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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02889
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 09-15-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02889

Full Text


On the rise: Stocks increase for second day/A7


I"I I


Partly sunny with a
50 percent chance of
showers and storms.
PAGE A4


CITRIU-S CO U N T Y





HI NNICLeonine
www.chronicleonline.com


SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 39


Prescribed burn
cause of smoke
The Florida Forest
Service conducted a
1,000-acre prescribed
burn in the Citrus tract of
the Withlacoochee State
Forest near Inverness on
Friday, an official with the
service said.
Smoke from the burn
was seen across much of
Citrus County as the fire
eliminated built-up under-
brush and other natural
fuels that can burn out of
control as a result of a
lightning strike or some
other fire-starting mecha-
nism. Officials expected
the fire to be out by late
afternoon Friday.
From staff reports

WORLD:
I _00


Sanctuary
New Zealand, U.S. at
odds over place for
Antarctic marine ./
Page A5


WORLD:


STE


T


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Sue Heglund, household hazardous waste technician at the Citrus County Landfill, categorizes buckets of paint Thursday morning at the house-
hold hazardous materials collection point. The site is open for household hazardous waste such as paint, oil and other toxic fluids three days a
week. The process helps keep the toxins out of the landfill.


Citrus County program safely disposes

ofhazardous material almost daily


Locally discovered meth labs find

home at Citrus County dump


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Turning people away when
they have a truckload of
household hazardous
waste products would be hard
on the user-friendly image of the
Citrus County Landfill.
"We've gone from collecting
chemicals three days a week to
six days a week, and that's dur-
ing working hours," said Casey
Stephens, director of the Divi-
sion of Solid Waste Management.
It's a select list of chemicals,
Stephens clarified, but the idea
is to get more materials into
proper disposal and recycling
and keep them out of the landfill
and natural environment.
"The true program is from 9 to
1 Tuesday, Thursday and Fri-
day," Programs Manager Randy
Messer said. "What was happen-
ing was you'd have a customer
come who'd have three gallons
of latex paint. We don't like to
tell them to come back during
the program, because they've got
to load it up and bring it back."
Stephens said it happened often


There is
another that
would prevent you
from going out and
throwing your
hazardous waste in
your garbage
can.
Randy Messer
Solid Waste Management Programs
manager.
Inconvenience
"We'd have to say, oh, it's
Wednesday You can't leave that
here," he said. "What kind of
service is that? We're not helping
ourselves. We're not helping the
environment. We're not helping
the citizens of Citrus County."
Messer gave an example: "If a
family had someone that passed,
the family flies in and cleans out
See Page A2


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
The toxic cauldron which ends up
becoming methamphetamines, or
meth, can leave a noxious aftertaste.
Besides the human cost to health
and well-being, if the lab blows up,
meth production has been known to
cost taxpayers thousands of dollars
to clean up after an arrest by law
enforcement. But, since Congress
cut a grant program to the Drug En-
forcement Agency (DEA) which
paid for clean-up costs in early 2011
- Citrus County Sheriff's Office en-
tered into an arrangement which
has slashed the cost of the
cleanup.
The collaborative deal among law
enforcement, the fire service and
Solid Waste allows CCSO to reduce
the cost and now pay an average of
$30 to $50 per lab to clean up, Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office Detective
Steve Smith said. Before the
arrangement and DEA grant cuts,
clean-up costs were between
$2,000 and $4,000 per lab.


Under the DEAgrant, private
companies were paid to clean up
meth labs. With clean-up costs re-
verting to the various local agencies,
the county handles clean-up, trans-
portation and disposal of the meth
lab in-house. Smith said five certi-
fied sheriff's office personnel gather
the noxious ingredients from the
meth site. Then the fire service,
which is always present on any lab
scene, transports it to the dump for
proper disposal.
Solid Waste Management director
Casey Stephens said it was not diffi-
cult for the dump to accept and dis-
pose of meth lab materials.
"Most of the ingredients they use
in the production of meth are also
common household items we were
already accepting here," he said.
Common items used for meth
production include tubing, unmarked
Mason jars with tubes attached,
stained coffee filters, 2-liter soda
bottles, blenders, camera batteries,
wooden matches, propane cylinders
See /Page A2


Florida a battleground for candidates


Take a stand
Singer-songwriter Brandi
Carlile is standing up for
gay rights by marrying
her partner Saturday./
Page B6


Com ics .......... C9
Community .......C7
Crossword ....... .C8
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ... B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C9
Obituaries ........ A5
Classifieds ....... C10
TV Listings .......C8


6 84115781 2011U02! II


Obama edges

out Romney at

the moment

Associated Press
APOPKA President
Barack Obama and Repub-
lican Mitt Romney have this
in common when it comes
to Florida: They're both
worried about the biggest
election battleground prize.
The president has an
edge here, but Democrats
fear the advantage may be
fleeting and fret about
Florida's undecided voters.
They're also nervous about
legal battles over state voter
laws that could cut into
Obama's support among
minorities.
Republicans are con-
cerned Romney hasn't


Battleground Florida
The vote-rich Sunshine State is a
hotly contested swing state in the
2012 presidential race.

General election winners,
by margin of victory
2008 Obama 2.8%
2004 Bush0
2000 Bush I0.0*
Unemployment rate
Seasonally adjusted, July 2012
Florida 8.8%


Budget cuts could wreak havoc

on Pentagon and election


Populati
Electoral

Racial
White:
57.5%


*Bush won by 537 votes after a recount and Suprem


SOURCES: Department of Labor; Census Bureau
closed the deal in a state and tin
hampered by joblessness The
and home foreclosures, critical
even though he's cast him- With
self as the economic fixer ward tl
and, along with his allies,
has spent significant money


nme
s
l f
h
he


Associated Press
ion: 19.1 million
al votes: 29 WASHINGTON A
White House report issued
breakdown,2010 Friday warns $109 billion in
across-the-board spending
1 ..:.- ....ispanic cuts at the start of the new
year would be "deeply de-
structive" to the military
Elack: and core government re-
''';5% sponsibilities like pa-
trolling U.S. borders and air
Other: traffic control.
3.1% The report said the auto-
le Court challenge. matic cuts, mandated by the
AP failure of last year's congres-
sional deficit "supercommit-
e here. tee" to strike a budget deal,
;tate is especially would require an across-the-
'or Romney board cut of 9 percent to
lis paths limited to- most Pentagon programs
S270 electoral votes and 8 percent in many do-
mestic programs. The
See Page A4 process of automatic cuts is


called sequestration, and the
administration has no flexi-
bility in how to distribute the
cuts, other than to exempt
military personnel and war-
fighting accounts.
"Sequestration would be
deeply destructive to na-
tional security, domestic in-
vestments and core
government functions," the
report said.
The cuts, combined with
the expiration of Bush-era
tax cuts at the end of the
year, have been dubbed the
"fiscal cliff." Economists
warn the one-two punch
could drive the economy
back into recession.
The across-the-board cuts
were devised as part of last


Page A4


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
72


CHE ii4LET

SEE PAGES C14 & C15



1fQIA i


Targeted
U.S.embassies in the
Middle East still under
attack./Page A10


SPORTS:



(I


Friday night
football
Citrus, Lecanto, Seven
Rivers all in action./
Page B1

ENTERTAINMENT:





A2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012



Bronson


considers


selling


its water

Otter Creek

seeks to buy

108,000gallons

MARK SCOHIER
Chiefland Citizen

Some say Bronson has
the best water in the state.
And Otter Creek, just a
dozen or so miles west
with its own water supply
tainted, wants its neighbor
to share.
Joe Mittauer of the engi-
neering firm Mittauer and
Associates Inc. addressed
the Bronson council Mon-
day night about a plan
Otter Creek is proposing
that involves piping up to
108,000 gallons of water
per day from Bronson's
pristine water supply.
"They've got a very seri-
ous water quality issue,"
Mittauer said, explaining
Otter Creek is "basically
pulling from a swamp."
Organic matter in the
water has to be treated
with chlorine, which
sometimes has the nega-
tive effect of creating a
byproduct known as tri-
halomethanes, a cancer-
causing chemical.
Mittauer said levels of the
toxin at Otter Creek are
sometimes twice the al-
lowed standard.
To solve the issue, the
town is tossing around sev-
eral ideas, Mittauer said.
Installing a 12-mile pipe
and pumping water from
Bronson is one of the more
costly about $2 million
-options, initially, he said.
But, in the long run, it
works out better for them.
"Option one (pumping
from Bronson) is actually
the most expensive to
build," Mittauer said, "but
it's the least expensive to
run."
Bronson could make
money off the deal by
charging for the water,
Mittauer said.
But Bronson Council
members have doubts.
Council members Berlon
Weeks and Jason Kennedy
said they don't like the
idea of Otter Creek asking
for 108,000 gallons per day
when it only uses an aver-
age of 12,600 gallons per
day. Bronson is permitted
about 800,000 gpd. The av-
erage water amount Otter
Creek would use is about
14 percent of Bronson's
water, Mittauer said.
"They can sell that
water to whoever they
want to, as long as they
don't go past the 108, 000,"
Weeks said. "Well, that
limits what we can do."
Weeks said it may open
a door for developers to
use up to the permitted
amount, which could af-
fect Bronson's future
development.
People have tried to de-
velop Otter Creek before,
he said.
"But it's got filthy
water," Weeks said.
That might change if all
of a sudden it had the "sec-
ond best" water in the
state.
"I don't mind helping
our neighbors in need,"
Kennedy said, "but why
give them three to four
times what they need?"
Kennedy also said the
council needed to see
more data before it de-
cided the matter.
Mayor Beatrice Roberts,
agreeing with Weeks on an


earlier point, said she was
scared the town would
lose its water control. She
also asked if Otter Creek
would let Bronson have
part ownership of the
pipeline.
Mittauer representative
Greg Lang said the issue
could be negotiated and
spelled out in the agree-
ment, but added Otter
Creek would purchase the
water, pipeline and stor-
age facility.
Roberts said the council
would form a committee to
discuss the matter, which
is expected to be brought
before the council at a
later date.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Delivery times rise for iPhone 5
NEW YORK Delivery times climbed quickly as
Apple Inc. started taking orders for the iPhone 5 on
Friday, suggesting strong demand.
Apple began taking orders for the phone at 12 a.m.


WASTE
Continued from Page Al

the garage and they come on a
Wednesday Oh sorry 'But we're
flying out tomorrow"'
Disposing of items
According to the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency regula-
tions, household hazardous waste
is exempt from disposal regula-
tions that apply to businesses,
Messer said.
"There is nothing that would pre-
vent you from going out and throw-
ing your hazardous waste in your
garbage can," Messer said.
Stephens said his division's goal
is to keep problematic materials
out of the landfill and disposed of
them properly
The three-day program was es-
tablished several years ago, be-
cause the landfill could not justify
staffing the hazardous waste area
during idle times. After all, the
landfill is operated through an en-
terprise fund. Its revenue is pro-
vided through user fees charged at
the landfill, a $25-per-year assess-
ment on each county residential
unit and a fee to businesses.
During program hours, each res-
ident in a vehicle can dispose of 10
gallons or 60 pounds of material
per day for free. Any resident who
wants to dispose of more than the
limit can put another person in the
truck.
"The haz-waste staff is also
tasked with SQG inspections,"
Messer said.
SQG means small-quantity gen-
erator, which are county busi-
nesses that use listed materials.
Inspections are required by the
Florida Department of the Envi-
ronment (FDEP). In addition to
those inspections, haz-waste staff
spends a great deal of time identi-
fying, labeling and storing materi-
als and keeping up with
paperwork.
Defining waste
Stephens set up a list of materi-
als the landfill will accept six days
a week. With other materials, such
as poisons, residents are encour-
aged to deliver them during pro-
gram hours.
Defining what constitutes haz-
ardous waste, Messer said: "We
take pretty much everything."
Pesticides, herbicides, flamma-
bles, corrosives, fuel. These mate-
rials can be purchased at the
supermarket or hardware store
and are kept under the sink and in
the garage or shed. If a resident has



DUMP
Continued from Page Al

and hot plates. Some of the chemi-
cal brew includes gasoline addi-
tives/rubbing alcohol, ether
(starting fluid), paint thinner,
Freon, Red Devil Lye, drain
cleaner, battery acid, Ephedrine
and camping stove fuel.


Nation BRIEF
Pacific time. It initially promised delivery by next Fri-
day, when the new phone also goes on sale in stores.
Four hours later, the expected delivery time had
grown to two weeks, according to Topeka Capital
Markets analyst Brian White.
White said the quick rise in the expected delivery


MATERIALS COLLECTED SIX DAYS A WEE


0 Motor oil, oil filters.
0 Anti-freeze: automotive or RV.
0 Batteries: lead acid, button or rechargeable.
0 Fluorescent bulbs and compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs.
0 Mercury switch, thermostat or thermometer.
0 Electronic devices, circuit boards, scrap metal.
0 Propane tanks, extinguishers, refrigerators, A/C units.
0 Printer ink cartridges and toner cartridges.
For a list of materials accepted from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Th
and Fridays, visit bocc.citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm/householddropoff
Materials also will be accepted from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct
Email hazwasteinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us or call 352-527-7670.


a surplus, landfill staff will recycle
or dispose it.
Recycling paint
One material useful to the land-
fill is liquid latex paint.
"We actually reuse that," Messer
said. "We have what they call an
ADC alternative daily cover -
machine that has some product
mixed into a water tank and a
water cannon on it. At the end of
the day, they pull that around the
landfill. It shoots a water stream on
top of the garbage. That's our cover
for the day We take a 55-gallon
drum of latex paint and put it in
with that mix, as per the FDEP, to
color the mixture to make sure
we're getting good coverage on the
waste."
Spraying the paint mixture over
the landfill is an acceptable substi-
tute for a six-inch cover of dirt. A
daily dose of dirt would fill the
landfill faster than ADC. Stephens
explained the landfill can go an-
other 40 feet above its current level.
Not only does the ADC machine
save space, it is cheaper than dirt
coverage.
The division also saved money by
no longer having to pay a company
to take away the latex paint, which
paid for the ADC machine in about
a year and a half.
Stephens said the focus is on
solid waste, meaning he tries to
keep liquids out of the landfill.
Latex paint in a garbage bag de-
feats that purpose. Stephens would
prefer the paint to be dried out, if
it's not going to arrive at the landfill
through the program.
Bulking liquids
All materials collected are char-
acterized and organized into
containtment-specific areas where
they will be bulked together for re-
cycling or disposal.
Bulking the materials saves
money when shipping it out, so all
similar liquids, such as cooking oil,
for example, would be poured into
one large container. If kept in orig-


"It is truly a partnership be-
tween the sheriff's office, Solid
Waste and the fire service and it
saves the taxpayers a lot of money,"
Smith said.
Congress, however, has since re-
stored funding for cleanup and
the DEA is placing containers at
various locations across the state
to collect the chemicals.
The cost-cutting program has
also enabled the sheriff's office to


Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-Ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


B.K. Patel, M.D.
Internal Medicine


H. Khan, M.D.
Board Certified Family Pactice


Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals




Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
308 S. Line Ave.
Inverness
(352) 344-5511


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


inal, small, partly filled (
these separate items
packed in a drum and s
by a benign substance su
litter. It costs more and
unwanted material.
In the case of bulked c
it has many recyclable u
livestock feed additive
biodiesel fuel. Although]
sion pays to remove ma
als, it can sell cooking
batteries.
"The more we can do
terize and containerize
here on site, the more
us," Stephens said.
Sorting proce
The sorting starts wit
the scale house to declare
of materials being deliv
Next is a visit to th
service area. A resident
items such as electron
metal, furniture, anti-fr
recent bulbs, car batter
oil and tires.
"It wouldn't be unusi
people to drive through
day," Messer said.
Saturday can draw a
500 people.
A resident with paint
combustibles or corrosi
be directed to the hazar
site, where Dan Sherloc
staff who handles mater
"We take what they he
lock said. "If they don't
they have, we still take i
want it dumped some
nice when you get an id
it is, but we get a lot of
from when grandma pa
and they've cleaned
property."
Hazardous ai
In this area, the fluore
crusher sucks down the
a big vacuum cleaner. It
the mercury dust that gc
posal. Pesticides are b
sent to a company in Te:
posal. A paper trail ch;

aggressively pursue m
facturers in the county, c
rus County to lead th
meth lab seizures with 2
beginning of the year, Si
"It is not like it is beca
eaten up with meth in t
it is because we are mo
sive about going after tl
Smith said, "and becau
blessed to have a sheriff
it is important to go afte


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time suggested much stronger demand than Apple
expected. Last year, one-week delivery of the iPhone
4S was available into the afternoon of the first order
day.
"Clearly, iPhone 5 fever is in full swing," White said.
From wire report


R tody follows materials to insure
proper disposal.
A large cart holds paint cans that
will get opened and emptied. With
aerosol paint cans, a device han-
dles each can to puncture and
drain it safely
The hazardous waste area con-
sists of small buildings, one that is
an office with a computer and In-
ternet access for materials re-
lursdays search. Shelves also are lined with
items.pdf a library of information about ma-
. 27. trials and regulations.
Other buildings look like back-
yard sheds, except they are neat to
the point of being finicky These are
containers, lockers where materials are organ-
would be ized, labeled and color coded as
surrounded flammables, corrosives, acids, al-
ich as kitty kalines, oxidizers and other haz-
moves less ardous designations. Whatever the
substance, if it is leaking, it gets
cooking oil, placed in secondary containment.
ses, from a "We check the pH," Stephens
to making said. "We only mix acids with acids,
h the divi- bases with bases. That way we
ny materi- know when we bulk them that it's
oil and car correct. We're not bulking incom-
patible materials that would cause
to charac- an issue."
materials These materials are stored until
savings to a volume is built to justify removal
by a disposal company
ess Monitoring staff
h a stop at Sherlock and other staff mem-
*e the types bers who work in this are wear cov-
ered. eralls, masks and gloves when
e citizens' combining the toxic substances.
can unload "They get a yearly physical that
lics, scrap does a lot of blood work," Messer
-eeze, fluo- said.
ries, motor "It's called medical monitoring,"
Stephens said. "That way, we know
ual for 300 whether they have been exposed to
4 here in a any chemicals and then they can
deal with any medical issues that
as many as might develop from it."
Stephens knows the monitoring
s, poisons, works because his own exposure to
lives would a herbicide while he was employed
dous waste in Ohio showed up on a blood test.
k is among Staff members also go through
ials. extensive training with continuing
ave," Sher- education every two years to keep
know what their certification. They learn how
it. We don't to store the different chemicals.
where. It's They are members of the North
ea of what American Hazardous Materials
stuff here Management Association (NAH-
issed away MMA), a professional organization
out her dedicated to pollution prevention
and reducing the hazardous mate-
rials at the landfill.
rea "Anything you have in your house
scent bulb that you don't want to go into the
tubes like water table, you bring it to us,"
catches all Sherlock said.
oes for dis- Chronicle reporter Chris Van
ulked and Ormer can be reached at
xas for dis- cvanormer@chronicleonline.com
ain of cus- or 352-564-2916.

eth manu- Smith, who is one of the leading
ausingCit- meth crime investigators for the
e state in agency, said other law enforcement
6 since the agencies have been hamstrung by
smith said. the DEA cleanup cuts. He said a lot
use we are of agencies are not as assiduous as
his county, CCSO about reporting meth lab
)re aggres- seizures to the DEA, which collects
these labs," the data.
ise we are Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe
who thinks can be reached at 352-564-2925 or
r them." asidibe@chronicleonline. com.


LOCAL


ICHl a SA







Page A3 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County

Dixon to speak at
Republican club
Dr. Bill Dixon will be the
guest speaker at the North
Suncoast Republican Club at
9 a.m. today at Sugarmill
Country Club in Homosassa.
For information, visit
www.NSRC-gop.com or call
Bill Connery at 352-382-0811
or Bruce Bryn at 352-
503-7375.
Port authority to set
scope of work
Citrus County Port Author-
ity representatives will meet
Monday to establish the
scope of work with Martin As-
sociates, the consultant hired
to conduct a feasibility study.
The meeting is at 9 a.m. at
the Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto. It is open to
the public, but input will not
be taken since it is not a
board meeting.
For information, call Lind-
say Ubinas, public informa-
tion officer, at 352-527-5484.
CUB needs food
to replenish shelves
Citrus United Basket
(CUB) is in immediate need
of food and monetary
donations.
"Our shelves are bare,"
said Deborah Rossfeld,
executive director, in a news
release.
Needed food items include
nonperishable canned meats,
macaroni, cereal, macaroni
and cheese, Tuna Helper,
canned vegetables and
canned fruit.
Items may be dropped off
at 103 Mill Ave., Inverness,
during regular business hours
Monday to Thursday.
Donations may be mailed
to P.O. Box 2094, Inverness,
FL 34451.
CUB is a registered non-
profit organization that pro-
vides food, financial and
material assistance in emer-
gency cases to citizens of
Citrus County.

Miami

DEA halts distribution
at Walgreens center
The U.S. Drug Enforce-
ment Administration has
halted distribution of con-
trolled substances such as
oxycodone painkillers at a
Walgreens Corp.
The DEA on Friday issued
an immediate suspension
order for the Walgreens cen-
ter in Jupiter. Officials said
since 2009 it has distributed
the most oxycodone in
Florida. The DEA said Wal-
greens has not had effective
controls on diversion of po-
tentially dangerous prescrip-
tion drugs at the Jupiter
facility.
A hearing will take place
on whether Walgreens' DEA
registration for Jupiter
should be revoked. Wal-
greens said it has taken
steps to improve monitoring
and reporting on controlled
substances.
The move is part of a
crackdown on illicit sale and
abuse of highly addictive pre-
scription drugs. Earlier this
week the DEA banned sales
of such drugs at two Florida
CVS stores.

Tallahassee

Unions sue over
health care change
Two Florida unions are
suing after lawmakers de-
cided to move ahead with a
plan to privatize nearly 3,000
jobs in the state's prisons.
The American Federation
of State, County and Munici-
pal Employees and a union
that represents health care


workers filed a suit Friday to
block the state's plan. A leg-
islative panel on Wednesday
approved a proposal by Gov.
Rick Scott to spend nearly
$58 million to privatize prison
health care operations by
January.
-From staff and wire reports


Gov. sends letters to students


Scott gives advice

about education

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov.
Rick Scott, who has been shifting
his attention to education during
his second year in office, is reach-
ing out to tens of thousands of
teachers, high school seniors and
incoming college students across
the state.
In what may be a first for a sitting
governor, Scott this month asked
school districts, community colleges
and universities to send out letters
penned by the governor
Scott, who made headlines when
he questioned the need for more
anthropology majors in the state's
universities, warns students the
world is rapidly changing and they
need to focus on education that will


help them get a job.
He mentions his
own background -
including that he
S spent time living in
public housing -
and suggests stu-
dents either work
Rick Scott or take an intern-
cautio ship while in
students about school. He cautions
college debt. college freshmen
about "taking on
debt."
"I focused my education in the
areas where I believed I could se-
cure a job paying well enough for
me to build a family," said Scott,
who was a lawyer before he helped
start the giant health care chain
Columbia/HCA.
In his letter to teachers, Scott said
he wants them to know "we have lis-
tened to Florida's educators who
are concerned about 'teaching to
the test."'
Scott recently had questioned the


state's emphasis on its use of high-
stakes testing, but has not yet of-
fered any alternatives. The state is
already transitioning to a new ver-
sion of the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test and the use of end-
of-course exams.
The governor also thanked teach-
ers for their time, dedication and
"selfless practice of teaching."
Scott's move to send out the let-
ters is coming at the same time he
has been on a weeklong "education
listening tour" around the state.
Scott is scheduled to wrap up the
tour with a dinner at the governor's
mansion with representatives of the
Florida Education Association. The
union has been at odds so far with
several of Scott's policies since he
became governor
Scott has battled low poll num-
bers since he came into office
nearly two years ago, some of which
has been blamed on his decision to
back major budget cuts to educa-
tion his first year Scott earlier this


year proposed restoring $1 billion
in education funding, although the
amount did not cover what was cut
in 2011.
Rod Smith, chairman of the
Florida Democratic Party, noting
the budget cuts, questioned Scott's
commitment to education.
"Gov. Scott's empty rhetoric and
closed-door listening tour does not
erase his party's failure to support
our education system," Smith said.
Melissa Sellers, a spokeswoman
for Scott, said the governor sent out
the letters to "start the conversation
about how to strengthen the educa-
tion system."
The Scott administration sent the
letters out last week, but not all
school districts have distributed
them. A spokesman for Hillsbor-
ough County schools said the letters
will be distributed at a time when it
will not overwhelm the email sys-
tem. Stephen Hegarty said the dis-
trict would likely send teachers a
link to the letter


Picture-perfect day


\


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Light breezes and partly-cloudy skies Friday make for perfect conditions for outdoor activities across Citrus County. The weather trend for the
next two days is forecast to be similar, with highs in the low 90s and less than a 50 percent chance of rain. Monday and Tuesday rain chances
increase to 70 percent, according to Bay News 9 and highs will be a few degrees cooler. Overnight temperatures are forecast to remain in the
mid-70s over the next several days.


Marion County man


charged in double murder


JIM CLARK
South Marion Citizen

A 22-year-old Marion
Oaks man is in the Marion
County Jail, charged with
two counts of felony mur-
der and various other
charges.
According to reports from
the Marion County Sheriff's
Office, Azael Angel Stevens,
of 15670 S.W 19th Ave. Road,
is accused of shooting and
killinghis grandmother and
great-grandmother on
Sept 9.
The victims were identi-
fied as Yolanda E. Fruto, 70,
and Faustina M. Bontteg,
93, who were killed at the
same address.


According to the report,
another woman, who was
at the house, and her 8-
year-old son went to a
house next door to ask for
help. The woman had ap-
parently been shot in the
face.
Because of the language
barrier with the adults, the
boy had to describe what
happened.
The report said Stevens
demanded car keys from
the boy's mother, then shot
her in the face. At some
point, he allegedly killed
the other two women.
He then left the area.
But, based on the informa-
tion they had, deputies
were looking for the car.


Stevens was stopped in the
1700 block of Southwest
27th Avenue and
arrested.
The two women were
pronounced dead at the
scene. The other victim was
taken to the hospital.
Stevens was charged
with two counts of felony
murder, one count of at-
tempted felony murder,
robbery, grand theft auto
and driving while license
suspended or revoked.
According to jail records,
Stevens has been arrested
several times since 2006 for
charges such as robbery,
carjacking and possession
and distribution of
marijuana.


Levy County emergency director


to perform on 'Letterman' show


Special to the Chronicle

Levy County Emergency
Management Director Mark
Johnson, also a musician, is
the third annual recipient of
the Steve Martin Prize for
Excellence in Banjo and
Bluegrass.
Along with the plaque,
Johnson received a $50,000
check, a sculpture by artist
Eric Fischi. He also will per-
form with Martin on the
"Late Show with David Let-
terman" on Sept. 24. The


award is bestowed by the
Steve Martin Foundation.
Martin, best known as a
comedian, is an award-win-
ning bluegrass musician and
plays a Deering Clawgrass
Banjo named after John-
son's style of bluegrass.
Johnson, who records
with Emory Lester, a man-
dolin and guitar player, has
championed the Clawgrass
style of banjo play.
Johnson said he was
stunned to receive the
award. He was at home ear-


lier this week when the
FedEx truck pulled in to de-
liver the package containing
the award.
Johnson, who is in his
busy season as emergency
management director, said
he is worried about leaving
the county for a few days to
rehearse and perform with
Martin on the Letterman
show.
But it is an opportunity to
spread the Levy County
name on a popular TV
program, he said.


DCF scuttles


controversial change


The News Service
of Florida
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Department of Chil-
dren and Families on Friday
scrapped a controversial
change that would have
halted public-assistance
benefits for people whose
mail is returned to the
agency as undeliverable.
DCF will go back to its for-
mer policy of allowing those
people to continue receiv-
ing benefits until they need
to reapply for assistance,
agency spokesman Joe Fol-
lick said. The change took
effect Sept. 1, but Follick
said it had not caused any-
one to lose benefits.
"We remain committed to
pursuing the most efficient
process of ensuring that
qualified Floridians receive
the short-term assistance
they need," Follick said in a
prepared statement. "Many
of our partners around the
state had expressed con-
cerns about unintended
consequences, and we will
continue to work with them
toward improving our sys-
tem and reducing the
amount of 'undeliverable'
mail that is returned to our
offices."
The Sept. 1 change
stemmed from concerns
people were not reporting
new addresses. DCF said
that could lead, for exam-
ple, to people receiving ben-
efits from Florida after
moving to other states.


Follick also said the federal
government, which provides
money for public- assistance
programs, requires benefi-
ciaries to report correct
addresses.
But the change drew ob-
jections from groups such as
Florida Legal Services,
which represents low-
income residents and ar-
gued benefits could be un-
necessarily cut off for
people who qualified for as-
sistance but had to move.
The issue even drew inter-
est from groups such as
health plans, which provide
coverage to low-income
people in the Medicaid
program.
The change would have
applied to the state's food-
assistance program, com-
monly known in the past as
food stamps, Medicaid and a
program that provides tem-
porary cash assistance to
families.
A few days before the
Sept. 1 change took effect,
DCF sent a memo to pro-
gram offices and managers
spelling out requirements
for people reporting ad-
dress changes and said if
"the post office returns mail
as undeliverable, take ap-
propriate action to end the
benefits." It also indicated
how people could get bene-
fits reinstated, with new ap-
plications required in at
least some cases.
But the agency sent an-
other memo to staff Friday
rescinding that decision.


I






A4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012



FLORIDA
Continued from Page Al

needed to win the White
House, Romney's chances
are far more difficult if he
doesn't claim Florida's
enormous cache of 29. That
explains why he's starting to
pour even more money into
television commercials here
now that he has access to
general election funds. Both
campaigns expect Republi-
cans to outspend Democrats
on the airwaves in the final
weeks of the race in a state
that already has seen each
side spend roughly $60 mil-
lion on TV and radio ads.
The situation in Florida -
and the campaigns' anxieties
about it-reflects the overall
state of the presidential race.
A new smattering of polls
shows Obama ahead by sev-
eral percentage points in key
states including Florida, Ohio
and Virginia, as well as na-
tionally The clock is ticking
toward November, Obama
clearly has momentum on his
side and Romney faces dwin-
dling opportunities to change
the race's trajectory
Without Florida, Romney
would have to win all of the
states that are leaning his
way, as well as all of the oth-



BUDGET
Continued from Page Al

summer's budget and debt
deal between President
Barack Obama and Capitol
Hill Republicans. They
were intended to drive the
supercommittee evenly
divided between Democrats
and Republicans- to strike
a compromise. But the
panel deadlocked and the
warring combatants have
spent more time since then


ers that Obama won four
years ago but now are too
close to call Ohio, Vir-
ginia, Iowa, Colorado, Ne-
vada and New Hampshire
- and still pick up two more
electoral votes elsewhere,
in states that are even more
difficult. The uncertainty of
Florida partly explains why
Romney now is making a
play for Wisconsin. That
state, which offers 10 elec-
toral votes, has voted for De-
mocrats for decades, but the
GOP has seen down-ballot
success there lately and
Romney running mate Paul
Ryan lives there.
Obama already has far
more states and, thus,
electoral votes in his
likely-winners column. Be-
cause of that edge, he can
hold the White House with-
out Florida as long as he
wins most of the other toss-
up states. His standing has
suffered here along with the
state's economy, four years
after he won the state by
cobbling together a coalition
of Hispanics, African-Amer-
icans and independents to
go with other Democrats.
This year, undecided vot-
ers, and those not entirely
sold on their candidates,
may well tip the balance
here. Few seem hot on ei-
ther contender.


blaming each other for the
looming cuts than seeking
ways to avoid them.
The White House report
continues in that vein, blast-
ing House Republicans for
an approach to avoiding the
sequester that relies on fur-
ther cuts to domestic pro-
grams while protecting
upper-bracket taxpayers
from higher rates proposed
by the president.
In advance of the report's
release, White House press
secretary Jay Carney went
on the offensive, blasting


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
President Barack Obama, above, greets people Aug. 2,
outside Lechonera El Barrio, a local restaurant in Orlando.
Republican presidential candidate and former Massachu-
setts Gov. Mitt Romney, below, flanked by Rep. Mario Diaz-
Balart, R-Fla., and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at a
campaign event in Miami.


"the adamant refusal of Re-
publicans to accept the fun-
damental principle that we
ought to deal with our fiscal
challenges in a balanced
way."
Republicans are trying to
cast any blame for a possi-
ble sequester squarely on
Obama, saying it was the
White House's idea during
last summer's budget nego-
tiations an argument that
fails to acknowledge GOP
leaders backed the idea at
the time, and all voted for it
In advance of the elec-


tion, rival Democratic and
GOP sides are dug in, un-
willing to make the required
compromises and unable to
trust the other side. It's com-
monly assumed more seri-
ous efforts will occur to
forestall the cuts in a post-
election lame duck session,
though it may only be for a
short time, to give the next
Congress and whoever oc-
cupies the White House a
chance to work out a longer-
term solution.
If not, sharp cuts are on
the way


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Robbie Allen Sanders,
27, Lake Panasofkee, at 10:45
a.m. Thursday was arrested on
charges of grand theft and bur-
glary. Released on own recog-
nizance.
Pamela Mamie Dicks, 42,
W. Lerchen Court, Homosassa,
at 11 p.m. Thursday was ar-
rested on a charge of posses-
sion of a controlled substance
(pills). Bond $5,000.
Everett Orsen Dicks, 43,
W. Lerchen Court, Homosassa,
at 11 p.m. Thursday was ar-
rested on a charge of posses-
sion of a controlled substance
(pills). Bond $5,000.
Matthew James
McKeowen, 26, W. Tanager
Court, at 9:29 p.m. Thursday
was arrested on charges of
criminal mischief, grand theft
and burglary. Bond $7,250.
Jaiden R. Doerfler, 19, S.
Jackson Street, Beverly Hills, at
8:03 a.m. Friday was arrested
on a charge of grand theft.
Bond $2,000.
Christopher Lee Arm-
strong, 27, Linder Drive, Ho-
mosassa, at 1:40 p.m. Friday
was arrested on charges of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance (marijuana and
methamphetamines), inmate
introducing drugs into a jail,
driving while license suspended
and paraphernalia. Bond
$13,500.
Darrian Robison, 18,
Crystal River, was arrested
Wednesday by Marion County
Sheriff's Office on a charge of
human trafficking for sex. Robi-
son allegedly took a 17-year-old
with her to the county for the
purpose of prostitution. Bond
$20,000.
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 9:28 a.m. Sept. 13
in the 3800 block of North Timu-
cua Point, Crystal River.


A residential burglary was
reported at 5:17 p.m. Sept. 13
in the 7900 block of East Emer-
ald Lane, Floral City.
Thefts
An auto theft was reported
at 6:55 a.m. Sept. 13 in the
9500 block of North Davy Way,
Dunnellon.
SA larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 10:27 a.m. Sept. 13 in
the 5800 block of South
Oakridge Drive, Homosassa.
SA grand theft was reported
at 3:18 p.m. Sept. 13 in the
1500 block of East Winnetka
Street, Hernando.
SA larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 3:46 p.m. Sept. 13 in
the 200 block of Southeast 16th
Terrace, Crystal River.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 6:21 a.m. Sept. 13 in the 100
block of Rose Avenue, Beverly
Hills.
A vandalism was reported
at 8:33 a.m. Sept. 13 in the 200
block of West Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Lecanto.

ON THE NET

For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, visit
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click on
Crime Mapping for a
view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County. Click
on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record reports
are also archived on-
line at www.chronicle
online.com.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI O PR HI LO PR
92 72 0.00 NA NA NA 85 70 trace

'"" -\ ---" >


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Ci II It :.. 'iii
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 10 knots. Seas 1
foot or less. Bay and inland waters will
have a ighi chop. Chance of showers
and thunderstorms today.


HI LO PR HI LO PR
95 77 0.00 89 71 trace

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exc usive daily
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
.High: 90 Low: 72
.....- 40% chance of afternoon showers,
maybe a -huriir,-.iorni
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 73
.....r Partly sunny with a 50% chance of showers and
thunderstorms.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 72
Mostly cloudy and breezy with a 70% chance of
rain and thunderstorms.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 88/69
Record 96/62
Normal 90/69
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.20 in.
Total for the month 3.00 in.
Total for the year 52.67 in.
Normal for the year 41.87 in.
*As of 7 pr.m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 5!
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, gra:
Today's count: 7/12
Sunday's count: 7.3
Monday's count: 6.5
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/15 SATURDAY 5:11 11:24 5:36 11:48
9/16 SUNDAY 6:01 -6:26 12:39
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT .7:35 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW i T
S 0 4 MOONRISE TODAY........................6:44 A.M.
PI. 15 SEPT 22 SEPT. 28 c.8 MOONSET TODAY .............. 7:09 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:53 a/1:38 a 6:04 p/1:46 p
Crystal River" 4:14 a/11:08 a 4:25 p11 36 p
Withlacoochee* 2:01 a/8:56 a 2:12 p/9:24 p
Homosassa"* 5:03 a/12:37 a 5:14 p/12:45 p


"'At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
6:21 a/2:14 a 6:49 p/2:27 p
4:42 a/11:49 a 5:10 p/--
2:29 a/9:37 a 2:57 p/9:59 p
5*31 a/1:13 a 5:59 p/1:26 p


j


Gulf water
te eratur e



83
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.18 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.87 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 40.13 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.47 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any oe year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. in no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION

A
71s '0 90, a tb 5
/ BOB.. ,*- t-..r" .9


00.. '-na, -l.n_.t - -


71 1

5%
qOs
30s


4'0


40City


City


S60s

70s
-E


J,.*.e u Honolulu
87/72
S80s



Friday Satur
H L Pcp. Fcst I


7Os -


\.. -m _
MO,,' C-,




FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


rday
H L


Albany 81 58 pc 70 44
Albuquerque 72 51 s 79 56
Asheville 80 55 ts 76 57
Atlanta 81 67 15 pc 86 63
Atlantic City 77 53 s 76 56
Austin 72 67 1.41 ts 83 65
Baltimore 82 55 s 76 53
Billings 86 42 s 88 50
Birmingham 86 62 s 86 66
Boise 90 53 s 81 49
Boston 81 61 sh 74 52
Buffalo 77 58 46 pc 67 45
Burlington. VT 83 57 pc 66 42
Charleston. SC 86 67 pc 85 70
Charleston, WV 84 55 s 75 49
Charlotte 82 56 pc 84 64
Chicago 76 51 s 77 57
Cincinnati 80 58 s 75 49
Cleveland 69 55 23 s 67 54
Columbia SC 86 61 s 87 66
Columbus, OH 80 60 s 74 48
Concord, NH 83 50 pc 73 42
Dallas 72 66 01 c 82 67
Denver 77 49 s 86 50
Des Moines 78 50 s 80 54
Detroit 73 55 .44 s 71 54
El Paso 66 57 08 pc 78 58
Evansville. IN 74 61 20 pc 79 55
Harrisburg 80 52 s 73 52
Hartford 81 59 pc 75 46
Houston 89 71 .05 ts 87 73
Indianapolis 70 57 .05 s 75 51
Jackson 88 69 s 90 67
Las Vegas 94 70 s 98 73
Little Rock 84 69 1 88 ts 78 64
Los Angeles 84 67 s 87 67
Louisville 84 63 pc 79 55
Memphis 83 72 .01 ts 80 63
Milwaukee 75 50 s 72 57
Minneapolis 76 50 s 83 61
Mobile 89 66 pc 89 68
Montgomery 87 64 s 90 66
Nashville 85 59 pc 80 61
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
92012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 90 75 pc 89 72
New York City 80 64 pc 75 57
Norfolk 81 68 pc 79 60
Oklahoma City 60 57 c 75 62
Omaha 79 50 s 79 56
Palm Springs 10579 s 104 77
Philadelphia 81 61 s 76 57
Phoenix 96 79 s 97 74
Pittsburgh 81 58 .02 s 70 45
Portland, ME 77 53 pc 72 43
Portland, Ore 87 54 pc 79 55
Providence, R 79 57 pc 75 51
Raleigh 80 63 s 82 61
Rapid City 83 42 s 93 58
Reno 92 51 s 89 55
Rochester, NY 81 60 36 pc 67 45
Sacramento 91 59 s 95 58
St. Louis 70 57 10 pc 77 55
St. Ste Marie 63 48 .14 s 63 48
Salt Lake City 85 52 s 86 58
San Antonio 77 68 1.30 ts 83 68
San Diego 86 68 s 96 69
San Francisco 64 54 pc 69 55
Savannah 79 67 .29 pc 86 69
Seattle 79 52 pc 73 51
Spokane 84 50 s 80 49
Syracuse 87 59 .38 pc 66 44
Topeka 71 52 pc 72 58
Washington 83 64 pc 77 56
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 108 Fullerton. Calif, LOW 21 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/77/pc
Amsterdam 61/51/pc
Athens 85/71/ts
Beijing 78/56/s
Berlin 64/49/pc
Bermuda 83/77/ts
Cairo 91/72/s
Calgary 66/38/pc
Havana 88/73/ts
Hong Kong 88/77/pc
Jerusalem 87/67/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


85/66/s
68/57/pc
90/64/s
74/53/ts
65/43/pc
64/49/c
67/49/pc
81/61/s
84/61/pc
68/50/s
87/76/ts
66/44/pc
63/49/pc


C I T R U S


C U N T Y


For the RECORD


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Lillian
Altman, 70
It is with great sadness
that the family of Lillian Alt-
man, age 70, announce her
passing. Lillian died Thurs-
day, September 13, 2012,
passing quietly and peace-
fully while in her sleep (we
should all
be so lucky).
She is
survived by
her Partner
In Life,
Stanley
Major, as
well as her
sons, Gary, Lillian
Daniel, Stan Altman
Major III,
Lance Tabano, her beauti-
ful, caring daughter-in-law,
Eve, and three beautiful
granddaughters, Kristen
Altman, Marissa Buck, and
Kristin Buck.
Lillian's entire family
would like to thank the
nurses, staff, and the entire
Hospice of Citrus County for
their dedication, profes-
sionalism, and caring in the
families darkest moment In
addition, the family would
like to thank Woodland Ter-
race Skilled Nursing Facil-
ity for their comfort, and
tending to every need Lil-
lian or the family had dur-
ing her brief stay, especially
Mary, who cared for Lillian
like she was her own mom.
We would like to extend a
special thanks to CMH's
hospital doctor, "Dr Boris"
for his expertise, and his
personal interest into the
well being and care of Lil-
lian. Finally, the family
would like to thank the
friends and family who have
either visited, called, or sent
a message thru Facebook
that brightened up my Lil-
lian's spirits. Words cannot
express the gratitude and
how much they meant to the
family
The Service of Remem-
brance for Lillian will be
7:00 PM, Monday, Septem-
ber 17, 2012 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. The family will re-
ceive friends Sunday and
Monday from 2:00 4:00 PM
and 6:00 8:00 PM at the
chapel. The family requests
expressions of sympathy
take the form of memorial
donations to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Doris Busto, 94
SAFETY HARBOR
Doris May Edna Busto, 94,
of Safety Harbor, died
Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at
Nurses Helping Hands,
Dunedin.
Private arrangements by
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

Alfred
Drayne Jr., 82
INVERNESS
Alfred G. Drayne Jr, 82, of
Inverness, died Thursday,
Sept. 13, 2012.
Funeral services will be
at 1 p.m. Monday, Sept. 17,
2012, at the Church of Christ
in Lecanto. Family will re-
ceive friends from 12 until
service time at the church.
Burial will follow at Magno-
lia Cemetery in Lecanto.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, was in
charge of arrangements.

Edna
Kleeck, 88
CITRUS SPRINGS
Edna L. Van Kleeck, 88, of
Citrus Springs, died
Wednesday, Sept. 12,2012 in
Lecanto.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory.

SO YOU KNOW
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material are
charged at the same
rates.


Margaret
'Peggy' Murphy
Margaret (Peggy) Murphy,
beloved wife of Edward
Murphy, died at Citrus Me-
morial Hospital Wednesday,
Sept. 12,
2012, after a
heroic
struggle re-
sulting from
complica-
tions of sur- -
gery in May.
Peggy was
born in
Cobleskill, Margaret
N.Y, work- Murphy
ing in ad-
ministration positions as
Office Manager, Assistant
Trust Officer, and with a di-
vision of General Electric in
Computer Assisted Design
Manufacturing in Albany,
N.Y After living in Lake
Placid, N.Y, Boqueron,
Puerto Rico and Cape Cod,
she has lived in Homosassa
for the last eleven years.
She has served as president
of the three women's golf
leagues of the Sugarmill
Woods Country Club and
never lost interest in im-
proving her game. She
worked as a volunteer on
the state management team
of the AARP Tax Aide Pro-
gram for nine years and
served as the treasurer of
the Southwest Citrus Club
for several years. Peggy will
be remembered by all who
knew her as a wonderful
cook and hostess with a gen-
erous heart Her laugh filled
a room as did her love for
life. In addition to volun-
teering, she loved to travel,
waterski, and do the NY
Times crossword puzzle in
ink each Sunday. At the time
of her death she held the
lead in a gin rummy game
that lasted for 25 years.
Peggy is also survived by
her loving daughter, Elaine
Chastenay, granddaughter,
Ashley McRae and great-
granddaughter, Liara
McRae.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto. Plans for a cele-
bration of life are incom-
plete but will be held in
Homosassa, Puerto Rico
and Lake Placid. Contribu-
tions may be made in her
memory to Nature Coast
Ministries, 999 N.E. 5th St.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, www.
brownfuneralhome.com is
in charge of arrangements.





Richard 'Rick'
Taylor, 81
INVERNESS
Richard "Rick" Taylor
passed away Saturday
evening, Sept. 2, 2012, at the
Life Care Center in Lecanto
under the care of Hospice.
Mr. Taylor was born Dec.
1, 1930, and had achieved
the age of 81 years.
Rick served in the Army
during the Korean conflict
1950. Rick was a proud
member of the Mensa Soci-
ety Rick received his pri-
vate pilot's license and flew
for the Civil Air Patrol.
Rick was a member of the
Inverness Loyal Order of
Moose No. 2112, American
Legion Post No. 155 and a
life member ofVFW in Lake
Park, Fla.
Rick is survived by his
steady companion, Sam (his
cat).
There will be no services.
Donations may be made in
his memory to Moose Chari-
ties via Inverness Loyal
Order of Moose Lodge No.
2112. Mr. Taylor will be in-
urned at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bushnell.
Sign the guest book at
ww chronicleonline. com.


To Place Your

"In Memo0ry" ad,'

Saralynne


Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com

SOME =.i~g


Carroll
Phillips, 86
HOMOSASSA
Carroll Douglas Phillips
died Sept. 11, 2012, at home
in Homosassa, Fla., after a
long struggle with Parkin-
son's disease. He was 86
years old.
He was born in Beau-
mont, Texas, on Aug. 13,
1926. After graduating from
high school, he enlisted in
the U.S. Army Air Corps.
Once the war ended, he re-
turned to Beaumont, where
he graduated from Lamar
College. He then moved to
Los Angeles to attend the
Northrop Institute of Tech-
nology so that he could pur-
sue his dream of being an
aeronautical engineer After
graduating, he began his ca-
reer at Northrop.
He married Barbara
Bond in 1950 and lived in
Palos Verdes, Calif., where
their two daughters, Linda
Lee and Teri Ann, where
born. During the 12 years at
Northrop, he was a design
engineer working on the in-
tercontinental SNARK mis-
sile and led a design team
that created a new launch-
ing system.
In 1961, he accepted a po-
sition with Raytheon Com-
pany and moved the family
to New England. In 1964, his
son, Douglas Bond, was
born. Carroll and Barbara
lived in Weston, Mass., dur-
ing the 30 years he worked
at Raytheon. During this pe-
riod, he held engineering
and management positions
at Raytheon and was influ-
ential in the design of rotat-
ing radar bases, the Hawk
missile system, towable
boxed missile launching sys-
tems, the Evolved Sea Spar-
row missile surface-to-air
portable launching system
and the Patriot missile. He
also reconfigured guidance
radars so they could be in-
stalled on luxury ships.
In 1991, he retired and
moved to Homosassa, Fla.,
where Barbara and Carroll
would live the rest of their
lives in a home they de-
signed in Sugarmill Woods.
A few years after his wife,
Barbara, passed away in
2007, his daughter Teri and
son-in-law Fred moved into
the Homosassa house to
help care for him.
Carroll was predeceased
by his wife of 57 years, Bar-
bara Bond, and leaves be-
hind two daughters, Linda
and her husband Russell
Rabinowitz of Raleigh, N.C.,
and Teri and husband Fred
Learned, formerly of Fort
Myers now residing in Ho-
mosassa, Fla., and son,
Doug and his wife Leslie
(Farrar) ofActon, Mass., and
six grandchildren: LTJG An-
drew (U.S. Navy) and Kelly
Learned; Daniel and
Allyssa Rabinowitz; and
Matthew and Kristen
Phillips.
There will be a memorial
gathering at 1:30 p.m. fol-
lowed by a 2 p.m. service
Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012, at
Wilder Funeral Home, 4890
S. Suncoast Blvd., Ho-
mosassa Springs, Fla. Me-
morial donations may be
made to First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa, 8831 W Bradshaw
Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448.
Arrangements entrusted to
Wilder Funeral Home.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

* U.S. flags denote
military service on
local obituaries.


Jimmie
'Jeanie'
Bellamy, 77
DUNNELLON
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Jimmie Eu-
genia "Jeanie" Bellamy, age
77, of Dunnellon, Florida,
will be held 1:00 PM Sunday
September
16, 2012 at
the Inver-
ness Chapel
of Hooper ."
Funeral
Homes with
Mr. Jay Nix
and Senator
Charles
Dean offici- Jimmie
ating. Inter- Bellamy
ment will
follow at Oak Ridge Ceme-
tery, Inverness, Florida. The
family will receive friends
from 5:00 8:00 PM Saturday
at the Chapel. Online con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com. Those,
who wish, may make dona-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464.
Jeanie was born Decem-
ber 1, 1934 in Augusta, GA,
daughter of the late Harold
and Julia (Hicks) Bates. She
died September 14, 2012 in
Lecanto, FL. She was a
homemaker and moved to
Hernando from Augusta,
GA, where she lived most of
her life. Her hobbies in-
cluded fishing, hunting,
cooking and crafting. Mrs.
Bellamy was preceded in
death by her parents and
her husband, Burton
Bellamy
Survivors include 4 sons,
Bobby McKettrick of Willis-
ton, Carl McKettrick of Ar-
cadia, Guy McKettrick of
Inverness, Burton Bellamy
of Williston, 4 daughters,
Daphne Rooks and Sybil
Stokes both of Hernando,
Barbara Renney of Ho-
mosassa, Beverly Rooks of
Safford, AL, sister, Betty Sue
Widgeon of North Augusta,
SC, and beloved Mamaw to
17 grandchildren, and 34
great grandchildren.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-
563-5660 for details
and pricing options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting the text.)


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,]lllU 1,. .I I ...,111h ,d ..1 , 'il I, ,I ,ll,


BEST
,2012'


Comfort


I ~ *1 .~- lr~ i~~'~s~~~


Associated Press
A small group of emperor penguins stand on the edge of
an ice drift Dec. 1, 2006, in the Ross Sea in the
Antarctic in this photo released by Fish Eye Films.


Plans for giant


Antarctic marine


sanctuary falter


New Zealand

rejects U.S.

compromise

Associated Press

WELLINGTON, New
Zealand Antarctica's
Ross Sea is often described
as the most isolated and
pristine ocean on Earth, a
place where seals and pen-
guins still rule the waves
and humans are about as
far away as they could be.
But even there it has
proven difficult, and maybe
impossible, for nations to
agree on how strongly to
protect the environment
The United States and
New Zealand have spent
two years trying to agree
on an Alaska-sized marine
sanctuary where fishing
would be banned and sci-
entists could study climate
change. U.S. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham
Clinton took a strong inter-
est in the outcome, regu-
larly prodding diplomats,
and New Zealand recently
sent a delegation to Wash-
ington to hash out a tenta-
tive deal.
That compromise, over a
region that accounts for less
than 2 percent of New
Zealand's fishing industry,
turned into a flop this month
when senior New Zealand
politicians rejected it be-
hind closed doors.
The U.S. and New
Zealand have now sent
competing plans to the 25
countries that meet annu-
ally each October to decide
the fate of Antarctica's wa-


EL


ters. Their inability to
agree greatly increases the
chances nothing will get
done.
Evan Bloom, director of
the U.S. State Department's
Office of Ocean and Polar
Affairs, said the U.S. put a
great deal of effort into its
reserve proposal because it
believes the Ross Sea is the
best place on Earth for sci-
entists to carry out studies
away from the influence of
mankind.
"If you can't do it in
Antarctica, where can you
do it?" said Bloom.
Both countries advo-
cated for marine sanctuar-
ies. The differences
between the two plans
seem small on a map, but
they center on the areas of
the sea where marine life
is most abundant.
The U.S. does not have
fishing interests in the
Ross Sea, though fish
caught there often end up
in high-end American
restaurants.
The species is actually an
ugly creature called the
Antarctic toothfish. Fisher-
men from New Zealand,
South Korea, Russia and
other nations have been
catching them in the Ross
Sea since the 1990s. They
use lines that can stretch
more than a mile to catch
about 100,000 of them a year
The U.S. aimed to reach
an agreement with a nation
that fishes the Ross Sea in
hopes it would lead to a
broader deal to protect ma-
rine habitats there.
New Zealand wanted to
minimize disruption to its
fisheries, but also wanted
to burnish its conservation
credentials.


C D U NT i

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/7af. E. Zacgt
Funeral Home With Crematory
WILLIAM J. HEAVIN
Private Arrangements
CHARLES GEORGE
Mem'l Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
Hernando United Methodist
DORIS BUSTO
Arrangements Pending
CARL PARKS
Private Arrangements
726-8323 0CHX5


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 A5


LG







A6 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


T M E R I


I HowTKs *I '1,H"TI f i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 3189537 9.55 +.15 Neuralstem 105895 1.15 -.23 Facebookn 715024 22.00 +1.29 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1514039147.24 +.65 CheniereEn 69638 16.80 +.11 SiriusXM 518995 2.47 -.01 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncI1107657 16.28 +.13 NovaGldg 46426 5.88 +.34 Microsoft 508390 31.21 +.28 tion). Names consisting of initials appear atthe beginning of each letter's list.
NokiaCp 1013920 2.98 +.04 GoldenMin 44925 5.86 -1.16 Intel 469285 23.37 +.01 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
GenElec 870984 22.11 +.09 NwGoldg 44432 11.85 +.15 Staples 463984 12.21 +.25 Chg: Loss orgain fortheday No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the Amencan Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
FSPBIUSDBr24.03 +3.98 +19.9 CoastD 2.20 +.30 +15.8 Virco 2.76 +1.21 +77.7 ingqualification n- Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
OfficeMax 8.15 +1.04 +14.6 AvalnRare 2.29 +.31 +15.7 BioFuel rs 8.98 +2.57 +40.1 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock Issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
BkA DJ5-1513.40 +1.65 +14.0 GoldStdVg 2.04 +.19 +10.3 Galectin un 6.45 +1.70 +35.8 Holder owes Installments of purchase pnce. rt- Right to buy security ata specified pnce. s-
CSGIobWm 7.97 +.82 +11.5 Augustag 3.07 +.28 +10.0 SthcstFn 4.02 +.66 +19.6 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the lastyear. wi -Trades will be settled when the
OnAssign 19.09 +1.90 +11.1 PyramidOil 4.77 +.42 +9.7 RoyaleEn 2.94 +.48 +19.5 stock is issued. wd When distributed, wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. v Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVlnvCpr 45.71 -10.88 -19.2 GoldenMin 5.86 -1.16 -16.5 SpiritAir 16.58 -3.08 -15.7
DBCmdyS 28.00 -4.90 -14.9 ImpacMtg 6.89 -1.07 -13.4 SynrgyPwt 2.05 -.35 -14.6 _T '
PrSht30BEI 36.33 -4.11 -10.2 SEDIntl 2.01 -.19 -8.7 Linktone 2.27 -.30 -11.7


ChinaGreen 3.68 -.40 -9.8 MGTCaprs 4.42 -.28 -6.0 OceanPwh 3.09 -.35 -10.2
AKSteel 5.87 -.57 -8.9 Medgenwt 4.75 -.25 -5.0 FstUtdCp 6.12 -.68 -9.9


DIARY


2,088 Advanced
958 Declined
108 Unchanged
3,154 Total issues
498 New Highs
7 New Lows
4,914,083,547 Volume


DIARY


270 Advanced
177 Declined
28 Unchanged
475 Total issues
23 New Highs
1 New Lows
126,305,285 Volume


1,607
842
145
2,594
252
22
1,957,225,898


52-Week
High Low Name
13,573.33 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 411.54Dow Jones Utilities
8,427.53 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,167.63 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,463.76 1,074.77S&P500
15,309.39 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
860.64 601.71 Russell 200


Last
13,593.37
5,215.97
472.13
8,458.87
2,468.77
3,183.95
1,465.77
15,354.15
864.70


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+53.51 +.40 +11.26 +18.11
+13.75 +.26 +3.91 +11.82
-3.16 -.66 +1.60 +7.48
+51.84 +.62+13.13+15.12
+.80 +.03 +8.36+10.32
+28.12 +.89+22.22 +21.42
+5.78 +.40+16.55+20.54
+87.00 +.57+16.41 +19.93
+8.58 +1.00+16.71 +21.05


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BoBradpf 17.73 +.19
BmSantSA 8.12 +.09
BmSBrasil 8.32 +.20
BkofAm 9.55 +.15
ABBLtd 20.03 +.56 BMontg 60.11 +.05
ACELtd 77.03 -.01 BkNYMel 23.62 +.17
AESCorp 11.57 +.07 Barday 14.81 +.46
AFLAC 49.66 +.32 BariPVix 9.18 +.31
AGCO 47.16 +1.31 BarrickG 42.38 +.75
AGLRes 41.21 -.28 Baxter 60.48 -.29
AK Steel 5.87 -.57 Beam Inc 58.97 -.43
ASA Gold 25.08 +.63 BeazerHm 3.77 +.26
AT&TInc 37.26 -.89 BectDck 79.16 +.54
AbtLab 68.27 -1.00 BerkHaA133000.00+149.00
AberFitc 39.36 +.82 BerkH B 88.70 +.14
Accenture 65.89 +.09 BestBuy 18.58 +.26
AccoBrds 7.21 +.18 BigLots 31.83 +1.37
AccretivH 12.45 +.97 BioMedR 19.78 +.31
AdamsEx 11.52 +.10 BIkHillsCp 35.35 +.31
AMD 3.90 -.02 BlkDebtStr 4.35 +.03
AdvActBear 19.69 -.31 BlkEnhC&l 13.20 +.13
Aetna 39.04 +.87 BIkGlbOp 13.80 +.08
Agilent 39.73 +1.35 Blackstone 15.22 +.74
Agniog 51.37 +1.20 BlockHR 16.93 +.18
AlcatelLuc 1.27 +.05 Boeing 71.28 -.30
Alma 9.84 +.21 BorgWarn 78.08 +2.12
AllegTch 36.75 +1.99 BostBeer 109.19 +4.22
Allergan 89.15 -.16 BostProp 116.07 +1.24
Allete 41.17 -.34 BostonSci 5.82 +.04
AlliBGlbHi 15.71 +.11 BoydGm 7.00 +.09
AlliBlnco 8.48 -.05 BrMySq 33.24 -.47
AlliBern 15.56 +.66 Brookdale 23.57 +.51
Allstate 39.86 +.43 BrkfldOfPr 17.63 +.16
AlonUSA 13.99 +.35 Brunswick 25.46 +.28
AlphaNRs 8.55 +.32 Buckeye 51.45 +1.29
AlpAlerMLP 16.57 +.12 BurgerKn 14.43 +.16
Altia 32.94 -.87 CBREGrp 20.36 +.76
AmBev 38.27 +.05 CBSB 37.15 +.20
Ameren 32.67 -.17 CH Engy 65.33 +.02
Amerigrp 90.94 -.06 CMSEng 23.19 -.29
AMovilL 25.73 +.21 CNOFind 10.00 +.10
AmAxle 12.80 +.26 CSSInds 20.00 -.02
AEagleOut 23.61 -.04 CSX 23.16 +.12
AEP 43.66 -.30 CVS Care 46.97 -.48
AmExp 59.27 +.22 CYS Invest 14.82 +.14
AmlntGrp 35.02 +.58 CblvsnNY 16.98 +.37
AmSIP3 7.38 ... CabotOGs 45.86 +.11
AmTower 71.36 -1.43 CallGolf 6.24 +.26
AmWtWks 35.86 -1.33 Calpine 17.89 +.24
Amerigas 43.26 +.20 Camecog 21.73 -.24
Ameriprise 59.20 +1.08 Cameron 58.99 +.42
AmeriBrgn 37.36 -.70 CampSp 34.55 -.12
Anadarko 75.59 +1.50 CdnNRsgs 34.65 +.80
AnglogldA 35.79 +.39 CapOne 59.37 +.39
ABInBev 85.37 +.08 CapiflSrce 7.46 +.13
Annaly 17.38 -.14 CapM p 15.76 -.06
Aonplc 53.10 +.53 CardnlHth 38.37 +.58
Apache 92.48 ... CareFusion 27.86 -.09
AquaAm 24.73 -.67 CarMax 32.34 -1.00
ArcelorMit 17.32 +.93 Carnival 37.96 +.14
ArchCoal 7.91 +.52 Caterpillar 93.17 +2.49
ArchDan 27.19 -.20 Celanese 42.68 +1.43
ArmosDor 14.40 +.74 Cemex 8.37 -.19
ArmourRsd 7.53 +.01 Cemigpfs 13.21 +.24
Ashland 76.40 -.28 CenterPnt 21.02 -.08
AsdEstat 15.47 +.10 Cntylink 42.37 -.54
AssuredG 15.53 +.28 Checkpnt 8.85 +.17
ATMOS 35.36 -.52 ChesEng 20.52 +.62
AuRicog 6.83 +.49 ChesUfi 46.11 -.33
Avon 16.29 +.01 Chevron 117.25 +.69
BB&TCp 33.99 +.37 ChicB&l 41.36 +.56
BHPBiILt 72.28 +1.77 Chimos 19.11 +.01
BHPBil plc 66.19 +2.35 Chimera 2.72 -.06
BP PLC 43.86 +.24 ChinaMble 53.80 +.46
BPZ Res 3.09 +.05 Chubb 76.08 -.68
BRFBrasil 18.01 +.71 Cigna 47.80 +.50
BRT 6.62 +.20 CindBell 5.42 -.10
BakrHu 50.04 +1.08 Citfgroup 34.79 +.34
BallCorp 43.28 -.26 CleanHarb 54.51 +1.61


CliffsNRs 45.55 +2.37 EVEnEq 11.28 +.10 Fusion-io 30.15 +55 HItCrREIT 58.50 -.86 iSR1KG 68.14 +.33
Clorox 70.59 -1.36 Ecolab 64.12 -.58 -HItMgmt 8.43 +.29 iShR2K 86.40 +.80
Coach 62.06 +.64 Edisonlnt 45.17 +.07 HIthcrRlty 24.78 -.07 iShREst 67.80 +.35
CobaltlEn 24.75 +1.31 Ban 10.95 +.21 GATX 44.85 +.42 Heckmann 4.86 +.07 iShDJHm 20.19 +.50
CCFemsa 129.45 +1.38 BdorGldg 15.75 +.64 GMACCpT 25.30 +.10 HeclaM 6.36 +.12 iShSPSm 80.14 +.80
CocaColas 38.12 -.23 Embraer 28.40 +.05 GabelliET 5.71 -.01 Heinz 56.20 -.48 iStar 8.30 +.30
CocaCE 31.17 +.11 EmersonEl 49.81 -.16 GabHIthW 9.02 -.06 Hersha 5.64 +.10 Idacorp 42.33 -.30
Coeur 28.52 +1.72 EmpDist 21.58 -.02 GabUtl 8.17 +.12 Hertz 15.00 +.24 ITW 61.12 -.25
CohStlnfra 18.57 +.01 EnbrdgEPt 28.82 +.17 GaisaSA 4.48 -.11 Hess 56.06 +.46 Imafon 5.87 -.07
ColgPal 103.75 -.79 EnCanag 23.41 +.08 GameStop 23.15 +.77 HewlettP 18.17 -.07 IngerRd 46.18 +.28
CollctvBrd 21.73 +.02 EngyTsfr 42.64 -.39 Gannett 17.58 +.12 HighwdPrp 34.06 +.49 IntegrysE 53.48 -.38
Comerica 33.03 -.07 Enerplsg 17.15 +.27 Gap 35.20 -.45 Hillshiren 27.05 +.56 IntcnfEx 140.09 +3.24
CmwREIT 15.52 +.08 EnPro 38.88 +.02 GenDynam 66.78 +.66 HollyFront 41.97 +2.22 IBM 206.81 +.45
CompSci 34.68 +1.13
Con-Way 30.56 -.44
ConAgra 25.59 -.37 u .. .
ConchoRes101.15 +3.87 0 I. h-
ConocPhils 58.21 +.56
ConsolEngy 32.82 +.32 l A
ConEd 59.81 -1.18 w rw.chronicleonline.co o
ConstellA 32.19 -.57
Cnvrgys 16.09 -.05
Cooper Ind 74.94 -.55
Corning 13.12 +.26
CosanLtd 15.00 -.25
CottCp 8.18 -.16
CovenbyH 41.57 +.23
Covidien 59.02 +1.24
Crane 41.33 +1.05
CSVS2xVxS 1.59 +.07
CSVellVSt 17.02 -.59
CredSuiss 23.11 +.28
Crwnsfle 63.49 -.54
CrownHold 37.01 -.21
CubeSmart 13.48 +.12
Cummins 102.62 +2.43
CurEuro 130.40 +1.29

DCTIndl 6.86 +.175 6 5 5
DDR Corp 15.86 +.19
DNPSelct 9.97 -.02 t's ]E *
DNP Sel rt .03 -.01
DR Horton 21.99 +.70
DSW Inc 65.21 -.37 *Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start


UiE sa.a8 -.46
DanaHldg 14.20 +.30
Danaher 54.76 -.65
Darden 54.04 -.79
DeanFds 16.13 -.21
Deere 82.00 +1.63
DelphiAun 31.82 +1.06
DeltaAir 9.27 -.18
DenburyR 17.65 +.55
DeutschBk 44.26 +1.39
DevonE 63.49 +1.30
DiaOffs 69.04 -.11
DxFnBullrs 117.49 +2.59
DirSCBear 13.64 -.38
DirFnBear 16.43 -.37
DirSPBear 16.36 -.20
DirDGIdBII 17.99 +1.29
DrxEnBear 6.87 -.27
DirEMBear 10.96 -.38
DirxSCBull 67.66 +1.89
Disomver 39.31 +.05
Disney 52.35 -.25
DollarGen 50.16 -.58
DomRescs 52.82 -.77
Dover 61.64 +1.85
DowChm 32.25 +.82
DrPepSnap 44.08 -1.32
DuPont 52.24 +1.11
DukeEnrs 64.19 -.47
DukeRlty 15.77 +.14
EMCCp 27.86 +.34
EOG Res 117.62 +2.44
EastChms 58.64 +.47
Eaton 47.23 -.59


ENSCO 58.13
Entergy 68.36
EntPrPt 54.40
EqtyRsd 60.23
EsteeLdrs 61.23
ExmoRes 8.04
Exelon 35.94
ExxonMbl 92.30
FMCTech 49.96
FairchldS 15.00
FedExCp 90.15
FedSignl 6.52
Ferrellgs 19.66
Ferro 4.03
FibriaCelu 9.51
idlNFin 19.87
FidNatlnfo 31.70
FstHorizon 10.23
FTActDiv 8.36
FtTrEnEq 12.39
FirstEngy 43.28
RagstBcp .98
Ruor 60.15
FootLodkr 36.87
FordM 10.53
FordMwt 1.56
ForestCA 16.56
ForestOils 9.18
Fortess 4.51
FBHmScn 28.19
FMCG 42.64
Frontine 3.98


GenElec 22.11 +.09
GenGrPrp 20.07 +.07
GenMills 38.89 -.57
GenMotrs 24.14 +.61
GenesWyo 66.62 +1.81
GenOn En 2.60 +.01
Genworth 6.12 +.23
Gerdau 10.38 +.11
GlaxoSKln 45.90 -.80
GolLinhas 5.60 +01
GoldFLd 12.90 +.01
Goldarpg 46.20 +.79
GoldmanS 121.36 +.69
Goodyear 13.51 +23
GtPlainEn 22.21 -.02
Griffon 10.31 +19
GpTelevisa 24.27 -.42
GuangRy 15.09 +.10
HCAHIdg 31.16 +.86
HCP Inc 46.42 -.58
HSBC 47.42 +.91
HSBCCap 26.05 +.01
HalconRrs 7.66 +.51
Hallibrtn 37.44 +1.00
HanJS 16.68 +.22
HanPrmDv 14.51 +.04
Hanesbrds 33.87 +.75
Hanoverlns 38.03 +.26
HarleyD 46.33 +.60
HarmonyG 9.08 +.19
HartfdFn 20.34 +.43
HawaiiEl 27.33 -.07


HomeDp 59.46 +1.16
HonwIllnf 61.02 -.10
HospPT 25.02 +.07
HostHofs 17.25 +.26
HovnanE 3.89 +.10
Humana 71.12 +1.71
Huntsmn 16.32 +.64
IAMGIdg 15.79 +1.10
ICICIBk 38.19 +1.81
ING 8.98 +.17
iShGold 17.25 +.04
iSAsfia 24.49 +.16
iShBraz 57.06 +.59
iSCan 29.39 +.30
iShGer 23.53 +.28
iSh HK 18.22 +.27
iShJapn 9.46 +.10
iSh Kor 60.55 +1.02
iSMalas 15.03 +.25
iShMex 65.74 +.64
iShSing 13.74 +.13
iSTaiwn 13.60 +.17
iShSilver 33.60 -.01
iShChina25 35.19 +.61
iSSP500 147.88 +.55
iShEMkts 42.37 +.50
iShiBxB 119.70 -.72
iShB20T 118.30 -3.23
iS Eafe 55.15 +.55
iSSPMid 102.92 +1.14
iShiBxHYB 93.88 -.01
iShMtg 15.53 +.09


InlGame 13.22 +.31
IntPap 35.52 -.24
InterOilg 86.80 +2.34
Interpublic 11.65 -.09
InvenSenn 13.18 +.87
Invesco 25.82 +.17
IronMth 33.30 +.37
ItauUnibH 17.42 +.12

JPMorgCh 41.57 +.17
Jabil 22.70 +.55
Jaguarg 1.40 +.05
JanusCap 9.39 +.17
Jefferies 16.03 +.17
JohnJn 68.47 -.52
JohnsnCi 29.20 +.42
JoyGlbl 61.60 +2.62
JnprNtwk 19.33 -.08
KB Home 13.65 +.74
KBRInc 31.93 +1.17
KKR 15.33 +.52
KCSouthn 83.63 +2.09
Kaydons 23.68 +.40
KA EngTR 27.27 +.28
Kelbgg 50.19 -.63
KeyEngy 9.51 +.68
Keycorp 9.04 +.21
KimbClk 82.68 -.59
Kimco 21.03 +.20
KindME 82.96 +.63
KindMorg 36.23 +.26


Kinrossg 10.27 +.37 MSEmMkt 15.00 +.31 PinWst 53.55 -.11 RobtHalf 27.45 +.52
KnghtCap 2.63 +.02 Mosaic 60.79 -.10 PioNtrl 113.16 +3.88 RockwAut 70.81 +.85
KnightTr 14.53 -.81 MotrlaSolu 50.54 +.42 PitnyBw 15.27 +.54 RockColl 53.11 +.13
KodiakOg 9.81 +.19 MurphO 56.24 +1.30 PlainsEx 40.06 +.66 RylCarb 30.86 +.49
Kohls 53.40 -.30 NCRCorp 24.41 +.40 PlumCrk 43.68 +1.03 RoyDShllA 72.56 -.68
KrispKrm 8.04 -.01 NRGEgy 22.10 +.30 Polaris 85.55 +.44 Royce 13.32 +.14
Kroger 23.80 -.08 NVEnergy 18.07 -.01 PostPrp 51.24 -.36 RoycepfB 25.64 +.00
LSICorp 7.89 ... NYSEEur 26.87 +.60 Potash 42.58 +.05 Rand 31.52 +1.70
LTCPrp 34.02 +.18 Nabors 16.69 +.57 PwshDB 29.73 +.31
LaZBoy 15.49 +.34 NatFuGas 54.54 +1.07 PSAgri 30.76 +.23
Ladede 41.86 -.64 NatGrid 55.55 +.04 PSBasMet 20.25 +.53 SAIC 12.98 +.30
LVSands 46.75 +1.37 NOilVarco 84.83 +.44 PSUSDBull 21.64 -.11 SCANA 48.42 -.55
LeapFrog 9.00 -.20 NewAmHi 11.19 -.04 PSlndia 18.37 +.50 SKTIcm 14.83 -.23
LeggMason 26.95 +.36 NJRscs 46.13 -.27 Praxair 107.94 +1.41 SpdrDJIA 135.86 +.47
LennarA 36.47 +1.35 NewOriEd 14.93 +.46 PrecDrill 9.29 +.25 SpdrGold 171.80 +.49
Level3rs 24.75 +.35 NYCmtyB 14.12 +.36 PrinFnd 29.16 +.47 SPMid 187.35 +2.04
Lexmark 23.99 +1.46 Newcasle 7.95 +.26 ProLogis 36.89 -.02 S&P500ETF147.24 +.65
LbtyASG 4.25 +.04 NewellRub 19.71 +.69 ProShtS&P 33.52 -.16 SpdrHome 25.87 +.58
LillyEli 46.72 -.43 NewfdExp 35.21 +.83 PrUShS&P 13.19 -.11 SpdrS&PBk 24.63 +.44
Limited 50.31 +.51 NewmtM 57.20 +1.75 PrUItQQQs 63.37 +1.17 SpdrLehHY 40.77 +.04
LincNat 25.80 +.44 NewpkRes 8.19 +.37 PrUShQQQ 26.57 -.51 SpdrS&P RB 29.95 +.59
Lindsay 69.38 -.25 Nexeng 25.60 -.10 ProUItSP 63.47 +.47 SpdrRefl 65.13 +.53
Linkedln 123.23 +3.76 NextEraEn 67.79 -.91 ProUShL20 17.20 +.90 SpdrOGEx 59.35 +1.51
LloydBkg 2.55 +.03 NiSource 25.61 ProUltSEM 23.99 -.54 SpdrMetM 47.70 +1.13
LockhdM 92.52 -.61 NikeB 96.64 -2.56 ProUPShD3016.11 -.20 STMiaro 6.74 +.31
LaPac 14.89 +.29 NobleCorp 38.52 -.07 PrUltSP500 95.35 +1.16 Safeway 16.86 +.36
Lowes 29.40 +.38 NokiaCp 2.98 +.04 PrUVxSTrs 32.68 +1.98 StJoe 22.35 +1.21
A 342 +150 NoestUt 37.75 -.57 PrUltCrude 36.47 +.69 SUude 41.91 +1.29
u NorthropG 66.33 -.68 ProUltSIvs 59.16 ... Saks 11.63 +19
Novarfs 59.86 -.20 ProUShEuro 19.32 -.40 Salesforce 159.43 +2.44
M&TBk 94.80 +1.08 Nucor 40.75 +.28 ProctGam 69.16 +.25 SallyBty 26.39 -.31
MBIA 11.75 -.10 NustarEn 49.94 +.67 ProgsvCp 20.81 +.15 SJuanB 14.13 +.31
MDURes 22.66 +.16 NuvMuOpp 15.23 -.01 PUShDowrs 45.81 -.34 SandRdge 7.75 +.43
MEMC 3.21 +.13 NvPfdlnco 9.82 -05 ProUSR2K 25.34 -.46 Sanofi 43.81 +.09
MFAFnd 8.32 -.02 NuvQPf2 9.42 +05 PrUShEur 29.02 -.67 Schlmbrg 77.60 +1.93
MCR 10.05 -.01 OGEEngy 55.29 +53 PUSSP500rs36.54 -.44 Schwab 14.43 +.12
MGIC 1.66 -.04 OasisPet 32.46 +1.18 Pruden 58.63 +.67 SeadrillLd 41.17 +.19
MGMRsts 11.41 +13 OcciPet 91.95 +1.49 PSEG 31.86 -.01 SeaAir 16.30 +08
Macquarie 42.19 +.39 Och-Ziff 9.59 +43 PubSg 148.77 +1.19 SempraEn 65.79 -1.43
Macys 39.24 -.04 OfficeDpt 2.47 +.11 PultGrp 16.52 +50 SenHous 22.62
MagelMPt 88.37 +1.74 OfficeMa 8.15 +1.04 PPrT 5.69 +.01 Sensient 37.18 .16
Magnalntg 47.10 +1.42 SAs 421 +08 QEPRes 33.22 +.64 ShawGrp 43.60 +.06
MagHRes 5.09 +.15 OdRepub 9.70 +25 Qo360 24.89 +.12 SiderurNac 6.78 +.36
Manitowoc 14.83 +.03 Olin 23.19 +12 QuanexBld 19.03 +.89 SilvWhg 39.33 +1.04
Manulifeg 13.02 +.52 meaHt 2458 .17 QuantaSvc 25.82 +.12 SilvrcpMg 6.75 +.19
MarathnO 31.09 +1.24 Omncre 35.53 +.63 QntmDSS 1.66 +.02 SimonProp 162.70 +1.04
MarathPet 55.61 +.94 OnAssign 19.09 +1.90 Questar 20.18 +.03 Skedichers 21.42 +.30
MMVGold 53.86 1.34 ONEOK 47.0 +13 QsilvRes 4.49 +.24 SmithAO 56.50 -.02
MVOilSvs 43.36 +.75 OneokPrs 58.79 +.48 Quiksilvr 3.47 -.12 SmithfF 20.59 +.32
MVSemin 33.32 50 Oshkoshp 29.76 +2.26 RPCs 14.12 +.28 Smuder 86.11 -.93
MkVRus 30.98 +.55 OwensCorn 34.77 +1.24 RPM 2915 24 Sony 1305 55
MkVJrGId 2468 +.63 we 197 +. RadianGrp 4.72 +.17 Soerlnd 52.48 -.23
MarntA 41.60 +.62 RadioShk 2.79 +.06 SouthnCo 45.05 -.87
MarshM 3490 +2 22 Ralcorp 72.85 +.08 SthnCopper 36.92 +1.23
MStewrt 2.94 -.02 PG&EC 43.25 -.08 RangeRs 70.10 -.60 SwstAirl 9.07 -.04
Maso 15.80 +.47 PNC 66.78 +1.04 Ramesn 38.59 +27 SwsthEy 35.64 -12
McDrmlnt 13.32 +.66 PNMRes 20.68 +.04 Rayonier 51.44 +.61 SpecaEn 28.80 -.01
McDnlds 91.70 +.13 PPG 118.84 +.26 Raytheon 57.81 -.59 SpiritAero 23.77 -.17
McGrwH 53.51 -.32 PPLCorp 29.07 -.17 Rltylnmo 42.20 +.06 SprintNex 5.26 +.06
McKesson 87.40 -.55 PVR Ps 25.25 +.38 RedHat 60.00 +1.01 SprottGold 15.17 +.11
McMoRn 13.35 +.10 PallCorp 64.08 +1.28 RegionsFn 7.62 +.03 SP Mals 38.35 +.47
McEwenM 4.68 +.08 Pandora 11.35 +.77 Renren 4.02 +.10 SP HIthC 39.67 -.16
Mechel 7.94 +.49 ParkerHan 86.38 +.76 RepubSvc 28.61 -.23 SP CnSt 35.78 -.27
Medids 43.47 -.03 PeabdyE 25.61 +.77 ResrceCap 6.02 +.07 SPConsum 47.71 +.19
Mednic 43.05 +.75 Pengrthg 7.31 +.15 Revlon 14.72 -.02 SP Engy 76.57 +1.00
Merck 43.62 -1.04 PennWstg 16.44 +.41 ReynAmer 43.96 +.03 SPDRFncl 16.28 +.13
Meritr 5.23 +.36 Penney 28.82 +16 RioTinto 53.18 +1.91 SPInds 37.76 +.23
Merilor b.23 +.3b Penney 2Q.Q +.1 RitaAid 1.33 +.03 SPTeoh 31.58 +.15
MetLife 36.25 +.79 PepBoy 10.22 +.23 RiteAid 1.33 +03 SPTech 31.58 +15
MetroPCS 10.63 +.15 PepsiCo 70.46 -.42
MeroHIth 8.50 -.09 PerkElm 30.36 +.96
MKorsn 53.59 -.55 Prmian 15.98 +.27
MidAApt 68.66 +.84 PerbrsA 23.32 +56
MobileTele 19.18 -.49 Petrobras 24.18 +.64 The r a inder of the
Molymorp 13.43 +.72 Pfizer 23.80 -.45 The remainder of the
MoneyGrs 15.63 -.07 PhilipMor 89.48 -.67 NYSE listings can be
Monsanto 88.97 -.93 Phillips66n 46.73 +.09 NYSE be
MonsrWw 8.24 -.26 PiedNG 3253 -.01 found on th next page.
Moodys 43.82 +.07 Pier 1 19.78 +.07 un n t e next page.
MorgStan 18.24 +.34 PimmoStrat 12.54 +.16


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.85 +.09
AbdnChile 15.26 -.39
AbdnEMTel 20.70 +.35
Acquityn 10.35 +.33
AdmRsc 36.44 +.03
Advenbx .68 -.01
AlexoRg 4.56 +.24
AlldNevG 39.11 +1.08
AlmadnMg 2.89 -.01
AmApparel 1.39 -.05
AfatsaRg .16 +.03
Augustag 3.07 +.28


Aurizong 4.95 +.05 ClghGlbOp 11.62 +.05
AvalnRare 2.29 +.31 CornstProg 5.63
Bacterin 1.48 -.12 CrSuiHiY 3.28 +.01
Banrog 4.82 +.19 Crosshrg .18 +.01
BarcUBS36 45.32 +.44
BarcGSOil 24.23 +.26
BrigusGg .98 +.01 DejourEg .19 +.00
BritATob 102.27 -.59 DenisnMg 1.46 +.03
CardiumTh .21 -.00 EVLtdDur 16.68 -.07
CelSd .38 +.04 EVMuni2 13.69 -.11
CFCdag 23.79 +.11 EllswthFd 7.25 -.06
CheniereEn 16.80 +.11 EmeraldOil 1.11 +.04
CheniereE 26.15 +.70 EnovaSys .13 +.01
ChinaShen .44 -.03 ExeterRgs 1.91
ClaudeRg .90 -.01 FrkStPrp 12.17 +.24


GamGldNR 14.61 +.04
GascoEngy .17 +.00
Gastargrs 1.88 -.01
GenMoly 3.19 +.12
GeoGloblR .13 -.01
GoldResrc 21.81 +.97
GoldStdVg 2.04 +.19
GoldenMin 5.86 -1.16
GoldStg 1.79 +.10
GranTrrag 5.51 +.09
GrtBasGg .09 -.00
GtPanSilvg 2.37 -.01
Hemisphrx .80 -.03


HstnAEn 1.24 -.03
ImmunoCII 2.90 +.04
ImpacMtg 6.89 -1.07
ImpOilgs 48.80 -.03
InovioPhm .58 -.01
IntellgSys 1.55
IntTowerg 3.01 -.07


KeeganRg 3.91 -.14
KimberRg .75 -.01
LadThalFn 1.40
LkShrGldg 1.04 -.02
LongweiPI 1.48 -.03
LucasEngy 1.88 +.03


NovaBayP 1.43 -.06
NovaCppn 2.51 +.18
MeetMe 2.49 +.06 NovaGd 5.88 +.34 SamsO&G 1.21 -.03
Metalio 2.84 +.03 Sandstgrs 10.69 +.38
MdwGoldg 1.42 -.03 ParaG&S 2.70 -.03 SilverBull .50 -.04
MinoGg .78 +.02 PlatGpMet 1.27 ... SilvrCrstg 2.85 -.10
NavideaBio 2.82 +.16 PolyMetg 1.16 -.02 SprottRLg 1.45
NeoStem .70 +.01 PyramidOil 4.77 +.42 TanzRyg 4.85 -.06
NBRESec 4.85 +.04 Quaterrag .34 -.01 Taseko 3.48 +.08
Neuralstem 1.15 -.23 QuestRMg 1.54 +.07 TrnsafiPet 1.11 +.05
Nevsung 4.48 -.18 RareEleg 4.93 +.25 TriangPet 7.60 +.36
NwGoldg 11.85 +.15 Rentech 2.49 +.09 Tuowsg 1.32 -.07
NAPallg 2.27 +.12 RexahnPh .49 -.01 UQMTech 1.56 +.19
NDynMng 4.02 +.19 Richmntg 4.84 +.16 USGeoth .34 +.01
NthnO&G 19.39 +.44 Rubiong 3.86 +.17 Ur-Energy .00 -.02


Uranerz 1.79 +.02
UraniumEn 2.77 +.02


VangTotW 49.94 +.38
VantageDrl 1.75 +.04
VirnetX 29.13 +.37
VistaGold 3.50 -.04
Vringo 3.55 +.05
Walterlnv 37.10 +1.13
WFAdvlnco 10.67 +.05
WTDrfChn 25.32 +.02
YMBiog 1.78 +.03
ZBBEngy .31 +.00


I AASDAQ NATIONAL5MARKET 11


Name Last Chg


ACIWwde 45.35 +.14
AMCNet 41.81 +.71
ASMLHId 57.13 +.97
Abiomed 20.29 -.81
Abraxas 2.36 +.10
AcadaTc 28.77 +.66
AcadiaHIn 22.71 -.02
AcadiaPh 2.12 +.03
Accuray 5.91 +.01
Achillion 8.42 +.12
AcmePkt 19.65 +.83
AordaTh 25.47 -.28
AcfvePw h .80 -.00
AcfivsBliz 12.11 +.11
Acxiom 18.50 -.01
AdobeSy 33.34 +.53
Adtan 20.31 +.22
AEternagh .61 -.06
Affymax 20.95 +.50
Aftymetix 4.12 +.03
AkamaiT 39.03 +.86
Akorn 14.30 -.36
AlaskCom 2.26
Alexion 110.47 +.01
AlignTech 38.22 -.95
Alkermes 19.15 +.24
AllotComm 27.51 -.09
AllscriptH 11.48 -.02
AlnylamP 20.87 +.68
AlteraCplf 38.16 +.54
AlterraCap 24.36 +.67
Amarin 14.16 -.03
Amazon 261.27 +1.03
Amedisys 15.40 -.16
ACapAgy 36.49 +.33
AmCapLd 11.91 +.08
ACapMtg 26.23 +.40
ARltyCTn 12.10 -.01
Amgen 81.36 -1.97
AmkorTch 4.84 +.12
Amsurg 27.63 -1.25
AnalogDev 41.68 +.79
Anlogic 80.44 +11.25
Analystlnt 3.89 +.09
Ancestry 30.95 -.19
AngiesLn 11.45 +.43
Ansys 73.03 +.64
AntaresP 3.96 +.02
AntheraPh .93 -.02
A123Sysh .31 -.02
ApolloGrp 29.42 +.55
Apollolnv 8.30 +.10
Apple Inc 691.28 +8.30
ApldMaf 12.05 +.20
AMCC 5.73 +.19
Approach 34.61 +1.15
ArQule 5.55 +.01
ArchCap 41.15 -.01
ArenaPhm 8.35 +.04
AresCap 17.44 +.09
AriadP 23.16 +.39
Ariba Inc 44.71 -.01
ArkBest 8.43 +.01
ArmHId 28.37 +.87
ArrayBio 5.39
Arris 14.07 +.15
ArubaNet 22.38 +1.56
AscenaRts 21.38 +.46
AscentSolr 1.83 +.06
AspenTech 26.22 +.41
AssodBanc 13.79 +.38
AstexPhm 3.31 -.04
athenahlth 90.47 -2.03
AfasAir 56.60 -.37
Atmel 6.49 +.23
Audiencen 6.96 +.14
AuthenTec 8.05 +.01
Autodesk 33.47 +.74
AutoData 58.45 +.67
Auxilium 23.35 -.50
AvagoTch 35.06 -.01
AvanirPhm 3.46
AviatNetw 2.57 -.03
AvisBudg 17.40 +.51


Aware 6.16 -.17 CityTIcms 4.69 -.38
Axcelis 1.07 +.02 CleanEngy 14.09 +.17
BBCNBcp 13.01 +.04 Clearwire 1.62 +.01
B/EAero 41.58 +.61 ClevBioLh 2.12 -.11
BGCPts 5.09 +.13 CoffeeH 7.72 -.57
BMCSft 43.09 +.13 CogentC 20.89 -.01
Baidu 115.62 +5.79 CognizTech 71.00 +.96
Bazaarvcn 14.45 -.14 CogoGrp 2.04 +.26
BeacnRfg 30.41 +.14 Coinstar 52.63 +.69
BeasleyB 5.35 +.04 ColdwCrkh .72
BebeSts 5.17 -.03 ColumLab .92 -.03
BedBath 71.60 +1.30 Comcast 35.30 +.05
BioDlvrylf 5.86 +.12 Comcspd 34.45 +.04
BioFuelrs 8.98 +2.57 CmcBMO 42.55 +1.01
Biogenldc 154.24 +1.74 CommSys 10.70 -.20
BioMarin 38.07 -.20 CommVlt 58.25 +1.80
BioSanters 1.53 +.10 CmplGnom 2.67 -.03
BioScrip 8.50 +.09 CompCred 4.25 -.12
BIkRKelso 10.54 +.22 Compuwre 10.13 +.11
Blckbaud 24.33 +.38 Comverse 6.49 +.09
BloominBn 14.40 +.15 ConcurTch 75.63 +.40
Bluora 17.70 +.62 Conmed 28.34 +.78
BobEvans 40.86 -.28 ConstantC 19.84 +.48
BodyCentrl 9.28 +.19 Coparts 27.75 -.15
BonTon 13.99 +.23 Corcept 2.67 -.16
BostPrv 10.16 +.06 CorinthC 2.57 +.16
BreitBurn 19.50 +.30 CorOnDem 29.55 +.28
Brightcvn 12.49 +.03 CornerTher 5.06 -.04
Brighpnt 8.96 ... Cost 102.19 -.57
Broadcom 36.23 +.06 CowenGp 2.90 +.11
BroadSoft 40.27 +.81 CreeInc 29.01 +1.00
BrcdeCm 6.39 +.12 Crocs 17.84 +.33
BrooksAuto 8.48 +.28 CrosstexE 13.46 +.27
BrukerCp 13.29 +.20 CrosstxLP 15.06 +.56
BuffabWW 83.55 -.08 Ctrip.om 18.36 +1.06
BldrFstSrc 5.06 +.05 CubistPh 48.44 +.62
CAInc 27.31 +.03 Curis 4.23 -.11
CBOE 29.30 +.30 Cyberonics 50.10 +.05
CH Robins 57.27 +.03 Cymer 56.94 -.11
CMEGrps 58.89 -.46 CypSemi 13.16 +.48
CNinsure 6.32 +.14 Cori 3.94 +.21
CSGSys 22.68 +.37
CTC Media 9.46 +.59
CVBFnd 12.74 +.14 DARABio 1.09 +.22
CadencePh 3.86 +.07 DFCGlbl 19.43 +.74
Cadence 13.54 -.07 Daktronics 9.65
Caesars n 7.57 +.22 DeclrsOut 48.92 +3.31
CalaGDyln 8.54 +.01 Delcath 1.70 -.01
CalaStTR 10.27 +.07 Dell Inc 10.83 +.20
Callidus 4.81 -.09 Dndreon 4.74 -.01
CalumetSp 29.15 -.77 Dennys 5.06 +.06
CdnSolar 3.03 +.14 Dentsply 37.66 +.08
CapCtyBk 10.02 +.03 DexCom 13.50 -.51
CapFedFn 11.99 -.01 DiamndFhlf 19.78 +.85
CpstnTrbh 1.03 ... DigitalGen 12.29 +.02
Cardiomgh .31 -.01 DigRiver 17.30 +.29
CareerEd 4.04 +.22 Diodes 19.54 +.38
Carrizo 29.25 +1.31 DirecTV 54.13 -.06
CarverBrs 4.00 ... DiscCmAh 58.75 +.60
CatalystPh 1.39 +.01 DiscCmCh 54.44 +.42
Catamaran 94.97 -.97 DiscovLab 3.34 -.07
CathayGen 18.14 +.25 DishNetwk 33.07 -.08
Cavium 36.20 +1.67 DollarTrs 47.20 +.35
Celgene 76.27 +1.18 DonlleyRR 11.86 +.07
CellTherrs 2.88 -.06 DragonWg 2.52 +.11
CelldexTh 5.88 +.13 DrmWksA 18.11 +.29
Celsion 5.10 +.15 DryShips 2.59 +.09
CentEurolf 3.29 ... Dunkin 30.18 -.08
CEurMed 7.63 +.36 Dynavax 4.55 +.03
CentAI 8.41 +.46 E-Trade 9.88 +.32
Cepheid 39.70 +.35 eBay 49.97 +1.10
Cereplasth .23 +.01 EagleBurs 3.64 +.39
Cerner 72.03 -1.21 EaglRkEn 9.61 +.06
Chartlnds 74.85 +1.06 ErthLink 7.20 +.01
CharterCm 82.54 +.91 EstWstBcp 22.92 +.40
ChkPoint 47.51 -1.15 EducDevh 4.00 -.01
Cheesecake 35.05 -.04 8x8 Inc 6.39 +.06
ChelseaTh 1.28 +.01 ElectSd 13.12 +.19
ChildPlace 60.67 +1.85 ElectArts 14.50 +.26
ChipMOS 15.66 +.64 EndoPhrm 33.68 +.07
ChrchllD 58.20 -.38 Endobgix 12.54 -.47
CienaCorp 14.86 +.72 EnerNOC 11.93 +.45
CinnFin 39.89 +.05 EngyXXI 37.37 +.84
Cintas 41.72 -.50 Entegris 9.13 +.06
Cirrus 44.18 +2.38 EntopCom 6.45 +.07
Ciso 19.49 +.13 Envivion 2.26 +.07
CitzRepBc 20.03 +.04 Equinix 195.28 -5.22
CitrixSys 81.74 +1.43 Ericsson 9.66 +.12


ExactSdh 10.32 -.09 IPGPhoton 65.38 +.99
Exelixis 5.24 +.11 iRobot 26.37 +.14
ExideTc 3.18 -.02 iShAsiaexJ 56.87 +.84
Expedias 55.88 +.31 iShACWI 48.08 +.33
Expdlnf 39.16 +.05 iShNsdqBio 141.76 +1.29
ExpScripts 62.84 -.09 lonixBr 19.70 +.01
ExtmNet 3.56 +.01 IdenixPh 5.68 -.23
Ezorp 24.90 +.51 Illumina 47.79 +1.31
F5Netwks 103.67 +3.28 ImunoGn 14.71 +.09
FLIRSys 21.08 +.22 ImpaxLabs 24.05 -.13
FXEner 7.92 -.60 inContact 6.23 +.41
Facebookn 22.00 +1.29 Incyte 17.88 +.50
Fastenal 44.26 +1.40 Infinera 6.15 +.27
FifthStin 10.89 +.05 InfinityPh 20.69 +.37
FifthThird 15.78 +.17 Informat 38.67 +1.14
Fndlnst 19.20 +.16 Infosys 48.15 +.82
Finisar 16.77 +.88 IntgDv 6.37 +.16
FinLine 23.51 -.06 Intel 23.37 +.01
FstCashFn 47.27 +.75 InteractB 14.47 +.13
FMidBc 13.26 +.34 InterDig 35.39 -.12
FstNiagara 8.42 +.15 Intrface 14.61 +.71
FstSolar 24.61 +2.01 InterMune 9.00 +.09
FstMerit 15.22 -.01 InlBcsh 20.14 +.42
Fiserv 71.79 -.36 InlSpdw 28.59 +.57
FiveBelwn 36.00 +2.08 Intersil 9.60 +.19
Flextn 6.61 +.16 Intuit 60.28 +.31
FocusMda 24.29 +.30 IntSurg 501.65 +11.93
ForcePro 5.55 ... InvRIEst 8.31 +.09
FormFac 5.76 +.29 IronwdPh 13.31 +.15
Fortnet 27.68 +.06 Isis 14.63 +.14
Fossil Inc 93.60 +9.60 IsleCapri 6.94 +.09
FosterWhl 24.56 +.78 IvanhoeEh .65 +.01
Francesca 31.66 +.17 Ixa 14.99 -.07
FreshMkt 57.97 +.37
FronterCm 4.65 -.14
FuelCell .93 +.02 JA Solar .83
Fullarde 7.99 -.26 JDSUniph 13.45 +.54
FultonFncl 10.65 +.44 JacklnBox 28.70 +.10
FushiCo 9.05 .06 Jamba 2.53 +.03
JamesRiv 3.28 +.12
JazzPhrm 48.12 +.05
GTAdvTc 6.52 +.19 JetBlue 4.95 -.10
GalenaBio 1.89 -.02 JiveSoftn 14.91 +.38
Garmin 42.45 +1.03 KEYWHId 12.99 -.30
Gentex 18.97 +.50 KITDigif 3.01 -.03
Genfvah 12.56 +.04 KLATnc 52.48 +1.00
GeronCp 1.41 -.01 KaiserAlu 58.70 -.45
Gevo 3.47 +.02 KeryxBio 2.42 +.01
GileadSd 62.02 +1.78 Kraft 39.93 -.20
Globalstrh .39 +.01 KratosDef 5.07 +.10
GlbSpcMet 17.04 +1.25 Kulicke 12.00 +.28
GluMobile 4.97 +.18 LKQCorp 39.10 +.17
GolLNGLd 40.47 +1.82 LPL Find 30.15 +.16
Google 709.68 +3.64 LS Indlf 6.85 +.43
GrCanyEd 23.57 +.27 LamResrch 34.35 +.44
GrLkDrge 7.80 ... LamarAdv 32.92 +.48
GreenMtC 31.09 -.36 Lattce 4.42 +.07
GreenPlns 5.97 +.24 Layne 20.72 +1.55
Grifolsrs 21.44 +.26 LeapWirlss 6.07 +.04
Grouponn 5.27 +.51 LexPhrm 2.47 -.10
Grpoin 5.76 +.10 LibGlobA 58.37 +.59
GulfportE 31.56 +1.93 LibCapA 104.49 +.39
HMN Fn 2.84 LibtylntA 19.26 +.51
HMSHdgs 32.52 -.16 LibMedrt 13.00 -1.00
HSNInc 48.13 +.91 LibVentAn 49.05 -.80
HainCel 67.95 -1.05 LifeTech 48.94 +1.37
Halozyme 6.34 +.16 LifePtH 43.27 +.73
HancHId 33.10 +1.05 Lifevantge 3.42 +.05
HansenMed 1.56 -.07 LincElec 42.31 +.48
Harmonic 4.95 +.04 LinearTch 33.67 +.20
Hasbro 39.96 +.89 Linktone 2.27 -.30
HawHold 5.82 -.11 LinnEngy 40.87 +1.16
HrfndEx 13.43 -.39 Lionbrdg 3.42 +.07
HSchein 77.07 -.43 Liquidity 53.77 +2.81
HercOffsh 4.71 +.14 LivePrsn 18.69 -.23
HimaxTch 2.07 +.08 LodgeNeth .42 -.02
HiSoftTech 11.40 +.12 Logitech 9.53 +.24
Hologic 20.95 +.74 LogMeln 23.88 +.41
HmLnSvcn 15.79 -.01 LookSmth .84 -.01
HomeAway 24.60 +.56 Lulkin 61.98 +4.01
HorizPhm 4.75 +.09 luuluemns77.99 .83
HorsehdH 10.34 +.10
HotTopic 9.12 .15
HubGroup 30.80 -.35 MAPPhm 15.41 +.31
HudsCity 7.94 +.12 MCGCap 5.28 +.05
HuntJB 52.34 -.18 MGE 52.72 +.54
HuntBncsh 7.20 +.15 MIPSTech 7.16 +.02
IAC Inter 52.65 +.52 MTS 54.36 +.54


MagelnHI 50.44 +.54 PDLBio 7.54 +.06
Majesco 1.53 -.09 PLXTch 6.27 +.18
MAKOSrg 17.15 -.43 PMCSra 6.37 +.11
MannKd 2.66 +.06 PSSWrld 23.18 +.48
MarvellT 10.34 +.14 Paccar 43.05 +1.23
Masimo 24.07 +.89 Pacerlnf 3.95 +.06
Mattel 36.17 +.51 PacBbsd 2.03 +.04
Maximlntg 28.17 +.79 PacEthanh .50 +.08
MaxwlT 8.95 +.29 PacSunwr 2.40 +.06
Maxygen 2.66 -.06 PaciraPhm 17.07 +.17
MedicAchn 3.64 +.06 PanASlv 20.56 +.95
MediCo 25.49 -.11 PaneraBrd 170.49 +2.31
Medivafon 101.43 -1.75 ParamTch 24.30 +.56
MeloCrwn 13.15 +.17 Parexel 30.65 +.30
Mellanox 101.42 -2.63 ParkerVsn 2.49 -.17
MentorGr 16.94 -.25 Patterson 34.39 -.16
MercadoL 88.57 +4.07 PattUTI 17.44 +.40
MergeHIth 3.91 +.26 Paychex 34.46 +.32
MeridBio 18.29 -.03 Pendrell 1.19 -.02
Metabolix 1.67 +.02 PnnNGm 40.88 -.41
Methanx 29.36 +.36 PennantPk 11.34 +.18
Microchp 34.35 ... PensonWh .09 +.01
MicronT 6.70 +.10 PeopUdF 12.45 +.01
MicrosSys 53.14 +.40 PeregrinP 3.96 -.01
MicroSemi 21.84 +1.22 PerfectWd 11.27 +.19
Microsoft 31.21 +.28 Perrigo 112.45 +1.54
Mindspeed 3.40 -.05 PetSmart 68.69 -1.35
Misonix 3.00 -.03 Pharmacyc 62.46 -3.17
MitekSys 4.63 -.04 PhysnsFm 4.90 +.04
Molex 27.95 +.08 PluristemT 3.83 -.02
Momenta 14.96 +.22 Polyom 12.01 +.71
MonPwSys 21.18 +.28 Popularrs 18.74 +.54
MonstBvs 53.77 +.36 Potlatch 38.27 +.50
Moticityh .60 +.05 Power-One 6.14 +.05
Moticityrt .03 ... PwShsQQQ 70.18 +.62
Movers 8.99 +.76 Pwrwvrsh .55 -.04
Mylan 24.30 +.04 Presstekh .50 +.01
MyriadG 27.53 +.45 PriceTR 65.81 +1.53
NETgear 39.25 -.45 priceline 637.48 +10.55
NICESys 30.59 -.13 PrivateB 17.27 +.48
NIIHIdg 6.72 +.16 PrUPQQQs 64.45 +1.61
NPSPhm 8.39 -.01 PrognicsPh 3.65 -.09
NXPSemi 26.67 +.24 PUShQQQrs34.75 -.97
Nanosphere 3.29 +.08 ProspctCap 12.07 +.03
NasdOMX 24.47 +.26 PureBiors 1.10 -.07
NatPenn 9.67 +.14 PureCycle 2.00 -.03
NektarTh 9.24 +.35 QIAGEN 18.84 +.35
NeptuneTg 4.47 -.10 QlikTech 25.28 +1.03
NetApp 35.81 +.53 Qlogic 12.92 +.30
NetEase 51.67 +.92 Qualom 64.88 +1.03
Netfiix 60.52 +2.52 QualityS s 19.62 +.54
NetSpend 9.18 -.22 QuestSft 27.98 +.01
NYMtgTr 7.31 +.25 Questor 50.05 -.74
Newport 13.17 +.15 QuickLog 3.22 +.02
NewsCpA 24.67 +.31 RFMicD 4.30 +.23
NewsCpB 24.91 +.18 Rambus 5.07 +.17
NexxusLhIf .38 +.00 Randgold 120.34 +5.99
NobltyHIf 5.78 ... RealPage 24.13 -1.89
Nordson 62.40 +.01 Rdiff.cm 4.33 +.46
NorTrst 49.13 +.25 Regenrn 149.68 +2.79
NwstBcsh 12.45 +.09 RenewEnn 6.11 +.70
Novavax 1.89 ... RentACt 37.10 +.40
NuVasive 22.23 +.59 ReprosTh 15.28 -.20
NuanceCm 25.79 +.18 RschMotn 7.56 +.14
Nvidia 13.84 +.17 Responsys 10.49 +.65
NxStageMd 13.26 -.39 RexEnergy 14.41 +.43
OCZTech 4.55 -.07 RigelPh 10.41 -.01
OReillyAu 80.37 -1.16 RiverbedT 22.82 +.83
OceanRign 18.02 +.12 RosttaGrs 5.28 -.01
Oclaro 3.15 +.11 RosettaR 49.74 +2.76
OdysMar 3.69 +.07 RossSts s 68.04 +.20
OldDomFs 30.89 -.79 RoviCorp 16.60 +.48
OmniVisn 16.95 +.46 RoyGId 94.55 +2.91
OnSmcnd 6.95 +.25 RoyaleEn 2.94 +.48
Onolytg 2.40 -.13 RubionTc 9.70 +.43
Oneothyr 5.74 +.14 Ranair 32.70 +.64
OnyxPh 76.67 +.62
OpenTbleh 49.20 +1.36
OpbmerPh 15.75 -.09 SBACom 59.54 -.52
Oracle 32.95 +.33 SEIInv 22.83 +.57
OraSure 10.22 +.03 SLMCp 16.78 +.19
Orexigen 5.56 +.07 SS&CTech 24.94 +.90
Orthfx 43.17 +.68 STEC 7.26 +.13
OtterTail 23.70 +.04 SalixPhm 42.92 +.44
Overstk 9.82 +.30 SanDisk 45.69 +.32
SangBio 6.46 +.22
Sanmina 9.54 +.42
PDCEngy 33.75 +1.15 Santarus 8.52 +.15


Sapient 10.65 -.02 TractSupp 97.00 -.74
Sareptars 13.93 -.01 TrimbleN 53.41 +1.36
SavientPh 1.84 +.26 TripAdvn 36.06 -.28
Schnitzer 31.45 -.59 TriQuint 5.95 +.19
SciClone 4.77 +.03 TrueReig 22.77 -.21
SciGames 8.37 +.10
SeagateT 30.48 +.17 TrstNY 5.89 +07
SearsHldgs 61.71 +1.89 Trusbk 25.54 +.43
SearsHmrt 2.33 +.02 21Vianet 11.04 +.07
SeattGen 27.31 +.02 UTStarcm 1.12 +.06
SelCmfrt 33.58 +.64 UTiWrldwd 13.96 -.21
Selectvlns 19.03 +.17 Ubiquitfn 12.80 -.13
Semtech 27.07 +.94 UltaSalon 100.87 +.71
Sequenom 4.08 +.08 Umpqua 13.62 +38
SvcSource 9.78 +.09 2
ShandaG s 3.84 +.09 UBWV 25.76 +1.07
Shire 92.50 -.56 UdNF 59.67 +69
ShufiMstr 14.94 +.20 UtdOnln 5.64 +.01
Shutterfly 33.74 +1.43 US Enr 2.37 +.09
SigmaAld 73.72 +.57 UtdTherap 57.15 +2.25
SignatBk 69.01 +2.26 UnivDisp 43.58 +.52
SilicGrln 9.40 -.01 UnivFor 41.80 +.47
Silinlmg 5.09 +.06 UnwiredP 1.91 -.02
SilinMotn 16.31 +1.87 UranmRsh 63 +.11
Slmware 5.80 +.05
SIcnware 5.80 +.05 UrbanOut 39.71 +.21
SilvStdg 16.08 +.16 Urba t
Sina 67.63 +.73
Sindair 12.45 +.05
SiriusXM 2.47 -.01 VCA Ant 20.30 +.01
Skullcandy 13.09 +1.17 VOXX Inf 7.82 +.13
SkyWest 10.80 +.59 ValVisA 2.15 +.26
SkywksSol 29.61 +.68 ValueClick 17.38 +.32
SmartBal 11.75 +.57 VanSTCpB 80.29 +.08
SmithWes 10.55 -.26 Veemlnst 37.76 +1.17
SodaStrm 40.96 -.25 Veli 8.84 +21
Sohu.cm 44.28 +1.24 rad 61 61
Solazyme 11.33 +.05 VBradley 23.61 +61
SonicCorp 10.20 +.04 VerintSys 28.31 +.15
Sonus 2.13 +.08 Verisign 47.78 -.23
SouMoBc 24.02 +.77 Verisk 47.68 -.40
Sourcefire 54.91 -1.24 VertxPh 58.08 +1.87
SpectPh 12.01 -.25 ViaSat 40.62 +.68
SpiritAir 16.58 -3.08 ViacomB 52.13 -.13
Splunkn 39.08 +1.27 ical 3.99 -.03
Spreadtm 20.99 +.72 ir 2.76 +1.21
Staples 12.21 +.25
StarBulkh .54 +.02 VirgnMdah 29.80 -.21
StarSdent 3.63 +.01 ViroPhrm 28.07 +.17
Starbucks 50.46 -1.26 Vivus 22.08 -.31
SfDynam 13.01 +.61 Vodafone 28.47 -.29
StemCells 2.05 -.03 Volterra 23.73 +.13
Stericyde 93.17 -.15 WarnerCh 12.96 +.07
Stratasys 64.36 +.81 WarrenRs 3.37 +.16
SunesisPh 4.73 +.34 WashFed 17.14 +16
SunPower 4.91 +.13
SunshHrtn 8.74 +.34 Web.com 18.20 +34
support.cm 4.06 +.17 WebMD 15.01 +.20
SusqBnc 11.17 +.28 WendysCo 4.58 +.03
SwisherHIf 1.80 +.02 WernerEnt 21.93 -1.74
Symantec 19.14 -.06 WAmBcp 48.52 -.18
Symetricm 6.73 +.09 WDigital 41.06 -1.52
Synaorn 7.60 +.14 Wesimrd 9.45 +.20
Synaptcs 26.66 -.14 Wstptlnng 30.83 -1.00
Synchron 24.49 +.17 Weel 3.13 +
Synopsys 33.61 -.34 e .0
SyntaPhm 8.03 -.02 WholeFd 97.76 -.20
TICCCap 10.81 +.01 WillsLpfA 10.86 -.14
TTMTCh 10.87 +.18 WilshBcp 6.67 +.03
twteleom 25.81 +.11 Windstm 10.78 +.08
TakeTwo 10.93 +.24 Wynn 113.02 +3.00
Tangoe 14.45 -.33 XOMA 3.76 +.18
TASER 5.75 +.33 Xinx 35.23 +.37
TechData 50.35 +1.00 YRCrs 7.04 +.03
TICmSys 2.20 +.11
TeleTech 17.77 -.10 Yaho 15.77 +18
Tellabs 3.78 +.14 Yandex 24.72 +.65
TescoCp 11.06 +.56 Yongye 4.32 -.20
TeslaMot 30.39 +.91 Zagg 8.45 -.18
TesseraTch 14.91 +.01 Zalicus .87 -.02
TxCapBsh 48.59 +.98 ZebraT 38.41 +.02
Texlnst 29.56 +.66 allow 42.72 -1.55
TexRdhse 17.11 -.41 onBcp 21.35 +.41
Theravnce 26.15 +.44
ThrshdPhm 8.72 -.02 opharm 5.53 +.08
TibcoSft 31.44 +.42 Zpcar 7.95 +.09
TitanMach 20.30 +.73 Zogenix 2.40
TiVoInc 9.84 +.03 Zumiez 28.30 -.91
TowerGrp 19.19 +.35 Zyngan 3.18 +.22


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.6630 4.6640
Australia .9468 .9484
Bahrain .3769 .3770
Brazil 2.0140 2.0206
Britain 1.6223 1.6154
Canada .9702 .9694
Chile 469.75 474.00
China 6.3195 6.3309
Colombia 1787.50 1802.50
Czech Rep 18.57 18.80
Denmark 5.6837 5.7409
Dominican Rep 39.25 39.25
Egypt 6.0975 6.0935
Euro .7624 .7701
Hong Kong 7.7516 7.7541
Hungary 214.58 216.79
India 54.315 55.415
Indnsia 9505.00 9587.00
Israel 3.8904 3.9365
Japan 78.30 77.45
Jordan .7078 .7080
Lebanon 1503.50 1503.50
Malaysia 3.0420 3.0805
Mexico 12.7160 12.8272
N. Zealand 1.2063 1.2037
Norway 5.6898 5.7214
Peru 2.600 2.609
Poland 3.10 3.13
Russia 30.5136 31.0876
Singapore 1.2199 1.2255
So. Africa 8.2100 8.2469
So. Korea 1116.30 1128.55
Sweden 6.5620 6.5756
Switzerlnd .9274 .9348
Taiwan 29.36 29.66
Thailand 30.79 30.88
Turkey 1.7923 1.8013
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6730
Uruguay 21.1999 21.2499
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2949


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.10 0.11
6-month 0.13 0.14
5-year 0.71 0.65
10-year 1.87 1.67
30-year 3.09 2.83



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Oct 12 99.00 +.69
Corn CBOT Dec 12 782 +8/4
Wheat CBOT Dec12 92414 +22/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov 12 1739 -81/4
Cattle CME Oct 12 127.05 -.50
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 12 19.91 +.20
Orange Juice ICE Nov 12 132.15 +2.85


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1769.80 $1737.50
Silver (troy oz., spot) $34.603 $33.b33
Copper (pound) $3.8515 $3.6560
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1/13./0 $1596.30

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ........ 5.87 -.57-28.9 Lowes .64 2.2 19 29.40 +.38 +15.8
AT&TInc 1.76 4.7 50 37.26 -.89+23.2 McDnlds 2.80 3.1 17 91.70 +.13 -8.6
Ameteks .24 .7 21 36.14 +.61 +28.8 Microsoft .80 2.6 16 31.21 +.28 +20.2
ABlnBev 1.57 1.8 ... 85.37 +.08 +40.0 MotrlaSolu 1.04 2.1 25 50.54 +.42 +9.2
BkofAm .04 .4 10 9.55 +.15 +71.8 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 13 67.79 -.91+11.4
CapCtyBk ......... 10.02 +.03 +4.9 Penney ...... 8.82 +.16-18.0
ntryLink 2.90 6.8 47 42.37 -.54 +139 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 13 17.91 +.21 +5.1
Citigroup .04 .1 10 34.79 +.34+32.2 RegionsFn .04 .5 18 7.62 +.03 +77.2
CmwREIT .0012.9 21 15.52 +08 -6.7 SearsHldgs .33 61.71 +1.89 +94.2
wREITSmucker .08 2.4 1 86.11 -.93+10.2
Disney .60 1.1 17 52.35 -.25+39.6 SprintNex ......5.26 +.06+124.8
DukeEnrs 3.06 4.8 17 64.19 -.47 Texlnst .68 2.3 21 29.56 +.66 +1.5
EnterPT 3.00 6.2 22 48.11 +.17+10.1 TimeWarn 1.04 2.3 17 44.71 +.38 +23.7
ExxonMbl 2.28 2.5 12 92.30 +1.07 +8.9 UniFirst .15 .2 15 68.30 +.14 +20.4
FordM .20 1.9 9 10.53 +.19 -2.1 VerizonCm 2.06 4.6 45 44.53 -1.05 +11.0
GenElec .68 3.1 18 22.11 +.09 +23.5 Vodafone 1.99 7.0 ... 28.47 -.29 +1.6
HomeDp 1.16 2.0 21 59.46 +1.16 +41.4 WalMart 1.59 2.1 16 74.50 -.64 +24.7
Intel .90 3.9 10 23.37 +.01 -3.6 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 12 36.02 ... +9.0
IBM 3.401.6 15206.81 +.45+12.5 YRC rs ........ 7.04 +.03-29.4


m







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 A7


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: MultCGrA 9.05 +.08
Balancp 17.28 +.05 InBosA 5.95 +.01
Retlnc 8.93 -.02 LgCpVal 19.91 +.09
Alger Funds B: NatlMunlnc 10.11 -.01
SmCapGr 7.28 +.07 SpEqtA 16.87 +.18
AllianceBern A: TradGvA 7.38 -.01
BalanAp 17.44 +.05 Eaton Vance B:
GIbThGrAp66.86 +1.34 HIthSBt 10.71 -.02
SmCpGrA 41.13 +.48 NatlMulnc 10.11 -.01
AllianceBern Adv: Eaton Vance C:
LgCpGrAd 31.51 +.26 GovtCp 7.37 -.01
AllianceBern B: NatMunlnc 10.11 -.01
GIbThGrBt 57.31 +1.13 EatonVance I:
GrowthBt 28.52 +.22 FItgRt 9.09 +.01
SCpGrBt 32.78 +.38 GblMacAbR 9.89 +.04
AllianceBern C: LgCapVal 19.95 +.08
SCpGrCt 32.96 +.38 FBR Funds:
Allianz Fds Inst: Focuslnvtn 50.78 -.15
NFJDvVI 13.21 +.07 FMI Funds:
SmCpVI 32.29 +.39 LgCappn 17.63 +.03
Allianz Funds C: FPA Funds:
AGICGrthC 27.79 +.23 Newlnco 10.68
Amer Beacon Insti: FPACres 29.23 +.17
LgCaplnst 22.17 +.13 Fairholme 32.23 +.62
Amer Beacon Inv: Federated A:
LgCaplnv 21.00 +.12 MidGrStA 36.61 +.35
Ameri Century 1st: MuSecA 10.65 -.03
Growth 29.29 +.12 FederatedlInstl:
Amer Century Adv: KaufmnR 5.50 +.05
EqGroAp 25.08 +.11 TotRetBd 11.56 -.01
EqlncAp 8.11 +.02 SbValDVIS 5.16 -.04
Amer Century Inv: Fidelity Adv Foc T:
AIICapGr 32.19 +.14 EnergyT 38.44 +.57
Balanced 17.78 +.03 HItCarT 23.01 -.08
DivBnd 11.21 -.04 Fidelity Advisor A:
Eqlnc 8.11 +.01 Nwlnsghp 23.49 +.12
Growthl 29.01 +.11 SblnA 12.74
Heritagel 23.56 +.14 Fidelity Advisor C:
IncGro 28.29 +.11 Nwlnsghtn22.16 +.11
InfAdjBd 13.42 +.03 Fidelity Advisor l:
IntDisc 10.12 +.13 EqGrln 69.04 +.39
InfiGrol 11.17 +.16 Eqlnln 26.96 +.08
NewOpp 8.49 +.09 IntBdln 11.68 -.02
OneChAg 13.45 +.08 Nwlnsgtln 23.82 +.12
OneChMd 12.86 +.05 Sblnin 12.90 +.01
RealEstl 24.46 +.17 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 27.16 +.19 BalancT 16.89 +.04
Valuelnv 6.49 +.02 DivGrTp 13.70 +.13
American Funds A: EqGrTp 64.43 +.37
AmcpAp 21.80 +.16 EqInT 26.53 +.09
AMufAp 28.86 +.04 GrOppT 43.93 +.42
BalAp 20.46 +.06 HilnAdTp 10.35 +.04
BondAp 12.89 -.03 IntBdT 11.65 -.03
CaplBAp 53.73 -.04 MulncTp 13.63 -.05
CapWGAp 36.88 +.26 OvrseaT 17.74 +.20
CapWAp 21.60 -.01 STFiT 9.35
EupacAp 40.53 +.51 SkSelAIICp20.88 +.12
FdlnvAp 41.00 +.30 Fidelity Freedom:
GIblBalA 26.80 +.05 FF2010n 14.49 +.06
GovtAp 14.56 -.03 FF2010K 13.27 +.05
GwhAp 34.49 +.32 FF2015n 12.12 +.05
HITrAp 11.26 +.03 FF2015K 13.35 +.05
IncoApx 18.12 -.14 FF2020n 14.70 +.07
IntBdAp 13.76 -.02 FF2020K 13.81 +.06
InfiGrlncAp30.47 +.28 FF2025n 12.29 +.06
ICAApx 31.26 -.01 FF2025K 14.02 +.08
LtTEBAp 16.28 -.03 FF2030n 14.66 +.09
NEcoAp 28.81 +.36 FF2030K 14.18 +.08
NPerAp 30.96 +.27 FF2035n 12.18 +.08
NwWrldA 53.05 +.69 FF2035K 14.32 +.09
STBFAp 10.10 ... FF2040n 8.50 +.05
SmCpAp 39.77 +.41 FF2040K 14.37 +.10
TxExAp 13.01 -.03 FF2045K 14.54 +.10
WshAp 31.99 +.05 FidelityInvest:
ArielInvestments: AIISectEq 13.33 +.06
Apprec 46.35 +.65 AMgr50n 16.53 +.04
Ariel 51.03 +.76 AMgr70rn 17.60 +.08
Artisan Funds: AMgr20rn 13.38
Inf 23.90 +.25 Balancn 20.52 +.06
Inftlnsf 24.06 +.26 BalancedK 20.52 +.06
InfiValr 29.53 +.21 BlueChGrn 51.62 +.37
MidCap 40.30 +.49 BluChpGrK 51.66 +.37
MidCapVal 21.91 +.22 CAMunn 12.80 -.03
Baron Funds: Canadan 55.47 +.29
Asset 53.08 +.58 CapApn 30.50 +.15
Growth 59.40 +.49 CapDevOn 12.31 +.10
SmallCap 26.82 +.29 Cplncrn 9.45 +.04
Bernstein Fds: ChinaRgr 27.90 +.33
IntDur 14.13 -.03 CngS 465.09
DivMu 14.81 -.04 CTMunrn 11.99 -.05
TxMgdlnI 13.82 +.16 Contran 80.64 +.41
BlackRockA: ContraK 80.65 +.41
EqtyDiv 20.31 +.04 CnvScn 25.47 +.27
GIAIAr 19.83 +.10 DisEqn 25.32 +.14
HiYlnvA 8.04 +.04 DiscEqF 25.32 +.14
IniOpA p 32.11 +.40 Divlntln 29.55 +.26
BlackRock B&C: DivrslntKr 29.54 +.26
GIAICt 18.45 +10 DivStkOn 17.88 +.14
BlackRock Instl: DivGthn 30.98 +.28
EquityDv 20.36 +.04 EmergAs r n28.29 +.46
GlbAllocr 19.93 +.11 EmrMkn 22.40 +.31
HiYdBd 8.04 +.04 Eqlncn 48.02 +.16
Brinson FundsY: EQIIn 19.99 +.03
HiYldlYn 6.37 +.02 ECapAp 18.51 +.21
BruceFund 403.05 ... Europe 30.78 +.41
Buffalo Funds: Exch 323.88
SmCapn 30.34 +.43 Exportn 24.52 +.09
CGM Funds: Fideln 36.88 +.22
Focus n 28.81 +.45 Fiftyrn 20.45 +.09
Mut n 28.48 +34 FItRateHi r n 9.94 +.01
Realtyn 30.80 +.19 FrlnOnen 29.89 +17
Calamos Funds: GNMAn 11.85 -.02
GrwthAp 53.68 +.49 Govtnc 10.87 -03
Calvert Invest: GroCon 101.09 +1.01
naqveA InvesF 9 .
Incop 16.40 -.01 Grolncn 21.67 +.12
nEAp 13.88 +18 GrowCoF 101.10 +1.00
SocialAp 31.1788 +.09 GrowtCoK101.09+.01
SocBdp 16.39 -.03 GrSatrn 20.84 +10
SocEqAp 39.17 +18 Highlncrn 9.34 +.03
TxFLgp 16.35 -.05 Indepnn 26.30 +.25
Cohen &Steers: InPBdn 1353 +05
IntBdn 11.09 -.03
RltyShrs 71.68+51 ntGovn 1106 -02
Columbia Class A: InnMun 10.59 -.03
Acornt 31.07 +.34 InflDiscn 3251 +34
DivEqlnc 10.72 +.01 nflSCn 201 +.2
DivOpptyA 8.94 -.01 InvSCGrn 1197 03
LgCapGrAt27.70 +.16 InvGBn 794 -.02
LgCorQAp 6.77 +.01 Japanr 971 +05
MdCpGrOp 10.57 +.08 JpnSrnn 937 +02
MidCVlOpp 8.38 +.04 LgCapVal 1165 +05
PBModAp 11.41 +.05 LatAm 50.85 +.64
TxEAp 14.16 -.05 LevCoSn 1.44 +
SelCommA47.02 +.38 Lowrn 401 +.38
FrontierA 11.5 +.11 LowPriK 40.0 +.38
GlobTech 22.20 +.17 MageLowPriKr 40.09 +.3847
Columbia Cl I,T&G:
nMagellanK 75.90 +47
MktOpln8.53 .17 Murn 11.59 -.04
Columbia Class Z: MAMunn 12.63 -.05
AcornZ 32.23 +.35 MegaCpStknl2.14 +.05
AcornlntZ 40.27 +.29 MIMunn 12.44 -.04
DivlncoZ 15.29 -.01 MidCapn 30.85 +.25
IntBdZ 9.53 -.01 MNMunn 11.95 -.04
IntTEBd 10.94 -.03 MtgSecn 11.38 -.01
LgCapGr 14.14 +.15 Munilncn 13.42 -.05
ValRestr 50.71 +.25 NJMunrn 12.21 -.06
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktrn 17.62 +.02
ComRett 8.75 +.09 NwMilln 33.75 +.12
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.58 -.05
IniCorEqn 10.38 +.13 OTCn 64.66 +.69
USCorEqln12.57 +.09 OhMunn 12.26 -.05
USCorEq2n12.41 +.10 100lndex 10.55 +.03
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 31.90 +.26
CommAp 19.87 -.12 PcBasn 24.40 +.10
DWS InvestS: PAMunrn 11.37 -.04
CoreEqtyS 18.35 +.08 Purinn 20.04 +.05
CorPlslnc 11.14 -.02 PuritanK 20.04 +.05
EmMkGrr 16.21 +.38 RealEn 339 +.29 21
EnhEmMk 11.12 ... SAIISecEqF13.35 +.07
EnhGbBdr 10.32 -.05 SCmdtyStrtn9.64 +.10
GIbSmCGr 39.73 +.48 SCmdtyStrFn9.67 +.10
GIblThem 23.30 +.35 SrEmrgMkt 16.53 +.29
Gold&Prc 15.79 +.43 SrslntGrw 11.85 +.12
HiYdTx 12.95 -.03 SerlniGrF 11.88 +.12
IntTxAMT 12.09 -.04 SrslntVal 9.35 +.07
InflFdS 43.31 +.42 SerlniValF 9.38 +.07
LgCpFoGr 34.71 +.15 SrlnvGrdF 11.97 -.04
LatAmrEq 42.19 +.42 StlntMun 10.86 -.01
MgdMuniS 9.45 -.03 STBFn 8.59
MATFS 15.17 -.05 SmCapDiscn24.02 +.39
SP500S 19.59 +.08 SmllCpSrn 18.65 +.22
WorldDiv 24.10 +.11 SCpValur 16.19 +.29
Davis Funds A: SkSelLCVrn12.05 +.05
NWVenA 37.22 +.25 SkSlcACapn29.00 +.16
Davis Funds B: SkSelSmCp20.82 +.27
NYVenB 35.40 +.24 Sbratlncn 11.41
Davis Funds C: SbrReRtr 9.94 +.05
NYVenC 35.74 +.24 TaxFrBrn 11.58 -.04
Davis FundsY: TotalBdn 11.24 -.02
NYVenY 37.67 +.26 Trendn 81.20 +.41
Delaware Invest A: USBI n 11.94 -.04
Diverlncp 9.41 -.01 Utilityn 18.95 -.16
SMIDCapG 25.61 +.21 ValStratn 31.47 +.39
TxUSAp 12.19 -.04 Valuen 76.48 +.74
Delawarel Invest B: Wrldwn 20.32 +.15
SelGrBt 36.33 +.41 Fidelity Selects:
Dimensional Fds: Aim 38.01 -.15
EmMCrEqnl9.33 +.38 Bankingn 20.45 +.22
EmMktV 29.01 +.70 Biotchn 112.87 +.67
IntSmVan 15.46 +.20 Brokrn 49.71 +.67
LargeCo 11.55 +.04 Chemn 118.35 +1.17
TAUSCorE2n10.09 +.08 ComrnEquipn23.22 +.36
USLgVan 22.83 +.15 Compn 66.97 +.57
USMicron 15.47 +.13 ConDisn 28.08 +.06
USTgdVal 18.04 +.21 ConsuFnn 14.66 +.09
USSmalln 24.10 +.23 ConStapn 81.60 -.29
USSmVa 27.82 +.31 CstHon 47.05 +.87
InflSmCon 15.56 +.17 DfAern 85.24 +.65
EmMktSCn20.34 +.28 Elecbrn 49.02 +.73
EmgMktn 26.57 +.56 Enrgyn 54.93 +.82
Fixdn 10.35 ... EngSvn 73.18 +1.19
IntGFxlnn 12.99 -.07 EnvAltEnrnl6.50 +.07
IntVan 16.36 +.25 FinSvn 61.48 +.59
Glb5Fxlncnll.22 -.01 Goldrn 43.28 +1.20
2YGIFxdn 10.13 ... Healihn 143.32 -.46
DFARIEn 27.32 +.13 Insurn 52.63 +.40


Dodge&Cox: Leisrn 106.86 +.09
Balanced 78.47 +.34 Materialn 73.15 +.88
Income 13.85 ... MedDIn 60.90 +.24
InlStk 33.84 +.34 MdEqSysn29.20 +.17
Stock 122.73 +.68 Mulhndn 56.25 +.13
DoubleUne Funds: NtGasn 33.15 +.28
TRBd 11.39 ... Pharmn 15.47 -.13
TRBdNp 11.39 ... Retail n 64.67 +.30
Dreyfus: Softwrn 91.46 +1.08
Aprec 46.02 +.15 Techn 108.15 +1.24
CTA 12.29 -.05 Telcmn 51.85 -.54
CorVA Transn 52.26 -.15
Dreyf 10.09 +05 UtilGrn 57.03 -.23
DryMidr 30.45 +.34 Wireless n 8.27 +.03
GNMA 16.19 -.01 Fidelity Spartan:
GrChinaAr 31.42 +.51 5001dxlnvn 52.16 +.20
HiYldAp 6.61 +.02 5001dxl 52.17 +.21
StratValA 30.88 +.18 Intlnxlnvn 34.06 +.39
TechGroA 36.35 +.58 TotMktlnv n42.65 +.22
DreihsAclnc 10.47 +.02 USBondl 11.94 -.04
Driehaus Funds: Fidelity Spart Adv:
EMktGr 28.74 +.31 ExMktAdrn41.63 +.45
EVPTxMEmI47.50 +.86 5001dxAdvn52.17 +.21
Eaton Vance A: IntAdr n 34.08 +.39
ChinaAp 16.81 +.27 TotMktAdrn42.65 +.22
AMTFMulnc10.33 -.04 USBondl 11.94 -.04


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 50.35 +.29
OverseasA 22.65 +.16
First Investors A
BIChpAp
Eqtylncop 7.79 +.02
GloblAp 6.96 +.08
GovtAp 11.53
GrolnAp 17.06 +.10
IncoAp 2.62 +.01
MATFAp 12.39 -.05
MITFAp 12.78 -.04
NJTFAp 13.68 -.05
NYTFAp 15.16 -.05
OppAp 30.29 +.27
PATFAp 13.65 -.05
SpSitAp 25.55 +.30
TxExlncop 10.20 -.03
TotRtAp 17.04 +.05
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.17 -.03
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.89 -.01
ALTFAp 11.82 -.05
AZTFAp 11.40 -.04
CallnsAp 12.83 -.05
CAIntAp 12.06 -.04
CalTFAp 7.45 -.02
COTFAp 12.36 -.05
CTTFAp 11.40 -.04
CvtScAp 15.35 +.08
DblTFA 12.18 -.05
DynTchA 34.51 +.28
EqlncAp 18.51 +.07
Fedlntp 12.44 -.05
FedTFAp 12.61 -.05
FLTFAp 11.91 -.04
FoundAlp 11.27 +.08
GATFAp 12.66 -.05
GoldPrMA 35.91 +1.13
GrwthAp 51.15 +.29
HYTFAp 10.82 -.03
HilncA 2.07
IncomAp 2.26 +.01
InsTFAp 12.51 -.04
NYITF p 11.79 -.05
LATFAp 11.95 -.05
LMGvScA 10.33
MDTFAp 11.95 -.04
MATFAp 12.07 -.05
MITFAp 12.28 -.03
MNInsA 12.87 -.06
MOTFAp 12.65 -.04
NJTFAp 12.55 -.04
NYTFAp 12.06 -.04
NCTFAp 12.88 -.04
OhiolAp 12.99 -.05
ORTFAp 12.49 -.05
PATFAp 10.86 -.04
ReEScAp 17.51 +.09
RisDvAp 38.10 +.14
SMCpGrA 38.30 +.39
Stratlncp 10.70 +.04
TtlRtnAp 10.45 -.02
USGovAp 6.89 -.01
UllsAp 13.96 -.08
VATFAp 12.16 -.04
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvnl3.40 +.11
IncmeAd 2.25 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.29 +.02
USGvCt 6.85
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.64 +.12
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 23.31 +.52
ForgnAp 6.86 +.12
GIBdAp 13.44 +.11
GrwthAp 19.46 +.22
WorldAp 16.21 +.20
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.66 +.51
ForgnCp 6.70 +.13
GIBdCp 13.46 +.11
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.85 +.11
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 12.01 -.03
US Eqty 46.22 +.35
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust III:
CHIE 23.08 +.12
Quality 24.01 -.01
GMOTrust IV:
InflntrVI 20.91 +.21
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.63 +.26
Quality 24.02 -.01
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 54.41 +.35
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 39.26 +.34
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 26.79 +.25
HiYield 7.39 +.03
HYMunin 9.25 -.02
MidCapV 39.63 +.35
ShtDrTF n 10.65
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.97
CapAplnst 44.09 +.30
Intlnv t 60.38 +.84
Inilr 61.07 +.85
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.54 +.30
DivGthAp 21.43 +.07
IntOpAp 14.83 +.19
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppl n 33.60 +.30
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 43.59 +.43
Div&Gr 22.19 +.07
Balanced 21.65 +.07
MidCap 28.66 +.30
TotRetBd 11.78 -.02
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
SbrTotRetr 12.50 +.01
SbrGrowth 10.77 -.06
ICON Fds:
Energy S 20.08 +.28
HIthcareS 17.58 -.03
ISI Funds:
NoAmnp 8.00 -.02
IVA Funds:
WldwideIr 16.47 +.09
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.65 +.04
Invesco Funds:
Energy 40.36 +.67
Ubliies 17.74 -.09
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 13.13 +.03
Chartp 18.27 +.11
Cmstk 17.78 +.07
Constp 24.78 +.18
DivrsDivp 13.66 +.04
EqlncA 9.31 +.02
GrlncAp 21.30 +.05
HilncMu p
HiYldp 4.38 +.02
HYMuA 10.00 -.03
InfiGrow 28.65 +.24
MunilnA 13.81 -.05
PATFA 16.94 -.05
USMortgA 13.13 +.01
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.79 -.04
US Mortg 13.06
Invesco FundsY:
BalRiskY 13.22 +.04
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 24.96 +.32
AssetStAp 25.82 +.33
AssetSbtlr 26.08 +.33
HilncAp 8.55 +.02
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.05 -.03
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.11 -.02
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpValn 28.41 +.15
JPMorgan RCI:
CoreBondn 12.05 -.03
ShtDurBd 11.02
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.77 +.08
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.04 -.03
HighYldn 8.18 +.04
IntmTFBdn11.33 -.02
LgCpGr 25.06 +.18
ShtDurBd n 11.02
USLCCrPIsn23.83 +.18
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 27.43 +.08
ContrarnT 14.44 +.18
EnterprT 66.60 +.54
FlxBndT 10.95 -.01
GlUfeSciTr 30.69 +.08
GIbSelT 9.70 +.13
GITechTr 19.27 +.21
Grw&lncT 35.07 +.17
JanusT 32.54 +.17
OvrseasTr 33.14 +.93
PrkMCValT 22.77 +.23
ResearchT 32.94 +.23
ShTmBdT 3.10
Twenty T 64.50 +.57
VentureT 61.77 +.49
WrldWTr 45.94 +.56
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.27


IncomeAp 6.71 +.02
RgBkA 15.33 +.17
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.71 +.02
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 13.03 +.11
LSBalanc 13.71 +.07
LSConsrv 13.58 +.03
LSGrwth 13.69 +.10
LSModer 13.49 +.05
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.75 +.35


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.18 +.36
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 133.54 +1.09
CBApprp 16.29 +.03
CBLCGrp 24.75 +.13
GCIAIICOp 8.93 +.10
WAHilncAt 6.20 +.03
WAMgMup 17.00 -.06
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 22.47 +.11
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 30.46 +.37
CMValTrp 43.02 +.37
Longleaf Partners:
Parhters 31.37 +.26
SmCap 30.70 +.34
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.07 +.03
SblncC 15.55 +.05
LSBondR 15.01 +.04
SblncA 15.47 +.05
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.71 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.72 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 12.23 +.05
FundlEq 13.57 +.09
BdDebAp 8.12 +.03
ShDurlncAp 4.64
MidCpAp 17.81 +.11
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.67 +.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.64 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 22.27 +.11
MIGA 18.12 +.10
EmGA 49.58 +.27
HilnA 3.58 +.01
MFLA
TotRA 15.31 +.02
UtilA 18.62 +.05
ValueA 25.88 +.04
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 16.23 +.09
GvScBn 10.50 -.02
HilnBn 3.59 +.02
MulnBn 8.92 -.03
TotRBn 15.31 +.01
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 26.01 +.04
MFS Funds Instl:
InflEqn 18.68 +.21
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.12 +.02
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.48 +.10
GovtBt 9.01 -.01
HYIdBBt 6.09 +.02
IncmBldr 17.85 +.04
InfiEqB 11.00 +.09
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 38.84 +.16
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 84.21 +.33
Managers Funds:
Yackfnanpnl9.31 +.04
YacktFocn 20.75 +.03
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.75 +.09
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 17.82 +.17
Indialnvr 16.63 +.43
PacTgrlnv 23.12 +.39
MergerFdn 16.01 +.01
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.98
TotRtBdl 10.98
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.04 +.13
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.26 +.14
MontagGrI 26.66 +.03
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 16.35 +.10
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 14.21 +.10
MCapGrl 36.53 +.38
Muhlenkn 58.09 +.26
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 30.13 +.16
Munder FundsY:
MCpCGrY 33.25 +.32
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.46 +.11
GblDiscA 30.23 +.18
GIbDiscZ 30.66 +.17
QuestZ 18.03 +.11
SharesZ 22.85 +.11
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.74 +.19
Geneslnst 50.99 +.27
Intlr 17.40 +.13
LgCapV Inv 28.35 +.23
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 52.83 +.27
Nicholas Group:
HilncIn 10.00 +.03
Nicholasn 48.99 +.26
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.04 -.03
HiYFxlnc 7.50 +.03
SmCpldx 9.60 +.09
Stkldx 18.26 +.07
Technly 16.81 +.21
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 16.80 -.05
LtMBAp 11.21 -.02
Nuveen CI R:
IntDMBd 9.31 -.02
HYMunBd 16.80 -.04
Nuveen CI Y:
RealEstn 22.66 +.13
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 44.53 +.24
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.63 +.17
Globall 22.63 +.24
Infllr 19.85 +.24
Oakmark 50.31 .39
Select 33.68 +.35
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.54 +.03
GIbSMdCap 15.08 .10
LgCapStrat 10.03 +.12
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.16 -.03
AMTFrNY 12.10 -.06
CAMuniAp 8.72 -.03
CapApAp 50.27 +.28
CaplncAp 9.30 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.86
DvMktAp 34.35 +.64
Discp 66.97 +.58
EquityA 9.82 +.04
GlobAp 62.63 +.86
GIbOppA 30.52 +.35
GblStrlncA 4.31 +.01
Goldp 36.69 +1.00
IntBdAp 6.55
LtdTmMu 15.03 -.04
MnStFdA 38.39 +.08
PAMuniAp 11.44 -.03
SenFltRtA 8.28
USGvp 9.81 -.02
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.12 -.03
AMTFrNY 12.11 -.06
CplncBt 9.10 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.87 +.01
EquityB 9.01 +.04
GblStrlncB 4.33 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.39
RoMuAp 16.84 -.07
RcNtMuA 7.47 -.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 34.03 +.64
InfiBdY 6.55 +.01
IntGrowY 30.03 +.36
Osterweis Funds:
Stlncon 11.77 +.02
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.87
TotRtAd 11.53
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 11.36 +.10
AIIAsset 12.86 +.12
ComodRR 7.38 +.10
Divlnc 12.15
EmgMkCur 10.57 +.08
EmMkBd 12.27
Fltlncr 8.87 +.03
ForBdUnr 11.60 -.02
FrgnBd 11.22
HiYld 9.60 +.04
InvGrCp 11.14 -.02
LowDu 10.63 -.01
ModDur 11.12 -.01
RealRtnl 12.56 +.03
ShortT 9.87
TotRt 11.53
TRII 11.08
TRIll 10.13 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 11.28 +.10
LwDurA 10.63 -.01
RealRtAp 12.56 +.03
TotRtA 11.53
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 11.14 +.10
RealRtCp 12.56 +.03
TotRtCt 11.53
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.56 +.03


TRtnp 11.53
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 11.35 +.10
TotRtnP 11.53
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 30.08 +.06
Perm Port Funds:
Permanent 50.22 +.22
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.87
InfiValA 18.85 +.24
PionFdAp 43.08 +.20
ValueAp 12.37 +.04


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.47 +.08
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.58 +.09
Pioneer Fds Y:
StatlncYp 11.20 +.02
Price Funds:
Balancen 21.30 +.10
BIChipn 47.07 +.38
CABondn 11.41 -.03
CapApp n 23.42 +.05
DivGron 26.75 +.08
EmMktBn 14.02 +.02
EmEurop 19.60 +.52
EmMktSn 32.51 +.59
Eqlncn 26.77 +.12
Eqlndexn 39.65 +.16
Europen 15.87 +.22
GNMAn 10.12 -.01
Growthn 38.88 +.23
Gr&ln n 22.99 +.06
HIhSci n 43.46 -.03
HiYieldn 6.93 +.03
InsfCpG 19.50 +.17
InstHiYIdn 9.76 +.04
MCEqGrn 31.27 +.28
IntlBondn 10.19
IntDisn 45.11 +.45
Intl G&l 12.98 +.18
InlStkn 14.21 +.20
Japan n 7.96 +.05
LatAmn 42.17 +.64
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 11.03 -.03
MidCapn 60.99 +.53
MCapValn 25.67 +.20
NAmern 36.49 +.30
NAsian 16.22 +.28
New Eran 45.83 +.84
NHorizn 37.46 +.41
N Incn 9.88 -.02
NYBondn 11.81 -.04
OverSSFn 8.48 +.10
PSlncn 17.41 +.08
RealAssetrnll.66 +.21
RealEstn 21.96 +.14
R2010n 16.84 +.08
R2015n 13.14 +.07
R2020n 18.25 +.11
R2025n 13.40 +.09
R2030n 19.29 +.15
R2035n 13.66 +.11
R2040n 19.45 +.16
R2045n 12.95 +.10
SciTecn 28.48 +.58
ShtBd n 4.86
SmCpStkn 37.46 +.40
SmCapVal n40.04 +.46
SpecGrn 19.91 +.18
Speclnn 13.00
TFIncn 10.48 -.03
TxFrHn 11.71 -.03
TxFrSln 5.70 -.01
USTIntn 6.27 -.04
USTLgn 13.47 -.31
VABondn 12.23 -.03
Valuen 26.69 +.11
Principal Inv:
Divlnfllnst 10.09 +.13
LgCGIIn 10.69 +.10
LT20201n 12.87 +.07
LT20301n 12.76 +.09
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.81 +.18
HiYldAp 5.69 +.03
MuHilncA 10.25 -.03
UtlityA 11.96 -.01
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.93 +.13
HiYldBt 5.68 +.02
Prudential Fds Z&I:
MadCapGrZ34.12 +.25
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.19 -.04
AZ TE 9.48 -.03
ConvSec 20.47 +.13
DvrlnApx 7.66 -.02
EqlnAp 17.42 +.09
EuEq 20.00 +.25
GeoBalA 13.36 +.02
GlbEqtyp 9.57 +.11
GrlnAp 14.86 +.10
GIblHItA 46.73 -.04
HiYdAp 7.92 +.03
HiYldIn 6.15 +.02
IncmAp 7.15 -.03
IntGrlnp 9.57 +.12
InvAp 14.94 +.07
NJTxA p 9.79 -.04
MuliCpGr 57.03 +.47
PATE 9.48 -.03
TxExAp 9.01 -.02
TFInAp 15.62 -.04
TFHYA 12.61 -.03
USGvApx 13.64 -.08
GIblUtilA 10.67 -.01
VoyAp 23.36 +.36
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.63 -.05
DvrlnBtx 7.60 -.01
Eqlnct 17.25 +.09
EuEq 19.12 +.23
GeoBalB 13.23 +.02
GIbEqt 8.61 +.09
GINtRst 18.69 +.35
GrlnBt 14.60 +.09
GIblHIthB 37.21 -.03
HiYldBt 7.90 +.03
HYAdBt 6.03 +.02
IncmBt 7.09 -.02
IntGrlnt 9.46 +.11
InfiGrtht 14.26 +.20
InvBt 13.41 +.07
NJTxBt 9.78 -.04
MultCpGr 48.69 +.40
TxExBt 9.01 -.02
TFHYBt 12.64 -.02
USGvBtx 13.57 -.07
GlblUtilB 10.63
VoyBt 19.60 +.30
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.55 +.28
LgCAIphaA 44.93 +.26
Value 26.03 +.33
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 12.09 +.10
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.84 +.20
PennMulr 12.29 +.16
Premier r 20.59 +.29
TotRetlr 14.29 +.15
ValSvct 12.21 +.23
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.39 -.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 17.30 +.13
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.88 +.35
Schwab Funds:
HIlhCare 20.63 -.04
l0001nvr 41.75 +.20
S&P Sel 23.16 +.09
SmCpSI 22.41 +.22
TSMSelr 26.77 +.14
Scout Funds:
Inf 32.23 +.27
Selected Funds:
AmShD 45.12 +.30
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 35.77 +.18
Sequoia 165.43 +.24
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 49.08 +.27
SoSunSCInv tn22.50+.27
St FarmAssoc:
Gwlh 57.60 +.27
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 38.74 +.30
RealEstate 32.10 +.22
SmCap 57.51 +.69
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.15 -.05
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.23 +.03
TotRetBdl 10.22 +.02
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.96 -.03
Eqldxlnst 11.24 +.06
InflEqllnst 16.14 +.17
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 19.67 +.34
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 16.55 +.19
REVallnstr 26.61 +.24
Valuelnst 49.61 +.51
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.80 +.54
IncBuildAt 19.17 +.08
IncBuildCp 19.17 +.08
IntValue I 27.42 +.56
LtTMul 14.61 -.03
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.04 +.01
Income 9.23 -.01
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp9.66 +.05
Flexlncp 9.32 +.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 37.63 +.44
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 25.06 +.21
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 26.01 +.17
ChinaReg 7.20 +.11
GIbRs 10.38 +.14
Gld&Mtls 13.45 +.46
WldPrcMn 13.35 +.46


Name NAV Chg
SciTech 15.32 +.11
ShtTBnd 9.26
SmCpStk 15.46 +.17
TxElt 13.61 -.03
TxELT 13.79 -.04
TxESh 10.84
VABd 11.57 -.02
WldGr 21.14 +.14
VALIC :
MdCpldx 21.99 +.25
Stkldx 27.56 +.11
Value Line Fd:
LrgCo n 20.02 +.09
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 24.19 +.04
CAITAdmn 11.63 -.03
CALTAdmn11.85 -.04
CpOpAdl n 78.82 +.38
EMAdmr r n 35.82 +.76
Energyn 120.64 +1.84
EqlnAdmnn51.65 +.03
EuroAdml n 60.54 +.75
ExplAdmln 77.22 +.93
ExtdAdm n 46.76 +.52
500Admln 135.75 +.54
GNMAAdnn 11.09
GrwAdmnn 38.15 +.24
HlthCrn 61.75 -.13
HiYldCp n 6.06 +.02
InfProAdn 29.34 +.08
ITBdAdmln 12.05 -.06
ITsryAdml n 11.74 -.05
IntGrAdm n 60.20 +.97
ITAdmIn 14.28 -.04
ITGrAdmn 10.36 -.03
LtdTrAdn 11.16 -.01
LTGrAdmIln 10.63 -.12
LTAdmln 11.68 -.04
MCpAdml n103.75 +.99
MorgAdm n 64.43 +.43
MuHYAdmnll.15 -.04
NYLTAdn 11.71 -.03
PrmCap rn 73.44 +.30
PALTAdmn11.63 -.04
ReitAdmrn 97.45 +.51
STsyAdmln 10.79 -.01
STBdAdmlnlO.66 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.88 -.01
STIGrAdn 10.84 -.01
SmCAdmn 39.75 +.44
TxMCaprn 73.82 +.38
TfBAdmln 11.11 -.04
TStkAdmn 36.73 +.19
ValAdmln 23.43 +.06
WellslAdm n59.40 -.14
WelltnAdm n59.80 +.07
Windsorn 51.03 +.42
WdsrllAdn 53.03 +.15
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.85 -.04
CapOppn 34.11 +.16
Convrtn 13.26 +.09
DivApplnn 24.31 +.11
DivdGron 17.04 +.03
Energyn 64.24 +.98
Eqlncn 24.64 +.02
Explrn 82.92 +1.00
FLLTn 12.11 -.04
GNMAn 11.09
GlobEqn 18.62 +.18
Grolncn 31.17 +.09
GrthEqn 12.82 +.10
HYCorpn 6.06 +.02
HlthCren 146.32 -.31
InfaPron 14.94 +.05
InflExplrn 14.70 +.16
IntlGrn 18.91 +.30
InfiVal n 30.75 +.39
ITIGraden 10.36 -.03
ITTsryn 11.74 -.05
LifeConn 17.45 +.02
LifeGron 23.94 +.13
Lifelncn 14.80 -.02
LifeModn 21.18 +.07
LTIGraden 10.63 -.12
LTTsryn 12.95 -.31
Morgn 20.77 +.14
MuHYn 11.15 -.04
Mulntn 14.28 -.04
MuLtdn 11.16 -.01
MuLongn 11.68 -.04
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.26 -.04
NYLTn 11.71 -.03
OHLTTEn 12.60 -.04
PALTn 11.63 -.04
PrecMtlsrn 17.53 +.71
PrmcpCorn 15.33 +.04
Prmcp r n 70.75 +.29
SelValu r n 21.37 +.21
STARn 20.89 +.08
STIGraden 10.84 -.01
STFedn 10.88 -.01
STTsryn 10.79 -.01
StratEqn 21.70 +.14
TgtRetlncn 12.33 +.01
TgRe2010n24.61 +.06
TgtRe2015 n13.66 +.04
TgRe2020n24.32 +.09
TgtRe2025 n13.89 +.07
TgRe2030n23.89 +.13
TgtRe2035 n14.42 +.09
TgtRe2040 n23.72 +.16
TgtRe2050n23.61 +.15
TgtRe2045n14.89 +.10
USGron 21.70 +.14
USValuen 12.13 +.05
Wellsly n 24.51 -.06
Welltnn 34.62 +.04
Wndsrn 15.12 +.12
Wndsll n 29.88 +.09
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl rn100.71+1.10
ExtMktln 115.41 +1.27
MidCplstP nl 13.05+1.08
TotlntAdm r r4.93 +.32
Totlntllnstr n99.71 +1.28
TotlntllPr n 99.74 +1.29
TotlntSigr n 29.90 +.38
500n 135.72 +.54
Balancedn 24.19 +.05
EMktn 27.24 +.58
Europe n 25.97 +.32
Extend n 46.70 +.51
Growth 38.15 +.25
LgCaplxn 27.14 +.12
LTBndn 14.11 -.21
MidCapn 22.84 +.21
Pacific n 9.99 +.08
REITrn 22.83 +.12
SmCap n 39.69 +.43
SmlCpGthln25.61 +.27
STBndn 10.66 -.01
TotBndn 11.11 -.04
Totllntl n 14.90 +.19
TotStkn 36.72 +.20
Value n 23.43 +.06
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 24.20 +.05
DevMklnstn 9.67 +.11
Extlnn 46.76 +.52
FTAIIWIdl r n88.84 +1.20
Grwthlstn 38.15 +.24
InfProlnstn 11.95 +.03
Instldxn 134.88 +.53
InsPIn 134.89 +.53
InstTStldxn 33.25 +.18
InsTStPlusn33.25 +.17
MidCplstn 22.92 +.22
REITInstrn 15.08 +.08
STBondldxnl0.66 -.01
STIGrlnstn 10.84 -.01
SCInstn 39.75 +.44
TBIstn 11.11 -.04
TSlnstn 36.74 +.19
Valuelstn 23.43 +.06
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 112.13 +.44
GroSign 35.33 +.23
ITBdSign 12.05 -.06
MidCplcbdxn 32.74 +.31
STBdlcbdxn 10.66 -.01
SmCpSig n 35.81 +.39
TotBdSgln 11.11 -.04
TotStkSgln 35.45 +.18
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.93
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 9.82 +.12
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetSp 9.77 +.13
CorelnvA 6.86 +.03
DivOppAp 15.99 +.07
DivOppCt 15.82 +.07
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 44.69 +.23
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.53 +.04
Wells Fargo Adv :
CmSlklnv 22.31 +.23
Opptylnv 41.14 +.36
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
Growth 45.16 +.37
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 43.93 +.36
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CrPlsBdF1 p 11.59
CorePlusl 11.59 -.01
William Blair N:
GrowihN 12.78 +11


USAA Group:
AgvGt 37.79 +.22
CABd 10.97 -.03
CrnstStr 23.28 +.11
GovSec 10.39 -.01
GrTxStr 14.80 +.01
Growth 16.93 +.09
Gr&lnc 16.83 +.12
IncStk 13.97 +.03
Inco 13.42 -.02
Inf 25.23 +.22
NYBd 12.42 -.04
PrecMM 31.55 +.99


Dow Jones
industrials


+53.51
13,593.37


Nasdaq +28.12
composite 3,183.95


Standard & +5.78
Poor's 500
1,465.77


Russell
2000


+8.58

864.70


Stocks rise for second day


Increase Stems Market watch
S t 14 2012 n


from action by


Federal Reserve


Associated Press


NEW YORK The stock
market rose again Friday
because of economic help
from the Federal Reserve.
But even some of the buyers
weren't believers.
The Dow Jones industrial
average hit its highest close
since of December 2007, the
start of the Great Recession.
The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies briefly
traded above its all-time
closing high.
Markets rallied around
the world in places where
traders were getting their
first chance to react to the
Fed announcement: Stocks
climbed more than 2 per-
cent in India and France
and almost 2 percent in
Japan and Germany
Apple, the most valuable
company in American his-
tory, blew through its own all-
time high and neared $700
per share as it started taking
orders for the iPhone 5.
The gains came on top of
a 206-point climb for the
Dow on Thursday, when the


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Dow average dumps Kraft India agrees to let in foreign

Foods for UnitedHealth retailers, again


Egan-Jones cuts US debt rating NYSE paying $5 million fine to

to AA- from AA settle charges on data


In addition to Delicious International

and American Dishes


Live
Entertainment


HpiaDnysI a Week!



MONDAY. ... Acoustic Guitarist Rick DePirro

TUESDAY ... Easy Listening with Shades of Gray


WEDNESDAY & SUNDAY J

Jazz Quartet

"Friday Night Alternative"



"OPA"



Experience your "WOW"

with Belly Dancer Maria!




re.kifast c "DATE" Night FRIDAY

I3C10h 1 ,& Experience the Passion ofIi

> L_.i SPCll 1 Greece with the music of
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Reservations Recommended

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Road on State Road 44)
www.tavernamanos.com

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NR ST


Name Last Chg
SP UIl 36.54 -.25
StdPac 7.46 +.19
Standex 44.76 -.72
StanBlkDk 76.70 +3.17
StarwdHf 60.70 +.93
StateSr 43.92 -.17
Steris 35.43 +.20
Sterlite 7.68 +.55
SlIlwtM 13.91 +1.06
StatHotels 6.54 +.17
Sbyker 56.01 +.82
SturmRug 48.72 +.73
SubPpne 38.16 -.08
SunCmts 44.60 +.19
Suncorgs 35.31 +1.07
Sunoco 47.31 -.19
SunriseSen 14.32 +.03
SunstnHf 11.70 +.29
Suntech .87 +.03
SunTrst 29.91 +1.04
SupEnrgy 24.04 +1.30
Supvalu 2.41 +.04
SwiftTrans 8.27 -.73
Synovus 2.44 +.02
Sysco 30.35 -.31
TCFFncl 12.31 +.37
TDAmerir 17.46 -.26
TECO 17.46 -.09
TJXs 46.46 -.10
TaiwSemi 15.36 +.33


TalismEg 15.00
Target 64.67
TataMotors 25.41
TeckResg 34.03
TeleBrasil 22.74
TelefEsp 15.02
TenetHIth 5.76
Teradata 75.24
Teradyn 16.43
Terex 25.55
TerraNito 221.91
Tesoro 40.85
TetraTech 6.95
TevaPhrm 40.70
Textainer 31.50
Textron 28.36
Theragen 1.78
ThermoFis 60.61
ThomCrkg 3.77
3MCo 93.98
Tiffany 65.60
TimeWarn 44.71
Timken 42.31
Titan Ini 21.21
TitanMet 13.83
TollBros 36.31
TorchEngy 1.48
Torchmark 52.76
TorDBkg 84.25
Total SA 54.51
TotalSys 23.86
Transocn 46.58


Travelers 68.58
Tredgar 18.70
TriConf 16.38
TurqHillRs 9.83
TwoHrblnv 11.90
Tyolnf 55.24
Tyson 16.46
UBSAG 13.48
UDR 26.34
UIL Hold 35.78
UNS Engy 41.30
USAirwy 10.53
USEC .63
USG 23.50
UltraPtg 23.83
UniFirst 68.30
UnilevNV 35.80
UnionPac 128.43
UtdConfl 20.06
UtdMicro 2.15
UPSB 73.68
UtdRentals 37.38
USBancrp 34.93
USNGsrs 19.96
US OilFd 36.84
USSteel 22.35
UtTech 82.45
UtdhlthGp 54.25
UnivHIthS 43.65
UnumGrp 20.92


ValeSA 19.36 +.37
ValeSApf 18.72 +.23
ValeantPh 56.37 -2.27
ValeroE 33.75 +.96
VlyNBcp 10.71 +.39
VangTotBd 84.28 -.42
VangTSM 75.50 +.40
VanS&P500 67.38 +.28
VangREIT 68.76 +.38
VangEmg 43.22 +.52
VangEur 48.54 +.50
VangEAFE 34.90 +.31
VarianMed 61.60 -.16
Vecren 28.38 -.19
Venoco 11.91 +.21
Ventas 65.07 -.29
VeoliaEnv 12.44 +.21
VeriFone 31.73 +.38
VerizonCm 44.53 -1.05
VimpelCm 11.95 -.04
Visa 134.25 -.73
VMware 102.27 +2.96
Vonage 2.47 +.07
Vornado 85.12 +.82
VulcanM 49.17 +2.21
WGL Hol 39.99 -.91
WPXEnn 17.48 +.41
Wabash 7.69 -.03
WalMart 74.50 -.64
Warn 36.02


bept. 14, zuu


NYSE diary
Advanced: 2,088

Declined: 958

Unchanged: 108

Volume: 4.9 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,607

Declined: 842

Unchanged: 145

Volume: 2 b
AP


Fed laid out additional
plans to try to energize the
economy, including buying
$40 billion a month in mort-
gage bonds for as long as
necessary
But a day later, even with
the market rising, plenty of
investors were uncon-
vinced. They bought stock,
but also worried the Fed
can't do much to fix the
economy and predicted the


NEW YORK The Dow Jones industrial av-
erage is dumping Cool Whip for copays.
The Dow, perhaps the most widely known
barometer of the U.S. stock market, announced
Friday it would boot Kraft Foods to make room
for UnitedHealth Group, the insurance company.
The change takes effect Sept. 24. S&P Dow
Jones Indices, which manages the average, said
it was dropping Kraft because it is about to be-
come a much smaller company after spinning off
its North American grocery business.


NEW DELHI India agreed Friday to open
its huge market to foreign retailers such as
Wal-Mart in a surprising decision that was part of
a flurry of economic reforms aimed at sparking
new growth in the country's sputtering economy.
The Cabinet's decision after a similar pro-
posal was withdrawn under withering criticism
last year immediately generated optimism a
government plagued by scandal was finally
breaking out of the political paralysis that had sti-
fled reforms for months.


NEW YORK Egan-Jones, an independent
credit-research firm, downgraded its rating on
U.S. government debt to AA- from AA on Friday,
citing the Federal Reserve's plans to stimulate
the economy.
The credit rating agency said the Fed's plans
to buy mortgage bonds will likely hurt the econ-
omy more than help it.
The plan will weaken the value of the dollar
and push up prices for oil and other commodi-
ties, Egan-Jones said. That would leave less for
consumers to spend on other things.
But at the same time, Egan-Jones warned the
federal government's borrowing costs are likely
to slowly rise as the global economy recovers.


WASHINGTON -The New York Stock Ex-
change is paying $5 million to settle federal civil
charges it gave some customers an unfair head
start by providing them with trading data ahead
of the wider public.
It marked the first time the Securities and Ex-
change Commission ever imposed a fine on an
exchange.
The NYSE and its parent NYSE Euronext
agreed in the settlement to hire an independent
consultant to review their systems for delivering
market data. They neither admitted nor denied
the SEC's allegations.
From wire reports


I fine dining at casual dining prices!


WalterEn 38.24
WsteMlnc 33.96
Weathflni 13.83
WeinRIt 28.83
WellPoint 58.35
WellsFargo 36.13
WestarEn 29.31
WAstEMkt 16.30
WstAMgdHi 6.48
WAstlnfOpp 13.21
WstnRefin 27.07
WstUnion 19.11
Weyerhsr 27.15
Whrlpl 83.34
WhibngPet 52.97
WmsCos 35.10
WmsPtrs 52.34
WmsSon 44.59
Winnbgo 12.37
WiscEngy 37.37
WT India 18.18
Worthgn 24.24
XL Grp 24.68
XcelEngy 28.14
Xerox 7.86
Xylem n 25.57
YPFSoc 12.75
Yamanag 18.77
Yelpn 26.18
YoukuTud 20.89
YumBrnds 66.56
Zimmer 66.90


stock market gains would be
short-lived.
Tyler Vernon, chief in-
vestment officer ofBiltmore
Capital in Princeton, N.J.,
wanted to capitalize on the
market euphoria while he
could. That the Fed is still
taking such aggressive steps
to boost the economy, four
years after the financial cri-
sis, doesn't give him much
comfort.
The Fed, Vernon said, is
"like the morphine being
pumped into the patient. It
keeps the patient walking
and talking."
The Dow rose as much as
113 points Friday before
pulling back. It ended up
53.51 points to 13,593.37. It is
a 4 percent rally away from
its all-time high of 14,164,
reached Oct. 9, 2007.
The Standard & Poor's
500 rose 5.78 to 1,465.77, al-
most exactly 1,000 points
below its all-time high. The
Nasdaq composite index,
which has been trading at
the highest levels since 2000,
climbed 28.12 to 3,183.95.
The Russell, which tracks
2,000 stocks with market val-
ues below $5 billion, closed
at 854.70, a hair under its
all-time high of 865.29 on
April 29, 2011. Because the
index contains small com-
panies, it is seen as a gauge
of investors' risk tolerance.







Page A8 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012



PINION


"Some are born great, some achieve greatness,
and others have it pinned on them."
George Ade,
"The Rise and Flight of the Winges Inset," 1920


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. ................... publisher
M ike Arnold .................................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ ................. citizen member
Mac Harris ............................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ..... ....... ...... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DESERVING RECOGNITION





Some good




news for a




change


you've heard someone
say it or maybe said it
yourself: "Why isn't
there any good news in the pa-
pers these days?"
If you've been paying atten-
tion during the last week or so,
you've seen some very good
local news.
First, the Economic Devel-
opment Council (EDC) an-
nounced its annual awards
honoring outstanding compa-
nies and businesses in Citrus
County. Then, a special section
spotlighting the 10 Most Ad-
mired Women in Citrus
County was published in the
Chronicle.
These recognition are spe-
cial for a number of reasons.
Both are organized and imple-
mented by private organiza-
tions in partnership: the EDC
and the Chamber of Commerce
cooperate on the industry
awards, and the women's group
Altrusa of Citrus County works
with the Chronicle on the Most
Admired Women.
Honorees are chosen from
among peer nominations. Is
there any greater compliment
than being recognized by those
around you?
Both sets of awards recog-
nize organizations or individu-
als who have made a
difference in their worlds, and
as a result have improved life
in Citrus County.
In addition to the "big three"
of Citizen of the Year, Out-
standing Small Business and
Outstanding Employer, the
EDC this year included indi-
viduals who have been more
active in the background: a
SCORE award and three spe-
cial awards for excellence.
Similarly, every year the 10
Most Admired Women list in-
cludes some women with
whom you may be familiar, but
many who are unknown out-
side their own groups. All,
however, are remarkable and
their stories are inspirations.
People are doing great things


THE ISSUE:
Recognizing excellence:
EDC awards and Most Ad-
mired Women.

OUR OPINION:
All well-deserved, and good
news for our county.

EDC HONOREES
Citrus County Economic
Development Council Industry
Appreciation Awards 2012
Citizen of the Year: Gerry
Mulligan, Citrus County
Chronicle
Outstanding Small Business:
Ferris Groves, Floral City
Outstanding Employer: LKQ,
Crystal River
SCORE Award: Dr. Jim Harvey
Special Awards for Excel-
lence: Diane Toto, We Care
Food Pantry; Curtis Peters,
Holcim Inc.; and Ardath Pren-
dergast, EDC/Chamber of
Commerce
MOST ADMIRED
WOMEN
Arts: Susan LaForsch
Athlete: Marilynne Dennison
Business: Pamela Bellman
Community involvement:
Jewel Lamb
Education: Dianna Bandhauer
Government: Cecelia Douglas
Health care: Margie Leturno
Leader: Lora Wilson
Mother: Sharon Hansen
Up-and-coming youth: Jill
Isenberg

in our community, giving rea-
son for optimism even in tough
times. It's ordinary people
doing extraordinary things. We
need to support and encourage
them: patronize the local busi-
nesses and honor the folks in
our lives who live the ideals of
service and selflessness.


Fashion campaign
It's truly amazing. On Channel
13 News this morning, now that
the Democratic convention is over,
there's so many issues one could
talk about relating to them and
how they responded to the Repub-
licans. And what do the news peo-
ple talk about? Michelle Obama's
dress that's now going to become
a fashion icon. Everybody's going
to go out and buy one. Her color
of her nail polish that is going to
all of the sudden start appearing
everywhere and people are going
to run out and buy that. And
good-ol' ex-governor Charlie, talk-
ing about him, who was not very
warmly received, but he's a party
jumper. But there's so many im-
portant things to dwell on and I
guess maybe the people in Tampa
and the surrounding area just
want to hear about the fashion as-
pect of the convention. I think
there was more important issues
to talk about than that.


Loyal opposition
I'm 82 years of age, retired
military veteran, and I've heard
all the political talk. I've heard
the two conventions, Republicans
and now the Democrats. There
are two words that before, well I'll
say before 2008, I heard hun-
dreds of times a day and that
was the outs in other words,
the ones who were not in the
White House were the loyal op-
position. I haven't heard those
two words in recent years.
Political bias
This I don't understand, al-
though it proves one thing: this
paper is very biased. You play up
the Obama campaign with
splashing the Obamas "love fest"
on the front page, but there was
very little, if any, of the Romneys
and their efforts for a new way of
life. God help us and God bless
America.


Email as campaign arsenal


O n Sept. 5,
Michelle Obama
sent a message
to her husband's email
list with the subject
line, "As always, thank
you." It was the morn- ":-
ing after her speech to
the Democratic con- *
vention, and she wrote:
"I know your life is full Coki
- with work, or school, Steven
or family-and yet you OTI
still find the time to
help out when you can. VOI
You may have a tight
budget, but you give what you can
afford."
In two short sentences, plus the
subject line, she used some ver-
sion of the word "you" seven
times. Then she noted one family
recently "skipped pizza at their
favorite place so that they could
make a difference in this elec-
tion." In a concluding PS., she
added: "It meant a lot to me to
speak with you and everyone else
last night. Thank you for every-
thing you do."
Both candidates communicate
with their followers in many ways
- through speeches and inter-
views, commercials and videos.
But emails sent by both cam-
paigns during the past two weeks
offer a particular insight into
their rival strategies.
Team Obama places top priority
on making supporters feel directly
connected to the campaign effort,
on making them feel their contri-
butions in money, energy, effort
- are invaluable. The most com-
mon word used in those emails is
not "I" or "me" but "you."
Leading up to midnight Aug. 31,
the campaign's fundraising pleas
became increasingly fervent and
frequent.
At 9:58 that night, Barack
Obama wrote: "After three
straight months of being out-
raised and recently being out-


-Sfu
e and
Roberts
HER
ICES


spent in some key
states more than 3-to-1
- your support before
the deadline couldn't
be more urgent."
It worked. Obama
raked in $114 million
in August, barely edg-
ing Mitt Romney for
the first time in three
months and adding a
boatload of names to a
donor base that's
reached 3.2 million.
Team Obama has al-
ways insisted support-


ers should not be treated simply
as ATMs, so emails offer many
ways for ordinary folks to get in-
volved besides giving money Join
Michelle on a conference call for
student volunteers. Attend a con-
vention watch party in your
neighborhood and bring a friend.
This link will help you register to
vote, that link will get you to a
new video, and here's one to an
online shop where Vote Obama
beach towels are on an end-of-
season special.
Recent polls reveal the reason-
ing behind this push to energize
volunteers. In the new ABC
News/Washington Post survey,
Obama posts a 6-point lead
among registered voters but is
held to a virtual tie among likely
voters. That puts a huge premium
on efforts to identify and turn out
folks on Election Day who al-
ready agree with you.
Romney's strategy is quite dif-
ferent. He uses email less often,
and fewer communications are
aimed at raising money Instead,
they're aimed at raising temper-
atures. The most common word
in his messages is "Obama," and
they're designed to stoke anger
and outrage among his backers.
An email sent Sept. 8, for ex-
ample, is titled "The cold hard
truth." Communications director
Gail Gitcho writes: "No amount


of liberal mythology or political
theater in Charlotte can mask the
cold, hard truth: This president
has not kept his promises, and
America is not better off."
This is Team Romney's
strongest campaign theme, and
the ABC News/Washington Post
poll shows why Only one in five
voters say they're better off fi-
nancially than when Obama took
office.
Romney's emails repeat many
of his standard campaign riffs
and are designed to portray gov-
ernment in the worst possible
light. One on Sept. 6, titled "Scan-
dals and cronies," attacks Obama
for backing Solyndra, a solar en-
ergy company that "went bank-
rupt and leftAmerican taxpayers
to pick up the bill." Another, on
Sept. 5, insists the president has
"effectively gutted" welfare re-
form. A third denounces the pres-
ident's stimulus bill for wasting
federal money repairing tennis
courts and studying honeybees.
It's a popular line of argument.
By 53 percent to 40 percent, vot-
ers say government programs do
more to interfere in people's lives
than to improve them.
The Democrats' core theme is:
like Obama (and his wife) and work
for them. The Republicans' retort:
hate Obama (and big government)
and vote against them. It's no won-
der 74 percent of Obama support-
ers say they're voting for the
president and not against his rival;
only 35 percent of Romney backers
describe their vote as a positive
gesture of support
So which is more powerful?
Admiration or animosity? That's
a key question voters will decide
in November

Cokie Roberts and Steven V
Roberts' column is syndicated in
newspapers around the country
by United Media.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Hotel proposal
I live in the Lecanto area (and)
have been here since 2000.
I have an idea. Why do not we,
the county, build a hotel or motel
next to the Hospice House that
will be built in the area? There
are none around the area.
Sounds like a good one, due to
the fact we have LifeCare of Cit-
rus County and Nature Coast
and the Hospice home on
County Road 491, and we have
Diamond Ridge.
The nearest motel is on
County Road 486 and the Holi-
day Inn in Inverness, not the
first one close to the homes
where families can be close to
their loved ones. We have that
area right on State Road 44, next
to the Hospice land or the land
across from there.
I work in one of the homes on
C.R. 491. I hear they would come
if they had a place to stay that
was closer (rather) than going to
their loved one's home. The
motel and hotel would be no
long drive -3.5 miles or less; 6
minutes tops.
Think about it, Citrus County.
I think it would be a good
choice.
Darlene Witt
Lecanto


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Happy ending
Upon reminiscing recently
with a friend who was a member
of a large city SPCA auxiliary, we
remembered a cute story
We auxiliary members put on


fundraisers such as flea markets,
raffle ticket sales, bake sales,
etc. We also visited nursing
homes on Saturday with a few
puppies and kittens for the resi-
dents to handle and play with.
Many of these seniors had
owned cats and dogs in their
younger days when living in
their own homes. Handling
these puppies and kittens
brought back many happy mem-
ories and joy to their hearts.
On one such nursing home
visit, an employee came over
and fell in love with a tiger-
striped kitten and wanted to
adopt it on the spot. We had to
explain to her shelter policy re-
quired her to inquire personally
at the adoption desk with photo
ID. We gave her the kitten's ID
tag number and she assured us
she would be at the shelter first
thing Monday
My friend and I both worked.
So first thing Tuesday morning,
we called the adoption clerk to
inquire if this particular kitten
had been adopted. In a minute,
the clerk got back on the line
and said "yes" a very kindly lady
had adopted "Tiger"
Sometimes there are happy
endings in life.
Marge Blum
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: CAMPAIGN





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


NEED



PROOF



CITRUS



COUNTY



IS WORKING FOR


Oil drying up
Robin Humphrey stated
some rather impressive
numbers in regard to our
oil supply, but they are not
grounded in fact.
Where is his research?
These fantastic numbers
give people the illusion
everything is wonderful.
False assurances will not
prevent petroleum from be-
coming prohibitively ex-
pensive. Petroleum is not a
renewable resource.
Cheap easy-to-get-oil is
gone. Petroleum is now
drilled through 2 miles of
ocean from super-sophisti-
cated drilling platforms
costing fortunes. Drilling
also happens in freezing
weather, requiring unper-
fected technology
Petro-geology defines
peak oil as the rate of oil
extracted from oil deposits
(and) starts to decline once
the halfway point of the de-
posit has been reached. No
matter how many wells are
drilled, the total produc-
tion from the deposit will
decline. Salt water, carbon
dioxide or natural gas can
be pumped in to coax more
oil, but the deposit is past
the halfway point The U.S.
has been declining in oil
production since 1970.
That's a fact.
Production in 60 of the 90
oil producing countries in
the world is now in decline
(www.energyfiles.com). We
are now discovering only
one barrel for every five
barrels burned for energy.
New discoveries can't
keep up with the losses from
the declining oil deposits.
If we exclusively used
shale oil fields as our en-
ergy supply (a physical im-
possibility), this oil would
last only a year under our
current use. Fracking for
gas and oil uses huge
amounts of fresh water.
Each time a well is fracked,
4,000,000 gallons of drinking
water are poisoned with 496
different toxic chemicals.
These toxic wells can
only be used for several
months before being
fracked again. There are
now hundreds of thousands
of these wells with each
well fracked up to 22 times
before it's tapped dry This
process not only poisons
water, wells and aquifers, it
also causes tremendous air
pollution and destabilizes
the ground, causing minor
earthquakes.
Earthquakes caused by
cracking in her area de-
stroyed my friend's home
in Oklahoma.
We can only declare our
nation's energy independ-
ence with conservation and
supporting renewable en-
ergy sources, not by wishful
thinking.
Roger Dobronyi
Inverness

Welfare questions
In response to "Voting a
Privilege" by Joe Spoto.
Mr Spoto's position on
who "deserves" the right to
vote has been given some in-
formation from an unknown
source to come up with all
the generalizations and de-
claratives he thinks make
"common sense" about who
has the right to vote.
The first thing out of his
mouth about who should be
restricted from voting is
welfare recipients.
Why? Making a state-
ment such as that, it is ap-
parent you do not have a
clue about welfare. Welfare
is an issue that has many
facets and primarily has to
do with poverty If you
would take the time to
study welfare, you would


not make such insidious
statements.
How do you know people
on welfare have squan-
dered every educational
opportunity? You have no
idea of who has squan-
dered anything. How do
you know people on wel-
fare have made right
choices, but had their deci-
sions and choices go awry?
Are you saying all people
on welfare do not want to
provide adequately for
their family? How many
men and women with col-
lege degrees are on wel-
fare? Care to take a guess?
So these people (with de-
grees) do not deserve the
right to vote? How many
men and women have lost
their employment and have
no alternative but to seek
assistance through the so-
cial services of the U.S.
government? Again, these
people do not deserve the
right to vote?
Try looking at a lot of the
politicians (who) have
never had a serious job in
their lives but continue to
take a salary, expenses and
other perks from the gov-
ernment (taxpayers) until
they retire with great bene-
fits. That sir, is a form of
welfare, but through se-
mantics, it seems to make it
other than what it is.
I shall not belabor my re-
sponses to such ignorance
and pomposity, but you sir
are so misinformed and
need to check your heart,
values and thoughts be-


cause you have let every-
one know by your letter
what you are about. I know
what you are about because
I can spot you a mile away
Charles Stovall
Pine Ridge

Government class
I got a show that a Re-
publican was acting as a
democratic newsperson at
the D.C. convention.
He asked many different
people of age and color the
same question. Should we
cap or restrict corporations
from making a profit? They
all quickly shouted "yes,
yes, yes."
That scared me. It tells
me they have no idea how
the business world works
or the government's job in
watching the actions of big
business.
These morons have the
right to vote. Is it a surprise
to any one they can be so
easy to manipulate? I wish
the law said only land own-
ers or property owners and
citizens who pay taxes
could vote. I know it cannot
happen, maybe?
People need a short class
in how the government
works. I would make it
mandatory I know many
friends who are citizens by
choice and boy how well
they know their new gov-
ernment and its workings.
Puts most of us to shame.
Gerald Ruble
Inverness


Wednesday, Sept. 19th
6pm 7pm
(Followed by an hour
of individual counseling)

The seminar will be held at the
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus in Lecanto,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
(Building C-4, Room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is
offering a free seminar for individuals
thinking about starting their own business.

The two hour session will cover the main
issues involved in becoming an entrepreneur
- from the business idea to the reality of
owning your own business. Following the
seminar, interested participants will have the
opportunity to meet with seasoned SCORE
counselors to further discuss their ideas.

"R U READY" is specifically designed for
individuals who are not business owners, but
who are interested in learning what is
involved in becoming one. If you have ever
asked yourself "Do I have what it takes to be
an entrepreneur?" then this seminar is for
you!

A one hour counseling session will follow
for those interested in meeting with a
SCORE counselor.

For more information and to register
for the seminar, please contact
Dale Maim at SCORE
352-249-1236
Swww.scorecitrus.org
Seating is limited.


YOU?



HERE YOU GO.


Industry Appreciation Month

salutes the 9,000 businesses

employing 44,000 Citrus

County residents

A small sampling of new and growing businesses in Citrus County


Come join us for the
EDC Industry Appreciation BBQ!

Thursday, Sept 20, 6:00 p.m.,
M&B Dairy, Lecanto
with Adam D. Tucker/Tim McGraw Tribute Show
Tickets: $25
352-795-3149 or www.citrusedc.com/events












Presented by Citrus County
Business Alliance Partners:


(
CITRUS COUNTY U


COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
E-FLORIDA
SCOE | Citrus County


WORKFORCE
CITIUS LEY -MARIOR


Citrus County Economic Development Council


www.citrusedc.com; 352-795-2000


I


OPINION


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 A9


Lb"v











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


tionBIEF Bomb threats evacuate campuses


StrikNothifo r two collies cleeed

Nothingfound after two colleges cleared


Associated Press
Karen Lewis, president of
the Chicago teachers
union, left, and vice presi-
dent Jesse Sharkey stand
Friday before a meeting of
the union's House of Dele-
gates in Chicago. The
city's nearly weeklong
teachers strike appeared
headed toward a resolution
Friday after negotiators
emerged from marathon
talks and said they had
achieved a "framework"
that could end the walkout
in time for students to re-
turn to class Monday.


Capitol bomb plot
gets man 30 years
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -A
Virginia man has been sen-
tenced to 30 years in prison
for plotting to detonate a sui-
cide bomb at the U.S Capitol
in an undercover sting.
The term imposed on 29-
year-old Amine EI-Khalifi of
Alexandria was the highest
allowed under a plea deal.
EI-Khalifi admitted plotting
with undercover agents he
believed were from al-Qaida
and volunteering to run a sui-
cide operation at the Capitol,
going so far as to don what
he thought was a bomb-laden
vest.
At Friday's hearing, El-
Khalifi expressed no remorse
and said only that he loves
Allah.
Defense lawyers said the
sting operation preyed on El-
Khalifi's financial woes by giv-
ing him nearly $6,000.
Prosecutors say EI-Khalifi
came to authorities' attention
in part by answering a Face-
book post seeking to recruit
Muslim holy warriors.

World BRIEF

Eruption


Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas-Tens of
thousands of people
streamed off university
campuses in Texas and
North Dakota on Friday
after telephoned bomb
threats prompted officials
to warn students and faculty
to get away as quickly as
possible. Both campuses
eventually were deemed
safe and reopened by early
afternoon, as authorities
worked to determine
whether the threats were
related.
The University of Texas


received a call about 8:35
a.m. from a man claiming to
be with al-Qaida who said
he had placed bombs all
over the 50,000-student
Austin campus, according to
University of Texas spokes-
woman Rhonda Weldon. He
claimed the bombs would go
off in 90 minutes and all
buildings were evacuated at
9:50 a.m. as a precaution,
Weldon said.
The deadline passed with-
out incident, and the univer-
sity reopened all buildings
by noon. Classes were can-
celed for the rest of the day,
but other university activi-


ties were to resume by 5 p.m.
North Dakota State Uni-
versity President Dean
Bresciani said 20,000 people
were evacuated from his
school's main and down-
town campuses in Fargo
after the school received its
threat. FBI spokesman Kyle
Loven said a call that in-
cluded a "threat of an ex-
plosive device" came in
about 9:45 a.m., but he de-
clined to give further de-
tails. He said the agency was
trying to determine if the
two campus threats were
related.
NDSU buildings reopened


Associated ress
University of Texas students stand outside Friday after
evacuating buildings at The University of Texas in Austin.
Thousands of people streamed off university campuses in
Texas and North Dakota on Friday after phoned-in bomb
threats prompted evacuations.
about 1 p.m. and classes Bresciani, adding the cam-
were set to resume pus had been "deemed
an hour later, said safe."


US embassies targeted


Anger spreads to

20 countries over

anti-Islam film

Associated Press
CAIRO Angry protests over
an anti-Islam film spread across
the Muslim world Friday, with
demonstrators scaling the walls
of U.S. embassies in Tunisia and
Sudan, torching part of a German
embassy and clashing with police
in violence that left at least four
dead. Amid the turmoil, Islamic
militants waving black banners
and shouting "God is great"
stormed an international peace-
keepers base in Egypt's Sinai and
battled troops.
Egypt's new Islamist president
went on national TV and ap-
pealed to Muslims to not attack
embassies, denouncing the vio-
lence earlier this week in Libya
that killed four Americans, in-
cluding the U.S. ambassador.
Mohammed Morsi's first public
move to restrain protesters after
days of near silence appeared
aimed at repairing strains with
the United States over this
week's violence.
Police in Cairo and the Yemeni
capital Sanaa dug in to prevent
protesters from reaching U.S. em-
bassies, firing tear gas and clash-
ing with the young demonstrators.
But elsewhere, authorities gave
the anger freer rein: In Sudan,
the attack on the U.S. Embassy
came after a call from a cleric on
state radio, and protesters drove
unhampered for miles in a con-
voy of buses to the embassy
The day of protests, which
spread to around 20 countries,


Associated Press
Egyptian protesters clash with security forces (not shown) Friday near the U.S. embassy in Cairo. The
protests are part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet
Muhammad.


started small and mostly peace-
fully in countries such as Indone-
sia, Malaysia, India, Afghanistan
and Pakistan. The most violent
demonstrations took place in the
Middle East In many places, only
a few hundred took to the streets,
mostly ultraconservative Is-
lamists -but the mood was often
furious.
Demonstrators came out after
weekly Friday Muslim prayers,
where many clerics in their


mosque sermons urged congre-
gations to defend their faith, de-
nouncing the obscure movie
produced in the United States
that denigrated the Prophet
Muhammad. It was a dramatic
expansion of protests that began
earlier this week and saw as-
saults on the U.S. embassies in
Egypt and Yemen and the storm-
ing of the U.S. Consulate in
Benghazi, Libya.
Several thousand battled with


Tunisian security forces outside
the U.S. Embassy in Tunis. Pro-
testers rained stones on police
firing volleys of tear gas and
shooting into the air
The heaviest violence came in
Sudan, where a prominent sheik
on state radio urged protesters to
march on the German Embassy
to protest alleged anti-Muslim
graffiti on mosques in Berlin, and
then to the U.S. Embassy to
protest the film.


Associated Press
The Volcan de Fuego or
Volcano of Fire, as seen
from Antigua, Guatemala,
releases a puff of volcanic
ash on Friday.

Volcano's eruption
draws tourists
ANTIGUA, Guatemala -A
terrifying eruption of one of the
world's most active volcanoes
tapered off Friday into a draw
for delighted tourists, who
snapped photos from a neigh-
boring colonial city and made
plans to take night hikes to
see glowing rivers of lava.
Villagers were returning to
their homes as it wound down
its largest eruption in nearly
four decades, spewing
smaller amounts of ash and
lava. Guatemalan authorities
reduced the alert level from
the highest, red, to orange
around the Volcan del Fuego,
or Volcano of Fire, and said
Thursday's ferocious lava
flow was now two smaller,
3,000-foot streams.
Tourists walking the cobble-
stone streets of the colonial
city of Antigua, about six miles
from the volcano, said they
were making plans to take
guided trips to the mountain.
-From wire reports


Rising gas prices crimp


Americans' spending


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Higher gas prices are
crimping consumer spending and slowing
the already-weak U.S. economy And they
could get worse in the coming months.
The Federal Reserve this week took
steps to boost economic growth. But those
stimulus measures are pushing oil prices
up. If gas prices follow, consumers will
have less money to spend elsewhere.
The impact of the Fed's actions "is likely
to weigh on the value of the U.S. dollar and
lift commodity prices," said Joseph Car-
son, U.S. economist at AllianceBernstein.
"We would not be surprised if (it) fueled
more inflation in coming months, squeez-
ing the real income of U.S. workers."
Americans are already feeling pinched
by high unemployment, slow wage growth
and higher gas prices.
Consumers increased their spending at
retail businesses by 0.9 percent in August,
the Commerce Department reported Fri-
day But that was largely because they paid
more for gas. Excluding the impact of gas
prices and a sizeable increase in auto
sales, retail sales rose just 0.1 percent.
Perhaps more telling is where Americans
spent less. Consumers cut back on clothing,
electronics and at general merchandise out-
lets discretionary purchases that typically
signal confidence in the economy
Gas prices have risen more than 50
cents per gallon in the past two months.
The national average was $3.87 a gallon on
Friday Most of the increase took place in


Associated Press
Gas station attendant Youssouf Soukouna,
42, pumps gas Wednesday at a LukOil
station in Newark, N.J., where all levels of
gas were priced at $4.99.
August, which drove the biggest one-
month increase in overall consumer
prices in three years, the Labor Depart-
ment said Friday in a separate report.
"Consumers were not willing to spend
much at the mall since they are feeling the
pump price pinch," said Chris Christo-
pher, an economist at IHS Global Insight.
Weaker retail sales will likely weigh on
growth in the July-September quarter.
Economists at Bank of America Merrill
Lynch slashed their third-quarter growth
forecast to an annual rate of only 1.1 per-
cent, down from 1.5 percent. That's not
nearly fast enough to spur more hiring,
which has languished since February
The Fed is hoping to kick-start growth
with a series of bold steps announced
Thursday that could make borrowing
cheaper for years.


Man convicted for

1957 murder of Ill. girl


Associated Press
SYCAMORE, Ill. A 72-
year-old man was convicted
Friday in the 1957 murder of
a 7-year-old girl, with spec-
tators letting out a
deafening cheer as
the verdict was an-
nounced in one of
the oldest unsolved
crimes to eventually
get to court in the
U.S.
The sound of sob-
bing overtook the Jai
room as the cheers McCu
and applause faded convict
after Judge James mur
Hallock pronounced Jack
McCullough guilty of mur-
der, kidnapping and abduc-
tion in Maria Ridulph's
death. Family and friends of
the girl fell into each other's
arms; others walked up to
hug and kiss prosecutors.
McCullough was around
17 years old on the snowy
night in December 1957
when the second-grader
went missing in Sycamore,
about 60 miles west of
Chicago. He later enlisted in
the military, and ultimately
settled in Seattle where he
worked as a Washington
state police officer
Maria's playmate the night


she disappeared, Kathy
Chapman, was a star witness
in the case. She testified Mc-
Cullough was the young man
who approached the girls as
they played, asking if they
liked dolls and if
they wanted piggy-
back rides.
'A weight has been
lifted off my shoul-
ders," said Chapman,
who is now 63, out-
side on the court-
house steps. "Maria
ck finally has the justice
lough she deserves."
ted of McCullough was
der. on an early list of sus-
pects in 1957. But he had an
alibi, saying on that day, he
had traveled to Chicago to
get a medical exam before
enlisting in the Air Force.
The case was reopened
after his old girlfriend con-
tacted police with evidence
calling his alibi into ques-
tion- she had found his un-
used train ticket from
Rockford to Chicago on the
day Maria disappeared. He
was arrested July 1, 2011, in
Washington state at a retire-
ment home where he
worked as a security guard.
McCullough waived his
right for a jury trial and opted
for a bench trial instead.


I











SPORTS


No. 18 Florida
travels to Knoxville
for a night game
Saturday at No. 23
Tennessee./B2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College football/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, hockey/B5
0 NFL/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Rays upend Yankees 6-4 in New York


'Canes


Tampa Bay stays

close in AL East

divisional race
Associated Press
NEW YORK David Price
earned his league-leading 18th
win with another superb per-
formance against the New York
Yankees, and the Tampa Bay
Rays opened a key series against
their AL East rival Friday night
by taking advantage of a fading
CC Sabathia and hanging on for
a 6-4 victory


The Rays began the day four
games behind division co-leaders
Baltimore and New York.
Out of the rotation since
Sept. 2 because of a sore shoul-
der, Price (18-5) boosted his AL
Cy Young Award credentials with
seven innings of two-run ball.
Striking out six and giving up five
hits, the lanky lefty got a big lift
from an inadvertent deflection
See Page B4
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher
David Price throws against the
New York Yankees in the first
inning Friday at Yankee Stadium
in New York.
Associated Press


Grasp slips away


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Seven Rivers Christian School ballcarrier Kelin Massullo hangs onto the ball after it is knocked loose by Bronson's Tyler Sistrunk, with
the Warriors' Michael Steve (4) ready to recover. Bronson won 43-16.

Close game turns into blowoutfor Seven Rivers in 43-16loss to Bronson


For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.


DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE Costly
turnovers and a few tense moments
with players going down to injury
were too much for Seven Rivers
Christian School to overcome in a
43-16 loss Friday night to Bronson
High School.
Numerous players were holding
bags of ice or sporting braces after a


very physical football game be-
tween the Warriors (0-3) and the Ea-
gles (1-1) at Ernie Wever Youth Park.
Seven Rivers the home team -
fought hard and through pain, com-
ing up just short.
"These guys were physical... they
came out and hit us in the mouth,"
Warriors coach Dave Iwaniec said.
Before the game, Iwaniec said his


Bronson 43
Seven Rivers 16


* The
Warriors' next
game is 7 p.m.
Friday at Christ
Church Academy
in Jacksonville.


See Page B4


throttle


Rattlers

Citrus'rushing

attack rolls in

49-27 triumph
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
BELLEVIEW Citrus
didn't need much variety in its
offense in Friday's football
matchup at Belleview's Strike
Zone stadium. Instead, it was
able to do what it does best -
dominate the line of scrim-
mage and attack opponents
with a formidable group of
running backs.
The return of Hurricanes
senior tail-
back Darius
Chapes also
helped. The
senior ran for
a game-high
210 yards and
four touch-
downs on 14 Darius
Darius
carries in his Chapes
first game Citrus RB ran
since suffer- for 210 yards,
ing an elbow 4 TDs in return
injury in the from injury.
preseason to
help Citrus beat Belleview 49-
27 in a game that wasn't even
as close as the score indicates.
Chapes' performance was
complemented by sophomore
tailback Breon Whaley's
game-high 21 carries for 158
yards and a score as well as
two first-half rushing TDs by
senior fullback Al-Lamar
White, which helped put Cit-
rus ahead 28-7 by halftime.
The 'Canes (2-1) outrushed
the Rattlers by 430 yards as
their swarming defense held
Belleview (1-2) to 12 yards on
the ground in the absence of
Rattlers standout junior run-
ning back Craig Riche. Belle-
view sophomore quarterback
Erik Pitts had some success in
the air, going 11-for-23 for 184
yards passing and four TDs
(two passing, two rushing). His
favorite target was junior
Dyantre Colston, who caught
seven balls for 86 yards and a
score.
See Page B4

Citrus 49
Belleview 27
The team's
next game is
7:30 p.m.
Friday at
Lecanto.


Panthers handle Central for second win of season


Kirk Osburn
Lecanto senior
RB scored two
touchdowns.


Nile Waters
Lecanto senior
RB scored two
touchdowns.


JOSEPH KORNECKI III
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE The
Lecanto Panthers football team
overwhelmed the Central Bears
26-13 with a strong offensive per-
formance Friday night at The
Bear Den in Brooksvile. Lecanto
amassed 354 yards of total offense
compared to Central's 194 yards.
Lecanto will now turn its atten-


tion to Friday's home game
against Citrus.
"I'm proud of the boys, and we
fought hard and played hard,"
said Lecanto head coach McKin-
ley Rolle. "Central didn't quit, and
I'm extremely proud of them, and
we will enjoy this and get ready
for the county rivalry next week."
Central got on the board first
when Jamarcus Hayes inter-
cepted a Lecanto pass and re-


turned it to the 34 yard line. The
Bears converted off the turnover
with a 2-yard rush by quarterback
Cole Teater with 8:33 left in the
first for a 7-0 Bears lead.
Lecanto (2-1) tied the score at 7-
all on the ensuing drive when sen-
ior Kirk Osburn ran in for a 1-yard
touchdown with 5:09 remaining in
the first


Lecanto 26
Central 13


A


See Page B4


* The team's
next game is
7:30 p.m.
Friday at
home against
Citrus.


rmaqr""





COLLEGE FOOTBALL


ACC opener at home for No. 5 'Noles


Associated Press
Florida State wide receiver Kevin Benjamin and the fifth-ranked Seminoles
host Wake Forest in their ACC opener today in Tallahassee.


Florida State hosts

foe Wake Forest

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher likes to describe
Saturday's contest against Wake For-
est as a double-whammy game.
The game between the Seminoles
(2-0) and Demon Deacons (2-0, 1-0
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference) is not only Wae
Florida State's league W e
opener, but a divi- at No. 5 I
sional matchup as Time: Noo
well. It's also the
Seminoles first game U TV: ESPN.
against a Football
Bowl Subdivision team this season.
"Double whammy," Fisher said
on several occasions this week. "We
need to be sure we're ready to play"
The fifth-ranked Seminoles are a
four-touchdown favorite to beat the
Demon Deacons, who won last year's
meeting 35-30 in Winston-Salem,
N.C. The Seminoles have been point-
ing to this date for a while.
Safety Lamarcus Joyner con-
ceded this week that the Seminoles
"overlooked" the Demon Deacons
last year.
"They outplayed us," Joyner said.
"This year we're ready"
Wake Forest's victory last year ef-


fectively ended any chances Florida
State had of winning the ACC and
earning a bid to a BCS game last year
"They are the same team in a
sense and we're the same team in a
sense," Florida State middle line-
backer Vince Williams said. "But
it's going to be a brand new game."
Wake Forest coach Jim Grobe
knows his club is stepping into a
tough situation.
"They're going to be pumped up,"
Grobe said. "Because we got them last
year, I know they're motivated to get
a little bit of revenge."
est (2-0) While Wake Forest
FSU (2-0) has eked out close
victories over Liberty
n today, and North Carolina,
the Seminoles' num-
bers are gaudy after
running roughshod
over FCS opponents Murray (Ky.)
State and Savannah State by a com-
bined 124-3 margin. Florida State's
defense ranks second nationally in
all of the significant defensive cat-
egories and quarterback EJ
Manuel is sixth nationally in pass-
ing efficiency
But they've always had difficulty
in recent seasons against Grobe's
teams, losing four of the last six
games in the series.
"There are just some teams that
you match up with a little better
once in a while and some teams
that you're a little more motivated
to play against," Grobe said.


The time for talk is over


Gators, Vols could

each take large

SEC East step

Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Steve
Spurrier isn't directing pregame
barbs at Phillip Fulmer. Danny
Wuerffel and Peyton Manning
aren't throwing any passes.
Yet there's an unmistakable sense
of 1990s nostalgia in the air now that
national relevance has returned to
the Florida-Tennessee rivalry When
No. 23 Tennessee opens Southeast-
ern Conference competition Satur-
day against No. 18 Florida, it will
mark the first time since 2007 that
both are ranked at the time of their
annual confrontation.
"Tennessee is always going to feel
like Tennessee because that's just
our rival, our rival team that we love
to play," Florida linebacker Lerentee
McCray said. "But it's kind of an old-
school feel, getting back to it"
When Spurrier coached Florida
and Fulmer led Tennessee, this
game ranked among the nation's
biggest September showdowns. Ei-
ther Florida or Tennessee repre-
sented the Eastern Division in the
SEC championship game every
year from 1992-2001.
Lately, the rivalry hasn't been
nearly as relevant.
Nor has it been much of a rivalry
Tennessee has posted two con-
secutive losing seasons. After win-
ning national titles in 2006 and
2008, Florida posted a combined
record of 15-11 in 2010 and 2011.
Even during its recent struggles,
Florida has continued its seven-
game winning streak in this series.
Now both teams have cause for
optimism.
Florida (2-0, 1-0 SEC) came from
behind to win 20-17 at Texas A&M
last week. Tennessee (2-0, 0-0) has
gained over 500 yards in back-to-
back games for the first time since
2000, giving the Vols reason to be-
lieve they can finally beat Florida.
"We walk around campus and
people just have that look, that Ten-
nessee's back," Tennessee defen-
sive end Darrington Sentimore said.
History suggests Tennessee won't
end the Gators' streak unless it does


Associated Press
Florida coach Will Muschamp takes his No. 18 Gators into Neyland Stadium to face No. 23 Tennessee at 6 p.m.
tonight in Knoxville.


a better job of running the ball.
Tennessee has averaged 1.8
yards per carry over its last seven
games with Florida. The Vols
haven't outrushed Florida since
2004, the last time they defeated
the Gators.
"It's a real focus the running
game and handling the line of
scrimmage in general," Tennessee
center James Stone


said. "That's their
strength, and we have
to make it our
strength."
Florida's offense
features Mike


seconds. Florida leads the SEC in
time of possession.
Yet both defenses also have rea-
son for hope.
Bray has completed 73.8 percent
of his passes for 643 yards with six
touchdowns and no interceptions,
but he entered last year's Florida
game with similar statistics. He
ended up throwing two intercep-
tions as well as three


No. 18 UF (2-0) at
No. 23 Tenn. (2-0)
* Time: 6 p.m. tonight.
* TV: ESPN.


Gillislee, who leads
the SEC with 231 yards rushing.
Tennessee has a quick-strike attack
with Tyler Bray throwing to SEC re-
ceptions leader Justin Hunter and
all-purpose yardage leader Cordar-
relle Patterson. Hunter has made a
successful return after tearing the
anterior cruciate ligament in his
left knee in Tennessee's 33-23 loss
to Florida last September
The Vols have four scoring drives
this season that took 34 or fewer


touchdown passes
against the Gators.
Florida cornerback
Marcus Roberson re-
ferred to Bray as a
"daredevil" this week


while noting his ten-
dency to force passes.
Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel
was sacked eight times last week.
That number has the attention of
both teams.
"We definitely noticed (how)
Texas A&M pass rushed in the
game and how it affected Jeff,"
Tennessee outside linebacker
Jacques Smith said. "They kind of
exposed themselves a little bit."
Driskel knows he must do a bet-


ter job of helping his blockers.
"I've got to get rid of the ball ear-
lier and not lock it onto my first
read," Driskel said. "Like I said,
live another day if nothing is open
and someone is coming at me, and
throw the ball away"
Florida must improve its pass
protection, but the Gators still have
plenty of confidence after winning
on the road last week. Tennessee
also is feeling good about itself after
two double-digit victories. Their fast
starts have brought back memories
of an era when these programs com-
peted for high stakes every season.
The Vols and Gators were "two of
the top five teams in the country in
the '90's," Florida coach Will
Muschamp said. "Basically, the
third Saturday in September, who-
ever won that game certainly had a
leg up on winning the East."
It's not quite as clear-cut this year
SEC East rivals Georgia and
South Carolina remain ahead of
both teams in the rankings. But the
winner of Saturday's game once
again should consider itself a real
contender for the division title.


B2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


Canes finally home to face B-C UCF thinking revenge vs. FIU


Miami will

playFCS

schoolfrom

Daytona Beach

Associated Press

MIAMI For the first
time this season, Miami has
a weekend itinerary that
doesn't include boarding
passes or middle seats.
The Hurricanes are
hoping it's also free of
turbulence.
After decidedly different
results from the first two
games of the season an
inspiring Atlantic Coast
Conference win at Boston
College, followed by an em-
barrassing blowout loss at
Kansas State -Miami is fi-


nally set for its home debut
The Hurricanes (1-1) play
host to Bethune-Cookman
(2-0) of the Football Cham-
pionship Subdivision on
Saturday, their last outing
before jumping back into
ACC play
"Feels like for-
ever since we
started training
camp," Miami
coach Al Golden
said. "It's exciting
to come home. I know
the kids are excited
about it."
The fact that they're ex-
cited about anything might
be considered a good sign.
A week ago, in a 52-13 loss
to Kansas State, absolutely
nothing went right for
Miami. Linebacker Ramon
Buchanan was lost for the
season with a knee injury,
safety Vaughn Telemaque
was lost for at least one game


with a knee issue of his own,
and top wide receiver Allen
Hums left the game early
after getting shaken up and
checked for symptoms of a
concussion. Hums will not
play Saturday.
So a young team gets
younger A total of
three seniors are
expected to be in
the offensive and
defensive starting
lineups, units that
are still reeling a bit
from the magnitude of issues
- six rushing touchdowns
allowed, most notably-that
popped up a week ago.
"There's no way to sugar-
coat it," Miami quarterback
Stephen Morris said. "The
best thing to do is to learn
from it."
A win would help, of
course.
Miami beat Bethune-
Cookman 45-14 last season.


Knights at home

vs. Panthers

Associated Press

ORLANDO If Central
Florida coach George
O'Leary had his way, none of
his players would have even
thought about last year's
matchup with Florida Inter-
national this week
If he had his way, there
would be no reminders of
how the Knights' highly
touted offensive line was
outmuscled by a Panthers
defense that produced six
sacks. Or how a handful of
other plays eventually lifted
FIU to a surprise 17-10 win.
"I think all losses should
sting. I remember every
one of them in 44 years.
Name the game and I can
tell you what happened,"


O'Leary said. "I think it's
the old saying that 'every
time you lose, you die a lit-
tle' and it's true.
"Last year was a game
that we did nothing offen-
sively Defensively we did
enough to win the game, but
you can't give up six sacks.
... We didn't play well
on special teams ei-
ther. We get an-
other opportunity
this Saturday to
face them and we
are working hard to
get things right"
There's no question that
last year's loss had an effect
on both teams.
After a 2-0 start the
Knights lost three of their
next four games en route to
a dismal 5-7 season. Mean-
while, the win was the Pan-
thers' third straight and
catapulted them to a pro-
gram-best 8-5 finish and sec-
ond consecutive bowl berth.


While last year's win over
the Knights turned a few
heads, it came a week after
FIU upset Louisville. Now
with wins like fellow Sun
Belt Conference member
Louisiana-Monroe's victory
at Arkansas last week, FIU
coach Mario Cristobal
hopes people notice.
"There's always
gonna be work to be
done, but these wins
are happening
every year now," he
said. "I think it's a trib-
ute to these programs
and these coaches, and most
importantly these players."
Coming off another early
season setback to Ohio
State last week, UCF senior
receiver Quincy McDuffie
said it's nearly impossible
for the Knights (1-1) not to
be looking for a little re-
demption on multiple
fronts this week against
FIU (1-1).


or


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

College football
schedule
Saturday, Sept.15
EAST
N. Illinois (1-1) at Army (0-1), Noon
CCSU (0-2) at New Hampshire (1-1), Noon
Virginia Tech (2-0) at Pittsburgh (0-2), Noon
William & Mary (0-2) at Towson (0-1), Noon
Marist (1-1) at Columbia (0-0), 12:30 p.m.
San Diego (1-1) at Harvard (0-0), 12:30 p.m.
Princeton (0-0) at Lehigh (2-0), 12:30 p.m.
Maine (0-1) at Bryant (0-2), 1 p.m.
Sacred Heart (0-1) at Colgate (0-2), 1 p.m.
Cornell (0-0) at Fordham (1-1), 1 p.m.
Yale (0-0) at Georgetown (2-0), 1 p.m.
Brown (0-0) at Holy Cross (0-1), 1 p.m.
Monmouth (NJ) (1-1) at Wagner (0-2), 1 p.m.
Bucknell (1-0) at Delaware (2-0), 3:30 p.m.
Navy (0-1) at Penn St. (0-2), 3:30 p.m.
Rhode Island (0-1) atVillanova (1-1), 3:30 p.m.
Stony Brook (2-0) at Syracuse (0-2), 4 p.m.
James Madison (2-0) vs. West Virginia (1-0)
at Landover, Md., 4:30 p.m.
Penn (0-0) at Lafayette (1-0), 6 p.m.
Butler (1-1) at Dartmouth (0-0), 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Wake Forest (2-0) at Florida St. (2-0), Noon
Bethune-Cookman (2-0) at Miami (1-1), Noon
Louisiana-Monroe (1-0) at Auburn (0-2),
12:21 p.m.
UConn (1-1) at Maryland (2-0), 12:30 p.m.
Presbyterian (1-1) atVanderbilt (0-2), 12:30 p.m.
Webber International (0-2) at Jacksonville (1-
1), 1 p.m.
St. Francis (Pa.) (1-1) at Morehead St. (1-1),
1 p.m.
Richmond (1-1) atVMI (1-1), 1:30 p.m.
Austin Peay (0-2) atTennessee St. (2-0), 2 p.m.
Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-1) at Alcorn St. (1-1), 3 p.m.
Furman (0-2) at Clemson (2-0), 3 p.m.
W. Virginia St. (1-1) at Elon (1-1), 3 p.m.
Samford (1-0) at Gardner-Webb (0-2), 3p.m.
The Citadel (2-0) at Appalachian St. (1-1),
3:30 p.m.
Virginia (2-0) at GeorgiaTech (1-1), 3:30 p.m.
North Carolina (1-1) at Louisville (2-0), 3:30 p.m.
East Carolina (1-1) at Southern Miss. (0-1),
3:30 p.m.
Howard (1-1) at Norfolk St. (2-0), 4 p.m.
FlU (1-1) at UCF (1-1), 4 p.m.
E. Kentucky (1-1) at Coastal Carolina (2-0),
6p.m.
Hampton (0-2) at Florida A&M (0-2), 6 p.m.
UTSA (2-0) at Georgia St. (0-2), 6 p.m.
Va. Lynchburg (0-0) at NC A&T (1-1), 6 p.m.
South Alabama (1-1)at NC State (1-1), 6 p.m.
Campbell (1-1) at Old Dominion (2-0), 6 p.m.
Florida (2-0) at Tennessee (2-0), 6 p.m.
Ohio (2-0) at Marshall (1-1), 6:30 p.m.
Prairie View (0-2) at Alabama A&M (2-0), 7 p.m.
NC Central (1-1) at Duke (1-1), 7 p.m.
Alabama St. (-1) at Grambling St. (0-2), 7 p.m.
W. Kentucky (1-1) at Kentucky (1-1), 7 p.m.
Rice (1-1) at Louisiana Tech (1-0), 7 p.m.
MiddleTennessee (1-1) at Memphis (0-2), 7p.m.
UAB (0-1) at South Carolina (2-0), 7 p.m.
Mississippi St. (2-0) at Troy (1-1), 7 p.m.
W. Carolina (1-1) at Wofford (2-0), 7 p.m.
FAU (1-1) at Georgia (2-0), 7:30 p.m.
Idaho (0-2) at LSU (2-0), 8 p.m.
Texas (2-0) at Mississippi (2-0), 9:15 p.m.
MIDWEST
Charleston Southern (0-2) at Illinois (1-1),
Noon
TCU (1-0) at Kansas (1-1), Noon
W. Michigan (1-1) at Minnesota (2-0), Noon
Arkansas St. (1-1) at Nebraska (1-1), Noon
California (1-1) at Ohio St. (2-0), Noon
E. Michigan (0-2) at Purdue (1-1), Noon
Robert Morris (0-2) at Dayton (0-2), 1 p.m.
E. Illinois (1-1) at Illinois St. (2-0), 2 p.m.
Duquesne (1-1) at Valparaiso (0-2), 2 p.m.
Drake (1-1) at Indiana St. (1-1), 2:05 p.m.
UC Davis (1-1) at S. Dakota St. (1-1), 3 p.m.
Morgan St. (1-1) at Akron (0-2), 3:30 p.m.
UMass (0-2) at Michigan (1-1), 3:30 p.m.
Boston College (1-1) at Northwestern (2-0),
3:30 p.m.
N. Iowa (1-1) at Iowa (1-1), 3:42 p.m.
Albany (NY) (2-0) atYoungstown St. (2-0), 4 p.m.
Delaware St. (1-1) at Cincinnati (1-0), 7 p.m.
North Texas (1-1) at Kansas St. (2-0), 7 p.m.
Arizona St. (2-0) at Missouri (1-1), 7 p.m.
SE Missouri (1-1) at S. Illinois (0-2), 7 p.m.
Bowling Green (1-1) at Toledo (1-1), 7 p.m.
Ball St. (1-1) at Indiana (2-0), 8 p.m.
W. Illinois (2-0) at Iowa St. (2-0), 8 p.m.
Notre Dame (2-0) at Michigan St. (2-0), 8 p.m.
Murray St. (0-2) at Missouri St. (0-2), 8 p.m.
Utah St. (2-0) at Wisconsin (1-1), 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Louisiana-Lafayette (2-0) at Oklahoma St.
(1-1), Noon
Alabama (2-0) at Arkansas (1-1), 3:30 p.m.
Texas A&M (0-1) at SMU (1-1), 3:30 p.m.
Sam Houston St. (1-0) at Baylor (1-0), 7 p.m.
Bacone (1-1) at Cent. Arkansas (1-1), 7 p.m.
New Mexico (1-1) atTexas Tech (2-0), 7p.m.
Nicholls St. (0-1) atTulsa (1-1), 7 p.m.
New Mexico St. (1-1) at UTEP (0-2), 8 p.m.
Jackson St. (0-2) at Texas Southern (1-1),
8:30 p.m.
FAR WEST
TennesseeTech (2-0) at Oregon (2-0), 3 p.m.
Liberty (0-2) at Montana (1-1), 3:30 p.m.
Stephen F Austin (1-1) at Montana St. (2-0),
3:35 p.m.
Miami (Ohio) (1-1) at Boise St. (0-1), 4 p.m.
Portland St. (1-1) atWashington (1-1), 4 p.m.
N. Colorado (1-1) at Sacramento St. (1-1),
5:05 p.m.
Cal Poly (1-0) at Wyoming (0-2), 6 p.m.
Fort Lewis (0-1) at N.Arizona (1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Northwestern St. (-1) at Nevada (1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Southern Cal (2-0) at Stanford (2-0), 7:30 p.m.
Colorado (0-2) at Fresno St. (1-1), 8 p.m.
NM Highlands (2-0) at S. Utah (0-2), 8 p.m.
North Dakota (2-0) at San Diego St. (1-1), 8 p.m.
Colorado St. (1-1) at San Jose St. (1-1), 8 p.m.
McNeese St. (2-0) at Weber St. (0-2), 8 p.m.
BYU (2-0) at Utah (1-1), 10 p.m.
SC State (1-1) at Arizona (2-0), 10:30 p.m.
Houston (0-2) at UCLA (2-0), 10:30 p.m.
Lamar (1-1) at Hawaii (0-1), 11:59 p.m.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


AL

Tigers 4, Indians 0


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
62.566 7-3
63.563 '2 5-5
66 .542 3/2 3 5-5
78 .455 16 15/2 5-5
80 .448 17 16/2 3-7


Str Home
W-3 42-32
L-1 41-29
W-1 39-32
L-1 35-37
W-1 33-43


Away
39-30 Chicago
40-34 Detroit
39-34 Kan. City
30-41 Cleveland
32-37 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
66 .538 - 5-5
67.531 1 4/2 4-6
78 .455 12 15Y2 5-5
85 .414 18 21/2 3-7
85 .414 18 21/2 5-5


Home Away
42-31 35-35
43-28 33-39
31-38 34-40
32-38 28-47
29-44 31-41


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Wash.
Atlanta
Philly
New York
Miami


East Division
W L Pct GB WC L10
89 55.618 7-3
82 63 .566 7/2 6-4
72 72 .500 17 4 8-2
65 78 .455 23/2 10/2 2-8
64 81 .441 25/2 12/2 4-6


Str Home Away
L-1 44-27 45-28
W-141-32 41-31
L-1 38-37 34-35
L-6 30-41 35-37
W-133-37 31-44


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10
87 58 .600 - 5-5
76 68 .528 10'/2- 4-6
72 71 .503 14 3/2 7-3
72 71 .503 14 3/2 2-8
57 87.396 29/219 6-4
46 98 .319 40/230 5-5


Str Home Away
L-1 47-28 40-30
W-1 43-29 33-39
W-3 44-28 28-43
L-7 42-30 30-41
W-2 35-34 22-53
W-1 30-42 16-56


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pot GB WC L10
58 .594 - 6-4
61 .573 3 6-4
66 .542 7/2 3 7-3
75 .479 16/212 5-5




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
62 .566 - 6-4
70 .514 7/2 2 3-7
72 .497 10 4/2 5-5
75 .479 12/27 7-3
85 .401 23/218 2-8


Home Away
45-26 40-32
42-30 40-31
40-32 38-34
36-36 33-39


Str Home Away
W-2 40-31 41-31
L-4 38-34 36-36
W-2 35-34 36-38
W-4 38-34 31-41
L-2 31-43 26-42


Detroit
ab r h bi
AJcksncf 5 1 1 1
Dirks If 4 00 0
MiCarr3b 4 1 2 1
Fielder lb 3 1 1 0
DYongdh 4 01 1
Boeschrf 3 02 1
AGarcirf 1 00 0
JhPerltss 3 0 1 0
Avila c 3 1 0 0
Infante2b 4 0 0 0
Totals 34 48 4
Detroit 220
Cleveland 000
DP-Detroit 1. LOB-
2B-A.Jackson (25),
(27), Chisenhall (3).


Associated Press
Washington Nationals left fielder Roger Bernadina crashes into the wall after making a catch to retire the Atlanta
Braves' Jason Heyward in the fifth inning of Friday's game in Atlanta. Bernadina was shaken up on the play but stayed
in the game.


Atanta's Simmons scores on Washington throwing error to win


Associated Press

ATLANTA Kris Medlen struck
out a career-high 13 and the Atlanta
Braves pulled out a 2-1 victory over the
Washington Nationals when Andrel-
ton Simmons scored on a throwing
error in the ninth inning Friday night
Simmons reached on an infield
single against Sean Burnett (1-2) and
scurried to third when Michael
Bourn lined a single that dropped in
right field. Pinch hitter Tyler Pastor-
nicky hit a one-hop grounder to short-
stop Ian Desmond, who had a shot at
getting Simmons but threw wildly to
the plate, the ball skipping all the way
to the backstop while the rookie slid
across with the winning run.
Craig Kimbrel (2-1) earned the win
by striking out the side in the top of
the ninth. Medlen went seven in-
nings, allowing only a homer to
Bryce Harper.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cubs 7, Pirates 4

CHICAGO The Pittsburgh Pirates
lost their seventh straight game and kept
fading in the NL wild-card race as Starlin
Castro hit a three-run homer that sent the
Chicago Cubs to a 7-4 win.
The Pirates have dropped 11 of 13
overall. They began the day three games
behind St. Louis for the final NL playoff
spot.
Chris Rusin (1-2) notched his first
major league victory, allowing two runs in
five-plus innings in his fourth career start.

Marlins 4, Reds 0
MIAMI The Cincinnati Reds' push
toward the playoffs was slowed by a last-
place team and a rookie who earned his
first National League victory.
Jacob Turner allowed only two hits in a
career-high seven innings to help the Miami
Marlins beat the NL Central leaders 4-0.
Turner (1-2) outpitched Bronson Arroyo
(12-8), who gave up four runs in six innings.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Tigers 4, Indians 0
CLEVELAND Justin Verlander
pitched seven shutout innings and made


sure Detroit stayed in step with first-place
Chicago in the AL Central, leading the
Tigers to a 4-0 win over the downward
spiraling Cleveland Indians.
Coming through the way he almost al-
ways does, Verlander (14-8) allowed six
hits. He escaped jams in the fifth and
sixth innings with help from Prince Fielder
and Miguel Cabrera, big men best known
for their powerful bats, who made stellar
defensive plays.

Red Sox 8, Blue Jays 5
TORONTO Mauro Gomez hit a
tiebreaking, two-run triple in the ninth in-
ning and the Boston Red Sox beat
Toronto 8-5, snapping their six-game los-
ing streak against the Blue Jays.
Boston had lost six of seven overall
coming in, but bounced back after falling
behind 3-0 and later blowing a 5-3 lead.
Ryan Lavarnway hit a three-run homer
and finished with four RBIs for the Red
Sox. Daniel Nava had a two-run single
and made a fantastic diving catch in left
field in the eighth to preserve a 5-all tie.
Chris Carpenter (1-0) got two outs for
his first major league win and Andrew
Bailey closed it out for his third save in
four chances.
Darren Oliver (3-3) lost for the first time
since May 23 at Tampa Bay, giving up
one run and two hits in one-plus inning.

White Sox 6, Twins 0
MINNEAPOLIS Chris Sale threw six
scoreless innings to notch his 17th victory
after being rained out the night before,
helping the Chicago White Sox keep their
one-game lead in the AL Central by beat-
ing the Minnesota Twins 6-0.
Sale (17-6) scattered three singles and
struck out five without a walk, cruising to
his third win in three starts against the
Twins this year.
Sale was supposed to pitch Thursday
against Detroit, but that game was post-
poned until Monday by wet weather. The
Tigers, who beat Cleveland 4-0, are one
game back in the division.
Dayan Viciedo had two RBIs, Kevin
Youkilis homered and Alex Rios doubled,
scored and drove in a run for the White
Sox, who played without injured slugger
Adam Dunn for the seventh straight
game.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Baltimore 3, Tampa Bay 2, 14 innings
L.A. Angels 6, Oakland 0
Toronto 8, Seattle 3
N.Y. Yankees 2, Boston 0
Cleveland 5, Texas 4
Minnesota 4, Kansas City 3,10 innings
Detroit at Chicago, ppd., rain
Friday's Games
Detroit 4, Cleveland 0
Tampa Bay 6, N.Y. Yankees 4
Boston 8, Toronto 5
Chicago White Sox 6, Minnesota 0
Seattle at Texas, late
L.A. Angels at Kansas City, late
Baltimore at Oakland, late
Saturday's Games
Boston (Buchholz 11-6) atToronto (Villanueva 7-5), 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Liriano 5-11) at Minnesota (Deduno 6-
3), 1:10 p.m.
Detroit (A.Sanchez 2-5) at Cleveland (Masterson 11-13), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 14-8) at N.YYankees (Nova 11-7), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Greinke 5-2) at Kansas City (Guthrie 4-3), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 14-10) at Texas (Feldman 6-11), 8:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 5-2) at Oakland (J.Parker 10-8), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 3:05 p.m.
Seattle at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Houston 6, Philadelphia 4
St. Louis 2, L.A. Dodgers 1
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 7, Pittsburgh 4
Miami 4, Cincinnati 0
Atlanta 2, Washington 1
Philadelphia at Houston, late
N.Y Mets at Milwaukee, late
San Francisco at Arizona, late
Colorado at San Diego, late
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 10-13) at Chicago Cubs (Berken 0-0),
1:05 p.m.
Washington (E.Jackson 9-10) atAtlanta (Hanson 12-8), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 9-10) at Houston (Keuchel 1-7), 7:05
p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 17-8) at Miami (Buehrle 12-12), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Mejia 0-0) at Milwaukee (Marcum 5-4), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 11-8) at Arizona (Miley 15-9), 8:10 p.m.
Colorado (D.Pomeranz 1-8) at San Diego (C.Kelly 1-1), 8:35
p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 4-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Blanton 9-13), 9:10
p.m.
Sunday's Games
Cincinnati at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 8:05 p.m.


Braves beat Nats in ninth


Cleveland

Choo rf
Kipnis 2b
CSantn c
Canzler If
Ktchm lb
Chsnhll 3b
LaPort dh
Carrer cf
Donald ss
Lillirdg ss
Totals
000 000
000 000


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
4010
3000
4010
4 0 1 0
4000
4010
4 0 1 0
3020
4 0 1 0
4010
4000
2000
0000
320 6 0
4
0


-Detroit 6, Cleveland 8.
Boesch (22), C.Santana

IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
VerlanderW,14-8 7 6 0 0 1 6
Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 1
Valverde 1 0 0 0 1 0
Cleveland
KluberL,1-4 5 8 4 4 2 5
Seddon 2 0 0 0 0 3
FHerrmann 2 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Verlander (Donald), by Kluber
(Fielder).

Rays 6, Yankees 4
Tampa Bay NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DJnngslf 5 1 2 1 Jeterdh 5 1 2 0
Zobristss 4 0 2 1 Swisher rf 3 0 0 0
Longoridh 4 00 0 AIRdrg3b 3 1 1 2
Thmps pr-dh0 0 0 0 Cano 2b 3 00 0
BUptoncf 5 1 1 1 RMartnc 4 1 1 0
Kppngr3b 4 00 0 AnJonslf 3 0 0 0
BFrncsrf 3 00 0 Ibanezph-lf 0 00 0
Fuld rf 1 0 0 0 Grndrscf 4 1 1 1
CGmnzc 4 1 2 0 Pearcelb 3 0 1 1
JMolinc 0 0 0 0 ISuzukiph 1 00 0
C.Penalb 3 1 1 0 ENunezss 3 0 1 0
EJhnsn2b 3 21 1 ErChvzph 1 0 0 0
Joyceph 1 00 0
Brignc2b 0 00 0
Totals 37 69 4 Totals 33 4 7 4
Tampa Bay 000 030 111 6
NewYork 010 010 020 4
E-E.Nunez (5). DP-Tampa Bay 1, NewYork
1. LOB-Tampa Bay 7, New York 6. 2B-
C.Gimenez 2 (3). HR-B.Upton (23), AI.Ro-
driguez (18), Granderson (38).
SB-De.Jennings (27), Thompson (5), E.John-
son (18).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
PriceW,18-5 7 5 2 2 2 6
Jo.Peralta H,34 1-3 2 2 2 1 0
RodneyS,43-45 12-30 0 0 1 2
New York
Sabathia L,13-6 62-36 4 4 2 3
Eppley 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Rapada 2-31 0 0 0 1
Chamberlain 1 1 1 0 0 2
HBP-by Sabathia (Longoria). WP-Rodney,
Sabathia 2. PB-R.Martin. Balk-Rapada.
T-3:23. A-45,200 (50,291).

Red Sox 8, Blue Jays 5


Boston


Toronto


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ciriaco3b 4 01 0 RDavislf 5 0 1 0
Ellsurycf 5 1 2 0 Rasmscf 4 2 1 0
Aviles2b 5 1 1 0 Lawrie3b 3 0 2 1
C.Rossrf 4 21 0 Lindlb 4 1 2 1
MGomzdh 4 3 2 2 YEscorss 4 0 1 1
Lvrnwyc 3 1 1 4 KJhnsn2b 3 0 0 0
Nava If 5 0 2 2 Arencii c 4 0 0 0
Loneylb 4 00 0 Sierradh 3 1 0 0
Iglesiasss 2 0 0 0 Gose rf 3 1 0 0
Totals 36 8108 Totals 33 5 7 3
Boston 000 320 003 8
Toronto 003 001 010 5
E-Lind (5). LOB-Boston 8, Toronto 6. 2B-
Lawrie (22), Lind (11). 3B-M.Gomez (1), Lind
(1). HR-Lavarnway (2). SB-Ciriaco (12), Ells-
bury (14), Iglesias (1), YEscobar (5). S-Ciri-
aco. SF-Lavarnway.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Matsuzaka 51-33 4 4 3 5
Mortensen H,1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
TazawaH,2 1 0 0 0 0 2
Padilla BS,4-5 1-3 2 1 1 0 0
C.CarpenterW,1-0 2-30 0 0 1 0
A.BaileyS,3-4 1 1 0 0 0 2
Toronto
Laffey 32-34 3 3 3 1
Jenkins 11-32 2 2 1 0
Frasor 2 0 0 0 0 2
OliverL,3-3 1 2 1 1 0 1
Janssen 1 2 2 2 0 0
Oliver pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP-by Matsuzaka (Sierra), by Frasor (Igle-
sias). WP-Matsuzaka 2, C.Carpenter.

White Sox 6, Twins 0


Chicago Minnesota
ab r h bi
DeAzalf 4 00 0 Spancf
Youkils3b-1b3 1 1 1 JCarrll 2b
Wisecf 4 1 1 1 Wlnghdh
Konerklb 4 11 0 Mornealb
JoLopz 3b 1 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b
Riosrf 3 1 2 1 Mstrnnlf
Przynsc 3 1 1 0 MCarsnrf
Viciedo dh 2 0 1 2 Butera c
AIRmrzss 4 0 1 1 Flormnss
Bckhm2b 4 1 1 0
Totals 32 69 6 Totals
Chicago 010 101 201
Minnesota 000 000 000


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
4010
4000
4000
4020
4000
2000
3000
3000
3010

31 0 4 0
-6
0


DP--Minnesota 2. LOB-Chicago 7, Minnesota
5.2B-Rios (34). HR-Youkilis (19). SB-Wise
(17), Mastroianni (20). SF-Wise.


Chicago
Sale W,17-6
Myers
Thornton
Minnesota
Vasquez L,0-2
Waldrop
Perdomo
AI.Burnett


IP H RERBBSO



1 1 0 0 0 0
630005
200002
110000


52-33 3
11-34 2
1 2 1
1 0 0


Perdomo pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Sale (Mastroianni), by Vasquez (Youk-
ilis).




Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
Sept. 15 at N.Y Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Sept. 16 at N.Y Yankees, TBA
Sept. 17 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 18 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 19 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 20 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 21 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 22 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 23 Toronto, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 25 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 26 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 28 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 29 at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 30 at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Oct. 1 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 2 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 3 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.


BASEBALL


Washington Atlanta
ab r h bi


W
Baltimore 81
New York 81
Tampa Bay 78
Toronto 65
Boston 65


4 0 1 0
3 1 2 1
4010
3121
4000
4010
4 0 1 0
4000
4000
3000
3010
3 0 1 0
2000
1 0 0 0
1000
0000
0000
0000
0000


Totals 32 15 1
Washington 000
Atlanta 000


ab rh bi


RJhnsn cf
Constnz ph
OFlhrt p
Kimrel p
Pstrnck ph
Prado If
Heywrd rf
C.Jones 3b
FFrmn lb
Uggla 2b
D.Ross c
Overay ph
JeBakrph
Smmns ss
Medlen p
Bourn ph-cf
Totals
001 000
100 001


One out when winning run scored.
E-Desmond (15). LOB-Washington 5, At-
lanta 10.2B-Werth (17), Prado (38), FFree-
man (31). HR-Harper (19). CS-Constanza
(1). SF-Simmons.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Detwiler 6 7 1 1 1 5
Mattheus 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
Mic.Gonzalez 1 0 0 0 0 2
Storen 1-30 0 0 0 0
S.BurnettL,1-2 1-3 2 1 0 0 0
Atlanta
Medlen 7 5 1 1 1 13
O'Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 1
KimbrelW,2-1 1 0 0 0 0 3

Cubs 7, Pirates 4
Pittsburgh Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Holt 2b 5 0 0 0 DeJess rf 4 1 1 0
SMarte If 4 1 1 0 Valuen 3b 3 31 0
Clemntph 1 0 0 0 Rizzolb 4 01 2
AMcCtcf 4 1 1 1 ASorinlf 4 1 11
GJonesrf 4 1 2 0 CampnIf 0 00 0
GSnchzlb 4 1 2 1 SCastross 4 1 2 4
McKnrc 3 0 0 0 Clevngrc 4 00 0
PAlvrz3b 4 0 1 2 BJcksncf 4 00 0
Barmesss 1 0 0 0 Barney2b 2 1 2 0
Sniderph 1 0 0 0 Rusinp 3 01 0
Mercer ss 0 00 0 JChpmp 0 00 0
JMcDnlp 1 00 0 Russellp 0 00 0
JuWlsnp 0 00 0 Corpasp 0 00 0
Lerouxp 0 0 0 0 LaHairph 1 0 0 0
Tabataph 1 0 1 0 Campp 0 00 0
McPhrsp 0 00 0 Marmlp 0 00 0
Walkerph 1 0 00
Watsonp 0 000
JHughsp 0 000
Quallsp 0 000
Morrisp 0 000
Presley ph 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 48 4 Totals 337 9 7
Pittsburgh 000 012 100 4
Chicago 001 303 00x 7
E-PAlvarez (23), S.Castro (25). DP-Chicago
1. LOB-Pittsburgh 7, Chicago 9. 2B-
G.Sanchez (15), DeJesus (26), Valbuena (18),
Rizzo (10), Barney (26). HR-A.McCutchen
(27), S.Castro (13). SB-S.Marte (5). CS-
S.Marte (2). S-Barney.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
McDonald L,12-8 32-35 4 4 4 2
Ju.Wilson 0 1 0 0 0 0
Leroux 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
McPherson 1 1 0 0 0 1
Watson 2-3 0 1 1 1 1
J.Hughes 1-3 1 2 2 0 0
Quails 1 0 0 0 0 0
Morris 1 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
RusinW,1-2 5 4 2 2 0 6
J.ChapmanH,3 1-3 2 1 1 1 0
RussellH,12 1 0 0 0 1 1
Corpas 2-3 2 1 1 0 0
CampH,16 1 0 0 0 0 1
MarmolS,20-22 1 0 0 0 0 0
Rusin pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Ju.Wilson pitched to 1 batter in the 4th.
HBP-by J.Hughes (A.Soriano), by Marmol
(Presley), by Rusin (Barmes). PB-Clevenger

Marlins 4, Reds 0


Cincinnati


Miami


ab rh bi ab rh bi
BPhllps2b 4 0 0 0 Petersn If 4 0 1 0
WValdz ss 4 0 0 0 Ruggin cf 3 1 2 1
Votto b 4 0 1 0 Reyesss 4 1 2 0
Ludwcklf 2 0 0 0 Stanton rf 3 00 0
Brucerf 4 0 0 0 Ca.Leelb 3 0 1 1
Frazier3b 2 0 1 0 Velazqz3b 1 00 0
Stubbscf 3 0 0 0 Dobbs3b-lb 4 1 2 1
Hanignc 3 0 0 0 DSolan2b 4 00 0
Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 Brantlyc 2 1 1 0
Ondrskp 0 0 0 0 JaTrnrp 3 00 0
Paulph 1 0 1 0 H.Bellp 0 00 0
Simonp 0 00 0 Cishekp 0 00 0
Totals 29 03 0 Totals 31 4 9 3
Cincinnati 000 000 000 0
Miami 001 120 OOx 4
DP-Cincinnati 1, Miami 1. LOB-Cincinnati 5,
Miami 6.2B-Frazier (24), Ruggiano (21). HR-
Dobbs (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
ArroyoL,12-8 6 9 4 4 2 6
Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 1 1
Simon 1 0 0 0 0 1
Miami
Ja.TurnerW,1-2 7 2 0 0 2 3
H.Bell 1 1 0 0 0 0
Cishek 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP-Ja.Turner



BASEBALL
TRANSACTIONS
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Assigned 2B
Ryan Adams outright to Norfolk (IL). Released
RHP Kevin Gregg.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Recalled RHP
Jhan Marinez from Charlotte (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Recalled OF
Jason Bourgeois from Omaha (PCL).
MINNESOTA TWINS Selected the con-
tract of C/OF Chris Herrmann from New Britain
(EL).
TEXAS RANGERS Renewed their player
development contract with Frisco (TL) through
the 2018 season.
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS-Renewed their player
development contract with the Lancaster
(CALIF) through the 2014 season.
MIAMI MARLINS Selected the contract of
SS Gil Velazquez from New Orleans (PCL).
Transferred OF Emilio Bonifacio to the 60-day
DL.
NEW YORK METS Renewed their player
development contract with Brooklyn (NYP)
through the 2016 season.
North American League
ABILENE PRAIRIE DOGS Traded LHP
Kevin Gelinas and RHP Derrick Dingeman to
San Angelo for future considerations.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS Traded RHP
Steve Fox to Camden for a player to be named.


Werth rf
Harper cf
Zmrmn3b
LaRochib
Dsmnd ss
Espinos 2b
Berndn If
KSuzukc
Detwilr p
CBrwn ph
Matths p
McGnzl p
Storen p
SBurntt p


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 B3




NL

Braves 2, Nationals 1






B4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012



NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y Jets 1 0 0 1.000 48 28
New England 1 0 0 1.000 34 13
Miami 0 1 0 .000 10 30
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 28 48
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 30 10
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 23 26
Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 21 41
Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 13 34
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 44 13
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 16 17
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 19 31
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 13 44
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 1 0 0 1.000 22 14
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 31 19
Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 24 40
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 14 22
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24 17
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 40 32
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 17 16
N.YGiants 0 1 0 .000 17 24
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 16 10
Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000 40 24
New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 32 40
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 10 16
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 27 23
Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 26 23
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 45 40
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 51 44
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 20 16
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 30 22
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 23 27
Seattle 0 1 0 .000 16 20
Thursday's Game
Green Bay 23, Chicago 10
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at New England, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Miami, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Denver at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 20
N.Y Giants at Carolina, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 23
Tampa Bay at Dallas, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Washington, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Miami, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 24
Green Bay at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
High School boxes

Nature Coast 17,
Dunnellon 8
Nature Coast 6 8 3 0 17
Dunnellon 0 8 0 0 8
Scoring summary
First Quarter
NC- Thomas 33 pass from Quigley (kick failed)
Second Quarter
NC- Breida 25 run (Breida run)
DU- A. Jackson 56 pass from Boley (Boley run)
Third Quarter
NC- FG Lacy 25
Individual leaders
Rushing: D: Parks 5-41, Swoll 10-28, Boley 14-
24; N: Breida 33-142, Thomas 2-45.
Passing: D: Boley 7-20-0-113; N: Quigley 6-12-
0-64.
Receiving: D: Wentz 3-35, A. Jackson 2-65,
Thomas 2-13; N: Thomas 4-49.
Citrus 49, Belleview 27
Citrus 7 21 21 0 49
Belleview 0 7 713- 27
Scoring summary
First Quarter
Citrus-White 1-yard run (Killeen kick)
Second Quarter
Citrus- Chapes 4-yard run (Killeen kick)
Citrus -White 3-yard run (Killeen kick)
Bell.- Pitts 8-yard run (Irwin kick)
Citrus- Chapes 1-yard run (Killeen kick)
Third Quarter
Citrus- Chapes 54-yard run (Killeen kick)
Bell.- Ehrhart 4-yard pass from Pitts (Irwin kick)
Citrus- Chapes 47-yard run (Killeen kick)
Citrus- Whaley 11 -yard run (Killeen kick)
Fourth Quarter
BR- Colston 4-yard pass from Pitts (kick fail)
BR- Pitts 2-yard run (Irwin kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing Citrus: Bogart 0-7-0-0-0; Bell: Pitts
11- 23-184-2-0.
Rushing Citrus: Chapes 14-210-4; Whaley 21 -
158-1; Bell: Maurice 10-9-0.
Receiving Bell: Colston 7-86-1.
Bronson 43,
Seven Rivers 16
Seven Rivers 0 8 8 0 16
Bronson 0 14 7 22 -43
Scoring Summary
Second Quarter
B: Beauchamp 9-yard pass to Barber


(kick good)
B: Robinson 24-yd run (kick good)
SR: Iwaniec 2-yard run (Iwaniec run)
Third Quarter
B: Cates 3-yard run (kick good)
SR: Iwaniec 2-yard TD run (Iwaniec run)
Fourth Quarter
B: Robinson 10-yard run (kick good)
B: Robinson 55-yard run (kick good)
B: 10-yard run (conversion good)
Individual Leaders
Seven Rivers
John Iwaniec, 15 carries, 176 yards, 2 TD's;
1-2 passing for 65 yards
Bronson
Tyler Beauchamp, 3-10, 40 yards, TD
Jahmel Robinson, 16 carries, 191 yards, 3 TD



MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Trout, Los Angeles, .331; Mi-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


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22


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing (Taped)
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: Dollar General 300
race
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Auto Club Speedway
3 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA O'ReillyAuto Parts Nationals
qualifying (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago White Sox at Minnesota Twins
4 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Cincinnati Reds at Miami Marlins
FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) California at Ohio State
12 p.m. (MNT) Louisiana-Monroe atAuburn
12 p.m. (ESPN) Wake Forest at Florida State
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Arkansas State at Nebraska
12 p.m. (FX) Texas Christian at Kansas
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) William & Mary at Towson
12 p.m. (SUN) Louisiana-Lafayette at Oklahoma State
12:30 p.m. (CW) Connecticut at Maryland
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Furman at Clemson
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Alabama at Arkansas
3:30 p.m. (ABC) North Carolina at Louisville
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Navy at Penn State
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at SMU
4 p.m. (FX) Portland State at Washington
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Miami (Ohio) at Boise State
6 p.m. (ESPN) Florida at Tennessee
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Arizona State at Missouri
7 p.m. (SUN) Alabama-Birmingham at South Carolina
7:30 p.m. (FOX) USC at Stanford
8 p.m. (ABC) Notre Dame at Michigan State
9:15 p.m. (ESPN) Texas at Mississippi
10 p.m. (ESPN2) BYU at Utah
2 a.m. (FSNFL) USC at Stanford (Same-day Tape)
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: BMW Italian Open -
Third Round
9 a.m. (ESPN2) Ricoh Women's British Open Third
Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Web.com: Albertsons Boise Open
Third Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Pacific Links Hawaii
Championship Second Round
SOCCER
3:30 p.m. (NBC) MLS: Seattle Sounders FC at Portland
Timbers
5:30 p.m. (UNI) America vs. Santos Laguna

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY
7:30 a.m. Lecanto, Citrus at Pasco Invitational
Seven Rivers, Crystal River at Zak Lucas Invitational
BOYS GOLF
12 p.m. Citrus at Buffalo Invitational (The Villages)
GIRLS GOLF
12 p.m. Lecanto, Citrus at Buffalo Invitational (The Villages)
VOLLEYBALL
9 a.m. Seven Rivers at OVC tournament
SWIMMING
Crystal River at Wiregrass Ranch relays


Cabrera, Detroit, .329; Jeter, New York, .323;
Mauer, Minnesota, .319; Beltre, Texas, .319;
DavMurphy, Texas, .315; Butler, Kansas City,
.311.
RUNS-Trout, Los Angeles, 115; Hamilton,
Texas, 97; Kinsler, Texas, 95; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 92; Jeter, New York, 92; AJackson, De-
troit, 91; Granderson, New York, 89; AdJones,
Baltimore, 89.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 123; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 119;Willingham, Minnesota, 105; Encar-
nacion, Toronto, 102; Fielder, Detroit, 98;
Pujols, Los Angeles, 96; Beltre, Texas, 92; But-
ler, Kansas City, 92.
HITS-Jeter, New York, 197; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 181; Beltre, Texas, 173; Butler, Kansas
City, 169; AGordon, Kansas City 169; Andrus,
Texas, 166; Cano, NewYork, 164.
DOUBLES-AGordon, Kansas City, 47; Pu-
jols, Los Angeles, 42; Kinsler, Texas, 40; Cano,
NewYork, 39; Choo, Cleveland, 37; AdGonza-
lez, Boston, 37; Brantley, Cleveland, 36;
NCruz, Texas, 36.
TRIPLES-AJackson, Detroit, 10; Andrus,
Texas, 8; JWeeks, Oakland, 8; Crisp, Oakland,
7; AEscobar, Kansas City, 7; Rios, Chicago, 7;
Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 7.
HOME RUNS-Hamilton, Texas, 42; Encar-
nacion, Toronto, 40; ADunn, Chicago, 38;
Granderson, NewYork, 38; MiCabrera, Detroit,
36; Willingham, Minnesota, 34; Beltre, Texas,
32.
STOLEN BASES-Trout, Los Angeles, 45;
RDavis, Toronto, 43; Revere, Minnesota, 36;
Crisp, Oakland, 34; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 30;
AEscobar, Kansas City, 28; DeJennings,
Tampa Bay, 27; Kipnis, Cleveland, 27.
PITCHING-Price, Tampa Bay, 18-5;
Weaver, Los Angeles, 17-4; Sale, Chicago, 17-
6; Scherzer, Detroit, 16-6; MHarrison, Texas,
16-9; Darvish, Texas, 15-9; PHughes, New
York, 15-12.
STRIKEOUTS-Scherzer, Detroit, 220;Ver-
lander, Detroit, 218; Darvish, Texas, 205; FH-
ernandez, Seattle, 199; Shields, Tampa Bay,
189; Price, Tampa Bay, 181; Sale, Chicago,
173.
SAVES-Rodney, Tampa Bay, 43; JiJohn-
son, Baltimore, 42; RSoriano, New York, 38;
CPerez, Cleveland, 36; Nathan, Texas, 33;
Valverde, Detroit, 30; Reed, Chicago, 26; Wil-
helmsen, Seattle, 26.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-MeCabrera, San Francisco,
.346; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .339; Posey,
San Francisco, .333; YMolina, St. Louis, .319;
DWright, New York, .315; Fowler, Colorado,
.311; Braun, Milwaukee, .310.
RUNS-AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 98; Braun,
Milwaukee, 93; Bourn, Atlanta, 88; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 88; Rollins, Philadelphia, 88; JUpton,
Arizona, 88; Holliday St. Louis, 87.
RBI-Headley, San Diego, 102; Braun, Mil-
waukee, 100; ASoriano, Chicago, 97; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 96; Holliday, St. Louis, 94;
LaRoche, Washington, 92; ArRamirez, Mil-
waukee, 91.
HITS-AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 178;
Prado, Atlanta, 170; Braun, Milwaukee, 164;
Bourn, Atlanta, 163; Scutaro, San Francisco,
163; DWright, New York, 163; SCastro,
Chicago, 162.
DOUBLES-ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 45;
DWright, NewYork, 40; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
39; Prado, Atlanta, 38; Votto, Cincinnati, 37;
AHil, Arizona, 36; DanMurphy NewYork, 36.
TRIPLES-Pagan, San Francisco, 12;
SCastro, Chicago, 11; Fowler, Colorado, 11;
Reyes, Miami, 11; Bourn, Atlanta, 10; MeCabr-
era, San Francisco, 10; Colvin, Colorado, 9.
HOME RUNS-Braun, Milwaukee, 38; Stan-
ton, Miami, 34; Bruce, Cincinnati, 33; Beltran,
St. Louis, 29; Kubel, Arizona, 29; LaRoche,
Washington, 29; ASoriano, Chicago, 29.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Atlanta, 39;
Pierre, Philadelphia, 35; Reyes, Miami, 35; Vic-
torino, Los Angeles, 33; CGomez, Milwaukee,
32; Altuve, Houston, 30; Bonifacio, Miami, 30;
EvCabrera, San Diego, 30; DGordon, Los
Angeles, 30.
PITCHING-GGonzalez, Washington, 19-7;
Dickey, New York, 18-5; Cueto, Cincinnati, 17-
8; Strasburg, Washington, 15-6; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 15-6; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 15-
7; Lynn, St. Louis, 15-7; Gallardo, Milwaukee,
15-8; Miley, Arizona, 15-9.
STRIKEOUTS-Kershaw, Los Angeles,
206; Dickey, New York, 197; Strasburg, Wash-
ington, 197; Hamels, Philadelphia, 192; GGon-
zalez, Washington, 191; Gallardo, Milwaukee,
188; Samardzija, Chicago, 180.
SAVES-AChapman, Cincinnati, 35; Kimbrel,
Atlanta, 35; Motte, St. Louis, 34; Hanrahan,
Pittsburgh, 34; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 34; Clip-
pard, Washington, 31; Putz, Arizona, 29.


Dunnellon stymied



by Nature Coast, 17-8


RICHARD BURTON
Correspondent

DUNNELLON Dun-
nellon couldn't put things
together on Friday night
against Nature Coast.
After averaging 28.5
points in their first two
games, the Tigers struggled
with just 186 yards and fell
17-8 to the
Sharks at Nature 4
Ned Love
Field. Dunne
The loss
was the
second sa
straight for [:L
Dunnel-
lon, which h
also saw a
three-
game win-
n i n g
streak against Nature Coast
snapped in the loss.
"We've just got to put an
entire game together," said
Tigers coach Frank Beasley,
whose team lost 37-20 last
week to Forest. "We played
well on offense last week
against Forest and then
tonight we struggled. We've



GRASP
Continued from Page B1


team needed to hold onto
the ball to have a chance to
win; his counterpart across
the field Eagles coach
Cameron Porch said his
team needed to contain
Warriors senior running
back John Iwaniec.
"They keyed on me this
week," John Iwaniec said of
Bronson's defense. "It's
hard to run when a team
can do that to you."
Iwaniec ran for 176 yards
and two touchdowns on 15
carries, for 11 yards a carry
However, his team lost three
fumbles that led to Eagles
points. John Iwaniec was hit
on the knee by a tackling Ea-
gles' helmet during a run
midway through the game,
and stayed down on the field
for several minutes in obvi-
ous pain.
Living up to his team's
namesake, John Iwaniec re-
entered the game several
minutes later but was no-
ticeably limping at times. In
the scariest moment of the
night, teammate Hayden
Hobbs who returned to



HANDLE
Continued from Page B1

The Panthers took the
lead with 37 seconds left in
the half after Osburn scored
his second touchdown of the
evening from 14 yards out
for a 13-7 lead. The point
after attempt failed for the
Panthers.
In the second half, the
Panthers continued to run



THROTTLE
Continued from Page B1

Citrus, meanwhile, failed
to complete a pass on seven
attempts.
"At this point in the year,
you can't hide what you do,"
'Canes coach Rayburn
Greene said. "We tried to
throw the ball around, but
we couldn't find our rhythm
tonight and we were domi-
nating them so much up
front that we just stayed



UPEND
Continued from Page B1

off an umpire and a fine play
by second baseman Elliot
Johnson.
Price improved to 7-3
against the Yankees. The
Rays have won seven of the
eight games he has matched
up against Sabathia.
With Price out of the
game, Alex Rodriguez hit his
647th homer, a two-run shot
offJoel Peralta in the eighth
that sent him past Lou
Gehrig for ninth place on
the runs list with 1,889 and
scored Derek Jeter to make
it 5-4.
Jeter, serving as the desig-
nated hitter for a second
straight day because of an
injured ankle, singled lead-
ing off to wake up the 45,200


got to get things going."
The Tigers fell behind 14-
0 early, but pulled to within
six on a 56-yard scoring
strike from Jordan Boley to
Andre Jackson and the en-
suing two-point conversion
run by Boley
This would be as close as
Dunnellon would get, as it
punted the ball six times
Overall
oast 17 anand strug-
oast17 gled to
hllon 8 gain any
consis-
SThe tency on
team's next offense.
game is "We just
7:30 p.m. made too
Thursday at many mis-
Gainesville takes,"
Eastside. Beasley
said.
"We've got
to get better and we've got to
coach better. This one is on
me."
The Sharks (1-2), mean-
while, were able to survive a
pair of scoreless trips into
the red zone in the first half
and responded after a 46-7
loss last week to state power
Orange Park Fleming Island.


- i


Seven River
Joshua Jack
called for a f;
drive going.


"(Nature Coast) played
well," Beasley said. "This
one was a must-win for
them, but heck, it was a
must-win for us. We've just
got to get better and got to
get our kids in better spots."
Nature Coast's Matthew
Breida rushed for 142 yards
and one touchdown on 33
carries, while Jonathan
Thomas totaled 94 all-pur-
pose yards.
"Our kids were starving
for a win," Nature Coast
coach Charles Liggett said.
"They're better than 0-2.
This was a good win for us.
We needed it."
Dunnellon tried to battle
back, but totaled just 30
yards on four drives in the
final quarter.
"I was proud of the effort
our kids gave," Liggett said.
"We've had some battles
with Dunnellon in the past
and it was good to come in
here and get a win.
"I've got a lot of respect
for (Dunnellon coach Frank)
Beasley and his program, so
to come in here and get a
win against them is big for
our kids."


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
rs Christian School's John Iwaniec (22) and
[son (52) tackle a Bronson player but were
ace mask penalty, allowing Bronson th keep the


the team this year after suf-
fering a serious knee injury
his freshmen year- injured
the right knee he had recon-
structive surgery on, when
he tried returning a kickoff
and was gang-tackled.
Hobbs had to be helped
off the field and there was
concern he might have torn
a tendon but the coaching
staff later said the injury


strong as Christian Barber
ran many quarterback draws
for quality yardage, and Nile
Waters scored on a 9-yard
rush with 35 seconds left in
the third for a 19-7 lead. The
extra point was blocked.
In the fourth, Waters on
a counter play ran it in
for a 25-yard touchdown to
give Lecanto a commanding
lead at 25-7. Luis Leiva con-
verted the extra point for a
26-7 lead.
The Bears never quit as


with the running game.
"Belleview is a pretty
good team, and Pitts is a
great player," Greene
added. "He throws a nice
slant and fade, and can run
the ball pretty well. No-
body's put up these kind of
numbers on these guys, yet."
Chapes appreciated his
team's blocking, which
helped spring him for TD
runs of 54 and 47 yards in
the third quarter.
"The offensive line al-
lowed me to make really big
plays tonight, because I only


fans that were silenced by
Tampa Bay's rally against
Sabathia (13-6). Jeter had an
infield single in the fifth to
pass Willie Mays for 10th on
the hits list with 3,284.
After a walk to Robinson
Cano, closer Fernando Rod-
ney entered. The top re-
liever by ERA in the majors
(0.68) struck out Russell
Martin, threw a wild pitch
and walked pinch hitter
Raul Ibanez. Curtis
Granderson meekly
grounded to end the threat
and send many to the exits.
Rodney finished with a
perfect ninth for his 43rd
save in 45 chances.
The Yankees lost for the
fourth straight time with
their burly ace on the
mound, and this one could
send them out of first place
in the East for the first time
since June 11. The Orioles


wasn't thought to be that se-
rious. Running back Josh
Iwaniec suffered what
coaches initially speculated
could be a broken wrist and
was expected to get X-rayed.
Eagles running back Jah-
mel Robinson had a strong
night for his team, carrying
the ball 16 times for 191
yards and three touch-
downs.


Teater scored a second
touchdown for Central (1-2)
on a 1-yard rush to cut the
lead in half to 26-13 in favor
of the Panthers with 7:35 left,
but the Bears couldn't
muster anything more as
Lecanto went on to victory
Aside from the rushing
scores, Osburn and Waters
each had a sack for the Pan-
thers on the defensive side
of the ball, and junior D'An-
dre Horton added a key fum-
ble recovery


needed to make one dude
miss," Chapes said. "We
came out with a big win and
now we can focus on
Lecanto."
Citrus enters its stretch of
intra-county games with a
game against the Panthers
on Friday
"I've already turned my
attention to them," Greene
said. "All I'm going to be
thinking about is the green
team up the road."
Citrus will travel to
Lecanto for a 7:30 p.m. kick-
off on Friday


played later at wild-card
leading Oakland.
Sabathia was sharp early,
allowing only a single
through four innings. But he
lost control of his breaking
ball in the fifth and was
done after allowing six hits
and four runs in 6 2-3
innings.
B.J. Upton homered off
Cody Eppley leading off the
eighth to make it 5-2.
Coming off a frustrating
three-game sweep at the
hands of the Orioles, Rays
manager Joe Maddon be-
moaned his ballclub's in-
ability to get the clutch hits
in support of a stellar staff.
The bottom of the order
helped turn that around.
Sabathia cruised into the
fifth, allowing only hit in the
first, but Chris Gimenez led
off with a double for Tampa
Bay's second hit.


SCOREBOARD


II

i


1
i


(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Winds wipe out Open


Women 's

British Open

disrupted

Associated Press
HOYLAKE, England -
Play was called off for the
day at the Women's British
Open on Friday because of
strong wind that disrupted
the second round so badly
that organizers declared
early scores "null and void."
With wind gusting to 60
mph at Royal Liverpool,
players struggled to keep
the ball on the tees and
greens. Play was suspended
at 8:25 a.m. with 36 players
on the course and the round
was called off at 2 p.m.
"I think it's only the right
thing to do," Norwegian star
Suzann Pettersen said. "The
conditions were unreason-
able. ... I don't think from the
players' perspective that
there was any other out-
come. It wasn't just unfair
conditions. It was un-
playable."
England's Felicity John-
son started with a quintu-
ple-bogey 9. American
Cristie Kerr's ball blew off
the 12th tee three times. Co-
leader So Yeon Ryu bogeyed
her only hole, the 10th, be-
fore play was stopped.
"It would have been un-
fair to those competitors not
to declare play null and void
and cancel all scores for the
round in question," Ladies
Golf Union tournament di-
rector Susan Simpson said.
"The competitors began
their round in extremely ad-
verse weather conditions
and conditions subse-
quently worsened despite
our belief that they would
remain stable."
The second round is
scheduled to restart early
Saturday, with conditions
forecast to be more
playable. Organizers said
the cut will be reduced from
65 and ties to 50 and ties.
The final two rounds are
set for Sunday with a two-
tee start and no redraw


Associated Press
Suzann Pettersen, left, and Christie Kerr, right, talk to a rules official Friday about the sus-
pension of play during day two of the Women's British Open at the Royal Liverpool Golf
Course in Hoylake, England. Play was suspended after about an hour because of strong
winds that disrupted the second round so badly, organizers declared early scores "null and
void." With winds gusting to 60 mph, all the players struggled and American Cristie Kerr
had her ball blown off the 12th tee three times.


between rounds.
Michelle Wie, one of the
tallest players in the field,
saw a lighter side.
"I think it's one day that's
really good to be short, be-
cause I felt like a flagpole
out there," she said.
With strong wind forecast
for Monday, officials hope
the tournament will not


extend to a fifth day
Ryu and fellow South Ko-
rean player Haeji Kang
topped the leaderboard at
2-under 70.
Australia's Karrie Webb,
the tournament winner in
1995, 1997 and 2002, was a
stroke back along with 16-
year-old English amateur
Charley Hull, Jiyai Shin, Ai


Miyazato, Mika Miyazato,
Stacey Keating, Lydia Hall,
Vicky Hurst and Kate
Kutcher. Two-time defend-
ing champion Yani Tseng
opened with a 72. New
Zealand's Lydia Ko, the 15-
year-old amateur coming off
a victory three weeks ago in
the Canadian Women's
Open, also was at 72.


Associated Press
Florida Panthers goalie Scott Clemmensen works out dur-
ing an informal skate Friday in Coral Springs. With a
lockout drawing ever closer, the NHL and the players'
union are in touch with each other after a day of internal
meetings. But no new negotiating sessions happened Fri-
day, one day before Commissioner Gary Bettman has said
he will lock out the players. This would be the NHL's
fourth work stoppage since 1992.


Will there be a


hockey season?


NHL, union

have contact,

but no talks

scheduled

Associated Press
NEW YORK- The NHL
seemed headed for another
lockout Friday as neither
team owners nor players
showed interest in getting
back to contract negotia-
tions a day before the old
labor deal was set to expire.
Brief conversations late
Thursday and Friday be-
tween leaders on the two
sides failed to spur more
formal talks in fact, the
idea of restarting negotia-
tions didn't even come up.
The current collective bar-
gaining agreement that
ended the season-long
lockout in 2005 expires at
midnight EDT on Satur-
day, and NHL Commis-
sioner Gary Bettman has
said a lockout would kick
in immediately if a new
deal hasn't been reached.
"It's their decision," de-
fenseman Mike Weaver,
the Florida Panthers'
player representative said
Friday "When that pad-
lock comes out, it's pretty


much Bettman's decision
on there."
The lockout would mark
the NHL's fourth work
stoppage since 1992.
On Thursday night, NHL
deputy commissioner Bill
Daly spoke to players' as-
sociation special counsel
Steve Fehr, the brother of
union executive director
Donald Fehr. The discus-
sions mostly dealt with an-
swering questions each
side have about proposals.
Bettman said the season
won't start without a new
deal. The regular season is
to begin on Oct 11.
"We have been clear that
the collective bargaining
agreement, upon its expi-
ration, needs to have a suc-
cessful agreement for us to
move forward," Bettman
said Thursday "The
league is not in a position,
not willing to move for-
ward with another season
under the status quo."
On Friday, the players' as-
sociation submitted an ap-
plication to the Quebec
labor relations board to de-
clare that the impending
lockout is illegal in the
province. The NHLPA and
16 Montreal players asked
the board to make an in-
terim ruling before the lock-
out is scheduled to begin in
a bid to allow the Canadiens
to attend training camp.


NFL team vows to fill seats


Jags won't have

any blackouts

in 2012

Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars won't
have any blackouts this
season.
They don't even want to
use the term, either
And if things go as
planned under new owner
Shad Khan, empty seats at
EverBank Field also will be
a thing of the past.
Team president Mark
Lamping said Friday the
Jaguars will have every home
game on local television in
2012, and in an effort to re-
move blackouts from the con-
versation, they won't even ask
the NFL for extensions.
"We don't sell tickets to
get our game on TV," Lamp-
ing said. "We sell tickets to
generate revenue and have
a stabile franchise. And al-
most just as important is to
have the stadium full so that
we have a home-field ad-
vantage. Whether the game
is on TV or not, that's just
sort of a by-product. That's
not our goal."
Jacksonville also has sev-
eral new initiatives to beef
up ticket sales. Fans are al-


Associated Press
Jacksonville quarterback Blaine Gabbert apparently won't
be a part of any home TV blackouts this season, according
to Jaguars management.


lowed to bring food into the
stadium to avoid high costs
at concession stands. Babies
sitting on a parent's lap get
free admission. And unused
seats are being sold for as
low as $20 each.
Fans can buy a certificate
for up to four tickets the day
before the game and then
redeem it for unused tickets,
some in prime locations, an
hour before kickoff. But the
new policy, tabbed "Coin-
Toss Tickets", does not guar-
antee location or whether
tickets will be singles,
paired or nearby each other
Nonetheless, the Jaguars
believe they are taking steps
to eliminate those empty
pockets of seats that get a lot
of national attention and cre-
ate speculation that the fran-
chise is destined to relocate.
"We wanted to eliminate


those policies that were
barriers to fans attending
games," Lamping said.
"The outside perception is
that no one goes to the
games here, that games are
always blacked out here. So
now there won't be that
talk. All the games will be
on television."
The Jaguars haven't
blacked out a home game
since 2009. Nonetheless, the
small-market franchise has
struggled to fill its cav-
ernous stadium, which was
built to house the annual
Florida-Georgia college
football game.
Jacksonville covered
nearly 10,000 seats in 2005
to reduce stadium capacity
and make it easier to avoid
blackouts. Now, the Jaguars
don't even want that to be
an issue.


Thursday's PREP BRIEFS


CR volleyball
rallies past Eustis
Paced by Casidy New-
comer's 14 kills and 15 digs,
the Crystal River volleyball
team improved to 4-0 in District
5A-7 with a 19-25, 25-21,21-
25, 25-9, 15-9 victory at Eustis
on Thursday night.
For the Pirates, Sabrina
Scott (18 assists, 18 digs, 8
kills, 5 aces), Emily Laga (29
digs), Kylie Sisk (7 kills, 17 as-
sists, 26 digs) and Olivia Hud-
son (4 kills, 2 blocks) each
chipped in to help the team win.
Crystal River (6-2 overall)
hosts Nature Coast on Tuesday.


Pirates girls golf
picks up pair of wins
The Crystal River girls golf
team improved to 3-1 overall by
scoring 250 strokes to defeat
Central (258) and Weeki
Wachee (279) on Thursday
afternoon.
Maycee Mullarkey led the
way for the Pirates with a 52
while teammate Marisa Wilder
shot a 63.
Bekah Hoffman (67) and
Brianna Wilson (68) also
contributed to Crystal River's
team score.
The Pirates return to their
home course at 7 Rivers Golf &


Country Club to face Citrus on
Tuesday.
SR can't overcome
Saints in Ocala
The Seven Rivers Christian
volleyball team fell 25-22,
19-25, 25-22, 25-13 to St.
John Lutheran in Ocala on
Thursday.
Daniette St. Martin had 8
kills, 2 aces and 8 digs to pace
the Warriors. Alexis Zachar (7
kills, 3 blocks, ace) and Andrea
Zachar (6 kills, 2 blocks, 2
aces, 4 digs) also played well in
the defeat.
SR (3-2 overall) play at
CFCA on Tuesday.


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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Lady Gaga
launches perfume
NEW YORK- Lady
Gaga launched her debut
perfume while sitting in-
side a life-size perfume
bottle.
The
avant-
f garde pop
star was
in a large
bottle a
replica of
her
Lady Gaga "Fame"
fragrance
bottle at New York's
Solomon R. Guggenheim
Museum, appearing in a
transparent glass where
attendees took photos of
Gaga and watched her
get a tattoo on her neck.

Paul Rudd to host
bowling benefit
NEW YORK Paul
Rudd wants to take you
bowling and he's
bringing along some of
his A-list
friends.
The
actor is
hosting a
bowling
benefit
next
month in
Paul Rudd New York
to support
Our Time, which helps
children who stutter The
event will be on Oct 22 at
Lucky Strike lanes.
The guest list includes
Gina Gershon, Mariska
Hargitay, Rashida Jones,
Julianna Margulies, Jesse
L. Martin, Lin-Manuel
Miranda, Denis
O'Hare,Fisher Stevens,
Victor Garber,Rosie
Perez, Anthony Rapp,
Rachel Dratch, and
Lewis Black.
Rudd was playing a
character who stutters in
Richard Greenberg's
"Three Days of Rain" in
2006 when he learned
about Our Time.

Rush wishes he
kept story secret
NEW YORK Geoffiey
Rush who played
speech therapist Lionel
Logue in the Oscar-win-
ning film "The King's
Speech" -has repeatedly
said he first found the
script left in brown paper
wrapping on his Australia
home's doorstep. Now, he
said he
wishes he
had kept
that story
to
himself.
Rush
said other
aspiring
Geoffrey filmmak-
Rush ers have
followed
suit, leaving all manner of
projects at his front door
in Melbourne since the
movie came out in 2010.
In a recent interview
promoting his film "Eye
of the Storm," the actor
asked prospective Oscar-
winners route submis-
sions through his agent.
He assured them if their
script has a "keen and in-
teresting and enthusias-
tic" cover letter, it will be
read.
Plus, Rush said he
might accidentally bury a
doorstep delivery "under
a pile of correspondence
or something and forget
about it."
-From wire reports


Ties that bind


Singer hopes

to inspire with

same-sex marriage

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. For years,
acclaimed singer-songwriter Brandi
Carlile kept her personal life ex-
actly that personal. As other gay
entertainers made pronouncements
about their relationships, Carlile,
while not hiding her sexuality, kept
the public focus on her music.
But with gay marriage embroiled
in the political landscape, Carlile is
taking a stand, and on Saturday, she
will do it with the biggest step of her
life by getting married to her
partner, Catherine Shepherd.
"It was a crazy feeling while I was
filling out the paperwork because I
felt like I was breaking a law, like
somebody was going to come in and
say, 'You know you can't have this,"'
said Carlile of getting her marriage
license. "It was so exciting. And her
mom and dad were there and it was
just really special. So we have a
marriage license in Massachusetts."
The couple will have a small cer-
emony Saturday in Boston, the first
of three the couple plans to hold to
celebrate their marriage. They also
plan to hold a large reception Sept.
28 outside Seattle, where Carlile
grew up and will have a third cere-
mony in London, where Shepherd
was raised, early next year
As she described her plans ear-
lier this week, she admitted she
never thought she'd have the
chance to celebrate love this way
"It's so surprising," Carlile said,
"and so hard fought. ... I wouldn't
have been able to picture myself
married or successful or pursuing
my dreams if there hadn't been
other people that had done it before
me, like role models, and that's why
talking about it is so important. If a
14- or 15-year-old girl reads this in
a small town who's gay, then she
knows that someday she might get
to go get a marriage license and get
married, and there's no reason she
should stop dreaming about a white
wedding because I didn't."
Carlile started off in the Seattle
coffeehouse scene before attracting
attention from people like Rick
Rubin and Burnett, who have both
produced her albums, and Elton
John, with whom she's collabo-
rated. Though she has yet to have


Associated Press
With gay rights becoming more of a political issue each day, singer Brandi
Carlile is taking a stand on Saturday, she will marry her partner,
Catherine Shepherd.


wide commercial success, she has
matured into an artist who fits into
several worlds simultaneously -
country, folk and rock as she
showed during a visit to Nashville
this week for performances during
the Americana Music Association
conference and awards.
That overarching sense of free-
dom is informing every part of
Carlile's life, from the recording of
her latest album "Bear Creek" to
her charitable work, to her ideas
about taking a stand in politically
exciting times.
Speaking out is a personal thing
for Carlile, but it's also a very public
act as election season nears. She
hopes to do her part to help pass
Referendum 74 to legalize same-sex
marriage in Washington along with


other issues she feels are impor-
tant, like opposing the Defense of
Marriage Act.
"There's a political undercurrent
around equality right now that just
demands a voice, voices to rise up
and say,'Yeah, I'm one of these peo-
ple too and I believe this thing as
well,"' said Carlile. "So that's what
we're doing right now. We're on the
cusp of a civil rights movement and
so I have to be a part of it and I want
to be."
The 31-year-old singer's closest
friends say Shepherd's presence
has changed Carlile in so many
ways, and not just personally It's
even reflected in "Bear Creek," re-
leased earlier this summer The
album was recorded in a mellow,
experimental atmosphere.


Art emerges from company's bankruptcy


Associated Press


BERKELEY, Calif. A
small building tucked in the
hills of Northern California
shines with an unusual
green glow from hundreds
of glass tubes jutting out
from one side toward
nearby bushes.
Inside, the dark wooden
shed contains an undulating
wall filled with the translu-
cent rods, each like a 3-foot-
long drinking straw, sucking
in a cool breeze and the
rushing sounds from a
nearby waterfall.
The work of experimental
architecture is called the
SOL Grotto and Republi-
cans are making fun of it as
a symbol of a $528 million
federal boondoggle, calling
it the most expensive art
project ever built.
The newly opened instal-
lation owes its 1,368 distinc-
tive glass rods, and its name,
to Solyndra the failed
solar company that received
a hefty sum in federal loans
before going bankrupt and
becoming a favorite target
for critics of President


Birthday: In the year ahead, you are likely to start to deal
with life in a much broader manner than you have in the
past. This new initiative will help you achieve many things
that are of a more personal nature.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Conditions that have been im-
peding your independence and mobility are about to let up,
allowing you to be able to find new avenues to express
your interests.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Pleasant surprises are in store
for you, starting now. It looks like certain people who are
obligated to you will begin to repay you for what you've
done for them in the past.
Scorpio(Oct. 24-Nov. 22) There's a good chance that
you'll get drawn into several constructive alliances over the
next few weeks; they'll be with cohorts whose interests
closely parallel yours.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Keep your goals and ob-


Associated Press
Artists Ronald Rael, left, and Virginia San Fratello stand in
the SOL Grotto, their exhibit at the UC Berkeley Botanical
Garden in Berkeley, Calif. Hundreds of glass rods, custom
made for the now bankrupt solar energy company Solyndra,
have found new life as an art installation.


Barack Obama's energy
policy
When the Fremont-based
solar company went under,
it left behind millions of 39-
inch glass tubes custom-
made for its signature solar
panels.
Husband and wife design
partners Ronald Rael and
Virginia San Fratello got the
rods from a storage com-


pany that ended up stuck
with thousands of pallets of
them, and created the in-
stallation in the Botanical
Garden at the University of
California, Berkeley
"We thought they glowed
so beautifully, we had to use
them in the grotto," said San
Fratello.
"These materials, instead
of being disposed of, are


Today's HOROSCOPE
jectives realistic and well-defined, so that your chances for
achieving them are better than average. Don't be afraid to
aim higher than usual.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Although important associ-
ates might not be totally in accord with your ideas at the
moment, with time they will start to become supportive.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)-A joint venture could turn
out to be extremely fortunate for you, if you collectively
begin updating something that is now considered to be out-
moded.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't despair if lately things
haven't been up to your hopes and expectations in the ro-
mance department. Dan Cupid is about to rectify this with a
brand-new plan in mind.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you've been trying to figure
out a way to generate more income, consider putting one of
your bright ideas into action. As the saying goes, "Nothing


being reused and recycled
in a fantastic way," she
added.
Like Solyndra, the instal-
lation has become an ob-
ject of ridicule for critics,
especially with the presi-
dential election only
months away
The Republican-con-
trolled House Energy and
Commerce Committee put
out a news release titled,
"UC Berkeley's Solyndra
Artwork Would Shatter
Record for World's Most Ex-
pensive Piece."
Three years ago, the fed-
eral government made a
$528 million loan guarantee
to Solyndra as part of a stim-
ulus program to promote re-
newable energy and create
"green jobs."
In the spring of 2010,
President Obama visited the
company's newly built Sili-
con Valley campus, praising
Solyndra for "leading the
way toward a brighter and
more prosperous future."
Then 15 months later, it
filed for bankruptcy protec-
tion and laid off 1,100
workers.


ventured, nothing gained."
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Numerous happy social
events could be in the offing starting today, and lasting over
the next couple of weeks. Friends will be planning all kinds
of events, and will want you there.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It's likely to be a financially
fulfilling period in which you can attain many short-term ob-
jectives, especially where your work or career is con-
cerned.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Get your mundane chores
out of the way as early as possible, so that you can dismiss
them from your mind and move on to other things that are
meaningful.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Important financial interests
could start to improve, with opportunities surfacing through
some veiled circumstances. This happening will mean a lot
to you.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
Fantasy 5:5 12- 20 21- 27
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 297 $555
3-of-5 9,325 $17

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Sept.
15, the 259th day of 2012.
There are 107 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On Sept. 15, 1887, the city
of Philadelphia launched a
three-day celebration of the
100th anniversary of the
Constitution of the United
States.
On this date:
In 1776, British forces oc-
cupied New York City during
the American Revolution.
In 1935, the Nuremberg
Laws deprived German Jews
of their citizenship.
In 1940, during the World
War II Battle of Britain, the
tide turned as the Royal Air
Force inflicted heavy losses
against the Luftwaffe.
In 1942, during World War
II, the aircraft carrier USS
Wasp was torpedoed by a
Japanese submarine; the
U.S. Navy ended up sinking
the badly damaged vessel.
In 1954, as raucous fans
looked on, Marilyn Monroe
filmed the famous billowing-
skirt scene for "The Seven
Year Itch" over a Lexington
Ave. subway grate in Man-
hattan (however, little, if any,
of the footage ended up in
the movie; the scene was
later reshot on a Hollywood
set).
In 1963, four black girls
were killed when a bomb
went off during Sunday serv-
ices at the 16th Street Baptist
Church in Birmingham, Ala.
(Three Ku Klux Klansmen
were eventually convicted for
their roles in the blast.)
In 1972, a federal grand
jury in Washington indicted
seven men in connection with
the Watergate break-in.
In 1982, The first edition of
USA Today was published.
Ten years ago: Opposi-
tion parties swept Macedo-
nia's ruling coalition from
power in the nation's first
elections since the 2001
armed uprising.
Five years ago: In his Sat-
urday radio address, Presi-
dent George W. Bush said
while "formidable challenges"
remained in Iraq, the United
States would start shifting
more troops into support
roles.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama bestowed the
Medal of Honor on Sgt.
Dakota Meyer, a young and
humble Marine who had de-
fied orders and barreled
straight into a ferocious
"killing zone" in Afghanistan
to save 36 lives at extraordi-
nary risk to himself.
Today's Birthdays: Co-
median Norm Crosby is 85.
Actor Henry Darrow is 79.
Baseball Hall-of-Famer Gay-
lord Perry is 74. Actor Tommy
Lee Jones is 66. Movie direc-
tor Oliver Stone is 66. Foot-
ball Hall-of-Famer Dan
Marino is 51. Britain's Prince
Harry is 28. TV personality
Heidi Montag is 26.
Thought for Today: "I
think the greatest curse of
American society has been
the idea of an easy millenni-


alism that some new drug,
or the next election or the lat-
est in social engineering will
solve everything." Robert
Penn Warren, American poet
(born 1905, died this date in
1989).












RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Labyrinth with a lesson


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal
Nancy and Gary Bridges created a labyrinth on their Tupelo, Miss., property. Its design is based on the pattern of the famous labyrinth at the
Chartes Cathedral near Paris.

Couple builds labyrinth modeled after famous structure at Chartes Cathedral


RILEY MANNING
Northeast Mississippi Daily
Journal
TUPELO, Miss.
When the morning sun is
gentle and geese are
landing silently on the
surface of the pond, you might
catch Nancy Bridges walking
barefoot in her yard.
From the road her winding
way may seem random, but that
is part of the point. Nancy is
walking the path of her
labyrinth.
"It symbolizes getting to the
center of who you are," Nancy
said. "It is peaceful to walk."
The intricate pattern weaves
the walker close to the center,
then away from it, like life does,


Nancy said, "and then you real-
ize it's really about the journey"
Unlike a maze, a labyrinth is a
singular path with no dead ends.
It leads the walker to the center
of the pattern, then back out
again.
In the center of Bridges'
labyrinth are two iron chairs
and a matching table, as if the
walker is meeting someone
there. The corridors are out-
lined by concrete bricks sunken
into the ground exactly two
feet apart.
In the spring, Nancy fills the
gaps between them with vibrant
flowers.
Nancy first encountered a
labyrinth during a church re-
treat to the Sisters of Mercy con-
vent in St Louis, then again at


Sacred Heart Monastery in Cull-
man, Ala.
She was touched by the
labyrinth's power as a prayer
tool and brought the idea back
home five years ago to her hus-
band Gary, who said he enjoyed
the challenge of such a project
After about a week of meticu-
lous measuring even the area
of the bricks were taken into ac-
count and three pallets of
bricks, the Bridgeses had their
labyrinth.
They based the pattern on the
famous labyrinth at the Chartes
Cathedral near Paris, an attrac-
tion still in use and immacu-
lately maintained. The
Bridgeses, however,
expanded it.
"We wanted to make sure the


path was wide enough for peo-
ple to pass each other while
being in their own zone," said
Gary
It is 110 feet in diameter and
takes about half an hour to walk.
Eleven layers of the path curl
around the center, called an "11-
circuit labyrinth." Standing at
the entrance, the walker faces
east, looking out over the small
pond in the front yard and ex-
pansive green fields of crop be-
yond that.
"It was worth the effort," Gary
said, "It's rewarding to see the
enjoyment (Nancy) gets out
of it."
While Gary is not as frequent
a walker as Nancy, he said he


Why


church?
Scattered throughout
any community are
tiny, struggling
churches.
Sometimes they're in-
visible. If you blink while
driving past them you'll
miss them. Or they're eye-
sores run down,
weather-worn.
In my 20 years covering
local religion for the
newspaper, I've gotten to
know the people at some
of these little churches.
I've attended their serv-
ices and could count the
people in the pews with
two hands and not need a
third.
Two things have run
through my mind: Why
don't they admit defeat,
close up shop and go
somewhere else? And,
why do they stay together?
I've always been part of
churches that are so big
that I don't know half the
people, and so I don't un-
derstand a tiny church's
dynamic or mentality.
I remember talking to a
pastor of one such little
church. In his community,
which maybe encom-
passes five square miles,
his church is one of three
of varying denominations,
See Page C4


Page C4


Worship
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, conducts
worship at 8 and 10:30 a.m.
with the Rev. Mark Gabb offici-
ating. Pre-k and kindergarten
will sing during the later service.
Sunday school for age 3
through high school students
and adult Bible class take place
at 9:15 a.m. After the 10:30
a.m. worship service, St. Paul's
School and Precious Lambs
Preschool fall picnic will begin
for students, parents, members
and guests. Bring a dish to
pass. There will be games,
bounce house and slide for
kids. Still time for seniors to
sign up for attending concert on
Sept. 22. St. Paul's School Li-
brary is open with books for
parents and students. Call 352-
489-3027. For information re-
garding Kingsway Retirement
Community, call 352-465-6006.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes Jim
Mclntosh to the pulpit at 10:30
a.m. Sunday. Mclntosh's topic
title, "Cats, Quantum Physics,
and Why We Think the Way
We Do," reflects the opinion
that it is often exasperating to
deal with people who doggedly
stick to an idea or concept that
almost everyone else sees as
totally false. Cats and quantum
physics give us a hint about
how decisions are made. Jim
Mclntosh is a member of the
Unitarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Marion County. In 2007
he won the John DeWolf Hurt
Levity Award from the Florida
District UU, given to honor a
person who remembers the
value of humor in congrega-
tional life. The Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalist Fellow-
ship meets at 7633 N. Florida
Ave., Citrus Springs. Call 352-
465-4225.


You can find not only a
church home but also a caring
church family at Abundant Life
of Crystal River, 4515 N. Talla-
hassee Road, Crystal River.
Sunday morning service is at
10:30 a.m. and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
Both services have uncompro-
mised and encouraging Bible-
based teachings that will build
your faith. Abundant Life is a
nondenominational church that
believes in the Power of Pente-
cost. Come and grow with us.
Come as you are and leave for-
ever changed by the presence
of the Lord. Visit www.
abundantlifecitrus.org or call
352-795-LIFE.
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs will have
its "Prayer Partner" breakfast at
9 a.m. today. Sunday school for
all ages is at 9:30 a.m. followed
by the worship service at 10:30
a.m. Evening study on "Not a
Fan," begins at 6. The Wednes-
day fellowship meal starts at 6
p.m. followed by prayer and
Bible study. The church is at
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Dan Wagner is the minis-
ter. Call the church office at
352-628-5556.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Vespers
at 5 p.m. Saturday and Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday. This
Sunday, Father David Balmer
celebrates the "Elevation of the
Precious and Life-giving
Cross." The church is at 1277
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, off
U.S. 41 North across from Dol-
lar General.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the 16th Sunday
after Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today
and 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
A nursery is provided during the
10:30 a.m. service. Godly Play
Sunday school is at 10 a.m.


Religion NOTES
There is a healing service and
Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day. SOS is at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church with summer
hours from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Thursday through September.
A Bluegrass come-as-you-
are service featuring River Blue
Bluegrass Band will take place
at 5 p.m. today at St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.19), Crys-
tal River. Sunday worship serv-
ices include the early service
with communion at 8 a.m., Sun-
day school classes for all ages
at 9:30 a.m. with coffee fellow-
ship hour at 9 a.m., and tradi-
tional service with communion
at 10:30 a.m. Special services
are announced. Nursery pro-
vided. Call 352-795-5325 or
visit www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
Faith Lutheran Church in
Crystal Glen Subdivision, off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites
the public to worship services
at 6 p.m. Saturday and 9:30
a.m. Sunday. This week's
theme is "I Believe, Help my
Unbelief," from Mark 9:14-22,
by Pastor Stephen Lane. Fol-
lowing the Sunday service is a
time of fellowship. Call 352-
527-3325 or visit
faithlecanto.com.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) will cele-
brate the 16th Sunday after
Pentecost at the 8 and 10:15
a.m. services. St. Anne's will
host Our Father's Table from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in
the parish library. The "Recov-
ering from Food Addiction"
group meets at 1 p.m. Thurs-
days in the parish library. Alco-
holics Anonymous meets at 8
p.m. Friday and Monday in the
parish library. All are welcome
to join St. Anne's at 6 p.m. Sun-


day, Sept. 30, for a Bluegrass
gospel sing-along. Annie and
Tim's United Bluegrass Gospel
Band will perform. (Note: this is
a week later than usual.)
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will Holy Eucharist Rite
1 at 8 a.m. Sunday followed by
Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at 10:30
a.m. Children's church is during
the 10:30 a.m. service. Adult
Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m.
Lunch and youth Sunday
school/adult forum is at noon.
Morning prayer at 9 a.m.
Wednesday is followed by a
healing and holy Eucharist
service celebrating the Holy
Cross at 12:30 p.m.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. The first
Sunday monthly is designated
for children to have a special
time together in the Children's
Church room during the 10:30
a.m. worship service. The re-
maining Sundays, children will
remain in the auditorium for
worship with their parents. Sun-
day school begins at 9:30 a.m.
with classes for everyone. Adult
Bible class is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in rooms 105 and
106. The youth group meets at
7 p.m. Wednesday in the
Youth Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for pre-k through the
eighth grade) meets from 5:30
to 8 p.m. Wednesday. This in-
cludes K.I.D.'s Choir practice
from 5:30 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s din-
ner from 6:30 to 7; and Mis-
sionettes and Royal Rangers
Bible study classes from 7 to 8
p.m. The church is at 416 U.S.
41 S., Inverness. Call the
church office at 352-726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour fol-
lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
CD ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices. A


nursery attendant is available
for children ages 3 and
younger. Sunday school begins
at 9:45 a.m. The church is on
County Road 486 opposite Cit-
rus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.
Sunday. We are a nondenomi-
national church where you will
experience a friendly, loving
and casual atmosphere; a
place where you can come just
as you are. A coffee fellowship
will follow the morning service.
Weekly Bible study meets at 7
p.m. Wednesday. The book of
Ephesians is the topic of study
and discussion. The church
meets at the Inverness
Woman's Club, 1715 Forest
Ridge Drive, across from the
Whispering Pines Park en-
trance. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Summer Sun-
day worship schedule: Casual
worship at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
school from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.,
and traditional worship at 11
a.m. This Sunday, the Rev.
Craig S. Davies will preach on
"Powerful Weapons for the
Front Lines," with readings from
Ephesians 6:10-20. Come for
the kickoff WOW dinner for Op-
eration Christmas Child at 6
p.m. Wednesday. There will be
a "packing party" after the din-
ner. Operation Christmas Child
is a ministry of Samaritan's
Purse. Call Heidi at 352-344-
0389 for more information.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school will
begin at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service be-
gins at 6. Midweek services are

See Page C2


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Praying


with


Dems,


too

As the Republican
show closed in
Tampa, Cardinal
Timothy Dolan faced a
flock of Tea Party activists,
religious conservatives
and country-club loyalists,
and gently addressed the
sanctity of life.
"We ask your benedic-
tion upon those yet to be
born, and on those who
are about to see you at the
end of this life," said the
shepherd of New York,
who also leads the U.S.
Conference of Catholic
Bishops.
A week later, Dolan of-
fered the final benedic-
tion for a Democratic
National Convention in
which 25 speakers
praised or defended their
party's unchallenged sup-
port for abortion rights.
While covering the same
litany of issues in both
conventions, the cardinal
tweaked this Charlotte
prayer to make his point
even more obvious.
"Help us to see that a
society's greatness is
found above all in the re-
spect it shows for the
weakest and neediest
among us," said Dolan.


Page C4


MAI--------f AS





C2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page Cl

at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Young
Musicians/Puppeteers meet at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Youth
Bible study for ages 11 and
older is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the
second and fourth Fridays
monthly in the fellowship hall.
The church is on East Parsons
Point Road in Hernando (di-
rectly across from the Her-
nando Post Office).
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Two adult studies
begin at 9 a.m.; one on Nooma
by Rob Bell, the other is the
Letter of James. Pastor Al-
wood's sermon this Sunday is
titled, "Sharing the Faith." The
food pantry is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, ex-
cept the first Tuesday monthly.
The choir has returned from its
summer hiatus. Homecoming
Sunday is Oct. 21. Old friends
and former members are in-
vited to share memories and
break bread together. Call the
church at 352-795-2259 for
luncheon reservations.
The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church
services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-
726-0100.
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rock Acres Industrial Park, 6843
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
The church is a spirit-filled,
word-of-faith family ministry that
plays traditional and contempo-
rary music. There is a gospel
sing at 7 p.m. Friday, which
gives the community and chil-
dren a safe, positive place to
come to on Friday nights. Reg-
ular church services are at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Follow us


RELIGION


Yoruba priest


Special to the Chronicle
Women from the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Fellowship met with a Yoruba priest, Baba (Father) Ona, to learn about
his wooden sculptures and African musical instruments. Pictured, Shari Harris listens as Baba "reads" the signs as his
Nigerian ancestors did.


on Facebook: @Covenant
Love Ministry or @Kinker Fam-
ily Worship. The ministry web-
site is Covenant-Love.com. Call
Pastor Brian Kinker at 352-
601-4868.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions as we are currently
seeking a new location: 1-855-
426-4542 or 352-8759614.
Rediscover church at
Gravity Church at 11 a.m.
Sunday. Come early to Grav-
ity Church Cafe for coffee, pas-


tries and fellowship. The church
is at 801 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. Visit www.gravity
church.org.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise
Sunday school class at 7:45
a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for
ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service featur-
ing Bible stories, skits, music
and group activities; Sunday
school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except the


7:45 a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered. A midweek worship
service for adults is offered at 6
p.m. Wednesday. For the
youths, we offer "Ignite," and for
children, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252. The church is at 550
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
also meet at 9 a.m. Sunday


and 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. All residents of the
area are welcome. Sunday
morning worship service is at
10. Peace Lutheran Church,
"The Church On The Hill," is
five miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the church
office at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is
in Old Homosassa at 10540 W
Yulee Drive. Turn onto Yulee
Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger
King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on
left. Call 352-628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-
denominational and Bible
based, only preaching the Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call 352-382-2557.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m., with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m., with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
For new friends and fellow-
ship, come to Parsons Memo-
rial Presbyterian Church at
5850 Riverside Drive in Yan-
keetown. Enjoy coffee and
sweets at 10 a.m. Sunday in
the fellowship hall followed by
the worship service at 11 a.m.
Communion is served the first
Sunday monthly. After church,
return to the fellowship hall to
visit and eat. Call 352-
447-2506.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Every-
one welcome. Call 352-
746-3620.
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


EI] Cry stal Crystal River
a River CHURCH OF


Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



Crystal River
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


CHRISf
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday I
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
I I'-' lr i .. . ,111 1 t
] i I ] t H ,r, I ]




STemple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon
00A93J


Special
Event or

Weekly
Services
Please Call

Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AlI Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir/ Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUSCOUNTY
ARMY CORPS
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
712 S. Scbool Ave


Homosassa West :0
First United Citrus CO
HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
Methodist Church of Christ o CAKIN FAMILY
church 9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. 'N CHKIT!
Everyone Crystal River, FL 34465 CKYSTAL
Becoming 352-564-8565 R IVEK.
A Disciple www.westcitruscoc.com VNITOD
of Christ HOD
W.:Deep Woods Dr. 0 CTHOD T


CH U KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:, A Stephen Ministry Provider .-


uJ


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 -4:30pmr
795-4479


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


West itru^s
Cuc B Inoffa i
ChristB





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State
Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at
352-794-3372 or 352-795-
8883, or email georgehick-
man@yahoo.com.
First Church of God of
Inverness, a nondenomina-
tional church which meets at
5510 E. Jasmine Lane, invites
the public to Sunday morning
worship services at 10:30 a.m.
Call 352-344-3700.
Special events
The seventh annual
blessing of the animals will
take place at 1:30 p.m. Satur-
day, Oct. 6, in the Memorial
Garden at Joy Lutheran
Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd Place
at State Road 200, Ocala. Pas-
tor Ed Holloway will conduct the


RELIGION


service. The public is welcome
to bring their dogs, cats,
horses, sheep, birds, etc., to re-
ceive the blessing. Owners
must be able to control their
pets. Call 352-854-4509,
ext 221.
The Unity Mystery Din-
ner Theater Team will present
a season of three mysteries for
the audience to solve. Dinner
will be served. Enjoy an
evening of surprises, good food
and super sleuthing. Schedule:
Today "Murder Is Par For
The Course"; Friday and Satur-
day, Dec. 14 and 15 "Santa's
Untimely Demise"; Friday and
Saturday, March 15 and 16 -
"Murder Most Green." Season
tickets on sale now. Individual
show tickets available for a $20
donation. Season tickets avail-
able for a $60 donation. Music
during dinner provided by Tom
Gray. Door prizes and "Top De-
tective Award." Call the box of-
fice at 352-746-1270 between 9
a.m. and 3 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday. All are
welcome.
The Rev. Israel Cohen of
Chosen People Ministries will
speak on the Arab/Israeli con-
flict at the 11 a.m. service Sun-
day at First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills, 4950 N Lecanto
Highway. Chosen People Min-
istries has been bringing the
Gospel of Jesus, the Messiah,


Day of Reflection


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the St. Scholastica Council of Catholic Women and parishioners of St. Scholas-
tica Church recently attended a Day of Reflection at Spiritus Sanctus Church in Safety Har-
bor. Hosted by the St. Petersburg Diocesan Council of Catholic Women, approximately 300
women throughout St. Petersburg Diocese attended. Guest speaker was the Rev. Michael
Smith, pastor of St. Scholastica Church and Citrus Deanery spiritual adviser. The topic was
"The Gentle Strength of Women." From left are: Rosalee Matt, Donna Moreno, Connie Tay-
lor, Jeannine Davis, the Rev. Michael Smith, Joanne Bobay, Jeannette Kollar, Toni Lempner,
Clair Schroder, Ginny Burke and Cora Tuble. If you are a Catholic woman 18 years or older and
would like to join a council or just want more information, contact Jeannine at 352-527-2209.


to Jewish people for more than
110 years. Call 352-746-2970
or visit www.fbcbh.com.


Come enjoy dinner at 6
p.m. Wednesday, supplied by
Calvary Chapel's youth depart-


ment for donations only. Free
dessert, coffee and tea. Sodas
and specialty drinks available at


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 C3

low prices. Teaching for all ages
follows at 7 p.m. Adults, enjoy
coffee as you sit around cafe
tables and take part in a current
study on Corinthians. Calvary
Chapel is at 960 S. U.S. 41,
Inverness.
A new "Coffee Talk" be-
gins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Cattle Dog's Roasters, 2416 N.
Heritage Oaks Path, Hernando.
Join us for an informal discus-
sion of the book "Blue Like
Jazz," by Donald Miller. "Blue
Like Jazz" portrays Donald
Miller's quest for meaning, a
depth of faith, the realization
that humanity is broken and im-
perfect, explorations of child-
hood misconceptions of faith,
and the desire to live into his
true identity. In many ways, it is
about finding a faith of one's
own, and not merely repeating
what we have experienced in
our upbringing or through a
family tradition. Don's faith jour-
ney is uniquely his, and yet ex-
presses experiences that many
of us identify as our own as we
journey through our search for
God, love, faith, and something
bigger than ourselves. So, grab
a cup of coffee and a dessert
and share your thoughts about
this intriguing book. You can
purchase your book ahead of
time from any bookstore, or we
See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

SCome on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! "


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF


HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL


CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


1A Faith
Lutheran
Church (L.CM.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
cff-mart o^(Mdew.


SFloral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Li til! Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Opew

OpeM


Doows

.... ry for Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell BryantHwy, (486)
(1 2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
wwwihernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


Glory to Glory
Ministries
SA Family

United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly

Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352)566-6613
www.G2GCares.org7
Pastor Brian Gulledge
S1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
ww Hernando, FL



Grace Bible

Church
V. h






11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................vening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana(Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00PM........... ible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman

(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
/2 mi.eastof US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigni
4:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352) 746-9422


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
00A5H7 Floral City, FL.


Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
Suk .( OTH E(' ,r,

^^ .^ ";


Come as you are!
GEnIESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH
-U. 'S|


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253


0


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran


Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 PM,
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


.. Church

Shepherd ELCA

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH A,


I


I I I


Hernando FL 34"2
352-726-6734

2 3790 E Parson's Point Rd.
Vlsit us on the Web at
www.fbchermnde.com
Z,





C4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


PRAYER
Continued from Page C1

"We beseech you,
almighty God to shed your
grace on this noble experi-
ment in ordered liberty,
which began with the confi-
dent assertion of inalien-
able rights bestowed upon
us by you: life, liberty and
the pursuit of happiness.
"Thus do we praise you
for the gift of life. Grant us
the courage to defend it, life,
without which no other
rights are secure. We ask
your benediction on those
waiting to be born, that they
may be welcomed and pro-
tected. Strengthen our sick
and our elders waiting to
see your holy face at life's
end, that they may be ac-
companied by true compas-
sion and cherished with the
dignity due those who are
infirm and fragile."
Democrats respectfully
stood with heads bowed,
even as TV crews searched
for anyone who might visi-
bly shun the cardinal.
Dolan's late insertion into
the program had been con-
troversial after months of
church-state conflict be-
tween the Obama White
House and the U.S. Catholic
bishops caused by Health
and Human Services man-
dates requiring most reli-
gious institutions to offer
health insurance covering
FDA-approved forms of con-
traception, including
"morning-after pills," and
sterilizations.
While critics on left and
right were quick to parse
the prayer, it was highly
symbolic that Dolan ended
up standing before the De-
mocrats in the first place,
said Russell Shaw, former
communications director
for the U.S. bishops.
"It's very important to
take steps to try to keep a re-
ligious presence in the pub-
lic square, to make sure the
church remains a player in
debates about the great is-
sues of our day," he said.
"There are major players
who, quite frankly, want to
chase us back into the sac-
risty, where we're supposed
to mind our own business
and not bother all the im-
portant people who are
working out in the real
world."
The Democratic Party's
leaders could have declined
Dolan's offer to pray, which
would have left him "twist-
ing slowly in the wind" since
he had accepted an invita-
tion to give a benediction for
the GOP said Shaw. That
would have made it easier
to portray Dolan as "a mere
political partisan" which
was precisely what he was
trying to avoid.
Also, it was important to
know that the Charlotte
drama unfolded in the wake
of Dolan's decision infu-
riating many Catholic con-
servatives to invite
President Barack Obama to
the white-tie Al Smith Din-
ner, a nonpartisan event cel-
ebrating lighthearted
civility that will take place
just before the election.
"I apologize if I have
given such scandal," wrote
Dolan on his "The Gospel in
the Digital Age" blog. "I sup-
pose it's a case of prudential
judgment: would I give
more scandal by inviting the
two candidates, or by not
inviting them? ...
"In the end, I'm encour-
aged by the example of
Jesus, who was blistered by
his critics for dining with
those some considered sin-
ners; and by the recognition
that, if I only sat down with
people who agreed with me,
and I with them, or with
those who were saints, I'd be
taking all my meals alone."
One thing is certain: court
cases and political debates
about religious liberty and
health care reform will con-
tinue for some time to come.
The cardinal knows that the
U.S. bishops will eventually


need to talk to people on both
sides of the negotiating table.
"Cardinal Dolan has pretty
good political instincts,"
said Shaw. "In this case, he
knows that it's important to
try to keep some channels of
communication open. ... It
helps to be able to pray with
people and to break bread
with them, too."

Terry Mattingly is the di-
rector of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion.org
project to study religion
and the news.


RELIGION


NOTEence"
NOTES girls w
,. ,a.m. to
Continued from Page C3 a.m. t
22, at (
972 N.
will have a few available at the The ev
first meeting. Call Genesis FresHc
Community Church at 352- FresHc
464-0983. Blesse
FFRA (Family and cial tim
Friends Reaching for the girls to
Abilities) will have a guest come i
speaker at the next monthly you are
meeting Friday. Lisa Noble truly ar
from the Seven Rivers Re- You are
gional Medical Center will talk ing. Th
about wound care, hyperbaric skits, w
medicine, diabetes, and treat- vignett
ing wounds. FFRA meets the Spe;
third Friday monthly at the Key Donna
Training Center, 130 Heights Lieberr
Ave., Inverness. Social time Princes
and a business meeting begin For mo
at 9, followed by the speaker at sister, vi
10 a.m. The public is invited to confer
attend. For more information 726-97
on this meeting or FFRA in 0 St
general, call Ron Phillips, pres- Catholi
ident, at 352-382-7819 or visit will hos
www.ffracitrus.org. Fashic
"The Blessed Confer- Craft S


LABYRINTH
Continued from Page C1

likes the fact there is no "right or
wrong speed, just whatever fits the
moment."
Four years ago, Nancy invited
the youths of her church, St. James
Catholic Church, to come walk the
labyrinth during Lent.
After giving a brief history of the
practice, she had the kids write on
a slip of paper anything that was
weighing on their hearts, drop the
paper in a bowl at the entrance of
the labyrinth, and walk the pattern.
"It was amazing to see guys you
wouldn't think it would mean any-
thing to come out with tears in their
eyes," said Gary

you
GRACE
Gchurcl
He
Continued from Page C1 had
and i
all three with only a hand- Which
ful of members. He
Each church has a long, tist, (
rich history. Each church Metho
has members who had been Metho
there since their birth be Pen
their mamas and grandmas, He
aunts and cousins had all was b
been members. that ti
The pastor was telling me church.
about some needed repairs along,
at his church and how the was
other two churches also church
needed some help. He also own s
told me about their tradi- where
tion of combining congrega- the san
tions and meeting together the un
in each other's churches on ways t
rotating Sundays. able a
That was a head I ge
scratcher Presb
"Baptists, Methodists, have
Pentecostals why don't tists o


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


for women and teen
'ill take place from 10
5 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
Christ Way Fellowship,
Christy Way, Inverness.
ent is co-hosted by
ope Ministries &
ope of Jacksonville. "The
d Conference" is a spe-
e for women and teen
have fun, worship, be-
nspired, know how loved
e, and realize who you
e in the heart of Christ.
e blessed to be a bless-
ere will be giveaways,
worship arts, and photo
e opportunities.
akers include Pastor
Sallee and Melissa
nan, and former Disney
ss Jennifer Beckham.
ore information or to reg-
sit www.blessed
ence.com or call 352-
'68.
:. John the Baptist
ic Church, Dunnellon,
st its third annual "Old
>ned Country Fair and
Show" from 3 to 9 p.m.


Friday, Oct. 5, and 11 a.m. to 9
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, on the
church grounds, 7525 S. U.S.
41, Dunnellon (approximately
3.5 miles north of Dunnellon).
Parking and admission are
free. The SJBCC Car Show will
take place Saturday in con-
junction with the fair; area car
enthusiasts will meet from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. to show their
treasures and compete for tro-
phies. "Field Day Events," such
as three-legged races, relay
races, water balloon races, and
an egg toss will take place from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Participation is free and rib-
bons will be awarded to the
winners. On both days, the fair
will feature a variety of live en-
tertainment such as the Sun
Coasters, Joyful, the James
Brothers, and Country Sun-
shine. Fair-goers will find a va-
riety of attractions including
games, a "Dunk Tank," a 17-
foot slide, a bounce house, hay
wagon rides, and a cake walk
featuring home-baked goodies.
On Friday, the fair will host a


The Bridgeses have lived in Tu-
pelo since 1975, when they started
their business Bridges Dental
Laboratory making dental prod-
ucts such as crowns and bridges.
Gary is six years retired, but Nancy
and two of their children are still
involved in the company
The parents of seven children,
ranging in age from 20 to 40, Nancy
and Greg said it is a joy watching
their grandchildren run and play in
the labyrinth. They welcome any-
one to come and take part in the
ancient experience.
"Labyrinth" is an ancient Greek
word from the legend of Theseus.
In the myth, the Athenian hero be-
comes trapped on the island of
Crete, where he must venture into
the center of a massive labyrinth and
slay a monster called the Minotaur, a


just all form one
h?" I asked.
looked at me as if I
asked a really dumb
insensitive question.
I had.
said, "If you're a Bap-
do you want to be
)dist? And if you're a
)dist, do you want to
ntecostal?"
wasn't saying that one
better than the other or
ie people in the three
hes didn't all get
because they do. He
saying that Christ's
h as a whole forms its
smaller family groups
Sthe people worship
me Lord and Savior as
liversal church, but in
hat are more comfort-
mong themselves.
et that. I love being
yterian. It's not that I
anything against Bap-
Dr Methodists or Pen-


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260



Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
Worship.................... 0:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30


fish fry and on Saturday, a
chicken barbecue. Donation is
$7 for either meal. An ala carte
menu of hamburgers, hotdogs,
peppers and homemade
sausage, drinks, and all the
trimmings will be available at
any time both days. Folks also
can enjoy fried dough, funnel
cakes, SnoKones, and a trip to
Miss Beverley's Old Fashioned
Ice Cream Shop for ice cream
cones, sundaes, and root beer
floats. For those 21 and older,
there's cold beer at the "Beer
Tent." Call the church office at
352-489-3166 or Claire at 352-
465-4477.
The "Brides of Christ
3rd Annual Fall Retreat 2012"
will take place Oct. 5-7 at the
"Historical Lakeside Inn" in
Mount Dora. The guest
speaker is author, journalist, re-
ligion editor and feature writer
Nancy Kennedy. The cost of
$235 per person includes two
nights lodging, two full-course
dinners, one lunch and two
breakfasts. Call Retreat Coor-
dinator Margi at 352-249-7315


beast that is half man and half bull.
That's not to say the Greeks in-
vented the labyrinth.
Labyrinths are present in an-
cient cultures on every continent,
from the Egyptians to the Celtics to
the Mayans.
The oldest ones predate history,
and though it is impossible to know
for sure, some believe their pur-
pose was to trap and confuse stray
spirits. Patterns and the materials
used to make them vary from sand,
turf, stones, sticks and even ice.
There are also portable labyrinths.
It wasn't until the Romans
adopted them as a floor plan that
labyrinths found a place in Chris-
tian tradition.
"During the Crusades, pilgrims
couldn't complete a voyage to the
Holy Land of Jerusalem, so they


tecostals, I just prefer being
Presbyterian. It feels as if
it's in my DNA.
But I don't want this to be
a discussion of denomina-
tions or even styles of wor-
ship. Instead, I'm thinking
today about churches in
general: small, medium,
large or jumbo, all colors,
all flavors.
Recently, I visited an-
other small church in the
community. The pastor, a
woman, has been in this
church since before she
was born. Her great-grand-
father was its founding pas-
tor. The church has gone
from 400 people to just a
faithful few, and hers is an-
other church that I've won-
dered why it still exists.
It all comes back to what
the church is.
If it's just a place to wear
your new clothes, to sing a
few songs and learn a few


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


principles to make yo
run more smoothly -
you can do that any-
Or not do it at all.
But if it's a fami
union, if it's the
where the people you
as your brothers and
come together each w
practice your common
ily traditions, to learn
and celebrate your co
faith and your Father
then whether you're
a few hundred or tho
in number, your chur
precious place.
The size of the me
ship doesn't matter as
as the size of the lo
people have for on
other.
One of my most che:
parts of going to c
each week is sitting ii
of Harry and Cha
Austin. At the end
service, after all the


.







VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.. & 10:30 A..

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pr..


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P. to 3:15 P. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
L .catholicweb.com .:


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

or Registration Coordinator
Darlene at 352-249-7003 to
register and receive an infor-
mational brochure. Space is
limited.
Trinity Independent Bap-
tist Church will host a "Civil
Servant Sunday" at 11 a.m.
Oct. 7. All civil employees, past
and present, are invited. Re-
tired state trooper William Tur-
ley (Ohio) is the guest speaker.
Special music will be provided
by River Jordan. All civil serv-
ice personnel are invited for
dinner following the service.
The church is on the corner of
Croft Avenue and Hayes
Street. Call the church at 352-
726-0100.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a "Military
Card Party" on Monday, Oct.
15, at 114 N. Osceola Ave., In-
verness. Reservations must be
made by Thursday, Oct. 11.
Lunch will be served at 12:15
p.m. followed by card play at 1
p.m. Cost is $12 per player.

See NOTES/Page C5


would walk the labyrinth as a sub-
stitute," said Nancy
Some went so far as to traverse
the path on their knees, deep in
prayer.
After the medieval age,
labyrinths fell out of popularity.
Many were lost to disuse along with
many of their secrets, but their
mystery still captivates pop culture
today in books, films and video
games.
Other labyrinths in northeast
Mississippi are the Carnegie Li-
brary labyrinth located in Okolona,
Episcopal Church of the Resurrec-
tion labyrinth located in Starkville,
Christ the King Lutheran Church
labyrinth located in Tupelo and Tri
Delta labyrinth located on the Uni-
versity of Mississippi campus in
Oxford.

)ur life and the offering, after the
-well, sermon and God coming
where. and loving us, after the pas-
tor's final prayer and bene-
ly re- diction, every week I turn
place around and say, "Good stuff,
count huh Harry?"
sisters If he and Charlotte aren't
'eekto there, I miss them. I miss
n fam- saying, "Good stuff." If I'm
i about not there, I miss it, too.
mmon I think that's the way
's love, church should be. I think it
few or makes Jesus happy
)usand
ch is a
Nancy Kennedy is the
mber- author of "Move Over,
Much Victoria I Know the
ve the Real Secret," "Girl on a
ie an- Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
rished She can be reached at
church 352-564-2927, Monday
n front through Thursday, or
arlotte via email at
of the nkennedy@chronicle
songs online.com.


Hwy.44E@
* Washington Ave., Inverness

* Sunday Services
* Traditional
* 11:00 AM
* Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service *
* Tapes & CD's Available *
" Sunday School for all ages 0
. 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided *
Fellowship & Youth Group
S 5to 7PM
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org u
Podcast: FPC inv.com r

. Church Office 637-0770 U
SPastor Craig Davies
U


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
.r -





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

Make up your table of four or
come as a single and we will
pair you. Enjoy fun, prizes and
a raffle. For more information or
to make a reservation, call Dot-
tie at 352-382-3656 or Marilyn
at 352-746-6583.
There will be a "Women's
Retreat" on Saturday, Nov. 3,
at Holy Faith Episcopal Church,
19924 W. Blue Cove Road.,
Dunnellon. The Episcopal
Church Women will host a full-
day retreat led by Dr. Peg
Davis. Dr. Davis' theme is
"ECW Embracing Christ
Within," with a goal to "refresh,
renew, reclaim and rejoice."
Coffee, sweets and a light lunch
provided. The $15 fee covers
all, including retreat materials.
All women in the Dunnellon
area are invited to attend. For
reservation information, call the
church at 352-489-2685 by Oct.
15. Seating limited.
Sale away
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly Hills
will resume its monthly outdoor
flea market from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, on the
church property at 6 Roosevelt
Boulevard in Beverly Hills off
North Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491). Shoppers
are welcome. As many as 50
commercial and private ven-
dors are expected to display
their wares. Commercial ven-
dors and private individuals are
welcome to bring and sell
goods. Spaces are available for
$10. A mobile kitchen, "Cooking
Good," will serve breakfast and
lunch items. Flea markets take
place the fourth Saturday
monthly except in June, July
and August. Next month's flea
market is Oct. 27. For more in-
formation or to reserve a space,
call Rose Mary at 352-527-
2729 or e-mail wjeselso@


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. .arrvPowner
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...................8:30 AM
Sunday School.........................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service .....................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 PM
Teens................................. 7:15 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
1 li. l It.. ..... it i -', ,,,,,i,.,,,,i .,,,I
S it the Inverness Womans( ,
1 715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


1\s o



All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Special
Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising
Information


Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
SeniorPastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
I Praise & Worship
FR Ar


RELIGION


tampabay.rr.com.
Crafters with a Mission will
have its "Third Annual Bazaar
and Bake Sale" from 9 a.m. to
7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, and
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 29, in the gym at Crystal
River Church of God, 2180
N.W. 12th Ave., Crystal River. A
variety of crafts will be featured.
Admission is free. Call 352-
795-3079.
Church of the Advent will
have its annual outdoor "Trash
to Treasure Sale" on Saturday,
Sept. 29. Rent 10-by-10-feet
spaces for $15 each. Shaded
spaces available on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Crafters, flea market and food
vendors are invited to partici-
pate. The church is at 11251
County Road 484, in front of the
new firehouse. For registration
and information, call Al Sickle at
352-208-5664 or Maryanne
Brennan at 352- 347-2428.
Hernando United
Methodist Church will sponsor
its semi-annual "Sell Your
Own Treasures" event from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6.
The price is $5 for a 12-by-12-
foot spot. No reservation re-
quired. Bring your own tables.
First come, first served. Set up
early and beat the crowd.
Breakfast and lunch is avail-
able. The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Hernando.
Call 352-726-7245 or visit
www.hernandoumcfl.org.
The Holidaze Crafters of
Hernando United Methodist
Church are opening the church
to crafters from all over Citrus
County for the annual "Holi-
daze Craft Sale" from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 9 and 10. More than 25
exhibitors will bring exciting and
unique handmade items made
in the USA. The Hernando
United Methodist Women will
also sell delicious home-baked
goods to raise money for mis-
sions. The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway


S Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
'........ P j,, ,-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
J Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!


(County Road 486), Hernando.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
accepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Estate donations are
also accepted. Pick-up is avail-
able for larger donations. Items
donated are tax deductible and
a form is provided from Helping
Hands. Call 352-726-1707.
Music & more
The Dunnellon Presbyte-
rian Church Concert Series
for Fall-Winter 2012-13 will
take place at 3 p.m. Sunday
as follows: Oct. 21 -The Uni-
versity of Florida School of
Music Chamber Ensemble will
present a program featuring
works by Dvorak, Ravel and
Brahms performed by members
of the elite string chamber
music program at the University
of Florida, and the Graduate
Piano Trio in residence at the
University. The program will be
directed by Steven Thomas,
DMA, assistant professor of
cello at the School of Music,
University of Florida.
Nov. 11 -The Dunnellon
Concert Singers will present "A
Salute to the Music of the Six-
ties," with accompanist Robert
Cubbage, featuring songs
made popular by famous
recording artists plus '60s show
tunes from "Camelot," "Mame,"
"Mary Poppins," "Funny Girl,"
and more.
Dec. 16 The Central
Florida Master Choir's program,
titled "A 'B'eautiful Christmas,"
will include Benjamin Britten's
Ceremony of Carols, Christmas
music by Alfred Burt, Irving
Berlin and others. Conductor
Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr., is
pastor of First Congregational
United Church of Christ of
Ocala. Piano accompanist is
Gaylyn Capitano, and guest


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


harp accompanist is Victoria
Shultz.
Jan. 20 Leslie Hammes,
pianist, will present classical,
romantic and contemporary
arrangements, with the last half
of the program saluting Ameri-
can composers, past and pres-
ent. All concerts are free
admission and open to the pub-
lic. Love offerings received will
be gifted to the artists. Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church is at
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
Saturday Night Gospel
Jubilees take place at 6 p.m.
the last Saturday monthly at
First Church of God, Inverness.
Bring your instruments, prepare
a song or two and join in this
great evening. Food and fellow-
ship will follow in the social hall.
No charge. The church is off
U.S. 41 North, one mile north of
Kmart on Jasmine Lane. Call
352-726-8986 or 352-344-3700.
A A talent show will be pre-
sented at 6 p.m. today and 2
p.m. Sunday in the church hall
at St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church in Dunnellon. Songs
from the "Rat Pack," which in-
cludes Frank Sinatra, Dean
Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., etc.,
will be sung. A tribute to veter-
ans will also be presented.
Tickets ($10) can be purchased
in the church office. The church
is on the corner of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40 East. Call 352-
489-3166.
A piano recital will be pre-
sented by Monica Daniels, Fel-
low, Trinity College of Music,
London, England at 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, Sept. 22, at First
Lutheran Church, 1900 W.
State Road 44, Inverness. The
recital includes pieces by De-
bussy, Schubert, Moeran,
Rachmaninov, Chopin and
Liszt, plus a Nocturne by Scri-
abin which is played only with
the left hand, and a Rhapsody
by Dohnanyi, a Hungarian-born
composer who taught for 10
years at Florida State Univer-
sity in Tallahassee. The public
is invited to this recital, which


S"First For Christ"...ohn 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESSs
We welcomeyou and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr TerryAllcorn
Interim Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 p M. Bible Study










Vic ory

in


3esus

At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siid.i, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


will be presented as part of the
Fine Arts Program of First
Lutheran Church. Free admis-
sion. Refreshments served fol-
lowing the concert. Call
352-726-1637.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will host a Christian
Bluegrass and traditional
Country music concert featur-
ing Shannon and Heather
Slaughter and County Clare at
7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28. Bring
family and friends for an enjoy-
able evening of music and re-
freshments. Suggested
donation is $10. For tickets or
more information, call the
church office at 352-795-5325.
The church is at 1070 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
Food & fellowship
Third Saturday supper is
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. today in
the Dewain Farris Fellowship
Hall at Community Congrega-
tional Christian Church, 9220 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes
lasagna, garden salad, bread,


jo PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Eperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 C5

dessert, coffee and tea for $10
for adults and $5 for children.
Tickets can be purchased at the
door. Takeouts available. Call
the church at 352-489-1260.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers will
return beginning Friday. Sup-
pers will take place from 4 to 6
p.m. the third Friday monthly in
the Jack Steele Hall at 86 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation
of $8 per person, $15 for two
and $4 for children 12 and
younger includes all-you-can-
eat salad, spaghetti with meat
sauce, Italian bread, dessert
and coffee or tea. Come and
enjoy a delicious meal. Tickets
are available at the door.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the corner
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, hosts its fish
fry the first Friday monthly in the
church pavilion. Cost is $7 for
adults and $3.50 for children.
The fish fry is open to the public.

See NOTES/Page C6


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 PM.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670




^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted !! I :

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


IRST Bringing Christ
F IRT Ito Inverness

LUTHERAN First ited
CHURCH FirstUnited

Holy Communion Meth
Every Sunday at I ethod
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School Chur
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M. of Inverness
726-1637 13896 S.Pleasant Grove Rd.
SMissouri hrynode Inverness, FL 34452
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness (2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)





C6 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C5

Live & learn
Our Lady of Grace
Church invites the public to
learn about the Catholic faith at
its RCIA program. All people,
whatever their background, are
invited to hear the message of
Jesus Christ. Call the church
office at 352-746-2144.
Nature Coast Commu-
nity Bible Study (CBS) will
continue its 30-week study of
the books of Amos and Isaiah
from 9:45 to 11:45 a.m. Thurs-
day at First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills, at the intersection
of Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491) and Forest Ridge
Boulevard. This class is open to
men and women and includes
a program for children ages 5
and younger. CBS is part of an
international organization that
provides interdenominational
Bible study for people who de-
sire an in-depth study of God's
word along with opportunities
for fellowship. To register or for
more information, call Terry at
352-382-2365, Lori or Ron at
352-746-7581, or Linda at 352-
746-1698.
First United Methodist of
Inverness will offer Dave Ram-
sey's Financial Peace Univer-
sity from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Thursday through Nov. 8. This
class will teach you to take con-
trol of your money, invest for
the future, and give like never
before.
If you truly believe all that we
have belongs to God, this class
is for you. Cost is $89 per fam-
ily. The church is at 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road (two
miles south ofApplebee's), In-
verness. Call the church at 352-
726-2522 or call Don Beaudet
with questions or to register at
352-302-5744, or register on
line at www.dave
ramsey.com.
Etz Hayim Institute the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


adult education program of
Congregation Beth Sholom of
Citrus County will present the
Genesis Project, an in-depth
analysis and discussion of the
entire text of Genesis con-
ducted in English. The class is
open to the entire community
- persons of any faith. Classes
are from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday
beginning Sept. 24, at the syna-
gogue, 102 Civic Circle in Bev-
erly Hills. Class will be taught
by Hazzan Mordecai Kamlot,
cantor/spiritual leader of Con-
gregation Beth Sholom. It is
recommended that each indi-
vidual purchase their own text-
book, "Etz Hayim Torah and
Commentary (Five Books of
Moses)," which is available for
$25 to anyone who registers for
the class.
For registration and textbook
purchase, send your name, ad-
dress, phone number and pay-
ment to Congregation Beth
Sholom Genesis Project,
P.O. Box 640024, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464-0024. Make checks
payable to Congregation Beth
Sholom. Course fee of $5 per
class may made weekly at
each class.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala announces open reg-
istration of its religious school,
Congregation Beth Israel
School of Jewish Education.
The school currently meets
once a week on Sunday morn-
ings at various places in the
community. The curriculum
consists of Jewish life cycle and
history, Hebrew, Bible, holidays
and traditions, and courses on
Israel and pre-bar and pre-bat
mitzvah and confirmation
classes.
The school caters to the indi-
vidual needs of the students
and parent participation is en-
couraged. The staff consists of
caring, experienced teachers.
Suzanne Boetger is educa-
tional director. For more infor-
mation and enrollment, call
Suzanne at theboetgers@
yahoo.com or Judi at 352-
237-8277.


Lifelong Bible enthusiast
Jim Septer leads a Bible study
class from 1 to 3 p.m. and at 6
p.m. Wednesday at Unity
Church of Citrus County, 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto
(off County Road 491, across
from Black Diamond golf
course, south of Beverly Hills).
The class features a format of
open discussion and exchange
of ideas. Call 352-746-1270.
Trusting Heart Ministries
Bible Study group meets at 6
p.m. the second and fourth
Thursday monthly at 176 N.
Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all denomina-
tions. Call 352-860-0052 or
352-586-5174 or email trusting-
heartministry@yahoo.com.
Announcements
A GriefShare seminar is
offered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday through Nov. 14
at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. Call 352-746.6200 or
visit www.sevenrivers.org.
Before- and after-school
care is available in Citrus
Springs. Children through fifth
grade can receive assistance
with breakfast, homework,
recreation, snacks, and more
with loving workers who have
been background screened and
fingerprinted. North Oak Baptist
Church offers this service to the
community at a very low cost.
From 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., NOBC
Preschool and Camp ministries
are available to work with chil-
dren and give them a safe, en-
joyable environment with
trustworthy workers. Bus trans-
portation is available from Cit-
rus Springs Elementary School.
Call 352- 489-3359 for more
information.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave., Inverness. This
group is open to all who are
single, widowed or divorced.
Call 352-860-0052 or 352-586-
5174 or email trustingheart
ministry@yahoo.com.


Pastor: Image meant to
remind people to vote
INDIANAPOLIS -An Indianapolis pastor
said a sign in front of his church with images of
a lynching and slaves in chains is meant to re-
mind people of the importance of their voting
rights.
One side of the sign outside Greater St. Mark
Missionary Baptist Church features a photo of
the 1930 lynching of two black men before a
crowd of white people in Marion, Ind. 'VOTE!!!"
is written about the image, and beneath it: "Is
this a reason to vote?"
Rev. Joy Thorton, who is black, said he has
heard few complaints since the sign went up
about a week ago.
"I think there is a sense of complacency
about the price that was paid for one of the
most precious rights we have, and that is the
right to vote," Thornton told WRTV. "That sign
serves as a historical reminder."
The sign along busy 38th Street amid a typi-
cally lower-income neighborhood on the city's
east side has drawn varied reactions.
Joyce Hise, the president of nearby Discount
Casket Sales, said the sign delivered an impor-
tant message.
"It is disturbing; however, it's a part of his-
tory," said Hise, who is black. "It's a part of his-
tory that we have to remember."
ACLU suit challenges
flier ban at Mormon temple
BRIGHAM CITY, Utah The American Civil
Liberties Union of Utah is suing the town of
Brigham City, claiming it is squelching a non-
denominational Christian church's free speech
by limiting flier distribution near a Mormon tem-
ple.
Leaders of Main Street Church say they got
a city permit to pass out literature during the
temple's open house Aug. 18 to Sept. 15, but
have been barred from staking out the two
busiest sides of the building.
"The overbreadth of Brigham City's 'Free
Speech Zone' Ordinance is breathtaking," said
John Mejia, legal director of the ACLU of Utah.
"Under this ordinance, you would arguably have
to apply for a permit to engage in nearly any
speech in the city. The ordinance could be used
to silence anyone, from two friends debating
politics on the sidewalk to a missionary handing
out fliers."
Brigham City Attorney Kirk Morgan told KSL
that Main Street Church members are upset


because they're being kept away from bus un-
loading zones, where thousands of people ar-
rive at the temple each day. Morgan said the
restrictions are for pedestrian and traffic safety.
Main Street, which describes itself as a Bible-
based church with a presence in Brigham City
since the 1960s, believes Mormonism falls out-
side of orthodox Christianity.
US opposes Jewish group's
bid for penalty against Russia
WASHINGTON The Obama administra-
tion is opposing a Jewish group's bid to have
civil fines levied against Russia for failing to
obey a court order to return its historic books
and documents a dispute that has halted the
loan of Russian art works for exhibit in the
United States.
In a recent court filing, the Justice Depart-
ment argued that judicial sanctions against
Russia in this case would be contrary to U.S.
foreign policy interests and inconsistent with
U.S. law.
The Jewish group, Chabad-Lubavitch, based
in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, has
already convinced Chief Judge Royce Lam-
berth of the U.S. District Court here that it has a
valid claim to the tens of thousands of religious
books and manuscripts, some up to 500 years
old, which record the group's core teachings
and traditions.
Lamberth ruled the records are unlawfully
possessed by the Russian State Library and
the Russian military archive. And in 2010, he
ordered the Russian government to turn them
over to the U.S. embassy in Moscow or to the
group's representative.
Russia, which doesn't recognize the authority
of the U.S. court, has refused. It says the col-
lection is part of Russia's national heritage.
Representatives of religions
pray for peace in Sarajevo
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina Repre-
sentatives of some of the world's major reli-
gions have concluded a three-day interfaith
meeting in Sarajevo by calling for peace around
the world.
The meeting involved officials from Greek Or-
thodox, Roman Catholic, Muslim, Jewish,
Hindu and Buddhist communities, and they
walked together through Sarajevo's streets
Tuesday evening before issuing their joint com-
mitment to peace.
From wire reports


Religion BRIEFS


ATTENTION



BUSINESS OWNERS

I Improve Your Performance I Enhance Your Marketing
I Beat the Competition by Attending Score's Small Business Institute

Program Begins Tuesday, October 2nd!

6- 8 p.m. Building 3, Room 202

College of Central Florida

3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
SCORE in partnership with CF is pleased to offer the Small Business Institute again.
Sessions are $25 each or $100 for the entire program. Individuals who complete the program
will receive a certificate plus a coupon for $100 for future advertising in the Citrus
County Chronicle.





Tuesdays- 2 One Hr. Sessions 6pm 8pm

Tuesday, October 2nd 6-7pm Increasing Profits *7-8pm Measuring Results
Tuesday, October 9th 6-7pm Solving Problems for More Money 7-8pm Projecting Profit Improvements
Tuesday, October 16th 6-7pm Research for Profits 7-8pm Sales Through Marketing & Market Media
Tuesday, October 23rd 6-7pm Continuous Improvement For Greater Profits 7-8pm Profit Planning & Summary

FREE Open Round Table Discussions with Facilitator
Every Thursday of October 6pm 8pm For Attendees


To Register or for more information contact
Dale Maim of SCORE at 352-249-1236.

www.scorecitrus.org
Click on Small Business Institue link




SCORE@l College of Central Florida CH ONICE
Counselors to America's Small Business CFItraining.cf.edu w .hron .onne.co


RELIGION







Page C7 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Bake sale helps
fire victim
Friends and neighbors of
Ben Berauer, who lost his
Chassahowitzka home in a
fire Sept. 8, will stage a bene-
fit bake sale for him from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today,
Saturday, Sept. 15.
The sale will be at the
Chassahowitzka Community
Center on Riviera Drive, the
old firehouse. All proceeds
will go to Berauer.
For more information, call
Cindy at 352 634-2447.
Visit park for
Literacy Day
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
will offer free park admission
for Literacy Day today, Sept.
15, when visitors donate a
new or used family-friendly
book.
Volunteers from the Citrus
County Library System will
be available to assist visitors
in signing up for a library card
and to share information on
resources available through
the Citrus County libraries.
For more information, call
Susan Strawbridge at 352-
628-5445, ext. 1002.
Need stuff?
Come to Freebees
There will be a Freebees
Giveaway event from 1 to 3
p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16, at
Homosassa Civic Center,
behind the fire station.
Everything is offered to the
public for free. Items include
clothing and shoes, house-
wares and more.
For more information, call
Theresa Waldron at 352-
746-5984, or email freedom
wayl@gmail.com.
American-Italians
to meet Sept. 19
Citrus American Italian
Club of Inverness' Sept. 19
dinner and meeting will begin
at 4 p.m, with the meeting at
5:30 pm.
On Saturday, Sept. 22,
there will be an indoor/out-
door flea market from 7 a.m.
to 2 p.m.; vendors welcome.
An inside table is $10 and
outside space is $7. Call
Martha at 352-476-8727, or
Dolores at 352-746-5019 to
reserve space. Profits will go
for Thanksgiving turkeys for
needy families. Food will be
available. Setup will be Fri-
day, Sept. 21, from noon
to 4 p.m.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Misti May


I- .
Special to the Chronicle
Misti May is looking for her
forever home. This gentle-
natured brown and black
tabby kitten is loving, play-
ful and fully socialized. If,
however, you are looking
for a more mature feline,
we are running a special -
all adult cat adoption fees
are half price at $27.50.
Visitors are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, at the Humani-
tarians' Manchester House
on the corner of State
Road 44 and Conant Av-
enue, east of Crystal River.
Please drop by and enjoy
our felines in their cage-
free, homestyle environ-
ment. Call 352-613-1629
for adoptions, or view most
of the Hardin Haven's fe-
lines online at www.
petfinder.com/shelters/fll
86html.


Good in taxing times?


AARP recruiting volunteers to help with free Tax-Aide service


Special to the Chronicle

AARP Tax-Aide is a national service
of the AARP Foundation, offered in
conjunction with the U.S. Internal
Revenue Service. It is a volunteer-run
program whose mission is to provide
high-quality free assistance in the
preparation and electronic filing of
federal income tax returns for low-
and middle-income taxpayers.
Volunteers are trained locally and
are certified by the IRS to assist tax-
payers in preparing their federal in-
come tax forms.
All tax returns are complete using


IRS/AARP-provided computers and
software. Last year in Citrus County,
more than 100 volunteers provided
this free help to more than 6,000 resi-
dents.
Are you good with numbers? Tax
volunteers help taxpayers by prepar-
ing and filing federal tax returns. For-
mal tax preparation experience is not
required. Training is provided.
Are you tech Savvy? Technical vol-
unteers manage computer equipment,
ensure taxpayer data security, manage
small networks and provide technical
assistance to other volunteers.
Are you a people person? Greeters


welcome taxpayers at a site and make
sure they have all the necessary pa-
perwork before meeting with a tax vol-
unteer They also manage the flow of
taxpayers being served.
To volunteer, visit the website at
AARPorg/taxaide, click on "Volun-
teer," then click on "Volunteer with
AARP Foundation Tax-Aide for 2013,"
register and enter the required con-
tact information.
Alternatively, email John Clarke,
district coordinator for Citrus County,
at johnwc741taxaide@gmail.com. In-
sure that you provide contact infor-
mation in the email.


Special to the Chronicle

You don't have to travel to Tampa or
Orlando to get a ServSafe Food Pro-
tection Manager's Certification. The
University of Florida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension Service is providing
training to help food managers and
staff keep food served to Florida's
consumers safer
This is a comprehensive training
that provides the most up-to-date in-
formation and current regulations.
The ServSafe Manager's exam is given
at the end of the training, which pro-
vides a national certification that is
good for five years. Certification is re-
quired in Florida for food managers of
all establishments licensed by the De-
partment of Business and Profes-


I -


sional Regulation, the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services
and selected licenses of the Depart-
ment of Health.
The next class will be on Wednes-
day, Oct. 17. It will begin promptly at
8:30 a.m. and run approximately seven
hours. Participants will then have a
maximum of three hours to take the
national certification exam. There is
no "test-only" option. Participants
should bring valid picture identifica-
tion with them, and a sack lunch.
Training is at the Citrus County Ex-
tension office at 3650 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 1, Lecanto (from State
Road 44, go south on County Road 491,
turn west on Saunders Way, go one
block, turn left onto Sovereign Path.
The Extension building is the first


building on the right).
The brochure and registration form
can be downloaded from
http://fycs.ifas.ufl.edu/foodsafety/. You
can also register with a credit card by
calling the toll-free hotline at 1-888-
232-8723. Pre-registration is required.
You must register at least three busi-
ness days before the training date.
Cost for the course and exam is
$110. The purchase of the ServSafe
Manual for $55 is highly recom-
mended and is available in English or
Spanish. It is suggested that partici-
pants study the ServSafe Manager,
sixth-edition textbook prior to attend-
ing the class. For more information,
call Monica Payne at the University of
Florida/IFAS Citrus County Extension
office in Lecanto at 352-527-5713.


Memory Lane
Airplanes that taxi down the runway then flip over, Ferris Wheels
that circle to carnival music and green frogs that hop for joy:
These are but a sampling of the new Tin Man Tin Toys just
received and placed in the Floral City Heritage Hall Museum
"Country" Store. Tin toys are reminiscent of the early 1900s and
these have been carefully reproduced in vibrant designs and
colors, ready for the visitor to collect or purchase as a gift. The
Floral City Heritage Hall Museum and Museum "Country" Store
are in the Town Center at 8394 E. Orange Ave./County Road 48
and is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday. To make
special arrangements for other times, call Director Frank Peters
at 352-860-0101, the-fchc@hotmail. Visit the website at
www.floralcityhc.org.
Special to the Chronicle


News NOTES

Civic group plans
fundraiser sale
In July 2012, Charles
Kostal, 33, a lifetime resident
of Citrus County, was airlifted
to Shands Hospital in
Gainesville and found to
have a rare infection called
septic pulmonary emboli.
Doctors removed two ab-
scesses from his spinal cord,
leaving him paralyzed.
Kostal is a stay-at-home
father for his 2-year-old son
and his wife is a full-time hair
stylist. They have no insur-
ance and need assistance in
providing full-time care and
handicap facilities.
The Ozello Civic Associa-
tion will have an inside
garage sale from 7 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, Sept 29, at
the Ozello Civic Center on
the Ozello Trail. They need
donated items of all kinds. All
proceeds will go to the Kostal
family.
Drop-off locations are Pre-
ferred Automobile Services,
636 S.E. Fort Island Trail (be-
hind Granny's on U.S. 19)
and Island Outpost on the
Ozello Trail.
For more information, call
Cecelia at 870-504-1262, or
Joan at 352-795-2622.
New Englanders
to meet Sept. 21
The New Englanders will
meet at 2 p.m. Friday, Sept.
21, at the Olive Tree Restau-
rant in Crystal River.
Speakers will be Lisa
Reed and Lee Jacobson,
therapists from TLC Therapy
in Hernando. Come see what
they have to say and also
meet old friends. For more in-
formation, call Ginny at 352-
527-0649.
FFRA to hear
medical speaker
FFRA (Family and Friends
Reaching for the Abilities) will
meet Friday, Sept. 21.
Lisa Noble from the Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center will talk about wound
care, hyperbaric medicine, di-
abetes and treating wounds.
FFRA meets the third Fri-
day monthly at the Key Train-
ing Center, 130 Heights Ave.,
Inverness. Social time and a
business meeting begin at 9
a.m., followed by the speaker
at 10 a.m. The public is
invited.
For more information on
this meeting or FFRA in gen-
eral, call Ron Phillips, presi-
dent, at 352-382-7819 or visit
www.ffracitrus.org.
CHS Chorus to
stage Disney show
The Citrus High School
Chorus will present "Once
Upon a Disney" onstage with
two shows at 2 p.m. and 7
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, in
the CHS cafeteria. Doors will
open 30 minutes prior to
each show.
The concert will feature
songs from some of Disney's
greatest films and theater.
Advance tickets are $2 for
students and $5 for adults.
Tickets at the door will be $7
for everyone. Pre-school and
younger children are free.
For tickets, call John Edel
at 352-726-2241, or email
edelj@citrus.kl2.fl.us. Con-
cessions will be available.
The chorus will also have
a car wash fundraiser from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 15, at the Inverness
Primary School bus ramp.
Donations will be
accepted.
Save tops, tabs
to help school
The Shriners' effort of col-
lecting box tops and can tabs
for Hernando Elementary
School is ongoing through
the end of the school year.
Box tops and tabs col-
lected help the school get
money for school equipment.
For information about the
drive and what to collect,


call Anna Mosley at 352-
341-5553.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Pins and promotions


Special to the Chronicle
At a recent pinning ceremony attended by colleagues, family and friends at the Emergency Operations Center in Lecanto,
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy, assisted by Fire Chief Larry Morabito, promoted three Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue personnel in recogni-
tion of their professionalism, integrity and stringent work ethic. From left are: Sheriff Dawsy, Battalion Chief Keith Long,
Capt. Robert Bessler, Lt. Ryan Maloney and Chief Morabito.


Friendship Quilters Guild
Georgie Inman shows a quilt she made, during a recent
meeting of the Citrus Friendship Quilters Guild. The guild,
which meets the first and third Thursdays monthly, will
gather again at 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, in the Lakes
Region Library on Druid Road in Inverness. Meetings may
include business sessions, workshops and show and tell.
Any member who has made quilts for a member of their
family, or different organizations the guild supports, is
welcome to share their talents. Anyone interested in quilting
or wanting to know more about the guild is welcome. For
more information, call Nancey Cagel at 352-422-5967 or
Nanci Osborn at 352-726-7805.

Special to the Chronicle


Extension offers food safety training






C8 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


Bridge


SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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S"John Sandford's NCIS Tony goes under NCIS "SWAK" NCIS "Mind Games" (In NCIS Tony and Ziva **** "Raiders of the
USA 47 32 47 17 18 Certain Prey" (2011) cover.'PG' Biohazard isolation.'PG' Stereo)'PG' c become trapped.'PG' LostArk"'PG'
My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My-Wedding- David My-Wedding- David My Fair Wedding With My-Wedding- David
WE 117 69 11 David Tutera David Tutera Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled David Tutera Tutera: Unveiled
(WGN 1Al 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: CI FunnyHome Videos FunnyHome Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine Monk'PG'


West
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South
4K2
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09-15-12


East
A Q 10 9 7
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SQ J9
A J 10 9 8 4

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East


2 -
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Pass 3 NT


Pass
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: + 4

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

A few years ago, an English newspaper printed
an article titled "The A to Z of American Football."
Since the first entry was Blitz, maybe the headline
should have been amended slightly
In bridge, the play runs from A to M. It is partic-
ularly important to pay attention to A.
In today's deal, how should South try to make
three no-trump after West leads a fourth-highest
diamond four?
In the auction, South might have rebid three
clubs or three no-trump. It is a matter of personal
preference.
South sort of starts with five top tricks: two
hearts, one diamond and two clubs. The opening
lead provides at least one more diamond trick, and
if West has led from the king-10, declarer can take
three diamond tricks. However, he must somehow
establish and run the clubs. How can he do that?
South will have to overtake dummy's king with
his ace and continue with the jack to drive out the
queen. You've no doubt seen that play before. But
what is South's re-entry card?
East might have the spade ace, but there is a
guaranteed entry in diamonds ... unless declarer
makes the mistake of running the first trick
around to his hand.
With this layout South must win with dummy's
diamond ace, overtake the club king with his ace,
and play clubs from the top until the queen ap-
pears. Suppose then that East shifts to the heart
queen. Declarer wins on the board and plays a di-
amond. He must end with two hearts, two dia-


monds and five clubs.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MIRPC

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Righls Reserved
HRCOD



SKENNU |



YURNLU
7~^7~ ^ ^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
C oh. .. 10 'u

1%
-,

.."






THE CONcRT ON
MOUNT RUSHMORE
FEATURES THs.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer
here: L Is I I I L
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PANDA HELIX TURNIP BEWARE
I Answer: The plane's arrival time was this -
UP IN THE AIR


ACROSS
1 Rainy
4 Two-timer
7 Multitude
11 Vocalist
Sumac
12 Brand for
Bowser
13 Orange road
marker
14 Not a picky
eater
16 Towel holders
17 Ohio city
18 Haulers
19 Pay with
plastic
20 Curtain call
21 Strong string
24 Colorful
annual
27 Seize
28 Hamilton-Burr
clash
30 Sunny side?
32 Ash or maple
34 Boarding
school
36 Draw on


37 Hobby knife Answer to Previous Puzzle
39 Actor
Welles
41 Where M OB L ID T A N
Ipanema is ERR A TOIP ER L E
42 Driver's peg L E I T E ET A 0 S
43 Kind of eagle
45 Downright D0 GTIED HI NT
48 Scholarly A N A AA GATE
language
49 Thought A[MFMI TAIA LON
52 Staff member I L T EL E V E N
53 DeMille genre PLUH ASH AM P
54 Cathedral
town AURIC SLURR
55 Black hole, P A N D A E SA
once
56 Spigot VANEJ UN KMIA L
57 "Science Guy" 0 T IS AR EA GA
I I T H a TF G O0


DOWN TOE
1 Cheyenne's -LL
st. 6 Fawn parent
2 Jane Austen 7 Too thin
title 8 Diving bird
3 Cistern 9 Terminates
4 Biological 10 "Scream"
double director
5 Loan abbr. Craven


LYE DON
12 Declared
frankly
15 Wrinkle
remover
18 Max Sydow
20 Liver
secretion
21 High
explosive
22 Silver suffix
23 Wild goat
24 Goose egg
25 Promises
to pay
26 What is more
29 As much as
(2 wds.)
31 Mammoth
Cave loc.
33 Sooner
35 Lyrical
38 England's FBI
40 Solar plexus
42 Dumas' "The
Black -"
43 Cheese in a
trap
44 "Hawkeye"
Pierce
46 50-50
47 Count on
48 Faux -
49 Put money on
50 Clean-air org.
51 Batik need


Dear Annie: When can we
stop giving our children
money? When is enough
enough?
My daughter and her
husband are in their
mid-30s. They bought a
house they could not
afford. On top of that,
they are in the middle
of filing for bank-
ruptcy, as they have
been overspending for
years. My daughter
works two jobs that
provide neither a con-
sistent paycheck nor ANN
benefits. Her hus- MA
band's job is more sta- M
ble, but his salary is
low.
At one point, we gave her one
of our used cars, which she was
able to keep running for a couple
of years. When that car died, I
took money out of my retirement
fund to buy her a used car My
son-in-law's mother just bought
them a new oven.
My question is: When does all
this stop? I worked for 30 years
and never once asked my mother
for money I'm tired of doing and
doing for them. At what point can
a parent stop taking on the prob-
lems of their children? Re-
senting Parent
Dear Parent: Whenever you
are willing to let them sink or
swim on their own.
When an adult child is having
temporary financial difficulties,
it is a kindness for a parent to
offer to help, provided the parent
can afford it and the child uses
the assistance to get out from
under But if a parent is con-
stantly bailing out an irresponsi-


ble spendthrift, the handouts
must stop before parents become
impoverished and resentful in a
misguided attempt to
"save" their children.
And these children
never learn to stand
on their own two feet.
Consider whether you
are helping or simply
prolonging your
daughter's financial
dependence, and act
accordingly.
Dear Annie: I read
the letter from
IE'S "Wigged Out," who has
BOX a condition that makes
her hair fall out. Peo-
ple constantly ask
about her "perfect" hair, and
some attempt to pull at her wig.
I have thin hair and wear a
weave method called a cap, done
by a local hairdresser It's a
process of braiding or molding
one's hair and putting a stocking
cap or mesh on the hair (this al-
lows the hair to breathe). Then
the woven hair is sewn or glued
on top. It allows you to wear your
hair however you want long,
medium or short and is not no-
ticeably different from regular
hair Hope this helps. E
Dear F.: Readers offered many
suggestions. Here are more:
From Boston: I, too, take med-
ication that contributes to hair
loss. My husband encouraged me
to order some beautiful synthetic
wigs, which I have worn for years.
At one event, a woman said she
wished her hair could always
look as nice as mine. I replied, "It
can," and lifted off my wig. It
turned the party upside down,
and everyone had a ball trying on


my wig and getting info. A wig is
no different from a hat, scarf or
barrette. It is an accessory to en-
hance the beauty of the head.
Wisconsin: She should con-
sider hair extensions or a hair-
piece that is bonded to her scalp
and stays on for weeks at a time.
Either of these would be more
natural looking and cooler than a
wig. I have been wearing light-
weight bonded hairpieces for 10
years. I can swim, play golf, exer-
cise, sleep and anything else
without removing my hair No
one can tell, and I am never
"wigged out."
Florida: Some people can't
stand it if they don't know ab-
solutely everything about you. I
wear hearing aids, but I was sen-
sitive about them, even though
my hair did a nice job of covering
them up. One "friend" took it
upon herself to reach up and pull
my hair back so she could see for
herself whether I had hearing
aids. I resisted the urge to slap
her, but have avoided her ever
since. I do not consider a person
a friend if she does such a thing.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at wwwcreators.com.


North
SJ 8 6 5 3
VAK72
SA65
* K


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9-15


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


/vLL MmiLssoL\
IIIWEN YOU'RE
GO 0E,RAMPWA.





S a ll -i -_-,- i-.. _

SaF_-1t__
Sally Forth -


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


~LT I HOPE yOU
ME6 BEFORE




7 "=. --"
AOF TWO


I WORE


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury Flashback


5O WHAT JUST RE-
POIPO VIEW THEM
WITH THE FOR ERRORS
PROOFr? OR TYPOS...









Big Nate

WANT To
HEAR MY ACADErMIC
GOALS FOR. GOALS,
THE YEAR) YOU








Arlo and Janis -


'THEp BE AWESOME PUNTERS ON A
FOOTSA LL TEAM, KIR6IT,PAP e"
Betty


www famllycircus corn
"Mommy, shouldn't they require
horses to come with
seat belts?"


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required. In 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required. 4:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Finding Nemo" (G) In 3D. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required. 4:45 p.m., 10:10


"Resident Evil 5" (R) ID required. In 3D. 1:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Finding Nemo" (G) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Premium Rush" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy Green" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'SCLUE: 0 slnb N


"ZHL DX LEJ NAJJM GP ZBB XODJMOJX,


OGWWAMDOZLDMR FMGSBJKRJ LG ZBB


LEJ RJMJHZLDGMX GP LEJ SGHBK."


BJGMZHKG KZ YDMOD

Previous Solution: "The secret of my success is that I bit off more than I could chew
and chewed as fast as I could." Paul Hogan
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-15


Peanuts


Pickles


I SUPPOSE YOU WANT TO FLIP A
COIN AGAIN TO SEE WHO TRIMS
- .THE HEDGE THIS TIME!

AOLUT. -,'
:NOT



I !, = '1


WHY DON'T WE USE A MORE
SCIENTIFIC METHOD OF
DECIDING?




-i


SOME OF THEM ARE
ACADEMIC, AND
SOME AREN'T!
OKAY, GO
A HEAD
"q o-=


Today MOVIES


COMICS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 C9











Religious leaders: We can't cover cuts to food stamps


The News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE -As Congress
returned from its summer recess
this week, Florida religious lead-
ers and anti-poverty activists are
trying to build opposition to bil-
lions of dollars in cuts to food as-
sistance contained in pending
federal farm legislation.
Both chambers of Congress
would cut the Supplemental Nu-
trition Assistance Program, or
SNAP formerly known as food
stamps. The Senate would cut
SNAP by $4.5 billion over the next
10 years, while the House Agricul-
ture Committee passed $16 billion
worth of cuts in late July
The Congressional Budget Of-
fice estimates that nearly 2 million
people nationally would lose their
food assistance under the House
farm bill.
Florida could see significant ef-
fects. It had the nation's second-
highest increase in SNAP use
from June 2011 to June 2012, a rise
of 9.7 percent. In June 2012, al-
most 3.5 million Floridians were
participating in the program, or
18.2 percent of state residents.
Leaders of Florida Christian
and Jewish congregations Thurs-
day rejected the idea held by


many policymakers: that the faith-
based community and not govern-
ment should care for the poor
"Our elected leaders need to
understand the resources for han-
dling the needs of the vulnerable
and the poor are not within the
church itself," the Rev. Russell
Meyer, executive director of the
Florida Council of Churches, told
reporters on a conference call.
"And to ask the church itself to do
that would be to put a tax on peo-
ple of faith that would not be
shared by the rest of society"
But Florida Congressman
Thomas J. Rooney, chairman of
the House Agriculture Subcom-
mittee on Livestock, Dairy and
Poultry, supports the House bill
partly on the grounds that it would
reduce fraud and waste in SNAP
According to his spokesman,
Michael Mahaffey, Rooney said
the $16 billion in cuts "amount to a
savings of about two percent, at a
time when spending on SNAP has
more than doubled over the last
three and a half years."
Rooney's office also said reform
will ensure that SNAP benefits
"are there for those who need
them. It closes loopholes...The
House bill also achieves signifi-
cant savings by cracking down on


Chroi





Classifieds


..


waste, fraud and abuse."
Meyer and others, however, said
U.S. church food pantries and
soup kitchens had seen a 100 per-
cent increase in demand over the
past three years. They estimated
that it would cost U.S. Christian
and Jewish congregations $50,000
apiece for 10 years to make up the
cuts being considered by Congress.
They also said congregations
have suffered during the reces-
sion as well. They cited a June
2012 study by the Barna Group,
which found that Americans re-
duced their donations to religious
institutions by 34 percent between
November 2008 and April 2012. As
of April, 11 percent had stopped
giving to churches and synagogues
altogether.
"As lawmakers consider these
cuts, we urge them to consider the
moral dimensions of the decision
how it will impact lives," said
Michael McCarron, executive di-
rector of Florida Catholic Confer-
ence. "There is a role for
churches. But that does not elimi-
nate the role of government in
providing for the needs of its vul-
nerable citizens."
Others say the role of the public
sector is exactly what must be
reconsidered.


"Government should be more
the facilitator," said state Rep.
Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, a former
director of the Christian Coalition
of Florida. "We are in a dangerous
place if we expect government to
just provide everything for
everybody"
"Sometimes the responsible
parent has to say, 'No."'
During the economic downturn,
the number of people receiving
SNAP benefits grew to 46.7 mil-
lion by June 2012. That has
alarmed many fiscal conserva-
tives. During last month's Repub-
lican National Convention, former
presidential candidate and talk-
show host Mike Huckabee said on
"Fox & Friends" that government
programs such as food stamps do
serve a purpose, but that expand-
ing them runs the risk of making
people dependent.
"We don't want to make ever a
situation where there is not a
need for some of those programs,"
said Huckabee, also a former
Arkansas governor "But when you
start expanding government pro-
grams that enslave people rather
than empower them to come off
those programs with the job and
dignity of work, then that's the op-
posite effect of what those pro-


grams were intended to do. They
were supposed to be a ladder out
of a hole. Not a top on the hole to
keep you there."
A big concern of those who sup-
port the cuts is that eligibility cri-
teria have loosened. Since 2002,
states have had more options to
enroll people with higher incomes
than before, or more assets such
as a house or a car
Supporters of the House farm
bill say its cuts would ensure that
people with assets start by spend-
ing what they have before taking
SNAP benefits. They want to rein-
state the basic federal guidelines
for food stamps, limiting support
to families with incomes under
130 percent of poverty and with
less than $2,000 in assets.
But Ellen Teller of the Food Re-
search and Action Center said that
for every dollar spent on food as-
sistance, $1.74 is generated in eco-
nomic impact by the tens of
millions of Americans who
receive it.
"They take those EBT cards and
those smart cards to their local
grocery store, and they swipe
those cards," she said. "And those
resources get funneled into local
communities throughout the
country"


To place an ad, call 563-5966


"--~


*'***u* ..
o^* ^ Hkh 1B*
WOW,


Classifieds

In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I a ( 25 5 5 T lr : 8 82 4 1 a:, a -. I -w w r ie i c


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
WkAAA ir


Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

Above Ground Pool
2006 15 x 20 oval. 2010
pool pump. Will take
down. $300. Call to see.
(352)341-0210
BOXER PUPPIES
AKC, 5 brindle females
Available 10/1/12
all shots $450 ea
(352) 344-5418 or
228-1969
Citrus Springs
Sat 8-1. No early birds.
7257 N Ireland Dr
CRAFTSMAN: 10" band
saw, 17" weed eater,
Plate biscuit Joiner 518
HP. ToolCraft Table
Saw 2 HP w/10" car-
bide blade. 1/2" Drill
Press 5 speed 113 HP.
$50 ea. Firm 621-3330
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near Kings
Bay $429,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat & Sun 8a-?
Household Goods,
Children's items
Dunkenfield Ave
Dinning Room Set
Bamboo table w/ 4
chairs. Earth tone padded
seats, glass top. $175
(352) 795-6870
DYT Craftsman 4000
Riding Mower 24 HP
48" Deck $700
(352) 746-7357


ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 16 weeks Old
male. BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$800 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 212
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, $46,500.
Cash (352) 586-9498
Gun Club looking for
5-10 acres for lease.
352-302-0648
HOMOSASSA
SMW
Bedrm. w/ roman bath &
jacuzzi, Non smoker, sin-
gle, use of pool. Full kit.
priv. (352) 503-7027
Call for offsite appt.
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, WID Hk.-up,
water & garbage incl.
No pets, $550mo.
(352) 220-4818
INVERNESS
SATURDAY, Lots of Misc.
2 Gun Cabinets
1208 Cypress Cove Ct.
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2, Pristine Cond.,
Prestigious Fox Hollow
Adult community no
smoking, $750 mo.
(352) 794-3093
Open House
Sat & Sun 10a-3p
Enchanting 2 story cot-
tage on "The Meadows"
121 E Glassboro Ct.
3BR/2BA/2+. New HVAC
& water heater,
renovated Kit w/ new
appl, Cabinets & counter-
tops. HW floors, fireplace
$189,900 352-697-3206


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

2 6

7 83

4 7 3

56

8 2 9 6

28


9 3

86 2

5 7 _1
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

All of our "
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Installations by Brian cBc 2z5ss3 win ds. '

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*Siding Soffit *Fascia Skirting Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms Decks Windows Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Sat. & Sun. 8am-2pm
1226 N. Munich Terr.
Must See to Believe
Warehouse full of
Garage Sale Items
$800 obo Takes All
High Profit Potential
352-220-3377
Riding Mower
Sears riding mower with a
Kohler engine. Excellent
Condition $600
(352) 527-2223
Sectional Sofa
Slate Blue with recliner,
sleeper and chaise.
Good Condition $250
(352) 746-1447
SHORKIES 3 females
Addorable & Non
shedding 8 wks on
9/23/12 $400.
Health Cert. Ist shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803




Advertising
Sales
Assistant
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is now accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales depart-
ment, manage work
flow, create insertion
orders, filing.
knowledge of
Excel & Word.
Ability to work well in
a deadline driven
environment.
Excellent Customer
Service Skills.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service
skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume
to HR at:
352-564-2935


1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers/Dryers/ WIH
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, TV ant 270-4087



Choc. Brown German
Wire hair pointer.
Female Name "Lilly"
spayed, microchipped
& Trained. Very good
dog. to good home.
(352) 344-4318
Free 26" TV
(352) 527-4999


Blackmouth Cur
Female, 2 /2 yrs old
spayed. Needs lots of
attention. After 4 pm
(352) 746-1019
Free Firewood
Lg. Oak Tree on ground
cut into sections
(352) 220-6060
horse manure mixed with
pine shavings. Great for
gardens. U load and haul
352-628-9624
Lonely Dog Free to good
home. Male 4 yrs old.
Part Doberman, part Bird
Dog. Very Friendly.
Needs companionship.
Updated on all shots.
(352) 726-2349
MOBILE HOME
1978 14X60 SW
2BR/2BA 352-621-0437
9AM-6PM



Female Catahoula lost in


LOSt -erret, Ilgnt Drown
w/pale face, goes by
"Merlin", reward offered,
lost in the vicinity of Daw-
son and Croft (Hilltop
Area)
(352) 533-2298
Lost
Mini dachshund,
long-haired, blk, Male.
Missing since 9/12 Cor-
bett & Costello in
Homosassa. REWARD
(352) 628-0206
Lost Pure White Cat on
9/12. Last seen on Michi-
gan and Azalea in Inglis.
12 yrs old, 1 blue eye, 1
green. (352) 447-0055
Please help us find our
"BUDDY". A male black
lab, 12 years old, with a
large growth on his ear.
He went missing Sunday
9/9 near Oldfield St.
during the rain storm.
Please call 352-503-6346
or 352-212-8555 with any
information.


missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825

To Whoever
purchased my storage
unit #220 at Kings Bay
Mini Storage on 8/7/12.
Please call Shawn
(352) 212-8594




Sr in need of dependable
older small or Midsize car
or pk-up. Text yrlmakel
mi & Price to 220-3682.
No dealers.


23 5691487|



5 6 99 8 2 3 1 7 4
7123 1 594236


1 563 9 2 615 2 8
569823174
872415936
143976528
6812497 53
9571386 42
324567 8 9 1


CUSTOMER
SERVICE ASST.
P/T front desk asst for
Vet Office. Will need to
be flexible with hours.
MUST be people fo-
cused, have basic office
skills, great with comput-
ers and knowledgeable
with all forms of social
media and devices. Apply
t- annli tnt11300f


Persnal


Sugarmill Woods, 7 Oaks .. .... 4com,
Golf Course on 9/12. 8 yahoo.com
yrs old Brindle brown & it/ H
Black. White star on
chest. Red collar and DOUBLE CEMETARY #1 Employment source is
microchiped. Very FOUND CRYPT Located in Veter-
Friendly. (352) 382-1714 MALE, UNDER 1 YR ans Wall in Fountains *I I B *A AAAAAAA
Lost Female OLD. Part Boxer, part Memorial Gardens. 2 Tell that special
Peacock. Last seen Pit. Found with collar and openings/closings incld.
between HWY 41 and walking lease on. Brindle Bargain price of $4000.00 Happeirthda"
HWY200. in color. Very for whole pkg. Call Maria with classified ad
(352) 897-4845 Friendly.(352) 527-4247 at 352-212-7533 wwwchronicleonlne mder Ha
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
NEED EXTRA CASH?I Dept for details
352-563-5966


Great Opportunity For


V Individuals


V Couples


V Friends


* Must be 18 years of age
* Must have valid driver's license and insurance
* Able to work or share 7 days a week, early
morning hours


For more information email:
homedelivery@chronicleonline.com
or come to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River to apply.
Both home delivery and
single copy routes available!
CITRUS COUNTY


C Hroleonline.com
Ib V.k www.chronicleonline.com


ARNP WANTED
Friendly Pediatric
office in Crystal River.
20 hours per week.
Send resume to:
medofficehrdept
@tampabay.rr.com

Dental Assistant
& Receptionist
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com

LPN
At NEW HORIZONS
VILLAGE
a premier residential
care facility for
developmentally
disabled adults, our
team is dedicated to
consistently provide
quality care to our
residents. We are
currently seeking a
Full-Time LPN.
Duties include:
*Med Pass, First Aid,
Charting.
*Training residents in
self-med and health-
care skills.
New Horizons Village
offers:
Competitive wages,
excellent benefits,
& a tobacco-free
campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at
1275 N. Rainbow Lp,
Lecanto, FL 34461 or
FAX Resume to:
(352) 746-6379.


--F


oda s
NTe w fds


Domesti -I


lit -


I a


C10 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN. LPN. CNA
All Shifts, FT &PT

RN SUPERVISOR

RECEPTIONIST
Part time

ACTIVITIES COOR.
Full Time

CNA DRIVER

Health Care
Experience Preferred.

MARKETING
DIRECTOR. F/T
ALS Exp Preferred

APPLY WITHIN
HEATRCMTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Cir
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility





INSURANCE REP

With a 440/220 LIC.
Sales/ Customer
Service Position. Prior
Independent agency
skills preferred. Mail
Resume to: Box # 1797P
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429





Breakfast Cook

Exp. Only Apply,
Now Taking Applica-
tions A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone Calls Apply
1:30-2:30 Mon-Sat.

CHEFICOOK
Experience only
Apply in person
CARMELA'S Dunnellon

DISHWASHER &
SERVER, Part time

Apply iv n Person 9a-5p
INVERNESS CLUB APTS
518 ELLA AVE DFWP






C HipcLE

Accepting
applications for

Advertising
Sales Rep

Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Working a
Sales Territory within
Citrus County.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers

QUALIFICATIONS
* Two years sales exp.
preferred.
s Computer
proficiency
- Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
" Strong presentation
skills preferred.
" Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.

Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com

EOE, drug screen
required for final
applicant.


AUTOMOTIVE
SALES

CITRUS KIA is hiring 2
Sales Professionals to
join our growing staff
Be a part of the
HOTTEST new car
brand in the country
professional training,
competitive pay and
bonuses provided to
the right people. If
you have the skills to
give our customers
the best car buying
experience of their
lives, WE NEED YOU!
Apply in Person
1850 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River


Outside Sales
Associate

Fountains Memorial
Pa rk
No Experience re-
quired, but a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-4867


RETAIL SALES

Nights/ weekends
75 CHROME SHOP
Wildwood
(352) 748-0330






A/C INSTALLER

Experienced Only
Drug test, Valid
Drivers Lic. For Appt.
Call: ALPHA AC
(352) 726-2202

DRIVER

OTR LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724












ROOFING
Experenced commercial
single ply roofers wheat
welding and detailing
skills. Travel required.
Good pay, per diem &
lots of hrs. Immediate
openings available.
DFWP/EOE
352-795-5599 Or
352-489-4274









PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
REPRESENTIVE

Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
Avail. weekdays
& weekends?

Join the Citrus County
Chronicle's
Circulation team!

Send Resume &
Cover Letter to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or Apply In Person

CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

EOE, drug screening
for final applicant


PROSHOP HELP

Needed, 30 Hrs. wk
Apply in Person
INVERNESS GOLF AND
COUNTRY CLUB
3150 S. Country Club
Dr. (352) 726-2583


CHicaLE


SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




TELEMARKETERS
Experienced

Must be Lazy, greedy
and willing to make
over $600 a wk.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean





CARE GIVER
Dependable for 115 Ib
woman. 5p-8p, 6 days
week. Send Resume
whgn@tampabay.rr.com










Massage Therapy
Weekend Class
OCT. 20 2U12T
SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-5
HAVE A NEW CAREER
IN 37 WEEKS
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com





DUTCH MAKEUP
VANITY solid wood with
seat $100 352-212-6483

OLD FOLDING SCHOOL
DESK w/ornate sides.
$65 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)





COFFEE SET. English
bone china Ridgeway
Potteries set for four
Royal Adderley. Beautiful.
Perfect condition. $45.
527-6709

Flat Ware
91 piece bronze and
rosewood. Bought 1984,
Never Used $200 OBO
(352) 344-5168
GLENN MILLER ALBUM.
An Album of 3 Glenn
Miller LP's in a beautiful
Presentation case. $35
527-6709

A


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






5 Person Hot Tub
New pump & heater,
Excel. condition
$1,000 cash or credit
(352) 228-7666


POOL HEAT PUMP
AQUA CAL T115
6 yrs old. Works Great
$500 (352) 637-0397




BREAD MACHINE
FOSTER DELUXE -
BRAND NEW Only
$15.00 352-621-0175
DRYER$100 Works
great. 90 day warranty.
Delivery extra. Free dis-
posal of old one. Call/Text
352-364-6504
DRYER, APARTMENT
SIZE,WHITE, works
good,works on
110 current. $65.00
352-513-4473
ELECTRIC STOVE
cream,2 big burners, 2
small burners. Works
Great! $100 obo
352-212-6483
FREE APPLIANCE RE-
MOVAL SERVICE Free
Pickup Of Unwanted Ap-
pliances 352 209 5853
GE ELECTRIC DRYER
GE Electric Dryer.
Excellent Condition.
Works Great. $100.00
352 860-0212
GE Stove, 2 years old
Excel. cond.
Glass top & stainless
As $425.
Cost $900 new
(352) 249-7212
KENMORE WASHER
WHITE, works good,
looks good.$100.00
352-513-4473
MAYTAG
Washer and Gas Dryer
$200
full size bed $150
724-953-1915
MICROWAVE works
good kitchen size
$15.00. 352-513-4473
NEW DOOR SWITCH
$30 Works in most
Kenmore/whirlpool/Roper
and Hotpoint washers.
Call/text364-6504
PRESSURE COOKER
Wolfgang Puck 4 in 1
electric NEW $60.00
352-621-0175
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, almond,
side-by-side w/ filtered ice
& water on door. $300
352-270-2232
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER & DRYER
Both work great (white)
large capacity $100.00
352-287-5279
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day warranty.
Delivery extra. Free dis-
posal of old one Call/text
352-364-6504




COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered
Adjustable $45 each
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered
Adjustable $45 each
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Gray
Tweed Fabric $15 each
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $85
727-463-4411
PREOWNED FILE CABI-
NET 2 Drawer Lateral
Commercial Metal Graph-
ite Color 30"x28"x18 $45
727-463-4411
SMALL COMPUTER
DESK Formica Top
36"x24" with 2 Drawer
File Cabinet Attached
$25 727-463-4411




A PICKER'S
PARADISE...
Onsite Estate Auction
Sat-9/15/12
Sale @10AM/
Register @9AM
4570 SW Floral Ct -
Dunnellon
American
Auction-Auctioneer,
David Seuis
AU3759/AB2830
(352)291-2623
www.american
auctions, us


CLASSIFIED




AC POWER HEDGE
TRIMMER, 13 INCH, $15
352-726-9983
CRAFTSMAN: 10" band
saw, 17" weed eater,
Plate biscuit Joiner 5/8
HP. ToolCraft Table
Saw 2 HP w/ 10" car-
bide blade. 1/2" Drill
Press 5 speed 1/3 HP.
$50 ea. Firm 621-3330
TABLE SAW Shop Craft
10",1.75 HP, Amer.
made, separate stand,
$50. call 352/628-0698
WELDING TABLE Heavy
Duty STEEL, 4X8 $100
(firm) 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)




48" HD Compatable TV,
excellent condition
$150
(352) 726-7952
AC MOBILE POWER
CONVERTER FOR
AUTO, 12VDC TO
120VAC, 140W $25
352-726-9983
SONY TELEVISION 36"
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $75
352-613-0529




79 Solid Maple Cabinet
Doors & Drawer fronts
stained red mahogany
great for garage or
workshop project $450.
obo. All/will separate
(352) 726-5832
CHANDELIER
Beautiful 16-light,
like-new condition, great
saving, only $100. Call
Dave at 352/628-0698.
CONCRETE STONES
210 used white con-
crete 16" X 2" X 5 1/2"
Edgers Bordeadoes
Stones.
Each Stone $1.74 plus
Tax New.. Asking $0.80
Per Stone. Call
(352) 382-5414
Homosassa
ENTRANCE DOOR
15 raised panel
w/hardware, solid wood,
great saving at only $100.
Call Dave 352/628-0698.
EPOXY TWO-PART
GARAGE COATING.
New, in orig.containers,
only $50. Call Dave at
352/628-0698.
WERNER 20FT
ALUMINIUM
EXTENSION LADDER
200 LBS DUTY RATED,
$75 352-726-9983




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Pavillion 525 C
desktop Computer
w/ LCD monitor & key-
board + all cables, Win.
XP Work great
$90. (352) 465-4037
WILSON ELECTRONICS
301135 DUAL BAND
PANEL CELL PHONE
ANTENNA W/COAX $35
352-726-9983




PATIO TABLE
glass table top on bam-
boo, 4 bamboo chairs
cloth seats $100
352-212-6483




2 DOOR COMMERCIAL
METAL STORAGE CABI-
NET 50"x36"x18"
4 Shelves, Door Lock &
Key $75 727-463-4411
36" ROUND TABLES (2)
Rugged Formica Top
Sturdy Steel Pedestal
$35 each 727-463-4411
Adjustable Bed
Craftmatic Full Size w/
massage & side rail.
Used 10 mo. Exc Cond.
Ong $3000, sell $1500
OBO. Black Spinet
Piano Exc Cond. $450
OBO (352) 422-3707
Armoire solid wood
w/ TV console and
5 drawers $30.
2 TV Stands
$20 ea. obo
(701) 648-8098 Cell
Beautiful Traditional
Sofa. Light golden
neutral, w/floral touches.
ExcellentCondition, Must
See! Sugarmill Woods
$199 OBO
(352) 503-3914


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 CI


Breakfront Cabinet,
has 4 openings to it.
All light wood, glass on
ea. side, doors below.
Made in Crystal River
20 yrs. ago. Must see to
appreciate it. $1,800
new, Now $1,000 obo
(352) 726-0944
CLEAN TWIN
MATTRESS AND BOX
Very clean, non-smoker
$75.00 352-257-5722
COFFEE TABLES two
end tables, glass insert
coffee and sofa table.
$200 obo Call
352-344-3112
COMPUTER DESK
Grey metal frame with
glass top. Good
condition. $90
352-270-2232
COUCH w/ neutral
pattern cover and large
white & green futon
$200 each OBO
352-422-8070
COUNTER HEIGHT
CHAIRS (4) Contempo-
rary metal with leather Ex
Cond 352-249-7212
All for 50.00
Dining Table with one
Leaf, Four Chairs, &
Buffet. Small Drop Leaf
Table with 2 Stools
All for $275.
Phone(352) 563-5955
Dinning Room Set
Bamboo table w/ 4
chairs. Earth tone padded
seats, glass top. $175
(352) 795-6870
Futon
$125.
(352) 527-0347
Futon white & black
W/Ithrow pillows. $60
(352) 621-3330
Gold Microfiber Sofa
80 inches long
Like New $130. +
Ottoman on casters
matches two toss pillow
$35. (352) 726-8912
GOLD VELOUR SOFA
(3 PILLOW) $35. Good
352-465-4441
(Dunnellon)
High End Used Furniture
SECOND TIME AROUND
RESALES 270-8803
2165 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Large Curved Desk
$150.
352-513-4759
Cell 352-201-7475
LOUNGE RECLINER
blue tweed clean, good
condition,standard size.
$40.00 352-513-4473
Lt Oak Tone Table 42"
sq. w/18" leaf, 4 micro-
fibr ulpol light oak
swivel arm chairs $600.
57" Oak Bar w/ built in
cab. & drawer for bev-
erages & glasses $350.
(352) 726-7952
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
METAL STORAGE CAB-
INET WITH LOCK AND
KEY 4 Roll Out Shelves
60"x36"x18" PreOwned
$65 727-463-4411
Panasonic TV
36" w/ surround sound
and stand. Stand has
storage. Exc Condition.
$80 352-382-4444
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Pretty Red Recliner
Cost $400 New I year
ago. Seldom used
$200.
(352) 503-6149
Sectional Sofa
Slate Blue with recliner,
sleeper and chaise. Good
Condition $250
(352) 746-1447
Single size white
Platform Bed
with storage, almost
new mattress $150
(352) 344-1441
SMALL TABLE 4 chairs
both sides on table fold
down wood and green
metal $75 352-212-6483
Sofa & 2 Matching
Chairs, mocha print
2 years old
Asking $875
(352) 637-2281
Solid wood round
table
w/ self storing leaf
and 6 chairs $130
(352) 419-4286
SQUARE TABLE 36"
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
$45 727-463-4411
Stickley Sofa
Pristine Condition
$850.
Mahogany Desk
$150.
(352) 270-8249


"Cruise control."




King'sL and s Tree Service
i-earing -1-"ILC
Cd a Free Estimates -

Tree Brush Stump
. RemoTaI

L' I Stump Grinding
... KfTree Trimming

Hauling Light Demolition
SFamily Owned & Operated


Find I On
WWW.kllmstmemserv!lcm.com Facelook


TANDTARTNAT-
ERS for TV, micro, etc.
27W, 18D,30H. Open
shelf, cabinet both under-
neath. $20 341 3607
Whitewashed Entertain-
ment Center Holds 22"
TV has shelves and glass
doors. $40 352-382-4444
WOOD GRAIN FOLDING
BANQUET TABLE 6 ft
Long pre owned $35
727-4634411




21" Self Prop. Snapper
Lawn Mower
Excel. cond. $200
McLane Commercial
Grade, Gas Edger, trim-
mer excel, cond. $200
(352) 726-7952
21" Self Propelled
Toro Mower,
hardly used,
paid $400
First $200
(352) 513-4257
DYT Craftsman 4000
Riding Mower 24 HP
48" Deck $700
(352) 746-7357
LAWN MOWER
Briggs & Straton
Like New
$750.
(352) 628-3329
MANUAL TELESCOP-
ING TREE PRUNER
WITH SAW CUTTER,
7FT-14FT REACH, LIKE
NEW $45 352-726-9983
Riding Mower
Sears riding mower with a
Kohler engine. Excellent
Condition $600
(352) 527-2223




BIG SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat., 8am to 2pm
Dinning Rm. Table &
chairs, collectible
glass, Hummels,
antiques, jewelry tools
& More! behind Olive
Tree Rest. US 19,
storage units 80 & 81

CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri., Sat., & Sun.9a-3p
Furn., Dryer, Din. Set.
and Other Hshold items
6977 N. Neal Terrace
Citrus Springs
Sat 8-1. No early birds.
7257 N Ireland Dr
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat & Sun 8a-?
Household Goods,
Children's items
Dunkenfield Ave
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat-Sun 7-1 Estate sale
3656 N. Brookshire Pt.


4 Private Storage Units
SATURDAY SALE In
Industrial Park Accross
from Howards Flea Mkt,
Weather Permiting


MO v I G
SALE

HOMOSAS-

SA
Fn & Sat 8am
Furn, daybed, King
Mattress, end tables
lamps, dinette w/6
chairs, dolphin fountain,
lawn mower. Lots more
5510 W. Nobis Cir
off Rock Crusher
HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat, 8a-4p
All proceeds go to
feed the hungry.
Helping Hands Ministry
3210 S. Regal Lilly Way
HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
Moving Sale, telescope
area rugs, crafts,
hshold & MORE!
Everything Must Go!
4516 S. Slash Pine Ave.
HOMOSASSA
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8a-4p
MULTI-FAMILY SALE*
5469 W. Demsey Lane
HOMOSASSA
Saturday & Sunday -
9am to 4pm.
Moving Sale Furniture,
Treadmill, Plants, Lawn
equipment, Misc. Call
anytime to see or open.
25 Mangrove Court
South 352-382-2294
INVERNESS
SATURDAY, Lots of Misc.
2 Gun Cabinets
1208 Cypress Cove Ct.
INVERNESS SHEDS
3399 E. Gulf to Lake hw
Fri. & Sat. 10Oa-2p
Hsehold Items, Benefit
Inverness Lions Eyesight
Project 726-0046
LECANTO
Sat. & Sun. 8am-2pm
1226 N. Munich Terr.
PINE RIDGE
Fn and Sat 8a-5p
MOVING SALE
Everything must go!
4570 N. Elcam Blvd
SUGARMILL WOODS
ESTATE SALE *
SATURDAY 15th, 9a-4p
Furn. Household & Tools
3 PEPPER COURT
off Lonepine
Sugarmill Woods
*ESTATE SALE*
Fri. ,& Sat., 9-2, Furn.,
Crafts, Jewelry, Xmas,
Hshld., clothes More!
30 Mayflower Ct. S.


WANTED
New & Used Items
in garage,
rods, reels, tackle,
tools,collectibles,
hunting equip.
352-613-2944




Sugarmill Woods
Fri & Sat 9a-3p
Moving sale, All Furniture
Must Go.
6 Statice Ct. Oak Village




Cocktail Dress-Marina
Lace/Beaded
Size 12 Online 4 Dillards
$60. (352) 220-3344




(2) NOS PIRELLI TIRES
P195X15 $80/SET
352-8754760
(Dunnellon)
1 GOODYEAR TIRE
P225R/16 80%TREAD
ONLY $35 464-0316
4 Person Hot Tub
very good cond.
w/ cover $400. Dining
table w/ 5 chairs &
2 bar stools, wood
w/white ceramic $175.
701-648-8098 cell
2ND SET OF 2 PIRELLI
TIRES NOS P195X15
$80/set 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)
A/C & HEATPUMP
CONDENSERS 2 ton
charged with R-22
freon, copper coil, 5
year war. Will install.
$1500 and up.
Thomas A/C
#CAC056691
352-726-3996 or
727-420-1645
ANIMAL CLIPPER
BLADES Oster A-5
Good Cond (2) #4 -
$12.00ea (1) # 30
-$12.00 352-270-3909
ANIMAL CLIPPER
BLADES FOSTER Like
New A-5: # 7F-$15.00 ; #
3F-$16.00 # 40-$12.00
352-270-3909
COLORED NOOK
Barnes and Noble, touch
screen excellent cond.
works perfect $100
422-2719
Dining Rm Set & China
Cabinet, Table w/ leaf
6 chairs, late 70's real
wood, good cond.$150
Electrolux Dryer
Paid over $1,000
Will Sacrifice $450
(352) 726-9151


~1s


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179






LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451






Professional Custom
Woodworking
Interior/Exterior
CrawfordWoodwork.com
352-464-4100






SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518






THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

ON SITE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licilns 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




Clean Waxed Floors
Free Estimate 344-2132


#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Remodels, Repairs,
We Do It All! Landscape
& Tractor Work. Lic./Ins
Steve/Rob, 476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
P/FAST 100% Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
V* RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557






The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584





All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320

JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790





Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE. Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE. Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


9-15


ugngStock InternatonalIn Ds by UnversalUCck trUs201


Picture Perfect Photos
of Family, Pets &
Casual Weddings






BARB MALZ 212-2439









C12 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012


BRAND NEW! Black
Twin metal bed frame,
$40 422-2719
Fridge 18.2 Kenmore
2yr. old mint cond., $300
Hunting Dog Hauler
alum. 48x48x24 dbl door
$250
(352) 419-6669
Gas Grill
Char-Broil, infrared, 2
burner, 2 yrs old, good
cond. $299/new asking
$80 w/ cover 527-9449
GATORS COOLER
WITH LARGE WHEELS
AND HANDLE, BLUE &
ORANGE, ONLY $30
464-0316
GIRL'S MONGOOSE
BMX BIKE- "Y not"
Model,20" by 1.95" tires &
wheels, like new, $40.
352-628-0033
HOOVER VACUUM
CLEANER $30 SELF
PROPELLED WORKS
FINE 352-419-5981
INVERNESS
MENS CLOTHING
LARGE PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
Must See to Believe
Warehouse full of
Garage Sale Items
$800 obo Takes All
High Profit Potential
352-220-3377
ONEIDA TULIP GAR-
DEN DISHES $40 EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
33 PIECES-CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
RED LINE REMINGTON
TIRES NOS (2) G70x14
$80/pr 352-875-4760
Dunnellon


Sick and want health?
Call 888-223-1922 for
toll-free message 24/7
that explains the
physics component
of health.
STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $40 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
INVERNESS
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW-ALL CONNEC-
TIONS AND BOOKLET
352-419-5981
TRAIN TABLE
Imaginarium Child's
Train Table. $40
352-270-2232
UGLY STICK FISHING
RODS- many to choose
from, $10 to $15. all ex.
352-628-0033
W/WALL REMINGTON
TIRES H70X14 NOS
$80/pr 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)
WHEELBARROW
SMALL 2.2 CUBIC FEET
ONLY $25 464-0316
Women's 26" Bike
5 speed $35
Bookcase $15.
(352) 527-6813




4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75 464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
ALUMINUM WITH
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
CLEAN & STERILIZED
$30 464-0316


Blue Power Lift Chair
$175.
Electric Adjustable Bed,
needs new Mattress
$400
352-527-0783
Folding Walker by
Invocare $25
352-382-4444
Harmar Mobility
Model AL500
$900. obo
(352) 228-9058
Ladies Bicycle
Schwinn
Never Used
$100.
352-341-1714
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOT RESTS
GOOD SHAPE. ONLY
$100 464-0316
Motorized
Wheelchair/Scooter Lift
Transport for rear of car
$250. firm
Call Rita 5-8pm
(352) 795-9756
Shower Commode
Chair with casters
$45
Light transport
wheel chair $150
352-527-0783
Small Medline
Wheelchair. Excellent
Shape Large back
wheels. $80
352-382-4444
Walker- folding to 5"
brand new, light
weight alum. cost $76.
asking $30., 527-0004
Walker Invacare,
3 wheel, brakes,
basket, $65.
Wheel Chair, invacare,
like new $100. both
excel cond. 341-1714
Walker-Dolomite
Folding, with folding
seat, 4 wheels, w/
brakes on front wheels,
$45. (352) 344-5283




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




"NEW" ACOUSTIC GUI-
TAR PACKAGE $85
W/GIGBAGTUNER,STRAP,ST
RINGS&MORE!
$85 352-601-6625
"NEW"BASS W/P&J
STYLE PICKUPS, VERY
HIGH QUALITY @1/3
STORE PRICE $85
352-601-6625
"NEW"LAGUNA L50
ELECTRIC GUITAR
MATT BLACK
2HUMBUCKERS $65
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
COMBO AMP LIGHT &
LOUD! SOUNDS
GREAT W/ KEYBOARD
TOO! $75 352-601-6625
AMPEG BASS COMBO
AMP SMALL BUT
POWERFUL,GOOD FOR
KEYBOARD TOO $65
352-601-6625
DANELECTRO
DANOBLASTER ELEC-
TRIC GUITAR"MINT"
BLUEFLAKE "RETRO"
$100 352-601-6625
Electric KEYBOARD
CASIO, multiple tones
plus bass cords comes
with case and stand.
$15.00 513-4473
Forming Light Jazz
Band. All instruments
needed. Call Jay
(352) 794-3741


FOUR CLARINETS.
Different manufacturers,
all for only $100. Call
Dave at 352/628-0698.
MITCHELL MD300S
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/STEALTH PREAMP
AND PICKUP $100
352-601-6625
MUSIC STAND Chrome
in color, collapsible, fold
up. $15.00 352-513-4473
PEAVEY BASIC 40
BASS COMBO AMP
U.S.A. MADE VERY
POWERFUL&CLEAN
$100 352-601-6625
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
tuffed leather like seat,
storage underneath,
sturdy wood. $35.00
352-513-4473




KING COMFORTER
reversible navy or red.
Excellent condition. Used
only few times.High loft.
$20 341 3607
KING COMFORTER
reversible navy/red. Ex-
cellent condition. Used
only few times. High loft.
$25. 341 3607
TWIN BEDDING 2 red
box-pleated (not ruffled)
bedskirts & 2 matching
red pillow shams. All for
$12. 341 3607
TWIN BEDDING 2 red
box-pleated (not ruffled)
bedskirts & 2 matching
red pillow shams. All for
$10 341-3607
TWIN BEDDING whales
& dolphins. Comforter,
bedskirt, shams, sheet
set, wallpaper border.
$40 341 3607
TWIN BEDDING whales
& dolphins. Comforter,
bedskirt, shams, sheet
set, wallpaper border.
$35 341 3607




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE WITH
HANDRAILS USA MADE
ONLY $100 464-0316
ELLIPTICAL
Horizon RE 7.6 $650
new, asking $250
TANNING BED
American Wolff $200
(352) 513-4399
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH, LIKE
NEW, $50 352-726-9983
EXERCISE BIKE D P
FAN TYPE UPRIGHT
TYPE. ALSO WORKS
THE ARMS. ONLY $85
464-0316
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE STAMINA
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO. ONLY $100
464-0316
TANNING BED
Price Is Right
No Room
$225.
(352) 503-7411




8 FT POOL TABLE 8 ft.
oak with slate top pool
table with accessories.
$700 352-382-9601
Homosassa

Above Ground Pool
2006 15x 20 oval. 2010
pool pump. Will take
down. $300. Call to see.
(352) 341-0210
ADAMS LADIES SPEED-
LINE FAST 12 DRIVER
Excellent Condition, 10
Loft $130.00. Call
249-7345


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745
CONCEALED
WEAPONS COURSE
At the Inverness
VFW Post 4337.
Sat. Sept. 15,2012,
10am $55.
The most entertaining &
informative instruction
ever! Call 352-220-4386
For info & reservations
FREE GUN with
Training. Learn more
at TrainToCarrv.com
GOLF DRIVER 2011
Nike Machspeed Str8-Fit
11.5* A/L shaft with
Wrench & HC exc. $75.
Dunnellon 465-8495
Gravity Esprit,
58 CM, 21 speed,
Mens Hybrid bicycle,
computer, etc.
excel cond. $185.
(352) 344-5933
Gun Club looking for
5-10 acres for lease.
352-302-0648
HI-POINT CARBINES
NEW IN BOX HI-POINT 9
MM CARBINES, $285.00
& HI-POINT 45 AUTO
CARBINE, $318.00,
NEW GLOCK 22 GEN 4
40 S&W $490.00 PHONE
352447-5595
Reebok Inversion
System, asking
$125
Call for Details
(352) 344-1413
SOLD
Izhmash Saiga,
7.62 + ammo $675.
Muzzle Loader Rifle,
50 Cal. $250.
TREADMILL
PRO-Form 415
4 yrs, like new $200 obo
(352) 489-4921
WATER SKIS New with
carrying case, tow-line
and life vest. Big saving,
only $75. Call Dave at
352/628-0698.

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Winchester 300 MAG
Mauser Action,
Red field Scope $550
Ruger Single 6 Revolver
22LR & 22mag, $400
352-220-2204




4 x 6 Covered
Utility Trailer
5 yrs. old, like new
Paid $,1,500
Sell $1,000 obo
(423) 584-2665 Cell
UTILITY TRAILER
10ftX5ft
4 Ft loading ramp
single axle $800
(352) 207-5946
UTILITY TRAILER
4X8 trailer with brand
new wooden sides.
Comes with spare tire.
$450
(352) 464-2180
UTILITY TRAILER
5' x 8' triple crown lawn
trailer. Mesh sides, rear
gate, good condition, new
spare $675 obo
(352) 860-1106




2 CAR SEAT FOR
INFANT $20 EA, 2
BOUNCE FOR baby $10
ea,2 seat chair for eat
$10 352-777-1256


Colle. ream irrC.m ,.oas' lo .OSt rave a large Flor.da fan
ruase. 6.5 million Floridians c.rn,.aier rr.emseives Fhridaa
criege rooi.i rans. Over 9.5 million Floridians
cr.r.aer r.ernelves Hirida ne*ap3Der readers.

FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... GET THE FACTS
AND GET IN THE GAME.


For more information on how to reach IIU t XIK T 1C
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
aa abcou2010


CLASSIFIED



SMALL SWING MUSI-
CAL $20 ,BOUNCE DE-
LUXE musical $15 stroller
$20 352-777-1256
STROLLER NEW $35
AND PLAYPEN $35 high
chair $20 352-777-1256




Large Amethyst Ring
8+ Karat, Cost $4,000
Will sell for
$1,500 obo
(352) 344-5168


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.
352-613-2944




AKC GREAT DANE
PUPPIES AKC Great
Danes Puppies! Born
Aug 1st Call
352-502-3607
BENGAL CUB CATS
10 weeks old, TICA
registered, FI Health
Cert, shots up to date.
1 Spotted Snow Sepia,
1 Horizontal Flowing
Marble. $200 each
352-601-5362
BLUE CRESTED
AMAZON
Breeding pair of 6 yr old
parrots. Talkative, cute
and very tame. They
have been together
since birth. 3 Cages: 1
large indoor, 1 med out-
door and 1 travel
Illness forces sale
Total $3000
212-2814 or746-8631
BOXER PUPPIES
AKC, 5 brindle females
Available 10/1/12
all shots $450 ea
(352) 344-5418 or
228-1969
Dachshunds Mini. Long
Hair, 10 wks, BIk. &
Cream, Choc. &
Cream Males &
Females, Health Certs,
Champ. bloodline,
perfect markings $200
& up (352) 795-6870


SIMON

"Simon is a 1-year-old
neutered male
Border Collie/Bulldog
mix. He is Heartworm
negative and house-
broken. Very friendly
and loving,
energetic and very
playful, also beautiful.
Would be great with
kids. Would also like
to be your lapdog,
even though he
weighs about 48
pounds. Walks well
on a leash and gets
along with other
dogs. Found as a
stray. Call Joanne at
352-795-1288."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STANDS, ALL SIZES, NEW
352-344-2927,447-1244
FOX TERRIER
puppy very small
4 1/2 mo female.
$250 OBO
(352) 795-7513
GERMAN SHEPHERD
Lrg. bone PUPS, white,
black, blk/tan, $450.
BOXER PUPS $450
Health Certs, can be
registered, 216-1481
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
SHORKIES 3 females
Addorable & Non
shedding 8 wks on
9/23/12 $400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803
Toy Poodle & Chihua-
hua 6 yr old males, neut.
shots, house trained,
sleep in crates, must stay
together $200 OBO
(352) 503-7270




Bunny's for sale. Lion
Head & New Zealand
$10 each. Great for 4-H
(352) 897-4845


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR.1BA.$495mo &
1BR.1BA.$475mo
Frdg,Stv,Watr-Trsh,Lrg
yard,Pets 352-587-2555
DUNNELLON
Hwy. 488, 2/1, Priv Lot
new A/C ,$475. + dep.
(352) 795-6970
HERNANDO
2/1, Small DW $450 mo
$450. dep. No pets
(352) 628-3912
HERNANDO
2/112, Furnished, Lrg.
Fm & Laun. Rm, Carport,
50+Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550 mo & 2/2 $525
352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn or Non Furn.
9075 S. Breen Terr
(352) 382-7396
HOMOSASSA
2/1/1/2, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
2/112, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
HOMOSASSA
Unfurn. 2/2, DIb Car-
port, No pets. $650. Mo.
F./L/S. 352-613-4884
352-503-2405




BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
'/2 acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

HOMOSASSA
26X60; 2BR/2BA,
Screened rm, utility rm,
Dbl pane win, 3+ acres,
2 fenced in, roof over, 2
carports, 30X84 Pole
Barn, well &septic
(352) 628-0812


Oasis Mobile Home 55+
Park, Inverness. 14x60
Fully Furnished 2BR/2BA.
Near Bike Path. Roof
over, carport, screen
room, shed and remod-
elled kitchen & baths.
Parking for trailer or
boat. Excellent Shape.
$10,000. Lot rent
$205. Call
815 986 4510
or cell
779-221-4781

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183


WORDY GIJRD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Fool a mass of individuals (1) Every answer is a rhyming
S pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Enemies suddenly stopped moving (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
|definition tells you how many
3. Sci-fi writer Jules' rotations (1) syllables in each word.

I 2012UFS, Dist byUniv UclickiorUFS
4. Lawman Earp's low-calorie regimens (2)


5. Giants QB Eli giving a bad review (2)


6. "Muppets" star Jason's bald birds (2)


7. Dick Clark show heels-over-head feat (2)


(IKVISNVHI (INVJISWNV 'L SH19V S'It9ES '9 ONINNVd 9NINNVINW
Sl3Ia( SJIJIVAA SNaIfl SHNH3A s 3ZOH s830H dflO adflaI 'I
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FULLY INSURED
LiablIty & Workers' 0Conm
CBC1252474

WILL CONSTRUCTION B |

352-628-2291
www.PreventDryerFiresNow.com 15Years '


YES!
New 312 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come &View
352-621-9182




INVERNESS
3/2, DW CHA, 3 sheds,
Dock Boat Access.
Section 8 Welcome.
813-244-0627




FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/double roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice, Quiet, $46,500.
Cash (352) 586-9498
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217






CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926

IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 2/2, 1988 Skylark
model, furnished, shed,
screened lanai & xtra-Ing,
covered carport on a Irg
lot. Lots of kitchen cabi-
nets with island stove top,
double oven, fridge,
washer, dryer. Lots of
storage. 352-344-1632
or 937-545-3413
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090





ACTION

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALLY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.itrus(ounlyHomeRentals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
59 S Tyle (H).....................550
2/1 nce sze rooms, cozy EL room
7942 N Obe Terr ((S).............950
3/2/2 newer home 2000 sq ft
2440 W Nautilus Dr (CS). ............ $750
3/2/1 cute home, corner lot
CRYSTAL RIVER
2561 N Seneca P ............. S1200
2/2/1 carporrtwterfront
DW moble, furnshe.d
11640 W Beraysore Dr ................S1300
2/2 Island condogreatwatervew furshed
548 N Gulf Ae......................$750
3/1/1 fenced yard, close to elementary
HOMOSASSA
4140 Skylark Ter .................... 00
2/2 cute home, fenced back yard av l Oct 1st
1843e1845...............REDUCED $685
INVERNESS/HERNANDO/LECANTO
1274 Cypress Cove Ct Oy)..... .S625
2/2 5 townhome, communty pool
6315 N Shewod D(Heri)....... 700
2/1 cute home, FL room, rce yard
1933 Shanelle Pa (L)............$1300
3/2/2ncl full memb poo, tennis, gym

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 waterfront DW, $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 House $600 mo.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/BR $450. ,2/BR $550.
3BR $750 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, Stove, refng. Wash
/Dryer, util. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice, clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719









HERNANDO
Over 2,200 sf, multi-rm
office or Home & office
on Hwy 200, for More
Info Call (352) 344-3444
Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$56,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




HERNANDO
1,000 sf Office Space
486, Cit Hills 341-3300




CITRUS HILLS
2/2%, Carport, FURN.
(352) 613-5655




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like new 2/2 All Appl.
Wa/Dr, Tile.$625 Call
954-557-6211
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
water & garbage incl.
No pets, $550mo.
(352) 2204818
INVERNESS
2/1/CP $550 mo. $250
sec. 707 Emory Street
(352) 895-0744 Cell




HERNANDO
1/1 Furnished, Clean
$100/wk. $400 sec $500
Moves In.352-206-4913

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
cottages 1/1, All until.
incl. 386-208-2495




FLORAL CITY
Waterfront 2/1, Carport,
Ig. scrn. por shed,
office/ craft rm. $500
mo. 352-344-1941













Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team help
you with your short or
long term rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Many Extras $450
(352) 382-3525
Citrus Springs
8354 Legacy 3/2/2 $850
(352) 464-2701


DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on %Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River &
Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
3/2/Loft BR, Den $650.
$500 sec. No pets
(352) 519-6051
INVERNESS
3/1, $575. mo, 1st, last
Sec. 352-476-1023

INVERNESS
312/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
201-9427

INVERNESS
3/2/2, $725. mo.
(352) 302-7349
INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873
INVERNESS
Brick Home 2/1/1 w/ tile
&wood fs. Encl. lanai,
W/D $650 mo. 1st, last
$400 dep. 352-586-8928
INVERNESS
Nice 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$700. (304) 444-9944
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2, Pristine Cond.,
Prestigious Fox Hollow
Adult community no
smoking, $750 mo.
(352) 794-3093




CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio, furn. on Hunter's
Springs, sun deck, W/D
rm. All until. incl.+ boat
dock. $700/mo. avail
10/1/12 352-372-0507
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




HOMOSASSA
Rent or Sale 2 BR,
Non smoker, $575 Avai
19/15/12, 352-364-3601




HOMOSASSA
SMW
Bedrm. w/ roman bath &
jacuzzi, Non smoker, sin-
gle, use of pool. Full kit.
priv. (352) 503-7027
Call for offsite appt.




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Rent Houses
Unfurnished







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ETT I SA [ OrLC Ill IN NaLUre
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
rate gated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial






Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660



HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srprings $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884



6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,
AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
897-4164.
$159,900
2/1/CP ALL NEW:
Kitchen, bath, appli-
ances, paint in/out,
carpet. 1180 sq ft liv,
$36,900.
(352) 527-1239
2/2/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884





HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
2BR/1BA/1. Cute brick
fenced home. Newer
roof & CHA, scrn porch.
$49,500 Cash or ap-
proved conventional loan
only. Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940
REDUCED!
2/1/1, Block Home
with den, Fireplace,
tile floors, shed w/elec.
near Bealls $44,900.
(352) 344-4192



Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




I a~=w1 I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169

E-I


CITRUS COUNTY
Gospel Island Location
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529


Rea Ete


CADILLAC
Black 2011 4dr CTS
1,100 mi. Free satilite
radio 6/13, smoke free,
garage kept. $37,000
(352) 249-7976


CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548


Hme


1992, good condition,
25k mi, radio, garaged.
$1800
(352) 746-7378
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles. Asking
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
MOTOR SCOOTER
2007, 250CC,
very low miles,
$1,000. obo
(352) 220-8454
VW TRIKE
VW Trike New Runs
Great Great Price
$6000.00 352-344-9340
Phone


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 CJ13


06261 W OAKLAWN
HOMOSASSA, FL
2.5 ACRES VACANT
$35,000/BEST OFFER
WILLING TO TRADE.
CALL TODAY!
786-298-7825
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745



2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $25,500.
(727) 439-9106
V2 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact
fee credit, high and
dry, trees, $11,500 obo
(352) 795-3710



Wooded lot,
little more than
1/ acre, low to
moderate flood
zone, in established
residential deed
restricted community,
centrally located in
Citrus County, con-
venient to shopping.
Celina Hills
1st Addition of Citrus
Hills, Block B Lot 5,
2801 E. Marcia St.,
Inverness, FL.
PLEASE CONTACT
MARY C.
SCHLUMBERGER
AT CELL 352-212-7962
OR EMAIL
mary@schlumberger
accounting.comrn



8 HP, 2 Stroke Yamaha
Outboard Engine,
Excellent Condition
$1050.
Call (352) 344-9479



BAYLINER
23ft., Randevu Deck
boat, tan axel trlr.
w/new tires. No mtr,
incls outdrive $2,000
obo 727-455-8075
Gheenoe
1999 Gheenoe 15'4"
and 1999 Trailer
$750 (352) 302-0778
GULF to LAKE MARINE
WE PAY CASH $$*
For Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
KEY LARGO
2001, 18 1/2 ft
90 HP Mercury
$6900
(352) 795-0363
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537
SWEETWATER
Pontoon 20ft. 50HP
evinrude,galvanized
trailer, $3000
(352) 613-2333



JAMBOREE
'05, 30 ft class C Motor
Home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
Sleeps 6 +,
Asking $29,750.
No slides. 352-746-9002
MAC'S M ANILE BY
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
TITANIUM
2008, 5th Wheel
28 E33, 3 slides, New ti-
res, excel, cond. Asking
$34,995, (352) 563-9835
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *.
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
*k Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892


'06 Seabring cony.
Touring Coup, loaded,
21K, gar. kept. Like new
$9,200 (352) 513-4257
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
GMC
1988 Suburban
3/4 Ton 4 x 4
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058
HONDA
NEW 2012, ACCORD LX
ONLY $18287
CALL 352-628-4600
FOR DETAILS
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, not dealer
owned. $17,900
(352) 302-0778
SATURN
1995 SC2 runs great
118,000 miles needs
paint & A/C recharge
$1,200. 352-637-0566
SCION TC
2005, Alloy Wheels, Auto,
AC, Power winds, locks,
mirrors, cruise cont. New
brakes & tires. Exc Cond.
$7900. (352) 527-2792



CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




FORD
1954 F-100 for sale
Call for information
(352) 489-4761
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440



JEEP
2003 Grand Cherokee
Limited Ed. Black, Sun
Roof. Exc Cond in/out.
Great A/C $7500 obo
746-8631 or 212-2814



FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907
PONTIAC
2003 Montana dark blue
extended length 7 pas-
senger van. Front and
rear a/c, CD player, DVD
player. 106,500 miles.
Some body damage.
$4100.00. 352 897 4362


Yamaha
'05, Raptor, 50CC,
4 Wheeler,
less than 20 hrs. $950
4 Goodyear Tires, 7000
miles, Rims & Hubcaps
off Corolla P185/65R15
All $100. (352) 726-9151



Harley Davidson
1978 Shovel Head, new
fenders, new tank '02
Springer front end, belt
drive, $7,500 613-2333
Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000 Custom built 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2008 Ultra Classic,
14Kmi., $17,000.
(352) 341-1143
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley looks, Chrome,
Leather bags, $5000.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
HONDA
2007 Shadow Aero ABS
(VT750ABS)Less than
600 original miles
$4,800. 724-953-1915
HONDA Goldwing
1990 SE New Tires
Excellect Shape Approx
70K mi. Selling due to
health. Asking $4250
(352) 476-3688
Honda Helix


2012 TOYOTA


k



COROLLA

Auto Trans, PW, PL, CD


rT121310


MSRP $17,800
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 2,805



SI, OD1EM;


or LEASE for $159


2012 TOYOTA






CAMRY

Auto, PW, PL, Cruise, CD


MSRP
CLEARANCE SAVINGS


T121117


$22,895
4,400


or LEASE for s189



2012 TOYOTA






PRIUS

Auto, Cruise, Push Button Start, Bluetooth, CD


MSR


MSRP
CLEARANCE SAVINGS





^2O1


S" T121453


$24,840
3,845


or LEASE for $219






VILLAGE TOYOTA

www.villagetooota.com CRYSTAL RIVER

SToyotaCare 352.628.5100


*All leases with $2,399 Cash Cap Reduction, 36 Mos, 12k Per Year, All Offers While Supplies Last.


AT VILLAGE TOYOTA


nationwide


Clearance

event


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1-800-584-87551 -id. 3112


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1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448


14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613


2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL 34453


*PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WAC ^LEASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 39,000 MILES FOR
THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC +0%/ AVAILABLE ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS FOR A LIMITED TIME WAC. PICTURES ARE FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK
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.. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . ...


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL




SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2012 C17


BMW in Ocala


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choose from two exceptional offers through BMW Financial Services on
a Certified Pre-Owned BMW. You can walk away with a three-payment
credit of up to $1500* or you can enjoy 0.9% APR financing** on the
Certified Pre-Owned BMW you've always wanted. With offers like these,
your dream car could easily become your reality car. Remember, even
before these great offers every Certified Pre-Owned BMW is first...a
BMW. Designed to give you peace of mind. Meticulously inspected
by a BMW technician. Backed by a protection plan for up to
6 years/100,000 miles and the reassurance of Roadside Assistance.
What more could you ask for? Besides the keys, of course.
New or Certified Pre-Owned, we only make one thing.
The Ultimate Driving Machine*.

BMW EfficientDynamics
Less emissions. More driving pleasure.


Certified Pre-Owned
by BMW


I 2009 BMW
128i Coupe
STK#M803226A

$23,991


2010 BMW
3281 Sedan
STK#WP074556A
$27,992

2011 BMW
328i Sedan
STK#MP1442
s28,994


I 2010 BMW
528i Sedan
i STK#MA14920A
I $32,891


S- 2009 BMW
3281 Convertible
STK#MP1441
$32,994


2012 BMW
Z4
STK#M353621A
$44,991


*BMW will make up to $1500 of the first 3 payments on Certified Pre-Owned BMWs purchased 9/4/12
through 10/31/12. **0.9% APR financing is for a limited term with approved credit for well-qualified buyers.
Must finance through BMW Financial Services. All Certified Pre-Owned BMWs advertised exclude tax,
tag, title, registration and dealer fee. Photos used for display purposes only, may not be actual vehicle. All
vehicles are subject to prior sale. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 9/16/12.


BMW
ofOcala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352-861-0234
BMWinOcala.com
000CK6A


LEASE FOR

$129 O%APR
1 9 FINANCING FOR
SPERMOJ 60 MONTHS*

lw R da--cinned 9019 VnlLcwanr n


All lease offers exclude sales tax and include tag, title, registration and dealer fees. All leases are 39 months with
$4775 due at signing including $0 security deposit with approved credit for well-qualified buyers. All leases are
10,000 miles per year, 200 per mile thereafter. *0% APR financing for 60 months is $16.67 per month per $1000
borrowed with $0 down. *0% APR financing for 72 months is $13.89 per month per $1000 borrowed with $0 down.
All offers are subject to credit approval. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 9/16/12.


Volkswagen

of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352-861-0234
VWofOcala.com


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CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET


2013 CHEVROLET
MALIBU


*Rear Backup
Camera
*8 Airbags


2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX



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YOU PAY PER MO
$21,999 $289
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


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$15,999
dOT A LEASE. ^


BRAND NEW MALIBU STARTING AT PER MO
$17,999* $229
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT


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YOU PAY PER MO
*21,999 $275
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


2012 CHEVROLET CAMARO


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YOU PAY PER MO
$21,999" 289
IOT A LEASE. YOU OWN IT!


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CrystalAutos.com


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-905


CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET
i e 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515


*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $2,999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY, $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. EXCLUDES
TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 3.65% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES
MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


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*37 MPG
* Eco Boost
*E Assist


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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