies patrolling on horseback.
New this year, 34 Little Rock police officers will
be on foot patrol in the neighborhoods around the
fairgrounds, as residents have complained about
car break-ins and other crime in the past.
Fair organizers had sought to move to new
grounds, scoping out sites near Jacksonville and
Cabot. But in June, they accepted a $3 million offer
from Little Rock to keep the fair on about 100
acres in the central part of the city, where the fair
has operated since the 1940s.
Under the new plan, the grounds could double in
size and add parking in the years ahead.


Birthday wish

Bucky Palmer wanted a cruise for his 69th birthday, so he got it and shared it
with a few friends. Judy and Ron, Amy and Earl, Ann and Bucky all went
to the Bahamas for a fun-filled week.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VCATIONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Friendship hurt


beyond repair


SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 14, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 8:30 I 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30111:00 11:30
B WESH NBC 19 19 News News Football Night in America '14' NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Houston Texans. (N) N News
Lost Cave Temples of Call the Midwife (N) (In Call the Midwife (N) (In Masterpiece Classic Broadway: The As Time As Time
B EDI PBS 3 3 14 6 the Himalaya PG Stereo) '14' s Stereo) '14' s (N) PG 'B American Musical Goes By Goes By
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up AsTime... NOVA'PG' Call the Midwife'14' Masterpiece Classic Broadway: Musical MI-5'14'B
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Houston Texans. From Reliant News
0 NB 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo Live '14'B Stadium in Houston. (N)(In Stereo Live) Nc
W FTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revene "Confidence" 666 Park Avenue (N) News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' PG' c(N)'PG' (In Stereo)'14' c Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife Two The Mentalist "Not One 10 News, Paid
(0 HW )CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) B (In Stereo) JN Girls, One Code"'14' Red Cent"'14' 11pm (N) Program
SNFL Football New York Giants at The OT (N) MLB Baseball National League Championship Series, Game 1: Teams News Burn
0 WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 San Francisco 49ers. (N) *PG' TBA. (N) (In Stereo Live) N Notice'PG'
SDWCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon aTime Revenge (N) 'PG' 666 Park Avenue'14 News Inside Ed.
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I ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'Bcc(N) 'PG' (In Stereo)'14' cc
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order Law & Order"Angel" (In How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
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M CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens '14' 'PG' Point"'14' Case"'14'B Patrick Bergin, Lysette Anthony'PG13'
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Mi WK FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Spotlight Kid 'G' Beauty
(i CWOX FOX 13 7 7 NFL Football: Giants at 49ers The OT MLB Baseball FOX 35 News at 11
' CWVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comned. Noticiero AgqufyAhora (SS) MiraQuien Baila'14'(SS) Saly Pimienta'14 Comed. |Noticiero
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(-M0 55 64 5 The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Comic
55 64 55 '14'm "Better Angels"'14' '14'm c"Seed"'14'B c "Seed"'14'B cDead'14' Book Men
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S 59 68 59 45 "Family Plan" "Puppy Love" (2012, Romance) Candace ** "Audrey's Rain" (2003, Drama) Jean Frasier PG Frasier PG'
59 68 59 45 54 (2005) Ton Spelling. Cameron Bure, Victor Webster. cc Smart, Carol Kane.'NR' Bc
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(MYIST 51 25 51 32 42 "Fairlane Fever"'PG' 'PG'B 'PG'B 'PG' Betcha"'PG' 'PG'
24 38 24 31 "Bride Wars" ** "Made of Honor" (2008, Romance- *** "Mean Girls" (2004 Comedy) Lindsay ** "Made of Honor"
24 38 24 31 (2009) Kate Hudson. Comedy) Patrick Dempsey.'PG-13'c Lohan, Tina Fey Premiere. PG-13"c (2008) c
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50 119 Erika Rosenbaum. NR'c Rowan. NR' Suspense) Vanessa Marcil. c
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tWGNW ] 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl Bloopers! Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: My hus-
band, "Chuck," and
my best friend,
"Loma," partnered to pur-
chase and remodel old
houses for rental. At first, it
worked well. Chuck did the
physical work, and Loma did
the aesthetic stuff. But they
had too many clashes and de-
cided to call it quits.
Chuck sug-
gested they split
the four proper-
ties evenly He
thought Loma had
agreed, but she ap-
parently changed
her mind. She has
completely dis-
counted all the
hard work he put
into the houses
and is being totally
unreasonable. ANI
Chuck thinks she AN
wants to take him MAlL
for everything.
Chuck suggested different
ways to split up the proper-
ties and has asked Lorna
what, exactly, she wants, but
she ignores him. Lorna is fo-
cused only on the money,
with no thought to our friend-
ship. She is not struggling fi-
nancially She and her
husband are very well off. I
never would have dreamed
she would be so ruthless. I
feel betrayed by her determi-
nation to get every penny, yet
she still expects us to be
friends.
They finally agreed to see a
mediator, which will cost us a
ton of money when all they
needed to do was talk it out
reasonably But I'm de-
pressed and physically ill
over Lorna's need to control
this. We've been friends for 30
years. Now I don't know this
person and want nothing to
do with her How do I deal
with this? Don't Do Busi-


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Here Comes the Boom" (PG)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Frankenweenie" (PG) In 3D.
4:45 p.m. No passes.
"Frankenweenie" (PG)
1:45 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D.
7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Sinister" (R) ID required.
1:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Argo" (R) ID required.
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.


"Here Comes the Boom" (PG)
1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Frankenweenie" (PG) In 3D.
4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Frankenweenie" (PG) 2 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D.
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1 p.m., 4:05 p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13)
1:55 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve"
(PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.
"House at the End of the Street"
(PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Of the bishop
of Rome
6 Salon items
11 Improvise (hyph.)
16 Necklace fastener
21 Solitary
22 Conscious
23 Male duck
24 City in
North Vietnam
25 Secluded room
26 Wife of Jason
27 Toned down
28 Think
29 Get darker
30 Something of value
31 Hoarfrost
32 ideal
34 Dead lang.
35 Full of passion
38 Warms
40 "- the night
before ..."
41 Time period
42 Equal
44 Bird's crop
45 Chinese "way"
47 In medias -
49 Said further
52 Worker in a theater
54 Be attentive
56 Provo's state
60 Pate de gras
61 Colorless
62 Ringlet
63 Act as arbiter
65 Public lodging
66 Device in a taxi
67 Stole
68 Nix
69 Too permissive
70 Fish eggs
71 Lacking rainfall
72 Stuff
73 Do wrong
74 Complete
76 Wandering
78 Restaurant VIP
79 Settle after flight
80 Old Roman date
81 Insect
82 Skedaddle
83 Prevail uncontrolled
84 Greek letter
85 More pallid
88 Gust
89 "Finnegans -"
90 Old leg coverings


94 Violin name
95 Haul
96 Champagne, e.g.
97 Sated
98 Container for dye
99 Certain voter (abbr.)
100 Hero in the "Iliad"
102 Orient
103 Something
inessential
104 Crete's Mount-
105 Of an island
107 Request on
an invitation
108 Allen or Harrelson
109 Asterisk
110 Let it stand!
111 Pulchritude
113 Overindulge
114 Core
115 tide
117 culpa
118 Eject
119 A little bit wet
121 Snooze
124 Like a moray
126 En (all together)
128 Lowest point
132 Totality
133 Constellation
134 Tears
135 Loos or Bryant
139 Kimono accessory
140 Metallic sound
142 Colossus
144 Make points
145 Sales and income
147 Actress
Zellweger
148 Bay window
149 Molding edge
150 Flavoring for cordials
151 Inscribe
152 Briny
153 Baking need
154 Worker below ground

DOWN
1 Macaroni
2 Communion table
3 Hit repeatedly
4 Plus
5 Pasture (var.)
6 Rotating machine parts
7 Is indebted
8 Fabricated
9 Kinsmen
10 Red or Dead
11 Acknowledge


Fried chicken piece
Tardy
President
Eisenhower,
familiarly
Moisten
Elect
Once around
a track
Old-womanish
92-Down relative
Statue
by Michelangelo
Consumed
Uncooked
Red gemstone
Fencing weapon
Rorem or Beatty
Pinna
Child
Countrified
"Moonstruck" star
Make inquiry
- generis
In flames
Generous one
Simple restaurant
Molt
Weaving machine
Correct a text
Claw
"--of Two Cities"
Puts a curse on
Eagle's nest
Be idle
Kind of skiing
Fabric
Sapling
Hollywood and -
Masticate
Flavoring plant
Owl's cry
Aid and -
Stop up
Erie or Ontario, e.g.
Constant change
Talk angrily
Car race
Left Bank city
Catkin
Let slip
Raucous sound
Bit of smoke
Kind of tour
Madonna
movie role
Speed-trap device
Commence
Undulating


97 Amphibious
creature
101 Talk a lot
102 Cafe
103 Baptismal basin
106 Western Indian
107 Regret
108 Smart aleck
109 Fall mo.
112 "Little Women" name
113 Coach


Managed care gp.
Lab vessel
CIA predecessor
Lawyers' org.
Pearly stuff
Ethan or Gracie
Factory
Port city in Nigeria
Appropriately
Poison
Fat


Tightfisted one
Marsh bird
Ibsen character
Rainbow
Schoolroom event
Word in a wedding an-
nouncement
Levin or Gershwin
Utter
Cap
Cuckoo


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


10-14


@ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ness with Friends
Dear Don't You have
learned something about
Lorna's character that sur-
prised and disappointed you.
Part of why it hurts so much
is that you feel she doesn't
value your friendship as
much as you thought. A me-
diator will help resolve the
business side of this mess, so
let your husband
handle that. But
you will have to
tell Loma that the
friendship has
suffered too
much to recover
Dear Annie: I
had to respond to
"Fbeling Unloved
in Kansas,"
whose parents
are paying for his
,1 sister to attend
lIE'S graduate school,
BOX but not him.
This happened
to me. My brother didn't want
to continue his education, but
my parents allowed him to
make lavish purchases with
investments our grandfather
had set up for us. When I
graduated, I was informed
that my investments were
needed to pay back my stu-
dent loans. I was upset and
knew that going to graduate
school would be impossible
with so much debt But I don't
think my parents love my
brother more. It was just hor-
rible timing and a bad
economy
My solution was to find a
job at a university I am
scheduled to graduate in May
with no additional loans.
It is difficult working full
time and taking night classes,
but it feels great knowing it
hasn't cost me anything and
that I am not a burden on my
retired parents. Boston
Grad


A18 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


L






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 25, at Ocala Regional Air-
port Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60t Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for more
information.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during wartime (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The auxiliary will serve a
roast pork dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, Oct. 19, at the Post
home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. The
auxiliary will serve a shrimp
scampi dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, at
the post home. Everyone is
welcome at the dinners. Dona-
tion for each meal is $7.
All profits from the dinners
support the many programs of
the American Legion Auxiliary.
For more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at 352-
249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-


hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. WiFi available at
the post for free. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch. Informa-
tion regarding any post events
is available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Friday night dinners are open
to the public from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
for $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. On the menu Oct. 19
are pork and sauerkraut.
All are welcome for a
spaghetti dinner from 4 to 6
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21. Cost is
$5.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-
3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule


an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The
public is welcome at bingo at
6 p.m. Thursday.
The public is welcome at the
Oct. 20 Outdoor Flea Market
and Pancake Breakfast. All-
you-can-eat pancakes served
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. for $5.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or


older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or
email him at ultrarayl 997@
yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampabay.
rr.com. Call or visit the post for
regular and special events, as
well as meetings. Google us at
VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6. The
public is welcome at the Oct. 21
flea market beginning at 7 a.m.
Outside space is $5 (bring a
table) and inside space is $10.
Call the post at 726-3339 to re-
serve space. Proceeds benefit
the Cancer Aid & Research
Foundation.
The public is welcome at the
Saturday, Nov. 3, Bonanza
Bingo. Cost of $35 includes the
bingo packet and luncheon.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.


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Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
Beverly Hills American Le-
gion Auxiliary Unit 237 will have
its fall bake sale at 9 a.m. Sat-
urday, Oct. 20, at the post,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Beverly Hills Plaza.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-637-
5915 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to


24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage, and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Billy Wein
at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-697-1749. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585

See VETERANS/Page A20


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Good food keeps us healthy


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Whites


What would you do if
your income sud-
denly stopped? Be-
sides some intense
negotiations with the utility
companies to keep your
home lit and safe, you'd
need food.
Living in Florida, I'm
sure you've done your best
to have extra food included
in your hurricane safety kit,
but, what if you
don't? What hap-
pens after that
food is gone and
you have no way
of getting more?
What if you've
already been liv-
ing from pay-
check to
not-quite-the- Barbara
next paycheck? Barbara
Non-veterans VETER
may or may not VIE%
find themselves
eligible for the Florida Ac-
cess program that distrib-
utes funds for food
assistance. In addition,
there are no less than 28
food programs in the Citrus
County region, hosted by a
wide variety of churches
and including the Salvation
Army (at Walmart parking
lot on Nov. 17 by the
Thanksgiving Feeding Al-
liance), Daystar Life Center
and We Care, where
Thanksgiving dinner pack-
ages are available again
this year. It's a wonderful
program, and you can learn



VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La
President Carol Kaiserian at
352-746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November.
All combat-wounded veter-
ans, lineal descendants, next of
kin, spouses and siblings of
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited. To learn more about
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit the chapter's
website at www.citruspurple
heart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV


For the RECORD

Divorces
10/1/12 to 10/7/12
Bakary M. Baradji, Inverness
vs. Christine A. Baradji,
Hernando
Denise Alberta Holloway,
Beverly Hills vs. Marc Edward
Holloway, Inglis
Octavio A. Montalva,
Hernando vs. Pauletta
Browning Montalva, Inverness
Russell Nearhood, Wesley
Chapel vs. Randi Nearhood,
Lecanto
Rachel Jones Stack, Crystal
River vs. Robert Joseph Stack,
Crystal River

Marriages
10/1/12 to 10/7/12
Matthew Thomas Bedford,
Floral City/Jasmine Lacey
Nicole Bibler, Floral City
Thomas Jon Washburn,
Homosassa/Tobie Nicole
Parham, Homosassa


more by calling 352- 628-
4842. A special $8 ticket
purchased at Publix gro-
cery stores will provide a
whole turkey meal to those
in need.
Veterans, their families,
and now their pets have ad-
ditional help available,
thanks to the Food Pantry
operated by the Citrus
County Veterans' Coalition
(CCVC).
Every Tuesday
and Thursday,
the coalition
"'r opens the pantry
6. doors from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at the
headquarters
they share with
the Disabled
Corcoran American Veter-
orcoran ans (DAV) at 1039
ANS' N. Paul Drive, In-
WS verness.
Veterans must
show their military ID, DD-
214, or other positive iden-
tification that proves their
military affiliation. The
shelves are lined with
canned and dry goods, and
the freezers often feature
meats and poultry. Pantry
staff members are hard at
work making sure the stock
is fresh and rotated.
Food for the CCVC Food
Pantry is obtained prima-
rily from donations. Cash is
happily accepted and
placed directly into the
Food Pantry fund. Food do-
nations are even better for


Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows.
All Marines and FMF Corps-
men are welcome.
Call Morgan Patterson at
352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19.
The Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the


the CCVC, because it helps
restock those shelves im-
mediately
Some folks like to buy
that second item when the
local grocer has a "two for
one" sale, and then hold
onto the second item(s)
until a box is filled, when
the box is then brought in
for distribution among the
veterans. Recently, the
CCVC Food Pantry added
dry dog and cat food to the
inventory, helping the furry
members of our military
families.
Everyone needs a little
help now and then, and be-
lieve me in these times, if
you're in need, you're also
in some very good company
The groceries at the CCVC
Food Pantry are safe, fresh
and clean. As a matter of
fact, I've been asked to pass
on a message to all of the
wonderful, generous peo-
ple who have (and will)
bring us these valuable
items.
The CCVC wishes to ex-
press heartfelt thanks to all
who have participated in
the donation of Food Pantry
items. The weary smiles of
those you have helped
when perhaps no help
seemed possible, would
melt your heart.
We appreciate your gen-
erosity, and hope that you
can continue to find it in
your hearts to continue to
keep our Food Pantry work-


post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness.
Call Bob Huscher, secretary,
at 352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City.
All eligible veterans are al-
ways welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on
the following dates: Nov. 10
and Dec. 8.


Sunday's PUZZLER


Puzzle is on Page A18.


P A P A L CO M B S A D L I B C L A S P
A L O N E A A R E D R A K EBHAN OI
STU DY M D A MUTED NE
TAIN A SSET R IME E GO LA T
ARIDEINT HEATS TWAS ERA
0 PIE IER RAW TIAO RES
A DD ED USHER LI STEN UITIAIH
FO I E ASHEN LOC K MED I A T E
I N N METE T0OOK sVE HTO L A X
R 0 E A De1 C R A M i I' W H 0 LEL
ERRATICDC('RAML DN ONE
P ALBEJEB F LEE AGEGRHO
P A L-E" R '-'0-W W K"E" 1, E R S
AMAT Il LU GEWIINE FUL L VAT
RE P A J AX EAST WFR I L I DA
I N SU A sUA R SoVoP WO DYl S T A R
S T E T BE AUT I NG HE A R T
0 E IBIB M A OUS T DA P
N AP EE LY M ASSEBOTT M
AL L ARA RT I PS N IA TAB I
CLAN K G I -A-NT SC-O AX ES
RE E OEgE R I E LeARR R S ANI SE
ENTER SALTY YEi AS M I ER


10-14


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ing as a vital part of our mil-
itary community. Thanks-
giving is almost upon us,
and in addition to donating
to the CCVC Food Pantry
during its operating hours,
we have members who are
happy to assist you with
your donations at the
monthly yard sale at Our
Lady of Fatima Church on
U.S. 41 in Inverness. The
sale is the second Saturday
of the month from 7 a.m. to
1p.m.
A "needs list" will appear
in the coming weeks on our
website, www.ccvcfl.org,
and we appreciate your at-
tention to the expiration
dates on the cans, boxes
and packages. We want to
keep our veterans and their
families safe, healthy and
happy, and must discard
anything that is past the ex-
piration date. Just a mo-
ment of your time to check
this fact will bring more
smiles than you imagine.


Barbara L. Corcoran is the
public information officer
of the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition Inc. She
may be contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl. org. More
information about this
group may be found at
www.ccvcfl.org


Mr and Mrs. Earl F White
celebrated their 60th wed-
ding anniversary Oct. 1,
2012.
They met and later were
married in the Lutheran
Chapel at Fort Monmouth,
N.J.
Earl grew up in Niles,
Ohio, and entered the U.S.
Army in 1949. Following his
service, he worked 30 years
and retired from Repub-
lic/LTV Steel in Niles. He
then worked 10 years and
retired from Ohio Bureau of
Employment Services in
1996 in Warren, Ohio.
Jeanne (Anderson) White
is a New Jersey native, grad-
uated from Neptune High
School in Ocean Grove, N.J.,
and worked for New Jersey
Bell Telephone Co. prior to
and shortly after the
wedding.
The Whites moved back to
Earl's home area in 1953.
Jeanne finished her 24
years in the Warren/United/
Sprint (Ohio) Telephone Co.
and retired in 1991. They
were snowbirds for eight
years, then settled perma-


nently in Crystal River in
2003.
During those 50 years in
Ohio, they purchased a
home in Lordstown and
raised their two children:
Lynda Frondorf of Warren,
and Richard (Julie) White of
Puyallup, Wash. Grandchil-
dren are Melissa Lemasters,
Krystal Marks, Adrienn
Reed, Michael White and
Shawn White. They also
have four great-grandchil-
dren: Brian, Ashley, Alaina
and Trent.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a
matter of public record, available from the Clerk of the
Courts Office; call 352-341-6400.


'a] ert G; 01Df


... is pleased to present its 6th Annual Women's

Inverness Fall Classic
October 26 & 27, 2012
We hope you will join us for two exciting days
of golf, camaraderie, food and prizes!
TOURNAMENT FORM AT:
36 Holes Individual Stroke Play
Max. Handicap Index -34.6
Players will be flighted by handicap index

Benefiting HOSPICE of
Citrus County


TITLE SPONSOR: (MEN MARTONE
:, REGIONS
MORTGAGE


4 J FIRY FI:1:: '0O.0l ITR PI'lRSON
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One (1) practice round the Week of Oct. 21
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Tournament Play and Range Balls


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* Breakfast, Lunch and Lounge Specials
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Will have Drop areas on #14 & 15 this year
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Generous Pro Shop Credis for All Flight Winners
SEntry Deadline: Must be received with p;i> imi'nl
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I I l DUI OO [VINiTS
DAY ONE
Friday, October26, 2012
8:30 a.m. Registration/Breakfast
9:30 a.m. Shotgun
11:00-1:30 Lunch at the turn
I)AY TWO
Saturday, October 27,2012
8:30 a.m. Breakilhs
9:30 a.m. Shotgun
1:45 p.m. Lunch, Awards & Raffl


Ie


For more information contact:
Jeff Shelton, Director of Golf,
at 352-726-2583


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A20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


TOGETHER & VETERANS


C
I


CR Q-"4 .SJJ r^fCf f











SPORTS


The Detroit
Tigers face the
New York Yankees
in Game 1 of the
ALCS on
Saturday./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* U Recreational sports/B2
0 Golf, cycling/B3
0 MLB, auto racing/B4
t Scoreboard/B4
A TV, lottery/B4
0 College football/B5, B6
0 NFL/B7
0 Entertainment/B8


Driskel's legs pace No. 4 UF to triumph


Sophomore sets Gators QB record

with 177rushing yards against Vandy


Associated Press
Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel runs for a 37-yard touchdown during the
first quarter Saturday against Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tenn.


ines'


Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. No one
will overlook Jeff Driskel again,
not after the Florida quarterback
ran the ball better than even Tim
Tebow.
Driskel ran for 177 yards and
three touchdowns, and the
fourth-ranked Gators beat Van-
derbilt 31-17 on Saturday night to
stay undefeated going into their
big showdown with No. 3 South
Carolina. Driskel ran only 11
times, and the sophomore set the
Florida record for yards rushing
by a quarterback, topping
Tebow's 166 yards against Missis-


cool


sippi in 2007 on 27 carries.
Vanderbilt watched Gators run-
ning back Mike Gillislee so closely
that Driskel didn't even think the
Commodores laid a hand on him
on any of his TD runs.
"We kept running really the
same play, and they didn't really
make adjustments," Driskel said.
"So we kept going to it. If some-
thing's working, keep going to it"
The Gators (6-0, 5-0 SEC) fin-
ished off their last SEC road trip
outside of the state of Florida
with their 22nd straight win over
Vanderbilt Florida, which rallied
in the second half to beat Texas
A&M, Tennessee and LSU al-


run


Lecanto girls nip

CR by point at

Inverness Invite
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS Was it home-
field advantage or did Alyssa
Weber simply want to beat
Clarissa Consol?
Whatever the reason, the Cit-
rus High sophomore couldn't
catch Belleview's Catherine
Blaney, but managed to keep
Consol behind her Saturday
morning at the 2012 Whisper-
ing Pines Invitational cross
country meet.
Running on her home
course, Weber had an even 20
minutes time to take second in
the girls' race. Consol, a Crystal
River High senior but in her
first year of cross country, was
fourth with a 20:06. Lecanto
High senior Chloe Benoist was
fifth with a 20:18.
Weber was the 2011 Chroni-
cle Female Cross Country Run-
ner of the Year but finished
behind Consol at Beat the
Sheriff and the Oct. 6 Gator
Invitational.
Whispering Pines offers a
true cross country course with
hills, shade trees and roots.
Those hills and roots are prac-
tically Facebook friends to
Weber, but were uncharted ter-
ritory to Consol.
"It was awesome," said
Weber, gasping for air "It was
good. Blaney pulled away at the
mile. It was down to Clarissa
and me close to the chute."
"Alyssa is strong in practice,"
said Citrus coach Michelle
Kiddy "She has that goal of
going to state. It is her home
course. She really wanted (to
See Page B2
Citrus High School
sophomore Alyssa Weber
passes Belleview's Melody Yero
at the very end to take second
place Saturday at the Whisper-
ing Pines Invitational cross
country meet in Inverness.
The boys run at the start
of their race Saturday at Whis-
pering Pines Park in Inverness.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


ready this season, took control
early this time. The Gators scored
21 straight points, including 11 in
the second quarter where they
took the lead for good.
Florida ran for 326 of its 403
yards even with three starting
linemen out with injuries. Center
Jonatthan Harrison, left guard
James Wilson and left tackle
Xavier Nixon didn't play, and the
Gators had some receiver Latroy
Pittman, linebacker Michael Tay-
lor and tight end Jordan Reed in-
jured during the game.
"We're a little bit of a M.A.S.H
unit on the offensive line,"
Florida coach Will Muschamp
said. "So I was really proud of
those guys, as many looks as Van-
derbilt gave us, in being able to
rush for 300 and something yards.
See Page B4


No letdown

for 'Noles

No. 12 FSU

blasts B.C.

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Criti-
cized for conservative play
calling after blowing a 16-point
lead last week, Florida State
went to the air from the get-go
Saturday and didn't let up.
EJ Manuel threw for a ca-
reer-high 439 yards and four
touchdowns and kicker
Dustin Hopkins became the
Atlantic Coast Conference's
career scoring leader as the
12th-ranked Seminoles re-
bounded from their first loss
of the season with a 51-7 vic-
tory over Boston College.
Manuel, who completed 27
of 34 passes before leaving
early in the fourth quarter
with a 48-7 lead, had little to
say afterward, though he was
quite happy
"I was ready to go," Manuel
said. "We made sure every-
body came back with a punch."
Florida State (6-1, 3-1 ACC)
didn't waste any time shaking
off last week's 17-16 loss at
North Carolina State, rolling
to a 28-0 lead midway through
the second quarter before
Boston College (1-5, 0-3)
scored its touchdown on
Chase Rettig's 18-yard pass to
Bobby Swigert.
See Rage B4


Associated Press
Florida State holder Chris Rev-
ell (86) watches as kicker
Dustin Hopkins (18) celebrates
after making a 51-yard field
goal against Boston College on
Saturday in Tallahassee.
Hopkins set a new record for
Florida State for most points
scored on the kick.


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CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS


GT Page B2 sumCT
E


IN


THE


tAME


P.L.A.Y. registration opens Oct. 22


Elks plan free

throw contest

Special to the Chronicle
Registration will open on
Monday, Oct. 22 for the next ses-
sion of PL.AY.
The next session will include
flag football, basketball and
cheerleading. Football will be at
Bicentennial Park on Tuesdays
or Thursday.
Basketball will be at the Cit-
rus County Resource Center on
Monday or Wednesdays and
Cheerleading will be at Bicen-
tennial Park on Thursdays from
5 to 6 p.m. Both basketball and
football have two timeslots
available: 5 to 6 p.m. or 6 to 7
p.m. So pick the time that works
for your schedule.
The PL.A.Y programs are de-
signed for children ages 3 to 5
and the cost is $45 per child.
Sign up for more than one sport
in a session and save $10.
Spaces fill up fast and pre-
registration is required, so be
sure to mark your calendar for
the registration opening date.
For more information on the
PL.A.Y programs, please con-
tact Crysta Henry, recreation
program specialist for youth


programs at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Elks planning Hoop
Shoot for 2012-13
West Citrus Elks Lodge will stage
its 2012-13 Hoop Shoot Free Throw
Contest for county middle and pri-
mary schoolchildren at 9 a.m. Satur-
day, Dec. 1, at Lecanto Middle
School, 3800 W. Educational Path.
Principal William Farrell and staff
will host the winners from Lecanto El-
ementary, Homosassa Elementary,
Rock Crusher Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Lecanto Middle, Crys-
tal River Middle and others. The
lodge champions will advance to the
district contest. The district finalists
will advance to the state finals.
The state champions will com-
pete at a regional contest to deter-
mine the contestants to compete at
the national finals. The lodge uses
this exposure to help attain funds
for student scholarships and other
projects in the county to help the
less fortunate.
For more information, call Hoop
Shoots Director Gene Murray at
352-382-2709 or Jim Brumback at
352-503-7904.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County Parks &


Recreation and Tennis Pro Mehdi
Tahiri for youth tennis lessons.
Instruction will include condition-
ing, drills, footwork, match play,
doubles and single strategy. The
five-week sessions will be at the
Lecanto Community Park Tennis
Courts on Sundays. Each session
will run from 3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is
open to boys and girls ages 8 to 14
and costs $60 per child.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
YMCA offers
afterschool programs
The Citrus County YMCA's After-
school Enrichment Clubs are of-
fered at Central Ridge Elementary,
Citrus Springs Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Floral City Elemen-
tary, Forest Ridge Elementary, Ho-
mosassa Elementary, Inverness
Primary, Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock
Crusher Elementary.
Ages for the Y Afterschool Program
range from kindergarten through fifth
grade. Afterschool programs are a
great way to end the school day, and
the first fall session will offer kids the
opportunity to participate in flag foot-
ball, cheerleading and art.
For more information, call the Cit-
rus Y at 352-637-0132.


,. -. ,
Special to the Chronicle
The P.L.A.Y. program will begin accepting registration on Monday, Oct. 22


Co-ed softball is back


Haunted Hills

fun run slated

for Oct. 27

Special to the Chronicle
Co-ed softball is back!
The fall league will now be
starting on Nov 1, with the
$50 registration fee on Oct.
25. Games will be held at Bi-
centennial Park, on Thurs-
day nights, with games at
6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
League fees depend on the
number of teams that enter.
For more information call
recreation program special-
ist Jess Sandino at 527-7547.
Men's softball
league back soon
Men's softball is ready to
begin again. We are looking to
start on Nov. 1, with games
slated for Mondays and
Wednesday. This league is
very competitive and for adults
18 and over. League fees de-
pend on the number of teams
that enter.
For more information contact
Recreation Program Specialist
Jess Sandino at 527-7547.
'Haunted' Hills
fun run Oct. 27
Citrus Hills will host the Cit-
rus "Haunted" Hills 5K Fun Run
at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27,
in the neighborhood of Terra
Vista. The Halloween-themed
run will also include a one-mile
fun walk, as well as pizza and
music at the finish line.
The Citrus "Haunted" Hills
Fun Run will support the Citrus
Memorial Heart and Vascular
Center. Sponsors include HPH
Hospice, Comfort Keepers and
the Citrus County Chronicle.
Registration begins at 3 p.m.
at Terra Vista's BellaVita Fit-
ness Center, 2125 W. Skyview
Crossing, Hernando. Partici-
pants may register in advance
at www.citrusroadrunners.org.
The registration fees are:
Adult pre-registration
(price good through Oct. 26 and
includes T-shirt) $20
Citrus Roadrunners and
Citrus Hills member preregistra-
tion (price good through Oct. 26
and includes a T-shirt) $18
Adult registration on race
day, Oct. 27 (T-shirt quantities
limited for day-of registrants) -
$25
Children 10 and younger
-$12
At the conclusion of the race,
prizes will be awarded for Top
Male and Female Runners in
standard age groups, Best
Costume Individual and Best
Costume Group.
For more information or to
sign up, visit www.
citrusroadrunners.org, or call


Special to the Chronicle


Co-ed and men's softball leagues begin soon.


352-746-5828.
Tourney benefits
Wounded Warriors
Project
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will have its inaugural Vet-
erans Tournament fundraiser
for Wounded Warriors Project
on Dec. 8. Men, women and
youths are welcome. All pro-
ceeds will go to the Wounded
Warriors Project. Sponsors will
be accepted and recognized.
There will be two divisions,
NHPA-sanctioned players and
unsanctioned players.
Sanctioned players will follow
NHPA tournament rules, and will
pitch five games of 40 shoes.
Sanctioned players will be cred-
ited for their scores as in any
other NHPA tournament. Non-
sanctioned players will pitch
three games of 30 shoes; the
rules for these players will follow
the NHPA guidelines for scoring.
Thirty and 40 foot players will
play together. The 30-foot rule
will be as follows: 60 years and
older have the choice of pitch-
ing 30 or 40 feet. All women
and youths (17 and younger)
will pitch 30 feet. Physically
challenged players will have the
right to pitch 30 feet, regardless
of age. All others pitch 40 feet.
Entry fee will be $15. All play-
ers will receive a free ham-
burger or hot dog and a cold
drink after they have pitched. All
entries must be in before Tues-
day, Dec. 4, by 5 p.m. Entries
can be made by phone or
email; payment must be in by
Dec. 4, as time is needed to
form classes for sanctioned
players and a schedule for non-
sanctioned players.
The public is welcome to ob-
serve. Refreshments will be
served at a discounted price for
non-pitchers. For entry informa-


tion, call Ron Fair at
352-746-3924, or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
Beach volleyball
is a success
Beach Volleyball has come
to Citrus County! If you are in-
terested in playing, we will be
having several weekend four
on four tournaments coming
soon. Our next league will not
begin until February 2013,
though everyone is welcome to
come out and be a part of the
fun! For more information, call
Recreation Programs Specialist
Jess Sandino at 352-527-7547.
Sami's Poker Run
set for Nov. 3
The third annual Sami's
Poker Run, sponsored by the
Eagle Riders of Crystal River
Eagles 4272, will take place
Saturday, Nov. 3.
The daughter of Crystal
River Eagles 4272 member
Donna Harris, Samantha Har-
ris, 16, was killed in a rollover
crash on Oct. 16, 2010, in Ho-
mosassa. Sami was a junior at
Lecanto High School. Sami's
Run will provide Christmas gifts
for underprivileged children in
the community.
Registration is from 9:45 to
10:45 a.m. at the Crystal River
Eagles 4272, 5340 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
All vehicles are welcome.
Schedule: Kick-stands up at
11 a.m. First stop Sand Trap
in Weeki Wachee. Second stop
- IRRU in Floral City. Third
stop Inverness Eagles.
Fourth stop Thunder Inn in
Hernando. Fifth stop Fat
Daddy's in Crystal River.
For more information, call
Philip at 352-228-2131 or
Joanell at 352-228-2132.


Golf tourney
benefits food pantry
The third annual S.O.S.
(Serving Our Savior) Golf Tour-
nament will be Nov. 3 at Seven
Rivers Golf and Country Club.
All proceeds benefit the S.O.S.
Food Pantry for the needy of
Citrus County.
The tourney is co-sponsored
by five local churches and the
Chronicle.
There will be a $10,000 prize
for hole-in-one, and many other
prizes. Entrance fee is $60. For
more information for golfers
and hole sponsors, visit
www.sothec.org.

Golf tourney needs
group members
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization will have its 12th An-
nual Charity Golf Tournament
on Nov. 10 at Seven Springs
Golf and Country Club, New
Port Richey. Committee mem-
bers are needed to assist in the
coordination of the fundraising
event.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization serves the central
Florida area, including Citrus,
Hernando, northern Hillsbor-
ough, Lake, Pasco, northern
Pinellas and Sumter counties.
The Florida Department of
Elder Affairs has determined
this region has more than
100,000 Alzheimer's disease
sufferers. By assisting the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, participants network with
local and regional professionals,
golfers and concerned mem-
bers of the community helping
those afflicted with Alzheimer's
disease and their families.
For more information, call
727-848-8888, or toll free at
888-496-8004.


PINES
Continued from Page B1

beat Consol)."
Consol found Whisper-
ing Pines a challenge.
"It helps that me and
Chloe Lane came out and
practiced it," said Consol.
"The hills were a problem."
In the team race, the
Lecanto girls beat Crystal
River by one point, 59-60, to
take the girls title.
"The girls had an excel-
lent race," said Lecanto
boys coach Roselle Lattin,
who took care of the girls
because Dan Epstein was
away "All had personal
records. The shade really
helped them."
The Crystal River coach
liked what she saw
"They had a good show-
ing today," said Crystal
River coach Lisa Carter.
"I'm happy with the way
they performed. She (Con-
sol) had a good run. It was a
tough course for her She
worked her heart out.
Chloe Lane was ninth
(21:11). Chloe Lane, Alexis
Ulseth (19th, 22:49) and
Elizabeth Bruty (13th,
21:58) did great. They
dropped a minute off their
time. That's impressive.
I'm happy with them."
Crystal River's Brandon
Harris took third (17:33) in
the boys race with Lecanto's
Sam Alford (17:52) not far
behind in fourth place.
Belleview's Boston Fitz-
patrick won (17:21).
"There were a lot of roots
and stuff," said Harris.
"They were well-marked. It
was a pretty fair race. I
think I could have done
better It was pretty good. I
didn't have it in me. I like
running in the woods."
Belleview won the boys
team title (37 points). Crystal
River was second (89) and
Lecanto's very improved
boys were third (98 points).
Citrus was sixth (160).
"I think (we)) ran excel-
lent," Lattin said. "I believe
the top five all had PRs
(personal records). We fin-
ished very well as a pack. I
think we ran a real good
race. I feel really good
about today"
"It was close," said Crys-
tal River coach Tim Byrne.
"They pretty much all had


their personal bests. Harris
ran well. Corey (Pollard)
ran well. I still think he has
a little more in him. The lit-
tle Bass (AJ, 30th, 19:05)
boy ran well. Pedro (Lopez,
26th, 18:58) ran well."
Citrus's Cameron Grant
was sixth (18:08).
"Cameron Grant was
right at 18," said Citrus
boys coach James Martone.
"This is his home course.
I'm very happy with their
results. We are right where
we want to be. We are in a
good position for the
county meet on Tuesday.
The City of Inverness Parks
and Recreation have
helped me all week long. I
can't thank our volunteers
and sponsors enough."
2012 Whispering
Pines Invitational
meet results
Girls team scores
1. Lecanto 59; 2. Crystal
River 60; 3. Belleview 65; 4.
Tavares 106; 5. Ocala Forest
125; 6. Brooksville Hernando
188; 7. Inverness Citrus 220; 8.
Eustis 220; 9. Brooksville Cen-
tral 244; 10. The Villages 246.
Girls Top 10 Individuals
Catherine Blaney, Belleview
19:26; 2. Alyssa Weber, Citrus
20:00.18; 3. Melody Yero,
Belleview 20:00.66; 4.
Clarissa Consol, Crystal River
20:06; 5. Chloe Benoist,
Lecanto 20:18; 6. Claire
Farnsworth, Lecanto 20:23; 7.
Sarah Northup, Tavares 20:27;
8. Harleigh Bilz, Tavares
21:03; 9. Chloe Lane, Crystal
River 21:11; 10. Katie Mat-
tingly, Lecanto 21:47.
Boys team scores
Belleview 37; 2. Crystal
River 89; 3. Lecanto 98; 4.
Ocala Forest 107; 5. The Vil-
lages 126; 6. Inverness Citrus
160; 7. Leesburg 188; 8.
Brooksville Hernando 197; 9.
Eustis 245; 10. Brooksville
Central 250; 11. Ocala St.
Johns Lutheran 370.
Boys Top 10 Individuals
1. Boston Fitzpatrick, Belle-
view 17:21; 2. Redondo Beau-
plan, Belleview 17:26; 3.
Brandon Harris, Crystal River
17:33; 4. Sam Alford, Lecanto
17:52; 5. Caleb Gruner, Eustis
17:53; 6. Cameron Grant, Citrus
18:08; 7. Jeffrey Wood, Belle-
view 18:16; 8. Connor McVay,
Leesburg 18:20; 9. Carlos Med-
ina Juan, Forest 18:23; 10. Lan-
den Delk, Belleview 18:24.


DAVE SIGLERIChronicle
Crystal River boys runner Brandon Harris finished third at
the Whispering Pines Invitational at Whispering Pines Park
in Inverness. The race was hosted by Citrus High School.


- -IL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In prime position


Mallinger in

line to win first

time on PGA

Associated Press

SAN MARTIN, Calif. -
John Mallinger remained
in position for his first PGA
Tour victory, shooting a 1-
under 70 on Saturday in the
Frys.com Open to take a
two-stroke lead into the
final round.
The 33-year-old Mallinger
had a 15-under 198 total at
CordeValle after opening
with a 66 and matching the
course record with a 62 on
Friday He has finished sec-
ond twice in his seven-year
career on the tour, losing in
a playoff to Bo Van Pelt in
Milwaukee in 2009.
Sweden's Jonas Blixt was
second after a 66, and
Charles Howell III and
Jason Kokrak were another
stroke back at 12 under.
Howell had a 66, and
Kokrak shot 67.
Vijay Singh and Brazil's
Alexandre Rocha were 11
under They each shot 66.
LPGA Malaysia
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
- Defending champion Na
Yeon Choi maintained a two-
shot lead in the LPGA Malaysia,
shooting a 3-under 68 in the
rain-interrupted third round.
The South Korean player
had a 13-under 200 total after
opening with rounds of 65
and 67 at Kuala Lumpur Golf
and Country Club. She
birdied the first hole before
play was delayed for more
than four hours because of
lightning and rain, and fin-
ished with four birdies and a
lone bogey on the 10th hole.
Choi won the U.S. Women's
Open in July for her first major


Associated Press
Na Yeon Choi hits a shot Saturday on the second hole during the third round of the LPGA
Malaysia golf tournament at Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.


title and sixth LPGA Tour victory.
South Korea's Inbee Park,
the tour money leader, was
second after a 65.

Greater Hickory
Classic
CONOVER, N.C. Fred
Funk took a one-stroke lead
over Larry Mize in the Greater


Hickory Classic, shooting his
second straight bogey-free 6-
under 66.
The 56-year-old Funk has
gone 42 holes without a bogey
since the 13th hole Sunday in
the final round of the SAS
Championship in Cary, N.C.
He birdied the final two holes
on Rock Barn Golf and Spa's


Jones Course.
Funk won at The Woodlands
in Texas in May for his seventh
Champions Tour title.
Mize had a 67.
Defending champion Mark
Wiebe, Chip Beck and Duffy
Waldorf were four strokes back
at 8 under. Beck and Waldorf
shot 67, and Wiebe had a 69.


Cycling legend dragged through mud


Scandalhurts

Armstrong but

doesn 't destroy image

Associated Press

It's not so much that the Lance Arm-
strong story was too good to be true.
Now it might just be too good to let go.
Even after investigators unveiled a
scathing report portraying him as an
unrepentant drug cheat, Armstrong
continues to confound his public with
rivaling images: a rapacious, win-at-
all-costs athlete or a hero who came
back from cancer.
We've all heard his story before: An
up-and-coming cyclist gets stricken
with testicular cancer at age 25. He's
given less than a 50 percent chance of
surviving. Instead, he fights it off and
comes back stronger He wins the Tour
de France seven times. Hobnobs with
presidents. Dates a rock star and
pretty much becomes one himself.


Uses his fame and success to raise mil-
lions to promote cancer awareness.
Even if it all really is the impossi-
ble fairy tale it sounds like one
built on a brittle mountain of drugs,
deception and arm-twisting- it's the
narrative the world
has happily listened
to for nearly 15 years.
More than 1,000
pages of finely de-
tailed evidence from
the U.S. Anti-Doping
Agency are now in the
open, supporting its
Lance decision to ban Arm-
Armstrong strong for life from cy-
cyclist's image cling and order his
not destroyed. titles stripped for
using performance-
enhancing drugs. Yet while other
sports stars who have faced drug-in-
duced downfalls Marion Jones,
Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens fade
from memory or become objects of
scorn, Armstrong keeps rolling along.
You can see it in social media. Sure,
negative comments dot the landscape


-people have put an "X" through the
"v" on their Livestrong wristbands to
make it read "Lie strong." But the
tributes also keep coming: a few
dozen new posts on a Facebook page
titled "Lance Armstrong Supporters,"
either vilify USADA or tell Armstrong
they've got his back.
You can see it from the sponsors -
Nike is one example that are stick-
ing with Armstrong. You can see it in
the donations to the Lance Armstrong
Foundation, which have spiked since
August, when Armstrong announced
he wouldn't fight the doping charges.
And it also shows in the way Arm-
strong steadfastly goes about his busi-
ness. On Thursday, the day after the
USADA report came out, he was at his
foundation headquarters in Austin,
Texas, looking for a place to hang a
picture. On Friday, he linked to his
Twitter account a shiny new slide
show touting the top 15 things his
foundation has accomplished since it
was founded, 15 years ago this month.
Star-studded anniversary celebra-
tions are in the works.


Frys.com Open
Saturday
At CordeValle Golf Club, San Martin, Calif.
Purse: $5 million
Yardage: 7,368, Par 71
Third Round


John Mallinger
Jonas Blixt
Charles Howell III
Jason Kokrak
Vijay Singh
Alexandre Rocha
Russell Knox
Danny Lee
Greg Owen
Scott Dunlap
Jhonattan Vegas
Gary Woodland
Bryce Molder
Jerry Kelly
John Rollins
D.A. Points
Nicolas Colsaerts
Nick O'Hern
Jeff Maggert
David Mathis
Tim Petrovic
Patrick Cantlay
Jeff Overton
Zack Miller
Bill Lunde
Ben Curtis
Billy Horschel
Martin Flores
Chez Reavie
Nathan Green
Steven Bowditch
Matt Jones
Richard H. Lee
Rocco Mediate
Rod Pampling
Will Claxton
Garth Mulroy
Brian Gay
Frank Lickliter II
Mathew Goggin
D.J. Trahan
Ernie Els
CamiloVillegas
Davis Love III
John Merrick
Tim Herron
Jimmy Walker
Angel Cabrera
Derek Ernst
J.J. Killeen
Heath Slocum
Mark Anderson
Robert Karlsson
Patrick Reed
Scott Brown
Brian Davis
Kelly Kraft
Stephen Gangluff
Charlie Beljan
Bud Cauley
Vaughn Taylor
Miguel Angel Carballo
Chris Riley
Stephen Ames
Todd Hamilton
Erik Compton
Kevin Streelman
Cameron Beckman
Billy Mayfair
GarrettWillis
Ryuji Imada
J.B. Holmes


66-62-70
66-68-66
66-69-66
68-66-67-
70-66-66
69-67-66
70-68-65
69-67-67-
66-69-68
70-63-70
65-67-71 -
66-72-66
71-67-66-
69-68-67-
71-69-64-
68-67-69-
65-68-71 -
62-71-71 -
67-71-67-
68-70-67
70-68-67-
67-70-68
68-69-68
70-69-66
69-67-69
69-71-65-
67-65-73-
71-67-68-
73-65-68
72-66-68
71-64-71 -
70-66-70-
71-67-69-
67-71-69-
70-68-69
67-69-71 -
73-67-67-
69-71-67-
71-64-72-
69-70-69
73-66-69
71-68-69-
70-66-72-
69-67-72
72-68-68
70-65-73-
73-68-67-
71-68-70-
65-72-72
67-72-70
70-70-69
71-70-68-
70-68-72
73-67-70
73-68-69
72-69-69
72-69-69-
70-67-74
69-67-75
68-72-71 -
67-74-70
73-65-74
70-69-73-
71-68-73-
73-67-72-
69-71-72-
72-69-72-
71-70-72-
72-69-72-
67-70-78-
70-70-77-
71-70-79-


LPGA Malaysia
Saturday
At Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club,
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Purse: $1.9 million
Yardage: 6,246, Par: 71
Third Round


65-67-68
69-68-65-
65-71-68-
68-69-68
71-64-70-
69-67-70-
68-68-70
66-69-71 -
69-68-70-
69-72-67-
68-73-67-
70-66-72-
66-70-72-
71-71-67-
70-71-68-
67-72-70
70-67-72-
70-67-72-
68-67-74-
69-65-75-
71-74-65-
71-70-69-
69-71-70-
70-69-71 -
70-69-71 -
72-66-73-
68-67-76
70-71-71 -
68-71-73-
70-69-73-
70-67-75-
72-74-67-
72-71-70-
70-72-71 -
70-72-71 -
72-70-71 -


NaYeon Choi
Inbee Park
Karrie Webb
Ai Miyazato
Suzann Pettersen
Paula Creamer
Catriona Matthew
Mika Miyazato
Brittany Lang
a-Ariya Jutanugarn
So Yeon Ryu
Lindsey Wright
Sun Young Yoo
Azahara Munoz
Karin Sjodin
Hee Young Park
Eun-HeeJi
I.K. Kim
Momoko Ueda
Sydnee Michaels
Chella Choi
Jiyai Shin
llhee Lee
Karine Icher
Amy Yang
Beatriz Recari
Lizette Salas
Candle Kung
Jessica Korda
Stacy Lewis
Caroline Hedwall
Jenny Shin
Sandra Gal
Shanshan Feng
Cindy LaCrosse
Anna Nordqvist


SPORTS


Mark Calcavecchia
Allen Doyle
D.A. Weibring
Esteban Toledo
John Harris
Jim Gallagher, Jr.
James Mason
Dana Quigley
PH. Horgan III
Jay Sigel
John Huston


150 +6
150 +6
151 +7
151 +7
152 +8
152 +8
153 +9
155 +11
157 +13
161 +17
74-WD


Game 5 NLDS
Cardinals 9,
Nationals 7


Cards shock Nats, will meet Giants in NLCS


Washington
ab r h bi


Jay cf 4 1 0 0 Werth rf 5 1 1 0
Beltranrf 3 2 3 0 Harper cf 5 2 2 2
Hollidy If 5 0 1 2 Zmrmn 3b 5 2 2 2
T.Cruz c 0 0 0 0 LaRochib 4 1 1 0
Craig 1 b 4 0 0 1 Morse If 4 1 2 2
YMolin c 3 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 0 0
Chamrs pr-lf0 1 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0
Freese3b 4 1 2 0 KSuzukc 4 0 3 1
Descals 2b 5 3 3 3 GGnzlz p 2 0 0 0
Kozma ss 5 02 2 Stmmn p 0 00 0
Wnwrg p 1 00 0 SBurntt p 0 0 0 0
J.Kellyp 0 0 0 0 Berndnph 1 0 0 0
SRonsn ph 0 1 0 0 EJcksn p 0 0 0 0
Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
Schmkr ph 1 0 0 0 Tracy ph 1 0 0 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Boggs p 0 0 0 0
MCrpnt ph 1 0 0 0
Motte p 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 9118 Totals 38711 7
St. Louis 000 120 114 9
Washington 303 000 010 7
LOB-St. Louis 9, Washington 5. 2B-Beltran
2 (3), Holliday (1), Descalso (1), Werth (1), Zim-
merman (1). 3B-Harper (1). HR-Descalso
(2), Harper (1), Zimmerman (2), Morse (1).
SB-Descalso (1). CS-Freese (1).
IP H RERBBSO


St. Louis
Wainwright
J.Kelly
Rosenthal
Mujica
Boggs
Motte W,1-0
Washington
G.Gonzalez
Stammen H,1
S.Burnett H,1
E.Jackson H,1
Clippard H,2
Storen L,1-1 BS,1-2
WP-G.Gonzalez.


6 0 5
0 0 2
0 0 2
0 1 1
0 0 0
1 0 1

3 4 5
0 0 0
0 0 0
1 2 2
1 0 1
4 2 2


Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Ed
Hickox; Second, Paul Emmel; Third, Marvin
Hudson; Right, Jim Joyce; Left, Joe West.
T-3:49. A-45,966 (41,487).


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Doesn't mat-
ter how bad things look for the St.
Louis Cardinals. Trailing by a
bunch, down to their last strike,
they simply stay calm and do what
it takes to win.
Erasing an early six-run hole in
Game 5 slowly but surely, the de-
fending World Series champion
Cardinals got a tying two-out, two-
run single from Daniel Descalso
and a go-ahead two-run single
from Pete Kozma in the ninth in-
ning and came all the way back to
beat the Washington Nationals 9-7
Friday night and win their NL di-
vision series.
It was the largest comeback ever
in a winner-take-all postseason
game, according to STATS LLC. No
other club in this sort of ultimate
pressure situation had come back
from more than four down.
First-year manager Mike Math-
eny and the wild-card Cardinals,
the last team to clinch a playoff
spot this year, will open the NL
championship series at San Fran-
cisco on Sunday
Down 7-5 with two outs in the
ninth against Nationals closer
Drew Storen, the Cardinals twice
were a strike away from losing. But
Storen walked both of those bat-
ters, Yadier Molina and David
Freese, setting the stage for the un-
heralded Descalso and Kozma -
Nationals manager Davey Johnson
even called the rookie "Cosmos"
before Game 4 to come through.


Associated Press
St. Louis Cardinals batter Daniel Descalso singles Friday in the ninth inning
of Game 5 of the National League division baseball series against the
Washington Nationals in Washington. The hit tied the game in the ninth
inning and set the stage for the Cardinals' 9-7 victory.


When Cardinals closer Jason
Motte got Ryan Zimmerman to pop
out to second base a half-hour past
midnight, the Cardinals streamed
from the visiting dugout for a
rather muted celebration, all in all.
This was nothing new to them.
Over the past two years, St. Louis
is 6-0 when facing elimination, in-
cluding victories in Games 6 and 7
of the 2011 World Series against
Texas.
Down to their last strike in the
Fall Classic a year ago, trailing by
the exact same 7-5 score, the Car-
dinals rallied in Game 6 and then


took the championship in what
turned out to be the final year with
the club for slugging first baseman
Albert Pujols and then-manager
Tony La Russa. Now Matheny, who
got the Cardinals into the playoffs
as the second NL wild-card team
on the next-to-last day of the regu-
lar season, has them back in the
NLCS.
And to think: Washington, which
won the NL East and led the ma-
jors with 98 wins, got off to as good
a start as possible Friday
Seven pitches, three runs. Just
like that, Jayson Werth's double,


Bryce Harper's triple and Zimmer-
man's homer got the hosts jump-
started in their first Game 5.
That opening outburst, plus a
big third inning highlighted by the
19-year-old Harper's homer, made
it 6-0.
St. Louis was not about to go
gently into the night, though. The
Cardinals chipped away, chipped
away. One run off 21-game winner
Gio Gonzalez in the fourth, a pair
in the fifth, another in the seventh
off Edwin Jackson the Game 3
starter and loser, and an all-
around surprising choice for
midgame relief.
Suddenly, it was 6-4. Descalso's
homer made it 6-5 in the eighth.
And a four-run ninth completed the
reversal.
In Game 6 of last year's World Se-
ries, the Cardinals twice were one
strike from losing, before Freese's
two-run triple in the ninth, then
Lance Berkman's tying RBI single
in the 10th. Freese's homer won it
in the 11th, and St. Louis went on
to a 6-2 victory in Game 7.
Here they were, doing it again.
All in front of a Nationals Park-
record crowd of 45,966 witnessing
the first postseason series in the
nation's capital in 79 years. So
seemingly close to a significant tri-
umph, the Nationals and their
fans left disappointed.
The Nationals went down with-
out All-Star ace Stephen Strasburg.
The team said he'd thrown enough
this year and didn't put him on the
playoff roster


St. Louis
ab r h bi


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 B3

Mo Martin 70-70-73-213 E
Cristie Kerr 68-77-69-214 +1
Julieta Granada 72-72-70 214 +1
Meena Lee 73-68-73- 214 +1
Gerina Piller 70-74-71 -215 +2
Mina Harigae 70-71-74 215 +2
Katherine Hull 70-71-74 215 +2
Nicole Castrale 78-67-71 216 +3
Pornanong Phatlum 74-70-72 216 +3
Hee-Won Han 67-75-74 216 +3
Lexi Thompson 69-71-76-216 +3
Michelle Wie 75-72-70-- 217 +4
Jennifer Johnson 74-72-71 217 +4
Sophie Gustafson 71-74-72 217 +4
Danielle Kang 72-73-72-217 +4
Brittany Lincicome 71-73-73 217 +4
YaniTseng 78-72-68-- 218 +5
Jodi Ewart 73-75-70-- 218 +5
a-Ssu-Chia Cheng 75-72-73 220 +7
a-Aretha Pan 73-73-75 221 +8
Haeji Kang 69-76-76 221 +8
Alison Walshe 71-72-78-- 221 +8
Vicky Hurst 69-81-72-222 +9
Angela Stanford 73-79-71 223 +10
Mariajo Uribe 81-73-70 224 +11
Giulia Sergas 76-72-76 224 +11
Ainil Johani 73-80-74 227 +14
Jean Chua 75-73-79-227 +14
Amanda Blumenherst 72-76-80-- 228 +15
Carly Booth 80-75-76 231 +18
Morgan Pressel 79-83-81 243 +30
a-Sarfina Vinota 81-84-81 246 +33
Greater Hickory
Classic
Saturday
At Rock Barn Golf and Spa (Jones
Course), Conover, N.C.
Purse: $1.6 million
Yardage: 7,090, Par: 72
Second Round
Fred Funk 66-66 -132 -12
Larry Mize 66-67-133 -11
Chip Beck 69-67-136 -8
Duffy Waldorf 69-67-136 -8
MarkWiebe 67-69-136 -8
Gene Sauers 69-68- 137 -7
Peter Senior 68-69- 137 -7
Dan Forsman 65-72-137 -7
David Frost 66-71 -137 -7
Mark O'Meara 70-69- 139 -5
Bernhard Langer 70-69-139 -5
John Cook 68-71 -139 -5
Jay Don Blake 67-72- 139 -5
Dick Mast 72-68- 140 -4
Loren Roberts 70-70- 140 -4
Steve Pate 70-70 -140 -4
Jeff Sluman 69-71 -140 -4
Bobby Clampett 69-71 -140 -4
Scott Simpson 68-72- 140 -4
Bob Gilder 72-69- 141 -3
Willie Wood 70-71 -141 -3
Jeff Freeman 69-72-141 -3
Bruce Vaughan 68-73- 141 -3
Rod Spittle 71-71 -142 -2
Mark Mouland 70-72-142 -2
Russ Cochran 70-72- 142 -2
Tom Lehman 68-74-142 -2
BobTway 71-72-143 -1
Hale Irwin 71-72-143 -1
Tommy Armour III 73-70-143 -1
KirkTriplett 70-73-143 -1
Rick Fehr 74-69-143 -1
Roger Chapman 74-69-143 -1
Tom Jenkins 69-74-143 -1
Brad Faxon 72-72-144 E
Mark McNulty 71-73-144 E
Joel Edwards 73-71 -144 E
Andrew Magee 73-71 -144 E
Bobby Wadkins 70-74-144 E
Steve Lowery 70-74 -144 E
Craig Stadler 70-74 -144 E
Joe Daley 74-70-144 E
Kenny Perry 74-70-144 E
Michael Allen 69-75-144 E
Olin Browne 74-70-144 E
Mark Brooks 75-69 -144 E
Mike Reid 68-76-144 E
Corey Pavin 71-74 -145 +1
Lance Ten Broeck 72-73- 145 +1
Tom Purtzer 71-74-145 +1
Jerry Pate 74-71 -145 +1
David Eger 74-71-145 +1
Gary Hallberg 74-71 -145 +1
Tom Kite 68-77- 145 +1
Jeff Hart 75-70- 145 +1
David Peoples 75-71 -146 +2
Eduardo Romero 79-67- 146 +2
Sandy Lyle 70-77-147 +3
Jay Haas 73-74- 147 +3
Wayne Levi 70-77- 147 +3
Bill Glasson 75-72- 147 +3
Gil Morgan 72-76- 148 +4
Larry Nelson 73-75-148 +4
Jim Rutledge 73-75-148 +4
MikeGoodes 74-74-148 +4
Robin Byrd 76-72-148 +4
Chien Soon Lu 73-76- 149 +5
JimThorpe 74-75-149 +5
Peter Jacobsen 70-79-149 +5
Walter Hall 75-74- 149 +5






B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012



NFL injury report
NEW YORK- The updated National Foot-
ball League injury report, as provided by the
league:
OAKLAND RAIDERS at ATLANTA FAL-
CONS RAIDERS: OUT: T Khalif Barnes
(groin), TE Richard Gordon (hamstring), CB
Shawntae Spencer (foot). QUESTIONABLE:
DT Tommy Kelly (foot). PROBABLE: TE David
Ausberry (shoulder), WR Darrius Heyward-Bey
(concussion), K Sebastian Janikowski (left
groin), RB Taiwan Jones (shoulder), RB Darren
McFadden (shoulder), TE Brandon Myers
(shoulder), C Alex Parsons (shoulder), DT
Richard Seymour (knee). FALCONS: OUT: TE
Michael Palmer (shoulder), RB Antone Smith
(hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: DT Jonathan
Babineaux (groin), LB Stephen Nicholas
(ankle). PROBABLE: WR Kevin Cone (knee),
WR Drew Davis (knee), DT Peria Jerry (thigh),
C Todd McClure (pectoral), S William Moore
(hip), G Garrett Reynolds (back), CB Dunta
Robinson (shoulder).
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS atTAMPA BAY BUC-
CANEERS CHIEFS: OUT: QB Matt Cassel
(concussion), DE Glenn Dorsey (calf), RB Pey-
ton Hillis (ankle), WR Devon Wylie (hamstring).
QUESTIONABLE: WR Jon Baldwin (ham-
string), WR Terrance Copper (calf), RB Cyrus
Gray (illness), DE Ropati Pitoitua (elbow).
PROBABLE: CB Jalil Brown (hamstring), RB
Shaun Draughn (ankle), S Kendrick Lewis
(shoulder), G Ryan Lilja (back). BUCCANEERS:
QUESTIONABLE: DT Roy Miller (back). PROB-
ABLE: G Carl Nicks (toe), T Jeremy Trueblood
(illness), CB Eric Wright (head).
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at NEW YORK JETS
- COLTS: OUT: LB Pat Angerer (foot), RB
Donald Brown (knee), LB Robert Mathis (knee),
DE Fili Moala (knee), G Joe Reitz (knee), NT
Martin Tevaseu (ankle). DOUBTFUL: CB Von-
tae Davis (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Dwight
Freeney (ankle), RB Mewelde Moore (ankle), C
Samson Satele (knee). JETS: DOUBTFUL: RB
John Conner (hamstring), DT Kenrick Ellis
(knee), WR Clyde Gates (shoulder), DT Sione
Po'uha (low back), S Eric Smith (knee). QUES-
TIONABLE: C Nick Mangold (ankle). PROBA-
BLE: LB Nick Bellore (shoulder), CB Aaron
Berry (ribs), CB Antonio Cromartie (shoulder),
TE Jeff Cumberland (ribs), LB David Harris
(hamstring), WR Stephen Hill (hamstring), T
Austin Howard (back), TE Dustin Keller (ham-
string), WR Jeremy Kerley (finger, illness), S
LaRon Landry (heel), G Brandon Moore (hip),
LB Calvin Pace (Achilles), QB Mark Sanchez
(low back), LB Bart Scott (toe), G Matt Slauson
(knee), LB Bryan Thomas (hamstring).
CINCINNATI BENGALS at CLEVELAND
BROWNS- BENGALS: QUESTIONABLE: CB
Jason Allen (quadriceps), DE Wallace Gilberry
(calf), CB Dre Kirkpatrick (knee), LB Dontay
Moch (illness). PROBABLE: WR A.J. Green
(knee), CB Adam Jones (back), CB Terence
Newman (groin), T Andrew Whitworth (knee).
BROWNS: OUT: S Tashaun Gipson (knee), WR
Mohamed Massaquoi (hamstring), CB Dimitri
Patterson (ankle). DOUBTFUL: WR Travis Ben-
jamin (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: LB Scott
Fujita (shoulder, neck), DTAhtyba Rubin (calf),
S RayVentrone (hand, calf), ST.J.Ward (hand).
PROBABLE: LB D'Qwell Jackson (head), DE
Frostee Rucker (shoulder), TE Alex Smith
(head).
DETROIT LIONS at PHILADELPHIA EA-
GLES LIONS: OUT: DT Corey Williams
(knee). QUESTIONABLE: DE Cliff Avril (back),
S Louis Delmas (knee), DT Sammie Hill (toe).
PROBABLE: LB Travis Lewis (quadriceps), TE
Brandon Pettigrew (knee), S Amari Spievey
(groin), LB Stephen Tulloch (knee), WR Titus
Young (knee). EAGLES: PROBABLE: S Colt
Anderson (knee), WR Jason Avant (wrist), RB
Bryce Brown (shoulder), WR Riley Cooper (col-
larbone), C Jon Dorenbos (ankle), T King Dun-
lap (hamstring), RB Stanley Havili (quadriceps),
LB Akeem Jordan (hamstring), LB Mychal
Kendricks (ankle), DT Derek Landri (knee), DE
Darryl Tapp (foot).
ST. LOUIS RAMS at MIAMI DOLPHINS -
RAMS: OUT: WR Danny Amendola (shoulder),
LB Mario Haggan (thigh), T Rodger Saffold
(knee). QUESTIONABLE: DT Matthew Conrath
(knee), DE William Hayes (back), RB Brit Miller
(ankle). PROBABLE: QB Sam Bradford (knee),
S Matthew Daniels (thigh), DE Eugene Sims
(head). DOLPHINS: OUT: CB Richard Marshall
(back), RB Daniel Thomas (concussion).
QUESTIONABLE: LB Kevin Burnett (ankle).
PROBABLE: RB Reggie Bush (knee), CB Nolan
Carroll (Achilles), WR Brian Hartline (quadri-
ceps), S Reshad Jones (back, heel).
DALLAS COWBOYS at BALTIMORE
RAVENS COWBOYS: OUT: P Brian Moor-
man (right groin). QUESTIONABLE: C Ryan
Cook (hamstring), P Chris Jones (left knee), LB
Anthony Spencer (shoulder). PROBABLE: LB
Alex Albright (neck), WR Miles Austin (ham-
string), CB Morris Claiborne (illness), DT
Kenyon Coleman (knee), C Phil Costa (back), S
Matt Johnson (hamstring), NT Jay Ratliff
(ankle), DE Marcus Spears (knee). RAVENS:
PROBABLE: DT Haloti Ngata (shoulder), T Jah
Reid (calf).
BUFFALO BILLS at ARIZONA CARDINALS
- BILLS: OUT: DE Mark Anderson (knee), T
Cordy Glenn (ankle), DE Spencer Johnson
(ankle), G Kraig Urbik (ankle). QUESTION-
ABLE: S Jairus Byrd (chest), G Chad Rinehart
(calf), DT Kyle Williams (ankle), C Eric Wood
(foot). PROBABLE: CB Aaron Williams (hand),
DE Mario Williams (wrist). CARDINALS:
DOUBTFUL: CB Michael Adams (hamstring),
RB Anthony Sherman (knee), CB Greg Toler
(hamstring), LB Reggie Walker (head). QUES-
TIONABLE: DT Darnell Dockett (hamstring), TE
Jim Dray (knee), LB Quentin Groves (ham-
string), TE Todd Heap (knee), LB Paris Lenon
(knee), LB O'Brien Schofield (knee). PROBA-
BLE: RB William Powell (head), QBJohn Skel-
ton (ankle), G Adam Snyder (elbow), RB LaRod
Stephens-Howling (hip).
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at SEATTLE
SEAHAWKS PATRIOTS: OUT: S Steve Gre-
gory (hip), LB Tracy White (foot). QUESTION-
ABLE: RB Brandon Bolden (knee), DE Brandon
Deaderick (ankle), WR Julian Edelman (hand),
DE Justin Francis (ankle), TE Rob Gronkowski
(hip), TE Aaron Hernandez (ankle), LB Dont'a
Hightower (hamstring), TE Michael
Hoomanawanui (concussion), G Logan Mank-
ins (calf, hip), G Nick McDonald (shoulder), S
Sterling Moore (knee), RBShaneVereen (foot),
T Sebastian Vollmer (back, knee), WR Wes
Welker (ankle). PROBABLE: DT Kyle Love
(knee). SEAHAWKS: OUT: DT Jaye Howard
(foot), G John Moffitt (knee). DOUBTFUL: DT
Clinton McDonald (groin). PROBABLE: RB Mar-
shawn Lynch (back), C Max Unger (hip).
NEW YORK GIANTS at SAN FRANCISCO
49ERS GIANTS: OUT: DT Rocky Bernard
(quadriceps), RB Andre Brown (concussion), S
Kenny Phillips (knee). QUESTIONABLE: T
David Diehl (knee), WR Hakeem Nicks (foot,


knee), CB Corey Webster (hand, hamstring).
PROBABLE: WR Ramses Barden (concus-
sion), TE Martellus Bennett (knee), LB Chase
Blackburn (hip), CB Jayron Hosley (hamstring),
LB Keith Rivers (hamstring), S Antrel Rolle
(knee). 49ERS: QUESTIONABLE: RB Brandon
Jacobs (knee). PROBABLE: P Andy Lee
(hand), QB Alex Smith (right finger).
MINNESOTA VIKINGS at WASHINGTON
REDSKINS -VIKINGS: OUT: S Mistral Ray-
mond (ankle). DOUBTFUL: LB Marvin Mitchell
(calf). QUESTIONABLE: WR Jerome Simpson
(lower back, foot). PROBABLE: WR Percy
Harvin (hamstring), G Charlie Johnson (back),
RB Adrian Peterson (ankle), QB Christian Pon-
der (knee), S Andrew Sendejo (ankle), CB An-
toine Winfield (knee). REDSKINS: OUT: S
Brandon Meriweather (knee), DE Doug Wor-
thington (calf). QUESTIONABLE: WR Pierre
Garcon (foot), QB Robert Griffin III (head), CB
Cedric Griffin (hamstring). PROBABLE: NT
Barry Cofield (shoulder), CB DeAngelo Hall
(knee), RB Evan Royster (knee).
GREEN BAY PACKERS at HOUSTON TEX-
ANS PACKERS: OUT: WR Greg Jennings


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S.. CASH 3 (early)
.. 8 -78-7-9
CASH 3 (late)
3-7-3
-K PLAY 4 (early)
4-4-8-6
PLAY 4 (late)
2-7-6-9

FANTASY 5
ora Lotty 3 3-25-26-33-36

POWERBALL LOTTERY
2 5 25 26 49 4 11 36 37 45 51
POWER BALL XTRA
18 3


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500 race
(Taped)
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (TBS) American League Championship Series -
Game 2: Detroit Tigers at New York Yankees
8 p.m. (FOX) National League Championship Series -
Game 1: St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco Giants
BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) WNBA: Indiana Fever at Minnesota Lynx.
Finals Game 1
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Vanderbilt (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Boston College at Florida State (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Oakland Raiders at Atlanta Falcons
4 p.m. (FOX) New York Giants at San Francisco 49ers
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Green Bay Packers at Houston Texans
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Portugal Masters -
Final Round
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Greater Hickory
Classic Final Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Frys.com Open Final Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Miccosukee Championship -
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
9:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
GYMNASTICS
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Kellogg's Tour of Champions (Taped)
HOCKEY
5 p.m. (ESPN2) KHL: Dynamo Moscow vs. Amur
(Same-day Tape)
BULL RIDING
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR George Paul Memorial Night 2
(Taped)
4:30 p.m. (NBC) PBR Tour (Taped)
RUGBY
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series: Australia (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Pumas vs. Pachuca
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Wake Forest at Duke
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Auburn at Florida
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Minnesota at Nebraska

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


(groin), S Sean Richardson (hamstring). QUES-
TIONABLE: TE Jermichael Finley (shoulder),
CB Davon House (shoulder), DT B.J. Raji
(ankle), TE D.J. Williams (hamstring). TEXANS:
OUT: S Quintin Demps (thumb, forearm).
PROBABLE: LB Mister Alexander (Achilles), CB
Alan Ball (ankle), G Antoine Caldwell (ankle,
foot), NT Shaun Cody (back), RB Justin Forsett
(thigh), RB Arian Foster (knee), K Shayne Gra-
ham (right calf), WR Lestar Jean (knee), WR
Andre Johnson (groin), CB Johnathan Joseph
(knee), S Shiloh Keo (neck), LB Jesse Nading
(foot), DE Antonio Smith (ankle), G Wade Smith
(foot), RB Ben Tate (toe).
DENVER BRONCOS at SAN DIEGO
CHARGERS BRONCOS: DNP: CB Tony
Carter (illness), T Ryan Clady (hamstring).
FULL: RB Lance Ball (ankle), LB Keith Brooking
(concussion), RB Chris Gronkowski (thigh), CB
Chris Harris (ankle), G Chris Kuper (forearm),
WR Demaryius Thomas (hip), WR Matthew
Willis (not injury related). CHARGERS: DNP: T
Jared Gaither (groin), K Nate Kaeding (right
groin), WR Eddie Royal (hamstring). LIMITED:
WR Malcom Floyd (groin). FULL: T Jeromey
Clary (foot), RB Ryan Mathews (ankle).



NBA preseason
standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 2 0 1.000 -
Brooklyn 1 0 1.000 12
Philadelphia 1 1 .500 1
Toronto 1 1 .500 1
Boston 0 1 .000 11Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 1 1 .500 -
Miami 1 1 .500 -
Charlotte 1 2 .333 12
Washington 1 2 .333 12
Orlando 0 2 .000 1
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 1 0 1.000 -
Chicago 1 1 .500 12
Detroit 1 1 .500 12
Indiana 1 1 .500 12
Cleveland 1 2 .333 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Houston 2 0 1.000 -
New Orleans 3 1 .750 -
San Antonio 1 1 .500 1
Dallas 0 0 .000 1
Memphis 0 1 .000 11Y2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Denver 2 0 1.000 -
Minnesota 1 1 .500 1
Portland 1 1 .500 1
Utah 1 1 .500 1
Oklahoma City 0 2 .000 2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Golden State 2 0 1.000 -
Sacramento 1 0 1.000 12
Phoenix 1 1 .500 1
L.A. Lakers 0 2 .000 2
L.A. Clippers 0 2 .000 2


Friday's Games
Toronto 82, Detroit 75
Indiana 96, Minnesota 91
Cleveland 86, Chicago 83
Houston 95, New Orleans 75
Denver 97, San Antonio 91
Utah 97, Oklahoma City 81
Phoenix 104, Portland 93
Saturday's Games
Brooklyn 108, Philadelphia 105, OT
New York 98, Boston 95, OT
Washington 99, Cleveland 95
Chicago at Minnesota, late
Detroit at Milwaukee, late
Utah at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
L.A. Clippers vs. Miami at Shanghai, China,
12:30 a.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 2 p.m.
Atlanta at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Orlando vs. Cleveland at Cincinnati, OH, 7 p.m.
Washington at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
NEW YORK YANKEES-Activated RHP
Cody Eppley to the League Championship Se-
ries roster. Deactivated INF Eduardo Nunez.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Suspended Tampa Bay CB Aqib Talib
four games for violating the NFLs policy on per-
formance-enhancing substances.
BUFFALO BILLS-Signed DT Jay Ross and
OL David Snow from the practice squad.
CLEVELAND BROWNS-Signed QB Thad-
deus Lewis to the practice squad.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Signed G Greg
Van Roten from the practice squad.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS-Released TE
Weslye Saunders.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Signed DE
Markus White from the practice squad.
COLLEGE
WAKE FOREST-Suspended S Duran Lowe
and OT Devin Boiling indefinitely.


Baseball Calendar
Oct. 13 League championship series begin.
Oct. 24 World Series begins, city of Na-
tional League champion.
November TBA Deadline for teams to
make qualifying offers to their eligible former
players who became free agents, fifth day after
World Series.
November TBA Deadline for free agents
to accept qualifying offers, 12th day after World
Series.
Nov. 7-9 --General managers meetings, In-
dian Wells, Calif.
Nov. 14-15- Owners meetings, Chicago.
Dec. 2 Last day for teams to offer 2013
contracts to unsigned players.
Dec. 3-6 -Winter meetings, Nashville, Tenn.
Dec. 3 Hall of Fame pre-integration era
committee (before 1946) vote announced,
Nashville, Tenn.


Bowyer wins in Charlotte


Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. Clint
Bowyer picked up his first
win in the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship
Saturday night, winning a
fuel mileage race that ended
in disaster for points leader
Brad Keselowski.
Keselowski dominated
Saturday night at Charlotte
Motor Speedway but ran out
of gas with 58 laps remaining
to blow his chance at the vic-
tory He fell a lap down and
finished 11th, and had his


lead in the standings sliced in
half over five-time champion
Jimmie Johnson.
Keselowski, who has a
seven-point lead over John-
son at the halfway point of
the 10-race Chase, immedi-
ately gave his Penske Racing
team a pep talk over the
radio.
"Win some lose some guys,
it's all good," he told them.
Keselowski, who also ran
out of gas Friday night in the
Nationwide Series race be-
cause of a fueling error, then
asked his crew if he led the


most laps Saturday night In-
deed -he led 139 of the 334
- but had little to show for
his effort
"It's blackjack, you're not
going to win every hand," he
said. "When you got a bad
deal you have to try not to
have too many chips on the
table."
But Keselowski was able to
see a silver lining in still fin-
ishing 11th.
"It was the worst-case sce-
nario," he said. "We mini-
mized the damage as best we
could."


Ibanez's Yankee heroics


Associated Press
New York Yankees hitter Raul Ibanez slugged a two-run home run off Detroit Tigers pitcher
Jose Valverde on Saturday in the ninth inning of Game 1 of the American League champi-
onship series in New York. The Yankees started the bottom of the ninth down 4-0 and
Ibanez's hit tied the game at 44. The game was still tied at that score at press time. Please
see Monday's Chronicle for the result.


GATORS
Continued from Page B1

... It says a lot about our guys
stepping up and manning
up."'
Vanderbilt (2-4, 1-3) now
has lost 47 straight against
Top Five teams in front of its
first sellout crowd since
Florida's visit in 2008.
"We did not adjust well to
the quarterback running
game," Vanderbilt coach
James Franklin said. "That's
on me. It will get fixed."
The Gators also had three
sacks, forced a turnover,
blocked a field goal and used
a fake punt to put away Van-
derbilt Caleb Sturgis kicked
three field goals.
Florida did give up its first
points in the fourth quarter
this season as Zac Stacy
scored on a 1-yard run with
8:57 left, pulling the Com-
modores within 21-14. Carey
Spear's second field goal, a
22-yarder, with 2:35 left to
pull Vanderbilt within 24-17
after Stacy had a Rodgers'
pass go through his hands on
third-and-goal.
Each time, the Gators an-
swered in a big way First,
Andre Debose returned the
kickoff 60 yards as he
bounced off a couple Com-



FSU
Continued from Page B1

"Some teams can't
bounce back," said Florida
State running back James
Wilder Jr., who caught two
of Manuel's scoring throws.
"We just made sure we did-
n't have that taste in our
mouth anymore."
"I thought our kids did a
great job all week of putting
that last game behind
them," Florida State coach
Jimbo Fisher said. "Not let-
ting it drag on. We executed
very well."
And that was exactly what
Boston College coach Frank
Spaziani had feared coming
into the game.
"They got annoyed that
they got a little conservative
last week and they weren't
about to do that," Spaziani
said. "They were going to at-
tack and they were in an at-
tack mode right from the
beginning."
Manuel threw six straight
passes on the opening 99-
yard drive without once
going to the run. He passed
for 295 yards and three
touchdowns in the first half
alone.
Boston College drove to
the Florida State 1-yard
line one on the opening


modores to set up Sturgis' 26-
yard field goal. The Com-
modores had a short kick
after pulling within 24-17,
and Driskel went 70 yards on
the next play for the sealing
TD.
"He did an awesome job,"
Florida receiver Solomon
Patton said of Driskel. "With
him being able to run like
that, it opened up a lot, as far
as the run game and passing
game. Teams don't know if he
is going to pass it or take off
running."
Florida showed the effects
of a bit of an emotional let-
down after a big win over
LSU last week that even had
Muschamp crowd-surfing in
his locker room after that
game. The Gators didn't cross
midfield until early in the
second quarter and helped
Vanderbilt out repeatedly
with 10 penalties for 80 yards.
Vanderbilt used an inter-
ference penalty on a punt to
take its only lead at 7-0 in the
first quarter Jordan Rodgers
threw a 10-yard TD pass to
Jordan Matthews in the back
of the right corner
Driskel capped a 91-yard
drive when he faked a hand-
off to Mike Gillislee so well
that the Florida quarterback
ran back to his left and up the
sideline untouched 37 yards
for a touchdown. Trey Burton


drive of the game, but
couldn't score, stopped
twice only inches from the
goal line.
"I don't know if that's
going to be a difference in
the game, but it certainly
sets a little different tone,"
Spaziani said.
It didn't take the Semi-
noles long to get to the other
end.
Kenny Shaw raced 77
yards with a Manuel pass to
cap Florida State's drive.
Shaw caught the pass near
midfield and outran two BC
defenders down the left
sideline for the touchdown.
He had two catches for 125
yards and teammate Rod-
ney Smith had nine recep-
tions for 108 yards and has
now caught at least one pass
in 32 straight games.
Kelvin Benjamin also
caught a scoring pass and
Lonnie Pryor had two
touchdowns on short runs.
Florida State added 201
yards rushing. Devonta
Freeman had 70 and Chris
Thompson ran for 68.
Hopkins passed the pre-
vious league scoring record
of 393 points with a 51-yard
field goal that gave the
Seminoles a 31-7 halftime
lead.
"I didn't know until after
it happened," Hopkins said.
"I'm just humbled by the


then took a direct snap and
ran in for 2-point conversion
and an 8-7 lead with 11:27 left
in the second.
Florida led 11-7 at halftime
even after failing to convert
after getting first-and-goal at
the Vanderbilt 2 before set-
tling for a Sturgis field goal.
Vanderbilt had its chances,
especially on the opening
drive of the third quarter.
Stacy took a direct snap in
the wildcat and went up the
middle 57 yards to the end
zone. Matthews was flagged
for holding as he grabbed the
shoulder of a Gators de-
fender, wiping out the TD.
They still drove to the
Florida 7 before a false start,
then Rodgers was sacked by
Josh Evans. Earl Okine
blocked Spear's 44-yard field
goal attempt and Loucheiz
Purifoy recovered, finally
getting Florida the ball for
the first time in the half with
6:17 left in the third.
The Commodores forced
Florida to punt three plays
later, but the Gators caught
Vanderbilt with a fake punt.
Patton ran up the left side-
line 54 yards to the Com-
modores 3. A hold wiped out
a touchdown, then the Com-
modores bit again on
Driskel's fake handoff as he
ran 13 yards untouched for
his second TD late in the
third.


whole thing."
Hopkins boosted his ca-
reer total to 402 points and
now stands fifth on the
NCAA scoring list. He also
erased a pair of Florida
State career marks that
stood for 25 years, both pre-
viously held by Derrick
Schmidt. Hopkins' 75 field
goals are five shy of the ACC
mark held by former Mary-
land kicker Nick Novak,
who was the league's previ-
ous scoring leader.
Rettig, who came into the
game averaging 306.2 yards
passing, managed 122
against the ACC's top de-
fense.
"It wasn't what we
wanted, but we were just
trying to stay in it," Rettig
said. "They made plays and
we didn't make enough."
Andre Williams ran for
104 yards on 20 carries for
the Eagles, who are at Geor-
gia Tech next Saturday
Florida State visits long-
time nemesis Miami next
weekend.
And the Seminoles play-
ers have no plans to take
the Hurricanes the least bit
lightly
"You're always seven
days away from being hum-
bled," Florida State's
Lamarcus Joyner said.
"Each game is going to be a
one game season."


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

No. 4 Florida 31,
Vanderbilt 17
Florida 0 11 7 13 31
Vanderbilt 7 0 0 10 17
First Quarter
Van-Matthews 10 pass from Rodgers (Spear
kick), 6:45.
Second Quarter
Fla-Driskel 37 run (T.Burton run), 11:27.
Fla-FG Sturgis 23, :10.
Third Quarter
Fla-Driskel 13 run (Sturgis kick), 4:31.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 29, 13:30.
Van-Stacy 1 run (Fowler kick), 8:57.
Fla-FG Sturgis 26, 5:22.
Van-FG Spear 22, 2:35.
Fla-Driskel 70 run (Sturgis kick), 2:20.


A-40,350.
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Fla
15
35-326
77
11-20-0
6
5-46.2
1-0
10-80
26:50


Van
23
47-126
237
17-31-0
11
5-44.6
1-1
4-33
33:10


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Driskel 11-177, Gillislee
17-67, Patton 1-54, Hines 2-16, T.Burton 2-10,
M.Brown 1-3, Team 1-(minus 1). Vanderbilt,
Stacy 24-86, Tate 10-66, Kimbrow 1-2, Team 1 -
(minus 1), Rodgers 11-(minus 27).
PASSING-Florida, Driskel 11-20-0-77. Van-
derbilt, Rodgers 17-31-0-237.
RECEIVING-Florida, Reed 2-14, Gillislee 2-
12, Dunbar 1-21, Hines 1-9, T.Burton 1-8,
C.Burton 1-6, Andrades 1-5, Hammond 1-2,
K.Taylor 1-0. Vanderbilt, Matthews 8-131, Scheu
3-21, Boyd 1-37, Krause 1-23, Stacy 1-16,
Grady 1-6, Kentera 1-4, Tate 1-(minus 1).
No. 12 FSU 51,
Boston College 7
Boston College 0 7 0 0 7
Florida St. 14 1710 10-- 51
First Quarter
FSU-Shaw 77 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 9:13.
FSU-Pryor 2 run (Hopkins kick), 4:53.
Second Quarter
FSU-Wilder 7 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 10:14.
FSU-Benjamin 6 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 7:27.
BC-Swigert 18 pass from Rettig (Freese kick),
1:56.
FSU-FG Hopkins 51, :00.
Third Quarter
FSU-Pryor 3 run (Hopkins kick), 11:45.
FSU-FG Hopkins 26, 3:43.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-Wilder 12 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 13:06.
FSU-FG Hopkins 38, 6:53.
A-81,075.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


BC
18
32-96
129
16-33-1
20
9-43.4
1-0
4-29
30:33


FSU
30
33-201
448
29-38-2
87
2-43.0
1-0
9-96
29:27


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Boston College, A.Williams 20-
104, McCaffrey 4-8, Bordner 1-3, Rettig 1-
(minus 8), Dudeck 6-(minus 11). Florida St.,
Freeman 8-70, Thompson 10-68, Wilder 6-27,
Smiley 2-21, Pryor 3-10, Manuel 4-5.
PASSING-Boston College, Rettig 15-31-1-
122, Bordner 1-2-0-7. Florida St., Manuel 27-
34-2-439, Trickett 2-4-0-9.
RECEIVING-Boston College, Swigert 5-61,
Dudeck 5-9, Amidon 3-44, McCaffrey 1-7, Cole-
man 1-5, Evans 1-3. Florida St., R.Smith 9-108,
Benjamin 5-68, Thompson 4-27, Dent 3-33,
Wilder 3-26, Shaw 2-125, Haggins 1-42,
Greene 1-8, Pryor 1-0, Manuel 0-11.
UNC 18, Miami 14
North Carolina 7 8 3 0 18
Miami 0 7 7 0- 14
First Quarter
NC-Bernard 10 run (Barth kick), 9:15.
Second Quarter
Mia-James 1 run (Wieclaw kick), 5:32.
NC-Bernard 17 run (Ebron pass from Hib-
bard), 2:57.
Third Quarter
Mia-Morris 5 run (Wieclaw kick), 5:06.
NC-FG Barth 48, 1:51.
A-58,954.
NC Mia
First downs 30 26
Rushes-yards 44-272 45-180
Passing 214 235
Comp-Att-Int 25-40-1 21-39-2
Return Yards 26 24
Punts-Avg. 4-43.3 3-33.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 15-140 7-54
Time of Possession 29:42 30:18
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-North Carolina, Bernard 27-177,
Morris 10-77, Blue 4-14, Renner 2-5, Team 1-
(minus 1). Miami, James 22-96, Du.Johnson 14-
47, Morris 7-40, Hagens 1-3, Ry.Williams
1-(minus 6).
PASSING-North Carolina, Renner 25-40-1-
214. Miami, Morris 12-26-2-155, Ry.Williams 9-
13-0-80.
RECEIVING-North Carolina, Highsmith 8-57,
Ebron 7-87, Bernard 4-36, Boyd 2-2, Tabb 1-13,
Q.Davis 1-10, Platt 1-10, Morris 1-(minus 1).
Miami, Scott 6-72, James 4-29, Humrns 3-44,
Dorsett 3-33, Da.Johnson 2-31, Walford 1-11,
Dye 1-9, Hagens 1-6.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 B5


Heels muddle past 'Canes


North Carolina

holds on to beat

Miami 18-14

Associated Press

MIAMI Giovani Bernard ran
for two touchdowns and North Car-
olina survived a slew of penalties to
beat Miami 18-14 Saturday, handing
the Hurricanes their first Atlantic
Coast Conference loss.
Bernard scored on runs of 10 and
17 yards for the Tar Heels (5-2, 2-1).
It was the fourth straight win for
North Carolina, which was penal-
ized 15 times.
Mike James and Stephen Morris
each had touchdown runs for
Miami (4-3, 3-1), which may have
lost more than a game. Morris,
Miami's quarterback, was helped
off the field with 8:26 remaining
after apparently hurting his left
ankle. He had a large icepack
strapped to the ankle shortly after-
ward and did not return.
Backup Ryan Williams was called
in and threw an incompletion on
fourth-and-6 from the North Car-
olina 26 with 5:45 left. North Car-
olina took nearly four minutes off the
clock before punting to Miami with
1:47 left, then held on from there.
With Williams running the show
- after Morris' ankle was wrapped
in a boot and he left the game the
Hurricanes got to the North Car-
olina 29 with just under a minute
left. But Miami gave up a sack to
North Carolina's Tommy Heffernan
with 38 seconds left, knocking the
Hurricanes back to the 35.
Two plays later, Miami turned the
ball over on downs and now four
teams have one loss in the ACC
Coastal race.
For Bernard, who played his high


Associated Press
North Carolina's Giovani Bernard outruns Miami's Paul Kelly during the first half Saturday in Miami.


school football at nearby St.
Thomas Aquinas in Fort Laud-
erdale, it was a long-awaited home-
coming- and he didn't disappoint.
His second touchdown came
with 2:57 left in the first half, the
second in a pair of brilliant plays by
the Tar Heels. Bernard got loose to
catch a 17-yard pass from Bryn
Renner on fourth-and-6 from the
Miami 33, a play where the Hurri-
canes nearly had a stop and one
that left defensive coordinator
Mark D'Onofrio punching the air in
disappointment.
His mood soured even worse just
seconds later when Bernard
quickly went in from 17 yards out,
sending the Tar Heels into the half
with a 15-7 lead. North Carolina got
a two-point conversion after that


score, catching the Miami defense
off-guard with a quick snap.
The first omen of trouble for
Miami came on its first drive. The
Hurricanes kept the offense on the
field for a fourth-and-1 at the North
Carolina 46, only to have left tackle
Malcolm Bunche jump offsides.
And on Miami's next possession, a
pass by Morris bounced off James'
hand, caromed into the air and was
picked off at the North Carolina 20
by Shakeel Reshad.
North Carolina cashed in only
one of those mistakes Bernard
went in from 10 yards out to cap the
opening Tar Heels' drive: a seven-
play, 61-yard waltz with nary any re-
sistance from the Hurricanes.
It stayed 7-0 until the midpoint of
the second quarter, though easily


could have been much worse. Ren-
ner was picked off by Miami's
Eddie Johnson near the goal line
on one possession, and Casey Barth
missed a 33-yard field goal into a
swirling wind with 10:53 left in the
half. A roughing-the-kicker penalty
on a Miami punt gave the Hurri-
canes a break, and James plowed
in from a yard out to tie the game at
7-all with 5:21 remaining.
Morris scored from 5 yards out
with 5:06 left in the third to end a
12-play, 94-yard drive and get the
Hurricanes within 15-14 a se-
quence where Miami apparently
wanted to try going for a two-point
conversion as well. But officials
flagged the Hurricanes for snap-
ping the ball too quickly, and Miami
settled for just an extra point.


Stars and numbers from Saturday action


Associated Press

STARS
Seth Doege, Texas Tech,
passed for six TDs and a career-
high 499 yards in the Red Raiders'
49-14 upset of No. 5 West Virginia.
Montee Ball, Wisconsin, ran for
a career-high 247 yards and three
TDs to help the Badgers beat Pur-
due 38-14. He is now is alone in
third place in NCAA history with 72
career TDs.
Eddie Lacy, Alabama, had a ca-
reer-best 177 yards on 18 carries
and three TDs in the top-ranked
Crimson Tide's 42-10 win over Mis-
souri.
Denard Robinson, Michigan,
threw two TD passes, ran for two
more scores and had 287 total yards
to lead the No. 25 Wolverines in a
45-0 win over Illinois.
EJ Manuel, Florida State,
threw for a career-high 439 yards
and four TDs as the 12th-ranked
Seminoles rebounded from their
first loss of the season with a 51-7
victory over Boston College.
Collin Klein, Kansas State, ran
for 105 yards and three TDs, and
the sixth-ranked Wildcats held off
Iowa State 27-21.
Cody Vaz, Oregon State, passed
for 332 yards and three TDs in his
first start since high school to help
the No. 10 Beavers beat Brigham
Young 42-24.
Senorise Perry, Louisville,
rushed for 101 yards and a career-
high four TDs to help the No. 18
Cardinals race by Pittsburgh 45-35.
Stefphon Jefferson, Nevada,
rushed for 185 yards and three TDs
to help the Wolf Pack overcome a
17-point halftime deficit and defeat


Associated Press
Wisconsin running back Montee Ball, right, pushes off Purdue defensive
back Frankie Williams as he runs during the first half Saturday in West


Lafayette, Ind.
UNLV 42-37.
Shane Carden, East Carolina,
threw for 308 yards and 5 TDs in a
41-7 win over Memphis.
Cary Grossart, Northern Ari-
zona, threw for 363 yards and four
TDs in a 45-38 win over North
Dakota.
Bo Wallace, Mississippi, scored
four TDs rushing, passing and re-
ceiving as the Rebels snapped a 16-
game SEC losing streak with a 41-20
win over Auburn.
Dri Archer, Kent State, rushed
for 222 yards, including an explo-
sive 87-yard TD late, and com-
pleted a trick 24-yard touchdown
pass in a 31-17 win over Army
Lanny Funsten, Davidson,
caught 17 passes to break the Pio-
neer Football League single-game
record and had 246 yards receiving


in a 34-24 loss to Jacksonville.
NUMBERS
4 Kick returns for scores this
season by Marcus Murphy, setting a
Missouri single-season record. He
returned a kickoff 98 yards for a TD
in the second quarter against No. 1
Alabama.
16 Straight wins by Penn over
Columbia after a 24-20 victory
18 Plays of 15 yards or more by
Texas Tech in its 49-14 upset of No.
5 West Virginia.
47 Career TD passes by East-
ern Kentucky's TJ. Pryor, breaking
Jim Guice's school record. Pryor
also broke Josh Greco's school
record of 478 career completions.
402 Career points by Florida
State kicker Dustin Hopkins, most
in the Atlantic Coast Conference
and fifth in NCAA history


467 Yards rushing by Wisconsin
in a rainy 38-14 win over Purdue.
IRISH REVENGE
Notre Dame knew what was com-
ing. Stanford doesn't get cute
inches from the goal line.
And after three years of getting
pushed around by the Cardinal, the
Fighting Irish pushed back, win-
ning the most important shoving
match they've had all season.
Or did they?
A wall of Notre Dame defenders
stopped Stepfan Taylor inches from
the goal line on fourth down in
overtime and the seventh-ranked
Irish remained unbeaten with a 20-
13 victory against the No. 17 Cardi-
nal on a soggy day in South Bend.
Taylor kept reaching and turning
with bodies underneath him, and his
knee never did hit the ground before
reaching the ball across the goal
line. But the officials ruled it was too
late. The whistle had blown, and that
meant the play was stopped.
The celebration had to wait for a
replay review. The call stood. Irish
fans who weren't already on the
field spilled out of the stands, and
Notre Dame's national title hopes
remained alive. The Irish are 6-0
for the first time since 2002.
KLIaS SEIZURES RETURN
Minnesota football coach Jerry
Kill's seizure problems returned
Saturday, hospitalizing the coach
shortly after he gave his postgame
press conference following a 21-13
loss to Northwestern.
Kill met with the media and an-
swered questions for about 10 min-
utes after the game, looking healthy
and strong. But moments after re-
turning to the locker room, school of-
ficials said he had another seizure.


The pros and cons of


With the death a few
days ago of Alex
Karras, the Detroit
Lions defensive tackle and
media personality, I re-
flected on the pros and cons
of being an athlete. Karras
had several ail-
ments, including
a diagnosis of de-
mentia about
seven years ago.
Last April, 0
Karras joined in
a lawsuit against -.
the NFL brought "-
by more than
3,000 former
players who al- Dr. Ron
leged the league DOCi
knowingly failed DOCT
to warn players ORD
about long-term
brain damage from concus-
sive injuries.
The long-term perils and
complications of athletics
and sports have been, until
recently, difficult to predict
With medicine and science


today, long-term problems
are more predictable.
In high school alone dur-
ing the 2009-10 season, there
were 1,359,900 injured ath-
letes with 3,698 different in-
juries nationally. Not only do
these injuries in-
clude knee, hip
and shoulder ail-
ments, but also
concussions.
Concussions
are one of the
consequences of
contact sports
which can in-
clude hockey, soc-
Joseph cer and rugby But
.... sports that are not


EORS
ERS


supposed to be
contact include
head trauma such


as baseball, mountain biking
and downhill skiing.
The injury of the day, es-
pecially in football, is a con-
cussion. The brain is made
up of soft tissue and is cush-
ioned by spinal fluid. With a


very hard blow to the head,
the brain suddenly moves
inside the skull and bumps
up against the skull's hard
bony surface. When this
happens with force, a
concussion occurs.
A concussion is the tem-
porary change in brain func-
tion as a result of suddenly
being moved or jarred. It is
viewed as a bruise to the
brain. In reality, the cumula-
tive effects can lead to a se-
rious and permanent
alteration in brain function.
Concussions range from
minor to major, but they
share one common factor
and that is the temporary in-
terference with the way your
brain works. This can affect
memory, judgment, reflexes,
speech, balance and coordi-
nation. But every concus-
sion, no matter how mild,
injures your brain.
Some sports injuries may
lead to arthritis or other
complications later in life


whether tr
not. It is im
stand the
that cause
life. These
jury to the
a fracture
injuries 1
mechanics
Injuries
structures
alters join
result in
loose or u
ing stress
faces leach
Injuries ol
cus, should
labrum sir
rected) cai
ity and art
Treating
with chroi
be the keN
gression to
pain occu
letes with
ture soo0
non-athlet
due to the


being

eated correctly or Early treat
iportant to under- in young a
types of injury term imp
arthritis in later and mobil
include direct in- prevention
cartilage such as hip disea
into the joint or ference 1
that alter joint pains and
s. The m
of the supporting place a tre
or ligaments that on the k
it mechanics can least mus
a joint being too very comr
stable, increas- juries to t
on the joint sur- tilage o01
ding to arthritis, frequent.
f the knee menis- lifetime
der capsule and pain andI
milarly (if uncor- placemen
n lead to instabil- The for
hritis. the lowes
young athletes L5 on the
nic hip pain may spondylol
y to slowing pro- commonlI
hip disease. Hip figure sk
rs in young ath- The sign
abnormal struc- heavy lan
ner than their frequentlI
tic counterpart, in this
level of activity. condition


an athlete

itment of hip pain These sports, including
athletes has a long- weight lifting, can lead to
act on the health spondylolisthesis and other
lity of the hip, thus back trauma resulting in
g later debilitating chronic disc herniation and
se. There is a dif- arthritis of the spine. All are
between growing lifelong consequences of
chronic hip pain. sports.
majority of sports While athletic injuries
emendous demand and their long term compli-
mee, the largest, cations can counter the ben-
cle protected and eficial effects of sports
plicated joint. In- participation, with current
he ligaments, car- medical experience, new
r meniscus are arthroscopic and limited ex-
and may lead to a posure surgery techniques
of chronic knee and appropriate therapy, the
possibly a knee re- risks of long term complica-
it tions are very small.
ward slippage of Believe, there is no gain
t lumbar vertebra, with pain. Get a proper
sacrum is called evaluation with any ongo-
.isthesis and is ing pain to prevent long-
y seen in gymnasts, term injury and stay in the
aters and divers, game.
lificant stress of Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
tidings on feet or and shoulder orthopedic
y rear-ends results surgeon at SeaSpine Ortho-
long term spine pedic Institute, may be
reached atrbjhand@cox.net


a






B6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


No. 5 WVU stunned


Texas Tech knocks

Mountaineers from

list ofunbeatens

Associated Press

West Virginia came into Satur-
day's game at Texas Tech in the
drivers' seat for the Big 12 title, un-
defeated and eyeing a shot at the
BCS championship and with quar-
terback Geno Smith acclaimed as a
Heisman Trophy front-runner
The No. 5 Mountaineers left with
none of it following a 49-14 loss to
the Red Raiders that was the most
lopsided Texas Tech victory over a
team ranked in the top five.
Texas Tech's defense consis-
tently stymied West Virginia's of-
fense. Heisman Trophy hopeful
Smith completed 29 of 55 passes for
275 yards, well off his season aver-
ages of nearly 400 yards and and 81
percent completion rate.
The Red Raiders offense had no
trouble moving the ball as quarter-
back Seth Doege threw TD passes
of 39, 19, 16, 2, 29 and 7 yards. He
completed 32 of 42 passes and the
six touchdowns matched his ca-
reer-high. Darrin Moore caught
three touchdown passes.
Earlier, Oklahoma clobbered
Texas 63-21 to get a leg up in the
Big 12 race, and only benefited
from West Virginia being brought
back to the pack. Kansas State (6-0,
3-0) is the only undefeated team
left in the conference, but next Sat-
urday faces what should be a moti-
vated West Virginia team, followed
the next week b by Texas Tech,
which is also 2-1 in the league.
No. 9 LSU 23,
No. 3 South Carolina 21
BATON ROUGE, La. LSU fresh-
man Jeremy Hill highlighted a breakout
124-yard, two-touchdown performance
with a 50-yard scoring run, and the
ninth-ranked Tigers handed No. 3
South Carolina its first loss of the sea-
son, 23-21.
LSU (6-1, 2-1 Southeastern Confer-
ence) substantially outgained South
Carolina (6-1, 4-1) 406 yards to 211,
but struggled to find the end zone.
Three times, LSU settled for field goals
after driving at least as far as the
Gamecocks 5-yard line, and another
drive to the South Carolina 15 stalled
on a missed field goal.
But Hill's long score with 5:03 left
gave LSU a nine-point lead that proved
a little too much to overcome.
Connor Shaw drove South Carolina
for a late TD on a short pass to Bruce
Ellington with 1:41 left, and the Game-
cocks got the ball once more with 35
seconds left, but LSU's defense held up.
No. 1 Alabama 42,
Missouri 10
ST. LOUIS Eddie Lacy and T.J.
Yeldon gave top-ranked Alabama a pair
of 100-yard rushers in the same game
for the first time this season and the
duo combined for five scores in a
soggy, weather-delayed game.
The defending national champion
Crimson Tide (6-0, 3-0 SEC) led 21-0
late in the first quarter en route to their
10th straight victory, all by 19 or more
points.
They did just enough right after that
to disappoint the few thousand fans
who didn't leave for good during a 38-
minute delay due to lightning with the
Crimson Tide awaiting the extra-point
kick for a 28-0 cushion after Yeldon's
second scoring run with 8:40 to go in
the half.
Texas Tech 49,
No. 5 West Virginia 14
LUBBOCK, Texas Seth Doege
passed for six touchdowns and a sea-
son-high 499 yards as Texas Tech
shocked No. 5 West Virginia 49-14,
ending the Mountaineers' hopes for an
unbeaten season.
The Red Raiders fans stormed the
field after the win, the most lopsided
Texas Tech victory ever over a team
ranked in the top five.
Texas Tech's defense consistently
stymied West Virginia's offense. Heis-
man Trophy hopeful Geno Smith com-
pleted 29 of 55 passes for 275 yards.
The Red Raiders offense had no
trouble moving the ball as Doege threw
TD passes of 39, 19, 16, 2, 29 and 7
yards. He completed 32 of 42 passes
and the six touchdowns matched his
career-high. Darrin Moore caught three
touchdown passes.
Texas Tech (5-1,2-1) had 18 plays of
15 yards or more, including a 61-yard


pass to Jace Amaro and a 53-yard
touchdown run by SaDale Foster.
No. 6 Kansas State 27,
Iowa State 21
AMES, Iowa Quarterback Collin
Klein ran for 105 yards and three touch-
downs to help K-State hold off the Cy-
clones and beat them for the fifth
straight time.


Associated Press
West Virginia's Tavon Austin is taken down by Texas Tech's Eugene Neboh, front, and Cody Davis on Saturday
in Lubbock, Texas. Unranked Texas Tech scored a 49-14 blowout over No. 5 West Virginia.


Klein also threw for 187 yards for the
Wildcats (6-0, 3-0 Big 12), who remain
unbeaten heading into next week's
showdown with West Virginia.
Kansas State held the Cyclones (4-2,
1-2) to just 231 yards of offense. Iowa
State still had a chance for the game-
winning drive from its own 3-yard line
with 2:17 left, but the Wildcats stopped
the Cyclones on downs.
The Wildcats held the ball for nearly
41 minutes and converted eight of 17
third downs.
Jared Barnett threw for 166 yards
and two TDs for Iowa State.
No. 7 Notre Dame 20,
No. 17 Stanford 13, OT
SOUTH BEND, Ind. TJ Jones
made a reaching 7-yard touchdown
catch in overtime and No. 7 Notre
Dame stopped Stanford inches from
the goal line.
After Jones and Tommy Rees gave
the Fighting Irish (6-0) a seven-point
lead in OT, Stanford (4-2) drove to a
first-and-goal at the 4.
Stepfan Taylor ran for 1 on first, 2 on
second and inches on third down. That
left one play from inside the 1 and the
Notre Dame defense, led by Carlos
Calabrese, stood up Taylor and pushed
him back.
Taylor kept reaching and turning, and
ended up reaching the ball across the
goal line, but the officials ruled it was
too late. The play had been stopped.
The celebration had to wait for a re-
play review. It was close, but the call
stood. The fans completed storming the
field, and the national title hopes in
South Bend remained alive.
No. 10 Oregon State 42,
BYU 24
PROVO, Utah Cody Vaz passed
for 332 yards and three touchdowns in
his first start since high school.
Vaz was filling in for Sean Mannion,
who is out indefinitely with a left knee
injury.
Oregon State is 5-0 for the first time
since 1939.
Markus Wheaton caught two first-
quarter TD passes, and scored on a
12-yard reverse in the fourth, while cor-
nerback Jordan Poyer returned an in-
terception 49 yards to seal the victory
against BYU (4-3).
Vaz started 5 of 5 for 75 yards and
finished 20 of 32 against BYU's fifth-
rated defense.
BYU quarterback Riley Nelson com-
pleted 28 of 51 passes for 305 yards
and a touchdown, but was intercepted
three times.
Oregon State rolled up 450 yards of-
fense.
Brandin Cooks caught eight passes
for 173 yards for the Beavers.
No. 11 USC 24,
Washington 14
SEATTLE Anthony Brown blocked
a punt and returned it 21 yards for a
touchdown in the first half, Jawanza
Starling forced and recovered Keith
Price's fumble inside the USC 5-yard
line in the fourth quarter, and the No. 11
Trojans overcame offensive inconsis-
tency for a 24-14 win over Washington.
Silas Redd rushed for 108 yards and
a touchdown in the first half and Matt
Barkley added an 18-yard TD pass to


Xavier Grimble as the Trojans contin-
ued rebuilding their resume following
last month's loss to Stanford that ap-
peared to end their national champi-
onship hopes.
The Trojans (5-1, 3-1 Pac-12) were
held scoreless in the second half and
got needed help from a defense that
sacked Price five times and forced four
turnovers to give USC its third straight
win.
No. 13 Oklahoma 63,
No. 15 Texas 21
DALLAS Damien Williams broke
off a 95-yard touchdown run for the
longest rush in Red River Rivalry his-
tory, Blake Bell powered his way in for
four TDs and Oklahoma got its second
straight blowout of Texas.
Landry Jones threw for 321 yards
and two touchdowns, and fullback Trey
Millard had a career-best 119 yards re-
ceiving as the Sooners (4-1, 2-1 Big 12)
added another rout to Bob Stoops' im-
pressive rivalry resume.
Stoops is now 9-5 against Mack
Brown and responsible for three of Ok-
lahoma's five most lopsided wins over
Texas and that doesn't include last
year's 55-17 clobbering.
The Longhorns (3-2, 1-2) couldn't get
a stop and never got their offense
going, then lost quarterback David Ash
to an apparent left wrist injury in the
fourth quarter.
No. 18 Louisville 45,
Pittsburgh 35
PITTSBURGH Senorise Perry
rushed for 101 yards and a career-high
four touchdowns.
Teddy Bridgewater passed for 304
yards for the Cardinals (6-0, 1-0 Big
East), including a 75-yard score to De-
vante Parker on the first play of the
second half as Louisville continued its
best start since 2006.
Parker's score came in the middle of
a 24-point burst by Louisville spanning
the second and third quarters that
turned a seven-point deficit into a 38-21
lead.
Tino Sunseri passed for 287 yards
and two touchdowns but Pitt (2-4, 0-3)
couldn't complete a late rally.
Trailing by 10 with 5 minutes to play,
Pitt went for it on fourth down deep in
Louisville territory rather than attempt a
field goal. Sunseri's pass was off the
mark and Perry finished off the Pan-
thers with a 59-yard sprint down the left
sideline.
Louisville began the season as the
overwhelming Big East favorite but
some of the shine was stripped away
by sluggish road wins at overmatched
Florida International and Southern Mis-
sissippi coupled with the impressive
starts by No. 20 Rutgers and No. 21
Cincinnati.
No. 20 Rutgers 23,
Syracuse 15
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Duron Har-
mon scooped up a blocked field goal
attempt and ran 75 yard for a tie-break-
ing touchdown early in the third quarter
and Rutgers rode its defense and spe-
cial teams to 6-0.
Big East Conference defensive
player of the year Khaseem Greene
forced three fumbles and intercepted a
pass as Rutgers (3-0) became bowl eli-
gible for the seventh time in eight
seasons.


Jawan Jamison scored on a 1-yard
touchdown run, Gary Nova threw a 12-
yard touchdown to Tyler Kroft and walk-
on placekicker Nick Borgese had a
25-yard field goal filling in for the injured
Kyle Federico as the Scarlet Knights
went 6-0 for only the third time since
1976.
Adonis Ameen-Moore scored on a 3-
yard run and Ryan Nassib threw a late
40-yard touchdown pass to Christopher
Clark and a 2-point conversion pass to
Marcus Sales pass for Syracuse (2-4,
1-1).
No. 21 Cincinnati 49,
Fordham 17
CINCINNATI Deven Drane
scooted 76 yards for a touchdown after
picking up a fumble and Munchie
Legaux threw two TD passes including
a 78-yarder to Travis Kelce to lead No.
21 Cincinnati past Fordham 49-17.
The Bearcats (5-0) stayed perfect
but the Rams (4-3), playing up a level
from the Football Championship Subdi-
vision, hung around for a half. The win
was Cincinnati's 24th straight in non-
conference games at Nippert Stadium
and upped its overall winning streak to
eight in a row.
After a sloppy first two quarters, the
Bearcats came alive on offense.
Legaux, Ralph David Abernathy IV and
Jordan Luallen scored on runs to start
the third quarter and the rout was on.
No. 24 Boise St. 20,
Fresno St. 10
BOISE, Idaho D.J. Harper rushed
for 122 yards and a touchdown and Joe
Southwick threw for another score.
Harper was the leader of a Boise
State (5-1, 2-0 Mountain West) rushing
attack that chewed up 215 yards on the
ground and propelled the Broncos to
their fifth consecutive win and seventh
straight over the Bulldogs.
The Boise State defense also turned
in another impressive performance.
The Broncos held Fresno State (4-3,
2-1) scoreless in the first half, the fourth
straight game the Broncos defense has
held foes scoreless in the first two quar-
ters. The defense also squelched a Bull-
dog scoring drive in the opening
minutes of the third quarter with an in-
terception, forced a fumble on another
possession late and held Robbie Rouse
to 77 yards rushing on 25 carries.
No. 25 Michigan 45,
Illinois 0
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Denard
Robinson threw two touchdown passes
and ran for two scores, brushing off an
undisclosed injury as well as the Illini.
The Wolverines (4-2, 2-0 Big Ten)
got a scare when Robinson left the
game late in the first quarter. He
missed just one-plus possessions,
though, and returned to score on a 6-
yard run to put Michigan up 17-0 late in
the first half.
Robinson, who wouldn't elaborate on
the injury after the game, ran for a 49-
yard score giving him 10,000-plus
career yards of offense on the
Wolverines' first drive of the second half
and tossed an 8-yard TD pass to Devin
Funchess on their next possession to
make it 31-0.
The Fighting Illini (2-5, 0-3) lost their
starting quarterback, Nathan Scheel-
haase, because of an undisclosed in-
jury in the second quarter.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

College football
scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 36, St. Francis (Pa.) 13
Albright 45, FDU-Florham 0
Bloomsburg 48, East Stroudsburg 27
Bryant 38, Robert Morris 35
Butler 17, Marist 14
CCSU 38, Duquesne 31
California (Pa.) 30, Lock Haven 0
Castleton St. 45, Becker 13
Colgate 51, Holy Cross 35
Cornell 41, Monmouth (NJ) 38
Cortland St. 45, Brockport 27
Delaware Valley 38, King's (Pa.) 0
Georgia St. 41, Rhode Island 7
Hamilton 14, Bowdoin 13
Harvard 35, Bucknell 7
Indiana (Pa.) 26, Edinboro 10
Kean 45, William Paterson 33
Kent St. 31, Army 17
Lafayette 20, Yale 10
Lebanon Valley 21, Wilkes 13
Lehigh 17, Georgetown 14
Louisville 45, Pittsburgh 35
Mass. Maritime 56, Fitchburg St. 32
Mercyhurst 38, Gannon 29
Millersville 35, Cheyney 0
Montclair St. 24, College of NJ 14
Muhlenberg 35, Gettysburg 31
New Hampshire 44, Richmond 40
New Haven 17, Bentley 13
Penn 24, Columbia 20
Princeton 19, Brown 0
RPI 31, Rochester 21
Rutgers 23, Syracuse 15
Sacred Heart 27, Dartmouth 10
Slippery Rock 28, Clarion 20
Susquehanna 38, Moravian 18
Temple 17, UConn 14, OT
Towson 24, Maine 19
Ursinus 37, Juniata 27
Utica 41, Frostburg St. 0
W. New England 36, MIT 14
Washington & Jefferson 24, Westminster
(Pa.) 21
SOUTH
Alcorn St. 21, Alabama A&M 20
Appalachian St. 28, Samford 25
Bethel (Tenn.) 51, Union (Ky.) 48
Campbellsville 28, Lindsey Wilson 23
Carson-Newman 52, North Greenville 10
Charleston Southern 32, VMI 14
Chattanooga 31, Furman 10
Delaware St. 31, SC State 17
E. Kentucky 45, Austin Peay 14
East Carolina 41, Memphis 7
Ferrum 51, NC Wesleyan 35
Florida 31, Vanderbilt 17
Florida A&M 44, Savannah St. 3
Florida St. 51, Boston College 7
Gardner-Webb 30, Mid-Am Nazarene 28
Georgetown (Ky.) 41, Cumberlands 35
Georgia Southern 17, Wofford 9
Hampden-Sydney 47, Emory & Henry 17
Hampton 28, Norfolk St. 14
Jackson St. 37, Alabama St. 34
Jacksonville 34, Davidson 24
James Madison 27, William & Mary 26, 20T
Kentucky Wesleyan 42, Lindenwood 35
Lane 16, Point (Ga.) 10
Lenoir-Rhyne 51, Tusculum 6
Liberty 56, Presbyterian 7
MVSU 45, Grambling St. 21
Maryland 27, Virginia 20
Middle Tennessee 34, FlU 30
Miles 45, Kentucky St. 0
Mississippi 41, Auburn 20
NCA&T 38, Howard 10
NC Central 24, Morgan St. 20
North Carolina 18, Miami 14
SE Louisiana 27, Northwestern St. 22
Sam Houston St. 41, Nicholls St. 0
Shaw 48, Livingstone 20
Southern U. 34, Texas Southern 7
Stony Brook 27, Coastal Carolina 21
The Citadel 45, W. Carolina 31
Thomas More 28, Thiel 16
Tulane 27, SMU 26
UT-Martin 66, Murray St. 59
Villanova 38, Old Dominion 14
Virginia Tech 41, Duke 20
Washington & Lee 49, Randolph-Macon 14
Winston-Salem 56, St. Augustine's 37
MIDWEST
Adrian 10, Trine 3
Alabama 42, Missouri 10
Albion 17, Kalamazoo 14
Ashland 30, Walsh 0
Augsburg 45, St. Olaf 37
Augustana (11.) 24, Millikin 14
Augustana (SD) 66, Upper Iowa 20
Ball St. 30, W. Michigan 24, OT
Bemidji St. 23, Northern St. (SD) 6
Bowling Green 37, Miami (Ohio) 12
Buena Vista 30, Central 25
Cincinnati 49, Fordham 17
Coe 41, Dubuque 38, 20T
Concordia (III.) 47, Concordia (Wis.) 44, OT
Concordia (Moor.) 63, Hamline 14
Cornell (Iowa) 42, Knox 38
Dayton 41, Morehead St. 27
Drake 35, Valparaiso 21
E. Illinois 31, Jacksonville St. 28
Greenville 46, Martin Luther 39
Hillsdale 30, Ferris St. 20
Hope 49, Alma 14
Illinois College 31, Beloit 9
Illinois St. 35, Youngstown St. 28
Indiana St. 17, N. Dakota St. 14
Iowa 19, Michigan St. 16, 20T
Kansas St. 27, Iowa St. 21
Lake Erie 35, Malone 24
Lake Forest 28, Monmouth (III.) 24
Lakeland 32, Maranatha Baptist 7
Michigan 45, Illinois 0
Michigan Tech 28, Northwood (Mich.) 21
Minn. Duluth 44, Minot St. 6
Minn. St-Mankato 34, SW Minnesota St. 31,20T
Minn. St.-Moorhead 35, Minn.-Crookston 13
Minn.-Morris 27, Eureka 23
Missouri St. 27, South Dakota 24
N. Arizona 45, North Dakota 38
N. Illinois 45, Buffalo 3
N. Michigan 38, Grand Valley St. 10
Northwestern 21, Minnesota 13
Northwestern (Minn.) 34, Crown (Minn.) 0
Notre Dame 20, Stanford 13, OT
Ohio 34, Akron 28
Ohio Dominican 63, Findlay 31
Oklahoma St. 20, Kansas 14
Rhodes 14, Macalester 0
Ripon 37, Grinnell 21
S. Dakota St. 31, W. Illinois 10
S. Dakota Tech 75, Preisentation 6
S. Illinois 34, N. Iowa 31
Simpson (Iowa) 28, Loras 7
St. Cloud St. 55, Mary 13
St. John's (Minn.) 51, Carleton 14
St. Norbert 79, Lawrence 7
St. Scholastica 20, Westminster (Mo.) 6
St. Thomas (Minn.) 37, Bethel (Minn.) 0
St. Xavier 45, Siena Heights 7
Taylor 34, Concordia (Mich.) 7
Tennessee St. 40, SE Missouri 28
Tiffin 27, Notre Dame Coll. 22
Toledo 52, E. Michigan 47
Valley City St. 16, Gustavus 0
Wartburg 24, Luther 10
Winona St. 17,Wayne (Neb.)13
Wis. Lutheran 28, Aurora 14


Wis.-Eau Claire 24, Wis.-LaCrosse 9
Wis.-Oshkosh 31, Wis.-Platteville 14
Wis.-River Falls 26, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 15
Wis.-Whitewater 41, Wis.-Stout 7
Wisconsin 38, Purdue 14
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 36, South Alabama 29
Houston 39, UAB 17
Oklahoma 63, Texas 21
Rice 34, UTSA 14
TCU 49, Baylor 21
Texas St. 38, Idaho 7
Texas Tech 49, West Virginia 14
FAR WEST
Air Force 28, Wyoming 27
Boise St. 20, Fresno St. 10
E. Washington 27, Montana St. 24
Nevada 42, UNLV 37
Oregon St. 42, BYU 24
S. Utah 30, Montana 20
San Diego 44, Campbell 0
San Diego St. 38, Colorado St. 14
Southern Cal 24, Washington 14
UC Davis 52, Idaho St. 45
UCLA 21, Utah 14
Utah St. 49, San Jose St. 27






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NFL standings


New England
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

San Diego
Denver
Oakland
Kansas City


Philadelphia
N.Y Giants
Dallas
Washington

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
Carolina
New Orleans

Minnesota
Chicago
Green Bay
Detroit

Arizona
San Francisco
St. Louis
Seattle


AFC
East
W L T
3 2 0
2 3 0
2 3 0
2 3 0
South
W L T
5 0 0
2 2 0
2 4 0
1 4 0
North
W L T
4 1 0
3 2 0
2 3 0
0 5 0
West
W L T
3 2 0
2 3 0
1 3 0
1 4 0
NFC
East
W L T
3 2 0
3 2 0
2 2 0
2 3 0
South
W L T
5 0 0
1 3 0
1 4 0
1 4 0
North
W L T
4 1 0
4 1 0
2 3 0
1 3 0
West
W L T
4 1 0
4 1 0
3 2 0
3 2 0


Pct PF
.600 165
.400 98
.400 103
.400 118

Pct PF
1.000 149
.500 91
.333 114
.200 65

Pct PF
.800 130
.600 125
.400 116
.000 100

Pct PF
.600 124
.400 135
.250 67
.200 94

Pct PF
.600 80
.600 152
.500 65
.400 140

Pct PF
1.000 148
.250 82
.200 92
.200 141

Pct PF
.800 120
.800 149
.400 112
.250 100

Pct PF
.800 94
.800 149
.600 96
.600 86


Thursday's Game
Tennessee 26, Pittsburgh 23
Today's Games
Oakland at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Miami, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Houston, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New
Orleans
Monday's Game
Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 18
Seattle at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 21
Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami,
Philadelphia, San Diego
Monday, Oct. 22
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Glantz-Culver Line
For Oct. 13
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Cincinnati 3 2 (4312) at Cleveland
at N.Y Jets 3 312 (4312) Indianapolis
at Tampa Bay 312 412 (40) Kansas City
at Atlanta 912 9 (4812) Oakland
at Baltimore 4 312 (4412) Dallas
at Philadelphia 6Y2 312 (4712) Detroit
at Miami 3 4 (3712) St. Louis
New England 4 312 (4412) at Seattle
at Arizona 5 412 (4312) Buffalo
at Washington OFF OFOFF (OFF) Minnesota
at San Fran. 512 6Y2 (4512) N.Y Giants
at Houston 4 312 (4712) Green Bay
Monday
at San Diego 3 1 (4912) Denver
Off Key
Washington QB questionable


Packers spoilers for Texans?


Associated Press

A year ago, Green Bay was the
hunted, spotless for three months
before finally losing, but winding
up 15-1 for the season.
Now, the Packers are struggling
and have become the spoiler in Week
6 as they face unbeaten Houston.
When the NFL scheduled this
game for prime time, it hoped to
have a team with a perfect record.
That it's the Texans who are 5-0 for
the first time in their history is a bit
of a surprise.
That Green Bay is 2-3 and can't
find the dominant passing offense
it rode to such a gaudy record a
year ago was not in NBC's plans.
Nor the Packers'.
"Being 2-3 isn't where we ex-
pected to be, but we finally get a
regular week where we have some
time," Packers linebacker Clay
Matthews said. "I know Houston's
coming off a Monday night game so
they'll have a short week.
"Ultimately, you have to have a
short memory in this game. We let
one get away from us last week (at
Indianapolis), but we still have all
the pieces of the puzzle and look
forward to hopefully getting a vic-
tory this Sunday"
Kansas City (1-4) at Tampa Bay (1-3)
Here's a couple of clubs with high
hopes entering 2012 that now are
teetering.
Kansas City turns to Brady Quinn,
who replaces Matt Cassel after the QB
was ruled out with a concussion sus-
tained last week. The Chiefs have been
their own worst enemies, leading the
league in giveaways (19), fumbles lost
(10), interceptions thrown (9) and at the
bottom with a minus-15 turnover margin
that is astoundingly inept for five games.
The Buccaneers are vulnerable in
the air, ranking 32nd against the pass
and 29th trying to complete them.
Oakland (1-3) at Atlanta (5-0)
The Falcons would appear to have
the easier road to 6-0, a record they
haven't managed since, well, ever.
Oakland comes off a bye, but was
awful in a 37-6 loss at Denver before
that. The Raiders have been outscored
72-19 on the road. This is a long trip,
and Atlanta's plus-10 turnover margin
leads the NFL.
Atlanta is off next week, so a victory
here would make for a sweet break.
New York Giants (3-2)
at San Francisco (4-1)
A rematch of the NFC championship
game in January the Giants survived in
overtime before beating New England in
the Super Bowl. The 49ers have up-
graded their offense and are just as for-
midable on defense, while the Giants
haven't found the overpowering pass
rush that catapulted them to the NFL title.
This one could be won on the ground,
where San Francisco ranks first in yards
gained as Frank Gore and Kendall
Hunter each are averaging 5.4 yards an
attempt, and backup quarterback Colin
Kaepernick is contributing in the wildcat.
New York's Ahmad Bradshaw rushed
for 200 yards last Sunday to enliven the
Giants' run game. But Cleveland's de-
fense hardly resembles San Francisco's.
Dallas (2-2) at Baltimore (4-1)
The Ravens never have lost to the


Associated Press
Green Bay cornerback Casey Hayward and the Packers take on the undefeated Houston Texans today.


Cowboys it's only three meetings -
but they face a rested Dallas team
coming off a bye with a bit of despera-
tion. Dallas has been among the most
erratic of NFL teams, plagued by
turnovers and dropped passes on of-
fense, and a mediocre run defense.
All of those ills can be exploited by
Baltimore, which also has been incon-
sistent, yet still is winning, especially at
home. The Ravens are after their 14th
straight home victory in the regular sea-
son, and under John Harbaugh, who
got the job over current Dallas coach
Jason Garrett, they are 8-0 in Baltimore
against NFC opponents,
Denver (2-3) at San Diego (3-2),
Monday night
San Diego is one of the few teams
Peyton Manning has struggled against
in his illustrious career, and now he's in
the same division. The winner will lead
the weak AFC West. The Chargers
have won five of the last six matchups
and twice knocked Indianapolis and
Manning from the playoffs.
"From a personal standpoint Peyton
has always been a favorite of mine,
back when I was in high school in Ala-
bama," Chargers QB Philip Rivers said.
"It's always special playing a Peyton
Manning-led team. We're playing for a
two-game lead in the division at the
bye. If that doesn't get you fired up,
nothing will."
New England (3-2) at Seattle (3-2)
New England's top-rated offense (in
yards gained) faces Seattle's No. 1 de-
fense in the same category, a rarity in
the NFL. The last time this happened
so late in the season was 2007, and it
also involved the Patriots, who were
setting all sorts of scoring and passing
records. Now, the Pats are a force run-
ning the ball with Stevan Ridley, who is
fifth in the league with 490 yards and
has scored four times.
"A lot of people key on (Tom Brady)
and our running back group has to get
some pressure off him so he can be the
quarterback he can be," Ridley said. "If
they're sitting back there staring Brady
in the face every play, we can't be a


one-dimensional offense."
Former Patriots coach Pete Carroll
(before he became a championship
winner at Southern Cal) has built one of
the most physical defenses around and
a victory over New England would en-
hance the Seahawks' reputation.
Minnesota (4-1) at Washington (2-3)
The Vikings visit the nation's capital
for the third straight year, and they won
the previous two games in down sea-
sons. Now, they appear to be on the
rise, sparked by the rapid recovery of
Adrian Peterson, who again is one of
the league's top runners after tearing
knee ligaments near the end of 2011.
With Chicago idle, the Vikes would be
alone in first place in the NFC North
with a win.
Washington expects to have rookie
QB Robert Griffin III available after he
sustained a concussion in last Sun-
day's loss to Atlanta. The Redskins also
have another rookie weapon on offense
in running back Alfred Morris, averaging
4.9 yards a try for the league's No. 4
rushing attack.
Detroit (1-3) at Philadelphia (3-2)
Expectations that these would be two
of the most dynamic NFL teams have
fizzled, although the Eagles are in first
place in the NFC East.
Philly is damaging itself with sloppi-
ness: 14 giveaways, including eight
fumbles, and a minus-7 turnover
differential. That has offset some solid
defensive work.
Quarterback Michael Vick has been
the main contributor to the turnovers
with 11.
Buffalo (2-3) at Arizona (4-1)
After a horrible performance in San
Francisco, the Bills headed to the
desert. No, they weren't being pun-
ished, just prudent, avoiding thousands
of miles in travel back and forth.
"I had talked to a couple of teams
who had done it like this before when
you have back-to-back weeks on the
(West) Coast," coach Chan Gailey said.
"They said that they felt like the trip
back-and-forth twice took a lot out of
you as a football team trying to adjust to


time and all of that.
They'll face a well-rested Cardinals
team that lost for the first time a week
ago Thursday in St. Louis, but one with
a severe hole in the backfield. Both
starting running back Beanie Wells and
backup Ryan Williams are out, although
Wells could return around Thanksgiving.
St. Louis (3-2) at Miami (2-3)
What looked like a dog of a matchup
when the schedule came out has a lot
more interest as the Rams and Dolphins
have been better than anticipated.
Miami isn't far away from a 4-1 record,
has the league's stingiest run defense
and has been surprisingly efficient on of-
fense behind rookie QB Ryan Tannehill
and a revamped receiving corps.
The Rams won two games a year ago,
and new coach Jeff Fisher has them be-
yond that already. Anyone wonder why
Fisher had his choice of jobs when he de-
cided to return to the league this year?
Cincinnati (3-2) at Cleveland (0-5)
The league's only winless team
keeps games relatively close, but
youthful mistakes do in the Browns
every week. They've already lost at
Cincinnati, 34-27 in Week 2.
If this game is close in the final quar-
ter, the Bengals are in excellent shape:
Andy Dalton has the NFL's best quarter-
back rating in the fourth period, 127.7.
He's also 3-0 against Cleveland, but the
Browns have this going for them: They
lead the AFC with seven picks.
Indianapolis (2-2) at
New York Jets (2-3)
Fresh off one of the more emotional
games and wins in team history,
the Colts head to the Meadowlands,
where the Jets' found a little bit of fire
last weekend, too. But they didn't win.
Indianapolis rallied to upset Green
Bay and paid tribute to ill coach Chuck
Pagano afterward, dedicating the game
and awarding the game ball to Pagano,
who is battling leukemia. The way An-
drew Luck and Reggie Wayne were
connecting in that one, New York's sec-
ondary, minus All-Pro cornerback Dar-
relle Revis, is in for a difficult test.


AFC leaders
Week 6
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD
WE 185 124 1450 8
DEN 197 130 1499 11
,PIT 198 128 1487 10
HOU 152 97 1162 8
SND 168 114 1251 8
'IN 169 111 1345 9
EN 106 67 781 4
3AL 183 112 1456 7
r,OAK 162 99 1081 5
k,BUF 151 88 1057 12
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG
s, KAN 103 551 5.35 91t
,HOU 132 532 4.03 46
WE 102 490 4.80 20
BAL 81 419 5.17 43
MIA 86 417 4.85 65t
ew, JAC 84 408 4.86 59t
e, DEN 83 376 4.53 31
UF 48 365 7.60 56t
on, CLE 81 303 3.74 32t
on, TEN 92 301 3.27 19
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG
JWE 38 484 12.7 59
ND 36 506 14.1 30t
nCIN 36 493 13.7 73t
ht, TEN 33 285 8.6 35
AN 31 402 13.0 33t
is, DEN 30 505 16.8 71t
MIA 29 514 17.7 80t
Nn, PIT 29 346 11.9 27
DEN 28 343 12.3 35
WE 28 321 11.5 27
Scoring
Touchdowns


A. Foster, HOU
Richardson, CLE
Battle, SND
Chandler, BUF
A..Green, CIN
H. Miller, PIT
Ridley, NWE
Spiller, BUF
M.Wallace, PIT
McGahee, DEN


Gostkow., NWE
Graham, HOU
Tucker, BAL
Suisham, PIT
Bironas, TEN
Nugent, CIN
Dawson, CLE
Succop, KAN
M. Prater, DEN
Folk, NYJ


TD Rush Rec Ret
6 5 1 0
5 4 1 0
4 3 10
4 0 4 0
4 0 4 0
4 0 4 0
4 4 0 0
4 3 1 0
4 0 4 0
3 3 0 0
Kicking
PAT FG LG
18-18 11-14 53
17-17 10-11 42
13-13 11-12 56
11-11 11-12 52
12-12 10-12 47
14-14 9-10 47
10-10 10-10 52
8-8 10-11 45
14-14 7-7 53
11-11 7-7 39


NFC leaders
Week 6
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds 1
A. Smith, SNF 137 94 1087
M. Ryan, ATL 199 136 1507
Griffin IlI, WAS 139 96 1161
Rodgers, GBY 188 129 1299
Manning, NYG 197 128 1579
Ponder, MIN 158 109 1082
Brees, NOR 236 139 1720
Kolb, ARI 157 95 1041
Stafford, DET 173 114 1182
Newton, CAR 136 80 1154
Rushers
Att Yds Avg L
M. Lynch, SEA 113 508 4.50
Morris, WAS 100 491 4.91 3
L. McCoy, PHL 97 437 4.51
Gore, SNF 79 434 5.49
A. Peterson, MIN 96 420 4.38r
Bradshaw, NYG 65 333 5.12
M. Turner, ATL 73 324 4.44
S. Jackson, STL 77 271 3.52
Forte, CHI 58 270 4.66
Benson, GBY 71 248 3.49
Receivers
No Yds Avg L
Gonzalez, ATL 39 388 9.9
Harvin, MIN 38 407 10.7 ,
Cruz, NYG 37 438 11.8 8
B. Marshall, CHI 35 496 14.2
Amendola, STL 32 395 12.3
R. White, ATL 31 481 15.5
Fitzgerald, ARI 30 337 11.2 3
C.Johnson, DET 29 423 14.6
Colston, NOR 28 444 15.9
Sproles, NOR 28 235 8.4
Scoring
Touchdowns


Cruz, NYG
Jam. Jones, GBY
Colston, NOR
Ve. Davis, SNF
Gonzalez, ATL
Gore, SNF
Griffin III, WAS
Ju. Jones, ATL
Morris, WAS
Roberts, ARI


Tynes, NYG
Walsh, MIN
Akers, SNF
Gould, CHI
M. Bryant, ATL
Zuerlein, STL
Ja. Hanson, DET
Cundiff, WAS
Hauschka, SEA
Hartley, NOR


TD Rush
5 0
5 0
4 0
4 0
4 0
4 4
4 4
4 0
4 4
4 0
Kicking
PAT
15-15 1
12-12 1
17-17 1
17-17 1
16-16 1
7-7 1
8-8 1
17-17
8-8 1
16-16


Tampa Bay defense takes a hit


NFL suspends Bucs

CB Talib games

Associated Press

TAMPA Tampa Bay's defense
was jolted Saturday when the NFL
suspended cornerback Aqib Talib
four games without pay for violating
the league's policy on performance-
enhancing substances.
The fifth-year pro said in a state-
ment released by the team he took an
Adderall pill without a prescription
"around the beginning of training
camp." He will not appeal the ban,
which begins Sunday against the
Kansas City Chiefs.
Talib was the 20th overall pick in
the 2008 draft and is one of the team's
top defenders with 18 career inter-
ceptions. He also will miss games
against New Orleans, Minnesota and
Oakland, becoming eligible to return
to the active roster on Nov 5, the day
after Tampa Bay faces the Raiders.
"I have spoken with Aqib, and he
knows that he made a poor decision
that let our team down," Bucs first-
year coach Greg Schiano said. "Cer-
tainly, other players will have the
opportunity to step up while he
serves this suspension."
It's the second suspension of Talib's
career
The 26-year-old was suspended
without pay for the 2010 regular-
season opener and fined one addi-
tional game check for violating the
NFL's personal-conduct policy. That
discipline stemmed from an alterca-
tion with a St Petersburg cab driver
during training camp in August 2009.
"I made a mistake by taking an
Adderall pill without a prescription.
This is especially regrettable be-
cause, for the past several months,
with Coach Schiano's help, I've


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers cornerback Aqib Talib was suspended for four games by
the NFL on Saturday for testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance.


worked very hard to improve myself
-professionally and personally- as
a player and a man," Talib said.
"I am truly sorry to my teammates,
coaches and Buccaneers fans, and I'm
disappointed in myself. I will work
diligently every day of this suspension
to stay in top football shape and be
ready to help this team in the second
half of the season," Talib added. "I
have chosen to be immediately ac-
countable for the situation I put my-


self in, which is why I will not exercise
my appeal rights and will begin serv-
ing the suspension immediately"
The Bucs placed Talib, who has one
interception and a team-leading seven
passes defensed, on the reserve/sus-
pended list. Defensive end Markus
White was promoted from the practice
squad to fill the roster opening.
There was no immediate an-
nouncement on who'll step into
Talib's spot in the starting lineup.


Brady, N\
Manning,
Roethlis.
Schaub,
P. Rivers,
Dalton, C
Locker, T
Flacco, B
C. Palme
Fitzpatric


J. Charle
A. Foster
Ridley, N'
R. Rice, I
Re. Bush
Jones-Dr
McGahee
Spiller, B
Richards
C. Johnsi


Welker, N
Wayne, II
A.. Greer
Ke. Wright
Bowe, KA
D.Thoma
Hartline,
Ant. Brow
Decker, [
Lloyd, NW


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 B7












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
This portrait of Walt
Whitman is by G. Frank E.
Pearsall.

Portrait Gallery
features poets
WASHINGTON -
America often knows the
names but not the faces of
its great poets. Now the
National Portrait Gallery
is introducing dozens of
20th century poets to
Washington visitors.
"Poetic Likeness: Mod-
em American Poets"
opens Friday and will be
on view through April.
The show opens with
Walt Whitman and maps
the evolution of language
from the first example of
free verse in "Leaves of
Grass." Later, Ezra Pound
and others develop a
unique American voice,
separate from Europe.
It explores biographies
of Robert Frost, Langston
Hughes, E.E. Cummings,
Allen Ginsberg, Mari-
anne Moore and others.

Spencer writes
books for students
NEW YORK Oscar
winner Octavia Spencer
is looking
to make
some
magic in
the book
world.
The ac-
tress best
known for
Octavia "The
Spencer Help" has
a deal
with Simon & Schuster
Books for Young Readers
for a pair of detective
novels for middle school
students. Simon & Schus-
ter said the first book,
"Randi Rhodes, Ninja
Detective: The Case of
the Time-Capsule Ban-
dit," will be out next fall.

Actor Gary Collins
dies at 74 in Miss.
BILOXI, Miss. -Gary
Collins, an actor, televi-

host and
former
master of
cere-
monies
for the
Miss
America
Gary Pageant,
Collins died Sat-
urday, au-
thorities said. He was 74.
Collins, a resident of
Biloxi, Miss., died of nat-
ural causes before 1 a.m.
Saturday after he was ad-
mitted Friday evening to
Biloxi Regional Medical
Center, according to Har-
rison County Coroner
Gary Hargrove.
During the 1980s,
Collins hosted the Miss
America pageant and the
television shows "Hour
Magazine" for which he
won a Daytime Emmy in
1983 -and "The Home
Show."
-From wire reports


Writing from the heart


Asso
Holocaust activist and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elie Wiesel, 83, has written a new book titled, "Open
His latest book is about his experience of undergoing heart surgery last summer.


Elie Wiesel survives Madoff wipeout, heart bypass


Associated Press

NEW YORK-When Elie Wiesel
emerged from quintuple heart by-
pass surgery, still wired to moni-
tors, he immediately started
writing a book about the ordeal -
"in my head." In French.
A year later, as he recuperates
from post-procedure fatigue and de-
pression, "Open Heart" is being
published, in English. And the 84-
year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate
and Holocaust activist is busy in the
Manhattan office of his foundation,
which also is recovering from fi-
nancial ruin by Bernard Madoff,
who had invested the money fund-
ing its humanitarian efforts.
Madoff's Ponzi scheme also
wiped out Wiesel's family invest-
ments.
About one-third of the Elie
Wiesel Foundation for Humanity's
$15 million assets have been re-
placed through new contributions,
according to tax documents ob-
tained by The Associated Press.
"Children sent us their pocket
money, people we never heard of,
Jews, non-Jews, young, old," Wiesel
says. "I was so touched by that."
None of the donations went to
him and his wife, who have had to
watch their personal budget, re-
thinking travels and restaurant ex-
penses, he said.
"But I've seen worse," the
Auschwitz survivor added with a
wry grin.
He pulls back his left jacket
sleeve to reveal a Nazi death camp
number tattooed on his forearm as
he sits comfortably in his Manhat-
tan office for an interview.
"Usually I don't show it," he said.
One of the exceptions was a 2009
visit to the Buchenwald death
camp Wiesel survived, with Presi-
dent Barack Obama and German
Chancellor Angela Merkel.


In a soft, intense voice, he re-
cently shared his thoughts in his of-
fice 20 floors above Madison
Avenue, filled with books and mem-
ories. A group of young assistants
scurried through the hallway tak-
ing care of business from Israeli
education centers for Ethiopian
Jews rescued from persecution to
an international ethics essay
contest.
After the heart surgery last sum-
mer at Manhattan's Lenox Hill Hos-
pital sudden and unexpected -
Wiesel said his doctor asked him to
cut back on teaching at Boston Uni-
versity. He'll still deliver lectures
there this fall and may add courses
later
"I love teaching, it's my passion,"
he said.
He also was to speak at New
York's 92nd Street Y in October on
two topics: "Judaism and Peace"
and "Ezekiel and his Frightening
Visions."
Wiesel wrote "Open Heart" in
French, the language that's easiest
for him because after the war, he
was a Romanian-born survivor
placed in a youth home in Paris,
where he settled and became a
journalist. He moved to New York
in 1956.
The new book was translated into
English by his wife, Marion Wiesel,
and is set for a Dec. 4 publication.
In addition to an account of the
surgical drama, it's an intimate as-
sessment of his life in the face of
possible death.
As he was wheeled away toward
the operating room on a gurney, he
recalls in an interview, "I saw my
son and my wife, and all of a sud-
den, a question ran through me,
'Maybe it's the last time?'"
That moment reminded him of
the day in Buchenwald when he
saw his ill father for the last time,
before he was beaten to death by a


Nazi guard. His mother an
perished earlier in the Au
gas chambers.
Wiesel set his just-publis
est novel, "Hostage," in Bi
the New York borough w
largest concentrations of J
side Israel. A Holocaust sui
held by two terrorists, one
origin, the other Italian, in
that probe how humans ne
their differences under dui
Wiesel was himself targ
2007, attacked and dragged
San Francisco hotel eleva
24-year-old New Jersey r
thorities said was a H(
denier
Wiesel said another H(
denier, Iranian Presiden
moud Ahmadinejad, should
rested and charged with
against humanity. "Does
doubt that if he had a
bomb, he would not use it?
Ahmadinejad "is a da:
man," said Wiesel, and he
be put on trial at the Intern
Criminal Court in the Hagu
deaths of thousands of Irani
for helping make this "ti
dangerous time since Wo
II."
Wiesel has read the Korai
he notes has been used by
ists and suicide bombers as
peal to violence."
"But it can also have ma
things said about human
morality; it depends how it
used," he said.
Wiesel's seminal work,
originally written in Yidd
first published in Paris in
found on many required
lists in U.S. schools.
It's the book that endedV
decade-long, self-imposed
about the horror he left
when he was liberated at 1
U.S. Army in April 1945.


Wall Street Journal BEST-SELLERS


Best-selling books in the
week ending Oct. 7.
FICTION
1. "The Mark of Athena" by
Rick Riordan (Hyperion Books)
2. "The Casual Vacancy" by
J.K. Rowling (Little, Brown)
3. "Mad River" by John
Sandford (Putnam)
4. "Winter of the World" by
Ken Follett (Dutton Books)
5. "Dork Diaries 5: Tales
From a Not-So-Smart Miss
Know-It-All" by Rachel Renee
Russell (Aladdin)


Birthday: In coming months, get out and circulate as much
as possible with as many new groups as you can. You're in
a cycle where your newfound popularity could help you
make interesting contacts who'll further your interests and
ambitions.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you maintain a philosophical
outlook, it becomes easier to envision yourself as being
lucky and when you envision yourself to be lucky, you'll
attract many good things.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Although you feel more satis-
fied when you are calling the shots, you still could be ex-
ceptionally fortunate in a situation in which you have little or
no say whatsoever.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)- When pleasantly ap-
proached, friends can be exceptionally helpful and cooper-
ative. This will be especially true with someone you think of
as one of your more influential pals.


6. "Gone Girl" by Gillian
Flynn (Crown Publishing
Group)
7. "The Time Keeper" by
Mitch Albom (Hyperion Books)
8. "A Wanted Man" by Lee
Child (Delacorte Press)
9. "Catching Fire" by
Suzanne Collins (Scholastic
Press)
10. "Mockingjay" by Suzanne
Collins (Scholastic Press)
NONFICTION
1. "Killing Kennedy" by Bill
O'Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry


Holt & Co.)
2. "No Easy Day" by Mark
Owen with Kevin Maurer (Dut-
ton Books)
3. "Total Recall" by Arnold
Schwarzenegger (Simon &
Schuster)
4. "America Again" by
Stephen Colbert (Grand Cen-
tral Publishing)
5. "God Loves You" by David
Jeremiah (FaithWords)
6. "The America's Test
Kitchen Quick Family Cook-
book" by Editors at America's


Today's HOROSCOPE
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)- You are presently in a
trend where the rewards for work well done are more ex-
cessive than usual. This is true even for mundane jobs sel-
dom acknowledged.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be optimistic about your
competitive involvements, especially those of a social or
sports-oriented nature. These could produce several
peripheral benefits in other areas.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Arrangements involving peo-
ple you have close emotional ties with will prove to be mu-
tually beneficial. Each party will have an influence in
improving the other.
Aries (March 21-April 19) By all means, listen to any ad-
vice being offered by another, but reserve the right to have the
final say. You'll do quite well at deciding the best alternative.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Although luck will be an impor-
tant factor in the success of a big project, you still must be


Test Kitchen (Ame
Kitchen)
7. "Jesus Callinc
Peace in His Prese
Sarah Young (Intel
ers)
8. "I Declare" by
(FaithWords)
9. "Waging Hear
Neil Young (Blue R
10. "Guinness V
Records 2013" by
Book Records (Gu
Records)


industrious and productive. Know how to utili:
tune and skill, and you'll come out on top.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) By looking out fc
of everybody involved, you make it easier to f
expectations. You'll gain much with a support
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Keep uppermost
the fact that the end results are of more signi
how you got there. Even if you don't start out
you could still be a dynamic finisher.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you are genuinely
about something, you can easily arouse the
others. Friends will get caught up in the mom
you where they can.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't be afraid to
sights, especially where your finances and co
dealings are concerned. You'll be far luckier
than you will with menial affairs.


FloERIESda
LOTTERIES


SO YOU KNOW
0 Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12
Mega Money: 22 23 26 28
Mega Ball: 3
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 4 $1,669.50
3-of-4 MB 49 $304
3-of-4 991 $44.50
2-of-4 MB 1,305 $23.50
1-of-4 MB 10,817 $2.50
2-of-4 27,580 $2
Fantasy 5:11 22 28 30 35
5-of-5 1 winner $225,190.82
4-of-5 246 $147.50
3-of-5 8,610 $11.50
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
Fantasy 5: 8- 7 12- 14- 15
5-of-5 No winners
4-of-5 429 $555
3-of-5 11,026 $8

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
0 To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
ciated Press www.flalottery.com, or
i Heart." call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

id sister Today is Sunday, Oct. 14,
ischwitz the 288th day of 2012. There
are 78 days left in the year.
shed lat- Today's Highlight:
rooklyn, On Oct. 14, 1912, former
vith the President Theodore Roo-
ews out- sevelt, campaigning for the
rvivor is White House as the Progres-
of Arab sive candidate, was shot in
otiate scenes the chest in Milwaukee by

press. New York saloonkeeper John
geted in Schrank. Despite the wound,
South of a Roosevelt went ahead with a
tor by a scheduled speech, declaring,
man au- "It takes more than one bullet
holocaust to kill a bull moose."
On this date:
holocaust In 1066, Normans under
it Mah- William the Conqueror de-
d be ar- feated the English at the Bat-
crimes tie of Hastings.
anyone In 1586, Mary, Queen of
nuclear Scots, went on trial in Eng-
land, accused of committing
ngerous treason against Queen Eliza-
should beth I. (Mary was beheaded
national in February 1587.)
e for the In 1908, the E.M. Forster
ans and novel "A Room With a View"
he mosWar was first published by Ed-
ward Arnold of London.

n, which In 1947, Air Force test pilot
y terror- Charles E. ("Chuck") Yeager
s "an ap- broke the sound barrier as he
flew the experimental Bell
marvelous XS-1 (later X-1) rocket plane
lity and over Muroc Dry Lake in
is being California.
In 1960, Democratic presi-
'Night," dential candidate John F.
ish and Kennedy suggested the idea
1956, is of a Peace Corps while ad-
reading dressing an audience of stu-
dents at the University of
Wiesel's Michigan in Ann Arbor.
silence In 1964, civil rights leader
behind Martin Luther King Jr. was
6 by the named winner of the Nobel
Peace Prize.
In 1987, a 58-hour drama
began in Midland, Texas, as
18-month-old Jessica McClure
slid 22 feet down an aban-
rica's Test doned well at a private day
care center; she was rescued
g: Enjoying on Oct. 16.
ence" by Ten years ago: FBI ana-
grity Publish- lyst Linda Franklin was killed
by the Beltway Sniper in a
Joel Osteen mall parking lot in Falls
Church, Va.
vy Peace" by Five years ago: Secretary
ider Press) of State Condoleezza Rice
world opened an intense round of
Guiness Mideast shuttle diplomacy.
iness Book One year ago: The St.
Louis Cardinals beat the Mil-
Associated Press waukee Brewers 7-1 to take
a 3-2 lead in the NL champi-
onship series.
Today's Birthdays: For-
ze both for- mer Surgeon General C.
Everett Koop is 96. Actor
or the interests Roger Moore is 85. Fashion
ulfill your own designer Ralph Lauren is 73.
ve network. Actor Harry Anderson is 60.
st in your mind World Golf Hall of Famer
ficance than Beth Daniel is 56. MLB man-
too strong, ager Joe Girardi is 48. Singer
enhsatc Usher is 34.
enthusiastic Thought for Today:
ent and help Ninety-nine percent of fail-
ures come from people who


o elevate your have the habit of making ex-
ommercial cuses." George Washing-
with big things ton Carver, American botanist
(1864-1943).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


THE

DEATH

PENALTY


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Recounting the tale ofwitnessing an execution in Florida in 2011


M anuel Valle
was born in
Florida. I was
born in Brooklyn.
On Sept. 28, 2011, r
we would meet for
the first time at ...
Florida State Prison '
in Starke. Our roles
were different. He
had to die. I had to Anthony
watch. GU
On April 2, 1978, COL
Manuel Valle killed a -
Coral Gables police
officer who pulled him over for
running a red light. I had been
invited to witness an execution
by the Florida Department of
Correction, having served as
Corrections Commissioner in
New York. As a criminologist, I
accepted the invitation, because
from time to time the death
penalty comes up in my class on
criminology and witnessing one
would contribute to the class
discussion.
The death penalty is nothing
new; it's been with us for cen-
turies. This century we have
been searching for more hu-
mane ways of killing people.
We've shot them by firing


Schembri
EST
.UMN


squads, suffocated
them, gassed them,
buried them alive,
lopped off their
heads, burned them
alive and hung them
because it reflects the
popular notion the
death penalty is a de-
terrent Now we have
developed a new de-
vice, the most humane
of all, lethal injection.
Counting down


Arriving at 2 p.m., they es-
corted me to the Warden's Con-
ference Room.
They knew me. Several other
witnesses came in. He was to die
at 4 p.m., but he got a stay of ex-
ecution. At 6:30 p.m. they came
in and told us the stay was lifted
and he was to die at 6:55 p.m. I
looked at my watch; he had 25
minutes to go.
I wondered if he was looking
at his watch. Later, they drove
the 16 of us in two vans to the Q
Building (execution chamber).
There are 397 inmates on death
row. On the day of an execution,
the inmates are locked down. In-
mates saw us exit the vans and


BY THE NUMBERS
* 10 states without capital punishment have homicide rates below
the national average, according to the FBI data.
* 154 people on death row have been exonerated by DNA
evidence, according to the Innocence Project.
* Currently, 404 inmates are on death row, according to the
Florida Department of Corrections website.


began to scream obscenities. We
were escorted to the witness
room. They seated me in front.
We stared at a brown curtain in
front of a 14-foot window. At 6:55
p.m. the curtain was raised.
Final moments
He was strapped to a gurney
Needles were already in his
arm. In England, they would say:
"The scaffold is high, eternity is
near."
They asked him if he had any-
thing to say He said "No." The
officer nodded to someone be-
hind the screen. I saw the needle
move.
Dostoevsky once said, "You
can judge the degree of civiliza-
tion in a society by entering its
prisons."
I was hoping we weren't being
judged today


Mechanics of death
The first shot anesthetized
him. The second shot stopped his
lungs. No. 3 stopped his heart
On the outside, it looks like he
goes to sleep, but on the inside,
his organs are going through Ar-
mageddon. The muscles on his
face would contort and his body
would jump, but shot No. 1 was a
muscle relaxant, so we don't
have to witness a horror show.
You die in your own arms. You
can't describe the impotence of
witnessing the last breath of a per-
son while his organs writhe, twist
and contort We just sat there qui-
etly No one spoke. It seems like
we shared a common embarrass-
ment for being there. Someone
said: '"Justice has been done."

See Page C3


A solution to Citrus County's water problems


DAN HILLIARD
Guest columnist


here is almighty debate
these days about the future
of our water resources, and
rightly so. It is critically important
we find a rational balance. Virtu-
ally every facet of water regulation
in this state is the focus of debate,
whether the subject is restoration,
supply or protection. On these top-
ics politicians commonly ask "How
are you going to pay for it?" Good


Other VOICES


question, so what is the solution?
"The purpose of the Regional
Water Supply Plan (RWSP) is to
provide the framework for future
water management decisions in
the District. The RWSP for the
Northern Planning Region shows
that demand for water through
2030 can be met with fresh ground-
water"
-SWFWMD 2010 Regional Water
Supply Plan, Northern Region.


Therein lies the rub. Suggesting
we can do something does not
mean it is a good idea.
Groundwater provides flow vol-
ume to our rivers and springs.
High-flow volume moderates pol-
lution concentrations to some de-
gree and serves as the foundation
of healthy estuarine productivity.
These systems are powerful eco-
nomic engines. Skim away the top
of the aquifer and such benefit


fades away This is the nexus of
contention.
Media polls make it profoundly
clear that water is a hot-button
topic. And because water is so crit-
ically important to our lives, this
debate is a good thing. The out-
come will define the quality of life
in this state forever.
"The era of cheap water is over."
Why would anyone think that? It
is simple recognition of the law of

See Page C4


Books,


schools


of great


value
An elected official in
Citrus County re-
cently said you
don't learn anything from
books.
He was mistaken.
Books may not be the
only way you learn things,
but for most people, books
are an important tool to
learn new skills, compre-
hend our history or simply
stimulate us to think in
different ways.
In our community, we
value books and we value
education.
Those are more than
just slogans or empty po-
litical promises, they are
facts reinforced by our in-
dividual financial com-
mitment.
Unlike many other
places in Florida and the
United States, Citrus
County residents have
twice voted in public ref-
erendums to buy more
books and support public
education.
It is not a coincidence
we have one of the best
school systems in the state
of Florida. Sure, we have
problems. But on the stan-
dardized measurements,
every elementary school
in our community has an
A rating. Every one of
them.
And it's not a coinci-
dence we have a great
public library system. The
citizens of Citrus County
voted to make them great.
It takes more than
money to make a good
school system. It takes
good teachers, strong
leaders, involved parents,
eager students and com-
munity support.
Two years ago we, the
residents of Citrus County,
voted to tax ourselves an
additional .25 of a mill to
support our schools. I can
remember a county com-
missioner who agreed to
permit the vote to go on
the ballot, sarcastically
predicting local voters
would unanimously reject
the idea of paying a little
more tax to make better
schools.
He was wrong. Voters
enthusiastically backed
the tax. The same voters
decided not to re-elect
that county commissioner.
At the same time, Citrus
County taxpayers have
had a self-imposed library
tax for the past 25 years,
because we collectively
do believe in books.
The Chronicle pub-
lished a story earlier this
week recognizing Ren
Renfro for his efforts a
quarter of a century ago to
create a library taxing dis-
trict via a self-imposed li-
brary tax. We continue to
pay the small tax each
year and we now have one
of the best library systems
in the state. Homosassa,
Inverness, Floral City,
Beverly Hills and Crystal
River each have outstand-
ing public libraries filled
with books. And people
come every day to read
those books.
On Election Day this
year, Citrus voters will
again be asked to endorse
the same extra .25 mill for
our school system. A ref-
erendum question is ask-
ing you to continue the
extra tax.
To the average house-
hold, that probably meant
See Page C3







Page C2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012



PINION


"A bank is a place that will lend you money
ifyou can prove that you don't need it."
Bob Hope, 1959


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ ............. citizen member
L fJ^ Mac Harris ................ ...........citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............. .................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ENDORSEMENT





Clear choice




for senator




is Bill Nelson


ill Nelson deserves an- positic
other term as Florida's Sen.
senior member in the job in 1
U.S. Senate. tuned
On Nov. 6, voters will go to County
the polls to decide if Nelson or The
challenger Connie Mack IV modern
should represent
us in Washington THE ISSUE:
for the next six
years. Sen. Nelson Candidates for th
is clearly the ap- U.S. Senate.
propriate choice.
Rep. Connie OUR OPINION
Mack IV won the Bill Nelson.
GOP nomination Bill Nelson.
in this Senate
race because of name recogni- party's
tion. His father of the same tendin
name was a popular U.S. sena- for any
tor and his great-grandfather million
(also of the same name) was a favore
baseball Hall of Famer. leader
Rep. Mack IV has had an The
undistinguished career in Con- spent
gress and business. He is in no back i
way qualified to assume the hard t
job his father once held. In iors ar
Congress, he missed twice as native
many votes as the average to prot
House member. While cam- vironn
paigning for the nomination, time
he knew his family name Comm
recognition was strong enough, new jc
so he did not have to publicly nities
debate the other GOP candi- Re-e
dates or visit newspaper edito- one of
rial boards to explain his this ye


Guns helped revolution a staterr
Here's a couple of
thoughts for people to pon- OUND
der: You don't shoot to kill; 1LOUN
you shoot to stay alive. An BF
armed man is a citizen; an 1
unarmed man is a subject.
And the American Revolu-
tion would never have hap-
pened with gun control. CAL I
Nuke costs hurt CA
I'm reading in the paper 563-0579
here today that Progress En-
ergy feels it's constitutional to charge Th(
people for power plants that may The V
never be built. What's so constitutional pouring
about people 80 years old paying for a what oui
power plant that may or may not go seems li
online in 10 to 15 years? you can
Causing bloodshed like that
Every so many years, along comes parking.
a government, a culture or a religion Sept.
that thinks they have the right orjustifi- I'm re
cation to dominate the world and its Libyan a
people. They cause bloodshed, death with an
and destruction and sadness. Ulti- 11 is goi
mately, people just want to live free from her
and in peace. I fear one day they will for the o
blow up this planet and life will cease well, tha
to exist, all in the name of a so-called be 90, b
worthy cause. And who will be left to is always
benefit from it? A supreme being, as longE
whatever he's called, is watching. (who) wE
Call for free speech Lohai
How cowardly are our current fed- I seev
eral government officials? When our Lohan is
Libyan Ambassador Stevens and our one of h
other U.S. citizens were murdered by what's rE
radical Muslim terrorists, the first thing ation is
out of our government's mouth was to above th
appease these killers by blaming a has to d
lame video produced by a U.S. citizen paper, it
who exercised their constitutional right this is wl
of free speech. The cowardly U.S. and mea
government made sure to tell these about it.
Muslim radicals the U.S. government of. But l
had nothing to do with producing the where h
video. My question is: Why did our of a role
government not simply come out with going.


>ns on issues.
Nelson has done a good
the Senate and has been
in to the needs of Citrus
y.
Democratic senator is a


*ate


ie


4:


who has attempted
to work in a bipar-
tisan way in an ex-
tremely divisive
Washington
environment.
He has not been
afraid to go his
own way, includ-
ing his decision to
buck his own


s stand and support ex-
.g the Bush-era tax cuts
yone earning less than $1
n instead of the $250,000
d by his party's
ship.
former astronaut he
six days on the Columbia
in 1986 has worked
o protect Florida's sen-
id veterans. The Florida
has fought many battles
ect the state's fragile en-
nent while at the same
serving on the Senate
erce Committee seeking
)bs and growth opportu-
for the Sunshine state.
electing Sen. Nelson is
'the clearest choices on
ar's November ballot.


nent that told these radical
Muslims the American citi-
zens in these United States,
under the FirstAmendment
of the Constitution, have the
right to voice their opinion
and produce videos regard-
less of who may be of-
fended. Let them know in
the United States, we abide
by the laws of the U.S. Con-
stitution and not the dictates
of foreign entities or religious
sects.
eater a money pit
Valerie Theater: Just keep
money down a rat hole. That's
r city fathers want to do, it
ke. There's plenty of places
go see shows, but nothing
where you don't have any
Wake up.
11 dangerous date
ading about "Miscues before
assault." Come on. Somebody
ounce of brains knows Sept.
ng to be a dangerous (date)
re on. And not to have security
ne person who spoke Arab so
t's dumb, plain dumb. I might
ut I'm not that dumb. Sept. 11
s going to be a problem for us
as there are people like that
ant to get rid of us.
n: A name in infamy
where this character (Lindsay)
s in the paper again for pulling
er idiotic stunts. And I guess
really sad about the whole situ-
she obviously thinks she's
he law. And if this is what she
o to get her name in the
's kind of sad. But obviously,
hat she thinks is the rationale
ans. Of course, when you think
. .she's not much to be proud
ook what her father is and look
e's in jail. So she had a heck
model to lead her where he's


Banks too big to maintain?


-DALLAS
f in four weeks
president-elect
Mitt Romney is
seeking a Treasury sec-
retary, he should look
here, to Richard
Fisher, president of the
Federal Reserve Bank
of Dallas. Candidate
Romney can enhance Georg
his chance of having OTI
this choice to make by VO1
embracing a simple VOI
proposition from
Fisher: Systemically important fi-
nancial institutions (SIFIs), mean-
ing too-big-to-fail (TBTF) banks,
are "too dangerous to permit"
Romney almost did this in the
first debate when he said Dodd-
Frank's designation of TBTF
banks makes them "effectively
guaranteed by the federal gov-
ernment" and constitutes "the
biggest kiss that's been given to -
to New York banks I've ever
seen."
Fisher, who has a flair for
rhetorical pungency, is more crisp:
There are 6,000 American
banks but "half of the entire bank-
ing industry's assets" are concen-
trated in five institutions whose
combined assets equate to almost
60 percent of GDPAnd "the top 10
banks now account for 61 percent
of commercial banking assets,
substantially more than the 26
percent of only 20 years ago." The
problems posed by supersizedd
and hypercomplex banks" may,
Fisher said, require anti-obesity
policies equivalent to "irre-
versible lap-band or gastric by-
pass surgery" The land of TBTFs
is "a perverse financial Lake
Wobegon" where all crises are
"exceptional," justifying "unique"
solutions that are the same,
meaning bailouts. This incurs
"the wrath of ordinary citizens
and smaller entities that resent
this favorable treatment, and we
plant the seeds of social unrest."
Fisher cited Andrew Haldane
of the Bank of England who cal-
culates this: The assumption cer-


HI
Ic


tain banks have im-
plicit TBTF status
gives them preferen-
tial access to invest-
ment capital. In 2009,
these silent subsidies
enjoyed by TBTFs
worldwide ap-
proached $2.3 trillion
in value.
e Will Haldane noted a
IER parallel between fi-
DES nancial systems and
epidemiological net-
works: Normal epi-
demiology involves "focusing
preventive action on 'super-
spreaders' within the network to
limit the potential for systemwide
spread."
Endorsing the axiom (attrib-
uted to Napoleon) one should
"never ascribe to malice that
which is adequately explained by
incompetence," Fisher said.
TBTF banks "are sprawling and
complex so vast that their own
management teams may not fully
understand their own risk expo-
sures, providing fertile ground
for unintended 'incompetence."'
Fisher's rejoinder to those who
impute "economies of scale" to
such banks is there also are 'dis-
'economies of scale." Fisher,
among many others, believes the
component parts of the biggest
banks would be "worth more bro-
ken up than as a whole."
Furthermore, the economy suf-
fers as indefensible preferences
multiply
In an essay, "Choosing the
Road to Prosperity: Why We Must
End Too Big To Fail Now,"
Harvey Rosenblum of the Dallas
Fed's Research Department
noted "people disillusioned with
capitalism aren't as eager to en-
gage in productive activities."
The desire to strive is inversely
proportional to the suspicion the
game is rigged.
Rosenblum adds:
"For all its bluster, Dodd-Frank
leaves TBTF entrenched. ... In
fact, the financial crisis in-
creased concentration because


some TBTF institutions acquired
the assets of other troubled TBTF
institutions. The TBTF survivors
of the financial crisis look a lot
like they did in 2008. They main-
tain corporate cultures based on
the short-term incentives of fees
and bonuses derived from in-
creased oligopoly power."
At bottom, the TBTF phenom-
enon raises questions not merely
about the financial system but
about the nature of the American
regime. These are Jacksonian
questions, implicating issues Old
Hickory raised in 1832 when ve-
toing the Second Bank of the
United States: Should the gov-
ernment be complicit in protect-
ing and by doing so, enlarging
- huge economic interests?
Capitalism which is, as Milton
Friedman tirelessly insisted, a
profit and loss system is sub-
verted by TBTF, which socializes
losses while leaving profits private.
And which enhances the profits of
those whose losses it socializes.
TBTF is a double moral disas-
ter: It creates moral hazard by en-
couraging risky behavior, and it
delegitimizes capitalism by vali-
dating public cynicism about its
risk-reward ratios.
It is inexplicable politics and
regrettable policy Romney has,
so far, flinched from a forthright
endorsement of breaking up the
biggest banks. This stance by him
would be credible because of his
background and would be intelli-
gible to voters because of its clar-
ity As the campaign reaches what
should be a satisfying culmina-
tion, they would be astonished by,
and grateful for, the infusion of a
fresh thought into the deluge of
painfully familiar boilerplate.
Having tiptoed close to where
Fisher stands, Romney still has
time to remember Gen. Douglas
MacArthur's axiom that in war all
disasters can be explained by two
words: "Too late."
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


FLC 3 0 P


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Talented children
The TV show "America's Got
Talent" covers a lot of different
states, but I have to say in
Florida that on Sunday, Sept. 30,
Citrus County showed us we
have some great talent right
here.
FFRA, a parent support group
of special-needs "Kids," had its
third annual talent show at the
First Presbyterian Church of
Inverness.
The tables were set with white
tablecloths, a vase of carnations,
and the programs were passed
out. The stage was set with a
backdrop of lights, camera and
action. It was time for some spe-
cial-needs "Kids" to show us
what they had. They did that and
more when they got up on stage.
It was an afternoon of fine
entertainment.
We had dancers, piano play-
ers, someone on the harmonica,
singers and with some of the
songs, we had "Kids" doing sign
language. Even some of the par-
ents and caregivers joined in.
We had a young man, Kenny
Roix, doing the music for the
show.
Our "Kids" are special all the
time, but today they also shined
showing a talent that was special


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

to each of them. Although no one
person was picked out as the
best, they all got a vase with a
carnation to take home for their
part in the show.
Thanks again, "Kids," for a


great afternoon of entertain-
ment. Keep up the good work
and thanks for being a part of
our lives. FFRA stands for Fam-
ily and Friends Reaching for the
Abilities.
Diane Phillips
Homosassa

Patrolling the area
A note of thanks to the sher-
iff's office from the residents of
Hernando.
We have had a serious drug
traffic problem in this area for
the past year.
Detective Laughlin is amazing
and is truly against people (who)
do wrong. After being assigned to
our problems, in the past three
weeks he has cleaned our area
up and placed some idiots in jail.
Thanks also go to Lt Vick and Lt.
Green. They have also helped
with the patrols in our area.
Sheriff Dawsy, thank you for
having people like Laughlin,
Vick and Green working for Cit-
rus County They are on the right
side of the law.
I pray for all our officers to
stay safe.
Ed Kinnett
Hernando


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vietnam memorial remembers living, dead


he Traveling Vietnam Battalion, 1st Brigade was made
Memorial Wall has up almost entirely of reservists,
recently been here in but the trainees at Company B,
Citrus County once more. And, 5th Battalion, 3rd Brigade were
as I'm sure it was for others, its mostly draftees. This brought
presence brought memories for with it a difference in attitude.
me. Reservists generally believed
There are things in life we active service was a temporary
don't get to choose, including inconvenience while draftees
which war is ours. Vietnam was were well aware they were
mine. As I've shared previously, Fred Brannen expected to complete basic; and,
I served as an army reservist A SLICE depending upon the luck of the
I was never sent into combat; OF LIFE draw, go on to advanced infantry
even so, the conflict was part of training and from there, be
my life. shipped to Vietnam.
Vietnam was really beginning to heat up It hadn't been a party atmosphere at E-2-
at the time I was ordered to active duty 1, but it wasn't all that serious, either. At B-
Then, during the midst of basic training, I 5-3, there was a prevailing life or death
contracted spinal meningitis and spent five mentality accompanied by a subtle sadness,
weeks in the hospital. This resulted in me a melancholy, if you will.
being moved from one company to another This wasn't the only difference. Trainees
and seeing how much things had changed at E-2-1 had been almost 100 percent white,
in such a short period of time. but at B-5-3 no less than half were black. I
My newly assigned training company, B- didn't consider myself a racist;
5-3, was altogether different from my initial nevertheless, I was a white boy from a small
training company, E-2-1. Company E, 2nd southern town who'd gone to segregated


schools during a time when there were
separate waiting rooms at doctors' offices,
separate public water fountains and
separate bathroom facilities. Signs
designating "colored" and "whites only"
were very much a part of the world in
which I'd grown up. So, in spite of my self-
righteousness, based on ignorance and not
intent, I was a racist.
That is, until I met Bobby Bradford, the
first black person I'd ever known on a first-
name basis and the first I called friend.
Bobby was a draftee from Baltimore. The
army does everything alphabetically, so
Bradford and Brannen were thrown
together in training exercises. What I
remember most vividly, the incident which
sealed the friendship between us, was the
pugil stick competition. A pugil stick is a 5-
foot pole that has heavy padding on both
ends. The intent is for one person to beat
the other into submission using this
overgrown Q-tip. I began executing formal
jabs and thrusts. The next thing I knew,
Bradford had swept my legs from beneath
me and was sitting on my chest with the


business end of a pugil stick pressed up
against my throat.
"Bradford, are you trying to kill me?" I
yelped.
"No, Brannen," he replied, "I'm not trying
to kill you, I'm trying to help you stay alive!"
Bradford and I became buddies and he
taught me many things, none more
important than skin color is in no way a
measure of a man's worth.
In almost all cases, basic training buddies
- unless they continue on in service
together are much too busy to stay in
touch. We exchanged a few letters after he
went on to advanced infantry training and I
returned home, but that was it.
Nonetheless, I never forgot him. When I
first visited the memorial, several years
ago, I wiped tears of sadness from my eyes
as I read the names of friends lost there and
I wiped away tears of gladness when I
didn't find Bobby Bradford.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident
and a Chronicle columnist


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

another $30 a year for the operation
of our schools. It's not a huge amount
of money Neither is the extra little
tax we pay for the libraries. But they
together send an important message
- books are important in Citrus
County. Schools are important.
Learning is important.
We collectively place a high value
on our children having the opportu-
nity to succeed in our schools. We
place a high value on books being
available for everyone at our terrific
public libraries.
On Election Day, it's important we,
the voters, send a message to the
politicians that books and schools are
important. They are what we value.
Once you vote "no" on all those
long constitutional amendments on
the crowded November ballot, look
for the question titled "School Dis-
trict Referendum" and vote yes.
We need to sometimes remind our
politicians about the values that
make Citrus County special.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of
the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


DEATH
Continued from Page C1

Aftermath
We got up, lined up,
stared at the floor and left.
We were not unlike a group
of strangers who huddled in
a doorway out of the rain
and shared an experience,
never to see each other
again. Manuel Valle was
pronounced dead at 7:14
p.m. He was put to death as
you would put to death a
beloved pet.
We are all safer now from
Manuel Vale. Florida is
scheduled to do this 397
more times.
It's funny how our mem-
ory works and we connect
dots. I thought years ago you
could walk into a deli-
catessen and would be over-
come by the wonderful
smells. You could smell the
bread, the pickles, the
cheeses and the meats. It
made you hungry Today,
everything is shrink-
wrapped. It's like entering a
drug store. It's sanitary,
clean. Years ago, we electro-
cuted a man in the electric
chair. It smelled like an exe-
cution. Flesh burning, you
were overcome by the smell
of death. Today, it's sanitary,
antiseptic, you don't smell
the death.
Emotional toll
I had conflicting emo-
tions. The emotions of a po-
lice officer who became a
police commissioner and at-
tended many police funer-
als and hugged the wives of
slain police officers as they
wept a river. Emotions and
the criminal justice system
is not a good combination.
Then, conflict. I had the
emotions of a criminologist
who teaches criminology
and criminal law and ex-
pects research to affect and
determine public policy
When it doesn't, I think we
are stupid. I wish stupidity
caused pain. Just think how
wonderful that would be.
I pose questions to my
class like "Why do we exe-
cute?" The crime issue is
manipulated for political
ends you can't get elected
dog catcher in this country
unless you're tough on
crime.
It's time to get smart on
crime. It's time to raise the
level of public debate on the


subject without emotions,
without being labeled a lib-
eral or a conservative. I un-
derstand the death penalty
and I can relate to the ret-
ributive impulsive for mur-
der.
1962 flashback
Walking out of the execu-
tion chamber, the streets of
Borough Park flashed before
me. The place was Brooklyn,
the time was my childhood.
It was May 1962; I heard a
bulletin on television.
Two detectives, Finnegan
and Fallon, were killed in a
tobacco shop in Borough
Park, Brooklyn. Unheard of,
two detectives killed at the
same time. I drove there. I
stood behind a police line.
Lt. Al Seedman went past
me. I told him I wanted to be
a cop and wanted to help
find the killers. He told me
to go home before I get in
trouble.
Twenty years later, he
would become chief of de-
tectives and I would be a
deputy chief of detectives in
the prosecutor's office and
work with him. I saw cops
weep a river that day Cop
killers should die I'm
thinking.
Well, here I was 49 years
later, about to see a cop
killer executed. The crimi-
nologist in me takes over.
The research said the death
penalty in America is dying.
In 2009, the number of death
sentences dropped for the
past seven years.
States' standards
In Illinois, the governor
halted all executions be-
cause of problems in the
criminal justice system with
it. Eleven states considered
abolishing the death penalty
last year, citing high costs
and the lack of measurable
benefits.
The dozen states that have
chosen not to enact the
death penalty since it was
ruled permissible in 1976
have not had higher homi-
cide rates than the states
with the death penalty. In-
deed, 10 states without capi-
tal punishment have
homicide rates below the
national average, according
to the FBI data. According to
the Innocence Project, 154
people on death row have
been exonerated by DNA ev-
idence. Supreme Court Jus-
tice Harry Blackman said
the American "machinery of
death" is broken.


Judicial process
After reviewing the re-
search and applying 45
years of experience, I
found: most homicides are
impulsive actions and
crimes of passion where the
killers do not consider the
consequences, law enforce-
ment officers sometimes
fudge the truth, they coerce
false testimony, court-ap-
pointed lawyers sleep
through trials, they miss
deadlines, they fail to put on
exculpatory evidence, ju-
ries believe every word of
"experts," witnesses opine
on defendants they never
met, jurors evade responsi-
bility by hiding behind other
jurors, judges evade respon-
sibility by hiding behind
jury verdicts and appeals
courts hide behind trial
courts.
In three cases, I found the
lawyers slept during trial,
did not call witnesses, gave
no closing arguments and
used drugs. One was dis-
barred, and one handled the
case of the victim's will (a
conflict). One made racial
remarks.
These issues are a self-in-
flicted wound to the death
penalty. Would you want to
die on evidence cited
above?
Higher certainty
If we are to continue to
use the death penalty, it is
my opinion the level of cer-
tainty should be higher. Per-
haps instead of proof
beyond a reasonable doubt,
it should be proof beyond all
doubt. Without fear of con-
tradiction, I can say the law
has become a rubrics cube;
you can twist it into any-
thing you want.
As an example, Black-
stone and Bentham dis-
cussed a 1278 statute
establishing the penalty for
"stealing horses." The Eng-
lish judges held this provi-
sion did not apply to
someone who stole a single
horse.
As a criminologist, I de-
mand proof for my opinion.
Two thirds of all witness
identification has been re-
versed because DNA cleared
them. Research demon-
strates the death penalty
does not deter murder
Penalty studies
The first of the compara-
tive studies of capital pun-
ishment was done by


Thorsten Sellin in 1959.
Sellin was a criminologist
at the University of Pennsyl-
vania and one of the pio-
neers of scientific
criminology He was a prime
mover in setting up the gov-
ernment agencies that col-
lect statistics on crime.
Sellin applied his combina-
tion of qualitative and quan-
titative methods in an
exhaustive study of capital
punishment. He compared
states to other states and ex-
amined changes in states
over time. Every compari-
son he made led him to the
"inevitable conclusion . .
that executions have no dis-
cernible effect on homicide
rates" (Sellin 1959, 34).
Sellin's work has been
replicated time and time
again, as new data have be-
come available, and all of
the replications have con-
firmed his finding capital
punishment does not deter
homicide (see Bailey and
Peterson 1997, and Zimring
and Hawkins 1986).
Life or death?
The popular notion the
death penalty is a deterrent
is wrong. Most murders are
committed by people who
know each other. Surveys of
inmates said they would
rather die than get life in
prison. So, life in prison is
more of a deterrent to in-
mates than the death
penalty.
The year 1963 is distin-
guished by two facts: the
first year in U.S. history in
which executions of crimi-
nals did not occur and a
crime rate higher than any
previous year. In many
polls, the most often cited
reason for the death penalty
is the belief it deters crime.
Research fails to support a
deterrence justification for
capital punishment, so say
the scientists of crime.
Finally, we must look at
retribution, the notion that
punishment (the death
penalty) is imposed because
it is deserved. As a crimi-
nologist I often pose this
question to my students: "Is
retribution the true cur-
rency of justice?"
Costly punishment
The death penalty means
murderers deserve death in
Texas but not in Massachu-
setts. I do not call for an end
to the death penalty I call
for a light on the death
penalty. Life in prison is


cheaper than the death
penalty, so a life sentence is
more cost effective.
Pierrepoint's point
In preparation for this ar-
ticle, I researched the work
of a man who executed 608
people from 1933-1945. Al-
bert Pierrepoint was the of-
ficial executioner of
England. Pierrepoint kept
his opinions to himself on
the topic until his 1974 auto-
biography "Executioner:
Pierrepoint."
He wrote: "I have come to
the conclusion that execu-
tions solve nothing, and are
only an antiquated relic of a
primitive desire for revenge
which takes the easy way
and hands over the respon-
sibility for revenge to other
people.
The trouble with the
death penalty has always
been that nobody wanted it
for everybody, but every-
body differed about who
should get off."
The death penalty made
Pierrepoint feel hanging
was no deterrent. Lewis
Lawes was the Warden of
Sing Sing prison from 1920
to 1941. He supervised 303
executions.
"I shall ask for abolition
of the penalty of death until
I have the infallibility of
human judgment demon-
strated to me," he said in
1923.
A conversation
Picture this. I had imag-
ined that when I was driving
down the road from the
prison I spotted a space ship
that had just landed. I
stopped my car.
An alien came out and
walked over to my car.
He asked me: "What are
you doing here?"
I said: "I just came from
an execution."
He said: "What is that?"
I said: "It's where and
when the government puts a
man to death."
He asked me: "Why do
you do that?"
I said: "We kill people
who kill people, to show that
it's wrong to kill people."
When those words came
out of my mouth, it struck me.
He said: "That doesn't'
make sense. Who was the
executioner?"
I said: "We the people.
The government kills peo-
ple in our name."
He retorted: "Your society
should be better than him


and model the way"
He asked: "What happens
now?"
I said: "Politicians will
make more speeches, the
press will sell more papers,
the police and parole will be
blamed, more laws will be
passed, Jenna's law,
Caylee's law etc."
He said: "That doesn't
make sense."
I said: "I know, welcome
to America."
He told me a story about a
Jewish man in a concentra-
tion camp who was about to
be executed. His friend
found him kneeling and
praying.
His friend said: "What are
you doing?"
He said: "I am thanking
God."
Amazed, his friend said:
"You are about to be exe-
cuted and you are thanking
God-for what?"
Looking up he retorted:
"For not making me like
them."
Have we become like
them? Is government now a
killer?
Similar opinions
Supreme Court Justice
Louis E. Brandeis said:
"Government is a teacher,
for good or bad, but govern-
ment should set the exam-
ple. You don't solve violence
by committing violence."
Kirk Douglas in Paths of
Glory, in defense of soldiers
about to be executed, said:
"There are times when I
am ashamed to be a mem-
ber of the human race and
this is one such occasion."
At 7:14 p.m. Sept 28, 2011,
I felt the same way
The end result
Once again, I do not call
for an end to the death
penalty I call for a light on
the death penalty and I pose
a question -why doesn't ev-
idence influence public pol-
icy? I came home, hugged
my wife, called my son and
looked forward to my next
class on criminology. I will
not ask my students: "Do
they deserve to die?"
But "Do we deserve to
kill them?"

Former Citrus CountyAd-
ministratorAnthonyJ
Schembri is the Radzinow-
icz professor of criminol-
ogy, criminal law and
police science at the
University of Florida.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATER
Continued from Page C1

supply and demand. As time passes the
requirement for use of alternative sup-
plies will rocket upward and those costs
are stratospheric due to direct expense
of water treatment and installation
costs of distribution architecture.
We have about 19,000,000 residents in
Florida. According to the U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey, our total daily consumption
or use of fresh water in the state is 7 to
8 billion gallons a day Ninety percent of
the state's residents are provided
potable water supply from underground
aquifers.
Water is the fuel of Florida's eco-
nomic engine. It runs poorly when the
fuel is pollut" ed or in short supply It is
very expensive when the engine stut-
ters.
At some time in the future when all
platted land in Florida reaches build-
out, it is said we may have more than 80
million residents. A Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission fore-
cast of growth in Florida projects 35-
plus million residents by 2060. We do
not have the water to support such pop-
ulation even though we have "planned"
for it, and this is why "The era of cheap
water is over."
If we, as a people, decide growth is in
our best interest, we must decide how to
provide water supply for such visions.
We must also recognize corrupted water
bodies will end these plans in mid
stride. High-quality water and all it sup-
ports is vital to our future prosperity
and generations to come.
"Re" words are expensive. Reclama-
tion. Restoration. So too are the words
"Alternative Water Supply"
How do we fund these things? Well,
this is the fly in the ointment. We are
adept at drawing on the resource and


short-sighted in long-term planning.
The water in this state belongs to the
people. This is a conceptual Law of the
Commons philosophy. The user with the
biggest pump has economic advantage
over the rest of us. In most cases, no
meter determines what quantity is ac-
tually used, and there is absolutely no
motivation found in this idea which pro-
motes conservation by any user.
I'm willing to compensate the people
for water I use. Would the developer, in-
dustrial or agricultural user do so as
well? Extrapolate this further to munic-
ipalities which pump tens of millions of
gallons per day, or industrial uses which
push up into the hundreds of millions of
gallons in aggregate and you probably
see where this is going. If all wells in
Florida were metered, a levy of 1 cent
per 1,000 gallons of groundwater would
generate estimated revenues of $50-
plus million per day, or $18-plus billion
per year for water projects. The num-
bers put a certain perspective on our
dependence upon this resource, no?
While this calculation is crude and
the details of doing something of this
nature would inspire great debate, need
it be spelled out what such funds could
accomplish toward funding restoration,
reclamation, alternative water supplies,
or water and sewer systems? Would an
economic imperative for conservation
and efficiency of use be a bad thing? Is
there a meaningful objection to be
found adverse to this idea? If so, accept
the challenge and make your case. De-
bate is beneficial when problem-solving
and we surely need a solution.

Dan Hilliard a director with
Withlacoochee Area Residents Inc.,
which was organized in 1984 in
response to quality of life threats
posed by activities that have a high
potential to degrade groundwater and
surface water quality


Doctor shows kindness, respect
In today's time when people don't have time for
people and doctors are so busy, I wanted to give
my recommendation to a Dr. Jeffrey Wallis. He
saw me as a gastroenterologist and a
colonoscopy doctor. He treated me with respect
and kindness along with everybody in
his office and went beyond the call of
duty, him and his staff. And I wanted to 01
say because of doctors like him, we still
have a lot of faith in our doctors.. .This
man had time, compassion and is a very
wonderful doctor and his whole staff.
And the surgical center in Lecanto
where I went to was also awesome.
Pay below minimum wage CA


OK, I am one of the 46 percent of C
Americans (who) do not pay federal in- tl
come tax because my employer only
pays me $5 an hour.
Disband un-American ACLU


)3-


I believe the ACLU, the American Civil Liberties
Union, is getting to be very un-American. What
can we do to dissolve this organization or at least
change their views, their un-American views? God
bless America.
Trump uninformed in book
Just because someone has a book published
does not make it factual. Donald Trump is one of
the most uninformed and biased persons in this
country. Reading his stuff is a waste of time, as far
as facts are concerned.
Smith column drips with irony
Recently read the article from Jimmie T. Smith
on "Balancing protection of our waters with devel-
opment," and he emphasized protecting local
sources first. I hope he realizes the well permit
Swiftmud approved recently in Crystal River is
step 1 in bypassing the local sources first.
Trump, lacocca writings scary
I find it very serious, disgusting and threatening
of the truth that Donald Trump is speaking about


Letters to the Editor
For endorsement letters,
see pages A13-15 in today's paper.

our president. But the most recent one that opened
my eyes is when I got an email of an address and
letter that had been written by the former
JND chairman chief of the Chrysler people, la-
FF cocca. You want to read that, it will scare
OiR you more. Do your homework, people.


w0579

0579


Tune out political bashing
I'm tired of people calling in Sound Off
bashing Democrats, saying they're get-
ting handouts and all this. And Republi-
cans are the ones (who) are dividing this
country with their conservative rhetoric
and their conservative talk radio and sit-


ting there bashing American people for
getting handouts and saying it's the Democrats.
Just give it a break and turn it over on a different
channel and watch some real news.
Are dolphins more deserving?
This is for the person who called in saying Carl
Hiaasen must be Republican because he doesn't
think we should feed the dolphins because it
makes them dependent. If a dolphin is injured and
unable to hunt, you would provide that dolphin
with government-financed medical care and food.
Even a Republican would do that. They do it for a
dolphin, just not for a human.
We Care Pantry best suited
Question is, who decides about the firehouse?
It seems to me it's to help residents of Ho-
mosassa. We Care Pantry serves the elderly, the
young, and, yes, our veterans in these great eco-
nomic times. This is a no-brainer. We Care Food
Pantry serves all the residents of Homosassa.
Good job, Diane. You deserve a permanent home.
Thanks to Good Samaritan
Thanks to the couple who found Phil's cane in
Wal-Mart's shopping cart and delivered (it) to our
home. Much appreciated.


C I T R U S .- "


,,, .. '
Ij* i^Fl ^ H


Saturday
November 3
7:30 a.m.
Hunter Springs Park
Crystal River

RUN OR WALK!
Register Online:
CitrusRoadRunners.org
proudly benefitting



BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CITRUS COUNTY

hosted by
SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

presented by


kIFUNERALFHOMES
& CREMATORY
in partnership with


October 27, 2012
8:00 a.m. 11:30a.m.



You are invited to participate!


Gather your friends, business associates, neighbors,
church groups, or club members to commit to a day
to give Withlacoochee State Trail a manicure!
To register as a volunteer, please call the
Nature Coast Volunteer Center at
352-527-5955 Lunch will be provided by
Walmart Super Center of Inverness. ( _j,
. -_a" LIVE UNITED
j almart



OOOCL2E


25th Annual

Scarecrow

Festival

Oct. 20

10 a.m. 4 p.m.
I. North Citrus Ave., Crystal River
.-.- on the grounds of
Heritage Village








/ j Come out and support our local nonprofits
For more information call
352-564-1400




E Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox
E Church invites you to join the... E

IGreek Festival|


S& Vendor/Ar tExpo

I Oct. 26, 27, 28
Indoor Dinners
8 Outside Grille
| Fri & Sat. II a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. II a.m. 5 p.m. -
| ADMISSION $2 Donation
4705 W. Gulf to Lake Blvd.


ELL
(S..44), Lecanto 7,


E*Gyros l Grilled Specialties
L*Greek pastries, desserts g coffee shop zest
| *Specialty merchandise vendors
, *Free parking
L Uain or shine For information call 527-076
i or www.stmichaelgoc.or* then click Festival
I Donate a unit of blood and get $1.00 off
tL a meal on Friday, October 26th. Om
LOOCGJI S n I I a* om.nm U
UCLiN
ULU
UL E~


October 14th
Elvis starring Billy Lindsey
Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion
CASI Chili Cook Off

October 17th
Military Card Party

October 1 Sth
Jazzat the Museum

October 19th
Elvis starring Billy Lindsey

October 20th
Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Day
Scarecrow Festival
Oldies in the Park

October 21 st
Biloxi, MS and New Orleans, LA Trip
Why St. Augustine

October 25th
Light up the Night for Alzheimer's Awareness
I I th Annual Swing for a Cure

October 26th
Inverness Fall Classic 10/26 & 10/27
Greek Festival 10/26 1-/28

October 27th
Halloween Movies in the Park
Veterans Appreciation Week 10/27 11/12
Crystal River Haunted Halloween at the Park
USPS Make a Difference Day Food Drive
2nd Annual 5K One Mile Walk
NCVC Make a Difference Day
Mt. Dora Craft Festival
Cooter Fest
2nd Annual Halloween Scramble
Nature Coast Community Band Concert


- I


Saturday, Nm.r3,2012 .L >


$20 Pre-Registered
$25 Race Day
T-shirt and free Stone Crab
Jam entry guaranteed to
pro-registered.
Door Prizes
by A Crystal River Kayak
Company and New Concepts
International Hair Salon

sme.tacular sunr
rac ealong :the
C^rytal R^ivercoast!
^M~afeT~iTO B.M


C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


OPINIONS











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Too good to be true?


Steep drop


in unemployment rate spawns overnight conspiracy theories


Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Sasquatch might as well
have traipsed across the
White House lawn Friday
with a lost Warren Commission
file on his way to the studio
where NASA staged the moon
landing.
Conspiracy theorists came out
in force after the government re-
ported a sudden drop in the U.S.
unemployment rate one month
before Election Day Their mes-
sage: The Obama administration
would do anything to ensure a
November victory, including
manipulating unemployment
data.
The conspiracy was widely re-
jected. Officials at the Labor De-
partment said the jobs figures
are calculated by highly trained
government employees without
any political interference. De-
mocrats and even some Repub-
licans said they also found the
charges implausible.
Yet that didn't stop the chatter
The allegations were a measure
of how politicized the monthly
unemployment report has be-
come near the end of a cam-
paign that has focused on the
economy and jobs.
The conspiracy erupted after
former General Electric CEO
Jack Welch, a Republican,
tweeted his skepticism five min-
utes after the Labor Department
announced that the unemploy-
ment rate had fallen to 7.8 per-
cent in September from 8.1
percent the month before.
"Unbelievable jobs numbers
... these Chicago guys will do
anything ... can't debate so
change numbers," Welch
tweeted, referring to the site of
Obama campaign headquarters.
The drop in unemployment
was announced two days after
Obama's lackluster performance
in his first debate with Republi-
can challenger Mitt Romney
Republican Rep. Allen West of
Florida soon announced via
Facebook that he agreed with
Welch.
"Somehow by manipulation of
data we are all of a sudden
below 8 percent unemployment,
a month from the presidential
election," West wrote. "This is
Orwellian to say the least."
The Obama administration
wasn't given much time to gloat
about the strong economic im-
provement Instead, it had to de-
fend statisticians and
economists against accusations
made without any supporting
evidence.


Associated Press
Former General Electric CEO Jack Welch addresses students Sept. 27, 2006, at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, Mass. Conspiracy theorists came out in force Friday, Oct. 5, after
the government reported a sudden drop in the U.S. unemployment rate one month before Election Day.
Welch tweeted his skepticism five minutes after the Labor Department announced that the unemployment
rate had fallen to 7.8 percent in September from 8.1 percent the month before.


"No serious person ... would
make claims like that," said
Alan Krueger, chairman of the
White House Council of Eco-
nomic Advisers.
The jobs report is prepared
under tight security each month
by a relatively obscure govern-
ment agency the Bureau of
Labor Statistics without any
oversight or input from the
White House. It is based on data
collected by an army of census
workers, who interview Ameri-
cans in 60,000 households by
telephone or door-to-door


Eight days before the unem-
ployment rate is made public, the
bureau's office suite goes into lock-
down. Tom Nardone, a 36-year
veteran at the agency who oversees
preparation of the report, keeps
crucial papers in a safe in his office.
A big reason for the security
has nothing to do with politics.
The data could move financial
markets if it were released early
"These are our best-trained
and best-skilled individuals,"
Labor Secretary Hilda Solis said
on CNBC. She called the claims
of manipulation "ludicrous."


The BLS, the statistical divi-
sion of the Labor Department,
collected and analyzed data and
calculated the unemployment
rate before Wednesday night's
presidential debate.
Joel Naroff, president of
Naroff Economic Advisors, said
that it's "not that unusual" for
the rate to move by three-tenths
of a percent in one month. It's
happened 12 times in the past 10
years.
"In other words, at least once


Page D3


Business DIGEST


Better Health team
now certified
Better Health Chiropractic of Crystal
River-Lecanto announces the certifica-
tion of the support team: Wanda Curry,
licensed chiropractic assistant, Chris
Buck, licensed chiropractic assistant
and Frankie Rowker, L.M.T. All are
certified in medical weight loss "medi-
wraps" and are now certified wrap
technicians.
Deborah Simmons
gets industry award
Deborah Simmons, training instruc-
tor at New Horizons Village in
Lecanto, has been honored with a
2012 "Circle of Champions" award
from the Florida Association of Reha-


bilitation Facilities.
As an instructor at New Horizons
Village day program, Simmons per-
forms a variety of tasks and services
related to the daily living training given
to the 48 residents of New Horizons
Village, an intermediate care facility for
the developmentally disabled.
"Debbie has a winning smile, a lov-
ing heart and a warm personality," said
Donna Salak, who oversees the day
program. "These traits make her a
wonderful staff whom the residents
love and respect. She believes in our
philosophy to give loving care and pro-
tection to our residents and exhibits
this every day at the day program. It is
my joy to work with her every day."
Simmons was recognized recently at
the Florida ARF meeting in Clearwater.


According to the Florida ARF, the
Circle of Champions Award is given to
individuals who display "the highest
commitment to professional growth
and pride in his or her position....the
key factor in this employee award is
the commitment and overall contribu-
tion to the organization."
Dr. Kinnard appointed
to WellFlorida board
Dr. Jeffery Kinnard has been ap-
pointed to the board of directors for
the WellFlorida Council. The Well-
Florida Council is a state-designated
local health council, with a service
area encompassing Citrus and 15
other counties.

See Page D3


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email
to newsdesk@chronicle
online.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attn: Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the
right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will be
considered for publication. Im-
ages taken with most cellphone
cameras do not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific date or
in color cannot be guaranteed.
" Submissions about specific
prices of products or sales
events are considered advertis-
ing and are not eligible for
Business Digest.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Stuck in

place and

running

out of time
DEAR BRUCE: I
don't know anyone
who knows more
about financial matters
than I do, and I know lit-
tle. I am 73 years old and
widowed, and I have an
annual income of $20,000,
plus or minus. I work two
part-time jobs to supple-
ment my IRAs and Social
Security. I own a 100-year-
old home in a dying city, so
houses are not moving
very fast, if at all.
I have to pay someone
to do most of the mainte-
nance, and the supply of
people who do that is ever
changing. The compe-
tency level goes down
rather than up. There are
many issues in a house
this old windows, side
wall insulation, plaster
cracks and, in my case, a
chimney with repairs that
have cost almost as much
as the house did back in
the '60s. (It still leaks, too.)
This eats up most of my
"disposable" income.
To make matters worse,
a store on the corner has
expanded right up to the
driveway of the house
next door to me, and park-
ing is scarce on this street.
The store owner bought
the house next door, and
while it is now rented, I
figure it's only a matter of
time before it becomes a
parking lot. I've already
been to the zoning/plan-
ning board and wasted my
breath about allowing
commercial creep to cut
deep into the middle-class
residential area.
If I sold the house, I
don't know where I'd go.
Rent would eat up much
of the monthly income,
and buying another house
is out of the question. My
children live away and
won't ever come back.
Should I try to obtain a
reverse mortgage? And if
I do, what should I look
for? My father lived to be
97, so I'm hoping to be
around for a while. -
H.R., via email
DEAR H.R: I appreci-
ate your circumstances.
The troublesome part
about a reverse mortgage
is that an appraisal will
have to be made, and
given your description of
the home, it's not going to
appraise for much. Fur-
ther, since you are rela-
tively young, the amount
you can get from a reverse
mortgage is much less on
a percentage basis be-
cause you still have a
fairly long life expectancy
See Page D4


Fall is here, and so are opportunities


an you feel it? Fall is fi-
nally in the air goodbye
soggy, energy-zapping hu-
midity; hello crisp, drier air,
cooler temperatures and bright
autumn skies. It's the time of year
that just makes you want to throw
open your windows and doors
and let that brisk breeze in.
It is also a great time to open
yourself up to myriad opportuni-
ties to find and prepare for your
next great job or employee and, if
you are an employer, learn how to
bolster your staff's credentials
through an Employed Worker
Training (EWT) program.
Because it is autumn and the
traditional prelude to all things
holiday, you'll want to start saving


the dates for these upcoming pro-
grams before your calendar gets
full:
Monster.com Power
Seeker workshop
Students attending any post-
secondary institution in Citrus,
Levy or Marion counties are in-
vited to participate in a monster
of a workshop on Tuesday, Nov.
13. Workforce Connection has
teamed up with Monster.com to
help college and vo-tech stu-
dents, especially those nearing
completion of their programs,
power up their job-search efforts.
The free workshop, "The Best
You: Online, On Paper and In
Person," will help participants:


Create their best
resume.
Search for jobs
and internships online.
Network online
and in person.
Research compa-
nies and organizations.
Make social media
work for them, not
against them. Laura
Stand out from the Laura
crowd in an interview. WORK
The workshop will CONNI
take place from noon
to 1:30 p.m. at the Klein Confer-
ence Center at the College of Cen-
tral Florida's (CF) Ocala campus,
3001 S.W College Road (State
Road 200). Again, even though the


I
F
E


workshop takes place
in Ocala, it is open to
postsecondary stu-
dents from CF's Citrus
County campus in
Lecanto, Withla-
coochee Technical In-
stitute (WTI) in
Inverness, and any
other postsecondary
institution in our re-
Byrnes gion at no charge.
FORCE Monster.com will have
CTION give-a-ways for the first
50 participants.
Registration is required. To
sign up, go to the Job Seekers
page at www.clmworkforce.com,
click on the Patriot Job Connec-
tion logo and either click on the


"Students Click Here" link or
scroll down until you see the
Monster.com workshop registra-
tion button. From there, you can
register online, add the event to
your calendar and find out how to
call for more information.
Fall Career Fair
Hot on the heels of the Mon-
ster.com workshop is another
great career fair open to general
job seekers as well as postsec-
ondary students. The Fall Career
Fair takes place from 10:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, at
CF's Learning and Conference
Center, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
See Page D4










D2

SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan M.
this:
ME %rC-.r


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Health and Fitness Expo raises


$10,000 in scholarship money


Helping Citrus County
stay healthy is the goal of
the Women's Health and
Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance
of the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce. This
year's expo was the BWA's
sixth annual event, provid-
ing health care and busi-
ness scholarships for the
women of Citrus County to-
taling over $30,000 to date.
The event this year was
on Saturday, Sept 22 at the
Crystal River Armory. Ap-
proximately 67 exhibitors
provided the community
with information focused
on staying healthy and well.
Many screenings and serv-
ices were offered, including
vision and hearing screen-
ings, chiropractic neck and
back evaluations, blood
pressure monitoring, blood
donations and flu shots.
The presenting sponsor,
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, displayed
its da Vinci robot and pro-
vided attendees with an in-
credible hands-on
experience.
Giveaways, provided by
the exhibitors, were plenti-
ful; however, there were
three grand prizes donated
that wowed the attendees.
The three lucky winners
are:
Avis Craig of Crystal
River Genesis Women's
Center, a gift basket of Med
Spa services and products
valued at $1,000
Karen Brown of Inver-
ness Tally-Ho, a two-day
Universal Studios vacation
package valued at $700
Lisa Lisenby of


)


Front row, from left: Rhonda Lestinsky,
Jodi Billings, Kara Williams, Avis Craig,
Catherine Holder, Jennifer Duca,
Theresa Eatough; back row, from left:
Dorothy Pernu, Dee Peters, Sue
Fullerton, Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee,
Annemarie Saxer, April Zay, Cira
Schnettler. Avis Craig is the grand
prize winner of the gift basket pre-
pared by Genesis Women's Center
filled with Med Spa services and
products valued at $1,000.
Lecanto Jazzercise, a gift basket
valued at $500.
This year, the Women's Health and
Fitness Expo raised more than
$10,000 in scholarship money
"This was the most well attended
Expo thus far, and we are honored to
have so many health-related profes-
sionals in this community who sup-
port our efforts to provide
scholarships to the women of Citrus
County. We are very thankful for all
our sponsors and exhibitors; the
Expo wouldn't be possible without
them," said Catherine Holder, R.N.,
and chair of this year's Health and
Fitness Expo.


Halloween
Oct. 26 Nature Coast EMS is pleased
to announce the third annual Trunk or
Treat Halloween event scheduled for 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26. Trunk or
Treat will be at Nature Coast EMS Lecanto
headquarters at 3876 W. Country Hill Drive
behind the Crystal Glen subdivision on
Homosassa Trail. Bring the kids for face-
painting, haunted hallways, a kids' costume
contest, free hot dogs, treats, a movie and
more! Free admission. Some of our par-
ticipating Trunk or Treaters are the Florida
Highway Patrol, the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office and Fire Rescue, Bayflite and, of
course, Nature Coast EMS.
Oct. 26 and 27 It's time again for
Haunted Tram Rides at the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park. Businesses,
organizations and families will be assigned
locations on Pepper Creek Trail. Rides
begin at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and
run until 11 p.m. In addition to tram rides,
there will be clowns, face-painting, a Hal-
loween costume contest, refreshments
and trinkets for the kids. A haunted house
for children will be set up in the Florida room.
Donations for admission: adult tram rides
$5; children up to age 12 are $3; and the
children's haunted house is $2.
Oct. 27 and 31 Come celebrate Hal-
loween with the 13th annual super scream
of "The Nightmare on Pine Bluff Street."
Come in through the Haunted Halloween
maze, see the spooky displays and picture
tunnel, exit through the scary graveyard.


Citrus County Cruisin'
Oct. 26 to 28 The Cooter Festival
returns in 2012 with three days loaded
with fun, music, contests, games,
food, refreshments, turtle races, bar-
becue cook-off, Cooter Idol champi-
onship, triathlon, costume contest
and more. Free parking and admis-
sion. More information is available
at http://www.cooterfestival.com/.
Nov 3 Celebrate the blues from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the annual
Blues 'n' Bar-B-Que in Homosassa.
Tickets are $20 at the gate. The ticket
price is for the concert only Barbe-
cue will be cooked on site and Cuban
cuisine offered in the Museum Cafe.
Cold beer, wine, soda, water, coffee and
desserts will stave offhunger and keep
you energized. Please, no pets, cool-
ers or outside food and drink, but
revelers are welcome to bring chairs
for personal comfort Be ready to
have a great time! More information
available at http://www.ncfblues.com.
Travel a few miles north and
join the street festival as the Rotary
Club of Crystal River King's Bay chapter
presents the fifth annual Stone Crab
Jam on Saturday, Nov 3. This street
festival kicks off at 4 p.m. on the
south side of Citrus Avenue all the


hauntings

This free annual event is assisted by John
and Dusty Porter, the Peters family, the
Bruno family and other neighbors and
friends. Hours are 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
on the 27th and 7 p.m. to 9:20 p.m. on
the 31st. Donations to C.U.B. will be ac-
cepted (food and/or money).
Oct. 26 and 27 Friends of Crystal River
State Parks sponsors Haunted Halloween
at Crystal River State Park for teens (over
12) and adults. Gate admission is a $5
donation to the Friends groups and in-
cludes a "Terrifying Tram Tour," a "Pirate
Boat Ride" and a "Zombie Haunted House."
Food booth by Gulf Archaeology Research
Institute. "Mortuary Photography" by
Florida Public Archaeology Network. Ad-
vance Tickets available at the Park Visitors
Center. Hours: 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Children
ages 12 and under admitted free. Children's
Activity time will be free; activities from 3
to 6 p.m. Crystal Cove area on State Park
Street in Crystal River Preserve State Park.
Family friendly for 8 and older; minors
must be accompanied by an adult. For
more information, call 352-563-0450.
Oct 31 --Join the merchants at Crystal
River Mall for Mall-O-Ween from 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. for mall-wide trick-or-treating and a
magic show with Dallas Smith.
If you are a Chamber member and wish
for your organization's Halloween event to
be listed here, email a press release to
cindi@citruscountychamber.com no later
than Tuesday, Oct. 16.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce








way to the waterfront at King's Bay
Park in Crystal River,
with music on three
stages, food and craft A
vendors and beer, wine,
soda and water. General
admission tickets are CITRUS COUN
only $5 and VIP tickets Economic Developm
are just $50 each. More co.n,Inc.
information is available
at http://www.stonecrabjam.com/.
Nov 10 and 11 -Enjoy the annual
Homosassa Seafood Festival, spon-
sored by the Homosassa Civic Club
and held in the historic district of
Old Homosassa. The art show is
judged and non-judged with ex-


us Coy Chamber of umece
Business Wme B's Alh. e


FITNESS Thank You
to Our Sponsors


Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center

Advanced Urology Specialists
Citrus Memorial Health System
Genesis Women's Center Medical Spa

Comfort Keepers
R--
Cypress Cove Care Center
HPH Hospice
Mike D. Bays Agency Inc.
Oak Hill Hospital
Walgreens
Williams Wealth Management
C.rtledog Coffee Roasters
Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus 9S / Classic Hits the Fox
Publix Supermarkets
SoilAView Indoor Digital Advertising
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric, Inc.
Sweetbay Supermarket Inverness


Leadership Citrus
forms due by Oct. 25
Leadership Citrus is an annual
program of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce. The
class meets every other week
over a five-month period begin-
ning in January. This highly suc-
cessful community leadership
program has been active in our
community for more than 20
years, and provides participants
a higher level of awareness and
understanding of Citrus County and
its resources and opportunities.
A limited number of appli-
cants are selected to participate
in the program. The process in-
volves filling out an application
and going through an interview
process. Selected members will
be notified through the mail in
December. Class membership
is open to Citrus County resi-
dents at a cost of $595. Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
members receive a discounted
rate of $495.
If you are interested in being
considered for the class of 2013,
visit www.leadershipcitrus.com
to complete an application and
submit it prior to Oct. 25, 2012.


hibitors from all over the country.
The food court is a well-known at-
traction of the festival. Vendors from
the community provide their seafood
and other specialties. Entry costs
are a $2 donation, but children get in
free! No pets allowed. The event is 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov 10, and
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov 11.
For more information, visit www.
homosassasaseafoodfestival.org.
Cruise the Crystal River Armory
during the 35th annual "Remodeling
America" Home & Outdoor Show on
Nov 10 and 11. Hosted by the Citrus
County Builders Association and
sponsored this year by Senica Air,
the show is open to the
x public 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Sunday More infor-
mation is available at
ITY _" http://tinyurl.com/9d38vwl.
Sent Nov. 24 Take a sce-
nic drive west on Ozello
Road to the seventh annual
Ozello Arts and Fine Crafts Festival.
Enjoy strolling through the vendors
and picking up holiday gifts. No pets.
Take U.S. 19 to Ozello Trail (494) and
continue west about 6.2 miles. Watch for
signs; the show will be on your right.
More information at www.ozello.net.


DEADLINE
RETURN YOUR VERIFICATION FORM BY Monday, Oct. 15.



YOU CAUGHT \

MY EYE ...
Prisila Henriguez
Publix, Crystal River
... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!

Upcoming EVENTS


Oct. 15- VERIFICATION
FORMS DUE BACK TO THE
CHAMBER OFFICE (fax 352-
795-1921)
Oct. 23 Business After
Hours 5 to 7 p.m. atALPACA
MAGIC
Oct. 30 Movember Shave
Off, 5 to 6 p.m. at Inverness
Chamber of Commerce/EDC
Office
Nov. 1-Business After Hours
- 5 to 7 p.m. at HOSPICE OF
CITRUS COUNTY
Nov. 8 Business After Hours
-5 to 7 p.m., SENICAAIR and
CITRUS COUNTY BUILDERS
ASSOCIATION preview the 35th


annual "Remodeling America"
Home & Outdoor Show
Nov. 9 November Chamber
Lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Plantation on Crystal River
Nov. 15 Business After
Hours 5 to 7 p.m. at FERRIS
GROVE RETAIL STORE
Nov. 29 Movember Mo
Show & Finale Party, 6 p.m. at
BURKES OF *
IRELAND u
Check our
full calendar i
for community, *
entertainment I r
and fundraising events. Follow
us on your smartphone:


Give a shout out to employees who focus
on Customer Service
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is proud to promote
its "'You Caught My Eye" program. The program allows residents
and visitors to recognize employees who go beyond in their atten-
tion to Customer Service. In addition to the employee's name ap-
pearing in the newspaper, the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce sends a letter to the employee's manager noting the
recognition. We are excited to offer such interaction between
businesses and community residents. So, go ahead, give a shout
out to someone who gave you exceptional customer service.
Please note: Business must be located within Citrus County.
:------------------------------------------------
YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ...
for OUTSTANDING Customer Service!
PERSON you are nominating
BUSINESS they work for
ADDRESS of business
CITY DATE of contact
WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?

Your name & phone number
Date submitted
SEND COMPLETED FORM TO Cindi Fein, Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, 28 NW U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, or
fax to 352-795-1921.
-------------------------------------------------I
_. _j1 11111116-.f.


S"like" us on
.... i i, I


Donna Bidlack Executive Officer of the Citrus County
Builders Association co-hosts Chamber Chat with Melissa
Benefield this week. Donna shares with us the function of
the CCBA and tells us about their upcoming Home and
Outdoor Show November 10th and llth at the Crystal
River Armory. Sue Fullerton of Walk Don't Run Travel has a
great cruise deal for April 2013 and the best part is that it
helps raise funds to provide scholarships for local
students! Sue is joined by Benny Cruz President of the
Spanish American Club who shares with us how the club
helps Citrus County students through various fundraisers
including this fantastic cruise deal! The Citrus "Haunted"
Hills 5K is coming up On Saturday October 27th and
Nicholle Fernandez is going to tell us why we don't want to
miss this fun event. Let's just say there are going to be
some surprises along the way! Did you know that vein
disease affects about 50% of the population? Dr. Sharma
from Premier Vein Center in Homosassa tells us how to
recognize vein disease and the treatments that are
available. You don't have to live with pain anymore!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday
6pm- Thursday 8am- Friday 1pm- every week!
If you would like your business or local event featured on
Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you-- Email Melissa
Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. LIKE" Chamber
Chat on Facebook for clips of past segments and updates
on our weekly show!


c~i
HEALTH~d


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No more refillable Coca-Cola CONSPIRACY
Continued from Page D1


Last 65-ounce

bottle hit end

ofline Tuesday
Associated Press

NEW YORK It's the
end of an era for Coca-Cola
lovers, as the last 6.5-ounce
returnable, glass bottle rolls
off the production line.
A small Coke bottler in
Minnesota said it's stopping
production of the bottles,
which customers could re-
turn to get back a 20-cent de-
posit. The company in
Winona, Minn., had been re-
filling the returnable bottles
since 1932, but said it no
longer makes business
sense.
LeRoy Telstad, the bot-
tler's vice president and
general manager, said the
last run for refilling the bot-
tles was Tuesday
The Coca-Cola Co., based
in Atlanta, notes its 8-ounce
glass bottles are still widely
available across the country
Those recyclable bottles are
nearly identical to the
smaller 6.5-ounce bottles.
They have less glass but
hold more cola.
The glass bottles that
were refilled in Winona,
Minn. had a very limited
footprint, distributed in only
four counties.
"They were made on an
old line that would have to
be completely replaced -
they kept them going as long
as they could," said Susan
Stribling, a Coca-Cola
spokeswoman.
And people often kept the
vintage bottles after they
bought them instead of re-
turning them.
As one of the last makers
of the refillable bottles, Tel-
stad said people would



DIGEST
Continued from Page D1

WellFlorida provides man-
agement services for locally,
state- and federally funded pro-
grams, special projects and
nonprofits throughout the re-
gion. As the lead agency for
two Healthy Start coalitions and
North Central Florida Ryan
White CARE Program, Well-
Florida has managed over $90
million in funding since 1991 for
maternal and infant care and
HIV/AIDS services. In addition
to fiscal administration, Well-
Florida provides technical and
advisory consultation, staffing,
quality assurance/improve-
ment, marketing and commu-
nity outreach.
Webster celebrates
15-year anniversary
OCALA- Webster Univer-
sity's Ocala Metropolitan cam-
pus is proud to announce the
15-year milestone of its incep-
tion. To commemorate this suc-
cess, Webster University will
host a 15th anniversary celebra-
tion, along with an open house
and campus-wide activities on
Friday, Oct. 19. The event will
take place at Webster's Market
Street at Heathbrook from 4
p.m. until 7 p.m. The event will
consist of a broad range of ac-
tivities scheduled throughout
the evening, including: free food
from 17th Street Deli, live radio
broadcasts from 92Q FM, a Life


Associated Press
ABOVE: Bottles in the last run
are prepared for crates Tues-
day at the Coca-Cola Bottling
Company in Winona, Minn.
RIGHT: General manager and
vice president LeRoy Telstad
pulls the last 6.5-ounce Coca-
Cola bottle off the line.
travel from all over to pick
them up. Customers paid a
deposit on each bottle they
bought and would get the
deposit back when they re-
turned the bottles.
The bottling company,
which will continue to dis-
tribute other Coca-Cola
products, said it refilled
about 6,000 bottles for the
final run. The bottles will be
sold online for $20 each start-
ing Monday, with proceeds
going toward the Lake
Winona Pedestrian and Bicy-
cle Path restoration project
The Coca-Cola Co. made
its trademarked contour
glass bottle in 1916. In 1961,
it made its first glass bottle
that couldn't be refilled or
returned. The vast majority
of glass bottles made in the
U.S. are recyclable.


SECO employees pledge
$47,191 to United Way
Special to the Chronicle

Sumter Electric Cooperative has completed its 2012-13
United Way campaign and its community-minded employees
have pledged $47,191 to assist those less fortunate in the co-
op's seven county service territory.
SECO employees choose where their individual donations
go and the breakdown for the current area United Way cam-
paigns is as follows:
Lake and Sumter counties $25,718
Marion County $12,259
Citrus County $5,860
Other counties $3,354
"Our employees face many of the same economic chal-
lenges that our member/customers are facing," said SECO
CEO Jim Duncan. "However, despite the current economic cli-
mate, they have certainly not abandoned their tradition of com-
mitment to the communities we serve and the people who live
within them. I am very proud of them for their support of United
Way, but it's also important to mention that our employees are
involved in a wide variety of humanitarian and community
causes and events throughout the year. They do so by donat-
ing their time, talents and monetary support."
The co-op also has its own humanitarian programs such as
the SECO Angel Fund and the SECO Gatekeeper Program.
Both programs have lent support to literally thousands of peo-
ple who were in need of help.


South blood drive, a special
"preview graduate school lec-
ture," guest speakers, prizes
and more.
Oak Hill gets AHA
gold again
Oak Hill Hospital announces
it has again been awarded the
American Heart Association's
Start! Fit-Friendly Company
Gold Award.
The award is intended to be


a catalyst for positive change in
the workplace across America.
It recognizes companies that
demonstrate progressive lead-
ership by making the health
and wellness of their employ-
ees a priority.
Oak Hill Hospital has been
recognized at the Gold Level,
which means that:
They offer employees
physical activity support at the
worksite.


a year, you should expect that large a move," he said in
an email to clients. It last happened 20 months ago, "so
we were overdue. That is just the reality of the data."
Romney didn't discredit the government data. But
plenty of conservatives did that work for him.
Conn Carroll, an editorial writer at the Washington Ex-
aminer, tweeted: "I don't think BLS cooked numbers. I
think a bunch of Dems lied about getting jobs. That
would have same effect."
Rick Manning, communications director of Americans
for Limited Government and the former public affairs
chief of staff at the Labor Department, said "anyone who
takes this unemployment report serious is either naive
or a paid Obama campaign adviser."
Rep. Paul Broun, a Maryland Republican, weighed in
with a statement saying the report "raises questions for
me, and frankly it should be raising eyebrows for people
across the country"
Economists offered more plausible reasons for skep-
ticism. A big chunk of the increase in employed Ameri-
cans came from those who had to settle for part-time
work: 582,000 more people reported that they were work-
ing part-time last month but wanted full-time jobs.
Conspiracy theories are nothing new for Obama. He
has been dogged by discredited claims that he wasn't
born in this country and that he is Muslim.
"Stop with the dumb conspiracy theories. Good grief,"
Tony Fratto, who worked for President George W Bush,
weighed in on Twitter
It wasn't just the political elite commenting. Angelia
Levy, a researcher at the Federal Judicial Center, the re-
search arm of the federal judiciary, told her 588 Twitter
followers that Welch's comments were "unbelievable."
"All of the sudden they're questioning this data that's
been reported for decades," the Democrat said in a
phone interview. "It's so hypocritical and ridiculous."
Justin Wolfers, a professor of business and public pol-
icy at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School
and research associate at the National Bureau of Eco-
nomic Research, went on Twitter to say Welch "just la-
beled himself an idiot."
In a follow-up phone call, Wolfers said the economists
who calculate the monthly jobs report "are nerds who
spend their lives crunching numbers for the public serv-
ice. To impute their integrity is outrageous."
The agency has been in the political glare before.
In 1971, President Nixon took aim at it after a top offi-
cial, Howard Goldstein, publicly attributed a steep drop
in unemployment to largely technical factors. The ad-
ministration reorganized the agency and installed sev-
eral officials in newly created positions. That led to
charges from Democrats that the GOP administration
was politicizing the bureau.
Welch said later in the day in a Fox News interview: "I
don't know what the right number is, but I'll tell you,
these numbers don't smell right when you think about
where the economy is right now."
Mayerowitz reported from New York


They have increased the
number of healthy eating op-
tions available to employees.
They promote a wellness
culture at the worksite.
They embrace at least
nine criteria as outlined by the
American Heart Association in
the areas of physical activity,
nutrition and culture.
It is at 11375 Cortez Blvd.,
Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of
U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit
our website at
OakHillHospital.com, or like us
on Facebook.
CF Foundation
schedules meetings
The CF Foundation of the
College of Central Florida (CF),
plans a meeting. A copy of the
agenda will be available at each.
For information, contact the CF
Foundation office, 3001 S.W.
College Road, Ocala, FL 34474.
CF Foundation Board of
Directors meeting is at 4:30
p.m. Wednesday, Oct.17, at CF
Founders Hall Boardroom,
Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. Col-
lege Road, Ocala, to discuss
general business.
Leadership Citrus
applications open
Applications are now being
accepted for the Leadership
Citrus Class of 2013. Leader-
ship Citrus has been active in
the community for 21 years,
and participants have gained a
higher level of awareness and
understanding of Citrus County


at the Thursday,

MUSEUM Oct. 18
The second floor historic courtroom at the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum
Featuring
Jloe Donato & LFrIends
From Miami
Doors open at 6pm. Music starts at 7pm


Call for tickets
341-6427 and 341-6488
$25/Concert $80/Season (4)
Proceeds to benefit the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum and
The Citrus County Historical Society.


Sponsored by


Edward
Jones
Financial
cMARiiT S Services


Citrus Dental of Inverness, Heinz Funeral Home, Comfort Keepers, James A Neale, PA,
Deco Cafe, Accent Travel, Whalen Jewelers, Tally-Ho Vacations, Regions Bank, Frank
LDi Giovanni, Chefs of Napoli II


and all it has to offer.
Leadership Citrus is a five-
month program that meets
every other week. A limited num-
ber of applicants will be selected
to participate in the program by
a committee made up from the
Leadership Citrus Board. The
process involves filling out an
application and going through
an interview process. Selected
members will be notified through


the mail in December and
classes will start in January.
Class membership is open to
Citrus County residents, and
members of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will re-
ceive a discount. Cost of the
class is $495 for Chamber
members and $595 for
nonmembers.
Applications can be found at
www.leadershipcitrus.com; ap-


Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall

Purple Heart Mural Memorial

Korean War Memorial

The Moving Tribute

Military Vendors

Military Displays

& MORE


Memorials Open 24hrs: October 14-21


Reunion & Vendors Open: October 15-21


Live Music


Food & Drinks


Location: 1 mile N. of Power Line St. & US Hwy. 19
on west side of 19. Watch for signs.
Crystal River, FL


Reunion Sites,
Primitive Camping & Vendor space available


Presented by: '"
American Legion Herbert Surber Post
PO Box 456 Florida City, FL 34436-0456

www.NatureCoastVeteransReunion.org

Get details at: www.NatureCoastVeteransReunion.org


CHRONICLE
l www.chronicleonline.com


407-579-6190
352-860-1629
352-238-5692


S S U T H MARION

Citizens

Accepting applications for
Advertising Sales Rep

Sell print and online advertising for Citrus Publishing
Working a Sales Territory within Marion County.
Service established customers and prospect for new
advertising customers.

Qualifications
Two years sales exp. preferred
Computer proficiency
Must have initiative, be self motivated.
Strong skills in planning/organizing, listening, written
and verbal communication, problem solving and
decision making aptitude.
Strong presentation skills preferred
Reliable transportation to make local and regional
sales calls.

Send Resume and Cover letter to:
djkamlot@chronicleonline.com


EOE, drug screen required for final applicant.
00CW3S


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 D3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Right app equals right price


Use smartphone

to compare costs

while shopping

JOSEPH PISANI
Associated Press

NEW YORK- It's a shop-
per's nightmare: Buying
something, then seeing it
cheaper at another store.
Thanks to price-comparison
apps, there's no need to
guess if you're getting the
lowest price.
All you need is a smart-
phone and some down-
loaded apps.
Smartphone owners have
been using the price-com-
parison apps for the past
couple of years. But they've
improved a lot recently
They're faster and easier to
use than earlier versions.
They've become a bigger
threat to retailers who don't
want customers using their
stores as showrooms.
I have been using Ama-
zon.com Inc.'s price-check-
ing app for a year now and
have always found the
prices on the app lower
than at a store. But I've
never tried other popular
apps by Google Inc. and
eBay Inc.
I wanted to see if they
could get me to even lower
prices. I've been looking to
buy a fruit and vegetable
juice extractor. It's been
costing me nearly $7 for a
20-ounce cup of kale juice at
my neighborhood juice bar.
I think I can save a lot of
money by doing it myself.
The target: a Cuisinart
juice extractor, because it
wasn't too big and looked
easy to clean. I saw it at a
Bed Bath & Beyond store in
New York, where it cost
$149.99. I took out my


Cuisinart Juice
Extractor Stainless-St...

From $69.99 online / $149.00 local


Online Results


cutleryandmore.com


Beach Camera.com


Abt Electronics


Abe's of Maine


Buy.com


iPhone and started scanning
the barcode from the box.
I used five different apps.
They were all free, and all
are available on both
iPhone and Android
phones. All the prices listed
below are for a new Cuisi-
nart juice extractor, though
some of the apps will give
you prices for used or re-
conditioned items, too.
To find the best deal, I re-
alized you need to have
more than one of these apps
on your phone. Here's the
lowest price each app
found:
Google shopper
LOWEST PRICE: $131.99
Google wins for finding
the lowest price for the


$148.95


$149.00


$149.00


$149.00


$149.00


juicer.
I was surprised to find the
best price was at a physical
store and not online. Macy's
had it on sale that day for
$131.99. (I went to Macy's to
make sure it actually was
that price, and it was.) One
bonus is the app also makes
it easy to call the store or
put it on a map if you need
directions.
Amazon mobile
LOWEST PRICE: $135.85
($124.36, plus $11.49 ship-
ping)
This app searches for
prices only within Amazon.
com. It doesn't show any
prices for local deals. That
said, it had the second-low-
est price, even with ship-


ping. You do need to have an
Amazon account to buy from
the app. But if you already
have one, purchasing from it
is easy, and done in one click
Pic2shop
LOWEST PRICE: $135.85
($124.36, plus $11.49 ship-
ping)
This app found the same
price from Amazon and
linked to the Amazon web-
site. The app does search
for nearby store prices, but
it wasn't as extensive as the
Google app. It only found
one physical store price, but
it wasn't cheaper than the
price available on Amazon.
RedLaser
LOWEST PRICE: $148.95
This app is owned by
eBay Inc., the online mar-
ketplace. The lowest price
was from an online retailer
Even though this app didn't
find the best price for the
juice machine, it's worth
downloading. You can scan
in loyalty cards for certain
supermarket and drugstore
chains, so you hand over
your phone to the cashier
instead of carrying a bunch
of cards. It lets you buy
items within the app from
retailers such as Toys R Us
and Best Buy and also posts
coupons.
Milo
LOWEST PRICE: $149.99
This app is also owned by
eBay This app shows prices
for brick-and-mortar stores,
not online retailers. The
lowest price it found for the
juice machine was at a
Macy's store, but it didn't
pick up the sale price of
$131.99 like the Google app
did. This app matched the
price of the item at the Bed
Bath & Beyond store, but it's
still worth downloading if
you are looking to buy some-
thing right away and can't
wait for it to be shipped.


Small business hiring


depends on industry


Associated Press

NEW YORK- If you are
trying to figure out if small
businesses are hiring, it de-
pends on where you look.
Just last Friday when the
government was raising sus-
picious eyebrows with its re-
port of a sudden drop in the
unemployment rate so close
to a presidential election,
Andy Asbury was hiring a
full-time employee
to work at his Min-
neapolis real estate
brokerage. A
For Asbury, the
need for a new em- 0
ployee was clear.
Sales at his agency,
Better Homes &
Gardens Real Es- Ai
tate Area Leaders, Asl
are up 25 percent hired a
from a year ago and emp
he's expecting since
them to rise more have
his rea
next year as the com
housing market


continues to improve. He's
getting signals from
prospective sellers that
things are going to get
busier and he's gearing up.
"People are planting the
seeds right now for when
they want to make their
move," he said.
Small businesses employ
about half the nation's
work force, or 60 million
people, so keeping track of
how small business owners
such as Asbury are faring is
key to figuring out if the
economy is getting better
or worse.
There are some encour-
aging signs. Asbury and
others in the housing and
construction industries are
feeling confident enough to
add workers. So are parts
of the manufacturing in-
dustry as demand for cars
and trucks picks up. Many


nm
b
fi

ri
ali
np


companies in the health
care field are bringing on
new workers as the full im-
plementation of the health
care overhaul nears and
baby boomers age.
The September report
from the Bureau of Labor
Statistics shows the gains.
The number of salaried
real estate workers has
risen by 195,000 in the past
12 months. In the auto in-
dustry, including
parts makers, em-
ployment is up by
51,700, or 7 percent.
The BLS doesn't
break out employ-
ment in health care
consulting serv-
ices, but hiring at
dy management and
)ury technical consult-
full-time ing services for
oyee businesses is up by
sales 637,000 or 5.8
estate percent.
any.p There's also an
often overlooked
form of small business hir-
ing people who start
their own companies and
become self-
employed. In September,
118,000 did that, according
to the Labor Department.
But for all the good news,
skeptics can find their fair
share of evidence to sup-
port a gloomier view. Not
all small companies are on
a hiring spree. Many de-
fense contractors are wait-
ing to see how much
Pentagon spending is cut
under what's called se-
questration. The budget
cuts which may be trig-
gered Jan. 2, would come
because lawmakers could-
n't reach a budget deal -
unless Congress stops
them. Smaller retailers are
holding back because the
economy is still so
uncertain.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

I would talk to the owner next door Since parking is an
absolute requisite for a retail business, he may consider
buying your house as an addition to his (future) parking
lot. The fact that you tried but weren't successful with
the zoning and planning board may work to your benefit.
Even though the amount of money you receive for your
house might not be as large as you would like, at least it
would reduce your expenses and responsibilities.
You mentioned maintenance expenses are eating you
up but that buying another house is out of the question.
You should reconsider renting. If things are as tight as
you have indicated in your community, there must be
rental properties that are available at a very competitive
rate. I wish you well.
DEAR BRUCE: I understand there is a possibility the
capital gains on the sale of a home may increase, to 25
percent from 15 percent, for 2013. Has this become law
yet? Should I sell in 2012? I am newly widowed and re-
tired, and this is a big chunk on a $500,000 home. PG.,
via email
DEAR PG.: Nobody knows which party will be calling
the shots after the November election, and on top of that,
what will happen on capital gains is difficult to forecast.
I think you are overly concerned, so let me explain.
There is a $250,000-per-person profit allowed on a pri-
mary residence for everyone. Furthermore, any tax is on
the profit from the sale of the house, not on the net pro-
ceeds. The expense of any capital improvements you
have made over the years would be deducted. You may
have to spend some money to fix up the house before
selling, and there may be real estate commissions to be
paid. These expenses also are subtracted from the sale
price. That having been observed, it's unlikely you will
have a high tax bill.


Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams. com or to
Smart Money PO. Box 7150, Hudson, FL 34674. Ques-
tions of general interest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.







Saturday,
October 27, 2012
8:00a.m. 11:30a.m.




You are invited to participate!



Gather your friends, business associates, neighbors,
church groups, or club members to commit to a day
to give Withlacoochee State Trail a manicure!
To register as a volunteer, please call the
Nature Coast Volunteer Center at
352-527-5955 Lunch will be provided by
Walmart Super Center of Inverness.
%x i ct| ,,1YCo, LIVE UNITED W1a




S CE 00CL2E
OOOL2E


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page Dl

Frank Calascione, Workforce's busi-
ness development manager in Citrus
County, said the Spring Fling Career
Fair held last April at CF in Lecanto
was such a success that the college
and Workforce Connection immedi-
ately began planning for another for
the fall semester.
Calascione said that once again "job
seekers will have the opportunity to
meet with area employers and explore
career opportunities they may not
have considered."
He noted that the career fair differs
from a job fair in that not all employ-
ers may be hiring. However, Calas-
cione said the fair gives participants
the chance to meet face-to-face with
recruiters and polish their network-
ing, presentation and interpersonal
skills and all that can make a valu-
able first impression that may help get
a foot in the door.
Calascione also encourages busi-
nesses to participate.
"For employers, this Career Fair is
an efficient, effective way to deter-
mine who might be the best fit for
their organization and job openings,
whether those openings are available
now or in the near future," he said.
Workforce Connection will have a
staffed computer kiosk set up during
the Career Fair to help attendees reg-
ister with the Employ Florida Market-
place to apply for jobs. There is no
charge to attend the Career Fair. For
more information, contact Workforce
Connection's resource center in In-
verness at 352-637-2223 or 800-
434-JOBS.


Employed Worker Training
(EWT)
The Marion Regional Manufactur-
ers Association (MRMA), in partner-
ship with Workforce Connection, is
investing $300,000 to support the train-
ing needs of the region's manufactur-
ers, fabricators and related industries.
Rob Adamiak, MRMA's executive di-
rector, notes that the funds may cover
up to 100 percent of businesses' out-of-
pocket costs to train current workers.
The goal, he said, is to build a talent
development system for entry-level
careers. Training may be provided by
a vendor of the business's choice or by
certified trainers employed by the
company
In a unique arrangement, Adamiak
was jointly selected by MRMA and
Workforce Connection to serve as
Workforce's new business develop-
ment and training manager assigned
to the new pilot program.
"MRMA has a close relationship
with unique access to manufacturers
in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties.
We understand the challenges of find-
ing and maintaining a trained work-
force," said Adamiak, who has more
than 20 years experience in the indus-
try as a former vice president of man-
ufacturing.
Adamiak said that his experience
enables him to "work closely with
each manufacturer to understand
their unique workforce requirements
and help the training provider in
meeting those needs."
MRMA serves the manufacturing in-
dustry throughout Citrus County, as well
as Levy, Marion, Sumter and Alachua
counties, and is a member of the Manu-
facturers Association of Florida (MAF).
Darlene Goddard, chairman of


Workforce's board of directors, said it
"makes sense" that MRMA and Work-
force would join forces in the effort.
"Part of (MRMA's) mission is to
serve the area manufacturing commu-
nity by supporting development of a
trained workforce," said Goddard,
who is also executive director of
human resources for Winco Manufac-
turing in Ocala. '"As the regional work-
force board, Workforce Connection is
likewise invested in helping build a
trained workforce. Given the timing,
and the current environment, we be-
lieve it is in the best interest of our
community to develop strong links
with the manufacturing sector."
Doing so, Goddard noted, will also
help close critical skills gaps and is an
approach that has worked in other re-
gional workforce boards.
Employers interested in finding out
more about the MRMA-sponsored
training program may call Rob
Adamiak at 352-840-5764.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a Florida
Certified Workforce Professional and
communications manager at Work-
force Connection. Please contact her
at (352) 291-9559, (800) 434-5627, ext
1234 or lbyrnes@clmworkforce. com.
Workforce Connection is a member of
the Employ Florida network of work-
force services and resources and an
equal opportunity employer/program.
All voice telephone numbers listed
above may be reached by persons
using TTYlTDD equipment via the
Florida Relay Service at 711. Ifyou
need accommodations, please call
352-840-5700, ext 7878 or e-mail
accommodations@clmworkforce.com.
Please make request at least three
business days in advance.


Swww.chrone onlne.om


September 30th October 24th


Are you a leaf peeper?
Do you miss watching
the leaves change color?

You are not alone; many others living in
Citrus County enjoy the warm weather but
long for the days when the changing
of the seasons meant an explosion of color.

We will select the best photos on
Thursday and publish them in
Sunday's newspaper each week.
We will also be featuring the winning
photos on our Facebook page.


Submit your photos online at
www.chronicleonline/fallfoliage


A Citrus Evening o .. F


Sunday, c9Nvember 4, 2012
receptionn begins at 6:30 p.m.
inner and dancing to follow at 7:30 p.m.
Proceeds to benefit
Scholarships Taking Elementary Promising Students
to CF (STEPS)for Citrus County students.

College of Central Florida
Citrus Learning and Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, Fla. 34461-9026

6Purchase your ticket online at www.cf edu/foundation,
or contact (Justine govantes at 352-249-1207,
cSponsorship opportunities available.
RSVP by F6riday, Oct, 25 n G6lack tie optional r $100 per person
Advertisement sponsor
CHRONICLE
Swww.chrniclenline.com000Sw;


D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


BUSINESS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



*51i, C ronicl


CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 D5



To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds .'..2



CAMa


Kr


S^


"- -^ -.w
-,_ . = ....


-MOT %


F.ax.:3. 2 *.691.llFree:(888) 852 -2 4. m Il: l Jss i... -.. l .omI ,:www .ho c i.- .o


Ladies, what are you
Looking For?
I'm an active widower,
clean cut looking, with
twinkling blue eyes and
a nice smile, very ex-
troverted, intelligent.
nice voice, nice ap-
pearance, likes to go
most places & do most
things, & have a good
sense of humor. In turn,
I would like to meet a
widow,, with a nice
personality, average
looking in aood health.
intelligent, affectionate
& hopefully with mutual
chemistry, average
to slim build and a
Christian Lady between
70-80+. If you sincerely
think we could mesh as
companions, give me
a jingle at 527-9632.
I'll return all calls, Thank
you for reading this ad
and have a good day!



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857
FISH TANKS
30 Gal. with stand,
hood, filter $90
20 Gal., with stand,
hood filter $70.
(352) 212-4454
Repair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352) 949-2292
SHORKIES 2 females
Adorable & Non shed-
ding 10 wks $400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
1 orange I black
multi- color 10 weeks
old To good home only
(863) 843-2495
FREE KITTENS
7 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
Free Pitt Bull Mix
Puppy, Female,
5-6 months, old
(352) 726-5066
Free Puppies
To Good Homes
(352) 361-5571
FREE Young Adult Cat
all shots, microchip-
ped, dewormed,
comes with accessories
To good home
(352) 634-2781
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372



20 lb. Mainecoon Cat,
male, goes by "Brady",
brindle (black/brown) long
hair, microchipped, lost in
vicinity of Citrus Springs,
Elkcam Blvd. and Citrus
Springs Blvd.
(352) 400-9444
Ladies white Sweater
Methodist flea
market on 486
(352) 746-4639
Lost Beagle
Female, tri color
Hartford & Triple Crown
Loop (352) 419-5425


















How

To Make

Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!





(352) 563-5966

Cl I ) I(.cI.E

www.chronicleonline.com g


Gray short hair female
tiger Green Acres in
Homosassa Oct. 2
$50. Reward
(352) 503-6763
Lost Cat
Yellow, male, neutered
Evergreen Ave.
Homossasa
(352) 503-6426














Found Cat
gray and white,
declawed on
Rooks Ave., Inverness
(352) 563-3226

Found Collie
Tan, Med. Size
Beverly Hills
on Monroe St.
(352)364-1929

Large Video Camera
in Black Case
In the Highlands
(352) 201-7142




FL Headless Jumbo
Gulf Shrimp 16 ct @
$.7.50/Ib,10 ct @ $8.50
Stone Crabs $6.001b
Delivered (352)513-5038




2 Lots, Your choice
Fero's Memorial Gard.
Lecanto Hwy (498)
Paid $2,300+ ea
will sell for $1,600 ea.
(352) 489-4649
2 Mausoleum Crypts
in Fero Memorial Gar-
dens, 3rd level, Bldg. F
side by side $16,500
(352) 270-9305




P/T SECRETARY

Exp. in MS Office Suite,
Payroll, Financial, Self
Starter. Send Resume
To: Beverly Hills Comm.
Church,82 Civic Circle
Beverly Hills, Fl. 34465




BUSINESS OFFICE
MANAGER
At Avante
at Inverness
Full Time position
Responsible for
Facility billing and
collections knowl-
edge of Medicare
and Medicaid
Must be organized
and a good team
player. Minimum of 2
years experience or
technical training in
medical billing

Please Applv Online
Avantecenters.com
Or fax your resume to
352-637-0333

JOB FAIR SEEKING
HOME HEALTH
PROFESSIONALS
Holiday Inn Express
1203 NE 5th Street
Crystal River, FL 34429
Applications being ac-
cepted during the follow-
ing dates and times.
\Coffee and doughnuts
will be served.
October 17 9AM to 2PM
October 19 9AM to 2PM
Village Home Care is
seeking additional staffing
in Citrus and Sumter
Counties, Ocala, The Vil-
lages, and Leesburg. Po-
sitions available are As-
sistant Director of Nurs-
ing, RNs, LPNs, PTs,
PTAs, OTs, OTAs, STs

For more information
contact Rhonda Bentz at
352-502-6143. Resumes
can be emailed to
Iphillips@vilagehomecare.org or
sent via fax at
352-390-6559.

Medical Assistant
/Certified Medi-
cal Assistant/ LPN

Seeking a Certified
Medical Assistant or
LPN to work at a
family medical clinic
in Crystal River, Fl.
Chosen candidate
will assist with all
aspects of clinic,
including rooming
patients vital signs,
giving vaccines,
scheduling patients,
and various other
duties as needed by
physician or nurse
you are working with.
Must be a graduate
from an accredited
Medical Assistant Pro-
gram or LPN. Current
demonstrated
clinical proficiency
with phlebotomy
required, proficiency
in EKG desired.
Minimum of five years
healthcare experi-
ence in a similar
setting.
Please email resume
and salary
requirements to:
Info@health-wellcare
.com


HOME HEALTH
CARE
Inverness private home
seeks NS healthy woman
able to lift 150#
Alzheimer's patient.
Sat/Sun 7:30am-7:30pm
Mon/Tues7:30pm-7:30am
Accepting calls Mon
10/15 @352-637-1793
Interviews with refer-
ences begin Tues 10/16.
$10 hr

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For Busy Cardiology
Practice. Exp. required
Email resume to:
sm@citrusarteriesand-
veins.com

MEDICAL/
CLERICAL

Immediate Opening
Candidate must pos-
sess strong
computer skills,
billing background
helpful. Benefits after
3 months, up to $14
hr. depending on exp.
Contact Human
Resource Dept.
866-675-3614

PART TIME
MEDICAL TRAN-
SCRIPTIONIST
PART TIME MEDICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONIST
WANTED.EXPERIENCE
PREFERRED. FAX RE-
SUME TO 352-795-7063

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

Looking for reliable
staff. With Alzheimers
Experience. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing aide
experience pre-
ferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP

RN, LPN, CNA's

ALL SHIFTS, FT &PT
Health Care
Experience Preferred.
APPLY WITHIN
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Clr
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility





ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in Enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722

HEALTHCARE
MARKETING REP

Searching to be part
of a team with a
deeper purpose? TLC
Rehab fosters a
culture of giving back
to the community
through high perfor-
mance teams. We
have an opportunity
for an experienced
dynamic marketing/
sales rep to market
Outpatient Physical
Therapy services to
existing and new
healthcare profes-
sionals. Competitive
salary & benefits of-
fered with a car
allowance and
results driven
bonus structure.
Please applv online
at: www.therapy
mgmtjobs.com
or fax resume to
352.382.0212.





The Grille
at CITRUS HILLS

Is Now Hlrlng all
Restaurant Posltlons.
We will be
interviewing for
Server Bartender,
Host/Hostess, Busser,
Expo/Runner Line
Cook Dish, and Prep
workers. Please
Apply In person at
505 E Hartford St
Tuesday-Saturday be-
tween 2-4:30pm.


m-I
Account Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460 to
Schedule an Interview

Experienced
SOUS CHEF
LINE COOKS
DISHWASHERS

Needed for Upscale
Restaurant
Call (352) 746-6727
For application
appointment




A/C SERVICE
TECH
Good Steady Work For
Experienced Honest
Tech. 401K, Health,
Life and Dental ins.
Paid Holidays and Va-
cation. Drug Free Work
Place.Good Driving
Record Required.
Premium Pay for NATE
certification
Call 352-245-1139

AC Lead Install
/Service Tech
Salary commercrate
with exp,
Also
Sales/Maintence
Tech needed
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427











Real Estate
Office Ass't.
SA License required
MS OfficeQuickBooks
Motivated individual
Apply Blind Box 1803P
Citrus Co.Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd Cysta River
Florida 34429




AREA TOURS

Enthusiastic, ener-
getic and persona-s
ble driver to conduct
area tours for visitors
to country club com-
munity. Sales support
function. Clean
driving record a must.
Schedule to
include weekends.
Please e-mail resume
to
nancy@citrushills.com

Exp.class A CDL
Driver-

Local. Full, Part-time.

NO CALLS-Atlas Van
Lines 5050 W. Norvell
River. Drug Screenr
S and Backgrcoundt
Check Required.



f CARRIERon.
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers
3 to 4 hoursper day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle

SUV, or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


COMCNIcLE

TRANSIT DRIVER
Announcement
# 12-61
Full time position
(Monday-Friday)
driving a County bus
or van transporting
passengers. Starting
pay $10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Must possess a valid
Florida CDL, Class C,
with P Endorsement.
Must successfully pass
a level II background
check.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online
by Friday,
October 19, 2012.
EOE/ADA.


TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Snowblrds are back.
Good Commission
pay. Apply In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr




DOCUMENT
SCANNER
Casual Labor
Employment
Must be at least 18
years of age

Human Resources
has a casual, part
time Document
Scanner position, 20
hours weekly, $7.69
hourly. Casual labor
applications may be
obtained at the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461 or
you may complete
the casual labor
application on-line at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
and deliver to the
Human Resources
Department
EOE/ADA










MASSAGE
THERAPY
Weekend Class NPR
OCT. 20, 2012

Massaae Days. NPR
November 19,2012
March 18, 2013
July 22, 2013
November, 4, 2013
Massaae Niahts NPR
November 19, 2012
Jully 22, 2013
Massaae Days.
Sprina Hill
January 14, 2013
September 3,2013
Massaae Niahts.
Spring Hill
January 14, 2013
September 3,2013

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Rlchey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




ESTABLISHED
PRIVATE MENTAL
HEALTH PRACTICE
FOR SALE, In
Beautiful Downtown
Inverness,
flexible financing.
Owner Moving.Office
continues to grow.
Low Rent. Email:
albrightd @live.com.




STREET SMART
SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVID-
UALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.



1936 ROYAL MODEL 0
Vintage Portable type-
writer can text pics
$175.00 call or text
352-746-0401
352-746-0401
CHINA CLOSET VIN-
TAGE DECO DESIGN
picture to cell phone upon
Reguest. $100.00
513-4473
TWO (2) ANTIQUE RE-
PRODUCTION Cocoa
Tray end tables. $325 for
the pair. 527-6709



Illinois pocket watch
bunn special ,21 jewels,
lever set, gold filled case,
made 1923, $325
(352) 344-5283
SWEETHEART TWIN
WICKER HEADBOARD
whitesingle. $25.00
used.good cond.
513-4473



DRYER$100 with 90 day
warranty. Free disposal of
old machine. Delivery ex-
tra. Call/text
352-364-6504
GLASS TOP
STOVE/OVEN Kenmore,
excellent condition, $75
352-382-7707
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER $100 with 90
day warranty. Free
disposal of old machine.
Delivery extra, call/text
352-364-6504
Washer & Dryer
$200
works great
Large Capacity
(352) 419-5231
WASHER AND DRYER
Kenmore, good condi-
tion,$50 each
352-382-7707


Works fine. Almond. $60.
527-1239
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel.
Cond. Can Deliver.
(352)263-7398



2 OFFICE DESKS
5 FEET LONG WITH
DRAWERS $50 ea
352-613-0529
FILING CABINET
metal,4-drawer, good
condition, $15
352-382-7707



Hammer Down
Auctioneers
10/19- General Merch.
10/26- Tailgate Auction
11/2- General Merch.
We Buy Estates
6055 N Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



WET/DRY VAC, Stinger,
2-gallon, $15
352-382-7707



46 Panasonic Plasma TV
moving out of area $100
firm 419-5549
19" SHARP LCD HDTV
with remote, stand &
manual. Great picture.
Asking $75. Inverness
352-341-0316
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER good size wood like
$15.00 513-4473
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER smaller, wood
like room for books,
$10.00 513-4473
MAGNOVOX TV cable
ready, good picture.
$30.00 513-4473
MAGNOVOX TV cable
ready 21" works good.
$25.00 513-4473
SONY 36" TV Cable
ready good pic-
ture.$100.00 513-4473
SYMPHONIC TV cable
ready good picture.
$25.00 513-4473
TOSHIBA TV 32" cable
ready. good picture,
$35.00 527-7119



DELL COMPUTER
Desktop Windows XP
w/keyboard&mouse, Out-
look, Word, Excel $75
352-382-3650
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON NX215
PRINTER/COPIER/SCANNER
WORKS GREAT
WITH XTRA INKS
$30.00 352-726-0686
PRINTER, Kodak Easy
Share 5500, All-in-One
printer, $35
352-382-7707
SCANNER UMAX Astra
3400, includes manual,
software, cables, $15
352-382-7707



PATIO FURNITURE
Small Patio Table, Slate
Top W/2 Padded Chairs,
$65 352-476-7516






2 "ASHLEY"
5-DRAWER DRESSER
CABINETS
BARELY USEDI!I
ONLY A
FEW MONTHS OLD!!!
Buy both for $400 or
$225 for 1
352-746-1910
2 Piece. Living
Room. Set,
teal couch with
2 recliners, & love
seat w/2 recliners,
excel. cond.
$250.
(352) 637-3113
2 TWIN LIGHT WOOD
HEADBOARDS, 2 BOX
SPRINGS, 2 METAL
FRAMES $45.00 Call
352-445-0853.
2 White Wooden
ROCKING CHAIRS
Large size, includes
$150 both
352-746-5157
1940's Mahogany China
Cab w/butler desk, 4
bevel glass doors $350
Dining Rm Set, 3 leaves,
brass feet, 5 chairs $125
pictures by email
(352) 341-1774
COFFEE & END TA-
BLES looks like new
Cherry Wood & Glass call
for photos $299. for all.
352-382-2294
Coffee Table glass top
teak wood matching lamp
table. Good condition $79
Pictures 382-7585
COFFEE TABLE
solid wood mahogany
47L x 17H. $95.00
352-795-0288
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Oak China Cabinet,
good cond. $90. obo
King Size mattress &
box spring, like .new
clean, $150. obo
(352) 422-1060


OCCASIONAL TABLE
Solid Oak Table with
Storage. Good condition.
$40 Picture 382-7585
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SIZE BED clean
good cond. box
,mattress, frame all for
$60.00 513-4473
Queen size boxspring,
mattress w/ chest of
drawers and dresser
$150.
Entertainment center
$50. (352) 795-7254
Queen size sofa hide a
bed. Very good condition
$150.
Executive Desk
Excel. Condition $95
(352) 637-5755
RECLINER STANDARD
SIZE Blue, velvet $40.00.
good cond. 513-4473
Small,All-wood oak drop
leaf table w/2 chairs,
Like-new $150
(352) 746-1447
SOFA navy blue with
touches of sage & rose,
showroom cond. $150.00
352-795-0288
Stratolounger
Tailgater Tulsa Rocker
-Recliner Black, Heat &
Massage, A-1 cond.
$275; Click-clack sofa
bed, $100.
Call 352-419-7017
SURRY COLLECTION
EASY CHAIR Beautiful
elligant chair good cond.
Blue $35.00 is a steal.
513-4473
TABLE octagon-wood
grain (extra leaf), 4
white vinyl chairs on
casters $40.00
621-4711
THOMASVILLE DINN-
ING ROOM SET Like
New Cherry Table w/2
arm & 4 side chairs,2
leaves $525. photos
available 352-382-2294
THOMASVILLE SOFA
Like New condition
earthtone colors call for
photo $175.
352-382-2294
Triple Dresser
with mirror,
Mans 5 drawer chest
$300.
352-563-0640,
cell 352-697-2111
Trundle bed matresses
and bedding to go with
$100
(352) 382-7903
WALNUT UTILITY
TABLE ON WHEELS
FOR SMALL T.V OR
PRINTER 28 HIGH 20
WIDE $20.00 726-0686
WICKER DRESSER
AND NIGHTSTAND very
good condition,$25 each
352-382-7707




AC POWER HEDGE
TRIMMER, 13 INCH, $10
352-726-9983
LAWN SWEEPER
pull-behind, 5' wide, $25
352-382-7707
WERNER 20FTALUMIN-
IUM EXTENSION LAD-
DER, 200 LBS RATED
D1120-2 GOOD COND
$75 352-726-9983
Yard-Man
Hydro Transmission
20HP Riding Lawn Trac-
tor, 42" mower, new
battery excel. cond.
$500 (352) 270-3824






HOMOSASSA
6714 S. Frankfurter Way
Moving Sale Sat 10/13
8-3pm and Sun 10/14
8-1pm furniture and
household items
WANTED Rods,
Reels, tackle, tools,
Antique collectibles,
hunting equipment.
352-613-2944


Christian Dior
Mink Coat $500
Gray Mink Stole $250
Call anytime after
8am to 9pm
(352) 382-1630
DOWN LADIES LGE
JACKET Snowbirds alert,
Black 3/4 length, clean,
$25 419-5549
MENS CLOTHING 10
PANTS & 5 SHORTS
SIZE 36X30 $50
352-613-0529
SLACKS Men's and
boy's, 30x30, 29x32,
18R, never worn, black,
khaki, pleated, $10
352-382-7707
STREET SMART
SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVIDU-
ALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.
WOMENS Full length
leather coatremovable
lining, burgundy, fits size
3-7, $50 352-382-7707




ROUTER, Linksys
Wireless-G Broadband
Router,speedbooster,Setip CD,
manual, ca-
bles,$30 352-382-7707




!!!!! 245/65 R 17 !!!!!
Great tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
...225/60 R16* I
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352-586-5485
----245/50 R20----
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
ANIMAL TRAVEL
CRATE medium size,
excellent condition, $30
352-382-7707
Bernina Artista 180E
SEWING MACHINE
Sewing and Embroidery
w/ Accessories $725
obo
(352) 794-3281
BOOK "SUPER
IMMUNITY"-Dr. Joel
Fuhrman-2012. $20.00
phone:352-527-7840
CHRISTMAS TREE 7'
Bavarian Spruce (new
lights included) $25.00
1-352-621-4711
CHRISTMAS TREES -
4'pre-lit spruce $10.00
and 4.5' pre-lit berry
mountain $15.00
1-352-621-4711
Compact
Refrigerator
$100.
352-601-7380
Craftsman Lawn
Mower $125
52" TV console
brand new
$200
(352) 527-7223
Electrolux Vaccum
Cleaner,
includes power handle,
like new $100
(352) 270-3824
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER
BY HEALTHMATH, LIKE
NEW $50 352-726-9983
FISH TANKS
30 Gal. with stand,
hood, filter $90
20 Gal., with stand,
hood filter $70.
(352) 212-4454
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
PANASONIC CORD-
LESS Phone/answering
Machine Digital; manual.
Asking $25 Inverness
352-341-0316


DOLLY heavy duty
appliance dolly (extra
strap)$50.00 621-4711
SCHWIN BIKE
black multi speeds
$65 estate sale 419-5549
Inverness Landings-Villas
41 S
Sofa & Two recliners
Qn Mattress set, end
tables, TV's, other
household & kit. items
MUST SELL *
Call for Info 897-4681
TOW HITCH, Reese, $50
352-382-7707



FILING CABINET metal,
4-drawer, $15
352-382-7707



Collapsible wheelchair, 3
wheel walker
w/handbrakes & pouch,
tripod cane, bath bench,
port. pot, folding 4 leg
walker ALL $300
(352) 746-5514
Electric go-go cart, Elite
traveler, used once,
w/battery,charger, basket
$600
(352) 746-5514
MEDLINE WALKER, red,
max capacity 300 Ibs,
barely used, $30
352-382-7707



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PAK W/ALL
ACCESORIES,SELLS
FOR $200+ MY PRICE
$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" GREG BENNET
BASS,LIGHTWEIGHT
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT $75
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
AMP 12" SPEAKER
PERFECT FOR SMALL
GIGS/PRACTICE $65
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR SELLS FOR
$300+ MY PRICE $100
W/ MANY EXTRAS
352-601-6625
AMPEG BASS COMBO
BA108,35W,LIGHTWEIGHT,P
PERFECT FOR
SMALL GIGS $65
3520601-6625
Behringer Thunderbird
Bx-108 bass amp $40.
352-419-4464
Crate KX-15
Keyboard/guitar amp
$25. 352-419-4464
DANELECTRO
DANOBLASTERHEAVY
BLUE FLAKE STRAT
STYLE "ACTIVE" $100
352-601-6625
DIGITAL ROLAND F90
PIANO REDUCED
$350.00 at a steal.
352-513-4027
Fender Rumble 15 bass
amp $35. 352-419-4464
Line 6 Spider III guitar
amp $40 352-419-4464
MINISTER STRAT
STYLE TRAVEL GUI-
TAR W/FULL SIZE
NECK&GREAT TONE!
$95 352-601-6625
Peavey Max 112 bass
amp $80. 352-419-4464



CUISINART COFFEE
MAKER 12 cup
programable-like new-
used very little, cost 85.
sell 30. 344-0686
Hague Watermax, Water
Softener and Filter 4 yrs
old, used with city water
only $600
(352) 344-0053


j sjj UTH MARION

Citizen w


Accepting applications for

Advertising Sales Rep


Sell print and online advertising for Citrus Publishing
Working a Sales Territory within Marion County.
Service established customers and prospect for new
advertising customers.


Qualifications

*Two years sales exp. preferred
Computer proficiency
Must have initiative, be self motivated.
Strong skills in planning/organizing, listening, written
and verbal communication, problem solving and
decision making aptitude.
Strong presentation skills preferred
Reliable transportation to make local and regional
sales calls.


Send Resume and Cover letter to:
djkamlot@chronicleonline.com



EOE, drug screen required for final applicant.
OOOCW3S


I


I


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time







D6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


Kitchenaid Ultra power
300 watt w/att, Original
cuisinart food proccessor
w/att, Pasta Maker
Queen w/electric motor,
ALL $400
(352) 746-5514
MEMORY FOAM MAT-
TRESS TOPPER, King,
4" thick, never used, $60
352-382-7707



NORDICTRACK
TREADMILL Like new,
varispeed, incline, pro-
gramable, foldup storage.
$200 OBO 352-400-0141
PLATES PRO-FORMER
EXERCISE MACHINE.
Great for toning and
strenght. $95. Have in-
structions. 352-860-0444


-I
2 FLY RODS w/ reels 6
FT.$ 30. BOTH OBO 2
vintage came poles, 3 pc.
$40. both obo 220-4074
7.62X54R Brown Bear
rifle ammunition. 174
Grain FMJ. Non-corrosive
Primer. 54 rounds. $40
527-6709
ABU GARCIA
CONOLON 300 8 FT,
OLYMPIC 1075 7.6 ft.,
Silstar pt 70 7 ft, Samurai
6 ft, $45. all 220-4074
BIMINI
TOP-BOAT/$100.00. 5'
Wide Boat...Good
Condition,White..
352-503-2792
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails, $3000 Per Acre
352 634-4745
Club Car DS Golf Cart
2007 Electric New
Batteries Excel. Shape,
$3,200 (352) 425-5804
Lefever Nitro Special
16 gauge, dbl barrel
shot gun good cond.
made 1927 $425.
(352) 344-5283
STREET SMART
SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVID-
UALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.
TERRA-TRIKE (2)
"The Rover" Adult
for information
www.terratrike.com
8 internal gears, basket
trek, interchangeable
trunk, water bottle w/
cage, back rack,
mirrors, flag w/ velcro
sieve $900. ea. emai
twinpekes@ymail.com
with questions or to
make an appt. to see
located in Inverness


Trademark 3-in-1
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey, and
Foosball), $250
Mini ping pong table with
net and paddles $75
(352) 637-7237



Brand New Custom
Design, 5-6" long bed,
w/ 36" folding loading
ramp. New tires, never
on road, $800 obo
352-419-6008
REESE TOW HITCH
$50 352-382-7707



Sat. & Sun. 9a-3p
Vintage. retro, mod
pre-owned jewelry sale,
will also have handbags
and buttons, great items
for resale, personal use,
or holiday giving, indoors
rain or shine
4100 S Fireside Way
Homosassa





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
collectibles, hunting
equip. 352-613-2944



2 Very Small Yorkie
Boys Socialized & Play-
full, Shots, health certs.,
& CKC Reg. 4-5 Ibs,
grown $600. ea. Parents
on site (352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258


BELLA
Bella T is a beautiful
Shepherd mix spayed
female, brindle, grey
and black in color,
brought to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. she
weighs 45 pounds, is
cooperative, walks
well on a leash, gets
along with other
dogs and doesn't
care about cats.
Housebroken and
Heartworm-negative.
About 4 years old.
Has a good personal-
ity, would make a
great pet for your
home. She is a very
sweet dog.
Please Call Joanne
at 352-795-1288.


Daschund, 3 male
$300 ea; 1 female $350
8 wks old.
(352) 464-2382
AKC GREAT DANES
Black Beauties Health
Checked AKC
Male/Female READY
NOW 600/800 PAT
352-502-3607
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
BLACK PUG PUPPIES
3 boys and 1 girl, $500
ea. POP, CKC, HC.
Playful & loving.
352-400-1230
Doa School & Kennel
New Classes 10/16 & 17
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
FREE shepard mix pup-
pies, 6 wks old, 1 lab mix
puppy 8 wks old
(352) 464-0871
Happy Guinea Pigs
smooth $15
abyssinian $20
curly hair $30
(352) 564-2442
Mini Chihuahua, CKC,
papers, 14 months old,
51bs, very smart.
$350
(352) 341-0934
SHAR-PEI
Beautiful male & female
6 mo old, Prefer to sell
as a pair for $900;
single 500 AKC,
Health certs & shots,
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732


SKYE
Skye is a loving, intelli-
gent Treeing Walker
Coonhound, neu-
tered. Fond of long
walks and hanging
out at the house with
his humans watching
TV or resting on his
bed. Very even
-tempered, gets
along with other
calm, stable dogs.
Will do anything for
treats/food. Very
smart. Can sit, stay,
and shake hands.
Needs some help
with housetraining
but with time and pa-
tience will learn
quickly. Very affec-
tionate and wants to
make his humans
happy. Will you have
the loving home
he deserves?
Call Crystal
352-533-4332.


Pet Homes Only
$10 ea. Dunnellon
(863) 843-2495 Cell
Pigeons, different types
(352) 795-1902
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net



For Sale Angus Brangus
Cross Bull 2'2yr old
Proven Breeder, $1,500
obo (352) 382-3114



816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
BOWRIDER
17.5 Caravel & Trailer
3.0 10, excel cond.
$4,995 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304
GULF to LAKE MARINE
*WE PAY CASH $$ *
For Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo


BOUNDER
32fT Motor home, Ford
V10 engine, low mile-
age, new tires, Sleeps
2-6. $16,500
(352) 220-6303

BT CRUISER
2004-26' mdl 5250 32k
miles Ford E450 V10
Triton gas eng, sleeps
4, 3 burner gas stove,
micro/conv oven, full
rear kitch, full bath, tv,
dvd, 4kw gen, many ad-
ditional extra's $28950.
352 489-4129


CLASSIFIED



ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, Diesel, motor
home, 2005, 55k miles,
extras include diesel gen-
erator, wash/dryer
$74,495 obo Call Bill
(352) 419-7882
JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002
PLEASURE WAY
19ft., Excel-TD new tires
brakes, loaded 56k mi.
2.5k Gen. Many Extras
Excellent Condition
$27,500 (352) 621-9250



KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



4 Dunlop Tires 31x10.5
R15LT all with aluminum
rims $400 obo
(352) 795-5642
4 Tires 2057014
white wall, 90% tread,
on universal rims,
painted red over
chrome $195.
Bed extended for Ford
Explorer Sport, $75.
(352) 586-7691



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! "*
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALLI
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
It In. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892



BMW
2003, 3251, 4DR
LEATHER, SUNROOF
PW, PL CALL 628-4600
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
CADILLAC
Black 2011 4dr CTS
1,100 mi. Free satilite
radio 6/13, smoke free,
garage kept. $35,750
(352) 249-7976
CAR FOR SALE
1997 marquis 178K miles
asking 1500 OBO call
352-628-1809


CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $20,000
call 1-352-503-6548
CHEVY
'03, Malibu LS, 65K miles
sunroof., leather inte-
rior, auto, PW, PB,
$7,500 (352) 726-4689
CHEVY
1988, Corvette #11669
Red & Ready, ground
and spoiler kit, nice!
$6,847. 352-341-0018
CHEVY
2007 Chevy Impala
#11508 red, auto, ac,
cd, It $9987.00
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008 Cobalt Coupe
#11620 pw, pl, It, XFE,
5 speed, great fuel
economy! $9,995.
352-341-0018
Chrysler
'00 Sebring Convertible,
cold air, low mileage, ex-
cel. cond., can be seen
on hwy 19, $3500 obo
(352) 795-5642
DAEWOO
'97 Leganza, nice in
and out, needs timing
belt, $500. obo
(352) 464-5582


FORD
2001 MUSTANG
AUTO, 6CYL, PW, PL,
PRICED TO SELL
CALL 628-4600
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2005 Mustang #11670,
2dr, auto, ac, cd, v6
$9488. 352-341-0018
Ford
'98 Mustang GT
Auto/cold air. Cranberry
Red, Convertible. 105k
miles, excellent, $3750
(352) 503-2792
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! "*
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
MERCEDES
'03, E500,64k mi pewter
silver, stone leather in-
terior, showroom new,
garage kept,
never in accident
$19,250 (352)586-0341
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, Promotion
forces sale, $16,900
(352) 302-0778
VW
2004 BEETLE
CONV., AUTOMATIC
FUN IN THE SUN
CALL 628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION




ALLEGRO BUS
2004,40ft., 3 slides,
400HP, 60k miles,
$95,000 Excel. cond.
(352) 795-9853
CADILAC '87
Alante Convertible, de-
pendble, All pwr. V8, 30
mpg, great cond. $5,200
C.R. (727) 207-1619


Misc. Notice


CHEVY
1955, Belair, 2 dr Se-
dan, 327, V8, auto
power glide transmis-
sion ground up restora-
tion, SS exhaust, excel-
lent In & Out $35,000
obo (352) 527-6988

CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426




DODGE
'03, RAM 1500, V6 auto
AC, runs excel. $3,800
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office

FORD
1995, F150 4X4...
RUNS GOOD.....PERFECT
HUNTING TRUCK.
CALL 628-4600
FOR DETAILS

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2002 Red Tundra SR5
61,500 miles
excellent condition
$12,000 352-503-3944




DODGE
'98, Caravan, Reliable
$900 obo
(419) 303-0888 cell
Crystal River




CHEVY
1987 pick up 4x4 step-
side, runs good 5.7 V8,
auto, radial tires 31.10,
restoring $2500 OBO
Robert 220-4143
9am-6pm


Misc. Notice


DODGE
2007 Grand Caravan
#11655 ext van, alloys,
ac, cd seats 711 $10488
352-341-0018
HONDA
'01, Odyssey, 123k mi.
new transmission at
50k, runs great, quiet
good cond. $5,500
(352) 201-5761
NISSAN
Quest, 110k mi, new
tires, 3rd row seating
dual AC, runs excel.
$2,900. 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
PLYMOUTH
'98, Voyager, 6 cyl.,
108K mi., runs good
$2,250
(352) 628-3674




MAX IV
6 x6, ATV Amphibious
Vehicle, Swims,
$2,800 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304




CAN-AM
2009 Spyder RS SE5
electric shift with reverse.
Silver and black 998cc
No warranty. Great condi-
tion. $13000 or make
offer. (352)628-9058
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley, 70 mpg, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $4,200.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE New Tires
Excellect Shape Approx
70K ml. Selling due to
health. Asking $4,000
(352) 476-3688
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688


Misc. Notice


346-1104 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA SITTING AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE 2011 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT FOR
WASTEWATER UTILITY SERVICES AREA 114 OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM METHOD
FOR THE LEVY, COLLECTION AND ENFORCEMENT OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
FOR THE PROVISION OF WASTEWATER SERVICES IN THE 2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114.


AN
LOMnaot


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





onur\oirld first


Need a jol)
4 ui
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CiO.. ILE


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lie. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERI-
ENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vynil Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST, SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Paint/Remodel, Repairs,
Woodwork, Flooring,
Plumbing, Drywall,
Tile work Lic.37658/ins.
Steve 352-476-2285
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
All Painting & Home
Repairs. Call Doug
at 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.
Repair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352) 949-2292



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
ELAINE TO THE RESCUE
Free Estimate. At Your
Convenience. No Job
to Small (262) 492-3403
Exp House Keeper.
Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



Complete Renovation
Kitchen countertop, tile,
tub to shower Lic#37801
(352) 422-3371

The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO ITALLII!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
All Painting & Home
Repairs. Call Doug
at 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL a PROFES-
SIONAL (352) 464-4418




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL A PROFESSIONAL
(352) 464-4418
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning
& Painting
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county aov-


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831


422-2019 Lic. #2713 ernment offices. 344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
B& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!

MREAASMOBILERV. SOD, LANDSCAPING #1 Employment source is
IREPAIR&MAINT.&IMOWING
RVTC Certified Tech 352-364-1180,
352-613-0113, Li/clns. 352-257-1831 www.chronicleonline.com


Igg RG SI


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
I or pool or plan
something
... completely new!
t :. ,X "Often imitate
never dupicatedf"


YOUR INTERIOCKINGBRICKPAVER SPECIAlIST
CO PES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Lic. CPC1456565 2-4.t. 8
& Insured 5352 i4003.1i8


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakh6usten"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF

Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000CSE0









BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathfub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S8S-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
00OC42R


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090






ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.

352-621-0881

S6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


I DOD GE DI L


We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
*Window Cleaning
SWindow Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
C* leaning & Sealing
- ^ Grout Painting
Residential &
3 ^' i^ t Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


MOPAR & JEEP CONNECTION
r CompleteMopar A
.. Repair & Maintenance
Engines Drivelines Oil Changes
Transmissions Brake Service
WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS
inline- <--

performance-I
Inc.
680 E. Southland Ave.
CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell |
352-568-7591


GENERAL,
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
,- All Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry

Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
S Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
SS cell: 400-1722
S Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761



REMODEIN


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 D7


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2011 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Area 114, more
particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof, that
the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the governing
body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Service
Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 is considering the adoption of a
non-ad valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services commencing in
fiscal year 2013/2014 within said area and intends to use the uniform method for the
levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assessments as set forth in Sec-
tion 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the govern-
ing body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Serv-
ice Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 will conduct a public hear-
ing on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. in the Board of County Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida to consider the adoption of a resolution authorizing their use of the uni-
form method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assess-
ments. If this method of collection is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
Interested persons may appear at the hearing to be heard regarding the use of
the uniform method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem as-
sessments. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the County Com-
mission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, they will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be made.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least seven (7)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please use the TTY
Telephone (352) 341-6580.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
2011 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREA 114
EXHIBIT A
The 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District -
Area 114 consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads in which
a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements are con-
structed or reconstructed and all lots and parcels which are served or to be served
by a centralized sewer disposal system and sewer system improvements, located in
Citrus County, Florida, further described as follows:
AREA 114 DESCRIPTION: BEGINNING AT THE WEST 1/4 CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWN-
SHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTHERLY,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 371, PAGE 454, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 659, PAGE 454, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTH-
WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT BEING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF WEST FORT ISLAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44);
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, TO THE AFORE-
MENTIONED WEST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE
NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1898, PAGE 1261, OF SAID
PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
PARCEL 17E18S32 11110, AS SHOWN IN THE CITRUS COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERS
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID PARCEL, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 29, TO THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1069,
PAGE 2075, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINES OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 29, OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 60, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 29, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 28 OF SAID PALM
SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY, ALONG THE WESTERLY
(REAR) LOT LINES OF LOTS 16 THROUGH 28 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION,
TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY,
ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWEST-
ERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER THEREOF; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID
BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE
FOR ISLAND LOT NO. 21, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTHWEST-
ERLY, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID BULKHEAD LINE FOR ISLAND LOT NO.
21, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF THE AFOREMENTIONED PALM SPRINGS
VILLAS ADDITION; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT
LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 15, OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS ADDITION, TO THE
NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF LOT 8 OF PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ME-
ANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY, ALONG THE REAR LOT LINES OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 8
OF SAID PALM SPRINGS VILLAS UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHEASTERLY TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF LOT 1, PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 16, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY,
ALONG THE WATERWARD BOUNDARY OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION, TO THE
SOUTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 14 OF SAID PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVISION; THENCE
SOUTH, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST;
THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF THOSE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1614, PAGE 1072, OF SAID PUBLIC
RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF
SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1732,
PAGE 86, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY,
ALONG THE WESTERLY AND NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2313, PAGE 2157, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 70, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND NORTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTH-
ERLY LINE OF SAID WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER THEREOF,
SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE WESTERNMOST CORNER OF SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO
WOODWARD PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 140, OF SAID PUBLIC REC-
ORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER
THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHERNMOST POINT OF TRACT 13, AS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 343, PAGE 722, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS;
THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID TRACT 13, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 792, PAGE 1146, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHERLY AND WESTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, OF SAID
SUNSET SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK; THENCE MEANDER SOUTHWESTERLY
AND NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID SUNSET SHORES ADDITION
TO WOODWARD PARK, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, OF SAID SUNSET
SHORES ADDITION TO WOODWARD PARK, ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2018, PAGE 348, OF SAID PUB-
LIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 179, PAGE 313, OF
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER EASTERLY, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 812, PAGE
1726, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE MEANDER NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG THE
NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT
ALSO BEING ON THE WEST LINE OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 2310, PAGE 1585, OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE NORTHERLY, ALONG SAID
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EASTERLY
AND SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE
SOUTHERLY, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 28, TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST FORT IS-
LAND TRAIL (ALSO KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 44); THENCE WESTERLY,
ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, TO THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST 1/2 OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE SOUTHERLY, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST; THENCE WESTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY ISLANDS, STATE AND FEDERALLY OWNED CONSERVA-
TION LANDS, GOVERNMENTALLY OWNED LANDS, LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY AL-
READY SERVED BY A FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PER-
MITTED SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEM AND LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PROPERTY WITHIN THE
CORPORATE BOUNDARY OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA.
October 14, 21, 28 & November 4, 2012.


345-1014 SUCRN
10/25 Sale
Knightly Auto Service
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicle
described below under
Florida Statues 713.78.
The undersigned will sell
at public sale by compet-
itive bidding on Thursday,

Metin
Notice


October 25,2012, at 8:00
am on the premises
where said vehicle has
been stored and which
are located at Knightly
Auto Service 61 NE Hwy.
19 #A Crystal River, Citrus
County, Florida, the fol-
lowing:
96 Chev Astro Van
1GNDM19W3TB145715
97 Ford Thunderbird
1FALP6248VH 162338

Mee


Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale
in cash only. Vehicles
sold as is and must
be removed at the time
of sale. Sale subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated
party. Published one (1)
time in Citrus County
Chronicle,
October 14,2012.

Meing
Notices


347-1021 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO FILE AN APPLICATION TO VACATE A PLAT
Pursuant to F.S. 177.101(4), J & D Industries, Inc., a Florida corporation gives notice of
its intent to apply Citrus County, Florida, for a plat vacation of the following of real
property:
That certain rear lot line easement dedicated to public utilities lying between Lots 24
and Lot 25, Citrus Industries Industrial Park, Plat Book 13, Page 146, public records of
Citrus County, Florida, located in Section 31, Township 17, Range 19. The street ad-
dress being 561 E Overdrive Circle, Hernando, Florida 34452. Parcel Alternate Key
No. 2573465.
Notice given by:
J & D Industries, Inc.
Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire
Counsel for Applicant
October 14 & 21, 2012.


344-1014 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAY October 24, 2012 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto, Florida 34461

DAVID HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN JAMES WHITE WILLIAM L. WINKEL
GERRY GAUDETTE ROBERT CABLE

(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES

(5) CITATIONS


a) William Hooper Citation #0036 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
b) Stephen Roberts Citation #0037 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
c) Shaun Stehlik Citation #0058 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
d) Steven Taylor Citation #0063 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
(7) SCHEDULED DISCUSSION
a) Discuss Building Chapter 18 and the Fee Schedule
b) Discuss Board vacancies

ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TION LICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSID-
ERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTI-
MONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION
286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)

ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING
BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
(352) 341-6560 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR
LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
October 14, 2012.


348-1014 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, will meet in regular session in the Board of County Commissioners'
Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450 on October 23, 2012 beginning at 1:00 pm to approve the sale of property
at 5145 E. Triss Street, Inverness, Florida to Patricia Quails-Love and the sale of prop-
erty at 222 S. Lincoln Avenue, Beverly Hills, Florida to Arlete T. Honorato under the
Neighborhood Stabilization Program. This notice is given pursuant to Section
125.35(3), Florida Statutes. Anyone not attending the meeting but who wishes to
make comments shall do so in writing and address same to the Department of Com-
munity Services, Housing Services Section, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto,
Florida 34461. Said comments must be received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, Oc-
tober 22, 2012.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public meeting he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requidng reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB
CHAIRMAN
October 14,2012.


349-1014 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance
Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have ques-
tions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Abreu, Julio; Abreu, Julio M. & Bertila
17 S Tyler St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One red Chevy S10 with a trailer attached and a red GMC on the property.
Abreu, Julio; Abreu, Julio M. & Bertila
17 S Tyler St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Abreu, Julio; Abreu, Julio M. & Bertila
17 S Tyler St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfuly established and mdntdnedjunk yard, garbage or wasteocd ite ar scritary londll; nd
except for accurn-atins of vegetative waste on agcuttrd
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, tree debris, metal, plastic, and other
miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Aurora Loan Services LLC ATTN: Nationstar
10 James Ct, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Aurora Loan Services LLC ATTN: Nationstar
10 James Ct, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A chair, garbage bag, a bucket, and miscellaneous
materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Bonnie J. Gabrielson Liv Trust
4836 E Fordham PI, Hernando, FI 34442
Construction of a structure (Porch) without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County
Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: A
porch with screen enclosure attached to the front of the mobile home.
Bonnie J. Gabrielson Liv Trust
4836 E Fordham PI, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The six boats and one trailer that is located in the front and rear of the prop-
erty.
Bonnie J. Gabrielson Liv Trust
4836 E Fordham PI, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car parts, buckets, household garbage, plastics, tires,
camper top, gas cans, blocks, logs, mattresses, tarps, and other miscellaneous mate-
rials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Breault, Ann C T
2676 E Center St, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, household items, household garbage, and
miscellaneous items.
Breault, Ann C T
2676 E Center St, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Two travel trailers and a motorhome.
Butzer, Rose
5388 E Jasmine Ln, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Comtois, June "REPEAT VIOLATION"
20 S Barbour St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-


growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Copeland, Tangila
1663 N Rock Cress Path, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Copeland, Tangila
1663 N Rock Cress Path, Crystal River, FI 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken furniture, wood


scraps, metal, plastic, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Dodson, Myrtle Lynn
281 S Honey Bear Way, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: a garage, front porch, and a deck around the pool were con-
structed.
Fabrizio, Marie G. & Ralph A.
43 New Florida Ave, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Fuller, A R
1135 S Maplenut Way, Inverness, Fl 34450
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Hoard, James S.; James E. & Catherine
6215 E Quincy St, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Hollis, Leonard P.
229 W Casurina PI, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Hollis, Leonard P.
229 W Casurina PI, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The trailer on the right side of the property and the two vans parked in the
driveway.
Jimenez, Carlos M. & Serrano, Aida
54 S Desoto St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The Dodge parked behind the house and the box truck parked on the front
of the property.
Jimenez, Carlos M. & Serrano, Aida
54 S Desoto St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, chemicals, buckets, metals, plastics, appli-
ances, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Kovacs, Brian
2001 S Gleneagle Ter, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
LNZ of Citrus County Inc. & Halverson, Jason & Jessica R.
880 S Bea Ave, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Marlow, Stephen G.
4035 E Parsons Point Rd, Hernando, Fl 34442
Construction of a structure (Tiki hut, dock, and site built open canopy) without a valid
permit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which
states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move,
improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, includ-
ing a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or
float-
ing residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having ob-
tained a permit therefore.
Morgan, Merlene
5462 E Tangelo Ln, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One long enclosed trailer, one boat on a trailer, one van with an enclosed
trailer attached, and one open trailer that is located on the right rear side of the
property.
Nicosia, Mark A. & Theresa A.
1999 S Melanie Dr, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Trash bags in a pit in front yard and hundreds of tires in
the backyard.
Pulcini, Walt
7857 E Wisp TrIl, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, tree debris, metal, blocks, cables, a winch of
some sort, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Pulcini, Walt
7857 E Wisp TrIl, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Shidler, Rodney & Christine
893 N Gardenview Ter, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential
unit
within the territory covered by this article without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Installed fill dirt on property with no permit.

The Suzanne McClure Family Trust
11142 W Creek Ln, Homosassa, FI 34448
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: A deck was built at the rear of the house without purchasing a per-
mit.
Wilson, Michael A.
9757 W Smokey Ln, Crystal River, FI 34429
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Converted
ground floor storage into living area without necessary permits.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the CodeCompliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be ased.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.

MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER


CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
To be advertised one (1) time, Sunday, October 14, 2012

350-1014 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Port Authority will meet on Tues-
day, October 23, 2012 at 9:30 AM at the Citrus County Courthouse, Room 100 Board
Chambers, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, to reevaluate the re-
sponses from consultants to the Authority's request for qualifications for the develop-
ment of a Port Citrus Feasibility Plan and any other business of the Port Authority.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Port Authority with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY:
Dennis Damato
Chairman
October 14,2012.


I Mic. oti


I Misc. No


CLASSIFIED


B
Meeting^
Notice


I Misc. No


B
MeeingH^f
I Noice


Meting
I Ntics


Meing
I Ntices :


Meeting
I Ntics


B
Meeting^
I Ntics




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


41IIMI;


III


k

I- =


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ALTIMA
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except the name.
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With $2,999 Due At Signing. Model# 13013 VIN# 129758


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D8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


%J %J rl% I m1


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INSIDE
I Sikorski's
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V rJ PAGE E4


H OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


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E2 SUNDA~~ OCTOBER 14, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


2I 7 14FO LIN


IRELLi uuu, nu oAW-fi~u-ou"lU
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Iwww.FloiidaLislilngllo.-co.m


* Real Cooks Kitchen Gorgeous Hardwood Floors
* Hurricane Trusses Plantation Shutters
* Relaxing Master Suite Lanai w/Porc. Tile
* On Large Lot/Gated Comm. 4/2/3 Car Gar.
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.elliesullon@roemax.net


VERY CHARMING MOBILE
*Spacious Great Room Large Master BR
* Above Ground Pool Nice Scrn. Porch
*Great Yard *Peaceful Dead-End Road
*Close to Rivers/Lake/Gulf 2 Lg. Sheds w/Elec.
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloiidaLislilnglnlo.com


W,.U .1. .II.II. 1 1... 11.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


11985 H. GOLDENDALE AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL
* Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
2BD/2BA w/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875



RENTALS

AVAILABLE

Visit

wwwAIICiunlelentals.com


CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME
on 1/2 acre. 3BR/2BA/2-car garage,
newer roof and A/C, and refinished
pool. Stainless appliances, built-ins and
large lanai for entertaining with bar.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.net










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


H 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


LARGE 3/2.5/2 HOME
on 2 acres with pond. Large master
suite. Caged inground pool, huge lanai,
fireplace in family room and cooks
kitchen. Owner ill and must sell.
JENNIFER STOLTZ (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferSlollz@remax.nel
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com [v


Come live the casual Florida
lifestyle. Open floorplan with tons
of natural light. Pool, spa, and
distant sunsets await!
KIM DEVAHE (352) 257-5353 -,
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


FLORAL CITY
2 Bedrooms, 1 bath, concrete block home
large living room with fireplace, inside
laundry, corner lot 1.06 acres, carport
and large detached garage, 2 sheds,
BBQ pit and concrete slab for entertaining.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM i
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


C~' Ar

, wqt


Skyline 1,700+ sq ft mobile on 2 fully fenced
acres just blocks from Lake Rousseau's fabulous
fishing Wide open floor plan, HUGE island kitchen
with tons of cabinets, large master with jetted tub
Attached 2 car garage with 4 doors and attached
potential MAN CAVE Also, an attached "safe
house" for storms Unbelievable property Must see
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


WOWII Describes this beautiful Pine Ridge home No
expenses spared Large 3/2/2 split plan home with
separate office space Interior features boast light and
bright spaces, gourmet upgraded kitchen, travertine tile
throughout, formal dining, bar/sitting area, window
treatments and much more Exterior offers fresh paint,
solar heated pool, fenced rear yard, large patio area,
workshop, fenced garden to name a few
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


wuwvz yv
Get away from it all.
1.5 acres, 2 story waterfront home.
Guest area, Spa area, boat ramp.
Covered lift, Dock and ELEVATOR.
PLUS a workshop.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com


3/2/2 7 Rivers Golf Course area
location on cul-de-sac. Home sits on
approximately 1 acre lot, metal roof,
shed. Laminate 'wood' floors, 2-sided
fireplace, eat-in kitchen, large screen
porch with private views. Short sale
could save you $$$$.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: teom@citrusrealty.com


242 N. Lec i Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
835S Snos Bv. oro1s 62-70 ww.our Inielsfeco 50 NE Hwy 9Ias ivr7524


*3BR/2BA *4.77 Fenced Acres
* Formal LR/DR 1,800 SF Living
*Kitchen & Brkfst Bar *20x30 Fla Room
*1,800 SF Pole Barn Hot Tub
* Carport w/9,000 lb. Lift 12x25 Gar/Paint Booth
*Newer 3.5 Ton A/C Level Treed Lot
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016
Email: lounalley@tampabay.rr.com


E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Planting a perimeter screen and wildlife zone


here isn't
much that
will grow in
straight sand. In
deep sandhills,
amend sandy soil
with ample fine
mulch from Cen-
tral Landfill, 352-
527-7600, on State
Road 44 between Jane
Lecanto and In-
verness. It's free JAI
and the staff will GAF
load it for you at
certain times.
Along the perimeter of a
lot, plant evergreen trees


Chiappy signs with
Top Performance
Top Performance Real Es-
tate Consultants Welcomes
Agent
Top Per-
formance
Real Estate
Consultants
is pleased to
announce
that Maria
Chiappy has Maria
joined the Chiappy
company. Top
Maria has Performance
been in the Real Estate.
Real Estate
industry for six years and is cur-
rently ranked in the top 20 per-
cent of Realtors in closed
volume through the Board of
Realtors. She holds ABR (Ac-
credited Buyer's Representa-
tive) and SFR (Short Sale and
Foreclosure Resource) desig-
nations. Maria can be reached
at 352-302-8403


I


every 10 to 15
feet with two or
three shrubs in
between for pri-
vacy This creates
wind breaks,
shade, food
sources, nest
sites, shelter and
cover from pred-
Veber ators for birds
and wildlife.
E'S Around tree
DEN trunks, create a
shallow ring sur-
rounded by a raised berm
wider than the root ball.
This will constrain irriga-


Holloway hits
new record
The asso-
ciates and
staff of
RE/MAX Re-
alty One are
proud to an-
nounce that
Realtor
Johnny Hol- Johnny
loway has Holloway
qualified for RE/MAX
the presti- Realty One.
gious multi-
million dollar club.
Johnny passed $2 million in
sales volume this month and
joins an elite group of agents
who have reached this mile-
stone. He specializes in the re-
gion around Inverness and
Floral City. He works out of the
Inverness RE/MAX office lo-
cated on Main Street.
The brokers of RE/MAX con-
gratulate Johnny on this well
earned accomplishment.


tion water to the growing
root zone. Pine needle and
leaf litter mulch around
each plant moderates soil
temperatures and helps
maintain soil moisture by
shading the amended soil
and reducing evaporation.
Mulch decomposition re-
leases plant growth nutri-
ents.
Check the plants often


and water the soil every day
for a week or two. Water
trees and shrubs weekly for
at least a year until estab-
lished. A 4-inch wide con-
tainer like a cat food tin
placed near the trunk will
indicate if enough rain has
fallen to avoid watering in
summer. Younger trees and
shrubs in smaller, less ex-
pensive pots take root


quicker and soon outgrow
larger, root bound speci-
mens.
A perimeter planting may
range from 10 to 20 feet
wide as it curves between
existing trees and native
vegetation. Remove only
dead trees like turkey oaks
too small for cavity nesting
birds to use. A longleafpine
looks like a tuft of stiff grass


for up to nine years and may
have a tap root over 10 feet
deep. It cannot be relocated
successfully It develops a
foot-tall trunk after six to
nine years. One with a
skinny 6- to 8-foot trunk may
be 11 years old!
Wiregrass, Aristidastricta,
critical for Bobwhite Quails,

See JANE/Page E6


rkJh ITLU L1IDGE R1L1EA U.


Amanda & Krk Jonson Tom Balfour Li Ave us & Hal $tne Art Paty
BROKER/A SSOC ALT R REACTOR REAL -BROKER REALTOR


746-900


0w~ctrs0 tuy Sa



10 Fo TyO r-w
0 W* A-A WE IACN
I.NE- 'I- -im wn


i89K53 W ,OSH
2// 526$84,900


r- Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney [ |
i Realtor'E A HOUSE Realtor
|I- 302-3179 SOLDON-fl' 287-9022
~I.. WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700R.. BD.

43 S. LINCOLN
.1yh) 1,I, I I-1,

.. .... .. ". ..' =:'u fill I, 1. ho,,I, I, L,,


4506 N MBEED


Real Estate DIGEST


FOREST RIDGE

00


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 E3


CRYSTAL RIVER
I'v


I BVERY HLL


H A







E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information.................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Healthy Halloween treats


Halloween is a fun and exciting
time, especially for kids. Fun
can still be had by all, without
consuming too many sugary sweets
and extra calories.
This is an important goal,
since the most recent na-
tional rates of childhood
overweight and obesity are
still alarming:
U 31.7 percent of children
age 2 to 19 are overweight
(at or above the 85th per- R
centile of Body Mass Index
for age growth charts). (Na-
tional Health and Nutrition
Survey, 2007-08) Monica
16.9 percent of kids in CONS
the same age range consid- CONS
ered obese (a BMI of SCIE
greater than or equal to the
95th percentile).(Ogden, Carroll, Kit, &
Flegal, JAMA, 2012)
One way we can make a difference
in these statistics and in the lives of
young people is to provide healthier
treats for Halloween and help chil-
dren learn portion control. Parents
can help kids manage treats by setting
a rule that they can have one piece of
candy per day at an agreed upon
time.There are many ideas to help you


provide healthier treats for your trick-
or-treaters.
Here are a few of them:
Individual packs of baby carrots.
Packs of mini-pretzels, shaped
like bats and Jack-o-
lanterns.
Individual pre-sliced
apple packs.
Mini boxes of raisins.
Shelf stable 4-ounce
fruit bowls.
SShelf stable sugar-free
Jell-O.
* Consider non-food items,
such as Halloween pencils
Payne and erasers, Halloween
UMER stickers, or small toys.
These items add some vari-
NCE ety to a trick-or treater's
loot.Make these items more
festive by tying a black and orange rib-
bon around each package and attach-
ing a plastic spider ring.
If you are hosting a Halloween
party, try these ideas provided by
Jacqueline Gomes, dietitian on the
www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.or
g website. She suggests:
Veggie and cheese kabobs dec-
orate trays with plastic spiders, bats,
etc.


Fill mini Halloween candy bags
with home-made trail mix (combine
dried fruits, such as cranberries, apri-
cots, and raisins with granola and dark
chocolate pieces).
Serve 100 percent juice instead of
soda.
Bake quick breads such as zuc-
chini or banana bread and add dried
fruits, apples, or pears for extra sweet-
ness and nutrients.
Call Monica Payne at the Extension
office at 352-527-5713. Citrus County
Extension links the public with the
University of Florida/IFAS' knowl-
edge, research, and resources to ad-
dress youth, family, community, and
agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions, or
affiliations.

Monica Payne is the Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.


Depression-era furniture; sizing up antique powder horns


D earJohn: I am a big fan of
your show and I am hop-
ing you can answer some
questions I have had for a long
time. My mother recently passed
away and I inherited a
very old, ornate dining
room table that origi-
nally belonged to my
great-grandmother,
who died in 1989 at
age 96. My grand-
mother remembers it
from her childhood in
the mid-1920s. We
think it is made of wal- John S
nut and it includes six SIKOR
chairs of the same de-
sign as the table five AT1
chairs and one cap-
tain's chair. The only distinguish-
able markings on the table are a
part of the table-leaf, which is
stamped 'Jefferson E-Z Table
Slide, Manufactured By The Jef-
ferson Wood Working Co.,
Louisville, and Kentucky."
I am very proud to own this


[


L
i,

I
I


and will one day pass it down to
my own kids, but I am very curi-
ous to find out exactly how old it
might be and how much it might
be valued. -B.K, Internet
Dear B.K: The Jef-
ferson E-Z Slide Com-
pany was in business
in Louisville, Kentucky
from 1920 into the
1990s. They manufac-
tured a variety of slide
openers for various
furniture manufactur-
ers. The style of your
korski set is often referred to
SKI'S as Depression Era fur-
niture. It consists of
IC various style motifs
taken from the 17th
and 18th centuries combined
into a 20th century version. The
set could have been manufac-
tured by any of a number of com-
panies that produced this type of
furniture. A lot of it was made in
Grand Rapids, Michigan. Cur-
rently there is very little market


interest in the style.
DearJohn: I am enclosing pho-
tographs of some antiques; I
would like your opinion as to
whether they have any value and
who might be interested in them.
I acquired both powder horns in
1959 when I traveled with a
friend to Mystic, Connecticut, to
settle his grandmother's estate
and clean out all the remaining
furniture. My friend was going to
toss all these antiques into a
dumpster when I retrieved them
and kept them to this day Both
powder horns are very fragile,
with some cracks in the horns.
The lighter-colored horn has a
date of 1839 lightly inscribed on
it together with a "G" initial on it.
See ATTIC/Page E7
Powder horns have long been
a specific area of collector
interest, though this pair would
be low on the totem pole of
collector interest.
Special to the Chronicle


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learn tips to protect



plants for winter


Master gardener clinics slated for October


Special to the Chronicle

The UF-IFAS Citrus County Exten-
sion Master Gardeners free plant clin-
ics for October will address
cold-weather plant protection.
Citrus County winters usually have
extreme temperature changes occur-
ring over short periods of time. If
Mother Nature gives plants time to ac-
climate to lower temperatures, they
can establish dormancy Dormancy
helps plants survive, but rapidly
falling temperatures do not allow this.
The October Plant Clinics will ex-
plain the types of freezes we experi-


ence and present actions to take be-
fore, during and after cold weather to
protect plants. The remaining sched-
ule is:
Wednesday, Oct 17-1 p.m. at Cit-
rus Springs Library
Tuesday, Oct. 23 2 p.m. at Ho-
mosassa Library
The clinic normally done in Floral
City will not be offered this month, but
will return in November.
Questions or pictures can be sent to
the master gardeners at MasterGi
@bocc.citrus.fl.us. Master gardeners
will research and respond. Call the Ex-
tension Service at 352-527-5700.


Wi.l -eilzn in err Vfista Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
a _144 &r B rentwoodResales (352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

REALTY G RO U P BILL DECKER 352-464-0647' SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133' VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777


DETACHED VILLA 2BED 2BATH 2CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Showcase Model Hartford, On the Brentwood Golf Course Fully maintained
Beautifully landscaped, Professionally color coordinated Volume
hot
v_$199,000

!initi--


mne Kyview bOlT bourse OT
Iway custom glass double
nters, upgraded cabinets wi
cited exterior


ED 3BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH
Is panoramic viewl Don't miss this 3/3/2 home
ra Vista heated pool & spa w/
ry door, golf cart door, corlan
pull outs, decorative painting, lighting Newly
$376,500


DETACH


MLS 357742 $232,000





SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3BED 3BATH SCAR HILLSIDE SOUTH
Spectacular ew nestled on a corner lot beckons
its new own I I has desirable southeast exposure
with a 12 ,
cabinets,
and doub
1 ,, $469,000


DETACHED VILLA 2BED 2BATH 2C
You Must See This I room 2 B
Community of Citrus 11 I II I
Tile Floors i Kitchen and Bath, Wood i .
Appliances, Built In Office/Desk Space In Gre
Closets, Master Bath Dual Sinks w/Conan Top
T \rea Enjoy The Main
i 1 II To Offer I
MI S 357052


AR


-I'll


To Include Ceramic Ths one is exceptional Elegant maintenance free home in TerrVa V This
S an Counters, Deluxe bedroom, 25 bath, 2 car garage heated pool/spa home is on the 8th green 0
atroom, Master Bedroom Walk In Skyview If you are quality conscious with sophisticated tastes, please don't mis
& Wood Cabinet, Screened lanai seeing this home with neutral colors throughout This is surely the kitchen of you
tenance Free Lifestyle & All The dreams, with cabinetry, counter tops and appliances of the highest quality
Membership required
$140,000 MLS 357018 $339,000


DETACHED VILLA 2BED 2 BATH 2 CAR BRETWOOD VILLAS
This beautiful 2 bedroom, 2 bath home in desirable Brentwood community Is in DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 3BED2BATH 2CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS -
torr ait Br n w o Re tas taia aebrsi 0nlue ait all aetl


I I Club membership
al membershiD is


Lawn maintenance is also Incl


I, Immaculate with a unique mnterlo
II 1 i Granite Counter Tops and Fireplace
rance of TerraVista. Social Membershl[


BRENTWOOD DETACHED VILLA 3 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR
Nicely maintained villa in Brentwood Open floor plan with large kitchen Law
maintenance and Social Club Membership included


DETACHED VILLA 3BED 2BATH 2CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
Maintenance free ving s yours within this 3 bed, 2 bath, 2car garage in the
St clous eat in kitchen with granite
S. 1 amlan shutters to the Corlan bath
MLS 357692 $220,000


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 E5


, I


so you can relax Open great room, mak


Fully furnished 2/2/2, with a
decorated Enjoy maintenance f
Di







E6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


JANE
Continued from Page E3

is an important plant in the sandhills, so
should remain unharmed. If relocating
wiregrass, do so in early spring. First dig

www.dudleysauction.com

REAL ESTATE AUCTION
~42 S. Tyler St., Beverly Hills ~-
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 19 ~ Preview 9am ~ Real Estate 10am


SOLD REGARDLESS OF PRICE
2/1 home with family room, finished garage and carport. Open
kitchen with partial half wall and dining room that steps into the
family room. Great investment opportunity for winter resident,
first-time home buyer or rental. Nice trees and in need of a bit of
elbow grease. Over 1,400 sq. ft. under roof. Taxes will be paid and
prorated and clean warrantee deed provided.
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
.- 4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds)
f .- e. BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
Q w Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352437.9588. Up-todate photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Abl667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
EU. 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL ak
ENE (352) 634-2371 Cell
ERA bob@bjdavis.com '
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bidavis.co


m Lmm T -, m m


A PARTY PALACE MADE FOR ENTERTAINING
This 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 3-car garage, pool home,
with its open and split floor plan, captures your eye
and pulls you towards its centerpiece: the 34' pool
with enough decking to invite your guests to dance.
The heated pool is deep enough for a diving board.
The 13' breakfast nook has a seamless bay window
that floods the home with light. Skylights in the
master bath along with a 2-seat jetted tub; central
vac, plantation shutters, security system, roof new in
'09, newly painted, on an acre.
$187,900 MLS 358111


0TWO MOM FAIRVIEWHOMES


a big hole. Then dig a big spadeful of
sand with the undisturbed root ball and
gently set in the hole. Do not stomp on
the roots. Flush with water from a hose
sprinkler once or twice in the first
weeks, then leave wiregrass alone.
Liatris, commonly called Gay
Feather and Blazing Star, blooms from
late summer through the fall in Florida.
Flower spikes are usually single in

SNorm Overfield
Realtor ,
352-586-8620
www.normoverfield. m


1^ .Hometown


younger plants but will develop several
stems if damaged or nibbled by wildlife.
Wiry tufts of Liatris leaves die down
in winter after the spectacular flower
turns to dry brown scapes. Strip off the
dry seeds to scatter among the trees
and shrubs of the buffer zone. Under-
ground corms can be dug in winter
and relocated to more cultivated loca-
tions. The corm is replaced every year


352-564-0333
6050 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
normoverfield@yahoo.com


rr 4 5585 W. Pawnee Dr.
MLS #358113 $309,900
Gorgeous 5 bed/3 bath pool home
with lovely landscape.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952






e !455111 N. Crockerl Terr.
TJ( MLS#356913 $231,000
3/2.5/2 pool home on one
beautifully landscaped acre.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
with a bigger one. It does not develop
cormlets or side shoots. Old roots also
wither away when the leaves die. Bags
of dry corms are sometimes available.
I can harvest some for avid gardeners.
Shrubs that work well in buffer zones
include 'Encore' Azaleas, Bridal
Wreath Spirea, Camellia, Oakleaf Hy-
drangea, Ocala Anise, St John's Wort,
Salt Bush, Simpson's Stopper, Walter's
Viburnum and Yaupon 'Schelling's'
Holly Add perennial bunchgrasses,
wildflowers, ferns and vines to make a
biodiverse buffer pleasing to gardeners,
birds, butterflies and native wildlife.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant Semi-retired,
she grows thousands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County garden. For an
appointment call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeberl2385@gmail.com.


-I S E,'J I0 ALL 0 C COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


OPEN HOUSE 1-3


.- .. //1 165 E. Ireland CI.
-, MvL' #of543uo $199,000
Updated 3/2/2 Oaks Golf Course Home.
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd., to right on Ireland Ct, to home on right.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203
NEW LISTING


i $l 3771 N. Goldencup Terr. 3605 N. Timothy Terr.
MLS#358118 $62,750 4tlet MLS #358123 $49,900
Affordable 2/2/1 home located Nice 2BR/BA popular villa
in quiet neighborhood. in 55+ community of The Glen.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Joy Holland 352-464-4952


( Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING





aC 3298 W. Daffodil Dr.
MLS#358091 $221,000
Little Pine Golf Course -fantastic view
of the 8th green & 7th tee.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


,, $. 1673E. Wesigale Ln.
& aU5 MLS #356655 $225,000
Perfect home, spacious rooms
& generous outdoor spaces.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


4 '4 L M 1875 W. Pearson St. 810 E. Gilchrist Ct. 28-5A 175 E. Hartford St. 8-10a 2745 W. Elm Blossom St.
W MLS#351889 $199,999 ft MLS#356430 $62,900 teen MLS #351790 $49,900 i i MLS#357960 $142,000
Unique 3/2/2 plus den on a Easy, breezy Florida living. Drastic price reduction on this Lush tropical environment
wooded 1 acre lot. 2/2 second floor condo. fully furnished condo. 3/2.5 pool home.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Joy Holland 352-464-4952 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Joy Holland 352-464-4952
P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities.An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the [ ML
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


NEW LISTING


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil PhoSos,
SwwF6.idSho cas rperiesco


_/ Z ^Zi N. Page Ave.
'-ake MLS #358012 $544,000
Custom built 3/3/plus w/tin-roofed
cracker home on 5 acres.
Sandra Olear352-212-4058


Ask a Veteran


m


ealty








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

As background, the home had origi-
nally had a coffin-making area in what
constituted the basement and that was
where I found the powder horns. The
second powder horn has no markings
on it of any kind but appears to be of
the same age.
This metal pitcher, which was tinned
inside, was probably used as a grease
or oil dispenser The only marking on it
is a "1" on the bottom. This too came
from the Mystic, Connecticut, home. I
read your column each week and find
the topics and answers very interest-
ing. -J.ED., Crystal River
DearJ.ED.: Powder horns have been
a specific category of collecting for a
long time. It is good you saved them
from a fateful end. Within the category,
the two you have are at the bottom of
the totem pole of collector interest Po-
tential dollar value is below $50 each.
The old metal pitcher is of no collec-
tor interest. Potential dollar value is


000BOSH

fE


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


-- -
ELEGANT
CUSTOM BUILT HOME
In the equestrian section of Pine
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a
3600 interactive virtual tour at
www mypineridgehome.com.
MLS #355468. $410,000


catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have some Heinrich
dinner plates and salad plates, about 25
pieces in all. I am looking to find the
name of the pattern. Can you help me
find out more about these? They have a
crown on the back with Heinrich Co.,
Selb, Bavaria Germany -L.O., Internet
Dear L.O.: Replacements Ltd. in
Greensboro, North Carolina offers
pattern identification. I suggest you
contact them and see if they can iden-
tify the pattern. The phone number is
1-800-REPLACE (737-5223). Good luck
Dear John: Though I am quite cer-
tain this book is not worth much, if
anything, it certainly does not hurt to
ask. I have a copy of "The Heroes" by

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
> For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$7.2 million already closed by Sept. 30, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
m To Learn More
(352) 746-9924 1.-A


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


MAGNIFICENT WATERFRONT
MAINTENANCE-FREE 2/2/2 HOME
in the Moorings at Point 0 Woods.
Completely remodeled. Move right
into Paradise. Enjoy tranquil
privacy with nature preserve
behind you. Most every room has


rA -"":- NATURE'S
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community
.... Take the on the Withlacoochee River
.. ... 1,, w.. . u.. f... $218,000
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven!


115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and
nice 1... 1 in beautiful Citrus
Hills!! .,,. i a one acre comer lot,
this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in
pool and patio area offers you the privacy
you want!! F l...... : well
maintained. Ne i ... bring
.. 1 ... .e1 ,nn


5721 S. LIVE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
and nestled in an area that preserved
most of its 1960's charm! Well main
tainted, fenced yard, sunroom. The perfect
home away from home.
MLS #357468 $39,900


A.


CLASSIC AND LIVING UN I lit WAI I!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well maintained 3/2/1
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, medical :... I. ,,.. r.., your fenced
true master .... .... 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard ..... ........ or private
Lake Tsala ... room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
family to move right in! imaginable! #3544 .. 6,'
WOOCwKILS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 i ,. $69,900


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 E7

Charles Kingsley with copyright First
Edition, September 1906; Reprinted,
October 1907. Any value to this book? John Sikorski has been in the an-
Thanks for all your help and guidance. tiques business for 30 years. He hosts
-JR.H., Internet a call-in radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
Dear J.R.H.: If your book were a on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from
first edition, it would be of some in- noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to
terest. But as a reprinted edition, very Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala
little. 34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


ARE YOU READY FOR A BOAT RIDE .HM. W BRING THE FAMILY AND HORSES I
0.y E WATERFRONT & PRIVATE ACREAGE ......... h
,,,l,,,,,ll .. ... i.... d i ,,,1 ... In ,,, ,I ......i h .1. W ATERFRO NT I PR IVATE ACR EA G E .. ,i-. l .... .. .. 0.ll000 . ...... t, ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,' ,,,,,. ,,
O N LY 564 900 1 1 li i .I.I.L f ,I .1 ,1 a, I .i,,,l,ih i l,- i ,, I i llI .ii r ,A it, .' ,, I ..i...i...1 ,,,,,,, ,,l
I,,1 I.,,,- I,,I .. .' ., lI .- .... ,,,h, r4.. .- I .. 5 12 9 9 0 0 11 .. .. 1 ,. .





OH MYLANTA HAVE YOu SEEN THE INTEREST IATES I. ,, T, .... ',." HIS DEALS HOTTER THAN IAR OF IALAPENOS' i .

" III J li ,,' 1 i I I .I. .... ll I, O N LY S 19 9 0 0 1 ,,,,,, .. ... I ,,,,, ,, ,,,',, ..... .... II..... .I
1.1 I l,,t... ASKING s 11 U ..1I 1 4 80 1 L ,,11.U,1 1..... h,,,, ll ll 1.1........... I h ONLY b 169 9001
I,, , H ..1 ,, I .I. 1 1',, ,hl '. I ,111. ,.I, 1,.. . ...1. ., I, .. I.
-S




I-SADDLE UP KIDS WE GOTTA SHOw YA A GREAT BuY ON B-iONCO'
LIKE STANDING IN LINES '
GOOD GRAVY THIS BUY IS GREEEEAAAATTT! .. ..l ......... a,,,,l, ,, ,,.,',.i'l ,']nn '. i ui
I, .. ,., ... 1,,,1,,,,,l ., ,I I ,.. I, '. , I.,,,h, ,. ,I I d,. Ir 5 6 9 3 0 0 1
$159,900! 48 Cypress Blvd. MLS #356262. Call Tomika 8595 Gospel Island. MLS #358066 Call ..., i,,,. .. 1i ... ..... SKI G S I o* '
Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.
ATTENTION INVESTORS
. BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS
AND BARGAIN HUNTERS'


.., ,,,, ,,,,,, .. ..1 BANK OWNED BOMBSHELL OF A BUy' . l...... . .
I..... .. . .... r ....... I .. ... .. I i "I BA D TO TH E BO N E!!!! I I. i 1 ,,, ,,. ... ... ..
counters, marble vanities try ceilings & crown molding, side entry grge, bad except for the bones! Aceage & close to town 3/1 home undy, living & family rooms, eat in kitchen, brkfst r r seenal porch
int laundry, eat in kitchen. REDUCED TO $149,900. ADJACENT on 1.7 acres for $67,500. Fencing, fireplace, updated kitchen and spit foor pln. Home in need of cosmetics however the home has great
HOUSE ASKING $225K! 8847 Suncoast Blvd MLS #355456. C1ll and a need for some TLC. MLS #356351. Cal Tomika Spires- bones! 6225 Misty OakTer MS#355026.0NLYS9,900. allmik
Tomika SpiresHanssen 586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-2125752. Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352 212-5752. Spi-Hanssen 352-586598or Kim Fuler 3522125752


CSLDWe"
113wIel?






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


viDey-rdS


....
.- -, ... I

Associated Press
Grapevines should be pruned once a year while the plants are dormant. Leaves should be stripped from the canopy in summer if they have formed around the fruit, shielding it from the sun.

Growing your own grapes can be rewarding, but it's a task that requires time, careful attention


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
Grapes are a great backyard
choice if you're seeking delicious
juice, some wine to savor or
snacks fresh from the vine. But
look elsewhere if it's low mainte-
nance or fast production that you
want.
Grapevines need a lot of atten-
tion and as many as five years to


mature from bare root plants.
"It's less expensive to do grapes
than traditional landscaping like
shrubs and flowers from an in-
vestment viewpoint," said Tom
Powers, author of "The Organic
Backyard Vineyard" (Timber
Press, 2012). "The trade-out is that
you have to put in more mainte-
nance time.
"Starting a small vineyard also
requires planning. Does your pref-


erence run to table grapes or wine
grapes? American or European
cultivars? Do you plan to use
chemical pesticides and herbi-
cides or go organic?
"Whatever you decide, don't let
a lack of space stop you," said
Powers, who has designed and in-
stalled more than 100 vineyards,
primarily around the San Fran-
cisco Bay Area.
"If you are simply hoping to


plant some table grapes to enjoy
for home consumption, you do not
need a vineyard," he said. "You
can grow grapevines up an arbor,
over a fence or against a wall."
Wine grapes, however, should
be trained to grow on a trellis.
That makes them easier to man-
age and allows the sun to reach
the leaves, which produces good
fruit.
"Even a few rows of vines can


produce enough grapes to make
several hundred bottles of wine
every year," Powers said.
Here are some additional
grape-growing basics:
Selection/hardiness: Match
the grapes to your climate by
knowing how many frost-free days
they'll need to ripen, Powers said.
Spacing: Vines planted for


Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012


Tocklo-n







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VINEYARDS
Continued from Page E8

training on a trellis normally are
spaced 8 feet apart, while those
planted for training on an arbor can
be placed 4 feet apart, said Gary Gao,
a small-fruit specialist with Ohio
State University Extension.
Soil: Most any kind will do, but
the best are those combining fertility
with good drainage.
Sunlight: At least eight hours a
day Photosynthesis uses energy from
the sun to convert carbon dioxide to
sugar. This is important, Powers said,
because sugars are the basic building
blocks of the components giving wine
its flavor
Pruning: Once a year when the
vines are dormant. "What you do for
accepted growth in summer is pull
leaves," Powers said. Strip any part of
the leaf canopy that forms around the
fruit.
Pest Management: "The first step


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 E9


is to practice prevention," Powers
said. "Choose the right location, pre-
pare the soil and select the right root-
stock. Maintain the vines properly
with adequate water and nutrition.
Always use the least toxic method for
control of any problem."
Growing requirements are much
the same no matter which grape va-
rieties you choose, Gao said.
Most cultivars were developed for
a specific use, although you can work
with an all-purpose grape like the
Concord, he said.
"Some will eat it as a table grape
but it's not perfect," Gao said. "Oth-
ers will use it for juice or a wine. It's
not a premium wine but it can be con-
sumed. Most would use the Concord
for jams or jellies."
It probably is best to choose just
one variety bred for a specific pur-
pose. "Their flavors are more con-
centrated," he said.
Grapevines require three years,
minimum, to produce a harvest, Pow-
ers said. "I tell people five years.
Growing grapes teaches patience."


Rain harvesting


with rain barrels


Chronicle

The Citrus County
Florida-Friendly Landscap-
ing program has partnered
with The Green Footprint of
Crystal River to offer rain
barrel workshops.
Participants help assem-
ble their own rain barrel to
take home after the class.
The first workshops will be
from 10:30 a.m. to noon and
1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov
10, at The Green Footprint's
new location, 619 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River The cost
per barrel is $45, which in-
cludes the necessary spigot
and overflow attachment.


For each barrel purchased,
The Green Footprint do-
nates $4 to a scholarship
fund for Citrus County stu-
dents pursuing a degree in a
field that promotes environ-
mental conservation, such
as environmental science,
agriculture, horticulture or
other related fields.
Call Julie or Tracy at 352-
257-5403 to reserve a spot.
Pre-registration is neces-
sary
Those interested in more
green learning may register
for the Worm and Tumbler
Composting workshop
slated for 10:30 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Dec. 1.


PINE RIDGE HI


31213 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
OOOCX14 Call Joe at 302-0910


AGET N1 3 o ID S E DnAYS: AWK.- r


-" CRYSTAL RIVER Waterfront 3 bedroom,
HERNANDO Furnished 2 bedroom, 1 bath home 2 bath; 84 ft on deep water canal, covered
w/fenced yard on 3 sides and a canal on the other, boathouse (21 x 30), dock, seawall. Tile
which is dry at present, but when wet has access to floors, new carpet in bedrooms, new roof,
Lake Hernando & Tsala Apopka chainm. Large double paned windows, updated kitchen &
screened porch and patio. #354661 $74,900 baths. #354933 $249,000




HOMOSASSA on corner of kitchen and
cardinal is this D/W M/H w/3bedrooms 1 5 INVERNESS 3 bedroom, 2 bath, DWV M/H with
baths, carport and shed Covered rear porch covered boat dock on a canal w/access to the lakes.
Gas for cooking Being sold "as is" #355143 Honda room w/vmyl windows. Enjoy fishing from
$28,990 your own dock in the backyard. #357311 $69,000


IMMACULATE WATERFRONT-HERNANDO, FL FOR RENT-INVERNESS, FL
3BR/2BA upgraded home on Hernando Lake. Most Immaculate 2BR/1 B apartment. Rent includes
1/2 acre lot. Must see $249,900 MLS#353564 washer & dryer. $600.00 per mo. MLS#357587
.ci S :IXB-- H


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Large 2BR/2BA pool home on 1 acre. Original garage
converted to living area. Detached 2 car garage.
$79,998 MLS#356908


BANK OWNED-SPRING HILL, FL
3BR/2BA pool home. Large family room
w/fireplace.
$59,900 MLS#356883


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352 302-6714 "'


SEc1 "Always There For You"
KEY GAIL COOPER

ER Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


TWO MASTER SUITES
3/2/2 pool home built in 2007
* Unique plan with 3+Cabana Room
* Three baths three-car garage
* Corian kitchen with wood cabinetry
* Cabana room has adjacent Great Room
Central vacuum security system
SWooded and private location
#352049 S155.OOO


I .----..-
PANORAMIC GOLF COURSE VIEWS!
* 4+office/5.3 with 3,804 sq ft of living
* Heated pool/spa custom summer kitchen
* Electric corner fireplace in the family room
* Porcelain tile and 4" Plantation shutters
* Granite island kitchen with 2 ovens
* Home warranty for the buyers
#353817 $499,500


a E~


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We've developed this investor
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because we know the right way to
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Register Now For Free at
% %% %.exilrealltvie leaers.com









E10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012



Chogc,


To place an ad, call 563-5966



"-"* Classifieds


In Print


, .. and


Online


All


IL The Time


Fax: (352) 563-5665 1 Tol -e ,) a-2340 1. Email: -lao I w : wwwSchronicleonline^com


Bring your fishing
pole!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

C.R.IHOMOSASSA
2/1 Furn. Mobile Homes
Nice, clean, quiet park
short/ long term.
Mobiles for Sale with
Finan. 352-220-2077

CRYSTAL RIVER
2Br/1Ba.$495 &
1Br/1 Ba.$475 Fridge,
Stove, Washer-Dryer,
Watr-Trsh 352-587-2555

HOMOSASSA
2 BR, 2 bath. 55+
Forest View Estates
8956 W. Sugar Bush
Path, across from pool &
clubhouse. Fully fur-
nished, master has king
bed, washer/dryer in
utility shed. Enclosed
Florida room, 1142 sq. ft.
$850/Mo. 319-471-2460
cards0661 @hotmail.com




2 Bedrooms 1/2, Bath
Large Florida Room
Washer, Dryer
Dishwasher
$7500 obo
(352) 527-9382

Mobile Home
for Sale
672 sq ft, and Lot
$19,500 Owner Finance
Kenny (352) 228-3406


BEST
OF THE BEST
11 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
45 New and Used
Homes have been
Disounted for
Clearance. Come by
or Call (352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down.
This is a purchase
W.A.C, Call to See
352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/Mo
Loaded
3/2 From $399/Mo
Loaded. $0 Down.
Singlewides $299/MO
800-622-2832 ext 210
USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/Ilong
term 352-220-2077


FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, $46,500.
Cash (352) 586-9498
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217




2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348
2 BR, 11V2, BA,12x56 MH
Nice Seasonal Home
Adult park, low lot rent
Carport, 2 screen
porches, some updates
$11,000 (352) 419-8275
2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987

V THIS OUT!
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090


IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 1988 Skylark
model, 2/2 furnished,
shed, screened lanai
352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413





- MTIONF
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALLY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.Cilrus(ounlyHonieRentals. com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
2440 W. Nautilus ((S)......... $750
3/2/1 Cute home, 1398 sq. ft.
CRYSTAL RIVER
1055 N. Hollywood r. (CR) .... $850
2/2/1 Carport, screened back porch
548 N. Gulf Ave. (R).......... $50
3/1 Fenced yard, close to Rock Crusher Elem.
HOMOSASSA
6944 W. Grant St. (H)......... $700
2/2/1 Cute, centrally located
1843 1845 Slar PI. (1). REDUCED $685
2/2 Duplex, incl. lawn and water
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/LECANTO
545 E. Alaska Dr. (H)......... $800
2/2/1 Florida room, handicap accessible
1933 Siaelle Path (L).. REDIKED $1200
3/2/2 Inc. full memb., pool, tennis, gym














Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

2/1/1......................$... 575
Lawncare Included On A Canal
2/1...................... $550
Screen Room, New Flooring, Paint
3/2/2 Lovely Home.....$950
2/2 Nice Duplex..........$600
2/2 ..................... $700
Pritchard Island Condo

2/1/1 ..................... $600
With Bonus Room

2/2..................... $600
Carport, Nice Mobile
Jennifer Fudge,
SProperty Manager
Cheryl Scruq9s,
Realtor-Assoc ate
352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/BR $450. ,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 Hse. 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
SNICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. 2/1 $575 F/L/S.
Includes Water/gar-
bage, W/D hook-up. Also
furnished units avail.
352-586-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985


CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, Small Pet OK.
(352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, Nice/Quiet
828 5th Ave NE, furnish
opt. $550 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-455-8998
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Inc. Water
Quiet, Clean $575. mo.
352-257-6461,563-2114
INVERNESS
1/ 1 $450 nearhosp 2/1
House $650. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy, no pets
or smoking $500.mo
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
INVERNESS
2/1.5, Townhouse,
W/D, $550 Mo. F/L/S.
(352)746-4108
(352) 302-6988
PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
Apts Homes
Monthly rent starting
at $741 plus utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental Assistance
available to qualified
applicants:
9826 West Arms Drive
Crystal River,
795-7793
TDD #1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00A-5:00P
Equal Housing
Opportunity


EruAL HOusIN









In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Homel
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



OPPORTUNITY





CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished, Clean
w/ membership
2/2 Unfurnished Villa
352-476-4242, 527-8002




HOMOSASSA
2BR, $495. mo. Nice
Area (352) 422-1932

INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
No pets, $550mo.
(352) 220-4818





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





CRYS. RIV. & BH
Furnished & Unfurnishd
352-302-1370


Crys. Riv. Cottage
2/1, CH/A, Near Beach
Includes. Util. $695.
352-220-2447, 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
2 Bedroom. 2 Bath. Re-
modeled home on small
canal! Fully furnished with
washer & dryer! No
smokers. Small dogs
only. First, last and de-
posit. $1,000/month! Call
#813-526-4944




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 C/H/A New Carpet &
Tile, Nice Neighborhood
$650/mo (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, 26 N. Melborne
CHA, Nice Back Yard
(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA,Shed,
$550. mo 352-795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
Beverly Hills, 2/1/1
Clean $550mo. 1st./
Last./Sec (786)286-1163
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, Encd. Porch $500.
mo. + sec. 465-0539
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299, 364-2073
CRYSTAL RIVER N.
2/1 on country road
lake rouseau area, lake
privileges, $550 mo.
1st & dep. No pets,
(352) 436-4189
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$1,250. 352-419-4421
HERNANDO
2/1/, 1,475Sf. $650.
Non Smoking/Pets.
352-419-0074, 464-4346
4195 E. Benthal Ct.
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Waterfront Home,
1st & Sec. No pets
(352) 637-1142


INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, 1st &Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-476-2860
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached Home,
Royal Oaks upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable /water.
949-633-5633
INVERNESS
CLOSE TO
HOSPITAL
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Newly tiled,
spacious,fenced yard,
2 car garage and family
room $675 monthly
845-313-3992
Sugarmill Woods
2 Master BR, Dbl Gar.,
S/S Appl. $850/Mo
352-302-4057
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 Upgrades $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616




CYRSTAL RIVER
3/3 Waterfront. Three
Sisters Area. Furnished
with Dock. $1400/mo
(352) 854-2511

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/Ilong
term 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
Mature, Responsible to
Share spacious mobile
$400. mo. Incl. Util.
Avail. 11/1, 364-1421




Citrus Hills/Condo
Mas. Bd Rm w/Ba. Pool
$450/ref's. 352-249-7804


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
On/Off Water, Boat
Dock 352-302-1370



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
-*******- -


Coast Landings RV
Resort. Large Developed
site, plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,500. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


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Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL H$USIHS
OPPORTUNITY




FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Professional
OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo CenterCR
352-794-6280, 586-2990



3BR/2BA/2, Shed, New
Interior paint, carpet,
pool, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
Citrus Springs $114,900
(352) 476-5061


Beautiful Golf Home
on El Diablo.
2563 sq. ft. 4/3/2.
Granite in kitchen
all baths and wine
bar.S/S appliances
and many upgrades!
Close to shopping,
restaurants top rated
schools. $159,900
352-464-1320




4/BR/2BA Mitch Under-
wood built home on 1.2
acres. Cherry cabinets
and wood floors. Outdoor
kit w/ Jenn-air grill.
Heated spa, oversized
pool, gazebo and lovely
garden. (352) 746-0912


3/2/2 POOL HOME,
updated roof, AC, water
heater, SS Appl's, gran-
ite kit counter tops, and
resurfaced Pool
Reduced to $149,900
6090 N. Silver Palm Way
(352) 586-7691



Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Sat
&Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418



2BR, 1 2 BA, new
enclosed sunroom, at-
tached utility and Laun.
rm. storage bldg.,
furnished Immaculate.
5111 Castle Lake Ave.
S. of Inverness on SR 41
$39,900 (740) 255-0125
Approximately 1 Acre
3BR, 2 Full BA, Open
concept, new steel
roof, deck & caged
pool, carport, storage
bldg., Priced to sell
$82,500 5155 Bridget Pt
S. of Inverness on SR 41
(740) 255-0125


HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness Highlands,
Corner of Carol and Ten-
nyson. My Loss, Your
Gain, New Low Price.
HUGE 1 Family, on 2.8
residential acres, fenced,
CHA, 4 BR, 3 BA, pool,
deep well, whole house
water treatment, wired for
generator, COSTLY UP-
DATES in 2011. Offered
AS IS. $172,900. Owner
352-419-7017.
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$800. Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529
Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AH1
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE
House for Sale
By Owner
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2
352-586-1772
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof.
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


WoodsU


fcA


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
OPEN HOUSE
Sugarmill Woods
32 Douglas
Sunday 14th, 11la-3p
3/2/2 New A/C & New
Roof, 2 sided fireplace,
eating kitchen, nicely
landscaped $118,000
352-726-7543, 228-0907


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

Get
Results in
the
homefront
class ifieds!


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
-******* - -


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real EstateL...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@


Hme


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


5 ACRES 1948 Sq Ft.
2BR + Office/2 Bath
Furnished Home,
Bushnell, Turn key cond
cage inground pool
3,000 sf garage
mechanics dream
completely equipped
Information, Appoint.
(352) 569-4205



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857


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Results in

the

homefront

classified!
_


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails, $3000 per Acre
352-634-4745



2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $24,000.
(727) 439-9106



CRYSTAL OAKS
Beautiful rare Crystal
Oaks .62 ac premium lot
on Crystal Meadows
Path. Municipal sewer
and water. All under-
ground utilities. $69,900
561-704-0313
HOMOSASSA
90 x 110 ft Lot, w/good
water, septic and im-
pact fee paid. $15,000
Owner financing Easy
Terms (941) 505-9287


*-^
I,,' '


Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print


/ J
* ' ''


& Online i / .
I / '

S3 J) * *X r i






(352) 563-5966


................ ........................ .............. .......................................
......................... ...................
......................................... ... ...............................................................
T !lie
.................... ................ ............................. ... .... ... ............ .... ...


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 E11


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


nowoo




You Dv7
Your Day ,









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RESTAURANT FOR LEASE
OR SALE IN INVERNESS
_111111 _1 I B I..vilrh .= ir i., hill
I nl bl i fnn ..n ll n i .li : ,: i n ,in i l i .. 1 ill e

OFFERED AT $350.000
OR $2000 + SALES TAX + NNN
Call Elias G. Knallah at 352 400 2635
flo mole inlotmation.


* h.:. 'ur.:..:.. -l ll I ai .
* IBh ; B.all. p1.1 pl'.i,

ML I = 'd."L111 $115,000
wi'irl. ciliuscountlsold. coin
Jeanne Willaid Pickiel 212 3410











ALMOST 7 ACRES
OFF HWY. 200

iii.r.., ( .1 I ri13 r...'r ir.ri 1...r I .I

M i = i_:idC:a:i $49,950
Call Ndilda Cano 352 270 0202


WATERFRONT

fnh,: ( I.:.J .ll.)m .Ji ?. I..nli I.,:lh 11,;I&
, r. hlr l .i 1- 66l 1 r h al. -, a rr pil ra di. :
Call Maitha Snidei 352 476 8727
and ask loi file =356357


H i.i.i: 1 IIII. iliill i I : b.i.i. : I m ilb :n. %:n

a, al li,, I a r,,,,I Ih. r. a ,, l. l,,,r ll lI
Priced Io sell quick! $189K
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


P. ': r. . 'u ; I IJ u I" n n '' J .l j u l . a


.I l b h i iu I n .J iJ.. .. I M l 'u l I . I .1 .
I.,.1. I_,I a'' ,i ...J I a''d ,:a b.. (I... I..

Mls = Q ')r' ASKING $97,000
Pat Davis i352/212 7280
View all stings c21paidaris corn


ih.' ., l. lh l ;/ :.;II l...l.l -i.. l.Ih '/ .. If:..
l -i ..l .. ,.. l r I, ...r ,. .l .i .I .. .|,..l. I/., h.

I .. i l.. ....o i....ne .I& I2 1 ll.
MI. = ;.:xI_ 1 $99,500
Call Dons Mine,-' 422 4627
] __ .


7 l i Ii:; l i p ih li I ... ..I
S11 vvI i ,l h . .l- '. ..-h.-i Fair..'h h.'J
_ la:l l i.-L rl I .:al.r[ .. il .:i h


MlI = 1._'' $850,000
Call Jim Motion at 352 422 2173 cell


SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACRE
* B F A I h : h- l .l l.
* I i. l i .:..:i II. .i: ..I :
* I_,.l I 1 -II" I I ll :l -.-1 1 -al l

Mi = `P.7_17 $264,500
Call Cha/les Kelly 352 422 2387


SPECTACULAR VIEWS
r.rI'I-" la:n lafii l... Ih f ii II l,; ..Ih .fi I 1,:.lai
h .ill a I r h ill i I rll.1i I. rI i ,:l ,L II


Ml = -,/'/ ASKING $72,000
Call loniame 0 Regan at 586 0075


* J ;l...lI ; ..I. A LI'

* I I: arai ..ll. ,l .1,1.h al.hii I

P..r i I. $105.000 MlN-. = :.II1
Jeanne at IIillaid Pichiel 212 3410
ivivi. CitiusCount Sold. comr


NEED LAND AND A BIG HOUSE?

H.il,: i I....l 1 1 i ,r r :.al I:. h.r .. 1 I.. I l. ,

MI_' = "'1_7 $300,000
Call Vichi Root Realloi Associate
352.212. 1926 oi housescitius,' .mail.corn


* RAP. I I I- JR P 1 F-F




MI_ = _I ") 1', $395,000
il'i'ir'. citiuscount'sold. coin
Jeanne Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


PRICED RIGHT!

r...I hI l l.. J i ,..i r i 'l ...m r .- i U ,:l ll



Ml = i ./ i ASKING $65,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072


* I lirn'ir.. .i ,:r
. llh.ll,

* 6inll "n UlU
* A 'ipl: ..,il i 1i
PRICE REDUCED S851(
OFFERED AT ON $262KI
Call Ehas G. Kiallah at 352 400 2635


INVERNESS TRIPLEX
i I,:.l.jil ql i il h I.)li IlI l :e
l h ll. .i[ i .ll h l . il ,: ... 1.h. ;.)


Mli = ':i 1:, ASKING $250,000
Call Emil lupu loit out personal lout
at 302 1713


RIVERFRONT
r,. Ill I..:.-l l 'll.l l..h l I.I,. l.' i', ll h l ,

.l... I A I I ..I . .. li I .,ll P i i.: | I., ill

= I11i11 ASKING $228,000
Pat Davis t3521212 7280


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
l,,,, ,,nnl nll- f 1 I :,Il ,l ,,,a l arinllnl .IIl,,,r,
1.r ,r ai .l _'111.11 a r .a .'' r ., l.hl rr.-rI

..l .l I r. r |.ll| I ih ll'I.l: l .arr 1. 1 .-ll. '.al' .h rll.-i
MrI= .i $75,000
David KuHiI Cel/ 954 383 8786
Olhce 352 726 6668


EXCELLENT BUY ON CLOSE-IN PROPERTY
_ o r. _ I .... ..'. lfri l rl, l i i I..
?. ..l.l..'.. ..h l .hi .. j. I ' I .ji.., il l .jh
.. ll .l l .l ll I -i rrh.. ~. r.hl i. I. '.
* I...,.] bui.l.j .... H Ill I1I1 1.. i.,:.I I V e ..il
Ml.s = '-i: ASKING 73,800
Pat Davis i352/212 7280
View all stings ,ivii, c21paidaris cornm


CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME
S bail '. ., .1l. .J l.i'.,
* I .. .I I ,l:. lr..ljl .1
* UJR IR f. R ,j.. r .. .

Mis = ;'.7\ll $204.500
Call Chal/es Ke/ll 352 422 2387


WATERFRONT!


Il lin l lh. ii.i ii .| .i l l l .. : lII.| .]i
7II. I. rrii U ji .a n a il Ir 11111 .ar

CALL TODAY. IT WON I LAST!
ONLY $84,900
Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012