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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02897
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 09-23-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02897

Full Text



Never in trouble: UF cruises to easy home win ove:


Mostly sunny; stray
p.m. thunderstorm; rain
chance 20 percent.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N TY





IRONICLE


23, 2012


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 118 ISSUE 47


Mall perseveres


Song, dance
A high school chorus
stages a show of songs
from Disney./Page A3


ENTERTAINMENT:


Vegas style
The 1960's version of
Las Vegas is recreated
in Santa Clarita, Calif.,
for new show./Page B8
LOCAL NEWS:


New signs
Three Sisters Springs
spells out rules for
visitors./Page A2

OPINION:
We need
wisdom and
leadership on
the hospital
board.



BUSINESS:

. -



If'
i
^~ ^
Paper stocks
In this digital age, more
companies no longer
issue paper stock
certificates./Page Dl


HOMEFRONT:


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
This aerial view shows the Crystal River Mall at 1801 N.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. The 429,265-square-foot facility
with its landmark tent roof has experienced ownership changes and the uncertain economy. It currently has 42
tenants. The mall anchors are Belk, J.C. Penney, Kmart and Regal Cinema.


Management offers

incentives to draw

tenants, shoppers
PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER There is
still some magic at the Crystal
River Mall.
Citrus County's landmark shop-
ping center has weathered the
tough economy and is gearing up
for the holiday season with a mix of
national chain stores and locally
owned shops and services.
With its circus-tent profile, as-
sorted mix of merchants and nu-
merous events, the Crystal River
Mall remains a local attraction. Vis-
itors can find plenty of merchandise,
animals, artisans, food and enter-
tainment What they will not find are
a lot of traditional big mall stores.
Open for business
Mall manager Millie Bresnahan
admits there have been changes as
the mall ownership evolved and
the retail industry took an uncer-
tain course. That uncertainly is still
playing out in Citrus County with
more than a dozen multi-unit retail
properties for sale.
Plus, the closing of Sears earlier
this year continues to have an
impact.
"Some people actually think the
mall closed," she said. But that is
far from the truth.
Joining the vacant Sears are
other empty spaces, but not for a
lack of effort by the management
and owners.
"We're looking for local tenants
and the owners are giving incen-
tives for people who want to start a
store, people who want to come
into the mall," Bresnahan said.
"They have been open to all kinds
of negotiations for national tenants
and for locals. They are offering
See Page A7


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
Photographer Jorge Blanco of Cafe Impressions Gallery poses in front of
his 10- by 13-foot photo of a scene from Rainbow Springs near Dunnel-
Ion. This photo and some of his other works adorn some of the walls at
the mall.

Tenants offer unique wares at mall


PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER If you visit
the Crystal River Mall, you can't
miss Jorge Blanco's work.
And that says a lot, in a large
shopping environment that in-
cludes cats and dogs up for adop-
tion, coin-operated kiddy rides,
movie marquees, cars on display,
information booths and numerous
kiosks, plus stores and eateries.
Blanco owns Caf6 Impressions
Gallery, but his photography can
be found throughout the mall. Vis-
itors often stop and touch a 10-by-
13-foot vibrant scene from
Rainbow Springs.
Not all of his photos are that big,
but all of them are striking with
vivid colors and detail.
The Homosassa resident has
combined his passion for photog-
raphy with his knowledge of com-
puter technology to create
artworks that challenge the viewer
to wonder exactly what is going on.


One of his favorite techniques is
focal stacking, where numerous
exposures are taken at different
focal points to produce a highly
detailed image.
"There's a lot to photography,"
he said explaining his use of a ro-
botic head to shoot multiple
frames that result in a 360-degree
image that seems to put the viewer
right into the setting.
A native of Cuba, Blanco had
been involved with photography
for 20 years as a hobby So when
his career in technology was
erased by the recession, he de-
cided to start his business.
He has been at the mall since
January, having moved from Cit-
rus Avenue. In addition to fine art
photography, mostly of local
scenes, Blanco can enhance pho-
tos customers bring in and pro-
vides other photo services.
But a project he is really excited
about is taking shape across the
hall.
See UNIQUE/Page A7


Voters need their thinking caps for amendments


Ballot proposals in 'lawyer talk'


Prefabricated
Prefab homes get
greener, more energy
efficient./HomeFront


Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ..............A12
Editorial................. .... C2
Entertainment ..........B8
Horoscope ...............B8
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B8
Movies .................. A12
Obituaries ................A6
Together................ A14


6 1|1184578 1121 1007I o


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Susan Gill cringes at the
thought
It's Election Day and vot-
ers are streaming to the
polls. But way past the 7
p.m. closing time, a line of
voters still snakes outside
the doors.
Why? Amendments.
Gill fears the 11 pro-
posed constitutional
amendments on the Nov. 6
ballot are so complicated,
voters will be stopped cold
by them.
So Gill sends sample bal-
lots to voters and has them
printed in the newspaper


ahead of time. She refers
interested voters to non-
partisan organizations that
have information about the
amend-
ments.
Gill
hopes vot-
ers will do
their
amend d -
ment
homework
before Susan Gill
wal k ing supervisor of
into the elections.
booth on
Election Day or for early
voting.
"We wanted people to
know ahead of time what
they're facing," Gill said.


"Being a voter is taking
some work."
All 11 amendments were
placed on the ballot by the
state Legislature. Five deal
with property taxes and the
others range from public
funding of
abortions
to the
makeup of
the Board
C of Gover-

State Uni-
^ e nors of the
versity
Charlie System.
Dean T h e
state senator. a m e n d -
ments are
complex because they
were written by attorneys
to make sure they stood the
test of constitutional chal-
lenge, state Sen. Charlie


MORE INSIDE
Find a four-page insert
in today's Chronicle.
Gerry Mulligan offers
his opinion in his
column./Page Cl
Reporter Nancy
Kennedy explains the
11 amendments.
/Page Cl

Dean said.
"It's in lawyer talk that
myself and other everyday
folks don't understand,"
Dean, R-Inverness, said.
Getting the word out to
voters is a challenging task.
Last August, Judy John-
son, a Marion County attor-
ney who is well versed in
constitutional law, led a
See Page A7


I IN S1 11,IDE I


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
91
LOW
65


SEPTEMBER


I -- S UI N I D :


Support


key in


state race

Argenziano

hopes name

overcomes

Smith's money
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER If
was all about money, Jim-
mie T Smith would win in a
landslide.
The first-
term Re-
publican
h a s
amassed rf
about
$180,000 in
campaign
contribu-
tions for his Nancy
state House Argenziano
of Repre- State House
sentatives candidate.
District 34
re-election
bid, includ-
ing more
t h a n
$81,000
from the
Republican
Party of
Florida. Jimmie T.
His oppo- Smith
nent on the incumbent
Independ- congressman.
ent Party of
Florida ticket, Nancy Ar-
genziano, has a tiny fraction
of that amount- $15,603 as
of Friday's reporting
deadline.
Argenziano, who once en-
joyed those spoils as a Re-
publican incumbent in the
state House and state Sen-
ate, has no political party to
back her up.
So Argenziano, who rep-
resented Citrus County for
10 years in the Legislature
that preceded an appoint-
ment to the Public Service
Commission, is hoping vot-
ers know enough about her
to overcome the barrage of
attack ads she is expecting
from Smith.
"My name recognition
still comes as a very high
positive," she said. "If I was
in another county running
as an Independent and
didn't have the history, I'd
be squashed."
Smith did not return
phone calls Friday and Sat-
urday seeking comment. In-
stead, he issued a statement
suggesting his financial
support comes from the
economic sector.
"I am pleased that so
many people across the dis-
trict and across the state be-
lieve, like me, that we must
enable the private sector to
flourish and create jobs,"
the statement read.
Smith's endorsements in-
clude backing from
builders, Realtors and the
Florida Chamber of
Commerce.

unions and associations af-
filiated with state troopers,
professional firefighters,
electrical workers, teachers
and public service workers.
And on Friday, Argen-
ziano picked up support
from the Tea Party of
Florida.
"Your honesty, integrity,
independence ... and
courage draw a rather dra-
matic contrast to the politi-
cal machine," state Tea
Party Chairman John Long
wrote to Argenziano.
Argenziano has first-hand
knowledge of how cam-
paign contributions for in-
cumbents pour in. In 2002,
then-Rep. Argenziano
raised $344,000- including
$200,000 from the state Re-
publican Party to over-
come $491,000 raised by
See Page A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


www.willmclean.com
A CD featuring finalists from 2006-10 in the Will McLean
Foundation New Florida Song Contest, "Soul of the Hawk,"
is available for $15 via the website, www.willmclean.com.


Best new Florida


song contest


under way


Special to the Chronicle
Now is the time to write a
Florida song. The annual
Will McLean Foundation
New Florida Song Contest
began Sept. 1. Songs may be
entered until Dec. 31 and
submitted to The Will
McLean New Florida Song
Contest, PO. Box 621568, Or-
lando, FL 32862.
The song must be about
Florida and must be clearly
identifiable as such. Songs
may be any type of music
and must be the original
work of the entrant. Those
who wish to enter need not
be skilled musicians. Songs
entered into the contest are
not judged on the slickness
of their presentation. How-
ever, a good recording show-
cases the songs to the best
advantage.
Since its beginning in
1992, the contest has gener-
ated hundreds of songs
about nearly every conceiv-
able aspect of Florida: its
history, land, water, charac-
ters, weather and creatures.
Songs have been serious,
comical, romantic and in-
spirational. They have in-
cluded folk, country, rap,
blues, jazz and classical. En-
tries arrive from various
areas of the United States,
but most come from Florida.
Five judges rate the songs
on authenticity, originality
and emotional impact, as
well as technical aspects.
Each person may submit


PRIOR WINNERS
2007 Lis Williamson,
"Florida Cracker Girl"
2008 Rog Lee, "City
of Jacksonville"
2009 Garrison
Doles, "This Florida"
2010 Dawn DeWitt,
"The Withlacoochee
Way"
2011 Ron Johnson
and Mary Mathews,
"Rescue Train"
2012 no contest
DEADLINE
New contest entries are
due by Dec. 31.

up to three songs. Cash
prizes are awarded the top
three entries. Winners are
invited to perform on the
main stage at the annual
Will McLean Music Festival,
March 8 to 10, 2013, at the
Sertoma Youth Ranch in
Brooksville. All who enter
will have an opportunity to
share their songs in song
circles at the festival.
The Will McLean Founda-
tion has produced the first
in a series of compact discs
featuring the finalists of
each year. The first CD,
"Soul of the Hawk," with
winners from 2006-10, is
available for $15.
For information, visit
www.willmclean.com or call
352-465-7208.


Signs of conduct


Three Sisters Springs

spels out rules for

visitors to site
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER As part of it
preparations for the crush of visitors
to Three Sisters Springs later this fall
and winter, officials have installed
signage to instruct conduct at the
area's premier manatee eco-garden.
Michael Lusk, manager of the Crys-
tal River National Wildlife Refuge,
announced Thursday the new rules of
behavior at the 57-acre parcel have
been posted for year-round activity.
"Basically, we are trying to bring it
line with the rules in state parks like
Blue Spring and Wakulla Springs.
These new rules are just common-
sense rules that will make everyone's
experiences much better and help us
protect the manatees," Lusk said.
In May, Lusk on behalf of the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service, which
manages the
Signs for Three Sisters par-
cel wrote a let-
prohibited ter to the city of
Crystal River that,
seasonal along with the
Southwest Florida
activities Water Manage-
Will go ment District
(SWFWMD), is a
up in co-owner of the
property, request-
NOvember. ing some restric-
tions to human
conduct.
Restrictions to human activities
will primarily be year-round, al-
though others only pertain to sea-
sonal activities.
In July, the council OK'd the rules
except for one, the prohibition of
flash photography without a special-
use permit
Some council members thought it
was not a good idea to be charging
tourists a permit fee to use flash
photography
However, Lusk said the ban on
flash photography is necessary to pro-
tect the sea cows from undue intru-
sion and to set distance parameters
for permit holders. He said most of
the flash photographers are going to
be big-time photographers who are
known to lug around huge equipment,
including lights that can startle
manatees.
Lusk was instructed by the council
to come back at a future date with re-
vised language about flash photogra-


O O I S

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Chronicle
A new sign at Three Sisters Springs in Crystal River explains what is permitted
and what is prohibited at the wildlife refuge.


phy that would be acceptable to all.
Restrictions for year-round activi-
ties are:
0 Open from sunrise to sunset
0 No weapons.
0 No alcoholic beverages.
0 No disposable containers.
0 No motorized vessels or propul-
sion devices.
0 Pets must remain in vessel.
0 No fishing, gigging or spearing.
0 Commercial photography re-
quires a USFWS special-use permit.
This restriction has not been ap-
proved yet, pending revised
language.
Prohibited activities from Nov 15
to March 31 are:
No anchoring of vessels.


No exiting or entering vessels.
Flash photography or lighted
filming requires a USFWS special-
use permit. This has not been ap-
proved yet pending revised language.
A provision in the management
agreement said USFWS will not en-
gage in any activity, including restric-
tions on public access or commercial
or recreational activities, except as
provided for in the applicable man-
agement plan without the prior writ-
ten approval of the city and
SWFWMD.
Lusk said the signs for prohibited
seasonal activities will go up in No-
vember. The season begins Nov 15.
Chronicle reporterAB. Sidibe can
be reached at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


^ ^f
'Al


Solutions

for Hip Pain


* Non-Surgical
* Surgical
* Smaller Incision


* No Blood Transfusion
* Shorter Hospital Stay
* Faster Recovery Time


(Pictured Above Left to Rjight)
Ralph Abadier, MD
Cardiokqist
Mohammad Ansari, NMD
Cardiologist
Gisela Trigo, MD
Cardiolqoist
Luis Delfin, MD
Cardiologist


Exceptional services and excellent patient outcomes are important
reasons why Citrus County's leading cardiologists choose Citrus
Memorial Heart and Vascular Center for their patients. Our highly
skilled team of surgeons and physicians, coupled with dedicated
and compassionate nurses and rehabilitation specialists, ensure
that patients receive the best cardiovascular care possible, with a
proven track record of success.
For nearly a decade, our dedicated Heart and Vascular Center has
provided the most comprehensive cardiovascular care available in
Citrus County. From our Chest Pain Center and Cardiovascular
Cath Labs, to our premier heart surgery and cardiopulmonary
rehab programs, Citrus Memorial is leading the way, right here
close to home in the Heart of Citrus.

Learn more about us by visitingg heartofcitrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.


SEMINAR


Wednesday Sept. 26,2012 11:00 AM
Comfort Inn Suites THE VILLAGES
1202 Avenida Central
Lunch will be provided for everyone in attendance.
Largo Medical Center RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
ATeaching Hospital 1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
FLORIDA KNEE &ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION www.LargoMedical.com


by The Society tl' Thoracic Surgeons for 2011

'(,! _,; Sr


CITRUS MEMORIAL


SC art
& VASCULAR CENTER


502 West Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


WV







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A2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


LOCAL


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Page A3 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE






ISNEY



ITTIES

Citrus High School Chorus delivers an % W

ode to animated and live-action children's

musicals in 'Once Upon Disney' -


Citrus High schoolers

sing and dance their way

around the auditorium

in a Disney-inspired

production
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
TOP RIGHT: The Mansoons brought their own
special physicality to the stage as they
performed the musical number "Seize the Day"
from the 1992 Disney musical "Newsies," on
Saturday at Citrus High School's auditorium.
TOP LEFT: The group Category 5 and Jackie
George, right front, performed "I Won't Say I'm
in Love" from the 1997 animated Disney film
"Hercules." MIDDLE: The Citrus High School
Chorus opened its performance of "Once Upon
Disney" with a medley of Disney classics. The
choir, under the direction of John Edel, is work-
ing on its first choral holiday performance,
scheduled for Dec. 7 and 8. BOTTOM RIGHT:
Ocean Moberg performed "Sally's Song" from
Tim Burton's "The Nightmare before
Christmas." BOTTOM LEFT: Teri Caudill sang
and danced "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious"
from the 1964 production of "Mary Poppins."


Campaign TRAIL


Around the COUNTY


The Citrus County Chronicle's
political forum is at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Oct. 18, at the College of Cen-
tral Florida in Lecanto. Information:
Mike Wright, 352-563-3228.
Pope John Paul II Catholic
School will have a candidates'
forum at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept.
24, at the school off County Road
490 in Lecanto.
The Beverly Hills Civic Associ-
ation candidates forum is at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Cir-
cle, Beverly Hills. Information:
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic Associa-
tion is hosting a candidates forum
at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, at Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country Club.
Supervisor of Elections Susan
Gill is sponsoring a candidates
forum targeted for high school stu-


dents at 7 p.m. Wedn
24, at Citrus High Sch
Winn Webb, Re
sheriff, will have a fun
noon to 2 p.m. Saturd
the Inverness Womer
Forest Drive, Inverne.
tion: Rosella Hale, 74
Sandra "Sam" I
mocrat for superinten
schools, will have a g
ment fundraiser at 1
Sept. 30, at Sugarmill
& Country Club. Infor
302-9843.
The Campaign Tra
political happenings f
election season. Senc
campaign fundraisers
Wright at mwright@c.
online.com.


iesday, Oct.
hool.
publican for


Progress Energy to offer
solar rebates


idraiser from Progress Energy Florida is about to
lay, Oct. 6, at launch its third round of solar photo-
n's Club, 1715 voltaic (PV) rebates.
ss. Informa- Customers interested in applying for
6-2545. rebates through Progress Energy's
immel, De- 2013 SunSense Solar PV Program can
dent of complete the online reservation process
olf tourna- starting at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 1.
op.. Sunday- Through the program, Progress En-
1.m. Sunday, ergy provides qualifying residential and
I Woods Golf commercial customers rebates of up to
nation: 352- $2 per watt for customer-installed solar
PV systems.
il is a listing of Progress Energy has implemented a
or the 2012 reservation process to help customers
d events or qualify for the solar PV rebate prior to
Sto Mike installation. Due to the annual solar PV
chronicle incentives cap, the utility recommends
customers wanting to take advantage
- From staff reports of these rebates become familiar with


the process prior to the Oct. 1 launch.
Additional information about the com-
pany's reservation process is available
at progress-energy.com/sunsense.
Funds offered
for sewer connection
Citrus County Housing Services has
announced available funding for
mandatory sewer connections and as-
sessments under the State Housing Ini-
tiatives Partnership Program (SHIP).
Previously, the application period
was to close Sept. 7, but it has been
extended until at least Oct. 1.
Funding is available to eligible low-
income families and can be used for
permit, impact and other fees neces-
sary to connect regional central water
and/or sewer service.
Priority will be given to hook-ups
done in conjunction with other state or


federal funding sources. Eligible appli-
cants will be owner-occupied house-
holds with an annual income of up to
80 percent of area median income.
Site-built homes, as well as mobile
homes constructed after June 1994,
provided the home is classified as Real
Property, are eligible for assistance.
Applications will be accepted at the Cit-
rus County Resource Center, Housing
Services Section, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court- Key No. 12, Lecanto, FL, 34461.
If more applicants apply than funding
will serve, applicants will be assigned a
random lottery number and served in
that order until all funds are depleted.
The application can be found on the
county's website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Click on Departments, Community Serv-
ices, Housing Services, SHIP or call 352-
527-7520.
From staff reports






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrest
Robert Alan Teeple, 39,
Hemando, at 10:26 p.m. Friday
was arrested on a charge of do-
mestic battery. No bond.
Other arrests
Tracy Allen Hawks, 50, N.
Florida Ave., Hemando, at 9:38
a.m. Friday was arrested on a
felony charge of failing to comply
with sex offender registration re-
quirements. Bond $20,000.
Jessica Kay Solida, 34, S.
Columbus St., Beverly Hills, at
9:32 a.m. Friday was arrested on
a felony charge of not informing
sexual partners that she has a
sexually transmitted disease.
Reports said Solida had unpro-
tected sex with two men while
not informing them she has HIV.
Solida denied having sex with
one man and said the other man
wore protection. Bond $10,000.
Crystal Buzzell, 50, E.
Arbor Lakes Drive, Hemando, at
11:37 a.m. Friday was arrested
on a charge of driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked.
Buzzell was driving a golf cart on
East Fisherman's Lane when a
deputy recognized her. The
deputy said he stopped Buzzell
because he knew she had a re-
voked driver's license and he
had warned her not to drive the
golf cart, the arrest report said.
Bond $500.
Burglaries
A commercial burglary was
reported at 7:49 a.m. Sept. 18 in
the 2500 block of W. Dunnellon
Road, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was
reported at 8:30 a.m. Sept. 18 in
the 80 block of S. Lucille Street,
Beverly Hills.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 6:34 p.m. Sept. 18 in
the 300 block of S.E. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 4:29 p.m. Sept. 19 in
the 6100 block of W. Grover


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type
of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense
Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* The "Sheriff's 10-43" show airs on TV station WYKE,
digital channel 47 and Bright House cable channel 16.
The show features interviews with sheriff's office staff
from all areas of the agency. It also features Sheriff
Jeff Dawsy taking live calls during the entire show on
the last Wednesday monthly.
* The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking all
registered sexual offenders and predators in the
county. Click on the Sexual Offender Information link
on the CCSO website.


Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 4:46 p.m. Sept. 19 in
the 50 block of N. Griffith Avenue,
Crystal River.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 5:02 p.m. Sept. 19 in
the 700 block of W. Main Street,
Inverness.
A residential burglary was
reported at 7:15 p.m. Sept. 19 in
the 10100 block of W. Oliver
Street, Homosassa.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 9:28 a.m. Sept. 20 in
the 5100 block of S. Rovan
Point, Lecanto.
A residential burglary was
reported at 1:35 p.m. Sept. 20 in
the 7100 block of N. Caesar
Point, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:19 p.m. Sept. 20 in
the 4100 block of E. Lake Park
Drive, Hernando.
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:28 p.m. Sept. 20 in
the 100 block of Pleasant Grove
Road, Invemess.
A residential burglary was
reported at 7:19 p.m. Sept. 20 in
the 12500 block of E. Big Buck
Trail, Floral City.


A residential burglary was
reported at 1:48 a.m. Sept. 21 in
the 6800 block of W. Holiday
Street, Homosassa.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported
at 7:53 a.m. Sept. 18 in the 6800
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 10:21 a.m. Sept. 18 in
the 1000 block of Hoffman Lane,
Inverness.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 10:47 a.m. Sept. 18 in
the 6400 block of W. Slander
Lane.
A grand theft was reported
at 1:45 p.m. Sept. 18 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 3:09 p.m. Sept. 18 in the 2600
block of W. Woodland Ridge
Drive, Lecanto.
An auto theft was reported
at 5:52 a.m. Sept. 19 in the 5000
block of N. Tanglewood Avenue,
Hernando.
An auto theft was reported
at 5:52 a.m. Sept. 19 in the 5200
block of N. Tanglewood Avenue,
Hernando.


A petit theft was reported at
10:15 a.m. Sept. 19 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 10:24 a.m. Sept. 19 in the
5200 block of S. Cherokee Way,
Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 1:39 p.m. Sept. 19 in
the 7000 block of W. Thatcher
Lane, Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 4:40 p.m. Sept. 19 in
the 3900 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported at
11:21 a.m. Sept. 20 in the 4000
block of S. Kindness Point,
Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 1:03 p.m. Sept. 20 in
the 30 block of S. Jackson
Street, Beverly Hills.
SA grand theft was reported at
6:23 p.m. Sept. 20 in the 200 block
of S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 7:59 p.m. Sept. 20 in
the 3400 block of S. Aberdeen
Terrace, Homosassa.
Vandalisms
*A vandalism was reported at
10:48 a.m. Sept. 19 in the 600
block of W. Highland Blvd.,
Invemess.
*A vandalism was reported at
9:52 p.m. Sept. 20 in the 6000
block of W. Fairhope Court,
Crystal River.


Scrap buys



lead to arrest


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -Au-
thorities arrested a scrap
yard worker on charges he
bought and sold metals
without asking for proper
identification from an un-
dercover sheriff's deputy
posing as a customer.
Harry Albert Dalbow, 45,
North Quarterhorse Ter-
race, Hernando, was ar-
rested at noon Friday
following an investigation
that began in July
Reports said the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office was
conducting compliance
checks on local scrap
yards. The undercover
deputy would show up with
regulated air conditioning
parts that require proof of
ownership and identifica-
tion from the seller.
An undercover deputy ar-
rived at Crystal River Metal
Recycling on North Enter-
prise Avenue in Lecanto.
The deputy told Dalbow he
had neither proof of owner-
ship or identification for the
air conditioning parts he


wanted to sell. According to
the arrest report, Dalbow
paid the deputy $40 cash
from his wallet.
The report stated the
deputy believed Dalbow
then sold the items to the
business either through his
name or the name of an au-
thorized seller of air condi-
tioning parts.
The deputy returned and
sold more equipment to
Dalbow under identical
circumstances, this time
for $60, the report said. The
deputy also bought items
under another customer's
name; Dalbow reportedly
told the deputy to sign the
other person's name, the
report said.
A similar transaction in-
volving copper and an air-
conditioning coil occurred
a third time on Sept 13, the
report said.
The deputy arrested Dal-
bow on Friday, charging him
with knowingly giving false
verification of ownership
and identification to a sec-
ondary metals recycling in
return for regulated metals.
His bond was set at $2,000.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
pc
ts
ts

ts
pc
ts
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
75 ts
65 pc
70 pc
62 pc
72 pc
57 s
72 pc
74 ts
74 ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a light chop. Partly to mostly sunny
today.


IA NA NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Eclus aly

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 91 Low: 65
Mostly sunny, stray PM
thunderstorm, rain chance 20%.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 65
Mostly sunny.

.......TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 66
..0411IF Partly cloudy, stray PM thunderstorm, rain
Chance 20%.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/69
Record 95/63
Normal 90/68
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.20 in.
Total for the month 4.80 in.
Total for the year 54.47 in.
Normal for the year 43.43 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 68
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 50%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, nettle, grasses
Today's count: 7.7/12
Monday's count: 8.4
Tuesday's count: 8.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/23 SUNDAY 12:37 6:51 1:05 7:20
9/24 MONDAY 1:31 7:44 1:58 8:11
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


OCT. 8 OCT. 15 OCT. 21


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 7:25 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:20 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................3:01 PM.
MOONSET TODAY ..........................12:57 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:47 a/7:21 a 11:30 a/9:08 p
Crystal River"* 9:51 a/4:43 a /6:30 p
Withlacoochee* 7:38 a/2:31 a 10:28 p/4:18 p
Homosassa*** 10:40 a/6:20 a /8:07 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
2:20 a/8:51 a 1:04 p/10:31 p
12:41 a/6:13a 11:25 a/7:53 p
9:12 a/4:01 a 11:34 p/5:41 p
1:30 a/7:50 a 12:14 p/9:30 p


Gulf water
temperature



83
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.13 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.95 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 40.40 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.73 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 89 69 pc 87 66
New York City 76 60 pc 72 52
Norfolk 82 62 pc 75 53
Oklahoma City 93 68 pc 81 58
Omaha 64 42 s 68 45
Palm Springs 10579 pc 105 77
Philadelphia 85 60 pc 71 52
Phoenix 10678 pc 105 78
Pittsburgh 70 53 .08 pc 60 40
Portland, ME 68 55 .01 pc 72 45
Portland, Ore 72 49 pc 72 52
Providence, R.I. 69 55 .01 pc 73 49
Raleigh 85 63 s 77 46
Rapid City 69 35 s 74 52
Reno 88 55 pc 82 53
Rochester, NY 68 55 .16 sh 62 43
Sacramento 93 55 pc 88 56
St. Louis 69 55 s 66 44
St. Ste. Marie 53 39 .05 sh 52 38
Salt Lake City 89 54 ts 86 56
San Antonio 88 60 pc 89 68
San Diego 82 69 pc 82 68
San Francisco 73 51 pc 73 54
Savannah 86 65 s 86 60
Seattle 67 55 .01 pc 68 53
Spokane 81 53 pc 80 54
Syracuse 70 61 .41 pc 61 42
Topeka 70 46 s 70 44
Washington 85 66 pc 71 48
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 107 El Centro, Calif.
LOW21 Langdon, N.D.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 90/78/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 60/50/sh Mexico City
Athens 84/65/s Montreal
Beijing 85/63/pc Moscow
Berlin 62/47/pc Paris
Bermuda 82/74/ts Rio
Cairo 88/66/s Rome
Calgary 80/50/s Sydney
Havana 89/73/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 88/78/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 80/61/s Warsaw


74/65/r
56/53/r
85/65/pc
72/58/ts
61/45/c
59/45/r
70/64/c
75/61/pc
74/67/c
75/50/s
78/68/sh
57/45/sh
56/42/pc


.26 pc
pc
s
p
pc
pc
PC
s
s
ts
pc
.90 sh
.18 pc
s
.01 pc
s
.02 s
.41 s
.56 pc
s
.27 pc
pc
pc
pc
s
.09 pc
s
p
pc
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
s
.01 pc
s
s
s
s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


CHRONICLE
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


0
SEPI. 29


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-


A4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Court offers troubled vets a better path


R. NORMAN MOODY
Florida Today
MELBOURNE Iraq
War veteran Richard
"Danny" First got a fresh
new start with a slate
cleared of criminal charges.
First, 28, served in the
war with the Army's 1st Ar-
mored Division. After suf-
fering a traumatic brain
injury when a roadside
bomb exploded under his
vehicle, he came to Mel-
bourne. Living with post-
traumatic stress disorder,
he fell into trouble with the
law.
He recently became the
first veteran in Brevard
County to complete the Vet-
erans Treatment Court pro-
gram, established to offer
eligible veterans arrested
on misdemeanor or crimi-
nal traffic offenses other
than DUI the option to seek
evaluation, treatment or
placement in a program for
behavioral health issues, as
opposed to being processed
through the regular court
system.
"I feel great, given the cir-
cumstances of the last year,"
First said just before Bre-
vard County Judge John
Murphy declared him re-
leased from the interven-
tion program. "I feel like the
program has given me a sec-
ond chance."
Those "circumstances"
included his arrest on three
charges of trespassing of a
structure or vehicle and two
counts of petty theft. Arrest
reports show the burglar-
ized vehicles were rum-
maged through and items
were moved around, but the
only items missing were a
plastic case containing band
aids and a coin purse.
After completing nine


months of aggressive treat-
ment for PTSD, counseling
and staying out of trouble,
First was cleared of all
charges against him.
In addition to the brain
injury, the blast left First
with an 80 percent hearing
loss in his left ear.
"I served my country," he
said. "I never asked for any-
thing in return, so I really
appreciate what they've
done for me. I was given an
opportunity to speak my
side, and people listened."
Veterans Treatment
Court, started in Brevard in
January, is part of a growing
nationwide trend that seeks
to help veterans suffering
from mental health issues
or substance abuse by keep-
ing them out of jail. Efforts
are made to get veterans
treatment they might not
seek on their own or for
which they don't know they
are eligible.
There were 97 veteran
treatment courts around the
nation as of the last official
count, made in December
by Justice for Vets, part of
the National Association of
Drug Court Professionals.
As many as 20 more may
have been established since
then.
'Jurisdictions all over are
turning to Veterans Treat-
ment Courts," said Chris
Deutsch, a spokesman for
NADCP "The growth has re-
ally been tremendous."
Fifteen other veterans,
ranging in age from early
20s to late 50s, are currently
part of the program in Bre-
vard. One was booted out
because he failed to follow
the directives.
"I'm very pleased the way
the program is going," said
Judge Murphy, who helped
start the program and who


presides over the cases.
"We're helping these folks
reconnect with their fami-
lies, friends and society."
Murphy, a retired colonel
who served 30 years in the
Army, said during the brief
ceremony for First that
troops make a great sacri-
fice and sometimes the toll
on them is very drastic. He
then handed First a certifi-
cate of completion and one
of his challenge coins, a
medallion that bears the
military insignia of his for-
mer unit that he used to give
to soldiers in recognition of
special achievements when
he served as a brigade
commander.
Murphy said he believes


intervention by the justice
system can help the veter-
ans before they get into
more serious trouble.
So far, the program only
admits those who are
charged with misde-
meanors, but could expand
later to include those
charged with certain
felonies.
Corrections officers at the
county jail identify the vet-
erans, and then the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs
verifies the veterans' status.
The state attorney's office
reviews the charges to de-
termine whether a veteran
is eligible for participation
in the program. The defense
attorney then must get his


WATERING FINES
Effective Jan. 1, Citrus County has stopped issuing
warnings for first offenders of local watering rules.
The county is issuing citations that carry with them a
fine of $100. Second violations cost $250, third or
more cost $500.


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
KNOW WHAT YOU NEED BEFORE
YOU BUILD....
To protect Florida's fragile waterways, the
DEP requires an Environmental Resource
Permit for dredging or filling in wetlands
and/or surface waters. If the project you are
planning requires dredging or filling in a
wetland area and/or surface waters, you may
need a permit from DEP prior to
construction. For further information,
contact the DEP at (813) 632-7600
OOOCMVS


I served my country. I never
asked for anything in return,
so I really appreciate what they've
done for me. I was given an
opportunity to speak my side,
and people listened.
Richard "Danny" First
first graduate of Brevard County's Veterans Treatment Court.


client to agree to participate
and comply with all aspects
of the program.
Assistant State Attorney
Wayne Holmes, who helped
set up the veterans program
just as he did with a drug
court and mental health
court in Brevard, said he was
pleased with the progress.
"It opens up a number of
resources to the veteran
community," he said.
Holmes said the key to the
program is that veterans
take advantage of resources
available to them.
First said it was what he
needed because after serv-
ing four years in the Army,
including one year in Iraq,
and that it was tough transi-
tioning back into civilian
life.
He grew up in the small
town ofWetumpka, Ala., and
the military was one of few
career options after high
school.
"It looked pretty exciting
at the time," he said.


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all alcohol, tobacco, lottery items, money services,
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Customer is responsible for all applicable taxes.
Reproduction or transfer of this coupon constitutes
fraud. Offer good 9/23/2012-9/29/2012 only in
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After he returned from
war, he took a few college
courses and moved to Mel-
bourne, where he lives with
his wife, Amanda. Trouble
started soon after when he
got caught after multiple car
break-ins.
First is planning to move
later this year to Largo,
where he hopes to start a
pool maintenance business.
"I'm very grateful for this
program," said Art Higgins,
First's attorney "We've got a
lot of folks coming back.
This is a good way to give
them a break and get them
the help they need."
First said though it is not
a great thing to need to use
the Veterans Treatment
Court, he wants to recom-
mend it to others. He said
he feels refreshed and
ready to start anew.
"I get to take a look at my-
self," First said. "I'm ready
I'm going to continue with
the VA. I'm going to con-
tinue with treatment."


Homosassa 621-7700 FREE INSPE TIONS
Crystal River 795860 FREE INSPECTIONS
Inverness 860-1037
TERMITE SPECIALISTS wT ,hi Ts
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STATE


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 A5


I. ,
AU^:-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Glenn
Adams, 67
HOMOSASSA
Glenn C. Adams, 67, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., died Sept. 20,
2012, at his home under the
loving care of his wife and
Hospice of Citrus County
Glenn was born Jan. 25,
1945, in Brooklyn, N.Y, the
son of Alfred and Doris
Adams. He was a U.S. Air
Force veteran serving dur-
ing Vietnam. He retired
from the New York City
Transit Authority He moved
to Sugarmill Woods in 2005
from Elmont, N.Y Glenn
was a member of First Pres-
byterian Church of Crystal
River, Fla.; the American
Legion Post 155 of Inver-
ness, Fla.; and the Bethpage
Hicksville Masonic Lodge
No. 975.
Survivors include his
wife, Lorraine, E. Adams of
Homosassa, Fla.; daughters,
Kristen L. Worster of
Kingston, N.Y, and Carolyn
E. Norman and her hus-
band, Jim, of Tallahassee,
Fla.; and son, Gregg M.
Adams of Saranac Lake,
N.Y; sister, Gloria Imberg-
amo and her husband,
Charles, of Homosassa, Fla.;
and three grandchildren,
Anita, Zofia and Jakub Nor-
man, all of Tallahassee, Fla.
A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28,
2012, at First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River, Fla.
The Rev Dr Jack Alwood
will preside. Military hon-
ors by the Inverness VFW
4337 will conclude services
at the church. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be
given to the First Presbyte-
rian Food Pantry or Hospice
of Citrus County Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Corinne
Bazo, 62
FRONT ROYAL, VA.
Corinne Joy Hill Bazo, 62,
of Front Royal, Va., died
Sunday, Sept. 9, 2012, in
Beverly Hills, Fla., of natu-
ral causes.
She was
born June
30, 1950, in
Arlington, -
Va. She
graduated
from War-
ren County
High School Corinne
in 1968. She Bazo
received a
nursing degree from
Alexandria School of Nurs-
ing in 1972. Joy always lived
life to the fullest and served
as an inspiration for those
who knew her Her absence
in this world will be felt and
her inspiration missed.
She is survived by her
mother, Carolyn; her two
sons, John and Peter; her
brothers, Richard and Paul;
and her sister, Ann.
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Sept. 29, at Seven
Rivers Presbyterian Church
in Lecanto, Fla. For further
information, contact the
church at 352-746-6200.
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

* Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.






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Glen Heck, 90
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Glen W Heck,
age 90, of Inverness,
Florida, will be held 10:00
AM, Tuesday, September 25,
2012 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Mr Stephen
Stuart officiating. Interment
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
Florida. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Heck was born March
23, 1922 in Indianapolis, IN,
son of the late William and
Gladys (Hall) Heck. He died
September 20, 2012 in In-
verness, FL. Mr Heck was a
Navy veteran and the recip-
ient of the WWII Silver Star
He worked as an electrician
and moved to Inverness
from St. Petersburg, FL in
1983.
Mr Heck was preceded in
death by his parents, his de-
voted wife of 52 years,
Wilma "Willie" Heck, sister,
Donna Barrs and great
grandson, Caleb. He was the
loving father of three daugh-
ters, Glenda M. (Stephen)
Stuart of Inverness, FL,
Dorcas (Rick) Rader of
Greenfield, IN, and Donna
(Jerry) McCawley of St. Pe-
tersburg, FL, the brother of
Fred Kraft and Joanna
(Fred) Trowbridge, the
grandfather of Dewey Stu-
art, Angela (Darren) Hartley,
Andrea (Rob) Dryer, Shaile
(John) Mulder, Brandon and
Derrick, and the great
grandfather of Clinton,
Sean, Michael, Sarah,
Alexandra, Glen, Preston,
and Drake, and Grandpa
Heck to Teresa, Robin,
Gavyn, Mason and David
Lee, all who survive him.





Arthur
Strickland, 55
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Arthur A. Strickland, 55,
of Chassahowitzka, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
Sept. 20, 2012, at the James
A. Haley VA. Hospital in
Tampa, Fla.
He was born Aug. 22, 1957,
in Brooksville, Fla., to Alli-
son Ray and Eloise (Dumas)
Strickland. He was a life-
long resident of this area.
He worked as a sales clerk
at the Circle K convenience
store on U.S. 19 and Ozello
Trail. He was a U.S. Navy
veteran, and he was of the
Presbyterian faith.
He was preceded in death
by his father, Allison Ray
"Baldy" Strickland. Surviv-
ing are his mother, Eloise
Strickland of Lecanto, Fla.;
a brother, Ben Strickland of
Homosassa, Fla.; a sister,
Edie Rabon of Tallahassee,
Fla.; three nephews; four
nieces; three great-
nephews; three great-
nieces; and numerous aunts
and uncles.
A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
25, 2012, at the Strickland
Funeral Home Chapel in
Crystal River, Fla., with the
Rev Lloyd Bertine, pastor of
the Gulf to Lake Church in
Crystal River, officiating. In
lieu of flowers, the family
would greatly appreciate
donations to help with fu-
neral expenses.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.







[IL ]n, 1


Daniel
Fertal, 94
INVERNESS
Daniel R. Fertal, 94, of In-
verness, died Thursday,
Sept. 20, 2012, at the Hos-
pice of Citrus County Unit
in Inverness.
Private inurnment will be
at Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.




James 'Jim'
King, 77
HOMOSASSA
James D. "Jim" King, 77,
of Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Sept. 18,
2012, at his home under the
care of his
family and
hospice.
He was
born Aug. 4,
1935, in
Hickman,
Ky., to Cleo
B. and
Hazel (Ray) James
King. He King
was a re-
tired police sergeant for the
Mount Clemens Police De-
partment in Mount
Clemens, Mich. After his re-
tirement, he moved to Ed-
dyville, Ky, where he owned
and operated the Twin Tiki
Motel and Restaurant. He
then moved back to Mount
Clemens, Mich., before his
moving to Homosassa, Fla.,
in 1997. He was a U.S. Army
veteran, a member of the
Fraternal Order of Police
Lodge No. 187 in Mount
Clemens, Mich., and a mem-
ber of St. Thomas the Apos-
tle Catholic Church in
Homosassa, Fla.
He was preceded in death
by a son, Cameron King, in
1979; a granddaughter, An-
drea Kay LeFan, in 2006;
and a sister, Dorothy Sue
Curry, in 2011. He is sur-
vived by his loving wife of 58
years, Jean Boyer King, of
Homosassa, Fla.; one son,
Bradford J. King (Mary
Jane) of Harrison Township,
Mich.; two daughters, Jamie
King (Dennis LeFan) and
Tracy King-Bennett (Eddie)
from Marion, Ky. He is also
survived by five grandchil-
dren, Christin Burton, Ryan
King, Blair Bennett-Travis,
Jay Bennett and Alison
LeFan; and six great-grand-
children. He is also sur-
vived by his loving canine
companion, Jilly-Bean.
Strickland Funeral Home
in Crystal River, Fla., as-
sisted the family with
arrangements locally To
celebrate his life, there will
be an open house at the
home of Eddie and Tracy
Bennett near Eddyville, Ky.,
and a graveside service at
St. Peters Catholic Ceme-
tery in Mount Clemens,
Mich. In lieu of flowers, the
family is requesting dona-
tions may be made in Jim's
name to: The Andrea Kay
LeFan True Artist Memorial
Scholarship Fund, c/o Fre-
donia Valley Bank, PO. Box
625, Eddyville, KY 42038.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits free and paid obit-
uaries. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.



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Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694 |
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


Ronnie
Marnell, 70
HERNANDO
Ronnie Veronica Marnell,
70, of Hernando, Fla.,
died Thursday, Sept. 20,
2012, at Woodland Terrace in
Hernando. Ronnie was born
on July 17, 1942, in Queens,
N.Y, the daughter of Freder-
ick and Anne Metsch. She
was very active at the Bella
Vita Spa, enjoying tennis,
yoga and bridge. Ronnie was
a member of St. Scholastica
Catholic Church.
Survivors include her
husband, Leonard W Mar-
nell of Hernando, Fla.;
daughters, Laura Prieto and
husband, Fidel of Hernando
and Denise Foley ofJupiter;
son, Richard M. Tommasi of
St. Petersburg; and four
grandchildren, Thomas,
Cristina, Antonio and Jake.
The family will receive
friends from 1 to 3 and 5 to 7
p.m. Monday, Sept. 24, 2012,
and again on Tuesday, Sept
25,2012, at the Heinz Funeral
Home. Vigil services will be
at 6 p.m. Tuesday A Mass of
Christian burial will be at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept
26, 2012, at St. Scholastic
Catholic Church in Lecanto.
Burial will be at a later date
at Nassau Knolls Cemetery
in Port Washington, N.Y
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness.

Bettie
Moore, 78
INVERNESS
Bettie Ann Moore, 78, In-
verness, died Sept. 21, 2012,
at her residence under the
loving care of her family
and Hos-
pice of Cit-
rus County
A native
Floridian,
Bettie was
born June
30, 1934, in
Tampa to
the late Bettie
William and Moore
Margaret
(Byrd) Collins. A loving wife
and mother, she was a
homemaker who also
worked for H&R Block as a
tax preparation agent for
more than 20 years. She en-
joyed fishing, playing bingo
and spending time with her
family
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her husband of 52
years, Lester L. Moore; sons,
Richard E. (Sylvia) Moore,
Pine Island, Fla., and Kevin
J. (Donna) Moore, Lecanto;
her daughter, Esther
Leonard, Inverness;
nephew, Jeffery (Linda)
Moore, Hernando; five
grandchildren; two great-
grandchildren; and ex-
tended family members.
She was preceded in death
by her brothers, Herbert
and Sheldon "K.B." Collins.
Respecting her wishes,
burial will be private at
Florida National Cemetery
The family will announce a
celebration of her life at a
later date. The family re-
quests donations to Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 in lieu of flowers.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.


"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"


Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Norma
Stone, 71
BEVERLY HILLS
Norma Jean Stone, 71,
Beverly Hills, passed away
Wednesday, Sept 19,2012, in
the care of the Hospice of
Citrus County Hospice
House, Lecanto.
She was born in Burling-
ton, Vt., and moved to Bev-
erly Hills in 1998 from
McLean, Va.
NormaJean
was a 1959
graduate of "'"
Washington-
Lee High -
School, Ar- .-
lington, Va.,
a home-
maker,
member of Norma
the First Stone
Baptist
Church of Dunnellon where
she was an enthusiastic vol-
unteer; prior to her retire-
ment, she was a long time
member of the McLean
Baptist Church, McLean, Va.
She enjoyed cooking, quilt-
ing, traveling (especially
cruising); most importantly,
she cherished quality time
with her family and friends.
A memorial service is
scheduled for 11 a.m. Tues-
day, Sept. 25, 2012, at the
First Baptist Church of Dun-
nellon with Pastor Russ
Randall officiating. Visita-
tion will be at the church
from 10 to 11 a.m. and the
committal service is sched-
uled for 1:30 p.m. at Fero
Memorial Gardens, Beverly
Hills, Fla.
Survivors include her
husband, Theodore; daugh-
ters, Kimberly Weiss,
Newark, Del., Judy (Allan)
Hazel, Charleston, S.C., San-
dra (Leigh) Kahler, Falls
Church, Va.; sister, Ada
Harke, Margaretville, N.Y;
grandchildren, Grant and
Scott Kahler, Falls Church,
Va., David Weiss, Newark,
Del., and Margaret Mary
Hazel, Charleston, S.C. In
lieu of flowers, the family
requests donations in the
memory of Mrs. Stone to
Hospice of Citrus County
Hospice House, 3350 W
Audubon Park Path,
Lecanto, FL 33461. Online
condolences may be offered
at www.robertsofdunnellon.
com.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
Find obituaries at www.
chronicleonline.com.


To Place Your

"In Memory"ad,
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Cecilia
Zomok, 87
HERNANDO
Cecilia M. Zomok, 87, of
Hernando, Fla., died Sept.
19, 2012, at Arbor Trails in
Inverness.
Cecilia
was born
Oct. 29,
1924, in
Hastings,
Pa., the \
daughter of
Raymond
and Ada Cecilia
Yahner. She Zomok
was a home-
maker and a great cook. Ce-
cilia moved to Citrus County
in 1978 from Pennsylvania.
She enjoyed being an artist,
along with sewing and golf-
ing. Cecilia also enjoyed
singing in the church choir
as a member of Our Lady of
Fatima and Our Lady of
Grace Catholic churches.
Cecilia is survived by her
children, Jim Cairns of
Pittsburg, Pa., Karen Cairns
of Inverness, Fla., Raymond
Cairns of Johnstown, Pa.,
Nancy Gemble of Her-
nando, Fla., and John
Cairns of Kissimmee, Fla.;
sisters, Emily Petrunyak of
Patten, Pa., and Romona
Bortman of Pittsburg, Pa.; 10
grandchildren; and five
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Zomok will be at a later
date in Pennsylvania. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, Fla.




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MALL
Continued from Page Al

anything from a free-rent pe-
riod of time to extremely at-
tractive square footage rates
and percentage-based rents.
"It's as creative as Ashley
and I can be, and our owner
is behind us 100 percent,"
Bresnahan said, referring to
marketing director Ashley
McDermott. "The idea is to
get this place filled."
That means finding poten-
tial tenants who want to come
and have the means to start
and maintain a business.
She acknowledged they
have been through a couple
of rough years, but they are
just starting to see a change.
Shopping has actually
picked up nationwide, with
the sales of clothing and ac-
cessories for August run-
ning about 5.4 percent over
August 2011, according to
the U.S. Census Bureau.
'Spaces of all sizes'
"We have a number of
spaces of all sizes for people
to come into," she said. They
are talking to potential ten-
ants about the 92,000-
square-foot space where
Sears was located, down to
300- to 600-foot spaces and
various sizes in between.
Plus, she said, they have
the unique opportunity to
put stores like the Gap or
Old Navy in with storefronts
that can be joined together
to get the footage they need.
"We're flexible," she said.
"We can move people; we
can do what we need to do.
"The idea is to get this
place filled." The mall cur-
rently has 42 tenants, ac-
cording to McDermott.
Bresnahan said they get
strong support in their ef-
forts to grow from the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council, the county,
the city of Crystal River and
have started working with
the Small Business Devel-
opment Center.



UNIQUE
Continued from Page Al

Blanco will soon be offer-
ing photography classes. "It
will cover everything to do
with photography," he said.
"We will cover the gamut."
"Photography has always
been my passion," he said,
and now he wants to share it
with others.
Blanco is one of those
local tenants who gives the
mall its quirky edge. It is a
place where a real estate
agent sells shoes and acces-
sories and you can pan for
gemstones.
Close by, Caf6 Impres-
sions is another new busi-
ness at the mall a unique
family owned enterprise.
Empire of Electronic Ciga-
rettes is exactly what the
name implies. According to
Jessica Valdes, the business
has been open a month, but
was previously at Howard's
Flea Market in Homosassa.
"It's a healthy alternative


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 A7


Countywide role
And the mall's role in Cit-
rus County goes well beyond
Crystal River
"It plays a multi-purpose
role, it adds to the economy
by paying taxes and the
stores hire people," said
John Siefert, executive di-
rector of the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council. "It plays a role in
us being a complete county
by having malls, strip malls,
strip shopping centers; all
the assets and facilities peo-
ple want in a county where
they want to live."
He added that tourists
and local residents want ac-
cess to stores without hav-
ing to drive far to get what
they need.
"It is a tool when we con-
vince businesses to grow
and expand here," said
Siefert. It is a quality-of-life
issue.
"We've been trying to get
out more and do a lot more
advertising," McDermott
said. "We hosted the cham-
ber business expo last year
and, hopefully, will do it
again.
In the future
As for the future, Bresna-
han said they are looking at
putting in a couple of more
women's clothing stores and
looking at a potential
restaurant tenant for the old
Gabby's.
"That's exciting," she
said. "We have a bookstore
coming in; we're just wait-
ing on the finished
paperwork.
"We have five or six things
out there that are new and
we're aggressively going
after some more. I know
there is an interest in the 18-
to 34-year-old clothing, I
have somebody who is in-
terested in coming in on
that."
"I think the mall's future
is bright," Siefert said. "We
have to work with the new
owners and management to
see other opportunities."


to smoking cigarettes," she
said, explaining how an
electric cigarette works. In-
stead of smoke, out comes
water vapor, and 29 flavors
are available.
Jenny and Angelo Arca-
dipane started their busi-
ness, FS Music, at the mall
nearly seven years ago in-
side a small storefront near
Kmart, sharing the space
with Angelo's brother Steve,
who owns Karat Gallery
Jewelry & Gifts.
Their business quickly
outgrew the space so they
moved to a larger store by the
front entrance and then to an
even larger space where they
are now just feet away from
the food court.
With direct access to such
a large space inside the
mall, Jenny said it's been a
great place to hold recitals
for the children who take
music lessons at the store.
Live entertainment at the
mall on weekends also
helps sales because if a mu-
sician needs something,
they are right there to help.


He pointed out the city of
Crystal River has passed an
ordinance enabling them to
look at bringing in other
businesses than just pure
retail.
Turning to the Halloween,
Black Friday and the Christ-
mas shopping season, Bres-
nahan and McDermott are
excited about a full sched-
ule of events. The mall will
be decorated, of course.
Santa Claus will arrive,
there will be choirs and car-
olers and the Hospice Tree
of Remembrance. On Black
Friday, Nov 23, traditionally
the start of the Christmas
shopping season, children
can get a free photo taken
with Santa.
Always active
But as McDermott pointed
out, there is no reason for
people to wait. There is al-
ways something going as the
mall continues to work with
local groups and host events
such as the VFW Post 8189
fashion on Sunday A com-
plete calendar is posted at
www.thecrystalrivermall.
com and "mall walkers are
welcome."
"We're air conditioned
with plenty of parking and
security," Bresnahan sad.
"And we get more people
here, even on a slow day,
than any place around."
Shop local
While the Crystal River
Mall has a lot of things hap-
pening or poised to happen,
what it really needs now,
everyone agrees, is a lot of
local support for the stores
that are here.
"We need community sup-
port to attract new stores,
Bresnahan said. "Instead of
driving to Ocala or Spring
Hill, if they would at least
come in and try to shop
local.
"We need big community
support so we can continue
to grow and add new stores
... if we have the interest and
we have the traffic they
will come."


"It's been a lot of fun," she
said. "The mall has always
been cooperative."
The Arcadipanes first
started their business at a
local flea market, but Jenny
said dragging the equip-
ment around started to be-
come a nuisance.
The original idea to move
the business to the mall was
her brother-in-law's, Jenny
said. They decided to first
start small.
"And it's been successful
thereafter," she said.
Since the mall was pur-
chased, Jenny said she has
seen improvements, but
what she hopes to see is the
community embracing the
mall again.
She strongly believes
being inside the mall has
contributed to her and her
husband's lasting success.
"I thank God every day,"
she said. "I want to see more
good things for the mall. I
want to see it succeed."
Former Chronicle staff
writer Shemir Wiles con-
tributed to this story


Collectors' Day



& Appraisal Fair

To be held Sat.. Oct. 6. 2012 at the Park's Visitor Center


Appraisal
fees are $5.00
per item or
$12.00 for 3 items


Ellie ScAi
HiQMOFe S SSh F 4150 S. Suncoas
SBlvd. (US 19),
"1sr HHomosassa, FL
LQLIr F -F 628-5445, ext.100
IM111LULIPE PFiREI


st


12


The Park's Visitor Center will be open to the public with free admission.
(Regular admission will apply for entrance into the Wildlife Park.)
Proceeds from appraisal fees will benefit the Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park.

COLLECTORS' DAY (from 10:00 am until 4:00 pm) Interesting
collections will be on display and you will be share and learn from
those who understand the joy of collecting. Collectibles will include
vintage tools, patriotic and holiday collectibles, antique hat pins,
bowls, bottles, tools, figurines, toys, pincushions, nutcrackers & ceramics.

APPRAISAL FAIR (from 11:00 am until 4:00 pm) Several know-
ledgeable collectors, dealers, auctioneers, and appraisers will be on
hand to assist you in identifying and placing a value on your
treasures. Their specialties will include, but are not limited to, coins,
military, jewelry, tools, postcards, signatures and other paper, and
string instruments. Many different items can be identified and valued.



*B .' 4000 S Florida Ave, Inverness n 34450
352-637-9588
Bi 166 www.dudleysauction.com
.AB1667 CHRONICLE
&d. ..aWdteo e CHI(ONICLE


Ryan speaks in Orlando

Associated Press Ryan was responding to a
woman's question about whether
ORLANDO Republican vice he would ask Vice President Joe
presidential candidate Paul Ryan Biden in a debate how he recon-
calls the Obama administration's ciles his views as a Catholic with
requirement that hospitals and -, the Democratic Party platform.
universities, including Catholic Ryan also condemned the
ones, be required to offer contra- Obama administration's space pro-
ception an "assault on religious Paul Ran gram in central Florida, where
liberty." thousands of jobs have been lost.
Ryan spoke at a town hall meet- Mitt Romney' Earlier Saturday, Ryan courted
ing Saturday in Orlando, saying running mate. Cuban-American voters at an event
GOP presidential nominee Mitt in Miami. He promised a Romney
Romney would reverse that decision if administration would "clamp down" on the
he's elected president. island's communist government.


SUPPORT
Continued from Page Al

Democrat incumbent
Richard Mitchell in a new
Senate district.
She raised a similar
amount two years later
against a much lesser
known Democrat In 2007, a
year before her term was to
end, Argenziano left the
Senate for an appointment
to the PSC, a position she
held until 2010.
Argenziano said many
special interests fund can-
didates who are supported
by the party. A few will drop



VOTERS
Continued from Page Al

talk in Holder that ex-
plained the pros and cons
of each amendment. The
Chronicle story that fol-
lowed is being re-printed in
today's Commentary
section.
The Citrus County Coun-
cil had hoped to bring
Johnson, a member of the
Marion County League of
Women Voters, to its Oct. 10
meeting.
Council past president
Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak
said Johnson had a sched-
uling conflict. But the Mar-
ion County League of
Women Voters was able to
send Gail Cross to speak at
the 9 a.m. meeting at the
Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72
Civic Circle.


that support if a lawmaker
votes against their interests,
which she said happened to
her on numerous occasions.
She said she believes
Smith's financial backers,
however, can count on his
votes for their interests.
"The man votes 100 per-
cent lockstep," she said.
Argenziano said she is al-
ready seeing attack mail
pieces from Smith's cam-
paign. Because she doesn't
have the money to respond
in kind, Argenziano instead
sends letters to the editor
hoping to get her point
across.
That's especially impor-
tant, she said, in Hernando


Rusnak blames lawmak-
ers for approving ballot lan-
guage the average person
can't understand.
"I think there are easier,
simpler, more direct ways
to get a point across than
what we are seeing in a
number of these amend-
ments," she said. "The lan-
guage is meant to confuse
and misdirect. I find that
reprehensible."
Edna Mattos, chair-
woman of the Citrus County
Tea Party Patriots, said leg-
islators should do a better
job explaining ballot
amendments to the public.
Right now, she said, the
task falls with organiza-
tions that dabble in politi-
cal issues.
"At the 11th hour, I will
get hundreds of emails:
'What should I do here?'"
she said. "People have to go
with their conscience."


County where her name is
not as known. District 34 in-
cludes about 16,000 voters
living west of the Suncoast
Parkway and north of State
Road 50.
"They could change a
race," she said.
Argenziano also wants to
challenge Smith to a series
of debates and she's hoping
community or civic organi-
zations will offer a venue.
"Put me in a room with
him for 10 minutes," she
said, "and I'll show that
he's a moron."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Dean said he offers to
help when people ask.
State Rep. Jimmie T Smith
responded to an interview
request by mailing a state-
ment saying his office
makes resources available
for voters asking about the
amendments.
Gill said she hopes voters
seek information from non-
partisan groups about the
amendments prior to
voting.
"I'm doing the best I can
to get information out about
this," she said. "I can't have
people calling up here and
asking about the amend-
ments. I have to be very
careful, too, about what we
say We don't have the time
to go through 11 amend-
ments with people."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Junky jalopy smart


buy for parents


New muffler and ex-
haust pipe, $400.
New tires, $700.
Third trip to find out why the
"check engine" light is still
on, $150. The mechanic is
thinking the engine may
need a head gasket. Esti-
mate: $1,200. Trade-in value
on old clunker? Priceless, in
the sense it has no value at
all, not in the sense that it is
worth a lot.
How do you decide when
to trade in a car? Maybe I've
made all the repairs and it
will run for another 98,000
miles. Or maybe this is just
the beginning,
and it will need
the new head gas-
ket and then a
new transmission
and then a new '
radiator, and then
the generator will
go out before
the thing stops
ru n n i ng
altogether
I'll never be MUL
able to sell it with
that check-engine light on.
The good news is sometimes
it goes off. Maybe I'll get
lucky and the light will be off
when I try to trade in the car
Would that be wrong? After
all, it has a new muffler and
new tires; someone would be
getting a practically new car.
Why do I have to go
through this every six or
seven years?
"Because you're too
cheap to buy something
new," says Sue. I'm sure she
meant to say "thrifty" or
"value-conscious," and it
just came out wrong. Why
buy something new when
you can get almost the same
car for much less if you let
someone else drive it
around for five or six years
to get the kinks out?
"You're just buying some-
one else's problems," she
says.
One of the problems that
came with my car was a stain
in the backseat that has a re-
markable resemblance to the
Shroud of Turin. It must have
been there when I bought it,
but it has slowly become
more visible over the years.
Is it a miracle, or did some-
one spill bleach back there? I
say it's sun damage; Sue's
theory is someone died back
there and the body wasn't
found for several weeks,
which is why I was able to
buy the car so cheap.


A better miracle would be
if the check-engine light
stayed off until I could sell
the car, but I guess we don't
get to pick and choose our
miracles. I'm pretty sure
there is little or no divine in-
terest in my automobile.
It's odd that 50 years from
now, a lot of people will want
my car. They will fix it up
with new and shiny parts,
they'll put in a new backseat,
they'll search junkyards to
replace the transmission,
and they'll go online to find
"authentic" hubcaps. They'll
show it off at antique car
shows, and the
neighborhood
kids will sneak a
peek through the
garage window to
ooh and ahh over
its classic lines.
But this future
antique has no
value now. It may
M even have nega-
tive value. When I
.LEN go to see how
much its trade-in
value is, I'm pretty sure the
guy will say, "We'll charge
you only two thousand to
take it" Which is crazy talk
This would make a fine
first car for a teenager -
some teenager who is good
with his hands and doesn't
expect to have many dates
with car-crazy girls. Did I
mention the new tires and
exhaust system? And since
there is absolutely no way he
could ever get a girl into that
disgusting backseat, his par-
ents might want to chip in,
seeing as it's a potential prob-
lem solver and the insurance
premium would be very low.
Parents who buy their kids
new cars aren't doing them
any favors. A used car will
teach teens how to become
problem solvers; it will teach
them basic car maintenance
and self-reliance. And if the
car is like mine, it can't go
much over 60 mph, so there's
a built-in safety factor. And
since the radio doesn't work,
it won't be a distraction.
Face it, if you really loved
your kids, you'd buy them
pieces of junk. So when you
see mine on the used-car lot,
don't think "someone else's
problem;" think, "a way to get
back at my sulky teenager"


Sept. 24 to 28 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
All meals include juice and milk variety.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots.
Tuesday: MVP breakfast, cereal variety
and toast, grits.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit,
cereal variety and toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon bun, cereal
variety and toast, grits.
Friday: No school; teacher work day.
Lunch
Monday: Mozarella maxstix, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, broccoli, applesauce.
Tuesday: Hot dog, uncrusted PBJ, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden salad, baked
beans, pears.
Wednesday: Spaghetti with ripstick, hot
ham and cheese on bun, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, peas, mixed fruit.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken, macaroni and cheese, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, green beans,
peaches.
Friday: No school; teacher work day.
Middle school
All meals include juice and milk variety.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater tots
and grits.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese bis-
cuit, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and
toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots.


Friday: No school; teacher work day.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and cheese sand-
wich, chicken and rice burrito, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, broccoli, mixed fruit.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets, macaroni
and cheese, ham super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, corn,
dried fruit mix.
Wednesday: Barbecue sandwich,
turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, baked beans, potato triangles, pears.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken, turkey super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, green
beans, potato roasters, applesauce.
Friday: No school; teacher work day.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater tots
and grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and cheese
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal and
toasts, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and cheese loco,
ultimate breakfast round, cereal and toast,
grits, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: No school; teacher work day.
Lunch
Monday: Roasted chicken with roll,
pizza, macaroni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, fresh broccoli, potato roast-
ers, broccoli, dried fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken, maxstix,
turkey and gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, ham
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, garden


salad, cold corn salad, potato triangles,
peas, celery, peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Cheesy chicken and rice
burrito, chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, pizza,
turkey salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, chilled baked beans, potato
triangles, mixed fruit, baked beans, juice,
milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with
ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich,
macaroni and cheese with ripstick, ham
super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, green beans, po-
tato triangles, applesauce, cucumbers,
celery, juice, milk.
Friday: No school; teacher work day.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Macaroni and cheese, green
peas, parslied carrots, pears, white bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sloppy Joe with seeded ham-
burger bun, mixed vegetables, potatoes
O'Brien, peaches, margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Blended juice, chicken
thigh, tomato pepper sauce, hot German
potato salad, Tuscan vegetables, slice
whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Meatballs with sweet and
sour sauce, coconut rice, green beans,
fruit salad, whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna salad, pea and cheese
salad, marinated broccoli salad, graham
crackers, two slices whole-grain bread
with mayonnaise, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto,
East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support Services at
352-527-5975.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Larry Bailey, who was rescued from Hurricane Isaac's floods in Slidell, La., on Aug. 30, sits
next to daughter Brenda LaFlamme, right, of the Orlando, Fla., area, the day they were
reunited after 16 years. With them are Red Cross Safe and Well volunteer Deborah Kemp,
in vest, who located Bailey's family, and Johnny Sontag of Slidell, who lets Bailey sleep in
a trailer he owns and found him there, bleeding and incoherent from an infected month-old
wound, several days after his rescue.



Family reunited


Red Cross finds

homeless man's

daughters

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS When
a Florida man saw a news
photo of a man rescued
from Hurricane Isaac's
floodwaters, he was sure it
was his brother It wasn't -
but the mistaken identity
started a search that ulti-
mately reunited that home-
less man with the two
daughters he hadn't seen in
16 years.
The saga began Aug. 30,
when The Associated Press
published a photograph of
the soaked, bearded man
being helped by two res-
cuers in Slidell after he
nearly drowned, swept away
in waist-deep water. Al-
though he has since been
identified as 60-year-old
Larry Bailey, his identity
was then unknown.
Marcus Michels of West
Melbourne, Fla., called the
AP's New Orleans bureau
on Aug. 31, certain the man
was his brother Mitchell
Lee Massey, who has been
missing for six years.
Red Cross search
The AP reached out to the
Louisiana Red Cross, where
a spokeswoman examined
the photo and was able to
figure out where the res-
cuers were based and the
nearest shelter in Slidell.
Debbie Kemp, a Red
Cross volunteer with Safe
and Well, a disaster program
that helps find people with
medical or mental health
problems, took up the


search. Kemp, of Ann Arbor,
Mich., called the number
Bailey had given at the shel-
ter and reached Johnny Son-
tag of Slidell, who gives
Bailey food for doing yard
work and lets Bailey stay in
a trailer he owns.
However, like so many
other times, Bailey wasn't at
the trailer Sontag said he
disappeared so often he had
a neighbor call him when-
ever Bailey returned.
Finally found
Days later, Sontag found
him, but Bailey took off
again. Someone Sontag
doesn't know who -
brought Bailey back to the
trailer, incoherent and
bleeding from a badly in-
fected head injury He
smelled terrible and was so
weak Sontag said he had to
bathe him.
Sontag called Kemp, who
told him to take Bailey to an
emergency room. Doctors
said Bailey would have been
dead in a month without
medical care, Sontag said.
As Bailey recovered, he
and Kemp called Michels
from the hospital, and it be-
came clear the two men
weren't related. However,
the search for Bailey's fam-
ily continued.
Family connections
As he regained his
strength, Bailey was able to
recall the names of relatives
and where they lived. Kemp
reached his ex-wife, who
told her daughters their fa-
ther had been found.
Bailey had struggled for
decades with bipolar disor-
der and substance abuse,
said his 38-year-old daugh-
ter, Heather Atkinson of
Bradenton, Fla. She said her
father had built a successful


yard business and a house,
but lost both to the alco-
holism that made her and
her sister stop seeing him.
"He was drinking and I
couldn't have my (1-year-
old) daughter around that,"
she said.
When she learned he had
been found, "I thought
maybe when he got out of the
hospital we could get him
into an addiction program,"
said Atkinson, who has three
teenage daughters.
Face to face
Bailey's other daughter,
Brenda LaFlamme, of the
Orlando, Fla., area, came to
Slidell on Sept 11, the day
Bailey was released from the
hospital. She soon signed
Bailey into a nursing home.
Atkinson said her father
told her his skull had been
fractured when he was
beaten by two men in New
Orleans about a month be-
fore the flood. He had been
treated in an emergency
room but not since, and the
injury got infected, she said.
Atkinson said she calls
Bailey daily, and he's shown
improvement.
"All of a sudden, he was
totally lucid. He said, 'It's so
good to hear from you.' He
said, 'I love you."'
After so many years apart,
that was overwhelming.
"He started tearing up. I
started tearing up. I said, 'I
love you, too. There's no
reason you have to be in this
situation. Make some life
choices and changes and
you can have your family
around."'
As for Michels, he re-
mained hopeful his brother
is still out there somewhere,
and said he was thrilled the
man in the photo had been
reunited with relatives.


Tragedy equaled major


money for N.Y. minister


Associated Press
NEW YORK Before the Sept. 11 at-
tacks, the Rev. Carl Keyes was a little-
known pastor of a small New York City
congregation searching for members and
money
When the twin towers fell, his fortunes
changed.
Donors poured $2.5 million into the min-
ister's charity to help 9/11 victims. Later,
he would collect at least another $2.3 mil-
lion more for relief efforts along the
hurricane-ravaged Gulf Coast, in the poor-
est corners of West Virginia and Ten-
nessee, and even in remote African
villages. Tens of millions more flowed
through his fingers from the sale of church
properties.
But Keyes, a one-time construction
worker, did more than help the needy with
the millions donated -he helped himself.
According to financial records, internal
correspondence and interviews with for-
mer employees conducted by The Associ-
ated Press, Keyes blurred the lines
between his two charities, his ministry and
his personal finances while promoting
himself as an international humanitarian:
Keyes diverted large sums donated for
9/11 and Hurricane Katrina into his cash-
starved church, and then used charity and
church money to pay hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in personal credit card
bills and other debts, documents show.
He failed for years to file required
federal and state reports showing how
much money his charities received and
spent.


Associated Press
The Rev. Carl Keyes speaks to an audience
March 3, 2010, in Harrisonburg, Va., about
his life experiences relating to his
organization, Aid for the World.

The minister used a big donation
meant for one of his charities to clear a
mortgage on his family's house, according
to an accountant who told Keyes he was
quitting, in part because of the transaction.
And, when his congregation sold its
19th-century church in midtown Manhat-
tan for $31 million, he and his friends ben-
efited. For example, $950,000 of the
proceeds was used to buy his family a
country home near the Delaware River in
New Jersey Another $1 million went to
support one of his charities, which spent
more on failed, lavish fundraisers than on
promised programs in Africa.


Family wants answers on missing girl


Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, WVa. Her mother is
in prison for welfare fraud. Her stepfather
is lying low. Her six siblings, some just in-
fants, are in the custody of child welfare
authorities. And Aliayah Lunsford, the
brown-eyed 3-year-old who vanished from
her West Virginia home a year ago Monday,
is still missing.
In the year since Aliayah disappeared


from her family's rented house in the Ben-
dale section of Lewis County, Bowen has
concluded the girl is probably dead,
though she avoids using the word.
"But we still need to know,"Aliayah's great-
aunt Vickie Bowen said. Aliayah's mother,
Lena Lunsford, told police her daughter was
in bed, wearing purple pajama pants and a
pink sweat shirt, at 6:30 a.m. Sept 24, 2011.
But she said the child was missing when she
checked on her a few hours later


ATTENTION


BUSINESS OWNERS

I Improve Your Performance I Enhance Your Marketing
I Beat the Competition by Attending Score's Small Business Institute

Program Begins Tuesday, October 2nd!

6- 8 p.m. Building 3, Room 202
College of Central Florida
3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
SCORE in partnership with CF is pleased to offer the Small Business Institute again.
Sessions are $25 each or $100 for the entire program. Individuals who complete the program
will receive a certificate plus a coupon for $100 for future advertising in the Citrus
County Chronicle.





Tuesdays- 2 One Hr. Sessions 6pm 8pm

Tuesday, October 2nd 6-7pm Increasing Profits *7-8pm Measuring Results
Tuesday, October 9th 6-7pm Solving Problems for More Money 7-8pm Projecting Profit Improvements
Tuesday, October 16th 6-7pm Research for Profits 7-8pm Sales Through Marketing & Market Media
Tuesday, October 23rd 6-7pm Continuous Improvement For Greater Profits 7-8pm Profit Planning & Summary

FREE Open Round Table Discussions with Facilitator
Every Thursday of October 6pm 8pm For Attendees


To Register or for more information contact
Dale Maim of SCORE at 352-249-1236.

www.scorecitrus.org
Click on Small Business Institue link




SC ORE College of Central Florida CHRONi.CL
Counselors to America's Small Business CFItraining.cf.edu .ww.chroieonie.cm


NATION


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 A9











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFSr

hool r rProtests reveal frailty of Libya
test for Emanuel ....


CHICAGO The grueling
teachers strike is over. Now
S comes the
-.'. hard part
for Chicago
Mayor
?Rahm
Emanuel.
As he
pushes
'Ram ahead on
Rahm
Emanuel his promise
to reform
the city's underperforming
classrooms, he faces several
daunting tasks: slashing an
estimated $1 billion budget
deficit, confronting a woefully
underfunded employee pen-
sion system and finding
money for the pay raises that
settled the first teacher walk-
out in a generation. He hasn't
ruled out school closings and
tax increases, both of which
would be hugely unpopular.
Waiting in the wings are
other unions, including police
and firefighters, whose labor
contracts have expired and
who no doubt took notes as the
teachers stood up to the former
White House chief of staff with
the fearsome reputation.

N.Y. man: I wanted
to be with tiger
NEW YORK -A man who
was mauled by a tiger at the
Bronx Zoo is facing arrest
after telling investigators he
wanted "to be one" with the
400-pound beast, police said
Saturday.
David Villalobos also
claimed despite his serious
injuries, he was able to pet
the tiger before zookeepers
came to his rescue, said New
York Police Department
spokesman Paul Browne.
Browne said based on a
complaint from the zoo and
his own admissions, the hos-
pitalized Villalobos would be
arrested and charged with
trespassing.

World BRIEFS

Drink up


Associated Press
A man dressed in traditional
Bavarian clothes wears a
decorated hat with hops,
prior to the opening
of the famous Bavarian
"Oktoberfest" beer festival
in front of a beer tent during
heavy rain Saturday in
Munich, southern Germany.
The world's largest beer fes-
tival will be from Sept. 22 to
Oct. 7.


Syrian rebels move
command post
BEIRUT Leaders of the
rebel Free Syrian Army said Sat-
urday they moved their com-
mand center from Turkey to
Syria with the aim of uniting
rebels and speeding up the fall
of President BasharAssad's
regime.
Brig. Gen. Mustafa al-
Sheikh, who heads the FSA's
Military Council, told The As-
sociated Press the group
made the move last week.
He would not say where the
new headquarters is located
or give other details.
The FSA is the most
prominent of the rebel groups
trying to topple Assad,
though its authority over net-
works of fighters in Syria is
limited. Its commanders have
been criticized for being
based in Turkey while thou-
sands are killed inside Syria.
Despite the announcement
of the command move,
rebels still have to rely on
Turkey as a rear base for
supplies and reinforcements.
-From wire reports


Authorities try to

stem anger against

militia groups

Associated Press
BENGHAZI, Libya Residents
of Libya's second-largest city
warned on Saturday of a "revolu-
tion" to get rid of armed militias and
Islamic extremists after protests
spurred in part by the killing of the
U.S. ambassador left four dead in
an unprecedented eruption of pub-
lic frustration.
In a sign of how weak the coun-
try's post-Moammar Gadhafi lead-
ership remains, authorities tried to
stem popular anger, pleading some


of the militias are needed to keep
the country safe since the police
and army are incapable of doing so.
A mass protest Friday against
militias against the compounds of
several armed groups in Benghazi
lasted into early Saturday, as thou-
sands stormed the headquarters of
Ansar al-Shariah, an Islamic ex-
tremist group suspected in the Sept
11 attack on the U.S. Consulate.
They drove out the Ansar gunmen
and set fire to cars in the compound
- once a major base for Gadhafi's
feared security forces and then
moved onto the base of a second Is-
lamist militia, the Rafallah Sahati
Brigade. Brigade fighters opened
fire to keep the protesters at bay
The state news agency said four
protesters were killed and 70 in-
jured in the overnight violence.
No new protests occurred Satur-


day, but the city of 1 million in east-
ern Libya was brimming with anger,
rumors and conspiracy theories.
Bodies of six soldiers were found
in the morning dumped on the out-
skirts of the city, shot through the
forehead and their hands cuffed,
state TV reported. An army colonel
was reported missing, feared
kidnapped.
Some militiamen bitterly accused
Gadhafi loyalists of fueling the
protests. Some media reports ac-
cused militiamen of taking revenge
on Gadhafi-era veterans in the mil-
itary, while military spokesman Ali
al-Shakhli blamed Gadhafi
loyalists.
Backers of the ousted regime con-
tinue to hold sway in some parts of
the country, particularly the west-
ern city of Bani Walid and parts of
the deep south.


Ocean exercise


Associated Press
A U.S. Navy boat is lowered Saturday to the sea from the deck of the USS Ponce, a floating base to support mine
countermeasure operations, in the Persian Gulf.


US Navy's new floating base gets a workout in


Associated Press
ABOARD THE USS PONCE -
After winning a reprieve from the
scrapyard, a key addition to
American-led naval efforts to en-
sure Mideast oil keeps flowing has
emerged as an unusual mix of a
ship combining decades' worth of
wear and tear with state-of-the-art
technology and a largely civilian
crew.
The USS Ponce was reborn
through a rush retrofit earlier this
year and turned into a floating base
prowling the waters of the Persian
Gulf. It is now getting its biggest
workout since refurbishment as
the centerpiece for sweeping naval
exercises under way that serve as
a very public warning to Iran. The
Islamic Republic has threatened to
shut the Gulf's entrance at the
Strait of Hormuz, the route for a
fifth of the world's oil supplies and
would likely use mines to do so.
Anti-mine divers on practice
drills deployed in small boats off
the Ponce's stern gate early Satur-
day, and MH-53 minesweeping hel-
icopters launched from the ship
kicked up sea spray as they hauled
mine-detecting equipment through
the water Later in the day, a U.S.
destroyer pulled alongside, fighter
jets roared past and gunners fired
thunderous rounds from.50 caliber


machine guns during a simulated
encounter with a hostile vessel.
Senior Navy officials in the Gulf
are quick to downplay talk of con-
flict with Iran, which is locked in a
dispute with the U.S. and its allies
over Tehran's disputed nuclear
program. The West suspects Iran
aims to develop a nuclear weapon;
Tehran denies the charges.
U.S. military officials in the re-
gion insist the exercises, which in-
clude forces from more than 30
countries, are defensive and not di-
rected at any country They prefer
to focus instead on the Ponce's role
as an innovative new tool to help
ensure security in the region, and
on the need to train with allies to
keep sea lanes open.
Still, the message is clear
"Any extremist group, any coun-
try that puts mines in the water
would be cautioned" by the exer-
cises, said Marine Gen. James R.
Mattis, the U.S. Central Command
chief, during his first visit onboard
the Ponce since it deployed June 1.
"We do have the means to take
mines out of the water if they go in.
We will open the waterways to free-
dom of navigation."
Military leaders believe the Nor-
folk, Va.-based Ponce is central to
that mission.
More than half the length of most
U.S. aircraft carriers, the Ponce


Gulf


Associated rress
U.S. Navy sailor Stormie Chandler,
of New Mexico, scans the sea from
aboard the USS Ponce, a floating
base to support mine countermeasure
operations, in the Persian Gulf on
Saturday.
can accommodate multiple heli-
copters on deck and small boats in
a well deck below.
The ship was originally an am-
phibious transport dock built at the
height of the Vietnam War. Those
types of vessels are typically used
to carry landing forces of Marines.


Associated Press
Members of the Rafallah Sahati
Islamic Militia Brigades stand on
alert Saturday in front their base in
Benghazi, Libya.


Spaceport


built, but


who will


come, fly?

Questions arise

about viability

ofspace travel
Associated Press
TRUTH OR CONSE-
QUENCES, N.M. New
Mexico Tourism Secretary
Monique Jacobson said it
will be New Mexico's Syd-
ney Opera House. Virgin
Galactic Chairman Richard
Branson has hinted it will
host the first of his new
brand of lifestyle hotels.
And the eclectic hot springs
town of Truth or Conse-
quences has been anxiously
awaiting all the economic
development the nearly
quarter-of-a-billion-dollar
project is supposed to bring
to this largely rural part of
southern New Mexico.
But as phase one of Space-
port America, the world's
first commercial port built
specifically for sending
tourists and payloads into
space, is nearing comple-
tion, the only new hotel proj-
ect that has been finalized is
a Holiday Inn Express here
in Truth or Consequences,
about 25 miles away And
three key companies with
millions of dollars in payroll
have passed on developing
operations in the state.
The lagging development,
along with competition from
heavy hitters such as
Florida and Texas, is raising
new questions about the vi-
ability of the $209 billion
taxpayer-funded project -
as well as the rush by so
many states to grab a piece
of the commercial spaceport
pie. To date, nine spaceports
are planned around the
United States, mostly at ex-
isting airports, and another
10 have been proposed, ac-
cording to a recent report
from the New Mexico
Spaceport Authority.
"Right now, the industry
is not there to support it,"
Alex Ignatiev, a University
of Houston physics profes-
sor and adviser to space
companies, said of the list of
planned and proposed
spaceports across America.


GM offers big discounts to boost Volt sales


Sales of the
Volt set a
monthly
record of
2,800 in
August,
mostly
because of
steep
discounts
to the
$40,000
car, which
is Chevy's
electric
version.
Associated Press


LCHIViDL.


TOM KRISHER
APAuto Writer
DETROIT General Mo-
tors rolled out the Chevrolet
Volt two years ago with lofty
sales goals and the promise of
a new technology that some-
day would help end Amer-
ica's dependence on oil.
So it seemed like a good
thing in August when sales
of the $40,000 car set a
monthly record of 2,800. But
a closer look shows things
aren't what they seem for
the cutting-edge car


Sales rose mostly because
of discounts of almost
$10,000, or 25 percent of the
Volt's sticker price, accord-
ing to figures from True
Carcom, an auto pricing
website. Other pricing serv-
ices gave similar numbers,
and dealers confirmed
steeply discounted Volts are
selling better than a few
months ago.
GM's discounts on the Volt
are more than four times the
industry's per-vehicle aver-
age, according to TrueCar
estimates. Edmunds.com


and J.D. Power and Associ-
ates say they're about three
times the average. Discounts
include low-interest financ-
ing, cash discounts to buy-
ers, sales bonuses to dealers,
and subsidized leases.
Americans have been
slow to embrace electric
cars. But the Volt's August
sales show they're willing to
buy if prices are low
enough. Even so, electrics
have a long way to go before
they enter the mainstream
and make money for car
companies.


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EXCURSIONS


* Veterans
Notes can
be found on
Page A13 of
today's
Chronicle.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


AMID CULTURAL CLASH,
FRANCE'S LOUVRE
OPENS NEW WING


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THOMAS ADAMSON
Associated Press


--PARIS
n its boldest
development in a
generation, the
Louvre Museum has a
new wing dedicated to
SIslamic art, a nearly $130
million project that comes
at a tense time between
the West and the
Muslim world.

Louvre curators tout their new Islamic
Art department, which took 11 years to
build and opens to the public on Satur-
Sday, as a way to help bridge cultural di-
vides. They say it offers a highbrow and
respectful counterpart to the recent un-
flattering depictions of the Prophet
Muhammad in Western media that have
sparked protests by many Muslims.
Still, one of the Louvre's own consult-
S ants acknowledged that some Muslims
could be "shocked" by three images of
Muhammad with his face exposed in the
new wing. Many Muslims believe the
prophet should not be depicted at all -
even in a flattering way- because it
Might encourage idolatry.
The galleries provide a needed show-
S- case for one of the West's most extensive
S Islamic art collections, some 18,000 arti-
.facts that range from the 7th century to
the 19th century
But the wing does not dwell on the old:
It is housed under a futuristic, undulat-
ing glass roof designed by architects
Rudy Ricciotti and Mario Bellini that has
garnered comparisons to a dragonfly
wing, a flying carpet, even a wind-blown
veil. It marks the Louvre's biggest change
since I.M. Pei shook up the famed Paris
museum with his iconic glass pyramid
in 1989.
France, meanwhile, was bracing for
possible disruptions at embassies across
the Muslim world after the French satiri-
cal weekly Charlie Hebdo published
lewd caricatures of Muhammad. The
publication raised concerns that French
interests could face violent protests like
the ones targeting the United States over
a video produced in California that
ridiculed the prophet Those protests left
at least 30 people dead.
But could the new museum wing
actually be good timing?
The Louvre collection's mission is to
foster understanding between the West
and the Islamic world. Instead of high-
lighting Islam as one united religion, it


celebrates the secular, tolerant and
cultural aspects of different Islamic
civilizations.
Sophie Makariou, head of the Louvre's
Islamic art department, hopes the new
wing will teach lessons about tolerance
and diversity.
"I like the idea of showing the other
side of the coin," said Makariou, standing
at a wall decorated with colorful, flower-
patterned tiles from the Ottoman Empire
in the 16th century. "We are talking about
a diverse world that goes from the
Atlantic, Spain and Morocco to India. It
brings complexity
"We are suffering from simplistic views
of the Islamic world. (Some) would make
us believe that there is just one Islam,
which is just not true."
Indeed, an intricately engraved bronze
lion from 13th century Spain stands
proudly alongside a rare modeled-stucco
head of a prince from medieval Iran. The
works presented were made not just by
Muslims, but by Christian and Jewish
artists as well.
In a sign of the political importance of
the new collection, French President
Francois Hollande attended an opening
ceremony Tuesday, calling it a "political
gesture in the service of respect for
peace." Saudi Prince Waleed Bin Talal
and the president ofAzerbaijan
accompanied him.
"The best weapons for fighting fanati-
cism that claims to be coming from Islam
are found in Islam itself," Hollande said.
"What more beautiful message than that
demonstrated here by these works?"
The Louvre opened a department of Is-
lamic art in 2003, under former President
Jacques Chirac, who said he wanted to
highlight the contributions of Muslim
civilizations to Western culture.
Chirac, who vigorously opposed the
U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, constantly
pushed for the idea of a "dialogue of cul-
tures" to break down misunderstandings
between the West and the Muslim world.
The collection's organizer decided to
include images of Muhammad to show
the evolution of Islamic art In one in-
stance, he appears as a veiled character
in a 16th century manuscript And in a
multimedia projection, Muhammad is
shown in three separate images with his
face exposed something almost
unheard of today
"I think Muslims will be shocked," said
Charlotte Maury, a historical consultant
for the Louvre. "That's why we put it on
the side."
"We felt we had to use them, to illus-
trate (Islamic) history the way we see it,"
she said.
Maury said Muhammad's face was only
covered up in Islamic art starting in the
15th century, when Muslim scholars de-
cided to interpret the veiled figure as a
more respectful image.


Associated Press
Detail of a 4th century Ivory box made for the youngest son of the caliph Abd al-
Rahman III, displayed at the Louvre museum in Paris. The Louvre is unveiling its new
wing and galleries dedicated to the arts of Islam, and new dragonfly-shaped building
marking the museum's greatest development since the iconic glass pyramid
constructed 20 years ago.


A member of the media walks past mosaics displayed at the Louvre.


Rock of Gibraltar

This photo of a Barbary macaque was snapped at the Rock of Gibraltar
by Nate Mishov. He was touring the Costa del Sol, Spain, with John Mishov,
Lyn Floyd and Jane Gibson.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


___


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A12 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


Child, parent


should share debt


SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D : Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
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S**7 "Broken Flowers"(2005, Comedy-Drama) **m "Piranha"(2010) Elisabeth "Botched"(2007) Stephen Dorff. "Blubberella"(2011)
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S1 "2 Fast 2 Furious" (2003 Action) Paul "The Hangover" (2009, Comedy) Bradley *** "The Hangover" (2009 Comedy) Bradley
48 33 48 31 34 Walker, Tyrese, Eva Mendes.'PG-13' m Cooper, Ed Helms.'R' (DVS) Cooper, Ed Helms.'R' (DVS)
(ITiOO 38 58 38 33 ** "Planet51"(2009, Comedy)'PG' Dragons Ben 10 Venture |King/Hill KinHill Fam.GuyFam.Guy Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 All You Can Eat Toy Hntr IToyHntr Tricked Out Trailers Extreme RV's'G' Extreme RV's'G' Extreme RV's'G'
IitruTl 25 55 25 98 55 Wipeout'PG' Wipeout PG' Wipeout 'PG' W Wipeout 'PG' Tow Tow World's Dumbest...
CTVyt 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H'PG' MASH Raymond Raymond RaymondRaymond Ramond Kin
NCIS Reopened inves- NCIS "Toxic" (In Stereo) NCIS "Legend"'14' NCIS "Legend"'14' NCIS The team tries to White Collar "Vested
S 47 32 47 17 18 tigation.'PG' 'PG' B replace Ziva. 14' Interest"'PG'B
Bridezillas "Remy & Bridezillas "Jennifer & Bridezillas "Jennifer & Bridezillas"Minyon & Bridezillas (N) '14' Tamar & Vince "Meet
WEl 117 69 117 Blanca"'14' Blanca"'14' Minyon"'14' Christine" theHerberts"
(WGN-AI 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Bloopers! Mother Mother Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay 30 Rock 30 Rock


D ear Annie: My
daughter, "Gina,"
was the first one in
our family to go to college.
Of course, we all were
proud. She chose a school
that was rather pricey, but
she had some scholarships
and loans. She graduated
last year.
In college, Gina
needed me to be
a co-signer on her
loan. Now I am
discovering the
cost of doing so.
Gina did not get a .
job right after
graduation, and
her bills have
come due in a big
way The loan
companies are
demanding their
money and are ANN
going to start tap- MAIL
ping Gina's
wages. She makes
just enough to get by as it is.
I understand the loan
companies are due their
money, but they are not will-
ing to work with Gina so she
can pay an affordable
amount each month. I as-
sume they will get around to
going after my wages, as
well, and I can't afford that,
either, since I am a sole
homeowner with my own
bills.
Now I know why college is
so unaffordable for most
people. I worry for my
daughter and am not sure
what to do. Stressed in
Pennsylvania
Dear Stressed: We spoke
with Gail Cunningham, vice
president of Membership
and Public Relations at the
National Foundation for
Credit Counseling. She said
to first be sure that the


Today s MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"House at the End of the Street"
(PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"End of Watch" (R) ID required.
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.
In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.
4:30 p.m.
"Finding Nemo" (G) In 3D.
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"The Possession" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9
564-6864
"End of Watch" (R) ID required.
1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Dredd" (R) 4:30 p.m.


"Dredd" (R) In 3D. 1:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes
"House at the End of the Street"
(PG-13) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Trouble with the Curve"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.
1:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.
In 3D. 4:50 p.m. No passes.
"Finding Nemo" (G) In 3D.
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Lawless" (R) ID required.
1:45 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America"
(PG-13) 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Earthen jar
6 Merman or
Barrymore
11 Condition
16 Kind of printer
21 Variety show
22 Hindu deity
23 Float
24 Pointed arch
25 Foreigner
26 Church doctrine
27 Wrongly
28 Solid figures
29 Beige
30 "Wild Wild-
31 Pull
33 Hidden supply
35 Skill
36 Ogled
38 100 square
meters
39 Spy org.
40 From - Z
41 "-a boy!"
42 Goes wrong
44 Pilot's place
48 Indian of
New Mexico
51 Insufficient
54 'American Beauty'
55 Legal wrong
57 Package
61 Taut
62 The greater
number of
63 Sober
65 Crystal-filled rock
66 Appraise
67 Acrobat's garment
70 Spring time
72 Today
73 Employ
74 Gifts for the needy
75 School subj.
77 Danger
79 Neighbor of Ore.
80 Part of MIT
82 Playfully shy
83 Rare
85 Ladybug
87 AGreat Lake
89 Kind of coat or jacket
90 Cup handle
91 English measure
92 Fabled creature
94 Knocked
96 Keep out


97 Jason's ship
100 Animal with horns
101 Recoil
104 Cul-de---
105 Run off in a hurry
106 Monk's title
107 Wane
108 Piece of furniture
110 What is actual
112 Beef
113 Aids and-
116 Handle
118 Betsy or Diana
119 Fruity beverage
120 Desert illusion
122 Best or Ferber
123 Greedy cry
124 Mad tea-party guest
125 Von Bismarck
127 Brainy one
129 Silent performer
130 Mil. rank
133 Liquor
135 Print measures
136 Pan of a kind
137 Adroit
141 Color
142 Gold or silver, e.g.
144 Devilkin
145 Green gem
146 Lanka
147 Diplomat
149 Native of Zagreb
151 -couture
153 State in India
155 Smell
156 Roper's rope
157 Bury
158 State of dishonor
159 Gear parts
160 Sing a certain way
161 Austere
162 Nervous (with "up")


DOWN
1 Jalopy
2 Pass along
3 Of lambs and ewes
4 Pool stick
5 Barbie's ex
6 Organic
compounds
7 A pronoun
8 Clue
9 Holiday time
10 Crisscross
structure


George Bernard -
Male animal
Rara -
Seed layer
Artificial and
inferior
- Ness
In the past
Biblical mount
Turn inside out
Sleeps
Cautious
Wood for flooring
Broth
Thickly populated
- del Sol
Itinerary (abbr.)
Fees
Liq. measures
Jot
Certain hunter
Pester
Wrath
Walk proudly
- and desist
Waiting room
Capacious
Grow weary
Bogus
Failed Ford
Part of AWOL
Cantaloupe
Movie-set VIP (abbr.)
Concise
Sums up, for short
Genetics letters
Freedom
Where Mount Olympus
is
Allow
Embrace
Ocean
Low fellow
Time
Tier
Go before
Grains for brewing
Reverie
Jewish spiritual leader
Golf standard
Idaho city
Kelly or Jones
Western
Believe it or -!
Remedy
Golden-haired
Suspend
Operatic songs


Toned down
Chinese "way"
Police rank (abbr.)
Playground game
Cram
Raison d'-
City in Tennessee
Walk
Loud complaint
- and haw


Up-to-date
Thorax
Small amount
Dike
Batali or
Van Peebles
Irrigate
Composition
Supporting
structure


Used an hourglass
Traditional story
Burden
Type style (abbr.)
Fiber plant
Prov. in Canada
Consumed
Insect
Invite
That girl


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


threat of garnishment is
real, since many states do
not allow it. Here are her
further recommendations:
Since both you and your
daughter are responsible
for the debt, but neither can
make the full payment, con-
sider splitting it. Although
money is tight, a shared bur-
den lessens it
When a collec-
tor calls, ask to
speak to a super-
visor. Explain
-0 why you are be-
hind in payments
and your plan to
resolve the situa-
tion. It is impor-
tant to have a
workable plan to
present and not
to make any
IE'S promises you
BOX can't keep. The
collector's goal is
to get as much
money as he or she can, so it
may appear that they're not
going to budge. However, it
is critical that you stick to
your plan, as doing other-
wise will only lead to more
problems.
You may want to consult
with a counselor at an
NFCC Member agency by
calling 1-800-388-2227 or
going online to www.Debt
Advice.org.


Annie's Mailbox is written
byKathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions
to anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All pro-
ceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
The Nature Coast All Vet-
erans Reunion for 2012 is
looking for diversified vendors
for Oct. 15 through Oct. 21 for
the reunion, to be at the Holcim
Corp. Red Level location on
U.S. 19, just north of County
Road 488. The event is to
honor the Vietnam Traveling
Wall, the Purple Heart Memo-
rial, Korean War Memorial, the
Moving Tribute and veterans
from all conflicts from World
War II on.
There will be no duplicate
vendors. A 10-foot by 10-foot
space is $175. A 15-foot by 15-
foot space is $250. Larger lots
are $1.25 per square foot.
Power is $35 additional and
those spaces are limited. All
prices subject to a 6 percent
sales tax. Vendor generators
permitted with prior approval.
Extension cords are not fur-
nished. Applications must be
received by Sept. 31. Call
Richard Mass at 352-726-8877,
or email at richardmass@
tampabay.rr.com for approval.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort). Reservations should
be made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-5131,
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Lunch-
eon for Military Women will
take place at noon Monday,
Nov. 12, at the Crystal River
Woman's Clubhouse, 320 N.
Citrus Ave, Crystal River. Those
who have never received an in-
vitation in the past may call
Leslie Martineau at 352-
746-2396 to be added to the
mailing list.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service-
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.
* Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast


Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities


and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the na-
tional service organization,
Yoga For Vets. Free classes to
combat veterans are offered by
her at several locations and
times. Call 352-382-7397.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
North. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty
and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call Cmdr. Michael
Klyap Jr. at 352-302-6096, or
email him at mklyap@
gmail.com. Call the post at
352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
On Wednesday, Sept. 26,
from 5 to 6:30 p.m., Swiss
steak is on the menu for dinner.
Everyone is welcome to come
and enjoy the dinner with their
friends and families for a dona-
tion of $7 for each. All profits
from the dinner will go to sup-
port the many programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter


for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.


Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. WiFi available at
the post for free.
The post is a nonsmoking fa-
cility; smoking is allowed on the
porch. Information regarding
any post events is available at
the post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the


OFFSHORE
FISHIrjGCHARVERS
Cspr DsnC C,,sr',R.e, r
GROUPER IS OPEN
$15000



352-422-4640,,,
split Charters Can Be Arranged
wietw ,wp j.'i Ht '. *" i nr


items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday. The
public is welcome at bingo at 6
p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email at ultraray1997
@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW


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Call for dates & details. 352-597-4822* Toll Free: 1-877-604-4822


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Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampabay.
rr.com. Call or visit the post for
regular and special events, as
well as meetings. Google us at
VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6. The
public is welcome at the Oct. 21
flea market beginning at 7 a.m.
Outside space is $5 (bring a
table) and inside space is $10.
Call the post at 726-3339 to re-
serve space. Proceeds benefit
the Cancer Aid & Research
Foundation.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City.


For information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at
1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly. Any veteran who has
seen honorable service in any
of the Armed Forces of the U.S.
is eligible for membership if
said service was within Korea,
including territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said

See VETERANS/Page A14


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A14 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


Learn history
from a veteran
Students in Citrus and sur-
rounding counties can learn
history from a veteran when the
Vietnam Traveling Memorial
Wall, Florida Purple Heart
Mural Memorial and Korean
War Memorial will be on display
Sunday, Oct. 14, to Sunday,
Oct. 21. Escorted tours are free
to class groups from public and
private schools or home-
schooled students. Military
displays will also highlight the
Nature Coast All Veterans
Reunion.
The war memorials will be
open to the public 24 hours a
day at the reunion site on the
Holcim property on U.S. 19,
seven miles north of Crystal
River. The event is hosted by
American Legion Post 225 and
sponsored by Holcim Corp., the
Citrus County Chronicle and
Military Order of the Purple
Heart.
A veterans' reunion and cele-
bration will be Friday, Oct. 19 to
Sunday, Oct. 21. There will be
booths with representatives
from nonprofit veterans' groups
and food, drinks, crafts vendors



VETERANS
Continued from Page A13

service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915 for information about
the post and auxiliary.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage, and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-697-1749. Your
call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the


40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,


and live music. Parking and ad-
mission are free.
For more information,
call Richard Hunt at 407-
579-6190, Tom Gallagher at
352-860-1629, Lee Helscel at
352-238-5692 or visit www.
NatureCoastAIIVeterans
Reunion.org.

Center helps troops,
victims of crime
The Center for Victim Rights
and Wear to Go! consignment
are teaming up again to help
out U.S. troops overseas and
crime victims at home.
Needed supplies are small-
size toothpaste, shampoo,
conditioner, soap, tooth-
brushes, mouthwash, combs,
dental floss, hand-held games,
game books (word search,
sudoku, etc. and other such
items to send to the troops
overseas. Cell phones also are
still being collected.
Items can be dropped off at
Wear to Go! In Times Square
Plaza, 3802 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
For more information, call
Cynthia at 352-628-6481 at The
Center for Victim Rights.


spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for
information about the post.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at
352-860-1629 for information
and directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Oct. 13, Nov.
10 and Dec. 8.


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Deas


Allen and Beverly Dea
celebrated their 60th
wedding anniversary on
Sept. 27, 2012.
The couple were mar-
ried Sept. 27, 1952, at the
Chestnut Street Congrega-
tional Church in Worch-
ester, Mass. Allen was an
application engineer and
Beverly was a medical sec-
retary Formerly of Worch-
ester and Martha's


Vineyard, they retired to
Beverly Hills in 1999.
The Deas have two chil-
dren: Peter (Cathy) Dea of
Golden, Colo., and John
Dea of Winter Park. They
have two grandchildren:
Michelle and Joshua Dea
of Olney, Md.
They celebrated at a
reunion with family and
friends on Martha's
Vineyard.


In SERVICE


Kelsey West
Air Force Airman Kelsey
Alyse West graduated from
basic military training at Lack-
land Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive,
eight-week
program that
included
training in
military disci-
pline and
studies, Air
Force core
Kelsey values, phys-
Alyse West
Alyse West ical fitness,
U.S. Air Force an asi
and basic
warfare prin-
ciples and skills. Airmen who
complete basic training earn
four credits toward an associ-
ate in applied science degree
through the Community Col-
lege of the Air Force.
She is the daughter of
Cathy Pollock of Beverly Hills
and granddaughter of Joan
and Milton Pollock Jr. of Mid-
dleton, Mass. She graduated
in 2012 from Lecanto High
School.

Caleb Sanders
Air Force Airman Caleb R.
Sanders graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an


intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical fit-
ness, and basic warfare princi-
ples and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the
Air Force.
Sanders is the son of Tina
Sanders of Dunnellon. He is a
2011 graduate of Crystal River
High School.
Melody Cubero
Army Pvt. Melody R.
Cubero has graduated from
basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradition
and core values, physical fit-
ness, and received instruction
and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chem-
ical warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony,
marching, rifle marksmanship,
armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, mili-
tary courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot
marches, and field training
exercises.
Cubero is the daughter of
Kerri Surber of Inverness. She
is a 2010 graduate of Citrus
High School.


Divorces 9/10/12 to 9/16/12
Tonia Arnette, Hernando vs.
Kenneth F. Arnette, Inverness
Bakary M. Baradji,
Inverness vs. Christine A.
Baradji, Hernando
Jeremy B. Fergerson, Inglis
vs. Heather E. Fergerson,
Citrus Springs
Gerald J. Harper, Bellevue,
Pa. vs. Gina A. Giordano,
Floral City
Ashley E. Heymans,
Homosassa vs. Christopher
C. Heymans, Homosassa
Steven L. Schmitt, Beverly
Hills vs. Kathleen D. Schmitt,
Beverly Hills
Marriages 9/10/12 to 9/16/12
James Christopher Cross,
Inverness/Jeralyn Ashleigh
Henderson, Inverness
David Douglas Dunham II,
Inverness/Laura Katherine
Dunham, Inverness
Billy Franks Jr., Atlanta,
Ga./Kim Louise Martinez,


Beverly Hills
Alexander Earl Marsh,
Floral City/Ashlei Nichole
Smith, Floral City
Gary Raymond Maser,
Floral City/Rhonda Kay
Merrifield, Floral City
John Edward Popp,
Crystal River/Diane Colson
Weiss, Crystal River
John Edwin Scianni,
Inverness/Brittany Nicole
Lovell, Inverness
Jonathon Michael Vargulish,
Homosassa/Brianna Kaitlin
Springer, Winterhaven
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the
clerk at 352-341-6400.


58th ANNIVERSARY

The Millses


Claude and Carolyn
Mills of Citrus Springs cel-
ebrated their 58th anniver-
sary Sept. 18, 2012.
The couple were mar-
ried at Lutheran Epiphany
Church in Detroit on Sept
18, 1954. They met on a
blind date.
Carolyn is a former dou-
ble gold medal figure
skater and toured the U.S.
with the Skating Vanities.
She also worked as a Fort
Lauderdale AAA travel
counselor for 10 years.
Claude is a World War II
Air Force veteran, a re-
tired sheet metal journey-
man and did refrigeration
in Saudi Arabia. He has a
private pilot's license.
The Millses moved to
Fort Lauderdale in 1968,


where they lived for 21
years.
They moved to Citrus
Springs in 1989 and were
very involved with Yankee
Air Force at Dunnellon
Airport for 10 years.
They currently volunteer
with the Military Order of
the Purple Heart Aaron
Weaver Chapter 776 and
American Legion Post 225
Floral City, as well as the
VFW Post Auxiliary 4864 in
Citrus Springs.
They had two children: a
daughter, Colleen Dawn,
who is deceased, and
Claude Wayne (Geri and
grandson Jesse), who live
in Stuart.
Their extended family
consists of two grandchil-
dren and a great-grandson.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The St. Jeans


Robert and Jo-Ann St.
Jean of Crystal River will
celebrate their 50th
wedding anniversary on
Sept 29, 2012.
The couple were mar-
ried Sept. 29, 1962, in Cen-
tral Falls, R.I. Both retired,
Jo-Ann was a teacher's
aide in Colchester, Conn.,
and Robert was a manager
at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft
in Hartford, Conn. They
have lived in Citrus County
for 17 years.
They have four children


- Seborah Saiha and
Susan St. Jean of Edge-
wood, N.M.; Jill Holmes of
Trumbull, Conn.; and Jay
St. Jean of Wallingford,
Conn. They have four
grandsons and four grand-
daughters: Tyler, Mathew,
Bradley, Chandler, Sydney,
Morganne, Grace and Han-
nah.
The St. Jeans celebrated
in June at a party with fam-
ily and friends, given by
daughter Jill and son-in-
law Philip Holmes.


:Engagement

Black/Baker


Cliff and June Black of
Inverness have announced
the engagement and ap-
proaching marriage of
their daughter, Casandra
Black, to Matthew Baker of
Orlando, son of Rick and
Robin Baker of Tarpon
Springs.
The bride-elect is a stu-
dent at the University of
Central Florida. Her fi-
anc6 is a graduate of Full
Sail University and is a
software engineer at Engi-
neering and Computer
Simulations in Orlando.
The couple will ex-
change vows at 3:30 p.m.
Dec. 22, 2012, at Calvary
Christian Center


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.


7 W


FOOD INE
WEEKENDS
AT WALDORF ASTORIP ORLANDO






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Veterans BRIEFS


For the RECORD


TOGETHER & VETERANS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


9-23


@ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS











SPORTS


The Tampa Bay Rays
continue their late playoff
push Saturday night at
home against he Toronto
Blue Jays./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Golf/B4
0 College football/B5, B6
0 Auto racing/B6
0 NFL/B7
0 Entertainment/B8


Citrus defense, ground game stops Lecanto


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus sophomore running back Breon Whaley bowls over a Lecanto
defender during a bruising rush on Friday night at Lecanto High School.


Weather delay

doesn'tfaze 'Canes

in 33-0 triumph
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO With extended
weather and injury delays, the
first intra-county rivalry football
game of the year was a long night.
For Citrus and its fans, it was well
worth the wait.
A 10-yard TD rush by senior
tailback Darius Chapes gave the
Hurricanes a 6-0 advantage over
Lecanto midway into the second
quarter before lightning in the
area brought about an over hour-


long delay Citrus managed to sus-
tain its momentum, however, to
notch its second straight 33-0 vic-
tory over the Panthers and move
to 1-0 in the district in a game that
approached midnight at Panther
Stadium on Friday
An injury to Lecanto junior
quarterback Christian Barber on
his team's last possession before
the delay provided a gloomier
forecast for the Panthers (2-2, 0-1
in District 6A-5) than the local
weather radar. Despite playing
just 18 minutes of regulation,
Barber accounted for 54 or his
team's 71 total yards as Citrus
loaded the box and dared
Lecanto to exploit mismatches in
the passing game amid an obsti-
nate pass rush.
"Barber going out was big,"


ever in danger


Associated Press
Florida running back Mike Gillislee, center, celebrates a 1-yard touchdown against Kentucky with tight end Clay Burton, left, and
offensive linesman D.J. Humphries during the first half Saturday in Gainesville.

No. 14 UF beats Kentucky 38-0; Gators haven't lost to 'Cats since 1986


Lecanto head coach McKinley
Rolle said. "It played a crucial
part, tonight. Christian is ar-
guably our top player, and (Citrus
head coach Rayburn) Greene told
me it changed the complexion of
the game. And it did."
Paced by Chapes' game-highs
of 24 carries and 176 rushing
yards, the 'Canes (3-1, 1-0) out-
gained Lecanto by 258 yards with-
out completing a pass for the
second consecutive week. Fri-
day's weather conditions made it
tough for either team to generate
much of an air attack.
"We came into the game, again,
wanting to throw the ball a little
bit, but the first few times we
tried it was a disaster because it
was a monsoon out there,"
See Page B2



No. 11


Irish halt


Michigan

Notre Dame

nabs 13-6victory

over Wolverines

Associated Press
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Manti Te'o had two intercep-
tions as No. 11 Notre Dame
picked off five Michigan
passes and backup quarter-
back Tommy Rees sparked
the Fighting Irish offense in a
13-6 win over the 18th-ranked
Wolverines on Saturday night.
Denard Robinson, who
amassed 948 yards of total of-
fense in victories over the
Irish past two years, wasn't as
effective this time as the Irish
repeatedly forced him into
mistakes. He threw four inter-
ceptions in the first half, then
lost a fumble at the Notre
Dame 8-yard line on the first
drive of the second half.
The victory by Notre Dame
(4-0) ended a streak of three
straight games in which
Michigan (2-2) beat the Irish
in the final 27 seconds.
Notre Dame didn't give the
Wolverines a chance to pull it
out this time, running out the
clock after a Brendan Gibbons
field goal with 3:27 left in the
game made it 13-6.


Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -The latest
game in the Kentucky-Florida
series went about like the pre-
vious four: the Gators took the
lead early and won in lopsided
fashion.
Jeff Driskel accounted for
two touchdowns, and No. 14
Florida beat Kentucky 38-0 Sat-
urday for its 26th consecutive
win in the Southeastern Con-
ference series.
The Gators (4-0, 3-0 SEC) also
recorded their first shutout in
conference play since a 52-0
victory against Mississippi


State in 2001.
"Any time you get a shutout,
man, those things are hard to
come by in this day and age of
football, regardless of who
you're playing," Florida coach
Will Muschamp said.
Florida struggled early, not a
great sign with No. 2 LSU up
next in two weeks. The slow
start also was a rarity against
the Wildcats (1-3, 0-1). The
Gators had outscored Kentucky
94-3 in the first quarter in the
last four meetings, essentially
sealing games before some fans
settled into their seats.
It took just a little longer


Saturday
The Gators scored three
touchdowns in the second quar-
ter, enough to put Kentucky
away and extend the nation's
longest winning streak in a cur-
rent series between two teams in
the Football Bowl Subdivision.
The Wildcats haven't beaten
Florida since 1986, haven't won
in Gainesville since 1979 and
haven't been all that competitive
in the last five meetings. Florida
has outscored Kentucky 238-36
in those five games.
"We didn't mention it,"
Driskel said of the streak.
"That stat didn't really make us


want to play any harder or play
any different. We were going to
come out and prepare like it's
another SEC East team and
they're just another team in the
way of our goal."
Kentucky hardly had a
chance in this one.
The Wildcats, who entered
with the league's top passing
attack, played without quarter-
back Maxwell Smith. He sat out
with a shoulder injury Backup
Morgan Newton missed open
receivers early and often, di-
minishing his team's already
See Page B4


Associated Press
Notre Dame's Stephon Tuitt
(7) reacts with Louis Nix III
after Tuitt sacked Michigan
quarterback Denard Robinson
during the first half Saturday in
South Bend, Ind.


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Paddleball courts now open in CR


Setup also for

handball as well

Special to the Chronicle
With the concerted efforts of
many, paddleball/handball courts
are now in Citrus County
The courts are at 405 S.E. 7th
Ave. in Crystal River, behind the
new SPOT Community Center.
This type of handball or paddle-
ball is played with only one wall
instead of the traditional 3 or 4-
wall version.
Groups and individuals par-
tially responsible for helping the
courts get built include Crystal


River city manager Andy Hous-
ton, Crystal River public works
director John Lettow and his
crew, the Crystal River City Coun-
cil, members of the Spanish
American Club of Citrus County
and other members of the
community.
JNT Fencing and Vic Hensley
Painting had a big hand in creat-
ing the courts as well.
Anyone is welcome to play. All
you need is a ball for handball or a
paddle for paddleball.
For more information, call
Benny Cruz at 352-746-3599.
A recent picture of the new
paddleball/handball courts
located in Crystal River.
Special to the Chronicle


Movie in Park coming near Halloween


Soccer Challenge

recently held at

PopeJohn Paul II

Special to the Chronicle
Parents, don't forget to mark your
calendar for Citrus County Parks
and Recreation's annual Halloween
Movie in the Park event. This year's
event will be Saturday, Oct 27, at
Lecanto Community Park
Monsters vs. Aliens (rated PG)
will be this year's movie and will be
shown on Parks and Rec's new
two-story-tall air screen. The movie
will begin at dusk.
Once again, there will be a pre-
carved pumpkin contest and sev-
eral categories of costume contests
including: boys, girls, couples and
family
Pre-movie festivities begin at 6
p.m. and will include a bounce
house, face painting and carnival
games. Free popcorn will be pro-
vided and food, drinks, and glow-
in-the-dark products available for
purchase.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks and Recreation at
352-527-7540 or visit www
citruscountyparks.com.
Soccer challenge
a success at PJP II
The St. Scholastica Knights of
Columbus, Council No. 14485, recently
held its Soccer Challenge at Pope John
Paul II Catholic School in Lecanto.
The Knights of Columbus Soccer
Challenge is a competition designed for
players to demonstrate the most basic
of soccer skills the penalty kick.
Each player is allowed 15 shots at the
goal from the penalty spot (12 yards
from the goal).
The Knights of Columbus Soccer
Challenge is open to boys and girls in
our community, ages 10-14. The win-
ners of the Council Championship ad-
vance to the district, regional and state
championships, respectfully.
'Beat the Sheriff'
for Jessie's Place
The annual Beat the Sheriff race re-
turns to Inverness on Saturday, Sept. 29,
for its 16th year. Hosted by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, the race starts at
7:30 a.m. from Courthouse Square. Afun
run for children will begin at 8:15 a.m.
Runners may pre-register by mail
at a reduced cost by visiting the
Jessie's Place website at


Special to the Chronicle
The St. Scholastica Knights of Columbus, Council #14485, recently held
its Soccer Challenge at Pope John Paul II Catholic School in Lecanto.
Pictured kicking the soccer ball is Zachery DeSerrano.


www.jessiesplacecitrus.org and down-
loading an application. Fill it out and in-
clude a check for $20 (or $18 if you're a
member of the Citrus Road Runners
club), made payable to Jessie's Place.
Spedal student pricing is available, and
the entry fee for the Kids Fun Run (no T-
shirt) is $2. Make sure all advanced regis-
trations are received no later than
Wednesday, Sept. 26, by mailing them to
Jessie's Place, Beat the Sheriff, 4465 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Or register and pay online at
www.raceit.com until midnight Sept. 27.
In addition, registration forms are avail-
able at the Sheriff's Operations Center


in downtown Inverness, where com-
pleted forms and checks also may be
turned in. All pre-registered runners are
guaranteed a commemorative Beat the
Sheriff T-shirt. Registration on the day
of the race will start at 6:30 a.m. at
Courthouse Square. Same-day regis-
trants will pay $30 to compete.
For more information, call Traci Bea-
gan at the Sheriffs Office, 352-341-7405.
Coed softball begins
Oct. 9 in Crystal River
Coed softball is back and hosted by
Citrus County Parks and Recreation.
The league is scheduled to start Oct. 9.


This league is designed for levels of
all. The league plays on Tuesday and
Thursday nights at Bicentennial Park
with games at 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Each team is required to have a mini-
mum of four girls each game. Each
team may roster up to 25 participants.
Last chance to register will be
Wednesday, Oct. 3, at the Citrus
County Resource Center. There is a
$50 registration fee that is required to
sign a team up. Team fees are based
on the number of entries per league
and are divided up equally among the
teams.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at 352-527-
7540. If you are a single player wanting
to play, call and they will aid you in find-
ing a team.
5K, 'Popsicle Mile'
run for scholarships
The inaugural Alumni Pride 5K and
Popsicle Mile Run/Walk at the Lecanto
High School complex will be Oct. 6.
Proceeds will be used for scholarship
programs at Lecanto.
All finishers in the Popsicle Mile will
be recognized. Awards in the 5K will be
given to the top two finishers in each
age category: younger than 11, 12 to
14, 15 to 18, 19 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to
49, and 50 and older.
Register online at active.com; type in
Lecanto as the site. Or, get a mail-in appli-
cation at http://sites.google.com/site/
athleticsscoringproviders/first-annual-
alumni-pride-5k-and-popsice-mile-fun-
run-walk.
Race day registration begins at 8
a.m.; 5K is a 8:15 and Popsicle Mile is
at 9:15 a.m. Register by Monday, Oct.
1, at 2 p.m. and receive a T-shirt.
For information, contact Mike Oss-
man at mikeossmann@nefcom.net or
352-904-886-3344; or email Freddie
Bullock at bullockf@citrus.k12.fl.us; or
call Ron Allan at 352-746-2334.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County Parks &
Recreation and Tennis Pro Mehdi Tahiri
for youth tennis lessons.
Instruction will include conditioning,
drills, footwork, match play, doubles
and single strategy. The five-week ses-
sions will be at the Lecanto Community
Park Tennis Courts on Sundays. Each
session will run from 3 to 4 p.m. The
clinic is open to boys and girls ages 8 to
14 and costs $60 per child.
For information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.


Recreation
BRIEFS


NCSC has important
upcoming dates
The Nature Coast Soccer
Club is holding recreational
coaching clinics scheduled:
* U-6 Academy on Tuesday,
Oct. 2, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
* U-8 Academy on Thursday,
Oct. 4, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
* U-10 on Saturday, Oct.6,
from 9 to 11:30 a.m.
* U-12/14 on Saturday, Oct. 6,
from 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Meet Mike Penn, director of
coaching, at the Central Ridge
fields. Other important dates in-
clude our Jamboree on Oct. 27,
Opening Day on Nov. 3 and
Picture Day on Nov.10.
For information, go to the
website at www.
naturecoastsoccer.com or "like"
us on facebook.
YMCA offers
afterschool clubs
The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
are offered at Central Ridge
Elementary, Citrus Springs El-
ementary, Crystal River Pri-
mary, Floral City Elementary,
Forest Ridge Elementary, Ho-
mosassa Elementary, Inver-
ness Primary, Lecanto
Primary, Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary and Rock Crusher
Elementary.
Ages for the Y Afterschool
Program range from kinder-
garten through fifth grade. Af-
terschool programs are a great
way to end the school day,
and the first fall session will
offer kids the opportunity to
participate in flag football,
cheerleading and art.
For more information, call the
Citrus Y at 352-637-0132.
WP Park holds
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.


--
d.-U
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Lecanto junior quarterback Christian Barber runs the ball against Citrus
on Friday night at Lecanto High School. After suffering a hard hit in the
second quarter just prior to a long rain delay, Barber didn't return to the
contest and the Panthers missed his presence in a 33-0 loss to Citrus.


GAME
Continued from Page B1

Greene said.
"I am proud of our guys. We said
all week, 'Be who we are and let
them be who they are.' We ran the
ball and played good defense.
"It's really a shame Barber went
down," Greene added. "I know it
probably meant a lot to him to com-
pete in this game, and it kind of de-
flated the whole situation having
him get injured. That was really
unfortunate. I hope he's ok"
In between the end of the storm
delay and halftime, 'Canes senior
punter and tight end Stevie Smith
booted a 44-yard punt to pin
Lecanto down near its own goal
line. Three plays later, Citrus
sophomore linebacker Jaimee
Juse stepped in front of a short
pass from Panthers junior quar-
terback Armante Young near the
Panther 3-yard line and returned
it for a score to put the 'Canes
ahead 12-0 at the break.
Citrus didn't get its second of-


fensive touchdown until five min-
utes into the third quarter when
senior fullback Al Lamar White
(14 carries, 62 yards) punched it in
for a 10-yard score and an 18-0
lead. Sophomore tailback Breon
Whaley (12 carries, 74 yards), who
left with an injury in the fourth
quarter, and junior tailback Tyric
Washington each ran for a 'Canes
TD in the final quarter, while
Chapes also scored on a two-point
conversion run.
Lecanto looked like it might get
a jump on Citrus in the opening
minute when junior Koty House
recovered a 'Canes fumble at the
Citrus 11-yard line on the game's
opening kickoff. But the Panthers
squandered their chance on the
first play, fumbling it right back
over to Citrus.
Later in the first quarter,
Chapes took a fake-punt run on a
fourth-and-2 near midfield for 27
yards before fumbling it over to
Lecanto and mimicking the effect
of a punt.
A disappointed Rolle took time
to acknowledge the large turnout
of support his team received be-


fore the weather went south.
"I'd like to thank the community
and (Lecanto principal Jeff) Davis
for the support we had tonight,"
Rolle said.
"A lot of people commented that it
was something they hadn't seen here
before, and that's what we need to do
- and we're going to do to try to
move this program forward."
The Panthers hit the road this
Friday to take on The Villages in a
non-district game, while Citrus re-
turns home to welcome Crystal
River (3-0, 1-0 in District 5A-5).
The 'Canes can win the county
championship outright with a vic-
tory over the Pirates, who have
beaten the Citrus five straight
years but barely escaped with a 7-
6 home victory last season.
"Crystal River is a very, very
good team," Greene said. "They
owned it the last few years.
They're tough, and that will be a
huge challenge for us to compete
with them, there's no question
about it."
Class 6A No. 1 Gainesville de-
feated Lake Weir 44-22 in other
District 6A-5 action Friday


,.-^ J






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 11, Blue Jays 5
Toronto Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Lawrie3b 4 2 2 0 DJnngsIf 3 4 3 1
RDavislf 4 1 2 0 JoPerltp 0 00 0
Encrnc dh 4 0 1 1 Rodney p 0 00 0
Lindlb 4 01 3 BUptoncf 4 1 1 2
YEscorss 4 00 0 EJhnsnss 0 0 0 0
Sierra rf 4 1 1 0 Longori3b 4 1 1 3
Mathisc 4 0 1 0 Thmpscf 0 00 0
YGomsc 0 00 0 Kppngrlb 4 1 3 0
Hchvrr2b 4 0 1 1 C.Penaph-1b1 0 0 0
Gose cf 4 1 1 0 Zobristss 2 0 0 0
Scott ph 1 0 1 0
Brignc 3b 0 0 0 0
BFrncsdh-lf 4 1 1 2
Joyce rf 5 00 0
RRorts2b 5 1 2 1
JMolinc 4 2 3 2
CGmnz c 1 00 0
Totals 36 5105 Totals 3811 1511
Toronto 200 020 010 5
Tampa Bay 130 160 00x 11
DP-Toronto 1. LOB-Toronto 8, Tampa Bay
10. 2B-Lawrie (25), R.Davis (22), Sierra (4),
Keppinger (15), Scott (22), B.Francisco (10),
R.Roberts (10). 3B-Lind (2). HR-De.Jen-
nings (13), B.Upton (25), Longoria (13),
J.Molina (8). SB-R.Davis (45). SF-Lind.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
MorrowL,8-7 4 5 5 5 4 2
Lincoln 2-3 6 6 6 1 0
Lyon 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
Cecil 1 1 0 0 1 0
Frasor 1 1 0 0 0 0
Carreno 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
M.Moore 22-33 2 2 2 2
BadenhopW,3-2 11-30 0 0 0 1
McGee 1 3 2 2 0 1
Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 0 2
W.Davis 1 1 0 0 1 1
Jo.Peralta 1 2 1 1 0 1
Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 0
T-3:25. A-15,699 (34,078).

Yankees 10, A's 9,
14 innings
Oakland NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Drew ss 8 34 1 Jeterss 7 0 1 0
S.Smithlf 4 1 1 1 ISuzukicf-lf 5 3 3 1
JGomsph-lfl 1 1 2 AIRdrgdh 6 3 3 0
Cowgilllf 0 00 0 Cano2b 8 2 2 1
Cespdscf 5 22 2 Swish.rf-1b 4 0 2 0
Mosslb 6 0 3 0 Dickrsnpr 0 0 0 0
Carterdh 4 1 1 2 Pearcelb 0 0 0 0
Reddckrf 7 00 0 ENunez3b 2 0 0 1
Dnldsn3b 6 1 1 0 McGehlb 2 0 0 0
Kottarsc 3 0 1 0 Ibanezph-rf 4 2 3 3
DNorrsph-c4 0 0 0 J.Nix3b 3 0 1 0
Pnngtn 2b 6 0 1 1 RMartn c 3 0 0 0
AnJons If 0 0 0 1
Grndrsph-cf 4 0 0
CStwrt c 3 0 0 0
ErChvz3b-1b3 0 1 0
Mesa pr 0 00 0
Totals 54 9159 Totals 5410167
Oak. 201 100 100 000 40 9
NY 310 010 000 000 41 10
E-Moss (6), Pennington (11), Donaldson
(11). DP-Oakland 1, New York 1. LOB-Oak-
land 13, New York 17. 2B-Drew (4), S.Smith
(23), Cespedes (23), Donaldson (16), Ibanez
(17). HR-Drew (4), J.Gomes (17), Cespedes
(20), Carter (15), I.Suzuki (9), Ibanez 2 (17).
SB-Dickerson (3). S-J.Gomes, Jeter,
I.Suzuki, J.Nix. SF-Carter, E.Nunez.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Blackley 2 4 4 2 3 1
J.Miller 3 3 1 1 2 1
Blevins 1 1 0 0 1 0
R.Cook 2 0 0 0 0 2
Balfour 2 1 0 0 0 2
Scribner 2 1 0 0 2 2
Figueroa 0 3 3 3 0 0
NeshekBS,1-1 1 1 1 1 0 0
TRossL,2-10 2-3 2 1 0 1 0
New York
Nova 21-35 3 3 2 2
Rapada 11-32 1 1 0 2
D.Lowe 22-31 1 1 1 2
LoganBS,2-3 11-32 0 0 1 1
Eppley 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Chamberlain 1 0 0 0 0 2
FGarcia 3 4 3 3 2 1
J.Thomas 1 1 1 1 0 1
WadeW,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0

Orioles 9, Red Sox
6, 12 innings


Baltimore Boston
ab r h bi


McLothlf 6 1 0 0 Ciriacodh
Hardy ss 6 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b
AdJonscf 6 2 2 2 C.Rossrf
Wietersc 5 03 0 Lvrnwyc
Thomedh 6 01 1 MGomzlb
Avery pr-dh 0 1 0 0 Aviles ss
MrRynllb 6 1 1 1 Valenci3b
C.Davisrf 3 2 2 0 Nava If
EnChvzpr-rf2 1 1 1 Pdsdnkcf
Machd3b 6 1 32
Flahrty 2b 4 0 2 2
Totals 50 9159 Totals
Baltimore 110 102 100 003
Boston 100 200 210 000


ab r h bi


47613 6
9
6


E-Machado (3), A.Cook (5). DP-Baltimore 1,
Boston 1. LOB-Baltimore 10, Boston 10. 2B-
Ad.Jones (37), Wieters 2 (26), Thome (4),
Machado (7), Flaherty (1), Pedroia (35), Nava (20),
Podsednik 2 (7).3B-Flaherty (1). HR-Ad.Jones
(31), Mar.Reynolds (22), Valencia (3). SB-
McLouth (9). CS-Ciriaco (1). S-Podsednik.


Baltimore
Wolf
Arrieta H,1
Strop BS,7-10
Ayala
Matusz
Tom.HunterW,6-8
Ji.Johnson S,47-50
Boston
A. Cook
R.Hill
Mortensen
Breslow
Tazawa
A.Bailey
Melancon
Aceves L,2-10
C.Carpenter


R ER BB SO



1 1 0 1
3322
2212
1101
0003
00 1 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1


0 0 0 1
1 1 2 3
0001

5521
0001
1123
0001
0002
0000
0002
3301
0010


Tigers 8, Twins 0
Minnesota Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Spancf 4 01 0 AJcksncf 5 1 1 1
Revererf 4 01 0 Berry If 4 11 0
Mauerc 4 0 2 0 MiCarr3b 4 2 1 1
Wlnghlf 4 0 1 0 Fielderlb 3 1 3 1
Mornea 1b 4 01 0 DYong dh 4 1 1 3
Doumitdh 4 00 0 Dirks rf 4 2 2 0
Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 JhPerltss 4 0 0 0
ACasill2b 3 0 1 0 Avila c 3 0 1 1
Flormnss 3 0 0 0 Infante2b 4 0 2 0
Totals 33 07 0 Totals 35812 7
Minnesota 000 000 000 0
Detroit 115 100 00x 8
E-A.Casilla (9). DP-Minnesota 1, Detroit 1.
LOB-Minnesota 6, Detroit 7. 2B-Mauer (31),
A.Casilla (16), Dirks (17). 3B-Dirks (5). HR-
A.Jackson (15), Mi.Cabrera (42), D.Young (18).
SB-Berry (20).
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
Deduno L,6-5
Swarzak
Perdomo
Detroit
FisterW,10-9


21-37 7 7 3 1
32-34 1 1 0 2
2 1 0 0 0 0

9 7 0 0 0 7
210000

970007


HBP-by Perdomo (Berry). WP-Deduno.


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 88
Baltimore 87
Tampa Bay 82
Boston 68
Toronto 66


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
63.583 9-1
64 .576 1 8-2
70 .539 6/2 3/2 5-5
85 .444 21 18 4-6
84 .440 21Y/218/2 2-8


Home Away
48-29 40-34 Chicago
42-32 45-32 Detroit
43-34 39-36 Kan. City
33-45 35-40 Minnesota
36-38 30-46 Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
69.540 5-5
70 .533 1 4/2 7-3
81 .464 11/215 6-4
89 .411 191/223 3-7
90 .408 20 23/2 3-7


Home Away
43-31 38-38
46-29 34-41
36-41 34-40
29-46 33-43
34-41 28-49


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


East Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
z-Wash. 92 59 .609 - 5-5 W-1 47-29 45-30
Atlanta 87 65 .572 5/2 6-4 W-1 43-32 44-33
Phila. 77 75 .507 15/24 6-4 L-1 39-38 38-37
NewYork 68 83 .450 24 122 3-7 W-2 32-44 36-39
Miami 66 86 .434 26/215 3-7 L-3 35-40 31-46
z-clinched playoff berth, x-clinched division


x-Cincy
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10
92 60 .605 - 7-3
81 71 .533 11 6-4
78 73 .517 13Y22/2 8-2
74 77 .490 17Y26/2 2-8
59 93 .388 33 22 4-6
50 102.329 42 31 5-5


Str Home Away
W-1 48-29 44-31
W-1 46-29 35-42
L-1 46-29 32-44
L-5 42-33 32-44
L-1 37-40 22-53
W-2 34-43 16-59


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
61 .593 - 6-4
66 .563 4/2 4-6
69 .543 7/2 3 5-5
80 .470 18/214 4-6



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
63 .583 - 9-1
74 .513 10/23 4-6
75 .500 121/25 6-4
79 .477 16 8/2 6-4
92 .387 29/2 22 1-9


Home Away
47-27 42-34
44-31 41-35
42-34 40-35
37-39 34-41


Str Home Away
W-5 45-31 43-32
L-1 40-35 38-39
W-1 38-37 37-38
L-1 40-35 32-44
L-7 31-44 27-48


Associated Press
Tampa Bay's Ryan Roberts singles during the fifth inning Saturday against the Toronto Blue Jays in St. Petersburg.




Bats stay red hot for Rays


TB hits 4 HRs in


rout ofJays; Reds


clinch NL Central

Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG B.J. Upton
and Jose Molina homered during a
six-run fifth inning and the surging
Tampa Bay Rays beat the Toronto
Blue Jays 11-5 on Saturday night for
their fourth consecutive victory
Evan Longoria and Desmond Jen-
nings also connected for the Rays,
who moved within 3 1/2 games of
Oakland for the second AL wild card.
Tampa Bay has scored 43 runs dur-
ing its winning streak.
The Blue Jays have lost 17 straight
road series at Tampa Bay, which is
two short of the AL record. The New
York Yankees won 19 consecutive
home series against the St. Louis
Browns from 1946-51.
Blue Jays shortstop Yunel Escobar
was back in the starting lineup two
days after he served a three-game
suspension for wearing eye-black
displaying an anti-gay slur written in
Spanish and went 0 for 4.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 10, Athletics 9,
14 innings
NEW YORK Raul Ibanez hit his sec-
ond home run of the game during a dra-
matic rally in the 13th inning, then the
New York Yankees won a thriller when
Ichiro Suzuki scored on first baseman
Brandon Moss' two-out error in the 14th
to beat the Oakland Athletics 10-9.
The AL East leaders held their one-
game edge over Baltimore. Down 9-5 in
the 13th, the Yankees won for just the
second time in team history after trailing
by at least four runs in extra innings.
Oakland began the day with a 3 1/2
game lead over Los Angeles for the sec-
ond AL wild-card spot, and blew a huge
opportunity.

Orioles 9, Red Sox 6,
12 innings
BOSTON Jim Thome hit a go-ahead
double in the 12th in his first game in
nearly two months and the Baltimore Ori-
oles won in extra innings for the 16th
straight time, beating the Boston Red Sox.
The Orioles won their sixth in a row
overall. They began the day one game
behind the AL East-leading New York
Yankees.
Baltimore's extra-inning streak is the
best in the majors since the Cleveland In-
dians won 17 straight in 1949. The Ori-
oles are 16-2 in extras this year, losing
only to the Yankees on April 10-11.
Tigers 8, Twins 0

DETROIT Miguel Cabrera hit his
42nd homer, putting him in Triple Crown
position, and Doug Fister pitched his first
career shutout to help the Detroit Tigers
beat Minnesota 8-0, keeping their hopes
high in the AL Central race.
Detroit began the day 1 1/2 games be-
hind the division-leading Chicago White
Sox, who played later at the Los Angeles
Angels.
Cabrera's solo shot tied with Texas star
Josh Hamilton for the most homers in the
AL. Cabrera has a relatively comfortable
league lead with a .332 batting average
and 131 RBIs. Hamilton is sidelined this
weekend because of a sinus condition


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 2, Oakland 1, 10 innings
Minnesota at Detroit, ppd., rain
Baltimore 4, Boston 2
Tampa Bay 12, Toronto 1
Kansas City 6, Cleveland 3
L.A. Angels 6, Chicago White Sox 2
Seattle 6, Texas 3
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 10, Oakland 9, 14 innings
Baltimore 9, Boston 6, 12 innings
Detroit 8, Minnesota 0
Kansas City 5, Cleveland 3
Tampa Bay 11, Toronto 5
Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, late
Texas at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Minnesota (Diamond 11-8) at Detroit (Scherzer 16-6), 1:05
p.m., 1st game
Oakland (Griffin 6-1) at N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 14-10), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 8-2) at Boston (Doubront 11-9), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Jenkins 0-1) atTampa Bay (Hellickson 8-10), 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Huff 1-0) at Kansas City (Odorizzi 0-0), 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 10-10) at L.A. Angels (Weaver
18-4), 3:35 p.m.
Texas (Dempster 6-2) at Seattle (Vargas 14-10), 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Walters 2-4) at Detroit (Smyly 4-3), 7:05 p.m.,
2nd game
Monday's Games
Toronto at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m., 1st game
Kansas City at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Baltimore, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, St. Louis 4, 11 innings
Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 2
Milwaukee 4, Washington 2
L.A. Dodgers 3, Cincinnati 1, 10 innings
N.Y Mets 7, Miami 3
Houston 7, Pittsburgh 1
Arizona 15, Colorado 5
San Francisco 5, San Diego 1
Saturday's Games
Washington 10, Milwaukee 4
St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 10 innings
N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 3
Atlanta 8, Philadelphia 2
Cincinnati 6, L.A. Dodgers 0
Houston 4, Pittsburgh 1
Arizona at Colorado, late
San Diego at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
Miami (Nolasco 12-12) at N.Y Mets (C.Young 4-8), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (THudson 15-6) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee 6-7), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 16-8) atWashington (Wang 2-3), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 15-8) at Houston (Lyles 4-11), 2:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 15-3) at Chicago Cubs (Germano 2-8),
2:20 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 14-11) at Colorado (Francis 5-6), 3:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 6-3) at San Francisco (Lincecum 10-14),
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Harang 9-10) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 12-9),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.


For more box scores,
see Page B4.


that has caused blurred vision.
Carl Yastrzemski won the last Triple
Crown in 1967. He took the batting and
RBIs title, and tied Harmon Killebrew for
the AL homer lead.

Royals 5, Indians 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Billy Butler hit a
run-scoring single in the first inning to
reach 100 RBIs for the first time and the
Kansas City Royals beat the Cleveland
Indians 5-3.
Butler also doubled twice in his 53rd
multihit game, raising his batting average
to .312. He became the first Royals
player to drive in at least 100 runs since
Carlos Beltran had 100 RBIs in 2003.
Alcides Escobar doubled in Jarrod
Dyson, then scored on Butler's base hit to
give Kansas City a 2-0 lead in the first.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Reds 6, Dodgers 0
CINCINNATI Jay Bruce's 34th homer


put the Reds ahead to stay, and they
made good on their second chance to win
the NL Central title by beating the Los An-
geles Dodgers 6-0 without Dusty Baker.
The 63-year-old manager spent an-
other day in a Chicago hospital getting
treated for an irregular heartbeat. The
Reds brought him his fifth division title as
a manager, including two during the last
three years with Cincinnati.

Braves 8, Phillies 2
PHILADELPHIA- Freddie Freeman
hit a three-run homer to back Mike Minor
and the Atlanta Braves roughed up Roy
Halladay to move closer to clinching a
postseason berth with an 8-2 victory over
the Philadelphia Phillies.
The win coupled with Milwaukee's 10-4
loss to Washington reduced Atlanta's
magic number for securing a playoff spot
to three. The Braves were up 8 1/2 games
through Sept. 5 last year, but went 9-18
down the stretch and were overtaken by
St. Louis on the final day of the season.
The Phillies fell four games behind the
Cardinals for the NL's second wild-card
spot with only 10 games remaining.

Cardinals 5, Cubs 4,
10 innings
CHICAGO John Jay's RBI double in
the 10th inning lifted St. Louis over the
Chicago Cubs 5-4, bolstering the Cardi-
nals' bid for another playoff appearance.
Carlos Beltran hit a tying solo homer in
the ninth for the Cardinals, who began
the day with a two-game lead over Los
Angeles for the second NL wild-card spot.
Milwaukee dropped 2 1/2 games behind.
The defending World Series champion
Cardinals have 10 games left in the regu-
lar season.

Nationals 10, Brewers 4
WASHINGTON Gio Gonzalez be-
came the majors' first 20-game winner in
2012, and the first pitcher for a Washing-
ton baseball team with 200 strikeouts
since Walter Johnson in 1916, taking a
shutout into the sixth inning to help the Na-
tionals close in on their first NL East title by
beating the Milwaukee Brewers 10-4.
Ryan Zimmerman and lan Desmond
each hit a three-run homer off former Na-
tionals pitcher Livan Hernandez in the
fourth inning, and Washington stopped
Milwaukee's six-game winning streak.
The Brewers entered Saturday 1 1/2
games behind St. Louis for an NL wild-
card berth.

Mets 4, Marlins 3
NEW YORK R.A. Dickey earned his
19th victory with a strong performance,
Jason Bay and Scott Hairston homered
and the New York Mets barely held on in
the ninth inning for their second straight
home win, 4-3 over the Miami Marlins.
Just hours after the Mets snapped a
nine-game losing streak at Citi Field on
Friday and scored more than three runs
in their home ballpark for the first time
since Aug. 12, New York broke out the
bats again in front of a crowd of 30,332.
The Marlins rallied in the ninth, capped
by John Buck's three-run homer off Jon
Rauch after Dickey (19-6) left. The home
run was confirmed after the second video
replay of the game when umpires ruled
the shot struck the left-field foul pole.

Astros 4, Pirates 1
HOUSTON Jason Castro hit a
three-run homer in the seventh inning
and the Houston Astros beat fading Pitts-
burgh 4-1, handing the Pirates their fifth
straight loss.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 B3



NL

Braves 8, Phillies 2
Atlanta Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bourn cf 3 2 2 0 Rollinsss 3 0 0 0
Prado ss 3 1 2 0 Pierre If 3 0 0 0
Heywrdrf 4 2 2 4 Utley2b 4 00 0
C.Jones3b 5 1 2 1 Howardlb 4 1 1 1
FFrmnlb 5 1 1 3 Ruizc 4 01 0
Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 Mayrry cf 4 00 0
McCnnc 4 1 0 0 DBrwnrf 2 00 0
Constnzlf 2 00 0 Frndsn3b 3 1 1 0
RJhnsn ph-lf2 0 0 0 Hallady p 0 00 0
Minor p 3 00 0 Horstp 0 00 0
JeBakrph 0 0 0 0 Rufph 0 00 1
Overay ph 1 0 0 0 Rosnrg p 0 00 0
Durbinp 0 0 0 0 Schrhltph 1 0 0 0
Ventersp 0 00 0 Diekmnp 0 00 0
OFlhrtp 00 0 0 Lindlmp 0 00 0
L.Nixph 0 0 0 0
Wggntnph 1 00 0
DeFrtsp 0 00 0
Aumontp 0 00 0
Totals 36 89 8 Totals 292 3 2
Atlanta 340 000 010 8
Philadelphia 001 100 000 2
E-Diekman (2). LOB-Atlanta 9, Philadelphia
4.2B-Bourn (25), Heyward (29), C.Jones (22).
3B-Frandsen (2). HR-FFreeman (21),
Howard (14). CS-Bourn (12). SF-Ruf.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
MinorW,10-10 6 2 2 2 1 6
Durbin 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
Venters 11-30 0 0 0 0
O'Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
HalladayL,10-8 12-35 7 7 3 3
Horst 11-31 0 0 0 4
Rosenberg 2 1 0 0 1 1
Diekman 12-30 0 0 4 2
Lindblom 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
DeFratus 1 2 1 1 0 1
Aumont 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Minor (Pierre).

Nats 10, Brewers 4
Milwaukee Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Aoki rf 3 1 1 0 Werth rf 3 22 0
LSchfrcf 1 0 0 0 Berndnph-rf 1 0 0 0
RWeks 2b 3 1 0 0 Harper cf 4 22 1
Farrislf 0 00 0 Zmrmn3b 4 1 1 3
Braun If 3 0 1 1 DeRosa3b 1 00 0
MorganIf-rf 1 0 0 0 LaRochlb 4 33 2
ArRmr3b 2 0 0 1 TMooreph-lbl 0 0 0
Thrnrgp 0 0 0 0 Morse If 2 1 2 0
Ishikawph 1 00 0 CBrwnph-lf 1 00 0
Hartlb 2 0 0 0 Dsmndss 4 1 3 3
Stinsonp 0 00 0 Espinos2b 2 00 0
Bian.3b-2b 2 1 1 0 KSuzukc 4 00 0
CGomz cf 3 00 0 GGnzlz p 3 00 0
TGreen 3b 1 1 1 2 Tracy ph 1 00 0
Mldnd c-b 3 0 1 0 McGnzlp 0 00 0
Segura ss 4 0 1 0 CGarcip 0 00 0
WPerltp 1 0 00
LHrndzp 0 000
Torrealc 3 0 00
Totals 33 46 4 Totals 3510139
Milwaukee 000 002 002 4
Washington 003 601 00x 10
E-W.Peralta (1), Segura (7), Harper(6). DP-
Milwaukee 3. LOB-Milwaukee 5, Washington
7. 2B-Aoki (34), Werth (18), Harper (23),
LaRoche (31). HR-TGreen (3), Zimmerman
(23), LaRoche (32), Desmond (24). SB-Se-
gura (6), Harper (14). CS-Werth (2). SF-
Ar.Ramirez.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
W.Peralta L,2-1 22-35 3 3 4 4
Li.Hernandez 2-3 5 6 6 1 0
Stinson 12-31 0 0 1 1
Thornburg 3 2 1 1 0 2
Washington
G.GonzalezW,20-8 7 3 2 0 1 5
Mic.Gonzalez 1 0 0 0 1 2
C.Garcia 1 3 2 2 0 2
WP-W.Peralta, Li.Hernandez.

Reds 6, Dodgers 0
Los Angeles Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
M.Ellis2b 4 0 1 0 BPhllps2b 3 22 1
Ethier rf 4 0 1 0 Paul If 2 00 0
Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 Stubbspr-cf 1 00 0
AdGnzllb 3 0 1 0 Vottolb 4 01 0
HRmrzss 4 00 0 Frazier3b 4 1 2 1
L.Cruz3b 3 0 2 0 Brucerf 3 21 1
JRiver If 3 0 0 0 Heiseycf-lf 2 1 0 0
Guerrirp 0 0 0 0 DNavrrc 3 0 0 0
Choatep 0 0 0 0 Cozartss 4 02 2
JWrghtp 0 0 0 Latosp 3000
Wallp 0 00 0 HRdrgzph 1 00 0
A.Ellisc 2 0 0 0 AChpm p 0 00 0
BAreuph 1 0 00
Treanrc 0 000
Fife p 1 0 0 0
DGordn ph 1 0 0 0
PRdrgzp 0 000
EHerrrlf 1 0 1 0
Totals 31 06 0 Totals 306 8 5
Los Angeles 000 000 000 0
Cincinnati 000 110 13x 6
E-J.Wright (4). DP-Los Angeles 1, Cincinnati
2. LOB-Los Angeles 5, Cincinnati 8.2B-Fra-
zier (26). HR-B.Phillips (18), Bruce (34). S-
Heisey.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
FifeL,0-2 5 5 2 2 2 4
PRodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Guerrier 2-3 1 1 1 1 0
Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
J.Wright 0 2 3 2 2 0
Wall 1 0 0 0 1 0
Cincinnati
LatosW,13-4 8 6 0 0 0 7
A.Chapman 1 0 0 0 1 0
J.Wright pitched to 5 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Fife (Heisey). WP-Fife.

Cardinals 5, Cubs 4,
10 innings
St. Louis Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jay cf 6 0 1 1 DeJess cf-rf 5 11 1
Beltranrf 5 22 1 Barney2b 5 00 0
Hollidylf 4 1 1 1 Rizzolb 511 0
Chamrs If 1 00 0 ASorin If 4 1 1 0
Craiglb 512 0 Campncf 0 00 0
YMolinc 3 001 LaHairph 1 00 0
T.Cruzph-c 1 00 0 SCastross 3 01 0
Freese 3b 3 0 1 0 WCastll c 3 00 1
Desc. 2b-ss 4 02 0 Sappeltrf-lf 3 01 1
Kozmass 2 001 Vitters3b 4 01 0
MCrpnt2b 1 1 1 0 TWoodp 2 1 1 0
Jcksn 2b-ss 0 0 0 0 Corpas p 0 00 0
Wnwrgp 3 00 0 Bowdenp 0 00 0
Schmkrph 0 00 0 Cardnsph 1 00 0
SRonsn ph 1 00 0 Campp 0 00 0
SFrmnp 0 00 0 Russellp 0 00 0
Rosnthlp 0 00 0 Marmlp 0 00 0
Boggs p 0 00 0 Valuen ph 1 01 0


BryAndph 0 00 0 JChpmp 0 00 0
Motte p 0 0 00
Totals 39 5105 Totals 374 8 3
St. Louis 012 000 001 1 5
Chicago 001 003 000 0 4
E-Vitters (4). LOB-St. Louis 13, Chicago 6.
2B-Jay (18), Holliday (36), A.Soriano (32),
S.Castro (26). HR-Beltran (30), DeJesus (8).
SB-Chambers (1). SF-YMolina, W.Castillo.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Wainwright 7 6 4 4 2 5
S.Freeman 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Rosenthal 11-32 0 0 0 1
BoggsW,4-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
MotteS,39-46 1 0 0 0 0 3
Chicago
TWood 5 6 3 2 2 7
Corpas 1 1 0 0 1 0
BowdenH,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
CampH,18 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
RussellH,13 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Marmol BS,3-23 1 1 1 1 1 1
J.Chapman L,0-1 1 1 1 1 3 1
WP-Wainwright.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus Hurricanes 33,
Lecanto Panthers 0
Cit. 0 12 6 15 33
Lec. 0 0 0 0 0
Scoring Summary
Second Quarter
Cit Chapes 10-yard run (kick failed)
Cit Juse 3-yard int. return (pass failed)
Third Quarter
Cit -White 10-yard run (run failed)
Fourth Quarter
Cit -Whaley 10-yard run (Chapes run)
Cit -Washington 4-yard (Killeen kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing Cit: Cody Bogart 0-5-0-0-0; Lec: Bar-
ber 1-1-39-0-0, Armante Young 2-11-30-0-2.
Rushing Cit: Chapes 24-176-1, Whaley
12-74-1, White 14-62-1; Lec: Barber 6-15-0.
Receiving Lec: Marcic 2-60-0.



PGA Tour Champ.
Saturday
At East Lake Golf Club, Atlanta
Purse: $8 million
Yardage: 7,319, Par: 70
Third Round
Brandt Snedeker 68-70-64--202 -8
Justin Rose 66-68-68-202 -8
Ryan Moore 69-70-65--204 -6
Rory Mcllroy 69-68-68-205 -5
BubbaWatson 69-66-70--205 -5
Jim Furyk 69-64-72--205 -5
TigerWoods 66-73-67--206 -4
Robert Garrigus 68-69-69-206 -4
Matt Kuchar 67-69-70--206 -4
Bo Van Pelt 67-68-71 -206 -4
Luke Donald 71-69-67-207 -3
Zach Johnson 68-69-70-207 -3
Webb Simpson 71-68-70--209 -1
Dustin Johnson 69-67-73-209 -1
Louis Oosthuizen 70-71-69 -210 E
Adam Scott 68-73-70-211 +1
Scott Piercy 67-73-71 -211 +1
Jason Dufner 70-70-71 -211 +1
Rickie Fowler 71-68-72--211 +1
Hunter Mahan 68-73-71 -212 +2
Phil Mickelson 69-71-72-212 +2
Sergio Garcia 69-73-71 -213 +3
Keegan Bradley 70-73-70-213 +3
Steve Stricker 67-73-73--213 +3
JohnSenden 72-68-73-213 +3
Carl Pettersson 71-67-75-213 +3
John Huh 74-70-73-217 +7
Ernie Els 72-75-71 --218 +8
NickWatney 75-74-70-219 +9
Lee Westwood 72-73-76 -221 +11

LPGA Tour

Navistar Classic
Saturday
At Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail
(Capitol Hill-The Senator), Prattville, Ala.
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,607, Par: 72
Third Round
Stacy Lewis 66-70-65-201 -15
Angela Stanford 67-68-68-203 -13
Lizette Salas 65-69-70 -204 -12
HaejiKang 70-68-67--205 -11
Mi Jung Hur 68-65-72--205 -11
Sarah Jane Smith 69-69-68-206 -10
HeeYoung Park 65-69-72-206 -10
LexiThompson 63-69-74-206 -10
Beatriz Recari 70-71-66--207 -9
SoYeonRyu 69-69-69--207 -9
Nicole Castrale 69-68-70--207 -9
Vicky Hurst 68-69-70-207 -9
Jennifer Johnson 71-65-71 -207 -9
Sydnee Michaels 67-68-72-207 -9
Dori Carter 67-67-73--207 -9
Mina Harigae 69-72-67-208 -8
Pornanong Phatlum 71-70-67-208 -8
Meena Lee 70-67-71 --208 -8
Jennifer Rosales 69-68-71 -208 -8
Natalie Gulbis 68-68-72--208 -8
Anna Nordqvist 68-72-69--209 -7
Amy Yang 69-71-69-209 -7
Pernilla Lindberg 70-68-71 -209 -7
Karin Sjodin 70-67-72--209 -7
Alena Sharp 67-69-73 -209 -7
Gerina Piller 68-67-74--209 -7
Mindy Kim 68-65-76--209 -7
Candle Kung 69-73-68--210 -6
Brittany Lincicome 72-70-68--210 -6
Jennifer Song 75-67-68--210 -6
Sun Young Yoo 73-69-68-210 -6
Irene Cho 70-71-69--210 -6
Kris Tamulis 72-70-69-211 -5
Moira Dunn 71-70-70--211 -5
YaniTseng 71-70-70--211 -5
Sandra Gal 68-71-72-211 -5
WendyWard 66-73-72--211 -5
Paige Mackenzie 70-68-73-211 -5
Belen Mozo 70-68-73-211 -5
Azahara Munoz 72-66-73--211 -5
AlisonWalshe 69-68-74--211 -5
Lorie Kane 67-68-76--211 -5
Karlin Beck 67-76-69--212 -4
Laura Diaz 71-72-69-212 -4
Hee-Won Han 71-69-72--212 -4
Stephanie Louden 70-70-72-212 -4
Dewi Claire Schreefel 71-69-72-212 -4
Amy Hung 73-70-70 -213 -3
Karine Icher 72-71-70--213 -3
Katy Harris 69-73-71 --213 -3
Suzann Pettersen 71-71-71 -213 -3
Jenny Shin 70-72-71 -213 -3
Jennie Lee 70-70-73-213 -3
Karen Stupples 66-74-73-213 -3
Heather Bowie Young 71-68-74--213 -3
Katherine Hull 70-72-72--214 -2
Brittany Lang 71-72-72-215 -1
llhee Lee 71-71-73-215 -1
Mariajo Uribe 71-70-74--215 -1
Taylor Coutu 70-73-73 -216 E
Christina Kim 72-71-73 -216 E
Angela Oh 74-69-73 -216 E
Sandra Changkija 68-74-74 -216 E
Mi Hyang Lee 66-76-74 -216 E
Maria Hjorth 70-70-76 -216 E
Lisa Ferrero 73-70-74--217 +1
Samantha Richdale 71-72-74--217 +1
Tiffany Joh 71-72-75-218 +2
Katie Futcher 71-72-78--221 +5
Amanda Blumenherst 66-74-82-222 +6



Sprint Cup

Sylvania 300 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon,N.H.
Lap length: 1.058 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 134.911.
2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 134.753.
3. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 134.568.
4. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 134.482.
5. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 134.354.
6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 134.179.


7. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 134.099.
8. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 133.933.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 133.872.
10. (22) Dave Blaney, Dodge, 133.863.
11. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 133.853.
12. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 133.825.
13. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 133.647.
14. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 133.637.
15. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 133.614.
16. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 133.6.
17. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 133.567.
18. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 133.544.
19. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 133.301.
20. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 133.128.
21. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 133.11.
22. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 133.021.


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
1-6-9
CASH 3 (late)
3-2-5

PLAY 4 (early)
1-3-8-3
PLAY 4 (late)
4-1-2-8

FANTASY 5
d Ltty 17- 20 -23 -25 -33

POWERBALL LOTTERY
2-16-18-40-42 13-19-30-43-46-51
POWER BALL XTRA
33 3



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Sylvania 300 race
2 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAAAA Texas Fall Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
12:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Sylvania 300 race
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at New York Mets
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Oakland Athletics at New York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs
(Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at Cincinnati Reds
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Dodgers at Cincinnati
Reds (Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN2) WNBA: Seattle Storm at Phoenix Mercury
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Kentucky at Florida (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Clemson at Florida State (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) New York Jets at Miami Dolphins
1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Dallas Cowboys
4 p.m. (CBS) Houston Texans at Denver Broncos
8:20 p.m. (NBC) New England Patriots at Baltimore Ravens
GOLF
11:30 a.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: The Tour Championship -
Final Round
1:30 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: The Tour Championship -
Final Round
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Navistar LPGA Classic-
Final Round
BULL RIDING
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR Championship Challenge (Taped)
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) PBR DeWALT Guaranteed Tough Invitational
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Toluca vs Atlante
11:30 p.m. (FOX) English Premier League: Liverpool vs.
Manchester United (Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


23.(51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 132.966.
24.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 132.85.
25. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 132.799.
26. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 132.72.
27. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 132.595.
28. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 132.558.
29. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 132.356.
30.(13) Casey Mears, Ford, 132.195.
31. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 131.929.
32. (11) DennyHamlin, Toyota, 131.633.
33. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 131.442.
34. (10) David Reutimann, Chevy, 131.18.
35. (91) Reed Sorenson, Chevy, 130.963.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 130.837.
37.(38) David Gilliland, Ford, 130.792.
38. (79) Kelly Bires, Ford, 130.64.
39. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 130.367.
40. (37) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 130.229.
41. (36) Tony Raines, Chevy, Owner Points.
42.(32) Mike Olsen, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 129.882.
Failed to Qualify
44. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 129.714.
45. (49) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 129.701.
46. (19) Jeff Green, Toyota, 129.248.
47. (26) Josh Wise, Ford.

Nationwide

Ky. 300 Results
Saturday
At Kentucky Speedway
Sparta, Ky.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200 laps, 139.5
rating, 47 points, $94,868.
2. (3) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 122.8, 43,
$55,743.
3. (6) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 200, 110,
0, $43,943.
4. (4) Drew Herring, Toyota, 200, 109.1, 41,
$33,943.
5. (8) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 131.4, 41,
$30,943.
6. (15) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 200, 107.9, 38,
$27,068.
7. (5) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 101.1, 38,
$24,793.
8. (10) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 95.4, 36,
$23,568.
9. (20) Ryan Blaney, Dodge, 200, 90.7, 0,
$22,543.
10. (13) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 200, 87.6, 34,
$23,193.
11. (7) Brian Scott, Toyota, 199, 92.4, 33,
$21,468.
12. (12) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 199, 84.2,
32, $20,943.
13. (19) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 199, 80.8,
0, $20,393.
14. (11) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 198, 77, 30,
$19,868.
15. (18) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 198, 77.4,
29, $23,418.
16. (23) Jason Bowles, Toyota, 197, 73.6, 28,
$19,418.
17. (2) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 197, 93.4, 28,
$20,293.
18. (17) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 197, 76.7, 26,
$19,143.
19. (16) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 196, 66, 25,
$12,550.
20. (22) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 196, 66.9, 24,
$19,568.
21. (27) Josh Richards, Ford, 196, 58.5, 23,
$12,300.
22. (24) Eric McClure, Toyota, 196, 55.4, 22,
$18,643.
23. (33) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 195, 56.1, 21,
$18,493.
24. (30) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 194, 51.3, 20,
$18,343.


25. (9) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 194, 87.1, 19,
$18,468.
26. (21) Scott Lagasse Jr., Chevrolet, 187, 58.3,
18, $11,805.
27. (32) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, engine, 143,
53.9, 17, $17,943.
28. (14) Kurt Busch, Toyota, rear gear, 128,
93.9, 0, $11,355.
29. (40) Timmy Hill, Ford, handling, 104, 39.7,
15, $11,220.
30. (25) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, engine, 81,
46.1, 14, $17,878.
31. (42) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, handling,
55, 42, 13, $11,000.
32. (29) Benny Gordon, Toyota, vibration, 52,
42, 12, $10,890.
33. (36) David Starr, Chevrolet, rear gear, 47,
44.8, 0, $10,785.
34. (34) Kevin Lepage, Ford, vibration, 46, 47.9,
11, $10,675.
35. (37) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, clutch, 38, 38.9,
9, $10,560.
36. (43) Mike Harmon, Ford, vibration, 22, 39.1,
8, $10,525.
37. (41) Carl Long, Chevrolet, overheating, 16,
41.1,7, $10,475.
38. (38) Tanner Berryhill, Toyota, rear gear, 15,
41.1,6, $10,431.
39. (26) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, vibration, 13,
39.5, 5, $10,295.
40. (39) Matt Carter, Chevrolet, transmission,
13, 37.9, 4, $10,210.
41. (31) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, vibration,
10, 36.5, 3, $10,150.
42. (35) Matt Frahm, Chevrolet, brakes, 6, 34.8,
2, $10,120.
43. (28) Charles Lewandoski, Toyota, vibration,
4, 33.4, 1, $10,053.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 137.492 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 10 minutes, 55 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.059 seconds.
Caution Flags: 6 for 26 laps.
Lead Changes: 11 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: R.Stenhouse Jr. 1-32; K.Lepage
33; A.Dillon 34-43; S.Hornish Jr 44-46; E.Sadler
47-87; A.Dillon 88-92; E.Sadler 93-144; S.Hor-
nish Jr. 145-146; D.Herring 147-148; M.Annett
149-150; A.Dillon 151-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): E.Sadler, 2 times for 93 laps; A.Dillon, 3
times for 65 laps; R.Stenhouse Jr., 1 time for 32
laps; S.Hornish Jr., 2 times for 5 laps; D.Herring,
1 time for 2 laps; M.Annett, 1 time for 2 laps;
K.Lepage, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 1,014; 2. R.Sten-
house Jr, 1,010; 3. A.Dillon, 995; 4. S.Hornish
Jr., 968; 5. J.Allgaier, 911; 6. M.Annett, 875; 7.
C.Whitt, 805; 8. M.Bliss, 748; 9. B.Scott, 666; 10.
J.Nemechek, 651.



Mets 4, Marlins 3


Miami

Petersn If
GHrndz cf
Reyes ss
Ca.Lee lb
Dobbs rf
DSolan 2b
J.Buck c
Velazqz 3b
Buehrle p
Cousins ph
Koehlerp
ARams p
Brantly ph
Totals
Miami
New York


NewYork


ab rh bi ab rh bi
4 00 0 Tejadass 4 01 0
4 01 0 DnMrp2b 4 0 1 1
4 00 0 DWrght3b 4 000
4 0 0 0 Hairstn rf 4 1 1 1
3 1 0 0 Dudalb 1 1 0 0
4 1 3 0 I.Davislb O 0 0 O
4 1 1 3 Bay If 4 1 1 2
4 02 AnTrrs cf 4 01 0
0 0 0 0 Thole c 3 1 2 0
1 00 0 Dickeyp 4 0 0 0
0 00 0 Rauchp 0 000
1010
1 0 1 0
33 38 3 Totals 324 7 4
000 000 003 3
020 110 OOx 4


FoT thei record


Cleveland
U.Jimenez L,9-17
Seddon
FHerrmann
Sipp
J.Gomez
Kansas City
W.SmithW,6-8
Crow H,19
K.Herrera S,2-3
HBP-by U.Jimenez (

Astros 4,
Pittsburgh
ab r h bi
SMartelf 4 01 0
Walker2b 4 01 0
AMcCtcf 4 00 0
GJonesrf 3 00 0
GSnchzlb 3 1 1 1
PAlvrz3b 3 01 0
McKnrc 3 00 0
Barmes ss 3 00 0
Correiap 2 00 0
Watsonp 0 00 0
Presley ph 1 0 0 0
Hanrhnp 0 00 0



Totals 30 1 4 1
Pittsburgh 010
Houston 100
E-Barmes (16), Mc
DP-Houston 2. LOB
6. 2B-S.Moore (9)
J.Castro (3). SB-Gre'
S-Altuve.


Pittsburgh
Correia L,11-10
Watson
Hanrahan
Houston
Keuchel W,3-7
Ambriz H,2
W.Lopez S,7-10


Correia pitched to 3 b;
WP-Correia, Ambriz.

AL le
BATTING-MiCabr
Los Angeles, .326; M
Jeter, New York, .321;
ler, Kansas City, .312;
RUNS-Trout, Los
Detroit, 104; AdJones,
Texas, 98; Kinsler, Texa
96; Jeter, New York, 94
RBI-MiCabrera,
Texas, 123; Willingham
nacion, Toronto, 103; F
Kansas City, 100; Pujo
HITS-Jeter, NewY
tmit 192 RButler Ka


Late Friday's game Floridd LOTTERY


IP H R ERBBSO ATLANTA Brandt
Snedeker had one of his
41-37 5 5 3 3
1-3 1 0 0 0 best rounds of the year, a 6-
2 1 0 0 0 0 under 64 on Saturday that
1-30 0 0 0 0 gave him a share of the lead
1 0 0 0 0 0 at the Tour Championship.
782It could turn out to be a
1 1 1 0 1 1 round worth $10 million.
1 1 0 0 1 1 Snedeker, in control of his
Francoeur). game despite increasing

Pirates 1 wind at tree-lined East
Lake, made a collection of
Houston abrhbi tough putts and used his
Altuve 2b 2 0 1 0 short game to pick up a cou-
SMoore rf 3 1 1 0 ple of other birdies to wind
BBarns ph-cf 1 0 0 0 up atop the leaderboard
Wallaclb 4 0 1 1 with Justin Rose, who also
Maxwllcf-lf 4000
FMrtnz If 3 0 0 0 played bogey-free for a 68.
Ambriz p O 0 0 Sunday at East Lake is
Pareds ph 1 0 0 0 the final day of the FedEx
WLopezp 0 0 0 0 Cup, and it has never been
Lowrie ss 3 o 1 0 more up for grabs among so
Greene pr-ss 1 1 1 O
Dmngz3b 4 11 0 many top players.
JCastro c 3 1 2 3 Rory McIlroy had a 68 -
Keuchl p 2 0 0 0 his 11th consecutive round in
Bogsvc ph-rf 0 0 0 0 the 60s-and was three shots
Totals 31 4 8 4
000 000 1 behind. Tiger Woods sal-
000 30x 4 vaged an important par after
:Kenry (3), Watson (2). bouncing a shot off a Georgia
-Pittsburgh 3, Houston pine and had a 67 that put
. HR-G.Sanchez (7), him four shots behind.
ene (11). CS-Altuve (9).him four shots b nd
McIlroy, Woods and
IP H R ER BBSO Snedeker were among the
top five seeds coming into
6 7 4 3 1 9 the Tour Championship,

1 1 0 2 meaning they only have to
win Sunday to claim the
7 4 1 1 1 5 FedEx Cup title and its $10
1 0 0 0 0 1 million bonus, the richest

matters in the 7th. prize in golf.
They won't be the only
players with a chance to win
aders at least one trophy the
era, Detroit, .332;Trout, Tour Championship on
Mauer, Minnesota, .323; Sunday Rose will be in the
Beltre, Texas, .316; But-
DavMurphyTexas, .312. final group with Snedeker,
Angeles, 120; MiCabrera, and while it's unlikely he can
Baltimore, 99; Hamilton, win the FedEx Cup, the Eng-
as, 98; AJackson, Detroit, lishman surely would settle
4. for his second win of the
netroit, 131; Hamilton year against a strong field.
n, Minnesota, 110; Encar-
ielder, Detroit, 102; Butler, Snedeker and Rose were
Ils, Los Angeles, 98. at 8-under 202.
ork, 204; MiCabrera, De- LPGA Tour
ansas Citv 179 RBeltre,


Texas, 176; AGordon, Kansas City, 176; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, 175; Cano, NewYork, 171.
DOUBLES-AGordon, Kansas City, 49; Pu-
jols, Los Angeles, 44; Cano, New York, 41;
Kinsler, Texas, 40; NCruz, Texas, 39; MiCabr-
era, Detroit, 38; Choo, Cleveland, 38.
HOME RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 42; Hamil-
ton, Texas, 42; Encarnacion, Toronto, 40; ADunn,
Chicago, 39; Granderson, NewYork, 39; Willing-
ham, Minnesota, 35; Beltre, Texas, 34.
STOLEN BASES-Trout, Los Angeles, 46;
RDavis, Toronto, 45; Revere, Minnesota, 37;
Crisp, Oakland, 35; AEscobar, Kansas City 31;
BUpton, Tampa Bay 30; JDyson, Kansas City,
28; DeJennings, Tampa Bay 28.
PITCHING-Weaver, Los Angeles, 18-4;
Price, Tampa Bay, 18-5; Sale, Chicago, 17-7;
MHarrison, Texas, 17-9; Scherzer, Detroit, 16-
6; Darvish, Texas, 16-9; PHughes, New York,
16-12.
STRIKEOUTS-Scherzer, Detroit, 224; Ver-
lander, Detroit, 223; Darvish, Texas, 214; FHer-
nandez, Seattle, 207; Shields, Tampa Bay, 202;
Price, Tampa Bay 188; Sale, Chicago, 181.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 47; Rodney,
Tampa Bay, 43; RSoriano, New York, 42;
CPerez, Cleveland, 36; Nathan, Texas, 34;
Valverde, Detroit, 31; Wilhelmsen, Seattle, 28;
Reed, Chicago, 28.
NL leaders
BATTING-MeCabrera, San Francisco, .346;
AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .336; Posey, San
Francisco, .335; YMolina, St. Louis, .319; Braun,
Milwaukee, .315; Craig, St. Louis, .308; DWright,
New York, .305.
RUNS-AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 102;
Braun, Milwaukee, 98; JUpton, Arizona, 98;
Rollins, Philadelphia, 96; Bourn, Atlanta, 93;
Holliday, St. Louis, 92; Pagan, San Francisco,
90.
RBI-Braun, Milwaukee, 107; Headley San
Diego, 106; ASoriano, Chicago, 104; Holliday,
St. Louis, 98; LaRoche, Washington, 98; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 97; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 97.
HITS-AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 186; Prado,
Atlanta, 178; Scutaro, San Francisco, 177;
Braun, Milwaukee, 175; SCastro, Chicago, 173;
Reyes, Miami, 173; Holliday St. Louis, 169.
DOUBLES-ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 47;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 41;Votto, Cincinnati, 40;
DWright, New York, 40; AHil, Arizona, 39;
Prado, Atlanta, 38; DanMurphy, New York, 37.
HOME RUNS-Braun, Milwaukee, 40; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 34; Stanton, Miami, 34; LaRoche,
Washington, 32; Beltran, St. Louis, 30; AMc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 30; ASoriano, Chicago, 30.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Atlanta, 39; Vic-
torino, Los Angeles, 37; CGomez, Milwaukee,
35; Pierre, Philadelphia, 35; Reyes, Miami, 35;
EvCabrera, San Diego, 34; Altuve, Houston, 32.
PITCHING-GGonzalez, Washington, 20-8;
Dickey NewYork, 19-6; Cueto, Cincinnati, 18-9;
Lynn, St. Louis, 16-7; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 16-
8; Miley, Arizona, 16-10; 7 tied at 15.
STRIKEOUTS-Dickey, New York, 209; Ker-
shaw, Los Angeles, 206; Hamels, Philadelphia,
202; GGonzalez, Washington, 201; Strasburg,
Washington, 197; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 194;
MCain, San Francisco, 185.
SAVES-Motte, St. Louis, 39; Kimbrel, At-
lanta, 38; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 36; Papelbon,
Philadelphia, 36; AChapman, Cincinnati, 35; Ax-
ford, Milwaukee, 32; Clippard, Washington, 32.


Navistar Classic
PRATTVILLE, Ala. Third-
ranked Stacy Lewis shot a 7-



NEVER
Continued from Page B1


slim chance at an upset
"I think Morgan was throw-
ing it to the right person; we
just weren't very accurate,"
Kentucky coach Joker
Phillips said. "Again, for us to
be successful in this offense,
you have to be able to throw
and catch, and we weren't
able to do that today"
Kentucky finished with 60
yards passing.
Newton completed 7 of 21
passes for 48 yards, with
three interceptions. He was
benched in favor of Jalen
Whitlow in the fourth. Smith
watched from the sideline -
unable to do anything to help.
"To run the risk of him
being out for a long period of
time if he got hit and injured
today, I was not ready to do
that," Phillips said. "I'm
treating him as if he's my kid
and I just did want to do that.
The risk was not worth the
reward."
De'Ante Saunders, Jaylen
Watkins and Michael Taylor
each picked off passes from
Newton in the decisive
second quarter
The Gators, though, only
turned one of them into
points.
Watkins anticipated New-
ton's pass in the flat, made
the interception and re-
turned it 26 yards for a
17-0 lead.
Florida could have turned
Taylor's pick into points, but
Muschamp decided to have
his offense run a play with no
timeouts and 16 seconds re-
maining in the half. The
Gators could have attempted
a 46-yard field goal well
within Caleb Sturgis' range
- but tried to get closer
Driskel got sacked, allow-


Associated Press
Stacy Lewis tees off Satur-
day on the 18th hole during
the third round of the Navis-
tar LPGA Classic golf tourna-
ment in Prattville, Ala.
under 65 to take a two-stroke
lead in the Navistar LPGA
Classic, while second-round
leader Lexi Thompson fell five
shots behind.
Lewis, a two-time winner this
season, had a 15-under 201
total on The Senator course at
the Robert Trent Jones Golf
Trail's Capitol Hill complex. She
birdied four of the first five holes
in her bogey-free round.
The 17-year-old Thompson
had a 74 to drop into a tie for
sixth at 10 under. Thompson
won the event last year at 16 to
become the youngest cham-
pion in LPGA Tour history, a
mark broken last month by 15-
year-old amateur Lydia Ko in
the Canadian Women's Open.
Angela Stanford was second
after a 68. Lizette Salas with third
at 12 under after a 70, and Haeji
Kang and Mi Jung Hur followed
at 11 under. Kang shot a 67, and
Hur had a 72. Sarah Jane Smith
and Hee Young Park joined
Thompson at 10 under. Smith
had a 68, and Park shot 72.
Lewis is trying to complete an
Alabama sweep after beating
Thompson by a stroke in the
Mobile Bay LPA Classic in late
April. The former Arkansas star
also won the ShopRite LPGA
Classic in June in New Jersey.


ing the clock to run out
Driskel completed 18 of 27
passes for 203 yards, with a
touchdown and an intercep-
tion. He also ran eight times
for 35 yards and a score. His
38-yard run in the first quar-
ter seemed to spark Florida
after two three-and-out
drives to start the game.
"Every game is really a
building block in develop-
ment," Driskel said. "The
more experience, the more
reps you get, the more you're
going to learn. I did some
nice things today, but there's
definitely some things I need
to clean up.... I think I did a
nice job with the opportuni-
ties I got."
Driskel hooked up with
Dunbar for a 19-yard TD pass
in the second quarter and
plunged across the goal line
for a 1-yard sneak in the third
as the Gators built a 31-0
lead.
Backup Jacoby Brissett
played most of the fourth.
His 1-yard sneak make it
38-0.
Mike Gillislee ran 13 times
for 56 yards before giving
way to Matt Jones and Mack
Brown.
Florida's defense gave up
chunks of yards early, but set-
tled down and pretty much
shut Kentucky down late.
"The turnovers were big
for us," Taylor said.
"Turnovers equal points, and
points equal wins."
Aiding the shutout, Ken-
tucky's Craig McIntosh
missed two field goals. He
was wide left on a 54-yarder
in the first and wide right
from 46 yards out in the
second.
"It definitely feels like a
missed opportunity," Ken-
tucky running back Ray-
mond Sanders said. "We just
have to keep building and
keep getting better"


E-D.Solano (4), Duda (5). DP-Miami 1.
LOB-Miami 8, NewYork 8.2B-D.Solano(10),
An.Torres (14), Thole (15). HR-J.Buck (12),
Hairston (19), Bay (8). SB-Petersen (8). S-
Buehrle 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Buehrle L,13-13 6 5 4 4 3 3
Koehler 1 1 0 0 0 0
A.Ramos 1 1 0 0 1 2
New York
DickeyW,19-6 8 6 2 2 2 4
RauchS,4-7 1 2 1 1 0 2
Dickey pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Dickey (G.Hernandez) WP-Dickey

Royals 5, Indians 3
Cleveland Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo rf 3 0 2 0 JDysoncf 2 1 0 0
AsCarrss 4 00 0 Bourgsph-cf 2 00 0
CSantnc 5 1 2 0 AEscorss 4 1 1 1
Brantly cf 4 0 1 0 AGordn If 3 1 0 0
Canzlerlb 4 02 0 Butlerdh 4 0 3 1
LaPortdh 4 0 1 0 Mostks3b 3 1 0 0
Chsnhll3b 3 00 0 Francr rf 3 1 1 0
Neallf 3 1 1 0 Hosmerlb 4 0 1 1
Ktchmph 1 00 0 B.Penac 3 01 1
Rottino If 0 0 0 0 Falu 2b 4 0 2 1
CPhlps2b 4 1 1 2
Totals 35 3102 Totals 325 9 5
Cleveland 000 020 010 3
Kansas City 200 030 00x 5
E-Neal (1), Bourgeois (3). DP-Kansas City
2. LOB-Cleveland 9, Kansas City 8.2B-A.Es-
cobar(29), Butler 2 (29). 3B-B.Pena (1). HR-
C.Phelps (1). SB-J.Dyson (28), Hosmer (16).
CS-Falu (1). SF-B.Pena.


Associated rress
Brandt Snedeker watches his tee shot Saturday on the third
hole during the third round of the Tour Championship golf
tournament in Atlanta.



Into final round,



Tour Champ. tight

Associated Press I F


B4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

No. 14 Florida 38,
Kentucky 0
Kentucky 0 0 0 00- 0
Florida 3 21 7 7 38
First Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 27, 5:18.
Second Quarter
Fla-Gillislee 1 run (Sturgis kick), 12:04.
Fla-Watkins 26 interception return (Sturgis
kick), 8:24.
Fla-Dunbar 19 pass from Driskel (Sturgis
kick), :44.
Third Quarter
Fla-Driskel 1 run (Sturgis kick), 2:50.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Brissett 1 run (Sturgis kick), 6:47.


A-87,102.
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Ky
12
32-159
60
8-27-3
1
6-42.5
0-0
7-45
22:19


Fla
22
45-200
203
18-27-1
73
3-46.0
1-0
7-51
37:41


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Kentucky, George 13-52, Sanders
10-48, M.Newton 4-34, Mobley 4-22, Whitlow 1-
3. Florida, Gillislee 13-56, Jones 10-45, C.John-
son 5-35, Driskel 8-35, M.Brown 4-31, Brissett
2-4, Team 3-(minus 6).
PASSING-Kentucky, M.Newton 7-21-3-48,
Whitlow 1-6-0-12. Florida, Driskel 18-27-1-203.
RECEIVING-Kentucky, King 3-13, McCaskill 2-
11, George 1-24, Legree 1-12, Sanders 1-0.
Florida, Hines 3-52, Hammond 3-41, Reed 3-41,
Dunbar 3-36, Gillislee 1-11, C.Burton 1-6, Jones
1-6, M.Brown 1-5, Joyer 1-5, Andrades 1-0.
Miami 42,
Georgia Tech 36, OT
Miami 19 0 314 6- 42
GeorgiaTech 022 14 0 0-- 36
First Quarter
Mia-Dorsett 65 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), 14:03.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 38, 4:11.
Mia-Safety, 4:11.
Mia-James 1 run (Wieclaw kick), :00.
Second Quarter
GaT-O.Smith 8 run (Scully kick), 11:23.
GaT-Washington 2 run (Scully kick), 9:05.
GaT-Washington 10 run (Washington pass
from Washington), 3:39.
Third Quarter
GaT-Zenon 35 run (Scully kick), 13:09.
GaT-Washington 2 run (Scully kick), 10:06.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 23, 4:25.
Fourth Quarter
Mia-James 15 run (Wieclaw kick), 13:41.
Mia-James 10 pass from Morris (Wieclaw
kick), :27.
Overtime
Mia-James 25 run.
A-50,390.
Mia GaT
First downs 30 18
Rushes-yards 32-173 58-287
Passing 436 132
Comp-Att-Int 31-52-1 3-8-0
Return Yards 18 84
Punts-Avg. 3-40.0 5-44.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 8-66 5-35
Time of Possession 29:37 30:17
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Miami, James 15-89, Du.Johnson
13-72, Morris 2-10, Clements 1-4, Team 1-
(minus 2). Georgia Tech, Laskey 15-82, God-
high 6-59, Zenon 6-57, Washington 20-47,
O.Smith 7-22, Bostic 2-15, Lee 1-3, Sims 1-2.
PASSING-Miami, Morris 31-52-1-436. Geor-
gia Tech, Washington 3-8-0-132.
RECEIVING-Miami, Dorsett 9-184, De.John-
son 7-107, Du.Johnson 4-38, Scott 3-48, James
3-24, Walford 2-13, Hurns 2-10, M.Lewis 1-12.
Georgia Tech, Zenon 2-74, Greene 1-58.


Ball St. 31, USF 27
South Florida 3 610 8- 27
BallSt. 3 714 7- 31
First Quarter
USF-FG Bonani 42, 7:17.
BSU-FG Schott 39, 3:09.
Second Quarter
BSU-Edwards 3 run (Schott kick), 7:18.
USF-Lamar 15 pass from Daniels (kick
blocked), 3:27.
Third Quarter
BSU-Wenning 1 run (Schott kick), 8:45.
USF-FG Bonani 27, 5:36.
BSU-Ja.Smith 5 pass from Wenning (Schott
kick), 3:14.
USF-A.Davis 15 pass from Daniels (Bonani
kick), :21.
Fourth Quarter
USF-Lamar 29 pass from Daniels (Murray
run), 4:12.
BSU-Snead 19 pass from Wenning (Schott
kick), 1:02.
A-16,397.
USF BSU
First downs 27 27
Rushes-yards 45-206 35-169
Passing 312 244
Comp-Att-Int 19-30-2 24-36-0
Return Yards 0 46
Punts-Avg. 1-40.0 2-31.5
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 11-112 5-65
Time of Possession 30:07 29:53
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Florida, Daniels 14-75, Mur-
ray 18-65, Lamar 11-55, Mitchell 1-9, Shaw 1-
2. Ball St., Edwards 16-98, Banks 10-42,
Wenning 4-16, Scott 4-12, Ja.Smith 1-1.
PASSING-South Florida, Daniels 19-30-2-312.
Ball St., Wenning 24-36-0-244.
RECEIVING-South Florida, Mitchell 6-99,
Lamar 5-80, Murray 2-49, A.Davis 2-21,
D.Montgomery 1-25, Hopkins 1-18, Landi 1-10,
Welch 1-10. Ball St., Snead 11-135, Ja.Smith
7-74, Fakes 2-11, Shillings 1-10, Edwards 1-7,
Schneider 1-4, C.Ryan 1-3.
No. 1 Alabama 40,
FAU 7
FAU 0 0 0 7- 7
Alabama 14 16 3 7- 40
First Quarter
Ala-Bell 85 pass from A.McCarron (Shelley
kick), 13:18.
Ala-White 4 pass from A.McCarron (Shelley
kick), 6:12.
Second Quarter
Ala-FG Foster 52, 14:49.
Ala-FG Shelley 26, 10:31.
Ala-FG Shelley 30, 5:22.
Ala-Ch.Jones 4 pass from A.McCarron (Shel-
ley kick), :08.
Third Quarter
Ala-FG Foster 46, 8:26.
Fourth Quarter
Ala-K.Drake 8 run (Shelley kick), 11:13.
FAU-Deleon 6 pass from Wilbert (M.Anderson


kick), 2:49.
A-101,821.
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Ala
25
47-256
247
16-26-0
89
1-29.0
4-1
3-21
33:13


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-FAU, Wallace 12-47, Fortner 14-
39, Jones 1-3, Wilbert 5-(minus 13). Alabama,
Lacy 15-106, Yeldon 10-63, K.Drake 5-35, Hart
4-29, Howell 4-20, A.McCarron 2-3, Sims 6-2,
Ely 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-FAU, Wilbert 7-13-0-34. Alabama,
A.McCarron 15-25-0-212, Sims 1-1-0-35.
RECEIVING-FAU, Deleon 4-24, Dorvilus 2-6,
Hankerson 1-4. Alabama, Cooper 4-65,
M.Williams 4-25, White 4-17, Bell 1-85,
Cy.Jones 1-35, Vogler 1-16, Ch.Jones 1-4.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 B5


Back from the dead Coming



- 0v up short


Associated Press
Miami running back Mike James (5) celebrates with Clive Walford after scoring a
touchdown in the second half Saturday in Atlanta. Miami won in overtime 42-36.


Miami nips

Ga. Tech

42-36in OT

Associated Press

ATLANTA Mike James
scored untouched on a 25-
yard run, moments after
Miami stopped Georgia
Tech quarterback Tevin
Washington on fourth-and-
inches on the first posses-
sion of overtime, giving the
Hurricanes a wild 42-36 win
Saturday
Junior quarterback
Stephen Morris passed for
436 yards and rallied the
Hurricanes (3-1, 2-0 At-
lantic Coast Conference)
from a 36-19 deficit.
Georgia Tech (2-2, 1-2) had
come back after trailing 19-
0 at the end of the first quar-
ter, with Washington rushing
for three touchdowns.
But the Yellow Jackets
couldn't slow down Morris
or Miami after that, as the
Hurricanes scored the final
23 points. Morris' 10-yard


touchdown pass to James
created a 36-all tie with 27
seconds left in regulation.
That capped an eight-play,
91-yard march that took
just 1:33.
Georgia Tech also lost its
season opener in overtime,
at Virginia Tech, and has
fallen to the Hurricanes four
consecutive years after beat-
ing Miami four straight
times.
After being limited to 39
yards in the first quarter,
big plays flipped the mo-
mentum in the second
quarter for the Yellow
Jackets, whose four plays
of 70 or more yards in their
first three games led the
Football Bowl Subdivision.
A 57-yard catch and run
by Tech's Tony Zenon was
the key on the Jackets' 91-
yard drive to open the sec-
ond quarter. Orwin Smith
soon swept 8 yards right for
Tech's first score.
On Miami's next play,
Tech linebacker Brandon
Watts forced wide receiver
Phillip Dorsett to fumble,
and fellow linebacker
Jabari Hunt-Days recov-
ered at the Tech


43-yard line.
A 37-yard carry by Geor-
gia Tech running back Rob-
bie Godhigh helped set up a
2-yard scoring run by Wash-
ington to pull the Yellow
Jackets within 19-14.
Minutes later, Jamal
Golden's 56-yard punt re-
turn put the Yellow Jackets
at Miami's 23, and they took
the lead with a 10-yard run
by Washington.
Tech added a two-point
conversion on a pass from
Washington to Zenon, al-
though it took video review
to reverse the original call.
The Yellow Jackets led 22-19
with 3:39 left in the first
half, their first lead over
Miami dating back to the
first quarter of their 2009
game.
The first quarter was as
ugly for Tech as the second
was pretty.
Morris found Dorsett wide
open for a 65-yard touch-
down pass on the game's
third play, and Dorsett
added a 40-yard reception a
few minutes later. That led
to Jake Wieclaw's 38-yard
field goal and a 10-0
Miami lead.


Ball State

edges South

Florida 31-27

Associated Press

MUNCIE, Ind. Keith
Wenning connected with
Willie Snead for a 19-yard
touchdown pass with 1:02
left as Ball State rallied to
beat South Florida 31-27
on Saturday
Snead, who finished
with 11 catches for 135
yards, caught the winner in
the back corner of the end
zone for the Cardinals (3-1).
Ball State's Eric Patter-
son picked off South
Florida's B.J. Daniels at
the 10-yard line as time
expired to seal the win.
Wenning was 24 of 36 for
244 yards passing with two
touchdowns, and also ran
for a score. Jahwan Ed-
wards ran 98 yards on 16
carries and a touchdown
for the Cardinals, who
won their second straight
game after being down
late. Ball State beat Indi-
ana, 41-39, on a field goal
as time expired last week.
South Florida (2-2) lost
its second in a row despite
Daniels' efforts. He threw
three TD passes and led
the Bulls in rushing with
75 yards.
After trailing much of
the way, South Florida
turned a 24-12 deficit into
a three-point lead in the
fourth quarter. Daniels,
who finished with 312
yards passing, threw a 15-
yard TD pass to Andre
Davis in the final minute
of the third quarter, then
connected with Lindsey
Lamar on a 29-yard touch-
down the second TD for
Lamar in the game.
Demetris Murray's 2-point
conversion run put the
Bulls ahead 27-24 with 4:12
to go.
Wenning, who was not
intercepted in the game,
earlier found Jamill Smith
in the corner of the end
zone to make it 24-12.


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COLLEGE FOOTBALL






B6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


Associated Press

SPARTA, Ky. -As Austin Dillon
proved again at Kentucky Speed-
way, being good creates its own
fate.
Although misfortune by Ricky
Stenhouse Jr and Elliott Sadler
factored in the outcome of the Na-
tionwide Series race Saturday, Dil-
lon's ability to take advantage


resulted in victory Starting on the
pole and always in contention, the
rookie positioned himself to pass
Sadler when his teammate's Chevy
fell off the pace with steering is-
sues with 50 laps left.
Nothing lucky about that.
"It wasn't a gift by (any) means,"
Dillon said after leading the final
50 laps to complete a season
sweep at the 1.5-mile oval. "We


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Tide rolls over Owls


Oregon State upends

No. 19 UCIA

Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -AJ McCar-
ron threw three touchdown passes,
including an early 85-yarder to
Kenny Bell, and No. 1 Alabama
routed Florida Atlantic 40-0.
Eddie Lacy rushed for 106 yards
in the first half for the Crimson
Tide (4-0), which rolled to 134 con-
secutive points and two shutouts
before allowing a late touchdown.
The Owls (1-3) managed only one
first down through three quarters
and were outgained 503-110 in total
yards. McCarron was 15-of-25 pass-
ing for 212 yards before leaving
midway through the third quarter.
The 85-yarder came 1:42 into the
game and is tied for the fifth-longest
touchdown pass in Tide history
No. 2 LSU 12, Auburn 10
AUBURN, Ala. LSU's defense de-
livered a first-quarter safety and shut out
Auburn in the second half to give the
second-ranked Tigers a 12-10 victory.
Auburn led 10-9 at halftime but man-
aged only 183 yards.
A fumbled punt return by Auburn's
Quan Bray set up DrewAlleman's 30-
yard field goal late in the third quarter that
gave LSU (4-0, 1-0 Southeastern Confer-
ence) a 12-10 lead. Alleman missed a
34-yarder with 39 seconds remaining.
Auburn (1-3, 0-2 SEC) managed only
one first down on its final possession.
Kiehl Frazier's final pass was intercepted
by Tharold Simon as the game ended.
LSU's Zach Mettenberger had two
first-half fumbles but threw a 33-yard
pass to running back Spencer Ware on
a key third-down late in the game.
Sam Montgomery tackled Tre Mason
in the end zone midway through the first
quarter and Michael Ford's 1-yard TD
run four minutes later made it 9-0 LSU.
No. 5 Georgia 48, Vandy 3
ATHENS, Ga. -Aaron Murray com-
pleted his first 12 passes and No. 5
Georgia finally got off to a good start,
blowing out Vanderbilt before halftime
on the way to a 48-3 victory.
Murray hooked up with Tavarres King
and Marion Brown on touchdown
throws, breaking a tie with Eric Zeier for
second place in school history.
The junior quarterback has 69 TDs,
just three behind David Greene.
Murray also scored on a 1-yard
sneak as the Bulldogs (4-0, 2-0 South-
eastern Conference) raced to a 27-0
lead. He finished 18 of 24 for 250
yards. Todd Gurley rushed for 130
yards and two touchdowns. Keith Mar-
shall also had a pair of scoring runs.
No. 15 Kansas St. 24,
No. 6 Oklahoma 19
NORMAN, Okla. John Hubert ran
for 130 yards and a touchdown, Jarell
Childs scooped up a fumble and returned
it for a score and No. 15 Kansas State
beat No. 6 Oklahoma 24-19 to avenge a
wrenching loss from last season.
Collin Klein picked up 228 yards of
total offense and ran for the go-ahead
touchdown early in the fourth quarter in
a solid performance that outshined and
error-filled night by Sooners quarter-
back Landry Jones.
Jones threw for 298 yards and a late
touchdown to get Oklahoma (2-1, 0-1
Big 12) within five but also fumbled and
threw an interception that put Kansas
State (4-0, 1-0) in position to go ahead.
No. 7 South Carolina 31,
Missouri 10
COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw
completed 20 straight passes and
threw for two touchdowns and Marcus
Lattimore ran for two scores as South
Carolina manhandled Missouri in the
Tigers' first SEC road game.
Shaw missed his first pass to Latti-
more on the game's first series, then
hit his final 20 for the Gamecocks (2-0
SEC).
Missouri (2-2, 0-2) struggled against
a Gamecocks defense that has given
up three touchdowns all year. The
Tigers had a season-low 254 yards.
Lattimore rushed for 85 yards.
No. 8 West Virginia 31,
Maryland 21
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Doug
Rigg returned a fumble 51 yards for
West Virginia and Tavon Austin had an-
other remarkable game against his
home-state Terrapins.
The Baltimore native caught 13
passes for 179 yards and set a school


"? -~


Associated Press
Alabama wide receiver Cyrus Jones tries to break free from Florida Atlantic defensive back Christian Milstead as
he runs down the sidelines Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala. No. 1 Alabama defeated FAU 40-7.


record for career receptions.
Still, West Virginia looked flat at times
on offense, after averaging 56 points and
612 yards in its first two games. Geno
Smith had as many incompletions in the
first half (nine) as he did in the first two
games combined before getting on track.
He finished with 338 passing yards.
No. 13 USC 27, Cal 9
LOS ANGELES Matt Barkley
passed for 192 yards and threw two
touchdown passes to Marqise Lee, and
No. 13 Southern California bounced
back from its first defeat with a 27-9 vic-
tory over California.
Lee had 11 catches for 94 yards, and
Silas Redd rushed for 158 yards and a
score as the Trojans (3-1, 1-1 Pac-12)
grinded out their ninth consecutive win
over the Golden Bears (1-3, 0-1) in the
schools' 100th meeting.
A week after the preseason No. 1
team got shut out in the second half of
a 21-14 loss at Stanford, USC drained
the suspense from this matchup with a
methodical 75-yard drive that con-
sumed more than half of the fourth
quarter, capped by Lee's 3-yard TD
catch with 5:56 to play.
No. 16 Ohio State 29,
UAB 15
COLUMBUS, Ohio Braxton Miller
ran for two touchdowns and Ohio State
overcame a lethargic, mistake-filled ef-
fort to hold off UAB.
UAB (0-3) more than held its own
against the Buckeyes (4-0), who com-
mitted drive-killing penalties, had a punt
blocked for a touchdown and had trou-
ble scoring against a defense giving up
44 points and 477 yards a game.
The Blazers picked up points on spe-
cial teams and started the second half
by recovering an onside kick, but were
undone by four chop-block penalties
and a giveaway that led to a score.
Miller completed passes for 12, 14
and 18 yards and ran for 26 yards to
set up his own clinching 1-yard TD run
with 5:03 left.
No. 17 TCU 27, Virginia 7
FORT WORTH, Texas Brandon
Carter had a 68-yard touchdown on
one of his two one-handed catches,
linebacker Kenny Cain recovered a
fumble along with two interceptions and
TCU won its 11th straight game.
Casey Pachall threw for 305 yards


Associated Press
Florida State quarterback E.J. Manuel runs Saturday during the first quar-
ter against Clemson in Tallahassee. No. 4 FSU led No. 10 Clemson 49-31
late in the fourth quarter. See Monday's Chronicle for the full story.


and three touchdowns for the Horned
Frogs (3-0), whose winning streak is
the longest among FBS schools.
Josh Boyce had his TCU-record 18th
touchdown catch. Freshman Jaden
Oberkrom had field goals of 46 and 47
yards, the second field goal set up by
Cain's 40-yard interception return.
Oregon State 27,
No. 19 UCLA 20
PASADENA, Calif. Sean Mannion
passed for a career-high 379 yards
and two touchdowns as Oregon State
beat UCLA to start the teams' Pac-12
seasons.
The victory was the 74th at Oregon
State for coach Mike Riley, matching the
school record set by Lon Stiner, the
Beavers' coach from 1933-48. Riley is in
his 12th year with Oregon State (2-0).
Mannion completed 24 of 35 passes
with one interception. Markus
Wheaton had nine receptions for 150
yards, Brandin Cooks had six catches
for 175 yards, and Storm Woods
rushed for 96 yards and scored once.
Johnathan Franklin, the country's
leading rusher with a 180.3-yard aver-
age, was held to 45 yards on 12 carries
for UCLA (3-1, 0-1).
No. 20 Louisville 28,
FlU 21
MIAMI Teddy Bridgewater passed
for two touchdowns and ran for another
score in the return to his home city, and
No. 20 Louisville remained unbeaten by


holding off Florida International 28-21.
Senorise Perry rushed for 74 yards
for the Cardinals (4-0), who trailed for
the first time this season before control-
ling the second half and avenging last
season's 24-17 loss to FlU.
No. 21 Michigan State 23,
Eastern Michigan 7
EAST LANSING, Mich. Le'Veon
Bell rushed for a career-high 253 yards
and a touchdown to help stagnant
Michigan State avoid a major upset.
Dan Conroy kicked three field goals
for the No. 21 Spartans (3-1), who
failed to score a TD for more than
seven quarters until Andrew Maxwell hit
tight end Dion Sims on a 10-yard pass
with 7:19 left.
Michigan State struggled mightily
through most of its final tuneup for next
week's Big Ten opener against un-
beaten Ohio State.
No. 23 Mississippi St. 30,
South Alabama 10
STARKVILLE, Miss. Mississippi
State started its season with four
straight wins for the first time since
1999, beating South Alabama 30-10.
Tyler Russell completed 13 of 27
passes for 171 yards for the Bulldogs
(4-0) while LaDarius Perkins rushed for
a team-high 69 yards including a 44-
yard touchdown run.
Nickoe Whitley and Johnthan Banks
both had long interception returns that
stopped South Alabama drives.


had a great car in practice, we ad-
justed on it (Friday) and today and
it got really good. We're in victory
lane and proud to represent the
speedway with the sweep."
Dillon, who dominated the June
race by leading 192 of 200 laps, led
four times for 65 laps this time
around in the iconic No. 3 Chevy
owned by grandfather Richard Chil-
dress.


He won comfortably over Sam
Hornish Jr., Brendan Gaughan,
Drew Herring and Sadler, who
seemed headed for his fifth win
after leading 93 laps.
Sadler's consolation was re-
claiming the points lead from
Stenhouse, whose pit-road colli-
sion with Eric McClure on lap 33
helped create an opportunity that
Dillon ultimately seized.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

College football
scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 30, Maine 20
Bloomsburg 42, CW Post 27
Castleton St. 35, SUNY Maritime 16
Cornell 45, Yale 6
Dartmouth 13, Holy Cross 10
Duquesne 35, Bryant 21
East Stroudsburg 59, Cheyney 27
Edinboro 35, Lock Haven 19
Fordham 20, Columbia 13
Franklin & Marshall 45, Juniata 38
Gettysburg 35, Susquehanna 24
Harvard 45, Brown 31
Hobart 42, Merchant Marine 21
James Madison 32, Rhode Island 7
Johns Hopkins 33, Muhlenberg 21
King's (Pa.) 55, Misericordia 17
Lafayette 20, Bucknell 14
Lebanon Valley 31, Stevenson 28
Lycoming 29, Albright 14
Marist 34, Davidson 21
Mass. Maritime 42, Coast Guard 38
Monmouth (NJ) 27, Sacred Heart 14
Montclair St. 34, William Paterson 17
Navy 41,VMI 3
Penn St. 24, Temple 13
Pittsburgh 55, Gardner-Webb 10
Rowan 30, W. Connecticut 24
Shippensburg 61, Millersville 6
St. John Fisher 43, Hartwick 13
Stony Brook 32, Colgate 31
Towson 46, St. Francis (Pa.) 17
Villanova 24, Penn 8
Wagner 31, CCSU 13
Washington & Jefferson 17, Thiel 0
West Virginia 31, Maryland 21
Widener 90, Wilkes 0
SOUTH
Alabama 40, FAU 7
Appalachian St. 34, Chattanooga 17
Belhaven 70, Campbellsville 28
Bethel (Tenn.) 56, Bluefield South 28
Birmingham-Southern 16, Rhodes 2
Bridgewater (Va.) 17, Shenandoah 14
Centre 35, Kalamazoo 23
Charleston Southern 23, Shorter 20
Cumberlands 63, Pikeville 21
Duke 38, Memphis 14
E. Kentucky 51, Jacksonville St. 21
Florida 38, Kentucky 0
Florida A&M 24, Delaware St. 22
Furman 31, Presbyterian 21
Georgetown (Ky) 27, Kentucky Christian 6
Georgia 48, Vanderbilt 3
Georgia Southern 26, Elon 23
Huntingdon 24, Hampden-Sydney 21
LSU 12, Auburn 10
Lehigh 28, Liberty 26
Livingstone 48, Lincoln (Pa.) 44
Louisville 28, FlU 21
Miami 42, Georgia Tech 36, OT
Mississippi 39, Tulane 0
Mississippi St. 30, South Alabama 10
NC Central 45, Savannah St. 33
NC State 52, The Citadel 14
Nicholls St. 73, Evangel 17
North Carolina 27, East Carolina 6
Northwestern St. 45, MVSU 14
Old Dominion 64, New Hampshire 61
Richmond 35, Georgia St. 14
SE Louisiana 25, McNeese St. 24
Samford 25, W. Carolina 21
South Carolina 31, Missouri 10
Southern U. 28, Jackson St. 21
Tennessee 47, Akron 26
Tennessee St. 21, Bethune-Cookman 14
UT-Martin 31, Austin Peay 6
Virginia Tech 37, Bowling Green 0
W. Kentucky 42, Southern Miss. 17
Wake Forest 49, Army 37
Winston-Salem 35, Virginia Union 6
MIDWEST
Albion 35, Central 16
Ashland 42, N. Michigan 13
Augsburg 48, Hamline 24
Ball St. 31, South Florida 27
Bethel (Minn.) 52, Carleton 14
Butler 35, Campbell 14
Carthage 49, Lakeland 9
Cent. Methodist 32, Culver-Stockton 7
Cent. Michigan 32, Iowa 31
Concordia (Moor) 31, St. John's (Minn.) 21
Doane 38, Nebraska Wesleyan 24
Drake 28, Morehead St. 25
Ferris St. 20, Walsh 14
Grand Valley St. 46, Ohio Dominican 41
Greenville 49, Minn.-Morris 24
Grinnell 13, Beloit 7
Hillsdale 63, Notre Dame Coll.14
Illinois College 46, Ripon 21
Illinois St. 23, W. Illinois 3
Illinois Wesleyan 23, Hope 13
Jacksonville 21, Dayton 17
Lake Forest 34, Knox 13
Louisiana Tech 52, Illinois 24
Mayville St. 54, Presentation 7
Miami (Ohio) 27, UMass 16
Michigan St. 23, E. Michigan 7
Michigan Tech 35, Findlay 10
Millikin 44, Aurora 20
Minn. Duluth 42, Augustana (SD) 34
Minn. St.-Mankato 24, Minn. St.-Moorhead 0
Minn.-Crookston 33, SW Minnesota St. 28
Minnesota 17, Syracuse 10
N. Dakota St. 66, Prairie View 7
N. Illinois 30, Kansas 23
Nebraska 73, Idaho St. 7
North Park 46, Olivet 21
Northern St. (SD) 24, Concordia (St.P) 23
Northwestern 38, South Dakota 7
Northwestern (Minn.) 54, Mac Murray 14
Northwood (Mich.) 35, Tiffin 14
Notre Dame 13, Michigan 6
Ohio 44, Norfolk St. 10
Ohio St. 29, UAB 15
S. Dakota St. 24, Indiana St. 10
S. Illinois 14, Missouri St. 6
SE Missouri 41, Tennessee Tech 38, 20T
Saginaw Valley St. 51, Lake Erie 24
Sioux Falls 21, Bemidji St. 5
St. Cloud St. 24, Wayne (Neb.) 19
St. Francis (11.) 52, Iowa Wesleyan 13
St. Francis (Ind.) 76, Concordia (Mich.) 14
St. Norbert 28, Carroll (Wis.) 21, OT
St. Olaf 17, Gustavus 14
St. Scholastica 21, Martin Luther 7
Toledo 38, Coastal Carolina 28
Trine 28, Taylor-Fort Wayne 13
Upper Iowa 26, Minot St. 20
W. Michigan 30, UConn 24
Wayne (Mich.) 38, Malone 14
Westminster (Mo.) 30, Crown (Minn.) 12
Winona St. 32, Mary 23
Wis.-Oshkosh 70, Alma 9
Wis.-Stout 20, Wis.-River Falls 9
Wis.-Whitewater 34, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 7
Wisconsin 37, UTEP 26
Youngstown St. 42, N. Iowa 35


SOUTHWEST
Alabama A&M 42, Texas Southern 13
Arkansas St. 56, Alcorn St. 0
Cent. Arkansas 24, Sam Houston St. 20
Kansas St. 24, Oklahoma 19
Lamar 31, Langston 0
Marshall 54, Rice 51, 20T
Rutgers 35, Arkansas 26
TCU 27, Virginia 7
Texas A&M 70, SC State 14
Texas St. 41, Stephen F Austin 37
Troy 14, North Texas 7
UTSA 56, NW Oklahoma 3
FAR WEST
Colorado 35, Washington St. 34
E. Washington 32, Weber St. 26
Montana St. 41, N. Colorado 16
N. Arizona 41, Montana 31
New Mexico 27, New Mexico St. 14
Oregon St. 27, UCLA 20
San Diego 51, Valparaiso 14
San Jose St. 38, San Diego St. 34
Southern Cal 27, California 9
Utah St. 31, Colorado St. 19
Wyoming 40, Idaho 37, OT


Dillon wins Kentucky Nationwide Series race






NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


NFL standings


N.Y Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

San Diego
Denver


AFC
East
W L T
1 1 0
1 1 0
1 1 0
1 1 0
South
W L T
2 0 0
1 1 0
0 2 0
0 2 0
North
W L T
1 1 0
1 1 0
1 1 0
0 2 0
West
W L T
2 0 0
1 1 0
110


Kansas City 0 2 0 .000
Oakland 0 2 0 .000
NFC
East
W L T Pct F
Philadelphia 2 0 0 1.000
N.Y Giants 2 1 0 .667
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 3
Washington 1 1 0 .500
South
W L T Pct F
Atlanta 2 0 0 1.000
Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500
Carolina 1 2 0 .333
New Orleans 0 2 0 .000
North
W L T Pct F
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 ,
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 ,
Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 ,
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 5
West
W L T Pct F
Arizona 2 0 0 1.000
San Francisco 2 0 0 1.000
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500
Seattle 1 1 0 .500
Thursday's Game
N.Y Giants 36, Carolina 7
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Dallas, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Washington, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Miami, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Green Bay at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 27
Cleveland at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 30
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Kansas City 1 p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Miami at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh
Monday, Oct. 1
Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
AFC leaders


Bucs might recognize today's foe


Tampa Bay, Dallas

have already been

good and bad

Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas- There al-
ready seems to be an identity crisis
for both the Dallas Cowboys and
Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
While 20 teams were 1-1 after the
first two weeks of the NFL season,
the two playing each other today at
Cowboys Stadium have had early
drastic swings from good to bad.
Consider the Cowboys going from
an impressive season-opening vic-
tory at the defending Super Bowl
champion New York Giants to a
20-point loss in Seattle, where a
fumbled kickoff return and blocked
punt touchdown had them down by
10 points in the first five minutes.
Tampa Bay is coming off a last-
minute loss to the Giants when it al-
lowed 604 yards a franchise
record. Eli Manning passed for 510
yards, a week after the Bucs con-
tained Cam Newton and held Car-
olina to 10 yards rushing, matching
another team record.
'I don't think there's a real
(defense) or a fake one," corner-


back Eric Wright said.
"We have to go out
there and handle our
responsibilities and
do exactly what the
defense asks us to so."
For the Bucca-
neers, at least they're
adjusting to new


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers' pass defense yielded 510 yards to the New York Giants last Sunday and are
hoping to avoid a similar fate today at the Dallas Cowboys.


coach Jason Garrett's first full year,
and missed the playoffs with that
final loss to the Giants they avenged
in the league's kickoffgame.


Tampa Bay Bucs
(1-1) at Dallas
Cowboys (1-1)

* Time: 1 p.m. today
* TV: FOX


coach Greg Schiano and the fran-
chise's first completely new staff
since 1996.
Such wild swings in performance
are more troubling for the Cow-
boys, who so far have only enforced
the perception of being inconsis-
tent and distinctly average since
winning three Super Bowls over a
four-year span in the 1990s.
They were 8-8 last season in


An extended break
followed before the
debacle in Seattle
that made Dallas a
.500 team again. The
Cowboys' record
since the start of the
1997 season is 121-
121.


When asked this week his defini-
tion of Cowboys football, 10th-year
tight end Jason Witten mentioned
being physical and not turning the
ball over. He also talked about an
attacking mentality running and
passing the ball.
"Hey, look, I'm not here to con-
vince y'all or anybody else what
this football team is going to be," he
said. "I believe we got the guys that


are going to do it. Ultimately, we
laid an egg. We didn't do it. And you
don't start the season off and
bounce around. ... We got our
(rears) beat That's where our focus
is, how we bounce back from that."
The Cowboys are playing their
home opener after games on oppo-
site sides of the country
This will be their fourth season
at $1 billion-plus Cowboys Sta-
dium, where they are 13-11 and
have lost two of three openers. Dal-
las lost its two games there last De-
cember as part of a season-ending
1-4 stretch when the only win was
31-15 at Tampa Bay.
New coaches aren't the only
changes for the Bucs, who pro-
vided plenty of help for quarter-
back Josh Freeman. Their free
agency signees included veteran
receiver Vincent Jackson, tight end
Dallas Clark and Pro Bowl guard


Carl Nicks.
Schiano's winning debut ended a
10-game losing streak for the Bucs
before the Giants game that had four
TDs scored in the last seven minutes.
Watching last year's film against
Dallas gave Schiano only the
chance to see a few players still
around. That's really about all he
got out of that.
"There's enough scheme differ-
ences that it doesn't give you a lot
that way," he said. "Now, you can
watch the Cowboys schemes, but
it's against a different scheme than
we'll be running."
The Cowboys still have Tony
Romo, who in three career starts
against Tampa Bay has completed
61 of 86 passes (71 percent) for 908
yards with 11 touchdowns and no
interceptions. And the Bucs have to
face him right after Manning's big
game against them.


Reunion of sorts for Sparano travel
Reunion of sos Sparanotody


Week 3
Quarterbacks
Aft Com Yds
P Rivers, SND 65 48 515
Roethlis., PIT 71 46 520
Sanchez, NYJ 54 29 404
Brady, NWE 77 51 552
Schaub, HOU 66 46 461
Dalton, CIN 68 46 539
Flacco, BAL 71 43 531
P Manning, DEN 63 43 494
Fitzpatrick, BUF 51 28 373
Gabbert,JAC 58 30 313
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
Spiller, BUF 29 292 10.07
Re. Bush, MIA 40 241 6.03
Ridley, NWE 39 196 5.03
A. Foster, HOU 54 189 3.50
McGahee, DEN 38 177 4.66
R. Rice, BAL 26 167 6.42
Green-Ellis, CIN 39 166 4.26
Richardson, CLE 38 148 3.89
Jones-Drew, JAC 31 137 4.42
Greene, NYJ 38 117 3.08
Receivers
No Yds Avg
Wayne, IND 15 206 13.7
McFadden, OAK 15 105 7.0
De.Thomas, DEN 13 188 14.5
Pitta, BAL 13 138 10.6
Lloyd, NWE 13 129 9.9
Hartline, MIA 12 161 13.4
Avery, IND 12 148 12.3
Gronkowski, NWE 12 135 11.3
A..Green, CIN 12 128 10.7
Bowe,KAN 11 155 14.1
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec
A. Foster, HOU 3 3 0
Rosario, SND 3 0 3
Spiller, BUF 3 3 0
McGahee, DEN 2 2 0
Battle, SND 2 2 0
Bowe,KAN 2 0 2
Re. Bush, MIA 2 2 0
Chandler, BUF 2 0 2
Gronkowski, NWE 2 0 2
St. Hill, NYJ 2 0 2
NFC leaders
Week 3
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds
M.Ryan,ATL 67 47 518
Ale. Smith, SNF 57 40 437
Bradford, STL 60 43 508
Griffin Ill, WAS 55 39 526
Ponder, MIN 62 47 515
Romo, DAL 69 45 558
Manning, NYG 118 79 1011
Kolb, ARI 35 21 206
Rodgers, GBY 76 52 522
Freeman, TAM 52 31 381
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
M. Lynch, SEA 47 207 4.40
Gore, SNF 33 201 6.09
L. McCoy PHL 45 191 4.24
Morris, WAS 44 185 4.20
And. Brown, NYG 33 184 5.58
Murray, DAL 32 175 5.47
D. Martin, TAM 44 161 3.66
A. Peterson, MIN 33 144 4.36
PThomas, NOR 13 127 9.77
Griffin III, WAS 20 124 6.20
Receivers
No Yds Avg
Cruz, NYG 23 279 12.1
Amendola, STL 20 230 11.5
Harvin, MIN 18 188 10.4
Sproles, NOR 18 163 9.1
M. Bennett, NYG 15 185 12.3
St.Smith, CAR 14 296 21.1
H. Nicks, NYG 14 237 16.9
C.Johnson, DET 14 205 14.6
R.White, ATL 14 189 13.5
G.Olsen, CAR 14 167 11.9
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec
A. Brown, NYG 3 3 0
M. Bennett, NYG 3 0 3
Ve. Davis, SNF 3 0 3
Mi. Austin, DAL 2 0 2
M. Bush, CHI 2 2 0
B.Gibson,STL 2 0 2
Gonzalez, ATL 2 0 2
Gore, SNF 2 2 0
J. Graham, NOR 2 0 2
Griffin III, WAS 2 2 0


Ret Pts
0 18
0 18
0 18
0 14
0 12
0 12
0 12
0 12
0 12
0 12


Ret
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


Former Miami

coach now with

New YorkJets

Associated Press

MIAMI Even after the
Miami Dolphins scored 35
points in a win last week,
offensive coordinator
Mike Sherman heard
grousing about his play-
calling from a fan his
wife when he got home
from the game.
"She asked me, 'Where's After ti
the flea-flicker? I want the Bush is
flea-flicker Where's the te
halfback pass?"' Sherman theJe-
said. "That's the first thing 1-1 anf
she asked me. Then when or
someone does it on TV she mar
says, 'See, I told you it marks
works."' where
Second-guessing goes the Do]
with the job, as Sherman head
well knows after more fornear
than a decade calling full s(
plays. And Tony Sparano, before
operating in the New York fired
fishbowl, already has Jets Deceml
fans grumbling after just "I've
two games as their offen- in sev
sive coordinator. unfortu
Sparano and Sherman heardI
will match wits Sunday special
when the Dolphins face places


Associated Press
wo weeks, Miami Dolphins running back Reggie
second in the NFL in rushing yards.


s, with both teams at
1 part of a four-way
the AFC East lead.
Sparano, the game
a return to Miami,
he was
lphins' New Yc
coach
ly four (1-1) al
lyfour l
seasons Dolphil
being U Time: 1
last
ber U TV: CBS
been
eral places before,
lately, but I've
people say that it's
when you go back to
like that," Sparano


said. "I think when you go
back when you've been a
head coach there, it's a lit-
tle different than going
places where you were an


irk Jets
t Miami
ns (1-1)

p.m. today


Dolphins


assistant
coach. It's a
business trip
and we've got
a job to do.... I
have no bitter
feelings to-
ward any-
body there."
linebacker


Kevin Burnett said he looks
forward to the reunion with
his former coach, but
laughed when asked if


they'll share a pregame hug
"You've got to know
coach Sparano is going to
sing your praises, and all
the while he's got that ma-
chete in his hand and he's
going to be ready," Burnett
said. "I'm not saying he
would stab me in the back,
but his job is to go out
there and kick my butt."
Sparano led the Dol-
phins to an improbable di-
vision title as a rookie
head coach in 2008, but
had a losing record each
of the next three years.
The Dolphins then began
rebuilding under new
coach Joe Philbin, while
Rex Ryan hired Sparano
to invigorate the Jets' of-
fense after they fell shy of
a playoff berth in 2011.
Results in New York are
decidedly mixed so far
The Jets scored one touch-
down during a winless pre-
season, which made their
season-opening 48-28 vic-
tory over Buffalo a shocker
They regressed last
week in a 27-10 loss at
Pittsburgh. Mark Sanchez
struggled, Tim Tebow
played only three snaps
and the Jets ran out the
clock trailing at the end of
the first half, all of which
kept Sparano's second-
guessers busy


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Coach
Chuck Pagano came to Indi-
anapolis to fix the defense.
He added bigger bodies to
stop the run, moved his pass
rushers around to create
havoc and brought in a new
system to change Indy's
identity.
So far, so good. The Colts
have held Matt Forte and
Adrian Peterson in check the
first two weeks and on Sun-
day, they'll face another big
test stopping Jacksonville's
Maurice Jones-Drew
Outside linebacker Robert
Mathis learned that lesson the
hard way when he once had a
clean shot at the 5-foot-7, 210-
pound wrecking ball and
wound up missing a rare
tackle.
Longtime Colts know all
about what that feels like.
In 12 career games against
Indy, Jones-Drew has rushed
for 1,212 yards, nine touch-
downs, averaged 5.3 yards
per carry, topped 100 yards
seven times and set the fran-
chise record for all-purpose
yards (303) in a 44-17 rout
that was Indy's last loss in its
2006 Super Bowl-winning
season. Nobody other than
perhaps Tom Brady has been
a bigger torn in Indy's side.


NFL INJURY REPORT


NEWYORK-The updated National Football League in-
jury report, as provided by the league:
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS at DALLAS COWBOYS -
BUCCANEERS: OUT: CB Anthony Gaitor (hamstring).
PROBABLE: CB E.J. Biggers (foot), LB Quincy Black
(back), DE Adrian Clayborn (not injury related), T Jeremy
Trueblood (ankle), CB Eric Wright (back). COWBOYS: OUT:
LB Alex Albright (neck), DT Kenyon Coleman (knee), C Phil
Costa (back), S Matt Johnson (hamstring), NT Jay Ratliff
(ankle). DOUBTFUL: S Gerald Sensabaugh (calf). QUES-
TIONABLE: DE Marcus Spears (knee). PROBABLE: WR
Miles Austin (hamstring), S Barry Church (quadriceps), WR
Andre Holmes (knee), CB Mike Jenkins (shoulder), LB Sean
Lee (hip), LB DeMarcus Ware (hamstring), LB Kyle Wilber
(thumb), TE Jason Witten (abdomen).
ST LOUIS RAMS at CHICAGO BEARS RAMS: OUT:
DT Matthew Conrath (knee), S Matthew Daniels (ham-
string), T Rodger Saffold (knee). DOUBTFUL: DT Michael
Brockers (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: T Wayne Hunter
(ankle), RB Steven Jackson (groin), RB Brit Miller (thigh).
BEARS: OUT: RB Matt Forte (ankle). PROBABLE: DE
Julius Peppers (foot).
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at MINNESOTA VIKINGS -
49ERS: QUESTIONABLE: WR Ted Ginn Jr. (ankle), RB
Brandon Jacobs (knee). PROBABLE: P Andy Lee (hand).
VIKINGS: OUT: LB Erin Henderson (concussion), DE
D'Aundre Reed (calf). PROBABLE:TE Rhett Ellison (ankle),
LB Marvin Mitchell (ankle), DE Brian Robison (elbow), S
Andrew Sendejo (ankle), WR Jarius Wright (ankle).
DETROIT LIONS at TENNESSEE TITANS LIONS:
DOUBTFUL: S Louis Delmas (knee), LB Travis Lewis
(quadriceps), TE Tony Scheffler (calf). QUESTIONABLE:
CB Jacob Lacey (toe), DT Corey Williams (knee). PROBA-
BLE: CB Bill Bentley (concussion), CB Chris Houston
(ankle), WR Calvin Johnson (ankle).TITANS: OUT: LB Colin
McCarthy (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: DT Sen'Derrick Marks
(knee), DT Mike Martin (foot), T Mike Otto (finger, knee),
RB Javon Ringer (elbow). PROBABLE: LB Zach Brown
(knee), G Leroy Harris (knee).
CINCINNATI BENGALS at WASHINGTON REDSKINS
- BENGALS: OUT: CB Dre Kirkpatrick (knee). DOUBT-
FUL: TE Donald Lee (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: CB Leon


Hall (calf). PROBABLE: CB Jason Allen (thigh), DE Carlos
Dunlap (knee), DE Robert Geathers (groin), S Jeromy Miles
(hip), RB Bernard Scott (hand), G Kevin Zeitler (hip). RED-
SKINS: DOUBTFUL: WR Pierre Garcon (foot). QUES-
TIONABLE: S Brandon Meriweather (knee). PROBABLE:
CB Josh Wilson (head).
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at NEW ORLEANS SAINTS -
CHIEFS: OUT: TE Kevin Boss (head), CB Jacques Reeves
(hamstring), WR DevonWylie (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE:
S Kendrick Lewis (shoulder), G Ryan Lilja (back), WR Dexter
McCluster (shoulder), TE Jake O'Connell (knee), DT Anthony
Toribio (ankle). PROBABLE: CB Javier Arenas (neck), DE
Allen Bailey (ankle), WR Steve Breaston (wrist), CB Jalil
Brown (groin), RB Jamaal Charles (knee). SAINTS: OUT: DE
Turk McBride (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB Jonathan Casil-
las (knee), WR Marques Colston (foot). PROBABLE: QB
Drew Brees (ankle), S Roman Harper (wrist), WR Devery
Henderson (concussion), CB Johnny Patrick (thigh).
NEW YORK JETS at MIAMI DOLPHINS -JETS: OUT:
T Dennis Landolt (knee). DOUBTFUL: RB John Conner
(knee), LB Bryan Thomas (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE:
TE Dustin Keller (hamstring), CB Ellis Lankster (low
back). PROBABLE: LB Nick Bellore (shoulder), DE Quin-
ton Copies (illness), CB Antonio Cromartie (shoulder),
DE Mike DeVito (calf), DT Kenrick Ellis (illness), S LaRon
Landry (heel), C Nick Mangold (wrist), G Brandon Moore
(hip), LB Calvin Pace (Achilles), DT Sione Po'uha (low
back), CB Darrelle Revis (concussion), QB Mark Sanchez
(low back), WR Chaz Schilens (ankle), LB Bart Scott
(knee), S Eric Smith (hip, knee), CB Isaiah Trufant
(ankle), DE Muhammad Wilkerson (not injury related).
DOLPHINS: OUT: DTTony McDaniel (knee). DOUBTFUL:
WR Marion Moore (hamstring). PROBABLE: WR Anthony
Armstrong (hamstring), LB Kevin Burnett (foot), LB
Jonathan Freeny (thumb), CB Richard Marshall (back),
RB Lamar Miller (ankle), LB Koa Misi (foot), DE Jared
Odrick (thumb), RB Daniel Thomas (concussion), S
Jimmy Wilson (back).
BUFFALO BILLS at CLEVELAND BROWNS BILLS:
OUT: RB Fred Jackson (knee), WR Ruvell Martin (ankle).
QUESTIONABLE: S Jairus Byrd (ankle). PROBABLE: LB
Nick Barnett (knee). BROWNS: OUT: LB James-Michael


Johnson (ribs, oblique), TE Alex Smith (head). QUES-
TIONABLE: WR Joshua Cribbs (knee), DE Juqua Parker
(foot), S Ray Ventrone (hand). PROBABLE:T Oniel Cousins
(ankle), LB Scott Fujita (knee), WR Greg Little (back), RB
Trent Richardson (knee), DT Billy Winn (head).
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS at INDIANAPOLIS COLTS -
JAGUARS: OUT: T Eben Britton (ankle), DE George Selvie
(knee), LB Daryl Smith (groin). DOUBTFUL: RB Rashad
Jennings (knee). QUESTIONABLE: T Cameron Bradfield
(ankle), DE Austen Lane (foot). PROBABLE: CB Derek Cox
(hamstring), QB Blaine Gabbert (glute). COLTS: OUT: LB
Pat Angerer (foot), G Joe Reitz (knee). QUESTIONABLE:
LB Dwight Freeney (ankle), G Mike McGlynn (knee), DE
Cory Redding (triceps). PROBABLE: WR Austin Collie
(head), T Winston Justice (head), C Samson Satele (knee).
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at ARIZONA CARDINALS -
EAGLES: OUT: WR Riley Cooper (collarbone), T King Dun-
lap (hamstring), WR Jeremy Maclin (hip). PROBABLE: S
Colt Anderson (knee), WR Jason Avant (wrist), WR DeSean
Jackson (hamstring), CB Curtis Marsh (hamstring). CAR-
DINALS: DOUBTFUL: CB Jamell Fleming (shoulder).
QUESTIONABLE: TE Todd Heap (knee), S Rashad John-
son (hamstring), S James Sanders (calf), QB John Skelton
(ankle), G Adam Snyder (elbow), S Adrian Wilson (ankle).
PROBABLE: G Daryn Colledge (shoulder), TE Jeff King
(knee), S Kerry Rhodes (foot), LB O'Brien Schofield (knee),
RB Beanie Wells (knee), RB Ryan Williams (knee).
ATLANTA FALCONS at SAN DIEGO CHARGERS -
FALCONS: OUT: CB Christopher Owens (head), RB An-
tone Smith (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: TTyson Clabo
(hip), LB Sean Weatherspoon (thigh). PROBABLE: DE John
Abraham (knee), WR Julio Jones (thigh), LB Stephen
Nicholas (thigh), WR Roddy White (knee). CHARGERS:
OUT: T Jared Gaither (back), CB Shareece Wright (foot).
QUESTIONABLE: RB Ryan Mathews (clavicle). PROBA-
BLE: RB Curtis Brinkley (knee), TE Antonio Gates (ribs),
TE Dante Rosario (calf), WR Eddie Royal (shoulder).
HOUSTON TEXANS at DENVER BRONCOS TEX-
ANS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Tim Dobbins (hamstring).
PROBABLE: LB Connor Barwin (elbow), LB Bryan Braman
(hamstring), G Brandon Brooks (thumb), G Antoine Cald-
well (ankle), LB Brian Cushing (ribs), CB Johnathan Joseph


(groin), CB Brice McCain (knee), C Chris Myers (neck), LB
Jesse Nading (knee), LB Brooks Reed (hip), DE Antonio
Smith (ankle). BRONCOS: OUT: G Chris Kuper (forearm).
PROBABLE: S Quinton Carter (knee), TE Joel Dreessen
(ribs), CB Chris Harris (ankle), LB Von Miller (hip), CB Tracy
Porter (neck), WR Brandon Stokley (shoulder).
PITTSBURGH STEELERS at OAKLAND RAIDERS -
STEELERS: OUT: LB James Harrison (knee), RB Rashard
Mendenhall (knee), S Troy Polamalu (calf), LB Stevenson
Sylvester (knee). QUESTIONABLE: T Mike Adams (back).
PROBABLE: RB Jonathan Dwyer (toe), T Marcus Gilbert
(groin), QB Byron Leftwich (illness), TE Heath Miller (ab-
domen), WR Emmanuel Sanders (knee), WR Mike Wallace
(groin). RAIDERS: OUT:T Khalif Barnes (groin), CB Shawn-
tae Spencer (foot). QUESTIONABLE: TE David Ausberry
(shoulder), CB Coye Francies (concussion), RB Mike Good-
son (hamstring), KSebastian Janikowski (left groin), RBTai-
wan Jones (ribs), LB Rolando McClain (concussion, ankle),
C Alex Parsons (shoulder), DT Richard Seymour (knee).
PROBABLE: WR Juron Criner (ankle).
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at BALTIMORE RAVENS-
PATRIOTS: OUT: DE Justin Francis (ankle), TE Aaron Her-
nandez (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: G Dan Connolly (con-
cussion), DE Brandon Deaderick (ankle), CB Alfonzo
Dennard (hamstring), TE Daniel Fells (shin), WR Brandon
Lloyd (thigh), G Logan Mankins (hip), G Nick McDonald
(shoulder), S Sterling Moore (knee), RB Shane Vereen
(foot), T Sebastian Vollmer (back). PROBABLE: S Patrick
Chung (shoulder). RAVENS: DOUBTFUL: TJah Reid (calf).
PROBABLE: LB Paul Kruger (back), LB Jameel McClain
(knee), DE Pernell McPhee (knee), T Michael Oher (ankle),
S Bernard Pollard (chest), CB Lardarius Webb (knee).
GREEN BAY PACKERS at SEATTLE SEAHAWKS -
PACKERS: DNP: LB Jamari Lattimore (ankle). LIMITED:
WR Randall Cobb (hamstring), TE Tom Crabtree (shoulder),
CB Davon House (shoulder), WR Greg Jennings (groin), G
Josh Sitton (knee), RB James Starks (toe), DE C.J. Wilson
(groin). FULL: LB Terrell Manning (concussion), LB Nick
Perry (wrist). SEAHAWKS: DNP: CB Byron Maxwell (ham-
string). LIMITED: WR Doug Baldwin (shoulder), RB Mar-
shawn Lynch (back), TE Zach Miller (foot). FULL: WR Charly
Martin (chest), T Russell Okung (knee).


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 B7












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Crystal


creates


parental


movie

Idea stems

from days with

his grandkids

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Actor Billy Crystal
babysat for his grand-
daughters for five days,
and from the experience,
a movie
was born.
On Fri-
day, Crys-
S tal walked
the red
Carpet for
a screen-
ing of his
Billy latest
Crystal film ,
"Parental
Guidance," which opens
in theaters later this year
and co-stars Bette Midler
and Marisa Tomei.
"It was exhausting,"
Crystal said of his babysit-
ting experience as he
walked the red carpet in
New Orleans. Crystal said
the movie is a fun, touch-
ing and comedic take on
"the phenomenon of
being able to take care of
your kids' kids."
The film's director,
Andy Fickman, said it was
"a dream opportunity as a
director to work with two
comedy geniuses" in Crys-
tal and Midler
Fickman, who also
walked the red carpet,
said he was drawn to the
story because many peo-
ple can relate to the sub-
ject matter
"Every generation
thinks they know more
than the previous genera-
tion," Fickman said. "We
all like to talk about how
we were raised."
Crystal starred in the
hit films "City Slickers"
and "When Harry Met
Sally" and has hosted the
Academy Awards nine
times. He said he hasn't
been approached to host
the Oscars for a 10th time
but he'd be up to the
challenge.
"I'm always willing to
do it," he said. "We'll see
what they decide, and if
it's me that's great, and if
it's not, then good luck to
whoever is going to do it."
Crystal turns 65 next
year and has made a ca-
reer out of turning his life
into comedy: "City Slick-
ers" was a story of mid-life
crisis. The actor is also
working on a book that
will be part memoir with
jokes about getting older
"It's about learning how
to navigate the world
when the world is moving
faster and you're not," he
said.
Friday's "Parental
Guidance" screening co-
incides with the AARP's
national convention in
New Orleans, which was
the site of a visit Friday by
Wisconsin Rep. Paul
Ryan, Republican presi-
dential nominee Mitt
Romney's running mate.
Crystal said he didn't sit
in on Ryan's address to
the AARP nor President
Barack Obama's address
via satellite.


Some '60s style


Associated Press
Dennis Quaid, left, and Michael Chiklis star in a scene from the new CBS series, "Vegas," which will premiere at
10 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25.


Sin City of 19

FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer

SANTA CLARITA, Calif. Strid-
ing through his Las Vegas casino,
tough guy Vincent Savino has a
beef.
"You went behind my back to
Chicago," he growls to the woman
beside him. "I thought we had an
understanding: You run the count
room, I run the casino."
Just another day in 1960 at the
Savoy, home base for CBS' new
drama "Vegas."
With its Sputnik chandeliers,
swooping circular stairway,
pleated-fabric walls and shapely
cigarette girls, The Savoy is a mas-
terpiece of Googie architecture and
Kennedy-era glamour
And there's more.
If you were to step out its doors,
you would seamlessly encounter
the Vegas strip, complete with the
Golden Nugget, the Tumbleweed
Club and, for not-so-heavy hitters, a
storefront boasting "All Day!
Bingo."
Parked along the curb, of course,
are vintage cars from a half-century
ago.
All in all, it's an impressive time
trip for a visitor to Santa Clarita
Studios where, in August 2012, pro-
duction is cranking up on "Vegas."
Inside Stage 1, the scene is about
to be shot again with Michael Chik-
lis, who plays Savino, as he presides
over this casino-full of 1960s-
costumed gamers and staff. It's the
very first day filming on the 14,000-
square-foot Savoy set, which, along
with the replica of Fremont Street
outside, existed only as blueprints,
empty studio space and a slab of
parking lot just a few weeks ago.
(The pilot for "Vegas," which airs
at 10 p.m. Tuesday, was shot last
spring on locations in New Mexico,
so this permanent new home won't
be seen until the second episode.)
The Strip ends abruptly at a bluff
as a hot wind rushes past. But the
huge green scrim will allow for CGI
effects to extend "Fremont Street"
into an illusory distance.
The job called for more than
being pretty.
"Everything on the street had to
be specially engineered," said the
show's production designer, Carey
Meyer, standing in the neon-glowing
Savoy entrance. "Each pole of those
facades goes into the ground 15 feet,
because the wind load up here is
just tremendous. And there's also
the risk of earthquakes."
Inspired by a true story, "Vegas"
stars Chiklis as the Chicago mobster
sent to run the recently opened
Savoy and who will butt heads
with Las Vegas Sheriff Ralph Lamb,


Birthday: Organizational activities might hold a special ap-
peal to you in the year ahead, with certain arrangements
tending to benefit you. However, you still must budget your
time and money wisely.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you make a promise to family
members or relatives you're unsure of being able to keep,
let them know right up front. If you don't and then are un-
able to comply, it may cause a brouhaha.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Carefully screen all informa-
tion you get from others, especially the juicy kind, so you
don't inadvertently pass on inaccurate gossip. It could dam-
age someone's reputation.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You're essentially a com-
passionate person, and it's hard for you to believe there are
some people who aren't. Be careful, because you might
have to deal with someone of the opposite type.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Even though you might


is reborn for CBS drama


'Vegas


Everything on
the street had to be
specially engineered.
Each pole of those
facades foes in the
group 15 feet be-
cause the wind load
up here is just
tremendous.

Carey Meyer
'Vegas" production designer.

a fourth-generation rancher who's
intent on keeping growth and cor-
ruption from spoiling his town. The
real-life Lamb is portrayed, two-
fisted and laconic, by Dennis Quaid.
"It's going to be an interesting
dance between us," Chiklis said.
"You know the end of the story: Vegas
grew and Vegas was successful. But
how did it get that way, especially
when Lamb and my character are so
culturally different and diametri-
cally opposed in so many ways?"
Chiklis has brought his own cam-
era to the set on this first day in res-
idence. He shares with a reporter
some of the photos he's been snap-
ping between scenes.
"They look like they could have
been shot back in the day, right?" he
said.
Clearly, Chiklis is pleased with
his surroundings. That's fortunate.
If "Vegas" clicks with viewers, this
could be his hangout for many sea-
sons to come.
But he isn't the only "Vegas"
member who's happy with its back-
in-time environment.


Today's HOROSCOPE
feel a bit superior to your peers, be careful to keep it to
yourself. Friends and associates need pats on the back,
not put-downs.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) We all have days where we
lack self-assurance, and it may be just such a day for you.
If you tell a good idea to a negative thinker, he or she may
convince you to scrap it.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Unless you truly do have
some effective suggestions to offer, it's best not to say any-
thing to a friend who is trying to sort out his or her prob-
lems. You could make matters worse.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't be taken in by a spell-
binding person with impressive external trappings. What he
or she espouses may sound or look great but be totally
worthless in actuality.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) You're one of the best at
telling others what to do and how to do it, but when it comes


"It's a hoot," executive producer
Greg Walker said, "walking out
there and seeing the extras in their
outfits, and those cars and the fa-
cades. I'm pinching myself. I hadn't
anticipated this kind of rush!"
Walker's office in the Stage 1
building overlooks a freeway down
below and, beyond it, Santa Clarita,
a city of 175,000 some 30 miles north
of L.A.
"What first appealed to me about
the show was its idea of Vegas I had-
n't seen anybody cover before,"
Walker said. "We've seen Vegas be-
fore then in 'Bugsy' and 'The God-
father,' and post-1960s in 'Casino.'
But what it finally came down to
was the allure of Ralph Lamb as a
character trying to preserve what
he loved about the city, against the
tidal wave of gangsters from
Chicago and the East Coast."
"It's cowboy hats vs. the fedoras,"
summed up Nicholas Pileggi, a fel-
low executive producer
Pileggi is the much-acclaimed
crime reporter who wrote the books
from which he adapted the screen-
plays for "Goodfellas" and
"Casino." He's an expert on Vegas
and its dark but dazzling history
That history is fueling the new se-
ries, which, according to Walker,
"calls for mixing procedural televi-
sion with a saga of rich characters
in a Dickensian sprawl and doing
all that in 42 minutes each episode."
Walker, whose credits include
"Without a Trace" and "Smallville,"
said crafting such a hybrid is the
biggest challenge facing "Vegas" -
and not, as you might think, the diffi-
culty and expense of its period detail.
"The period was never daunting
for me," he said, "nor was it the rea-
son to do the show. Our mantra is,
'It's not about the tail fin of the
Cadillac."'


down to you taking orders, you may not be so skilled.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If unflattering comments
about you allegedly were said by another come back to
you, don't take it as gospel. Someone may want to put you
two at odds with one another.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Confer with your mate about
establishing some ground rules for those in your charge. If
you don't, you may say one thing while your spouse says
another.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be extremely careful what you
commit to writing when it comes to matters that could affect
your work or career. Ill-chosen words could come back to
haunt you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You are not apt to make any
large financial purchases or commitments right now, but,
through indifference, you could make a number of small
ones that add up into a gigantic sum.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
Mega Money: 5 20 22 27
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $3,729.50
3-of-4 MB 42 $389
3-of-4 1,025 $47.50
2-of-4 MB 1,298 $26
1-of-4 MB 10,632 $3
2-of-4 31,646 $2
Fantasy 5:9 27 30 33 36
5-of-5 3 $74,157.68
4-of-5 268 $133.50
3-of-5 8,885 $11
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
Fantasy 5:17 19- 20 24- 33
5-of-5 1 winner $201,613.77
4-of-5 242 $134
3-of-5 8,157 $11
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 23,
the 267th day of 2012. There
are 99 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Sept. 23, 1952, Sen.
Richard M. Nixon, R-Calif.,
salvaged his vice-presidential
nomination by appearing live
on television to refute allega-
tions of improper campaign
fundraising. (The address be-
came known as the "Check-
ers" speech because of
Nixon's on-air reference to
the family pet, a dog named
"Checkers.")
On this date:
In 1780, British spy John
Andre was captured along
with papers revealing Bene-
dict Arnold's plot to surrender
West Point to the British.
In 1806, the Lewis and
Clark expedition returned to
St. Louis more than two
years after setting out for the
Pacific Northwest.
In 1846, Neptune was
identified as a planet by Ger-
man astronomer Johann
Gottfried Galle.
In 1932, the Kingdom of
Saudi Arabia was founded.
In 1939, Sigmund Freud,
the founder of psychoanaly-
sis, died in London at age 83.
In 1949, President Harry S.
Truman announced there
was evidence the Soviet
Union had recently conducted
a nuclear test explosion. (The
test had been carried out on
Aug. 29,1949.)
In 1957, nine black stu-
dents who'd entered Little
Rock Central High School in
Arkansas were forced to
withdraw because of a white
mob outside.
In 1962, "The Jetsons," an
animated cartoon series about
a Space Age family, premiered
as the ABC television net-
work's first color program.
Ten years ago: Gov. Gray
Davis signed a law making
California the first state to offer
workers paid family leave.
Five years ago: Cuba pub-
lished a photo of a standing,
smiling Fidel Castro looking
heavier but still gaunt as he
met with Angola's president.
One year ago: After 41
years, the soap opera "All My
Children" broadcast its final
episode on ABC-TV.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Mickey Rooney is 92. Actress
Margaret Pellegrini ("The
Wizard of Oz") is 89. Singer
Julio Iglesias is 69. Rock star
Bruce Springsteen is 63.
Golfer Larry Mize is 54. Actor
Jason Alexander is 53. Actor
Kip Pardue is 36. Pop singer
Erik-Michael Estrada ("Mak-
ing the Band") is 33. Tennis
player Melanie Oudin is 21.


Thought for Today: "Each
generation imagines itself to
be more intelligent than the
one that went before it, and
wiser than the one that
comes after it." George
Orwell (Eric Blair), British au-
thor (1903-1950).


The 1960s-era Vegas strip set of "Vegas," is on a lot in Santa Clarita, Calif.











COMMENTARY__
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Book REVIEW


'Embers'

satisfies,

but it's a

slow burn
MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
"Embers of War,"
Fredrik Logevall,
839 pages, $40
(Random House,
New York, 2012)
An avalanche of books
have been written about
the Vietnam War from a
variety of perspectives
and reaching a wide range
of conclusions about that
bitter struggle. What is
unique, and quite helpful
to understanding of this
conflict, is that this book
focuses on the period 1940
to 1960 -the years imme-
diately before Washing-
ton's direct military
involvement.
The subtitle is "The Fall
of an Empire and the
Making of America's Viet-
nam." The volume ends
before the American mili-
tary escalation began. The
author, a history professor
at Cornell, convincingly
argues that much of what
happened after America's
troop involvement in-
creased seemed an in-
evitable outgrowth of the
1940 to 1960 period.
See Page C6


Henry Kelley
FLORIDA
VOICES


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A worker drills for water samples at the planned site of a well in Crystal River. For a $50 permit, the Southwest Florida Water Management
District issued two private companies a 10-year water-use permit to withdraw up to 76,700 gallons per day (gpd) from the site with, during
the peak month, up to 153,400 gpd allowed. A meter measuring withdrawal amounts is not required and there are concerns locally and
statewide about the potential impact to the springshed that feeds the Crystal River.





Think, baby, think


As water supplies dwindle, citizens must channel anger into action


KATIE TRIPP
Special to the Chronicle
It has been a big year for
water issues in Florida -
particularly North Florida.
Folks in every corner of the state
have likely heard about the
Adena Springs Ranch permit
application in Marion County,
originally for 13.2 million gal-


lons per day (mgd) from the
Floridan aquifer, now for 5.3
mgd. A North Florida regional
water supply partnership has
been convened to solve trans-
boundary water issues between
the lesser developed Suwanee
River Water Management Dis-
trict and the ever-thirsty St.
Johns River Water Management
District.


In Crystal River, residents and
local government are outraged
over a water-bottling permit is-
sued by the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
(SWFWMD) to allow 76,700-
153,400 gallons to be withdrawn
daily from the Floridan aquifer.
This issuance came after resi-
dents and the environmental
community worked arduously to


purchase and protect local
springs, only to have a well per-
mitted in the city limits so water
can be pumped, shipped bottled,
and sold by a private water-bot-
tling company Meanwhile, no
minimum flows and levels
(MFLs) have been set for the
Crystal River and King's Bay,


Page C5


Why you,

too, should

fear federal

health care
I am a frequent critic of
the government run-
ning too many things
the private sector can run
better. One of the first re-
torts I hear is, "What
about the military? You
conservatives say govern-
ment can't do anything
right. Your government-
run military killed Osama
bin Laden!"
While I point out the ob-
vious we haven't won a
war since 1945 and de-
fense is in our Constitu-
tion if you haven't been
around the military, you
don't know how "efficient"
it can be.
I am a designated care-
giver for my retired mili-
tary father and, as such, I
have to get a pass from
two nearby Air Force
bases to get on base to
pick up his prescriptions.
Here is my story of try-
ing to obtain an ID card to
get my father's medications.
My father is 100 percent
See Page C4


A guide to the amendments
Editor's note: Due to the complexity of moved from the ballot. Five of the 11
the proposed amendments to the state amendments deal with taxes.
Constitution, we are republishingthis story According to Judy Johnson, a Marion
by staff writer Nancy Kennedy that origi- County attorney who is well-versed in con-
nally appeared in the Aug. 27 Chronicle. stitutional law and a member of the Marion


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Here's what you need to know about the
11 proposed Florida constitutional
amendments on the 2012 ballot: If you are
for them, vote yes; if against, vote no.
Also, the amendments are listed as 1
through 12, but Amendment 7 has been re-


County League of Women Voters (Citrus
County does not have a chapter), Florida
has one of the easiest state constitutions
to amend, and there are five ways to do it:
by the Legislature proposing a change;
citizen-initiative petitions; constitutional
convention, revision commission or budget
and tax reform commission proposal.
See Page C5


A simpler guide: Just vote no


I m getting lots of phone
calls from Florida voters
concerned about the fact
that there are 12 constitu-
tional questions to be decided
on Election Day
Twelve.
Readers are calling con-
stantly to ask one question:
"What the heck should I do?"
I have a simple answer:
Vote no on every one of them.
Citizens have the right to
amend the Constitution and


that's a great thing. It's our
Constitution and we should
have the right to change it But
most every constitutional amend-
menton this year's Florida ballot
has been generated by a special-
interest group that has been
unsuccessful in getting laws
changed the old-fashioned way
When you want a law
passed, you go to the Florida
Legislature and you work it
through the process.
See Page C5


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW







Page C2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. ................... publisher
M ike Arnold ..................................................editor
Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. ................. citizen member
S Mac Harris ............................ .......... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ....... ....... ...... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CANCER DETECTION





Blocking






purchase






illogical


When people hold posi-
tions of public trust,
they cannot let petty
political point-making get in
the way of doing the right thing.
Last week Michael Small-
ridge, chairman of the Citrus
County Hospital Board, stood
in the way of Citrus Memorial
purchasing equipment that
helps detect breast cancer.
Smallridge ar-
gued against ap- THE IS
proval of the
purchase because Blocking
he said he wanted of cancer
written proof the equip
hospital adminis-
tration would OUR 01
serve indigent pa-
tients with the Inappropri
machine.
The problem is that the gov-
erning board already has two
written agreements with the
administration stating all
equipment in the public hospi-
tal will be used for indigent pa-
tients. An administration
official present at the govern-
ing board meeting gave his
pledge that all equipment is
used for all patients regardless
of their ability to pay
Smallridge was trying to play
a disingenuous role as the pro-
tector of low-income residents
by demanding additional writ-
ten guarantees.
Instead, his inappropriate
grandstanding puts potential
breast cancer patients at risk.
As Smallridge should know,
Citrus Memorial hospital played
a lead role last year during
breast awareness week, when
free screening was offered to
nearly 200 Citrus County women.
The hospital has a long and
commendable history of serv-
ing all patients who need care,
regardless of their ability to pay


They've come; build it
Extend the parkway. All you
need to do is drive down 1-75 to
Tampa and you'll see why we
need the parkway extended. If
you don't drive that and don't
have to go down there, then that's
fine. If you want a little
town, there's a lot of little (0
towns around the country
you can live in.
Money's end
According to the edi-
tor's note in Sound Off
on Sept. 9, the iPads for
Citrus Springs Middle CAL
School were bought with
a grant from the Ameri- 563-(
can Recovery and Rein-
vestment Act. My question
is: Where were those iPads made?
African oranges
Where do Florida oranges go? I
don't see Florida oranges in the
supermarket at all. Wednesday, I
went to (a supermarket) and they
have oranges two for $1 from Africa.
Why? What is happening to us?
I've never seen that before and
I'm 75.


S





i


Smallridge, an unsuccessful
candidate for county commis-
sion in August, continues to
serve as a gubernatorial ap-
pointmee to the controversial
hospital board.
While the hospital board is
supposed to have five mem-
bers, only three individuals are
currently serving because Gov.
Rick Scott has not filled two
vacancies.
;SUE: A hospital bylaw
S technicality states
purchase that at least three
screening members of the
nent. governing board
must approve
INION: equipment pur-
bar chases, and since
te barrier. the board cur-
rently has only
three members, the vote must
be unanimous. That technical-
ity let Smallridge's lone vote
stand in the way of purchasing
the breast cancer detection
equipment.
That is a shame.
We know that Gov. Scott has
deep concern about health
care in Florida, and we urge
him to help solve the problems
at Citrus Memorial by quickly
filling the two vacancies on the
board. At the same time, we
recommend that Smallridge be
replaced. We need wisdom and
leadership on the hospital
board. There is no place for
self-serving grandstanding.
It's time for Gov. Scott to
show leadership and appoint a
group of citizens who can work
together to find long-term
solutions for the health care
dilemma facing our community.
It's highly inappropriate
that political gamesmanship
gets in the way of improving
service to patients at risk for
breast cancer.


Peeved about permit


Swiftmud what a bunch of
bureaucrats. Here they go, they
want to sell water. They're selling
it off of (State Road) 44 and up
by the Interstate. Our lakes have
been dry for about two years.
They restrict us on water-
UND ing, but yet they'll sell the
Water. On Top of the
World, just off of (State
Road) 200, during the
drought, those people's
wells were going dry.
Come on, give us a
break. Don't be selling
water. I hope somebody
0579 can stop this. And don't
ever tell me I can't water
my yard.
Onus on district
K.C. Nayfield has the right idea
for the water of Citrus County. But
before we start anymore sacrificial
saving, Swiftmud needs to do the
right thing and quit giving away our
water. Seventy-six thousand, seven
hundred gallons a day out of that
well? Where do they think that
well comes from? There is one
aquifer and they are draining us.


"All lay load on the willing horse."
English proverb


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


From Utah with love


SALT LAKE CITY
Specter is haunting the
Congressional Black Cau-
cus, the specter of integra-
tion. It is discomforting enough
that the now 43-member CBC has
included a Republican since 2011,
when Florida's Allen West became
the first Republican to join the
CBC since 1997. South Carolina's
Tim Scott also came to
Congress in 2011 but
declined to join.
And soon a second
might move in. There
goes the neighbor-
hood.
Mia Love, 37, is run- r-
ning against incum-
bent Democrat Jim -
Matheson, 52, in a dis- Georg
trict created when the OT
2010 census gave a
fourth representative VOI
to this booming state
- imagine Utah's growth if the
federal government did not own
58 percent of the land.
Love is black, but not African-
American. She was born in Brook-
lyn in 1975 to Haitian immigrants
who arrived with $10. On her fa-
ther's wages as a janitor and a
factory worker and her mother's
as a housekeeper, she got through
the University of Hartford. In
Connecticut, she met her husband
- he is a Mormon, as she now is,
and 62 percent of Utahans are.
Fourteen years ago, they
moved to this state, where blacks
were about 1 percent of the pop-
ulation before Love arrived and
had three children. In 2009, she
was elected mayor of Saratoga
Springs, a suburb of 18,000 that
grew 1,700 percent between its
incorporation in 1997 and the
housing crash in 2008, after
which Mayor Love governed like
this: When constituents said they
needed a library, she found
$10,000 and suggested volunteers


ge
H
4


do the rest: "I intended to see if
they really wanted a library"
They have one.
Two-thirds of the voters in the
new district have never voted for
Matheson, whose home is not in
the district. There is, however, no
constitutional requirement that a
representative live where he runs,
and as a sixth-generation Utahan,
and the son of a popu-
lar two-term governor,
he has considerable
S strengths as he seeks
a seventh term.
Utah may be the
most Republican
state, and Matheson is
one of the Democratic
congressmen repre-
e Will senting especially Re-
IER publican districts. But
Utah has seemed to
CES like having a token
Democrat in its dele-
gation in Washington, where
Matheson, after graduating from
Harvard, worked for Speaker Tip
O'Neill. Matheson is a member of
the dwindling Blue Dog caucus of
moderate Democrats, and voted
against Obamacare, cap-and-
trade and the DREAM Act immi-
gration measure for children of
illegal immigrants. This year he
voted to repeal Obamacare (pre-
viously he voted against that) but
has announced he will vote for
Barack Obama.
Love is energetic and eclecti-
cally principled: If elected, she
surely will be the only House
member whose Kindle contains
works by Frederic Bastiat, the
French free-market thinker who
in a satirical 1845 letter asked
France's parliament to protect
candle makers:
"We are suffering from the ru-
inous competition of a rival who
apparently works under condi-
tions so far superior to our own
for the production of light that he


is flooding the domestic market
with it at an incredibly low price.
... This rival, which is none other
than the sun, is waging war on us.
... We ask you to be so good as to
pass a law requiring the closing
of all windows, dormers, sky-
lights. ... "
In this, one of the most racially
and culturally homogenous
states, the only uninteresting
thing about Love is that she is
black. This is not just progress, it
is the destination toward which
progress was directed during the
brisk march to today's healthy in-
difference to the fact that Love
would be the first black Republi-
can woman ever in the House.
Some "stalemate."
In March 2008, in the speech
ostensibly explaining the inexpli-
cable his 20 years in the pews
of the raving Rev Jeremiah
Wright candidate Barack
Obama referred to "a racial stale-
mate we've been stuck in for
years." Hardly
He was then eight months from
winning 43 percent of the white
vote two points more than John
Kerry won four years earlier.
Obama carried three states -
three more than Kerry of the
Confederacy (Florida, Virginia
and North Carolina). In states
outside the South, Obama re-
ceived substantially more white
votes than any Democratic candi-
date since Lyndon Johnson in
1964 more than Hubert
Humphrey, George McGovern,
Jimmy Carter, Walter Mondale,
Michael Dukakis, Bill Clinton or
Al Gore. This is part of the "racial
stalemate" in which Mississippi
has more black elected officials
- not more relative to popula-
tion; more than any other state.
--In--
George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


/AAAPRULIS
@2al- JimAPgya.o.,


SLETTERS to the Editor


Source of success
President Obama on success:
"If you've got a business, you
didn't build that. Somebody else
made that happen."
Mitt Romney's response goes
something like this: "You earned
it through your own hard work."
I believe that neither response
is correct. You can work hard
and do your best to achieve your
dreams; perhaps others have
helped you along the way, as
well, but the ultimate reason you
have what you have, and have
succeeded in your endeavors, is
because God has blessed you
with it. "Every good and perfect
gift is from above." (James 1:17)
Have we completely forgotten
about God? After all, "It is He
that hath made us, and not we
ourselves." (Psalm 100:3)
Historically, nations that have
forgotten about the Creator have
fallen, and fallen hard. This his-
tory lesson could result in more
than just falling over a "fiscal
cliff" it might just lead to a
complete collapse.
Marsha Shappell
Inverness

Honest people
My boyfriend and I were shop-
ping at Sweetbay Supermarket
Sept. 8 and went to finish more
errands when I realized, when I
looked in my purse, three money
orders of great value he had pur-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
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Letters must be no longer than
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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352-563-3280, or email to
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chased at Wal-Mart, were miss-
ing. We went to Wal-Mart and
they wouldn't cancel the money
orders, so we went back to Sweet-
bay and some kind person found
two of them in the parking lot I
want to thank the person who was
honest enough to turn them in.
We were so grateful; I was cry-
ing. There are still some honest
people out there. God bless you.
Dorraine Baltzell
Lecanto


Healing words
Thank you to Yvonne Hess for
writing such a forthright, insightful
column in the Sept 18 paper ("Two
words to break the cycle," Page C1).
Many years ago, for several
years, I went through much emo-
tional and financial pain with an
addicted child. I reacted in the
ways described by Mrs. Hess:
helping, pleading, trying to find
solutions, sending the child to
counseling, etc. No one directed
me to Al-Anon, so I struggled with
my own sense of guilt and inade-
quacy to resolve this situation.
Finally, on the advice of a
counselor who was familiar with
addiction, I gave notice to my child
that in a few months, when my
apartment lease was up, I was
moving out and he would have to
find lodging elsewhere, as I could
not have him under my roof and
watch him destroy himself(and me.)
He did not believe me. When
that day came, I sadly put his be-
longings out on the sidewalk in front
of my apartment, returned the keys
to the superintendent, and left.
Although things did not resolve
for a few more years, he said it
was one of the turning points in
his life that helped him face the
consequences of his choices.
If you have an addicted relative or
friend in your life, read the column
and get the loving support and hope
you need in the Al-Anon program.
Marsha Shappell
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


c\i~:'





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What do you want to be when you grow up?


A few weeks ago,
Cheryl and I hosted
an open house.
Daughter Becky and her
family were here from Houston
and the only way we could
arrange for them to see the
local family members was to
invite 'em all to come to our
house for a little bit of food
and fellowship. It was a nice
event with Becky, Kurt, Emily
and Eric seeing grandparents,
aunts, uncles, cousins and
friends, some of whom they
hadn't seen for years.
During the festivities, I
noticed my good brother
William sitting with his arm
draped around the
shoulders of grandson Fred
4, talking with him and
pointing to a picture that
hangs above a plant shelf,


high in the living room. The But, we do that.
picture is of our father, Fred What do you want to be
Sr, at the age of 20. I when you grow up?
listened in and picked up on It's one of the first
my brother questions little
telling my kids are asked;
grandson that .. and, most of the
not only is he the time, it's asked
fourth in a long long before he or
line of Freds, but she has any idea
that he is the about wanting to
only male heir in be anything
our particular other than a
family and that it b ig lea g u e
was his job to Fred Brannen ballplayer or
carry on the A SLICE a famous
Brannen name. ballerina, usually
Young Fred OF LIFE with the him
didn't seem at all wanting to play
perplexed, but I teasingly ball and the her wanting to
told my good brother that he dance, but not necessarily
was heaping a pretty big This past week, I gave
load on a little guy who is thought to what I'd wanted
only 8 years old! to be when I grew up.


I tried my hand at playing
ball. I disappointed many a
Little League baseball coach
because they expected me to
play as well as my brother. I
didn't. So, that was out.
I loved to draw, so I
pictured myself becoming
Walt Disney's prot6g6, but
that seemed to be going
nowhere fast he had all
the prot6g6es he needed,
and besides, they didn't
make a lot of money
I liked to cook, so being a
chef was on the table, but
that, too, soon went by the
wayside.
Oh, sure, I still cook and I
still paint, but for pleasure,
not profit.
Then, in September, 1962,
I landed an after-school,
part-time job at a local bank


and immediately knew that
was my life's calling uh,
no, I didn't. But, I was still
there three years later when
I first met Cheryl, then after
adding another year, she
was Mrs. Brannen and the
die was cast. I'd be the best
banker I could be so that I
could be the best husband I
could be and I quickly
realized I truly enjoyed very
much being both.
On Sept. 5, I quietly
celebrated what, absent a
medical need to retire early,
would have been 50 years in
the business of banking. I
only made 46 years, but no
one could have asked for a
more interesting, exciting or
rewarding career, one
which included being the
state banking department's


assistant director during the
time Florida became a
branch banking state and
one during which, at least
occasionally, I felt as though
I made a difference.
When I was asked what I
wanted to be when I grew
up, I never said banker; I
never said Cheryl's husband;
I never said Beth, Becky and
Fred 3's father; and, I never
said Ariana, Emily, Kaylee,
Ashley, Eric, Fred 4 and Joy-
Joy's grandfather.
But, though I had no idea
such a future awaited me, I
grew up to be precisely what
I wanted to be.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


Economic woes need



not be catastrophic


By JOHN READ
Special to the Chronicle


What are fiscal and monetary poli-
cies and how are they used?
Presidents normally want con-
trol over as much fiscal, regulatory and tax
policy as possible. For instance, Barack
Obama wants to extend government influ-
ence over financial regulations in an effort
to inject more fairness and honesty into
that system.
On the other hand, Mitt Romney and his
fellow Republicans want to reduce regu-
lations so the financial industry can ex-
pand its control over the
global economy He be- A "hands-of
lives that if left alone had already
the unregulated market-
place will "self-correct" for well ove
and balance will eventu-
ally be achieved. Unfor- during the
tunately, this could take
years or even decades to and early 20
work itself out without As a re,
government help. S
A "hands-off" ap- economy w
proach had already
been tried for well over beset by ;
130 years during the
18th, 19th and early20th major cras
centuries. As a result, lack of co
the economy was regu-
larly beset by a series of mOnetary,
major crashes due to
lack of control over regulator!
monetary, fiscal and reg-
ulatory policies (much like what is hap-
pening in Europe right now).
It became apparent by the beginning of
the 20th century that the U.S. economy
had become far more industrialized and
that changes needed to be made; the econ-
omy had become very complex and the
rules and regulations became more com-
plex in response. This led to the rise of
modern fiscal and monetary policies.
Basically, fiscal policy is how the federal
government decides to disburse the
money it receives primarily from taxes,
fees and sale of assets. Much of the push
and pull of political wrangling takes place
in this arena. In general, Democrats want
to use fiscal policy to direct money both to
businesses and the general population
while Republicans want primarily to di-
rect federal money to businesses and the
military and then to privatize public ex-
penditures. This tension never seems to be
resolved to anyone's satisfaction because
it involves ongoing compromises and
that is in short supply in these angry times.
Without federal money being directed to
both the public and private sectors, we
would not have the world's largest mili-
tary, or Social Security, Medicare, Medi-
caid, 401(k)s or IRAs, a clean environment,
education, disease control, safe drugs,
non-commercial scientific research, flu
shots, a reliable food supply, air-traffic
controllers, and ... well, the list goes on.
Of course, we tend not to notice our gov-
ernmental benefits because we have got-
ten used to them and have absorbed them
into our general expectation of things that
will always be there. We only notice when
they break down or disappear and then
there is a mighty uproar to restore what
we once took for granted (think of hurri-
canes and other natural disasters: when
they arrive you do not expect corporations


to come to the rescue you expect the
government to step in on a massive scale).
Monetary policy is how government con-
trols a constant flow of money in and out
of the financial system. This is the primary
job of the Federal Reserve, which was es-
tablished in 1913. Before that time, eco-
nomic crashes were regular occurrences
because each bank simply did its own thing
(some even printed their own currency).
To gain control over national money
supplies, the Fed monitors many of the ac-
tivities of the banking industry and sets in-
terest rates and bank reserves according
to the current economic situation. Lately,
interest rates have been
f" approach set at historic lows in
Seen tried order to help reduce un-
employment and to
r 130 years shore up bank balances
and thus allow money to
18th, 19th flow more freely be-
tween banks and cus-
th centuries, tomers.
*lt, the Just recently, the Fed
UiL, the announced another
as regularly round of stimulus to buy
up mortgage-backed se-
a series of curities in order to re-
duce the bottleneck of
hes due to excessive bonds that
ntrol over banks carry This frees
intro ove banks up to lend more
fiscal and to consumers and will,
hopefully, spur the
Policies. economy to greater ac-
tivity. The immediate
result of this action was stock markets
shooting upward toward record levels.
Roughly 80 percent of all economic ac-
tivity in this country involves consumers.
Democrats believe in financial stimulus in
times of recession (think of this as a blood
transfusion after you have lost a lot of
blood). If consumers don't have money or
access to credit then they buy less. Repub-
licans, on the other hand, are concerned
that too much money in the system will
cause uncontrolled inflation and that the
"magic of the marketplace" should be al-
lowed to sort things out. But this could
take a very long time and leave a lot of
damage in its wake. If done poorly, both ap-
proaches entail risk of excessive debt and
inflation or another crash. Take your pick.
While the national debt is indeed large
and risks are inherent in any solution to
our current problems, much of the money
that is being created now can be absorbed
later through the use of higher interest
rates that will apply the brakes on exces-
sive borrowing and spending. This was the
approach used in the inflationary 1970s
and 1980s when Fed Chairman Paul
Volker raised interest rates to record
highs. As a result, inflation was tamed and
the economy rebounded because invest-
ments shifted from stocks to T-bills and
money poured into the Treasury
With cool heads and wise politicians we
can avoid unnecessary shocks to the sys-
tem and we may get out of this in one piece
in the coming years. Just don't expect
things to bounce back in the next couple
of months. Unfortunately, we are in this for
the long haul.


John Read is the assistant public
information officer for the Citrus County
Democratic Executive Committee.


Citrus a better place
Jeff Dawsy, a wonderful sheriff, has
made Citrus County a safe place for peo-
ple to live. I am from Miami. A big city,
high crime rates, violence, everything
you could possibly think of. About three
to four times a year my wife and I would
come visit her family in Inverness. I looked
forward to those visits like a little kid going
to the candy store. Inverness, as well as
Citrus County as a whole, was peaceful,
crime free, and everyone welcomed you
with kindness. It was a place where I
could get away from all the craziness.
Now you might say, "You're from
Miami, it's gorgeous there!" Well yes it
might be in your eyes but you probably
haven't experienced it quite like some-
one who has lived there for years. People
pulling guns on you, carjackings left and
right. Citrus County is the complete op-
posite. I knew from the first time I visited
that it was a place I could live for the rest
of my life, raise my family, and build my
business. Boy was I right!
In 1995, I made the move and I don't re-
gret it at all. My daughters are my whole
world. I couldn't have raised them to be
the wonderful ladies that they are today
without Mr Dawsy and his team making
Citrus County the safest place to be. I, Mark
Dominique and my wife Jeannie thank
him for everything and we are endorsing
him to be our sheriff for four more years.
The Dominique Family
Lecanto

Give Himmel another term
I cannot imagine why anyone who has
lived in Citrus County for any length of time
would want to vote for anyone but Sam
Himmel for superintendent of our schools.
Citrus County is unbelievably fortunate to
have Mrs. Himmel as our educational
leader. Our school system has never run
as smoothly as it has with Superinten-
dent Himmel leading it
I've raised two children in the Citrus
County Public Schools. We went through
quite a number of superintendents in that
time. It's not an easy balancing act, to
communicate with and command respect
from all the players in the educational
scene: parents, teachers, students, staff,
School Board, and our citizens, but Sam
Himmel does it with energy, intelligence,
fairness, and decisiveness. Everyone
knows where they stand. If a decision
needs to be made, it's made. And it's


made with the best interests of the stu-
dents' quality of education in mind.
I am thankful that she is running to
serve another term. And I urge all parents
who want their best for the children's ed-
ucation to vote for Sandra "Sam" Himmel
as Superintendent of Schools. I am a Re-
publican for Sam Himmel.
Marcia Dalkalitsis
Inverness

Dawsy's good deeds
While I have known Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
for more than 20 years and greatly appre-
ciate his qualities as an intelligent, hon-
est and good man, his dedication and
desire to improve the lives of Citrus
County children impress me the most. He
has worked diligently with organizations to
improve the lives of Citrus County youth.
Examples of his dedication to our chil-
dren include his work with Jessie's
Place, the Citrus County school system
and school resource officers, FOCUS,
FOCUS Junior, the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County, Take Stock in Children,
the Teen Driver Challenge, the Sheriff's
Summer Safety Program, and the Ex-
plorer program. These are just the pro-
grams I know about. There may be others.
I believe Jeff is an excellent sheriff for
other reasons, as well. He has brought
fairness, professionalism and integrity to
the Citrus County Sheriff's Office. His
work with the school resource officers
has allowed that unit to be recognized
throughout the United States for its qual-
ity and accomplishments.
I went door to door for Jeff when he
first ran for sheriff. In the years he has
been in office, he has never let me or his
other constituents down. Why would any-
one even consider someone else for sher-
iff? Whether Democrat or Republican, I
believe Jeff Dawsy is the right choice for
sheriff of Citrus County.
Lane Vick
Crystal River

Thanks, Nancy
Thank you Nancy Argenziano for run-
ning for public office again. You have
more courage, and guts, than most I am
glad you are running Independent, be-
cause I do not vote party, but candidate,
and you will be the one to get my vote!
Jeanette Georgiadis
Lecanto


Letters to THE EDITOR


A gift of opportunity
My daughter, Samantha
Prodey, received a Take Stock in
Children Scholarship. I just want
to say thank you to Pat Lancaster
and all of the people who be-
lieved my daughter deserved to
receive this wonderful gift.
I don't know how Samantha
would be able to go to college if it
hadn't been for Mrs. Lancaster
and her great group of colleagues
who made this happen. I also
want to thank everyone involved
for all of the donated money to
make this happen, including the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
My daughter and I are very
thankful to Citrus County and
everyone involved with the Take
Stock in Children organization.


Thank you very much.
Cindy and Samantha Prodey
Hernando

PC nonsense
On Sept. 5 you printed a very
well written letter by Mike Asher
pertaining to the insanity of po-
litical correctness going on in
America today Mr. Asher may not
be quite as free as he thinks he
is, though.
In many European countries
today, if you have the audacity to
question the normality of the ho-
mosexual lifestyle or you ques-
tion Muslim immigration, you
can end up in a big jam, possibly
even jailed.
This type of PC nonsense is


coming here it's only a matter vides coverage for more Ameri-
of time. cans than ever before. If Republi-
cans think this is "nothing," it
Brad Block says a lot about their attitude to-
Homosassa ward those less fortunate than
themselves.


Making life better
Republicans keep insisting
President Obama has done noth-
ing during his first four years.
Well, despite Republican opposi-
tion to everything the president
has tried to do, he has managed
to accomplish quite a bit.
The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay
Act ensures women get paid the
same as men for the same work.
If Republicans think this is
"nothing," it says a lot about their
attitude toward women.
The Affordable Care Act pro-


Closing the Medicare drug
"donut hole" ensures senior citi-
zens will save money on their
prescriptions. If Republicans
think this is "nothing," it says a
lot about their attitude toward
seniors.
Job creation reduces the loss of
jobs under the previous adminis-
tration and protects unemploy-
ment benefits. If Republicans
think this is "nothing," it says a
lot about their attitude toward
the middle class and the Ameri-
can worker.


Tax incentives are provided
for companies hiring unem-
ployed and disabled veterans. If
Republicans think this is "noth-
ing," it says a lot about their atti-
tude toward those who served
our nation.
While President Obama has
spent his first four years in office
trying to make life better for all
Americans, the Republicans have
spent this time blocking all pro-
grams put forward in order to
achieve their stated goal mak-
ing Obama a one-term president
- even, it appears, if it means ig-
noring the needs of their fellow
citizens.

Evlyn Skurow
Crystal River


Endorsement LETTERS


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 C3


fl







3
S


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9

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Relieving the burden
It has often been said, espe-
cially during the Democratic
Convention, that Barak Obama
got us out of the Iraq war.
There is an important fact that
is never mentioned by the De-
mocrats or the news media: Pres-
ident George W Bush made a
point to negotiate what's referred
to as a 'SOFA (Status of Forces
Agreement) between the U.S. and
Iraq before he left office. This
was not signed by both parties
(U.S. and Iraq) until the Decem-
ber before Obama took office.
He did this because he did not
want to leave the burden to the
next president.
All President Obama did was to
implement the agreement; noth-
ing more, nothing less. I find it
sad Obama and his minions con-
tinuously tout that Obama ended
the war.
David A. Matthews
Crystal River

Pumping gas
There is a Wawa (a conven-
ience store and gas station) being
built in Pasco County. In New
Jersey they pump your gas for


you (I think it is a law in New
Jersey).
Here's hoping they will do the
same in Pasco, because it will
give jobs to the people who need
them. The price of gas will not go
up if they hire these people (man
or woman) to pump the gas. We
need one up here in Citrus
County. It would be nice if they
did this at Race Trac. They clean
your windshield, too.
Betty L. Smith
Homosassa

Thanks for your votes
I want to thank all citizens of
Citrus County who voted for me
during the recent election for
county commissioner of District
5. I also want to thank all of my
supporters, contributors, volun-
teers that helped me with signs,
at the polls, those who wrote let-
ters of support, those who offered
words of encouragement and
those who gave me public en-
dorsements such as the Citrus
County Chronicle and the Citrus
County Realtors Association. I
also want to thank my employer,
Progress Energy, for giving me
the opportunity to represent my
community. Above all I want to


thank my wife, Debbie, and my
children, Charlie and Amanda.
All of you placed a lot of trust
and support in me to run for
county commissioner. I can as-
sure you that's not something I
take lightly, and I thank you all
for believing in me!
Although I wasn't successful
this time, this was a tremendous
learning experience for my fam-
ily and me. We had agreed from
the beginning that we would run
a clean race based on my merits
and my ability to lead Citrus
County forward as part of a team
with the other four commission-
ers. We held true to our word,
even when the campaign took a
negative turn.
Over the course of the rela-
tively short campaign, we met so
many wonderful people along the
campaign trail that embraced my
family and me. We met so many
new friends along the way, and
we rekindled many friendships
we already had but that got
strengthened along the way My
kids, my wife and I got a tremen-
dous civics lesson, one that you
could not pay for in any school. It
was a great experience!
As I said during the campaign,
I have been here and involved in


Citrus County for the last 31
years. My "roots" run deep and I
love this community. I look for-
ward to staying involved in my
community, helping those agen-
cies that help others and continu-
ing to give to my community just
as my community has helped me
over the years.
Charles Poliseno
Hernando


Where to begin
Re: "Difficult fiscal times,"
Brad Thorpe, guest column, No-
vember
My suggestions:
1) It appears that there are sev-
eral hundred thousand dollars of
county money that has been
spent on staff time alone, the port
politics, promoting, such as
chamber meetings, EDC meet-
ings, port events, etc. This has all
been done without having any
idea of the scope of work or feasi-
bility studies completed. My
opinion is that putting the cart
before the horse is costing tax-
payers dearly
2) After analyzing the structure
of county government and what's
going on inside such as self-


created projects and hiring prac-
tices, I would cut administration
by half. I suggest letting county
commissioners handle all poli-
tics and meetings such as cham-
ber, EDC, potential businesses,
etc., to determine if it should be
handed over to staff. This will be
a commission-driven board that
directs staff and this will save
hundreds of thousands of dollars.
3) Health Department issue: It
is mine and the citizens' concern
that all this started with the new
Publix plan in Inverness and the
possibility of selling the Health
Department for less than what
we can replace it for. Starting to
de-fund it without a proper busi-
ness plan in place for it to stand
on its own, this is not a good idea
without more analyzing of the
facts.
4) On operating practices and
overhead, I will suggest a num-
ber of things that I see when
dealing with budgets and stream-
lining on issues that are not vital
to citizens that will save them
money
Look forward to representing
Citrus County in November
Scott Adams
Inverness


What about dentists?
This is in reference to
people going to a doctor
and getting a second opin-
ion for their health prob-
lems. What about dentists?
Does anyone ever get a sec-
ond opinion? I had a prob-
lem. I went to a dentist. He
told me I had four cavities. I
haven't had a cavity in 40
years. I said, "That can't
be." I said, "I can't afford to
fix the cavities right now," and
I left. Went to another dentist
who examined me and said,
"There's no cavities
at all. I don't know
where they got the
four cavities from.
Maybe they were
looking at some-
body else's X-rays."
My question is: Has l
anybody got a sec-
ond opinion on a
dentist that had the CAL
same problem that 563
I had? 00

Barnes' view
I hope that everyone has
read the Chronicle's great
article concerning the pro-
posed Port Citrus. A very
knowledgeable business-
man named Jeff Barnes
gave his views on the sub-
ject. He summed it up to
say it is very unrealistic. So,
Brad Thorpe, cease the ex-
pensive studies and vote
"no."
Focus on helping
Years ago I knew of a col-
lege student in another
state who was on public as-
sistance although her par-
ents were well off. She said
the forms were so compli-
cated, the disadvantaged
couldn't execute them and
you needed a car to trans-
port them from place to
place. Now you need com-
puter knowledge. Instead of
worrying about food stamp
fraud, we should be wonder-
ing if the really needy are
getting help. Perhaps volun-
teers with knowledge of the
system would be a good idea.
USO photos
I have some black-and-
white military photos from
overseas with Bob Hope and
the USO shows and air-
planes and different types
of ships. They're all black-
and-white, glossy 8-by-10s.
If anyone would be inter-
ested in them, they could
put their telephone number
in the paper and I'll be glad
to give them a good deal on
all of them.


KELLEY
Continued from Page C1

disabled from Vietnam, is
on oxygen, has skin cancers
from Agent Orange, and is
generally unable to walk
more than 100 feet due to a
parachute accident. That is
to say, his chute failed to
open properly and he had
an accelerated trip with an
abrupt stop. Ignoring the
medical miracles involved, I
am his designated caregiver
We went to Hurlburt Air
Force Base near Fort Wal-
ton Beach, a secure base
home to Air Force Special
Operations Command. The
ID office is inside the base,
inside a secure building.
But first, I have to get a pass
to get on base, and then


(


Chinese goods not new
I read the "Free trade?"
comment in Sound Off. I'm
80 years old and remember
during my youth, items in
the store were made in
China long before Obama
and Clinton were even
thought of. Maybe the free
trade act was enabling, but
I believe the unions drove
the manufacturers out of
America. An entrepreneur
gets an idea, works to im-
prove it. When it succeeds
enough, he hires people to
produce it. They
| form a union and
demand more and
More until it be-
comes too much.
When the business
owner can't afford
their demands any-
more, he's gone.
Who can blame
him? It was his
0579 idea, he developed
it, now the union is
the boss. Union
members should put them-
selves in his shoes and see.
If you own it and can't oper-
ate it, why stay? Would you?
Unions were needed in the
beginning. They have be-
come too powerful.
Hidden history
In reading "Massacre si-
lenced" (page A10, Tuesday,
Sept. 11), my husband in
World War II was an inter-
preter and he spoke fluent
German. (He) said that
when U.S. troops were ready
to enter Berlin, his troops
were ordered three miles
back to let the Russians
enter Berlin first, which co-
incides with the statement
in the Associated Press that
Roosevelt deliberately
backed our troops back to
give credit to the Russians.
That needs to be further
looked into.
No love for tennis
I wish that the TV net-
works and cable networks
would get together because
the other day I went to tape
"60 Minutes" on Sunday
night. Finally when I played
my tape, because the U.S.
Open extended and went
beyond the time limit, (I
had recorded) 45 minutes
of tennis and I got to see 15
minutes of "60 Minutes."
Never got to see the rest of
"60 Minutes." I mean, it's
ridiculous. Shut the tennis
off and go to "60 Minutes"
and just put on the bottom
who's winning, whatever.
They shouldn't interrupt the
program.


present said pass twice to
get to the ID office. Which
begs the first question -
shouldn't this office be out-
side the base?
Once I reach the ID desk,
I give the desk sergeant the
documentation needed to
obtain a caregiver's pass, a
letter on a physician's let-
terhead that very, very
specifically details the re-
quirements for my father's
care. Once I get my special
ID, I am allowed un-
escorted privileges on
base.
Well, sort of. While I am
allowed unescorted access,
I'm not allowed to pick up
my dad's prescriptions with-
out him present. So I can get
on a secure base by myself,
but I can't do anything with
this access.
The desk sergeant also


Astounding outpouring
As post commander of Blanton-
Thompson American Legion Post
155, myself, the Post officers, execu-
tive board committee and legion
family members would like to take
this time to thank the community
for their never ending and tremen-
dous support to our local hero, Marine
Lance Cpl. Josh Langston White.
The outpouring of donations to
the Josh White fund has been more
than anyone could imagine, and it is
because of this great community
coming together in a time of need
for one of their own. Donations re-
ceived to date have reached the
$20,000 milestone. Donations have
been received from individuals,
families, and large and small busi-
nesses not only from our commu-
nity, but communities throughout
this great nation. There have been
fundraisers at Crystal River High
School, Havana House, donations
by Sen. Charles Dean, Dr Kamalesh
Amin of Citrus Diagnostic Center,
Steve and Jewel Lamb, Crystal
Chevrolet, American Legion Post
228 and Sons of the American Le-
gion, Rockhall Maryland, Beef 'O'
Brady's of Crystal River and Inver-
ness, veteran and fraternal organi-
zations such as the Eagles of
Homosassa and the hundreds of
true Americans who are too many to
name who continue to donate on a
daily basis.


tells me, "Your father's ID
has a Social Security num-
ber on it. That's not allowed
anymore." I politely ask,
"Do I need that fixed today
or can it wait?"
"It can wait," he said omi-
nously
After also learning that
dad's prescription is not
available at Hurlburt, we
head to Eglin AFB about 10
miles away, which has an ID
pass office outside the gate.
So far, so good. I dutifully
present my father's ID, doc-
tor's note and driver's li-
cense, and I'm told, "Your
father's ID is invalid. We
can't issue your pass."
I protest. "But they did it
at Hurlburt."
Drum roll please. "They
are on a different system.
Your dad needs a new ID,
and you can't get one until


Letters to THE EDITOR

This milestone could not have
been reached without the long
hours and dedication of so many
volunteers of our close-knit commu-
nity. We thank the teachers, stu-
dents and staff at Crystal River
High School, our local law enforce-
ment officers, firefighters and gov-
ernment officials who are so proud
to show their support. The citizens
of Citrus County have set the exam-
ple and placed the bar high for
other communities to look at and
follow when such a tragic event takes
place involving one of their own.
We as a community will reach
other milestones for Josh Langston
White. The residents of Citrus
County should be proud of their ac-
complishment, and I, for one, am
glad to be a part of such a great
community. May god bless each and
everyone, their family and may God
Bless America.

Commander Michael Klyap Jr.
Blanton Thompson American Legion
Post No. 155
Crystal River

Thanks from Marines
The members of Marine Corps
League Detachment 1139 want to
thank all those who participated in
our first golf outing at the Lakeside
Golf Club, the proceeds going to the
Injured Warriors of Florida, Nature
Coast Young Marines, Det 1139.


his is fixed."
"He's waiting in the car.
Let me wheel him in," I
said, having planned ahead.
"Well," the new desk ser-
geant replies. "We can't
issue his ID here. That's at a
different building, inside
the base. You need to go
there, get his ID, and then
return here. Let me get you
a temporary pass to get on
base so you can get your
dad's new ID. Then return
here to get your new ID.
"But you should call
ahead. They are always
busy," she says ominously
So I call. And I'm told that
yes, I need to make an ap-
pointment, but I can only do
so online.
"So let me get this
straight. You work at the of-
fice. I'm speaking to a human.
But I have to go online to


schedule an appointment."
"Yes." Click.
Fortunately, there is a
third Air Force base nearby
- Duke Field, where the
legendary Doolittle Raiders
of World War II (the last
time we won a war) trained
in 1941-42. It's a nice day, so
we go to lunch, get refueled
and drive up to get my par-
ents' new ID cards.
We approach the guard
station and, naturally, I need
another pass to get on this
base. Once through, we ap-
pear to see our luck chang-
ing. This is a small base, the
line is short and we are out
in 30 minutes with brand
new ID cards, sans Social
Security numbers.
Back to Eglin, where I am
issued a new caregiver ID.
Now, I have unescorted
privileges and the ability to


Our thanks to the sponsors who
are listed, Citrus Kia, Nick Nicholas
Ford, Gold and Diamond Exchange,
Citrus Hematology and Oncology,
Robert and Sheila Bendle, John and
Sue McQuiston, Advanced Urology
Specialists, Allen Tyler (in memory
of Larry Schoomaker), American
Legion Post 155, ABC Fine Wine and
Spirits, James and Jean Sponheim,
Nature Coast Printing, Kenny Patel,
VFW Post 4337, Angelic Air, All
Prestige Auto, Mitch Duncan and Son
Plumbing, Van Allen Insurance,
Sandra "Sam" Himmel, Love
Chevrolet, World Woods and Inver-
ness Liquors.
The support of the sponsors, play-
ers and volunteers made this event
a big success.
Semper Fi.
Joe Spoto
Past commandant

Thanks, donors
The Blood Ministries of Our Lady
of Grace Parish and Knights of
Columbus Council 6168 wish to ex-
tend heartfelt thanks to all the
donors who gave the gift of life on
Saturday, Sept. 15, in memory of a
caring person, Matt Curley Each
pint donated can affect up to three
lives. Thank you, everyone. It was
greatly appreciated.
Len Houle
Knights of Columbus Council 6168


pick up my father's pre-
scriptions without my dad
present. So on the same day,
I get two permanent ID
cards for two military bases
to start the ability to get
health care services, having
negotiated two sets of rules
from the same military
Keep in mind, this was
just to get an ID card. It
doesn't have the slightest
thing to do with getting ac-
tual health care.
And you wonder why
those of us closest to the
government dread more
government?


Henry Kelley a Fort Walton
Beach business owner
is a leader of the Florida
tea party movement and
a columnist for Florida
Voices.


C4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


COMMENTARY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

When folks get frustrated or
emotional about something,
they often try to cram it through
as a constitutional amendment.
We do not need a longer Con-
stitution. We don't need more
words.
The Bill of Rights to the U.S.
Constitution has 463 words in it
It does a pretty good job of map-
ping out the basics.
The Ten Commandments was
done in 297 words. The mes-
sage is pretty clear
We have tens of thousands of
words in our state Constitution,
and these amendments will
add many thousands more if
they are adopted.
Some of the ideas are good. I
like the thought of giving a home-
stead exemption to veterans from
other states who were wounded
in combat Currently our laws say
thatyou musthave lived in Florida
when you got the combat injury
to receive the tax exemption.
That's dumb. Most people
who live in Florida were not
born here, and that has nothing
to do with the seriousness of
their injuries.
So pass a law don't amend
the darned Constitution.


COMMENTARY


If this makes sense, and I
think it does, our legislators
should take up the cause for
out-of-state veterans and make
the change.
We've got to stop junking up
our Constitution with every
issue that comes down the pike.
A few years ago we reached
the extreme when voters ap-
proved an amendment to out-
law the confinement of
pregnant pigs in cages.
This is now part of our Con-
stitution, and it was possibly one
of the dumbest things ever done.
Ever
Our state Constitution should
be for the big-picture things. It
should guarantee freedoms
and protect basic rights.
It should not be about every-
day laws. And it certainly should
not be about pregnant pigs.
Our legislative branch of
state government is somewhat
dysfunctional, but that is the
place where we make laws.
My advice: Don't spend a lot
of time in the voting booth this
year trying to read the very con-
fusing constitutional amend-
ments. Just vote no.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
His email address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


WATER
Continued from Page C1

where anyone who lives on or
recreates on the water will tell you
that the bay is saltier and the
spring flows have been reduced.
Just to the south, a group of
stakeholders have been fighting
MFL proposals from the SWFWMD
for the Chassahowitzka and Ho-
mosassa rivers that would allow
reduced flows. All of these issues
are integral to the future of our
state's water supply and the vital-
ity of our aquatic ecosystems and
the species dependent upon those
ecosystems, including manatees.
While these permit applications
and the continued mindset of the
water management districts to find
"more" water are disconcerting,
there is one positive, and it is this:
people are angry People are tired
of business as usual while they
watch the waters that they love
continue to decline. They are
angry at Florida's leadership for
lacking vision and a sustainable
long-term plan for water use.
Folks are right to be angry, and if
we are going to create positive
change in the way we provide, use,
and value water, we all need to
channel that anger into action- to
contact our water management
districts and our local govern-


Our state is at a
crossroads, or perhaps
more appropriately, a
fork in the river.
ments and to show up at the public
meetings where these issues are
being discussed, and let our lead-
ers know that we want a more sus-
tainable future for Florida's water
resources.
What we need are safeguards
that will curb our wasteful water
use and move us toward water
neutrality, where we find creative
ways to use what we already have.
We need to stop giving our limited
and precious water away to corpo-
rations that will turn around and
use our public resources for pri-
vate profit.
New developments can find
water from the existing permitted
water supplies. They can install
cisterns in those new develop-
ments; pay to install low-flow fix-
tures in every home adjacent to
and within those developments;
and plant Florida-friendly land-
scapes that do not need intensive
irrigation. Our existing develop-
ments must also do more to curb
water use.
Our water management districts
are tasked with providing us water
As long as they see a demand, they
will make it happen, but at what


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 C5


cost? Whether that means setting a
lower MFL for state water bodies,
drawing surface waters off our
rivers like the St. Johns, or build-
ing a seawater desalination facil-
ity, they will "find" the water
Meanwhile, people and the envi-
ronment will pay the price. By
2030, the districts have estimated
Floridians will "need" 1.9 billion
gallons more per day than they did
in 2005, as our population is ex-
pected to grow by 48 percent The
price tag to construct the alterna-
tive water supply projects to meet
this demand: $3.6 billion.
Our state is at a crossroads, or
perhaps more appropriately, a fork
in the river If we want to steer the
ship down a path of sustainability,
we must get and stay engaged. We
must be vigilant in defending our
natural resources and our water
supply, and we must support laws
and leaders that are committed to
these principles. Ultimately, we
must realize the true costs associ-
ated with the water that seems to
flow so freely from our faucets.


Dr Katie Tripp has been Save
the Manatee Club's director of
science and conservation since
May of2008. She received her
Ph.D. in Veterinary Medical
Sciences from the University
ofFlorida, where she conducted
research on manatee physiology


GUIDE
Continued from Page C1

"In order to pass an
amendment to the Constitu-
tion, after the 'pregnant pig'
amendment (in 2002), the
people of Florida said sev-
eral years ago that we don't
want a simple majority to
pass an amendment any-
more. Now it must pass by
60 percent," Johnson said.
That's the easy part of un-
derstanding Florida consti-
tutional amendments.
Understanding what they
say and mean is a different
matter altogether
Thanks to an explanation
from Johnson and the
League of Women Voters,
here are the basics of each
amendment, plus what the
"for" sides say about them
and what the "against" sides
say
Amendment 1 Health
Care Services: This allows
Florida to opt out of the fed-
eral affordable health care
act, prohibits laws or rules
compelling any person or
employer to provide health
care coverage or participate
in any health care system. It
also authorizes health care
providers to accept direct
payment for health care
services and individuals or
employers to pay directly
for health care services
without incurring penalties
or fines.
The "for" side says: Indi-
viduals ought to have the
right and freedom to
choose their own health
care and ought not to be
forced by the federal gov-
ernment into a particular
health care program.
The "against" side says:
The U.S. Supreme Court al-
ready ruled with regards to
the Affordable Health Care
Act and this amendment
was actually on the 2010
Florida ballot (and removed
because of inadequate lan-
guage) before the U.S.
Supreme Court ruling.
Therefore, it has no leg to
stand on if passed, so why
bother? Besides, the
Florida Constitution is a
governing document and
this is not a governing issue.
Amendment 2 Veter-
ans Disabled Due to Combat
Injury Homestead Property
Tax Discount: This amend-
ment expands the current
homestead exemption avail-
able to disabled veterans to
those who were not Florida
residents at the time they
entered military service.
For: Veterans are veter-
ans whether they entered
the military in New York,
Montana, Ohio or Florida,
and if they were injured in
combat, then we should re-
ward them with a tax break.
It's the least we can do.
Against: There's already
an added homestead ex-
emption for Florida combat-
injured veterans we don't
need any more exemptions.
In Florida, cities and coun-
ties depend on property
taxes for services and they
are already stressed and
stretched. Florida can't af-
ford this.
Amendment 3 State
Government Revenue Limi-
tation: This amendment has
two parts. Due to population
and inflationary changes, it
replaces the existing rev-
enue limitation adopted


about 10 years ago. That
means excess revenue
would be placed in the
state's "rainy day" fund, and
once the fund reaches 10
percent of the prior year's
total budget, the state Legis-
lature would be required to
vote to either provide tax re-
lief or reduce property
taxes.
The second part says the
Legislature may increase
the revenue limitation by a
bill approved by a two-
thirds majority
For: Government is al-
ready overblown and over-
grown. This "Smart Cap"
amendment ensures that
the state budget doesn't
grow beyond Florida's fami-
lies' abilities to pay for it.
Against: The proposed
revenue cap could prevent
government services from
keeping up with demand.
Currently, Florida doesn't
even have enough revenue
to fund what we need, such
as good roads, etc. Besides,
even if this passes, the Leg-
islature could increase the
revenue cap, so it doesn't
matter what the voters say
Amendment 4 Prop-
erty Tax Limitation; Prop-
erty Value Decline;
Reduction for Non-Home-
stead Assessment In-
creases; Delay of Scheduled
Repeal: This reduces the
annual growth in assess-
ment limitation on business
and rental properties and
second homes from 10 per-
cent to 5 percent and pro-
hibits increase in the
assessed value of home-
stead property when the
market value of the prop-
erty decreases.
This also gives "first-time
homesteaders," which in-
cludes non-owners for three
years, an additional tax ex-
emption equal to 50 percent
of the median just value on
the property. This exemp-
tion, which applies only to
non-school property taxes,
is reduced 20 percent each
year, diminishing to zero in
five years or less. If ap-
proved, this exemption ap-
plies to property purchased
on or before Jan. 1, 2012.
For: This provision will
stimulate Florida's econ-
omy and its real estate mar-
ket, encourage people who
may have had previous
homes foreclosed on to buy
homes, will create new jobs
- construction and related
jobs such as house painting,
carpeting, interior decorat-
ing, lighting, etc. and


bring new residents to
Florida, which will help re-
duce the glut of houses on
the market
Against: This would bring
new residents to Florida
who wouldn't be paying
their fair share of taxes yet
would be using the same
services as others who are
paying full price.
Cities and counties are al-
ready stressed and
stretched, and Florida can't
afford this.
Amendment 5 State
Courts: This amendment
has several parts. It adds a
requirement for a state
Supreme Court justice ap-
pointed by the governor to
also be confirmed by the
Senate. It also authorizes
repeal of a court rule by a
simple majority of the Leg-
islature instead of the cur-
rent two-thirds majority,
prohibits re-enactment of
any repealed rule and al-
lows the Speaker of the
House of Representatives
to review all files of the Ju-
dicial Qualification Com-
missions even if it isn't
related to impeachment
considerations.
For: Someone besides the
judicial nominating com-
mittee and the governor
needs to be looking at the
qualifications and back-
ground of Supreme Court
nominees. Also, this amend-
ment makes it easier to re-
peal a rule and might get
the Supreme Court to pay
more attention.
Against: There are three
independent arms of the
state government (execu-
tive, legislative and judi-
cial), and this amendment
usurps power from both the
governor and the judicial
branch. In the 40 years since
we've been doing things this
way there hasn't been a
problem, so why change it
now?
Amendment 6 Prohi-
bition of Public Funding of
Abortions; Construction of
Abortion Rights: This pro-
hibits the use of public
funds for abortions with the
exception of rape, incest or
to save the pregnant
woman's life. This also stip-
ulates that the state Consti-
tution cannot be
interpreted to include
broader rights to abortion
than those contained in the
U.S. Constitution.
For: This codifies what's
already federal law, but just
in case the federal folks
change their minds, this will


be in the state Constitution.
This will reduce the number
of abortions in Florida and
ensure that the privacy
rights of women in regard to
abortion are consistent with
federal standards.
Against: There's already a
federal law and Florida's
right to privacy is already
one of the strongest of any
state constitution. This
amendment interferes with
a woman's right to choose
guaranteed by Roe v Wade.
Amendment 8 Reli-
gious Freedom: Also known
as the "Blaine Amend-
ment," this deletes the cur-
rent provision in the state
Constitution that prohibits
taxpayer funding of reli-
gious institutions and would
allow the state to use public
money to fund religious in-
stitutions and schools.
For: Religious organiza-
tions already fill a gap in
providing social services
that the general public can
use, but are excluded from
some state funding sources.
If they're providing services
to state residents, they
should be entitled to state
funds.
Against: If passed, this
would ensure the creation
and expansion of voucher
programs for private, reli-
gious schools, and finan-
cially this is not a good time
to have vouchers when the
public schools are under-
funded. Also, an unintended
consequence could be the
state interfering with the
"church" rather than the
other way around.
Amendment 9 Home-
stead Property Tax Exemp-
tion for Surviving Spouse of
Military Veteran or First
Responder: This grants full
homestead property relief
to surviving spouses of mil-
itary veterans who die from
service-connected causes
while on active duty or first
responders killed in the
line of duty The deceased
must have been a perma-
nent resident of Florida on
Jan. 1 of the year they died.
This amendment adds first
responders to the existing
exemption.
If enacted, this amend-
ment would authorize the
Legislature to totally or par-
tially exempt surviving
spouses of military veterans
or first responders who died
in the line of duty from pay-
ing property taxes.
For: If they died while try-
ing to protect us, we ought to
be able to provide benefits


to their families. It's good
public policy
Against: This is yet an-
other category of exemp-
tions that take away tax
revenue to already strapped
cities and counties. Who's
going to pick up the slack?
Amendment 10 Tan-
gible Personal Property Ex-
emption: This gives
businesses an additional ex-
emption on tangible prop-
erty such as furniture and
equipment used for the
business, increasing it from
the current $25,000 to
$50,000. It also authorizes
counties and cities to grant
additional personal prop-
erty and tangible tax
exemptions.
For: Lowering taxes will
stimulate business growth
in Florida. Also, this gives
local control to city and
county governments.
Against: Businesses just
got a $25,000 exemption and
now they want it doubled?
We already have enough
business incentives. What
we need is more revenue.
SAmendment 11 -Addi-
tional Homestead Exemp-
tion for Low-Income
Seniors Who Maintain
Long-Term Residency on
Property; Equal to Assessed
Valuation: This gives coun-
ties and cities authority to
grant full homestead prop-


erty exemptions to low-
income seniors (age 65 and
older) who have lived in
their home for at least 25
years and whose home has a
just value of less than
$250,000.
For: This helps keep low-
income seniors in their homes
and allows local control.
Against: Florida already
has additional homestead
exemptions for seniors. Why
is another exemption neces-
sary, why now and why just
seniors? We're already cash-
strapped; who will pick up
the slack?
Amendment 12 Ap-
pointment of Student Body
President to Board of Gov-
ernors of State University
System: This creates a new
council composed of stu-
dent body presidents and
requires that the chair of
that council replace the cur-
rent Florida Student Asso-
ciation member on the
Board of Governors.
For: This is just a clean-
up process replacing one
group with another
Against: The Constitution
is a governing document
and this is not a governing
issue. Therefore, it doesn't
belong there.
Chronicle reporterNancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, com or 352-564-2927.


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------ -





C6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

Vietnam and much of
SoutheastAsia was colonized
by the French. This was part
of Paris' far-flung empire
between the World Wars I
and II. As colonial masters,
Paris kept control of the
country, managed its economy,
only allowed Vietnamese
they approved of into posi-
tions of any importance.
The idea of France being
a major global power with a
far-flung colonial empire was
shattered by France's quick
surrender to the Germans in
World War II. Despite this,
or perhaps to compensate for
it, the French clungtenaciously
to the idea that they should
take their place as a global
power after the conflict.
The greatly weakened gov-
ernment in Paris felt threat-
ened by developments in the
Far East and particularly with
the communist victory in the
Chinese civil war in 1949.
Paris was sensitive to the rise
of the Viet Minh political
movement which demanded
Vietnam's independence
from France and whose
leaders were sympathetic to
communism including, of
course, Ho Chi Minh.
So a significant portion of
the book is the story of French
arrogance and the ineffec-
tiveness ofits troops inVietnam
- many of them mercenar-
ies (including the Foreign
Legion) or troops from
France's African colonies.
Eventually those forces


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


were soundly defeated at
Diem Bien Phu in 1954, where
botched French military tac-
tics led to a bloody debacle
- despite American attempts
to provide military equipment
in support of the French.
The author spends a num-
ber of vivid chapters on that
fateful military engagement
Ho Chi Minh had spent
time in France and then in
Russia in the '20s and'30s. As
a young man, he was a lonely
advocate of independence
for Vietnam. He admired
Communism, but was pri-
marily a Vietnamese nation-
alist(even most French officials
recognized this). The move-
ment he headed (although
there were many other im-
portant figures) was rooted
in Vietnamese nationalism
and a distrust of the French
or any colonial power
The Vietcong army was
put together by Vo Nguyen
Giap, a superb military
leader in terms of inspiring
his troops and military tac-
tics that worked in the thick
jungles and eventually in
urban areas. Giap was re-
spected, although his tactics
were at times unsuccessful.
But the victory at Diem Bien
Phu solidified his reputation.
The third major actor in
this historical drama was the
United States. Dwight Eisen-
hower was elected president
in 1952 in part because he
promised to end the Korean
War, which had reached a
military stalemate by this
time. Eisenhower and his top
advisers including Secre-
tary of State John Foster
Dulles were all highly


vocal anti-communists.
Eisenhower often referred
to the "domino theory," which
predicted that a communist
takeover in Vietnam would
lead to a communist control
of Cambodia and other for-
mer French colonies that
would result in the commu-
nist takeover of newly inde-
pendent India, of Indonesia
and eventually Australia.
Washington demanded the
French not negotiate with
the Vietcong even after the
debacle at Dien Bien Phu.
(There is a bit of hypocrisy
here in that the U.S. was ne-
gotiating with Communist
China trying to find a settle-
ment for the stalled war in
Korea.) Washington had given
the French a large number of
military vehicles, airplanes
and other military equipment
to support their defense of
Vietnam weapons that
were largely unsuccessful
both due to the terrain and
the French army's lack of fa-
miliarity with the technol-
ogy of the weapons.
When talks began in
Geneva in 1954 between
France, England, the Vietcong,
Russia, Communist China,
and other western allies, the
Eisenhower administration
boycotted the talks rather
than negotiate with the com-
munists. However, during
the talks it continually put
pressure on the French and
other allies not to make con-
cessions that would divide
Vietnam into two states.
Eventually, however, the de-
cision was reached to divide
Vietnam a settlement that
Washington refused to rec-


ognize on the grounds that
this would be the first of the
falling dominoes.
This extraordinary book
ends in 1960 before the major
American military effort
materialized. The volume is
full of interesting episodes
that illuminate the events of
the time. "Embers of War"
covers the Vietnam situation
from the 1919 peace confer-
ence that ended World War I
to the French exit and slow
American buildup that took
place in the '60s. Eventually
the nationalist/communist
forces overwhelmed a weak
government that Washing-
ton funded and propped up.
That story is covered in an
earlier book by Logevall that
describes how Washington
came to escalate the conflict
("Choosing War: The Last
Chance for Peace and the Es-
calation of War in Vietnam").
So "Embers of War" sets the
stage for the other book.
I found "Embers" contin-
ually engrossing and read-
able. It is, as they say, hard
to put down. The main prob-
lem of the volume is its
length. The text of the book
runs 714 pages plus an-
other 100-plus pages of foot-
notes and index. The
volume is engrossing be-
cause of vivid details and
description, but one has to
start with the realization
that reading this is going to
eat up a lot of hours.

Michael Francis taught
international politics and
U.S. foreign policy at the
University ofNotre Dame.


Stop first
This is in regards to a
traffic stop in Dunnellon.
As far as I'm concerned, I
came to Florida -yeah,
I'm a Yankee, but I came
to Florida and I wanted
a Florida license, so I
abide by the Florida laws.
And if I'm not mistaken,
it's a Florida law that,
yeah, you can turn right
on red, but you're sup-
posed to come to
a stop first and O
then turn right on
red and proceed
with caution. Be-
cause, let's face
it, you know, the
person that's
going straight
across the inter-
section at that CA
time has the 563
right of way. It
doesn't mean,
"Oh, I've got 10 seconds
so I can jump in front of
this person going 10 mph."
OK, right. Just stop at the
red light and then take your
right turn. It's pretty simple.
If you don't have two sec-
onds in your day, then you'd
better leave earlier, OK?
This time, you pay
Considering all the de-
struction and violence done
to American embassies in
the Middle East by fanati-
cal Muslims protesting,
perhaps the governments
of these countries should
pay for rebuilding and re-
pairing our embassies.
We've given them enough
foreign aid over the years.


I
.1

-0


Not Obama's
This is in response to a
letter to the editor on
Sunday (Sept. 16) titled
"Presidential film"... "2016"
is not a movie that was
produced by Barack
Obama. This only indicates
the direction that the writ-
ers and the director of the
film think. It's no different
than listening to a bunch
of talking heads on TV ex-
pressing their
JND opinion, not
based on fact. I
Af certainly hope
That this doesn't
sway your vote.
Sugar & salt
It is time that
manufacturers of
products who put
0579 way too much salt
or sugar in prod-
ucts be forced to
change course. Home
cooking never has that much
salt in cooked or baked
products. Are the manu-
facturers working with in-
surance companies and
doctors? Stop with the over-
dose of sugar and salt in
food products. Me, I call the
companies. I will not buy
food that has too much
salt and I keep my blood
pressure down. You parents
of young children need to
stop buying ready-made
foods and start teaching
your young how to cook.
Keep them busy cooking
and baking and they'll stay
out of trouble. They will
become healthier and enjoy
learning to cook meals.


Friday Satu




7



14


pp- ---


21 2



28 29


September 28 October 2
Citrus Counry Auditorium
C!trus C_'unrv Fairpround .- Li S. 41 S Invemess

Sale Hours
Fri. 5 p.m. 8 p.m. with $5 donation

No charge for the following:
Sat. 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m. 4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m 7 p.m. (half price day)
Tues. 10 a.m. 3 p.m. ($3 a bag)
Great bargains in recycled reading!
Cash or Check Only
Thousands of best sellers, large print, art, crafts,
cooking, hobbies, classics, children's, treasures,
vintage, DVDs, puzzles, etc.
Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region,
Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and
Citrus County Library System.
www.foccls.org
For book sale information call
0OC94K 746-1334 or 527-8405 C RWRI


l E S i11th Annual Fundraiser
832 K-9's

Deputy Dogs
Sa ,i' ng lives by providing trained
bloodhounds to law enforcement
across the nation.


Celebrating over 140 Dogs
in Service working across
the U.S. and overseas

IPP^ NotSo-Silen Auction
(^featresfun and unsual itemsdona
by posrsfr n wd! rgi^


Sept. 29- 4- 10 p.m.
Plantation on Crystal River
Dinner & Music
Awards & Prizes
Featuring our
Not-So-Silent
Auction!
Raffles
Door Prizes
Tickets $50
www.deputydogs.org
832 K-9's Deputy Dogs
11565 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 302-8319


It's Af About ,Heart
Join Us To Learn Our Recipe For Success!
Kody Snodgrass Memorial Foundation, Inc.
11565 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness, FL 34450

SSponsored by: CHii tbNic E
000C93L ww. hrnic nline.com


ART CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY

Art Center Theatre
PRESENTS


By special arrangement Samuel French, Inc.

By Ray Cooney and John Chapman
Directed by Brady Lay
Sept.14-30


w w. Amm fiSw 11Y\ i


I Show times: 7:30pm Fri.&Sat.
2:00pm Sundays
Box Office: Hours 1-4pm Mon. through Fri.
Tickets: $18.00
OOOCG2S


352-746-7606
www.artcenter.cc


^^^^^^B SundayjiT September 23rdi'TTy^* ^^^^^^^^^
B^^^^^BlThe unllon Concer~t Singers[^^^^^^^^

^^ Moda Septe.T''Jfmber~-c 24th^^^^^^
R^BB&^Tango&del Cielo ^^^^^^^^^^

Tuesday^^ Septembe 25^^^^^l^^ythj ^^^^^^^^^
B|SUnitd3 BWayKc ff~~l l^^^^

^^^^ rida Sepembr 28 -fn^^^y- Ocobr 2L]'^ynd^^
V~~~Falf u~Book ale ~ lllI

Bi^^Saurday eptembr 2thPi^^^^
^rCiru Ave Lights up the Night^^^^
B,'~colrsi Fundraiser^^^^^^^^^^
^^^^^^^Trivia Challenge^^^^
^^,~eut Dg FuKflfT^CjindraiserTi^^^^^
^^^^^Sunday tilii~Septemberi 30thw^^^^^^
-^^LPGA Sotheas^t Scin Workshop^^^^
^^^I^^IBMona Otber IKsUt^^^^^^^^
*~aia for Huma^^^nity* Golf Tournament







L^^y^Bies & iBBBBQ
All Fo^3rd i!W?'Powered Car & Truck Show

^K^^K^Su ^nda Otobr th^^^^^^^
^^^*^^Rails tjrals ike Ride ^^^^^^^^

0r Tusa OctoB^ber 9th^^^^^^^
K~~Fl Car Party^H^^^^^^^

Frida Octber 12h & 13th^^
Aii^frtiansBoutiquef^^


SPONSORED
EVENTS SO
FAR THIS YEAR!
The Chionicle is committed to suppoi ting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
services, fundraiseis and entertainment throughout on0
community The Chionicle is committed to helping make
Citrus County the best place to live and uoik. Don t
hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 foi
your sponsoishlp needs!


1 0 0 0 0* 00 9 0 0 00 00 0 0


COMMENTARY












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Something to share


This image provided by Scripophily.com shows a paper war
bond for the U.S. Treasury War Finance Committee.


This image provided by Scripophily.com shows a paper
stock certificate for Brooklyn Elevated Railway Company.

In a digital age, paper stocks

hang on for some people


CHRISTINA REXRODE
AP Business Writer
ob Kerstein loves
his paper stock
certificates.
At a time when stock
trading is dominated by
rapid-fire computers, he
relishes paper stocks for
their palpability. Wall
Street seems cryptic and
far away, but certificates
are something he can see
and hold.
They're a pleasant
throwback, a tangible
marker of company his-
tory, a wisp of inky artwork
in a canyon of electronic
solemnity. So when Face-
book went public this year
and decided not to print
paper stock certificates,
Kerstein was bummed.
"A travesty," he says.
He's used to it. For
years, people have been
writing the obituary for
paper stocks. They're de-
rided as hard to track,
easy to lose, out of date
and out of place.
And yet they keep stick-
ing around, stubbornly
analog in a world gone
digital.
Die-hards hoard Enron
certificates in hopes
they'll be worth something
someday They hold on to
Bear Stears because they
lost everything on it or,
for a few, because they
made a ton of money bet-
ting against it


They scramble for Dis-
ney because their kids are
into Mickey and the stock,
graced with the image of
the famous mouse and
Walt Disney himself, looks
nice in a frame.
Joe Wildberg, an auto in-
dustry retiree in Wolver-
ine, Mich., has been
accumulating stocks of old
Michigan copper-mining
companies since he ran
across a few shares in a
house he inherited.
"Where else would you
find a document going back
to the 1840s?" he says.
Tom Carroll, a sales di-
rector in Reston, Va., was a
hit at a family reunion
when he doled out stock of
the old Pennsylvania Rail-
road, where his grandfa-
ther worked for 52 years.
"Everybody was getting
them framed and hanging
them up to remember our
grandfather," he recalls.
Kerstein's favorite is a
certificate for a business
with the unfortunate name
Shadyside Operators. The
stock he owns is dated Oct.
29, 1929 during the most
infamous crash in Wall
Street history
Kerstein makes a living
hawking paper stocks on a
website he founded,
Scripophilycom. But of
Shadyside, he vows, "I'll
never sell."
Long before companies
churned out TV commer-
cials and Twitter feeds,


*' .
,-*- .... . .. ... . 1 .. .. _-. '




. ..


a' *-' **


. .


* *-I


Associated Press
Tom Carroll poses for a portrait Thursday, Sept. 20, with his collection of paper stocks
in Washington. At a time when most stock trading is powered by rapid-fire computers,
some relish paper stocks for their palpability.


they used stock certifi-
cates to establish their
public image. They hired
artists, picked out elabo-
rate lettering, added fancy
borders.
Sometimes the decora-
tions made sense, like
drawings of locomotives
on stocks for railroad com-
panies. Sometimes they
didn't, like pictures of
toga-clad warriors on
stocks for refrigerator
businesses.
But today, paper stocks
are, to put it gently, out of
place. Finance firms time
trades in milliseconds,
and banks accept smart-
phone photos of checks.
The government hasn't is-
sued paper versions of
Treasury bonds since 1986.
And yet paper stocks
command an odd re-
silience even odder
when you consider how
many times people have
tried to kill them.
The Depository Trust &
Clearing Corp., which han-
dles most of the adminis-
trative underpinning of
stock trading in the United
States, set a goal this sum-


2~WF~


jy"~lg;a~~i~LLi.C7L I,1 jC

VIWRL-O IjASLn ~


.... - -- - - - -
This image provided by Scripophily.com shows a paper
stock certificate for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.


mer to eliminate paper
stocks, perhaps as early
as 2015.
The DTCC likes to point
out that more than 700 is-
suers on U.S. stock ex-
changes no longer offer
paper shares, including
big names like Apple, Gen-
eral Motors and Microsoft
But more than 6,300
still do.
The DTCC can't figure
out why "Having posses-
sion of a physical certifi-
cate really adds no value
to the investor or to any-
body else," says Daniel


Thieke, managing director
of settlement and asset
services. "You can't do
anything with it except
look at it and put it in a
file cabinet."
In 2003, the Group of
Thirty, an influential co-
terie of the world's busi-
ness and government
leaders, called for an end
to paper stock trading
worldwide and extras
like the paper documents
investors get to confirm
their holdings.


Page D4


Workshops explore the 'New World of Work'


If you're of an age, you probably
remember those commercials,
"This is not your father's
Oldsmobile." The late '80s slogan
for the ill-fated Cutlass Supreme
has been co-opted hun-
dreds of times, and even
spawned a brand of
women's wear, "Not Your
Daughter's Jeans." Over
the years, it has come to
mean something that has
recently changed or
made unconventional
through modernization.
Which brings me to
Navigating the New Laura
World of Work. Suffice it WORK
to say, when it comes to CONNE
finding employment, it is
not your father's job
search. Forget Dad, it's not even
that of your older siblings', because
things have changed, and in fairly
short order
If you've been out of work and
looking for a job for any length of
time, you know what I'm talking
about. Electronic applications are
the norm. Gone are the days when
you could "hit the pavement" and


I
I


drop off your old generic r6sum6
hoping for an unscheduled sit-down
with a business owner or hiring
manager
Jerry Flanders, who coordinates
Workforce Connection's
Navigating the New
World of Work seminars,
does an excellent job of
explaining just how the
old ways of finding a job
and connecting with em-
ployers are no longer ef-
fective and how the old
paradigms have given
way to new strategies.
Byrnes Today, it's all about
FORCE marketing your skills
"CTION and qualifications and
leveraging your social
and professional net-
works and yes, by social, I mean
Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn but
I'm also talking about your connec-
tions in Kiwanis, the PTA and Tues-
day Night Bowling League.
If you haven't explored the New
World of Work, it's an imperative
place to start, no matter how long
you've been "out there" looking for
work. The workshops hammer


home why you need to stand out in
today's fiber-competitive job mar-
ket, why dusting off your old r6sum6
won't get you an interview and,
once you get an interview, what you
can do to ace it
And just like the aforementioned
generic r6sum6, we recognize that
one size does not fit all, so the work-
shop comes in three formats. As
with all workshops, registration is
required. You can learn more, and
register online, by visiting our Cal-
endar of Events at www.clmwork-
force.com.
Fill Workshop takes place over
two half-days at the Workforce Con-
nection Citrus County Resource
Center in Inverness. If you haven't
visited the resource center, often
referred to as the "one-stop," this
may be the perfect opportunity for
you to discover the full array of
services and resources available to
you, from the computers in the re-
source room to staff support. The
workshops are held twice a month,
on Thursday and Friday, and the
next ones take place at 1:15 p.m.
Oct. 4 to 5 and Oct. 18 to 19.
Community Workshop: If you


don't have time to commit to the
two-day workshop, you can get the
highlights during these convenient
two-hour sessions: Wednesday, Oct.
3 at 3 p.m. at the Central Ridge Li-
brary in Beverly Hills; 2 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 9, at the Coastal Region
Library in Crystal River; or 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 10, at the Ho-
mosassa Library. If you live near
Dunnellon, there is also a commu-
nity workshop at 10 a.m. Thursday,
Oct. 11, at the Dunnellon Library
Student Workshop: Any post-
secondary student in Citrus County,
whether attending the College of
Central Florida in Lecanto, the
Withlacoochee Technical Institute
in Inverness or other program, may
attend the newest offering in the
"Navigating" series, From Educa-
tion to Employment. These three-
hour workshops are tailored for the
student nearing completion of their
college or technical education pro-
gram. The next workshop takes
place at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 3,
at CF's Ocala campus.
Of course, Navigating the New


Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


No


reason


to rush

DEAR BRUCE: I'm
20 years old. I am
the general man-
ager of a local restaurant
and most likely will be in
business with my dad in
the near future. I share an
apartment with a friend,
but soon I will be getting
married, and that will
then increase my monthly
outlay for rent.
Right now is a very bad
time to buy a house, and
I'm not even sure we
should. At the store, I
bring home around
$45,000, but that varies de-
pending on how much the
store makes or doesn't
make. Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: I must
say, at 20 years old, it
sounds like you are on the
fast track. You may very
well have found the girl of
your dreams, but given
your current situation and
your tender years, you
might want to consider put-
ting off that marriage for a
while. You're independent
and not living with your
parents, and you've worked
out what sounds like a good
arrangement that I would
continue.
As for your comment
about now being a bad
time to buy a house, I'm
not at all sure that is cor-
rect But I agree it's wise to
question whether this is an
appropriate action for you.
In many ways, it is a very
good time to buy a house,
because housing prices
are seriously depressed in
most parts of the country
The flip side is once you've
got a house, you may be
stuck with it, as prices may
soften even more.
You haven't mentioned
it in your letter, but I hope
you are doing some sav-
ing. On balance, I think
you're doing well.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 50
years old, in great health
and have never smoked.
What is the best life insur-
ance product for me -
term, whole life or univer-
sal? Reader, via email
DEAR READER: You
ask what the "best" life in-
surance product is for
you, and that is a term that
always makes me nerv-
ous. There is no absolute
answer without knowing a
great deal more informa-
tion about your life.
Why are you buying the
insurance? How long do
you want to keep the
insurance?
That said, the general
answer would be term in-
surance. Why? Because
term is pure insurance. It
is not sold as a savings ve-
hicle or investment. It is
strictly insurance that
provides money in case of
your death.
Let's face it: When you
buy a life insurance policy
such as term, you are bet-
ting you're not going to
make it If you absolutely,
positively knew you
weren't going to die for
the next 20 years, there
would be no reason to
purchase it
Term is the least expen-
sive insurance, but on the
other side of that, if you
live another 20 years or
more, the only thing you
will have to show for the
premiums you've paid is
the satisfaction of know-
ing you have beaten the
odds. Some insurance
folks would tell you if you
See Page D4


1 r
~ C










D2

SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan .
this:
rSi r.*FB


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


A little guessing game for you


Hmmm....
Two fully equipped airports
with 5,000-foot runways, fueling
capabilities, FBO operations,
flight training.
Top-notch K-12 public school
system awarded an "A" rating for
seven years in a row, including a
fully staffed technical school of-
fering a variety of accredited pro-
grams and classes from industrial
machinery maintenance and re-
pair, to welding and home con-
struction, to health care; plus a
first-rate four-year accredited
college.
More than 9,000 small,
medium and large businesses.
Any idea where this is? I'll give
you a few more hints:
A locally funded incentive
package available to targeted in-
dustries for hiring and tax refunds
for ad valorem, property and tan-
gible taxes.
Excellent, experienced work-
force with diverse skills available


at reasonable rates, with free or
assisted training available.
Historically, less hurricane
and storm activity than in other
Florida counties.
50 percent of county set aside
for forest, recreation and parks.
A sheriff's office that earned
national accreditation from the
Commission on Accreditation for
Law Enforcement Agencies
(CALEA) and state accreditation
from Commission for Florida Law
Enforcement Accreditation (CFA).
Still guessing?? OK here are
your last hints:
Access to Interstate 75 via
State Road 44.
Access to Suncoast Parkway
via US 98.
Access to Florida Turnpike
via State Road 44.
Planned extension of Sun-
coast Parkway through Citrus
County.
One hour to Orlando or
Tampa.


Designation as the 15th Port
in Florida with a working barge
operation in place.
Yes, you are right! It's our own
Citrus County!
At the end of August, the Citrus
County EDC made a presentation


to Duke Energy's Business Devel-
opment Team about our county's
major assets. As we examined
each of our assets, we realized
that we do, indeed, have a very im-
pressive list!
The items above are only small
excerpts from that list. Our home
- the one we love, work in and
play in is a pretty amazing place
of which we can all be proud. With
our unique natural environment
and wildlife, and our champi-
onship golf courses, bike trails
and overall quality of life, it is lit-
tle wonder that tourism is our
major economic driver supporting
many of our businesses small and
large. But beyond tourism, our
businesses add to our quality of
life in Citrus County by providing
jobs, tax income, services and
goods that each of us counts on
daily
The Board of County Commis-
sioners proclaimed September as
Industry Appreciation Month. It


gave us a chance to acknowledge
the important roles businesses
have in our lives, recognize their
achievements, and say "thank
you." Thank you for the jobs,
thank you for your service, and
thank you for believing in Citrus
County and establishing your busi-
ness here.
We live in a wonderful commu-
nity and I, for one, am grateful. I'll
bet you are, too.
Cheers,
John Siefert,
Executive Director, Citrus County
Economic Development Council
Footnote: Every September the
Citrus CountyEconomic Develop-
ment Council celebrates business
in Citrus County with IndustryAp-
preciation Month. Through vari-
ous networking activities, they
acknowledge and applaud the
9,000-plus businesses in the
county Citrus County IS OPEN
FOR BUSINESS.


Upcoming Citrus County Chamber/ EDC events


Sept. 25 RIBBON CUTTING:
Forest View Retirement/Solstice, Ho-
mosassa 8:30 a.m.
Sept. 26 RIBBON CUTTING: Dr
Padala, Crystal River 8:30 a.m.
Sept. 27 RIBBON CUTTING:
Florida Pools & Paver, Crystal River
4:30 p.m.
Oct. 11 After Hours Business
Networking Mixer 5 to 7 p.m. at
NATURE COAST EMS.
Oct. 12 October Chamber Lunch,
11:30 a.m. at Citrus Hills Golf& Coun-
try Club.
Oct. 23 TUESDAY After Hours
Business Networking Mixer 5 to 7


p.m. at ALPACA MAGIC.
Nov 1 Business After Hours 5
to 7 p.m. at HOSPICE OF CITRUS
COUNTY
Nov 8 Business After Hours -
SENICA AIR and CITRUS COUNTY
BUILDERS ASSOCIATION preview
the 35th annual "Remodeling Amer-
ica" Home & Outdoor Show Nov 10 to
11.
Nov 15 Business After Hours 5
to 7 p.m. at FERRIS GROVE RETAIL
STORE.
Dec. 1 6 p.m. Crystal River "A
Postcard Christmas" Parade.
Dec. 5 BWA December Luncheon.


Dec. 6 Business After Hours 5
to 7 p.m. at B & W REXALL DRUGS.
Dec. 8 Noon Inverness "A Post-
card Christmas" Parade.
Dec. 13- Business After Hours/Pa-
rade Winners 5 to 7 p.m. WAY-
BRIGHT REALTY
Jan. 19 and 20 2013 Florida Man-
atee Festival in Crystal River.
http://www.floridamanateefestival.
com/external/wcpages/manatee_
festival/index.aspx
Check out our complete calendar
for community, entertainment and
fundraising events.


News You CAN USE


Santa Claus is
coming to town!
The Magic of Christmas is the theme
for the Saturday, Dec.r 1, Parade in the
Hills Christmas parade this year. Kicking
off in Beverly Hills at 10 a.m., the parade
travels down Beverly Hills Boulevard from
C.R. 491 (Lecanto Highway) to Civic Cir-
cle, where crafters, cars and kids' zone
await. Crafters will man their tables from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., a
classic car show will be sure to make you
dream or remember. There will be a Kids
Fun area from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. that day,
also. There is something for everyone at
this Christmas celebration in the Civic Cir-
cle at the end of Beverly Hills Boulevard.
For more information, please visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Santa travels to Crystal River that
evening (Saturday, Dec. 1) to take part in
the Crystal River parade at 6 p.m. This


year's theme is "A Postcard Christmas."
The parade route runs from Northeast
Third Avenue south on U.S. 19 to Port
Paradise Road. Applications for the pa-
rade are available at www.citruscounty
chamber.com.
The following week, Saturday. Dec. 8,
Santa will be in the Inverness Christmas
parade at noon. Applications are available
at www.citruscountychamber.com.
Did you know?
The Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce has gone high-tech with a mobile
phone website. If you
are out in the car and n l O
need the contact infor-
mation for a chamber
member, you can look
it up right from your
smartphone! Mem- I| l
bers are posting their
events as well as coupons on the site, so if


you have a moment, take your smartphone
and check us out. Click on the QR code
and take Citrus County along with you.
Customer Service
nominations
Since starting our 'You Caught My Eye"
program in late June, we have had many
nominations. We have wonderful com-
ments from across the county regarding
experiences with fantastic employees.
When you nominate someone, that per-
son and his or her manager receive a let-
ter from the Chamber of Commerce. We
are letting business owners and managers
know when their employees are doing
something right. We believe strongly that
rewarding positive behavior will cause that
behavior to blossom and bloom else-
where. Thank you, Citrus County, for par-
ticipating in this program and we look
forward to applauding more employees of
Citrus County in the weeks to come.


Citrus County Cruisin'


Sept. 28 to Oct. 2 Join the Friends
of the Citrus County Library System at
their Fall Mega Book Sale at the Audito-
rium, 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness.
This is your chance to find some fantastic
bargains in recycled reading from
thousands of fiction titles, cookbooks,
history, audio books, CDs, DVDs and
more. There's something for everyone at
this huge event. Don't miss out! Hours: 5
to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, $5 donation for
entry; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
29; 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30, "Blue
Light" specials and BOGO; 10 a.m. to 7
p.m. Monday, Oct. 1, half-price day; and
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, $3-a-
bag day.
Oct. 6 Nick Nicholas Ford and The
Citrus County Chronicle host the third an-
nual Nature Coast Mustang Club All
Ford Powered Car & Truck Show on
Saturday, Oct. 6, at Nick Nicholas Ford,
2901 State Road 44, Inverness. Pro-
ceeds benefit Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services, and donations of non-
perishable food items for local charities
will also be accepted. Music, fun, raffle,
50/50 and FORDS!
Travel a little farther south to enjoy
Bikes & BBQ in Floral City. Join Floral
City for a day of barbecue competition,
music, art and small-town charm. Bike
riders from across the area converge
here to participate in the annual Rails to
Trails fundraiser the next day, Oct. 7, on
the Withlacoochee State Trail. Visit
www.floralcitymerchants.com.
Oct. 26 to 28 The Cooter Festival
returns in 2012 with three days loaded
with fun, music, contests, games food,
refreshments, turtle races, barbecue
cook-off, Cooter Idol championship,
Triathlon, Costume Contest and more.
Free parking and admission. More infor-
mation is available at www.cooter
festival.com/.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce










t ^-


Nov. 3 Celebrate the Blues from 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. with the annual Blues 'n
Bar-B-Que in Homosassa. Tickets are
$20 at the gate. The ticket price is for the
concert only. Bar-B-Que cooked onsite,
Cuban cuisine in the Museum Cafe, cold
beer, wine, soda, water, coffee and
desserts will stave off hunger and keep
you energized. Please, no pets, no cool-
ers, no outside food or drink, but bring
chairs for your personal comfort and be
ready to have a great time! More infor-
mation is available at www.ncfblues.com.
Travel a few miles north and join the
street festival as the Rotary Club of Crys-
tal River-Kings Bay presents the fifth an-
nual Stone Crab Jam on Saturday, Nov.
3. This street festival kicks off at 4 p.m.


on the south side of Citrus Avenue all the
way to the waterfront at King's Bay Park
in Crystal River, with music on three
stages, food and craft vendors, and beer,
wine and soda/water. General admission
tickets are only $5, and VIP tickets are
just $50 each. More information is avail-
able at www.stonecrabjam.com/.
Nov. 10 to 11 Return to the Crystal
River Armory during the 35th annual "Re-
modeling America" Home & Outdoor
Show. Hosted by the Citrus County
Builders Association and sponsored this
year by Senica Air, the show is open to
the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. De-
tails available at www.citrusbuilders.com/
commhomeoutdoorshow.php.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ...
Gary Vanover and \/

Michael (Buzz)
Marchese
Advance Auto Parts,
Homosassa
... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Are you getting


your money's


worth?


We have all heard that
phrase, "It takes money to
make money," and it IS true.
As a Chamber Member you
are lucky you invested in
the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce and now it is
time to get your money's
worth! So go ahead, use and
abuse us ... we can take it!
1) Do you keep your con-
tact information current?
It publishes to the main
website AND the mobile site
immediately Log into
www.citruscountychamber.
com and click on Members
Only Log in and update con-
tact information, register for
events, pay your bills all at
YOUR convenience. Don't
know your log in informa-
tion? Call us at 352-795-3149.
2) Do you send press
releases to cindi@citrus
countychamber.com?
Perhaps you have hired a
new employee or two,
maybe an employee or your
company was recently rec-
ognized or given an award.
We can increase your visibil-
ity by mentioning your com-
pany in public media such
as the Chamber Connection
page in the Business section
of the Chronicle, our FB

&j f5 "like" us on
facebook


page and our E Blasts.
3) Do you post your
coupons and discounts on
the Chamber website?
Coupons and discounts
post immediately and you
get to choose if they are pub-
lic or just member to mem-
ber You can even add a
code to know if the coupon
has come from the Chamber
website! Coupons and dis-
counts are also available on
the mobile website.
4) Do you post your events
on the Chamber website?
We now have a Community
Event calendar where you
can post your organizations'
events a great source to in-
clude the residential and
tourist communities. Events
automatically post to the mo-
bile website also. We will be
on WYKE Citrus Today and
Chamber Chat explaining
and promoting the mobile
website to viewers.
5) Have you liked the
Chamber/EDC on Facebook?
When you like us on FB
then we can share your
events easier AND it is one
more way for visitors on our
page to get to your page.
Don't have a FB page???
Call us, we can help!


Susan Gill Supervisor of Elections joins Melissa Benefield
on this weeks Chamber Chat. How can I request a mail
ballot? Where do I go to vote? When does early voting
start? We will have all your questions answered in
preparation for the General Election. Nicole Gasiorek
DME Director at Brashears Pharmacy shares with us
their Jodee line of products. From breast forms to
swimwear, camisoles and even prostheses, Brashears
has a private boutique to make your post-mastectomy
fitting a comfortable experience.Come on out for the 1st
Annual Village Crier Shop Local Expo! Necia Ratliff tells
us how we can win one of their fabulous prizes which
include a $100 Visa Gift card and even an Ipad! There
are over 80 exhibitors at this FREE event so you will
want to be sure to mark your calender for Saturday
September 29th. The Shop Local Expo is from 10-3 at
the College of Central Florida Lecanto. Don't miss it!
Todd Pace, Head Chef at Joe's Family Restaurant is
coming to prepare a fantastic Greek salad on our
Chamber Cooks segment. This is a recipe you don't want
to miss!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday
6pm-- Thursday 8am- Friday 1pm- every week! If you
would like your business or local event featured on
Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you-- Email Melissa
Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber
Chat on Facebook for clips of past segments and
updates on our weekly show!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Stylists attend
road show
The stylists from New Con-
cepts Hair Salon were intro-
duced to the latest styles and
cuts for men when they recently
attended the MENSDEPT Road
Show in Tampa.
Sponsored by SalonCentric,
the show demonstrated cutting
techniques that achieve the lat-
est styles and trends in men's
hair fashion.
"It's great to see what the
newest styles are and have a
chance to learn just how to cre-
ate them," said stylist Kaleb
Sisco of New Concepts.
More information is available
from New Concepts Hair Salon
at 352-563-0005.
State boards to
meet in Tampa
The Department of Business
and Professional Regulation's
mission is to license efficiently
and regulate fairly. DBPR li-
censes more than 1 million
businesses and professionals
ranging from real estate agents,
veterinarians and accountants
to contractors and cosmetolo-
gists. For information, visit
www.MyFloridaLicense.com.
The Board of Auctioneers
will conduct a public meeting at
9 a.m. Friday, Sept. 28, at Em-
bassy Suites Hotel, 3705 Spec-
trum Blvd., Tampa. The board
is housed within the Depart-
ment of Business and Profes-
sional Regulation's Division of
Professions.
The Board of Accountancy
will conduct a public meeting at
9 a.m. Friday, Sept. 28, at
Tampa Airport Marriott inside
Tampa International Airport.
The board is housed within the
Department of Business and
Professional Regulation's Divi-
sion of Professions.
Bealls Outlet plans
grand re-opening
Bealls Outlet store at Re-
gional Shopping Center, 1430
U.S. 41 N. in Inverness, has
undergone a total store make
over. Store manager Michelle
Malanga will host a grand re-
opening to showcase all the
major improvements from Fri-
day, Sept. 28, through Monday,
Oct. 1.
Event sponsors include Life
South blood mobile, Master-
piece Dental Studio, We Care
Food Pantry, Citrus County Fire
Department, Manhattan Hair-
styling Academy, Not Just a
Fish Store and Bella the clown.
Workforce sets
September events
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties is offering
nearly 50 workshops during the
month of September to assist
those interested in sharpening
their employability skills.
Ranging from drop-in open
resume labs to two-day work-
shops, the programs are avail-
able at no charge to job
seekers throughout Workforce
Connection's three-county re-
gion. Participants must be fully
registered with Workforce Con-
nection through the Employ
Florida Marketplace (EFM) at
www.EmployFlorida.com. Addi-
tional workshop registration
may also be required.
Workforce Connection Re-
source Centers are in Citrus
County at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., Inverness; in Levy
County at 109 N.W. Third Ave.;
and in Marion County at 2703
N.E. 14th St., Ocala. To sign up


SunTrust Bank kicked off its campaign Wednesday, Aug. 29.
Marie Straight, SVP area manager SunTrust Bank, stands
with Amy Meek, United Way CEO.

Businesses
'Live United'
Special to the Chronicle
Several businesses recently
began their annual United
Way Workplace Campaigns.
United Way of Citrus County
appreciates the commitment
these businesses provide to
the organization and to the
community. The employees .
are dedicated to the United
Way movement and their loy-
alty is highly valued. RIGHT:
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center kicked off its cam- /
paign Thursday, Sept. 6. .
Pictured are: Dorothy Pernu,
director of marketing and pub-
lic relations, SRRMC; Joyce
Brancato, CEO, SRRMC; Amy
Meek, United Way CEO; and
Ray Chirayath, United Way
Board vice president.


New PR president


Special to the Chronicle
The Nature Coast Chapter of the Florida Public Relations As-
sociation recently installed Katie Mehl, APR, as the group's
new President for the 2012-13 year. Mehl, right, public re-
lations coordinator for Citrus Memorial Health System, re-
ceived congratulations from Tina Banner, APR, who
represented the state association. Banner is the vice presi-
dent of resource development for United Way of Marion
County. FPRA is the oldest public relations organization in
the United States and is dedicated to developing public re-
lations practitioners who, through ethical and standardized
practices, enhance the profession. Members represent a va-
riety of different organizations, including private and public
corporations, government entities, not-for-profits, counsel-
ing firms and independent practitioners. The local chapter
meets the first Friday monthly in Citrus Hills. To learn more,
contact Katie Mehl at kmehl@citrusmh.org.


for any of the workshops, call
352-291-9552 or 800-434-
JOBS, ext. 1410. or register on-
line at https://www.timecenter
.com/wcworkshops.
Complete program and regis-
tration information is available
at Workforce Connection's Cal-
endar of Events at www.clm
workforce.com. The following
programs take place at Work-
force Connection Resource
Centers in Chiefland, Inverness
and Ocala, as well as at various
community locations:


Computer Basics is de-
signed for those new to tech-
nology or with entry-level
computer skills. Last session is
1:30 p.m. Sept. 28 p.m. in
Ocala.
Employ Florida Market-
place Essentials, Nail that In-
terview and Optimal R6sum6
workshops take place Sept. 27
beginning at 8:15 a.m. in Ocala.
Nail that Interview workshops
are also at 8:15 p.m. Sept. 26
in Chiefland and at 1:15 p.m.
Sept. 28 in Inverness.


Belk kicked off its inaugural campaign Saturday, Sept. 15.
Amy Meek, United Way CEO, stands with Ashley Strouse,
Belk operations team manager.


Tally Ho on Disney Dream


Special to the Chronicle
Tally Ho Vacations travel agents was invited to inspect Dis-
ney's cruise ship, The Disney Dream. It was a full day for the
agents, who were special guests of the Walt Disney World
cast members, as they explored the entire ship from top to
bottom including the interactive dining rooms, guest rooms,
spa areas and children and adult activity areas. Agents pic-
tured are Roger Carlson, Hazel Carlson and Maria Nunez.
Contact Tally Ho Vacations at 352-860-2805 or dmuir@
tallyhovacations.com.


Navigating the New
World of Work two-day work-
shop takes place every Tuesday
and Wednesday in Ocala, with
sessions at 8:15 a.m. for new
job seekers and those with barri-


ers to employment and at 1:15
p.m. for displaced professionals.
The workshops cover how to
identify abilities and transferable
skills, job search strategies/tar-
geted resume development, in-


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

terviewing skills/follow up and
how to work effectively with a
Workforce Connection place-
ment specialist.
Mobile Resource Unit pro-
vides jobseeker services and re-
sources every Monday at 10:30
a.m. at the Bronson Library, and
at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
Williston Library. The MRU is
available at 9 a.m. the first
Wednesday monthly at Annie
Johnson Center in Dunnellon, at
10 a.m. the second Wednesday
at the Town Hall in Inglis, and 10
a.m. the third Wednesday at the
Cedar Key Library.
Navigating the New
World of Work (community
workshop) offers many of the
highlights of the two-day ses-
sions, but in a two-hour format.
The condensed workshops take
at 4 p.m. Sept. 27 at Taylor Col-
lege in Belleview and at 5:30
p.m. Sept. 27 at Forest Com-
munity Center in Ocklawaha.
Open R6sum6 Labs are
in Ocala at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
each Monday, as well as 9 a.m.
every Friday. Labs also take
place at 8:15 a.m. Sept. 25 in
Chiefland and at 1:15 p.m.
Sept. 25 in Inverness. Drop-ins
are welcome, and no additional
registration is required but
space is limited.
Leadership Citrus
applications open
Applications are now being
accepted for the Leadership
Citrus Class of 2013. Leader-
ship Citrus has been active in
the community for 21 years,
and participants have gained a
higher level of awareness and
understanding of Citrus County
and all it has to offer.
Leadership Citrus is a five-
month program that meets
every other week beginning in
January.
Class membership is open to
Citrus County residents, and
members of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will re-
ceive a discount. Cost of the
class is $495 for Chamber
members and $595 for non-
members.
Applications can be found at
www.leadershipcitrus.com; ap-
plications are due by Oct. 25.


Honoring Survivors and



Remembering Loved Ones

Include your loved ones and those touched
by cancer in our Chronicle Keepsake
Edition on October 2. This special edition
will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT.

*All photos & information must be submitted
by Wednesday, September 26th






.$ 30

SPer Tribute
Will include a photo and
short bio, approximately
20 words or less.
S' Call Saralynne
564-2917
or Yvonne
563-3273
to reserve your space.

Cwfi| i cloi.,cE
.CI tS.w~hroilohn~


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 D3





D4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page D1


World of Work is just the
starting off point of your job-
search journey. To help you
along the way, we offer a va-
riety of supporting work-
shops, as well:
Computer Basics: Move
Your Mouse, Move Your
Cheese, Shape a Better Fu-
ture is designed for individ-
uals who have little or no
computer skills. Partici-
pants will learn about basic
computer features and op-
erations, including the use
of a mouse, how to create
and save a Microsoft Word
document, how to create an
email address and basic
navigation techniques for
the Internet and the Employ
Florida Marketplace.
EFM (Employ Florida
Marketplace) Essentials:
Whether you're new to EFM
or have limited experience
with the state's premier job
search engine, this work-
shop will guide you through
the new and improved site
and its features, including
background, resume, jobs,
Virtual Recruiter, online
training and self assess-
ment. EFM is where em-
ployers post their jobs and
where Workforce Connec-
tion finds job candidates.
Nail that Interview: Let
Me Tell You About Myself -
This workshop is for individ-
uals committed to improving
their interview skills. Build-
ing on the basics introduced



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

bought whole life insurance,
at least you would have a sav-
ings product (although you
also would have paid more in
premiums). In the case of
universal life, there would be
some investments.
One consideration is the
time period for which you
want to buy insurance. The
10-year term premium
would cost less than a 20-
year, but you'd have to renew
at age 60.
If you buy term insurance,
look for a policy that is re-
newable and convertible,
meaning you have the right
to convert it to whole life if
there are reasons to do this.
Most important, the policy
should be "without evidence
of insurability" That means
you can have all sorts of dis-
eases, even terminal ones,
but the insurance company
must renew the product at
the appropriate rates for
someone who is perfectly
healthy
DEAR BRUCE: My sister,
who is 80 years old, wants to
know if she can add her
nephew as a beneficiary on
her stock. Right now he is
only 6 years old and won't
have access to this for an-
other 12 years. Then he
would be 18 and could use it
for college. -Jerry, via email
DEARJERRY: Whether or
not it's possible to put the
youngster's name on the
stock, it is a very foolish thing
to consider It seems to me if
there's any important money
involved, it should be left to
the boy's parents with the un-
derstanding they will spend
the money on his behalf. If
your sister doesn't trust the
parents enough to put their
name on the stock, which I
can understand, she could
have a trust established or
some other legal documenta-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


in Navigating, participants
will delve into interview
preparation, dressing for
success and to impress, and
how to respond to the "tell
me about yourself" question
as well as behavioral ques-
tions. You will be paired with
a Workforce Connection
placement specialist and go
through a mock interview,
receiving suggestions on
areas of improvement
If that seems like a lot of
effort to go through, remem-
ber, this is not your father's
job search. Make it yours.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is a
Certified Workforce
Professional and
communications manager
at Workforce Connection.
Contact her at 352-291-9559
or 800-434-5627, ext. 1234,
or lbyrnes@clm workforce.
com. Workforce Connection
is a member of the Employ
Florida network of
workforce services and
resources. Workforce
Connection is an equal
opportunity employer/
program. Auxiliary aids
and services are available
upon request to individuals
with disabilities. All voice
telephone numbers listed
above may be reached by
persons using TTY/TDD
equipment via the Florida
Relay Service at 711. Ifyou
need accommodations, call
800-434-5627, ext. 7878, or
e-mail accommodations@
clmworkforce.com. Make
the request at least three
business days in advance.


tion. Or she could just leave
a legacy to her nephew in her
will.
That, too, may create
some problems, because the
beneficiary would be a
minor. Someone would have
to be responsible for man-
agement of the money and
would have to report to the
courts how it's being han-
dled. Furthermore, having
that money in his name
could seriously affect his
ability to get student loans.
You are also assuming he
will go to college in 12 years.
Many things can happen be-
tween now and then. Leav-
ing funds to children often
creates many more prob-
lems than it solves.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 34
years old and have a 5-year-
old daughter. I have started
saving for her college. I
would like to get some type of
life insurance that would
protect and provide for her if
something should happen to
me. What can you suggest? -
Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: Congrat-
ulations on trying to put
money away for your daugh-
ter's education.
In my opinion you ought to
consider term insurance.
Since she is 5, you might
want to consider a 20-year
term. That would take you to
age 54, at which time your
daughter ought to be long on
her own. In all likelihood, it
would be the least expen-
sive insurance you could
purchase.
As to the amount of life in-
surance to buy, this depends
in some measure on how
much you are earning (pro-
tecting the money you re-
ceive now) and on who would
look after the child if some-
thing were to happen to you.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com
or to Smart Money PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.


SHARE
Continued from Page D1

Three years later, the group con-
cluded "islands of paper and manual
processes remain and are a persistent
source of inefficiency" The G30 hasn't
made further recommendations.
As far back as 1991, the Government
Accountability Office warned paper
certificates in the U.S. would "hamper
the strength of our markets" and noted
that Denmark, France and Norway had
already gone virtually paperless. The
agency, which works for Congress, has-
n't updated its report, either
To be sure, the paper-haters have
had success. In 1990, there were more
than 32 million physical certificates
stuffed into the DTCC vault for safe-
keeping. Now there are only about
1.2 million.
States have gradually gotten rid of
laws that required companies to issue
paper shares when asked.
The DTCC now charges $500 to bro-
kers who want to withdraw
paper certificates.
In 2004, the Securities In-
dustry and Financial Mar-
kets Association, a trade Ci
group, distributed an imagi-
nary tale of two sisters to
help financial advisers per-
suade clients to go paperless.
Louise insisted on paper
stocks. Winnie didn't Guess
who was better off?'
After all, paper stocks are
expensive to print and mail.
It's easy to stuffthem away in .' A
the attic or the safe-deposit jo
box, forgetting them until
long after the company is
gone and the shares worthless.
They get lost: Thomson Reuters,
which operates the Securities and Ex-
change Commission's Lost and Stolen
Securities Program, says $48 billion
worth were reported missing or stolen
last year
Trading them is also a pain, usually
requiring a trip to the post office and a
certified signature rather than a few
clicks on E-Trade. And keeping track of
them can be harrowing. In 2006, War-
ren Buffett had to trundle a Berkshire
Hathaway certificate worth a terrifying
$11 billion from Omaha, Neb., to pro-
cessing in Minneapolis, so he could
give the converted shares to charity
Buffett briefly considered FedEx but
opted to send someone from his office.
So if paper stocks are so square, why
are they still around?
A lot of companies, it seems, really
don't mind them maybe because
they build shareholder goodwill and
public relations cred. Companies like
McDonald's and Starbucks, whose cer-
tificates are popular among collectors,
say they have no plans to nix paper
shares.
Playboy had a blockbuster when it
decorated its shares with a nude image


Associated Press
These images provided by Scripophily.com shows paper stock certificates for
The Gold Glen Mining Milling and Tunnelling Co., above, and Enron Corp., below.


<.-



"^"ei Enron Corp. fro^


--- u


of Miss February 1971. It was so flooded
with requests that it had to switch to a
less exciting design. "It just got to be a
little too much," says spokeswoman
Theresa Hennessey
Maybe it's also just easier to send
them to the few investors who ask
rather than argue about paper's fail-
ings. "We don't have an abundance of
requests," says a McDonald's spokes-
woman, who declined to give details.
The cluster of investors who prefer
paper not for novelty but for security
could prove especially hard to bicker
with. Recent computer glitches that
sent the market swinging aren't going
to convince any of them their stock is
safer when it's a number punched into
a corporate record.
In 2007, corporate gadfly Evelyn Y
Davis filed a proposal asking Macy's to
issue paper stocks to shareholders who
asked. Macy's said it wasn't considering
getting rid of them anyway.
She had less success at NYSE Eu-
ronext, parent company of the New
York Stock Exchange, where for three
years she lobbied the company to issue
paper shares.
"Hackers can get into computers or


even terrorists and destroy
them," Mrs. Davis wrote in
the proposal she submitted
in 2008,2009 and 2010.
NYSE Euronext, which
went public in 2007, has
never issued paper shares.
In a response to Mrs. Davis,
it said eliminating paper
stock certificates protected
shareholders against extra
costs and fraud.
"The securities markets
in the U.S. and around the
world are rapidly moving
toward a paperless envi-
ronment," the company
wrote.
Paper stocks are in such obvious de-
cline that basic statistics, like how
many are still floating around, are af-
terthoughts.
The Group of Thirty, the Securities
Transfer Association and SIFMA say
they don't have that information. Nor
does the Lost and Stolen Securities
Program, the World Federation of Ex-
changes or the International Organiza-
tion of Securities Commissions.
In 2005, the DTCC estimated that
paper stocks were involved in about 0.1
percent of trading each day in U.S.
markets, based on transactions the
DTCC oversaw. It doesn't have updated
information.
SIFMA's last report about how much
it costs companies to print and distrib-
ute paper stocks was in 2004. (Answer:
$250 million a year) The STA's last re-
port on how much it costs companies
per share is even older (Answer: $1.51
to $4.26.)
Even the DTCC acknowledges the
quandary will likely work itself out
"With the changing demographics of
investors," says spokesman Ed Kelle-
her, paper stocks "will probably die a
natural death in a few years, anyway"


Saturday, Sept. 29 ~ 7:30 a.m.

in Historic Downtown Inverness


BUSINESS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


New Ads II I0 0I S I Skills I. H el II
- --- -- -^^^^1^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^1^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^H^^---j_^ ^^^H^^^


Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle
is now accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales depart-
ment, manage work
flow, create insertion
orders, filing,
knowledge of
Excel & Word.
Ability to work well in
a deadline driven
environment.
Excellent Customer
Service Skills.

Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately.
Must have excellent
organizational and
customer service
skills.

Fax or mail cover
letter and resume
to HR at:
352-564-2935


CHRONIC iL
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, FOE

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Melody Park Dwntwn
Inverness, 2/2, Open
Shed, Carport, $11,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352) 341-5297





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Washers/Dryers/ W/H
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, TV ant 270-4087





Fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens U load
and haul 352-628-9624

Free Firewood
Lg. Oak Tree on ground
cut into sections
(352) 220-6060

FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545

FREE KITTENS
(352) 860-0964

FREE KITTENS
8 weeks old
To good home only
(863) 843-2495

I have a male black cat
very loving an gives you
high 5 when asked, he is
fixed an declawed in front
and has never been out-
side he is looking for his
new forever home due to
a change in our house-
hold Litterbox trained very
very sweet cat.

I have a male black cat
very loving an gives you
high 5 when asked, he is
fixed an declawed in front
and has never been out-
side he is looking for his
new forever home due to
a change in our house-
hold Litterbox trained very
very sweet cat.please call
352-400-9756


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to go.
Bring Shovel & Help your-
self. 352-697-5252
Lost Dog, Males
Pom/Chihuahua
Black & Tan,16 yrs. old
Really miss, Sept 20
Corner of Demsey
& Greenfield
(352) 442-4131
Moving
2 Female Adult Cats
Spayed,
Free to good home
(512) 827-1755
Neutered
Gold Male Cat
Lap Cat
Needs Attention


Female, black,
Sand Color Female
med. length fur
Palmer & Demsey
(352) 228-7805
Lost a new winch
somewhere between
school board office and
Haven Street and a
chrome grill guard. Will
pay small reward if
found. Bruce
352-400-1580
Lost Black & White
Boston Terrier Near
Kimberly Lane on 9/15.
2 ys old, Very Friendly
(352) 419-6866 or
(580)251-7822
LOST DOG
Small White with brown
spots fuzzy dog. Lost on
9/19 on Elsie & Cardinal
REWARD (727)470-5374
Lost Purse
by Walgreens,
Down town Inverness
REWARD
(352) 860-2910



Found In Floral City
Medium Size
Pitt/Mix Male,
(352) 697-1343




missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825




Disabled Vet with can-
cer, wishes to take over
payments on a small
camper or pop-up to
transport himself and
family to cancer treat-
ments out of town. No
Dealers. Please call Jack
(352) 341-1127




FIT Administrative
Secretary

LG. POA located in
Bev. Hills. Must be pro-
fessional, computer
literate and a team
player. POAexp. help-
ful. Smoke-free
workplace
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-0875




HAIR STYLIST

Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628 0630
to apply in person











Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR

Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to join a
progressive customer
service oriented
team. Candidate will
have a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and manage-
ment abilities, great
organizational skills
and effective dele-
gation and monitor-
ing of clinical systems.

Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send Resume to:
athrc@Southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


ARNP WANTED

Friendly Pediatric
office in Crystal River.
20 hours per week.
Send resume to:
medofficehrdept
@tampabay.rr.com


CNA

to work with Children
with Medical Needs.
PEDIATRIC DAY
HEALTH FACILITY
Call 352-360-0137
or Fax resume to:
352-360-1082


EXP. MARKETER

In search of a friendly
professional individ-
ual who will be
expected to market
to local Physicians.
Please e-mail
your resume to
resumesl1990
@yahoo.com


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


PRN Activity Aid

Must be C.N.A.
Certified
Please apply online @
Avantecenters.com






E f COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-

Multiple Employment
Opportunities
Available

Administrative:
De an,He alth
Sciences
* Dean, Liberal Arts
and Sciences
Professional:
* Director, Lab
School
* Educational
Advisor, Admissions
and Records
* Programmer
Analyst II
Instructional:
* Faculty, Associate
Degree Nursing
* Faculty,
Communications
* Faculty, Criminal
Justice Institute
* Adjunct opportuni-
ties college-wide

Please submit a copy
of transcripts with the
online application for
all positions that
require a degree.

How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit unofficial
transcripts with the
online application at
time of submission.
Alternatively fax
transcripts to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITIONS















EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
#* Sales -


Repreentaive


ATTENTION

NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in Enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722



BB&T
Part-Time Teller

Crystal River location.
Good customer
service/cash handling
skills. Related
experience. No
nights/weekends.
Cross-trained opportuni-
ties. All qualified and
interested
candidates need to
apply on line
www.bbandt.com
EOE/AA/D/V, Drug
Free Workplace



Contractor Seeking
a full time Motivated
Candidate with

Human Resources
background and
Payroll Exp.
Candidate must
possess computer
skills in Micro soft
Windows plus Excel
and be able to
adapt quickly to
company account-
ing program. Knowl-
edge of HR policies,
procedures, rules
and regulations and
payroll Must be
dependable and
detail oriented for this
position. Background
checks and drug
screening will be
required after hiring.

SEND RESUME TO
frichey@fandh
contractors.com.



INSURANCE REP

With a 440/220 LIC.
Sales/ Customer Serv-
ice Position. Prior
Independent agency
skills preferred. Mail
Resume to: Box # 1797P
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Or Fax: 352-564-2952
Attn: Box 1797P



P/T Thrift Store
Clerks-
Inverness (1) &
Lecanto (1). Sorting,
pricing, stocking
shelves/clothing
racks. Run cash regis-
ter as needed. Assist
customers loading
and unloading dona-
tions and/or pur-
chases. Flexible
schedule, weekends.

P/T Christmas
Decor Associate.
Temporary seasonal
position; located in In-
verness store run
cash register, finalize
sales. Schedule is 24
hours-Thur/Fri/Sat

P/T Food Service
Assistant -
working in commer-
cial kitchen assist
with meal prep,
kitchen duties, etc.
Past experience in
commercial kitchen
a plus.

APPLY IN PERSON
Key Training Center
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL
-"EOE"


THERAPIST FACT
TEAM
Provide treatment, reha-
bilitation and support ser-
vices to individuals with
mental illness as part of a
multidisciplinary team.
Responsibilities include
individual and group ther-
apy, case mgmt. and
treatment planning. MA
Degree in Social Work,
Psychology, Counseling
or Rehabilitation. Apply
at LifeStream 515 W.
Main St. Leesburg or
online at www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EEOC







CHRONICLE

Accepting
applications for

Advertising
Sales Rep

Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Working a
Sales Territory within
Citrus County.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers

QUALIFICATIONS
* Two years sales exp.
preferred.
* Computer
proficiency
* Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
* Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
* Strong presentation
skills preferred.
* Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.

Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
EOE, drug screen
required for final
applicant.


Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River

SERVICE
ADVISOR
Experience Pre-
ferred but will
consider training
the right person.
Good Benefits, 401K,
& Medical Plans.
We're looking for a
long term relationship.
Apply in person.
Ask for Greg.
Mon Fri 8-5
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace


RETAIL SALES

Nights/ weekends
75 CHROME SHOP
Wildwood
(352) 748-0330






EXPERIENCED
ROOFING CREW
& ROOFERS
Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
Apply In Person
AAA ROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411


IR


DRIVER

OTR LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724
Local Tower
Service Co.
Looking for
individuals capable
of ascending
broadcast towers to
service lights.
Electrical
experience
preferred, will train.
Travel required
throughout South-
east. Company
vehicle and hotel pro-
vided. Excellent pay,
per diem, bonus and
benefits. Background
check performed and
clean FL drivers
license
required. Apply in
person at Hilights Inc.
4177 N. Citrus Ave,
Crystal River, FL.
352-564-8830
Technician Needed.
Our business is growing
and we are in need of
technicians who have
experience in diesel en-
gines and transmis-
sions. We have the best
working hours Mon-Fri
and paid holidays. Sign
on bonus or moving al-
lowance is available.
GM experience even
though not required is a
plus. We offer top
wages and benefits. Call
Kevin 352-493-4263 or
send email to
kbelfry@ymail.com
S c o g g i n s
Chevrolet/Buick




CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460
DRIVER/LABORER
CDL Required With
Tanker Call For More In-
formation.352-563-2621
FLOOR
TECHNICIAN

Now accepting
applications for a
full-time Floor
Technician Must
have experience
with use of machin-
ery for buffing,
stripping, waxing, etc
of all types of flooring.

Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send Resume to:
athrc@Southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D




PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE

Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
Avail. weekdays
& weekends?

Join the Citrus County
Chronicle's
Circulation team!

Send Resume &
Cover Letter to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.comrn
or Apply In Person
CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

EOE, drug screening
for final applicant


Payroll Analyst

THE CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR A PAYROLL ANALYST.
Full time position working day shift, Monday through Friday. Duties
involve calculating and verifying employee hours and deductions in
order to ensure all payroll checks are accurate, verifying timesheets,
reconciling inaccuracies and inputting correct time and leave into
payroll management system, generating financial statements by
balancing fund accounts and receipts, compiling statistical data,
maintaining and filing records, preparing bank reconciliation and
making deposits.
QUALIFICATIONS: Two years office experience in accounting or
related field with at least one year in payroll preferred. Proficiency
in use of general office equipment and Microsoft Office. High
School Diploma or GED required.

Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ave
Inverness FL 34450
(352) 341-7429

On-line employment applications are available at
www.sheriffcitrus .org
Equal Opportunity Employer MF/DN/V


CHoI E

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.












Massage Therapy


SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-5
HAVE A NEW CAREER
IN 37 WEEKS
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




12 ACRES
PRIME REAL ESTATE
8 MOBILE HOMES
Good Income a
Lots of possibilities.
Own. Finan., Reason-
able down payment
(352) 212-6182




ANTIQUE CHINA
CLOSET glass door,
good cond.$100.00
352-513-4473
PRIE EALESAT


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A r A ^ -f


TOY ACTION FIGURES
Princess of Ireland Barbie
in original boxes
Cabbage Patch Doll and
assorted toys $75
OBO (352) 794-3768



***REMOVAL OF
UNWANTED APPLI-
ANCES*** A Free
Service 352 209 5853
A CHAR-BROIL GRILL 2
Burner w/Side
Good Older Model
No Tank $60.00 obo
352-601-7816
ADMIRAL
Heavy duty white
washing machine. Very
Good condition. $100
Firm. (352) 794-3768
DRYER APARTMENT
SIZE uses 110 electric,
white good cond.
352-513-4473
G E DISH WASHER
white, under the counter.
good cond.$65.00
352-513-4473
GE Electric Stove
30 Inch, glass top
4 burner, works good
$85. Kenmore Refriger-
ator $50 Both Beige
(352) 212-8979
MICRO WAVE
standard size $15.00
352-513-4473
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, almond,
side-by-side w/ filtered ice
& water on door. $300
352-270-2232
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER $100 with 90
day warranty.Delivery
extra.Free disposal of old
machine Call/Text
352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WHIRLPOOL DRYER,
white good cond.
$100.00
352-5134473
WHIRLPOOL WASHER,
white ,good
cond,$100.00
352-513-4473



Computer Desk
L shape, mahogany
w/ small hutch,
shelves, $200
(352) 563-6327
(352) 860-3481



CRAFTSMAN: 10" band
saw, 17" weed eater,
Plate biscuit Joiner 5/8
HP. ToolCraft Table
Saw 2 HP w/10" car-
bide blade. 1/2" Drill
Press 5 speed 1/3 HP.
$50 ea. Firm 621-3330
Heavy Duty Aluminum
Ladder Rack for Vans
2 supports w/2 aluminum
door kits for PVC $140
(352) 586-7125
Smithy Lathe-Drill-Mill
Combo
CB 1220 XL,
very good cond.
Asking $580.
(352) 726-2986


TABLE SAW Grizzly 10"
table saw with mobile
base. Top 41" wide x 27"
deep. With 1-1/2 HP mo-
tor, 110V or 220V. ac-
cessories included. $200
or best offer. Telephone
(352) 795-6318 or email:
apm2ts@yahoo.com



DVD/CD PLAYER.
Panasonic S Video or
component output. Dolby
digital sound. Works per-
fect. $20. 527-6709
MAGNAVOX 21 IN. TV
nice picture, cable ready,
$30.00 352-513-4473
SHARP
Large 32"Sliver TV
w/ remote $75 OBO
(352) 794-3768
SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $75
352-613-0529
Sony 51 Inch
Projection TV
Works great,
$150. obo
(352) 422-0005





COMPUTER DOCTORS
$25% off-mention this ad
Repairs&Computers4sale
visa/mc/dis/ax 344-4839
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
PRINTER Epson 435
Like new, print, scan, fax,
WiFi, 4 new ink cartrds.
Paid $120, sell $65.
Call (local) 228-7372



500 gal. Poly Water -
Chemical Tanker
1 Axle with balloon
Tires, like new
Asking $550
(352) 726-2986
TRACTOR
2008 Kiotio diesel, front
end loader. ONLY 261
hrs. $10,000 364-3125



PATIO TABLE
white 42" glass top w/ 4
padded chairs-blue/white
cushions $95
(352) 586-7125



5 piece living room
group + 2 lamps
$500
Small Secretary desk
w/ 1 drawer $150.
(352) 489-3511
Bedroom Set Queen,
Headboard Footboard,
side rails, night stand,
Big dresser, mirror
Armoire, three draws
$450
Kitchen Table $100
(352) 527-1097
Breakfront Cabinet,
has 4 openings to it.
All light wood, glass on
ea. side, doors below.
Made in Crystal River
20 yrs. ago. Must see to
appreciate it. $1,800
new, NowSOOO$1,000obo
(352) 726-0944


Store Fronts



Available




Lowest Leasing Rates Ever!



Busy Hwy 19

Crystal River location


Anchored by national

retail stores


Newly refurbished


Kiosks also available


C: )


CRYSTAL RIVER

M.A.L.L


352-795-2585
www.thecrystalrivermall.com
1 801 NE Hwy 1 9 Crystal River, FL 34428 F-


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23,2012 D5









D6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


Dining Room
Table & 6 Chairs
$225.
(352) 628-9375
Dinning Room Set
Bamboo table w/ 4
chairs. Earth tone padded
seats, glass top. $175
(352) 795-6870
ETHAN ALLEN
ANTIQUED PINE Coffee
Table w/drop leaves.
$50.00 FIRM
352-382-4911
ETHAN ALLEN HEIR-
LOOM COLLECTION
End Tables $95.00
352-382-4911
High End Used Furniture
SECOND TIME AROUND
RESALES 270-8803
2165 N. Lecanto Hwy.
KING SIZE MATTRESS
AND BOX SPRINGS
Restonic ChiroTonic
Quantum. $200 Clean,
non smoker,
352-613-4279 Must Sell!
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
PINE DINNING TABLE
AND 4 CHAIRS beautiful
dark hard wood, $100.00
takes it. 352-513-4473
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
TWO END TABLES
WI DRAWER
Dark gray black granite
top & dark wood. $50 ea
OBO (352) 794-3768
Wicker Loveseat,
and
two matching chairs,
$75.
(352) 795-4596


QUEENSIZE MIRROR
HEAD BOARD photo
upon request.$10.00
352-513-4473



2005 Craftsman Yard
Tractor 42" cut with
bagger $650.
2005 Craftsman 6.5 HP
Power Propelled yard
Vaccum $200
(352) 746-6913
DYT Craftsman 4000
Riding Mower 24 HP
48" Deck $700
(352) 746-7357
John Deere
Utility Cart
10 cu ft. $75.
(352) 746-6913
WOOD CHIP-
PER
CHIPPEWA
5HP
VERY GOOD
COND.
$185(352)
465-7219




HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -noon
Saturday, Sept. 29th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020


CRYSTAL RIVER
Sept 22 & 23 8am-1pm.
Baby Items, furniture,
books, clothes, house-
hold items. Horse equip-
ment & much more.
9095 W Emerald Oaks Dr
Rain or Shine Yard Sale!
HOMOSASSA
MOVING SALE
(352) 212-1746
Hot Tub w/ Cover, sec-
tional: Sofa & Loveseat
Tan, Din. Rm Tbl 2 chrs.
3 TV's, microwave,
Wolf gang puck rotissre
oven, 2 mattress/ box
springs sets, 1 qn. ldbl.
kit. items, decorative
pcs. & Washer & Dryer
HOMOSASSA
Sat& Sun 1Oa-3p
Estate Moving Sale
Boat, Furniture,Tools, TV,
Housewares, Clothing,
Everything Must Go!!
3826 S Swan Ter
HOMOSASSA
Saturday & Sunday -
9am to 4pm.
Moving Sale Furniture,
Treadmill, Plants, Lawn
equipment, Misc. Call
anytime to see or open.
25 Mangrove Court
South 352-382-2294

WANTED Rods,
Reels, tackle, tools,
Antique collectibles,
hunting equipment.
352-613-2944




BABY CARRIER Jeep 2
in 1 Sport Baby Carrier
$15.00 352-637-4916
GIRLS CLOTHES 24
pieces-9-12 months.
outfits, onsies, sleepers,
jackets $20.
352-637-4916


MENS CLOTHING
LARGE PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529



!!!!!!!225/55 R16!!!!!!!
Great tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****35X12.50 R15"***
Good tread!!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
----~~~~~235/65 R17---~~~~~--
Great tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
6 ASSORTED BONE
CHINA TEA CUP AND
SAUCER SETS $50
ENGLAND CAN E-MAIL
PHOTOS 352-419-5981
Above Ground Pool.
Round 15' diameter, 52 "
deep. All accessories
including sand filter and
new pump. $500
(352) 795-9399
BASE SPEAKER sound
dynamics-rjs series
1000-100 watt mosfet
amplifier like new-$50.00
352-527-9982
BIRD CAGE(LIKE AT
WALMART)METAL
LARGE Sell $25 call
352-344-3472
Brand New
Samsung Galaxy S3
color pebble blue
$350 obo
+ all accessories
(352) 628-1408
HOOVER SELF PRO-
PELLED VACUUM
CLEANER $30 HEAVY
AND STURDY INVER-
NESS 352-419-5981
Must See to Believe
Warehouse full of
Garage Sale Items
$800 obo Takes All
High Profit Potential
352-220-3377
NURSING STUDENTS
6 books $10 each
medicine admin.,
pharmacology,math med.
calculations 513 4473
SCHWINN BICYCLE,
ALUMINUM Mountain
bike $80 or trade for
computer 352-344-3472
STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $40 VINTAGE
80'S CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
352-419-5981
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW ALL CONNEC-
TIONS. Inverness
352-419-5981



4 WHEELED WALKER
portable, handbreaks,
basket and seat. $65
352-341-1714
BED SIDE
COMMODE,CRUTCHES(TALL
)WHEELCHAIR
CUSHION from $40 to
$10 call 352-344-3472


CLASSIFIED



Pride Scooter
Wide seat Blue, $500.
Jazzy
Motorized Chair $500
Jazzy Never Been Out-
side (352) 527-1097
Walker-Dolomite
Folding, with folding
seat, 4 wheels, w/
brakes on front wheels,
$35. (352) 344-5283
WHEELCHAIRS
portable, baskets,
brakes, leg rests,
Excellent. Several to
choose from $75/ea
352-341-1714



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" BASS GUITAR
GREG BENNET COR-
SAIR LIGHTWEIGHT
W/P&J PICKUPS $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" MITCHELL
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAGTUNER,DVD-
STRAP,STRINGS,&PICS
$85 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
AMP COMBO
W/12"SPEAKER VERY
GOOD CONDITION $65
352-601-6625
AMPEG BASS AMP
COMBO 25W VERY
GOOD CONDITION $65
352-601-6625
ESTABAN ACOUSTIC
GUITAR:, CASE, 10
LESSON DVD'S, EXTRA
STRINGS, EX. COND.
CAN BE USED W/AMP.
$125. 304-544-8398 or
352-563-5537
MITCHELL MD300S
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR, SOLID TOP
W/ABALONE TRIM $100
352-601-6625
MUSIC STAND chrome
colored, fold up, $10.00
352-513-4473
PEAVEY BASIC 40W
BASS COMBO AMP
W/12" SPEAKER MADE
IN U.S.A. $100
352-601-6625
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
hard wood & tuffed stow-
age seat with $40.00
352-513-4473
REALISTIC KEYBOARD
100 rhythms,100
sounds.$35.00, Also a
keyboard stand $15.00
513-4473
Upright Piano & Bench
Kohler and Campbell,
excl. cond. Was asking
$2K, Now $1,500
(352) 563-6327
(352) 860-3481



2" FAUX WHITE WOOD
BLINDS 8 total blinds -
several sizes $100
352-382-4911


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
37&19inch TV's, DVD &
VCR Recorder; TV Cabi-
net; Electric Fireplace;
Microwave over Range
hood, Leather Loveseat,
Computer Desk.
352-601-0256
KING COMFORTER re-
versible navy/red. Excel-
lent condition. Used only
few times.High loft. $20
341-3607, Inverness
SOARING EAGLE
STATUE NEW,in
box.Was 59.95/selling for
20.00 Linda 419-4788
TWIN BEDDING 2 red
box-pleated (not ruffled)
bedskirts & 2 matching
red pillow shams. All for
$10 341-3607 Inverness


Bowflex- Extreme 2
Like New
was $1,200
$250.
(352) 726-2986





2 FLY RODS w/ reels 6
FT.$ 30. BOTH OBO 2
vintage came poles, 3 pc.
$40. both obo 220-4074

3 Speed Chesapeake
Bicycle,
good cond. $45.
Used revolving top,
golf BagBoy $35.
(352) 382-0051


Fitness
Equipme^


50 Cal. Comaflage,
Inline Remmington
Muzzel Loader
2 x 7 See through red
field scope, sling, rub-
ber stock plate, like
neww/ ammo $325.
205, 350 Honda 4 wheel
drive Foot Shift, low hrs.
kept up, new battery &
clean carborator
$3,000 (352) 697-4224
ABU GARCIA COMMO-
DORE ROD 11.6 heavy
action w/ master spinning
reel. $60.00 obo
220-4074
ABU GARCIA
CONOLON 300 8 FT,
OLYMPIC 1075 7.6 ft. ,
Silstar pt 70 7 ft, Samurai
6 ft, $45. all 220-4074


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



EXPERIENCED CNA
Providing Basic Duties
with Compassion &
Care. In Your Home
John (352) 465-3899




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


ON SITE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078


CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/ 410-7383


FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554

40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CITRUS SENIORS
SHUTTLE
Doctor/Personal/
TPA Airport
7 Days/ 24 Hrs
352-464-2946




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777


ANNIE'SELE TRIG
Husband & Wife
Teamrn.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *k



Clean Waxed Floors
Free Estimate 344-2132




ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
"AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V*FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
vFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
VFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
All Painting & Home
Repair. Call Doug
Ferrance 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
ELAINE TO THE RESCUE
Free Estimate. At Your
Convenience. No Job
to Small (262) 492-3403
STHE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
All Painting & Home
Repair. Call Doug
Ferrance 352-270-6142
Free Est. Reg. & Ins.
MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL a PROFESSIONAL
(352) 464-4418



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
MIKE ANDERSON
PAINTING, Int./Ext.
& Pressure Washing


CALL A PROFESSIONAL
(352) 464-4418
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning
& Painting
352-341-3300


All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
cccl32549 302-9269




REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831






A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831






344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
t' Grout Painting
-| o Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868





GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians I
ER0015377

352621124


Add an artistic ou(h to your existing yard
or pool or plan
something
( completely new!

1r. "Often initiated,
g neverdfupfcate


YOURINTELOCKINGBRICKPAVERSPECIALIST


POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 352-400-3188



my-,M mr Gr ,


CARPET & A c
S UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Special zing in: Cleaned for
Carpet Stretching'FREE sk
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell .
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates 9
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


^SI RMDLN


WINDOW ;

We Ocean Windows and Whole Lot More
Window Cleaning
*Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
- Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenle.com/spnringhill


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
"NO ROT"
Door Units
* Blinds Between
the Glass
Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 I
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL(Hernando Plaza)






AAA ROOFING
Call te ak6ustn"
Free Written Estimate

100 OFF
SAny Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
ic./Ins. CCCO57537 OOCHOW

M E- II,


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
S ALL Home
S Repairs
Sk* RSmall Carpentry
Fencng
Screening
C (lean Dryer
Vents
SAffordable & Dependable
Experence lifelong
352-344-0905
c ell 400-1722
| .. sured Lic.#37761


NEED EXTRA CASH?













Great Opportunity For


JEFFREYVJIDGsY




Accounts Payable Analyst
THE CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR AN ACCOUNTS PAYABLE ANALYST.
Full time position working day shift, Monday through Friday. The
position involves a purchase order driven accounts payable
processing system, managing agency credit cards, processing travel
reimbursements, maintaining accounting information, processing
purchase orders, liaison with other departments and grant
management.
QUALIFICATIONS: Two years office experience in accounting or
related field with experience in high volume accounts payable
processing preferred. Proficiency in use of Microsoft software
applications including high level of expertise in Excel.

Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr Martin Luther King JrAve
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 341-7429
On-line employment applications are available at
www.sheriffcitrus .org
Equal Opportunity Employer MF/DN/


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S85-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000C42R


ADAMS LADIES SPEED-
LINE FAST 12 DRIVER
Excellent Condition, 10
Loft $130.00. Call
249-7345

Gun Club looking for
5-10 acres for lease.
352-302-0648

SMITH & WESSON 686
SS 357 Magnum. 6"
barrel, drilled for
scope, adj front & rear
sights. $575.
(352) 465-7506

Stevens 12 gauge, dbl
barrel shot gun. model
311A excel. cond.
$325
(352) 344-5283


r~w trpw #








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ladies Bicycle
Excellent Condition
$40 352-341-1714
VINTAGE ZEBCO XRT80
REEL W/12 FT. ROD
$50.00 obo 220-4074



U-DUMP TRAILER
Single Axel
5x8X3 w/ Spare
$2050 (352) 527-0018



Large Amethyst Ring
8+ Karat, Cost $4,000
Will sell for
$1,500 obo
(352) 344-5168


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


WANTED Rods, Reels,
tackle, tools, Antique
collectibles, hunting
equip. 352-613-2944



2 Male Daschund, Black
and Tan. 10wks old. No
shots, No papers. $150
ea (352) 419-8153
AKC GREAT DANE
PUPPIES AKC Great
Danes Puppies! Born
Aug 1st Call
352-502-3607
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
BOXER PUPPIES
AKC, 5 brindle females
1 Male, Available 10/1/12
all shots $450 ea
(352) 344-5418 or
228-1969
CUTE PUPPIES!!! CKC
registered Shischon. Will
be ready 9-21-12. They
are Shih Tzu & Bichon
Fnse. 2 males- $300 and
4 females- $350. Multi
colors. Wont last long call
now. Contact Melody @
352-601-0777 or Karen
@ 352-503-7525
Dog School & Kennel
New Classes 10/16 & 17
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 16 weeks Old
male. BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$800 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
FOX TERRIER
puppy very small
4 1/2 mo female.
$250 OBO
(352) 795-7513
INVERNESS FL
KC Offers Training
Classes for Breed &
Obedience. Starts Oct.
10 7pm at C.R. Armory.
Six wks. Call Mern at
352-628-5371 for
reservations.


GERMAN SHEPHERD
Lrg. bone PUPS, white,
black, blk/tan, $450.
BOXER PUPS $450
Health Certs, can be
registered, 216-1481
Looking for inexpen-
sive, clean and rust free
dog and crates Call
Kate (352) 257-8158
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofouos.net
SHORKIES 3 females
Addorable & Non
shedding 8 wks on
9/23/12 $400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





8 HP, 2 Stroke Yamaha
Outboard Engine,
Excellent Condition
$1050.
Call (352) 344-9479


1989 25HP Johnson
Outboard Motor,
new spark plugs new
carborator, painted
camo for hunting $650.
352-212-1105, 795-2549



Kawasaki
2002 Jet Ski, 1100, new
fuel pump, low hrs, $1800
(352) 465-6631



17 ft. PROLINE
Extra Clean,
Center Console w/
trailer.Call for Details
(352) 344-1413
2002 DURACRAFT
18FT W/I 2010
YAMAHA 90HP
Only 188 hours on motor:
Wide Hull, Hydrolic Steer-
ing, Jack Plate, PT&T,
GPS, FF, VHF, Stereo,
Livewell, Trolling Motor,
LOADED. Boat is Turn
Key, Runs Perfect.
$9500.00 OBO
Call 352-257-3202
AQUA SPORT
17ft., 90 HP 4 stroke
Honda, GPS. Trailer
$5,000.
(352) 794-3083
816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No:
2012-CP-432 Notice to
Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R.
COWLES
EYE CATCHING
BOAT DETAILING
If you'd like your boat
to take your breath
away again, Call Jim or
Rose at (850) 348-9002
GULF to LAKE MARINE
SWE PAY CASH $$ *
For Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


CLASSIFIED



MIRROR CRAFT
16ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537
SMOKER CRAFT
'02, 16 ft. Aluminum
Fully equip., trolling mtr.
50HP outboard,
$5,500 941-276-9519




JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




FOREST RIVER
2006 Rockwood Ultra Lite
31ft, 1 slideout, sleeps 6,
electric towing jack, like
new, by appointment only
$14,500, 795-8679
GULFSTREAM
2008, 18 FT.
KINGSPORT LITE
Very good cond.
Reduced $6,500
(352) 201-9768
KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011. Hybrid, 19ft.
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835


WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




For 2005
Chrysler Crossfire
front end bug bra. $55.
2 Air Filters $30. both
(352) 726-5794
For Toyota FJ Cruiser,
1 set of seat covers
$50.
1 rear door storage net
$35.
(352) 726-5794




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition
Tile, No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. CALL A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892


CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909




BMW
2003, 3251, 4DR
LEATHER. SUNROOF
PW. PL CALL 628-4600
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
CADILLAC
Black 2011 4dr CTS
1,100 mi. Free satilite
radio 6/13, smoke free,
garage kept. $37,000
(352) 249-7976



CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanlum ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548
CHRYLSER
'06 Seabring conv.
Touring Coup, loaded,
21K, gar. kept. Like new
$9,200 (352) 5134257
FORD
2001 MUSTANG
AUTO. 6CYL. PW. PL.
PRICED TO SELL
CALL 628-4600
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, onginal miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, not dealer
owned. $17,900
(352) 302-0778
SATURN
1995 SC2 runs great
118,000 miles needs
paint & A/C recharge
$1,200. 352-637-0566
Senior in need of
dependable older small
or Midsize car or pk-up.
Text yr/makel mi &
Price to 220-3682.
No dealers.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 D7


-a


2010 Yaris, 2 Door
hatchback, 60K mil.
automatic, 40 MPG,
$10,500 (352) 895-0543
VW
2004 BEETLE
CONV. AUTOMATIC
FUN IN THE SUN
CALL 628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION



CHEVY
1955, Belair, 2 dr Se-
dan, 327. V8. auto
power glide transmis-
sion ground up restora-
tion, SS exhaust, excel-
lent In & Out $35,000
obo (352) 527-6988
CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426






,i r iSr^,TSr -i#r,
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




FORD
1978 F 100, 302 engine,
Great work truck $800
(352) 201-0899
FORD
1994 Ranger. Starts and
Runs. Has blown head
gasket. $375 Cash
(352) 422-6956
FORD
1995, F150 4X4...
RUNS GOOD.....PERFECT
HUNTING TRUCK.
CALL 628-4600
FOR DETAILS
FORD
2010 F150, Super Cab
27K mi., many extras,
Still under Warranty
$23,500. (352) 270-8952
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.org
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
Metn


CHEVY
'94, Conversion Van
runs good, new tires,
clean, $1,000
(352) 446-2699
CHRYSLER
2003 Town & Country
LX, 119K mi.
extra clean $4,900
(352) 257-4251
FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907
PONTIAC
2003 Montana dark blue
extended length 7 pas-
senger van. Front and
rear a/c, CD player, DVD
player. 106,500 miles.
Some body damage.
$4100.00. 352 897 4362



Harley Davidson
1978 Shovel Head, new
fenders, new tank, '02
Springer front end, belt
drive, $7,500 613-2333
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000. Custom built. 20K
miles. $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513
HONDA
2003, 250, Rebel 1,700
miles, Black, new tires
& battery, beautiful bike
$2,200 (352) 794-5446
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley, 70 mpg, Chrome,
Leather bags, $4500.
C.R. (727)207-1619
HONDA
2009 Shadow Aero
(VT750) 6100 miles.
Windshield, highway &
sissy bars. Black. Must
see. $4200 Call
352-793-6430
HONDA
450 Hulk, 1981- Runs.
Needs TLC. New tires
and battery. Extra's,
$1200 OBO. 795-5531
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE New Tires
Excellect Shape Approx
70K mi. Selling due to
health. Asking $4250
(352) 476-3688
Honda Helix

1992, good condition,
25k mi, radio, garaged.
$1800
(352) 746-7378
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
KAWASAKI
1995 VN1500 Shaft drive
with only 8,598 miles.
$2,400 or best offer.
352-628-3617


323-0923 SUCRN
9/28 Board Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
A Conflicts Committee meeting of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., will
be held on Friday, September 28, 2012, at 12:00 pm, in the Board Room located on
the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502
Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. Copies of the Agenda are available in the Ad-
ministration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board,
with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
September 23,2012.

325-0923 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organi-
zation (TPO) Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and Citizens Advi-
sory Committee (CAC) will meet on Wednesday, October 3, 2012 in Room 280 at the
Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, to
discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization. The TAC will meet at
1:00 pm and the CAC will meet at 3:00 pm.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organi-
zation (TPO) Board will meet on Thursday, October 18, 2012 at 5:15 pm in Council
Chambers at the Inverness Government Center, 212 W. Main Street, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person deddes to appeal any decision made by the Transportalion Planning
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

BY: /s/ Michelle
Greene
Director of Planning and
Administration
TBARTA
September 23,2012.

326-0930 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF MEETING
TUSCANY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT
NOTICE OF INTENT TO DISSOLVE DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that the Board of Supervisors of the Tuscany Community
Development District (the "District") has filed a petition with the Florida Land and
Water Adjudicatory Commission (the "Commission") seeking to dissolve the District
(the "Petition"). The District was established by Rule 42GG-1, Florida Administrative
Code, adopted by the Commission pursuant to Chapters 190 and 120, Florida Stat-
utes, on June 18, 2003 (the "Rule"), as such Rule was amended on March 9, 2008.
The District has asked the Commission to repeal the Rule establishing the District.
The District includes approximately 1,710.93 acres, and is located in Citrus
County. The District is generally located east and south of County Road 491, north of
County Road 486 and west of U.S. Highway 41.
The Commission is presently reviewing the Petition. Anyone objecting to the dis-
solution shall file such objections no later than October 8, 2012 with the office of the
District's Counsel, Hopping Green & Sams, 119 South Monroe Street, Suite 300, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32301 attn: Brian A. Crumbaker, Esq.
A copy of the Petition is on file at the District's Records Office, 13574 Village Park
Drive, Suite 265, Orlando, Florida 32837, and may be obtained by contacting the Dis-
trict Manager, phone number (407) 841-5524, during normal business hours.
George Flint
District Manager
September 23 and 30, 2012.


It IV


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers calF
352-563-5592.


S CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
ida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission;
http://lnyu.com/http-myfw-custhelp-cm-app


324-0923 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB# 001-13
Provision of Type SP-9.5 and Type SP-12.5 Asphalt Concrete Mix
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide Type SP-9.5 and Type SP-12.5 Asphalt Concrete Mix loaded into
County vehicles at the vendor's facility for use in small repair projects performed by
its own work force. Anticipated volume of Type SP-9.5 and Type SP-12.5 Asphalt
Concrete Mix is 2,000 tons for the first year of the contract.
To assure an adequate and cost effective supply of Type SP-9.5 and Type SP-12.5 As-
phalt Concrete Mix, the County may contract with two vendors who offer the lowest
pricing, provided they are also responsive and responsible. The decision as to which
vendor the County will purchase the Type SP-9.5 and Type SP-12.5 Asphalt Concrete
Mix from will be predicated upon 1) total cost of product (vendor's price per ton plus
County's cost for transportation to the project site), 2) ability of vendor to provide the
product when required by County, and 3) the quality of vendor's product. The pur-
chase of any product by the County is on an as-needed basis with no guarantee of
volume purchased.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before October 16, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for October 16, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
September 23,2012.


TA~t


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CrystalAutos.cor


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800-440-905



CRYSTAL"

CHEVROLET
I 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515


*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $2,999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY, $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. EXCLUDES
TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 3.65% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES
MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


L-0L4


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lmftk 0 Vie I
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03 0CL4W


D8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012





Section E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012

FOMEFiti
(A 1 I 14ti. I 1 I'" ( 'II44}N I I I R I .\1


Sikorski's
SAttic
P VIP GE EJ


ON THE COVER:
PREFAB HOMES

GET GREENER,

E6

HOME AND GARDEN:
WINTER RYE

FOR GREEN

Lawns, E8

REAL ESTATE:
SEE

COMPLETE

LISTINGS


This modern prefab house, created by
Seattle company. Greenfab. was the
first platinum LEED-certified prefab
home in Washington state.









E2 SUNDAY~ SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


* Very Tasteful Decor Great Room w/FP
* Kit/Wood Cab/Island MBR w/Walk-In
SElec. Hurr Shutters 2/2/2 Car Garage
* Steele Frame Const. Secluded Area!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloridaLisliingli lo.corm


SFurnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
S2BD/2BA w3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


How much
home can I
comfortably
afford?
Op For more information call:
Celeste Seales
352.564.2250
NMLS ID:432391
Bankof America 1W Home Loans


Rofl4R(


REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 uyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828
+


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


3/2/2 offered at attractive price. If you are
looking for a 3 bedroom home look no further.
This home has just had a new roof installed
and is in nice condition.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


4254 W. MEADOW ST.
HOMOSASSA
5 acres of privacy with 3/2 doublewide.
R.V. storage. Call for more details.
DIR Turnon Green Acres St, R on Carnary Palm, L on
Oaklawn, R on Oldfield, L on Meadow St
LINDA BARNES (352) 239-4844
Email: lbarnes@remax.net


Need a large Citrus Springs home that s priced well
and NOT a short sale?l This one is for youl Large,
possible 4 bedroom, 2 story home in peaceful Citrus
Springs ready for new owner today Interior features
large functional kitchen, family room, living room,
formal dining and huge loft area Large fenced
backyard for boat or RV parking
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllambert@remax.net


I o 2 1 N. H I10WM


S2117 NFoLINE
(352) 637.-2282
Peter house #^549






5849 N. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CC Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


I 1BELL, uuuumunu ~ururiou ,mffla
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloridaLlislingllnlo.corm


33 SANDERS CIRCLE
SUGARMILL WOODS
Bank-owned beauty built 4/2/2 home in 2007.
Home is in good condition and priced to sell.
DIR 19 to Cypress Blvd W to L on Cypress Blvd E, to
L on Corkwood Blvd, to L of Fringetree St, to R on
Sanders Circle, house #33
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


E2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rrm




- II:







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


ERA offices tap
top agents
ERA American Realty & In-
vestments is proud to an-
nounce the
latest produc-
tion level
achieved by
one of its In-
verness office
agents for
2012.
Barbara
Banks has Barbara
Banks
surpassed ERAAmerican
the $1 million Realty.
mark in
closed sales volume in 2012.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the achieve-
ment of this fine real estate pro-
fessional. Banks can be


reached at the Inverness office
of ERAAmerican Realty by call-
ing 352-726-5855 or by email at
barbarabanksrealtor@yahoo.
com.
ERASun-
coast Realty
is proud to
acknowledge
that Realtor
Steve Latiff -
is currently
one of ERA
International's
top 100 Steve Latiff
agents in the ERA Sun
United States realty
in closed sales in 2012. Previ-
ously, Latiff has been the No. 1
producing agent in Citrus
County for 14 consecutive
years. Latiff can be reached on
his cell at 352-634-0101.


COME SEE OUR MODELS!




Of Citrus
I a: Inc. Fin
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 ac k
Hwy. 19, 4/ miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


Fr- Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney [,-
I Realtor.' iiA OUSE Realtor I I
i 302.3179 so'LDN-le 287.9022 [
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700 .
OAK RIDGE
6340 N. Whispering Oak Lp. 3/2/2....$139,900
OAK WOOD VILLAGE
4316 N. Bacall Lp. 2/2/2.................$104,900
THE GLEN
3540 N. Woodgate Dr 2/2/1 ................$44,900
CITRUS SPRINGS
10255 N. Abby Dr. 2/2/2 .....................$54,900
BEVERLY HILLS
28 Beverly Hills Blvd. 3/1/CP.............$34,900
62 S. Davis St. 2/1/1 ............................$42,900
43 S. Lincoln 3/2/CP......................... $79,900


Thompson joins
EXIT Realty
Linda Thompson has
joined EXIT Realty
Leaders in Crystal River.
She brings 34 years of
real estate experience
serving the residents of
Citrus County.


Linda
Thompson


Thompson is a third- EXIT Realty
generation native, and Leaders
has lived in Florida her
entire life. She has been a resident of Old
Homosassa for 21 years, and is active in
the community, having been past president
of the Homosassa Civic Club.
She is a waterfront specialist on the Na-
ture Coast. She piloted as a Skipper in the
Coast Guard Auxiliary, and has acquired a


commercial captain's license.
EXIT Realty Leaders is at 730 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Call
352-794-0888 or visit www.exitrealty
leaders.com.
Spires on board with
Coldwell Banker


Coldwell Banker In-
vestors Realty of Citrus
County would like to an-
nounce Realtor Katie J.
Spires has recently
joined the Coldwell
Banker team.
Spires can be reached
at the Inverness office,
314 West Main St., at
352-726-9533 or directly
at 352-212-3673.


Katie
Spires
Coldwell
Banker.


McFarland hits
multi-million level
Realtor Deb McFar-
land has passed another
milestone in sales vol-
ume this year.
She has qualified for
the Multi-Million Dollar
club!
McFarland is one of a
small group of Realtors Deb
who have qualified for McFarland
this prestigious club this RE/MAX
year. Realty One.
She has more than $2
million in sales volume. She is a Realtor in
the Inverness RE/MAX Realty One office
at 1100 W. Main St. Call McFarland at 352-
637-6200.


SE:4:,VIN q- ALL O C COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


VP Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Fo a Virt l To*Lur or Mu Sli le Photos

Swww.Florida howcaseroperiesc


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2





-tiltS 3605 N Honeylocust Dr
MLS#357317 $114,900
Beautiful 2/2/2 pool home In quite a
neighborhood.
Directions: Re 86 to norethon FstRidge Blvdto right
on Valerian to home on coer of HoneylocustDr.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING





tl;//s 241 W Hollyfern PI
MLS#357605 $74,900
Beautiful 2/2/2 home
located on corner lot.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238






/IeeDns 1730 E Pacific Ln
MLS#356869 $129,900
Great house atthe top of the hill
in Cambridge Green.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2


..iUS 31/I N Guldlhc:iin, T1n
Affordable 2/2/1 home in quiet neighborhood
close to library.
Directions: Rte 491 to ForestRidge Blvd to left on
Honeylocustto left onGoldencup.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING


NEW LISTING


".Yt/ g 6742 W Sentinel Post Path
y"' MLS#357704 $517,500
BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY ESTATE ON 10 ACRES!!
6/4/3 pool home.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


NEW LISTING
*^ ^ r-


S 11 E Hartord St32-3b
MLS#357701 $99,000
New Paint& Carpet 22.5 +FL Rm
Greenbriartownhouse.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


q iE G.I.nin. 0CI 27 2, 165 E Ireland Ct 3842W North,
MLS#357670$59,900W Ttt MLS#354308 $199,000 MLS#352588$
Very attractive and much sought after Updated 3/2/2 3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac
ground level condo. Oaks Golf Course Home offers spacious Indoor
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


5109 N Red Ribbon Pt
MLS#357635$249,900
3/2/3 pool home on
one acre cul-de-sac lot.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


IcJut 1I< NSJ. Slll Dr /J iS 1 k CSAW 2
MLS#356856 $139,900 M
3/2/2 pool home, country feel Elegant 2/2/2+den p
with 1.5wooded acres, in immaculate co
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507 Jo Ann Martin 352


Illl, LI,
$119,500


1 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the M
A' Prudential logo and the Rocksymbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 E3


E-01B BILDNE


7-ur







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
......... .....................................advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
...... ......................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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"The market leader in real estate information"

CHRONICLLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
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* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Tips to reduce gas usage


We all know that gas prices
have been on the rise lately
and they are approaching $4
per gallon for regular unleaded gaso-
line. Pat Faherty did a good job ex-
plaining some of the
reasons for the increases in
gas prices in his September
18 article in the Citrus
County Chronicle.
While I think it is impor-
tant to understand the fac-
tors that affect gas prices, I
would like to focus on some
things that we have more
control over such as our
driving behaviors in
order to reduce the amount Monic
of money spent on gas. CONS
By putting in your ZIP SCIE
code or city and state at a
website, such as wwwgas
buddy.com, you can find the stations
with the lowest gas prices in your area.
Plan to use these stations to save
money on gas.
In a rural area such as Citrus
County, we may have to travel some
distance to get to and from work and
pick up children.
This type of travel is required, and
we may not be able to change this.


a


However, many people make discre-
tionary trips, such as running out to
get something at the grocery store.
Eliminating just two discretionary
trips per week can save money at the
gas station. This can be ac-
complished by planning
ahead and using a weekly
shopping list to purchase
all necessary items and
help to avoid forgetting
something.
Also, it is important to
combine trips. Try to pick
up items from the cleaners
and do grocery shopping on
the way home from work,
Payne for example.
UMER According to the U.S. De-
:NCE apartment of Energy (DOE),
several short trips from a
cold start can use twice as
much gas as a longer, combined trip to
the same places when the engine is
warm.
More ways to save include:
Maintain your car -According to
the U.S. DOE, a dirty air filter and
under-inflated tires can increase your
fuel costs by up to 13 percent.
Don't idle too long. While waiting
in a drive-through, you are getting 0


miles to the gallon. It is better to go in if
you are going to be waiting a long time.
Drive the speed limit and don't be
an aggressive driver. It is not only
safer, but also more fuel-efficient
Don't overload your car A loaded
roof rack can decrease fuel efficiency
by 5 percent and an extra 100 pounds
in the trunk reduces a typical car's fuel
economy by 1 percent to 2 percent.
Call Monica Payne at the UF/IFAS
Citrus County Extension office at 352-
527-5713.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or
affiliations.


Monica Payne is the Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.


Statue's missing arm hurts value; table, desk evaluated


Dear John: I have had this
statue of Isis for more
than 40 years and have
tried unsuccessfully many times
to get a value, but could not. I
have seen the bust ver-
sion, but mine is 45
inches tall. She is obvi-
ously missing one arm,
broken at the band
and drilled through
the top of her head,
maybe as a lamp. As
shown in the photo, it
is signed L. Hottot
with no date. I know John S
the pictures are bad. I SIKOR
would appreciate any
help. -R.K, Internet AT1
Dear R.K: What a
striking figure. L. Hottot, 1834-
1905, was a French sculptor. He
produced a large number of
bronzes and white metal figures.
His favorite subjects were Egypt-
ian and Blackamoor men and
women. His works have sold
from $250 to $28,000. Your white


L
i

I
I


metal figure depicting Isis was
likely polychrome decorated,
which appears to be completely
gone. The hole in the head could
be repaired but the broken miss-
ing portion of the arm
is a disaster. Potential
dollar value due to
condition is catch-as-
catch-can. However, it
S has the potential to be
a great decorator item
if properly attended to.
Dear John: Please
see attached photos of
korski a wood table acquired
SKI'S from my grandparents
who recently passed
-C away in northeast
Pennsylvania. They
were both in their 90s. The story
of this table is that it was an early
first-year anniversary gift from
my maternal great-grandparents
to my grandparents, who were
married almost 69 years. The
photos show the tabletop, the
hidden folding leaf, the total


table, and the spindle leaves that
swing out to support the leaves
on both ends. There are no mark-
ings underneath that suggest
manufacturer information. I am
curious about your thoughts. -
TC., Internet
Dear T.C.: You have a 19th cen-
tury-style gate leg drop-leaf table
manufactured in America some-
time during the 1920s to 1940s.
Potential dollar value is $75 to
$150.
DearJohn: I am curious about
this old desk that was my grand-
father's when I was very young in
the 1970s. It is very solid and the
top drawer, when pushed in,
See ATTIC/Page E5
This sculpture by French artist L.
Hottot depicts the Egyptian god-
dess Isis. Although Hottot's
works have sold for as much as
$28,000, the damaged arm on
this piece severely undermines its
possible value.
Special to the Chronicle



i
~Z1I II


E4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

locks all the other drawers. I
could not find anything simi-
lar online. Any information is
appreciated. TA, Internet
Dear TA: You have a
commercial-grade quality
kneehole writing desk. The
English first produced the
kneehole desk in the 18th
century Your desk is a 20th
century version of the origi-
nal era. Potential dollar
value is in the used furni-
ture category, leaving it at
the catch-as-catch-can level.
Dear John: We have a
painting by Serbian artist
Ciba painted in 1969, which
we may want to sell if there
is a market for Serbian art.
Can you advise us on how to
find out if there is any inter-
est in this artist? Any advice
would be appreciated. -


S.C., Homosassa
Dear S.C.: You did not in-
clude a photograph of your
painting, making it impossi-
ble to speak to the issue of
decorative value. I think the
artist Ciba you mention may
be Victor Egorovic Cibarev,
born in Russia in 1922. I
could not find any informa-
tion on his death. If you like,
send a couple of good clear
photographs, include the di-
mensions and any notations
on the back of the canvas.
Then I will try to finish the
story


John Sikorski, in the
antiques business for
30years, hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 E5


Many frugal uses for baby powder


SARA NOEL
Frugal Living

aby powder is a popular baby
shower gift If you're a new par-
ent, you'll probably have more
than you know what to do with. Many
parents don't use much of it for their
baby, so rather than let it collect dust,
you can use it around your home.
Here are a few suggestions:
Halloween: You can make your
hair white by sprinkling baby powder
in it. One reader, Palooka from Mis-


souri, shares: "When I was a teen, I
dressed up for work as an old lady I put
my hair in a bun, poured tons of baby
powder in it to make it look gray and
wore my mom's robe and slippers."
This works well for school plays, too.
Hot sheets: During summer
months, your bed can feel hot and
clingy. Sprinkle baby powder be-
tween your sheets to help with hu-

Norm Overfield
Realtor"
Hometown 352-586-8620
IRealty www.normoverfield.
352-564-0333 homesandland.com
6050 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,Crystal River, FL


FIVE LOTS, JUST LISTED.
A 4 From .60 acres to over
3 acres, all heavily
-' wooded for privacy.
Some wetland areas,
too. Rural with lots of
wildlife, yet close to Ocala and 1-75. Priced
from $7,500 to $19,900. Call Norm for
details at 352-586-8620


midity and perspiration. It gives your
sheets a fresh scent, too.
See FRUGAL/Page E7

lI "I i Im~ rr


S T Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
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11


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p 1 1 1 p on p p


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Prefabricated efficiency


Prefab homes

make inroads

CEDAR BURNETT
For The Associated Press

So much of what is in our
homes these days is factory-made
- toasters, furniture, toys but
not the homes themselves.
Most are still built on-site, as
opposed to being prefabricated
and trucked in. That doesn't
make sense, says Sheri Koones,
author of four books on prefab
housing, including the new "Pre-
fabulous + Almost Off the Grid:
Your Path to Building an Energy-
Efficient Home" (Abrams).
"Would you want your car to be
built in your driveway?" says
Koones, of Greenwich, Conn. "Of
course you wouldn't. You want
your car made in a climate-con-
trolled factory by skilled profes-
sionals on an assembly line.
Wouldn't you want the same thing
for your home?"
Prefab housing, a concept
that's been around at least since
Sears and other companies intro-
duced mail-order kits in the
early 1900s, generally refers to
factory-built modular and panel-
ized housing. They are built to
the same code as traditionally
built homes, with additional
structural requirements to make
sure they withstand being trans-
ported. Depending on the home's
size, multiple pieces (or modules)
are delivered to a site and se-
cured together onto the founda-
tion in a matter of hours.
Prefab homes are typically 60
percent to 90 percent complete at
the time of delivery, but often re-
quire an additional two or three
weeks for finishing touches.
By contrast, mobile homes,
which carry much of the stigma
against prefabricated housing,
are built to a more lenient fed-
eral code, arrive on their own
wheels, depreciate quickly and
are not generally zoned for urban
use.
Because modular prefab
homes are indistinguishable
from site-built homes, they have
become increasingly popular,
pushed by the growing interest in


-.


Associated Press
This undated publicity photo provided by Greenfab shows the dining room of a prefab house in Seattle, Wash.
The home was the first platinum LEED-certified prefab home in Washington state.


green building.
"Prefab homes are much more
efficient and environmentally
friendly There is so much less
waste in the manufacturing
process. Any excess materials
can be recycled into other homes
or sent back to the manufacturer
instead of ending up in a dump-
ster," Koones says. "Because the
materials aren't exposed to the
elements, prefab houses avoid
problems with mold, rot and
bacteria...."
She also cites worker health
and safety as a benefit to building
homes off-site. "Prefab construc-
tion professionals can work year-
round, indoors, without being
exposed to the elements."
Still, some consumers remain
unsure of what a green home
built off-site would entail.
Greenfab, a Seattle company,
recently used a newly built pre-
fab home as a teaching tool. After
producing the first platinum
LEED-certified prefab home in
Washington State, Greenfab
opened the modern house to the
public for three months. School


Prefab homes are
typically 60 percent
to 90 percent
complete at the
time of delivery, but
often require... two
or three weeks for
finishing touches.

groups, builders, buyers and non-
profit groups toured it.
"People in the neighborhood
just saw a foundation in the
morning, and came home to find
a completed house," says Johnny
Hartsfield, founder and presi-
dent of Greenfab. "Our main goal
as a company is to educate the
public on the benefits of green
and prefab. "
He also lists cost as a reason to
go prefab. Since the homes are
pre-designed, he says, there are
no architect fees, time delays or
cost overruns.


"Site building is loud and
stressful," Hartsfield says. "We
want to make building your home
more exciting and fun we don't
want you to hate it or get di-
vorced over it."
Prefab homes can be cus-
tomized. Some companies offer
environmental upgrades beyond
standards such as low-VOC paint
and efficient appliances.
"We can install the foundation
for water collection and solar
adaptability in our homes,"
Hartsfield says. "Even if they
don't have the money to set up a
full solar collection system, we
can build their home with the in-
frastructure to do that down the
line."
Of course, consumers still tend
to choose homes based on gut re-
actions, emotional connections
and personal taste.
"If houses aren't attractive, no
one is going to want to build an
efficient house," says Koones.
"One of the misconceptions
about prefab is that they're all
modern, and not everyone likes
modern. The truth is, most of the


The cover of author and prefab ex-
pert Sheri Koones' latest book,
"Prefabulous + Almost Off the Grid:
Your Path to Building an Energy-In-
dependent Home" shows the GO
Logic Home in Belfast, Maine. This
prefab home is the first Passive
House, a rigorous standard for en-
ergy-efficiency, in Maine, and the
12th in the country.
prefab being built in this country
is actually traditional."
Brooklyn, N.Y-based New
World Home, one of the builders
featured in Koones' book, builds
traditionally styled prefab homes
across the Northeast. Founding
partners Mark Jupiter and Tyler
Schmetterer built on-site homes
until 2006, when they decided to
produce prefab green homes for
the masses.
"I love chunky timber-framed
houses," say Jupiter. "I wanted to
make homes that fit in the neigh-
borhood, that conjure good feel-
ings and are anchored in
history"
He cites one project in which
his prefab home was the first
new construction in its neighbor-
hood in 100 years. The neighbors
were wary, but came around
when they saw the finished
home, he says.
And after building a model
home in the upscale Hamptons,
on Long Island, N.Y, New World
Home won over the neighbor-
hood and produced five more
homes there, Jupiter says.
"Modern is hard to relate to for
some people," he says. "Our
stylings are based on a rich archi-
tectural history Aesthetically,
they look like they've been
around for 100 years, but they
perform like they're 30 years in
the future."


E6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

Deter ants: Leave a
powder line near doors and
windows to prevent ants


from crossing over.
Add it to your beach
bag: If you sprinkle baby
powder on yourself before
you get in the car, the sand
will slide right off.
Clean grease: Baby
powder also works well for


removing grease on kitchen
walls. Rub the grease spot
with powder and a soft
cloth. Another reader, Lisa
C. from Texas, shares:
"Sprinkle cornstarch or
baby powder over the
grease stain, let it sit for a


few minutes, then brush it
off. The powder absorbs the
grease. You can use Dawn
dishwashing liquid for
grease stains, too."
Baby powder also works
well for removing grease
from


suede. You can absorb the
stain by blotting it with a
soft, dry cloth and then ap-
plying baby powder, corn-
meal or cornstarch. Let it
set for a few hours. Use a
suede brush to remove the


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 E7

absorbent product. Do this a
couple of times, until the
grease stain is far less no-
ticeable. Lastly, gently rub a
pencil eraser over any re-
maining stain.
See /Page E8


ERA 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
S Office: 352-746-3600 Realtor 1
oP ...... cell (352) 586-8885 -


PINE RIDGE HORSE FARM
5.7 acres bordenng horse trails. You
must see this impeccable mother-
daughter set up! Main portion of
home has 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2
car garage;mother portion is 1200
sq. ft of living space with its own
garage built 2006. 4 gorgeous
paddocks. Barn has 4 large stalls
with separate tack room and feed
rooms. Wash area. Home Warranty
provided!
MLS 353470.................$399,900


PINE RIDGE HORSE FARM
3-acre gated gentleman's horse
farm. Beautiful home with granite
countertops and an extra room
could be 3rd bedroom (has no
closet). Caged salted inground
pool. Block built barn with two
12x12 stalls,concrete floor. Tiled
tack room, 12x12 with water &
electric. 4 pastured paddocks.
Separate well 165'deep zoned
for paddocks and landscaping.
MLS 357647................$339,000


WOW! PRICED TO SELL!
Enjoy retirement living here in
this 55+ community. Really
adorable and neat villa.
Needs some cosmetics and
could use some paint, but is
in very good condition.
Community is close to eve-
rything, shopping, library, golf
courses, pool, etc. Come and
make this your own.
MLS 353326..................... $58,000


I S I I


CANAL FRONT ....... I...... I .. .... .nn BODACIOUS BUY IN BEVERLY HILLS"i I -.r-, LOTS OF LIVING SPACE!! -, li .1. 1u I. -.
Beautifully appointed 2003 d/w features 3 bedrooms, 2 full dining area, living room, blinds, lawn sprinters, rear screen porch, River Lakes Manor with 1,864 iing. Home features living & family
baths, master suite, open floor plan, breakfast bar, oversized front covered patio, standard ceilings, appliances, and in need of rooms, interior laundry, den/office, shed, partial appliances, fully
screen room overlooks canal. Extra house for extra income or some TLC. 2145 Jeffery St. ONLY $34,900! MLS 357632 fenced, large master bathroom, and in need of some TLC. 6395 N Iris
family. ONLY $98,000 MLS 355442...7840 E Smoke Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352- Dr, Hernando ONLY $50,400!! MLS 357626 Call Kim Fuller
Trail Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 586-6598 352212-5752 or Tomika Sires-Hanssen 352-586-6598





INVERNESS POOL HOME! Fannie Mae owned 3/2/2 REDUCED Fabulous Inverness Highlands 3/2/2 with fabulous HAMMER AND SAW AND A LITTLE INITIATIVE" i ..I1I
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dining area, one car carport, front covered porch, partial detached workshop, rear fenced yard, gazebo, updated windows, & family rooms, dining area, split floor plan, shed, standard
appliances, and in need of some TLC. 1304 Claymore St. living & family rooms, rear covered pato, lawn sprinklers, and ceilings, and a lanai. Come take a peek quick! 3220 N Clements
ASKING $53,900 MLS 357719 Call Kim Fuller 352-212- more!! 6111 E Seneca St ONLY $63,900 MLS 355872 Call Ave., Hernando ONLY $67,900 MLS 357745 Call Kim Fuller
5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-5866598 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598

REDUCED!!! GINORMOUS -
HOME for the growing -tr
family. 2004 5/2/2 Citrus _
Hills home w/ 2910 living -
featuring formal living & REDUCEDi I1- I il, I IT S TIME TO LIVE THE WATERFRONT DREAM I
dining rooms, family room, I 1,,,i,,,
large rear screen porch, split ,, ,,,.,,. i ..... ...... .h ,,,,,,I l.. I ,,, l,, I ,,,,. ,
& open floor plans, breakfast bar, pantry, interior laundry, and master bedroom with a garden tub and dual sinks. In need of some inside laundry This fantastic waterfront community offers a large
more!! 1172 W Legion Ct., Hernando. ASKING $159,900 TLC. 6177 W Nielsen Ct, Homosassa. ONLY $39,900 MLS community pool, tennis courts, and recreational activities. 11358 W
MLS 355867 Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires- 356382 Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen Bayshore Dr, Crystal River ONLY $69,000 MLS 354826 Call Kim
Hanssen 352-586-6598 352-586-6598 Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598
. ... OOCH


000BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


ELEGANT
CUSTOM BUILT HOME
In the equestrian section of Pine
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a
3600 interactive virtual tour at
wwwmsypineridgehome.com.
MLS #355468.$410,000

77 _&


CLASSIC AND
CONTEMPORARY
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A
true masterpiece in a 11 ,.
Lake Tsala Apopka, ....
family to move right in!
000COHFMLS #357471 $425,000


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


115 N. LEGION TERR.
MAGNIFICENT WATERFRONT CITRUS HILLS
MAINTENAN -FRE 2/2/2 H Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and
MAINTENANCE-FREE 2/2/2 HOME in beautiful Citrus
HOME nice I...1 r. in beautiful Citrus
in the Moorings at Point O Woods. Hills!! .... i ..a one acre comer lot,
Completely remodeled. Move right this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in
into Paradise. Enjoy tranquil pool and patio area offers you the privacy
privacy with nature preserve .... well
behind you. Most every room has .. .... .. I brin
water view MT IsR a4 -S13tR ., .. n nnn


LIVING ON THE WATER!
This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well maintained 3/2/1
lifestyle. Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, medical ...I 1. r .., your fenced
190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard I ... ........ or private
room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
im aginable! .:i... I .. ..
MLS #354435 $489,000 1i -- $69,900


0"l~meL







E8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012



Plant rye grass for winter lawns


Days are shorter in fall and tem-
peratures are lower. North
Florida and the north part of
Central Florida can expect frosty


mornings by November
In Citrus County, the last
frost has historically been
in early March. Close to the
Gulf Coast and farther
south, the last frost may be
over by mid-February Ex-
otic turfgrasses go dormant
during Florida's three-
month winter.


Homeowners wanting an Jane
expanse of green lawn to
cut during Florida's brief JAN
winter will need to over- GAR
seed with ryegrass in Sep-
tember or early October Although the
bag may claim ryegrass is perennial
somewhere in the world, it is not so in
Florida. The summer heat will kill it.
Summer rains and humidity, along
with the heat, will rot any remaining
rye seeds. The decomposing grass
clippings and dying rye plants provide
nutrients for the established lawn
grass, which will start to green up in
February
Rye germinates quickly, in seven to
10 days. First mowing will be in about
three weeks. Over winter, the underly-
ing turf will be dormant, needing no
extra irrigation. The overseeded rye
survives nicely with watering every
other week. A brief half-hour sprin-
kling in the cool early evening is


enough to help the seeds sprout, and
will stay in the soil overnight and well
into the late morning hours.
If a gardener were to go outside on
the lawn at 10 p.m. and
again at 6 a.m., he would
find the grass is normally
covered with dew. Rye
seedlings quickly burrow
roots and take their mois-
ture from the soil. There is
usually enough dew and hu-
midity for rye seeds to ger-
minate with little irrigation.


Veber Before the rye is over-
seeded, perhaps a home-
E'S owner should consider
DEN eliminating established
Seeds and sedges with a
post-emergent herbicide specific to
the type of turfgrass prevalent in the
lawn. If Bahiagrass, Paspalumnota-
tum, and St. Augustine, Steno-
taphrumsecundatum, are
intermingled, I would use a herbicide
designed for Bahia that would also kill
the straggly, thirsty St. Augustine
species. The Bahia is a most practical
turfgrass for sandy, well-drained soils.
It is much more drought-tolerant than
St Augustine. Bahia can thrive with lit-
tle irrigation except in the dry months
of April and May, when weekly irriga-
tion will be adequate until the normal
summer rains arrive in June.
A pre-emergent herbicide should be
used early in February to prevent
weed seeds from sprouting in the old


lawn. By April, the effect of the pre-
emergent herbicide wears off in about
eight weeks. Bahia seed can be over-
seeded in late spring to improve the
thickness and quality of the Bahia
lawn. The ryegrass overseeded in the
fall will provide shade to the germi-
nating Bahia seeds. As the rye dies out
in warmer weather, it decays and pro-
vides nutrients for the new seedlings.
Mole crickets are an easily con-
trolled insect pest in Bahia turfgrass.
A time-released fertilizer combined
with a broad spectrum insecticide can
be broadcast in mid-March to kill
adults, juveniles and eggs as they
hatch and start to feed. Once the life
cycle has been interrupted, the pest
problem should disappear, No adults
will be alive to breed and lay eggs.
Be on the watch for others arriving
from places nearby There are two
types of Bahia commonly sold in
Florida. The cheaper 'Pensacola' has
taller and more seed heads so needs
cutting weekly in summer to look tidy
'Argentine' Bahiagrass is twice the
price but has shorter and fewer seed
heads. It can be mowed less frequently


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome to
herDunnellon, Marion County
garden. For an appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or email
JWeberl2385@gmail.com.


*' i AMERICAN
Lou IfIeeU .Realtor ERa REALTY& INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU" 4511 N.leto Hw.
Beverly His, FL 34485
Cell: (352) 697-1685 Offi 52-7436



L I 4/2/3 CUSTOM


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

For shoes: Baby pow-
der keeps sneakers dry
and comfortable. If your
shoes are squeaking, some-
times sprinkling powder
inside them can stop the
noise.
Unstick items: Playing
cards often stick together.
If you place them in a bag,
add some baby powder and
shake the bag, they'll stop
sticking. Baby powder
works well on inflatable
beach/pool toys, too. Once
they've been deflated and
folded up, inflatable toys
tend to stick to themselves
and can rip easily Sprinkle
them with baby powder to
help keep them intact.
On hair: Sprinkle baby
powder on your hair and
brush it out to give your


hair volume. Another
reader, M.M. from Georgia,
shares: "If I don't have
time to shower before I go
out, I brush my hair with
baby powder from root to
end. It absorbs the oils so
my hair looks freshly blow-
dried."
Detangle a necklace: If
the chain gets tangled,
apply a bit of baby powder
or baby oil to help slide the
tangles out with a pin or
needle. Baby powder
works for detangling
shoelaces, too.
MEN
Dear Sara: After reading
your article on using a waf-
fle iron to make cornbread
waffles, pizza, omelets,
brownies, etc., I brought
my waffle iron out of the
closet after I hadn't used it
in years. I'm motivated to
try some new things! Do

See FRUGAL/Page E9


000CPMS F

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OE E: (352) 795-6633
WWALEXRE COM E-Mar: SALES@ALEXRE COM


Realtor


BEVERLY HILLS JAMAICAN model, CRYSTAL RIVER-NORTH 2.5 acres,
2 bedrooms, 15 baths, 1 car garage, family 3 bedroom, 2 bath, D/W M/H with 3 car
rm, screen porch, country kitchen, dining rm, . .1 1. 1 .. wood deck on front
needs lots of work and cleaning. Assumable ,, I I, i. .. i ck. Large country
mortgage. Off of Forest Ridge Blvd, newer kitchen, large master bath w/garden tub &


nltVIvnAA Knivernaven waterfront nome IJNVl'.KtNtb Deautifully renovated
w/2 bdoom2 er baths, 2 car garage, & den, 2 bedroom, 25 bath condo w/high ceiling in
clean,bright and ready to moveinto.Formal living rm, end unit, 2 I ;. .1 .;
dining, breakfast bar, carpet & tile balcony overlooking, i. .JJ
throughout. #357662 $195,000 PRICE REDUCED TO $60,000




HOMOSASSA-3/2 home on 160 acres,
CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 25 bath (2-80 ac tracts) surrounded by 5,000 acre
D/W M/H by Skyline on 45 acres of land. Homosassa Wildlife management area; raise
Country kitchen, dining rm, family rm, wood cattle/horse or just enjoy the wildlife.
burning fireplace, Ig master suite w/dbl Electrically independent-home is powered by
vanity, shower, garden tub. #356265 photo-electric cells & generator. #352921
$89,900 $500,000




SUMMERFIELD-1999 3/bdrm, 2 bath D/W
JUST NORTH OF CRYSTAL RIVER M/H on 1.66 acres, paved road, cent A/C,
24 x 44 1983 dbl wide M/H on 1.77 acres of fully fenced. Spacious eat-in kitchen; Ig
land. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 10 x 16 workshop, bdrms & walk-in closet, main bath has
S 1 1 1 .r. 1 athedral shower, dbl vanity and garden tub. Amidst
.'... 7..5 ..$.. 0... .... wooden horse & cattle ranches #355982 PRICE
porches. #357695 $65,000 REDUCED TO $74,900


PI]


- 1/ I


www.dudleysauction.com
FON-SITE REAL ESTATE
& CONTENTS AUCTIONS
October 12th ~ 7331 W Pinebrook St. Crystal River ~ 7 Rivers Home
Real Estate & Contents Plus 38 ft. Chris Craft Corinthian
Preview 8am ~ Auction 9am ~ Real Estate 10am
HOME HIGHLIGHTS:
3/33 1908 si.ft. under roof
with complete makeover
and movein ready Tiled
floors, esh paint, 12 X 24 I
tied sunroom, tiled counter-
top s newer appliances,
water softener. 6/10 (+/-) I...'
acre landscaped lot, 12 X 20
shed, and many other extras'on I
Personal property highlights .... . -
F-I 50V-6 pck up 96k, 3 1 ..... I P . I f _
leather recliners & love s I I I I
china cabinet, king-size i I I 1 I I .i TV, quality glass and china
from all over the world, camping items, many hand & power tools.
October 19th ~ 42 S Tyler St. Beverly Hills
REAL ESTATE ONLY Preview 9am ~ Real Estate 10am
SOLD REGARDLESS OF PRICE
I I .I Iillshed garage and carport. Open
,, . I ,,I ,1 i d ni g room that ste s into the
,, , tment opportunity for winter
,, I I, I i er or rental Nice trees and in
,_ 1 Over 1,400sq. ft. underroof.
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds)
BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
-- Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352437-9588. Upto.date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Ab1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


m







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E8

you have any other sugges-
tions? Lisa, New
Hampshire
Dear Lisa: You can make
quick and easy cinnamon
waffles using a can of pre-
sliced cinnamon rolls. Add
four rolls to your waffle
maker, close the lid and
bake them. Watch them
closely, so they don't burn.
These are great for lazy
weekends or sleepovers
with kids. You can use any
boxed muffin mix (or home-
made, for that matter) to
produce a wide variety of
waffle flavors, too.
Dear Sara: I'm just getting
into owning houseplants,
and I need to do some re-
planting from the plastic
pots they're sold in into
something nicer and more
permanent. I was at the sec-
ondhand shop today and
they have a lot of flowerpots,
but none of them had a hole
in the bottom for drainage.
Is it OK to use this type of
pot for spider plants and ivy,


or do I need the ones with a
hole and a saucer? Sage,
Denmark
Dear Sage: I like my spi-
der and ivy plants to hang
and to have drainage. So if
you have ceramic pots, con-
sider some sort of hanger
for them. It's not a must, but
because they are both trail-
ing plants, I prefer them
hanging. I wouldn't directly
re-pot into ceramic pots
without drainage holes, but
you could place the plastic
pot into the ceramic, so
there's still drainage, but a
decorative pot, too. Spider
plants are fairly forgiving,
but they grow best if wa-
tered when the top of the
soil first becomes dry to the
touch. Because they like to
be pot-bound, keeping them
in their original plastic pots
isn't a problem. Ivy plants
like to be evenly moist, but
don't allow their roots to sit
in water. Both plants like
bright light (not direct light).
Dear Sara: I was given a
bag of frozen Italian-style
meatballs and I need ideas
for what I can do with them. I
know I can use some for
pasta and sandwiches, but


Jackie & Bob Davis
I American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
N E (352) 634-2371 cell
ERA bob@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bida om
R AN- ,1`1 r


Thrilling, eye-popping open water on Little Lake Spivey. Along with this jaw-dropping view comes a
charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage home that shouts "easy-to-love-me." The breakfast nook and
20' Florida room both overlook nature at play. Formal dining room, interior laundry. The C/H/A is new
in 2011. The rear lawn leads to the 2-story observation deck with boat lift, along with a deck that leads
to a covered dock with power and water. Perfect for watching those heart-warming sunsets. How about
that for the end of your day? $275,000 MLS#357697


-Oil..




This charming 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, pool home (2-car screened garage) has so much beckoning you. The
family room has handsome built-in bookcases surrounding its gas fireplace. The kitchen is ALL new: Wood
cabinets, s.s. appliances and Corian counters. The home's entertainment portion has gorgeous large-tile
floors and the bedroom portions have stunning bamboo wood floors. The seller is a landscper so,
naturally, the acre grounds look like a botanical garden $225,000 MLS#357693


could I use some as the main
meat with mashed potatoes,
beans, etc.? Also, the only
way I know to cook them is
with chili sauce and jelly Any
ideas would be appreciated.
- Hope S., North Carolina
Dear Hope: Yes, you could
use them as a main meat.
They would be good with
rice or potatoes. You could
put them on homemade
pizza, in a casserole, soup,
stew, calzones or in a pot pie.
Here's a creative recipe
that uses meatballs, string


cheese and refrigerated bis-
cuits to make "Meatball
Bubble Biscuits": food.com/
recipe/meatball-bubble-
biscuits-88605.
I would be hesitant to use
them in some recipes, such
as chili, nachos, tacos or
stroganoff, because the Ital-
ian flavoring in frozen meat-
balls can be quite
overpowering. Consider
making cheese ravioli or
lasagna noodles, spaghetti
sauce and meatball bake for
a change-of-pace pasta dish.


MEm
U After-school snack: My
kids often want a sweet or
salty snack after school, but
I don't want them to eat
chips or total junk food
every day. So I spread
peanut butter on graham
crackers and add sliced ba-
nanas to make a peanut but-
ter and banana sandwich. I
freeze them and my kids eat
them as a sweet frozen treat
You can substitute a scoop
of yogurt for the peanut but-
ter. My youngest son also


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 E9
loves sliced cucumbers with
cream cheese spread and a
goldfish cracker on top. -
Barb C., Illinois
Visit frugalvillage.com/
2010/03/17/unique-and-easy-
homemade-snacks.

Sara Noel is the owner of
the Frugal Village website.
Write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut St., Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


.EPe1hI kU1IIT-bU1 tn RE 'SI


Amanda & sirk Jonm Tom Ballour il Aveus & Hl Saner Art Paty7 4 69
-B f:igl ASOC.I REA1TOR RtAMR- REACTOR






23 TRIPLE CROWN 10100 ROY THOMAS RD. 2372 W. SNOWY ERET PL. 3620 W. COWOOD 5086 N. PEPPERMINT DR
4/3/3 353329 $359,5 3/1.5/2 356947 $295,000 4/2/2 356193 $189,900 3/2/2 357160 $139,900 3 357756 154900




4275 N. ODEWOO 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR. 895W. BEARUSH LN. 7768 N SARAZEN 4935 N. PEPPERMINT DR
3/2/2 356461 $13990 22 3545302 357276 32 354564 $139900 I 3/2/2 357718 $138,900




842 W COCKATIEL LP. 277 ATHESON 6541 W. COPENHAGEN 7577 GROVEWOOD LR 6618N. DELTONA BLVD. 67155. FRANKFURTEI
3/2/2 357166 $108,900 3/2/2 357083 94,900 3/2 356535 $89,500 2/2 357588 $109,900 3/2/1 357740 $54,900 3/15/1 356952 $44,90




7239COTTAGE
1945 W. OLIVER 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 3/2/CP Det./4+ CP Det. 400 S. WASHINGTON 101 .BARBOUR ST 3 CLIFFORD
2/2/2 355628 $74,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900 357796 $149,900 2/2/2 356626 $62,500 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 / 355613 $7,90




10013 E. BASS 521 N. HARRISON 78 S. LEE 27 S. FILLMORE 15 S FILLMORE 4506 N. TUMBLEWEED
S3/2/2 357224 $59,900 2/2/2 35036 $54,900 356827 $59,000 3/1/1 356531 $53,900 354359 $900 3500 3/2 356299 $44,900




_,ilLI J il -
29 N. WASHINCTON 6 S. ADAMS 3755 N. ROSCOE 1 NEW NORTH CT. 45 S. MELBOURNE 9412 E FERNWOOD P
2/1 356448 $39,900 2/1 356532 $42,900 2/2 356615 $37,500 1/2 356609 $29,900 | 354341 $84,900 2/2/2 357736 $74,90
3521 N. LECANTO HWY.. BEVERLY HILLS. FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


r






I


I

I









E10 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012



6J


Bring your fishing
pole!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R.IHOMOSASSA
2/1 Furn. Mobile Homes
Nice, clean, quiet park
short/ long term.
Mobiles for Sale with
Finan. 352-220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR.1BA.$495mo &
1BR.1BA.$475mo
Frdg,Stv,Watr-Trsh,Lrg
yard,Pets 352-587-2555
HERNANDO
Rent to Own Nice Wa-
terfront Lot, on paved
street, city water &
sewer w/ older SW Mo-
bile needs major fix up
$1,275 down $275.
monthly (352) 726-9369
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550 mo & 2/2 $525
352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
HOMOSASSA
2/1%, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
HOMOSASSA
2/11/, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
Remodeled 2/2 MH on
1/2 acre. $495/mo
(352) 503-7020




BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

HOMOSASSA
26X60; 2BR/2BA,
Screened rm, utility rm,
Dbl pane win, 3+ acres,
2 fenced in, roof over, 2
carports, 30X84 Pole
Barn, well &septic
(352) 628-0812

m.u -a-


uasis IvioDlle nome oo-
Park, Inverness. 14x60
Fully Furnished 2BR/2BA.
Near Bike Path. Roof
over, carport, screen
room, shed and remod-
elled kitchen & baths.
Parking for trailer or
boat. Excellent Shape.
$10,000. Lot rent
$205. Call
8159864510
or cell
779-221-4781

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183


YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shrt/long
term 352-220-2077




2BR-Log Cabin Decor
Off 486 -Den-FP-AC-Kit.
Bar 4 stall barn 24x24,
/2 end. w/AC, Approx.
1 Acre, fenced-well.
$53,500. Call Jackie
352-634-6340
Cridland Realestate
3/2 MFG HOME
Remodeled,
on 2.9 AC, paved road,
3 sheds, CHA $65,000
Lease/Option,
352-302-4057
Crys. Riv. Area 2BR+Den
3 yr. New AC. Remod-
eled RV Hkup. $39,900
off US 19, Pool-fenced,
Jackie (352) 341-5297
Cridland Real Estate
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, $46,500.
Cash (352) 586-9498
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217




2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
Call Lee (352) 817-1987


' THIS OUT!
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport.
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926


IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 2/2, 1988 Skylark
model, furnished, shed,
screened lanai & xtra-Ing,
covered carport on a Irg
lot. Lots of kitchen cabi-
nets with island stove top,
double oven, fridge,
washer, dryer Lots of
storage. 352-344-1632
or 937-545-3413

Melody Park Dwntwn
Inverness, 2/2, Open
Shed, Carport, $11,900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie (352) 341-5297

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090







-PAMTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.Citrus(ountyHomeRentals.com
BEVERLYHILLS/CITRUSSPRINGS
635Greedde (CS).............. $1000
3/2/2 pool, 1787 sq ft
2440 W Nilus r (CS) .. .......$750
3/2/1 cute home, 1398 sq ft
CRYSTAL RIVER
1055 N Hollywo Cir .............. $850
2/2/1 carport, screened back porch
11435 N Dixie Shoes .......... $900
3/1 silt home, gulf access
1266 N Seagll Pt ................ $1 100
2/3, 2 story condo
HOMOSASSA
5865 W Vike Path..................25
3/2/1 Ig yard, close to Rock Crusher elem
7843 or 7845 Sd PI ...REDUCED $685
2/2 duplex, incl lawn and water
7416 W Kendale Ct ................. $750
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 acre
INVERNESS HERNANDO LECANTO
1274 Cypress Cove Ct (v) .......... $625
2/2 5 townhorne, communruty pool
3441 E Ch pel Ct (Her) .............. $600
2/1 close to lake and Ocala
1933 Shanelle Path (L) ..REDUCED $1200
3/2/2 incl full rerb pool, tenns, gym



CASTRORI:ALI
and Property^^^


33 N' r o-ftc Avenue
InvenessFIfL 34453
352-341-4663fl^^
CIRUSH COUNTY^
R^cyfcIENTALS


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT, LLC
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/1 Reduced....$700
2/2/2 ...............$650
2/1/1 Lawncare
Included.............$575
2/1 Screenroom...$550
2/2 Duplex
Tile Floors..........$600
2/1/1 Fenced
Backyard...........$625
2/2 Pritchard
Island Condo........$700

2/1/1 Bonus
Room.........$600
Jennifer Fudge.
oProperty Manager
SCheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
S352-726-9010
CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 waterfront DW, $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 House $600 mo.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/BR $450.,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio, furn. on Hunter's
Springs, sun deck, W/D
rm. All util. incl.+ boat
dock. $700/mo. avail
10/1/12 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $350/Mo. $350/Sec.
Incls, septic water, trash
No pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, Stove, refrig. Wash
/Dryer, util. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp 2/1
House $650. 422-2393


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
INVERNESS
2/1.5, Townhouse,
W/D, $550 Mo. FILlS.
(352)746-4108
(352) 302-6988
LECANTO
Nice, Clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$56,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




CRYSTAL RIVER
800 Sq Ft. Office Space
$750. mo., Incl. Maint.,
Sign Space Available
Hwy 44, Frontage
352-564-8007
HERNANDO
1,000 sf Office Space
486, Cit Hills 341-3300




CITRUS HILLS
2/2%, Carport, FURN.
(352) 613-5655




CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, $525. Mo.
Tim (352) 464-3522




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm cottage ideal for
one or two. Good credit
and rental history a must.
1st/last/sec. $500 p/m
Call for app.
352-628-1062

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 $695, $800 Dep
(352) 621-0616


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, EZ Terms $500.
352-697-1457, 382-3525
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/CP $525
Lecanto cottage
1/1 furnished $425
(352) 220-2958
Citrus Springs
8354 Legacy 3/2/2 $850
(352) 464-2701
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg. 3/2/2
on % Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River
& Historical District
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, st &Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-302-6633

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
201-9427

INVERNESS
Nice 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$700. (304) 444-9944
Sugarmill Woods
2 Master BR, Dbl Gar.,
S/SAppl. $850/Mo
352-302-4057




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, Boat Lift & Dock,
very clean Dixie Shores
$980 Neg. 795-0102
Leave Messge
CYRSTAL RIVER
3/3 Waterfront. Three
Sisters Area. Furnished
with Dock. $1400/mo
(352) 854-2511

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Homosassa River
2/2 Furn., MH, Shit/long
term 352-220-2077


R
BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & WID
WIFI UTILITIES
$450. (352) 603-0611


Inverness Hghlands
Prvt. Bath, Cable, WIFI,
Laun. rm. 352-419-5393







AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Karna Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com






HOME

AUCTIONS







7489 E. Stage Coach Trail
FLORAL CITY
2 BR, 2 BA,
1942 SF HOME






SI # A s II
No Back Taxes or Liens
Insurable Title


u GW Geth
Details AD
Bi Nw!



OPEN HOUSE:
Sat & Sun, Sept 29 &30,
1:.00O 3:00pi .
ocau 866-518-9065



12.5003e n in n oar r iea hnest r
Ech p eint) 7 premium neI Sall
All IdiESru tl WrVll gporvil
H81M 0110355, Aflrl B1: H.,j::n P


aommercialr


2 ACRES
MOBILE HOME
7 Car Garage, R.O.P.
$48,000 Cash, Firm
Behind K-Mart Inverness
(352) 726-6432
HOMOSASSA
For Rent 1 BR Home w/
Small commercial gar-
age, auto shop/auto
body off grover cleve

HOMOSASSA
For Rent 1 BR Home w/
Small commercial gar-
age, auto shop/auto
body off grover cleve
$1,000. (603) 860-6660








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VJVSTW"


E-L

BANK OWNED-SPRING HILL FL FOR RENT-INVERNESS, FL
3BR/2BA pool home with tiled family room with Immaculate 2BR/1B apartment. Rent includes
fireplace. MLS#356883 washer & dryer. $600.00 per mo MLS#357587





BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Large 2BR/2BA pool home on 1 acre. Original garage Commercial corner Hwy 44 & Gospel Island
converted to living area. Detached 2 car garage. Road. Across from the Hess station.
$84,900 MLS#356908 $59,900 MLS#354972

CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tmpbay.rr.com wwwllcitrusrealty.com After Hours 3302-671 0 4


1405 E.WEDGEWOOD LN., HERNANDO
A Mitch Underwood Diplomat pool home with
3 bedrooms, 2 Bath, office and extra room off garage,
can be a studio or workshop. 1.6 acre lot in lovely
Fairview Estates. An approved short sale, this home
needs some painting on the inside and the perfect touch
to make it sparkle. MLS 356025 S190.000


105 W. FOREST OAK, BEVERLY HILLS
A great price for this spacious home. Oversized kitchen
and breakfast nook that will delight any cook. Master
bedroom comes with a large sitting room that can have
many functions. A 3BR, 2.5 ba family room with
fireplace. Come see and be surprised!
MLS 355556 $145,900


91 W. FOREST OAK, BEVERLY HILLS
Beautifully maintained solar heated pool home with
3 bedrooms. 2.5 bathrooms split plan home. Summer
kitchen for those outdoor summer cooking, oversized
master bath with jetted tub. This home has great
energy efficient features that will help keep down those
bills. MLS 350752 $178,900


6143 N. WHISPERING OAK LP, BEVERLY HILLS
A perfect winter or year round home features 2 BR 2BA,
LR, FR, and DR with very spacious rooms. Easy to
maintain, close to the community club house
and tennis court. Solar heated pool home overlooking a
private back yard. Come look this home over,it couldbe
yours. MLS 355450 $152,900


Call Lili Garcia For Showings At 352-302-9129 s
000CPGE____________________________________


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012 Ell


KEYI "Always There For You"
REALTY GAIL COOPER
. u. multimillion Dollar Realtor
FR~ Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


SPACIOUS AND OPEN!
* 3+office/3/2 with 2750 sq ft of living
*2- car garage is 21'3" x 33'5"
* Prewired so you can add that pool
* Large island kitchen with maple cabinetry
* Oversized family room off the kitchen
* $320 yearly fee includes use of community pool
#352827 $249,900


AFRICAN PADUAK HARDWOOD FLOORING!
* 3+office/2/2 with salt system heated pool
S2 waterfalls with very private screen lanai
* Top of the line stainless in granite kitchen
* Lot backs up to state forest land
* Gas log fireplace in the Great Room
* Home warranty for the buyers
#354824 $224,900


HOMOSASSA
Ind. Warehouse for Rent
900sf $450 mo, 628-4066



3BR/2BA/2, Shed, New
Interior paint, carpet.
pool, jetted tub.+ shwr.
newer roof, fenced yd.
6560 N. Deltona Blvd.
Citrus Springs $139,000
(352) 476-5061









New 3/2/3
Home
MUST SEE,
All wood cabinets
tile floors, Large
Porch, laundry
and Pantry
Many Extras
$185,000.
Call Joe 302-0910



2/1/CP ALL NEW:
Kitchen, bath, appli-
ances, paint in/out,
carpet. 1180 sq ft liv,
$36,900.
(352) 527-1239



Open House
Sat & Sun 10a-3p
Enchanting 2 story cot-
tage on "The Meadows"
121 E Glassboro Ct.
3BR/2BA/2+. New HVAC
& water heater,
renovated Kit w/ new
apple, Cabinets & counter-
tops. HW floors, fireplace
$189,900 352-697-3206


2BR, 1 '2 BA, new
enclosed sunroom, at-
tached utility and Laun.
rm. storage bldg.,
furnished Immaculate.
5111 Castle Lake Ave.
S. of Inverness on SR 41
$39,900 (740) 255-0125

Approximately 1 Acre
3BR, 2 Full BA, Open
concept, new steel
roof, deck & caged
pool carport storage
bldg.. Priced to sell
$82,500 5155 Bridget Pt
S. of Inverness on SR 41
(740) 255-0125


LeQQk
HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

INVERNESS
2BR/1BA/1. Cute brick
fenced home. Newer
roof & CHA, scrn porch.
$49,500 Cash or ap-
proved conventional loan
only. Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940

REDUCED!
2/1/1, Block Home
with den, Fireplace,
tile floors, shed w/elec.
near Bealls $44,900.
(352) 344-4192





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF6I XC
REALTY ONE




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


SI=1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den
and Fireplace,
Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
REDUCED $95,900
(863)414-7169




CITRUS COUNTY
Gospel Island Location
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BUYER REBATE

*50% of COMM.*

New/Resale-All FL
30+ yrs. exp.
Call For Details

Ron & Kara Neitz
Brokers/Owners
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060




Your World


%#49C44/C4ee






CfikoricLE


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $25,500.
(727) 439-9106
/2 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact
fee credit, high and
dry, trees, $11,500 obo
(352) 795-3710


Wooded lot,
little more than
/2 acre, low to
moderate flood
zone, in established
residential deed
restricted community,
centrally located in
Citrus County, con-
venient to shopping.
Celina Hills
1st Addition of Citrus
Hills. Block B Lot 5.
2801 E. Marcia St..
Inverness. FL.
PLEASE CONTACT
MARY C.
SCHLUMBERGER
AT CELL 352-212-7962
OR EMAIL
mary@schlumberger
accounting.com

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


3,000 sq. ft. Capacity up to 160 seats
Gross during season 12K to 14K
Full liquor license Transferable lease
Newly decorated
Beautiful building in beautiful setting
High volume turn-key operation in great location
$125,000 and well worth it!


~1 rJ~l TU.


EFxitRelty L e ader


__ ,_ --------=-


I SeeVirtu l T @ -wlI ,.re.salehoe11. .


Hme


CirsCu









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


H ,i : ,i hi.].b .. .,: .I I _.'I 'I 1:.. IJ 1 I lh. i'

I... Ih jIl.. fm I.,il..... Ih .lll.. I..
.jl:l .sl ,l. I.:l,lI: 1ii,] i'i l l.:i h ii l I .' il
Mil= 3I~ 7i $300,000
Call Vichi Root Realloi Associate
352.212. 1926 or housescitius'gmnaid.com


PRIME SHOPPING CENTER WITH
NATIONAL ANCHOR TENANT
* I' I 1 1II I II, 1 h ll 11111 ,, I ,,. 1 -
* gn, h, I,,, i ,nn , 1,,ln ,- l i 1.1, 1 hn -
* I 11 ,hi l IIIn u ,, 11,,,,,-,

* ,' IIIIII I,,,,,1111 1 I I,, ,,, ,,,,. I
Call Elas G IKfallah Broket Associate
lot more Inloimation 3524100 2635


9116 E. LISA COURT. INVERNESS
* Il... I l I. .
* ". H I l; l h l .hil i.lhi, I ; h.i .r

l JMi r. $220,000
Jeanne b Wilaid Pickiel 212 3410
wIv'I. ciliuscounin'sold. com


ESTATE SALE
". ._111l. h II Ih..11 i .ii,.n in , :,. i .il..111 .i .

rI III l ,:II ,] ,la.lll ,: rdl III r rrI ii lh,: ii.,j lil
I:.J.....on. I ..h l .: ll.r.h .II. h. I l. l
inr ,l,,i,. i,,, l ,,i .,. .i ,, ..I,,,i SHORT SALE
POSSIBILITY SUBJECT TO BANK APPROVAL
REDUCED TO $89,500
Call Tei'- R. Blanco 352 419 9252


RARE RIVERFRONT BLUFF
I A. I .1... I .inl I, In
_' _' wi ih .j .j i. .. l, I i, ,
I. ..i.i: l.j I l -nhll I h ..

Mi. = .'. $395,000
Jeanne I Wilaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'1'1I'. ciltuscounirsold. comn


..Hh -' / l.h I .h .1..I 1-h


I I:. l p 'l I "- Al" l.. i.6p

Mi : =iI3 ONLY $134,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


I ,i,- ,,I ,,,i i I ,,I ,I I ', 1 I 1 ,, 11,, ,i
I'hlh,, -l h,-d1 ll 1,l- 1-h 11 d l1,I .- I ,I, lh-

MI. =-* .I'II ASKING $154,900
Pal Davis i352/212 7280.
View listing.: rwin.c21palidavs. com


HERITAGE A PREMIER
GATED COMMUNITY
i , ,I I h ,,,II II,- H ,,II, I,,-,h ,,,, .' I,11i I
, ,, l. 1 ,,,, I 1,.. 11 11 11. I: I... I .:l, ,
Inn lhq m I nII 11h. -i, 11 II.I n I h-,- lnl

11" '.1 I ............ I h h ,- l I 11'.- '. "l. I. 1 ",

Call Isaac Baj Ion at 352 6972493 to
schedual a pri'ale shorenng


MODEST BUDGET?

.i 16m 1 1111. 1. Ih InI IpnyII: 1 Ili
.I j. h. Will j- I rlrrri.r m I.
.w v lvy ll .1 I" llq' p_11:1 !. llh iljlq. .l 11 311j
P1M. =,i 77. ASKING $65,000
Call Nancl Jenkv 352 400 8012


2/2/2

mu I... I... .l H .n I .j I l I ll.l 1 n i ,



OFFERED AT $134,900
Maiy Pa/sons 352 634 1273
(./,,., I ... l.. t, .... ,,1 I,, 1 -. , I ,t ,- I.- ,..s. .....,..,


GREAT CORNER LOCATION
In .. i:... ., : ... ,,: ..,:,, a p.i., REDUCED RIVERFRONT!
I. l (.] l I. :I ,i .: ,i' .il .i [l i] ,i il f. H I I. II II i: 1ii i ll l ,I v ih ( llv v l.


$279,000 Mio = ~l.i ./i? .. .-i, i ..: i I. i, I $194K
Call Jim Motion lot a tour at 4222173. Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED


hi, ,, 1, hh, , I, I h .

Just reduced to S21,000.00. 11-i = 111. I
PalD.n is 1352 212 1280
[',eln lisnlg Centlu 21corn


I I A ll I IIII l- IN ,,- 1,, 1 11 1 h 11"h I,,,, ,, II
,6t. I,. lli 6..' ,,il ,,.h.'.h, I 1 iI ,,,,6 1 i r.l,,. 1....I
,11 h ,, ll,,,h ,',,. I I,,, ,h.l,' ,,, llh ll. r I ,, r ,l II
i, ,i, h ,I 1, h , 1II : 1 1 .ii,,,, ,I I,,, I I
rIl = _.". ASKING S168.900
Pit Di ,J 352,212 7280
I l.- tli .1ng 1 .Iii 2 g/2fId1.. gi m


MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING ...



....1 ..... ... I .. ... ,..
. I, n ] ,II .nI l ,I 5I. .
MlI.- = 3:.";. .' $59,500


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST
...] ... H...... 1 'l h .. l.i l lh



I 1 ,l-,....I i ,,,, ..1 ,,.,, I,, ,, I I I
.11111.1. IVI i j l i ll . I T i

Fhl ]= '... $73,900
Call a.nRo I/lronto 352 212 7595


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS POOL HOME
I ii hI,,,, I 'I I ,,I,,I h II,, I rJ, % ,I .'1 1
F. i I I I Id"I I
i4 1 , no 1%% rJ, i~h Iu lmu i "1'"l I.. I I m


M! i.- = 'il $75,000
Onil huwu: LU .JI S ~,' Off :2 666S


ROYAL OAKS VILLA
* ,,, I .i .- l- 111 l.irl iT
* ;KI ; il.lh i i|..|i,.i.
* I... ,I. I ,I 'l. I... ,i l I .- ,: .. .

Mi. : ..hl $84,500
Jeanne b Willaid Pickiel 2123410
wI'1 '. ciltuscountl'sold. comn


BANK SAYS REDUCE THIS SHORT
SALE DOWN TO $39,000
WHAT A BUY!!!
Ih.. Ir. ii b. id ....i, bllh h. ',L i hP.i i j l

n.ll .lEj I l. hfiii rj,,, , l. .'.I '
Cr ill J irj : e v l- :i: i r ,122.162 ji- I26666 i
rji,,. io -. ,,,,l I _.. = ..;. ;.h .
c.,l/t/fl.,,

* V yl 11.-: Il.i...pi l, I
SMi = ..177 $89,900
Call Cha/les Kelly 352 422 2387


E12 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012