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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 10-07-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02910

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Bend, don't break: UF defense shuts down LSU


Partly cloudy, with a
40 percent chance of
afternoon storms.
PAGE A4


OCTOBER 7, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


CITRU-S CO U N T Y





ONICchronic
^& www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 118 ISSUE 61


middle of the end


Outsourcing
Business brings jobs
and hope to rural village
in India./Page A16
LOCAL NEWS:


Remember
Family, friends recount
time spend with Derrick
Vaccianna./Page A3
LOCAL NEWS:
Meningitis
Three Marion County
clinics used medicine
linked to a dangerous
outbreak./Page A3
BUSINESS:
New column
Chronicle
expert
Danielle
Kerese
writes
about QR
Codes.
/Page Dl
HOMEFRONT:


Color splash
Shades of orange can
liven up a room when
used sparingly.
/HomeFront
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:
Is it .
gold? -
Antiques
expert
John Siko-
rski ex-
plains how
to check .
for maker's marks on
jewelry./Page E6


BUSINESS:


Pensions
Many states ponder how
to balance budgets
while supporting
retirees./Page DI1

Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds................ D4
Crossword ..............A18
Editorial .......... ...C2
Entertainment .......... B6
Horoscope................ B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ................. A18
O bituaries ................A8
Together................ A20


6 EIL|1|1||185820I0 oIL


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Due to cedar Key's geographic location between two freshwater rivers many consider oysters from Cedar Key to be some
of the best tasting found anywhere in Florida. But this year the oyster crop has taken a massive hit and oystermen are
struggling to find live oysters.


From salinity to tropical weather,


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
It appears a myriad of reasons are
being put forward to explain the
near-collapse of the oyster industry
in the state.
Last week during a visit to Franklin
County, Gov Rick Scott suggested the
federal government release more
fresh water from a Georgia lake to
offer proper balance for oysters in
their Panhandle delta reefs.
State agriculture officials say the
severe drought and heat created an
imbalance with the special mix of salt
and fresh water needed for robust
oyster growth.
The head of a fishermen's group in
Wakulla County blames the industry's
woes on storms and over-harvest.
Mark Berrigan, aquaculture devel-
opment chief of the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture, said while
oysters are resilient, hot water stress
can wreak havoc with oyster beds.
"I think the drought we had in past
few years contributed to the high
salinity in the estuaries," Berrigan
said.
He said the salinity, coupled with
high water temperatures this sum-
mer, stressed the oyster beds and per-
haps helped strengthen an oyster
parasite called Perkinsus Marinus or
dermo.
"This parasite is already in oysters
and during the extreme summer
heat, they can kill some of the oys-
ters," Berrigan said.
He said the past years' drought has
been the worst in decades, causing
levels of many rivers that empty into


experts have plenty


of opinions


Billie Jo Booth goes through each individual oyster searching for a live specimen.
Experts point to a variety of reasons for the sudden drop in oyster harvests.


Gov. Rick Scott wants
the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers to
release more fresh
water from Lake
Lanier in Georgia, a
federal reservoir.
the Gulf in the Big Bend area to
diminish.
Berrigan said officials recently
conducted checks on baby oyster or
spats and found enough of them
thriving to engineer a comeback sea-


son, "but we wouldn't know for sure
until we check again in the spring."
He said the Big Bend area has been
through similar droughts and oyster
bed deaths, but this year's problems
seem to be more widespread. Berri-
gan said one of the lingering issues
for the season also would have to be
about dealing with another issue.
"I think a lot of the oyster beds from
last year have already been har-
vested, which would mean there
wouldn't be any oysters left in those
areas," he said.
Gov Scott wants the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers to release more fresh
water from Lake Lanier in Georgia, a
See Page A7


So far,
so good.
William Bunch
owner, Oysters Restaurant.
could change in the future. .
William Bunch, owner of
Oysters Restaurant in Crys-
tal River, said his supplies
of the shellfish are
uninterrupted. -
Bunch, however, has no- -
ticed subtle changes.
The oysters used to come
opened, but no longer are
and the price for a box
jumped from $18 to the low
$20s. U..
"But, so far so good. We .
continue to offer it and we .
are getting our supplies," ..
Bunch said.
"We have to have it since
our restaurant has the
same name, but I am will-
ing to clean them, shuck Michael Roach utilizes long, wooden tongs to harvest what
them, whatever, as long as he can from the bottom of Rattlesnake Point off Cedar Key.
See Page A7 The tongs are one of the standard tools used by oystermen.


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
The dearth of oysters just
a little more than a month
into the season has yet to
trickle down to consumers,
but if the scarcity persists
diners will feel the pinch
soon.
Local coastal seafood
businesses already have
noticed slight increases in
oyster prices.
Marie Price of Charlie's
Fish House in Crystal
River said they have no-
ticed a rise in the past
month.
"It has gone from $12.99
a pint to $14.99 a pint,"
Price said. "So we are
keeping an eye on it, but
unless they go back to the
way things were, I think
(oysters) will only get more
expensive."
She said though Char-
lie's restaurant has not
made any changes to its
menu prices yet, things


Dying oyster

beds crippling

once-thriving

industry
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
-CEDAR KEY
t is written large on
the faces of the hard-
scrabble oystermen
and -women.
Their skins are deeply
browned and creased
from years, days and
hours of exposure to the
unrelenting and lingering
Florida sun.
The people are part of
the multi-generational tra-
dition of extracting gnarly,
irregular-shaped mollusks
- oysters from the
sounds and bays that dot
the state's Big Bend area.
From Waccasassa Bay
on through the Suwannee
Sound past the bend into
Apalachicola Bay, their in-
dustry and way of life is
besieged by the vagaries
climate and what some de-
scribe as government in-
flexibility regarding rules.
So far, the 2012 oyster
season, which began Sept.
1, is widely regarded as
poor and perhaps the
most extensive failure of
the oyster reefs in
generations.
Ten percent of the na-
tion's oyster supplies and
90 percent of the state's
supplies come from this
region.
In an industry where a
typical harvester can haul
in an average of 15
bushels of oysters a day,
this year the oystermen
struggle to make two to
four bushels.
"Oysters are dead. The
oysters are dead," Danny
Beckham shouted over the
whir of his skiff's motor as
he plowed through white
foam in his wake heading
recently to an estuary on
the southern reaches of
the Suwannee Sound.
"The question is, what are
we going to do about it?"
He said the dying oyster
beds, and what he consid-
ers restrictions placed on
oystermen like him, are
conspiring to end a mar-
itime heritage.
"My family has done this
for four generations. I
have done it for 55 years.
My grandson comes out
here after school to do it,
too," Beckham said.
"I feel like we are in the
middle of the end for what
we do."
Little to show
for lots of work
Upon arrival at an estu-
ary near the Gulf of Mex-
ico, three other skiffs were
anchored over the oyster
reefs in estimated 6-foot-
deep water Men wielded
10-foot-long, scissor-like
rakes called tongs to
dredge the bivalves from
the bottom. The oysters
are then heaved over the
tiny skiff's gunwale and
dumped on the bow for
culling.
As his boat approached
the others, Beckham
heard a familiar sound:
Oysters crack and rattle as
See Page A7

MORE
See more photos from
Cedar Key/Page A6
View a slideshow with
this story online.


For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
69


Prices for oysters

starting to climb


I-- S o IU I N DL -


I INS111(IDEI


0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BP fine might be


windfall for Levy


Estimate ranges

from $2.;7 to

$10.9 million

Lou ELLIOTT JONES
Chiefland Citizen
When the Deepwater
Horizon oil rig exploded
and crude oil gushed into
the Gulf of Mexico, folks in
Levy County warily watched
to see if oil would reach the
county's coastlines and clam
beds.
While the oil came no
closer than 250 miles, it af-
fected Levy's tourism and
aquaculture businesses as
visitors vacationed else-
where and stopped buying
Florida seafood, fearing
contamination.
Now the county could re-
ceive a share of the fines to
be paid by BP operator of
the oil rig under the fed-
eral Clean Water Act.
A Florida Association of
Counties (FAC) consultant
told the Levy County Com-
mission in its Tuesday meet-
ing BP is expected to be
fined between $5 billion to
$20 billion, with Levy's
share being between $2.7
and $10.9 million. FAC con-
sultant Doug Darling said
the county should join the
Gulf Consortium a group
of counties along the Gulf
that will facilitate receiving
the money from a trust fund
established by Congress and
send to the five states af-
fected by the spill instead
of going to the federal
government.
"There are those who
would like this to fail," he
said.
The consortium is a way
to have the ability to spend
the money "without being
dictated to."
"The consortium will be
in the driver's seat," Darling
said.
The county agreed and
will pay the $640 share of
the money to join the con-
sortium. Commissioner
Ryan Bell of Chiefland, R-
District 4, was appointed as
its representative, because
his district includes Cedar
Key, the county's major
tourism and aquaculture
spot. The commission also
named Commissioner Mar-
sha Drew of Yankeetown, D-
District 3, and county
coordinator Fred Moody as
alternates. The consortium
will meet for the first time
Oct 22 in Tallahassee.
Darling ran through a
laundry list of ways the RE-
STORE Act, passed by Con-
gress earlier this year, can
be spent. The list includes
ecological, wildlife and nat-
ural resource restoration,
promoting seafood and
tourism, economic develop-
ment, port infrastructure,
workforce development and
job creation.
"There's not much on that
list that would not benefit
your county," Darling said.
Another fund shared by
six federal agencies and five
states would provide money
for more focused projects.
"You could spend it on
oyster renourishment or
seagrass renourishment,"
he said, adding the county
should take its comprehen-
sive plan off the shelf and
use it in planning how to
spend the money
He noted other money is
coming from the spill that
the county could share since
it is specifically for the 23
Florida counties on the
Gulf.
"This 30 percent could be
$300 million to $1 billion
and Florida gets 19 to 20
percent of this," Darling
said.
Commission Chairman
Danny Stevens of Williston,
D-District 5, asked whether
the consortium had an expi-
ration date. Darling said it
will continue "until all the
money is exhausted." He re-
minded the commission the
settlement from the Exxon
Valdez oil spill in Alaska in
1989 is still coming in.
Darling said a federal trial
is due to start in mid-


January in Louisiana to as-
sess fault in the Deepwater
Horizon incident, but BP is
expected to settle out of
court
Lou Elliott Jones is editor
of the Chronicle's sister
newspaper the Chiefland
Citizen and can be emailed
at editor@chieflandcitizen.


Levy seeks BP
marketing money
Lou ELLIOTT
JONES
Chiefland Citizen
The Levy County tourism
director has learned market-
ing money from BP is avail-
able to promote tourism and
Florida fresh seafood, and
she is going after it despite a
short deadline.
It is part of a $57 million
fund created in April as part
of a court settlement by BP
to defray the effects of the
massive oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico from the Deepwater
Horizon oil rig in 2010.
Carol McQueen, director of
the Tourist Development
Council and Levy Visitor Bu-
reau, told the Levy County
Commission on Tuesday the
money is being made avail-
able by BP as a result of the
oil spill. She said the maxi-
mum amount available is
$500,000, but she will apply
for $200,000. She said the
money can be used for pro-
motion of aquaculture, fish-
ing, festivals and production
of videos, among other items.
"I just learned about this
on Thursday," she said in ex-
plaining why she had a non-
agenda item to bring before
the commission.
The deadline to apply was
Friday, Oct. 5, she said.


Sertoma Oktoberfest at Crystal River Mall


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The Central Citrus Sertoma Oktoberfest is off and running today from noon to 5 p.m. adjacent to the Crystal River Mall on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Jan and David Dees, left, and Jim and Linda Minton came for the food, but the festival also offers
rides for children and the DeLeon family plays their oompa music along with a large variety of other tunes for dancing.


Campaign TRAIL


The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forum is
7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, at
the College of Central Florida
in Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
Supervisor of Elections
Susan Gill is sponsoring a
candidates' forum targeted
for high school students at
7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24,
at Citrus High School.
Jimmie T. Smith, Re-
publican incumbent for state
House District 34, and Winn


Webb, Republican for sheriff,
will be the guest speakers at the
Women's Political Network of
Citrus County meeting at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16, at the
Citrus County Resource Center,
2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Information: Jeanne
McIntosh, 352-484-9975 or
352-746-5660 evenings.


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Winn Webb, Republican
for sheriff, will have a fund-
raiser from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 20, at Frank Bal-
lots on the corner of U.S. 41
and C.R. 48 in Floral City.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat for superintendent of
schools, will have a barbecue
fund-raiser at 7 p.m. Friday,


Oct. 19, at the Davis residence,
3500 E. Oak Trace Path, Inver-
ness. Information: 352-563-
9419 or 352-637-5191.
The Campaign Trail is a list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season. Send
events or campaign fundraisers
to Mike Wright at mwright@
chronicleonline.com.


Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD


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One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave, Inverness


NEW THIS YEAR!
Awaw oil be, nooll
HAUNTED HOUSE


A2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Health


agencies


issues


advisory

Clinics'meds

tainted with

meningitis
Chronicle
State and federal agen-
cies have advised all
Florida health care facili-
ties and practitioners to
stop using products from
the company linked to
pain medicine tainted
with meningitis.
The Centers for Disease
Control (CDC), Food and
Drug Administration
(FDA), the Department of
Health (DOH) and the De-
partment of Business and
Professional Regulation
(DBPR) issued the state-
ment Saturday telling the
facilities to pull them
from their shelves until
they have been deter-
mined safe by the CDC
and FDA.
The contaminated lots
of Methylprednisolone
Acetate have been found
and removed from eight
Florida facilities, includ-
ing three in Ocala. Two
cases of patients with
meningitis have been
found in Marion County.
The advisory urged "pa-
tients known or suspected
to have received back in-
jections with NECC
Methylprednisolone Ac-
etate from the suspected
lots should be evaluated
immediately by their
health care professional."
According to the advi-
sory, the medications are
not used for epidural
analgesia in labor and de-
livery The meningitis is
not contagious and cannot
be spread from person-to-
person.
Patients who have re-
ceived back steroid injec-
tions since July 1, 2012,
and have experienced
fever, new or worsening
headache, neck pain, nau-
sea or symptoms consis-
tent with stroke should
contact their health care
professional immediately
The Ocala facilities con-
taining the contaminated
medication are Florida
Pain Clinic, Marion Pain
Management Center and
Surgery Center of Ocala.
The other five state facili-
ties with contaminated
medicine are Interven-
tional Rehab Center, and
Pain Consultants of West
Florida in Pensacola;
North County Surgicenter
in Palm Beach; Orlando
Center for Outpatient Sur-
gery; and Surgical Park
Center in Miami.


Around the
COUNTY
Chronicle's office
hours change
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's Inverness office hours
have changed to 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Walk-in customers can
stop by between those hours
Monday through Friday. For
information after 1 p.m., call
352-563-6363.

Correction
For those playing the
Chronicle's bingo game, the
numbers given Friday and
Saturday were the same.
Find a replacement number
for Saturday on Page A4
today, and look for today's
winning number elsewhere in
the Chronicle.
The Chronicle regrets the


error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.
-From staff reports


King of Rock 'n Roll shakes into town


Elvis impersonator

toperform Oct. 19

at Central Ridge

BROOKE PERRY
Correspondent
The King is making his way back
to Citrus County on Friday, Oct. 19,
to the Central Ridge Community
Center at Beverly Hills.


Tampa-based award-winning
Elvis impersonator Billy Lindsey
will be the entertainment for an up-
coming event, which will include
music, dancing, fun and food.
Dina Emmanuel, supervisor for
community centers for Citrus
County, had the idea to use the show
as a fundraiser for the now-self-
funded community center building.
"The funds will help maintain
and keep the facility going,"
Emanuel said.
The community center offers its
users a fitness center, shuffleboard,


pool, tennis court and various dance
classes, including Zumba. More
than 400 individuals are members.
"The fundraisers have always
brought in many people," Emanuel
said. "They can sit, relax, dance; it's
a lot of fun, and Billy Lindsey is a
great entertainer"
Lindsey isn't a new entertainer to
Citrus County residents.
"I've been doing Elvis for 14
years," Lindsey said. "He was my
childhood hero."
Lindsey was named winner of
The Elvis Extravaganza at the 2012


Florida State Fair, in addition to
being the overall champion and fan
favorite. He was also crowned King
of South Tampa by The Tampa Trib-
une last summer
Lindsey said his favorite thing
about performing "is watching
everybody have a good time, I really
enjoy singing."
Doors will open at 5 p.m. and the
event will begin at 6 p.m. Tickets
are $5 for members and $7 for non-
members. Tickets can be pre-
purchased by calling the commu-
nity center at 352-746-4882.


'A smile on his face'


Family,friends

reminisce about

Vaccianna 's life
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer
He stood outside of the church
doors offering everyone a big
smile and firm handshake. He
held his smile and talked about
the many fond memories of his
son. The pain could be heard,
though, through his voice as he
prepared himself for his son's
memorial service.
A memorial service for Derrick
Vaccianna, 28, of Hernando, was
Saturday at The New Church
Without Walls in Hernando.
According to earlier reports,
Vaccianna was involved in a con-
frontation and tussle with Citrus
County Sheriff's Deputy Gregory
Entrekin and a then-unnamed
woman at her residence on Eden
Drive. Following the confronta-
tion, the off-duty deputy fired a
shot, striking Vaccianna in the
chest. Vaccianna was transported
to Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem where he later died.
Friends and family joined the
Vaccianna family Saturday to cel-
ebrate his life.
"I'm convinced that everyone
is here today not to celebrate that
Derrick died but that he lived,"
Frederick Simmons said.
Many tears were shed, but even
more smiles were shown. Those
who spoke in front of the crowd
spoke of Vaccianna's "conta-
gious" smile.
"You couldn't run into Derrick
and not be moved by the spirit
that he had in him," Simmons
said.
Simmons described Vac-
cianna's love for sports and com-
petition on the field. He
illustrated how he and Vaccianna
played a game called "21" on the
basketball court. Simmons told
the crowd he "beat the pants off
Derrick."
As they chuckled, Simmons
said it made him feel good about
himself.
"Even after losing really bad, a
couple of times, he still had a
smile on his face," Simmons said.
The next Sunday, Vaccianna
showed up at church with a soc-
cer ball. Vaccianna then "beat the
pants off" Simmons. The congre-
gation laughed, knowing of Vac-
cianna's soccer capabilities.
"I was like 'Man I suck'," Sim-
mons said. "Derrick was like 'No,
you don't suck. I just changed the
game on you.' That's what we can
all learn from Derrick is to
change the game."
Simmons said this was the type
of "swag" that Vaccianna had.
New Church Without Walls
pastor Doug Alexander inter-
preted "swag" as Vaccianna
being "cool." Alexander said he
got it from his parents, Derrick
and Dorothea Vaccianna.
"Derrick touched many lives,"
Alexander said. "He was a very
respectful young man. He always
said 'Yes, ma'am' and 'Yes, sir'
He was a great young man with a
great upbringing. He got his swag
from his parents."
Simmons explained the memo-
ries everyone has is because Vac-
cianna lived. He linked
Vaccianna's life, smile and the
love for soccer as one.
His passion for soccer was vis-
ible at his memorial. Signatures
and messages were written all
over a soccer ball passed around
the church for family and friends
to sign.
Vaccianna's memorial service
included a personal touch from
his brother, Kevin Vaccianna. He
wrote a poem describing how
God needed one more player for
his soccer team. Kevin Vaccianna


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
ABOVE: Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr. opens the memorial service for the family and friends of Derrick N.
Vaccianna, who gathered Saturday at New Church Without Walls. The service was to remember the life and
times of the young man, who died from injuries from a shooting involving an off-duty Citrus County Sheriffs
deputy that is under investigation. BELOW: Derrick Vaccianna greets people as they arrive Saturday to the
memorial for his son at New Church Without Walls.

SThe New Chaurch oito


said God knew he needed a soc-
cer player who was quick on the
field. That's when he looked


down and saw Vaccianna.
His poem ended with a mes-
sage to his brother


"Have fun Derrick as you are
safe in God's care," Kevin Vac-
cianna wrote.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3 arrested in fraud, burglary case


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff Writer

Two men and a woman are facing
charges of conveyance burglary in
which they allegedly broke into un-
locked vehicles looking for valuables.
One man is facing additional
charges of residential burglary, crimi-
nal use of personal identification in-
formation, forgery with intent to
defraud and publish a forged instru-
ment with intent to defraud.
Thomas Earl Smail, 29, S. Shady
Terrace, Inverness; John Brian Mur-
phy, 32, E. Finland Lane, Dunnellon;
and Felicia Marie Black, 23, E. Fin-
land Lane, Dunnellon; were arrested
Friday on charges of conveyance bur-
glary, conspired with another person
and grand theft. Murphy's bond is


County launches
new website
County government's web-
site has new, user-friendly fea-
tures on the main page that
include a calendar on the front
page displaying important dates
including county commission
meetings and area events, a
search engine and online serv-
ices. At the top of the page, the
most recent events and pro-
grams scroll continuously
through the carousel to grab
attention.
The Public Information Office
also has established a county
Facebook page with pictures
and updates about what's hap-
pening in Citrus County. You
can "Like" the county's page by
going to www.facebook.com
/CitrusCountyBOCC. The
county also tweets out updates
on Twitter at #CitrusConnects.
The new website will be
modified and updated as more
people visit during the next cou-
ple of weeks. Patience is re-


$24,000 and Black was released on her
own recognizance. Smail's bond is
$46,000 because of his additional
charges.
According to the arrest affidavits,
the three felons would stay in local ho-
tels, smoke methamphetamine and
leave to commit conveyance burgla-
ries in residential areas of Citrus Hills
and Homosassa.
They would enter unlocked vehicles
looking for valuables while one of
them would be a lookout.
Lowe's video surveillance shows, in
one case, Black and Smail used a
stolen Lowe's credit card to purchase
gas cards in excess of $100.
In another case, a stolen checkbook
was found in the vehicle driven by
Murphy
Smail admitted to writing a check


for $250 and forging the victim's
signature.
Smail also admitted to using a
stolen identification and passing the
check at the Suncoast Schools Bank in
Inverness. He placed his thumbprint
on the stolen check. The thumbprint
was later matched to Smail.
After a positive K9 alert was con-
ducted on Murphy's and Black's vehi-
cles, a search revealed numerous
stolen items belonging to victims of
seven conveyance burglaries and one
residential burglary
Smail and Murphy were placed
under arrest at the Citrus County De-
tention facility and were incarcerated
for other charges related to the
affidavit.
Black was released on her own
recognizance.


Worth NOTING


quested as issues are worked
through.

Flaunt photos
of fall foliage
Do you miss watching the
leaves change color? You are
not alone; many others living in
Citrus County enjoy the warm
weather but long for the days
when the changing of the sea-
sons meant an explosion of
color.
The Citrus County Chronicle
is hosting an online contest
through the end of October. We
want your fall color photos. The
photos can be from any where
in the country or world where
leaves change. Go to
www.chronicleonline/fallfoliage
and upload your photos each
week. We will select the best
photos on Thursdays from the
top vote getters and publish
them in Sunday's newspaper
each week. You will not need to
resubmit the same photo each
week; we will consider all pho-


tos submitted for the month at
the end of each week. Photos
should not have been taken be-
fore September 2011. Make
sure you have permission to
use the photos if you are not
the original photographer.
20/20 officials
to look to future
The Citrus 20/20 Board of Di-
rectors will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 15, in Room 117,


Lecanto Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.
All directors are especially
urged to attend to review the fu-
ture direction of Citrus 20/20.
Interested persons or organiza-
tions are invited to attend.
For more information about
Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit www.
citrus2020.org or call 352-201-
0149.
-From staff reports


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglary
A commercial burglary was
reported at 12:17 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 2, in the 3200 block of E.
Thomas St., Inverness.
Thefts
M A grand theft was reported
at 9:43 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in
the 20 block of N. Columbus
St., Beverly Hills.
M A petit theft was reported at
10:59 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in
the 300 block of E. Highland
Blvd., Inverness.
A grand theft was reported
at 11:22 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2,
in the 1600 block of E. St.
Charles Place, Inverness.
An auto theft was reported
at 1:58 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in
the 5700 block of S. Live Oak
Drive, Floral City.
A petit theft was reported at
4:02 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in
the 1200 block of W. Main St.,
Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 5:49 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in
the 2800 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
A grand theft was reported
at 6:08 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in
the 9800 block of N. Sandree
Drive, Dunnellon.
Vandalism
M Avandalism was reported
at 7:44 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in


regal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Fictitious Name Notices...................D6

Bid Notices .......................................D6

Meeting Notices ........................D6

Miscellaneous Notices....................D6

..... Self Storage Notices..........................D6


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County. Click
on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record reports
are also archived
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.

the 500 block of W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness.




-SAT U RDAY'S -




NUMBER












CALL 564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO.
E Damwn i
1. Traditional Bingo $100
2. Double Bingo $200
3. Full Card Bingo $300


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts

ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds around 10 knots. Seas 1
foot or less. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Chance of showers
and thunderstorms today.


91 75 trace NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 69
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of a PM
Thunderstorms
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 68
"1 ^ Partly cloudy; 30% chance of a PM thunder-
storms
w i TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 66
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/72
Record 93/52
Normal 87/64
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.50 in.
Total for the month 2.80 in.
Total for the year 57.31 in.
Normal for the year 45.59 in.
*As of 7 p mrn at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 70%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, elm, chenopods
Today's count: 6.4/12
Monday's count: 7.4
Tuesday's count: 7.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/7 SUNDAY 11:50 5:38 6:02
10/8 MONDAY 12:15 6:27 12:39 6:51
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
OCT. 29


SUNSET TONIGHT 7:09 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ....... 7:28 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY................................ NONE
MOONSET TODAY............................ 1:44 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:55 a/5:55 a /7:07 p
Crystal River* 8:16 a/3:17 a 10:29 p/4:29 p
Withlacoochee* 6:03 a/1:05 a 8:16 p/2:17 p
Homosassa*** 9:05 a/4:54 a 11:18 p/6:06 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:08 a/6:59 a 11:02 a/8:18 p
9:23 a/4:21 a 11:45 p/5:40 p
7:10 a/2:09 a 9:32 p/3:28 p
10:12 a/5:58a -- /7:17 p


Gulf water
temperature


84
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.62 32.62 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 39.03 39.03 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 40.25 40.25 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.64 41.64 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


l-ncthoragf Jrneau OPOU
2 a M -
s 80S


50s ,a__ _.






W-
H- n ,


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 69 48 sh 54 39
Albuquerque 79 54 pc 70 45
Asheville 73 50 sh 58 40
Atlanta 82 62 pc 67 49
Atlantic City 79 61 sh 56 46
Austin 71 63 c 65 50
Baltimore 79 58 sh 52 40
Billings 49 24 pc 64 38
Birmingham 70 58 .01 c 63 45
Boise 62 35 s 57 30
Boston 78 59 .06 sh 56 42
Buffalo 55 46 .66 sh 50 40
Burlington, VT 65 50 .26 sh 54 35
Charleston, SC 85 66 pc 86 60
Charleston, WV 64 46 .05 sh 49 33
Charlotte 83 56 sh 61 46
Chicago 50 34 s 52 38
Cincinnati 58 41 .16 c 53 35
Cleveland 54 41 .40 sh 50 37
Columbia, SC 87 60 ts 77 54
Columbus, OH 57 42 .37 sh 53 36
Concord, N.H. 78 53 sh 59 35
Dallas 57 51 c 58 47
Denver 36 31 s 54 33
Des Moines 46 30 s 57 37
Detroit 51 39 c 52 38
El Paso 86 57 s 74 50
Evansville, IN 56 38 pc 56 35
Harrisburg 66 56 sh 50 37
Hartford 77 57 sh 52 40
Houston 86 63 c 69 55
Indianapolis 53 35 pc 52 32
Jackson 68 56 c 67 47
Las Vegas 88 69 pc 88 64
Little Rock 51 44 .31 pc 62 41
Los Angeles 76 63 pc 70 62
Louisville 59 40 .11 pc 57 40
Memphis 59 46 .15 pc 61 44
Milwaukee 47 38 s 52 37
Minneapolis 45 36 s 55 38
Mobile 88 61 pc 77 54
Montgomery 87 64 pc 72 50
Nashville 62 45 .71 pc 58 40
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 86 65 pc 75 58
New York City 77 57 sh 57 45
Norfolk 84 61 sh 60 48
Oklahoma City 50 44 c 56 35
Omaha 48 26 s 58 34
Palm Springs 95 66 pc 93 64
Philadelphia 78 62 sh 52 41
Phoenix 93 71 pc 92 69
Pittsburgh 57 46 .11 sh 49 35
Portland, ME 71 57 .18 sh 57 40
Portland, Ore 75 41 s 75 44
Providence, R.I. 78 56 .09 sh 53 41
Raleigh 84 58 sh 60 43
Rapid City 45 30 s 59 39
Reno 76 46 pc 73 43
Rochester, NY 57 45 .84 sh 51 38
Sacramento 75 53 pc 76 54
St. Louis 51 38 s 56 36
St. Ste. Marie 46 37 .09 pc 48 34
Salt Lake City 62 37 s 64 40
San Antonio 79 66 c 65 52
San Diego 77 64 pc 71 63
San Francisco 72 56 c 66 53
Savannah 86 68 pc 86 62
Seattle 75 46 s 71 47
Spokane 62 30 s 66 36
Syracuse 61 51 .49 sh 52 39
Topeka 48 35 s 57 37
Washington 80 59 sh 51 41
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 98 Borrego Springs, Calif. LOW 7
Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 89/77/s Madrid
Amsterdam 55/48/c Mexico City
Athens 83/67/s Montreal
Beijing 73/52/pc Moscow
Berlin 55/41/sh Paris
Bermuda 82/77/ts Rio
Cairo 84/69/pc Rome
Calgary 66/36/pc Sydney
Havana 85/73/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 84/72/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 77/60/s Warsaw


77/63/s
57/47/pc
79/63/pc
72/46/ts
47/35/c
54/42/sh
59/47/pc
88/67/s
72/59/pc
65/54/pc
73/59/pc
50/36/c
55/43/c


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N TY


For the RECORD


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
I- IMeadowcrest
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a I-ll Brunt H.v, 1624 N.
Dunkerlield Meadowcrest
Dunker ed lCannondale Dr Blvd.
IA M dCrystal River,
A "1 \ ,Madowresi FL 34429
N 1:1 :

I Inverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. q .square
8 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld ................................................ ............................ .. E d itor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ......................... .................................. Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.......................................................... Classified M manager, 563-3255
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .... ............... ............... M ike Arnold, 564-2930
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4I^ Phone 352-563-6363
S1 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


OCT. 8 OCT. 15 OCT. 21


I-


A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


LOCAL


-. --- ,---


U -


U-b





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state gov't: Supreme Court in session


MICHAEL PELTIER
The News Service of
Florida
TALLAHASSEE -As the
nation tuned in for the first
of three presidential de-
bates this week, Tallahas-
see's attention focused
heavily on the state
Supreme Court.
The court heard argu-
ments in a range of contro-
versial cases that included a
parental-rights fight be-
tween former lesbian part-
ners; an undocumented
immigrant's attempt to be-
come a lawyer; a long-
running debate about nu-
clear-power costs; and a dis-
pute about university
tuition.
Meanwhile, three justices
fought back in a political
battle with Republican
leaders and conservatives
who want them replaced.
Outside the court, regula-
tors approved new rates for
Citizens Property Insurance
Corp. customers for 2013,
while business groups and
the state's consumer advo-
cate traded salvos about an
effort to reduce the number
of policies in the state-
backed insurance pool.
JUDGES ON HOT SEAT
The Supreme Court typi-
cally hears oral arguments
one week each month. And
this week was a doozy
The court heard argu-
ments about whether the
Florida Board of Governors
has the power to determine
tuition and fees for public
universities, a power that, if
granted, would take that au-
thority away from the
Legislature.
A skeptical court listened
as an attorney for a group
led by former U.S. Sen. Bob
Graham argued a 2002 con-
stitutional amendment es-
tablishing the Board of
Governors implicitly gave it
the authority to set tuition
and fees.
Justices also said they
may be powerless to let an
undocumented immigrant
practice law in the state, de-
spite recent federal moves
to create a pathway to per-


manent status for immi-
grants brought to the coun-
try as children.
In a case that has drawn
national attention, the
Florida Board of Bar Exam-
iners asked justices to
weigh in on whether it
should waive rules, set up in
2008, and allow Jose
Godinez-Samperio to be ac-
cepted as a Bar member de-
spite the fact he is illegally
residing in the country
In another case, the court
raised doubts about a chal-
lenge to a 2006 law that has
led to customers of two util-
ities paying for future nu-
clear reactors that might not
be built.
The Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy filed the legal
challenge after the PSC late
last year approved allowing
Florida Power & Light and
Progress Energy Florida to
pass along $282 million in
nuclear-project costs to cus-
tomers in 2012.
From nuclear power to
nuclear family, the court
also heard arguments in a
legal battle that raises new
questions about parental
rights after the break-up of
same-sex relationships.
A Brevard County case
pits two women who were
lesbian partners when they
decided to have a child. It is
unique because one of the
women provided an egg that
was fertilized and im-
planted in the other woman,
who later gave birth. After
the relationship ended, the
woman who gave birth
blocked her former partner
from having parental rights.
Florida law gives egg or
sperm donors limited rights,
but some justices wondered
if the laws were written with
anonymous donors in mind
and did not reflect other
situations.
At one point, Justice Bar-
bara Pariente raised the sce-
nario of a man who
impregnates a woman in a
"one-night stand" and re-
ceives parental rights. She
questioned whether two
women who decide to raise a
child should have lesser
rights and said that could cre-


ate issues of equal protection.
In most years, merit re-
tention votes don't draw
much attention, as sitting
appellate judges and
Supreme Court justices qui-
etly return to office.
This year, some conserva-
tive groups and the Repub-
lican Party of Florida are
attempting to unseat three
veteran justices who have
repeatedly come under fire
from conservatives for rul-
ings going back more than a
decade.
On Friday, Justices R.
Fred Lewis, Barbara Pari-
ente and Peggy Quince at-
tended a forum at the
Florida State University
College of Law to talk about
merit retention as the trio
tries to counter the push to
send them packing.
Collectively, they have
raised more than $1 million
to keep their jobs. Last
month, the RPOF voted to
officially oppose the justices
for a series of rulings that
have not gone Republicans'
way
Among others joining the
fight is Americans for Pros-
perity, a group funded by
conservative billionaires
Charles and David Koch.
The justices have been
joined by a group, Defend
Justice from Politics, which
supports their retention
efforts.
CITIZENS IN THE NEWS
The state-backed insurer
was in the news this week as
the Florida Office of Insur-
ance Regulation approved
rates for 2013 that will boost
premiums by 10.8 percent
for Citizens Property Insur-
ance Corp. customers.
Following more than a
month of review and multi-
ple hearings by Citizens
board members and the
agency, OIR approved new
rates that will affect most of
the company's 1.4 million
customers on policies re-
newed after Jan. 1.
State lawmakers and OIR
officials have been trying to
boost Citizens rates in re-
cent years to make them
more comparable to rates
that would be charged by


the private market in some
of the riskiest areas of the
state.
Lawmakers, however, lim-
ited annual increases to 10
percent, a cap critics say has
hindered efforts to depopu-
late the state-run pool that
has become the largest
property insurer in the
state. The cap, however,
does not include higher
costs for hurricane catastro-
phe insurance, resulting in
rates climbing higher than
10 percent
The rate hikes come amid
growing efforts by Citizens
to reduce its ranks. This
week, a plan to use $350 mil-
lion in surplus to coax pri-
vate companies into taking
policies out of Citizens drew
concern from Florida's in-
surance consumer advo-
cate, who called on the
insurer to provide much
more data surrounding the
proposed loan program.
In a letter to Citizens
Chairman Carlos Lacasa,
consumer advocate Robin
Westcott put forth a lengthy
list of questions surround-
ing a deal approved in Sep-
tember by Citizens' board of
governors to provide 20-
year, low-interest loans to
private carriers to partially
offset the risks associated
with Citizens policies.
Business groups, led by
Associated Industries of
Florida, jumped to Citizens'
defense, saying the loan
program is needed to help
re-invigorate the state's pri-
vate insurance market
ELECTION UPDATE
Florida's effort to remove
non-citizens from the ranks
of voters took another step
forward this week.
A federal judge ruled
there's no time limit for the
state to push for the removal
of voters who were never
supposed to be registered,
and an effort to clean the
rolls of non-citizens can con-
tinue until the November
election.
Judge William Zloch
ruled Secretary of State
Ken Detzner is within the
law in seeking the removal
of voters from the rolls who


were never supposed to be
there. Opponents con-
tended federal law pre-
vented such purges within
90 days of the election.
"Certainly, the 'National
Voter Registration Act' does
not require the State to idle
on the sidelines until a non-
citizen violates the law be-
fore the State can act,"
Zloch wrote.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: The Florida
Supreme Court took up a se-
ries of high-profile cases,
which dealt with issues


such as university tuition,
nuclear power costs and the
admission of an undocu-
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Florida Bar
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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 A5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IVINDUSTRYI

Photos by Matthew Beck








ABOVE: Live oysters must be 3 inches long to be considered of legal size
for harvest. RIGHT: Cedar Key is a fishing, boating and vacationing
community. Recently, the oyster harvesting has hit the rocks, leaving
commercial oystermen in dire straights. BELOW: Michael Roach uses
tongs to rake the bottom for oysters off Rattlesnake Point in Cedar Key.


ABOVE: Sea birds flee from their perch on a dock in Cedar Key. RIGHT: Once oysters are collected, they are culled through
by hand and the live oysters are harvested for sale. Discarded shells are returned to the Gulf.


A6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


i-' .


2 ..





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OYSTERING
REGULATIONS
H A bag equals two
five-gallon buckets, one
10-gallon bucket or
60 pounds of culled
oysters in the shell.
Undersized oysters
must be culled
immediately upon
harvest and returned to
the reef from which
they were harvested.
Undersized oysters
may number no more
than 5 percent (by
count) of unattached
oysters per bag and no
more than 15 percent
(by count) attached
(such that separation
would destroy either
oyster) per bag. Vessels
connected together,
such as towing, may
only claim one bag
limit all together.
* Commercial and recre-
ational harvest by any
person during the same
day is prohibited.
Bycatch from trawling
or dragging any gear
over a public oyster bar
should be returned to
the water as closely as
possible to the beds
where taken and
transport and sale of
bycatch or oysters
taken intentionally is
prohibited. Wholesale
and retail dealers may
not sell oysters unless
they are labeled and
traceable to the point
of harvest.
* Upon leaving an area,
harvesters must pass
through a monitoring
station when in
operation. Harvest on
leased parcels is
subject to the
established rules unless
otherwise exempted by
the approved lease
provisions.
* Harvest from public
reefs is prohibited from
July 1 to Sept. 30,
except as provided
below.
* In Wakulla, Dixie and
Levy counties, harvest
is prohibited from June
1 to Aug. 31.
* In Indian River County,
harvest is prohibited
within 75 feet of the
shoreline of the Indian
River, any canal bank,
or any privately owned
submerged lands, or
dock without written
permission of the
owner.
* In Volusia County,
oysters harvested from
an approved public bar
may not be stockpiled
onto a lease.
Season bag limits
* June 1 to Aug. 31:
Harvest is allowed only
in areas referenced in
paragraph 5L -
1.003(1). Table 2 of the
Department of
Agriculture and
Consumer Services
Comprehensive
Shellfish Control Code.


* July 1 to Sep
20 bags per
day or vessel
is less.
* Oct. 1 to Jun
20 bags per
day.
* Nov. 16 to M
Harvest is all
day of the we
DACS can clo
on Saturday
Sunday if th
less than 30(
oysters per a
* Apalachicola
includes St. G
Sound, East
Apalachicola
St. Vincent S
their canals,
rivers and cre
Indian Lagoo
canals, chani
and creeks.


OYSTER
Continued from PageAl

they were being dumped on
skiff bows.
"Did you hear that? They
are dead. It sounds like bro-
ken glass because the shells
are empty," Beckham said.
The men continued to
plunge the rusty, iron-forged
tongs into the shell-laden
bottom and in a shallow arc
dump more of it onto their
boat bows. The sun hung
high with some clouds in the
distance as the ritual
continued.
A lean woman wearing
sunglasses, a well-worn
baseball hat and football
jersey sat with a hammer-
like culling iron, ferreting
the good from the bad.
Her hands, like the oth-
ers, are rough hewn. In her
holding hand, she had on a
Kevlar-type glove.
Mike Roach, who was
working solo, had his bow
piled high with oysters.
After five hours of deliber-
ate and muscle-fueled work,
he had only two bushels.
"Hopefully, I can get an-
other bushel from this,"
Roach said, pointing to his
pile.
George Stevens had also
been there for hours, but
only had two bushels.
"That's like $50 from
working all day," Stevens
said.
"We used to make $150 to
$200 a day," he added.
Ronald Fred Crum, head
of the Wakulla Fishermen's
Association, which also rep-
resents the oystermen, said
he has been working over-
time to find solutions for an
industry in crisis.
Crum said the industry
workers need help and soon.
"We can't and should not
shut down the season as
some are suggesting. We
need some entitlements,
help for these people. We
should subsidize what they
are making right now and
allow the industry to re-
cover in about two years,"
Crum said.
"Let's reward effort and
hard work. These people
have families and bills to
pay They need help and we
need answers," he added.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Danny Beckham has been an oysterman for 55 years. Beckham says that, in years past, a hard day on the water would
yield about 20 bushels of oysters. Today, he's lucky to catch two bushels in the same amount of time.


The close-knit fishing community in Cedar Key has been hit hard by the difficult times.


Cedar Key oysterman
Beckham has been supple-
menting his meager harvest
with a smoked mullet and
dip business, but said sales
from that business are
hardly sufficient to offset


the loss of revenue from the
scant season.
Oysters typically take 15
to 18 months to recover,
which means next year's
season also could be af-
fected. Oyster season run


through May
Gov Rick Scott visited
Franklin County on Wednes-
day and said up to 2,500 jobs
are at risk in that county
alone because of the poor
harvest.


We can't
and should not
shut down the
season as some
are suggesting.
We need some
entitlements,
help for these
people. We
should subsidize
what they are
making right
now.

Ronald Fred Crum
Wakulla County Fishermen's
Association.

Scott has declared an
emergency from Levy to
Franklin counties. The
emergency declaration
means the counties involved
will now be eligible for fed-
eral aid.


Day in and day out, the oystermen continue to search for
their quarry, hoping in time the fishing will improve.


EXPERTS
Continued from PageAl

federal reservoir. Lake


Lanier provides drinking
)t. 30: water for metro Atlanta.
person per The Chattahoochee River
, whichever flows south from Atlanta
along the border between
Alabama and Georgia. It
e 30: then merges with the Flint
person per River as it enters Florida
and becomes the
ay 31: Apalachicola River, which
owed any empties into the Gulf in
eek, except Apalachicola Bay
ose harvest Fresh water allocation for
and those rivers has become a
iere are long-running legal dispute
0 bags of between the three states.
cre. However, Ronald Fred
Crum, head of the Wakulla
Bay County Fishermen's Associ-
George ation, said he believes the
Bay, culprit in the Panhandle is
Bay and the two major tropical
ound and storms that hit the area this
channels, summer
'eks;,and "We had 32 inches of rain
n and its here. That just changed the
nels, rivers
water mix too quickly," Crum
said.
Source: FWC He added that the collapse
of the construction industry


PRICES
Continued from Page Al

they keep coming," he said.
Bunch said if the poor harvest continues
and prices keep going up, he also would
have to look at adjusting his prices accord-
ingly, "but we are not there yet."
Sandy Stone, owner of Sandy's Produce
and who sells fresh oysters at the corner of
County Road 24 and Wooten Avenue in
Cedar Key, said her proximity to the har-
vesters is helping keep her stocked.
"The oysters are not as plentiful as they
used to be, but I get what I need," she said.
Maryann Beckham, manager at
Seabreeze Restaurant, one of the Gulf-front


We have
had a 400 to
500 percent
increase in the
numbers of
oystermen. That
means we have
been harvesting
a lot in the past
few years.

Ronald Fred Crum
Wakulla County Fishermen's
Association.

in the Panhandle area also
meant many of those people
became certified as fishers.
"We have had a 400 to 500
percent increase in the
numbers of oystermen,"
Crum said. "That means we
have been harvesting a lot
in the past few years. We
need some solutions around
here. If not, the industry will
be destroyed."


We are getting
supplies right now, but it
is scary what could
happen in the future.

Maryann Beckham
manager, Seabreeze Restaurant.

eateries in Cedar Key, said she has never
seen the oyster harvest this poor in more
than the four decades she has lived there.
"We are getting supplies right now, but it
is scary what could happen in the future,"
she said. "People depend on oysters around
here."


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Carolyn
Cooper, 87
LECANTO
Carolyn Cooper, 87,
Lecanto, died Oct. 5, 2012,
under the loving care of her
family at Nature Coast
Lodge.
Carolyn was born Sept. 25,
1925, in Greenfield, Tenn., to
the late John and Irene
(Tillman) McCurley She
was employed as a model
and in retail sales. She en-
joyed her home, flower gar-
dening and entertaining her
many friends.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her two daughters
and son-in-laws, Janis and
Steve Umbras, Hernando,
and Joyce and the Rev.
Ernest Thomas, Dunnellon;
her brother John and his
wife, Francoise McCurley,
N.C.; two grandchildren;
and three great-grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in
death by her husband Ray
E. Cooper in 2004 and her
sister Virginia.
A Celebration of Life Me-
morial Service will be at 3
p.m. Thursday, Oct 11, 2012,
at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory The
family will receive friends in
visitation from 2 p.m. until
the hour of service. Inurn-
ment will take place at a
later date at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bushnell.
If family and friends so de-
sire, memorial donations
may be made in Carolyn's
memory to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464.


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Shirley Dole, 87
Shirley Jean Moore Dole
passed away on Saturday,
September 22, 2012 at the
Elizabeth House, a hospice
facility in Flat Rock, NC.
Shirley was born on April 4,
1925 in Burlington, VT.
She married Roderick A.
Dole on February 26, 1944
and lived most of her life in
CT Shirley was involved in
many community organiza-
tions. She served on the
boards of these organiza-
tions and also as president
or vice president of many of
them. Shirley was very
proud to graduate second in
her class in 1968 to become
a Licensed Practical Nurse.
Shirley and Rod loved to
travel. They traveled
throughout the U.S., Canada
and Mexico and also trav-
eled abroad, living in
Kuwait for several years.
Shirley was a lifetime mem-
ber of the Wally Byam Cara-
van Club International and
served in both national and
regional offices with that or-
ganization.
Shirley is survived by her
husband, Roderick Almon
Dole; her daughters, Pamela
Jean Dole and Robin Dole
Coolbeth and her husband,
David; granddaughters
Emily Coolbeth (Paul),
Suzanne Coolbeth,
Stephanie Coolbeth
(Robert), Jessie Neborsky
(Eric), two great-grandchil-


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dren Silas Songy and Olivia
Heinis, and one sister, Helen
Persuette. She is prede-
ceased by her son, Roderick
A. Dole, Jr. and her grand-
daughter, Eliza Coolbeth.
A funeral service will be
held at the Willimantic Con-
gregational Church, Willi-
mantic, CT on November 20,
2012 at 1:00 PM., with burial
at St. Philip the Apostle
Cemetery, Ashford, CT, fol-
lowing the service. Memo-
rial donations can be made
to the American Heart Asso-
ciation, the American Can-
cer Society or Four Seasons
Hospice of Flat Rock, NC.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.




Patrick
Baumhardt, 80
INVERNESS
Patrick J. Baumhardt, 80,
of Inverness, passed away
Thursday, Oct 4,2012.
He will be buried at
11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 15,
2012, at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell. In
lieu of flowers, please con-
tribute to HPH Hospice,
3445 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

obits@chronicleonline.com


Lecanto
522 N. Lecanto Hwy. Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
352.527.0106

Inverness
605 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452


Leon Batz, 48
HERNANDO
Leon Batz, 48, of Her-
nando, died Thursday,
Oct. 4, 2012. Private crema-
tion under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto.
Rocco Boni, 86
MOUNT DORA
Rocco Boni, 86, of Mount
Dora, died Wednesday, Oct
3, 2012. Local arrangements
under the care of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory
in Lecanto. Burial will be in
Connecticut




Joseph
Fabio, 88
ST. PETERSBURG
Joseph Charles Fabio, 88,
St Petersburg, died Saturday,
Oct. 6, 2012. Military honors
will be conducted at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, at
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home With Crematory
Shirley
Beauchamp, 89
HOMOSASSA
Shirley W Beauchamp, 89,
of Homosassa, died Satur-
day, Sept. 29, 2012. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Wilder
Funeral Home, Homosassa.


James
Horst Sr., 92
INVERNESS
James L. Horst Sr, 92, In-
verness, died Oct. 6, 2012, in
the Hospice Unit of Citrus
Memorial hospital.
A native
of Pitts-
burgh, Pa.,
he was born
July 27,
1920, to the
late Harry
C. and Mary
(Behlert)
Horst and James
moved here Horst Sr.
in 1974 from
St. Petersburg. He was a re-
tired motel owner and man-
ager James was a 69-year
member of the Masonic
Order and affiliated with
Citrus Lodge No. 118. He
also was a member of the
Islam Grotto, Funsters and
Past Watchman of Shep-
herd's of The White Shrine.
Jim enjoyed fishing, spend-
ing time with his family and
reading.
Survivors include two
daughters, Marilyn (John)
Rowe, Lecanto, and Carolyn
Horst, Crystal River; two


sons, James (Tracy) Horst
Jr, Inverness, and Robert
(Janet) Horst, Ocala; his sis-
ter, Margaret Carlton,
Tampa; four grandchildren,
Chad (Autumn) Rowe and
Joshua Rowe, Danielle
Horst and Jeremy
(Stephanie) Horst; and one
great-grandchild, Trenton.
He was preceded in death
by his wife of 44 years, Betty
Horst; and a brother, Harry
C. Horst Jr.
Masonic services will be
conducted at 3 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 9, at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Citrus Masonic Lodge No.
118 officiating. Burial will
follow in Magnolia Ceme-
tery, Lecanto. The family
will receive friends at the
funeral home from 6 to 8
p.m. Monday
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.
See DEATHS/Page A10

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A8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 A9


J





A10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


DEATHS
Continued from Page A8

Bessie
Mushorn, 94
INVERNESS
Bessie Truluck Mushorn,
94, Inverness, passed away
Oct. 5, 2012, in the Citrus
Health & Rehab Center.
Mrs.
Mushorn
was born
May 7,1918,
in Fort [ .,
White, Fla.,
to the late
Arthur and
Cleo (Tol-
bert) Tru- Besie
luck. She IVIushorn
was a re-
tired registered nurse, of
the Baptist faith and en-
joyed gardening, reading
and bird watching.
She is survived by her
husband, William R.
Mushorn, Inverness; two
daughters, Beverly (Joseph)
Millar, Seffner, Fla., and
Linda (Richard) Beasley,
Waycross, Ga.; two step-
daughters, Donna (Bill)
Story, Inverness, and Linda
Glaze of Valdosta, Ga.; one
stepson, Edward (Camille)
Mushorn, West Islip, N.Y;
grandchildren, Laura, Lisa,
Sharon, Heather, Shannon
and Dylan; and stepgrand-
children, Jennifer, Laura,
Tracy and Michael. She was
predeceased by her son,
Lewis Glaze; her grandson,
Robert Story; and great-
grandson, Joshua Wyka.
Funeral services con-
ducted at 10 a.m. Thursday,
Oct. 11, from the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Pastor Leary Willis Jr. offici-


ating. Burial will follow in
Florida National Cemetery
Friends may call at the fu-
neral home from 5 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday Memorial dona-
tions are gratefully accepted
by the Salvation Army
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Lena
Carpenter, 92
HERNANDO
Lena M. Carpenter, 92, of
Hernando, died Friday, Oct.
5, 2012, at Brentwood in
Lecanto.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

William
Miller, 83
OCALA
William Bruce Miller,
born Oct. 27, 1928, in Cleve-
land, Ohio; died Oct 1, 2012,
in Ocala, Fla.
Prior to moving to Beverly
Hills, Fla., he lived 17 years
in Greeneville, S.C. He
spent his adult life in mar-
ket research.
He is survived by his wife,
Gloria Miller; and his sons,
James (Elizabeth) of Ocala,
Fla., Christopher of Irmo,
S.C., and Andrew (Karen) of
Largo, Fla.; and his grand-
children Emily, Annabeth
and Hallie Miller
Donations may be given
in his name to Hospice of
Marion County or a charity
of choice.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


Kevin
O'Rourke, 52
HERNANDO
Kevin O'Rourke, 52, of
Hernando, Fla., died Sept.
29, 2012, in Afghanistan
while working as a civilian
contractor with NATO pro-
viding law enforcement.
Kevin was born Oct. 30,
1959, in Jersey City, N.J., the
son of Gerard and Loretta
O'Rourke. He was a ser-
geant for the New York Po-
lice Department for 20
years. Kevin moved to Her-
nando in 2003 from Islip,
N.Y He was a member of
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. He rode a Harley,
had a great sense of humor,
loved NASCAR and scuba
diving.
Survivors include his
mother, Loretta O'Rourke of
Orlando, Fla.; two children,
Kaitlyn and Kevin O'Rourke
of Hernando, Fla.; three
brothers, Brian O'Rourke of
Odenton, Md., Barry
O'Rourke of Port St. Lucie,
Fla., and Brendan O'Rourke
of Bayville, N.Y; and the
mother of his children,
Stacey O'Rourke of Her-
nando, Fla.
Funeral services for Mr.
O'Rourke will be at 7 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto. The
family will receive friends
from 4 p.m. until the hour of
service. The Rev Adam
Jones will preside. In lieu of
flowers, the family request
that donations be made to


"The Kevin O'Rourke Me-
morial Fund" and sent to
Sun Trust Bank at 2525 N.
Forest Ridge Blvd., Her-
nando, FL 34442. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Carolyn
Cozzolino, 60
OCALA
Carolyn Cozzolino, 60, of
Ocala, died Wednesday, Oct.
3, 2012. Private arrange-
ments under the direction
of Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory in Lecanto.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)


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Jean Ramin, 91
HOMOSASSA
Jean Katherine (Ribbe)
Ramin passed away Sept. 4,
2012, in Homosassa, Fla.
Born July 27, 1921, in Mil-
waukee, Wis., she was pre-
ceded in death by beloved
husband, Dr. James E.
Ramin; much-loved daugh-
ter Donna Stanelle; and sis-
ter Charlotte
Bentschneider. She leaves
behind son Scott Ramin and
wife Kathy of Mount Vernon
Wash.; daughter Debra
Ramin of Wasilla, Alaska;
former son-in-law Chuck
Stanelle of Milton, Wis.;
grandchildren Traci Alm
and husband Steve, J.C.
Stanelle and wife Alaina, all
of Milton, Wis., Larke
Clinger and husband Kevin
of Mount Vernon, Wash.,
Jesse Peterson of Wasilla
Alaska, and Chris Ramin
and wife Rebekah of
Phoenix Ariz.; eight great-
grandchildren; and her
treasured dog, Jasmine.
Jean was a homemaker
for her entire life. She was a
gracious hostess, an avid
gardener, an animal lover
and a reader. Most of her
life was spent pouring her-
self out for those she loved
most. In earlier days, she
loved to knit and sew and
has left behind many hand-
made treasures.
She handled the difficul-
ties life brought her with
strength and grace, and was
a good example of personal
responsibility for all for us.


3636 N Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL 34465


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Those who knew her will re-
member her laugh and her
positive outlook on life.
Jean was always looking
ahead with a plan. Of spe-
cial significance was her
love for children all chil-
dren. Jean had a deep ten-
derness for the youngest of
us. She will be greatly
missed.
Condolences may be
mailed to 6961 W Flying
Crown Drive, Wasilla, AK
99623.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

See Page All


SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
corn or phone 352-
563-5660 for details
and pricing options.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A1O

John Popke, 48
DUNNELLON
John William Popke, 48,
Dunnellon, Fla., died
Thursday, Oct 4, 2012, at his
residence. He was born in
Danbury, Conn.
He loved landscaping,
fishing, camping, enjoyed
nature and animals of all
kinds, baseball, especially
the Yankees, football, WWE
wrestling; he helped care
for his mother-in-law and
enjoyed spending time with
his family and friends.
Services are scheduled
for 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at
The Lighthouse Baptist
Church, Citrus Springs, Fla.,
with Pastor E Jess Burton
officiating.
Survivors include his
wife, Susan, Dunnellon;
sons, John and Charles
Popke, Bethel, Conn., and
Paul Popke, Dunnellon;
stepson, Justin Whipple,
Ocala, Fla.; parents, Paul
and Yvonne Popke, Citrus


Springs, Fla.; brother, Tracy
Alan Popke, Dewey, Ariz.;
sister, Cenia Montalvo, Se-
vierville, Tenn; and grand-
daughter, lana Whipple,
Ocala, Fla.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests donations in the
memory of Mr. Popke to The
Lighthouse Baptist Church,
974 WG. Martinelli Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, FL 34434.
Condolences may be of-
fered at wwwrobertsof
dunnellon.com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
corn or phone 352-
563-5660 for details
and pricing options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.


Michael
Saunders, 94
HOMOSASSA
Michael D. Saunders, 94,
of Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Oct. 2, 2012, at his
home under the care of his
family and Hospice of Cit-
rus County.
Born April 7,1918, in Lex-
ington, Mass., to Benjamin
and Josephine Santosuosso.
Michael moved to Citrus
County 12 years ago from
Lake Susie, Fla. He was a
retired self-employed con-
tractor, and a World War II
Navy veteran. His member-
ships included the Lions
Club, Sons of Italy, Lexing-
ton Golf Club and Kingsway
Country Club, and he was
Catholic.
He is survived by his wife,
Ruth Ann Saunders, of Ho-
mosassa; one son, Michael
D. Saunders Jr. of Lexing-
ton, Mass.; two granddaugh-
ters, Elizabeth Ruth
Saunders and Jackqueline


Marie Saunders; and two
great-granddaughters, Lilly
Anna Maria O'Neil and Mia
Elizabeth Saunders.
Graveside services will be
at 11:30 a.m. Monday, Oct 8,
2012, at the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, Fla.,
where full military honors
will be given by the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 of Crys-
tal River.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.
GUEST BOOKS
The national database
Legacy.com maintains
the Chronicle's
obituaries and guest
books. Per Legacy
policy, all guest book
comments are
screened by its staff for
appropriate content
before being placed
online. Allow 24 hours
for review of guest book
entries.
A copy of the printed
Commemorative Guest
Book may be
purchased from Legacy
in a hardcover or
softcover format.


Josephine
Tirado, 86
Josephine Ann Tirado,
aka "Josie," born Sept. 7,
1926, in
Stamford,
Conn.;
passe d
away Sept.
6, 2012, in
Nevada. -
She lived .
in Florida
for 30 years. Josephine
She was a Tirado
homemaker
and loving mother of three,
grandmother of six and
great-grandmother of six;
survived by a twin sister,
Theresa.
She will be missed by all.
R.I.P "Josie."
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.
Deaths ELSEWHERE

R.B. Greaves, 68
SINGER
LOS ANGELES R. B.
Greaves, a pop singer whose
"Take a Letter, Maria" was a
1969 hit, died Sept. 27 in Los


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 All
Angeles. He was 68.
Ronald Bertram Greaves
died of prostate cancer at
his home, said Craig Harvey,
Los Angeles County coro-
ner's chief of operations.
Greaves was a nephew of
the legendary R&B singer
Sam Cook. He was born on a
U.S. Air Force base in the
former British Guyana.
Living in the United King-
dom in the 1960s, he
recorded several soul sin-
gles as Sonny Childe.
It was after moving to the
United States that he scored
his biggest hit as R.B.
Greaves.
"Take a Letter, Maria"
tells the story of a man who
comes home to find "the
woman I thought I knew in
the arms of another man."
He dictates a final letter
to her through his secretary
with the chorus: "Take a let-
ter, Maria. Address it to my
wife. Say I won't be coming
home, gonna start a new
life."
The tune ends on a hope-
ful note, however, as the
man asks his secretary out
to dinner
-From wire reports


S and no change,' This is A, u oii:deltlul setn ice

Real People Say It Best: ( m. ..Ii. t hil- 1..ii, ... ,.. I I., .
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon bun, cereal vari-
ety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast round, cheese
grits, tater tots, cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella maxstix, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, broccoli, applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Hot dog, uncrusted PBJ, turkey
super salad with ripstick, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, baked beans, pears, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Pulled barbecued pork on bun,
turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
corn, dried fruit mix, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken,
macaroni and cheese, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, green beans, peaches, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with ripstick, hot ham and
cheese on bun, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
peas, mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast, tater tots and grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese biscuit, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots, milk
and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and toast, tater tots,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and cheese sandwich,
chicken and rice burrito, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, broccoli, mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets, macaroni and
cheese, ham super salad with ripstick, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, corn, dried fruit mix,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Pulled barbecued pork on bun,
turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles, pears, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken, hot
dog, turkey super salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, green beans, potato
roasters, applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with ripstick, cheese
pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, peas,


peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast, tater tots and grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and cheese loco, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuff, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety, toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice burrito, pizza,
macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita chicken salad with
wheat roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
fresh broccoli, potato roaster, broccoli, dried
fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken, maxstix, turkey
and gravy over noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham salad with
wheat roll, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad,
cold corn salad, potato triangles, celery, peas,
peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Roasted chicken with roll,
chicken alfredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey salad with wheat roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato roasters, mixed fruit,
chilled baked beans, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick, ham super salad with
wheat roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, potato triangles, apple-
sauce, cucumbers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese sandwich,
spaghetti with ripstick, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita chicken salad with
wheat roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
cold corn salad, potato roasters, corn, peaches,
juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced turkey with turkey gravy, po-
tatoes O'Brien, carrot coins, sugar cookie slice
whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Beef and mushroom penne pasta,
mixed vegetables, garlic spinach, pineapple,
slice wheat bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken thigh with
chicken gravy, mashed potatoes, green beans,
graham crackers, slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger patty with bun,
ketchup and mustard, baked beans, yellow corn
with diced tomato, mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Oktobertfest Celebration: Hot dog
with mustard, boiled baggage and carrots, hot
German potato salad, whole-grain troll, blue-
berry cobbler, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Cit-
rus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inver-
ness and South Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 352-527-5975.


OCTOBER 7, 2012

EXTENDED HOURS TO 10 P.M.




















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Pros, cons of chicken tattoo


T y is 63 and in the
midst of a full-blown
midlife crisis. (Yes,
midlife. He plans to live to
be 126.) He told
his wife, Carol,
he was thinking
of getting a tattoo.
"Of what?"
"Oh, I don't '.
know," he said. "I
was thinking of a
crow."
Ty has been
reading a lot of JI
mysteries that
take place in the MUL
West and contain
Native American mysticism,
with birds taking on a spe-
cial meaning. He also likes
the Brandon Lee revenge
film classic "The Crow," and
was thinking of a large,
menacing bird tattooed
across his ever-widening,
hairy shoulder
Carol reads British mys-
teries, and birds and tattoos
do not play much of a part in
most of them.
"Why a tattoo? Why a
crow? What's going on?"
"I don't know," he said. "I
feel like I would be a crow if
I were a bird. It's a symbol. It
can mean a lot of different
things. I want to be different,
not like everybody else."
"Crows are nasty, noisy
birds," Carol said. "Why
don't you get a chicken? I
like chickens."
Ty was dumbstruck. A
chicken? What kind of a tat-
too is that? The whole point
of getting a tattoo is to show
people how tough you are,
what a renegade you are,
how you march to your own
drummer, how you do things
your way Is that what Carol
thought he would be if he
were a bird? A chicken?
Besides, people would
laugh at him if he got a
chicken tattoo. Ty wanted
the same kind of tattoo the
other renegades had. Carol
probably meant chickens
were cute, but Ty didn't see
it that way
"What about a turkey?"
Carol asked. She was think-
ing of a wild turkey, tail dis-
played. Ty pictured a
Thanksgiving turkey, golden
brown and sitting on a plat-
ter It was not a macho
image at all. It was obvious


Carol did not know current
tattoo trends.
If he really wanted to be a
renegade, he'd need a lot
more than a crow.
He'd need the
tree where the
crow lived and
then maybe a
scene from the
Movie, and it
I would all have to
be held together
with vines and
M mystical symbols
that would climb
LEN his arm from his
wrist to his shoul-
der Then he'd have to start
on the other side.
"I've heard it hurts to get a
tattoo," Carol rattled on. "You
know, they use a little needle
gun to do that. Then it scars
over until it heals. You would-
n't even get a flu shot last year
because of the needle."
He had forgotten about
that Maybe they could give
him some Novocain. No,
they do that with a needle.
Surely there's something
they could rub on his arm so
he wouldn't feel it


Ty started wondering how
small a crow he could stand.
But if it were too small, no
one would see it.
"A parrot," said Carol.
"Now that would be
something."
A parrot Well, there is the
pirate connection. And the
Jimmy Buffett connection.
They're both renegades.
Ty was rethinking the
whole tattoo thing. A crow.
That really wouldn't say
anything except he got a tat-
too. He wanted to send a
message he might be 63 and
have gray hair, but he didn't
act the way people expect
an old person to act.
"What about a penguin?"
Carol said. "I really like
penguins."
Ty thought about it "So do
I," he said.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 A13


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Enduring America's longest war


Mother mourns

grim milestone

for Afghan war

ALLEN G. BREED
AP National Writer
Lisa Freeman was cradling
her 6-day-old grandson in her
left arm and watching the
news on her iPad while her
daughter and son-in-law
caught some much-needed
sleep. The retired teacher
was taking notes with her
free hand when she heard
the news: The nation had suf-
fered its 2,000th casualty in
the Afghan war
On Sept 29, Army Sgt. 1st
Class Daniel Metcalfe was
on patrol in the country's
rugged Wardak Province
when his unit came under
small-arms fire.
As the announcer droned
on, all Freeman could do was
shake her head and stare at
little Matthew named for
an uncle he would never
know. Marine Capt. Matthew
C. Freeman fell to a sniper's
bullet Aug. 7, 2009, northeast
of Kabul, not far from where
Metcalfe perished.
It is almost certain Met-
calfe and Freeman both
29 when they died never
met. Freeman grew up in
the Savannah suburb of
Richmond Hill, Ga.; Met-
calfe was from the village of
Liverpool, N.Y, population
about 2,400, a few miles
north of Syracuse.
Nonetheless, they were
brothers, casualties in what
has become America's
longest war
Looking at the number
2,000 on the small, glass
screen, Lisa Freeman felt as
if she'd lost her son all over
again.
"I just sat here, reliving
the pain and wondering:
Where is America's outrage?
Where is America's concern
that we're still at war?"
"I walk around this coun-
try and look in faces that
don't even know we're at war
anymore. People (who) are
going about their everyday
lives, not realizing that
they've been kept safe by this
amazing group of young men
and women who have been
willing to sacrifice so much."
She has reason to be bit-
ter And yet, her son's story is
a shining example of how
each life and death -
touches so many others. She
and all who loved him are
bound to others in a spread-
ing web of loss and grief, and
they do not mourn alone.
Freeman's story
Matthew Freeman excelled
at everything he set his mind
to Eagle Scout, honor roll,
student council president So
no one was surprised when
he won an appointment to the
U.S. Naval Academy, follow-
ing in his father's footsteps.
After graduation in 2002, the
son and grandson of naval
aviators took his commission
in the Marine Corps and went
for jets.
Freeman was stationed in
Okinawa, Japan, in the sum-
mer of 2009 when a resurgent
Taliban began retaking areas
once thought pacified. When
officers asked for volunteers
to shore up the thin lines, the


The family of Sgt. Daniel Metcalfe, originally of Penfield, N.Y., weep during a memorial
service in his honor after he was killed in Afghanistan. Metcalfe's wife, Vesna, is in the
middle holding one of their three children, Ethan, 11 months.


young pilot with the striking
blue eyes stepped forward.
In July 2009, Freeman
made a secret trip home to
marry his high school
sweetheart, Theresa Hess.
He wanted to make sure she
would be notified and
taken care of-- should any-
thing happen to him.
They married July 10,
2009. Thirteen days later, he
shipped out
Barely two weeks into his
deployment, Freeman and a
fire support team set out for
reconnaissance in the Shpee
Valley when they came
under almost immediate
enemy attack and became


pinned down. According to
an official account, Freeman
fought his way into a nearby
building and up to the roof to
get a better angle on the
enemy position.
Once atop, he spotted an
insurgent with a rocket-
propelled grenade and was
firing at the man when he
was shot in the back of the
head. A comrade told Lisa
Freeman her son was found
with his finger on the trigger
of his rifle; its magazine was
nearly empty.
The following January,
Mrs. Freeman was visiting
the Pennsylvania home of a
woman whose son, an Army


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second lieutenant, had been
killed in 2006 by an impro-
vised explosive device in
Iraq. On the wall, she no-
ticed an amazingly lifelike
pencil sketch of the fallen
soldier and asked the
woman who drew it.
Reagan's sketches
Retired Marine Cpl.
Michael Reagan knows
something about long, un-
popular wars.
When asked about his
tour in Vietnam, he said sim-
ply, "I survived Con Thien."
Translated as "Hill of An-
gels," the remote Marine fire


Associated Press
ABOVE: Lisa Freeman pins on her son
Matthew's first lieutenant rank after his
father swore him in at their home May
2004 in Richmond Hill, Ga. Marine Capt.
Matthew C. Freeman was killed Aug. 7,
2009, northeast of Kabul, Afghanistan.
LEFT: A poster features dozens of hand-
drawn portraits of men and women killed
at war by artist Michael Reagan.


base south of the North Viet-
namese border was the site
of fierce fighting for a year
beginning February 1967.
While there, Reagan
sketched many of his bud-
dies some of whom didn't
make it home alive.
The Edmonds, Wash., man
has since done portraits of
dozens of celebrities, 137
Playboy playmates, six pres-
idents, three prime minis-
ters, even a pope. Using


pre-autographed picture
boards, he's helped raise
millions for children's char-
ities and cancer research.
In 2004, a national news
show aired a piece on Rea-
gan's work. The next day, an
Iraq War widow from Boise,
Idaho, called him and asked
how much he would charge
to do a portrait of her late
husband.
See WAR/Page A15


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A14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WAR
Continued from Page Al

He told her there would
be no charge; just send him
a photo. When the woman
called back to thank him for
the sketch, he was overcome
with emotion.
Reagan turned to his wife
and said, "We need to do
them all."
Thus was born the Fallen
Heroes Project. At the be-
ginning, a general asked
whether Reagan understood
what he had gotten himself
in for. Reagan replied he fig-
ured the wars would last five
years, and he would have to
no more than 1,500 portraits.
He has done 3,100 so far.
And every day, he gets at
least one email, requesting
another
"I haven't drawn 3,100


NATION


portraits," he said. "I've
drawn one. ... Every one is
too many for me."
The 65-year-old artist
wakes around 4 a.m. each
morning. He "cooks" his cof-
fee, feeds his cats and sits
down at his drawing table.
Each portrait takes about
five hours, though some
take longer and he has done
as many as four in one day
to have them ready in time
for funerals or memorial
services. He walks five
miles each night, "to just be
able to get air back in me."
Reagan works from
videos and favorite photos
- some showing the person
in civilian life. People send
him letters and diary en-
tries from the deceased.
"So when I draw," he said,
"I feel like I'm having a
conversation."
When Lisa Freeman wrote
to ask he draw her son in


Associated Press
Artist Michael Reagan displays two of the many scrapbooks
he has bearing copies of the hand-drawn portraits he has
produced of men and women who have been killed at war.
Since starting the Fallen Heros Project in 2004, Reagan has
drawn more than 3,000 portraits.
his Marine dress blues young man who listened so
she passed along a note from well he made you feel "like
one of Matthew's high school you were the most important
classmates, who recalled the person in the world."


"I believe the world and
the lives he touched are bet-
ter for him being here," she
wrote.
Welles' mission
Joshua Welle was presi-
dent of the Annapolis Class
of 2002. But there were 980
midshipmen, and though he
had heard of Freeman, he
did not know him until
after his death.
Welle, a lieutenant com-
mander in the Navy, is back
in the States for three
weeks' leave. He is using
part of that time to travel
the country and tell audi-
ences about Freeman and
other classmates who have
sacrificed in the ongoing
War on Terror.
The surface warfare offi-
cer is lead editor of a new
book, "In the Shadow of
Greatness: Voices of Lead-
ership, Sacrifice, and Serv-


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 A15
ice from America's Longest
War." Of the Class of 2002,
four have died in combat,
one lost both legs, and an-
other won the Silver Star.
As he crisscrosses the
country, Welle senses "the
American people have fa-
tigue" about the war in
Afghanistan. It has become
part of his mission to re-
mind them why our troops
are still there, that the war
serves to protect the United
States. "Americans need to
have a long view," he said.
Welle said he and his coed-
itors wrote the book "to tell a
story of post-911 leadership
and help America under-
stand that there is a good
news story coming out of Iraq
and Afghanistan, even though
there's no clear victory"
He adds: "I don't think we
can look at the wounds of
battle in a body count and a
death toll."


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NATION


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


orlw Many worry about meningitis Nation BRIEFS


Abu Hamza
extradited to US
LONDON Radical
preacher Abu Hamza al-
Masri and four other terror
suspects
were extra-
dited from
the U.K.
after
Britain's
High Court
ruled they
Abu Hamza had no
al-IVMasri more
grounds for
appeal in their yearlong bat-
tles to avoid facing charges in
the United States.
Scotland Yard said Friday
the suspects had been
brought to an air force base
in eastern England from Long
Lartin Prison, where two
planes provided by U.S. au-
thorities were waiting to fly
them to America. The aircraft
took off shortly before mid-
night, Scotland Yard said.
Pardon expected
for Pope's butler
VATICAN CITY -A painful
and damaging chapter in
Pope Bene-
dict XVI's

closed Sat-
urday with
the convic-
tion of his
former but-
Paolo ler on
Gabriele charges he
stole the
pontiff's private letters and
leaked them to a journalist.
But questions remain as to
whether anyone else was in-
volved in the plot, and when
the pope will pardon his
once-trusted aide.
Paolo Gabriele stood
stone-faced as Judge
Giuseppe Dalla Torre read out
the conviction and sentenced
him to 18 months in prison.
I dead, 11 arrested
in anti-terror sweep
PARIS Police carried out
raids across France on Satur-
day after DNA on a grenade
that exploded last month at a
kosher grocery store led them
to a suspected jihadist cell of
young Frenchmen recently
converted to Islam.
The man whose DNA was
identified, named by police as
Jeremy Sydney, was killed by
police after he opened fire on
them, slightly wounding three
officers in the eastern city of
Strasbourg.
Eleven other suspects
were arrested across the
country Saturday, according
to the Sipa news agency.
Israeli jets
down drone
JERUSALEM Israel
scrambled fighter jets to inter-
cept a drone Saturday that
crossed deep into Israeli air-
space from the Mediterranean
Sea, shooting the aircraft
down over the country's south-
ern desert, the military said.
The incident marked the
first time in at least six years
that a hostile aircraft has pen-
etrated Israel's airspace, and
Israeli officials said they were
taking the incident seriously,
raising the possibility of retal-
iatory action.

Laboring


IV V W.


Woman waits

for news about

possible infection
Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Patsy Bivins tossed and
turned all night after find-
ing out the steroid shot she
received to ease her chronic
back pain could instead
threaten her life.
For now, all the 68-year-
old retired waitress can do
is hope she doesn't develop
the telltale signs of a rare
form of fungal meningitis
health officials said has
sickened more than 60 peo-
ple in nine states: a splitting
headache, fever, stiff neck,
difficulty walking or wors-
ening back pain. There may
be hundreds or even thou-
sands more like her.
She called her doctors


Associated Press
Patsy Bivins, 68, of Sturgis, Ky., kneels down while walking
her dog Little Britches at her apartment Friday. Bivins was
injected with steroids at St. Mary Sugricare in Evansville,
Ind., who notified her of possibly being infected with fungal
meningitis.


Friday, right after her first
cup of coffee, hoping to re-
lieve the anxiety stirred a
day earlier when she
learned she might be at risk.
Bivins was told only she did-


n't need to be checked un-
less she developed
symptoms.
"I'm not sure if I like it,"
Bivins, of Sturgis, Ky., said
Friday in a telephone inter-


view with The Associated
Press. "Seems like there
should be some way to tell it
before you get the symp-
toms. Honestly, it makes me
worse than I was."
Federal health officials
said seven people have died
so far, and they fear thou-
sands more could have been
exposed. The Centers for
Disease Control and Pre-
vention has said the out-
break may have been
caused by a steroid made by
a specialty pharmacy in
Massachusetts, where in-
spectors found at least one
sealed vial that was contam-
inated. It's not yet clear how
the fungus got into the
steroid, which is commonly
used to treat back pain. But
officials have told health
professionals not to use any-
thing made by the pharmacy
So far, the government
has identified about 75 fa-
cilities in 23 states that re-
ceived the recalled doses.


Outsourcer brings

jobs to rural village

Associated Press
SIMAYAL, India They come to-
gether each morning from the slop-
ing forests. Some walk for more
than an hour along muddy foot-
paths past terraced farms stacked
like soft green steps. Some race
their new motorbikes down narrow,
cracked roads cut into the hillsides.
The team of young men and
women wear ID cards on lanyards
around their necks and have the
rarest of commodities in rural
India, a company job.
They work mainly in data pro-
cessing for a 3-year-old business
called B2R that is using the spread
of the Internet to transport India's
outsourcing boom from metropoli-
tan Bangalore and the suburbs of
New Delhi to this speck of a farming
village in the Himalayan foothills.
Before B2R arrived, Simayal was
being drained of its bright young
men as they left for cities to search
for work. Its women had little op-


tion but to wed right out of school.
Nearly everyone's survival was tied
to the whim of the rains and prayers


for a strong harvest.
Now, men are staying. Some who
left have returned. Many women
have put off marriage to work and
are helping to support their fami-
lies. Other new businesses are
opening up.
The 50 new jobs B2R created
brought a "glimmer of hope" to the
110 families in this cluster of farm-
ing hamlets barely touched by
India's economic transformation
over the past two decades, said VK.
Madhavan, who has spent the past
eight years running Chirag, a local
development organization.
Deepa Nayal's two sons per-
suaded the 47-year-old widow to re-
tire from her $38 a month teaching
job after they got hired. Mohan
Singh Bisht, 20, helped his family
build a six-room house. Khasti Far-
tiyal, 22, started paying for one of
her sisters to go to college and
bought an essential, expensive
piece of gold jewelry for another
sister's wedding. Many bought re-
frigerators, new clothes and motor-
bikes. Many are proud just to help
buy food.
"There's a buzz around the place
that didn't exist before," Madhavan
said.


Syria vows to 'crush' rebels, launches new attacks


Associated Press

BEIRUT Syria's military will
"crush" armed rebels, President
Associated Press Bashar Assad's defense minister
An Indian laborer carries a warned Saturday, as the regime
bag of spices at a warehouse shelled rebel positions in two cities
Friday in the Spice Market and near the Lebanese border in a
in New Delhi, India. Delhi's widening offensive.
wholesale spice market is Neighboring Turkey, meanwhile, set
said to be Asia's largest, new rules of engagement after three
selling all kinds of spices, shells from Syria hit Turkish territory
nuts, herbs and other prod- Saturday. Turkey retaliated with ar-
ucts such as rice and tea. tillery, as it has for the past four days,
-From wire reports and Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet


Davutoglu said this would now be the
standard response.
Davutoglu insisted that "we haven't
taken a step toward war," but Turkey's
threat to fire back for each errant Syr-
ian shell was bound to keep border
tensions high. Turkey is one ofAssad's
harshest critics and a key supporter of
Syria's opposition.
The latest Syria-Turkey crisis
erupted earlier this week, after a Syr-
ian shell killed five civilians in a Turk-
ish border town.
The Syrian regime has apologized and
tried to defuse tensions by pulling some


tanks back from the border, according to
a Turkish Fbreign Ministry official who
spoke on condition of anonymity in line
with government regulations.
Still, the week's daily cross-border
exchanges have heightened fears of a
regional conflagration.
Syrian mortar rounds are likely to
hit Turkey again as regime forces try
to retake rebel-controlled areas near
the border. Two of the shells that fell
in Turkey on Saturday were fired in
clashes between government troops
and opposition fighters in a Syrian
border village.


Color change

~j.
A-'d


Associated Press
Bill Niedermair, 95, of
Bainbridge Island, Wash.,
takes his dog Missy for a
walk Oct. 4 at Battle Point
Park on Bainbridge Island.


Sandusky's jurors
hope for life in jail
HARRISBURG, Pa. -
Jerry Sandusky should be
sent to
prison for
life when a
judge sen-
tences him (
Tuesday,
according
to several
of the jurors Jerry
who con- Sandusky
victed the
former Penn State assistant
coach of molesting several
boys over a period of years.
None of the jurors inter-
viewed by The Associated
Press said they have had
second thoughts about their
June verdict, and several
plan to attend the sentencing.
Four jurors said they plan to
be in the courtroom when
Sandusky, 68, learns the
penalty for sexually abusing
boys he met through a charity
for at-risk children. Sandusky's
own attorney expects his client
to be handed a long sentence
from Judge John Cleland after
conviction on 45 counts.
Although a list of jurors has
not been released by Cle-
land, the AP was able to con-
tact five of them.
Bus from Canada
overturns in NJ
WAYNE, N.J. -Atour bus
from Canada carrying about
60 people bound for New York
City overturned on a highway
exit ramp in northern New Jer-
sey early Saturday, slid down
an embankment and landed
on its side, injuring 23 people
on board, authorities said.
The driver, who suffered a
gash in his arm, told state po-
lice he was cut off by another
vehicle, though it was not im-
mediately clear whether that
caused the crash at 7:30 a.m.
on eastbound Interstate 80 in
Wayne.
Eight of the injured passen-
gers were admitted in critical
condition, hospital spokes-
woman Liz Asani said.
Chrysler recalls
Ram, Dodge trucks
DETROIT Chrysler is
recalling thousands of Ram
1500 and Dodge Dakota
trucks because of a problem
with a rear axle pinion nut
that could cause the driver to
lose control of the vehicle.
The National Highway Traf-
fic Safety Administration said
the recall affects 44,300
trucks.
Honda recalls
2002-2006 CR-V
DETROIT Honda Motor
Co. is recalling CR-V
crossovers from the 2002 to
2006 model years because
an electrical switch in the dri-
ver's side door could melt
and cause a fire.
Honda and the National
Highway Traffic Safety Ad-
ministration announced the
recall Saturday.
The government agency
said owners should park CR-
Vs from those model years
outside until the recall is per-
formed, to avoid any property
damage from a fire. Afire
could start even when the ig-
nition is off and the CR-V is
parked.
-From wire reports


Source of hope


Associated Press
Shoba Bisht, second right, sits with her family Aug. 24, at the kitchen she has helped build with money
earned from working at B2R, in Simayal, India. An employee talks to a client while working at the B2R
center in Simayal, India. Before B2R arrived in Simayal, local women had little option but to marry right out of
school, and educated young men had to travel far to seek respectable jobs.











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes can be
found on Page A19 of
today's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Small olia e

.J .CHRONICLE
JMK a. 0B* II NL NINE CONTEST


_Srd


: I-: : '1 :, 1n-,e Chronicle
The Citrus County Chronicle is
hosting an online contest through
the end of October where readers
send in fall color photos. Go to
www.chronicleonline/fallfoliage
for information and to upload your
photos each week. This week's
top photo is "Mabry Mill"
submitted by online user
DawnJolly. Mabry Mill is on the
Blue Ridge Parkway
(approximately mile marker 175)
in southwestern Virginia.
"This is one of my favorite
stretches along the parkway in
the fall," DawnJolly said.


Autumn puts on finery


RANDALL DICKERSON
Associated Press
NASHVILLE

shorter and
nights become
chillier, the
annual fall foliage show
is getting under way in
the Southeast.

The first colors are beginning to
show in the higher elevations of the
Great Smoky Mountains National Park,
which is a popular draw for tourists in
October
Expect a good show, said Janet Rock,
a botanist in the Smokies.
"As long as we stay on track with the
weather we've had, it should be a good
year," said Rock.
The shorter span of sunlight each day
is the main trigger, but Rock said tem-
peratures and precipitation also affect
the show.
"When you have warm sunny days
and nights that don't reach freezing, it
brings out the best colors," Rock said.
The mountains weren't badly af-
fected by drought conditions that
burned crops to the west.
Leaves change color because they're
shutting down photosynthesis, which
makes food for the trees. The produc-
tion of green chlorophyll masks other
colors. However, red pigment produc-
tion also ramps up as photosynthesis


shuts down.
Here's the fall foliage outlook for
seven states in the Appalachian Moun-
tain region.
GEORGIA:
DOGWOODS VIVID
The north Georgia mountains typi-
cally showcase some of the state's
brightest fall colors, and this year will
be no exception, state forestry officials
say
Dogwood and maple trees in the
upper elevations have already begun to
change color, Ken Masten, a district
manager with the Georgia Forestry
Commission, wrote in a recent report.
"If we get a cold snap in the next two
weeks or so where it gets 15 or 20 de-
grees colder, then the colors will be a
little more vivid," said Joe Burgess, a
senior forester with the Georgia
Forestry Commission.
The colors are a big draw in north
Georgia's mountain towns, where
tourists come to see the hues of the
leaves and then stay to shop or catch
some live music at venues such as the
Crimson Moon Cafe in Dahlonega, a
town 60 miles north of Atlanta.
KENTUCKY:
HOPE FOR RED
The mountainous areas of eastern
Kentucky typically put on the best fall
color show in the state, thanks to the
variety of species and dense canopy
The first color transformations of the
season are happening on dogwoods,
sourgums and tulip poplars, which are
showing yellows.
"I think we can always count on a fair


Associated Press
Red leaves hang from a tree in Greens-
boro, Vt. After images of Tropical Storm
Irene scared away leaf peepers last fall,
tourists are heading back to see fall fo-
liage a year later in the Northeast and
Southeast, and aren't worried about how
the dry summer might affect the color.
degree of color in Kentucky, especially
in the east, because of this envious mix
of trees that we have," said Dean Hen-
son, naturalist at Pine Mountain State
Park in southeastern Kentucky. He said
the forests there have up to 35 species
of leaf-dropping trees.
The dry summer hasn't hurt the
state's prospects for a colorful fall, but
the weather over the next two weeks


will determine if the most desirable
colors the reds and purples come
out this year, Henson said.
NORTH CAROLINA:
STARTING TO SHOW
The Blue Ridge Mountains are fa-
mous for showing their true colors each
fall, drawing visitors from around the
globe. And with dry summer days soon
to be followed by cool summer nights,
those bright colors may be coming
sooner
North Carolina's foliage season starts
in earnest in the high mountain areas
in October and runs through mid-No-
vember, with colors cascading down to
lower elevations throughout the month.
In the highest areas, sourwoods are
turning red, while maples are changing
to shades of yellow, orange and red.
High bush blueberries are turning a
deep red, while sassafras is starting to
turn its usual mixture of the same
colors.
"Following one of the hottest sum-
mers on record, the North Carolina
Piedmont is looking forward to a beau-
tiful fall season," says Dick Thomas of
the Piedmont Environmental Center
SOUTH CAROLINA:
EARLY START
The drought that has dried up the
state for much of the summer means
that South Carolina's fall foliage will be
vibrant and early this year
Blackgum, flowering dogwood, sour-
wood and sweetgum trees are already
beginning to display shades from yel-
low to orange and bright red. But some
of those same trees are already
starting to drop their leaves, due to dry
conditions.


Page A19


Iguazu Falls

Stephen and Gloriela Hendrickson photographed this rainbow above the Iguazu
Falls on their Dream Vacation to Argentina. Brazil and Paraguay can be seen in
the background. The 267 falls are arranged in sort of a reverse letter "J." The
border between Brazil and Argentina runs through the Devil's Throat. On the right
bank is the Brazilian territory, which has just over 20 percent of the jumps of
these falls, and the left-side jumps are Argentina's, and make up almost
80 percent of the falls.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Colors beginning to show in Southeast






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Siblings want to


meet 'new' brother


SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 7, 2012 C:Comcast Citrus B: Bright House DA:ComcastDunnellon & Inglis F: OakForest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 8:30 I 9:00 I 9:30 I 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
0 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Football Night in America '14' NFL Football San Diego Chargers at New Orleans Saints. (N) News
Masterpiece Classic Call the Midwife (In Call the Midwife (N) (In Masterpiece Classic (In Broadway: The AsTime As Time
B ED PBS 3 3 14 6 'PG' Stereo) '14' Stereo) 14' Stereo) PG' American Musical Goes By Goes By
0 WiFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up AsTime... NOVA'PG' Call the Midwife'14' Masterpiece Classic Broadway: Musical MI-5 "The School"
SN r )M( NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football San Diego Chargers at New Orleans Saints. From the News
S FA NB 8 8 8 8 News Stereo Live) '14' Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. (N) a
S FTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time "We Revenge "Resurrection" 666 Park Avenue News Sports
CWF ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' Are Both" 'PG (N) N "Murmurations" 14' Night
NFL Football Denver Broncos at 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife "And The Mentalist "Devil's 10 News,
0 ] TS)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 New England Patriots. (N) N Stereo)N a(In Stereo) N the Law Won" 14' Cherry" (N) '14' 11pm (N)
FOX 13 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) The Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX1310:00 News (N) News EPL
[(D FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) Simpsons Show Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) N Soccer
E WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge (N) a 666 Park Avenue'14' News Practice
WCLF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
E CMC IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Wommack Kolinda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
S FTS ABC 11 1 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time "We Revenge "Resurrection" 666 Park Avenue News Castle 'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' Are Both"'PG' (N) N] "Murmurations"'14'
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Hot Law & Order"Angel" (In How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
EP LiWM IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory Pursuit" PG u Stereo) PG '14' 'PG'
@ WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "The Dog Who Saved Halloween"(2011) Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Tampa Whacked Born-Ride Honor
OD WACX TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Paid Paid Journey Creflo Connec Jim Raley Dayna Brody
King of Two and nd Engagement CSI: Miami "PowerTrip" CSI: Miami The *** "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" (2001)
(T CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men '14 DeLuca Motel"'14' Haley Joel Osment. 'PG-13'
S _E F 6 Casita Big Rotary Sunflower Inverness Your Citrus County Court I Spy'Y' heCisco Black
I WYKE FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Spotlight Kid'G' Beauty
ED CWOX FOX 13 7 7 NFL Football Simp sons Cons |Burgers IFam. Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 Big Bang Big Bang
M WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comed. |Noticiero AguiyAhora (SS) MiraQuien Baila'14'(SS) Saly Pimienta '14' Coned. Noticiero
S IWXPX ION 17 Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl House "DNR" 'PG' House '14' House "Detox" '14'
Exterminator Exterminator Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck
L(h 54 48 54 25 27 Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynast Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
(___ Into the West Custers Into the West "Ghost Dance" Army slaughter of Hell on Wheels "Blood M lood Moon Hell on Wheels
MC 55 64 55 death.'14' Indians. (Part 6 of 6)'14'm Rising" Cullen prepares for battle. (N)
Swamp Wars"Deer- Call- Call- Drug Kingpin Hippos Eating Giants: Hippo Eating Giants: Elephant Eating Giants: Hippo
52 35 52 19 21 Eating Python"'PG' Wildman Wildman (In Stereo)'PG' (In Stereo) PG' (N) 'G' (In Stereo) 'PG'
"Battlefield ** "Roll Bounce"(2005) Bow Wow. A roller-skater pre- "The Janky Promoters" (2009, Comedy) Don't Don't
96 19 96 Am" pares fora big showdown. PG-13'" Ice Cube, Mike Epps.'R'" Sleep! Sleep!
[BiAVO] 254 51 254 Housewives/NJ |Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Happens Jersey
7 7 "Grandma's Boy" (2006, Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Jeff Dunham: Minding Jeff Dunham: Minding Tosh.0 Brickleberry
27 61 27 33 Comedy) Doris Roberts. R'" '14' the Monsters (N) the Monsters 14'm
Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys Extreme Makeover: Extreme Makeover: Extreme Makeover: Extreme Makeover:
98 45 98 28 37 Cheerleaders Cheerleaders Home Edition'PG' Home Edition'PG' Home Edition'PG' Home Edition'PG'
(CNBC 43 42 43 Paid |Paid Diabetes Wall St. J. Crew and Amer. Greed American Greed Trash Inc: The
(CNi) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Latino in America (N) Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Latino in America
SAustin & Shake It Good- Gravity Good- Austin & A.N.T Jessie 'G' My My A.N.T My
46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up!'G' Charlie Falls7' Charlie AllyG' Farm 'G' Babysitter Babysitter Farm 'G' Babysitter
(ESPTB 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) a BCS MLS Soccer: Timbers at Sounders SportsCenter (N)
) 34 28 34 43 49 NHRA Drag Racing NHRA Drag Racing Auto-Plus Nationals. From Reading, Pa. "N World/Poker NASCAR Now (N)
(EWTl 95 70 95 48 Devotions |Holy Mass and Novena |Sunday Night Prime |G.K. Rosary Franciscan Univ. God |Bookmark
"Princeof Persia: The *** "The Mummy"(1999) Brendan Fraser. A mummy *** "The Mummy"(1999) Brendan Fraser. A mummy
29 52 29 20 28 Sands of Time" seeks revenge for a 3,000-year-old curse, seeks revenge for a 3,000-year-old curse.
*** "Mansfield Park" (1999) Embeth Davidtz. **2 "Vanity Fair" (2004, Drama) Reese Witherspoon, ** "The Golden Bowl" (2000)
118 170 (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Eileen Atkins. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'" [ Uma Thurman.'R'a
[FNi 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 1 Diners |$24 in 24 Food Truck Race Cupcake Wars (N) Halloween Wars'G' Iron Chef America Restaurant Stakeout
(j$L) 35 39 35 Bull Riding |Game 365 World PokerTour UFC Unleashed (N) Being: Liverpool (N) World Poker Tour
S** "Eagle Eye" (2008, Action) Shia LaBeouf, *** "Taken" (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, *** "Taken" (2008, Action) Liam Neeson,
(tX) 30 60 30 51 MichelleMonaghan.'PG-13' Maggie Grace, FamkeJanssen. PG-13' Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 PGATourGolf Central |PGA Tour Golf IPGATourGolf
"The Wish List" "Accidentally in Love" (2010, Drama) Jennie "Undercover Bridesmaid" (2012, Romance- Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG'
HALL 59 68 59 45 54 (2010) BNGarth, Ethan Erickson.'NR' DComedy) Brooke Burns. 'NR' N
"Big Mommas: Like ** "Cowboys & Aliens" (2011) Daniel Craig, Boardwalk Empire Treme Toni searches Boardwalk Empire
302 201 302 2 2 Father, Like Son" Olivia Wilde. (In Stereo)'PG-13'" "Blue Bell Boy"'MA' for a killer. (N) MA' "Blue Bell Boy"'MA'
*** "Die Hard With a Real Time With Bill *2 "A Thousand Words" (2012) **2 "Paul" (2011, Comedy) Simon *2 "Dream House"
(i 0 ) 303 202 303 Vengeance" Maher 'MA'" Eddie Murphy. 'PG-13' Pegg. (In Stereo)'R' (2011) "N
(HITV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Million Dollar Rooms Extreme Homes'G' Buying and Selling Property Brothers 'G' House Hunters Reno
American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers Pawn Stars Restoration American Pickers
(MYIS) 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'" 'PG' 'PG'"
lieD 24"Tyler Perry's the "Abducted: The Carlina White Story" (2012, "Steel Magnolias" (2012, Comedy-Drama) "Abducted: The
24 38 24 31 Family That Preys" Docudrama) Aunjanue Ellis. N Queen Latlfah. Premiere. N Carlina White Story"
"Nora Roberts'Carnal Innocence" (2011, Project Runway Project Runway "It's All Project Runway'PG'm Proect Runway "It's
CL_=MN 50 119 Mystery) Gabrielle Anwar. 'NR' "Starving Artisf'PG' About Me"'PG Fasion Baby" 'PG'
S** "Due Date" (2010, Comedy) Robert **+ "Underworld" (2003, Horror) Kate ** "What's Your Number?" (2011) Anna Faris,
(WlX) 320 221 320 3 3 Downey Jr. (In Stereo) 'R' Beckinsale. (In Stereo) RRChris Evans.(In Stereo) R
I SLNBJC 42 41 42 1 1 1 Caught on Camera ICaught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Predator Raw ILockup
109 65 Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers "Extreme Justice" An Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers
W 109 65 109 44 53 14' 14' Intoxicated miner blocks a road. (N)'14' "Knife Fight"'14' 14'
(NIllJ 28 36 28 35 25 You Gotta |YouGotta You Gotta You Gotta See Dad |Full Hse. Full Hse. |Full Hse. Nanny |Nanny Friends |Friends
(CWiJ 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next
(O ___44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl
n 340 241 340 *** "A Better Life" Dexter "Are You ...?" Homeland The Smile" Dexter (N) (In Stereo) Homeland "Beirut Is Dexter (In Stereo)
340 241 340 4 (2011)'PG-13' 'MA' *'MA' *'MA'" Back'"(N) 'MA' 'MA'B
732 112 732 Motorcycle Racing SPEED Center (N) NASCAR Victory Wind Tunnel With Dave My Classic Car Crazy Auto Racing
732112 732 (Live) Lane (N) Despain (N) Car 'G
Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction
(aili 37 43 37 27 36 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
370 271 370 "Moneyball"(2011, Drama) Brad Pitt. (In Boss"Consequence" ** "Colombiana" (2011, Action) Zoe Saldana, Boss "Consequence"
370 271 370 Stereo)'PG-13'* 'MA'B Jordi Molla. (In Stereo) PG-13' *'MA'
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(MN) 36 31 36 Announced 'PG' SFFishingShape TV Sports.
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F 31 59 31 26 29 Horror) R Ch'aska Cuba de Reed.'NR' Horror) Sean Skene.'R'N (1992)'R'Re
( ) 49 23 49 16 19 MLB Baseball (N) G' MLB Baseball (N) (Live) GMLB Baseball 'G'
S*** "Monkey Business" (1952, Comedy) **2 "The Doughgirls" (1944) Ann ** "Nightand Day" (1946) Cary Grant. A romanticized
(Iuv) 169 53 169 30 35 Cary Grant, Ginger Rogers. NR' Sheridan. NR' account of the life o composer Cole Porter.
S 53 34 53 24 26o MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (In Stereo) Plane Crash An unmanned 727 is deliberately Plane Crash (In
53 34 53 24 26 'PG'N 'PG' [ ''PG'm crashed. (N) (In Stereo) N] Stereo) N
(?ITL 50 46 50 29 30 Medium |Medium Medium |Medium Medium |Medium Long Island Medium: Breaking Amish 14' Long Island Medium:
i ** "Powder" (1995 Drama) Mary ** "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days" (2003) "Finding Bliss" (2009) Leelee "Fourth
350 261 350 Steenburgen. (In Stereo) PG-13'" Kate Hudson.'PG-13'" Sobieski. (InStereo) R N Angel"
Law & Order"Take-Out" Law & Order "Second Law & Order "Sweetie" Law & Order Law & Order "Evil Law & Order "Hitman"
(W)J 48 33 48 31 34 (In Stereo)'14' Opinion"'14' '14' "Humiliation"'PG' Breeds"'14' (In Stereo) 14'
[TOON 38 58 38 33 Gumball |Dragons "Open Season 3"(2010))'PG' Ben 10 Cleveland |King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Most Terrifying Fright House IMaking Monsters (N) Making Monsters (N) Halloween Crazier Dest. Dest.
(riiTV) 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Wipeout 'PG' Wipeout PG Wipeout 'PG' Tow Tow World's Dumbest...
(TVLD 32 49 32 34 24 *** "Jurassic Park" 1993) Sam Neill. Premiere.'PG-13' Raymond |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |King
S 47 17 Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special aw & Oder: Special "Pirates of the
4 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Caribbean: End"
Bridezillas "Jennifer & Bridezillas"Minyon & Bridezillas "Tabby & Bridezillas "Tabby & Bridezillas'14' Bridezillas "Tabby &
(WE 117 69 117 Minyon"'14'" Christine"'14' Christine"'14' Davina"'14'" Christine"'14'"
(WiNFAJ 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: I am 40
years old and have a
younger brother. My
mother died a few years ago.
My father is 67, in good
health and very active. We
all live near one another.
In June, I received a
Facebook message from a
woman in another state say-
ing she is the mother of
Dad's 42-year-old son. It in-
cluded contact information
for "Chris" and a
few photos of him
with my Dad
when Chris was
about 10. Chris is
now a successful
businessman
with a wife and
two kids. Chris
agreed that it
would be nice to
know his siblings.
However, out of
respect for us, he ANN
will do nothing
unless we make MAIL
the first move.
As you can imagine, I hit
the roof. I am furious that
my parents hid this from us
all these years. My brother
and I visited Dad, who was
quite upset that this woman
had made contact. He said
she was merely a girl he
dated after college and the
child was "an accident." He
supported Chris financially,
but there was minimal con-
tact because Chris' mom
moved around a lot
It bothered my mother
that Dad would visit Chris,
so he hasn't seen him since
that photo was taken. Dad
asked the woman never to
contact my brother or me.
Chris sent an occasional
Christmas card to Dad, but
that was it


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Frankenweenie" (PG)
1:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Frankenweenie" (PG)
In 3D. 4:50 p.m. No passes.
"Taken 2" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
In 3D 7:40 p.m.
"Looper" (R) ID required.
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Taken 2" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Frankenweenie" (PG)


In 3D. 3:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Frankenweenie" (PG)
1 p.m., 5:30 p.m.
"Pitch Perfect" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Looper" (R) ID required.
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Won't Back Down" (PG)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
In 3D. 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Hotel Transylvania" (PG)
1:50 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
"End of Watch" (R)
ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve"
(PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"House at the End of the
Street" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m.
Movie times are subject to
change, call ahead.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Move furtively
6 Bum with
a hot beverage
11 Salad plant
16 Booth
21 "-, Dolly!"
22 Indulge
23 Tract of wasteland
24 Kind of wave
25 Toward the stern
26 Speechify
27 Concur
28 Rope for a vaquero
29 Swamp
30 Toy-gun projectile
31 Defunct acronym
33 Fashion
35 Precious stone
36 Most senior
39 Adorned with fringe
43 Charge
44 Baseball stat.
45 Follow in secret
47 Fragrant wood
49 Common abbr.
51 Complain
54 Chimp's cousin, for short
57 Apelike
59 Genus of bees
63 Jogged
64 "What's Up, -?"
66 Story
68 Hardy heroine
69 Trick
70 "The King--"
72 Tucker's mate
74 Baby bird sound
76 Slide
78 Sign on a door
79 Tiny amount
82 British lockup
84 Prisoner
86 Use with another
87 Bridge position
89 Housetop
91 Likewise not
92 French article
93 Work unit
95 Prejudice
97 Island dance
99 Joke of a kind
101 That lady
104 Fish eggs
106 Ridge on
a fingerboard
108 Remove
110 Fuzzy fruit


114 Spread
throughout
117 Streetcar
119 Without direction
121 Succulent plant
122 Flip
124 Sign on a door
126 Honest-
127 Old English bard
128 Bandy about
129 Unhearing
131 On the rocks
133 "Go, team!"
135 Undivided
136 Kind of British gun
137 Fruity drink
139 Monster of myth
141 Horse opera
143 Sheep
145 Circus performer
147 Circa
149 Stop up
152 Farm bird
154 Bargaining chip
157 Blush
161 Actress Lupino
162 Name in Genesis
164 Long story
165 Francisco
167 Earthbound bird
168 Outspoken
170 Lustrous fabric
173 Sour or shaving
175 Fast car
177 Die down
178 Surrounded by
179 Depend
180 Jackson and
Rickman
181 More up-to-date
182 Potato pancake
183 Lawn tool
184 Writer Oscar-


DOWN
1 Rub against
2 Mutineer
3 African antelope
4 Sprite
5 Kitty
6 Brake part
7 Museum director
8 "I - Camera"
9 Water lily
10 Array
11 Barkley or Bronson
12 Rule (abbr.)


13 Lend an -
14 Goblet part
15 Bundle of grain
16 Paved way
17 Fasten
18 Saw
19 Delayer's motto
20 Andes animal
30 School org.
32 Dry, said of wine
34 Sharp
37 Psychic ability (abbr.)
38 Molt
40 Far and -
41 Use a blue pencil
42 Women of rank
46 Easy to manage
48 Perilous
50 St. John's bread
51 Forage plant
52 Cattleman's spread
53 ink
55 Snooze
56 Louganis or
Kinnear
58 Chinese or
Japanese
60 Student
61 French department
62 Transmits
65 Kimono sash
67 Close
71 Concerning
(2 wds.)
73 Spill the beans
75 Winnie the -
77 Plummet
80 Haute
81 Seemingly (2 wds.)
83 Raucous
85 Fruit with a stone
88 Sour
90 Kind of circus
94 Farm animal
96 Withered
98 Inter-
100 Headland
101 Gaiters
102 Person in
servitude
103 Notched, as a leaf
105 Musical work
107 Hack
109 Undeveloped
organism
111 Scarf
112 Duplicate
113 High-strung


Kind of feudal lord
Build
Neighbor of Ind.
Pasture
Port city in Brazil
Oolong, e.g.
Notoriety
Kind of strip
Sharpen
Require
"- of the Nerds"


Portend
Do sums
Hunter of a kind
Certain pol.
Vessel for ashes
Sofa
Sun-dried brick
Colorful parrot
Twangy
Nouveau -
Bitter


Puzzle answer is on Page 20.


Peel-and-stick decoration
Correct
Clinic employee
Baby talk
Yankee (abbr.)
Stopped a fast
Child
Sign
School subj.
Like sashimi
- Baba


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Here is the problem: Dad
said he would be extremely
angry if we chose to commu-
nicate with Chris. Annie, we
don't have much family.
Chris is our brother. Have
we lost too many years to
start a relationship? How
should we handle this and
keep the peace with Dad? -
New Sibling
Dear Sibling: This is no
longer Dad's decision to
make. You are an
adult. Your adult
half-sibling
would like to be
S in touch.
Whether or not to
make contact is
up to you, and
yes, you could
certainly have a
relationship at
any age.
Dad will be
IE'S upset, but we
think he will
.BOX eventually for-
give you. And
who knows? Perhaps he
would even be willing to get
to know his oldest son some-
day We hope so.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737
Third St., Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers,
visit the Creators Syndicate
Web page at
www. creators. com.


A18 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


41





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes some-
times contain only basic
information regarding each post.
For more information about a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.
Special Forces Associa-
tion Retired Green Berets,
Florida Chapter XXI, will have its
quarterly meeting Saturday,
Oct. 13, at the Best Western,
Crystal River Resort. For more
information, call Sharon
Hoagland, widow of SGM
Charles Hoagland, at 352-
249-7616. All are welcome.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to as-
sist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and non-
law enforcement programs.
Criminal background check and
membership are required. Email
Vince Maida at vsm440@aol.
com, or call 917-597 6961.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veterans
living in West Central Florida,
meet the third Saturday monthly
at 1 p.m. for lunch and coffee at
the Country Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd.
(State Road 50, east of U.S. 41).
All Coastie veterans are wel-
come. For more information, call
Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associa-
tion meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 25, at Ocala Regional Air-
portAdministration Building, 750
S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All are
welcome. Call Mike Emig at 352-
854-8328 for more information.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to veter-
ans in need. Food donations and
volunteers are always welcomed
and needed. The CCVC is on
the DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Hours of operation are 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.
Appointments are encouraged
by calling 352-400-8952. CCVC
general meetings are at 10 a.m.
the fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness. All
active duty and honorably dis-
charged veterans, their spouses,
widows and widowers, along
with other veterans' organiza-
tions and current coalition mem-
bers are welcome. The CCVC is
a nonprofit corporation; dona-
tions are tax deductible. Mem-
bers can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.



AUTUMN
Continued from Page All

"The limited summer
rains came just in time,"
said Victor Shelburne, pro-
fessor emeritus of forestry
and natural resources at
Clemson University. "While
we're still in a drought, we
received enough rain to
keep most of the leaves on
the trees."
Colors are expected to be
most brilliant around mid-
October in the higher ele-
vations, late October in the
lower elevations and early
November in the Pied-
mont.

TENNESSEE:
COLOR TEASING
Smokies spokeswoman
Molly Schroar noted yellow
birch, American beech,
mountain maple and hob-
blebush have begun turn-
ing high in the mountains,
giving a hint of the rich
show to come. But Shroar
suggested looking down
now and then, to see black-
eyed Susans, purple asters,
goldenrod and other fall
flowers just hitting their
peak.
"We're getting teased a
little bit by Mother Nature
now," said Cindy Dupree of
the Tennessee Department
of Tourism as she looked
out her car window at hints
of red sumac and golds in
the maples. "It won't be
long until it's spectacular"
"On down in the Chat-
tanooga area, that gets just
as pretty as I've seen any-


where," Dupree said.

VIRGINIA:
PLENTY OF COLOR
With terrain varying from
the mountains to the coast,
Virginia offers an array of
hues for leaf-peepers as 15
million acres of foliage
change colors.
Expect yellow and ma-
roon on ash trees, scarlet to
purple on the state's dog-
woods, and golden bronze


AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its ac-
tivities, call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families. For more informa-
tion about the post and its activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr.
at 352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday of every
month at the post. Eligibility in
the Auxiliary is open to mothers,
wives, sisters, daughters, grand-
daughters, great-granddaugh-
ters or grandmothers of
members of the American Le-
gion and of deceased veterans
who served during war time
(also stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who served
during wartime. Call Unit Presi-
dent Sandy White at 352-249-
7663, or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers activ-
ities such as meals, bingo, golf,
darts, karaoke, pool and more
for members and guests. Re-
view the monthly newsletter for
activities and updates, and call
the post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind Ca-
dence Bank. The VFW Mixed
Golf League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted Oaks
Golf Club and Citrus Springs
Country Club. Tee time is 8 a.m.
New players, both men and
women, are welcome. You do
not have to be a member of the
VFW to join. Lunch follows.
Call Rich or Jayne Stasik at
352-464-3740.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. WiFi available at
the post for free. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch. Informa-
tion regardingpost events is
available at the post or call 352-
465-4864.
Afghanistan and Iraq war vet-


on hickories. Virginia's red
maples offer brilliant scar-
let colors, beech trees fea-
ture yellow to orange
leaves, poplars present a
golden yellow, and reds,
browns and russet colors
from the state's oaks.
"This year should be a
spectacular year because of
the summer weather condi-
tions," said Richard Lewis,
a spokesman from the Vir-
ginia Tourism Corporation.
"It's going to produce a lot
of very vivid foliage.
Peak colors are expected
in the western mountains
during mid-to-late October
and in the central and east-
ern parts of Virginia during
late October and early
November

WEST VIRGINIA:
BEST STILL AHEAD
With most of West Vir-
ginia's best fall colors yet to
arrive, the best places to
see an array of red, yellow
and orange are in the high-
est elevations.
The Division of Forestry
recommends drives from
Harman to Spruce Knob,
from Webster Springs to
Valley Head, the Highland
Scenic Highway in Poca-
hontas County, and in the
Monongahela National For-
est along state Routes 28-55
to the Dolly Sods Wilder-
ness.
With a wide variety of
trees and elevations, West
Virginia's fall color season
began in late September
and runs through late
October
Maple, gum, ash, beech
and birch trees in higher el-


erans are wanted for member-
ship. Call 352-465-4864.
Friday night dinners are open
to the public from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
for $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. On the menu Oct. 14
are ham and accompaniments.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall, 1039
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. The chap-
ter hall is on the corner of Inde-
pendence Highway and Paul
Drive. We thank veterans for
their service and welcome any
disabled veteran to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their fami-
lies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran or
their family who requires assis-
tance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disabil-
ity claim by appointment. Call
352-344-3464.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appointment
for transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville should
call the veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville may call the
Citrus County Transit office for
wheelchair transportation; call
352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' ben-
efits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should
the machine answer.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veterans
in nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the


Rock said the show can
last into November, barring
storms that bring down the
leaves.


Cp DoiC,, C,,s^'R.e,
GROUPER IS OPEN
$15000



352-422-4640..
L lher,, .:lan .::,e Arran g J
iSpit Charters Can be Arranged


items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also col-
lect toiletry items for the veter-
ans. Good, clean material and
yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at 906
Highway 44 East, Inverness.
Call the post at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.org for infor-
mation about post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The pub-
lic is welcome at bingo at 6 p.m.
Thursday.
The public is welcome at the
Oct. 20 Outdoor Flea Market
and Pancake Breakfast. All-you-
can-eat pancakes served from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. for $5.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive in
Inverness. This is an advocacy
group for current and future vet-
erans, as well as for POWs and
MIAs. Florida Chapter 7 wel-
comes new members to help
promote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. Full mem-
bership is open to all individuals
18 years or older who wish to
dedicate time to the cause. Visit
the website at www.rollingthun-
derfl7.com for more information
about the group, as well as infor-
mation about events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson at
813-230-9750 (cell), or email
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan Cecil
at 352-726-0834 or President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
for information. New members
are welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Any female relative
age 16 or older who is a wife,
widow, mother, mother-in-law,
stepmother, sister, daughter,
stepdaughter, grandmother,


Asked when she would
take her hike, Rock replied
the second to third week of
October


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

|352-795-5797
E,.F 1 ..... www.crystalriverdivers.com
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ovations are showing a mix
of colors.
"We are at a higher eleva-
tion so we enjoy the leaf
color change earlier," said
Babcock State Park Super-
intendent Kevin Cochran.
"It's just tremendous here."
Rock, the Smokies
botanist, cautioned about
planning a leaf-viewing trip
too early
"People seem to jump the
gun a lot, thinking Oct. 1
comes and is a magic date."


granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of an honorably dis-
charged Marine and FMF
Corpsman eligible to join the Ma-
rine Corps League, and female
Marines (former, active and re-
serves) and associate members
are eligible for membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose High-
way, State Road 200, Hernando;
352-726-3339. Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com. Call
or visit the post for events, as
well as meetings. Google us at
VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6. The
public is welcome at the Oct. 21
flea market beginning at 7 a.m.
Outside space is $5 (bring a
table) and inside space is $10.
Call the post at 726-3339 to re-
serve space. Proceeds benefit
the Cancer Aid & Research
Foundation.
The public is welcome at the
Saturday, Nov. 3, Bonanza


Bingo. Cost of $35 includes the
bingo packet and luncheon.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number above
for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. For information
about the post and its activities,
call 352-637-0100.
The post invites the public to
an Old Country Hayride Opry
Show at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7.
There will be music and dancing.
Admission is free.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077

See VETERANS/Page A20


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learn how to


protect plants


Free clinics offered in October


Special to the Chronicle

The UF-IFAS Citrus
County Extension Master
Gardeners free plant clin-
ics for October will address
cold-weather plant
protection.
Citrus County winters
usually have extreme tem-
perature changes occur-
ring over short periods of
time. If Mother Nature
gives plants time to accli-
mate to lower tempera-
tures, they can establish
dormancy Dormancy helps
plants survive, but rapidly
falling temperatures do
not allow this.
The October Plant Clin-
ics will explain the types of
freezes we experience and
present actions to take be-
fore, during and after cold
weather to protect plants.
The schedule is:


Tuesday, Oct. 9 -
1 p.m. at Lakes Region
Library, Inverness.
Wednesday, Oct. 10 -
1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
Friday, Oct. 12 -
1:30 p.m. at Coastal Region
Library, Crystal River.
Wednesday, Oct. 17 -
1 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library
Tuesday, Oct. 23 -
2 p.m. at Homosassa
Library
The clinic normally
done in Floral City will not
be offered this month, but
will return in November
Questions or pictures
can be sent to the master
gardeners at MasterGl@
bocc.citrus.fl.us. Master
gardeners will research
and respond.
Call the Extension
Service at 352-527-5700.


Edward "Ed" and
Smirna Velez celebrated
their 55th wedding an-
niversary on Sept. 28,
2012, surrounded by their
children, grandchildren,
family and friends.
Married in the Bronx,
N.Y, on Sept. 28, 1957,
they moved to Crystal
River in the summer of
1979.
Ed still remains active


as a commercial artist and
technical illustrator, self-
employed since 1979.
Smirna is a retired ward
secretary from Citrus Me-
morial Hospital after 25
years of service.
They have three chil-
dren: Lizette Souder of
Clearwater, Ed Velez Jr. of
Crystal River and
Kimberly Ulseth and hus-
band Bob of Citrus Hills.
Their seven grand-
children are Josh, Mark,
Krystina, Jacquelyn, Trey,
Alexis and Zachary


News NOTES


55th ANNIVERSARY

The Velezes


Golden Agers
to get together
Golden Agers of Floral City
will meet at 11:30 a.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 9, in the Fellowship
Hall of First Baptist Church of
Floral City.
Guest speaker will be Chris
Bogg, who has a dog trained to
go visit at nursing homes,
hospitals and assisted living
facilities.
A potluck meal will follow the
meeting. For more information,
call Arlene at 352-637-3359.
Retired employees
to meet Monday
Chapter 776 of the National
Active and Retired Federal



VETERANS
Continued from Page A19

N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
erly Plaza, invites all eligible vet-
erans to join or transfer to our
Post 237 family. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Auxil-
iary (ALA) are active helping vet-
erans and the community. Stop
by the post or visit the website at
www.Post237.org to view the
calendar of upcoming events.
Call the post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honorable
service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside
of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. Call Hank Butler
at 352-563-2496, Neville Ander-
son at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 orAuxiliary presi-
dent Marie Cain at 352-637-
5915 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip will
be used to purchase a brick for
the Fisher House Walk of
Courage, and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of Post
77. The Fisher House will be a
home for the families of hospital-
ized veterans at the Malcom
Randal Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of Courage
will be the paved walkway be-
tween the Fisher House and the
hospital. For more information,
call Alice at 352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base Cmdr.
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Satur-
day monthly at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west


Employees (NARFE) Associa-
tion invites all active and retired
federal employees and surviv-
ing annuitants to attend its next
chapter meeting Monday, Oct.
8, at B&W Rexall Drugs, 214
U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
The meeting will begin at
12:30 p.m. with a short lunch,
followed at 1 p.m. by the regu-
lar business meeting. Guest
speaker will be a representa-
tive from Blue Cross Blue
Shield. For information, call
352-270-0185.

Genealogists
to gather Oct. 9
Citrus County Genealogical
Society will meet at 10 a.m.


side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-David-
son. We meet in the small build-
ing to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are invited to
be a part of American Legion
Post 166. For information, call
and leave a message for the
post commander at 352-697-
1749. Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of Amer-
ica (SVA) Island X-23 wel-
comes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call John
Lowe at 352-3444702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom
Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2
p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, Septem-
ber and November. All


Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, 3474 W. Southern St.,
Lecanto.
The topic will be "Ten Ways
to be a Better Ancestor," ad-
dressing a genealogist's night-
mare: What will happen to all
my work when I'm gone?
The program will be pre-
sented by Paul Enchelmayer,
instructor and member of the
Association of Professional
Genealogists. Call Mary Ann
Machonkin at 352-382-5515.

Stone Crab Jam
seeks vendors
The Rotary Club of King's
Bay and the city of Crystal


combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more aboutAaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Cit-
rus Detachment 819 meets at 7
p.m. the last Thursday monthly
at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane
in Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen are
welcome. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership meet-
ing is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call the
post at 352-447-3495 for infor-
mation about the post and its ac-
tivities.


Saturday,
October 27, 2012
8:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m.




You are invited to participate!



Gather your friends, business associates, neighbors,
church groups, or club members to commit to a day
to give Withlacoochee State Trail a manicure!
To register as a volunteer, please call the
Nature Coast Volunteer Center at
352-527-5955 Lunch will be provided by
Walmart Super Center of Inverness.
Xag.f ,, LIVE UNITED CT
1 .a. W Walmart


SCHRIONi E P9 3
H,,"- (* F


River will bring Citrus Avenue
alive with the fifth annual Stone
Crab Jam from 4 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 3.
The committee is accepting
sponsors and vendor applica-
tions. For more information,
visit www. stonecrabjam.com
for an application.
Deadline is Oct. 8.

Canteen offers
free hot meal
The Salvation Army Canteen
provides a hot meal from 5 to 6
p.m. Wednesday at the Ho-
mosassa Lions Club.
The club is about 1/2 mile
east of U.S. 19 on Homosassa
Trail. Everyone is welcome.


Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher at 352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible vet-
erans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at
860-1629 for information
and directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War
II meetings for 2012 will be at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill on the following
dates: Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and
Dec. 8.


For the RECORD


Divorces 9/24/12 to 9/30/12
David L. Hammersla, Bowie,
Md. vs. Julieanne W.
Schneider, Beverly Hills
Marriages 9/24/12 to 9/30/12
Lancelott Isiacar Anderson,
Homosassa/Joyce Marie Pratt
Price, Stockbridge, Ga.
Mark Joseph Cyrulik Jr.,
Dunnellon/Jamie Lee Diehl,
Dunnellon
Jason Freas Fester,
Inverness/Theresa McKean
Maynard, Inverness
Frederick Russell Grehl,
Homosassa/Amanda Lee
Brooks, Homosassa
Thomas Michael McGee,
McDonough, Ga./


Anastaisa Desiree Vaughan,
McDonough, Ga.
Stephen Stanley Moser Jr.,
Inverness/Nancy Elizabeth
Mayors, Inverness
Wallace Downing Payne,
Beverly Hills/Marie Caruso,
Crystal River
Scott William Thornton,
Crystal River/Colleen Denise
Keaton, Crystal River
Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a
matter of public record, avail-
able from each county's Clerk
of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County call the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.


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Wedding

Frank/Byers

Jennifer Karen Frank and
Keith Byers exchanged nup-
tial vows Saturday, Oct. 6,
2012, at Our Lady of Fatima
Church.
The bride is the daughter
of Phillip and Debra Frank
and the groom is the son of
Frank and Debbie Byers.
Both families are from the
Floral City area.
The newlyweds will make
their home in
Beverly Hills.


First BIRTHDAY

Clayton Stephen Whitehurst

Clayton Stephen
Whitehurst will celebrate
his first birthday Monday, R
Oct. 8, 2012. .
The happy boy is the son
of Gina Russo and Kurt
Whitehurst.
Also celebrating Clayton's
birthday are grandparents
Michele Conner and Glenn
Conner, and Ruth m '
Whitehurst and Barry a
Whitehurst, as well as aunt
Carissa Espada.


A20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


TOGETHER











SPORTS


Detroit pitcher Justin
Verlander dazzled the
A's on Saturday in Game
1 of the American
League division
series./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


. NFL/B2
0 College football/B2, B3
- Prep sports/B4
- TV, lottery/B4
SMLB/B5
SGolf, auto racing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Consol takes 5th at Gator Invitational


Citrus grad
scores TD in rout
KALAMAZOO, Mich. -
Western Michigan running
backAntoin Scriven, a 2009
Citrus High School graduate,
had 6 catches for 53 yards
and a touchdown as the
Broncos rolled to a 52-14
victory over Massachusetts.
The score was the 11 th
of the 5-foot-11, 216 pound
redshirt junior's collegiate
career.
Western Michigan raised
its record to 3-3 overall, 1-1
in Mid-American Confer-
ence play. Massachusetts
fell to 0-6 and 0-3.
CR splits results
at Saddlebrook
Crystal River senior
Michael Kidd earned low
medalist honors Saturday
after shooting a 1-under 69
on the Saddlebrook course
at the Saddlebrook Resort
in Wesley Chapel.
During the 18-hole
round, the Pirates tallied a
team score of 313, which
was in between opponent
Saddlebrook's 295 and Na-
ture Coast's 378.
Following Michael Kidd
was Kyle Kidd (75), Matt
Allen (82) and Kyle Velasco
(87).
Crystal River (11-2
overall) tees off 10 a.m.
Monday in the Citrus
County boys golf champi-
onship at Inverness Golf
and Country Club.
Tribe tab Francona
as new manager
CLEVELAND -A per-
son familiar with the deci-
sion said the Cleveland
Indians have chosen Terry
Francona to be their next
manager and are working
with him on a contract.
Francona, who led
Boston to two World Se-
ries titles, was offered the
job on Saturday, a person
with knowledge of the
team's search told the As-
sociated Press. The per-
son spoke on condition of
anonymity because the
sides have not yet reached
agreement on a deal.
Francona interviewed on
Friday, one day after the
club met with interim man-
ager Sandy Alomar Jr.
Francona previously
worked as an adviser in
Cleveland's front office.
Reds lose pitcher
Cueto to injury
SAN FRANCISCO -
Cincinnati's Johnny Cueto
left his Game 1 start
against the San Francisco
Giants on Saturday night in
the first inning because of
back spasms.
The Red said he is day
to day. The right-hander
threw a second strike to
No. 2 hitter Marco Scutaro
and walked off the mound
in obvious pain. A trainer
and manager Dusty Baker
rushed out to check on
him, and the 19-game
winner came out moments
later.
From staff and wire reports


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
LAND O'LAKES Clarissa
Consol is on fire.
The Crystal River senior cross
country runner took fifth in the
Land 0' Lakes Gator Invitational
cross country meet Saturday
She was the best Citrus County
finisher, running a time of 20:21 on
the shady course with a mix of grass


and pavement Citrus harrier Alyssa
Weber was eighth (20:28). Lecanto's
Chloe Benoist was 13th (20:49).


It was a pain and
gain situation for
Consol.
"There was a lot
of pavement," she
said. "It hurt my
calves."


Consol won the Beat the Sheriff
race a week earlier. A soccer


standout, she is in her first year of
cross country
"Clarissa is doing great," said
Crystal River girls
coach Lisa Carter.
"She's really
strong, really con-
ditioned. She's in
the middle of travel soccer and is
doing cross country now. We have
people taking SATs. I'm missing
Delaney (Calew) and Kristen


Geaux home!.


-. ..



Associated Press
Florida running back Mike Gillislee (23) ran for 146 yards and two touchdowns Saturday as the No. 10
Gators defeated No. 4 LSU 14-6 at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville.

No. 10 Florida shuts doum No. 4 LSU in 14-6 triumph


Associated Press
GAINESVILLE This was
old-school football at its best, the
kind of performance only South-
eastern Conference loyalists
could love.
And Florida yes
Florida was the
team putting on a
show.
Mike Gillislee ran
for a career-high 146
yards and two touchdowns,
bringing the 10th-ranked Gators
to life in the second half as they
upended No. 4 LSU 14-6 on
Saturday


Led by Gillislee and a domi-
nant defense, Florida's grind-it-
out victory avenged a 41-11 loss in
Baton Rouge last season, handed
the Tigers their first regular-sea-
son loss in 19 games and gave
coach Will Muschamp a
signature win in his
second season.
Muschamp's trans-
formation of the
Gators from spread-of-
fense speed-merchants to
hard-running street fighters
seems to be complete. It was the
program's first victory against a
ranked team since beating rival
Georgia in 2010.


"We wanted to hurt them,"
Florida defensive end Do-
minique Easley said. "We wanted
them to feel the pain that we felt
last year. We had hurt in our
heart, so we wanted them to feel
that same thing."
Linebacker Jon Bostic and
safety Matt Elam provided big
plays on defense. Gillislee once
again carried the load on of-
fense, carrying 34 times.
Together, they wore down the
Tigers (5-1, 1-1 SEC) in the second
half no surprise since the
Gators (5-0, 4-0) have been doing
See Page B4


Associated Press
Florida State head coach Jimbo
Fisher directs his team during the
first half Saturday against North
Carolina State in Raleigh, N.C..


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(Dunlap). I don't have a full team.
This is all getting us ready for dis-
tricts. They did great today I'm
proud of them."
Weber found this
course worked for
her
"It's a nice
course," Weber
said. "It's flat."
See Page B4



N.C. St.


shocks


FSU

No. 3 'Noles

blow 16-point

lead in 17-16

loss to Wolfpack

Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. Mike
Glennon found Bryan Under-
wood for a 2-yard touchdown
pass on fourth down with 16
seconds left, helping North
Carolina State rally to beat
third-ranked Florida State 17-
16 on Saturday night.
The Seminoles (5-1, 2-1 At-
lantic Coast Conference) ap-
peared poised to strengthen
their grip on their division,
leading 16-0 at halftime be-
hind a dominating defensive
performance. But the Wolf-
pack (4-2, 1-1) inched closer
after halftime before coming
up with a game-turning
blocked punt with 2:27 left,
giving the ball back to Glen-
non at the FSU 43 with a
chance to complete a stun-
ning comeback.
Glennon marched the Wolf-
pack down the field and com-
pleted a pair of fourth-down
passes, the second when he
found Underwood alone over
the middle to tie the game
and take the lead on the ensu-
ing point-after kick.
FSU drove near midfield in
the final seconds, but the
Wolfpack defense knocked
down EJ Manuel's despera-
tion heave near the goal line
to end it.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Irish blast 'Canes


No. 9 ND nabs

41-3 triumph

over Miami

Associated Press

CHICAGO Cierre Wood
and George Atkinson III gave
Notre Dame its first 100-yard
rushing duo in a decade, and
Everett Golson came off the
bench to lead the No. 9 Irish
to a 41-3 victory over Miami
on Saturday night in what
was a very tame sequel to the
famed "Catholics vs. Con-
victs" rivalry
Wood rushed for 118 yards
and two touchdowns, and
Atkinson added 123 yards
and another score. Golson,
who sat the first series as
punishment for violating
team rules, completed his
first six passes and finished
17 of 22 as Notre Dame im-
proved to 5-0 for the first
time since 2002.
The loss snapped a three-
game win streak for Miami,
which was held to just 285
yards after piling up 1,260
yards and 86 points in its
previous two games. The
Hurricanes (4-2) were hurt
by at least a half-dozen
drops by their receivers, in-
cluding two certain touch-
downs by Phillip Dorsett on
Miami's very first drive.
Miami's only points came
on Jake Wieclaw's 28-yard
field goal in the first quarter
Back in the 1980s, Notre
Dame-Miami was perhaps
the nastiest, most hotly con-
tested rivalry in college foot-
ball. Most entertaining, too.
Both teams were ranked
in the top 10 when they met
in 1987, '88, '89 and '90, and
from 1987 through 1989 the
winner went on to win the
national title. The teams
didn't like each other, either,
and made no secret of it Po-
lice actually had to be called
in to break up a pushing and
shoving match as the teams
were leaving the field after
pregame warmups at Notre


E-_r--------------,-i ------- *- '. --- ---- --- ---r, ^ i- - -* * = --, ^ -. ---c ---- *-.. r m
Associated Press
Miami tight end Clive Walford advances the ball and is tackled by Notre Dame cornerback
Bennett Jackson (2), Manti Te'o, behind, and Zeke Motta (17) during the first half
Saturday at Soldier Field in Chicago. The No. 9 Irish won 41-3 over the Hurricanes.


Dame Stadium in 1988.
In a video posted on
Notre Dame's website, for-
mer Irish coach Lou Holtz
said he urged his team to
avoid any on-field incidents
against Miami.
"After we win the game, if
Miami wants to fight, fine,
we'll meet 'em in the alley,"
Holtz, on the video, recalled
saying to his team. "And if
they do, you save Jimmy
Johnson's (butt) for me."
The Irish stormed out of
the locker room and beat
Miami 31-30. Many still con-
sider it the best home win in
Notre Dame history, and it
propelled the Irish to their
eighth and most recent-
national title.
The teams played the
next two years before the ri-
valry was discontinued,
with Notre Dame officials
feeling "it brought out the
worst sides of fans." (Con-
sidering it was Notre Dame
fans who came up with the
"Catholics vs. Convicts"


moniker, it's hard to argue
with them.) It would be 20
years before the teams
would meet again, in the
2010 Sun Bowl.
But that old chippiness
was nowhere to be found at
Soldier Field. Most of the
Irish and Hurricanes weren't
even born in 1988, and it's
hard to nurse a grudge when
the history is so ancient.
Hard when the game is
such a mismatch, too.
Miami should have been
up 7-0 after its first series,
but Dorsett dropped two
surefire touchdowns, the
second going through his
hands on the goal line. In-
stead of making the Irish
play catch-up, the Hurri-
canes were forced to punt.
Then, after chasing
Tommy Rees off the field in
three plays, the Hurricanes
gave them a second chance
when Gabriel Terry was
called for roughing the
kicker. Golson replaced


Rees and, six plays later
rushed for what looked like
a touchdown. He was ruled
down at the 1 upon review,
but Theo Riddick scored on
the next play and Notre
Dame was off and running.
After a missed field goal
just before halftime left the
Irish with a slim 13-3 lead,
they broke the game open on
the first series of the second
half. Taking off from the
Miami 39, Wood ripped off a
long run up the right sideline
that looked like it was good
for a touchdown. But reviews
showed he stepped out at the
2. No matter. He rumbled
right up the middle on the
next play to give Notre Dame
a 20-3 lead with just under 12
minutes left in the third.
The Irish chewed up 86
yards, all on the ground, on
their next drive, capping it
with a 3-yard run by Wood.
That gave Notre Dame a 27-
3 lead, and the game was all
but out of reach.


Temple rolls past



South Florida


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Marcus Green blocked a
late field goal attempt and
Montel Harris scored two
touchdowns to lead Tem-
ple to a 37-28 victory over
South Florida in a Big East
Conference matchup
Saturday.
The game marked Tem-
ple's re-entry into the Big
East after the Owls were
kicked out of the confer-
ence in 2004.
Temple snapped a two-
game losing skid with the
victory, improving to 2-2
overall and 1-0 in the Big
East. After South Florida
opened the season with a
pair of victories, the loss
was the Bulls' fourth-
straight defeat, dropping
them to 2-4 overall and 0-2
in the conference.
"I thought our kids were
scratching, and fighting
and clawing and not re-
lenting, and had two losses
against two good football
teams, and our kids never
blinked," Temple coach
Steve Addazio said. "This
is a great win for our pro-
gram. It's an emotional
win. It's Temple back in
the Big East Conference,
our first Big East game
making a statement that
our program is headed in
the right direction and


Temple 37, USF 28
South Florida 7 0 14 7 28
Temple 6 3 14 14 37
First Quarter
Tem-Coyer 24 run (kick failed), 8:38.
USF-Lamar 24 pass from Daniels (Bonani
kick), 3:34.
Second Quarter
Tem-FG McManus 50, :00.
Third Quarter
USF-Lamar 19 run (Bonani kick), 11:14.
Tem-M.Brown 15 run (McManus kick), 6:23.
Tem-Booth 9 pass from Coyer (McManus
kick), 5:05.
USF-Murray 4 run (Bonani kick), 1:19.
Fourth Quarter
Tem-M.Harris 3 run (McManus kick), 7:29.
USF-Daniels 1 run (Bonani kick), 5:19.
Tem-M.Harris 35 run (McManus kick), 1:03.
A-25,796.


we'll be a valued member
in this conference."
Harris, a transfer from
Boston College, erupted for
a season-best 133 yards on
24 carries and two fourth-
quarter touchdowns.
Temple's Chris Coyer
was a very efficient 16 for
20 for 167 yards, throwing
for one touchdown and
scoring the first TD of the
game on a 24-yard run on
the Owls' first possession.
"It was a great team ef-
fort, and my offensive line
opened up some holes, but
it was a great team win,
and it was in the back of
my mind that I wasn't able
to show people how good I
could play," said Harris,
who had been hampered
by a hamstring injury that
limited him to 15 carries
for 35 yards in two games.
"I think this says we're not
just a team everyone can
run over. I would say I
think this week I felt my
leg getting back to normal."
South Florida was in po-
sition to take the lead late
in the fourth quarter. But
on third-and-one at the
Temple 23, with around
1:30 left to play, Demetri
Murray went wide and was
pulled down by Temple
linebacker Tyler Matake-
vich, a true freshman who
had a team-high 15 tackles,
for a five-yard loss.

USF Tem
First downs 23 22
Rushes-yards 44-165 51-216
Passing 219 167
Comp-Att-Int 18-31-1 16-20-0
Return Yards 19 33
Punts-Avg. 5-43.0 7-42.9
Fumbles-Lost 3-2 1-0
Penalties-Yards 2-30 7-85
Time of Possession 26:56 33:04
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Florida, Murray 19-80, Lamar
10-57, Shaw 4-17, Marc 1-7, Daniels 9-6, Hop-
kins 1-(minus 2). Temple, M.Harris 24-133,
M.Brown 12-59, Coyer 11-54, Team 4-(minus 30).
PASSING-South Florida, Daniels 18-31-1-
219. Temple, Coyer 16-20-0-167.
RECEIVING-South Florida, Hopkins 3-66,
Marc 3-41, Lamar 3-33, Mitchell 3-21, A.Davis
2-21, Landi 2-18, Shaw 1-18, Murray 1-1.Tem-
ple, Booth 3-39, Fitzpatrick 3-34, M.Harris 3-
15, M.Brown 2-26, Jackson 2-15, Miller 1-16,
Harper 1-12, Christopher 1-10.


NFL STATISTICS


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y Jets 2 2 0 .500 81 109
New England 2 2 0 .500 134 92
Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 115 131
Miami 1 3 0 .250 86 90
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 4 0 0 1.000 126 56
Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 83
Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 62 97
Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 81 151
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 121 83
Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 112 112
Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 75
Cleveland 0 4 0 .000 73 98
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 3 1 0 .750 100 71
Denver 2 2 0 .500 114 83
Kansas City 1 3 0 .250 88 136
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 125
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 1 0 .750 66 83
Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 88
Washington 2 2 0 .500 123 123
N.Y Giants 2 2 0 .500 111 84
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 4 0 0 1.000 124 76
Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 91
Carolina 1 3 0 .250 80 109
New Orleans 0 4 0 .000 110 130
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Minnesota 3 1 0 .750 90 72
Chicago 3 1 0 .750 108 68
Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 85 81
Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 114
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 4 1 0 .800 94 78
San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 104 65
St. Louis 3 2 0 .600 96 94
Seattle 2 2 0 .500 70 58
Thursday's Game
St. Louis 17, Arizona 3
Today's Games
Baltimore at Kansas City 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Buffalo at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Tennessee at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m.
San Diego at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay
Monday's Game
Houston at N.Y Jets, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 11
Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 14
Oakland at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Miami, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Houston, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New
Orleans
Monday, Oct. 15
Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.


AFC leaders
Week 4
Quarterbacks


Roethlis., PIT
Schaub, HOU
Dalton, CIN
Brady, NWE
P Manning, DEN
Flacco, BAL
P Rivers, SND
Locker, TEN
Fitzpatrick, BUF
C. Palmer, OAK

J. Charles, KAN
A. Foster, HOU
Re. Bush, MIA
Jones-Drew, JAC
Spiller, BUF
Ridley, NWE
McGahee, DEN
R. Rice, BAL
Green-Ellis, CIN
Richardson, CLE

A.. Green, CIN
Hartline, MIA
Welker, NWE
Bowe, KAN
Lloyd, NWE
Decker, DEN
Wayne, IND
R. Rice, BAL
D.Thomas, DEN
Bess, MIA
Pui

McKelvin, BUF
Ad. Jones, CIN
Kerley NYJ
M.Thigpen, MIA
Arenas, KAN
Cribbs, CLE
P Adams, OAK
Ant. Brown, PIT
Edelman, NWE
Br. Tate, CIN


AttCom Yds
120 82 904
124 83 953
126 85 1111
154 101 1227
153 99 1162
156 99 1269
126 87 897
106 67 781
125 72 931
162 99 1081
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
72 415 5.76
103 380 3.69
67 369 5.51
72 352 4.89
41 341 8.32
74 339 4.58
69 325 4.71
64 317 4.95
82 286 3.49
64 222 3.47
Receivers
No Yds Avg
27 428 15.9
25 455 18.2
25 380 15.2
25 342 13.7
25 287 11.5
24 322 13.4
23 294 12.8
22 174 7.9
21 325 15.5
20 297 14.9


NFC leaders
Week 4
Quarterbacks
Att Comrn Yds TI
M. Ryan, ATL 147 1021162 1
Griffin III, WAS 124 861070
Ale. Smith, SNF 113 76 784
Ponder, MIN 123 84 824
Kolb, ARI 107 67 752
A. Rodgers, GBY 156 109 1064
E. Manning, NYG 160 1031320


LG
73t
80t
59
33t
27
35
30t
37
71t
23


nt Returners
No Yds Avg LG
6 178 29.7 88t
5 98 19.6 81t
7 119 17.0 68t
10 159 15.9 72t
10 133 13.3 24
11 144 13.1 27
7 78 11.1 47
5 55 11.0 23
6 63 10.5 22
7 68 9.7 19


Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG
Goodman, SND 8 234 29.3 37
Cribbs, CLE 12 341 28.4 39
Vaughn, IND 6 164 27.3 40
Reynaud, TEN 15 408 27.2105t
McKnight, NYJ 10 271 27.1 44
McKelvin, BUF 5 131 26.2 34
D.Thompson, BAL 13 337 25.9 49
M.Thigpen, MIA 10 252 25.2 32
D. McCourty NWE 5 118 23.6 28
Parmele, JAC 8 185 23.1 38
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret
A. Foster, HOU 5 4 1 0
Battle, SND 4 3 1 0
Chandler, BUF 4 0 4 0
H. Miller, PIT 4 0 4 0
T Richardson, CLE 4 3 1 0
Spiller, BUF 4 3 1 0
McGahee, DEN 3 3 0 0
Bowe,KAN 3 0 3 0
J. Charles, KAN 3 2 1 0
A.. Green, CIN 3 0 3 0
Kicking
PAT FG LG
Gostkowski, NWE 14-14 10-13 53
Tucker, BAL 13-13 8-9 56
S. Graham, HOU 15-15 7-8 41
Nugent, CIN 13-13 7-7 47
M. Prater, DEN 11-11 7-7 53
Succop, KAN 8-8 8-9 45
P Dawson, CLE 7-7 8-8 52
Janikowski, OAK 5-5 8-8 51
Bironas, TEN 9-9 6-8 38
Folk, NYJ 9-9 6-6 39


C. Newton, CA
Brees, NOR
Stafford, DET


M. Lynch, SEA
L. McCoy, PHL
Morris, WAS
A. Peterson, MIN
Gore, SNF
M. Turner, ATL
Griffin III, WAS
D. Martin, TAM
Murray DAL
Benson, GBY

Cruz, NYG
Amendola, STL
Harvin, MIN
Ca. Johnson, DET
R. White, ATL
Gonzalez, ATL
J. Graham, NOR
B. Marshall, CHI
Pettigrew, DET
Sproles, NOR
Pun

Sherels, MIN
Cobb, GBY
Hester, CHI
Logan, DET
Franks, ATL
Randle, NYG
Amendola, STL
J. Adams, CAR
Sproles, NOR
Washington, SEA


107 681013
191 1101350
173 1141182
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
92 423 4.60
81 384 4.74
82 376 4.59
79 332 4.20
66 326 4.94
55 257 4.67
39 252 6.46
71 247 3.48
61 237 3.89
64 228 3.56
Receivers
No Yds Avg
32 388 12.1
31 351 11.3
30 299 10.0
29 423 14.6
27 413 15.3
26 265 10.2
24 248 10.3
23 352 15.3
23 223 9.7
23 207 9.0
int Returners
No Yds Avg
8 150 18.8
7 108 15.4
7 78 11.1
9 98 10.9
5 49 9.8
6 58 9.7
8 73 9.1
5 42 8.4
6 50 8.3
8 64 8.0


Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
Harvin, MIN 9 345 38.3
Washington, SEA 7 264 37.7
D.Wilson, NYG 13 393 30.2
Sproles, NOR 12 353 29.4
Hester, CHI 9 241 26.8
Cobb, GBY 8 205 25.6
Banks, WAS 8 202 25.3
Logan, DET 5 124 24.8
Benn, TAM 8 195 24.4
K. Hunter, SNF 7 165 23.6
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
Ve. Davis, SNF 4 0 4
Griffin III, WAS 4 4 0
Morris, WAS 4 4 0
Roberts, ARI 4 0 4
And. Brown, NYG 3 3 0
Mi. Austin, DAL 3 0 3
Ma. Bennett, NYG 3 0 3
M. Bush, CHI 3 3 0
Gonzalez, ATL 3 0 3
Gore, SNF 3 3 0
Kicking
PAT FG
Ja. Hanson, DET 8-8 12-13
Tynes, NYG 10-10 11-12
Zuerlein, STL 5-5 12-12
M. Bryant, ATL 13-13 9-9
Akers, SNF 11-11 9-12
Gould, CHI 12-12 8-8
Walsh, MIN 9-9 9-10
Barth, TAM 7-7 9-9
Cundiff, WAS 15-15 6-10
Feely ARI 10-10 7-7


'Phins must shield QB


Miami needs

to protect

Tannehill vs.

Cincy rush

Associated Press

CINCINNATI Ryan
Tannehill showed the
Miami Dolphins what he
could do
Miami when he
Dolphins gets some
time, put-
(1-3) at ting up a
Cincinnati record
BengalS number in
(3-1) their lat-
est over-
Time: time loss.
1 p.m. T h e
today, question
TV: CBS this week:
Can they
keep him
on his feet long enough to
do it again?
The Dolphins (1-3) bring
a streak of back-to-back
overtime losses to Cincin-
nati, where their rookie
quarterback is going to face
a defense that's so far the
best at bringing them down.
The Bengals (3-1) lead the
NFL with 17 sacks, includ-


Associated Press
Miami running back Daniel Thomas and the Dolphins travel
to Cincinnati for a 1 p.m. game today against the Bengals.


ing six sacks in each of
their last two games.
They've faced rookie or
second-year quarterbacks
in each of their last three
games, and won all three.
That combination of inex-
perience at quarterback
and a relentless pass rush
has worked in Cincinnati's
favor.
"In the quarterback's
mind, his clock is sped up
and he really has to get rid
of the ball, he can't hold
onto it," safety Chris
Crocker said. "Our defen-
sive linemen are very tall
guys. Just them getting
their arms up, getting
around him it's uncom-


fortable. As long as they
continue to get the pres-
sure like they're getting,
then we'll make a lot of
plays."
In Miami, it's all about
getting Tannehill ready to
face the heat.
The eighth overall pick
in the draft had a sensa-
tional day during a 24-21
overtime loss at Arizona,
completing 26 of 41 for 431
yards the most yards
ever by a rookie quarter-
back on the road and the
second-most overall. He
had two bad moments that
turned the game, both
when the Cardinals got
pressure on him.


Jags prepare for physical Bears


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE
When asked what Chicago
Bears defensive end Julius
Peppers brings to the table,
Jacksonville Jaguars guard
Uche Nwaneri responded
with arguably the perfect
one-liner
"A lot of problems," he
said.
Here's the bigger
predicament for the
Jaguars (1-3): Peppers isn't
the only one wreaking
havoc on Chicago's defense.
The Bears (3-1) have
smothered their last two op-
ponents, stuffing the run and
forcing turnovers in the
passing game. Now they face
the league's worst offense in
Jacksonville and it looks
like a Sunday mismatch.


The Jaguars have man-
aged a combined 329 yards
in two home games, a 117-
yard effort against Houston
in Week 2 and an even
more baffling, 212-yard out-
put against injury-riddled
Cincinnati last week.
"I can't explain it," coach
Mike Mularkey said. "I've
told them that, at some
point, it's going to go our
way I feel like when it does,
it's going to happen in
bunches, and I think they
believe the same thing."
The one thing the
Jaguars seemingly have in
their favor is they're getting
the Bears on a short week.
Chicago beat Dallas 34-18
on the road Monday night,
got home early Tuesday
and was back on a plane
Saturday


Associated Press
Jacksonville Jaguars quar-
terback Blaine Gabbert
throws during the first half
last Sunday against the
Cincinnati Bengals.


B2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


FOOTBALL


AR





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Backyard beating


No. 6 USC

routs No. 5

Georgia 35-7

Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. Con-
nor Shaw threw two touch-
down passes and ran for
another, Ace Sanders had a
dazzling 70-yard punt return
touchdown and No. 6 South
Carolina's defense domi-
nated fifth-ranked Georgia
in a 35-7 victory Saturday
The Gamecocks (6-0, 4-0
Southeastern Conference)
won their school-record 10th
straight game with a per-
formance that marked cer-
tainly marked them an
Eastern Division front-run-
ner and maybe showed
they're capable of even more.
Those tests come soon as
South Carolina travels to
once-beaten LSU next week
and then to Florida on Oct.
20. It'd be hard to pick
against the Gamecocks after
this one.
South Carolina grounded
"Gurshall," holding Geor-
gia's stellar freshmen Todd
Gurley and Keith Marshall
to 76 yards combined. The
Bulldogs (5-1, 3-1) finished
with 224 yards, less than
half their season's average
coming in.
No. 8 West Va. 48,
No. 11 Texas 45
AUSTIN, Texas Geno
Smith passed for four touch-
downs, leading No. 8 West Vir-
ginia to another wild shootout
win in the Big 12, this time tak-
ing out No. 11 Texas 48-45.
Smith, who has 24 touch-
down passes this season with-
out an interception, hit Tavon
Austin with a 6-yard score with
10:50 left to play. Andrew Buie
ran for 207 yards and two
touchdowns, the second com-
ing giving the Mountaineers a
critical 10-point lead late.
West Virginia (5-0, 2-0) didn't
seal the win until recovering an
onside kick with 14 seconds left
after Texas scored a touchdown
on a pass from David Ash to
Marquise Goodwin.
Joe Bergeron scored four
touchdowns, all on short runs,
for Texas (4-1, 1-1).
No. 7 Kansas St.56,
Kansas 16
MANHATTAN, Kan. John
Hubert ran for 101 yards and four
touchdowns on just 10 carries,
and Collin Klein had two touch-
downs running and throwing as
Kansas State routed Kansas.
Klein finished with 129 yards
passing and 116 yards rushing
to help the Wildcats (5-0, 2-0 Big
12) pile up more than 50 points
for the third straight year against
their biggest rival. They've won
four straight against the Jay-
hawks (1-4, 0-2) since Bill Sny-
der returned as coach.
The longtime Kansas State
coach probably had some choice
words for his team at halftime,
when a slew of mistakes resulted
in a modest 21-14 lead. But the
Wildcats scored four touchdowns
in the third quarter, three in a
span of about 5 minutes, to put
the game away.
No. 15 Clemson 47,
Georgia Tech 31
CLEMSON, S.C.- Tajh
Boyd threw for a career high 397


Associated Press
South Carolina quarterback Connor Shaw throws a short pass to running back Marcus
Lattimore to pick up a first down during the first quarter Saturday against Georgia in
Columbia, S.C. The No. 6 Gamecocks blasted the No. 5 Bulldogs 35-7 in a key SEC East clash.


yards and DeAndre Hopkins had
173 yards receiving to lead
Clemson over Georgia Tech.
The Tigers (5-1, 2-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference) gained 601
yards, while the Yellow Jackets
(2-4, 1-3) gained 483.
Boyd threw for two touch-
downs, including a 35-yard
touchdown to Hopkins that put
Clemson up 38-31 with 10:29
left in the game.
Georgia Tech bobbled the
kickoff and started its next pos-
session at the 2 yard line. Tigers
linebacker Spencer Shuey
sniffed out an option pitch two
plays later for a safety.
No.14 Oregon St. 19,
Washington State 6
CORVALLIS, Ore. Jordan
Poyer had three interceptions,
Sean Mannion passed for 270
yards and No. 14 Oregon State
survived a shaky start with a 19-
6 win over Washington State.
Markus Wheaton had 95
yards receiving and a touch-
down but it was the Beavers
defense which kept the
Cougars at arm's length on the
day when Mannion, who threw
three interceptions, was more
down than up.
Oregon State (4-0, 3-0 Pac-
12) has surpassed its win total
from all of 2011, but many in the
school-record crowd of 46,579
were left shaking their heads at
penalties and turnovers as the


offense sputtered. Mannion
completed 25 of 42 passes and
was sacked three times.
Iowa St. 37,
No. 15 TCU 23
FORT WORTH, Texas -
Jared Barnett threw three
touchdowns to Josh Lenz, who
later had a scoring toss of his
own on a trick play, as Iowa
State ended TCU's FBS-best
12-game win streak.
It was the first Big 12 home
game for conference newcomer
TCU (4-1, 1-1), which played
without suspended quarterback
Casey Pachall.
Barnett was 12-of-21 passing
for 183 yards and ran nine
times for 30 yards in his first
start this season for the Cy-
clones (4-1, 1-1).
No. 17 Oklahoma 41,
Texas Tech 20
LUBBOCK, Texas Landry
Jones passed for two touch-
downs, Blake Bell ran for two
more and Oklahoma beat Texas
Tech to avenge a home loss to
the Red Raiders in 2011.
The win was crucial for Okla-
homa to remain in the conver-
sation for the Big 12 title.
Both of Jones' touchdown
passes went for 13 yards -
one each to Justin Brown and
Kenny Stills. Bell, in at quarter-
back, scored his touchdowns
from a yard out.


Javon Harris put the game
out of reach midway through
the third quarter when he re-
turned an interception 46 yards
for a TD to put the Sooners (3-
1, 1-1) up 38-13.
No. 18 Stanford 54,
Arizona 48, OT
STANFORD, Calif. Chase
Thomas intercepted a tipped
pass by Matt Scott in overtime,
Stepfan Taylor ran for a 21-yard
score two plays later and Stan-
ford rallied from a two-touch-
down deficit to stun Arizona.
Josh Nunes threw for a ca-
reer-high 360 yards and two
touchdowns and ran for three
more scores for Stanford (4-1,
2-1 Pac-12) to offset Scott's
record-setting performance.
Scott completed 45 of 69
passes both school records
- for 491 yards and three
touchdowns until Henry Ander-
son tipped his final pass in over-
time that Thomas intercepted.
Arizona (3-3, 0-3) amassed 617
total yards.
No. 20 Miss. St. 27,
Kentucky 14
LEXINGTON, Ky.- Tyler
Russell passed for two touch-
downs and Mississippi State
held Kentucky to just 228 yards
on offense in the victory.
LaDarius Perkins carried 25
times for 110 yards, including a
31-yard score, and Devon Bell


College Football
scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 31, Bryant 14
Army 34, Boston College 31
Bloomsburg 38, Millersville 14
Brockport 35, William Paterson 14
Brown 17, Rhode Island 7
California (Pa.) 41, Clarion 22
Castleton St. 35, Norwich 27
Cortland St. 42, College of NJ 28
Dartmouth 34, Yale 14
East Stroudsburg 35, West Chester 28
Edinboro 44, Gannon 24
Fordham 38, Georgetown 31
Harvard 45, Cornell 13
Heidelberg 45, Capital 10
Hobart 28, Springfield 7
Holy Cross 13, Bucknell 6
Lehigh 35, Columbia 14
Lycoming 42, FDU-Florham 7
Maine 26, Delaware 3
Penn St. 39, Northwestern 28
Princeton 35, Lafayette 14
RPI 46, St. Lawrence 27
Richmond 28, Villanova 17
Rochester 44, Merchant Marine 26
Rowan 33, Montclair St. 7
Rutgers 19, UConn 3
S. Connecticut 47, Pace 26
St. Francis (Pa.) 10, Robert Morris 3
Stony Brook 49, Charleston Southern 7
Temple 37, South Florida 28
Trinity (Conn.) 53, Hamilton 14
Utica 51, Buffalo St. 44
Wagner 12, Sacred Heart 3
Walsh 34, Malone 7
Widener 56, Stevenson 20
Wilkes 45, Misericordia 13
William & Mary 34, Penn 28
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 35, MVSU 0
Alabama St. 45, Texas Southern 0
Alcorn St. 20, Southern U. 17
Appalachian St. 35, Elon 23
Arkansas 24, Auburn 7
Bethel (Tenn.) 57, Pikeville 17
Bethune-Cookman 28, NC A&T 12
Boise St. 40, Southern Miss. 14
Carson-Newman 42, Catawba 7
Clemson 47, Georgia Tech 31
Cumberland (Tenn.) 42, Union (Ky.) 21
Dayton 38, Davidson 3
Delaware St. 20, Norfolk St. 17
Duke 42, Virginia 17
Florida 14, LSU 6
Georgetown (Ky.) 42, Campbellsville 13
Georgia Southern 45, W. Carolina 13
Hampden-Sydney 24, Bridgewater (Va.) 7
Howard 17, Florida A&M 10
Jacksonville 38, Morehead St. 17
James Madison 13, Towson 10
Liberty 42, Gardner-Webb 35
Louisiana-Lafayette 41, Tulane 13
La.-Monroe 31, Middle Tennessee 17
Mars Hill 37, Wingate 31
Maryland 19, Wake Forest 14
Memphis 14, Rice 10
Mississippi St. 27, Kentucky 14
Morgan St. 45, Savannah St. 6
Murray St. 52, Austin Peay 14
NC Central 40, SC State 10
New Hampshire 44, Georgia St. 21
North Carolina 48, Virginia Tech 34
Northwestern St. 30, Lamar 23
Samford 38, The Citadel 7
South Carolina 35, Georgia 7
St. Augustine's 32, Livingstone 27
Tennessee St. 23, E. Kentucky 20
Texas A&M 30, Mississippi 27
Thomas More 54, Wash. & Jefferson 18
Tulsa 45, Marshall 38
UAB 52, SE Louisiana 3
UNC-Pembroke 20, Tusculum 10
UT-Martin 51, E. Illinois 37
Urbana 74, Kentucky Wesleyan 0
VMI 17, Presbyterian 7
Virginia Union 61, Lincoln (Pa.) 13
Washington & Lee 45, Emory & Henry 28
Wofford 20, Furman 17
MIDWEST
Adrian 27, Alma 3

kicked field goals of 20 and 37
yards as Mississippi State
moved to 5-0 for the first time
since 1999. The Bulldogs are
2-0 in SEC play.
Russell was 23 of 39 for 269
yards, hitting Adrian Marcus
and Chad Bumphis for touch-
downs of 10 and 27 yards,
respectively.
Freshmen quarterbacks
Patrick Towles and Jalen Whit-
low both led scoring drives for
Kentucky (1-5, 0-3), which lost
its fourth straight.
No. 22 Rutgers 19,
Connecticut 3
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Jawan
Jamison ran for 110 yards and
Wayne Warren returned an in-
terception 25 yards for a scores
as Rutgers suffocated UConn
to remain undefeated.
The Scarlet Knights (5-0, 2-0
Big East) are off to their best
start since 2007, and they
avenged a bitter loss to the
Huskies that ended last regular
season and kept Rutgers from
sharing the conference title.
Jamison ran it 28 times and
recorded his sixth straight 100-


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


C C I T R U 0 U N T E




Political Forum

Thursday, October 18th

College of Central Florida
Forum Starts at 7pm
Doors Open at 6pm

Meet the local candidates
and hear their positions.

Sheriff

U.S. House of
Representatives District 11

Florida House of
Representatives District 34

Superintendent of Schools

Clerk of Courts


For more information call
Mike Wright 352-563-3228
000CST.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 B3

Ashland 44, Ohio Dominican 21
Augsburg 48, St. John's (Minn.) 17
Aurora 41, Benedictine (III.) 30
Baker 42, Avila 13
Baldwin-Wallace 22, Ohio Northern 20
Bemidji St. 29, Mary 21
Bethel (Minn.) 15, Concordia (Moor.) 14
Bowling Green 24, Akron 10
Butler 56, Valparaiso 17
Carleton 21, Macalester 20
Carroll (Wis.) 55, Lawrence 6
Case Reserve 31, Wooster 28
Cincinnati 52, Miami (Ohio) 14
Coe 69, Loras 7
Concordia (St.R) 35, Upper Iowa 6
Concordia (Wis.) 55, Maranatha Baptist 8
Crown (Minn.) 41, Presentation 20
Drake 38, San Diego 10
Dubuque 29, Luther 0
Elmhurst 31, Augustana (III.) 27
Eureka 22, Martin Luther 12
Ferris St. 40, Grand Valley St. 24
Findlay 41, Tiffin 17
Greenville 34, Mac Murray 27
Grinnell 21, Monmouth (lll.) 7
Hope 24, Olivet 14
Indiana St. 31, Missouri St. 17
Kansas St. 56, Kansas 16
Kent St. 41, E. Michigan 14
Knox 35, Beloit 33
Lake Erie 38, Notre Dame Coll. 35
Lake Forest 35, Illinois College 28
Lakeland 31, Rockford 7
Michigan 44, Purdue 13
Michigan St. 31, Indiana 27
Michigan Tech 41, N. Michigan 17
Mid-Am Nazarene 63, Culver-Stockton 3
Minn. Duluth 45, Minn. St.-Moorhead 14
Minn. St.-Mankato 52, Augustana (SD) 14
Minn.-Morris 54, Westminster (Mo.) 20
Morningside 28, Doane 3
Mount Union 66, Wilmington (Ohio) 0
N. Dakota St. 48, Youngstown St. 7
N. Illinois 35, Ball St. 23
North Central 42, Millikin 22
Northern St. (SD) 31, Minot St. 17
Northwestern (Minn.) 14, St. Scholastica 13
Ohio 38, Buffalo 31
Ohio Wesleyan 26, DePauw 22
Olivet Nazarene 20, Siena Heights 14, 40T
Robert Morris-Chi. 42, Concordia (Mich.) 9
S. Illinois 17, Illinois St. 0
SW Minnesota St. 40, Wayne (Neb.) 24
SaginawVall. St. 28, Northwood (Mich.) 20
Simpson (Iowa) 21, Central 18
St. Cloud St. 36, Minn.-Crookston 24
St. Norbert 20, Cornell (Iowa) 16
St. Olaf 48, Hamline 14
St. Thomas (Minn.) 28, Gustavus 14
Toledo 50, Cent. Michigan 35
Trine 27, Albion 22
Vanderbilt 19, Missouri 15
W. Illinois 24, South Dakota 17
W. Michigan 52, UMass 14
Wartburg 42, Buena Vista 21
Wayne (Mich.) 24, Hillsdale 21
Winona St.10, Sioux Falls 9
Wis.-Oshkosh 50, Wis.-Eau Claire 13
Wis.-Platteville 40, Wis.-LaCrosse 10
Wis.-Stout 33, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 14
Wis.-Whitewater 35, Wis.-River Falls 0
Wisconsin 31, Illinois 14
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 34, Jackson St. 24
Cent. Arkansas 34, Nicholls St. 14
Houston 44, North Texas 21
Iowa St. 37, TCU 23
Oklahoma 41, Texas Tech 20
Prairie View 31, Grambling St. 14
Sam Houston St. 51, Stephen F Austin 43
West Virginia 48, Texas 45
FAR WEST
Fresno St. 28, Colorado St. 7
Idaho 26, New Mexico St. 18
Montana 40, N. Colorado 17
Montana St. 48, UC Davis 41
Navy 28, Air Force 21, OT
Nevada 35, Wyoming 28, OT
New Mexico 35, Texas St. 14
Oregon St. 19, Washington St. 6
Sacramento St. 27, S. Utah 22
Stanford 54, Arizona 48, OT

yard game.
Penn State 39,
No. 24 N'western 28
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Quarterback Matt McGloin
scored on a 5-yard run with
2:37 left and Penn State rallied
from 11 points down in fourth
quarter to beat Northwestern.
The Nittany Lions scored
three times in the final 9:49,
starting with McGloin's 6-yard
touchdown pass to Allen Robin-
son as the receiver dragged
along the back line of the end
zone. Michael Zordich had a 2-
point conversion run to get
Penn State within 28-25 before
McGloin's scramble into the
end zone sent the homecoming
weekend crowd into a frenzy.
Penn State (4-2, 2-0 Big Ten)
stuffed a last-gasp drive after
Trevor Siemian's pass was
tipped away on fourth down.
McGloin finished 35 of 51
passing setting a school
record for completions in a
game for 282 yards and two
scores. Zack Zwinak ran for
121 yards and a score on
28 carries.






B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012



NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Atlanta 3 3 (51) at Washington
at Pittsburgh 4 3Y2 (43) Philadelphia
Green Bay 6Y2 7 (48) at Indianapolis
at N.Y. Giants 10Y29 (44)Cleveland
atMinnesota 6Y2 5Y2 (44)Tennessee
at Cincinnati 5Y2 3 (45)Miami
Baltimore 6Y2 6 (46Y2)atKansasCity
at Carolina 3 3 (43Y2)Seattle
Chicago 4 4Y2 (41)atJacksonville
at N. England 6Y2 6Y2 (52)Denver
at San Fran. 10 9Y2 (44Y2)Buffalo
at N. Orleans 3 3Y2 (53)San Diego
Monday
Houston 7 812 (41/2)atN.YJets





Late Friday box

Lecanto 28,
Wildwood 7
WW 0 0 7 0 7
LP 7 21 0 0 -28
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
LP- N. Waters 1-yard run (L. Leiva kick)
Second Quarter
LP- C. Barber 10-yard run (Leiva kick)
LP -Waters 1-yard run (Leiva kick)
LP A. Stephens 23-yard pass from Barber
(Leiva kick)
Third Quarter
WW K. Brown 13-yard run (R. Dyal kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing LP: Barber 5-12-92-1-0; WW T.
Parker 3-16-38-0-1.
Rushing LP: Waters 22-81-2; Barber 9-29-1;
WW: Brown 19-67-1; Parker 5-27-0.
Receiving LP: Stephens 4-85-1; R. Marcic 1 -
5-0; WW: T. Shaw 1-34-0; R. Wagner 1-8-0.





No. 10 Florida 14,
No. 4 LSU 6
LSU 3 3 0 0-- 6
Florida 0 0 7 7- 14
First Quarter
LSU-FG Alleman 31,10:48.
Second Quarter
LSU-FG Alleman 21, :24.
Third Quarter
Fla-Gillislee 12 run (Sturgis kick), 5:15.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Gillislee 12 run (Sturgis kick), 13:18.
A-90,824.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


LSU
8
25-42
158
11-25-1
22
7-45.6
2-2
8-83
22:36


Fla
22
58-176
61
8-12-0
2
7-49.1
2-2
6-52
37:24


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-LSU, Ware 8-21, Hilliard 5-16, Ford
4-14, Hill 2-8, Shepard 1-2, Magee 1-0, Met-
tenberger 4-(minus 19). Florida, Gillislee 34-
146, Hines 1-14, M.Brown 2-12, T.Burton 3-7,
Driskel 13-1, Patton 3-0, Team 2-(minus 4).
PASSING-LSU, Mettenberger 11-25-1-158.
Florida, Driskel 8-12-0-61.
RECEIVING-LSU, Beckham 4-78, Jacobs 2-
22, Hill 1-20, Ware 1 -20, Clement 1 -7, Copeland
1-7, Shepard 1-4. Florida, Reed 3-30, Dunbar
2-15, Hines 1-14, Debose 1-5, Hammond 1-
(minus 3).



MLB playoffs
All Times EDT
WILD CARD
Friday, Oct. 5
National League: St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3
American League: Baltimore 5, Texas 1
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)
American League
Detroit 1, Oakland 0
Saturday, Oct. 6: Detroit 3, Oakland 1
Sunday, Oct. 7: Oakland (Milone 13-10) at
Detroit (Fister 10-10), 12:07 p.m. (MLB)
Tuesday, Oct. 9: Detroit (Sanchez 4-6) at
Oakland, 9:07 p.m. (TBS)
x-Wednesday Oct. 10: Detroit (Scherzer 16-
7) at Oakland, TBD (TBS or MLB)
x-Thursday, Oct. 11: Detroit at Oakland, TBD
(TBS)
New York vs. Baltimore-Texas winner
Sunday, Oct. 7: New York (Sabathia 15-6) at
Baltimore (Hammel 8-6), 6:15 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 8: New York (Pettitte 5-4) at Bal-
timore, 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Wednesday, Oct. 10: Baltimore at New York
(Kuroda 16-11), TBD (TBS or MLB)
x-Thursday, Oct. 11: Baltimore at New York
(Hughes 16-13), TBD (TBS)
x-Friday, Oct. 12: Baltimore at New York, TBD
(TBS)
National League
Cincinnati vs. San Francisco
Saturday, Oct. 6: Cincinnati at San Francisco,
late
Sunday, Oct. 7: Cincinnati (Arroyo 12-10) at
San Francisco (Bumgarner 16-11), 9:37 p.m.
(TBS)
Tuesday, Oct. 9: San Francisco at Cincinnati
(Latos 14-4), 5:37 p.m. (TBS)
x-Wednesday, Oct. 10: San Francisco at
Cincinnati (Bailey 13-10), TBD (TBS or MLB)
x-Thursday, Oct. 11: San Francisco at Cincin-
nati, TBD (TBS)
Washington vs. Atlanta-St. Louis winner
Sunday, Oct. 7: Washington (Gonzalez 21-8)
at St. Louis (Wainwright 14-13), 3:07 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 8: Washington (Zimmermann
12-8) at St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2), 4:37 p.m.
(TBS)
Wednesday, Oct. 10: St. Louis at Washington,
TBD (TBS or MLB)
x-Thursday, Oct. 11: St. Louis at Washington,
TBD (TBS)
x-Friday, Oct. 12: St. Louis at Washington,
TBD (TBS)
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
American League
All games televised by TBS
Saturday, Oct. 13: Oakland-Detroit winner at
NewYorkOR Baltimore at Oakland-Detroit win-
ner
Sunday, Oct. 14: Oakland-Detroit winner at
New YorkOR Baltimore at Oakland-Detroit win-
ner
Tuesday Oct. 16: New York at Oakland-De-
troit winner OR Oakland-Detroit winner at Bal-
timore
Wednesday, Oct. 17: New York at Oakland-
Detroit winner OR Oakland-Detroit winner at
Baltimore
x-Thursday, Oct. 18: New York at Oakland-
Detroit winner OR Oakland-Detroit winner at
Baltimore
x-Saturday, Oct. 20: Oakland-Detroit winner
at New York OR Baltimore at Oakland-Detroit
winner
x-Sunday, Oct. 21: Oakland-Detroit winner at
New YorkOR Baltimore at Oakland-Detroit win-
ner


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
: ... CASH 3 (early)

CASH 3 (late)
2-8-5

PLAY 4 (early)
0-0-7-2
PLAY 4 (late)
5-7-9-6

FANTASY 5
Florida4-5-19-27-32

POWERBALL LOTTERY
15 26 34 36 59 5-12-19-30-41-48
POWER BALL XTRA
35 2


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Good Sam Roadside Assistance
500 race
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAAuto-Plus Nationals (Same-day Tape)
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Good Sam Roadside Assistance
500 race (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
MLB Division Series playoffs
12 p.m. (MLB) Oakland Athletics at Detroit Tigers Game 2
3 p.m. (TBS) Washington Nationals at St. Louis Cardinals
Game 1
6 p.m. (TBS) New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles -
Game 1
9:30 p.m. (TBS) Cincinnati Reds at San Francisco Giants
Game 2
BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (SUN) Preseason: Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks
3:30 p.m. (ABC) WNBA: Minnesota Lynx at Los Angeles
Sparks. Western Conference Final Game 2
BICYCLING
3:30 p.m. (NBC) UCI World Championships (Taped)
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Tours (Same-day Tape)
CRICKET
1 p.m. (ESPN2) ICC World Twenty20 final (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) LSU at Florida (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at North Carolina St. (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at Cincinnati Bengals
1 p.m. (FOX) Atlanta Falcons at Washington Redskins
4 p.m. (CBS) Denver Broncos at New England Patriots
8:20 p.m. (NBC) San Diego Chargers at New Orleans
Saints
GOLF
7:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Alfred Dunhill Links
Championship Final Round
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: SAS Championship -
Final Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Justin Timberlake Shriners
Hospitals for Children Open Final Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Neediest Kids Championship
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
RODEO
2 p.m. (NBC) Bull Riding PBR Tour (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Pumas vs Monterrey
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Maryland at North
Carolina State
4:30 p.m. (FOX) English Premier League: Newcastle United
vs. Manchester United (Same-day Tape)
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Portland Timbers at Seattle Sounders
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Kentucky at Florida

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


National League
All games televised by Fox
Sunday, Oct. 14: Cincinnati-San Francisco
winner at Washington OR St. Louis at Cincin-
nati-San Francisco winner
Monday, Oct. 15: Cincinnati-San Francisco
winner at Washington OR St. Louis at Cincin-
nati-San Francisco winner
Wednesday, Oct. 17: Washington at Cincin-
nati-San Francisco winner OR Cincinnati at St.
Louis
Thursday, Oct. 18: Washington at Cincinnati-
San Francisco winner OR Cincinnati at St. Louis
x-Friday, Oct. 19: Washington at Cincinnati-
San Francisco winner OR Cincinnati at St. Louis
x-Sunday, Oct. 21: Cincinnati-San Francisco
winner at Washington OR St. Louis at Cincin-
nati-San Francisco winner
x-Monday, Oct. 22: Cincinnati-San Francisco
winner at Washington OR St. Louis at Cincin-
nati-San Francisco winner
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Wednesday, Oct. 24: at National League, (n)
Thursday, Oct. 25: at National League, (n)
Saturday, Oct. 27: at American League, (n)
Sunday, Oct. 28: at American League, (n)
x-Monday, Oct. 29: at American League, (n)
x-Wednesday, Oct. 31: at National League,
(n)
x-Thursday, Nov. 1: at National League, (n)



Sprint Cup

Good Sam Roadside
Assistance 500
Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 191.455.
2. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 191.145.
3. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.119.
4. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 190.993.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.955.
6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 190.848.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 190.784.
8. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 190.727.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 190.662.
10. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 190.628.
11. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 190.465.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 190.427.
13. (18) KyleBusch, Toyota, 190.419.
14. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 190.393.
15. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 190.37.


16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.332.
17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 190.298.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 190.298.
19. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 190.177.
20. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 190.17.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 190.113.
22. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 189.778.
23. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 189.748.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 189.74.
25. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 189.616.
26. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 189.552.
27. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 189.38.
28. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 189.316.
29. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 189.025.
30. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 188.947.
31. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 188.794.
32. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 188.727.
33. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 188.649.
34. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 188.638.
35. (97) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 188.326.
36. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 188.296.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 188.001.
38. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 187.986.
39. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 187.46.
40. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 186.991.
41. (10) David Reutimann, Chevy, 186.783.
42. (33) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 186.289.
43. (23) R. Richardson Jr, Toyota, 185.942.


BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Named Terry
Francona manager.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Activated DE
Mike Neal from exempt status. Released DE
Phillip Merling.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-Promoted OT
Tony Hills from the practice squad. Waived
WR Kris Adams.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS-As-
signed G Kenny Reiterto Fort Wayne (ECHL).
GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS-Reassigned
G Petr Mrazek to Toledo (ECHL).
SPRINGFIELD FALCONS-Assigned LW
Oliver Gabriel and D Anton Blomqvist to
Evansville (ECHL). Released C Dan Gendur
and LW Patrick Kennedy from their tryout
agreements and returned them to Evansville.
Released RW Don Maloney and G Daren
Machesney from their tryout agreements.
ECHL
ECHL-Suspended Trenton's Tyler Miller
three games and fined him an undisclosed
amount and fined Trenton's Kory Nagy for their
actions in an Oct. 5 game against Reading.


Pirates take second



in volleyball tourney


Special to the Chronicle

The Crystal River volley-
ball team came in second in
the Bishop McLaughlin vol-
leyball tournament, played
on Friday and Saturday The
Pirates had a 4-1 record, with
its only loss coming against
host Bishop McLaughlin by
scores of 25-19, 24-26, 13-15.
Each match was best-of-3
and the Pirates' four wins
included:
A 25-14, 25-12 victory
over Brooks-Debartolo.
Defeated Seffner Chris-


tian 25-23, 23-25, 15-7.
A 25-15, 25-10 triumph
over Gulf
The tournament con-
cluded for CR with a 24-26,
25-15, 15-12 comeback effort
against Seven Rivers.
Highlights for the week-
end included:
Casidy Newcomer with
15 kills vs. Seffner and 15
kills vs. Seven Rivers.
Emily Laga had 20 digs
vs. Bishop Mclaughlin and
18 digs vs. Seven Rivers.
Sabrina Scott served 12
aces over the five matches


and led CR in assists with 47
for the weekend.
Kylie Sisk registered 7
kills and 16 digs vs. Bishop
McLaughlin and added a 16-
dig performance against
Seven Rivers.
Victoria Warne came up
with 4 blocks and 3 kills vs.
Seven Rivers.
Crystal River is now 15-5
overall. The Pirates play at
Weekie Watchee on Monday
before returning home Tues-
day to host Seven Rivers on
its Third Annual Breast Can-
cer Awareness match.


Associated Press
Florida defensive backs Marcus Roberson, left, De'Ante Saunders (26) and Josh Evans (9)
celebrate with fans after defeating LSU 14-6 Saturday in Gainesville.


HOME
Continued from Page BI

that all season. Florida,
which trailed 6-0 at halftime,
also came from behind to
beat Texas A&M and Ten-
nessee on the road last
month.
This one was even more
impressive.
"They beat us down last
year," Elam said. "We had to
come back. We had some-
thing to prove. We had a plan
to hit them in their mouth,
and we executed."
The Gators harassed quar-
terback Zach Mettenberger,
pretty much shut down run-
ning backs Spencer Ware,
Kenny Hilliard and Michael
Ford, and completely wore
down LSU's vaunted
defense.
Mettenberger completed
11 of 25 passes for 161 yards,
with an interception. LSU
finished with 42 yards rush-
ing, three more than whatAl-
abama held the Tigers to in
last season's Bowl Champi-
onship Series title game. The
Tigers were 1 of 13 on third
down and finished with just
eight first downs three on
penalties.
"I think our football team
is sick, sick with knowledge
that they could have played
better," LSU coach Les Miles
said.
Florida credited new



GATOR
Continued from Page BI

The Lecanto High girls
finished seventh (156 points)
out of 23 teams. Despite
missing two key runners,
Crystal River finished ninth
at 209 points. The Citrus
girls were 14th (409).
"We ran well as a team,"
said Lecanto High head
girls coach Dan Epstein.
"The humidity was really
tough on the girls. Some of
our girls were upset. I told
them listen, you beat some
of the top girls. This is going
to be a good indication of
where we stand in districts."
Belleview's Catherine
Blaney won the girls race
(19:47).
Crystal River High's
Brandon Harris was the top
Citrus County boy finisher.
He was 28th after running a
20:11.
Lecanto's Sam Alford was
38th (18:29).
The Lecanto boys were
eighth (281 points). Crystal
River was just behind at
ninth (292). Citrus was 14th
(384).
"Roselle Lattin has done
a great job with the team,"
said Lecanto boys assistant
coach Robert Dupler. "They
are working hard. They ran
a very strong race."
Citrus is having problems
with the air


strength coach Jeff Dillman
and the team's continually
improving offensive line -
the same one Muschamp
called soft late last season -
for the victory Gillislee got
props, too.
"I'll take Gilly over any-
body," Muschamp said. "I tell
him that all the time and I
mean that I felt that way in
spring and going into fall
camp. ... He's a Will
Muschamp guy He don't ever
say anything, he just does his
job, lines up, runs the ball. If
you ask him to block, he's
going to block. If you ask him
to catch the ball, he's going to
catch the ball. He just is a re-
ally, really, really good foot-
ball player."
It was Gillislee's third 100-
yard game of the season, and
it came against one of the
league's most feared fronts.
Highly touted defensive ends
Barkevious Mingo and Sam
Montgomery were neutral-
ized much of the day Line-
backer Kevin Minter had a
career day, finishing with 20
tackles despite missing a few
plays while dealing with leg
cramps.
Minter had two of LSU's
five sacks in the first half,
helping the Tigers hold
Florida to 47 yards at the
break.
But the Gators looked
completely different after in-
termission. They went to a
heavy package featuring two
extra offensive linemen to


"The humidity is not our
friend right now," said Cit-
rus High boys coach James
Martone. "We are working
towards district. Cameron
Grant ran an 18:54 (48th
place). He would like to be
in the 17s and is working in
that direction."
Sarasota's Courtland
Bernard won the boys race
with a clocking of 16:29.
2012 Gator Invitational
cross country race
Girls team scores
1. Palm Harbor University
104; 2. Sarasota 120; 3. New-
some 136; 4. Tampa Freedom
153; 5. Largo 155; 6. Belleview
156; 7. Lecanto 156; 8. Tampa
Chamberlain 176; 9. Crystal
River 209; 10. Spring Hill
Springstead 227; 11. Land O'
Lakes 281; 12. Wesley Chapel
310; 13. McKeel Academy 335;
14. Inverness Citrus 409; 15.
Tampa George Steinbrenner
415; 16. New Port Richey
Ridgewood 423; 17. Brooksville
Central 424; 18. Wesley Chapel
Wiregrass Ranch 443; 19.
Tampa Gaither 494; 20. Land
O' Lakes Sunlake 496; 21. Holi-
day Anclote 527; 22. Hudson
Fivay 549; 23. Zephyrhills 670.
Girls Top 10 Individuals
1. Catherine Blaney, Belle-
view 19:47; 2. Angelina Grebe,
Sarasota 19:57; 3. Alexandra
Mitchell, Freedom 20:13; 4.
Melody Yero, Belleview 20:14;
5. Clarissa Consol, Crystal
River 20:21; 6. Emily Zwijacz,


run the ball they call it
"God's play" and it worked
to perfection.
Florida scored on consec-
utive drives by running on 17
of 18 plays. Gillislee ended
both of them with 12-yard
touchdown runs, one in the
third quarter and another
early in the fourth.
"They were definitely
more physical than last
year," Mingo said.
The Gators ran the ball on
their final 25 snaps, gashing
the Tigers between the tack-
les.
"Them boys was huffing
and puffing," Easley said. "I
was looking in people's eyes
and they were scared. That's
what we wanted. We wanted
to take somebody's will. We
like to take people's will, not
just win the game. Make
them remember this night"
Maybe the play of the
game came between those
game-changing, run-oriented
drives. Elam stripped Odell
Beckham Jr following a 56-
yard reception on third
down.
Initially, the officials ruled
Beckham was down when
the ball came out. Replays,
though, clearly showed the
ball coming out before his
knee hit the ground. The play
was reversed, and Florida
seized the momentum.
"It was a hustle play,"
Elam said. "It was all in-
stinct. It was great effort that
paid off."


Newsome 20:25; 7. Marina
Levine, Largo 20:27; 8. Alyssa
Weber, Citrus 20:28; 9. Rachel
Cazares, Gaither 20:35; 10. Bri-
anna Paczynski, Palm Harbor
University 20:38.
Boys team scores
Sarasota 32; 2. Land 0'
Lakes 78; 3. Wesley Chapel
Wiregrass Ranch 95; 4. McKeel
Academy 112; 5. Newsome
154; 6. Springstead 226; 7.
Trinity Mitchell 266; 8. Lecanto
281; 9. Crystal River 292; 10.
Belleview 299; 11. Palm Harbor
University 322; 12. Brooksville
Central 355; 13. Tampa Cham-
berlain 378; 14. Inverness Cit-
rus 384; 15. Holiday Anclote
386; 16. Land O' Lakes Sun-
lake 430; 17. New Port Richey
Ridgewood 442; 18. Dade City
Pasco 467; 19. Hudson Fivay
482; 20. Largo 508; 21. Wesley
Chapel 591; 22. Hudson 662;
23. Tampa Gaither 672; 24.
Zephyrhills 718.
Boys Top 10 Individuals
Courtland Bernard, Sarasota
16:29; 2. Zackery Summerall,
Sarasota 16:35; 3. Tyler Stahl,
Land '0 Lakes 16:46; 4.
Spencer Guerette, Anclote
16:59; 5. Travis Nichols, Land
O' Lakes 16:59; 6. Ian Hull,
Sarasota 17:02; 7. Ermias
Bireda, Wiregrass Ranch
17:04; 8. Benjamin Hall, Wire-
grass Ranch 17:07; 9. Justin
Martinez, Newsome 17:10; 10.
Adam Bradtmueller, Sarasota
17:17.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pitching pays off


Associated Press
Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Justin Verlander throws Saturday during the first inning of Game I of the American League
Division Series against the Oakland Athletics in Detroit.


Verlander aces A's in Detroit's 3-1 victory in Game 1 ofALDS


Associated Press

DETROIT Justin Verlander al-
lowed a home run to the first batter of
the game and quickly shrugged it off.
This hard-throwing ace doesn't usu-
ally hit his stride until a bit later
Verlander shut down Oakland after
that early slip, and Alex Avila home-
red in the fifth inning to lift the De-
troit Tigers over the Athletics 3-1
Saturday night in the opener of their
best-of-five AL playoff.
Verlander allowed three hits in seven
innings and matched his career post-
season high with 11 strikeouts. As usual,
he seemed stronger in the later innings,
striking out the side in the sixth and the
first two hitters of the seventh. That
made up for Coco Crisp's home run that
quieted the Comerica Park crowd just
one batter into the game.
"I was a little out of synch but was
able to get some outs with guys on
base and keep the score at one run,"
Verlander said. "The adrenaline got
me a little bit early"
Joaquin Benoit pitched the eighth
and Jose Valverde struck out two in a
perfect ninth for the save.
Oakland's Jarrod Parker allowed
two earned runs in 6 1/3 innings and
took the loss.
Game 2 is Sunday, with Doug Fister
taking the mound for Detroit and left-
hander Tommy Milone for Oakland.
It was only the second victory for
Detroit in its last seven series open-
ers. The Tigers lost Game 1 to the
Yankees in the division series last
year before winning in five. Detroit


ALDS Game 1

Tigers 3, Athletics 1


Oakland
Crisp cf
Drew ss
Cespds If
Moss lb
Reddck rf
Dnldsn 3b
S.Smith dh
DNorrs c
Kottars ph
Pnngtn 2b
Totals
Oakland
Detroit


ab r h bi
4 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0


14 00 0
3 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 1 0
31 14 1
100
101


Detroit


ab r h bi
AJcksncf 4 1 1 0
Berry If 3 0 2 0
AGarciph-rf 1 0 0 0
MiCarr3b 3 0 0 0
Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0
DYong dh 2 00 0
Dirks rf-lf 3 0 1 0
JhPerltss 3 0 0 0
Avilac 3 1 2 1
Infante 2b 3 1 1 0
Totals 293 7 1
000 000 1
010 OOx 3


E-J.Parker (1). DP-Oakland 2. LOB-Oakland
7, Detroit 4. 2B-Drew (1), A.Jackson (1), Infante
(1). HR-Crisp (1), Avila (1). SB-Berry (1).
CS-D.Young (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
J.Parker L,0-1
Neshek
Blevins
Detroit
Verlander W,1-0
Benoit H,1
ValverdeS,1-1


61-37 3 2 1 5
2-3 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 0
7 3 1 1 4 11
1 1 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 2


HBP-by J.Parker (D.Young).
T-2:56. A-43,323 (41,255).


then lost the opener of the AL cham-
pionship series to Texas.
After winning their final six games
to take the AL West in shocking fash-
ion, the As made their presence felt
right away in Detroit. The home
crowd greeted Verlander with a roar
and a sea of twirling white towels
when he popped out of the dugout
and headed to the mound to start the
game, but Crisp was unfazed. He


pulled Verlander's two-strike fastball
just inside the pole in right field to
put Oakland on top.
The AL Central-champion Tigers tied
it immediately Austin Jackson's hard-
hit ball deflected off diving shortstop
Stephen Drew and into short left field.
The Detroit leadoff man ended up with
a double and went to third when
Quintin Berry slapped a single to third
offDonaldson, who also could only get a
piece of the ball while diving for it
Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabr-
era, who went hitless, grounded into a
double play, but Jackson came home
to make it 1-all.
Drew finally made a diving play in
the second, sprawling to his right on
Delmon Young's grounder and then
throwing to first for the out. At the
plate, the As made Verlander work,
forcing him to throw 61 pitches in the
first three innings. The Detroit ace
struck out Brandon Moss to end the
Oakland third with a 99 mph fastball
- but Verlander was having to reach
back for extra speed early
Parker looked sharp early but al-
lowed another run in the third be-
cause of a fielding mishap. With two
out and a man on second, Berry
chopped a soft grounder to the right
side. Parker came off the mound to
field it, but with the speedy Berry hus-
tling to first, Parker lost control of the
ball with his glove hand for an error
that allowed Omar Infante to score.
It looked like Parker may have
been trying to flip the ball with his
glove to his first baseman, who wasn't
on the bag.


For more information call
Chris Gregoriou 795-7000 or the
Citrus County Chronicle at 563-6363


www.chronicleonline.com


*


R r Deadline to register:

Registration Form oFriday,

Yes, we would like to participate in the following Veterans Appreciation Week 2012 events.
I Veterans Appreciation Concert, Oct. 27 & 28 J Veterans Day Luncheon, Nov. 10
I Veterans Fair, Nov. 3 (VSO cdrs. & Aux. presidents invited)
I Veterans Appreciation Program, Nov. 4 J Military Ball, Nov. 10
I1 Veterans in the Classroom, Nov. 5-9 ($35 per person Call 746-1135 for tickets)
-I Veterans Flea Market, Nov. 7 J Marine Corps Ball, Nov. 10
I Veterans Program, IPS, Nov. 9 (Vets & guests invited) ($40 per person Call 746-3315 for tickets)
IJ Veterans Social, Nov. 9 ($7 per person) OI Massing of the Colors, Nov. 11
J Veterans Day Parade, Nov. 10 J Women Veterans Luncheon, Nov. 12
J Veterans Day Service, Nov. 10 (Women Vets invited Call 746-2396 for resv.)
Organization:
Mailing Address:
Description of participation (For Parade, Fair, Massing of Colors) Please attach separate sheet if necessary:


Contact Name (Print): Phone:
We, the above, release Citrus Publishing Inc. and the Veterans Appreciation Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee from any liability
that may be associated with Veterans Appreciation Week events.

Authorized Signature Date
Mail this form to: Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week
1624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429
- - - - - - - - - - - -


Blixt still in



front in Vegas


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS -Jonas Blixt
birdied six of the last seven
holes Saturday for a 5-under
66 and a share of the lead
with Ryan Moore and Bren-
don de Jonge in the Justin
Timberlake Shriners Hospi-
tals for Children Open.
Moore had a bogey-free
65, and de Jonge birdied
four of the last five for a 66
to match Blixt at 19-under
194 in the Fall Series
opener at TPC Summerlin.
Moore, a former UNLV
player who lives in Las
Vegas, won the 2009 Wynd-
ham Championship for his
lone PGA Tour title. Blixt,
from Sweden, and de Jonge,
from Zimbabwe, are winless
on the tour.
Jimmy Walker and Tim
Herron were five strokes
back. Walker had a 66, and
Herron shot 68.
John Daly, tied for sixth at
10 under after a season-best
63 on Friday, had a 15-over
86 to drop to last among the
72 players who made the cut.
SAS Championship
CARY, N.C. Steve Pate
and Fred Funk shot 3-under
69 to share the second-
round lead at 8 under in the
Champions Tour's SAS
Championship.
Funk, the Insperity Cham-
pionship winner in May for
his seventh victory on the 50-
and-over tour, birdied four
of the last seven holes. He's
eighth in the Schwab Cup
standings, 1,130 points be-
hind leader Tom Lehman.
Pate is winless on the
Champions Tour after win-
ning six times on the PGA


Associated Press
Jonas Blixt tees off Saturday
on the eighth hole during the
third round of the Justin
Timberlake Shriners
Hospitals for Children Open in
Las Vegas.
Tour.
Jay Don Blake and An-
drew Magee were a stroke
back. They shot 70.
Sixty-five-year-old Larry
Nelson had a 66 to match
Mark McNulty, Mark
O'Meara and Mark Wiebe at 6
under McNulty had a 68, and
O'Meara and Wiebe shot 69.
First-round leader Russ
Cochran followed his open-
ing 66 with a 73 to finish at 5
under.
Dunhill Links
Championship
ST ANDREWS, Scotland
- Branden Grace shot a 3-
under 69 at Carnoustie to
take a four-stroke lead into
the final round of the Dun-
hill Links Championship.
The South African, a
three-time winner this year
on the European Tour, was
20 under overall.


Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. -
Kasey Kahne has won the
pole at Talladega
Superspeedway, the
fourth race in
NASCAR's Chase
for the Sprint Cup
championship.
Kahne's lap of
191.455 mph earned
him the top starting
spot for Sunday's Ka
race. Ryan Newman Ka
qualified second out in 1
with a lap at 191.145, Tallade
giving Chevrolet a
sweep of the front row.
Two-time defending race


fr
g


winner Clint Bowyer quali-
fied third and was surprised
by the strong run. He said he
expected to qualify poorly,
and the good starting
spot will force him to
change his race
strategy
Three-time
NASCAR champion
Tony Stewart quali-
fied fourth, and Greg
Biffle was fifth to
3ey put four Chase driv-
ine ers in the top five.
ont for Jeff Gordon, Carl
)a race. Edwards, Trevor
Bayne, Martin
Truex Jr and Sam Hornish
Jr rounded out the top 10.


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20TH

CRYSTAL RIVER NATIONAL

WILDLIFE REFUGE DAY

10am-4pm
SIMPLY. OUTDOOR FUN!


WHERE MANATEES THRIVE!
Musical Parade (IBEX)
Live Music (All Day)
Lunch and refreshments available for purchase
Mermaid World (All Day)
Best Manatee Pictures Show (All Day)
Spring Ecosystem Lectures
Over 20 Educational Booths

Free Parking at Kings Bay Plaza (right behind Sonic)
Call 563-2088 for more information.


FRIENbS
S ON- ICI M U 0UrrUT A
P www ol eouInem 16


Kahne grabs pole


for Talladega race


"Honoring our Military Retirees"



Mail your registration form to

Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429


SPORTS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Hannah freed
following arrest
TYLER, Texas-Ac-
tress Daryl Hannah has

leased
from a
Texas jail
following
her arrest
as she
protested
an oil
Daryl pipeline
Hannah designed
to bring
crude from Canada to the
Gulf Coast.
The Tyler Morning
Telegraph reported Satur-
day that Hannah was
freed on $2,500 bond
Thursday night, but faces
criminal trespass charges.
Her release came hours
after being arrested in
Winnsboro, about 100
miles east of Dallas.
Hannah and 78-year-
old Eleanor Fairchild
were arrested after
blocking heavy equip-
ment in an attempt to
halt construction of the
Keystone XL pipeline
through Fairchild's land.
Fairchild was released
on a personal recogni-
zance bond.

Blaine goes for
shock-factor stunt
NEW YORK-- Dare-
devil stuntman David
Blaine lit up New York's
Pier 54 on Friday for his
latest high-voltage feat.
The illusionist is
scheduled to spend three
days and nights standing
in the middle of a million
volts of electric currents
streamed by Tesla coils.
The stunt is called
"Electrified: One Million
Volts Always On."
"Electrified" also is
being streamed on
YouTube, thanks to com-
puting company Intel.
Viewing stations are lo-
cated in London, Beijing,
Tokyo and Sydney View-
ers at the stations are
able to control the coils.
The 39-year-old Blaine
is wearing a chainmail
bodysuit as a barrier be-
tween himself and the
electric currents.

Railroad Revival
Tour canceled
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
The Railroad Revival
Tour has run off the
tracks.
The cross-country tour
featuring Willie Nelson,
JameyJohnson, Band of
Horses and John C.
Reilly has been canceled
by organizers.
A note on the tour's
website said "certain
complications would not
permit us to host the
shows in the manner in-
tended," but gave no fur-
ther details.
The eight-stop tour in
vintage railcars was ex-
pected to start Oct. 20 in
Duluth, Ga., and con-
clude Oct. 28 in Oakland,
Calif. Full ticket refunds
are being given.
Emails sent to organiz-
ers were not immediately
answered.
This would have been
the second Railroad Re-
vival Tour. The first, fea-
turing Mumford & Sons,
Old Crow Medicine Show
and Edward Sharpe and
the Magnetic Zeros, was
chronicled in the docu-
mentary "Big Easy
Express."
-From wire reports


Old classic, new cast


Associated Press
Queen Latifah portrays M'Lynn, left, with Condola Rashad as Shelby, center, and Tory Kitties as Jackson in a
scene from the Lifetime Original Movie, "Steel Magnolias," which premieres at 9 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7, on Lifetime.


Latifah, Woodard Rashad and Scott star in 'Steel Magnolias'


SANDY COHEN
AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES The onscreen
love between Queen Latifah, Alfre
Woodard, Jill Scott and Phylicia
Rashad in the updated version of
"Steel Magnolias" is real.
The actresses, who take on the
roles originated by Sally Field,
Shirley MacLaine, Dolly Parton and
Olympia Dukakis in the 1989 film,
bonded in real life just like their
characters do in Truvy's salon.
"It's been a love fest," said Scott,
who plays Truvy, adding she would
have taken any role to be a part of
the star-studded, small-screen
retelling of Robert Harling's stage
play and original film, set to pre-
miere Oct. 7 on Lifetime.
The new "Steel Magnolias," pro-
duced by Academy Awards produc-
ers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron,
maintains the flavor of Harling's
story, only this time with an all-
black cast
Zadan said he learned over a
lunch discussion with Harling
about the story that his "dream
would be to do it again but do it with
an African-American cast," the pro-
ducer recalled. "It could be like a
completely new film that you've
never seen before. We thought, wow,
that's a great idea, so we called our
friends and made the movie."
(Latifah, also an executive pro-
ducer of "Steel Magnolias," previ-
ously worked with Zadan and
Meron on "Chicago" and
"Hairspray")
Harling's words are essentially
unchanged in the updated version,
producers said, save for references
to Facebook and Michelle Obama
and some medical details that re-
flect advances in science.


Latifah and Condola Rashad
play mother and daughter in the TV
version of Robert Harling's stage play
and original film, "Steel Magnolias."
: Adepero Oduye plays Annelle
and Phylicia Rashad plays Clariee in
the TV movie.
"That's why we think the material
is classic material," Meron said,
"because it can live no matter
where you put it."
As in the original film, the story is
set in the south and opens as
M'Lynn (Latifah) and her husband
are preparing for daughter Shelby's
wedding. The communal center in
their town is Truvy's hair salon,
where M'Lynn and her friends,
Ouiser (Woodard) and Clairee
(Rashad), gather to catch up on their
beauty regimens and gossip.
"We connected immediately, so
we didn't really have to fake being
girls in the beauty shop," Latifah
said. "We just bonded right away"
It's that sisterhood among women
- and the enduring safety of the


salon space that makes "Steel
Magnolias" such a timeless story.
Women have long turned to one an-
other in times of joy and sorrow,
said Woodard, and the salon is prac-
tically sacred ground.


Noth's on board 'Titanic' cable miniseries


Associated Press
Actor Chris Noth portrays
J.P. Morgan in a scene from
the Encore cable channel 12-
hour miniseries, "Titanic:
Blood and Steel."


Birthday Your leadership qualities are likely to be sub-
stantially enhanced in the year ahead. In arrangements
where you have previously been content to be a follower,
you will now want to take on a more commanding role.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) In a competitive situation, you'll
fare much better if you are realistic in the assessment of
your competitors. Don't underestimate anyone.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You'll be quite efficient when
doing things you like, but not so much with projects or jobs
you find distasteful. Regardless of what you do, do it with
pride.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Bad feelings could result
if you have false expectations of a colleague. Don't auto-
matically assume that he or she enjoys engaging in some-
thing as much as you do.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Small domestic issues


FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer

NEW YORK The man
widely known as "Big" gets
even bigger: He's playing J.P
Morgan, one of history's tow-
ering business magnates.
It was one of Morgan's
businesses that funded the
Titanic, and Chris Noth ap-
pears in a supporting role
in "Titanic: Blood and
Steel," an epic 12-part
miniseries about the build-
ing of the great ship. It pre-
mieres on six consecutive
nights, with two episodes
airing back to back, on the
Encore cable network be-


ginning Monday at 8 p.m.
Noth said the idea of play-
ing Morgan intrigued him.
"He's sort of maligned
today," Noth said. "But two
times in our history he
saved our banking system
from falling apart and saved
the country from bank-
ruptcy and depression. He
was a patriotic man. But he
liked to make money, too.
"It was fun to come into
this film and remind people
whose wallet it was that was
building the Titanic," Noth
said. "Morgan wanted the
ship done right and he
wanted it safe. But the bu-
reaucracy below him equiv-


Today's HOROSCOPE
could easily be blown out of proportion. Keep this in mind
before you find fault with your mate for a lack of enthusiasm
regarding a certain matter.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You're likely to come out
better in handling your material affairs if you follow your
own counsel instead of listening to the advice of outsiders.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You'll have to be a bit thick-
skinned if you intend to take over a faltering recreational sit-
uation and reorganize it. Even though you'll do what's right,
you may be criticized.
Aries (March 21-April 19) The consequences of your
acts could adversely affect others if you're not careful, even
if your intentions are good. Consider what you're about to
do before you take action.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Even if it normally takes a lot
for you to show any anger, be extra sure you have control


ocated a lot."
Everyone knows the re-
sulting tragedy But that fa-
miliar outcome looms just
beyond the final fade-out of
"Titanic: Blood and Steel,"
itself the largely untold
story of how the ship came
to be.
Also appearing is Derek
Jacobi ("The King's Speech,
"The Borgias") as Lord
William Pirrie, chairman of
the Harland and Wolff ship-
yard in Belfast, Ireland,
where the ship was built.
Kevin Zegers ("Gossip
Girl") stars as a young scien-
tist who raises questions
about the safety of the ship.


over your temper at all times. Once your ire's released, it'll
be quite difficult to rein in.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Watch out for the little things
that bug you to the point of distraction. Conversely, if you
have to deal with something serious, you'll handle it well.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't do anything that you
know from experience is apt to cause you or someone else
a problem. If you choose to ignore your good judgment,
you'll hate yourself down the line.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There is a good chance that
you'll be inclined to strive for something that you know is
beyond your capabilities. Set realistic goals; it's foolish to
spin your wheels on the unattainable.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If a forceful and domineering
friend tries to involve you in something that you really don't
want to participate in, resist coercion. Stand up for your rights.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
Mega Money: 12 27 32 35
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 3 $2,164
3-of-4 MB 37 $384.50
3-of-4 722 $58.50
2-of-4 MB 1,168 $25
1-of-4 MB 10,428 $2.50
2-of-4 23,006 $2
Fantasy 5:4 7 16 21 31
5-of-5 2 winners $114,021.87
4-of-5 340 $108
3-of-5 10,888 $9
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
Fantasy 5:3 7 13 25 35
5-of-5 2 winners $103,113.44
4-of-5 353 $94
3-of-5 9,879 $9

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Oct. 7,
the 281st day of 2012. There
are 85 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Oct. 7, 1929, former In-
terior Secretary Albert B. Fall,
one of the main figures of the
Teapot Dome scandal, went
on trial in Washington, D.C.,
charged with accepting a
bribe from oil tycoon Edward
L. Doheny. (Fall was found
guilty and sentenced to a
year in prison and fined
$100,000; he ended up serv-
ing nine months. Ironically,
Doheny was acquitted at trial
of offering the bribe that Fall
was convicted of taking.)
On this date:
In 1777, the second Battle
of Saratoga began during the
American Revolution. (British
forces under Gen. John Bur-
goyne surrendered 10 days
later.)
In 1849, author Edgar
Allan Poe died in Baltimore at
age 40.
In 1982, the Andrew Lloyd
Webber-Tim Rice musical
"Cats" opened on Broadway.
(The show closed Sept. 10,
2000, after a record 7,485
performances.)
In 1991, University of Okla-
homa law professor Anita Hill
publicly accused Supreme
Court nominee Clarence
Thomas of making sexually in-
appropriate comments when
she worked for him; Thomas
denied Hill's allegations.
In 2001, the current war in
Afghanistan started as the
United States and Britain
launched air attacks against
military targets and Osama bin
Laden's training camps in the
wake of the Sept. 11 attacks.
Ten years ago: The
Washington-area sniper
struck again, shooting and
critically wounding a 13-year-
old boy as his aunt dropped
him off at school in Bowie,
Md.
Five years ago: In a race
run in scorching heat that left
one man dead, Kenya's
Patrick Ivuti won the Chicago
Marathon by a fraction of a
second; another 250 runners
were taken to hospitals be-
cause of heat-related ailments.
One year ago: The Nobel
Peace Prize was awarded to
three women: President Ellen
Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia,
Liberian activist Leymah
Gbowee, and Tawakkul Kar-
man, who began pushing for
change in Yemen long before
the Arab Spring.
Today's Birthdays: Re-
tired South African Archbishop
Desmond Tutu is 81. Come-
dian Joy Behar (TV: "The
View") is 70. Former National


Security Council aide Lt. Col.
Oliver North (ret.) is 69.
Thought for Today: "If a
man happens to find himself,
he has a mansion which he
can inhabit with dignity all the
days of his life." James
Michener, American author
(1907-1997).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama shake hands Wednesday after the first presidential debate at the
University of Denver, in Denver, Colo.



Dissecting the debate


BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent

WASHINGTON Republican Mitt Rom-
ney was fiery and having fun. President
Barack Obama came off as the professor
without much pop.
And while Democrats grudgingly conceded
that Romney did well in Wednesday's debate,
what matters is whether he changed the dy-
namic of a race that he appeared to be losing.
The best answers will come: Did the de-
bate help Romney close his polling deficit in
a must-win state such as Ohio? Or take a
polling lead in Florida, Virginia or the other
toss-up states? Or deliver the kind of per-
formance that translates into noticeable en-
ergy on the trail, a crisper message, more
likelihood that the undecided voters out
there will go with him?
In terms of instant conclusions, the judging
is best done in view of what Obama and Rom-
ney set out to do.
By that measure, Romney may not have
changed the game, but he sure played it well.
Obama avoided any gaffes but looked sur-
prisingly lackluster at times.
And he kept in his pocket one of the
strongest weapons of his political arsenal,
Romney's videotaped view that half the na-
tion sees itself as a bunch of entitled victims.
The president never mentioned it over 90
minutes even though he talks about it daily
in his campaigning.
In the midst of a dense debate that lacked
much discipline, something important ap-
peared answers on how the two men
would run the country differently
But good luck to the undecided voter who
had to sort that out
The debate often got bogged down with
complicated and contradictory versions of
the candidates' plans and of the truth, with a
distracting dose of insider Washington refer-
ences. Even voters clamoring for specific dif-
ferences may have found themselves
wondering why all the talk about "Bowles-
Simpson" (a debt commission) and "Dodd-
Frank" (a Wall Street reform law).
The night's mystery was why Obama did
not bring up Romney's embarrassing caught-


UPCOMING DEBATES
9 to 10:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11: Vice
presidential candidates' debate between
Vice President Joe Biden, Wis. Rep. Paul
Ryan on foreign and domestic topics.
Moderator: Martha Raddatz, senior
foreign affairs correspondent, ABC News.
9 to 10:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16:
Second presidential candidates' debate
between Obama, Romney on foreign and
domestic issues. Moderator: Candy
Crowley, chief political correspondent,
CNN, and anchor, CNN's "State of the
Union."
9 to 10:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22: Third
presidential candidates' debate between
Obama, Romney on foreign policy.
Moderator: Bob Schieffer, chief
Washington correspondent, CBS News,
and moderator, "Face the Nation."

on-tape moment from a ritzy fundraiser, in
which he said "47 percent" of the people out
there pay no income taxes, see themselves as
victims and do not think they should "take
personal responsibility and care for their
lives."
The video has undermined Romney's bid
for the presidency and gone to the heart of
Obama's case of how differently the two men
see the role of government and the people it
serves.
It got at best an indirect nod during talk
about Medicare and Social Security, both
known as entitlements.
"You know, the name itself implies some
sense of dependency on the part of these
folks," Obama said. "These are folks who've
worked hard, like my grandmother, and there
are millions of people out there who are
counting on this."
Obama's campaign disputed the notion
that the president missed an opportunity
They argue Romney's own words, which the
Obama campaign is using in television ads,
are more effective.
The president's biggest trouble seemed to
be that he got caught up in exactly what he
wanted to avoid engaging Romney time


and again on the challenger's accusations in-
stead of turning each answer into a clear, co-
herent argument about how he would help
people over the next four years.
It did not help that moderator Jim Lehrer
lost control of the debate to the point that six
segments got reduced to five, a sign of how
long both men took to answer questions.
"Excuse me. Excuse me. Just so everybody
understands, we're way over our first 15 min-
utes," Lehrer said at one point
"It's fun, isn't it?" Romney said.
Following tradition, Romney stood to gain
simply by standing next to the president and
holding up well.
He started off with the kind ofhere-is-how-
this-affects-you empathy that has been miss-
ing from much of his campaign.
"Ann yesterday was at a rally in Denver,"
Romney said of his wife. "'And a woman came
up to her with a baby in her arms, and said:
'Ann, my husband has had four jobs in three
years, part-time jobs. He's lost his most re-
cent job. And we've now just lost our home.
Can you help us?' And the answer is, yes, we
can help, but it's going to take a different
path."
What Obama wanted was to leave the
American people with little doubt about his
plans for the next four years and how they
differ from Romney's. It was a rare chance
for him in this election year to reach millions
of people directly, yet the debate's jerky pace
and subject detours made it hard for him to
break through.
Even so, a status quo result, or something
close, would not hurt him nearly as much as
it would Romney
By the end of a long night, the president
tried to bring his agenda items back to the
prideful auto workers, to the mom who went
back to school.
"All those things are designed to make sure
that the American people, their genius, their
grit, their determination, is channeled, and
they have an opportunity to succeed," Obama
said.
Romney's calculus was different.
He needed a commanding performance.
See Page C3


Comings

and goings

at the

Chronicle
here have been
some changes at the
Chronicle recently
that deserve some
recognition.
Mike Arnold has been
named the editor of the
newspaper and is now in
charge of the overall con-
tent. Mike is a real success
story at the Chronicle,
proving you can start at
the bottom and work your
way up.
More than a decade ago,
Mike started working at
the Chronicle as a sports
correspondent covering
various high school foot-
ball games.
Over the years, he next
became a sports reporter
and then the sports editor.
After serving as sports ed-
itor, he moved on and be-
came managing editor of
the newspaper. For many
of those years, he served
as a member of the Chron-
icle's editorial board and
wrote regular opinion
pieces for the newspaper.
Mike continued his ed-
ucation while at the
Chronicle and went on to
earn his master's degree.
After more than a decade
in the newsroom, he
moved over to become the
human resource director
for the newspaper com-
pany and took care of all
those issues from training
to hiring to making sure
that people got paid. We
have 10 newspapers in
Florida, and he had the
opportunity to work with
the staffs of each of the
publications.
A month ago, he re-
turned to the news de-
partment and took over as
editor of the paper.
Mike is a Citrus Springs
resident, where he lives
with his wife, Brenda.
Charlie Brennan con-
tinues to work at the
newspaper in the role of
editor at large, where he
will continue to coordi-
nate our editorial opin-
ions and help with the
writing and reporting that
happens on a daily basis.
On another front,
Chronicle circulation di-
rector Kathie Stewart offi-
cially retires from the
company this year after 23
years of service. Kathie
See Page C4


Where the GOP stands 'One-term proposition'


A t the dawn of the 20th
century, Frederic f ."
Townsend Martin said, :
"we are the rich; we own Amer- .-
ica; we got it God knows how, .
but we intend to keep it." ,
This sentiment was recently .
echoed in the Republican Na- ,
tional Convention when some
delegates declared "we own
this place." In the 1980s Paul John
Weyerich, one of the founders of GUI
right-wing culture wars, de- COL
cleared that "I don't want every- COLI
one to vote."
Does this sound familiar?
How do these statements reflect current
Republican thinking? And if Republicans
are elected this November, what do they
intend to do? Let's have a quick look at
some of the most pressing issues facing us
and how they intend to deal with them.
Jobs and the economy: This is the biggest
issue confronting many of us today Unfor-
tunately, Republicans have no real plans
beyond reducing taxes on millionaires and
regulations on corporations. Very nice, but
how does that create the millions of cus-
tomers necessary to buy goods and serv-
ices? After more than 30 years of trying


"- "trickle-down
these policies
- ';. work for most
that money
-1, down very far
directed into
overseas tax s
U. is the only rea
v'. is increased co
Businesses d
Read hire based on
EST efits that
UMN there are lots
JMN they need add:
orders.
Family planning: Repul
lieve in family planning -
unplanned families and v
they can to prevent women
say in how many children
Their motto seems to be'
kids, don't have sex." Ri
work in the real world.
War: Get ready for the
now Iran looks promising
beat has begun. I don't sup
go wrong with bombing
country the size of Iran.
take a few months and w


economics," ( f I don't have this done gy -
do not seem to lyin three years then it's a
of us. Apparently, one-term proposition."
does not trickle Well, more than three years
-it tends to get have passed, and President
mansions and Obama continues to prevent a
shelters. The fact fix for the economy His only
al solution to jobs plan is to propose a jobs bill to
)nsumer demand. put more government-paid
o not generally workers in the labor market.
minimal tax ben- How would he pay for this Bob Ha
happens when when we are nearly bankrupt? GUI
of customers and He would borrow money from COL
itional help to fill China or have the Federal Re- COL
serve print more dollars. Bor-
blicansdoenotbe- rowing just increases our debt further,
- they believe in ruining our economy. Printing funny
will do everything money does the same, since there is no
en from having a economic activity justifying it. Hence, what
n they can have. little money most of us have loses more of
"if you don't want its purchasing power. There will be no fix
eight, that should as long as increased commercial activity is
next one. Right limited by his actions.
Next one. Right On the international scene, our em-
ig and the drum- bassies are being attacked while he goes to
pose much could Las Vegas to raise money to fund his cam-
and invading a paign. Attacks on our embassies are acts of
This should only war (in case no one has noticed). The em-
e'll be out just bassies are sovereign U.S. territories. First
See Page C3 the administration blamed the attacks on


some cheap movie. Now it has
become known that the attack
in Libya was a terrorist attack.
Yet the word "terrorist" was ex-
cluded from any administration
report until they could no
longer avoid it.
Among other reasons for con-
cern about this man, consider
the apology tour right after the
igaman 2008 election. After all the fi-
EST nancial aid and moral support
we have given around the
U MN world, it would have been more
appropriate to visit those coun-
tries to tell them how honored we feel by
having been able to help them so much.
Bowing to kings was not likely ever a cus-
tom for a head of a sovereign state!
There has been a constant divisive
drumbeat about the rich receiving unfair
advantages while the poor are being left
behind. In reality, when the rich succeed,
the rest of us gain because we use the fruits
of their gain to sustain us. Whenever they
spend or invest, we gain. Their investments
supply funds for real job growth as well as
their spending makes jobs for those who


Page C3


a
I
I


IE
A







Page C2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012



PINION


"America is a land where a citizen will
cross the ocean to fight for democracy
- and won't cross the street to vote
in a national election."
Bill Vaughan, 1915-1977


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ......................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
L fJ ^ Mac Harris ..................... .........citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ........... ................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


JUSTICE MUST BE BALANCED





Courts can't




be caught




in politics


Images of justice popular
for more than 500 years
have depicted Lady Justice
as a blindfolded figure holding
a balance scale, indicating that
judges should rule without fear
or favor, based only on the
merit of arguments for and
against a position.
This belief led
reformers re-
sponding to politi- THE Il
cal scandals in the
state Supreme Conservat
Court to promote campaign
a successful 1976 Supremr
constitutional just
amendment in-
tended to create a OUR 01
barrier around Politicizir
the court de- a threat
signed to prevent
such scandals.
The amendment ended elec-
tion of higher court judges and
calls for justices to be ap-
pointed on merit and then
stand for a retention vote every
six years.
However, this year the
Florida Republican Party and
the conservative political ac-
tion group Americans for Pros-
perity, funded by the
billionaire Koch Brothers,
have interjected politics into
what should be a nonpartisan
retention election of three
Supreme Court justices by
joining with a group called
"Restore Justice 2012" led by
an Orlando youth minister
The targeted justices, Bar-
bara Pariente, Peggy Quince
and Fred Lewis, were ap-
pointed by former governor
Lawton Chiles and have been
previously retained in
statewide elections. Under
Florida law, judges must face a
vote on whether to retain them
or remove them every six
years, and they are up for a re-
tention vote this year
According to Restore Justice
2012, these judges have been
targeted because they are "ju-
dicial activists."
But the examples cited by
the organization appear more
like decisions that were un-
popular with some partisan
groups than with judicial ac-
tivism. According to a state Bar
association survey of 7,857
lawyers in the state, the three
had an average approval rating
of 90 percent.
The campaign to oust the
three justices has drawn the
criticism of a variety of highly-
respected Florida court au-

What a shame
This is about the picture of the
gator in the newspaper today,
Thursday (Sept. 20). What a
shame. These people, they knew
the gator was there. They watched
it since they were kids. They've
watched that gator grow up for
years and years and years. It was
out in the wild away from every-
thing. It never hurt anybody. It
wasn't a nuisance gator. So they
had to go out and kill it just for
sport. What a shame that we hu-
mans kill just because we can.
Unbelievable.


S
i


ic

P

to


thorities, including a resolu-
tion signed by 23 former presi-
dents of the state Bar, calling it
a "well-financed and ill-con-
ceived political campaign" that
if successful "could do ir-
reparable damage to our sys-
tem of judicial fairness and
impartiality."
The effort by po-
litical parties to
;SUE: get involved in a
judicial retention
ve groups election is a
to remove "colossal mis-
e Court take," according
ces. to Sandy D'Alem-
berte, a Tallahas-
DINION: see lawyer, former
g court is legislator and for-
o justice. mer president of
the American Bar
Association. As a
state legislator, he was on the
committee that worked for pas-
sage of the 1976 constitutional
amendment aimed at keeping
politics out of the state's court
system.
While not taking an advocacy
position on whether individual
judges should be retained, the
Florida Bar is running a
$300,000 campaign to educate
voters about the judicial reten-
tion process, and has enlisted
former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor
to introduce a video on
retention.
In that introduction, O'Con-
nor says that for more than
three decades, the merit reten-
tion system has helped buffer
the state's appellate courts
from improper influence; and
for the system to work, voters
need to educate themselves
and make informed decisions.
This is sound advice for vot-
ers. In a highly politicized en-
vironment, the last thing the
state needs is for its highest
court to become just another
political institution. We are
disappointed that some in the
state are trying to make the ju-
dicial retention process a po-
litical football. We believe this
is a threat to the independence
and impartiality we expect
from our state's highest court.
We urge voters to ignore po-
litical appeals, educate them-
selves, and make informed
decisions intended to encour-
age our state's highest jurists to
make their decisions free from
fear or favor, and based solely
on the merit of arguments for
or against cases they are
presented.

Differing Republicans
This is in response to a Sound
Off titled "Contract with Amer-
ica," in Thursday, Sept. 20's
Chronicle. Yes, it is appropriate to
note that Newt Gingrich and the
Republican Congress actually
wanted to work with our president
at that time. It should also be
noted that over two years ago, Re-
publican leadership in the House
and even in the Senate were say-
ing that their No. 1 job was to
make this a one-term president.
I'm referring to President Obama.
Now, isn't their No. 1 job to do


Romney's trifecta

he presidential campaign, hitherto a plod
through a torrent of words tedious beyond
words, began to dance in Denver There a mas-
terfully prepared Mitt Romney completed a trifecta
of tasks and unveiled an issue that, because it illus-
trates contemporary liberalism's repellant essence,
can constitute his campaign's closing argument
Barack Obama, knight of
the peevish countenance, il-
lustrated William E Buckley's
axiom that liberals who cele- f
brate tolerance of other views
always seem amazed that ,
there are other views.
Obama, who is not known as /
a martyr to the work ethic
and who might use a
teleprompter when ordering
lunch, seemed uncomfort- George Will
able with a format that al- OTHER
lowed fluidity of discourse.
His vanity- remember, he VOICES
gave Queen Elizabeth an
iPod whose menu included two of his speeches -
perhaps blinds him to the need to prepare. And to
the fact that it is not lese-majest6 to require him to
defend his campaign ads' dubious assertions with
explanations longer than the ads. And to the ample
evidence, such as his futile advocacy for Demo-
cratic candidates and Obamacare, that his sup-
posed rhetorical gifts are figments of acolytes'
imaginations.
Luck is not always the residue of design, and Rom-
ney was lucky that the first debate concerned the
economy, a subject that to him is a hanging curve ball
and to Obama is a dancing knuckleball. The topic
helped Romney accomplish three things.
First, recent polls showing him losing were on the
verge of becoming self-fulfilling prophesies by dis-
couraging his supporters and inspiriting Obama's.
Romney, unleashing his inner wonk about eco-
nomic matters, probably stabilized public opinion
and prevented a rush to judgment as early voting
accelerates.
Second, Romney needed to be seen tutoring
Obama on such elementary distinctions as that be-
tween reducing tax rates (while simultaneously re-
ducing, by means testing, the value of deductions)
and reducing revenues, revenues being a function of
economic growth, which the rate reductions could
stimulate.
Third, Romney needed to rivet the attention of the
electorate, in which self-identified conservatives out-
number self-identified liberals two-to-one, on this
choice: America can be the society it was when it had
a spring in its step, a society in which markets the
voluntary collaboration of creative individuals -al-
locate opportunity Or America can remain today's
depressed and anxious society of unprecedented
stagnation in the fourth year of a faux recovery- a
bleak society in which government incompetently al-
locates resources in pursuit of its perishable certi-
tudes and on behalf of the politically connected.
Late in the debate, when Romney for a third time
referred to Obamacare's creation of "an unelected
board, appointed board, who are going to decide
what kind of (medical) treatment you ought to have,"
Obama said, "No, it isn't" Oh?
The Independent Payment Advisory Board per-
fectly illustrates liberalism's itch to remove choices
from individuals, and from their elected representa-
tives, and to repose the power to choose in supposed
experts liberated from democratic accountability.
Beginning in 2014, IPAB would consist of 15 un-
elected technocrats whose recommendations for re-
ducing Medicare costs must be enacted by Congress
by Aug. 15 of each year. If Congress does not enact
them, or other measures achieving the same level of
cost containment, IPAB's proposals automatically
are transformed from recommendations into law.
Without being approved by Congress. Without being
signed by the president
These facts refute Obama's Denver assurance that
IPAB "can't make decisions about what treatments
are given." It can and will by controlling payments to
doctors and hospitals. Hence the emptiness of Oba-
macare's language that IPAB's proposals "shall not
include any recommendation to ration health care."
By Obamacare's terms, Congress can repeal IPAB
only during a seven-month window in 2017, and then
only by three-fifths majorities in both chambers.
After that, the law precludes Congress from ever al-
tering IPAB proposals.
Because IPAB effectively makes law, thereby tra-
ducing the separation of powers, and entrenches
IPAB in a manner that derogates the powers of fu-
ture Congresses, it has been well described by a Cato
Institute study as "the most anti-constitutional meas-
ure ever to pass Congress." But unless and until the
Supreme Court an unreliable guardian over-
turns it, IPAB is a harbinger of the "shock and awe
statism" (Indiana Gov Mitch Daniels' phrase) that is
liberalism's prescription for curing the problems
supposedly caused by insufficient statism.
Before Denver, Obama's campaign was a pro-
tracted exercise in excuse abuse, and the promise
that he will stay on the statist course he doggedly de-
fends despite evidence of its futility. After Denver,
Romney's campaign should advertise that promise.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


something good for our these for free from the
country and work to im- UIIU Veterans Administration.
prove our debt situation Seems to me we have a
as well as our economy? duplication of effort here.
Let's not forget that all Wouldn't the county Vet-
Republicans are not the erans Services Office be
same. better served by mailing
Mail Out booklets things out to the various
Mail out booklet CA veterans organizations on
(In) reference to an ar- a timely basis as a previ-
ticle in the Chronicle (on 563-0579 ous officeholder of that
Page C4 Thursday) Sept. position did?
20, "Veterans compensa- Good question.
tion booklet updated, published": Help the vets
I don't understand why this is
happening when you can get I would like to make a comment


Other VOICES


Social media and


the sensible center


decide first debate

DOUGLAS COHN AND ELEANOR CLIFT
Special to the Chronicle
President Obama often looked down when
Gov Romney spoke, and he seemed slightly
unsteady and off his game. As a result, Rom-
ney won their first presidential debate on style,
and the plaudits came quickly from most com-
mentators. Then the fact checkers began to weigh
in: Romney had indeed proposed a budget-bust-
ing $5 trillion tax cut, his debate protestations to
the contrary notwithstanding. The undisclosed tax
loopholes Romney would close undoubtedly
would include elimination of the mortgage inter-
est deduction. ObamaCare actually did derive
from Romney's Massachusetts plan.
In the end, Romney won the night; Obama will
win the morning.
For all the president's preparation, it was stun-
ning that he simply failed to say:
"My statements are accurate, and the fact check-
ers will confirm this."
"The have and have-not gap is widening at a
pace reminiscent of the 19th century Gilded Age
when robber barons had more money than the
U.S. Treasury And yet you believe millionaires
and billionaires are paying their fair share of
taxes."
"I cut the Social Security tax by 2 percent It is
the largest tax most middle-income citizens pay,
and yet you oppose the cut."
"You were caught on tape saying 47 percent of
Americans pay no income tax and that you have
already conceded their votes. Do you believe these
people who are retired or in the military or who
pay Social Security taxes, Medicare taxes, sales
taxes, property taxes, fuel taxes and other taxes
are freeloaders?"
Clearly, the president may have prepared, but
he was unprepared.
Presidential debates have been a fixture of
American politics for most of the last half century
Television was in its infancy when Vice President
Nixon and Sen. John E Kennedy faced off in 1960.
History has judged that Kennedy, like Romney,
won on style, but lost on substance. But times have
changed. Now there is the Internet.
Yet, long before the Internet was even an idea,
H. L. Mencken wrote "No one in this world ... has
ever lost money by underestimating the intelli-
gence of the great masses of the plain people,"
which is popularly paraphrased as, "No one ever
went broke underestimating the American peo-
ple." But that was then.
The Internet has changed the world in many
ways, not all of them uplifting, but one thing it has
brought out in force is people who think for them-
selves, and who link up with other like-minded
people. It is a global phenomenon as witnessed by
the Arab Spring. In the presidential campaign it
was witnessed when Romney's 47 percent remark
went Internet viral, penetrating the consciousness
of just about every citizen of voting age.
And by the time the cable news pundits weighed
in at the conclusion of the 90-minute Obama-Rom-
ney debate, views were already forming and atti-
tudes taking shape across the country and indeed
the globe. Social media saw people tweeting and
sharing their thoughts in real time on a variety of
Internet sites.
It's been a long year with a number of fringe
voices commanding the headlines from Michele
Bachmann to Herman Cain (remember 9-9-9) and
of course Rep. Todd Akin and his outrageous "rape"
remark, but in the end the American electorate is
no longer the electorate of Mencken's era. They are
beneficiaries of a flood of information in this Inter-
net age when millions of voices are now heard in-
stead of a few spinmeisters, and the public has
learned how to sift through it all, ignoring the ex-
tremes and gravitating to the sensible center
U
Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift author the
Washington Merry-Go-Round column, founded
in 1932 by Drew Pearson.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or
letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the
editorial board.
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fairness and good taste.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadow
crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352.
563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com.


about the Republicans on (Sept.
19) who blocked a bill to help our
veterans (who are) coming home.
The bill would have helped
them find jobs, which they need.
The Republicans blocked that.
Of course, the vets coming
home probably don't pay taxes,
especially on combat pay. Take
note of this, voters, whether
you're a Republican or Democrat.
Let's hang together here and
help our people and help our
country, no matter what party
we're affiliated with. We need that
right now.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Extraordinary, ordinary day determined by pastor


If all goes tremendously, doing
according to ordinary things, but
schedule, this will doing them together;
be published on and now, I'm thinking
Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012, about how it was that
but tonight, as I'm Sept. 24 became our
writing, it is Monday, extraordinary, ordi-
Sept. 24. I'd promised nary day
myself to back off for a It was May 1966, and
few weeks on writing we were anxious to be
the gooey columns I Fred Brannen married, but we knew
write so often concern- A SLICE we had to give her par-
ing the love I share OF LIFE ents time to prepare.
with my Cheryl. Also, a part of me
I realize I get carried away once wanted this to be something I did
in a while, and they can become on my own as an adult and that
syrupy Son Fred chides me occa- would require waiting until after
sionally about my columns' pan- my 21st birthday on Aug. 1.
cake rating that is, how many During 1966, in these United
pancakes should be served with States, the illogical logic prevailed
'em to sop up the syrup! that at 18 a young man was old
Nonetheless, today was our 46th enough to be drafted, he was old
wedding anniversary and I simply enough to fight a war and he was
can't help myself. We enjoyed it old enough to die, but to vote, or to


get married, that same young man
had to be at least 21 years old.
Cheryl's 18th birthday was on
July 22. She'd only need one par-
ent's consent, but she would still
need one. We had the blessings of
both of her parents; even so, we
liked the idea of her being a
woman of 18 instead of a girl of 17
at the time we became husband
and wife.
We decided to set our date as
soon after Aug. 1 as the Rev An-
dersen could marry us in the All
Faiths Community Church of
Ridge Manor, hoping for early to
mid-August.
Cheryl made an appointment
with her pastor. We thought we
were meeting with him for the
sole purpose of selecting a date
that would fit on his calendar.
Little did we know.


We went through a stirring
round of "Are you sure?" Then,
after talking with us at length and
asking some noticeably personal
- and, at times, some rather em-
barrassing -questions, he an-
nounced his decision.
"You're both still very young,
but I believe you truly love each
other. I believe you love each
other in the right way and that you
want to be married for the right
reasons. I'm convinced you are
good candidates for marriage."
He thumbed through his calen-
dar and advised, "The earliest I
can perform the ceremony will be
in late September How about Sat-
urday evening, Sept. 24, at eight
o'clock?"
He never said Sept. 24 was the
earliest date available on his
calendar, he said it was the
earliest he could perform the


ceremony
I read between the lines and
realized he wanted us to wait for
at least a few more weeks. First, to
be sure we remained as sure as we
thought we were, but, also, to give
Cheryl's parents and, as it would
turn out to be, the community as a
whole, time to organize what was
destined to become a major social
event.
Regardless of his reasons, Rev
Andersen said what he said to us
with love; and, we joyfully
accepted his blessing and booked
the date he'd suggested.
And, that is how Sept. 24
became what continues to be our
most extraordinary, ordinary day
--In--
Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


The
October
Surprise


I'M SURPRISED
OBAMA D1SO
POORLY !
OOP,-7


IrM SURPRISED
ROMNuY DIP SO
\ WEL4 !

T- -


Letter to the EDITOR


Tough debate
I have to ask if The Associated Press
watched the same debate that I did last
night. I wish the AP wouldn't do that, but
considering they are the epitome of our
left-wing highly partisan media, I should
have expected their article in the Thurs-
day, Oct. 4, Chronicle. The AP says in
their headlines; "Tough sparring in first
debate" and "Obama, Romney hit hard in
initial meet."
That doesn't sound like what I was wit-
ness to. I saw Mitt hand Obama his head.
It was the most one-sided exchange of
ideas that I have ever seen. That's not
just my opinion, here's what the first
three sources I saw on the Internet had
to say '"After the debate debacle for
Obama, we'll find out if we have a race."
"Mitt Romney won the debate. Why does
that matter? Debates don't move polls.
Debate winners do." "Mitt Romney won
the first debate; virtually every snap poll
and snap pundit agrees on this point."
Even the big three of our liberal media
didn't try to hide the facts like the AP did.
ABC News says "Obama supporters con-


READ
Continued from Page Cl

like in Iraq and
Afghanistan which so far
have cost about $4 trillion
and countless lives on all
sides. How many trillions of
dollars and thousands of
lives are we willing to pour
into a new war?
Tax codes: Here is the
grand prize for billionaires
and the corporate classes,
because this is where the
real money is and they aim
to grab as much of it as pos-
sible. The latest push is for
taxing "the 47 percent"
while providing cuts for the
top 1 or 2 percent under the
guise of "flattening" and
"broadening" the tax codes.
This means those who can
least afford to pay income
taxes will pay more, while
those at the top will have
their taxes cut, sometimes
by millions of dollars.
Maybe some of that will
trickle down to the rest of
us. Then again, maybe not.
The environment: They
want to kill the Environ-
mental Protection Agency,
an agency set up by Presi-
dent Nixon, a Republican,
to clean up burning rivers
(true story), acid rain, toxic
dump sites, smog, water
and a host of other environ-
mental catastrophes. Now
that we have relatively
clean air and water, the bil-
lionaires and their corpo-
rations want to get back to
polluting the country. All
they ask is that we not do it
in their back yards some
things are still sacred.
Education: Right-
wingers hate public educa-
tion. They hate teachers
unions and evolution and
science and anything that
contradicts their funda-
mentalist religious beliefs.
Many will either home
school their kids or send


cede debate defeat, Romney heads to Vir-
ginia." CBS News says "Romney's big
night The first presidential debate was
Republican candidate Mitt Romney's
best moment of the campaign so far."
NBC News says "Romney comes to play,
outduels Obama in debate." I say shame
on the AP for such a partisan distortion
of the facts.
Barack Obama is not the most articu-
late person without his teleprompter, but
he was absolutely awful in the debate,
pausing, stuttering, and in some cases not
able to speak in complete sentences.
I think Mitt cut him too much slack.
Last night was about jobs. Let's hear the
hard questions about religion, Marxism,
the role of government and the rights of
man. Let's ask them this time around and
not let him skate on "change."
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
See Page C3 for guidelines about
writing a letter to the editor.


them to private or religious
charter schools. Ironically,
religious charter schools
want to use tax dollars for
funding. Isn't there some-
thing in the Constitution
forbidding that? Some
studies show that charter
schools are not much better
at teaching kids than our
public school system. But
remember, charter schools
can pick which kids they
want to accept while un-
derfunded public schools
do not have that option and
are at a huge disadvantage.
Voter suppression: Re-
publicans exist to defend
wealth and power. They are
not very interested in the
middle class as anything
more than consumers or a
source of labor. They know
they cannot win if they
admit they want to hand the
country over to massive pri-
vate wealth and will thus
try to keep voter turnout
low especially among mi-
norities, the young, and the
elderly because these peo-
ple are liable to vote for De-
mocrats. Are Republicans
afraid of a fair fight?
Medicaid: Essentially,
they want to turn it over to
the states where it can be
quietly starved to death.
Republicans like Mitt Rom-
ney prefer to have unin-
sured people continue to
use emergency rooms in-
stead of doctor visits and
receive regular medical
care for themselves and
their families. But contrary
to what Mr Romney thinks,
emergency room care is not
free of charge just ask
any uninsured person who
has been to one the bills
follow them.
Medicare: They want to
pay for it by vouchers that
will lose value over time. As
a result seniors will have to
pay thousands in higher
premiums and will eventu-
ally cut back on medical
care because they can no


longer afford it. Basically,
they want to kill Medicare
by draining it of funds or
turning it completely over
to the private sector. Un-af-
fordability is the real death
panel.
Social Security: They
want to privatize it, but this
program has proven to be
very successful and popu-
lar for millions of people
since around 1935. Repub-
licans hate it and in a mira-
cle of modern marketing
they have even convinced
many in the middle class
that this program should
go. The very program that
has kept so many millions
of people out of poverty is
disdained by many of the
people who will depend on
it. Fantastic! Republican
propaganda has convinced
millions of future recipi-
ents that they will be better
off without Social Security.
This is like wolves convinc-
ing sheep that killing them
will be an act of kindness.

These and numerous
right-wing "culture wars"
issues are being funded by
millionaires and billion-
aires who will benefit from
pushing an authoritarian
agenda. While demonstra-
tors wave signs and holler
about "freedom" and "lib-
erty" what they really mean
is their freedom and liberty
to control those of us who
do not agree with them.
Anger over the recent eco-
nomic crash has blinded
them to reasonable and
constructive solutions that
could benefit all of us.
Please do not allow your-
selves to be manipulated by
the 1 percent and the right-
wing media.

John Read is the assistant
public information officer
for the Citrus County
Democratic Executive
Committee.


Not 'change' for the better


Barack Obama burst from obscurity in
2004 at the Democratic National
Convention when he gave a stirring
address affirming "one America," not De-
mocrat nor Republican, not white, black,
Hispanic or Asian, but one nation undi-
vided. He spoke of shared goals and sacri-
fices and of a future where the political
parties worked together. The media were
smitten with this wonderful young man of
color who spoke so well with so much
promise.
Elected to the Senate in 2006,
within months he embarked
upon his unlikely campaign for
the presidency Sen. Obama,
when he took time off from cam-
paigning to vote or speak in the
Senate, was a strong partisan of
the left
But candidate Obama prom-
ised to heal the divide, cut the Dr. Will
federal deficit, eliminate useless
government programs and to OTI
fundamentally change the coun- VOI
try He offered "hope" but did
not say what was to be hoped for.
He offered "change," but did not specify
what changes exactly were to be made. He
left the pages blank so voters could fill in
their own wishes. When his ties to the racist
Rev. Jeremiah Wright could no longer be
hidden by the media, he gave an eloquent
speech on race and promised to bring all
races together as one, as Americans.
By November 2008, the financial crisis
had deepened. The economy was in reces-
sion; jobs were being lost in the millions.
The war in Iraq was winding down with
problems still to be solved. The war in
Afghanistan seemed interminable. Presi-
dent Bush had signed onto a foolish tax re-
bate and a massive bailout of the financial
system on advice from his treasury secre-
tary and against his market principles. Can-
didate John McCain was looking foolish
and incompetent.
Voters thought: Why not give this young
black candidate a chance? He seemed
bright enough and sincere in what he prom-
ised. Would it not be a pleasure to be part of
electing the first black president? Would it
not be likely that a black president could
help to heal the black-white divide in
America. What would it say to the rest of
the world, if the man leading America were
black? What harm could there be in voting
for Barack Obama? If he really were as rad-


DEBATE
Continued from Page C1

He needed people to see
him as a president, un-
flinching next to the guy
who currently has the job.
In 10 battleground states,
none of the nonpartisan
polling since before the re-
cent Democratic and Repub-
lican conventions had found
Romney holding a lead.
Romney's mission was to


ical as some of the fringe media suggested,
the requirements of the office and consti-
tutional checks on executive power would
limit harm to the nation.
It was easy to vote for Obama in 2008. He
won a landslide victory
But President Obama is no longer a blank
sheet upon which each voter can write his
aspirations. Under his watch, political and
racial relationships have worsened. The
class warfare used to foster his re-election
pits rich against poor, black
against white. His Environmen-
tal Protection Agency punishes
carbon fuels in favor of green en-
ergy, raising energy costs to con-
sumers. His Energy Department
favors failed companies run by
Democrat contributors. He bor-
rowed nearly $800 billion to give
to union supporters under the
am Dixon guise of stimulating the economy
He promised unemployment lev-
IER els below 8 percent and millions
CES of new jobs. The jobless numbers
increased. He put 17 percent of
our economy health care -
under control of government bureaucrats.
His foreign policy of "leading from behind"
cost him the favor of our allies and gained
us the disrespect of our enemies. American
leadership in the free world under Obama
has achieved a new low.
Was this the "fundamental change" the
voters wanted? Did voters want America to
become like a European welfare state, fail-
ing economically, defenseless and suffering
from cultural malaise? If so, they should be
pleased with this president If not, re-elect-
ing Barack Obama in 2012 and expecting
something different would be a triumph of
hope over experience.
Because I have children and grandchil-
dren, and because I believe in the founding
principles of this great nation, I hope expe-
rience triumphs this November.

William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
University, New York Medical College
and the USF College ofBusiness
Administration. He served in the Army as
a surgeon and as a Special Forces officer,
achieving the rank of lieutenant colonel.
He was an assistant professor of surgery
at the University of Georgia before
entering private practice. Dr Dixon can
be reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


come across as having a bet-
ter and clearer economic re-
vival plan than Obama; to
undermine the president's
standing, particularly on the
economy, without being
petulant; to get people think-
ing that four more years of
Obama would make their
lives worse; to score that one
memorable moment
"Mr President, you're en-
titled as the president to
your own airplane and to
your own house, but not to
your own facts," Romney


HAGAMAN
Continued from Page C1

supply goods and services to support their
spending. The more the wealthy are con-
demned, the less likely they are to step for-
ward to grow our economy
After a demand for Romney to reveal his
2011 tax return, he did so and immedi-
ately there was an outcry because he paid
his full liability, the same as anyone else
did! Anyone else who earns most of their in-
come from investment growth pays the
same tax rate he did. The argument is being
twisted to compare a fair income tax rate to
social insurance rates while on these; Rom-
ney pays the same rate as anyone else. His
Social Security and Medicare tax on wages
are the same as anyone else and he pays the
same sales tax rate as anyone else. Also, if
he purchases a luxury item that most of us
cannot purchase, he pays a punitive tax on
the item. That tax money is used to sustain
some of the excessive federal spending.
Keep in mind that if we have no wealthy
people in our country, we will only have the
poor How many poor people will step up to
support other poor? Most poor people can
barely support themselves. Think about it!
We have several very important races
here in Citrus County. Two of them should
not be political, since they should be filled


said during one of the flare-
ups, this one on education.
Romney clearly had his
lines ready Two more de-
bates await.
Associated Press writer
Steve Peoples and Deputy
Director of Polling Jennifer
Agiesta contributed to this
analysis. AP White House
Correspondent Ben Feller
has covered the presiden-
cies of Barack Obama and
George WBush. Follow Ben
Feller on Twitter at www
twittercom/benfellerdc.


Keep in mind that if we
have no wealthy people in
our country, we will only
have the poor. How many
poor people will step up to
support other poor?

by persons hired by their qualifications
rather than the best politically connected.
Actually, all races should be that way, but
the superintendent of schools office defi-
nitely should be filled with the best-quali-
fied person, not the most politically
popular one. Also, our safety and security
should be determined by the most qualified
person, rather than the most politically
powerful person.
We have very well qualified Republican
candidates running for school superinten-
dent, sheriff, clerk of the court, and state
representative. A vote for them will ensure
that we have chosen the best-qualified per-
sons who have our best interest as their
goal.

Robert E. Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman. He
resides in Homosassa.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 C3


I
a
H
R





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

,,.Ia
7bW.by N Fwhm


Clearing the air
A few nights ago I probably
caused some hard feelings with
some I consider my friends. It
stemmed from a political discus-
sion (what's new?). Naturally we
had different views of our na-
tion's current political direction.
I, like thousands of my com-
rades, gave more than 20 years
of our lives standing up for, and
protecting this America I love.
During my 20-plus years in the
military I stood up and served
her then, and I will continue to
stand up for her when, in my
opinion, her future is in
jeopardy
Personally I'm convinced that
the current administration's
ideology of wealth redistribu-
tion and their idea of"funda-


Letter to the EDITOR
mentally changing America" (to
what?) is not in America's best
interests. We do not need to
"fundamentally change Amer-
ica." We do need to revert back
to the "Fundamentals of Amer-
ica" put in place by our forefa-
thers in the Constitution of this
great nation.
I believe we Americans are
currently in an untenable posi-
tion brought on by both political
parties. For most of my life I was
a registered Democrat When the
moderate Democrats died and
became progressives, I switched
to the Republican Party About 10
years of being a registered Re-
publican, I found that the Repub-
lican Party, too, was no longer
adhering to our Constitution, so I
have been a registered Inde-
pendent for the past eight years.


At heart I am a libertarian (if
you're not sure what a libertar-
ian believes in, look it up).
America's problems seem to
be, we elect people based on
their speaking abilities, good
looks, etc., not on the issues fac-
ing this country For me a politi-
cal platform consisting of the
words "hope and change" or
"fundamentally changing Amer-
ica" tells me nothing. Hope for
what change would be my ques-
tion. Fundamentally changing
America to what, would be an-
other question.
All in all, I'm sorry my friends
and I had a somewhat heated
discussion causing ill feelings
and I just wanted to clear the air.
Bob Locher
Crystal River


. AID AL. TvTf- R.1AREO-EDGE
!AHO A I4TOTUR, r^.Y/RE O EDGiE.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

has played a number of leader-
ship roles with the newspaper
over the past two decades.
She actually came to work for
the Chronicle when we purchased
the Riverland News in Dunnellon.
She became a first-round draft
choice when the weekly newspa-
per became part of our extended
family She served in lots of be-
hind-the-scenes positions such as
the manager of our design depart-
ment, the manager of the Beverly
Hills Visitor and later as the di-
rector of our circulation services.
She has done a terrific job in


helping the newspaper grow and
serve customers over the years.
John Murphy will assume the
circulation director position. John
is another veteran of the newspa-
per who first joined us as an ad-
vertising sales person. He has
managed our online department,
our classified sales effort and now
will move to circulation.
John is one of the smartest tech-
nical people who works at the
paper and he is the first guy I call
whenever my computer doesn't
work. Unfortunately, that is a fre-
quent occurrence and is usually
due to operator error John is usu-
ally too nice or smart to mention
that.
John is a real leader in our com-
munity He serves as a Boy Scout


leader in Inverness and has been
a longtime director on the cham-
ber of commerce. Next year, John
will become the president of the
countywide chamber
Tom Feeney is the production
manager of the Chronicle, and he
will now assume responsibilities
for our distribution service. Tom
has also been with the company
since he was a teenager and now
oversees the pressroom, mail-
room, warehouses and now distri-
bution. Our distribution services
center on the delivery of other
newspapers in this market.
Some folks don't realize, but the
Chronicle also delivers the Tampa
Bay Times, The New York Times,
the New York Post, Wall Street
Journal, USA Today and Financial


Times to residents of our service
area.
Tom is also very involved in the
community He serves as the assis-
tant district governor for the Rotary
Clubs in the county and plays in al-
most every golf tournament in the
area. Tom hits the golf ball longer
than any employee at the Chronicle,
and he also spends the most time
searching for his golf balls in the
backyards of golf course residents.
Long doesn't always mean
straight.
He lives in Homosassa with his
wife, Karen.
Deb Kamlot has returned to
the Chronicle recently, and she
now serves as HR director and as
our community affairs director.
Deb, who lives in Inverness with


her two baseball-crazy sons, will
now lead our sponsorship efforts
with community groups.
Newspapers are institutions
that serve a community The
Chronicle has served Citrus
County since 1894, so those of us
lucky enough to work here recog-
nize we serve for a period of time
and then we turn over the respon-
sibility to the next generation.
But those who lead have each left
their mark and have made this a
better place. I appreciate the efforts
of all of those coming and going.
I hope you do, also.
0]
Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


Satay, Nmnler 3, 2012 L L

$20 Pre-Registered
$25 Race Day
T-shirt and free Stone Crab
Jam entry guaranteed to
pre-registered.
Door Prizes
by A Crystal River Kayak
Company and New Concepts
International Hair Salon


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race alongVthe
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Saturday
November 3
7:30 a.m.
Hunter Springs Park
Crystal River

RUN OR WALK!
Register Online:
CitrusRoadRunners.org
proudly benefitting



BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CITRUS COUNTY

hosted by
SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

presented by


BzIIFUNERALPHJMES
& CREMATORY
in partnership with
C^ ..,.u. --o.. N *-
C oNI.......


Tenth Annual Nature Coast
Fine Art &
True Craft Show

\October 13th & 14th



Saturday <5 Sunday
at tSomosassa springs t5ate \ViLdLife Park
on Ua 19 in Lomo5sas5a
9am-4pm E-ain or hine


October 7th
Sportsman Showcase
Oktoberfest
Rails to Trails Bike Ride
Citrus Jazz Society

October 9th
Fall Card Party

October 12th & 13th
Artisan's Boutique

October 12th & 13th
Citrus Springs Library Book Sale

October 13th
CASI Chili Cook Off
Community Food Bank Dinner Fundraiser
Arts & Crafts Show 2012
NliW Nature Coast Fine Art & True Craft Show
Team Hope Fishing Tournament

October 14th
Elvis starring Billy Lindsey
Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion

October 17th
Military Card Party

October 1 Sth
Jazz at the Museum

October 19th
Elvis starring Billy Lindsey

October 20th
SZ7 Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Day
October 2 1 st
Biloxi, MS and New Orleans, LA Trip
Why St. Augustine


I-vent to benefit the
THE FRIENDS OF HOMOSASSA








I,,


West Citrus Ladies of the Elks

Annual Arts &

Crafts Show


Saturday, October 13
From 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Vendors may set up on
Oct. 12 at 3 p.m. and on Oct. 13 at 8 a.m.

For more information call
Judy 628-2085


West Citrus Elks Lodge
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446 .: ,.





F.1


Camp E-Nini-Hassee's

Spaghetti Dinner







Includes salad, bread,
dessert & drink

Wednesday
October 10, 2012
3:30 pm to 7:00 pm
$8.00 donation per person
7027 E. Stage Coach Trail, Floral City
726-3883
Tickets available at door 100% of
proceeds to
.. .v Cbenefit
Christmas
000CGCA Activities


C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


COMMENTARY


1 1


I













CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Workforce names new regional chair


Special to the Chronicle

OCALA Darlene God-
dard, executive director of
human resources for Winco
Manufacturing in Ocala, is
the new chairwoman of
Workforce Connection's re-
gional board of directors.
Goddard, who had been
serving as interim chair
since last summer, was reaf-
firmed during the board's
quarterly meeting Sept. 27
in Ocala. Kevin Cunning-


ham, owner of RE/MAX Re-
alty One in Lecanto, was
elected vice chairman.
Goddard joined the local,
business-led nonprofit in
2008 and Cunningham was
appointed to the board in
2011. They will both serve
two-year terms along with
secretary/treasurer Fred
Morgan, a local union rep-
resentative from Reddick.
The board of directors
also welcomed the following
new members:


Pete Beasley, director of
Rasmussen College's Ocala
campus.
Theressa Foster, senior
executive director of Supe-
rior Residences of
Lecanto/Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living, Homosassa.
Diana Hammond, pres-
ident of Taylor College,
Belleview
Patricia Keelean, oper-
ations manager for Mid
Florida Community Serv-
ices (serving Citrus County).


Ted Knight, Marine
Corps League Detachment
819 of Citrus County.
Becky Magwood, admin-
istrative manager of Capital
City Bank, Chiefland.
Lanny Mathis, presi-
dent of the International
Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers (IBEW) Local 1205,
Gainesville.
David Pieklik, execu-
tive director of the Nature
Coast Business Develop-
ment Council, Chiefland.


Eddie Sencer, Experi-
ence Works Senior Work-
ers, Levy and Marion
counties.
Denise Willis, director
of the Withlacoochee Tech-
nical Institute, Inverness.
In other action, the 26-
member board approved
the following:
Pilot program in part-
nership with the Marion


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Figuring


S taxes on


Retirement challenges


$1.4 trillion

inpension

fights in RI

DAVID KLEPPER
Associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -
Retired social worker Jim
Gillis was told his $36,000
Rhode Island state pen-
sion would increase by
$1,100 next year to keep
up with inflation. But law-
makers suspended annual
increases, leaving Gillis
wondering how he'll pay
medical bills and whether
he'd been betrayed by his
former employer.
"When you're working,
you're told you'll get cer-
tain things, and you retire
believing that to be the
case," Gillis said. He and
other retirees are chal-
lenging the pension
changes in a court battle
that's likely to have na-
tional implications as
other states follow Rhode
Island's lead.
Cities and states around
the country are shoring up
battered retirement plans
by reducing promised
benefits to public workers
and retirees. All told,
states need $1.4 trillion to
fulfill their pension obli-
gations. It's a yawning
chasm that threatens to
wreck government budg-
ets and prompt tax hikes
or deep cuts to education
and other programs.
The political and legal
fights challenge the clout
of public-sector unions
and test the venerable
idea that while state jobs
pay less than private-
sector employment, they
come with the guarantee
of early retirement and
generous benefits.
Actions taken by states
vary. California limited its
annual pension payouts,
while Kentucky raised re-
tirement ages and sus-
pended pension increases.
Illinois reduced benefits
for new employees and cut
back on automatic pension
increases. New Jersey last
year increased employee
retirement contributions
and suspended pension
increases.
Nowhere have the
changes been as sweeping
as in Rhode Island, where
public sector unions are
suing to block an overhaul


Associated ress
Retired social worker Jim Gillis stands in front of his home Wednesday in Warwick, R.I. Gillis was told his $36,000
Rhode Island state pension would increase by $1,100 next year to keep up with inflation. But lawmakers sus-
pended annual increases, leaving Gillis wondering how he'll pay medical bills and whether he'd been betrayed by
his former employer.


passed last year. The law
raised retirement ages,
suspended pension in-
creases for years and cre-
ated a new benefit plan
that combines traditional
pensions with something
like a 401(k) account.
"This saved $4 billion
for the people of Rhode
Island over 20 years," said
state Treasurer Gina Rai-
mondo, a Democrat who
crafted the overhaul.
"Rhode Island is leading
the way I expect others to
follow, frankly because
they have to."
Public employee unions
say Rhode Island is reneg-
ing on promises to workers.
"What they did was ille-
gal," said Bob Walsh, ex-
ecutive director of the
National Education Asso-
ciation Rhode Island.
"We're deep into a real as-
sault on labor. It worries
me that people who pur-
port themselves as De-
mocrats do this."
The court case foreshad-
ows likely battles else-
where as states grapple
with their own pension
problems. In the past two
years, 10 states suspended
or cut retiree pension in-
creases; 13 states now offer
hybrid retirement plants
that combine pensions
with 401(k)-like plans.
"Forty-three states from
2009 to 2011 did something,


but in many cases some-
thing was not enough," said
David Draine, a re-
searcher who tracks pen-
sion changes at the Pew
Center on the States.
States are discovering
the political challenge of
reining in pensions is only
one step in a battle ulti-
mately won or lost in the
courts.
A plan to enroll new
Louisiana state workers
in a 401(k)-like retirement
plan is being challenged
by retirees. New Hamp-
shire is defending a law
that cuts pension benefits
and increases employee
contributions.
California Gov Jerry
Brown last month ap-
proved higher retirement
ages and contribution
rates for some state work-
ers and a $132,000 cap on
annual pension payouts.
The state's two main pen-
sion funds the Califor-
nia Public Employees'
Retirement System and
the California State
Teachers' Retirement Sys-
tem are underfunded
by $165 billion.
Brown said the changes
may lead to bigger pen-
sion reforms in the future.
Unions are ready for a
fight.
"Any additional pension
reform they try to do will
be met with serious oppo-


sition," said Dave Low, of
Californians for Retire-
ment Security, which rep-
resents 1.5 million public
workers. "Public employ-
ees have become the
whipping boy"
Unions note states have
long neglected to con-
tribute enough to pay for
promised benefits. In
2010, 17 states set aside no
new money for pension
benefits. Kentucky hasn't
made its share of pension
contributions since 2004.
In the past decade,
Kansas and New Jersey
haven't paid their full
shares a single year, and
Illinois has done so only
once.
Steep pension fund in-
vestment losses made the
situation far worse a
federal report said state
and local pension plans
lost $672 billion during fis-
cal years 2008 and 2009.
Longer-lived retirees,
higher health care bills
and pension increases
also drive costs. In Rhode
Island, 58 percent of re-
tired teachers and 48 per-
cent of state retirees
receive more in their pen-
sions than in their final
years of work.
Before Rhode Island's
reforms passed in Novem-
ber, its pension costs were
set to jump from $319 mil-
lion in 2011 to $765 million


in 2015 and $1.3 billion in
2028. The state's annual
budget is $7 billion.
Passing the changes
wasn't easy Public em-
ployees rallied at the
Statehouse and jeered
lawmakers during floor
debate. Firefighters lined
the walls of committee
hearings. Rep. Donna
Walsh called the vote the
"most heart-wrenching,
gut-wrenching vote" she'd
cast in 12 years as a
lawmaker.
One of the biggest
changes involved putting
off pension increases for
five years, and then only if
pension investments per-
form well.
North Providence re-
tiree Jamie Reilly left her
job as a secretary at age
50, thinking her 30 years
of state employment
would mean good benefits
during her later years. But
now she said she may be
forced to re-enter the
workforce at age 55 be-
cause the state has put off
pension increases.
"I counted on that
money," Reilly said of the
increases, which she esti-
mates would have started
at $700 to $1,000 a year "I
retired knowing I was going
to get a certain amount of
money You work all your
life and you plan, and they
take it away from you."


annuity

DEAR BRUCE: My

father is 80 years
old. A while ago,
he opened an annuity ac-
count with his bank. He
withdrew money from the
account and did not pay
any taxes at the time.
When he files his taxes,
will he have to pay taxes
on his withdrawal? He
doesn't make much
money Is there a way to
calculate how much he
will owe if he does? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I can-
not give you a specific an-
swer without knowing
more details about your
father, the type of annuity,
etc.
This is not a problem
that should be difficult to
solve, however Gather up
all of your father's infor-
mation and go to a CPA, an
enrolled agent or any of
the tax services that oper-
ate national chains. The
cost for such tax advice
should be relatively mod-
est. There are just some
things you shouldn't try to
do yourself.
Given the minimum in-
come you have mentioned
your father has, it's un-
likely there will be a tax
liability.
DEAR BRUCE: I'm
going to inherit my fa-
ther's house. His attorney
has set it up to add my
name to the deed after my
father's death. There is
also a will to fall back on if
need be.
What are the capital
gains laws in Florida cur-
rently? Must I own and
live in the property so
many years? I tried to ask
these questions of my fa-
ther's attorney, but he
won't answer them since
he represents my father.
- J.T. in Florida
DEAR J.T: First of all, I
don't understand why the
attorney won't answer
your questions. Unless
you and your father are at
odds, your father can cer-
tainly instruct his attorney
to answer any questions
you might have.
If you were to add your
name on your father's
deed now, there could be
some possible tax compli-
cations, gift tax and so
forth. I think it would be
better to wait until your
dad passes away to add
your name to the deed, as
the attorney intends; then
the property will pass to
you through death, and
the lifetime exclusion will
See Page D4


'Changing of the Guard' Not your parents' barcodes


very hour on the hour, a
"Changing of the Guard"
occurs at the tomb of the
Unknown Soldier in Arlington
National Cemetery The British
perform a similar ritual at both
Buckingham Palace and Wind-
sor Castle.
During the American version
of this formal ceremony, a relief
guard approaches the tomb and
conducts a "White Glove" in-
spection at the site. All soldiers
present salute the unknown sol-
diers who have been symboli-
cally awarded the Medal of


Dr. Fre
Her
EXPERT
MATI


Honor. The new soldiers then replace the
old guard and resume the honorary watch.
SCORE leadership changes hands
Every two years Citrus County SCORE
has a "Changing of the Guard." Chapter
members elect new officers who will vol-


unteer their time and talents for
the next two years. As SCORE

S command they experience what
it takes to manage chapter pro-
grams and the volunteer
mentors.
The outgoing officers from
FYs 2010-11 through 2011-12
are: Dr. Frederick J. Herzog,
,derick chairman; Joan D. Herzog,
zog treasurer; Myron Wambold, sec-
HENCE retary/office administrator; and
Norman Mangano, immediate
ERS past chairman.
The newly elected officers for
FYs 2012-13 through 2013-14 are: Robert
Braatz, chairman, Jim Green, vice-chair,
Char Waters, treasurer; and Myron
Wambold, secretary/office administrator.


Ever wonder what those square,
maze-looking boxes are? You know,
the ones you
see in newspaper
and magazine
articles, in advertise-
ments and on ,
product packaging?
Or the one right here
with this column?
You may be all
caught up on techie
things like this and,
therefore, feel free Danielle Kerese
to move on. But for IN THE
those of you who are MEME TIME
still wondering when MEME TIME
I will get to the point
and finally explain what the heck those
things are:
They are called Quick Response codes,
or QR Codes basically, a complex


barcode. You have r i
seen barcodes for U I II
years on your
groceries; when
scanned in, those
codes tell the
cashier what you
are purchasing
and how much it
costs. A QR Code, -
when scanned, Aim a smartphone at
can be used as a this QR Code to go
coupon. It may directly to this column
contain an answer online.
to a puzzle, it may
be used to track inventory, but most likely
it will take you immediately to a website.
Of course, you need to have a QR Reader
to make use of these codes. If you don't
have a smartphone or a tablet with an

See MEMPage D4










D2

SUNDAY
OCTOBER 7, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan M.
this:
rSi rrFBI


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Get your motor running


Enter to win a 2013 Chevrolet Corvette

Coupe and help the local YMCA


The Citrus County YMCA is pleased
to announce the donation of a 2013
Chevrolet Corvette Coupe from Steve
and Jewel Lamb of Crystal Motor
Company, the recipients of the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce's Sep-


tember New Image Award. A total of
2,000 tickets in the drawing are avail-
able for a donation of $100 per ticket.
All proceeds will go to benefit the Cit-
rus County YMCA. The winner of the
Corvette will be announced on Satur-


day, December 15 at 1 p.m. at Crystal
Chevrolet at 1035 South Suncoast
Blvd. in Homosassa.
Tickets are available at the YMCA
office in Beverly Hills at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway from Executive Di-
rector Joanna Castle, or they may be
purchased online at
https://donate. suncoastymca. org/
citruscorvettedrawing. For more in-
formation, please contact the YMCA
office at 637-0132.


Welcome Dr. Padala and Padala Family Practice


Padala Family Practice,
918 N. Suncoast Blvd. in
Crystal River, is your neigh-
borhood clinic, providing
high quality medical care for
each member of your family,
no matter the age or
condition.
We provide regular pre-
ventive care visits; manage
diabetes and blood pressure
problems, obesity issues.
We also provide routine
urgent care, including minor
laceration repairs, treat-
ment of upper respiratory
tract infections and UTI's.
We look for our future to
include providing home vis-
its, late night clinic hours
and weekend clinic through
advanced technology tele-
medicine equipment. s
Walk-ins are welcome and
we are accepting new I
patients.
Our phone number is 352-
436-4228.


Ambassadors from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce join with Dr. Padala and his
staff to cut the ribbon on Dr. Padala Family Practice. From left: Bill Hudson, Land Title of
Citrus County; Jenee Vickers, Kiddie Kampus Learning Center; Nicholle Fernandez, The Vil-
ages of Citrus Hills; Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at
Brentwood; Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of
Citrus County; Jeanne Green, The Grove Downtown; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; and
Kelley Paul, Wollinka Wikle Title Insurance.


November in Citrus County is back


Mark your calendar now for the sec-
ond annual Movember in Citrus County
- it starts in just a few short weeks.
And the Movember partners want to
see you, your spouse, your co-workers,
your golf- or fishing buddies or anyone
you know growing a Mo in November
What is Movember? November is
the month formerly known as No-
vember, where men and women
across the globe join to raise aware-
ness and funds for men's health is-
sues. Men grow a Mo (moustache) for
30 days to become walking, talking
billboards, for men's health causes -
specifically cancers affecting men.
Men who support Movember, called
Mo Bros, start Movember 1st clean-
shaven, then grow and groom their


,J


Mo, for the rest of the month. Women
who support Movember, called Mo
Sistas, champion the Mo by support-
ing their Mo Bros, and spreading the
important message of men's health.
We celebrate the shaving off AND
the choice of winners with the follow-
ing events: the official Movember


Partners Shave-Off, Citrus County
Chamber/EDC Office in Inverness:
from 5 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30, and
the Movember Mo Show & Finale
Party/Celebrity Bartending Event,
Burke's Irish Pub, Crystal River: 6 to
9-ish p.m. Thursday, Nov 29.
If you, your business or your friends
would like to get involved in Movem-
ber in Citrus County, contact Dorothy
Pernu at dorothypernu@hma.com or
352-795-8344.
The following organizations bring
November in Citrus County to our
community: Agricultural Alliance of
Citrus County, Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce, Citrus County Economic
Development Council and Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center.


Nov. 1 mixer syncs with National Hospice/Palliative Care Month


This year's national
theme, "Hope, Dignity, Love
... It must be hospice," re-
minds us that the care we
provide brings hope to help
people live life as fully as
possible, offers dignity
when there is not a cure
and surrounds families
with love at one of life's
most challenging times.
In celebration of the
month, Hospice of Citrus
County/Hospice of the Na-
ture Coast is hosting a
mixer Nov 1 at its location


in Homosassa at 8471 W
Periwinkle Lane (east of
U.S. 19 behind Wendy's).
Herry's Cafe will provide
delectable delights with zy-
deco music provided by
Cajun Dave.
Hospice of Citrus County,
Citrus' first and only home-
town provider of end of life
and bereavement services,
employs more than 400 staff
and enjoys the services of
several hundred specially
trained Hospice volunteers.
They serve as Citrus


Citrus County Cruisin'
Oct. 26 to 28 Haunted Tram
Rides from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park. Recommended donation
for the tram ride is $5 for adults and
$3 for children 12 and younger. This
fundraising event with kids' costume
contest is sponsored by the Friends
of the Homosassa Springs Wildlife
Park. For more information, call 352-
628-5343.
Oct 26 to 28 The Cooter Festival
returns in 2012 with three days
loaded with fun, music, contests,
games food, refreshments, turtle
races, barbecue cook-off, Cooter Idol
championship, Triathlon, Costume
Contest and more. Free parking and
admission. More information is
available at www.cooterfestival.com/.
Nov. 3 -Celebrate the Blues from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the annual
Blues 'n Bar-B-Que in Homosassa.
Tickets are $20 at the gate. The ticket
price is for the concert only Bar-B-
Que cooked onsite, Cuban cuisine in
the Museum Cafe, cold beer, wine,
soda, water, coffee and desserts will
stave off hunger and keep you ener-
gized. Please, no pets, no coolers, no
outside food or drink, but bring
chairs. More information is available
at www.ncfblues.com.


County's only provider of
children's hospice and pal-
liative care via Florida's
Children's Medical Serv-
ices and serve nearly 600
patients and their families
in need.
For Hospice of Citrus
County, it's about choices
and really good care. Their
team of physicians, nurses,
home health aides, social
workers, chaplains and
trained volunteers provide
specialized medical care;
emotional, spiritual and so-


W
CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Travel a few miles north and
join the street festival as the Rotary
Club of Crystal River-
Kings Bay presents the
fifth annual Stone Crab S
Jam on Saturday, Nov 3. -Arn
This street festival kicks
off at 4 p.m. on the south CITRUS COUN
side of Citrus Avenue all Economic Developr
the way to the waterfront Council, Inc.
at King's Bay Park in
Crystal River, with music on three
stages, food and craft vendors, and
beer, wine and soda/water. General
admission tickets are $5, and VIP
tickets are $50. More information at
www.stonecrabj am.com/.
Nov 10 to 11 Enjoy the Annual
Seafood Festival sponsored by the


cial support. They provide
medical services, equip-
ment, supplies, medica-
tions and training to
manage care. Hospice of
Citrus County/Hospice of
the Nature Coast serves
Alachua, Bradford, Citrus,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Levy,
Putnam, Suwannee and
Union counties. For more
information about Hospice
of Citrus County, please
visit their website www.
hospiceofcitrus.org.


Homosassa Civic Club, taking place
in the historic district of Old Ho-
mosassa. Art show, food court and
vendors from the community pro-
vide their seafood and other special-
ties. $2 entry donation, and children
are free! No pets. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat-
urday and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday
For more information, visit www.
homosassaseafoodfestival.org.
Cruise the Crystal River Armory
during the 35th annual "Remodeling
America" Home & Outdoor Show.
Hosted by the Citrus County
Builders Association and sponsored
this year by Senica Air, the show is
open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 3
l p.m. Sunday More infor-
Smation is available at
www.citrusbuilders.
com/comm home_
outdoorshowphp.
TY Nov. 24 Take a sce-
meint nic drive west on Ozello
Road to the seventh an-
nual Ozello Arts and
Fine Crafts Festival. Enjoy strolling
through the vendors and consider
picking up holiday gifts. (No pets)
Take U.S. 19 to Ozello Trail (C.R. 494)
and continue west about 6.2 miles.
Watch for signs, the show will be on
your right. More information at
www.ozello.net


DEADLINE
RETURN YOUR
VERIFICATION FORM
BY Monday, Oct. 15.



YOU CAUGHT

MY EYE ...
Clint Stevenson
A-Able Septic Sewer Services,
Crystal River


* REGISTER FOR OCT 12
LUNCH TODAY-
Presenting a Forum on
Amendment 4, 11:30
a.m. at Citrus Hills.


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!

Upcoming EVENTS


Oct. 11 Business After
Hours 5 to 7 p.m. at
NATURE COAST EMS.
Oct. 12 October Chamber
Lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club.
Oct. 23 TUESDAY
Business After Hours 5 to 7
p.m. at ALPACA MAGIC.
Oct. 30 Movember Shave
Off, 5 to 6 p.m. at Inverness
Chamber of Commerce/EDC
Office.
Nov. 1 Business After
Hours 5 to 7 p.m. at
HOSPICE OF CITRUS
COUNTY.
Nov. 8 Business After
Hours SENICAAIR and
CITRUS COUNTY BUILDERS
ASSOCIATION preview the
35th annual "Remodeling
America" Home & Outdoor
Show.
Nov. 9- 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
November Chamber Lunch at


Plantation on Crystal River.
Nov. 15 Business After
Hours 5 to 7 p.m. at FERRIS
GROVE RETAIL STORE.
Nov. 29 Movember Mo
Show & Finale Party, 6 p.m. at
BURKE'S IRISH PUB.
Dec. 1 "A Postcard
Christmas" Parade, 6 p.m. in
Crystal River
Dec. 5 BWA December
Luncheon.
Dec. 6 Business After
Hours -5 to 7 p.m. at B & W
REXALL DRUGS.
Dec. 8 "A Postcard
Christmas" Parade, noon in
Inverness.
Check out ff IM
our complete%
calendar for
community,
entertain- I
ment and ilfrI
fundraising events. Follow us
on your smartphone:


-m__. -
p -






I-



.I "-


"like"us on
*I"J farahnnl


Nancy Argenziano Co-hosts Chamber Chat this
week. Nancy talks about two local organizations
that she is involved with-- Friends of Citrus County
Animal Shelter (FOCCAS) and the We Care Food
Pantry. Nancy tells us why these organization mean
so much to her. Mary Napolitano from FOCCAS
brings us some wonderful small breed dogs that
are available for adoption. Diane Toto shares with
us how the We Care Food Pantry gives back to our
community. You don't want to miss our Chamber
Cooks segment. Chef Eric from The Plantation on
Crystal River is making a Seafood Mornay-- a
delicious pasta dish with shrimp, scallops, lobster
and panchetta. I bet your mouth is watering
already!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat--
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every
week!
If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefiedl at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of
past segments and updates on our weekly show!


I


11l fd ii





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


'Lenny Damron Day'


Special to the Chronicle
An artist's rendering of Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center at Sugarmill Woods.


Citrus Memorials Sugarmill

facility now open for business


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners presented a proclamation to Casey Dam-
ron, son of the late Leonard Alfred Damron III, at the regular meeting Sept. 25, proclaiming
Sept. 25 as "Lenny Damron Day" in Citrus County. From left are: Commissioner J.J. Kenney,
Commissioner Dennis Damato, Commissioner Rebecca Bays, Casey Damron, Commissioner
Joe Meek and Commission Chairman Winn Webb. Lenny was the founder of Damron Auto
Parts and senior vice president of LKQ Self Service and Heavy Trucks divisions. To the com-
munity, Lenny was a business success. He was also an avid supporter of the local YMCA
and the Boys & Girls Clubs.


CF Foundation
schedules meetings
The CF Foundation of the
College of Central Florida (CF),
plans two meetings. A copy of
the agenda will be available at
each. For information, contact
the CF Foundation office, 3001
S.W. College Road, Ocala, FL
34474.
CF Foundation Executive
Committee meeting is at 4:30
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, at
CF Enterprise Center, Founda-
tion Office, 3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, to discuss gen-
eral business.
CF Foundation Board of
Directors meeting is at 4:30
p.m. Wednesday, Oct.17, at CF
Founders Hall Boardroom,
Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. Col-
lege Road, Ocala, to discuss
general business.
Barbaron to
rebuild golf course
The golf course renovation
specialists at Barbaron Inc.
have been selected for the ren-
ovation of the Lake Venice Golf
Course adjacent to the Venice
Municipal Airport.
Celebrating 25 years in the
golf industry, Barbaron has
completed more than 140 proj-
ects. Visit www.barbaron.com.
Edward Jones has
income management
Financial services form Ed-
ward Jones has introduced an
income management account
designed to help investors sim-



MATTERS
Continued from Page D1

Dr. Herzog moves to the
immediate past chairman-
ship for the next two fiscal
years.
Norman Mangano, who
served as immediate past
chair, has been appointed
district director and will be
responsible for monitoring
the activities of the seven
chapters in the North Cen-
tral SCORE District
SCORE salutes
all who serve
"SCORE salutes" with a
well-deserved thank you to
all SCORE out-going offi-
cers for their continued ef-
forts during years of service.
To the newly elected lead-
ership of Citrus SCORE
gives congratulations and
well wishes for your suc-
cesses and dedication to our
worthy cause.


CHRONICLE
OOOCPBC ^- "ww.chronicleonline.Com
TODAY'S



NUMBER


CALL 564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO.
F 13'KM C1
1. Traditional Bingo $100
2. Double Bingo $200
3. Full Card Bingo $300


plify, track and access income
from multiple sources, accord-
ing to Justin Rooks, financial
adviser in Homosassa.
The Edward Jones Income
Manager account allows in-
vestors to collect income gener-
ated from multiple sources,
such as stocks, bonds, IRAs,
paychecks, annuities and So-
cial Security. Balances are
FDIC-insured up to $1.5 million,
and can be accessed through
checks, debit cards, electronic
transfers and online bill pay.
The account can estimate ac-
count balances for the coming
12 months, to help account-
holders avoid potential short-
falls before they happen.
Edward Jones provides fi-
nancial services for individual
investors in the United States
and, through its affiliate, in
Canada. The firm is headquar-
tered in St. Louis, Mo. Visit
www.edwardjones.com.
Contact Rooks at Edward
Jones Investments, 4550 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa,
352-628-3466.
Chamber plans
October luncheon
Reservations are open for
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce's October Lunch-
eon on Friday, Oct. 12. Net-
working begins at 11:30 a.m. at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club. This will be a forum pre-
senting the pros and cons of
the Florida Property Tax
Amendment (No. 4) on the No-
vember ballot.


National SCORE's
'White Glove Inspection'
National SCORE's ver-
sion of the "White Glove In-
spection" is the Biennial
On-Site review. The review
is an examination required
of every one of the 364
SCORE chapters across the
United States.
Every other year, a
chapter-by-chapter assess-
ment is performed to ensure
minimum operational stan-
dards are present. SCORE
district directors, who over-
see multiple chapters in
their geographic areas, per-
form this function.
An audit with
directive suggestions
During the review, chap-
ters are encouraged to man-
age their programs with best


Guest speakers will present
a forum about Amendment 4.
Prepaid registration, due by
noon Thursday, Oct. 11, for
members is $18; at the door,
price is $20.
Log into the Members Only
section at www.citruscounty
chamber.com to register, or call
352-795-3149.
Leadership Citrus
applications open
Applications are now being
accepted for the Leadership
Citrus Class of 2013. Leader-
ship Citrus has been active in
the community for 21 years,
and participants have gained a
higher level of awareness and
understanding of Citrus County
and all it has to offer.
Leadership Citrus is a five-
month program that meets
every other week. A limited num-
ber of applicants will be selected
to participate in the program by
a committee made up from the
Leadership Citrus Board. The
process involves filling out an
application and going through
an interview process. Selected
members will be notified through
the mail in December and
classes will start in January.
Class membership is open to
Citrus County residents, and
members of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will re-
ceive a discount. Cost of the
class is $495 for Chamber mem-
bers and $595 for nonmembers.
Applications can be found at
www.leadershipcitrus.com; ap-
plications are due by Oct. 25.


practices. Minimal chapter
management practices in-
clude, but are not limited to,
strict client confidentiality,
continuing education for
both clients and volunteers,
constant improvement of
services and the mainte-
nance of an appropriate and
secure facility.
There are other manage-
ment standards to which
chapters are held, all of
which are established for
the benefit of those we
serve. Business ethics un-
derpin the relationship of
volunteer to client.
SCORE clients in
'Good Hands'
As outgoing chapter
chairman I can say, without
any reservations, any client
who comes to Citrus SCORE


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus Memorial Health System will
close its Homosassa-area Walk-In Clinic at
the end of 2012, but the remainder of Cit-
rus Memorial Healthcare Center at Sug-
armill Woods will remain open for
business.
According to Citrus Memorial CEO
Ryan Beaty, urgent care is no longer a
vital need in the community.
"When we opened the Walk-In Clinic in
2009, there were not many other services
like it in Homosassa. Now, there are mul-
tiple primary care physicians and even
another urgent-care center serving the
area's needs," he said. "There are, how-
ever, other medical needs in Homosassa
that are not being met. We'd like to ex-
plore the idea of bringing in another serv-
ice that the community will find
valuable."


The facility provides laboratory collec-
tion services, pre-admission testing, reha-
bilitation services and diagnostic imaging
including X-ray, ultrasound, digital mam-
mography, bone density, CT scanning and
MRI. Additionally, primary care is avail-
able at the office of Tim Peterson, M.D.,
and Carolyn Bautista, ARNP
While the clinic will close at the end of
the year, the other services will remain
open.
"We understand that this facility is a
real convenience for patients living in the
Sugarmill Woods community and others
in the Southwest area of Citrus County,"
Beaty said.
"Our goal is not to take services away,
but to provide the community with the
care they need to stay healthy"
For information or to request a speaker
for your club or civic organization, contact
Katie Mehl at kmehl@citrusmh.org.


Cody's donates to food bank


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Cody's Original Roadhouse, at 305 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River, presented a check to the
Community Food Bank recently from the money raised during a 1-pound New York strip
steak special for $9.99 on Sept. 25 at the local restaurant. Proceeds of $2,950 were pre-
sented to the Community Food Bank. Food bank board members, from left, accepted the
donation: Joe Cappuccilli; Jewel Lamb; John Marmish; Franck Maigne, owner, Cody's Road-
house; JoAnne Boggus; Debbie Roberts; Duane Dueker; and Jennifer Grow. Franck Maigne
also made a contribution to the total.


* Submit information via email to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attn: Business Digest. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.



ON THE NET
citruscounty.score.org

is in "Good Hands." Citrus 6N
SCORE mentor volunteers I r G a
earned the "Top Gun" na-
tional award because we of-
fered more high quality
services for the business
base in Citrus County com-3
pared to all other chapters
in the United States.B
Want help? "For The LifeS
of Your Business" call
SCORE 352-249-1236.O

Dr FrederickJI Herzogis Annual Percentage Yield. Rates may vary depending on deposit amount and
immediate past chairman availability Certain restrictions and penalty for early withdrawal may apply
of Citrus SCORE. He can *P.... tiona incentives may be included to obtain yield. BBB
of Citrus SCORE. ie can All bank accounts are FDIC insured to the legal limits Call for complete details T
be reached via email at APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED MEMBER
therzog@tampabayrrcom. 00.....


11thAnnual

CASI Chili Cook Off For Charity
Florida State Open Chili Championship

Octoberl3th & 14th, 2012

At Nature Coast RV Resort
10359 W Halls River Road Homosassa, FL
^ Saturday 10 am-4 pm
Sunday 11 am-3 pm
Participate in the Chili Cook Off
and try to win a People's Choice Award!
Samples of the chili will be provided to participants
and a winner will be chosen by popular vote.
Food, Live Music, Entertainment, Chili Tasting, Arts & Crafts
Proceeds to Benefit the American Cancer
Society& Blessings (a program that provides
backpacks of food to homeless children)
Lecanto Levi's 4H Club
'- .T'NT[uIE I I
.. www.chronicleonline.com
Call 352-697-3364 for More Information


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 D3






D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page Dl


Regional Manufacturer's Associa-
tion (MRMA) creating a jointly se-
lected business development and
training manager position. The goal
of the training manager, who works
out of Workforce Connection's ad-
ministrative office, is to facilitate
training and employment services
to the manufacturing industry sec-


BUSINESS


tor, including fabricators and
distribution.
The 2012-16 strategic plan,
which continues Workforce Con-
nection's focus on seamless services
for businesses and applicants, pro-
fessional human resources and ex-
panded access to services.
Expand the high school senior
scholarship program to provide
postsecondary education to more
graduates in the three public school
districts, with the goal of increasing
the number of credentials in sci-


ence, technology, engineering and
math (STEM) and other high-
demand careers in the region. Last
spring, the board sponsored $65,000
in scholarships for 13 graduating
seniors in all three counties.
Acquisition at no charge of a
second "mobile one stop" unit The
mobile resource unit (MRU) is
equipped with 10 computer work-
stations; Workforce Connection cur-
rently operates an MRU with four
computer workstations.
Workforce Connection CEO


Rusty Skinner said the second mo-
bile unit will "provide a lot more
flexibility" and the organization is
working with the College of Central
Florida to determine how the new
unit can provide educational serv-
ices in conjunction with workforce
services. The new unit will hit the
road sometime in January Skinner
said the mobile units provide ac-
cess to job seeker and employer
services in parts of the region that
do not have ready access to Work-
force Connection's brick-and-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

mortar resource centers.
Workforce Connection is the re-
gion's workforce expert, helping an
average of 1,500 employers and
more than 36,000 job seekers each
year. Workforce Connection offers
innovative solutions to help area's
businesses succeed while providing
the tools job seekers need to suc-
ceed in today's competitive market-
place. For information about
Workforce Connection, call 352-291-
9559 or 800-434-5627, ext 1234, or
visit www.clmworkforce.com.


MEME
Continued from Page D1


above-average camera, I'm
afraid you are pretty much
out of luck and won't be able
to use QR Codes, unless you
are with a friend who has
one of these devices.
In Japan, where the QR
Code was invented and is
widely used, QR Readers
come pre-installed on all




MONEY
Continued from Page D1


apply Even if nothing is
done to change the rules,
your father will have at least
a $1 million lifetime gift tax
exemption to a close rela-
tive you and as a con-
sequence there would be no
tax whatever.
You mention there is a
will to "fall back on." That is
not a fallback; that is where


able devices.
In Europe and America,
we have to visit the app
store and download one of
the free readers. (An app
store is not a "real" store,
but a store you can access
through the Internet to
download games, tools and
other time wasters.)
At this point, you may
wonder if it's worth it. If you
don't already have an able
device like a smartphone
then no, of course it's not



you should be mentioned as
an heir for the home. If
there are other children in-
volved, that could compli-
cate things.
DEAR BRUCE: Where is
the best place to buy silver
bars? My son is 3 years old,
and I would like to get them
for him. Every year, I invest
$1,200 for him and keep
records so I can show him
later, when he is much older,
how you can make your
money work for you.
Do you think this is a good


worth buying a smartphone
just to use a QR Reader.
Although there are about a
thousand other reasons that
I would say, if you can afford
the phone and data
package, get a smartphone.
You won't be sorry
If you already have a
device that is able to use a
QR Reader, but you have yet
to download the app, I say
yes, it's completely worth it
Most QR Readers are free,
and easy to use.



idea? Tony, via email
DEAR TONY: You can
buy silver bars any number
of places, such as dealers.
But for your purpose, that
would not be my choice.
Bars are for the big guys,
not for you. The reason is
you would want to have
them assayed at purchase,
even though they're labeled,
to protect your interests.
As you know if you have
listened to my radio pro-
gram or read my column
over the years, I consider


I use "Microsoft tag,"
because it's reliable. I also
really like that it keeps track
of the websites and
information through the QR
Codes that I have scanned.
I hear Kaywa has a good
QR Reader, and at work I
use their QR Code creator
often.
There are larger
advantages for consumers
to use QR Codes other than
just getting to the
information quicker. Many



"investments" in metals to
be a speculation, not an in-
vestment. They don't pay in-
terest. There is some
expense in keeping them,
such as a safe-deposit box.
If you do invest in metals,
I would definitely invest
only in coinage. And I would
be far more comfortable
buying coins that are numis-
matically valuable instead
of valued only for their
metal content.
For the amounts you're
talking about, consider sil-


companies are giving
discounts and special
privileges to people who use
their QR Codes.
So you may be reading a
magazine, see an ad for that
cruise you have been
dreaming about taking, and
see a QR Code that, if you
scan, you can enter a contest
to win that cruise.
The disadvantages are it
takes up some memory on
your phone.




ver dollars, probably Mor-
gans, or gold coins such as
Saint-Gaudens. Buy the
kinds of coins that coin col-
lectors are going to want,
and that means the very
best quality you can find.
They should be in superior
condition and should be at-
tested as such by a reliable
agency
Over a period of time, and
for a kid who's only 3, these
coins likely will pay a great
deal more in appreciation
than would speculating en-


Danielle Kerese is the
multi-media designer at
the Citrus County
Chronicle. She has spent
countless hours designing
websites and other
Internet ventures and is
happy to share her
knowledge with you. If
there is something you
have seen online that you
just don't understand,
email her at
DKerese@chronicle
online, com.



tirely in the metals.
U
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be
provided. The Bruce
Williams Show is at
wwwbrucewilliams.com on
the Made in America
Broadcast Network


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


F a x : . .. . . .. . . ... .. ... . .... . .. .... .. . . .. .. .. . .. . . . .


Ladies. what are you
Looking For?
I'm an active widower,
clean cut looking, with
twinkling blue eyes and
a nice smile, very ex-
troverted. intelligent.
nice voice, nice ap-
pearance, likes to go
most places & do most
things, & have a good
sense of humor. In turn,
I would like to meet a
widow,, with a nice
personality, average
looking in aood health.
intelligent, affectionate
& hopefully with mutual
chemistry, average
to slim build and a
Christian Lady between
70-80+. If you sincerely
think we could mesh as
companions, give me
a jingle at 527-9632.
I'll return all calls, Thank
you for reading this ad
and have a good day!







INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, 1st & Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-476-2860



Medium Equip-
ment Operator-
Skilled work in the
operation of moderately
complex Public Works
construction and main-
tenance equipment.
One year's experience
in the operation and
routine maintenance of
the type of equipment
assigned. Performs
manual laboring tasks.
Must have or be able to
obtain within 90 days of
employment a valid
Florida CDL, Awith N
endorsement. Starting
pay $10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits. ALL
APPLICATIONS MUST
BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries or
the Human Resources
Department, 3600 W
Sovereign Path, Suite
178, Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by Fri-
day, October 12, 2012
EOE/ADA



OPEN HOUSE
Saturday 12p-4p
3/2/3 w/pool. 1.3 Ac,
Withlacoochee River
Access, River Oaks East
1099 Natchez Loop
$274K or make offer
Kathy 352-484-8043


SHORKIES 2 females
Adorable & Non shed-
ding 10 wks $400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803


Inside only
Approx. 5 months old
352-220-8634
Trademark 3-in-1
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey, and
Foosball), $250
Mini ping pong table with
net and paddles $75
(352) 637-7237
YAMAHA
2002 650 V Star Classic
5k Miles, Exc Condition
$2900 (386) 365-3159

^^^^


Tiger Titus 8-6-00 to
8-16-12
You died on the same
day as my dad 8-16-01
I lost my best friends and
buddies
I miss you, Love Always
John





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metals,
Antena towers 270-4087



2 Pomeranians
Both Males
Both Neutered
Brothers, 5 yrs. old
To good home
(352) 364-1384
Chocolate Lab, 4 yr old
Female. Spayed, Great
w/ kids. Needs to be able
to run and play.
(352) 621-0401
Free 3 year old
Cockatiel
w/cage
(352) 465-5172
FREE CAT
2 years, declawed
& Spayed
To Loving Home
(352) 634-4636
FREE DOG Blackmouth
Cur Female,
2 1ayrs old spayed.
Needs lots of attention.
(352) 746-1019
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great fertilizer/mulch.
Stored in trash cans -
easy to load onto your
truck or container. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-7127
leave message
if no answer


FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
6 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
Lab Mix
Housebroken, neutered
very friendly,
loves to play
(352) 503-6121



Lost Chihuahua
Female, Dark Brown, &
Tan Color Yorkie, Male
Near Jefferson St.
Beverly Hills
(352) 476-2863
Lost Jack Russell
3 Yrs old Dark gray and
white. 1 blue eye. Lost
near Rosedale in
Homosassa on 10/05
(352) 628-3436
Lost Large Set of Keys
w/ attach,
black monitor
Homossasa area
813-375-1676
Lost Male Cat
Med. Long Hair Black &
White, not nuetered or
declawed, blue collar
Lost on Owens &
Spaniel Trails, Inverness
(352) 419-4688



Found Bench Grinder
on 41, in Floral City
Water
(352) 560-4231
Found White & Black
Male older Jack Russell
Terrier, Near Citrus Hills
on Cherry Pop
(352) 637-5335



FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15 ct @ $5/Ib,13 ct @
$6/Ilb,9 ct @ $7/lb.
Stone Crabs $6/lb.
(352)513-5038




Clerk Typist
Full-time
(Tuesday-Saturday)
position performing
routine clerical work in
Animal Services. Must
be willing to handle
animals. Must be
familiar with Microsoft
Office Suite of Prod-
ucts. Must possess a
current valid Florida
Driver license. $8.45
hourly. Excellent bene-
fits. ALL APPLICA-
TIONS MUST BE
SUBMITTED ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries or
the Human Resources
Department, 3600 W
Sovereign Path, Suite
178, Lecanto, FL
34461 to apply online
by Friday, October 12,
2012 EOE/ADA


Clerk Typist
Full-time
(Tuesday-Saturday)
position performing
routine clerical work in
Animal Services. Must
be willing to handle
animals. Must be
familiar with Microsoft
Office Suite of Prod-
ucts. Must possess a
current valid Florida
Driver license. $8.45
hourly. Excellent bene-
fits. ALL APPLICA-
TIONS MUST BE
SUBMITTED ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries or
the Human Resources
Department, 3600 W
Sovereign Path, Suite
178, Lecanto, FL
34461 to apply online
by Friday, October 12,
2012 EOE/ADA
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
P/T Position; Pay based
on Qualifications
$10-$11.75. Resp include
chkg lines and water me-
ter for damage, repairing
as required. GED or HS
Diploma, valid Dr Lic,
vehicle and own tools
required. (352) 489-1777
RECEPTIONIST
For Evening Shift.
Established
Cosmetology school
in Inverness. $10+ /
hour. Organization
and follow thru a
must. Must have
good communica-
tion and people skills.
Send Resumes to:
jpuglisi@
manhattanhairstyling
academy.corn




HAIR STYLIST
Full time /Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630
to apply in person




YOLiI"\\porld flrt


Need a jl)h
or 'a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


C [jj ftj,-i",, ,E
.. *, * t t t i


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






Assistant Business
Office Manager
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
Full-time position
available. Experience
with long-term care
billing and collections
of Medicare, Medi-
caid and private
insurance is required.
We offer great pay
and benefits, includ-
ing medical cover-
age, 401(K) and paid
vacation, sick days &
holidays. Please
Apply in Person
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
Resumes may be
faxed to the atten-
tion of Business Office
Manager at
352-746-6081.
EOE/M/F/V/D 35458







Citrus Podiatry
Center, Pa,:
Fulltime 40hr/week,
8:30am-5pm M-F
back-office assistant.
Employer Funded
100% Health,
Dental, Rx Benefits.
Additional Benefits
provided. Must
exhibit Professional
Mannerism and
Positive Attitude.
Podiatry x-ray
certification required,
we pay for course
and certification.
Must have recent,
minimum 2 yrs experi-
ence with patient
care in physician
office or hospital
setting. Please do
not apply if you do
not meet minimum
requirement.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Podiatry
Center, Pa,
P.O. Box 1120,
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120.
No phone calls or
faxes accepted.


Dental Assistant
& Receptionist
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo com

Granny Nannies
CNA'S & HHA'S,
Needed Immediately.
Must be Certified.
(352) 794-3811

P/T Chiropractic
Assistant

26-33 hrs/wk, Sat. am
a must. Busy office,
exp'd preferred.
Fax resume to :
352-726-3885
RN's/ LPN's/OT's
NEEDED
For Home Health Visits
In Citrus County Area
Per Diem, w/potential
for Fulltime. Per Diem
rates & mileage paid
Fax Resume to
352-236-6096



ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in Enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722


M -


I -I

Key Training Center
F/T Thrift Store
Manager
Strong retail/
merchandising
background pre-
ferred. Day to day
operations of busy
thrift store, to include
staffing, scheduling,
pricing, merchandis-
ing and working with
Key program partici-
pants. Must be flexi-
ble with schedule;
may include week-
ends. HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto FL
34461. "EOE**

LIC 4-40 CUST.
SERVICE REP/or
2-20 Agent

Needed for busy Insur-
ance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover Cleve-
land, Homosassa








# Employment
source is...





1www chronlcleonlne


The Grille
at CITRUS HILLS
Is Now Hiring all
Restaurant Positions.
We will be
interviewing for
Server, Bartender,
Host/Hostess, Busser,
Expo/Runner, Line
Cook, Dish, and Prep
workers. Please
Apply In person at
505 E Hartford St
Tuesday-Saturday be-
tween 2-4:30pm.




RETAIL SALES
Nights/ weekends
75 CHROME SHOP
Wildwood
(352) 748-0330




Accounts
Payable Clerk
position available.
Experience required.
Proficient in PO
processing, GL
coding, prepare and
check invoices for
payment, prepare
monthly reports and
basic accounting
skills. Proficient in
Microsoft Office Suite
and accounting
software knowledge.
Experience with
Computer Ease a
plus but not required.
EOE/DFWP
CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY
Resume Submission
resumes@
dabcon.com


APT. MAINTE-
NANCE
For 36 Unit Complex
F/T, & Benefits, must
have reliable transporta-
tion and own tools. Work-
ing knowledge of Gen
Maint., Plumbing AC &
Lawncare. Apply at FLO-
RAL OAKS APTS
Or send Resume to:
8092 S Floral Oak Circle
(352) 860-0829
EXP. PLUMBER

All phases, Valid
Florida license. Apply
at 102 W. Main Street,
Downtown Inverness

STRUCTURAL
STEEL ERECTOR
Needed In
Homosassa Area.
Apply: 6260 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa F 34448
Or Fax Resume
352-628-2600




Medium Equip-
ment Operator-
Skilled work in the
operation of moderately
complex Public Works
construction and main-
tenance equipment.
One year's experience
in the operation and
routine maintenance of
the type of equipment
assigned. Performs
manual laboring tasks.
Must have or be able to
obtain within 90 days of
employment a valid
Florida CDL, Awith N
endorsement. Starting
pay $10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits. ALL
APPLICATIONS MUST
BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries or
the Human Resources
Department, 3600 W
Sovereign Path, Suite
178, Lecanto, FL
34461 to apply online
by Friday, October 12,
2012 EOE/ADA




Choir Piano
Accompanist
P/T: 1 hr Thursday choir
rehearsal; Sun a.m warm
up plus one service. Or-
gan a plus. Fax
resume to 352-489-5222.
Hope Lutheran Citrus
Springs. Questions-call
Diane 352-598-4919

Part-Time
Church Secretary
Proven MS Office
experience, excellent
people skills, and
ability to work within
deadlines required.
Email Resume and
3 references to:
theresa@lumc.org


BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE I DRUIG FREE WORKPLACES
Prefe Expe : hriecd,_ lf










BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

APPL I -PESO

221 S uthSu co :t lv., o os .









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MASSAGE
THERAPY
Weekend Class NPR
OCT. 20, 2012

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com





STREET SMART
SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVID-
UALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.





Illinois pocket watch
bunn special 21 jewels,
lever set, gold filled case,
made 1923, $325
(352) 344-5283


1


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






COMPACT
REFRIGERATOR
Stainless Steel Magic
Chef 3.6 cu. needs some
work. $20 352.637.2647

Maytag Dryer
Whirlpool Washer
Large Capacity
White $75. ea.
(352) 419-4467

SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179


$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can De-
liver 352 263-7398
Whirlpool Washer &
Maytag Dryer
Super capacity
$100 ea.
(352) 419-4467



30" Electric Stove
White,
Excellent condition
$100. (352) 302-8265
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered Adjusta-
ble $45 each
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS(4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Gray
Tweed Fabric $15 each
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $85
727-463-4411
OFFICE DESK 8 FOOT
LONG WITH DRAWERS
BLOND OAK GOOD
CONDITION $50.00
352-613-0529
OFFICE DESK 8 FOOT
LONG WITH DRAWERS
DARK OAK GOOD
CONDITION $50.00
352-613-0529
PREOWNED FILE CABI-
NET 2 Drawer Lateral
Commercial Metal Graph-
ite Color 30"x28"x18" $45
727-463-4411
SMALL COMPUTER
DESK Formica Top
36"x24" with 2 Drawer
File Cabinet Attached
$25 727-463-4411



AC MOBILE POWER
CONVERTER FOR
AUTO, 12VDCTO
120VAC, 140W $25
352-726-9983
AC POWER HEDGE
TRIMMER, 13 INCH, $15
352-726-9983
CraftmanTable Saw.
Old and ulgy but runs
$30 firm (352) 628-4437
Dry Wall Stilts
3 pairs for $100
239-572-4490
MANUAL TELESCOP-
ING TREE PRUNER
WITH SAW CUTTER,
7FT-14FT REACH, LIKE
NEW $45 352-726-9983
RYOBI ROUTER TABLE
with fence, miter gauge,
switch box, insert plates
& featherboard. Like new
$60.00 (352)628-1734
WERNER 20 FT
ALUMINIUM EXTEN-
SION LADDER 200 LBS
DUTY RATED D-1120-2
$75 352-726-9983



Magnavox 32"
$85.
RCA 26"
$70.
Both with Remotes
(352) 220-2715


SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $50.00
352-613-0529



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


1930's Mahagoney
China Cab w/butler desk,
4 bevel glass doors $475
Dining Rm Set, 3 leaves,
brass feet, 5 chairs $140
pictures by email
(352) 341-1774
36" ROUND TABLES (2)
Rugged Formica Top
Sturdy Steel Pedestal
$35 each 727-463-4411
Complete Wicker
Bedroom Set
w/two single Craftmatic
Beds in A-1 Shape
$1,100 MUST SEE
(352) 794-3474
Couch, Chair, 2 Tables
W/Cushions. Henry
Link Wicker $375;
Tanning Bed Woff Sys 2
W/ extra box of bulbs
$350(740)255-0125
DINING ROOM SET
Wood Table w/2 exten-
sion, 4 chairs, hutch and
china cabinet. Cream
color. $450 OBO
(352) 503-6525
LAZY BOY RECLINER
Very clean, non-smoker.
Green color.
$100.00 352-257-5722
for details.
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen Size Bed
& Boxspring
$65.
(352) 563-0425
QUEEN SIZE SLEEPER
SOFA multi-colored pas-
tels Very Good condition
$100.00 527-1399
Queen size sofa hide a
bed. Very good condition
$165. Executive Desk
Exc Condition $125
(352) 637-5755
SLEEPER SOFA SAGE
color Solid fabric Good
Condition $50.
352-621-0175
Sofa Bed
plaid, like new $75 obo
(352) 382-3928
SQUARE TABLE 36"
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
$30 727-463-4411
STORAGE CABINET 2
Door Gray Commercial
Metal 50"x36"x18" Lock
and Key 4 Shelves $75
727-463-4411
STORAGE CABINET
Gray Commercial Metal 4
Shelves Lock and Key
50"x36"x18" $75
727-463-4411
Temperpedic Ergo
Twin Long
Adjustable Bed.
2 months old, excel.
cond. org. price $1,900
Sell $900 or make offer
352-270-1515, 270-1516


Living Room Brown
& Gold Pasely design
Excel. Cond.
Asking $395
(352) 637-2281
TWIN MATTRESS &
BOX SPRING No frame
Good shape $20.00
352-621-0175
Twin mattress and box
spring w/ metal frame.
Used only one week
$100 (352) 637-7237
White Crochet Bed-
spread & shams from
India, never used $60.
King sz. (352) 746-2479
WOODGRAIN FOLDING
BANQUET TABLE 6 Foot
Long PreOwned $35
727-463-4411
YOUTH BEDROOM SET
5 Pieces, Loft bed,
dresser, bookshelf, desk,
end table. Light wood ap-
pearance with contrast
navy blue doors and
drawer fronts. $350 for all
352-634-1692



Craftsman Riding
Mower 21 1/2 HP Briggs
& Stratton engine,
42" Deck, Overhead
Valve $500 (352)
746-7357
DROP SPREADER pull
behind all metal drop
spreader in good condi-
tion.$75. 352-563-2288
Yard-Man
Hydro Transmission
20HP Riding Lawn Trac-
tor, 42" mower, new
battery excel. cond.
$500 (352) 270-3824




CITRUS SPRINGS
Oct.6&7, 8-2pm,
household ,women/mens
clothing, books & more.
7091 N Deltona Blvd

HOMOSASSA
Fri., Sat, & Sun 7am
Moving Sale,
In & Out
4982 Grand Circle Ter
INVERNESS
Fri. Sat. & Sun. 8a-3p
Furn., Lift Chair, Eliptical,
Mics HsHold Items,
7676 East Shore Dr
INVERNESS
SAT & SUN 8A-5P
MOVING SALE
1109 Knobhll St
WANTED Rods,
Reels, tackle, tools,
Antique collectibles,
hunting equipment.
352-613-2944




STREET SMART
SHOES
STORE CLOSING
All shoes 50-70% off.
Adidas Soccer, Baseball,
& Football kleets all 50%
off. SELLING INDIVIDU-
ALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.


assorted prices vary.
call Kate at 352-794-3768
MENS CLOTHING
PANTS & SHORTS 10
pants size 36X30 5
shorts 36" waist $50
352-613-0529
Western Boots.
Tony Lama SizelO.
Almost new $50 firm.
(352) 628-4437



WILSON ELECTRONICS
301135 DUAL BAND
PANEL CELL PHONE
ANTENNA W/COAX $35
352-726-9983



!!!!!!!245/65 R17!!!!!!!
Great tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****225/60 R 16******
Great tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
----.225/60 R18----
Great tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
44 PIECE FIESTAWARE
DISH SET- Rose color, 6
pc. place settings plus
accessories, Ex., $75
352-628-0033
1-Hi-back wicker rocker,
like new, cost $129, sell
$75
(352) 586-1566
BIRD CAGE
white, for medium sized
birds.20x20x34 high. On
stand with coasters. $50
352 726 5753
Brother electric type-
writer like new $50,
Brother sewing machine
like new $40
(352) 628-6901
CHAIN SAW
REMINGTON ELECTRIC
EXTENDABLE 10" cut,
extends to 10ft., Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
Coffee Maker,
Cuisinart 12 cup pro-
gramable, just 1 yr old
Paid $85 sell $30. cash
(352) 344-0686
Craftsman Lawn
Mower $125
52" TV console
brand new
$200
(352) 527-7223
Dining Rm Table, 5 ft
round 6 chairs, all solid
wood, white pine,
stained early american
$325. Excericse Bike
w/Fan wheel, keeps
cool $200. 726-8361
Electrolux Vaccum
Cleaner,
includes power handle,
like new $100
(352) 270-3824
Good cond. Refrigera-
tor dbl drs w/icemaker
white $100 Range, blk,
white $100.
Radial Arm Saw $225.
(352) 419-4069
Home Made Trailer
8 ft. x 5, $150
Compact Refrigerator
$100.
352-601-7380


SALE, New king size
mattress, TV's, Washer/
Dryer & Other items
Call for Info 897-4681
Manitowc 1,000 lb
Ice Maker
$950
352-628-6537
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
QUICKSHADE
ROLLERBAG
Fit's 10'by10'
Popup canopy $45.00
Call @ 464-0573
SAMSONITE HA NGI
GARMENT BAG $15
LUGGAGE
CARRIER $10
352-419-5981
Screen Door,
Aluminum,
74 %"x 35%" $25.
352-795-5310
410-474-3454
Sears Electric Blower w/
15 ft cord; Gargage Dis-
posal 1/2 HP. $30 for
Both (352) 563-2022
SEWING MACHINE
Bernina Artista 180E
Sewing and Embroidery
w/ Accessories $850
(352) 794-3281
STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $40 VINTAGE
1980'S. CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
352-419-5981
TELEPHONE DIGITAL
ANSWERING MACHINE
$10 LIKE NEW ALL
CONNECTIONS INVER-
NESS 352-419-5981
UGLY STICK FISHING
RODS- many to choose
from, Spin/cast/troll, $10
to $15, Ex. 352-628-0033



4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
MANUAL WHEEL CHAIR
LIFT Harmar TiltNTote
#AL003 fits all vehicles
exc $100.Dunnellon
465.8495



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" GREG BENNET
JAZZ BASS METALLIC
RED,W/PRECISSION &
JAZZ STYLE PICKUPS
$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" MINISTER
"STRAT" TRAVEL GUI-
TAR W/FULLSIZE
NECK&GIGBAG&MORE!
$100 352-601-6625


CLASSIFIED


-LDMw


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755





DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENC NG
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *





Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vynil Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352)201-2245





1 CALL & RELAX! 25 yrs
Paint/Remodel, Repairs,
Woodwork, Flooring,
Plumbing, Drywall,
Tile work Lic.37658/lns.
Steve 352-476-2285


#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
/ FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
All Painting & Home
Repairs. Call Doug
at 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
ELAINE TO THE RESCUE
Free Estimate. At Your
Convenience. No Job
to Small (262) 492-3403


Exp House Keeper.
Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018



Complete Renovation
Kitchen countertop, tile,
tub to shower Lic#37801
(352) 422-3371

The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALLI!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
All Painting & Home
Repairs. Call Doug
at 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing











CALL a PROFES-
SIONAL (352) 464-4418


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing











CALL A PROFESSIONAL
(352) 464-4418
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning
& Painting
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR &MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


WINDOW '
GENIE.
We Clean Windows and o Whole 0at More!
Window Cleaning
*Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





Your World











CHI-RTpNOALE




s.';. ,.In n I I I, rll


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
.', Pools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
"Grout Painting
S-w. Residential &
st-',- ~Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
\ / Small Carpentry

Screening
S lean Dryer
Geet Vents
SAffodale & Dependable
s Experence lifelong
3,52-344-0905
ycell- 400-1722
,. ;ured -1Lic.#37761





GENEIAC
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.


352-621-0881

6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextaluml3@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED






BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
________________________00QQC42R


AAA ROOFING
Call t4 ak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate

:$1OO OFF
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 ~ OCSE0


Add an artist( tou(h to your existing yard
Sor pool or plan
something
S_ ( completelyy new!
"Often imitated,
never dupetea"


YOUR INTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVERSPECIALIST

COPES
P POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 352-400-3188




MOPAR & JEEP CONNECTION
S Complete Mopar A
. Repair & Maintenance
Engines Drivelines Oil Changes
Transmissions Brake Service
WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS
inline-+-

performance-
Inc.
680 E. Southland Ave.
CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell S
352-568-7591


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
"NO ROT"
Door Units
Blinds Between
the Glass
Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 ii
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)


ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAQTUNERDVD-
STRINGS,& STRAP $75
352-601-6625
"SMALL GIG" BASS
GUITAR AMP
W/PLENTY OF POWER
LIGHT WEIGHT! $65
352-601-6625
Behringer Thunderbird Bx
108 bass amp $45
Inverness 352-419-4464
Crate Kx 15
Keyboard/guitar amp $25
Inverness 352-419-4464
DANELECTRO
DANOBLASTER
GUITAR RETRO LOOK
W/BLUE FLAKE FINISH
$100 352-601-6625
Fender Frontman 15G
guitar amp $25.Inverness
1-352-419-4464
Fender Rumble
15 bass amp $45
Inverness. 352-419-4464
Fender
Vintage Amp, 85Watts,
Guitar Amp, twin
reverb, 2 12" Speakers
tube type, like new
$1,350 (352) 726-8361
Line 6 Spider III 15 watt
guitar amp $40.Inverness
1-352-419-4464
MITCHELL MD100S
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/"STEALTH" ELEC-
TRICS & EXTRAS $100
352-601-6625
MITCHELL MD300S
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/"STEALTH" ELEC-
TRICS & EXTRAS $100
352-601-6625
RANDALL 25WATT
LEAD AMP W/CAN RE-
VERB & SWITCHABLE
CLEAN & DISTORTION
$90 352-601-6625




ATARI 2600 & games.
Needs powerplug. Asking
$25 call Justin
352-212-2556
BABY HIGHCHAIR
$20; portable swing $20;
bouncing infant seat $15
call Kate 352-794-3768
Hague Watermax, Water
Softener and Filter 4 yrs
old, used with city water
only $600
(352) 344-0053
INFANT CARSEAT $15
Deck playschool chair$25
Tub $3 call Kate at
352-794-3768
VINTAGE VIDEO
GAMES original Nintendo
& nes 64
$3 each call Justin
352-212-2556




EM WAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH, LIKE
NEW $75 352-726-9983




2 FLY RODS w/ reels 6
FT.$ 30. BOTH OBO 2
vintage came poles, 3 pc.
$40. both obo 220-4074


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 D5



410hotcguMgun ase
DORE ROD 11.6 heavy and clip. Some Rust
action w/ master spinning $50 Firm (352) 628-4437
reel. $60.00 obo VINTAGE ZEBCO XRT80
220-4074 REEL W/ 12 FT. ROD
ABU GARCIA $50.00 obo 220-4074
CONOLON 300 8 FT,
OLYMPIC 1075 7.6 ft. Ility
Silstar pt 70 7 ft, Samurai
6 ft, $45. all 220-4074
AR-15 M4 LMT 1x9 6 X 10 UTILITY TRAILER
barrel, quad rail, folding Ramp & side door, tie
sights, C-15 carbon downs, spare tire, used
upper and lower, 1 mag once $2,000 419-6656
very light 5.5 lb sacrifice
$690, CCW or Rcpt,
will trade for a 1911,
45,9mm, 38S
Inverness 352-586-4022 2 CAR SEAT FOR
CABIN ON 40 ACRES INFANT $15 ea,1
Hunting recreational BOUNCE DELUXE musi-
in Gulf Hammock Mgt.. cal $15, 2 bounce $10
Area, well, pond, ATV 252-777-1256
trails, $3000 Per Acre HIGH CHAIR $20,
352 634-4745 CAR SEAT TODDLER
CAMO HOLSTER Uncle $35 and stroller new $35
Mikes, Size 10 (small), 352-777-1256
goes on belt, call or text SWING $20, HIGH
$10.00 352-746-0401 CHAIR $15, STROLLER
Club Car DS Golf Cart $20, ROCKER $20 GYM
2007 Electric New $10 GYM MUSICAL $15
Batteries Excel. Shape, 352-777-1256
$3,200 (352) 425-5804
Golf Cart, club car, new
paint, all seats new,
rear seat folds down to
utility bed. headlights, WOMEN'S TIMEX
tail lights, break lights, WATCH LIKE NEW $10
horh, strong batteries, GOLDTONE-LARGE
good tires, $2,700. NUMBERS-NEEDS
352-795-5310 BATTERY 352-419-5981
410-474-3454
GOLF DRIVER Nike
2011 Machspeed Str8-fit
11.5 A/L shaft

Dunnellon 465-8495
HOLSTER, BLACK Uncle
Mikes size 0 shoulder
holster, for small revolver
or equal $25.00 call or V
text 352-746- 0401
HOLSTER, LEATHER -
Tan leather belt holster
for 38 revolver short
barrel. $15.00 call or text
352-746 -0401
Lefever Nitro Special
16 gauge, dbl barrel "
shot gun good cond. Tell that special
made 1927 $425. person
(352) 344-5283 Happy Birthday"
Men's Golfsmith Clubs with a classified ad
4 full sets, regular flex, under Happy
with bags Notes.
& buckets of balls, Only $28.50
$125. ea. includes a photo
(352) 382-1971
POOL TABLE Brunswick Call our Classified
4 x 8, 3/4inch 3 pc slate Dept for details
accessories & stand 352-563-5966
$2,995 obo 637-4455 * * * *
Riffle: 8mm, Mauser
w/ Scope, Ammo,
Extras. $350. obo
Beverly Hills.
(352) 270-8903 WANT TO BUY HOUSE
STREET SMART or MOBILE Any Area,
SHOES Condition or Situation.
STORE CLOSING Call Fred, 352-726-9369
All shoes 50-70% off. WANTED Rods, Reels,
Adidas Soccer, Baseball, tackle, tools, Antique
& Football kleets all 50% collectibles, hunting
off. SELLING INDIVID- equip. 352-613-2944
UALLY OR BULK. Open
every Saturday 10a-6p
(352) 860-0089. For Bulk
inquiries 352-697-3246.
Trademark 3-in-1 2 Very Small Yorkie
Rotating Table Game Boys Socialized & Play-
(Billiards, Air Hockey, and full, Shots, health certs.,
Foosball), $250 & CKC Reg. 4-5 Ibs,
Mini ping pong table with grown $600. ea. Parents
net and paddles $75 on site (352) 212-4504
(352) 637-7237 (352) 212-1258









D6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012



ma


4 WIRED HAIR
Daschund, 3 male
$300 ea; 1 female $350
8 wks old.
(352) 464-2382
AKC GREAT DANES
Black Beauties Health
Checked AKC
Male/Female READY
NOW 600/800 PAT
352-502-3607
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219

Lee k
BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Oct 7th, 9a-4p,
Cages, Seed, Millet, Cut-
tlebone, Playstands,
Cage Wire, Lots of Toys!
Mineral Block, Fruit & Nut
Treat! Great Prices!
8260 Adrian Drive,
Brooksville,
727-517-5337
BOSTON TERRIER PUPS
CKC, Registered
2 males $450 ea
2 females, $500 ea
health cert. & first shots
(352) 564-4170
Dog School & Kennel
New Classes 10/16 & 17
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039


ROCCO
is a 4-year-old Hound
mix who came to the
shelter because his
family could not
afford to feed him.
He is neutered,
housebroken, and
Heartworm-negative,
as well as already
microchipped. Gets
along with other
dogs, walks well on a
leash, and is playful.
He is a "family dog"
and needs to have
a home of
his own again.
Please call Joanne at
352-795-1288.

SHAR-PEI
Beautiful male & female
6 mo old, Prefer to sell
as a pair for $900;
single 500 AKC,
Health certs & shots,
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




For Sale Angus Brangus
Cross Bull 2V/2 yr old
Proven Breeder, $1,500
obo (352) 382-3114
MALE PIGMY GOAT
5 month's old, $45
(352) 628-4750

X *=


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES


17.5 Skii Boat & Trailer
3.0 10, excel cond.
$4,995 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304
GHEENUE
1991 Gheenue 15'4"
with 9.9 H.P Johnson,
Boat/Motor/Trailer
$1200.00 352-424-2760
GULF to LAKE MARINE
WE PAY CASH $$ *
For Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537




BOUNDER
32fT Motor home, Ford
V10 engine, low mile-
age, new tires, Sleeps
2-6. $16,500
(352) 220-6303

JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002




KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel. cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




Diamond Plate Tool Box
w/ Side Rails; 6'4" bed
liner. Both in excellent
Condition! $250/both
(352) 628-0139




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *k
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892




BMW
2003, 3251, 4DR
LEATHER, SUNROOF
PW, PL CALL 628-4600
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
BUICK
2000 Century Green 4
door, tan leather interior.
No body damage, runs
good. 136,000 miles.
$2,250. 352-564-0488
CADILLAC
Black 2011 4dr CTS
1,100 mi. Free satilite
radio 6/13, smoke free,
garage kept. $35,750
(352) 249-7976
CAR FOR SALE
1997 marquis 178K miles
asking 1500 OBO call
352-628-1809



CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $20,000
call 1-352-503-6548
CHEVY
1988, Corvette #11669
Red & Ready, ground
and spoiler kit, nice!
$6,847. 352-341-0018
CHEVY
2007 Chevy Impala
#11508 red, auto, ac,
cd, It $9987.00
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008 Cobalt Coupe
i11620pw, pl, It, XFE,
5 speed, great fuel
economy! $9,995.
352-341-0018
CHRYLSER
'06 Seabring conv.
Touring Coup, loaded,
21K, gar. kept. Like new
$9,200 (352) 513-4257
CHRYSLER
'04, PT Cruiser,


107K, New tires, clean,
$4,250.
352-400-1038
FORD
2001 MUSTANG
AUTO, 6CYL, PW, PL,
PRICED TO SELL
CALL 628-4600
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
FORD
2005 Mustang #11670,
2dr, auto, ac, cd, v6
$9488. 352-341-0018


2010, Edge, white, ext.
Tan, inter great shape,
49K mi. $18,000 obo
(352) 503-9265
HONDA
'05 Accord XL,, Gray,
98k miles, Runs very
good $6,700. obo
Bill (352) 257-9866
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *A
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k ml.
Clean car, Promotion
forces sale, $16,900
(352) 302-0778
OLDSMOBILE
'99, Silhouette, Loaded
Nice Van
$3,995
352-460-1038
SATURN
'96, Looks & runs great
call for details Great
Transportation $1,150
obo ((352) 586-7658
TOYOTA
1993 Camry Wagon
Runs Great, body needs
work, 280,000 miles $750
OBO 352-212-3617
vw
2004 BEETLE
CONV., AUTOMATIC
FUN IN THE SUN
CALL 628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. OCT. 7. 2012
1-800-438-8559
CHEVY
1955, Belair, 2 dr Se-
dan, 327, V8, auto
power glide transmis-
sion ground up restora-
tion, SS exhaust, excel-
lent In & Out $35,000
obo (352) 527-6988
CHEVY
1991, Corvette Coupe,
red, glass top, auto, AC
67K miles very clean,
$8, 250 (352) 270-8221
CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Chevrolet
'03 Silverado, 4x4 V8 vor-
tex engine, 87k mi, new
tires $8600 obo
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
DODGE
'98, Dakota, club cab,
Sport, Electric Blue
good cond. 80k miles
$4,500 (352) 613-3050
FORD
1995, F1504X4...
RUNS GOOD.....PERFECT
HUNTING TRUCK.
CALL 628-4600
FOR DETAILS
FORD
2004, F 50, XL
4x4
$7,500
(352) 513-4133
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




DODGE
'98, Caravan, Reliable
$900 obo
(419) 303-0888 cell
Crystal River




CHEVY
1987 pick up 4x4 step-
side, runs good 5.7 V8,
auto, radial tires 31.10,
restoring $2500 OBO
Robert 220-4143
9am-6pm
JEEP
'99 Wrangler 5 SP,
4 Cyl, 4X4. EXC Cond.
$6600 OBO (352)
637-5149, (352)586-3090
MAX 500
6 x6 Amphibious
Vehicle, Swims,
$2,800 obo
352-637-0475, 586-6304


Chevrolet
'95 Conversion Van, 350
eng., 21 mi/gal, trail hitch,
excel. shape $2000 obo
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
DODGE
2007 Grand Caravan
#11655 ext van, alloys,
ac, cd, seats 7!! $10,488
352-341-0018
FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907
Honda
'04 Odyssey, 110k mi,
runs great $7200
leave message
(352) 422-1140


CAN-AM
2009 Spyder RS SE5
electric shift with reverse.
Silver and black 998cc
No warranty. Great condi-
tion. $13000 or make
offer. (352)628-9058
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom Built, 20K
miles, added lights &
chrome $10,000 obo
Tom (920) 224-2513




328-1007 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage
10-17-12 Uen Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
- DUNNELLON
UNIT


Misc. otice


CLASSIFIED




HARLEY DAVIDSON
2009, Heritage Softtail
22k miles,
$14,500
(352) 637-2273

HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley, 70 mpg, Chrome,
bags, trade?, $4200.
C.R. (727) 207-1619

HONDA
450 Hawk, 1981Classic
Runs. New tires and
battery. Extra's, $900
OBO. 795-5531




#0008 MARILY WALKER
#0039 RYAN REAVIS
#0197 ELIDE ANDA
#0233 DONNAMAE MUR-
PHY
#0237 CINDA SEIBERT
#0334 DAVID & PATRICIA
VANDEMARK
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VE-
HICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE New Tires
Excellect Shape Approx
70K mi. Selling due to
health. Asking $4,000
(352) 476-3688

HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688

YAMAHA
2002 650 V Star Classic
5k Miles, Exc Condition
$2900 (386) 365-3159




OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- October
17th @ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
September 30 & October
7,2012.


Misc. otice


335-1007 SUCRN
Eig, To Vote- Mark Nickel
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Mark Nickel
7760 W. Miss Maggie Dr.
Homosassa, FL 34448
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 7, 2012.


337-1007 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Section 00020
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River Wastewater Grant Project: Area 114
DATE: October 7, 2012 BID NUMBER: 12-B-17
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for construction of:
City of Crystal River Wastewater Grant Project: Area 114
You are hereby invited to submit a bid on the above referenced project.
OWNER: City of Crystal River
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, Florida 34428

ENGINEER: GPI SOUTHEAST, INC.
1414 S.W. Martin Luther Kng Avenue
Ocala, Florida 34474-3129
Bids will be received until 10:00 am on November 19, 2012 at the City of Crystal River
City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: All work for the Project shall be constructed in accordance
with the Drawings and Specifications prepared by the Engineer. Bids shall be submit-
ted for furnishing, delivering and installing all materials, equipment and services, in-
cluding labor for the Work, which generally involves:
The significant components of the project include wastewater collection and trans-
mission systems for 1 defined grant area. Specific components include a vacuum /
pump station, approximately 14,000 LF of 4" Vacuum Main, 2,700 LF of 6" Vacuum
Main, and 51A00 LF of 8" Vacuum Main, 1000LF of 6" FM, and lot services for approxi-
mately 240 residential lots. The construction plans should be used to determine ex-
act quantities associated with this project.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE: 10:00 am October 22, 2012 at City of Crystal River City Hall.
Attendance is mandatory, and is a pre-requisite to be qualified for submitting bids.
CONTRACT TIME: Construction time to achieve Substantial Completion is 335 con-
secutive calendar days from the date of the Notice to Proceed, with an additional
30 consecutive calendar days to achieve Final Completion.
PROJECT MANUAL AND DRAWINGS: Available for review and purchase at the office
of the Public Works Department:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
Ph: (352) 795-4216 Ext: 314
A payment will be required for each complete hard copy set of Bidding Documents.
This payment represents reproduction costs and is non-refundable.
A. Complete set of Bidding Documents $150.00 per set
(Project Manual and Drawings)
Electronic PDF copies are also available, by email or CD. Send email request with
complete bidder's contact information to:
Theresa Krim
City of Crystal River
tkrim@crystalriverfl.org
Ph: (352)795-4216 Ext. 314
Three PDF files comprise the Bidding Documents as follows; and each file will be at-
tached to a separate email. Approximately Two Four emails total. If the files can-
not be emailed a CD can be picked up at City Hall.
1. Drawings Area 114 20mg size
2. Project Manual 2 mg size
Bids shall be prepared using the Project Manual and Drawings. Addenda will be
sent, via fax or electronic mail, to all holders of complete Bidding Documents up to
seventy-two (72) hours before the Bid closing time. Brief Addenda may be issued
between seventy-two (72) hours and twenty-four (24) hours before Bid closing time
by fax transmittal or electronic mail to all holders of complete Bidding Documents.
The Owner/Engineer is not responsible for delivery of addenda to prospective bid-
ders.
BID SECURITY: Will be required for this project in the amount of 5% of the bid price.
PERFORMANCE AND PAYMENT BONDS: In the event the Contract is awarded to the
Successful Bidder, the Owner will require that the Contractor furnish a Payment and
Performance Bond in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price.

All Payment and Performance Bonds shall be secured from or countersigned by an
agency or surety company recognized in good standing and authorized to do busi-
ness in the State of Florida.
BID SUBMITTAL: Bids shall be enclosed within a sealed envelope, on the Bid Form pro-
vided in the Project Manual, with the words "BID NO. 12-B-17: CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER WASTEWATER GRANT PROJECT AREA 114" and the Bidder's name and address
clearly shown on the outside thereof. Bids must be delivered not later than the time
set forth herein. The Owner will not be responsible for any lost or late arriving Bids
sent via the U.S. Postal Service or other delivery services. Mailed bids shall be sent to
the attention of Carol Harrington, City Clerk. 123 NW Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL 34428.
Bid submittals shall include one original Bid and two (2) copies.
OPENING OF BIDS: Bids will be received until 10:00am on November 19, 2012 and
read aloud publicly at 10:00am at the City of Crystal River City Hall Council Cham-
bers.
AWARD OF CONTRACT: The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids for
any reason whatsoever and waive all informalities. The owner also reserves the right
to select the bid response that in its sole determination best meets its business needs.
Construction Experience with Vacuum Sewer Systems is a requirement for this proj-
ect.
The City of Crystal River is not responsible for expenses incurred prior to the award of
the bid.
October 7, 2012.


338-1007 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Roadway Improvements for Cutler Spur Boulevard from CR44 to US 19
DATE: October 7, 2012 BID NUMBER: 12-B-11
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for construction of:
Roadway Improvements for Cutler Spur Boulevard from CR44 to US 19
You are hereby invited to submit a bid on the above referenced project.
OWNER: City of Crystal River
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, Florida 34428

ENGINEER: WilsonMiller Stantec
2205 North 20th Street
Tampa, FL 33605
BID OPENING: Bids will be received until 10:30 am on November 15, 2012 at the City
of Crystal River City Hall, City Clerks Office. Bid read aloud and publically 10:40 on
November 15,2012.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Perform all work and furnish all necessary labor, equipment,
material and transportation for the construction of the ROADWAY IMPROVEMENT
FOR CUTLER SPUR BOULEVARD FROM CR44 TO US19. The project is approximately 1.2
miles in length, includes roadway reconstruction, drainage, force main, water line
and multi-use path.
The work includes, but it is not limited to the drawing and specification listed in bid
documents. All work is to be performed per the edition specified on the plans of the
Florida Department of Transportation Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge
Construction, supplements, thereto, unless stated in the Special Provisions, or shown
on the plans
QUALIFICATIONS: ALL BIDDERS must possess a valid state, local or federal license (if li-
cense is required) to perform the work for which the BID is submitted and must be
qualified for the type of work for which the BID is submitted. DIDDERS shall provide
project descriptions. Cost of construction, completion date, and references for three
(3) projects of similar magnitude and complexity performed for public agencies (per
FDOT Standards) in the last 5 years. BIDDERS who do not possess the requisite mini-
mum qualifications for this project shall be disqualified.


ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS FOR CUTLER SPUR BOULEVARD FROM CR44 TO US19
PROJECT MANUAL AND DRAWINGS: Available for review and purchase of CD at the
Public Works Office;
Cost of $25.00
City of Crystal River
123NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 24428
Phone#: (352)-795-4216 ext. 314
All inquiries to Theresa Krim
Addenda will be sent, via fax or electronic mail, to all holders of complete Bid Docu-
ments up to Seventy-two (72) hours before the Bid Closing time. No requests for infor-
mation will be accepted 96 hours before bid opening.
MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: 9:30 am October 23, 2012 at City of Crystal River
City Hall. Attendance is mandatory, and is a pre-requisite to be qualified for submitt-
ing bids. All bidders are encouraged to tour the PROJECT Site prior to Pre-bid meet-
ing
CONTRACT TIME: Construction time to achieve Substantial Completion is 270 con-
secutive calendar days from the date of the Notice to Proceed, with an additional
60 consecutive calendar days to achieve Final Completion.
BID SECURITY: Will be required for this project in the amount of 5% of the bid price.
PERFORMANCE AND PAYMENT BONDS: In the event the Contract is awarded to the
Successful Bidder, the Owner will require that the Contractor furnish a Payment and
Performance Bond in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price.
All Payment and Performance Bonds shall be secured from or countersigned by an
agency or surety company recognized in good standing and authorized to do busi-
ness in the State of Florida.
BID SUBMITTAL: Bids shall be enclosed within a sealed envelope, on the Bid Form pro-
vided in the Project Manual, with the words "BID NO. 12-B-11: ROADWAY IMPROVE-
MENTS FOR CUTLER SPUR BOULEVARD FROM CR44 TO US19 and the Bidder's name and
address clearly shown on the outside thereof. Bids must be delivered not later than
the time set forth herein. The Owner will not be responsible for any lost or late arriv-
ing Bids sent via the U.S. Postal Service or other delivery services. Mailed bids shall be
sent to the attention of Carol Harrington, City Clerk. 123 NW Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL
34428. Bid submittals shall include one original Bid and two (2) copies.
AWARD OF CONTRACT: The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids for
any reason whatsoever and waive all informalities. The owner also reserves the right
to select the bid response that in its sole determination best meets its business needs.
The City of Crystal River is not responsible for expenses incurred prior to the award of
the bid.
October 7, 2012.


343-1007 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULA-
TIONS AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a Pub-
lic Hearing on the following application on October 18, 2012 at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Flor-
ida. Please note that the PDC meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a
particular item is discussed will vary depending on how fast the PDC moves through
the agenda.

SV- 12-03- Department of Plannina and Development for the Department of Public
Works-
Applicant is requesting to vacate a portion of Secaucus Terrace (aka W. Flight Path
Court), lying in the plat of Crystal Paradise Estates Unit Number 2, as recorded in Plat
Book 4, Pages 88, public records of Citrus County, Florida; and a portion of a 50-foot
roadway described in O.R. Book 2456, Pg. 1981, public records of Citrus County, Flor-
ida. Both roadways lie in the Crystal River Airport vicinity
Property is located in Section 35, Township 18 South, Ranae 17 East. A complete le-
gal description of the property is on file with the Land Development Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 141, Lecanto, FL, 34461, telephone (352) 527-5239.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida
October 5 & 7, 2012.


340-1007 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE: The Southwest Florida Water Management District is
proposing to amend the following ruless: 40D-2.091, F.A.C.
The purpose and effect of this rulemaking will be to amend Rule 40D-2.091, F.A.C.,
and Section 3.1 of the Southwest Florida Water Management District's Water Use
Permitting Basis of Review to require permit applicants to utilize specific information,
to be requested from and provided by a reuse utility, in an evaluation of the environ-
mental, economic and technical feasibility of the use of reclaimed water to meet all
or a portion of the
applicant's needs.
The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking appeared in the Florida Administrative Weekly,
Vol. 38, No. 40, on
October 1, 2012. A copy of the proposed rule can be viewed on the District's
website at http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/rules/proposed/.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
special accommodations to provide comments on this rulemaking is asked to con-
tact The Southwest Florida Water Management District Human Resources Director,
2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702
or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please
contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 1(800)955-8771 (TDD) or
1(800)955-8770 (Voice).
THE PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING THE PROPOSED RULES AND TO OBTAIN A
COPY IS: Sonya White, Office of General Counsel, Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District, 7601 Highway 301 North, Tampa, FL 33637-6759, (813) 985-7481 (Ext.
4660) (Ref OGC # 2011030).
October 7, 2012.


341-1007 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 11, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.

Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
October 7, 2012.


SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 003-13
CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Program
CDBG 11DB-L4-05-19-01-H18
Housing Rehabilitation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit
a Bid to furnish all labor and materials to rehabilitate a single family home for its
Community Development Block Grant Program located at 6747 E. Holly Street, Inver-
ness, Florida 34452.
The scope of the work for the above shall be provided to potential Bidders at
the mandatory pre-bid conference scheduled for October 16, 2012. Additional in-
formalon concerning Ihe prebid conference Is provided bebw. A prices shall hdude all
labor, supervision, materials, equipment and services nec-
essary to do a workman like job. No contractor or subcontractor may participate in
this work if ineligible to receive federal or state funded contracts. Financing of the
work will be provided, in whole or in part by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
Citrus County and their agent will act as agent for the owner in preparing contract
documents, inspecting, and issuing payments. However, the contract will be be-
tween the owner and contractor. Bids, work performed and payments must be ap-
proved by the owner and the agent.
All Bidders must complete an application, submit such to the County's consult-
ant, Guardian CRM, Inc., and be pre-approved by them prior to bid submittal. Con-
tact Guardian CRM, Inc., Phone (863) 899-6695 or Fax (863) 774-2114 for an applica-
tion.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on Octo-
ber 16, 2012 at 11:00 am at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located
at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a
Mandatory Walk through of the location.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before November 7, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path: Suite
266: Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for November 7, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the
Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the
left hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Manage-
ment & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
October 7, 2012.


336-1007 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Fbtic-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of G &
K Vending, located at
3234 S. Arundel Terrace,
Homosassa, Florida 34448,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register said
name with Florida De-
partment of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-


lahassee, Florida.
DATED at airus,
FL
this 1st day of October,
2012.
/s/ George Carpenter
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. October 7, 2012.


I Misc. N


I Misc. N


I Misc. N


Metn


Metn


MeBn


I BidNotic


I Bi


I ^^BidNtc












HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


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E2 SUNDA'I~ OCTOBER 7, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


IEILLI uuuumnu o,~TU-IU- U i
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FIloIidaLisliglnlo.conm


and start really enjoying life in this premier golf course
community This OUTSTANDING family home has acres
of granite countertops A GENEROUS ISLAND kitchen
with stainless appliances Gorgeous wood and tile floors
and a SPECTACULAR POOL that delights the eye So
many upgrades Just move in and enjoy Prices won't stay
this low forever
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.comi
Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


* 3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
* Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
*2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL F?
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


5849 H. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CG Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


This formal builder's model home has a new
roof, new air conditioning in 2010, new interior
paint and new washer and dryer! Relax on the
10x20 screened lanai or enjoy the solitude in
your master bedroom sitting area. This house
has it all! Furnishings are negotiable!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.comi
Website: www.CrysialRiverLiving.com


--as




REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

+,
2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish










DESIRABLE CITRUS HILLS
*3/2/2 Pool Home Oak Hardwood Floors
* Large Dining Area *Split Bedroom Plan
* Cathedral Ceiling Great Room *Master Bath Walk-In Shower
* Inside Laundry *Covered Lanai to Caged Pool
* Nicely Treed Backyard Close to Dining& Theater
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha sather@rema net
VIRTUAL TOURS atof o inailho solhei ilnm coin


CUSTOM POOL HOME ON 2.1 ACRES...
This home features a 30'x52' garage with upstairs 1BR/
1 BA apartment, great room with gas fireplace and
overlooking r. I .; I I I I -i \ --,
4 bedrooms, i i i i ..... i J
private location. i i ....n -
ideal space for hobbies or the teenager hang-out Very
private location yet in the middle of everything, abutting Terra
Vista A great package.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich. com


ROLLING

HILLS

10 ACRES
One block from city limits. Cul-
de-sac, horses allowed, access
to the forest. MLS #354648
PRICED TO SELL
$125,000

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 1[
Email: barbaramills@earthlink.net


Maintainance-Free Living
2-Story 3/2.5/2
2,194 Sq. Ft. of Living
Master Suite 1 Floor Handicap Accessible
Formal Living & Dining
Large Kitchen with Breakfast Bar
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net

C N

Iftr IIB


DO NOT MISS OUT on this Pine
Ridge deal! Lovely 3/2/3+ den boasts a
solar heated pool & spa, gas fireplace, RV
pad with 50 amp, large open kitchen.
Upgrades include flooring, custom window
treatments and baths. Enjoy your morning
coffee in the breakfast nook overlooking
your pool. H
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


242 N. Lec i Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
837 S. Iucos BldHro*s 2-80w wHlr~nielsuecm54N w.1,Cy lRvr7524


3l40 LINE
5) .17-82
Enter wniS


Rare 3 bedroom contemporary home with
attached modern apartment. Located on
2.75 acres including caged pool, fireplaces,
screened porches and so much more. 3-car
garage along with inside laundries and spacious
kitchens. Perfect for expanded family
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How to recycle


saltshakers


altshakers are plenti-
ful at thrift stores, or
you may have a few
spares around your home.
These handy little contain-
ers can be used
in a variety of
ways. Many of
these uses will
work for plastic
Parmesan cheese
shakers, too.
Cinnamon and
sugar: Combine
cinnamon and
sugar into a Sara
shaker and you'll Sar
have it ready for FRU
toast or French LIV
toast, oatmeal,
hot cocoa or coffee.
Glitter: Add glitter to
shakers for craft projects.
You can add colored sand to
them, too.
Easy ornament: Clear
glass salt and pepper shak-
ers filled with candy make
great gifts or Christmas or-
naments. Just slip a thin
satin ribbon through the
holes on the top, tie closed
and use the ribbon as the
hanger.
Stop splattering grease:
When cooking eggs, grease
often splatters. Keep a
shaker of cornstarch ready


I


vinegar or potpourri. The
holes in the lid release the
scents and help draw in any
odors.
Terrarium: Add tiny
plants, soil, small
pebbles and moss
to a clear glass
saltshaker and
you have a cute
^- mini-terrarium.
Colored sugars
-- for baked goods:
Put a drop of food
coloring in a con-
tainer that has a
Noel tight lid, add a
GAL couple of table-
NG spoons of sugar
and shake.
Spread on a plate and shake
again if it clumps. Store in
an airtight container. Save
spice jars with the shaker
top or reserve a saltshaker
to store the sugar.
Vases: Group various
shakers and use them as
miniature vases for wild-
flowers. They fit perfectly
on a window ledge.
Photo stand: Use a salt-
shaker as a base to create a
photo stand. Coil 20-gauge
craft wire. Insert the wire
into the holes in the lid. Use
sand salt, buttons, beads or
any small items and fill the


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 E3


SUBMISSION DEADLINES


* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publica-
tion of submitted material. The earlier Chronicle edi-
tors receive submissions, the better chance of notes
running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the
event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sun-
day.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.


* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication
Saturday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication
Sunday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is available.
The Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on color
pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crys-
tal River; or e-mail newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


rL ChI LUL1IDGE BL1RLTY -j


Amanda & Nrk Johnson Tom Ballour UI eAnus & Hi Stdner Art Paty
BROER/A SSOC- EALTR REACTOR EALR-BROKER REALTOR


746-900


0vvwciru0atby So


BE VEiRLY HILL


CIT S
02; 6:


ancd sprinkle a bit in the pan shaKer to stabilize mthe wire -..a. .i EL
to stop the splattering. Or so it can hold a photo. For a 842W. COCKATIEL LP. 6277 N. MATHESON 6541 W. COPENHAGEN 3620 W. COGWOOD 5086 N
fill the shaker with flour tutorial, visit whimsy- /2/2 357166 $108,900 3/2/2 357083 $94,900 3/2 356535 $89,500 3/2/2 357160 $139,900 3/2/2
andusewheneveryouneed love.com/2009/11/salt-
to dust your counters or for shaker-photo-stand-tutorial.
pans when baking. html
Air freshener: Add a cot- Pincushion: Fill the W WI
ton ball soaked in vanilla or shaker with fabric scraps or 7239 COTTAGE .
essential oil, or fill with cof- 1945W OLIVER 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD 3/2/1CP Det./4+ CP Det. 400 S. WASHINGTON 1 1
fee grounds, baking soda, See FRUGAL/Page E7 222 355628 74900 3 2/1 356581 $69,900 357796 $1900 00 222 356626 $62,500 2/2/2


SJackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney A
Realtor.-. Realtor@ I ,1, 1. ;1 .LJil,'-
[II R11A I0ouE Ratr02 10013 E. BASS 521 N HARRIS7.LEE 27. FILLMORE 15
902$,oo 900 J7 'o
179~I 7oo '. L87. 2215S.6N.F,50
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WEEKS REAL, 5 BEVERLYHILLS BLVD. L .
The Golden Girl w746e.6 7 0

1 - *- -7I
29 N3 WASHINTON 64 S LEE 3755 N. ROSCOE 6715S FRANKFURTER 45
2/1 356448$39900 2/2/2 357886$54900 2/2 356615 $37.500 3 015 356954 43900


3F RLFOD





450TN.TUMLEWEED
BEVRL HI699$3990











Visiting the oldest botanical garden in America

LEE REICH '
For The Associated Press K*S


PHILADELPHIA He was Amer-
ica's first botanist, and his garden is
still one of the best
John Bartram was called "the great-
est natural botanist in the world" by
no less than Carl Linnaeus, who in the
18th century devised our system for
classifying plants.
Bartram's garden is a convenient
stop during a visit to Philadelphia, just
minutes from the Liberty Bell.
When he bought this tract along the
Schuylkill River in 1728, it was rural
land skirting
the colonial
city. Bar- U For information
t r a m s about Historic
t r a m i Bartram's Gar-
botanizing den, call 215-
took him 729-5281 or visit
throughout their website,
what is now www.bartrams
the eastern garden.org.
United
States, and
this land was where he grew the many
plants and seeds he collected in his
travels.
His son, William, was a knowledge-
able companion for those travels. The
notes and sketches that William made
during a four-year journey throughout
the South, beginning in 1773, were
eventually published as "Travels," a
book that would be published in sev-
eral foreign editions as well.
America's first catalog
plant nursery
Among the Bartrams' most exciting
discoveries, in 1765, was the
Franklinia tree (Franklinia
See GARDEN/Page E13


tow ---

- "- ---a--. -- --- - _ -




m .






-- Mn'


Associated Press


This image taken on July 16 shows Bartram's Garden in Philadelphia with a Franklinia tree in the foreground.


CAROLE LISTER
* VW Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA Cell: 422-4620 KEY
Office: 382-1700
OPE HOSS U. C. -P


KEY 4"Always There For You"
SGAIL COOPER
,, multimillion Dollar Realtor
E R Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


I - a
CORIAN WITH STAINLESS STEEL!
* 3/2/2 pool home built in 2007
* Sweeping circular driveway
* Corner cul de sac lot
* Fireplace in the family room
* Double leaded beveled entry doors
* Well for outside irrigation
#354014 $219,000


3-CAR GARAGE SEPARATE OFFICE!
* 3+office/2/3 South Oak Village
* Extra deep boulevard lots
* Large outside entertaining area
* Salt system pool with waterfall
* Brand new neutral carpeting
* Home warranty for the buyers
#365183 $237,000


M* KEY" Office 382-1700
REALTY INC.


14 Greenpark
Newer 2007 Great room home with
4 bedrooms, 2 baths and a caged
pool on estate size 1/2 acre. Come
see! $198,500.
Dir: to S. Oak village: Hwy 98 to
S. on Greenpark


7 Enclave Pt. S.
Truly a diamond in the rough: 3
bedrms, 3 baths, DEN, huge family
rm overlooking golf course. Much
more! $200,000
Dir: Hwy 19 to Cypress Blvd E to
rt @ golf course on Cypress Cir, rt
on Bvrsonima. left on Enclave


g,-

Ton & Lois Scmi 35238-557


E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ww~ister isings].co..m


SeeVirualToursIII vv..AIJ .resJJl4h11J.I. u.IJ orggf







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learn how to protect


plants for winter


Special to the Chronicle

The UF-IFAS Citrus County Exten-
sion Master Gardeners free plant clin-
ics for October will address
cold-weather plant protection.
Citrus County winters usually have
extreme temperature changes occur-
ring over short periods of time. If
Mother Nature gives plants time to ac-
climate to lower temperatures, they
can establish dormancy
Dormancy helps plants survive, but
rapidly falling temperatures do not
allow this.
The October Plant Clinics will ex-
plain the types of freezes we experi-
ence and present actions to take
before, during and after cold weather
to protect plants.


The schedule is:
Tuesday, Oct. 9 1 p.m. at Lakes
Region Library, Inverness.
Wednesday, Oct. 10 1:30 p.m. at
Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
Friday, Oct. 12 1:30 p.m. at
Coastal Region Library, Crystal River.
Wednesday, Oct 17-1 p.m. at Cit-
rus Springs Library
Tuesday, Oct. 23 2 p.m. at Ho-
mosassa Library
The clinic normally done in Floral
City will not be offered this month, but
will return in November.
Questions or pictures can be sent to
the master gardeners at
MasterGl@bocc. citrus. fl.us.
Master gardeners will research and
respond. Call the Extension Service at
352-527-5700.


Safe drinking water: A guide


Learn contaminants, and how to combat them


LETITIA L. STAR
Natural Home & Garden

Although for most of us the
tap water runs out of the faucet
clear, tasteless and odorless,
our municipalities must work
hard to filter an ever-increas-
ing array of both natural and
manmade pollutants from our
groundwater. And even if it
meets legal standards, your tap
water may still contain pollu-
tants. Getting informed about
drinking water quality is a
good idea for everyone, but
particularly those of us who
live with children, are sensi-
tive to chemicals or have weak-
ened immune systems.
The Safe Drinking Water Act


of 1974 is the main federal law
establishing standards for
drinking water quality. Under
this law, all U.S. municipal tap
water is treated to remove pol-
lutants in accordance with fed-
erally mandated maximum
contaminant levels (MCLs) set
by the EPA. State and local
governments may also set
water safety laws.
But despite federal, state
and local water regulations,
contaminants can still make
their way into our water sup-
ply The Environmental Work-
ing Group (EWG) recently
analyzed nearly 20 million
records from state water offi-
cials and discovered that "test-
ing by water utilities has found


315 pollutants in the tap water
Americans drink." More than
half of these detected chemi-
cals aren't subject to health or
safety regulations and can
legally be present in any
amount. And although federal
guidelines do govern the oth-
ers, 49 of these contaminants
were found to exceed set levels
in different parts of the coun-
try, thus polluting the tap water
of 53.6 million Americans.
Because of these kinds of re-
ports, consumer concern about
tap water safety has increased
in recent years. In a 2011 sur-
vey commissioned by the
Water Quality Association


See WATER/Page E14


NiE GITTA BARTH
Investors Realty REALTOR
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@ myflorida-house .com




115 N. LEGION TERR.
ELEGANT MAGNIFICENT WATERFRONT CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and
CUSTOM BUILT HOME MAINTENANCE-FREE 2/2/2 HOME nice I't ;" in beautiful Citrn
In the equestrian section of Pine in the Moorings at Point 0 Woods. Hills!! ...... .. a one acre comer lot,
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a Completely remodeled. Move right this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in
360' interactive virtual tour at into Paradise. Enjoy tranquil pool and patio area offers you the privacy
360 interactive virtual tour at privacy with nature preserve .. ...." ,1.. ; well
www.mypineridgehome.com. behind you. Most every room has : 1. bring
MLS #355468.$410,000 water view. MLS 355584 $138,895 i ... $175,000





5721 S. LIVE OAK DR. FLORAL CITY
NATURE'S CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River and nestled in an area that preserved
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community most of its 1960's charm! Well main-
...... .1 Take the on the Withlacoochee River tainted, fenced yard, sunroom. The perfect
... ... ... ... $218,000 home away from home.
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #357468 $39,900






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well-maintained 3/2/1
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle. Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, medical ;... 1 1. ,... F.. your fenced
true masterpin .... i .... 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard I ... 1. .... ... or private
Lake Tsala ... room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
family to move right in! imaginable! .,,,. r .. :..'
000CRQPMLS #357471 $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 In '. $69,900


4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
2 Office: 352-746-3600

PINE RIDGE
POOL
In-law suite,
on golf course, 4 bed,
3 bath, 3 car gar.
Loaded!
. v MLS #355285
$324,900

PINE RIDGE
POOL HOME
2.75 private park-like
S acres, 3 bed, 2.5 bath,
2 car & detached 2 car
garage w/carport.
MLS 357513
-gig _4tSAQNNN


U -


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 ES






E6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHRONICLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Choosing a tree


for your landscape


Perhaps the most famous lines writ-
ten about trees were those penned
by Joyce Kilmer in 1913: "I think
that I shall never see a poem lovely as a
tree."
As lovely as trees appear to
the casual observer, trees are
living historical symbols with
an economic and ecological im- at
portance unequaled by any
other group of plants. While --
trees are many things to many
people, by definition they are
woody perennial plants, typi-
cally having a single stem or Joan B]
trunk growing to a considerable FLOE
height and bearing lateral FRIE
branches at some distance from LIV
the ground. LI
You may not have given it
much thought, but trees differ from shrubs
in that shrubs are usually shorter, and
have multiple stems springing directly
from the ground. Although some tropical
vines can grow several hundred feet into
the canopy of a rain forest, their stems are
weak and cannot support the plants. This


r
R

I


characteristic distinguishes them from
trees, which stand upright on their own.
Trees are classified into two categories:
evergreen and deciduous. Those that
paint the landscape in shades
and tones of green all year are
evergreens; those that shed
their leaves are deciduous.
SEvergreen trees are further
divided into conifers and
broadleaved trees. Trees with
needles, such as pines, firs and
spruces, and those with scale-
like leaves, such as cedars and
adshaw junipers, are called conifers,
IEDA- because they produce their
QDLY seeds in cones. Almost all
conifers are evergreen; the
ING most notable exceptions are the
larches (found in cooler tem-
perate northern hemisphere, i.e. Canada),
the dawn redwood (North Carolina) and
the bald cypress (Taxodium distichum),
which shed their needles in fall. All de-
ciduous trees are broad-leaved, as are a
small number of evergreens such as the
See TREES/Page E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


~i,


Autumn hue
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E12
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Drawing appears to be a print; sizing up gold jewelry


Dear John: I listen to your give me any information about
Saturday show, usually this drawing? Does it have any
with my wife on value? Thank you for
a shopping trip. Any- anything you can tell
way, I find it interest- me. TG., Internet
ing and informative. Dear T.G.: Jean
I would first like to ., Louis Ernest Meis-
let you know that I am '.. sonier, 1815-1891, was
a novice when it a French artist whose
comes to art. I ac- 1 specialty was figures
quired a drawing and genre, depictions
about 40 years ago I of life circumstances.
from my great uncle John Sikorski Popular subjects were
who passed away It is military, cavaliers,
14 inches by 11 inches, SEKORSKE'S musketeers and tav-
and I think it's pen ATTIC ern scenes. Your pic-
and ink. ture of a cavalier
It is a picture of what looks like smoking a pipe at a tavern is a
one of the three Musketeers print, not a drawing. I can see in
smoking a pipe. The detail is in- the photograph the picture
credible. I have looked up the See ATTIC/Page E7
artist on the Web, but can only
find paintings he had done. The How do you determine if these
writings only say that his etching jewelry pieces are gold or gold-
and lithographs are scarce. The plated? Look for marks; some-
drawing and date are very hard times they can be very hard to
to see with the naked eye but the find without a magnifier.
drawing is dated 1861. Can you Special to the Chronicle


S







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

suffers from water damage
at the bottom. His oil on
canvas paintings have sold
in the $500 to $5,000 range
and his prints sell in the
$50 to $150 range. Potential
dollar value for your print
in as-is condition is
below $50.
Dear John: I have had
these two pieces of jewelry
for a while now and know
very little about them. They
are both gold but the pen-
dant has no mark. The stone
in it appears to be maybe
agate and has an inscrip-
tion, "Summit R.I. Sept. 10th
1910." I have attached pic-
tures, and if you can tell me
anything about them includ-
ing their price and/or age, I
would be very grateful. If
you cannot, maybe you


know somebody who can. -
G., Internet
Dear G.: Both decorative
pieces of jewelry are nice-
looking and appear to be in
good condition. If they are
made of 14kt or 18kt gold
they will marked. Often
these marks are very small
and difficult to see unless a
magnifier is used. If the
marks are not there, they
are gold plated. Potential
dollar value if gold is about
$100 each; if they are not
gold, their value is below
$50 each.
Dear John: Enclosed is a
picture of a pitcher my
mother received as a wed-
ding gift from an older Eng-
lish neighbor, who received
it for a wedding gift herself.
My parents were married in
1920.
Please let me know any-
thing you can tell me about
it. -AL., Homosassa
Dear A.L.: Your decora-


tive stoneware pitcher was
made in England as
marked, likely in the
Staffordshire district in one
of the numerous pottery
companies there. Time of
production is late 19th cen-
tury Potential dollar value
is below $50.
Dear John: We have an
old serpentine secretary
desk with drop-down writ-
ing lid. One of the hinges
that attaches to the drop-
down part and the support
arm that slides out under
the desk is missing. It is
brass, about 12 inches long
with a hook on one end and
flattened with a hole in the
other end. Where may we
find one? We have looked
online at catalogs from
Rocklers, Constantine, Van
Dyke, eBay and others. Any
help will be appreciated. I
also want to find the value
and sell it. I really enjoy
your show and newspaper


article each week. -A.T,
Internet
Dear A.T.: I wish you had
included a photograph.
Based on your description, I
think you have a pre-World
War II reproduction of an
earlier period style.
If you like send a couple
of good, clear photos, I will
give you an opinion of po-
tential dollar value. For the
missing hinge, try the Lee
Valley Reproduction Hard-
ware Catalog at www.lee
valleycom.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Siko-
rski's Attic, P.O. Box 2513,
Ocala 34478 or ask
sikorski@aol. com.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

buttons. Add fiberfill or a
piece of wool at the top and
put the lid back on. Pins go
into the holes and are se-
cured by the wool or
fiberfill.
In the garden: Use a salt-
shaker to dispense tiny
seeds evenly when sowing.
One reader, Susie from
Minnesota, shares another
idea: "Getting seeds to
sprout can be difficult. I
use gelatin to help fight
disease. I sow my seeds
and add gelatin to a salt-
shaker and sprinkle the
gelatin over the seeds.
Then I mist the seeds and
cover with wet paper tow-
els. Once the seeds have
sprouted, I remove the
paper towels. When water-
ing, I add a teaspoon of gel-


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 E7

atin to a gallon of liquid
fertilizer, too."
Popcorn seasoning: Cre-
ate your own popcorn sea-
soning mix and store it in a
large saltshaker. Sprinkle it
on your freshly popped
popcorn. For popcorn sea-
soning recipes, visit
recipegoldmine.com/pop
cornsav/popcornsav.html.
mEN
Don't toss your old or
crumbled eye shadow. Use
it to make your own unique
colored nail polish and
avoid splurging on a new
bottle.
The first reader tip
shares how:
New nail polish colors:
Tap the eye shadow into a
bowl. Add clear nail polish
to it. Mix with a cotton
swab and apply the polish.
You can crush the eye
shadow in a plastic baggie

See Page E12


Specializin in Terra Vista Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
e a _94 &rBrentwoodResales (352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

REALTY GROUP l BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133* VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777






SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED 2.5 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS
SINGLE FAMILY 3 BR 3 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE Great lanai overlooking the Skyview Golf Course is expanded with an open patio
Spectacular Terra Vista home Situated on a cul de sac, beautiful views Custom DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH DEN 2 CAR WOODVIEWVILLAS complete with lots of room for your grll, outdoor patio furniture, and open fire pit
, details with upgrades galore Professionally decorated Pool, spa, extended lanai Maintenance free villa Situated in the heart of Terra Vista Nicely appointed Open floor plan features lots of upgrades including maple cabinets, solid surface
community of Terra Vista with extensive landscape countertops and an expanded shower in the master bath
MLS 357971 $339,000 MLS 356255 $499,000 1 $175,000 MLS 354017 $229.000


ME W 7 SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BEDROOMS 2 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH
[NTWOOD VILLAS Situated under magnificent Live Oaks you will find this wonderful split floor
car$18 9 .900 .... ....... l, . 0, . .. ... .. ...

$189900 .. ...S...... I I ,, $199,000


WELL-MAINT)
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS 0
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR LAKEVIEW VILLAS Fully furnished 2/2/2 detached villa in Terra VistaBeautifully decorated Enjoy NM
Nice unfurnished villa located near the Bella Vita Fitness Center & Spa Open floor maintenance-free so you can relax Open great room, makes for a sunny bi i
atmosphere Neutral colors throughout V1.500
$1.400 #2938 $1.500 #1203


ED UNFURNISHED VILLA
BRENTWOOD DETACHED VILLA 3 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR
I I Nicely maintained villa in Brentwood Open floor plan with large kitchen Lawn
S. maintenance and Social Club Membership included
$1.000 #1267 $1.100


DETACHED VILLA 3 B

overlooks private backyard
MLS 357398


Terms 6 Months or More
Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! Social Membership included with all Rentals


I I


I I


I I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Orange adds indoor zest


Beyondpumpkins: Punchy autumn shade brings pop, pizzazz no matter where you place it


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
Leaves are changing and pumpkins are
appearing on doorsteps around the coun-
try. As vibrant shades of orange fill the
outdoors, they're also becoming increas-
ingly popular inside.
Upholstery fabrics, paint colors, furni-
ture and accessories that range from neon
orange to tangerine to terra cotta are get-


ting attention this season.
But orange isn't for everyone. When in-
terior designers suggest decorating with
orange, clients can get nervous. Designer
Kyle Schuneman often eases homeowners
into using orange by suggesting variations
on it.
"The idea of orange can sound juvenile
and unsophisticated," Schuneman says.
"But if you go with umbers, burnt bricks or
terra cottas, you can sell a client on the


idea much easier"
The key, he says, is using orange cre-
atively and carefully
Here, Schuneman and designers Brian
Patrick Flynn and Betsy Burnham offer
tips on decorating with the color orange,
and avoiding the pitfalls of using it badly
How much to use?
Orange can be overpowering as the
main color in a room. But, like red, it


works brilliantly as an accent color.
"I don't suggest painting your walls or-
ange," Burnham says. "But maybe there's
an orange in the print on your pillows."
It can be casual ("maybe you bring in a
garden stool that's bright orange"), or chic
and sophisticated ("think of Hermes or-
ange, those shopping boxes"), she says.
In a bedroom with muted, gray-blue
See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I ORANGE
Continued from Page E8

walls, Burnham opted to add lac-
quered end tables in a rich shade of
orange.
Orange paint can also be a great
way to spruce up a dated piece of
furniture.
"Think about painting a great old
chest of drawers a beautiful shade in
a high gloss," Schuneman says, "and
changing out the knobs to really spe-
cial crystal knobs to make a state-
ment piece in a room."
Which shades are best?
All three designers like earthy
burnt orange tones that are almost as
brown as they are orange.
"With a burnt orange, you'd be sur-


prised what the paint chip looks
like," Burnham says. "It looks more
like a brown. But you paint a piece of
furniture that color, and it reads or-
ange. It does what it's supposed to do
- it brings some whimsy"
Flynn also likes using red-orange,
"ideal for more youthful or edgy
rooms."
The style of your home may help
determine which shades you choose,
says Schuneman. "Terra cotta is a
beautiful backdrop for a traditional
or retro feeling space, while pops of a
more neon orange could be really fun
for a modern space."
Whatever tone you choose, Schune-
man suggests testing a sample if
you've decided to take the plunge
and paint with orange. "Try three or
four different shades," he says, and
view them in various types of day-
light and artificial light.


Also, he says, "orange is a lot like
red when you're painting, so you're
going to need three or four coats to
get an even finish. But the end prod-
uct will be a beautiful cozy space."
Just one word of warning: "Don't go
with a true shade of orange," Schune-
man says. "It will feel like 'Pee-Wee's
Playhouse."'
Where does it work?
Orange can look good anywhere in
your home, but these designers say
it's especially beautiful for bed-
rooms.
"Orange is my favorite choice for
kids' rooms, because it's totally gen-
der-neutral," Flynn says. "My favorite
combo for a kids' space is tangerine
and white. It's clean and classic."
Schuneman agrees: "I love a warm

See Page E12


-tE1R1VIN[- ALL O I COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


w Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


For a VirtualSTu Ml le Phots

Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiesc


CHRISTINA WEDGE/Associated Press
Designer Brian Patrick Flynn mixes patterned wallpaper and
patterned curtains, both featuring the same shade of red-
orange. The intensity of that color is balanced by shades of
blue, cream and gold.


I PERIDE


31213 beautiful lot, great location.
Perfect size home. All wood cabinets,
solid surface counters, energy efficient,
tile flooring, large utility room with
cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray
ceilings, beautiful trim and crown. Rear
porch, with exterior shower, and bath
access. Price $185,000. Many special
features.
OOOcuwN Call Joe at 302-0910


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

2/2...............$700
Pritchard Island Villas
2/1.5/1..............$650
2/1 Screen Room $550
2/2 Duplex........$600

2/2/2 Water

2/1/1............... $600
Bonus Room
Jennifer Fude,.
.Property Manager
5 Cheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
3 352-726-9010


OPEN HOUSE 12-2




4394 N. Indianhead Rd.
SE1 MLS #357441 $229,900
Elegantly 3/3/2 Sweetwater custom
home on 1.30 acres.
Rte. 486 to north on Annapolis, to end of
road, to right on Indianhead, to #4394.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


".W 1 351 W. HiInloor I
/C%4 MLS #357980 $147,(
2/2/2 + workshop surrounded by
Twisted Oaks Golf Course.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


k |iv - -. -,- 7011
L144 E. Hartford SI.
-Wil3 1.13 ,,- ;l S169,900
Lovely 3/2/2 pool home on the
"Oaks" Golf Course.
Rte. 486 to south on Essex, to left on
Hartford, to home on right.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


2145 W. Elmhn Blossom SI.
2lfe MLS #357960 $142,000
Lush tropical environment
3/2.5 pool home.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3




812 E. Ray SI
2219 N. Brentwood Cir. 14di, MLS #352070 $99,900
MLS #354592 $124,900 Cozy 3/2/2 located on an acre
3/2/2 Open floorplanwith a nice viewfrom lanai. in Citrus Hills.
Rte. 486 to Brentwood entrance, to straight Rte. 486 to south on Annapolis, to
on Brentwood Cir., to #2219. home on the corner of Ray St.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


-c.' 2864 N. Churchill Way
,SfA#J MLS #357929 $137,500
Immaculate custom 3/2/2
with spa on lanai.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


MLS #357882 $8
Largest villa 3/2/2 model on
a quiet cul-de-sac.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136


C,,t, ,,, -.o- m .

3920 N. Stirrup Dr. 1075 S. Softwind Lp. 300E.Glassboro Ct.18-1b ..iii. 1 W. Lemon Sireel
MLS #357147 $398,500 MLS #352259 $133,000 MLS #347068 $78,900 T MLS #355045 $29,900
BRING YOUR HORSE! Lovely 3/3/3 Tara Lynn, Spacious 3/2/3 home, corner lot, Lovely furnished 2 story Townhouse CUTE, WELL MAINTAINED HOME.
byBluestone, pool home on 3.3 acres. friendly neighborhood. w/carport. Many upgrades have been done.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Brian Murray 352-212-5913
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the B M
. Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 E9









E10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012



Chronicle


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


- -~ -cj

- -- --


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


r. Fax (32 563566 1 Tol Fre (88 85-24 1 Em il clsiid-hoilo~n~o I -,sie ww-hoiloln~


Bring your fishing
pole!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R./HOMOSASSA
2/1 Furn. Mobile Homes
Nice, clean, quiet park
short/long term.
Mobiles for Sale with
Finan. 352-220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2Br/1Ba.$495 &
1 Br/1Ba.$475 Fridge,
Stove, Washer-Dryer,
Watr-Trsh 352-587-2555
HOMOSASSA
2 BR, 2 bath. 55+
Forest View Estates
8956 W. Sugar Bush
Path, across from pool &
clubhouse. Fully fur-
nished, master has king
bed, washer/dryer in
utility shed. Enclosed
Florida room, 1142 sq. ft.
$850/Mo. 319-471-2460
cards0661 (S)hotmail.com
HOMOSASSA
2/11a, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182




HOMOSASSA
26X60; 2BR/2BA,
Screened rm, utility rm,
Dbl pane win, 3+ acres,
2 fenced in, roof over, 2
carports, 30X84 Pole
Barn, well &septic
(352) 628-0812


BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

Mobile Home
for Sale
672 sq ft, and Lot
$19,500 Owner Finance
Kenny (352) 228-3406

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


Palm Harbor Homes
New Homes at $39,900.
$5K for your used
mobile home. 3 New
Models, 1,100-2,400 SF
800-622-2832 ext 210


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/long
term 352-220-2077



FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, $46,500.
Cash (352) 586-9498
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987

V THIS OUT!
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
FALL SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882


IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 2/2, 1988 Skylark
model, furnished, shed,
screened lanai & xtra-Ing,
covered carport on a Irg
lot. Lots of kitchen cabi-
nets with island stove top,
double oven, fridge,
washer, dryer. Lots of
storage. 352-344-1632
or 937-545-3413

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090







-ATION
-RENTAL MANAGEMENT
( REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.Citrus(ounlyHonmeRenlals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
59 S. Tyler St. (BH)............. $550
2/1 Good sized rooms and Fl room
2440 W. Nautilus (CS)......... $750
3/2/1 Cute home, 1398 sq ft
CRYSTAL RIVER
1055 N. Hollywood (ir ........ $850
2/2/1 Cairport, screened back porch
2561 N. Seneca Pt ......... $1200
2/2 Waterfront DW mobile, FURNISHED
11435 N. Dixie Shores........ $900
3/1 Stilt home w/dock & gulf access
HOMOSASSA
5865 W. Vikre Path............ $725
3/2/1 Cozy home close to Rock Crusher Elem
7843 or 1845 Solar Pl.....REDUCED $685
2/2 Duplex, incl lawn and water
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/LECANTO
3529 E. Saphire Ln. (Her)..... $725
2/2/1 Lake front, fenced backyard
1933 Shele Path (L).. REDUCED $1200
3/2/2 Inc full memb, pool, tennis, gym


CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 waterfront DW, $600
2/2, Doublewide, $600
3/2, Seasonal, $1,200
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 House $600 mo.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




1/BR $450. ,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio, Furn. on Hunter's
Springs, sun deck, W/D
rm. All until. incl'd.+ boat
dock. $700/mo. avail
10/1/12 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
* NICE* Secret Harbour
Apts. 2/1 $575 F/L/S.
Includes Water/ gar-
bage, W/D hook-up. Also
furnished units avail.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, Small Pet OK.
(352) 628-2815


CRYSTAL RIVER
APTS
Now Renting 1 & 2 BR
units starting at $508.
36 units situated on 4
acres on private st.
Very quite, close to
Winn-Dixie & Publix,
3 minutes to New
Super Wal-Mart.
Managed by an Award
Winning MGT Co.
Clean and Well
Maintained, off Rt 486.
(352) 795-1700






CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Inc. Water
Quiet, Clean $575. mo.
352-257-6461, 563-2114
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp 2/1
House $650. 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
or smoking $500.mo
$300. Sec. 352-341-1847
INVERNESS
2/1.5, Townhouse,
W/D, $550 Mo. F/L/S.
(352)746-4108
(352) 302-6988
INVERNESS
2/1.5, Townhouse,
W/D, $550 Mo. F/L/S.
(352)746-4108
(352) 302-6988
INVERNESS
2/1/1 W/D; Water/Garb
$550 mo $550 Dep. No
Pets, (815)325-4110


PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
Apts Homes
Monthly rent starting
at $741 plus utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental Assistance
available to qualified
applicants:
9826 West Arms Drive
Crystal River,
795-7793
TDD #1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:OOA-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based on
income.
Applications now
accepted for 1 & 2
bedrm units with
carpeting, custom cab-
inets, central air &
heat, stove, refrigerator
& additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis
Call (352)
447-0277-TDD


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Homel
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite Clean
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



OPPORTUNITY





LECANTO
1/1 Apt. W/D, Util. incl
Non Smoking
$550/mo. 352-628-3501




INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
water & garbage incl.
No pets, $550mo.
(352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYS. RIV. & BH
Furnished & Unfurnishd
352-302-1370

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm. cottage ideal for
one or two. Good credit &
rental history a must.
lst/last/sec. $500 p/m
inc. util. 352-628-1062


Crys. Riv. Cottage
2/1, CH/A, Near Beach
Includes. Util. $695.
352-220-2447, 212-2051
LECANTO
Cottage 1/1 furnished
$425 incls. power /water
(352) 220-2958




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 C/H/A New Carpet &
Tile, Nice Neighborhood
$650/mo (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2 1, 26 N. Melborne
CHA, Nice Back Yard
(352) 746-1300
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2, tile firs, nice
area, across rails to trails
$845. mo. No pets
(352) 598-0235
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299, 364-2073
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg. 3/2/2
On % Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River
& Historical District
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
FLORAL CITY
4BR/3BA, 2 Acres
Pool, Can have horses.
$925 mo or buy $145k
(352) 220-1692
HERNANDO
2/1%, 1,475 Sf. $650.
Non Smoking/Pets.
352-419-0074, 464-4346
4195 E. Benthal Ct.
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Nice neighborhood
$500. mo. 239-272-9230
HOMOSASSA
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
$775 + Deposit, Move-In
Special 727-463-4411
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, 1st & Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-476-2860

INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$995 (352) 634-3897


Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached Home,
Royal Oak upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serve W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable /water.
949-633-5633
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA/1, $750 mo
838 Duck Cove Path
(352) 895-0744 Cell
Sugarmill Woods
2 Master BR, Dbl Gar.,
S/S Appl. $850/Mo
352-302-4057




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/Ilong
term 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
On/Off Water, Boat
Dock 352-302-1370




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
*******k - -


LO I/1 CL /-LLC III iAdLUIt
Coast Landings RV
Resort. Large Developed
site, plus, a separate
gated storage lot. Almost
new 5th wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,500. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

Homosassa
1 Acre, well, septic,
power pole, workshop,
fenced, paved rd, no im-
pact fees $48,000
(352) 422-6792


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available oan equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



ECUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial






4- 91
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





FOR SALE OR RENT
1,200 sq. ft. Professional
OFFICE SPACE
Furnished, Executive
Condo CenterCR
352-794-6280, 586-2990

HERNANDO
Over 2,200 SF, Multi-Rm
Office or Home & Office
on Hwy 200, for More Info
Call (352) 344-3084




3BR/2BA/2, Shed, New
Interior paint, carpet,
pool, jetted tub,+ shwr,
newer roof, fenc'd yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
Citrus Springs $114,900
(352) 476-5061


Beautiful Golf Home
on El Diablo.
2563 sq. ft. 4/3/2.
Granite in kitchen
all baths and wine
bar.S/S appliances
and many upgrades!
Close to shopping,
restaurants top rated
schools. $159,900
352-464-1320





4/BR/2BA Mitch Under-
wood built home on 1.2
acres. Cherry cabinets
and wood floors. Outdoor
kit w/ Jenn-air grill.
Heated spa, oversized
pool, gazebo and lovely
garden. (352) 746-0912





Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Sat
& Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




2BR, 11/2 BA, new
enclosed sunroom, at-
tached utility and Laun.
rm. storage bldg.,
furnished Immaculate.
5111 Castle Lake Ave.
S. of Inverness on SR 41
$39,900 (740) 255-0125

Approximately 1 Acre
3BR, 2 Full BA, Open
concept, new steel
roof, deck & caged
pool, carport, storage
bldg., Priced to sell
$82,500 5155 Bridget Pt
S. of Inverness on SR 41
(740) 255-0125



HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

Inverness Highlands,
Corner of Carol and Ten-
nyson. My Loss, Your
Gain, New Low Price.
HUGE 1 Family, on 2.8
residential acres, fenced,
CHA, 4 BR, 3 BA, pool,
deep well, whole house
water treatment, wired for
generator, COSTLY UP-
DATES in 2011. Offered
AS IS. $172,900. Owner
352-419-7017


Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$800. Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529


Hme


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.




CRYSTAL OAKS
Beautiful rare Crystal
Oaks .62 ac premium lot
on Crystal Meadows
Path. Municipal sewer
and water. All under-
ground utilities. $69,900
561-704-0313


Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD/1BTH, 672 Sq. Ft.,
located at 4244 Illana
Ter. Inverness $64,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\A5C
Drive by then Call
(866)937-3557





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/IMW
REALTY ONE

House for Sale
By Owner
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2
352-586-1772
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558



anirr


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY
(352) 613-3503




BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060
*******k - -


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


5 ACRES 1948 Sq Ft.
2BR + Office/2 Bath
Furnished Home,
Bushnell, Turn key cond
cage inground pool
3,000 sf garage
mechanics dream
completely equipped
Information, Appoint.
(352) 569-4205


BRENTWOOD
2 bedroom. 2 bath. Brand
new Townhouse currently
rented good income per
month 352-527-8198


CirsCu


Home Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Frin Yoar DreOI Homw'e

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


CirsCu


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 Ell


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857


OPEN HOUSE
Saturday 12p-4p
3/2/3 w/ pool. 1.3 Ac,
Withlacoochee River
Access, River Oaks East
1099 Natchez Loop
$274K or make offer
Kathy 352-484-8043





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails, $3000 per Acre
352-634-4745






2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $24,000.
(727) 439-9106







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ORANGE
Continued from Page E9

shade of orange for a bedroom. My last bedroom
was a burnt brick. It felt so warm and cozy," he says.
"It really works well with dim lighting at night, but
also can invigorate you to wake up in the morning."
Burnham is using orange and white gingham print
draperies, along with navy blue and dark denim up-
holstery, to decorate the bedroom of a pre-teen boy
"It's boyish, but sophisticated," she says. "Not over-
the-top country or anything. Sort of preppy"
What goes with orange?
"I love pairing gray with orange," Schuneman
says. "It immediately amps up the hip factor and
brings it into a contemporary setting. It works well
because gray has a cool base, where orange is
warm. So the balance really creates harmony in a
room."
Along with pale grays and deep charcoals, orange
also goes well with dark and light blues and also
browns, taupe, cream or white.
Burnham cautions against pairing orange with
other tropical colors or other harvest colors, like
red and yellow. The room can easily begin to feel as
though you've taken those themes too far
Rather than piling on all the fall colors at once,
Schuneman suggests pairing orange only with
brown: "I think you can create a really beautiful
monotone room of creams, off whites and browns,"
he says, "and pop it with orange to create a cozy
feel. Use different textures in these similar color
tones ... jutes, velvets and linens for that cozy fall
feel."
What to avoid?
"I find yellow-orange the hardest to work with,"
Flynn says, "because it's very limited in accent
color choices." Burnham agrees, saying it's best to
avoid "that school-bus orange."
If you're going with a bright orange, just be sure
you'll enjoy it long-term.
Edgy, bright shades are "really going to pop and
give your room some personality," Burnham says.
But "a little goes a long way," and what's hot today
may quickly go out of style.
"Like any trend," she says, "use it sparingly"


Real Estate DIGEST


Pilny, MacDonald
hit new highs
The associates and staff
of RE/MAX Realty One
are very pleased to an-
nounce that two more
agents have passed the
multi-million dollar mark in
sales volume this year.
Both Debra Pilny and
Dianne MacDonald have
qualified for this prestigious
club. Debra is a veteran agent
than 25 years experience in th,


FRUGAL
Continued from Page

and funnel it into the n.
polish bottle, then shake,
store it in any airtight cc
trainer if you want to keep t
new nail polish for addition
uses. You can mix e
shadow colors, too.
Michelle, Florida
Use for shaving crea
While helping my daughl
with her genealogy resear
at a cemetery, I used fo,
shaving cream on the old
tombstones to photogra
weather-worn inscriptions
sprayed the foam, then wip
it with a spatula and quid
photographed the words.
worked like a charm! 1
land N, email
Second use for fabr
Cloth napkins are cheap, uw
ful and reusable. I ma
mine from sheets from Goc


Debra
Pilny
RE/MAX
Realty One.


County marketplace. She
works out of the Inverness
RE/MAX office on Main
a Street. Dianne has nearly
20 years experience in the
( local market and is cele-
brating her 10th year with
RE/MAX this month. She
Dianne specializes in short sale
MacDonald transactions and works out
RE/MAX of the Crystal River office
Realty One. on U.S. 19.
The brokers of RE/MAX
congratulate these two professionals on their
success.


will, and I'm proud to use
them. I also used a white
sheet to make handkerchiefs,
another savings that keeps on
giving. -Mildred L., email
Waste less food: I do not
put leftovers in the fridge,
where they never get used
and I just end up throwing
them out. Instead, I put
everything in containers that
can be put in the freezer right
after dinner and taken to
work. If we have leftover veg-
gies that I don't care to take to
lunch, they go in the freezer
in a freezer bag, then I add
them when I make veggie-
based soup. I do the same
with small portions of meat.
-Mel, Arkansas
Handling leftovers: Our
leftovers get used either in
homemade soup or pizza. We
have some odd pizza toppings
and weird soup mixtures at
times, but they've never pro-
duced a culinary disaster -
K.H., Illinois


Thompson joins
with Parsley
Deb Thompson recently
joined Parsley Real Estate
in Hernando, at 4635 State
Road 200.
Deb has more than 20
years of experience selling Deb
real estate. Formerly from Thompson
Indiana, she and her hus- Parsley
band moved here in Feb- Real Estate.
ruary 2000.
Call her at 352-634-2656. or visit her web-
site at debthompson.com.


DIY Jenny Craig: Make
your own foods using recipes
with specific calories per
serving, then portion them
appropriately and freeze. It's
much cheaper than paying
for diet frozen meals, and it's
good food. It makes eating
right a lot easier S.D.,
Minnesota
Organize boxes of foil, plas-
tic wrap, etc.: I use a plastic
magazine file I found at Sta-
ples to hold my boxes of wax
paper, foil and plastic wrap.
It fits neatly in my pantry, so I
don't have to cram them into
a cabinet drawer anymore. -
Katie, Ohio
mmm
Dear Sara: How can I re-
move coffee stains from a
stainless steel or glass
carafe? Tina, Ohio
Dear Tina: Fill the carafe
with water and drop in two
denture-cleaning tablets. Let
it soak overnight and then
wash as usual. You can add


ice cubes, salt and lemon
wedges and swirl it around
and then rinse with water
Another option for the stain-
less steel carafe is to use bak-
ing soda. Add hot water and
baking soda to the
carafe/thermos, let it set
overnight (with the lid off),
then scrub with a bottle
brush.
Dear Sara: Where can I
purchase Borax? I would like
to clean my shower with it.
Thanks. -Mama, email
Dear Mama: 20 Mule Team
Borax can be found at major
retailers (Wal-Mart, Kmart,
Target, Walgreens), hardware
stores and local supermar-
kets. Visit 20muleteamlaun-
drycom for a store locator
It's usually shelved in the
laundry aisle.
Dear Sara: I like to hear
your latest thrift store finds.
It gives me ideas of things I

See FRUGAL/Rage E15


- "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"'

NANCY Cell: 352-634-4225
PONTICOS A KEY 1 REALTY INC.
-0 8 8015S SuncoastBlvdHomosassa FL 382.1700


IMMACULATE WATERFRONT-HERNANDO, FL FOR RENT-INVERNESS, FL
3BR/2BA upgraded home on Hernando Lake. Almost Immaculate 2BR/1B apartment. Rent includes
|1/2 acre lot. Must see! $249,900 MLS#353564 washer & dryer. $600.00 per mo. MLS#357587



BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Large 2BR/2BA pool home on 1 acre. Original garage Commercial corner Hwy 44 & Gospel Island
converted to living area. Detached 2 car garage. Road Across from the Hess station.
$84,900 MLS#356908 $59,900 MLS#354972
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352)302-6714 -""


FANTASTIC BUY! GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD! SWEETWATER TRADEWINDS w/POOL!
Separate Living, Family AND Florida Rooms Maple Kitchen (abinets *Tile Kitchen & Baths
Brand New Carpet 2010 Heat Pump Private Lanai has View to Wooded Greenbelt
Large Backyard & Private, Deep Greenbelt PERFECT (Cul-de-Sac Double Pane Windows
$85,000 MLS#344849 $189,500 MLS#357690
akern yvirtuallou oo


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!




I Of Citrus
Inc. Fn o
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 FacebOk
Hwy. 19, 4Y2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


I


E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GARDEN
Continued from Page E4

alatamaha), which they found grow-
ing along the Alatamaha River in
Georgia and named after their friend,
Ben Franklin. William later revisited
the beautiful trees and collected
seeds, which were planted in
Philadelphia.
For reasons unknown, this tree was
never again seen in the wild after
1803, so the seeds William collected
are the source of all known Franklinia
trees in existence today
(Franklinia, hardy to USDA zones 5-
8, is a small to medium-size tree with
white, fragrant, camellia-like blos-
soms that open in mid-summer, and
leaves that turn coppery red in fall.
Good soil drainage is a must.)
The Schuylkill River site also be-
came a commercial plant nursery
Among the 220 species the Bartrams
offered in 1783 were tulip poplar trees
and poison ivy vines. (Admit it, poison
ivy is a handsome plant much of the
year.)
Under the leadership of another
son, John Jr, Bartram's granddaugh-
ter, Ann, and her husband, Robert
Carr, the nursery flourished. By the
1830s, 4,000 species of plants were
being raised there, and there was
greenhouse space for 10,000 potted
plants.
Bartram's nursery supplied plants
for such gardens as Jefferson's Monti-
cello and Washington's Mount Vernon.
It was the first American nursery to
publish a catalog.
Compare that catalog -now on dis-
play at Bartram's Garden and consist-
ing of nothing more than a list of
plants with the splashy photo-
graphs and hyperbole of catalogs
today
Native American plants were the

I7"21. EVELYN CURRENCY
N uECo sT REALTORI
Crystal Rver FL Cell: 352-634-1861 |
352-795-0021 evelyn.surrency@century21.com


PICTURESQUE VIEW OF INDIAN COVE
FROM YOUR BEDROOM AND LIVING ROOM
2 Bedroom, 2 baths ground floor unit at
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MLS #357252.


mainstay of the gardens and nursery,
but exotics also were grown. Soybeans,
for example, from seeds sent by Ben-
jamin Franklin. Ben was thoughtful
enough to include a recipe for tofu, as
well.
Another plant from China, a gingko
tree, was planted in 1785 and survives
today It may be the oldest gingko tree
in North America.
Like many old gardens, Bartram's
fell into disrepair for awhile. Indus-
trial sprawl creeping along the
Schuylkill threatened the site when
family members lost interest in the
nursery in the middle of the 19th
century
To the rescue came Philadelphia in-
dustrialist Andrew Southwick, who
bought the property, proclaiming, "I
don't want a solitary branch cut ... so
that not a bush of this beloved old gar-
den shall be disturbed."
Unfortunately, with Southwick's
death, the property was again sold,
this time resulting in the loss of many
plants.
Salvation returned in 1891 when the
property was bought by the City of
Philadelphia. Restoration efforts were
spurred by the discovery, in 1950, of a
sketch made by William or John of
their 8-acre botanical garden.
In addition to many of the plants
grown by the Bartrams, the present
Historic Bartram's Gardens also in-
cludes an education center housed in
the stone barn built by John Bartram
in 1775, as well as a wildflower
meadow and the furnished Bartram
home. More recently, a community
garden and orchard were added to the
site.
The Bartrams would have
approved.


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A look at pansies and violets


Fall days are less hot and
shorter than summer
ones. Nights are cooler
and longer. Summer annual
plants have set and shed their
seeds and begun to die off. It is
time to pull the failing summer
annuals to add to the back yard
compost pile. Heat generated
by decomposition rises to more
than 130 degrees the tem-
perature where most seeds are
cooked to death. Some seeds
are hardy enough to survive
winter frosts. Others need the
cold to stratify the seed case so
moisture can penetrate in
spring. Seeds that were shed
beneath the plants in the gar-
den bed are likely to sprout
next spring.
A sure sign of autumn is the
appearance of colorful bed-
ding annuals in nurseries, su-
permarkets and home
improvement stores. Pansies
are a popular favorite. They
are sold in flat trays, individual
pots and hanging baskets. A
flat of pansies usually comes in
one color, ideal for massed
plantings. Those in hanging
baskets could be frozen right
through the pot so must be
taken indoors on frosty nights.
Planted in a bed and sur-


rounded by a few
inches of pine nee-
dle or leaf litter
mulch, these bed-
ding annuals should
thrive through
Florida's mild
winter
Pansies, heart-
sease and violets
are members of the Jane
Viola genus found in
most temperate re- JAI
gions world wide. GAR
Some are annuals,
others either deciduous or
evergreen perennials. A few of
the 500 Viola species are al-
most shrub-like. Some grow in
cooler mountainous regions
within the tropics such as the
Andes Mountains of South
America. Most species come
from North America, the
Andes and Japan.
Violas typically have three
spreading lower petals and
two erect upper petals. A short
nectar spur may be at the back
of the flower. Perennial, ever-
green Florida violet and Wooly
Blue Violet, V sororia, are na-
tive to Florida. The pretty wild
pansy popularly called Johnny
Jump Up, V tricolor, produces
neat little tricolored flowers in


Weber
IE'S
DEN


yellow, blue, violet
and white. It has ap-
pealing face-like
markings. Imported
from Europe, it has
naturalized in
North America
from cold zone 4 to
warmer zone 10. It
may be annual in
freezing zones or bi-
ennial in temperate
zones. In Central
Florida it lasts sev-
eral years in zones


with light frosts.
Pansies with flowers over an
inch wide are usually hybrids
of a European species and
named Viola X wittrockiana.
They are compact and densely
branched. Most are frost-hardy
and can survive short freezes.
Although perennial in Cold
Zones 5 to 10, they are grown in
Florida as winter annual
plants. Locally, the torrid heat
of our Heat Zone 10 summer
effectively kills these hybrids.
Pansies can have a flower up
to 4 inches across. Somewhat
flat-faced, the five petals may
have a face of a different color.
For example purple on white,


See JANE/Page E15


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 E13







E14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012


WATER
Continued from Page E5

(WQA), 54 percent of con-
sumers polled were con-
cerned about contaminants
in tap water, and 49 percent
were concerned or very con-
cerned about their house-
hold water supply
"We are seeing people be-
come more educated about
water issues and finding
ways to ensure water quality
for their families," says Peter
J. Censky, WQA executive di-
rector Although safety regu-
lations do ensure at least a
minimal level of cleanliness
and safety in municipal
water supplies, taking re-
sponsibility for the health of
our own drinking water is
smart. Indeed, even the
President's Cancer Panel
recommends the use of
home filtering devices to de-
crease exposure to cancer-
causing agents. To ensure
you have safe drinking water
in your home, take these
steps:
Every year by July 1, your
water supplier will mail you
an annual Consumer Confi-
dence Report (also called
the Drinking Water Quality
Report). You may also be
able to find your report on
the EPAs website. The EPA
offers online tools to help
you learn how to read the re-
port at its Local Drinking
Water Information page. You
also may find your local and
state reports in the EWG's
National Drinking Water
Database.
While these reports offer
an analysis of your local
water at its source, it's also
wise to directly test your tap
water at home. Some con-
taminants, such as lead,
could leach through pipes


and household plumbing,
and therefore not be de-
tected before water enters
your home. Relatively inex-
pensive home water-testing
kits are available at hard-
ware stores. You could also
obtain professional tests on
your water; the EPA recom-
mends contacting your state
certification program for a
list of certified laboratories.
Drinking water contami-
nants come from many
sources: Radon, radium and
arsenic are naturally occur-
ring, while microorganisms,
pesticides and nitrates come
from people, animals and in-
dustry Here are a few con-
taminants to specifically
watch out for:
U Chromium-6 (Hexava-
lent chromium): You may be
familiar with this highly
toxic chemical from the
movie Erin Brockovich.
Chromium-6 occurs natu-
rally from the erosion of
chromium deposits, but it
can also be produced by in-
dustrial processes and re-
leased into the environment
by poor storage or inade-
quate industrial waste dis-
posal practices. In a 2010 tap
water survey, the EWG found
this known carcinogen in 31
of the 35 American cities
tested-that's 89 percent
While chromium-3 is an im-
portant dietary element,
chromium-6 is believed to
cause many serious health
problems, including cancer
The EPAs maximum level of
chromium was set in 1991,
but in 2008, the agency began
a rigorous and comprehen-
sive review of chromium-6
health effects based on new
science. According to the
EPAs website, "when this
human health assessment is
finalized, the EPA will care-
fully review the conclusions
and consider all relevant in-


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formation to determine if the
current chromium standards
should be revised." Read
more at the EPAs website
Afrazine. This common
herbicide is thought to poten-
tially cause endocrine dis-
ruption, cancer and
reproductive disorders. Stud-
ies have linked high levels of
atrazine in the water supply
to birth defects in children,
and in one study male frogs
exposed to atrazine trans-
formed into fully functioning
female frogs. Use of the her-
bicide is particularly high in
the Midwest, where it's used
on crops in spring. Six states
- Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,
Kansas, Mississippi and Ohio
- recently settled a lawsuit
against Syngenta, the manu-
facturer of atrazine, for mil-
lions to subsidize the
chemical's removal from the
public water supply Atrazine
is among the pollutants dis-
cussed in the 2012 water
quality documentary Last
Call at the Oasis, which fea-
tures Erin Brockovich and
other environmental experts.
Chlorine and chlo-
ramines. Chlorine is com-
monly used by
municipalities to help purify
the local water supply How-
ever, chlorine can combine
with organic matter in water
to create chlorination by-
products, which could poten-
tially cause cancer, according
to NSF International, an in-
dependent nonprofit organi-
zation that provides
standards development,
product certification and
risk management to help
protect the world's food,


water and health. Some mu-
nicipalities have switched
from chlorine to chloramine
(a combination of chlorine
and arsenic) to treat water
Although the EPA classifies
both as safe at levels used in
drinking water, both chlorine
and chloramine are toxic at
high levels and have been as-
sociated with health risks. If
your local water utility uses
chloramines as a disinfec-
tant, make sure the water fil-
tration system you use is
certified specifically for
chloramines, and not only
chlorine, the NSF
recommends.
Lead. Lead is a highly
toxic metal. If your home
was built before 1986, it's
more likely to have lead
pipes, fixtures and solder,
according to the EPA. Even
legally "lead-free" plumbing
in newer homes may contain
up to 8 percent lead. No
amount of lead exposure is
considered safe drinking
lead-contaminated water
could result in physical and
mental development delays
in babies and children.
Adults aren't immune: Watch
out for blood pressure in-
creases and kidney prob-
lems. Because lead is more
likely to enter drinking
water through the corrosion
of plumbing materials where
water has high acidity or low
mineral content, the EPA is-
sued the Lead and Copper
rule, which requires treat-
ment systems to make drink-
ing water less corrosive to
the materials it comes into
contact with on its way to
consumers' taps. You can


read more about lead expo-
sure at the EPAs website.
While many filter tech-
nologies exist, those most
adept at removing contami-
nants include carbon or
charcoal filtration and re-
verse osmosis. Carbon filters
vary in effectiveness; some
remove chlorine only while
others remove a range of
contaminants, including
lead and mercury You will
find carbon filters in carbon
block and granulated acti-
vated carbon varieties. In
general, carbon block filters
are more effective. Carbon
filters cannot effectively re-
move many inorganic pollu-
tants such as arsenic,
fluoride or nitrate, according
to the EWG.
Reverse osmosis filters
are adept at removing inor-
ganic contaminants not re-
moved by carbon filters. You
can sometimes find combi-
nation carbon/reverse osmo-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

sis filters, which remove a
wide range of organic and
inorganic pollutants. How-
ever, reverse osmosis filters
use three to 20 times the
water they produce, so limit
their use to drinking and
cooking water
Other filter types you may
encounter include ozone
and UV (ultraviolet). These
are effective at removing or
killing bacteria and microor-
ganisms but not chemical
contaminants.
Excerpted from Natural
Home & Garden, a national
magazine that provides
practical ideas, inspiring ex-
amples and expert opinions
about healthy, ecologically
sound, beautiful homes. To
read more articles from Na t-
ural Home & Garden, please
visit wwwNatural
HomeMagazine.com or call
(800) 340-5846 to subscribe.
Copyright 2012 by Ogden
Publications Inc.


000CVEB F

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[ 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E12

can look for. So what was your latest
deal? -Kelli, Illinois
Dear Kelli: My kids speed skate and
run cross country Athletic clothing is
costly I look for leggings, fitted shorts
and shirts. I found two pairs of Under
Armour leggings for $1 each. In the
sports stores they cost more than $40.
Recently, I found hockey sticks in great
condition for $0.50-0.99. My kids love to
use them for roller hockey at the outdoor
rink. I also found brand new CCM ice
skates (the blades hadn't even been
sharpened yet) for $3, and an Adidas
track jacket and pants for $1 each (re-
tails for about $40 and $35 respectively).
Our thrift store offers buy one, get one
item half off if you have purchased a


TREES
Continued from Page E6

rhododendron (Rhododendron ar-
boreum), live oak (Quercus virgini-
ana), and southern magnolia
(Magnolia grandiflora).
Of the 60,000 to 70,000 species of
trees in the world that have been iden-
tified by botanists, a few hundred are
palms, about 500 are conifers, and the
rest are broad-leaved trees. Approxi-
mately 865 different species of trees
are native to or naturalized in the con-
tinental United States. The most no-
table of these are in the pine, yew,
palm, maple, cashew, walnut, beech,
birch, magnolia, laurel, rose and wil-
low families.A bit closer to home, in
Florida there are 300 species of native
trees and more than 1,000 non-native
species introduced to the state.
With so many species of trees that
successfully grow in Central Florida,
it is no wonder that residents are often
perplexed as to the best selection for
their home landscape. To help you de-
termine the best tree choice, a website
has been designed to help guide you
through the process of tree selection,
resulting in a list of possible trees for
your home landscape project. This


JANE
Continued from Page E13

yellow or pink. Main petal colors
range from hot pink to almost black.
Slow growers, hybrid pansies reach
just 8 inches high and as wide by the
end of the season. Planting early in
fall lets gardeners enjoy pretty pan-


state park pass, too. My community
forum (frugalvillage.com/forums) has a
section specifically for everyone to share
their latest thrift store scores, too. You're
not alone; most frugal people love hear-
ing about thrift store finds. I know I do.
Dear Sara: I have a HUGE zucchini
in my fridge. I want to make zucchini
bread eventually (not today or tomor-
row), but I think it would make a dozen
or more. Can you freeze zucchini? Can
you just grate it and freeze it in indi-
vidual portions to use for baking later?
I don't want it to go to waste. I eat zuc-
chini sauteed each week, but this
would be enough to feed my fiancee
and I for a month. -Marie, New York
Dear Marie: Yes, you can freeze
grated zucchini. Be sure to cut and
scoop out the seeds. Your life will be
easier if you freeze it in the cup meas-
urements needed for your bread
recipe. You can add the grated zucchini

website is also designed to provide ex-
tensive cultural and maintenance in-
formation with supporting
photographs.
To get started, visit "Florida Trees,"
located at http://lyra.ifas.ufl.edu/
FloridaTrees/. This information was
assembled through the Florida Divi-
sion of Forestry in cooperation with
University of Florida and the Florida-
friendly Landscaping Program. For
additional information, call Citrus
County Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons without dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or
affiliations, genetic information and
veteran status as protected under the
Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment
Assistance Act.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is director of
Citrus County Extension.

sies from October through to April.


Jane Weber is a Professional
Gardener and Consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands
ofnative plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County
garden. For an appointment call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


to meat loaf, meatballs, spaghetti lage (www.frugalvillage.com), a web-
sauce, stews and soups or in omelets, site that offers practical, money-saving
too. Some people drain the thawed zuc- strategies for everyday living. To send
chini before using it in breads; I do not tips, comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas City, MO 64106,
Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil- or email sara@frugalvillage.com.


NED HOUSE ON WHEELS' .i HOUSE PRICE ARE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BARREL' II .I - -'-
1. This home sit on a half acre MOL featuring 1,736 City Buy. 3/2 with 1,408 living for ONLY $34,900! This home features A TALENTED HANDYMAN WILL EVEN HAVE A CHALLENGE HERE!
plan, pantr den/office, living room, dining area, living family rooms eat-in kit en split & open floor plan interior laundry, floral City 2/1/1 with living & family roons, r screen porch, shed, standard
a master bedroom with a garden tub and dul sinks. I rear patio, partial fencing, standard ceilings and pariial appliances. In need I ceilings, prtial fencing, breolkst bar, and in need of a lot of work! ONLY
S 356382.6177 Nielsen. ASKING $39,900. of some TIC 7969 Northlake. MLS #356839. Call Tomika Spires-Hnssen $19,900 so take a peek quick. MLS #357074. 8034 Roundlake Lp.
en 5866598 or Kimberl Fuller 352-212-5752. 1 586-6598 or Kimbedy Fuller 352-212-5752. (ell omika Spe-Hnssen 5866598 or Kimbedy Fulbr 352-212-5752.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 E15S









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r| & -Il. ..i Ii ,I iv. .i .. -ii .ii.ilm Hill I11 i -AIN
.I ... I.,.. ........ SERV tNG
, ,,,, .. .,,,,.... .....i ,,,,, ... is. .... ITRUS COURNTY
..l.... I, II..I.ul ,.,ilh H1 0-..I I C1 I OR O
.. ,, ,, I.,i, .., o ,.ii, H .... . FO O VE R

MC i = a.v.:iBo) $249,000
Call Mai/dIn Booth 637 4904


"FIRE SALE"
ON 10 ACRE EQUESTRIAN HOME SITES
PRICES REDUCED FROM S220,000 TO S95,000111
S 1.. 1 111111 1- 2. I I d



Ml. '= ..*.' $95,000
C.ll Jim lotion 352 726 6668


I


I a'II 'I I II. Ih, ' I I Ia' u .
l l ...lll ll I .... .l l. .. I.. ill h. l.

Mi, = il l ASKING $69,900
Call Isaac Baylon at 697 2493


Hn..l.'l' 1 ,:Ill.aI .I


V .Il l I: a ,ai l :l .lJ l' ll.l
Mi = i57:. $88,000
wnv'. Citi usCount'Sold. corn
Jeanne I Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


BI fi 1 . I
BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME
I. ..i t ...... 1 j, l. iii... ': ,iJ lII I h
'.ui J .. 'i l 'p ,: P ..ul' .. .ili i ,i.i .J iU j h. .
Al. r, -.I .... I

,l,..i.J .. i. h 1 .Ii ,. \l v in ,J'.. .J .. i ',
Mi.: =i: ;//Il ASKING $140,000
Call Casej Keatse at 476 6549


OH, WHAT A VIEW!
- A ll '.' 1111 I. I' il. h .. .I
* l.i .I .i 'l *l. ini I. .i. I, n ic '1

*MI.II H MI.II H MIKIIRim
Mt i = 1.'.l5:. $475,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


.1


/M1 LnEl UEll 5UUNI v 5LWl
I..l .. il.ll ; i i I)1 I.. .:.......... I1.. 1 I...). i i
.. I ll.l I. a. 1ii I. ....aj .'aa iI .. ..a ..a..


o '' "' a 1 ..1...a II '''''' a j' ,'" ''''a'".
S .. .1...I.. ). I I..1 ...... .1
.l.. laIia a .a .I iija.. il.l r I ..:. ai.i..a..a Ha
Ciii Do:ns 4fl,,r -. ;26 666S, .r J22 J62; i. ,i
OWNERS ARE WAITING FOR FAST SALE!!! S154.500


GOSPEL ISLAND HOME ON 2 LOTS
GREAT LOCATION BuA I. II F. F




Mi = 3.3' ASKING $225,000 MIl_ = .Vi' ONLY $134,900
Call Jim Motion 422 2173 loI youth tout Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


* l.nall . "_P A : ,:f .A :.i
* u ll 1 _" 'II'I6 .l .:.:...i ,:i.:.i i .. .1..
* -I. ,: I, I ,,,lid l ,, I.
* J]aJr I
Mt i. = ,`.1:i. $159,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i'wi'ir,. CiltusCountilSold. corn


al lai al ; I r.a' ..a.l.. _' I, ll i .'l I ,:n,:i

ai ..m V w hl, li.u I 'Iin A...II h uin. l..., piq
...j.,l a, I,,a...ai ..'"aI ASKING 199K.
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


READY FOR NEW OWNERS!


,i l.l.' I m i n i. s p ol. lns 6i p111' /i Iii.1

, .: 1'.. i I] 1 l. ,: M I_ i = ./'i _"I
Call Mai- Pa/sons 634 1273


LOTS OF VALUE HERE
Sl.lil. l. I I lh.v4 ..I. .. I III l..I -l I.ii
m i l nilIb *li a lair .I .a a-.
i. I air. I 'I l,,, I h, l, I V I',:rlir ,i
.. 111 l IJI' ..ifl I M II. 1 .. .h .fi l B il
Mi = .3i'. ASKING $228,000
Call Pat Davis 352 212 7280
View listing at:. c21paldavis. corn


HERNANDO
i A il: l.I ''''L I h: pai .': ri- l .ai i' ..l'
:l r llll.: l.p lh ;i l: I. l..ljf. fli. p lh (h11 :1 ,: .ll


P : l.' .. ,,l i. .. I ,,,.i: I i l .,:. H in y r '1 III
Mt i = _ll':.I: $49,950
Call Nidda Cano 352 270 0202


SUPER LOCATION -
MAINTENANCE FREE LIFESTYLE

I m p06.a in i ll I'll. a all l
MI i = i.'','/ ASKING $57,240
Pat Davis t3521212 7280
Viewi listing at: i'i,'i',. c21paldavis. corn


E16 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012