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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 10-13-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02916

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Election 2012: Learn what you need to know/Ins:


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Mostly sunny and
breezy.
PAGE A4


CITRUS C 0 U NTY






ivwww.chronicleonline.com
Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


EL. C iI








VOLUME 118 ISSUE 67


Vets reunion kicks off Sunday


Overworked
Overtaxed doctors tend
to a flood of wounded
in a Syrian
hospital./Page A10
NATION:


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
A scale replica of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D.C., will be erected Sunday north
of Crystal River as part of the Nature Coast Veterans Reunion. Activities will be throughout
the week.


CRYSTAL RIVER -
Last year's first Nature
Coast Veterans Reunion
brought 10,000 military
veterans and their families
to a site north of Crystal
River during a week full of
activities and memories.
Organizers are expect-
ing at least more of the
same this year.
The reunion kicks off at
2 p.m. Sunday with "Rais-
ing of the Colors" fol-
lowed by a drill team
exhibition by the JROTC
squads from Citrus, Crys-
tal River and Lecanto
high schools.
As with last year, the re-


* What: Citrus County
Veterans Reunion.
When: Starts 2 p.m.
Sunday, runs through
the week.
Where: Holcim ranch
on U.S. 19 north of
Crystal River.
Features: Family-
oriented entertainment,
refreshments and
memorials.
Admission: Free.
Information: www.
naturecoastveterans
reunion.org

union takes place at the
Holcim ranch about


Page A2


Warning
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta said the U.S.
will strike back against
cyberthreats./Page AO10
CHANGING WAYS:


Islam in Haiti
In the wake of the
country's massive
earthquake, Islam is
gaining a foothold in the
impoverished Caribbean
nation./Page Cl
NATION:
I.-.m ..-..-I


Last mission
Space shuttle Endeavour
heads to California
Science Center./
Page A5
SPORTS:














Best drive
Citrus County girls golf
championship played at
Lakeside on
Friday./Page BI

Com ics ......... .C9
Community ...... .C7
Crossword ....... .C8
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers .. .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C9
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ...... .C10
TV Listings ....... C8


6 1IIBI 84578 20021


0 0


Spirit of volunteering


Crystal River woman

to receiveprestigious

community service award
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
ood distribution has always been a pas-
sion of hers. Averaging six hours at a
time, she organizes and prepares food
delivered to her home for distribution to local
organizations. Before she knows it, her time is
up and she runs to volunteer for another non-
profit organization in Citrus County.
A lifelong volunteer, Ruth Levins, 76, of Crys-
tal River, is receiving the 2012 AARP Florida
Andrus Award for Community Service for her
power and ability to make a difference in the
lives of citizens in Citrus County. She will re-


ceive this
award at 2
p.m. Sunday
at the Crys-
tal River
Woman's
Club, 320 N.
Citrus Ave.
According
to AARP, its
most presti-
gious and
visible
award is be-
stowed
upon indi-
viduals who
are signifi-
cantly influ-
encing the
lives of oth-
ers through


Every day, Ruth
exemplifies the spirit
of volunteer
participation by
providing information,
advocacy and her
own active example
of community service
in Citrus County.
Jeff Johnson
AARP Florida state director.


volunteer work.
"Ruth Levins is receiving this award for her
remarkable service and impact she's had on
the lives of others and on her community,"
AARP Florida State Director Jeff Johnson said.
"Every day, Ruth exemplifies the spirit of vol-
unteer participation by providing information,
advocacy and her own active example of com-
munity service in Citrus County."
See Page A4
Ruth Levins, 76, of Crystal River, is receiving the
2012 AARP Florida Andrus Award for Community
Service for making a difference in the lives of citi-
zens in Citrus County.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle






Balfour:


Room t
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER It's
time to turn it up a
notch.
Sandy Balfour has
heard all the talk
about Citrus County
being a top-rated
school district in
Florida.
She just doesn't
think that's much to Sanc
brag about. Balfl
"We definitely have room


o grow
to grow," Balfour told the
Chronicle Editorial Board
this week.
Balfour, a teacher at the
Academy of Environ-
mental Sciences, is
challenging incum-
bent Sandra "Sam"
Himmel for superin-
tendent of schools.
Balfour has taught
at all three levels of
schools and was as-
dy sistant principal at
Sur
See Page A2


Election 2012

* What: Citrus County
Superintendent of
Schools.
* Who: Democrat
incumbent Sandra
"Sam" Himmel;
Republican Sandy
Balfour.
* Term: 4 years.
* Covers: All Citrus
County.
* Pay: $117,198.
m On the ballot: Nov. 6
election.
* Info: Vsit chronicle
online.com/voters
guide.


Himmel:


Success starts


with leadership


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Results tell the story.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
has served eight years as
the Citrus County super-
intendent of schools. The
last seven, Citrus has
been an "A" rated school


district. It's
been a
high-per-
forming
district for
six straight
years and
is ex-
pected to Sam
Himmel
See .Page A2


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
87
LOW
64


I IN SI DI I





A2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


HIMMEL
Continued from Page Al

be one of a few in Florida to
reach that status again next
year.
"It's all about leadership,"
Himmel told the Chronicle
Editorial Board this week.
"Under my leadership
we've been a high perform-
ing school district."
Himmel is at the helm,
but she credits a philosophy
shared by the county's edu-
cators and support workers
that children come first.
"It's because of the heart
we have in our district," she
said. "It's all about our kids.
I believe in Citrus County. I
believe the community rep-
resents the culture of our
county."
Himmel oversees a dis-
trict of 17,000 children and
2,200 employees. She said
employees want success for
every child.
"I do believe in all kids,"



BALFOUR
Continued from Page Al

Crystal River High School
for one year. She also is a
gubernatorial appointee on
the College of Central
Florida Board of Trustees.
While the Citrus County
School District retains its
"A" grade for academic
achievement, Balfour
still sees plenty of areas
for improvement. They
include:
A lack of coordination
between elementary, mid-
dle and high schools to
streamline a student's edu-
cational progress.
Students are graduating

WATERING FINES

Effective Jan. 1, Citrus
County has stopped
issuing warnings for
first offenders of local
watering rules.
The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


she said. "It's not about our
test scores. It's about our
caring and commitment -
and it starts with me. I take
this job very personally"
Himmel served on the
school board for eight years
before being elected super-
intendent. She said that
school board experience
prepared her for budgets,
policies and mandates -
"what we can control and
don't control," she said.
Himmel's political oppo-
nent, Sandy Balfour, is a
teacher at the Academy for
Environmental Sciences.
While Balfour is also a Col-
lege of Central Florida
trustee and spent one year
as an assistant principal,
Himmel said her job re-
quires vast knowledge and
an understanding of budget
pressures.
"It would be very hard for
a teacher to come out the
classroom ... and take over
the school district with the
challenges we have from the
state," she said.

from high school and not
ready for college. While Bal-
four and Himmel disagree
on the percentage of stu-
dents taking remedial
classes as college freshmen,
Balfour said it should be im-
proved.
"Every kid counts. That's
the bottom line," she said.
The district should do a
better job of involving par-
ents in the schools. She sug-
gested developing a guide
for parents and encouraging
their involvement while
children are in the early
grades.
Opening up vacancies
by posting positions both in
and outside the school dis-
trict. Vetting of potential
candidates should be done


Asked if she would con-
sider Balfour for any future
open principal's position,
Himmel said no. Himmel
noted that Balfour asked
after a year as assistant
principal at Crystal River
High School to return to the
classroom.
"She's never asked from
that day to put her in any
type of leadership position,"
Himmel said.
Himmel disagrees with
critics who say she is out of
touch with the district. On
the contrary, Himmel said,
her decisions are based on
input from educators, par-
ents and students.
"I visit schools, I visit bus
compounds," she said. "I
care about all of us. I have
an open-door policy I've
never denied any meeting
with a parent or teacher or
union group."
Himmel knows that Bal-
four is critical of her ten-
dency to appoint principals
from within the district
rather than advertise open

by committee.
Balfour said Himmel ap-
points too many school prin-
cipals instead of conducting
broader searches.
"I really do believe in a
vetting process," she said.
"We're not getting a whole
lot of applications for the
jobs. I think competition is
good."
Balfour said her decision-
making process is research-
based.
"It all comes down to
deep, deep research involv-
ing all the stakeholders,"
she said.
She said voters shouldn't
expect her to remove Him-
mel's appointees after tak-
ing office.
"I'm not going to go in


positions. Himmel said
positing most jobs is not
necessary.
"If our schools were fail-
ing I would agree with her,"
she said.
She also has heard Bal-
four say morale is low. Him-
mel said that is a common
campaign complaint regard-
less of the position up for a
vote.
"Everybody can talk
about morale," she said.
"No one can ever be specific
when they say morale is
bad."
Himmel was asked her
opinion about whether the
superintendent's position
should be appointed or
elected. Himmel said she
supports an elected super-
intendent
"Our voters should have
the right," she said, "to de-
cide who leads our school
district."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. com.

there and clean house.
That's not what I'm going to
do," Balfour said. "You're
going to see an increase in
morale."
Balfour was also asked
whether the job of superin-
tendent should be ap-
pointed or elected.
She said an appointed su-
perintendent would widen
the field for qualified appli-
cants, though she acknowl-
edged voters prefer an
elected superintendent.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.


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REUNION
Continued from Page Al

seven miles north of Crys-
tal River on U.S. 19. The
week features entertain-
ment, food, drink and me-
morials.
Vietnam veteran Mark
Riden, life member of the
Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart, said veterans
are invited to meet at 10
a.m. Sunday at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds in In-
verness. From there, they
and sheriff's deputies will
escort the Vietnam travel-
ing wall to the Holcim
property, where its 300
panels will be attached to-
gether.
Prior to the escort, veter-
ans are invited to have a $5
pancake breakfast at Beef
O'Brady's in Inverness.
The breakfast will benefit
bringing the wall to the Na-
ture Coast.
Other memorials on site
through the week include
the Purple Heart Mural,
the Korean War Memorial
and the Moving Tribute.
The memorials are open 24
hours a day for public
viewing.
Riden said the Purple
Heart Memorial includes
the faces and names of
Florida's fallen soldiers
from 2001-11.
"It took some doing, but
it's a very beautiful memo-
rial," he said.


American
Legion Herbert
Surber Post
225 is
presenting the
reunion.

"It's a very emotional
thing when you went to
high school with somebody
and his picture's on the
wall and he's dead," Riden
said. "There's a healing
process that goes on as
people view these memori-
als."
Live entertainment com-
mences each day at 4 p.m.
Food vendors will be on
site and primitive camping
is available at $10 a night.
School children are ex-
pected to visit the site next
week for guided tours.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 is pre-
senting the reunion. It is
sponsored by Holcim
Corp., the Citrus County
Chronicle and Aaron
Weaver Chapter 776 of the
Military Order of the
Purple Heart.
The week closes at 3 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 21. JROTC
from the three high schools
will provide color guards.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. com.


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Page A3 -SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Jury convicts man of
kidnapping, burglary
It took nearly two hours
Thursday for a jury to convict
David Duncan Jr., 52, of one
count each of kidnapping with
a firearm, false imprisonment,
burglary of a dwelling and
felony battery.
On May 3, Duncan kicked
his way into the Floral City
residence of his 29-year-old
ex-girlfriend while she investi-
gated a gunshot and a knock
on the door she heard while
showering.
According to the prosecu-
tors Bill Catto and Stacia Mon-
roe Duncan severely beat the
woman and then forced her
and her toddler into a blue
Chevy Blazer and drove off.
Duncan later lost control of
his vehicle and ran over a
stop sign at the intersection
of East Gobbler Drive and
Old Floral City Road.
Authorities found the
woman and her daughter
later in Marion County at the
home of an acquaintance.
Duncan fled the state and
was caught a few days later
in South Carolina by the
Orangeburg County Sheriff's
Office, with assistance from
the U.S. Marshals Office.
Currently, Duncan is in the
county jail awaiting his sen-
tencing hearing at 2 p.m.,
Nov. 15, Catto said Friday.
Call election office for
vote-by-mail ballots
Registered voters still have
time to request a vote-by-mail
ballot for the upcoming
general election.
Eligible voters who have
not previously requested a
ballot should contact the
elections office at 352-34 1-
6740 or www.votecitrus.com,
or submit a request in writing.
Written requests must include
the voter's date of birth, sig-
nature and Citrus County res-
idence address. Vote-by-mail
ballots cannot be forwarded,
but can be mailed to a tem-
porary address if outside of
Citrus County. Voters are en-
couraged to confirm their
mailing address when re-
questing a vote-by-mail bal-
lot. Requests are fulfilled
immediately, with ballots
being mailed daily.
Voted ballots must be re-
turned to the elections office
by 7 p.m. Election Day. It will
cost 65 cents in postage to
return the ballot by mail.
Voted ballots may also be
hand-delivered to the Inver-
ness elections office or the
Meadowcrest elections office
near Crystal River.
From Saturday, Oct. 27, to
Saturday, Nov. 3, voted bal-
lots may also be hand deliv-
ered to an early-voting site at
Central Ridge Library, Crystal
Elections Office, Homosassa
Public Library or Inverness
City Hall. Voted ballots may
not be turned in at the polling
place on Election Day.
The deadline to request a
vote-by-mail ballot is
Wednesday, Oct. 31.
Register by Oct. 17
for YMCA clubs
The deadline for the sec-
ond session of Enrichment
Clubs with the Citrus County
YMCA has been extended to
Wednesday, Oct. 17. The
second session will feature
two new clubs, Ultimate Fris-
bee and Line Dancing, and
will begin the week of Oct. 22.
These dubs are offered at
most Citrus County Elementary
Schools. Full and partial schol-
arships are available and based
on a first-come, first-serve basis.
For more information, con-
tact the Citrus County YMCA
at 352-637-0132 www.ymca
suncoast.org.
Cancer fundraiser
slated for Sunday
On Sunday, Oct. 14,
Grumpy Gator's, 4828 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa, will


host a Breast Cancer Aware-
ness Month benefit. Music, a
50/50 raffle and a silent auc-
tion begin at 1 p.m.
For more information, con-
tact Grumpy Gator's at 352-
503-2064.
-From staff reports


Deadline extended for Cooter Idol


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

The deadline has been
extended and entry fees
dropped for both the Miss
Cooter Queen and Cooter
Idol contests for the 2012
Ninth Annual Great Ameri-
can Cooter Festival.


Women age 18 and older
who would like to compete
for the $1,000 prize and
Miss Cooter Queen title can
show up for an open call
Wednesday, Oct. 17, at the
Grove Downtown, 210
Tompkins St., Inverness.
Registration begins at
6:30 p.m., and the prelimi-


nary contest begins at 7.
Contestants should
wear a denim skirt or
denim shorts and heels or
boots. A Cooter Festival
tank top will be provided.
For information, call 352-
795-7625.
Likewise, singers age 18
and older who want to vie


for the $1,000 prize and
Cooter Idol title are invited
to show up Thursday, Oct.
18, at the Grove Downtown.
Registration begins at 6:30
p.m. and singing starts at 7.
For information, call 352-
795-7625.
Finals for both contests
are the following week.


Fundraising gift


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Steve and Jewel Lamb, owners of Crystal Automotive Group, flank Joanna Castle, Citrus County YMCA execu-
tive director, as they stand with the Chevrolet Corvette the Lambs donated.

Car dealership donates Chevrolet Corvette to YMCA


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County YMCA re-
cently received a 2013 Chevrolet
Corvette coupe from Steve and
Jewel Lamb of Crystal Automotive
Group. The car will be used this
fall as a fundraiser for the YMCA
through a ticket drawing.
The Citrus County YMCA is one
of 10 branches in the YMCA of the
Suncoast, headquartered in Clear-
water The Citrus County operation
currently functions as a program
branch, offering many activities
such as group exercise, sports
leagues, summer camps, after-
school clubs, and other programs
throughout the area.
"This is a great opportunity that
we have been given with the dona-
tion of the Corvette," said Joanna
Castle, executive director for the
Citrus County YMCA. "We appreci-
ate so much the generosity of the


Lambs, and know that this
fundraiser will make a difference
for our branch this year"
President and CEO of the YMCA
of the Suncoast G. Scott Goyer has
been very pleased with the in-
volvement from the Citrus County
community regarding program
participation and funding.
"We are thrilled to have a great
amount of support coming from
our local advisory board along with
many caring people across Citrus
County who are capturing the vi-
sion of the YMCA," Goyer said.
"The donation of the Corvette rep-
resents a new threshold for not
only the Citrus County branch, but
it is the first donation of its kind to
any YMCA of the Suncoast branch.
We are thankful to Steve and Jewel
Lamb for their commitment to the
YMCA and its success."
A total of 2,000 tickets in the
drawing are available for a dona-


tion of $100 per ticket All proceeds
will go to benefit the YMCA of the
Suncoast-Citrus County Branch.
The winner of the Corvette will be
announced at 1 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 15, at Crystal Chevrolet, 1035
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
The Citrus County YMCA will
have tickets available for purchase
at many area events during the
next few weeks including the
Chamber of Commerce luncheons,
the Scarecrow Festival, Cooter
Festival, Homosassa Seafood Fes-
tival, K-9 Carnival and more. Tick-
ets may also be purchased online
at donate.suncoastymca.org/citrus
corvettedrawing. Tickets are also
available for purchase directly at
the YMCA office in Beverly Hills,
3909 N. Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), from Executive Director
Joanna Castle.
For more information, call the
YMCA at 352-637-0132.


Ribbon party supports cancer research


ANDREW WELFEL
Special to the Chronicle
An unfortunate side ef-
fect of cancer treatment is
hair loss. No known cures
exist, save one.
The Rapunzel Project, an
organization dedicated to
raising funding and aware-
ness for cold cap therapy,
provides the answer Cold
caps frozen to minus 22 de-
grees Fahrenheit freeze
hair follicles and minimize
the rate chemotherapy
drugs are absorbed. This
treatment allows cancer pa-
tients to receive the
chemotherapy they need to
survive while also allowing
them to keep their hair
Niesha Walker, owner
and stylist of Eclectic Ends
Hair Studio, is hosting her
first ribbon party, a non-
profit event in support of
the Rapunzel Project and


all cancer patients. Guests
are invited to attend at
5 p.m. today at Dance Cen-
tral, 7270 S. Eastlake Drive,
Floral City. For more infor-
mation, call 352-344-2394.
Walker's calling it a rib-
bon party because the focus
is on all kinds of cancer
She said most people know
of pink ribbons associated
with breast cancer, but
nearly every form of cancer
has some sort of colored
ribbon representing it. The
ribbon party encourages all
colors and all cancers to be
represented; there's no
catering to a specific type of
cancer
People interested in at-
tending the ribbon party can
either call ahead or simply
show up on the day of the
event She said gifts will be
provided, and she's working
on putting together a draw-
ing. Gipetto's Cookie Jar and


Bakery will cater, free of
charge, for those attending.
She said she wants to cre-
ate a welcoming atmos-
phere, a time and a place
where people can share
stories and inspire one an-
other A lot of people facing
chemotherapy are scared of
the prospect of losing their
hair She said as many as 8
percent of people who need
chemotherapy opt out be-
cause that fear is so great.
Losing hair isn't about
vanity; it's about losing self-
confidence and self-esteem,
she said. It makes a person
feel weak and vulnerable.
She hopes cancer patients
will meet up at the party
and draw encouragement
from those who are facing
the same problems.
Cold cap therapy is still
undergoing clinical trials.
Hospitals do not carry them
and awareness is minimal.


She said this leaves it up to
private people and private
businesses to fund the cost.
Walker said her goal is to
raise enough money to sup-
port a cold cap freezer in
Citrus County, which cur-
rently has none. Even if
enough money isn't raised
for a freezer alone, pro-
ceeds will be sent to help
other cold cap causes, she
said. She said the benefits
of these cold caps would be
incredible for the mental
health of cancer patients.
Personal ties to the ef-
fects of cancer have driven
her passion. Her grand-
mother was diagnosed with
Leukemia. Experimental
drugs caused her to go
blind and lose her hair
'Anything to help these
people is worth it My grand-
mother would give anything
to go out in public and just
have a normal day," she said.


State BRIEF


Scott higher ed panel
weighs tuition increases
TALLAHASSEE -A higher education
task force appointed by Gov. Rick Scott
moved a step closer Friday to issuing a
range of proposals that could help change
how Florida universities are funded and
what they charge students to attend.
Members of Blue Ribbon Task Force on
State Higher Education discussed scrap-


ping an existing 15 percent annual cap on
tuition increases and replacing it with a
model based on market rates and ac-
countability measures.
State Rep. Bill Proctor, a member of the
task force, and others agreed market tu-
ition could be beneficial for Florida's uni-
versities and still within students' means.
"Not many schools are going to price
themselves out of existence," he said.
Scott vetoed legislation in April that


would have let Florida and Florida State
exceed the 15 percent cap, saying he
wanted a more detailed plan to make sure
students get a return on their investment.
Florida universities have among the lowest
tuition in the nation, though it has increased in
recent years as state funding has declined. In
order for university board of trustees to go be-
yond the cap, the Legislature would need to
give up its tuition-setting authority.
-From wire reports


Proposals


outlined


for


Chamber

Both sides of

Amendment 4

discussed
PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
With No. 4 out front as the
most controversial of the 11
proposed amendments to
the state Constitution, the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce made sure mem-
bers heard both sides of the
issue.
At Friday's chamber
lunch, members heard from
Carolyn Johnson, assistant
campaign manager at Yes
on Amendment 4 Campaign,
and Cragin Mosteller, direc-
tor of communications for
the Florida Association of
Counties.
Johnson said thatAmend-
ment 4 was sponsored by
state Rep. Chris Dorworth,
R-Lake Mary and state Sen.
Mike Fasano, R-New Port
Richey, and would need 60
percent of the vote to pass.
She said Amendment 4
does three things: first, it
gives an additional home-
stead exemption for first-
time homebuyers; second, it
lowers the non-homestead
exemption cap from 10 per-
cent to 5 percent and has
the potential to stop recap-
ture. Third, there is an
additional homestead ex-
emption for first-time home-
buyers equal to 50 percent
of the homestead's value.
"We are trying to make
things fairer for businesses
and rentals," she said, "and
authorize the Legislature to
fix recapture." Recapture is
when homeowners face
high property taxes even as
their property value
declines.
"It puts more money in
your pocket," Johnson said.
"It limits the expansion of
government."
She cited an analysis of
Amendment 4 done by
Florida Tax Watch, a non-
partisan research institute.
It estimated the amendment
could help create an addi-
tional 20,000 jobs and stim-
ulate the sales of 313,000
homes.
"It's not only good for the
housing market," Johnson
said, "it is good for the
homeowner ...it puts more
money in your pocket"
Mosteller argued that
Amendment 4 is not only
just for the first-time home-
buyer but also for the first-
time homesteader
"If you haven't home-
steaded in the state of
Florida for the last three
years, you qualify for this 50
percent tax break," Mosteller
said. "So if I winter here for
15 years, I can live here for
six months and a day and get
my 50 percent tax break
"The burden on full-time
residents will go up and the
burden on snowbirds will
drop."
Mosteller said counties
are going to have two
choices if the amendment
passes: they are either going
to have to raise taxes or
lower services.
She questioned the esti-
mated job creation, saying
the 20,000 news jobs would
work out to about 15 new
jobs a year in Citrus County
if every promise is kept.
"I don't think the impact (in
jobs) is going to be that large,"
she said, "as much as the im-
pact to your bottom line."
She said Amendment 4
actually would cost Citrus
County about $2.8 million
over four years.
County Commissioner Re-
becca Bays pointed out that
the county has been running


a $7 million deficit for about
four years. "If we do this, we
will have to raise the mill-
age," she said.
Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty can be reached at
352-564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.











Woman arrested in connection with burglaries


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer

A Beverly Hills woman is
facing charges of stealing a
purse from Applebee's and
multiple gas sta-
tions and then using
stolen credit cards
from those purses to -
make purchases,
according to the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's
Office.
Kerri Lee
O'Brien, 32, Melissa Ke
Drive, was arrested
Tuesday on charges faceshr
of two counts of bur-
glary, two counts of petit
theft, grand theft and utter-
ing a forged instrument. Her
bond was $21,500.
According to her arrest af-
fidavits, a victim reported




AWARD
Continued from Page Al

Volunteering in Citrus
County for 52 years, Levins
serves approximately 14 dif-
ferent nonprofit and non-
partisan organizations in
Citrus County. She limits her
volunteering, though, to
nonprofit organizations that
are run by fellow volunteers.
In addition, Levins writes
two weekly columns for the
Citrus County Chronicle.
She defined a volunteer as a
person who influences the
lives of others through posi-
tive measures.
"Volunteers take one day
at a time, alleviating regrets
of the past, or fears of the fu-
ture, as they follow through
with positive thoughts and
actions," said Levins in her
Sept 26 column featured in


r


her purse was stolen while
she was working at Apple-
bee's. She stored her purse
at a resting position near
the side of the "to go" door.
An investigation revealed
that O'Brien had
used the victim's
One's Wells Fargo
Visa card at the Wal-
Mart Murphy's gas
* station in Inverness
and again at
Marathon gas station
in Hernando. Her
rien child support card
was also used at a
ules Wal-Mart in Ocala.
Winn Dixie's store
manager reviewed the store
video surveillance and re-
vealed that O'Brien had
used the victim's EBT card
to make purchases while ac-
companied by a small male


the Crystal River Current.
She derives her columns
off a positive word and then
concludes with a list of vol-
unteering opportunities in
the community.
Levins said her main mes-
sage is to inform others of
how gratifying volunteering is
and it is an expression of love.
"Spread the word of how
beautiful and rewarding it is
to be a volunteer," Levins
said.
She became interested in
volunteering when, as an el-
ementary schoolteacher,
she noticed a volunteer pro-
gram begin in her school.
The program showed her
the empowerment that vol-
unteering can have on a
person's life.
Furthermore, Levins has
never driven a vehicle.
While in college, she was di-
agnosed with a detached
retina, which led to blind-


child with her, it was re-
ported.
A deputy proceeded to
the Wal-Mart in Ocala,
where the victim's card had
reportedly been used, and
made contact with the loss-
prevention officer. Surveil-
lance video was also
obtained and revealed that
a young woman fitting
O'Brien's description with a
young male child during the
transaction. Furthermore,
the surveillance also
matched the tattoo on the
back of her neck.
They were observed leav-
ing the premises in a small
white SUV
On Sept. 6, surveillance
showed that a small white
SUV circled the parking lot
of the Murphy's gas station in
Inverness. After the victim


ness in her left eye. How-
ever, she does not let the af-
fliction be a roadblock in
her volunteerism.
Furthermore, she is very
grateful to her friends who
supply her with transporta-
tion to and from clubs,
church groups and other or-
ganizations. Levins knows
she could not have earned
this award on her own.
"You don't get an award
like this alone," Levins said.
She also credits other vol-
unteers, workers and peo-
ple she has met over the
years for influencing her
life and mission.
When receiving news of
her award, she was over-
whelmed.
"I was flabbergasted when
I found out that I won," said
Levins. "I'm here in tiny
Crystal River. I was thinking
about bigger communities
like Miami, Jacksonville or


exited her vehicle and pro-
ceeded to the cashier's
stand, O'Brien pulled the
white SUV next to the vic-
tim's vehicle, the report
states. She opened the pas-
senger door of the victim's
vehicle, removed two purses,
entered back into the white
SUV and drove away
O'Brien proceeded the
next day to take the small
male child with her to
Sweetbay grocery store in
Inverness to write one of the
victim's checks for a pur-
chase. She also used the vic-
tim's checks to make more
purchases in Dunnellon and
Ocala.
According to reports, on
Oct 3, O'Brien waited for an-
other victim to walk into the
Racetrac gas station in Inver-
ness when she entered the


Tampa. They must have a lot
of volunteers."
Whether in tiny Crystal
River or not, she is recognized
for the influences she has im-
pressed upon Citrus County
Among her accomplish-
ments, Levins has played
notable roles in the estab-
lishment of Seven Rivers
Community Hospital, the
expanded Key Training


victim's vehicle and removed
approximately $75, the vic-
tim's driver's license, Social
Security card and other mis-
cellaneous paperwork
The next day, O'Brien re-
moved motorcycle riding
gloves and paperwork from
another victim's vehicle.
She'd exited a store and
proceeded to the victim's
driver-side vehicle door.
The victim noticed the
dome light inside the vehi-
cle was illuminated. A short
time later the dome light
went off and O'Brien was
observed behind the vic-
tim's vehicle and leaving the
scene.
Last Tuesday, a deputy no-
ticed O'Brien's vehicle sway-
ing all over the road and
then a traffic stop was initi-
ated. However, O'Brien's


Center, the Citrus County
Library System, Seven
Rivers Golf and Country
Club and other community
landmarks. She is also a
member of First United
Methodist Church in Crystal
River, where she teaches
Sunday school.
She has kind words for
Bill and Diane Micklone,
Citrus County retired edu-


boyfriend was the only occu-
pant in the vehicle.
He gave the detective per-
mission to search the vehi-
cle. Upon the search, the
detective found three hats
that were observed in the
backseat that had matched
the hats that O'Brien had
been wearing on surveil-
lance video. O'Brien's
friend said the hats were his
and his girlfriend had bor-
rowed them.
After that traffic stop,
deputies proceeded to
O'Brien's residence where
O'Brien was accompanied
by the young child.
O'Brien denied involve-
ment with the deputy's al-
legations. She was arrested
and transported to the Cit-
rus County Detention
Facility


cators, who wrote up her re-
sume and sent it to AARP
She is very grateful to them.
For more information
about Levins' receipt of the
AARP award, call Amy Ma-
tovina at 727-592-8010.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington at
352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online. com.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
C i llil ..'llld
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
pc
pc
s
pc
s
PC
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
76 pc
63 s
68 s
68 pc
71 s
62 s
71 s
75 s
77 pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
86 62 0.00 86 62 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 87 Low: 64
Mostly sunny and breezy.

S ........... SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING

High: 89 Low: 67
Partly cloudy with a 10% chance of a PM
shower.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 65
Partly cloudy with a 10% chance of a PM
.. ... shower.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 86/60
Record 94/55
Normal 86/62
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 4.40 in.
Total for the year 58.91 in.
Normal for the year 46.21 in.
*As of 7 pro. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p m. 30.15 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 45
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, Elm, Grasses
Today's count: 7.6/12
Sunday's count: 7.9
Monday's count: 7.8
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


61

%


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/13 SATURDAY 3:54 10:06 4:19 10:31
10/14 SUNDAY 4:40 10:53 5:06 11:20
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 7:02 PM
Sc S SUNRISE TOMORROW .
0 O O 4 MOONRISE TODAY.....................5:27 A.M.
OCT. 15 OC1.21 T. 29 NU. MOONSET TODAY ............................5:40 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fi re weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:33 a/12:20 a 5:06 p/12:41 p
Crystal River* 2:54 a/10:03 a 3:27 p/1024 p
Withlacoochee* 1241 a/7:51 a 1:14 p/8:12 p
Homosassa'** 3:43 a/11:40 a 4:16 p/--


"'At Mason s Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
5:06 a/1:02a 5:55 p/1:25 p
3:27 a/10:47 a 4:16 p/11:04 p
1:14 a/8:35 a 2:03 p/8:52 p
4:16 a/12:01 a 5:05 p/12:24 p


Northeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters ,-ill have a moderate chop.
Mostly sunny skies today.


Gulf water
temperature


80
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.91 32.91 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 39.08 39.08 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 40.26 40.26 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.73 41.73 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
anual flood which has a 43-precen t chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


-"* Seam
/ __

1*70s
a- i0


o :. B


20s

A *
*0s


50S




SEl P


Honol
87/73
80s


m ili 50s
SngDw nJ
IW[F* S -



Ch o


Ho.son I


-- -


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 84 63 pc 86 71
New York City 56 48 s 56 51
Norfolk 68 45 s 65 50
Oklahoma City 75 67 .08 ts 80 55
Omaha 58 33 ts 76 51
Palm Springs 79 55 s 90 64
Philadelphia 62 45 s 57 47
Phoenix 76 65 s 83 64
Pittsburgh 54 42 pc 66 53
Portland, ME 53 41 04 pc 53 43
Portland, Ore 54 48 45 r 62 53
Providence, RI 58 40 01 s 53 42
Raleigh 73 44 s 66 45
Rapid City 72 29 pc 68 47
Reno 76 52 .05 pc 72 44
Rochester, NY 48 36 15 r 56 51
Sacramento 63 54 pc 79 56
St. Louis 66 50 c 83 65
St. Ste Manrie 44 28 .13 r 46 44
Salt Lake City 63 50 .04 pc 65 47
San Antonio 86 73 ts 84 72
San Diego 71 60 45 s 73 63
San Francisco 64 55 02 pc 70 55
Savannah 78 56 s 77 58
Seattle 57 48 03 r 59 52
Spokane 64 41 c 63 47
Syracuse 55 38 .37 r 54 47
Topeka 59 51 ts 77 52
Washington 67 46 s 63 50
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 97 McAllen, Texas LOW 14 Benson,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES


Friday Saturday
City H L Pcp.Fcst H L
Albany 52 41 04 pc 51 42
Albuquerque 79 57 s 68 45
Asheville 70 44 s 64 45
Atlanta 75 61 pc 74 52
Atlantic City 65 44 s 59 49
Austin 87 68 ts 84 71
Baltimore 67 39 s 61 48
Billings 76 32 pc 68 47
Birmingham 82 58 pc 81 62
Boise 76 50 pc 67 42
Boston 54 46 03 s 55 46
Buffalo 47 41 05 r 56 53
Burlington. VT 50 38 .03 c 51 40
Charleston. SC 81 51 s 76 57
Charleston, WV 64 36 pc 73 56
Charlotte 76 44 s 66 46
Chicago 53 37 Is 66 64
Cincinnati 61 39 pc 74 59
Cleveland 52 45 sh 64 61
Columbia SC 81 50 s 73 47
Columbus, OH 58 42 pc 73 60
Concord, N.H 53 39 01 pc 53 39
Dallas 86 70 ts 82 66
Denver 68 34 .02 c 66 43
Des Moines 62 38 ts 74 55
Detroit 54 37 sh 58 58
El Paso 89 63 s 79 52
Evansville. IN 70 50 19 pc 79 67
Harrisburg 57 37 s 56 43
Hartford 56 43 03 s 54 42
Houston 89 70 c 89 74
Indianapolis 59 43 c 76 62
Jackson 85 58 pc 88 65
LasVegas 67 54 s 76 65
Little Rock 71 58 04 pc 83 65
Los Angeles 71 55 s 72 61
Louisville 68 47 pc 76 65
Memphis 75 60 pc 86 68
Milwaukee 50 34 ts 63 60
Minneapolis 53 28 ts 66 47
Mobile 85 58 pc 86 66
Montgomery 87 57 pc 85 62
Nashville 62 55 1 12 pc 77 61
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
92012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


SATURDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 89/77/ts
Amsterdam 51/41/sh
Athens 79/68/pc
Beijing 71/43/pc
Berlin 57/41/pc
Bermuda 77/72/ts
Cairo 87/71/s
Calgary 57/35/sh
Havana 86/73/ts
Hong Kong 86/75/pc
Jerusalem 83/65/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


71/57/pc
58/38/pc
75/52/pc
74/54/ts
46/42/c
44/34/c
58/45/r
76/66/sh
71/58/s
69/56/pc
72/60/pc
52/45/sh
54/40/sh


C I T R U S.


C O U N T Y


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CHRONICLE
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TompkinsSt. g square
0 8 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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I-


A4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


William
Nelson, 90
HERNANDO
William Robert Nelson,
90, of Hernando, died
Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. He
was born July 27, 1922, in
Hoquiam,
Wash., the
son of Victor
and Elsie
(Baumgart-
ner) Nelson.
SHe grew up
in Everett,
Wash.,
William where he
Nelson thrived in
the out-
doors of the great North-
west. He was a longtime
resident of Warrington, Fla.
At the time of his death, he
was a resident of Woodland
Terrace, Hernando, Fla.,
where he retired to take
care of his beloved wife
"Lete". "Mr. Bill" had many
friends during retirement in
and around the
Hernando/Inverness
community.
Bill professed his faith in
Christ and the assurance of
the resurrection through
our Lord Jesus. He was a
faithful Lutheran and long-
time member of Redeemer
Lutheran Church in War-
rington, Fla., and supported
the Lutheran elementary
school.
In high school, Bill en-
listed in the Washington
National Guard and then
became a private first class,
161st Regiment, 41st In-
fantry Division, Fort Lewis,
Wash. In 1941, prior to
WWII, he enlisted in the
Navy as an aircraft me-
chanic and served with
honor in many combat ac-
tions in the Pacific as a petty
officer (AMM2) aboard the
USS WASP CV-18. His com-
mendations included Amer-
ican Theatre Defense,
American Defense, Asiatic
Pacific, Good Conduct, Vic-
tory, Washington National
Guardsman and Navy Unit
Commendation. Bill also
served in Pensacola where
he met and married Alice
Aletha Conquest, his wife of
65 years, raising her two
children, Carolyn Conquest
Snyder Drew and George
William Conquest as his
own.
After the war, Pop, as his
grandchildren know him,
was employed by Naval Air
Station Pensacola as an air-
craft mechanic. With more
than 37 years of federal
service, he worked as a mas-
ter mechanic on various
types of aircraft and heli-
copters. In this capacity, he
became a member of the
team that maintained the
fierce MH-53 Pave Low for
Air Force Special Opera-
tions.
Pop was the strong-loving
center for the family and
saw his children and grand-
children had all they
needed. He lovingly opened
his home to his mother-in-
law and mother and took
care of them throughout
their retirement. He sup-
ported his extended family


through many challenges
and was always there when
needed. He was a fun-loving
outdoors type and took all of
the family on many trips
and vacations.
Bill was preceded in
death by his parents, Victor
and Elsie Nelson; his wife,
"Lete;" and his daughter,
Carolyn. He is survived by
his son, George William
Conquest (Kathie); and was
"Paw-Paw" to five grand-
children, Donnie (Terri),
Scott (Cheryl), Susan
(Paule), Lisa (Galan) and
Kim (Scott); 15 great-grand-
children, Melissa, Shannon,
Jarred, Laura, Justine,
Samantha, Jordan, Caroline
and Katelyn, Jahn Nicole,
Jorje, Ashton, Benjamin,
Jordan, and Makaya; and
five great-great grandchil-
dren, Ethan, Logan, Ad-
dyson, Knox and Elliette.
He is also survived by
beloved niece, Edith Sinnott
Rogers, and nephew,
Thomas Sinnott.
We would like to thank
the wonderful caregivers
from Woodland Terrace and
Hospice of Citrus County for
their loving kindness. The
family asks in lieu of flow-
ers, donations be made to
the Redeemer Lutheran
School, Warrington, Florida
or Hospice of Citrus County
(www. hospiceofc i tr-
uscounty.org).
Funeral services will be
at 12 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
17, 2012, at Bayview Fisher-
Pou Chapel, 3351 Scenic
Highway, Pensacola. Visita-
tion with the family starts at
11 a.m. Fisher Pou-Dignity
will be in charge of arrange-
ments.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Susan
Cassella, 58
INVERNESS
Susan Cassella, 58, Inver-
ness, died Saturday, Sept.
29, 2012, at Citrus Memorial
hospital. Susan was born
April 8, 1954, in Brooklyn,
N.Y, to John and Clarice
Harper.
She is survived by her
husband, Vito Cassella; son,
David Dittell of California;
father, John Harper; sisters,
Ann Lukin of Margaretville,
N.Y, and Patricia Terwil-
leger, Brooklyn, N.Y She
was preceded in death by
her mother, Clarice Harper
Private arrangements are
under the care of Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

* Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of arrangements.

616. E. bar
Funeral Home With Crematory
GORDON THOMPSON
Private Arrangements
CLAIRE PERKINS
Private Arrangements
THOMAS LEE, II
Arrangements Pending
RUTH PERRY
Private Arrangements
CIRINO DIPIETRO
Private Arrangements
ALBERT FESTA
Service: Later in Palm Beach
726-8323 ..CTA5


Adition aae KthnI ah


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11920 N.Florida Ave. (Hwy 41), Cits Springs* Mile south of Dunnellon L_


Thomas
Lee II, 38
INVERNESS
Thomas Bruce Lee II, 38,
Inverness, died Monday,
Oct. 8, 2012 as the result of a
motorcycle accident. Tom
was born
J (March 23,
1974, in
Strouds-
burg, Pa., to
Thomas B.
SLee Sr and
Susan
(Mackenzie)
Thomas Lee. Tom
Leell proudly
served our
country as a U.S. Marine, re-
ceiving the rank of lance
corporal. He enjoyed every-
thing "Marine:" Semper Fi.
OORAH! Thomas enjoyed
his work as a cook in various
restaurants. He was a loving
father to his children and a
free spirit.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his children, Tommy
Lee III (Rachel) and their
unborn child, Jazmine Lee
and Adam Lee; mother,
Susan Lee (Jay Watson) all
of Inverness; his former
wife and mother of his chil-
dren, Carrie Connelly (Cory
Beachler); brothers, Gre-
gory (Katie) Lee, Inverness,
Jeffrey (Allison) Lee, Lutz,
Steven (Sherry) Lee, Inver-
ness; nephew and nieces,
twins Logan and Lexi and
Leslie. He will be deeply
missed by all. He was pre-
ceded in death by his father,
Thomas Lee Sr. in 1995.
A celebration of Tom's life
will be announced at a later
date. Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Arline
Rodarmer, 71
BROOKSVILLE
Arline Rodarmer, 71, of
Brooksville, died Tuesday,
Aug. 27,2012.
Visitation is from 3 to 4
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18,2012,
at Brooksville Chapel with a
memorial service to follow
at 4 p.m.
Brewer & Sons, 352-
796-4991, is in charge of
arrangements.
* U.S. flags denote mili-
tary service on local
obituaries.


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 8-5
Sat. 9-1prn

...... n- 1 1


Jackie 'Nanna'
Coon, 70
INGLIS
Jackie Ann "Nanna"
Coon, 70, of Inglis, Fla.,
passed away Thursday, Oct
11, 2012, at HPH Hospice
Care Center in Lecanto. She
was born March 13, 1942, in
Delhi, La., to Jack Ernest
and Eva Loraine (Shepard)
King. She came here 20
years ago from West Mon-
roe, La. She was a retired
manager of the Northwood
Estates Mobile Home Park
in Inglis. She enjoyed play-
ing BINGO and POGO, the
computer game, and she en-
joyed socializing with peo-
ple and she never knew a
stranger. She was a member
of the First Baptist Church
of Inglis.
Surviving are her two
sons, Robert Coe of North
Carolina and Steven Coe
(Sharon) of Baytown, Texas;
two daughters, Sandy Case
(Edward) and Angela Dosal
(James), all of Inglis; mother,
Eva Loraine King of Crystal
River; brother, Ernest
Wayne King (Evon) of Ber-
nice, La.; eight grandchil-
dren, Kelsie, Matthew,
Alexis, Victoria, Caleb,
Robin, Jonathan and Jessie;
and one great-grandson,
Brantley
A celebration of her life
will be at 1 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 20, 2012, at the Aurora
Acres Mobile Home Park in
Inglis, lot No. 2. The family
suggests in lieu of flowers
those who wish may make a
memorial contribution in
her name to the American
Cancer Society. Strickland
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory assisted the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free
and paid obituaries.
Additional days of pub-
lication or reprints due
to errors in submitted
material are charged at
the same rates.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


pm

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--1 Ui ed --S l as- -
I *--Uited Slates a


Associated Press
China Eastern Airlines jet flies near the space shuttle
Endeavour on Friday in Los Angeles. Rolled on a 160-
wheeled carrier, it left from a hangar at the Los Angeles
International Airport, passing diamond-shaped "Shuttle
Xing" signs, and reached city streets about two hours later.


Space shuttle


makes final trip


over streetlights and its
wings spanning the road-
way.
It made stop-and-go
progress, with some halts to
check its balance and to
prune trees in its path as it
crept past strip malls and
storefronts.
In a massive feat of paral-
lel parking, the shuttle was
backed into a shopping cen-
ter parking lot in the
Westchester neighborhood
around 5:30 a.m. later
than expected.
Janet Dion, a family ther-
apist from nearby Manhat-
tan Beach, was in awe as
she marveled at Endeavour,
its sides weathered by mil-
lions of miles in space and
two dozen re-entries.
"You can sense the mag-
nitude of where it's been,"
Dion said, focusing on the
heat tiles that protected the
shuttle during the return to
Earth.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com
Coing imeoainga-
L s4daspiort rndae


RA0035171
ER0005952


ALICIA CHANG
AP Science Writer

LOS ANGELES -At its
prime, the space shuttle
Endeavour circled the
globe at 17,500 mph, faster
than a speeding bullet
In retirement, it's crawl-
ing along the streets of Los
Angeles at a sluggish 2
mph, a pace that rush-
hour commuters can sym-
pathize with.
Endeavour's two-day,
12-mile road trip to the
California Science Center
where it will be put on dis-
play kicked off early Fri-
day. Rolled on a
160-wheeled carrier, it left
from a hangar at the Los
Angeles International Air-
port, passing diamond-
shaped "Shuttle Xing"
signs, and reached city
streets about two hours
later.
Hundreds of spectators,
some with pajama-clad
children in tow, waited in
the predawn darkness. In
unison, they held up their
cameras and cellphones
and gaped as the 170,000-
pound Endeavour inched
by with its tail towering

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 A5







A6 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


I IHwT E H ",' fIfiT is


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1483341 9.12 -.22 Vringo 64107 4.78 +.01 Clearwire 1092337 2.32 +.10 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
SprintNex 1270894 5.73 -.03 VantageDrl 31705 1.94 +.07 SiriusXM 552001 2.78 +.05 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
S&P500ETF1089558142.89 -.47 GoldStrg 26877 2.04 -.02 Intel 454892 21.48 -.20 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDR Fncl 715475 15.81 -.22 CheniereEn 22346 15.73 -.13 Microsoft 441963 29.20 +.25 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
AMD 655137 2.74 -.46 NovaGldg 17476 5.01 -.16 Cisco 267028 18.41 +.14 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Ch- %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
iP LXR1K 82.50 +25.27 +44.2 eMagin 4.26 +.43 +11.2 NPS Phm 10.86 +1.73 +19.0 ing qualification. n -Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
Envestnet 13.54 +1.16 +9.4 TellnstEl 3.89 +.24 +6.6 GluMobile 3.37 +.48 +16.6 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
Kngswyrs 4.30 +.28 +7.0 IncOpR 3.88 +.22 +6.0 Aegerion 15.96 +1.98 +14.2 Holder owesinstallments of purchase price. rt- Rightto buy security ata specified price. s-
BarcShtC 16.00 +1.00 +6.7 MGTCap rs 3.27 +.17 +5.5 TranS1 2.95 +.36 +13.9 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
NeoPhoton 5.82 +.36 +6.6 SynthBiol 2.22 +.09 +4.2 CrumbBke 2.84 +.34 +13.6 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
AMD 2.74 -.46 -14.4 MeetMe 3.25 -.25 -7.1 AEtern grs 2.43 -.69 -22.1
OvShip 5.08 -.80 -13.6 ImmunoCII 2.50 -.14 -5.3 Travelzoo 20.02 -3.48 -14.8
WbstFnwt 7.70 -1.05 -12.0 Vringowt 2.68 -.14 -5.0 DigCinen 4.86 -.74 -13.2
SunTrwtA 6.10 -.80 -11.6 GoldRsvg 3.16 -.13 -4.0 Sareptars 27.11 -3.62 -11.8 52-Week Net % YT[
CSVS2xPall45.14 -5.31 -10.5 PacBkrMg 3.91 -.16 -3.9 XenoPort 10.65 -1.26 -10.6 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ct


DIARY


1,101 Advanced
1,873 Declined
147 Unchanged
3,121 Total issues
80 New Highs
15 New Lows
3,054,609,882 Volume


DIARY


172 Advanced
248 Declined
28 Unchanged
448 Total issues
5 New Highs
5 New Lows
57,592,113 Volume


817
1,611
132
2,560
42
46
1,519,317,240


13,661.72 11,104.56Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 4,365.98Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 422.90Dow Jones Utilities
8,515.60 6,844.16NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,094.30Amex Index
3,196.93 2,441.48Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,158.15S&P500
15,432.54 12,085.12Wilshire 5000
868.50 664.58Russell 2000


13,328.85
5,044.63
475.48
8,227.08
2,425.97
3,044.11
1,428.59
14,917.94
823.09


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


+2.46 +.02 +9.10 +14.46
+44.17 +.88 +.50 +7.53
-3.09 -.65 +2.32 +8.37
-29.51 -.36+10.03+11.93
-5.63 -.23 +6.48+10.95
-5.30 -.17 +16.85+14.10
-4.25 -.30 +13.60 +16.66
-52.72 -.35 +13.10 +16.09
-6.69 -.81 +11.09+15.53


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK0 STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BeoSantSA 7.24 -.22
BcoSBrasil 7.32 +.01
BkofAm 9.12 -.22
BkMontg 59.65 -.30
ABBLtd 18.89 +.08 BkNYMel 22.84 -.55
ADTCpn 36.48 +.03 Barday 14.78 -.04
AESCorp 10.61 -.09 BariPVixrs 35.38 +.37
AFLAC 48.14 -.15 BarnesNob 15.22 -.79
AGL Res 40.13 -.52 BarrickG 39.02 -.89
AK Steel 5.20 -.16 Baxter 60.69 -.27
AOL 36.77 +1.06 Beam Inc 56.80 +.27
ASA Gold 24.16 -.27 BeazerH rs 16.90 -.75
AT&T Inc 35.63 -.63 BectDck 76.62 -.41
AbtLab 69.28 -.14 BerkHaA132501.98-511.01
AberFitc 32.96 -.57 BerkH B 88.25 -.46
Accenture 69.42 ... BestBuy 17.66 -.18
AdamsEx 11.30 +.05 BioMedR 19.08 +.01
AMD 2.74 -.46 BIkHillsCp 35.12 -.02
AecomTch 21.01 -.07 BlkDebtStr 4.25 -.02
Aeropostf 12.92 -.24 BlkEnhC&l 13.04 +.01
Aetna 43.25 -.04 BIkGlbOp 13.73 -.14
Agilent 37.22 -.41 Blackstone 14.94 +.45
Agnicog 51.50 -1.15 BlockHR 16.92 -.04
AlcatelLuc 1.00 -.01 Boeing 71.85 +1.02
Alcoa 8.69 -.08 Boise Inc 9.06 +.01
AllegTch 31.42 -.30 BorgWarn 66.57 -.29
Allergan 92.26 -.26 BostBeer 106.85 +1.53
Allete 41.24 -.35 BostProp 108.98 -.47
AlliBGIbHi 15.57 -.01 BostonSci 5.57 -.01
AlliBlnco 8.61 +.05 BoydGm 6.50 -.11
AlliBern 15.97 +.06 Brinker 33.05 -.36
Allstate 40.61 -.21 BrMySq 33.09 +.14
AlphaNRs 7.88 -.67 BrkfidOfPr 16.00 -.13
AIpAIerMLP 16.67 ... Brunswick 23.25
Altria 33.12 +.41 Buckeye 48.03 +.23
AmBev 39.72 -.32 BungeLt 68.56 +.04
Ameren 32.60 -.20 BurgerKn 14.50 -.17
AMovilL 25.82 +.03 CBREGrp 18.82 -.23
AmAdxle 11.75 -.32 CBSB 33.77 -.06
AEagleOut 21.54 -.25 CH Engy 64.72 -.09
AEP 44.12 -.12 CNOFind 9.58 -.19
AmExp 57.89 -.58 CSSInds 20.02 -.32
AmlntGrp 35.46 -.22 CSX 21.31 +.15
AmSIP3 7.56 +.03 CVS Care 47.08 -.52
AmTower 72.17 +.50 CYS Invest 13.27 -.24
Amerigas 44.51 +.61 CblvsnNY 16.91 +.18
Ameriprise 55.96 -.87 CabotOGs 43.86 -.49
AmeriBrgn 39.50 +.03 CalDive 1.34 +.01
Amphenol 58.57 +.07 CallGolf 6.27
Anadarko 69.18 +.21 Calpine 17.48 -.40
AnglogldA 34.28 -.10 Camecog 19.07 -.13
ABInBev 86.82 -.10 Cameron 53.22 -.87
Annaly 16.04 -.07 CampSp 34.68 -.20
Anworth 6.20 -.10 CdnNRsgs 30.83 +.12
Aon plc 53.19 +.03 CapOne 58.21 -.68
Apache 85.33 -.64 CapifiSrce 7.73 -.02
Aptlnv 25.45 +.02 CapM plB 15.60 -.09
AquaAm 24.79 -.08 CapsteadM 12.43 -.19
ArcelorMit 14.82 -.16 CardnlHIth 40.89 -.02
ArchCoal 7.62 -.32 CarMax 32.55 +1.30
ArchDan 28.05 +.02 Carnival 36.76 -.11
ArmourRsd 7.20 -.15 Caterpillar 82.82 -.03
ArrowB 32.58 -.04 Celanese 35.31 -.34
Ashland 68.90 -.56 Cemex 8.83 -.03
AsdEstat 14.58 -.11 Cemigpfs 12.23 -.02
AssuredG 14.15 -.15 CenterPnt 21.13 -.05
AstraZen 46.13 +.31 CenEIBras 5.75 -.03
ATMOS 35.68 -.27 Cntyink 39.06 -.12
AuRicog 7.18 -.38 Checkpnt 7.99 -.15
Avnet 27.01 -.27 ChesEng 20.18 +.04
Avon 17.11 -.20 ChesUfi 48.40 -.01
BB&TCp 32.34 -.86 Chevron 112.07 -.99
BHP BilILt 68.34 -.28 ChicB&l 38.26 +.02
BPPLC 41.84 -.28 Chicos 18.13 -.34
BRFBrasil 18.13 +.01 Chimera 2.58 -.08
BRT 6.72 +.09 ChKanghui 30.66 +.36
BakrHu 44.77 +.12 ChinaMble 54.28 -.15
BallCorp 41.31 -.20 Chubb 76.99 -.73
BcoBrad pf 15.36 -.11 Cigna 49.71 -.43


CindBell 5.46 -.08 Dynegyn 18.01 +.62 Ruor 56.39 -.48 Hanesbrds 31.97 -.34 iSSP500 143.41 -.61
Cifgroup 34.75 -.77 DynexCap 9.60 -.27 FootLockr 34.80 +.15 Hanoverlns 38.26 -.43 iShEMkts 41.27 -.13
CleanHarb 47.67 +.06 EMCCp 25.64 -.04 FordM 10.12 -.02 HarleyD 41.42 -.37 iShiBxB 122.75 +.14
CliffsNRs 40.50 -.48 EOG Res 108.78 -1.05 ForestOil 8.82 -.01 HarmonyG 8.05 -.10 iShB20T 123.97 +.31
Clorox 73.81 +.03 EastChem 54.25 -.47 Fortress 4.15 -.05 Harriscorp 48.84 -2.01 iS Eafe 53.17 -.06
Coach 53.71 -.72 Eaton 44.97 +.32 FMCG 40.14 -.61 HartfdFn 21.33 -.17 iShiBxHYB 92.51 +.16
CobaltlEn 20.60 -.49 EatnVan 27.98 -.48 Fusion-io 29.89 +.02 HatterasF 26.54 -.51 iShMtg 14.48 -.19
CCFemsa 132.63 +.89 EVEnEq 11.12 -.03 HawaiiEl 26.01 -.26 iSR1KV 72.01 -.47
CocaColas 38.23 +.12 Ecolab 66.24 +2.57 HItCrREIT 59.04 -.35 iSR1KG 65.90 -.07
CocaCE 31.49 -.20 Edisonlnt 46.59 -.15 GATX 42.89 -.08 HItMgmt 7.64 -.04 iShR2K 82.10 -.67
Coeur 28.92 -.50 EducRty 10.21 GabelliET 5.54 +.01 HIthcrRlty 23.09 -.14 iShREst 63.95 -.28
CohStlnfra 18.42 +.03 EdwLfSci 87.10 +.92 GabHIthW 9.27 -.05 Heckmann 4.10 +.05 iShDJHm 19.35 -.08
ColgPal 107.89 -.14 Ban 11.12 +.37 GabUDI 7.94 +.10 HeclaM 6.44 -.20 iStar 8.37 -.08
Comerica 30.89 -.68 _
CmwREIT 14.72 -.47
ComstkRs 20.03 -.34 -
Con-Way 28.21 +.38
ConAgra 27.94 +.09
ConchoRes 91.46 -1.53
ConocPhils 56.17 -.46 www.hroncleonImne.com
ConsolEngy 35.14 -.34
ConEd 59.83 -.34
ConstellA 35.00 -.20
Cnvrgys 15.78 -.08
Cooper Ind 73.59 +.36 P a y
CooperTire 19.65 -.13
Corning 12.98 -.04
CottCp 8.39 +.03
CoventyH 43.46 +.12
Coidien 57.74 +.10
Crane 40.23 -.16
CSVS2xVxS 1.46 +.03 00
CSVellVSt 17.17 -.19
CredSuiss 2243 -.15
CrwnCsfie 64.65 +.67 o E IN E S
Cummins 87.49 +1.00

DCT Indl 6.44 563-5655
DDRCorp 15.59 +.09
DNPHSelc 9.87 -.11
DR Horton 19.96 -.28 VISA
DSW Inc 66.62 +.29 m
DTE 60.38 -.38 *Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start
L)dIIdf 16 -0


Dal 12.6 5 -.01
Danaher 55.93
Darden 54.35 -.09
Darling 17.19 +.29
DeVry 23.72 -.56
DeanFds 14.96 +.31
Deere 82.44 +.07
DelphiAu n 32.08 +.05
DeltaAir 10.02 +.27
DenburyR 16.19 +.02
DeutschBk 41.95 -.69
DevonE 61.36 -.25
DiaOffs 66.58 +.35
DiamRk 9.06 -.53
DxFnBull rs 108.50 -3.75
DirSCBear 15.58 +.38
DirFnBear 17.56 +.59
DirSPBear 17.53 +.18
DirDGIdBr 26.24 +1.27
DirDGIdBII 15.66 -.79
DrxEnBear 7.88 +.12
DirEMBear 11.72 +.08
DirxSCBull 58.46 -1.58
Discover 38.79 -.80
Disney 50.59 +.25
DoleFood 12.60 +.39
DollarGen 49.25 -.32
DomRescs 52.68 -.35
DEmmett 23.72 -.23
Dover 55.33 +.08
DowChm 28.08 -.14
DrPepSnap 43.46 +.05
DuPont 48.69 -.09
DukeEnrs 64.16 -.32
DukeRlty 14.65 -.07


BdorGldg 14.00
EmersonEl 48.35
EmpDist 21.41
EnbrdgEPt 29.78
EnCanag 22.32
EngyTsfr 42.61
EnPro 36.45
ENSCO 55.07
Entergy 69.95
EntPrPt 53.73
EqtyRsd 56.02
EsteeLdr s 63.01
ExeoRes 8.72
Exelis n 10.60
Exelon 36.11
Express 11.29
ExxonMbl 91.03
FMC Tech 44.02
FairdichldS 11.88
FamilyDIr 66.40
FedExCp 90.40
FedSignl 6.33
Ferrellgs 18.95
Ferro 2.70
FidlNFin 22.52
FidNatlnfo 31.88
Rfiflh&Pac 10.26
FstARn n 23.03
FstCwIth 7.00
FstHorizon 9.52
FTActDiv 8.36
FtTrEnEq 12.26
RFirstEngy 44.91


GafisaSA 4.18
GameSbtp 22.77
Ganneft 17.90
Gap 36.10
GenDynam 66.10
GenElec 22.48
GenGrPrp 19.32
GenMills 39.19
GenMobrs 24.44
GenOn En 2.77
Genworth 5.47
Gerdau 9.30
GlaxoSKIn 45.83
GoldFLtd 12.15
Goldcrpg 43.47
GoldmanS 120.20
Goodyear 12.28
jGrace 61.22
GtPlainEn 22.34
Griffon 9.99
GpFSnMxn 14.55
GpTelevisa 23.87
GuangRy 17.34
Guess 24.88
HCA Hldg 30.92
HCP Inc 45.18
HSBC 47.92
HSBC Cap 25.81
HalconRrs 6.99
Hallibrtn 33.80
HanJS 16.64
HanPrmDv 14.16


Heinz 56.34 -.27
HeimPayne 49.60 +1.34
Hershey 69.53 -.86
Hertz 14.83 -.07
Hess 53.28 -.05
HewlettP 14.41 +.16
HighwdPrp 32.53 -.15
HollyFront 37.37 -.62
HomeDp 59.56 +.55
HonwIllntI 60.20 -.09
HospPT 23.53 -.24
HostHofis 15.69 -.16
HovnanE 3.57 -.05
Humana 74.82 -.51
Huntsmn 15.14 -.22
IAMGIdg 15.64 -.32
ICICI Bk 39.50 -.55
ING 8.47 +.06
iShGold 17.08 -.13
iSAsfia 24.07 -.08
iShBraz 54.00 -.26
iSCan 28.36 -.16
iShGer 22.78 +.01
iSh HK 18.08 -.07
iShJapn 8.96 +.01
iSh Kor 57.24 -.43
iSMalas 14.86 -.01
iShMex 66.74 +.13
iShSing 13.29 +.04
iSTaiwn 12.95 -.07
iShSilver 32.45 -.45
iShDJDv 57.58 -.29
iShChina25 36.38 +.29


Idacorp 43.75 -.06
ITW 58.55 +.12
Imafon 5.40 -.08
ImaxCorp 21.85 +.31
IngerRd 44.31 -.07
IngrmM 14.86 -.01
IntegrysE 54.48 -.47
IntcfiEx 129.74 +.60
IBM 207.80 +2.04
InfiGame 12.76 -.12
IntPap 36.80 -.44
Interpublic 11.26 -.05
Invesco 24.71 -.30
InvMtgCap 20.73 -.13
IronMtn 35.24 -.72

ItauUnibH 14.54 -.07

JPMorgCh 41.62 -.48
Jabil 17.03 -.14
JanusCap 8.88 -.28
Jefferies 14.37 -.23
JohnJn 67.97
JohnsnCfi 25.87 -.36
JoyGIbl 58.44 -.12
JnprNtwk 16.35
KB Home 14.60 -.06
KBRInc 30.02 +.10
KC South 75.15 +.71
Kaydon s 22.01 -.07
KAEngTR 28.10 +.21
Kelbgg 51.73 +.13


KeyEngy 6.88 -.06 MetroHIth 9.91 ... PennVa 4.89
Keycorp 8.33 -.30 MKorsn 52.98 -.11 Penney 26.03
KimbClk 85.65 -.34 MidAApt 62.72 -.65 Pentair 43.63
Kimco 20.27 -.05 MobileTele 17.13 -.09 PepBoy 10.25
KindME 84.34 -.85 Molyomrp 10.72 -.41 PepcoHold 19.34
KindMorg 34.50 -.59 MoneyG rs 16.11 -.26 PepsiCo 70.05
KindrMwt 3.43 +.09 Monsanto 88.57 +.08 Prmian 14.94
Kinrossg 10.18 -.16 MonstrWw 7.56 -.06 PetrbrsA 21.93
KnghtCap 2.50 ... Moodys 44.36 -.01 Petrobras 22.71
KodiakOg 9.47 -.10 MorgStan 17.31 -.55 Pfizer 25.12
Kohls 51.42 +.26 MSEmMkt 14.68 -.10 PhilipMor 91.70
KrispKrm 7.67 +.02 Mosaic 54.15 -1.19 Phillips66n 43.92
Kroger 23.31 -.01 MotrlaSolu 50.09 +.01 PiedNG 31.28
LDK Solar .93 -.08 MurphO 58.70 +.31 PiedmOfc 17.41
LSICorp 6.45 -.12 NCRCorp 22.06 -.04 Pier1 18.83
LTCPrp 32.05 +.19 NRG Egy 23.02 -.63 PimcoHil 12.51
LaZBoy 14.72 -.21 NV Energy 18.26 -.05 PimooStrat 11.66
Ladede 42.91 -.16 NYSE Eur 23.80 -.46 PinWst 52.71
LaredoPn 21.52 +.72 Nabors 14.53 -.14 PitnyBw 13.36
LVSands 43.96 +.60 NatFuGas 50.86 -1.47 PlainsEx 36.41
LeapFrog 8.55 +.01 NatGrid 55.57 +.25 PlumCrk 42.94
LennarA 35.76 +.04 NOilVarco 78.22 -.75 Polaris 82.57
LexRItyTr 9.49 -.10 Navistar 22.29 -.32 PostPrp 47.37
Lexmark 20.88 +.09 NewAmHi 11.00 +.10 Potash 41.59
LbtyASG 4.14 +.02 NJRscs 45.27 -.29 PwshDB 28.55
LillyEli 50.45 -.15 NewOriEd 17.14 -.81 PShEMSov 31.29
Limited 48.26 -.38 NYCmlyB 14.45 -.36 Praxair 103.87
LincNat 23.76 -.51 Newcastle 7.66 -.08 PrecDrill 8.08
Lindsay 72.12 -.07 NewellRub 19.75 +.14 PrinFnd 26.92
Linkedln 110.41 -3.36 NewfidExp 33.13 -.23 ProLogis 34.84
LockhdM 92.96 +.24 NewmtM 54.94 -.41 ProShtQQQ 25.30
LaPac 14.00 +.33 NewpkRes 6.85 -.24 ProShtS&P 34.33
Lowes 31.18 +.41 Nexeng 25.83 +.08 PrUItQQQs 57.40
L BA 586 49 NextEraEn 69.37 .48 PrUShQQQ 29.14
NiSource 25.32 -.13 ProUItSP 60.28
iiNikeB 94.42 -.48 ProShtR2K 25.40
M&TBk 96.32 -2.07 NobleCorp 36.00 +.16 PrUItSP500 88.14
MBIA 10.55 +.03 NobleEn 93.78 +.49 PrUVxSTrs 29.79
MDU Res 21.48 -.29 NokiaCp 2.56 +01 PrUlOrude 30.87
MEMC 2.39 -.04 Nordstrm 5493 -.40 PrUShCrde 40.27
MFAFnd 8.16 -.08 NorfkSo 67.28 +1.32 ProUItSIvs 54.75
MCR 10.34 +01 NoestUt 38.68 -.19 ProctGam 67.94
MGIC 1.66 NorthropG 68.82 +.18 ProgsvCp 22.20
MGMRsts 10.25 -.02 Novarts 61.61 +.12 PrUShSPrs 55.36
MSCI Inc 25.93 -.48 NuSIn 41.84 +.06 PrUShL20rs 62.12
Macerich 59.03 +.40 Nucor 38.58 -.43 ProUSR2K 27.72
MackCali 27.80 -.25 NustarEn 51.68 +.20 PUSSP500 rs39.22
Macquarie 42.67 -.31 NuvMuOpp 15.44 +.08 Prudent 56.05
Macys 39.41 +.18 NvPfdlnco 9.90 -.02 PSEG 32.49
MageMPr 88.08 +.14 NuvQPf2 9.53 +.05 PubSg 136.54
Magnalntg 43.47 -.17 OGEEngy 56.70 +.41 PuteGrp 15.61
4G 4233 815.9 .69 PPrIT 5.74
MagHRes 4.33 -.15 OcciPet 81.93 -.69 EP Res 32.00
Manitowoc 13.30 -.13 OcenFn 35.41 +.12 Qihoo36 22.00
Manulifeg 12.08 -.12 OfficeDpt 2.34 -.03 QuanexBld 19.04
MarathnO 29.38 +.08 OiSAs 4.11 -.06 QuantaSvc 24.30
MarathPet 54.30 -.36 OldRepub 9.78 -.09 Questar 20.20
MktVGold 51.66 -.83 Olin 21.31 -.18 QksilvRes 4.84
MVOilSvs 39.58 -.18 OmegaHIt 23.15 -.23 Quiksilvr 3.35
MVSemi n 30.50 -.10 Omnicom 51.73 -.29 RPM 26.16
MktVRus 28.71 -.18 OnAssign 19.13 -.55 Rackspace 67.27
MktVJrGId 24.01 -.44 ONEOKs 47.80 -.15 RadianGrp 4.35
MarlntA 38.16 -.01 OneokPtrs 59.68 +.15 RadioShk 2.26
MashM 34.34 -.04 OshkoshCp 29.73 -.17 Ralcorp 72.91
MStewrt 2.98 -.09 OvShip 5.08 -.80 RageRs 71.73
Masom 14.30 OwensCorn 29.95 +.32 RJamesFn 36.54
McDrmlnt 11.32 -25 Rayonier 47.68
McDnlds 92.51 +.15
McGrwH 55.36 -.11 PG&ECp 42.50 .57 Raytheon 54.88
McKesson 89.28 +.28 PHH Corp 20.76 -.74
McMoRn 11.86 +.53 PNC 62.73 -1.82
McEwenM 4.52 -.12 PNM Res 21.63 -.12 '
MeadJohn 70.61 -.40 PPG 114.23 -1.23
Mechel 6.81 -.23 PPLCorp 29.44 -.03 The rer
MedProp 11.23 ... PVRPtrs 25.57 -.13 e r
Medids 43.35 -.07 PackAmer 35.19 -.32 NYSE I
Medtrnic 43.05 +.23 PallCorp 63.36 +.15 1 I.
Merck 45.62 +.17 Pandora 9.40 -.10 found o
MetLife 35.00 -.36 PeabdyE 25.71 -.47 un
MetroPCS 11.88 +.24 Pengrthg 6.44 -.07


-.11 Reaogyn 33.60 -.60
-.15 Rltylnco 41.00 -.04
-.08 RedHat 53.69 -.08
-.17 RegionsFn 7.28 -.34
-.04 RepubSvc 27.80 +.14
+.23 ResrceCap 5.79 -.08
-.06 Revlon 14.79 +.02
-.08 ReynAmer 41.98 -.21
-.11 Riolinb 48.69 -.56
RiteAid 1.16 -.02
+.86 RobtHalf 25.24 -.17
-.68 RockwAut 69.73 +.43
-.36 RockColl 53.26 +.43
+.05 RBScofind 8.64 -.12
+.06 RylCarb 30.56 -.44
-.11 RoyDShllIA 68.97 -.06
-.04 Royce 12.89 -.04
-.13 Royce pfB 25.90
-.17 Ryland 29.64 -.67
-.67
+.48
+.81 SAIC 10.89 -.09
SAPAG 70.54 +1.11
-.77 SCANA 48.30 -.21
-.40 SKTIcm 14.80 -.06
+.16 SpdrDJIA 133.13
+.17 SpdrGold 170.06 -1.26
+.06 SPMid 177.66 -1.47
-.45 S&P500ETF142.89 -.47
+.01 SpdrHome 24.62 -.12
SpdrS&PBk 23.65 -.59
+.11 SpdrLehHY 40.25 +.04
-.03 SpdrS&P RB 28.16 -.91
+03 SpdrRefi 62.23 -.38
-.39 SpdrOGEx 55.57 -.53
+.25 SpdrMetM 44.14 -1.03
-1.09 STMicro 6.00 +.36
+.41 Safeway 15.57 -.14
-.45 StJoe 19.20 +.11
+.61 StJude 42.59 -.10
-1.54 Saks 10.35 -.13
-.06 Salesforce 153.29 +.68
+.14 SaelyBty 24.67 -.37
+44 SJuanB 14.68 -.06
-.32 SandRdge 7.24 -.08
+.44 Sdchlmbrg 72.19 -.23
+.38 Schwab 12.95 -.22
-.87 SeadrillLtd 39.55 +.07
-.21 SealAir 15.35 -.13
-.99 SempraEn 66.88 -.13
-.08 SenHous 22.00 -.13
... Sensient 36.33 -.45
-.49 SiderurNac 5.41 -.03
-.69 SilvWhthg 38.87 -.42
-.21 SilvrcpMg 5.96 -.18
+.23 SimonProp 152.39 -.66
-.13 Skedichers 17.64 +.05
+.09 SmithAO 55.94 -.38
-.12 Smucker 83.45 -.11
-.07 SonyCp 11.36 -.08
+.23 SoJerInd 51.49 -.40
-.02 SouthnCo 45.61 -.11
-.04 SthnCopper 35.01 -.51
-.53 SwstAirl 8.84 +.13
-1.55 SwstnErngy 36.11 +.04
-.65 SpectraEn 29.03 -.39
+.06 SpiritAero 21.70 +.18
SprinNex 5.73 -.03




nainder of the

listings can be

n the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.92 -.01
AbdAustEq 10.32 +.09
AbdnEMTel 20.56 -.03
AdmRsc 32.52 -.96
Adventrx .72 -.03
AlexeoRg 4.05 -.10
AlldNevG 38.88 -.79
AmApparel 1.34 +.05
Argan 16.98 -.15
Augustag 2.71 -.02
Aurizong 4.75 -.06
Banrog 4.65 -.08


BarcUBS36 43.73
BarcGSOil 22.25
BlkMunvst 11.39
BrigusGg 1.04
CAMAC En .46
CelSd .36
CFCdag 23.10
CheniereEn 15.73
CheniereE 22.30
ChinaShen .28
ClaudeRg .76
CloughGEq 12.93
ClghGlbOp 11.58
ComstkMn 2.72
Contango 51.27


-.59 CorMedix .44 +.04
-.18 CornstProg 5.67
-.02 CornerstSt 7.70 -.05
-.03 CrSuiHiY 3.32 +.01
+.03 I 11
-.32 DeourEg .23 +.02
-3 DenisnM g 1.38 +.03
-.13 DocuSec 3.64 -.07
-.21 EVCAMu 12.55 -.03
-.02 EVLtdDur 16.92 -.04
-.03 EVMuni2 13.77 +.04
-.01 EllswthFd 7.28 -.01
-.06 eMagin 4.26 +.43
+.04 EmeraldOil .79 -.01
-.40 EnovaSys .06 -.01


EntreeGold .52 -.03
EurasnMg 2.51 +.02
ExeterRgs 1.37 -.06
FTEgylnco 30.39 +.03


GamGldNR 14.51
GascoEngy .14 +.01
Gastargrs 1.25 -.02
GenMoly 3.27 +.01
GeoMnefcs .36 +.07
GoldResrc 20.13 -.33
GoldStdVg 1.70 -.06
GoldenMin 4.41 -.06
GoldStrg 2.04 -.02


GranTrrag 5.17 -.11
GtPanSilvg 1.99 -.05
Hemisphrx .70 -.01
HstnAEn .44 -.04
iBb 1.04 -.03
ImmunoCII 2.50 -.14
InovioPhm .71
IntellgSys 1.45
IntTower g 2.59 +.02
Inuvo 1.20 +.30

KeeganRg 3.72 -.09
LadThalFn 1.23 -.02
LkShrGldg .87 -.05
LongweiPI 1.76 -.01


NthnO&G 17.18 -.23 RexahnPh .47 -.01
u e NovaBayP 1.30 Richmntg 4.04 -.07
NovaCppn 1.85 -.09 Rubicon 3.67 -.04
MAGSlvg 11.83 -.14 NovaGldg 5.01 -.16
MadCatzg .60 +.02 NuvDiv3 15.54 +.02
MeetMe 3.25 -.25 NMuHiOp 14.00 +.04 SamsO&G .94
MdwGold g 1.62 +.02 NuvREst 11.68 +.24 Sandstg rs 13.62 -.38
NTS Inc 1.18 -.06 TanzRyg 4.90 -.04
NavideaBio 2.60 -.06 Taseko 3.07 -.02
NeoStem .71 -.03 ParaG&S 2.51 -.05 TimberlnR .46 -.02
NBRESec 4.68 -.02 PlatGpMet 1.03 -.06 Timminsg 2.76 +.03
Neuralstem 1.10 -.03 PyramidOil 4.31 +.02 TrnsafiPet .96 +.01
Nevsung 4.63 -.11 Quaterrag .40 +.00 TriangPet 7.30 -.02
NwGoldg 11.80 -.40 RareEleg 4.73 +.06 Ur-Energy 1.00 -.01
NAPallg 1.84 -.01 Rentech 2.48 -.06 Uranerz 1.52 -.05
NDynMng 3.96 -.14 RevettMin 3.66 -.11 UraniumEn 2.37 -.04


VantageDrl 1.94 +.07
VirnetX 25.02 +.63
VistaGold 3.37 -.07
Vringo 4.78 +.01
Walterlnv 40.31 -.12
WFAdvlnco 10.46 +.10
WFAdMSec 16.45 -.02
YMBiog 1.55 -.07


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 41.46 -.31
ASML HId 52.99 -.05
Abiomed 19.99 -.25
Abraxas 2.20 -.07
AcadaTc 25.80 -.11
AcadiaPh 2.40 -.05
Accelrys 8.99 -.33
Accuray 6.79 -.23
Achillion 10.79 +.41
AcmePkt 16.08 -.08
AeordaTh 24.46 -.04
AcfvsBliz 11.16 -.04
Acxiom 17.51 -.16
AdobeSy 31.94 +.16
Adtran 15.65 -.19
Aegerion 15.96 +1.98
AEterngrs 2.43 -.69
Affymax 26.75 +.80
Affymetrix 3.42 -.10
AkamaiT 37.58 -.31
Akorn 13.11 +.20
AlaskCom 2.27 -.05
Alexion 111.19 -.97
Alexzars 5.67
AlignTech 36.56 -.34
Alkermes 19.22 +.10
AllotComm 24.72 -.24
AllscriptH 13.74 -.16
AlnylamP 18.41 -.32
AlteraCp If 32.33 +.35
Amarin 10.88 -.21
Amazon 242.36 -1.86
ACapAgy 32.59 -.61
AmCapLd 11.59 -.05
ACapMtg 24.46 -.57
ARItyCTn 11.87 -.02
AmCasino 17.80 +.01
Amgen 84.00 -.61
AmicusTh 6.47 +.02
AmkorTch 4.21 -.06
Anadigc 1.32 +.06
AnalogDev 38.11 +.15
Anlogic 80.25 -.91
Analystlnt 4.03 -.05
Ancestry 28.49 -.30
AngiesLn 10.21 -.35
Ansys 69.55 +.42
AntaresP 3.98 -.01
AntheraPh 1.02
A123Sysh .24 -.02
ApolloGrp 28.64 -.23
Apollolnv 7.84 -.14
Apple Inc 629.71 +1.61
ApldMati 10.90 -.05
AMCC 4.38 -.10
Approach 27.73 -.39
ArQule 2.51 -.04
ArchCap 43.06 -.14
ArenaPhm 9.13 -.18
AresCap 16.94 -.17
AriadP 24.22 +.01
ArkBest 8.18 -.09
ArmHId 27.95 +.29
ArrayBio 5.08 -.18
Arris 12.58 -.01
ArubaNet 19.43 -.37
AscenaRts 19.99 -.36
AscentSolr 1.01 +.02
AsialnfoL 9.92 -.58
AspenTech 24.49 +.09
AssodBanc 12.79 -.42
AstexPhm 2.90 -.08
athenahlth 82.07 -.07
Atmel 4.73 -.05
Audience n 5.65 -.09
Autodesk 31.20 +.19
AutoData 58.32 -.04
Auxilium 21.92 -.43
AvagoTch 32.98 +.05
AvanirPhm 3.08 -.11
AVEO Ph 7.98 -.58
AvidTch 8.87 -.33
AvisBudg 16.98 -.03
Aware 6.26 -.02


B/EAero 43.96 +.36 Coinstar 44.35 -.66
BGCPtrs 4.76 -.03 ColBnkg 18.55 -.46
BMCSft 42.55 +.12 Comcast 35.78 +.65
BSDMed 1.72 -.01 Comcspd 34.93 +.60
Baidu 111.22 +2.18 CmcBMO 39.13 -1.21
BkOzarks 32.57 -1.56 CommSys 10.96 -.01
Bazaarvcn 14.98 -.51 CommVIt 57.05 +.48
BeacnRfg 27.70 -.30 CmplGnom 3.06 +.01
BeasleyB 4.96 -.04 Compuwre 9.52 +.09
BebeStrs 4.24 -.04 Comverse 6.39 +.05
BedBath 61.45 -.12 Concepts 19.27 -.24
BioRelLab 31.88 -.42 ConcurTch 68.82 +.41
BioDIvrylf 6.50 -.15 Conmed 28.37 +.05
BioFuelrs 7.15 +.83 ConstantC 17.03 +.04
Biogenldc 147.20 +.10 CopanoEn 33.27 -.16
Biolase 2.16 -.09 Coparts 26.72 -.15
BioMarin 41.57 +.27 CorinthC 2.63 +.08
BioSanters 1.39 -.08 Costeo 97.55 -.78
BIkRKelso 10.07 -.05 CrackerB 66.71 -.01
BobEvans 37.99 -.26 Creelnc 25.11 +.15
BonTon 12.17 +.39 Crocs 15.69 -.42
BostPrv 9.51 -.29 CrosstxLP 15.32 -.14
BreitBurn 19.72 -.09 Ctrip.eom 18.45 +.02
Brightcvn 12.35 +.31 CubistPh 47.00 -.04
Brightpnt 8.99 +.01 CumMed 2.64 -.05
Broadcom 32.90 +.03 Curis 3.95 -.14
BroadSoft 36.97 +.42 Cymer 46.82 -1.27
BrcdeCm 5.78 -.04 CypSemi 9.88 -.07
BrklneB 8.42 -.22 CyoMlneth .72 -.02
BrukerOp 12.25 -.30 C ri 4.23 -.041
BuffabWW 88.00 -.25
CA Inc 24.86 -.06
CBOE 29.29 -.17 DARABio 1.03 -.04
CEVAInc 14.23 +.60 DFCGIbl 16.48 -.18
CH Robins 59.94 +1.04 DealrTrk 27.15 +.11
CMEGrps 56.37 -.21 DeckrlsOut 36.44 -.19
CSG Sys 21.72 -.50 DehaierMd 2.34 +.23
CTC Media 9.36 -.07 Delcath 2.09 -.11
CVB Fnd 11.75 -.19 Dell Inc 9.69 +.34
CadencePh 3.99 +.04 Dndreon 4.18 -.17
Cadence 12.51 -.09 Dentsply 37.01 -.21
CafePrssn 5.95 -.30 DexCom 13.60 -.18
CalaCvHi 12.40 +.04 DiambkEn 17.50
CalaStrTR 10.17 +.08 DigitalGen 10.49 -.50
CalAmp 9.10 -.30 DigRiver 15.46 -.45
CalumetSp 29.44 -.75 Diodes 15.73 -.29
CapBkFnn 18.15 +.13 DirecTV 49.84 -.29
CapCtyBk 10.59 -.23 DiscCmAh 60.74 +.27
CapFedFn 11.68 -.18 DiscCmCh 56.71 +.10
CpstnTrbh 1.00 +.01 DiscovLab 2.88 +.04
Cardiom gh .31 -.01 DishNetwk 33.39 -.31
Cardtronic 28.76 -.29 DollarTrs 41.11 -2.17
CareerEd 3.90 -.30 DonlleyRR 10.66 -.46
Carrizo 25.02 -.06 DragonWg 2.49 +.04
CarverBrs 3.69 DrmWksA 19.56 -.18
CasellaW 4.57 DryShips 2.27 -.05
CatalystPh 1.63 -.02 Dunkin 31.60 +.44
Catamarns 50.18 -.52 DurectCp 1.51 +.03
CathayGen 17.00 -.59 Dynavax 4.91 +.03
Cavium 31.06 +.60 E-Trade 9.00 -.32
Celgene 78.42 +.70 eBay 47.85 +.36
Celgenert 3.24 -.14 EaglRkEn 10.33
CellTherrs 1.46 +.05 ErthLink 6.88 -.05
CelldexTh 5.88 -.20 EstWstBcp 20.39 -.90
Celsion 4.98 -.12 Ebixlnc 22.64 -.44
CentEurop 2.73 -.05 EducDevh 4.00
CentAI 7.09 -.17 8x8 Inc 6.19 -.06
Cepheid 33.90 -.46 ElectSd 12.69 -.04
Ceradyne 34.97 -.05 ElectArts 13.41 +.36
Cerner 72.42 -.14 EndoPhrm 30.48 -.34
CerusCp 3.40 -.02 Endocyte 10.19 -.19
Chartlnds 68.70 -1.13 Endobgix 12.70 -.30
CharterCm 76.13 +.01 EngyXXI 33.90 +.68
ChkPoint 46.05 +.62 Entegris 7.66 -.07
Cheesecake 34.46 -.05 EntropCom 5.44 -.05
ChildPlace 61.41 +.10 Equinix 190.19 +1.52
ChrchllD 62.54 -.21 Ericsson 8.75 +.14
CienaCorp 12.75 -.27 Euronet 19.01 -.62
CinnFin 38.40 -.26 ExactScih 10.65 -.95
Cintas 41.86 +.06 Exelids 4.75 -.06
Cirrus 37.20 -.38 E)deTc 3.16 -.02
Cisco 18.41 +.14 Expedias 54.25
CitzRepBc 18.69 -.73 Expdlni 34.78 +.37
CitrixSys 67.70 +.08 ExpScripts 63.56 +.46
CleanEngy 13.07 -.06 Ezcorp 18.94 -.68
Clearwire 2.32 +.10 F5Netwks 97.27 -1.52
CognizTech 69.54 -.29 FEICo 50.93 -.18
CogoGrp 2.29 +.07 FLIRSys 19.58 -.09


FX Ener 6.50 +.09 Infinera 5.20 -.02
Facebookn 19.52 -.23 Informat 27.49 +.39
Fastenal 45.32 -.57 Infosys 44.54 -3.68
FemaleHIt 8.09 -.18 InnerWkgs 14.39 -.21
FifthStRn 10.70 -.11 IntegLfSci 39.01 -.06
FifthThird 15.27 -.62 IntgDv 5.59 -.12
Fndlnst 18.74 -.49 Intel 21.48 -.20
Finisar 12.04 -.53 Inteliquent 7.78 -.05
FinLine 20.91 -.22 InteractB 14.15 -.18
FstCashFn 44.83 -.36 InterDig 34.77 -.39
FMidBc 13.10 -.24 Intrface 13.79 -.19
FstNiagara 8.01 -.26 InterMune 7.93 -.08
FstSolar 22.11 +.39 InfiSpdw 24.91 -.36
FstMerit 14.21 -.54 Intersil 6.89 -.08
Fiserv 73.76 +.26 Intuit 59.89 +.27
FiveBelwn 34.18 -.87 IntSurg 494.58 -.06
Flextrn 5.94 -.08 IridiumCm 7.31 -.19
FocusMda 24.00 -.46 IRIS Int 19.49
FormFac 4.52 -.08 IronwdPh 13.40 +.29
Fortnet 24.26 +.35 Isis 12.64 +.14
Fossil Inc 82.73 -.59 Itron 42.27 -.85
FosterWhl 23.13 -.15 IvanhoeEh .50 -.01
Francesca 29.24 -.50 IMa 16.32 -.17
FreshMkt 56.59 -.56
FronterCm 4.81 -.05
FuelSysSol 18.08 -.65 j2Global 30.64 -.36
FuelCell .96 -.04 JA Solar .79 -.04
FultonFncl 10.40 -.06 JDASoft 33.58 +.09
JDSUniph 10.30 -.18
JackHenry 37.86 -.15
GTAdvTc 4.66 -.13 JacklnBox 26.64 -.65
GalenaBio 1.85 +.02 JkksPac 14.00 +.01
Garmin 40.17 -.27 Jamba 2.37 -.05
Gentex 16.77 -.32 JamesRiv 3.88 +.14
GeoEye 27.35 +.10 JazzPhrm 56.14 -1.09
GeronCp 1.37 -.02 JetBlue 5.09 +.02
Gevo 2.03 -.01 JiveSoftn 13.17 -.91
GileadSd 67.94 +.07 JoesJeans 1.17
GladerBc 14.80 -.44 KCAPRFin 8.79 -.39
Globalstrh .39 -.04 KIT Digit 2.06 -.06
GIbSpcMet 15.42 -.30 KLATnc 45.15 +.25
GluMobile 3.37 +.48 KeryxBio 2.92 -.05
GolLNGLtd 37.81 -.05 KiOR 5.93 -.27
Google 744.75 -6.73 KraftFGpn 47.10 +.64
GrCanyEd 23.89 -.23 KratosDef 5.47 -.03
GrLkDrge 7.45 -.05 Kulicke 9.65 -.01
GreenMtC 22.00 -.27 LKQCps 19.63 -.06
Grifolsrs 24.48 -.02 LSI Indlf 6.89 -.14
Groupon n 5.29 +.04 LamResrch 32.46 -.25
GulfportE 32.17 -.63 LamarAdv 37.70 +.31
H&EEqs 12.82 -.05 Landstar 48.13 -.37
HMN Fn 3.31 -.04 Lattice 3.56
HMS Hldgs 27.62 -.03 LeGaga 3.90 +.10
HSN Inc 47.75 +.14 LeapWirlss 6.36 +.24
HainCel 58.92 -2.13 LedPhrm 2.69 +.30
Halozyme 6.15 -.12 LibGlobA 60.86 +.20
HancHId 30.34 -.99 LibGlobC 56.91 +.33
HansenMed 1.72 -.12 LibCapA 108.40 -.10
Hasbro 39.30 +1.49 LibtylntA 19.48 +.18
HawHold 5.37 +.06 LibVentAn 51.81 -1.62
HIthCSvc 23.21 +.62 LifePtrs 2.17 +.03
HrfindEx 13.36 -.21 LifeTech 48.42 -.42
HSchein 77.03 -.66 LincElec 38.86 +.19
HercOffsh 5.21 -.09 LinearTch 31.51 -.26
Hologic 21.60 +.15 LinnEngy 40.55 +.54
HmLnSvcn 17.20 +.09 LinnCon 38.26
HomeAway 26.87 -.24 Liquidity 40.76 -2.85
HorizPhm 3.27 -.10 LocalCorp 2.75 +.01
HotTopic 9.19 -.06 LodgeNeth .60 +.01
HubGroup 30.28 +1.21 Logitech 8.60 -.13
HudsCity 8.00 -.18 LookSmth .78
HuntJB 58.37 +3.58 Lulkin 54.20 -.19
HuntBncsh 6.93 -.22 lululern 7343 +.73
IAC Inter 53.55 -.10
iGateCorp 18.00 +.18
IPG Photon 55.48 +.30 MAP Phm 15.55 -.35
iShACWX 39.33 -.09 MB Fncl 19.31 -.63
iShACWI 46.63 -.08 MCGCap 4.69 -.13
iShs SOX 49.78 -.29 MGE 52.88 -.03
iShNsdqBio 141.64 -1.00 MIPSTech 6.98 +.12
Iberiabnk 45.25 -.96 MKS Inst 22.87 -.23
IconixBr 18.32 -.13 MTS 52.14 -.33
IdenixPh 4.08 +.02 MagicJcks 20.11 -1.21
Idenfive h 1.05 -.07 MAKO Srg 14.95 -1.04
Illumina 51.16 -1.07 MalvernF 11.00 +.53
ImunoGn 14.54 -.09 MannKd 2.35 -.05
ImpaxLabs 26.35 +.30 MarvellT 8.75 -.13
Incyte 16.75 -.38 Mattel 36.01 +.76


MattrssF n 32.08 -.41 PacEthan h .40 +.01
Maximlnig 26.73 -.14 PacSunwr 2.22 +.01
MaxwlT 7.47 -.04 PanASIv 21.19 -.31
MedAssets 18.32 -.08 PaneraBrd 167.95 +1.13
MedicAcIn 3.44 -.01 ParamTch 21.72 +.29
MediCo 23.95 -.39 ParkerVsn 2.01 -.03
Medivatns 53.66 +.28 PatrkInd 18.09 +.96
MeleoCrwn 13.60 +.21 Patterson 34.35 -.34
Mellanox 103.38 +1.79 PattUTI 16.97 +.10
MentorGr 15.75 +.06 Paychex 32.63 -.07
MergeHIth 3.49 -.03 Pendrell 1.16 +.01
Methanx 29.21 -.11 PnnNGm 40.82 -.38
Micrel 9.67 -.16 PennantPk 10.51 +.02
Microchp 31.71 -.34 PeopUtdF 12.04 -.18
MicronT 5.67 -.08 PeregrinP .73 -.04
MicrosSys 48.15 +.27 Perrigo 117.94 +.19
MicroSemi 17.93 -.27 PetSmart 69.35 -.30
Microsoft 29.20 +.25 Pharmacyc 65.56 -.03
Misonix 4.13 -.01 PhotrIn 4.84 -.12
MobileMini 17.80 -.06 PluristemT 3.91 -.08
Molex 25.69 -.20 Polymom 10.14 -.21
Momenta 14.59 -.01 PoolCorp 41.31 -.51
Mondelez 27.22 -.02 Popular rs 18.27 -.63
MonPwSys 18.37 -.02 Power-One 4.76 -.06
MonstrBvs 57.08 +2.64 PwShs QQQ 66.68 -.03
MoSys 4.09 +.11 Presstekh .49 -.00
Motricityh .46 +.06 PriceTR 63.60 -.65
MulimGm 16.20 +.27 priceline 593.15 -4.99
Mylan 23.78 -.18 PrivateB 16.90 +.03
MyriadG 27.09 -.03 PrUPQQQs 55.65 -.01
NETgear 37.18 -.54 PrognicsPh 2.85 +.02
NIl HIdg 7.91 -.02 ProgrsSoft 18.56 +.15
NPSPhm 10.86 +1.73 PUShQQQrs39.90 +.02
NXPSemi 21.96 -.74 ProspctCap 11.47 -.09
Nanosphere 3.21 +.01 PureBiorsh 1.41 -.16
NasdOMX 23.26 -.24 PureCycle 2.42 -.10
Natlnstrm 23.69 -.10 QIAGEN 17.95 -.15
NatPenn 8.89 -.32 QlikTech 21.37 -.35
NektarTh 10.64 -.07 Qlogic 9.89 -.13
Neonode 3.78 +.01 Qualeom 58.89 -.32
NeptuneTg 3.96 -.18 QualitySs 17.82 -.28
NetApp 28.93 -.26 Questeor 22.01 +.97
NetEase 52.73 +.30 QuickLog 2.70 -.03
Netfiix 64.33 -1.65 RFMicD 3.56 -.11
NtScout 24.07 +.10 RPX Corp 9.69 -.41
NetSpend 9.79 -.18 RTI Biolog 4.56 +.11
Neurcrine 7.88 +.12 Rambus 4.96 -.23
NYMigTr 6.75 -.09 Ramtrn 3.10 +.01
Newport 10.73 -.06 Randgold 121.22 -1.06
NewsCpA 24.11 -.10 RaptorPhm 5.19 -.15
NewsCpB 24.58 Reeds 7.33 -.14
Ninetowns 1.73 +.65 Regenrn 150.73 -2.97
NorTrst 46.29 -.76 RentACt 34.25 -.25
NwstBcsh 12.16 -.21 RschMotn 7.80 -.11
Novavax 2.20 +.06 Responsys 10.22 -.03
nTelosrs 16.72 +.05 RexEnergy 12.76 -.39
NuVasive 14.08 -.42 RigelPh 9.25
NuanceCm 23.32 ... RiverbedT 21.97 -.13
Nvidia 12.63 -.11 RosttaGrs 5.37 -.18
NxStageMd 12.38 -.35 RosettaR 45.59 -.88
OCZTech 1.47 -.39 RossStrss 61.73 -.44
OReillyAu 83.30 -1.04 Rovi Corp 14.20 -.27
Oclaro 2.21 RoyGId 88.60 -2.80
OdysMar 3.00 -.01 rue21 31.76 -.62
OldDomFs 29.75 +.27 RushEntA 18.73 -.21
Omnicedl 13.54 +.14
OmniVisn 13.80 -.24
OnSmcnd 5.86 -.09 SBACom 65.22 +.88
OnyxPh 89.07 +.30
OpenTbleh 45.29 +.58 SEI Inv 21.17 -.24
OpbmerPh 11.26 -.07 SLM Cp 17.00 -.31
Oracle 31.00 +.28 STEC 6.17 -.03
OraSure 9.85 -.40 SVB FnGp 59.03 -1.84
Orexigen 5.99 -.03 SalixPhm 39.82 -.08
Orthfx 42.13 -.60 SanDisk 42.28
Otelo un 2.50 -.02 Sanmina 7.87 -.40
OtterTail 23.76 -.09 Sanofi rt 1.83 +.01
Overstk 10.66 -.07 Santarus 9.11 -.23
Oxieneh .51 .01 Sapient 10.57 -.11
.- Sareptars 27.11 -3.62
Satcon rsh .48 -.42
PDCEngy 31.76 -1.11 SavientPh 2.26 -.04
PDLBio 8.14 -.02 Schnitzer 27.12 -.51
PLXTch 5.36 -.32 SchoolSp 2.03 -.04
PMC Sra 5.02 -.04 SdClone 5.72 -.07
PSSWrld 22.38 -.63 SdGames 7.82 +.10
Paccar 40.15 +.25 SeagateT 28.07 -.18
Pacerlnfi 3.99 -.01 SearsHIdgs 59.92 -1.00


SearsH&On 30.68
SeattGen 25.00
SelCmfrt 31.84
Selectvlns 19.14
Semtech 23.52
Sequenom 3.44
ShandaG s 3.75
ShoreTe 5.13
ShuffiMstr 15.17
Shutterfly 28.42
SigmaAld 71.90
SignatBk 66.93
SilicGrln 7.54
Silicnlmg 4.34
SilicnMotn 13.91
Slcnware 5.27
SilvStdg 14.51
Sina 60.64
Sindair 12.17
SiriusXM 2.78
SironaDent 56.96
SkyWest 10.68
SkywksSol 22.17
SmartBal 12.14
SmithWes 10.17
SodaStrm 35.89
Sohu.cm 39.61
Solazyme 10.11
SonicCorp 9.69
Sonus 1.78
SouMoBc 23.94
Sourcefire 46.16
SpectPh 11.78
SpiritAir 17.60
Splunkn 31.31
Spreadtrm 20.48
Staples 11.10
StarBulkh .58
StarSdent 3.13
Starbucks 47.18
SiDynam 12.10
StemCells 2.18
Stericyde 89.99
SterlFWA 22.32
Stratasys 62.74
SucampoPh 6.07
Summerlnf 1.55
SunHIth 8.47
SunesisPh 5.46
SunPwrh 4.69
SuperMicro 8.79
SusqBnc 10.20
Susser 34.66
SycamNts 5.20
Symantec 17.88
Symetricm 6.91
Synaeorn 6.77
Synapfcs 23.21
Synopsys 32.10
SyntaPhm 9.00
Syntrolm h .74
TFS Fncl 9.05
TICCCap 10.04
tw tdeeom 26.74
TakeTwo 11.18
Tangoe 12.55
TASER 5.99
TechData 42.78
TICmSys 2.05
Tellabs 3.31
TescoCp 9.90
TeslaMot 27.64
TesseraTch 13.33
TetraTc 25.61
TxCapBsh 47.24
Texlnst 27.28
TexRdhse 17.09
Theravnce 25.17
Thoratec 34.21
ThrshdPhm 5.30
TibcoSft 27.27
TitanMach 20.42
TiVo Inc 9.94
Towerstm 3.80
TractSupp 97.18
Travelzoo 20.02
TrimbleN 46.99
TripAdv n 31.22


TriQuint 4.86 -.19
+.29 TrueRelig 25.92 +.09
-.37 TrstNY 5.70 -.05
-.22 Trustmk 23.92 -.61
-.41 21Vianet 12.01 +.01
-.06 USATechh 1.67 +.16
+.14 UTStarcm .98 -.01
+.06 UllWrldwd 13.87 +.07
+.40 UltaSalon 95.22 -.43
UlimSoft 103.05 +3.57
-1.41 Ultratech 28.81 -.47
-.35 Umpqua 12.22 -.48
-.17 Unilife 2.23 +.06
-.30 UBWV 24.30 -.69
-.10 UtdNtrF 56.09 -1.08
-.3390 UtdOnln 5.58 +.04
+.01 US Enr 2.08
+.05 UtdTherap 55.34 -1.08
-.21 UnivDisp 33.74 -1.17
+.04 UnivFor 40.70 +.30
-.24 UranmRsh .44 -.02
+.14 UrbanOut 36.61 -.36
-.07
-.23
-.56 VCAAnt 20.53 +.20
-.16 VOXX)InD 6.90 +.03
-.12 ValueClick 17.41 -.23
-.01
-.11 VanSTCpB 80.65 +.02
+.16 VanlntCpB 88.54 +.18
-.17 Veeeolnst 28.75 +.43
-.01 Velt 7.68 -.24
-.21 VBradley 27.49 +.65
+.58 Verisign 48.03 +.13
-.34 Verisk 47.03 +.10
-.03 VertxPh 53.53 -3.35
+.08 ViaSat 39.71 -.09
+-.28 ViacomB 54.33 +.03
+.16 Vical 3.89 -.16
-.25 VirgnMdah 30.71 +.20
-.37 ViroPhrm 28.77 -.43
+3.25 VistaPrt 35.62 +1.41
+.04 Vivus 22.86 +.92
-.03 Vodafone 28.15 -.40
-.01 Volcano 26.03 -1.06
-.30 Volterra 19.39 -.26
+.01 WarnerCh 13.00
-.47
-.42 WashFed 16.62 -.30
+.05 Web.com 17.19 -.47
+.53 WebMD 14.63 +.04
-.07 Wendys Co 4.21
-.04 WernerEnt 22.56 +.39
-.12 WDigital 36.02 -.57
-.14 Westmrld 9.92 -.06
-.15 Wstptlnng 30.45 -.41
-.09 WetSeal 3.06 -.01
-.02 WholeFd 96.40 -.76
-.0319 WillsLpfA 10.02 +.00
.15 WilshBcp 6.28 -.15
+.21 Windstrm 9.97 -.08
+.04 Wintrust 37.88 -.91
+.07 WisdomTr 7.11
-.21 Woodward 33.11 +.14
-.07 WrightM 21.33 -.09
-.05 Wynn 113.81 +1.35
-.01 XOMA 3.25 -.06
-.6812 XenoPort 10.65 -1.26
+.07 Xflinx 32.68 -.11
-3.22 Xyratex 7.13 -.03
-.02 YRC rs 6.91 +.21
-.16 Yahoo 15.88 -.04
-.53 Yandex 23.28 +.02
-.16 ZaZaEngy 2.27 -.15
-.31 Zagg 8.02 +.01
+.31 Zalicus .60 +.01
-.11 Zlow 36.54 -1.28
+.06 ZonBcp 21.98 -.54
-.25 Zopharm 4.80 -.11
-3.48 Zogenix 2.85 -.10
-.44 Zumiez 26.47 +.04
+.07 Zyngan 2.43


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.7120 4.7120
Australia .9776 .9743
Bahrain .3769 .3760
Brazil 2.0431 2.0387
Britain 1.6073 1.6043
Canada .9797 .9789
Chile 472.95 474.10
China 6.2668 6.2803
Colombia 1800.50 1799.80
Czech Rep 19.28 19.29
Denmark 5.7553 5.7690
Dominican Rep 39.28 39.30
Egypt 6.0981 6.1004
Euro .7717 .7734
Hong Kong 7.7515 7.7523
Hungary 216.06 217.64
India 52.820 52.685
Indnsia 9580.00 9606.00
Israel 3.8293 3.8482
Japan 78.38 78.34
Jordan .7085 .7081
Lebanon 1503.50 1503.50
Malaysia 3.0595 3.0670
Mexico 12.8696 12.9073
N. Zealand 1.2233 1.2227
Norway 5.7034 5.7083
Peru 2.587 2.588
Poland 3.16 3.17
Russia 31.0756 31.0412
Singapore 1.2219 1.2279
So. Africa 8.7369 8.6826
So. Korea 1111.40 1113.71
Sweden 6.6911 6.7032
Switzerlnd .9329 .9347
Taiwan 29.24 29.25
Thailand 30.73 30.69
Turkey 1.8068 1.8077
U.A.E. 3.6733 3.6729
Uruguay 20.2499 20.4499
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2949


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.11 0.10
6-month 0.16 0.14
5-year 0.66 0.68
10-year 1.66 1.74
30-year 2.83 2.97



S FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Nov 12 91.86 -.21
Corn CBOT Dec 12 7523/4 -2012
Wheat CBOT Dec 12 8563/4 -2914
Soybeans CBOT Nov12 152212 -26
Cattle CME Dec12 125.50 -.42
Sugar (world) ICE Mar 13 20.05 -.40
Orange Juice ICE Nov12 112.60 -1.00



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1758.00 $1778.60
Silver (troy oz., spot) $33.633 $34.b16
Copper (pound) $3./14b $3./86b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$16b/.10 $1/03.30

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I I I


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... ... ... 5.20 -.16 -37.0 McDnlds 3.08 3.3 17 92.51 +.15 -7.8
AT&T Inc 1.76 4.9 48 35.63 -.63 +17.8 Microsoft .92 3.2 15 29.20 +.25 +12.5
Ameteks .24 .7 20 34.11 -.47 +21.5 MotrlaSolu 1.04 2.1 24 50.09 +.01 +8.2
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 ... 86.82 -.10 +42.4 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 14 69.37 -.48 +13.9
BkofAm .04 .4 10 9.12 -.22 +64.0 Penney ... ... 26.03 -.15 -25.9
CapCtyBk ...... 10.59 -.23 +10.9 PiedmOfc .80 4.6 13 17.41 +.05 +2.2
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 43 39.06 -.12 +5.0 RegionsFn .04 .5 17 7.28 -.34 +69.3
Citigroup .04 .1 10 34.75 -.77 +32.1 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 59.92 -1.00 +88.5
CmwREIT 1.00 6.8 20 14.72 -.47-11.5 Smucker 2.08 2.5 20 83.45 -.11 +6.8
Disney .60 1.2 17 50.59 +.25 +34.9 SprintNex .......... 5.73 -.03+144.9
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.8 17 64.16 -.32 ... Texlnst .84 3.1 19 27.28 -.02 -6.3
EnterPT 3.00 6.7 20 44.86 +.09 +2.6 TimeWarn 1.04 2.3 17 45.06 +.05 +24.7
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.5 12 91.03 -.14 +7.4 UniFirst .15 .2 15 66.50 -.60 +17.2
FordM .20 2.0 8 10.12 -.02 -5.9 VerizonCm 2.06 4.6 45 44.62 -.58 +11.2
GenElec .68 3.0 18 22.48 -.03 +25.5 Vodafone 1.99 7.1 ... 28.15 -.40 +.4
HomeDp 1.16 1.9 21 59.56 +.55 +41.7 WalMart 1.59 2.1 16 75.81 +.80 +26.9
Intel .90 4.2 9 21.48 -.20 -11.4 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 15 35.94 -.16 +8.7
IBM 3.40 1.6 15207.80 +2.04 +13.0 YRC rs ... ... 6.91 +.21 -30.7
Lowes .64 2.1 21 31.18 +.41 +22.9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: EVPTxMEmI 46.90 -.10
Balanc p 17.02 -.03 Eaton Vance A:
RetInc 9.01 +.01 ChinaAp 16.80 -.03
Alger Funds B: AMTFMuInc 10.50 +.01
SmCapGr 6.87 -.04 MulICGrA 8.67 -.02
AllianceBern A: InBosA 5.92
BalanAp 17.30 -.06 LgCpVal 19.52 -.11
GIbThGrAp63.42 -.19 NatlMunlnc 10.21
SmCpGrA 38.52 -.23 SpEqtA 15.92 -.08
AllianceBern Adv: TradGvA 7.39
LgCpGrAd 30.41 -.01 Eaton Vance B:
AllianceBern B: HIthSBt 10.87 +.02
GIbThGrBt 54.34 -.16 NatlMulnc 10.21
GrowthBt 27.53 -.01 EatonVance C:
SCpGrBt 30.67 -.19 GovtCp 7.37
AllianceBern C: NatMunInc 10.21
SCpGrCt 30.85 -.18 Eaton Vance 1:
Allianz Fds Insti: FItgRt 9.10
NFJDvVI 12.77 -.09 GblMacAbR 9.98
SmCpVi 31.07 -.24 LgCapVal 19.57 -.11
Allianz Funds C: FBR Funds:
AGICGrthC 26.74 -.09 Focuslnvtn50.76
Amer Beacon Insti: FMI Funds:
.14 L gCappn 17.35 -.05
Amer Beacon Inv: FPA Funds:
LgCaplnv 20.48 -.14 Newlnco 10.63 +.01
Ameri Century 1st: FPACres 28.70 -.06
Growth 28.37 ... Fairholme 31.36 -.23
Amer Century Adv: Federated A:
EqGroAp 24.41 -.06 MidGrStA 34.90 -.17
EqlncAp 7.92 -.04 MuSecA 10.79 +.01
Amer Century Inv: Federated Instl:
AIICapGr 31.16 -.06 KaufmnR 5.33 -.01
Balanced 17.51 -.03 TotRetBd 11.65 +.01
DivBnd 11.30 +.01 StrValDvS 5.11 -.01
Eqlnc 7.92 -.04 Fidelity Adv FocT:
Growthl 28.09 -.01 EnergyT 36.27 -.24
Heritagel 22.68 -.08 HItCarT 23.51 -.08
IncGro 27.44 -.08 Fidelity Advisor A:
InfAdjBd 13.47 +.01 Nwlnsghp 22.90 -.06
IntDisc 9.90 -.03 StrInA 12.77 +.01
InfiGrol 10.89 -.04 Fidelity Advisor C:
NewOpp 8.10 -.05 Nwlnsghtn21.59 -.05
OneChAg 13.16 -.02 Fidelity Advisor I:
OneChMd 12.61 -.02 EqGrIn 66.16 -.08
RealEstl 23.12 -.10 Eqlnin 26.41 -.13
Ultra 26.31 -.02 IntBdlIn 11.75
Valuelnv 6.31 -.03 Nwlnsgtl n 23.22 -.06
American Funds A: StrIlnn 12.93 +.02
AmcpAp 21.19 -.05 Fidelity AdvisorT:
AMufiAp 28.26 -.05 BalancTx 16.56 -.08
BalAp 20.19 -.03 DivGrTp 13.21 -.05
BondAp 12.98 +.01 EqGrTp 61.71 -.08
CaplBAp 52.90 -.05 EqInT 26.01 -.12
CapWGAp 36.09 -.03 GrOppT 41.92
CapWAp 21.60 +.03 HilnAdTp 10.29
EupacAp 39.59 -.12 IntBdT 11.73 +.01
FdInvAp 39.89 -.11 MulncTp 13.78 +.01
GIblBalA 26.42 ... OvrseaT 17.07 -.10
GovtAp 14.60 ... STFiT 9.36
GwthAp 33.59-.06 StkSelAIICp 20.32 -.06
HITrAp 11.26 +.01 Fidelity Freedom:
IncoAp 17.98 -.01 FF2010n 14.30 -.03
IntBdAp 13.80 ... FF2010K 13.10 -.03
InfiGrlncAp29.83 -.03 FF2015n 11.96 -.02
ICAAp 30.54 -.05 FF2015K 13.17 -.03
LtTEBAp 16.42 +.01 FF2020n 14.48 -.03
NEcoAp 28.29 -.05 FF2020K 13.60 -.03
NPerAp 30.26 -.06 FF2025n 12.06 -.03
NwWrldA 52.43 -.05 FF2025K 13.75 -.04
STBFAp 10.09 ... FF2030n 14.36 -.04
SmCpAp 39.18 -.10 FF2030K 13.90 -.03
TxExAp 13.15 ... FF2035n 11.89 -.04
WshAp 31.22 -.07 FF2035K 13.98 -.05
Ariel Investments: FF2040 n 8.30 -.03
Apprec 44.73 -.28 FF2040K 14.02 -.05
Ariel 49.32 -.40 FF2045K 14.17 -.05
Artisan Funds: Fidelity Invest:
Infl 23.55 +.01 AIISectEq 12.94 -.04
Infilnsfi 23.71 +.01 AMgr50On 16.32 -.02
InfiVal r 28.79 -.04 AMgr70 r n 17.32 -.03
MidCap 37.78 -.10 AMgr20rn 13.37
MidCapVal 21.09 -.04 Balancxn 20.09 -.13
BBH Funds: BalancedKx20.09 -.13
CorSeIN 17.52 -.03 BlueChGrn 49.54 -.10
Baron Funds: BluChpGrK 49.58 -.11
Asset 51.49 -.05 CAMunn 12.95 +.01
Growth 56.99 -.18 Canadan 54.00 -.18
SmallCap 25.77 -.08 CapAp n 29.54 -.07
Bernstein Fds: CapDevOn 11.91 -.05
IntDur 14.26 +.01 Cplncrn 9.40
DivMu 14.92 ... ChinaRgr 27.84 +.13
TxMgdlni 13.37 ... CngS 465.09
Berwyn Funds: CTMunrn 12.13
Fund 31.76 -.34 Contran 78.59 -.18
BlackRock A: ContraK 78.60 -.18
EqtyDiv 20.02 -.05 CnvScn 24.71 -.13
GIAIAr 19.50 -.04 DisEqn 24.46 -.10
HiYlnvA 7.99 +01 DiscEqF 24.46 -.10
InfiOpAp 31.29 -.08 Divlntin 28.91 -.09
BlackRock B&C: DivrslntKr 28.90 -.09
GIAICt 18.13 -.03 DivStkOn 17.47 -.06
BlackRock Insti: DivGthn 29.90 -.10
EquityDv 20.07 -.06 EmergAs r n28.39 +.07
GlbAllocr 19.60 -.04 EmrMkn 22.15 -.01
HiYldBd 7.99 +.01 Eqlncn 47.00 -.22
Brinson Funds Y: EQIIn 19.62 -.05
HiYldlYn 6.33 ... ECapAp 18.12 -.04
BruceFund 404.35 .. Europe 30.04 -.04
Buffalo Funds: Exch 323.88
SmCapn 28.70 -.11 Exportn 22.83 -.08
CGM Funds: Fideln 35.92 -.17
Focusn 27.80 .19 Fifty r n 20.10 -.09
MutIn 27.85 -.14 FItRateHirn 9.95
Realtyn 28.78 -.30 FrnOnen 29.16 .07
Calamos Funds: Gv 1 .
GrwthAp 51.12 -.16 GroCon 96.70 .0
Calvert Invest: on 96.70 -.08
Calvert nv T66 0 Grolncn 21.14 -.10
Incop 16.65 +.03 FoK2 .1
no 16 + GrowCoF 96:73 -.08
InfiEqAp 13.50 G.rowCoK 9671 08
SocialA p 30.57 -.03 GowqhCoK 96.71 -.08
SocialAp 30.57 .03 GrStratrn 20.19 -.05
SocBdp 16.66 +03 Highlncrn 9.30 .
SocEqAp 38.07 -.01 HighIncrnn 9.30
TxF Lgp 16.64 +.01 ndepn n 25.25 .06
Cohen & Steers: IntBd n 11.16
RltyShrs 67.39 -.28 IntGovn 10.90
Columbia Class A: InNun 1068 + 0
Acornt 29.58 -.08 InfiDiscn 31.69 .12
DivEqlnc 10.51 -.03 nfSCprn 1990 -.01
DivOpptyA 8.74 -.04 InvGrBden 11.70 -.37
LgCapGrAt26.91 -.04 InvGBn 8.01
LgCorQAp 6.59 -.03 Japanr 9.16 +.02
MdCpGrOp 10.09 -.02 JpnSm n 9.06 .03
MidCVOpp 8.13 .04 LgCapVal 1141 -.08
PBModAp 11.26 -.02 LatAm 49.16 -.02
TxEAp 14.31 LevCoStkn 3026 -.14
SelCommA42.49 -.28 LowPrn 3884 .11
FrontierA 10.90 -.05 LowPriKr 3882 11
GlobTech 20.33 -.10 Magellnn 74.00 -.28
Columbia Cl l,T&G: MagellanK 73.96 -.28
EmMktOpln8.40 -.03 MDMurn 11.70 +.01
Columbia Class Z: MAMunn 12.76
AcornZ 30.69 -.09 MegaCpStknll.91 -.04
AcornlntZ 39.87 +.02 MIMunn 12.55 +.01
DivlncoZ 14.96 -.04 MidCapn 29.72 -.18
IntTEBd 11.05 MNMunn 12.06 +01
LgCapGr 13.66 .01 MtgSecn 11.39
ValRestr 49.50 -.10 Munilncn 13.57 +.01
Credit Suisse Comm: NJMunr n 12.35 +.01
ComRett 8.46 -.10 NwMktrn 17.77 +.06
DFA Funds: NwMilln 33.41 -.13
InfiCorEqn 9.99 NYMunn 13.73 +.01
USCorEqln12.19 -.06 OTCn 60.28 -.13
USCorEq2n12.02 -.07 OhMunn 12.42 +.01
DWS Invest A: 0lOIndex 10.32 -.02
CommAp 19.32 -.13 Ovrsean 31.20 -.09
DWS InvestS: PcBasn 24.63 -.04
CoreEqtyS 17.94 -.10 PAMunrn 11.50 +.01
CorPlsInc 11.27 +.01 Puritnxn 19.51 -.36
EmMkGrr 15.76 -.07 PuritanKx 19.51 -.36
EnhEmMk 11.17 +.04 RealElncr 11.42 -.01
EnhGIbBdr 10.42 +.02 RealEn 31.51 -.12
GIbSmCGr 38.14 -.09 SAIISecEqF 12.96 -.04
GIblThem 22.31 -.11 SCmdtyStrtn9.31 -.12
Gold&Prc 15.21 -.18 SCmdtyStrFng9.34 -.12
HiYldTx 13.11 +.01 SrEmrgMkt 16.26 -.01
IntTxAMT 12.22 SEmgMktF 16.32 -.01
Infl FdS 41.61 -.14 SrslntGrw 11.57 -.02
LgCpFoGr 33.27 -.02 SerlnflGrF 11.61 .01
LatAmrEq 41.03 .07 SrslntVal 9.07 .01
MgdMuni S 9.57 ... SerlnfiValF 9.09 -.02
MATFS 15.34 +.01 SrlnvGrdFe 11.71 -.36
SP500S 19.04 -.06 StlntMun 10.89
WorldDiv 23.52 -.05 STBF n 8.60
Davis Funds A: SmCapDiscn22.82 -.23
NYVenA 36.16 -.19 SmllCpSrn 17.69 -.14
Davis Funds B: SCpValur 15.27 -.17
NYVenB 34.36 -.19 SlSelLCVrn11.72 -.07
Davis Funds C: S6SIcACap n28.24 -.09
NYVenC 34.70 -.19 SiSelSmCp 19.87 -.17
Davis Funds Y: Sratlncn 11.44 +02
NYVenY 36.60 -.20 SBrReRtr 9.79 -.03
Delaware Invest A: TaxFrBr n 11.71
Diverlncp 9.47 +.01 TotalBden 11.04 -.28
SMIDCapG 24.24 -.12 Trendn 78.88 -.12
TxUSAp 12.34 ... USBIen 11.96 -.07
Delaware Invest B: Utilityn 18.88 -.13
SelGrBt 35.24 .07 ValStratn 30.26 -.13
Dimensional Fds: Value n 73.71 -.45
EmMCrEqnl9.04 -.03 Wrldwn 19.90 -.09
EmMktV 28.45 .06 Fidelity Selects:
IntSmVan 14.93 -.01 Aim 37.78 +.18
LargeCo 11.28 -.03 Banking n 19.69 -.46
TAUSCorE2n9.77 -.06 Biotchn 113.84 -.28
USLgVan 22.37 -.12 Brokrn 48.65 -.44
USMicron 14.93 -.12 Chemn 113.03 -.33
USTgdVal 17.26 -.15 ComEquipn21.21 -.09
USSmalln 23.09 -.18 Compn 61.87 +.09
USSmVa 26.66 -.24 ConDisn 27.41 -.04
InflSmCon 15.11 ... ConsuFnn 14.64 -.20
EmMktSCn20.41 ConStapn 81.86 +.06
EmgMktn 26.04 -.06 CstHon 45.52 +.03
Fixd n 10.35 ... DfAer n 82.63 +.09
IntGFxlnn 13.15 +.01 Elecfrn 42.35 -.43
IntVan 15.56 -.02 Enrgyn 51.85 -.34


Glb5Fxlncnll.28 +.01 EngSvn 66.69 -.41
2YGIFxdn 10.13 EnvAItEnrn15.79 +.01
DFARIEn 25.94 -.11 FinSvn 60.13 -.46
Dodge&Cox: Goldrn 41.72 -.55
Balanced 76.56 -.14 Healthn 146.72 -.47
GblStock 8.91 -.01 Insur n 52.35 -.34
Income 13.89 +.01 Leisrn 102.98 +.12
InfilSt 32.67 +.01 Materialn 70.23 -.32
Stock 118.79 -.32 MedDI n 62.45 -.32
DoubleUne Funds: MdEqSysn 28.77 -.13
TRBdIn 11.41 MulTndn 56.10 +.16
TRBdNpn 11.40 NtGasn 31.22 -.15
Dreyfus: Pharm n 15.62 -.01
Aprec 44.92 +01 Retail n 62.43 -.13
CTA 12.43 Softwrn 87.76 -.01
CorVA Techn 101.14 -.11
Dreyf 9.79 -.03 Telcmn 52.25 -.25
DryMidr 28.95 -.21 Transn 50.88 +.29
GNMA 16.16 UtilGrn 57.35 -.41
GrChinaAr 31.55 +.25 Wirelessn 8.16 -.03
HiYldAp 6.58 Fidelity Spartan:
StratValA 30.11 -.18 5001dxlnvn 50.65 -.15
TechGroA 33.40 -.12 5001dxl 50.65 -.15
DreihsAclnc 10.55 +.01 InfilnxlInvn 32.87 -.06
Driehaus Funds: TotMktlnvn 41.47 -.16
EMktGr 28.63 -.06 USBond I e 11.96 -.07


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdr n39.80 -.27
5001dxAdvn50.65 -.15
IntAd r n 32.89 -.06
TotMktAdrn4l.48 -.15
USBond Ie 11.96 -.07
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.21 -.07
OverseasA 22.20 +.01
First Investors A
BIChpAp
Eqtylnco p 7.62 -.03
GloblAp 6.76 -.01
GovtAp 11.45
GrolnAp 16.50 -.05
IncoAp 2.61
MATFAp 12.56 +.01
MITFAp 12.94 +.01
NJTFAp 13.81 +.01
NYTFA p 15.33
OppAp 29.21 -.17
PATFAp 13.87 +.01
SpSitAp 23.59 -.21
TxExlncop 10.32
TotRtAp 16.74 -.03
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.25 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.90
ALTFAp 11.94 +.01
AZTFAp 11.52 +.01
CallnsAp 13.00 +.01
CAIntAp 12.21 +.01
CalTFAp 7.53
COTFAp 12.46
CTTFAp 11.48
CvtScAp 14.97-.04
DblTFA 12.26 +.01
DynTchA 33.17 +.03
EqlncAp 18.11 -.04
Fedlntp 12.61 +.01
FedTFAp 12.75 +.01
FLTFAp 12.00 +.01
FoundAlp 11.03 -.04
GATFAp 12.82 +.01
GoldPrMA 35.31 -.40
GrwthAp 49.71 -.01
HYTFAp 10.94 +.02
HilncA 2.06
IncomAp 2.23
InsTFAp 12.63 +.01
NYITFp 11.97 +.01
LATFAp 12.07 +.01
LMGvScA 10.32
MDTFAp 12.04
MATFAp 12.22 +.01
MITFAp 12.36 +.01
MNInsA 13.02
MOTFAp 12.77 +.01
NJTFAp 12.67 +.01
NYTFAp 12.16 +.01
NCTFA p 12.99
OhiolAp 13.14 +.01
ORTFAp 12.62 +.01
PATFAp 10.97 +.01
ReEScAp 16.59 -.07
RisDvAp 37.48 -.02
SMCpGrA 36.78 -.13
Stratlncp 10.69 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.53 +.01
USGovAp 6.86 +.01
UbIsAp 14.06 -.09
VATFAp 12.29 +.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 13.40 +.03
IncmeAd 2.21 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.25
USGvCt 6.81
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.34 -.08
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 22.90 -.07
ForgnAp 6.49 -.01
GIBdAp 13.44 +.03
GrwthAp 18.71 -.05
WorldAp 15.58 -.03
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.25 -.07
ForgnC p 6.33 -.01
GIBdCp 13.47 +.04
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.57 -.05
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 12.11 +.01
US Eqty 44.92 -.09
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust III:
CHIE 22.49 -.04
Quality 23.71 +.06
GMOTrust IV:
InfilntrVI 20.05 -.02
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.27 -.03
Quality 23.72 +.06
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.20 -.17
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 37.79 -.26
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.44 -.09
HiYield 7.35
HYMuni n 9.34 +.01
MidCapV 38.16 -.26
ShtDrTFn 10.68 +.01
Harbor Funds:
Bond 13.02 +.01
CapAplnst 42.57 -.13
Infillnvt 58.17 +.04
lnf r 58.85 +.04
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.74 -.09
DivGthAp 20.91 -.07
IntOpA p 14.43
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppln 32.80 -.10
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.12 -.14
Div&Gr 21.75 -.07
Balanced 21.36 -.04
MidCap 27.63 -.13
TotRetBd 11.90 +.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 10.98 +.02
ICON Fds:
Energy S 18.80 -.09
HIltcareS 17.73 -.02
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 8.01 +.01
IVA Funds:
WldwideIr 16.14 +.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.45 -.08
Invesco Funds:
Energy 37.38 -.21
Ubliies 17.70 -.11
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.98 -.04
Chart p 17.85 -.01
CmstkA 17.50 -.09
Constp 23.79 -.02
DivrsDivp 13.46 -.08
EqlncA 9.24 -.03
GrlncAp 21.08 -.10
HilncMu p
HiYldp 4.37
HYMuA 10.09 +.01
InfiGrow 27.97 -.04
MunilnA 13.97
PATFA 17.10
USMortgA 13.11 -.01
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.95 +.01
US Mortg 13.04 -.01
Invesco FundsY:
BalRiskY 13.07 -.04
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 24.24 +.01
AssetStAp 25.09 +.01
AssetStrlr 25.35 +.02
HilncAp 8.54
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.14
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.20 +.01
JP Morgan Inst:
MdCpValn 27.80 -.19
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondn 12.15 +.01
ShtDurBd 11.02
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.37 -.04
JPMorgan Sel Cls:
CoreBdn 12.13
HighYIdn 8.13 +.01
IntmnTFBd n 11.42
LgCpGr 24.21 -.03
ShtDurBd n 11.02
USLCCrPIsn22.98 -.09
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.97 +.02
ContrarnT 13.93 +.01
EnterprT 64.18 +.36
FIxBndT 11.06 +.01
GlIUfeSdciTr 30.96 .10
GIbSel T 9.44 .01
GITechTr 18.19 +.13
Grw&lncT 34.11 -.01
JanusT 31.52
OvrseasTr 32.64 +.01
PrkMCVal T21.91 -.14
ResearchT 31.70 -.02
ShTmBdT 3.11


TwentyT 61.84 +.07
VentureT 59.27 -.29
WrldWTr 44.60 -.08
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.41 +.02
IncomeAp 6.71
RgBkA 14.90 -.31
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.71
John Hancock CI1:
LSAggr 12.70 -.04
LSBalanc 13.48 -.02
LSConsrv 13.48


Name NAV Chg
LSGrwth 13.41 -.03
LSModer 13.32 -.01
Lazard Insti:
EmgMktl 19.33 -.01
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.74 -.01
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 128.35 -.36
CBApprp 16.02 -.02
CBLCGrp 23.92 -.01
GCIAIICOp 8.66 -.03
WAHilncAt 6.20
WAMgMup 17.24 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.71 -.01
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.26 -.20
CMValTrp 41.87 -.10
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 30.68 -.03
SmCap 29.99 -.11
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.06 +.01
StrlncC 15.41
LSBondR 14.99
StrIncA 15.33
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.78 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.79 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.89 -.08
FundlEq 13.16 -.08
BdDebAp 8.08
ShDurlncAp 4.65
MidCpAp 17.15 -.13
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.68 +.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.64
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.79 -.05
MIGA 17.52 -.02
EmGA 48.09 -.05
HilnA 3.56
MFLA
TotRA 15.20 -.03
UtilA 18.61 -.06
ValueA 25.48 -.09
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.68 -.02
GvScBn 10.53
HilnBn 3.57
MulnBn 9.03 +.01
TotRBn 15.20 -.03
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.59 -.10
MFS Funds Instl:
InfiEqn 18.13
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.10 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.97 -.03
GovtBt 9.02
HYIdBBt 6.07 +.01
IncmBldr 17.56 -.02
InfiEqB 10.78 -.03
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.89 -.16
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 82.28 -.30
Managers Funds:
Yacknan pnl9.11 -.02
YacktFocn 20.51 -.03
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.44 -.01
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.16 +.07
AsianGllnv 17.93 +.05
Indialnvr 17.88 -.13
PacTgrlnv 23.58 +.16
MergerFdn 15.96
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 11.06 +.01
TotRtBdl 11.05
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.94 -.04
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.64 -.04
MontagGrl 26.10 -.04
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 16.06 -.02
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 13.84 -.01
MCapGrl 34.65 -.12
Muhlenkn 56.68 -.24
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.06 -.05
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 31.64 -.14
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.28 -.02
GblDiscA 29.82 -.09
GIbDiscZ 30.25 -.10
QuestZ 17.75 -.05
SharesZ 22.56 -.08
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.23 -.05
Geneslnst 49.58 -.26
Int r 16.96 -.07
LgCapV Inv 27.53 -.23
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.36 -.27
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.99
Nicholasn 48.26 -.22
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.12 +.01
HiYFxlnc 7.47
SmCpldx 9.15 -.07
Stldx 17.74 -.05
Technly 15.72
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 17.01 +.02
LtMBAp 11.27
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.40
HYMunBd 17.01 +.02
Nuveen CI Y:
RealEstn 21.37 -.09
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.15 -.26
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.12 -.08
Global 21.71 -.02
Intl lr 18.98 -.01
Oakmark 49.08 -.08
Select 32.86 -.10
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.50
GIbSMdCap 14.58 -.05
LgCapStrat 9.71 -.02
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.26
AMTFrNY 12.24 +.01
CAMuniAp 8.82 +.01
CapApAp 48.49 -.06
CaplncAp 9.23 -.01
DvMktAp 34.14 -.08
DiscR p 64.20 -.25
EquityA 9.56 -.03
EqlncAp 25.74 -.15
GlobAp 60.90 -.10
GIbOppA 29.62 -.25
GblStfrlncA 4.32 +.01
Gold p 35.90 -.51
IntBdA p 6.56 +.01
LtdTmMu 15.13 +.01
MnStFdA 37.47 -.07
PAMuniAp 11.50
SenFItRtA 8.31 +.01
USGv p 9.85
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.22
AMTFrNY 12.24
CplncB t 9.05
EquityB 8.77 -.03
GblSfrlncB 4.33
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.40
RoMuAp 16.96 +.01
RcNtMuA 7.56 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.83 -.07
InfiBdY 6.56 +.01
IntGrowY 29.33 -.07
Osterweis Funds:
Slncon 11.64
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.89
TotRtAd 11.59 +.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 11.23
AIIAsset 12.70
ComodRR 7.08 -.09
Divlnc 12.24 +.02
EmgMkCur 10.52 +.01
EmMkBd 12.39 +.04
Fltlnc r 8.88 +01
ForBdUnr 11.65 +.03
FrgnBd 11.33 +.02
HiYld 9.55
InvGrCp 11.34 +.02
LowDu 10.65
ModDur 11.17 +.01
RealRhnl 12.62
ShortT 9.89
TotRt 11.59 +.01
TRII 11.14 +.01
TRIll 10.20 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 11.16
LwDurA 10.65
RealRtAp 12.62
TotRtA 11.59 +.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 11.05


RealRtC p 12.62
TotRtCt 11.59 +.01
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.62
TRtnp 11.59 +.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 11.22 +.01
TotRtnP 11.59 +.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.67 -.13
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.26 -.17


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.95
InfiValA 18.16 +.01
PionFdAp 41.73 -.16
ValueAp 12.11 -.05
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 10.33 -.01
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.42 -.02
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.26 +.01
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.85 -.03
BIChip n 45.43 -.07
CABondn 11.55 +.01
CapAppn 23.23 -.05
DivGro n 26.28 -.06
EmMktBn 14.14 +.04
EmEurop 18.64 -.10
EmMktSn 32.31 +.06
Eqlncn 26.13 -.13
Eqlndexn 38.52 -.12
Europen 15.48
GNMAn 10.08
Growth n 37.63
Gr&ln n 22.49 -.07
HIlthSci n 43.57 -.16
HiYieldn 6.91
InsfiCpG 18.69 -.02
InstHiYId n 9.73
MCEqGrnn 29.80 -.06
IntlBondn 10.21 +.03
IntDis n 45.00 +.23
Intl G&l 12.54
InflStkn 13.85 -.01
Japan n 7.56 +.02
LatAm n 40.63 -.04
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondnn 11.14
MidCapn 58.26 -.08
MCapValn 25.10 -.15
NAmern 35.40 +.02
NAsian 16.24 +.01
New Era n 43.88 -.28
N Horiz n 35.56 -.21
NIncn 9.98 +.01
NYBond n 11.96 +.01
OverSSFn 8.19
PSIncn 17.16 -.01
RealAssetrnll.18 -.05
RealEstn 20.74 -.07
R2010n 16.64 -.02
R2015n 12.95 -.01
R2020n 17.93 -.03
R2025 n 13.14 -.02
R2030 n 18.86 -.04
R2035n 13.34 -.02
R2040n 18.98 -.04
R2045n 12.63 -.03
SciTecn 26.26 +.09
ShtBd n 4.86
SmCpStk n 35.56 -.29
SmCapVal n38.51 -.27
SpecGrn 19.37 -.05
Speclnn 13.02 +.01
TFIncn 10.59
TxFrHn 11.85 +.01
TxFrSIn 5.72
USTIntn 6.32 +.01
USTLg n 14.01 +.03
VABondn 12.37 +.01
Value n 26.28 -.16
Principal Inv:
Divlnfillnst 9.84 -.02
LgCG In 10.25 -.01
LT20201n 12.64 -.03
LT20301n 12.48 -.03
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.09 -.09
HiYIdAp 5.66
MuHilncA 10.34 +.01
UtlityA 11.95 -.05
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.27 -.05
HiYIdBt 5.65
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 32.85 -.10
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.22
AZTE 9.56
ConvSec 20.14 -.04
DvrlnAp 7.64 +.01
EqlnAp 17.08 -.08
EuEq 19.48 -.03
GeoBalA 13.26 -.03
GIbEqtyp 9.34 -.01
GrInAp 14.51 -.08
GIblHIthA 47.44 -.13
HiYdAp 7.89
HiYIdIn 6.13
IncmAp 7.24 +.01
IntGrln p 9.29 -.01
InvAp 14.60 -.04
NJTxA p 9.89 +.01
MultCpGr 54.57 -.16
PATE 9.56 +.01
TxExA p 9.09 +.01
TFInAp 15.75 +.01
TFHYA 12.72 +.01
USGvAp 13.67 -.02
GIblUtilA 10.55 -.05
VoyAp 22.00 -.12
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.77 +.01
DvrlnBt 7.57
Eqlnct 16.93 -.08
EuEq 18.61 -.03
GeoBalB 13.12 -.03
GIbEq t 8.40 -.02
GINtRst 17.66 -.11
GrlnBt 14.26 -.07
GIblHIthB 37.75 -.10
HiYIdBt 7.88 +.01
HYAdBt 6.01 +.01
IncmBt 7.17 +.01
IntGrlnt 9.18 -.01
InfiGrth t 13.90 +.01
InvBt 13.09 -.04
NJTxB t 9.88 +.01
MultCpGr 46.57 -.14
TxExB t 9.09 +.01
TFHYBt 12.74 +.01
USGvBt 13.60 -.01
GlblUtilB 10.51 -.05
VoyBt 18.45 -.10
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.05 -.02
LgCAIphaA 43.68 -.21
Value 25.23 -.18
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkA p11.64
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.32 -.09
PennMulr 11.60 -.08
Premierlr 19.41 -.12
TotRetlr 13.81 -.07
ValSvc t 11.50 -.08
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.51 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.47 +.01
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.51 -.02
Schwab Funds:
HIlthCare 20.88 -.03
100OOnvr 40.65 -.13
S&P Sel 22.61 -.06
SmCpSI 21.36 -.18
TSMSelr 26.04 -.10
Scout Funds:
Infl 31.50 +.03
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.90 -.24
Sentinel Group:
ComS Ap 34.85 -.10
Sequoia 163.00 -.98
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.67 -.04
SoSunSCInvtn21.56-.10
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 56.38 -.11
Stratton Funds:
Mulf-Cap n 37.28 -.24
RealEstate n30.63 -.12
SmCapn 54.61 -.52
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.23 +.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktIn 9.31 +.02
TotRetBdl 10.28
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.04
Eqldxlnst 10.94 -.04
InfiEqllnst 15.58 -.02
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.81 -.05
Third Avenue Fds:
InfiValnstr 16.13 +.02
REVallnstr 26.35 +.01
Valuelnst 48.24 -.14
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.15
IncBuildAt 18.83 -.07
IncBuildCp 18.83 -.07
IntValue I 26.73
LtTMul 14.71
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.02
Income 9.36 +.01
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 72.75 -.96
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.62 +.01
Flexlncp 9.37 +.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 35.17 -.20
Tweedy Browne:


GblValue 24.86 -.05
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.51 -.14
ChinaReg 7.14 -.01
GIbRs 9.92 -.07
Gld&Mtls 13.18 -.21
WdPrcMn 12.83 -.16
USAA Group:
AgvGt 36.39 -.02
CABd 11.10
CrnstStr 23.13 -.03
GovSec 10.37
GrTxStr 14.67 -.01


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 16.42 -.02
Gr&lnc 16.15 -.07
IncStk 13.70 -.03
Inco 13.55 +02
Infl 24.54
NYBd 12.55
PrecMM 30.92 -.45
Sciech 14.67 -.01
ShtTBnd 9.28
SmCpStk 14.65 -.11
TxElt 13.74 +.01
TxELT 13.94 +.01
TxESh 10.85
VABd 11.68 +.01
WldGr 20.69 -.03
VALIC:
MdCpldx 20.91 -.15
Stkldx 26.89 -.09
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.47 -.02
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.76 -.05
CAITAdmn 11.76
CALTAdrnn12 +.01
CpOpAdl n 76.53 -.05
EMAdmr r n 34.56 -.11
Energyn 114.73 -.51
EqlnAdm n n50.73 -.13
EuroAdml n 57.19 -.04
ExplAdml n 73.05 -.43
ExtdAdm n 44.67 -.30
500Adml n 131.84 -.39
GNMA Ad n 11.05
GrwAdm n 36.83 +.01
HlthCr n 62.88 -.09
HiYldCp n 6.05
InfProAd n 29.29
ITBdAdml n 12.21
ITsryAdmln 11.81
IntGrAdm n 58.67 -.04
ITAdmln 14.42
ITGrAdmnn 10.50 +.01
LtdTrAdn 11.20
LTGrAdmln l.11 +.03
LTAdmln 11.81
MCpAdml n 99.83 -.49
MorgAdmn 62.03 -.10
MuHYAdrnm nl1.27
NYLTAdn 11.85 +.01
PrmCaprn 71.82 -.05
PALTAdm n11.76 +.01
ReitAdm r n 91.75 -.43
STsyAdml n 10.79
STBdAdmlnlO.67
ShtTrAdn 15.94
STFdAdn 10.89
STIGrAdn 10.88
SmCAdm n 37.85 -.31
TxMCaprn71.89 -.22
TfBAdml n 11.20 +.01
TStkAdm n 35.55 -.13
ValAdml n 22.84 -.15
WellslAdrnm n59.35 -.02
WellAdrm n59.15 -.05
Windsorn 49.50 -.17
WdsrllAdn 52.21 -.26
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 12.01 +.01
CapOppn 33.12 -.02
Convrt n 12.90 -.03
DivApplnn 23.73 -.01
DivdGron 16.90 +.01
Energy n 61.09 -.27
Eqlnc n 24.20 -.07
Explr n 78.43 -.46
FLLTn 12.26 +.01
GNMAn 11.05
GlobEqn 18.24 -.04
Grolncn 30.50 -.10
GrthEqn 12.32 -.04
HYCorpn 6.05
HlthCren 148.99 -.21
InflaPron 14.91
InfiExplrn 14.37 +.01
IntlGrn 18.43 -.01
InfiValn 29.49 -.10
ITIGraden 10.50 +.01
ITTsryn 11.81
LifeConn 17.24 -.01
LifeGro n 23.44 -.05
Lifelncn 14.74
LifeModn 20.89 -.03
LTIGraden 11.11 +.03
LTTsryn 13.48 +.03
Morg n 19.99 -.03
MuHYn 11.27
Mulntn 14.42
MuLtdn 11.20
MuLongn 11.81
MuShrtn 15.94
NJLTn 12.40
NYLTn 11.85 +.01
OHLTTEn 12.75 +.01
PALTn 11.76 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 17.49 -.20
PrmcpCorn 15.00
Prmcprn 69.19 -.04
SelValurn 20.87 -.14
STARn 20.64 -.03
STIGraden 10.88
STFedn 10.89
STTsryn 10.79
StratEqn 20.77 -.11
TgtRetlncn 12.22 -.01
TgRe2010n24.41 -.02
TgtRe2015nl3.50 -.01
TgRe2020n23.95 -.04
TgtRe2025 nl3.64 -.02
TgRe2030 n23.40 -.05
TgtRe2035 nl4.08 -.03
TgtRe2040On23.13 -.06
TgtRe2050 n23.03 -.06
TgtRe2045 nl4.52 -.04
USGron 21.00 -.01
USValuen 11.81 -.08
Wellsly n 24.50 -.01
Welltn n 34.25 -.03
Wndsrn 14.67 -.05
Wndsll n 29.42 -.14
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPlr n97.19 -.10
ExtMkt In 110.27 -.73
MidCplstPl n108.78 -.53
TotlntAdm r r23.77 -.04
Totlntllnstr n95.08 -.13
TotlntllPrn 95.10 -.13
TotlntSig rn 28.52 -.04
500n 131.83 -.40
Balancedn 23.76 -.05
EMktn 26.30 -.08
Europe n 24.55 -.01
Extend n 44.62 -.29
Growth n 36.83 +.01
LgCaplxn 26.33 -.09
LTBndn 14.70 +.03
MidCapn 21.98 -.11
Pacific n 9.47 -.02
REITrn 21.50 -.10
SmCapn 37.79 -.31
SmlCpGlthn24.29 -.14
STBndn 10.67
TotBndn 11.20 +.01
TotllntI n 14.21 -.02
TotStkdn 35.54 -.13
Value n 22.85 -.14
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.76 -.05
DevMklnstn 9.33 -.01
Extln n 44.67 -.30
FTAIIWIdl r n84.53 -.14
Grwthlstn 36.83 +.01
InfProlnstn 11.93
Instldxn 130.96 -.39
InsPI n 130.97 -.39
InstTStldxn 32.18 -.11
lnsTStPlus n32.18 .12
MidCplstn 22.05 -.11
REITInstrn 14.20 -.07
STIGrlnstn 10.88
SCInstn 37.85 -.31
TBIstn 11.20 +.01
TSInstn 35.56 -.13
Valuelstn 22.84 .15
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 108.90 -.32
GroSig n 34.10
ITBdSig n 12.21
MidCpldxn 31.50 .16
STBdldxn 10.67
SmCpSign 34.10 -.28
TotBdSgl n 11.20 +.01
TotStkSgln 34.31 -.13
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.94
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 9.92 +.02
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 9.50
CorelnvA 6.67 -.01
DivOppAp 15.57 .04
DivOppC t 15.40 .03
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.27 -.11
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.36 +.01
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 21.49 -.11
Opptylnv 39.60 -.12
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
Growth 43.22 -.10
UlStMulnc 4.83
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 42.04 -.09
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.83
Western Asset:


CrPIsBdF1 p11.70 +.01
CorePlusl 11.70 +.01
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.32


Market has worst






week since June


Associated Press


Stocks closed out their
worst week since June after
investors looked over third-
quarter corporate earnings
reports and decided there
wasn't much to get excited
about.
The big indexes were
mixed on Friday. But they
were all down more than 2
percent for the week. That
was their worst weekly
showing since the Standard
& Poor's 500 index fell 3
percent for the week ending
June 1.
On Friday, the S&P closed
down 4.25 points at 1,428.59.
The Dow Jones industrial
average edged up 2.46 points
to close at 13,328.85, giving
up an earlier gain of 75. The
Nasdaq composite lost 5.30
points to close at 3,044.11.
Investors haven't had
much to like this week, with
mixed results from U.S.
companies including Alcoa,
Safeway and Yum Brands.
Investors have seemed un-
sure how to evaluate the
news. This week stocks have
posted some of their biggest
daily losses in the late
morning or early afternoon.
"It's been a relative
downer week in the market
this week, and people are
going into the weekend not
wanting to hang out there
too much," said Bill Stone,
chief investment strategist



Business

HIGHLIGHTS


Federal deficit tops

$1T for fourth year

WASHINGTON-The fed-
eral budget deficit has topped
$1 trillion for a fourth straight
year. But a modest improve-
ment in economic growth
helped narrow the gap by $207
billion compared with last year.
The Treasury Department
said Friday that the deficit for
the 2012 budget year totaled
$1.1 trillion. Tax revenue rose
6.4 percent from last year to
more than $2.4 trillion, helping
contain the deficit.
The government's revenue
rose as more people got jobs
and received income. Corpora-
tions also contributed more tax
revenue than in 2011.

Dems in coal states

diverge on Obama

ST. CLAIRSVILLE, Ohio-
Friends of coal are certain they
know the enemy.
They fault President Barack
Obama and his Environmental
Protection Agency for new
clean air rules they deride as a
devastating blow to a multibil-
lion-dollar industry that has
been the lifeblood of Ap-
palachia for generations.
The agency standards im-
posed earlier this year tight-
ened limits on existing coal
powered-plant emissions while
guidelines on restricting green-
house gases could affect new
plants as early as 2013.

Profits soar for

mortgage lenders

NEW YORK The country's
two biggest mortgage lenders,
Wells Fargo and JPMorgan
Chase, reported Friday that a
surge in home lending pushed
them to record profits.
JPMorgan CEO Jamie
Dimon declared the housing
market "has turned the corner."
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
said that "every quarter, we
have more confidence."
Wells said it issued $139 bil-
lion in mortgages from July
through September, compared
with $89 billion in the same pe-
riod last year.
From wire reports


of the world, or are we going
Market watch to start accelerating and
Oct. 12, 2012 lead the way out of reces-
sion for the rest of the
Dow Jones +2.46 world," said Randy Warren,
industrials 13,328.85 chief investment officer for

Warren Financial Service.
Nasdaq -5.30 Financial stocks were the
composite 3,044.11 focus on Friday

Standard & -4.25 The nation's largest bank,
oor'500 128.59 JPMorgan Chase, blew away
doors 500 142859 Wall Street's expectations

Russell -6.69 for quarterly profits. Wells
2000 Fargo just edged out profit
0 823.09 forecasts but its revenue fell
NYSE diary short.
Advanced: 1,101 Wells Fargo fell 93 cents,

Declined: 1,873 or 2.6 percent, to $34.25, and
JPMorgan fell 48 cents to

Unchanged: 147 $41.62. Bank of America fell

Volume: 3.1 b 22 cents to $9.12. US Ban-
corp lost 67 cents to $33.72.
Nasdaq diary Financial and utility
Advanced: 817 stocks had the biggest de-

Declined: 1,611 lines among the 10 indus-
Unchaed: tries in the S&P 500.
Unchanged: 131 Trucking and logistics

Volume: 1.5 b company J.B. Hunt Trans-
AP port Services Inc. rose $3.58,

or 6.5 percent, to $58.37
or PNC Wealth Manage- after its third-quarter profit
nent. rose almost 14 percent on
Looking beyond this strong growth in handling
veek, stocks have had a containers that move by
trong run. The S&P 500 is ship, rail, or truck.
p 11.8 percent since June Advanced Micro Devices
. The run-up suggested that Inc. dropped 46 cents, or 14
investors were anticipating percent, to $2.74, after the
strong economic recovery chipmaker said its third-
iow it's put-up or shut-up quarter revenue will fall
ime for corporate profits. about 10 percent from the
"What people have to de- second quarter because of
ide is, is America going weak demand for its
nto recession with the rest products.



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I NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


Torchmark 50.77
TorDBkg 82.56
Total SA 49.62
TotalSys 23.03
Transom 45.49
Travelers 68.72
Tredgar 16.54
TriConfi 16.21
TrinaSolar 4.21
TwoHrblnv 11.66
Tycolntis 27.08
Tyson 16.02
UBSAG 12.61
UDR 24.01
UIL Hold 35.79
UNS Engy 41.39
USAirwy 11.36
USG 21.06
UltraPtg 23.22
UniFirst 66.50
UnilevNV 36.20
UnionPac 121.05
UtdContI 20.00
UPSB 72.11
UtdRentals 32.08
US Bancrp 33.72
USNGsrs 23.16
US OilFd 34.00
USSteel 21.19
UtdTedh 75.96
UtdhlthGp 57.07
UnumGrp 19.75


ValeSA 18.20 -.06
ValeSApf 17.54 -.12
ValeroE 29.01 -.13
ViyNBcp 9.85 -.30
VangTotBd 85.00 +.06
VangTSM 73.02 -.32
VangREIT 64.77 -.23
VangEmg 41.60 -.12
VangEur 45.75 -.04
VangEAFE 32.98 +.01
VarianMed 58.29 -.58
Vectren 28.78 -.26
Ventas 63.54 -.12
VeoliaEnv 10.61 +.26
VeriFone 31.06 +.38
VerizonOm 44.62 -.58
Visa 139.12 +.07
Vishaylnt 8.59 -.25
VMware 87.30 -1.69
Vornado 78.49 -.53
WGL Hold 39.09 -.10
WPCarey 51.30 +1.37
WPXEnn 17.86 -.24
Wabash 6.48 -.16
WaddellR 31.44 -.41
WalMart 75.81 +.80
Walgrn 35.94 -.16
WalterEn 35.54 -2.14
WsteMInc 32.09 -.02


Weathflnfi 12.17
WebsterFn 22.00
WeinRIt 27.57
WellPoint 61.83
WellsFargo 34.25
WestarEn 29.31
WAstEMkt 16.20
WstAMgdHi 6.30
WstAstMtn 21.15
WAstlnfOpp 13.28
WstnRefin 24.34
WstnUnion 17.88
Weyerhsr 26.26
Whrlpl 83.58
WhiongPet 46.41
WmsCos 35.14
WmsPtrs 53.59
Winnbgo 11.22
WiscEngy 38.16
WT India 18.83
Workday n 48.69
Worthgtn 21.29
XL Grp 24.98
XcelEngy 27.62
Xerox 7.08
Xylem n 24.61
Yamanag 18.69
YumBrnds 69.45
Zimmer 62.26


Name Last Chg
SPMafs 36.37 -.16
SP HIthC 40.31 -.06
SP CnSt 35.85 +.03
SP Consum 46.25 -.01
SP Engy 72.56 -.40
SPDR Fncl 15.81 -.22
SP Inds 36.45 +.04
SPTech 29.92 -.02
SP UDI 36.50 -.21
StdPac 6.97 -.08
Standex 44.13 -.52
StanBlkDk 70.06 -1.67
StateStr 41.38 -.64
Steris 35.13 -.17
SbllwtrM 10.22 -.80
StratHotels 5.85 -.14
Sbyker 52.30 -.16
SturmRug 44.85 +.27
SubPpne 42.19 +.22
SunCmts 43.41 -.12
Suncorgs 32.98 -.07
Suntedich .82 -.02
SunTrst 29.17 -1.02
SupEnrgy 19.95 -.33
Supvalu 1.86 -.04
Synovus 2.37 -.07
Synovus pf 21.24 -.49
Sysco 31.25
TCFFncI 11.13 -.55
TDAmeritr 15.56 -.38


TE Connect 32.75
TECO 17.52
TJXs 42.83
TaiwSemi 15.12
TalismEg 13.02
Target 61.52
TeckRes g 30.50
TelefBrasil 21.81
TelefEsp 13.09
TempurP 32.37
Tenaris 39.60
TenetHltrs 23.67
Teradata 74.59
Teradyn 13.62
Terex 22.43
TerraNitro 211.53
Tesoro 38.29
TetraTech 5.99
TevaPhrm 39.44
Textron 25.49
Theragen 1.58
ThermoFis 58.84
ThomCrkg 2.70
3DSys 36.55
3M Co 92.75
Tiffany 62.21
TWCable 96.86
TimeWarn 45.06
Timken 37.25
TitanMet 12.06
TollBros 32.71
TorchEngy 1.40


ft




s


1
ii
a
N
ti


c
ii


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............... .................. publisher
M ike Arnold ....................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. ............. citizen member
i Mac Harris ................. ........... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...... ................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ENDORSEMENTS




Vote to approve


discount for


combat-disabled


In 2006, Florida voters ap-
proved a constitutional
amendment granting a
property tax discount on home-
stead property to honorably
discharged veterans commen-
surate with their degree of dis-
ability, provided the veteran is
a current Florida resident, is
age 65 or older,
has a combat-re- THE IS
lated disability
and was a Florida Consti
resident at the Amend
time of entering
military service. OUR 01
If approved by Vote
voters, Amend-
ment 2 would ex-
tend eligibility for the existing
property tax discount to those
veterans with a combat-related
disability who established res-
idency in Florida after enter-
ing military service.
According to the state's Rev-
enue Estimating Conference,
Amendment 2's estimated im-
pact on school taxes during fis-
cal year 2013-14 would be a
combined $1.1 million in
school districts across the
state, $2.3 million in fiscal year
2014-15 and $3.6 million in fis-
cal year 2015-16. The impact on
non-school property tax rev-
enues is expected to be $1.3
million in fiscal year 2013-14,
$2.6 million in 2014-15, and $4
million in 2015-16.


S
tu


P
i


Any loss of tax revenue is a
matter of concern given the
difficult budget times of the
past several years. Neverthe-
less, the modest revenue loss
incurred by eliminating the
current inequity in favor of ex-
tending eligibility to all com-
bat-disabled veterans calling
Florida home is a
;SUE: small price to pay
for their sacri-
utional fices made in de-
nent 2. fense of our
freedoms under
INION: the flag of the
Yes.' United States.
As our veterans
age and struggle
with combat-related disabili-
ties, Amendment 2 would pro-
vide needed financial relief,
especially for those veterans
with combat-related disabili-
ties on small, fixed incomes,
by helping them to meet their
medical and property tax
bills.
While legislation is pre-
ferred to right the current in-
equity, the fact that the
measure won unanimous ap-
proval in the Legislature and
that the existing eligibility re-
quirements are already chis-
eled in the Florida
Constitution, a "Yes" vote to ex-
tend the discount to all combat-
disabled veterans residing in
Florida is recommended.


Since 1997, state law has pro-
vided a full homestead prop-
erty tax exemption to surviving
spouses of active duty service
members who died from serv-
ice-connected causes. As pro-
posed by the Legislature,
Amendment 9 would enshrine


this exemption in
the Florida Con-
stitution and ex-
tend it to
surviving spouses
of police, fire-
fighters, correc-
tional officers,
paramedics and
emergency med-
ical technicians.
The exemption


THE IS!
Constitu
Amendm

OUR OPI
Vote '

applies as


long as the surviving spouse
holds the title to the home-
stead, is a permanent resident
of the homestead and does not
remarry. If the property is sold,
the surviving spouse can trans-
fer the exemption to a new pri-
mary residence.
Given the small number of
first responders killed in the
line of duty, the state Revenue
Estimating Conference esti-
mates Amendment 9, if passed,
would reduce property tax rev-
enues by about $600,000

GENERAL
The general election is
Tuesday, Nov. 6.


statewide the first year it's in
effect. This is a minuscule sum
for recognizing the sacrifice of
first responders and softening
the devastating loss suffered by
the families of those who pro-
tect and serve us.
Furthermore, considering
that the surviving
spouses of most
SUE: first responders
who die in the line
tional of duty are youthful
ient 9. with young chil-
dren, affording
INION: them the same tax
No.' relief currently of-
fered to the
spouses of military
members who died while on ac-
tive duty is the right thing to do.
Extending property tax relief
to surviving spouses of first re-
sponders certainly has merit
and warrants the public's sup-
port. Nevertheless, the current
law enacted in 1997 should be
changed by the Legislature to
accomplish this deserved tax
relief- not the Florida Consti-
tution that has become a volu-
minous compendium of
disparate statutes. For this rea-
son, a "No" vote is reluctantly
recommended.

ELECTION
* Visit www.votecitrus.com for
local election information or
call 352-341-6740.


Primary analysis
Being one of the three candi-
dates that ran in what the writer
called a "three-way race" the
District 1, county commission
"universal primary" and a
current candidate in the 2014
District 2, Citrus County Com-
mission race, I did my own
analysis.
At first, I thought that the
"universal primary" election
would be beneficial to my elec-
tion as all parties can vote with
no opposition in such a primary,
but then after I realized that 73
percent of the voters did not
vote. I know that it is a Florida
law and it is for the birds! One
man, after the election, came up
to me and said, "I would have
voted for you, but I am a regis-
tered Independent." Who knows
how many did not vote because
they did not know that they
could?
I spoke to an attorney with
the Florida Attorney General's
Office who told me that the


"You have reached the pinnacle of success
as soon as you become uninterested in
money, compliments, or publicity."
Dr. 0. A. Battista, 1917-1995


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Romney surge too little, too late


Mitt Romney's stellar de-
bate performance in-
jected new energy,
enthusiasm and money into his
presidential campaign. National
polls now show the
race tied with less
than a month to go. .
But have the funda-
mental factors gov-
erning this election
changed? Not really. "
Not yet.
Just a few weeks
ago, Republicans 2
were wringing hands,
pointing fingers and Cokie
hanging heads. Now Steven i
it's the Democrats'
turn. A typical wail of OTH
dismay came from VOI(
blogger Andrew Sulli-
van, who headlined his post on
The Daily Beast, "Did Obama
Just Throw the Entire Election
Away?" The president, kvetched
Sullivan, "has, at a critical mo-
ment, deeply depressed his
base."
But if you step back from the
daily even hourly frenzy to
identify "turning points" and
"game changers," the campaign
looks a bit different. Many of the
essential elements geography
and demography, organization
and personality still favor
President Barack Obama.
Romney's victory in the first
debate is clearly having a positive
impact. In the latest Pew Re-
search Center survey, his favor-
able rating broke 50 percent for
the first time, and among Romney
supporters, two out of three now
feel strongly about their choice.
The dynamism in Republican
ranks is no longer fueled just by
hatred of Obama; after a long and
rocky courtship, many GOP'ers
seem ready to embrace their can-
didate.
Despite the latest improve-
ment in jobless numbers, the eco-
nomic recovery remains sluggish.
The real unemployment rate is
about 15 percent when discour-


R
II
cl


aged and part-time workers are
included. Drops in real income
and wealth erode family wallets
and well-being. Paul Ryan, the
Republican vice presidential
candidate, accurately
described plenty of dis-
illusioned young adults
S who are living in their
parents' basements,
gazing sadly at fading
Obama posters.
Romney has shrewdly
started to tell personal
stories on the stump,
softening his image as a
and hard-nosed, hard-
oberts hearted business execu-
tive who relates to
ER ordinary folks only
ES when he fires them.
When he talks about
drawing up a will for a dying 14-
year-old, giving away the young
man's skateboard and fishing rod,
he becomes a far more appealing
figure.
But Romney's surge goes only
so far. The basic architecture of
the race has not changed, starting
with geography Yes, polls have
narrowed in swing states such as
Florida and Virginia, but the in-
dependent website Real Clear
Politics still puts Obama ahead in
21 states with 251 electoral votes,
19 shy of the magic number of
270. As ABC's political director
Amy Walter concludes, this map
leaves Romney with "a very nar-
row path to (victory) and no room
for error"
Demography has not changed,
either Obama is still getting more
than 90 percent of the black vote
and about 70 percent of the His-
panic vote. Democrats should
worry that in the Pew survey,
Obama's share of the white fe-
male vote dropped sharply, but in
several swing states Colorado,
Nevada, Virginia, Florida a
strong minority turnout could
still pull the president across the
line.
That's why a third fundamen-
tal, organization, is so critical.


SAIYU!


I I U!


SERY FOUR


Team Obama showed its muscle
last month by pulling in more
than $180 million, much of it
raised in small sums online.
About 570,000 donors gave for the
first time, and each one of them
becomes a potential campaign
worker, organizer and cheer-
leader. Romney has to convince
some Obama voters from four
years ago to switch sides; the
president only has to get his
proven supporters to the polls.
A fourth fundamental is the
economy In the Pew survey, vot-
ers express more confidence in
Romney's job-creating abilities,
but some underlying trends favor
the president. As Walter points
out, the Bloomberg Consumer
Comfort Index has risen for six
straight weeks, the longest such
stretch in six years. The number
of Americans who think the coun-
try is headed in the wrong direc-
tion remains high, but it has
dropped by 18 points in a year.
The stock market keeps setting
new records. Obama's auto
bailout helps him in states such
as Ohio and Michigan.
The final fundamental is per-
sonality. Romney's stories are ef-
fective, but he starts from far
behind. When Pew asked which
candidate "connects well with or-
dinary Americans," Obama main-
tained a 29-point lead. Three out
of four still think Romney's poli-
cies would favor the wealthy, and
even though he has renounced
his own comments deriding the
"47 percent" of Americans who
feel like "victims," Team Obama
will repeat that damning clip
endlessly in its advertising.
This election is much closer
than Democrats expected a month
ago. But if you look behind the
daily polls and examine the basic
shape of the contest, the president
still holds an advantage.
--*--A
Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. com.


YEAEGJ BJDRE TIEa LCTONS t NAMitO[rPC.
RNGCOVRTRE ULO CLAZ


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

"universal primary" law came
into existence in 1998, after a


Florida Constitutional Revision
Committee was able to have it
enacted.
He also said another revision
committee could change it, but
that it would take years until
another Florida Constitutional
Convention, and that the only
way to have it abolished is with
a Florida legislative amend-
ment.
I recommend that all Citizens
for a truly representative and
democratic government write
and call for an amendment to
abolish the law entitled "Uni-
versal Primary"!
As a candidate, I hope to
never be used in such an elec-
tion again, and as president of
the Ronald Reagan Republican
Assembly, I will fight to rid the
citizens of this undemocratic
law called a "Universal Pri-
mary" as it is a policy- for the
birds!
Renee Christopher-McPheeters
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


No. 9 desirable


as law, but not



as amendment


SLETTERS to the Editor


.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to the EDITOR


Foreign policy
While thugs throughout
the world have bombed
over 28 diplomatic stations,
they still have a lot to go to
get to all of the 315 U.S. em-
bassies, consulates, and
diplomatic missions
around the world.
Included are nine mis-
sions in China, 12 in Mex-
ico, eight in France, and 47
in Africa.
Currently there are over
9,900 employees employed
and supervised by Secre-
tary of State Hillary Clin-
ton at a cost to the United
States of 53 million dollars.
There are over 54 major
policies in which they are
involved, including issues
from counter terrorism to
youth activities.
Woodrow Wilson was
president during World
War I and was considered
to be an Isolationist and at-
tempted to not be involved
in the war, but with the
sinking of the Titanic by
Germans, he had little
choice but to get involved.
He was the leading force
in the development of the
League of Nations with the
expectation that this organ-
ization could prevent wars
which it, of course, could
not.
It appears now that the
U.S. is in a Wilson predica-
ment; should the U.S. iso-
late themselves partially or
completely from world pol-
itics or not? If not, then just
how involved should our
country be in the 315 mis-
sions?
William C. Young
Crystal River

Vote for Nancy
My wife and I work hard
for the environment, mostly
water
I am president of TOO
FAR, a water activist
group; we belong to the Ho-
mosassa River Alliance
and I am the chair of the
Citrus/Hernando Water-
ways Restoration Council-
Citrus County Task Force.
We see very little support
from Florida government.


We love Nancy A
ziano because she
helped in major in
She sponsored the
strongest and mos
tant legislation to
our waters. Her "L
Sources First" leg:
the best in spite
tempts to weaken
We love Nancy b
of what she did to
the Florida Nursir
Industry
We love Nancy b
she heard us and s
scored "The Jessica
ford Act."
We love Nancy f
200 other bills she
scored.
We love Nancy f
heart, her soul, he
and her honesty.
See her website
www.nancyargenz:
Jan and Al


Energy reso
Ttter to Mitt Rc


rgen- U.S. need for no more than
has a token presence in that
stances. part of the world.
single 0 Explain succinctly, by
t impor- reducing the argument to
protect barrels of oil equivalents
local (BOE) needed to run our
isolation is economy
of at- 0 Convert that number
it to currently available
becausee equivalents and needed in-
clean up crease over a specific time.
ng Home 0 Explain the number
and type of jobs needed on
becausee each unit of exploration
spon- and production to obtain
a Lunds- the needed BOE's (rig, pro-
duction platform, miners,
or over nuclear plant builders and
spon- developers, cracking unit)...
Hope you get my gist.
or her 0 Frame it in a measur-
r drive able time.
Propose a plan that
sets the stage for and moti-
iano.com vates the private sector to
start immediately
Grubman Paint a picture of non-
Inverness U.S. involvement in that
part of the world, and the
)urceS economic benefits to us,
omnveyre: the American people.


energy:
I'll try to make this brief:
We have the proven po-
tential energy resources in
this country to eliminate
the need for Middle
Eastern/African Oil.
The U.S. interest in
the Middle East is not sand,
it is energy, in the form of
oil.
All of the economic
and political problems in
that area come from our
need for energy.
A credible, viable and
easily explainable plan to
allow our private sector to
make us energy independ-
ent would eliminate the


Robin Humphrey
Crystal River

Re-elect Himmel
It is important that we re-
elect Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel for Citrus County
Superintendent of Schools.
For those who usually
vote a straight ticket,
please make sure to vote
for her no matter which
party you agree with. Sam
is experienced and has
been a great leader
Citrus County elemen-
tary and middle schools
have achieved a state rat-
ing of A-plus! These great


kids will be the ones mov-
ing on to high school
shortly where they will
raise those schools to A-
plus ratings as well.
In this time of economic
downturn, Sandra has been
fiscally responsible and
worked within her budget.
Most importantly she is a
great leader and she loves
the kids she serves across
the county.
Please share this opinion
with your friends and vote
for Sandra "Sam" Himmel
for superintendent of
schools.
Marion Langlo
Hernando

Abortion
Helen E Koczur says my
data is incorrect concern-
ing abortion. She cites Dr
Nathansen, co-founder of
the National Abortion
Rights Action League as my
source. I never mentioned
him. I cited The Lancet, a
renowned medical journal
and an independent
source. From where does
Helen Koczur get her infor-
mation about abortion?
According to the study
conducted by Guttmacher
Institute and the World
Health Organization
(WHO) and identified in
The Lancet, the rate of
abortion is higher in coun-
tries where it is illegal or
highly restricted. They also
discovered that abortions
carried out in places
where it is illegal tend to
be unsafe because they are
done by people who lack
the necessary skills or
occur in rooms that don't
meet minimal medical



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standards.
I had an ectopic preg-
nancy My baby was stuck
in my fallopian tube, un-
able to reach my uterus.
Without an abortion, I may
not have lived to take care
of my young son. Under the
new laws proposed by the
GOP, my abortion would be
against the law.
When I was a teenager,
three of my classmates
"disappeared." No one
talked about them. I later
discovered they were not
only pregnant, they died.
Two had illegal abortions.
One was too young to bear
a child.
My daughter was preg-
nant and her baby died in
utero. She had a legal abor-
tion to remove the fetus.
The GOP opposes all abor-
tions, no exceptions. What
would have happened to
my daughter and her dead
baby under the proposed
laws?
Abortion should never be
last resort birth control, yet


more and more laws are
preventing easy access to
contraceptive measures.
With the birth rate rising
and natural resources
taxed to the limit, when will
government get out of the
birth control legislation and
seriously address the eco-
nomic and environmental
problems of our country?
Kathy Dobronyi
Inverness

ENDORSEMENT
GUIDELINES
The Chronicle has
enacted its practice of
asking endorsement
letters be limited to the
reasons writers are
supporting candidates
not why they won't
support candidates.
Endorsement letters
are subject to editing to
keep the emphasis on
reasons for support vs.
criticism of their
opponents


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NATION


Associated Press
Diane Latham holds an
American flag Friday as the
funeral caisson passes
during the funeral for Army
National Guard Sgt. Thomas
Jefferson Butler IV in Wilm-
ington, N.C. The 25-year-
old soldier was killed Oct.
1 with two others when a
Taliban suicide bomber
rammed a motorcycle
packed with explosives
into a joint U.S.-Afghan pa-
trol in Khost, Afghanistan.


Town waits
for list of 'Johns'
KENNEBUNK, Maine-
Residents of a Maine town are
going to have to wait at least a
few more days before learning
if friends and neighbors have
been accused of calling on a
Zumba instructor charged with
being a prostitute.
Kennebunk police declined
Friday to release any names
because of a court challenge
by a lawyer for two of the
suspected clients.
Alexis Wright, of Wells, has
pleaded not guilty to prostitu-
tion, invasion of privacy and
other charges for allegedly
accepting money for sex and
secretly videotaping her en-
counters. Her business part-
ner also pleaded not guilty.
Smaller iPad to be
revealed Oct. 23
Apple Inc. is set to reveal a
smaller, cheaper version of
the iPad at an event Oct. 23,
according to several reports
published Friday.
The reports from
Bloomberg News, Reuters
and the AllThingsD blog are
based on unnamed sources
"familiar with the plans."
The screen is reportedly
about half the size of the
iPad's, which measures 9.7
inches diagonally. Analysts
speculate the starting price of
the device could be about
$299.
Crackdown of soft
drinks leads to suit
NEW YORK- Soft drink
makers, restaurateurs and
other businesses are suing to
block New York City's move to
end the sale of super-sized,
sugary drinks in many eateries.
The American Beverage
Association and others sued
the city Friday. City officials
had no immediate response.
Dr. nabbed in Italy
goes to prison
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -A
former Indiana surgeon cap-
tured in Italy after five years
on the run has been sen-
tenced to seven years in
prison for health care fraud.
A federal judge who sen-
tenced Mark Weinberger on Fri-
day said he imposed a relatively
lengthy sentence because
Weinberger fled and because of
the trouble he caused his former
patients and employees.
Octomom accused
of child neglect
SANTAANA, Calif. Police
investigated allegations of child
neglect at the home of Octo-
mom Nadya Suleman after a
caregiver reported the abuse
last month, police said Friday.
Authorities and social serv-
ices had previously investi-
gated many of the
allegations, La Habra police
said in a statement.
Suleman who has been
in the media spotlight since
giving birth to octuplets after
she already had six children
- lived in the home in Or-
ange County until recently,
when she moved to the Los
Angeles County city of
Palmdale.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS Orstokes controversy BRIEFS
HRomney stokes controversy
Honoring yCelebrate
American citizens than a year by the ....
C oBdItanayaO


Associated Press
ALEPPO, Syria- The injured ar-
rive at the hospital in taxis or in the
back of pickup trucks, to the blare
of car horns and shouts of "Help!"
Sometimes, they are battle-
hardened rebels with gaping
wounds. Sometimes, they are chil-
dren, peppered with shrapnel and
screaming in pain.
Those who die are left on the
sidewalk outside, to be claimed
hours later by relatives.
An Associated Press team spent
24 hours at Dar al-Shifa hospital in
Aleppo and witnessed the frantic
work by overtaxed doctors and
nurses to save those wounded in
the battle for control of Syria's
largest city.
The AP first visited the hospital
last month and returned this week
to get a fuller impression of how its
staff is coping amid Syria's civil
war The routine is as simple as it
is brutal: A barrage of shelling
echoes over the city, and about 15
minutes later, the wounded flow in.
The medics work amid the wails
of traumatized children, badly


uricizes Dzaen on
consulate attack

Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. Broadening his
attack on administration foreign pol-
icy, Mitt Romney accused Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden on Friday of "doubling
down on denial" in a dispute over se-
curity at a diplomatic post in Libya
that was overrun by terrorists who
killed the U.S. ambassador and three
other Americans.
"The vice president directly contra-
dicted the sworn testimony of State
Department officials," the Republican
presidential candidate said, eager to
stoke a controversy that has flared pe-
riodically since the attack Sept. 11 "...


have a right to know
just what's going on.
And we're going to
find out."
President Barack
Obama had no cam-
paign appearances
during the day, leav- Mitt
ing it to White House Romney
press secretary Jay
Carney to defend Biden's assertion in
a campaign debate Thursday night
that "we weren't told" of an official re-
quest for more security at the site.
The spokesman rejected Romney's
claim of a contradiction. Biden "was
speaking directly for himself and for
the president. He meant the White
House," Carney said.
With his accusation, Romney once
again pushed foreign policy to the fore-
front of a campaign dominated for more


r economy, which has
been painfully slow to
i recover from the worst
recession in more than
a half century
The Republican
challenger was cam-
Joe paigning across a pair
Biden of battleground states
during the day, first in
Virginia, which has 13 electoral votes,
and then in Ohio, which has 18 elec-
toral votes and where running mate
Paul Ryan joined him. It takes 270
electoral votes to win the White House.
Biden was in Wisconsin, Ryan's
home state, and one where polls give
Obama a narrow lead despite a debate
performance last week that was so
poor it fueled a Republican comeback
nationally and sent shudders through
the ranks of Democratic partisans.


Coping with wounded


wounded men shouting Islam's
declaration of faith in their final
minutes, and rebel fighters holding
RPGs mourning dead comrades,
with tears streaming down their
gunpowder-blackened cheeks.
Blood is everywhere. Orderlies
mop it up as more wounded arrive.
Amid the din of groans and cries
for help, a worker spots a severed
limb on the floor and tries to break
the tension with some black humor
"Anyone missing a foot?" he
asked.
Once a private clinic owned by a
businessman loyal to President
Bashar Assad, Dar al-Shifa hospi-
tal has been taken over by volun-
teer doctors, nurses and aides
united by their opposition to the
regime and the need to give med-
ical care to civilians and rebels.
The seven-story hospital stands
only 400-500 yards from the front
line in a neighborhood that is heav-
ily shelled. Nearly three months
into the rebel offensive in Aleppo,
the facility has taken at least six di-
rect hits, mostly affecting the upper
stories; its staff uses the bottom
three floors.


Most of the surrounding apart-
ment blocks are badly damaged and
deserted, with the only evidence of
life being the fluttering of clothes on
laundry lines or an occasional resi-
dent stepping onto a balcony to get a
better cellphone signal.
Dar al-Shifa has only seven doc-
tors, two of whom are trained for
emergency duties, and two nurses.
The atmosphere is a bizarre and
somewhat unnerving mixture of
urgency, nonchalance, resolve and
anger
The staff smokes freely in the
corridors, watching TV during
breaks in treating the waves of
wounded. Dr Osman al-Haj Osman
even has moved his wife and two
small children into the facility in
order to be close to them.
Hospital officials said they see
about 100 to 120 cases a day, of
which 10 or 15 are children. Eighty
percent of the cases are civilians;
the rest are mostly rebel fighters.
In the 24-hour period that the AP
was there on Wednesday and
Thursday, the hospital's records
showed nine dead and 107
wounded.


US warning reflects fears of Iranian cyberattack


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Defense Secre-
tary Leon Panetta's pointed warning
that the U.S. will strike back against a
cyberattack underscores the Obama
administration's growing concern that
Iran could be the first country to un-
leash cyberterrorism on America.
Panetta's unusually strong com-
ments Thursday came as former U.S.
government officials and cybersecu-
rity experts said the U.S. believes
Iranian-based hackers were responsi-
ble for cyberattacks that devastated
computer systems of Persian Gulf oil
and gas companies.
Unencumbered by diplomatic or
economic ties that restrain other na-
tions from direct conflict with the U.S.,
Iran is an unpredictable foe that na-
tional security experts contend is not
only capable but willing to use a so-
phisticated computer-based attack.
Panetta made it clear the military is


Associated Press
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said
the U.S. will strike back against any
cyberattacks.
ready to retaliate though he didn't
say how if it believes the nation is
threatened by a cyberattack, and he
made it evident the U.S. would con-
sider a preemptive strike.
"Iran is a country for whom terror
has simply been another tool in their
foreign policy toolbox, and they are a
country that feels it has less and less


to lose by breaking the norms of the
rest of the world," said Stewart Baker,
former assistant secretary at the De-
partment of Homeland Security and
now in private law practice. "If any-
body is going to release irresponsible
unlimited attacks, you'd expect it to be
Iran."
National security experts have long
complained the administration needs
to be much more open about what the
military could and would do if the U.S.
were to be the victim of cyberattacks.
They argue that such deterrence
worked in the Cold War with Russia
and would help convince would-be at-
tackers that an assault on America
would have dire results.
Panetta took the first steps toward
answering those critics in a speech an-
alysts said was a thinly veiled warning
to Iran, and the opening salvo in the
campaign to convince Tehran any
cyberattack against America would
trigger a swift and deadly response.


Confetti rains down on
parishioners Friday at the
Basilica of Our Lady of
Aparecida during a Mass to
celebrate Brazilian Catholics'
patroness feast day.

Bullied teen
commits suicide
TORONTO -Authorities
said a 15-year-old British
Columbia girl was found dead
in an apparent suicide, weeks
after posting a haunting
YouTube video detailing
years of bullying she said
drove her to drugs and
alcohol.
Coroner Barb McLintock
said Thursday night prelimi-
nary indications suggest
Amanda Todd killed herself.
The teen pleaded for help
in a 9-minute video posted
Sept. 7. She doesn't speak,
but holds up a series of notes
saying she was lured by a
stranger to expose her
breasts via webcam. She said
the picture was used to tor-
ment her on social media.
Fidel Castro fine,
according to son
HAVANA- One of Fidel
Castro's sons reportedly said
his father is in good shape
despite a long public silence
that has again fueled specu-
lation about the 86-year-old
former president's health.
Journalist for the state-run
newspaper Venceremos
quoted Alex Castro as saying
"the comandante" is going
about daily life as normal,
reading and exercising.
Rumors of Fidel Castro's pur-
portedly declining health sur-
faced anew this week after he
did not publicly congratulate
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez on his re-election.
Christian accused
of blasphemy
KARACHI, Pakistan -A
Pakistani official said police
have opened a blasphemy
case against a teenage Chris-
tian boy accused of sending
derogatory text messages
about Islam's prophet to
neighbors in the southern city
of Karachi.
Senior police officer Shahid
Hayat said Friday the 17-
year-old is in hiding along
with family members after
neighbors angrily came to his
house to inquire about the
text messages.
Somali pirates
release ship
MOGADISHU, Somalia--A
Somali pirate said the
Liberian-flagged, Greek-owned
bulk carrier MV Free Goddess
has been released after pay-
ment of a $2.3 million ransom.
Bile Hussein, a pirate
based in Garacad in the
semi-autonomous Puntland
region of Somalia, said Friday
that they initially wanted to be
paid $9 million after they cap-
tured the ship. He said
months of negotiations led to
the lowering of the ransom
and they released the ship
Thursday.
Cocaine cache
benefits animals
THE HAGUE, Netherlands
- A major cocaine seizure in
Europe turned out to be good
news for the animals at Rot-
terdam's zoo.
Drugs were hidden among
boxes of bananas, and the
fruit went to the monkeys and
other creatures at the Blijdorp
zoo.
Dutch prosecutors said Fri-
day more than eight tons of
cocaine was hidden among
the bananas on a ship from
Ecuador.
-From wire reports


/ I


Associated Press
A youth carries a child wounded by Syrian Army shelling Thursday near Dar al-Shifa hospital in Aleppo, Syria.

Overtaxed doctors tend to flood of victims of Syrian civil war


*










SPORTS


Yankees, Tigers set
for American League
Championship Series
after New York's 3-1
win over Baltimore
on Friday night./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College football/B2
0 MLB playoffs/B3
0 Auto racing/B3
0 High School football/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL/B5
0 College roundup/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Lady 'Canes queens of the course


Citrus girls win county

golf meet; two tie for
individual crown
JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
INVERNESS 18 holes. One match.
All the marbles.
Bragging rights were up for grabs Fri-
day afternoon, as the county's girls golf
teams convened at Lakeside Country Club
Crystal River High School's Maycee
Mullarkey follows through on her second
shot on the ninth hole Friday afternoon at
Lakeside Golf and Country Club in
Inverness during the girls county golf
championship.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


to vie for the rights to call themselves
county champions. And after six hours,
and what had to be 20 miles traversed, the
Citrus High School girls golf team walked
away victorious, after shooting a 443 and
narrowly escaping second-place
Lecanto's 452. Crystal River, ever improv-
ing, rounded out the field by scoring a 479.
The top two golfers on the day, Citrus'
Victoria Pfeiffer and Crystal River's
Maycee Mullarkey, tied after 18 holes,
after each shot 99, ending with a share of
the county crown.
Crystal River coach Claudia Sebold
commented on Mullarkey's performance.
"I couldn't be happier with all my play-
ers," she said. "Besides Marisa (Wilder),
none of the other girls have played 18
holes before. But Maycee is a great player
Shooting a 99 and medaling, it's great. But
they all did great today"
For Citrus, 'ever improving' being the
motto of coach Dave Hamilton, they find


County's top performers
Victoria Pfeiffer, Citrus 99
Maycee Mullarkey, CR- 99
Caitlin Johnson, Citrus 108
Jennifer Hafner, Lecanto 112
Kierah Tettenburn, Lecanto 112
Marisa Wilder, CR-- 113
Madison Polazzo, Lecanto 113
Chynna Liu, Lecanto 115

themselves as benefactors of scoring clus-
ters. Behind Pfeiffer's 99, Citrus' Caitlin
Johnston 108 paved the way, while
Camrin Kersh's 116, and Kayla Woodard's
120 kept top and bottom within 21 strokes.
Lecanto, meanwhile, followed its top
golfers on the day Jennifer Hafner and
See Page B4


the Buffao


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus High School senior running back Darius Chapes carries the ball while The Villages defensive back Kole Harris tries to stop him
during the first quarter Friday night in Inverness.

Citrus demolishes The Villages on gridiron Friday to improve to 4-2 overall


Citrus 49
The Villages 13


* The
'Canes
next
game
7 p.m.


Oct. 26 at home vs.
Lake Weir.


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS Two weeks after suf-
fering an excruciating overtime defeat
to Crystal River, and a week after suf-
fering a blowout loss to Class 6A No. 1
Gainesville, the Citrus football team
rebounded with style for senior night
Friday at the Citrus Bowl.
The Hurricanes churned up 376
yards and seven touchdowns on the


ground to force a running clock the
entire second half and steamroll The
Villages Charter 49-13.
Senior Darius Chapes, sophomore
Breon Whaley, and 280-pound senior
tight end Stevie Smith each had rush-
ing scores in the opening quarter be-
fore junior James Pouncey slipped a
tackle and found the edge for a 75-yard
scoring scamper to help put his team
See .Page B4


For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.


Pirates

stifled by

Eagles

CR football
takes 21-7 loss

in Daytona
RANDY RORRER
Correspondent
SOUTH DAYTONA -
Crystal River enjoyed the
return of injured running
back Dallas Baldner to its
backfield, but even he was-
n't enough to overcome the
power running game of
Warner Christian as the Pi-
rates fell 21-7 Friday night
in South Daytona.
Both teams featured
power running, but it was the
Eagles (6-1) who landed the
biggest blows as senior Mar-
cus Dixon ran for 181 yards
and delivered the biggest
blows in a non-district game.
Baldner ran for 174 yards
on 26 carries and scored the
Pirates' (4-2) only touchdown.
"It's nice to have him
back," Crystal River coach
Greg Fowler said. "He has
been out the last two weeks
with a concussion. I wish I
could have given the ball to
him a dozen more times, but
we ran out of time."
Warner Christian scored
first when Dixon capped an
11-play, 84-yard drive with
a 5-yard touchdown run
with 5:31 left in the second
quarter
Crystal River was on the
verge of tying the game right
before the half, but Pirates
quarterback Joseph
Lafleur's pass was inter-
cepted at the 5-yard line
with 45 seconds left before
See Page B4

Warner Christian 21
Crystal River 7
0 The
S IPirates'
next game
S is 7:30 p.m.
Friday at
home vs.
Gainesville Eastside.


Stamp





B2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012

College football
schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Today, Oct. 13
EAST
Louisville (5-0) at Pittsburgh (2-3), 11 a.m.
Kent St. (4-1) at Army (1-4), Noon
Duquesne (4-1) at CCSU (0-5), Noon
Butler (4-2) at Marist (2-3), Noon
Richmond (4-2) at New Hampshire (4-2),
Noon
Brown (3-1) at Princeton (2-2), Noon
Syracuse (2-3) at Rutgers (5-0), Noon
Lafayette (3-2) at Yale (1-3), Noon
Monmouth (NJ) (3-2) atCornell (2-2), 12:30 p.m.
St. Francis (Pa.) (3-3) at Albany (NY) (5-1), 1 p.m.
Robert Morris (1-4) at Bryant (0-6), 1 p.m.
Holy Cross (1-4) at Colgate (2-3), 1 p.m.
Lehigh (6-0) at Georgetown (3-3), 1 p.m.
Columbia (1-3) at Penn (1-3), 1 p.m.
Georgia St. (0-6) at Rhode Island (0-5), 1 p.m.
Temple (2-2) at UConn (3-3), 1 p.m.
Sacred Heart (1-4) at Dartmouth (3-1), 1:30 p.m.
Bucknell (1-4) at Harvard (4-0), 3:30 p.m.
Maine (2-3) at Towson (2-3), 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Auburn (1-4) at Mississippi (3-3), 12:21 p.m.
Duke (5-1) at Virginia Tech (3-3), 12:30 p.m.
Jacksonville (5-1) at Davidson (0-5), 1 p.m.
Norfolk St. (2-4) at Hampton (0-4), 1 p.m.
NC Central (3-2) at Morgan St. (3-2), 1 p.m.
SMU (2-3) at Tulane (0-5), 1 p.m.
VMI (2-3) at Charleston Southern (1-4), 1:30 p.m.
SC State (2-4) at Delaware St. (2-3), 1:30 p.m.
Chattanooga (2-3) at Furman (2-4), 1:30 p.m.
Howard (4-1) at NC A&T (2-3), 1:30 p.m.
Alcorn St. (2-4) at Alabama A&M (6-0), 2 p.m.
Jackson St. (2-4) at Alabama St. (4-2), 2 p.m.
Liberty (1-4) at Presbyterian (2-4), 2 p.m.
W. Carolina (1-5) atThe Citadel (3-3), 2 p.m.
North Carolina (4-2) at Miami (4-2), 2:30 p.m.
Austin Peay (0-6) at E. Kentucky (4-2), 3 p.m.
Grambling St. (0-5) at MVSU (1-4), 3 p.m.
Appalachian St. (4-2) at Samford (4-1), 3 p.m.
Maryland (3-2) at Virginia (2-4), 3 p.m.
Stony Brook (5-1) at Coastal Carolina (2-3),
3:30 p.m.
William & Mary (2-4) at James Madison
(4-1), 3:30 p.m.
Villanova (4-2) at Old Dominion (5-0), 3:30 p.m.
UT-Martin (4-2) at Murray St. (3-3), 4 p.m.
Northwestern St. (3-3) at SE Louisiana (2-4),
4p.m.
Memphis (1-4) at East Carolina (3-3), 4:30 p.m.
Boston College (1-4) at Florida St. (5-1), 5:30 p.m.
Middle Tennessee (3-2) at FlU (1-5), 6 p.m.
Savannah St. (0-5) at Florida A&M (2-4), 6 p.m.
Mid-Am Nazarene (4-1) at Gardner-Webb
(0-5), 6 p.m.
Wofford (5-0) at Georgia Southern (4-1), 6 p.m.
Florida (5-0) at Vanderbilt (2-3), 6 p.m.
Texas Southern (1-5) at Southern U. (2-3),
6:30 p.m.
Sam Houston St. (3-2) at Nicholls St. (1-3), 7 p.m.
South Carolina (6-0) at LSU (5-1), 8 p.m.
FAU (1-4) at Louisiana-Monroe (3-2), 8 p.m.
Cent. Arkansas (4-2) at McNeese St. (4-1), 8p.m.
Southern Miss. (0-5) at UCF (3-2), 8 p.m.
Tennessee (3-2) at Mississippi St. (5-0), 9 p.m.
Texas A&M (4-1) vs. Louisiana Tech (5-0) at
Shreveport, La., 9:15 p.m.
MIDWEST
Kansas St. (5-0) at Iowa St. (4-1), Noon
Iowa (3-2) at Michigan St. (4-2), Noon
Northwestern (5-1) at Minnesota (4-1), Noon
Wisconsin (4-2) at Purdue (3-2), Noon
Morehead St. (1-4) at Dayton (2-4), 1 p.m.
Toledo (5-1) at E. Michigan (0-5), 1 p.m.
Youngstown St. (4-1) at Illinois St. (5-1), 2 p.m.
South Dakota (1-4) at Missouri St. (0-6), 2 p.m.
Akron (1-5) at Ohio (6-0), 2 p.m.
Drake (4-2) at Valparaiso (0-5), 2 p.m.
Jacksonville St. (3-2) at E. Illinois (3-3), 2:30 p.m.
W. Michigan (3-3) at Ball St. (3-3), 3 p.m.
N. Iowa (1-4) at S. Illinois (3-3), 3 p.m.
Miami (Ohio) (3-3) at Bowling Green (3-3),
3:30 p.m.
Oklahoma St. (2-2) at Kansas (1-4), 3:30 p.m.
Illinois (2-4) at Michigan (3-2), 3:30 p.m.
Alabama (5-0) at Missouri (3-3), 3:30 p.m.
Buffalo (1-4) at N. Illinois (5-1), 3:30 p.m.
Stanford (4-1) at Notre Dame (5-0), 3:30 p.m.
N. Arizona (4-1) at North Dakota (3-3), 4:05 p.m.
Indiana St. (4-2) at N. Dakota St. (5-0), 4:07p.m.
Fordham (4-2) at Cincinnati (4-0), 7 p.m.
W. Illinois (3-2) at S. Dakota St. (4-1), 7 p.m.
Tennessee St. (6-0) at SE Missouri (2-3), 7p.m.
Ohio St. (6-0) at Indiana (2-3), 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
UAB (1-4) at Houston (2-3), Noon
Texas (4-1) vs. Oklahoma (3-1) at Dallas,
Noon
UTSA (5-0) at Rice (1-5), 3:30 p.m.
West Virginia (5-0) atTexasTech (4-1), 3:30 p.m.
Kentucky (1-5) at Arkansas (2-4), 7 p.m.
South Alabama (1 -4) atArkansas St. (3-3), 7p.m.
TCU (4-1) at Baylor (3-1), 7 p.m.
Idaho (1-5) atTexas St. (2-3), 7 p.m.
McMurry (3-2) at Lamar (2-4), 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Utah (2-3) at UCLA (4-2), 3 p.m.
Nevada (5-1) at UNLV (1-5), 3 p.m.
Oregon St. (4-0) at BYU (4-2), 3:30 p.m.
Fresno St. (4-2) at Boise St. (4-1), 3:30 p.m.
S. Utah (2-4) at Montana (3-3), 3:30 p.m.
E. Washington (4-1) at Montana St. (6-0),
3:35 p.m.
Utah St. (4-2) at San Jose St. (4-1), 4 p.m.
Campbell (1-4) at San Diego (2-3), 5p.m.
UC Davis (2-4) at Idaho St. (1-4), 6:05 p.m.
Colorado St. (1-5) at S. Diego St. (3-3), 6:30 p.m.
Southern Cal (4-1) at Washington (3-2), 7p.m.
Air Force (2-3) at Wyoming (1-4), 7p.m.
N. Colorado (1-4) at Cal Poly (5-0), 9:05 p.m.
Weber St. (0-6) at Sacramento St. (4-2), 9:05 p.m.
California (2-4) at Wash. St. (2-4), 10:30 p.m.
New Mexico (3-3) at Hawaii (1-4), 11:59 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UNC's Bernard eager for return to Miami


Associated Press

MIAMI North Carolina's Gio-
vani Bernard comes home this
weekend. It's up to Miami to decide
if he enjoys the trip.
Bernard's first scholarship offer
came from the Hurricanes, who
lost out in that race because the
running back wanted to get a little
farther away
North from South
Carolina Florida-- where
he grew up, play-
(4-2) at ing for famed
Miami high school pro-
(4-2) gram St. Thomas
Aquinas to ex-
TIME: perience college
2:30 p.m. life.
toda. And now he's
today- starring for the
TV: Tar Heels, who
ESPNU visit Miami today
for what shapes
up as a massive
game in the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence's Coastal Division race. The
Hurricanes (4-2, 3-0) have the best
league record so far, while North
Carolina (4-2, 1-1) is coming off two
offensive explosions and just dealt
perennial division favorite Virginia
Tech its second loss in its last 21
ACC games.


"I mean, it's a good feeling going
down there," Bernard said. "It's the
first time my dad actually gets to
see me play live (in college). My
brother's going to be down there. A
little bit of significance, but it's an-
other game, another opportunity to
get better, an opportunity to win.
That's what we want"
In simplest terms, North Car-
olina's offense fueled by
Bernard is rolling.
Miami's defense is not.
In the past two weeks, North Car-
olina has scored 114 points and
gained more than 1,100 yards.
Meanwhile, Miami has yielded 78
points and more than 1,250 yards
during that span, and coming off
last week's 41-3 loss against Notre
Dame, the Hurricanes now face an-
other team that looks like an offen-
sive juggernaut in the Tar Heels.
"ACC, Coastal game coming up,
great opportunity at home, back in
our own stadium," Miami defen-
sive back Brandon McGee said. "So
that's the focus."
It didn't take Miami long to try to
put Notre Dame in the rear-view
mirror and start thinking about
North Carolina. About 20 minutes,
to be precise.
As the Hurricanes were loading
up for the bus ride from Soldier


Associated Press
Miami must rebound from an ugly loss to Notre Dame but might not find
that to be an easy task with a resurgent North Carolina team coming off a
big win over Virginia Tech.


Field to the airport in Chicago last
Saturday night, Miami coach Al
Golden started looking at North
Carolina film. He and his staff kept
studying on the flight home, then
went right into the office upon
landing Sunday morning -roughly
5:30 a.m. and stayed in their of-


UF's trap game


Gators face possible

tough test at SEC

foe Vanderbilt

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -The fourth-
ranked Florida Gators remember
only too well how close Vanderbilt
came to knocking them off last sea-
son in The Swamp.
The Commodores rallied with
three touchdowns in the second half
before Florida pulled out a 26-21 win
last November, and Gators corner-
back Jaylen Watkins said Vanderbilt
is a sneaky good team.
"It lets you know this is not a joke
week or anything like that," Watkins
said. "We've got to play or something
bad will happen."
Overlooking a program the Gators
(5-0, 4-0) have beaten 21 straight
games would be understandable, es-
pecially with Florida hosting No. 3
South Carolina on Oct. 20, followed
by the annual showdown in Jack-
sonville with No. 14 Georgia. It's a
three-game stretch that could put the
Gators atop the SEC East on the road
back to Atlanta for the conference
championship.
Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel
said the Gators understand that
every SEC game is big going into Sat-
urday night's game with Vanderbilt
(2-3, 1-2).
"You can't take anybody lightly be-
cause anybody can beat you," Driskel
said. "This league is full of players
and full of athletes, and they're going
to be well-coached and ready to go.
So we can't take this week off or take
it lightly We're going to prepare like
we have been the whole year, and
we'll be ready to go Saturday"
The Commodores have strong
memories of their last game with
Florida as well, a game that drove
home the need to start better and fin-
ish strong.
"This year we're just going to come
out, play well and finish," Vanderbilt
senior defensive tackle Rob Lohr
said. "It's just about finishing, and
that's kind of the mentality our de-
fense has taken. We can't give up
plays at the end of the first half and
end of the fourth quarter."
Florida is coming off a strong 14-6
win over LSU, while the Com-
modores got a big boost with a 19-15


Associated F
Florida running back Mike Gillislee (23) celebrated his 12-yard touchdown
Saturday with running back Hunter Joyer against LSU.
win at Missouri that was their first sons, though Franklin's job of
road win since 2010. The win, com- building is much bigger at a progr
bined with hosting the he took to only its fifth bo
fourth-ranked Gators, NO. 4 UF game ever in 2011. T
helped Vanderbilt sell out (5-0) at Gators won their third
for the first time since tional championship in 2(
Florida's visit in 2008. Vandy "I think he did a fanta,
Now coach James (2-3) job last year," s
Franklin wants to see his Muschamp, who has coaci
Commodores go play well 0 TIME: at Franklin when both pr
tonight 6 p.m. ously worked elsewhe
"Selling out is great, but today. "You turn the tape on you
we have to put a product on TV guys playing fast, hard a
the field that people can be U TV: physical. Multiple off
excited about and that peo- ES P N U sively Bob Shoop does
ple want to keep coming great job defensively atta
back to see," Franklin said. ing, and what they do on special tea
Both Florida coach Will Muschamp ... there's no question that's Jam
and Franklin are in their second sea- personality written all over it"


fices for the next 13 hours.
That's roughly a day and a half
without sleep. That's the havoc
North Carolina's offense can wreak
upon opposing coaches.
"The hottest team in our confer-
ence," said Golden, describing the
Tar Heels.




k Can't

Overlook


Eagles


U UCF looks to

avoid letdown

vs. So. M iss.

Associated Press

ORLANDO For all the
success that Central Florida
has had in its seven previous
seasons in Conference USA,
consistent victories against
Southern Mississippi hasn't
been one of them.
The Knights (3-2, 1-0) and
the Golden Eagles (0-5, 0-1)
have met seven times since
UCF joined the league in
2005 with Southern Miss
holding a 6-1 overall edge,
including four straight wins.
UCF (3-2, 1-0 C-USA) gets
its final chance to end that
streak against its division
rival today when it hosts its
division rival for the final
time as a league member.
* A win won't erase all the
S tart memories for the Golden
:- Eagles (0-5, 0-1), but for a
team looking to enter the Big
East next year with momen-
tum, it would be a nice start.
"I think you throw the
me records out the door when it
Press comes to this game,"
run Knights coach George
O'Leary said. "I anticipate
even though they haven't
re- won a game I expect a
wam whale of a ball game on Sat-
the urday night"
Southern Miss coach Ellis
008 Johnson said this week that
stic though "It's been a Golden
;aid Eagle series" against UCF,
hed in just his first year in Hat-
evi- tiesburg he also knows that
ere. his team clearly respects
see the Knights' toughness.
and Johnson does have previ-
ren- ous experience against
s a UCF, having served as Mis-
ack- sissippi State's defensive
ams coordinator when it de-
nes' feated the Knights in the
2007 Liberty Bowl.


No. 12 Seminoles hope to rebound from first loss


FSUhosts

Boston College

in A CC tilt

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida
State coach Jimbo Fisher
thinks his team learned a les-
son. He's going to find out
today
The Seminoles put together
a 5-0 start and were poised to
add to their perfect record be-
fore they struggled in the sec-
ond half of a 17-16 loss at North
Carolina State last weekend.
The Wolfpack erased a 16-0
halftime deficit and scored the
winning touchdown on a 2-
yard pass on fourth down with
16 seconds left
It was the fifth time in
Fisher's 2 1/2 years as head
coach that the Seminoles were


upset by a double-digit
underdog.
Next up is a home game
against Boston College (1-4, 0-2
Atlantic Coast Conference),
which is looking for its first vic-
tory of the season against a Fbot-
ball Bowl Subdivision team.
"We chal-


lenged our kids
to come back ...
to come back
and focus,"
Fisher said.
"You have to
get better as a
team."


Boston C
at No.12
* TIME: 5:3
today.
* TV: ESPN


No. 12
Florida State
(5-1, 2-1), which dropped nine
spots in The Associated Press
poll following the loss to N.C.
State, is a four-touchdown fa-
vorite against the Eagles.
Boston College coach Frank
Spaziani sized up the enor-
mity of his team's challenge
when he asked his players
how many wanted to play in


the NFL someday
After several hands went up,
Spaziani said: "Saturday
night, there's your chance."
Florida State, anchored by
defensive ends Bjoern Werner
and Cornellius Carradine,
ranks first in virtually all de-
fensive cate-
gories in the
oll. (1-4) ACC. Carradine
FSU (5-1) and Werner
rank 1-2 in the
30 p.m. conference in
sacks, and they
12 should be hun-
gry after failing
to get to Wolf-
pack quarter-
back Mike Glennon.
Despite the loss last week-
end, the Seminoles remain in
contention for the conference
title and their first Bowl
Championship Series appear-
ance since 2005.
Boston College's only vic-
tory so far this season came
against Maine, an FCS mem-


ber. In the ACC losses to Miami
and Clemson, the Eagles
yielded 86 points and 417
yards rushing combined.
And Florida State likes to
run, featuring speedy break-
away threat Chris Thompson -
who averages 7.7 yards a carry
Florida State quarterback EJ
Manuel was frustrated by last
week's game plan that he felt
was too run-oriented against a
North Carolina State team that
had been having difficulty all
season defending the pass.
"I didn't throw the ball as
much as I thought we would
have," he said.
Much of Boston College's of-
fensive success has come
through the air.
Florida State receiver Willie
Haulstead and the No. 12 Semi-
noles look to rebound from a
tough loss when the team
welcomes Boston College to
Tallahassee today.
Associated Press


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 B3

Yankees 3, Orioles 1


Baltimore


New York


tellar


CC pitches Yankees

into ALCS with

victory over Orioles

Associated Press

NEW YORK Yankees-Orioles.
Playoffs. Disputed home run to
right field. Yankees win.
Sound familiar?
CC Sabathia and his New York
teammates saw Nate McLouth's
long drive called foul by the
slimmest of margins hello, Jeffrey
Maier and then hung on to beat
Baltimore 3-1 Friday in the deciding
Game 5 of the AL division series.
With Alex Rodriguez benched,
the Yankees advanced to the AL
championship series against the
Detroit Tigers, starting Saturday
night in The Bronx.
Sabathia pitched a four-hitter,
wriggling out of a bases-loaded jam
in the eighth inning. It was his first
career postseason complete game,
and the first for the Yankees since
Roger Clemens did it in 2000.
Yet, it was another piece of his-
tory that this game evoked.
Baltimore again was stung on a
close play in right, echoing what
happened across the street at the
old Yankee Stadium in the 1996 AL
championship opener
This time, with the Orioles trail-
ing 1-0 in the sixth, McLouth sent a
3-1 pitch deep down the right-field
line. Eyes turned to right field um-
pire Fieldin Culbreth, who demon-
strably waved foul with both arms.
Orioles manager Buck Showalter
came out to ask for a video review,
and five of the umpires went down a
tunnel to examine the images. When
they ran back onto the field about
two minutes later, they didn't make


W -w


abih


/- -. .-


S. .. - -

Associated Press
New York Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia tossed a complete game four-hitter to propel the Yankees past the
Baltimore Orioles in Game 5 of the ALDS on Friday night at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Yankees are now
set to face the Detroit Tigers in the American League Championship Series.


any signal meaning the original
call stood. McLouth struck out on
the next pitch, ending the inning.
"I saw it go to the right of the
pole," Culbreth said. "There is net-
ting there and it didn't touch the
netting. It did not change direc-
tion," he added, indicating he did
not think the ball grazed the pole.
Added crew chief Brian Gorman:
"We saw the same thing on the re-
play There was no evidence to


overturn the decision."
Showalter? Not sure.
"I couldn't tell. It was real close,"
he said.
Steven Ellis, a fan from the
Broad Channel section of Queens,
caught the ball with his Yankee cap
in the second deck.
"It was foul all the way, never hit
the pole," he said.
Ada Cruz, sitting behind Ellis,
added: "No way, no way I watched


it and he caught it."
A stadium usher who wouldn't
give his name, however, said he
saw the ball glance off the pole.
Back in 1996, the 12-year-old
Maier reached over the wall above
right fielder Tony Tarasco and de-
flected Derek Jeter's fly ball. Um-
pire Richie Garcia called it a home
run, which tied the score 4-all in
the eighth inning, and the Yankees
went on to win in the 11th.


ab rhbi ab rhbi
McLoth If 4 0 1 0 Jeter ss 3 1 0 0
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki If-rf 3 0 1 1
AdJons cf 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 00 0
C.Davisrf 4 0 0 0 Teixeirlb 2 1 1 0
Wieters c 3 1 1 0 Ibanez dh 3 0 1 1
Machd 3b 2 0 0 0 Swisher rf 3 00 0
MrRynllb 3 0 0 0 Gardnrlf 0 00 0
Ford dh 3 0 1 1 Grndrs cf 3 1 2 1
Andino2b 3 0 1 0 RMartnc 3 00 0
ErChvz 3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 30 141 Totals 2735 3
Baltimore 000 000 010 1
NewYork 000 011 10x 3
DP-Baltimore 2, NewYork 1. LOB-Baltimore
4, NewYork3.2B-I.Suzuki (2). HR-Grander-
son (1). SB-McLouth (2), Teixeira (1), Grander-
son (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
HammelL,0-1 52-34 2 2 2 6
Patton 11-31 1 1 0 3
Strop 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Matusz 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
SabathiaW,2-0 9 4 1 1 2 9
Umpires-Home, Mike Everitt; First, Mark Carl-
son; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Angel Her-
nandez; Right, Fieldin Culbreth; Left, Brian
Gorman.
T-2:52. A-47,081 (50,291).

Late Thursday

Tigers 6, Athletics 0
Detroit Oakland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksn cf 5 2 2 2 Crispcf 4 00 0
Berry If 3 1 1 0 Drew ss 4 00 0
AGarci rf 0 0 0 0 Cespds If 4 0 1 0
MiCarr3b 4 0 0 1 S.Smith dh 4 0 0 0
Fielder 1b 5 0 1 1 Reddckrf 3 0 0 0
DYongdh 4 0 1 1Dndsn 3b 3 01 0
Dirksrf-lf 4 0 1 0 Mosslb 2 01 0
JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 0 DNorrs c 2 0 0 0
Avila c 4 0 0 0 JGomsph 1 00 0
Infante 2b 3 2 2 0 Kottarsc 0 0 0 0
Pnngtn2b 3 0 1 0
Totals 36 69 5 Totals 30 0 4 0
Detroit 002 000 400 6
Oakland 000 000 000 0
E-Drew (1). LOB-Detroit 7, Oakland 4.2B-
A.Jackson (2), Berry (1), Cespedes (1). SB-
Dirks (1), Jh.Peralta (1), Infante (1). S-Berry.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
VerlanderW,2-0 9 4 0 0 1 11
Oakland
J.ParkerL,0-2 61-37 4 4 1 6
R.Cook 0 1 2 2 1 0
Blevins 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Scribner 2 0 0 0 0 3
R.Cook pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by R.Cook (Mi.Cabrera).WP-J.Parker 2.
Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First, Scott Barry;
Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Mark Wegner;
Right, Eric Cooper; Left, Dana DeMuth.
T-2:56. A-36,393 (35,067).


Motoring to victory


Joey Logano wins

Nationwide event

at Charlotte

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. It's hard to bet
against Joey Logano these days when
it comes to the Nationwide Series.
Logano raced to his eighth Nation-
wide Series victory of the year Friday
night, passing Brad Keselowski with
eight laps to go after taking on two
tires and a splash of gas.
Logano led 62 laps en route to his
17th career victory and first at Char-
lotte Motor Speedway He has made
18 series starts this season.
"I just had to adjust my style a little
bit and get this little 20 car rocking
and get these guys in Victory Lane
one more time," Logano said.
Keselowski gambled by making a
quick pit stop with nine laps left, but
his pit crew didn't get enough fuel in
his tank and he couldn't challenge for
the lead. He finished 18th.
Kevin Harvick was second, fol-
lowed by Nationwide Series point
leader Elliott Sadler. Kyle Busch fin-
ished fourth and Denny Hamlin fifth
in a competitive race that included 11
Sprint Cup regulars.
Austin Dillon, who entered the race
third in the standings 25 points behind
Sadler, finished sixth and is now 29
points behind. Ricky Stenhouse Jr,
Brian Scott, James Buescher and


Associated Press
Joey Logano celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Dollar
General 300 Nationwide Series auto race Friday in Concord, N.C.


Michael Annett rounded out the top 10.
Logano questioned his crew chief
Adam Stevens about whether it was
good idea for the No. 20 Toyota to take
on two right side tires when he en-
tered the pits with 15 laps to go.
That meant briefly giving up the
lead.
"I should never question Adam
Stevens," Logano said afterward.
"He's given me great cars every sin-
gle weekend. We worked really hard
for this. The 22 car (Keselowski) was
really good for most of the race."
Sadler came in with a nine-point


lead over Stenhouse in the Nation-
wide Series standings. He expanded
that edge to 13 after Stenhouse's sev-
enth-place finish.
Sadler said he wanted to win, but
came away happy with the third-
place finish.
"It was a good run and anytime you
gain points, we're going to call it a
good night," Sadler said.
The championship hopes of Sam
Hornish Jr. and Justin Allgaier, who
were fourth and fifth respectively in
the Nationwide Series standings, took
a hit when they crashed on lap 13.


Tigers to face


Yankees in ALCS


Associated Press

DETROIT A day to
rest and a trip to New
York.
Justin Verlander and the
Detroit Tigers will face a
familiar foe in the AL
championship series.
The Tigers had less than
24 hours to savor their five-
game victory over the Oak-
land Athletics before
learning their opposition
in the ALCS. Detroit will
face the Yankees in a re-
match of last year's
playoffs.
New York edged Balti-
more 3-1 on Friday night in
the deciding Game 5 of the
division series. The Tigers
were set to fly hours later,
with Game 1 at Yankee Sta-
dium on Saturday night
and Doug Fister facing
Andy Pettitte.
Detroit beat the Yankees
in five games in the play-
offs last year before losing
in the ALCS to Texas.
"We don't want to be sat-
isfied," general manager
Dave Dombrowski said
after Detroit eliminated
Oakland with a 6-0 victory
Thursday night. "Now
we're there. But we've


been there before. Now we
want that next step. We
want eight more wins."
Verlander led the Tigers
past the Athletics by throw-
ing a four-hit shutout in a
winner-take-all Game 5.
The Tigers signed slug-
ging first baseman Prince
Fielder in the offseason in
an effort to win their first
World Series since 1984.
Detroit took the AL Central
for the second straight
year, but its offense hasn't
necessarily lived up to ex-
pectations despite the
presence of Fielder and
Triple Crown winner
Miguel Cabrera.
Instead, it's been the
pitching specifically
from the starting rotation
- that has lifted the Tigers
lately. Verlander allowed a
home run by Coco Crisp to
open the division series
and calmly shut the As out
after that, winning both his
starts. For the series, De-
troit starters went 2-1 with
a 1.30 ERA against a strike-
out-prone Oakland lineup.
Fister and the rest of De-
troit's entire postseason
rotation is right-handed,
bringing Alex Rodriguez's
role into immediate ques-
tion for the Yankees.


Rose wins $1.5 million by taking World Golf Final


Associated

BELEK, Turk
Rose beat Euro
Cup teammate
wood by a stroke
win the eight-pl
Golf Final and ea
best $1.5 million.
The fifth-ranke
a 5-under 66 in
lish final at the A
to finish 5-0 in t
lion exhibition
birdied the open
the Sultan Coui
the rest of the
the fourth-ranked
Rose sealed ti
holing a 20-foot
at the 17th. On
Rose chipped in

Justin Rose plays
ing the World G
Friday in Belel
Turkey. Rose p
$1.5 million payc
biggest of his ca
beating Lee We
win the eight-p
Golf Final.


Press to beat Tiger Woods in the
semifinals.
ey Justin Frys.com Open
pean Ryder
Lee West- SAN MARTIN, Calif.- John
:e Friday to Mallinger opened a four-stroke
layer World lead in the Frys.com Open,
arn a career- making an eagle and two
birdies on the final four holes
ed Rose shot for a 9-under 62.
the all-Eng- Mallinger eagled the par-5
ntalya Club 15th and closed with consecu-
he $5.2 mil- tive birdies to cap his second
event. Rose straight bogey-free round and
ling hole on reach 14 under. He matched
rse and led the CordeValle Golf Club record
way against with the 62.
d Westwood. Billy Horschel and Jhonattan
he match by Vegas were second. Horschel
birdie putt had a 65, and Vegas shot 67.
i Thursday, First-round leader Nick O'Hern
i at the 17th followed his opening 62 with a 71
to drop into a tie for fourth at 9
Associated Press under with European Ryder Cup
s a shot dur- player Nicolas Colsaerts and
Zolf Final on Scott Dunlap. Colsaerts had a
k, Antalya, 68, and Dunlap shot 63.
icked up a Colsaerts is a special tempo-
Dheck -the rary PGA Tour member and
reer after needs to finish the equivalent of
estwood to 125th on the money list to earn
layer World a full 2013 card. The Belgian
player has earned $652,886,


enough now for the 120th spot.
British Open winner Ernie Els
was 3 under after a 68.
LPGA Malaysia
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
- Defending champion Na Yeon
Choi took a two-stroke lead in
the LPGA Malaysia, shooting a
4-under 67 in hot and humid con-
ditions to reach 10 under.
The U.S. Women's Open win-
ner in July for her first major title
and only victory of the year, Choi
was 11 under after birdies on Nos.
12 and 13. The South Korean
player bogeyed the par-3 17th
and dosed with a par at Kuala
Lumpur Golf and Country Club.
American Sydnee Michaels
was second after a 65. Nor-
way's Suzann Pettersen shot a
tournament-record 64 to match
American Lizette Salas and
Japan's Momoko Ueda and
Mika Miyazato at 7 under. Salas
had a hole-in-one on the par-3
15th in her 67. Ueda also shot
67, and Miyazato had a 69.
Min Lee, the 17-year-old Tai-
wanese amateur who opened
with a 66, was disqualified for


signing an incorrect scorecard
after shooting a 73. She signed
for a 4 on the par-4 13th, but
made a 5. Lee also was disquali-
fied last month for signing an in-
correct scorecard after the
Taiwan Amateur Championship,
costing her a victory.
Greater Hickory
Classic
CONOVER, N.C. Dan
Forsman shot a 7-under 65 to
take a one-stroke lead over Fred
Funk, David Frost and Larry
Mize after the first round of the
Greater Hickory Classic.
Forsman had eight birdies and
a bogey at Rock Barn Golf and
Spa's Jones Course. He won the
season-opening Mitsubishi Elec-
tric Championship in Hawaii in
January for his third Champions
Tour title.
Frost and Mize had bogey-
free rounds, and Funk had four
birdies and a closing eagle on
the par-5 18th.
Defending champion Mark
Wiebe and Jay Don Blake shot
67. Wiebe had a hole-in-one on
No. 3.


SPORTS






B4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012



Glantz-Culver Line
For Oct. 13
NCAA Football
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
Oklahoma-x 3Y2 3Y2 (59) Texas
at Michigan St. 11 Y2 8Y2 (40) Iowa
North Carolina 5Y2 7Y2 (69) at Miami
at Bowl. Green 6Y2 7Y2 (56) Miami (Ohio)
Kent St. +1 2 2Y2 (58Y2) at Army
at Ohio 20 20Y2 (66) Akron
Toledo 13Y2 16Y2 (57Y2) at E. Mich.
at Virginia 3 1 (45Y2) Maryland
at Virginia Tech 9Y2 10 (54Y2) Duke
at Purdue Pk 1 (50) Wisconsin
Northwestern 312 312 (51) at Minnesota
at Rutgers 7Y2 7Y2 (45Y2) Syracuse
at Florida St. 28 28 (54) Boston College
at UConn 4 512 (41) Temple
Louisville 11Y2 3 (49) at Pittsburgh
at E. Carolina 20 1712 (50) Memphis
Florida 9 9 (41) at Vanderbilt
Air Force 512 3 (61 2) at Wyoming
at Ball St. 11/2 3 (66/2) W. Michigan
at N. Illinois 14 14 (5512) Buffalo
at Texas St. 212 212 (54) Idaho
Kansas St. 612 612 (48) at Iowa St.
at Mississippi 312 512 (4812) Auburn
at Houston 1312 1312 (67) UAB
at Michigan 2112 25 (49) Illinois
at Boise St. 9 712 (57) Fresno St.
Southern Cal 131213 (5412) at Wash.
at BYU 312 512 (37) Oregon St.
Alabama 1712 2112 (4312) at Missouri
at Notre Dame 9Y2 7 (44) Stanford
at San Jose St. Pk 3 (50) Utah St.
at Arkansas 16Y2 18 (51) Kentucky
at Miss. St. 2Y2 3 (57) Tennessee
at LSU 4 3 (39Y2) S. Carolina
California 7 7 (5412) at Wash. St.
WestVirginia 5 3Y2 (7812) atTexasTech
at Baylor 6 7 (68) TCU
at UCF 14 17 (5012) So. Miss.
Oklahoma St. 20 27Y2 (72) at Kansas
Ohio St. 18 17Y2 (63Y2) at Indiana
SMU 20 17Y2 (51) atTulane
at Rice 4 2Y2 (57) UTSA
at UNLV OFF OFF Nevada
at S. Diego St. 19 22Y2 (56) Colorado St.
at UCLA 512 9 (51Y2) Utah
New Mexico 2 3 (52) at Hawaii
at La.-Monroe 23 23Y2 (56) FAU
at Arkansas St. 20 20Y2 (52) So. Alabama
Middle Tenn. 212 212 (57) at FlU
Texas A&M-y 6 7Y2 (79Y2) La.Tech
x-at Dallas
y-at Shreveport, La.
Off Key
Nevada QB questionable
NFL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0O/U UNDERDOG
Cincinnati 3 2 (43Y2) at Cleveland
at N.Y. Jets 3 3/2 (4312) Indianapolis
atTampa Bay 312 412 (40) Kansas City
at Atlanta 9Y2 9 (48Y2) Oakland
at Baltimore 4 3Y2 (44Y2) Dallas
at Philadelphia 6Y2 3/2 (47Y2) Detroit
at Miami 3 4 (37Y2) St. Louis
New England 4 312 (4412) at Seattle
at Arizona 5 4Y2 (4312) Buffalo
at Washington OFF OFF (OFF) Minnesota
at San Fran. 512 6Y2 (45Y2) N.Y. Giants
at Houston 4 3/2 (47Y2) Green Bay
Monday
at San Diego 3 1 (49Y2) Denver
Off Key
Washington QB questionable




Ocala Christian 32,
Seven Rivers 28
OCA 13 13 6 0 32
Seven Rivers 8 12 0 8 28
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
OCA J. Kauffman 21 -yard pass from Smith
(Keane kick)
SR -J. Iwaniec 3-yard run (Mazza run)
OCA Cizmadia 57 run (kick failed)
Second Quarter
SR J. Iwaniec 1 -yard run (run failed)
OCA Cizmadia 83-yard kickoff return (run
failed)
OCA- Fortune 10-yard run (Keane kick)
SR -J. Iwaniec 3-yard run (run failed)
Third Quarter
OCA Culver 69-yard pass from Cizamdia
(run failed)
Fourth Quarter
SR -J. Iwaniec 4-yard run (J. Iwaniec run)
Individual Leaders
Rushing: OCA: Cizmadia 8-87, Smith 9-58, For-
tune 7-32; SR: J. Iwaniec 34-204, Massullo 14-
59, Mazza 10-42.
Passing: OCA: Smith 6-12-0-89, Cizmadia 2-2-
0-82; SR: Gardner 3-5-0-44.
Receiving: OCA: Kauffman 3-33, Culver 2-107;
SR: Mazza 2-19.
Warner Christian 21,
Crystal River 7
CR 0 0 0 7 7
WC 0 7 7 7 21
Scoring Summary
Second Quarter
WC -Dixon 5-yard run (Critcher kick)
Third Quarter
WC Hicks 11-yard run (Critcher kick)
Fourth Quarter
CR Baldner 5-yard run (McAteer kick)
WC Dixon 1-yard run (Critcher kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing CR: LaFleur 4-10-34-0-3; WC: Eck-
els 3-10- 24-0-1.
Rushing CR: Baldner 26-174; Dawsy 6-23;
WC: Dixon 24-181, Hicks 4-21, Critcher 1-10.
Receiving CR: Baldner 2-18, Franklin 2-16;
WC: Critcher 2-18, Hicks 1-6.
Citrus 49,
The Villages 13
VC 0 6 0 7 13
CH 28 14 7 0 49
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CH D. Chapes 16-yard run (Killeen kick)
CH B. Whaley 28-yard run (Killeen kick)
CH S. Smith 10-yard run (Killeen kick)
CH J. Pouncey 75-yard run (Killeen kick)
Second Quarter
CH A.L. White 13-yard run (Killeen kick)
VC- C. Kelly 40-yard run (kick fail)
CH -Whaley 3-yard run (Killeen kick)
Third Quarter
CH Chapes 18-yard run (Killeen kick)


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY

Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
< ; '3-4-7
S. -. CASH 3 (late)
5 *5-0-4
PLAY 4 (early)
1-1-9-1
PLAY 4 (late)
3-7-6-9
FANTASY 5
11- 22 28 30 35
MEGA MONEY
22 23 26 28
loida Lottey MEGA BALL
3


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Dollar General 300 race
(Same-day Tape)
7:30 p.m. (ABC) Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500 race
MLB
8 p.m. (TBS) American League Championship Series,
Game 1: Teams TBA
BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Preseason: Basketball Chicago Bulls at
Minnesota Timberwolves
BOXING
10 p.m. (HBO) Nonito Donaire vs. Toshiaki Nishioka -
Junior Featherweights
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma vs. Texas
12 p.m. (MNT) Auburn at Mississippi
12 p.m. (ESPN) Iowa at Michigan State
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Northwestern at Minnesota
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Alabama-Birmingham at Houston
12 p.m. (FX) Kansas State at Iowa State
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Brown at Princeton
12:30 p.m. (CW) Duke at Virginia Tech
2:30 p.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina at Miami
3 p.m. (FOX) Utah at UCLA
3 p.m. (SUN) Maryland at Virginia
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Stanford at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Alabama at Missouri
3:30 p.m. (ABC) West Virginia at Texas Tech
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Illinois at Michigan
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Oklahoma State at Kansas
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Fresno State at Boise State
5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Boston College at Florida State
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Vanderbilt
7 p.m. (FOX) USC at Washington
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas Christian at Baylor
7 p.m. (SUN) Kentucky at Arkansas
8 p.m. (ESPN) South Carolina at LSU
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Tennessee at Mississippi State
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Kansas State at Iowa State (Same-day
Tape)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Portugal Masters -
Third Round
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Greater Hickory
Classic Second Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) Frys.com Open Third Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Miccosukee Championship -
Third Round (Same-day Tape)
9:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia
Third Round (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Ice Breaker Tournament final: Teams
TBA

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY
8:30 a.m. Citrus, Lecanto, Crystal River, Seven Rivers at
Whispering Pines Invitational


Fourth Quarter
VC Kelly 1-yard run (O.M. Morken kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing CH: C. Bogart 0-3-0-0-0; VC: Kelly 2-
3-59-0-1.
Rushing -CH: Chapes 12-127-2; Pouncey 6-
102-1; Whaley 7-92-2; White 7-55-1; VC: Kelly
18-153-2; T Macedo 9-72-0; T. Bryant 7-22-0.
Receiving -VC: Bryant 1 -31-0; M. Meginley 1 -
28-0.



Sprint Cup

Bank of America
500 Lineup
After Thursday qualifying; race Saturday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 193.708 mph.
2. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 193.361.
3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 193.251.
4. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 193.043.
5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 192.995.
6. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 192.919.
7. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 192.885.
8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 192.85.
9. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 192.802.
10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 192.644.
11. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 192.637.
12. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 192.561.


13. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 192.212.
14. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 191.666.
15. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 191.605.
16. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 191.293.
17. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 191.286.
18. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 191.279.
19. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 191.245.
20. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 191.232.
21. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 191.225.
22. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 190.691.
23. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 190.691.
24. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.617.
25. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 190.382.
26. (88) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 190.181.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 190.027.
28. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 190.027.
29. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 189.987.
30. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 189.867.
31. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 189.687.
32. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 189.587.
33. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.587.
34. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 189.52.
35. (37) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 189.341.
36. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 189.255.
37. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 189.168.
38. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 189.142.
39. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 188.469.
40. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, 188.225.
41. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (91) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 189.102.
Failed to Qualify
44. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 188.937.
45. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 187.123.
46. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 184.989.
47. (33) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 183.517.


U.S. soccer edges Antigua 2-1


Associated Press

ST JOHN'S, Antigua -
Eddie Johnson rewarded his
coach's faith in him twice.
In his first game back with
the U.S. national team, John-
son scored twice Friday
night, including the winning
goal in second-half injury
time, lifting the United States
to the verge of advancing in
World Cup qualifying with a
nervous 2-1 victory over An-
tigua and Barbuda.


If the Americans beat
Guatemala on Tuesday night
in Kansas City, Kan., they will
move into the final round of
CONCACAF qualifying for
the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
The U.S. has 10 points;
Guatemala and Jamaica each
have seven and were playing
each other in a late game in
Guatemala.
Johnson connected on
headers in the 20th minute
and then in the dying mo-
ments in his first game for the


U.S. team in two years. He
was added to the squad by
coach Jurgen Klinsmann, os-
tensibly replacing the disap-
pointing Jozy Altidore, and
the move paid off.
"It's good to be back in the
mix," Johnson said. "Going
into this game the coach has
a ton of confidence in me to
put me wide out on the wing."
"We have a world-class
coach who played at the high-
est level. He knows the
game."'


Warriors' furious rally



falls just short at OCA


RICHARD BURTON
Correspondent

OCALA The Seven
Rivers Christian football
team came up just short on
Friday night.
After a goal-line stand
late in the fourth quarter,
the Warriors drove 92 yards
for a touchdown and then
recovered the ensuing on-
side kick in the waning sec-
onds, but couldn't quite
complete the comeback and
fell 32-28 to Ocala Christian
Academy
"That's the best fourth
quarter that I have seen us
play," Seven Rivers coach
Dave Iwaniec said. "They
had first-and-goal at the
one-inch line and we hold
them and then come down
and score and then get the
onside kick.
"That's the kind of game
that you want to be a part
of," Iwaniec continued.
"Things might have been
different if we had 32 more
seconds."
John Iwaniec (34 carries,
204 yards, four touchdowns)
scored from four yards out
and added the ensuing two-
point conversion run with
19.4 seconds remaining, as
Seven Rivers (1-6) drove
nearly the length of the field



PIRATES
Continued from Page B1

intermission.
It was one of four
turnovers committed by
Crystal River.
"You can't turn the ball
over four times and expect
to beat good teams,"
Fowler said. "We left 14
points on the board in the
first half alone. We've been
doing that all year."
Warner extended its
lead to 14-0 in the third



CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

ahead 28-0 in the first
quarter after senior Austin
Killeen's fourth extra point
of the night.
"We had a really good
week of practice out here
and we really wanted to
take it to these guys to get
that taste out of our
mouths," Citrus head
coach Rayburn Greene
said. "It feels good to win.
It picks morale back up
and gets people excited."
Senior fullback Al-
Lamar White grew the lead
with a 13-yard score, which
was set up by a 41-yard
rush by Whaley midway
through the second
quarter.
Despite Citrus' domi-
nance, there was no deny-
ing the talents of Buffalo
junior quarterback Chase
Kelly. After one of The Vil-
lages' top backs junior
Tony Bryant exited with
an injury early in the sec-
ond quarter, Kelly found
success on the option
keeper and also con-
nected on a pair of passes



CROWN
Continued from Page B1

Kierah Tettenburn, who
both led the team, shooting
112. The next two golfers
kept the scores close, with
Madison Polazzo shooting a
113 and Chynna Liu shoot-
ing a 115.
Following Mullarkey,
Crystal River's Marisa
Wilder came in second on
her team, shooting a 113.
Hadley Gilman and Bekah
Hoffman rounded out the
day, scoring 135 and 132,
respectively
But after the very long
day, everybody left with a
smile on their face.
Citrus' Hamilton perhaps
the biggest.
"This is the first time in
four years that we beat


Lecanto and Crystal River,
both in the county match,"
he said. "So, for the first
time in four years, we can
lay claim to being county
champs. You always like to
hear that."
Hamilton also talked
about his squad's ever ma-
turing nature.


Ocala Christian 32
Seven Rivers 28


* The War-
riors' next
game is 7
p.m. Oct. 26
at home vs.
CFCA.


after stopping the Cru-
saders on downs.
From there, the Warriors
recovered an onside kick at
the OCA 48-yard line, but a
tripping penalty pushed
them back and Seven
Rivers saw time run out fol-
lowing its next play from
scrimmage.
"Hats off to (OCA)," Dave
Iwaniec said. "We saw them
on film against Peniel and
they lost 12-6, but we knew
the better team didn't win
that game.
"They dominated against
Peniel between the 20s and
things might have been dif-
ferent for them if it hadn't
been for a few big mistakes.
They've got a good football
team."
In the first half, OCA used
several big plays to jump out
to a 26-20 halftime lead.
David Cizmadia scored on
a 57-yard run and then fol-
lowing John Iwaniec's sec-

quarter, when Khalil Hicks
scored on an 11-yard run
after the Pirates had lost a
fumble on their opening
possession.
Crystal River rallied late
in the game to cut the score
to 14-7 on a 5-yard touch-
down run by Baldner. The
TD was set up by Warner's
lone turnover a pass in-
terception by Sam
Franklin.
Warner's final touch-
down came on a 1-yard run
by Dixon with 2:32 left in
the contest.
"I'm proud of our kids,"


for 59 yards.
Kelly scored on a 40-yard
run on the possession fol-
lowing White's TD, but the
Buffalo (0-6) missed the
PAT attempt, leaving the
score at 35-6.
Kelly finished with a
game-high 153 rushing
yards on 18 carries, and he
had another scoring run in
the fourth quarter.
"The option is tough to
prepare for, even at the
college level," Greene said.
"We tried to simulate it and
we did the best we can."
The 'Canes (4-3) put their
hurry-up run offense on
display in the final two
minutes of the first half,
going 49 yards in 1:38 and
culminating the drive on a
3-yard Whaley TD rush
through the belly of the Vil-
lages defense with a sec-
ond remaining to force the
running clock in the
second half.
Chapes added his second
rushing score in the third
quarter, and celebrated
senior night with a team-
high 127 rushing yards on
12 touches.
Citrus surrendered more
than 300 yards to the Buf-
falo offense, but it forced


CV


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Lecanto's Chynna Liu watches the flight of her ball Friday
during the girls county golf championship at Lakeside Golf
and Country Club in Inverness.


"Like I've said all year:
we play this to get ready for
district," he said. "The girls
played great today They
played hard and they were
all very consistent. This just
means great things for Cit-
rus golf."
He also sang the praises
of his opponents.
"These are two solid
teams," he said. "Crystal


River is up and coming and
will be great someday soon.
And Lecanto is a very tough
team, and they just had an
off day today
"I always love playing
Lecanto," Hamilton contin-
ued. "(Lecanto coach) Doug
(Warren) is always fun to
play, and Crystal River has a
great group of kids. So, hats
off to them for a great day"


SPORTS


ond scoring run of the game,
returned the kickoff 83
yards for another touch-
down, which put the Cru-
saders ahead 19-14.
After Bryant Fortune
scored from 10 yards out to
push OCAs lead to 26-14, the
Warriors battled back to
within six on the third score
by John Iwaniec.
"He's a very good back
and is real shifty," OCA
coach Jason Zimmerman
said. "Usually, he breaks off
80- and 90-yard touchdowns
runs, but I thought we were
able to stop him from bust-
ing any long ones."
The Warriors, who
finished with 299 yards on
62 carries for the game, got
113 on 19 carries in the
opening half from its stand-
out back, but struggled to
find the end zone as the
game wore on.
OCA, meanwhile, got a big
play on a 69-yard scoring
strike from Cizmadia to PJ.
Culver late in the third, be-
fore Seven Rivers stepped
up its game late.
For the game, the Cru-
saders were 5-of-7 on third
down conversions and its
quarterbacks were 6-for-6
for 133 yards and two touch-
downs on third down pass-
ing attempts.


Fowler said. "I thought we
played hard. That's a good
team."
Warner coach Steve
Allen said he knew his Ea-
gles were in for a battle.
"We knew they were
going to be tough," Allen
said. "That's a good 5A
school.
"Our defense was stellar
tonight," he said. "The
number I care about is the
seven points we gave up. I
don't care about the stats. I
don't care about how many
yards their kid had. It's all
about winning games."


three costly turnovers, in-
cluding an interception by
senior Kyle Tobin, and, led
by junior captains Steven
Knowles and Jesse Vine-
yard, sophomore Jaimee
Juse and Tobin, issued
punishing contact and dis-
ruption to The Villages all
night.
In addition to his TD
run, Smith also gained a
couple of first downs in
what were his first carries
of the season.
"It wasn't bad," Smith
said. "It was pretty easy to
make the switch. We just
put those in this week. It
feels incredible for us to
bounce back tonight"
Citrus is on bye next
week while it prepares for
a district homecoming con-
test against Lake Weir in
two weeks. If the 'Canes
prevail, their game at Van-
guard on Nov. 2 will likely
determine who gets the
second playoff spot in the
conference.
"Lake Weir is a good
football team," Greene
said. "They're physical and
they run a lot of the same
things we do. It's a very im-
portant game for us and
hopefully it'll be
hard-fought."





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fresh off a bye


Buccaneers ready

to stop run against

Quinn-led Chiefy

Associated Press

TAMPA The Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers are bracing for a heavy dose of
Jamaal Charles when they face the
struggling Chiefs on Sunday
"They pride themselves on running
that rock," Bucs cornerback Aqib Talib
said, noting Charles is the NFEs lead-
ing rusher. "The quarterback don't do
nothing but turn around and hand the
ball off in that situation."
That, of course, is not entirely true.
When Brady Quinn makes his first
start in three years Sunday, replacing
the injured Matt Cassel, the Chiefs
will count on the sixth-year quarter-
back to be effective throwing the ball
as well. Still, Talib is right. Tampa
Bay's challenge defensively begins
with containing the speedy Charles.
"They have a strong philosophy of
what they want to do as a football
team. So I think regardless of who the
quarterback is, they're going to stick
to that philosophy," Bucs coach Greg
Schiano said. "I don't see them vary-
ing way off."
The Chiefs (1-4) have the NFEs
second-ranked rushing attack at 221.6
yards per game, with Charles off to an
impressive start after missing the
final 14 games of last season with a
knee injury The fifth-year pro is av-
eraging 153.6 yards rushing his past
three games, including a 233-yard
performance against New Orleans
three weeks ago.
The Bucs (1-3) are coming off a bye
week, which Schiano used to address
offensive and defensive shortcomings
that have contributed to a three-game
losing streak.
"We went back and looked at every
single play," said Tampa Bay quarter-
backJosh Freeman, the former Kansas
State star who grew up in the Kansas
City area rooting for the Chiefs.
"Some stuff was good, some stuff
was bad," the fourth-year pro added
of his own inconsistent play "You've
got to get more of the good, eliminate
the bad. It's pretty black and white."
Like the Bucs, the Chiefs feel their
record would be better if not for crit-
ical mistakes. Kansas City has turned
over the ball a league-high 19 times,
including nine interceptions thrown
by Cassel, who's out after leaving the
fourth quarter of last week's 9-6 loss


Associated Press
Tampa Bay running back LeGarrette Blount and the Bucs eye a matchup
Sunday with the Kansas City Chiefs.


to Baltimore with a concussion.
Quinn, a former first-round draft
pick, will make his first start since
Dec. 12, 2009, when he was with the
Cleveland Browns.
"I'm not here to make predictions
or anything like that," Quinn said. "I
hope to go out there and play a good
clean game and give us an opportu-
nity to win."
Chiefs coach Romeo Crennel, who
was with Cleveland when the Browns
drafted Quinn in 2007, thinks the for-
mer Notre Dame quarterback is more
than capable.
Quinn came off the bench last week
to complete all three of his passes for
32 yards and had a go-ahead touch-
down nullified by a penalty against
the Ravens.
"Quinn has been in the league, and
he's been on different teams and he's
seen different operations and how
things are done," Crennel said. "I
think that he's excited about this op-


portunity. I think he'll be good and
make the best of it."
Schiano called Quinn a "highly qual-
ified" quarterback who's a little more
mobile than Cassel, who's completed
just 58.5 percent of his passes and
thrown for five touchdowns this season.
"He's played in Cleveland. He
played a little bit (with Kansas City)
in the preseason. There is tape out
there and we've gotten our hands on
pretty much what we need to see,"
Tampa Bay's first-year coach said.
Crennel said the Chiefs aren't in-
clined to tailor a game plan specifi-
cally for Quinn because he has similar
skills to Cassel. As far as the Bucs are
concerned, that includes handing the
ball to Charles again and again.
In addition to averaging 5.4 yards
per carry and leading the league with
551 yards rushing and two touch-
downs, Charles has 15 receptions and
is averaging a league-best 133.8 yards
from scrimmage.


Local players help


college teams


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

Here is a roundup of Cit-
rus County high school
graduates making an im-
pact athletically at the
collegiate level.
Antoin Scriven, a junior
running back for Western
Michigan University, en-
joyed one of the best days of
his collegiate athletic ca-
reer in the Broncos' 52-14
win over the University of
Massachusetts last Satur-
day in Kalamazoo.
The Citrus High School
graduate scored a pair of
touchdowns, the first on a 2-
yard run with 9:24 left in the
second quarter that boosted
WMU's lead to 28-7. With
11:57 remaining in the third
quarter Scriven struck
again, hauling in a 3-yard
touchdown pass from Tyler
Van Tubbergen to increase
the Broncos' lead to 35-7.
Scriven finished with sea-
son highs in both categories,
rushing four times for 33
yards and grabbing a team-
best six passes for 53 yards.
WMU, 3-3 overall, travels to
Mid-American Conference
rival Ball State today
Jake Allan, a sophomore
offensive lineman, and Tim-
othy Jones, a freshman wide
receiver, are playing foot-
ball for NAIA school
Friends University of
Kansas.
The Falcons, currently 4-2
overall and 3-1 in the Kansas
Collegiate Athletic Confer-
ence, entered the NAIA Top
25 poll this week at No. 25
and the pair of Lecanto
graduates has contributed.
Allan, a 6-foot-7, 270-
pound left tackle, has
started all six games for
Friends without allowing a
sack or being called for a
holding penalty to date.
Jones, a 5-foot-ll, 185-
pound wideout, began the
season returning kicks for
the Falcons, but is recover-
ing from an injury sus-
tained early in the season.
Nick Brothers, a senior at
St Leo University from Cit-
rus High School, turned in
the second-best score for the


Lions on Monday and Tues-
day at the Indian Bayou
Classic at the Indian Bayou
Country Club in Destin.
Brothers followed his
opening round of 77 with a
two-under par 70 for a two-
round total of three-over
par 147. St. Leo finished in
a three-way tie for fifth in
the 10-team tournament,
shooting 603, the same as
Harding University and
Shorter University North
Alabama, the host team for
the tourney, took top honors
with a 587.
Ryan Connors, another
Citrus High School gradu-
ate in his first year playing
for the Lions, had a rough
outing with an 81 and a 91
for a two-round total of 172.
St. Leo is now idle until
Oct. 22 and 23 when it plays
at the Rollins Invitational at
the Rio Pinar Country Club
in Orlando.
Carleigh Williams, a
sophomore defender for the
eighth-ranked University of
Central Florida women's
soccer team and a Lecanto
High School graduate, ran
her number of starts this
season to 14 in the Knights
matches against the Univer-
sity of Tulsa on Friday and
Southern Methodist Uni-
versity on Sunday UCF
blanked Tulsa 2-0, but was
upset by SMU 2-1.
Williams, who has one as-
sist for the season, has
started every match for the
Knights, who are 10-3-1
overall.
Kylie Fagan, a freshman
for the St. Leo University
Lions women's cross country
team and a Citrus High
School graduate, was fourth
for her team and 92nd over-
all at Friday's Florida State
University Cross Country In-
vitational, at Apalachee Re-
gional Park in Tallahassee.
Fagan finished the 6-kilome-
ter course in 25:23.2.
The Lions placed 15th out
of 18 teams competing, scor-
ing 363 points. Host FSU
won the event with 72
points. Next up for St. Leo
is the University of Central
Florida Invitational on
Friday in Orlando.


Titans down


Steelers on late FG


Bironas kicks

team to win

Thursday night

Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
The Tennessee Titans have
bought themselves a little
breathing room with a much-
needed victory, and the Pitts-
burgh Steelers still can't win
away from Heinz Field.
Rob Bironas kicked his
fourth field goal, a 40-yarder
as time expired, and the Ti-
tans beat the Steelers 26-23
on Thursday night to snap a
two-game skid.
Matt Hasselbeck threw a
5-yard touchdown pass to
Kenny Britt with 4:19 left to
tie it at 23, and the Titans (2-
4) snapped a three-game
losing streak against the
Steelers.
Pittsburgh (2-3) lost its
third straight road game this
season and for the fifth time
in six games dating to last
season despite Ben Roethlis-
berger throwing for 363 yards
and becoming the Steelers'
career passing leader
Roethlisberger drove the
Steelers into position to
take the lead after the Ti-
tans tied it. Shaun Suisham,
who already had connected
from 29, 28 and 52 yards,
had his 54-yard attempt fall
short of the crossbar with 49
seconds left.
Chris Johnson ran for 91
yards on 19 carries, and
Hasselbeck finished with
290 yards passing.
The Steelers were up 20-
16 when Lawrence Tim-
mons picked off
Hasselbeck's pass, but they
had to settle for Suisham's
third field goal after moving
the ball only 14 yards. That
field goal put Pittsburgh up
23-16, and the NFEs fourth-
ranked defense couldn't
make that stand up.
Johnson, who has been
criticized mercilessly for his


struggles running the ball,
kicked off Tennessee's next
drive with a 12-yard run.
The Titans drove 80 yards
before Hasselbeck found
Britt to tie it.
After the Titans stopped
Pittsburgh, Hasselbeck
drove them 33 yards with the
big play a 25-yard pass to
tight end Jared Cook on a
night his mother, Yulinda,
was honored as a breast can-
cer survivor. The Titans gave
the ball to Johnson to run
down the clock, then sent out
Bironas for the field goal.
Pittsburgh coach Mike
Tomlin tried to ice Bironas
with a timeout. Bironas
waited it out, and then
kicked the ball through to
give the Titans a rare chance
to celebrate this season.
Roethlisberger entered
the game with 27,703 yards,
286 yards shy of Terry Brad-
shaw's franchise record.
Roethlisberger was 24 of 40
and passed Bradshaw with
a 17-yard pass to Heath
Miller late in the third quar-
ter of his 119th game. Brad-
shaw played 168 games from
1970-83.


Titans 26, Steelers 23
Pittsburgh 10 0 3 10- 23
Tennessee 6 10 0 10- 26
First Quarter
Ten-FG Bironas 22, 10:53.
Pit-FG Suisham 29, 7:24.
Pit-Wallace 82 pass from Roethlisberger (Su-
isham kick), 5:25.
Ten-FG Bironas 38, 1:11.
Second Quarter
Ten-Harper 1 run (Bironas kick), 14:14.
Ten-FG Bironas 47, :00.
Third Quarter
Pit-FG Suisham 28, 9:03.
Fourth Quarter
Pit-B.Batch 1 run (Suisham kick), 13:34.
Pit-FG Suisham 52, 8:18.
Ten-Britt 5 pass from Hasselbeck (Bironas
kick), 4:19.
Ten-FG Bironas 40, :00.
A-69,143.
Pit Ten
First downs 19 21
Total Net Yards 412 359
Rushes-yards 22-56 22-94
Passing 356 265
Punt Returns 4-17 1-9
Kickoff Returns 3-97 5-131
Interceptions Ret. 1-4 1-0
Comp-Att-Int 24-40-1 25-44-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 3-25
Punts 4-30.8 5-52.2
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 4-50 5-45
Time of Possession 29:57 30:03
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Pittsburgh, B.Batch 10-22, Red-
man 5-14, Roethlisberger 1-14, Mendenhall 6-
6. Tennessee, C.Johnson 19-91, Hasselbeck
1-2, Harper 2-1.
PASSING-Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 24-40-1-
363. Tennessee, Hasselbeck 25-44-1-290.
RECEIVING-Pittsburgh, Miller 6-67, Redman
4-105, Sanders 4-43, A.Brown 4-20, Wallace 2-
94, Rainey 1-12, Mendenhall 1-11, Paulson 1-8,
B. Batch 1-3. Tennessee, Wright 6-71, Britt 4-62,
Cook 4-54, C.Johnson 4-23, Washington 3-57,
Williams 2-14, Thompson 1-5, Stevens 1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Pittsburgh, Suisham
54 (SH).


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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Bieber laptop
tweet not a hoax
SEATTLE-Was pop
star Justin Bieber's lap-
top actually stolen during
a show in
Washing-
ton state?
Bieber
i tweeted
to his
nearly 29
million
followers
Justin he was
Bieber victim-
ized dur-
ing the show Tuesday
night at the Tacoma
Dome. But questions
were raised Friday about
the authenticity of
Bieber's claim.
Another Twitter al-
luded to having the lap-
top. The account linked
to Bieber's new music
video, which starts with
text saying personal
footage was stolen and
uploaded "illegally"
That prompted suspi-
cions the supposed theft
was a hoax meant to hype
the new music video,
which was released
Friday
But Bieber's publicist
Melissa Victor said it's
not a hoax.

Elvis' California
estate for sale
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -
The former Beverly Hills
home of the late Elvis
Presley and his wife
Priscilla is up for sale for
a cool $12.9 million.
Like Elvis' home in
Memphis, known as
Graceland, Elvis fans
have for years flocked to
visit the property. Ac-
cording to the listing, the
four bedroom, five bath-
room French Regency es-
tate sits on a 1.18 acre
promontory overlooking
Los Angeles.

Stars honor
Whitney Houston
LOS ANGELES -Jen-
nifer Hudson embodied
the look of one of her
idols, Whitney Houston,
during a tribute to the late
singer in Los Angeles.
Rocking a pompadour
and glittery jacket remi-
niscent of Houston's stage
costumes from the 1980s,
Hudson belted out a med-
ley of Houston's hits
Thursday at the Nokia
Theatre for "We Will Al-
ways Love You: A Grammy
Salute to Whitney Hous-
ton," which will air as a
TV special next month.
Britney Spears, LL
Cool J, Halle Berry,
Taraji P Henson, CeCe
Winans and Yolanda
Adams also participated.


'Appre
All-Stars
NEW YORK
"Celebrity Ap]
winner BretlM
and 13 other p
ants are return
all-star edition
March.
NBC annou
on the "Today
slate of contend
face host Don;
in the "Celebr
tice" boardroom
They include
music star Tra
magician Peni
actress Marilu
and "Apprenti
tion Omarosa.


Cancer in comedy


Associated Press
After starting her comedy routine with "Good evening! Hello. I have cancer. How are you?" Tig Notaro launched
into a 30-minute performance that immediately became legendary in comedy circles.

Comedian deals with disease by incorporating it into her act


Associated Press

NEW YORK-A frightfully nerv-
ous Tig Notaro stood just offstage at
the Los Angeles club Largo while
Ed Helms introduced her.
The audience of 300 and Notaro's
fellow performers that August night
had no idea what she was about to
do. They had no idea she was going
to address the trauma and pain that
had been the last few months of her
life, or relay the bad news she had
received just days earlier. They had
no idea she was about to perform
the bravest set they had ever seen.
"Good evening! Hello. I have can-
cer. How are you?"
With those words said cava-
lierly in the normal stand-up greet-
ing manner- Notaro launched into
a 30-minute performance that im-
mediately became legendary in
comedy circles and that's now avail-
able as an unlikely live album via a
$5 digital release by comedian
Louis C.K. In just a week, it's sold
more than 60,000 copies.
The 41-year-old Notaro, a stand-
up veteran of 15 years, was in the
midst of a string of misfortunes: She
had been hospitalized and debili-
tated by clostridium difficile, her


mother had died in a tragic acci-
dent, she went through a break-up,
and, days earlier, she had learned
she had breast cancer.
"It's weird because with humor,
the equation is tragedy plus time
equal comedy," Notaro told a
stunned crowd. "I am just at tragedy
right now."
But Notaro's performance wasn't a
weepy lament It was matter-of-fact
storytelling, filled with heartbreak-
ingly funny observations. It was tak-
ing comedy straight into darkness
and grief, in the rawest catharsis.
"It felt amazing," Notaro said in a
recent interview, days after moving
from Los Angeles to New York.
"When I was on stage I felt, 'Wow, I
think something really special is
happening."'
The audience at turns con-
fused, amazed, gasping, saddened,
hysterical cheered her on, some
through tears. Among those there
that night was Louis C.K., who in-
sisted Notaro release the largely
unrehearsed show as a comedy
album. He put it out on his website,
calling it "one of the greatest
standup performances I ever saw."
It took Notaro more than a month
to convince herself to release it


(mostly because it was so raw and off-
the-cuff, like an open-mic perform-
ance), but she was eventually swayed
by thinking it could help someone.
Notaro was performing that night
partly to work out material she had
written on her ordeal, having been
urged by "This American Life" host
Ira Glass, who would later feature
her story on the radio program. Just
90 minutes before going on stage,
she had thought she would begin by
sitting down and laying everything
out for the audience. Instead, while
showering, she decided such an
apologetic opening was "lame" and
was seized by maniacal laughter at
the thought of beginning as she did:
"This is how I'm going to deal with
having cancer," she told herself.
She paused, worried that she might
offend anyone with cancer, before
realizing: "Wait, I have cancer."
"I just really needed to talk about
it," says Notaro, explaining her
mindset at the time. "What if my life
is slipping away right now?"
Notaro is now back from the brink.
She had a double mastectomy and
doctors believe the cancer has been
removed with recurrence unlikely
She finds herself a sensation, and has
signed a book deal with Ecco Press.


Decades of Miss Subways smiled on straphangers


Associated Press


NEW YORK It was an
ad campaign conceived as
eye candy to bring attention
to other advertisements in
New York's transit system.
But the "Meet Miss Sub-
ways" beauty contest
posters of pretty young New
York women and their aspi-


rations quickly evolved into
mtice' a popular and even ground-
on tap breaking fixture that ran for
35 years, from 1941 to 1976.
Former When photographer Fiona
prentice" Gardner first learned about
[ichaels it she "immediately wanted
iast contest- to know what happened to
ning for an all the women."
n to air next She set out to find out.
The result is "Meet Miss
nced Friday Subways: New York's
" show the Beauty Queens 1941-76," an
riders set to exhibition at the New York
ald Trump Transit Museum running
'ity Appren- Oct. 23-March 25, and a com-
)m. panion book of the same
e country name.
ace Adkins, The contest reflected an
nJillette, evolving America. When it
Henner was launched, the war al-
ce" sensa- ready was changing the role
of women. From 1952 to
-From wire reports 1962, the contest featured


Birthday: You'll be extremely lucky in the year ahead when
it comes to fulfilling an ambitious objective, so it's important
that your goals are clear-cut. Success becomes more prob-
able when you know exactly what you want.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Rather than making your pres-
ence felt up front, much more can be accomplished by
functioning as the power behind the scenes. It behooves
you to keep a low profile.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you continue to strive for
your objectives in a realistic manner, you will find great suc-
cess. The favorable cycle you're in won't change, as long
as you keep your eyes on the ground.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Others will perceive your
actions to be extremely important. It isn't likely to be your
accomplishments that look so impressive, but how you're
going about making them.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) One of the more important


Meet Maureen Walsh A
BeaulnrL Dr.41 e-&0t.ra4 Mauu ee I.- hTl-w-iCal MM S ontled L m N %
oiund ..I erar n.noi. I la .s uu n .1.r'S lIq |i1. C.-.i
a. Ih r, k- -n14ea-,I C-.nr M1I'L-n tiis hI..' 4a-tim. S. N... Ir.-
I, IU 0T 0 jad.iV at ISMdnari l 1rad. sh s as ib am nMut aa ,""
at 3.a *sIa .he. e bl I o r e. n nh. .1i .8a lA t r astm, K l
ar.ta~ Ard ft. eapr n. Ir,.-I: Kn..e k.i, rma. m has
A,_d- 1:i...-TF

Associated Press
Maureen Walsh appeared on placards in the New York City
subways from Feb. to Aug. 1968 in the "Meet Miss Sub-
ways" campaign that ran for 35 years as eye candy to bring
attention to other advertisements in New York's transit
system.


schoolteachers, stewardesses
and suburban housewives;
the next 10 years saw secre-
taries and airplane pilots.
The first African-Ameri-
can was crowned Miss Sub-
ways in 1948 long before
Vanessa Williams was
named Miss America in 1984
- and the first Asian-Amer-
ican was honored in 1949.
"It was the first integrated
and ethnically diverse
beauty contest in America,"
representing working-class
women, said Gardner, who
was born the year the con-
test ended. "I realized I had
stumbled on a piece of for-


Today's HOROSCOPE
lessons you're likely to learn won't be found in books. The
indications are that wisdom will come your way through
personal experience.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Possibilities for you to reap
material gains from unusual sources look good. If a compe-
tent associate talks to you about something potentially prof-
itable, listen carefully.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you pledge your word to
do something for another, make every effort to follow
through on it. Your commitments should be taken very seri-
ously.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Spend your efforts and time
on some truly meaningful endeavors, and you'll increase
your feelings of self-worth considerably. Structure your day
to be truly productive.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) There is no need to feel guilty
if you end up participating in some fun diversions. After


gotten New York history."
Her interest was piqued
in 2004 after seeing some of
the original posters on the
walls of Ellen's Stardust
Diner, whose owner, Ellen
Hart Sturm, was crowned
Miss Subways in 1959. The
winners' future dreams
were listed along with their
headshots; many wanted to
be models or singers, while
others yearned to travel -
"Europe four times, no
less," read the Miss Sub-
ways poster of Maureen
Walsh Roaldsen in 1968.
The first Miss Subways,
Mona Freeman, even went


on to become a movie star
after being discovered by
Howard Hughes.
But for most, the subway
placard was their only mo-
ment in the spotlight, and
finding the former winners
was a challenge for Gardner
The contest archives were
lost Many of the women had
married and changed their
names, some had moved,
still others had died.
She searched the Internet,
voter registration and munic-
ipal archives and even hired
a private eye. With journalist
Amy Zimmer, she tracked
down 146 Miss Subways
posters and interviewed 41
winners in person. Together
they collaborated on the
book, with Gardner taking
the women's portraits wear-
ing their Miss Subways
sashes at home or at work
"Many of these women
are very interesting and
have accomplished many
things. You realize there's a
much more complex story
behind the headshots. Many
of them went back and had
second and third careers,"
said Gardner.


having such a hectic week, with the chance of another one
ahead, you need the break.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You'll feel far more gratifica-
tion by looking out for the needs of others rather than just
your own. Generosity breeds nobility.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) One of your greatest assets
will be your ability to communicate effectively with others. It
doesn't matter if you're writing, selling, promoting or in-
structing you'll do well.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There are times to be frugal and
times when it's OK to splurge within reasonable parame-
ters. You should be able to combine these two extremes
without detrimental results.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Most people with whom you'll
be involved aren't likely to be as effective in a leadership
situation as you will be. Being asked to take charge of a
critical situation is inevitable.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
Fantasy 5:5 7 12 14 15
5-of-5 No winners
4-of-5 429 $555
3-of-5 11,026 $8

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Oct. 13,
the 287th day of 2012. There
are 79 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Oct. 13, 1962, Edward
Albee's searing four-charac-
ter drama "Who's Afraid of
Virginia Woolf?" opened on
Broadway with Arthur Hill as
George, Uta Hagen as
Martha, George Grizzard as
Nick and Melinda Dillon
(whose 23rd birthday it was)
as Honey.
On this date:
In A.D. 54, Roman Em-
peror Claudius I died, poi-
soned apparently at the
behest of his wife, Agrippina.
In 1307, King Philip IV of
France ordered the arrests of
Knights Templar on charges
of heresy.
In 1843, the Jewish organi-
zation B'nai B'rith was
founded in New York City.
In 1944, American troops
entered Aachen, Germany,
during World War II.
In 1972, a Uruguayan
chartered flight carrying 45
people crashed in the Andes;
16 survivors who resorted to
feeding off the remains of
some of the dead in order to
stay alive were rescued more
than two months later.
In 1981, voters in Egypt
participated in a referendum
to elect Vice President Hosni
Mubarak the new president,
one week after the assassi-
nation of Anwar Sadat.
Ten years ago: Serbia's
first presidential elections
since the ouster of Slobodan
Milosevic failed because of a
low voter turnout.
Five years ago: Secretary
of State Condoleezza Rice,
after meeting with human-
rights activists in Moscow,
told reporters the Russian
government under Vladimir
Putin had amassed so much
central authority that the
power-grab could undermine
its commitment to
democracy.
One year ago: Raj Ra-
jaratnam, the hedge fund bil-
lionaire at the center of the
biggest insider-trading case
in U.S. history, was sen-
tenced by a federal judge in
New York to 11 years behind
bars.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer British Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher is 87.
Singer-musician Paul Simon
is 71. Musician Robert Lamm
(Chicago) is 68. Actor De-
mond Wilson is 66. Singer-
musician Sammy Hagar is
65. Singer Marie Osmond is
53. College and Pro Football
Hall of Famer Jerry Rice is
50. Actress Kelly Preston is
50. Country singer John Wig-
gins is 50. Actor Christopher
Judge is 48. Actress Tisha
Campbell-Martin is 44.
Olympic silver-medal figure
skater Nancy Kerrigan is 43.
Actor Sacha Baron Cohen is
41. Rhythm-and-blues
singers Brandon and Brian
Casey (Jagged Edge) are 37.
NBAAII-Star Paul Pierce is
35. Singer Ashanti is 32.
Thought for Today:


"There are some things one
can only achieve by a delib-
erate leap in the opposite di-
rection. One has to go
abroad in order to find the
home one has lost." Franz
Kafka, Austrian author (1883-
1924).









RELIGION 6,
.L EIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Church to host Christian rock band
BROOKE PERRY
Correspondent
Saved, a Christian rock
band with members hailing
from Crystal River, Ho-
mosassa and Hernando, has
proven not only their talent
through original songs and
praise to God, but that gospel
music can be enjoyable to
everyone. The four men will
be playing Oct. 19 at the
Covenant Love Church in
Crystal River at 7 p.m.
The band was started
about two years ago, after
lead singer and guitarist
Terry Stimpfling was saved
himself.
"(Being saved) changed
me dramatically," Stimpfling .
said. "I've changed from.
hate to love, not only in- .
wardly, but outwardly, so
everyone can see."
A while after he was re-
deemed, Stimpfling, who
has been playing music and ...
singing from a very young ,
age, had the idea to start
writing and making music
together with some friends.
He along with rhythm gui-
tarist and singer Joe Florio -
write original songs for the
band, whose sound falls DAVE SIGLER/Chronic


Joe Florio, Terry Stimpfling, and Jeff Garbig rehearsed recently in preparation for the show they are
Page C3 Covenant Love Ministries, located at 6843 N. Citrus Ave. in Crystal River.


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Game of


Thrones

t's no surprise to peo-
ple who know me that
I am not a fancy
Nancy
I'm not plain, and I am
(I hope) feminine, but I'm
definitely not lacy, doily,
flowery foo-foo.
I'm so not a princess.
That said, I'm con-
stantly getting invited to
women's events that bor-
der on the fancy This past
weekend, I was with a
group of women at a
nearby Victorian hotel,
which has fancy in its very
structure.
Not all the women were
fancy, although some liked
the bling and shiny things,
Southern-style big hair,
wigs and hairpieces,
manis, pedis and spas and
shopping in boutiques.
I liked all the women I
met, fancy and not. I dis-
covered that 70-year-olds
can be a lot of fun and that
the one 80-year-old in the
group had more energy
than the rest of us put
together.
The event was a retreat
and, therefore, there were
games and skits. I think
there's a rule somewhere
that whenever women
gather, games must be
played. I'm not a huge fan
See Page C5


le


performing at the


Haitians turn to Islam


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Associated Press
Darlene Derosier, 43, a Muslim, sits on a prayer rug Sept. 28 at the AI-Fattah Mosque in Gressier, Haiti. Islam has won a growing number of
followers in this impoverished country, especially after the catastrophic earthquake in 2010 that killed hundreds of thousands and left millions
more homeless. Derosier said what's helped pull her through all the grief has been her faith, but not of the Catholic, Protestant or even Voodoo
that's dominated this island country. Instead, she's converted to a new religion here, Islam, and built a small neighborhood mosque out of cin-
derblocks and plywood, where some 60 Muslims pray daily.

In wake ofearthquake, new faithputs down roots in impoverished country

Associated Press
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
school teacher Darlene ...
Derosier lost her home in
the 2010 earthquake that
devastated her country Her hus-
band died a month later after
suffering what she said was
emotional trauma from the
quake. She and her two daugh-
ters now live in tents outside the
capital of Port-au-Prince, sur-
rounded by thousands of others
made homeless and desperate
by the disaster
What's helped pull her
through all the grief, she said,
has been her faith, but not of the
Catholic, Protestant or even
Voodoo variety that have pre-
dominated in this island coun-
try Instead, she's converted to a
new religion here, Islam, and
built a small neighborhood
mosque out of cinderblocks and
plywood, where some 60 Mus-
lims pray daily
A man reads about Islamic customs and traditions Sept. 28 at the AI-Fattah Mosque before the start of
See Page C6 Friday prayer in Gressier, Haiti.


Visions of


Chernobyl
KIEV The apoca-
lyptic visions begin
just inside the
doors of the Ukrainian
National Chernobyl Mu-
seum and many of them
lead into the Book of
Revelation.
The final pages of
Christian scripture are
full of angels, trumpets,
flames, thunder, lighting,
earthquakes and catastro-
phes that shake heaven
and earth.
In this museum, the key
is in the eighth chapter:
"And the third angel
sounded, and there fell a
great star from heaven,
burning as it were a lamp,
and it fell upon the third
part of the rivers, and
upon the fountains of wa-
ters. And the name of the
star is called Wormwood:
and the third part of the
waters became worm-
wood; and many men died
of the waters, because
they were made bitter"
When Ukrainians trans-
late "wormwood" into
their own language it be-
comes "chernobyl." It's
easy to connect the two
when discussing the
legacy of pain that fol-
lowed the 1986 disaster at
the Chernobyl Power Sta-
tion north of Kiev, when
explosions and fires at the
reactor core released a
plume of radioactive de-
bris that drifted over Rus-
sia and into Europe.
Soviet officials claim a
See Page C5


MAII f -





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Fall fun
The public is invited to a
"Fall Festival" from 2 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 20, at Joy &
Praise Fellowship, 4007 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills.
Enjoy free food, games and
fun.
Hernando United
Methodist Church will have its
old-fashioned Pumpkin festi-
val for the community from 4 to
6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27. Fes-
tivities include a hayride, cake
walk, games, ball tosses,
horseshoes, fish pond and
more. After the "trunk or treat"
parade, there will be free hot
dogs and a drink. Put on your
costume, bring a friend and
have some old-fashioned,
made-in-America fun. Tell Mom
to bring her camera and take
your picture with the scarecrow.
This is a free event.
A "Harvest Festival,"
sponsored by First Baptist
Church of Floral City, will take
place from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednes-
day, Oct. 31, at Floral City Park.
Enjoy food, drinks, candy, more
than 30 booths with activities
for children of all ages. Every-
thing is free.
"Fall Harvest Bazaar"
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, Nov. 2 and 3, at
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa at the corner of
Yulee and Bradshaw (off U.S.
19). Two days of exciting
shops: Craft, Kitchen, Bake
Shoppe & Cookie Walk, Hidden
Treasure Shoppe, Book
Shoppe, Christmas Wonder-
land Shoppe, Plant & Garden,
Technology, Man Cave, and
Silent Auction. Hosted by the
United Methodist Women and
Serendipity Men of the Church,
with proceeds benefiting local
and worldwide charities. Visit
www.1umc.org.
Sale away
Mary Martha Circle of First
Christian Church of Ho-


mosassa Springs will continue
its annual rummage and bake
sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today in the fellowship hall,
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Ladies' designer clothing,
children's clothing, household
goods, shoes, purses, kitchen
items, linens and bedding, and
homemade goodies. Proceeds
to benefit Florida Christian Col-
lege, Sunday School Ministry
and Kitchen Ministry. Call
Brenda at 352-678-8834.
Joy Lutheran Church, 83rd
Place, Ocala, will have its an-
nual indoor yard sale and
bake sale from 7:30 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, in
Swenson Hall. The public is in-
vited to donate furniture, tools,
gardening items, kitchen and
house wares, linens, books and
craft supplies at Swenson Hall
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednes-
day through Friday. Bring
wrapped and labeled baked
goods on Friday. Lunch will be
served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday. Call Edie Heinzen at
352-854-6816 or Patty Corey at
352-854-0660.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church, will host its annual
"Holiday Bazaar and Craft
Fair" from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fri-
day, Oct. 26, from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, and 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28,
in the Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Christmas and holiday treas-
ures, handmade crafts, jewelry,
live plants, books, toys and
games. Raffle drawing at 1:30
p.m. Sunday. The Our Lady of
Grace monthly flea market will
also take place outside from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. that Saturday.
Refreshments available. Call
Fran Wagner at 352-527-0723
or Joan Reinhart at 352-
527-7064.
An indoor yard sale will
take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27, at Holy Faith
Episcopal Church, 19924 W.


Blue Cove Road, Dunnellon.
Call the church office at 352-
489-2685.
Worship
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Vespers
at 5 p.m. today and Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, (off U.S. 41
North, across from Dollar Gen-
eral). The Holy Myrrhbearers
ask attendees to bring a box or
can of food for distribution at
Family Resource Center in
Hemando.
At First Baptist Church
of Floral City, Pastor John L.
Rothra will teach the Bible fol-
lowing this pattern of subjects:
Sunday morning blended serv-
ice at 8:30 a.m. and traditional
service at 11 a.m. -through
the book of Philippians. Sun-
day evening service at 6 p.m.
- series on "What We Believe
and Why: Doctrines of the
Christian Faith." Wednesday
evening service at 6:30 p.m. -
devotionals and prayer. Addi-
tional Wednesday evening ac-
tivities for children and youth
include: AWANA for children
led by Mike Johnson and oth-
ers at 6:30 p.m. OTEG for
youth (Ordinary Teens, Ex-
traordinary God) led by Josh
and Jennifer Pensinger. The
church is at 8545 E. Magnolia
St., Floral City. Call 352-
726-4296.
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rock Acres Industrial Park, 6843
N. CitrusAve., Crystal River.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday. Regular church serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
The ministry website is
Covenant-Love.com. Call Pas-
tor Brian Kinker at 352-
601-4868.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Men and Women's
Club breakfast and workday


begins at 8:30 a.m. today. The
church will celebrate Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. Sunday
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. Children's church is
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Adult Sunday school is at 9:30
a.m. Morning prayer is at 9
Monday through Friday. Pastor
Gene's noon luncheon and
Christian study is Tuesday The
Feed My Sheep Ministry will
host a hot lunch at 11:30 a.m.
for those in need followed by a
healing and Holy Eucharist
service celebrating St. Luke the
Evangelist at 12:30 p.m.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the 20th Sunday
after Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today
and 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
A nursery is provided during the
10:30 a.m. service. Godly Play
Sunday school is at 10 a.m.
There is a healing service and
Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day. SOS is from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday at Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church. Evening
Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
A come-as-you-are service
will take place at 5 p.m. today
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S.19), Crystal River.
Sunday worship services in-
clude the early service with
communion at 8 a.m., Sunday
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. with coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with communion at
10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutherancrystal-
river.com.
Faith Lutheran Church,
off State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Crystal Glen Sub-
division in Lecanto, invites the
public to services at 6 p.m. Sat-
urdays and 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
This week Pastor Stephen
Lane will preach on the subject
"What Must I Do?" from Mark


10:17-32. Following the Sunday
service is a time of fellowship,
then Sunday school at 11 a.m.
Call 352-527-3325 or visit faith-
lecanto.com. Audio of the serv-
ice is also on the website.
St. Anne's Church (a
parish in the Anglican Com-
munion) will celebrate the 20th
Sunday after Pentecost at the 8
and 10:15 a.m. services. Our
Father's Table is hosted from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.
The "Recovering from Food Ad-
diction" group meets at 1 p.m.
Thursday. Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets at 8 p.m. Friday
and Monday. All are welcome to
join St. Anne's at 6 p.m. Sun-
day, Oct. 28, for a Bluegrass
Gospel sing-along. Annie and
Tim's United Bluegrass Gospel
Band will perform. Ice cream
will be served after.
Inverness Church of
God, 416 U.S. 41 S., Inver-
ness, has Sunday worship
services at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
The first Sunday monthly is
designated for children to have
a special time together in the
Children's Church room during
the 10:30 a.m. worship service.
The remaining Sundays, chil-
dren remain in the auditorium
for worship with their parents.
Sunday school begins at 9:30
a.m. with classes for everyone.
Adult Bible class is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in rooms 105 and
106. The youth group meets at
7 p.m. Wednesday in the
Youth Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for pre-k through the
eighth grade) meets from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday. This in-
cludes K.I.D.'s Choir practice
from 6 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s dinner
from 6:30 to 7; and Mis-
sionettes and Royal Rangers
Bible study classes from 7 to 8
p.m. Call 352-726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour fol-


lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
CD ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices. A
nursery attendant is available
for preschool-age children. The
"Talent for Tents" fundraiser to
benefit the area homeless will
take place at 7 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 27. Enjoy an evening of
music, puppetry, dancing and
refreshments. The church is on
County Road 486 opposite Cit-
rus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.
Sunday. A coffee fellowship
will follow the service. Bible
study is at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The Faith Journey video series
continues the first Wednesday
monthly; lessons that help ex-
plain the Scriptures as related
to the culture and land of bibli-
cal times. On subsequent
Wednesday, a study and dis-
cussion of the book of Eph-
esians continues. The church
meets at the Inverness
Woman's Club, 1715 Forest
Ridge Drive. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service is at
6. Midweek services are at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Young Musi-
cians/Puppeteers meet at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Bible
study for ages 11 and older is
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the second
and fourth Fridays monthly in
the fellowship hall. The church
is on East Parsons Point Road
in Hernando.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Pastor Jack Alwood's
sermon is "All Things are Possi-
ble with God." Two adult Bible

See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Crystal Qiver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
| (12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
Saturday 4:30 P.M.
sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
LI ril ,. t ,l r ,





First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


& Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko

Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


E ST. ANNE'S
ST CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


MOMCrystal
5 River
Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CP. ""
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller






Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call
Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.- 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


! West Homosassa
Citrus 9st First United
H-K,, YOU'LL FIND
Church of Christ x CKIN F MILY Methodist
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. IN cH KIT church
Crystal River, FL 34465 CKYSTXL Everyone
352-564-8565 RivC Becoming
of Christ
www.westcitruscoc.com VJN ITCD A Disciple
W. Deep Woods Dr. o ) CTHODlT rs
Sunday Worship
HUCH______ 8:00 am & 9:30 am
o 4801 N. Citrus Ave. & 11:00 am
S (2 Mi. N Of US 19) ud
74 Sunday School
795-3148 9:30 am
I IPq Uw .m. 1t a I __


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
- A Stephen Ministry Provider -


Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pmr
795-4479


C2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


RELIGION


I


US Hwy.19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CONCERT
Continued from Page Cl

under various genres.
"Our sound is kind of rock-
blues-country," Florio said.
The band lists The Beatles as
one of its in-
fluences.
"What we 0 WHAT:
grew up lis- Covenant
tening to, we Love
put that style Church
in our music Concert
to Christian 0 WHEN: 7
w o r d s p.m. Friday,
Stimpfling Oct. 19.
said. Doors open
Although 6 p.m.
the band has
only been to- WHERE:
gether two Covenant
years, they Love
are no Church,
strangers to Shamrock
performing. Acres In-
In addition to Park Build-
the gigs ing 11,
the y ve 6843 N.
played all Citrus Ave,
over the Crystal
county, they River.
were picked
to play Dis-
ney's Night of Joy, a huge contem-
porary Christian music festival
that takes place at Magic King-
dom.
"There were thousands of peo-
ple," Stimpfling said. "It was very


RELIGION


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 C3


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Covenant Love Ministry is presenting a concert of the group "Saved" at their building off Citrus Avenue in Crystal River. Band members are, from
left, Joe Florio, Terry Stimpfling, Jeff Garbig and Chris Baker.


nice; a real blessing to play for
that many people."
Covenant Love Church pastor
Brian Kinker has commended the
band's music, as well as their dis-
position.
"They are just extremely profes-
sional and have an incredible min-


istry," Kinker said. "They're a great
group of guys who really give their
service to God. Their music is from
the heart and can really reach peo-
ple, the songs are easy to under-
stand and catch on to."
The concert will also open up for
prayer and testimony throughout


the service. Doors will open at 6
p.m. and the concert will begin at 7
p.m. Covenant Love Church is lo-
cated in the Shamrock Acres In-
dustrial Park Building 11, the
physical address is 6843 N. Citrus
Ave, Crystal River
"I'm most looking forward to


being able to get the message out
about God," Florio said about the
upcoming performance.
Stimpfling couldn't agree more.
"The best part is being able to
express my musical talents and
songs to people, to be able to bring
them closer to God," he said.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO,


LECANTO, FLORAL


CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA








Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

3 7 7


U_ Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


First Baptist"
Church
Sof Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
S www.fbcfloralcity.org


Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm


Community Church




Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.qenesiscommunitvchurch.org
Authentic Love Relevant Faith
Embracing Community


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


4. ryfor Children and Families"
2125 ENorvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1/2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
i ,, h ,. ,,I h h," I , 1 .


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
... Floral City, FL.


Grace Bible
Church





Sunday
9:30 AM.................. Discovery Time
11:00 AM .................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.................. Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1y mi.east of US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


1A Faith
Lutheran
Church (L.CS.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
7"-arroom ,t.. I


I I I


Hems ndo, FL 34-442
352.726-6734

a 3790 E. Parson's Point Rd.
Vlsft us on the Web at
www.fbehernmdo.com





C4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

studies begin at 9 a.m. Joy
class continues to study the
New Testament; contemporary
class will study Christianity and
world religions, beginning with
Hinduism. The Forum meets at
6 p.m. Wednesday to discuss
issues and current events.
Homecoming Sunday is Oct.
21. Worship will begin at 10:30
with luncheon and program to
follow. Former members, visi-
tors and friends of the church
are welcome. For luncheon
reservations, call the church of-
fice at 352-795-2259.
Find a church home at
Abundant Life of Crystal
River, 4515 N. Tallahassee
Road, Crystal River. Sunday
morning service is at 10:30 and
the midweek service is at 7
p.m. Wednesday. Visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org or
call 352-795-LIFE.
"The Meaning of Life" is
the topic of Minister Dan Wag-
ner's sermon at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at First Christian
Church of Homosassa, 7030
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Sunday school for all ages is at
9:30 a.m. The evening service
is at 6. Wednesday evening
supper is served at 6 followed
by prayer and Bible study titled
"Not a Fan." Call 352-628-5556.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes Doug
Worthington to the pulpit at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Worthing-
ton's topic, "Different Ways of
Showing Affection and/or
Friendship for Someone." The
fellowship meets at 7633 N.
Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Call 352-465-4225.
We all have vampires in
our lives. They're not the ones
with pale skin and bloodthirsty
fangs, but they do suck the life
out of us. They live in your city,
across the street and maybe
even under your own roof. So
how do you love the people
who drain you? How do you
handle your dysfunctional rela-
tionships? How do you make it
work when all you want to do is
run? It's time to learn how to
hug a vampire. Start this Sun-
day at 11 a.m. at Gravity
Church, 801 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, offers the following Sun-
day activities: SONrise Sunday
school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the
9 a.m. service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for


RELIGION


all services except the 7:45
a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered and AWANA begins
at 5:15. Midweek worship serv-
ice for adults is at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. For the youths,
there is "Ignite," and for chil-
dren, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252 or visit www.fbc
inverness.com.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
meet at 9 a.m. Sunday and 10
a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Sunday morning worship serv-
ice is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at the
junction of U.S. 41 and State
Road 40. Call the church office
at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa, 10540 W Yulee
Drive, weekly schedule: Sun-
day school for all ages at 9 a.m.
followed by morning worship at
10:25. Youth Bible study is at
4:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall.
Sunday evening Bible study be-
gins at 6. Life Care Center is
open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Call 352-
628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. Call 352-382-2557.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services are at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study is at 6
p.m. Wednesday in the
chapel. Everyone is welcome.
Call 352-746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. The
church is at the intersection of
State Road 44 and U.S. 19.
Call Evangelist George Hick-
man at 352-794-3372 or 352-
795-8883, or email
georgehickman@yahoo.com.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional


1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions: 855-426-4542.
The public is invited to
worship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
Call 352-726-0100.
Special events
"Pioneer Club," a chil-
dren's program for K-5 through
sixth grade, is offered at 6:45
p.m. Wednesday while school
is in session, at Heritage Bap-
tist Church, 2 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills. Activities include Bible
stories, crafts and games. Call
352-746-6171.
Beverly Hills Community
Church's Youth Group will host
a car wash from 9 a.m. to noon
today at the church, 82 Civic
Circle. Donations accepted.
Melissa Thomas Bias,
founder of the nonprofit Re-
member Me Kidney Organi-
zation, will speak at 11 a.m.
today at First Assembly of God
Church, 4201 S. Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness. Host
pastor for the fundraiser talk is
Pastor Dairold Rushing. The
main purpose of the organiza-
tion is to provide support for vic-
tims of kidney disease and their
families, and to raise money for
research. The event will include
information on kidney failure
and diabetes, raffles, gifts and
prizes. For more information
about the organization, call
855-408-4455.
Shepherd's Way Baptist
Church, 965 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto, will host its 2012
Friend Day at 10 a.m. Sunday.
The public is invited. A covered-
dish fellowship meal prepared
and provided by members will
be shared afterward. All visitors
are welcome. Call 352-
527-9900.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a "Military
Card Party" on Monday at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
Lunch served at 12:15 p.m. fol-
lowed by card play at 1 p.m.
Cost is $12 per player. Call Dot-
tie at 352-382-3656 or Marilyn
at 352-746-6583.
Join the Salvation Army
Vacation Bible School from 5
to 8 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day. Children in kindergarten
through sixth grade are wel-
come to embark on a "Sky" ad-
venture filled with cool Bible
songs, games, tasty treats and
fun. Learn how everything is
possible with God at 712 S.
School Ave., Lecanto (corner of
State Road 44). To register or
Call Maggie Murphy at 352-
513-4960, ext. 8.
Gulf to Lake Church is col-
lecting coats for schoolchildren
in grades K-8 (sizes 6 through
juniors up to adult small).


Cayla's Coats Ministry was
started in memory of Cayla
Barnes, who passed in 2010.
Her mother, Jessica Barnes, is
a teacher in the county and
sees first-hand the need for
kids inadequately dressed for
our occasional cold weather.
Coat donations are accepted at
the church, 1454 N. Gulf Ave.
(off State Road 44 across from
Meadowcrest), and at the Inver-
ness Wal-Mart from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday. Call the church
at 352-795-8077 or Joan Cook
at 352-422-2635.
A representative from
MetroCrime Prevention will ad-
dress the public at the meeting
Friday of the FFRA (Family
and Friends Reaching for the
Abilities) meeting. Along with
information on "How Not to Be-
come a Suitable Target of
Crime," topics of discussion will
include "Identity Theft," "Bur-
glary," "Fraud & Scams," and
more. FFRA meets the third Fri-
day monthly at the Key Training
Center, 130 Heights Ave., In-
verness. Social time and a
business meeting begin at 9,
followed by the speaker at 10
a.m. Call President Ron Phillips
at 352-382-7819 or visit
www.ffracitrus.org.
There will be a "Women's
Retreat" on Saturday, Nov. 3,
at Holy Faith Episcopal Church,
19924 W. Blue Cove Road.,
Dunnellon. The Episcopal
Church Women will host a full-
day retreat led by Dr. Peg
Davis, whose theme is "ECW
- Embracing Christ Within."
Coffee, sweets and a light
lunch provided. The $15 fee
covers all, including retreat ma-
terials. Call the church at 352-
489-2685.
The Ladies Auxiliary
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 will host a "Bunco Bo-
nanza" on Saturday, Nov. 3, at
the K of C Hall, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County Road
486), Lecanto. Doors open at
10:30 a.m. and play begins at
12:30 p.m. The $12 ticket in-
cludes a brunch of finger foods.


\Door prizes, raffle prizes and
cash prizes awarded. For reser-
vations, call Char at 352-746-
9490 or Bernita at
352-344-0235.
Music & more
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will host Mark John-
son and Emory Lester at 7
p.m. Friday. Bring family and
friends for an enjoyable
evening of music and refresh-
ments. For tickets and /or more
information, call 352-795-5325.
The church is at 1070 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River. Sug-
gested donation is $10 per
person.
The Dunnellon Presbyte-
rian Church Concert Series
for Fall-Winter 2012-13 will
begin at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct.
21, with the University of
Florida School of Music Cham-
ber Ensemble's presentation
featuring works by Dvorak,
Ravel and Brahms performed
by members of the elite string
chamber music program at the
University of Florida and the
Graduate Piano Trio in resi-
dence at the University. The
program will be directed by
Steven Thomas, DMA, assis-
tant professor of cello at the
School of Music, University of
Florida. Free admission. The
public is invited. Love offering
received for the artists. Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church is at
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
The Nature Coast Com-
munity Band under the direc-
tion of Cindy Hazzard, will open
Veterans Appreciation festivities
with two concerts at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27, at First
United Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa and at 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day, Oct. 28, at Cornerstone
Baptist Church in Inverness.
The theme of the concerts is
"Honoring Our Military Re-
tirees." The program will include
"The Homefront; Musical Mem-
ories of WWII" by James Chris-
tensen, complete with an
original air-raid siren; "Varia-
tions on A Korean Folk Song"


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

by John Barnes Chance:
"Mekong" by Robert W. Smith,
featuring many interesting non-
Western traditional instruments;
"Journal For A Soldier" by Brian
Balmages, a Soviet Union
march from the Cold War, and
other interesting pieces to com-
plete the narrated program. Call
352-601-7394.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., will host a six-month con-
cert series. The first concert at
6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, will fea-
ture nationally known gospel
singer Brian Arner. The entire
list of concerts can be found on
our website: www.hernando
nazarene.org.
Food & fellowship
The women of Calvary
Chapel invite all ladies to their
free monthly tea at 11 a.m.
today in the chapel's tea room
at 960 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. A
fashion show from Bealls will
also take place. Enjoy delicious
food, tea and coffee. Call 352-
726-1480.
Third Saturday supper is
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 20, in the Dewain Farris
Fellowship Hall at Community
Congregational Christian
Church, 9220 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. Menu in-
cludes barbecue chicken,
baked beans, coleslaw, rolls,
dessert, coffee and tea for $10
for adults and $5 for children.
Tickets can be purchased at
the door. Takeouts available.
Call the church at 352-489-
1260.
The Hernando United
Methodist Men will host their fall
"Save a Child" fish fry from 4
to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, at the
church, 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486).
Menu includes Joe Duteau's
fried fish, french fries or grits,
coleslaw, hushpuppies, dessert
and drink for $7.50. After ex-
penses, the balance will be
sent to the Florida United
Methodist Children's home in
Enterprise.


Chat with Chronicle Journalist

Nancy Kennedy on our Facebook page

http://www.facebook.com/citruscountychronicle


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com








Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


BELIEVERS
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CITRUS CAMPUS
Join us this month
Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012
From 6:30-8pm
Powerful Worship,
Bible Teaching,
and Prayer for the Sick.
at the Holiday Inn Express of
Crystal River
(1203 NE 5th St.,) Hwy. 44
Pastors Adam & Shatiel Brant
More information?
Call 352-610-2560
or e-mail us at



I I : .I I
1. 1. 1" Ol id i





16
C4- J
V 0CL
hSimS ~f'
l^^s "^^T3


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light
For more
information call .
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH










SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


Hwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness

* Sunday Services *
* Traditional
* 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
* Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service *
* Tapes & CD's Available *
" Sunday School for all ages 0
0 9:30 AM 0
" Nursery Provided *
Fellowship & Youth Group
5 to 7 PM
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org u
Podcast: FPC inv.com *

* Church Office 637-0770 U
Pastor Craig Davies


.







VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M & 6:00 P.M

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P..


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
.catholicweb.com .:


Vic ory

in


3esus

At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Si,,d,., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


Let's do Lunch.

Weekdays at Noon


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! 1

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

of games. I don't mind skits
as long as I don't have to be
in one.
Game night for us was
supposed to be Saturday
night, but the group leader
saw that everyone was tired
so the game was postponed
until Sunday
Heaven forbid we don't
play a game!
Perhaps it's a law of the
universe. Maybe the earth
will wobble on its axis if a
women's retreat ends with-
out a game played.
Or maybe God knew what
He was up to.
Sunday morning came
and the game was an-
nounced. With this game,
everyone had to remove one
shoe and put it in a laundry
basket. Then we had a relay
race where we had to grab a
shoe that wasn't our own
from the basket and find out
who it belonged to, slip it on
her foot and say, "The shoe
fits, so you are the princess."
The game ended with one
woman without her shoe.
The game leader had re-
moved one shoe from the
basket and then the women
on the retreat committee,
who were all in on the game,
made a big production out
of looking for the missing
shoe.
The committee disap-
peared into a side room and
emerged with the show on a
pillow, and with great and
fancy pomp and foo-foo
pageantry and fanfare I
was waiting for trumpets -
and presented the semi-
shoeless woman with her
shoe and declared her, not
just a princess, but a queen.
They put a royal robe
around her shoulders and a
tiara on her head, led her to
a fancy chair, her "throne,"
presented her with red
roses and a scepter and put
a sash on her that read in
sparkly letters: "Miss Un-
derstood."
I think the sash was from
a skit they did a previous
year. However, it wouldn't
have mattered what was
written on the sash to the
newly crowned retreat
queen.
Overwhelmed, she started
to cry
I had learned earlier a lit-
tle bit about this woman.
Her dad died when she was
young and she had two
"evil" stepfathers. Her mom
taught her to shoplift. She
had four babies before she
was 20. She married a man
who wasn't kind to her, to
put it mildly, and one night
she broke a beer bottle and
used it to slit his throat.
He didn't die, and by
some incredible fluke she
was never arrested for her
crime.
Years later, Jesus changed
her life and wiped away her
sins, but she has carried a
lot of guilt and shame and
feelings of unworthiness.
To be crowned queen,
even queen of a silly
princess shoe game, was as
if God was saying to her,
"This is how I see you now"
- which I believe is exactly
what he was saying to her,
and not just to her but to all
those who love Jesus.
Through her tears the
woman said, "I never went
to a prom. I was married
four times and never wore a
white wedding dress. I'm
just starting to believe that
God smiles on me."
I'm still not a fan of
princess games, but I was
awestruck and amazed, yet
not surprised, at how God
knew exactly whose shoe
needed to be hidden and
who needed to be crowned
queen.
Of all the women there, no
one needed it more because
she believed she deserved it
the least.
That, dear friends, is the
grace of God.
-- -


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
-I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace." She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


The Chronicle has
forms available for
wedding and engage-
ment announce-
ments, anniversaries,
birth announcements
and first birthdays.


RELIGION


VISIONS
Continued from Page C1

mere 31 died. Ukrainians mock
this number, saying it's impos-
sible to calculate the long-term
fallout in cancers, birth defects
and other forms of human
suffering.
"The catastrophe at Cher-
nobyl station took its victims
before their time," said Arch-
priest Andrei Tkachev of St.
Agapit of Pechersk Orthodox
Church in Kiev. "Man is sup-
posed to meet death in his own
time, when he has a chance to
prepare to meet God. That
kind of death is a gift from God
- a good death.
"That is not what happened
for many of the victims of
Chernobyl."
The museum opened on
April 26, 1992, the sixth an-
niversary of the disaster and
soon after the Soviet Union's
collapse. The exhibits include
7,000 artifacts from the 76
towns and villages with 76
churches, in this historically
Orthodox culture that were
razed in the radiation-tainted
resettlement zone.
The door into a large cham-
ber dedicated to the families
and children of Chernobyl
leads to the church iconostasis,
with a radiation suit hanging in
place of the Archangel
Michael, and barbed wire and
a contamination sign blocking
the way to the altar High over-
head is an icon of St. Nicholas,
the patron saint of endangered
children.
The altar is gone, replaced
by a boat to carry souls over
the waters of death full of
children's toys. Under the boat,
the blackness is full of the
icons of saints.
The Chernobyl disaster was
especially poignant, said
Tkachev, because it struck a re-
gion that for many symbolized
the innocence and safety of the
past
"The people here were sim-
ple people. They didn't have
writers and journalists to tell


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service....................8:30 AM
Sunday School........................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service.......................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 -m
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 m
Teens.......................... 7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"

R 46 Years of
F RST Bringing Christ
F IRST to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class

726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson



01? o



All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


their stories," he said. "This is
an attempt to tell their story,
using what they left behind
when they were forced to flee
the homes, their schools and
their churches ...
"Modern life separates a
man who has deep faith from a
man who has little. In these vil-
lages, life and faith were sim-
ply combined and you can see
that here."
In one of the starkest images
- over a map of the stricken
region the melting reactor
literally shatters a famous icon
of the Virgin Mary holding the
Christ child, while an apoca-
lyptic storm swirls around her
"We are tempted to think
that fire and water and all the
elements of nature are at our
command, but that is not true,"
said Tkachev, outside the final
exhibit hall. "We can become
victims. ... The more technolo-
gies are in our lives, the more
danger there is that we become
their servants, even their
slaves."
The archpriest stroked his
beard, thinking of another way
of stating the ultimate message
of this sobering tribute to les-
sons learned at Chernobyl.
Finally he offered a litany of
simple images.
If a man builds a bicycle and
it breaks while he is riding it,
then he will be hurt when he
falls, said Tkachev If he builds
an airplane and it breaks, he
will almost certainly die when
it crashes.
"Now, if we build a nuclear
reactor in our backyard and it
breaks, then the catastrophe
will kill many and it may last
into future generations," he
said. "What this teaches us is
that we must fear God and try
to be humble about the things
that we build with our own
hands."

Terry Mattingly is the director
of the Washington Journalism
Center at the Council for
Christian Colleges and Uni-
versities and leads the GetRe-
ligion.org project to study
religion and the news.


NORTHRIDGE 1
CHURCH


SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
S t the Inverness Womans (
1 715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
.,,... i-,i, !,-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
S Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!


o PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM -Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos! z
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 CS


Religion BRIEFS


Thousands march to mark
killing of Coptic protesters
CAIRO Several thousand Egyptians
marched for miles through Cairo on Tues-
day, marking the year anniversary of a mili-
tary crackdown on Christian protesters that
killed 26 people, and demanding retribution
against army leaders they hold responsible
for the deaths.
Muslim clerics, Christian priests, activists
and liberal former lawmakers joined the
procession, filling large boulevards to me-
morialize the "Maspero massacre," refer-
ring to the name of the state TV building
overlooking the Nile River where the vio-
lence took place a year ago.
The protest last year was led by hun-
dreds of Christians angered over a string of
attacks on churches and denouncing the
military which ruled the country at the
time for failing to protect them. Soldiers
attacked the crowd, with military vehicles
running over some protesters, while others
were killed by gunshots. Almost all the
dead were Christians.
For many in Egypt's Coptic Christian mi-
nority, the violence marked a turning point,
ending their faith that the state would protect
them in the face of increasingly assertive Is-
lamic hardliners. Christian worries have only
grown since Islamist Mohammed Morsi,
Egypt's first freely elected president, came
to power in late June, ending military rule.
Pope prays in Arabic, for
Arabs in new outreach
VATICAN CITY-- Pope Benedict XVI
has delivered a prayer in Arabic during his
weekly general audience in a new effort by
the Vatican to show support for Christians
in the Middle East.
A priest read a summary of the pope's
remarks on Wednesday in Arabic. The
pope then delivered his own brief greeting
in Arabic: "The pope prays for all the Ara-
bic-speaking people. God bless you all."
The Vatican said it was adding Arabic to
the six other languages, aside from the
original Italian, typically spoken during the
general audience, to remind Catholics to
pray for peace in the Middle East.
Church started by former
pastor of megachurch folds
OLATHE, Kan. The suburban Kansas
City church that a pastor started after los-


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor










road


tgst


ch

5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
X Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


ing his megachurch to foreclosure has
folded.
The Kansas City Star reports that the
Rev. Jerry Johnston's New Day Church
Kansas City held its last service Sept. 30.
The church met in Olathe schools after last
year's closure of the First Family Church in
Overland Park. The megachurch once was
described as among the fastest-growing in
the country.
But members began leaving in 2007 be-
cause of financial accountability concerns.
Last year, the church was foreclosed upon
after its lender alleged it owed more than
$14 million in mortgage payments and
other costs.
Church stops Walmart
from selling alcohol
POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. -A church
outside Atlanta has won a battle to stop a
Walmart Supercenter from selling alcohol.
The Marietta Daily Journal reports that
Cobb County commissioners on Tuesday
denied a request from the Powder Springs
store to have a wine and beer package
license.
The vote was 4-1, with county chairman
Tim Lee alone in support of the sales.
The store wanted the commission to
waive its restriction of selling alcohol within
600 feet of a church.
The Rev. Bobby Wood of Pine Grove
Baptist Church had said congregation
members were asking commissioners not
to approve the waiver for the store on Bar-
rett Parkway.
Fire captain fired over
sending religious emails
SPOKANE VALLEY, Wash. The
Spokane Valley Fire Department has fired
a captain who continued to send religious
emails from his department account de-
spite numerous orders to stop.
The Spokesman-Review reported that
Capt. Jon Sprague, who runs the Spokane
County Christian Firefighter Fellowship,
has been disciplined several times for
sending the emails. This year, he received
two letters of reprimand and a suspension
before the Spokane Valley Board of Fire
Commissioners voted unanimously to fire
him on Monday.
Sprague sent emails to a group of fire-
fighters who agreed to receive the notices.
From wire reports


"FirstFor Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study









'First United

Methodist


<-Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 PM.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
S9:00 and 11:00A.M. /
726-1670




SFirst

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

I i

Dairold

hBettye
Rushing


9:45 AM
Sunday School W
10:00 AM

Contemporary IAv
I Praise & Worship OFFICE: (3
S* OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted'!! !

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press


Muslim men sit on prayer rugs Sept. 28 at the AI-Fattah Mosque during a Friday prayer service in Gressier, Haiti.


HAITI
Continued from Page C1

Islam has won a growing
number of followers in this
impoverished country, espe-
cially after the catastrophe
two years ago that killed
some 300,000 people and
left millions more homeless.
A capital where church at-
tendance is so prevalent
that the streets echo with
Christian hymns on Sun-
days now has at least five
mosques, a Muslim parlia-
ment member and a nightly
local television program de-
voted to Islam.
The disaster drew in aid
groups from around the
world, including Islamic Re-
lief USA, which built 200
shelters and a secondary
school with 20 classrooms.
"After the earthquake we
had a lot of people join,"
said Robert Dupuy, an imam
or Islamic spiritual leader
in the capital. "We were or-
ganized. We had space in
the mosques to receive peo-
ple and food to feed them."
Derosier said she was
drawn to the religion's
preaching of self-discipline,
emphasis on education and
attention to cleanliness. The
constant washing, she said,
helps her and other Mus-
lims avoid cholera, the wa-
terborne illness that health
officials say has sickened
nearly 600,000 people and
killed more than 7,500 oth-
ers since surfacing after the
quake.
"This is a victory for me,"
the 43-year-old woman said
about her post-quake con-
version. The former Protes-
tant spoke in the tent-filled
courtyard of her home, her
face framed by a clean,
black head scarf. "It's a vic-
tory that I received peace
and found guidance."
In part, the Muslim com-
munity's growth can be at-
tributed to the return of
expatriates who adopted
the faith in the U.S., said
Kishner Billy, owner of the
island's Telemax TV station
and host of the nightly pro-
gram "Haiti Islam."
Billy and some others be-
lieve that Islam's Haitian
past goes back before the
country's independence in


1804, and that a Jamaican
slave and Voodoo priest
named Boukman who led
the slave revolt that ousted
French colonizers was actu-
ally a Muslim.
"Islam is coming back to
Haiti to stay," said Billy, who
says he converted from
Christianity 20 years ago.
"Future generations, my
sons and daughters, will
speak about Islam."
There are no firm statis-
tics on the number of Mus-
lims in Haiti, just as there
are no reliable figures for
many things in the country,
including Port-au-Prince's
exact population.
A 2009 study by the Pew
Research Center on the
world's Muslim population
estimated that Haiti had
about 2,000 devotees. Is-
lamic leaders in the country
insist the figure is much
higher and growing.
Islam is hardly unknown
in the Caribbean; countries
such as Trinidad & Tobago,
Suriname and Guyana have
significant Muslim popula-
tions. Many of those nations
have strong roots in coun-
tries such as India and In-
donesia where Islam is
widespread.
The ancestors of Haitians,
by contrast, were brought
largely from non-Muslim
areas of Africa. Haiti's
French colonial rulers also
imported their Christian
beliefs.
The recent growth of
Islam, as well as other new
religions, shows Haiti is
modernizing and becoming
more pluralistic, said
Patrick Bellegarde-Smith, a
professor of Africology at
the University of Wisconsin-
Milwaukee.
"Inroads made by Islam
(and by extension, by Mor-
monism and Rastafarian-
ism) tell me that Haiti is
very much a product of this
century, subject to all winds,
ill-winds and otherwise,
that blow over the
Caribbean nation-states,"
Bellegarde-Smith wrote in
an email.
Rosedany Bazille, a 39-
year-old teacher who con-
verted several months after
the earthquake, said she
had felt rudderless before
embracing the religion and
was looking for a


way forward.
"Islam can put people on
the right path and show
them who's God," she said.
Some Haitian Muslims
belong to the Nation of
Islam, a U.S.-based branch
of the religion that preaches
black self-determination.
Some local members con-
verted while serving time in
U.S. prisons before being
deported back to Haiti. The
group's leader, Louis Far-
rakhan, visited the country
for the first time last year.
The decision to convert
has made some the targets
of discrimination.
The Haitian government
doesn't recognize Islam as
an official religion, nor does
it honor Muslim marriages.
Wearing the skullcaps or
flowing head scarves typical
of the religion can draw
stares and finger-pointing.
Derosier said her neighbors
gossip that she's evil.
Voodoo, a blend of West
African religions created by
slaves during the colonial
period, has long been a pop-
ular faith in the country,
with elements followed
even by some of the 85 per-


CHRONICLE

TODAY'S



NUMBER











CALL 564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO.

1. Traditional Bingo $100
2. Double Bingo $200
3. Full Card Bingo $300


CC I T R U 0 U N T E



Political Forum
Thursday, October 18th

College of Central Florida
Forum Starts at 7pm
Doors Open at 6pm

Meet the local candidates
and hear their positions.

Sheriff
U.S. House of
Representatives District 11
Florida House of
Representatives District 34
Superintendent of Schools
Clerk of Courts


For more information call
Mike Wright 352-563-3228


cent of the population who
claim Christian beliefs.
Voodoo was once so com-
monly embraced that the
notorious dictator Francois
"Papa Doc" Duvalier used it
to terrify and control the
masses.
Most Christian Haitians
identify themselves as
Roman Catholics. A priest,
the Rev Jean-Bertrand Aris-
tide, was elected president
in 1990 by opposing the
hereditary dictatorship that


continued with Francois'
son, Jean-Claude "Baby
Doc" Duvalier.
With so much still wrong
in Haiti, the need for Islam
couldn't be greater, said
Billy Two months ago, he
launched his live talk show
to educate his compatriots
about his adopted faith.
"Haiti has gone astray It
can't produce anything,"
said Billy "Right now
Haitians just want a visa to
go the United States, to


Canada. They don't want to
stay in Haiti."
With a tapestry of Mecca
and praying crowds as a
backdrop to his TV show
one recent evening, Billy
and his co-host Ruben
Caries invited watchers to
send questions about Islam
via text messages.
Billy's BlackBerry buzzed
with missives, including this
one in Creole: "M vle vini
Muslim" "I want to be a
Muslim."


9301 West Fort Island Trail I^_j
Crystal River, Florida 34429 Everything Outdoors
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com
(352)795-4211


Thanks! C ITNCST
For being a subscriber. hron leonlinecoL


Don't Miss Out


m


C6 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


RELIGION







Page C7 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Friends to host
annual craft sale
The Friends of the Com-
munity Centers Inc. will stage
its annual crafts sale from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Tues-
day and Wednesday, Oct. 15,
16 and 17, at Central Citrus
Community Center.
The center is within the
Resource Center on State
Road 491 in Lecanto. Do hol-
iday shopping early and help
support the centers.
Retired nurses
to meet Oct. 22
The Citrus Marion Chapter
of the Florida Registered
Nurses, Retired (RNR) will
meet at the Inverness Golf &
Country Club Monday,
Oct. 22.
Sign-in for the meeting
starts at 11 a.m. The speaker
will be Dr. Carl Roseborough
from the West Coast Eye In-
stitute. His topic will be Eye
Problems of the Aging Adult.
Charity for the month is Cit-
rus United Basket; a donation
of dry goods or cash is
welcomed.
Retired RNs wishing to at-
tend may call Mary Jane at
352-726-6882 or Gladys at
352-854-2677 by Oct. 18.
Quilters guild to
gather Oct. 18
Citrus Friendship Quilters
Guild will meet at 1 to 4 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 18, at Lakes
Region Library, 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness.
The meeting will be a
Quiltathon and members will
be donating the quilts to
many nonprofit organizations
in Citrus County who are in
need of them. Visitors are
welcome.
For more information, call
Nancy Cagle at 352-422-
5967 or Nancy Osborn at
352-726-7805.
Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will
have its pancake breakfast
from 8 to 11 a.m. Sunday,
Oct. 14.
Cost for adults is $4; chil-
dren younger than 12 eat for
$2. Menu includes all-you-
can-eat pancakes with choice
of bacon or sausage or
combo, orange juice and cof-
fee or tea.
For more information, call
Lion Shirley at 352-527-1943.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Chica


Special to the Chronicle
Chica is a young momma
who has weaned her kit-
tens and is ready for a
human family. This calico
girl may look serious, but
she is only 9 months old
and comes with a playful
and loving personality.
Right now we are running
an adoption special all
adult cat adoption fees are
half price at $27.50. Visi-
tors are welcome from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4
p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River.
Please drop by and enjoy
our felines in their cage-
free, homestyle environ-
ment. Call the
Humanitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Jazz at the Museum


Historical Society offers sixth consecutive season of entertainment


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Historical Soci-
ety presents Jazz at the Museum for
the sixth consecutive season.
An all-star cast of jazz musicians is
slated to perform the 2012-13 season,
including some new ones making their
appearances for the first time. Open-
ing the series this year on Oct. 18 will
be the talent of Joe Donato and
Friends from Miami.
From October until April 2013, four



Barbersho

Special to the Chronicle ,
It's now time to leave the '.
comfort of your shower, garage, car,
back porch, or riding lawnmower and
put your tonsorial prowess to work.
The Citrus County Chapter /
"Chorus of the Highlands" of the /
Barbershop Harmony Society


concert performances will be staged
in the restored courtroom of the 1912
Historic Citrus County Courthouse on
Courthouse Square, Inverness. Doors
open at 6 p.m. and light refreshments
will be available. Wine and beer will
be available for purchase.
Music starts promptly at 7 p.m., last-
ing until 9 p.m.
Tickets can be purchased at the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum for $25
each, or season tickets are available
for all four performances at $80. Pro-


ceeds benefit the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum and the Citrus County
Historical Society's exhibitions and
programs. Additional concert dates
and musicians include the return of
the Southern Exposure ensemble on
Dec. 6 and Feb. 14. Closing out the se-
ries on April 11 is Cathy Dewitt and
Friends, well known on the
Gainesville scene.
For more information about spon-
sorships or to purchase tickets, call
the society office at 352-341-6427.


itonsorial talent


,.;* r seeks
men to
join the
'2.,0,up,
which has
been enter-
training in
the Citrus
\ County


area for more than 27 years.
The Chorus of the Highlands meets
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in Inverness.
Although the ability to read music
is an asset, it's certainly not a
priority.
All interested men are invited
to call 352-382-0336 for more
information about how to participate.


Special to the Chronicle

Gulf to Lake Church is
again collecting coats for
schoolchildren in kinder-
garten through eighth grade
(sizes 6 through juniors, up to
adult small).
Cayla's Coats Ministry was
started in memory of Cayla


Barnes, who died in 2010.
Her mother, Jessica Barnes,
is a teacher in the county and
witnesses firsthand children
inadequately dressed for Cit-
rus County's occasional cold
weather
"This ministry is a way for
my family and friends to
keep Cayla's memory alive. It


is important to us that her
brother know about her and
understand that she is a very
important part of our family,"
Barnes said. "I can see Cayla
every time we help less for-
tunate children have a warm
winter and as we work to im-
pact others' lives."
In addition to taking col-


elections at the church (1454
N. Gulf Ave., off State Road
44 across from Meadow-
crest), a donation station will
be setup from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct 16, at Inverness
Walmart For more informa-
tion, call the church at 352-
795-8077 or Joan Cook at
352-422-2635.


Looking at bigger picture of homelessness


ust like everyone else, when I area, for several reasons, it was much
started The Path, I had precon- better for the clients to call in first to
ceived ideas of homelessness. make sure they understood the rules
Without realizing what had hap- and ensure we had space. The last
opened, I was trained by our current TV thing we wanted was for our people to
programs. I saw in my mind pictures spend their last resources to get to us
of people in the cities and find out the shelter was
sleeping in cardboard full.
boxes, pushing shopping | So, it did not take long to
carts and standing in soup see how far off my percep-
lines for a daily meal. tion was in a rural county
Don't get me wrong: Are and find out what Citrus
people hungry when they -- County needed. Sure, we re-
check in? Sure, but they ceived some of the transient
are not starving to death as population, but we found out
you might see in a Third the mass of our homeless
World country, population are people who
It still breaks your heart DuWayne Sipper find themselves in a current
to hear that someone is THE PATH state of distress. In other
hungry The harder part to words, every county in
get your mind around is al- HOME America has homeless; the
most all are suffering mal- question is, how are we serv-
nutrition from a lack of funds and icing them? Ninety percent, to this
buying cheap food. day, are what I call displaced. Domes-
I lived in the shelter for the first four tic violence, crime, jail, prison, alco-
years The Path was open and I an- hol, drugs, eviction, loss of jobs and
swered the intake calls. In a rural more such factors are to blame. All of


these can spell homelessness.
From the beginning, we have recog-
nized what comes with this type of
check-in: daily paperwork, birth cer-
tificates, probation, court, family vis-
its, parenting courses, budgeting, job
coaching, group counseling and one-
on-one counseling. Our case manage-
ment now offers what we call a "full
program."
Do we still offer shelter in emer-
gency circumstances? Of course! But
we have also been working hard on
defining ourselves as a Rescue Mis-
sion, part of the Association of Gospel
Rescue Missions. I encourage you to
look on the Internet and find out what
we stand for; when we are asked what
that is, we have an opportunity to ex-
plain what I have written here today

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus County,
a faith-based homeless shelter.
Contact him at 527-6500 or
sipperd@bellsouth.net.


Happening
TODAY

Cruisers yard sale
The Citrus County Cruis-
ers will have a yard sale from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 13, in the Wendy's park-
ing lot in Crystal River.
Items will include from fish-
ing tackle to grandma's frying
pan. All are welcome.
Green Berets meet
Special Forces Association
Retired Green Berets, Florida
Chapter XXI, will have its
quarterly meeting/ Saturday,
Oct. 13, at the Best Western,
Crystal River Resort.
For more information, call
Sharon Hoagland, widow of
SGM Charles Hoagland, at
352-249-7616.
All are welcome.
New Age Thinkers
New Age thinkers will meet
at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13,
at the Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park on U.S. 19.
This month's speaker will
be Rayna Tamarin, owner of
Crystal Closet in Sanford.
Tamarin will discuss her jour-
ney as a Star Seed Indigo
child to modern muse, au-
thor, artist and intuitive
healer.
Space is limited. For more
information, call Donna at
352-628-3253, or email miss-
donna@tampabay.rr.com.
Chorale yard sale
Sugarmill Chorale will
have a yard sale at 7 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 13, at Save-a-
Lot, 204 U.S. 19 S.E.,
Crystal River.
Items for sale will include
craft supplies, artificial flow-
ers, beads and beading sup-
plies, acrylic paint, brushes,
crafting table, small appli-
ances, table saw, floral
arrangements and other
household items.
For more information, call
Rose Keasey at 352-
634-2688.
Coffee for kids
Isaiah Foundation Inc. an-
nounces the second annual
Coffee Tasting at Cattle Dog
Coffee Roasters from 9 a.m.
to noon Saturday, Oct. 13.
The address is 541 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River (on the
west side of U.S. 19).
Tickets are $10 and the
money will go to serve autis-
tic children in Citrus County.
Email IsaiahFoundation
@ymail.com or call Barbara
at 352-527-0112 for more in-
formation or to buy a ticket.
Tickets will also be sold at
the door.
There will also be a raffle,
jewelry and baskets to pur-
chase at the event.
Ghost hunters talk
Ready for a real ghost
story? Then join this month's
meeting of the Sunshine
State Romance Authors
(SSRA), the newest chapter
of Romance Writers of Amer-
ica, as they host Arlene Hale
and the Old Gilchrist Jail
Ghost Hunters.
SSRA meets at 10 a.m.
today, Oct. 13, in the Com-
munity Room at Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch
Ave.
The area paranormal in-
vestigators will be demon-
strating equipment used in
their investigations, as well
as discussing their experi-
ences and answering
questions. If you've ever
wanted to write a paranormal
novel, or are just curious
about investigating the para-
normal, all are welcome to
the free program.
Founded by local authors,
SSRA's goal is to educate
and support area writers in
their efforts to write and mar-
ket quality novels in all gen-
res. SSRAwelcomes new
members, and anyone inter-
ested in writing and becom-
ing published may attend.
For more information, visit
www.sunshinestateromance


authors.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Season opener


Special to the Chronicle
Several members of the Citrus County Audubon Society enjoyed searching the treetops for the elusive and very tiny blue-
gray gnatcatcher recently. It was one of the 39 species of birds identified by the group on its season-opener field trip at
Rainbow Springs, home of Florida's fourth-largest spring. The weather was so perfect that the group ended up staying an
extra hour to enjoy beautiful surroundings of one of Florida's great state parks. There are several opportunities to join CCAS
for outdoor adventures. Visit CitrusCountyAudubon.com for details.




Collecting coats for Cayla's Ministry
.. ( J -2.,_,; ::y .:. o. . .: :." -::
CletncotsfrCyasM sty





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 13, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 I 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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S ABC20 20 20 TBA.N) Sprint N.C. (N) (Live)
T P CBS 1College Football Teams Wheel of Jeopardy! To Be Announced To Be Announced 48 Hours (N) In 10 News Paid
() WTPCBS 10 10 10 10 10 TBA. N) Fortune 'G'X Stereo) 'PG' 11pm(N Program
WTVT Fox 13 13 13 13 College FOX College Football Teams TBA. (N Subject to Blackout) (In Stereo Live) Xa FOX13 10:00 News (N) News
0 (T FOX 13 13 13 13 Football College (In Stereo) x __
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(W[FS) ABC 11 11 11 TBA. N) Sprint N.C. (N) (Live)
MRND 12 12 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Leverae "The Miracle Leverage "The Bank Movie'PG'
1 4' 'PG' Theory Theory Job"'P G' Shot Job" 'PG' a
D WTTAI MNT 6 6 6 9 9 House Paid Paid Paid Bloopers! Bloopers! Futurama Futurama Ringof Honor Wrest. Bones'14' s
D WACX TBN 21 21 Paid Gospel Jim Raley Life Center Church Studio Direct B. Hinn Paid |Pillow Chosen |Kingdom
King of Two and Two and Engagement The First The First Mr. Box Mr. Box Criminal Minds Criminal Minds "The
S I cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men Family (N) Family (N) Office (N) Office (N) "Corazon"'14' c Thirteenth Step"'14'
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Walking The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Walking
55 64 55 Dead "Bloodletting"'14' '14'X '14'X "Chupacabra"'14' "Secrets" '14' a Dead
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(JI) 52 35 52 19 21 Cottonballs"'PG' Puppies" 'PG' s Premiere) (N) 'PG' (In Stereo) 'PG' "Face Off"'PG' (In Stereo) 'PG'
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27 61 27 33 Powers" wonders take a cash-laden briefcase to Aspen. John Cusack. Premiere. 'R' s Underdog Story"
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51 25 51 32 42 'PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
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College Driven College Football (N) (Live)'PG' Reel Future 3 Wide Life
SU 36 31 36 Football Dream Phenoms 'PG
i 31 59 31 26 29 "Haunted High" "House of Bones" (2010 Horror) Charisma "American Horror House" (2012, Horror) **"The Amityille
31 59 31 26 29 (2012) DannyTrejo. Carpenter, Corin Nemec. 'NR' Morgan Fairchild. Premiere. Horror" (1979)'R'
(TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 Fam. Guy |Big Bang BigBang |MLB MLB Baseball American League Championship Series, Game 1: Teams TBA. |MLB
**** "Gandhi"(1982, Biography) Ben **** "The Third Man" (1949, Suspense) *** "Cry, the Beloved Country" (1952,
OSii 169 53 169 30 35 Kingsley CandiceBergen.'G' ccOrson Welles. 'NR' c Drama) Canada Lee. 'NR' s
I Almost) Got Away Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In
S 53 34 53 24 26 With It'14'x Stereo)'14 c' Stereo) '14 c' Stereo) '14 c' Stereo) '14 cc Stereo) '14 c'
(iL) 50 46 50 29 30 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. '48 Hours: Hard Evid.
**Yo "A Simple Twist *** "The Others" (2001, Suspense) Nicole "The Inheritance" (2010, "Dark Fields" (2009) David
iiJ 350 261 350 of Fate"(1994) Kidman. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' s Suspense) Keith David. 'NR' s Carradine. (In Stereo) 'R' s
1 "Catch Me if You *** "Ocean's Eleven"(2001) George Clooney A suave *** "G.I. Jane" (1997) Demi Moore. A female Navy SEALs
48 33 48 31 34 Can" (2002) ex-con assembles a team to rob a casino vault, recruit completes rigorous training. 'R' cc
TOON 38 58 38 33 Adven |Adven Movie'PG' Venture King/Hill Cleveland |Fam. Guy Dynamite |Boon
fTRl 9 54 9 44 The Dead Files'PG' Legends Of Alcatraz Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
truTi 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout 'PG' s Wipeout 'PG' s Wipeout 'PG' s Repo Repo Most Shocking
(1TL) 32 49 32 34 24 Cosby |Cosby Cosby |Cosby Cosby |Cosby Raymond |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |King
NCIS "Blowback" (In NCIS "Friends and NCIS "Angel of Death" NCIS "Bury Your Dead" NCIS Ziva's cover may NCIS "Toxic" (In Stereo)
47 32 47 17 18 Stereo)'PG' c Lovers" 'PG' '14' '14'X be blown.'14' PG' c
My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David
117 69 117 Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled
1WN 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: CI Videos |Bullseye NBA Preseason Basketball: Bulls at Timberwolves |News Bones'14' c


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SBEAFL / E

2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Righls Reserved
WARLD



REIMSY



ESECUX

1^ ^ _


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Stacy just mailed andid we're
missing the October 13th puzzle.
She needs it in 5 minutes!
Quick! Give me a pun!
I'll start drawing. ou
jumble the words.


-A



T3-
IR A 5 --~ ^


WHEN THE JUML-E
CREATOR5 REALIZiP TYHIY'P
FORGOTTEN T T TURN IN A
PUZZLE, THEY --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your V Vy V V V
answer here: XXAAAAAAAA
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ITCHY SWUNG SENSED FACADE
I Answer: The manager at the health club ran things -
AS SHE SAW FIT


ACROSS
1 Sticker stat
4 Horror film
street
7 Morning glory
11 Pay dirt
12 Violent anger
13 Seaweed
derivative
14 Width
16 "Primal Fear"
star
17 Jelly flavor
18 Whey
opposite
19 Departed
quickly
20 "- Sera,
Sera"
21 Volcanic
output
24 Fenced
27 Tofu base
28 Quartet minus
one
30 Montand of
the movies
32 Family man
34 Cattle stall


36 Be very frugal Answer to Previous Puzzle
37 Applicant's
handout
39 Usefulthing GEL LEM SAS
41 Current meas. APE EMUS GAVE
42 Pen contents LIOE G NE ALOE
43 Rain protector
45 Yucatan E C S T A T I CD
civilization AI L TRE ND I
48 Doozy
49 Relocate M I N ORS0N
52 Footnote AWE UNA MATCH|
abbr. (2 wds.) EWERS MOP KO
53 Old Chevy
54 Louis X,e.g. ONEAL MOLT
55 Melody M ILAN YEA
56 Stein filler
7 Lennon's wife P 0L TEMB LOR R S
ANNE EXPO VAN


DOWN R[E I D R
1 Stylish E T A
2 Fuddy-duddy -- -- -
3 Backpack 7 Sort of
contents 8 Disney CEO
4 Consumed Bob -
5 Size above 9 Ancient
med. ointment
6 Debussy 10 Prior to
subject 12 Banquet


15 Foal parent
18 Prompter's
hint
20 Je ne sais -
21 Deadly snake
22 Glide like an
eagle
23 Ad spiel
24 More than
serious
- 25 Arden and
Curie
26 Hockey feint
29 Mounties
31 Become solid
33 Generally
(3 wds.)
35 Cereal topper
38 Foul ball
caller
40 The the
limit!
42 Reflection
43 Ballerina's
attire
44 Sen.
Cranston
46 Frizzy coif
47 Flashy sign
48 Endorse
49 Rural elec.
provider
50 Aunt or bro.
51 Sugarloaf
locale


D earAnnie: In January, I fi-
nally married the woman
of my dreams. "Julie" was
sweet and kind, with
lots of love to give.
Things went well for a
few weeks, but then
everything changed.
Julie has always had
issues with depres-
sion. She'd be over-
whelmed from time to
time but always came
to me for comfort. Sud-
denly, she didn't want
me near her when she
was depressed. As hurt AN IN
as I was, I gave her the MAIl
space she wanted.
It's been several
months now, and it seems as if
Julie no longer needs me for any-
thing. All affection has ceased,
and though I ask her to join me in
every activity, she refuses. We
don't even watch TV together.
She prefers to do that on her own
with her headphones on.
After months of begging, she fi-
nally went for counseling. (I've
been seeing a counselor myself.)
It seemed to help her depression,
but she still maintains a great
deal of distance from me. Worse,
we are beginning to get heavily in
debt and are in danger of losing
our house, but she refuses to get a
job or even help out around the
house. She spends her time talk-
ing to friends, sleeping and
watching videos.
I am miserable. I love this
woman, and I know these are all
signs that she's still fighting her
depression, but how much is too
much? She barely responds to
me when I try to discuss it. I
promised "in sickness and in


health," but I don't know how
much more I can handle. --Wish-
ing for Better Times
Dear Wishing: If
Julie handles her de-
pression by spending
money, you need to be
supportive without
being indulgent. This
is an area that is diffi-
cult for her to control.
Put her on a budget
and limit her access to
your joint account.
Then contact the De-
pression and Bipolar
IE'S Support Alliance (db-
BOX salliance.org) at 1-800-
826-3632 for
information. Julie
must put some effort into this for
the sake of your marriage.
DearAnnie: My mom was diag-
nosed with multiple sclerosis 30
years ago. She was 42, active in
her church, taught piano and was
involved in our community. She
always took the time to visit or
call friends. By the time she was
49, she was in a nursing home. At
first, her friends visited regularly
Now I'm the only one. Her sister
and brother never come to see
her. Her friends rarely ask about
her.
I realize we are all busy, but it
only takes a half-hour once a
week to stop by and say hello. It
would mean so much. I have told
her friends that she would love to
see them, but they make excuses,
saying they can't bear to see her
this way or she won't remember
them. This breaks my heart. Mom
is so wonderful and sweet. Even
if she doesn't recognize you, she
enjoys the visit
Annie, there are so many peo-


ple left alone in nursing homes.
Please encourage your readers to
reach out. It's OK if they don't re-
member you. You remember
them. Tell them stories about ear-
lier days. Bring flowers. Take a
guitar and play a song. A 15-
minute visit can make a differ-
ence in someone's life. And they
might make a difference in yours,
as well. Washington
Dear Washington: Bless you for
inspiring our readers to visit a
friend or family member in a
nursing home. These visits can
mean so much.
DearAnnie: I am a retired psy-
chologist and often recom-
mended this rejoinder to patients
who found themselves in endless
rounds of arguments, belittling,
etc. It takes a bit of courage to say
it, but it works: "You could be
right. I'll have to think about it."
Incredibly, this stops the argu-
ment in its tracks. Meanwhile,
whoever says those words can
blissfully go about their business,
doing and thinking whatever they
actually think is best. Former
Psych in New Hampshire


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www creators. com.


Bridge

North 10-13-12
4 763
V Q 8 5 3
S52
SA J 10 9
West East
4K Q 8 5 4 J 10 9
V K2 V J10 6
*AQ83 J 10964
S7 4 83
South
4 A 2
VA 9 7 4
+ K7
K Q 6 5 2

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 16 Dbl. Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: 4 K

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Lao-tzu, a great thinker considering that he was
alive some 2,500 years ago, said, "To know yet to
think that one does not know is best. Not to know
yet to think that one knows will lead to difficulty."
This deal was also in yesterday's column. Today,
we will try to know what is best for South. He is in
four hearts. West leads the spade king and East sig-
nals with the jack. What should South do?
North made a negative double, showing four
hearts (or perhaps five or six when not strong
enough to respond two hearts). South jumped ag-
gressively to game.
South has a lot of losers: one spade, one or more
hearts and one or two diamonds. This means that
trumps need to be 3-2. And if so, declarer has
enough tricks if he can draw trumps and run the
clubs without first losing four tricks. How might
South lose too many tricks?
Based on the bidding, West is likely to have the
diamond ace, so if East gains the lead and shifts to
that suit, South will surely lose at least one spade,
one heart and two diamonds. How can East be
kept off the lead?
Perhaps with difficulty! But there are two steps
South should take. First, he must duck at trick one;
otherwise, East will have a spade entry Second,
he must begin trumps by leading a low one from
his hand. With this layout, as we saw yesterday, if
South starts by cashing the heart ace, West can de-
feat the contract by sacrificing his king under the
ace. Then East would gain the lead in hearts for
the lethal diamond shift.
This deal is not easy, but the entry-creating and
entry-denying themes are important.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-13


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C8 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


y






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


kw6lA!I mALL'C GOT \ LOYE "
OFF 1T4E 4M0E Wi-t1 B6LT I'V6
TRKSHEp 6E11('7. EVPC
GTOP-fALK4G. M GR9Pe,(
eR WI..M-. ALL-M







Sally Forth

bON'T YOU THINK IT'S A LITTLE
WEIRD HOW MUCH BECCA
I t RE. YOU IL -


-I -






Dilbert

ONE OF YOUR
ENGINEERS CAME TO ME I
JITH A SUGGESTION.


6SEE :SLW GoeS ot4
A9Q oN AI90K ASo.-r
W"ATEIEeR' B01MER-
IN ER.9 0OLUHAVE


NO I _ow
~.i_ ... . : - .. .


I'M JUST SAYING BE ryOU KNOW, FOR P
CAREFUL. YOU KNOW WHAT A SMART K YOU PLUS YOU'RE
HAPPENS TO PEOPLE PUT ON REALLY bON'T REALLY HIGH
HIGH PEDESTALS? PAY ATTENTION O NO ONE CAN
AT ALL IN CLASS, REACH UP AN
THEY GET TO STAND DO YOU;? PUSH YOU.
1 ABOVE EVERYONE ELSE? D '


THE ONLY REASON
I HAVE MIDDLE MAN-
AGERS IS SO THIS
NEVER HAPPENS.


HEY,BUDDY.
WHAT ARE GAAA!!
WE TALKING W(JORST
ABOUT? CASE
SCENARIO!


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"It's nothing to be embarrassed about. It's
not uncommon for men your age to
experience a reduced floe."


Doonesbury


Big Nate

DID YOU )YESYES.
SEE THAT, WELL
MR. ROSA? PLAYED,
1 JUST NATE...
DUSTED ]
GINA,







Arlo and Janis


Dennis the Menace


-1|(ELMO, HAVE YOU
SEEN MR. B.?


)6J ...-c, 1 /I/ _
I ( OR/MANT_ /'".l _

_" l-


The Family Circus


'MY PARENTS ALMOST THEN I'P BECALLIN'
NAMEP ME AFTER N4 YOL/ /VNCL CLARLIA."'
UNCLE CHARLIG."
Betty


"...I want to know if I have time
to have a bowl of cereal."


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Here Comes the Boom" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Frankenweenie" (PG) In 3D. 4:45 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Frankenweenie" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:25
p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D. 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:10
p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Sinister" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50
p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Argo" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,


10:15 p.m.
"Here Comes the Boom" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Frankenweenie" (PG) In 3D. 4:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Frankenweenie" (PG) 2 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Taken 2" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55
p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) In 3D. 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG) 1 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"House at the End of the Street" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenbe z


"F LRJ'G DPJG VA DXFJBKTN GPBTJ


PDPA F LRJ'G DPJG GR KRRB KFBT


TZTXARJT TKNT." OPJT WRJLP

Previous Solution: "Life is so largely controlled by chance that its conduct can be but
a perpetual improvisation." W. Somerset Maugham
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-13


Peanuts


Pickles


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


A HOW COME BECAUSE IT'S
YOU DON'T AVE "DORMANT "
> TO MOW THE --f ELC .
LAWN IN FALL
ANDIM WT -


"DOR-WHAT"? ) "DORMANT"...IT
GOES TO SLEEP
| AND DOESN'T
S A STINKIN
S: THING ALL
SWINTRF..-


...BUT TRY TO RE-
MEMBER, THAT THE
OBJECTIVE IS TO
BEAT PLAYERS. FROM
OTHER SCHOOLS,
NOT GINA.


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 C9









CIO SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012










Classifieds


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


.a: ..) 63565 S *llFee .(88 .82-34 1*millaIiie. *. ilenln.co Sbie


Ladies, what are you
Looking For?
I'm an active widower,
clean cut looking, with
twinkling blue eyes and
a nice smile, very ex-
troverted, intelligent.
nice voice, nice ap-
pearance, likes to go
most places & do most
things, & have a good
sense of humor. In turn,
I would like to meet a
widow,, with a nice
personality, average
looking in good health.
intelligent, affectionate
& hopefully with mutual
chemistry, average
to slim build and a
Christian Lady between
70-80+. If you sincerely
think we could mesh as
companions, give me
a jingle at 527-9632.
I'll return all calls, Thank
you for reading this ad
and have a good day!




2 White Wooden
ROCKING CHAIRS
Large size, includes
cushions, like new
$150 both
352-746-5157

ALLEGRO BUS
2004, 40 ft. 3 slides,
400HP, 60k miles,
$95,000 Excel. cond.
(352) 795-9853

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Sat, 8am to 2pm
Metal lathe, furniture,
collectible glass, hum-
mels, ss jewelry, co-
ins, tools, collectibles
and more!
behind Olive Tree
Rest. US 19,
Storage units 80 & 81

Crystal River
Sat. 8a-2p
baby items & tools
5055 N Andn Dr

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sunday 10A.-5P. 2974
N. Pennsylvania Ave.

DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696

FISH TANKS
30 Gal. with stand,
hood, filter $90
20 Gal., with stand,
hood filter $70.
(352) 212-4454

Ford
'98 Mustang GT
Auto/cold air. Cranberry
Red, Convertible. 105k
miles, excellent, $3750
(352) 503-2792

HOMOSASSA
2 Bedroom. 2 Bath. Re-
modeled home on small
canal! Fully furnished with
washer & dryer! No
smokers. Small dogs
only First, last and de-
posit. $1,000/month! Call
#813-526-4944



HOMOSASSA
6714 S. Frankfurter Way
Moving Sale Sat 10/13
8-3pm and Sun 10/14
8-1pm furniture and
household items

FILING CABINET
metal,4-drawer, good
condition, $15
352-382-7707

HOMOSASSA
Frn. & Sat. 8a-5p
7390 S. Finale Point


HOMOSASSA
Saturday 13th 8a-2p
Children books & toys
Christmas, furn, MISC.
4390 S. Evergreen aVE
INVERNESS
CLOSE TO
HOSPITAL
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Newly tiled,
spacious,fenced yard,
2 car garage and family
room $675 monthly
845-313-3992
MEDLINE WALKER, red,
max capacity 300 Ibs,
barely used, $30
352-382-7707
MEMORY FOAM MAT-
TRESS TOPPER, King,
4" thick, never used, $60
352-382-7707
Mini Chihuahua, CKC,
papers, 14 months old,
51bs, very smart.
$350
(352) 341-0934
Pigeons, different types
(352) 795-1902
PLYMOUTH
'98, Voyager, 6 cyl.,
108K mi., runs good
$2,250
(352) 628-3674
PRINTER, Kodak Easy
Share 5500, All-in-One
printer, $35
352-382-7707
Reoair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352) 949-2292

ROCK CRUSHER
ANNUAL FALL SALE
Sat., 13th, 8a-lp,
5899 W. VIKRE PATH

SCANNER UMAX Astra
3400, includes manual,
software, cables, $15
352-382-7707
SHORKIES 2 females
Adorable & Non shed-
ding 10 wks $400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803
SLACKS Men's and
boy's, 30x30, 29x32,
18R, never worn, black,
khaki, pleated, $10
352-382-7707
TOW HITCH, Reese, $50
352-382-7707
Washer & Dryer
$200
works great
Large Capacity
(352) 419-5231
WET/DRY VAC, Stinger,
2-gallon, $15
352-382-7707




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers, Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 2704087




FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
1 orange I black
multi- color 10 weeks
old To good home only
(863) 843-2495


Sudoku


FREE KITTENS
6 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
Free Kittens
To good home,
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
Free Pitt Bull Mix
Puppy, Female,
5-6 months. old
(352) 726-5066
Free Puppies
To Good Homes
(352) 361-5571
FREE Young Adult Cat
all shots, microchip-
ped, dewormed,
comes with accessories
To good home
(352) 634-2781
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge


20 Ib. Mainecoon Cat,
male, goes by "Brady",
brnndle (black/brown) long
hair, microchipped, lost in
vicinity of Citrus Springs,
Elkcam Blvd. and Citrus
Springs Blvd.
(352) 400-9444
Ladies white Sweater
Methodist flea
market on 486
(352) 746-4639
Lost 2 yr. male
Shih-Tzu, gold & white
last seen in Old
Homosassa
$50 REWARD
(352) 503-6988
Lost Beagle
Female, tri color
Hartford & Triple Crown
Loop (352) 419-5425
Lost Cat
Gray short hair female
tiger Green Acres in
Homosassa Oct. 2
$50. Reward
(352) 503-6763
Lost Cat
Yellow, male, neutered
Evergreen Ave.
Homossasa
(352) 503-6426














Found Cat
gray and white,
declawed on
Rooks Ave., Inverness
(352) 563-3226
Found Collie
Tan, Med. Size
Beverly Hills
on Monroe St.
(352) 364-1929
Large Video Camera
in Black Case
In the Highlands
(352) 201-7142




FL Headless Jumbo
Gulf Shrimp 16 ct @
$.7.50/Ib,10 ct @ $8.50
Stone Crabs $6.001b
Delivered (352)513-5038




2 Lots, Your choice
Fero's Memorial Gard.
Lecanto Hwy (498)
Paid $2,300+ ea
will sell for $1,600 ea.
(352) 489-4649


*oocozv

****** 4 p z.corn


9 _58 1


6 9 4


6 3


8 _7


86 __32


9 3


6 4


3 5 2


7 16 4 _

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9

S. All of our
,I4'nso n .. -structures
withstand
Installations by BrianCBC1253853 1Twin

352-628-7519



Permit And
I Engineering Fees I
Up to $200 value

*Siding* Soffit Fascia Skirting' Roofovers* Carports Screen Rooms* Decks* Windows* Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


2 Mausoleum Crypts
in Fero Memorial Gar-
dens, 3rd level, Bldg. F
side by side $16,500
(352) 270-9305










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BUSINESS OFFICE
MANAGER

At Avante
at Inverness
Full Time position
Responsible for
Facility billing and
collections knowl-
edge of Medicare
and Medicaid
Must be organized
and a good team
player. Minimum of 2
years experience or
technical training in
medical billing

Please Aoopply Online
Avantecenters.com
Or fax your resume to
352-637-0333
JOB FAIR SEEKING
HOME HEALTH
PROFESSIONALS
Holiday Inn Express
1203 NE 5th Street
Crystal River, FL 34429
Applications being ac-
cepted during the follow-
ing dates and times.
\Coffee and doughnuts
will be served.
October 17 9AM to 2PM
October 19 9AM to 2PM
Village Home Care is
seeking additional staffing
in Citrus and Sumter
Counties, Ocala, The Vil-
lages, and Leesburg. Po-
sitions available are As-
sistant Director of Nurs-
ing, RNs, LPNs, PTs,
PTAs, OTs, OTAs, STs

For more information
contact Rhonda Bentz at
352-502-6143. Resumes
can be emailed to
lphillips@vilbgehomecare.org or
sent v afax at
352-390-6559.
Medical Assistant
/Certified Medi-
cal Assistant/ LPN

Seeking a Certified
Medical Assistant or
LPN to work at a
family medical clinic
in Crystal River, Fl.
Chosen candidate
will assist with all
aspects of clinic,
including rooming
patients, vital signs,
giving vaccines,
scheduling patients,
and various other
duties as needed by
physician or nurse
you are working with.
Must be a graduate
from an accredited
Medical Assistant Pro-
gram or LPN. Current
demonstrated
clinical proficiency
with phlebotomy
required, proficiency
in EKG desired.
Minimum of five years
healthcare experi-
ence in a similar
setting.
Please email resume
and salary
requirements to:
info@health-wellcare
cornn


HOME HEALTH
CARE
Inverness pnvate home
seeks NS healthy woman
able to lift 150#
Alzheimer's patient.
Sat/Sun 7:30am-7:30pm
Mon/Tues7:30pm-7:30am
Accepting calls Mon
10/15 @c352-637-1793
Interviews with refer-
ences begin Tues 10/16.
$10 hr

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For Busy Cardiology
Practice. Exp. required
Email resume to:
sm@citrusarteriesand-
veins.com


MEDICAL/
CLERICAL

Immediate Opening
Candidate must pos-
sess strong
computer skills,
billing background
helpful. Benefits after
3 months, up to $14
hr. depending on exp.
Contact Human
Resource Dept.
866-675-3614

PART TIME
MEDICAL TRAN-
SCRIPTIONIST
PART TIME MEDICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONIST
WANTED.EXPERIENCE
PREFERRED. FAX RE-
SUME TO 352-795-7063

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

Looking for reliable
staff. With Alzheimers
Experience. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing aide
experience pre-
ferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE DFWP





HEALTHCARE
MARKETING REP

Searching to be part
of a team with a
deeper purpose? TLC
Rehab fosters a
culture of giving back
to the community
through high perfor-
mance teams. We
have an opportunity
for an experienced
dynamic marketing/
sales rep to market
Outpatient Physical
Therapy services to
existing and new
healthcare profes-
sionals. Competitive
salary & benefits of-
fered with a car
allowance and
results driven
bonus structure.
Please apply online
at: www.therapy
mgmtjobs.com
or fax resume to
352.382.0212.





The Grille
at CITRUS HILLS

Is Now Hiring all
Restaurant Positions.
We will be
interviewing for
Server, Bartender,
Host/Hostess, Busser,
Expo/Runner, Line
Cook, Dish, and Prep
workers. Please
Apply in person at
505 E Hartford St
Tuesday-Saturday be-
tween 2-4:30pm.


Exp. Line Cook
and Sous Chef
Dishwashers

needed for upscale
restaurant
Call (352) 746-6727
For application
appointment





A/C SERVICE
TECH
Good Steady Work For
Experienced Honest
Tech. 401 K, Health,
Life and Dental ns.
Pard Holidays and Va-
cation. Drug Free Work
Place.Good Driving
Record Required.
Premium Pay for NATE
certification
Call 352-245-1139












Real Estate
Office Ass't.
SA License required
MS OfficeQuickBooks
Motivated individual
Apply Blind Box 1803P
Citrus Co.Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 34429





DELIVERY DRIVER

P/T w/ FT potential
must be able to lift
751bs., clean driving
record, reliable trans-
poration necessary.
Must 21 yrs. or older
Apply in person at
Deem Cabinets
3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave.
Homosassa Fl. 34448

Exp.class A CDL
Driver-

Local. Full, Part-time.
Apply in person
NO CALLS-Atlas Van
Lines 5050 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy, Crystal
River. Drug Screen
and Background
Check Required.


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SU or pick up with
a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
I 1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5prm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



In mm IJ


CU SOUTH MARIO N

Citizen


Accepting applications for

Advertising Sales Rep


Sell print and online advertising for Citrus Publishing
Working a Sales Territory within Marion County.
Service established customers and prospect for new
advertising customers.


Qualifications

Two years sales exp. preferred
Computer proficiency
Must have initiative, be self motivated.
Strong skills in planning/organizing, listening, written
and verbal communication, problem solving and
decision making aptitude.
Strong presentation skills preferred
Reliable transportation to make local and regional
sales calls.


Send Resume and Cover letter to:
djkamlot@chronicleonline.com



EOE,drug screen required for final applicant.
OOOCWMS


TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Snowbirds are back.
Good Commission
pay. Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr










MASSAGE
THERAPY
Weekend Class NPR
OCT. 20, 2012

Massage Days. NPR
November 19, 2012
March 18, 2013
July 22, 2013
November, 4 2013
Massaae Niahts NPR
November 19, 2012
Jully 22, 2013
Massage Days.
Spring Hill
January 14, 2013
September 3, 2013
Massaae Niahts.
Spring Hill
January 14, 2013
September 3, 2013

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




STREET SMART
SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVID-
UALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.




1936 ROYAL MODEL 0
Vintage Portable type-
writer can text pics
$175.00 call or text
352-746-0401
352-746-0401
CHINA CLOSET VIN-
TAGE DECO DESIGN
picture to cell phone upon
Reguest. $100.00
513-4473
SECRETARY DESK
Great for student.
Solid pine. $75.00
352-513-4027
TWO (2) ANTIQUE RE-
PRODUCTION Cocoa
Tray end tables. $325 for
the pair. 527-6709




1918 JENNY STAMP
GOOD CONDITION /
$100.00 OBO Linda
352419-4788
HORSE LOVERS
Brass & Bronze Horse
statue and plaques
$100.00 352-513-4027
Illinois pocket watch
bunn special ,21 jewels,
lever set, gold filled case,
made 1923, $325
(352) 344-5283
JOHN CUTRONE "KISS-
ING FACES" Sculpture
with stand Can text pics
call or text $95.00 obo
3352-746-0401
LIPPER & MANN
POCELIN ZEBRA Vin-
tage Bookends, 1 Pr,
$75.00 Call, text can
send pics. 352-746-0401
SWEETHEART TWIN
WICKER HEADBOARD
white,single. $25.00
used.good cond.
513-4473
TED WILLIAMS Baseball
glove 39 yrs old stamped
autograph model 16156
in VG cond. can text pics
$50.00 352-746-0401


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





DRYER$100 with 90 day
warranty. Free disposal of
old machine. Delivery ex-
tra. Call/text
352-364-6504
GLASS TOP
STOVE/OVEN Kenmore,
excellent condition, $75
352-382-7707
KITCHENAID RANGE.
Works fine. Almond. $60.
527-1239
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179


8 1 236 4 9 5 3 7


2 3 458 9 6 1 7 5
58647 1329
1 9 7 52 3 8 4 6
9b6123147158
345987161 2
7 2 8 1 6 51419 3


day warranty. Free
disposal of old machine.
Delivery extra, call/text
352-364-6504
Washer & Dryer
$200
works great
Large Capacity
(352) 419-5231
WASHER AND DRYER
Kenmore, good condi-
tion,$50 each
352-382-7707
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel.
Cond. Can Deliver.
(352)263-7398



2 OFFICE DESKS
5 FEET LONG WITH
DRAWERS $50 ea
352-613-0529
FILING CABINET
metal,4-drawer, good
condition, $15
352-382-7707



Hammer Down
Auctioneers
10/19- General Merch.
10/26- Tailgate Auction
11/2- General Merch.
We Buy Estates
6055 N Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
(352) 613-1389



WET/DRY VAC, Stinger,
2-gallon, $15
352-382-7707



46 Panasonic Plasma TV
moving out of area $100
firm 419-5549
19" SHARP LCD HDTV
with remote, stand &
manual. Great picture.
Asking $75. Inverness
352-341-0316
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER good size wood like
$15.00 5134473
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER smaller, wood
like room for books,
$10.00 513-4473
MAGNOVOX TV cable
ready good picture.
$30.00 513-4473
MAGNOVOX TV cable
ready 21" works good.
$25.00 513-4473
SONY 36" TV Cable
ready good pic-
ture.$100.00 513-4473
SYMPHONIC TV cable
ready good picture.
$25.00 513-4473
TOSHIBA TV 32" cable
ready good picture,
$35.00 527-7119



BROOKSTONE PIC-
TURE BOOK Digital
photo albumn, holds 500
pics, like new $75.00 call
or text 352-746-0401
DELL COMPUTER
Desktop Windows XP
w/keyboard&mouse, Out-
look, Word, Excel $75
352-382-3650
DELLL FLAT SCREEN
13 X 9 AND A
HALF/Gtear condition
25.00 Linda 419-4788
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON NX215
PRINTER/COPIER/SCANNER
WORKS GREAT
WITH XTRA INKS
$30.00 352-726-0686
PRINTER, Kodak Easy
Share 5500, All-in-One
printer, $35
352-382-7707
SCANNER UMAX Astra
3400, includes manual,
software, cables, $15
352-382-7707



PATIO FURNITURE
Small Patio Table, Slate
Top W/2 Padded Chairs,
$65 352-476-7516
SERVICES NEEDED
Looking for some to do
some "Dado Cuts" on
small post to support 2 x
3's for "Dock Look" furni-
ture. If you have a Dado
table saw and can make
some cuts, give me a
call. Roger
(352)563-1425






2 "ASHLEY"
5-DRAWER DRESSER
CABINETS
BARELY USED!!!
ONLY A
FEW MONTHS OLD!!!
Buy both for $400 or
$225 for 1
352-746-1910


ece. IUvinmg
Room. Set,
teal couch with
2 recliners, & love
seat w/2 recliners,
excel. cond.
$250.
(352) 637-3113
2 TWIN LIGHT WOOD
HEADBOARDS, 2 BOX
SPRINGS, 2 METAL
FRAMES $45.00 Call
352-445-0853.
2 White Wooden
ROCKING CHAIRS
Large size, includes
cushions, like new
$150 both
352-746-5157
1940's Mahogany China
Cab w/butler desk, 4
bevel glass doors $350
Dining Rm Set, 3 leaves,
brass feet, 5 chairs $125
pictures by email
(352) 341-1774
COFFEE & END TA-
BLES looks like new
Cherry Wood & Glass call
for photos $299. for all.
352-382-2294
Coffee Table glass top
teak wood matching lamp
table. Good condition $79
Pictures 382-7585
COFFEE TABLE
solid wood mahogany
47L x 17H. $95.00
352-795-0288
Fireplace New $300.
Hutch, solid wood $300
Dinette set wood $250.
Sofa & 3 Tables
352-341-1845, 287-9124
LOVE SEAT COUCH
Great condition/different
darker colors.100.00
Linda 419-4788
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Oak China Cabinet,
good cond. $90. obo
King Size mattress &
box spring, like .new
clean, $150. obo
(352) 422-1060
OCCASIONAL TABLE
Solid Oak Table with
Storage. Good condition.
$40 Picture 382-7585
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SIZE BED clean
good cond. box
,mattress, frame all for
$60.00 513-4473
Queen size boxspring,
mattress w/ chest of
drawers and dresser
$150.
Entertainment center
$50. (352) 795-7254
Queen size sofa hide a
bed. Very good condition
$150.
Executive Desk
Excel. Condition $95
(352) 637-5755
RECLINER STANDARD
SIZE Blue, velvet $40.00.
good cond. 513-4473
Small,All-wood oak drop
leaf table w/2 chairs,
Like-new $150
(352) 746-1447
SOFA navy blue with
touches of sage & rose,
showroom cond. $150.00
352-795-0288
Stratolounger
Tailgater Tulsa Rocker
-Recliner Black, Heat &
Massage, A-1 cond.
$275; Click-clack sofa
bed, $100.
Call 352-419-7017
SURRY COLLECTION
EASY CHAIR Beautiful
elligant chair good cond.
Blue $35.00 is a steal.
513-4473
TABLE octagon-wood
grain (extra leaf), 4
white vinyl chairs on
casters $40.00
621-4711
THOMASVILLE DINN-
ING ROOM SET Like
New Cherry Table w/2
arm & 4 side chairs,2
leaves $525. photos
available 352-382-2294
THOMASVILLE SOFA
Like New condition
earthtone colors call for
photo -$175.
352-382-2294
Triple Dresser
with mirror,
Mans 5 drawer chest
$300.
352-563-0640,
cell 352-697-2111
Trundle bed matresses
and bedding to go with
$100
(352) 382-7903
WALNUT UTILITY
TABLE ON WHEELS
FOR SMALL TV OR
PRINTER 28 HIGH 20
WIDE $20.00 726-0686
WICKER DRESSER
AND NIGHTSTAND very
good condition,$25 each
352-382-7707



AC POWER HEDGE
TRIMMER, 13 INCH, $10
352-726-9983
LAWN SWEEPER
pull-behind, 5' wide, $25
352-382-7707









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ga en/Law owen
Like New,
2010 Troybilt-Pony
17/2HP, $600
(352) 494-3551
WERNER 20FT ALUMIN-
IUM EXTENSION LAD-
DER, 200 LBS RATED
D1120-2 GOOD COND
$75 352-726-9983
Yard-Man
Hydro Transmission
20HP Riding Lawn Trac-
tor, 42" mower, new
battery excel. cond.
$500 (352) 270-3824




CITRUS SPRINGS
2368 W Newhope Ln.
SAT 10/13.8am-2pm.
One day only.

CRYSTAL RIVER
402 N Venturi Avenue
Saturday October 13th
8:00 2:00 Household
items and tools.

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Sat, 8am to 2pm
Metal lathe, furniture,
collectible glass, hum-
mels, ss jewelry, co-
ins, tools, collectibles
and more!
behind Olive Tree
Rest. US 19,
Storage units 80 & 81

CRYSTAL RIVER
ESTATE MOVING SALE
Furn. Tools, yard equip.
household, antiques &
collectible Boat 19ft
Mako, with 11OH,
Suzuki, motor. & trailer.
Sat. Only 8am-4pm
1640 19th Street NW
No Early Birds
CRYSTAL RIVER
ESTATE MOVING SALE
Furn. Tools, yard equip.
household, antiques &
collectible Boat 19ft
Mako, with 11OH,
Suzuki, motor. & trailer.
Sat. Only 8am-4pm
1640 19th Street NW
No Early Birds

CRYSTAL RIVER
MEADOWCREST
Community Yard Sale
Saturday, Oct 13th
8-1p in Winn-Dixie
Parking Lot/Hwy. 44.

CRYSTAL RIVER
Moving Sale, Fri. 9-1
Sat. & Sun 9a-3p
312 N. McGowan Ave.
Crystal River
Sat. 8a-2p
baby items & tools
5055 N Andn Dr
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 13, 8am-2p
GIANT YARD SALE
Meadowcrest Office Pk
at Christy Dental Office
6015 W. Nordling Lp.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sunday 10A.-5P. 2974
N. Pennsylvania Ave.




Crystal River
Thurs-Sat. 9a-?
Greenbay off of Citrus
HERNANDO
Friday & Saturday
3684 E. Diamond Circle
Willola Heights Off 200
kao rNV4TWi a

HOMOSASSA
6714 S. Frankfurter Way
Moving Sale Sat 10/13
8-3pm and Sun 10/14
8-1pm furniture and
household items

HOMOSASSA
Fn. & Sat. 8a-5p
7390 S. Finale Point

HOMOSASSA
Riverhaven Moving Sale
Fri. & Saturday 9a-2p
Furniture, Hshold Items,
Clothing, Tools,
Lawn Equipment, ETC.
5099 S. Mystic Point
HOMOSASSA
Saturday 13th 8a-2p
children books & toys
christmas, turn, MISC
4390 S. Evergreen aVE

HOMOSASSA
SPRING
RUMMAGE SALE
SAT. OCT. 13th 8A-1P
CHRISTIAN CENTER
CHURCH
7961 W. Green Acres
St. US 19

INVERNESS
2791 E Mary Lue St Off
Croft Ave. Fn & Sat 9 4
Misc household items,
tools, Halloween items
and much more. Someth-
ing for everyone!
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 8am-3pm
HUGE SALE! *r
H 6445 E. Morley St


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383


S PHRI[TMATREEi-
Fri. Sat. & Sun. 9a-4p 4'pre-lit spruce $10.00
3110 S. Eagle Terr. and 4.5' pre-lit berry
mountain $15.00
INVERNESS 1-352-621-4711
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima Compact
Church Refrigerator
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p $100.
550 US HWY 41 S. 352-601-7380
Call 352-400-8952 COWBOY BOOTS
for vendor space, $10 ACME leather size 8 1/2
Please Bring EW brown marble great
A Can Good to help feed shape USA can text pic
veterans $50.00 352-746-0401
LECANTO Craftsman Lawn
6 FAM.+ 4 FAM. -HUGE Mower $125
Fri.-Sun. High Acres 52" TV console
491 by Cardinal brand new
LECANTO $200
Sat. Oct. 13th, 7a-lp (352) 527-7223
2895 Brentwood Circle DINNING TABLE FOR 8
LECANTO Brand new, excellent con-
dition, mahogany, no
Saturday only 9am-3pm chairs just table, $90 buy
Collectibles: Retired asap (352)465-1616
Barbie Dolls, Precious asap (352)465-1616
Moments, Beanie Babies. DOLLY heavy duty
Must Sell. Brentwood appliance dolly (extra
1733 W Caroline Path strap)$50.00 621-4711
(352) 249-7266 Electrolux Vaccum
PINE RIDGE Cleaner,
4547 N Allamandra Dr includes power handle,
Sat. 8-2. Large & small like new $100
items/tools. (352) 270-3824
EMWAVE PERSONAL
PINE RIDGE STRESS RELIEVER
Fri. 12 & Sat. 13, 9a-3p BY HEALTHMATH, LIKE
GOOD QUAULITY NEW $50 352-726-9983
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS FISH TANKS
5371 W. Cisco Street 30 Gal. with stand,
hood, filter $90
PINE RIDGE 20 Gal., with stand,
Fri. 12, & Sat. 13, 8a-3p hood filter $70.
Furniture, Like new, (352) 212-4454
Antiques and MORE!
2373 W. Apricot Drive Good cond.Refrigera-
tor dbl drs w/icemaker
PINE RIDGE white $100 Range, blk,
Fri. Sat. & Sun. 12N -4P white $100.
5440 N. Rosedale Cir. Radial Arm Saw $225.
rEi (352) 419-4069
PINE RIDGE HOLMES HEATER/FAN
Moving Sale Fri. & Ok condition, Heats up to
Sat. 7a-2p Something 180 sq. ft, $10
For Everyone (352)4651616
4837 W. Phoenix Dr. (352)465-1616
missionincitrus.com
ROCK CRUSHER Citrus County's Only
ANNUAL FALL SALE Emergency Homeless
Sat., 13th 8a-1 p, & Veteran's Shelters
5899 W. VIKRE PATH Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
WANTED Rods, EMERGENCY FUNDS
Reels, tackle, tools, & Other needs are
Antique collectibles, needed at this time.
hunting equipment. 352-794-3825
352-613-2944 PANASONIC CORD-
_ LESS Phone/answering
Machine Digital; manual.
Cl thnAsking $25 Inverness
352-341-0316
Christian Dior PET CAGE- Needs a little
Mink Coat $500 TLC, W-26, L=41, H=30.
Gray Mink Stole $250 $30.00 352-513-4027
Call anytime after SCHWIN BIKE
8am to 9pm black multi speeds
(352) 382-1630 $65 estate sale 419-5549
DOWN LADIES LGE Inverness Landings-Villas
JACKET Snowbirds alert, 41 S
Black 3/4 length, clean, Sofa & Two recliners
$25419-5549 Qn Mattress set, end
MENS CLOTHING 10 tables, TV's other
PANTS & 5 SHORTS household & kit. items
SIZE 36X30 $50 MUST SELL *
352-613-0529 Call for Info 897-4681
SLACKS Men's and TODDLER HEADBOARD
boy's, 30x30, 29x32, Brand New Metal Head-
18R, never worn, black, board, TC (rr?? re-
khaki, pleated, $10 duced) ,'-,N' 1616
352-382-7707 TOW HITCH, Reese, $50
STREET SMART 352-382-7707


SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVIDU-
ALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.




!!!!! 245/65 R 17 !!!!!
Greattread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****225/60 R16*****
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352-586-5485
----245/50 R20---~~~~
Great tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
3 Used Sheds
needs some work
make offer, 860-0111,
20' X 12'SHED
Call 4 pic $2,400.
352-527-0832
ANIMAL TRAVEL
CRATE medium size,
excellent condition, $30
352-382-7707
Bernina Artista 180E
SEWING MACHINE
Sewing and Embroidery
w/ Accessories $725
obo
(352) 794-3281
BOOK "SUPER
IMMUNITY"-Dr. Joel
Fuhrman-2012. $20.00
phone:352-527-7840
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, white color,
only $10 (352)465-1616
CHRISTMAS TREE 7'
Bavarian Spruce (new
lights included) $25.00
1-352-621-4711


FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERI-
ENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


FILING CABINET metal,
4-drawer, $15
352-382-7707




Collapsible wheelchair, 3
wheel walker
w/handbrakes & pouch,
tripod cane, bath bench,
port. pot, folding 4 leg
walker ALL $300
(352) 746-5514
Electric go-go cart, Elite
traveler, used once,
w/battery,charger,basket
$600
(352) 746-5514
MEDLINE WALKER, red,
max capacity 300 Ibs,
barely used, $30
352-382-7707




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PAK WALL
ACCESORIES,SELLS
FOR $200+ MY PRICE
$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" GREG BENNET
BASS,LIGHTWEIGHT
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT $75
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
AMP 12" SPEAKER
PERFECT FOR SMALL
GIGS/PRACTICE $65
352-601-6625


BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 *k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vynil Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Paint/Remodel, Repairs,
Woodwork, Flooring,
Plumbing, Drywall,
Tile work Lic.37658/Ins.
Steve 352-476-2285

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR SELLS FOR
$300+ MY PRICE $100
W/ MANY EXTRAS
352-601-6625
AMPEG BASS COMBO
BA108,35W,UGHTWEIGHT,P
PERFECT FOR
SMALL GIGS $65
3520601-6625
Behringer Thunderbird
Bx-108 bass amp $40.
352-419-4464
Crate KX-15
Keyboard/guitar amp
$25. 352-419-4464
DANELECTRO
DANOBLASTER, HEAVY
BLUE FLAKE STRAT
STYLE "ACTIVE" $100
352-601-6625
DIGITAL ROLAND F90
PIANO REDUCED
$350.00 at a steal.
352-513-4027
Fender Rumble 15 bass
amp $35. 352-419-4464
Line 6 Spider III guitar
amp $40 352-419-4464
MINISTER STRAT
STYLE TRAVEL GUI-
TAR W/FULL SIZE
NECK&GREAT TONE!
$95 352-601-6625
Peavey Max 112 bass
amp $80. 352-419-4464




CUISINART COFFEE
MAKER 12 cup
programable-like new-
used very little, cost 85.
sell 30. 344-0686
Hague Watermax, Water
Softener and Filter 4 yrs
old, used with city water
only $600
(352) 344-0053
Kitchenaid Ultra power
300 watt w/att, Original
cuisinart food proccessor
w/att, Pasta Maker
Queen w/electnc motor,
ALL $400
(352) 746-5514
MEMORY FOAM MAT-
TRESS TOPPER, King,
4" thick, never used, $60
352-382-7707
SOARING EAGLE
STATUE New,in box
.Was 59.95/SELLING
FOR 18.00 BOB
601-3524




NORDICTRACK
TREADMILL Like new,
vanspeed, incline, pro-
gramable, foldup storage.
$200 OBO 352-400-0141
PLATES PRO-FORMER
EXERCISE MACHINE.
Great for toning and
strenght. $95. Have in-
structions. 352-860-0444
PLATES REFORMER
$75.00 352-513-4027




2 FLY RODS w/ reels 6
FT.$ 30. BOTH OBO 2
vintage came poles, 3 pc.
$40. both obo 220-4074
7.62X54R Brown Bear
rifle ammunition. 174
Grain FMJ. Non-corrosive
Primer. 54 rounds. $40
527-6709
ABU GARCIA
CONOLON 300 8 FT,
OLYMPIC 1075 7.6 ft.,
Silstar pt 70 7 ft, Samurai
6 ft, $45. all 220-4074
BIMINI
TOP-BOAT/$100.00.5'
Wide Boat...Good
Condition,White..
352-503-2792
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails, $3000 Per Acre
352 634-4745
Club Car DS Golf Cart
2007 Electric New
Batteries Excel. Shape,
$3,200 (352) 425-5804
Lefever Nitro Special
16 gauge, dbl barrel
shot gun good cond.
made 1927 $425.
(352) 344-5283
Men's Golfsmith Clubs
4 full sets, regular flex,
with bags
& buckets of balls,
$125. ea.
(352) 382-1971
STREET SMART
SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVID-
UALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.
Trademark 3-in-1
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey, and
Foosball), $250
Mini ping pong table with
net and paddles $75
(352) 637-7237


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
All Painting & Home
Repairs. Call Doug
at 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.
Reoair. Remodel. Addi-
tions. Free est.
(352) 949-2292




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
ELAINE TO THE RESCUE
Free Estimate. At Your
Convenience. No Job
to Small (262) 492-3403
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


CLASSIFIED




Brand New Custom
Design, 5-6" long bed,
w/ 36" folding loading
ramp. New tires, never
on road, $800 obo
352-419-6008
REESE TOW HITCH
$50 352-382-7707




Sat. & Sun. 9a-3p
Vintage. retro, mod
ore-owned jewelry sale,
will also have handbags
and buttons, great items
for resale, personal use,
or holiday giving, indoors
rain or shine
4100 S Fireside Way
Homosassa


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
collectibles, hunting
equip. 352-613-2944




2 Very Small Yorkie
Boys Socialized & Play-
full, Shots, health certs.,
& CKC Reg. 4-5 Ibs,
grown $600. ea. Parents
on site (352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258


BELLA T
Bella T is a beautiful
Shepherd mix spayed
female, brindle, grey
and black in color,
brought to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. she
weighs 45 pounds, is
cooperative, walks
well on a leash, gets
along with other
dogs and doesn't
care about cats.
Housebroken and
Heartworm-negative.
About 4 years old.
Has a good personal-
ity, would make a
great pet for your
home. She is a very
sweet dog.
Please Call Joanne
at 352-795-1288.


DOUGIE
is a handsome
5-year-old Hound
mix, weighs 40
pounds, very sweet
and gentle,
mild-mannered,
housebroken. He
came to the shelter
because his family
could not afford to
care for him. A little
shy at first but warms
up quickly. Has low
energy and would
make a wonderful
companion for a
family.
Please call Michelle
at 352-726-5139.


Exp House Keeper.
Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018




Complete Renovation
Kitchen countertop, tile,
tub to shower Lic#37801
(352) 422-3371




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 CJl


4 WIRED HAIR
Daschund, 3 male
$300 ea; 1 female $350
8 wks old.
(352) 464-2382
AKC GREAT DANES
Black Beauties Health
Checked AKC
Male/Female READY
NOW 600/800 PAT
352-502-3607

BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
BLACK PUG PUPPIES
3 boys and 1 girl, $500
ea. POP, CKC, HC.
Playful & loving.
352-400-1230
BOSTON TERRIER PUPS
CKC, Registered
2 males $450 ea
2 females, $500 ea
health cert. & first shots
(352) 564-4170
GERMAN SHEPHERD
Lrg. bone PUPS, white,
black, blk/tan, $450.
BOXER PUPS $450
Health Certs, can be
registered, 216-1481


GREMLIN
is a 6-months-old ter-
rier puppy who was a
stray. He is very play-
ful, friendly,
Heartworm-negative,
and housebroken. He
gets along with other
dogs and doesn't
care about cats. As
he is very playful, he
would be great with
kids. He needs a
good home where
he would have a lot
of loving attention
and exercise and a
fenced yard would
be preferred.
Please call Joanne at
352-795-1288.

Haopp Guinea Pigs
smooth $15
abyssinian $20
curly hair $30
(352) 564-2442
Mini Chihuahua, CKC,
papers, 14 months old,
51bs, very smart.
$350
(352) 341-0934








ROCCO
is a 4-year-old Hound
mix who came to the
shelter because his
family could not
afford to feed him.
He is neutered,
housebroken, and
Heartworm-negative,
as well as already
microchipped. Gets
along with other
dogs, walks well on a
leash, and is playful.
He is a "family dog"
and needs to have
a home of
his own again.
Please call Joanne at
352-795-1288.


SKYE
Skye is a loving, intelli-
gent Treeing Walker
Coonhound, neu-
tered. Fond of long
walks and hanging
out at the house with
his humans watching
TV or resting on his
bed. Very even
-tempered, gets
along with other
calm, stable dogs.
Will do anything for
treats/food. Very
smart. Can sit, stay,
and shake hands.
Needs some help
with housetraining
but with time and pa-
tience will learn
quickly. Very affec-
tionate and wants to
make his humans
happy. Will you have
the loving home
he deserves?
Call Crystal
352-533-4332.


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

All Painting & Home
Repairs. Call Doug
at 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.
MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL a PROFES-
SIONAL (352) 464-4418


PIGEONS
Pet Homes Only
$10 ea. Dunnellon
(863) 843-2495 Cell
Pigeons, different types
(352) 795-1902
SHAR-PEI
Beautiful male & female
6 mo old, Prefer to sell
as a pair for $900;
single 500 AKC,
Health certs & shots,
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
wwwaceofouDs.net




For Sale Angus Brangus
Cross Bull 21/2 yr old
Proven Breeder, $1,500
obo (352) 382-3114
-. -U..


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966















INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!


INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998





CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL A PROFESSIONAL
(352) 464-4418

PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning
& Painting
352-341-3%00





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


2/1 Furn. Mobile Homes
Nice, clean, quiet park
short/ long term.
Mobiles for Sale with
Finan. 352-220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2Br/1 Ba.$495 &
1Br/1Ba.$475 Fridge,
Stove, Washer-Dryer,
Watr-Trsh 352-587-2555
HOMOSASSA
2 BR, 2 bath. 55+
Forest View Estates
8956 W. Sugar Bush
Path, across from pool &
clubhouse. Fully fur-
nished, master has king
bed, washer/dryer in
utility shed. Enclosed
Florida room, 1142 sq. ft.
$850/Mo. 319-471-2460
cards0661 0dhotmail.com
HOMOSASSA/
S. Slashpine 2 BR
Mobile, $425.mo + Sec.
612-226-0091




2 Bedrooms 1 /2, Bath
Large Florida Room
Washer, Dryer
Dishwasher
$7500 obo
(352) 527-9382
BEST
OF THE BEST
11 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
45 New and Used
Homes have been
Disounted for
Clearance. Come by
or Call (352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
floorinng. I can finance,
$3,500 down $394.80/
mo P&I, W.A.C.
We have land &
home packages
$59,900-$69,000.
Call 352-621-3807


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.









Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Mobile Home
for Sale
672 sq ft, and Lot
$19,500 Owner Finance
Kenny (352) 228-3406

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down.
This is a purchase
W.A.C, Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
New Homes at $39,900.
$5K for your used
mobile home. 3 New
Models, 1,100-2,400 SF
800-622-2832 ext 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/long
term 352-220-2077




FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, $46,500.
Cash (352) 586-9498
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217




2 Bedroom Home, Oak
Pond Mobile Hm Park
Ready to move in.
$13,500 Nice Area,
Quiet Neighborhood
3 miles from shopping
(352) 726-0348
2 BR, 1/2, BA,12x56 MH
Nice Seasonal Home
Adult park, low lot rent
Carport, 2 screen
porches, some updates
$11,000 (352) 419-8275


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializinging in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


AdMLM%

rRI


As.









C12 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012


on LakeiRousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987

i THIS OUT!
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 1988 Skylark
model, 2/2 furnished,
shed, screened lanai
352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090








352-795-7368
www.CitrusounlyHomeRenltals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
2440 W. Nautilus (CS) $750
3/2/1 Cute home, 1398 sq. ft.
CRYSTAL RIVER
1055 N. Hollywood r. (CR)....$850
2/2/1 Carport, screened back porch
548 N. Gulf Ave.((R).......... $750
3/1 Fencedyrd, close to Rock Crusher Elem.
HOMOSASSA
6944 W. Grant St. (H).........$700
2/2/1 Cute, centrally located
71843 or 1845SolarPI.(H).IREDIKED $685
2/2 Duplex, incl. lawn and water
INVERNHRNANDO/LEANTO
545 E. Alaska Dr. (CH)......... $800
2/2/1 Florida rom, handicap accessible
1933S ShIelle Path (L)..REDUCED $1200
3/2/2Inc. full memb., pool,tennis, gym




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/BR $450. ,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/BR $450. ,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 Hse. 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts.
2 BR/1I BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. 2/1 $575 F/L/S.
Includes Water/ gar-
bage, W/D hook-up. Also
furnished units avail.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, Small Pet OK.
(352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, Nice/Quiet
828 5th Ave NE, furnish
opt. $550 + sec 727-
343-3965, 727-455-8998
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Inc. Water
Quiet, Clean $575. mo.
352-257-6461, 563-2114
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp 2/1
House $650. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy, no pets
or smoking $500.mo
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
INVERNESS
2/1.5, Townhouse,
W/D, $550 Mo. FILlS.
(352)746-4108
(352) 302-6988


PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
Apts Homes
Monthly rent starting
at $741 plus utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental Assistance
available to qualified
applicants:
9826 West Arms Drive
Crystal River,
795-7793
TDD #1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:OOA-5:OP
Equal Housing
Opportunity


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS,
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719









CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished, Clean
w/ membership
2/2 Unfurnished Villa
352-476-4242, 527-8002




HOMOSASSA
2BR, $495. mo. Nice
Area (352) 422-1932
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
No pets, $550mo.
(352) 2204818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYS. RIV. & BH
Furnished & Unfurnishd
352-302-1370




Crys. Riv. Cottage
2/1, CH/A, Near Beach
Includes. Util. $695.
352-220-2447, 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
2 Bedroom. 2 Bath. Re-
modeled home on small
canal! Fully furnished with
washer & dryer! No
smokers. Small dogs
only. First, last and de-
posit. $1,000/month! Call
#813-526-4944




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 C/H/A New Carpet &
Tile, Nice Neighborhood
$650/mo (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, 26 N. Melborne
CHA, Nice Back Yard
(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
Beverly Hills, 2/1/1
Clean $550mo. 1st./
Last./Sec (786)286-1163
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, Encl. Porch $500.
mo. + sec. 465-0539
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299, 364-2073
CRYSTAL RIVER N.
2/1 on country road
lake rouseau area, lake
privileges, $550 mo.
1st & dep. No pets,
(352) 436-4189
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$1,250. 352-419-4421


2/1%2, 1,475 St. $650.
Non Smoking/Pets.
352-419-0074, 464-4346
4195 E. Benthal Ct.
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Waterfront Home,
Ist & Sec. No pets
(352) 637-1142
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached Home,
Royal Oaks upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serve, W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable /water
949-633-5633
INVERNESS
CLOSE TO
HOSPITAL
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Newly tiled,
spacious,fenced yard,
2 car garage and family
room $675 monthly
845-313-3992
Sugarmill Woods
2 Master BR, Dbl Gar.,
S/SAppl. $850/Mo
352-302-4057




CYRSTAL RIVER
3/3 Waterfront. Three
Sisters Area. Furnished
with Dock. $1400/mo
(352) 854-2511
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/long
term 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
Mature, Responsible to
Share spacious mobile
$400. mo. Incl. Util.
Avail. 11/1, 364-1421




CRYSTAL RIVER
On/Off Water, Boat
Dock 352-302-1370





BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are here hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HTOUING
OPPORTUNITY


Et ITAi SC ALE In iNature
Coast Landings RV
Resort. Large Developed
site, plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,500. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial






9:

Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Professional
OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo CenterCR
352-794-6280, 586-2990





3BR/2BA/2, Shed, New
Intenor paint, carpet,
pool, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
Citrus Springs $114,900
(352) 476-5061








Beautiful Golf Home
on El Diablo.
2563 sq. ft. 4/3/2.
Granite in kitchen
all baths and wine
barS/S appliances
and many upgrades!
Close to shopping,
restaurants top rated
schools. $159,900
352-464-1320





4/BR/2BA Mitch Under-
wood built home on 1.2
acres. Cherry cabinets
and wood floors. Outdoor
kit w/ Jenn-air grill.
Heated spa, oversized
pool, gazebo and lovely
garden. (352) 746-0912





3/2/2 POOL HOME,
updated roof, AC, water
heater, SS Appl's, gran-
ite kit counter tops, and
resurfaced Pool
Reduced to $149,900
6090 N. Silver Palm Way
(352) 586-7691





Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Sat
& Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418





2BR, 1 V2 BA, new
enclosed sunroom, at-
tached utility and Laun.
rm. storage bldg.,
furnished Immaculate.
5111 Castle Lake Ave.
S. of Inverness on SR 41
$39,900 (740) 255-0125


Home Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fia Your tDrwum, w



Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


Real Esta
For Sal


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

OPEN HOUSE
Sugarmill Woods
32 Douglas
Sunday 14th, 1la-3p
3/2/2 New A/C & New
Roof, 2 sided fireplace,
eating kitchen, nicely
landscaped $118,000
352-726-7543, 228-0907


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!









DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


CLASSIFIED



Approximately 1 Acre
3BR, 2 Full BA, Open
concept, new steel
roof, deck & caged
pool, carport, storage
bldg., Priced to sell
$82,500 5155 Bridget Pt
S. of Inverness on SR 41
(740) 255-0125



HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness Highlands,
Corner of Carol and Ten-
nyson. My Loss, Your
Gain, New Low Price.
HUGE 1 Family, on 2.8
residential acres, fenced,
CHA, 4 BR, 3 BA, pool,
deep well, whole house
water treatment, wired for
generator, COSTLY UP-
DATES in 2011. Offered
AS IS. $172,900. Owner
352-419-7017.
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$800. Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing-*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Iliana
Ter. Inverness $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AHI
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557




House for Sale
By Owner
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2
352-586-1772
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558

-S=1


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857

OPEN HOUSE
Saturday 12p-4p
3/2/3 w/ pool. 1.3 Ac,
Withlacoochee River
Access, River Oaks East
10199 Natchez Loop
$274K or make offer
Kathy 352484-8043





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails, $3000 per Acre
352-634-4745





2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $24,000.
(727) 439-9106





CRYSTAL OAKS
Beautiful rare Crystal
Oaks .62 ac premium lot
on Crystal Meadows
Path. Municipal sewer
and water. All under-
ground utilities. $69,900
561-704-0313

HOMOSASSA
90 x 110 ft Lot, w/good
water, septic and im-
pact fee paid. $15,000
Owner financing Easy
Terms (941) 505-9287





816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES

BOWRIDER
17.5 Caravel & Trailer
3.0 10, excel cond.
$4,995 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304

GULF to LAKE MARINE
WE PAY CASH $$ *
For Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537






















BOUNDER
32fT Motor home, Ford
V10 engine, low mile-
age, new tires, Sleeps
2-6. $16,500
(352) 220-6303


BT CRUISER
2004-26' mdl 5250 32k
miles Ford E450 V10
Triton gas eng, sleeps
4, 3 burner gas stove,
micro/cony oven, full
rear kitch, full bath, tv,
dvd, 4kw gen, many ad-
ditional extra's $28950.
352 489-4129


Mus Cou
Homes


Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty





5 ACRES 1948 Sq Ft.
2BR + Office/2 Bath
Furnished Home,
Bushnell, Turn key cond
cage inground pool
3,000 sf garage
mechanics dream
completely equipped
Information, Appoint.
(352) 569-4205





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, Diesel, motor
home, 2005, 55k miles,
extras include diesel gen-
erator, wash/dryer
$74,495 obo. Call Bill
(352) 419-7882
JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002




KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




4 Dunlop Tires 31x10.5
R15LT all with aluminum
rims $400 obo
(352) 795-5642
4 Tires 2057014
white wall, 90% tread,
on universal rims,
painted red over
chrome $195.
Bed extended for Ford
Explorer Sport, $75.
(352) 586-7691




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892




CADILLAC
Black 2011 4dr CTS
1,100 mi. Free satilite
radio 6/13, smoke free,
garage kept. $35,750
(352) 249-7976
CAR FOR SALE
1997 marquis 178K miles
asking 1500 OBO call
352-628-1809



CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $20,000
call 1-352-503-6548




263-1013 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Fiti-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to


'03, Malibu LS, 65K miles
sunroof., leather inte-
rior, auto, PW, PB,
$7,500 (352) 726-4689
CHEVY
1988, Corvette #11669
Red & Ready, ground
and spoiler kit, nice!
$6,847. 352-341-0018
CHEVY
2007 Chevy Impala
#11508 red, auto, ac,
cd, It $9987.00
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008 Cobalt Coupe
#11620pw, pl, It, XFE,
5 speed, great fuel
economy! $9,995.
352-341-0018
Chrysler
'00 Sebnng Convertible,
cold air, low mileage, ex-
cel. cond., can be seen
on hwy 19, $3500 obo
(352) 795-5642
DAEWOO
'97 Leganza, nice in
and out, needs timing
belt, $500. obo
(352) 464-5582
FORD
2001 MUSTANG
AUTO, 6CYL, PW, PL,
PRICED TO SELL
CALL 628-4600
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2005 Mustang #11670,
2dr, auto, ac, cd, v6
$9488. 352-341-0018
Ford
'98 Mustang GT
Auto/cold air. Cranberry
Red, Convertible. 105k
miles, excellent, $3750
(352) 503-2792
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *A
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
MERCEDES
'03, E500, 64k mi pewter
silver, stone leather in-
terior, showroom new,
garage kept,
never in accident
$19,250 (352)586-0341
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, Promotion
forces sale, $16,900
(352) 302-0778
SATURN
'96, Looks & runs great
call for details Great
Transportation $1,150
obo ((352) 586-7658




ALLEGRO BUS
2004, 40 ft. 3 slides,
400HP, 60k miles,
$95,000 Excel. cond.
(352) 795-9853
CHEVY
1955, Belair, 2 drSe-
dan, 327, V8, auto
power glide transmis-
sion ground up restora-
tion, SS exhaust, excel-
lent In & Out $35,000
obo (352) 527-6988
CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





engage in business under
the fictitious name of NA-
TURE COAST CLEANING,
located at 8681 N.
Briarpatch Avenue, Crys-
tal River, Florida 34428, in
the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register said
name with Florida De-
partment of State, Divi-


BEST
FF 1


15 Years


CADILAC '87
Alante Convertible, de-
pendble, All pwr. V8, 30
mpg, great cond. $5,200
C.R. (727) 207-1619




DODGE
'03, RAM 1500, V6 auto
AC, runs excel. $3,800
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
FORD
1995, F1504X4...
RUNS GOOD.....PERFECT
HUNTING TRUCK.
CALL 628-4600
FOR DETAILS

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *A
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2002 Red Tundra SR5
61,500 miles
excellent condition
$12,000 352-503-3944




DODGE
'98, Caravan, Reliable
$900 obo
(419) 303-0888 cell
Crystal River




CHEVY
1987 pick up 4x4 step-
side, runs good 5.7 V8,
auto, radial tires 31.10,
restoring $2500 OBO
Robert 2204143
9am-6pm




DODGE
2007 Grand Caravan
#11655 ext van, alloys,
ac, cd, seats 7!! $10,488
352-341-0018
HONDA
'01, Odyssey, 123k mi.
new transmission at
50k, runs great, quiet
good cond. $5,500
(352) 201-5761
NISSAN
Quest, 110k mi, new
tires, 3rd row seating
dual AC, runs excel.
$2,900. 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
PLYMOUTH
'98, Voyager, 6 cyl.,
108K mi., runs good
$2,250
(352) 628-3674




MAX IV
6 x6, ATV Amphibious
Vehicle, Swims,
$2,800 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304




CAN-AM
2009 Spyder RS SE5
electnc shift with reverse.
Silver and black 998cc
No warranty. Great condi-
tion. $13000 or make
offer. (352)628-9058
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley, 70 mpg, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $4,200.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE New Tires
Excellect Shape Approx
70K mi. Selling due to
health. Asking $4,000
(352) 476-3688
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
YAMAHA
2002 650 V Star Classic
5k Miles, Exc Condition
$2900(386)365-3159




sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
DATEDataitrus,
FL
this 9th day of October,
2012.
/s/ Lori Jean Taylor
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. October 13, 2012.


LiabilitIv scorers' Comp M -1d
| 1U1 ^CBC1252474


WILL CONSTRUCTION

352-628-2291
www.PreventDryerFiresNow.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




WORDY GUARD TRICKY RCKY KANEcozu
1. Slightly wet stadium walkway (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Pass on taking a business journey (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Sharp tip of an elbow or hip (1) syllables in each word.
1 @2012UFS, Dist by Univ UclickorUFS
4. City official salary giver (2)


5. Courtroom hammer's journeys (2)


6. Hospital workers' lines of poetry (2)


7. Learning-to-walk tots' pamperers (2)


SHMI cIIO SMT IIO 'L SH3SIA S3SHIlN '9 STIAVHI SI3HAV9 '
101312 Vd HOXI VW INIOd LNIOP '8 dIL dIIS '5 dW V dI Vl I
10-13-12 SHAMSNV




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRAND OPENING OF OUR BRAND NEW
STATE-OF-THE-ART BUILDING.
r .E



COME CELEBRATE

AND SAVE THOUSANDS!


i 2012 GMC TERRAIN
iii ^^H--i^


IPOD INPUT, SATELLITE RADIO, CRUISE,
S REAR BACK UP CAMERA, BEST IN CLASS

s23,2151
From
a. ...-"I . a lo. ' . .. -. "



2012 GMC SIERRA EXT. CAB


2012 BUICK VERANO


AUTOMATIC, POWER OPTIONS,
AM/FM/CD/XM, BLUETOOTH,
ONSTAR, STABILIRAK
- IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -


$1 9 9 LEASE (2)


2012 BUICK

(433 ^


LACROSSE ASSIST


AM/FM/CD/MP3, XM RADIO,
USB PORT, BLUETOOTH, CRUISE
-- IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -


2012 BUICK REGAL TURBO
^H-. H __,


4.


ALLOY WHEELS, STABILITRAK,
CRUISE CONTROL,
POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS
- IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -


$2 2 9.
LEASE I?)


2012 BUICK ENCLAVE


AUTOMATIC, POWER OPTIONS,
ALUMINUM WHEELS,
BLUETOOTH, AM/FM/CD/XM
- IT'S ALL INCLUDED FOR -


12.59 299
SAVUPE TO 9 I
All Gltr ; are .epsrle aro r.anr-r rrmbin,3 m I, Pr.cOS are piuu Ir la I. 1 rIle. S3.300 Xi on cash or trade equity, $499 50 dealer fee, and include all incentives, rebates and discounts where applicable (2) 24 mo closed end lease. Total due at signing:
Veran:c S2 219 Regal 3 1079 LdCrcisse S3 229 Enclare 3 5)9 12 001) rni'vear 1B'm, lor oierage, WAC. Payments are plus tax, tag and title, $499.50 dealer lee and include all incentive, rebates, and discounts where applicable. (3) On select models.
AiC F;r i, !de i>s rv a'n:e mu% shn,[ pcal cl canclthip ofl 194i or n r Bu.,lh or MC and I'rade n a 1999 model year or newer vehicle. Not available with some other offers. Does not include leases Must Take delivery by 12/31/12 See dealer for details. *On select
rmodls WSC 5e ,,?leui For dladil, PIclures are IGr illusIraiiln puppcses onla Desalr not responsible for typographical errors. Sorry, all prior sales excluded.


2004 BUICK LESABRE



AUTOMATIC, LEATHER, FULL PWR.


-I 9 I


EAllI


* S S
U


2001 CADILLAC ELDORADO



NORTHSTAR ENGINE,TOURING
Il! ILI


I LEATHER, AUTOMATIC


2008 CHEW TRAILBLAZER


AIR SUNROOF AUTOMATIC
AIR, SUNROOF, AUTOMATIC


2008 GMC ENVOY


2008 PONTIAC SOLSTICE


2010 FORD EXPLORER XLT


2012 CHEVY EXPRESS


KI~m U


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:1 ii


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No reason to delay -


you can vote today!

T he big day, Nov. 6, is just around the corner!
We are very fortunate in Florida to have
three convenient ways to cast your vote: 1) mail
ballots; 2) early voting; and 3) voting at the polls
on Election Day.


In this political tab there is a
sample ballot. Voters are encour-
aged to mark their sample ballot
and bring it to the early
voting site or polling place
on Election Day.
In this election we not
only are voting for presi-
dent, but also important
federal, state and local of-
flees.
There are 11 amend- Sus
ments on the ballot placed Gt
there by the Legislature. COI
The school board also has
an amendment on the ballot. Vot-
ers need to do some homework on
the amendments in order to make
an informed choice.
In this tab there is a very good
analysis of the amendments writ-
ten by Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy. There are informative
websites, including the Collins
Center at www.collinscenter.org
and the League of Women Voters
2012 Non-Partisan Voters Guide at
www.bereadytovote.org as well as
the Citrus County Property Ap-
praiser's site, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.
Five of the amendments have to
do with property taxes.
Voters do not have to vote in
every race in order to have their
ballot count. We ask all voters to
deposit both ballot cards in the
voting equipment or return both
mail ballot cards. Return postage
is 65 cents.
Mail ballots may be mailed or re-
turned in person to the Inverness
or Crystal River Elections Office


a
LJ
LI


or to one of the four early voting
sites from Saturday, Oct. 27,
through Saturday, Nov. 3, from 7
a.m. to 7 p.m. The four
early voting sites are at
Inverness City Hall, Cen-
tral Ridge Public Li-
brary in Beverly Hills,
Homosassa Public Li-
brary and the Crystal
River Elections Office at
n Gill Meadowcrest. Mail bal-
EST lots can not be returned
UMN at the polling place on
Election Day
The two-page ballot may cause
waiting lines at the polls on Elec-
tion Day or at early voting sites.
We ask you to please be prepared
and be patient! The dedicated
election workers want to serve
everyone properly and will need
the time to do so.
Lastly, please remember that
polling locations have been reduced
from 41 to 31. New voter informa-
tion cards were sent to all registered
voters in May informing voters of
precinct changes and district num-
ber changes due to redistricting.
If you have any questions, please
call the elections office in Inver-
ness at 352-341-6740 or the Crystal
River office at 352-564-7120 or go
the website www.votecitrus.com.
We encourage you to be in-
formed and make your vote count!
Remember: Your vote is your voice!

Susan Gill is the Citrus County
Supervisor of Elections.


ne ame n ene ts
An anlyi of th prpoe cosiutoa
amnmet by Choil reotr*ac



Keney Page G8 to

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A bra look at th issuesfn voer in
thi yea's prsdeta elcin an why


G2 Saturday, October 13, 2012


ELECTION 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Voter Information


General Election


Sample Ballot


TUESDAY, 7
NOVEMBER 6, 2012 )
POLLS OPEN FROM
..7a.m. to 7p.m....


Requirement for Voters
You must show a photo and signature ID when voting
early or at the polls. Voters who do not show a photo
and signature ID rmut vote a provisional ballot (F.S.
101.043 (2)).

Acceptable Forms of Valid Photo ID:
* Florida Driver's License
* Florida ID
* US Passport
* Military ID
SStudent ID
* Debit or Credit Card with Photo
* Retirement Center ID
* Neighborhood Association ID
* Public Assistance ID

Has Your Signature Changed
Since You First Registered?
Signatures on mail ballots are checked against your
most recent signature on file. Update your signature by
completing a voter registration application and
delivering it to the elections office.




(!0iThe ultimate
/ voting machine... YOU

2VOTE 2012


Prepare Now for the General Election
ASK YOURSELF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
Li Is the address and name on my voter
information card correct?
]J Do I have the appropriate photo ID and
signature to bring when voting?
L- Do I know enough about the candidates and
amendments to make an informed decision?
i Do I know where my polling location is to
cast my vote?

Early Voting Dates and Locations
Early voting will run from the 10Oth to the 3rd day prior to each
election. Show your acceptable photo and signature ID, to
receive a ballot. Lack of photo and signature ID will require
you to cast a provisional ballot. (ES 101.043(2))

Early Voting Dates and Hours
October 27 November 3, 2012 Saturday to Saturday
(including Sunday)
Hours: 7a.m. to 7p.m.

Early Voting Locations
Central Ridge Library 425 W- Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
Crystal River Elections Office -1540 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River
Homosassa Public Library 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa
Inverness City Hall 212 W. Main St., Inverness

Call Now for Your Mail Ballot
(352) 341-6740 or apply online at www.votecitrus.com.
The last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election
is October 31, 2012 by 5p.m.


Saturday October 13, 2012 G3


ELECTION 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CARD A


NO. 1
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 28
Health Care Services

Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to prohibit laws or rules from
compelling any person or employer to
purchase, obtain, or otherwise provide for
health care coverage; permit a person or an
employer to purchase lawful health care
services directly from a health care provider;
permit a health care provider to accept direct
payment from a person or an employer for
lawful health care services; exempt persons,
employers, and health care providers from
penalties and taxes for paying directly or
accepting direct payment for lawful health care
services; and prohibit laws or rules from
abolishing the private market for health care
coverage of any lawful health care service.
Specifies that the amendment does not affect
which health care services a health care
provider is required to perform or provide;
affect which health care services are permitted
by law; prohibit care provided pursuant to
general law relating to workers' compensation;
affect laws or rules in effect as of March 1,
2010; affect the terms or conditions of any
health care system to the extent that those
terms and conditions do not have the effect of
punishing a person or an employer for paying
directly for lawful health care services or a
health care provider for accepting direct
payment from a person or an employer for
lawful health care services; or affect any
general law passed by two-thirds vote of the
membership of each house of the Legislature,
passed after the effective date of the
amendment, provided such law states with
specificity the public necessity justifying the
exceptions from the provisions of the
amendment. The amendment expressly
provides that it may not be construed to
prohibit negotiated provisions in insurance
contracts, network agreements, or other
provider agreements contractually limiting
copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or other
patient charges.

C YES
C NO


NO. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6 ARTICLE XII,
SECTION 32
Veterans Disabled Due to Combat
Injury; Homestead Property Tax
Discount

Proposing an amendment to Section 6 of
Article VII and the creation of Section 32 of
Article XII of the State Constitution to
expand the availability of the property
discount on the homesteads of veterans
who became disabled as the result of a
combat injury to include those who were
not Florida residents when they entered
the military and schedule the amendment
to take effect January 1, 2013.
= YES
C NO


NO. 3
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 1 AND 19 -
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32
State Government Revenue Limitation

This proposed amendment to the State
Constitution replaces the existing state revenue
limitation based on Florida personal income
growth with a new state revenue limitation
based on inflation and population changes.
Under the amendment, state revenues, as
defined in the amendment, collected in excess
of the revenue limitation must be deposited into
the budget stabilization fund until the fund
reaches its maximum balance, and thereafter
shall be used for the support and maintenance
of public schools by reducing the minimum
financial effort required from school districts for
participation in a state-funded education
finance program, or, if the minimum financial
effort is no longer required, returned to the
taxpayers. The Legislature may increase the
state revenue limitation through a bill approved
by a super majority vote of each house of the
Legislature. The Legislature may also submit a
proposed increase in the state revenue
limitation to the voters. The Legislature must
implement this proposed amendment by
general law. The amendment will take effect
upon approval by the electors and will first
apply to the 2014-2015 state fiscal year.

D YES
D NO


G4 Saturday, October 13, 2012


ELECTION 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CARD B


NO. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 4, 6 ARTICLE XII, SECTIONS 27, 32, 33
Property Tax Limilations; Property Value Decline; Reduction for
Nmnhanestead Assessment Inreases; Delay of Scheduled Repeal

(1) This would amend Florida Constitution Article VII, Section 4 (Taxaion;
assessments) and Section 6 (Homestead exemptions). It also would
amend Article XII, Section 27, and add Sections 32 and 33. relating to the
Schedule for the amendments.
(2) In certain circumstances, the law requires the assessed value of
homestead and specified nonhomestead property to Increase when the
just value of the property decreases. Therefore, this amendment provides
tat the Legislature may, by general law, provide that the assessment of
homestead and specified nonhomestead property may not increase if the
just value of that property is less than the just value of the property on the
preceding January 1, subject to any adjusrnent in the assessed value due
to changes, additions reductions, or improvements to such property which
are assessed as provided for by general law. This amendment takes effect
upon approval by the voters. If approved at a special election held on the
date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, it shall operate
retroactively to January 1.2012. or, if approved at the 2012 general
election, shall take effect January 1, 2013.
(3) This amendment reduces from 10 percent to 5 percent the limitation on
annual changes in assessments of nonhomestead real property. This
amendment takes effect upon approval of the voters. If approved at a
special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference
primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at
the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1,2013.
(4) This amendment also authorizes general law to provide, subject to
conditions specified In such law, an additional homestead exemption to
every person who establishes the right to receive the homestead
exemption provided in the Florida Constitution within 1 year after
purchasing the homestead property and who has not owned property in
the previous 3 calendar years to which the Florida homestead exemption
applied. The additional homestead exemption shall apply to all levies
except school district levies. The additional exemption is an amount equal
to 50 percent of the homestead property's just value on January 1 of the
year the homestead is established. The additional homestead exemption
may not exceed an amount equal to the median just value of all
homestead property within the county where the property at issue is
located for the calendar year immediately preceding January 1 of the year
the homestead is established. The additional exemption shall apply for the
shorter of 5 years or the year of sale of the property. The amount of the
additional exemption shall be reduced in each subsequent year by an
amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of the additional exemption
received in the year the homestead was established or by an amount
equal to the difference between the just value of the property and the
assessed value of the property determined under Article VII, Section 4(d),
whichever Is greater. Not more than one such exemption shall be allowed
per homestead property at one time. The additional exemption apples to
property purchased on or after January 1. 2011, if approved by the voters
at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference
primary, or to property purchased on or after January 1, 2012, if approved
by the voters at the 2012 general election. The additional exemption is not
available in the sixth and subsequent years after it is first received. The
amendment shall take effect upon approval by the voters. if approved at a
special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference
primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at
the2012 general election, takes effect January 1.2013.
(5) This amendment also delays until 2023, the repeal, currently
scheduled to take effect in 2019. of constitutional amendments adopted in
2008 which limit annual assessment increases for specified
nonhomestead real property. This amendment delays until 2022 the
submission of an amendment proposing the abrogation of such repeal to
the voters.
CD YES .
C NO


NO. 5
CONSTITUTIMNAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 2, 11, AND 12
State Courts
Proposing a revision of Article V of the State Constitution relating
to the judiciary. The State Constitution authorizes the Supreme
Court to adopt rules for the practice and procedure in al courts.
The constitution further provides that a rule of court may be
repealed by a general law enacted by a two-thirds vote of the
membership of each house of the Legislature. This proposed
constitutional revision eliminates the requirement that a general
law repealing a court rule pass by a two-thirds vote of each
house, thereby providing that the Legislature may repeal a rule of
court by a general law approved by a majority vote of each house
of the Legislature that expresses the policy behind the repeal.
The court could readopt the rule in conformity with the public
policy expressed by the Legislature, but If tre Legislature
determines that a rule has been readopted and repeals the
readopted rule, this proposed revision prohibits the court from
further reedopting the repealed rule without the Legislature's prior
approval. Under current law, rules of the judicial nomrinatrg
commissions and the Judicial Qualifications Commission may be
repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the
membership of each house of the Legislature. Under this
proposed revision, a vote to repeal thosa rules is changed to
repeal by general law enacted by a majority vote of the legislators
present. Under current law, the Governor appoints a justice of the
Supreme Court from a list of nominees provided by a judicial
nominating commission, and appointments by the Governor are
not subject to confirmation. This revision requires Senate
confirmation of a justice of the Supreme Court before the
appointee can take office. if the Senate votes not to confirm the
appointment, the judicial nominating commission must reconvene
and may not renominate any person whose prior appointment to
fill the same vacancy was not confirmed by the Senate. For the
purpose of confirmation, the Senate may meet at any time. If the
Senate falls to vote on the appointment of a justice within 90
days, the justice will be deemed confirmed and will take office.
The Judicial Qualfications Cormmission is an independent
commission created by the State Constitution to investigate and
prosecute before the Florida Supreme Court alleged misconduct
by a justice or judge. Currently under the constitution,
commission proceedings are confidential untiformal ral charges are
filed by the investigative panel of the commission. Once formal
charges are filed. the formal charges and all further proceedings
of the commission are public. Currently, the constitution
authorizes the House of Representatives to impeach a justice or
judge. Further, the Speaker of the House of Representatives may
request, and the Judicial Quallfications Commission must make
available, all information in the commission's possession for use
in deciding whether to impeach a justice or judge. This proposed
revision requires the commission to make all of its files available
to the Speaker of the House of Representatives but provides that
such files would remain confidential during any investigation by
the House of Representatives and until such informatalion is used
in the pursuit of an impeachment of a justice or judge. This
revision also removes the power of the Governor to request flesh
of the Judicial Qualifications Commission to confonn to a prior
constitutional change. This revision also makes technical and
clarifying additions and deletions relating to the selection of chief
judges of a circuit and relating to the Judicial QualIications
Commission, and makes other nonsubstantive conforming and
technical changes in the judicial article of the constitution.
C YES
-- NO


Saturday October 13, 2012 G5


ELECTION 2012


@111to







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CARD B


NO. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 28
Prohibition on Public Funding of Abortions;
Construction of Abortion Rights

This proposed amendment provides that public
funds may not be expended for any abortion or
for health-benefits coverage that includes
coverage of abortion. This prohibition does not
apply to an expenditure required by federal
law, a case in which a woman suffers from a
physical disorder, physical injury, or physical
illness that would place her in danger of death
unless an abortion is performed, or a case of
rape or incest. This proposed amendment
provides that the State Constitution may not be
Interpreted to create broader rights to an
abortion than those contained in the United
States Constitution. With respect to abortion,
this proposed amendment overrules court
decisions which conclude that the right of
privacy under Article I, Section 23 of the State
Constitution is broader in scope than that of the
United States Constitution.
d YES
D NO
NO. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMEN DM ENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 3
Religious Freedom

Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution providing that no individual or
entity may be denied, on the basis of religious
identity or belief, governmental benefits,
funding or other support, except as required by
the First Amendment to the United States
Constitution, and deleting the prohibition
against using revenues from the public treasury
directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect,
or religious denomination or in aid of any
sectarian institution.
YES
NO


NO. 9
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6 ARTICLE XII,
SECTION 32
Homestead Property Tax Exemption for
Surviving Spouse of Military Veteran or
First Responder

Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to authorize the Legislature to
provide by general law ad valorem
homestead property tax relief to the
surviving spouse of a military veteran who
died from service-connected causes while
on active duty or to the surviving spouse of
a first responder who died in the line of
duty. The amendment authorizes the
Legislature to totally exempt or partially
exempt such surviving spouse's
homestead property from ad valorem
taxation. The amendment defines a first
responder as a law enforcement officer, a
correctional officer, a firefighter, an
emergency medical technician, or a
paramedic. This amendment shall take
effect January 1, 2013.

CD YES
CD NO
NO. 10
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 3 -ARTICLE XII,
SECTION 32
Tangible Personal Property Tax
Exemption

Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to:
(1) Provide an exemption from ad valorem
taxes levied by counties, municipalities,
school districts, and other local
governments on tangible personal property
if the assessed value of an owner's
tangible personal property is greater than
$25,000 but less than $50,000. This new
exemption, if approved by the voters, will
take effect on January 1, 2013, and apply
to the 2013 tax roll and subsequent tax
rolls.
(2) Authorize a county or municipality for
the purpose of its respective levy, and as
provided by general law, to provide
tangible personal property tax exemptions
by ordinance. This is in addition to other
statewide tangible personal property tax
exemptions provided by the Constitution
and this amendment.
CD YES
CD NO


NO. 11
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6
Additional Homestead Exemption; Low-
Income Seniors Who Maintain Long-Term
Residency on Property; Equal to Assessed
Value

Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to authorize the Legislature, by
general law and subject to conditions set forth
in the general law, to allow counties and
municipalities to grant an additional homestead
tax exemption equal to the assessed value of
homestead property if the property has a just
value less than $250,000 to an owner who has
maintained permanent residency on the
property for not less than 25 years, who has
attained age 65, and who has a low household
income as defined by general law.

(D YES
C NO
NO. 12
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE IX, SECTION 7
Appointment of Student Body President to
Board of Governors of the State University
System

Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to replace the president of the
Florida Student Association with the chair of
the council of state university student body
presidents as the student member of the Board
of Governors of the State University System
and to require that the Board of Governors
organize such council of state university
student body presidents.

CD YES
C NO
SCHOOL DISTRICT
REFERENDUM
Referendum Regarding Levying for Four
Years 0.25 Mills for Necessary Operating
Expenses of School District

Shall the School District of Citrus County add a
total of 0.25 mills to the ad valorem millage for
necessary operating expenses to maintain
academic programs and retain teaching
positions for the fiscal years beginning July 1,
2013 and ending four fiscal years later on June
30, 2017?

GD YES
= NO


G6 Saturday, October 13, 2012


ELECTION 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OFFICIAL GENERAL ELECTION BALLOT
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOVEMBER 6,2012

TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL = NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE.
I Use a blue or black ink pen.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your vote may not count.
To vote for a candidate whose name is not printed on the ballot, fill in the oval, and write in the candidate's name on the blank
line provided for a write-in candidate.


PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
CD Mitt Romney R
Paul Ryan
CD Barack Obama D
Joe Biden
CD Thomas Robert Stevens C
Alden Link
C Gary Johnson L
James P. Gray
CD Virgil H. Goode, Jr. C
James N. Clymer
D Jill Stein G
Cheri Honkala
D Andre Barnett F
Kenneth Cross
CD Stewart Alexander s
Alex Mendoza
CD Peta Lindsay F
Yari Osorio
CD Roseanne Barr F
Cindy Sheehan
CD Tom Hoefling
Jonathan D. Ellis

CD Ross C. "Rocky" Anderson
Luis J. Rodriguez
CD


EP

EM

)BJ

.BT

.PF

RE

tEF

OC

"SL

'FP

AIP


IPF


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
CD Connie Mack
CD Bill Nelson
(D Bill Gaylor
CD Chris Borgia
SWrite-In


REP
DEM
NPA
NPA


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
DISTRICT 11
(Vote for One)


CD Richard B. "Rich" Nugent
CD H. David Werder
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 34
(Vote for One)


CD Jimmie T. Smith
CD Nancy Argenziano


REP
DEM


REP
INT


CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(Vote for One)


D Angela Vick
D Phillip F. Mulrain


REP
DEM


SHERIFF
(Vote for One)
D Winn Webb REP
C Jeffrey J. Dawsy DEM
Write-in
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
(Vote for One)


_D Sandy Balfour
CD Sandra 'Sam' Himmel


REP
DEM


JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT

Shall Justice R. Fred Lewis of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?

CD YES
CD NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT

Shall Justice Barbara J. Pariente of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?

D YES
D NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT

Shall Justice Peggy A. Quince of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?

D YES
D NO


City of Crystal River
Precinct 105
CITY COUNCIL MEMBER
SEAT 5
(Vote for One)
D0 Robert Holmes
CD Keith M. Shewbart



Homosassa Water District
Precinct 302.2 and 305.2
HOMOSASSA SPECIAL
WATER DISTRICT
SEAT 3
(Vote for One)
D Martina Rogers
CD Lora Sipos


Write-in


Saturday October 13, 2012 G7


ELECTION 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A guide to the amendments


Editor's note: Due to the complexity of the
proposed amendments to the state Constitution,
we are republishing this story by staff writer
Nancy Kennedy that originally appeared in the
Aug 27 Chronicle.
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
ere's what you need to know
about the 11 proposed Florida
constitutional amendments
on the 2012 ballot: If you are for
them, vote yes; if against, vote no.
Also, the amendments are listed as
1 through 12, but Amendment 7 has
been removed from the ballot. Five
of the 11 amendments deal with taxes.
According to Judy Johnson, a Marion
County attorney who is well-versed in
constitutional law and a member of
the Marion County League of Women
Voters (Citrus County does not have a
chapter), Florida has one of the easi-
est state constitutions to amend, and
there are five ways to do it: by the
Legislature proposing a change; citizen-
initiative petitions; constitutional con-
vention, revision commission or budget
and tax reform commission proposal.
"In order to pass an amendment to
the Constitution, after the 'pregnant
pig' amendment (in 2002), the people
of Florida said several years ago that
we don't want a simple majority to pass
an amendment anymore. Now it must
pass by 60 percent," Johnson said.
That's the easy part of understanding
Florida constitutional amendments.
Understanding what they say and
mean is a different matter altogether.
Thanks to an explanation from
Johnson and the League of Women
Voters, here are the basics of each
amendment, plus what the "for"
sides say about them and what the
"against" sides say.
0---
Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy
can be reached at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline. com.


AMENDMENT
T his allows Florida to opt out
of the federal Affordable
Health Care Act, prohibits laws
or rules compelling any person
or employer to provide health
care coverage or participate in
any health care system. It also
authorizes health care
providers to accept direct pay-
ment for health care services
and individuals or employers to
pay directly for health care



AMENDMENT :
VETERANS
DISABLED
DUE TO
COMBAT INJUR
HOMESTEAD
PROPERTY TA)"
DISCOUNT
T his amendment expands the c
rent homestead exemption av,
able to disabled veterans to those
were not Florida residents at the t
they entered military service.
For: Veterans are veterans whet[
they entered the military in New Y
Montana, Ohio or Florida, and if tl
were injured in combat, then we
should reward them with a tax bre
It's the least we can do.
Against: There's already an add<
homestead exemption for Florida
combat-injured veterans we doi
need any more exemptions. In Flo
cities and counties depend on pro
erty taxes for services and they ar
ready stressed and stretched. Flor
can't afford this.


L: HEALTH CARE SERVICES


services without incurring
penalties or fines.
The "for" side says: Individu-
als ought to have the right and
freedom to choose their own
health care and ought not to be
forced by the federal govern-
ment into a particular health
care program.
The "against" side says:
The U.S. Supreme Court al-
ready ruled with regards to the


Affordable Health Care Act and
this amendment was actually
on the 2010 Florida ballot
(and removed because of inad-
equate language) before the
U.S. Supreme Court ruling.
Therefore, it has no leg to
stand on if passed, so why
bother? Besides, the Florida
Constitution is a governing
document and this is not a
governing issue.


AMENDMENT 3:
STATE GOVERNMENT
REVENUE IMITATION
T his amendment has two parts. Due to population
and inflationary changes, it replaces the existing
revenue limitation adopted about 10 years ago. That
means excess revenue would be placed in the state's
"rainy day" fund, and once the fund reaches 10 per-
cent of the prior year's total budget, the state Legis-
lature would be required to vote to either provide tax
relief or reduce property taxes.
The second part says the Legislature may increase
the revenue limitation by a bill approved by a two-


thirds majority.
For: Government is al-
ready overblown and
overgrown. This "Smart
Cap" amendment en-
sures that the state
budget doesn't grow be-
yond Florida's families'
abilities to pay for it.


Against: The proposed
revenue cap could pre-
vent government serv-
ices from keeping up
with demand. Currently,
Florida doesn't even
have enough revenue to
fund what we need, such
as good roads, etc. Be-
sides, even if this
passes, the Legislature
could increase the rev-
enue cap, so it doesn't
matter what the voters


G8 Saturday, October 13, 2012


ELECTION 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMENDMENT 4: PROPERTY TAX LIMITATION; PROPERTY VALUE
DECLINE; REDUCTION FOR NON-HOMESTEAD ASSESSMENT
INCREASES; DELAY OF SCHEDULED REPEAL


T his reduces the annual
growth in assessment limita-
tion on business and rental prop-
erties and second homes from 10
percent to 5 percent and pro-
hibits increase in the assessed
value of homestead property
when the market value of the
property decreases.
This also gives "first-time home-
steaders," which includes non-


owners for three years, an addi-
tional tax exemption equal to 50
percent of the median just value
on the property. This exemption,
which applies only to non-school
property taxes, is reduced 20 per-
cent each year, diminishing to
zero in five years or less. If ap-
proved, this exemption applies to
property purchased on or before
Jan. 1, 2012.


For: This provision will stimu-
late Florida's economy and real
estate market, encourage people
who may have had previous
homes foreclosed on to buy
homes, will create new jobs -
construction and related indus-
tries such as house painting, car-
peting, interior decorating,
lighting, etc. and bring new
residents to Florida, which will


help reduce the glut of houses on
the market.
Against: This would bring new
residents to Florida who wouldn't
be paying their fair share of taxes
yet would be using the same
services as others who are paying
full price. Cities and counties are
already stressed and stretched,
and the state of Florida can't af-
ford this.


AMENDMENT 6:
PROHIBITION OF
PUBLIC FUNDING
OF ABORTIONS;
CONSTRUCTION
OF ABORTION
RIGHTS
T his prohibits the use of public
funds for abortions with the
exception of rape, incest or to save
the pregnant woman's life. This
also stipulates that the state
Constitution cannot be interpreted
to include broader rights to abortion
than those contained in the U.S.
Constitution.
For: This codifies what's already
federal law, but just in case the fed-
eral folks change their minds, this
will be in the state Constitution. This
will reduce the number of abortions
in Florida and ensure that the pri-
vacy rights of women in regard to
abortion are consistent with federal
standards.
Against: There's already a
federal law and Florida's right to
privacy is already one of the
strongest of any state constitution.
This amendment interferes with a
woman's right to choose guaranteed
by Roe v. Wade.


AMENDMENT 5: STATE COURTS


T his amendment
has several parts.
It adds a requirement
for a state Supreme
Court justice appointed
by the governor to
also be confirmed by
the Senate. It also
authorizes repeal of
a court rule by a sim-
ple majority of the
Legislature instead of
the current two-thirds
majority, prohibits re-
enactment of any re-
pealed rule and allows
the Speaker of the
House of Representa-
tives to review all files
of the Judicial Quali-
fication Commis-
sions even if it isn't
related to impeach-
ment considerations.
For: Someone be-
sides the judicial
nominating commit-
tee and the governor
needs to be looking
at the qualifications
and background of
Supreme Court nom-
inees. Also, this
amendment makes it
easier to repeal a


rule and might get the Supreme
Court to pay more attention.
Against: There are three inde-
pendent arms of the state govern-
ment, and this amendment usurps


power from both the governor and
the judicial branch. In the 40 years
since we've been doing things this
way there hasn't been a problem,
so why change it now?


Saturday October 13, 2012 G9


ELECTION 2012






G10 Saturday October 13, 2012


AMENDMENT 8:
REUGIOUS
FREEDOM
Also known as the "Blaine
Amendment," this deletes the
current provision in the state Consti-
tution that prohibits taxpayer fund-
ing of religious institutions and
would allow the state to use public
money to fund religious institutions
and schools.
For: Religious organizations al-
ready fill a gap in providing social
services that the general public can
use, but are excluded from some
state funding sources. If they're pro-
viding services to state residents,
they should be entitled to state
funds.
Against: If passed, this would en-
sure the creation and expansion of
voucher programs for private, reli-
gious schools, and financially this is
not a good time to have vouchers
when the public schools are under-
funded. Also, an unintended conse-
quence could be the state interfering
with the "church" rather than the
other way around.


AMENDMENT 9: HOMESTEAD PROPERTY
TAX EXEMPON FOR SURVIVING SPOUSE OF
MILITARY VETERAN OR FIRST RESPONDER


T his grants full homestead
property relief to surviving
spouses of military veterans
who die from service-con-
nected causes while on active
duty or first responders killed
in the line of duty. The de-
ceased must have been a per-
manent resident of Florida on
Jan. 1 of the year they died.


This amendment adds first re-
sponders to the existing ex-
emption.
If enacted, this amendment
would authorize the Legislature
to totally or partially exempt
surviving spouses of military
veterans or first responders
who died in the line of duty
from paying property taxes.


For: If they died while trying
to protect us, we ought to be
able to provide benefits to their
families. It's good public policy.
Against: This is yet another
category of exemptions that
take away tax revenue to al-
ready strapped cities and
counties. Who's going to pick
up the slack?


T his gives counties and cities authority to
grant full homestead property exemptions
to low-income seniors (age 65 and older) who
have lived in their home for at least 25 years
and whose home has a just value of less than
$250,000.


For: This helps keep low-income seniors in
their homes and allows local control.
Against: Florida already has additional homestead
exemptions for seniors. Why is another exemption
necessary, why now and why just seniors? We're
already cash-strapped; who will pick up the slack?


AMENDMENT 12:
APPOINTMENT
OF STUDENT BODY
PRESIDENT TO BOARD
OF GOVERNORS OF
STATE UNIVERSITY
SYSTEM
T his creates a new council composed of stu-
dent body presidents and requires that the
chair of that council replace the current Florida
Student Association member on the Board of Gov-
ernors.
For: This is just a clean-up process replacing one
group with another.
Against: The Constitution is a governing docu-
ment and this is not a governing issue. Therefore,
it doesn't belong there.


AMENDMENT 10: TANGIBLE
PERSONAL PROPERTY EXEMPTION


T his gives businesses an additional
exemption on tangible property such
as furniture and equipment used for the
business, increasing it from the current
$25,000 to $50,000. It also authorizes
counties and cities to grant additional
personal property and tangible tax
exemptions.


For: Lowering taxes will stimulate
business growth in Florida. Also, this
gives local control to city and county
governments.
Against: Businesses just got a $25,000
exemption and now they want it doubled?
We already have enough business incen-
tives. What we need is more revenue.


MORE RESOURCES
Still have questions about the proposed amendments? Wondering about claims
opponents and proponents have made? PolitiFact has done a roundup of claims
made about the impact of the proposals which can be viewed at http://www.
politifact.com/subjects/florida-amendments/. If you'd like to read the full text of
the amendments, it can be found at http://tinyurl.com/9ufnnna.


AMENDMENT 11: ADDITIONAL HOMESTEAD
EXEMPTION FOR LOW4-NCOME SENIORS
WHO MAINTAIN LONG-TERM RESIDENCY ON
PROPERTY; EALTO A ASSESSED VALWAMON


ELECTION 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Saturday, October 13, 2012 Gil


Citrus County Clerk of Courts


TERM: 4 YFARS


COVERS:ALL CITRUS COUNTY


PAY: $117,198 ONTHE BALLOT: Nov 6 ELECTION


PHILLIP
MULRAIN
Age: 66
Town: Lecanto
Party: Democrat
Occupation: Heavy
equipment operator
Education: High school
graduate
Civic involvement:
Masonic Lodge; American
Legion


(Editor's note: Mr Mulrain did
not respond to the Chronicle's
questionnaire by deadline for this
publication. Information came
from past Mulrain campaigns.)


RIGHT MAN. RIGHT JOB. RIGHT NOW.
...Now. MORE THAN EVER!


'0.b TUUr f Itfrili I aldveU diiU VVIll I.U[ILIInUt LU etJep ruU Ocedl "
*New Intelligence Led Policing (ILP) strategy decreasing crime in Citrus County
*Public Service Officer volunteer deputies equates to seven deputies per year .ooo man hours)
*Seniors vs. Crime program has recovered over $2 million to date
*Estimated savings of over $1.8 million in 2011 by 700+ volunteers
*Child Protective Investigations consistently ranked one of highest in state



Opened 3 Additional Fire Stations With No Budget Increase!
*Placed Nine More Firefighters on the Streets with No Budget Increase.
*Hired Full Time Training and Volunteer Firefighter Coordinators with No Budget Increase.

M I* --@ S


f


/ ^


ANGELA
VICK
Age: 47
Town: Inverness
Party: Republican
Occupation: Chief deputy
clerk, Citrus County Clerk of
the Circuit Court.
Education: Bachelor's
in business management,
St. Leo University.
Civic involvement:
American Cancer Society,
Relay for Life team captain;
National Day of Prayer; Cattle
Barons' Ball.
For more background and Angela Vick's
views on the issues, visit www.chronicle
online.com/votersguide.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ELECTION 2012






G12 Saturday October 13, 2012


Citrus County Sheriff


TERM: 4 YEARS COVE:ALL CITRUS COUNTY


PAY: $125,794


ONTHmE BAm : Nov 6 ELECTION


JEFF DAWSY
Age: 56.
Town: Pine Ridge.
Party: Democrat.
Occupation: Incumbent
sheriff.
Education: Master's in busi-
ness administration at Nova
University; bachelors in crim-
inal justice, St. Leo University.
Civic involvement: Presi-
dent, Jessie's Place child ad-
vocacy center; Crystal River
High School Boosters; Crystal
River ROTC Boosters; Mason;
Rotary honorary member.
For more background and Jeff Dawsy's
views on the issues, go to www.chroni-
cleonline.com/votersguide.


WINN
WEBB
Age: 62.
Town: Inverness.
Party: Republican.
Occupation: Citrus County
commissioner.
Education: High school
graduate.
Civic involvement:
Charter member of "Herbert
Surber" American Legion
Post 225 in Floral City;
Veteran's Coalition; Salva-
tion Army Advisory Board.

For more background and Winn Webb's
views on the issues, visit www.chronicle
online.com/votersguide.


ELECTION 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Saturday, October 13, 2012 G13


Citrus County Superintendent of Schools


TER: 4 YEARS


COVERS:ALL CITRUS COUNTY


PAY: $117,198


ON THE BALLO: Nov 6 ELECTION


For more background and Sam Himmel's views
on the issues, go to www.chronicleonline.com/
votersguide.


SANDRA 'SAM'
HIMMEL
Age: 57.
Town: Inverness.
Party: Democrat.
Occupation: incumbent
superintendent of schools
Education: Master's of
science, University of
Phoenix; bachelor's of sci-
ence in education and health,
University of Florida.
Civic involvement: Citrus
County Veterans Coalition;
Inverness Rotary Club hon-
orary member; Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County;
Citrus County Education
Foundation; Citrus County
American Cancer Society.


TERM: 2 YEARS COVERS: CITRUS COUNTY, PART OF HERNANDO COUNTY


PAY: $29,052


SANDY
BALFOUR
Age: 54.
Town: Beverly Hills.
Party: Republican.
Occupation: Teacher,
Academy of Environmental
Sciences.
Education: Master's of
education, University of
South Florida; bachelor's
degree, St. Leo University.
Civic involvement:
Board trustee, College of
Central Florida.

For more background and Sandy Balfour's
views on the issues, visit www.chronicle
online.com/votersguide.


State Representative District 34


NANCY
ARGENZIANO
Age: 57.
Town: Homosassa.
Party: Independent.
Occupation: Home
decorating/home
makeovers; real estate;
consultant.
Education: GED.
Civic involvement:
Rotary; Red Cross; Boys &
Girls Clubs.



For more background and Nancy
Argenziano's views on the issues, go to
www.chronicleonline.com/votersguide.


JIMMIE
T. SMITH
Age: 46.
Town: Inverness.
Party: Republican.
Occupation: Retired
military; incumbent
legislator.
Education: GED.
Civic involvement:
Agricultural Alliance of
Citrus County; Citrus
County Community
Coalition; Filter Youth
Alternatives; Sertoma.

For more background and Jimmie T.
Smith's views on the issues, visit
www.chronicleonline.com/votersguide.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ELECTION 2012







G14 Saturday October 13, 2012


Sh y it matters



Abrief look at issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans:
Associated Press I=


ABORTION
Abortion and birth control are
divisive issues in politics, and
they've flared up at times in this
campaign despite the candidates'
reluctance to dwell on them.
President Barack Obama sup-
ports abortion rights. And his
health care law requires contra-
ceptives to be available for free
for women in workplace health
plans.
Republican Mitt Romney op-
poses abortion rights, though he
previously supported them. He
says the Supreme Court ruling es-
tablishing abortion rights should
be reversed, allowing states to
ban abortion. He's also criticized
mandatory coverage for contra-
ception as a threat to religious
liberty
Romney's ability as president
to enact federal abortion restric-
tions would be limited unless Re-
publicans gained firm control of
Congress. But the next president
could have great influence over
abortion policy if vacancies arise
on the Supreme Court. If two
seats held by liberal justices were
filled by Romney-nominated con-
servatives, prospects for a rever-
sal of Roe v. Wade would
increase.
AFGHANISTAN
The stakes now are similar to
what caused the U.S. to invade al-
most 11 years ago: the threat of
more al-Qaida attacks.
Obama says U.S. forces must
not leave until Afghan forces can
defend the country on their own.
Otherwise the Taliban would re-
gain power and al-Qaida might again
launch attacks from there. Rival
Romney appears to share that view
What's often overlooked in the
"al-Qaida returns" scenario is an
answer to this question: Why,
after so many years of foreign
help, are the Afghans still not ca-
pable of self-defense? And when
will they be?


lbv







S
-^^ ^ F ^ T


Associated Press
Connecticut Light & Power's unionized linemen rally Sept. 17 at the state Capitol in Hartford, Conn. The union, which has been without a contract
since June, rallied over what they say are inadequate staffing levels. Labor unions are still big political players. But they have seen a steady de-
cline in membership and clout since their heyday in the 1950s.


The official answer is by the
end of 2014, when the U.S. and its
allies plan to end their combat
role. The Afghans will be fully in
charge, or so it is hoped, and the
war will be over, at least for
Americans.
CAMPAIGN FINANCE
This election probably will cost
more than $1 billion. Big donors
who help cover the tab could gain
outsized influence with the elec-
tion's winner. Your voice may not
be heard as loudly as a result.


Recent court decisions have
stripped away restrictions on
how elections are financed, al-
lowing the very rich to afford
more speech than the rest. In
turn, super PACs have flourished,
thanks as well to limitless contri-
butions from the wealthy in-
cluding contributors who have
business before the government.
Disclosure rules offer a
glimpse into who's behind the
money But the information is
often too vague to be useful. And


nonprofits that run so-called
issue ads don't have to reveal
donors.
Obama criticized the Supreme
Court for removing campaign fi-
nance restrictions. Republican
presidential nominee Mitt Rom-
ney supported the ruling. Both
are using the lax rules with gusto.
CHINA
The U.S. accuses China of
flouting trade rules and under-
valuing its currency to helps its
exporters, hurting American


competitors and jobs. But impos-
ing tariffs could set off a trade
war and drive up prices for
American consumers.
Tensions now have spread to
the automotive sector: The U.S. is
seeking international rulings
against Chinese subsidies for its
auto and auto-parts exports and
against Chinese duties on U.S.
autos. Romney says he'll get
tougher on China's trade viola-
tions. Obama has taken a variety
See MATTERS/Page G15


ELECTION 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTERS
Continued from Page G14

of trade actions against
China, but on the currency
issue, he has opted to wait
for economic forces to en-
courage Beijing to raise
values.
Cheap Chinese goods
have benefited American
consumers and restrained
inflation. But those imports
have hurt American manu-
facturers. And many U.S.
companies outsource pro-
duction to China. One study
estimated that between
2001 and 2010, 2.8 million
U.S. jobs were lost or dis-
placed to China.
CLIMATE CHANGE
This year America's
weather has been hotter
and more extreme than
ever before, records show.
Yet the presidential candi-
dates aren't talking about
it.
In the U.S. July was the
hottest month ever
recorded and this year is
on track to be the warmest
Scientists say that's both
from natural drought and
man-made global warming.
Each decade since the
1970s has been nearly one-
third of a degree warmer
than the previous one.
Sea levels are rising
while glaciers and summer
Arctic sea ice are shrink-
ing. Plants are blooming
earlier Some species could
die because of global
warming.
Obama proposed a bill
to cap power plant carbon
dioxide emissions, but it
died in Congress. Still,
he's doubling auto
mileage standards and put
billions into cleaner en-
ergy Romney now ques-
tions the science of
man-made global warm-
ing and says some actions
to curb emissions could
hurt an already struggling
economy.
DEBT
A sea of red ink is con-
fronting the nation and
presidents to come.
The budget deficit the
shortfall created when the


ELECTION 2012


Associated Press
The steel skeleton for the eastern end of the new Innerbelt Bridge in Cleveland sits next to the existing span on May 17.
Much of America's infrastructure, including its interstate highway system, is more than half a century old and in need of
serious work to keep pace with a rising population. Highway, rail and airport bottlenecks slow the movement of goods and
commuters, costing billions in wasted time and fuel and even measurably slowing the economy.


government spends more
in a given year than it col-
lects is on track to top $1
trillion for the fourth
straight year. The govern-
ment borrows about 40
cents for every dollar it
spends.
The national debt is the
total amount the federal
government owes. It's
risen to a shade over $16
trillion.
Obama has proposed
bringing deficits down by
slowing spending gradu-
ally, to avoid suddenly tip-
ping the economy back into
recession. He'd raise taxes
on households earning
more than $250,000 and im-
pose a surcharge of 30 per-
cent on those making more
than $1 million. Romney
would lower deficits mostly
through deep spending
cuts. But many of the cuts
he's pushing would be par-
tially negated by his pro-
posals to lower top tax
rates on corporations and
individuals.


DEFENSE SPENDING
At its core, the debate
over how much the U.S.
spends on defense gets
down to this: What is it that
America should be defend-
ing against?
There are plenty of po-
tential security threats on
the horizon, not to mention
an unfinished war in
Afghanistan.
The size and shape of the
defense budget go a long
way toward determining
whether the U.S. can influ-
ence events abroad, pre-
vent new wars and be
ready for those it can't
avoid. It also fuels the do-
mestic defense industry in
ways that affect the vitality
of communities large and
small across the country
Obama wants more re-
straint in military spending
while Romney favors ex-
pansion. Obama also wants
more focus on Asia-Pacific
security, reflecting China's
military modernization.


But that and other ele-
ments of military strategy
could come apart if Wash-
ington doesn't find a way to
avoid automatic budget
cuts starting in January
ECONOMY
The job market is brutal
and the economy weak.
More than 12 million Amer-
icans can't find work; the
unemployment rate fell in
September but is still at a
recession-level 7.8 percent.
It had been over 8 percent
for 43 straight months. A di-
vided Washington has done
little to ease the misery
The economy didn't take
off when the recession
ended in June 2009. Growth
has never been slower in
the three years after a
downturn. The human toll
is staggering. Forty percent
of the jobless, 4.8 million
people, have been out of
work six months or more -
a "national crisis," accord-
ing to Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke.


Wages aren't keeping up
with inflation.
Obama wants to create
jobs by keeping taxes low
for everybody but the
wealthiest and with public-
works spending, clean en-
ergy projects and targeted
tax breaks to businesses.
Romney proposes further
cuts in tax rates for all in-
come levels; he'd also slash
corporate rates, reduce
regulations and encourage
oil production.
EDUCATION
Education ranks second
only to the economy in is-
sues important to Ameri-
cans. Yet the U.S. lags
globally in educating its
children. And higher edu-
cation costs are leaving stu-
dents saddled with debt or
unable to afford college at
all.
State budget cuts have
meant teacher layoffs and
larger class sizes. Colleges
have had to make do with
less. It all trickles down to


Saturday, October 13, 2012 G15

the kids in the classroom.
Although Washington
contributes a small fraction
of education money, it in-
fluences teacher quality,
accessibility and more. For
example, to be freed from
provisions of the No Child
Left Behind law, states had
to develop federally ap-
proved reforms.
Romney wants more
state and local control over
education. But he supports
some of Obama's proposals,
notably charter schools and
teacher evaluations. So,
look for them to be there
whoever wins the White
House.
GAY MARRIAGE
Both sides of the gay
marriage debate agree on
this much: The issue de-
fines what sort of nation
America will be.
Half a dozen states and
the District of Columbia
have made history by legal-
izing it, but it's prohibited
elsewhere and 30 states
have placed bans in their
constitutions.
Obama supports legal
recognition of same-sex
marriage, as a matter de-
cided by states. Romney
says same-sex marriage
should be banned with a
constitutional amendment.
The debate divides the
public down the middle,
according to recent polls,
and stirs up passion on
both sides.
In November, four states
have gay-marriage meas-
ures on their ballots. In
Minnesota, the vote is
whether to ban gay mar-
riage in the state constitu-
tion. Voters in Maine,
Maryland and Washington
state are voting on whether
to legalize gay marriage.
Thus far, foes of gay mar-
riage have prevailed in all
32 states where the issue
reached the ballot
GUNS
Gun violence has been
splayed across front pages
with alarming frequency
lately: the movie theater
killings in Colorado, the
Sikh temple shootings in
Wisconsin, the gunfire out-
side the Empire State
See MATTERS/Page G16







G16 Saturday October 13, 2012


ELECTION 2012


Associated Press
A man waits to be processed Jan. 11 at a Border Patrol detention center in Imperial Beach, Calif. Illegal immigration has slowed in recent years,
with the Border Patrol recently recording the fewest arrests in almost 40 years. But many people worry that the Mexican border, the most popular
crossing point for newly arriving illegal immigrants, still isn't secure more than a decade after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.


MATTERS
Continued from Page G15

Building and more. Guns are
used in two-thirds of homicides,
according to the FBI. But the
murder rate is less than half what
it was two decades ago.
Neither Obama nor Romney
has had much to say about guns
during the campaign. Obama has-
n't pushed gun control measures
as president; Romney says new
gun laws aren't needed.
It's getting harder to argue that
stricter gun laws are needed
when violent crime has been de-
creasing without them.
But the next president may well
fill at least one Supreme Court
seat, and the court is narrowly di-
vided on gun control. An Obama
appointee could be expected to
be friendlier to gun controls than
would a Romney nominee.


HEALTH CARE
America's health care system is
unsustainable. It's not one prob-
lem, but three: cost, quality and
coverage.
The U.S. has world-class hospi-
tals and doctors. But it spends far
more than other advanced coun-
tries and people aren't much
healthier And in an aging society,
there's no reliable system for
long-term care.
Obama's expansion of coverage
for the uninsured hits high gear
in 2014. Obama keeps today's
Medicare while trying to slow
costs. He also extends Medicaid.
Romney would repeal Obama's
health care law but hasn't spelled
out what he'd do instead. On
Medicare, he favors the option of
a government payment to help fu-
ture retirees get private coverage.
The risk of expanding cover-
age: Health costs consume a
growing share of the stressed


economy The risk of not: Millions
continue uninsured or saddled
with heavy coverage costs as the
population grows older.
IMMIGRATION
An estimated 11.5 million ille-
gal immigrants are living and
often working in the United
States. Figuring out what to do
with them has confounded Wash-
ington for years.
Lax enforcement could mean
more illegal immigrants compet-
ing with citizens for jobs and
some social services, without
necessarily paying income taxes.
A too-tight policy could mean
farmers and others in industries
that rely on the cheaper labor of
illegal immigrants are left beg-
ging for workers, passing higher
costs on to everyone else or going
out of business.
Obama backed the DREAM
Act, a failed bill that would have
provided a path to legal status for


many young illegal immigrants.
In June, Obama decided to allow
as many as 1.7 million of them to
stay for up to two years. Romney
supports completing a fence at
the Mexican border and other
tough security measures while
pledging to veto the DREAM Act.
INCOME INEQUALITY
The income gap between the
rich and everyone else is getting
larger, while middle incomes
stagnate. That's raised concerns
that the middle class isn't sharing
in economic growth as it used to.
Obama would raise taxes on
households earning more than
$250,000 a year, plus set a mini-
mum tax rate of 30 percent for
those earning $1 million or more.
He also wants to spend more on
education, "a gateway to the mid-
dle class." Romney would cut
taxes more broadly and says that
will generate enough growth to
raise all incomes.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Income inequality has risen for
three decades and worsened
since the recession ended. The
Census Bureau found the high-
est-earning 20 percent earned
51.1 percent of all income last
year. That was the biggest share
on records dating to 1967. The
share earned by households in
the middle 20 percent fell to 14.3
percent, a record low.
IRAN
With the Iraq war over and
Afghanistan winding down, Iran
is the most likely place for a new
U.S. military conflict.
Obama says he'll prevent Iran
from acquiring nuclear weapons.
He hopes sanctions alongside ne-
gotiations can get Iran to halt ura-
nium enrichment. But the
strategy hasn't worked yet.
Obama holds out the threat of
military action as a last resort.
Romney accuses Obama of
being weak on Iran. He says the
U.S. needs to present a greater
military threat.
Attacking Iran is no light mat-
ter, however That is why neither
candidate clearly calls for mili-
tary action.
Tehran can disrupt global fuel
supplies, hit U.S. allies in the
Gulf or support proxies such as
Hezbollah in acts of terrorism. It
could also draw the U.S. into an
unwanted new war in the Muslim
world.
SUPREME COURT
APPOINTMENTS
With four justices in their 70s,
odds are good that whoever wins
in November will fill at least one
Supreme Court seat. The next
justice could dramatically alter
the direction of a court split be-
tween conservatives and liberals.
One new face could mean a sea
change in how millions get health
care, shape gay rights and much
more.
Obama already has put his
stamp on the court by selecting
liberal-leaning Justices Elena
Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor, 50-
somethings who could serve a
quarter-century or more. Romney
has promised to name justices in
the mold of the court's conserva-
tives.
Since the New Deal, Supreme
Court decisions have made huge
differences in American lives,
from rulings to uphold Social Se-
curity, minimum wage laws and
other Depression-era reforms to
See MATrERS/Page G17







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTERS
Continued from Page G16

ringing endorsements of
equal rights. Big decisions
on health care, gun rights
and abortion have turned
on 5-4 votes.
SOCIAL SECURITY
Unless Congress acts, the
trust funds that support So-
cial Security are on pace to
run out of money in 2033,
triggering an automatic 25
percent cut in benefits that
millions of older Ameri-
cans rely on for most of
their income.
That may seem far off.
But the sooner Congress
acts, the more time to
phase in changes slowly
Social Security could be
preserved for generations
with modest but politically
difficult changes to benefits
or taxes, or some of both.
Obama hasn't laid out a
detailed plan for address-
ing Social Security. Rom-
ney proposes a gradual
increase in the retirement
age and, for future benefi-
ciaries, slower growth in
benefits for the wealthy
But nothing will happen
without White House lead-
ership.
For millions of retired
and disabled workers, So-
cial Security is almost all
they have to live on.
Monthly retirement bene-
fits are $1,237; average dis-
ability benefits, $1,111.
SYRIA
Syria's conflict is the
most violent to emerge
from last year's Arab
Spring. Activists say at least
23,000 people have died
over the last 18 months.
Obama wants Syrian
President Bashar Assad to
leave power. But he won't
use U.S. military force to
make that happen.
Romney says "more as-
sertive" U.S. tactics are
needed, without fully
spelling them out.
The future of Arab
democracy could hinge on
the crisis. After dictator-
ships fell in Tunisia, Egypt,
Libya and Yemen, critics
say Assad's government has
resorted to torture and


ELECTION 2012


Saturday, October 13, 2012 G17


Associated Press
President Franklin Roosevelt signs the Social Security Bill Aug. 14, 1935, in Washington. For millions of retired and disabled workers today Social Se-
curity is pretty much all they have to live on, even though monthly benefits are barely enough to keep them out of poverty. Monthly payments average
$1,237 for retired workers and $1,111 for disabled workers. Most older Americans rely on Social Security for a majority of their income; many rely on it
for 90 percent or more, according to the Social Security Administration.


mass killings to stay in
power.
Its success would deny
the U.S. a major strategic
victory. Assad long has
helped Iran aid Hamas and
Hezbollah, destabilizing
Lebanon while threatening
Israel's security and U.S.
interests in the Middle East
But extremists among
the opposition, Assad's
weapons of mass destruc-
tion and worries about Is-
rael's border security have
policymakers wary about
deeper involvement.


TAXES
Almost every U.S. tax-
payer faces a significant
tax increase next year, un-
less Congress and the
White House agree on a
plan to extend a huge col-
lection of tax cuts expiring
at the end of the year.
And there's a huge de-
bate over how to overhaul
the tax code to make it sim-
pler, with lower rates bal-
anced by fewer deductions.
Obama wants to extend
Bush-era tax cuts again, but
only for individuals making


less than $200,000 and mar-
ried couples making less
than $250,000.
Romney wants to extend
all those tax cuts and enact
new ones, dropping all in-
come tax rates by 20 per-
cent. Romney says he
would pay for that by elim-
inating or reducing tax
credits, deductions and ex-
emptions. But he won't say
which ones would go.
Most lawmakers want a
simpler tax code, but mil-
lions count on the mortgage
interest deduction, child tax


credit and more, making
progress all but impossible.
WALL STREET
REGULATION
The debate over banking
rules is, at its core, a dispute
about how to prevent an-
other economic cataclysm.
The financial crisis that
peaked in 2008 touched off
a global economic slow-
down. Four years later, the
recovery remains painfully
slow.
After the crisis, Congress
passed a sprawling over-


haul of banking rules and
oversight. The law gives
regulators new tools to
shutter banks without re-
sorting to emergency
bailouts. It restricts risky
lending and establishes a
new agency to protect con-
sumers from misleading
marketing and other traps.
The new rules also boost
companies' costs, accord-
ing to Romney and many in
the business community.
He has pledged to repeal it.
Obama fought for and sup-
ports the law.







G18 Saturday October 13, 2012


Diminished GOP brand heightens Romney's challenge


Associated Press

SALISBURY, N.C. Even with
his strong debate performance,
Mitt Romney needs every possi-
ble advantage to overtake Presi-
dent Barack Obama in the next
four weeks. Not helping him
much is the Republican Party he
leads.
Thanks in part to congressional
Republicans' no-compromise
stands on key issues, and an un-
popular past president in George
W Bush, the GOP's image is at
one of its lowest points in modern
times. Romney is now distancing
himself a bit from some party
policies, most notably by empha-
sizing that he doesn't want to cut
taxes for high earners.
That's probably a smart move,
say Republican activists in re-
gions where it's getting harder to
sell the party's brand.
When talking with unaffiliated
voters, "it's more important to sell
Romney" than Republican poli-
cies, said Jordan McSwain, 19,
who makes about 800 phone calls
a week for GOP candidates from
the central North Carolina town
of Salisbury A lot of undecided
voters tell him "the Republicans
have stopped all work in Wash-
ington," McSwain said, although
he reminds them that Democrats
controlled Congress for Obama's
first two years.
Ten months ago, Americans
were fuming over a near crisis in


the economy triggered by Con-
gress' partisan showdown over
raising the debt ceiling and keep-
ing the government operating. A
Pew Research poll found that
considerably more adults thought
the Republican Party was "more
extreme in its positions" than the
Democratic Party They saw the
GOP as less ethical and less will-
ing to work with the other party
And more Americans blamed Re-
publican leaders for Congress'
paltry list of accomplishments.
Recent polls spell out the Re-
publican Party's challenge. A
CBS-New York Times poll last
month found that 49 percent of
adults had a favorable view of the
Democratic Party, and 36 percent
unfavorable. The GOP was up-
side down on the question, with
43 percent viewing it favorably,
and 55 percent unfavorably
This is partly because more
Americans see themselves as De-
mocrats. The latest AP-GfK poll
found that 31 percent of adults
considered themselves Democ-
rats, 22 percent Republicans and
29 percent independents. When
unaffiliated voters were pressed
to say which way they lean, the
results were 50 percent Democ-
rat and 37 percent Republican.
The Democratic Party's favor-
able ratings are nothing to brag
about. But party identification is
less important to Obama, who has
a four-year record for voters to
judge. Romney, being less well


known, must rely at least in part
on the "Republican brand."
"The Republican brand name
is in terrible shape, and people
are not naturally sympathetic to
the Republicans in Congress,"
Fox News commentator Brit
Hume said in June.
Fox News commentator
Charles Krauthammer, speaking
in February of the rambunctious
GOP primary, said, "This process
has certainly hurt all the Repub-
lican candidates, and diminished
the brand, unfortunately"
Romney's hopes may rest, at
least somewhat, on distancing
himself from the brand's less
popular parts, while sacrificing
as little fundraising and enthusi-
asm from the base as possible.
The less popular parts, in some
voters' eyes, include the uncom-
promising stand that many tea
party-leaning Republicans have
taken in Congress, especially on
tax and spending issues.
In recent days, Romney has
said he does not want to reduce
the overall tax burden for high-
income families, even though he
still calls for a 20 percent cut in
all federal income tax rates. He
says changes in tax deductions
would keep Americans' overall
tax burden about the same. But
he has not detailed how he can
accomplish both goals.
Polls show significant support
for Obama's call to increase taxes
on households making more than


$250,000 a year
Romney's new emphasis on a
no-net-decrease tax policy puts
him at odds with many congres-
sional Republicans, who say tax
cuts for high earners will spur job
growth.
The move delights GOP com-
mentators such as David Brooks.
During the presidential primar-
ies, "the GOP did its best to ap-
pear unattractive," Brooks wrote
last week in The New York
Times. In Wednesday's debate
with Obama, he wrote: "Romney
did something no other main-
stream Republican has had the
guts to do. Either out of convic-
tion or political desperation, he
broke with tea party orthodoxy
and began to redefine the Re-
publican identity."
With the Nov. 6 election near-
ing, it's unclear what effect Rom-
ney's efforts will have.
Brian Nick, a Republican con-
sultant based in Charlotte, said
neither party "has a good brand
right now," because Washington's
constant partisan quarreling has
given politics in general a bad
name. He said, however, that De-
mocrats have sometimes benefit-
ted in competitive states by
painting all Republicans as being
more interested in party purity
than in solving problems.
"Democrats do use the tea
party label to attack Republicans
and try to tie them to a strict or-
thodoxy," Nick said.


Further hurting the Republi-
can brand is the status of each
party's most recent former presi-
dent. Only one-fourth of Ameri-
cans had a favorable view of Bush
when his presidency ended, ac-
cording to Gallup. His standing
has improved somewhat since
then, but he lags far behind for-
mer President Bill Clinton. A re-
cent Bloomberg News poll found
that nearly 2 in 3 Americans fa-
vorably view the former Demo-
cratic president.
Ron Thomas, 26, is an inde-
pendent voter with a fairly dim
view of the national Republican
Party
"Who will help the working
man more? It's definitely
Barack," said Thomas, who works
for a rental car company in Char-
lotte.
Thomas, who endured a chilly
drizzle this week to discuss poli-
tics, has few problems with Re-
publicans at the state level. In
fact, he supports Republican Pat
McCrory in the governor's race,
saying the former Charlotte
mayor is good on urban issues.
But Thomas said Romney
turned him off with his claim that
the 47 percent of Americans who
don't owe federal income taxes
will not take responsibility for
their lives.
"I'm part of that 47 percent,"
Thomas said. "I have a college
degree, and I work two jobs," he
said, but it's still a struggle.


Romney cuts into Obama's early voter advantage


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Mitt
Romney's campaign is
working hard to chip away
at President Barack
Obama's advantage among
early voters, and there are
signs the effort is paying off
in North Carolina and
Florida, two competitive
states that the Republican
nominee can ill afford to
lose. Obama is doing better
in Iowa, another battle-
ground state important to
both candidates.
Obama dominated early
voting in key states four
years ago, giving him a big


advantage over Republican
John McCain before Elec-
tion Day even arrived. In
Colorado, Florida, Iowa
and North Carolina, Obama
built up such big leads
among early voters that he
won each state despite los-
ing the Election Day vote,
according to voting data
compiled by The Associ-
ated Press.
Romney's campaign won't
predict victory among early
voters this year. But a top
campaign official is
adamant that Romney will
not let Obama build insur-
mountable leads among
early voters in key states.


"They're not going to run
up the same margins as
they did four years ago,"
said Rich Beeson, political
director for the Romney
campaign. "It just isn't
going to happen."
Early voting for the pres-
idential election has
started in more than 30
states much of it by mail,
though some in person -
and some important num-
bers are starting to dribble
in. No votes will be counted
until Nov 6. However, North
Carolina, Florida and Iowa
report the party affiliation of
people who have cast bal-
lots. Other states will follow.


Among the 29,400 voters
who have cast absentee
ballots in North Carolina,
54 percent are registered
Republicans and 28 per-
cent are Democrats, ac-
cording to the United
States Elections Project at
George Mason University
It's a small sample -
more than 2.6 million peo-
ple voted before Election
Day in North Carolina in
2008. And these are all mail
ballots, which have histori-
cally favored Republicans;
in-person voting starts Oct.
18 in North Carolina. Nev-
ertheless, Republicans are
encouraged because Mc-


Cain lost the state's early
vote by 11 percentage
points.
Florida's sample is even
smaller only 14,500 votes
so far but it too favors
Republicans over Democ-
rats, 53 percent to 32 per-
cent. In 2008, nearly 4.6
million voters in Florida cast
ballots before Election Day
Democrats have a big
lead in Iowa as they did
in the past two presidential
elections. About 60 percent
of the 127,100 voters who
have cast absentee ballots
so far were registered De-
mocrats. Twenty-two per-
cent were Republicans and


18 percent were unaffili-
ated, according to the United
States Elections Project.
In Ohio, a perennial bat-
tleground state, Democrats
have an edge over Republi-
cans among people who
have requested absentee
ballots, though relatively
few completed ballots have
been submitted. Among the
691,000 people who have
requested absentee ballots
in 49 of the state's 88 coun-
ties, 30 percent are Democ-
rats and 24 percent are
Republicans. Forty-six per-
cent are unaffiliated voters,
according to data collected
by the AP


ELECTION 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Saturday, October 13, 2012 G19


Campaigns targeting new citizens


Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO From
Florida to Virginia, Massachusetts
to California, candidates and polit-
ical parties seeking to squeeze
every vote from a divided elec-
torate are targeting America's
newest citizens. It's a relatively
small bloc but one that can be sub-
stantial enough to make a differ-
ence in razor-close presidential
swing states and competitive con-
gressional races.
In Florida, which President
Barack Obama won by less than 5
percentage points four years ago, a
new analysis of U.S. Census data
shows people who naturalized as
Americans since 2000 make up 6
percent of the population of voting-
age citizens. For months, the
Obama campaign has been sending
volunteers to citizenship cere-
monies to register people and can-
vassing Miami-area neighborhoods
where immigrant families live.
In California, where new citizens
comprise nearly 9 percent of poten-
tial voters, Republicans hope
House candidates Ricky Gill and
Abel Maldonado can reach that
group by highlightingtheir families'
journeys from India and Mexico,
respectively, in search of the Amer-
ican Dream.
Georgina Castaneda, a home-
care worker who grew up in Ver-
acruz, Mexico, and now lives in Los
Angeles, is the type of person the
campaigns are targeting. After
years of waiting for her citizenship
application to go through the bu-
reaucracy, she passed the U.S.
civics test and swore her allegiance
to the flag along with thousands of
others at a ceremony in March at
Los Angeles' Staples Center.
Castaneda said Democratic Party
workers walked down the aisles
handing out brochures to the
crowd. She filled one out while still
seated.
"My idea was that one more vote
could do something, so I registered
at the ceremony," she said.
Political parties have tried to en-
gage new arrivals since at least the
1790s, when New York City's fabled
Tammany Hall political machine
organized immigrants, especially
the Irish. In this final stretch of con-
temporary campaigns, the influ-
ence of new voters is magnified in
several battleground states, where


Associated Press
Georgina Castaneda, a new citizen who registered to vote Democratic at a swearing-in ceremony in March,
when she took the U.S. citizenship oath, poses for a photo Oct. 2 at her home in Los Angeles. From Florida
to Massachusetts and Iowa to California, candidates and political parties seeking to squeeze every vote they
can from a divided electorate are targeting America's newest citizens, a bloc relatively small in number but
substantial enough to make a difference in presidential swing states.


small shifts can produce large im-
pacts on the electoral vote count.
"The trick with politics is to get to
people early, so whatyou wantto do is
make sure that your party gets in on
the ground floor of any new citizen's
thinking," said Stephen Farnsworth,
a professor of political science at
the University of Mary Washington
in Fredericksburg, Va. "So instead
of meeting people at the docks like
the political machines of a century
ago, political parties and cam-
paigns are meeting potential voters
right after they take the oath."
Overall, first-generation citizens
historically have leaned Demo-
cratic and registered at lower rates
than U.S.-born voters. But during
the past decade that gap in regis-
tration has narrowed, partly be-
cause the newest Americans have
been motivated by the immigration
debate, said Manuel Pastor, direc-
tor of the Center for the Study of Im-
migrant Integration at the
University of Southern California.


The center released the data last
week, after performing a first-of-its
kind analysis made possible be-
cause the Census Bureau in 2008
started asking people more de-
tailed questions about when they
became citizens.
Nationwide, there are an esti-
mated 7.8 million people of voting
age who naturalized since 2000, or
3.6 percent of all potential voters,
according to the study Two swing
states Florida, at 6 percent, and
Nevada, at 5.1 percent have
higher concentrations than the na-
tional average. Virginia is at 3.5 per-
cent, and Colorado at 2.1 percent.
States like California, Massachu-
setts and Illinois that are consid-
ered likely to go for Obama also
have significant populations of new
citizens who could make the differ-
ence in congressional races.
In Massachusetts, where the
newest Americans make up 5 per-
cent of all potential voters, GOP
Sen. Scott Brown often emphasizes


his support for legal immigrants
who have "played by the rules" as
he competes with Democratic chal-
lenger Elizabeth Warren for the
swath of undecided voters.
In downtown Oakland, Calif, the
Alameda County Republican Party
has been erecting foldingtables be-
decked with American flags and
voter registration forms in Spanish,
Chinese, Tagalog and English out-
side naturalization ceremonies at
the Paramount Theater
"We want to be in places where
we are reaching the minorities or
ethnic blocs," said Sue Caro, the
local GOP chairwoman.
The success rate for Republicans
in this traditionally Democratic
stronghold is unclear- Caro noted
sometimes new citizens pose with
the party's cardboard cutouts of
Mitt Romney and Ronald Reagan,
then walk down the sidewalk to the
Democratic Party's table and take
family photos with likenesses of
Michelle and Barack Obama.


In Florida, the Obama campaign
for months has sent volunteers to
the conference halls where the fed-
eral government holds its citizen-
ship ceremonies, and has been
seeking out new citizens willing to
host house parties.
"Our campaign is about inclu-
siveness and to that end we encour-
age all citizens, including our newest
citizens, to get involved in the dem-
ocratic process," Obama campaign
spokesman Adam Fetcher said.
To be sure, campaigns and par-
ties say courting undecided new cit-
izens is just one element of the
numbers game, which ultimately
will turn on how many people show
up to vote.
Maldonado, a former lieutenant
governor whose father came to the
U.S. from Mexico, is locked in a
fierce campaign against longtime
Democratic Rep. Lois Capps in a
new Santa Barbara-San Luis
Obispo district that has a voter reg-
istration edge for Democrats of just
3 percentage points.
Maldonado, a wealthy farmer,
said he has been talking to new cit-
izens at house meetings in the agri-
cultural region of his district.
"I think they're very proud to see
that someone can come here to this
country of ours poor, and work
hard, save, plan, pay taxes and see
their son eventually become lieu-
tenant governor," he said.
Eight-term incumbent Capps
said her voting record reflected her
strong alliance with Hispanics and
said as a former school nurse she
understands immigrant families'
challenges.
In Virginia, immigrants from
India make up a substantial portion
of the newest citizens.
South Carolina Gov Nikki Haley,
who is Indian-American, has cam-
paigned for Romney multiple times
in northern Virginia, where a siz-
able Indian population has settled.
Obama made a campaign stop at a
high school in Leesburg in August,
and on Friday went to Sterling, the
same town Haley addressed.
"That part of Virginia that is
home to a lot of striving recent ar-
rivals," said Farnsworth. 'And for
the parties it represents time and
money very well spent to approach
new voters, because as close as the
polls tell us this race will be, that
last 3 percent may be the percent
that makes the difference."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ELECTION 2012






G20 Saturday October 13, 2012


U.S. House ofRepresentatives, District 11
TERM: 2 YEARS COVS: CRTRUS AND ALL OR PARTS OF HERNANDO,LAKE, SUMMER AND MARION COUNTIES PAY: $174,000


SCITR U COUNTY
CHIRpNCLE

Political Forum
Thursday, October 18th
College of Central Florida
Forum Starts at 7pm
Doors Open at 6pm
Meet the local candidates and hear their positions.
Sheriff
U.S. House of Representatives District 11
Florida House of Representatives District 34
Superintendent of Schools
Clerk of Courts

For more information call
Mike Wright 352-563-3228


H. DAVID
WERDER
Age: 57.
Town: Spring Hill.
Party: Democrat.
Occupation: Retired
truck driver.
Education: Orange
County Community College
undergraduate.
Civic involvement:
ABATE.



For more background and H. David
Werder's views on the issues, visit
www.chronicleonline.com/votersguide.


RICH
NUGENT
Age: 61.
Town: Brooksville.
Party: Republican.
Occupation: Incumbent
member of Congress.
Education: Master of arts
from Troy State University;
bachelor of arts from St.
Leo College.
Civic involvement:
Charter member Spring
Hill Rotary Club.

For more background and Rich Nugent's
views on the issues, visit www.chronicle
online.com/votersguide.


ELECTION 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE