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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02890
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 09-16-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02890

Full Text


Vols fall: Gators triumph against Tennessee 37-20 /B


TODAY I.R CITR U- COUN TY O
&next f c 1. L
morning ..... -/E TTTIV"fNLTT'T'


Scattered p.m. show-
ers, isolated storms;
chance of rain 40%.
PAGE A4


SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


VIN ILLL
www.chronicleonline.com
SNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 118 ISSUE 40


or


Port authority
to set scope
of work
Citrus County Port Au-
thority representatives will
meet Monday to establish
the scope of work with
Martin Associates, the
consultant hired to con-
duct a feasibility study.
The public may attend
this meeting at 9 a.m. at
the Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto, but
public input will not be
taken as this will not be a
board meeting.
For information, call
Lindsay Ubinas, public in-
formation officer, at 352-
527-5484.


COMMENTARY:


Let it flow
Save Our Waters Week
continues with columns
and photos./Page Cl
and HomeFront
BUSINESS:
A ,


S


iti


0


Shawn Scott, vice president of Mike Scott Plumbing, explains how treated wastewater is handled at his com-
pany's facility in Hernando. A recent odor in an Inverness neighborhood emanated from an overflowing septic tank,
not from a proposed septage spray field for reclaimed water on nearby land, an investigation found.


Neighbors unhappy with septic spray issue


I AMiil I I
Fed's QE3
Will efforts by the
Federal Reserve help
the economy?./Page D1
LOCAL NEWS:








Craft show
Inverness Elks put on a
craft show./Page A7
OPINION:
It is
either
hypocrisy or
ignorance that
is at the root
cause of this
unfortunate
turn of events.


NANCY KENNEDY
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writers
People who live along East Teni-
son Street in the Inverness High-
lands near County Road 581 say
something stinks in their
neighborhood.
They say local sewage treatment
companies are dumping waste in a
nearby field as well as other fields
around the county.
One company, Mike Scott Plumb-
ing in Hernando, has applied for a
domestic septage land application
site permit to use a 12-acre portion
of 250 acres of land on Pleasant
Grove Road owned by John
Thomas to dispose treated, re-
claimed water.
Although nothing's been dumped
so far, just the thought of it stinks to
the Inverness group of neighbors.
On Sept. 20, they plan to contest
the permit when Shawn Scott, vice
president of Mike Scott Plumbing,
goes before the Planning and De-
velopment Commission board to
see if he and his company are
approved.
Two weeks ago, more than 20 res-
idents met at the home of Audrey
Forrester to voice their alarm and
concerns.
"It's not all the time, but we smell
something periodically, and we've
been seeing septic trucks,"
Forrester said.
Lauren Stephen, who delivers
mail on Tenison Street, said some-
times she gets a sore throat as she
See Page A4


RECLAIMED WATER IN
FLORIDA
* During the past 20 years,
Florida and California have led
the nation in water reuse.
* Approximately 722 million gal-
lons per day of reclaimed
water was reused in 2011,
representing an average of
38.19 gallons per person per
day.
* Among other things,
reclaimed water can be
used for:
* Golf course, parks, residential
property, highway medians
and other landscaping
irrigation.
* Toilet flushing, car washing,
decorative lakes and
fountains.
* Agricultural uses such as
edible food crops, pasture
lands and feed and fodder
crops.
* Wetlands creation, restoration
and enhancement.
* Industrial use including
facilities washdown,
processing water and cooling
water purposes.
* It cannot be used for:
* Body-contact recreation
(including swimming pools).
* Cooking or drinking.
* Irrigating vegetable and herb
gardens (unless a drip or
bubbler system is used).
-Source: Southwest Florida
Management District


So where does

it all go?
NANCY KENNEDY
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writers
HERNANDO It's a topic
genteel people prefer not to dis-
cuss in polite society, but as the
popular children's book title
suggests, "Everybody Poops."
Everybody pees, too, and it all
has to go somewhere.
Before the 1920s, it often went
wherever there was room, which
included rivers, lakes and the
ocean. By the 1930s, industrial-
ized nations began building treat-
ment plants to treat waste
products. That was ramped up in
1972 with the passage of the fed-
eral Clean Water Act, which pro-
hibited the disposal of untreated
waste into the nation's waterways.
Billions of dollars have gone
into sewage treatment facilities
and the use, or reuse, of the final
result "reclaimed" or "recy-
cled" water has been on the
increase, especially in Florida.
One local company, Hernando-
based Mike Scott Plumbing,
added a septic treatment divi-
sion about five years ago.
Currently, the reclaimed
water is taken to several sites
around the county Crystal
River, Inverness and Hernando.
But before it becomes water, it
goes through a multi-step treat-
ment process.
See WHERE/Page A5


SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:
I


Court to


decide


nuke


plant


funding

PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
The fate of advance fund-
ing for the state's nuclear
power plants will be in the
hands of the Florida
Supreme Court next month.
But the process of ap-
proving advance nuclear
cost recovery requests for
2013 continued this month
before the Florida Public
Service Commission.
Last week, the PSC con-
tinued a hearing on nuclear
cost recovery requests from
Progress Energy Florida
(Duke Energy) and Florida
Power and Light. The
state's two largest power
companies are asking the
PSC to approve about $296
million in advanced cost re-
covery fees from their
Florida customers. PSC
staff recommendations are
due Nov 7 and a decision is
expected when the hearing
resumes Nov 20.
Nuclear cost recovery
was established by the state
legislature in 2006. It has
been a controversial financ-
ing method that allows util-
ity companies to use
advanced billing to recover
the cost of nuclear plants
and plant enhancements
ahead of time.
For example, in 2012, ac-
cording to a Progress En-
ergy press release, the
company was seeking to re-
cover $157.6 million in nu-
clear costs, which included
investments of $135.3 mil-
lion in the proposed Levy
County plant project and
$22.2 million to increase
production capability at the
Crystal River Nuclear
Plant
For power customers, it
meant an additional $5.20 a
month on a 1,000 kilowatt-
hour bill.
For 2013, Progress En-
ergy is requesting $145 mil-
lion. It breaks down to $105
million for constructing two
new nuclear reactors in
Levy County and $40 mil-
lion to increase the output
at the Crystal River nuclear
plant (Costs incurred prior
to 2012).
According to Progress
Energy spokeswoman
See Page A7

PSC MEETING
Oral arguments
challenging the
constitutionality of the
pre- payment statute
are scheduled to begin
Thursday, Oct. 4.


Poll: Strong support for campaign spending limits


Famous seat
Did composer Leonard
Bernstein own this
chair?/Page E4

Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................D6
Crossword ..............A12
Editorial...... .............C3
Entertainment ..........B8
Horoscope ................B8
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B8
M ovies ....................A12
Obituaries ................A6
Together..................A14


6 111|171J10!I07 oI


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Amer-
icans don't like all the cash
that's going to super politi-
cal action committees and
other outside groups that
are pouring millions of dol-
lars into races for president
and Congress.
More than eight in 10
Americans in a poll by The
Associated Press and the
National Constitution Cen-
ter support limits on the
amount of money given to
groups trying to influence
U.S. elections.
But they might have to
change the Constitution
first. The Supreme Court's
2010 decision in the Citi-
zens United case removed
limits on independent cam-
paign spending by busi-


nesses and labor unions,
calling it a constitutionally
protected form of political
speech.
"Corporate donations, I
think that is one of the
biggest problems today,"
said Walter L. Cox Sr., 86, of
Cleveland. "They are buy-
ing the White House. They
are buying public office."
Cox, a Democrat, was one
of many people in the poll
who do not, in spite of the
high court ruling, think cor-
porate and union campaign
spending should be
unlimited.
The strong support for
limiting the amount of
money in politics stood
alongside another poll find-
ing that shows Americans
have a robust view of the
right to free speech.


Unlimited speech, limited donations
AP-NCC poll finds few favor limits on speech, but most
support limits on corporate donations to PACs.
Do you think there should or should not be limits on the
amount of money corporations, unions and other
organizations can contribute to outside organizations trying to
influence campaigns for president, Senate and U.S. House?
Should be limits: 83% Should not be limits: 13% Don't know: 4%


Do you think freedom of speech should mean that people
should have the right to say what they believe...


even if they take
positions that seem
deeply offensive to most
people: 71%


except when they
want to say things that
seem deeply offensive
to most people: 26% ..


Don't know/
Refused: 4% *


SOURCE: AP-National Constitution Center Poll


Seventy-one percent of
the 1,006 adults in the AP-
NCC poll said people


should have the right to say
what they please, even if
their positions are deeply


ON THE NET
Poll: www.ap-gfkpoll.
com
National Constitution
Center: http://
constitutioncenter.org/

offensive to others.
The ringing endorsement
of First Amendment free-
doms matched the public's
view of the Constitution as
an enduring document,
even as Americans hold the
institutions of government,
other than the military, in
very low regard.
"The Constitution is 225
years old and 70 percent of
Americans continue to be-
lieve that it's an enduring
document that's relevant
See PageA2


HIGH
90
LOW
72





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney campaigns Friday in Painesville, Ohio.


POLL
Continued from Page Al

today, even as they lose faith
in some of the people who
have been given their job
descriptions by the Consti-
tution," said David Eisner,
the constitution center's
chief executive officer
For the first time in the
five years the poll has been
conducted, more than six in
10 Americans favor giving
same-sex couples the same
government benefits as op-
posite-sex married couples.
That's an issue, in one form
or another, the Supreme
Court could take up in the
term that begins Oct. 1.
More than half of Ameri-
cans support legal recogni-
tion of gay marriage,
although that number is un-
changed from a year ago.
In the past three years,
though, there has been both
a significant uptick in sup-
port for gay marriage, from
46 percent to 53 percent,
and a decline in opposition
to it, from 53 percent to
42 percent.
Loretta Hamburg, 68, of
Woodland Hills, Calif., tried
to explain why support for
gay marriage lags behind
backing for same-sex
benefits.
"If they've been in a long
relationship and lived to-
gether and if it's a true rela-
tionship, long lasting, it
would be OK to have the


same rights," Hamburg said.
But she does not support
a same-sex union because
"it would open up a lot of
other things, like a man
wanting two or three wives.
I believe in marriage. They
could call it something else
if they want to give it a dif-
ferent definition. But I don't
think it's right and that's
what I feel."
The poll also found a
slight increase in the share
ofAmericans who say voting
rights for minorities require
legal protection, although
the public is divided over
whether such laws still are
needed. Sixty percent of De-
mocrats say those protec-
tions are still needed,
compared with 40 percent
of independents and 33 per-
cent of Republicans.
One potential influence
was that the survey was con-
ducted amid lawsuits and
political rhetoric over the
validity of voter identifica-
tion laws in several states.
The laws mainly have been
backed by Republican law-
makers who say they want to
combat voter fraud. Democ-
rats, citing academic studies
that found there is very lit-
tle voter fraud, have called
the laws thinly veiled at-
tempts to make it harder for
Democratic-leaning minor-
ity voters to cast ballots.
Two areas in which there
has been little change in
public attitudes in spite of
major events are gun con-
trol and President Barack


Obama's health care
overhaul.
No matter that the
Supreme Court upheld the
health law, nearly three-
fourths of Americans say the
government should not have
the power to require people
to buy health insurance or
pay a penalty. It didn't mat-
ter in the poll whether the
penalty was described as a
tax or a fine.
The July 20 mass shooting
at a suburban Denver movie
theater that killed 12 people
and wounded 58 others did
not move opinion on gun
rights, where 49 percent op-
pose gun control measures
and 43 percent said limits
on gun ownership would not
infringe on the constitu-
tional right to bear arms.
Retired Army Col. Glenn
Werther, 62, called the Col-
orado shootings a "horrible
thing," but said gun control
is not the answer to curbing
violence. \
"There are crazy people
out there. How you monitor
that, I have no idea," said
Werther, a resident of Broad
Brook, Conn., and a member
of the National Rifle Associ-
ation. "People are going to
get guns that should not
have them."
The National Constitution
Center is a nonpartisan,
nonprofit organization that
operates a Philadelphia
museum and other educa-
tional programs about the
Constitution.
The AP-NCC Poll was con-


President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks Thursday in Golden, Colo.
ducted by GfK Roper Public 20, using landline and cell- The margin of sampling
Affairs & Corporate Com- phone interviews with 1,006 error was plus or minus 3.9
munications from Aug. 16 to randomly chosen adults. percentage points.


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A2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012







Page A3 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ABOVE: Austin Spears, Ron Researe and Pete Pohge pick up paper, cans and cigarette butts along the banks of Cooter Pond during the Adopt-A-Shore cleanup project
Saturday. BELOW: Kaely Adkins, Damien Westfall, Garrett Adkins and Deven Reed come out of the wetlands next to a pier at Fort Island Beach. The Crystal River Key Club
members spent Saturday making the environment a better place.



PRESERVING

NATURE'S

PLAYGROUND .


Volunteers clean up trash one pieceat a time .
NANCY KENNEDY tional data and publishes an item-by-
Staff Writer item, location-by-location report of ,-
everything found.
Wearing pink boots decorated with In 2009, volunteers picked up 1.1 mil-
tiny black-and-white cows, 9-year-old lion plastic bags and enough cups,
Shyanne Waller walked through Wallace plates, knives, forks and spoons for a pic-
Brooks Park in Inverness on Saturday, nic for 100,000 people.
carrying a rake taller than she is. After the groups finished picking up
She was there with her friends from trash, everything went into designated
Ease's Rough Riders 4-H group picking receptacles and were taken to the
up trash during the Adopt-A- county landfill to be weighed, -
Shore cleanup day, part of Citrus explained Dana Fields, CRHS
20/20's 17th Save Our Waters Key Club advisor
Week, Sept. 14 through Sept. 22. "What we're finding people
More than 580 volunteers across are just dumping their trash
Citrus County signed up to partic- when there are trash cans
ipate in this national event, which For more nearbythey can use just as eas-
is part of the Ocean Conservancy's photos, click ily," she said.
International Coastal Cleanup. on this story at ily," she said.
International Coastal Cleanup www.chronicle The goal is to change people's
According to information from online.com. behavior to stop tossing their
the Ocean Conservancy, in the trash on the beaches and wa-
past 25 years, nearly 9 million volunteers ters' edges so it won't make it into the
have cleaned 145 million pounds of trash water and destroy the ecosystem.
from the shores of lakes, streams, rivers, As Shyanne Waller said, "We're pick-
gulfs and oceans. ing up trash so that the animals can be
Beginning bright and early at 8 a.m., safe here."
Inverness Rotarians Eloy Nufiez, Judge Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy
Mark Yerman and Ron Researe joined can be reached at nkennedy@
members of Boy Scout Troop 457 and chronicleonline.com or 352-564-2927.
Big Brothers Big Sisters "big" Pete
Pohge and his "little" Austin Spears to LEFT: Inverness Rotary
clean around Cooter Pond. For the Boy member and Boy Scout
Scouts, this was one of six to eight com- Troop 457 scoutmas-
munity service projects they participate tI ter John Murphy gave
in each year For Judge Yerman, it was volunteers their march-
about "service above self," not just a Ro- ing orders before they
tary slogan but something he believes in. 4 'ki: blanked Cooter Pond
Across the county at Fort Island Beach, looking for litter.
more than 20 Crystal River High School RIGHT: Crystal River
students, members of the school's Key High School Key Club
Club, gave up their Saturday morning jump Kaely Adkins
sleep to diligently log every item of trash jumped right into the
they picked up every plastic grocery muck around the Fort
bag, soda bottle or can and food wrapper Island Gulf Beach Pier
One group found a fishing net, bait con- on Saturday to retrieve
tainers and a light bulb. several beer bottles .
Each year, Ocean Conservancy com- thrown into the
piles and analyzes the combined na- wetland area.


Campaign TRAIL


The Citrus County Chronicle's po-
litical forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18, at College of Central Florida
in Lecanto. Information: Mike Wright,
352-563-3228.
Pope John Paul II Catholic
School will have a candidate's forum
at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24, at the
school on County Road 490 in
Lecanto.
The Beverly Hills Civic Associa-
tion candidates' forum is at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle,


Beverly Hills. Information: Rosella
Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic Association
is hosting a candidates' forum at
7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.
Supervisor of Elections Susan
Gill is sponsoring a candidates forum
targeted for high school students at
7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, at Citrus
High School.
Sandy Balfour, Republican for
superintendent of schools, and An-


gela Vick, Republican for clerk of
courts, will speak at the 6:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Sept. 18, meeting of the
Women's Political Network of Citrus
County at Citrus County Resource
Center, 2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto, off County Road 486. Infor-
mation: Jeanne Mclntosh, 352-484-
9975.
Winn Webb, Republican for sher-
iff, has two fundraisers planned: 6 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 17, at Neon Leon's Zy-
deco Steakhouse, 10350 W. Yulee


Drive, Homosassa. Information: email
winn.webb@gmail.com. Also, noon to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at the Inver-
ness Women's Club, 1715 Forest
Drive, Inverness. Information: Rosella
Hale, 746-2545.
Sandy Balfour, Republican for
superintendent of schools, will have a
fundraiser from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 21, at Skeet's Family Barbecue,
3871 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills. Information: Debbie,
352-613-6507.


Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat for superintendent of
schools, will have a golf tournament
fundraiser at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30,
at Sugarmill Woods Golf & Country
Club. Information: 352-302-9843.
The Campaign Trail is a listing of
political happenings for the 2012
election season. Send events or
campaign fundraisers to Mike
Wright at mwright@chronicleonline.
com.
-From staff reports






A4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


NEIGHBORS
Continued from Page Al

drives through this neighborhood.
Christine DeTomasi said she's
concerned that whatever is put on
the land will seep into the aquifer
and end up in their wells.
"People dump their prescrip-
tion drugs down the toilet," she
said.
From there it goes into their
septic tanks, which eventually gets
pumped out by a septic company
and is hauled off- and then it has
to go somewhere just not in
their backyard.
On July 20, every resident
within a 500-foot radius of the
property in consideration was
sent a notice from the county
Planning and Development Com-
mission informing them of the ap-
plication and inviting them to a
public hearing Aug. 2. About 30
attended.
After the meeting, Shawn Scott
began receiving "hate mail,"
emails accusing him of everything
from wanting to dump raw sewage
on produce crops to secretly plan-
ning to include hospital and
morgue hazardous materials and
even decomposed body parts.
He said nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth, but people be-
lieve what they want to believe.
mEN
On Aug. 30, Valerie Seconi wrote
and sent a letter to 37 people -
local and state legislators and rep-
resentatives, county people, peo-
ple she hopes will come to their
side.
She wrote: "This permit would
allow several septic waste compa-
nies to dump septic waste and
sewage 500 feet from a residential
area of private homes, including
their water wells ... they collect
from homes and businesses and
hospitals, human waste and
sewage.
"No matter how it's treated, it's
toxic and pollutes the aquifer and
the land to which it's being ap-
plied. Then this land is used for
growing fruits and vegetables and


the sewage becomes part of the
produce itself."
Seconi ended her letter with a
plea for an investigation into the
practice of domestic septage ap-
plication and help them stop the
issuance of this permit
iME
It used to be a septic company
didn't need to get a county permit
to dispose of its waste. Instead, it
needed an agricultural permit.
For years, septic companies in
the area have been using fields
around the county for waste
disposal.
"We searched for land that's ap-
proved by both the county and the
health department," Scott said.
"There's an area of Crystal River
around (County Road) 495 I'd
love to bring it out there, but find-
ing out who owns it and all that is
a big hassle. There is a field out
there that other companies use,
and I actually brought Mr Thomas
there because he was worried
about odor. For him, his land is re-
ally important to him."
Thomas, a longtime county cat-
tle farmer, concurred.
"Our land to us is our livelihood.
The last thing that we're going to
do is do anything to damage our
land," Thomas said. "My family
has been here since 1881 in Citrus
County. We've always had land.
We've always treated it the best we
could. We're not going to do any-
thing to harm it."
Thomas, who has never before
allowed septage application on
his land, expressed confidence in
Scott's business reputation.
"I was in the construction busi-
ness for 45 years. I've known Mike
Scott for 35 years," Thomas said.
"They employ over 100 people in
Citrus and Sumter counties and
they're not going to do anything
wrong. They're going by the law."
Thomas said he was aware a
complaint had been received
about an odor. He said he was vis-
ited last week by Florida Fish and
Wildlife (FWC) officers.
"They told me they had had re-
ports they could smell the mate-
rial," Thomas said. "I went back
there and showed the people the


I went back

there and showed

the people the site

where's it's

supposed to be at.

There was one track

in the field where my

tractor went through

there. We have not

allowed anything

to be dumped

here.

John Thomas
owner of the land where the
proposed spray field will be.

site where's it's supposed to be at
There was one track in the field
where my tractor went through
there. We have not allowed any-
thing to be dumped here."
Thomas said dump sites exist
all over the county.
"We will not dump anything on
our property until it's approved by
the health department," Thomas
said.
The land that would be used for
septage application would be
fenced off from other lands on his


property and would not be used
for agricultural purposes until
those uses would be allowed.
After a period of time, regulations
would allow a land owner to use
the land for grazing or to cut hay
Thomas said he follows govern-
ment regulations so consumers
can be confident in the quality of
local produce. American-
produced food is safer than food
from other countries that have no
regulations.
"I'm just a farmer out here try-
ing to make a living," Thomas said.
MEN
Scott said what he will dispose
on the land is odorless treated
waste water, not smelly sludge.
(See accompanying story to read
about the treatment process.)
He said he has not released a
single drop and can't and won't
- until he gets a permit.
"And then we still have to meet
with the health department and
start to follow their procedures,"
he said.
He said the parcel of land he
wants to use is 750 feet away from
Tenison Street. He plans to build a
road away from the residential
area so people won't hear his
trucks. They won't work on week-
ends or holidays. They're going to
build a fence to keep wildlife
away
Scott said they would dispose
two or three times a week.
"The water and that's what it


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

is is to be used on an area
where there's cattle, not on pro-
duce fields," he said.
The Tenison Street residents
aren't convinced. They smell
something.
Earlier this week, Audrey
Forester called Will Bryant,
county environmental manager,
about a stench of raw sewage.
Bryant said Thursday he had
gotten several calls that week
about the same thing and sent
people out to investigate the area
in question. They discovered a
house in foreclosure, with people
still living in it and a leaking, fail-
ing septic tank.
The smell is what the residents
think it is, Bryant said, but it's not
what they think it is it's not a
septic company disposing treated
waste water.
Forester acknowledged even if
Mike Scott Plumbing is not re-
sponsible for the past and current
smell, the Tenison Street resi-
dents are still going to oppose the
company's application Sept. 20.
They've contacted a lawyer,
planning to contest Scott with
everything they've got.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleonline. cor
or 352-564-2927.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer @chronicleonline. cor
or 352-564-2916.


,egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



City of Inverness ............................. A8


City of Inverness ............................. A8

Meeting Notices .............................. D8

Lien Notices ..................................... D8

SMiscellaneous Notices ................... D8


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
88 75
88 78
90 74
88 69
88 76
86 71
88 79
90 73
87 76


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
PC
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
T.illi i :. -
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a moderate chop. Chance of showers
and thunderstorms today.


HI LO PR HI LO PR
91 78 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Eclsve daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 72
_-... Scattered PM showers, isolated
storm, rain chance 40%
SF MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
S High: 89 Low: 74
Showers and storms, rain chance 70%

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 75
....;... i ... Showers and storms, breezy, rain chance 70%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 88/71
Record 97/62
Normal 90/69
Mean temp. 80
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday trace
Total for the month 3.00 in.
Total for the year 52.67 in.
Normal for the year 42.08 in.
*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.05 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 63%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grasses
Today's count: 3.8/12
Monday's count: 5.9
Tuesday's count: 6.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/16 SUNDAY 6:01 -6:26 12:39
9/17 MONDAY 6:55 12:41 7:21 1:08
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ..... ... 7:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:16 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................7:47 A.M.
SPT.22 SEPT. 2 OCT.8 OCT. 15 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 7:48 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. S.:.ni- n,-.. p1 a -irii,.: ir 1 ,, q1. iair, i,:,r ai l.:,n i
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:21 a/2:14 a 6:49 p/2:27 p
Crystal River" 4:42 a/11:49 a 5:10 p/-
Withlacoochee* 2:29 a/9:37 a 2:57 p/9:59 p
Homosassa** 5:31 a/1:13 a 5:59 p/1:26 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
6:51 a/2:49 a 7:34 p/3:09 p
5:12 a/12:11 a 5:55 p/12:31 p
2:59 a/10:19 a 3:42 p/10:34 p
6:01 a/1:48 a 6:44 p/2:08 p


Gulf water
temperature


83
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness n/a n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being e ualed or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is sub ect to revision. In no event
will the District or the united States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at 352 796-7211.

THE NATION


,/ :is


qtos



30s
,40s
S 50s
- "'.
30s


p i 3. -


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burilngton, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


70s BI 6l0ng 6s


-
BMp 90cDFW

EIPa.so Meinopf- 70s -.
----- ,so- -- ,80 "~
Hnuslon


80s ,
-l


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L
70 55 13 s 68 42
78 49 s 87 58
81 54 ts 76 59
83 68 sh 86 68
75 62 s 75 58
79 67 ts 80 62
77 62 pc 78 60
87 53 sh 68 38
85 63 ts 86 69
91 58 s 79 47
74 63 .12 s 69 53
68 52 s 69 52
67 58 .03 s 64 42
88 65 pc 85 69
77 57 pc 78 57
86 59 ts 81 65
79 50 s 78 60
76 50 s 78 54
68 50 s 74 52
87 62 sh 86 67
74 48 s 77 54
72 57 s 69 37
77 63 ts 80 67
87 50 pc 85 50
80 52 s 81 59
73 49 s 77 58
76 49 s 86 63
77 53 pc 80 59
74 57 s 75 52
73 60 02 s 72 44
89 70 ts 83 69
74 50 s 77 54
88 64 ts 87 70
95 71 s 96 73
72 66 .60 ts 77 66
98 72 s 79 67
77 55 pc 81 60
83 69 ts 83 67
74 50 s 77 60
85 52 pc 83 54
89 70 ts 87 70
90 67 ts 87 69
82 64 ts 82 64


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


-60s

70s

DC'
'-BOS

Ala~M
aeBt


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 90 75 ts 88 73
New York City 73 60 s 75 59
Norfolk 75 65 pc 80 63
Oklahoma City 66 59 c 84 62
Omaha 78 50 s 81 59
Palm Springs 10377 s 104 77
Philadelphia 76 61 s 76 57
Phoenix 98 78 s 99 75
Pittsburgh 71 53 s 71 49
Portland, ME 73 58 .01 s 69 44
Portland, Ore 82 54 s 84 55
Providence, R.I. 74 59 s 71 50
Raleigh 80 61 c 80 63
Rapid City 91 46 pc 73 45
Reno 89 53 s 86 52
Rochester, NY 65 50 s 67 49
Sacramento 93 56 s 94 59
St. Louis 69 57 pc 79 60
St. Ste. Marie 62 39 s 74 59
Salt Lake City 89 57 s 85 54
San Antonio 81 66 ts 82 65
San Diego 10172 s 82 67
San Francisco 64 53 pc 69 54
Savannah 86 67 trace pc 86 70
Seattle 72 52 s 77 53
Spokane 83 54 s 78 49
Syracuse 69 54 s 69 45
Topeka 75 46 pc 78 59
Washington 78 64 pc 79 62
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 106 Corona, Calif. LOW 23 Fraser, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 89/78/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 64/55/pc Mexico City
Athens 79/69/sh Montreal
Beijing 79/62/s Moscow
Berlin 69/53/pc Paris
Bermuda 82/73/pc Rio
Cairo 96/76/s Rome
Calgary 55/39/pc Sydney
Havana 88/73/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 87/77/s Toronto
Jerusalem 89/71/s Warsaw


80/64/pc
64/56/c
90/64/s
75/55/ts
66/47/s
61/44/sh
74/51/s
86/65/s
78/59/s
70/52/pc
86/73/ts
69/56/pc
65/47/pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY -T


HRKONICLE
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To start your subscription:
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N 1:1 il

SInverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. g square
C "
c 106 W. Main
S 41 4 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ............................... ...................................... ...... Editor, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 5
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ .............................. Online M manager, 563-3255
John Murphy........................................................... Classified Manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................... Business Manager, 564-2908
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions........................................ Charlie Brennan, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............... ........................... Mike Arnold, 564-3255
Com munity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14 more whooping cranes to join flock in Louisiana


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS More than a
dozen young whooping cranes are
expected to arrive this fall in
southwest Louisiana, doubling the
number in a flock being reintro-
duced near the area where the
state's last wild flock lived in the


1930s, the Louisiana Department
of Wildlife and Fisheries says.
Twenty-six whoopers have been
brought to Louisiana, but preda-
tors and disease killed nearly half
of them. Whooping cranes are
some of the world's largest and
rarest birds.
State wildlife biologist Carrie


Salyers said the next 14 are tenta-
tively scheduled to arrive Nov 28.
The department is trying to
spread the word about the need to
protect Louisiana's whooping
cranes with billboards, radio an-
nouncements and workshops
teaching middle- and high-school
science teachers and environ-


mental educators about them.
The workshops offering a $75
stipend, lesson plans on topics
such as endangered species,
ecosystems and bird reproduction,
and a GPS unit to use for teaching
- began in August The next work-
shops are planned Nov 12 in
Shreveport and Feb. 22 during the


Louisiana Educators Environmen-
tal Symposium in Baton Rouge.
Whooping cranes are the rarest
and tallest birds in North America,
known for their elaborate dance
and unique call, according to the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
They have white feathers, black
wing tips and a red and black mask.


WHERE
Continued from Page Al

Recently, Shawn Scott, vice
president at Mike Scott
Plumbing, gave the Chronicle
a tour of the company's treat-
ment facility in Hernando.
"After we pump your sep-
tic tank, we bring it here -
and we don't collect any-
thing from the hospital or
the morgue as some people
think," Scott said.
Trucks holding between
3,000 and 4,500 gallons un-
load as often as three times
a day Everything passes
through a three-filter sys-
tem, catching all the paper
and solids before going
through a grinder pump,
and then once it becomes
liquid it goes into one of
three 10,000-gallon under-
ground tanks.
The paper and solids are
put into a container and
taken to the landfill by
ED.S. Disposal.
Next, lime is added and
mixed for 24 hours. The
lime helps to further break
down any remaining sludge
into liquid, raises the pH
level and kills the odor and
pathogens, making it inhos-
pitable to bacteria growth.
Vince Cautero, director of
the county's Planning and
Development Department,
said Scott's application was
the first request to spread
septage he had seen since
returning to his depart-
ment two years ago. In his
experience in other commu-
nities, Cautero said the
number of applications was
not dependent on popula-
tion growth as much as on
policy about where septage
should go: agricultural lands
or into a sewage facility.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Shawn Scott says his facility in Hernando is equipped to handle large quantities of wastewater with high-tech equipment
that, when treated, is safe and clean.


"It's generally common in
rural communities that it's
spread out on land where
you have wide spaces,"
Cautero said. "When you get
more population involved, it
becomes a more con-
tentious issue."
Cautero explained how the
application process worked
for his department to recom-
mend the request to the Cit-
rus County Planning and
Development Commission.
"We look at the compatibil-


ity issues with the surround-
ing properties and make sure
the land use is acceptable
and that the conditional use
standards can be met in the
Land Development Code,"
Cautero said. "We look to the
health department to review
and assure that the docu-
mentation is in order and
that the applicant can pro-
ceed to get permits from the
agencies they need to and
that the health department
would monitor it"


After 2016, the practice
will be stopped, but cur-
rently approved sites will
still function.
"In this particular case,
the land is agriculture. This
has been a controversial
issue for some time, and my


understanding is that the
Florida Legislature is out-
lawing the spreading of sep-
tage on property in the year
2016," Cautero said. "My un-
derstanding is that septage
will have to be held in a fa-
cility that will be permitted


by the state."
With Scott's application,
Cautero said he requested a
process to give members of
the public the opportunity
to discuss it.
"For 30 years, when I've
worked in different commu-
nities, (septage spreading)
has been allowed by right on
agricultural lands due to the
Right To Farm Act," Cautero
said. "Our opinion on that is
that although someone
might claim that you could
do that under the Right to
Farm Act, that it would be
better to notify the property
owners surrounding so that
they would be able to state
their concerns at a public
meeting. So we asked the
applicant to go through the
conditional use process and
he agreed. So that's why we
are at this process."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, cor or 352-564-2927.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916.


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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


)hit/ivriPC


Lillian
Altman, 70
It is with great sadness
that the family of Lillian Alt-
man, age 70, announce her
passing. Lillian died Thurs-
day, September 13, 2012,
passing qui-
etly and
peacefully
while in her
sleep (we
should all
be so lucky).
She is
survived by .
her Partner Liian
In Life, Altman
Stanley
Major, as well as her sons,
Gary Daniel, Stan Major III,
Lance Tabano, her beauti-
ful, caring daughter-in-law,
Eve, and three beautiful
granddaughters, Kristen
Altman, Marissa Buck, and
Kristin Buck.
Lillian's entire family
would like to thank the
nurses, staff, and the entire
Hospice of Citrus County for
their dedication, profes-
sionalism, and caring in the
families darkest moment In
addition, the family would
like to thank Woodland Ter-
race Skilled Nursing Facil-
ity for their comfort, and
tending to every need Lil-
lian or the family had dur-
ing her brief stay, especially
Mary, who cared for Lillian
like she was her own mom.
We would like to extend a
special thanks to CMH's
hospital doctor, "Dr Boris"
for his expertise, and his
personal interest into the
well being and care of Lil-
lian. Finally, the family
would like to thank the
friends and family who have
either visited, called, or sent
a message thru Facebook
that brightened up my Lil-
lian's spirits. Words cannot
express the gratitude and
how much they meant to the
family
The Service of Remem-
brance for Lillian will be
7:00 PM, Monday, Septem-
ber 17, 2012 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. The family will re-
ceive friends Sunday and
Monday from 2:00 4:00 PM
and 6:00 8:00 PM at the
chapel. The family requests
expressions of sympathy
take the form of memorial
donations to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Ernest 'Bud'
Hutcheson, 65
HOMOSASSA
Ernest "Bud" Hutcheson,
65, of Homosassa, died
Wednesday, Sept. 12,2012, at
Citrus Memorial Health
System.
No services are planned
at this time.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
free and paid obituar-
ies. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660
for details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.






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::I


Robert
Trent, 77
LECANTO
Robert Lee Trent, 77, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
Sunday, Sept 9,2012, at 12:30
p.m. in Hos-
pice care.
Robert was
a retiree
from Snap-
on Tool &
Corp.
Robert's ill-
ness lasted
for several Robert
years. Trent
He was
preceded in death by
daughters, Linda and
Shirley Ann, parents and
two brothers. Survivors in-
clude his wife, Shirley;
brother, Marvin of North
Carolina; sister, Margie of
Tennessee; sons, William of
Kentucky, Matthew of Ocala
and Dylan of Lecanto;
stepchildren, Lonnie and
Barbara; granddaughter,
Jennifer and Bradford of
Kentucky, and Nathan in
U.S. Air Force; a host of
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be at Bible Baptist Church
in Crystal River at 2 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 22,2012. Pas-
tor Tommy Reeves will offi-
ciate. McGan Cremation
Services was in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.



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Lester
Wulkan, 89
INVERNESS
Lester Wulkan, of Inver-
ness, Fla., went home to be
with his Lord in heaven on
Sept. 12, 2012, though the
many family and friends
who were honored to know
and love him in this life will
always keep his memory
alive.
Les was
born Nov.
23, 1922, in

Minn., to
Lynn and
Joselyn
Wulkan, the
second of Lester
four chil- Wulkan
dren. He
grew up on the family dairy
farm, where he developed
his core values the im-
portance of faith, family and
hard work for success in
life. He was academically
and athletically gifted, ex-
celling in math and science,
and playing ball on the state
championship Hector base-
ball team. He enrolled in
the University of Minnesota,
where he eventually earned
a bachelor's degree in elec-
trical engineering and
played on the varsity
wrestling team, and was in-
ducted into the engineering
honor society Tau Beta Pi
upon his graduation in 1944.
His education was inter-
rupted by World War II,
however, and Les joined the
Navy in 1943. He returned
to UM to complete his
B.E.E. degree and gradu-
ated from the Naval Acad-
emy in Annapolis, Md., in
1945, commissioned as en-
sign. He served in the Navy
as a supervising officer in
electronics, building naval
ships at the ironworks in
Bath, Maine. He then
served on the USS Bausell,
a destroyer in the Atlantic
Fleet, in Cuba and Puerto
Rico, until the war came to
a close. Lester was dis-
charged from active duty in
1946 and began his 41-year
career in electrical engi-
neering with Honeywell
Inc., though he continued
his Navy service as a re-
serve officer until 1954. Les
married Marcella Janet
Hein, the mother of his four
children, on July 23, 1946.
They resided in Minneapo-
lis, Minn., until the Honey-

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well Aeronautics Division
opened its new plant in
Clearwater, Fla., and the
family relocated there in
1957. At Honeywell, Les
served as development and
evaluation section head and
manager, and later as inde-
pendent research and de-
velopment liaison and
coordinator. He retired in
1975, but continued to work
for years as a consultant on
special projects at Honey-
well. Lester was the original
"do-it-yourselfer," and took
many continuing education
courses in auto repair and
body work, as well as in
business and finance. He
was also a lifelong stamp
and coin collector and avid
golfer.
Les was preceded in
death by his first wife, Mar-
cella, and daughter, Linda J.
Lombardo, both in 1976. A
year later, he met Mary
Moberley, and they were
married Jan. 21, 1978. Les
accepted Mary's six chil-
dren as his own. Through-
out his life, Les Wulkan was
a devout Christian and
faithful church member,
serving as longtime church
treasurer and elder at the
Largo Alliance Church, and
later joining the First Bap-
tist Church of Inverness
when he and Mary moved to
their retirement home in In-
verness. Lester was also a
faithful and dedicated ser-
vant for many years as a
board member of Child
Evangelism Fellowship,
Upper Pinellas and West
Pasco counties. Les and
Mary were able to travel
and enjoy their retirement,
taking trips to the Holy
Land and Western Europe,
before Les developed the
Parkinson's disease that
ended his life in this world.
Les was also preceded in
death by his sister, Geneva
Testa; and by stepdaughter
Nancy S. Henderson.
He is survived by his lov-

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ing and faithful wife, Mary
Wulkan; two siblings, Wes-
ley Wulkan of Hector, Minn.,
and Arlene (Einar) Swanson
of Las Cruces, N.M.; three
children, Janet (Gerald) El-
lison, Springfield, Mo., Mar-
sha (Chris) Sykes, Quincy,
Fla., and Timothy L. (Robin)
Wulkan, Largo, Fla.; five
stepchildren, Harry R.
Moberley, St. Petersburg,
Fla., Susan (Bruce) Bartlett,
St. Petersburg, Virginia L.
Moberley, Inverness,
William M. Moberley,
Huntsville, Ala., and David
L. (Cheryl) Moberley, Holi-
day, Fla.; and nine grand-
children, Shannon (Mark)
Bailey, Mark (Mary Ann) El-
lison, Timothy C. (Fatima)
Wulkan, Randal Wulkan,
Chella Sykes, Kyle Bartlett,
Brant Bartlett, Mary Esther
Moberley and David Lester
Moberley
We will remember Lester
Wulkan as a steadfastly hon-
est, faithful, energetic, hard-
working, God-loving family
man with a big heart, whose
humility and personal in-
tegrity were an inspiration
to all who knew him. Rest in
peace, Les. We love you and
know you are in a better
place.
The service of remem-
brance for Mr. Wulkan will
be at 11 a.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 19, 2012, at the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home with the Rev.
Donnie Seagle officiating.
Interment, with military
honors, will follow at
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell. The family will
receive friends from 5 to 7
p.m. Tuesday at the chapel.
An additional memorial
service will be at 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, Sept. 22, 2012, at St.
Paul's United Methodist
Church, Largo, Fla. The
family requests expressions
of sympathy take the form of
memorial donations to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
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Betty
Woehlk, 76
CRYSTAL RIVER
Betty Ann Woehlk, 76, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Wednesday, Sept. 14,
2012, in Inglis, Fla.
She was born Oct. 12,
1935, in St Petersburg, Fla.,
and came to Citrus County
23 years ago. She was a re-
tired postal clerk for the
U.S. Postal Service in St Pe-
tersburg, with 22 years of
service. She was a volunteer
and attended the First Bap-
tist Church of Inglis. She
was a very loving person.
Her husband, Fred
Woehlk, preceded her in
death April 6, 2002. She is
survived by her sister, Ruby
Hazelief of Fort Pierce, Fla.;
and many loving nieces and
nephews.
A funeral service will be
conducted at 2 p.m. Tues-
day, Sept. 18, 2012, at the
First Baptist Church of In-
glis. Friends may call one
hour prior to service time.
Private interment will be at
the Memorial Park Ceme-
tery in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
See DEATHS/Page A7





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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Lillian 'Pinky'
Castro, 72
HOMOSASSA
Lillian (Lily) Marie
"Pinky" Castro (Hoppe), 72,
of Homosassa, Fla., for-
merly of Derby, N.Y, en-
tered into rest peacefully on
Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, at
her home in Homosassa.
Lily worked at Wal-Mart for
the past 10 years. She made
many friends and was loved
by everyone. She always
had a smile on her face and
loved helping her cus-
tomers. She had a love for
gardening, puzzles and
going to the Casino to play
her favorite "Miss Kitty" slot
machine. She will be missed
by all.
She was the beloved wife
of the late Joseph Castro;
loving mother of Douglas
(Dawn) Hoppe of Findlay,
Pa., Mark Hoppe and Car-
olyn Harmon of Homosassa;
loving grandmother of Crys-
tal and Justin Hoppe,
Joseph Harmon, Mark,
Michael (Bee) and Madylin
Hoppe; great-grandmother
of Kinsley Hoppe; beloved
sister of Linda (Ronald)
Petrus of Lake View, N.Y,
the late Janie (late Charles)
Morgan and the late Harvey
Wightman; also survived by
several nieces and
nephews.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be 7 to 9
p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18,2012,
at the Crystal River Moose
Lodge. Come and celebrate
Lily's beautiful life with us.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Joyce
Earles, 77
DUNNELLON
Joyce B. Earles, 77, Dun-
nellon, Fla., passed away
Tuesday, Sept 11, 2012, after
a two-year battle with can-
cer She was born in Har-
risonburg, Va., and moved to
Dunnellon from Washing-
ton, D.C., in 1997. She is a
member of the Dunnellon
Garden Club, attended the
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church and the Christian
Women's Club. She enjoyed
reading, listening to music,
decorating, flowers, the arts
and theater, watching the
travel channel and travel-
ing, especially cruising and
her trips to Europe.
She is the wife of Calvin
Earles; a sister to Nancy
(Nelson) Hess, Harrisburg,
Va., Betty (Richard) Payner,
Clemens, N.C., and Bobby
(JoAnn) Burkholder, Ruck-
ersville, Va.; and several
nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will
be at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept.
17, at The Roberts Funeral
Home, Dunnellon, with Pas-
tor Jeffrey Welch presiding.
The family suggests dona-
tions in the memory of Mrs.
Earles may be made to the
Legacy House, 9505 S.W
110th St, Ocala, FL 34481 or
The American Cancer Soci-
ety, Marion County Office,
2201 S.E. 30th Ave. No. 301,
Ocala, FL 34471. Online con-
dolences may be offered at
robertsofdunnellon.com.

DEADLINE
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Submissions received
after 3 p.m. will appear
in later publications.


LOCAL


Patricia Toft, 86
INVERNESS
Patricia Alice Toft, 86, In-
verness, died Sept. 14, 2012,
at Citrus Memorial hospital.
Patricia was born Nov 21,
1925, to the late Leo and
Genevieve Burke and relo-
cated to this
area in 1968
from East
Troy, Wis.
She was em-
ployed as a
teacher in
the middle
and high
school lev- Patricia
els in both Toft
Michigan
and at Inverness Middle
School. She was a parish-
ioner at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church and served
as a Sunday school teacher
and choir member She en-
joyed playing bridge and
swimming at the Inverness
Golf and Country Club.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her sons, Patrick
(Pam) Toft, Clearwater, Fla.,
and John (Patty) Toft,
Myakka, Fla.; her daughter,
Catherine Densmore, Inver-
ness; her sister, Helen (Jim)
Anderson, Virginia; and six
grandchildren. She was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band of 59 years, Ronald E
Toft, on June 5, 2010; and a
sister, Mary Cummings.
A Mass of Christian burial
will be offered at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012,
from Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church. Burial will
follow at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. The family will receive
friends in visitation at 9 a.m.
prior to the Mass at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The U.S. military
consists of five active-
duty services and their
respective guard and
reserve units: Army,
Marine Corps, Navy, Air
Force and Coast Guard.
U.S. flags denote
military service on local
obituaries.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material are
charged at the same
rates.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 A7


Elks show arts, crafts in Hernando


BROOKE PERRY
Correspondent

On Saturday, vendors and buyers
alike set out for the fourth annual
Elks Lakeside Craft Show at Inver-
ness Elks Lodge in Hernando.
From baked goods to lawn d6cor,
the craft show featured the work of
more than 25 crafstmen and had
something for everyone. Even better,
the profits from the
fee each vendor paid
for a spot, as well as i |i
ticket sales for draw-
ings, will go toward
Elk's charities. For more
For more
One item catching photos, click
many eyes was Jim on this story at
Perez's Birdie Potts. www.chronicle
Parrots, flamingos, online.com.
cranes and pelicans
all make a home on Perez's craft,
which is made from pine and a rub-
ber golf cart tire, flipped inside out.
"I've been making them for about
four months," Perez said. "It was my
wife's idea."
Along with Perez, many newcomers
joined past merchants.
"This show, we have the largest
number of outside vendors, people
are hearing about us," said Judith
Greathouse, who makes "functional
jewelry"
Greathouse's rings, bracelets and
necklaces are great for anyone to
wear, but make it especially simple


COURT
Continued from Page Al

Suzanne Grant, repairs to
the Crystal River nuclear
plant (CR3) are not covered
by this funding source.
Duke Energy has yet to an-
nounce a decision on
whether to repair that plant
or retire it.
On Aug. 13, James E.
Rogers, Duke Energy CEO,
told the PSC repair costs
were estimated at $900 mil-
lion to $1.3 billion and
trending up. He also said
when the Levy nuclear
plant comes online, CR1
and CR2, the Crystal River
coal burning plants, would
be retired.
If approved by the PSC,
the 2013 cost recovery re-
quest would mean addi-
tional $4.73 a month on a
1,000 kwh bill for Progress
Energy customers. A 1,000
kwh residential customer
bill would be $115.94 (in-


BROOKE PERRY/For the Chronicle
ABOVE: Barbara Lauer shows off some
embroidered shirts. She also does
hats, kitchen ware, linens and hand-
bags. TOP RIGHT: Jim Perez took a cre-
ative approach to a normal golf cart
tire, making a hanging plant pot out of
it called a Birdie Pott. BOTTOM RIGHT:
Millie Young sells Thunder Jackets,
perfect for dogs scared of storms. She
can make one in a couple of hours.
for those with arthritis to get on and
off. The pieces easily coil and are
made on memory wire with magnetic
closures.
"The best thing about the event is
the help from Elks," Greathouse said.
"The cooperation is absolutely
incredible."
The next craft show for the Elks
will be March 23.


cluding gross receipts tax)
starting in January 2013.
That is a $7.25, or about 6
percent, decrease over the
current total bill price.
Though advanced nu-
clear cost recovery has a
five-year track record in
Florida as efforts to over-
turn it have failed, the prac-
tice remains unpopular to
some politicians and con-
sumer advocates.
On Aug. 13, state Sen.
Charles Dean, R-Inverness,
appeared before the PSC to
question the continued
used of advanced recovery
costs to pay for the pro-
posed Levy Nuclear Plant.
"I ask the question, where
is our money since it was for
nuclear planning for the
Levy plant?" Dean said.
State Rep. Michelle Reh-
winkel Vasilinda, D-
Tallahassee, who called ad-
vanced nuclear recovery
costs "a scheme," also ap-
peared before the PSC that


day "I think it has an impact
on our economy," she said.
"All the money that is being
taken out of the economy in
a time of an extremely slug-
gish recovery is not appro-
priate when you are looking
at nuclear power plants that
are having grave difficulties
and that may or may not be
built."
The Southern Alliance
for Clean Energy, a non-
profit energy watchdog
group, has labeled the ad-
vanced cost recovery a "nu-
clear tax."
"Year after year the com-
mission has unfortunately
voted to enrich the big
power companies at the ex-
pense of Florida's busi-
nesses and families for
risky nuclear power proj-
ects that may never even be
built," said Dr. Stephen A.
Smith, executive director of
Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy. "However,
we remain hopeful that the


PSC will finally see the
light and reject this latest
request for another nuclear
industry bailout and put
the financial interests of
the public first.
"Regardless, we look for-
ward to arguing this issue
before the Florida State
Supreme Court in October."
"We are looking forward
to the first week of Octo-
ber," said Jennifer Ren-
nicks, Director of Policy
and Communications for
the Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy
She added some legisla-
tors, including Dean have
submitted briefs as Friends
of the Court. Oral argu-
ments challenging the con-
stitutionality of the
pre-payment statute are
scheduled to begin Thurs-
day, Oct. 4.
Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty can be reached at
pfa herty@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2924.


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Change in course of Civil War


Did battle and

US future hang

on thread offate?

Associated Press

SHARPSBURG, Md. From as
far away as Minnesota, Colorado
and Ohio they came, more than 30
members of the Bloss and Mitchell
families who converged on the
hallowed Civil War fighting
grounds of rural Maryland.
John McKnight Bloss, now 81,
tried to sum up what this gather-
ing of his clan was about. He's
been researching his namesake
great-grandfather, who was
wounded four times during Civil
War battles, including the epic
fight along meandering Antietam
Creek 150 years ago and he
wanted the younger generation to
"understand the sacrifices that
were made."
Robert Mitchell Menuet spoke
proudly of Barton Mitchell, his an-
cestor who served alongside John
Bloss in the 27th Indiana Volunteer
Infantry and suffered a life-
shortening wound at Antietam -
one of the 23,000 casualties that
made the battle on Sept 17,1862, the
single bloodiest day in U.S. history
But something more particular
drew the descendants to Maryland.
Exhibition
They cheered the opening last
month of an exhibit in nearby
Frederick showcasing a simple ac-
tion their forebears took that
helped change the course of the
war and with it, perhaps, the
course of America's history as one
nation, indivisible.
The exhibit's centerpiece was a
two-page document a copy of
Gen. Robert E. Lee's secret Spe-
cial Orders No. 191, detailing the
Southern commander's audacious
plans for an invasion of enemy ter-
ritory that would propel the Con-
federates to victory. Carelessly
dropped as Lee's army marched
north, the copy was spotted in a
field by the Indianans.
When Mitchell and Bloss passed


their stunning find up the chain of
command, Lee's counterpart, the
famously cautious Union Gen.
George McClellan, exclaimed,
"Now I know what to do!"
Four days later came the cata-
clysmic clash along the Antietam
near Sharpsburg what James
McPherson, the eminent Civil War
historian, has called "arguably ...
THE event of the war."
Notable momemt
Over years of study, the Prince-
ton professor and Pulitzer prize-
winning author has come to rank
Antietam and the finding of the
lost orders among the most no-
table moments when America's
trajectory turned and its very fu-
ture was reset.
Pondering the "one-in-a-
million" opportunity the Indiana
infantrymen seized, McPherson


Associated Press
ABOVE: This 1864 photo shows
Confederate Army Gen. Robert E.
Lee. LEFT: This 1862 photo shows
soldiers next to a lone grave after
the Battle of Antietam near
Sharpsburg, Md. BELOW: President
Abraham Lincoln and Gen. George
B. McClellan sit in the general's
tent in 1862 after the Battle of
Antietam near Sharpsburg, Md.
McClellan's skill in organizing and
preparing troops was what made
Lincoln elevate him to command.


said he understood their family
members' excitement.
"They can take pride in what
they did," he said in an interview,
"but also marvel at the accidental
nature of it."
This is a story about a harrow-
ing battle that let America become
the nation it is today, and the
thread of fate on which some say
it hung.
Civil War
By September 1862, Americans
had endured a year and a half of
brutal Civil War.
After a spring when Union sol-
diers and sailors had a series of
successes, major reversals in the
summer crushed Northern
morale. An offensive by McClellan
nearly reached the Confederate

See CIVIL WAR/Page A9


Sept. 17 to 21 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
spaghetti with ripstick, PB Dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, broc-
coli, mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Roasted chicken
with ripstick, turkey super salad,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, warm apple
slices, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
mozzarella maxsitx, PB Dippers,
fresh baby carrots, baked beans,
peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Chicken nuggets,
ham super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, baked French fries, ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Barbecue sandwich,
turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, corn, pears, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,


milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
breaded chicken sandwich, PB
Dippers, fresh baby carrots,
broccoli, pineapple, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, ham super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, Mexicali corn, apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
roasted chicken with ripstick,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles,
peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese, turkey super salad with
ripstick, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
warm apple slices, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
peas, mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots and grits,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-


fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, fresh
broccoli, potato triangles, broc-
coli, dried fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice with ripstick, turkey and
gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, turkey salad with roll,
MaxStix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cold corn salad,
potato triangles, corn, celery,
peaches, juice, milk.


Wednesday: Turkey wrap,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, ham salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
chilled baked beans, potato tri-
angles, dried fruit, baked
beans, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
turkey salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, potato
roasters, mixed fruit, cucum-
bers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecue sandwich,
pizza, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
cold corn salad, potato trian-
gles, corn, peaches, juice, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Beef with rotini
pasta, parslied carrots, Italian


vegetable medley, applesauce,
white bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken thigh, mashed pota-
toes, green beans, graham
crackers, whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Orange
pineapple juice, breaded fish
filet with tartar sauce, cheese
grits, tomatoes and okra, oat-
meal raisin cookie, slice whole-
grain bread, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak


(352) 489-3579


with brown gravy, rice pilaf,
spinach, peaches, whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Pork chop patty with
brown gravy, black-eyed peas,
country vegetable medley,
mixed fruit, dinner roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


iN


MWard

Eye Center
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa

(352) 628-0123


Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology '
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons |


0916-SUCRN

NOTICE OF

BUDGET HEARING

The City of Inverness has tentatively adopted
a budget for Fiscal Year 2013.

A public hearing to make a
FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES

will be held on:

Thursday, September 20, 2012
5:01 p.m.
Inverness Government Center
City Council Chambers
212 West Main Street
Inverness, Florida
)CN81


0916-SUCRN

BUDGET SUMMARY
CITY OF INVERNESS
2012/2013 FISCAL YEAR
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF INVERNESS ARE 12.4% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES
General Fund 6.4923
ROAD CAPITAL BEFORE I.C.R.A.
GENERAL WHISPERING IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS WATERS IMPACT PENSION COMPONENT TRUST TOTALALL
ESTIMATED REVENUES FUND PINES PARK FUND FUND SEWER CEMETERY FUND FUNDS UNIT FUND FUNDS
TAXES
AD-VALOREM MILLAGE PER $1000 -6.4923 2,159,834 2,159,834 2,159,834
AD-VALOREM Delinquent Taxes 95,000 95.000 95,000
SALES AND USE TAXES 300,000 300,000 300,000
FRANCHISE FEES 743,000 743,000 743,000
UTILITY SERVICE TAXES 670,000 670,000 670,000
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE TAX 355,880 355,880 355,880
LICENSES AND PERMITS 104,700 104,700 104,700
GRANTS AND LOCAL SHARED REVENUES 307,500 1,526,700 500,000 2,334,200 65,000 2,399,200
STATE SHARED REVENUES 695,627 695,627 695,627
CHARGES FOR SERVICES 306,750 107,200 2,896,675 3,310,625 3,310,625
FINES AND FORFEITURES 25,000 25,000 25,000
INTERESTEARNINGS 80,250 800 800 5,000 69,700 44.450 6,000 207,000 1,500 208,500
RENTS & ROYALTIES 16,643 16,643 16,643
SPECIALASSESSMENTS/IMPACT FEES 600 200,000 10,000 210,600 210,600
CONTRIBUTIONS/DONATIONS 7,250 7,250 7,250
SALE OF FIXED ASSETS 12.400 12,400 12,400
PENSION CONTRIBUTIONS 5,000 5,000 5,000
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 22,700 3,500 21,000 500 47,700 47,700
DEBT PROCEEDS
TOTAL SOURCES 5.583,534 419,000 800 1,731, 00 3,487,35 57.350 10,UU0 11 .00 11,300,459 f66l.50 11,66,959
TRANSFERS IN 365,000 314,555 2,680,868 3,055,923 52,828 6,469,174 60,000 6,529,174
FUND BALANCES/RESERVES/NET ASSETS 8,127,535 489,745 153,840 5,492,577 3,706,810 720,046 225,483 311,185 19,227,221 149,464 19,376,685
TOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS & BALANCES 14,075,769 1,223,300 154,640 9,905,145 10,250,108 830,224 235,483 322,185 36,996,854 275,964 37,272,818
GENERAL GOVERNMENTAL 2,179,707 3,287,700 18,500 5,485,907 5,485,907
PUBLIC SAFETY 728,800 15,000 743,800 743,800
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 529,500 2,267,676 54,328 21851,504 2,851,504
TRANSPORTATION 693,926 545,250 1,239,176 1,239,176
ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT 225,954 1,228,400 1,454,354 38,495 1,492,849
CULTURE & RECREATION 317,985 739,682 840,168 1,897,835 1,897,835
DEBT SERVICES 346,970 684,268 1,031,238 1,031,238
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 5,022,842 739,582 S,916eB 2,9S1,944 54.,3 S 18,5U- 14,703,114 3,49S 14,742,309
TRANSFERS OUT 2.755,923 89.500 3,405.923 56,328 6.307,674 221,500 -- 529,174
UND BALANCESRESERVES/NET ASSETS 6,297,004 394,11 154,640 3,988,627 3,892,241 719,568 235,483 303,685 15,985,366 15,969 16,001335
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES,
TRANSFERS, RESERVES & BALANCES 14,075,769 1,223,300 154,640 9,905,145 10,250,108 830,224 235,483 322,185 36,996,854 275,964 37,272,818
THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE REFERENCED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD


mmmmmmmmmmoi


A8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CIVIL WAR
Continued from Page AB

capital of Richmond, but
stalled. Lee drove the feder-
als back. When the rebels
then thrashed a large Union
army at Manassas, Va. (the
second humiliating Northern
loss there), despair engulfed
nearby Washington, D.C.
Presidential plague
For Lincoln, "this was the
low point of the war... Every-
thing was going wrong," said
Stephen W Sears, author of
the Antietam history, "Land-
scape Turned Red."
Lincoln knew European
powers were closely moni-
toring the war A naval block-
ade had cut into trade
between the South's cotton
suppliers and the British
textile industry, costing
many jobs there. London
and Paris were openly con-
sidering mediation to end
the war and recognition of
the Confederacy After Man-
assas, Britain's prime minis-
ter suggested another victory
or two would prove South-
ern independence was "per-
manently established."
Abolitionists, meanwhile,
urged Lincoln to fight on -
and demanded the South's
enslaved millions be freed.
They didn't know Lincoln
had already settled this
question in his mind. In
July, he had drafted a pre-
liminary emancipation
proclamation, but Secretary
of State William Seward ad-
vised him not to issue it
"until you can give it to the
country supported by mili-
tary success."
So, like European inter-
vention, the enormous ques-
tion of emancipation would
wait to be answered on a
battlefield.
Lee's strategy
A drawn-out war, Lee
knew, favored the North,
and so he hoped a thrust di-
rectly into the Union would
cap the South's latest victo-
ries with a demoralizing, de-
cisive blow.
Never averse to risk, Lee
made a fateful decision
while camped at the Best
Farm near Frederick (now
part of Monocacy National


NATION


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 A9


Associated Press
Luminaries are seen across Antietam National Battlefield on Dec. 4, 2010, in
Sharpsburg, Md., to commemorate the soldiers who were killed or wounded during the
three-day Civil War battle. Dave Maher, wearing a uniform like those of Union army
soldiers and carrying a replica Civil War rifle, stands in front of the simple white church
building of the pacifist Dunker sect on the Antietam battlefield June 30, 2012, near
Shaprsburg, Md. The church was repaired after being damaged on Sept. 17, 1862.


Battlefield, host of the lost
orders exhibit): He would
divide his army into four
parts. While portions would
move deeper into Maryland,
others would capture the
federal garrison at Harper's
Ferry (now West Virginia),
and then all would reunite
to press their advance to-
ward Pennsylvania.
He detailed the bold plan
in Special Orders 191 and
had copies distributed to
commanders.
But when the army moved
out, something "freakish"
happened, as Sears put it:
One copy was somehow
dropped. No one has ever
conclusively determined
how.
Surprising discovery
Corporal Mitchell of the
27th Indiana found Lee's
letter. It was sent to Gen.
George McClellan, who
planned to strike the sepa-
rated parts of the Southern
army, one by one.
They clashed with Con-
federate units that Lee had
sent into rugged passes on
South Mountain, leading to-
ward what would become
the Antietam battlefield; the
Northern forces prevailed,
but the Southerners' resist-


ance bought Lee time -just
enough to re-unify his army
And both sides dug in for
a showdown at Sharpsburg.
Antietam
Shrieking shells and rebel
yells filled the air when
combat commenced at
dawn Sept. 17, 1862.
Hellish fighting would per-
sist all day: at a church and
nearby woods, at a stone
bridge over Antietam Creek,
in a head-high cornfield
where bullets and cannister
shot flew so thick one sur-
vivor said it looked after-
ward as if the stalks had been
cut to the ground with a
knife. A sunken wagon track,
contested for three hours
and in the end piled deep
with bodies, became known


forever as Bloody Lane.
The fighting raged on and
on with McClellan order-
ing serial assaults and Lee
shifting his smaller force to
meet each thrust.
When the day ended, both
sides remained on the field.
In this stalemate, every-
one expected renewed as-
saults the next day, but they
did not come. Then, during
the night, Lee's army pulled
back across the Potomac
into Virginia.
Announcing victory
Unionists hailed the re-
treat- "GREAT VICTORY,"
a headline exulted even
though critics faulted Mc-
Clellan for not pursuing and
finishing off the rebels.
They would fight on for


more than two years.
Five days after the battle,
Lincoln announced his pre-
liminary Emancipation
Proclamation.
In doing so, he redefined
the war "from one to re-
store the Union into one to
destroy the old Union and
build a new one purged of
human bondage," as
McPherson, the historian,
wrote in "Crossroads of
Freedom: Antietam."
What if
Looking back, Lee him-


self said, "Had the Lost Dis-
patch not been lost, and
had McClellan continued
his cautious policy for two
or three days longer, I
would have had all my
troops concentrated on the
Maryland side, stragglers
up, men rested and in-
tended then to attack Mc-
Clellan ... Tho' it is
impossible to say that vic-
tory would have certainly
resulted, it is probable that
the loss of the dispatch
changed the character of
the campaign."


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NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


BIEFS Thousands of teachers still on strike


dancing


Associated Press
Riley Sanch, 3, of
Plymouth, left, and Ansley
Haywood, 3, of Nunica,
strike up a friendship built
on dance during the
performance of The Moxie
Strings on Friday at the
Irish Music Festival at
Heritage Landing in
Muskegon, Mich. This year
celebrates the festival's
12th anniversary.


Teen charged with
trying to blow up bar
CHICAGO Undercover
FBI agents arrested an 18-
year-old American man who
tried to detonate what he be-
lieved was a car bomb outside
a downtown Chicago bar, fed-
eral prosecutors said Saturday.
Adel Daoud, a U.S. citizen
from the Chicago suburb of
Hillside, was arrested Friday
night in an undercover opera-
tion in which agents pretend-
ing to be terrorists provided
him with a phony car bomb.
The U.S. Attorney's Office
in Chicago, which announced
the arrest Saturday, said the
device was harmless and the
public was never at risk.
Daoud is charged with at-
tempting to use a weapon of
mass destruction and at-
tempting to damage and de-
stroy a building with an
explosive

Hurricane Nadine
gets stronger
MIAMI Hurricane Na-
dine has gotten slightly
stronger as it heads eastward
out into the Atlantic Ocean.
The National Hurricane
Center in Miami reported late
Saturday morning that Na-
dine's maximum sustained
winds were 80 mph. It remains
a Category 1 hurricane and lit-
tle strengthening is expected
over the next two days.
Nadine is centered about
880 miles east of Bermuda
and 1,390 miles west-
southwest of the Azores
islands. It is moving east-
northeast at 15 mph.

Judge strikes law
limiting union rights
MADISON, Wis.- A Wis-
consin judge has struck down
nearly all of the state law
championed by Gov. Scott
Walker that effectively ended
collective bargaining rights for
most public workers.
Walker's administration im-
mediately vowed to appeal
the Friday ruling, while
unions, which have vigor-
ously fought the law, declared
victory. But what the ruling
meant for existing public con-
tracts was murky: Unions
claimed the ruling meant they
could negotiate again, but
Walker could seek to keep
the law in effect while the
legal drama plays out.

Ford recalls some
2012 Ford Edge
Ford is recalling some of its
2012 Edge vehicles because
of concerns the fuel line could
leak and potentially cause a
fire.
The recall affects about
5,500 vehicles. The problem
is caused by a part in the fuel
line that could crack. If it did,
the smell of gas would proba-
bly be noticeable, and fuel
leaks might also appear.
Those conditions could cause
a fire under the hood. The
Edge is a midsized SUV, and
the affected vehicles have
2-liter engines.
Ford blamed faulty manu-
facturing by a parts supplier.
Ford will notify owners to
take their vehicle to a dealer.
-From wire reports


Job security, evaluations main

stickingpoints in negotiations


Associated Press
CHICAGO Thousands
of striking Chicago public
school teachers and their al-
lies packed a city park Sat-
urday in a boisterous show
of force as union leaders
and the district tried to
work out the details of an
agreement that could end a
week-long walkout.
Pushing strollers, toting
signs and towing wagons of
children, thousands of red-
shirted teachers cheered
and chanted as speaker
after speaker urged them to
stand firm until they have a


deal in writing. They told
the teachers their strike was
a symbol of hope for public
teachers and other unions
who have been losing
ground around the nation.
"I'm pretty confident that
something will come to-
gether that both sides will
agree on," said Ramses
James, a sixth-grade math
teacher "I believe this is a
very strong turning point
when you have so many peo-
ple coming out to fight
alongside (the teachers
union). That means a lot."
Months of contract negoti-
ations came down to two


main issues: job security
and union opposition to a
new teacher evaluation
process the union felt was
too heavily weighted on stu-
dent test scores.
Union leaders who an-
nounced a framework for a
deal Friday said they would
not end the strike the first
in Chicago in 25 years until
they see a proposal in writ-
ing. Saturday's talks were
aimed at settling on the exact
language, and both sides
were hopeful the nearly 800-
member House of Delegates
could vote Sunday to suspend
the strike so children could
be back in class Monday.
Addressing demonstra-
tors Saturday, Chicago
Teachers Union President
Karen Lewis cautioned "we
are on strike" and classes


Associated Press
Karen Lewis, president of the Chicago Teachers Union,
addresses the crowd during a rally Saturday in Chicago.
Lewis reminded teachers although there is a "framework"
for an end to their strike, they are still are on strike.


won't resume until the dele-
gates see an agreement they
can support.
The Rev Jesse Jackson


Public attacks


Associated Press
Egyptian protesters gather around a burning vehicle early Saturday in downtown Cairo, Egypt, before police
cleared the area after days of protests against a film ridiculing the Prophet Muhammad.


Al-Qaida calls for more attacks on


Associated Press
CAIRO Al-Qaida's most active
branch in the Middle East called
for more attacks on U.S. embassies
on Saturday to "set the fires blaz-
ing," seeking to co-opt outrage over
an anti-Muslim film even as the
wave of protests that swept 20
countries this week eased.
Senior Muslim religious author-
ities issued their strongest pleas
yet against resorting to violence,
trying to defuse Muslim anger over
the film, a day after new attacks on
U.S. and Western embassies left at
least eight protesters dead.
The top cleric in U.S. ally Saudi
Arabia denounced the film but said
it can't really hurt Islam, a contrast
to protesters' frequently heard
cries the movie amounts to a hu-
miliating attack that requires re-
taliation. He urged Muslims not to
be "dragged by anger" into vio-
lence. The head of the Sunni Mus-
lim world's pre-eminent religious
institution, Egypt's Al-Azhar,
backed peaceful protests but said
Muslims should counter the movie
by reviving Islam's moderate ideas.
In the Egyptian capital Cairo,
where the first protests against the
movie that denigrates the Prophet
Muhammad erupted, police finally


Associated Press
Supporters of an Insaf Student
Federation burn an effigy of U.S.
President Barack Obama and a
representation of a U.S. flag, during
a demonstration Saturday in
Karachi, Pakistan, as part of
widespread anger across the
Muslim world about a film ridiculing
Islam's Prophet Muhammad.
succeeded in clearing away pro-
testers who had been clashing with
security forces for days near the
U.S. Embassy Police arrested 220
people and a concrete wall was
erected across the road leading to
the embassy


US embassies

Tunisia's ruling party
condemns attacks on
US Embassy, school
TUNIS, Tunisia Tunisia's gov-
erning moderate Islamist party con-
demned the attack on the U.S.
Embassy in Tunis and the neighbor-
ing American school, saying Satur-
day that such violence threatens the
country's progress toward democ-
racy after decades of dictatorship.
State Department ordered family
members, non-emergency person-
nel from posts in Sudan, Tunisia.
The embassy compound and
school were surrounded by Tunisian
police and army vehicles and per-
sonnel on Saturday, a day after sev-
eral thousand demonstrators angry
over a film that insults the Prophet
Muhammad stormed the compound
in Tunis. They tore down the Ameri-
can flag and raised an Islamic one,
while looting and burning buildings.
Four demonstrators died, includ-
ing two following operations in the
hospital, and 49 people were in-
jured, according to Brahim Labassi,
spokesman for the Ministry of
Health.
-Associated Press


also addressed the crowd,
saying the strike was a
"struggle for working peo-
ple everywhere."




US spies


rush to


Libya

Search continues

for killers of

US ambassador
KIMBERLY DOZIER
AP Intelligence Writer
WASHINGTON The
U.S. is sending more spies,
Marines and drones to
Libya, trying to speed the
search for those who killed
the U.S. ambassador and
three other Americans, but
the investigation is compli-
cated by a chaotic security
picture in the post-revolu-
tionary country and limited
American and Libyan intel-
ligence resources.
The CIA has fewer people
available to send, stretched
thin from tracking conflicts
across the Middle East,
Africa and Asia. Much of the
team dispatched to Libya
during the revolution had
been sent onward to the Syr-
ian border, U.S. officials say
And the Libyans have
barely re-established full
control of their country,
much less rebuilt their in-
telligence service, less than
a year after the overthrow of
dictator Moammar Gadhafi.
The U.S. has already de-
ployed an FBI investigation
team, trying to track al-
Qaida sympathizers thought
to be responsible for turning
a demonstration over an
anti-Islamic video into a vi-
olent, coordinated militant
attack on the U.S. Consulate
in Benghazi.
Ambassador Chris
Stevens and three other em-
bassy employees were
killed after a barrage of
small arms, rocket-pro-
pelled grenades and mor-
tars tore into the consulate
buildings in Benghazi on
Tuesday, the 11th anniver-
sary of 9/11, setting the
buildings on fire.
President Barack Obama
said in a Rose Garden state-
ment the morning after the
attack that those responsi-
ble would be brought to jus-
tice. That may not be swift.
Building a clearer picture of
what happened will take
more time and possibly
more people, U.S. officials
said Friday


FAMU holds first home game without famed band


Associated Press
Robert Champion, a drum major in
Florida A&M University's Marching
100 band, performs Nov. 19, 2011,
during halftime of a football game in
Orlando.


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE As Florida
A&M's Marching 100 quick-stepped
across the grass, the stadium an-
nouncer's voice would boom
through the speakers to remind
those in the stands no one could
match the show they were watching:
"Often imitated, never duplicated."
This season, the words more com-
monly used to describe FAMU's
famed marching band, which has
performed at high-profile events
like the Super Bowl, are "disgraced"
and "suspended." Saturday marks
the first football game in decades


that will not feature a halftime show
of elaborate dances, booming per-
cussion and thundering brass.
The band will be absent for the
entire academic year as part of the
fallout from the hazing death of
drum major Robert Champion.
Champion died following a hazing
ritual that took place following
FAMU's last football game of 2011.
Twelve former band members
have been charged with felony haz-
ing in connection with Champion's
beating. All have pleaded not guilty.
The scandal has nearly paralyzed
the school. The band has been sus-
pended, and the longtime band di-


rector and university president
have resigned. The school is being
sued by Champion's parents, who
say university officials ignored a
culture of hazing.
University officials have responded
by putting in a long line of new poli-
cies, including new requirements for
band membership and new require-
ments for all students at the school.
But more immediately the uni-
versity is trying to figure out how to
entertain a fan base accustomed to
dancing in the stands as the band
played. They have turned to rap-
pers, high school bands and DJs in
an attempt to keep up attendance.







Page A11 Sn, S E 16LE2012


EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


*A


Remembering 9/11
Recently, Bob and Joan Huscher of Inverness took their two grandsons, Zachary
and Rowan Pennington of Nancy, Ky., to see the Flight 93 Memorial in
Shanksville, Pa. It's the third time they've been there to see the memorial. It
started out as a fence in a field, covered with mementos, then had a fence
overlooking the knoll where the memorial was being built. Now finished, it is a
beautiful marble wall honoring those who gave their lives on Sept. 11, 2001.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






A12 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


Suggest friend get


job counseling


SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 C:Comcast, Citrus B:Bright House D : Comast, Dunnellon & Inglis F:OakForest H Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
O WESH NBC 19 19 News News Football Night NFL Football Detroit Lions at San Francisco 49ers. (N) (In Stereo Live) a News
Andre Rieu: Radio City Music Hall: Live in New Broadwa or Bust Boot Masterpiece Mystery! Wallander Victor ADD and Mastering
0 WED PBS 3 3 14 6 York Musician and guests.'G' B Camp"PG assists the Rigan police. (N) '14' Borge It!'G'
S WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Ladies ADD and Mastering It! G' N Broadway or Bust Masterpiece Mystery! (N)'14' Mustang MI-5 a
W FA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in NFL Football Detroit Lions at San Francisco 49ers. From Candlestick Park in San News
0 [WF NB 8 8 8 8 8 News America (N) 14' Francisco. (N) (In Stereo Live) Nc
S[WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Revene Pilot" (In Revene "Chaos" (In Revenge "Reckoning" News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' Stereoj'PG' Stereoj'PG' c 'PG' Night
NFL Football: Jets at 60 Minutes (In Stereo) Big Brother (N) (In The Good Wife 'The The Mentalist (In 10 News, Paid
S (WTSICBS 10 10 10 10 10 Steelers Stereo) a Penalty Box"'14' Stereo)'14'0 11pm(N) Program
WTVT FOX 13 13 FOX13 6:O0 News (N) merican Cleveland The The Family Guy Family Guy FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Being:
0 WTT FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Dad' 14' Show Simpso4' '14' (In Stereo) cN Liverpool
SDWCJBI ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Revenge "Pilot"PG' Revenge'PG' Revenge'PG' News Inside Ed.
D 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
S IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' G' Kolinda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
N WFTS ABC 11 1 1 News World America's Funniest Revenge "Pilot" (In Revenge "Chaos" (In Revenge"Reckoning" News Private
SFI ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' Stereo)'PG' N Stereo)'PG c 'PG' 'PG' Practice
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law &Order"Seed"(In Law& Order How I Met How I Met TheOffice TheOffice
W IND 12 12 16 '14' 14 Theory Thery Stereo) PG Wannabe" PG '14' 'PG'
S[WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "The Omen"(2006) Liev Schreiber.'R Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Tampa Whacked Born Ride Paid
SWAC TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Variety Variety Journey Creo Connec Jim Raley Dayna Variety
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~ CWVEAUNI 15 15 15 15 14 Coned. Noticiero AquiyAhora (SS) MiraQuien Baila'14'(SS) Saly Pimienta'14 Coned. Noticiero
S[W IPX ION 17 Leverage LPG Le PG' m Leverage PG Psych 'PG' Psych'PG' Leverage 'PG
54 m, Sage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
(aE) 54 48 54 25 27 Wars PG WarsPG Wars PG WasarsPG WarsPGWas arsPG Wars PG WarsPG Wars'PG Wars PG'
( J 55 64 DInto the West "Manifest Into the West "Dreams and Schemes" A heinous Hell on Wheels Durant Hell on Wheels Durant Breaking Bad
55 64 55 Destiny" '14' act. (Part 3 of 6)'14' fights for his life. fights for his life. "Madrigal"'14'
Gator Boys (In Stereo) Call of Off the Offthe Off the Man-Eating Super Croc Eating Giants: Hippo Man-Eating Super Croc
W52 35 52 19 21 'PG'N Wildman Hook Hook Hook '14, V' N (N) (In Stereo)'PG' 14, V'
*** "Men in Black" (1997) Tommy Lee Jones. Secret ** "Major Payne" (1995) Damon Wayans. A gung-ho Let's Stay Let's Stay
96 19 96 agents monitor extraterrestrial activity on Earth. Marine commands young recruits.'PG-13' Together Together
IBRVO 254 51 254 Jersey The Real Housewives of Miami Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Happens Jerse
S** "Semi-Pro"(2008, Comedy) *** "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" 2005, Romance-Comedy) Tosh.0 The Burn- South Park Key &
S27 61 27 33 WilFerrell.'R Steve Carell, Catherine Keener. NR' '14 Jeff 'MA' Peele'14'
S 9 4 9 2 "Smokey- ** "Smokey and the Bandit 11" (1980) Burt "WhiskeBusiness" (2012) Pauly Shore. The son of a **"Smokey and the
98 45 98 28 37 Bandit" Reynolds. (In Stereo) 'PG' gangster ides in a small Tennessee town. 'NR' Bandit II" (t980)
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid nsanity! Diabetes |WallSt. *** "The Pixar Story" 2007) G'American Greed Mob Money:
(NN) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG'
46 40 46 6 Austin & Shake It Austin & Austin & Good- My A.N.T Jessie Gravity My My Austin &
IN 46 40 46 6 5 AllyG' Up!G' AllyG' AllyG' Charlie Babysitter FarmFallsik T Babysitter Babystter AllyG'
(ESPN 3 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) MLB Baseball Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves. (Live) SportsCenter(N)
(ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 Auto Racing Baseball Tonight (N) SportCtr NHRA Drag Racing O'ReillAuto Parts Nationals. a NASCAR
EWTN 95 70 95 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime G.K. |Rosary Peace Search God Bookmark
i 29 52 29 2 8 *** "Remember the Titans"(2000, Drama) ***" "The Blind Side" (2009 Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do Switched at Birth (In
(UAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Denzel Washington.'PG' whitecouple adopts a homeless black teen. PG-13' Stereo)'14'c
S**1 "Phenomenon" (1996, Drama) John **+ "Rumble Fish" (1983) Matt *b "Jack" (1996, Fantasy) Robin Williams, "Long-
TX 118 170 Travolta. (In Stereo) PG' B Dillon. (In Stereo)'R' P Diane Lane. (In Stereo)'PG-13' m Friday"
FNCI 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOO) 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Food Truck Race Cupcake Wars Food Truck Race Iron Chef America Restaurant Stakeout
:FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding |Game World PokerTour The Best of Pride (N) UFC Game 365 World PokerTour
S5 **"Mr.& Mrs. Smith" (2005, Action) Brad *** "Salt"(2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev *** "Salt" (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev
( ) 30 60 30 51 Pitt, Angelina Jolie.PG-13' Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor.PG-13' Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. NR
GOLF 72767 727 PGA Tour Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Ultimate Matches Central
"Honeymoon for "Flower Girl"(2009, Romance) Marla *** "Straight From the Heart" (2003, Frasier PG Frasier
HALL 59 68 59 45 54 One"(2011) 'NR Sokoloff, Kieren Hutchison. B Romance) Teri Polo, Andrew McCarthy 'G'B
S* "Devil" (2010) *** "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" (2011) Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Emire Boardwalk Empire
(iBI 302 201 302 2 2 Chris Messina. a James Franco.'PG-13' "Resolution"'MA "Resolution"'MA "Resolution"'MA'
H 2 0 20 Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire To ** "Hop" (2011) Voices of James 2 Days: *** "'Intolerable Cruelty" (2003) "Due
B 303 202 303 'MA' the Lost" 'MA Marsden. PGC' Chavez George Clooney 'PG-13' Date" R
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl You Live in What? Buying and Selling PropertyBrothers'G' Handyman Holmes Inspection
American Pickers American Pickers "Odd American Pickers Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Modern Marvels
(MiS) 51 25 51 32 42 'PG c Fellas"'PG' 'PG' '14' "Race the Melt"'14' "Alaska" PG'
I "Virtual Lies" (2011) "Taken Back: Finding Haley" (212 ** "The Elizabeth Smart Story"(2003, "Taken Back: Finding
24 38 24 31 Christina Cox.'NR' Suspense) Moira Kelly David Cubitt.'NMR' Docudrama) Dylan Baker. 'NR' c Haley" (2012)
S 5 "Exposed" (2010 Suspense) Jodi Lyn "Vanished"(2006, Suspense) A.J. Cook, Brad "The Bling Ring" (2011, Docudrama) Jennifer
U 50 119 O'Keefe, Peter Stebbings. 'NR' N Rowe, Carlos Ponce. NR' Grey Austin ButTer, in Chang. N
i "Your Highness"(2011, Comedy) Danny *** "Cazy, Stupid.Love." (2011) Steve ** "The Bone Collector" (1999) Denzel
MIMAXJ 320 221 320 3 3 McBride. (IntCarel(I (In Streo'PG-13' Washington. (In Stereo) 'R'
M(ISNBl 42 41 42 -Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Sex Slaves: UK c |Lockup: Raw
Drain the Ocean'G' Alien DeepWith Bob Alien Dee With Bob Alien Deep With Bob Alien Dee With Bob Alien Deep With Bob
S 109 65 109 44 53 Ballard 'P' Ballard (N'PG Ballard () PG Ballard (N)'PG Ballard 'P'
(iCKI 28 36 28 35 25 You Gotta You Gotta You Gotta You Gotta **** "ET. theExtra-Terrestrial"(1982) 'PG' INanny Friends |Friends
tOWi 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Lovetown, USA 'PG' Oprah's Next
IOXY 44 123 Snapped PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' c Law Order: Cl
SnOW 34 1 30 4 "Back-up Kevin Nealon: Weeds Dexter Debra's battle Homeland Carrie is Weeds "It's Time" Weeds "It's Time"
340 241 340 4 Plan" Whelmed, Not Overly MA with LaGuerta.MA' hospitalized.MA' MA' 'MA'
Dumbest Dumbest SPEED Center (N) NASCAR Victory Wind Tunnel With Dave My Classic Car Crazy Auto Racing
SPEE 732 112 732 Stuff Stuff (Live) Lane (N) Despain (N) Car 'G
i 37 43 37 27 36 Bar Rescue"Murphy's Bar Rescue "Downey's Bar Rescue Weber's of Bar Rescue "Owner Fli Men FlMen Bar Rescue (In Stereo)
SPIKE 37 43 37 27 36 Mess"'PG' and Out"'PG' Lies"'PG' Ousted" (N) 'PG' (N)'PG' P PG
S** "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of I.. i,~ nin "Jack and Jill" (2011) Adam I".. i,,,n in "Freaky
(STAHRZ 370 271 370 the BlackPearl" (2003) 'PG-13' il.-.-i I- Sandier (In Stereo) 'PG' i.-..-..i i-Friday
1lJ 36 31 36 Florida Fishing the Addictive College Football Wake Forest at Florida State. (Taped) Seminole Professional Tarpon
N 36 31 36 Sports. Flats FishingSports ournamentSeries
SvF 59 "Wrong ** "Predator 2"(1990) Danny Glover. Police officers lock ** "Fast & Furious"(2009, Action) 11. Ci.- .-I I i ** PlanetTerror"
) 31 59 31 26 29 Turn 4 horns with a bloodthirsty alien.'R c PaulWalker. Premiere. PG-13' -
TJBS) 49 23 49 16 19 *** "King Kong"(2005) 'PG-13' c **t "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest"(2006) Sullivan Pirates
S ** "55 Days at Peking" (1963, Historical ***t "Travels With MyAunt"(1972, Comedy) *** "Love and Pain (and the Whole Damn
TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Drama) Charlton Heston.NR' Maggie Smith.'PG' Thing)"(1972) Maggie Smith.'PG'
SSurvivorman Ten Days Survivorman Ten Days MythBusters (In Stereo) One CarToo Far (N) (In Bering Sea Gold: One Car Too Far (In
(1 53 34 53 24 26 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Stereo) 'PG' N Under the Ice '14' Stereo) 'PG' c
(TI 50 46 50 29 30 48 Hours: Hard Evid. Breaking Amish'14' Medium Medium medium medium Breaking Amish'14 Medium |Medium
"Constant ** "Swinging With the Finkels" **t "Scream 4" (2011, Horror) Neve Campbell. **"Fright Night" (2011, Horror) Anton
TMCI 350 261 350 Gardn" (2010) Mandy Moore. NR (In Stereo) 'R' Yelchin, Colin Farrell. (In Stereo) R' o
S** Transformers" (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson.Two Leverage'The Leverage'The Frame- Leverage'The
IN) 48 33 48 31 34 races of robots wage war on Earth. PG-13' m (DVS) Rundown Job" (N) PG Up Job 'PG' Rundown Job"'PG'
(IllN) 38 58 38 33 ** "Diary of a WimpyKid" (2010) Dragons |NinjaGo Venture |King/Hill KingHll Fam. Guy Fam.Guy Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 No Reservation Toy Hntr ToyHntr Mud People'PG' Sturgis: Wild Ride Sturgis: Cops'G' Radical Rides'G'
iiV 25 55 25 98 55 Pawn |Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Storage Forensic Forensic
TVLI 32 49 32 34 24 ***"M*A*S*H:Goodbye, Farewell,Amen"(1983)AlanAlda. Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special White Collar"Gloves
USA 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Off"'PG' m
Bridezillas 'Tasha & Bridezillas "Remy & Bridezillas "Jennifer & Bridezillas "Jennifer & Bridezillas (N) '14' My- Wedding-David
E 117 69 117 Remy"'14' B Blanca"'14' m Blanca"'14' Minyon"'14' 0 Tutera: Unveiled
(WGilA) 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Bloopers! Mother Bloopers! Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: I've been
friends with a small
group of people since
junior high. We're in our late
50s now, and though none of
us has set the world on fire,
we have good families and
stable careers. All except
'Joe."
Ever since he was a boy,
Joe dreamed of making it big
in a profession in which, with
a good deal of skill and some
luck, you can make a lot of
money in a relatively short
time. Unfortunately, Joe's
skills are no better than aver-
age, and he's never had much
luck He hasn't gotten further
than the fringes of his dream
profession, no matter how
hard he's tried. But that's his
dream, and he is
absolutely sure
his big break is
right around the
corner His inter-
ests haven't
changed since
junior high.
Joe has had
one entry-level
job after another,
with no interest
in moving up the
ladder He's
never had a seri- ANNI
ous relationship. MAILI
Some guys in
our group say
maybe he'll come to his
senses when he fails yet
again. Others believe he will
end up living in a cardboard
box.
The rest want to find a way
to get him to wake up and
smell the coffee. How do we
help someone who's thrown
away his entire life on an im-
possible dream? Joe's
Buddies for Life
Dear Buddies: Most people
eventually learn the limits of
their talent and find success


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.
In 3D. 1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.
4:40 p.m.
"Finding Nemo" (G) In 3D.
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20
p.m.,9:55 p.m. No passes.
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required.
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID
required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.
4:45 p.m.
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required.


In 3D. 1:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Finding Nemo" (G) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required.
1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Premium Rush" (PG-13)
2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America" (PG-
13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Pitches
6 Rare instrument, for short
11 Conclude
16 Plate of mixed greens
21 Fields
22 Treasure -
23 Of a grain
24 Hirsch or Zola
25 "Loma -"
26 Creamy dessert (2 wds.)
28 Poe's bird
29 Down Under bird
30 Select
31 Abbr. in bus.
32 Malicious
34 and outs
35 Soft mineral
37 Simian
38 Norman
Vincent -
40 Black cuckoo
41 Poor grade
42 Hard to find
44 Some parents
46 Catch sight of
49 Copyist
52 Linksman's cry
53 Nerve or natural
55 Perfect place
59 de menthe
60 Tome
61 Diving duck
64 Place of contest
65 Inclined roadway
66 Layer
67 Speak rhythmically
68 Kind of game
70 Dribble
71 Yoko -
72 Tablet
73 Encore!
74 Stopwatch, e.g.
76 Plant fluid
77 Tooth doctor
79 Flittermouse
80 "--forAll
Seasons"
82 Bequest
84 Transmitted
85 Son of Adam
and Eve
86 Hoop
87 Aid and -
88 Turn
90 Word of parting (hyph.)
91 Sign


92 Completely clean
95 Calendar abbr.
96 Pipe or barrel
98 Tier
100 Affaire d'honneur
101 Kindled
102 Type style (abbr.)
104 Enthusiast
105 Metallic sound
106 Fastened
107 "Gone the Wind"
108 Saltpeter
110 Process
112 Paved way
113 -Dame
114 Picturesque
116 Agnus--
117 Man of rank
118 Mark Twain's Tom
119 Detergent
121 Good behavior
124 Imprison
125 Pop
128 Upperclassmen (abbr.)
130 Full of froth
131 Holbrook or Linden
132 Stops up
136 Expert
137 In front
139 Neighbor of Can.
140 Yearn
141 Soft food for
babies
142 Fresh
144 Kind of light
147 Flora and fauna
149 Warble
150 Occurrence
151 Burn a little
152 Church officer
153 Foe
154 Sleeps
155 Dinner guest
156 Fierce look


DOWN
1 Military trainee
2 Smell
3 South Korea's capital
4 Light brown
5 Opposite of NNW
6 Band
7 Short time
8 Boulder
9 Maria
10 Use up


Pamper
Youngster
Elevator name
Medicinal plant
Diesel or V-8
Withered
Drs.' org.
Furious
Coeur d'-
Thickly populated
The Beehive State
Reduce
Platter
Hamper
Theme or trailer
Rye fungus
Honest -
Linear measure
Perched
Toy-gun projectile
Lawn
Young cod
Hoisting device
Say in protest
Young horse
Stitchery
Usefulness
Early computer
British diaper
Roll of cloth
- Lancelot
Glade
Sheep
Container for
rainwater
Womanizer
Like mother and daughter
Spotted horse
Damon or Dillon
Aquarium
Mutiny
Brewed beverage
Hit on the head
Costly fur
Part of Eur.
Asserted
Pours
Relating to vision
Took legal action
British measure
Old anesthetic
Chicle
Plus
Compass part
Telescope part
Cat burglar
Whig's opponent


107 Impressed
109 de Janeiro
111 Spread to dry
112 Suggestive
113 Pester
115 Dollars and cents
117 All together
(2 wds.)
118 Auction
120 Like better


122 Woos
123 Facilitate
124 Horse's gait
125 "Divine Comedy" author
126 Oak-to-be
127 Eau----
129 Something
soothing
131 Device on a lid
133 Footless creatures


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


Alma -
Extra
Friendly nation
Club charge
Confined
Shade tree
Where Toronto is (abbr.)
Spy org.
Implore
Sick


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


in areas in which they can do
well. The kindest thing you
could do for Joe is suggest he
look into job counseling (or
therapy) and work on becom-
ing more successful.
DearAnnie: I am respond-
ing to "Lost in the City,"
whose friends deserted her
after she suffered from de-
pression. This happens even
when you aren't depressed.
I have learned that even
close friends you have known
for decades have their own
lives to live. Over time, these
friendships faded, especially
after I moved away. We, too,
had shared life's thrills and
tragedies, and I thought they
would always be by my side.
They would sometimes re-
spond to my calls
and emails, but
then would disap-
pear until I made
contact again. It
was a long time be-
fore I finally gave
up.
I was upset for
years, but finally re-
alized that life just
got in the way.
I honestly don't
think they dropped
E'S off the radar on
BOX purpose, and I don't
question myself
anymore as to what
I may have done. It wasn't
personal. However, I encour-
age "Lost" to make new
friends, as I have done, and I
am confident she will lead a
happier, more productive
life. Just the Way It Is


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of
the Ann Landerscolumn.
Email questions to annies
mailbox@comcastnet.


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
The Nature Coast All Vet-
erans Reunion for 2012 is
looking for diversified vendors
for Oct. 15 through Oct. 21 for
the reunion, to be at the Holcim
Corp. Red Level location on
U.S. 19, just north of County
Road 488. The event is to
honor the Vietnam Traveling
Wall, the Purple Heart Memo-
rial, Korean War Memorial, the
Moving Tribute and veterans
from all conflicts from World
War II on.
There will be no duplicate
vendors. A 10-foot by 10-foot
space is $175. A 15-foot by 15-
foot space is $250. Larger lots
are $1.25 per square foot.
Power is $35 additional and
those spaces are limited. All
prices subject to a 6 percent
sales tax. Vendor generators
permitted with prior approval.
Extension cords are not fur-
nished. Applications must be
received by Sept. 31. Call
Richard Mass at 352-726-8877,
or email at richardmass@
tampabay.rr.com for approval.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort). Reservations should
be made as soon as possible.


Call McLean at 352-637-5131,
or email dmclean8@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Lunch-
eon for Military Women will
take place at noon Monday,
Nov. 12, at the Crystal River
Woman's Clubhouse, 320 N.
Citrus Ave, Crystal River. Those
who have never received
an invitation in the past may call
Leslie Martineau at 352-
746-2396 to be added to the
mailing list.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service-
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.
* Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the na-
tional service organization,


Yoga For Vets. Free classes
for combat veterans are offered
by her at several locations
and times. Call her at 352-
382-7397.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
The Vietnam Helicopter
Pilots Association of Florida
will have its annual reunion at
the Plantation on Crystal River
Sept. 20 to 22. A helicopter will
be on display in front of the inn
and memorabilia will be dis-
played inside, open to the pub-
lic. A sales area with
helicopter-related items will be
open starting at noon Thursday,
Sept. 20. Call 352-527-6767.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for more infor-
mation. The next meeting will
be Thursday, Sept. 20. Mem-
bers will be briefed on the AFA
National Convention and up-
coming events.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
North. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty
and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can


renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
0 AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call Cmdr. Michael
Klyap Jr. at 352-302-6096, or
email him at mklyap@gmail.
com. Call the post at
352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The auxiliary will serve a
roast pork dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, at the
post home. On Wednesday,
Sept. 26, from 5 to 6:30 p.m.,
Swiss steak is on the menu for
dinner. Everyone is welcome to
come and enjoy the dinners
with their friends and families
for a donation of $7 for each. All
profits from the dinner will go to
support the many programs of
the American Legion Auxiliary.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and


call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are wel-
come. You do not have to be a
member of the VFW to join.
Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. WiFi available at
the post for free.
The Friday night dinner Sept.
21 will be baked pork chops
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $8.
Children younger than 6 eat for
$4. All are welcome. There will
also be a POW/MIA ceremony
at 11 a.m. Friday, Sept. 21.
The post is a nonsmoking fa-
cility; smoking is allowed on the
porch. Information regarding
any post events is available at
the post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.


Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw
4337.org for information about
all weekly post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. Dunnellon Young
Marines meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at bingo
at 6 p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.

See VETERANS/Page A14


BOOKS
Continued from Page All

year teaching at Philadelphia's
largest high school, and Jimmie
Walker, who starred in the TV sit-
com "Good Times" and wrote a
memoir called "Dyn-O-Mite." In a
phone interview about his upcom-
ing appearance, Walker said fans
who come to his book events love
to "talk about the show they
grew up with it"
The festival is also committed to
programming that reflects Brook-
lyn's diversity. Many events have
an international flavor or explore
serious themes. This year, one ses-
sion focuses on African novels
with child narrators and another
features leading Indian writers.
Two events honor the 50th an-
niversary of independence in Ja-
maica and Trinidad and Tobago,
with one curated by Jamaica's leg-
endary Calabash literary festival,
and the other presented by
Trinidad's groundbreaking Bocas


literary festival. Another seminar
looks at poetry and narratives in
light of the Arab Spring, while Is-
abel Wilkerson will talk about her
book, "The Warmth of Other
Suns," about the 20th century mi-
gration ofAfrican-Americans from
the American South to the North.
There's also an extensive sched-
ule of children's writers as well as
writing workshops.
The festival takes place Sept. 23,
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., in and around
Brooklyn Borough Hall in down-
town Brooklyn, but related events
will be held beginning Sept. 17 in
other venues around the borough.
The festival started in 2006 and
quickly grew to fill a void left by
the demise of an annual Manhat-
tan book festival called "New York
is Book Country" When that event
ended, Markowitz recalled, "I said
to myself, 'You know what, we're
going to pick it up and make it big-
ger and better than it ever was in
Manhattan.' We're already home
to so many writers, it was a natural
place to launch a book festival."
Evan Hughes, author of the


book "Literary Brooklyn: The
Writers of Brooklyn and the Story
of American City Life," says
Brooklyn is experiencing a
"golden age" of a literary commu-
nity, comparable to postwar
Greenwich Village, or Paris in
the 1920s.
"Greenwich Village was the
beating heart of literary New York
at one time and in a way Green-
wich Village moved to Brooklyn,"
Hughes said. "I know a lot of peo-
ple hear that and say, 'Oh boy, that
sounds like a lot of hype.' But I do
think those comparisons are fair
It's sometimes hard to see the big
sweep of history when you're in it.
And it's fashionable to roll your
eyes at it. But I think it was fash-
ionable in Paris in the '20s to roll
your eyes at it, too."
Why do writers move to Brook-
lyn? Yes, real estate is cheaper
than in Manhattan, though the
borough has plenty of million-dol-
lar homes and apartments. But it's
not just about paying the rent "It's
got the brownstones and the well-
preserved streetscapes, many of


them from the 19th century that
have a real appeal, a sense of
small town within the city," said
Hughes. "The neighborhoods are
very distinct from one another.
The buildings don't crowd out the
sky. There's less clamor I think
those things prove very
attractive."
Bestselling crime novelist Wal-
ter Mosley, who will appear on a
panel with Danticat and Dennis
Lehane to discuss their charac-
ters, said in a phone interview
that he's been to the Brooklyn
event a few times and he loves the
"strong sense of community." The
borough also has "such a strong
identity," said Mosley "It's always
been a place where writers have
come and worked partly because
they wanted to feel anchored."
For book-lovers who can't make
the festival, the borough is a good
destination for a literary pilgrim-
age any time, with a long history of
local writers going back to poet
Walt Whitman. Whitman worked
at a Brooklyn newspaper in the
19th century and his poem "Cross-


ing Brooklyn Ferry" is engraved in
a waterfront railing at the foot of
Old Fulton Street in Brooklyn's
DUMBO section.
Hughes says Brooklyn Heights
also has a lot of interesting liter-
ary spots: WH. Auden and Carson
McCullers lived in a commune at 7
Middagh St, Truman Capote lived
at 70 Willow St., and Norman
Mailer lived at 142 Columbia
Heights. Other residents of Brook-
lyn at various points included
Richard Wright, Marianne Moore,
Thomas Wolfe, William Styron,
and Arthur Miller Children's writ-
ers Maurice Sendak and Ezra Jack
Keats grew up in Brooklyn, as
did Jonathan Lethem and
Henry Miller
For visitors looking for some fun
places to hang out with the 21st
century literary crowd, Hughes
recommends Greenlight Book-
store, 686 Fulton St., a "terrific
indie store" in the Fort Greene
section, and The Brooklyn Inn bar
at 148 Hoyt St, which he describes
as "a favorite of the publishing
community."


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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 A13


I





A14 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


If you can dream it, you can fry it


I just got back from the state fair.
You could tell it was the last day
because people were winning big
stuffed dolls on the midway. It seems
that after two weeks of rarely winning
a prize, yesterday's suckers suddenly
became expert marksmen and started
shooting mechanical ducks right and
left If I didn't know better,
I'd think the games were
rigged and the carnies
simply didn't want to pack
up a lot of useless stuff at
the end of their season.
It had been a good many
years since I'd been to the
fair. Face it, there's a limit
to how many times in your
life you want to eat funnel
cakes and corn dogs. That JiM
limit for me was once M
which cut out half the food MU
wagons on this trip to the
fairgrounds.
The good news is that our state's
farmers are growing the most fabulous
foodstuffs in the world, and those were
for sale at the other half of the stands.
I didn't realize it until I strolled
around the grounds, but we must grow
huge quantities of Oreos and Snickers
bars in this state, because that is what
the rest of the food wagons were sell-
ing. All you have to do to make them
edible is batter them and throw them
in a deep-fat fryer. One vendor had a
long list of things he would batter and
fry Twinkies, Reese's Pieces,
bologna, cheese curds, pizza and one
that I had to have a banana


I
I


smeared with peanut butter and
wrapped in bacon.
"I'll take one of those," I told the
heavily tattooed clerk. As he took my
money, he turned to the cook and
yelled, "One Dead Elvis!"
Now, I'm no food critic, so I may be
talking through my hat, but this snack
was not as good as it sounds.
Hot banana and way over-
ripe banana have a similar
taste. Deep-fried, melted
peanut butter sticks to the
roof of your mouth like dry-
ing concrete. It makes you
feel as if you are choking
and thirsty at the same time.
Your tongue is not a tough
enough tool to remove it; you
M have to chisel it out with a
LEN spork. The only thing that
was good about the Dead
Elvis was the bacon, but not
good enough to save it. You could get a
similar effect by mixing cooked bacon
into your pancake mix.
Another agricultural breakthrough
seems to have occurred in the potato
industry Apparently frying potatoes in
hot oil does not deliver enough calo-
ries to the average fairgoer. The scien-
tific, farm bureau extension-approved
solution is to smother them in melted,
processed cheese and call them
"cheesy fries." You can add toppings
such as bacon, sausage and pepperoni
to your cheesy fries. Has no one
thought of topping them with a Dead
Elvis? If not, I'm sure they will.
Of course, no one loves the state fair


as much as 1- and 2-year-old toddlers
-for about 15 minutes. After that, it is
back to needy crying, diapering,
breast-feeding, burping and re-dia-
pering. The fair is especially fun for
toddlers who have toddling brothers
or sisters, or even twins. I could not
count the number of double strollers
that ran over my feet or hit me in the
shins. The one-kid-in-front, one-kid-
behind strollers seem to be a thing of
state fairs past. The preferred mode of
transportation is now much wider,
aisle-blocking, side-by-side strollers.
They are the Hummers of strollers,
and driven by the same type of people.
I also don't remember so many peo-
ple in electric carts. The problem is
the carts are electric and, unlike the
toddlers, they barely make a sound.
They are upon you before you notice.
I think if they ran on noisy, two-stroke,
exhaust-belching engines, there'd be
fewer disasters involving human heels
and cart bumpers.
The highlight of the fair for me is al-
ways the butter sculpture. After all,
what better thing can you do with but-
ter than make large statues of histori-
cal scenes out of it? I'd like to see
Rachael Ray try that with extra virgin
olive oil. All you can do with that stuff
is cook.
-- U -
Jim Mullen's newest book, "How to
Lose Money in Your Spare Time -At
Home, "is available at amazon.com.
You can follow him on
Pinterest at interest com/jimmullen.


For the RECORD


Marriages 9/3/12 to 9/9/12
Brian Paul Birchfield, Citrus
Springs/Stephanie Robynn
Auth, Citrus Springs
Charles Phillip Halcomb,
Homosassa/Ashley Elaine




VETERANS
Continued from Page A13

Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell),
or by email him at ultra-
rayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. First
meeting of the year will be
Sept. 18. Any female relative
age 16 or older who is a wife,
widow, mother, mother-in-law,
stepmother, sister, daughter,
stepdaughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of an honorably dis-
charged Marine and FMF
Corpsman eligible to join the
Marine Corps League, and fe-
male Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular and special
events, as well as meetings.
Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6. The
public is welcome at the Oct. 21
flea market beginning at 7 a.m.
Outside space is $5 (bring a
table) and inside space is $10.
Call the post at 726-3339 to re-
serve space. Proceeds benefit
the Cancer Aid & Research
Foundation.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open


Lamb, Homosassa
Michael Thomas Kiernan Jr.,
Inverness/Shawn Ashley Beck,
Inverness
Wayne John Ritz, Concho,
Ariz./Kari Lynn Edwards,



to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at
352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915 for information about
the post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at the post's
spaghetti dinner from 5 to 7
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at the
Highlands Civic Center. The
menu consists of spaghetti with
choice of homemade marinara,
meat or alfredo sauce, meat-
balls, Italian sausage, salad
bar, garlic bread, desserts, cof-
fee, lemonade, iced tea and
soda. Cost is $7. Entertainment
will be provided by Bernie.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 -
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage, and for new equip-
ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-


Concho, Ariz.
Joseph Cleave Starley,
Homosassa/Patrece Darlene
Patrick, Homosassa
Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a mat-



pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-697-1749. Your
call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-3444702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Voiture & Cabane 1219 will
present a Chikin' BBQ begin-
ning at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at American Legion Post
155. The public is welcome. For
$7, the dinner includes half a
chicken, beans and coleslaw.
Hot dogs and sodas will be
available for children at a nomi-
nal price. Fun for the day will in-
clude a washer tournament,
horseshoe tournament, dart
games, basketball shoot, bean
bag toss, ring toss and more.
Also available will be a free
child identification program.
Proceeds will benefit youth
sports in Citrus County. For
more information, call Larry
Pink at 352-563-5451.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-


ter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the
Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit www.clerk
citrus.fl.us/.



tember and November. All com-
bat-wounded veterans, lineal
descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. The
next meeting will be at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 18, at the Citrus
County Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), Lecanto.
The location is approximately 1
mile south of State Road 44 on
the west side of C.R. 491. This
is a new start time for the bi-
monthly meeting.
To learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post
and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building, In-
dependence Highway and U.S.
41 North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at
7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All el-
igible veterans welcome. Call
Commander Tom Gallagher at
860-1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Oct. 13, Nov.
10 and Dec. 8.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Yosts

Beverly (Andler) Yost
and Jerry Yost Sr. cele-
brated their 50th wedding
anniversary Sept. 15, 2012.
The couple were mar-
ried Sept. 15, 1962, in Du-
luth, Minn. Both are
retired.
They have four children
- Tammey (Brad) Perkins,
Teena (David) McCoy,
Jodie Yost and Jerry Yost
Jr. who reside in
Florida, Georgia, and
Maryland. They have nine
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
Residents of Citrus
County for 22 years, the
Yosts live in Homosassa.


In SERVICE


Jessica E. Espada
Air Force Airman Jessica E.
Espada graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical fit-
ness, and basic warfare prin-
ciples and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force.
Espada is the daughter of
Maria and Willie Espada of In-
verness. She is a 2007 gradu-
ate of Citrus High School and
earned a bachelor's degree in
2011 from the University of
South Florida, Tampa.
Steven S. Stout
Army Pvt. Steven S. Stout
has graduated from basic
combat training at Fort Jack-
son, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history, tra-
dition and core values, physi-
cal fitness, and received
instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare


and bayonet training, drill and
ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map read-
ing, field tactics, military cour-
tesy, military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches
and field training exercises.
Stout is the son of Kenneth
Stout of Spring Hill. He is a
2009 graduate of Lecanto
High School.

Shaun C. Jackson
Army National Guard Pvt.
Shaun C. Jackson has gradu-
ated from basic infantry train-
ing at Fort Benning,
Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier received
training in drill and cere-
monies, weapons, map read-
ing, tactics, military courtesy,
military justice, physical fit-
ness, first aid, and Army his-
tory, core values and
traditions. Additional training
included development of basic
combat skills and battlefield
operations and tactics and ex-
periencing use of various
weapons and weapons de-
fenses available to the infantry
crewman.
Jackson is the son of Evetta
Mike and grandson of Frances
Nelson, both of Inverness.
He is a 2009 graduate of
Citrus High School.


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TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











PORTS


Pittsburgh upsets
No. 13 Hokies./B6





CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Golf, NASCAR/B2
0 Baseball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 NCAA football/B5, B6
0 NFL football/B7
0 Entertainment/B8


No deal


in sight;


NHL


on ice

Associated Press
NEW YORK The
chance of averting another
NHL lockout all but disap-
peared long before midnight
With only a few hours left
before NHL Commissioner
Gary Bettman made good on
his vow to shut down the
league Saturday night with-
out a new collective bar-
gaining agreement with the
players' association, there
were no signs either side
would budge and return to
the negotiating table.
A lockout had become
such a foregone conclusion
an NHL spokesman said the
league wouldn't even make
an official announcement at
midnight that a work
stoppage was in effect. The
clock itself would be the
confirmation.
"We talked with the union
this morning, and in light of
the fact that they have noth-
ing new to offer, or any sub-
stantive response to our last
proposal, there would be
nothing gained by conven-
ing a bargaining session at
this time," NHL Deputy
Commissioner Bill Daly
said in a statement Satur-
day "I'm sure that we will
remain in contact in the
coming days."
Barring a sudden change
of heart, this will be the
league's fourth work stop-
page since 1992. This latest
action adds to a landscape
of labor unrest across Amer-
ican professional sports.
The lockout will be the third
to hit a major sports league
in 18 months, following ones
in the NFL and the NBA.
Despite a third straight
day of telephone discus-
sions between Daly and
players' association special
counsel Steve Fehr, the
brother of NHLPA execu-
tive director Donald Fehr,
hopes of face-to-face talks
were dashed early Saturday
"We suggested that the
parties meet in advance of
the owners' self-imposed
deadline of midnight
tonight," Steve Fehr said
Saturday in an emailed
statement to the AP "Don
Fehr, myself and several
players on the Negotiating
Committee were in the City
and prepared to meet. The
NHL said that it saw no pur-
pose in having a formal
meeting.
For nearly a year,
Bettman has said he would
lock out players when the
current CBA expires. It now
appears unlikely that train-
ing camps will open next
week. The regular season is
scheduled to begin Oct. 11,
but that is also in peril.
While the NHL lockout
might not wipe out the
whole season, a sizeable
chunk of games could be
lost without productive talks
soon.
In jeopardy are a couple
of key items on the calen-
dar: the New Year's Day
outdoor Winter Classic and
the Jan. 27 All-Star game.


Seminoles dismantle Demon Deacons


No. 5 Florida

State 52,

Wake Forest 0
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE The
day belonged to Florida
State's Chris Thompson,
even if he only played less
than a half.
A year after he suffered
a broken back during a
loss at Wake Forest that
nearly ended his playing
career, the Seminoles'
speedster ran for 197
yards on nine carries in a
52-0 pasting of the Demon
Deacons on Saturday
"I was in that hospital
bed and so many thoughts


went through my mind. I
didn't know if I wanted to
play football again,"
Thompson said, recalling
his injury "I didn't know if
I was going to play again
and I didn't know if I was
going to be walking straight
"I'm breathing, so I'm
happy"
It took the 5-foot-8, 185-
pound Thompson about 20
minutes on the game clock
to have a career day
Thompson scored on
runs of 74 and 80 yards on
successive first-half car-
ries that sparked No. 5
Florida State to a 38-0
halftime lead.
"I wish he waited until
Clemson next week to have
a big day, but it's good to
see him back," Wake For-
est coach Jim Grobe said.


Associated Press
Florida State's Rashad Greene runs past Wake Forest's
Alex Kinal to score on a punt return Saturday in the first
quarter in Tallahassee.


"To see him come back
from that injury is pretty
special."
Florida State, which
hosts 11th-ranked Clemson
next week, has outscored


its first three opponents
176-3, although its first two
games were against teams
from the lower-division
Football Championship
Subdivision.


Associated Press
Tennessee running back Rajion Neal dives for yardage as he's tackled by Florida Gators defensive back Josh
Evans on Saturday in the second quarter in Knoxville, Tenn.





Vols fall short


Tennessee gives Gators

a scare at home, but

can't beat back rally
Associated Press
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Florida ran
away from Tennessee to run its win-
ning streak against the Volunteers to
eight straight games.
Jeff Driskel threw a pair of touch-
down passes and Trey Burton rushed
for two more scores as the 18th-
ranked Gators scored the final 24
points to beat the No. 23 Vols 37-20 on
Saturday night.
Mike Gillislee ran for 115 yards to
lead a 336-yard rushing effort for the
Gators (3-0, 2-0 Southeastern Confer-
ence), who have outrushed Tennessee
in each game of the streak.
Burton added 91 rushing yards on 4 '
only three carries and Driskel ran for
81 yards on eight attempts.
Tennessee's Tyler Bray went 22 of
44 for 257 yards and threw touchdown
passes to Cordarrelle Patterson and
Mychal Rivera, but he also threw his Tennessee wide receiver Justin Hunter catches a pass as defensive
See Page B4 back Loucheiz Purifoy defends Saturday during the first quarter.


r-----------------------------------


I I Ii CIH'ECK.UP! I


ii [ iM IH11 *Id,] ii


And while Grobe
headed back to the Demon
Deacons' North Carolina
campus, it was Florida
State coach Jimbo Fisher
and some 60,000 fans who
wanted to see how the
Seminoles in general, and
Thompson specifically,
would perform against a
team in their own league.
"I was sitting there
watching him in the hospi-
tal last year... not knowing
what his future was,"
Fisher related. "He's a
special guy and I'm just so
happy for him."
Thompson, who is aver-
aging 14.1 yards a carry on
18 attempts this season,
had said all week that he
was emotional getting
See Page B4



Rays can't


capitalize


on chances

late, drop


close one


to Yankees
Associated Press
NEW YORK Ivan Nova
was sharp in his return from
a shoulder injury and the New
York Yankees got back-to-
back home runs from Curtis
Granderson and Eduardo
Nunez in a 5-3 victory over
the Tampa Bay Rays.
Derek Jeter and Alex Ro-
driguez each had an RBI
single for the Yankees, who
began the day tied with Bal-
timore atop the AL East.
The Orioles were scheduled
to play later in Oakland.
Evan Longoria homered for
the third-place Rays, who fell
four games behind New York
David Robertson worked
a perfect eighth and Rafael
Soriano got three outs for
his 39th save in 42 attempts.
With two on in the ninth,
Soriano fanned pinch-hitter
Elliot Johnson for the final
out assuring the Yankees
(82-63) their 20th consecu-
tive winning season.
Nova was lifted after Jeff
Keppinger's leadoffsingle on
his 85th pitch in the seventh.
He pointed to the crowd,
tapped his chest and doffed
his cap as he walked off the
field to a grateful ovation.
Joba Chamberlain gave up
a two-run single to pinch-
hitter Luke Scott before
striking out Desmond Jen-
nings to preserve a 4-3 lead.
Jennings whiffed three
times in the leadoff spot.
NOTES: Longoria (ham-
string) was the DH again for
Tampa Bay Keppinger started
at 3B. ... Shields dropped to
2-9 in 12 career starts at
Yankee Stadium. He is 7-14
in 26 career starts against
New York.... Tampa Bay ac-
tivated INF Sean Rodriguez
(broken right hand) from the
disabled list. Alex Rodriguez
singled for his 2,885th hit,
passing Zack Wheat for sole
possession of 37th place on
the career list.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


As tech advances,


humans still embody


the spirit of sports


he media coverage of
such dramatic med-
ical aspects of sports
medicine and technology
over the past few weeks
drew my attention to the
amazing South African run-
ner Oscar Pistorius. Oscar
ran in the Olympics in the
800 meters as a double am-
putee from birth. He ran
with leg prostheses fitted
with composite-
fiber blades as
feet. The track
community's
presumption
was that the new
composite pros-
thesis would
provide him
with a distinct
advantage. Dr. Ron
Michael John- DOCT
son, the famed
Olympic- and ORE
world record-
setting athlete in the 200
and 400 meters, and a friend
of Oscar Pistorius, believed
Oscar had an unfair com-
petitive advantage. Oscar
has had to struggle and pe-
tition for years to finally
gain access to the "able-
bodied" Olympics.
He competed in London
last month in both the 800-
meter race and the 4x400
relay for South Africa. He
ran so well, he qualified for
the finals in both events.
South Africa would have
placed higher in the relay
had another African team
not tripped one of Oscar's
teammates in protest for
something.
Surprisingly, a week later
in the Paralympics, also
held in London, Oscar ran
the 200 meters and placed
second. He was supposed to
be the odds-on favorite, but
was beaten in the final few
steps by Brazil's Alan
Oliveira. Amazingly, both
were born as congenital
double-leg amputees.
More amazingly, after try-
ing for years to gain accept-
ance as an able-bodied
athlete with prosthetic de-
vices, Oscar bitterly com-
plained Oliveira cheated by
using longer prosthetic
blades. He thought this gave
his opponent a distinct ad-
vantage.
Technologic advances in
almost all sports have been
attained with controversy
and trepidation. Initially
technology was always
questioned as an advantage,
which it was. The rules
eventually change to accom-
modate the advances, or in
some cases they are not al-
lowed and banned.
Steve Haake, an English
sports engineer and profes-
sor, noted in a USA Today
article that "more athletes
in more sports are turning
to high-tech devices, cloth-
ing, testing and research to
gain an edge against the
competition." He pointed
out that advances even in a
sport's basic equipment,
like a soccer ball, are
changing and elevating
performances.
Cycling, from long cross-
country endurance events
to sprinters on the velo-
drome track, has seen tech-
nologic changes that
provide a more competitive
advantage. These same tech


r
1


Bowl-a-thon for
Susan G. Komen
Manatee Lanes in Crystal River
and Muddin' for a Cure will
sponsor a bowl-a-thon to raise
funds for two team members who
will be walking in the Susan G.
Komen 3-Day for the Cure.
The eventwill be from 2 to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 23. Donation is
$10 person, or $25 or more in
sponsorships. Multiple sponsors
allowed per person. Door prizes
and 50/50 drawing. Prizes for
colored pin strikes and first prize
to bowler with the most sponsors.
Call Anita Black at 352-427-
4034, or Marion Langlo at Man-
atee Lanes, 352-795-4546.

Tournament benefits
Wounded Warriors
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will have its inaugural Vet-
erans Tournament fundraiser
on Dec. 8. All proceeds will go
to the Wounded Warriors Proj-
ect. Sponsors will be accepted
and recognized. Call Ron Fair at
352-746-3924 or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.


Men's softball
winding down season
Men's softball is winding down,
with only four games remaining
before the playoffs. Advanced
Fitness is leading the pack at
8-0. Reflections Church 2 is
right behind them at 5-3.
The rest of the standings are
as follows: Reflections Church
(5-4), R.C. Lawn Care (4-3), 01'
Guys with Help (4-4), The Pistols
(1-6); and The Machine (0-7).
Games played at Bicenten-
nial Park on Monday and
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m. and 8:30 p.m.

Coed softball
begins Oct. 9
This league is designed for
all levels. League plays on
Tuesday and Thursday nights
at Bicentennial Park at 6:30,
7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Each team
required to have a minimum of
four women each game. Each
team may have 25 participants.
Last chance to register will
be Wednesday, Oct. 3. Call
352-527-7540.


advances have improved
the ability for impaired in-
dividuals to compete using
wheelchairs and other simi-
lar assistive devices, allow-
ing them not only to play
sports but also get around
the community
The pole vault has been
an Olympic medal event
since 1896. Early competi-
tors started by using wood
poles. As heights
increased, flexi-
ble bamboo and
then tubular alu-
minum poles, ta-
pered at each
end, were used.
Pole-vaulters
today use fiber-
glass/carbon-
Joseph fiber poles that
FOR'S are slightly pre-
bent and bend
ERS more easily
under compres-
sion at takeoff- a clear ad-
vantage over stiff metal
poles.
Speed suits are not new.
The concept of increasing
speed by reducing drag is
the basis of every speed
sport Alpine ski racers have
been wearing wind tunnel
tested speed suits for years.
Speed suits for track and
field sprinters have been
around for a while. The
suits are single-piece uni-
forms made of tight-fitting
elastic material designed to
be more aerodynamic than
loose clothes.
Olympic and world-level
sprinters are wearing newer
suits which, according to
Nike, could shave up to
0.023 seconds off 100-meter
sprint times. This is a
byproduct of Nike's dim-
pled golf ball, which sup-
posedly has less friction and
flies farther
A few years ago swimmers
were wearing friction-
reducing, buoyancy-enhancing
polyurethane suits or "tech-
nical suits" which lead to a
rash of unbelievable world
records. These suits were so
slippery the athletes had to
wear special gizmos to get
into their sausage casings.
Swimming's international
governing body, FINA,
banned technical suits from
competition in 2010.
Suits now must be made
fully of textile material.
Michael Phelps observed
that "Swimming is actually
swimming" when respond-
ing to reporters' questions
about the ban on the suits.
In actuality, Phelps seems
to state the fine line in dealing
with technologic advances.
There are changes that
leave the sporting event and
the participating athlete in-
tact. Then there are changes
that so dramatically change
the sport you are unsure if
you are watching the athlete
or the technology.
Yet part of the popularity
of sports is that they are al-
ways changing, evolving and
gaining new levels of com-
petition. In the end, it is the
athlete.


Ron Joseph, M.D, is a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
surgeon at SeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute
and may be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net.


r jl
r 1 ~ -t ~I
V I.- *t-4

~ -


Associated Press
Paula Creamer enjoys the moment Saturday during the delayed second round of play on day three of the Women's British
Open at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club, Hoylake, northwestern England.




Open back on course


Shin opens 5-stroke lead in delayed Women's British Open


Associated Press

HOYLAKE, England Jiyai Shin
opened a five-stroke lead in the
Women's British Open, shooting an 8-
under 64 on Saturday in the wild-
delayed second round.
Coming off a playoff victory Mon-
day in the Kingsmill Championship,
the 24-year-old South Korean player
had a 9-under 135 total at Royal
Liverpool.
The nine-time LPGA Tour winner
hit all 18 greens in regulation and
needed only 28 putts. The 64 is the
lowest round in competition at Royal
Liverpool, breaking the mark of 65 set
by four players in the 2006 British
Open.
"A bogey-free day and then bunker-
free, too, so that was probably the best
round I have ever played in a major,"
Shin said. "So that is a good thing,
today's golf. I missed just one fairway
And on the back nine, it's blowing
very strong wind, but I just stay fo-
cused on my tempo and my timing
with my driver and shots."
South Korea's Inbee Park was second
after a 68. She played alongside Shin.
"I had a lot of easy birdies on the
back nine, and the front nine was re-
ally tough because the wind picked
up," Park said. "I've been playing the
front nine really hard because my ball
is a little bit right to left shape and the
wind is coming right to left, so I just
have to watch the front nine a little bit
more the next two days. The back


nine, I've been playing great and I've
been having a lot of birdies on the
back nine, so feeling really confident
with the back nine."
Australia's Karrie Webb, the tour-
nament winner in 1995, 1997 and 2002,
was another stroke back along with
Japan's Mika Miyazato. They shot 70.
"I'm surprised to be six shots be-
hind at 3 under," Webb said. "But I'm
happy with the way I played and han-
dled the golf course. I'll just try to nar-
row the gap and see how it goes."
Play was called off Friday because
of high wind and the round was
restarted Saturday The final two
rounds are set for Sunday
Shin opened on the par-5 10th with
a 30-yard chip for eagle and birdied
the next three holes. She also birdied
the 16th for a 6-under 31 on the back
nine. She added two more birdies on
the front nine.
"I chipped in from 30 yards for the
eagle," said Shin, sidelined for two
months this year after having surgery
on her left wrist. "After that I felt re-
ally good and hit great shots at the
next three holes to make birdies."
She won the 2008 event at Sunning-
dale.
American Katie Futcher was 2
under after a 71.
Lydia Ko, the 15-year-old amateur
coming off a victory three weeks ago
in the Canadian Women's Open, was 1
under along with American Vicky Hurst,
Sweden's Carin Koch,Japan'sAi Miyazato
and South Korea's Jenny Shin.


Mulroy takes lead
at Italian Open
FIANO, Italy Garth Mulroy of South
Africa shot a 6-under 66 Saturday, giving
him a one-shot lead after three rounds of
the Italian Open. Ryder Cup players Nico-
las Colsaerts and Martin Kaymer were
four strokes behind.
Mulroy was at 17 under on the Royal
Park I Roveri course outside Turin. Last
November, Mulroy won the Alfred Dunhill
Championship at home for his first European
Tour victory. He has yet to win in Europe.
"I said on the first day the course re-
minds me a lot of a South African course,"
he said. "The trees, the shape, and the
ball goes a little further, too. ... I haven't
played so well this year. It would be a big
thing to win on mainland Europe."
Three Spaniards were right behind -
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano (67) at 16
under and Rafa Cabrera-Bello (65) and
Pablo Larrazabal (66) one shot further back.
Colsaerts (65) and Kaymer (67) remain
in contention at 13 under, along with 19-
year-old Matteo Manassero of Italy (65),
second-round leader Richard Bland of
England (71), Phillip Price of Wales (66)
and Gregory Bourdy of France (70).
Colsaerts, the European Tour's longest
hitter, was a captain's pick for the Ryder Cup.
The third Ryder Cup player in the field,
Italy's Francesco Molinari, fell back to 3
under with a 76. Europe Ryder Cup cap-
tain Jose Maria Olazabal also shot a 76
and was at par.


Stenhouse snags fifth win of the year


Associated Press
JOLIET, Ill. Ricky
Stenhouse Jr edged past
Kyle Busch and into the
lead, then held on for the
final 20 laps for a relatively
easy victory
Perhaps more importantly,
he left Elliott Sadler even
farther behind and took
over the Nationwide Series
points lead for the first time
since the beginning of June.
Stenhouse raced to his
fifth Nationwide victory of
the year, outlasting Busch
on Saturday at Chicagoland
Speedway Once Stenhouse
passed Busch on the 180th
lap, there wasn't much any-
one could do to catch him.
Stenhouse, the 2011 series
champion, gave up the points
lead to Sadler on June 2, but
now he finally has it back.
"We knew if we won com-
ing in here to Chicago that
we would leave the points
leader and that is what it is
all about," Stenhouse said.
"It is going to be tough as
you can see. Elliott was up
front as well and he runs
good at every racetrack we
have left as well. It is going
to be a lot of fun."
Stenhouse has won two of
the last four races and
finished second in the other
two. He finished 2.402 sec-
onds ahead of Busch.
Austin Dillon was third, fol-
lowed by Brad Keselowski
and Paul Menard.
"I feel like we've got good
momentum, but in this
business and this sport,
anything can change at any
time," Stenhouse said.
"You've got to keep your
guard up. We've got to keep
not making mistakes."
Sadler, who led Stenhouse
by a point atop the stand-
ings coming into the race,
finished eighth. Pole win-
ner Joey Logano was an-
other spot back in ninth.


Associated Press
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. crosses the finish line Saturday to win the NASCAR Nationwide Series
race at Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, III.


It's Stenhouse's seventh
win in 99 Nationwide starts.
Busch, the career victory
leader in this series, was
trying for his 52nd victory It
would have also been his
first win in the series for
the team he owns. Busch
and his brother, Kurt, have
teamed up this year as co-
drivers for Kyle Busch Mo-
torsports on the
Nationwide circuit, with
Kurt Busch winning at
Richmond.
Busch was pleased with
his run Saturday, but he
couldn't keep up with Sten-
house's No. 6 Ford.
"Our race was really good,"
Busch said. "The six just
come out of nowhere.... That's
the only discouraging part
of the day, was just seeing
the six drive by us and
check out there at the end."
Stenhouse's win was the
first for Roush Fenway Rac-
ing at Chicagoland in any of
NASCAR's three national
series.


"He's certainly on cham-
pionship form," owner Jack
Roush said. "Ricky does a
really great job of finding a
part of the racetrack that'll
work for whatever setup
he's given. Throughout the
race, he was moving around
and finding what the race-
track would give him."
Stenhouse now leads
Sadler by nine points atop
the standings. Dillon is an-
other 25 points back.
Dillon was asked after-
ward about the decision not
to help Sadler during the
race. The two are teammates
with Richard Childress
Racing, but Sadler is leaving
RCR before next season.
"It's just racing hard for
the championship," Dillon
said. "RCR is a group work-
ing for a championship.
We're both wanting to win,
and we had to beat the six.
We didn't help each other at
all today It hurt us not
much because the six
was that much faster."


Johnson wins pole
for Chase opener
JOLIET, Ill. Jimmie
Johnson won the pole for
the Sprint Cup race at
Chicagoland Speedway an
impressive start for the five-
time champion whose streak
of Cup titles came to an end
last year.
The 2012 Chase for the
Sprint Cup begins with Sun-
day's 400-mile race. John-
son's run of five straight
championships was snapped
last season, when Tony Stew-
art took the title.
Johnson will start from the
front after winning his second
pole of the year and 27th of
his career. The other 11 driv-
ers in the Chase had mixed
results in qualifying. Matt
Kenseth was third, Dale Earn-
hardt Jr. was fourth and Kasey
Kahne was sixth but Earn-
hardt will have to start from
the back because of an en-
gine change.


Recreation BRIEFS


B2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


SPORTS


* 4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AL


Yankees 5, Rays 3
Tampa Bay NewYork
ab r h bi ab r
DJnngslf 4 01 0 ISuzukiIf-rf 4 1
Zobristss 4 0 0 0 Jeterdh 4 0
Longoridh 4 1 1 1 Cano2b 4 1
BUptoncf 4 00 0 AIRdrg3b 4 0
Kpgr3b-1b 4 0 1 0 Ibanezrf 2 1
Joyce rf 1 01 0 Swshrph-1b 1 0
Frncsph-rf 2 1 1 0 ErChvzlb 3 0
RRorts2b 4 1 1 0 AnJonsph 1 0
C.Penalb 1 0 0 0 Dickrsn If 0 0
CGmnz ph 0 0 0 0 Grndrscf 3 1
Fuldph 1 0 0 0 ENunezss 3 1
Loatonc 0 00 0 CStwrtc 2 0
Vogtph 0 000
JMolinc 2 00 0
Scott ph 1 0 1 2
SRdrgzpr-3b00 0
EJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 37 3 Totals 31 5
Tampa Bay 000 001 200 -
NewYork 030 010 01x -


h bi
1 0
1 1
20
21
00
00
00
00
00
1 2
1 1
00


85
3
5


DP-Tampa Bay 1, New York 1. LOB-Tampa
Bay 6, New York 4.2B-Joyce (17), R.Roberts
(8), Cano (40). HR-Longoria (12), Granderson
(39), E.Nunez (1). SB-I.Suzuki (21).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Shields L,14-9 61-36 4 4 1 4
Farnsworth 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
McGee 1 2 1 1 0 0
New York
NovaW,12-7 6 4 2 2 2 8
LoganH,21 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
Chamberlain H,3 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
D.Robertson H,27 1 0 0 0 0 0
R.Soriano S,39-42 1 1 0 0 1 1
Nova pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
T-2:54. A-46,856 (50,291).

Tigers 5, Indians 3
Detroit Cleveland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksncf 4 00 1 Choorf 2 0 0 0
Dirks rf 4 1 0 0 AsCarrss 4 0 1 1
MiCarr3b 5 1 1 1 CSantndh 4 1 1 0
Fielderlb 3 1 0 0 Canzlerlf 4 1 1 1
Boeschdh 3 1 0 0 Chsnhll3b 4 0 1 1
Avilac 4 0 3 2 Ktchm b 2 000
JhPerltss 3 0 0 0 LaPortph-lb 1 0 0 0
Berry If 3 1 2 0 Brantlyph 1 0 0 0
DYongph 1 00 0 CPhlps2b 3 1 1 0
D.Kellylf 0 0 0 0 Carrercf 3 0 0 0
Infante2b 4 02 0 Marsonc 2 00 0
Kipnisph 1 0 0 0
Rottino c 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 58 4 Totals 31 3 5 3
Detroit 200 110 100 5
Cleveland 000 000 210 3
E-As.Cabrera (18), Marson (2), Chisenhall (3).
DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Detroit 10, Cleveland 3.
2B-Avila (20), Canzler (2). 3B-C.Santana (1).
HR-Mi.Cabrera (37). SB-Boesch (6), Infante
2 (4). SF-A.Jackson.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
A.SanchezW,3-5 62-33 2 2 0 7
CokeH,18 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
BenoitH,30 1 2 1 1 1 1
ValverdeS,31-35 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cleveland
MastersonL,11-14 42-36 4 2 4 8
Sipp 12-32 1 1 2 0
C.Allen 12-30 0 0 0 5
S.Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by A.Sanchez (Choo), by Masterson
(Avila).
T-3:12. A-22,849 (43,429).

Red Sox 3, Blue Jays 2
Boston Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ellsury cf 3 0 0 0 RDavis If 5 0 0 0
Nava If 4 0 0 0 Lawrie 3b 2 0 0 0
Pedroia2b 3 00 0 Encrncdh 1 1 0 0
C.Rossrf 3 21 1 Lindlb 3 0 1 1
Loneylb 4 02 0 YEscorss 4 0 1 1
Sltlmchc 4 1 2 1 KJhnsn2b 3 00 0
Lvrnwy dh 4 00 0 Torreal c 4 00 0
Avilesss 4 0 0 0 Sierra rf 3 0 1 0
Ciriaco3b 3 01 1 Rasmsph 1 0 0 0
Gose cf 4 1 2 0
Totals 32 36 3 Totals 30 2 5 2
Boston 010 100 001 3
Toronto 100 010 000 2
E-Ciriaco (7), Ellsbury (2). LOB-Boston 8,
Toronto 8. 2B-Saltalamacchia (16), Ciriaco
(12), Lind (12). HR-C.Ross (21). SB-Ciriaco
(13), Gose (15). S-Nava, Lawrie. SF-Lind.


Boston
Buchholz
BreslowW,1-0
A.Bailey S,4-5
Toronto
Villanueva
Loup
Delabar L,4-2
Cecil


IP H RERBBSO

7 4 2 1 5 5
1 0 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 0 2
742155
100001
110002


7 4 2
1-3 0 0
11-32 1
1-3 0 0


Villanueva pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
T-3:09. A-27,325 (49,260).

White Sox 5, Twins 3
Chicago Minnesota
ab rh bi ab rh bi
De Aza cf-lf 5 0 0 0 Revere cf 3 1 0 0
Ykils3b-lb 4 1 0 0 EEscor2b 3 00 0
A.DunnIb 3 1 2 0 Spanph 1 0 1 0
JLopz pr-3b 0 0 0 0 Wlngh If 2 0 0 0
Konerkdh 3 1 1 3 MCarsnpr 00 0 0
Riosrf 4 00 0 Mornealb 3 1 0 0
Przynsc 3 0 0 0 Plouffe3b 4 1 1 2
Viciedolf 2 1 0 0 Parmeldh 3 0 0 0
JrDnks cf 0 0 0 0 Mstrnn rf 3 0 0 0
OHudsn ph 0 1 0 0 Butera c 2 0 0 0
Wise cf 0 00 0 Flormnss 3 0 0 0
AIRmrzss 3 01 1
Bckhm 2b 4 0 1 1
Totals 31 55 5 Totals 273 2 2
Chicago 102 100 001 5
Minnesota 000 000 201 3
DP-Chicago 2, Minnesota 1. LOB-Chicago
6, Minnesota 2. 2B-A.Dunn (18). HR-Kon-
erko (23), Plouffe (22). SB-O.Hudson (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
LirianoW,6-11 7 1 2 2 2 9
CrainH,9 1 0 0 0 0 2
A.Reed 0 1 1 1 2 0
ThorntonS,3-7 1 0 0 0 0 0
Minnesota
DedunoL,6-4 4 3 4 4 5 6
Duensing 31-31 0 0 1 2
Fien 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
TRobertson 1-3 0 1 1 1 0
AI.Burnett 1 1 0 0 0 0
T.Robertson pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
A.Reed pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Liriano (Morneau). WP-Deduno 2,
Duensing.
T-2:39. A-36,308 (39,500).

Royals 3, Angels 2
Los Angeles Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Trout cf 3 0 1 0 Lough cf 4 0 0 0
TrHntr rf 4 0 1 1 AEscorss 4 0 2 0
Pujolslb 4 0 0 0AGordnlf 4 1 20
KMorlsdh 4 1 1 1 Butler dh 4 1 1 2
HKndrc2b 4 0 1 0 S.Perezc 4 1 1 1
Aybarss 4 00 0 Mostks3b 3 0 0 0
V.Wellslf 4 1 2 0 Francrrf 3 0 1 0
Callasp3b 3 00 0 Hosmerlb 1 0 0 0
lannett c 3 0 0 0 Giavtll2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 33 26 2 Totals 30 3 7 3
Los Angeles 000 010 010 2
Kansas City 000 000 003 3
One out when winning run scored.
E-Giavotella 2 (6). DP-Los Angeles 2.
LOB-Los Angeles 5, Kansas City 4. HR-
K.Morales (20), Butler (27), S.Perez (11).
SB-Aybar (16), Hosmer (15).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Greinke 81-35 1 1 2 3
FrieriL,3-1BS,3-22 0 2 2 2 0 0
Kansas City
Guthrie 8 5 2 2 1 2
K.HerreraW,4-2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Frieri pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
T-2:23. A-23,027 (37,903).


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 82
Baltimore 81
Tampa Bay 78
Boston 66
Toronto 65




W
Washington 89
Atlanta 83
Philadelphia73
New York 66
Miami 65


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
63.566 6-4
63.563 '2 6-4
67.538 4 3/2 4-6
80 .452 16/216 4-6
79 .451 16/216 5-5



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
56 .614 6-4
63 .568 6/2 7-3
73 .500 16Y23Y2 8-2
78 .458 222 9/2 2-8
81 .445 24/211Y2 5-5


Str Home
W-1 42-29
L-1 42-32
L-1 39-32
W-2 33-43
L-2 35-38


Away W
40-34 Chicago 78
39-31 Detroit 77
39-35 Kansas City66
33-37 Cleveland 60
30-41 Minnesota 60


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
66 .542 5-5 W-2 42-31 36-35
67.535 1 4 5-5 W-4 43-28 34-39
79 .455 12/215/2 5-5 W-1 32-39 34-40
86 .411 19 22 2-8 L-2 32-39 28-47
86 .411 19 22 4-6 L-2 29-45 31-41


W
Texas 86
Oakland 83
Los Angeles79
Seattle 69


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
L-2 44-27 45-29
W-2 42-32 41-31
L-1 38-37 35-36
W-1 30-41 36-37
W-2 34-37 31-44


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
59 .596 5-5 L-2 47-28 40-31
69 .524 10'2- 3-7 L-1 43-29 33-40
71 .507 13 2/2 3-7 W-1 42-30 31-41
72 .500 14 3/2 7-3 L-1 44-29 28-43
88 .393 29/219 6-4 L-1 35-35 22-53
99 .322 40 29/2 5-5 W-1 31-43 16-56


W
San Fran. 82
Los Angeles75
Arizona 71
San Diego 69
Colorado 58


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
58 .597 6-4 W-1 46-26 40-32
61 .576 3 7-3 W-1 43-30 40-31
67.541 8 3 6-4 L-1 40-32 39-35
76 .476 17/212'2 4-6 L-2 36-36 33-40




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
62 .569 6-4 W-3 40-31 42-31
70 .517 7/2 1 3-7 W-1 39-34 36-36
73 .493 11 4/2 5-5 L-1 35-35 36-38
76 .476 13/27 7-3 L-1 38-35 31-41
85 .406 23/217 3-7 W-1 31-43 27-42


Associated Press
Detroit Tigers outfielder Quintin Berry is congratulated by Andy Dirks on Saturday after Berry scored on a sacrifice fly
by Austin Jackson in the fourth inning in Cleveland.




Tigers still in fight for first


Associated Press

CLEVELAND Anibal Sanchez
took a no-hitter into the seventh in-
ning as Detroit beat the Cleveland In-
dians 5-3 Saturday despite the Tigers
having a run taken off the score-
board.
Carlos Santana ruined Sanchez's
no-hit bid with a two-out triple in the
seventh, but Cleveland was officially
eliminated from the playoffs after
falling to 16-45 since the All-Star
break. Starter Justin Masterson (11-
14) took the loss.
Sanchez (3-5) struck out seven over
6 2-3 innings as Detroit stayed one
game behind the first place Chicago
White Sox in the AL Central with its
fourth straight win.
After Cleveland rallied, Jose
Valverde, the fourth Tigers pitcher,
worked the ninth for his 31st save in
35 chances.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Red Sox 3, Blue Jays 2
TORONTO Pedro Ciriaco drove in
the tiebreaking run with a two-out double
in the ninth inning, Cody Ross hit a solo
shot and the Boston Red Sox won their
second straight, beating the Toronto Blue
Jays 3-2.
After stranding runners at third base
three times in the previous five innings,
the Red Sox finally broke through in the
ninth. Jarrod Saltalamacchia led off with a
double against Steve Delabar (4-2), Ryan
Lavarnway struck out and Saltalamacchia
moved to third on Mike Aviles' flyball. Ciri-
aco followed with a double to left.
Craig Breslow (1-0 AL, 3-0) worked
one inning for the win and Andrew Bailey
finished for his fourth save in five
chances.

White Sox 5, Twins 3
MINNEAPOLIS Francisco Liriano
took a no-hitter into the seventh inning,
Paul Konerko homered and drove in
three runs, and the Chicago White Sox
stayed on top of the AL Central with a 5-3
victory over the Minnesota Twins.
Liriano (6-11) was tremendous against
his former team, allowing only a two-out
homer in the seventh to Trevor Plouffe.
He walked two, hit a batter and struck out
nine in seven innings.
Acquired from the Twins on July 28,
the victory was Liriano's third for the
White Sox and his first against Min-
nesota.
Liriano's bid for the second no-hitter of
his career ended after hitting Justin
Morneau with a pitch with two outs in the
seventh. Plouffe then homered to left-
center on Liriano's 96th pitch of the
game.

Royals 3, Angels 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Ernesto Frieri
needed just four pitches to ruin a spec-
tacular start by Zack Greinke, giving up
two home runs in the ninth inning as the
Kansas City Royals rallied to hand the
playoff-contending Los Angeles Angels a
stunning 3-2 loss.
Frieri (3-1) replaced Greinke with one
out in the ninth after Alex Gordon singled.
Billy Butler homered to center on Frieri's
first pitch to tie the score. Three pitches
later, Salvador Perez homered off the left-
field pole for his first career walkoff homer.
The Angels entered the day 2 1/2
games back of Baltimore and New York
for the second wild-card spot in the AL


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's games
Detroit 4, Cleveland 0
Tampa Bay 6, N.Y Yankees 4
Boston 8, Toronto 5
Texas 9, Seattle 3
Chicago White Sox 6, Minnesota 0
L.A. Angels 9, Kansas City 7
Oakland 3, Baltimore 2

Saturday's games
Boston 3, Toronto 2
Chicago White Sox 5, Minnesota 3
Detroit 5, Cleveland 3
N.Y Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 3
Kansas City 3, L.A. Angels 2
Seattle at Texas, late
Baltimore at Oakland, late

Sunday's games
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 10-10) at N.Y.Yankees (Kuroda 13-
10), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 9-11) at Toronto (Morrow 8-6), 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 10-11) at Minnesota (Diamond
11-7), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 10-11) at Kansas City (W.Smith 5-7),
2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 9-12) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez 9-16), 3:05
p.m.
Seattle (Beavan 9-9) atTexas (M.Harrison 16-9), 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Wolf 2-0) at Oakland (Straily 2-0), 4:05 p.m.

Monday's Games
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's games
Chicago Cubs 7, Pittsburgh 4
Miami 4, Cincinnati 0
Atlanta 2, Washington 1
Philadelphia 12, Houston 6
N.Y Mets 7, Milwaukee 3
San Francisco 6, Arizona 2
Colorado 7, San Diego 4
L.A. Dodgers 8, St. Louis 5

Saturday's games
Pittsburgh 7, Chicago Cubs 6
Atlanta 5, Washington 4
Houston 5, Philadelphia 0
Miami 6, Cincinnati 4
Brewers 9, Mets 6
San Francisco at Arizona, late
Colorado at San Diego, late
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late

Sunday's games
Cincinnati (Latos 12-4) at Miami (Nolasco 12-12),
1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 10-7) at Houston (Lyles 4-11),
2:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets (C.Young 4-7) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 1-0),
2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 0-1) at Chicago Cubs (Volstad 3-10),
2:20 p.m.
Colorado (White 2-8) at San Diego (Werner 2-1), 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 12-8) at Arizona (Corbin 5-7),
4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 13-13) at L.A. Dodgers (Fife 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 19-7) at Atlanta (Minor 8-10),
8:05 p.m.

Monday's games
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

Greinke gave up just five singles,
walked two and struck out three in 8 1-3
innings. He has allowed seven runs and
24 hits in 37 innings for a 1.70 ERA in his
past five starts.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pirates 7, Cubs 6
CHICAGO -Andrew McCutchen
homered and reached base four times,
and the Pittsburgh Pirates held off a late
rally to snap a seven-game losing streak
with a 7-6 win over the Chicago Cubs.


Wandy Rodriguez (11-13) held
Chicago to three runs one earned -
in helping the Pirates stop their free-fall in
the NL playoff race. Pittsburgh had lost
17 of 22, yet was just three games behind
St. Louis for the second NL wild-card slot
entering the day.
Rodriguez is 3-0 with a 1.40 ERA over
his last four starts after struggling initially
upon being acquired midseason from
Houston.
McCutchen launched Jason Berkin's
pitch off the rear fence behind the left-
field bleachers leading off the third, his
28th round-tripper of the season. He
also singled and walked twice, improving
to .394 in 27 career games at Wrigley
Field.

Braves 5, Nationals 4
ATLANTA Pinch-runner Jeff Baker
scored the go-ahead run in the eighth in-
ning when reliever Ryan Mattheus hit An-
drelton Simmons' uniform with a
bases-loaded pitch that helped the At-
lanta Braves beat the Washington
Nationals 5-4.
Jason Heyward and Freddie Freeman
homered for the Braves, who have won
the first two games in the series and nine
of 13.
Atlanta moved within 6 1/2 games of
first-place Washington in the NL East.
The Braves began the game with a
seven-game lead over third-place Los An-
geles in the NL wild-card race.
Braves closer Craig Kimbrel earned his
36th save in 39 ties after striking out the
side.
Eric O'Flaherty (3-0) faced the mini-
mum in the eighth for Atlanta, extending
his scoreless innings streak to 19 1-3 in-
nings, a span of 22 games.
Mattheus (5-2) allowed one hit, one
walk, two walks and no strikeouts.

Marlins 6, Reds 4
MIAMI Carlos Lee homered and
drove in three runs and the Miami Marlins
beat the Cincinnati Reds 6-4.
Mark Buehrle (13-12) allowed four runs
on seven hits over 7 2-3 innings to im-
prove to 4-1 in his last six starts. Jose
Reyes had three hits and also drove in a
run for Miami.
Johnny Cueto (17-9) suffered his third
straight loss and failed to last five innings
for the second straight start. Cueto gave
up six runs on nine hits in 4 1-3 innings,
and hasn't won since August 28 at Ari-
zona. Ryan Ludwick homered for the
Reds.

Brewers 9, Mets 6
MILWAUKEE Rickie Weeks hit a
two-run homer during a five-run fourth in-
ning to lift the Milwaukee Brewers to a 9-
6 win over the New York Mets on
Saturday night.
Trailing 4-1 in the fourth the Brewers
rallied for five runs to win for the 19th time
in 25 games and stay in the hunt for a
wild card. The Mets lost for the ninth time
in 11 games.
Weeks' homer capped the inning and
was his 20th of the season. He also had
a double, scored two runs and drove in
three. Reliever Brandon Kintzler (2-0)
pitched a scoreless fifth to get credit for
the victory.
Jenry Mejia (0-1) pitched three innings
in his first major-league start exactly two
years after undergoing ulnar collateral lig-
ament reconstruction surgery.


NL


Pirates 7, Cubs 6
Pittsburgh Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
SMartelf 3 2 2 1 Mathercf 5 21 1
Sniderrf 5 1 1 1 Barney2b 3 21 0
Tabatarf 0 00 0 Rizzolb 5 02 1
AMcCtcf 3 1 2 1 ASorinlf 5 02 2
GJoneslb 4 0 1 2 Campnpr 0 00 0
Hanrhnp 0 00 0 SCastross 4 1 2 0
Walker2b 5 00 0 WCastllc 4 01 0
PAlvrz3b 4 1 1 0 Smrdzjpr 0 00 0
Barmes ss 5 2 2 1 Vitters 3b 3 01 0
Barajs c 4 0 1 1 Valuen ph-3b 1 0 1 2
WRdrgp 2 0 0 0 Sappeltrf 5 1 2 0
Watsonp 0 0 0 0 Berkenp 1 00 0
JHughsp 0 00 0 Dolisp 0 00 0
Holt ph 0 0 0 0 BJcksnph 1 00 0
Grillip 0 0 0 0 Beliveap 0 0 0 0
GSnchzlb 0 0 0 0 Reckerph 1 00 0
AICarr p 0 00 0
DeJessph 1 00 0
Bowdenp 0 00 0
Totals 35 7107 Totals 39613 6
Pittsburgh 111 300 100 7
Chicago 001 020 012 6
E-Barajas (5), W.Rodriguez (3), W.Castillo (5),
Vitters (3). DP-Pittsburgh 2. LOB-Pittsburgh
9, Chicago 11.2B-S.Marte (2), G.Jones (27),
Mather (9), S.Castro (25). 3B-S.Marte (3).
HR-A.McCutchen (28), Barmes (7). SB-
Mather (5), Campana (29). S-S.Marte, W.Ro-
driguez. SF-G.Jones.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
W.RodriguezW,11-136 9 3 1 1 4
Watson 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
J.Hughes 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Grilli 1 2 1 1 0 2
HanrahanS,35-38 1 2 2 2 3 1
Chicago
Berken L,0-1 4 8 6 2 1 2
Dolis 1 0 0 0 0 1
Beliveau 1 1 0 0 1 0
AI.Cabrera 2 1 1 1 1 2
Bowden 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Berken (S.Marte).
T-3:26. A-32,774 (41,009).

Braves 5, Nationals 4
Washington Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Werth rf 4 1 2 0 Bourn cf 4 00 0
Harpercf 4 0 0 0 Pradolf 3 1 0 0
Zmrmn3b 4 0 0 0 Heywrdrf 4 1 1 2
LaRochlb 4 1 1 2 McCnnc 1 00 0
Dsmndss 4 0 1 0 D.Rossc 3 01 0
Espinos2b 4 0 0 0 JeBakrpr 0 1 0 0
Flores c 2 1 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Tracyph 1 0 0 FFrmn b 4 23 1
EPerezpr 0 0 0 0 Uggla2b 3 01 1
Lmrdzzlf 4 1 1 0 JFrncs3b 2 00 0
EJcksnp 2 01 0 C.Jonesph-3bl 00 0
Grzlnyp 0 00 0 Smmnsss 2 00 1
DeRosaph 1 0 1 0 Hansonp 1 00 0
Berndnpr 0 0 0 0 Constnzph 1 00 0
CGarcip 0 0 0 0 Ventersp 0 00 0
McGnzlp 0000 Moylanp 0 00 0
Matthsp 0 0 0 0 Avilanp 0 00 0
Dukep 0 00 0 Pstrnckph 0 00 0
TMooreph 1 00 0 OFlhrtp 0 00 0
Overayph 0 00 0
RJhnsnph 1 00 0
Boscan c 0 00 0
Totals 35 48 2 Totals 30 5 6 5
Washington 220 000 000 4
Atlanta 010 102 01x 5
E-E.Jackson (3), Boscan (1), Hanson (4),
FFreeman (10). LOB-Washington 5, Atlanta 8.
2B-Desmond (30), Uggla (26). 3B-FFree-
man (2). HR-LaRoche (30), Heyward (27),
FFreeman (20). SB-Werth (5), E.Perez (2).
CS-Lombardozzi (3). S-Pastornicky.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
E.Jackson 51-34 4 3 1 7
Gorzelanny 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
C.Garcia 2-3 0 0 0 2 0
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
MattheusL,5-2 1-3 1 1 1 2 0
Duke 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
Hanson 5 5 4 2 1 7
Venters 12-31 0 0 0 2
Moylan 0 1 0 0 0 0
Avilan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
O'FlahertyW,3-0 1 0 0 0 0 0
KimbrelS,36-39 1 1 0 0 0 3
Moylan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Mattheus (Simmons).WP-Hanson.
T-3:22. A-38,763 (49,586).

Marlins 6, Reds 4
Cincinnati Miami
ab rh bi ab rh bi


BPhllps 2b
WValdz ss
Votto lb
Ludwck If
Bruce rf
Rolen 3b
Stubbs cf
Paul ph
Hanign c
DNavrrph
Cueto p
Cingrn p
Arrdnd p
Frazier ph
Hoover p
Marshall p
Heisey ph
Totals
Cincinnati
Miami


4 0 0 0 Petersn If
4 0 2 1 Ruggin cf
4 1 1 0 Reyesss
4 1 1 2 Stantonrf
4 1 1 0 Ca.Leelb
4 0 1 1 Dobbs 3b
3 0 0 0 Velazqz3b
1 0 0 0 DSolan2b
3 11 0 Brantlyc
11 0 0 Buehrlep
1 00 0 MDunnp
0 0 0 0 Kearnsph
0 0 0 0 Cishekp
1 000
0000
0000
1 000
35 48 4 Totals
001 100 020
300 030 OOx


33610 6
4
6


E-W.Valdez (4), Cingrani (1), Ca.Lee (6),
Reyes (16). LOB-Cincinnati 5, Miami 8.2B--
Votto (38), Ruggiano (22), Reyes (32), Brantly
(6). 3B-Bruce (5), Stanton (1), D.Solano (3).
HR-Ludwick (26), Ca.Lee (9). CS-Reyes
(10), Stanton (2). S-Cueto. SF-Ca.Lee.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Cueto L,17-9 41-39 6 6 2 2
Cingrani 11-31 0 0 1 3
Arredondo 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 1
Marshall 1 0 0 0 1 2
Miami
BuehrleW,13-12 72-37 4 4 0 7
M.DunnH,18 1-3 0 0 0 0
CishekS,14-18 1 1 0 0 0 2
T-2:58. A-27,502 (37,442).

Astros 5, Phillies 0
Philadelphia Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollinsss 4 01 0 Altuve2b 3 1 1 1
Frndsn 3b 5 0 2 0 FMrtnz rf 4 00 0
Utley 2b 2 0 0 0 BBarns cf 0 00 0
Howardlb 4 00 0 Wallaclb 4 01 1
Mayrrycf 3 0 1 0 Maxwllcf-lf 4 1 1 2
Wggntnlf 3 0 1 0 Lowriess 4 01 0
L.Nixph-lf 1 00 0 Greenepr-ss 0 0 0 0
DBrwnrf 3 00 0 Dmngz3b 4 01 0
Kratz c 4 0 1 0JCastro c 4 22 0
Kndrckp 1 0 1 0 JDMrtnlf 4 02 1
Orr ph 1 0 0 0 Bogsvc rf 00 0 0
Lindlmp 0 0 0 0 Keuchlp 2 1 1 0
Diekmnp 0 00 0 Storeyp 0 00 0
Ruiz ph 1 00 0 SMooreph 0 00 0
XCedenp 0000
Ambrizp 0 00 0
B.Laird ph 1 0 0 0
Wrght p 0 00 0
Totals 32 07 0 Totals 34510 5
Philadelphia 000 000 000 0
Houston 210 011 00x 5
E-Frandsen (7). DP-Houston 1. LOB-
Philadelphia 12, Houston 7.2B-Frandsen (4),
Wigginton (11), Wallace (10), J.Castro (15).
HR-Maxwell (16). SB-Rollins 2 (29), Utley
(8). S-K.Kendrick, Altuve.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
K.Kendrick L,9-11 5 7 4 4 0 4
Lindblom 2 3 1 1 1 2
Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 0
Houston
KeuchelW,2-7 51-35 0 0 4 0
Storey 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
X.Cedeno 1 0 0 0 1 1
Ambriz 1 1 0 0 0 0
W.Wright 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Keuchel (Utley).
T-3:10. A-20,419 (40,981).


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 B3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lecanto 26, Central13 3For th' e record


Panthers 7- 6 -6- 7 26
Bears 7- 0 -0- 6 13
Scoring summary
First quarter
CEN Teater 2 rush (Merritt kick), 8:33
LHS Osburn 1 rush (Leiva kick)
Second quarter
LHS Osburn 14 rush (kick failed), :37
Third quarter
LHS -Waters 9 rush (kick blocked), :45
Fourth quarter
LHS -Waters 25 rush (Leiva kick), 10:30
CEN -Teater 1 rush (kick blocked), 7:35

Individual leaders
Passing (Comp-Att-Yds-TD-Int):
LHS Barber 2-6-42-0
CEN -Teater 6-15-95-0
Rushing (Att-Yds-TD):
LHS Barber 19-122-0; Waters 14-119-2;
Osburn 3-18-2
CEN -Teater 14-46-2
Receiving (Catches-Yds-TD):
LHS- Lucas 1-23-0
CEN -Hayes 1-32-0
Defense:
Sacks: LHS- Osburn 1; Waters 1
Int: Dunham 1
Fumble recoveries: Horton 1



Dollar General 300
results
Saturday at Chicagoland Speedway,
Joliet, Ill.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1.(3) R. StenhouseJr., Ford, 200 laps, 132.5 rating,
47 points.
2. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 131.9, 0.
3. (2) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 127.1,42.
4. (16) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200, 104.4, 0.
5. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 103, 0.
6. (4) Sam Homish Jr, Dodge, 200, 105.9, 39.
7. (8) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 101.7, 38.
8. (5) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 109.2, 37.
9. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 119.9, 0.
10. (42) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 90.9, 34.
11. (10) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 93.8, 34.
12. (12) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 88, 32.
13. (9) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 90.6, 31.
14. (13) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 200, 85.4, 30.
15. (18) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 199, 82.5, 29.
16. (25) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 199, 78.9, 29.
17. (20) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 199, 73.6, 27.
18. (19) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 198, 71.6, 26.
19. (21) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 198, 71.5, 25.
20. (11) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 196, 73.9, 24.
21.(17) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 196, 59, 23.
22. (34) Erik Damell, Chevrolet, 195, 54.2, 22.
23. (22) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 195, 59.9, 21.
24. (24) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 194, 52.8, 20.
25. (30) Eric McClure, Toyota, 194, 43.7, 19.
26. (37) Juan Carlos Blum, Chevrolet, 193, 47.6, 18.
27. (35) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 192, 44.6, 17.
28.(15) Jason Bowles, Toyota, engine, 153,53.9, 16.
29. (14) B. Gordon, Toyota, suspension, 122, 68.7,15.
30. (31)J. Clements, Chevrolet, oil leak, 68, 53.2, 14.
31. (27) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 30, 53.1, 13.
32. (39) M. Shepherd, Chevrolet, engine, 30,45.2,12.
33. (36) Timmy Hill, Ford, vibration, 28, 46.4, 11.
34. (38) T Raines, Chevrolet, electrical, 26, 42.1,0.
35. (40) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, handling, 23, 36.4, 9.
36. (29) Blake Koch, Toyota, vibration, 19,44.8, 8.
37. (33) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, ignition, 19, 45, 0.
38. (32) Matt Carter, Chevrolet, rear gear, 15,40.2, 6.
39. (41) M. Harmon, Chevrolet, overheating, 12, 35, 5.
40. (28) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, vibration, 11,36, 0.
41.(23) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 10, 35.1, 0.
42. (26) C. Miller, Chevrolet, overheating, 9, 33.4, 2.
43. (43) Tim Andrews, Ford, ignition, 9, 31.8, 1.
Race statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 138.373 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 10 minutes, 5 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.402 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 20 laps.
Lead Changes: 17 among 9 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-7; S.Hornish Jr. 8;
J.Logano 9-59; A.Dillon 60; K.Busch 61-62;
A.Dillon 63; K.Busch 64-69; A.Dillon 70-95;
R.Stenhouse Jr. 96; M.Annett 97; J.Allgaier 98-
100; J.Nemechek 101; A.Dillon 102-125;
J.Logano 126-134; K.Busch 135-168; E.Sadler
169-171; K.Busch 172-179; R.Stenhouse Jr.
180-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): J.Logano, 3 times for 67 laps; A.Dillon, 4
times for 52 laps; K.Busch, 4 times for 50 laps;
R.Stenhouse Jr., 2 times for 22 laps; E.Sadler,
1 time for 3 laps; J.Allgaier, 1 time for 3 laps;
S.Hornish Jr., 1 time for 1 lap; M.Annett, 1 time
for 1 lap; J.Nemechek, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 982; 2.
E.Sadler, 973; 3. A.Dillon, 948; 4. S.Hornish Jr,
925; 5. J.Allgaier, 875; 6. M.Annett, 837; 7.
C.Whitt, 767; 8. M.Bliss, 722; 9. J.Nemechek,
634; 10. B.Scott, 633.
NASCAR Driver Rating formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

GEICO 400
lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
at Chicagoland Speedway, Joliet, Ill.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 182.865.
2. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 182.636.
3. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 182.334.
4. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 182.07.
5. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 182.045.
6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 181.971.
7. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 181.953.
8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.928.
9. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 181.855.
10. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 181.629.
11. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 181.616.
12. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 181.525.
13. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 181.507.
14. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 181.354.
15. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 181.257.
16. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 181.251.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 181.05.
18. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 180.989.
19. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 180.874.
20. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 180.729.
21. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 180.705.
22. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 180.524.
23. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 180.463.
24. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 180.276.
25. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 180.21.
26. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 180.12.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 180.048.
28. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 179.94.
29. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 179.892.
30. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 179.671.


31. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 179.575.
32. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 179.569.
33. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 179.539.
34. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 179.533.
35. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 179.456.
36. (33) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 179.438.
37. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 179.265.
38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 178.986.
39. (32) T.J. Bell, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 179.164.
Failed to qualify
44. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 178.271.
45. (91) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 177.965.
46. (37) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 177.942.
47. (49) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 177.713.


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S. CASH 3 (early)
0-5-5
CASH 3 (late)
9-0-0

S PLAY 4 (early)
S1-5-6-4
PLAY 4 (late)
2-6-8-1

FANTASY 5
ld LOtty 2-4-12-21-31

POWERBALL LOTTERY
3-20 -26 -43 -48 5-12-21-24-51-53
POWER BALL XTRA
1 5


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: GEICO 400. From
Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, Ill.
3 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series. From
Indianapolis (taped)
5 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans Series: Virginia. From
Alton, Va. (taped)
8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing O'ReillyAuto Parts
Nationals. From Concord, N.C. (same-day tape)
12:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: GEICO 400. From
Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, Ill. (same-day tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Cincinnati Reds at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
1 p.m. (TBS) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Pittsburgh Pirates at Chicago Cubs
(same-day tape)
8 p.m. (ESPN) Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves
(same-day tape)
BICYCLING
1 p.m. (NBC) La Vuelta a Espana. From Spain (taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Tennessee (taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Wake Forest at Florida State (taped)
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Oakland Raiders at Miami Dolphins
1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at New York Giants
4 p.m. (CBS) New York Jets at Pittsburgh Steelers
8:15 p.m. (NBC) Detroit Lions at San Francisco 49ers
GOLF
7:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: BMW Italian Open,
final round. From Turin, Italy
9 a.m. (ESPN2) Women's British Open, second and final
rounds. From Hoylake, England
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Web.com: Albertsons Boise Open,
final round. From Boise, Idaho
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Pacific Links Hawaii
Championship, final round. From Hawaii
OLYMPICS
2 p.m. (NBC) Paralympic Games from London (taped)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR Roto-Mix Dodge City Shootout. From
Dodge City, Kan. (taped)
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) PBR PFI Western.com Invitational. From
Springfield, Mo.
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: Pumas de la
U.N.A.M. vs San Luis
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Women's international friendly: United States
vs. Australia. From Los Angeles
TENNIS
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) World Team Tennis Final: Teams TBA.
From Charleston, S.C.
TRACKAND FIELD
12 p.m. (NBC) IAAF Diamond League: Brussels. From
Brussels, Belgium (taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East W L T Pct PF
N.Y.Jets 1 0 0 1.000 48
New England 1 0 0 1.000 34
Miami 0 1 0 .000 10
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 28
South
W L T Pct PF
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 30
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 23
Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 21
Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 13
North
W L T Pct PF
Baltimore 1 0 01.000 44
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 16
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 19
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 13
West
W L T Pct PF
San Diego 1 0 01.000 22
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 31
KansasCity 0 1 0 .000 24
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 14
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East W L T Pct PF
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24
Washington 1 0 01.000 40
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 17
N.Y.Giants 0 1 0 .000 17
South
W L T Pct PF
Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 16
Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000 40
New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 32
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 10
North
W L T Pct PF
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 27
Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 26
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 45
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 51
West
W L T Pct PF
Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 20
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 30
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 23
Seattle 0 1 0 .000 16
Thursday's game
Green Bay 23, Chicago 10
Sunday's games
Tampa Bay at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at New England, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Miami, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's game
Denver at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.


Betting lines
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
at N.Y Giants 8/2 7 (44) Tampa Bay
at New Englandl3'2 13'2 (48'2) Arizona
Minnesota Pk 3 (45/2) at Indianapolis
New Orleans 3 2/2 (52) atCarolina
at Buffalo 3 3 (44/2) Kansas City
at Philadelphia 2/2 2/2 (46'2) Baltimore
Oakland 1 2/2 (39) at Miami
at Cincinnati 10 7 (39) Cleveland
Houston 7/2 7 (41) at Jacksonville
Dallas 3 3 (42/2) at Seattle
Washington 3 3/2 (44) at St. Louis
at Pittsburgh 6 5/2 (4212) N.Y. Jets
at San Diego 412 62 (43) Tennessee
at San Francisco 6'2 7(46) Detroit
Tomorrow
at Atlanta 3 3 (51) Denver
NFL individual leaders
AFC -Week 1
Quarterbacks
AttCom Yds TD Int
P Manning, DEN 26 19 253 2 0
Flacco, BAL 29 21 299 2 0
Sanchez,NYJ 27 19 266 3 1
Brady, NWE 31 23 236 2 0
Schaub, HOU 31 20 266 1 0
P Rivers, SND 33 24 231 1 0
Gabbert, JAC 39 23 260 2 0
C. Palmer, OAK 46 32 297 1 0
Locker, TEN 32 23 229 1 1
Roethlisberger, PIT40 22 245 2 1
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Spiller, BUF 1416912.0756t 1
Ridley, NWE 21 125 5.95 17 1
Greene, NYJ 27 94 3.48 14 1
Green-Ellis, CIN 18 91 5.06 14 1
J. Charles, KAN 16 87 5.44 46 0
A. Foster, HOU 26 79 3.04 14t 2
Jones-Drew, JAC 19 77 4.05 11 0
Re. Bush, MIA 14 69 4.93 13 0
R. Rice, BAL 10 68 6.80 16 2
McGahee, DEN 16 64 4.00 12 0
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
McFadden, OAK 13 86 6.6 17 0
Wayne, IND 9 135 15.0 23 0
And. Johnson, HOU 8119 14.9 29 1
A. Hawkins, CIN 8 86 10.8 27 0
Fleener, IND 6 82 13.7 24 0
McCluster, KAN 6 82 13.7 21 0
R. Gronkowski, NWE6 60 10.0 28 1
Hernandez, NWE 6 59 9.8 23t 1
Chr.Johnson, TEN 6 47 7.8 16 0
Re. Bush, MIA 6 46 7.7 19 0
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Scifres, SND 3 163 5554.3
Anger, JAC 4 214 5753.5
Kern, TEN 4209 5652.3
McAfee, IND 5 257 6351.4
Dr. Butler, PIT 3 142 5247.3
Huber, CIN 4 183 5745.8
Fields, MIA 3 133 5644.3
Hodges, CLE 7 308 5444.0
Donn.Jones, HOU 5 218 5543.6
Mesko, NWE 4 154 5138.5


Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG T
M.Thigpen, MIA 2 76 38.0 72t
Cribbs, CLE 6 78 13.0 23
Ant. Brown, PIT 2 23 11.5 23
Leonhard, DEN 2 22 11.0 12
Br.Tate, CIN 2 19 9.5 14
Edelman, NWE 3 27 9.0 14
Royal, SND 2 18 9.0 14
M. Thomas, JAC 2 16 8.0 9
Brazill, IND 2 12 6.0 8
Jones-Drew, JAC 2 4 2.0 4
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG
Cribbs, CLE 3 91 30.3 39
M.Thigpen, MIA 5 137 27.4 32
Vaughn, IND 2 51 25.5 28
Goodman, SND 3 76 25.3 34
Reynaud, TEN 4 98 24.5 30
McKelvin, BUF 3 71 23.7 26
D. Thompson, BAL 4 88 22.0 27
Br.Tate, CIN 3 64 21.3 25
Parmele, JAC 3 63 21.0 22
Arenas, KAN 4 79 19.8 25
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret F
A. Foster, HOU 2 2 0 0
St. Hill, NYJ 2 0 2 0
Kerley, NYJ 2 0 1 1
R. Rice, BAL 2 2 0 0
Streater, OAK 1 0 1 0
Avery IND 1 0 1 0
Boldin, BAL 1 0 1 0
Boss, KAN 1 0 1 0
Do. Brown, IND 1 1 0 0
Cassel, KAN 1 1 0 0
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Kaeding, SND 1-1 5-5 45 16
Tucker, BAL 5-53-3 46 14
Folk, NYJ 6-62-2 39 12
S.Graham, HOU 3-33-4 40 12
PDawson,CLE 1-13-3 43 10
Gostkowski, NWE4-4 2-2 31 10
Scobee, JAC 0-1 3-3 47 9
Bironas,TEN 1-1 2-2 28 7
Nugent, CIN 1-1 2-2 34 7
Suisham, PIT 1-1 2-2 35 7
NFC -Week 1
Quarterbacks
AttCom Yds TD
Griffin Ill, WAS 26 19 320 2
M. Ryan, ATL 31 23 299 3
Romo, DAL 29 22 307 3
Ale. Smith, SNF 26 20 211 2
Ponder, MIN 27 20 270 0
Bradford, STL 25 17 198 1
Cutler, CHI 35 21 333 2
Jo. Freeman, TAM 24 16 138 1
E. Manning, NYG 32 21 213 1
A. Rodgers, GBY 44 30 303 2
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG
Murray DAL 20 131 6.55 48
Gore, SNF 16 112 7.00 23t
L. McCoy, PHL 20 110 5.50 22
Morris, WAS 28 96 3.43 18
D. Martin, TAM 24 95 3.96 15
M. Lynch, SEA 21 85 4.05 11
A. Peterson, MIN 17 84 4.94 20
Forte, CHI 16 80 5.00 32
Bradshaw, NYG 17 78 4.59 33
K. Smith, DET 13 62 4.77 19
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG
B. Marshall, CHI 9 119 13.2 24
Cobb, GBY 9 77 8.6 16
Ogletree, DAL 8 114 14.3 40t
St. Smith, CAR 7106 15.1 32
Maclin, PHL 7 96 13.7 46
M. Crabtree, SNF 7 76 10.9 20
Finley, GBY 7 47 6.7 16
L. Moore, NOR 6 120 20.0 33t
Ca.Johnson, DET 6 111 18.5 51
Ju.Jones, ATL 6108 18.0 31
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Morstead, NOR 5 278 5955.6
Henry PHL 6 330 6255.0
A. Lee, SNF 5256 6151.2
Weatherford, NYG 4 201 5650.3
Kluwe, MIN 5 242 5948.4
Hekker, STL 5 241 5748.2
Masthay, GBY 6289 6048.2
Zastudil, ARI 5 238 5347.6
Rocca, WAS 3 139 5846.3
J. Rvan, SEA 4 185 4846.3


Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
L. Washington, SEA 2 56 28.0
Cobb, GBY 3 80 26.7
Sherels, MIN 2 22 11.0
Logan, DET 5 53 10.6
J.Adams, CAR 3 28 9.3
P Peterson, ARI 4 37 9.3
Banks, WAS 4 34 8.5
Sproles, NOR 2 14 7.0
D. Bryant, DAL 2 0 0.0
Browner, SEA 2 -6 -3.0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
J. Rodgers, ATL 2 104 52.0
L.Washington, SEA 3 133 44.3
Sproles, NOR 3 103 34.3
Harvin, MIN 3 88 29.3
Banks, WAS 2 49 24.5
Hester, CHI 2 49 24.5
Cobb, GBY 3 73 24.3
D.Wilson, NYG 3 71 23.7
B. Boykin, PHL 2 46 23.0
F Jones, DAL 3 61 20.3
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec I
M. Bush, CHI 2 2 0
Ju. Jones, ATL 2 0 2
Morris, WAS 2 2 0
Ogletree, DAL 2 0 2
A. Peterson, MIN 2 2 0
K. Smith, DET 2 1 1
Sproles, NOR 1 0 1
Mi. Austin, DAL 1 0 1
J. Bell, DET 1 1 0
Ma. Bennett, NYG 1 0 1
Kicking
PAT FG LG
M.Bryant,ATL 4-44-4 41
Cundiff, WAS 4-44-4 45
Walsh, MIN 2-24-4 55
Akers, SNF 3-3 3-3 63
Gould, CHI 5-5 2-2 35
Zuerlein, STL 2-2 3-3 48
Barth, TAM 1-1 3-3 40
Hauschka, SEA 1-13-4 47
Ja. Hanson, DET 3-32-2 45
Feely, ARI 2-2 2-2 31


LG
52
75t
15
21
21
17
20
9
1
-1
LG
77
83
48
30
27
31
28
32
29
25

Ret F
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Pts
16
16
14
12
11
11
10
10
9
8


TD
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

TD
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Pts
12
12
12
12
8
6
6
6
6
6











Int
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
TD
0
1
0
2
0
0
2
1
1
1
TD
1
0
2
0
1
0
1
1
0
2










TD
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TD
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Pts
12
12
12
12
12
12
8
6
6
6


BASEBALL
American League
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Activated INF Sean Ro-
driguez from the 15-day DL.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES-Activated RHP Ben
Sheets from the 15-day DL.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS-Signed RB Kahlil Bell to
a one-year contract. Waived S Jeremy Jones.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS-Promoted OT
Daniel Baldridge from the practice squad. Re-
leased OL Troy Kropog.
OAKLAND RAIDERS-Promoted CB Coye
Francies and LS Nick Guess from the practice
squad. Placed WR Jacoby Ford on injured re-
serve and CB Ron Bartell injured reserve-re-
turn list.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BOSTON BRUINS-Signed F Milan Lucic to
a three-year contract extension.
BUFFALO SABRES-Re-signed F Tyler
Ennis to a two-year contract.
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Assigned F Kyle
Beach, F Brandon Bollig, F Terry Broadhurst, F
Rob Flick, F Byron Froese, F David Gilbert, F
Jimmy Hayes, F Marcus Kruger, F Peter
LeBlanc, F Jeremy Morin, F Philippe Paradis, F
Brandon Pirri, F Brandon Saad, F Andrew
Shaw, F Ben Smith, D Adam Clendening, D
Klas Dahlbeck, D Shawn Lalonde, D Joe Lavin,
D Nick Leddy, D Dylan Olsen, D Ryan Stanton,
G Mac Carruth, G Carter Hutton, G Alec
Richards and G Kent Simpson to Rockford
(AHL). Assigned F Joakim Nordstrom to AIK
(Swedish Elite), F Phillip Danault to Victoriaville
(QMJHL) and F Mark McNeill to Prince Albert
(AHL).
EDMONTON OILERS-Assigned RW
Cameron Abney, F Mark Arcobello, G Tyler
Bunz, LW Dane Byers, F Philippe Cornet, G
BYann Danis, D Brandon Davidson, RW Jordan
Eberle, D Taylor Fedun, F Curtis Hamilton, F
Teemu Hartikainen, F Tanner House, F Anton
Lander, D Martin Marincin, F Ryan Martindale,
C Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, F Magnus Paajarvi,
LW Kristians Pelss, F Tyler Pitlick, D Alex
Plante, F Toni Rajala, G Olivier Roy, D Justin
Schultz, D ColtenTeubert, FAnttiTyrvainen and
F Chris VandeVelde to Oklahoma City (AHL).
Assigned D David Musil to Vancouver (WHL)
and F Nail Yakupov to Sarnia (OHL).
LOS ANGELES KINGS-Assigned D An-
drew Bodnarchuk, F Stefan Legein, D Slava
Voynov and F David Mecklerto Manchester (AHL).
NEWYORK ISLANDERS-Assigned F Sean
Backman, F Colin McDonald, F Matt Watkins,
D Nathan Mclver and D Ty Wishart to Bridge-
port (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING-Assigned RWJ.T


Lady Panthers bring
home win at Buffalo
Invitational
The Lecanto girls golf team
traveled to the Villages on Sat-
urday to take part in the 18-hole
Buffalo Invitational and came home
winners. The Lady Panthers
outshot the Villages, Citrus
High School and Trinity Catholic.
Freshman Madison Polazzo
shot the team's lowest score
with a 94.
Ryan Blaney wins
Trucks race in Iowa
NEWTON, Iowa Ryan
Blaney became the youngest
winner in NASCAR Trucks Se-
ries history Saturday night, tak-
ing the caution-filled race at
Iowa Speedway at 18.
Blaney, the son of Sprint Cup
driver Dave Blaney, was making
his third start in the series. He
made his Nationwide Series debut
at the track this year, finishing 10th.
Blaney held off Ty Dillon after
a late restart on the 0.875-mile
track. Todd Bodine was third in




GATORS
Continued from Page B1


first two interceptions of the
season.
Tennessee linebackerA.J.
Johnson added a 1-yard
touchdown run out of the
Wildcat formation for the
Volunteers, who were out-
gained 152-5 in the fourth
quarter.
Tennessee (2-1, 0-1)
seemed intent on ending the
streak for much of the night
in front of a sellout crowd of
102,455 at Neyland Stadium.
The Vols led 20-13 and had a
chance to take a double-
digit advantage midway
through the third quarter
after an unsuccessful
Florida fake punt attempt
gave the Vols possession at
the Gators' 47-yard line.
Tennessee failed to capital-
ize and ended up punting
into the end zone.
Florida dominated from
that point on.
Burton, a fullback who
often takes snaps out of the
Wildcat formation, raced for
an 80-yard touchdown on
the first play of Florida's en-
suing possession. That play
was only Burton's second
carry of the night. He went
around left end for a 14-yard
touchdown on his first at-
tempt.
Florida got the ball back
when Matt Elam picked off
Tyler Bray's pass intended
for Justin Hunter. Driskel
then put the Gators in front




'NOLES
Continued from Page B1


ready to play Wake Forest.
He was emotional as well in
the locker room after his
performance.
"When coach Fisher first
started talking to me, I al-
most burst out in tears," he
said. "But you know, I was
just holding it back."
He didn't hold back on the
field despite leaving the
game early with his team
comfortably ahead.
Thompson was done for
the afternoon after his 80-
yard touchdown run that
put the Seminoles into a 28-
0 lead with 9:42 remaining
in the first half. His 74-yard
touchdown earlier followed
a 60-yard punt return TD by
Rashad Greene as the Semi-
noles (3-0, 1-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference) led 38-0 at the
half.
Thompson has five touch-
down runs of more than 70
yards in his Florida State
career, including two of over
90 yards.
"He's so good once he gets
going," Grobe said.
Thompson's heroics over-
shadowed another shut-
down performance by the
Florida State defense,
which has allowed only one
field goal and a total of 310
yards and 19 first downs in
its first three games.
The Seminoles held Wake


Forest (2-1, 1-1 ACC) to 126
yards. Tanner Price com-
pleted 8 of 22 passes for 82
yards and was sacked three
times while his favorite tar-
get, Michael Campanaro,
had two catches for 8 yards.
"Their front four is tal-
ented and they do a great
job of putting pressure on
quarterbacks,." Price said.
"It was pretty ugly at times."
Campanaro had caught 22
passes in Wake Forest's first
two games, but was smoth-
ered by the Seminole sec-


the 200-lap race slowed by nine
caution periods that took up 54
laps.
The 20-year-old Dillon took
over the season points lead.
Will Power crashes
in IndyCar finale
FONTANA, Calif. IndyCar
points leader Will Power
crashed out of the season fi-
nale at Auto Club Speedway.
Power went into Saturday
night's race with a 17-point lead
over Ryan Hunter-Reay in the
standings. The two were racing
with each other near the back
of the field on the 55th lap
when Power lost control of his
car and hit the outside wall.
Hunter-Reay narrowly missed
being collected by Power's car.
Power says he was pushing
to get around Hunter-Reay and
his car slipped in a seam in the
track. He said it took him totally
by surprise.
It's the third consecutive year
Power has gone into the sea-
son finale in contention.
-From staff and wire reports


for good with a 23-yard
touchdown pass to Jordan
Reed. The touchdown was
set up by a 45-yard run from
Gillislee, who had gained 27
yards on 11 carries up to
that point.
The Vols never recovered.
A Tennessee offense that
had moved the ball well for
the first 2 12 quarters could
do nothing right the rest of
the evening. And a Florida
offense that had taken a
grind-it-out approach for
the first two weeks of the
season started delivering
big play after big play
Driskel and Frankie
Hammond connected on a
75-yard touchdown that ex-
tended Florida's lead to 34-
20 with 9:55 left in the game.
Caleb Sturgis' third field
goal of the game a 49-
yarder closed the scoring
with 6:44 remaining.
Florida came from be-
hind in the second half to
win an SEC road game for
the second consecutive
week. The Gators had won
20-17 at Texas A&M last
week after trailing 17-10 at
halftime. Florida had lost
all five times it had trailed
at halftime last season.
This also marked the first
time Tennessee had lost a
game it led at halftime since
Derek Dooley took over as
the Vols' coach in 2010.
Through the first 27 games
of Dooley's tenure, the Vols
had been 13-0 when leading
at halftime and 0-14 when
tied or behind at the mid-
way point.


ondary while Price, who
threw for a career-high 327
yards last week in a win
over North Carolina to earn
ACC offensive back of the
week honors, spent the af-
ternoon trying to stay up-
right
"We were focused be-
cause this team defeated us
last year," said defensive
end Cornellius Carradine,
who had 2.5 of the Semi-
noles' four sacks in the
game.
Wake Forest upset the
Seminoles 35-30 a year ago
and had won four of the pre-
vious six games in the se-
ries, but was no match this
time.
Florida State had 357 of
its 612 yards offense by half-
time. James Wilder Jr.
chipped in with 94 of the
Seminoles' 385 rushing
yards. It was the Seminoles
most lopsided win over the
Demon Deacons since a 72-
13 rout in 1995.
EJ Manuel's 16-yard
touchdown run set up by a
33-yard Thompson gain
started the scoring ava-
lanche with 4:28 left in the
opening quarter. A minute
and 43 seconds later Greene
was in the end zone with his
second TD of the season on
a punt return.
Manuel retired after
throwing his second touch-
down pass, a 19-yard throw
to Kenny Shaw, in the final
minute of the third period
that gave the Seminoles a


45-0 lead. He completed 15
of 24 passes for 172 yards
and two scores.
The Seminoles kept the
Demon Deacons pinned
down deep in their own ter-
ritory throughout the first
half. Wake Forest first five
offensive possessions
started inside its 20, includ-
ing two at the five.
It was sixth time Florida
State has shut out Wake For-
est., which suffered its last
shutout two years ago in
Tallahassee, 31-0.


Sports BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


SCOREBOARD


1.


I -






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

UCF 33, FlU 20
FlU 0 014 6- 20
UCF 9 14 7 3- 33
First Quarter
UCF-Giovanetti 4 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 7:36.
UCF-Safety, 1:24.
Second Quarter
UCF-Hall 16 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
8:11.
UCF-B.Harvey4 run (Moffitt kick), 1:59.
Third Quarter
FlU-Rhodes 5 pass from Medlock (Griffin
kick), 10:53.
UCF-Worton 10 pass from Godfrey (Moffitt
kick), 3:59.
FlU-Mallary 28 run (Griffin kick), 1:13.
Fourth Quarter
FlU-Mallary 4 run (pass failed), 9:16.
UCF-FG Moffitt 23, 2:26.
A-40,478.
FlU UCF
First downs 15 21
Rushes-yards 34-152 40-170
Passing 154 261
Comp-Att-Int 13-29-0 21-32-1
Return Yards 7 48
Punts-Avg. 6-40.5 5-39.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 2-14 5-59
Time of Possession 24:37 35:23
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-FlU, Mallary 11-71, Rhodes 11-48,
Harden 1-36,
SColeman 2-7, Hammonds 1-5, Medlock 7-2,
Team 1-(minus 17). UCF,
S.Johnson 18-78, B.Harvey 16-73, Godfrey 2-
19, Bortles 2-1, Team 1-0,
Calabrese 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-FlU, Medlock 13-28-0-154, Ham-
monds 0-1-0-0. UCF,
Bortles 20-30-1-251, Godfrey 1-1-0-10, Cal-
abrese 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING-FlU, Mallary 4-49, Times 3-12,
Griner 1-26, Wright 1-24,
Younger 1-21, Dan-Fodio 1-13, Rhodes 1-5,
J.Williams 1-4. UCF,
Worton 5-94, Giovanetti 3-31, Godfrey 3-26,
B.Harvey 3-26, McDuffie 3-13, Hall 2-63, Cal-
abrese 1-8, S.Johnson 1-0.

Miami 38,
Bethune-Cookman 10
Bethune-Cookman 7 0 0 3 10
Miami 7 10 7 14- 38
First Quarter
Beth-I.Jackson 1 run (Hurd kick), 2:37.
Mia-Du.Johnson 95 kickoff return (Wieclaw
kick), 2:25.
Second Quarter
Mia-Du.Johnson 1 run (Wieclaw kick), 5:48.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 20, :35.
Third Quarter
Mia-Du.Johnson 50 pass from Morris
(Wieclaw kick), 4:26.
Fourth Quarter
Beth-FG Hurd 31, 9:49.
Mia-Du.Johnson 28 run (Wieclaw kick), 8:25.
Mia-Clements 10 run (Wieclaw kick), 3:56.
A-39,435.
Beth Mia
First downs 20 20
Rushes-yards 53-233 29-215
Passing 122 211
Comp-Att-Int 10-26-1 20-35-1
Return Yards 0 30
Punts-Avg. 8-38.5 4-43.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 7-45 9-70
Time of Possession 36:57 23:03
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Bethune-Cookman, Scott 14-72,
I.Jackson 13-66, Waters 6-60,
Allen 2-15, Cabrera 5-14, J.Wilson 9-6,
Q.Williams 4-0. Miami,
Du.Johnson 14-94, James 9-77, Clements 5-
37, Morris 1-7.
PASSING-Bethune-Cookman, J.Wilson 3-10-
0-51, Q.Williams 5-9-0-69,
Waters 2-6-0-2, Kowalski 0-1-1-0. Miami, Morris
20-35-1-211.
RECEIVING-Bethune-Cookman, I.Jackson 2-
29, Cleckley 2-27,
Stroud 2-17, Poole 1-20, Gordon 1-16, Harris
1-3. Miami, Dorsett 6-49,
Du.Johnson 3-57, Dye 2-10, M.Lewis 2-9, Wal-
ford 2-8, Da.Johnson 1-20, James 1-14, Ha-
gens 1-8.

No. 5 Florida State 52,
Wake Forest 0
Wake Forest 0 0 0 0-- 0
Florida St. 14 24 7 7 52
First Quarter
FSU-Manuel 16 run (Hopkins kick), 4:28.
FSU-Greene 60 punt return (Hopkins kick),
2:45.
Second Quarter
FSU-Thompson 74 run (Hopkins kick), 12:52.
FSU-Thompson 80 run (Hopkins kick), 9:42.
FSU-FG Hopkins 19, 4:37.
FSU-R.Smith 20 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), :14.
Third Quarter
FSU-Shaw 17 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), :44.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-Smiley 18 run (Hopkins kick), 12:21.
A-68,833.
Wake FSU
First downs 7 27
Rushes-yards 35-43 45-385
Passing 83 227
Comp-Att-Int 10-24-0 19-28-0
Return Yards 0 89
Punts-Avg. 13-40.0 4-42.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 3-20 5-48
Time of Possession 29:19 30:41
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Wake Forest, J.Harris 15-51, Mar-
tin 8-14, Campanaro 1-3,
Ragland 1-0, Sousa 2-(minus 1), Team 1-(minus
2), Reynolds 2-(minus 3),
Price 5-(minus 19). Florida St., Thompson 9-
197, Wilder 16-94,
Manuel 8-48, Smiley 4-30, Freeman 6-14, Pryor
2-2.
PASSING-Wake Forest, Price 8-22-0-82,
Cross 1-1-0-(minus 2),
PThompson 1-1-0-3. Florida St., Manuel 15-24-
0-176, Trickett 3-3-0-41,
Coker 1-1-0-10.
RECEIVING-Wake Forest, Ragland 2-48,
J.Harris 2-10, Campanaro 2-8,
Davis 1-9, Terry 1-7, James 1-3, Martin 1-
(minus 2). Florida St.,
Benjamin 4-44, Shaw 3-32, Greene 2-30, Pryor
2-30, Thompson 2-23,
R.Smith 1-20, Haggins 1-11, O'Leary 1-11,
Green 1-10, Wilder 1-9, Freeman 1-7.

No. 18 Florida 37,
No. 23 Tennessee 20
Florida 7 317 10 37
Tennessee 7 7 6 0--20
First Quarter
Fla-T.Burton 14 run (Sturgis kick), 7:52.
Tenn-Patterson 2 pass from Bray (Brodus
kick), 3:02.
Second Quarter
Tenn-Rivera 6 pass from Bray (Brodus kick),
8:40.
Fla-FG Sturgis 20, :00.
Third Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 25, 12:22.
Tenn-Johnson 1 run (kick failed), 7:33.
Fla-T.Burton 80 run (Sturgis kick), 3:15.
Fla-Reed 23 pass from Driskel (Sturgis kick),
:30.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Hammond 75 pass from Driskel (Sturgis


kick), 9:55.
Fla-FG Sturgis 49, 6:44.
A-102,455.
Fla Tenn
First downs 20 19
Rushes-yards 43-336 28-83
Passing 219 257
Comp-Att-Int 14-20-0 22-44-2
Return Yards 38 8
Punts-Avg. 5-48.6 8-44.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 8-78 9-59
Time of Possession 33:13 26:47
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Gillislee 18-115, TBurton
3-91, Driskel 8-81,
Patton 3-34, Jones 5-9, Elam 1-5, M.Brown 1-
3, Debose 2-1,
Team 2-(minus 3). Tennessee, Neal 23-87,
Johnson 2-5, Lane 1-1,
Bray 2-(minus 10).
PASSING-Florida, Driskel 14-20-0-219. Ten-
nessee, Bray 22-44-2-257.
RECEIVING-Florida, Reed 5-60, Dunbar 3-
30, TBurton 2-38,
Hammond 1-75, Patton 1-17, Joyer 1-5, Hines
1-(minus 6).Tennessee, Patterson 8-75, Hunter
5-76, Rivera 4-47, Rogers 3-39, Neal 2-20.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Knights own first half, easily slay Panthers


Associated Press


ORLANDO Central
Florida rode a dominant
first-half performance to a
33-20 victory over Florida
International.
The Knights (2-1) limited
FIU to just 26 yards total of-
fense en route to a 23-0 half-
time lead, but had to hold
off a late rally to get the vic-
tory Blake Bortles threw
for 251 yards and two touch-
downs and Storm Johnson
rushed for 78 yards for UCE
"It was two different
halves," UCF coach George
O'Leary said. "I thought we
were in sync on offense in
the first half, but sporadic
and inconsistent the second."
FIU tailback Darian Mal-
lary rushed for 71 yards and
two touchdowns, almost all
of it in the second half when
the Panthers made up for
their anemic first half by
rolling up 280 yards of of-
fense and scoring three
times. Kedrick Rhodes got
the other FIU touchdown
on a 5-yard scoring pass
from Jake Medlock.


"I really like the way we
did things in the second half,
but we dug too deep a hole
in the first half," FIU coach
Mario Cristobal said. "We
couldn't get them off the field
in that first half and then
things were completely dif-
ferent in the second. We
started moving it really well."
UCF owned the first half.
Bortles found fullback Billy
Giovanetti on a third-and-
goal play for a 4-yard scor-
ing pass to get UCF's
offense started. FIU con-
tributed a safety when an
errant center snap went
over punter Jack Griffin's
head and out of the end-
zone to make it 9-0.
Bortles then threw a 16-
yard scoring pass to Rannell
Hall in the second quarter
and Brynn Harvey tacked
on a 4-yard scoring run to
make it 23-0 at the half.
UCF's defense, mean-
while, was manhandling
FIU. The Knights allowed
only two first downs and
made the Panthers go
three-and-out on four occa-
sions in the half.


Associated Press
Central Florida wide receiver J.J. Worton catches a pass in
front of Florida International cornerback Richard Leonard on
Saturday during the second half in Orlando. UCF won 33-20.


"We had a chip on our
shoulder because we didn't
think these guys respected
us," said UCF linebacker
Troy Davis, who had two sacks
and seven tackles in the
game. "Then we got sloppy
in our techniques and ad-
justments the second half."
"What I saw was sloppy
tackling," O'Leary said.
"They got a lot of hidden
yards after the first hit."


The Panthers' offense fi-
nally got on track with an
85-yard scoring drive on
their first possession in the
third quarter. Medlock, who
was just 1-of-8 passing in
the first half, went 4 for 4 for
77 yards on the drive, in-
cluding the 5-yard toss to
Rhodes for a touchdown.
UCF responded with an
83-yard scoring drive that
included a 47-yard recep-


tion by Hall on which the
Knights' receiver laid him-
self out completely to make
a diving catch at the FIU 32-
yard line. Two plays later,
Jeff Godfrey, a quarterback
last year but now a wide re-
ceiver, took a handoff on an
apparent end around. In-
stead, he stopped and fired
a 10-yard scoring pass to J.J.
Worton to make it 30-7.
Mallary scored on a 28-
yard run to cut the deficit to
30-14 at the end of the third
quarter.
Early in the fourth quar-
ter, Medlock fumbled at his
own 4-yard line while being
sacked. UCF's Terrance
Plummer picked it up, but
then fumbled and FIU's
Glenn Coleman fell on it.
The Panthers drove 96
yards in eight plays, with
Mallary scoring from four
yards out to make it 30-20. A
2-point attempt that would
have made it a one-posses-
sion game failed.
UCF got a 23-yard field
goal from Shawn Moffitt
with just over two minutes
left to sew up the victory


Associated Press


Bethune-Cookman quarterback Brodrick Waters scrambles with the ball Saturday against Miami in the first half in Miami.




'Canes cooking' against Wildcats


Miamieshman Johnson tallies 246yards in 30-10 win over Bethune-Cookman


Associated Press

MIAMI One of the biggest
reasons why Duke Johnson de-
cided to enroll at Miami was
that staying in his hometown for
college would enable his friends
and family to still see him play
And on Saturday, he gave
them a show.
The freshman scored four
touchdowns getting them
three different ways and fin-
ished with 246 all-purpose yards
in his first collegiate home
game, leading Miami past
Bethune-Cookman 38-10.
"I'm just waiting for him to do
a backflip sometime in the mid-
dle of a play," Miami quarter-
back Stephen Morris said. "He
can do it."
At this point, few would doubt
that
Johnson had a 95-yard kick re-
turn for a score, a 50-yard touch-
down reception and scoring
runs of 1 and 28 yards for the
Hurricanes (2-1), who trailed the
Wildcats 7-0 for the second
straight year before pulling


away from their Football Cham-
pionship Subdivision opponent
and winning their sixth straight
home opener.
Johnson now has six touch-
downs in his first three college
games, four going for at least 50
yards. He's the first Hurricane
with a four-touchdown outing
since Tyrone Moss in 2005, and
according to STATS LLC, John-
son became just the 10th player
at the major-college level in the
last seven seasons to have rush-
ing, receiving and return touch-
downs in the same game.
You surprised, Duke?
"Not really," Johnson said.
Not even a little?
"Nah," he said with a grin.
The Hurricanes have raved
about Johnson's humble ways
since his two-touchdown opener
at Boston College both ex-
ceeding 50 yards and did
more of the same on Saturday
Of Miami's 11 touchdowns this
season, six have been scored by
Johnson, one of the nation's
most coveted recruits out of
Miami Norland High last year.


"As I've said all along, he's
very mature in his work ethic,
his approach, his preparation,"
Miami coach Al Golden said.
"You can ask him to do some
things and he accepts it, he ac-
cepts that challenge and then
goes out and executes it. He's a
kid that's proving it to himself
right now, not really to any of us.
He's one of those guys who's got a
standard of excellence right now"
Johnson finished with 94
rushing yards and Morris shook
off a rusty start and completed
20 of 35 passes for 211 yards for
the Hurricanes, who return to
Atlantic Coast Conference play
at Georgia Tech next weekend.
The Wildcats took a 7-0 lead
when Jackson's score capped a
six-play, 20-yard drive set up
when the Hurricanes' Phillip
Dorsett fumbled a punt return.
Last season, the Wildcats kept
their edge on the Hurricanes for
much of the first half.
This time, the lead lasted for
all of 12 seconds. The Duke
Show took care of that.
After Jackson's score, John-


son took the ensuing kickoff, fol-
lowed Dorsett through some
gaping holes and sprinted un-
touched to the end zone, tying
the game at 7-7.
He was just getting started.
Miami took the lead after going
50 yards in nine plays midway
through the second quarter,
Johnson getting the last yard
after taking a pitch and running
left, diving just past the goal line
for a 14-7 lead. The Hurricanes
forced a three-and-out, and Jake
Wieclaw's 20-yard field goal with
35 seconds left sent Miami into
halftime leading 17-7.
Johnson dazzled again in the
third, catching a short pass from
Morris, waiting for some block-
ing to develop and sprinting 50
yards for his third score of the
afternoon. His fourth score
came with 8:25 left, a 28-yard rush
that pushed the lead to 31-10 -
and after that play, Johnson
sprinted back to check on Maurice
Hagens, who had just caught a
pass on the previous play and
threw a key block to spring
Johnson free for his final score.


Collegefootball BRIEFS


Connecticut 24, Maryland 21
COLLEGE PARK, Md. Lyle Mc-
Combs and Scott McCummings both
ran for touchdowns, and Nick Williams
returned a punt for another score as
Connecticut defeated Maryland 24-21.
McCombs rushed for 94 yards and
his fourth-quarter touchdown. McCum-
mings, who also came in at quarterback
occasionally, ran for a 3-yard score that
gave the Huskies a 14-0 first-half lead.
That came after Williams scored the
game's first touchdown on a 58-yard
punt return.
Connecticut (2-1) started quickly in
going against their former coach,
Randy Edsall, who left after 2010 to
come to Maryland (2-1). The Huskies
outgained Maryland 148-80 in total
yardage in the first half and controlled
the ball for 18 minutes, 40 seconds.


Georgia Tech 56, Virginia 20
ATLANTA Tevin Washington ran
for three touchdowns and threw a 70-
yard scoring pass to Zach Laskey on
Georgia Tech's first snap, setting up an
early barrage of big plays as the Yellow
Jackets beat Virginia 56-20.
Washington's backup at quarterback,
Vad Lee, added to the rout with two
touchdown runs.
Georgia Tech's spread-option offense
overwhelmed the Cavaliers with three
gains of 60 yards or longer on its first
four plays.
Georgia Tech (2-1, 1-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference) kept up the high-scoring
pace with 1-yard scoring runs by Wash-
ington and Lee in the second quarter
for a 35-7 halftime lead.
Virginia (2-1,0-1) was held to 98
yards rushing.


Okla. St. 65, La.-Lafayette 24
STILLWATER, Okla. Backup J.W.
Walsh threw for 347 yards and four
touchdowns in relief of injured starting
quarterback Wes Lunt, leading Oklahoma
State to a 65-24 blowout of Louisiana-
Lafayette.
Walsh also ran for 73 yards and a
score after replacing Lunt, who hurt his
left knee on the sixth play of the game.
The Cowboys (2-1) didn't miss a beat
without him, scoring on their first eight
possessions to build a 44-0 halftime
lead and setting a school record with
742 yards of total offense.
Blake Jackson had 112 yards receiving
and a touchdown, and Josh Stewart added
104 yards and two touchdowns through
the air. Joseph Randle ran for 105 yards
and two scores for Oklahoma State, which
rebounded from a 59-38 loss at Arizona.


Penn State 34, Navy 7
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Matt Mc-
Gloin threw for 231 yards and four
touchdowns and Penn State over-
whelmed Navy in a 34-7 win Saturday
for rookie coach Bill O'Brien's first ca-
reer victory.
The Nittany Lions (1-2) rolled to a
morale-boosting victory following two
draining losses to open a season of
change in Happy Valley. Penn State
picked up its first win since the NCAA
levied landmark sanctions in July.
Allen Robinson torched the Midship-
men's porous secondary for three
touchdowns and 136 yards on five
catches, while Linebacker U. forced
four turnovers including linebacker Mike
Hull's 74-yard fumble return to make it
34-0 in the fourth quarter.
-From wire reports


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 B5






B6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Associated Press
Pittsburgh running back Rushel Shell wards off a Virginia Tech defender Saturday in Pittsburgh. The Panthers upset the No. 13 Hokies 35-17.










Real 1




Unranked Pitt routs No. 13- andACCpowerhouse- Virginia Tech 35-17


Associated Press

PITTSBURGH A video-
taped message from ACC com-
missioner John Swofford offered
Pitt a warm welcome to the ACC
in 2013 moments before the Pan-
thers hosted conference power
Virginia Tech on Saturday.
Somehow after two baf-
fling, listless losses to open the
Paul Chryst era Pitt looks
ready to make the move.
Ray Graham rushed for 94
yards and two scores and added
an 18-yard touchdown reception
as the Panthers upset the 13th-
ranked Hokies in a 35-17 romp.
"We definitely went out there
and made noise today," Graham
said. "I think playing an ACC
team just gives us a feeling for
what we can do when it's time to
go in the ACC. This is a good
ACC team. It can only get better
from here."
It couldn't have gotten much
worse for the Panthers (1-2),
who began the season getting
upset at home by Youngstown
State then blown out on the road
at Cincinnati.
Yet Chryst, the program's


third coach in as many seasons,
doesn't really do panic. Even
with the seemingly surging Hok-
ies (2-1) looming, he told his
players things would be fine so
long as they stuck to the plan.
"It's not like the movies, 'Any
Given Sunday,' it's not just a
pregame speech," Chryst said.
"It's the process and that's what
you appreciate going through.
This is the culmination of the
work week."
One the Panthers hope pro-
vides a welcome breakthrough.
Tino Sunseri passed for 283
yards and three touchdowns
and freshman running back
Rushel Shell added 157 yards as
Pitt ended the nation's longest
road winning streak. The Pan-
thers raced to a quick 21-0 lead,
forced four turnovers and took
advantage of uncharacteristi-
cally sloppy play by Virginia
Tech.
"I thought (Pitt was) hitting on
all cylinders, and I thought it
was their day," Virginia Tech
coach Frank Beamer said.
"We've got to play a lot better.
(But) Pitt deserves a lot of
credit. They played hard, and


they played well. And they got
the win today"
The Hokies had won 13
straight true road games but
were stunned by the Panthers in
the game's first 20 minutes and
never really threatened. Logan
Thomas completed just 14 of 31
passes for 265 yards and one
touchdown against three inter-
ceptions against a defense that
managed just one sack and no
turnovers through the season's
first two weeks.
All that changed on a day Pitt
held the Hokies to just 59 yards
rushing and stopped a pair of
fourth-down attempts in the sec-
ond half to snuff out any hope
Virginia Tech had of rallying.
"Their first two games, they
just didn't play as hard as they
did today," Thomas said. "They're
a good defense. They're strong,
and they're physical. They're
fast, and they make you make
mistakes. They did that today,
and that's what won them the
game. They played real hard."
Pitt is jumping to the ACC
next year along with Syracuse
and will face Hokies on a yearly
basis as part of the league's


Coastal Division, reigniting a
spirited rivalry that ended in
2004 when Virginia Tech and
Miami abruptly left the Big East
with Boston College officially
joining them a year later.
The Panthers sent off an em-
phatic opening salvo.
Using Graham and Shell to
chew up yardage and time, the
Panthers controlled the ball for
over 38 minutes and rolled up
537 yards against one of the bet-
ter defenses in the country Not
bad for a team that looked lost
at times against lesser foes.
"Those two losses were big for
us," wide receiver Devin Street
said. "I think it was an eye-
opener for us."
Just like this one will be for
the Hokies, though Beamer
downplayed Pitt's early season
struggles, calling it the byprod-
uct of having three different
coaches in as many seasons.
The Panthers think they've fi-
nally found a keeper in Chryst,
who has given the program a
sense of calm. He insisted there
was no panic in his team after
such a horrific start
He was right.


Top 25 ROUNDUP


No. 1 Alabama 52, Arkansas 0
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Eddie Lacy
ran for three touchdowns and the Crim-
son Tide forced five turnovers to win its
21st straight to SEC opener.
Vinnie Sunseri and Haha Clinton-Dix
had interceptions against the Razorbacks,
who played without quarterback Tyler
Wilson because he had a head injury in
last week's loss to Louisiana-Monroe.
The shutout was the second straight
for the Crimson Tide (3-0, 1-0 South-
eastern Conference). The last time Ala-
bama, which has forced 12 turnovers this
season, had back-to-back shutouts was
against Vanderbilt and Kentucky in 1980.
No. 3 LSU 63, Idaho 14
BATON ROUGE, La. Ronald Martin
and Lavar Edwards each intercepted
deflected passes and returned them for
scores, and No. 3 LSU rolled to a 63-14
victory over winless Idaho.
LSU intercepted Idaho's Dominique
Balckman four times, with Martin snag-
ging two, en route to an NCAA FBS
record 40th-straight non-conference
regular season victory.
LSU (3-0) also set a Tiger stadium
mark with 20 straight home wins.
LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger
passed for 222 yards and two TDs.
No. 4 Oregon 63,
Tennessee Tech 14
EUGENE, Ore. Marcus Mariota
threw for 308 yards and four touchdowns
before Oregon pulled its starters.
Multitalented De'Anthony Thomas
had 222 all-purpose yards on 10
touches. He ran for a 59-yard touch-
down and caught a 16-yard scoring
pass from Mariota.
The Ducks (3-0) were playing their
final nonconference game before host-
ing Arizona next Saturday. They had
652 yards in total offense, compared to
177 yards for Tennessee Tech.
No. 7 Georgia 56, FAU 20
ATHENS, Ga. -Aaron Murray
passed for a career-best 342 yards and
two touchdowns, also scored twice on


short runs, and No. 7 Georgia bounced
back from another slow start to rout
Florida Atlantic 56-20.
Playing without Jarvis Jones and two
other defensive stalwarts, Georgia (3-0)
struggled in the first half to slow a Florida
Atlantic team that scored a single touch-
down against lower-division Wagner.
The 44-point underdog Owls (1-2) kept
converting third downs and found them-
selves tied at 14 in the second quarter.
But the Bulldogs had too many weapons,
piling up a school-record 713 yards.
No. 8 South Carolina 49, UAB 6
COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw
went 8 of 14 for 107 yards before rein-
juring his throwing shoulder as No. 8
South Carolina beat UAB 49-6.
Shaw left the game after taking a
brutal hit just late in the first half. Team
officials said the junior aggravated the
bruised right shoulder that kept him out
of last week's game.
Sophomore Dylan Thompson took
over again, throwing a 95-yard touch-
down pass to Damiere Byrd that put
South Carolina (3-0) up 35-6 midway
through the third quarter.
Gamecocks coach Steve Spurrier
picked up his 200th college coaching win.
No. 9 West Virginia 42,
James Madison 12
LANDOVER, Md. Geno Smith
completed 34 of 39 passes for 411 yards
and five touchdowns for West Virginia.
Smith set the school's career passing
yardage record, topping Marc Bulger.
Stedman Bailey and Tavon Austin both
had 100 yards receiving before halftime
for the Mountaineers, who improved to
2-0 and are 13-0 against FCS schools.
Bailey finished with 173 yards on 13
catches and three touchdowns.
No. 11 Clemson 41, Furman 7
CLEMSON, S.C. -Tajh Boyd threw for
310 yards and three touchdown passes,
Sammy Watkins had a 58-yard touchdown
run in his season debut and Clemson
won its 30th straight over Furman.
Watkins scored in the first quarter
after taking an inside handoff from Boyd


and rushing past the right side of Furman's
defense. The All-American sophomore
receiver spent the past two games on the
sideline, suspended for a May drug arrest.
He finished with four catches for 52 yards.
Boyd's three scoring throws gave
him 43 for his career, second at Clem-
son (3-0) and just six behind the record
held by Charlie Whitehurst.
No. 12 Ohio State 35,
California 28
COLUMBUS, Ohio Braxton Miller
lofted a 72-yard touchdown pass to an
all-alone Devin Smith with 3:26 left and
Christian Bryant snuffed out California's
last chance with an interception for the
Buckeyes.
The Golden Bears (1-2) missed three
field goals and had a touchdown called
back by a penalty, while the Buckeyes
(3-0) gave up 512 yards and were out-
played for much of the second half.
No. 15 Kansas State 35,
North Texas 21
MANHATTAN, Kan. Collin Klein
threw for 230 yards and accounted for
three touchdowns, Tyler Lockett returned
a kickoff 96 yards for another score and
No. 15 Kansas State eased past pesky
North Texas 35-21.
Tramaine Thompson caught five
passes for 102 yards and two scores,
and John Hubert added a touchdown
on the ground for Kansas State (3-0),
which struggled to put away the
tougher-than-expected Mean Green in
its tuneup for next Saturday's show-
down with fifth-ranked Oklahoma.

No. 16 TCU 20, Kansas 6
LAWRENCE, Kan. Casey Pachall
threw for 335 yards and two touch-
downs, both to Brandon Carter, and
TCU won its Big 12 debut.
Carter finished with eight catches for
141 yards, and Waymon James added
99 yards rushing for the Horned Frogs
(2-0, 1-0), who pushed the nation's
longest winning streak to 10 games by
beating up on the team picked to finish
last in the conference in preseason polls.


No. 17 Michigan 63, UMass 13
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Denard
Robinson put up 397 yards of total of-
fense and accounted for four touch-
downs for Michigan.
Robinson, who came out of the
game with Michigan (2-1) leading 56-13
late in the third quarter, rushed for 106
yards and a touchdown and completed
16 of 24 passes for 291 yards and
three scores.
No. 19 Louisville 39,
North Carolina 34
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -Teddy Bridge-
water threw three first-half touchdowns
and No. 19 Louisville scored on its first
six possessions, and then had thwart
North Carolina's comeback with a late
defensive stand.
Bryn Renner settled down from a
rough first half to rally the Tar Heels
(1-2) from a 36-7 deficit with four sec-
ond-half touchdowns, including a
screen pass to Romar Morris for a 50-
yard touchdown with 1:45 remaining.
North Carolina's Norkeithus Otis then
forced Adrian Bushell to fumble the en-
suing kickoff, and the Tar Heels recov-
ered at the Cardinals 10. But after
moving to the 3, North Carolina was pe-
nalized for a false start and Renner's
final pass two plays later was broken up
by Andrew Johnson in the end zone.
No. 21 Stanford 21,
No. 2 USC 14
STANFORD, Calif. Even without
Andrew Luck, Stanford still has every
answer for Matt Barkley and USC.
Josh Nunes threw a go-ahead 37-
yard touchdown to Zach Ertz, Stepfan
Taylor ran for 153 yards and scored two
touchdowns, and No. 21 Stanford upset
second-ranked USC 21-14 for its fourth
straight win in this series.
Heisman Trophy hopeful Matt Barkley
threw for 254 yards and two interceptions
while completing only 20 of 41 passes. He
was sacked twice on the final drive for
the Trojans (2-1, 0-1 Pac-12) and threw
out of bounds on a final, desperate heave
on fourth-and-39 from USC's 25-yard line.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

College football scores
EAST
American International 49, Merrimack 34
Bloomsburg 44, Kutztown 37
Brockport 41, College of NJ 17
Brown 24, Holy Cross 21
California (Pa.) 24, Edinboro 14
Colgate 35, Sacred Heart 14
Columbia 10, Marist 9
Cortland St. 72, W. Connecticut 14
Dartmouth 35, Butler 7
Delaware 19, Bucknell 3
Dickinson 17, Susquehanna 14
Fordham 34, Cornell 27
Franklin & Marshall 40, Ursinus 28
Gettysburg 28, Juniata 7
Harvard 28, San Diego 13
Heidelberg 43, Ohio Northern 7
Hobart 45, Utica 26
Ithaca 27, Union (NY) 24, OT
Lafayette 28, Penn 21
Lehigh 17, Princeton 14
Maine 51, Bryant 7
Monmouth (NJ) 38, Wagner 17
Montclair St. 7, Morrisville St. 0
N. Illinois 41, Army 40
New Hampshire 43, CCSU 10
New Haven 44, Pace 10
Penn St. 34, Navy 7
Pittsburgh 35, Virginia Tech 17
RPI 56, Castleton St. 35
St. Augustine's 30, S. Connecticut 14
Syracuse 28, Stony Brook 17
Thiel 21, Geneva 14, OT
Towson 20, William & Mary 17
Villanova 31, Rhode Island 10
Washington & Jefferson 24, Grove City 17
West Virginia 42, James Madison 12
Yale 24, Georgetown 21
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 42, Prairie View 30
Alabama St. 19, Grambling St. 18
Ark.-Pine Bluff 24, Alcorn St. 6
Auburn 31, Louisiana-Monroe 28, OT
Carson-Newman 47, Lenoir-Rhyne 23
Clemson 41, Furman 7
Cumberland (Tenn.) 36, Belhaven 30, OT
Cumberlands 48, Union (Ky.) 14
Duke 54, NC Central 17
E. Kentucky 35, Coastal Carolina 17
East Carolina 24, Southern Miss. 14
Edward Waters 42, Livingstone 36
Elon 48, W.Virginia St. 14
Emory & Henry 34, Methodist 20
Florida 37, Tennessee 20
Florida A&M 44, Hampton 20
Florida St. 52, Wake Forest 0
Georgetown (Ky) 33, Lindsey Wilson 7
Georgia 56, FAU 20
Georgia Tech 56, Virginia 20
Guilford 45, Averett 35
Howard 37, Norfolk St. 36, OT
Jacksonville 33, Webber International 10
Johns Hopkins 49, Moravian 15
LSU 63, Idaho 14
Louisiana Tech 56, Rice 37
Louisville 39, North Carolina 34
Maryville (Tenn.) 24, Sewanee 17
Miami 38, Bethune-Cookman 10
Middle Tennessee 48, Memphis 30
Mississippi St. 30, Troy 24
NC A&T 40, Va. Lynchburg 7
NC State 31, South Alabama 7
Ohio 27, Marshall 24
Old Dominion 70, Campbell 14
Rhodes 21, Claremont-Mudd 17
Richmond 47, VMI 6
Samford 44, Gardner-Webb 23
Shaw 31, Stillman 26
South Carolina 49, UAB 6
St. Francis (Pa.) 57, Morehead St. 23
Tennessee St. 34, Austin Peay 14
The Citadel 52, Appalachian St. 28
Tusculum 33, North Greenville 21
UCF 33, FlU 20
UConn 24, Maryland 21
UTSA 38, Georgia St. 14
Vanderbilt 58, Presbyterian 0
W. Kentucky 32, Kentucky 31, OT
West Alabama 41, Mississippi College 3
Westminster (Pa.) 23, Thomas More 21
Wofford 49, W. Carolina 20
MIDWEST
Adrian 31, Wis. Lutheran 23
Akron 66, Morgan St. 6
Ashland 47, Ferris St. 32
Augsburg 26, Gustavus 24
Augustana (11.) 34, Loras 10
Augustana (SD) 61, Minn.-Crookston 0
Aurora 24, Alma 21
Benedictine (11.) 32, Albion 28
Bethel (Minn.) 56, Buena Vista 7
Bluffton 28, Earlham 20
Buffalo St. 7, Wis.-Whitewater 6
Capital 13, Marietta 7
Carleton 21, Hamline 14
Carroll (Wis.) 48, Knox 6
Central St. (Ohio) 28, Urbana 22
Cincinnati 23, Delaware St. 7
Coe 20, Washington (Mo.) 14
Concordia (11.) 63, Hope 47
Concordia (Moor) 28, St. Olaf 14
Concordia (Wis.) 13, Trine 10
Dayton 20, Robert Morris 14
Duquesne 45, Valparaiso 17
Eureka 17, Crown (Minn.) 14
Evangel 45, Culver-Stockton 23
Findlay 29, Saginaw Valley St. 27
Grand Valley St. 28, Tiffin 0
Hanover 28, Mount St. Joseph 24
Hillsdale 27, Malone 10
Illinois 44, Charleston Southern 0
Illinois St. 54, E. Illinois 51, 20T
Indiana St. 27, Drake 10
Iowa 27, N. Iowa 16
Iowa St. 37, W. Illinois 3
Kalamazoo 31, Lakeland 24
Kansas St. 35, North Texas 21
Kenyon 24, Hiram 7
Lake Forest 33, Grinnell 7
Lawrence 38, Beloit 14
Mary 43, SW Minnesota St. 24
Michigan 63, UMass 13
Michigan Tech 30, Walsh 7
Minn. Duluth 70, Concordia (St.R) 24
Minn. St.-Mankato 25, St. Cloud St. 21
Minn.-Morris 24, Mac Murray 21
Minnesota 28, W. Michigan 23
Missouri 24, Arizona St. 20
Nebraska 42, Arkansas St. 13
North Central 37, Wis.-Stout 10
Northwestern 22, Boston College 13
Northwestern (Minn.) 35, Presentation 10
Northwood (Mich.) 49, Notre Dame Coll. 14
Ohio Dominican 47, N. Michigan 7
Ohio St. 35, California 28
Purdue 54, E. Michigan 16
Rockford 28, Olivet 12
Rose-Hulman 33, Defiance 20
S. Dakota St. 12, UC Davis 8
S. Illinois 35, SE Missouri 14
Siena Heights 31, Concordia (Mich.) 14
Sioux Falls 42, Minot St. 20
St. Norbert 35, Ripon 31
St. Scholastica 45, Greenville 3
St. Thomas (Minn.) 43, St. John's (Minn.) 21
TCU 20, Kansas 6
Toledo 27, Bowling Green 15
Upper Iowa 51, Minn. St.-Moorhead 33
Wabash 35, Denison 2
Wartburg 27, Carthage 3
Wayne (Mich.) 35, Lake Erie 31
Wayne (Neb.) 20, Bemidji St.17
Westminster (Mo.) 26, Martin Luther 7
Wheaton (lll.) 53, Luther 7
Winona St. 42, Northern St. (SD) 32
Wis.-Oshkosh 16, Wis.-LaCrosse 7


Wis.-Stevens Pt. 55, Dubuque 14
Wisconsin 16, Utah St. 14
Youngstown St. 31, Albany (NY) 24
SOUTHWEST
Alabama 52, Arkansas 0
Baylor 48, Sam Houston St. 23
Cent. Arkansas 70, Bacone 3
Hardin-Simmons 57, Texas College 21
Mary Hardin-Baylor 32, Wesley 25
Oklahoma St. 65, Louisiana-Lafayette 24
Sul Ross St. 62, Trinity (Texas) 35
Texas A&M 48, SMU 3
Texas Tech 49, New Mexico 14
Tulsa 66, Nicholls St. 16
FAR WEST
Boise St. 39, Miami (Ohio) 12
Cal Poly 24, Wyoming 22
McNeese St. 35, Weber St. 21
Montana 34, Liberty 14
Montana St. 43, Stephen F Austin 35
N. Arizona 69, Fort Lewis 0
Nevada 45, Northwestern St. 34
Oregon 63, Tennessee Tech 14
Sacramento St. 28, N. Colorado 17
San Jose St. 40, Colorado St. 20
Washington 52, Portland St. 13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jaguars have concerns with Texans' Johnson


Associated Press


JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars typi-
cally shadow Pro Bowl re-
ceiver Andre Johnson.
Sometimes it's been
Rashean Mathis covering
Houston's go-to guy Other
times it's been Derek Cox.
Regardless, the Jaguars
haven't had much success.
Things could get dicey
when the AFC South rivals
play in Jacksonville today
With Cox likely out again
and Mathis still recovering
from knee surgery, the Jaguars
(0-1) are shuffling their sec-
ondary as much as any team
in the league. In Week 1's
overtime loss at Minnesota,
they rotated seven players
through five positions and
couldn't seem to find the
right combination.
The Jaguars struggled to
cover Percy Harvin and did-
n't do a whole lot better on
his teammates.


Now they face the high-
powered Texans (1-0) and
Johnson, who's healthy
again after missing nine
games last season with a
nagging hamstring injury
"Andre can hurt you,"
Mathis said. "If it's a passing
play, almost 90 percent of
the time the ball is coming
to him. It makes you dot
your I's and cross your T's a
little quicker."
Johnson caught eight
passes for 119 yards and a
touchdown in Houston's
opener, a 30-10 win against
Miami.
The Jaguars have seen
numbers like that regularly
from the five-time Pro Bowler
Johnson has 87 catches
against Jacksonville, tied for
his most against any team.
"There's not too many re-
ceivers in the game right
now, healthy, that can line
up with him," Mathis said.
"Maybe two. He's been doing
it for 10 years. You have to


earn your keep. He's earned
his keep. I don't crown any-
body before his time. He's
definitely shown that he's a
consistent guy when healthy
There aren't too many guys
that can do what he does."
One thing the Jaguars
aren't is healthy
Cox missed most of the
preseason with a hamstring
injury, fellow cornerback
Mathis has been limited
while recovering from a
torn knee ligament late last
season, and linebacker
Daryl Smith has been
slowed by a groin injury
Jacksonville's answer on
the back end?
The Jaguars used corner-
backs Will Middleton orAaron
Ross in their base defense
against the Vikings. They
brought in Kevin Rutland and
Rashean Mathis on passing
downs, took Middleton off
the field and moved Ross to
the slot. On longer-yardage
plays, they had three


Associated Press
Jacksonville Jaguars running back Rashad Jennings carries
the ball Sept. 9 during the first half against the Minnesota
Vikings in Minneapolis.


safeties on the field.
"Regardless of who's out
there, we expect guys to get
the job done," Jaguars de-
fensive coordinator Mel
Tucker said.


The Jaguars crumbled at
the end of regulation last
week, allowing the Vikings
to drive for a tying field goal
after taking the lead with 20
seconds remaining.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive back Mark Barron knocks the ball away from Carolina Panthers tight end Greg Olsen Sept. 9 during the
first quarter in Tampa.


Testy Giants look to shrug ofchip as favorite son Greg Schiano returns to NJ.


Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
Don't expect the New York
Giants to roll out the red
carpet for former Rut-
gers coach Greg Schiano on his
return to New Jersey as Bucca-
neers coach.
The Super Bowl champions
are miffed after a dismal per-
formance in their nationally tel-
evised 24-17 loss to the Dallas
Cowboys in the kickoffto the NFL
season. They need to get back on
track against the Bucs (1-0).
Waiting 10 days to play hasn't
helped Tom Coughlin's team, ei-
ther They're antsy, anxious and
ready to hit someone.
"This is how we are after we
lose," running back Ahmad
Bradshaw said. "Everybody is
out to win. Everybody has some-
thing to prove. That's what we
take this week as, and that's the
approach we take going into the
next game. Get over the loss and
get ready for the next game -
be motivated, have a lot of en-
ergy and be ready to win."
Schiano, who took the Scarlet
Knights to six bowls in his final
seven seasons, got off to a good
start with a 16-10 win over Car-
olina in his NFL head coaching
debut


It was an impressive perform-
ance. His offense did not have
any turnovers. The defense tied
a franchise record by limiting
the Panthers to 10 yards rush-
ing, and special teams blocked a
punt.
That was at home, though.
This will be on the road against
a much better team.
"They're the world champs,"
Tampa Bay left tackle Donald
Penn said. "After that loss last
week, they're going to be coming
back It's going to be a tough one.
It's going to be a lot of hitting in
the mouth."
Schiano can't afford to get too
sentimental about his return
home, although this will be an
emotional game for him. It will
be the first time he has coached
in MetLife Stadium since Eric
LeGrand was paralyzed making
a tackle on a kickoff in a game
against Army in 2010.
LeGrand, signed by the Bucs
after the draft and then retired,
also plans to attend.
"It's just a good New Jersey
thing, and a good thing overall
for football," said Schiano, who
vividly recalls driving to his
grandmother's home in nearby
Rutherford and seeing the now-
replaced Giants Stadium being
built.


The focal this week is keeping
the Giants winless.
New York struggled on both
sides of the ball against Dallas.
Eli Manning was limited to 213
yards passing and the offense had
the ball for roughly 26 minutes.
The defense gave up 433 yards and
ends Jason Pierre-Paul, Justin
Tuck and Osi Umenyiora failed to
get a sack. The Giants' two sacks
were made by defensive tackles
Rocky Bernard and LinvalJoseph.
"When we have opportunities
to make some plays, we've got to
do that" Manning said. "It's just
pick up the intensity a little bit,
have a great practice, have a
great work ethic and know the
game plan. When we get out
there Sunday, just go play hard
and there's going to be opportu-
nities to make some plays."
The Bucs will have a little
extra help preparing for the Gi-
ants this week.
Offensive coordinator Mike
Sullivan was the Giants' quar-
terbacks coach last season and
a member of Coughlin's coaching
staff for both Super Bowl wins in
the past five seasons. Defensive
coordinator Bill Sheridan was
the team's linebackers coach in
the first Super Bowl win and its
defensive coordinator the fol-
lowing season.


Schiano said the flip side is
the Giants know what to expect
from his coordinators.
Coughlin and his staff have
looked for insight on Schiano by
watching videotapes of his days
at Rutgers. His offenses in college
were fairly conservative and
looked that way in the opener.
Josh Freeman threw 24 times
for 138 yards and rookie run-
ning back Doug Martin carried
24 times for 95 yards.
Defensively, the Bucs used a
plethora of formations and
showed a lot of speed.
"That's what he's been preach-
ing," said Ronde Barber, who
was moved to safety by Schiano.
"You play fast; you get your as-
signments down. He has a way of
making sure every detail is taken
care of, and that you're very pre-
pared. When you have that feeling
... you can go out and play fast We
look forward to that every week"
In the opening week, it al-
lowed Schiano to walk off the
field a winner.
"I never really even thought
about it," Schiano said. "It's just
one of those things where you're
doing your job. It was nice after
the game to take a deep breath and
say: 'Ok, now let's get out of the
frying pan into the fryer. Super
Bowl champs next."'


Rookie Blair Walsh
kicked a 55-yarder to send
the game into overtime,
then added a 38-yarder to
clinch a 26-23 victory
Jaguars coach Mike Mula-
rkey spent extra time this
week ensuring his players
put the loss behind them.
"I've just been around the
league long enough to know,
and I think they're over that
and moving on," Mularkey
said.
The Texans had much
better vibes coming out of
their opener
Sure, they had a few early
hiccups against Miami and
even heard some boos at
home.
"I don't know what those
were about" defensive end
J.J. Watt said. "We turned it
around pretty quickly and
they were on our side again."
The Texans took advan-
tage of three consecutive
turnovers to turn a 3-3 game
into a 24-3 rout.




Dolphins


hope heat


will help


against


Raiders
Associated Press

MIAMI Following a
midday practice in steamy
sunshine, Miami Dolphins
defensive tackle Randy
Starks sat at his locker peel-
ing off sweat-soaked gear as
beads of perspiration dripped
from his nose and beard.
Someone asked if he likes
playing in hot weather
"No," Starks said. "Not at
all."
After four years in Miami,
Starks still finds uncomfort-
able the subtropical climate
that makes football an espe-
cially sticky business. The
forecast for the Dolphins'
home opener Sunday
against Oakland calls for
temperatures approaching
Starks' uniform number -
94 and high humidity, too.
"It takes its toll in the sec-
ond half," Starks said. "With
the adrenaline going, it's going
to be much more intense
than practice. You just have
to deal with it, especially in
the fourth quarter. We can't
be the ones that fold.
They've got to be the ones."
At home of late, the Dol-
phins have been the team to
fade. Over the past three
years they're 9-15 in Miami,
which helps explain why
they finished below .500
each of those seasons. They
haven't won a home opener
since 2005.
More than the weather
should work in the Dolphins'
favor. After losing to San
Diego in the NFEs final sea-
son opener Monday night,
the Raiders had to fly 2,500
miles for a game starting at
10 a.m. California time.
Getting the necessary rest
beforehand will be the most
difficult challenge, quarter-
back Carson Palmer said.
"When you change time
zones, you can't get to sleep
when it's 11 o'clock there,"
he said.
But, Palmer added, the
Raiders are ready after
their opening defeat.
"We're not thinking West
to East, time-zone change,
humidity," he said. "We're
thinking about a chance to
play football and get to 1-1
and get a bad taste out of
our mouths."


NFL CENTRAL


NFL injury report
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS at NEW YORK GIANTS -
BUCCANEERS: DOUBTFUL: CB E.J. Biggers (foot), CB Anthony
Gaitor (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE:T JeremyTrueblood (ankle).
PROBABLE: WR Arrelious Benn (knee), RB LeGarrette Blount
(neck), G Carl Nicks (toe). GIANTS: OUT: DE Adewale Ojomo
(hamstring). DOUBTFUL: LB Keith Rivers (hamstring). QUES-
TIONABLE: CB Prince Amukamara (ankle), WR Hakeem Nicks
(foot). PROBABLE: DT Marvin Austin (ack), C David Baas (hip),
T James Brewer (ack), CB Michael Coe (hamstring), WR Victor
Cruz (not injury related), RB Da'Rel Scott (knee).
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at CAROLINA PANTHERS -
SAINTS: OUT: WR Devery Henderson (concussion), DE Turk
McBride (ankle), CB Johnny Patrick (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: CB
JabariGreer(groh), LB Scott Shanle (knee). PANTHERS: DOUBTFUL:
G Mke Pollak (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE:WRSteve Smi (knee),
RB Jonathan Stewart (ankle). PROBABLE: G Jeff Byers (knee),
DE Greg Hardy (illness), LB Kenny Onatolu (not injury related).
ARIZONA CARDINALS at NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS -
CARDINALS: DOUBTFUL: QB John Skelton (ankle). QUES-
TIONABLE: S Rashad Johnson (thigh), CB Patrick Peterson
(groin), S Adrian Wilson (ankle). PROBABLE: G Daryn Colledge
(ankle), KJay Feey (back), CB Jamell Fleming (shoulder), TE Jeff
King (knee), S Kery Rhodes (foot), LB O'Brien Schofield (knee),
C Lyl Sendlein (back), G Adam Snyder(elbow), CB Greg Toler (hip),
RB Beanie Wells (knee), RB Ryan Williams (knee). PATRIOTS:


QUESTIONABLE: G Dan Connolly (head), CB Alfonzo Dennard
(hamstring), TE Daniel Fells (shin), G Nick McDonald (shoulder),
S Sterling Moore (knee), RB Shane Vereen (foot), T Sebastian
Vollmer (back). PROBABLE: S Patrick Chung (shoulder).
MINNESOTA VIKINGS at INDIANAPOLIS COLTS -
VIKINGS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Marvin Mitchell (ankle), WR Jar-
iusWright (ankle). PROBABLE: CB Chris Cook (biceps), TE Rhett
Ellison (ankle), RB Adrian Peterson (knee), CB Josh Robinson
(hip), S Andrew Sendejo (ankle), C John Sullivan (ankle). COLTS:
OUT: LB Pat Angerer (foot), LB Dwight Freeney (ankle), G Joe Reitz
(knee). DOUBTFUL:WRAustin Collie (head). QUESTIONABLE:
TWinston Justice (head). PROBABLE: WRTY Hilton (shoulder).
BALTIMORE RAVENS at PHILADELPHIA EAGLES -
RAVENS: OUT:TJahReid (leg).QUESTIONABLE: LB Paul Kruger
(ack), DE Pemell McPhee (knee). PROBABLE: C Matt Birk (thigh),
S Ed Reed (thigh). EAGLES: OUT:WR Riley Cooper (collarbone).
QUESTIONABLE:WR DeSean Jackson (hamstring), WR Jeremy
Maclin (hip), CB Curtis Marsh (hamstring). PROBABLE: S ColtAn-
derson (knee), WRJason Avant (wrist), S Coleman (facial lacerations).
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at BUFFALO BILLS CHIEFS:
OUT: DE Allen Bailey (ankle), S Kendrick Lewis (shoulder), DT
Anthony Toribio (ankle), WR Devon Wylie (hamstring). QUES-
TIONABLE: CB Jalil Brown (groin), CB Brandon Flowers (foot).
BILLS: OUT: RB Fred Jackson (knee).
CLEVELAND BROWNS at CINCINNATI BENGALS -
BROWNS: OUT: LB James-Michael Johnson (ribs, oblique), S
RayVentrone (hand). QUESTIONABLE:T Oniel Cousins (ankle),


For NFL standings and leaders, see
Page B4.

G John Greco (calf), TE Benjamin Watson (thigh). PROBABLE:
CB Sheldon Brown (neck), WR Joshua Cribbs (knee), LB Scott
Fujita (knee), WR Josh Gordon (knee), C Alex Mack (knee), RB
Chris Ogbonnaya (ankle), RB Trent Richardson (knee), T Joe
Thomas (knee). BENGALS: OUT: CB Dre Kirkpatrick (knee).
DOUBTFUL: TE Donald Lee (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: CBJason
Allen (thigh), DE Carlos Dunlap (knee), RB Bernard Scott (hand).
PROBABLE: S George Iloka (ankle), CB Adam Jones (illness).
HOUSTONTEXANS at JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS -TEX-
ANS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Bryan Braman (hamstring). PROBA-
BLE: G Antoine Caldwell (ankle), NT Shaun Cody (back), LB Brian
Cushing (ribs), LB Tim Dobbins (neck, nose), RB Arian Foster (ill-
ness, back), CB Johnathan Joseph (illness), CB Brice McCain (foot),
C Chris Myers (ankle), LB Brooks Reed (hip), DE Antonio Smih
(ankle), GWade Smih (wrist), DEJ.J.Watt (elbow).JAGUARS: OUT:
T Cameron Bradfield (ankle), RB Rashad Jennings (knee), DE
Austen Lane (foot), DE GeorgeSelvie (knee), LB DarylSmih grown) .
QUESTIONABLE:T Eben Britton ankle) CB Derek C (hamstrhg).
PROBABLE: CB Mke Harris (hamstring), G Uche Nwaneri (ankle).
DALLAS COWBOYS at SEATTLE SEAHAWKS COW-
BOYS: OUT: C Phil Costa (back), S Matt Johnson (hamstring),
NT Jay Ratliff (ankle). PROBABLE:WR Miles Austin (hamstring),
WR Andre Holmes (knee), CB Mike Jenkins (shoulder), RB Felbi


Jones (ribs), S Danny McCray (neck), RB DeMarco Murray (wrist),
S Gerald Sensabaugh (concussion), LB DeMarcus Ware (ham-
string), LB KyleWilber (thumb), TE Jason Witten (abdomen). SEA-
HAWKS: OUT:WR Charly Martin (chest). QUESTIONABLE: TE
Zach Miller (foot), T Russell Okung (knee). PROBABLE: DE Jason
Jones (not injury related), RB Marshawn Lynch (back).
WASHINGTON REDSKINS at ST. LOUIS RAMS RED-
SKINS: OUT: S Brandon Merweather (knee). QUESTIONABLE:
WR Pierre Garcon (foot). PROBABLE: NT Chris Baker (ankle).
RAMS: OUT: DT Michael Brockers (ankle), DT Matthew Conrath
(knee), T RokeviousWatkins (ankle).
NEWYORK JETS at PITTSBURGH STEELERS -JETS:
OUT: TE Dustin Keller (hamstring), T Dennis Landolt (knee), CB
Darrelle Revis (concussion), LB Bryan Thomas (hamstring).
QUESTIONABLE: RB John Conner (knee), CB Isaiah Trufant
(ankle). PROBABLE: LB Nick Bellore (shoulder), CB Antonio Cro-
martie (shoulder), DE Mike DeVito (calf), WRStephen Hill (cal),WR
Jeremy Kerley (low back), S LaRon Landry (heel), LB Josh Mauga
(rib), G Brandon Moore (hp), DT Sione Pouha (lowback),WR Chaz
Schilens (ankle), S Eric Smith (hip, knee). STEELERS: OUT: LB
Stevenson Sylvester (knee). DOUBTFUL: RB Rashard Menden-
hall (knee). QUESTIONABLE: LB James Harrison (knee), S Troy
Polamalu (calf). PROBABLE: RB Jonathan Dwyer (foot).
TENNESSEE TITANS at SAN DIEGO CHARGERS TI-
TANS: OUT: LB Colin McCarthy (ankle), T Mike Otto (finger, knee),
RB Javon Ringer (elbow). QUESTIONABLE: WR Kenny Britt
(knee), QB Jake Locker (left shoulder), DT Sen'Derrick Marks


(knee), WR Nate Washington (calf). PROBABLE: G Leroy Harris
(knee). CHARGERS: OUT: T Jared Gaither (back), CB Shareece
Wright (foot). QUESTIONABLE: TE Antonio Gates (ribs), RB Ryan
Mathews (clavicle). PROBABLE: DT Antonio Garay (ankle), WR
Richard Goodman (concussion), CB Quentin Jammer (thumb).
OAKLAND RAIDERS at MIAMI DOLPHINS RAIDERS:
OUT: CB Ron Bartell (shoulder), WRJacoby Ford (foot). QUES-
TIONABLE: LB Jon Condo (concussion), WRJuron Criner (ankle),
RB Taiwan Jones (rbs), LB Rolando McClain (ankle), C Alex Parsons
(shoulder). PROBABLE:TE David Ausberry (shoulder), KSebastian
Janikowski (left groin), S Mike Mitchell (ribs), WR Denarius Moore
(hamstring), TE Brandon Myers (shoulder), DT Richard Seymour
(knee). DOLPHINS: OUT: DT Tony McDaniel (knee), RB Daniel
Thomas(cancussbn).DOUBTFUL:WRAnihonyArmstong (hamstrg).
PROBABLE: LB J. Freeny (thumb), DT Randy Starks (groin).
DETROIT LIONS at SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS LIONS:
OUT: CB Bill Bentley (concussion). DOUBTFUL: S Louis Delmas
(knee), CB Chris Houston (ankle), LB Travis Lewis (quadriceps).
QUESTIONABLE: DE LawrenceJackson (calf, DT CoreyWillims
(knee). PROBABLE: WR Calvin Johnson (foot). 49ERS: QUES-
TIONABLE: WRTed Ginn Jr (ankle), RB Brandon Jacobs (knee).
PROBABLE: LB Navorro Bowman (shoulder), P Andy Lee (hand).
DENVER BRONCOS at ATLANTA FALCONS BRONCOS:
DNP: CB Chris Harris (ankle), G Chris Kuper (forearm). FULL: G
Manny Ramirez (elbow), WR DemaryiusThomas (shoulder). FAL-
CONS: LIMITED: T Tyson Clabo (hip), LB Robert James (knee),
LB Sean Weatherspoon (hamstring), WR Roddy White (groin).


NFL FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 B7












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


New doctor in town


Associated Press
Topless photos of Britain's
Kate, the Duchess of
Cambridge, were printed in
a Irish tabloid.


Topless


pictures


of Kate


printed


Irish tabloid

publishespics

Associated Press

ROME The British
royal family faced a multi-
national battle to contain
the spread of topless pho-
tos of Prince William's
wife Kate, as an Irish
tabloid published them
Saturday and an Italian
gossip magazine planned
to do the same despite the
threat of legal action.
The royal couple's St.
James's Palace office con-
demned the moves as un-
justifiable and evidence
of pure greed, and said it
was considering "all pro-
portionate responses."
The Duke and Duchess
of Cambridge sued
French magazine Closer
on Friday after it ran the
photos, taken while Kate
and William were on va-
cation at a relative's pri-
vate estate in southern
France last month.
The publication has
been roundly condemned
by British newspapers,
which refrained from
publishing them out of re-
spect for the young cou-
ple's privacy, even though
tabloids like The Sun run
topless women every day
on page 3 and ran pictures
of Prince Harry naked in
Las Vegas last month.
The British media, wary
about an ongoing media
ethics inquiry triggered by
revelations of illegal
phone hacking and other
intrusive newspaper be-
havior, has generally re-
spected palace guidelines
stressing William and
Kate should not be pho-
tographed when they are
not in public.
But across the Irish Sea,
the Dublin-based Irish
Daily Starran a blurry re-
production of the pages
from Closer over two in-
side pages Saturday
Editor Mike O'Kane told
the BBC the photos weren't
included in the edition dis-
tributed in Northern Ire-
land, which is part of the
United Kingdom. And the
newspaper's website came
up as "temporarily un-
available" Saturday
O'Kane defended his
newspaper, saying Ireland
did not view the royal
family the same way as
the British.
"She's not our future
queen," he told the BBC.


Associated Press
Zeljko Ivanek, from left, Floriana Lima and Jordana Spiro portray staff members at Chicago's Roosevelt Medical
Center in the new show "The Mob Doctor," premiering at 9 p.m. Sept. 17 on Fox.

Dual lives forJordana Spiro as 'The Mob Doctor'


FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. "The
Mob Doctor" focuses on Dr. Grace
Devlin, a respected surgeon at
Chicago's Roosevelt Medical Center
who supplements her day job with
an underground practice: To pay off
her brother's gambling debt and
save his life, Grace has sworn to
give private medical care to the
Southside mobsters she grew up
with.
"When I first heard the concept of
the show, I wondered if this was just
a gimmicky way to have a medical
procedural," said Jordana Spiro,
who stars as Devlin.
Soon enough, she concluded
otherwise.
On the series (which premieres
Monday at 9 p.m. on Fox), the cen-
tral issue for Spiro is this: "When
does the motivation stop being the
debt Grace owes and become a
hunger for the adrenaline rush she
gets from treating these dangerous
criminals?"
Under her seemingly oppressive
deal, Devlin has turned the table on
people who, through the years, had
exerted control on her and her family
"You like feeling powerful, don't
you?" said Constantine Alexander
(William Forsythe), the former and
maybe yet-again head of the South-
side mob, as he notes the clout
Grace's doctor skills have given her
"I like making a difference," she
said evasively
Ignoring her, he makes a pointed
reference to how power corrupts.
"It's not about power," Grace
insists.
Spiro knows better.
"For me, the show is not a med-
ical procedural," she said. "I see it
as being about someone who is torn
between the two different worlds
she occupies. I think she's trying to
make good in both these worlds,
even when they're at odds and
even if she gets more and more
compromised."
Doing all that, at least in the pilot,
keeps Grace scrambling.
'A friend told me the title of the
show should be 'Dr I-Gotta-Go,"'
Spiro said with a laugh.
Pinballing between her hospital
and gangster enclaves in her SUV
Grace twice makes an abrupt de-
parture with a curt "I gotta go," and
once again with "I gotta take care of
something," not to mention her cell-
phone's cuing even more interrup-
tions: "I gotta take this."
Living her dual life, Grace is
headstrong and defiant in the face
of authority whether it's her hos-
pital boss or a mafia boss. And she


Birthday: Your intuition about commercial or career mat-
ters might be rather remarkable in the year ahead. When
you get a hunch about something that could be important,
do not simply dismiss it as wishful thinking.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You should check things out
before volunteering to do something that could be costly if it
isn't handled properly. If you're not the right person for the
job, leave it to others.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Just because your mate is a
faster thinker than you are, doesn't necessarily mean that
his or her judgment is better or even correct. Double- check
on things before taking action.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you know for a fact this
isn't a good day to work on tasks requiring deep concentra-
tion and a lot of patience, postpone taking action until an-
other time.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Be extremely careful not


seems fearless and remarkably
adept behind the wheel when pur-
sued in a car chase.
Meanwhile, she finds time for
flirtations with her handsome doc-
tor boyfriend (Zach Gilford), locks
horns with her screw-up brother
(Jesse Lee Softer) and holds at bay
her gangster ex-boyfriend (James
Carpinello).
Not your typical doctor?
"She's a surgeon, not a doctor,"
said Spiro while meeting with a re-
porter last month. "Doctors hear
symptoms and are driven by the rid-
dle of what is the diagnosis. But sur-
geons want to cut it open and get
their hands in it: going for broke.
That's how Grace is living her life."
All in all, it's a far more hectic
routine than the life of weekly
poker games and covering the Cubs
that Spiro portrayed as Chicago
sportswriter PJ. Franklin on her
TBS sitcom "My Boys."
Airing from 2006 to 2010, "My
Boys" established Spiro as a win-
some and amusing every girl.
"After that, a lot of things coming
my way were light comedy, which I
was interested in continuing," she
said. "But Grace Devlin was such a
great role!"
Appreciatively she cites "Mob
Doctor" co-creators Josh Berman
and Rob Wright as well as director
Michael Dinner, saying, "They
could have so easily gone to other
actresses with a better-known
drama background. For them to put
their faith in me, I feel really grate-
ful for that."
The deal came up while Spiro
was in school. She's been studying
film at Columbia University since


Today's HOROSCOPE
to hurt a friend's feelings by inadvertently making it obvious
you would rather be elsewhere. Such behavior would jeop-
ardize the relationship.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Try not to do things in fits
and starts, because such behavior is not likely to fulfill what
you'd like to accomplish. You must have continuity of pur-
pose to succeed.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you possess some kind
of confidential information a friend of yours is anxious to at-
tain, be extra careful not to carelessly fold under your pal's
clever questioning.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Because a great number of
burdens are likely to be dumped in your lap, it might be
hard for you to feel friendly toward a co-worker who makes
an early exit.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Be careful about making a
decision under pressure, because your judgment might not


"My Boys" ended two years ago, she
said, which is where she was when
she got early word about "The Mob
Doctor."
"It was kind of funny," she re-
called. "The only time they could
find to speak was during my writing
class. I ducked out of my class with
Paul Schrader, my screenwriting
hero" he wrote "Raging Bull"
and "Taxi Driver" "to find a quiet
spot in a Columbia hallway to talk
to them."
She is taking this semester off,
but her studies continue: She'll be
doing a thesis film to complete her
Master of Fine Arts.
But she's always liked learning
things. The 35-year-old Spiro grew
up in Manhattan, the middle of five
kids whose parents were art deal-
ers. They encouraged her interest
in acting with one caveat: that she
never forget it's a business. So she
made it her business to use acting
as a path for exploration.
In recent months, she's been shad-
owing surgeons to prepare her to
play Devlin, "and it reminded me
why I wanted to be in this business in
the first place: the access, being a fly
on the wall to witness something you
wouldn't normally be able to see."
Has she also been shadowing
mobsters?
"It's a little more difficult to find
THOSE opportunities," she said with
a laugh. "You have to rely on what
you read and your imagination."
By then, Spiro has spent a busy
weekend in Los Angeles doing
press for her new show. Early the
next morning she will be on a plane
for Chicago. By afternoon, she'll be
shooting the series.


be too sharp right now. Don't allow yourself to respond be-
fore thinking things through.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Applying proper procedures is
extremely important if you are working on a complex as-
signment. If you're not careful, you could easily put the cart
before the horse.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -You may have to change
some long-anticipated social plans at the last minute. Don't
let your disappointment spoil things for the others involved.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -An objective you've estab-
lished could turn out to be an ordeal instead of the instanta-
neous achievement you had expected. Don't be
discouraged if your efforts aren't initially successful.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Although you're usually a careful
person who thinks things through before acting on any-
thing, you could become intrigued by a harebrained idea
and act without knowing what it's all about.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
Mega Money: 3 32 36 40
Mega Ball: 22
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $3,452
3-of-4 MB 33 $458.50
3-of-4 669 $67.50
2-of-4 MB 1,121 $28
1-of-4 MB 11,485 $2.50
2-of-4 22,318 $2
Fantasy 5:6 16 20 22 25
5-of-5 3 $76,049.92
4-of-5 257 $143
3-of-5 9,812 $10.50
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
Fantasy 5: 5 12- 20 21- 27
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 297 $555
3-of-5 9,325 $17

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 16,
the 260th day of 2012. There
are 106 days left in the year.
The Jewish New Year, Rosh
Hashana, begins at sunset.
Today's Highlight:
On Sept. 16, 1857, the
song "Jingle Bells" by James
Pierpont was copyrighted
under its original title, "One
Horse Open Sleigh." (The
song, while considered a
Christmastime perennial, was
actually written by Pierpont
for Thanksgiving.)
On this date:
In 1893, more than
100,000 settlers swarmed
onto a section of land in
Oklahoma known as the
"Cherokee Strip."
In 1908, General Motors
was founded in Flint, Mich.,
by William C. Durant.
In 1919, the American Le-
gion received a national char-
ter from Congress.
In 1953, "The Robe," the
first movie presented in the
widescreen process Cine-
maScope, had its world pre-
miere at the Roxy Theater in
New York.
In 1972, "The Bob Newhart
Show" premiered on CBS.
In 1987, two dozen coun-
tries signed the Montreal Pro-
tocol, a treaty designed to
save the Earth's ozone layer
by calling on nations to re-
duce emissions of harmful
chemicals by the year 2000.
Ten years ago: U.N. Sec-
retary-General Kofi Annan
announced Iraq had uncondi-
tionally accepted the return of
U.N. weapons inspectors.
Five years ago: O.J.
Simpson was arrested in the
alleged armed robbery of
sports memorabilia collectors
in Las Vegas. (Simpson was
later convicted of kidnapping
and armed robbery and sen-
tenced to nine to 33 years in
prison.)
One year ago: President
Barack Obama signed into
law a major overhaul of the
nation's patent system to
ease the way for inventors to
bring their products to market.
Today's Birthdays:
Actress Lauren Bacall is 88.
Blues singer B.B. King is 87.
Clergyman-author the Rev.
Robert H. Schuller is 86.
Actor George Chakiris is 80.
Rock musician Ron Blair
(Tom Petty & the Heartbreak-
ers; Mudcrutch) is 64. Actor
Ed Begley Jr. is 63. Country
singer David Bellamy (The
Bellamy Brothers) is 62.
Baseball Hall of Famer Robin
Yount is 57. Actor Mickey
Rourke is 56. Retired MLB
All-Star pitcher Orel Her-
shiser is 54. Comedian-


actress Amy Poehler is 41.
Actress Alexis Bledel is 31.
Thought for Today: "Sto-
icism is the wisdom of mad-
ness and cynicism the
madness of wisdom." -
Bergen Evans, American lexi-
cographer (1904-1978).


Spiro portrays Dr. Grace Devlin, a rising young surgeon who supplements her
day job with an underground practice to pay off her brother's gambling debt
and save his life by giving medical care to the Southside mobsters.












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


ti


The election

and the future
AL GRUBMAN
Special to the Chronicle
he primary election just
finished. In many races,
where only one party put
up a candidate or candidates,
the election is over However, it
has cast shadows and maybe
some bright spots on our future,
especially our waters.
In one race, we had two of our
friends competing. Each of them
would have been good for our
waters. The winner is a lifelong
resident who spends a lot of
time on the water and has seen
many changes. That experience
should make him an advocate
for our lakes, rivers, springs and
estuaries. He should also advo-
cate for each of his children and
us.
On the other hand, two com-
missioners won their races in
spite of voting for a four-county
water supply authority to plan a
pipe to run water from our rela-
tively water-rich county to a
neighboring county that, in my
opinion, has depleted its water
and would like to start on ours.
The plan has no limitations on
groundwater and requires no
agreement of our county The
system is a "run-around" of the
Local Sources First legislation
that Nancy Argenziano success-
fully sponsored. These guys did
not care. They won their pri-
mary and their election. They
also voted against conservation
rates; the simplest, most effec-
tive and automatic system of
saving water Their wins, in
spite of working against our wa-
ters, bode badly for our future.
That our friends and neighbors
voted for them makes it even
worse.
I have not mentioned names,
because it is not just a problem
where I live. The story is com-
mon in our beautiful state.
There are more shadows on
our future. In Marion County,
the Adena Ranch water permit
application requesting many
wells and more than 13.3 million
gallons per day (gpd) of ground-
water is a gigantic threat The
request is to use more water
daily than the city of Ocala. If
approved, it will probably, in my
opinion, kill off the already-de-
teriorated Silver Springs and be
a precedent for badly hurting
the Homosassa, Chassahowitzka
and Withlacoochee rivers.
Do not believe the inflated
numbers of jobs they claim will
result. Those are only to soften
up spineless politicians. Also, do
See Page C4


JOHN FUNDERBURK/Special to the Chronicle
Hernando resident John Funderburk's second-place winner in the Save Our Waters Week photo contest is
of a wood duck family, taken in the vicinity of the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. It
symbolizes the vital role our waters play in sustaining local wildlife and their habitats. Find the third-place
winner and honorable mention inside today's HomeFront section.

Killing the Homosassa Springs and River
~-
-











--









JOHN FUNDERBURK/Special to the Chronicle
Hernando resident John Funderburk's second-place winner in the Save Our Waters Week photo contest is
of a wood duck family, taken in the vicinity of the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. It
symbolizes the vital role our waters play in sustaining local wildlife and their habitats. Find the third-place
winner and honorable mention inside today's HomeFront section.


Killing the Homosassa Springs and River


Statewide project

threatens delicate

ecosystem

.. The Water Management
District is setting the stage for
groundwater withdrawals that
will permanently lower the
river's flow to the MFL level.."
Sonny Vergara, executive di-
rector,
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District
from 1997-2003.

RON MILLER
Special to the Chronicle
The Minimum Flows and Lev-
els (MFL) program is, in reality, a
statewide project to locate water
sources for developments. The
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District (SWFWMD) is
in the process of defining MFLs
for our coastal springs and rivers.
The MFL will authorize destruc-
tion of 15 percent of the local
species and habitat. This will be
used in the water permitting
process and sets consumptive ob-
jectives: 9 percent for the Chas-
sahowitzka River, 3 percent for


the Homosassa River and yet-to-
be-determined percentages for
the Crystal and Withlacoochee
rivers.
In Citrus County, planners and
engineers have already defined
where the first well fields will be
for "regional distribution" of the
Homosassa and Chassahowitzka
waters. Just this summer, a per-
mit was issued for the pumping
and transporting of nearly 77,000
gallons a day from Crystal River
to Ocala.
SETTING THE HOMOSASSA
MFL AT 3 PERCENT
In 2010, the flow reduction tar-
gets of the Homosassa and Chas-
sahowitzka rivers were proposed
to be set at 5 percent and 11 per-
cent, respectively After two years
ofpushback by the citizens, these
numbers were reduced by 2 per-
centage points each.
That may seem like a victory to
some, but to protect our waters,
SWFWMD should recognize the
stressed state of these coastal
rivers and cap all new permits
until we understand the pro-
found changes that are taking
place right now with our current
level of water withdrawals. Cit-
rus County should be able to deal
with that. After all, we currently
permit more than 40 million gal-
lons a day to be pumped out of


the aquifer. That equates to about
250 gallons a day for every person
in the county
LOOKING AT THE
HOMOSASSA
An estuary is a transition area
where fresh and salt waters are
constantly shifting and mixing
due to a tidal influence. Many
fish, crabs and other critters are
migrants, spending a critical part
of their lives in estuaries. The
Homosassa River is (or was) a
highly productive estuary, vital to
the lives of many species of fish,
waterfowl and wading birds.
In the Homosassa, salinity goes
from near zero at the springs to
about 35 parts per thousand
(PPT) in the Gulf. A very sensi-
tive, low-salinity zone exists near
the springs that is fundamental to
the aquatic web of life. Reducing
spring flow will destroy this zone
and the many species that de-
pend on it.
The 2010 MFL report showed
the Homosassa to be very sensi-
tive to reduced spring flow. If you
cut the flow 1 percent, you will
lose 15 percent of the bass. Cut
flow 2 percent, you will lose 15
percent of the blue crabs. Cut a
little more, and the bass and blue
crabs are history The Homosassa
River was found to be so complex
See Page C4


Voters to have two ballot pages Primary care and the

for the November election health department


Voters need to be prepared for
the upcoming general elec-
tion, to be Tuesday, Nov 6.
For the first time since Citrus
County started voting on the optical
scan system in 1998, each voter will
have two, two-sided 14-inch ballot
cards to vote.
In addi-
tion to the
candidates
for election,
there are 11
amend -
m e nt s -
placed on
the ballot by
the Florida
Legislature. Susan Gill
The Citrus
GUEST
County
School COLUMN
Board also
has an amendment on the ballot.
To assist voters in viewing their
ballot early, we have included in
this Sept 16 edition of the Chroni-
cle a four-page section showing the
ballot in its actual size. Also in-
cluded is important information
about registering for the general
election, applying for a mail ballot
and preparing yourself to vote at an
early-vote site or at the polls on
Election Day
Voters who request a mail ballot
will have the ballot in their posses-


SO YOU KNOW


* To link to staff writer Nancy
Kennedy's recent story on the
amendments, go to: www.
chronicleonline.com/content/
good-bad-about-11-state-
changes or search the site
for the word "amendment" to
find the link.
Find the proposed
amendments in a special,
four-page section inside
today's Chronicle.

sion early and will have time to
study the amendments prior to vot-
ing and returning their mail ballot
to the elections office. All regis-
tered voters who do not request a
mail ballot will receive a sample
ballot priorto the beginning of
early voting to study
To request a mail ballot, call the
Citrus County Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at 352-341-6740 or go
online at www.votecitrus.com
It is recommended that voters
study the amendments, mark their
sample ballot and take their com-
pleted sample ballot to the early
vote site or polling location on
Election Day to use as a guide. This
will help prevent long lines at the
early voting site or polling place.
See Page C4


I would like to respond to the re-
cent articles concerning the
county's participation in ex-
ploring options to provide primary
care in Citrus County.
The Citrus County
Health Department cur-
rently provides primary
care to the citizens of
this community Citrus
County and the county
health department have
historically been part-
ners. The county pro-
vides and maintains BradT
facilities at no cost to
the health department
in Inverness, Crystal COL
River, Lecanto and


Lecanto North.
The county also contributes fi-
nancial support annually, which in-
cludes a subsidy from the general
fund to help support health depart-
ment operations, which is $650,000
for 2013.
Due to this relationship, it is my
role as the county administrator to
seek all options for the Board of
County Commissioners to consider,
which includes funding the health
department and the use of those
funds in a most efficient and cost-
effective manner This is even more
important due to the fact the county
is facing a budget shortfall.


T
E
_u


The current issues with the
health department were illustrated
in the recent newspaper articles
concerning the double-digit layoffs
in Citrus County, the
closing of the urgent
care center at the Re-
source Center and the
fact the pharmacy adja-
cent to the center is in
financial difficulty It
was these factors that
led to the decision of ex-
ploring other opera-
horpe tional models for
primary health care,
EST which includes a stand-
JMN alone Federally Quali-
fied Health Center
(FQHC) option.
The George A. Dame FQHC is
administered as a public entity
provider, and the health depart-
ment is the grant recipient. This
model is not uniform throughout
the state.
For instance, in Hillsborough
and Marion counties, the health de-
partments have turned to private
FQHCs to provide primary care for
residents. The primary responsi-
bilities of these health departments
are education, vital statistics, dis-
aster response, disease control and
environmental health, etc.
See Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


There are

so many

things I

don't know

After working in the
news business in
Citrus County for
more than three decades,
someone recently sug-
gested I must know every-
thing about our
community.
The very same day, an
angry reader called me up
and complained that all of
our local politicians are
corrupt. When I disagreed
with the sweeping accusa-
tion, the reader told me:
"you don't know a thing."
I actually agree with the
second comment more
than the first. There is so
much I don't know.
That got me thinking,
and thus comes the list:
1. I don't know how our
state government and
Southwest Florida Water
Management District can
keep a straight face and
approve a water bottling
plant for Crystal River
right in the water
recharge area for King's
Bay Experts all agree that
the flow from the springs
has slowed in the past
decade, and that is one of
our causes of pollution.
SWFWMD tells home-
owners only to water their
lawns once a
week to save I don't
water, then knw
they approve o
taking mil- why
lions of gal-
lons of water mullet
from the
most sensi- jump
tive recharge Out of
area in our
county Huh? the
2. I don't
know how water
people
around the or why
world can redfish
justify killingreis
each other in are not
the name of
religion. red.
3. I don't
know how
any human being can jus-
tify taking a single dose of
crystal meth. Each week,
our newspaper is filled
with arrests of citizens
who are using or selling
this concoction of chemi-
cals that quickly rots out
the brain. Those in the ar-
rest photos look like zom-
bies, yet people continue
to voluntarily get involved.
4. I don't know how
come I sometimes find
myself sleepy at 3 p.m.
and wide awake at 3 a.m.
5. I don't know why,
when I buy a pair of
sneakers at Bealls, I pay a
6 percent sales tax but
when I buy the same
sneakers through the mail
from some online site, I
don't pay taxes.
6. I don't know why the
sides of our highways are
filled with trash when
everyone knows that you
don't throw trash out your
car window. Who is put-
ting the trash along our
road sides? I just don't
know.
7. I don't know why mul-
let jump out of the water
or why redfish are not red.
8. I don't know why we
still don't have a traffic
light at the intersection of
Meadowcrest Boulevard
and State Road 44 where
the county opened up its
new west side government
center. I don't know why
the formula for urgency
on such improvements in-
cludes giving extra weight
to traffic deaths and
See Page C4


I


JL










Baby, you can drive my car, and Baby, I'll love you


"Baby you can drive shake, they shake be- and I can still feed myself, but I
my car and baby, I'll cause my grandfather's usually use a big spoon rather
love you." hands shook, they than a fork.
"Baby You Can shake more when I try One thing I still do that is "iffy"
Drive My Car" to do something specif- is to drive, but I only do that on a
PaulMcCartney ically with my hands, limited basis. Cheryl pretty much
and John there's not a known has me on a one-mile leash. I can
Lennon, 1965. cure and the prognosis get to many of the places I need or
H N is that it will only get want to go with such a limitation;
It doesn't really worse as time passes. and, if I remain within a one-mile
seem possible, but Fred Brannen Fortunately, there is radius, I know where I'm going
it has been almost A SLICE medication that still and can concentrate on my driving
four years now since I OF LIFE allows me to do almost rather than reading street signs.
retired from my real- anything I'd like to do This reduces stress, which in turn,
world job, retirement which was almost. I have major problems reduces the shakiness.
hastened a bit by a medical with longhand, but I can still write Enough already
malady known as familial using a computer; I can still paint, Outside the one-mile limit, my
intentive essential tremors. but I cheat and use masking tape sweetheart is my chauffeur
All of those words strung to paint a straight line and various At least that's what I thought she
together mean that my hands other tricks to paint other shapes; was.


Folks in different countries
speak different languages. For in-
stance, in Greece, they speak
Greek; in Germany, they speak
German; in Brazil they speak Por-
tuguese, none of which I under-
stand. In England, they speak
English, but not the same kind I do
- I understand some of it and
some of it I don't. But in France,
they speak French. I don't under-
stand that either, but I love it and
can always lookup the translation.
A few days ago, I was watching
a movie on television and in one
scene they used the words
"masseur" and "masseuse" which,
as I'm sure most of you know, are
the French terms for massage
therapists, with the former being


the male and the latter the female.
That got me to thinking.
If such a difference is in place
for masseur, what about for
"chauffeur"?
I looked it up, and sure enough,
the French word for a female
chauffeur is "chauffeuse."
With this in mind, on this lovely
Sunday morning, I say to the even
more lovely Cheryl, my very own
chauffeuse, "Bebe, tu peux
conduire ma voiture, et bebe, je
taimerai!"
"Baby, you can drive my car, and
baby, I'll love you!"
[-
Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Making the right choice


We have two multimillionaire candi-
dates who would be our president.
One worked and invested in our
country's businesses to accumulate his
wealth. Who knows how the other became
so wealthy It is as much of a secret as his
education background and other back-
ground information.
Both candidates have a dis-
tinctly different approach to
leading our country One would
have all of us strive for suc-
cesses by becoming the best we
can become. The other not only
fails to apologize for his enor-
mous wealth, but condemns the
other candidate as well as other
successful people for being Robert H
wealthy It seems that he thinks GUI
he is the only one who deserves
this wealth. COLI
After vetting the candidates
through the two recent conventions, there
are obvious choices to be made in choosing
a leader for our future.
Choice number one is to continue deni-
grating successful people. This approach
says if you are successful you owe it to those
less fortunate to support them. Never does
that plan discuss those who do not pay any
share, yet insists that the successful should
pay their "fair" share. I just heard a sensi-
ble suggestion that those less fortunate
should be helped temporarily, and then be
expected to repay the help they got so some-
one else less fortunate could get help. The
philosophy that pushes "fair" share almost
gets there. However, the "fair share" lead-
ers want the less successful to continue to
nurse at the fountain of the wealthy without
any responsibility. Everything in the liberal
philosophy assumes that bringing all to a so-
called "level playing field "is the answer
Choice number two starts out with the
promise that we can all be as successful as
our ability and circumstances allow. Natu-
rally, some will rise above the flock and be-
come super successful. God gave each of us
the talents He chose to. What we do with
those talents will vary widely Some have the
"great success" talent and use it wisely Oth-
ers squander their talent. Many strive dili-
gently, but due to circumstances beyond their
control, only achieve moderate success. Oth-
ers simply squander their talents, then com-
plain or envy those more successful.
When it comes to governing, the first choice
says we should look to government to level


the playing field. With unemployment so high
it seems that they would encourage people to
become employed. However, if someone
gives up looking for work they are no longer
considered unemployed. Then it becomes
the government's responsibility to care for
them. Also, this philosophy says we can con-
tinue to pay all the bills and cre-
ate new spending programs even
though we have no money to pay
the bills. Have you ever maxed
out all your credit cards? What
happens then? Do you really be-
lieve our government has no need
to be concerned with $16 trillion
of debt with no visible means to
pay the bill?
[agaman Now the second choice seeks
ST to chart a course with plans to
pay off the credit card. They do
JMN need a little spanking along the
way because there is a tendency
to delay the payoff plan for another day or
other days. One big difference in the sec-
ond choice is that they realize that busi-
nesses must be successful if we are to ever
return to sound fiscal policies. Promoting
business success also promotes higher lev-
els of employment and everyone benefits
when people are employed. Some may feel
otherwise, but being gainfully employed
greatly improves mental and physical
health and satisfaction with life.
Government has obligated us to more
than we can "contribute" (a Clinton term)
and we must reduce those obligations.
There is no easy way out of the crisis we
are in now. However, we must attempt to
move toward a resolution. Continuing with
the current government will do nothing to
help our situation, since those in charge
plan to continue with the failing policies.
Electing a Republican president and Con-
gress can lead us in the right direction.
However, it will require all of us keeping a
close watch on the way our resources are
used to ensure that they move toward a fis-
cally and morally responsible goal. It will
not be easy and no leader will be able make
all of us happy
Do you love out-of-control spending or
would you prefer a government we can live
with?

Robert E Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman.
He resides in Homosassa.


i HOIJES
IS FINAL I
AVA(LAE!


Thank-You LETTERS


Thanks for support
I would like to extend my thanks and
gratitude to everyone who took part in
the most recent Primary Election
process in Citrus County
The opportunities presented by the
many groups who provided candidate fo-
rums were most generous!
And, to those of you, both commercial
and residential, who posted my candi-
date signs, you were truly awesome and
great sign caretakers.
For those of you who took part in the
democratic process of voting, I bid you
the highest level of congratulations. And
of course, for those of you who voted for
me, I humbly appreciate each and every
vote.
My goal as a Citrus County School
Board member is to serve the students of
Citrus County to the best of my ability
God Bless America!
Sue Hale
Homosassa


Grateful donations
On behalf of Citrus County Support
Services, I would like to thank the employ-
ees of Citrus Memorial hospital for their
recent "Summer for Seniors" project
The employees of Citrus Memorial col-
lected items for our local seniors, such as
toothpastes, toothbrushes, shampoo,
soap, lotion, paper towels and toilet
paper as well as other very useful neces-
sities, and donated them to the seniors
who receive services through Citrus
County Support Services.
With our current economy making it es-
pecially difficult for our seniors on fixed
incomes, these items were a very wel-
come gift. It is truly my pleasure to say
"thank you" on behalf of all of the seniors
who benefited from your efforts. I am
proud to live and work in Citrus County
where people take care of our seniors.
Pat Coles
operations supervisor
Citrus County Support Services


* Follow the instructions on Page C3
today to submit a letter to the editor.
* Read the box on Page C4 about


endorsement letters.
* Letter writers are limited to three
letters per month in print.


Sound OFF


'PC-free' kudos
This is in reference to the
article "PC-free life," in
Wednesday's paper, Sept. 5.
Kudos, Mr. Asher, kudos.
Use existing study
Regarding the article in
the Citrus County Chronicle
on Tuesday, Sept. 4, excel-
lently written by Chris Van
Ormer: Why have we com-
missioned a Citrus port fea-
sibility study when Jeff
Barnes has done an excel-
lent feasibility study? Why
don't they take that and run
with it? Have a good day. No
to the port.
'Too young to vote'
About the voting age:
Most 18-year-olds don't
know that much about the
government. They're not in-
terested in government.
They're more interested in
their dating and women and
everything. I think they're
much too young to vote to
know who to run our
government.
Shameful theft
For the (person) who took
the stand for the heavy bags
at Rock Crusher Canyon
over Labor Day weekend at
some event they had: This
bag was for the kids for Tae
Kwon Do for the Y that
Aaron Shields volunteers his
time and myself and my
husband donated that stand
to Aaron for these children.
You know who you are.
Shame on you. Hopefully
somebody will bring it back.
Somebody knows some-
thing. Maybe the sheriff's
(office) should ... find out
where this equipment is.
This man does these


classes for free. Shame on
you. Shame on you.
Tale of the tail
In reference to the classi-
fied ad for "Found cat."
Some cats have a tale and
most cats have a tail, but
some cats have both.
Civic club vs. food
I read the article in Satur-
day's paper (Sept. 1) follow-
ing up on the Civic Club
against We Care Food
Pantry. You know, Ho-
mosassa Elementary School
has computers in their
school and also the Ameri-
can Legion in Homosassa
has computer classes for
the people. Kids should be
doing their homework at
home.
The food program is very


important so the kids and
their families can eat right
and be able to do their
homework right. Civic club's
fighting to take away the
food program from We Care
Food.
Also free of PC
Mike Asher of Homosassa
had a letter to the editor in
the Sept. 5 Chronicle. The
letter was captioned ("PC-
free life"), meaning that no
more political correctness
in his life. Fantastic letter.
He said from now on he's
going to call a duck a duck
if that's what he sees and
knows to be a duck. Politi-
cal correctness leads to
slavery, and I will never
again accept any part of it.
Accolades to you, Mike.
Very good insight and you


wrote the script for me.
Thank you.
Waterfront board
I'd like to ask a couple
questions. One is, what is
exactly the function of the
Crystal River Waterfront
Commission and who is on
the board? You know, seeing
as how water is one of our
most valuable assets, you
know, what are they doing,
you know, about the well
that wants to pump 77,000
gallons a day? I never read
anything in the newspaper
about it. Is there no one
there that covers the meet-
ings or talks to them?
Editor's note: There is the
Crystal River Community Re-
development Agency, which
works to spruce up the city's
downtown area. There is the


Crystal River Waterfronts Advi-
sory Board, established in
May 2006 to develop short-
range and long-term water-
fronts plans for the city. The
extensive mission statement
for the WAB is listed on the
city's website under "Water-
fronts Advisory Board." Most
all the points mention "study-
ing and monitoring," not regu-
lating. Dee Atkins and city
manager Andy Houston are
listed as the contacts for the
CRWAB on the Florida Depart-
ment of Economic Opportu-
nity website.
Not a believer
I'm calling in regard to
the speech that the San An-
tonio (Texas) mayor made
at the Democratic National
Convention where he (said),
and I'm quoting now: "Re-


publicans are counting on
you maybe not to vote for
Romney, but they're count-
ing on you to feel discour-
aged," he said, "and they
figure if you don't vote, then
Big Oil will write our energy
future and insurance com-
panies will write our health
care plans and politicians
will dictate what a woman
can or can't do when it
comes to her own health."
I'll tell you what; these
people ... think every Ameri-
can is stupid. What do they
think Big Oil's doing now at
almost $4 a barrel?
And insurance prices are
going up every day because
of Obamacare.
And then they come out
with something like this and
think they're going to make
believers out of people.


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


C2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L

E
A







Page C3 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................... ..................... publisher
M ike Arnold .................................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz.................. ...................citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ............. ................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...............................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................... .....................copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DO AS YOU SAY



Realities surrounding

water withdrawal permit

cause for concern


he irony of a government
agency issuing a water
withdrawal permit in the
King's Bay watershed area
while promoting conservation
by residents is not lost on us.
If the realities of the situa-
tion were not so shocking and
outrageous we could even
manage a smile, but this is no
laughing matter.
The Southwest
Florida Water THE IS
Management Dis- Crystal R
trict (SWFWMD) withdraw
issued a 10-year
water-use permit OUR O
July 24 to OUR
Heatherwood In- Statute
vestments LLC of rew
Crystal River and
Mistletoe LLC of
Ocala to withdraw up to 76,700
gallons per day. Average daily
use during the highest water
use month or peak month can-
not exceed 153,400 gallons. Of-
ficials say the drawdown is
going to be .01 of a foot, which
is a little over a tenth of an
inch. According to SWFWMD,
the companies intend to trans-
port the water for sale to a bot-
tling company, Consolidated
Water Group LLC in Ocala.
Crystal River officials and
residents found out Monday
the permit cost $50 and, be-
cause the withdrawal is con-
sidered a small-use permit,
SWFWMD will not require a
meter and will be unable to
monitor the drawdown.
Additionally, the 21-day win-
dow for appeals has closed.
To be fair, SWFWMD does
not make the rules; it only is-
sues permits based on the cri-
teria set by the Florida
Legislature. The companies in-
volved in this withdrawal met
the requirements.
However, due to its role as a
regulatory body, SWFWMD of-
ficials should consider chang-


Top hospitals
I noticed on the television sev-
eral times and in the Tampa Bay
papers that Tampa General Hospi-
tal was voted No. 1 in the
whole state of Florida and
No. 10 through the whole
United States. Where did
Citrus Memorial and
Seven Rivers come in? Do
you have any idea?
Editor's note: The rank-
ings released by U.S. News CAL
& World Report's Best Hospi- 563-C
tals 2012-13 list the top 30
hospitals in Florida. No hos-
pitals in Citrus or surrounding coun-
ties made the list. The closest were
Shands Hospital in Gainesville and
South Lake Hospital in Clermont.
Computer scam
I'm calling about a scam that's
going around. I had a phone call
the other day. A foreigner called
me and told me I had a virus in my
computer and he was calling from
Microsoft and he wanted to make
sure I had my computer on and he
wanted me to get into my com-
puter, press a few keys. And I told
him, "No, I don't think so. Why
don't you call me back in about an
hour, I want to think about this."
Well, a couple days later he called
me back again and this time he got
my husband and my husband
started questioning him about the
make of our computer. He couldn't
tell him, but he told my husband
the same story, that we had a virus
and he wanted to get into our com-


ing the district's processes in
the future as they relate to no-
tification of pending permits
and appeal deadlines. In obvi-
ously controversial situations,
a heads-up to city officials and
residents that a withdrawal
permit has been applied for in
their back yard would be pru-
dent. It might not change the


SSUE:
iver water
al permit.

PINION:
e needs
rite.


0


outcome, but it
certainly would
deter the criticism
SWFWMD offi-
cials are facing.
Taking the extra
step to provide
transparency is al-
ways the best
practice in contro-
versial decisions.
The major issue


here is the state statutes that
make it so easy, and cheap, for
companies to apply and re-
ceive water withdrawal per-
mits. No one denies these
companies the right to profit
off the use of their land, but
there has to be a balance with
what is right for the community
and environment.
When visiting the SWFWMD
web site one can, with a few
clicks of a mouse, download
and read at least a half-dozen
publications on how to con-
serve water. Based on this, one
would conclude conservation
is important to the agency and,
presumably, to the state gov-
ernment that funds the agency.
It is, therefore, incredulous to
conceive of a government or its
agencies issuing permits at
cross-purposes with that phi-
losophy. It is either hypocrisy or
ignorance at the root cause of
this unfortunate turn of events.
We urge local lawmakers to
use the upcoming session to in-
troduce bills that fit their
stated philosophy of conserva-
tion and better protect our pre-
cious water resources.


puter. Well, it's definitely a scam.
He probably wanted to get in there
and get my passwords and who
knows what he would have done....
The phone numbers on my Caller
ID both times showed up, it
IND was all zeroes. So I defi-
D i nitely knew it was a scam
about the computer. I just
want to let people know,
please do not let anybody
talk you into getting in on
S your computer. Who knows
what they'll be doing.
)579 Please just be careful.
Wasted effort
On Labor Day, the VFW Post on
Veterans Drive and U.S. 19 in Ho-
mosassa had a lovely buffet of ribs,
chicken, vegetables, salad,
desserts, etc., for only $5. Unfortu-
nately, many of the people who
signed up did not show up. The
post purchased and prepared a lot
of food based on the number of
people who signed up for the event.
This meant a lot of unnecessary ex-
pense, not to mention all the work
by the kitchen. How can you people
be so thoughtless and careless and
not call to cancel several days be-
forehand? There are people starving
and such a thoughtless attitude
was shown by many members.
Editor's note: Many organiza-
tions choose to sell tickets in ad-
vance for a clearly marked donation,
so the cost is covered even if the
ticketholder decides not to attend.
Also, consider contacting the local
homeless shelters if there is leftover
food to donate.


"It is by the goodness of God that in our country we
have those three unspeakably precious things:freedom
ofspeech, freedom of conscience, and theprudence
never to practice either of them."
Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens), 1835-1910


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Tangled web of conflicting rights


Elaine Huguenin, who with
her husband operates
Elane Photography in
New Mexico, asks only to be let
alone. But instead of being al-
lowed a reasonable zone of sov-
ereignty in which to
live her life in accor- -
dance with her beliefs,
she is being bullied by
people wielding gov-
ernment power.
In 2006, Vanessa
Willock, who was in a
same-sex relationship,
emailed Elane Photog-
raphy about photo-
graphing a Georg
"commitment cere- OTI
mony" she and her VOI
partner were plan-
ning. Willock said this
would be a "same-gender cere-
mony" Elane Photography re-
sponded that it photographed
"traditional weddings." The
Huguenins are Christians who,
for religious reasons, disapprove
of same-sex unions. Willock sent
a second email asking whether
this meant that the company
"does not offer photography serv-
ices to same-sex couples." Elane
Photography responded "you are
correct."
Willock could then have said
regarding Elane Photography
what many same-sex couples
have long hoped a tolerant soci-
ety would say regarding them -
"live and let live." Willock could
have hired a photographer with
no objections to such events. In-
stead, Willock and her partner set
out to break the Huguenins to the
state's saddle.
Willock's partner, without dis-
closing her relationship with
Willock, emailed Elane Photogra-
phy She said she was getting mar-
ried actually, she and Willock
were having a "commitment cere-
mony" because New Mexico does
not recognize same-sex marriages
- and asked if the company
would travel to photograph it The
company said yes. Willock's part-
ner never responded.


H
Ic


Instead, Willock, spoiling for a
fight, filed a discrimination claim
with the New Mexico Human
Rights Commission, charging that
Elane Photography is a "public
accommodation," akin to a hotel
or restaurant, that de-
nied her its services
because of her sexual
Orientation. The
NMHRC found against
Elane and ordered it
to pay $6,600 in attor-
ney fees.
But what a tangled
web we weave when
we undertake to regu-
e Will late more and more
IER behaviors under over-
CES lapping codifications
of conflicting rights.
Elaine Huguenin says
she is being denied her right to
the "free exercise" of religion
guaranteed by the U.S. Constitu-
tion's First Amendment and a
similar provision in the New
Mexico constitution. Further-
more, New Mexico's Religious
Freedom Restoration Act defines
"free exercise" as "an act or a re-
fusal to act that is substantially
motivated by religious belief,"
and forbids government from
abridging that right except to
"further a compelling govern-
ment interest."
So New Mexico, whose mar-
riage laws discriminate against
same-sex unions, has a "com-
pelling interest" in compelling
Huguenin to provide a service
she finds repugnant and others
would provide? Strange.
Eugene Volokh of the UCLA
School of Law thinks Huguenin
can also make a "compelled
speech argument": She cannot be
coerced into creating expressive
works, such as photographs,
which express something she is
uncomfortable expressing.
Courts have repeatedly held that
freedom of speech and the free-
dom not to speak are "comple-
mentary components of the
broader concept of 'individual
freedom of mind."'


LETTERS


Correct conclusion
RE: Your editorial ofAug. 21,
2012, about minimum flows and
levels on the Homosassa and
Chassahowitzka Rivers.
Many thanks to your editorial
board for the clear and accurate
description of the recommenda-
tions by the water management
district for further reductions in
the minimum flows and levels
on the two Outstanding Florida
Waterways.
The study the Water District
should actually be making is
how to reverse severe damage
already done to these water bod-
ies. Not, as the current study has
done as to how much more dam-
age can be done.
Both of these water bodies
used to teem with bass and
bream fish. Today there are
none. Native grasses, which are
the birthing grounds for numer-
ous species of marine life, have
all but disappeared, to be re-
placed by the dreaded lyngbya.
Any further damage to these
streams would be a death blow
to these once beautiful and pris-
tine rivers.
Your last paragraph says it all.
The Water District is merely fol-
lowing its marching orders. And
the only way to reverse these or-
ders is a loud and clear message


OPINIONS INVITE
The opinions expressed in
c/e editorials are the opini
the newspaper's editorial I
Viewpoints depicted in po
cartoons, columns or letter
not necessarily represent t
opinion of the editorial bo
Groups or individuals are
to express their opinions ii
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address
editorial board, which mee
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660
All letters must be signed
elude a phone number and
town, including letters sen
email. Names and hometo
be printed; phone number
not be published or given
We reserve the right to ed
ters for length, libel, fairne
good taste.
Letters must be no longer
350 words, and writers wi
limited to three letters per
SEND LETTERS TO: The E
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River, FL 34429. O
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.c

from the public at large t
these contemplated redu
are intolerable and this d
ation must first be stopped
then reversed. The restore
to health of these rivers is
to the economy and quali


A New Mexico court, however,
has held that Elane Photography
is merely "a conduit for another's
expression." But the U.S.
Supreme Court (upholding the
right of a person to obscure the
words "Live Free or Die" on New
Hampshire's license plates) has
affirmed the right not to be com-
pelled to be conduits of others'
expression.
New Mexico's Supreme Court
is going to sort all this out, which
has been thoroughly reported
and discussed by the invaluable
blog The Volokh Conspiracy,
where you can ponder this: In ju-
risdictions such as the District of
Columbia and Seattle, which ban
discrimination on the basis of po-
litical affiliation or ideology,
would a photographer, even a
Jewish photographer, be com-
pelled to record a Nazi Party
ceremony?
The Huguenin case demon-
strates how advocates of toler-
ance become tyrannical. First, a
disputed behavior, such as sexual
activities between people of the
same sex, is declared so personal
and intimate that government
should have no jurisdiction over
it. Then, having won recognition
of what Louis Brandeis, a pio-
neer of the privacy right, called
"the right to be let alone," some
who have benefited from this
achievement assert a right not to
let other people alone. It is the
right to coerce anyone who dis-
approves of the now protected
behavior into acting as though
they approve it, or at least into
not acting on their disapproval.
So, in the name of tolerance,
government declares intolerable
individuals such as the
Huguenins, who disapprove of a
certain behavior but ask only to
be let alone in their quiet disap-
proval. Perhaps advocates of gay
rights should begin to restrain
the bullies in their ranks.


George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


to the Editor
S life of Citrus County
ED Jim Bitter
Chroni- president of Homosassa River
ons of Alliance
board.
litical Underground idea
rs do
:he Just about everyone in this
ard. county loses power or TV/tele-
invited phone/Internet data at least
n a let- once every year Poles and wires
are knocked down. In a major
s e storm, we will suffer dislocation
through poles and wires being
I. knocked down.
and in- With no data transmissions,
d home there are no credit cards and no
will a callinghome. Even if cellphone
s will antennas and towers survive,
out. they may be restricted to govern-
it let- ment use.
ess and We can leave the 19th century
and bury these increasingly im-
than portant utilities. As part of the
II be FEMA remediation effort from
mnt Debby, we might be able to settle
Editor, the question, "Is it worth the cost
r, fax to to bury?"
o All the commissioners and
om. senior county staff have known
for weeks that it is possible
hat FEMA would use Citrus County
actions for a cost/benefit study For free.
egener- But our county has to apply
d and Ask your commissioner why
*ation nothing is being done!
s vital Linus Upson
ty of Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Endorsement LETTERS


Endorsements ing "trickle-down snake oil" to an
audience in New Hampshire.
Please do not endorse candi- The choice we have in Novem-
dates for political office. ber is clear. We have a sitting
The Chronicle did a superb job president who, by his own ac-
of covering the recent primary count in not one but two autobi-
election with much information ographies, never learned what
on those running and the com- most of us as youths learned
plete ballots. Keep up this good about "trickle down" from lawns
work and continue to print sup- mowed or groceries bagged to
porting letters and all points of earn spending money After get-
view. ting a free ride to Ivy League
As a local newspaper, your job schools, Obama never worked
is to print the news not make it; odd jobs to pay his bills and his
therefore, again I'm requesting dubious attendance record at Co-
you list all candidates, their lumbia only proves that money
viewpoints, their qualifications, given and not earned is unappre-
etc. but do not tell us for whom to ciated. Now, he stands before a
vote. crowd deriding the very engine
Our job as voters is to learn as of our economy he knows nothing
much as possible to understand of and has never participated in.
the issues and then decide who I would argue that never in our
we think is the best person for 236-year history has a man run
the job they are seeking. By your for president who, as a private
endorsements, you are giving an citizen, created more private-sec-
unfair encouragement and ad- tor jobs than Mitt Romney The
vantage for one particular per- companies Bain Capital saved
son. We, the people, are able to from extinction and created from
discern the qualities and abilities scratch are a living testimony to
of our leaders and when we vote, his understanding and apprecia-
we alone are responsible for our tion of the American economic
insight or our misguided choices. engine. His campaign has come
Nada Jones at the right time to rescue this
Homosassa nation from the abyss we face
with the alternative.


Good job,John
I have to commend 14-year-
old John Houston on his recent
letter clarifying the constitu-
tional structure of our nation.
Houston reminds us that we are a
representative republic, not a
pure democracy If there is any
doubt, look to the Pledge of Alle-
giance for the word "democracy".
You won't find it there.
Coincidentally, Mr. Houston's
letter was adjacent to George
Harbin's piece in the Sunday edi-
tion dated the Aug. 19. Mr.
Harbin's letter was asking for
young people to register and vote
for Obama for our nation to sur-
vive as a "democracy"
On the front page of the same
issue, two local business owners
are good examples of how
trickle-down economics are the
lifeblood of our economy Both
businesses depend heavily on in-
come generated from Duke En-
ergy's Crystal River operation.
Both were discussing how elimi-
nating the nuclear reactor will
negatively impact their busi-
nesses, their employees and all
of the local suppliers they buy
from. Juxtaposed to these arti-
cles was President Obama vilify-


Tim French
Citrus Springs

Vote for Himmel
As a 10-year resident of Citrus
County and teacher in the Citrus
County schools, I strongly sup-
port Mrs. Sandra Himmel for re-
election as school super-
intendent. Mrs. Himmel remains
an unwavering and staunch advo-
cate for public education and the
Citrus County schools. For this
educator, it has been an honor
and a privilege to work under her
leadership.
The Florida state Legislature
has been steadily shifting the
economic burden of public enti-
ties to local municipalities. This
shifting of financial responsibili-
ties has not come with adequate
funding sources. Worse still, the
Florida state Legislature has se-
verely restricted how local mu-
nicipalities raise funds to finance
compulsory programs such as ed-
ucation. It is now more difficult
than ever for local communities,
especially rural areas like Citrus
County, to maintain high quality
public education. Yet, under Mrs.
Himmel's leadership and conser-
vative budgeting, our local school


ENDORSEMENT
GUIDELINES
The Chronicle has enacted
its practice of asking that
endorsement letters be
limited to the reasons writers
are supporting candidates -
not why they won't support
candidates.
Endorsement letters are
subject to editing to keep the
emphasis on reasons for
support vs. criticism of their
opponents.


system has weathered drastic
and far-reaching cuts and main-
tained, for the past seven years,
an "A" rating.
Mrs. Himmel is a great asset to
Citrus County Schools and to Cit-
rus County. Her years of experi-
ence, both as a small business
owner and as a leader in public
education, make her the ideal
candidate. She understands both
the needs of our students and the
demands of the private sector.
Thus, I reiterate my support and
urge all of Citrus County to stand
with Mrs. Sandra Himmel on
Election Day Thank you for your
time and attention to this letter.
Brian F. Sullivan
Inverness

Vote for Balfour
"Aiming Higher" is not just an-
other political slogan plastered
on a sign or pamphlet. When
used in reference to education,
the author of the phrase is first
instilling hope in us by reaffirm-
ing the belief that our school sys-
tem can be made much better
Second, it challenges us to make
the promise of the best possible
education for every student a re-
ality Third, it illustrates a prin-
cipled commitment to the idea of
stepping out of the box to achieve
that goal.
This election, you could suc-
cumb to the lies, deceptions, and
skullduggery we have all come to
expect from political candidates
from every political spectrum,
ideology or philosophy You can
accept the same old politics as
usual and cookie-cutter ap-
proach to problem-solving that
incumbents always offer us or
you can muster up a little of that
rapidly receding hope that
dwells deep within you and dare
to "Aim Higher" by voting for


Sandy Balfour for superinten-
dent of schools.
Kim Morrison
Homosassa

Keep Himmel
As we approach this election
year, I wanted to write this letter
in support of Superintendent
Sandra "Sam" Himmel. A profes-
sional with the highest integrity,
Superintendent Himmel has al-
ready done a fantastic job with
our school district and absolutely
deserves to be re-elected for an-
other four years.
Superintendent Himmel has
the knowledge of the needs of
Citrus County schools from stu-
dents to parents to teachers to
community leaders. Having been
born and raised in Citrus County,
she knows exactly the best way to
get things done. Her support of
students and parents is unwaver-
ing. Her desire to provide teach-
ers with the tools they need to be
successful is second to none. I
have never seen another profes-
sional with the same attentive-
ness to detail and drive that
defines Mrs. Himmel.
The mark of a great educator
and leader is availability. Super-
intendent Himmel has that rare
energy to visit 10 schools in the
morning, go to a tennis match in
the early afternoon, and then
rush to an evening school con-
cert. Even though she races from
place to place to help others, she
always has the time and patience
to listen to any concern that is
brought to her attention. This is
exactly the type of superinten-
dent of schools that Citrus
County needs!
Even more impressive is her
understanding that a great stu-
dent is well-rounded. Committed
to academics, Mrs. Himmel also
promotes athletics, physical fit-
ness, music, art, and community
service. She attends football
games, tennis matches, the Art
Festival in Inverness, Rotary
Club service projects (to name
just a few). Grades in school are
very important, but Mrs. Himmel
also understands that what stu-
dents do before and after school
is equally important.
This fall, I strongly urge every-
one to vote to reelect Superinten-
dent Himmel. Our school district
is one of a very few that has been
an A-plus school district for the
past seven years. Let's keep our


school district an A-plus district
for the next four years as well.
Vote for Superintendent Sandra
"Sam" Himmel!
Dr. Parmanand Gurnani
Lecanto

From the election
I want to take this opportunity
to thank everyone who supported
my campaign.
To my wife who supported me
unconditionally, without her sup-
port I would not have been able
to run; and to my family, who be-
lieved in me from the start and
continues to believe in me.
(To) my volunteers, you guys
are the greatest and without your
support I couldn't have done as
well as I did. And to the hard-
working citizens and business
owners (who) donated time,
money and resources to the cam-
paign, I can't thank you enough. I
know how hard everyone worked
and we can hold our heads high
after a hard-fought primary
To my opponent, through our
challenges we only get stronger.
You have made me a stronger
person and I can only wish you
and your family the best.
To all the voters who cast their
votes:
This upcoming election in No-
vember is critical. We, as respon-
sible citizens, must keep in mind
our values and beliefs. Therefore,
I would encourage all of those
(who) voted for me to vote for the
following local candidates:
State Rep. Jimmy T Smith.
Sherriff: Winn Webb.
School Superintendent:
Sandy Balfour.
Clerk of the Court: Angela
Vick.
I have been on the campaign
trail with these people for quite
some time. I have heard them
speak and believe they will serve
our county with the honor and re-
sponsibility needed in our county
government.
In the future, I hope to be a
part of the political process in
Citrus County
Until such time, I will continue
to work hard and serve my com-
munity After much refection and
prayer, I have come to the conclu-
sion I still have my God, family,
ideas and values. These things I
hold dear and will never
relinquish.
Shannon Heathcock
Inverness


ELECTION
Continued from Page C1

not be reassured by the new
reduction of the water per-
mit request. The latest trick
is to move some or all of the
cattle to Levy County, where
an additional water permit
application will be submit-
ted to a different water
management district.
The Southwest Florida


Water Management District
(SWFWMD) permit number
20299 for withdrawal of up
to 76,700 gpd allowing for
a maximum of 153,400 gpd
during the highest water-
use (peak) month in Crystal
River for bottled water -
will continue to reduce flow
in King's Bay, increase
salinity and kill native
plants. Unbelievably, bot-
tled water and water for bot-
tling are considered as
agricultural products. As we


work to conserve water,
more straws are going into
the ground, negating our
efforts.
The engineering work
needed to restore the his-
toric function of the Tsala
Apopka lakes, as the over-
flow basin for the Withla-
coochee River, has not been
started. That reservoir for
our aquifer and springs
would bolster the entire
county With higher water,
SWFWMD should fulfill its


commitment to trials and
cause-and-effect analyses.
With that, and the new com-
missioner, who was pushing
this idea during the cam-
paign and before, we have
signs of hope.
Probably the biggest sign
of hope is the new Florida
Conservation Coalition
(FCC) headed by former
Florida governor and U. S.
senator Bob Graham. The
charter members are bright,
knowledgeable and commit-


ted people. Groups and in-
dividuals around the state
have allied with FCC and lo-
cally include Homosassa
River Alliance, Citrus
County Council, concerned
citizens such as former Cit-
rus County administrator
Gary Kuhl and, of course,
TOO FAR.
To aid county residents in
gaining a greater under-
standing and appreciation
for our irreplaceable waters,
the Homosassa River Al-


liance will bring Cynthia
Barnett and her book "Blue
Revolution" to Citrus County
Watch the Chronicle for de-
tails. Think about sponsor-
ing, and certainly attend.

Al Grubman is president of
TOO FAR, a retired profes-
sional engineer and chair-
man of the Citrus/
Hernando Waterways
Restoration Council-Citrus
County Task Force.


HOMOSASSA
Continued from Page C1

and so sensitive that the scientists dropped
this part of the MFL analysis in favor of
simply looking at the area and volume of
the salinity based habitat near the main
springs.
Maintaining a salinity-based habitat of 2
PPT or less at the headsprings was also re-
jected as too sensitive to fresh water re-
moval. It is known that there are times (like
now) when the spring flow can reach that
level of salinity (Doesn't that say we should
stop taking more fresh water?) Next the
salinity-based habitat of 3 PPT or less was
examined. A 3 percent flow reduction of the


springs results in a 15 percent reduction of
the 3 PPT habitat. Therefore, that was se-
lected as the MFL.
In 1993, the Homosassa was designated
an Outstanding Florida Waterway to pro-
vide legal protection against degradation.
However, that designation has been re-
jected for consideration by the MFL
program.
HOW MUCH CAN THE
HOMOSASSA TOLERATE?
Aquatic vegetation is rapidly disappear-
ing and is dead in most of the river.
There is a disturbing University of
Florida (UF) study showing a steady de-
cline in fish in the Homosassa from 2007 to
2010. In fact, UF eventually stopped count-
ing fish in the area near Otter Creek be-
cause of the total lack of fish and


vegetation. We started calling this a "dead
zone" and invited Gov Rick Scott to come
see it He got us in touch with the DEP folks
responsible for our state coastal waterways.
They set up a team of scientists to come in-
vestigate. What they found was not just a
dead zone, but also a dead river!
Finding high salinity near the springs is
very surprising to some, but not to the local
people. In recent years, there has been a
vast increase in barnacles all the way up to
the springs. The MFL program, designed to
remove more fresh water from our springs,
will greatly aggravate this situation.
COME EXPLORE THE
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS AND RIVER
You better come quickly You often hear
of environmental tipping points where the
delicate balance of nature and man falls


out of line and something (usually nature)
crashes. The Homosassa is at a tipping
point. The proposed MFL will encourage
additional freshwater withdrawals. That
will further diminish the spring flows, and
we can kiss the Homosassa good-bye.
There are choices to be made. Clearly,
SWFWMD can choose to protect these
unique, fragile, already impacted, coastal
springs and rivers. Or, it can choose, as its
scientists recommend, to authorize their
destruction. Why would anyone want to do
this?


Ron Miller is a Homosassa resident and
a charter member and current
vice president of the Homosassa
RiverAlliance.


ON THE NET


Continued from www.votecitrus.com
Continued from Page C1


Voters who choose to wait
until Election Day to read the
amendments will most likely
not be making an informed
choice.
Nancy Kennedy, Chronicle
reporter, wrote an excellent
summary (Aug. 27) of the


amendments as discussed at a
presentation byJudyJohnson,
a Marion County attorney and
member of the Marion County
League of Women Voters.
Other sources of informa-
tion on the amendments are:
Florida League of Women


Voters www.thefloridavoter.
org.
The Collins Center -
www.CollinsCenterorg.
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office www
citruspa.org.
Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections www.vote
citrus.com.

Susan Gill is Citrus County's
supervisor of elections.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

accidents. Why, when we know the in-
tersection is a danger, do we have to
wait until someone gets killed before
we get something done?
9. I don't know why there are not
enough jobs for all the people who
want to work in this country
10. I don't know why, when we live in


the greatest nation on Earth and have a
government process open to all (at least
those with the proper photo ID), that
less than 30 percent of the residents of
Citrus County voted in the primary
election.
And that's just the start of the things
I don't know.

GerryMulligan is the publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


HEALTH
Continued from Page C1

After reviewing the Hills-
borough County model, it
was evident their primary
care health system was ex-
panding and providing pro-
grams that are not available
in Citrus County
As part of this effort, my
staff has been in constant
contact with the previous
health department director
concerning operational and
funding requirements of the


health department.
As has been reported, the
trip to Hillsborough County
to meet with Bradley Herre-
mans, CEO of the Suncoast
Community Health Centers
Inc., was in an effort to ex-
plore the option of a stand-
alone FQHC.
This trip had been
planned by my staff with the
understanding of the previ-
ous health department di-
rector, who also served as
the chief executive officer
(CEO) of the George A.
Dame FQHC.
Unfortunately, the direc-


tor left the position and a
representative from the
health department attended
the meeting in her place:
Jim Goodworth, chairman
of the George A. Dame
FQHC. Mike Bays, an insur-
ance agency owner in Citrus
County, was invited to at-
tend this meeting along with
county staff, a health de-
partment representative,
and a medical business
consultant.
Mr. Bays' expertise is
based on the fact that, in
2007, he applied for a stand-
alone FQHC and later de-


termined to withdraw the
application due to the fact
the health department ap-
plied for and received a
public-entity FQHC.
One of the responsibili-
ties of the governing body of
the George A. Dame FQHC
is to set the course for de-
termining the most cost-ef-
fective and efficient method
for providing quality pri-
mary care for the residents
of Citrus County
This board is made up of
a cross-section of commu-
nity leaders and health cen-
ter users, which provides


the solid foundation for de-
cision-making.
The Florida Legislature
has debated in previous ses-
sions the wisdom of having
primary care as a function
of the state health depart-
ment. I believe it is prudent
for all involved in the deliv-
ery of health care in Citrus
County to continue to seek
viable options for providing
these services.
It is my understanding the
board has scheduled a re-
treat to discuss these mat-
ters and it is my hope this
will empower each board


member to recognize the
possibilities of new options
in providing quality health
care to our residents.
In these difficult fiscal
times, rest assured, as the
county administrator, I am
always looking for options
for the Board of County
Commissioners to consider
new ways to do business
more efficiently while still
keeping quality service.

Brad Thorpe is
Citrus County's county
administrator


BALLOT


C4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


COMMENTARY





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Letters to the EDITOR


Good advice
On the Sunday before the primary elec-
tions, Gerry Mulligan wrote in his editorial
that there has been too much character
bashing and that voters should ignore the
issues and vote for the candidate who was
being bashed the most I am not sure that
ignoring the issues is the best way to pro-
ceed, but I do agree there has been way
too much negativity in this election.
The next day, the Monday before the pri-
mary elections and again on Tuesday, the
very morning of the primary elections, the
Chronicle ran articles that were not flatter-
ing to Scott Adams. I am not sure if these
articles by Mike Wright would be consid-
ered "bashing" or not that term can be
spun many ways but the end result was
that Scott Adams won by a huge margin.
It would appear that Gerry Mulligan's
comments came true. Vote for the guy who
is getting bashed the hardest. In this case,
however, there is no doubt that the voters
picked the best candidate for that position.
Harry Cooper
Hernando

Primary analysis
The article "Primary results: Voters
stayed home" was interesting, but Dam-
ato's analysis is silly and contrary to elec-
tion reality
The truth is the low turnout combined
with the fact that it was a three-way race
is why you won. The fact is primary voter
turnout is always low and anyone who has
ever analyzed election results knows that
historically here in Citrus County primary
voter turnout is never much higher than
30 percent and more often less. A crowded
race, like yours, Mr Damato, where there
are three or more candidates involved in
the race and the voter turnout is low, is ac-
tually advantageous to the incumbent, es-
pecially in those perceived
anti-incumbent election cycles.
Yes, you should thank the 9,299 voters
who kept you in office this time, but not
forget that 15,477 the combined vote to-
tals of the two candidates who ran against
you glaringly indicates that a plurality
of voters wanted someone else in that
commission seat. The fact that Mr. Kitchen
came within a cat's whisker of unseating
you despite it being a three-way race with
low voter turnout is more of an indication
of his electoral strength and strongly sug-
gests that you may have been the one cry-
ing in your cocktail election night if you
had been running just against him or
there had been a higher voter turnout
Mr. Damato, do not jump to conclusions
here; I am not a disgruntled Kitchen sup-
porter. I have never met either one of you.
Our Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill
did everything possible to alert voters to
the fact that part of the primary was uni-
versal and that everyone could vote in the
races that were to be decided that day I
agree with Mrs. Gill that some voters were
most likely confused, but the only real way
to generate interest in primary elections
and improve these dismal turnout num-
bers is to consider going to an open pri-
mary system.


Kim Morrison
Homosassa


No peace


My son Johnny Masukevich was killed
Oct 3, 2004. An 11-year-old shot and killed
him. Here we are almost eight years later.
I cry every day for my loss of my boy -
sometimes for a minute, sometimes for


hours. But that doesn't matter. He was my
only son and this boy took a wonderful,
happy person from family and friends.
I wonder, does the boy who killed him
have an ounce of conscience? I've never
received an apology. He did his time 11
months. Of course, my family feels this
wasn't enough. An apology doesn't even
touch the pain and heartache.
Only this boy knows the truth about
what happened that day! My family has
carried this burden around since the day
Johnny died. What really happened
there? We need peace of mind, and let my
son rest in peace.
This boy is going on with his life. I won-
der, does he even care? Does he feel
sorry? Does he feel anything?
How does he go on with his life?
Michelle Hudak
Hernando

Presidential film
We went to see the "2016 Obama's Amer-
ica" movie Monday afternoon. We were
really surprised at the three-fourths full
theater on a Monday afternoon when we
were expecting a hurricane.
"2016" is very well done, not partisan
hype in any way just background infor-
mation on President Obama and a map of
the direction he has in mind for America's
future.
Anyone who is planning on voting owes
it to themselves and the country to learn
as much as they can about each candidate
before they vote. If their support for a can-
didate is so fragile they can't risk learning
more about him, they are not prepared to
vote.
"2016" would give everyone the oppor-
tunity to understand President Obama
and where he intends to lead our country
Sally Quinn
Hernando

Vote with your head
In a recent guest column, the writer be-
littles voters for not being informed on is-
sues prior to casting ballots.
He goes on to say that "only the in-
formed should vote," an unworthy com-
ment that clearly misunderstands our
constitution and our national character.
His article then descends into mostly anti-
government partisan rhetoric and ends
with an implied voting recommendation.
To be sure voters should be knowledge-
able of the policies of the person for
whom they will vote especially those that
affect their lives directly
But how does one inform oneself? Let
me offer a suggestion or two. First, turn off
cable television news since they feed
mostly on fluff, sensationalism and irrele-
vancy to sell their product. On the air, PRI,
BBC, and local TV channels, for example,
give less biased information. Reject nega-
tive advertisements. Instead, seek infor-
mation from respected journals (the
Economist, New York Times, Wall Street
Journal, etc.) and search the Web for
sources that are non-partisan to discover
different perspectives.
Look at both party platforms and com-
pare them to your own values. Ask your-
self what and how current and future
policies would affect you overall. Then
vote with your head and not your heart.
Perhaps the guest writer could pursue
such suggestions to better inform himself,
as well.
Wayne Logsdon
Hernando


Where's the outrage?
Where is "Save Crystal River Inc." now?
Without consultation with those poten-
tially affected by the decision, the South-
west Florida Water Management District
(SWFWMD) has issued permits that allow
the withdrawal of 28 million gallons of
water a year from a site near the springs
that feed King's Bay
With potential to worsen water quality in
King's Bay/Three Sisters, I would think
that Save Crystal River Inc. would be fired
up with the same passion and outrage we
saw from them towards the FWS just a few
months ago when speeds were slowed on
the water of Kings Bay to help protect
Manatee. Why are there no anti-SWFWMD
signs on the front lawns of King's Bay
homeowners?
How is this not the state (SWFWMD)
"over reaching"? It appears that the "Sum-
mer Sports Zone Season" has come and
gone with little to no complaints about the
speed or size of the area used for recre-
ation. I've read nothing of tourist dollars
lost from the flocks of people (who) would
stay away from the slower speeds of King's
Bay Makes me wonder if the outrage from
months ago wasn't just anti-FWS and not
really so much about the speed in the bay?
I wonder if the permit to draw 28 mil-
lion gallons per year had FWS's name
anywhere on or near it, would SCR Inc. be
shouting from the rooftops about more
overreaching or government control of
our water? I believe taking that much or
any more water from the Springs will have
much more of an effect on King's Bay than
slowing down speed boats for a few
months a year, and I am shocked and
amazed that those (who) care so much for
the Bay they live on have kept so quiet.
Steve Sapienza
Crystal River

Oath for enlisted men
This letter is in response to letters writ-
ten by Neville Anderson and Ruth J.
Anderson.
I, too, am a retired veteran (U. S. Navy). I
took the same oath that Mr. Anderson did;
however, we seem to have a difference of
opinion on what that oath was all about I
am sure that Mr Anderson is a patriotic in-
dividual having served his country honor-
ably in time of war I also agree that I am
fed up with all the mudslinging and see no
really good choice in the coming elections
but for me, the choice is clear.
I will vote for the person that I believe
will do the least damage to the Constitu-
tion. The oath that I took said first, "I will
support and defend the Constitution of the
United States against all enemies, foreign
and domestic." It also went on to say "that
I will obey the orders of the President of
the United States and the orders of the of-
ficers appointed over me." This is the oath
for enlisted men; if you were an officer,
the line about obey orders of the Presi-
dent is left out.
The President of the United States is, by
law, the Commander-in-Chief of our
armed forces; however, my first obligation
is to the Constitution. I feel that the peo-
ple that took this oath have a moral obliga-
tion to disobey any orders that are
contrary to the Constitution.
If you're not familiar with the Constitu-
tion and the Bill of Rights, then you should
be, because they are the very freedoms
that Mr. Anderson and I both fought for.
My fear is not of the foreign enemies of
this country, we know who they are and
what they propose. My fear is of domestic
enemies that pose as representatives of
the people while passing laws that in-
fringe on our Constitutional rights. To Mr


Anderson, I say Semper Fi, Marine, and
thank you for your service to our country
W.J. (Jack) Fowler, ATC Ret.
Homosassa

Penal system backwards
Perhaps it is my 15 years on the board of
NAMI-Citrus that gives me a certain per-
spective on "crime and punishment". I don't
want any fingers pointed at me saying "soft
on crime"... or "bleeding-heart liberal."
We are a society of laws, without which
would be anarchy Your lead story on (Aug.
9) refers to a young man, now age 20, whose
first brush with the law came at his age 11.
Our esteemed sheriff (my friend) stated in
court, "his agency watched this young man
as a juvenile offender and watched him be-
come an even worse adult offender"
He is now going to be a guest of the
great state of Florida for 15 years, which
doing some approximate math adds up to
approximately $450,000 to keep him in a
milieu which could promise to make this
"worse offender" into something we can-
not even imagine, if he survives.
Question: At age 11, did anyone attempt
to find what was motivating this child to
do illegal things? Did teachers suggest
there were behavior or intelligence or
abuse factors, or biological brain-based is-
sues this young person would not have
created, but he and his family would have
to live with, which would create violence
or "use of firearms"? Were any funds
available to somehow get to the bottom of
this aberrant behavior?
It seems our penal system is exactly
backwards: Let's spend money to punish,
but relatively nothing to head off such be-
havior and consequences "at the pass."
Who knows what $4,500 to diagnose, treat,
etc., would have meant to this young life?
In sorrow, I rest my case.
Marilyn Booth
Inverness

Dunnellon traffic trap
I have written twice before on Dunnel-
lon's improper use of red light cameras. I
have pointed out that Florida Statute
316.0083 does not allow a ticket to be is-
sued on the basis of camera evidence to a
driver who is making a right-hand turn
without stopping as long as he/she does so
carefully and prudently
The Dunnellon police are slapping peo-
ple with violations who pass over sensors
embedded in the roadway 10 to 15 feet be-
fore the stop bar at any speed above 10
mph. This speed criterion makes no
sense, since the sensors range from 30 feet
to 90 feet short of the intersections where
the cameras and sensors are being used. It
would seem that a careful and prudent
turn would be simply without interfering
with other traffic or pedestrians. Florida
Statute 316.002 states that a municipality
is not entitled to add criteria, such as the
arbitrary 10 mph speed, to the statutes ap-
plicable on state roads.
I went to traffic court a couple of weeks
ago with a lady who had objected to her
citation. The courtroom contained two
Dunnellon police officers and about 40-45
people who had been cited for red light vi-
olations in Dunnellon. The police officers
played the camera videotapes for the
hearing officer and, in every case of a
right-hand turn heard before I exited the
courtroom, the citations were dismissed.
The hearing officer paid no attention to
the recorded speed over 10 mph.
My message here is, if you feel you
made a careful and prudent right-hand
turn but were ticketed by camera evi-
dence, take it to court.
Burt Eno, Ph.D., PE (ret)
Rainbow Springs


"NW THAT YoU M/NT1ioN mT, MIAYe W S UPMD'T I.l4W A
RPeFPiCAN FVPf

COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 C5


I


wa0w





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fossil fuels to stay
"The rocket's red glare from
gravity's rainbow." Holy cow, what
does that have to do with any-
thing other than obscure Ameri-
can literature? I gave Mike Fahey
350 words to explain a carbon-
constrained atmosphere and he
comes up with that and a satu-
rated sponge. That's the trouble
you have when public policy is in-
fluenced by rabid environmental-
ism. The English literature
majors all pipe up, but nobody
has any concept of the numbers.
Mike mentions Enron. Enron
was a company, a single company
Coal is an industry with thou-
sands of companies depending
on it. The same is true for the oil
and gas industries. The differ-
ence in the order of magnitude is
literally in the thousands.
Mike firmly establishes himself
as a member of a scientific group
I call the navel contemplators.
He says "humans have the capac-
ity to perceive reality accurately
and that there are rational expla-
nations for elements in the real
world." Three thousand years
ago the Greeks sat around and
reached the same conclusion. In
the meantime, we have theories
covering subatomic physics and
some actual data, but we have a
long way to go in putting it all to-
gether. We can't account for 70
percent of our known universe.
We don't know what dark matter
and dark energy are. Mike sees
things in his navel that he can't
put a number to, and that's the
problem.
Mike says excessive carbon


dioxide stays in the atmosphere,
where it acts like a blanket His
fellow navel contemplators have
thrown out numbers like a per-
sistence of 100 years to 500 years.
That's wrong dead wrong by
a magnitude of thousands. The
latest research suggests the per-
sistence is more on the order of
four days.
Mike says you don't have to pay
for sun, wind and geothermal. If
you do the math to calculate the
cost per BTU of energy you can
get from those sources and com-
pare it to carbon-based fuels, you
get magnitudes of difference.
They can never replace carbon-
based fuels, only supplement
them. If you do the math cor-
rectly, you are paying for both
systems.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Inferior act
Thanks to Frank Koegler for
defending the Wall Street
bankers who made decisions to
bundle toxic mortgages with
other assets that brought down
the economy, and for claiming
the Affordable Care Act isn't good
for the country I needed that.
I wouldn't suggest Democratic
legislators weren't complicit in
past deregulation; however,
since the 2008 crash, in the wake
of staggering unemployment, un-
derwater mortgages and rising
deficits, the unwillingness of the
Republican Congress to work
across the aisle to create jobs,
construct safeguards for the


Letters to the EDITOR
hardworking American people
and regulate the financial indus-
try just so they can make Obama
a one term president is both irre-
sponsible and inexcusable.
I restate: The Affordable Care
Act is inferior to a Single Payer
System for cost and savings rea-
sons, but according to a July 24th
Congressional Budget Office re-
port, it saves $109 billion over a
decade while increasing cover-
age for millions, not to mention
some other popular benefits that
are already in effect:
It closes the prescription
drug donut hole and in so doing,
seniors have already saved
$3.7 billion.
Children are able to stay on
their parents' policies until they
are 26.
It creates $40 billion in tax
credits for small businesses.
Children with pre-existing con-
ditions are covered now.
75 percent of premiums cover
actual health care, not CEO
bonuses.
These are just the current ben-
efits. In 2014, everyone will be
able to purchase insurance
whether they have a pre-existing
condition or not
Frank's opinion that President
Obama is a "My Way or the High-
way" president is laughable. Ac-
cording to all independent polls,
he has bent over backwards com-
promising and trying to work
with the recalcitrant Republi-
cans. I pray those days are over.
When it comes to corporate
donors, if you look at the record,
there is no comparison to which


party gets the biggest hunk of the
pie. The Koch Brothers,
Exxon/Mobil, Sheldon Adelson,
and Wall Street's biggest banks
give almost exclusively to The
Party of No.
If these guys have our best in-
terests at heart, why disenfran-
chise millions of legitimate
voters in battleground states? I
wonder.
Harriet Heywood
Homosassa

Misuse of terms
Re: Fourteen-year-old John
Houston's guest column about a
republic vs. a democracy today
Kudos to John. John is a per-
spicacious young man with good
writing skills. He is correct about
the difference between our re-
public and a democracy His con-
clusion that our rights will be lost
is sound. John is better informed
about our history than I am, so I
will take his word for the correct-
ness of his references.
Politicians and the media have
dumbed down the regular folks
on at least two pet peeves of
mine: what Congress is and is not
and John's point about a republic
vs. a democracy
Concerning the former, the U.S.
representatives en masse with
the near-total compliance of the
media (especially TV reporters
and pundits) have convinced
people that there are congress-
men vs. senators. The incumbent
representatives are so arrogant
that they will not even run for the
correct political office of U.S.


representative. Instead, they run
for the non-existent office of Con-
gress. All opponents are some-
how indoctrinated to do the
same. Amazingly, they all have
the complicity of the media. How
ridiculous and revolting of the
media people who surely
know better but just go along.
I assume the politicians hood-
wink the people to sound more
important in their own eyes. If I
am wrong, I certainly wish one or
more politicians would enlighten
us. Tell us how you cannot or will
not run for U.S. representative
but can, or think you should, run
for a nonexistent Congress
position.
Of course, one can run for the
U.S. Senate legitimately The
Senate is one of the two entities
that comprise our Congress.
Have you ever heard of a senator
or an opponent running for Con-
gress in lieu of running for the
Senate?
I encounter people over and
over who think there are con-
gressmen and senators who make
up our bicameral Congress. They
are unaware (astonishingly) that
representatives and senators are
all members of Congress, i.e.,
congressmen. Senators are con-
gressmen! No one in the media
would dare call a senator a con-
gressman. Conversely, all repre-
sentatives are routinely referred
as congressmen. How stupid.
This is political correctness gone
awry Please, politicians and
media folk, abandon the misuse.
Sam Williams
Homosassa


Wednesday Thursday Friday SaturL





6 7


-c-If


14


!0 21 2.



17 28 '29


SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
proudly presents the
ALTH I i .1...s County Chamber of Comme .
Business Women's Alliance


FITNESS RE


Saturday, September 22, 2012
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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Health, fitness & wellness exhibits
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Saturday September 29, 2012
3 PM 8 PM
Knights Of Columbus Hall #6168
2389 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy (CR 486)
Lecanto, Fl. 34461


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Limited Seating Dress Is

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Buffet Dinner
Member Talent Show
Performances By SAC Members
i &
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- Frank Torrales
Singing Love Ballads



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(352) 302-8319


C6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


COMMENTARY












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


QE3: Will it help?


Associated Press
Lukoil service station worker Harbhasan Singh explains to Tiffany Price that, as a protest to what they say are unfair pricing practices by Lukoil
North America, the station has raised their gas price to more than $8 a gallon Wednesday in South Plainfield, N..J. Higher gas prices are crimp-
ing consumer spending and slowing the already-weak U.S. economy. And they could get worse in the coming months. The Federal Reserve this
week took steps to boost economic growth. But those stimulus measures are also pushing oil prices up. If gas prices follow, consumers will
have less money to spend elsewhere.

Federal Reserve officials seeking to create wealth, notjust cut rates


MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writers

WASHINGTON The Fed-
eral Reserve wasn't just trying
to drive down interest rates
when it announced a third
round of bond purchases
Thursday.
It also wants to make people
feel wealthier and more
willing to spend.
The idea is for the Fed's $40
billion-a-month in bond pur-
chases to lower interest rates
and cause stock and home
prices to rise, creating a
"wealth effect" that would
boost the economy
And "if people feel that
their financial situation is bet-
ter because their 401(k) looks
better or for whatever reason
- their house is worth more
- they're more willing to go
out and spend," Chairman
Ben Bernanke told reporters.
"That's going to provide the
demand that firms need in
order to be willing to hire and
to invest."
Sure enough, stocks have
surged since the Fed an-
nounced plans to buy mortgage
bonds as long as it feels neces-
sary a policy known as
"quantitative easing," or QE.
And since Bernanke gave a
speech Aug. 31 more or less
confirming that QE3 was on the
way, the Dow Jones industrial
average has jumped more than
500 points, about 4 percent.
Stocks tend to rise when
See Page D5


The impact of QE3:

the pros react
The Federal Reserve launched a third round of What s different this time is that the Fed has not
bond purchases Thursday. Since the 2008 financial set a limit for the amount of bonds it will buy, nor
crisis, the central bank has purchased more than has it said how long it will keep buying the bonds.
$2 trillion in Treasury bonds and mortgage-backed The Fed has simply said it will start at a pace of
securities in an effort to lower long-term interest $40 billion a month and keep purchasing
rates, and spur borrowing and spending. The bond mortgage-backed securities until the job market
purchases are called "quantitative easing." improves "substantially."


On the stock market:

"The rally is
not going to last. I think
i it s going to come to an end
When QE3 s unveiled as the
desperate act that it
really is."

Jeff Sica, president and chief
investment officer of SICA Wealth
Management

"It s only a matter
of time before speculation
begins as to when the Fed
will raise its purchases
from $40 billion a
month."

Paul Ashworth,
economist at Capital
Economics


On the economy
"QE has
successfully lifted the
economy before. Taken
together, the Fed's efforts to
lower long-term rates have
raised real GDP by an
estimated 1.2% as of the
second quarter of
2012. "
', _l : ,,,
economist at Moody's
Analytics


On investors:
"Mom and Pop
on the street? Forget
it. The most important
thing that will get them to
come back (to stocks) is
house prices going
up and more
jobs."


managing partner of Macro
Intelligence 2 Partners

"They will
slowly return over the
next few years. If people
Want to have a comfortable
retirement, they
have to."

-- R ,.I -,II 'li,:- '.'-,_ii,
economist, Ameriprise Financial
AP


'R U Ready' to own your own business?


H ave you ever ,
dreamed of own-
ing a business
and being the boss? As
you think about the ad-
vantages, you should
consider listening to the
facts about the owner-
ship experience. The
best source for this side
of the equation is from Dr. Fre
those who have been Her
owners. EXPER
Citrus SCORE will
present an "RU Ready?" MATI
seminar, which will focus
on ownership realities. This confer-
ence explores business startup
specifics.
The upcoming program is sched-
uled for 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
19, at the College of Central Florida
in Lecanto. "R U Ready?" is free
and should be an essential first look
at the basics to fulfill your dream of
being a business owner. SCORE
mentors are ready to help you.
Putting an idea into action


I









I
r


The thought of owning
a business usually starts
with an idea. However, it
shouldn't end there. If it
does, it becomes just a
dream forever destined
to remain in your fantasy
life. What should happen
is a realistic overview of
just what it takes to start
derick a new business.
zog SCORE won't sugarcoat
|ENCE the requirements, nor
will we exaggerate the
*ERS personal costs of entre-
preneurship. What we
will stress is the ABCs for startup
and continued success. Ask yourself,
"Do I have the knowledge, skills and
experience plus the drive and en-
ergy to make a business successful?"
Knowledge and the market
Chances are you have thought
about your knowledge, skills and
experience. This reflection may
have created the business idea. If
so, the first step should be an evalu-
ation of probable success. Ask your-


self, "What service or product can I
offer to a market? Is there, in fact, a
market for me to serve?"
If yes, then ask the next question:
"Can I meet or exceed what the
completion is offering?"
In any business, market competi-
tion is usually present. Some com-
petitors will usually be there before
you and some will come after you.
Under either scenario, you will
have to meet and/or beat the com-
petitor to survive.
Market pressures and pricing
One very important business con-
sideration will be pricing. Prices
are market driven. Prices should
not be based on costs. Costs permit
an owner to establish price based
on market conditions.
Owners must know their costs to
determine if a profit is possible. If
your pricing is higher than the com-
petition, knowing your costs will
allow a careful evaluation as what
is causing this situation.
Competing with lower prices will
get you business. Everyone likes


lower prices. But here is the
dilemma. If your pricing is below
your costs, how long can you keep
that up?
What will suffer is insufficient
revenue to pay employees, supplier
bills and you. How long can you
exist under those circumstances?
On the other hand, if your com-
petitor has very low prices, chances
are that may work to your advantage.
He may go broke instead of you.
SCORE has answers
By signing up and attending "R U
Ready?," you will gain an aware-
ness of these and other basic prin-
ciples about new business startup
issues. SCORE mentors will be
there to counsel you.
To sign up, call the SCORE office
at 352-249-1236. If you call during
non-business hours, leave enough
information so we can call you back.

Dr FrederickJ. Herzogis
chairman of Citrus County SCORE.
Email therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Probate


can be


painless

DEAR BRUCE: We
have two children.
Our daughter is
the executor of our estate,
because she lives closer
than our son and we
thought it would be easier
for her to handle our af-
fairs. We are in our late
60s. The majority of our
estate is in our home. My
husband and I are in dis-
agreement on whether we
should have a living trust
or just a will. What do you
think? We want to avoid
probate if at all possible.
- Reader, via email
DEAR READER: You
can avoid probate by put-
ting your home and other
assets in a living trust, but
I can't see any reason in
the world to do that. Pro-
bate really is a relatively
painless process for an
uncomplicated estate,
which is what you have
described. I understand
there have been many
books, papers, articles,
etc., written about the hor-
rors of probate, but in
most cases, they are enor-
mous exaggerations.
A properly executed
will, drawn by an attorney
and indicating your son
and daughter are your
heirs, should be sufficient.
I see no reason for the ex-
pense of a living trust
other than the privacy
that a trust affords.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a
very close friend who has
not filed income tax re-
turns for several years.
While she's had enough
income for the past sev-
eral years to file, she has-
n't. I keep trying to tell her
if she doesn't get it
straightened out now,
she's going to be in a lot of
trouble.
I don't know what advice
to give her, other than to
seek the assistance of a tax
professional, as they
should know the rules and
regulations pertaining to
these matters. I just want to
make sure if she takes my
advice, she finds someone
who will really help her
and not get her into more
trouble than she already is
in. I am not sure ifjust hav-
ing the title of CPA is reas-
surance enough.
She wants to do the
right thing and become
current on her tax liabil-
ity; she just does not want
to make things worse. -
Friend in Nevada
DEAR FRIEND: This is
a relatively common
proposition. If your friend
comes forward, it is un-
likely any punishment
other than maybe some fi-
nancial penalties would
be assessed. But if the IRS
approaches her first, she
is going to have a lot of
problems to deal with.
I would suggest she find
a CPA who specializes in
tax matters. You're right:
having CPA in his or her
title is not enough. If your
friend prefers, she can con-
tact an "enrolled agent"
This is someone who is li-
censed to practice before
the IRS; most enrolled
agents are former IRS em-
ployees. A tax professional
can submit for her what are
called "amended returns."
If penalties and interest
are due, she can enclose a
check with the amended
returns, and I think she will
find the matter is
concluded.


Page D4









1n 9


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan R
this:
Mihrt


16, 2012 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


2012 Industry Appreciation Month


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SUPERIOR
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To register for event
352.795.3149
reception@
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cirusedc.corn/events


The Citrus County Economic Devel-
opment Council, along with the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce, cele-
brated business success during the
month of September
Showing appreciation for the 9,000
businesses in Citrus County, the EDC
organized a kickoff event at the new
Crystal Chevrolet, an awards lunch-
eon featuring renowned speaker Jerry
Ross of Disney's National Entrepre-
neur Center, and their annual meeting
highlighting the economic progress in
Citrus County over the last year
This coming Thursday, Sept. 20, is
our signature finale, the EDC barbe-
cue. This year the barbecue, at M & B
Dairy, also honors Dale McClellan of
M & B Dairy, the Swisher-Sweets 2012
Florida Farmer of the Year
Come out and celebrate with us:
Tickets are $25. That gets you in the


CITRUS COUNTY
Economic Development
Council, Inc.


gate, with unlimited finger-licking
barbecue prepared by the Citrus
County Ag Alliance, open bar and
music featuring the nationally known
Tim McGraw cover band Adam D.
Tucker
Event begins at 6 p.m. and tickets


are available at www.citrusedc.com/
events.html or call 352-795-3149. Come
kick it up at the farm Citrus County
style!
We thank our generous Diamond
Sponsor of all our events, Superior
Residences of Lecanto/Sunflower
Springs Assisted Living; our Present-
ing Sponsors, Progress Energy, Crystal
Chevrolet, and Sibex; as well as all the
organizations that made these events
possible, including M & B Dairy, TCG,
College of Central Florida, Bernie Lit-
tle Distributors, Mitch Simmons of
Neon Leon's, and Mike Scott Plumb-
ing. Industry Appreciation Month is
put on by the Citrus County Economic
Development Council, the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce, in co-
operation with the Citrus County Agri-
culture Alliance and the Citrus County
Visitors & Convention Bureau.

Steve and Jewel
Lamb, owners of
Crystal Chevrolet,
accept the new
image award from
Josh Wooten, pres-
ident and CEO of
the Citrus County
Chamber of Com-
merce. At the far
left and assisting
in the presentation
is John Seifert, ex-
ecutive director of
the Economic
Development
Council, as County
Commissioner Joe
Meeks, far right,
observes.


And the New Image Award goes to Crystal Chevrolet


It seems only fitting that
Industry Appreciation
Month kicked off with a
mixer at Crystal Chevrolet's


new $2 million showroom.
First opening their doors
in Citrus County in 1984,
Steve and Jewel Lamb knew


a new showroom would service area, where employ-
allow them to be more ees now have quick and di-
innovative. rect access to the service
A major benefit is in the lane and the waiting room


to serve customers better
Additionally, the new fa-
cility is "greener," providing
a 70 percent drop in their


electric bill even though the
building is larger Visit the
new showroom at 1035 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.


A WORD OF CONGRATULATIONS
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce extends
recognition and Congratulations to the 10 Most
Admired Women in Citrus County:
" Susan LaForsch Arts
" Pamela Bellman Business
" Lora Wilson Leader
" Sharon Hansen Mother
" Marilynne Denison Athlete
" Margie Leturno Health
" Dianna Bandhauer Education
" Jewel Lamb Community Involvement
" Cecelia Douglas Government
" Jill Isenberg Up and Coming Youth


YOU CAUGHT

MY EYE ...

Debbie Hurley
Floral City Library


I -.~~ *


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Give a shout out to employees

who focus on Customer Service
The Citrus County Cham- name appearing in the news-
ber of Commerce is proud to paper, the Citrus County
promote its "You Caught My Chamber of Commerce sends
Eye" program. a letter to the employee's
The program allows resi- manager noting the recogni-
dents and visitors to recog- tion. We are excited to offer
nize employees who go such interaction between
beyond in their atten- businesses and community
tion to Customer Serv- residents. Please note: Busi-
ice. In addition to ness must be within
the employee's Citrus County
r ------------ -----------------*
I YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
for OUTSTANDING Customer Service!
IPERSON you are nominating:
I I
I I
IBUSINESS they work for:
I I
I I
SADDRESS of business:
I I
City: I
IDATE of contact:
I I
I I
WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?
I I



Your Name:
SYour Phone Number:
IDate Submitted: I
I I
SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: CINDI FEIN,
S CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
28 N.W. U.S. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
L----------- -------------.


Upcoming Citrus County Chamber/ EDC events


Sept 20 EDC Industry Appre-
ciation BBQ 6 to 10 p.m. at M & B
Dairy, Lecanto. $25 per person gets
you in the gate, unlimited barbecue,
open bar and the Tim McGraw cover
group, the Adam D. Tucker band. For
tickets: www.citrusedc.com/events.
html or call 352-795-3149.
Sept. 22 Business Women's Al-
liance Health and Fitness Expo 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. at National Guard Ar-
mory, Crystal River
Sept. 29 "Citrus Ave. Lights Up
the Night" Progressive Dinner (6 to 9
p.m.) on Citrus Avenue, with LIVE en-
tertainment (6 to 11 p.m.).
Oct. 11 -After Hours Business
Networking Mixer 5 to 7 p.m. at
NATURE COAST EMS.
Oct. 12 October Chamber


Lunch, 11:30 a.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
& Country Club.
Oct. 23 After Hours Business
Networking Mixer- 5 to 7 p.m. atAL-
PACA MAGIC.
Nov 1 Business After Hours -
5 to 7 p.m. at HOSPICE OF CITRUS
COUNTY
Nov 8 Business After Hours -
SENICA AIR and CITRUS COUNTY
BUILDERS ASSOCIATION preview
the 35th annual "RemodelingAmerica"
Home & Outdoor Show Nov 10 to 11.
Dec. 1 10 a.m. Parade in the
Hills, "The Magic of Christmas" pa-
rade, crafts, car show.
Dec. 1 6 p.m. Crystal River "A
Postcard Christmas" Parade.
Dec. 5 BWA December
Luncheon.


Dec. 6 Business After Hours -
5 to 7 p.m. at B & W REXALL DRUGS.
Dec. 8 Noon Inverness "A Post-
card Christmas" Parade.
Dec. 13 Business After
Hours/Parade Winners 5 to 7 p.m.
WAYBRIGHT REALTY
Jan. 19 and 20 2013 Florida
Manatee Festival in Crystal River
http://www.floridamanateefestival.
com/external/wcpages/manatee_festi-
val/index.aspx
Check out our
complete calen-
dar for commu-
nity, entertain-
ment and fiund-


raising events.
Follow us on your
smartphone:


Anytime Fitness joins Citrus County Chamber


Anytime Fitness, the
largest and fastest growing
24-hour co-ed fitness facil-
ity, is pleased to announce it
is open for business in the
Highland Plaza at 345 E.
Highland Blvd., Inverness,
FL 34452.
Meeting the needs of
today's on-the-go lifestyle
where you can exercise any
time using your own secu-
rity-access key! That's 24
hours a day, seven days a
week, 365 days a year
Call 352-400-4894 to see
how Anytime Fitness, Inver-
ness, can help you reach
your fitness goals.


Citrus County Cruisin'
Sept. 22 Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center presents the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce Business
Women's Alliance Women's Health & Fit-
ness Expo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. New
this year, in addition to the Well Zone and
the Spa Zone, are five mini workshops.
Sept. 29 Dance under the stars
Saturday, Sept. 29, when Crystal River
hosts "Citrus Avenue Lights Up The
Night" with an "Al Fresco" Progressive
Dinner, a Fall Fashion preview and music
by two bands. James Raymond opens
the evening with his one-man show, often
seen in the Orlando area. The evening
continues with Ocean Street, out of Geor-
gia, a "melodic collision of Southern-Soul
and Songwriter-Rock." Dinner tickets in-
clude three courses and one drink (alco-
holic or non-alcoholic) and are available
for pre-purchase at $15 ($20 at the gate)
at all Citrus Avenue merchants, both
Chamber of Commerce offices or by call-
ing 352-563-2833. General admission is


Chamber Ambassadors join staff from the Inverness Anytime Fitness in cutting the ribbon
to open for business. From left are: Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Crystal Ashe,
Health Center at Brentwood; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County, Janet Mayo, The
Plantation on Crystal River; Justin Berger (staff); Rick Roberts (owner); Susan Viola (man-
ager); Kim Baxter, Cadence Bank; Becca Morrison (certified trainer); and Tom Corcoran,
Life Care Center of Citrus County.


$5. Dinner served 6 to 9 p.m., merchants
open and music from 6 to 11 p.m.
Oct. 6 Nick Nicholas Ford and the
Citrus County Chronicle host the third an-
nual Nature Coast Mustang Club All
Ford Powered Car & Truck Show on Sat-
urday, Oct. 6, at Nick Nicholas Ford, 2901
State Road 44, Inverness. Proceeds bene-
fit Friends of Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices, and donations of non-perishable food
items for local charities will be accepted.
Music, fun, raffle, 50/50 and FORDS!
Oct. 26 to 28 The Cooter Festival
is loaded with fun, music, contests, games
food, refreshments, turtle races, barbecue
cook-off, Cooter Idol championship,


Triathlon, Costume Contest and more.
Free parking and admission. Information is
available at www.cooterfestival.com/.
Nov. 3 Rotary Club of Crystal
River-Kings Bay presents the fifth annual
Stone Crab Jam on Saturday, Nov. 3. This
street festival kicks off at 4 p.m. on the
south side of Citrus Avenue all the way to
the waterfront at King's Bay Park in Crystal
River, with music on three stages, food and
craft vendors, and beer, wine and
soda/water. General admission tickets are
only $5, and VIP tickets are just $50 each.
Information is at www.stonecrabjam.com/.
Nov. 10 to 11 Return to the Crys-
tal River Armory during the 35th annual
"Remodeling America" Home & Out-
door Show on Nov. 10 and 11. Hosted by
the Citrus County Builders Association
and sponsored this year by Senica Air,
the show is open to the public from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Sunday. Information is available at
www.citrusbuilders.com/comm home
outdoorshow.php.


C i c.CrrRus couNTY
-'-^ s-'a


O &
OPEN


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


- *


M






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's connection


D3

SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16


Pinnacle of his career


August V. I. P.

Dan Kern a fixture at

Gulf Coast Ready Mix

Having been in the ready mix concrete busi-
ness for the past 20 years, Dan Kern feels both
honored and blessed to hold his current posi-
tion as Vice President/General Manager of Gulf
Coast Ready Mix, LLC in Homosassa. He con-
siders this to be the pinnacle of his career, giv-
ing him the opportunity to bring his experience
to a locally owned and operated company, who
believes in operating under the guidelines of in-
tegrity and ethics.
Dan also considers it to be a privilege to help


Dan Kern, Gulf Coast Ready Mix LLC.
serve his community and the building industry
over the past several years as a member of the
Board of Directors and Golf Committee Chair-


man at the Citrus County Builders Association.
"It is sometimes easy to lose sight of all the
important things being done by the CCBA until
you get a look from the inside," he said. "They
are both good stewards of the building industry
and our community in general."
In fact, the only thing that surpasses his pas-
sion for his career is the love Dan has for his
wonderful wife, Aly, and their beautiful family
Dan truly enjoys unwinding on the weekends
with his three grown boys, their families and
Dan and Aly's three grandchildren. Whether it
is taking long drives to wherever or just hang-
ing around the house, the sound of children's
laughter (and arguments) is always in the air.
For more information on Dan Kern and Gulf
Coast Ready Mix, LLC, please contact him at
8778 W Jump Court, Homosassa, FL 34448 or by
phone at 352-621-3900 or 352-400-0107.


Newly elected board members


The Citrus County Builders Association Board of Directors for 2012-13, from left, are: Immediate Past President Wayne Bardsley of Quality Crafted
Builders, Frst Vice President Michael Gilbert of Gold Crest Homes, President Bill Larder of Larder & Sons Construction, Associate Director John Porter
of Porter's Locksmithing, Second Associate Vice President Mark Schroder of Kings Bay Engineering, Associate Director Eric Swart of Citrus Pest Man-
agement, President Elect Randy Clark, Clark Construction, Contractor Director Virginia Will of Will Construction Corp, Associate Director John Jobe of
City Electric Supply and Associate Vice President Dan Kern of Gulf Coast Ready Mix.


Presentations to local congressmen


Ron Lieberman, secretary of the Florida Home Builders Association, made presentations to Sen. Charlie Dean and Rep. Jimmie T. Smith on behalf of
the Florida Home Builders Association at the CCBA Annual Elections Meeting of Aug. 23. LEFT: Dean receives the A Plus Champion of Housing Award.,
RIGHT: Smith receives a $500 check from the Florida Home Builders Association PAC Fund.


Important upcoming CCBA EVENTS


Citrus County Builders Association
Awards & Installation Banquet spon-
sored by Progress Energy & Event So-
lutions by Linda Sept. 28. Dress as
your favorite movie character from 1950
and before, and join us for Surf & Turf
dinner. Reservations must be prepaid.


Ro-mac Night CCBA General
Membership Mixer 5 to 7 p.m. Oct.
25, location TBD. Mixer is open to all
members of the Citrus County Builders
Association, Citrus County Chamber
and Hernando County Builders
Association.


2012 Home & Outdoor Show, pre-
sented by Home Improvement Sponsor
Florida Public Utilities Nov. 10 and
11 at the National Guard Armory in
Crystal River.
Booth spaces are now open to the
general public, with restrictions.


* www.CitrusBuilders.com

Sponsorship opportunities are now
available as well.
Visit www.CitrusBuilders.com or call
352-746-9028 for more information.


Renewing members


Renewing members, pictured from left, with New Member Keven Tinsley of Tinsley Electric on far right, are: President Wayne Bardsley of Quality
Crafted Builders (8 years), Kevin Blackshear of Blackshears II Aluminum (35 years), Dick Dolbow of Citrus County School District (14 years), Dan Kern
of Gulf Coast Ready Mix (9 years), John Osborne of Pinecrest Building Corp (24 years), Jim Loos of Schlabach Security & Sound (17 years), and Rich
Gelfand of Sherwin Williams Crystal River (25 years). Renewing members not present were: B& W Rexall Drugs (4 years), Bluewater Drafting Inc. (4
years), Citrus Hills Construction (14 years), Cummings Construction Inc. (22 years), F & H Electrical & Air Conditioning Contractors (1 year), Gard-
ner's Concrete (15 years), Habitat for Humanity (9 years), Jim Hajek Inc (1 year), Joe's Carpet Inc. (1 year), Joe's Deli (1 year), Lowe's (2 years), Mike
Scott Plumbing (23 years), Papa Bear Construction Inc. (9 years), Schlabach Security Affiliate (6 years), Schnettler Construction LLC (5 years), Senica
Air Conditioning Inc. (15 years), Sherwin Williams Affiliate (25 years), Sunniland Corp (5 years), Tampa Bay Times (11 years), Wheeler Construction
Inc. (30 years), Withlacoochee River Electric (27 years).


---


2012-2013
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Congratulations and
welcome to the 2012-13
CCBA Board of Directors.

PRESIDENT:
Bill Larder,
Larder & Sons Construction

PRESIDENT-ELECT:
Randy Clark,
Clark Construction

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT:
Michael Gilbert,
Gold Crest Homes

IMMEDIATE
PAST PRESIDENT:
Wayne Bardsley,
Quality Crafted Builders

ASSOCIATE
VICE PRESIDENT:
Dan Kern,
Gulf Coast Ready Mix

TREASURER:
Gaston Hall,
Hall Brothers of
Citrus County Inc.

SECRETARY:
Kathleen Gilbert,
Gold Crest Homes Inc.

SECOND ASSOCIATE
VICE PRESIDENT:
Mark Schroder,
Kings Bay Engineering

CONTRACTOR
DIRECTORS
Rusty McDermott,
Dream Custom Homes

Virginia Will,
Will Construction

Scott Schnettler,
Schnettler Construction

ASSOCIATE
DIRECTORS
John Porter,
Porter's Locksmithing

Eric Swart,
Citrus Pest Management

Ken Lindquist,
Ken Lindquist Corp.

John Jobe,
City Electric Supply

LIFE DIRECTORS
Joe Bell,
Surfaces Flooring

Ron Lieberman,
Steel Structures of Florida

Lorie Clark,
Clark Construction

John Osborne,
Pinecrest Building Corp.

Gaston Hall,
Hall Brothers of
Citrus County

Jim Loos,
Schlabach Security &
Sound

Chuck Sanders,
Sanderson Bay Fine Home

Gerry Gaudette,
Gaudette Electric

Dick Dolbow,
Citrus County Schools

Mike Moberley,
Tropical Windows Inc.

Todd Workman,
Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric

George Rusaw,
Habitat for Humanity

Larry Tate,
Sweetwater Homes of CC

Rich Gelfand,
Sherwin Williams


A





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Salon plans monthly
Beauty Bash
YAI YAI green salon will host
a monthly Beauty Bash, an in-
formative beauty "talk" live with
YAI YAI herself displaying live
models and sharing informative
tips, as featured in her style
columns. The Beauty Bash will
be the last Saturday monthly,
posted on the events page at
www.yaiyai.co.
Each bash will feature a dif-
ferent topic. The Sept. 29 topic
from noon to 2 p.m. will be "Fall
Trendz 2012"; strong silhou-
ettes, bold colors, spicy fall
tones, the best hair, mineral
makeup and couture for the
season.
The team will choose a non-
profit organization each month
to donate proceeds to; Septem-
ber honors the Ovarian Cancer
Foundation. As an ovarian can-
cer survivor, YAI YAI will share
preventative tips with her
guests. Ticket cost is $15 and
will include tapas and a
beverage.
YAI YAI is at 530 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River, 352-
795-7625.
Workforce plans
recruiting events
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection will host two "Meet and
Greet" recruiting sessions on
Monday, Sept. 17, and
Wednesday, Sept. 19, for any-
one interested in careers with
the new HealthSouth Rehabili-
tation Hospital of Ocala.
The sessions take place by
appointment only and will be at
the College of Central Florida's
University Center, 3001 S.W.
College Road, in Ocala. Health-
South plans to hire 75 during
the first round of staffing, and
has openings for the following:
Admissions assistants
Cooks
Environmental services
Pharmacy technicians
Physical therapists
Occupational therapists
PTAs, COTAs, R.N.s and
LPNs
Rehabilitation nursing
technicians
Speech pathologists
Unit secretaries
The Alabama-based corpo-
ration is the nation's largest
owner and operator of inpatient
rehabilitation hospitals in terms
of revenues, number of hospi-
tals, and patients treated and
discharged. HealthSouth oper-
ates 99 hospitals in 27 states
across the country and in
Puerto Rico.
The Ocala hospital on South-
west 19th Avenue Road is



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

DEAR BRUCE: Our 26-
year-old son is attending col-
lege in another state. He has
found a part-time job, and we
give him money every month
for his rent. In addition, we
sometimes lend him money
for extra things. Does he have
to declare all of this extra
money that he receives from
us on his taxes? Reader,
via mail
DEAR READER: I would
be more concerned about
when this guy is ever going to
cut the cord, grow up and pay
his own bills.
Be that as it may, obviously
you can lend as much as you
wish. But if you give him
money, which is what you're
doing, you are limited to
$11,000 a year under ordi-
nary circumstances. Unless
you're trying to claim him as
a dependent (he's too old), I
can't imagine there is going to
be any problem other than
what he is going to do when
you finally decide enough is
enough.
DEAR BRUCE: A couple
of times, with two completely
different companies, I have
purchased something but
was not billed for many
months after the fact Isn't
there a certain amount of
time a company has to bill
you before you are not obli-
gated to pay? Is this legal for


companies to come after you
eight months later, when
you've never received a bill to
begin with? TR, via email
DEAR TR: The fact that
you have not been billed for
months for a service or prod-
uct you received does not ex-
cuse you in any way from that
obligation.
Computer glitches and
sloppy bookkeeping are not
good business practices, but
they are not illegal.
If you called the company


scheduled to open later this fall.
Registration for the "Meet
and Greet" sessions are re-
quired and space is limited. For
information or to attend one of
the sessions, call Marisel Her-
nandez at 352-840-5700, ext.
1145, or 800-434-JOBS, ext.
1145.
Workforce Connection is the
local, business-led organization
that strives to connect qualified
workers with local employers in
Citrus, Levy and Marion coun-
ties through cost-effective, high
quality employment, training
and education services in part-
nership with businesses, com-
munity-based organizations,
educational institutions and
governmental agencies.
Workforce sets
September events
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties is offering
nearly 50 workshops during the
month of September to assist
those interested in sharpening
their employability skills.
Ranging from drop-in open
resume labs to two-day work-
shops, the programs are avail-
able at no charge to job
seekers throughout Workforce
Connection's three-county re-
gion. Participants must be fully
registered with Workforce Con-
nection through the Employ
Florida Marketplace (EFM) at
www.EmployFlorida.com. Addi-
tional workshop registration
may also be required.
Workforce Connection Re-
source Centers are in Citrus
County at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., Inverness; in Levy
County at 109 N.W. Third Ave.;
and in Marion County at 2703
N.E. 14th St., Ocala. To sign up
for any of the workshops, call
352-291-9552 or 800-434-
JOBS, ext. 1410. or register on-
line at https://www.timecenter.
com/wcworkshops.
Complete program and regis-
tration information is available
at Workforce Connection's Cal-
endar of Events at www.clm
workforce.com. The following
programs take place at Work-
force Connection Resource
Centers in Chiefland, Inverness
and Ocala, as well as at various
community locations:
Beyond Barriers: Path-
ways to Employment is for
those whose background is-
sues create a barrier to finding
a job. The workshops take
place at 1:30 p.m. Sept. 21 in
Ocala.
Computer Basics is de-
signed for those new to tech-
nology or with entry-level
computer skills. Sessions are
set for 3:30 p.m. Sept. 18 in


to inquire and it still didn't
provide you with a bill, you
will owe the amount due, but
the company cannot charge
you any interest for late pay-
ment If, however, you just ig-
nored that you weren't billed
and never brought it to the
company's attention, you
may be hard-pressed to
argue that you don't owe in-
terest if the company tries to
charge it.
DEAR BRUCE: My father
and I own a house together
that neither of us lives in; it's
just a rental. Upon his death,
does the house become
mine, or does half of it go to
his estate? I'm worried if he
were to require long-term
care, this house would be
considered part of his assets.
- R, via email
DEAR ER: With regard to
your first question, it de-
pends on how the house is ti-
tled. If the house is titled "in
joint tenancy with the right of
survivorship," then when
one of you dies, the other guy
owns the house in its entirety
If the house is not titled that
way, his half will go into his
estate. Unless your dad has
reasons not to, I would sug-
gest changing the title so it is
worded that way if it isn't
already
If your father needs long-
term care and collects Medi-
caid, the house is part of his
assets and, upon his demise,
his piece of the action could
be attached by the state that
provides the Medicaid help.


If you were to put the house
in your name, you would
have to satisfy the "look-
back" period, which is five
years. That means if your fa-
ther collects any aid before
that look-back time has ex-
pired, the house would still
be considered his asset.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.


Chiefland and 1:30 p.m. Sept.
14 and Sept. 28 p.m. in Ocala.
Employ Florida Market-
place Essentials, Nail that In-
terview and Optimal R6sum6
workshops take place Sept. 27
beginning at 8:15 a.m. in Ocala.
Nail that Interview workshops
are at 8:15 p.m. Sept. 26 in
Chiefland and at 1:15 p.m.
Sept. 14 and Sept. 28 in
Inverness.
Navigating the New
World of Work two-day work-
shop takes place every Tues-
day and Wednesday in Ocala
beginning Sept. 11, with ses-
sions at 8:15 a.m. for new job
seekers and those with barriers
to employment and at 1:15 p.m.
for displaced professionals.
It is also offered at 8:15 a.m.
Sept. 18 in Chiefland and at
1:15 p.m. Sept. 20 in Inverness.
The workshops cover how to
identify abilities and transfer-
able skills, job search strate-
gies/targeted resume develop-
ment, interviewing skills/follow
up and how to work effectively
with a Workforce Connection
placement specialist.
Mobile Resource Unit
provides jobseeker services
and resources every Monday at
10:30 a.m. at the Bronson Li-
brary, and at 12:30 p.m. Tues-
days at the Williston Library.
The MRU is available at 9 a.m.
the first Wednesday monthly at
Annie Johnson Center in Dun-
nellon, at 10 a.m. the second
Wednesday at the Town Hall in
Inglis, and at 10 a.m. the third


Wednesday at the Cedar Key
Library.
Navigating the New
World of Work (community
workshop) offers many of the
highlights of the two-day ses-
sions, but in a two-hour format.
The condensed workshops
take place in Citrus County at
2 p.m. Sept. 18 at the Coastal
Region Library in Crystal River
and at 10 a.m. Sept. 20 at the
Homosassa Library. They will
also be offered in Marion
County at 2 p.m. Sept. 20 at
Dunnellon Library, at 4 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Taylor College in
Belleview and at 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Forest Community
Center in Ocklawaha.
Open R6sum6 Labs are
in Ocala at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
each Monday, as well as 9 a.m.
every Friday. Labs also take
place at 8:15 a.m. Sept. 25 in
Chiefland and at 1:15 p.m.
Sept. 25 in Inverness. Drop-ins
are welcome, and no additional
registration is required but
space is limited.
Leadership Citrus
applications open
Applications are being ac-
cepted for the Leadership Cit-
rus Class of 2013. Leadership
Citrus has been active in the
community for 21 years, and
participants have gained a
higher level of awareness and
understanding of Citrus County
and all it has to offer.
Leadership Citrus is a five-
month program that meets


every other week. A limited
number of applicants will be se-
lected to participate in the pro-
gram by a committee made up
from the Leadership Citrus
Board. The process involves fill-
ing out an application and going
through an interview process.
Selected members will be noti-
fied through the mail in Decem-
ber and classes will start in
January.
Class membership is open to
Citrus County residents, and
members of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will re-
ceive a discount.
Cost of the class is $495 for
Chamber members and $595
for nonmembers.
Applications can be found at
www.leadershipcitrus.com; ap-
plications are due by Oct. 25.
Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will return from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Registration is open to
health-, fitness- and wellness-
related organizations, on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Chamber members receive a
discount.
Details on exhibit registra-
tion, excellent sponsorship op-
portunities and the popular Spa
Zone are available from Citrus


IV\ -W\iS mromeyn\ ...
It doesn't matter if you savc.. iir. ,. ri,
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It doesn't matter if your neig IL.. I I,.-,- rl,..
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What matters right now is thl.-r .. _. r r.
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BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

County Chamber of Com-
merce's Crystal River office at
28 N.W. U.S. 19, 352-795-
3149, or from any Business
Women's Alliance member.
The expo's purpose is to ed-
ucate women and those around
them about health, fitness and
wellness. Proceeds are dedi-
cated to furthering the educa-
tion of students from Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto high
schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute.
Proceeds from last year's
expo helped to fund nine schol-
arships in health care and busi-
ness careers.


Swww.chronicleonline.com
TODAY'S



NUMBER


CALL 564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO.

1. Traditional Bingo $100
2. Double Bingo $200
3. Full Card Bingo $300


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citrusedc.comrevents


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I


D4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


BUSINESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In a crummy economy, why are stocks soaring?


CHRISTINA REXRODE
AP Business Writers

WASHINGTON Economic
growth is pitiful. Unemployment
has topped 8 percent for an ex-
hausting 43 months. The nation is
careering toward a so-called fiscal
cliff, and maybe a recession.
So why is the Dow Jones indus-
trial average, that trusty gauge of
corporate America's strength, just
4 percent shy of an all-time
record? And why are the smaller
public companies measured by
the Russell 2000 index almost
there already?
Start with two words: Ben
Bernanke.
Bernanke, the Federal Reserve
chairman, this week announced
unprecedented measures aimed
at lifting the sagging economy -
and boosting the prices of assets
like stocks and houses. The mar-
ket rallied all summer in anticipa-
tion of such a move.
The Fed made an open-ended
promise to purchase $40 billion a
month in mortgage bonds and said
it will keep interest rates low
through 2015, even if the economy
starts to improve.
The announcement set off a
two-day rally that drove the Dow
up 260 points, leaving it less than
600 points shy of its record high -
14,164, reached on Oct. 9,2007, two
months before the Great Reces-
sion began.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index, a broader measure of the
market's strength, would need to
gain less than 7 percent to surpass


its own record, reached on the dexes rose more than 20 percent.
same day The Fed's actions work in part
There's ample reason to think because they help make U.S.
Bernanke's prescription will stocks one of the least ugly invest-
work, at least for stocks. ments out there. Big
The idea is to pump American companies are
money into the economy to a stable bet compared
push interest rates even with Europe and many
lower, which encourages I, it emerging markets.
spending, and drive up T- T People might prefer the
stocks, which makes peo- .;.* safety of Treasurys, but
ple feel richer. the Fed is shooing them
The hope is that will B away, pushing yields so
drive people out of invest- low that, adjusting for in-
ments based on interest Bernanke flation, investors end up
rates, such as CDs and o paying the government to
bond mutual funds, and the Fed. hold on to their money
into stocks. If stock prices There's no denying the
rise, investors will be Fed measures draw in-
richer and more likely to spend. vestors into stocks, says Tyler Ver-
It's called the "wealth effect." non, chief investment officer of
The measures are the Fed's Biltmore Capital, an investment
third round of so-called quantita- adviser in Princeton, N.J.
tive easing. It's the fourth round if But without some improvement
you count a similar, ongoing plan in the economy itself, he says, the
known as Operation Twist under effects will be fleeting.
which the Fed drives down long- "We've had this recovery in the
term interest rates. stock market but not really in the
The earlier actions were rocket economy," Vernon says. Stocks will
boosters for stocks: likely fall within months, he says,
The first round was an- "when the same stories are com-
nounced in its full $1.2 trillion ing out about the economy, when
form in March 2009, at the depths we start hearing the same old song
of the recession. From there, the of people dropping out of the work
Dow gained 45 percent over the force and unemployment staying
following year The S&P 500 rose high."
even more. There are other factors that
Bernanke hinted at a second help explain stocks' recent gains.
round in August 2010. From then Investors expect corporate profits
until it ended June 30, 2011, the to rise strongly in the fourth quar-
Dow added 24 percent ter, after a trough in the quarter
Between the launch of Opera- that ends later this month, says
tion Twist last September and Sam Stovall, chief equity strategist
Wednesday, the day before the with S&P Capital IQ, a research
Fed's announcement, all three in- firm.


And by one key measure, stocks
are relatively cheap. Analysts
often assess a stock's value by
looking at the ratio of its price to
the company's earnings per share.
Right now, prices are about 14.5
times earnings over the past year,
Stovall says. The median over the
past quarter-century is 17.9.
Hopes for an economic rebound
are rising now that Europe has a
better handle on its debt crisis. In-
vestors were relieved this month
by news the European Central
Bank will buy bonds from debt-
strapped countries and Germany
will participate in a crucial
bailout fund.
Despite the wave of optimism,
though, a record for the stock mar-
ket isn't a sure thing. If the next
few monthly jobs reports are as
weak as the last few, the unem-
ployment rate will likely rise a
discouraging sign that nearly
everyone notices.
And corporate profits are ex-
pected to be down in the current
quarter compared with last year,
in many cases because of weak
demand in recession-plagued
Europe.
Europe's stability is far from
guaranteed. In the three years the
debt crisis there has loomed over
markets, several apparent solu-
tions have turned out to be false
starts.
Economists' greatest fear is the
so-called fiscal cliff, a set of auto-
matic tax increases and govern-
ment spending cuts that take
effect at the end of this year unless
Congress acts.
President Barack Obama and


many Democrats want to allow
certain tax breaks to expire only
for wealthier Americans. Repub-
licans want to keep them for
everybody
Without a deal, taxes will rise,
reducing people's ability to spend
and invest. A budget standoff
could lead to massive cuts in
spending on defense and social
programs.
If people are paying higher
taxes while the government
spends less, that could sink the re-
covery, said Ron Florance, man-
aging director of investment
strategy for Wells Fargo Private
Bank in Scottsdale, Ariz.
"If Congress doesn't do some-
thing about the fiscal cliff, the
math adds up to a recession," he
said.
Meanwhile, the Fed-fueled rally
could easily push indexes past all
records a remarkable feat con-
sidering unemployment is above 8
percent. During the Dow's recent
cyclical peaks -August 1987, Jan-
uary 2000 and October 2007 un-
employment was between 4
percent and 6 percent.
Jeff Sica, president and chief in-
vestment officer of SICA Wealth
Management in Morristown, N.J.,
said investors shouldn't put too
much stock in whatever the Fed is
cooking up.
The Fed has created a "false
sense of security, that as bad as
things get, the Fed is going to step
in and make it better," Sica said.
"The Federal Reserve would
never expand their mandate had
they not felt that the economy was
very, very bad."


QE3
Continued from Page D1

investors expect lower in-
terest rates. In part, that's
because some investors
shift money out of low-
yielding bonds and into
stocks, which are riskier but
offer potentially higher re-
turns. And lower rates can
spark more spending and
boost corporate profits.
Still, economists say the
wealth effect from higher
stock prices tends to be
modest. And some caution
that home prices might not
rise much as long as many
would-be buyers can't qual-
ify for mortgages.
In addition to the bond
purchases, the Fed said it
expects to keep short-term
rates super-low at least
through mid-2015, six
months longer than it previ-
ously planned. And it said it
would probably hold rates
low even after the economic
recovery has strengthened
- a sign it will intervene
until the economy starts
growing fast enough to re-
duce unemployment
sharply
As a result of the Fed's lat-
est moves, Mark Zandi, chief
economist at Moody's Analyt-
ics, expects the average rate
on a 30-year fixed mortgage
to fall in the next several
months to near 3 percent
from 3.55 percent now.
Lower rates could trigger an-
other wave of refinancing,
which would give people
more money to spend.
If lower mortgage rates
boost home sales and
prices, they could con-
tribute to the wealth effect:
Americans whose homes
rise in value would be more
willing to spend.
The combination of more
refinancing and increased
household wealth will help
the economy quickly but
only modestly, Zandi pre-
dicted. The Fed's moves
should lower unemploy-
ment (8.1 percent in August)
by up to 0.3 percentage
point by the end of 2013, he
said.
Many economists worry
the Fed is reaching a point
of diminishing returns after
nearly four years of aggres-
sive efforts to help the econ-
omy. Bernanke himself
urged everyone to keep ex-
pectations in check.
"I personally don't think
that it's going to solve the
problem," he said Thursday
"But I do think it has
enough force to help nudge
the economy in the right
direction."
Every $1 increase in stock
prices raises consumer
spending by 3 cents to 5
cents, according to calcula-
tions by Joseph Gagnon, a
former Fed official who's a
senior fellow at the Peterson
Institute for International
Economics. So if the market
value of the Standard &
Poor's 500 stock index,
which was $13.9 trillion Fri-
day, rose 10 percent, con-


summer spending would rise
$40 billion to $70 billion.
In the context of a $15.6
trillion economy, "it's
small," Gagnon said. "But it
adds up."
About 80 percent of stocks
are held by the wealthiest
10 percent of the popula-
tion. As a result, the major-
ity of Americans don't enjoy
much of a lift from stock-
market rallies. That said,
the richest 20 percent of
Americans account for
about 40 percent of con-
sumer spending.
Rising housing prices
work better, prodding peo-
ple to spend more, Yale Uni-
versity economist Robert
Shiller and others have
found.
But the mortgage bond
purchases are unlikely to


boost home sales signifi-
cantly, even if they manage
to lower mortgage rates fur-
ther. The average rate on a
30-year fixed mortgage is
barely above the record low
of 3.49 percent.
Home sales remain de-
pressed not so much be-
cause loan rates are too
high but because would-be
buyers can't qualify unless
they have stellar credit or
can produce hefty down
payments.
"If you get a 2 percent
mortgage but you've got to
put 30 or 40 percent down, is
that going to encourage peo-
ple to buy a house?" said
Doug Roberts, chief invest-
ment strategist at Channel
Capital Research.
Still, Bernanke main-
tained the Fed can help fur-


Wednesday, Sept. 19th

6pm 7pm
(Followed by an hour
of individual counseling)

The seminar will be held at the
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus in Lecanto,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
(Building C-4, Room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is
offering a free seminar for individuals
thinking about starting their own business.

The two hour session will cover the main
issues involved in becoming an entrepreneur
- from the business idea to the reality of
owning your own business. Following the
seminar, interested participants will have the
opportunity to meet with seasoned SCORE
counselors to further discuss their ideas.

"R U READY" is specifically designed for
individuals who are not business owners, but
who are interested in learning what is
involved in becoming one. If you have ever
asked yourself "Do I have what it takes to be
an entrepreneur?" then this seminar is for
you!

A one hour counseling session will follow
for those interested in meeting with a
SCORE counselor.

For more information and to register
for the seminar, please contact
Dale Maim at SCORE

352-249-1236
www.scorecitrus.org
Seating is limited.


their, even with rates already
ultra-low He's argued the
Fed's first two rounds of
bond purchases, in which it
bought more than $2 trillion
in bonds, saved 2 million
jobs and accelerated
growth.
By comparison, President
Barack Obama's $862 billion
stimulus program created


nearly 2.7 million jobs, ac-
cording a study by Zandi
and former Fed Vice Chair-
man Alan Blinder.
In the short term anyway,
the economy might actually
receive a bigger boost from
Apple's new iPhone 5.
Michael Feroli, chief US
economist at JPMorgan, cal-
culated the iPhone might


add 0.25 to 0.5 percentage
point to the annual growth
rate in the last three months
of2012.
"I wouldn't be surprised"
if the iPhone does more for
the economy, Feroli said in
an email. "At the end of the
day, economic growth is
about producing more and
better goods and services."


ATTENTION



BUSINESS OWNERS

I Improve Your Performance I Enhance Your Marketing
I Beat the Competition by Attending Score's Small Business Institute

Program Begins Tuesday, October 2nd!

6- 8 p.m. Building 3, Room 202

College of Central Florida

3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
SCORE in partnership with CF is pleased to offer the Small Business Institute again.
Sessions are $25 each or $100 for the entire program. Individuals who complete the program
will receive a certificate plus a coupon for $100 for future advertising in the Citrus
County Chronicle.





Tuesday 2 One Hr. Sessions 6pm 8pm

Tuesday, October 2nd 6-7pm Increasing Profits *7-8pm Measuring Results
Tuesday, October 9th 6-7pm Solving Problems for More Money 7-8pm Projecting Profit Improvements
Tuesday, October 16th 6-7pm Research for Profits 7-8pm Sales Through Marketing & Market Media
Tuesday, October 23rd 6-7pm Continuous Improvement For Greater Profits 7-8pm Profit Planning & Summary

FREE Open Round Table Discussions with Facilitator
Every Thursday of October 6pm 8pm For Attendees


To Register or for more information contact
Dale Maim of SCORE at 352-249-1236.

www.scorecitrus.org
Click on Small Business Institue link




SC ORE College of Central Florida CHRONICLE
Counselors to America's Small Business CFItraining.cf.edu .chroiceonie.cm


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 D5






D6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclonlne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~co
I ItS .. e *. S S )m


ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


CHO NCLE


Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle
is now accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales depart-
ment, manage work
flow, create insertion
orders, filing,
knowledge of
Excel & Word.
Ability to work well in
a deadline driven
environment.
Excellent Customer
Service Skills.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service
skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume
to HR at:
352-564-2935

CH IONICLE
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE

HOMOSASSA
Meadows 3/2/2
from $650.
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 Upgrades $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616

IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 2/2,1988 Skylark
model, furnished, shed,
screened lanai & xtra-Ing,
covered carport on a Irg
lot. Lots of kitchen cabi-
nets with island stove top,
double oven, fridge,
washer, dryer. Lots of
storage. 352-344-1632
or 937-545-3413

METAL HEAD-FOOT
BOARD & side frame for
double/queen. Black with
specs of color. Paid $400
now $90.00. Call for pho-
tos. 352-344-4811

Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River
SERVICE
ADVISOR
Experience Pre-
ferred but will
consider training
the right person.
Good Benefits, 401K,
& Medical Plans.
We're looking for a
long term relationship.
Apply in person.
Ask for Greg.
Mon Fri 8-5
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace


Sugarmill Woods
2 Master BR, Dbl
Garage, Remodeled,
S/S Appl. $850/Mo
352-302-4057



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers/Dryers/ W/H
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, TV ant 270-4087



Choc. Brown German
Wire hair pointer,
Female Name "Lilly"
spayed, microchipped
& Trained. Very good
dog, to good home.
(352) 344-4318
Free 26" TV
(352) 527-4999
HORSE MANURE
Bring Shovel & Help
yourself. Yard is open
352-697-5252
horse manure mixed with
pine shavings. Great for
gardens. U load and haul
352-628-9624
Lonely Dog Free to good
home. Male 4 yrs old.
Part Doberman, part Bird
Dog. Very Friendly.
Needs companionship.
Updated on all shots.
(352) 726-2349
MOBILE HOME
1978 14X60 SW
2BR/2BA 352-621-0437
9AM-6PM



Female Catahoula lost in
Sugarmill Woods, 7 Oaks
Golf Course on 9/12. 8
yrs old Brindle brown &
Black. White star on
chest. Red collar and
microchiped. Very
Friendly. (352) 382-1714
Lost Female
Peacock. Last seen
between HWY 41 and
HWY 200.
(352) 897-4845
Lost
Mini dachshund,
long-haired, blk, Male.
Missing since 9/12 Cor-
bett & Costello in
Homosassa. REWARD
(352) 628-0206
Lost Pure White Cat on
9/12. Last seen on Michi-
gan and Azalea in Inglis.
12 yrs old, 1 blue eye, 1
green. (352) 447-0055



FOUND
MALE, UNDER 1 YR
OLD. Part Boxer, part
Pit. Found with collar and
walking lease on. Brindle
in color. Very
Friendly.(352) 527-4247




missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825


To Whoever
purchased my storage
unit #220 at Kings Bay
Mini Storage on 8/7/12.
Please call Shawn
(352) 212-8594




Sr in need of dependable
older small or Midsize car
or pk-up. Text yr/make/
mi & Price to 220-3682.
No dealers.




DOUBLE CEMETERY
CRYPT Located in Veter-
ans Wall in Fountains
Memorial Gardens. 2
openings/closings incld.
Bargain price of $4000.00
for whole pkg. Call Maria
at 352-212-7533




CUSTOMER
SERVICE ASST.
P/T front desk asst for
Vet Office. Will need to
be flexible with hours.
MUST be people fo-
cused, have basic office
skills, great with comput-
ers and knowledgeable
with all forms of social
media and devices. Apply
to: applicant1130@
yahoo.com

Executive
Assistant I
Announcement
# 12-54
Highly responsible
administrative work
assisting the Assistant
County Administrator
with daily operations.
Requires six year's
responsible adminis-
trative /executive
secretarial/assistant
experience. Must
possess exceptional
organizational skills
and be able to work
under pressure. Work-
ing knowledge of the
Microsoft Office
Suite of Products.
Salary range
$1,164.52-$1,793.39
B/W DOQ
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461 to
apply online by
Friday, September 21,
2012 EOE/ADA





HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630
to apply in person


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


ARNP WANTED
Friendly Pediatric
office in Crystal River.
20 hours per week.
Send resume to:
medofficehrdept
@tampabay.rr.com


Dental Assistant
& Receptionist
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoii@
vahoo.comrn

Home Health Agency
Seeking Experienced
Field RN
Field LPN
LPN Intake
Coordinator
CNA
Generous
compensation
package available.
FAX RESUMES TO:
352-513-4685


LPN
At NEW HORIZONS
VILLAGE
a premier residential
care facility for
developmentally
disabled adults, our
team is dedicated to
consistently provide
quality care to our
residents. We are
currently seeking a
Full-Time LPN.
Duties include:
*Med Pass, First Aid,
Charting.
*Training residents in
self-med and health-
care skills.
New Horizons Village
offers:
*Competitive wages,
excellent benefits,
& a tobacco-free
campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at
1275 N. Rainbow Lp,
Lecanto, FL 34461 or
FAX Resume to:
(352) 746-6379.


MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

Billing Clerk
Receptionist
Medical Asst.
Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


RN. LPN. CNA
All Shifts, FT &PT
RN SUPERVISOR

RECEPTIONIST
Part time
ACTIVITIES COOR.
Full Time

CNA DRIVER

Health Care
Experience Preferred.

MARKETING
DIRECTOR. F/T
ALS Exp Preferred
APPLY WITHIN
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Clr
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility


CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)





ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in Enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722

Office Utilities
Specialist
The Homosassa
Special Water District
will be accepting
applications for the
position of Office
Utilities Specialist.
Duties for this position
will include but are
not limited to: Payroll,
Accounts Payable,
recording and tran-
scription of Board
Meetings, Accounts
Receivable. Interac-
tion with Customers
both on the phones
and in person
required. Applicant
must have experi-
ence with Microsoft
Word and Excel.
Applicant must
possess Excellent
Customer Service
Skills. Government
Utility Experience
preferred. Applicant
must reside within
Citrus County.
Applications will
be accepted until
September 24, 2012.
Applications may be
dropped off at
District office or email
to: hswd@
tampabav.rr.com
Applications may be
filled out at the
District website @
www.homosassa
water.com.

Program Exten-
sion Agent FYN
Announcement
# 12-55
Grant funded
professional, techni-
cal position providing
leadership for
development,
implementation, de-
livery and evaluation
of a comprehensive
water conservation
program in coopera-
tion with the
University of Florida's,
Florida Yards and
Neighborhoods
Program and South-
west Florida Water
Management District.
Bachelor's degree
required. Ability to
design, teach and
conduct community
based educational
programs. Must
possess a current
valid Florida Driver
license. Beginning
salary $1,107.03 B/W.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, September 21,
2012 EOE/ADA


INSURANCE REP
With a 4401220 LIC.
Sales/ Customer
Service Position. Prior
Independent agency
skills preferred. Mail
Resume to: Box # 1797P
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429



Breakfast Cook
Exp. Only Apply,
Now Taking Applica-
tions A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone Calls Apply
1:30-2:30 Mon-Sat.
CHEFICOOK
Experience only
Apply in person
CARMELA'S Dunnellon
DISHWASHER &
SERVER, Part time
Apply in Person 9a-5p
INVERNESS CLUB APTS
518 ELLA AVE DFWP





CHOMCLE

Accepting
applications for

Advertising
Sales Rep
Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Working a
Sales Territory within
Citrus County.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers
QUALIFICATIONS
* Two years sales exp.
preferred.
* Computer
proficiency
* Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
* Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
* Strong presentation
skills preferred.
* Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.
Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
EOE, drug screen
required for final
applicant.

AUTOMOTIVE
SALES
CITRUS KIA is hiring 2
Sales Professionals to
join our growing staff
Be a part of the
HOTTEST new car
brand in the country
professional training,
competitive pay and
bonuses provided to
the right people. If
you have the skills to
give our customers
the best car buying
experience of their
lives, WE NEED YOU!
Apply IDDn Person
1850 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River


S .-N RRv i


Looking For
Leaders To Join
Our Team a.




Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center believes in investing in technology,
equipment and especially people.We are a family friendly work environment
and offer self scheduling with a generous benefit package that includes BCBS
insurance.We retain top talent by promoting from within and 28% of our
employees have been with us for 10 years or more.We are positively looking
for additional leaders to join our thriving team, including:

RN Manager-Women's and Family Center Respiratory Services Manager
RN Clinical Coordinator-ICU/PACU Charge RN and Staff RN -various departments

For these and other opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
Career Center at www.srrmc .com
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464 Job Line #352-795-8418 Email: stephaniearduser@hma.com 352-795-8462

EOE/DRUG/TOBACCO FREE WORKPLACE 000CN4T


Account Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460 to
Schedule an Interview

Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River
SERVICE
ADVISOR
Experience Pre-
ferred but will
consider training
the right person.
Good Benefits, 401K,
& Medical Plans.
We're looking for a
long term relationship.
Apply in person.
Ask for Greg.
Mon Fri 8-5
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace

Outside Sales
Associate
Fountains Memorial
Park
No Experience re-
quired, but a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-4867


RETAIL SALES
Nights/ weekends
75 CHROME SHOP
Wildwood
(352) 748-0330





A/C INSTALLER
Experienced Only
Drug test, Valid
Drivers Lic. ForAppt.
Call: ALPHA AC
(352) 726-2202

DRIVER
OTR LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724











Technician Needed.
Our business is growing
and we are in need of
technicians who have
experience in diesel en-
gines and transmis-
sions. We have the best
working hours Mon-Fri
and paid holidays. Sign
on bonus or moving al-
lowance is available.
GM experience even
though not required is a
plus. We offer top
wages and benefits. Call
Kevin 352-493-4263 or
send email to
kbelfry@ymail.com
S c o g g i n s
Chevrolet/Buick


PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
EXP. SALES TECHS
k Company Vehicle
* Hourly Pay
* Commission
* Benefits
APPLY 5882 Hwy 200
ROOFING
Experienced commercial
single ply roofers w/heat
welding and detailing
skills. Travel required.
Good pay, per diem &
lots of hrs. Immediate
openings available.
DFWP/EOE
352-795-5599 Or
352489-4274





CHkoNCLE

PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE

Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
Avail, weekdays
& weekends?
Join the Citrus County
Chronicle's
Circulation team!
Send Resume &
Cover Letter to
djkamlot@chronlcle
onllne.com
or Apply In Person
CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
EOE, drug screening
for final applicant


CHIO-NICLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




You've Got It!


Somebody


Wants


It!


NEED EXTRA CASH






Great Opportunity For


V Individuals A

V/ Couples

V Friends


Must be 18 years of age -
Must have valid driver's license and insurance
SAble to work or share 7 days a week, early
morning hours


n11


For more information email:
home delivery@chronicleonline.com
or come to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River to apply.
Both home delivery and
single copy routes available!

C H-44 r iceoli- o


I-U


--

Y.












How To

Make Your

Dining Room Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
quickly!





(352) 563-5966



www.chronicleonline .com

www.chronicleonline.com


J



Store Fronts


Available



Lowest Leasing Rates Ever!



Busy Hwy 19

Crystal River location


Anchored by national

retail stores


Newly refurbished


Kiosks also available


i.
SC)


CRYSTAL RIVER
M.A.L.L


352-795-2585
www.thecrystalrivermall.com
1801 NE Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL 34428


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bm
PROSHOP HELP

Needed, 30 Hrs. wk
Apply in Person
INVERNESS GOLF AND
COUNTRY CLUB
3150 S. Country Club
Dr. (352) 726-2583

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced

Must be Lazy, greedy
and willing to make
over $600 a wk.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask tor Jean




CARE GIVER
Dependable for 115 lb
woman. 5p-8p, 6 days
week. Send Resume
whgn@tampabay.rr.com









Massage TherapyDv
Weekend Class
OCT. 20 20112
SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-5
HAVE A NEW CAREER
IN 37 WEEKS
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




DUTCH MAKEUP
VANITY solid wood with
seat $100 352-212-6483




COFFEE SET. English
bone china Ridgeway
Potteries set for four
Royal Adderley. Beautiful.
Perfect condition. $45.
527-6709

t.


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Flat Ware
91 piece bronze and
rosewood. Bought 1984,
Never Used $200 OBO
(352) 344-5168
GLENN MILLER ALBUM.
An Album of 3 Glenn
Miller LP's in a beautiful
Presentation case. $35
527-6709




5 Person Hot Tub
New pump & heater,
Excel. condition
$1,000 cash or credit
(352) 228-7666
POOL HEAT PUMP
AQUA CAL T115
6 yrs old. Works Great
$500 (352) 637-0397




BREAD MACHINE
OSTER DELUXE -
BRAND NEW Only
$15.00 352-621-0175
DRYER$100 Works
great. 90 day warranty.
Delivery extra. Free dis-
posal of old one. Call/Text
352-364-6504
ELECTRIC STOVE
cream,2 big burners, 2
small burners. Works
Great! $100 obo
352-212-6483
FREE APPLIANCE RE-
MOVAL SERVICE Free
Pickup Of Unwanted Ap-
pliances 352 209 5853
GE ELECTRIC DRYER
GE Electric Dryer.
Excellent Condition.
Works Great. $100.00
352 860-0212
GE Stove, 2 years old
Excel. cond.
Glass top & stainless
As $425.
Cost $900 new
(352) 249-7212
MAYTAG
Washer and Gas Dryer
$200
full size bed $150
724-953-1915
NEW DOOR SWITCH
$30 Works in most
Kenmore/whirlpool/Roper
and Hotpoint washers.
Call/text364-6504
PRESSURE COOKER
Wolfgang Puck 4 in 1
electric NEW $60.00
352-621-0175
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, almond,
side-by-side w/ filtered ice
& water on door. $300
352-270-2232
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER & DRYER
Both work great (white)
large capacity $100.00
352-287-5279
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day warranty.
Delivery extra. Free dis-
posal of old one Call/text
352-364-6504


COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered
Adjustable $45 each
727463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered
Adjustable $45 each
727463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Gray
Tweed Fabric $15 each
727463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $85
727463-4411
PREOWNED FILE CABI-
NET 2 Drawer Lateral
Commercial Metal Graph-
ite Color 30"x28"x18 $45
727463-4411
SMALL COMPUTER
DESK Formica Top
36"x24" with 2 Drawer
File Cabinet Attached
$25 727-4634411



AC POWER HEDGE
TRIMMER, 13 INCH, $15
352-726-9983
CRAFTSMAN: 10" band
saw, 17" weed eater,
Plate biscuit Joiner 5/8
HP. ToolCraft Table
Saw 2 HP w/10" car-
bide blade. 1/2" Drill
Press 5 speed 1/3 HP.
$50 ea. Firm 621-3330
TABLE SAW Shop Craft
10", 1.75 HP, Amer.
made, separate stand,
$50. call 352/628-0698
WELDING TABLE Heavy
Duty STEEL, 4X8 $100
(firm) 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)



48" HD Compatable TV,
excellent condition
$150
(352) 726-7952
AC MOBILE POWER
CONVERTER FOR
AUTO, 12VDC TO
120VAC, 140W $25
352-726-9983
SONY TELEVISION 36"
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $75
352-613-0529



79 Solid Maple Cabinet
Doors & Drawer fronts
stained red mahogany
great for garage or
workshop project $450.
obo. All/will separate
(352) 726-5832
CHANDELIER
Beautiful 16-light,
like-new condition, great
saving, only $100. Call
Dave at 352/628-0698.
ENTRANCE DOOR
15 raised panel
w/hardware, solid wood,
great saving at only $100.
Call Dave 352/628-0698.
EPOXY TWO-PART
GARAGE COATING.
New, in orig.containers,
only $50. Call Dave at
352/628-0698.


WERNER 20FT
ALUMINIUM
EXTENSION LADDER
200 LBS DUTY RATED,
$75 352-726-9983




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Pavillion 525 C
desktop Computer
w/ LCD monitor & key-
board + all cables, Win.
XP Work great
$90. (352) 465-4037
WILSON ELECTRONICS
301135 DUAL BAND
PANEL CELL PHONE
ANTENNA W/COAX $35
352-726-9983




PATIO TABLE
glass table top on bam-
boo, 4 bamboo chairs
cloth seats $100
352-212-6483




2 DOOR COMMERCIAL
METAL STORAGE CABI-
NET 50"x36"x18"
4 Shelves, Door Lock &
Key $75 727-463-4411
36" ROUND TABLES (2)
Rugged Formica Top
Sturdy Steel Pedestal
$35 each 727-463-4411
Adjustable Bed
Craftmatic Full Size w/
massage & side rail.
Used 10 mo. Exc Cond.
Orig $3000, sell $1500
OBO. Black Spinet
Piano Exc Cond. $450
OBO (352) 422-3707
Armoire solid wood
w/ TV console and
5 drawers $30.
2 TV Stands
$20 ea. obo
(701) 648-8098 Cell

Beautiful Traditional
Sofa. Light golden
neutral, w/ floral
touches. Excellent
Condition, Must See!
Sugarmill Woods
$199.
(352) 503-3914

Breakfront Cabinet,
has 4 openings to it.
All light wood, glass on
ea. side, doors below.
Made in Crystal River
20 yrs. ago. Must see to
appreciate it. $1,800
new, Now $1,000 obo
(352) 726-0944
COFFEE TABLES two
end tables, glass insert
coffee and sofa table.
$200 obo Call
352-344-3112
COMPUTER DESK
Grey metal frame with
glass top. Good
condition. $90
352-270-2232
COUCH w/ neutral
pattern cover and large
white & green futon
$200 each OBO
352-422-8070


CLASSIFIED



CLEAN TWIN
MATTRESS AND BOX
Very clean, non-smoker
$75.00 352-257-5722
COUNTER HEIGHT
CHAIRS (4) Contempo-
rary metal with leather Ex
Cond 352-249-7212
All for 50.00
Dining Table with one
Leaf, Four Chairs, &
Buffet. Small Drop Leaf
Table with 2 Stools
All for $275.
Phone(352) 563-5955
Dinning Room Set
Bamboo table w/ 4
chairs. Earth tone padded
seats, glass top. $175
(352) 795-6870
Futon
$125.
(352) 527-0347
Futon white & black
W/ throw pillows. $60
(352) 621-3330
Gold Microfiber Sofa
80 inches long
Like New $130. +
Ottoman on casters
matches two toss pillow
$35. (352) 726-8912
Hiah End Used Furniture
SECOND TIME AROUND
RESALES 270-8803
2165 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Large Curved Desk
$150.
352-513-4759
Cell 352-201-7475
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
METAL HEAD-FOOT
BOARD & side frame for
double/queen. Black with
specs of color. Paid $400
now $90.00. Call for pho-
tos. 352-344-4811
METAL STORAGE CAB-
INET WITH LOCKAND
KEY 4 Roll Out Shelves
60"x36"x18" PreOwned
$65 727-4634411
Panasonic TV
36" w/ surround sound
and stand. Stand has
storage. Exc Condition.
$80 352-3824444
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Pretty Red Recliner
Cost $400 New 1 year
ago. Seldom used
$200.
(352) 503-6149
Sectional Sofa
Slate Blue with recliner,
sleeper and chaise. Good
Condition $250
(352) 746-1447
Single size white
Platform Bed
with storage, almost
new mattress $150
(352) 344-1441
SMALL TABLE 4 chairs
both sides on table fold
down wood and green
metal $75 352-212-6483
Sofa & 2 Matching
Chairs, mocha print
2 years old
Asking $875
(352) 637-2281
Solid wood round
table
w/ self storing leaf
and 6 chairs $130
(352) 419-4286


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 D7


SQUARE TABLE 36"
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
$45 727-4634411
Stickley Sofa
Pristine Condition
$850.
Mahogany Desk
$150.
(352) 270-8249
Whitewashed Entertain
ment Center Holds 22"
TV has shelves and glass
doors. $40 352-3824444
WOOD GRAIN FOLDING
BANQUET TABLE 6 ft
Long pre owned $35
727463-4411




21" Self Prop. Snapper
Lawn Mower
Excel. cond. $200
McLane Commercial
Grade, Gas Edger, trim-
mer excel. cond. $200
(352) 726-7952
21" Self Propelled
Toro Mower,
hardly used,
paid $400
First $200
(352) 513-4257
DYT Craftsman 4000
Riding Mower 24 HP
48" Deck $700
(352) 746-7357
MANUAL TELESCOP-
ING TREE PRUNER
WITH SAW CUTTER,
7FT-14FT REACH, LIKE
NEW $45 352-726-9983
Riding Mower
Sears riding mower with a
Kohler engine. Excellent
Condition $600
(352) 527-2223




CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri., Sat., & Sun.9a-3p
Furn., Dryer, Din. Set.
and Other Hshold items
6977 N. Neal Terrace
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat & Sun 8a-?
Household Goods,
Children's items
Dunkenfield Ave
HOMOSASSA
Saturday & Sunday -
9am to 4pm.
Moving Sale Furniture,
Treadmill, Plants, Lawn
equipment, Misc. Call
anytime to see or open.
25 Mangrove Court
South 352-382-2294
LECANTO
Sat. & Sun. 8am-2pm
1226 N. Munich Terr.




Cocktail Dress-Marina
Lace/Beaded
Size 12 Online & Dillards
$60. (352) 220-3344




4 Person Hot Tub
very good cond.
w/ cover $400. Dining
table w/ 5 chairs &
2 bar stools, wood
w/white ceramic $175.
701-648-8098 cell


1 GOODYEAR TIRE
P225R/16 80%TREAD
ONLY $35 464-0316
ANIMAL CLIPPER
BLADES Oster A-5
Good Cond (2) #4 -
$12.00ea (1) #30
-$12.00 352-270-3909
ANIMAL CLIPPER
BLADES OSTER Like
New A-5: # 7F-$15.00 ;#
3F-$16.00 # 40-$12.00
352-270-3909
Dining Rm Set & China
Cabinet, Table w/ leaf
6 chairs, late 70's real
wood, good cond.$150
Electrolux Dryer
Paid over $1,000
Will Sacrifice $450
(352) 726-9151
Fridge 18.2 Kenmore
2yr. old mint cond., $300
Hunting Dog Hauler
alum. 48x48x24 dbl door
$250
(352) 419-6669
Gas Grill
Char-Broil, infrared, 2
burner, 2 yrs old, good
cond. $299/new asking
$80 w/ cover 527-9449
GATORS COOLER
WITH LARGE WHEELS
AND HANDLE, BLUE &
ORANGE, ONLY $30
464-0316
GIRL'S MONGOOSE
BMX BIKE- Y not"
Model,20" by 1.95" tires &
wheels, like new, $40.
352-628-0033
HOOVER VACUUM
CLEANER $30 SELF
PROPELLED WORKS
FINE 352-419-5981
INVERNESS
MENS CLOTHING
LARGE PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
Must See to Believe
Warehouse full of
Garage Sale Items
$800 obo Takes All
High Profit Potential
352-220-3377
ONEIDA TULIP GAR-
DEN DISHES $40 EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
33 PIECES-CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981


Sick and want health?
Call 888-223-1922 for
toll-free message 24/7
that explains the
physics component
of health.

STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $40 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
INVERNESS
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW-ALL CONNEC-
TIONS AND BOOKLET
352-419-5981


TRAIN TABLE
Imaginarium Child's
Train Table. $40
352-270-2232
UGLY STICK FISHING
RODS- many to choose
from, $10 to $15. all ex.
352-628-0033
WHEELBARROW
SMALL 2.2 CUBIC FEET
ONLY $25 464-0316



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75 464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
ALUMINUM WITH
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
CLEAN & STERILIZED
$30 464-0316
Blue Power Lift Chair
$175.
Electric Adjustable Bed,
needs new Mattress
$400
352-527-0783
Folding Walker by
Invocare $25
352-382-4444
Harmar Mobility
Model AL500
$900. obo
(352) 228-9058
Ladies Bicycle
Schwinn
Never Used
$100.
352-341-1714
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOT RESTS
GOOD SHAPE. ONLY
$100 464-0316
Shower Commode
Chair with casters
$45
Light transport
wheel chair $150
352-527-0783
Small Medline
Wheelchair. Excellent
Shape Large back
wheels. $80
352-382-4444
Walker- folding to 5"
brand new, light
weight alum. cost $76.
asking $30., 527-0004
Walker Invacare,
3 wheel, brakes,
basket, $65.
Wheel Chair, invacare,
like new $100. both
excel cond. 341-1714
Walker-Dolomite
Folding, with folding
seat, 4 wheels, w/
brakes on front wheels,
$45. (352) 344-5283



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



Forming Light Jazz
Band. All instruments
needed. Call Jay
(352) 794-3741
FOUR CLARINETS.
Different manufacturers,
all for only $100. Call
Dave at 352/628-0698.


KING COMFORTER
reversible navy or red.
Excellent condition. Used
only few times.High loft.
$20 341 3607
LAMP Unique lamp. Palm
tree painted base with
beige shade.
Call for photos $25.00
352-344-4811
LAMPS 2 unusual lamps.
$30 each or $50 pair. Call
for photos 352-344-4811
TWIN BEDDING 2 red
box-pleated (not ruffled)
bedskirts & 2 matching
red pillow shams. All for
$10 341-3607
TWIN BEDDING whales
& dolphins. Comforter,
bedskirt, shams, sheet
set, wallpaper border.
$35 341 3607




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE WITH
HANDRAILS USA MADE
ONLY $100 464-0316
ELLIPTICAL
Horizon RE 7.6 $650
new, asking $250
TANNING BED
American Wolff $200
(352)5134399
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH, LIKE
NEW, $50 352-726-9983
EXERCISE KE D P
FAN TYPE UPRIGHT
TYPE. ALSO WORKS
THE ARMS. ONLY $85
464-0316
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE STAMINA
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO. ONLY $100
464-0316
TANNING BED
Price Is Right
No Room
$225.
(352) 503-7411




8 FT POOL TABLE 8 ft.
oak with slate top pool
table with accessories.
$700 352-382-9601
Homosassa

Above Ground Pool
2006 15 x 20 oval. 2010
pool pump. Will take
down. $300. Call to see.
(352) 341-0210
ADAMS LADIES SPEED-
LINE FAST 12 DRIVER
Excellent Condition, 10
Loft $130.00. Call
249-7345
BEAMHIT SELF
DEFENSE TRAINER
Portable indoor training
range. Learn to shoot in
your own home. $75.00
352-344-4811
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745
FREE GUN with
Training. Learn more
at TrainToCarrv.com


I ee-


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451




Professional Custom
Woodworking
Interior/Exterior
CrawfordWoodwork.com
352464-4100




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




Your World

4 9= 4W "&'t .


Ck ONiLE


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lie. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775



All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lie. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *



Clean Waxed Floors
Free Estimate 344-2132



1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Remodels, Repairs,
We Do It All! Landscape
& Tractor Work. Lic./Ins
Steve/Rob, 476-2285


All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *A
Affordable Handyman
v FAST* 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *A
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k



BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO ITALLII
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


Picture Perfect Photos
of Family, Pets &
Casual Weddings


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
"NO ROT"
Door Units
Blinds Between
the Glass
Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)






Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
-4 Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
*352- 344-0905
u cell: 400-1722
o wed Lic.#3 7761


AAA ROOFING
ai the"Aeakh6ustejn"
Free Written Estimate

*100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000CHO


WINDOV,'-
1.ENIL."'._
We Ocean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill






CARPET &
L UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

urniture
Special izing in: (leaned for
Carpet Stretching FREE -Ask
Carpet Repair Howl
352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates f J
Lic & ns Lifetime Warranty L


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000C42R


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
/), Cleaning & Sealing
St" Grout Painting
S Residential &
4 -'. Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians I
EROO15377

352-61a124


^AUMEEUGE^B







D8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


Nike Machspeed Str8-Fit
11.5* A/L shaft with
Wrench & HC exc. $75.
Dunnellon 465-8495
Gun Club looking for
5-10 acres for lease.
352-302-0648
HI-POINT CARBINES
NEW IN BOX HI-POINT 9
MM CARBINES, $285.00
& HI-POINT 45 AUTO
CARBINE, $318.00,
NEW GLOCK 22 GEN 4
40 S&W $490.00 PHONE
352447-5595
Reebok Inversion
System, asking
$125
Call for Details
(352) 344-1413
SOLD
Izhmash iga,
7.62 + ammo $675.
Muzzle Loader Rifle,
50 Cal. $250.
TREADMILL
PRO-Form 415
4 yrs, like new $200 obo
(352) 489-4921
WATER SKIS New with
carrying case, tow-line
and life vest. Big saving,
only $75. Call Dave at
352/628-0698.

WE BUY GUNS
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Winchester 300 MAG
Mauser Action,
Red field Scope $550
Ruger Single 6 Revolver
22LR & 22mag, $400
352-220-2204




4 x 6 Covered
Utility Trailer
5 yrs. old, like new
Paid $,1,500
Sell $1,000 obo
(423) 584-2665 Cell
UTILITY TRAILER
4X8 trailer with brand
new wooden sides.
Comes with spare tire.
$450
(352) 464-2180




Large Amethyst Ring
8+ Karat, Cost $4,000
Will sell for
$1,500 obo
(352) 344-5168


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.


PUPPIES AKC Great
Danes Puppies! Born
Aug 1st Call
352-502-3607
BENGAL CUB CATS
10 weeks old, TICA
registered, Fl Health
Cert, shots up to date.
1 Spotted Snow Sepia,
1 Horizontal Flowing
Marble. $200 each
352-601-5362
BLUE CRESTED
AMAZON
Breeding pair of 6 yr old
parrots. Talkative, cute
and very tame. They
have been together
since birth. 3 Cages: 1
large indoor, 1 med out-
door and 1 travel
Illness forces sale
Total $3000
212-2814 or746-8631
___


DAISEY

"Daisy is a 4-year-old
Shepherd mix,
spayed female.
Weighs 52 pounds.
is housebroken and
very gentle. She and
her best friend Dixie
came into the shelter
because their owner
died. Daisy is very
sweet and gentle,
affectionate, walks
well on a leash, ig-
nores cats. She needs
a home of her
own again.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288.


DIXIE
Dixie is an 8-year-old
female Shepherd mix,
spayed, housebroken
and very gentle. She
and her best friend
Daisy came to the
shelter because their
owner died. Dixie is a
beautiful white color
with brown spots on
her head and back.
with upright Shepherd
ears. Very calm, gen-
tle, walks well on a
leash, weighs 47
pounds. She is looking
for a home of her
own again.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288.


Mr\U ,J ulnlllu iui iilna
Available 10/1/12
all shots $450 ea
(352) 344-5418 or
228-1969
Dachshunds Mini. Long
Hair, 10wks Blk. &
Cream, Choc. &
Cream Males &
Females. Health Certs,
Champ. bloodline,
perfect markings $200
& up (352) 795-6870
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Thurs. Sept. 20th, 7 p.m.
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 16 weeks Old
male. BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$800 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
FOX TERRIER
puppy very small
4 1/2 mo female.
$250 OBO
(352) 795-7513
GERMAN SHEPHERD
Lrg. bone PUPS, white.
black, blk/tan, $450.
BOXER PUPS $450
Health Certs, can be
registered, 216-1481
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
SHORKIES 3 females
Addorable & Non
shedding 8 wks on
9/23/12 $400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803







SIMON

"Simon is a 1-year-old
neutered male
Border Collie/Bulldog
mix. He is Heartworm
negative and house-
broken. Very friendly
and loving,
energetic and very
playful, also beautiful.
Would be great with
kids. Would also like
to be your lapdog.
even though he
weighs about 48
pounds. Walks well
on a leash and gets
along with other
dogs. Found as a
stray. Call Joanne at
352-795-1288."
Toy Poodle & Chihua-
hua 6 yr old males, neut.
shots, house trained,
sleep in crates, must stay
together $200 OBO
(352) 503-7270




Bunny's for sale. Lion
Head & New Zealand
$10 each. Great for 4-H
(352) 897-4845
# -.


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





8 HP, 2 Stroke Yamaha
Outboard Engine,
Excellent Condition
$1050.
Call (352) 344-9479




BAYLINER
23ft., Randevu Deck
boat, tan axel trlr.
w/new tires. No mtr,
incls outdrive $2,000
obo 727-455-8075
GULF to LAKE MARINE
*WE PAY CASH $$ *
For Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
KEY LARGO
2001, 18 1/2 ft
90 HP Mercury
$6900
(352) 795-0363
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537
SWEETWATER
Pontoon 20ft. 50HP
evinrude,galvanized
trailer, $3000
(352) 613-2333




JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR &MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Tltled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892




BMW
2003, 3251, 4DR
LEATHER, SUNROOF
PW, PL CALL 628-4600
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
CADILLAC
Black 2011 4dr CTS
1,100 mi. Free satilite
radio 6/13, smoke free,
garage kept. $37,000
(352) 249-7976



CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548
CRYLSER
'06 Seabring cony.
Touring Coup, loaded,
21K, gar. kept. Like new
$9,200 (352) 513-4257
FORD
2001 MUSTANG
AUTO, 6CYL, PW, PL,
PRICED TO SELL
CALL 628-4600
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
GMC
1988 Suburban
3/4 Ton 4 x 4
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, not dealer
owned. $17,900
(352) 302-0778
SATURN
1995 SC2 runs great
118,000 miles needs
paint & A/C recharge
$1,200. 352-637-0566
SCION TC
2005, Alloy Wheels, Auto,
AC, Power winds, locks,
mirrors, cruise cont. New
brakes & tires. Exc Cond.
$7900. (352) 527-2792
VW
2004 BEETLE
CONV.. AUTOMATIC
FUN IN THE SUN
CALL 628-4600 FOR
MORE INFORMATION




CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers.
LeMans blue, converti-
ble 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





FORD
1954 F-100 for sale
Call for information
(352) 489-4761
FORD
1995, F150 4X4...
RUNS GOOD.....PERFECT
HUNTING TRUCK.
CALL 628-4600
FOR DETAILS

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *


Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




JEEP
2003 Grand Cherokee
Limited Ed. Black, Sun
Roof. Exc Cond in/out.
Great A/C $7500 obo
746-8631 or 212-2814




FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907


PONTIAC
2003 Montana dark blue
extended length 7 pas-
senger van. Front and
rear a/c, CD player, DVD
player. 106,500 miles.
Some body damage.
$4100.00. 352 897 4362




Yamaha
'05, Raptor, 50CC,
4 Wheeler,
less than 20 hrs. $950
4 Goodyear Tires, 7000
miles, Rims & Hubcaps
off Corolla P185/65R15
All $100. (352) 726-9151




Harley Davidson
1978 Shovel Head, new
fenders, new tank '02
Springer front end, belt
drive, $7,500 613-2333

^^^^^^^-I


CLASSIFIED




2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800

HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom built, 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513

HARLEY DAVIDSON
2008 Ultra Classic,
14K mi., $17,000.
(352) 341-1143

HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley looks, Chrome,
Leather bags, $5000.
C.R. (727)207-1619

HONDA
2007 Shadow Aero ABS
(VT750ABS)Less than
600 original miles
$4,800. 724-953-1915




316-0916 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE New Tires
Excellect Shape Approx
70K mi. Selling due to
health. Asking $4250
(352) 476-3688
Honda Helix

1992, good condition,
25k mi, radio, garaged.
$1800
(352) 746-7378
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
MOTOR SCOOTER
2007, 250CC,
very low miles,
$1,000. obo
(352) 220-8454
VW TRIKE
VW Trike New Runs
Great Great Price
$6000.00 352-344-9340
Phone


Misc. Notice


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A MEETING
ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2012, at 9:00 A.M., AT THE LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING,
ROOM 166, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH, LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461.
The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the proposed resolution that includes the
new Planning and Development Fee Schedule as well as a new proposed Ordi-
nance Chapter 18, Buildings and Building Regulations for unincorporated Citrus
County, and any other business which may be brought before the Board.
The title of the Resolution is as follows:
RESOLUTION NO. 2012 -

A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, A
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AMENDING AND ESTABLISHING A
FEE SCHEDULE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT; ESTABLISHING
A TABLE OF CONTENTS; INCORPORATING FEES FOR THE BUILDING DIVISION, EXHIBIT "A";
INCORPORATING FEES FOR THE CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION, EXHIBIT "B"; INCORPO-
RATING FEES FOR THE LAND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION, EXHIBIT "C"; INCORPORATING
FEES FOR THE GEOGRAPHIC RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY PLANNING DIVISION, EX-
HIBIT "D"; INCORPORATING PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATIVE FEES, EX-
HIBIT "E"; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The title of the Ordinance is as follows:

ORDINANCE NUMBER 2012-

AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER 18, CODE OF ORDINANCES OF CITRUS COUNTY, ENTI-
TLED BUILDINGS AND BUILDING REGULATIONS FOR THE UNINCORPORATED AREAS OF
CITRUS COUNTY; SUPERCEDING AND REPEALING CHAPTER 18 CITRUS COUNTY CODE
OF ORDINANCES, BUIDLINGS AND BUILDING REGULATIONS; PROVIDING FOR GENERAL
PROVISIONS (THAT INCLUDES TITLE, AUTHORITY, FINDINGS, PURPOSE AND INTENT, DEFI-
NITIONS, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS, THE CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD AND
THE CONTRACTOR LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD); PROVIDING FOR ARTICLE I
-CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, REGULATIONS, AND TECHNICAL CODES;
ARTICLE II CONTRACTOR LICENSING; ARTICLE III HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM;
ARTICLE IV NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM (NSP); ARTICLE V -
DESIGN-BUILD CRITERIA/SELECTION; ARTICLE VI FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT REGULA-
TION; ARTILE VII POST-DISASTER REDEVELOPMENT PLAN; PROVIDING FOR SEVERA-
BILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS OF LAW; PROVIDING FOR CODIFICATION, INCLU-
SION IN THE CODE, SCRIVENER'S ERRORS; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
THE PROPOSED FEE SCHEDULE AND CHAPTER 18 BUILDING AND BUILDING REGULA-
TIONS, MAY BE REVIEWED IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT AD-
MINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 3600 WEST SOVEREIGN PATH, LECANTO, FL BETWEEN THE HOURS
OF 8:00 AM AND 5:00 PM, MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY.
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CODE REVIEW AND
APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUBLIC MEET-
ING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560
AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IM-
PAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING
(352-527-5310).

GASTON HALL, CHAIRMAN
CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD
OF CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA
APPROVED AS TO FORM FOR THE RELIANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY ONLY:
COUNTY ATTORNEY

SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


321-0916 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bid-
ding on the premises


Mee^tingB
Notices


where said vehicles)
have been stored and
which is located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
6403 W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa.Citrus County,
Florida the following:
DOS: 9/27/12 @8 AM
2003 MITSUBISHI
VIN#4A3AA46G83E169989
1994 FORD M/H


Meetingfl^
Notice


VIN#1FDKE30G6PHB92718
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale in
cash only. Vehicle(s) sold
as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement, between
owner & obligated party.
September 16,2012.


Meting
Notice


320-0916 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast's Administrative Committee's
monthly meeting is scheduled to be held on Wednesday, September 26, 2012 at
9:00a.m. The meeting will be held at the Early Learning Coalition of the Nature
Coast's main office at 1560 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL. 34429. Please
contact Coalition Staff at 352-563-9939, ext. 263 if you have any questions.
Public participation is welcome.
September 16,2012.


322-0916 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, September 19, 2012 @ 9:00AM in
the Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons
interested are invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code
Compliance Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you
have questions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Allen, David R. & Rae Nell "REPEAT VIOLATION"
10 W Murray St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfly established end mdntdnedjunkycrd, garbage waste dcspod ste r saitcry cndill; and
except fa accumdaions of vegetative waste on agcicurd
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, tires, paint cans, metal, plastic, bedd-
ing, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Benedicto, Tina Marie
9146 W Tonto Dr, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Cary, Lucinda L.
7632 W Grove St, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning,leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Coburn, Michael Dale
7175 W Gator Ln, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Coburn, Michael Dale
7175 W Gator Ln, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; ex-
cept for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set
out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable mate-
rial stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in
a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken furniture
and other miscellaneous trash and debris.

DeMarchi, Thomas E.
1333 N Magnolia Hill Way, Inverness, FI 34453
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(A), Accessory Uses: Acces-
sory uses or structures may not be placed on residentially zoned property prior to the
establishment of the principal use.
DeMarchi, Thomas E.
1333 N Magnolia Hill Way, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Unregistered boat
Finley, David S. & Pamela J.


5430 N Suncoast Blvd, Crystal River, Fl34428
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Comply with the conditions of permit #2007 03834. Remove sec-
ond driveway, create required parking spaces, and complete the buffer.
First National Acceptance Co.
4824 E Doeskin Loop, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: TV sets, plywood, carpet pieces, carpet padd-
ing, cardboard boxes, coolers, lawn furniture, camper top, tarps, plastic containers,
plastic cartons, and miscellaneous trash and debris.
Giddens, Estela Quinal

19 N Barbour St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Lumber, tires, building materials, furniture, and
miscellaneous junk.
Guy, Randy W.
7898 W Riverbend Rd, Crystal River, FI 34428
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Permit #200803491 expired and did not have a final inspection.

Hayes, Lora J. & Alicia
408 E Sunbeam Ln, Beverly Hills, FI34465
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(A)(4); Any barn, stable, pen
or sty shall be located not less than 50 feet from any property line.
Hayes, Lora J. & Alicia
408 E Sunbeam Ln, Beverly Hills, FI34465
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(A)(1); Low Density Residential
Districts must contain 2 acres and may have 1 swine per acre.

Howerton Koon, Jacqueline L. "KOVACH, JR."
1940 S Mooring Dr, Inverness, FI34450
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash, cardboard boxes, tires, over-
flowing garbage can and miscellaneous trash and debris.
Howerton Koon, Jacqueline L. "KOVACH, JR."
1940 S Mooring Dr, Inverness, FI34450
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Hurst EST, David J. & Edward B.
10235 S Sherry Loop, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
James M. Heck Revocable Inter Vivos Trust "REPEAT VIOLATION"

3118 N Whitewater Ter, Crystal River, FI34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such matedals; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Carpet remnants, mattresses, broken furniture,
and other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Manko Co.

86 W Withlacoochee Trl, Dunnellon, FI 34434
Failed driveway apron inspection: Citrus County Land Development Code Section
4221(J) "(Driveway) aprons shall be constructed pursuant to the standards of Ap-
pendix A. Section 6 of Appendix A: "any damage to the County right of way as a
result of apron constructions shall be repaired in conjunction with the permit, prior to
final release." This includes restoration of sod and other vegetation to pre construc-
tion condition.

Monson, Richard & Fran

5945 W Pine Cir, Crystal River, FI 34429
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Nelson, Andrew C. & Gwen L. Romine c/o D. Nelson
3141 N Hooty Pt, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Fish tank, old plywood, fan, shower doors,
wood crates, animal cages, old boats, plastic containers, tree debris, scrap metal,
camper top, pickup trucks with trash and debris in the bed, and miscellaneous trash
and debris.

Reid, Thomas Burton

8367 N Tee Lake Pt, Hernando, FI 34442
Construction of a structure (Remodel of existing mobile, permit #201004227) without
a vdid permit, a vidation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a)
which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair,
move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code,
including a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or
floating residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having
obtained a permit therefore.
Siplin, Shea L.

8 Donna Ct, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: A maroon Camaro with no tags and a white Dodge Intrepid with
expired
tags in the driveway.

St. Hilaire, James R. & Miller, Cecile S.
8022 E Bayberry Ln, Floral City, FI 34436
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored
in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Sofa, computer parts, cardboard boxes, car-
pet pieces, plastic containers, tree limb debris, tires, old bicycles, and miscellenous
trash and debris.

Warner, John W. & Donna J.
2472 N Pennsylvania Ave, Crystal River, FI 34428
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B); Accessory uses and struc-
tures shall not be occupied as a residence, with the exception of guest
cottages/garage apartments as outline herein. To Wit: Vacate the two travel
trailers on the property.
Warner, John W. & Donna J.

2488 N Pennsylvania Ave, Crystal River, FI 34428
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B); Accessory uses and struc-
tures shall not be occupied as a residence, with the exception of guest
cottages/garage apartments as outline herein. To Wit: Vacate the two travel
trailers on the property.
Warner, John W. & Donna J.
2488 N Pennsylvania Ave, Crystal River, FI 34428
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of


Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential
unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Installed mobile home on property.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.

MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MAS-
TER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
September 16,2012.


Meeting

I Notices I


Meetng^O^
I Ntics :


Meng

I Ntics






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 D9




D10 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


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1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613


2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL 34453


*PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC "LEASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 39,000 MILES FOR
THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WAC +0% AVAILABLE ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS FOR A LIMITED TIME WAC. PICTURES ARE FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL






S Section E-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16,2012


1 OME 'RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


B Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


KATHY PHILLIPS/Special to the Chronicle
The beautiful rainbow spreading across Citrus County's Hernando Lake was snapped by Hernando resident Kathy Phillips, who garnered third-place in the annual Save Our Waters Week
photo contest.


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Frugal uses
for hosiery

Frugal Living
PAGE E7

Turfgrass
weeds

Jane's Garden
PAGE E4









E2 SUNDA~~ SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


A VERY CLASSY HOME!
* Exquisite MBR Porcelain Tile/Custom Paint
* Lots of Ceramic Beautiful PooVPavers
* 2 Golf Courses Gorgeous Decor
* Close to Gulf/Rivers Shed w/Elec./Lg. Lot!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997


www.FloridaListinglnfo.com


Beautiful 4 BR/3 BA/3 CG Home
Formal Living & Dining Room
Family room w/Fireplace
Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area
SOffice w/Built-in Bookcases & Desk
Play/Craft Room
Caged Lanai & Pool w/Spa
Nicely Landscaped 1 7 Acres
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


COUNTRY RETREAT
* Electric Fireplace LR + Fam. Room!!
* Really Nice Deck Relaxing Master
* Close to Town Over and Acre
* Cute Shed/Storage Very Peaceful!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 ,-


LUWEcI rnIL.E un Inc LmEIC1
This is THE PERFECT Fisherman's Retreat you've
been watching forl Get back to basics and enjoy
3,700 acres of unspoiled Lake Rousseaul Beautiful
property with lots of serious shade Everything you
need to kick back and relax is already here This
unique property will comfortably sleep six Isn't it
time to leave the rat race behind?
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpottlls@ol.com i
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


LAKESIDE GOLF
Has this 3BR/2BA home to offer on the 9th
fairway. 2,086 sq. ft. of living area. Large
lanai, family room, split plan and utility room
with lots of storage and circular drive.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: brbarajmills@earthlink.net -



RENTALS

AVAILABLE

Visit

wwAIICiMsRentals.com


REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 uyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


LARGE 3/2.5/2 HOME
on 2 acres with pond. Large master
suite. Caged inground pool, huge lanai,
fireplace in family room and cooks
kitchen. Owner ill and must sell.

JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferSlollz@remax.net
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


5078 W. GROVER CLEVELAND BLVD.
* 3BR/2BA/2Car Gar. 7-1/2 Fenced Acres
* Formal LR/DR Woodburning Fireplace
SKitchen & Brkfst Dinette New Dual Pane Windows
* Fresh Paint IN/OUT New Air Conditioner
* Newer Carpets Added 2 Car Carport
* Beautiful Landscaping Outbuildings
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 [
Email lounalley@tampabay.rr.com r


This gorgeous, fully furnished, 2/2/2 free-standing end
unit boasts 1,579 sq ft of waterfront living Recently
remodeled and updated w/Corlan counters & new
carpet Includes all appliances Enjoy the enclosed patio
or shaded back deck, each allowing a serene view of the
Crystal River Preserve Boat slip w/1 6,000 Ib lift Call
for your private showing now I
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


3/2/2 Canal Front
3,323 Sq. Ft. Living
S1.06 Acres Oaks & Fruit Trees
SBuilt 1992 Updated 2010
SBeautiful Unique Design
SNewer Appliances
STop-of-the-Line Water System
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


aurcn nifb Doneniruuu aiaI un un A rnilVr
CORNER LOT. All prettied up and move-in
ready. Split plan; great cooks kitchen w/
breakfast bar. Living and dining rooms
have sliders to large screened-in lanai;
inside laundry, large side-entry garage.
Priced right to sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


o i H BI 0WMi In re
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


5950 N. LAMP POST DR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
*3BD/2BA/3CG Beautifully Maintained
* Solar Heated Pool Over 2,000 SF Living
' Corner Lot w/Shed Many Upgrades
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


UUU If. rH.rllll H Lr. IIVlHlVFIIw I
2007 IMMACULATE 3/2/2 HOME
Custom kitchen wood cabinetry, tankless water
heater, thermopane windows, tray ceilings, UV
lite in HVAC, 18" tile & carpet, oversized screen
lanai. All for only a motivated price.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com


TRIPLEWIDE MOBILE
SNew Carier HVAC Huge Kitchen!!
* Very Nice Master New Tie Downs
* Close to Town On Two Acres
* 12x20 Shed w/Elec. A Must See!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloIidaLislillnglnlo.com


E2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Watch out


for scammers


F lorida
storms
often bring
out the best in a ,
community.
Friend, family,
neighbors and
even sometimes
strangers help
each other out in
the cleanup ef- Kerry
forts of property TI
and tree damage A
left in the wake of A
a storm, tornado
or hurricane.
Unfortunately, storms can
also bring out the worst, too.
After a storm (or even on a


F
H
O


regular day), the
fast buck artists
go to work look-
ing to profit from
the misfortune of
a situation. Often
they prey on the
elderly and wid-
ows. These artists
go door to door
sreider looking to clean
IE up and clean out
more than just
RIST trees! So how can
property and
homeowners protect
themselves?'


See ARBORIST/Page E5


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660, and be pre-
pared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be prepared to
leave a detailed message.


PIN RIG Sw21


3/213 beautiful lot, great location. Perfect size home. All wood
cabinets, solid surface counters, energy efficient, tile flooring,
large utility room with cabinets, large walk-in shower, spacious
Master bath and master closet. Tray ceilings, beautiful trim and
crown. Rear porch, with exterior shower, and bath access. Price
$185,000. Many special features.
OOOCMWN Call Joe at 302-0910


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


= ,- -It


Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!


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HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 L Facebok
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


Specializing i Terra Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
era & BrentwoodResal (352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
REALTY G RO UP rFliInjIm BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA SLOCUMB 352-427-3777


LA W_


MLS 357521......................................$259,000






SINGLE FAMILY 3BR 3 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE
Spectacular Terra Vista home Situated on a cul de sac, beautiful views Custom
details with upgrades galore Professionally decorated Pool, Spa, extended
lanai with extensive landscape
MLS 356255 ....... ............... ........$499,000


Spacious 3/2 5 townhome with great room, modern kitchen with solid surface
counters and eat-in nook, spacious lanai, indoor laundry closet, expanded
ceilings, and single car garage
MLS 357481............................. ...... 105.900 MLS 357052............................................................$140,000


DETACHED VILLA BEDROOM 2 BATH 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLA
Terra Vista maintenance free villa Popular Lanatana model Open floor plan
n office or den
M LS 353077..............................................................$219.000


DETACHED VILLA 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLA
Beautiful maintenance free home, 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2 car garage, open floor
plan design with a great use of space Sunroom with plantation shutters, DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH DEN 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
Superior condition, lots of add; .. l--t i ... ... I -Pl ,..., ir.l;- .in ; room lI i ni ........ ... i III....... I I II I I I.... I 1
Ready to move into on a corner I. .I ....................... I I I ..... 0 h III
MLS 355853................................. ........... $209,000 MLS 356067............................................................. $175,000


" I


I "


Terms 6 Months or More
Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! Social Membership included with all Rentals


| |


L


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 E3







E4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Weed control and turfgrass


Lawns are high-maintenance
areas of the home landscape. All
perennial turf grasses commonly
used on Florida are exotic, non-native
species. Bahia, Centipede,
St. Augustine and Zoysia are
the most popular turf
species. In central and
North Florida these grasses
go dormant as soon as the
frost comes in November or
December The lawn will
start to green up and grow
after the frosts in late Feb-
ruary or early March. Jane
Fall weed seeds sprout as JAN
the days get shorter and tem- G
peratures cool in late August GA
and September Sprouting
can be controlled by an application of
pre-emergent granular herbicide. I sug-
gest three applications a year: Valen-
tines's Day, Mother's Day and
mid-August before Labor Day A 50-
pound bag of 0-0-8 Pre-M costs around
$30 to $40 at a landscape supply
But there may be established weeds
in a lawn. Take turf sprig and weed sam-
ples to the UF/IFAS Extension Service
volunteers for identification. The uni-
versity publication "Weeds of Southern
Turfgrasses" is available for about $8


!
\

i


online or from IFAS on Soverign Path in
Lecanto. Do read the short introduction
and study the first three pages. You will
constantly be referring to the drawings
and labels.
The bulk of the 208-page
paperback has a brief writ-
ten description of 190
species of prevalent weeds,
along with one or two color
photographs. Frequent lawn
mowing usually lops off
flower heads before the
seeds actually mature and
Weber are capable of germinating.
E'S The index of common plant
N names is handy, as many
DEN northern gardeners incor-
rectly call southern weeds
by names they used up north. Scientists
and professionals will use the index of
scientific binomial names for the
plants.
Many weeds spread from the crown
of the parent plant by runners or stolen
along the soil surface and beneath the
mowed turfgrass. Sandburs, Panicum
and Goosegrass are prime examples.
Other weeds spread by strong under-
ground rhizomes and emerge far from
the parent The sedges are among the
worst to control or eliminate, because


the underground rhizomes and tubers
are perennial. A colony can live for
decades and survive freezes, drought
and fire. You can buy individual pack-
ets of Sedge Hammer, an expensive tar-
geted chemical that is effective against
sedges while not harming the lawn if
used according to directions.
To kill established weeds in a Bahia
lawn, a post-emergent herbicide can be
used specifically designed for that par-
ticular species of grass. Knowledge and
temperature are critical. Early Sep-
tember may still be too hot to use a post-
emergent on a lawn. Ask the experts at
a landscape supply store or leave it to a
licensed and insured professional
weed control company Momentum is
one brand name for use on Bahiagrass
in late September Accurate identifica-
tion is critical, as some chemicals used
on Bahiagrass lawns will kill a St Au-
gustine lawn.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant Semi-retired,
she grows thousands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County garden. For an
appointment, call 352-249-6899 or
contactJWeber12385@gmail.com.


Chairs might have famous connection; Mr. Rogers rumors


Dear John: It has been a
long time since I last
wrote to you. Just maybe
you can help me again. I have
two hand clutch-type purses or
bags. The white one is
made of all beads and
pearls and was made
in Belgium.
The second one is
all gold sequins with
gold beads and with a
hand band to hold it. It
was made in Czecho-
slovakia. I have no
idea how old they are. John S
I have had them many, SIKOF
many years. Thank
you for any help you AT
can give me about
their value. L.B., Hernando
Dear LB.: Decorative arts made
in Czechoslovakia form a large
category of collecting. Your gold
beaded purse is low on the totem
pole of collector interest I think it
was made after World War II. Po-
tential dollar value is $10 to $20.


1


S'U


,1

1


The white purse made in Bel-
gium was probably made between
World War I and II. Potential dol-
lar value is $15 to $30.
Dear John: I really enjoy lis-
tening to your show
and reading your arti-
cles. I think you are the
perfect person to ask
about two chairs
owned by a friend!
These are two identi-
cal chairs, photo of one
attached. The label on
them says "Wellington
korski Hall, Tailor Made for
'SKI'S Mr. & Mrs. Leonard
Bernstein." The chairs
IC were purchased in
1999 from a thrift store
in Homestead, and my friend was
able to find out from talking to
some locals that at one time Mr
Bernstein and his wife, Felicia
Montealegre, had a vacation
home in Tavernier, Fla.
Do you think these chairs
could possibly have belonged to


the Leonard Bernstein, and if so,
is there any value to them? Any
information you could provide
would be greatly appreciated! -
M.L., Inverness
Dear M.L.: I was not able to
find any specific collector inter-
est in your upholstered chairs.
The Wellington Hall Company is
still in business. Perhaps the
company can help with informa-
tion about the connection to
Leonard Bernstein.
Dear John: I heard the call-in
on your radio show about Mr
Rogers being a military hero in
Vietnam, and his tattoos, etc. It is
all bogus. These false stories
about him have been around
See ATTIC/Page E6
This upholstered chair was found
at a Homestead and according to
a label was "Tailor Made for Mr.
& Mrs. Leonard Bernstein."
The Bernsteins once owned a
vacation home in Tavernier.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ARBORIST
Continued from Page E3

If you need the service of
a professional tree care
service, make sure you hire
a licensed and insured ar-
borist. With hundreds or
even thousands of dollars at
stake, not to mention the in-
tegrity and appearance of
your property, trees, and
your personal safety, ask to
see a current certificate and
liability insurance.
A reputable company will
be listed in the phone book
or on the internet, or maybe
a friend or family member
can recommend a profes-
sional arborist with these


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


credentials. Disreputable
individuals or companies
often cruise neighborhoods
going door to door, and are
known for ripping gutters
off, breaking fences and
bird baths and even drop-
ping limbs or trees on
houses or other structures.
Then they typically fold up
and leave, never to be seen
again.
Disreputable individuals
or companies tend to solicit
door to door; demand pay-
ment (all or part) in ad-
vance; or may offer tree
topping (a practice that is
very bad for the health of
the tree). These individuals
sell jobs without producing
a written estimate or work
order.


Always insist on a signed
contract as to costs, dates
when work is to be pre-
formed, and exactly what is
to be done.
Insist climbing spikes are
not to be used unless the
tree is being removed. The
holes left behind from
spikes are an open invita-
tion for fungal diseases and
insects, although there are a
few species that can tolerate
lightly spiking.
Always get a second opin-
ion before removing any
trees. If tree removal is un-
avoidable, I highly recom-
mend tree replacement for
property, neighborhood
beautification and wildlife
habitat.
A properly pruned or


trimmed tree is a bigger
asset to you and your prop-
erty than a healthy tree re-
moved just for the profit of
others.
Never pay in advance.
Don't be lured by a bar-
gain price; if it seems too
good to be true, it usually is.
Don't just hire someone
with a chainsaw who knocks
on your door. Always hire a
professional to protect your-
self and your trees.
Have your trees trimmed
annually or biannually to
help assure strong and
healthy trees, and remem-
ber the best time to plant a
tree was yesterday


Kerry Kreider is a practic-


I I _' S-O ALLOF-CITRUSCOUNTY


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


ing arborist and a
member of the Interna-
tional Society ofArboricul-
ture, a tree preservationist
and president ofAction


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 E5

Tree Service. You
can reach him at 352-
726-9724 or by email
atactionpro
arborist@yahoo. com.


I Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney I
I -.M Realtor.. A HOUSE Realtor I
Irw 302.3179 soLDo#'an 287.9022 2 |
I WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700 .0NO




o ..1 easy living 55+ community, new carpet &
Interior pint, furniture is negotiable with
sale. Home is sold AS-IS with right to inspect.


J fj7~ i-rn


4316 N. BACALL
OAKWOOD VILLAGE

S1" i, I 1,,1 1, Ih ,1 I ,,,, I I
S|,] l,,j I ,,| I l I I ... I .


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFIcE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAI: SALES@ALEXRE COM


0`1 -


retor


I A1G E I T S E D W


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2





-tillS 1940W Pearson St 30iUS 300 N Hul..v I11 l Dr
MLS#354649 $232,500 i I i: ..
Elegant 3/2/3 plus garage on an acre lot. Beautiful 2/2/2 in quiet neighborhood.
Directions: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd to let on Directions: Rte 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd to left on
Boston to St Lucie on Left Honeylocust to home on right.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


.4-llS 86 E Ireland Ct
MLS#357556 $254,800
New 2012 construction
on Citrus Hill's Oaks Golf Course.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


sg ae 1312W Sphere PI
i MLS#357532 $229,900
4/2/2 pool home on a beautifully
elevation 1 acre.
Teresa Boozer352-634-0213


-u iU S 111 N woolilower lerr
MLS#356403 $68,900
Windsormodel offers 2 bedroom 1.5 baths car garage.
Directions: Rte 486 to Forest Ridge Blvd to right on
Sugarmaple to left on Woolflower to home on right.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


'7iaae 2302 Colby St
M LS#356263 $139,900
TRIPLEX, GREAT INVESTMENT.
Each unit 2 bdrm/1.5 bath.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


- ills 192 E Keller CI
1.IL : Il.: S329.000
Oaks Golf Course 4/3.5/2+ home
on the 8th hole.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136






Czisat
S 1075 S SoftwindLp
MLS#352259 $133,000
Spacious 3/2/3 home, corner lot,
friendly neighborhood.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


6Afgeen6%ff 110E GIassboro Ct 12-5a 81I'&Illl 8IuEG10ilI.iCi.C1 8 6A 1320 Lake Shore Dr N SL Lucie Pi
MLS#353672 $66,400 MLS#356430 $65,900 ,OU MLS#351954 $99,000 MLS#349694 $95,000
2/2 fully furnished EASY, BREEZY FLORIDA LIVING. Well Kept home w/a Exceptionally nice refurbished villa
w/attached carport 2/2 second floor condo. greatview of Lake Spivey. w/wood cabs & new appl.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Sandra Olear352-212-4058 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the 2
S Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


IOMOSASSA 2006 D/W M/H on a little PINE RIDGE short sale, gorgeous
>ver 5 acres of land, fully fenced, 4 bedroom, 3 bath home w/inground heated
v/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, gourmet kitchen and pool & spa all on 2.97 acres of land.
island, cathedral & vaulted ceilings, lovely GOURMET kitchen, quartz counter tops,
getting. Gas fireplace, inside laundry, wood cabinets, island, all GE .1... :


SPrudential
Florida Showcase

Properties


Fo a Vru T o M P o os,

S 6. F .d -c P S r opeSrties.


- 4 :








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

a while. I heard a version of them
many years ago.
Any Google search for Fred Rogers'
military record brings up a number of
sites dealing with it. Also Bob Kee-
shan, Mr Kangaroo, did serve in
WWII, but did not see combat; Lee
Marvin did not serve on Iwo Jima. It
seems so odd, in these days when facts
can be quickly and easily checked,
that these weird stories are perpetu-
ated. B.E, Citrus Springs
Dear B.E: I am glad you took the
time to write and set the record
straight I suspect you have triggered
a bunch of Remember When moments
for our readers.
DearJohn: Thank you for answering
my email on the air last Saturday I
had asked about what I thought was a
Jade vase and you told me it was soap-
stone and not a vase, but a brush and
ink holder


0001BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com
I I


I truly appreciate your taking the
time to read my email and respond. I
really enjoy your show and articles.
You suggested that I scratch the sur-
face of the item, to determine if you
are correct that it is soapstone. I did
that and found that you were correct.
When I scratched it, a white powder
appeared. C.VN., Internet
Dear C.TN.: Soapstone is often re-


--i1

2/2/2 VILLA. MOVE-IN READY
Mint condition, lots of room. Must See!
Make an offer. Cypress Blvd. (L) on
Seagrape, first villa on left. $112,000 or
best offer. 1 Fairwood Ct. mls# 354818
OFFICE: (352 3827s00


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


ELEGANT
CUSTOM BUILT HOME K "- BELOW
In the equestrian section of Pine l i -- -INVESTMENT
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a -., -1
3600 interactive virtual tour at
www mypineridgehome.com. ...r...
MLS #355468.$410,000 ...i $499.000




it I till.


NATURE'S CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River and nestled in an area that preserved
and private setting -perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community most of its 1960's charm!
i ...i... ... I Takethe on the Withlacoochee River Well maintained, fenced yard, sunroom.
.. .. ..i. .. i. $218,000 The perfect home away from home.
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #357468 $39,900
"-~- .






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well maintained 3/2/1
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, medical ... I 1 ,,... F .. your fenced
true masterpiece in a .. 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard I. ... ........ or private
Lake Tsala Apopka, room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
family to move right in! imaginable! :i.. ... :
OOOCLOB $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 n .I $69,900


ferred to as "a poor man's jade" by col-
lectors, because it looks so much like
jade. I am glad you took the time to
respond.


John Sikorski has been a profes-


LANDMARK


311 W.Main St., Inverness

352-726-5263
1 A kI.:


B ST
f 'i
,. ,, ,


.,I n


SUNNY AND BRIGHT .u H.If ,,, ....,, AMAZING WATERFRONT LOCATION i .
NEW LISTING! Family oriented 3/3/1 home on 2+ acres with 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 2 car garage and FL room under bedroom, 2 bath home, endosed pato for pondering, large game
dose-to-town location! Home has HUGE basement area perfect for air. Well maintained home with new roof and A/C. All room, plus a 3 car attached garage/workshop with office, full roll up
man-cave, expansion, etc. Acreage allows for horses. $140,000. appliances. Oversized private corner property. City and well doors and so much more. Property priced t $354,900 but owner
3171 E Possum C., Inverness. MLS #357508. Call Tonya Koch water. ONLY $72,800. MS #357445. 411 Hemlock. Call says bring all reasonable offers. Telephone Point Rd. in Inverness.
352-613-6427 or Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. MLS #355889. Call 352-726-5263.





BEVERLY HILLS BARGAIN!! I i I-.... I ,
W ATERFRONT CRACKER STYLE I.-uI.... I-........ ,,,,,L.. i,,, ,,,, ,,., ,, ...
I .hl l 1 1.- [ nl n. .... 1 ,,,,,,,, ,,,,, n1.1. 1. ....1 ..,... n. I,,, ,
deck and boat dock. Central A/C. Oversized shed/workshop GREAT FIND in this 1 acre vacant lot in the Crystal Hill Mini ONLY $24,900 and won't last long! 9 Oak Hollow Dr.
with electric. Check this one out! ONLY $64,900.10416 E Farms. Backs up to Rails to Trails. Owner asking $13,000 but MLS #357486. Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-
Gobbler MLS #356970. Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. will consider all offers. MLS #353578. Call 352-726-5263. Hanssen 352-586-6598.


rnl_.c nEUU cu" "II 1y- I I "' """. II L:r mn urr1n AnMu %.rLL Inc ImVuvvn Ihl
CH EA P, CH EA P CH EA PH! I I.. .".. .. r 11 1 .. ,,,, ,d ., ,, ,,,, ... ,,,I ,. 1 ,' I .. .i I HI .. ,,, I.. ..
Home features living room, breakfast bar, pantry screen porc, floor plan, 46 acre fenced yard with mature landscaping, living room paint & carpet, vaulted ceilings, covered patio, great room and
appliances, dining area, and in need of some TLC. dining area, rear covered patio, and some TLC. 9765 W Laurel Oak Ln. ready for immediate occupancy. 6461 E. Mobile Street,
ONLY $19,900. MLS #357596. Call Kim 212-5752 or ONLY $49,900. MLS #356398. Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Inverness. ONLY $67,480. MLS #355265. Call Kim Fuller
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-5866598 Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-5866598. 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.





REDUCED 30K" i iI i .... r 1 ,,,1. .I I GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD" ..I,, ,, ,,,I,,, .. ,., MOVE RIGHT IN" I,.,,.. I ....,, ,, 1 ,,,,,I
.. ... .. I..r ,,,,Y ..... In.n.1. .. n. .... n ...Y" ,,,,1.1. .. .... ...... ..... ,,, ..... ... ..I,, ,, .. ..... ...... ...... ..... .... .. .... ..... .
.,, .. ..... y ,,, ,,
II..,,,, I. ,, ,,,, .Ih .. I ,d, .n. Ir. ,ll. 1.. .r rih .....I I .. II I h ." h ,1 B .1"1 ,,, l ., ,,, ,, ,, 1... l h.. I I 1 ,,",,,,, h11,,1 I ,, ,, ,l ,,, : 1, , ,
11 w 11" .... ,,,I..... i I ONLY 5179.0 0 ro ..,,.I,,.., l. ,i ". ASKING 583 500 ..i ... 1,,,, H.Il ONLY 57Z900 .1 .' ,,l h,,', 111 ,
Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 orTomik Spire-Hnssen 352-586598. Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.
INCREDIBLE I eI
OPPORTUNITY



ORIGINAL OWNER HAS TO SAY GOODBYE, ...... PRICE REDUCED' I ........ d, l, ,, ,, I
S ... ... ,..i 1, Inverness Highlands West 2/1/1 ready....new interior pint & flooring, wood cabinets, interior laundry,
....... . I.-,,, i hllen, living room, Florida room, shed, updated bathrooms, rear screen porch, potio, dining area, updated A/C
. .... ... .1..1.... ..l.I.. .- i new drainfield, and more. 3415 S. and more! You will not be disappointed...come see me today. 9081 S.
,,,' ,,,,. i I Hl .II... .. I I ASKING II,, ,,..... I ASKING $49,900. MLS #357400. Call Kim Waterview Dr, Floral City. ASKING $89,500. MLS #355918. Call
$174,900. al Kim 212-5752 or Tomik Spire-Hanseen 352-5866598. 212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Kim 212-5752 or Tomia Spires-Hanssen 352-5866598.


sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala 34478 or asksikorski
@aol.com.


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSUREwww.S IN CITRUS COUNTYnverness.co


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


E6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


II






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Way to recycle


old pantyhose


H osiery
gets snags
and tears
pretty easily.
While a snag or
tear doesn't al-
ways make them
unwearable,
most of the time,
they go straight to
the trashcan. In-
stead of throwing
them away, they
can be used
around your home.
Here are
suggestions:
Skin exfoliant: R


than spending
money on a costly
skincare product,
go natural. One
reader, Lori from
SIllinois, suggests:
"Cut a leg off of a
pair of pantyhose
or knee-highs
and fill the foot
part with equal
FRUGAL parts baking soda
LIVING and brown sugar.
Tie the end.
Double the pantyhose thick-
some ness to make sure the
ather See Page E10


CAROLE LISTER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
MER cell: 422-4620 "o-1
Office: 382-1700
OPEN HUSE


4 MASTIC COURT W 16 SALVIA COURT W
* 22/2 + fam. rm. All updated 3/2//2/ + den Fam. rm. w/FP
* New SS appl. Silestone counters Heated pool Summer kitchen
* Wood/tile/carpet Glass enc. lanai Corian counters Breakfast bar
* Newer A/C Immaculate Well for yard On 2 lots
#357409 $128,500 #356188 $249,900


N

or
PL flnr


.

S IL OOPD ETAEH


I"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" r

IANCY Cell: 352-634-4225
ONTICOS KEY1 REALTY INC.
S 8015 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, FL 382-1700






SELF-CLEANING! 37' SOLAR HEATED POOL w/ALARM!


* Private Guest Wing w/ Bath to POOL
* Spacious Living / Family Room Design
* Tub + Shower & 2 Walk-In Closets
$182,000 MLS#356074
ak myviia Vll os


* 3 Bed + Den /Office (or 4th Bedroom)
* DOUBLE PANE Windows & Doors
* Larger Property PLUS Side Easement
$239,500 MLS#356455
I ,SI, R S--,,i


BANK OWNED-LEESBURG, FL
Waterfront 2BR/2BA double wide on canal to FOR RENT-INVERNESS, FL
Lake Eustis & chain of lakes. $45,900 Immaculate 2BR/1B apartment. Rent includes
MLS#351395 washer & dryer. $600.00 per mo MLS#357587



BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Large 2BR/2BA pool home on 1 acre. Original garage Commercial corner Hwy 44 & Gospel Island Road.
converted to living area. Detached 2 car garage. Across from the Hess station. $59,900
$84,900 MLS#356908 MLS#354972
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 ,
Email: royboss@tompaboy.rr.com www.allcitrusreolty.com AfterHours (3521302-6714 ""


L 1 CTIUS RIDGIE1 RE -


anda &Mirk Jonsl. Tom Ballour il Avrus & E Hia Sner At Paty
BROKERf/AASSOC. EALTOR REACTOR REALTORBROKER REACTOR


746-9000


0vvwctrs0etby Sa


1945 W. OLIVER 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 420 WASHINGTON 400 S. WASHINGTON 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 3 CLIFFORD
2/2/2 355628 $74,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900 2/2/2 $65,000 2/2/2 356626$62,500 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 2/2/2 355613 $57,900




0013 E BSS 521 N HARRION 78 S. LEE 27 S. FILLMORE 15 S. FILLMORE 4506 N. TUMBLEWEED 975W. CATBRIER LN.
3/2/2 357224 $5900 54900 22 356827 $59,00 3//1 35653 $53900 2/2 354359 $49,900 3/2 356299 $44,900 2//1 357440 $54,900




6715S. FRANKFURTER SHINTON 16 ADAMS 3755 N. ROSCOE 1 NEW NORTH CT. 45 MELBOURNE 7577 CROVEWouD LP
3/1.5/1 356952 $44,900 2/1 356448 $39,900 2/1 356532 $42,900 2/2 356615 $37,500 1/2 356609 $29,900 354341 $84,900 2/2 357588 $109,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY. BEVERLY HILLS FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


d Robert & Holly Jones AMERICAN -
M N 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
E R A hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com
IE R A 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 i .



SNEW LISTING N
e PRICED TO
p ?BUY AND WELL
SjN MAINTAINED!
So many uses for the 4th bedroom! Den, Hobby, Storage,
you name it! Stop in and see the Open Floor Plan, High -
SCeilings, Plant Shelving, Spacious Island Kitchen, Range,
Microwave, Dishwasher, Refrigerator, Pantry, Inside
SLaundry room, Breakfast Bar and more. Year 2006. Plenty
of room to entertain 3049 / 3670 Sq. Ft., Home also fea-
S* tures 3 bathrooms and a 2 car garage. There's more, the
S Owners are motivated! MLS #357672 352-287-5020
SDirections: Hwy 19 S. to Hwy 98 go East to Greenpark Blvd turn right to Grass St.
turn left to Geranium Dr turn left to 13 Geranium Ct. E, Homosassa, FL 34446
S I S I* I I S S* S S I S


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 E7













Keep our waters clean


Proper maintenance practices

with septic systems are essential

for protecting water sources


While "Save Our Wa-
ters Week" is cele-
brated each year in
Citrus County during the
third week in
September, there
are a number of
simple actions
everyone can
take all year long
to preserve and
protect our Cit- '
rus County wa-
ters. Although
special events Joan Br
are scheduled all FLOF
during the com-
ing week, "Save FRIEI
Our Waters LIVI
Week" is de-
signed to teach Citrus
County residents about
changes that can be made to
ensure our natural environ-
ment remains the corner-
stone for our future quality
of life.
The return of summer
showers has really helped
replenish much-needed
water flowing in lakes and
rivers in Citrus County fol-
lowing a number of years of
drought. You probably
haven't given it much
thought, but as rainwater
flows across our roads,
yards, parking lots, drive-
ways and other surfaces, it
picks up oil or grease, chem-
icals, fertilizers and pet
waste from gardens and
lawns. This cocktail of con-
taminated runoff flows into
neighboring water bodies
and can be harmful to
aquatic plants and animals,
making waters unsafe for
swimming and shellfish un-
safe to eat.
The real culprits are nu-
trients from fertilizer, pet
waste and onsite septic sys-
tems that can create an un-
balanced growth of algae


and bacteria in local waters,
stripping oxygen from the
water and resulting in fish
kills. Excess fertilizers may
also seep past the
root zone of
plants and into
the aquifer, our
drinking water
t source.
There is no
-doubt we all de-
pend on clean
water for sur-
adshaw vival. It is all the
IDA- more important
we take action to
NDLY mitigate potential
NG harmful practices
to ensure we pre-
serve the beauty and natu-
ral wonders of our area by
each citizen doing his or her
part.
Is your septic system out
of sight out of mind? If
you have a septic system, it
is most likely off your radar
screen and doesn't get your
attention until it fails to per-
form. Did you know that im-
properly maintained septic
systems can contaminate
ground water and surface
water with nutrients and
pathogens?
Let's take a closer look at
septic systems and what we
all can do to ensure they are
functioning properly to pre-
vent water pollution. Septic
systems are a type of on-site
sewage facility that require
proper maintenance in
order to protect our water
supply By following the rec-
ommendations listed below,
you can help ensure your
system continues to func-
tion properly, as well as sav-
ing you time and money
Your septic system
needs a checkup, too! In-
spect your septic system an-
nually and have it pumped


RALPH SKIKUS/Special to the Chronicle
The honorable mention Save Our Waters Week contest photo by Ralph Skikus of Citrus
Springs reveals the natural treasure of Crystal River's Three Sisters Springs.


out regularly Experts rec-
ommend pumping out every
three to five years for a
three-bedroom house with a
1,000-gallon tank; smaller
tanks should be pumped
more often. Never attempt
to open a septic tank your-
self. Gases and bacteria in it
are dangerous.
Divert rainwater away
from the septic drain field.
A soggy drain field won't ab-
sorb and neutralize liquid
waste. Plan landscaping,


roof gutters and foundation
drains so excess water is di-
verted away from the septic
drain field.
Keep trees away from
the septic system. Discour-
age root damage by keeping
trees at least 100 feet away
from the septic system.
Trees with very aggressive
roots, such as willows,
should be even farther away
from the system.
Protect the system from
damage. Do not drive over


the drain field, build a struc-
ture on top of it, or cover it
with concrete or asphalt. Do
plant grass on the drain field
to minimize soil erosion.
Avoid pouring heavy-duty
cleaners down the drain.
Overuse of heavy cleaners
kills beneficial bacteria in the
septic tank, so solids won't
break down as well.
Definitely don't pour
grease down the drain.
Grease can clog the septic
drain field, making it impos-


sible for soil to absorb liq-
uids. If that happens, you'll
need to have a new drain
field installed.
The toilet isn't a garbage
disposal. Never flush cat litter,
disposable diapers, sanitary
napkins, tampons, paper tow-
els, facial tissues, coffee
grounds or cigarette butts and
filters. They'll clog your septic
tank in less time than you
might imagine.
No need to add septic
system additives. There is
no scientific evidence that
biological and chemical ad-
ditives aid or accelerate de-
composition in septic tanks;
some additives can, in fact,
be detrimental to the septic
system or contaminate
groundwater
Never dispose of haz-
ardous chemicals down the
drain. Varnish, paint thin-
ners, motor oils, gasoline
and other similar chemicals
can ruin your system and
are a hazard to groundwater
Dispose of them properly
For more information
on water conservation or
pollution prevention, call
Citrus County Extension at
352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS'
knowledge, research and re-
sources to address youth,
family, community and agri-
cultural needs. All programs
and related activities spon-
sored for, or assisted by, the
Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences are open to all
persons without discrimina-
tion with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, dis-
ability, sex, sexual orienta-
tion, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or
affiliations, genetic informa-
tion and veteran status as
protected under the Vietnam
Era Veterans' Readjustment
Assistance Act


Dr Joan Bradsha w is
director of Citrus County
Extension.


E8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Top agents at
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker In-
vestors Realty would
like to congratulate the
each of the following Re-
altors for having sur-
passed $1 million in Debi Beltz
sales volume for 2012: Coldwell
Jeremy Lasseigne, Banker.
Debi Beltz, Gitta Barth,
and Rob Tessmer Jr.
These sales agents
have shown through their .
tireless efforts that they '
are among the best real .. -
estate professionals in all
of Citrus County, dedi-
cated to helping their Rob
customers with all of their Tessmer Jr
real estate needs. Reach Coldwell
them at the Coldwell Banker.
Banker office in Inverness
at 352-726-9533, or directly on their cell
phones: Jeremy Lasseigne, 352-586-9009;
Debi Beltz, 352-220-0005; Gitta Barth, 352-
220-0466; and Rob Tessmer Jr., 352-302-
0469.
New highs, new blood at
Top Performance


Top Performance
Real Estate Consult-
ants are pleased to con-
gratulate Kathy Apple of
Debbie Rector's Team
for achieving over $2.3
million in closings as of
Aug. 31.
This is a great
achievement and it is at-
tributed to Kathy's hard
work and dedication to
her clients. Kathy can be


Kathy
Apple
Top
Performance
Real Estate.


reached at 352-212-
0205.
Top Performance Real
Estate Consultants is .
also proud to welcome
Lee Wakefield to our
company. Lee has been
a successful Realtor for
more than a decade, as- Lee
sisting homeowners and Wakefield
buyers in residential and Top
business opportunity Performance
sales. Real Estate.
Lee can be reached at 352-228-0733.
Hartman
hits new
milestone
ERA American Re-
alty & Investments is
proud to announce the /
latest production level
achieved by an agent of
its Beverly Hills office for SHue
2012. Sue Hartman has ER eran
ERAAmerican
surpassed the $1 million Realty.
mark in closed sales vol-
ume in 2012.
ERAAmerican Realty is proud to recog-
nize the achievement of this fine real es-
tate professional. She can be reached at
the Beverly Hills office of ERAAmerican
Realty by calling 352-746-3600 or by email
at hartmans@tampabay.rr.com.

The Chronicle has forms avail-
able for wedding and engage-
ment announcements,
anniversaries, birth announce-
ments and first birthdays.


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
S For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$7 million already closed by August 31, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
iTo Learn More
ra (352) 746-9924

Norm Overfield
c Realtor"
Hometown 352-586-8620
Realty www.normoverfield.
352-564-0333 homesandland.com
6050 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,Crystal River, FL

FIVE LOTS, JUST LISTED.
I \From .60 acres to over
3 acres, all heavily
wooded for privacy.
Some wetland areas,
too. Rural with lots of
wildlife, yet close to Ocala and 1-75. Priced
from $7,500 to $19,900. Call Norm for
details at 352-586-8620


BEAUTIFUL SWEETWATER
RIDGEWOOD 2
3/2/2 golfcourse home. Close to the Country
Club. This home features upgrades &
beautiful golf course views. A must see.
Make an offer. $234,000
2 Pine St., Homosassa
Suaarmill Woods. MLS# 357518


eFC (32 38 g10


1


Cavalieri signs on
with EXIT Realty
Michelle Cavalieri recently joined EXIT
Realty Leaders in Beverly Hills.
EXIT Realty Leaders is at 5018 N.
Lecanto Highway in Beverly Hills. For more
information, call 352-527-1112 or visit
www.exitrealtyleaders.com.

DIGEST DEADLINES
Submit information for the Real
Estate Digest by 4 p.m. Thursday
for publication Sunday. News
notes are published as space is
available. Photos cannot be re-
turned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.


BEST VIEWS AT SOUTHERN WOODS!
* 3/2 custom Tradewinds built in 2007
* Beautiful landscaping detail with rock waterfall
* 11x27 lanai for outdoor entertaining
* Exterior repainted 2011/Dual Pane Windows
* Leaded beveled entry doors and sidelights
* Home warranty for the buyers
#354721 $199,700


CUSTOM 4-BEDROOM POOL HOME!
S4+office/3/3 with 2700 sq ft of living
* Set on 2 lots in South Oak Village
* Well for the yard security system
* Granite kitchen opens to family room
SHardwood flooring in office and dining room
SHome warranty for the buyers
#351467 $285,000


l21 EVELYN CURRENCY B
NATUECOST REALTOR"
835 NE US19,
crystal Rver, FL Cell: 352-634-1861
352-795-0021 evelyn.surrency@century21.com








39,00i
Very affordable and just waiting for you,
2 bedroom, 2 bath, split plan
D/W manufactured home.
Great front and back porch to enjoy and relax, Attached
two car carport, utility shed, all situated on a level 1 acre.
Located in a great neighborhood, paved roads. Shopping
and area amenities all within 10 minutes.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 E9

ASKING ONLY
$150,000!
ZONED COMMERCIAL
& QUALIFIES FOR _
MIXED USE ZONING -
AS COMMERCIAL!
RESIDENTIAL!
Cracker Style Building with .
Commercial Zoning. This
one has it all! The curb appeal, the interior charm, the high & dry
location, adjacent to Route 19 and with Post Office traffic pattern. This
property has many possibilities with its desirable CH Zoning. Building
has newer metal roof, beautiful wood floors, 4 offices, 2 full baths, plus
lobby and receptionist room with service window. Lower level has
kitchenette, 80 gal. hot water tank and washer/dryer hook up.
Alison Markham & Steven McClory
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-697-0761 cell 352-422-3998 3s27940888


s


S "Always There For You"
EAY GAlL COOPER
mEN multimillion Dollar Realtor
ERA Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindsprinq.com


I JS-eeVial" .I TIu @I I,.I. .resIJ aleo11. .


.








E10 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

ingredients don't seep out too fast
Wet the skin and if you want,
lightly lather with a body sham-
poo, soap or olive oil. Use the ny-
lons as a loofah and gently scrub
your skin. Afterward, apply a light
moisturizer." Along the same
lines, you can wad a section into a
ball and use as a little scouring
pad for cleaning.
Deodorize shoes: Pour some lit-
ter into a pair of socks or cut sec-
tions of hosiery Place the litter
"tubes" in your shoes to absorb
odors. This works well to keep
moisture away from camping gear,


such as tents and sleeping
bags, too.
Store onions: Drop an onion in,
tie a knot above it, drop another
onion in and repeat with a knot,
and so on. Then hang them. This
keeps them separated while al-
lowing plenty of air circulation.
One reader, H.M. From Michigan,
shares: "Garlic bulbs won't sprout
if tied up in pantyhose."
Mr. Grass Head: Make your own
mock Chia Pet. The only supplies
needed are a section of stocking,
grass seeds, potting soil, a baby
food jar and some wiggly eyes.
For directions, visit frugalvil
lage.com/2005/12/08/frugal-winter-
fun-with-kids.
Skimmer: Use a rubber band to
attach a piece of pantyhose over


the end of your vacuum, then go
over an area where you dropped a
small object. It will get picked up
without getting sucked into your
vacuum. Another reader, Darlene
from New York, shares: "My mom
used to make bug and leaf skim-
mers out of panty hose for our kid-
die pools. She'd take a wire coat
hanger and bend it into the shape
she wanted, then slip it into the
pantyhose and tie it."
Indoor tennis: Make a game by
stretching cut legs of stockings
over wire hangers bent into cir-
cles to make tennis rackets. Hit
balloons back and forth with your
homemade rackets.
Soap slivers: Place soap slivers
in a section of hosiery and attach
it to your bathroom faucet for


cleaning up, or hang it near your
outside faucet for washing up
after working in the garden.
Speaking of gardens, use a small
portion of pantyhose to line flow-
erpots so water can drain out but
dirt won't fall through the bottom,
or cut the legs into rubber-band-
like circles and use them to tie
garden plants to stakes. Another
reader, Sam from Ohio, shares: "At
our Girl Scout camp, they use
laundry detergent containers as
hand-washing stations. They put a
small bar of soap in a section of
panty hose and tie it onto a laun-
dry detergent pump jug."
Sachet: Add potpourri to a small
section of pantyhose. Tie it off and
place it in your closet or dresser.
Gift wrap: Use strips to tie your


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


wrapping paper so it doesn't un-
ravel while it's being stored. An-
other reader, Missy from
Colorado, adds: "You can put a
roll of wrapping paper in each leg
and hang them in the back of a
closet to keep the paper from get-
ting mangled throughout the
year"


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com),
a website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut St., Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


^*V Chronicle


To place an ad, call 563-5966


S-. Classifieds


Ini Print


and


Online


All


The Time


. Fax: (352)drW 5 6 1- Tol Free: (888 85-24 1, Email:^ I we ww croiceolie o


CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR.1BA.$495mo &
1BR.1BA.$475mo
Frdg,Stv,Watr-Trsh,Lrg
yard,Pets 352-587-2555
DUNNELLON
Hwy. 488, 2/1, Priv Lot
new A/C ,$475. + dep.
(352) 795-6970
HERNANDO
2/1, Small DW $450 mo
$450. dep. No pets
(352) 628-3912
HERNANDO
2/11, Furnished, Lrg.
Fm & Laun. Rm, Carport,
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550 mo & 2/2 $525
352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn or Non Furn.
9075 S. Breen Terr.
(352) 382-7396
HOMOSASSA
2/1/1/2, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
2/11/, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
HOMOSASSA
Unfurn. 2/2, DIb Car-
port, No pets. $650. Mo.
F./L/S. 352-613-4884
352-503-2405



BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807


-I


Oasis Mobile Home b5+
Park, Inverness. 14x60
Fully Furnished 2BR/2BA.
Near Bike Path. Roof
over, carport, screen
room, shed and remod-
elled kitchen & baths.
Parking for trailer or
boat. Excellent Shape.
$10,000. Lot rent
$205. Call
815 986 4510
or cell
779-221-4781
ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


HOMOSASSA
26X60; 2BR/2BA,
Screened rm, utility rm,
Dbl pane win, 3+ acres,
2 fenced in, roof over, 2
carports, 30X84 Pole
Barn, well &septic
(352) 628-0812
USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




INVERNESS
3/2, DW CHA, 3 sheds,
Dock Boat Access.
Section 8 Welcome.
813-244-0627


2BR-Log Cabin Decor
Off 486 -Den-FP-AC-Kit.
Bar 4 stall barn 24x24,
1/ end. w/AC, Approx.
1 Acre, fenced-well.
$53,500. Call Jackie
352-634-6340
Cridland Realestate

Crys. Riv. Area 2BR+Den
3 yr. New AC. Remod-
eled RV Hkup. $39,900
off US 19, Pool-fenced,
Jackie (352) 341-5297
Cridland Real Estate
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, $46,500.
Cash (352) 586-9498

HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925

HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit.
all appliances, carport.
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926


IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 2/2, 1988 Skylark
model, furnished, shed,
screened lanai & xtra-lIng,
covered carport on a Irg
lot. Lots of kitchen cabi-
nets with island stove top,
double oven, fridge,
washer, dryer. Lots of
storage. 352-344-1632
or 937-545-3413

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090


J.W MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT, LLC
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/1 Reduced....$700
2/2/2 ..............$650
2/1/1 Lawncare
Included.............$575
2/1 Screenroom...$550
2/2 Duplex
Tile Floors..........$600
2/1/1 Fenced
Backyard...........$625
2/2 Pritchard
Island Condo........$700

2/1/1 Bonus
Room..............$600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
R Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010


-ACJION-
fRENTAL MANAGEMENT"
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHomeRenlols.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
59 Tyler (H)........................ 550
2/1 nre size rooms, cozy FL room
942 N Orm Terr (CS) .......... 950
3/2/2 newer home 2000 sq ft
2440 W Nautilus D (CS)..............$750
3/2/1 cute home, corner lot
CRYSTAL RIVER
2561 N Senea P....................1200
2/2/1 carport.waterfront
DW mobile, furnished
1640 W ysh D .................$1300
2/2 Island condo, great water view, furnished
48 N Gulf Ave...... .. .....$750
3/1/1 fenced yard, close to elementary
HOMOSASSA
4140 Skylk Te......................$700
2/2 cute home, fenced back yard avald Oct 1 st
843o845.................REDUCED $685
2/2 newer duplex awn ndwater
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/LECANTO
1274 Cypess Cove C (In) ..........625
2/2 5 townhome, communnly pool
6315 N Shorewood Dr (He)...........$700
2/1 cute home, FL room, nlce yard
1933 Shnelle Path (L)...............$1300
3/2/2 Ind full memb pool, tennis, gym


Get Results
In The Hfomefronfr
Classifiecds!









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHASSAHOWITZKA
2 waterfront $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1.050.
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 House $600 mo.
AGENT (352) 382-1000



-I
CRYSTAL RIVER
I/BR $450. ,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
/Dryer, until. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice, clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-00121613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite. Clean.
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


EOU HOUSING
DIRECTIORTNITY


Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$56,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




HERNANDO
1,000 sf Office Space
486, Cit Hills 341-3300
HERNANDO
Over 2,200 sf, multi-rm
office or Home & office
on Hwy 200, for More Info
Call (352) 344-3444




CITRUS HILLS
2/2%, Carport, FURN.
(352) 613-5655




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like new 2/2 All Appl.
Wa/Dr, Tile.$625 Call
954-557-6211
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
water & garbage incl.
No pets, $550mo.
(352) 220-4818
INVERNESS
2/1/CP $550 mo. $250
sec. 707 Emory Street
(352) 895-0744 Cell




HERNANDO
1/1 Furnished, Clean
$100/wk. $400 sec $500
Moves ln.352-206-4913

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
cottages 1/1, All until.
incl. 386-208-2495




FLORAL CITY
Waterfront 2/1. Carport,
Ig. scmrn. por. shed.
office/ craft rm. $500
mo 352-344-1941


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Many Extras $450
(352) 382-3525
Citrus Springs
8354 Legacy 3/2/2 $850
(352) 464-2701

CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO
OWN
This is a real
cutie!
$649. Move-In Special
3Bed/1/2 Bath/garage
tiled, spotless, Pets ok.
352-527-0493

DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River &
Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st+ sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
3/2/Loft BR, Den $650.
$500 sec. No pets
(352) 519-6051
HOMOSASSA
Meadows 3/2/2
from $650.
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 Upgrades $750
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, Ist & Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-302-6633
INVERNESS
3/1, $575. mo, 1st, last
Sec. 352-476-1023

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
201-9427

INVERNESS
3/2/2, $725. mo.
(352) 302-7349
INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873
INVERNESS
Brick Home 2/1/1 w/tile
& wood fls. Encl. lanai,
W/D $650 mo. 1st, last
$400 dep. 352-586-8928
INVERNESS
Nice 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$700. (304) 444-9944
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2, Pristine Cond.,
Prestigious Fox Hollow
Adult community no
smoking, $750 mo.
(352) 794-3093
Sugarmill Woods
2 Master BR, Dbl
Garage, Remodeled,
S/SAppl. $850/Mo
352-302-4057


CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio, furn. on Hunter's
Springs, sun deck, W/D
rm. All util. incl.+ boat
dock. $700/mo. avail
10/1/12 352-372-0507

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




HOMOSASSA
Rent or Sale 2 BR,
Non smoker, $575 Avai
19/15/12,352-364-3601




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450. (352) 603-0611
HOMOSASSA
SMW
Bedrm. w/ roman bath &
jacuzzi, Non smoker, sin-
gle, use of pool. Full kit.
priv. (352) 503-7027
Call for offsite appt.




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


bi IAl b SALI: In Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
rate gated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com























Insurable Title
AUCTIONS



















I ,' Get The
FLORAL CITY
2 BR, 2 BA,










b Details AND
1942 PEN HOUSE:


un., SGet 29The 30,



Sat ISun,Sept29 130,
1:00-3:00pm
Nallc866-518-9065




Z 0 dOOw h D cn lu n ro'


Real Estate


Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


-S I l -I


HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660




6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,
AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
897-4164.
$159,900
1/1, FI. Rm. Tile
$27,900
Joseph (352) 382-3525
2/1/CP ALL NEW:
Kitchen, bath, appli-
ances, paint in/out,
carpet. 1180 sq ft liv,
$36,900.
(352) 527-1239






HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
2BR/1BA/1. Cute brick
fenced home. Newer
roof & CHA, scrn porch.
$49,500 Cash or ap-
proved conventional loan
only. Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940
REDUCED!
2/1/1 Block Home
with den, Fireplace,
tile floors, shed w/elec.
near Bealls $44,900.
(352) 344-4192




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

REMXC
REALTY ONE





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 Ell




Se l Lai YANKEETOWN
Gospel Island Location BR,2BA.OFFICE,
Lake front, spacious 1040 SQ.FT,EXTRA
3/2/2 $800. Rent or LOTVERY PRIVATE,
Sale (908) 322-6529 NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$65,000.CALL
(352)513-5001

^Watefrontf
i

MICHELE ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well. pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745



2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $25,500.
(727) 439-9106
'2 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact
fee credit, high and
dry, trees. $11,500 obo
(352) 795-3710




Wooded lot,
little more than
/2 acre, low to
moderate flood
zone, in established
residential deed
restricted community,
centrally located in
Citrus County, con-
venient to shopping.
Celina Hills
1st Addition of Citrus
Hills. Block B Lot 5.
2801 E. Marcia St..
Inverness FL.
PLEASE CONTACT
MARY C.
SCHLUMBERGER
AT CELL 352-212-7962
OR E-MAIL
mary@schlumberger
accounting.com









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY ACREAGE CG --. ,
PRICED TO SELL SER-V Y
4 1":i ,' ,,.., ,,l' .."' ,,,A... i,, .IRUS COu"s"
P. .J R...,J F...,.. rj,|...r.b ...r..j FO R OV E.R
O.FFRD :ubwab.:" RS.
OFFERED AT ONLY $25K 37 yE
Call Ehas G Knallah at 352400 263


1 ACRE HOME ON THE FOREST

61 1. lf. l I ..... I .... I ,= I., I. IC

PRICE REDUCED RECENTLY TO S85,000
Nancy Jenks 352 4008072
irrr l''sell/n ci/iuscountl'/lhomes.com


SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACRE
* If BA I1.:.i: .. i ,:,l.h,,

* L i ..i .iIII Ini. 1 .i Mil. 1
* l..l ll| M.j h h I ,:llf l,:lh l ll .1 .1 i ,:ll
in. ] 1.jl/ 1 19 Ol
Mli = ,7i 17 $279,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


2011 BETTER THAN NEW!
ALL TH I MP'ROVLtMtIS HAVt ti A L1LL0 fOR 1Ou'
IWALLtAh OOL1S SOUFH MOBIL' HOMl P'AkRI

S i.. 1 i.d.. .... .. i ....i 11h ..1. 1. i 1 ..d .........I
.. ..u ... I 1. .. .... 1 .. 1, I ...1
I,, hd, h, 1 i. ,I d.h,,h ..... i ,,, 1,1 ,,I ,, I -,, l',,, .i
I... I.d. I, ... ..... $89.000
4'.I N,! 0', -i,.,1 ...J.' J. '' ,, K. tj ttftS


... .. .... i,, ....... .... i,,,,, .... ...1 ,,,, ,


i 1, ,,I 1.. II ,, ,, I,,
i.... I,,,, I ,,, r1 ,..,,.i ,1 .,, ,, h h .. 1 I 5337.500 II I i.

hIell ill, lini 1 II I. I l Il. llli i ,..>m


SHOWS LIKE A MODEL
i I I i .ii I l ,: .ii l l ,i .il C

H j..... n 1..., ,: .,I .1h .j *,** ,* I
Mi = i I'.l ASKING $480,000
Call Jim Moiton at 422 2173 loi you
pirate tout ol this elegant home











CAMBRIDGE GREENS

* I ..\l i .1.d J cs 6, v,.ilI

Mt 5 = .7-i::. $145,000
Jeanne o Iil/laid Pickiel 352212 3410
Itirti CitrusCountflSold conm


WATERFRONT 3/2
FOR ONLY $58,500!!


H, Cili u. adi7. I es:eli I.l .. 699.. il.:li
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


sr IL


UIEVELY HILL3

Sh.l ..llm Ihlll I.... 111 11. h l
MI = .I Ji J $51,900
loaine 0 Regan 586 0075


I l ......l.Ml filh h. ...i h.i ,ll ..I
".h .l.V I n i N ... i 1_ lu ll l l N IN b .ilr .iln l
I_,h..i -, l. .l bl l I, Il .....'l l h..,l.,J _



Mi'L, -=:... '$92,000
Ask For Dons Miner ,-' 352344 15/5 cell/
352726 6668 Ollhcel


RIVERFRONT
.t ll,,,l .ll l.ll, l L hl I. i ,I, I,, il Ih jll:

.6. l ~lI i l' ... .L I .. II .,li II Pll i.1 11iII

= IIIIl ASKING $228,000
Pat Davis t352212 7280


IClB~jlliai@MaliR S T-& i-- I
SNOW BIRD SPECIAL

ssl l 1li 1 1l;ll I, llllh: Ii ii l li ill q g l
.ll hl 1; ..v I p .fh,; I j..v l h .l h.illl, l


$74,900
Ca// me!! Ruth Fiedencl 352 563 6866


~* ~, R 8 .iii. M H .... I .
* -I i h.):- p II. p l]; .I
. 0:,,, p,,l ,l ,:l l

Mii = : $109,000
Jeanne b Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'i'vr. citiuscountI'sold. corn


WINDERMERE VILLA

* I i l :..:.i I_, .: li ii
* I1.I.llllrll : .i l Al l f I. III
Mi = .,'i 1' AL.,,..IiII.,,lI $95,000
Jeanne b Wl/laid Pickiel 2123410
w I':'r'. ciliuscountI'sold. comn


.....I ...I '..- h1l ~ ,-. I'1 I ,,11 1.h 01 1 ,
", I, .l l, ...l ..l ....
IIIh- 'l'l,- I' o I,- II i, ,ii II I hll ,,,,,Vll I I hIII


Ml.- = 3..4. $109,00
Di IId Rul.r Cell 9dJ 393 88/6 1Oi 36 b?' '666








PRISTINE RANCH
..I .i.- .ll l l, l l l I-. . 1 1- l i I I 1 11I 1 1 .

Jl .I hi-H i li. lllinh, h.... %ll -l lh,- .lli. I i 11ii 1h-l lJ
I I ,' I :',I ', h- h i,- 1 1 I'


S1 1 1 1 1 ..1 1-, md 1.. 1 .
i 1 ti l- I- 11h- I I h i h II

MI ', = '.I. $375.000
Call Jim Morion at 4222/173
to see Ihis catlleman s dream


FIND ON THE FIRST FLOOR!
I, ,f _in _l l l l hi I mii i,:,l l i u II, ,l I,. l ... I, l..i



Mti =.:at.h $49,900
Mainln Booth 6374904


CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME
M R b .,ill .1. .. I,..,.
* I .Ih ...l I .il ,,Ijl .
* I IR FR .ind ilJ....I
C a....I h aSl R. e| j3I 2 .1,2. .
l-I = i -., II $214,900
Call Charles Hell/ 352 422 2387


SPACIOUS 3/2/2



,:l i,,.i h. llv' ,li ,: l I ,: l ,ld I .l L h T
wy .1 1 .1 I'll.q ipn 1, ; If ni



HIl:ll I_-1.F, AT I:,ll' Ml = .:' I, ll :
Hij' I


Pat Davis 13522122 7280
V/eir hstinmg:. i'I. c2l1aldavis. com


RIVERFRONT CABIN!
,l.I..II h: :iii -* -* n i: Ih l.j..]. ".11 411 .1 1, i. I.:.I
1, 1 /h i I ...m .: 1 v... .fl I I n c... ,l..
Ni'. I.1. 5 ... III l:l.i .Ii ,:l l ... ill IIIII ,.il .l' .l s l I.:
. I I I *, I I, l l *I. ... .ilU I I,:.1I
ONLY $89,900
Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BANK OWNED SHOPPING CENTER
PRICE TO SELL!

.J .l ,F bl. li. "I:II: I I I I



OFFERED AT ONLY $262.000
Call Ehas G Knallah at 352 400 2635


E12 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012