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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02886
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 09-12-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02886

Full Text



Citrus County's 10 most admired women/ Inside


I ED ES A


Partly cloudy with
isolated showers.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S COUNTY







Swww.chronicleonline.com


I& I ~~.IAILI&


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 118 ISSUE 36


Frustration mounts over well


School
funding suit
will go to trial
TALLAHASSEE
The fate of
Florida's public
schools could soon
be decided at a
landmark trial.
After three years
of legal wrangling,
the Florida
Supreme Court on
Tuesday refused to
block a lawsuit that
accuses the state of
shortchanging
Florida's public
schools.
This means that
lawyers for Republi-
can Gov. Rick Scott
and the Florida Leg-
islature will now
have to defend the
amount of money
that goes into public
school classrooms
and the state's high-
stakes system of
testing.
"We will now have
a real, live conversa-
tion about the quality
of Florida's educa-
tion system," said
former House
Speaker Jon Mills,
one of the lawyers
representing the
groups bringing the
lawsuit.
The lawsuit, first
filed in 2009, claims
the state hasn't lived
up to a constitutional
requirement for a
"uniform, efficient,
safe, secure and
high-quality system
of free public
schools."
Besides funding
cuts in recent years,
the suit cited under-
paid and under-
qualified teachers,
elimination of fund-
ing for a seventh pe-
riod and summer
school, violence on
school grounds, low
graduation rates and
testing requirements
that allegedly have
reduced quality.
The lawsuit was
brought against the
Legislature by four
parents or guardians
and two students
from Duval and
Pasco counties, as
well as two advocacy
groups: Citizens for
Strong Schools and
Fund Education
Now.
From wire reports


EDUCATION:


-
Early learning
High school students
learn about child
care./Page Cl


Comics . . . . .C7
Community ...... .C5
Crossword ........ C6
Editorial ........ A10
Entertainment . B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B6
Lottery Payouts . .B4
M ovies .......... .C7
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ....... .C8
TV Listings ....... C6


6 1 84178 2002! 5I


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER City
officials and residents were
confronted with several in-
convenient realities regard-
ing the water district's
now-controversial decision
to issue a water withdrawal
permit in the King's Bay
watershed area.
A Southwest Florida
Water Management District
(SWFWMD) official was on
hand at the city council


meeting Monday night to
answer questions about
SWFWMD's permitting
process.
The answers Chris Zajac,
SWFWMD's community af-
fairs manager, gave some-
times drew gasps and
comments of determination
to halt the issuance of per-
mits until the springs in and
around the bay get a chance
to recover.
SWFWMD issued a 10-
year water-use permit July
24 to Heatherwood Invest-


WATER PERMIT
CRITERIA

Applicant must show
demand.
Withdrawal must not
harm the water
resources or the related
environment.
Applicant may not affect

ments LLC of Crystal River
and Mistletoe LLC of Ocala


existing users.
* For more information
about the water manage-
ment district, go to
http://www.swfwmd.
state.fl.us/
* For more information of
the state statute, go to
http://tinyurl.com/
water-statute

to withdraw up to 76,700
gallons per day Average


Walking for freedom


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The city of Inverness annual 9/11 Freedom Walk took to the streets Tuesday to commemorate the Sept. 11, 2001,
attacks on America. The walk started and ended at Inverness City Hall.


Local residents pay tribute to victims of Sept.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS
For 6-year-old Jacob
Demaio, the events
of Sept 11, 2001,
are pictures in a book
"The planes went into
the buildings," he said as
he looked at photos in a
book that was part of the
9/11 memorial exhibit at
the Inverness Govern-
ment Center on Tuesday
"The pilots weren't
paying attention," he
said.
His mother, Kelley De-
maio, teared up as she
told him, "They were
paying attention. They
did it on purpose."
Demaio was in the
South Tower, the first to
go down. She was on the
73rd floor.
She had just moved to
Manhattan from Or-
lando, hoping to change
her life. She was at the
World Trade Center for a
job interview.
"They found me on the
23rd floor," she said.
She came to Inverness
with her two sons to take


INSIDE
See more 9/11
coverage on Page A3
and Page A5.

part in the annual City of
Inverness 9/11 Freedom
Walk, because that day
changed her life and she
didn't want her sons to
grow up not knowing of
the tragic events 11 years
ago.
Likewise, the day was
unfamiliar to 5-year-old
Laura Ann Ciangiola,
dressed in a red T-shirt
embellished with a flag.
She knew that the
"buildings fell," but she
didn't fully know why
Her mother, New York
native also named Laura
Ann Ciangiola, brought
her daughter to Tues-
day's event so she, too,
will know.
As daughter Laura
walked with a flag and a
red and a white carna-
tion up Main Street,
around the Old Court-
house and back to City
Hall, she said it was
good.


11 attacks


Retired New York Port Authority officer Andrew Tarpey,
right, was one of the flag bearers in the 9/11 Freedom
Walk Tuesday in downtown Inverness.


"My favorite is white
and red," she said. One
day she'll know about
Sept. 11 as something
other than just a day for
pretty flowers.
"This is a sacred, im-
portant day of remem-
brance of that dastardly
act that occurred 11
years ago today," said In-


verness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni as he
welcomed the several
hundred people in
attendance.
"We will never forget,"
he said. "We will never
forget where we were.
We'll never forget the


Page A2


Cat adoption fees waived at shelter


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
It's raining cats.
Beginning Saturday, any-
one wanting a cat will find
one for free, except for a $5
license fee, at Citrus
County Animal Services in
Inverness.
"We're doing pretty
good with our dogs, but
the cat situation it's de-
plorable the amount of
cats we're putting down,"
County Commissioner JJ
Kenney told fellow board


members at Tuesday's
meeting of the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners. "I know
we've been doing half-
price adoptions. But I'd
like to move to waive the
fees with the exception of
the $5 licensing fee and
see if we can't move more
cats into homes."
Dr. Julie Rosenberger,
the county veterinarian,
outlined the expense to the
county of cats adopted
from animal services.
Vaccinations are $7.75,


with an additional $2.60
for boosters. Flea treat-
ment and deworming costs
$7.90. The microchip costs
$5.95. The leukemia test
costs $9. Ear mite treat-
ment, if necessary, is $5.50.
In addition, surgical sup-
plies can cost $10. Total
costs can range from $30 to
$36 per cat.
"Typically, there are
around 40 to 50 cat adop-
tions per month, but when
we started the half-price
cat adoptions in July, it in-
creased close to 100


adoptions," Rosenberger
said.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe said animal
services could try the in-
centive for a trial period of
six months.
Kenney made the motion
to waive the fees, and it
was seconded by Commis-
sioner Rebecca Bays.
The motion passed
unanimously
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. corn or 352-564-2916.


daily use during the highest
water use month or peak
month cannot exceed
153,400. Officials say the
drawdown is going to be .01
of a foot, which is a little
over a tenth of an inch
drawdown.
The site of the well is on
an old lumberyard at 142
N.E. 11th St.
According to SWFWMD,
the companies intend to
transport the water for sale

See Page A2



Four


arrested


in meth


bust
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
A code violation stem-
ming from excessive
garbage led to the arrest of
four people deputies were
investigating on charges of
manufacturing, possession
and use of methampheta-
mines, according to the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office.
Benjamin Lee Holliday, 34,
Jessica Ann
Holliday,
33, Chase
EverettAsh,
28, and Hope
E. Wright,
25, all of W.
Jedi Court,
Dunnellon,
Chase were ar-
Ash rested Mon-
day Bond
for Wright
and Ash
was set at
$205,500
each. Ben
Holliday's
bond was set
at $255,500.
Benjamin Jessica Hol-
Holliday liday was
released on
her own re-
cognizance
a because of
an existing

condition.
Accord-
ing to arrest
Jessica affidavits,
Holliday investiga-
tors were
aware that
Benjamin
Holliday
and his fam-
S ily mem-
bers were
purchasing
Sudafed.
Hope Wh ile
Wright walking the
yard with Benjamin Holli-
day after addressing his
garbage issues, deputies ob-
served a large burn pile in
which they recognized sev-
eral "one-pot cooks," shards,
lithium batteries and other
tell-tale byproducts of the
manufacture of meth.
According to the report,
investigators ignored their
observations until they en-
tered the house where Jes-
sica Holliday, Wright and
Ash were found. Two small
children were also report-
edly present
Investigators confronted
the adults with what they saw
and they all eventuallyvolun-
tarily gave their statements.
Benjamin Holliday
claimed he was the primary
cook of the operation and
reportedly was very cooper-
ative with investigators,
leading to where all the dis-
carded materials were.
Wright, Ash and Jessica
Holliday confirmed Ben-
jamin Holliday's version
of events in their state-
ments, saying they mainly
See Page A2


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
70





A2 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


STATE/LOCAL


Local eateries undergo change


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

INVERNESS Familiar
names, familiar faces, dif-
ferent places.
That's the name of the
game when it comes to re-
cent changes, moves and
openings of restaurants and
eateries in the city of Inver-
ness.
Beginning its second
week, the Hen House
opened in the former Cock-
adoodles, at 206 Tompkins
St. in Connor's Plaza near
Inverness City Hall.
For owner Kimberly
Speckner and her team -
Gaye Swenson, Robin Terry
and cook Eva Parham -
being at this location is
coming full circle. The
women have been together
for the past 13 years, having
worked together at Cock-
adoodles, the Country
Diner and, most recently,
Kracker Shack.
"We've always worked so
well together," Speckner
said. "We've talked about
opening a place together
for years. When the



FREEDOM
Continued from Page Al

videos and the vigils. We
will never forget the people
we may have known or the



WELL
Continued from Page Al

to a bottling company, Con-
solidated Water Group LLC
in Ocala.
On Monday Zajac ad-
dressed the following main
points:
SWFWMD has a three-
part criteria for issuing
water use permits.
The companies in-
volved in this withdrawal
met the requirements.
The permit decision
cannot be appealed at this
point because the 21-day
window has closed.
The permit cost $50.
Because the with-
drawal is considered a
small-use permit, SWFWMD
will not require a meter and
will be unable to monitor
the drawdown. Public sup-
ply permits that use more
than 100,000 gallons per day
or permits for other use
types that use more than
500,000 gallons per day are
required to have meters, ac-
cording to SWFWMD.
Because all their rules
are based on state law, they
can't discriminate based on
the purpose of the water-use
permit being sought.
In response to council
member Ron Kitchen's
question about whether any
of the noise over the is-
suance of this permit would
have mattered in the end,
Zajac candidly said no, be-
cause the companies were
in compliance with the cri-
teria set forth by the agency
and that they were obligated
by law to issue it.
Zajac also said that 32
million gallons of water are
used daily in Citrus County.
He said most of that figure
represents public use. Com-
mercial or industrial use is
3 million gallons daily in the
county By comparison,


"Same but bigger" is how Gwen
Piazza described the Kracker Shack
Cafe at its new location near the
Inverness post office.


Kracker Shack moved to
their new location and this
opportunity came up,
lucky for me we were able
to get the lease and buy all
the equipment and the
inventory."
As for the name, Specker
explained: "Eva has a laugh
that would make anyone
laugh, and whenever we'd
be together customers
would say, 'Y'all sound like
a bunch of cackling hens.'
Hence, the name. Plus,
when we came in here and
all the chicken d6cor was
still here it fit."
Call the Hen House at
352-419-7942 for hours of
operation.
Does the name Ro-
mano sound familiar? For
11 years, Joe Romano
owned Romano's Italian
Restaurant in Lecanto. This
past June, Romano and his


sorrow for those we've
never met ... as we march
together in a 'freedom
walk,' as a community and
as a reflection of an entire
nation."
The walk, led by Citrus
County Sheriff's Office


Sumter and Hernando
counties use 34 and 38 mil-
lion gallons daily Hernando
County's industrial and
commercial daily usage is 4
million while Sumter's is
less than a million. These
figures are based on data
from 2010.
Zajac told council mem-
bers that in the water dis-
trict's southern zone, there
is what is considered a
water use caution area
where issuance of permits
is tightly controlled because
of the aquifer recovery ef-
forts launched by the water
district
But residents here said
they are equally worried
this area may go the way of
the southern zone and ex-
pressed concerns about the
health of the springs near
the bay
Council member Mike
Gudis said he found it in-
credible that these types of
permits are being issued
without consultation with
the municipalities and the
residents.
Gudis said people in this
area have been trying hard
to clean up the bay and re-
store better water flow to
the myriad of springs feed-
ing into it.
"I just don't understand
why the agency didn't have
the courtesy to communi-
cate with the municipality
and let us know what was
going on," Gudis said.


son, also named Joe,
opened Caf6 105, a light
breakfast and lunch place
at 105 Line Street, across
from Citrus High School
and near Citrus Memorial
Health System where Joe
Romano Sr works.
Romano said his son
wanted to continue the fam-
ily tradition of serving food.
He added that so far,
about 70 percent of their
business is hospital em-
ployees, but that word of
mouth is spreading.
"People are recognizing
that we're the same Ro-
mano's from the other
restaurant," he said.
Call Caf6 105 at 352-
341-1720. Closed Sundays.
"Same but bigger" is
how Gwen Piazza described
the Kracker Shack Caf6 at
its new location, 1314 U.S.
41 North near the Inverness


color guard, was a picture of
America itself-- young and
old, in high heels and sneak-
ers, two or three abreast,
holding hands, walking
alone. Some wore patriotic
red, white and blue; others
wore uniforms, even fire-


Mayor Jim Farley said it
sends the wrong message
when people are being
asked to conserve water
with restrictions, yet per-
mits are being issued for
water withdrawal.
"We hear from people
saying, 'Why should I follow
the rules (watering restric-
tions). I am going to water
when I want to,' Farley
said.
Zajac said individuals or
municipalities who need
prior information about
permit applications can sign
up for alerts from
SWFWMD.
He also suggested people
consult their lawmakers if
they seek to change the
rules of permitting.
Gudis and the rest of the
council said their next step
will be to contact the local
lawmakers to see if anything
can be done to safeguard
the watershed around
King's Bay
City resident Dee Atkins
said she is befuddled by the
process.
"So, there is not going to
be a meter at the well. How
would they know if a 100,000
gallons is being taken out or
150,000 gallons a day?"
Atkins said.
Atkins was one of several
residents who urged action
be taken to change the laws
regarding permits.
"I think it is great that so
many people came out


post office.
They moved from a 2,500-
square-foot space on U.S. 41
S. with parking space for
about 20 cars to a building
nearly triple the size with
parking for about 75.
"The parking situation
was not good, plus there
was an incline to get into
the front door," Piazza said.
With the new location,
they've kept the same
menu, added a salad bar,
offer a weekend breakfast
buffet, increased their
hours to include dinner and
now have a meeting room.
Call the Kracker Shack
Caf6 at 352-344-1263. Closed
Monday.
Since 2006, folks in
Crystal River have known
they don't have to go to I
Philadelphia for an "eye-
poppin' Philly cheese-
steak sandwich since
Eyepoppin' Cheesesteaks &
Hoagies, owned by Clau-
dine Demainczuk, is right
in town. In mid-July, De-
mainczuk opened a second
store at 1221 U.S. 41 North
near Beef O'Brady's.
"We eventually want to


fighters in their hot, heavy
emergency gear
Matilda Kristensen, a Cit-
rus High School junior, was
there as a foreign exchange
student from Denmark,
sponsored by the Rotary
Club of Inverness.


against this and we should
keep going until it is fixed,"
Art Jones said. Jones,
through the King's Bay Ro-
tary, has been spearheading
a lyngbya cleanup in the
bay
Also Monday, the city
council:
OK'd a tentative budget
on first reading for both the
city and the Community Re-
development Agency (CRA).
City Manager Andy Houston
recommended maintaining
a millage rate of 3.8 mills for
fiscal year 2013. That rate is
actually lower than the roll-
back rate, which would be
3.9.
Local military heroes
Charles Klyap and Michael
Mehringer were honored by
Mayor Jim Farley with a
week being named in their
honor Mehringer was given
a key to the city.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.



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franchise," Demainczuk
said, adding that the Inver-
ness restaurant, more than
three times bigger than the
one in Crystal River, will be
the hub for processing all of
their meats. Demainczuk
formerly owned Gannon's
Meat Market in Crystal
River
Call Eyepoppin' at 352-
419-4885. Closed Sundays.
Just outside the city
limit, Highland Family
Restaurant opened four
months ago at 3066 S.
Florida Avenue. Owner
Valsi Zumis, with more than
30 years restaurant experi-
ence, most recently was
with Mama Sally's in Crys-
tal River and before that,
Sugarmill Restaurant in
Homosassa.
"Inverness is a much bet-
ter place for a restaurant,"
Zumis said.
Call Highland Family
Restaurant at 352-341-3030.
Open seven days.
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or352-
564-2927.


"We learn about this in
Danish schools, too," she
said. "It's a big day in Den-
mark, too. I was only 5, so I
don't remember that day,
but my mom and dad told
me. I think this is a very
good event today We don't



BUST
Continued from Page Al

purchased the cold medi
cines and chemicals for the
cooking.
Wright led investigators
to a small box under
the mattress in her
child's room which
contained pipes, syringes
and a small amount of
methamphetamine.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State BRIEF

Everglades project
can start
TALLAHASSEE The De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection has made the final
sign-off on permits and consent
orders that will allow for a mas-
sive Everglades restoration
project to go forward, the
agency said Tuesday.
The previously-agreed-on
proposal is aimed at reducing
water pollution in the Ever-
glades ecosystem and restor-
ing its original quality through
the creation of several
stormwater treatment areas to
filter water before it goes into
the system.
'This plan is an historic step
forward in restoring America's
Everglades," Gov. Rick Scott said
in a statement. "This plan will re-
sult in significant water quality im-
provements to the Everglades
without raising or creating new
costs for Floridians."
A 21-day period during which
parties could have objected to
the permits expired Monday.
The plan calls for 6,500 acres
of stormwater treatment areas
and nearly 110,000 acre-feet of
water storage.
From wire reports


have anything like this in
Denmark, and it's a good
way of memorizing what
happened."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


Investigators also report-
edly found plastic bags,
scales and several other
* drug paraphernalia items.
The Department of Chil-
- dren and Families was
called to remove the chil-
dren and the adults were
arrested and transported to
s the Citrus County Deten-
tion facility.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
s Sidibe can be reached at
f 352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


^^^Ku. f


S rard

Eye Center
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa

(352)489-3579 (352) 628-0123
Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons







Page A3 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12,2012



TATE1&


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THE STATE Commission passes sewer assessment


Citrus County
BOCC to host public
hearing Thursday
The Citrus County Commis-
sion will have a public hearing
at 5:01 p.m. Thursday in the
commission meeting room,
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
This meeting is for the pur-
pose of reviewing the tenta-
tive budget for the fiscal year
beginning Oct. 1 and ending
Sept. 30, 2013.
CF executive committee,
directors set meetings
The College of Central
Florida Foundation Executive
Committee will meet at 4:30
p.m. today at its office in the
Enterprise Center at the
Ocala campus.
The Foundation Board of
Directors meeting will be at
4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19,
at the Founders Hall boardroom,
also at the Ocala campus.
Meetings are open to the
public. Copies of the agenda
will be available at each meeting.
For information, contact
the CF Foundation office,
3001 S.W. College Road,
Ocala, FL 34474.
C.E.R.T. team
meets today
The regular monthly meet-
ing of the Community Emer-
gency Response Team
(C.E.R.T.) for the Northeast
Quadrant will be at 7 p.m.
today at Our Lady of Grace
Parish Life Center, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
There will be a practice
ham radio network at the end
of the meeting to demon-
strate C.E.R.T. communica-
tion capabilities in case of
mobilization. The first actual
"Radio Net" for the northeast
quadrant airs Thursday.
There is a need for C.E.R.T.
volunteers. Call 382-4446 or
visit www.citruscountycert.org.

Tallahassee
FPL pitches nuclear
upgrades, new reactors
Arguing increased nuclear
power will help hold down
long-term electric bills, Florida
Power & Light on Tuesday urged
state regulators to approve
$151.5 million in costs next
year for upgrading and poten-
tially building nuclear reactors.
About 90 percent of that
amount would go toward up-
grading and expanding the
capacities of already-existing
plants in Miami-Dade and St.
Lucie counties.
The Public Service Com-
mission will decide later this
year whether to grant the util-
ity's requests.
Court: Stealing emails
not domestic violence
A woman who used her
husband's email password to
read all his emails and then
changed the password so he
couldn't get into his account
isn't guilty of cyberstalking or
domestic violence, a state
appeals court said Tuesday.
A domestic violence injunc-
tion had been issued against
Cheryl Young of Alachua County
and the lower court judge in
the case suggested her actions
amounted to cyberstalking.
Ms. Young not only read
her husband's emails, but
used substantial information
from those emails in a di-
vorce proceeding.
-From staff and wire reports

Clarification
A story on Page A3 of
Tuesday's edition, "Water
management district review-
ing surplus lands," gave infor-
mation about Southwest
Florida Water Management
District programs. The Flying
Eagle Nature Center is not
part of the district's surplus
lands initiative, as it will be
leased, not sold. The district
has yet to determine which
Citrus County parcels will be
offered for sale.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to


any errors in news articles by
mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Despite residents'protests, county decides project is of greater benefit to community


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Seventeen county resi-
dents spoke Tuesday
against a sewer system as-
sessment roll one even
asked to be removed from it
County commissioners
listened, but voted unani-
mously to confirm, adopt
and execute areas 112 and
113 of the 2010 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River
Special Assessment District
The district is a project
that has been unpopular
with many of its affected
residents since the first
public hearing in December
2010.
"The system's ready We
actually put our first cus-
tomer on last Thursday,"
said David Burnell, Crystal
River director of public
works, who said the actual
cost to take the houses in
the areas off septic tanks
and connect to a sewer sys-
tem came in at $3.9 million,


about 10 percent less than
the original projected cost.
The public hearing, dur-
ing a meeting of the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC), was
the last time opponents of
the project could speak out
Although the sewer line is
complete, many residents
gave reasons why they did
not want to connect to it.
Glen Nail of Country Club
Drive said the construction
caused flooding in the
neighborhood.
Norman Hopkins of the
Amy Remley Foundation
argued the project worked
like an impact fee on long-
established residents. He
raised questions about
some of the financing infor-
mation. Another resident
stated the people affected
would be paying a greater
share of the expense, as he
calculated grant funds to
cover 82 percent rather
than the original figure of
85 percent.


Several residents said
they have good septic tanks
that are not failing, so they
said they should not have to
connect to sewer until the
septic tanks have to be re-
placed. John Jones said he
planned to use his septic
tank as a cistern at such
time as it failed, rather than
remove it, as required
under the project.
Perhaps the most creative
argument came from Peter
Aare, the former assistant
county attorney who repre-
sented all the homeowners
opposed to the project. He
said the legal language was
such that the municipal
service benefit unit (MSBU)
- the assessment district-
appeared to have created it-
self. Therefore, it couldn't
exist.
Aare also had an issue
with legal notice language,
as he said it did not appear
to invite all members of the
public to the meeting, just
those affected.


"The bottom line here is,
it's my opinion that there is
no MSBU, so it would be
wise for the board as county
commissioners to convert
this to a workshop and pro-
vide further information on
where the city's numbers
come from," Aare said.
After members of the pub-
lic spoke, commissioners
gave their reasons for sup-
porting the assessment
"The DEP (Department of
Environmental Protection)
is going to start requiring the
counties throughout the state
of Florida to permit water
quality," Commissioner Re-
becca Bays said. "Right now,
King's Bay is considered to
be an impaired water body."
Commissioner John "JJ"
Kenney said he was reluc-
tant to support it because of
Crystal River charging a higher
expansion fee to residents
who don't pay city taxes.
Kenney asked Pat Wilkin-
son with the county's hous-
ing services division about


funds to help homeowners
with connection fees.
Wilkinson said $217,000 was
available and six homeown-
ers had made applications.
Commissioner Dennis
Damato said the BOCC was
serving as a facilitator to im-
prove the water quality in
King's Bay
Commissioner Joe Meek
said, "It will never be less
expensive for us to do this."
Commissioner Winn
Webb, like Kenney, was not
happy about the expansion
fee. However, "we did set a
policy in the county about
septic tanks and we're try-
ing to get them on the sewer
line," Webb said.
With that, all the commis-
sioners supported setting the
assessment roll. The final
assessment costwillbe $2,310.06.
It can be paid on a 10-year
plan of $277.43 a year
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormercan be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline
.corn or 352-564-2916.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle




Fallen not forgotten


T he Blanton Thompson Post 155 American Legion held a memorial walk Tuesday from the post on
State Road 44 near Crystal River to the Meadowcrest entrance to commemorate those who were
lost in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The post color guard led the procession of more than 50 people along
the sidewalk with stops along the way to remember the three sites where hijacked passenger planes were
crashed: the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and a field in Shanksville, Pa.


School board approves


budget with tax decrease


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Citrus County
School Board members approved a
$232 million budget Tuesday that re-
duces property taxes by 9 percent.
The final tax rate of 7.639 mills is
about one-third of a mill less than
this year's rate. The average home-
owner with no significant increase or
decrease in their taxable value will
pay about $763 in school taxes, about
$30 less than this year
The millage difference is a direct
result of the state increasing its
funding to the school system by $2.6
million.
State law sets most of the school
board millage, called the required
local effort. If state funding drops,
the local millage rises. If state fund-
ing increases, as it will in 2012-13, the
local millage drops. The fiscal year
begins Oct. 1.
No one from the public showed up
for Tuesday's public hearing.
Assistant Superintendent of
Schools Kenny Blocker said the dis-
trict balanced the budget for the
third straight year from its reserve
funds.


Despite the increase in state fund-
ing this year, the net decrease is $16
million over the past five years,
Blocker said.
He said he hopes this year is the
bottom for falling property values. If
not, he said, the district will need to
make significant cuts next year to
avoid dipping into the reserve ac-
counts again.
He also said a potential budget
issue is the unknown outcome of
Florida Retirement System lawsuit
State employees, including teachers,
are suing to overturn a state law re-
quiring them to pay 3 percent toward
their retirement. That case is under
state Supreme Court review
Blocker said if employees win the
lawsuit, the district would have to
repay $2.3 million this year. If the
case drags on, the potential liability
to the district in 2012-13 is $2.5 mil-
lion, he said.
The tax rate includes 0.25 of a
mill approved by voters in 2010 for
capital improvements. The school
board is asking voters in November
to keep that millage intact for capi-
tal and operational programs. It ac-
counts for about $2.3 million in
revenue.


State BRIEFS


Deputies: Taxi driver
ripped off Disney tourists
ORLANDO -Authorities have ar-
rested a taxi driver who they say
ripped off tourists at Disney hotels.
The Orlando Sentinel reported two
pairs of undercover Orange County
Sheriffs detectives made reservations
last week from two Disney resorts for
a taxi to take them to SeaWorld. They
were investigating reports from
tourists who paid for round-trip fares
but were stranded when the driver
failed to show up for the return trip.
Officials said the driver told detectives
he was from Mears the only com-
pany authorized to pick up and drop
off customers at Disney resorts. They
later identified him as 53-year-old
Nankishore Ramkisoon, who once
worked for Mears but is now an inde-
pendent driver.
He is charged with one count of
committing communications fraud and
two counts of scheming to defraud.
Governor orders probe on
soured economic deal
TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov.
Rick Scott is ordering a probe into the
state's decision to award millions in
economic incentives to a company
that is now closing its Florida facility.
Scott on Monday asked his inspec-
tor general to review the process


used to award money to help bring
Digital Domain Media Group to Port
St. Lucie. The company announced
last week it was closing the facility
and laying off about 280 workers.
Scott said he wants to be assured the
process used to award incentives in
2009 is not the process utilized now.
Digital Domain has spent the past
few years building a new animation
studio that was backed by millions in
incentives from the city and the state,
including $20 million from one of the
state's main economic incentive funds.
Changes made for final
Mack, Nelson debate
TALLAHASSEE -A scheduled
debate between U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson
and his Republican challenger is on
for late October now that a newspa-
per is no longer the event's sponsor.
Spokesmen for the senator's campaign
and that of U.S. Rep. Connie Mack IV
said Monday the candidates are set for
an event cosponsored by CNN, Bay
News 9 and Channel 13 of Tampa.
The debate was originally scheduled
Oct. 30, but Nelson's office said Mon-
day they would prefer an earlier date.
The state's largest newspaper, the
Tampa Bay Times, was a previous
sponsor, but Mack refused to partici-
pate if it was involved, unhappy with
the Times' coverage of his campaign.
-From wire reports


LOCAL






A4 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


Union plans to




challenge prison




privatization plan


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
long-running push by the ad-
ministration of Florida Gov
Rick Scott to privatize thou-
sands of prison jobs could
soon be headed back to
court, marking yet another
constitutional clash for the
Republican governor
Florida's prison's agency
has asked a legislative
panel to approve spending
nearly $58 million in order
to privatize prison health
care operations by January
The move could affect up to
nearly 3,000 employees
statewide.
But the union that repre-
sents state workers con-
tends that the Legislative
Budget Commission cannot
legally make such a large
change to the state's nearly
$70 billion state budget.
That role is left to the en-
tire Legislature, said Tom
Brooks, an attorney for the
American Federation of
State, County and Munici-
pal Employees.
Brooks said the union
will sue if the budget panel
approves the privatization
plan at its Wednesday
meeting.
State legislators back in
2011 had previously ap-
proved the privatization ef-
fort, but they tucked it into
the overall state budget.


That move sparked a court
fight, but a judge this sum-
mer declared the case over
because the outsourcing
provision had expired at
the end of June. That's
when the state's fiscal year
ended.
"This is just a back door
attempt to revive (the pro-
vision)," Brooks said.
Senate Democratic
Leader Nan Rich, D-
Weston, agrees with the
union that the Scott admin-
istration and the legislative
panel are overstepping
their authority.
"It has a certain role, one
of making limited adjust-
ments in the budget, not
creating a policy change,"
Rich said.
House and Senate lead-
ers did not respond directly
for comment on the lawsuit
threat.
But the Florida Depart-
ment of Corrections, point-
ing to another section of
state law, contends it can
move ahead with the priva-
tization plan without leg-
islative approval. The
agency only needs the ap-
proval of the budget panel
in order to pay for it
Ann Howard, a spokes-
woman for the department,
says that if the state does
not privatize its health care
operations for nearly
100,000 inmates, it will cre-


ate a deficit in the state's
prison budget by more than
$60 million.
The agency says that the
deficit will be lowered to
about $6 million if the pri-
vatization plan goes ahead.
"This is common sense
math," Howard said. "We
have to be responsible. The
choice is obvious."
The department already
has selected two compa-
nies to handle health care
services. The state picked
Pittsburgh-based Wexford
Health Sources for the
southern part of the state
and Corizon Inc. of Brent-
wood, Tenn., for other
regions.


On the campaign trail


Associated Press
Ann Romney holds flowers from local supporter Nancy McGowan on Tuesday during a visit
to the Romney Victory Headquarters in Jacksonville.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers

Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


HI LO PR |HI LO
91 78 0.00 87 74 0

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excusivedaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 70 *
Partly cloudy with isolated showers.

THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 70
-Partly to ii, cloudy with isolated showers
and thunderstorms.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 69
.... P-- ," Partly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 89/72
Record 98/63
Normal 91/70
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 2.30 in.
Total for the year 51.97 in.
Normal for the year 41.23 in.
*As of 7 pro. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.09 in.


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m,
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 5'
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grass
Today's count: 7.2/12
Thursday's count: 7.9
Friday's count: 6.9
AIR QUALITY
Tuesday was good with pollutant
mainly ozone.


PR
.00


-5


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
pc
pc
ts
pc


sh
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc



PC
PC
PC
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds from 15 to 20 knots. Seas
2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters will
be choppy. Partly cloudy skies today.


Gulf water
temperature



85
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Mon. Tues. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.20 33.20 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.77 38.77 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.66 39.66 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.41 41.41 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
anual flood which has a 43-precen t chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If vou have any questions you should contact the HvdroloQical Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


70

9%


es





ts


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/12 WEDNESDAY 2:59 9:11 3:23 9:35
9/13 THURSDAY 3:42 9:54 4:06 10:18
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 7:38 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW I 1
5 O C4 MOONRISE TODAY................ 3:45 A.M.
SE, 15 SEi 22 SEPT. 28 i .8 MOONSET TODAY .............. 5:14 PM

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Dvision of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fi-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:16 a/11:26 a 3:38 p/-
Crystal River* 2:37 a/8:48 a 1:59 p/9 44 p
Withlacoochee* 12:24 a/6:36 a 11:46 a/7:32 p
Homosassa"' 3:26 a/10:25 a 2:48 p/11:21 p


"'At Mason s Cree
Thursday
High/Low High/L
4"52 a/12:22 a 4:31 p/12:1
3:13 a/9:41 a 2:52 p/10:2
1:00 a/7:29 a 12:39 p/8:1
4:02 a/11:18 a 3:41 p/-


ek
ow
9p
24 p
2p


/ (D

70s







40s
._Anc *.j. ,.,,


/---


Tuesi
City H L
Albany 72
Albuquerque 84
Asheville 75
Atlanta 84
Atlantic City 74
Austin 94
Baltimore 79
Billings 72
Birmingham 85
Boise 72
Boston 73
Buffalo 73
Burlington. VT 72
Charleston. SC 84
Charleston, WV 80
Charlotte 78
Chicago 83
Cincinnati 79
Cleveland 77
Columbia SC 83
Columbus, OH 79
Concord, NH 74
Dallas 92
Denver 90
Des Moines 94
Detroit 81
El Paso 90
Evansville. IN 83
Harrisburg 75
Hartford 74
Houston 90
Indianapolis 78
Jackson 86
Las Vegas 87
Little Rock 86
Los Angeles 75
Louisville 82
Memphis 87
Milwaukee 83
Minneapolis 95
Mobile 87
Montgomery 86
Nashville 85


60-
lloB M..nr. Sl ,, .


*' e.. ,
rnvH T .- ,. _


E -, -f,
- -O- WN


SOs


1 70s


t P'lIA
fli f..


J_ ,i _-Bat, -
S- -.
MIi, -llBn -
Melroip' -- *,, i & 'B3


, sos "' _--


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY


day Wednesday
LPcp. Fcst H L
41 s 81 55
60 ts 77 59
56 s 75 51
65 s 84 63
48 s 76 60
56 pc 93 74
51 s 81 56
50 s 69 35
61 s 83 64
47 s 75 42
53 s 79 62
49 s 81 60
43 s 79 57
61 pc 82 66
47 s 84 54
67 s 82 57
52 s 89 69
50 s 85 57
48 s 80 63
59 s 84 58
51 s 85 60
40 s 82 50
69 pc 92 72
64 sh 68 50
60 sh 86 57
52 s 86 63
74 pc 89 70
54 s 85 61
48 s 82 53
46 s 82 56
64 ts 90 74
56 s 83 61
58 pc 88 65
68 1.01 s 92 76
61 s 88 65
69 s 78 67
59 s 85 63
63 s 88 66
58 pc 84 64
63 c 69 53
i2 pc 86 68
61 pc 86 66
56 s 85 61


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Tuesday Wednesday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 88 67 pc 87 72
New York City 73 54 s 81 63
Norfolk 74 66 s 80 60
Oklahoma City 93 56 pc 93 65
Omaha 95 61 sh 77 57
Palm Springs 94 76 s 102 80
Philadelphia 76 54 s 82 59
Phoenix 80 72 02 pc 93 76
Pittsburgh 75 46 s 82 53
Portland, ME 72 45 s 76 54
Portland, Ore 73 47 s 83 50
Providence, RI 71 51 s 79 60
Raleigh 78 55 s 80 56
Rapid City 79 63 pc 71 46
Reno 87 56 s 88 52
Rochester, NY 75 46 s 81 60
Sacramento 94 55 s 95 60
St. Louis 85 60 s 87 61
St. Ste Marie 79 53 pc 77 56
Salt Lake City 79 65 s 79 54
San Antonio 92 65 pc 93 75
San Diego 76 71 s 79 70
San Francisco 71 54 s 68 55
Savannah 84 65 pc 84 66
Seattle 68 48 s 74 49
Spokane 64 35 s 70 43
Syracuse 76 45 s 84 54
Topeka 92 59 pc 89 64
Washington 78 57 s 82 62
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 101 Guymon. Okla
LOW 23 Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


WEDNESDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 88/76/ts
Amsterdam 63/52/sh
Athens 87/69/pc
Beijing 77/58/s
Berlin 65/50/c
Bermuda 81/72/pc
Cairo 90/72/s
Calgary 58/41/pc
Havana 89/72/ts
Hong Kong 87/78/ts
Jerusalem 83/64/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


85/64/s
65/47/sh
88/58/pc
72/53/ts
80/56/s
70/51/pc
64/54/sh
78/65/pc
81/64/ts
74/47/s
88/77/ts
80/59/s
65/53/sh


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N T Y


ILegal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


i" Meeting Notices ..........................C12




Notice to


Creditors/Administration.......C12



: ;.i- Tax Deed Notices........................C11


CHRONICLE
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TompkinsSt. g square
0 106 W. Main
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-" 34450


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STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 A5


9/11 across the nation



Biden: Country ham't

forgotten 9/11 families


Associated Press
Members of the Spokane Valley Fire Department honor guard, front to back, Bill Clifford, assistant fire marshal, Greg Ben-
nett, fire Inspector, Dave Vegele, engineer/paramedic, Michael Fields, firefighter, Tag Baugh, captain/paramedic, wait Tues-
day in the engine bay of the under construction Valley Fire Station 6 for a flag raising ceremony to start in Spokane Valley,
Wash. The Spokane Valley Fire Department has a tradition that whenever they have a building or new station under con-
struction, they hold a dedication and flag raising ceremony on 9/11.


Associated

NEW YORK
were still the t
sages to loved on
of photos and f
moments of sile
years after Sept
cans appeared
new, scaled-bac.
collective mour
worst terror ati
history
Crowds gathE
ways, at the W
Center site in N
Pentagon and a
nia memorial
mourn the near
tims of the 200
tacks, reciting t
and remember
music, tolling
prayer. But thE
fewer numbers,
were less elal
some cities can
remembrances
year after the
10th anniversary
the memorials
reached an emo
ing point.
"It's human
people move
Wanda Ortiz, of
City, whose husb
Ortiz, was killed
center's north to
behind her
5-month-old twii
"My concern no
keep the memory
band alive."
It was also a
politicians large
back seat to gri
lies; no electE
spoke at all at
3 1/2-hour ceren
dent Barack Ob;
publican Mitt
pulled negativE
ads and avoic


Smaller memorials on 11th anniversary of9/11
d Press of the plane that crashed in
Like 2001, this Sept. 11 was on a a field south of Pittsburgh,
There T fr th ti sin saying he understood 11
Learful mes- Tesday, for te second time since years haven't diminished
ies, clutches the attacks. The cloudless blue sky memories.
lowers, and "Today is just as monu-
ence. But 11 and brisk, early fall weather recalled mental a day for all of you,
t. 11, Ameri- for each of your families, as
to enter a the morning of 2001. any Sept. 11 has ever been,"
k chapter of he said.
ning for the with the president laying a family members laid roses Wearing white ribbons,
tack in U.S. wreath at the Pentagon cer- and made paper rubbings of many wearing T-shirts with
emony and visiting their loved ones' names their loved ones' pictures,
ered, as al- wounded soldiers at a Mary- etched onto the Sept 11 me- victims' families in New
Vorld Trade land hospital. And beyond morial. A few hundred at- York read loved ones'
ew York, the the victims of the 2001 at- tended ceremonies at the names, and looked up to the
Pennsylva- tacks, attention was paid to Pentagon and in sky to talk to their family -
Tuesday to the wars that followed in Shanksville, Pa., fewer than even those they hadn't met.
rly 3,000 vic- Iraq and Afghanistan. in years past. Juan Torres wasn't old
)1 terror at- In Middletown, N.J., a As bagpipes played at the enough to remember his
;heir names bedroom community that year-old Sept. 11 memorial uncle, Luis, "but after all
ring with lost 37 residents in the at- in New York, families hold- the stories I heard, I knew
bells and tacks, town officials laid a ing balloons, flowers and he was a good man. Al-
ey came in wreath at the entrance to photos of their loved ones though he threw himself
ceremonies the park in a small, silent bowed their heads in si- from the building, I know
borate and ceremony Last year, 3,700 lence at 8:46 a.m., the mo- God was waiting for him
iceled their people attended a remem- ment that the first hijacked below and caught him in his
altogether. A brance with speeches, jetliner crashed into the arms."
* milestone music and names read. trade center's north tower. Like 2001, this Sept. 11
y, some said "This year," said Deputy Bells tolled to mark the mo- was on a Tuesday, for the
may have Mayor Stephen Massell, "I ments that planes crashed second time since the at-
)tional turn- think less is more." into the second tower, the tacks. The cloudless blue
Some worried that mov- Pentagon and a Pennsylva- sky and brisk, early fall
nature, so ing on would mean Sept. 11 nia field, and the moments weather recalled the morn-
on," said will fade from memory that each tower collapsed. ing of 2001.
f New York "It's been 11 years al- President Obama and Other ceremonies were
)and, Emilio ready," said Michael Reneo, first lady Michelle Obama held across the country -
in the trade whose sister-in-law, Daniela laid a white floral wreath at from New York's Long Is-
)wer, leaving Notaro, was killed at the the Pentagon, above a con- land, where hundreds
and their trade center. "And unfortu- create slab that said "Sept. wrote messages to their
n daughters. nately for some, the reality 11, 2001 937 am." Obama loved ones on a memorial,
w is ... how I of this day seems to be fad- later recalled the horror of to Boston, where more than
y ofmyhus- ing as the years go by ... I the attacks, declaring, "Our 200 people with ties to Mas-
hope we never lose focus on country is safer and our sachusetts were remem-
year when what really happened people are resilient." bered. Two of the hijacked
gely took a here." Vice President Joe Biden airliners took off from
living fami- Thousands had attended remembered the 40 victims Boston's Logan Airport.


ed officials
New York's
mony Presi-
ama and Re-
t Romney
e campaign
led rallies,


the ceremony in New York
in previous years, including
last year's milestone 10th
anniversary In New York, a
crowd of fewer than 200
swelled to about 1,000 by
late Tuesday morning, as


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Associated Press

SHANKSVILLE, Pa. -
Ceremonies in New York
City, Washington, D.C.,
and a western Pennsylva-
nia field are a reminder
that the nation hasn't for-
gotten the 9/11 attacks
and offer a chance for the
victims' families to re-
member and recover, Vice
President Joe Biden said
Tuesday
"We wish we weren't
here. We wish we didn't
have to be here. We wish
we didn't have to com-
memorate any of this,"
Biden told relatives and
guests at the memorial for
United Airlines Flight 93,
the jet on which passen-
gers fought hijackers for
control before it crashed
near Shanksville.
Still, Biden said, "I
imagine you all find sol-
ace in seeing one another.
There's nothing like
being able to talk with
someone who you know
understands," Biden said
before participating in a
wreath-laying at the me-
morial about 60 miles
southeast of Pittsburgh.
The names of the 40
passengers and crew
were read aloud at 10:03
a.m. the moment the
airplane crashed on Sept.
11, 2001. Investigators
later determined the four
terrorists aboard planned
to pilot the airliner to
Washington, D.C., where
another airplane crashed
into the Pentagon.
After the ceremony, the
victims' families and
friends were invited to
walk through a gate and
along a path where the
plane crashed.
"You have to show re-
spect and thanks and that's
what really goes through
my mind," Jerry Bingham
said about visiting the site
where his son Mark died.
"Mainly, I feel (his) pres-
ence that's really it I
feel closer to him."
Biden said he under-
stood that 11 years have
not dimmed the memo-
ries of those lost, nor the
impact felt by their
families.
"Today is just as mo-
mentous a day for all of
you ... for each of your
families, as any Sept. 11
has ever been," he said.
"I also hope it contin-
ues to give you some sol-
ace that this nation, that
all of the people who are
gathered here today who


are not family members,
all your neighbors, that
they have not forgotten,"
Biden said.
Bells of remembrance
were rung by surviving
family members and com-
munity members who be-
came involved in the
aftermath of the crash.
Eleven years after the
attacks, the Flight 93 me-
morial remains unfin-
ished. Among projects
still incomplete are an
educational center and a
93-foot tower with a wind
chime for each passenger
and crew member.
Secretary of the Inte-
rior Ken Salazar said the
goal is for the memorial to
be complete by the 15th
anniversary
King Laughlin, vice
president of the Flight 93
National Memorial Cam-
paign, said about $5 mil-
lion more must be raised
from private donors to
finish the work. Federal
and state governments al-
ready have contributed
$36 million, with about
$30 million more coming
from private donors.
Biden's brief remarks
to the crowd in
Shanksville were a con-
trast to the events at the
World Trade Center site
in New York, where
politicians were not
invited.
Gordon Felt, whose
brother Edward was one
of the Flight 93 passen-
gers, said it was impor-
tant for Biden and
Salazar to attend because
it's symbolic of the gov-
ernment's and the
American people's -
view of the seriousness of
the anniversary
"I think that we're al-
ways concerned that Sept
11 not be used for politi-
cal purposes and in lis-
tening to all the remarks
made here I think, once
again, we realize this is
apolitical," he said.
"This is something that
since Sept. 11, 2001, that
has united Americans.
And I think as we look
back in our memories, we
remain united."
About 150 family mem-
bers and invited guests
were joined by hundreds
of other attendees who
began arriving after
dawn, some from the
rural community now in-
extricably tied to the
events of the day and oth-
ers making longer trips to
pay their respects.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION


V el


I OOCHDG





A6 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


Obituaries


Johnson
'Buddy'
Savary, 83
Sarasota lost one of its
most distinguished and
beloved members of the
community
early Sun-
day morn-
ing, Sept. 9.
Johnson
Sidney
""Buddy"
Savary
passed
Johnson away qui-
'Buddy' etly at his
Savary home fol-
lowing a
lengthy battle with pancre-
atic cancer and pulmonary
fibrosis.
Buddy Savary was born
Dec. 12, 1928, in Inverness,
Fla. He graduated from Cit-
rus High School, attended
the University of Florida
and graduated with a Bach-
elor of Science in account-
ing in 1950. While in
Inverness, he met and later
married his loving wife of 58
years, Mary Russell Tarr.
Following service in the
U.S. Army, he earned a law
degree from the University
of Florida in January 1956.
He initially began what
was to become an accom-
plished legal career in Sara-
sota as a defense and
general litigation attorney
During the 1960s, he prac-
ticed law briefly in Inverness
and Fort Myers, and in 1965,
moved back to Sarasota to
stay He ultimately served as
president of the Sarasota
County Bar Association and
became a senior partner at
the Kirk Pinkerton Law
Firm in Sarasota, which
eventually merged to be-
come part of the 270-mem-
ber national law firm of
Dykema Gossett He was a
senior partner at Dykema
Gossett and selected to be a
member of the firm's six-per-
son Executive Committee.
During his expansive
legal career, Buddy litigated
and argued hundreds of
cases in state and federal
courts, including before the
U.S. Supreme Court He was
widely respected among
practicing attorneys and
judges alike, and earned a
reputation of not only being
a superb advocate for his
clients, but an example of
dignity, honor and civility,
bestowing great credit upon
his profession. It was no sur-
prise Sen. Connie Mack
asked him to serve on his
Federal Judiciary Screen-
ing and Nominating Com-
mittee, responsible for
reviewing and recommend-
ing potential presidential
nominees for the federal
bench.
In 1993, Buddy joined the
Sarasota law firm, Abel
Band, and practiced "Of
Counsel" during his latter
years in the areas of estate
planning, estate and trust
litigation, estate mediation


and real estate law. He be-
came a circuit court certi-
fied mediator in 1994 and
mediated and resolved nu-
merous estate, trust and
real estate matters. In June
2006, he was honored by the
Florida Bar for more than
50 years of practicing law.
As a veteran attorney,
Buddy took great pleasure
in mentoring young lawyers
entering the legal profes-
sion and served as a role
model of integrity for all for-
tunate enough to have
worked with him.
He was a proud Gator
alumnus of the University of
Florida. He was actively in-
volved and supported the
university throughout his
entire life, serving on the
board of the UF Foundation
from 1978 to 1991 and again
from 1993 until his death.
During that time, he served
as chairman of the real es-
tate committee, a member
of the executive committee
and a member of the major
gifts committee. Buddy also
served as a trustee emeritus
of the University's Levin
College of Law and funded
and established a scholar-
ship endowment for finan-
cially disadvantaged UF
Law students. An honorary
member of Florida Blue
Key and a member of Phi
Delta Theta, Buddy was a
Bull Gator and a former di-
rector of Gator Boosters and
the alumni association.
Through his endless gen-
erosity, he also created an
endowment fund designed
to support the Gator base-
ball program, granting edu-
cational scholarships to the
young athletes.
He was recognized as a
compassionate and generous
benefactor of numerous
charitable, civic and social
organizations in the Sarasota
community He served as
elder at the Church of the
Palms Presbyterian Church,
a former trustee of the
Church of the Palms Founda-
tion as well as serving as a
former chairman of the
trustees of the West Florida
Presbytery He was a board
member and former chair-
man of the Sarasota Memo-
rial Hospital Foundation,
board member and vice pres-
ident of Tidewell Hospice of
Southwest Florida, trustee of
Eckerd College Foundation,
director of the Sarasota
United Way Foundation, di-
rector of the Sarasota Kiwa-
nis Club, a former director of
The Argus Fbundation, an ac-
tive member of the Old
Timers Group of the Sarasota
County Bar Association and

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director of the Sarasota
Chamber of Commerce.
Also an avid Gator foot-
ball fan, outdoorsman,
hunter, fisherman, Buddy
will be remembered as a
loving husband, devoted fa-
ther and a man of faith who
was a friend to everyone he
met. Although he will be
greatly missed by all who
knew him, the impact he
has left on numerous lives
will endure for many, many
years to come.
He is survived by his wife,
Mary Savary; two sons,
Joseph Sidney Savary II,
and Johnson Sidney Savary
Jr.; and two daughters, Mary
Elizabeth Savary Taylor
(Robert) and Laura Savary
Rees (Brett). He is also sur-
vived by 10 grandchildren:
Emily Savary, Russell
Savary, Lillian Savary, Kate
Taylor, Lauren Taylor, Jor-
dan Taylor, Matt Taylor
(Teri), Jack Rees, Sydney
Rees and Alyson Rees. In
addition, he is also survived
by several cousins, nieces
and nephews. His beloved
four-legged friend, Bull
Gator, predeceased him.
Services will be held at 3
p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, at The
Church of the Palms, 3224
Bee Ridge Road, Sarasota.
The "Old Timers" group of
the Sarasota County BarAs-
sociation will serve as hon-
orary pallbearers. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be
made to The Church of The
Palms Foundation, 3224 Bee
Ridge Road, Sarasota, FL
34239; The Pines of Sara-
sota Foundation, 1501 North
Orange Avenue, Sarasota,
FL 34236; or the University
of Florida, Levin College of
Law Foundation, 2500 S.W
Second Ave., Gainesville,
FL 32611. Toale Brothers
Funeral Homes, Colonial
Chapel, is handling the
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Richard
Szekeres, 72
BEVERLY HILLS
Richard J. Szekeres, 72, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Sunday, Sept 9,2012, under
the care of his loving family
and Hospice of Citrus
County Arrangements by
McGan Cremation Service,
Hernando, Fla.

To Place Your
("In Memory" ad,
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com
Coing imeoainga-
L s4daspiort u dt.A


Mary
Cubberley, 84
Mary Cubberley, 84, died
June 26,2012, under the lov-
ing care of her family and
Hospice of Citrus County
Mary was born July 1, 1927,
in Caldwell, N.J., to the late
Russell and Anna (Martin)
Weaver. She was a home-
maker and excellent
needlepointer, creating
many beautiful pieces that
her family and friends have
enjoyed.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her husband, Robert
Cubberley; sons, Ronald
Cubberley, Lacy, Wash.,
Robert (Lori) Cubberley,
Glen Mills, Pa., Douglas
(Laurel) Cubberley, Nor-
man, Okla., and Stuart
(Karen) Shafer, Fallbrook,
Calif.; daughters, Lisa Tyler,
Seattle, Wash., Sue (Bob)
Nute, Sandy Hook, Conn.,
and Amy (Ron) Rock, Bev-
erly Hills, Fla.; her sister,
Ellen Clark, N.J.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be at 1
p.m. Friday, Sept.14, 2012, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services. If web-
sites, photos, survivors,
memorial contributions
or other information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.







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Charles George,
80
HERNANDO
Charles Roy George, 80, of
Hernando, died Tuesday,
Sept. 11, 2012, at his resi-
dence.
Charles was born on Oct.
25, 1931, in Kittanning, Pa.,
to the late Arthur and Mary-
bell George. He was a U.S.
Navy veteran, serving more
than 21 years, retiring with
a rank of chief. Charles en-
joyed golfing and fishing. He
was an excellent archer
Survivors include his wife
of 52 years, Joyce (Sawvell)
George; two sons, Charles R.
George, Sarasota, and Carl-
ton A. George, Inverness;
two daughters, Kerron S.
Kirby, Inverness, and
Kathryn Kierczynski,
Tampico, Ill.; his brother,
Billy George, and sister,
Patty Palette, both of Canes-
burg, Pa.; 15 grandchildren;
and 24 great-grandchildren.
A celebration of life serv-
ice will be announced at a
later date at Hernando
United Methodist Church.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is as-
sisting the family with
arrangements.

OBITUARIES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Call 352-563-5660 for
details or email obits
@chronicleonline.com.


Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Verta Boyd, 77
CRYSTAL RIVER
Verta Boyd, 77, of Crystal
River, passed away Monday,
Sept 10, 2012, at the Hospice
House of Citrus County in
Lecanto, Fla. She was born
Feb. 23, 1935, in Haleyville,
Ala. She had lived in Lake-
land, Fla., before returning
here four years ago. She was
a retired receptionist for the
Watson Clinic. She was a
past president of the Crystal
River Junior Women's Club
and a loving wife, mother
and grandmother. She at-
tended the Crystal River
Church of God.
She was preceded in
death by her parents, Ira
and Tressie Wilkes, and two
sons, Reginald and Michael.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 58 years, Thomas L.
Boyd of Crystal River; son,
Tim Boyd (Sophia) of Indi-
alantic; daughter, Kay
Townsend (John) of Inglis;
five grandchildren; and five
great-grandchildren.
The funeral service will
be conducted at 2 p.m. Fri-
day, Sept. 1, at Strickland
Funeral Home Chapel in
Crystal River with the Rev.
Steve Boyd presiding. Inter-
ment will follow at Memo-
rial Gardens Cemetery in
Beverly Hills. Friends and
family will gather in visita-
tion from 1 p.m. until serv-
ice time. Arrangements are
under the care of Strickland
Funeral Home with crema-
tory, Crystal River
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


ART CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY

Art Center Theatre
PRESENTS


By spec arrangement Samuel French Inc

By Ray Cooney and John Chapman
Directed by Brady Lay


Sept.14-30
Showtimes: 7:30pm Fd.&Sat.
2:00pm Sundays
Box Office: Hours 1-4 pm Mon. through Fri.
Tickets: $18.00
000CG2S


352-746-7606
www.artcenter.cc


LiEwr SHINE 2012
Precuied Bv Sh/tphLrd lot tlih Hill/ Ept 'pal Church


The Dunnellon Concert Singers
A Salute to the Music of the Sixties


I~q2J


Due to interest, this free performance is limited to 200 ticketed
attendees. Free tickets available at Shepherd of the Hills
office and at the Chronicle's Office in Meadowcrest.


The Singers are back by
popular demand with a new
and highly skilled accompanist,
Robert Cubbage. Featured are
songs made popular by famous
recording artists plus show
tunes from Camelot, Mame,
Mary Poppins, Funny Girl and
many more. All from the 1960's


Made inAmerica: 1The Joy of Christmas
Religions in the American Context A Singing Celebration of Carols


[ UNA, OEME 4-4p


Dr. Harry S. Coverston,
Professor of Religion. Law and Philosophy.
University of Central Florida, Orlando
America has historically drawn a wide range
of religious beliefs fro Europe. Africa and
Asia, and in tum our culture has generated a
number of new religions "made in America".
Dr. Coverston will discuss the history of
American religions from colonization to the
present and conclude with ctrrenlt data on the
present religious makeup of the U.S. and whete
religion in America appears to be headed.
This presentation is funded by the Florida Humanities
Council under a grant from the National Endowment
tor the Humanities (NEH)


Shepherd of the Hill's Stacey Adams tacey Adams and Bill Kinley will
present some of their favorite Christmas music and lead a
chorus of attendees in a traditional carol sing along"


Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, ."" .I
2540 W. Norvell Br.ani High%%a iCR 4861, Lecanio "'"" RONCL
For Il/'A ,ILvmItii tall: 3'-52'..)W52 IcL. S'i i t Ip, 1


Why St Augustine?
Struggle and Survival in Early Florida


Dr. J. Michael Francis,
Professor of Florida Studies. LUniversity
of South Florida, St. Petersburg
First of two presentations on
Florida's Spanish heritage: this first
presentation will cover the struggle
for an early colony in the Americas.
Next year, 2013, will mark the 500th
anniversary of Spain's colonial
interest in Florida.
This presentation is funded by the Florida Humanities
Council under a grant from the National Endowment
for the Humanities (NEH)


Honoring Survivors and



Remembering Loves Ones

Include your loved ones and those touched
by cancer in our Chronicle Keepsake
Edition on October 2. This special edition
will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT.

*All photos & information must be submitted
by Wednesday, September 26th



.30









Call Saralynne

564-2917
20 wor Yvonne


563-3273
to reserve your space.


OBITUARIES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a


[ SUNDAY, DECEMBER





WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 A7


Alzheimer drug


may stabilize


brain plaque


Bapineuzmab

failed to help

somepatients

MARILYNN
MARCHIONE
AP Chief Medical Writer
An experimental drug
that failed to stop mental
decline in Alzheimer's pa-
tients also signaled poten-
tial benefit that suggests it
might help if given earlier,
fuller results of two major
studies show.
Some patients on the drug
had stable levels of brain
plaque and less evidence of
nerve damage compared to
others who were given a
dummy treatment, re-
searchers reported Tuesday
The drug is called bap-
ineuzumab, made by Pfizer
Inc. and Johnson & Johnson.
The new results suggest it
might work if given sooner,
before so much damage and
memory loss have occurred
that it might not be possible
to reverse, experts say
"We're very disappointed
that we were not able to
come up with a treatment to
provide to our dementia pa-
tients in the near term,"
said Dr Reisa Sperling, di-
rector of the Alzheimer's
center at Brigham and
Women's Hospital in Boston
and leader of one of the
studies.
But brain imaging and
spinal fluid tests are "very
encouraging" and suggest
the drug was "doing some-
thing to the biology of the
disease."
"We've got a path for-
ward" now to test it in peo-
ple with mild mental
impairment or those who
show plaque on brain imag-
ing but have not yet devel-
oped symptoms of
dementia, Sperling said. Of
people with mild cognitive
impairment, about 15 to 20
percent a year will develop
Alzheimer's disease.
About 35 million people
worldwide have dementia,
and Alzheimer's is the most
common type. In the U.S.,
about 5 million have
Alzheimer's. Current medi-


cines such as Aricept and
Namenda just temporarily
ease symptoms. There is no
known cure.
This year researchers had
been hopeful of major
progress in treating the dis-
ease, but study after study
has proved disappointing,
including results reported
earlier on bapineuzumab.
The drug failed to slow
mental decline or improve
activities of daily living for
patients with mild to mod-
erate Alzheimer's in two
studies in the United States
and Canada.
Bapineuzumab is de-
signed to attach to and help
clear amyloid, the stuff that
makes up the sticky plaque
that clogs patients' brains,
harming nerve cells and im-
pairing memory and
thought. Doctors don't know
whether amyloid is a cause
or just a symptom of
Alzheimer's, but many com-
panies are testing drugs to
try to remove it.
Sperling's study involved
people with a gene that
raises the risk of developing
the disease. Dr. Stephen
Salloway, a neurologist at
Brown Medical School in
Providence, R.I., led the
other study of people with-
out the gene. Both re-
searchers have consulted
for the companies that
make the drug and pre-
sented results Tuesday at a
neurology conference in
Stockholm.
Brain imaging on a subset
of patients in Sperling's
study found 9 percent less
amyloid in those on bap-
ineuzumab compared to
those on a dummy treat-
ment. The drug group had
stable levels while the oth-
ers developed more plaque.
Spinal fluid tests on some
participants also showed
the drug group had less of
another substance called p-
tau that is released when
nerve cells are damaged.
There were potential
safety concerns, including
six deaths from various
forms of cancer among
those on bapineuzumab and
none in the placebo group.
But a wider review of all
studies of the drug found
that cancer was not more
common among users.


Zuckerberg said
Facebook has
overcome hurdles
SAN FRANCISCO Face-
book CEO Mark Zuckerberg,
acknowledging concerns
about his company's stock
performance, said Tuesday
that Facebook has survived
troubles before.
He spoke to a standing-
room-only audience at a tech
conference in San Francisco
in his first interview since the
company's rocky initial public
offering in May. Facebook
Inc.'s stock has lost half its
value since the IPO.
Zuckerberg said the drop
"has obviously been disap-
pointing," but he said it's a
great time to "double down" on
the company's future.
Nielsen shows how
people use TV
differently
NEW YORK- The number
of U.S. homes that don't get
traditional television service
continues to increase, but that
doesn't mean they don't have
TVs.
The Nielsen company said
in a report issued Tuesday
three-quarters of the esti-
mated 5 million homes that
don't get TV signals over the
airways or through cable,
satellite or telecommunica-
tions companies have televi-
sions anyway.
Many of these homes are
satisfied to use their TVs for
games or get programming
through DVDs or services
such as Netflix or Apple TV,
said Dounia Turrill, senior vice
president for client insights at
Nielsen.
Moody's set to
downgrade US
without budget
NEW YORK- The U.S.
government's debt rating
could be heading for the "fiscal
cliff" along with the federal
budget.
Moody's Investors Service
on Tuesday said it would likely
cut its "Aaa" rating on U.S.
government debt, probably by
one notch, if budget negotia-
tions fail.
If Congress and the White
House don't reach a budget
deal, about $1.2 trillion in
spending cuts and tax in-
creases will automatically kick in
starting Jan. 2, a scenario that's
been dubbed the "fiscal diff,"
because it is likely to send the
economy back into recession
and drive up unemployment.


Associated Press
Facebook Inc. CEO Mark Zuckerberg spoke at a technology conference Tuesday in San
Francisco. It was his first interview since the company's rocky initial public offering ear-
lier this year.


US trade deficit
grew slightly to
$42 billion in July
WASHINGTON -The U.S.
trade deficit grew to $42 billion
in July, widened by fewer ex-
ports to Europe, India and
Brazil that offset a steep de-
cline in oil imports.
The Commerce Department
said Tuesday the trade deficit
increased 0.2 percent from
June's deficit of $41.9 billion.
U.S. exports fell 1 percent
to $183.3 billion. Sales of
autos, telecommunications
equipment and heavy machin-
ery all declined. Imports
dropped 0.8 percent to $225.3
billion.
Retail group says it
opposes card fee
settlement
NEW YORK- The Na-
tional Retail Federation is op-
posing a proposed $7.25
billion settlement Visa Inc.,
MasterCard Inc. and major
banks have agreed to pay re-
tailers for alleged fee fixing.
The retail trade association
said Tuesday its board has
given approval for it to go to
court to try to block the settle-
ment. The NRF, which is not a
party to the lawsuit that led to
the settlement, said it is un-
sure whether outside groups
will be allowed to intervene, or
if the case qualifies as a class
action.
The NRF said it believes the
proposed settlement will not
stop swipe fees from continu-
ing to rise, which will hurt both


retailers and shoppers, and that
it will prevent any future legal
challenges.
McDonald's sales
bounce back on
value deals
NEW YORK-- McDonald's
said a key sales figure climbed
3.7 percent in August, as the
fast-food chain emphasized the
value of its menu offerings amid
the challenging global economy.
The world's biggest ham-
burger chain said Tuesday its
breakfast menu and value
items pushed up sales by 3
percent in the U.S. Last month,
the figure had dipped 0.1 per-
cent in the region after the com-
pany said its promotions failed
to drive growth.
In Europe, which is McDon-
ald's biggest market and ac-
counts for 40 percent of
its business, sales at restaurants
open at least 13 months was up
3.1 percent on strength in the
U.K., France and Russia. The
Oak Brook, Ill.-based company
said its sponsorship of the Lon-
don Olympics helped lift results.
Legg Mason CEO
to step down, temp
CEO named
BALTIMORE Legg
Mason's chairman and CEO
Mark Fetting, who led the
money manager through the
difficult years during and after


the financial crisis, will step
down Oct. 1.
The asset management
company said Tuesday that
Joseph Sullivan, Legg Mason
Inc.'s head of global distribu-
tion, will become interim chief
executive as it searches for a
new CEO. The company's lead
independent director, W. Allen
Reed, will become non-execu-
tive chairman.
Fetting will remain as a con-
sultant to the Baltimore-based
company through the end of
the year.
YouTube offers new
iPhone app to fill
looming void
SAN FRANCISCO -
YouTube is being repro-
grammed for the iPhone and
iPad amid the latest fallout from
the growing hostility between
Apple and the video service's
owner, Google.
The new format debuted
Tuesday with the release of a
new YouTube application that
will introduce more advertising
and more videos on Apple's
trend-setting devices.
Changes are being made be-
cause Google Inc. and Apple
Inc. didn't renew a five-year li-
censing agreement that estab-
lished YouTube as one of the
built-in applications in the oper-
ating system that runs the
iPhone and iPad.
From wire reports

laul; laut


Lie rrSHINE2012



The Dunnellon Concert Singers


A Salute to the Music of the Sixties
"The Singers are back by
popular demand with a new
and highly skilled accompanist,
Robert Cubbage. Featured are
songs made popular by famous
recording artists plus show tunes
from Camelot, Mame, Mary
Poppins, Funny Girl and many
more. All from the 1960's
Due to interest, this free performance is limited to 200 ticketed
attendees. Free tickets available at Shepherd of the Hills
office and at the Chronicle's Office in Meadowcrest.


A.. .. i ,, ,,,qv .O. ,Sn CM(ONti CLE

Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church.
2540 % Noriell Brant HighaN ICR 48o). Lecanto
F,,r .\lo, lrlorrhn cail 352-l/"*.Pa to ill


IV\ -N SS o e t . .
It doesn't matter if you sav c ...*-. ,
15 minutes.

It doesn't matter if your neig Ilb. I I,.-,- i..
same insurance you .,

What matters right now is th.-r ..... r r.
enjoy the little things in lit. ,. 1Ir,
completely at ease bece. i-.- *.,
independent insurance ag ,-t .r *i H ..
company that stands behind Il.. i,, I.-.- ."
you and your entire family, ,. ,.1

Call or visit us: '
THE HAGAR GROUP
Inverness & Crystal River ':2- -1 1 -'
www.hagargroup c m". .. ..


(ecpg) ettI Dtnner
hosted by The Knights of Columbus

Saturday, September 15th

5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
in the
New Fr. James Hoge
Parish Center
The Menu vvill include: Italian Sausage,
Meatr Balls, Bread, Salad and Dessert.
Donations:
v' $8 or two for $15


For Tickets,
call Vic at 527-7114


CHR5ONaCLE
w chronicleonline.com
TODAY'S



NUMBER


CALL 564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO.

1. Traditional Bingo $100
2. Double Bingo $200
3. Full Card Bingo $300


www.chronicleo i ne.ccb /pet dol

Citrus 20/20's 7th Annual Fundraiser

Let's play Water Jeopardy!
with a special tribute to Gary Maidhof


s Sept. 14 ~ 6 p.m.

2/1o 0College of Central Florida
S conference center
OurWaters Dinner at 7 p.m.
Week
Local organizations will
compete in a game of
Jeopardy based on county issues!


$35 per
S person
Come early to bid on
silent auction items.

Help us kick-off this year s
Save Our Waters Week


t"w&---prI For ticket purchase and
..Ol.. information call: 201-0149


Business HIGHLIGHTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS







A8 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


I HowTKs *I '1,H"TI f i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
AmlntlGrp 2301300 33.45 +.15 CheniereEn 148420 16.29 +.57 SiriusXM 727305 2.50 -.01 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAm 1972302 9.03 +.45 NavideaBio 86970 2.64 -.87 Intel 528613 23.34 +.08 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SprintNex 872929 5.00 -.15 SamsO&G 32011 1.21 +.13 Facebookn 448315 19.43 +.62 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
S&P500ETF733626 143.91 +.40 Vringo 22266 3.47 +.05 Cisco 309264 19.04 -.11 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SPDRFncl 554300 15.68 +.13 Rentech 19981 2.38 +.07 MicronT 288533 6.36 -.05 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd-Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
Amrep 8.25 +1.31 +18.9 ASpecRIty 5.40 +.66 +13.9 WSBHIdgs 5.34 +2.42 +82.9 ing qualification. n Stockwasa new issue in the lastyear.The 52-week high andlowfig-
CSVLgNGs 28.81 +4.32 +17.6 ImpacMtg 8.15 +.81 +11.0 CellTher rs 3.56 +.99 +38.5 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences.pp-
NavistrpfD 9.35 +1.39 +17.5 Alderonlrg 2.01 +.17 +9.2 SunesisPh 3.49 +.85 +32.2 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Gafisa SA 4.34 +.47 +12.1 Suprmlnd 4.05 +.24 +6.3 Sigmatr 4.50 +.77 +20.6 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi- Trades will be settled when the
AmrRIty 2.67 +.28 +11.7 Metalico 2.79 +.16 +6.1 Rdiff.cm 4.24 +.68 +19.1 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
ETLg2mVi 25.57 -9.43 -26.9 NavideaBio 2.64 -.87 -24.8 CmplGnom 2.69 -.35 -11.5
CSVInvNG 22.32 -4.81 -17.7 Aerosonic 3.25 -.46 -12.4 CenGrdAlf 11.43 -1.48 -11.4 I '
DBCmdyS 33.22 -5.37 -13.9 ImmunoCII 3.06 -.16 -5.0 DigitAllyrs 4.36 -.56 -11.4
K12 20.31 -3.15 -13.4 Protalix 4.89 -.26 -5.0 HotTopic 8.96 -.92 -9.3 52-Week Net % YT[
PitnBpr 250.07 -38.21 -13.3 PyramidOil 4.19 -.18 -4.1 CentGard If 11.23 -1.08 -8.8 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ct


DIARY


2,039 Advanced
978 Declined
116 Unchanged
3,133 Total issues
202 New Highs
15 New Lows
3,363,147,992 Volume


DIARY


276 Advanced
160 Declined
28 Unchanged
464 Total issues
12 New Highs
3 New Lows
97,545,711 Volume


1,447
990
147
2,584
88
23
1,562,813,157


13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 411.54Dow Jones Utilities
8,327.67 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,139.61 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,438.74 1,074.77S&P 500
15,047.44 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
847.92 601.71 Russell 2000


13,323.36
5,133.50
469.91
8,246.15
2,436.97
3,104.53
1,433.56
14,997.77
841.92


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


+69.07 +.52 +9.05 +19.97
+34.89 +.68 +2.27+13.80
-1.32 -.28 +1.13+10.45
+53.75 +.66 +10.29 +15.98
+28.61 +1.19 +6.96+10.72
+.51 +.02+19.17 +22.60
+4.48 +.31 +13.99 +22.23
+43.99 +.29 +13.71 +21.25
+2.55 +.30 +13.63+21.71


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg Bar iPVix 9.86 -.07
BarVibMdT 37.31 -1.09
Barrid{G 39.46 +.08
Baxter 59.70 +.37
ABB Ltd 18.90 +.36 Beam Inc 60.13 -.15
ACE Ltd 75.09 +.28 BeazerHm 3.23 +.07
AESCorp 11.50 +.04 BectDck 78.25 +.59
AFLAC 48.62 +.62 BerkHaA130170.00 +470.00
AGL Res 40.78 -.09 BerkH B 86.76 +.15
AKSteel 5.99 +.18 BestBuy 18.58 +.40
AOL 33.09 +.36 BBarrett 24.88 +.46
ASAGold 23.58 +.15 BioMedR 19.23 +.41
AT&T Inc 37.62 +.20 BIkHillsCp 34.56 +.11
AbtLab 67.33 +.14 BlkDebtStr 4.42 +.07
AberFitc 35.97 -.59 BlkEnhC&l 13.20 -.06
Accenture 64.88 +.86 BlkGlbOp 13.54 +.03
AccoBrds 6.97 +.07 Blacksbne 13.99 +.14
AdamsEx 11.21 +.02 BlockHR 16.51 +.01
AMD 3.75 +.28 Boeing 71.27 +.19
Aeropostf 14.28 -.18 BorgWarn 73.36 +1.74
Aetna 37.89 -.31 BostBeer 104.43 +.10
Agilent 37.83 -.43 BostProp 112.68 -.53
Agnieog 48.18 +.19 BostonSci 5.58 -.02
AlcatelLuc 1.16 -.01 BoydGm 6.57 +.25
Alcoa 9.33 +.28 BrMySq 33.56 +.42
AllegTch 33.25 +1.46 Brunswick 24.64 -.32
Allergan 89.30 +.25 Buckeye 49.25 -.12
Allete 41.43 -.19 BurgerKn 14.07 +.19
AlliBGIbHi 15.68 +.17 CBREGrp 17.65 +.37
AlliBInco 8.54 +.05 CBS B 36.84 -.06
AlliBern 14.68 +.33 CH Engy 65.25 +.03
AllisonTn 18.88 -.52 CMS Eng 23.28 -.10
Allstate 38.50 +.25 CNOFind 9.81 +.14
AlphaNRs 7.45 +.53 CSS Inds 20.60 +.22
AIpAlerMLP 16.31 -.01 CSX 22.66 +.38
Altria 34.39 -.06 CVSCare 46.05 -.14
AmBev 37.73 +.43 CYS Invest 14.60 +.02
Ameren 32.50 -.05 CblvsnNY 15.77 +.02
AMovilL 25.30 +.10 CabotOGs 44.51 +2.40
AEagleOut 22.71 -.21 Calix 5.86 +.39
AEP 43.43 +.04 CallGolf 5.97 +.11
AmExp 57.23 -.29 Calpine 17.37 -.17
AmlniGrp 33.45 +.15 Cameron 57.20 +1.29
AmSIP3 7.37 -.03 CampSp 34.59 -.12
AmTower 71.74 +.34 CdnNRsgs 33.04 +.68
Amerigas 41.96 -.25 CapOne 56.47 -.57
AmeriBrgn 37.77 -.26 CapifiSrce 7.33
Anadarko 71.62 +1.22 CapM pB 15.59 -.11
AnglogldA 34.30 +.50 CardnlHIth 38.11 -.14
ABInBev 85.03 +.76 CareFusion 27.93 +.24
Annaly 17.65 +.06 CarMax 32.21 -.01
Apache 89.79 +.21 Carnival 36.89 +.37
AquaAm 25.21 -.26 Caterpillar 88.60 +1.50
ArcelorMit 16.12 +.35 Celanese 39.78 -.32
ArchCoal 6.83 +.24 Cemex 8.08 +.15
ArchDan 27.33 +09 Cemigpfs 15.77 -1.42
ArmosDor 13.81 -.12 CenterPnt 20.90 -.03
ArmourRsd 7.61 +.03 CenEIBras 6.32 -.15
Ashland 76.00 -.73 CntryLink 42.36 +.48
AsdEstat 15.23 -.03 Cenveo 2.30 +.05
AssuredG 15.14 +.22 Checkpnt 8.28 +.05
ATMOS 35.45 -.36 ChesEng 20.10 +.53
AuRicog 5.91 +.08 ChesUfi 46.72 +.25
Avon 15.91 +.03 Chevron 114.18 +.22
BB&TCp 32.56 -.02 ChicB&l 40.29 +.81
BHPBilILt 68.49 +1.35 Chieos 19.08 -.11
BP PLC 42.57 +.53 Chimera 2.69 +.04
BRFBrasil 16.35 +.17 ChinaMble 52.95 +.59
BRT 6.27 +.01 Chipofe 332.51 -.30
BakrHu 47.28 +.63 Chubb 75.22 +.46
BallCorp 42.95 +.26 Cigna 46.55 +.56
BcBilVArg 8.41 +.21 CindBell 5.14 +.07
BeoBradpf 16.80 +.16 Citfgroup 32.66 +.83
BeoSantSA 7.84 +.24 CleanHarb 53.41 +.19
BeoSBrasil 7.95 +.23 CliffsNRs 41.68 +2.50
BkofAm 9.03 +.45 Clorox 72.11 -.21
BkMontg 59.61 +.29 Coach 61.48 -1.12
BkNYMel 22.74 +.04 CobaltlEn 22.59 -.57
Barclay 13.72 +.62 CCFemsa 125.40 +1.89


CocaColas 37.77 +.11
CocaCE 30.55 +.09
Coeur 24.80
CohStlnfra 18.25 +.15
ColgPal 102.82 -.88
CollctvBrd 21.69
Comerica 31.71 +.01
CmwREIT 15.00 +.22
CompSci 32.90 -.19
Con-Way 30.61 +.63
ConAgra 25.69 +.04
ConocPhils 56.37 +.19
ConsolEngy 31.22 +.21
ConEd 60.31 -.18
ConstellA 32.80 +.04
Cnvrgys 16.03 +.05
Copel 17.10 -.23
Corning 12.77 +.19
Cosan Ltd 14.65
CottCp 8.42 +.02
CoventryH 41.23 -.18
Covidien 56.99 +.20
Crane 39.76 +.06
CSVS2xVxS 1.84 -.08
CSVellVSt 15.96 +.11
CredSuiss 21.49 +.51
CrwnCsfie 64.12 +.37
CubeSmart 13.05 +.07
Cummins 98.25 +.86

DCTIndl 6.57 +.09
DDR Corp 15.57 +10
DNP Selct 10.05 +.05
DNP Sel rt .03 +.01
DR Horton 20.31 +.55
DSWInc 63.84 -1.19
DTE 59.61 +.13
DanaHIdg 14.34 +.26
Danaher 54.54 +.45
Darden 53.88 -.06
DaVita 97.60 -.86
DeVry 21.65 +1.06
DeanFds 16.53 +.28
Deere 78.25 +1.06
DelphiAun 31.10 +.23
DeltaAir 9.28 -.10
Demndw n 28.97 +.52
DenburyR 16.68 +.74
DeutschBk 42.62 +2.44
DevonE 60.62 +1.25
DiamRk 10.17 +.11
DxFnBullrs 106.19 +2.31
DirSCBear 14.83 -.09
DirFnBear 18.25 -.44
DirSPBear 17.57 -.16
DirDGIdBII 14.36 +.23
DrxEnBear 7.68 -.25
DirEMBear 12.49 -.49
DirxSCBull 62.34 +.30
Discover 38.34 +.12
Disney 51.56 +.04
DollarGen 48.83 -.14
DomRescs 52.94 -.34
DEmmett 23.71
DowChm 30.24 -.06
DrPepSnap 44.83 +.26
DuPont 51.05 +.42
DukeEn rs 64.46 -.37
DukeRlty 15.23 +.14
EMC Cp 27.32 -.06
EOG Res 112.43 +.03
EQTCorp 56.83 +1.92
EastChms 56.54 -.63
Eaton 47.62 +.50
EVEnEq 10.99 +.03
Edisonlnt 44.43 +.09
ElPasoPpl 34.77 -.71
Elan 10.99 +.08


BdorGld g 14.55
EmersonEl 49.42
EmpDist 21.41
EnbrdgEPt 28.44
EnCanag 22.97
EngyTsfr 42.76
EnergySol 2.63
EnPro 38.83
ENSCO 57.58
Entergy 67.76
EntPrPt 52.83
EqtyRsd 59.36


GabHIthW 9.14 +19
GabUlI 8.13 -.03
GafisaSA 4.34 +.47
GameStop 21.77 +.18
Gannett 17.00 +.70
Gap 35.13 -.35
GenDynam 65.98 -.34
GenElec 21.59 +.11
GenGrPrp 20.09 -.51
GenMills 39.29
GenMobors 22.97 -.01
GenOn En 2.66 +.06


Hertz 14.65 -.24
Hess 54.59 +1.46
HewlettP 17.95 +.52
HighwdPrp 33.10 +.05
Hillshiren 25.89 -.44
HollyFront 40.02 +.45
HomeDp 56.72 -.58
Honwlllni 59.79 +.23
HospPT 24.57 +.08
HostHofis 16.50 +.03
HovnanE 3.60 +.29
Humana 70.10


iShR2K 84.06
iShUSPfd 39.79
iSRus3K 84.96
iShREst 66.39
iShDJHm 18.82
iStar 7.61
Idacorp 42.53
ITW 60.32
Imafon 5.94
IngerRd 45.98
IntegrysE 54.25
IntcnbEx 135.75


-I-


PINE AVENUE

BUSINESS CENTER


FIRST MONTH


FREE!
With a signed one-year lease'

1000 sq. ft. offices
for lease with parking
- ..... in downtown Inverness


For Information Call 32t-344-0040

or email drywellgroup@tampabay.rr.com


EsteeLdrs 60.22 -.60
ExeoRes 7.66 +.25
Exelon 35.49 -.21
Express 15.52 -.28
ExxonMbl 89.62 +.14
FMC Tech 48.66 +.52
FTI Cnslt 27.55 +.59
FairchldS 14.46 -.23
FedExCp 88.70 +.74
FedSignl 6.44 +.04
Ferrellgs 19.27 +.13
Ferro 3.83 -.03
RbriaCelu 8.63 +.29
RdlNRn 19.81 +.02
RdNatlnfo 31.96 -.50
Rfih&Pac 13.31 -.26
FstHorizon 9.57 +.17
FTActDiv 8.26 +.09
FtTrEnEq 12.15 +.02
FrstEngy 42.69 -.15
Ruor 56.99 +1.13
FootLodckr 36.50 -.33
FordM 10.15 +.04
ForestLab 34.67 -.15
ForestOils 8.17 +.30
FBHmScn 26.00
FMCG 39.93 +.22
Fusion-io 28.22 +.15

GATX 43.69 +.22
GNC 40.11 -.03
GabelliET 5.84 +.09


Genworth 5.76 +.04
Gerdau 9.63 +.14
GlaxoSKIn 45.86 +.57
GolLinhas 5.13 +.17
GoldFLtd 12.96 -.10
Goldcrpg 42.29 +.13
GoldmanS 116.69 +2.01
Goodyear 13.06 -.06
GtPlainEn 21.76 +.06
Griffon 9.90 -.07
GuangRy 14.85 +.27
GugSPEW 52.49 +.29
GugSP400ew32.04 +.09
HCP Inc 46.73 +.45
HSBC 45.39 +.50
HSBCCap 26.02 +.02
HalconRrs 8.55 +.34
Hallibrtn 35.35 +1.08
HanJS 16.43 +.05
HanPrmDv 14.51 -.08
Hanesbrds 32.77 -.06
Hanoverlns 36.77 +.08
HarleyD 45.03 +.31
HarmonyG 8.67 -.01
HartfdFn 19.22 +.18
HawaiiEl 27.37 -.17
HItCrREIT 58.45 +.45
HItMgmt 7.93 +.06
HIthcrRlty 24.58 +.23
Heckmann 4.13 +.14
HeclaM 5.73 +.05
Heinz 56.09 -.06
Hersha 5.34 +.09


Huntsmn 15.34 +.50
IAMGIdg 14.02 +.28
ICICI Bk 34.69 +.73
ING 8.49 +.12
iShGold 16.86 +.06
iSAsfia 23.81 +.36
iShBraz 54.84 +.75
iSCan 28.56 +.13
iShEMU 30.96 +.55
iShGer 22.74 +.47
iShHK 17.53 +.17
iShJapn 9.11 +.04
iSh Kor 57.33 +.50
iSMalas 14.38 +.07
iShMex 63.25 +.38
iShSing 13.33 +.14
iSTaiwn 12.97 +.16
iShUK 17.42 +.10
iShSilver 32.41 +.12
iShDJDv 58.03 -.02
iShChina25 33.40 +.34
iSSP500 144.46 +.36
iShBAgB 111.78 -.13
iShEMkts 40.60 +.48
iShiBxB 120.02 +.10
iShEMBd 120.71 +16
iSSPGth 77.61 +.08
iShB20T 123.55 -.78
iS Eafe 53.44 +.60
iShiBxHYB 93.01 +.63
iSR1KV 72.28 +.27
iSR1KG 66.70 +.05
iSR2KV 74.52 +.32


IBM 203.27 +2.32
InfiGame 12.72 +.35
IntPap 34.48 -.31
Interpublic 11.21 +.13
Invesco 24.79 +.19
IronMtn 32.63 -.26
ItauUnibH 16.41 +.17

JPMorgCh 39.60 +.84
Jabil 22.21 +.34
Jaguar g 1.36 +.05
JanusCap 9.00 -.04
Jefferies 15.43 +.03
JohnJn 68.20 +.02
JohnsnCfi 28.14 +.43
JoyGIbl 56.47 +1.27
JnprNtwk 18.54 +.33
K12 20.31 -3.15
KB Home 12.24 +.22
KBR Inc 29.95 +.41
KCSouthn 80.68 +.94
Kaydons 23.03 +.09
KA EngTR 26.79 +.01
Kelbgg 50.43 +.16
KeyEngy 8.37 -.22
Keycorp 8.65 +.02
KimbClk 82.35 -.02
Kimco 20.56 +.15
KindME 81.59 +.42
KindMorg 35.75 -.01
KindrM wt 3.47 -.04
Kinross g 9.46 +.02


KnghtCap 2.70 +.03 MonstrWw 7.91 -.24 PepsiCo 71.58 -.26 RepubSvc 28.22 +.01
KodiakOg 9.45 +.13 Moodys 42.50 +.83 Prmian 15.17 +.05 ResrceCap 5.91
Kohls 52.02 -.66 MorgStan 17.25 +.64 PetrbrsA 21.57 +.57 Revlon 12.90 +.03
KrispKrm 7.52 +.05 MSEmMkt 14.32 +.11 Petrobras 22.31 +.57 ReynAmer 44.03 -.37
Kroger 23.40 +.35 Mosaic 60.33 +.28 Pfizer 24.17 +.07 RioTlint 49.33 +.97
LDKSolar 1.27 +.04 MotrlaSolu 49.19 +.35 PhilipMor 88.38 -.24 RiteAid 1.28 +.01
LSICorp 7.84 +.15 MurphO 52.87 +.22 Phillips66n 45.59 +1.05 RobtHalf 27.21 +.06
LTCPrp 33.80 +.20 NCR Corp 23.10 +.21 PiedNG 32.22 -.22 RodckTen 66.51 -.46
LaZBoy 15.11 +.01 NRG Egy 22.31 +.35 Pier 1 19.19 -.13 RodkwAut 70.83 -1.61
Ladede 42.02 -.30 NVEnergy 18.02 -.07 PimoStrat 12.53 +.09 RockdColl 51.38 +.25
LVSands 43.76 +.35 NYSE Eur 26.02 +09 PinWst 52.38 -.03 Rowan 37.32 +.68
LeapFrog 8.66 +.31 Nabors 15.65 +.30 PioNtrl 105.57 +2.37 RylCarb 29.79 +.66
LeggMason 26.85 +1.38 NatFuGas 52.70 +.42 PitnyBw 14.42 +.26 RoyDShllIA 71.73 +.75
LeggPlat 24.58 +.28 NatGrid 54.56 +.10 PlainsEx 36.65 +.56 Royce 12.94 +.06
LennarA 33.08 -.11 NOilVarco 83.13 +2.11 PlumCrk 41.01 -.12 Roce B 25.56 -.04
Lexmark 21.98 +.31 Navistar 24.58 +59 Polaris s 82.41 +1.65
LbtyASG 4.19 +.06 NewAmHi 11.16 +.05 Polypore 36.91 +.95
LillyEli 46.49 -.03 NJRscs 45.64 +.29 PostPrp 50.76 -.06 SAIC 12.43 +.14
Limited 48.43 -.41 NewOriEd 14.50 +10 Potash 42.88 -.11 SCANA 48.27 +.02
LincNat 24.43 +.11 NYCmlyB 13.62 +.06 PwshDB 29.07 +.06 SKTIcm 14.77 +.31
Lindsay 69.95 +.22 NYnTmes 9.55 +05 PSUSDBull 21.91 -.17 SpdrDJIA 133.09 +.61
Linkedln 117.90 +.10 Newcastle 7.66 +.14 PwShPfd 14.84 +.01 SpdrGold 167.90 +.61
LloydBkg 2.35 +.06 NewellRub 18.80 +.05 PShEMSov 30.72 +.06 SpdrlntRE 39.48 +.41
LodckhdM 92.24 +.21 NewfidExp 33.99 +.59 Praxair 106.58 -.21 SPMid 182.54 +.12
Lorillard 121.00 -2.56 NewmtM 52.00 +.64 PrecDrill 8.69 +.30 S&P500ETF143.91 +.40
LaPac 14.17 +.04 NewpkRes 7.67 +.10 PrinFnd 28.01 +.33 SpdrHome 24.39 +.11
Lowes 28.60 -.09 Nexeng 25.55 +.07 ProLogis 36.18 +.45 SpdrS&PBk 23.53 +.15
nBasA 4940 +.07 NextEraEn 67.74 -.20 ProShtS&P 34.33 -.09 SpdrLehHY 40.38 +.19
uI 5 NiSource 25.27 +.08 PrUShS&P 13.84 -.06 SpdrRefi 63.20 -.24
M&TBk 91.76 +1.32 NielsenH 28.43 +.10 PrUltQQQs 60.27 -.20 SpdrOGEx 56.33 +1.16
M&TBk 91.76 +1.32.36 PrUShQQQ 27.99 +.10 SpdrMetM 44.45 +.55
MBIA 11.53 +.05 NobleCorp 37.05 +30 ProUItSP 60.67 +.32 Safeway 16.40 +.04
MDURes 3.22.45 +.08 NobleEn 93.94 +.83 ProUShL20 15.80 +.19 StJoe 20.50 +.47
MFA Fnd 8.33 +.04 Nokiap 2.79 +16 ProUPShD3017.17 -.26 Stude 39.43 +.29
MCR 10.06 +.05 Nordsrm 57.77 .09 ProShtR2K 24.97 -.03 Saks 11.20 -.24
MCR 10.0674 +.1305 Noriko 73.52 +1.12 PrUIltSP500 89.02 +.68 Salesforce 150.79 +1.45
MGIC 1.74 +.13 NoestUt 37.94 -.18 PrUVxSTrs 38.06 -.57 SallyBty 27.06 -.12
MGMRsts 10.78 -.14 NorthropG 7.42 +.37 ProUltSIvs 55.22 +.45 SJuanB 13.97 +.05
MSCquarinc 35.66 -.56 NStarRIt 6.10 +.08 ProUShEuro 20.13 -.31 SandRdge 7.20 +.08
Macysquaie 42.07 -.2 NSovarts 59.5610 +.6108 ProctGam 68.26 -.25 Sanofi 43.18 +1.48
MageiMPr 84.67 -.08 NuSHn 44.96 +.84 ProgsvCp 19.80 +.17 Sdichlmbrg 73.66 +.97
Magnalntg 45.87 +-.0854 Nucor 39.28 +.15 PUSSP500 rs39.30 -.29 Schwab 13.92
MagHRes 4.54 +.10 NustarEn 48.99 +.05 Prudent 56.68 +56 ScrippsNet 61.38 +1.37
Manitowoc 14.07 +.07 NuvMuOpp 15.30 +.06 PSEG 31.54 -.24 SeadrillLtd 40.25 +.28
Manulifegwoc 12.08 +.23 NvPfdlnpo 9.83 PubStrg 144.03 -.18 SealAir 15.60 -.05
MaratnuifeghnO 29.22 +.75 Nuv23 QPf2 9.35 +.12 PulteGrp 14.67 +.16 Sensient 37.40 -.20
MarathnO 29.22 +.75 Pf2 9 +.2 PPrT 5.69 +.01 ShawGrp 42.95 +.14
MarathPet 53.35 +.99 OGEEngy 54.32 -.14 QEP Res 30.66 +1.02 SiderurNac 5.77 +.24
MktVGold 49.81 +.33 OasisPet 30.53 -.07 Qihoo360 24.00 +1.08 SilvWhtng 36.04 +.13
MVOilSvs 41.62 +.69 OcciPet 86.44 +.12 QuanexBld 18.10 +.12 SimonProp 157.74 +1.53
MVSemin 32.57 +.16 Oceaneeg 55.55 +.95 QuantaSvc 24.54 +.08 Skechers 20.85 -.18
MktVRus 29.15 +.38 OenFn 26.83 +.60 Questar 19.99 -.15 SmithAO 55.61 +.45
MktVJrGId 23.27 +.29 OfficeDpt 1.89 +.05 QksilvRes 4.02 +.17 SmithfF 20.71 +.05
MarlntA 39.34 +.37 OiSAs 4.04 +.16 RPM 28.22 -.05 Smudcker 86.01 +.16
MarshM 33.97 -.09 OldRepub 9.34 +.08 Rackspace 64.15 +.15 SonoeoP 30.13 -.91
MStewrt 2.96 +.01 Olin 22.63 +.05 RadianGrp 4.84 +.22 SonyCp 11.93 +.18
Masmo 14.41 +.23 OmegaHIt 24.48 +.10 RadioShk 2.68 -.03 SoJerInd 50.90 -.59
McDrmlnt 12.18 +.21 Omncre 33.95 +.72 Ralcorp 72.20 -.81 SouthnCo 45.42 -.27
McDnlds 91.20 -.10 Omnicom 53.53 +.21 RLauren 156.22 -4.09 SwstAirl 8.95 -.20
McGrwH 52.94 +.19 OnAssign 16.71 -.27 RangeRs 70.57 +2.82 SwstnEngy 34.16 +1.66
McMoRn 13.00 +.36 ONEOKs 46.15 +.25 RJamesFn 37.26 +.48 SpectraEn 28.66 -.07
McEwenM 4.32 -.08 OneokPtrs 57.29 +.33 Rayonier 50.53 +.02 SprintNex 5.00 -.15
MeadJohn 74.71 -1.07 OshkoshCp 26.75 +.23 Raytheon 57.39 +.05 SprottGold 14.85 +.02
MeadWvco 29.55 +.05 OwensCorn 33.80 Rltylno 42.26 -.25 SP Mats 37.02 +.13
Mechel 7.09 +.32 Owenslll 19.76 +.14 RedHat 57.18 -1.24 SP HIthC 39.41 +.02
MedProp 10.49 +.03 RegalEnt 13.64 -.06 SP CnSt 35.61 -.11
Medids 43.60 +.08 RegionsFn 7.33 -.09 SPConsum 46.69 -.02
Medtrnic 41.68 +.22 PNC 63.96 +.08 Renren 3.77 ... SPEngy 73.91 +.78
Merck 44.33 +.07 PNM Res 20.79 -.15 SP En 73.91 +78
MetLife 35.36 +.38 PPG 115.87 +.08
MeroPCS 10.06 +29 PPLCorp 28.93 -.20
MefroHIth 8.32 +.18 PVR Pfrs 24.23 +.09 T S
MKorsn 53.32 -.18 PallCorp 57.61 +.68
MidAApt 67.79 +.34 PaloANetn 66.60 -5.15 The remainder of the
MobileTele 19.52 -.15 Pandora 9.91 +.08
MolsCoorB 45.35 +.14 PeabdyE 24.34 +.64 NYSE listings can be
Molyeorp 12.08 +.15 Pengrthg 7.02 +.12
MoneyGrs 15.82 -.27 Penney 29.47 +.77 found on the next page.
Monsanto 89.50 +.08 PepBoy 9.92 ... ge.
PepeoHold 19.01 -.23


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.74 -.01
AbdnEMTel 20.13 +.14
AdmRsc 36.14 +.14
Advenox .67 -.04
AlexeoRg 4.00 +.02
AlldNevG 35.59 +.56
AlmadnMg 2.85 +.14
AmApparel 1.29 +.07
AfiatsaRg .14 +.00
Augustag 2.77 +.03
Aurizong 4.75 +.13
AvalnRare 1.93


Bacterin 1.70 +.05 CornerstStr 7.64 +.09
BarcUBS36 44.24 +.25 CrSuislneo 3.96 -.02
BarcGSOil 23.70 +.18 CrSuiHiY 3.27 +.03
BrclndiaTR 52.76 +.65 Crosshrg .18 -.00
BrigusG g .96 -.01
BritATob 101.81 +1.90
CardiumTh .23 -.01 DeourEg .18 +.01
CelSd .33 EVLtdDur 16.78 +.19
CFCdag 22.97 +.16 EVMuniBd 14.01 +.09
CheniereEn 16.29 +.57 EVMuni2 13.75 -.05
ChinaShen .43 -.03 EllswthFd 7.22 +.01
ClaudeRg .84 +.03 EmeraldOil 1.06 -.13
ClghGlbOp 11.40 +.06 EnovaSys .10 +.00
Contango 55.25 -1.98 EntreeGold .78 +.07
CornstProg 5.70 +.03 FrkStPrp 11.51 +.28


GamGldNR 14.49 +.01
GascoEngy .16 +.01
Gastargrs 1.83 +.01
GenMoly 2.85 +.11
GeoGlobIR .16 +.03
GoldResrc 19.91 -.56
GoldStdVg 1.81 +.07
GoldenMin 6.14 -.17
GoldStrg 1.60 +.02
GIdFId 2.10 -.06
GranTrrag 5.23 +.03
GrtBasGg .25 +.01
GtPanSilvg 2.16 +.01


Hemisphrx .85 -.03
HooperH .62 +.00
HstnAEn 1.42 +.32
ImmunoCII 3.06 -.16
ImpacMtg 8.15 +.81
ImpOilgs 48.27 +.14
IndiaGC .21 +.01
InovioPhm .61
IntellgSys 1.55 +.01


KeeganRg 3.98 +.07
LadThalFn 1.35 -.07
LkShrGldg 1.07 +.01
LucasEngy 1.90 +.22


NA Pall g 2.06 -.05 Rentech 2.38 +.07
NDynMng 3.69 -.01 RexahnPh .51 +.04
NthnO&G 18.78 +.13 Richmntg 4.56 +.17
MAG Svg 11.29 + .01 NovaBayP 1.45 +.07 Rubion 3.64 +.01
MadCatzg .67 +.03 N aCpp n 2.14 -.08
MeetMe 2.40 +.07 Nov d 5
Metalio 2.79 +.16 SamsO&G 1.21 +.13
MdwGoldg 1.32 -.03 Sandstgrs 10.12 +.02
MineoG g .67 +.05 PalafnTch .60 +.02 Senesco .21 -.01
NTNBuzz .18 ... ParaG&S 2.60 -.08 SprottRLg 1.44 -.01
NavideaBio 2.64 -.87 PhrmAth 1.26 +.08 SynergyRs 2.82 +.09
NeoStem .67 -.05 PlatGpMet 1.17 +.05 TanzRyg 4.73 +.16
NBRESec 4.82 Protalix 4.89 -.26 Taseko 3.43 +.05
Neuralstem .79 +.01 PyramidOil 4.19 -.18 Timminsg 2.80 +.14
Nevsung 4.59 +.12 QuestRMg 1.44 +.06 TrnsafiPet 1.09 +.03
NwGoldg 11.32 +.14 RareEleg 4.57 +.13 TriangPet 7.30 +.13


Tuows g 1.38
UQMTech 1.33 +.14
Uranerz 1.48 -.01
UraniumEn 2.79 +.08


VantageDrl 1.66 +.04
VirnetX 28.75 +.75
VistaGold 3.38 +.08
Vringo 3.47 +.05
Walterlnv 34.31 +.48
WFAdvlnco 10.49 -.02
YMBiog 1.82 -.06


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMC Net 41.52 +.67
APITech 3.04 -.04
ASML HId 55.56 +.14
Abads h 35.30 -.94
Abiomed 20.39 +.03
Abraxas 2.23 +.07
AcadaTc 26.53 -.11
AcadiaHI n 22.03 +.31
AcadiaPh 2.05
Accuray 5.67 -.32
Achillion 7.78 +.46
AcmePkt 18.86 -.24
AeordaTh 25.95 +.40
AcfvsBliz 11.99 +.01
Acxiom 18.28 -.21
AdobeSy 32.43 +.30
Adtran 20.13 +.57
AdvEnld 13.39 -.17
AEternagh .53 -.01
Affymax 19.17 +.24
Affymetrix 3.80 +.05
AirTrnsp 4.67 +.01
AkamaiT 38.12 -.37
Akorn 14.52 -.03
Alexion 109.65 -.42
AlignTech 38.10 +.62
Alkermes 18.77 -.17
AllotComm 27.52 -.17
AllscriptH 11.32 +.12
AlnylamP 18.81 +.16
AlteraCplf 37.43 -.16
Amarin 13.56 -.85
Amazon 255.67 -1.42
ACapAgy 35.66 +.22
AmCapLd 11.51 +.09
ACapMtg 25.47 +.39
ARItyCTn 12.10 -.14
ASoft If 8.06 +.06
Amgen 83.94 -.11
AmkorTch 4.65 +.03
Amyris 3.45 +.22
Anadigc 1.23 +.02
AnalogDev 40.23 +.16
Anlogic 70.55 +.51
Analystlnt 3.90 +.09
Ancestry 30.79 -.19
AngiesLn 10.93 +1.04
Ansys 71.94 -.63
AntaresP 3.89 -.01
AntheraPh .94
A123Sysh .29 +.06
ApolloGrp 28.74 +.71
Apollolnv 8.08 +.09
Applelnc 660.59 -2.15
ApldMati 11.65 -.04
AMCC 5.36 -.18
Approach 31.73 +.16
ArQule 5.42 -.08
ArchCap 40.65 +.24
ArcfcCat 44.29 -1.27
ArenaPhm 7.99 -.23
AresCaph 17.68 +.12
AriadP 23.01 +.65
ArkBest 8.47 +.47
ArmHId 26.40 +.05
ArrayBio 5.54 -.02
Arris 13.86 +.06
ArubaNet 20.03 +.07
AscenaRts 20.81 -.18
AscentSolr 1.76 +.03
AspenTech 24.82 +.11
AspnBio rs 1.83 +.40
AsscdBanc 13.11 +.03
AstexPhm 3.18 -.11
AfiasAir 55.72 -.52
Atmel 6.27 +.15
Audience n 6.76 -.38
AudCodes 1.93 -.01
Autodesk 32.19 +.22
AutoData 58.84 -.20
AvagoTch 34.96 -.04
AvanirPhm 3.22 -.07
AVEO Ph 9.99 +.13
AviatNetw 2.26 +.03


AvisBudg 16.47 -.25 CleanDsl 2.64 +.27
Aware 6.50 +.10 CleanEngy 13.57 +.02
B/EAero 39.52 -.67 Clearwire 1.64 -.05
BGCPtrs 4.83 +.06 Codets 2.83 +.11
BJsRest 43.94 +.63 CoffeeH 7.34 -.52
BMCSft 42.76 +.06 CogentC 20.33 -.18
Baidu 109.81 +.65 CognizTech 67.26 +.44
Bazaarvcn 14.45 -.68 CogoGrp 1.87 +.01
BeacnRfg 28.99 +.21 Coinstar 53.49 +.72
BeasleyB 5.12 +.13 ColdwCrkh .62 +.04
BedBath 69.33 +.59 Comcast 34.27 +.10
BioRelLab 28.39 +.79 Comcspd 33.51 +.11
BioDIvrylf 5.53 -.13 CommSys 11.41 -.10
BioFuelrs 4.25 +.15 CommVIt 53.84 +.78
Biogenldc 151.95 +.35 CmplGnom 2.69 -.35
BioMarin 38.58 -.03 Compuwre 10.08 -.06
BioSanters 1.40 +.01 Comverse 6.27 +.03
BIkRKelso 10.11 -.05 ConcurTch 74.30 -.31
BloominBn 14.44 +.02 Conmed 27.57 +.03
BobEvans 40.67 +.07 Conns 24.34 -.45
BodyCentrl 8.93 +.03 ConstantC 20.35 -.36
BonTon 14.00 +.90 Coparts 27.81 +.50
BostPrv 10.03 +.20 CorinthC 2.38 -.02
BttmlnT 23.19 -.24 CornerTher 6.19 -.08
BreitBurn 18.99 +.24 Costeo 99.52 -.93
Brightcvn 11.37 -.65 CowenGp 2.72 +.02
Brightpnt 8.96 +.01 Cree Inc 27.81 +.23
Broadcom 35.59 +.01 Crocs 18.24 +.02
BroadSoft 38.44 +1.18 CrosstxLP 13.91 -.20
BrcdeCm 6.19 +.04 Ctrip.eom 17.18 +.03
BrooksAuto 8.03 +.06 CubistPh 47.68 +.32
BrukerCp 12.79 -.21 Cyberonics 50.10 -.03
BuffabWW 82.74 +.97 CypSemi 12.44 +.17
BldrFstSrc 4.72 -.04 Cytoldneth .83 +.04
CAl Inc 27.23 +.38 CVori 3.54 -.32
CBOE 28.69 +.03
CEVAInc 16.67 -.12
CH Robins 57.47 +.13 DeckrsOut 45.18 -.98
CMEGrps 58.58 -.03 DehaierMd 1.81 +.21
CSG Sys 21.73 +.25 Delcath 1.69 -.02
CTC Media 8.90 +.18 Dell Inc 10.64 +.03
CadencePh 3.76 -.04 Dndreon 4.84 -.03
Cadence 13.49 -.16 Dentsply 37.57 +.38
CalaGDyln 8.33 -.02 DexCom 13.68 +.20
CalaStrTR 10.12 -.03 DiamndFhlf 19.21 -.17
Callidus 4.84 +.03 DianaCont 5.67 +.08
CalumetSp 29.30 -.78 DigitalGen 11.00 +.10
CdnSolar 2.92 +.05 Diodes 18.64 +.08
CapCtyBk 9.76 -.24 DirecTV 52.84 -.58
CapProd 7.60 -.10 DirectMkt .14 +.01
CapFedFn 11.93 ... DiscCmAh 56.02 -.21
CpstnTrbh 1.01 -.01 DiscCmCh 51.92 -.28
CareerEd 3.85 +.34 DiscovLab 3.29 +.09
Carrizo 27.44 +.07 DishNetwk 32.56 +.30
CarverBrs 3.70 -.20 DollarTrs 46.42 -.99
CasellaW 4.66 -.08 DonlleyRR 11.96 -.03
Caseys 57.99 +2.33 DrmWksA 17.75 +.11
CatalystPh 1.45 -.01 DryShips 2.50 +.14
Catamaran 92.79 +.84 Dunkin 30.36 +1.03
CathayGen 17.38 +.08 DurectCp 1.24 +.11
Cavium 33.90 -.52 Dynavax 4.24 +.10
Celgene 73.62 +.04 E-Trade 8.94 +.19
CellTherrs 3.56 +.99 eBay 48.33 -.20
CelldexTh 5.68 -.11 EaglRkEn 9.58 -.01
Celsion 4.86 -.04 ErthLink 7.11 -.04
CentEurolf 3.10 +.09 EstWstBcp 22.11 -.08
CentGardlf 11.23 -1.08 EducDevh 4.13 +.03
CenGrdA If 11.43 -1.48 8x8 Inc 6.42 +.36
CentAI 7.61 +.12 ElectSd 13.01 +.03
Cepheid 39.09 -.88 ElectArts 13.81 -.03
CeragonN 6.25 +.06 EndoPhrm 33.06 -.32
Cerner 72.82 -.98 Endobgix 12.33 +.35
CerusCp 3.44 +.04 EngyXXI 35.05 +.49
Changyou 25.54 -.08 Entegris 9.00 +.06
Chartlnds 71.84 -1.66 EntropCom 6.17 +.24
CharterCm 78.90 +1.10 Envivion 2.20
ChkPoint 47.96 +.51 Equinix 189.08 -5.34
Cheesecake 34.46 -.18 Ericsson 9.22 +.15
ChelseaTh 1.25 -.03 ExactScih 10.37 +.02
ChildPlace 57.16 -.35 Exelids 5.03 +.10
ChrchllD 57.22 +.11 EddeTc 3.26 +.05
CienaCorp 13.80 -.38 Expedias 53.79 +1.04
CinnFin 39.13 +.50 ExpdlnDi 38.81 +.47
Cintas 41.34 +.09 ExpScripts 61.71 -.04
Cirrus 42.90 +.27 ExtrmNet 3.50 -.01
Cisco 19.04 -.11 EZchip 33.98 -.28
CitzRepBc 20.29 -.01 F5 Netwks 95.31 -1.32
CitrixSys 80.19 -.16 FLIRSys 20.47 +.09


FSI Inf 6.18 +.01 Incyte 17.93 +.04
FXEner 7.96 +.07 Infinera 5.72 -.14
Facebookn 19.43 +.62 InfinityPh 19.08 +.79
FarmerBrs 8.96 +.07 Informat 36.53 -.06
Fastenal 42.53 +.28 Infosys 45.84 +.53
FifthStRn 10.77 -.18 InnerWkgs 12.21 -.28
FifthThird 15.18 -.01 IntgDv 5.88 +.09
Fndlnst 18.10 +.15 Intel 23.34 +.08
Finisar 15.28 +.39 Inteliquent 11.23 +.39
FinLine 24.51 +.72 InterDig 34.90 +.12
FstCashFn 45.97 +.27 Intermoln 6.48 -.10
FMidBc 12.72 +.03 InterMune 8.08 -.30
FstNiagara 8.12 +.10 InfiSpdw 28.00 -.07
FstSolar 21.80 +1.01 Intersil 9.20 +.06
FstMerit 16.99 ... IntervalLs 19.71 +.26
Fiserv 72.38 -.02 Intuit 59.95 +.33
FiveBelwn 33.55 -1.25 IntSurg 487.41 -7.78
Flextrn 6.50 -.05 InvRIEst 8.29 -.18
FocusMda 23.91 +.16 IronwdPh 11.95 +.01
ForcePro 5.55 Isis 14.56 -.05
FormFac 5.48 +.05 IvanhoeE h .64
Forinet 27.20 -.13
Fossil Inc 84.95 -.92
FosterWhl 22.64 +.32 JA Solar .85 +.04
Francesca 29.01 +.21 JDS Uniph 12.66 +.37
FreshMkt 56.28 -1.43 JadcknBox 27.82 +.14
FronterCm 4.76 +.13 Jamba 2.50 +.01
FuelCell .91 +.01 JamesRiv 2.87 +.16
FultonFncl 10.10 +.03 JazzPhrm 47.84 +4.28
FushiCo 908 +03 JetBlue 4.99 -.05
JiveSoft n 14.27 +.45
JoesJeans 1.14 +.02
GTAdvTc 6.31 -.16 KCAP Rn 8.76 +.09
GalenaBio 1.88 +.05 KEYW HId 12.14 -.23
Garmin 40.29 -.06 KITDigit 3.04 -.13
Gentex 18.43 +.17 KLATnc 51.83 -.34
Genfivah 12.57 +.51 Kayak n 31.20 +1.17
GeronCp 1.26 -.02 KeryxBio 2.20 +.07
Gevo 3.23 -.04 Kimballlnt 12.16 +.29
GileadSd 59.31 -.35 KnightT 7.20 +.11
Globalstrh .32 +.01 KongZhg 6.87 +.43
GIbSpcMet 15.50 -.02 Kraft 39.77 -.44
Globeco 13.30 +.77 Kulicke 11.53 +.06
GluMobile 4.85 -.01 L&L Engy 2.18 +.09
GolLNGLtd 38.44 +.10 LKQCorp 38.94 -.07
Google 692.19 -8.58 LS Ind lf 6.35 +.12
GrCanyEd 23.14 +.51 LTX-Cred 5.94 +.09
GreenMtC 32.16 +1.80 LamResrch 34.07 -.26
GreenPlns 5.27 +.31 LamarAdv 31.78 -.30
Groupon n 4.61 +.34 Landstar 48.68 +.09
GulfportE 28.17 +.47 Lattce 4.21 +.28
HMN Fn 2.65 -.06 Layne 18.47 +.33
HMS HIdgs 33.12 -.47 LeapWirlss 5.76 -.05
HSN Inc 46.74 -.02 LedPhrm 2.42 +.10
HainCel 69.79 -1.76 LibGlobA 56.87 -.24
Halozyme 5.80 -.09 LibGlobC 53.51 -.33
HancHId 31.33 +.15 LibtylntA 18.75 -.14
HansenMed 1.70 +.22 LibVentAn 49.82 +.81
Harmonic 4.75 +.08 LifeTech 47.59 -.35
Hasbro 38.56 +.71 Lihua lnf 3.72 +.30
HawHold 5.79 ... LimelghtN 2.42 +.08
HSchein 77.09 -.75 LincElec 42.01 +.05
HercOffsh 4.49 +.10 LinearTch 33.15 +.09
Hollysys 9.37 -.58 Linktone 3.00 +.08
Hologic 19.75 -.29 LinnEngy 39.68 +.07
HmLnSvcn 15.90 +.03 Lionbrdg 3.18 -.16
HomeAway 22.99 +.11 Liquidity 55.08 +1.07
HomeownC 22.70 -.89 LivePrsn 17.38 +.01
HorizPhm 4.07 +.08 Local.com 1.69 +.06
HorsehdH 9.80 +.05 LodgeNeth .41 +.04
HotTopic 8.96 -.92 Logitech 10.11 +.45
HudsCity 7.68 +.14 LookSmth .88 -.05
HuntJB 51.90 -.26 Lulkin 56.31 +.35
HuntBncsh 6.81 +.13 lululemngs 76.49 -.17
IAC Inter 52.18 +.82 Luminex 20.30 +45
IPG Photon 63.67 +.43
iShACWI 46.73 +.33
iShDevRE 30.72 +.23 M/A-COMn 11.24 -.73
iShNifty50 22.33 +.30 MCGCap 5.20 +.07
iShNsdqBio 139.36 -.33 MGE 51.23 +.20
Iberiabnk 47.75 -.24 MIPSTech 7.11 -.05
Icon PLC 24.50 +.48 MTS 53.08 +.55
IconixBr 19.29 +.05 MSG 41.08 -.80
IdenixPh 5.65 -.11 MagelPt 1.05 -.04
Illumina 44.92 +.22 MagicJcks 26.39
ImunoGn 14.14 -.25 Majeseo 1.68 -.06
ImpaxLabs 24.36 +.31 MAKOSrg 18.11 +.45
inContact 5.17 -.19 MannKd 2.52 +.08


MktAxess 29.81 +.63 PanASlv 18.77 +.03
MarvelT 10.35 +.21 PaneraBrd 159.49 -.05
Masimo 22.32 -.49 ParamTch 22.29 +.16
Mattel 35.54 -.01 Parexel 30.11 -.05
Maximlntg 27.35 -.05 ParkerVsn 2.53 +.14
MaxwlT 8.42 -.09 PrtnrCm 4.65 +.10
Maxygen 2.73 +.02 Patterson 34.34 +.16
MedCath 7.98 -.08 PattUTI 16.19 +.48
MedAssets 17.62 -.11 Paychex 34.11 -.02
MedicAcIn 3.57 +.04 PnnNGm 40.20 +.49
Medivafton 103.13 -.59 PennantPk 11.00 +.01
MeleoCrwn 12.59 +.29 PensonWh .08 +.00
Mellanox 102.41 +.76 PeopUtdF 12.04
MenbtrGr 17.00 -.01 PeregrinP 3.98 -.36
MercadoL 82.52 -.56 PerfectWd 11.14 +.19
MergeHIth 3.41 ... Perfrmnt n 11.28 +.26
Methanx 29.48 -.29 Perrigo 110.51 -.88
Microchp 34.07 -.07 PetSmart 71.67 +.16
MicronT 6.36 -.05 Pharmacyc 64.33 -.27
MicrosSys 52.05 ... PhotrIn 5.91 +.13
MicroSemi 20.56 +.13 PluristemT 4.65 +.05
Microsoft 30.79 +.07 Polymom 10.69 +.06
Misonix 2.99 ... Popular rs 17.20 +.35
Molex 27.26 +.15 Pwrlnteg 35.25 -.34
MonstrBvs 56.36 -.86 Power-One 6.06 +.38
MorgHtl 5.78 +.23 PwShs QQQ 68.43 -.11
Motricityh .56 +.09 PranaBo 2.00 +.19
Mylan 24.01 +.06 Presstekh .49 +.00
MyriadG 26.84 -.16 PriceTR 63.07 +.16
NETgear 38.64 -.65 priceline 617.76 +9.44
NICESys 31.17 -.13 PrivateB 16.66
NIl HIdg 6.49 +.17 PrUPQQQs 59.91 -.26
NPS Phm 8.47 +.42 PrognicsPh 3.66 +.07
NXPSemi 24.67 +1.12 PUShQQQrs37.54 +.18
Nanosphere 3.24 -.02 ProspctCap 11.88 +.22
NasdOMX 23.66 +.08 PureBio rs 1.37 -.38
Natlnstrm 26.28 +.14 PureCycle 2.03 +.03
NatPenn 9.35 +.08 QIAGEN 18.50 +.07
NektarTh 8.26 -.25 QlikTech 23.34 -.35
Neonode 4.01 +.31 Qlogic 12.48 +.11
NeptuneTg 4.87 +.21 Qualeom 61.85 +.56
NetApp 35.18 +.10 QualitySs 18.51 -.60
NetEase 48.75 -.24 QuestSft 27.95 -.02
Netfiix 57.16 +1.24 Questeor 51.46 +.28
NetSpend 9.15 -.13 RFMicD 4.13 +.34
NetwkEng 1.45 +.01 Rambus 4.73 +.05
NeurMxrsh .60 -.03 Randgold 110.23 -.19
NYMtgTr 6.95 -.03 RaptorPhm 5.38 +.10
NewsCpA 24.35 +.21 RealPage 25.50 +.45
NewsCpB 24.60 +.25 Rdiff.cm 4.24 +.68
NobltyHIf 5.25 -.07 Regenrn 148.76 -1.53
NorTrst 47.44 +.34 RentACt 36.09 +.14
NwstBcsh 12.19 +.05 Replgn 5.98 -.04
Novavax 1.91 -.02 ReprosTh 15.25 +.56
NuVasive 21.18 -.21 RschMotn 7.46 +.31
NuanceCm 24.84 +.42 ResConn 12.70 +.10
Nvidia 13.44 +.16 RexEnergy 13.57 +.57
OCZTech 4.56 -.17 RiverbedT 21.73 -.16
OReillyAu 85.64 +.58 RosttaGrs 5.54 -.11
ObagiMed 12.75 -.48 RosettaR 46.79 +.79
Oclaro 2.75 +.08 RossStrss 66.27 -.61
OdysMar 3.62 -.11 RoviCorp 16.31 +.30
OldDomFs 31.54 +.69 RoyGId 87.60 -.68
OmniVisn 16.34 +.12 RubieonTc 9.19 +.50
OnSmcnd 6.67 +.12 Rudolph 10.14 +.23
Oneothyr 5.24 rue21 31.17 +.02
OnyxPh 75.40 -1.12 Ranair 3164 21
OpenTbleh 47.03 +1.53
OptmerPh 15.77 +.23
Oracle 32.32 +.01 SBACom 60.04 +.21
OraSure 10.25 +.52 SEI Inv 22.04 -.08
Orexigen 5.30 +.11 SGOCO 1.65 +.13
Orthfx 42.30 -.31 SLMCp 16.16 +.21
Oteleo un 1.86 +.26 STEC 7.51 -.05
OtterTail 23.38 +.06 SVB FnGp 60.46 +.07
Overstk 9.22 +.03 SabraHItc 19.48 +.12
SalixPhm 42.66 +.09
SanDisk 44.52 +.53
PDC Engy 32.33 +.31 SangBio 5.84 -.37
PDL Bio 7.34 ... Sanmina 9.03 +.05
PLXTch 5.97 +.03 Sanofi rt 1.72
PMCSra 6.22 -.12 Santarus 7.80 +.14
PSSWrld 21.82 +.06 Sapient 10.69 -.16
Paccar 41.71 +.18 Sareptars 13.61 -.63
Pacerlnfi 3.89 +.03 SavientPh 1.55 +.08
PacEthanh .37 +.00 Schnitzer 31.09 -.19
PadraPhm 17.17 -.80 SchoolSp 2.79 +.04
PainTher 4.33 +.29 SdClone 4.51 +.02


SciGames 8.02
SeagateT 30.11
SearsHIdgs 56.56
SeattGen 27.80
SelCmfrt 31.59
Selectvlns 18.42
Semtech 25.61
Sequenom 3.63
SvcSource 9.52
SevArts rs .76
ShandaG s 3.82
ShoreTe 4.02
ShuffiMstr 14.71
Shutterfly 30.42
SifyTech 2.61
SigmaDsg 6.30
SigmaAld 72.61
Silinmlmg 5.03
SilicnMotn 14.23
Slcnware 5.74
SilvStdg 15.03
Sina 63.60
Sindair 12.21
SiriusXM 2.50
SironaDent 54.42
Sky-mobi 2.18
SkyWest 9.40
SkywksSol 29.46
SmartBal 11.24
SmithWes 10.29
SodaStrm 39.95
Sohu.cm 41.00
Solazyme 11.41
SonicCorp 10.05
Sonus 1.95
SouMoBc 23.16
Sourcefire 55.48
Spectranet 13.07
SpectPh 12.15
SpiritAir 19.65
Splunkn 36.49
Spreadtrm 20.37
Staples 11.37
StarBulkh .53
StarSdent 3.76
Starbucks 50.73
SiDynam 12.28
StemCells 1.90
Stericyde 93.19
SMadden 44.40
StewEnt 8.25
Stratasys 62.30
SunesisPh 3.49
SunOpta 6.09
SunPower 4.76
SunshHrtn 9.17
SusqBnc 10.74
SwisherH If 1.70
Symantec 19.00
Symetricm 6.36
Synaeorn 7.60
Synapfcs 28.40
Synchron 23.97
SynrgyP rs 4.64
Synopsys 33.66
SyntaPhm 7.73
TFS Fncl 8.96
TICCCap 11.02
TPCGrp 41.11
TTMTch 10.53
tw teleom 25.40
TakeTwo 10.82
Tangoe 14.22
TASER 5.47
TechData 49.10
TICmSys 2.07
Tellabs 3.63
TescoCp 10.39
TeslaMot 27.80
TxCapBsh 46.97
Texlnst 28.58
TexRdhse 17.73
Theravnce 24.75
Thoratec 33.53
ThrshdPhm 8.54
TibcoSft 31.30
TitanMach 19.66
TiVo Inc 9.70


+.13 Towerstm 3.94 -.10
+.24 TractSupp 99.27 -1.08
-.59 TrimbleN 50.55 -.12
-.45 TripAdvn 35.38 +.09
+.58 TriQuint 5.88 -.02
+.05 TriusTher 5.82 +.13
-.28 TrueRelig 22.92 -.36
+.09 TrstNY 5.71 -.02
-.08 Trustmk 24.55 +.08
-.02 21Vianet 10.55 +.14
-.09 UTStarcm 1.11 +.07
-.72 UTIWrldwd 14.38 -.13
-.39 Ubiquii n 13.10 +10
+.17
UltaSalon 99.34 -.85
-5. Umpqua 13.08 +.06
+.09 UtdCmBks 8.62 -.08
-.02 UtdNtrIF 55.24 -5.20
+.04 UtdOnln 5.46 +.01
+.23 US Enr 2.20 +.05
+1.52 UtdTherap 55.00 +.14
+.06 UnivDisp 42.27 +1.00
-.01 UnivFor 39.95 -.03
+.29 UranmRsh .50 -.01
+.20 UrbanOut 38.90 -.58
-.45
-.07
-.08 VCAAnt 20.18 -.11
+.48 VOXX Intf 7.58 +.05
+.40 ValueClick 16.60 +.21
+.01 VanSTCpB 80.15 +.02
+.03 VanlntCpB 87.07 +.07
+.03 Veeeolnst 35.81 +.27
-.21 Veli 8.19 +.50
+.77 VBradley 21.69 -.66
+.28 VerintSys 27.62 -.16
-.09 Verisign 47.25 -.65
-.49 Verisk 47.98 -.10
+.42 VertxPh 56.05 -.59
+.12 ViacomB 50.91 +.15
-.01 Vical 3.80 +.08
-.10 VirgnMdah 29.44 +.07
+.02 ViroPhrm 27.76 +.46
-.02 VistaPrt 36.85 -.14
+.16 Vivus 22.26 -.31
-.31 Vodafone 28.37 +.22
-.08 Volterra 23.49 +.02
-1.38 WSBHIdgs 5.34 +2.42
+.85 WarnerCh 12.86 -.07
-.08 WarrenRs 3.00 -.01
+.03
+.65 WebMD 14.70 -.29
+.07 Websense 16.10 +.01
-.01 Wendys Co 4.45 +.06
+.04 WernerEnt 23.31 +.02
+.07 WDigital 42.25 +1.07
-.08 WLibtyBcp 3.95
-.55 Westmrld 8.75 -.10
+.54 Wstptlnng 32.55 +1.03
-.21 WetSeal 3.15 -.14
-.15 WholeFd 95.91 -1.87
+.03 WillsLpfA 10.93 -.05
+.04 WilshBcp 6.38 -.02
-.12 Windstrm 10.52 +.27
-.04 WTEMCpBd 78.69 +.06
+.02 Wynn 104.80 +1.71
+.17 XOMA 3.43 -.14
+.20 Xlinx 34.88 +.25
+.30
+.10 YRCrs 6.94 +.17
-.08 Yahoo 15.16 +.05
+.01 Yandex 22.49 -.15
+.16 Zagg 8.28 +.19
+.43 Zalicus .79 -.00
+.57 ZebraT 38.17 -.07
-.09 illow 40.47 +.19
-.01 ZonBcp 20.03 +.02
+.94
-1.01 Zopharm 5.35 -.18
+.13 Zpcar 7.91 +.05
-.98 Zogenix 2.43 +.05
+.25 Zumiez 27.52 +.05
+.14 Zyngan 2.79 -.03


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.6620 4.6610
Australia .9580 .9673
Bahrain .3782 .3770
Brazil 2.0193 2.0256
Britain 1.6070 1.5998
Canada .9733 .9776
Chile 474.65 475.05
China 6.3363 6.3387
Colombia 1800.50 1800.50
Czech Rep 18.89 19.24
Denmark 5.7949 5.8361
Dominican Rep 39.15 39.11
Egypt 6.0928 6.0893
Euro .7776 .7832
Hong Kong 7.7539 7.7551
Hungary 219.49 223.10
India 55.300 55.445
Indnsia 9576.00 9574.00
Israel 3.9511 3.9641
Japan 77.78 78.28
Jordan .7085 .7080
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0890 3.1025
Mexico 13.0008 13.0684
N. Zealand 1.2217 1.2364
Norway 5.7630 5.7866
Peru 2.609 2.612
Poland 3.17 3.22
Russia 31.6866 31.6848
Singapore 1.2293 1.2358
So. Africa 8.1739 8.1689
So. Korea 1128.25 1129.45
Sweden 6.6081 6.6372
Switzerlnd .9389 .9464
Taiwan 29.67 29.64
Thailand 31.04 31.06
Turkey 1.8027 1.8014
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6731
Uruguay 21.2499 21.3499
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.10 0.10
6-month 0.14 0.135
5-year 0.67 0.62
10-year 1.70 1.57
30-year 2.85 2.68



S FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Oct 12 97.17 +.63
Corn CBOT Dec 12 7773/4 -51/2
Wheat CBOT Dec 12 8833/4 -6
Soybeans CBOT Nov12 17011/2 -171/4
Cattle CME Oct 12 127.10 +1.35
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 12 19.44 +.01
Orange Juice ICE Nov 12 124.10 -2.75


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1731.80 $1692.90
Silver (troy oz., spot) $33.b59 3$2.348
Copper (pound) $3./14b $3.4685
Platinum (troy oz., spot)l160/.00 $1bb/.bO

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... ... ... 5.99 +.18 -27.5 Lowes .64 2.2 19 28.60 -.09 +12.7
AT&T Inc 1.76 4.7 50 37.62 +.20 +24.4 McDnlds 2.80 3.1 17 91.20 -.10 -9.1
Ameteks .24 .7 20 35.22 -.26 +25.5 Microsoft .80 2.6 15 30.79 +.07 +18.6
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 85.03 +.76 +39.4 MotrlaSolu 1.04 2.1 24 49.19 +.35 +6.3
BkofAm .04 .4 10 9.03 +.45 +62.4 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 13 67.74 -.20+11.3
CapCtyBk ...... 9.76 -.24 +2.2 Penney .29.47 +.77-16.2
CntryLink 2.90 6.8 47 42.36 +.48 +13.9 PiedmOfc .80 4.6 13 17.45 +.23 +2.4
Citigroup .04 .1 9 32.66 +.83 +24.1 RegionsFn .04 .5 17 7.33 -.09 +70.5
CmwREIT 2.00 13.3 20 15.00 +.2299 SearsHIdgs .33 56.56 -.59 +78.0
SmuckerwREIT 2.0013.3 2.08 2.4 21 86.01 +.16 +10.0
Disney .60 1.2 17 51.56 +.04+37.5 SprintNex ......5.00 -.15+113.7
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.7 17 64.46 -.37 Texlnst .68 2.4 20 28.58 -.09 -1.8
EnterPT 3.00 6.3 22 47.57 +.34 +8.8 TimeWarn 1.04 2.4 16 43.04 -.03 +19.1
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.5 11 89.62 +.14 +5.7 UniFirst .15 .2 15 66.79 +.74 +17.7
FordM .20 2.0 8 10.15 +.04 -5.7 VerizonCm 2.06 4.7 44 44.24 +.18 +10.3
GenElec .68 3.1 18 21.59 +.11 +20.5 Vodafone 1.99 7.0 ... 28.37 +.22 +1.2
HomeDp 1.16 2.0 20 56.72 -.58 +34.9 WalMart 1.59 2.1 16 74.06 +.55 +23.9
Intel .90 3.9 10 23.34 +.08 -3.8 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 12 35.11 -.03 +6.2
IBM 3.40 1.7 14203.27 +2.32 +10.5 YRC rs ... ... ... 6.94 +.17 -30.4







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 A9


I MUTUALFUNDS I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: MultCGrA 8.85 +.02
Balancp 17.08 +.02 InBosA 5.92 +.01
Retlnc 8.95 -.01 LgCpValx 19.41 -.03
Alger Funds B: NatlMunlnc 10.11 -.01
SmCapGr 7.13 -.01 SpEqtA 16.48 +.04
AllianceBern A: TradGvA 7.38 -.01
BalanAp 17.24 +.03 Eaton Vance B:
GIbThGrAp63.45 +.14 HIthSBt 10.60 +.05
SmCpGrA 40.10 +.01 NatlMuInc 10.11 -.01
AllianceBern Adv: Eaton Vance C:
LgCpGrAd 30.70 -.03 GovtC p 7.37
AllianceBern B: NatMunlnc 10.11 -.01
GIbThGrBt 54.40 +.12 Eaton Vance I:
GrowthBt 27.80 +.02 FItgRt 9.07 +.01
SCpGrBt 31.96 ... GblMacAbR 9.83
AllianceBern C: LgCapValx 19.46 -.04
SCpGrCt 32.14 +.01 FBR Funds:
Allianz Fds Instl: Focuslnvtn 50.37 +.18
NFJDvVI 12.90 +.09 FMI Funds:
SmCpVl 31.52 +.08 LgCappn 17.34 +.06
Allianz Funds C: FPA Funds:
AGICGrthC 27.03 +.05 Newlnco 10.68
Amer Beacon Insti: FPACres 28.77 +.08
LgCaplnst 21.63 +.14 Fairholme 30.65 +.16
Amer Beacon Inv: Federated A:
LgCaplnv 20.49 +.13 MidGrStA 35.72 +.06
Ameri Century 1st: MuSecA 10.70
Growth 28.67 ... Federated Insti:
Amer Century Adv: KaufmnR 5.35
EqGroAp 24.57 +.06 TotRetBd 11.57
EqIncAp 8.00 +.02 StrValDvS 5.14 +.02
Amer Century Inv: Fidelity Adv Foc T:
AIICapGr 31.45 +.04 EnergyT 37.02 +.48
Balanced 17.58 +.03 HItCarT 22.84 +.02
DivBnd 11.25 -.01 Fidelity Advisor A:
Eqlnc 8.00 +.02 Nwlnsghp 22.91
Growth 28.40 ... StrlnA 12.72 +.02
Heritagel 23.09 +.03 Fidelity Advisor C:
IncGro 27.73 +.10 Nwlnsghtn21.61
InfAdjBd 13.33 -.02 Fidelity Advisor I:
IntDisc 9.74 +.05 EqGrln 67.54 +.10
InfiGrol 10.80 +.06 Eqlnin 26.42 +.10
NewOpp 8.27 +.01 IntBdlIn 11.70
OneChAg 13.18 +.02 Nwlnsgtl n 23.23 +.01
OneChMd 12.66 +.03 StrInin 12.87 +.02
RealEstl 23.87 +.09 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 26.48 -.01 BalancT 16.63 +.03
Valuelnv 6.35 +.02 DivGrTp 13.31 +.06
American Funds A: EqGrTp 63.03 +.09
AmcpAp 21.33 +.06 EqInT 25.99 +.09
AMuiAp 28.43 +.04 GrOppT 42.69 +.03
BalApx 20.12 -.07 HilnAdTp 10.26 +.01
BondAp 12.91 -.01 IntBdT 11.67 -.01
CaplBAp 53.22 +.17 MulncTp 13.70
CapWGAp 36.08 +.22 OvrseaT 17.23 +.11
CapWAp 21.53 +.07 STFiT 9.34
EupacA p 39.39 +.36 StkSelAIICp 20.40 +.07
FdlnvAp 40.12 +.13 Fidelity Freedom:
GIblBalA 26.46 +.10 FF2010n 14.29 +.03
GovtAp 14.58 -.01 FF2010K 13.09 +.03
GwthAp 33.54 +.07 FF2015n 11.95 +.03
HITrAp 11.18 +.01 FF2015K 13.16 +.03
IncoAp 18.07 +.05 FF2020n 14.47 +.04
IntBdAp 13.77 -.01 FF2020K 13.59 +.03
InflGrlncApx 29.69 +.15 FF2025n 12.07 +.04
ICAAp 30.75 +.08 FF2025K 13.75 +.04
LtTEBAp 16.32 -.01 FF2030n 14.37 +.04
NEcoAp 27.98 +.07 FF2030K 13.90 +.04
NPerAp 30.22 +.11 FF2035n 11.92 +.05
NwWrldA 51.58 +.27 FF2035K 14.01 +.06
STBFAp 10.09 ... FF2040n 8.32 +.04
SmCpAp 38.81 +.09 FF2040K 14.05 +.06
TxExAp 13.06 -.01 FF2045K 14.20 +.06
WshAp 31.40 +.07 Fidelity Invest:
Ariel Investments: AIISectEq 13.02 +.05
Apprec 44.63 +.31 AMgr50n 16.34 +.03
Ariel 49.12 +.35 AMgr70rn 17.30 +.04
Artisan Funds: AMgr20rn 13.33
Inft 23.25 +.16 Balancn 20.20 +.05
Infilnsti 23.40 +.16 BalancedK 20.20 +.04
InfiVar 28.87 +.13 BlueChGrn 50.22 +.10
MidCap 39.31 -.03 BluChpGrK 50.26 +.10
MidCapVal 21.41 +.14 CAMunn 12.85 -.01
Baron Funds: Canadan 54.24 +.13
Asset 51.53 +.01 CapApn 29.78
Growth 58.15 +.07 CapDevOn 11.93 +.03
SmallCap 26.16 -.04 Cplncrn 9.36 +.01
Bernstein Fds: ChinaRgr 26.80 +.06
IntDur 14.17 ... CngS 465.09
DivMu 14.86 ... CTMunrn 12.06 -.01
TxMgdlnI 13.40 +.12 Contran 78.64 +.03
BlackRock A: ContraK 78.65 +.03
EqtyDiv 19.94 +.08 CnvScn 24.94 +.08
GIAIAr 19.48 +.09 DisEqn 24.73 +.12
HiYnvA 7.96 +.01 DiscEqF 24.72 +.12
InfiOpAp 31.11 +.28 Divlntin 28.79 +.25
BlackRock B&C: DivrslntKr 28.78 +.25
GIAICt 18.12 +08 DivStkOn 17.41 +.08
BlackRocklnst: DivGthn 30.11 +.13
EquityDv 19.99 +08 EmergAs r n27.25 +.06
GIbAllocr 19.58 +09 EmrMkn 21.66 +.05
HiYldBd 7.96 +.01 EqGlncn 47.04 +.18
Brinson Funds Y: EQIIn 19.63 +.05
HiYldlYn 6.32 +.01 ECapAp 18.00 +.16
BruceFund402.04 +1.00 Europe 29.85 +.27
Buffalo Funds: Exch 323.88 .
SmCapn 29.48 +.07 Exportn 23.99 +.05
CGM Funds: Fideln 35.90 +.09
Focus n 27.34 +.39 Fiftyrn 19.95 +.06
Muti n 27.35 +.32 FItRateHi r n 9.92
Realtyn 30.12 +.09 FrlnOnen 29.24 +.12
Calamos Funds: GNMAn 11.84 -.02
GrwthAp 52.23 +.07 Govtnc 10.91 -.01
Calvert Invest: GroCon 98.19 +.05
Incop 16.43 +.01 GroIncn 21.14 +.07
SocialAp 30.83 +.04 GrowtCoK 98.19 +.06
SocBdp 160.44 + GrSratrn 20.51 +.02
SocEqAp 38.23 +.0 Highlncr n 9.27 +.01
TxF Lgp 16.41 -.01 Lndepnn 25.50 +.05
InProBdn 13.43 .01
Cohen & Steers: intBd n 1 .01
o m SIntBd n 11.11 -.01
RltyShrs 70.06 +.21 IntGovn 11.07 -.01
ColumbiaClass A: InMun 10 -63 01
Acorn t 30.32 +.04 InfDiscn 31.54 +1
DivEqInc 10.54 +.04 nfSCprn 19.55 +.05
DivOpptyA 8.82 +.03 InGrBdn 12.050 .0
LgCapGrA t 27.08 InvGBn 7.96 -.01
LgCorQAp 6.63 +.02 Jnr 9 0
MdCpGrOp 10.34 Japanr 9.39 +.03
UidCVlOpp 8.20 +.0 JpnSm n 9.04 +.08
SModAqp l.250 +.02 LgCapVal 11.36 +.06
PBModAp 11.25 +.02 LatArm 49.40 +40
TxEAp 14.23 -.01 LevCoStn 3036 +12
SelCommA45.88 +.23 LowPrn 39.26 +17
FrontierA 11.26 LowPriKmr 39.23 +.16
GlobTech 21.65 +.10 Magelnn 73.99 +.15
Columbia ClIl,T&G: Magellnn 73.94 +.14
SIn 80 MagellanK 73.94 +.14
EmMktOpln8.20 +.07 MDMurn 11.64 -.01
Columbia Class Z: MAMunn 12.70
AcornZ 31.46 +.05 MegaCpStknll.83 +.04
AcornlntZ 39.25 +.23 MIMun n 12.50 -.01
DivlncoZ 15.05 +.03 MidCapn 30.20 +.06
IntBdZ 9.55 MNMunn 812.00
IntTEBd 10.99 MtgSecn 11.36 -.03
LgCapGr 13.76 +.03 Munilncn 13.49
ValRestr 49.51 +.07 NJMunrn 12.28 -.01
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktrn 17.65 +.04
ComRett 8.55 +.04 NwMilln 33.05 +.09
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.65
InfiCorEqn 10.01 +.10 OTCn 62.80 +16
USCorEql n12.26 +.05 OhMun n 12.34
USCorEq2nl2.09 +.05 o100ndex 10.32 +.03
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 31.07 +.28
CommAp 19.62 +.12 PcBasn 23.70 +.04
DWS InvestS: PAMunr n 11.43
CoreEqtyS 17.96 +.03 Puritnn 19.73 +.03
CorPlsInc 11.16 +.01 PuritanK 19.72 +.02
EmMkGrr 15.60 +.10 RealEn 32.57 +.11
EnhEmMk 11.11 +.03 SAIISecEqF 13.03 +.04
EnhGlbBdr 10.32 +.05 sCmdtytrtn9.43 +.06
GIbSmCGr 38.55 +.04 SCmdtyStrF n9.46 +.06
GIblThem 22.46 +.20 SrEmrgMkt 15.88 +.06
Gold&Prc 14.75 +.05 SrslntGrw 11.56 +.08
HiYdTx 12.99 ... SernfiGrF 11.59 +.08
IntTxAMT 12.14 -.01 SrslntVal 9.07 +.09
InflFdS 41.84 +.43 SerlnfiValF 9.10 +.09
LgCpFoGr 33.96 .02 SrlnvGrdF 12.01 -.02
LatAmrEq 40.50 +.62 StlntMu n 10.87
MgdMuniS 9.49 -.01 STBFn 8.59
MATFS 15.22 .01 SmCapDiscn23.06 +.14
SP500S 19.15 +.06 SmllCpSrn 18.24 +.05
WorldDiv 23.64 +.18 SCpValur 15.53 +.11
Davis Funds A: SllSelLCVrnll.76 +.05
NYVenA 36.14 +.04 SllSlcACapn28.35 +.11
Davis Funds B: SllSelSmCp 20.25 +.05
NYVenB 34.37 +.03 SEratlncn 11.39 +.02
Davis Funds C: S.rReRtr 9.82 +.01
NYVenC 34.70 +.03 TaxFrBrn 11.64 -.01
Davis FundsY: TotalBdn 11.26 -.01
NYVenY 36.57 +.04 Trend n 79.24 +.21
Delaware Invest A: USBI n 11.98 -.02
Diverlncp 9.42 ... Utilityn 18.83 +.01
SMIDCapG 25.04 -.11 ValStratn 30.46 +.15
TxUSAp 12.24 -.01 Valuen 74.36 +.37
Delaware Invest B: Wrldwn 19.78 +.08
SelGrBt 35.33 ... Fidelity Selects:
Dimensional Fds: Air n 37.68 +.01
EmMCrEqnl8.59 +.11 Bankingn 19.72 +.03
EmMktV 27.69 +.17 Biotchn 110.93 -.04
IntSmVan 14.92 +.15 Brokrn 47.78 +.31
LargeCo 11.30 +.04 Chemn 115.23 -.11
TAUSCorE2n9.83 +.04 ComEquipn22.34 +.13
USLgVan 22.23 +.18 Compn 65.23 +.37
US Micron 15.06 +.05 ConDisn 27.60 -.01
USTgdVal 17.50 +.09 ConsuFnn 14.22 +.08
US Small n 23.49 +.06 ConStap n 81.00 +.35
USSmVa 26.99 +.13 CstHon 44.88 +.05
InflSmCon 15.06 +.12 DfAern 83.23 +.08
EmMktSCn 19.75 +.09 Elecfrn 47.44 +.32
EmgMktn 25.50 +.18 Enrgyn 52.90 +.69
Fixdn 10.35 ... EngSvn 70.38 +1.19
IntGFxlnn 13.08 ... EnvAltEnrnl6.24 +.06
IntVan 15.70 +.21 FinSvn 59.62 +.27
Glb5Fxlncnll.24 +.01 Goldrn 40.19 +.13
2YGIFxdn 10.12 ... Healiln 142.23 +.13
DFARIEn 26.78 +.09 Insurn 51.28 +.27


Dodge&Cox: Leisr n 104.91 +.12
Balanced 76.87 +.33 Material n 70.59 +.09
Income 13.86 MedDI n 59.94 -.27
IntSk 32.72 +.45 MdEqSysn 28.56 +.12
Stock 119.36 +.66 Mulesdn 55.07 +.04
DoubleUne Funds: NtGasn 32.23 +.32
TRBd I 11.34 Pharm n 15.45 +.09
TRBdNap 11.34 ... Retailnn 63.43 -.14
Dreyfus: Softwr. n 88.70 +.18
Aprec 45.12 +.11 Techn 104.74 +.21
CTA 12.37 -.01 Telcm n 51.52 +.16
CorVA Transn 51.70 +.34
Dreyf 9.84 +.02 UtilGrn 56.80 -.01
DryMid r 29.69 +.04 Wireless n 8.07 +.07
GNMA 16.15 -.01 Fidelity Spartan:
GrChinaAr 30.24 -.12 5001dxlnvn 50.99 +.15
HiYldAp 6.56 +.01 5001dxl 51.00 +.16
StratValA 30.06 +.13 InftllnxInvn 32.97 +.32
TechGroA 35.13 -.01 TotMktlnvn41.67 +.13
DreihsAclnc 10.43 ... USBond I 11.98 -.02
Driehaus Funds: Fidelity Spart Adv:
EMktGr 27.84 +.17 ExMktAdrn40.54 +.10
EVPTxMEmI 45.92 +.32 5001dxcAdvn51.00 +.16
Eaton Vance A: IntAd r n 32.98 +.31
ChinaAp 16.21 +10 TotMktAdrn41.67 +.12
AMTFMuInc10.39 -.01 USBondl 11.98 -.02


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.21 +.18
OverseasA 22.13 +.13
First Investors A
BlChpAp
Eqtylnco p 7.67 +.02
GloblAp 6.76 +.03
GovtAp 11.53
GrolnAp 16.69 +.05
IncoAp 2.60
MATFAp 12.47 -.01
MITFAp 12.85 -.01
NJTFAp 13.76 -.01
NYTFAp 15.24 -.01
OppAp 29.66 +.09
PATFAp 13.73 -.01
SpSitAp 24.90 +.02
TxExlncop 10.25 -.01
TotRtAp 16.83 +.02
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.21 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.90
ALTFAp 11.89
AZTFAp 11.46
CallnsAp 12.90 -.01
CAIntAp 12.12 -.01
CalTFAp 7.48
COTFAp 12.43
CTTFA p 11.47
CvtScAp 15.15 +.06
Dbl TFA 12.26 -.01
DynTchA 33.68
EqlncAp 18.15 +.07
Fedlntp 12.51 -.01
FedTFAp 12.68
FLTFAp 11.98
FoundAl p 11.03 +.07
GATFAp 12.73 -.01
GoldPrMA 33.66 +.08
GrwthAp 50.14 +.11
HYTFAp 10.87 -.01
HilncA 2.06 +.01
IncomAp 2.23 +.01
InsTFAp 12.57
NYITFp 11.85 -.01
LATFAp 12.02 -.01
LMGvScA 10.33 -.01
MDTFAp 12.01
MATFAp 12.15 -.01
MITFAp 12.33 -.01
MNInsA 12.94
MOTFAp 12.72 -.01
NJTFAp 12.62
NYTFAp 12.12
NCTFAp 12.94 +.01
OhiolAp 13.07 -.01
ORTFAp 12.57
PATFAp 10.92
ReEScAp 17.15 +.05
RisDvAp 37.59 +.10
SMCpGrA 37.29 +.05
Stratlncp 10.62 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.45 -.01
USGovAp 6.89
UbIsAp 13.91 -.04
VATFAp 12.23 -.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 13.24 +.04
IncmeAd 2.21 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.25 +.01
USGvC t 6.84 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.25 +.09
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 22.43 +.08
ForgnAp 6.60 +.05
GIBdAp 13.28 +.04
GrwthAp 18.86 +.18
WorldAp 15.68 +.11
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 21.80 +.07
ForgnC p 6.44 +.05
GIBdCp 13.30 +.04
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.60 +.10
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 12.05
US Eqty 44.92 +.09
GMOTrust Ill:
CHIE 22.65 +.16
Quality 23.72 +.08
GMOTrust IV:
InfilntrMV 20.25 +.30
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.16 +.09
Quality 23.73 +.08
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.27 +.18
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 38.30 +.10
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 26.15 +.03
HiYield 7.33 +.01
HYMuni n 9.28
MidCapV 38.66 +.10
ShtDrTF n 10.66
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.93
CapAplnst 43.05 -.01
Infllnv t 58.42 +.61
Inf r 59.09 +.62
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.58 +.14
DivGthAp 20.97 +.07
IntOpAp 14.36 +.14
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppln 32.63 +.13
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.30 +.18
Div&Gr 21.72 +.08
Balanced 21.27 +.04
MidCap 28.00 +.09
TotRetBd 11.80
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.45
StrGrowh 10.92 -.02
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.37 +.18
HIlthcareS 17.43 +.03
SI Funds:
NoAm p 8.00
IVA Funds:
WAdwideIr 16.17 +.07
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.40 +.03
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.73 +.50
Ubliies 17.66 -.04
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 13.04 +.01
Chart p 17.90 +.07
CmstkA 17.34 +.11
Constp 24.08
DivrsDivp 13.40 +.02
EqlncA 9.17 +.02
GrIncA p 20.86 +.07
HilncMu p
HiYld p 4.34 +.01
HYMuA 10.04
InfiGrow 27.93 +.23
MunilnA 13.87 -.01
PATFA 17.02 -.01
USMortgA 13.10
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.85 -.01
US Mortg 13.03
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 13.13 +.02
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 24.22 +.06
AssetStAp 25.05 +.06
AssetStrlr 25.30 +.07
HilncAp 8.50 +.01
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.09
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.14
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 27.85 +.06
JPMorgan R Cl:
CoreBondn 12.09
ShtDurBd 11.02
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.46 +03
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.08
HighYldn 8.10 +.01
lndTFBd n 11.36 .01
LgCpGr 24.49
ShtDurBd n 11.02
USLCCrPIsn23.14 +.05
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 27.08 +.04
ContrarnT 14.07 +.05
EnterprT 65.35 +.07
FIxBndT 10.96
GlLUfeSciTr 30.30 +.07
GIbSel T 9.38 +.07
GITechTr 18.71 +.06
Grw&lncT 34.34 +08
JanusT 31.90 -.01
OvrseasTr 31.28 +.31
PrkMCValT22.16 +.11
ResearchT 32.19 +.05
ShTmBdT 3.10
Twenty T 62.77 -.06
VentureT 60.49 +.10
WrldWTr 44.49 +.31
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.25
IncomeA p 6.68 +.01
RgBkA 14.82 +.05


John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.68 +.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.70 +.04
LSBalanc 13.49 +.04
LSConsrv 13.48 +.01
LSGrwth 13.39 +.04
LSModer 13.33 +.02
Lazard Insti:
EmgMktl 19.14 +.11
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.56 +.12


Name NAV Chg
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 130.20 +.37
CBApprp 15.98 +.05
CBLCGrp 24.21 +.04
GCIAIICOp 8.64 +.10
WAHilncAt 6.15 +.01
WAMgMup 17.09
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.99 +.03
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.55 +.12
CMValTrp 41.83 +.18
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 30.31 +.21
SmCap 29.62 +.06
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.94 +.04
StrlncC 15.37 +.06
LSBondR 14.88 +.04
StrlncA 15.29 +.06
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.65 +.03
InvGrBdY 12.66 +.04
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.92 +.05
FundlEq 13.22 +.05
BdDebAp 8.06 +.02
ShDurlncAp 4.63
MidCpAp 17.40 +.05
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.66
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.63 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.75 +.07
MIGA 17.73 +.04
EmGA 48.44 +.11
HilnA 3.56 +.01
MFLA
TotRA 15.14 +.05
UtilA 18.39 +.05
ValueA 25.42 +.11
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.88 +.03
GvScBn 10.52
HilnBn 3.56
MulnBn 8.96 -.01
TotRBn 15.14 +.04
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.55 +.11
MFS Funds Insti:
InfiEqn 18.08 +.21
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.08 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.24 +.02
GovtBt 9.00
HYIdBBt 6.05 +.01
IncmBldr 17.67 +.06
InfiEqB 10.71 +.06
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.82 +.17
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 82.60 +.26
Managers Funds:
Yacknannp nl9.10 +.05
YacktFocn 20.55 +.04
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.53 +.06
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 17.41 +.11
Indialnvr 16.01 +.15
PacTgrlnv 22.33 +.09
MergerFdn 15.99
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.95
TotRtBdl 10.95
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.79 +.03
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.80 +.04
MontagGrI 26.16 +.03
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 16.05 +.11
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 13.83 +.17
MCapGrl 35.49 +.11
Muhlenkn 56.99 +.37
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.40
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 32.46 +.04
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.19 +.06
GblDiscA 29.70 +.13
GIbDiscZ 30.13 +.14
QuestZ 17.77 +.09
SharesZ 22.46 +.09
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.13 +.06
Geneslnst 50.17 +.06
Int r 16.97 +.13
LgCapV Inv 27.46 +.25
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.99 +.06
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.93 +.01
Nicholasn 48.05 +.03
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.08
HiYFxlnc 7.44 +.01
SmCpldx 9.34 +.02
StkIdx 17.85 +.06
Technly 16.29 +.01
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 16.86 -.01
LtMBAp 11.23 -.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.34 -.01
HYMunBd 16.86 -.01
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 22.19 +.09
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.37 +.09
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.10 +.11
Globall 21.91 +.11
Intl l r 19.15 +.13
Oakmark 48.96 +.17
Select 32.62 +.16
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.45 +.03
GIbSMdCap 14.78 +.07
LgCapStrat 9.70 +.05
RealRet 9.70 +.03
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.20
AMTFrNY 12.19 -.01
CAMuniAp 8.77
CapApAp 49.21 +.13
CaplncAp 9.23
ChmplncAp 1.85 +.01
DvMktAp 33.15 +.13
Discmp 65.27 -.02
EquityA 9.61 +.02
GlobAp 60.72 +.40
GIbOppA 29.51 +.09
GblStrlncA 4.29
Goldp 34.39 +.17
IntBdA p 6.54 +.02
LtdTmMu 15.08 -.01
MnStFdA 37.50 +.19
PAMuniAp 11.48
SenFItRtA 8.26 +.01
USGv p 9.82 -.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.16
AMTFrN 12.20 -.01
CplncB t 9.03
ChmplncBt 1.85
EquityB 8.82 +.02
GblStfrlncB 4.31 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.40
RoMuAp 16.94 -.01
RcNtMuA 7.49 -.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 32.84 +.14
InfiBdY 6.54 +.03
IntGrowY 29.11 +.15
Osterweis Funds:
Strklncon 11.72
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.87
TotRtAd 11.49 -.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 11.20 +.03
AIIAsset 12.66 +.03
ComodRR 7.16 +.04
Divlnc 12.14
EmgMkCur 10.44 +05
EmMkBd 12.29 +.02
Fltlnc r 8.82 +.02
ForBdUnr 11.53 +.09
FrgnBd 11.19 +.01
HiYId 9.53 +.02
InvGrCp 11.16 -.01
LowDu 10.60
ModDur 11.10 -.01
RealRtnIl 12.48 -.01
ShortT 9.87
TotRt 11.49 -.01
TRII 11.06 -.01
TRIll 10.11 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 11.12 +.04
LwDurA 10.60
RealRtAp 12.48 -.01
TotRtA 11.49 -.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 10.98 +.03
RealRtCp 12.48 -.01
TotRtCt 11.49 -.01
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRhip 12.48 -.01
TRhip 11.49 -.01


PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 11.18 +.03
TotRtnP 11.49 -.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.72 -.04
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.35 +.15
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.88 +.01
InfiValA 18.16 +.15
PionFdAp 42.16 +.11
ValueAp 12.07 +.05


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.33 +.02
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.44 +.02
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.17 +.01
Price Funds:
Balance 20.91 +.07
BIChip 45.80 +.07
CABond 11.46 -.01
CapApp 23.14 +.04
DivGro 26.24 +.07
EmMktB 14.03 +.02
EmEurop 18.83 +.10
EmMktS 31.18 +.15
Eqlnc 26.13 +.11
Eqlndex 38.76 +.12
Europe 15.37 +.14
GNMA 10.13
Growth 37.93 +.04
Gr&ln 22.49 +.08
HIthSci 43.03 -.01
HiYield 6.87 +.01
InsfiCpG 18.97 +.04
InstHiYld 9.68 +.02
MCEqGr 30.50 +.08
InfiBond 10.14 +.06
IntDis 43.85 +.14
Intl G&I 12.55 +.12
InflStk 13.74 +.07
Japan 7.72 +.04
LatAm 40.36 +.42
MDShrt 5.24
MDBond 11.07 -.01
MidCap 59.54 +.13
MCapVal 24.98 +.13
NAmer 35.67 +.05
NAsia 15.67 +.05
New Era 43.97 +.48
N Horiz 36.50 -.01
N Inc 9.89 -.01
NYBond 11.87 -.01
OverS SF 8.20 +.09
PSInc 17.16 +.04
RealAssetr 11.18 +.08
RealEst 21.49 +.06
R2010 16.57 +.04
R2015 12.90 +.04
R2020 17.88 +.06
R2025 13.10 +.05
R2030 18.82 +.07
R2035 13.32 +.06
R2040 18.95 +.08
R2045 12.62 +.06
SciTec 27.37 +.15
ShtBd 4.86
SmCpStk 36.51 +.05
SmCapVal 39.02 +.08
SpecGr 19.35 +.07
Specln 12.95 +.02
TFInc 10.53
TxFrH 11.75 -.01
TxFrSI 5.71
USTInt 6.31 -.01
USTLg 13.98 -.06
VABond 12.28 -.01
Value 26.09 +.13
Principal Inv:
Divlnfillnst 9.77 +.10
LgCGIIn 10.41 +.02
LT20201n 12.63 +.04
LT20301n 12.49 +.05
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.31 +.06
HiYIdAp 5.64 +.01
MuHilncA 10.28 -.01
UtlityA 11.86 +.01
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.49 -.01
HiYIdBt 5.63
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 33.50 -.02
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.26 +.01
AZ TE 9.52 -.01
ConvSec 20.13 +.04
DvrlnAp 7.67
EqlnAp 16.99 +.10
EuEq 19.32 +.21
GeoBalA 13.18 +.04
GIbEqtyp 9.24 +.08
GrInAp 14.48 +.10
GIblHIthA 46.11 +.18
HiYdAp 7.84 +.01
HiYIdIn 6.10 +.01
IncmAp 7.18
IntGrlnp 9.26 +.12
InvAp 14.57 +.04
NJTxA p 9.85
MultCpGr 55.44 +.19
PA TE 9.52
TxExA p 9.05
TFInA p 15.69
TFHYA 12.65 -.01
USGvAp 13.68
GIblUtilA 10.54 +.04
VoyAp 22.45 +.16
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.70 -.01
DvrlnBt 7.60
Eqlnct 16.82 +.09
EuEq 18.48 +.20
GeoBalB 13.05 +.04
GIbEq t 8.32 +.08
GINtRst 17.87 +.21
GrlnBt 14.21 +.10
GIbIHIthB 36.72 +.14
HiYIdBt 7.83 +.01
HYAdB t 5.98 +.01
IncmBt 7.12
IntGrlnt 9.16 +.12
InfiGrth t 13.75 +.13
InvBt 13.08 +.04
NJTxB t 9.83 -.01
MultCpGr 47.34 +.16
TxExBt 9.05
TFHYBt 12.67 -.01
USGvBt 13.61
GlblUtilB 10.50 +.05
VoyBt 18.83 +.12
RS Funds:
IntGrA 16.94 +.14
LgCAIphaA 43.80 +.23
Value 25.24 +.14
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkA p11.77
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.35 +.08
PennMul r 11.94 +.04
Premierl r 20.00 +.06
TotRetl r 13.95 +.05
ValSvc t 11.72 +.04
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.39
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.89 -.02
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.18 +.04
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 20.47 +.08
10001nvr 40.80 +.12
S&P Sel 22.64 +.07
SmCpSI 21.82 +.07
TSMSelr 26.16 +.08
Scout Funds:
Intf 31.37 +.33
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.84 +.03
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 35.04 +.14
Sequoia 163.27 -.07
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.95 +.09
SoSunSCInv tn22.01+.11
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 56.44 +.19
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 37.64 +.17
RealEstate 31.50 +.13
SmCap 55.96 +.14
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.24 -.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktIn 9.21 +.01
TotRetBdl 10.15
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.00
Eqldxlnst 10.98 +.03
InfiEqllnst 15.63 +.18
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.96 +.20
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 15.97 +.09
REVallnstr 25.80 +.13
Valuelnst 47.82 +.23
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.00 +.12
IncBuildAt 18.93 +.10
IncBuildCp 18.93 +.10
IntValuel I 26.59 +.12
LtTMul 14.65
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYId 5.01 +.01
Incom 9.24
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.55 +.01
Flexlncp 9.27 ..
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGr n 36.67
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 24.74 +.08
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.40 +.09
ChinaReg 7.00 +.03
GIbRs 9.97 +.08
Gld&Mtls 12.35 +.05
WdPrcMn 12.31 +.08


Name NAV Chg
SciTech 14.94
ShtTBnd 9.25
SmCpStk 15.07 +.04
TxElt 13.66 -.01
TxELT 13.84 -.01
TxESh 10.84
VABd 11.60 -.01
WldGr 20.65 +.09
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.44 +.03
Stkldx 26.94 +.08
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.64 +.05
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.89 +.03
CAITAdmn 11.67 -.01
CALTAdmnll.91 -.01
CpOpAdln 77.56 +.15
EMAdmr r n 34.35 +.25
Energyn 116.00 +1.51
EqlnAdm n n50.81 +.11
EuroAdml n 58.64 +.80
ExplAdml n 75.34 +.13
ExtdAdm n 45.53 +.11
50OAdml n 132.71 +.42
GNMAAdn 11.07 -.02
GrwAdm n 37.23 +.07
HlthCrn 61.15 +.08
HiYldCp n 6.02
InfProAdn 29.14 -.04
ITBdAdmln 12.11 -.02
ITsryAdml n 11.79 -.02
IntGrAdm n 58.09 +.48
ITAdmI n 14.33 -.01
ITGrAdmn 10.38 -.01
LtdTrAdn 11.18
LTGrAdmI n 10.83 -.04
LTAdmln 11.74
MCpAdmlnlOl.19 +.34
MorgAdmn 62.98 +.03
MuHYAdmnl1.20 -.01
NYLTAdn 11.76 -.01
PrmCaprn 72.27 +.19
PALTAdmnn11.68 -.01
ReitAdmr n 95.48 +.34
STsyAdmln 10.79
STBdAdmlnlO.66 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.88 -.01
STIGrAdn 10.84
SmCAdmn 38.69 +.12
TxMCaprn 72.11 +.23
TfBAdmln 11.15 -.02
TStkAdm n 35.89 +.11
ValAdmI n 22.94 +.09
WellslAdm n59.25 -.01
WelltAdm n59.05 +.12
Windsor n 49.49 +.32
WdsrllAdn 51.91 +.22
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.91 -.01
CapOppn 33.57 +.07
Convrtn 13.03 +.03
DivApplnn 23.89 +.05
DivdGron 16.82 +.01
Energyn 61.77 +.80
Eqlnc n 24.24 +.05
Explrn 80.90 +.14
FLLTn 12.17 -.01
GNMAn 11.07 -.02
GlobEqn 18.11 +.10
Grolnc n 30.53 +.09
GrthEq n 12.51
HYCorpn 6.02
HlthCren 144.91 +.21
InflaPron 14.83 -.02
InfiExplrn 14.25 +.13
IntlGrn 18.25 +.15
InfiVal n 29.67 +.37
ITIGraden 10.38 -.01
ITTsry n 11.79 -.02
LifeConn 17.30 +.02
LifeGro n 23.45 +.08
Lifelncn 14.76 -.01
LifeMod n 20.87 +.05
LTIGraden 10.83 -.04
LTTsryn 13.45 -.06
Morg n 20.30 +.01
MuHYn 11.20 -.01
Mulntn 14.33 -.01
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.74
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.32 -.01
NYLTn 11.76 -.01
OHLTTEn 12.65 -.01
PALTn 11.68 -.01
PrecMtlsrn 16.24 +.08
PrmcpCor n 15.10 +.04
Prmcprn 69.62 +.18
SelValu r n 20.81 +.07
STARn 20.58 +.06
STIGrade n 10.84
STFed n 10.88 -.01
STTsryn 10.79
StratEqn 21.27 +.07
TgtRetlncn 12.23
TgRe2010n24.34 +.04
TgtRe2015nln3.47 +.03
TgRe2020 n23.93 +.06
TgtRe2025 nl3.64 +.05
TgRe2030 n23.41 +.08
TgtRe2035 nl4.10 +.06
TgtRe2040n23.17 +.11
TgtRe2050 n23.06 +.10
TgtRe2045 nl4.55 +.07
USGron 21.20 +.05
USValuen 11.86 +.05
Wellsly n 24.45 -.01
Welltn n 34.19 +.08
Wndsr n 14.67 +.10
Wndslln 29.25 +.13
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n97.52 +1.13
ExtMkt In 112.37 +.27
MidCplstPl nl 10.26 +.37
TotlntAdm r rn24.11 +.24
Totlntllnst r n96.42 +.95
TotlntllP r n 96.44 +.94
TotlntSig r n 28.92 +.29
500n 132.68 +.41
Balancedn 23.88 +.03
EMktn 26.13 +.20
Europen 25.15 +.33
Extend n 45.47 +.10
Growth n 37.23 +.08
LgCaplxn 26.53 +.08
LTBndn 14.46 -.06
MidCap n 22.28 +.07
Pacific n 9.67 +.08
REITrn 22.37 +.08
SmCapn 38.63 +.12
SmlCpGth n24.97 +.04
STBndn 10.66 -.01
TotBndn 11.15 -.02
TotllntlIn 14.41 +.14
TotStkn 35.87 +.11
Value n 22.94 +.10
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.89 +.03
DevMklnstn 9.36 +.11
Extlnn 45.52 +.10
FTAIIWIdl r n85.86 +.87
Grwthlstn 37.23 +.07
InfProlnstn 11.87 -.01
Instldxn 131.86 +.41
InsPIn 131.87 +.41
InstTStldxn 32.48 +.10
InsTStPlus n32.48 +.09
MidCplstn 22.35 +.07
REITInstrn 14.78 +.06
STBondldx n .66 -.01
STIGrlnstn 10.84
SCInstn 38.69 +.12
TBIst n 11.15 -.02
TSInstn 35.89 +.11
Valuelstn 22.94 +.09
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 109.62 +.34
GroSig n 34.48 +.07
ITBdSign 12.11 -.02
MidCpldxn 31.93 +.11
STBdldxn 10.66 -.01
SmCpSig n 34.85 +.10
TotBdSgln 11.15 -.02
TotStkSgIn 34.63 +.10
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.91
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 9.66 +.05
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 9.47 +02
CorelnvA 6.70 +.01
DivOppAp 15.66 +.08
DivOppC t 15.48 +.09
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.99 +.07
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.31
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 21.70 +.11
Opptylnv 40.06 +.03
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
Growth 44.09 -.06
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 42.89 -.06
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.60 +.01
CorePlus I 11.60
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.44


USAA Group:
AgvGt 36.93 +.07
CA Bd 11.02 -.01
CrnstStr 22.90 +.07
GovSec 10.40
GrTxStr 14.68 +.02
Grwth 16.57 +.04
Gr&lnc 16.39 +.07
IncStk 13.71 +.03
Inco 13.44 +.01
Infi 24.45 +.17
NYBd 12.48
PrecMM 29.33 +.14


Stocks rise before Fed meeting


MATTHEW CRAFT
AP Business Writer


NEW YORK Investors
spent Tuesday preparing for
two events sure to move
markets this week: a Fed-
eral Reserve meeting and a
court decision on whether
Germany can help support
its struggling neighbors.
And if the stock market's
gains Tuesday are any sign,
they expect both events to
turn out well.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 69.07 points to
close at 13,323.36. The aver-
age of 30 large company
stocks has already gained
1.8 percent to start Septem-
ber, a month which is usu-
ally dismal for stocks.
Bank of America led the
30 stocks in the Dow, rising
5 percent, or 45 cents, to
$9.03.
Federal Reserve officials
will gather for a two-day
meeting Wednesday. Many
expect the Fed will an-
nounce a new effort to re-
vive the sluggish economy
Thursday afternoon.
On the same day the Fed
starts its meeting, Ger-
many's high court is ex-
pected to rule on whether
the country can participate
in a European bailout fund.
The court rejected a last-
minute appeal to delay the
decision Tuesday
"It's going to get interest-
ing this week," said Randy
Frederick, managing direc-
tor of active trading and de-
rivatives at the brokerage
Charles Schwab.


Market
Sept. 11

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


NYSE
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:



Frederick ex
will make some
especially after
ment reported
employers add
100,000 jobs in
"Prior to the
report people
sure," Frederi
definitely on
side here. The
of easing comi
In other trad
dard & Poor's
4.48 points to
Nasdaq compo
0.51 of a point t
The assume
will announce
measures is so


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NEWYORK STOC K EXCHANGE


Name Last Chg
SPDR Fncl 15.68 +.13
SP Inds 36.96 +.20
SPTedch 30.84 +.08
SP Uil 36.49 -.09
StdPac 6.91 +.13
Standex 46.35 +.69
StanBlkDk 72.18 +.43
StarwdHtl 58.26 +.47
StateStr 43.10 +.20
Steris 34.78 -.06
StIIlwrM 11.34 +.04
SratHotels 6.39 +.08
Sbyker 54.00 +45
SturmRug 47.57 -.43
SubPpne 38.07 -.02
SunCmts 44.05 -1.85
Suncorgs 33.48 +.22
Sunooo 47.25 -.07
SunriseSen 14.29
SunstnHfl 11.28 +.20
Suntedi .81 +.06
SunTrst 27.58 -.05
SupEnrgy 22.07 +.33
Supvalu 2.42 -.03
Synovus 2.33 +.07
Sysco 30.46 -.07
TCF FncI 11.54 +.10
TDAmeritr 17.44 +.19
TE Connect 36.33 +.37
TECO 17.50 +.05


TIM Part
TJX s
ThawSemi
TealismEg
Target
TeckRes g
TelefBrasil
TelefEsp
TempurP
Tenaris
TenetHlth
Teradata
Teradyn
Terex
TerraNitro
Tesoro
TetraTech
TevaPhrm
Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
ThomCrkg
3DSys
3MCo
Tiffany
TW Cable
TimeWarn
Timken
TollBros
TorchEngy
Torchmark
TorDBkg


Total SA 52.65
TotalSys 23.34
Transom 46.61
Travelers 66.95
Tredgar 17.55
TriConfi 16.24
TrinaSolar 4.23
Trinity 31.64
Tronoxs 25.29
TurqHillRs 9.50
TwoHrblnv 11.90
Tycolnfi 55.69
Tyson 16.13
UBSAG 12.56
UDR 25.86
UIL Hold 35.93
UNS Engy 41.33
US Airwy 11.62
USEC .50
USG 22.41
UltraPtg 22.08
UndArmrs 59.22
UniFirst 66.79
UnilevNV 35.37
UnionPac 124.19
UtdContI 19.80
UtdMicro 2.08
UPSB 73.54
UtdRentals 37.05
US Bancrp 34.04
USNGsrs 20.19
USOilFd 36.11


USSteel 21.61 +.91 WalterEn 35.42
UtdTech 78.76 +.15 WsteMInc 34.15
UtdhlthGp 52.80 -.94 Weathflnfi 12.90
20.16 +.21 WeinRlt 28.37
SWellPoint 58.65
ValeSA 18.26 +.48 WellsFargo 34.15
ValeSApf 17.78 +.41 WestarEn 29.31
ValeantPh 58.04 -1.11 WAstEMkt 15.92
ValeroE 32.77 +.75 WstAMgdHi 6.43
Validus 34.03 +.06 WAstlnfOpp 13.25
VangTSM 73.68 +.16 WstnRefin 26.77
VangREIT 67.41 +.20 WstUnion 18.33
VangEmg 41.46 +.45 Weyerhsr 25.84
VangEur 47.09 +.68 Whrlpl 79.65
VangEAFE 33.83 +.39 WhifngPet 49.77
VarianMed 60.33 +.40 WmsCos 33.74
Vectren 28.47 -.07 WmsPtrs 51.44
VeoliaEnv 11.94 +.25 WmsSon 43.51
VeriFone 31.76 -.41 Winnbgo 11.47
VerizonCm 44.24 +.18 WiscEngy 37.87
VimpelCm 11.73 +.20 WTIndia 17.13
Visa 131.49 +2.81 2.
Vishaylnt 10.52 +.06 Worydhg 23.51
VMware 96.48 +2.73 W 2dham 53.89
Vonage 2.34 +.02 XLGrp 23.82
Vornado 82.38 +.55 XcelEngy 28.01
WGL Hold 40.26 -.09 Xerox 7.49
WPXEnn 16.60 +.43 Yamanag 17.11
Wabash 7.61 +.51 Yelp n 26.20
WalMart 74.06 +.55 YingliGrn 1.82
Walgrn 35.11 -.03 YumBrnds 66.85


some worry the market
watch could take a plunge if the
,2012 Fed fails to deliver.

Ron Florance, managing
director of investment strat-
13,323.36 egy at Wells Fargo Private

+0.51 Bank in Scottsdale, Ariz.,
said he's always wary when
3,104.53 stocks rise on nothing more
+4.48 than expectations.

1,433.56 "These are the things that
make you nervous, when
+2.55 markets are going strong in

841.92 anticipation of news,"
Florance said.
dlary On Tuesday, the Com-
2,039 merce Department re-

978 ported exports to Europe

d: 116 dropped 11.7 percent in
July, stoking concerns Eu-
3.4b rope's troubles could

diary smother the U.S. recovery.
1,447 Overall, U.S. exports fell 1
percent to $183.3 billion,
990 lowered by weaker sales of

d: 147 autos, telecom equipment

.6b and heavy machinery
AP Morgan Stanley and Citi-
group rose after the two
expects the Fed banks settled a dispute over
e sort of move, how much to value their
er the govern- jointly owned brokerage
d last Friday firm, Morgan Stanley Smith
led fewer than Barney The deal cleared
August the way for Morgan Stanley
employment to buy Citigroup's stake. Citi
e weren't as gained 83 cents to $32.66.
ck said. "I am Morgan Stanley rose 64
the majority cents to $17.25.
re's some sort A profit warning from lux-
ing." ury clothing chain Burberry
ling, the Stan- helped tug down other high-
500 index rose end retailers in early trad-
1,433.56. The ing. Burberry said slowing
)site increased sales to China will likely
to 3,104.53. weaken earnings. Ralph
)tion the Fed Lauren lost $4.09 to $156.22.
new stimulus Tiffany & Co. sank 78 cents
o widespread to $62.26.







Page Al0 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
B Mike Arnold ........................ ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ......................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz.......................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen m em ber
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


AGING DRIVERS





Impaired




abilities a




real concern


Is there a point when people
get too old to drive a car
and, if so, what is that age?
This is a simple question,
and with an aging population,
a relevant one, but
the answer is far
from simple and THE IS
clear.
The fundamen- Should th
tal reason is that limits or
people age differ-
ently. Most every- OUR 01
one knows people No hard
who behave like rules -
they are really old judgi
at 65, and others
who seem to be
vigorous and strong at 80.
And statistics don't give a
clear answer, because they are
ambiguous enough to neither
support nor refute arguments
for age limits on driving.
For example, according to
the American Medical Associa-
tion, the fatality rate for driv-
ers 85 years and older is nine
times higher than the rate for
drivers 25 to 69 years old. But
the U.S. Department of Trans-
portation says the increased fa-
tality rate for drivers over 80 is
due to the increased suscepti-
bility to injury among older
drivers rather than an in-
creased tendency to get in-
volved in crashes.
According to the U.S. De-
partment of Transportation,
drivers 65 and older were in
the middle of the pack when it
comes to traffic fatalities per
100,000 population. Drivers
from 16 to 20 had the highest
fatality rate, followed by driv-
ers from 21 to 34, and then by
drivers 65 and older. The two
groups with lower fatality rates


S
e


P
n


were drivers from 35 to 54, and
drivers from 55 to 64, with the
lowest rate being drivers from
55 to 64.
While the statistics don't give
clear answers, it is
a given that aging
;SUE: tends to result in a
reduction in
-re be age strength, coordi-
driving? nation and flexi-
bility, and these
INION: can impair the
and fast ability to drive
but use safely
nent. The only age re-
strictions in cur-
rent Florida law
are that anyone over 80 must
pass a vision test, and the pe-
riod for a license renewal for
anyone over 80 is six years in-
stead of eight.
With the ambiguity of data,
and the fact that an automobile
is necessary for many daily ac-
tivities in our county, we do not
support hard and fast rules on
driving age limits, but we do
recommend that the state look
at whether the length of licens-
ing for older drivers be further
reduced, and possibly investi-
gate whether driving tests
should be required for drivers
when there is a question of
whether the driver is capable
of safely operating a vehicle.
We also recommend that all
drivers of whatever age evalu-
ate their own safety to drive,
and if there are questions
about driving capability, do
what many already do, such as
not driving at night, or driving
only at times when traffic is
lighter. These are prudent
steps regardless of a person's
age.


Listen to Barnes
This is a message to the Citrus
County commissioners: Listen to
Jeff Barnes about the port of Cit-
rus. He knows. I just read the
story here in the Tuesday, Sept. 4,
paper. He knows what he's talking
about. Listen to what he says,
commissioners. Please listen to
what he says.


It's our problem
I had to spend an extra hour
with my psychiatrist this week
after picking up litter because
someone who called Sound Off
apparently thinks trash is the
least of our problems in Citrus
County. It's true that we have
budget deficits, politi-
cians who pursue useless 0
boondoggles like roads
to nowhere, sidewalks in
sparsely populated areas
and even a shipping port
with no products to ship (
and not enough water
depth to ship it in. But
the only way to solve CAL.
those problems is to vote
the rascals out. But litter 563-
on our roadways is a
problem we've brought
upon ourselves. People buy water
bottles and toss the plastic bottle
out the window. Many cigarette
smokers apparently think their
butts and cartons are invisible.


0
0


Good advice
My wife and I have just finished
reading a most enlightening
story about the Port Citrus
brouhaha.
Jeff Barnes runs a business
that would profit from a port
here, but he's recommending
against it. Brad Thorpe, please
listen to him.


Drinking drivers think tossing the
beer can out the window will help
them avoid a DUI. We need to po-
lice ourselves better and pass on
to our children that our roads,
rivers and even our swamps are
not trash receptacles.
Thank you
I am the person that
JND was looking for a tread-
il W mill. I just want to thank
all the wonderful people
b that called to give me a
treadmill. We really ap-
preciate it. A nice gentle-
man called and his
neighbor and they came
and they delivered me a
5 beautiful treadmill with a
1579 truck.
And I want to thank all
the nice people that
called for a treadmill for me and I
just would like to say thank you.
Thank you very much and thank
you (Sound Off) for putting it in.
We really appreciate it.


"Conservation is a state of harmony
between men and land."
Aldo Leopold, 1887-1948


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Think about water


It is always a pleasure to share I wrote a proposal for a
my views and experiences in Northeast 2nd Street/Hunters
working to "Save Our Waters." Spring water quality project in
As a commission the city of Crystal
member of the Withla- g River, and am
coochee Regional Vpleased to report that
Water Supply Authority .. project will receive
for the past eight years funding.
and as the twice- Also high on the
elected chairman of the funding list is a sec-
18-member authority, I ond water quality
want to address three project written by
topics that are impor- county staff to in-
tant as to how we crease water flows
should think about Dennis Damato from Ozello to Crystal
water OTHER River/King's Bay by
The first topic I VOICES cleaning out and in-
would like to speak stalling some new cul-
with you about is water verts under Fort
supply Island Trail.
Participating in the water au- The Florida Department of En-
thority for the past eight years vironmental Protection (FDEP)
provided me firsthand knowl- and SWFWMD will jointly fund
edge and information about re- the purchase of a small dredge,
gional water supply issues that which will be utilized to clean up
are being addressed for Citrus, King's Bay
Marion, Sumter and Hernando The final water-related topic I
counties by the authority. would like to discuss is "Think
The authority has a 30-year ap- About Water"
proved water supply master plan. Water has a multitude of uses
Its largest asset is the Charles that sustain our environment and
A. Black well field in central Cit- daily lives.
rus County, which provides most Potable drinking water comes
of our county's drinking water from a variety of sources like pri-
through the Citrus County Utility vate wells, public supply and bot-
System. tled water
It can receive priority funding The provision of sanitary sew-
from the Southwest Florida erage systems should be utilized
Water Management District to eliminate septic tanks from en-
(SWFWMD) for the development vironmentally sensitive areas by
of new water supply projects. pumping effluent to central
It also funds over $135,000 per plants for treatment to re-use
year in water conservation grants standards. Reclaimed water can
for its members. be used as a valuable resource
The second topic I would like for irrigation and process water
to address is water quality. to help sustain our subsurface
Citrus County has participated aquifer
in developing projects that cap- Recently we have seen the im-
ture existing SWFWMD basin portance of storm water retention
board water quality grant funding and treatment, or sometimes the
for our community. lack thereof during our current


above-normal rainy season.
Irrigation best management
practice standards are extremely
important to conserve water used
to maintain turf, plantings and
agricultural products.
We all know and realize the
value of clean water for a multi-
tude of recreational uses. In Cit-
rus County, you are never more
than 10 minutes away from a
water body
Water is also used in agricul-
tural, institutional, industrial,
mining, power generation, and
manufacturing processes.
The proper use and applica-
tion of fertilizers and pesticides
have a direct effect on water
quality.
Our waters must be preserved
and protected as everything that
touches it has a direct cause and
effect relationship.
We must train ourselves to
"Think About Water" if we are to
produce only good outcomes on
every water-related issue we ad-
dress.
The most important thing to re-
member about water is that it is a
finite resource that must be
treasured, conserved and pro-
tected, as life is not sustainable
without good clean water
I would like to thank the
Chronicle and the Citrus 20/20
Save Our Waters Week Commit-
tee for allowing me the opportu-
nity to share my thoughts about
my water-related experience as
the District 1 commissioner
--in--
Dennis Damato is a Crystal
River resident, Citrus County
commissioner and Withla-
coochee Regional Water Supply
Authority member for the past
eight years. Currently, he is the
authority's chairman.


I I 0/
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'--in :r~, '~~w&ri~ 11 -ttA~
~4~f


TTH EOA oFAR LrTeAVELEd


_ LETTERS to the Editor r


Retirees' health care
Re: The GOP platform should
include protecting retirees
The Republican National Con-
vention came to Florida Aug. 27-
30 and here is what is important
to many retirees: our health care
future. Bipartisan legislation in
Congress, the Earned Retiree
Healthcare Benefits Protection
Act (H.R. 1322), would protect
the earned employer-sponsored
healthcare benefits of retirees
across America. This bill has
been languishing in Congress for
a good number of years. It is
needed because the earned
health care rights of 22 million
retirees have already been ter-
minated, with another 14.3 mil-
lion threatened. We urge
Congress to pass this bill.
Throughout my career, I, along
with millions of other retirees,
accepted a lower salary and less
paid time off in exchange for
guaranteed
employer-sponsored earned
health benefits in retirement. Yet
companies have been canceling
earned health care benefits left
and right and devastating mil-
lions of American retirees.
Retirees and baby boomers
are the largest voting bloc in
America and our interests
should not be ignored in this
critical election.
While Gov. Romney may have


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

pledged to repeal the health care
law, I urge him and the GOP to
spell out in their platform their
commitment to protecting earned
retiree health care benefits and
to this important legislation.
Francis J. DuPonte
Crystal River


Growing old gracefully
1.Thou shall never make
mountains out of mole hills.
2. Thou shall always express
empathic concern and interest
in others.
3. Thou shall be polite, tactful
and gracious in all life circum-
stances.
4.Thou shall never express
how others should live their
lives.
5.Thou shall selectively pur-
chase stylish clothes and coordi-
nate dress and accessories.
6.Thou shall physically main-
tain oneself by controlling
weight by diet and exercise.
7.Thou shall maintain active
interest in what is going on in
one's current space and what is
going on universally
8.Thou shall maintain ones
residence, yard and vehicles or-
derly and cleanly
9.Thou shall structure life so if
at all possible not depend on
others, now and until dirt nap
time.
10.Thou shall respond appro-
priately to letters and phone
calls and be sure to write thank-
you notes, birthday cards and
congratulation messages.
William C. Young
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: PORT CITRUS





WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 All


Keep Dawsy
I am writing to show my
support for Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy. I have lived in this
county since 1984 and I
have been here to see all of
the positive changes that
he has implemented since
he has taken over the
safety and well-being of all
of us.
I get so tired of hearing
people complain about the
sheriff's office spending
too much money You sure
don't hear anyone com-
plain when they are able to
sleep safe in their homes
and drive safely on our
roads due to the up-to-date
technology that our sher-
iff's department has. I
know I feel safer just know-
ing that they have the re-
sources needed to not only
prevent crime but solve ex-
isting criminal situations.
Drugs are out of control
in every county in our
state. Sheriff Dawsy takes a
firm stance on this. If you
are selling drugs here in
our county, the sheriff's de-
partment will come after
you and you will be caught.
I can only say that I hope
our elected officials will
address the synthetic mari-
juana problem that is a
scourge on our whole state.
The sheriff's office needs
laws to be passed so that
they can win this battle,
too.
I graduated from the Cor-
rectional Academy at WTI
and I can tell you that we
have some of the finest law
enforcement officers in the
country The integrity and
dedication to their job is
commendable. I believe
this is due to the strong
leadership of Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy A good leader leads
by example and Sheriff
Dawsy lives and breathes
this philosophy
I urge you when you go to
the polls, stop before you
mark that ballot and think
about our county, its safety
and what a fine sheriff we
have and need to continue
to have. I know where my
vote is going ...Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy!
Maria Parker
Inverness


Supporting Balfour
Many folks who know me
are most likely wondering
why I am ardently support-
ing Republican candidate
Sandy Balfour for superin-
tendent of schools here in
Citrus County rather than
incumbent "Sam" Himmel.
First, I have no ill will to-
ward Superintendent Him-
mel at all and I am not just
a disgruntled employee
wanting to get rid of the
boss.
The reason I am sup-
porting Mrs. Balfour is be-
cause despite FCAT tests
and our A-Plus state rat-
ing, I have witnessed first-
hand students fresh out of
Citrus County high schools
struggle at the College of
Central Florida.
As one of CF's many
AARP-age students, I
failed to pass the college
level placement in math to
allow me to take the col-
lege core classes needed
in that area to earn my de-
gree. I was not surprised
because I have been out of
school for over 30 years.
Math was never my strong
suit when I was in school,
so I knew before I took
the College Level Place-
ment Test that I would be
in a remedial math
class.
What was shocking was
walking into that remedial
class and seeing just how
many young people fresh
out of our local high
schools were there. I rec-
ognized the faces because
as a school bus driver for
Citrus County schools for
10 years, I remembered
transporting some these
now-young adults to our
schools and on field trips.
I think it is a real sad
shame that so many young
people six months to a
year out of our schools
need remedial work in the
basics.
Sandy Balfour is the can-
didate best suited now to
fix this problem and make
our school system reach its
true potential and promise
by persistently "aiming
higher."
Kim Morrison
Homosassa


Argenziano can win
With all due respect to
Mr. Dostal for his well-run
campaign and his win in
the Democratic primary for
state representative, it's
doubtful he has sufficient
name recognition or known
background to compete
with incumbent Jimmie T
Smith in November.
Nancy Argenziano, on the
other hand, has proved to be
an excellent representative
of Citrus County residents
in the Legislature and
served equally well as the
former chairwoman of the
Public Service Commission.
She is an independent
thinker and showed she
cannot be bullied by the cor-
porate flunkies who make
up the majority in the state
Capitol.
Nancy was ostracized by
her own Republican Party
because she and two other


members dared to vote
against an increase in elec-
tric rates requested by
Progress Energy. To assure
she could not repeat as
chairwoman, our so-called
representatives instituted
education requirements
beyond those she had at-
tained. The Public Service
Commission was severely
weakened by the loss of
Nancy as chairwoman.
Regardless of your party
affiliation, you will not find
a better representative
than Nancy Argenziano.
She has shown that she will
not be dictated to by large
corporations, will not be
pressured by her peers to
vote against her con-
stituents but as she has
done in the past, will work
to protect the interests of
all Citrus County residents.
Larry Sparks
Homosassa


SO YOU KNOW
* The Chronicle has enacted
its practice of asking that
endorsement letters be


limited to the reasons writ-
ers are supporting candi-
dates not why they won't
support candidates.


S








Wednesday, Sept. 19th
6pm 7pm
(Followed by an hour
of individual counseling)

The seminar will be held at the
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus in Lecanto,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
(Building C-4, Room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is
offering a free seminar for individuals
thinking about starting their own business.

The two hour session will cover the main
issues involved in becoming an entrepreneur
- from the business idea to the reality of
owning your own business. Following the
seminar, interested participants will have the
opportunity to meet with seasoned SCORE
counselors to further discuss their ideas.

"R U READY" is specifically designed for
individuals who are not business owners, but
who are interested in learning what is
involved in becoming one. If you have ever
asked yourself "Do I have what it takes to be
an entrepreneur?" then this seminar is for
you!

A one hour counseling session will follow
for those interested in meeting with a
SCORE counselor.

For more information and to register
for the seminar, please contact
Dale Malm at SCORE

352-249-1236
www.scorecitrus.org
Seating is limited.


S R a CITRUS.- CO UNT p

N CHRONICLE
^^^B^^^^^^^ &'1 www.chronicleonline.com
i^^ ^ '


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Letters to the EDITOR


,S t 18th Annual

o Rails to
n Trails

uITHLncoocHEE STATC TRAIL B ike R ide !

Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012
on the Withlacoochee State Trail
Start Time:
7 a.m. 9 a.m. (No mass start) Rain or Shine.
Location: The ride will begin at the North Apopka
Avenue Trail Crossing in Inverness. Continental Breakfast
available, Lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Entry Fee: $25 per rider up to 10/04/12.
$15 for riders 12 and under.
Children under 12 years of age must be accompanied by an adult.
All Door Prizes will be
*randomely selected and given
to those who are pre-registered
by 12pm Oct. 5. At least one
> bike will be included in door
For mofri~irmation
i or applications log onto:
www railstotrailsonline.com
For information call (352) 527-9535
or e-mail richg37s@tampabayrr.com
- - NOTICE - -
Thank you for participating in our past Bike Rides. To be eligible for door prizes
and be guaranteed a T-shirt you must be registered by September 14, 2012.
Therefore, we encourage you to sign up early Again, our price is still $25.00
for the ride if you register by September 14, 2012.
We hope you will join us this year and enjoy a day of fun as well as support the
Withlacoochee State Trail. SIGN UP EARLY! C I1 ()\(II E


Contest ends September 30,2012.


STUDIO


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPINION


N I


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UUL


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I











NATION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Y CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Gap widens


Congress courts vets as elections near


Associated Press
A container ship from China
is offloaded July 13 at the
port of Boston. The U.S. trade
deficit grew to $42 billion
in July, widened by fewer
exports to Europe, India
and Brazil that offset a
steep decline in oil imports.

Bullied bus monitor
gets $700,000
TORONTO -A New York
bus monitor who was relent-
lessly bullied by four middle
school students has received
more than $700,000 raised
by a Canadian man.
Sixty-eight-year-old Karen
Klein received the check at a
ceremony Tuesday in Toronto.
A spokeswoman for the
fundraising site Indiegogo
said more than 30,000 people
from 84 countries contributed
to the fund. Their sympathies
were stirred by a cellphone
video of the June taunting up-
loaded to YouTube by a stu-
dent on the bus. The amount
far exceeded the expecta-
tions of Max Sidorov, who
started the drive with the goal
of raising $5,000 to send
Klein on vacation.
The video shows Klein try-
ing to ignore a stream of pro-
fanity, insults and threats from
the seventh-grade boys, who
have been suspended.
The Greece, New York,
grandmother has since retired.

World BRIEFS

Well quenched
I A


Associated Press
A village boy drinks water
from a tube well Tuesday on
the outskirts of the eastern
Indian city of Bhubaneswar.

Bomb in Yemen kills
13, misses target
SANA'A, Yemen -A car
bomb struck the Yemeni de-
fense minister's motorcade
as he was driving through the
nation's capital Tuesday,
killing at least 13 people but
leaving the minister unharmed,
security officials said.
The minister, Maj. Gen.
Mohammed Nasser Ahmed,
has been the target of several
failed assassination attempts.
The blast hit the minister's
convoy as it was traveling to
a Cabinet meeting.
Eight of the minister's se-
curity guards were among the
13 people killed, the security
officials said. The other five
dead were bystanders. The
officials spoke on condition of
anonymity because they were
not authorized to brief the media.
There was no immediate
claim of responsibility for
Tuesday's attack, but it bore
the hallmarks of al-Qaida and
came a day after Yemeni au-
thorities announced the death
of the No. 2 leader of the net-
work's Yemeni branch in an
apparent U.S. airstrike.
AI-Qaida's Yemeni franchise
is seen as the world's most
active, planning and carrying
out attacks against targets in
Yemen as well as in the U.S.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Both
parties are using a brief pre-
election session of Congress
to make campaign appeals
to returning veterans.
Senate Democrats are
pushing President Barack
Obama's proposed $1 billion
Veterans Jobs Corps to re-
lieve high unemployment
among servicemen and
women returning from Iraq
and Afghanistan. House Re-
publicans are pushing a bill
making it a crime to benefit
from lying about military
services or awards.


Lawmakers in both par-
ties agreed this week to
come up with more money
to help the Veterans Admin-
istration reduce a disability
claims backlog.
Obama proposed a job
corps for veterans last Feb-
ruary that would place them
in jobs restoring public
lands and beefing up local
police and fire departments.
It cleared a preliminary test
vote Tuesday, but aides said
progress could easily un-
ravel as lawmakers negoti-
ate what amendments and
how many of them will be
allowed.


Although the legislation is
not expected to become law
this session, it gives law-
makers a chance to display
their support for the na-
tion's 21 million-plus veter-
ans before Congress
adjourns for the campaign
season.
The unemployment rate
for veterans of Iraq and
Afghanistan has been
trending lower in recent
months, but hit a bump last
month. Joblessness among
them was nearly 11 percent
in August, compared with
an 8.1 percent jobless rate
nationwide.


House Republicans plan a
vote this week on their "stolen
valor" bill. The Supreme
Court struck down a similar
law in June, saying false
claims about being awarded
medals for military service
are "contemptible" but are
still protected by the First
Amendment
Rep. Joe Heck, a Nevada
Republican in a tough re-
election contest, said his
legislation is constitutional
because it would narrow the
scope of the law to punish-
ing just those who seek to fi-
nancially benefit by lying
about their service.


Chicago public school teachers walk a picket line Tuesday outside Lane Tech High School on the second day of
a strike in the nation's third-largest school district. Negotiations by the two sides failed to come to an agreement
Monday in a bitter contract dispute over evaluations and job security.



Union, school board no



closer to striking deal


Associated Press
CHICAGO Negotiators were
back behind closed doors Tuesday
on the second day of Chicago's
teachers strike, but publicly the
teachers union and school board
couldn't even agree on whether
they were close to a deal.
The union issued a statement at
midday saying negotiators had re-
turned to the bargaining table and
were discussing one of the most
serious remaining issues, a new
teacher evaluation system. But the
union said it had signed off on only
six of 48 articles in the contract
and that the two sides had "a con-
siderable way to go."
"To say that this contract will be
settled today is lunacy," union
President Karen Lewis said at one
of several sites around the city
where teachers gathered to chant
and wave placards.
School board officials have re-
peatedly described the two sides
as being close and suggested bar-
gaining could be wrapped up
quickly with agreements on the
evaluations and a dispute about
the recall of teachers who lose
their jobs.
Earlier, Mayor Rahm Emanuel
reiterated his belief that the strike
could have been avoided alto-
gether. At an appearance with
principals and former principals,
he addressed another sticking
point over how teachers are hired,


Chicago exti
hours at child-
CHICAGO Chic
officials said they'll e
hours at child-care si
ensure students are
while teachers walk tl
Chicago Public Sc
Tuesday that 147 sc
ings will be opened f
from 8:30 a.m. to
beginning Thursday
settlement isn't reac
The sites have be
for four hours so stud
breakfast and lunch
pate in structured ac
About 11,000 child
144 sites on Monday
the vast majority of t
idled students either
or parents found oth
CPS said it opene
sites and can serve
dents. Churches, pa
and other sites also
opened for students


insisting that princi
city or the union -
full control to pick t
"I don't think dow
be in the business
teachers that the loc
cipal should select:


to hold them accountable,"
tending Emanuel said, as several hundred
care sites protesting teachers chanted and
banged on drums.
cago school A group of seven educators
extend the backed him up. One was Mahalia
tes opened to Hines, a member of the Board of
safe and fed Education and a former principal
he picket lines, at a school in the violent Engle-
chools said wood neighborhood. She said it
hool build- was essential that she be allowed
for six hours to choose her staff "in that war
2:30 p.m. zone."
if a contract "If I'm a principal and you're
hed by then. going to hold me accountable,
en opened you're going to fire me. I want to
dents can eat pick my people," she said.
and parici- Meanwhile, parents and care-
and partici- givers were once again scrambling
tivities. to figure out what to do with more
dren went to than 350,000 idle children. On
y. That means Monday, only about 18,000 stu-
he 350,000 dents showed up at schools and
stayed home other venues where authorities or-
er options. ganized activities and provided
d three more meals for those in need. That
150,000 stu- means the vast majority of parents
rk buildings have to make alternative arrange-
have been ments or leave their children un-
supervised through the day
-From wire reports The walkout less than a week
after most schools opened for fall
has created an unwelcome po-
pals not the litical distraction for Mayor Rahm
- should have Emanuel. In a year when labor
heir team. unions have been losing ground
vntown should nationwide, the implications were
s of selecting sure to extend far beyond Chicago,
al school prin- particularly for districts engaged
if you're going in similar debates.


House Republicans also
plan a series of hearings re-
viewing the Veterans Affairs
Department's performance.
Lawmakers want to return
to their districts to campaign
as soon as possible. House
members could leave as
early as Friday and are ex-
pected to stay in Washington
no later than the end of next
week. The Senate is likely to
have a shortened Septem-
ber schedule, too.
That means there is al-
most no time to pass sub-
stantive legislation but
enough time to try to score
some points with voters.



Health care

costs still on

the rise, but

wages flat
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -Annual
premiums for job-based
family health insurance
went up just 4 percent this
year, but that's no comfort
with the price tag approach-
ing $16,000 and rising more
than twice as fast as wages.
Premiums for a family plan
are averaging $15,745, with
employees paying more
than $4,300 of that. And
lower-wage workers are
paying more for skimpier
coverage than their coun-
terparts at upscale firms.
Overall, "it's historically a
very moderate increase in
premiums," said Drew Alt-
man, president of the Kaiser
Family Foundation, which
conducted the survey with
the Health Research & Ed-
ucational Trust
He quickly added: "But
even a moderate increase
feels really big to workers
when their wages are flat or
falling." General inflation
rose only 2.3 percent, by
comparison.
Most independent experts
say rising premiums reflect
underlying problems with
the health care system that
have frustrated policymak-
ers of both parties for years,
as well as corporate benefit
managers.
Indeed, only last week an
arm of the National Acad-
emy of Sciences estimated
that about 30 cents of every
dollar spent on health care
- $750 billion a year is
wasted through unnecessary
procedures, cumbersome
paperwork, uncoordinated
care and fraud.
The availability of employer-
based coverage, the mainstay
for working people and their
families, remained stable
this year, with 61 percent of
all companies offering
health benefits.
Companies continued
shifting costs to workers, at
a somewhat slower pace. A
trend toward steering em-
ployees into plans with high
annual deductibles eased a
bit The survey found that 34
percent of workers are in
plans with annual de-
ductibles of at least $1,000
for single coverage, up from
31 percent in 2011.
The survey includes more
than 2,000 small and large
employers. Asked what kind
of increase they're expect-
ing for 2013, employers said
their best estimate at this
point is 7 percent.


IRS pays whistleblower $104 million


Associated Press


WASHINGTON-The In-
ternal Revenue Service has
awarded an ex-banker $104
million for providing infor-
mation about overseas tax
cheats the largest amount
ever awarded by the agency,
lawyers for the whistle-
blower announced Tuesday
Former Swiss banker
Bradley Birkenfeld is cred-
ited with exposing wide-
spread tax evasion at Swiss
bank UBS AG. Birkenfeld


himself served roughly two
and a half years in prison
for a fraud conspiracy con-
viction related to the case,
which resulted in a $780
million fine against the
bank and an unprecedented
agreement requiring UBS to
turn over thousands of
names of suspected Ameri-
can tax dodgers to the IRS.
"The IRS today sent 104
million messages to whistle-
blowers around the world -
that there is now a safe and
secure way to report tax


fraud and that the IRS is
now paying awards,"
Birkenfeld's lawyers,
Stephen M. Kohn and Dean
A. Zerbe, said in a state-
ment. "The IRS also sent
104 million messages to
banks around the world -
stop enabling tax cheats or
you will get caught."
The IRS, which doesn't
usually confirm individual
award payments, said
Birkenfeld signed a disclo-
sure waiver, allowing the
agency to confirm his award.


Birkenfeld has become
something of a cause cele-
bre among whistleblowers
because of the magnitude of
his case and the fact that he
was jailed after cooperating
with authorities.
In a summary of the
award provided by Birken-
feld's lawyers, the IRS said,
"The comprehensive infor-
mation provided by the
whistleblower was excep-
tional in both its breadth
and depth."
Federal prosecutors,


however, had said Birken-
feld withheld information
about his own dealings with
a former UBS client who
pleaded guilty in 2007 to tax
charges.
In 2006, Congress
strengthened whistleblower
rewards. The 2006 law tar-
gets high-income tax
dodgers, guaranteeing re-
wards for qualified whistle-
blowers if the company in
question owes at least $2
million in unpaid taxes, in-
terest and penalties.











SPORTS


* Fisher
and the
'Noles ready
for Wake
Forest./B3


* Golf/B2
* Scoreboard/B4
* Sports briefs/B4
* Baseball/B5
* Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Wrestling delegate recalls Olympic visit


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Bill Grant ad-
mits it. Being selected to repre-
sent his country, in his own way, at
the 2012 Summer Olympic Games
in London was something special.
"I was honored," the Inverness-
based attorney said. "I'm not say-
ing I was necessarily surprised,
but it was a great honor."



Gage off,


other


Warriors


improve


SR falls to

Weeki Wachee

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
HOMOSASSA Like the
Beatles song, Adam Gage
believes in yesterday
Actually, the Seven Rivers
Christian School golfer be-
lieves more in Thursday
The junior shot a 44 last
Thursday Tuesday, he shot
a 47 in a match against
Weeki Wachee High School
at the Southern Woods Golf
Course.
While disappointed with
the round, Gage was still the
low medalist of the day The
Warriors, on the other hand,
were not quite as lucky
against the Hornets.
Weeki Wachee, a larger
public school, won 201-221.
Mike Rampino shot a 48 to
lead all golfers for the Hor-
nets. Other top Weeki
Wachee golfers included
John Gula (49), Chris Brazee
(53) and Ty Ennis (59).
For Seven Rivers, Zach
Daniel shot a 50. London
McGuffey hit a 56 and Bryar
Kreger shot a 68. Kreger is
an eighth-grader who just
took up the game recently
Gage needs a short mem-
ory about the Tuesday
match.
"It wasn't (a good day),"
Gage said. "I would say ap-
proach shots into the green
and chipping and missing a
bunch of greens (were all
problems). Wind was not a
factor. It might be having no
practice over the weekend.
"It was good to feel the
wind actually," Gage contin-
ued. "They (Weeki Wachee)
are better. I remember win-
ning last year.
"The first hole I parred.
Last week was a whole dif-
ferent story"
Warriors coach Steve
Meehan liked what he saw
overall. This is decidedly a
rebuilding year for the
Lecanto school's golf team.
See Page B4


A huge wrestling advo-
cate since childhood,
Grant was first elected to
the board of the Florida
Amateur Wrestling Associ-
ation nine years ago, and a
year later he became the
board's chairman, a title
he retains today He is also
a member of the national
board of delegates for
Wrestling.


Which ultimately led to
his selection as a delegate
for USA Wrestling at the
i Summer Olympics.
The 12 days Grant got to
I spend in and around Lon-
don left an indelible im-
pression, both within the
Bill Grant competitive venues and
with the country itself.
USA "Without a doubt, the entire Amer-
ican team showed great spirit," he


said. "And the British hospitality
was fantastic."
Grant stayed in a village east of
London called Meopham. "We
took the bullet train into the city
every day," he said. "You could lit-
erally look one way in the evening
and see the beach volleyball com-
petition and look the other and
see London Bridge."
And yet, it was the British gra-
ciousness that impressed most.


"Their hospitality was unbeliev-
able," Grant said. "You couldn't go
15 yards without someone there to
help you. It was all a wonderful
spectacle for them to have in their
capital city."
That attitude was also prevalent
in all the sports, something else
that Grant noticed.
"All in all, I was very, very


Page B4


Not Kidd-ing around


Brothers

lead CR

tovictory
S JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Two
intra-county golf teams
.. showed up at the Planta-
tion on Crystal River Golf
Course Tuesday afternoon,
., /but only one left the links
.. with their
heads held
a little
higher The
Crystal
/ River Pi-
Srate boys For more
golf team photos, click
faced off on this story at
with the www.chronicle
visiting online.com.
Lecanto
Panthers and, after nine
holes of hotly contested
play, the Pirates won the
meet by 12 strokes 156 to
Lecanto's 168.
The undefeated Pirates'
(4-0) team score of 156 is
the lowest team total so far
this season on their home
course, a full five strokes
less than their season-
opening win over
Springstead.
S .'"These guys all played
well," Crystal River head
coach Jere DeFoor said.
"We've had 160 and 161 out
here (before)."
The Kidd brothers, senior
S Michael and sophomore
Kyle, shared top medalist
honors as both players shot
even pars of 36. Lecanto sen-
ior Drew Cooke finished just
one stroke behind the sib-
lings at 37, while Panthers
teammate Micah Sugioka
(39) came in behind him.
Crystal River senior
Travis Swanson (40) scored
for his team in the third po-
sition. A full four strokes
better than his last showing
at Plantation, Swanson was
pleased with the better
score but still sees room for
improvement
"It wasn't my best day,"
Swanson said of the round.
"I had one bad hole but I
DAVE SIGLER/IChronicie birdied number one. I shot


Crystal River High School's Michael Kidd tees off on the first hole Tuesday against Lecanto at The Plantation
golf course.


Page B4


Brady's performance puts Pats on top of AP poll


Bucs move up; Dolphins dead last '


Associated Press
NEW YORK While Tom
Brady cares for his damaged nose,
New England Patriots fans can
gain comfort from having their
team lead the AP Pro32 power
rankings.
Thanks to Brady's impressive
work at Tennessee, even with a
possible broken nose, the Patriots
moved into the top spot of the first
regular season poll released Tues-
day New England's convincing
win and Green Bay's home loss to
San Francisco jumbled the rank-
ings at the top. Further down,
Washington, Tampa Bay, Dallas
and Denver surged thanks to
opening victories.
In voting by 12 media members
who regularly cover the NFL, the
Patriots received eight top selec-
tions to earn 378 points, 10 in front
of San Francisco. The 49ers
moved from fourth to second and
earned one first-place vote.


"Business as usual," is how
ESPN's Chris Berman explained
placing Brady's bunch on top.
"The Patriots looked just OK in
the preseason. Not so fast!" said
former All-Pro safety John Lynch,
now with Fox Sports. "They
whooped up on a good Titans
team. Brady and the youth-infused
defense looked like a team de-
serving of the No. 1 ranking.
Only Dan Pompei of the Chicago
Tribune selected the 49ers as the
best team, reasoning that their
showing at Lambeau Field war-
ranted a jump from No. 4.
"People don't want to believe L
this team can be this good with
Alex Smith at quarterback," Pom-
pei said. "Believe it"
Also getting strong support were
Baltimore, third with 357 points 1
and two first-place votes, and
Houston with 336 and one.
"Ravens show in no uncertain
Associated Press
See Page B134 New England Patriots helmets sit by players on the bench Sunday in a game against the Tennessee Titans.







CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO GOLF


OUTDOORS









G(ET


z







YOUTH SPORTS ADULT LEAGUE I


TEBER 12, 2012





IN THE


SPORTS


GAM


How to evaluate proper golf shoes


L ast week Steve Fischer, my
friend and fellow PGA pro-
fessional, discussed the im-
portance of overseed on the golf
courses during the winter months.
What Steve said is exactly right.
Overseeding protects the dormant
Bermuda grass from influx of play
that arrives during the winter
months. I am the general manager
of two clubs and we take two dif- Herb
ferent approaches to over seed. HE
At Sugarmill Woods, we over- HI
seed our tees, fairways, collars and
greens. However, at Southern
Woods, we chose to not overseed our greens.
My superintendent, Tim Gatz, feels we can
provide truer, smoother and faster putting
surfaces by not overseeding the greens.
By not overseeding, we also do not have to
deal with transition during the spring
months. We have not overseeded our greens
for the past two years and I do not see us
overseeding anytime soon.
This month I would like to talk to yoi
about a piece of equipment commonly x\ er-
looked golf shoes.
Golf shoes are a very important piece of
equipment. A trend over the past year or so
has made golf shoes lighter and more ath-
letic. One of the biggest changes we ha\ e
seen is a shoe without changeable spikes
If you have been watching golf the pa st
couple of weeks, you might have no-
ticed Sergio Garcia is wearing the
Adidas AdiCross golf shoe. I have
been wearing this shoe for the past
two months and feel it is the light-
est, most comfortable sh-hoe I have
ever worn.
When purchasing i olf
shoes, it is impor-
tant to know
what you are
looking for in
your shoe.
Some play-
ers need sta-
bility while
others want


ER
IN


lightweight shoes.
If it is stability you desire, I sug-
gest a test before trying a shoe.
Grab the toe of the shoe with one
hand and the heel with the other
and twist. The more it twists, the
less stability that shoe has. If it
barely moves, then it is a very sta-
ble shoe.
The kind of shoe you wear also
Hurley has to do with what type of golf
WB'S swing you have. If your swing has a
ITS lot of movement in your lower
body, then you will require a shoe
that has more stability. If you have
a quiet lower body or you are trying to quiet
your lower body, a less stable
shoe would work well.
I believe this new trend
away from classic-look-
ing saddle shoes into
more athletic shoes is
going to continue.
The reason for this
is lip:, iii|m es such u111
jsAdi.jlSl nd I(I (I ,"
Nike re_ Iii kil j a .
limiie or theill-
selles iII the A / .s


golf business and relying on what they do
best, which is creating athletic shoes for
other sports. Nike and Adidas then bring the
technology into golf. A great example is the
shoe Tiger has been wearing for the past
year. That shoe was developed from a run-
ning sneaker that Tiger wore for his work-
outs.
For golfers out there who are traditional-
ists, there are still golf shoes out there for
you. But I recommend trying one of the new
more athletic offerings. To experience a dif-
ferent kind of golf shoe, visit your nearest
golf pro shop or contact me for more infor-
mation on what kind of shoe you should be
wearing.


Herb Hurley is the PGA general manager of
Sugarmill Woods Country Club and Southern
Woods Golf Club.


Golf BRIEFS


Youth golf lessons
at Pine Ridge
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
in partnership with Pine Ridge Golf
Course will offer youth golf lessons
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday evenings for five
weeks beginning Sept. 5.
Children ages 6 to 16 are eligible
and the cost is $50 per child. Instruc-
tion will be given by golf pro Randy
Robbins and several of his volun-
teers. During the lessons, partici-
pants will learn putting, driving,
chipping, on-course play and on-
course etiquette. Golf clubs will be
provided, but if a child has his or her
own set, they are encouraged to
bring them.
Visit www.citruscountyparks.com,
or call 352-527-7540.

Golf tourney needs
committee members
The Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion will have its 12th Annual Charity
Golf Tournament on Nov. 10 at
Seven Springs Golf and Country
Club, New Port Richey. Committee
members are needed to assist in the
coordination of the fundraising event.
The Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion serves the central Florida area,
including Citrus, Hernando, northern
Hillsborough, Lake, Pasco, northern
Pinellas and Sumter counties. The
Florida Department of Elder Affairs
has determined this region has more
than 100,000 Alzheimer's disease
sufferers. By assisting the Alzheimer's
Family Organization, participants net-
work with local and regional profes-
sionals, golfers and concerned
members of the community helping
those afflicted with Alzheimer's dis-
ease and their families.
For information, call 727-
848-8888, or toll free at 888-
496-8004.


Local LEADERS


SHOT HIS AGE
Sept. 8 Don Stickney shot his age with a 72
at Plantation on Crystal River resulting in +11
in the points game.

BRENTWOOD
Sept. Second Sunday Morning Scramble
results.
First 7 under
Bob Staker, Paul N. Roy
and Frank Hyer
Second 6 under (MOC)
Birdie on No. 6
Bruce Liston, Wayne Brooks,
Bill Owens and Herman Gardner
"Honorable Mention"
George Batson, Jay Hylemon,
Don Gittings and Russel Clark
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Chuck Curtis
No. 4 Herman Gardner
Sept. 5 -Wednesday Point Quota Group
results.
First +4
Pete Bauerle and Vaughn Thornton
Second +2 (MOC)
Total of 9 on No. 6
Possum Lindsey and Steve Leonard
Most over quota +5
Glenn Connelly
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Glenn Connelly
No. 4 Richard Jackson
50/50 winner Don Oslance
Sept. 6 -Thursday Evening Scramble
results.
First 8 under
Anita McCabe, Paul N. Roy
and Dave Gollobin
Second 3 under
Kenny McCabe, Jennie Diaz,
Ron Cart and Maggie Cart
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Ron Cart
No. 4 Dave Gollobin
Sept. 8 Saturday Morning (HDCP)
Scramble results.
First
Ron Worrell, L.T Schull,
Bob Myers and Irv Rayburn
Second
Ruth Doring, Russ Doring,
Dick Sherman and Jerry Walker
Third
Bob Staker, Mona Evans
and Steve Leonard
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Art Miller
No.4 Steve Leonard
Sept. 9 Sunday Morning Scramble
results.
First 4 under
Malcolm Hollop, Paul N. Roy
and Bruce Liston
Second 4 under
Kenny McCabe, Chuck Curtis
and Mona Evans
Third 3 under
Russell Clark, Jay Hylemon,
George Batson and Don Oslance
Closest to th Pin:


No. 2
No. 4
50/50 winner


Bruce liston
Anita McCabe
Johnny Holcomb


Sept. 9 Monday Mens Group results.
First Vaughn Thornton
Second Lou DeGennaro
Third Kenny McCabe
"Honorable Mention" Rob Goyette
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Vaughn Thornton
No. 4 Kenny McCabe

CITRUS HILLS
Sept. 5 -The Citrus Hills Men's Golf
Association played individual low net on
the Oaks golf course.


First
Second
Third
Fourth

First
Second
Third
(MOC)
Fourth

First
Second
Third
Fourth

First
Second
Third
Fourth
(MOC)


A Flight
Larry Jones
John Nagle
Don Morrison
Richard Stillwagon
B Flight
Jerry Krause
Ed Ryan
Angelo Previte

Bob Miller
C Flight
John Bechler
Hervey Schrank
Clive Affleck
Randy Robertson
D Flight
Joe Skender
ClintWynn
Mike Rizzio
Bob Deboer


WOMEN
Sept. 4 -The Citrus Hills Ladies Golf
Association participated in this month's
qualifying round for the end of year Ace of
Aces tournament.


First Low Gross
Second Low Gross
First Low Net
Second Low Net

First Low Gross
Second Low Gross
First Low Net
Second Low Net

First Low Gross
Second Low Gross
First Low Net
Second Low Net

First Low Gross
Second Low Gross
First Low Net
Second Low Net
Birdies:
No. 3
No. 3
No. 10


Flight 1
Kay Close 82
Helene Reed 83
Lily Kim 66
Marti Jones 69
Flight 2
Sung Ja Kim 86
Sherry Robertson 91
Nina Kimball 69
Helen Clayton 72
Flight 3
Sharon Fowler 99
Linda Mullen 101
Brenda Benoit 73
Nancy McCoy 76
Flight 4
JoAnn Messina 100
Virginia Romiti 106
Fe Alino 71
Erika LaPerch 73

Ivalee Lawrence
Brenda Lindsey
Nelia Rodriguez


CITRUS SPRINGS
MEN
Aug. 18 -The Citrus Springs Men's Asso-
ciation played two best ball.
First 57
Curry, Jenkins,
Woodworth and Rocky
Second 62
Sirmons, Balas,


Lycke and Colletti (blind)
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Robertson
No. 8 Williamson
Aug. 25 -The Citrus Springs Men's
Association played low net.
First Jenkins
Second Feher
Gold Tees:
First Manecky
Second Hunt
Closest to the Pin:
No.4 Woodworth
No.8 Feher
No. 11 Manecky
No.14 Manecky
No.16 Feher
Aug. 29 -The Citrus Springs Men's
Association play 3 on par 3's, 1 on par
4's and 2 on par 5's.
First 98
Bob Manecky, Bob Hunt,
Glen Robertson and Don Gonczi (blind)
Second 98
Doug Sirmons, Larry Murphy,
Don Gonczi and Bob Manecky (blind)
Closest to the Pin:


69
71

67
71


No. 4 Don Gonczi
No. 8 Bill Curry
No. 11 Harvy Jenkins
No. 14 Ed Starling
No. 16 Don Gonczi
Sept. 1 -The Citrus Springs Men's
Association played team points.
First 38
Clutter, Sirmons,
Hunt and Robertson
Second 351/4
Feher, Balas,
Jenkins and Rocky
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Feher
No. 8 Feher
No. 11 Williamson
No. 14 Clutter
No. 16 Robertson
Sept. 4 -The Citrus Springs Men's
Association played 2 best balls.
First 124
Jack Williamson, Dave Balas,
Glen Robertson and Rocky Marziani
Second 126
Jerry Feher, Don Gonczi,
Bob Hunt and Pete Clutter
Closest to the Pin:
No.4 JackWilliamson
No. 8 Pete Clutter
No. 11 Bob Hunt
No. 14 Jerry Feher
No. 16 Doug Sirmons
Sept. 6 -The Citrus Springs Men's
Association played 2 man teams.
First 30
Clutter and Rocky
Second 20
Curry and Gonczi
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Glen Robertson
No. 8 Walt Norton
No. 11 Pete Clutter
No. 14 Glen Robertson
No. 16 Pete Clutter
WOMEN
Sept. 7 Points Quota "Chicks with
Sticks" results.


Jean O'Brien +5
Linda Miller +5
Sandy Brown +3
Marj Sibley +3
Marion Ladd +2
Leanne Feher +2
9 Jan Kominski +1
0 Mary McConnell +1
Closest to the Pin:
38 No. 4 Mary McConnell
1 No. 8 Mary McConnell
No. 11 Jean O'Brien
No. 16 Carole Seifert
"Chicks with Sticks," a ladies points quota
league, meets every Friday morning at Citrus
Springs. Interested players with GHIN handi-
caps should call Jan at 352-344-9550 or Car-
ole at 352-746-2082.
MIXED
Sept. 4 Citrus Springs Golf & Country
Club Played 9 Hole Par 3 Mixed Scramble
results.
First 24
Nancy Haydon, Dick Haydon,
Rick Drohan and Henry McAloan
Second 25
Linda Turschmann, Ed Turschmann
and Don Voss
Third 27
Kathy Sirmons, Barbie McAloan,
Bill Curry and Keith Miller
Closest to the Pin:
No. 7 women only Barbie McAloan
No. 3 men only Dick Haydon
No. 9 all players Linda Turschmann

PINE RIDGE
MEN
Sept. 4 -Beverly Hills Men's Nine Hole
Golf League results.
Frank DeLucia 31
Ed Hildenbrandt 37
Jerry Krause 35
OTG winner
No.2 Yerry Myers
CTTG
No. 5 Frank Hughes
Sept. 11 Beverly Hills Men's Nine Hole
Golf League results.
JesseLewie 38
Tarry Myers 38
Ed Hildenbrandt 39
OTG winner:
No. 11 Dick Emberley
No. 11 Jesse Lewis
Golfers of any age or ability are welcome to
join in for a friendly round of nine holes of
competitive golf. We know you have a lot to
do, so we get the round of golf out of the way
early every Tuesday morning at Pine Ridge
The group alternates weekly front nine and
back nine with tee time at 7:30 a.m. For infor-
mation call Frank Hughes at 352-746-4800 or
email new216@tampabay.rr.com.
WOMEN
Aug. 29 -Wednesday Little Pine Ladies
Association played a scramble.
First 27
Jan Lassiter, Jo Steele
and Ann Riach
Second 28
Betty Klinger, Rainey Hart
and Elsie Pierce
Chip-in:


No. 9


Jan Lassiter


Birdies:
No. 9 Jan Lassiter
Closest to the Pin:
No. 1 Lorraine Palazz
No. 2 Lisa Wahba
No. 7 Barb Schmidt
No. 9 Lorraine Palazz
Sept. 5 -Wednesday Little Pine Ladies
Association played throw out four holes
Babe Zaharais Flight
First Jo Steele
Second Lisa Wahba
Patty Berg Flight
First Barb Schmidt
Second Margie Ebbert
Julie Inkster Flight
First Zona Doane
Second Norma Hedin
Nancy Lopez Flight
First Barb Lamb
Second Wanda Purser


Closest to the Pin:
No. 1
No. 7
Birdies:
No. 8

SEVEN

Sept.6 -The 7 Rive
tion played a "Two M
ment.
Firs
First
Don Eddy and Ron N
Second
Paul Mantey and Bud
Secor
First
(Tie) Gene Kelly and,
(Tie) Ted Grabowski a
Closest to the Pin:
No. 7
No. 11


Gary Mosey 13'-8"
Rich Galasso 8'-4"
ErvKock 3'-11"


7olo


SUGARMILL WOODS
zolo Sept. 6 Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Men's Golf Association played One Low
s. Gross, One Low Net.
Flight 1
19 First -6
20 Mike Howard, Howard Watson,
John Holden and John Bradley
21 Flight 2
21 First +2
Tom Venable, Ken Eckhardt,
17 Bill Moreau and JackWinner
21 Second +3
Al Turska, Bob Maeder,
26 Tom Jones and Ed Skinner
27 Flight 3


First -9
Barbara Lamb Stan Fleming, Zane Megos,
Barbara Schmidt Ron Rosenwald and Dick Henry
Golfers of the Week:
Zona Doane Low Gross Mike Howard 78
Low Net Tom Jones 68
RIVERS Low Net Senior Stan Fleming 66
MEN Closest to the Pin:
ers Men's Golf Associa- Oak No. 3 Bob Mason 1'3"
Man Better Ball" tourna- Oak No.6 FelixTarorick 14'1"
Cypress No. 3 Bob Maeder 19'6"
t Flight Cypress No. 6 RickWehrheim 13'0"
57 Sept. 4- Sand Blasters Men's Group
eal played team point quota.
59 First +12
Dalm Paul Angelo, Gary Osborne,
nd Flight Jeff Stier and Ken Eckhardt
59 Second +8
Al Silliman Sam Hunt, Felix Tarorick,


nd B


Barry Blood Barry Turska and JackWinner
Third +7
Don Eddy Ed Compson, Jim Rettick, Gus Calleri,
Robin Thomas Gary Osborne and Jim Rettick


WOMEN
Sept. 5 -7 Rivers Women's Golf Associa-
tion played 2 of 4 Shamble.
First 131
Joan Poore (MOC), Judy McMechan,
Joan Burnett and Lee Simon
Second 131
Katherine Carver, Arlene Cox,
Ida Feihl and Norma Tutty
Birdies:
Nos. 4 and 6 Katherine Carver
Niners:
Low Gross Cathy Difani 54
Low Net Flora Roberts 38

SOUTHERN WOODS
Sept. 5 Southern Woods Men's Golf As-
sociation played 1 on Par 5's; 2 on 4's; 3 on
3's.
First -25
Bob Boal, Rich Galasso,
O.J. Klimm and Chuck Swenson
Second -20
Dick Tuxbury, Erv Koch,
Gary Mosey and Kyle Muzina
Third -19
Ben Lee, Ken Moody,
Nelson Wright and Rich Perry
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Nelson Wright 6'-5"


Notable Rounds:


Dave Hornbeck +10 points
WOMEN
Sept. 5 -The Sugarmill L.G.A. 18 holer's
opening day scramble
First 67
Karen Taylor, Pauline Gerbino,
Mary Tarorick and Lee Ferrari
Second 70.125
Chris Venable, Janice Doyle,
Barbara Turska and Mary Stassi
Third 71
Lorraine Dayton, Kay Walsh
Dyane Koskela and Pauline Woodbury
Fourth 71.125
Linda Compson, Carolyn Ohlmeyer
Marilyn Tannenhaus and Gloria Megos

TWISTED OAKS
Sept. 4--Twisted Oaks Ladies Association
played low net.


First
Second
Third

First
Second
Third


First Flight
Shirley Young
Chris Hultzen
Maria Valdas
Second Flight
Sonia Seward
Bonnie Kaiser
Ro Spencer


I





WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 B3


Vols WR eyes Gators matchup


Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
Tennessee wide receiver
Justin Hunter has been
thinking about this game
for an entire year
Ever since he tore the an-
terior cruciate ligament in
his left knee during a 33-23
loss to Florida last Septem-
ber, Hunter has awaited
Tennessee's next shot at the
Gators. His chance finally
comes Saturday when the
23rd-ranked Volunteers
open Southeastern Confer-
ence competition against
No. 18 Florida in front of a
sellout crowd at Neyland
Stadium.
"I just want to show them
what I can do for real, when
I'm 100 percent," Hunter
said.
It isn't that Hunter has
any hard feelings toward
the Gators. His injury didn't
come from a dirty hit, or
even from any contact at all.
He simply considers this a
case of unfinished business.
"That's a game that I left
on the field and wish I
could have back," Hunter
said.
Hunter leads the SEC with
17 catches and ranks second
in the conference with 219
receiving yards, behind only
Vanderbilt's Jordan
Matthews. His 17 catches
have tied Johnny Mills' 46-
year-old school record for
the most through the first
two games of a season.
He got off to a similar
start last year
Hunter was leading the
SEC in receiving and Ten-
nessee had an undefeated
record as the Vols headed
into Gainesville. On Ten-
nessee's opening posses-
sion, Hunter caught a
12-yard pass for a third-
down conversion and
landed awkwardly on his
left knee.
"I knew immediately it
was serious," Hunter said.
"As soon as I landed, I felt
something pop and I just
fell to the ground. It started
stinging."
Hunter wouldn't play


Associated Press
Tennessee wide receiver Justin Hunter (11) catches a
touchdown pass in front of Georgia State cornerback Nate
Anthony (1) on Saturday in Knoxville, Tenn.


again the rest of the year
Tennessee wasn't the same
without him.
The Vols fell to Florida
and finished 5-7 for their
second consecutive losing
season. Tennessee coach
Derek Dooley said after the
Florida game that "it was
clear that it was a break in
your spirit" when the Vols
saw Hunter go down.
"Once Justin got hurt, I
don't think we responded
like we should," Tennessee
cornerback Prentiss Wag-
gner said.
The Vols believe they're
more confident this year
One big reason for that


change in attitude is the
presence of a healthy
Hunter, who has shown few
signs of rust in his return.
Hunter's ability to use his
length to outfight defenders
for the ball has caught the
Gators' attention. Hunter is
6-foot-4 and teammate Cor-
darrelle Patterson is 6-3,
giving Tennessee's re-
ceivers a height advantage
over Florida's secondary
Florida cornerbacks Mar-
cus Roberson, Cody Riggs,
Jaylen Watkins and
Loucheiz Purifoy are all 6-1
or shorter
"He's one of their re-
ceivers where if they get


anywhere close to the red
zone, they're just going to
throw the ball up and he'll
come down with the ball
somehow," Florida line-
backer Jon Bostic said.
Hunter benefits from the
fact that Tennessee has
plenty of playmakers in its
receiving corps, even after
former all-SEC selection
Da'Rick Rogers' preseason
transfer to Tennessee Tech.
Patterson ranks first in the
SEC with 360 all-purpose
yards. Although Hunter led
the Vols with nine catches
in a season-opening 35-21
victory over North Carolina
State, Tyler Bray's two long
touchdown passes in that
game went to Patterson and
Zach Rogers.
Hunter made a bigger im-
pression last week in a 51-
13 blowout of Georgia State.
He caught eight passes for
146 yards and tied a school
record with three touch-
down receptions.
"Honestly, I think he's got
a little more explosiveness
than he did last year," Zach
Rogers said. "I know it's
hard to believe, but coming
out every day and watching
him, he's still jumping over
people and doing all the
things Justin Hunter does,
but he's learning things bet-
ter It's great to see him
looking at coverages and
adjusting his routes and
being a smarter player"
Florida should give
Hunter the biggest test of
his comeback season. The
Gators haven't allowed a
single touchdown pass
through their first two
games.
"It's going to be a little
tougher," Dooley said. "This
is going to be a whole dif-
ferent philosophy in the
secondary They're going to
put their hands on us and
play deny the ball. They're
going to grab. They're going
to push. It's going to be
physical. We have to go out
there and match it"
Hunter savors the chal-
lenge.
He's been waiting for it
all year


Seminoles gearing up forACC opener


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher finds it hard to
believe his team is a three-touchdown
favorite in its Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence opener against Wake Forest
The Demon Deacons (2-0) have nar-
row victories over Liberty and North
Carolina, while the fifth-ranked
Seminoles (2-0) own lopsided wins
over lower-division opponents, in-
cluding a bizarre weather-shortened
55-0 rout of Savannah State on
Saturday
"Things will happen quicker, faster,
tougher, more physical," Fisher said
Monday "There's no doubt Wake has
better players."
Fisher could only shake his head in
bemusement when told that odds
makers had installed the Seminoles
as a 24-point favorite in what amounts
to their first real test of the season.
"Where in the world did that come
from?" Fisher asked. "I don't see all
that. We need to worry about how we
play and what we do."
The Seminoles have won nine of
their last 10 games since losing a 35-30
contest at Wake Forest a year ago. The
Demon Deacons have been particu-
larly tough for the Seminoles lately
with wins in four of the last six games
in the series.


Associated Press
Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher
watches the Seminoles play Murray
State on Sept. 1. FSU won 69-3.
Fisher said he's particularly wor-
ried about Wake Forest's passing
game, led by junior quarterback Tan-
ner Price, who was named the ACC
offensive back of the week for his per-
formance in a 28-27 win Saturday
over North Carolina.
Price, who threw for 233 yards and
three touchdowns in last year's win


over the Seminoles, ran for a pair of
touchdowns and completed 27 of 38
passes for a career-high 327 yards
against the Tar Heels. His favorite
target, Michael Campanaro, had 13
catches for 164 yards and was the
ACC's pick as receiver of the week.
"He and Price have a great com-
munication connection," said Fisher,
who is hoping the improved competi-
tion brings out the best in his club.
"Sometimes when you play better
players, more comes out of you," he
said.
"They have a very experienced
team, a lot of redshirt juniors and sen-
iors," Fisher said. "As you get older,
you get older and smarter That's how
they play"
Fisher said Wake Forest coach Jim
Grobe's system of redshirting many of
his first-year players has paid divi-
dends for the Demon Deacons.
"I call it the Butler (Ind.) syndrome
(basketball)," Fisher said. "A lot of
older guys who have played and play
together very well and understand
the system, been there and know how
to win."
Florida State ranks second nation-
ally in most defensive categories, and
quarterback EJ Manuel is sixth in
passing efficiency, although he's
played a total of a little more than
three quarters.


Junior season


to start with JCT


Previously the junior
season for most play-
ers in Citrus County
did not start until school
practice in January This
has changed since the start
of the Junior Circuit Tour-
nament, now in its third sea-
son.
On Sept. 15-16, they will
kick off their new season at
Sugarmill Woods. This is a
tremendous opportunity for
our youngsters to start their
season early and be ready to
hit the school
tennis season
running. So get
on your PC, tablet
or smartphone .
and e-mail .
jjeanette3saj
@aol.com to sign -' -
up. Provide your
name, age, grade
in school, city,
cell phone, name Eric vw
of school and Hoc
seeding informa- ON C(
tion if it applies.
Then, go to the
JCT Facebook page and
look up starting times.
Divisions are boys and
girls high school singles,
boys and girls middle school
singles, 10U juniors (10 and
under) on 36-foot and 60-
foot courts.
First place receives a $15
Best Buy gift certificate and
second place a $10 Best Buy
gift certificate.
The five tournaments cost
$80 if you prepay, or $20 for
each event. Tennis balls are
provided. Entry deadline is
9 p.m. Wednesday prior to
each tournament.
You must prepay for all
five tournaments or accu-
mulate a minimum of 10
points to be eligible to play
in the Feb. 9 and 10 Tourna-
ment of Champions.
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Team Tennis
The women-only league is
geared toward players rated
3.0 to 3.5. If interested in
playing or you want to cap-
tain a team, contact chair-
woman Candace Charles at
352-563-5859 or Candace
charles@tampabayrr.com.
Citrus Area Senior
Ladies 3.0 to 3.5
Tuesday League
For information, email
chairwoman Lucy Murphy
at wjlrmurphy@embarq-
mail.com.
Thursday Morning
Citrus Area Doubles
League
For information, contact
chairwoman Diane Hallo-
ran at 352-527-7763 or td-
hfla@tampabay.rr.com
Ladies on the Court
Ladies on The Court play
at 8:30 a.m. Thursday at Le
Grone Park courts in Crystal


River Bring a new can of
balls and 50 cents. Sign up
ahead and play two out of
three tiebreak sets.
For information, contact
Barbara Shook at dshook@
tampabayrrcom or 352-795-
0872.
The Friday Senior
Ladies Doubles 3.0
to 3.5 League
For information, email
chairwoman Sue Doherty at
suedoherty@prodigy.net.


an den
gen
OURT


USTA Leagues
Mixed Senior
7.0: Skyview def.
The Villages, 2-1.
Record 1-0.
April Man-
ley/Paul Hibbard
won, 7-5, 6-2;
Marti Lit-
tle/John Hawley
won, 6-2, 7-5; one
default loss.
Mixed Senior
8.0: Skyview lost
to Fort King, 2-1.


Record 0-1.
Deadline to sign up a new
team for the combo leagues
is today But as an individ-
ual player, you can sign up if
you can find a team that
needs additional players.
That goes for the mixed sen-
iors as well.
Starting dates are as fol-
lows:
Sept. 29: Senior combo
- 50 and up (anybody turn-
ing 50 in 2012).
Oct. 19: Adult combo -
18 and up (anybody turning
18 in 2012).
Combo women's matches
will be Fridays and Satur-
days. Combo men will be on
Friday and Sundays.
For information in our
District 4 (south) call or e-
mail Leigh Chak at 352-572-
7157 or vacocala@gmail.com
or ustaflorida.com.
For information about the
Hernando leagues, contact
Lou Giglio at 727-207-4760
or Lou@topseedtennispro.
com.
Tournaments
Sept. 15 and 16: JCT
Tournament at SMW
Oct. 20 and 21: JCT
Tournament at Southern
Hills C.C.
Oct. 27 and 28: eighth
annual Fall Fest Compass
Tournament at Crystal
River High School.
Dec. 1 and 2: JCT Tour-
nament at SMW
Jan. 12 and 13: JCT
Tournament at Southern
Hills C.C.
Feb. 9 and 10: JCT Tour-
nament of Champions at
SMW


Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis columnist,
can be reached at
hoera@juno. com.


Tourney benefits
Wounded Warriors
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will have its inaugural Vet-
erans Tournament fundraiser
for Wounded Warriors Project
on Dec. 8. Men, women and
youths are welcome. All pro-
ceeds will go to the Wounded
Warriors Project.
Entry fee will be $15. All play-
ers will receive a free ham-


burger or hot dog and a cold
drink after they have pitched. All
entries must be in before Tues-
day, Dec. 4, by 5 p.m. Entries
can be made by phone or
email; payment must be in by
Dec. 4, as time is needed to
form classes for sanctioned
players and a schedule for non-
sanctioned players.
For entry information, call
Ron Fair at 352-746-3924, or
email rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.


Southern Woods Golf Club
Monday, October 1, 2012
0o" '11:30 a.m. Shotgun Start
10:00 a.m. Registration (New Time)
$60/person incl. cart, beverages, lunch, greens
fees & Certificate for Golf at World Woods
Me et Um Multiple Drawings, 50/50 Raffle,
Hooters Closest to Pin, & Longest Drive Contests
Girls! Rules: 4-person best ball scramble,
SAk Individual and Couple entries.


SMak checks Payable toRACC
Mail or fax entries to: k j
REALTORS Association of Citrus County '16
714 S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto Fl 34461
Fax (352) 746-3223
FOR MORE INFO CALL '
S RACC (352)746-7550


,. CHRONICL ee
'. V "w

ORNERS ONE Allproceeds go directly
to the CBC Youth Fund
SBAPTIST CHURCH forMission Trips and

"Send Them to Serve"'/
4 person scramble -,; '
Saturday, Sept. 29 t"'
Lakeside Golf and Country Club


Sports BRIEF


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS






B4 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Purchased the
contracts of OF Endy Chavez and OF L.J. Hoes
from Norfolk (IL). Designated RHP Kevin Gregg
and INF Ryan Adams for assignment.
Can-Am League
NEWARK BEARS-Released OF Charlie
Stewart, INF Glen Johnson, C Patrick Reardon,
RHP Greg Lane, RHP Mark Rutledge, RHP
Zach Goyer, C Dan Coury and RHP Julian
Sampson.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS-Named Bob
Beyer assistant coach. Promoted Darren Erman
to assistant coach.
MIAMI HEAT-Re-signed G Terrel Harris.
NEWYORK KNICKS-Signed G Oscar Bell-
field, C Henry Sims, F John Shurna and F My-
chel Thompson to contracts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS-Signed RB Johnny White.
Placed WR David Nelson on injured reserve.
CLEVELAND BROWNS-Signed OL D.J.
Young to the practice squad. Released OL Jeff
Shugarts from the practice squad. Announced
the NFL lifted the exemption for LB Scott Fujita.
DALLAS COWBOYS-Released TE Colin
Cochart.
DENVER BRONCOS-Signed C Dan Kop-
pen. Waived C C.J. Davis, Re-signed QB Caleb
Hanie. Placed DTTy Warren on injured reserve.
OAKLAND RAIDERS-Signed FB Marcel
Reece to a contract extension.



Astros 1, Cubs 0
Chicago Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DeJesscf 5 0 1 0 Pareds2b 4 1 1 0
Valuen 3b 5 0 0 0 JValdz p 0 0 0 0
Rizzolb 2 00 0 WLopezp 0 0 0 0
Matherpr-rf-1b2 0 0 0 FMrtnz If 3 0 1
0
ASorin If 4 0 0 0 JDMrtn ph-lf 0 0 0 0
SCastross 4 0 1 0 Wallacib 3 00 0
Clevngr c 3 0 0 0 Maxwll cf 2 0 1 1
LaHairrf-1b2 0 1 0 Corprnc 4 0 0 0
Sappelt ph-rf2 0 1 0 Dmngz 3b 4 0 0 0
Cardns2b 1 0 0 0 Bogsvcrf 3 0 0 0
Barney ph-2b20 1 0 Wrghtp 0 0 0 0
Germn p 2 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 0 0 0 0
Bowden p 0 0 0 0 Greene ss 3 0 0 0
Campn ph 1 00 0 Lyles p 1 00 0
AlCarrp 0 00 0 SMooreph 1 01 0
Belivea p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr pr 0 0 0 0
Corpas p 0 00 0 XCeden p 0 00 0
WCastll ph 1 0 1 0 Storey p 0 0 0 0
BBarns rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 06 0 Totals 29 1 4 1
Chicago 000 000 000 0
Houston 001 000 00x 1
E-Clevenger (4), S.Castro (24), Greene (10),
Paredes 3 (4). DP-Houston 1. LOB-Chicago
11, Houston 8.2B-Sappelt (3), FMartinez (6).
SB-Paredes (2), Maxwell (8). SF-Maxwell.


Chicago
Germano L,2-7
Bowden
AI.Cabrera
Beliveau
Corpas
Houston
LylesW,4-11
X.Cedeno H,3
Storey H,3
W.Wright H,17
J.Valdez H,2
W.Lopez S,4-7


AFC

Qua

P Manning, DEN
Flacco, BAL
Sanchez, NYJ
Brady, NWE
Schaub, HOU
P. Rivers, SND
Gabbert, JAC
C. Palmer, OAK
Locker, TEN
Roethlisberger, PIT
R


Spiller, BUF
Ridley, NWE
Greene, NYJ
Green-Ellis, CIN
J. Charles, KAN
A. Foster, HOU
Jones-Drew, JA
Re. Bush, MIA
R. Rice, BAL
McGahee, DEN


McFadden, OAK
Wayne, IND
And. Johnson, H
A. Hawkins, CIN
Fleener, IND
McCluster, KAN
R. Gronkowski,
Hernandez, NW
Chr. Johnson, T
Re. Bush, MIA


A. Foster, I
St. Hill, NY
Kerley NY
R. Rice, BA
Streater, C
Avery, IND
Boldin, BA
Boss, KAN
Do. Brown
Cassel, KA


Kaeding, S
Tucker, BA
Folk, NYJ
S. Graham
P. Dawson
Gostkowsk
Scobee, JA
Bironas, TE
Nugent, CI
Suisham, F


ER BB SO

1 0 2 8
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 2
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0


Leaders
Week 1
rterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD Int
26 19 253 2 0
29 21 299 2 0
27 19 266 3 1
31 23 236 2 0
31 20 266 1 0
33 24 231 1 0
39 23 260 2 0
46 32 297 1 0
32 23 229 1 1
40 22 245 2 1
ushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
1416912.0756t 1


21 125 5.95 17
27 94 3.48 14
18 91 5.06 14
16 87 5.44 46
26 79 3.04 14t
C 19 77 4.05 11
14 69 4.93 13
10 68 6.80 16
16 64 4.00 12
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG
K 13 86 6.6 17
9 135 15.0 23
HOU 8 119 14.9 29
8 86 10.8 27
6 82 13.7 24
6 82 13.7 21
NWE 6 60 10.0 28
'E 6 59 9.8 23t
EN 6 47 7.8 16
6 46 7.7 19
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRushRec Ret


HOU 2 2 0
eJ 2 0 2
J 2 0 1
AL 2 2 0
)AK 1 0 1
1 0 1
L 1 0 1
1 0 1
, IND 1 1 0
AN 1 1 0
Kicking
PAT FG
,ND 1-1 5-5
L 5-5 3-3
6-6 2-2
n, HOU 3-3 3-4
, CLE 1-1 3-3
ki, NWE 4-4 2-2
AC 0-1 3-3
EN 1-1 2-2
IN 1-1 2-2
PIT 1-1 2-2

NFC Leaders


1
1
1

0
2
0
0
2
0


Week 1
Quarterbacks
AttCom Yds TD Int
Griffin lll, WAS 26 19 320 2 0
M. Ryan, ATL 31 23 299 3 0
Romo, DAL 29 22 307 3 1
Ale. Smith, SNF 26 20 211 2 0
Ponder, MIN 27 20 270 0 0
Bradford, STL 25 17 198 1 0
Cutler, CHI 35 21 333 2 1
Jo. Freeman, TAM 24 16 138 1 0
E. Manning, NYG 32 21 213 1 0
A. Rodgers, GBY 44 30 303 2 1
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Murray, DAL 20 131 6.55 48 0
Gore, SNF 16 112 7.00 23t 1
L. McCoy PHL 20 110 5.50 22 0
Morris, WAS 28 96 3.43 18 2
D. Martin, TAM 24 95 3.96 15 0
M. Lynch, SEA 21 85 4.05 11 0
A. Peterson, MIN 17 84 4.94 20 2
Forte, CHI 16 80 5.00 32 1
Bradshaw, NYG 17 78 4.59 33 1
K. Smith, DET 13 62 4.77 19 1
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
B. Marshall, CHI 9 119 13.2 24 1


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
: : --9-1-8
CASH 3 (late)
8 -4-7
PLAY 4 (early)
1-6-6-1
PLAY 4 (late)

FANTASY 5
8 12-18-26-30
MEGA MONEY
6-22- 23-32
oida Lottery MEGA BALL
21


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies
7 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore Orioles
BASKETBALL
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) WNBA Connecticut Sun at Phoenix
Mercury

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


SR
Continued from Page B1

"We have five kids who
have never played golf," he
said.
"Overall, 221 is the best we


Cobb, GBY 9 77 8.6 16 0
Ogletree, DAL 8 114 14.3 40t 2
St. Smith, CAR 7106 15.1 32 0
Maclin, PHL 7 96 13.7 46 1
M. Crabtree, SNF 7 76 10.9 20 0
Finley, GBY 7 47 6.7 16 1
L. Moore, NOR 6 120 20.0 33t 1
Ca.Johnson, DET 6 111 18.5 51 0
Ju. Jones, ATL 6 108 18.0 31 2
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret Pts
M. Bush, CHI 2 2 0 0 12
Ju.Jones, ATL 2 0 2 0 12
Morris, WAS 2 2 0 0 12
Ogletree, DAL 2 0 2 0 12
A. Peterson, MIN 2 2 0 0 12
K. Smith, DET 2 1 1 0 12
Sproles, NOR 1 0 1 0 8
Mi. Austin, DAL 1 0 1 0 6
J. Bell, DET 1 1 0 0 6
Ma. Bennett, NYG 1 0 1 0 6
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
M.Bryant,ATL 4-44-4 41 16
Cundiff, WAS 4-44-4 45 16
Walsh, MIN 2-24-4 55 14
Akers, SNF 3-33-3 63 12
Gould, CHI 5-52-2 35 11
Zuerlein, STL 2- 23-3 48 11
Barth,TAM 1-1 3-3 40 10
Hauschka, SEA 1-1 3-4 47 10
Ja.Hanson,DET 3-32-2 45 9
Feely ARI 2-2 2-2 31 8

NFL standings


East
N.Y. Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo
South

Houston
Jacksonville
Indianapolis
Tennessee
North

Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
West

Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


AFC
W L T Pct
1 0 0 1.000
1 0 0 1.000
0 1 0 .000
0 1 0 .000

W L T Pct
1 0 0 1.000
0 1 0 .000
0 1 0 .000
0 1 0 .000

W L T Pct
1 0 0 1.000
0 1 0 .000
0 1 0 .000
0 1 0 .000

W L T Pct
1 0 0 1.000
1 0 0 1.000
0 1 0 .000
0 1 0 .000

NFC


East W L T Pct
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000
Washington 1 0 0 1.000
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000
South
W L T Pct
Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000
Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000
New Orleans 0 1 0 .000
Carolina 0 1 0 .000
North
W L T Pct
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000
Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000
West
W L T Pct
Arizona 1 0 0 1.000
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000
Seattle 0 1 0 .000
Wednesday's Game
Dallas 24, N.Y. Giants 17
Sunday's Games
Chicago 41, Indianapolis 21
Minnesota 26, Jacksonville 23, OT
Houston 30, Miami 10
New England 34, Tennessee 13
Washington 40, New Orleans 32
Atlanta 40, Kansas City 24
N.Y. Jets 48, Buffalo 28
Detroit 27, St. Louis 23
Philadelphia 17, Cleveland 16
Arizona 20, Seattle 16
San Francisco 30, Green Bay 22
Tampa Bay 16, Carolina 10
Denver 31, Pittsburgh 19
Monday's Games
Baltimore 44, Cincinnati 13
San Diego 22, Oakland 14
Thursday, Sep. 13
Chicago at Green Bay 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 16
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at New England, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.


have had," Meehan continued.
"Our second, third and fourth
players came down in their
strokes by 10 strokes each.
"Our first place went up
three strokes. That hurt us.
It went real well and we
play another match on
Thursday"


Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Miami, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 17
Denver at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.

Chargers 22,
Raiders 14
San Diego 3 7 6 6--22
Oakland 3 3 0 8- 14
First Quarter
Oak-FG Janikowski 51, 4:56.
SD-FG Kaeding 23, 1:00.
Second Quarter
SD-Floyd 6 pass from Rivers (Kaeding kick),
3:10.
Oak-FG Janikowski 19, :04.
Third Quarter
SD-FG Kaeding 28, 6:01.
SD-FG Kaeding 19,1:49.
Fourth Quarter
SD-FG Kaeding 41, 12:48.
SD-FG Kaeding 45, 5:06.
Oak-Streater 2 pass from Palmer (Streater
pass from Palmer), :54.
A-61,896.
SD Oak
First downs 15 21
Total Net Yards 258 321
Rushes-yards 20-32 20-45
Passing 226 276
Punt Returns 2-18 1-15
Kickoff Returns 4-76 1-6
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 24-33-0 32-46-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 3-21
Punts 3-54.3 3-38.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 4-1
Penalties-Yards 9-78 6-35
Time of Possession 30:34 29:26
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-San Diego, Brinkley 10-12, Royal
2-12, Brown 5-5, McClain 2-5, Rivers 1-(minus
2). Oakland, McFadden 15-32, Goodson 2-13,
Lechler 2-0, Reece 1-0.
PASSING-San Diego, Rivers 24-33-0-231.
Oakland, Palmer 32-46-0-297.
RECEIVING-San Diego, Brown 5-26, Floyd 4-
66, Gates 4-43, McClain 4-15, Brinkley 3-28,
Meachem 2-49, Royal 2-4. Oakland, McFadden
13-86, Myers 5-65, Hagan 4-44, Streater 4-27,
Heyward-Bey 3-43, Reece 2-20, Ausberry 1-12.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
NFL Power Rankings
The Associated Press Pro32 NFL Power
Rankings, as voted by a 12-member panel, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records, total
points based on 32 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 32nd-place vote, and
previous ranking:
W L T Pts Pvs
1. New England (8) 1 0 0 378 2
2. San Francisco (1) 1 0 0 368 4
3. Baltimore (2) 1 0 0 357 5
4. Houston (1) 1 0 0 336 6
5. Green Bay 0 1 0 326 1
6. Denver 1 0 0317 11
7. Atlanta 1 0 0 309 10
8. Chicago 1 0 0 296 12
9. Dallas 1 0 0 291 15
10. N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 288 3
11. Pittsburgh 0 1 0 249 7
12. Philadelphia 1 0 0 246 8
13. Detroit 1 0 0 240 13
14. New Orleans 0 1 0 229 9
15. N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 225 19
16. Washington 1 0 0 218 24
17. San Diego 1 0 0211 16
18. Cincinnati 0 1 0 170 14
19.Tampa Bay 1 0 0 149 26
20. Arizona 1 0 0 139 25
21. Kansas City 0 1 0130 17
22. Carolina 0 1 0 129 18
23.Tennessee 0 1 0 125 21
24. Seattle 0 1 0 110 22
25. Oakland 0 1 0 102 23
26. Minnesota 1 0 0 100 28
27. Buffalo 0 1 0 89 20
28. St. Louis 0 1 0 64 29
29. Jacksonville 0 1 0 50 31
30. Cleveland 0 1 0 40 32
31. Indianapolis 0 1 0 34 27
32. Miami 0 1 0 21 30
VOTING PANEL
Chris Berman, ESPN
Clifton Brown, Sporting News
Cris Collinsworth, NBC Sports
Rich Gannon, CBS Sports/SiriusXM NFL
Radio
Bob Glauber, Newsday
Rick Gosselin, Dallas Morning News
Clark Judge, CBSSports.com
Ira Kaufman, Tampa Tribune
Pat Kirwan, SiriusXM NFL Radio/CBSS-
ports.com
John Lynch, Fox Sports
Alex Marvez, Foxsports.com
Dan Pompei, Chicago Tribune


Pirates pound Tigers
for district win
The Crystal River volleyball
team scored a 25-3, 25-23, 25-
13 victory Tuesday night at
Dunnellon.
The Pirates (5-2 overall, 3-0
District 5A-7) got 10 kills and 6
digs from Casidy Newcomer
and 12 digs by Emily Laga.
Sabrina Scott (9 assists, 5
digs, 7 aces), Aspen Phillips (7
assists, 5 digs, ace), Laynee
Nadal (2 kills, 5 digs) and Olivia
Hudson (4 kills, 4 digs, 4 aces)
also chipped in for Crystal
River.
The Pirates play 7 p.m.
Thursday at Eustis in an impor-
tant early-season district match.

Friends of ILL hold
fundraiser Saturday
The Friends of Inverness Lit-
tle League are holding a
fundraiser and dinner at 6 p.m.
Saturday at the Citrus County
Auditorium in Inverness.
Tickets for the event are
$100 for two people, which in-
cluded food and drinks; all at-
tendees must be 21 or older.
Participants will have the op-
portunity to win a G3 15-foot
Jonboat with a 20-25 hp
Yamaha motor with trailer.
Please contact Inverness Lit-


tie League at 352-422-2517 or
www.invernessll.com for pur-
chase of tickets or to make a
donation of door prizes.
Tickets for this event are on
sale now. You can purchase
tickets by speaking with one of
our board members (located on
our website) or by going to Just
Sports.
US bounces back to
beat Jamaica 1-0
COLUMBUS, Ohio- The
United States rebounded from
a loss at Jamaica in World Cup
qualifying, beating the Reggae
Boyz 1-0 Tuesday night as Her-
culez Gomez curled a free kick
in the 55th minute.
After hitting the frame three
times in a dominant first half as
goalkeeper Dwayne Miller
made several sparkling saves,
the U.S. went ahead after Clint
Dempsey was fouled by
Rodolph Austin. Gomez's drive
from 28 yards went over the de-
fensive wall and to the left of a
diving Miller, who was only able
to lightly brush the ball with his
fingertips.
The U.S., which made five
changes to its starting lineup
from Friday's 2-1 loss in
Kingston, is tied with
Guatemala (2-1-1) at seven
points in Group A of the North


and Central American and
Caribbean semifinals. Jamaica
(2-1-1) also has seven points
but trails on goal difference.
Goodell to meet with
bounty scandal players
NEW ORLEANS The NFL
confirms that Commissioner
Roger Goodell has agreed to
meet with four players whose
suspensions in connection with
the bounty investigation were
recently lifted by an appeals
panel.
NFL spokesman Greg Aiello
said Tuesday no specific dates
have been set for the meetings.
Goodell is reconsidering
whether to hand down revised
suspensions to Saints line-
backer Jon Vilma, Saints defen-
sive end Will Smith, Cleveland
linebacker Scott Fujita and free
agent defensive lineman An-
thony Hargrove.
The panel that lifted the four
players' suspensions on Fri-
day did not permanently void
them or address the merits of
the bounty probe. Rather, it
asked Goodell to start the dis-
ciplinary process over after rul-
ing it was unclear whether he
followed proper procedures in
disciplining the players the first
time.
From staff and wire reports


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Matt Allen chips onto the third hole green Tuesday at the Plantation on Crystal River.


BROTHERS
Continued from Page BI

a 38 last match (against Na-
ture Coast)."
Lecanto's Patrick Colletti
(44) and Tanner Keeran (48)
rounded out the last two
scoring positions for their
squad.
Crystal River sophomore
Matt Allen (44) came through
for the Pirates in the fourth
and final scoring position.
Michael Kidd (lowest
medalist in Crystal River's




DELEGATE
Continued from Page BI

pleased with the way the
Americans viewed the
Olympics," he said. "They
were there cheering, but not
just for their team in their
sport but for all athletes."
And such camaraderie
wasn't limited to the U.S.
Squad. "This is one of the
few places in the world
where people can come to-
gether and their troubles
melt away," he said. "You
could see North Koreans
cheering for an underdog
American in a match."




POLL
Continued from Page BI

terms how ready they are to
get back to the AFC champi-
onship game and perhaps
beyond," Newsday's Bob
Glauber said. "After honor-
ing the memory of the late
Art Modell in a rousing
pregame ceremony, Joe
Flacco engineers the rout
More where that came from."
And more from the Tex-
ans, whose 30-10 demolition
of Miami persuaded Rick
Gosselin of the Dallas Morn-
ing News to vote them No. 1
- even if the Dolphins rank
32nd and last.
"Andre Johnson is
healthy The AFC is in trou-
ble," Gosselin said.
Green Bay rounded out
the top five with 326 points.
Making big jumps in the
rankings were Washington,
up eight spots to No. 16;
Tampa Bay, improving from
26th to 19th; Dallas, up six


opener against Springstead
as well) bettered his 37 from
two weeks ago by a stroke.
"I was just consistent the
first couple of holes,"
Michael Kidd said. "Got just
par the first five. If I could
have hit a drive today, I
would have went pretty low.
"I was one over par on the
last hole," he continued. "I
knew I would have to make
birdie (to win), so I hit it
right on the green and
flopped it in (for the birdie)."
Lecanto head coach Dave
Soluri is still waiting for
some players to step up on


As for the U.S. Wrestling
Team, Grant said those com-
peting in the men's freestyle
events "did fantastic," with
Jake Varner in the 96-kilo-
gram weight division and
Jordan Burroughs in the 74
kg division both bringing
home gold medals the
first time the U.S. Olympic
Team has had multiple
golds in wrestling since
1996. Coleman Scott also
added a bronze in the 60 kg
class.
In women's freestyle,
however, the U.S. Team
made no inroads, again
earning just one medal, by
Clarissa Chun, who got a
bronze in the 48 kg class.


spots to No. 9; and Denver,
from 11th to sixth.
"The RG3 show is off and
running," said Rich Gan-
non, the 2002 NFL Most
Valuable Player now work-
ing for SiriusXM NFL
Radio and CBS Sports.
As for the Broncos, NBC
Sports' Cris Collinsworth,
who called their win over
Pittsburgh, saw their im-
proved simply as "Manning
and a much improved run
defense."
Moving the other way
were the defending cham-
pion New York Giants, New
Orleans and Buffalo.
After the Giants couldn't
ride the emotion of unveil-
ing their latest champi-
onship hardware and lost
the season's kickoff game at
home to the Cowboys, they
fell seven spots to No. 10.
"They have to find a way
to protect their secondary
with a better pass rush, as
well as their offensive line
protecting Eli Manning bet-
ter," said Pat Kirwan of CBS


the team and fill in the
fourth man position.
"The 48 killed us," Soluri
said. "We don't have a con-
sistent No. 4 player Until we
get one, we're going to be
struggling.
"We were hoping to be
right around 160, so 168 is
disappointing."
A few players who partic-
ipated in the meet but did
not score for their respec-
tive teams are as follows:
Lecanto's Zach Groff (54)
and Matt Alt (55), along with
Crystal River's Kyle Smith
(49) and Kyle Velasco (50).


And despite high hopes in
the men's Greco-Roman
wrestling events, the U.S.
Team again failed to medal.
"These are grass-root level
sports," was how Grant de-
scribed the slight progress
made by the USA Wrestling
program. "We need to keep
developing talent."
Grant did bring back one
nagging question from the
Summer Games. "The only
concern I had was how the
United Kingdom managed
to build such an empire
with the food they have," he
said. "Thank God we found
an Italian restaurant"
Many cultures blended to-
gether, indeed.


Sports and SiriusXM NFL
Radio.
Buffalo was down seven
places, too, plummeting to
27th following a 48-28 loss to
the Jets, who now rank 15th.
"So much for all the offsea-
son playoff hype," said Alex
Marvez of Foxsports.com.
"The Bills will be drafting in
the top 12 of the first round
for the eighth consecutive
year if they can't clean up the
mess on display last Sunday
against the Jets."
New Orleans also had a
big drop, from ninth to 14th
after a sloppy performance
against Washington. One
voter wondered why that
didn't prompt some further
action from the Saints' star
quarterback.
"These guys should be -
and will be better than
they showed," Clark Judge
of CBSSports.com said.
"They have too much talent.
My question: After what
happened, how come Drew
Brees doesn't demand an
explanation?"


Sports BRIEFS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-" w I


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Mariners 4, Blue Jays 3


Seattle

Ackley 2b
Gutirrz cf
Seager 3b
Jaso dh
JMontr c
MSndrs If
Thams rf
C.Wells rf
Carp lb
Ryan ss

Totals
Seattle
Toronto


Toronto


ab r h bi
5 1 2 0 Lawrie3b
5 1 2 0 Rasmscf
5 2 3 2 Encrnc dh
4 0 1 1 Lind lb
3 0 1 0 Sierra ph
4 0 2 1 YGomslb
4 0 0 0 YEscor ss
0 0 0 0 KJhnsn 2b
4 0 2 0 Arencii c
3 0 1 0 RDavislIf
Gose rf
37 4144 Totals
201 010 000
101 000 010


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
3 2 2 1
4 00 0
3 0 1 0
1 0 0 1
0 00
4 0 2 1
4 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 1 0

343 8 3
4
3


E-Gutierrez (1). DP-Toronto 1. LOB-Seat-
tle 8, Toronto 6. 2B-Ackley (19), Gutierrez (5),
Seager (27), M.Saunders (29), Rasmus (21),
YEscobar (20). HR-Seager (18). SB-R.Davis
(42). S-Ryan. SF-Rasmus.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
Er.RamirezW,1-2 7 6 2 2 1 6
Furbush 0 1 1 1 0 0
KinneyH,6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
LuetgeH,12 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
PryorH,4 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Wilhelmsen S,25-28 1 1 0 0 0 0
Toronto
Morrow L,8-6 42-311 4 4 1 4
Cecil 2 2 0 0 0 1
Lincoln 11-30 0 0 0 1
Frasor 1 1 0 0 0 0
Furbush pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP-Morrow.

Orioles 9, Rays 2
Tampa Bay Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
BUpton cf 4 00 0 McLoth If 5 2 2 0
Kppngr3b 4 01 0 Hardyss 5 3 4 5
Zobristss 4 01 0 AdJonscf 4 2 1 0
Longori dh 3 0 0 0 Wieters c 3 0 3 2
Joyce rf 3 0 0 0 MrRynllb 4 0 0 0
BFrncsIf 4 0 1 0 C.Davisdh 4 1 1 1
Scott 1b 2 00 0 Fordrf 4 0 0 0
CGmnzph-lb 1 0 0 0 Machd3b 4 0 1
0
C.Penaph 1 0 0 0 Andino2b 3 1 1 0
RRorts2b 1 1 1 1
Loatonph-c1 0 0 0
Fuld ph 1 0 0 0
JMolinc 2 0 0 0
EJhnsn2b 1 1 1 1
Totals 32 25 2 Totals 36913 8
Tampa Bay 001 000 010 2
Baltimore 102 021 12x 9
E-Joyce (2). DP-Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Tampa
Bay 6, Baltimore 6.2B-B.Francisco (7), Hardy
(28), Wieters (22), Andino (11). HR-R.Roberts
(4), E.Johnson (6), Hardy 2 (21), C.Davis (25).
SB-McLouth (8), Machado (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
M.Moore L,10-10 4 4 3 2 3 4
Badenhop 1-3 3 2 2 0 0
C.Ramos 12-32 1 1 0 1
Howell 1 2 1 1 0 0
D.DeLaRosa 1 2 2 2 0 1
Baltimore
Hammel 32-31 1 1 1 1
S.JohnsonW,3-0 11-30 0 0 2 2
Ayala 11-31 0 0 0 2
Matusz 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
O'Day 1 2 1 1 0 1
Strop 1 1 0 0 0 1

Red Sox 4, Yankees 3


NewYork


Boston
ab r h bi


Jeter ss 4 1 2 Ellsury cf
Swisher rf-1b5 0 2 0 Pdsdnkdh
ENunez pr 0 00 0 Nava ph-dh
McGeh lb 0 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b
AIRdrgdh 4 0 0 0 Loneylb
Cano2b 3 0 0 1 C.RossIf
RMartn c 3 0 1 0 Lvrnwy c
Pearcelb 2 0 0 0 Kalish rf
ISuzuki ph-rfl 0 0 0 Ciriaco 3b
Grndrs cf 3 1 0 0 Aviles ss
AnJonslf 2 1 1 0
Dickrsn pr-lf0 0 0 0
J.Nix3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 30 36 3 Totals
NewYork 100 002 000
Boston 002 001 001
One out when winning run scored.


ab r h bi


36412 4
3
4


E-R.Martin (6). DP-NewYork 1, Boston 1.
LOB-NewYork 9, Boston 8. 2B-Jeter (30),
Swisher (31), R.Martin (16), J.Nix (12), Ells-
bury (18), C.Ross (31), Ciriaco (10). HR-
Pedroia (15). SB-Ellsbury (13).
CS-E.Nunez (2). S-J.Nix, Ciriaco.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Kuroda 61-38 3 3 0 6
Logan 0 1 0 0 0 0
Chamberlain 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
D.Robertson L,1-7 11-33 1 1 0 3
Boston
Lester 51-35 3 3 7 5
Tazawa 12-30 0 0 0 3
Breslow 1 0 0 0 1 0
A.BaileyW,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.

Royals 9, Twins 1
Kansas City Minnesota
ab rh bi ab rh bi
L.Cain cf 5 1 3 2 Revere cf 5 0 3 0
AEscorss 5 1 2 2 JCarrll2b 4 1 1 0
AGordn If 5 1 1 0 Wlngh If 4 0 1 0
Butler dh 4 0 1 0 Mornealb 3 0 2 0
S.Perezc 4 1 2 1 Doumitc 4 0 1 1
Mostks 3b 4 00 0 Plouffe dh 4 0 0 0
Francr rf 4 1 1 1 Mstrnn rf 3 0 2 0
Hosmerlb 5 3 3 1 EEscor3b 3 0 1 0
Giavtll 2b 5 1 3 1 Flormn ss 4 0 0 0
Totals 41 9168 Totals 34111 1
Kansas City 031 000 041 9
Minnesota 000 000 010 1
E-L.Cain (4), Doumit (2). DP-Kansas City 2,
Minnesota 1. LOB-Kansas City 10, Minnesota
10. 2B-L.Cain (8), A.Escobar (28), Hosmer
(21), Giavotella (6). 3B-L.Cain (2), A.Escobar
(7), A.Gordon (5). HR-Hosmer (14). CS-
J.Carroll (5), Mastroianni (3). SF-S.Perez.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
W.SmithW,5-7 7 7 0 0 3 7
Crow 1 2 1 1 1 1
L.Coleman 1 2 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
Diamond L,11-7 6 10 4 4 3 2
Perdomo 1 3 3 3 0 0
AI.Burnett 2 3 2 2 0 0
Perdomo pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Perdomo (L.Cain). WP-Diamond,
AI.Burnett.

Rays schedule
Tampa Bay Rays upcoming schedule
Sept. 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 13 at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Sept. 14 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 15 at N.Y Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Sept. 16 at N.Y Yankees, TBA
Sept. 17 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 18 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 19 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 20 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 21 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 22 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 23 Toronto, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 25 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 26 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 28 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 29 at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 30 at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Oct. 1 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 2 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.


BASEBALL


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 B5


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Baltimore 79
New York 79
Tampa Bay 77
Toronto 64
Boston 64




W
Washington 88
Atlanta 81
Philadelphia71
New York 65
Miami 63


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
62 .560-- 6-4
62 .560-- 4-6
64 .546 2 2 6-4
76 .457 14Y2 14Y2 5-5
78 .451 1512 1512 2-8



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
54 .620 - 8-2
62 .566 7Y2 7-3
71 .500 17 4Y2 8-2
77 .458 23 10Y2 3-7
80 .441 25Y213 4-6


Str Home
W-1 40-32
L-1 41-28
L-1 39-32
L-1 34-35
W-1 33-41


Away
39-30 Chicago
38-34 Detroit
38-32 Kan. City
30-41 Cleveland
31-37 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
64 .543 - 4-6 W-1 42-29 34-35
67 .521 3 5/2 4-6 L-4 43-28 30-39
77 .454 121/215 5-5 W-2 31-38 33-39
82 .418 171/220 4-6 L-3 32-37 27-45
83 .415 18 202 5-5 L-1 28-42 31-41


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-2 44-27 44-27
L-2 40-32 41-30
W-6 37-37 34-34
L-5 30-40 35-37
L-2 32-37 31-43


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
57 .601 - 5-5 W-2 46-28 40-29
66 .532 10 4-6 L-1 43-29 32-37
69 .511 13 3 2-8 L-5 42-30 30-39
71 .500 141/24/2 7-3 W-2 43-28 28-43
87 .387 301/2201/24-6 L-1 34-34 21-53
97 .317 401/2301/25-5 W-1 29-41 16-56


w
San Fran. 79
Los Angeles74
Arizona 69
San Diego 67
Colorado 57


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
57 .593 - 6-4 L-1 43-25 40-32
60 .571 3 7-3 W-4 42-30 38-30
64 .546 6/2 2 8-2 L-1 39-30 38-34
74 .479 16 111/24-6 W-1 36-36 32-38




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
62 .560 - 5-5 L-1 40-31 39-31
67 .525 5 1 4-6 L-1 38-33 36-34
72 .489 10 6 5-5 L-1 33-34 36-38
75 .472 12/281/2 6-4 W-2 36-34 31-41
83 .407 211/2171/24-6 W-1 31-41 26-42


Game of the Day


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Ryan Roberts hits a solo home run in the third inning Tuesday against the Baltimore Orioles in
Baltimore. The Orioles won 9-2.




Rays battered by Baltimore


Associated Press

BALTIMORE J.J. Hardy home-
red twice, doubled and drove in five
runs, and the Baltimore Orioles de-
feated Tampa Bay 9-2 Tuesday night
to increase their lead over the Rays
in the AL wild-card chase.
Hardy went 4 for 5 to help Balti-
more open a two-game advantage
over Tampa Bay for the second wild-
card spot. The Orioles and Rays are
also in close pursuit of the first-place
New York Yankees in the AL East.
Chris Davis homered and Matt Wi-
eters had three hits and two RBIs for
Baltimore.
Hardy hit a two-run homer in the
third inning, doubled and scored in
the fifth, singled in a run in the sixth
and added his 21st homer with a run-
ner on in the eighth. It was his ninth
career two-homer game, the second
this season.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Mariners 4, Blue Jays 3
TORONTO Kyle Seager homered
and came within a triple of the cycle,
Erasmo Ramirez pitched seven innings
for his first major league win and the
Seattle Mariners beat the Toronto Blue
Jays 4-3 on Tuesday night.
Starting for the first time since June 30,
Ramirez (1-2) allowed two runs and six
hits, setting down nine straight at one
stretch. He walked one and struck out six.
Four relievers combined to work the
eighth and Tom Wilhelmsen closed it for
his 25th save in 28 chances.
Seager went 3 for 5. He had an RBI
single in the first, doubled and scored in
the third and homered in the fifth, his
18th, as the Mariners snapped a three-
game losing streak.
The victory was Seattle's 68th, one
more than they recorded last season.
Toronto's Brandon Morrow (8-6)
matched a career high by allowing 11 hits
as the Blue Jays failed to extend their
winning streak to five games.

Red Sox 4, Yankees 3
BOSTON Jacoby Ellsbury singled in
the winning run with his fourth hit of the
game in the ninth inning and the Boston
Red Sox beat New York 4-3 on Tuesday
night, dropping the Yankees into a tie for
first place in the AL East.
Pedro Ciriaco, who started the rally
with a single, slid in to beat the throw
from right fielder Ichiro Suzuki to give
Boston its second win in 13 games.
The loss left the Yankees and Orioles
tied with 79-62 records. Baltimore beat
Tampa Bay 9-2 on Tuesday night. The
Rays are two back in the division.
Andrew Bailey (1-0) got the win after
allowing one hit in one inning.

Royals 9, Twins 1
MINNEAPOLIS Will Smith pitched
seven shutout innings, Eric Hosmer
homered and the Kansas City Royals
beat the Minnesota Twins 9-1 on Tuesday
night.
Lorenzo Cain had two RBIs and was a
home run away from the cycle as Kansas
City beat Minnesota for just the sixth time
in 16 games.
Salvador Perez extended his hitting
streak to a career-best 15 games and
threw out two runners trying to steal in
support of Smith (5-7), who struck out a
career-high seven and gave up seven


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesday's Games
Baltimore 9, Tampa Bay 2
Seattle 4, Toronto 3
Boston 4, N.Y Yankees 3
Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City 9, Minnesota 1
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay (Cobb 9-8) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 6-4),
7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Millwood 5-12) at Toronto (R.Romero 8-13), 7:07
p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (D.Phelps 3-4) at Boston (A.Cook 3-9), 7:10
p.m.
Cleveland (J.Gomez 5-7) at Texas (Dempster 5-1), 8:05
p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 15-6) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 9-9),
8:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 7-13) at Minnesota (Walters 2-3),
8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Griffin 5-0) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 8-11),
10:05 p.m.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesday's Games
Philadelphia 9, Miami 7
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 5, N.Y Mets 3
Houston 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 0
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
St. Louis at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Miami (Jo.Johnson 8-11) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee 4-7), 4:05
p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 14-2) at San Diego (Richard 12-12), 6:35
p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 15-6) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 10-9),
7:10 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 2-0) at N.Y Mets (Harvey 3-4), 7:10
p.m.
Chicago Cubs (TWood 5-11) at Houston (Abad 0-3), 8:05
p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 12-9) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 14-8), 8:10
p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 8-14) at Colorado (Francis 5-4),
8:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Harang 9-8) at Arizona (Cahill 10-11), 9:40
p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.

hits in his first win in four starts.
Ryan Doumit had the Twins' RBI and
Ben Revere had three hits.
Joe Mauer was in the initial starting
lineup, but was scratched after experienc-
ing back spasms before batting practice.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Reds 5, Pirates 3
CINCINNATI Mike Leake pitched
seven innings, had a pair of hits and
scored on a dash home off a wild pitch
Tuesday night, leading the Cincinnati
Reds to a 5-3 victory over the fading
Pittsburgh Pirates.
Both teams were recovering from their
5-hour, 22-minute game on Monday
night, won by the Reds 4-3 in 14 innings.
Leake (8-9) gave up Alex Presley's
solo homer and pinch-hitter Gaby
Sanchez's two-run shot. The Reds
pitcher singled and scored during a deci-
sive three-run second inning off Kevin
Correia (10-9).
Brandon Phillips homered on Correia's
first pitch of the game and doubled home
another run. Scott Rolen added a solo
shot.

Nationals 5, Mets 3
NEW YORK Bryce Harper had his
first four-hit game and pinch-hitter Tyler
Moore launched a go-ahead homer off
R.A. Dickey in the seventh inning to send
the Washington Nationals past the


punchless New York Mets 5-3 on Tues-
day night.
Harper doubled and singled twice off
Dickey after the teen star entered 0 for 10
with six strikeouts against the knuckle-
baller. Leadoff batter Jayson Werth
reached base all five times for the NL
East leaders, who have won seven
straight and 11 of 12 at Citi Field.
Looking for a win over baseball's top
team to boost his Cy Young Award re-
sume, Dickey (18-5) mostly pitched out of
trouble for seven solid innings. But he
gave up a two-run shot to Moore that
made it 3-2 in the seventh and was un-
able to tie Nationals lefty Gio Gonzalez
for the major league lead in wins.
Gonzalez beat the Mets 5-1 in the se-
ries opener Monday.

Phillies 9, Marlins 7
PHILADELPHIA- Jimmy Rollins
homered and drove in three runs and
Roy Halladay won again as the streaking
Philadelphia Phillies outslugged the
Miami Marlins 9-7 on Tuesday night for
their sixth straight win.
Despite allowing five runs in 6 1-3 in-
nings, Halladay (10-7) improved to 4-0 in
his last five starts. The right-hander
walked three and struck out six.
Juan Pierre and Chase Utley both had
three hits for Philadelphia, which finished
with 15 hits while winning its 14th in the
last 18 games. The five-time defending
NL East champion Phillies, who reached
.500 for the first time since June 4, are
making a late playoff push. They began
the day five games behind St. Louis in
the NL wild-card race.

Brewers 5, Braves 0
MILWAUKEE Marco Estrada pitched
shutout ball into the seventh inning, Rickie
Weeks and Aramis Ramirez homered and
the Milwaukee Brewers beat the Atlanta
Braves 5-0 Tuesday night.
The Brewers won their eighth in a row
at Miller Park and reached the .500 mark
for the first time since April 24. Milwaukee
has surged back into the NL wild-card
race by winning 17 of 22 overall, and beat
the wild card-leading Braves for the sec-
ond straight day.
Estrada (3-6) was dominant from the
start, allowing only two singles to Andrel-
ton Simmons in the first five innings.
Estrada allowed four hits in 6 2-3 in-
nings and struck out six.

Astros 1, Cubs 0
HOUSTON Jimmy Paredes singled
and scored an unearned run in the third
inning and the Houston Astros beat the
Chicago Cubs 1-0 on Tuesday night.
It was an otherwise tough night for the
second baseman, who committed three
errors. Paredes has started the last three
games at second base with All-Star Jose
Altuve out with an abdominal strain.
Houston starter Jordan Lyles (4-11)
scattered two hits and struck out five in
five innings and five relievers completed
the shutout. Wilton Lopez allowed two
hits in a scoreless ninth for his fourth
save.
The last error by Paredes came in the
seventh inning, and interim manager
Tony DeFrancesco lifted him for Altuve to
start the eighth.
Cubs starter Justin Germano (2-7) al-
lowed three hits and tied a career high
with eight strikeouts. He lost his fifth
straight start.


NL

Reds 5, Pirates 3


Pittsburgh Cincinnati
ab r h bi


4 02 0
4 1 2 1
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
4 00 0
3 1 2 0
4 0 1 0
2 02 0
1 0 0 0
0 00
1 0 0 0
2 00 0
1112


BPhllps 2b
Stubbs cf
Votto lb
Ludwck If
Bruce rf
Rolen 3b
DNavrr c
WValdz ss
Leake p
Ondrsk p
Marshll p
Paul ph
Broxtn p


Holt 2b
Presley If
AMcCt cf
GJones lb
PAIvrz 3b
Tabata rf
McKnr c
Barmes ss
Clemnt ph
Mercer ss
Snider ph
Correia p
GSnchzph


ab rh bi


McPhrsp 0 0 00
Totals 34 3113 Totals 325 9 3
Pittsburgh 100 000 200 3
Cincinnati 130 000 01x 5
E-McKenry (2). DP-Cincinnati 3. LOB-Pitts-
burgh 5, Cincinnati 7. 2B-G.Jones (26), Tabata
(18), Barmes (16), B.Phillips (30). HR-Presley
(9), G.Sanchez (6), B.Phillips (17), Rolen (7).
S-Leake.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Correia L,10-9 6 7 4 3 3 2
McPherson 2 2 1 1 0 1
Cincinnati
Leake W,8-9 7 9 3 3 1 3
OndrusekH,13 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Marshall H,20 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
BroxtonS,1-3 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Correia.

Nationals 5, Mets 3


Washington


New York


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Werth rf 2 1 2 0 Tejada ss 5 1 3 0
Harper cf 5 0 4 1 DnMrp2b 3 1 1 1
Zmrmn3b 4 0 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 0 1 1
LaRochlb 4 0 1 0 I.Davislb 2 0 0 0
Morse If 5 0 0 0 Baxter rf 3 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Shppch ph 0 00 0
Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Duda ph-rf 1 00 0
Espinos 2b 4 1 1 0 Bay If 3 0 0 0
KSuzukc 4 2 2 1 FLewisph 1 00 0
Zmrmn p 2 00 0 AnTrrs cf 3 0 0 0
Grzlny p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 1 1 1 1
TMooreph 1 1 1 2 Tholec 4 0 1 0
CGarci p 0 0 0 0 Dickey p 2 0 0 0
McGnzl p 0 0 0 0 Vldspn ph 1 00 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 Rauch p 0 00 0
Tracy ph 1 0 1 0 Frncsc p 0 0 0 0
EPerez pr-lf 0 0 0 0 Edgin p 0 0 0 0
Acosta p 0 00 0
RCeden ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 36 5145 Totals 343 8 3
Washington 100 000 202 5
NewYork 000 020 001 3
E-Zimmerman (15). DP-Washington 2, New
York 3. LOB-Washington 9, New York 7.2B-
Harper (21), Desmond (29), Espinosa (34),
Dan.Murphy (36). HR-T.Moore (9), Hairston
(17). CS-Desmond (5). SF-Zimmerman.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Zimmermann 5 6 2 2 3 6
GorzelannyW,4-2 1 0 0 0 0 1
C.Garcia H,1 11-30 0 0 0 3
Mic.Gonzalez H,7 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Storen H,9 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
ClippardS,31-35 1 2 1 1 0 2
NewYork
Dickey L,18-5 7 8 3 3 3 2
Rauch 1 2 0 0 0 0
FFrancisco 0 3 2 2 1 0
Edgin 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Acosta 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
FFrancisco pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
Umpires-Home, Rob Drake; First, Joe West;
Second, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Sam Holbrook.
T-3:05. A-22,596 (41,922).

Phillies 9, Marlins 7


Miami

Petersn If
Ruggin cf
Reyes ss
Stanton rf
Ca.Lee lb
Dobbs 3b
DSolan 2b
MDunn p
H.Bell p
Brantly c
Eovaldi p
DJnngs p
Hatchr p
GHrndz ph
Gaudin p
DMrph 2b


Philadelphia
ab rh bi a
3 1 1 1 Rollins ss
4 1 2 2 Pierre If
4 1 0 1 Frndsnph
4 1 1 1 Aumont p
5 0 1 1 Papelnp
5 0 2 1 Utley 2b
4 1 1 0 Howard lb
0 0 0 0 Ruiz c
0 0 0 0 DBrwn rf-lf
3 2 2 0 Mayrry cf
1 0 0 0 Mrtnz 3b
0 0 0 0 Hallady p
0 0 0 0 Lindlm p
1 0 0 0 Horst p
0 0 0 0 Rosnrg p
1 0 1 0 L.Nixph
Wggntn ph
Schrhlt rf
35 7117 Totals
002 001 400


ab rh bi
3 32 3
4 2 3 1
0 00 0
0 00 0



0000
3 0 3 1
5 0 1 0
3 1 1 1
5 0 2 1
5 1 1 0
3 1 1 0
3 1 1 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
34915 8
7


Philadelphia 301 013 10x 9
E-Brantly (2), Utley (6). DP-Miami 3,
Philadelphia 1. LOB-Miami 8, Philadelphia 10.
2B-Petersen (6), Dobbs (12), Pierre (9), Ruiz
(29), Mayberry (22), M.Martinez (2). HR-Stan-
ton (34), Rollins (18). SB-Ruggiano (13),
Rollins (26). S-Petersen, Eovaldi, M.Martinez.
SF-Reyes, Rollins.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
EovaldiL,4-12 4 8 5 5 2 3
Da.Jennings 1 1 0 0 1 0
Hatcher 1 5 3 1 0 1
Gaudin 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
M.Dunn 2-3 0 0 0 3 0
H.Bell 1 0 0 0 0 1
Philadelphia
HalladayW,10-7 61-37 5 5 3 6
Lindblom 1-3 2 2 0 0 1
Horst 0 1 0 0 0 0
RosenbergH,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
AumontH,2 1 1 0 0 1 2
Papelbon S,33-37 1 0 0 0 0 2
Horst pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Eovaldi pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Hatcher (Ruiz). PB-Brantly.

Brewers 5, Braves 0


Atlanta

Bourn cf
Prado If
Heywrd rf
C.Jones 3b
McCnn c
Uggla 2b
Overay lb
Smmns ss
THudsn p
Gearrin p


ab r h bi
4000
4 0 1 0
4 00 0
3 0 1 0
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 2 0
1 0 0 0
0 00 0


Milwaukee

Aoki rf
RWeks 2b
Braun If
ArRmr 3b
Lucroy c
Ishikaw lb
CGomz cf
Segura ss
Estrad p
Hndrsn p


ab rh bi


Constnzph 1 00 0 TGreenph 1 0 1 1
Batista p 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0
Kintzlrp 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 05 0 Totals 31 5 9 5
Atlanta 000 000 000 0
Milwaukee 100 000 31x 5
LOB-Atlanta 6, Milwaukee 5. 2B-Aoki (30).
3B-R.Weeks (3). HR-R.Weeks (18),
Ar.Ramirez (23). S-T.Hudson, Ishikawa.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
T.Hudson L,14-6 62-37 4 4 1 4
Gearrin 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Batista 1 2 1 1 0 0
Milwaukee
Estrada W,3-6 62-34 0 0 1 6
Henderson H,10 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by T.Hudson (C.Gomez).












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Anna Paquin and Steven
Moyer are the parents of
twins, who are "in good
health" on Tuesday.
Paquin and Moyer
welcome twins
NEW YORK-Anna
Paquin and Stephen
Moyer are the proud par-
ents of newborn twins.
Reps for the acting
couple confirm Paquin
gave birth to the babies a
few weeks early but say
they're in good health
and their parents "are
overjoyed." The state-
ment issued Tuesday did-
n't specify when or where
the babies were born or
the sex of the children.
News of the births was
first reported by
People.com.
The babies are 30-year-
old Paquin's first chil-
dren. Moyer, 42, has two
children from previous
relationships.
The "True Blood" stars
were married in 2010.
The show is in its fifth
season on HBO.

Michael J. Fox
part of 9/11 charity
NEW YORK-
Michael J. Fox did his
part to make the anniver-
sary of 9/11 about helping
others.
The actor spent Tues-

ticipating
in Cantor
Fitzger-
ald's
Charity
Day, along
with 50
Cent
Michael J. Edie
Fox Falco,
Venus
Williams, Eli Manning,
former New York City
Mayor Rudy Guiliani and
a host of other luminaries.
Cantor Fitzgerald, the fi-
nancial firm that lost 658
employees in the attacks
on the World Trade Cen-
ter in 2001, has marked
the anniversary of that
day by raising funds for
charities; organizers said
about $12 million was
raised.

Awards to honor
Lochte, others


Penning poignancy


Associated Press
Dave Matthews, lead singer of the Dave Matthews Band, said his new album, "Away From the World" was
released Tuesday.

Dave Matthews heads 'Away From the World' in new album


RYAN PEARSON
AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES Dave
Matthews needed a break.
His famously hardworking band
took last year off and Matthews said
he's planning to scale back future
summer tours to spend more time
with his wife and three children.
Still, Matthews didn't want to give
himself too much free time.
The band reunited early this year
with "Crash" and "Before These
Crowded Streets" producer Steve
Lillywhite, and originally planned
to record studio versions of older
tunes from live performances.
Matthews decided instead to pen
and record all new songs, with lyrics
about love, lust, aging and activism
laid over his three bandmates' rec-
ognizably comfortable-yet-funky
musical bed.
The result, "Away From the
World," follows the critical and
commercial success of 2009's "Big
Whiskey & the GrooGrux King": 1.2
million copies sold, and an album of
the year Grammy nomination.
The latest album, out Tuesday,
"has a smaller poignance for me,"
the South African-born musician
said in an interview. "It's not a wave
the way the other one was, but it has
a more personal quality to it for me."
Clearly proud of his latest at-


tempt to shake DMB from the ca-
sual listener's "great jam band, but
..." label, the 45-year-old singer-
songwriter spoke with The Associ-
ated Press about his children,
growing old and God.
Associated Press: How was your
break from touring last year? Did it
accomplish what you'd hoped?
Matthews: It was good. It forced
me to realign things. There was a
momentum that had built up over
the years that I sort of didn't feel I
had any say ... I wanted to stop. So
we did. ... It wasn't like I went to
Outer Mongolia and stared at the
stars, which I sort of fantasized
about doing. But I think it was good
for very personal reasons.
AP: Who did you spend time with?
Matthews: I spent most of my
time with my family We traveled a
bit. ... I think I will (take a break)
every year because it made a big
difference to have time with my
kids. ... I like working. But it seems
like there's a shift and I had to
make that shift apparent to myself
and everyone around me with my
kids. ... I feel really important
around them.
AP: Are they into music?
Matthews: Yeah. In all different
ways. My girls are 11 so they're fans
of music. At the moment I think they
like my music. They've got their
own things they're into as well (Be-


yonce, Taylor Swift). I don't care
what they listen to. My son, he's
pretty heartfelt. He's 5 now. He's
sort of more of a thrasher He likes
Iron Maiden and he likes Black
Sabbath. Mainly I think because of
'Iron Man.'... This year was the first
year I took my girls on the road with
me with no one else, which was
nice. I just hang out with them all
the time. Then I also end up seeing
the cities I'm in in a much more
thorough way ... It's good fun to host
a party with my daughters.
AP: You recorded this album much
quicker than the last album a few
weeks in the studio versus many
months. How were you thinking
about following up "Big Whiskey"?
Matthews: There was so much
that happened in the last record.
Roi (Moore) died in the middle of it
so it had a different focus. ... The
last album incorporated a lot of
mourning with the death of our
bandmate. I can't compare the two:
apples and oranges. But this album,
it was a very refreshing process.
And it was interesting to go back
with Steve Lillywhite and be old
men together
AP: Were you flashing back to cut-
ting those first records with him?
Matthews: Yeah, there were some
similar methods. Also the relationship
is very different It was nice to see an
old friend who we had lost touch with.


Isbell celebrates at Americana Awards


CHRIS TALBOTT
AP Music Writer


LOS ANGELES NASHVILLE, Tenn. Music was
Ryan Lochte is among the all around Jason Isbell as he grew up
Latino U.S. Olympians to in northern Alabama.
be honored at this year's The region's rich musical history
ALMA Awards. provided a soundtrack for his child-
Eva Longoria and hood. His grandparents turned on the
George Lopez are return- radio and taught him to play guitar He
ing for the third time as was schoolmates with The Secret Sis-
co-hosts of this month's ters, bandmates with future hit song-
awards, which celebrate writer Chris Tompkins and a casual
Latino achievements in rock 'n' roll rival with John Paul White
music, television and film. of The Civil Wars.
A salute to Olympic Everyone was practicing "a hillbilly
medalists from the Lon- gospel tradition" that's been passed
don Games will honor down in the area for generations. It
swimmer Lochte, whose spawned some of history's best music
mother is Cuban-born, at Muscle Shoals in the 1960s and '70s,
along with water polo and there's been a second coming of
champions Brenda Villa prominent acts in the 21st century Is-
and Jessica Steffens, bell, the top nominee at the Ameri-
gymnast Danell Leyva, cana Honors & Awards on Wednesday
boxer Marlen Esparza night at the Ryman Auditorium, is the
and runner Leonel Man- latest artist to break out of the area.
zano, it was announced "I stayed with my grandparents" after
Tuesday he finished school, Isbell said. "That's
-From wire reports where I learned how to play because


Birthday Certain special knowledge that you've
been acquiring over time could now serve as a power-
ful base for the development of a raft of new ideas in
the year ahead. You're now ready to put innovative
twists on many old experiences.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -An important commercial
involvement is not likely to be conducted along con-
ventional lines. However, this departure from traditional
methods could present you with a great opportunity.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although you might get
paired up with a new and unfamiliar partner in order to
pursue a mutual interest, you'll enjoy every minute of it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your chances for suc-
cess will be greatly enhanced if you truly enjoy what
you are doing. It will be up to you, however, to make
the love of your task the motivating factor.


they were trying to give me something
to stay occupied so I wouldn't get into
much trouble. I'd sit and play for hours
and hours at a time and not be break-
ing anything or stealing anything. I
know a lot of people who did that The
Rogers girls (Laura and Lydia), The Se-
cret Sisters ... my mom used to make
sure we got next to them in church on
Sunday Even though they were 4 and 6,
they were just harmonizing. They were
just born with it"
Isbell's upbringing left him with a
strong sense of place, and he's used it to
turn heads in the Southern songwriting
community, first as a member of the
Drive-By Truckers and later as a soloist
He's nominated for four awards at
the Americana Music Association
awards, including artist of the year,
with Hayes Carll, Justin Townes Earle
and Gillian Welch. His 2011 release,
"Here We Rest," is up for album of the
year; he and his band, the 400 Unit, are
nominated for group of the year; and
he's nominated in the song category
for "'Alabama Pines," a tune his good
friend White says is a great example of
Isbell's gift as a songwriter


Today's HOROSCOPE
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Establish lofty ob-
jectives for yourself, regardless of how far-fetched they
may appear to be to your companions. You'll perform
better if you feel you have to push yourself a bit.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't lose faith,
even if the going gets tough. Things should work out to
your ultimate advantage, but only as long as you keep
your focus on victory.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)- Decisions you make
in which you are looking out for a loved one's interests
along with your own have excellent chances of work-
ing out the way you're hoping.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Your chances for per-
sonal gain are much stronger than usual today, espe-
cially if you get involved with some type of commercial
arrangement with an influential friend.


Associated Press
Country singer Jason Isbell, the top
nominee at the Americana Honors &
Awards on Wednesday night at the
Ryman Auditorium, is the latest artist
to break out of northern Alabama.


Aries (March 21-April 19) It is smart not to dele-
gate an assignment to others that you're capable of
doing better than anybody else.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) You're a resourceful
person to begin with, so it isn't unlikely that you'll come
up with one of your better ideas today.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -You should take ad-
vantage of a social invitation that gives you an oppor-
tunity to meet new people.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Lady Luck is in your
corner where financial interests are concerned. Chances
are she will be arranging something quite unique.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It doesn't matter if your
tactics appear to be strange to your associates. As
long as they are tailored to suit your needs, everything
should work out to your satisfaction.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
Fantasy 5:3 5 18 19 21
5-of-5 2 winners $98,496.61
4-of-5 359 $88.50
3-of-5 10,636 $8
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
Fantasy 5:3 10 22 25 29
5-of-5 2 winners $87,042.57
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Sept.
12, the 256th day of 2012. There
are 110 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Sept. 12, 1942, during
World War II, a German U-boat
off West Africa torpedoed the
RMS Laconia, which was car-
rying Italian prisoners of war,
British soldiers and civilians.
The German crew, joined by
other U-boats, began rescue
operations. (On Sept. 16, the
rescue effort came to an
abrupt halt when the Germans
were attacked by a U.S. Army
bomber; some 1,600 people
died while more than 1,100
survived. As a result, U-boat
commanders were ordered to
no longer rescue civilian sur-
vivors of submarine attacks.)
On this date:
In 1814, the Battle of North
Point took place in Maryland
during the War of 1812 as
American forces slowed the
advance of British troops on
Baltimore.
In 1960, Democratic presi-
dential candidate John F.
Kennedy addressed ques-
tions about his Roman
Catholic faith, telling a South-
ern Baptist group, "I do not
speak for my church on pub-
lic matters, and the church
does not speak for me."
In 1962, in a speech at
Rice University in Houston,
President John F. Kennedy
reaffirmed his support for the
manned space program, de-
claring: "We choose to go to
the moon. We choose to go
to the moon in this decade
and do the other things, not
because they are easy, but
because they are hard..."
In 1992, the space shuttle
Endeavour blasted off, carry-
ing with it Mark Lee and Jan
Davis, the first married cou-
ple in space; Mae Jemison,
the first black woman in
space; and Mamoru Mohri,
the first Japanese national to
fly on a U.S. spaceship.
Ten years ago: Raising
the specter of war, President
George W. Bush told skeptical
world leaders at the United
Nations to confront the "grave
and gathering danger" of
Saddam Hussein's Iraq or
stand aside as the U.S. acted.
Three former Tyco Inter-
national executives were
charged with looting the con-
glomerate of hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars; all three
pleaded not guilty at their ar-
raignment in New York. (For-
mer CEO L. Dennis Kozlowski
and former CFO Mark Swartz
were later convicted of grand
larceny and securities fraud;
Tyco's former top lawyer, Mark
A. Belnick, was acquitted.)
Five years ago: Oil prices
briefly topped a record $80 a
barrel.
One year ago: Novak
Djokovic beat defending
champion Rafael Nadal 6-2,
6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-1 to win his first
U.S. Open championship.
Today's birthdays: Rock
musician Neil Peart (Rush) is
60. Rock singer-musician
Ben Folds (Ben Folds Five) is
46. Actor-comedian Louis


C.K. is 45. Singer Ruben
Studdard is 34. Basketball
player Yao Ming is 32.
Thought for Today: "Con-
science without judgment is
superstition." Benjamin
Whichcote, English theolo-
gian and philosopher (1609-
1683).










EDUCATION cfrom
ITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Wearing your letters on your sole


Associated Press
SUDBURY, Mass. -
Jason Shuman was sitting
in a chapter meeting of
Sigma Phi Epsilon at the
University of Miami when
he had an epiphany, a reve-
lation that encouraged the
then-sophomore to start his
own business.
He noticed a lot of


companies offer products
with Greek letters to frater-
nities and sororities that
tend to be overpriced and of
low quality.
"You're paying $100 for a
sweatshirt with your logo
on it and you're kind of
looking at yourself when
you get it. You're saying,
'Why did I do that?'"
So when he got home one


day and his boat shoes
were worn out, Shuman
thought, "Why don't I get a
pair of boat shoes with my
letters on it?"
Nice idea, except the
product didn't exist. Even
the top retailer of boat
shoes did not make what
Shuman sought.
Luckily, the entrepre-
neurship major had con-


nections. He was able to get
a custom-made pair from a
manufacturer in China.
The shoes passed the "cool
factor," grabbing the
See Page C2
Jeffrey Shuman, left, Nate
Shron, Jason Shuman and
Gregory Karelitz have
launched Category 5 Boat
Shoes, which specializes in
shoes embossed with
fraternity letters or logos.
Associated Press


Youthful studies


Program teaches

high schoolers

about child care
MATTHEW BECK
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER-High
school students usually don't
spend their days coloring, re-
peating their days of the week
and counting to 10, but for a
group of students who attend
Crystal River High School
that's exactly what much of
their day entails.
The students are super-
vised, counseled and in-
structed by Early Childhood
Education teacher Dana
Fields through the high
school's Treasure Chest Pre-
school, the day care facility
the class operates for 4-year-
olds.
Fields said the Early Child-
hood Education curriculum is
broken into three categories at
the school.
"I see my Level 1 students
every day, and that's an intro-
ductory class," she said. "The
main course work for that
class is the course work that is
required to be completed to
work in child care in the state
of Florida. Those courses are
offered through the Depart-
ment of Children and Families
(DCF). I am one of their train-
ers. We actually enroll the stu-
dents in the DCF courses so
they are getting both a high


Page C2


Alexandra "Lexi" Nicholas,
standing, helps Kaitlyn Tyre,
seated at right, with her
project as Level 2-3 students
Daveda Lemon and Jazmin
Lowe help.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


State investigating virtual school operator


Associated Press
The Florida Department of Edu-
cation is investigating K12, the na-
tion's largest online educator, over
allegations the company uses un-
certified teachers in violation of
state law and has asked employees
to cover up the practice.
K12 officials asked state-
certified teachers to sign class ros-
ters that included students they


hadn't taught, according to docu-
ments that are part of the investi-
gation, which began in January
In one case, a K12 manager in-
structed a certified teacher to sign
a class roster of more than 100 stu-
dents, according to documents ob-
tained by the Florida Center for
Investigative Reporting and State
Impact Florida. She only recog-
nized seven names on that list.
"I cannot sign off on students


who are not my actual students,"
then-K12 teacher Amy Capelle
wrote to her supervisor. "It is not
ethical to submit records to the dis-
trict that are inaccurate."
Founded in 2000 by William Ben-
nett, a former U.S. education secre-
tary under President Ronald
Reagan, K12 is an $864 million pub-
licly traded company whose stock
price has more than doubled in the
past year. It operates in 43 Florida


school districts, including in Miami-
Dade, Broward, Hillsborough, Or-
ange and Duval counties, teaching
everything from art to algebra to stu-
dents in kindergarten through high
school. It has denied wrongdoing.
According to K12's website, stu-
dents enjoy "state-certified teach-
ers, with a parent or other
responsible adult in the role of
'Learning Coach.'
See Page C2


Darrick Buettner
GUEST
COLUMN


Learning

beyond

the

classroom
W hat's the real goal
to high school?
Just good grades?
No. Become great in
sports? No.
The real goal is to be-
come well-rounded, to
excel in and out of the
classroom. Lecanto High
School has many students
who do just that!
September means foot-
ball; At Lecanto, the cap-
tain of the football team,
Kirk Osburn, definitely
excels in and out of the
classroom. A student with
advanced placement
classes, Kirk has also par-
ticipated in football, base-
ball, track and wrestling.
As a three-year varsity
member of the football
team, coach McKinley
Rolle selected Kirk as the
captain because of his
leadership and intelli-
gence. If that weren't
enough, Kirk also wake-
boards!
"Wakeboarding allows
me to relax from the pres-
sures of school, but it's like
anything in life. The more
you're committed, the more
you practice, the better you
become," Kirk said.
With a GPA of 4.76,
Amanda Pitre is one of the
smartest students at
Lecanto. She has been a
volleyball starter for three
years (currently captain),
manages the soccer team
and announces at base-
ball games. This year, she
volunteers at the Citrus
Abuse Shelter Association
(CASA). She and her
friend Hannah Hunting-
ton have organized a road
race at 8 a.m. Sunday,
Sept. 16, at Lecanto High
School to raise money for
CASA.
See Page C2


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C2 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


DAY CARE
Continued from Page C1

school credit and credit
through DCE The DCF re-
quires me to do these
classes just as the class
would be given to an adult."
She said if their atten-
dance is good, she can rec-
ommend her students take
the state test for
certification.
Once they pass the test,
she said the students have
completed the 30-hour in-
troductory training and are
ready to move on.
In order to legally work
in a child care facility in
Florida, 40 hours of DCF-
monitored training is
required.
If a student wishes to
continue their education in
the child care field, they
can enroll in the Level 2
and Level 3 classes, accord-
ing to Fields.
Once Level 2 is complete
the students are qualified
to work in child care in
Florida. The certification
they earn from DCF does
not expire, according to the
teacher
The more advanced
Level 2 and Level 3 stu-
dents are taught together
for three hours daily
"We block the students
together in Level 2 and 3 so
they get two credits," she
said. "Then that way they
are here with me for the
whole time we have the on
sight preschool open."



BUETTNER
Continued from Page C1

What's her key to success?
"Success occurs through
communication," Pitre said.
"Whether in volleyball or
organizing this race, the bet-
ter you communicate, the
better you do!"
When Eric Riser was a
freshman, he decided to get
involved with Key Club, an
international high school
service organization that
promotes leadership and
character-building. Want-
ing to get involved with Key
Club at the state level, Eric
ran for district treasurer
(one of three elected, exec-
utive positions in Florida)
and won his junior year To
say last year was busy is an


EDUCATION


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Level 2-3 Early Childhood Education student Kayla
Razonski, left, asks teacher Dana Fields for advice with a
lesson plan.


Fields explained how the
more advanced class dif-
fers from Level 1.
"The main difference in
Level 2 and 3 is the
hands-on experience,"
she said. "In Level 1 there
is no hands-on with chil-
dren, it's all classroom in-
struction. Level 2-3
students are writing les-
son plans, working with
each other planning the
whole curriculum. In our
pre-school, my students
set the curriculum."
If a student desires, ac-
cording to Fields, he or she
can work in a number of
child care facilities such as
a traditional day care cen-
ter or some family home
day care settings.


understatement; he was
constantly coordinating
and calling other high
school clubs around the
state.
What has he learned?
"I have learned so much
about working with differ-
ent groups of people in
order to solve the real
world problems that I
have encountered," Riser
said.
Lainey Poulis has defi-
nitely excelled in the class-
room. In addition to her
great grades, she also runs
the Greek Club at Lecanto.
That's right, she runs it -
not just participates. Her
focus with the Greek Club is
to teach students about all
things Greek: language, cul-
ture, history and the fact
that Western civilization can
trace its roots to Greece.


"I have some of my stu-
dents who complete Level 3
here and go over to the
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute and complete
Level 4," she said.
Fields said that is where
students work toward a na-
tional or a more advanced
state certification.
"At that point they can be
eligible to be a pre-k
teacher in the school sys-
tem," she said.
Fields says the high
school's preschool is open
from 9:30 a.m. to noon
weekdays. The cost is $30
per month.
"It's more of a mom or
dad's morning out kind of
an idea, not a full-time care
situation," she said. "We


That's not all, though
This summer, she had thE
opportunity to sing the Na
tional Anthem at a Torontc
Blue Jays game. Where? Ii
Toronto. After all, she wa
already there volunteering
at Toronto's Mt. Sina
Hospital.
"Singing the Americar
National Anthem in Canad;
made me so appreciative o
being from America and Cit
rus County," Poulis said.
Whether its sports, clubs
community service o:
singing the National An
them in front of 36,000 peo
ple, an excellent student
excels both in and out of thE
classroom.

t DarrickBuettneris the IB
coordinator for Lecanto
High School.


draw from the community
and the only requirement is
that they are three-and-a-
half or four and are potty
trained."
She said the tuition is
low due to no overhead as-
sociated with the pre-
school, which has been in
operation at Crystal River
High School since early
1998.
"The money we collect
here at Treasurer Chest
Preschool stays right here
at the preschool," she said.
"It pays for our snacks, any
consumable supplies like
paint, glue and paper We
also try to go on two field
trips each year so the tu-
ition stays here with us to
help us offset those types of
costs."
Ashley Meiman, a senior
high school student, com-
pleted Level 3 last year and
continues to work in the
preschool as an assistant,
offering suggestions to her
younger peers. She has
been in the program most
of her high school career
and said she thought the
program sounded like fun.
"Everybody's always hav-
ing kids these days and I'm
always helping to babysit,"
she said. "I'm always loving
on kids, so I figured why
not? It sounds fun."
The teen said her fu-
ture goals are to find a job
in the social work field
after high school, and her
experiences in the class
will help her in the years
to come.
"The whole experience



e SHOES
I-
o Continued from Page
n
s attention of practice
g everyone at "The U" w
i saw Shuman sporting the
Two years later, af
n testing nearly a dozen p
a totypes and spending hi
f dreds of hours planni
- Shuman and four frier
have launched Categor
3, Boat Shoes.
r The company special:
- in boat shoes emboss
with letters or a logo on t
t back or side, sold by camp
e reps mainly to fraternity
and sororities.
"We can also do coun
clubs, private schools,
3 sailing teams," said SI
man, CEO of the compare
"We're licensed for


in general has been good
for me," she said. "Getting
to know what are these
little kids thinking all the
time. This helps me a lot
get to know four year
olds."
Alexandra "Lexi"
Nicholas is a junior high
this year and a Level 3 grad
as well and describes her
role in the class as more of
an internship assisting the
younger students. She said
that because of her early
work her freshman and
sophomore year complet-
ing all three levels of the
program her sights are set
on attaining certification to
be an intern at the primary
school.
"I definitely want to be a
teacher at some point in my
life," she said. The teen
said her training in the pro-
gram has afforded her the
opportunity to learn first-
hand, the challenges and
benefits of working with
young children.
"This program has taught
me how to work with kids,
how to work with parents,
how to present yourself in a
preschool atmosphere,"
she said. "There is a lot of
hard work that goes into
putting all of this together
and what I've discovered
this year is trying to bal-
ance everything this year
has been my biggest
challenge."
Chronicle staff writer
Matthew Beck can be
reached at 352-564-2919 or
mbeck@chronicleonline.
comn.


different fraternities at the
moment," said Gregory
Karelitz of Wayland, a sen-
C1 ior at Boston College, who
handles the technology for
illy the company "More are in
vho the pipeline."
em. The other partners are
ter Shuman's older brother
ro- Jeff, a Bentley College grad-
un- uate who works in high-end
ng, real estate in Boston, and
ids two other childhood
y 5 friends, Nate Shron of Sud-
bury, a senior at Syracuse
zes University, and Julien
sed Rousson of Sudbury, a sen-
the ior at Hofstra University.
pus The first shoe, the
ies Yachtsman, is available in
oak, mahogany and walnut
try and sells for $69.99, or
or $59.99 when purchased
hu- through a college rep.
y. The three main qualities
18 of the Cat5 shoe are afford-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ONLINE
Continued from Page C1

But K12 has a financial in-
centive to skirt Florida's law
requiring the use of certified
teachers. Simply, K12 can
pay uncertified teachers
less than certified teachers
while collecting the same
amount per student from
school districts, increasing
profits for shareholders.
And documents indicate
it may have used uncertified
teachers in at least one
county.
In 2009, K12 asked Semi-
nole County Public Schools if
it could use uncertified
teachers for some online
classes. Those uncertified
teachers would be overseen
by a so-called "teacher of
record" a certified teacher
Seminole officials con-
sulted with the Florida De-
partment of Education and
then denied the request, cit-
ing state law requiring cer-
tified teachers. But emails
forwarded to the school dis-
trict by a K12 employee
show the company went
ahead anyway
In one email, K12's Florida
project manager asked
teachers to sign off on having
taught students they may
have never encountered.
Gilormini asked K12
teacher Capelle, whose
emails helped spark the in-
vestigation, to sign off on a list
of 112 students. Of the 112,
she'd taught only seven of the
students, and refused to sign.


ability, customization and
quality, said Shuman.
"The shoes are hand-
sewn, and the one thing that
sets our shoe apart is that
the insole is both foam and
leather," said Shron, who
ran a DJ business in middle
school and a photography
business in high school.
"From the second you start
wearing it, it feels like it's
broken in from day one. It's
truly a comfortable shoe."
Over the summer, the
partners set up shop in an
office on Speen Street in
Framingham, planning the
final details of the launch.
The team received more
than 200 applications for
campus reps, and planned
to hire enough to cover 80
campuses this fall, and to
double the number by the
spring of 2013.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

HONORS
Joseph F. Thompson
graduated on Aug. 4 from the
University of South Florida. He
received a Bachelor of Arts de-
gree in criminology and was a
member of Alpha Phi Sigma
Criminal Justice Honor Soci-
ety. He graduated from the
College of Central Florida in
2011 with an Associate De-
gree in Criminal Justice and
was a member of Phi Theta
Kappa Honor Society. He is a
2008 graduate of Crystal River
High School and is the son of
Robert and Lisa Thompson, of
Homosassa. He is currently
attending Withlacoochee Tech-
nical Institute's Law Enforce-
ment Academy.
FUNDRAISERS
Sign up now for the Inver-
ness Primary School PTA's
fourth annual "Mom to Mom
Sale," which will take place
from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday,
Oct. 6, in the IPS cafe. Sell
gently used toys, strollers,
cribs, child furniture, books, ma-
ternity wear and babies,' tod-
dlers,' children's and teens'
clothing.
Moms, dads and grandpar-
ents from Citrus County are in-
vited to rent space and shop at
this popular and unique event.
Rent a space for $8 before Oct.
1 or $10 after. IPS collects 10
percent of the proceeds to ben-
efit the school's PTA events.
For more information and to
register for the sale, call V.
Spaight at 352-419-4750 or
email vmail@spaight.net.
The Rotary Club of Sug-
armill Woods and the Rotary In-
teract Club of Lecanto High
School have joined together to
support the Box Tops for Edu-
cation fundraiser for Lecanto
Primary School. Box Tops for
Education labels can be found
on more than 300 products that
families purchase and use on a
daily basis.
There are two drop boxes -
one in the lobby of the Sug-
armill Woods Country Club and
the other in the Military Outlet
Store on West Citrus Avenue in
Crystal River.
For a complete listing of the
products, go to www.Rotary
SMW.com.
The labels can also be
mailed to the Sugarmill Woods
Rotary Club. P.O. Box 8,
Homosassa Springs, FL 34447.
SCHOLARSHIPS
AND CONTESTS
The Harry F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 of Beverly Hills is
sponsoring two national VFW
scholarship programs.
The Patriot's Pen Essay
Contest is open to sixth-, sev-
enth- and eighth-grade stu-
dents, and gives them the
prospect of winning cash
awards at the local, regional
and state levels, with the oppor-
tunity for a first-place scholar-
ship at the national level and an
all-expenses-paid trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., for the winner and
a parent/guardian. This year's
essay theme is "What I Would
Tell our Founding Fathers." A
300 to 400-word typed essay is
required.
The Voice of Democracy
Competition is for students in
grades nine through 12. The
program allows students to
compete for more than $2.3
million in scholarships and in-
centives. First-place state win-
ners will receive an
all-expenses-paid trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., from March 2
through 6 to be honored and
compete for $152,000 in


EDUCATION


scholarships. First place re-
ceives a $30,000 scholarship. A
typed essay and a three- to
five-minute standard cassette
tape or audio CD of the essay
is required. The theme is "Is our
Constitution Still Relevant."
Students must be enrolled in
public, private or parochial
schools within the U.S.; home-
school students are also
eligible.
The deadline for submittal is
Nov. 1 for judging at the local
level, with winners advancing to
regional, state and national lev-
els. Application forms are avail-
able at VFW Post 10087, 2170
Vet Lane, behind Cadence
Bank in Beverly Hills on County
Road 491.
For more information, call the
post at 352-746-0440.
The Fleet Reserve Associ-
ation National Committee on
Americanism-Patriotism is
sponsoring an annual Ameri-
canism-Patriotism Essay
Contest, based on this year's
theme: "What My Vote Will
Mean to Me."
The contest includes a grand
prize of a trip to Washington,
D.C., at the association's ex-
pense to visit the White House,
Supreme Court and Capitol Hill
with a meeting and/or photo op-
portunity with his/her U.S. rep-
resentative or senatorss,
depending upon availability.
The winner and a parent will be
a guest of the FRA.
There are also cash prizes of
$2,500, $1,500 and $1,000 to
each first-, second- and third-
place winner in grades seven
through 12. All national winners
will receive a plaque citing their
achievement. Every entrant
judged at the national level
receives a Certificate of
Recognition.
Winners in the local area are
judged by the branch and unit,
then sent to the regional con-
vention for further judging, then
to the national level for final
judging. Additional prizes may
be awarded at the branch and
regional levels.
FRA's essay contest is open
to all students grades seven
through 12 (including home-
schooled students). Students
attending grades seven through
12 can contact their guidance
counselor.
Each entrant must be spon-
sored by an FRA member in
good standing or by a currently
chartered branch or unit. The
local contact is Bob Huscher,
chairman, FRA Branch 186, at
352-344-0727.
All entries must be submitted
by Dec. 1 or sooner to the local
chairman or to local school
representatives.
The deadline for the Citrus
Macintosh Users Group 2012 to
2013 school year scholarship
applications is Tuesday, Jan.
15, 2013. This year, CMUG will
award scholarships a mini-
mum of $500 each to one
graduating senior from Citrus,
Lecanto and Crystal River high
schools. Academy of Environ-
mental Science seniors, includ-
ing home-schooled students
attending the academy, will
compete with applicants from
their home district. Students in-
terested in applying should get
applications from their school
guidance department.
For more information, call
Buzz Fredrickson at 352-
341-4392.
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir, Inc. is now ac-
cepting applications for its 2013
scholarship award of $1500.
Application is open to graduat-
ing high school seniors or en-
rolled college students and


residents of Citrus County or
children of Citrus County resi-
dents. Past and present choir
members and relatives of choir
members are also eligible. Ap-
plicants may obtain scholarship
qualifications and application
forms from their school guid-
ance counselors or online at
www.citruschoir.com. Com-
pleted applications must be re-
ceived no later than April 30,
2013.
The College of Central
Florida is now awarding
dozens of scholarships to
qualifying students interested in
taking honors classes at the
Citrus campus this fall semes-
ter. A major component of CF's
Honors Institute, the Commu-
nity of Scholars Honors Pro-
gram offers incoming high
school graduates two-year tu-
ition scholarships, currently val-
ued at $3,000 per academic
year, while offering partial
scholarships to those who are
currently attending CF.
Students in the honors pro-
gram are free to pursue the de-
gree option of their choosing at
CF, with the scholarship re-
quirement being successful
participation in a limited number
of honors-level classes that
also serve to fulfill degree re-
quirements. Students may also
take classes at any of the CF
locations each term, and are
not bound to enrolling only in
classes offered at the Citrus
campus. Besides financial ben-
efits, the Community of Schol-
ars offers members priority
registration each term.
Typically, a cumulative high
school GPA of 3.75 is needed
to qualify for the Community of
Scholars, although applications
for those with a slightly lower
GPA may be considered in
some cases. Students wishing
to be considered for scholar-
ships should call Dr. June Hall
at 352-746-6721.
CLASSES AND COURSES
For information about out-
doors and recreational classes
in Citrus County, see the Sun-
day Sports section of the
Chronicle.
The College of Central
Florida will hold information
sessions on Wednesday, Sept.
12, for the Bachelor of Science
in Early Childhood Education.
Sessions will be held at noon
and 5:30 p.m. in the University
Center, Room 108, at the Ocala
Campus, 3001 S.W. College
Road.
Participants will receive gen-
eral information about admis-
sion and financial aid, as well
as details about the Bachelor of
Science in Early Childhood Ed-
ucation, Prekindergarten/
Primary Education.
For more information, contact
Cheryl Lonon at 352-854-2322,
ext. 1597, lononc@cf.edu, or
Debbie Bowe at 352-854-2322,
ext. 1575, bowed@cf.edu.
Starting with the Sept. 28
meeting, Citrus Macintosh
Users Group (CMUG) will re-
sume meeting on the fourth
Friday monthly. The club meets
from 7 to 9 p.m. with an infor-
mal question-and-answer ses-
sion at 6:30. Guests are
welcome.
Classes for September will
be Apple and iPad literacy of-
fered by instructors Bill Dean
and Curtis Herrin.
The schedule for the month is:
Thursday, Sept. 20, 1 to


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 C3


5 p.m., iPad workshop. Regis-
tration required and indicate
topic to be covered. Email Car-
olyn Moss at ckmoss@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Monday, Sept. 24, 1 to 5 p.m.
Apple literacy class. Registra-
tion required; email
ckmoss@tampabay.rr.com.
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 1 to 5
p.m. Macintosh workshop. Reg-
istration required and indicate
topic to be covered. Email Bill
Dean at bjdean@embarq
mail.com.
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 6 to 9
p.m. iPad literacy class. Regis-
tration required; email ckmoss
@tampabay.rr.com.
Thursday, Sept. 27, 1 to 5
p.m. Lab/tune-up. Registration
required and indicate topic to
be covered. Email John
Engberg at mbyte@earthlink.
net.
Friday, Sept. 28, 6:30 to 9
p.m. Meeting.
All events are in room 103,
building C4 on the College of
Central Florida Citrus Campus.
Class fees are $10 for single,
$15 for family and $20 for non-
members.
For more information about
CMUG, visit cmugonline.com
and click on the About Us or
News and Events button.
Crystal River Users Group
Inc. has announced its 2012
fall class schedule. Go to
crug.com to register and get di-
rections to classes.
All classes except Digital
Scrapbooking will be conducted
at Crystal Oaks Community
Clubhouse, 4958 Crystal Oaks
Blvd., Lecanto.
Classes are:
CSS, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., Sept. 17 and 24; $15 for
members, $23 for nonmembers.
Digital Scrapbooking, 1 to
4 p.m., Sept. 20, 27 and Oct. 4;
$20 for members, $30 for
nonmembers.
Windows 7 Basic, 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Oct. 1 and
8; $15 for members, $23 for
nonmembers.
Word 2010 Basic, 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Oct. 15, 22
and 29; $20 for members, $30
for nonmembers.
Adobe Elements PSE,
9:30 to 11:30 p.m., Nov. 12, 19,
26 and Dec. 3; $20 for mem-
bers, $30 for nonmembers.
WordPress, noon to 1:30
p.m. Nov. 12, 19, 26 and Dec.
3; $15 for members, $23 for
nonmembers.
The Art of Calligraphy art
class is offered every Thursday
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at The Gar-
den Shed, 2423 S. Rock-
crusher Road., Homosassa.
Call Louise at 352-503-7063 for
more information.
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute is offering GED prep
classes. Classes are $30 per
term and are offered during the
day and evening in many loca-
tions in Citrus County.
In addition to GED prepara-
tion classes, adult education
students are also offered free
career counseling, and financial
aid and post-secondary appli-
cation assistance, as well as
free child care for eligible adult
education parents. ESOL
classes are available for those
wanting to learn to speak, read
and write English.
Tuition scholarships are
available to qualified candi-
dates. For more information,
contact Student Services at


352-726-2430, ext. 4326 or ext.
4363, or online at www.wti
online.cc/programs.htm#adult.
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute would like input from
community members regarding
what classes they would like to
see offered at the school. To
offer suggestions, log on to
www.wtionline.cc, then click on
"Community Education" and fill
out a suggestion form.
Join the excitement as the
Homosassa Public Library be-
gins a new Celebrate Reading
program from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
on Tuesday.
Celebrate Reading is a ses-
sion consisting of two programs
geared toward helping pre-
school and elementary school-
age children develop literacy
skills, improve their reading and
gain a love of books.
The first program, PAWS to
Read, gives children the oppor-
tunity to build confidence in
their reading ability by reading
aloud to a certified therapist.
The second program, Read-
ing Pals, pairs teens and
younger children together.
Teens read storybooks aloud to
one or two younger children at
a time. Children may wish to
draw or write about a story they
like.
Listening to stories, talking
about stories and reading aloud
are great ways to improve liter-
acy skills while having a good
time. For information, call the
youth librarian at 352-
628-5626.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation is offering baton
classes at the Citrus Springs
Community Center.
Classes are open to all girls
and boys ages 4 to college age.
No experience is necessary.
For more information, call
Diane Sorvillo at 352-527-6540.
All classes are taught by
Sorvillo, a former Majorette
Queen of America and two-time
national champion.
Classes and times are:
4:45 to 5:30 p.m. New
Beginners (ages 4 to 7).
0 5:30 to 6:15 Competi-
tive team class.
6:15 to 7 p.m. Solo
competitive class.
0 7 to 7:45 p.m. New Be-
ginners (ages 8 and older).
Class fees are $32 per
month, or two different classes
for $45.
Free tutoring is available
from state-approved providers
to students who scored a Level
1 or Level 2 on the Reading or
Math FCAT last spring at all Cit-
rus County Elementary Schools
and the Renaissance Center
(Title I schools).
Enrollment forms will be
mailed to all qualifying families.
Tutoring is available after
school, at day care sites or
community centers, in home or
online. Spaces are limited, so if
requests for free tutoring ex-
ceed the amount of funding
available, the school district will
prioritize services.
Neither the Florida Depart-
ment of Education nor the
school district promotes or en-
dorses any particular Supple-
mental Educational Services
provider. For more information,
call Maribeth Smith at 352-726-
1931, ext. 2321.
MISCELLANEOUS
The Citrus County Interna-
tional Baccalaureate Parent Or-
ganization, CCIBPO, will meet
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18,
at Lecanto High School cafete-
ria, 3810 W. Educational Path,
Lecanto.
On the agenda for discussion
are college applications and


how to research colleges. Par-
ents of PIBS and IB students
are encouraged to attend. Inter-
ested business leaders are
welcome.
For more information, email
Sue Schulze, CCIBPO presi-
dent, at suzibob@tampabay.
rr.com, or call 352-212-2766.
The Citrus County YMCA
is currently seeking to connect
community volunteers through
their Y Community Champi-
ons program. The Y Commu-
nity Champions program
embraces volunteers to help in
a variety of areas with the
YMCA organization.
The benefits of volunteering
include personal development,
health and wellness, building
relationships and having a com-
munity connection. Volunteers
are currently needed in the
areas of coaching, program as-
sistants, special events and of-
fice administration. All
volunteers must undergo a
background screening.
To volunteer at the YMCA,
call 352-637-0132, or stop by
the office at 3909 N. Lecanto
Highway in Beverly Hills.
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County are now register-
ing children for the before- and
afterschool programs at each
club.
Clubs open as early as 6
a.m. for before-school program-
ming, with children remaining
until the school bus transports
them to their respective
schools. Buses also transport
children in the afternoon when
school is out to the clubs for the
afterschool program, with par-
ents picking up children
by 6 p.m.
To register a child or to learn
more about the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County pro-
grams, call the Central Ridge
Boys & Girls Club at 352-270-
8841, the Robert Halleen Boys
& Girls Club at 352-795-8624,
or the Evelyn Waters Boys &
Girls Clubs at 352-341-2507, or
the administrative office at 352-
621-9225.
Hernando Elementary
School is looking for donations
of working Kindles, Nooks,
iPod Touches, iPads, Internet
tablets, digital cameras and dig-
ital recording devices to be
used by their students in the
classroom. If you have any
used but working electronic de-
vices from the list above or
would like to donate a new
electronic device, contact
Heather Bone or Laura Manos
at 352-726-1833 Monday
through Friday, between the
hours of 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
If you would like to contact
someone outside of these
hours, call Heather Bone at
352-462-4768.
Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County Central Ridge
and Robert Halleen clubs seek
mentors to work with their
members. The two clubs have
received federal grants through
Boys & Girls Clubs of America,
allowing mentors to come into
the clubs to serve as tutors and
special friends of members. All
mentors will undergo complete
background security checks
with fingerprinting. Cost of
background checks will be cov-
ered in most cases through
grant funding by the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
Mentors may be assigned
more than one child. A training
session will be done prior to
mentoring. All mentoring will be
done at the club sites. Those
who are interested, may call
Amy Stonestreet at 352-270-
8841 or Lane Vick at 352-
621-9225.


Spanish American Club of Citrus
County
Annual Scholarship Fundraiser
Saturday September 29, 2012
3 PM- 8 PM
Knights Of Columbus Hall #6168
2389 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy iCR 486i
Lecanto, Fl. 34461


&
Musical
Performance By
Trio
Los Caballeros
Del Sol
Musica De Trio


$25 Donation
All Net Proceeds Go To
Our Scholarship Fund


Buffet Dinner
Member Talent Show
Performances By SAC Members
&
A Special Performance By
"El Caballero De La Bohemia"
Frank Torrales
Singing Love Ballads









Please Call
Ben Cruz 746-3599
Maria Coimbre 341-0979
Jeanette Rodriguez
726-1935


Limited Seating Dress Is Casual Guayaberas Are Encouraged
.mspons'or
-.i-. ,.*^^-i ,,.~. ^< ,,^^.^,r/ Ih K N UJI


Save Our Water Week volunteers wearing their
Adopt-a-Shore T-shirts will receive special ,,
and discounts. Displays and information on
various ...... ........ ....
GREATER
JN INvE NESS
For information, oine wnownr
call 352-726-4682.
Cllli^p{~j


GREATER INVERNES

[LE owNE





C4 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


The Mini ae

Betty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large 's

Pioneer Children romThe Mini Page @ 2012 Universal Uclck
Pioneer Children


Schools on the Frontier


Are you excited about using the
computers at school, checking out
books at the school library or playing
sports? School was much different for
pioneer kids in the late 1800s.
Of course, there were no computers.
Even paper and books were scarce
on the frontier. There were no sports
teams. Instead, school activities
included chores such as chopping
wood.
The Mini Page talked with an
expert at the Stuhr Museum of the
Prairie Pioneer in Grand Island, Neb.,
to learn more about pioneer schools.
One-room schools
Few places had kindergarten. Kids
started first grade when they were
about 5 or 6 years old. Students
usually stopped going to school after
the eighth grade.
On the frontier, children from ages
6 to 14 would all go to class together
in the same room. By the time they
graduated, they had probably heard
every grade's
lectures year after
year. By graduation, -~ 4'1I
they'd know the
subjects backward 1 '-t
and forward. r


A teacher and students pose in front of a sch
Mont., in 1893.
Flurry of activity
A teacher might teach first-graders,
then give them a project to work on.
While the first-graders worked, the
teacher would start instructing fourth-
graders. At the same time, advanced
pupils might be helping younger kids.
There may not have been a desk for
each student, so kids sat on benches.
When they had writing or art lessons,
they'd move to desks. They might get
up to help a younger student. They
could move around at recess too.


Before class
Before school even
started, students
put in hours of work.
They began each day
by doing chores at
home. Girls would
help their mothers
prepare breakfast and
clean up. Boys might
help feed the animals
or chop wood.
After breakfast,
they'd probably walk
to school, which
might be three to five
ool in Hecla, miles away. In warm
weather, they would
usually walk barefoot.
Although they had shoes, most kids
wore them only in the winter. Going
barefoot was more comfortable. Back then,
there were no left and right shoes. The
shoes would form to the feet after time,
but breaking in new shoes was painful.
Sometimes kids would get to ride a
pony to school.
Once at school, students had more
chores. Kids as young as third-graders
might help chop the wood for the
stove, pump water for the washbasin
or sweep the floor.


Meet Melissa Green
D Melissa Green is a singer and songwriter. Her
l latest album is "Sing Loud!" Actress and singer
Brooke Shields joins Melissa for duets on this
H1 album.
Melissa was teaching at a preschool in New York
C, I., ,.. began singing with the kids. She
worked on her guitar skills and began writing and
recording songs. She became the school's music
teacher.
Melissa grew up in Stratford, Conn., where she loved to play kickball
and ride bikes. She and her older sister made movies with tI.. ii., il... -.
video camera, and she took dance classes. When she was in sixth grade,
she got the role of Wendy in a local production of the musical 1.1'. i .i. ,
Pan." She later earned other singing roles in plays.
After college, Melissa took acting classes in New York City. She now
teaches music classes in Los Angeles. Besides singing and dancing, she
loves to cook and bake.
from Th Mini Page 2012 Universal k


< G1s Goodsport;s Bort

Supersport: Montee Ball
1 Height: 5-11 Weight: 212 Hometown: Wentzville, Mo.
Give the football to Ball. That's what the Wisconsin
Badgers do a lot, and they get remarkable results.
Going into this season, the senior running back has
scored 51 touchdowns and needs 18 more to set the
Division I college record for career TDs.
That's well within the Badger star's reach. Last fall,
Ball tied the NCAA single-season record with 39 touchdowns and led the
nation in rushing with 1,923 yards. His performance helped Wisconsin win
the Big Ten title and earn its second straight Rose Bowl berth.
This is nothing new. At Timberland (Mo.) High, Ball scored 107
touchdowns and earned academic recognition as well. A sociology major at
Wisconsin, his outside interests include basketball and reading.
As for traveling, trips to the end zone are what Ball seems to enjoy the most.


Learning the Har


Lessons
Paper was expensive, so kids did
most of their lessons on chalkboards.
Books cost a lot too. Schools did not
provide textbooks. They might have
a dictionary and a Bible. Kids had
to buy their own books or use ones
passed down from older kids.
..* Students followed
,,, .....i ,,, ,, ,,' a strict form ula
1 for answering
questions. For
I example, Suzie
would be sitting
straight in her desk
with her hand up.
When the teacher
called on her, she
"The McGuffey would move her
Reader" was the legs to the aisle
main reading at the side of her
textbook. There seat. She'd stand
were different
levels of the up, then she'd turn
"Reader," all with to face the teacher.
stories, poems, Only then would
plays and spelling she answer.
words.


Most teachers seated the younger
children closer to the stove, with the
oldest kids sitting the farthest away.
When the stove was in the front of the
schoolroom, the youngest kids would
sit up front. When the stove was in the
center, the younger kids would sit close
to the sides, front and back of the stove.
This school was built in the 1870s in
Nebraska. It is now at the Stuhr Museum
of the Prairie Pioneer.


from The Mini Page 2012 Uni.Iversal Ucick


d Way

School years
Girls were usually more educated
than boys because boys would leave
school in the spring to help with the
planting and in the fall to help with
the harvest.
When the boys came back, the
girls would have moved ahead. Girls
might graduate at age 13 or 14.
Boys might be 18 when they
graduated.
Many boys quit school early to
earn money. Sometimes, older girls
might have to quit school to help
with younger siblings at home.
Teachers
After eighth grade, students could
train to be a teacher. Training would
take only six to 12 months.
New teachers could be as young
as 15. They might be teaching
students who were older and bigger.
They often boarded with students'
families, sometimes even sharing a
room with a student.


from Th Min Page 2012 Un al Ucick


A Day in School


School lunches
Students brought their own
lunches to school. Usually, they'd
bring whatever was left over from
breakfast or supper the night before.
A favorite meal was a bacon grease
sandwich. Students would take a
thick slice of homemade bread and
soak it in bacon grease. Or they
might slather bread with homemade
butter or jelly. Sometimes, they
would bring a can of milk or leftover
soup. If they were lucky, they might
have boiled eggs or cold fried chicken.
One common lunch was leftover
oatmeal. Kids would let oatmeal
from the day before thicken, slice it
and fry it in butter. It would taste
something like a cracker.
In warm months, students would
leave their lunches in the cloakroom.
In the winter, they might store their
lunches near the wood stove in the
classroom.






Most kids brought their lunches in tin
cans that had held something else, such
as crackers or tobacco.
The Mini Page thanks Renae Hunt, Stuhr
Museum of the Prairie Pioneer, Grand
Island, Neb., for help with this issue.
Look through your newspaper for ads,
photos and stories that show how
different schools are today than they were
in pioneer times.


Kids who
could
afford it
ordered
fancy lunch
boxes from
catalogs.


Goody Two-Shoes
Kids whose families had more
money may have had special lunch
pails. The bottom of these pails
would hold sandwiches, with an
upper part for lemonade or milk, and
a cap they could use for a cup.
The kids who carried these lunch
pails were called "goody two-shoes"*
because they were the only students
who could afford to buy the pails and
two new, comfortable shoes each year.
*Goody Two-Shoes is the character in a
book written in the 1700s.


The school-day schedule might be put
on the blackboard at the beginning of the
year. In the "health inspection," teachers
would check kids' hands and fingernails
for cleanliness, to see if they'd washed
behind their ears, and for an overall clean
appearance and a good smell.


Discipline
Parents backed up the teachers
when a student misbehaved. A
student might face punishment at
school and then at home too.
When kids got into trouble, they
usually had to stay after school to
clean the blackboards or chop more
wood. They might have to write a
passage 100 times.
Girls and boys usually sat in
different sections. One punishment
might be to send a boy to sit with
the girls or a girl to sit with the boys.
This was very embarrassing
to kids of that time.
Sometimes students were
made to sit on a stool and
wear a pointed hat called a
dunce cap.
In one punishment, 44 L
the child had to face the U d
blackboard. The teacher drew a
circle about four inches above the
kid's nose. The child had to stand
on tiptoes with his or her nose in
the circle, without moving. They
might have to stand that way for 10
minutes for a first offense and 20
minutes for a second offense.
Most teachers did not give physical
punishments. When they did, they
could spank the child, sometimes
with a paddle or a switch. Teachers
might rap kids' knuckles with a ruler
or stick.

Next week, The Mini Page is about
the introduction of the Emancipation
Proclamation.


The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley Artist


The Mini Page i t i& -e'

Guide to the Constitution
The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in
collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a
colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers:
* the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments
* the "big ideas" of the document
* the history of its making and the signers .


from The Mini Pg 2012 Univer.al Ucick
TMM MIGHTY M

All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category? .

Stanley: How does a scarecrow drink milk?
Seamus: Through straws!

Sol: What do scarecrows say to greet each
other?
SSuni: "Hay, friend!"

Steve: Why don't scarecrows enjoy parties?
Samantha: Because they are all stuffed
shirts!
fm Th Mini PageX 2012 Unw U.rsal1Uck
OTSSe f.WT.P-Q TRY 'N
j 's Pioneer Schools FIND
Words that remind us of pioneer schools are hidden in the block below. Some
words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find: BENCH,
BLACKBOARD, BOOKS, CHOP, CHORES, DESKS, DISCIPLINE,
FRONTIER, HORSE, LUNCH, ONE, NOSE, PAIL, PAPER, PIONEER,
READER, RECESS, ROOM, SCHOOL, STUDENT, TEACHER, WOOD.
P R E I T N O R F D N MO O R
DOYOU WALK CA L O OH C S P B E O V P P
SCHOOL? R H I L S K O O B A E S S K I
E C O L M E S RO H P N K E O
CWH R R R E D A E R E C S N
E O O O E T N E D U T S R H E
S O N K P S V R E H C A E T E
S S D E M DR A O B K C A L B R
H C N U L E N I L P I C S I D

frm The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uchck k ,

Ready Resources s
The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, 4"
books or other resources that will help you learn
more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
nebraskastudies.org/0500/stories/0501_0207.html
pbs.org/wnet/frontierhouse/frontierlife/essayl0.html
nps.gov/ozar/historyculture/one-room-schools-in-the-ozarks.htm
At the library:
"Rachel's Journal: The Story of a Pioneer Girl" by
Marissa Moss
The "Little House" books by Laura Ingalls Wilder
"A Pioneer Sampler: The Daily Life of a Pioneer Family in
1840" by Barbara Greenwood


To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money
order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood,
KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097.
Please send copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at
$13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com


Name:
Address:
City:


Mini Spy... T
Mini Spy and Basset Brown are ready for a day at their
pioneer school. See if you can find: word MINI
* elephant strawberry chicken number 7
* ladder kite letter D dragon
* letter A tooth snake cooking pot
* car frog key number 2
* pencil banana carrot ruler


M
Rookie Cookie's Recipe

Spicy Peanutty Dip
You'll need:
* 1/2 cup organic peanut butter 2 to 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro
(no sugar) finely chopped
* 1/2 cup very hot water 11/2 tablespoons sugar
* 2 tablespoons light soy sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
* 3 small garlic cloves (optional)
What to do:
1. Place peanut butter in a medium bowl, add hot water and stir
constantly until well-blended.
2. Add soy sauce and vinegar and continue to stir until mixed well.
3. Add all other ingredients and stir to blend.
4. Cover and refrigerate.
5. Serve at room temperature as a dip with fresh vegetables.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe. .. M ....- ... .2U


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mm ,m w nv.m. oe


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EDUCATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I
I


-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -J







Page C5 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Hospice to do
pet memorial
Hospice of Citrus County
will present a Pet Memorial
Service at 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 18, at the Pet Memorial
Garden, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane., Suite A, Homosassa.
For many people, pets are
considered their best friends
and part of the family.
Pet Memorials can be a
helpful and comforting way to
remember and commemo-
rate the life of a pet.
Light refreshments will be
served following the service.
For information or to RSVP,
call Lynn Miller at 352-
527-2020.

Tickets on sale for
chance to win car
Citrus County YMCA has
announced the donation of a
2013 Chevrolet Corvette
Coupe from Steve and Jewel
Lamb of Crystal Motor Co.
A total of 2,000 tickets in
the drawing are available for
a donation of $100 per ticket.
All proceeds will benefit the
Citrus County YMCA.
The winner of the Corvette
will be announced at 1 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15, at Crystal
Chevrolet, 1035 S. Suncoast
Blvd. in Homosassa.
Tickets are available online
at https://donate.suncoast
ymca.org/citruscorvette
drawing.
Tickets may also be pur-
chased at the YMCA office in
Beverly Hills, 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, from
Executive Director Joanna
Castle. For more information,
call the YMCA office at
637-0132.

Play 'Jeopardy'
for Citrus 20/20
Citrus 20/20 Inc., a not-for-
profit organization, will have
its seventh annual fundraiser
on Friday, Sept. 14, at the
College of Central Florida's
Conference center.
Doors will open at 6 p.m.
and dinner will be served
at
7 p.m.
Those who plan to attend
should arrive early to bid on
silent auction items.
The evening will begin with
a special tribute to Gary
Maidhof, a friend and
colleague of Citrus 20/20.
For entertainment (immedi-
ately following the dinner),
four local organizations will
compete in a rousing game
of "Jeopardy" based on is-
sues concerning the county.
The Citrus County Cham-
ber will once again defend
their title as teams from
across the county attempt to
get the coveted trophy.
Tickets are $35, available
now. For ticket purchase and
more information call 352-
201-0149.
A portion of the proceeds
will go to support Citrus
20/20's scholarship program
and Save Our Water Week
activities.
Inverness Lions
plan yard sale
Inverness Lions Club will
have its quarterly yard sale
from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 14, and Saturday, Sept.
15, at 3399 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway.
For more information, call
Bob at 352-422-2224.

Garden Club will
meet Sept. 14
The first meeting of 2012-
13 season of the Floral City
Garden Club will be at noon
Friday, Sept. 14, at the Com-
munity Building on East Or-
ange Avenue.
The program will start at
12:30 p.m. and the business
meeting will be at 1:30 p.m.
September's program will be
Dr. Charles Thomas dis-
cussing orchids.
All meetings are open to


the public.
For more information, call
club President Christine


Minstres n ill Bld. Amzin1 Grce.1I


Naue ot omncety Bnan r egsfeing fnem choirorbndSepa.d22y


Special to the Chronicle

The Nature Cost Community Band,
under the direction of conductor
Cindy Hazzard, begins its 2012-13 con-
cert season at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept
22, at the Citrus Springs Community
Center.
This concert is a celebration of the
Citrus Springs Community Center's
10th anniversary The Sept. 23 concert
is at a new venue the First United
Methodist Church of Inverness, also
at 2:30 p.m.
Both concerts are a mix of light clas-


sics including selections from Andrew
Lloyd Webber's "Phantom of the
Opera," Rodgers and Hammerstein's
"South Pacific," Jacques Offenbach's
"La Belle Helene" and John Williams'
"Theme from Schindler's List" with
15-year-old violin soloist Mariah
Dixon, and clarinet soloist Marilyn
Scaccio will perform an Antonio Ca-
pucci Rondo from the famous "String
Bass Concerto," Rossini's "La Bou-
tique Fantasque" and many more se-
lections.
The program is narrated by Doreen
Morgan with a short educational in-


production to each piece.
The Nature Coast Community Band
concerts are free, so arrive early
because seats and parking are at a
premium.
To learn more about the band, visit
the NCCB website at naturcoast
communityband.com.
Links to the NCCB conductor for
membership inquiries, forms to be-
come a Friend of NCCB, which sup-
ports the 75-piece local orchestra, and
a full schedule of 2012-13 concerts are
available, along with some recordings
and pictures.


Special to the Chronicle

The goal of Child Passen-
ger Safety Week, Sept. 16 to
22, is to make sure all par-
ents and caregivers are
properly securing all chil-
dren in the right car re-
straint for their age and size
(rear-facing car seat, for-
ward-facing car seat,
booster seat or seat belt).
Few would argue that
parents don't want to keep
their children safe at all
times. The problem is keep-
ing them safe in vehicles
isn't as easy as it might ap-
pear, since an average of
four out of five car seats are
not used correctly (Accord-
ing to safekids.org.)
A child's vulnerability in a
vehicle crash is greater than
that of most adults. In fact,
motor vehicle crashes are
the No. 1 cause of death for
children ages 1 to 13 in the
United States. (According to


the National Highway Traf-
fic Safety Administration.)
From 2006 to 2010, there
were 4,028 children age 12
and younger killed in car
crashes as occupants, and
about 660,000 were injured.
That is why safety events
like Child
Passenger A 20
Safety A
wee k, seat ch
Sept. 16 to
22, are so painless .
important
to help it can sa
parents child
and care-
givers
learn how
to choose E
the right child pass
type of car
seats and how to use them.
For a car seat to best pro-
tect your child, it must be
one that fits your child, your
vehicle, and is one that you
will use correctly every time


you travel in your vehicle.
So, where do parents and
caregivers go for help to be
sure they have it right?
The Early Learning Coali-
tion, 1564 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, will
have a Car Seat Check-up


-minute car
eckup is
.. and
ive a
's life.

Sue Littnan
early Learning Coalition,
anger safety instructor.


event on
Wednes-
day, Sept.
19, where
certified
child pas-
senger
safety
techni-
cians will
be avail-
able from
9 a.m. to
noon by
appoint-


ment to provide hands-on
car seat education and
inspections.
"A 20-minute car seat
checkup is painless, the ad-
vice and instruction are


free, and it can save a
child's life," said Sue
Littnan, child passenger
safety instructor at the
Early Learning Coalition.
During Child Passenger
Safety Week parents are
urged to spend the time and
have their child's car seat
checked.
The inspection station is
also available by appoint-
ment each week to have the
car seat inspection service
provided.
Parents and caregivers
can also visit www.safer
car.gov/therightseat for car
seat tips, how-to videos for
car seat installation, along
with recommendations and
recall information.
To make an appointment
for a car seat checkup or for
more information, call the
Early Learning Coalition at
352-563-9939, ext. 235, or
email slittnan@elc-nature
coastorg.


Franks


slates


book


signing

Special to the Chronicle

Suzan Franks, author of
"The Dave Maynard
Spin," will have three
book signing in Septem-
ber and October They will
be:
6:30 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 17, at Citrus Hills Ac-
tivity Center, 240 W Fen-
way Drive, Hernando.
3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21,
at Central Ridge Library,
425 W Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.
Noon to 3 p.m. Satur-
day, Oct 20, at Homosassa
Public Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.
Franks will be accompa-
nied by Pat Maynard,
Dave Maynard's wife.
It took Franks nearly
three years to write "The
Dave Maynard Spin," but
50 years to live it Maynard
was the quirky mainstay of
WBZ radio for much of
that time. His acclaimed
"Maynard in the Morning"
show was the leader in its
time slot for the entire
time it was on the air His
commercials for the show,
which won advertising
awards, always ended
with a disheveled May-
nard saying "piece of
cake."
He also interviewed
many of the stars of the
day Included in "The
Dave Maynard Spin" are
memorable moments with
such luminaries as Louis
Armstrong, Danny Kaye,
Angie Dickinson, Tony
Bennett, Jimmy Stewart
and Richard Simmons, to
name a few. He invented
the radio version of "The
Phantom Gourmet" and
on television was the long-
time host of "Community
Auditions," forerunner of
"Star Search." Some of his
memorable moments are
recounted for the readers'
enjoyment.
As spokesperson for
Crimson Travel Co., May-
nard had the privilege of
leading thousands, who
enjoyed tours for more
than 22 years, including
the first groups allowed to
tour China and Russia.
Those escapades are in-
cluded in the book.

News NOTES

Chorus to do have
wash fundraiser
The Citrus High School
Chorus will stage a car wash
fundraiser from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at
the Inverness Primary School
bus ramp.
Donations will gratefully be
accepted to help the students
fund their activities through-
out the school year.
Master gardeners
offer citrus clinics
UF-IFAS Citrus County Ex-
tension Master Gardeners
will offer free plant clinics dur-
ing September on growing
citrus in Citrus.
The remaining schedule
for the free plant clinics is:
Wednesday, Sept. 12-
1:30 p.m. Central Ridge Li-
brary, Beverly Hills.
Friday, Sept. 14-
1:30 p.m. at Coastal Region
Library, Crystal River.
Wednesday, Sept. 19
- 1 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library.
Tuesday, Sept. 25 -2
p.m. at Homosassa Library.
Plan to bring any samples
of citrus concerns or any
plant/nature questions to one
of the clinics. Master gar-
dener volunteers will be
available to discuss the topic.


For more information, call
352-527-5700.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Scrambling for veterans


Special to the Chronicle
The sixth annual VFW Post 10087 Men's Auxiliary Golf Scramble will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at Twisted Oaks
Golf Club on Forest Ridge Boulevard in Beverly Hills. The scramble will benefit veterans served by Hospice of Citrus County.
There will be a wealth of prizes and many surprises; the Golf Planning Committee has been busy planning a world-class
outing. There are only a few openings left; call Chairperson Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740 for information. Pictured,
from left, are: Hospice of Citrus County Public Relations Manager Joe Foster, committee member George Fry, committee
member John Garvey, Hospice of Citrus County Development Director Linda Baker, committee member John Kaylor and
Stasik.



Checkup shows how to keep kids safe in cars






C6 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


WEDNES DAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:001 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
0 WE ) NBC 19 19 News News Ent Access America's Got Talent America's Got Talent Guys- Practice News Jay Leno
SPBS 3 3 14 6 World Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In Andre Rieu: Radio City Music Hall: Live in New Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr.
i PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) xc York Musician and guests. 'G' Daniel Amen (In Stereo 'G'E
B WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Journal Business PBS NewsHour (N) Nature'PG' Great Performances at the Met "Die Walkure (The Valkyrie)" 'PG'
LA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 oNews Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment America's Got Talent America's Got Talent Guys With Animal News Jay Leno
S WF NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News 8 Ton. (In Stereo) PG (N) PG Kids s Practice
S. ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of The Middle Suburgatory Modern Suburgatory Revenge "Commitment" Eyewit. Nightline
S (W ABC20 20 20 News 'G'N Fortune 'PG' 'PG' Family 'PG' PG' News (N'PG'
SiP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News, Evening Inside Be a Big Brother (N) (In Criminal Minds "Run" CSI: Crime Scene 10News Letterman
[ CBS10 10 10 10 106pm (N) News Edition Millionaire Stereo) c '14' Investigation'14' 11pm (N)
FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) The Insider The X Factor "Auditions No. 1" Hopefuls perform FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Access
0 FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) c 'PG' (N) for the judges. '14' (In Stereo) a Hollyw'd
S WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. Middle Suburg. Mod Fam Suburg. Revenge 'PG' m News Nightline
W ND 2 2 2 2 Christian Today With JackVan Great Awakening Joseph Place for A. CTN Life Today Clear Great
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f WFTSABC 11 11 11 News Fortune 'G'x 'PG' 'PG' Family 'PG' 'PG' (N 'PG'
WMR ND 12 12 16 .Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Criminal How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
B(WE )IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory Intent 14' E Intent 14' e 14' e 14' N
D IWTTAI MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Raymond Seinfeld FamFeud FamFeud Burn Notice'14' Burn Notice'14' Scrubs Seinfeld Excused Excused
B (WAX TBN 21 21 Paid The 700 Club (N)'G' Victor M. Child |Praise Paid |Gospel Studio Direct Healing
King of King of Two and Engagement Oh Sit! (N) (In Stereo) Supernatural (In Two and Engagement Friends Friends
G) CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men Ia Stereo) 14' N Half Men 'PG' '14'
Nature Citrus County Sheriff's To Be Straight Funny Business'PG' World Match Racing Ladies European Golf
C FAM 16 16 16 15 Coast Today Court 10-43 Announced Talk Med Tour'G' Tour
S(WOGX) FOX 13 7 7 Simpsons Simpsons Big Bang Big Bang The X Factor "Auditions No. 1" '14' N FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ'PG' Access
B (WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticias Notic. Un Refugio Por Ella Soy Eva'14' Abismo de Pasi6n La Que No Noticias Noticiero
SWWXPX ION 17 Cold Case'PG' Leverage '14' Leverage 'PG' Leverage 'PG' N Leverage 'PG' Leverage 'PG'x
54 48 54 25 27 Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage- Storage- Storage- Storage- American American American American
54 48 54 25 27 WarsG' WarsPG' WarsG' WarsPG' Texas Texas Texas Texas Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers
CSI: Miami "Fallen" (In ***Y "The Green Mile"(1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A ***Y "The Green
55 64 55 Stereo) 14'N guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. 'R' N Mile"(1999)
Gator Boys"Gators Tanked: Unfiltered A Tanked Working with Call of Redneck Off the Off the Tanked Working with
) 52 35 52 19 21 Gone Rogue"'PG' robotic fish tank. 'PG' family members. 'PG Wildman Roadtrip Hook Hook family members. 'PG'
i 96 19 96 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live Wild ** "AllAbout the Benjamins"(2002, Action) Ice Cube, ** "Soul Men" (2008 Comedy) Samuel L.
96 19 96 Out Wednesday. (N)'PG' Mike Epps, Eva Mendes. 'R' c Jackson, Bernie Mac. 'R' c
[iB VO] 254 51 254 Housewives/NYC Gallery Girls Flipping Out c Top Chef Masters Top Chef Masters Happens Top Chef
Tosh.0 Colbert Daily Show Chappelle's Show Key & South Park South Park South Park South Park Daily Show Colbert
27 61 27 33 14'N Report 14' N Peele'14' 'MA' WMA' WMA' 'MA' Report
8 Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou
CMG 98 45 98 28 37 PG PG c Billion Bilon Bilion Bilion Billion Bilion
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fil 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Anderson Cooper Erin Burnett OutFront
Phineas Good- Jessie Austin & A.N.T ** "Tinker Bell and the Lost Mater's Tall Phineas My Austin &
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29 52 29 20 28 game puts its players in mortal jeopardy 'PG Mia Wasikowska. 'PG' Stereo) PG '
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1F18 118 170 Boatman, Ice Cube. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' sa (In Stereo) R'R N Wayans.'PG-13' c 'R'N
(iEN) 44 37 44 32 Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
[F 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Stakeout Restaurant: Im.
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rEX n 30 *** "Salt" (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev *** "Wanted" (2008) James McAvoy. An office drone *** "The Road"(2009) Viggo
TX) 30 60 30 51 Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. PG-13' becomes part of a secret society of assassins. Mortensen. Premiere. 'R
(iLF) 727 67 727 Central |Euro Tour Golf |Golf On the Range (N) Golf Central Special On the Range PGATour Central
Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG Frasier PG Frasier PG'
5ALLJ 59 68 59 45 54 Prairie 'G' Prairie 'G' s Prairie 'G' s Prairie 'G' s
302 201 302 2 2 o o** "Unknown" ** "Devil"(2010) Chris Messina. 24/7 *** "The Debt" (2010, Drama) Helen Mirren. Real Time With Bill
302 201 302 2 2 (2011) Liam Neeson. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c Chavez Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' Maher'MA' c
i 303 202 303 S** "The Saint" (1997, Suspense) Val Kilmer. God-Bigger Boardwalk **, "J. Edgar"(2011) Leonardo DiCaprio. J. Edgar Hoover "Love"
303 202 303 (In Stereo) 'PG-13'c NEm. becomes the first director of the FBI. 'R
(HiT 23 57 23 42 52 Holmes Inspection Hunt Intl Hunters Property Brothers'G' Buying and Selling Hunters Hunt IntlI Property Brothers'G'
Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration
(HiT) 51 25 51 32 42 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
Trading Spouses: Meet Trading Spouses: Meet Trading Spouses: Meet Trading Spouses: Meet Trading Spouses: Meet Trading Spouses: Meet
Lt 24 38 24 31 New ommy New Mommy New Mommy New ommy New ommy New Mommy
*** "Homeless to Harvard: The Liz Murray "Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story" (2009, **Y "My Sister's Keeper" (2009, Drama)
50 119 Story" (2003) Thora Birch., c Docudrama) Cuba Gooding Jr. ca Cameron Diaz. PG-13 E
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320 221 320 3 3 Greek forces in the Trojan War.'R' 'MA'c Stiller. 'PG-13' c DeNiro.'PG-13'Bc
MSNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball Matthews The Ed Show (N) Rachel Maddow The Last Word |The Ed Show
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[(W) 103 62 103 Personal Justice Personal Justice 48 Hours: Hard Evid. Dateline on OWN Dateline on OWN 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
WXlJ 44 123 *** "Charlie's Angels"(2000)'PG-13' Bad Girls Club Bad Girls |Bad Girls Girlfriend: LA "Charlie's Angels"
*** "The Company **Y "Real Steel"(2011, Action) Hugh Inside the NFL (N) Inside NASCAR (N) Inside the NFL (In
340 241 340 4 Men"(2010)'R' Jackman. (In Stereo) PG-13 'PG, L c 'PG, L Stereo) 'PG, L a
NASCAR Race Hub Pass Time Pass Time NASCAR Contenders 101 Cars 101 Cars Barrett-Jackson Special NASCAR Contenders
732 112 732 (N) 'PG' 'PG' Live (N) Edition (N) 'G' Live
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la EJ 37 43 37 27 36 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
**, "Stone"(2010) Starz *** "Freaky Friday" (2003) Jamie **Y "Cars 2" (2011, Comedy) Voices of Owen ** "Little Black
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36 31 36 Truth (N) Camden Yards in Baltimore. (N) (Live) (N) (Live) PG'
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31 59 31 26 29 International 'PG' "Lady on the Stairs" Stereo) ca Fear" (N) "The Apartment" (N) Fear" cc
(TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 King |King Seinfeld |Seinfeld Family Guy '14' Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang IBigBang Conan (N) '14' c
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169 53 169 30 35 Drama) Ethel Waters. 'NR' a Lauren Bacall c Charles Boyer, Lauren Bacall. 'NR'a With a Horn
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(IC) 50 46 50 29 30 Toddlers &Tiaras Medium |Medium Breaking Amish '14' Honey Honey Honey |Honey Honey |Honey
"Out of the Cold" (1999, Drama) Keith "Swinging With the Finkels" ** "Pete Smalls Is Dead" (2010) *, "Filth and
350 261 350 Carradine, Mia Kirshner. (In Stereo) 'R'c (2010)-andy Moore. 'NR' c Peter Dinklage.'NR' c Wisdom"(2008) 'NR'
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TOON 38 58 38 33 Regular |Gumball Adven Johnny T NinjaGo NinjaGo King/Hill King/Hill American |American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
TRfl 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Food Food Food Food Toy Hntr Toy Hntr Steak Paradise 'G' Food Food
truTi 25 55 25 98 55 Cops 14' Cops '14' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Most Shocking Most Shocking
(1TL) 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Home |Home Cosby |Cosby Cosby |Cosby Soul Man |Soul Man Cosby |Cosby
NCIS A Navy pilot is NCIS "Flesh and Blood" NCIS "False Witness" Royal Pains (N) 'PG' NCIS A Naw diver is NCIS: Los Angeles
UiiAJ 47 32 47 17 18 found dead.'PG' 14' 'PG' c c (DVS) murdered. PG' "Predator"'PTG
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1Wi 18 18 18 18 20 Chris |Chris Funny Home Videos Rules |Rules |Rules |Rules WGN News at Nine 130 Rock |30 Rock


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GNART /

2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
SKROCO



YONTHR



DMELID
7^ 7
^ _


Great game,


SF


THE TENNIS PLAYERS WERE
SUCH A HAPPY COUPL-
BECAUSE THEY WERE THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer A
here: s ( 1 1
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ABHOR YOUNG CREAMY RATHER
I Answer: After he asked the movers a question, he
said CARRY ON


ACROSS
1 Enough
6 Style of
necklace
12 While
14 Midnight rider
15 Ms. Earhart
16 Popular
watches
17 Woodworking
tool
18 EMT
technique
19 Cul-de- -
21 Goddess of
dawn
23 LP spinners
26 Tarboosh kin
27 Wane
28 Eats sparingly
30 Open meadow
31 London
lavatory
32 Just right
33 Globe
substitute
35 Not up to
snuff
37 Estuary


38 Stranger's Answer to Previous Puzzle
query
39 "My gal" of TEA MATS AVEC
song EASA V E
40 High school SI BO VAL V 0 T
subj. GB RIE ALO
41 Teacup
handle SEEDED DESC
42 Common R YAN STAB
abbr.
43 Visa and ZOD AC IN I
passport METE OSU ROA
44 It gives a hoot R, MAE USS
46 Rural lodging
48 Was on the TON YOLED
team SAL E FERNN
51 Time of the G UAM A I-D
mammalsG U A F A I D
55 Let go by AL EE DEMO NEE
56 Band crew BER T C I R IC
member
57 Yellowstone SOSO EAST SE
sight 3 Opposite 7 Rope fiber
58 Hillock 8, __W, o iAi_.R C


UI post-
4 Fragrant
DOWN shrub
1 Nabokov 5 Novelist
novel Bagnold
2 Fall flower 6 Gator cousins


0 VVntL LUto
extremes
9 Barbecue
extra
10 Pitcher's stat
11 Legal matter
13 Summerhouse
19 Barely boil
20 Funnel-
shaped flower
22 Orchestra
member
24 Yelled insults
25 Laundry
problems
26 Defect
27 Threat ender
28 Pickling herb
29 Steel mill
refuse
34 Dry gullies
36 More frilly
42 Of greater age
43 Early
Peruvian
45 As it -
47 Cozy corner
48 Porker
49 Size above
med.
50 "Have you
wool?"
52 Tokyo, once
53 Zilch
54 Electric
swimmer


D earAnnie: My wife's sister
and her husband moved
in with my mother-in-law
30 years ago. Mom was
the sole caregiver until
age limited her ability,
and then government
aid allowed for home
assistance. Mom sup-
ported them while my
brother-in-law spent
every dime on alcohol
and toys. When Mom
died two years ago, my
sister-in-law ended up
in a nursing home. My
brother-in-law is in ANIN
bankruptcy and has MAIL
done nothing to plan
for his wife's needs.
My wife owns the house, al-
though there is a lien on it from
the state because of the aid my
sister-in-law received. My wife
and I cannot manage the respon-
sibility or expense of maintaining
the home, and we'd like to sell it
and pay back the state.
Four months ago, we informed
my brother-in-law that we will be
putting it up for sale. But he has
not moved out. In fact, he says his
lawyer told him he can drag it out
for a year.
As bad as my brother-in-law is,
I still feel some compassion for
him, although I do not feel we are
responsible for him. His bad de-
cisions and inability to plan are
his own fault. I have held onto the
letter informing him to vacate the
house. I need help with licking
the stamp so we can move
on. C.
Dear C.: You can hire a lawyer
to have your brother-in-law
evicted more quickly, but it
sounds as if you are reluctant to


do that However, unless you are
willing to let him stay indefi-
nitely, you both are only postpon-
ing the inevitable.
Talk to your brother-
in-law calmly, and find
out what his future
plans are. Ask how you
can help him move
into more manageable
accommodations. Sug-
gest he contact AA
(aa.org). Do as much as
you can to ease your
conscience, but under-
stand that there is only
IE'S so much you can do if
-BOX your brother-in-law is
unwilling to help
himself.
Dear Annie: I'd like to see my
children wait until marriage be-
fore having sex, but I realize that
probably will not happen. I want
to be able to advise my children
correctly, so here are my ques-
tions: What is the age of consent?
And if two 15-year-olds are inti-
mate and caught, are both pun-
ished the same?
Under the current system, a 17-
year-old boy could have consen-
sual sex with his 15-year-old
girlfriend and go to jail. The boy
is branded for life as a sex of-
fender. I think these laws are out-
dated and need to be modified. -
Ellen in Florida
Dear Ellen: The age of consent
varies by state and falls some-
where between 16 and 18. You
can find this information on the
Internet simply by typing "age of
consent by state" into your search
engine. The punishment also
varies by state and depends on
the age of the older partner, the
age of the younger partner, the


number of years between them,
etc. The underage partner is not
punished, and if both kids are 15,
neither is punished unless there
was coercion.
These laws were intended to
protect children from predatory
adults, although we agree that a
distinction should be made for
teenagers who have consensual
sex with their boyfriends and
girlfriends. Until then, however,
please be sure your children un-
derstand the risks and urge them
to be careful.
Dear Annie: The letter from
"Sad Wife" resonated with me.
For years, my husband could not
hold a decent job.
I realized, after he was fired
from his last job, that I didn't be-
lieve in him. When he asked me,
with tears in his eyes, whether I
would divorce him, I decided to
have complete faith. From that
point forward, I truly believed he
would be successful. I stayed pos-
itive, encouraging and kept him
motivated. Within months, he had
two amazing job offers.
Now he has a great career, and
our relationship is stronger than
ever. Whether you think you can
or think you can't, you are right
- Proud Wife


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more visit
www crea tos. com.


Bridge

North 09-12-12
4 A Q 2
VJ 9 8 5
*7
4 A Q 7 6 4
West East
A J 8 7 4 4 1095
VA3 VK762
*AQ1065 J43
S K 10 J 9 3
South
4 K 6 3
V Q10 4
SK 9 8 2
8 5 2

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 + Dbl. Pass
1 NT Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: + 6

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Arthur Ashe said, "A wise person decides slowly
but abides by these decisions."
That is interesting from someone who had to
make split-second decisions on a tennis court.
However, in each deal, declarer and the defend-
ers must decide whether to strive quickly to take
the number of tricks needed to make or break the
contract, or to act more leisurely, slowly develop-
ing the necessary winners.
Which applies in today's deal? South is in one
no-trump. West leads his fourth-highest diamond,
East puts up the jack, and South wins with his
king.
These days, many Easts would have responded
one heart over North's takeout double. But it con-
sumes no space and cannot even be considered a
useful lead-director.
South starts with five top tricks: three spades,
one diamond (trick one) and one club. It looks
tempting to play on clubs, where surely West has
the king. But note what happens. If declarer plays
a club to the queen, cashes the club ace, and plays
a third club, East takes the trick and returns a di-
amond. Then the defenders can collect one club,
four diamonds and two hearts for down one.
Is there a better way to get the two extra tricks?
Yes, if South is willing to go slowly by attacking
hearts. He loses two tricks in the suit, but he also
establishes two winners. The defense is held to
two hearts and four diamonds, while declarer
takes three spades, two hearts, one diamond and
one club.
Losing tricks early to establish winners is a com-
mon no-trump strategy


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9-12


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


y






WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 C7


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Nni-i

Sally Forth,
Sally Forth


You RAVE
-TO Go?
\ 9?




i*-PI


Dilbert


GRAWPAS ARE\
OW MORE \
FO ULMilL-
GRMANAt1 SAKE
COOKIES,


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


HOW
ABOUT
JUST
"BUSY"?


OKAY. I
WILL INSIST
THAT PEOPLE
IGNORE THE
ROOT CAUSE.


The Born Loser


ROW N t OU GUOF55?



FIN f7_
ID L;) C;


iM^4j


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie


WELL, IT SURE SOUNDS TO ME LIKE
YOUR LUCKY JACKESNT ISN'LIVING

J -- ', ic --t






v. ....


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury Flashback


HEY LOOK W1HO IT
BECCA! 15/ HAT TIM-
S IN6- YOUR
/ 6AUY PROOFS
JUST ARRIYEP!









Big Nate


wow. JEFFREY, WE
YOU 6UY5 HAVE A B16
MOVE FA-US4T -
FASP MIC6INN1IS'
/ PAUN BOOK,
COAPI RICE's
MEMOIR...









THINK OF IT
LOGICALLY!
USE YOUR HEAD!'


Arlo and Janis


... BUT NOTHIN6'9 CAUSIIM
MORE EXCITEMENT THAN THE
REP RASCAL' HOPE YOU'RE
REAPY TO BE FAMOUS YOUR
PUB PATE I1 NOVEMBER 14!










f 'D -ATi-ER. USE
YOUR HEAD.


IET ME YOU STAY IN
CHECK. CHARACTER?
I MAY LOVE IT! I'L,
B95 O A TELL, PUBUCiTYi
MIS41ION
/ \










AS A I'M GOING
PUNCHING To RUN
BA6. AWAY
HA HA A. NOW.


"MP PAP SA"S "YOUR BILLS ARrE AORE
PAINFUL -HAN RI6 TOOTHACHE."
Betty


Dst by Kn eturs Synd
www familycircus comn
"Mommy, did you and Daddy get
this Bible before or after we
were begat?"


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Hit and Run" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13) 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,


7:45 p.m.
"Premium Rush" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy Green" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,
5:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenbea


"UPZXSXMGZ RMXGY YKTXL RXSYPLTZ


BG ZXHTGST. JT RLBOXFT YKT UPZXS,


MGF VBP RLBOXFT YKT ZXHTGST."


HTBRBHF ZYBWBJZWX

Previous Solution: "Firemen never die, they just burn forever in the hearts of the peo-
ple whose lives they saved." Susan Diane Murphree
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-12


Peanuts


----- EE THE TEACHER PUT \
i" I/ L' i .L THE FLOWER PAINTIN65
_0, I,'L'R LASS HAS BEEN OOIN6..


Pickles


!u SO, FIRST LET'S DISCUSS
WHAT'S FOR RATES FOR THE B&.B
BREAKFASTj I'VE APPARENTLY
OPENED AND WILL
,- 'i : ,ABDOM
*1. 71/



fe ^^-


I NEED TO GIVE YOU
SOME PUSH-BACK ON
THESE DUE DATES.


NO PROBLEM. SHOULD
I TELL THE OTHERS
YOU'RE LAZY, OR
INCOMPETENT, OR IN
OVER YOUR HEAD?
\CQ


THE LAST TIME I BROUGHT MY
-C JC--T IN HERE, IT WENT
.'1 'r ,l I


Today's MOVIES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMICS








CS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Mir, W A0Ik %M I I .1*. 1.S..5


Attractive Widow looking
for a man 70-80 for com-
panionship, dinner and
artistic pursuits. Send
photo and something
about you to:
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1802
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal Rvr, Fl
34429









Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle
is now accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales depart-
ment, manage work
flow, create insertion
orders, filing,
knowledge of
Excel & Word.
Ability to work well in
a deadline driven
environment.
Excellent Customer
Service Skills.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service
skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume
to HR at:
352-564-2935



1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^* *A* **


Toro Mower,
hardly used,
paid $400
First $200
(352) 513-4257
BASSETT Sleep sofa
and matching chair
$225, wood round
table w/ self storing
leaf and 6 chairs $130
(352) 419-4286
CUSTOMER
SERVICE ASST.
P/T front desk asst for
Vet Office. Will need to
be flexible with hours.
MUST be people fo-
cused, have basic office
skills, great with comput-
ers and knowledgeable
with all forms of social
media and devices. Apply
to: applicant1130@
yahoo.com
Dining Rm Set & China
Cabinet, Table w/ leaf
6 chairs, late 70's real
wood, good cond.$150
Electrolux Dryer
Paid over $1,000
Will Sacrifice $450
(352) 726-9151
Flat Ware
91 piece bronze and
rosewood. Bought 1984,
Never Used $200 OBO
(352) 344-5168
Futon
$125.
(352) 527-0347
HONDA
2007 Shadow Aero ABS
(VT750ABS)Less than
600 original miles
$4,800. 724-953-1915
MAYTAG
Washer and Gas Dryer
$200
full size bed $150
724-953-1915
Pretty Red Recliner
Cost $400 New I year
ago. Seldom used
$200.
(352) 503-6149
Sofa & 2 Matching
Chairs, mocha print
2 years old
Asking $875
(352) 637-2281
Yamaha
'05, Raptor, 50CC,
4 Wheeler,
less than 20 hrs. $950
4 Goodyear Tires, 7000
miles, Rims & Hubcaps
off Corolla P185/65R 15
All $100. (352) 726-9151



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers/Dryers/ W/H
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, TV ant 270-4087



FREE DOG
Blackmouth Cur
Female, 2 /1 yrs old
spayed. Needs lots of
attention. After 4 pm
(352) 746-1019


#1 Employment source is






wvvw. ch ron ic leon line -.cam


Sudoku **** 4puz.com


265398


8172 5


9 8


137_





S974


3 _5__


2 3489


82


43


Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9

S.Al ofour ,
J ,4 ac -structures
d e. 12Omph

Installations by BrianCBC1253853 ", win

352-628-7519
---- -

FREE r
Permit And
I Engineering Fees
% Up to $200 value I -

*Siding. Soffit *Fascia* Skirting* Roofovers *Carports *Screen Rooms *Decks Windows *Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Free Entertainment
Center, Blond color
will fit 32" Inch TV
Good Condition
(352) 613-5023
Free Firewood
Lg. Oak Tree on ground
cut into sections
(352) 220-6060
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great fertilizer/mulch.
Stored in trash cans -
easy to load onto your
truck or container. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-7127
leave message
if no answer
FREE KITTENS
15 weeks old,
very cute
Needs good homes
(352) 341-2219
Free Pallets
(352) 628-0445
MOBILE HOME
1978 14X60 SW
2BR/2BA 352-621-0437
9AM-6PM
Twin Mattress and Box
Spring. Clean and
excellent condition.
Cre fnr ni L-,,n


CUSTOMER
SERVICE ASST.
P/T front desk asst for
Vet Office. Will need to
be flexible with hours.
MUST be people fo-
cused, have basic office
skills, great with comput-
ers and knowledgeable
with all forms of social
media and devices. Apply
to: applicant1130@
yahoo.com




HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630
to apply in person











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





ARNP WANTED
Friendly Pediatric
office in Crystal River.
20 hours per week.
Send resume to:
medofficehrdept
@tampabay.rr.com

Dental Assistant
& Receptionist
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
Xahoo.com

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT /
X-RAY TECH
Medical assistant / x-ray
tech needed for fast
paced office. Must have
3-5 yrs experience. Must
have Florida x-ray
licence. Fax resume to
352-746-4130

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
With Venipuncture
exp. Needed for
Busy Medical Prac-
tice. Fax Resume
To: 352-270-8889 or
Call (352) 746-1515
For Information

Medical Office
RECEPTIONIST
For busy Primary
Care Office. Must
possess great cus-
tomer service skills.
Strong work ethic,
and ability to multi
task in a fast paced
office environment.
Good Benefits
FAX RESUME TO
352-382-2289

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-In,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

Registered Nurses
RN's needed to perform
basic first aid at a busi-
ness near Crystal River.
Interesting/Low Stress
Work Environment. Call
888.269.6344/Fax re-
sume to 740.266.6671
Email to: nursingcorps
@yahoo.com
RESEARCH
COORDINATOR/RN
Seeking Detail Orien-
ted, computer literate
RN for Busy Clinical
Research Office
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1800P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
34429
RN. LPN. CNA
All Shifts, FT &PT
RN SUPERVISOR

RECEPTIONIST
Part time

ACTIVITIES COOR.
Full Time

CNA DRIVER

Health Care
Experience Preferred.
APPLY WITHIN
HEALTR FITER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Cir
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility


CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT
Looking for reliable
staff. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing expe-
rience preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy. Lecanto
EOE/DFWP





Office Utilities
Specialist
The Homosassa
Special Water District
will be accepting
applications for the
position of Office
Utilities Specialist.
Duties for this position
will include but are
not limited to: Payroll,
Accounts Payable,
recording and tran-
scription of Board
Meetings, Accounts
Receivable. Interac-
tion with Customers
both on the phones
and in person
required. Applicant
must have experi-
ence with Microsoft
Word and Excel.
Applicant must
possess Excellent
Customer Service
Skills. Government
Utility Experience
preferred. Applicant
must reside within
Citrus County.
Applications will
be accepted until
September 24, 2012.
Applications may be
dropped off at
District office or email
to: hswd@
tampabav.rr.com
Applications may be
filled out at the
District website @
www.homosassa
water.com.

P/T Administra-
tive Assistant
(Full Time Jan -April)
Must be proficient,
able to multi-task, or-
ganized and possess
communication and
computers skills with
an extensive knowl-
edge in Microsoft
Office products for a
Crystal River CPA
Firm. Qualified appli-
cants submit
resumes to
mindvY(wmwccpa
.corn or send to:
PO box 895
Inverness, FL 34452


Accepting
applications for

Advertising
Sales Rep
Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Working a
Sales Territory within
Citrus County.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers
QUALIFICATIONS
* Two years sales exp.
preferred.
" Computer
proficiency
* Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
* Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
* Strong presentation
skills preferred.
* Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.

Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
EOE, drug screen
required for final
applicant.

Outside Sales
Associate
Fountains Memorial
Park
No Experience re-
quired, but a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-4867

RETAIL SALES
Nights/ weekends
75 CHROME SHOP
Wildwood
(352) 748-0330





DRIVER
OTR LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

LABORER

Must have clean Drivers
License and pass drug
test. Send resume to
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1801P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd.Crystal River, Fl
34429


ROOFING
Experienced commercial
single ply roofers w/heat
welding and detailing
skills. Travel required.
Good pay, per diem &
lots of hrs. Immediate
openings available.
DFWP/EOE
352-795-5599 Or
352-489-4274





Barber/Beautician
Experience Required
Call (352) 795-2511



CHoMNi-dE

PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
REPRESENTIVE

Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
Avail. weekdays
& weekends?
Join the Citrus County
Chronicle's
Circulation team!
Send Resume &
Cover Letter to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or Apply In Person
CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

EOE, drug screening
for final applicant





SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CH NCE


COFFEE SET. English
bone china Ridgeway
Potteries set for four
Royal Adderley. Beautiful.
Perfect condition. $45.
527-6709
Flat Ware
91 piece bronze and
rosewood. Bought 1984,
Never Used $200 OBO
(352) 344-5168










ii

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





5 Person Hot Tub
New pump & heater,
Excel. condition
$1,000 cash or credit
(352) 228-7666
POOL HEAT PUMP
AQUA CAL T115
6 yrs old. Works Great
$500 (352) 637-0397




A CHAR-BROIL GRILL
2 Burner w/Side
Good Older Model
No Tank $60.00
352-601-7816
DRYER, APARTMENT
SIZE,WHITE, works
good,works on
110 current. $65.00
352-513-4473
FREE APPLIANCE RE-
MOVAL SERVICE Free
Pickup Of Unwanted Ap-
pliances 352 209 5853


* Must be 18 years of age

* Must have valid driver's license and insurance

* Able to work or share 7 days a week, early
morning hours


For more information email:
home delivery@chronicleonline.com
or come to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River to apply.

Both home delivery and
single copy routes available!

CITRUS COUNTY



www.chronicleonline.com


265398417J



1 3 7 9 4 5 68 2

8 94 267.3 5 1
5 216 8 1 3 9174
314186 719 112,5
-7 5 2> 1 3 -4 s19 G
6 1 9 5*8 2 ~7 4 3


TELEMARKETERS
Experienced
Must be Lazy, greedy
and willing to make
over $600 a wk.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean




P/T DELIVERY HELP
Apply In Person
Mon. thru Fri. 10a-4p
EASY LIVING FURNITURE
4100 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto
No Phone Calls









Massage Therapy
Weekend Class
OCT. 2U0 2012
SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-5
HAVE A NEW CAREER
IN 37 WEEKS
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




LAWN CARE
BUSINESS for Sale
$40,000 Call For Details
(352) 586-6685



OLD FOLDING SCHOOL
DESK w/ornate sides.
$65 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)



1938 WEBSTER DIC-
TIONARY Hardback,
School/office, self pro-
nunciation. $800.00
Passed down through
family. Cell 352-422-5659
cell 352-422-5659


LOSt r-erre, iignbi rown
w/pale face, goes by
"Merlin", reward offered,
lost in the vicinity of Daw-
son and Croft (Hilltop
Area)
(352) 533-2298
Lost Yellow Lab on 9/6
in River Lakes Manor
off of HWY 200. Camo
collar, very friendly.
(352) 697-0828



Found Mini-Pinscher,
Black & Brown found in
Citronell area on 9/6/12
352-364-6746




missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
To Whoever
purchased my storage
unit #220 at Kings Bay
Mini Storage on 8/7/12.
Please call Shawn
(352) 212-8594



Sr in need of dependable
older small or Midsize car
or pk-up. Text yr/make/
mi & Price to 220-3682.
No dealers.



Forming Light Jazz
Band. All instruments
needed. Call Jay
(352) 794-3741




Admin. Assistant

Office position
available in Inverness.
PT, 9am-4pm, M-F.
Computer experi-
ence required.
Send Resume to:
ironhorsecwbv@
aol.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Excel. cond.
Glass top & stainless
As $485.
Cost $900 new
(352) 249-7212
KENMORE WASHER
WHITE, works good ,
looks good.$100.00
352-513-4473
MAYTAG
Washer and Gas Dryer
$200
full size bed $150
724-953-1915
MICROWAVE works
good kitchen size
$15.00. 352-513-4473
Refrigerator
Kenmore, Elite, stainless
steel, water, icemaker,
french door, runs great
$250. 352-746-6034
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STAINLESS STEEL AP-
PLIANCES Sears Ken-
more sidebyside refriger-
ator with ice maker and
water dispenser on
door,convection electric
range, microwave,
dishwasher; 9 months
old; Dawnmarie Forte,
352-410-0220 or
Robert Melvin,
352-586-2558/
732-898- 9648
TWO 17 C.F.
REFRIGERATORS not
fancy but work well.
$50 each. Walter@
352-364-2583
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day warranty.
Delivery extra. Ill take
your old one. Call/text
352-364-6504




DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Gray
Tweed Fabric $15 each
727-463-4411




DUDLEY'S
AUCTION
THREE AUCTIONS

9/13 Thursday 3pm
Estate Adventure
Auction
4000 S Florida (US 41)
Inverness

3 Estate Home
Contents Inc.
Furniture, Appliances,
Collectible, Cookie
Jar collection,
New items,
Precious Moments,
great selection.

9/14 Friday
2 REAL ESTATE
AUCTIONS
"Sold Regardless
of Price **

Preview 9am
Auction 10am
8 Dahoon Ct N.
Homosassa Sugarmill
Woods 2/brd home
1985 total sq ft w/
updates, fireplace,
lania ++

Preview 1 pm
Auction 2pm
63 Jackson St
Beverly Hills
2/1 investor or starter
home 1482 total sq.
ft. needs bit TLC

www.dudlevsauction.
corn
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




WELDING TABLE 1/4"
STEEL, 4X8 $100 (firm)
352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)




48" HD Compatable TV,
excellent condition
$150
(352) 726-7952




79 Solid Mable Cabinet
Doors & Draw fronts
stained red mahogany
great for garage or
workshop project $450.
obo (352) 726-5832
TILE, GROUT, AND
MORTAR Glazed porce-
lain tile. 50% off retail.
20x20 $18 per 16 sf case
13x13 $15 per 15 sf
case. Grout mortar to
match. 352-344-4811


WERNER 20FT
ALUMINIUM
EXTENSION LADDER
200 LBS DUTY RATED,
$75 352-726-9983




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Pavillion 525 C
desktop Computer
w/ LCD monitor & key-
board + all cables, Win.
XP Work great
$90. (352) 465-4037




Excellent 10 piece PVC
patio Furniture Set, $80.
Excellent Condition
(352) 726-1891
THOMASVILLE
WALNUT WOOD Large
Square Table with 4
chairs, umbrella hole
$75.00 obo 422-2719




Adjustable Bed
Craftmatic Full Size w/
massage & side rail.
Used 10 mo. Exc Cond.
Ong $3000, sell $1500
OBO. Black Spinet
Piano Exc Cond. $450
OBO (352) 422-3707
ANTIQUE DESK
Kidney shaped mahog-
any solid wood $300.
CHERRY WOOD
day bed w/trundle
no mattress $200
(352) 613-5009
Armoire solid wood
w/ TV console and
5 drawers $30.
2 TV Stands
$20 ea. obo
(701) 648-8098 Cell
BASSETT Sleep sofa
and matching chair
$225, wood round
table w/ self storing
leaf and 6 chairs $130
(352) 419-4286
Beautiful Traditional
Sofa's. Light golden
neutral, w/ floral
touches. Excellent
Condition, Must See!
$150 ea OBO
(352) 503-3914
Blond dining room
table w/ 2 leaves, '2"
protective glass top &6
chairs, excel. cond. Pd.
$1,900. asking. $600.
Bedroom Suit, off white
wicker, bed, night
stand, chest of drawers,
dresser w/ mirror, like
new Pd. $2,100. asking
$800. (352) 302-6934
COFFEE AND END
TABLES new, dark
mahogany $60 for all
Walter@ 352-364-2583
COFFEE TABLES two
end tables, glass insert
coffee and sofa table.
$200 obo Call
352-344-3112
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURN www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com 795-0121
COUCH w/ neutral
pattern cover and large
white & green futon
$200 each OBO
352-422-8070
COUNTER HEIGHT
CHAIRS (4) Contempo-
rary metal with leather Ex
Cond 352-249-7212
All for 85.00
DESK Simple 3 drawer
desk, grey and blue.
Metal framed, light wood
colored surface. Good
condition $30
352-257-5156
DINING TABLE
ITALIAN MARBLE
Sacrifice at $500.00, 3
pieces of solid marble.
Can e-mail pic's.
352-513-4027
FULL MATTRESS Full
size mattress in good
condition. Does not in-
clude box spring or
frame. $30 352-257-5156
Futon
$125.
(352) 527-0347
Gold Microfiber Sofa
80 inches long
Like New $130. +
Ottoman on casters
matches two toss pillow
$35. (352) 726-8912
GOLD VELOUR SOFA
(3 PILLOW) $35. Good
352-465-4441
(Dunnellon)
High End Used Furniture
SECOND TIME AROUND
RESALES 270-8803
2165 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Large Curved Desk
$150.
352-513-4759
Cell 352-201-7475


CLASSIFIED


Musical
Instrulments


LOUNGE RECLINER
blue tweed clean, good
condition,standard size.
$40.00 352-513-4473
LOVE SEAT Reclining
love seat earth tone col-
ors, good condition. $75
352-257-5156
Lt Oak Tone Table 42"
sq. w/ 18" leaf, 4 micro-
fibr ulpol light oak
swivel arm chairs $600.
57" Oak Bar w/ built in
cab. & drawer for bev-
erages & glasses $350.
(352) 726-7952
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Pretty Red Recliner
Cost $400 New 1 year
ago. Seldom used
$200.
(352) 503-6149
QUEEN MATTRESS.
Queen mattress, box spr-
ing and frame in good
condition. $60
352-257-5156
Single size white
Platform Bed
with storage, almost
new mattress $150
(352) 344-1441
Sofa & 2 Matching
Chairs, mocha print
2 years old
Asking $875
(352) 637-2281
SOLID PINE GUN
CABINET needs small
repair $20 Walter@
352-364-2583
STAND/CART ON CAST-
ERS for TV, micro, etc.
27W, 18D ,30H. Open
shelf, cabinet both under-
neath. $20 341 3607
Stickley Sofa
Pristine Condition
$850.
Mahogany Desk
$150.
(352) 270-8249




21" Self Prop. Snapper
Lawn Mower
Excel. cond. $200
McLane Commercial
Grade, Gas Edger, trim-
mer excel. cond. $200
(352) 726-7952
21" Self Propelled
Toro Mower,
hardly used,
paid $400
First $200
(352) 513-4257
HIGH WHEEL TRIMMER
SEARS 6.75 torque
Like New $150
(352) 560-0307
LAWN MOWER
Briggs & Straton
Like New
$750.
(352) 628-3329
MANUAL TELESCOP-
ING TREE PRUNER
WITH SAW CUTTER,
7FT-14FT REACH, LIKE
NEW $45 352-726-9983




WANTED
New & Used Items
in garage,
rods, reels, tackle,
tools,collectibles,
hunting equip.
352-613-2944




(2) NOS PIRELLI TIRES
P195X15 $80/SET
352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)
2 CAR GARAGE DOOR
SCREEN, White $80
(352) 465-4037
4 Person Hot Tub
very good cond.
w/ cover $400. Dining
table w/ 5 chairs &
2 bar stools, wood
w/white ceramic $175.
701-648-8098 cell
2ND SET OF 2 PIRELLI
TIRES NOS P195X15
$80/set 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)
ANIMAL CLIPPER
ANDIS model AG2
2speed/uses A5 blades
seldom used works exc
$80. 352-270-3909
BAKERY
EQUIPMENT
20 qt Hobart mixing
mach. w/stainless steel
bowl & accessories,
1 tabletop sabrett hotdog
cart, pizza tray, screens
and much more.
(954) 647-0472
COLORED NOOK
Barnes and Noble, touch
screen excellent cond.
works perfect $100
422-2719


BRAND NEW!lBlack
Twin metal bed frame,
$40 422-2719
Dining Rm Set & China
Cabinet, Table w/ leaf
6 chairs, late 70's real
wood, good cond.$150
Electrolux Dryer
Paid over $1,000
Will Sacrifice $450
(352) 726-9151
DOUBLE CEMETERY
CRYPT Located in Veter-
ans Wall in Fountains
Memorial Gardens. 2
openings/closings incld.
Bargain price of $5000.00
for whole pkg. Call Maria
at 352-212-7533
Fridge 18.2 Kenmore
2yr. old mint cond., $300
Hunting Dog Hauler
alum. 48x48x24 dbl door
$250
(352) 419-6669
GIRL'S MONGOOSE
BMX BIKE- "Y not"
Model,20" by 1.95" tires &
wheels, like new, $40.
352-628-0033
HOOVER VACUUM
CLEANER $30 SELF
PROPELLED WORKS
FINE 352-419-5981
INVERNESS
MENS CLOTHING
LARGE PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
ONEIDA TULIP GAR-
DEN DISHES $40 EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
33 PIECES-CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
RED LINE REMINGTON
TIRES NOS (2) G70x14
$80/pr 352-875-4760
Dunnellon
SONY TELEVISION 36"
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $75
352-613-0529
STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $40 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
INVERNESS
TANNING BED
Price Is Right
No Room
$225.
(352) 503-7411
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW-ALL CONNEC-
TIONS AND BOOKLET
352-419-5981
UGLY STICK FISHING
RODS- many to choose
from, $10 to $15. all ex.
352-62-0033
W/WALL REMINGTON
TIRES H70X14 NOS
$80/pr 352-875-4760
(Dunnellon)




Harmar Mobility
Model AL500
$900. obo
(352) 228-9058
Ladies Bicycle
Schwinn
Never Used
$100.
352-341-1714
Motorized
Wheelchair/Scooter Lift
Transport for rear of car
$250. firm
Call Rita 5-8pm
(352) 795-9756
Walker- folding to 5"
brand new, light
weight alum. cost $76.
asking $30., 527-0004
Walker Invacare,
3 wheel, brakes,
basket, $65.
Wheel Chair, invacare,
like new $100. both
excel cond. 341-1714




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




"NEW" ACOUSTIC GUI-
TAR PACKAGE $85
W/GIGBAQTUJNERSTRAPFST
RINGS&MORE!
$85 352-601-6625
"NEW"BASS W/P&J
STYLE PICKUPS, VERY
HIGH QUALITY @1/3
STORE PRICE $85
352-601-6625
"NEW"LAGUNA L50
ELECTRIC GUITAR
MATT BLACK
2HUMBUCKERS $65
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
COMBO AMP LIGHT &
LOUD! SOUNDS
GREAT W/ KEYBOARD
TOO! $75 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR wow
solid spruce
6 string $100
352-586-4226


AMEG BASSb COUiViBOU
AMP SMALL BUT
POWERFUL,GOOD FOR
KEYBOARD TOO $65
352-601-6625
DANELECTRO
DANOBLASTER ELEC-
TRIC GUITAR"MINT"
BLUEFLAKE "RETRO"
$100 352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR
sg copy black $100
free bag/amp
352 586 4226
ELECTRIC GUITAR
strat copy $100
free amp/bag
352 586 4226
Electric KEYBOARD
CASIO, multiple tones
plus bass cords comes
with case and stand .
$15.00 513-4473
MITCHELL MD300S
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/STEALTH PREAMP
AND PICKUP $100
352-601-6625
MUSIC STAND Chrome
in color, collapsible, fold
up. $15.00 352-513-4473
PEAVEY BASIC 40
BASS COMBO AMP
U.S.A. MADE VERY
POWERFUL&CLEAN
$100 352-601-6625
PIANO
ROLAND DIGITAL F90
Sacrifice at$450.00 OBO,
Excellent for student. Can
e-mail pic. 352-513-4027
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
tuffed leather like seat,
storage underneath,
sturdy wood. $35.00
352-513-4473




KING COMFORTER
reversible navy/red. Ex-
cellent condition. Used
only few times. High loft.
$25. 341 3607
TWIN BEDDING 2 red
box-pleated (not ruffled)
bedskirts & 2 matching
red pillow shams. All for
$12. 341 3607
TWIN BEDDING whales
& dolphins. Comforter,
bedskirt, shams, sheet
set, wallpaper border.
$40 341 3607




ELLIPTICAL
Horizon RE 7.6 $650
new, asking $250
TANNING BED
American Wolff $200
(352) 513-4399
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH, LIKE
NEW, $50 352-726-9983




8 FT POOL TABLE 8 ft.
oak with slate top pool
table with accessories.
$700 352-382-9601
Homosassa
Beacon Cruiser
Red upland 26" girls
bicycle. $60
(352) 419-5669
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745

FREE GUN with
Training. Learn more
at TrainToCarrv.com

Gravity Esprit,
58 CM, 21 speed,
Mens Hybrid bicycle,
computer, etc.
excel cond. $185.
(352) 344-5933
HI-POINT CARBINES
NEW IN BOX HI-POINT 9
MM CARBINES, $285.00
& HI-POINT 45 AUTO
CARBINE, $318.00,
NEW GLOCK 22 GEN 4
40 S&W $490.00 PHONE
352-447-5595
Izhmash Saiga,
7.62 + ammo
$675.
Muzzle Loader Rifle,
50 Cal. $250.
352- 220-2204
Stevens 12 gauge, dbl
barrel shot gun. model
311 A excel, cond. $350
Lefever Nitro Special
16 gauge, dbl barrel
shot gun good cond.
made 1927 $425.
(352) 344-5283

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

Winchester 300 MAG
Mauser Action,
Red field Scope $550
Ruger Single 6 Revolver
22LR & 22mag, $400
352-220-2204


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Argea
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.
352-613-2944




3 Male Yorkies, $650.
1 Male Morkie $500.
1 Male Shorkie $500.
ckc, fl. health certs.,
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
BENGAL CUB CATS
10 weeks old, TICA
registered, Fl Health
Cert, shots up to date.
1 Spotted Snow Sepia,
1 Horizontal Flowing
Marble. $200 each
352-601-5362
BLUE CRESTED
AMAZON
Breeding pair of 6 yr old
parrots. Talkative, cute
and very tame. They
have been together
since birth. 3 Cages: 1
large indoor, 1 med out-
door and 1 travel
Illness forces sale
Total $3000
212-2814 or746-8631







SIMON

"Simon is a 1-year-old
neutered male
Border Collie/Bulldog
mix. He is Heartworm
negative and house-
broken. Very friendly
and loving,
energetic and very
playful, also beautiful.
Would be great with
kids. Would also like
to be your lapdog,
even though he
weighs about 48
pounds. Walks well
on a leash and gets
along with other
dogs. Found as a
stray. Call Joanne at
352-795-1288."


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 C9


System, asking
$125
Call for Details
(352) 344-1413




4 x 6 Covered
Utility Trailer
5 yrs. old, like new
Paid $,1,500
Sell $1,000 obo
(423) 584-2665 Cell
UTILITY TRAILER
10 ftX5ft
4 Ft loading ramp
single axle $800
(352) 207-5946

UTILITY TRAILER
5' x 8' triple crown lawn
trailer. Mesh sides, rear
gate, good condition, new
spare $675 obo
(352) 860-1106




2 CAR SEAT FOR
INFANT $20 EA, 2
BOUNCE FOR baby $10
ea,2 seat chair for eat
$10 352-777-1256
SMALL SWING MUSI-
CAL $20 ,BOUNCE DE-
LUXE musical $15 stroller
$20 352-777-1256
STROLLER NEW $35
AND PLAYPEN $35 high
chair $20 352-777-1256


Sell r Swa


AKC GREAT DANE
PUPPIES AKC Great
Danes Puppies! Born
Aug 1st Call
352-502-3607
Dachshunds Mini. Long
Hair, 10wks, Blk. &
Cream, Choc. &
Cream Males &
Females, Health Certs,
Champ. bloodline,
perfect markings $200
& up (352) 795-6870
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Toy Poodle & Chihua-
hua 6 yr old males, neut.
shots, house trained,
sleep in crates, must stay
together $200 OBO
(352) 503-7270


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






Bring your fishing
pole!
WiO!.


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!


DUNNELLON
Hwy. 488, 2/1, Priv Lot
new A/C ,$475. + dep.
(352) 795-6970

HERNANDO
2/1%, Furnished, Lrg.
Fm & Laun. Rm, Carport,
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850

HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550 mo & 2/2 $525
352-464-3159

HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311

HOMOSASSA
2/1/1/2, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696

HOMOSASSA
2/1%, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019


14x60 Fully Furnished
2BR/2BA MH. Close to
Bike Path. Roof over, car-
port, screen room, shed
and remodelled kitchen &
baths. Parking for trailer
or boat. Excellent Shape.
$10,000.Oasis MH Park,
Inverness. Lot rent
$205 Call
815 986 4510 or cell
779-221-4781
2/3 MFG HOME
Remodeled,
on 2.9 AC, paved road, 3
sheds, CHA $63,500
Lease/option,
352-302-4057

BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
c acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

HOMOSASSA
26X60; 2BR/2BA,
Screened rm, utility rm,
Dbl pane win, 3+ acres,
2 fenced in, roof over, 2
carports, 30X84 Pole
Barn, well &septic
(352) 628-0812

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




INVERNESS
3/2, CHA, 3 shedsdock
boat access. Section 8
Welcome. Water serve.
incl'd. 813-244-0627




HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217






CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926


~Fs


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179





Elderly Assistance
Providing all around
General Help Light
Hsekeeping., Cooking
& Dr. Visits, Ref. Avail
Call Mary 352-897-5250

LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

ON SITE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE







All AROUND TRACTOR









all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 k




Clean Waxed Floors
Free Estimate 344-2132




#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST. SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Remodels, Repairs,
We Do It All! Landscape
& Tractor Work. Lic./Ins
Steve/Rob, 476-2285


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352465-9201
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
v FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
P FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 k




BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557






The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584





All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320

JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826





AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244





A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790





Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
PlC PIC CARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341-3300




All ihases of Tile
SHandicap Showers,
SSafety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR MAINT
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.









Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE. Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


-1 Laughingstockl international n Dist by ,nve rJsalCckorFS 2012


"I got 6 percent in math. Is that

good or bad?"






YOUR AD HERE


$250/month


Call Beverly to reserve this space



352-564-2912









C10 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


IMMACULATE
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+
FREE 2 MONTHS LOT
RENT WITH ASKING
PRICE! 2/2, 1988 Skylark
model, furnished, shed,
screened lanai & xtra-Ing,
covered carport on a Irg
lot. Lots of kitchen cabi-
nets with island stove top,
double oven, fridge,
washer, dryer. Lots of
storage. 352-344-1632
or 937-545-3413

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090





CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Waterfront DW, $600
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $1,050.
Agent (352) 382-1000





FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
IBR, Stove, refng. Wash
/Dryer, until. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537





Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE


1tOR~
wy~\

~tv

OOOSXHD


BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
Homosassa
2/1 $500/m
352-465-2985
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice, clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000




HERNANDO
Over 2,200 sf, multi-rm
office or Home & office
on Hwy 200, for More
Info Call (352) 344-3444
Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$56,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




HERNANDO
1,000 sf Office Space
486, Cit Hills 341-3300




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like new 2 BR/2 BA,
All Appl, W/D,Tlle. $625.
Call: 954-557-6211
INVERNESS
2/1/CP $550 mo. $250
sec. 707 Emory Street
(352) 895-0744 Cell


HERNANDO
1/1 Furnished, Clean
$125/wk. $475 sec $600
Moves ln.352-206-4913

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
cottages 1/1, All util.
incl $650. 386-208-2495




FLORAL CITY
Waterfront 2/1, Carport,
Ig. scrn. por. shed,
office/ craft rm. $500
mo. 352-344-1941


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 & FL. RM.
10 N. Barbour
$550. 352-422-2798

BEVERLY HILLS
3/2 +1/1 Many Extras
$450, (352) 382-3525


CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Very clean,quiet
neighborhood, F/L/S
(352) 249-7033

CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO
OWN
This is a real
cutie!
$649. Move-In Special
3Bed/11/2 Bath/garage
tiled, spotless, Pets ok.
352-527-0493

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1V2 Near power plant
$600 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/1, Close to shops
garb & Pest control
incld $700. 1st & sec.
(352) 201-7676
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River &
Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HOMOSASSA
3/2/Loft BR, Den $650.
$500 sec. No pets
(352) 519-6051
INVERNESS
2/1/1, Fl. Rm. CHA,
W/D hk up, frnt. & back
screen porch, corner
lot w/ privacy fence
$750. 1st., last $250 dep
(352) 419-6957

INVERNESS
3/212
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
201-9427
INVERNESS
3/2/2, $725. mo.
(352) 302-7349
INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers calF
352-563-5592.


CLASSIFIED



IBNVERNESSi
Brick Home 2/1/1 w/tile
& wood fls. Encl. lanai,
W/D $650 mo. 1st, last
$400 dep. 352-586-8928
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
LECANTO
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2'/2 Free cable
& lawn care $1100.
Social membership
Available 352 527-0456




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




HOMOSASSA
Rent or Sale 2 BR,
Non smoker, $575 Avai
19/15/12, 352-364-3601




INVERNESS
Highlands cable, WIFI,
Laund rm
(352) 419-5393

Rea Estate


CaUdtL LdalnUlIn gsv RVR-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
rate gated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ile-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY















1www chronicleonline co


S C I T R U S- N T Y


CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Florida Rsh and Wildlife CoservatonCommission;
http:/nyurl.co ttp-myfwc-custelp-com-app


WORDY GURD.BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Has to wipe away motes with Pledge (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Whichever one-cent coin (2) theywill fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Scold a museum tour giver (1) syllables in each word.


hUh II


2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclickfor UFS


4. Not-on-time Laurel partner (2)


5. Yankee Derek's curbside coin takers (2)


6. Shabby, untidy vampire-slaying girl (2)


7. Cardinals' or bishops' BBs (2)


SLTi 3d SWIvIHd 'L A3Afl AAIAflIOS 9 SI9I3IIHN S3J3 *'
AHVII AGHVI 3(1mIf9 IH3 ANNad AN iV isna fl( lISlW
9-12-12 SH1ASNV


uiiiL-it & Workers' Comp
CBC1252474

WILL CONSTRUCTION

352-628-2291
www.PreventDrverFiresNow.com


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660



HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srprnngs $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884



6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,
AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
897-4164.
$159,900
2/1/CP ALL NEW:
Kitchen, bath, appli-
ances, paint in/out,
carpet. 1180 sq ft liv,
$36,900.
(352) 527-1239
2/2/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884



Open House
Sat & Sun 10-3
Canterbury Lake Est
3035 Brigadoon Ct
3BR/2BA/2+ Htd Pool
Cath Ceiling, upgrades
$146K. 352-419-4192






HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
2BR/1 BA/1. Cute brick
fenced home. Newer
roof & CHA, scrn porch.
$49,500 Cash or ap-
proved conventional loan
only. Senous inquiries.
904-887-8940
REDUCED!
2/1/1I Block Home
with den, Fireplace,
tile floors, shed w/elec.
near Bealls $44,900.
(352) 344-4192




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

S=1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


3/2/2 with Fireplace,
New A/C & New Roof
$118, 000
PRINCIPLES ONLY
352-726-7543


SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503



DUDLEY'S
AUCTION
THREE AUCTIONS

9/13 Thursday 3pm
Estate Adventure
Auction
4000 S Florida (US 41)
Inverness

3 Estate Home
Contents Inc.
Furniture, Appliances,
Collectible, Cookie
Jar collection,
New items,
Precious Moments,
great selection.

2 REAL ESTATE
AUCTIONS
*Sold Regardless
of Price **
Preview 9am
Auction 10am
8 Dahoon Ct N.
Homosassa Sugarmill
Woods 2/brd home
1985 total sq ft w/
updates, fireplace,
lania ++

Preview 1I m
Auction 2pm
63 Jackson St
Beverly Hills
2/1 investor or starter
home 1482 total sq.
ft. needs bit TLC

www.dudlevsauction.
com
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


BEST 3r


2012
1F Y -

l5Years *-


CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529

Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com













Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty





YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE,
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA
LOT,VERY PRIVATE,
NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$65,000.CALL
(352)513-5001





"FREE foreclo-
sure
and short sale
lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com





06261 W OAKLAWN
HOMOSASSA, FL
2.5 ACRES VACANT
$35,000/BEST OFFER
WILLING TO TRADE.
CALL TODAY!
786-298-7825
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745




2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $25,500.
(727) 439-9106
/2 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact
fee credit, high and
dry, trees, $11,500 obo
(352) 795-3710




Gheenoe
1999 Gheenoe 15'4"
and 1999 Trailer
$750 (352) 302-0778









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KEY LARGO
2001, 18 1/2 ft
90 HP Mercury
$6900
(352) 795-0363
MIRROR CRAFT
16ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537
SEARS
12 FT. JON BOAT,
6hp Johnson Motor.
$550
621-0392
SPORT FISH
28ft, twin Volvo turbo die-
sel, tower, pilot, GPS,
turn key $19,500.
(352) 978-0658
SWEETWATER
Pontoon 20ft. 50HP
evinrude,galvanized
trailer, $3000
(352) 613-2333
TRITON
Fish & Ski 2000, 18ft,
w/ 200 HP Yam. Eng., &
Troll mtr., Pwr. Ster., tilt &
trim, new trlr. tires,
includes water skis,
tubes & life vest $3,900.
352-726-4943. 201-4512




2008, Glendale
Titanium 28 E33, 3
slides, New tires, excel.
cond. Asking $34,995,
(352) 563-9835
BAYLINER
23ft., Randevu Deck
boat, tan axel trlr.
w/new tires. No mtr,
incls outdrive $2,500
obo 727-455-8075
JAMBOREE

'05, 30 ft class C Motor
home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
NADA 38,000 asking
29,750. No slides.
352-746-9002

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800

KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098

Travel Trailer
2000 21 ft Sunline,
Solaris light,
series M2053.
Exc Cond $4425
(352) 344-2927 or
447-1244

WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909


LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments -k
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TitledNo title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
n1 "_- 4_r. 0"/O 37_8I9no


CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548

CRYLSER
'06 Seabring cony.
Touring Coup, loaded,
garage kept. Like new
$9,200 (352) 513-4257

FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763

GMC
1988 Suburban
3/4 Ton 4 x 4
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058

LEXUS
'05, ES 330, 131k miles
1 owner $10,500
(352) 212-6179
luckylorra@aol.com

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments -k
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, not dealer
owned. $17,900
(352) 302-0778

SCION TC
2005, Alloy Wheels, Auto,
AC, Power winds, locks,
mirrors, cruise cont. New
brakes & tires. Exc Cond.
$7900. (352) 527-2792

SUBARU
2009 Outback Special
Edition 43,000 mi. in
Pristine Condition
by Elderly Gentleman
$17,995 (352) 746-3988





CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352) 465-0812
352-322-5555


For more information on how to reach

Citrus County readers call

352-563-5592.


o1o-HJ


CLASSIFIED




FORD
1954 F-100 for sale
Call for information
(352) 489-4761

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440






DODGE
'98, Caravan, Reliable
$1,100 obo
(419) 303-0888 cell
Crystal River

JEEP
2003 Grand Cherokee
Limited Ed. Black, Sun
Roof. Exc Cond in/out.
Great A/C $7500 obo
746-8631 or 212-2814





FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907





Yamaha
'05, Raptor, 50CC,
4 Wheeler,
less than 20 hrs. $950
4 Goodyear Tires, 7000
miles, Rims & Hubcaps
off Corolla P185/65R15
All $100. (352) 726-9151

YAMAHA
2001 Grizzly 600 4x4, like
new, 395 miles, $3200
352-746-9618


Harley Davidson
1978 Shovel Head, new
fenders, new tank, '02
Springer front end, belt
drive, $7,500 613-2333

Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800

HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom built, 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513

HONDA
2007 Shadow Aero ABS
(VT750ABS)Less than
600 original miles
$4,800. 724-953-1915

HONDA
2008 Full Size Shadow.
Harley looks, Chrome,
Leather bags, $5700.
C.R. (727) 207-1619

MOTOR SCOOTER
2007, 250CC,
very low miles,
$1,000. obo
(352) 220-8454

VW TRIKE
VW Trike New Runs
Great Great Price
$6000.00 352-344-9340
Phone






2317-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-221
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CAROL A RASHID
ROGER A RASHID
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:


CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
ww.chronicleonline.com

Scarborough 2010


CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0167
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
RIVER BEND UNIT 5 LOT
143
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: DAVID R TARRY,
MARY TARRY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
August 29, September 5,
12 & 19, 2012.
2318-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-228
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CAROL A RASHID
ROGER A RASHID
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7377
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
ROVAN FARMS UNREC
SUB TRACT 5F &6F: E1/2
OF SW1/4 OF SE1/4 OF
FRAC SEC 3-20-18, EXCEPT
THE W 31.50 FT THERE F
FOR RD R/W PURPOSES.
DESC IN OR BK 543 PG
189 & OR BK 1509 PG 584
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: SHAWN MEIMAN
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2319-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-234
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010 1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-1910
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
S1/2 OF S1/2 OF SW1/4 OF
NE1/4 OF NW1/4 DESC IN
OR BK 594 PG 431 & OR
BK 1861 PG 494
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: THREE SPRINGS
INVESTMENTS INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2320-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-241
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2488
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
GULF HWY LAND UNIT 2 PB
4 PG 36 LOT 1 BLK C
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: JAMES P TULLY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2321-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-248
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7000
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-


ERTY:
LECANTO ACRES UNIT 1
PB2 PG 133 LOT 47 TITLE
IN OR BK 1749 PG 1516
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: HOLD EM PROP-
ERTIES INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 CII


Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2322-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-223
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010-1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0992
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
FROM 1/4 SEC COR ON W
BDRY RUN S 859.7 FTTO A
PT TH E 762.2 FT TO POB,
TH N 52 DEG 39M 44S E
96.73 FTTH S53 DEG 47M
55S E 55.20 FT TH S 21
DEG 46M 19SW 82.74 FT
THS31 DEG45M 31SW
41.40 FT TH S 70 DEG 1M
1S W 30.55 FT TH N 69
DEG 51M 53S W 35.31 FT
TH N 40 DEG 17M 32SW
39.8 FT TH N 19 DEG 4M
14S E 57.02 FT TO POB
DESC IN OR BK 1363 PG
190 ESMT OR BK 1910 PG
1077
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: XMAS ISLE HOLD-
INGS INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2323-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-229
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CAROL A RASHID
ROGER A RASHID
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2591
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
GREEN ACRES ADD 1 LOT
25 DESCR IN O R BK345
PG 408
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: CLEOPATRA L
BENNETTE
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2324-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-236
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010-1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO:
10-10678 YEAR OF ISSU-
ANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
SHERWOOD FOREST UN-
REC SUB LOT 42: COM AT
SW COR OF SE1/4 OF SEC
6, TH N 0 DEG 52M 50S E
ALW LN OF SE1/4 1708.17
FT, TH S 89 DEG 7M 10S E
1767.90 FT TH S 86 DEG
49M 10S E 50 FTTO PT ON
E R/W LN OF 50 FT RD, PT
ALSO BEING PC OF
CURVE CONC NE'LY,
HAVING CTRL ANG OF 60
DEG 40M 8S & A RAD OF
164.52 FT, TH SE'LY AL
ARC OF CURVE 174.21 FT
TO PT OF CURVE, THS 57
DEG 29M 18S E 120.87 FT
T O POB, PT BEING THE PC
OF CURVE CONC NE'LY,
HAVING CTRL ANG OF 39
DEG 46M 28S & A RAD OF
123 .50 FT TH SE'LY AL
ARC OF CURVE 85.73 FT
TO PT OF CURVE, TH N 82
DEG 44M 14S E 33.99 FT
TO PC OF CURVE, CONC
NW'LY, HAV ING CTRL
ANG OF 27 DEG 7M 54S &
A RAD OF 214.40 FT TH
NE'LY, AL ARC OF CURVE,
60.14 FTTO PT (CHORD
BEARING & DIS BETW PTS
BEING N 74 DEG 42M 6S E
59.94 FT) TH N 23 DEG 59M
30S W 239.46 FT MOL, TO
WTRS OF CANAL, TH S 78
DEG 21M 20S W AL WT RS
53.46 FTTO PT BEARING N
6 DEG 28M 40S E FROM
POB, TH S 6 DEG 28M 40S
W 211.08 FT MOL TO POB
TITLE IN OR BK 1897 PG
185
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: RAYMOND
COLLAZO, MARCOS A
GUERRA
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,


Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12and19, 2012.
2325-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-242
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:


CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7888
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
(LLRS-99-04 OR BK 1309
PG 1016-1026 ACCEPTED
5-19-99 UNREC SUBD LOTS
1-8)) LOT 7:COM AT SW
COR OF SE1/4 OF SEC
29-17-19, TH N 0 DEG OOM
48S E AL W LN OF AFRMTD
SE 1/4 488.99 FT TO POB,
TH N 0 DEG OOM 48S E
105.02 FT TH S 89 DEG
58M 16S E 115.06 FT TH N
0 DEG 02M 38SE 105.02 FT
TH N 89 DEG 59M 51SW
115.14 FT, TH N 0 DEG OOM
48S E 175.65 FTTH S89
DEG 49M 02S E 1249.54 FT
TH S 0 DEG 09M 08S W
387.07 FT TH S86 DEG 43M
42SW 719.60 FT TH N 89
DEG 50M 52SW 530.19 FT
TO POB (11.59AC) SUBJ
TO EASE TITLE IN OR BK
1360 PG 2213 & OR BK
1635 PG 1583
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: LARRY OVITT
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2326-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-249
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7217
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
LOTS 15, 16 & 17 OFAN
UNREC SUBD DESCR AS
FOL: LOT 15: COM AT THE
NW COR OF SW1/4 OF
NW1/4 SEC 19-19-18, TH S
1D 4M 30S W AL THE W
LINE OF SD SEC 19,645.01
FT TO THE POB, TH CONT S
1 D 4M 30S W AL SD W
LINE 118.35 FTTH S 89D
38M 12S E PAR WITH THE N
LINE OF SD SW1/4 OF
NW1/4 378.75 FT TH N 1D
4M 30S E PAR WITH SD W
LINE OF SEC 19, 118.35 FT,
TH N 89D 38M 12S W PAR
TO SD N LINE OF SD SW1/4
OF NW1/4 378.75 FT TO
THE POB, SUBJ TO EASE
ACROSS W 25 FT THEREOF
- &- LOT 16: COM AT
THE NW COR OF SW1/4
OF NW1/4 SEC 19-19-18,
TH S 1D 4M 30S W AL THE
W LINE OF SD SEC 19,
763.35 FT TO THE POB, TH
CONT S 1 D 4M 30S W AL
SD W LINE 118.34 FT, TH S
89D 38M 12S E PAR WITH
THE N LINE OF SW1/4 OF
NW1/4 378.75 FT TH N 1D
4M 30S E PAR WITH SD W
LINE SEC 19, 118.34 FT TH
N 89D 38M 12SW PAR
WITH SD N LINE OF SD
SW1/4 OF NW1/4 378.75
FT TO THE POB, SUBJ TO
EASE ACROSS W 25 FT
THEREOF &- LOT 17:
COM AT THE NW CORN
OF SW1/4 OF NW1/4 SEC
19-19-18, TH S 1D 4M 30S
W AL THE W LINE OF SD
SEC 19, 881.70 FT TO THE
POB, TH CONT S 1 D 4M
30S W AL SD W LINE OF
SEC 19, 118.35 FT TH S
89D 38M 12S E PAR WITH
THE N LINE OF SW1/4 OF
NW1/4 378.75 FT TH N 1D
4M 30S E PAR WITH SD W
LINE OF SEC 19, 118.35 FT
TH N 89D 38M 12SW PAR
WITH SD N LINE OF SW1/4
OF NW1/4 378.75 FT TO
THE POB, SUBJ TO EASE
ACROSS W 25 FT THEREOF
TITLE IN OR BK 2067 PG
1329 ((FKA ACCEPTED UN-
REC SUB FOR GUNNAR
DANENGEN 2-8-1983))
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: OCALA PARK ES-
TATES LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2327-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-224
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CAROL A RASHID
ROGER A RASHID
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7008
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
ALL THAT PTN OF NW1/4
OF SE1/4 SEC 6-19-18 &
ALL THAT PT OF SW1/4 OF
SE1/4 SEC 6-19-18 THAT
LIES N & W OF CINNA-
MON RIDGE UNIT FOUR
PHASE ONE PB 16 PG 124
TITLE IN OR BK 737 PG
1883
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: GULF HIGHWAY
LAND CORPORATION
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at


www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19,2012.
2328-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-230
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CAROL A RASHID
ROGER A RASHID
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-


u i


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C12 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012


ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-6385
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
MINI FARMS UNIT 6 UNREC
SUB PCL 1 N1/2 OF NW1/4
OF SW1/4 OF NW1/4
DESC IN ORBK 1032 PG
1758
OR BK 2273 PG 2157
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: JOHN
MULROONEY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2329-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-237
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010-1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-1211
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
(LR-04-12 ACCEPTED
6/2/04 SURVEY IN OR BK
1737 PG 109)PARCEL B:
COM AT SE COR OF S 1/2
OF N 1/2 OF SE 1/4 OF SW
1/4 OF SEC 27-18-17,TH N
89DEG 34M 14S W AL S LN
OF SD S 1/2 OF N 1/2 OF
SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 1160.66
FTTO POBTH CONT N
89DEG 34M 14S W AL SD S
LN 217.69 FT TO SW COR
OF SD S 1/2 OF N 1/2 OF
SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 TH CONT
N 89DEG 34M 14SWAL S
LN OF N 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF
SW 1/4 OF SD SEC 27
143.25 FT TO E R/W OF US
HWY 19TH N 18DEG 17M
20S W AL SD E R/W LN
116.14 FT TO S R/W LN OF
W MAYO DR TH S 89DEG
34M 14S E AL SD S R/W LN
179.57 FTTO E LN OF
AFOREMENTIONED N 1/2
OF SW 1/4 OF SW 1/4 AND
E R/W LN OF W MAYO DR
TH N OODEG 03M 56S W AL
SD E LN 222.04 FT TO S
R/W LN OF W MAYO DR
TH S 89DEG 43M 11S E AL
SD S R/W LN 240.49 FT TH S
OODEG 16M 17S E 180.00
FTTH N 89EG 34M 14S W
24.00 FTTH S OODEG 16M
17S E 152.68 FT TO POB
DESC IN OR BK 1961 PG
688
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: MELIZZA RAMO
HATCHIK
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2330-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-244
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7831
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
SOUTHERN WOODS AT
SUGARMILL WOODS
PHASE III PB 16 PG 78 LOT
6 BLK H
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: 2726 SERENITY
CIRCLE LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29 September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2331-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-250
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0030
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
NATURE COAST LANDINGS
CAMPGROUND LOT 16
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: CITRUS RECREA-
TIONAL MARINA INC VA-
LERIE ORSHAL HUNT,
WIlLIAM A HUNT, WILLIAM
A HUNT


Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2332-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE


APPLICATION: 2012-225
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0639
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
MINI FARMS UNIT 5 UNREC
SUB LOT 34 DESC AS: W
1/2 OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4
OF SW 1/4 OF SEC
26-17-17 DESC IN OR BK
1514 PG 922
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: GERALDINE G AL-
DEN, ANTHONY J
YANNAZZO, GERALDINE G
YANNAZZO
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2333-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-231
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CAROL A RASHID
ROGER A RASHID
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-3035
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
TRACT 7: BEG AT SE COR
OF NW1/4 OF 5-17-18- TH
S 89 DEG 49M 30S W AL S
BDRY OF NW1/4 655.94
FT TH DEPARTING FROM S
BDRY N 0 DEG 2M 26S E
1025.92 FT, TH S 89 DEG
50M 7S E 354.88 FT, TH N 0
DEG 9M 53S E 938.66 FT
TO INT WITH S R/W LN OF
SR 488(66 FT WIDE), TH S
89 DEG 50M 7S E AL R/W
LN 125 FT, TH DEPARTING
FROM R/W LN S 0 DEG 9M
53S W 660 FT, TH S 89 DEG
50M 7S E 169.47 FT TO INT
WITH E BDRY OF NW1/4,
TH S 0 DEG 13M 24S E ALE
BDRY 1300.72 FT TO POB
TITLE IN OR BK 2239/188
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: PROTIUM REO I
LP, D GAITRI
RAMPADARAT,
ROOPISHWAR
RAMPADARAT, SUTTON
FUNDING LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2334-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-238
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010-1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-8291
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
GREENBRIAR TWO
CONDO DECL IN OR BK
687 PG 1199 PHASE XIII
UNIT 4B BLDG 34 DESC IN
OR BK668 PG 52
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: GREENBRIAR
TWO CONOMINIUM AS-
SOC INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2335-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-245
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0632
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
MINI FARMS UNIT 3 UNREC
SUB W1/2 OF LOT 29 DESC
IN OR BK720 PG 1280
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: ROBERT D PE-
TERSEN


Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2336-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE


APPLICATION: 2012-251
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
BEOR FUND I LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-4912
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 15 PB 6
PG 123 LOTS 28, 29 & 30
INCL BLK 1149
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: A PLUS HOMES
INC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2337-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-226
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010-1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-8571
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
LAKESIDE OF INVERNESS A
CONDOMINIUM UNIT 203
BLDG 2 TITLE IN OR BK
1307 PG 262 DECL OF
CONDO IN OR BK 1782
PG 50-97
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: CHANTAL
TAVEIRNE, WALTER
VOGELAERS
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2338-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-232
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as
follows:CERTIFICATE NO:
10-6944 YEAR OF ISSU-
ANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
N1/2 OF SE1/4 OF NE1/4
DESC IN OR BK 1460 PG
658
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: GEORGE
ALETRAS, ESTATE OF
GEORGE ALETRAS
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2339-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-239
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-6805
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
BRENTWOOD VILLAS IV PB
16 PG 143 LOT90
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: PALM COAST IN-
VESTMENT GROUP VI LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29 September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2340-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC SALE


APPLICATION: 2012-246
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7859
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
RIVER OAKS EAST PB 14
PG 56 LOT 18 BLK D
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: ROBERT J
WEAVER SARAH ROBYN


WEAVER
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2341-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-252
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
BEOR FUND 1 LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2011
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
S1/2 OF NE1/4 OF SW1/4
EXCEPT R/W OF HWY 19 &
EXCEPT PT W OF R/W
DESC IN OR BK 1962 PG
1955
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: FORTY FOUR AS-
SOCIATES LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2342-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-227
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CAROL A RASHID
ROGER A RASHID
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-6954
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
NEW MAYFIELD 1ST ADD
PB 2 PG 129 LOT 7 BLK K
DESC IN OR BK904 PG
1279
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: AMERICAN MO-
BILE SYSTEMS INCORPO-
RATED A DELAWARE COR-
PORATION, TOWER ASSET
SUB INC A DELAWARE
CORPORATION, TOWER
PARENT CORP A DELA-
WARE CORPORATION
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at


CLASSIFIED




www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, 2012
September 5, 2012
September 12, 2012
September 19,2012
2343-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-233
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010 1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-1040
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
CRYSTAL CITY ADD TO
CRYSTAL RIVER PB 1 PG
125 A LOT 50 FT FRONTING
2ND AVE BEG 250 FT
FROM NW COR OF LOT 1
BLK 10 DE SC IN OR BK925
PG 495
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: BRENDA WEBB,
BRENDA Y WEBB
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2344-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-240
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0529
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
NEIGE FARMS UNREC
SUBD LOT8: N1/2 OF
NW1/4 OF SW1/4 OF
SW1/4 SEC 22-17-17 THN N
0 DEG 4M 5S E AL E LN OF
N 1/2 OF NW 1/4 OF SW
1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECT 22
131.79 FT TO PT ON CURV
CONCAVE SE'LY HAVING
RADIUS OF 50 FT THN S'LY
AL AR OF CURVE THR
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 150
DEG OOM 1S 130.90 FT TO
PT CHORD BEARING &
DIST BETW PTS S 15 DEG
4M 5S W 96.59 FT THN S9
DEG 4M 5S W 38.29 FT TO
PTON SLN OF N 1/2 OF
NW 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SW
1/4 OF SEC 22 THN S 89
DEG 41M 45S E AL S LN
25.00 FT TO POB TO-
GETHER WITH EASE FOR IN-
GRESS & EGRESS OF REC-
ORD TITLE IN OR BK 1518
PG 1968 & OR BK 1778 PG
2396
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
ABU MIZAN RAHMAN


Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.
2345-0919 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-247
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERMAN AMERICAN
CAPITAL CORPORATION
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-7851
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
(LR-06-36 ACCEPTED
1/3/2007 SURVEY IN OR BK
2180 PG 2098 & 2099) LOT
3A: COM ATTHE SW
CORN OF NE1/4 SEC
7-17-19, TH AL THE S LINE
OF SD NE1/4 N 89D 58M
30S E 1332.49 FT TO THE NE
CORN OF W1/2 OF SE1/4
OF SD SEC 7, TH CONT N
89D 58M 30S E 30 FT TO
THE NE CORN OF EASE "C"
AS RECORDED IN OR BK
873/325, TH LEAVING SD S
LINE OF NE1/4, S OD 4M
19S E AL THE E LINE OF
EASE "C" 913.94 FT TO THE
POB, TH LEAVING SD E
LINE OF EASE "C", N 89D
55M 41S E 550.23 FT TO A
MEANDER LINE AL THE
WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER
AS DESCR IN OR BK
1816/805, TH AL SD MEAN-
DER LINE S 60D 52M 22S E
101.22 FT, TH LEAVING SD
MEANDER LINE S50D 22M
44S W 156.94 FT, TH S 89D
55M 41S W 517.58 FT TO
THE E LINE OF SD EASE "C",
TH N OD4M 19S WAL SD E
LINE OF EASE "C" 149.31 FT
TO THE POB (2AC MOL)
TOGETHER WITH EASE "C"
AS REC IN OR BK 873/325
AND TOGETHER WITH EASE
"D" AS REC IN OR BK 872
PG 1884 AND TOGETHER
WITH EASE "SF" AS RE-
CORDED IN OR BK
940/2191 AND TOGETHER
WITH ACCESS EASE IN OR
BK 2201 PG 604 AND SUBJ
TO RECREATIONAL USE
EASE DESCR IN OR BK
854/155 & OR BK
1483/409 & OR BK 2201
PG 609
TITLE IN OR BK 2201 PG
614
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: BRIAN CESAREC,
STEPHANIE CESAREC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on October 3, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.co
m.
Dated August 20,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
August 29, September 5,
12 and 19, 2012.


737-0912 WCRN
Melzner, Ruth H. File No: 2012-CP-517 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-517


IN RE: ESTATE of RUTH H. MELZNER,
DECEASED,
FILE NO. 2012-CP-517
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:

You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the Estate of Ruth H. Melzner, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-517, by the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of death
was July 27, 2012; that the total value of the estate is SNONE and that the names
and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:

Karl H. Melzner, 336 I Street, Fremont, California 94536

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WITH BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is September 5, 2012.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice Person Giving Notice:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/Karl H. Melzner
/s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire 336 I
Street
209 Courthouse Square
Fremont, California 94536
Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar Number: 157310
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
September 5 & 12, 2012.


741-0912 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Chickadee Andre File No: 2012 CP 501 Notice to Creditors
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION

File No.: 2012 CP 501
IN RE: ESTATE of CHICKADEE ANDRE a/k/a Dorothy Ann Andre,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the Estate of Chickadee Andre a/k/a Dorothy Ann Andre,
deceased, whose date of death was May 19, 2012, and whose social security num-
ber is xxx-xx-9638, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address which is 111 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450-4299.
The name and addresses of the personal; representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is September 3, 2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
JOSHUA N. GOLDGLANTZ, Esq. John a. Bojus
Florida Bar No.: 0044012 5921 Taft
Street
BEHAR, GUTT & GLAZER, P.A.
Hollywood, FL 33021
Attorneys for Petitioner
2999 NE 191st Street, Fifth Floor
Aventura, Florida 33180
Telephone: (305) 931-3771
Fax: (305) 931-3774
September 5 and 12, 2012.


742-0912 WCRN
Raymond E. West Case No: 2012-CP-000395 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 2012-CP-000395

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF

RAYMOND E. WEST,

Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Raymond E. West, deceased, whose date of
death was June 30, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Probate Division, File Number 2012-CP-000395; the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is September 3, 2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq. Sherri R. West
Florida Bar No. 0857750 7280 South
Kitwake Point
VanNess & VanNess, P.A. Lecanto, FL 34461
1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
1-352-795-1444
September 5 and 12, 2012.



743-0912 WCRN
Conn, Harold O. Case No: 2012CP435 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 2012CP435


IN RE: THE ESTATE OF

HAROLD 0. CONN,

Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Harold 0. Conn, deceased, whose date of
death was July 1, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, File Number 2012 CP435; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Av-
enue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal represent-
ative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is September 3, 2012, 2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq. Nancy
Jane Stevens
Florida Bar No. 0857750 1 0 2
Durrington Place
VanNess & VanNess, P.A. Richmond, VA 23236
1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
1-352-795-1444
September 5 & 12, 2012.


746-0919 WCRN
Roman Hupalo Case No:2012-CP-497 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


IN RE: THE ESTATE OF

ROMAN HUPALO

DECEASED,

CASE NO. 2012-CP-497
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Theadmhstratbn ofthe Estateof Roman Hupab, deceased,whose date
of death was February 6, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE T11ME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is September 12, 2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG &
FRIEDRICH, P.A. /s/MARGARET C. HUPALO
452 Pleasant Grove Road c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida 34452 Inverness, Florida
34452 (352) 726-0901
(352) 726-3345 (Facsimile)
Florida Bar Number: 0196529
/s/JEANNETTE M. HAAG
Attorney for Estate
September 12 & 19, 2012.


747-0919 WCRN
Carol S, Bearse File No: 2072CP448 NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012CP448

IN RE: ESTATE OF
CAROL S. BEARSE A/K/A CAROL STETSON BEARSE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CAROL S. BEARSE a/k/a CAROL STETSON
BEARSE (the Decedent), whose date of death was April 13, 2012, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is September 12, 2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/Thomas E. Slaymaker, Esquire Raymond James Trust, N.A.
Attorney for the Personal Representative Post Office Box 14407
Florida Bar Number: 398535 St. Petersburg, Florida
33733
Slaymaker and Nelson, P. A. By:/s/Catherine Hood
Brinkman,
2218 Highway 44 West First Vice President
Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726 6129
tom@slaymakerlaw.com
September 12 & 19, 2012.


856-0914 FCRN
Schroeder, Maria I 2012-CP-434 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2012-CP-434
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIA ISABEL SCHROEDER
A/K/A MARIA I. SCHROEDER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARIA ISABEL SCHROEDER A/K/A MARIA I.
SCHROEDER, deceased, whose date of death was May 20, 2012 and whose Social
Security Number is 102-22-0490, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Flroida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having daims or demands
against the decedent's estate must file thier claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE T11ME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is September 12, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/ HAROLD B. STEPHENS /s/ GERARD REGI-
NALD SCHROEDER
3591 West Gulf to Lake Hwy P.O. Box 783
Lecanto, FL 34448 DILLS-
BORO, NC 28725-0783
Florida Bar No. 095562
September 12 and 19, 2012.


745-0912 WCRN
09-20 meeting Nature Coast EM Foundation
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nature Coast Emergency Medical Foundation, Inc.
Executive Committee will be holding a meeting on Thursday, September 20, 2012 at
9:30 am. For those interested in attending the meeting will be held in the Nature
Coast EMS Administration Building, 3876 W. Country Hill Dr., Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any persons) requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because
of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Executive Assistant at (352)
249-4700 before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record shall be the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Jennie Sanders, Executive Assistant
September 12, 2012.


Nocst rqos


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10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RIAptt|






Wednesday September 12, 2012 G3


What's Inside

Most Admired Woman ~ Arts
l Susan LaForsch ................................ Page 4



Most Admired Woman ~ Business |
Pamela Bellman ................................. Page 6

Most Admired Woman ~ Leader
Lora W ilson ....................................... Page 8



Most Admired Woman ~ Mother
Sharon Hansen ............................... Page 10

[T Most Admired Woman ~ Athlete
1 fje Marilynne Denison........................... Page 12



Most Admired Woman ~ Health
Margie Leturno................................. Page 16

Most Admired Woman ~ Education
Dianna Bandhauer........................... Page 18



Most Admired Woman ~ Community Involvement
Jewel Lamb ........................................ Page 20

Most Admired Woman ~ Up and Coming Youth
Jill Isenberg ..................................... Page 22



Most Admired Woman ~ Government
Cecelia Douglas............................... Page 24


10 Most Admired Women of


Citrus County saluted by Altrusa


By Linda McCarthy
Special to the Chronicle
It is that time of the year again,
children return to school, foot-
ball season starts and most im-
portant of all the Citrus County
Chronicle, in partnership with
Altrusa International Inc. of Citrus
County, acknowledge the 10 Most Ad-
mired Women in Citrus County.
Each of these women is nominated
by the community as representatives of
outstanding service or accomplish-
ments in various categories including:
Government, Health, Business, Educa-
tion, Community Involvement, the
Arts, Athletics, the Up & Coming


Youth, Community Leader and Mother.
Each nomination includes thoughtful
insights on the characteristics that
demonstrate why these individuals are
deserving of this honor.
The Women of Altrusa will pay trib-
ute to the 10 Most Admired Women in
Citrus County at a recognition dinner
at the monthly meeting of Altrusa In-
ternational Inc. of Citrus County on
Thursday, Oct. 4, at 5:30 p.m.
As president of the Altrusa Club, it is
an honor to acknowledge these dedi-
cated women that demonstrate their
individual passion and commitment to
our community.
They are indeed the Best of Citrus
County.


I~! I rII&&


Gerry Mulligan
Publisher
Ken Melton
Community Affairs
Editor
Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs
Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling
Community Editor
Trista Stokes
Advertising
Sales Manager
Dave Sigler
Section photographer


Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363

www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN





G4 Wednesday September 12, 2012


About the

winner

What's your name?
Susan LaForsch

Nickname?
Susi

Where do you live?
Hernando

How long have you been in
Citrus County?
I moved to Inverness from
Miami in 1984.

What do you do?
I am a wife, mother,
grandmother and volunteer.
I am an artist, art instructor
at the Florida Artists Gallery,
exhibit organizer and charter
board member of the Citrus
Cultural Alliance.

What was your reaction
when you were notified
about being chosen?
I was tickled. It is very nice
that someone thought I did
something admirable.


I
'di
~h ~d~i&


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
Everything, good and bad, has
contributed to who I am today. I am
thankful for it all.
I have always had a wonderful
supportive family and thoughtful


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Most Admired Woman

Arts-







t-o rsch


friends. I have work that allows me
to express myself, and hopefully im-
pact others in a positive way.
At this point in my life I feel like a
success, depending on your defini-
tion of the word. Of course artists
are rarely considered a success until


about a hundred years after they are
dead, so struggling to make ends
meet is just part of the choice we
make.

See LaForsch Page G5


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LaForsch
from Page G4
What challenges have
you faced, and how did
they influence you or
lead you to success in
your field?
I married at 17, had two
beautiful daughters by 19,
and was a divorced single
parent by 20. I worked
whatever jobs I could get
down in the Keys, wait-
ressing and bartending
during the season and
even building crab traps
in the summer. Actually, it
was a pretty good life -
maybe that's why so
many of my paintings
have palm trees in them.
My more serious paint-
ings from my Girl in a
Glass series came from my
struggles with alcoholism.
Getting sober 18 years ago
motivated me to get an
education. I earned my
Bachelor of Fine Arts de-
gree from the University
of Florida School of Art
and Art History in 2002.
Serving for a year as an
AmeriCorps VISTA volun-
teer after graduation
helped to prepare me for
future volunteer work.

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
Going through college
and menopause at the
same time was certainly a
challenge. They both
make you sweat.

What has been the most
rewarding, or has given
you the most joy in what
you do?
I love it when I finish a
painting and someone
says "wow." I love it
when I help a student


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


complete, and be proud of
their first painting.
I love that I can help a
good cause by donating
time or artwork even if I
don't have money to give
them.
Most of all, the most re-
warding thing about my
career has been that it al-
lowed me to work from
home for the seven years
we cared for my late
mother.

Was there anyone spe-
cial that helped mold
you, what did you learn
from them?
I have learned a lot from
many exceptional people I
have known in my life.
My parents taught me
to treat everyone with re-
spect.
The love of my life, my
husband of almost 30
years, Mikie, has taught


me about being unselfish.
However, my daughters
are the ones who helped
mold me. If it wasn't for
them, things could have
turned out very differ-
ently.

What are some funny
or inspiring things that
happened along the way?
I find inspiration in so
many things, and so many
people that it's hard to
single out a particular
event. I guess I was in-


Wednesday September 12, 2012 G5


spired every time I accom-
plished something I
thought was impossible
for me like learning al-
gebra at 45.

What words of wisdom
do you have for women
on a similar journey?
Learn from your mis-
takes, and realize that you
are more capable than you
think you are. Set your
goal, find out what you
need to do to achieve it.
Then do it.


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Hilda McFall Fialko started her optical lT
career in 1984 with Smith Optical in
Inverness. Hilda managed Smith Optical
at West Coast Eye Institute until 1993 HILDA MCFALL/FIALKO
when the optical became part of West OWNER/OPTICAN
Coast Eye. She worked there until 2003. In 2005, Hilda realized her
dream of owning her own optical business when she purchased Optical
Express in the Crystal River Mall. She moved Optical Express to
Heritage Village in October 2010 and changed the name to
MezMerEYES. MezMerEYES is more the "boutique" that Hilda has
always wanted. She feels the residents of Citrus County should not have
to drive to larger cities for designer collections and quality products. Visit
Hilda at MezMerEYES "Where Eclectic Funk Meets Simple Elegance in
Eyewear." Hilda is a board certified optician, a member of Professional
Opticians of Florida, The American Board of Opticians and National
Contact Lens Examiners. Appointments available everyday with Hilda,
Dr. Kaplan or Dr. Fosen.





G6 Wednesday September 12, 2012


About

the

winner

What's your name?
Pamela Bellman

Nickname?
Pam

Where do you live?
Floral City

How long have you
been in Citrus
County?
I've been here 18
years.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Most Admired Woman

Business -


fmema


Sel[[man


What was your
reaction when
you were notified
about being
chosen?
Thrilled


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
When I joined the Floral City Garden
Club and took on the Roadside Beautifi-
cation and Community Development
Committee, I saw by making improve-
ments in town it was the first step to


putting the floral back in Floral City and
by fixing up the historical homes and
joining the Floral City Heritage Council
in preserving the history of our area it
has made Floral City a great place to
live and work.


What challenges have you faced, and
how did they influence you or lead
you to success in your field?
The biggest challenge has been where
my shop was located off of Main Street,
See Bellman Page G7


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Bellman
from Page G6
so marketing was very im-
portant. I marketed the first
Spend the Day in Floral
City event and had many
art shows before I became
noticed. I own Forgotten
Treasures and Gifts at 7838
S. Great Oaks Drive.

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
When I started my busi-
ness three and a half years
ago, Floral City was close
to being a ghost town and I
knew I had to help other
businesses in order for us
all to succeed. I started the
Floral City Merchants As-
sociation and by working
together with the other
business owners our town
has come a long way from
where it was three years
ago.
We are a very close com-
munity that I am proud to
be a part of. I still serve as
president of that group.

What has been the most
rewarding or what has
given you the most joy in
what you do?
Seeing Floral City becom-
ing a destination for people
coming from all over to
visit our town. Seeing 90
percent of our buildings oc-
cupied. Seeing how all the
business owners work to-
gether for one goal.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn
from her?
My mother, she always
believed in what I was
doing and taught me to be-
lieve in myself and to trust
in God.


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


What are some funny or
inspiring things that hap-
pened along the way?
As for inspiring, know-
ing that we as a community
are restoring all the old
buildings/homes and put-
ting great business in his-
torical homes and not
tearing them down to make
room for box stores.


Wednesday September 12, 2012 G7


What words of wisdom
do you have for other
women on similar jour-
neys?
Be an honest person,
helping others in the com-
munity achieve their goals
and don't be afraid of
competition; instead,
welcome it.


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G8 Wednesday September 12, 2012


About the

winner

What's your name?
Lora Wilson

Where do you live?
Inverness

How long have you
been in Citrus
County?
16 years

What do you do?
I put people back
together financially
after an accident -
I am an attorney.
I handle personal
injury cases
exclusively including
wrongful death, auto,
motorcycle, truck, ATV,
boat and golf cart.

What was your
reaction when
you were notified
about being chosen?
I was surprised.


2012 Most Admired Woman

Leader -



Sora


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
Everything we do in life (waitress-
ing, cleaning house, legal secretarial
work) brings us to where we are today
and contributes to our success.
What challenges have you faced,
and how did they influence you or


lead you to success in your field?
The pivotal point in my career was
in 2004. I was working for a law firm
(that I had been with since I graduated
from law school in 1996). I had been
away on vacation and was back only a
week when the firm decided to down-
size. They let three attorneys go in one
week and I was one of them. I made a


decision then that this would never
happen to me again. I knew if I simply
did my work in the same manner that
I had in the past that I could do well.
Do any particular challenges stand
out in your mind? Why?


See Wilson Page G9


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Wilson
from Page G8
My biggest challenge
was learning how to net-
work on a small budget.
The big law firms from
Tampa and Orlando have
huge advertising budgets. I
have learned that the one
thing they do not have is a
constant community pres-
ence.
I enjoy meeting and talk-
ing to people one-on-one.
As a member of Inverness
Olde Town Association, I
love to actively participate
at the Farmer's Market
when my calendar permits.
I am also active in the Ro-
tary Club of Inverness (our
members recently re-
habbed the community
building at Whispering
Pines Park) and Suncoast
Business Masters (net-
working club that provides


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


substantial support to the
Early Learning Coalition of
Citrus County).

What has been the most
rewarding or what has
given you the most joy in
what you do?
Hearing a new client say
that I have lifted the
weight off of their shoul-
ders. When someone is in-
jured in an accident, the
last thing they want to
have to do is deal with pa-
perwork.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn
from her?
Too many family mem-
bers, friends and teachers
to mention.
However, I always re-
member one of my law
school professors telling us
to not box yourself into a


comer regarding your
work. I think that was the
morning she had to bring
one of her kids to her lec-
ture. In any type of busi-
ness, but especially as an
attorney, you never know
if something will happen
unexpectedly; you need to
always have a backup


plan.


Wednesday September 12, 2012 G9


What words of wisdom
do you have for other
women on similar jour-
neys?
When you are working
for someone, learn every-
thing you can about every
aspect of the job. Also,
have faith and trust in
yourself.


- I


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Athlete of the Year


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G10 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


About the

winner

What's your name?
Sharon Lynn Hansen

Where do you live?
Inverness

How long have you
been in Citrus County?
My husband of 45
years and I moved from
Plantation in October
2002, coming to Citrus
County to retire.

What do you do?
I am a retired RN,
BSN specializing in
CCU and ICU.

What was your
reaction when
you were notified
about being
chosen?
I was very surprised
when I was notified, I had
no idea that I had even
been nominated.


2012 Most Admired Woman

Mother -



bharon


ansen


*
S \\
\ m


94
a


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
The majority of our married life
was spent in Broward County, raising
our son and daughter.
Having grown tired of corporate
life, we decided a slower pace was
needed and we thought we could find
it in Citrus County.


However, things don't always work
out as planned. Our grandson An-
drew, then 11, came to live with us. A
few years later he was followed by his
three brothers Matthew, 10; Mark, 9;
and the youngest, Jonathan, 8.
In 2007 we acquired legal guardian-
ship of our four grandsons. We are
now raising children for a second


time.
Andrew is now a junior at the Uni-
versity of Texas studying engineering.
Matthew spent his summer at bum
camp and having several surgeries.
Mark spent part of the summer vol-
unteering for Hospice of Citrus
See Hansen Page G11


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Hansen
from Page G10

County. He is a member of
AVID, and just joined the
drama club, both at Citrus
High. Jonathan is a trum-
pet player for the March-
ing Hurricanes and the
jazz band, also at Citrus
High.
My time is now spent
helping with homework,
sports, musical activities,
(soon) drama and as a
band booster. We are all ac-
tive in our church.
It is a far cry from the
quiet retirement we had
planned but we love every
minute we spend with the
boys.

What challenges have
you faced, and how did
they influence you?
I went back to school in


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


my 30s while maintaining
a home and having a full-
time job. Now in my 60s, I
maintain our home and
am faced with the chal-
lenges of raising teenage
boys in a totally different
era. I have learned to
adapt.

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
One of the worst days of
my life was Aug. 1, 2005,
the day I received a call
telling me that Matthew,
my 9-year-old grandson,
had been airlifted to
Tampa General having re-
ceived burns over half of
his body. From that time
on, Matthew and I have
spent many days at
Shriner's Boston Chil-
dren's Burn Hospital.
Matthew has been under-
going reconstructive sur-


gery four to five times a
year.

What has been the most
rewarding thing or what
has given you the most
joy in what you do?
I am raising children to
become moral, productive
citizens. My joy comes
from watching them strive
to achieve their dreams.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Gil


from her?
My mother always told
me to be true to myself.

What are some funny or
inspiring things that hap-
pened along the way?
My faith has helped me
every step of the way.

What words of wisdom
do you have for other
women on similar
journeys?
Follow your heart.


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G12 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


About the

winner

What's your name?
Marilynne Denison

Nickname?
Mazzy

Where do you live?
I live in Inverness.

How long have you
been in Citrus
County?
I've lived here for
almost four years.

What do you do?
I am a group and
personal fitness
trainer.

What was your
reaction when you
were notified about
being chosen?
I felt flabbergasted
when learned about
being chosen. My good-
ness, what an honor!


2012 Most Admired Woman

Athlete -



ard nne


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
Forty years ago when my first hus-
band left me for his skinny secretary, I
decided to get fit. I had never been
athletic and in school was often the
last chosen for team sports.
I had read that running was the best
way to get in shape so I decided to
give it a try.
I started by running around the


block, then gradually increasing my
distance. In doing so I discovered that
running was something I could do as
opposed to ball sports. The weight
started dropping off and my self-
image blossomed. Soon I was running
5-Ks, which turned into 10-Ks, then
half marathons.
One year after I started running, I
ran my first marathon with little diffi-
culty and became a real runner. In the


past 39 years, I have competed in 38
marathons and am presently training
for my 39th. Along the way I found
that to be truly fit, I needed to add
strength training. So, I decided to be-
come a certified personal trainer and
group fitness instructor. This, I de-
cided, was the perfect second career
for me when I retired from teaching.
See Denison Page G13


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I :&M1 III






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Denison
from Page G12
So now, after teaching ele-
mentary school for 30 years
and doing part-time train-
ing, I am the fitness direc-
tor at Dynabody Fitness
Center where I also teach
Spinning, Pump, Zumba
and cardio classes.
From 1998 to 2005, I was
a running coach for the
Leukemia Society Team in
Training, a program that
trains runners to take part
in marathons and while at
the same time, fundraising
for victims of leukemia. I
took my teams to six differ-
ent marathons during that
time.
One of the marathoners I
trained was David, a para-
plegic paralyzed from the
neck down, except for one
arm. He had a racing
wheelchair that enabled
him to lie on his stomach


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


as he wheeled and steered
with his one good arm. He
was determined to finish
the race and was relentless
in his training. Because of
his disability, he was un-
able to sweat so I trained
him at a track. As he
lapped and double lapped
me, I would spray him
with water.
David was an inspiration
to the other runners whose
problems paled in compar-
ison. In the long run, David
came in second in the
wheelchair division and I
couldn't have been
prouder. I often think of
David when I'm faced with
a challenge.
Over the years I've also
become an avid biker,
kayaker and hiker.
My vacations are always
adventures, which have in-
cluded rock climbing, sky-
diving and zip lining. I've
biked in China, Italy,


Alaska, Hawaii, Canada
and Europe. Next year I
hope to run a New
Zealand marathon com-
bined with a bike trip. I'm
already signed up to com-
pete in the Antarctica
marathon the following
year.

What challenges have
you faced and how did
they influence you or lead
you to success in your
field?
Running has turned me
into a very disciplined in-
dividual. I have found
goal-setting to be the foun-
dation of success.
I have had many set-
backs in my life, including
an early death of my
beloved husband four
years ago. My running and
my training has kept me
grounded. My training as

See Denison Page G26


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 G13


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G14 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


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Encourage your smoking employees to quit...
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Contact: Tobacco-Free Partnership of Citrus County
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10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Wednesday, September 12, 2012 G15


Does smoking


cigarettes


affect women

differently

than men? .,.'







Not only do tobacco companies advertise differently for the
opposite gender, their products also affect them differently.


Women now make up over half of all new cases of lung cancer.
Deaths related to lung cancer have increased 150% in women
between 1974 and 1994, while men experienced only a 20%
increase (Cornforth, 2009).
The reason tobacco products affect women differently is still
unknown. Research suggests that while women may smoke
fewer cigarettes and inhale less of the cigarettes that they do
smoke, women are 1.5 times more likely to get lung cancer than
men (Cornforth, 2009).

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According to the Florida Department of Health, Citrus County
has more females that smoke than males (Florida Charts, 2010).
Contact: Tobacco-Free
Partnership of Citrus County
(352) 726-1731
ext 242


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN






G16 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


About the

winner


What's your name?
Margie Maureen Leturno

Where do you live?
On a small farm between Lecanto
and Homosassa

How long have you been in
Citrus County?
Over 34 years

What do you do?
I am director of Women and
Children's Services at Citrus
Memorial (CMH). Within the last
year I gained certification as a
Family Nurse Practitioner, which
has expanded my role to include
Stress Test Lab in addition to
obstetrics, pediatric and nursing
resource departments.

What was your reaction when
you were notified about being chosen?
I was on a family vacation in Cocoa Beach
when I received a text message from my
boss. Although I hesitated, because I really
just wanted uninterrupted family time, I called
her back, and she shared the happy news. I
was so excited and shocked and partly
thought it was a joke. I knew what this honor
meant and I had even nominated previous
winners. How cool to be honored for working
in a profession that I love.


S1e,


4


111


What challenges have you
faced and how did they lead
you to where you are today?
I was very fortunate to attend
the University of Florida with
scholarships after graduation
from Lecanto High School. I ini-
tially intended to become a vet-
erinarian, but quickly burned
out on it.
I had avoided the field of
nursing because my mother and
three sisters had chosen that
profession. But it was my call-
ing I joined the College of
Nursing. I started working as a
night-shift RN in the obstetrics


department at CMH in May of
1993.
When a management position
opened in my department I ap-
plied, not expecting to get it, but
I did.
Among my challenges along
the way: trying to juggle my po-
sition at CMH; be a wife; a
mother to three children; fi-
nances and master's degree
classes. It took understanding
and patience by all entities, and
it was a team effort. I passed my
certification Sept. 14, 2011, and
was power-texting everyone
that awesome news.


Sturno











The knowledge, the patience
and the determination to attain
my goals motivates me to im-
pact patients in any way I can:
getting an IV with the first stick;
teaching a mother how to
breastfeed; explaining to a pa-
tient about metabolic syndrome;
resisting ordering an antibiotic
for a viral infection; or just help-
ing people understand the dif-
ferences among physicians,
physician assistants and nurse
practitioners.

See Leturno Page G17


I


2012 Most Admired Woman


Health -


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Leturno
from Page G16

What has been the most
challenging part of health
care? The most reward-
ing? What gives you the
most joy?
Challenge: The constant
hoops to jump through in
the ever-changing health
care environment. The bal-
ance of finance, ethics and
patient-centered care that
all health care professionals
face is a constant challenge.
Rewarding: My greatest
reward was saving a life. It
was on May 26,1998, early
in the morning. Very pre-
mature twin girls were
born alive. One passed on
to heaven within 20 min-
utes and the other, we
thought, had followed. I
carried Twin A from the
operating room to the
nursery, crying as I looked
down at the angelic face
swaddled in a warmed
blanket. Halfway to the
nursery I could have sworn
that this lifeless, baby girl
had a beating heart
through that tissue-thin
skin. I squeezed my eyes to
clear the tears and saw her
take a gasp of air.
I ran the rest of the way
to the nursery to announce
that this baby girl was
alive. Our team resusci-
tated her and stabilized her
for transport to a neonatal
intensive care unit. She
lived, and to this day still
she visits me. She is a testi-
mony to miracles, and to
my calling of being an ac-
tive member of the health-
care field. May 26, 1998: it
is the most rewarding day
in my career.
Joy: The instant gratifica-
tion of patients. The instant
smile when you do some-


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


thing right for the patient:
the right word, the right
touch, the right request.
That brings joy to my heart
and my world.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who really inspired
you or helped mold you in
the field you pursued?
There is no single person
I can say really inspired me
to become a nurse maybe
all of my sisters, my broth-
ers, my father and my
mother. I say my brothers,
because although they are
not nurses, they are teach-
ers. And I enjoy teaching
childbirth education, too.
As for molding, many
have tried. Most successful
was Dottie Lasse, a team
leader in OB, who encour-
aged me to apply for the
management position after
just two years as an RN.
She helped me step into


the leadership role that I
love and enjoy. Everyone I
work with molds me in
some manner.

What are some funny or
inspiring things that hap-
pened along the way?
Funny: During a night
shift when I was beyond
sleepy writing in a new-
bom's chart that "the
puppy dog nursed well on
both sides."
Inspiring: I am inspired
by so many and so much. I


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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 G17


am inspired by my team at
CMH. I have nurses who
love to care for patients,
who are there for each
other and they inspire me
to be there for them. They
are my extended family
and they have been there
when I became a mom all
three times. They were
there the first time I wasn't
meant to be a mom, yet.

Words of wisdom for
other women on similar
journeys?


Follow the path even if
it takes a direction you
thought to avoid if it feels
right, follow it. I was not
meant to be a veterinarian,


I was meant to be a nurse.
This award is a testimony
to that. It is a challenging
profession, but most good
things are challenging.


Jan op Deer Lorra
H ':ir I'1 i., jr ,l ,l 5 ,, ll :i,.[ rl ,l '.".l r,:1
-- J2r A 21


rrofani

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G18 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


About the


winner


What's your name?
Dianna Bandhauer

Where do you live?
Homosassa

How long have you
been in Citrus
County?
I have lived in
Citrus County since
July 1980 -
32 years.


2012 Most Admired Woman


- Education -


anna

Ldanhaer
S'an hauer


What do you do?
I am a physical
education teacher
at Lecanto
Primary since
1980.

What was your
reaction when
you were notified
about being
chosen?
Wow what
an honor!!


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
I have been teaching since 1971.
Prior to teaching in Florida I was a
Navy wife. I taught in Hawaii, Con-
necticut and Maryland.
During that journey I have been
exposed to many different curricu-


lums that focused on building a
foundation for a lifetime of physical
activity. It is not calisthenics or large-
group games but lessons designed to
develop competent and skillful
movers.
Currently I strive to teach a variety
of games, dance, and gymnastics that


integrate thinking and decision-
making skills.
What challenges have you faced,
and how did they influence you or
lead you to success in your field?


See Bandhauer Page G19


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sv' ,


7,N







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Bandhauer
from Page G18

When I first started
teaching in Citrus County,
my school had very little
equipment, no indoor or
outdoor facilities, no
grass, and no shade.
With the support of the
principal I did fundrais-
ing, wrote grants, held
after-school sport camps
with the high school
coaches, made my own
equipment, and had
booths at fall festivals.
Now the school has
great facilities and
enough equipment to pro-
mote maximum participa-
tion time for all students.

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
Since 1980 there has
been an explosion in edu-
cational research.
One of the biggest chal-
lenges is to translate cur-
rent research into a
framework that will pro-
vide meaningful lessons
for children.

What has been the
most rewarding or what
has given you the most
joy in what you do?
There are many things I
enjoy about teaching
physical education, and
that is why I am still
teaching after all these
years.
I love seeing former stu-
dents who you would
never expect to play
sports excel in high
school.
One of the greatest re-
wards is hearing from for-
mer students.
I remember one special


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


call. When I was an-
nounced as Florida Ele-
mentary PE Teacher of the
Year, I got a call from a
former student I taught in
eighth grade in Connecti-
cut.
She was married and
had moved to Ho-
mosassa.
She wanted me to know
that I was the first PE
teacher that provided her
an opportunity to actively
participate in a PE class.
It was also the first time
the school had any ex-
tracurricular physical ac-
tivities for the students.
She wanted me to know
because of her experience
in my class, she went on
to join the track team in
high school. I ended up
being her daughter's PE
teacher as well.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn
from her?
My first mentor was Dr.
Delores Curtis from the
University of Hawaii. She
provided guidance and
support.
She was instrumental in
the development of my


philosophy that all chil-
dren deserve quality of
physical education.

What are some funny
or inspiring things that
happened along the way?
When working with
children something funny
happens every day.
Many of them you have
to be present to appreci-
ate.
I often ask students to
make up their own games
based on the concepts of
the lesson.
An emphasis is placed
on everyone getting to
have a say in how the
game is designed.
Once I asked a group of
students to tell me about
the game and one student
said, "Don't ask us, he
made it up."

What words of wisdom
do you have for other
women on similar
journeys?
Whatever field you
choose, become a lifelong
learner.
Never be satisfied with
doing the same thing, the
same way, year in and
year out.


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 G19


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G20 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


About the

winner

What's your name?
Jewel Risher Lamb

Nickname?
Jewels

Where do you live?
Crystal River

How long have you been in
Citrus County?
I have lived in Citrus County for
30 years, but I have lived in the
area for my entire life, which would
be 52 years.

What do you do?
I am the vice president of Crystal
Automotive Group. My current
community involvement is serving
as a board member on the
YMCA of the Suncoast, YMCA
Citrus Branch and Community
Food Bank of Citrus County.

What was your reaction when
you were notified about being
chosen?
I must be honest and say that I
believe it was God's way of telling
me that I am making a difference
in the community in which I live. It
is truly an honor and I was in awe.


12 Most Admired Woman

Community

Involvement -



fewe[



I. Lamb


How has your life's path
brought you to where you are
today?
I have always believed in help-
ing others less fortunate. I believe
in working hard and working


smart. I have made many mis-
takes and have learned from
them. I believe you have to ask
and never be afraid of the answer
no.
I thank God every night for


what I have and ask that he be
generous with his blessings that
he bestows on me so that I can
continue to give back. I know that
See Lamb Page G21


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lamb
from Page G20

God trusts that I will
hold true to my words.
Giving back to commu-
nity in which I live has
been a very important
part of my life and suc-
cess. I give God all the
credit. Working with oth-
ers who are
passionate about their
cause only fuels me more
to help them continue
with their work.

What challenges have
you faced, and how did
they influence you or
lead you to success in
your field?
The challenges are not
having enough hours in a
day. Balancing family,
business and giving back


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


while making sure that
you spend the right
amount of time with each
so that one doesn't suffer.
My family has always
been supportive of my
charity work and for that
I am truly blessed.
I am also faced with
what charities to lend my
support. I want to make a
difference with my time
and money, but unfortu-
nately you can only do so
much. Charities should
never forget that you
have a business to run. It
is my business that en-
ables me to not only fund
their cause but to also
give of my time. I believe
you have to spend money
to make money. I have
never had a problem with
catering to a donor be-
cause it has always paid
off for me. I believe to get


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out of something exactly
what you put into it.

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
I am a horrible delega-
tor. I am afraid that some-
one else might not follow
through and I will have
to pick up the pieces. I try
to do too much myself
and a lot of times I bum
myself out. My family
understands me best and
they demand that I give
them their duties and to
not say a word until they
are complete. In business
or with charity work,
everyone must pitch in to
do their part to have the
greatest result.

What has been the
most rewarding or what
has given you the most


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 G21


joy in what you do?
Working with my em-
ployees or fellow board
members to provide a
better way of living for
those with less is most re-
warding. Citrus County
has some very giving and
loving individuals. We
have caring businesses
that truly step up and out
to make a difference.
I have always believed
that charity begins at
home. I give and volun-
teer locally because I can
see first hand the differ-
ence in which my efforts
make.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn
from her?
My mother, Carolyn
Risher, was the one who
molded me. She was a


stay-home mom with five
children and then she
served as the mayor of
Inglis for over 16 years.
She was firm in her be-
liefs and never took no
for an answer when she
took on a project. She
taught me that if it is
God's will, anything can
be accomplished.
And then there is my
husband, Steve.
He is always there to
back me in everything I
do. He holds my hand in
good times and puts my
head back together in
bad. He is truly an inspi-
ration and my best
friend.

What are some funny
or inspiring things that
happened along the
way?
My life is always full of


fun, laughter and inspir-
ing things.
My family, friends and
employees inspire me
every day.
If I am not having fun
doing something, I am
not inspired. Laughter is
a must in my daily life.

What words of wis-
dom do you have for
other women on similar
journeys?
Speak up and out for
what you believe in.
Give, give, give and let
God be the judge. Oper-
ate under faith not fear.
Have a bucket list.
Forgive and forget be-
cause there may be no to-
morrow. And most of all,
know that with God's
help, all things are possi-
ble.


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G22 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


About the

winner

What's your name?
Jill Isenberg

Where do you live?
I live in Inverness.

How long have you been in
Citrus County?
I moved here from Knoxville,
Tenn., the summer of 2005.

What do you do?
I am a senior at Citrus High
School (CHS). I am the bassist
for Breez', CHZ, the Broken
Home Children and First
Baptist Inverness. I play flute
in the Concert Band at Citrus.
I am also one of the two drum
majors for the CHS Marching
Canes.

What was your reaction
when you were notified
about being chosen?
When I was notified about
being chosen, I had no idea
what was going on. I lowered
the phone and mouthed to my
mom, "What is this?!" After I
had it explained to me a couple
of times, I felt really honored
and I couldn't stop smiling.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Most Admired Woman

Up and Coming

Youth-





senber

jf <


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
When I was in seventh grade, Ms.
Dover asked me to play keyboard
bass for Jazz Band. That Christmas,
my dad gave me my first bass and
playing it soon became my passion.
As an incoming freshman, I audi-


tioned for Breez' and made the
group. This will be my fourth year
performing in the ensemble. This
will also be my fourth year playing
bass for the Jazz Band at the high
school. My freshman year, thanks to
my connection with Brian York, the
opportunity to play bass in the Praise


Band at First Baptist Church Inver-
ness presented itself and I have been
playing there ever since.
Going into high school, I continued
playing flute throughout marching
and concert band. York has provided
See Isenberg Page G23


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Isenberg
from Page G22
me with countless oppor-
tunities to succeed, be it
playing flute, bass or being
a leader.

What challenges have
you faced, and how did
they influence you or lead
you to success in your
field?
The biggest challenge for
me growing up was when
my parents divorced in
2003. Going back and forth
between houses wasn't
fun. In 2005, my mom re-
married and we moved to
Florida. Going back and
forth between houses 600
miles away during school
vacations is even less fun.
The whole situation chal-
lenged me to become my
own person and find
something that I enjoyed
doing. In sixth grade, I dis-
covered that music was re-
ally fun. It came naturally


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


to me and I made some
great friends within the
program. Six years later,
I'm still playing music with
the same great people (and
then some).

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
Back in May of my
eighth-grade year, I audi-
tioned to play bass for
Breez'. I had never had to
audition for anything be-
fore and the whole process
seemed real scary. I knew
that being accepted into
Breez' as a freshman was
pretty rare, but despite my
concerns, John Edel ac-
cepted me into the group.
Through him, I've been
challenged to get out of my
comfort zone and grow as
a bass player.

What has been the most
rewarding or what has
given you the most joy in
what you do?


I love standing on the
podium during a marching
band competition and see-
ing my band family
dressed in their black and
gold, marching the show
that they've been playing
for months. To see how far
they've come and to feel
the intensity of the mo-
ment is just incredible. Last
year, I was fortunate
enough to be co-drum
major with one of my good
friends, Deanna Mielke.
Neither of us had been in
the position before, but we
brought home superior rat-


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 G23


ings for drum major
throughout the season. We
even received a distin-
guished superior and best
in class drum major at one
of the competitions.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn
from her?
Without Ms. Barbara J.
Dover, I definitely would
not be the person I am
today.

What are some funny or
inspiring things that hap-


opened along the way?
One of my favorite mem-
ories was during the Cho-
rus Holiday Dinner my
freshman year. I was play-
ing flute in the little wood-
wind ensemble off to the
side. We finished our seg-
ment and I began laughing
with Abigail McDonald,
who was also playing flute,
and was the keyboard
player for Breez'.
All of sudden, we looked
at each other with shocked,
almost terrified expres-
sions, as we realized that
Breez' was getting ready to


perform on stage at that
very moment. We jumped
up from our seats, placed
our flutes on the chairs, ran
out of the side door of the
cafeteria, entered the stage
through the side door,
jumped onto the platform,
the curtain opened and we
acted like nothing had just
happened.

What words of wisdom
do you have for other
women on similar jour-
neys?
Everything you do, do
with efficiency.


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G24 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


About the

winner

What's your name?
Cecelia Douglas

Nickname?
Cece


Where do
Lecanto


you live?


How long have
you been in
Citrus County?
26 years

What do you do?
Case manager '
for Citrus County 3
Senior Care
Services

What was your
reaction when
you were
notified about
being chosen?
I was humbled and
totally blown out of
the water.


2012 Most Admired Woman

Government -



Ceceta


.4 ouas
... .


How has your life's path brought
you to where you are today?
After my dad died in 1972 I lived in
Bedford, Pa., a small Civil War town
where everyone knows everybody.
Life just kind of happened around
me, I pretty much just jumped in


with both feet, I never thought any-
thing through, good or bad, but
trudged on and did the best I could.
Some decisions were good, some
were not. The best jobs in my life in-
volved people and making them
comfortable and happy. My junior


and senior high school summers, I
worked graveyard shift at a Grey-
hound bus terminal, meeting, greet-
ing and directing people.
One month after high school grad-
see Douglas Page G25


I


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Douglas
from Page G24
uation, I went to secretarial
school, then returned to my
hometown and took a job
at a nursing home. I was
doing meals for approxi-
mately a year when I
landed my first secretarial
position. I kept the books,
answered phones, made
deposits, picked up the
mail, greeted customers
and weighed trucks for a
stone quarry and paving
company.
After the quarry position
closed, I worked three jobs
simultaneously I worked
part time as secretary at the
American Cancer Society,
part time at Thrift
Drugs/JCPenney catalog
store and I cleaned houses
and provided respite for
friends and neighbors.
Shortly thereafter we


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


moved to Florida, and ea-
gerly awaited the birth of
my daughter Quincey.
Three weeks later I hired
on as a billing clerk with
Waste Management Inc. in
Lecanto, with the best gen-
eral manager ever, then
later promoted to dis-
patcher. This was my first
encounter with Citrus
County inspection dead-
lines and county codes.
During this period my
daughter Haley became
part of our family. While I
was attending a small
country church in Ho-
mosassa, I was saved and
my life was eternally
changed.
I took a work hiatus to
welcome James III to our
family, then through a JTPA
program, I attended a
course at the Withlacoochee
Vo-tech. I became a certi-
fied nursing assistant,


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home health aide, and pa-
tient care assistant.
By November I was em-
ployed with Visiting Nurse
Association. Home health
not only provided an op-
portunity to care for and
help recuperating patients
in their homes, but allowed
me to adjust my time to be
with the children before
and after school.
I applied for a secretarial
position with Citrus
County in July of 1997. I
celebrated 15 years with the
county in August. Working
with the county commis-
sion, the county attorney
and the county administra-
tor's office was such a
learning experience. I en-


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 G25


joyed learning the mechan-
ics of government, greeting
visitors and helping them
feel comfortable.
After seven years, I be-
came secretary to the Com-
munity Support Services
Division director. I felt that
I had found my niche. My
dispatch experience came
in handy assisting with
routing home-delivered
meals to clients.
Several years later my su-
pervisor, sensing I had
enough experience in the
Home Delivered Meals po-
sition, encouraged me to
take on 20 Senior Care
clients. Citrus County Sen-
ior Care Services case man-
agers assess client needs


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Ellen Zane,

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Ellen has 27 years experience in the
financial services industry and has resided,
with her husband, Steve, in Citrus County
since 1991. Ellen is currently a Financial Advisor with Wells Fargo
Advisors in Crystal River. Client service is a top priority and she is
honored to be able to help clients plan their financial futures. Ellen is
involved with many service organizations, among them, Altrusa,
Rotary Club of Crystal River, and the United Way. Ellen was honored
by Altrusa International of Citrus County as one of Citrus
County's 10 Most Admired Women For Leadership.
Ellen Zane, Financial Advisor
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and arrange for services in
the home. I was with Title
III two years when I ac-
cepted a full-time case
management position with
Senior Care Services. I've
been solely with SCS for
over one year, and I love
my job.

What challenges have


you faced, and how did
they influence you or lead
you to success in your
field?
Again, I can't say that
I've ever had a plan
mapped out. Opportunities
that have arisen in my life
were all part of a master

See Douglas Page G26


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Zana has been active in the community since moving
to Citrus County in 1986.
A graduate of Leadership Citrus, Zana is past president
of Altrusa & the Heart Association, past chairman of
Taste of Citrus, Heart Ball & the Citrus County Chamber
Ambassadors, past treasurer of the Inverness Olde
Towne Association. She is currently chairman of the
Citrus County Planning & Development Commission,
treasurer of the Inverness Woman's Club, and member of
the Ft. Cooper DAR Chapter.
The Citrus County Chamber honored Zana for
outstanding community service in 1996 & chose her as
Ambassador of the Year in 1995. She was honored by
Altrusa as one of the 10 most admired women in
Citrus County in 1998 for volunteer service and again
in 2004 for business. rnet


I A







G26 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


Denison
from Page G13
an elementary school
teacher has taught me pa-
tience and has given me ex-
perience. I love working
with others who are striv-
ing for their own levels of
fitness and in helping them
reach their goals.

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
In the 1990s, I worked in
Saudi Arabia and entered a
half marathon. It turned
out I was the only female in
the race. Although it was
close to 100 degrees, I had
to wear long pants and a
long-sleeved shirt.
Because I was a woman
in a Muslim country, I was-
n't given any water and
was given the wrong direc-
tions which lengthened my
course by two miles. When
I arrived at the finish line I
was badly dehydrated, but
was determined not to let
my "sisters" down. I barely
made it, passing out after
I'd finished.


What has been the most
rewarding or what have
given you the most joy in
what you do?
For the past three years,
I've been volunteering at
The Key Training Center
where I teach Zumba
classes to about 90 clients. It
is so rewarding to see the
joy in their faces as they
move freely to the music.
I feel very strongly the
need to give back to my
community. I've organized
two fundraisers for the Key
and I'm the proud "parent"
of four miles of the Rails to
Trails which I help tidy a
couple of times a week.

Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn
from him?
My brother, Larry, an ex-
Marine and Vietnam vet-
eran, has been my
inspiration from my very
first run to the present. He
signed me up for my first
race ever and continues to
be my biggest advocate.

What are some funny or
inspiring things that hap-


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


opened along the way?
Two years after I started
running, my brother and I
ran the Pike's Peak
Marathon, which was 14
miles up and 14 down on a
rugged trail. With a climb
of 7,000 feet at very high al-
titudes, it was indeed a
challenge. We kept each
other going by singing
"Rocky Mountain High"
which I'm sure was not a
pretty sound as neither of
us can carry a tune.
Thirty years later, I at-
tempted the same run,
which was not so easy this
time, partly due to age and
partly due to no brother at
my side. I was knocked
down by a passing runner
with eight miles to go.
However, in spite of a
twisted ankle I was able to
limp over the finish line.
David kept me going!
What words of wisdom
do you have for other
women on similar jour-
neys?
The road to fitness is not
an easy one.
My advice to anyone on
a similar journey is this. If
you're young, get in shape


now. The older you are
when you start, the harder
it'll be. If you're no longer
as young as you wish you
were where there's a will
there's a way.




Douglas
from Page G25

plan. And I'm indebted to
the master. I just do what's
right.

Do any particular chal-
lenges stand out in your
mind? Why?
Paperwork.
I'm a people person, and
paperwork is my adver-
sary. But it's part of the
equation and I do my best.

What has been the most
rewarding or what has
given you the most joy in
what you do?
Helping people.
This sounds redundant,
but every time a case man-
ager meets a need, it is re-
warding.


The key is setting goals.
Have short-term goals as
well as long-term goals.
Don't let small setbacks
stop you.
Another important key is



Was there anyone spe-
cial who helped mold
you? What did you learn
from her?
Well, I watched my
grandmother sell World
Book encyclopedias. She
used to boast that she had
taken the Dale Carnegie
course on meeting and in-
fluencing people, and she
was good. But watching
my mother maintain and
continue on after the death
of my father (there were
three of us 9, 12 and 13 I
was the oldest) was the sin-
gle most impressive "git 'er
done" influence in my life.
Nothing interfered with her
care of us.

What are some funny or
inspiring things that hap-
pened along the way?


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

consistency. Many people
want a quick fix. There's no
such thing. You've got to
keep your eye on that end
goal, and keep improving
on that goal.



I was a jack of all trades.
When we opened the Thrift
Drug Store in Pennsylva-
nia, I was the official
emcee. I wore a top hat,
black boots and a red sport
coat. I welcomed new cus-
tomers into the store. At
Christmas I was Santa. You
couldn't fool the young-
sters into believing Santa
was a woman, so I told
them Santa was busy and I
was just a stand-in to report
naughty behavior.

What words of wisdom
do you have for other
women on similar jour-
neys?
Treat people with respect.
Ultimately, they are some
one's mother/father,
sister/brother or
daughter/son.


Heather White Hagar
I am often asked why should
we choose your dance school? I
have spent my entire life
devoted to dance education.
When returning home after
receiving my Bachelors of Arts .'J
Degree in Dance from the
University of South Florida I
opened Step N' Time School
of Dance Arts. Twenty-one
years later, I am the director of Citrus County's
Nutcracker Ballet, Past President of Florida Dance
Masters, the American Academy of Ballet's Jazz Faculty
and member of the Cecchetti Council. I emphasize the
correct technical aspects of dance training in an artistic
and loving environment. Come join my dance family!

Step N' Time, Inc. School of Dance Arts


352-637-4663
301 N Apopka Ave., Inverness
www.schofdancearts.com


MY PRICES ARE THE SAME OR BETTER THAN YOU WOULD PAY
BOOKING YOURSELF.

THE VALUE OF WORKING WITH ME IS MY KNOWLEDGE,
EXPERTISE AND RELATIONSHIP WITH TRAVEL SUPPLIERS AND
MY PERSONAL COMMITMENT TO YOU.
"It's time to Trrave'("

CatTGerry at 352-476-4242 or 352-527-8002 or
e-mai gerrystraveCcCub@aoCcom Emerald


I


H E A L T H
S E R V I C ES PA


Dr. Claudia L. Chavez,
Optometric Physician
Dr. Claudia L. Chavez has 20 years of
experience in the eye care field, and
personally takes care of every patient
with excellence and dedication.
E&C Health Services focuses on
Family Eye Care, Pediatric Eye
evaluations of all ages and Adult Eye
Care including but not limited to
ocular disease diagnosis, eyeglasses
and contact lenses exams.
www.hernandoeyi


Lane SNaw, Licensed Uptician
Lane Shaw has worked in the optical
field since 1987 and has been a
Licensed Optician in the state of
Florida since 1995. Her compassion
and attention to customer needs has
enabled her to service many Citrus
County clients through the years, with
an expanding clientele of referrals
from satisfied customers. With her
vast knowledge and continued
education into new technologies, Lane
is able to provide the best possible
solution to your vision needs.
eclinic.com Aquamarine


11


352419790 -324975 0 0 *h *


S Mystic Topaz


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE 10 Mosi ADMIRED WoMEN Wednesday September 12, 2012 G27


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


Gi1%T





G28 Wednesday, September 12, 2012


We're


Honored
to employ so many exceptional
women that represent our
dealerships from all areas of
the business: sales, service,
parts and administration.


Inverness Nick Nicholas Ford Administration Department
Front row left to right: Dora Hunt, Lisa Hayes, Shanna Willbur.
Back Row left to right: Deb Hanlon, Laura Carter, Sharon Gullett,
Karen Rogers, Brandy Erlandson. Not pictured Sally McDavid.


Crystal River Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln
From left to right:
Sylvia Slimak, Ashley Oglesby, Anna Cruz, Charissa Treacy.


Inverness Nick Nicholas Ford Sales, Parts, Service, Collision
From left to right: Nora Souhrada, Michelle Bosley, Donna Bandy,
Louise Tyler, Michelle Russo, Yvonne Baker, Kim Williams.


Congratulations To Citrus County's 10 Most Admired Women!


IMoonstone]


f LINCOLN


4
06H


NICK NICHOLAS N H.
IN CRYSTAL RIVER L-
Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River "
TOLL FREE 1-877-795-7371
Sales: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7PM; Sat 8:30AM to 5PM 352 795 7371
Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM 3 2*7 9 5


Hwy. 44 W., Inverness 352-726-1231
SALE HOURS:
www.nicknicholasford.com Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5


10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


F00CK5X